Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Pim blowin’ it

90F
79F

SUNSHINE,
FSTORM

Volume: 105 No.182

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009

HIGH
LOW

Mt. Royal Ave:
Tel:326-1875



Was

MAUL
UN ST 3





Verdict returned over
stabbing death of
Defence Force officer

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

MOTHER-OF-THREE
Shimeakima Delores Pratt broke
down sobbing in court last night
after she was found guilty of the
manslaughter of Defence Force
officer Gary Leon Carey Sr.

The 12-member jury deliber-
ated for several hours yesterday
and returned with a eight to four
not guilty verdict on the murder
charge, but a unanimous guilty
verdict on the manslaughter
charge.

Pratt’s lawyer, Romona Far-
quharson, told The Tribune that
her client did not take the ver-
dict well, and “completely broke
down sobbing.”

Pratt, 30, was Mr Carey’s girl-
friend for eight-and-a-half years.
The 54-year-old Royal Bahamas
Defence Force officer was found
stabbed to death in Pratt’s Minnis
Subdivision apartment off
Carmichael Road on Sunday,
August 17, 2008. She denied mur-
dering him.

During closing submissions in
the murder trial yesterday, lead
prosecutor and Deputy Director
of Public Prosecutions Cheryl
Grant-Bethel told the jury that

Shimeakima Delores Pratt



Pratt was a liar and stage man-
ager.

She said the prosecution has
established a clear circumstantial
case to show that Pratt had had
intended to kill Mr Carey.

Mrs Bethel said Pratt had sim-

SEE page 13

Jr. Twister Combo
ak Toilet

Regular Fries

{bea Orink

I Snacker Combo

Sache
Regular Fries
iicg Drink







Union president allegedly

attempts to reprimand member
over comments in The Tribune

A HEATED battle is brew-
ing in the Bahamas Utilities
Service and Allied Workers
Union as the president has
allegedly attempted to repri-
mand a union member for
voicing his concerns in The
Tribune .

In the June 11, 2009, edition
of The Tribune Delgardo
Forbes, a former candidate for
president of the BUSAWU
was quoted advising union
members they were under no
obligation to give in to Presi-
dent Carmen Kemp’s threats
of action being taken against
them if they did not support

the industrial actions being
taken by the union.

At that time, the BUSAWU
were protesting the comments
made by Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham, who said
that there would be no across-
the-board salary increases at
the Water and Sewerage Cor-
poration.

Mr Forbes, along with those
who opposed the ideals of the
current union executive, claim
that while they support the
union 100 per cent, the cur-

SEE page 13

Mother of three foun
guity of manslaughter

LINCOLN POITIER outside of
court yesterday.

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net



A 48-YEAR-OLD Gam-
bier Village man charged with
the forcible detention and rape
of an 18-year-old woman was
arraigned in a magistrates
court yesterday afternoon.

It is alleged that Lincoln
Poitier, forcibly detained the
teenager between Wednesday,
June 17, and Friday, June 19.
It is further alleged that during
that time, Poitier raped her.
Poitier, who was brought to
the courtroom shackled, bare-
footed and visibly in pain, was
not represented by an attor-
ney.

The accused, who had a
bruise under his right eye,
winced noticeably as he asked
to stand in the dock while the

SEE page 13





















Plaid Skirts Starting @

Plain Skirts Starting @

Jumpers Starting @
Whlte & Assorted Colours Shirts

& Blouses Starting
Monogram Shirts/blouses



NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS”

LEADING NEWSPAPER









Death sentence
for murder of
businessman

CONVICTED murder-
er Jamal Glinton received
the death sentence yes-
terday for the murder of
businessman Keith Carey.

Prosecutors had sought
the death penalty for
Glinton who they claimed
shot Mr Carey, 43, twice
on the steps of the Bank
of the Bahamas, Tonique
Williams Darling High-
way, on February 27,
2006.

Mr Carey had been
attempting to deposit
$40,000 belonging to the
Esso Service Station
which he operated.

Glinton, alias ‘Bumper’,
was unanimously found
guilty of his murder and
armed robbery on April

Glinton had been
charged along with
Dwight Knowles and
Sean Brown who were
unanimously convicted of
robbery and conspiracy to
commit robbery.

Justice Jon Isaacs had
directed the jury not to
consider the charge of
murder against Knowles
and Brown. Knowles was
given an 11-year sentence
and Brown received a 10-

SEE page 14



Plan to sue
over bishop’s
dead wife in
mausoleum

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FURIOUS residents are
planning to sue the Govern-
ment for failing to get a local
bishop to remove his dead
wife’s body from a mausoleum
near their homes.

In March, some members of
the Garden Hills community
were up in arms after Bishop
Stanley Seymour of the Evan-
gelistic Pentecostal Church
created a purpose-built mau-
soleum in the grounds of his
church to house his wife’s
remains.

Police were called to her
funeral service on March 21
when it was claimed that Bish-
op Seymour did not have
approval to go ahead with the
burial.

After delaying the service
for a week in order to obtain
approval from the Depart-
ment of Physical Planning, the
woman was laid to rest.

SEE page 14





PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Fe Gifts for Miss Bahamas Universe

jor/Tribune staff





; “iS a et ._. Des :
NEWLY-CROWNED Miss Bahamas Universe Kiara Sherman (right) took
to Bay Street yesterday, along with 2005 Miss USA Chelsea Cooley, to
receive gifts to mark her victory.

IMPORTANT

Starbucks Barista Blade Grinder

Starbucks Coffee Company is
voluntarily recalling its Starbucks
Barista Blade Grinder due to a
potential safety hazard if the
operating and cleaning instructions
aren't followed. When emptying the
ground coffee there is a risk that the
grinder blade could continue to spin
after the machine is turned off.

If you purchased a Starbucks

Barista Blade Grinder (sold between
March 2002 and March 2009), please
return your grinder to any Starbucks
Coffee Bahamas store to receive a
store credit.

Please visit Starbucks.com for more
information on this product recall.

At Starbucks your safety is important to us.

We apologize for any inconvenience this
voluntary recall may cause.

© 2009 Starbucks Coffee Company. All rights reserved.




The Embassy of the United States of America
is saddened by the loss of our
ee dear friend and colleague
Leslie Pyfrom

a.k.a Diplomat DL

The Embassy ‘Family mourns his passing
and offers condolences to his family, friends and loved ones.





ABOVE: Inga Bowleg, director
of business development

for the John Bull group of
companies, shows Miss
Bahamas Universe Kiara
Sherman her gifts yesterday
from David Yurman and Tous.

LEFT: Ineisy Rodgers, sales
assistant, places a Tous piece
on Miss Bahamas Universe
Kiara Sherman yesterday.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Call for unity as Bahamas
celebrates Independence

By LINDSAY THOMPSON

WITH the theme ‘towards a
common loftier goal’, the
Bahamas is celebrating 36 years
of Independence.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham is urging Bahamians to cele-
brate the day “in a spirit of pride
and gratitude,” despite being in
the midst of global and protracted
economic crisis.

Many activities to commemo-
rate that historic event on July 10,
1973 have been planned.

“Tn the spirit of unity, let us pur-
sue the loftier goal of peace and
goodwill,” said Governor General
Arthur Hanna in his Indepen-
dence Day message.

Since July 10, 1973, he said, the
goal of successive governments
and society at large has been the
advancement of social and eco-
nomic equity for all Bahamians.

“Over the years much has been
accomplished and going forward
there will be greater accomplish-

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

RR UE
PHONE: 322-2157



ments as we work together
towards the realisation of this lofty
goal,” the Governor General said.
“We remain one people, patriotic
Bahamians, standing proud and
tall.”

The Independence celebrations
include a showcase of heritage and
culture, story-telling and singing,
all reflective of the country’s his-
tory.

“This Independence we are cog-
nisant that the Bahamas, like the
rest of the world, is experiencing a
recession,” he said.

“But we have hope, and shall
with God’s help successfully
weather this economic storm.”

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said: “Our economy has been
hard hit, especially the hospitality
sector which is the principal engine
of our economy, resulting in the
lay-offs of many Bahamian work-
ers with consequent hardship for
their families and for the whole
community.”

However, he urged Bahamians
to still celebrate the sacrifices and
resourcefulness of their ancestors
and the hard-won achievements
in more recent times.

“It is through their struggles,
resilience and spirit of self-reliance
that we have arrived at where we
are today, that we have become a
proud nation with our heads held

high in the community of nations,
having achieved a distinct cultural
identity, a stable parliamentary
democracy, and a large measure of
prosperity,” Mr Ingraham said.

Independence activities include:
Friday, July 3 — National Pride
Day and E Clement Bethel
National Arts Festival and Cul-
tural Show, Rawson Square, 9am

to 9pm.

Saturday, July 4 — Independence
Beat Retreat, Rawson Square,
6pm to 7.30pm.

Sunday, July 5 — Ecumenical
Church Service, Bahamas Faith
Ministries, Carmichael Road, 3pm.

Thursday, July 9 - Clifford Park
Celebrations — Cultural show,
inspection, prayers, flag raising
ceremony, and fireworks, 8pm to
12.30am.

Friday, July 10 — The People’s
Rush, Rawson Square to Arawak
Cay, lam to 9am.

Saturday, July 11 and Sunday,
July 12 - National Fun Walk.
Starting points: Windsor Park,
Golden Gates, Montagu Beach,
Goodman’s Bay to Clifford Park,
6am.

. WEW CHEESY
BREAKFAST

INCLUDES

reba. 5 +e
Reg. Hash Brown
& Reg. Coffee or Tea



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 3



Meh dN yal Ys) Se

0 In brief

Harl Taylor
murder trial
set to start
this morning



Felipé Major/Tribune staff
TROYNIKO MCNEIL, who is
charged with Har! Taylor’s murder,
is shown at court yesterday.

THE trial of the man accused
of the murder of internationally
known handbag designer Harl
Taylor is scheduled to begin this
morning.

The case was expected to
begin yesterday at 2pm, howev-
er, Senior Justice Anita Allen
was still engaged in the trial of
Shimeakima Pratt, 30, who was
last night found guilty of the
manslaughter of Gary Leon
Carey, 54. Troyniko McNeil,
22, is charged in Mr Taylor’s
murder. It is alleged that
McNeil caused the designer’s
death between Saturday,
November 17 and Sunday,
November 18, 2007. He has
pleaded not guilty to the murder
charge and is being represented
by attorney Murrio Ducille.

Mr Taylor, 37, was found
stabbed to death at Mountbat-
ten House on West Hill Street,
two days after Dr Thaddeus
McDonald, 59, a senior academ-
ic at the College of the
Bahamas, was found blud-
geoned to death, apparently
with a clothing iron, in his near-
by Queen Street guest house.

To date, no charges have
been filed in relation to Dr
McDonald’s murder. The trial
into Mr Taylor’s death will be
heard before Senior Supreme
Court Justice Allen. Prosecutors
are expected to call some 25
witnesses during the trial.

Man arraigned on
murder charge

BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A 31-year-old
man who is accused of murder-
ing a 59-year-old Haitian man at
Garden Villas was arraigned in
the Freeport Magistrates Court
yesterday. Orman Osrick Dean
appeared in Court Three before
Acting Deputy Chief Magistrate
Helen Jones. He was not repre-
sented by counsel.

Dean was charged with the
murder of Jean Maquez Noel. It
is alleged that on June 27, at
Freeport, Grand Bahama, the
accused unlawfully and inten-
tionally caused the death of Mr
Noel. Magistrate Jones
informed Dean that he was not
required to enter a plea to the
charge.

She remanded Dean to Fox
Hill Prison until October 6
when a preliminary inquiry will
be held to determine whether
there is sufficient evidence for
him to stand trial in the
Supreme Court for murder. In
other court news, Jermaine
Duncombe, 27, was charged in
Court Three with assaulting his
girlfriend, causing her harm,
and making threats of harm
against her. It is alleged that on
June 22, the accused intention-
ally and unlawfully assaulted
Michelle Deveaux. He pleaded
not guilty to the charge.

Asked about his relationship
to the complainant, Duncombe
told the magistrate that Ms
Deveaux was his girlfriend. He
said they lived together at the
time. Magistrate Jones
adjourned the matter to March
29, 2010 for trial. She granted
Duncombe $500 bail with one
surety. She also warned that he
is not to have contact with Ms
Deveaux or his bail would be
revoked and he would be
remanded to prison.

Duncombe also pleaded not
guilty to causing harm and
threatening to harm Ms
Deveaux. The magistrate
adjourned the matters to March
29, 2010. She granted the
accused $1,000 bail with one
surety.

eR Be Bales
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
IAG Ti Rn

Ue Paty
322-2157



FRUSTRATION OVER BULLET WOUND DEATH MYSTERY
Grieving family asks police:
why was Kristoff Cooper shot?

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

The frustrated family of a young man found to
have died of a bullet wound to the head after he was
first thought to have been killed in a police chase car
crash say officers still have not given them any
insight into when or why he was shot on that night.

Kristoff Cooper, 22, was killed almost two months
ago on the morning of Sunday, May 3 after the car
that he and his brother Caleb were travelling in
crashed through a wall on the corner of Robinson
Road and East Street.

The pair had been chased by the police and fam-
ily members were initially led to believe that Kristoff
died as a result of the injuries he received when he
was flung from the car on impact.

However, an autopsy subsequently revealed a
bullet wound to the head was the actual cause of
death.

Caleb, 25, who survived but suffered major
injuries, said he did not recall any gun shots before
the car crashed. Once ejected from the vehicle, he
suffered concussion and cannot recall what hap-

pened. Having met with the commissioner of police
in mid-May, the family said that Reginald Ferguson
told them that he cannot not explain the bullet
wound until he sees a police report.

When contacted about the matter on June 7, the
commissioner said he still does not have the report
and investigations into the matter are continuing.

The following story in The Tribune sparked com-
mentary on the matter in parliament when PLP
chairman Glenys Hanna-Martin said it represented
yet another episode — in addition to the hanging
death of 15 year-old Michael Knowles in a police cell
— that warranted the creation of an independent
body to investigate matters involving police offi-
cers.

Yesterday Phil Cooper, the victim’s father, said he
agreed with this sentiment, telling The Tribune that
almost two months after Kristoff’s death, no further
light has been shed on how it happened.

“We are still here wondering when are they going
to come to us and say what’s going on.

I feel like they just don’t want to apologise to say
that they are wrong,” said Mr Cooper.

Attempts to reach Commissioner Ferguson yes-
terday were unsuccessful.

Limestone rock excavation and waste



dumping a ‘legitimate’ operation, says MP



By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE excavation of limestone
rock and the dumping of waste
in its place has met with approval
from Golden Isles MP Charles
Maynard despite the outcry from
his constituents.

Mr Maynard maintains that
digging eight feet down to the
water table and filling the resul-
tant hole with bio-degradable
waste on Crown Land farmland is
a legitimate agricultural tech-
nique, one which he is not able to
prevent.

Charles Maynard



ment for the sanitary landfill in
Harrold Road, and those dump-
ing waste in the quarry are con-
tracted by government to clean
up New Providence.

As trucks were lining up to col-
lect quarry from the site yester-
day, Ms Lundy said: “Something
needs to be done to protect the
health and welfare of the people,
because if they contaminate the
water table they are putting our
health at risk. And it is our only
access to water in this area.

“This man is digging govern-
ment land and selling it back to
the government on a verbal
approval. And the government is

However, Minister of Agricul-
ture and Marine Resources Larry
Cartwright said the practice can
only be done for agricultural rea-
sons by leaseholders with a
license to excavate.

And farmer/contractor Cardi-
nal Newman, responsible for the
excavation of more than two
acres of Crown Land north of
Cowpen Road and south of Mil-
lars Heights, told The Tribune he
had no license, but was given ver-
bal permission to excavate by
physical planning officials.

Residents of Millars Heights
are concerned the practice will
contaminate the water table and
put the health of thousands at
risk. Mr Maynard said he saw a
refrigerator, stoves, beds and mat-
tresses dumped in the quarry
when he visited the site around
six months ago, but on his latest
official visit to the site, the oper-
ation appeared to have been
cleaned up.

He said: “It was a cause for
concern in the community, but if

you look at the land now it gives
you the impression that it’s a
legitimate operation.

“You can’t grow things on
rock, so you dig down to the
water table and replace it with
soil, so the water can feed the
plants. Bio-degradable stuff is not
going to hurt the soil or the water
table. It’s an accepted farming
technique — they don’t need per-
mission.”

Mr Maynard maintains his con-
stituents’ discomfort stems from
residential areas bordering on
industrial zones, and he assured
the community that he will close-
ly supervise the site to prevent
indiscriminate dumping.

Millars Heights resident Jeanne
Lundy maintains the farmer leas-
ing an adjacent plot is successful-
ly growing bananas and peas
without ever having excavated
the land. And a source in the
Department of Environmental
Health told The Tribune that Mr
Newman sells fill to the depart-

using taxpayers’ money to pay for
fill they already own.”

The Ministry of Agriculture
and Marine Resources maintains
the operation of heavy duty
equipment, removal of soil, rock,
quarry, fill or sand from Crown
Land designated for agriculture
is absolutely prohibited. As is
dumping refuse of any kind.

Although the minister said
excavation for agricultural rea-
sons is common in the Family
Islands, it can only be done with a
license from the government.
And it is not a technique recom-
mended by his department.

Mr Cartwright said: “A lot of
land in Cowpen has been exca-
vated and a lot of it is agricultur-
al land, but before you can exca-
vate on Crown Land you need to
have a lease from the government
and a permit to excavate.

“Tf you do not have a lease or a
permit and are excavating on the
land illegally there’s a penalty for
that. Verbal permission is defi-
nitely not enough.”

Packed external negotiations agenda for the region

CARICOM is embarking on a busy period of
trade negotiations as the region prepares to imple-
ment already signed trade agreements while at the
same time embark on negotiations for new agree-
ments with a number of states.

This period of intense work will also pose some
challenges in light of the work to be done to inte-
grate the Regional Negotiating Machinery (RNM)
into the CARICOM Secretariat, according to chair-
man of the CARICOM Prime Ministerial Sub Com-
mittee on External Negotiations, Prime Minister of
Jamaica Bruce Golding.

Speaking at the CARICOM Secretariat yesterday
at a meeting of the sub-committee, Prime Minister
Golding highlighted some of the trade issues which
would engage the region.

These include:






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¢ Upcoming negotiations with Canada and the
Dominican Republic and the plan to complete the
Doha Round at the level of the World Trade Organ-
isation (WTO)

Mr Golding said the discussions with the Domini-
can Republic now need to be considered in line
with the request of that country for membership of
CARICOM.

He added that the Copenhagen negotiations on a
new global climate change agreement would also
engage the attention of the Prime Ministerial Sub
Committee.





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380-FLIX





PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

These shameful

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

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US cap-and-trade energy bill

There is much in the House cap-and-trade
energy bill that just passed that I absolutely
hate. It is too weak in key areas and way too
complicated in others. A simple, straightfor-
ward carbon tax would have made much more
sense than this Rube Goldberg contraption. It is
pathetic that we couldn’t do better. It is
appalling that so much had to be given away to
polluters. It stinks. It’s a mess. I detest it.

Now let’s get it passed in the Senate and
make it law.

Why? Because, for all its flaws, this bill is
the first comprehensive attempt by America to
mitigate climate change by putting a price on
carbon emissions. Rejecting this bill would have
been read in the world as America voting
against the reality and urgency of climate change
and would have undermined clean energy ini-
tiatives everywhere.

More important, my gut tells me that if the
USS. government puts a price on carbon, even a
weak one, it will usher in a new mind-set among
consumers, investors, farmers, innovators and
entrepreneurs that in time will make a big dif-
ference — much like the first warnings that cig-
arettes could cause cancer. The morning after
that warning no one ever looked at smoking
the same again.

Ditto if this bill passes. Henceforth, every
investment decision made in America — about
how homes are built, products manufactured
or electricity generated — will look for the
least-cost low-carbon option. And weaving car-
bon emissions into every business decision will
drive innovation and deployment of clean tech-
nologies to a whole new level and make energy
efficiency much more affordable. That ain’t
beanbag.

Now that the bill is heading for the Senate,
though, we must, ideally, try to improve it, but,
at a minimum, guard against diluting it any fur-
ther. To do that we need the help of the three
parties most responsible for how weak the bill
already is: the Republican Party, President
Barack Obama and We the People.

This bill is not weak because its framers,
Reps. Henry Waxman and Ed Markey, wanted
it this way. “They had to make the compromis-
es they did,” said Dan Becker, director of the
Safe Climate Campaign, “because almost every
House Republican voted against the bill and
did nothing to try to improve it. So to get it
passed, they needed every coal-state Democrat,
and that meant they had to water it down to
bring them on board.”

What are Republicans thinking? It is not as if
they put forward a different strategy, like a car-
bon tax. Does the GOP want to be the party of
sex scandals and polluters or does it want to
be a partner in helping America dominate the
next great global industry: ET — energy tech-
nology? How could Republicans become so
anti-environment, just when the country is going
green?

Historically speaking, “Republicans can claim
as much credit for America’s environmental
leadership as Democrats,” noted Glenn Prick-
ett, senior vice president at Conservation Inter-
national. “The two greatest environmental pres-
idents in American history were Teddy Roo-
sevelt, who created our national park system,
and Richard Nixon, whose administration gave
us the Clean Air Act and the Environmental
Protection Agency.” The elder George Bush
signed the 1993 Rio Treaty, to preserve biodi-
versity.

Yes, this bill’s goal of reducing U.S. carbon
emissions to 17 percent below 2005 levels by
2020 is nowhere near what science tells us we
need to mitigate climate change. But it also
contains significant provisions to prevent new
buildings from becoming energy hogs, to make
our appliances the most energy efficient in the
world and to help preserve forests in places like
the Amazon.

We need Republicans who believe in fiscal
conservatism and conservation joining this leg-
islation in the Senate.

We want a bill that transforms the whole
country not one that just threads a political
needle.

T hope they start listening to green Republi-
cans like Dick Lugar, George Shultz and Arnold
Schwarzenegger.

I also hope we will hear more from Obama.
Something feels very calculating in how he has
approached this bill, as if he doesn’t quite want
to get his hands dirty, as if he is ready to twist
arms in private, but not so much that if the bill
goes down he will get tarnished.

That is no way to fight this war. He is going to
have to mobilize the whole country to pressure
the Senate — by educating Americans, with
speech after speech, about the opportunities
and necessities of a serious climate/energy bill.
If he is not ready to risk failure by going all
out, failure will be the most likely result.

(This article is by THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
c.2009 New York Times News Service)



parenting practices are
costing us our sons!

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Iam angry and frustrated
beyond words with the seeming
careless unconcern of Bahamian
parents towards their young sons!
T have spoken passionately of this
issue to friends and family alike
for years and now feel the time
has come to speak of it to a wider
audience. Why do we continue to
neglect our young boys and then
wonder why they get “sucked in”
by the streets, fall into criminal
activity, exhibit irresponsible
behaviour and become more or
less unfit persons? God have
mercy on us, but we will not be
blameless before Him!

I used to volunteer to spend
nights at a home for young
women and on numerous occa-
sions travelling there around 11
o’clock at night, used to see very
young boys roaming the streets.
This grieved me greatly because
these young boys were not being
attended to but allowed to basi-
cally do whatever they wanted.
Most of us know the passages
from the Bible that read: “Fool-
ishness is bound up in the heart of
a child but the rod of correction
drives it away,” and “The rod and
reproof bring wisdom but a child
left to himself brings his mother
shame.” From roaming the
streets these young boys could
easily start entering people’s
yards, progressing from there to
breaking into cars, homes, etc.
From there it is not a long stretch
to drinking, using drugs and car-
rying loaded weapons with the
intent to use them.

How can we justify training and
teaching our young girls but leav-
ing our young boys to bring up
themselves? For shame! The
Lord Himself says that if we leave
children to themselves, they will
only perform the foolishness that
is within their hearts. Why do we
continue to do it then? Why
don’t we give them the same
amount of time and attention that
we give our girls? Why? Why do
we not call it for what it is? Self-
ishness and neglect! Sadly, at the
end of the day, which group suf-
fers the higher mortality rate,
incarceration rates, alcoholism

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



and drug addiction rates, disen-
franchisement rates, etc? Yes, you
guessed it, our males.

Due to some of the debased
and low-minded among us, we
have had to take great care with
our young females, watching their
friends and keeping them at
home for the most part. This is a
sad fact. However, we seemed to
have gotten it into our heads that
our young boys do not need to
be guarded and watched because
no one would rape or molest
them.

How wrong we have been
proven! Have we not learnt from
the tragic deaths of those young
boys in Freeport, who we can
assume, were brutally violated
before being unceremoniously
disposed of?

What about the young boys
who have been molested in our
malls or kidnapped off our
streets?

What about the young boys
who are allowed to wander about
by themselves and later turn up
dead?

Ask persons in Adelaide about
their recent loss. How much
longer shall we ignorantly pay the
price for our shameful parenting
practices?

Over the weekend we heard of
the deaths of another set of boys:
brothers, ages nine and five years
of age.

They were allowed to go out
crabbing by themselves. Would
we have allowed girls of nine and
five to go wandering about by
themselves? Most of us would say
“absolutely not!” Why were these
two boys not accompanied by an
older person? When I hear of
these stories, my insides cringe
and the thought comes “oh, not
again!”

It is very easy for parents (and
I say parents, not just mothers), to
cast off the responsibility for rais-
ing their sons with the thought
that boys don’t need much atten-
tion. We have already shown,

however, that this viewpoint is a
death sentence for many of our
young males both now and in the
future.

There is a law on the books of
this country about child neglect
which is failure to provide a child
with all that is necessary for their
health and happiness. Many of
our young boys roam the street
looking dirty and unkempt.

We do not even bother to teach
them grooming skills. How then
can we blame them, if, as young
men, they come sweaty and
unkempt into our presence?
There is something stinking here,
and it is not our young men!

Fathers and mothers,
guardians: it is our God-given
duty to train and raise up our chil-
dren so that they have the knowl-
edge and skills to become suc-
cessful and useful members of
society.

Not only does the Lord require
it of us, the law of the land man-
dates it as well.

Let’s watch over our young
boys; they are valuable and pre-
cious. Let’s stop the one-sided
parenting — yes our girls need
attention, but our boys do as well.
Remember, what we put into
something (sow) is what we will
get out of it (reap): if we sow
attention, love and training into
our young boys from the cradle,
we will reap the positive rewards.

A word to fathers: to the very
young and the very old. The Lord
never instructed mothers to teach
and raise their children. He
instructed you as fathers to do so.

Do not let anyone take away
your right to watch over and raise
your children. You may not have
had a father when you were grow-
ing up who took any interest in
you, but that does not mean that
you yourself cannot be a good
father. Shatter the mould of
incompetence and apathy!

You do not need to conform
to that. This generation and the
next one, will thank you because
you took the time to show that
you care.

DIONE PRATT (MS)
Nassau,
June 15, 2009.

Was the full moon to blame for these statements?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

This past weekend was a full
moon which probably explains
much of the content from cer-
tain people.

The union leaders proposed
that in any future senate the
unions must be guaranteed an
automatic senate seat.

Okay we will discriminate
against every organisation that
has a larger membership than
the collective count of the
union.

As the unions do not by a
large percentage represent the
majority of those working,
government discriminates
against those not members of

a union and never listen to or
even ask for their opinion, but
the non-union employee is by
far the majority of the working
force, never heard and simply
ignored.

Union recognition should
only be as long as their col-
lective agreement stands —
six-months prior to the expiry
of the collective agreement all
unions should be required to
revert to their membership
and employees of the busi-
nesses to see if the unions are
still their choice for represen-
tation.

It is absolutely ridiculous
that once recognition is
achieved that is till death do us
come.

Numbers — do you really
think any government will
make them legal?

Far, far too much money
flows here and there and the
numbers boys will guarantee
at election time to write big
cheques and whether anyone
is willing to admit, I really take
an alleged statement of one
leader in the numbers busi-
ness that he offered to pay 35
per cent of his sales as that
would be less than what he
pays-out for silence and pro-
tection today — in that he
talked a mouth full.

ABRAHAM MOSS
Nassau,
June 8, 2009.

Pirst Baptist Church

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

DPM challenges
freemasons to
help out with
nation building

DEPUTY Prime Minister
Brent Symonette challenged the
freemasons and other local fra-
ternities to serve as a channel
through which the government
can impact the lives of Bahami-
ans.

As an autonomous entity, he
said, the masons can also take
the lead, formulate plans, and
proposition government collec-
tively, to benefit national pur-
poses.

Speaking at
the official
opening of the
Most Worship-
ful Prince Hall
Grand Lodge
on June 29, Mr
Symonette
told those
gathered: “T
must impress
upon you that
you being
organised as
you are, could ably assist gov-
ernment initiatives and social
programmes.

“Through the methods which
bind you as a cohesive body of
people, united to improve
brotherly and sisterly love, you
are already equipped to speak
with one voice.”

“You could serve as a conduit
to the government on national
issues. Once you establish your
collective force, the government
would be obliged to at least con-
sider our collective position,”
Mr Symonette said.

“Tt must always be your goal
to improve on this living co-
operatively experience to
enhance financial benefits for
each other.”

Prince Hall (Bahamas)
reached the top rung of The
Bahamas Masonic status on
June 13, 2006 when the “amity
visitation agreements were
signed between Prince Hall
affiliation Masons and the Eng-
lish, Irish and Scottish Constitu-
tion Masons, attaining world
recognition, Mr Symonette said.

Having reached such historic
status, “can you afford to sit by
and be contented with a meagre
effort in maintaining your lofty
status built by your forefathers?

“It is your duty to thank them
(forefathers) continuously for
their broad shoulders on which
you now stand.”



BRENT
SYMONETTE

OPPOSITION SENATOR ALLYSON MAYNARD-GIBSON LASHES OUT

Government under fire over
Nassau Harbour dredging plans

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

OPPOSITION Senator Allyson
Maynard-Gibson took the gov-
ernment to task yesterday for its
plans to go ahead with the dredg-
ing of Nassau Harbour in spite of
the current economic situation.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson also
questioned why renewals of the
incentives for cruise lines are
scheduled for every six years
instead of every three and accused
the government of working to the
agendas of special interest groups.

"Why are we building, in this
economy, an automatic six-year
concession situation? The FNM
continues to make significant
grants, not explain to the public,
and divert money that could be
spent on national development
objectives and under the present
FNM plans, FNM special inter-
ests are being guaranteed that
their pockets will be lined for six
years," she charged.

She also noted that the harbour
dredging — which will facilitate
the arrival of more cruise ship
passengers to the Bahamas on the
huge Genesis ships — will provide
"a key area of growth to the sec-
tor" but argued that there has not
been a proper cost-benefit analy-
sis with regard the concessions
given to cruise companies in the
process.

"The (International Monetary
Fund) IMF has just told us...
that we need to be careful about
the incentives that we are giving
investors and developers and that
includes cruise lines," she said
while giving her contribution to
the debate on a Bill for an Act to
Amend the Cruise Ship's
Overnighting Incentives Act yes-
terday.

Ms Maynard-Gibson also said
Deputy Prime Minister Brent
Symonette ran the risk of being
accused of a conflict of interest
by agreeing to sit on the commit-
tee that deliberated on the pro-
posal to move the container port
from southwest New Providence
to Arawak Cay.

"The harbour dredging, to the
benefit of FNM special interests,
will result at the western end of
Bay Street where the deputy
prime minister and other FNM
special interests own land, bene-



“We support the
dredging, but not
now ... there’s a
downturn in the
economy and we
think that money
is not being well-
spent by sending it
abroad at this
time.”



fiting from the Woodes Rodgers
to Armstrong Street expansion
paid for by the Bahamian peo-
ple,” she said.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson, leader
of opposition business in the Sen-
ate, also said the impending
dredging is not in the best inter-
ests of the public because there
is no guarantee that more ships
will visit the Bahamas.

"Tn this economic environment,
will these ships come to the
Bahamas? After we have spent
$55 million dredging the harbour
will the actually come to the
Bahamas? There is no evidence
before the Bahamian people that
these two ships actually will come
to the Bahamas".

"We support the dredging, but
not now ... there's a downturn in
the economy and we think that
money is not being well-spent by
sending it abroad at this time,”
she said.

Ms Maynard-Gibson also
argued that the concessions given
in the Bill will negatively affect
local nightclub owners as cruise
ships will now only be required
to spend 13 hours in port, down
from 18 hours.

Under the old law, ships were
required to stay in port until 3am
and passengers would typically
leave a venue to return to the ship
at lam, said Ms Maynard-Gibson.

"The FNM by its ill-considered
concessions is depriving Bahami-
an entrepreneurs of the opportu-
nity to benefit from those three
hours," she said.

The Bill was passed in the Sen-
ate yesterday. The Senate
adjourned until July 16.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



JUSTICE SWORN IN :

JUSTICE STANLEY JOHN (left) was yesterday sworn in as a
Justice of the Court of Appeal by the Governor General Arthur
Hanna at Government House.

Kingsway Academy High School Invites
qualified applicants for the following
teaching positions for September, 2009.

Spanish
French

Art and Design
Music

Successful applicants must:
e¢ Be born again Christians, with



PM reveals designs for straw
“market, Supreme Court complex

By BAHAMAS
INFORMATION SERVICES

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham
on Tuesday unveiled architectural
drawings for the proposed multi-mil-
lion dollar straw market and for the
new Supreme Court complex on Bank
Lane.

Renovation and extension to the
Supreme Court building should com-
mence within this fiscal period, which
started July 1. More than $4 million
have been earmarked for this project.

During the 2009/10 budget debate in
parliament, Minister of Public Works
and Transport Neko Grant shared
plans for the new straw market to be
built on the old site. The old straw mar-
ket was destroyed by fire in September
2001.

In December 2008, a contract was
awarded to Patrick Rahming to execute
the duties of project architect for the
design of the Bay Street Straw Market.

“The architectural design of the
building has been completed,” Mr
Grant told the House of Assembly.

“The new straw market is not to
exceed $10 million in construction cost,
a portion of which has been allocated
in the new budget.”

A tendering process is expected to be
completed by August 2009 and con-
struction of the new market is expected
to commence at the end of September.
The market is to be completed over a
16 to 18 month period.

“This project along with other ongo-
ing projects in the downtown area such
as works at the Nassau Harbour, the
Prince George Wharf, Woodes
Rodgers Walk and the repaving of Bay
Street will all contribute to the

Hubert Ingraham shows
off architectural drawings
for a new straw market
for downtown Nassau in
parliament on Tuesday.

minimum qualifications of a
Bachelor’s Degree in the
appropriate subject areas

Have a valid Teachers Certificate
Be willing to participate in

Extra Curricular activities, etc

debate.

Application Forms can be collected from
the Human Resources section at the
Business Office, Bernard Road,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Tel. 242-324-6269 / 324-6887

THE Bahamas Reef Envi-
ronment Educational Founda-
tion has received a $50,000
donation from the Nassau
office of the Swiss private bank
Lombard Odier for support
the “A Return of the Drum-
beat” fundraiser.

The event, to be held on
November 28, aims to raise
funds which are vital to
BREEP’s efforts to protect the
Bahamian marine environ-
ment.

BREEF was founded in 1993

Deadline for Applications:
Friday, July 17, 2009






































PE oR KM Co Se wae Dre
Kelly’s Dock, Twenty-One days after the date of arrival
will be sold to cover storage fees.

Please contact our Customer Service Dept. at

322-2142/322-2813/356-0575

MANAGEMENT
Betty K. Agencies Limited
East Street North
Nassau, Bahamas

Anniversary

Sal

enhancement of our tourism product,”
Mr Grant said during the budget



PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham displays architectural drawings for a new Supreme Court

complex for Bank Lane.

$50,000 donated to
BREEF fundraiser

by the late Sir Nicholas Nut-
tall to address growing threats
to our marine resources, and
is now a leader in educating
Bahamians and visitors about
its diverse and essential
marine ecosystem of the
Bahamas.

The organisation also works
to build government and pub-
lic support for marine envi-
ronmental protection.

BREEF has held 10 inten-
sive marine conservation
teacher training workshops,
which have provided insight to
more than 260 Bahamian edu-
cators, allowing them to be
ambassadors for the Bahamas’
seas, and train the next gener-
ation of environmental stew-
ards.

BREEF played an instru-
mental role in the establish-
ment of a Nassau grouper
closed season to protect the
spawning stocks of this impor-
tant fish and has long been an
advocate for the establishment
of a network of Marine Pro-
tected Areas in the Bahamas.

The fundraiser promises to
take guests back to an “ole
Nassau town” of the 1950s and
60s, with musical performances
and other entertainment from
that era relived for one night
only.

Performers will include
Peanuts Taylor and many oth-
er esteemed Bahamian enter-
tainers. The notion behind the
theme of the evening is to take
attendees back in time to when
the waters of the Bahamas
were full of marine life and
clear as crystal.

The donation by Lombard
Odier is part of both its com-
mitment to support worthwhile
endeavours in the Bahamas,
and its global commitment to

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BREEF is now a leader in educating
Bahamians and visitors about its
diverse and essential marine
ecosystem of the Bahamas.

environmental organisations
around the world.

“Lombard Odier is very
proud to contribute towards
raising the awareness about
our precious and fragile envi-
ronment. Endangering our nat-
ural resources is endangering
our economy. Without our
beautiful waters, the Bahamian
economy would be very bleak
and we must respect that,” said
Christian Coquoz, managing
director of the Nassau office.

“In celebration of our 30th
anniversary in Nassau, we
would like to demonstrate our
support and commitment to
the Bahamas,” said Mr
Coquoz. Lombard Odier has
been an active advocate of sus-
tainable energy and tackling
long term environmental chal-
lenges.

Clarence Cleare
On 25 yaers of service in
The Royal Bahamas

Defence Force

from:
Barents, Children, Friends



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Public Advisory

The public is advised that due to the
LPIA Expansion Project, the
entrance road leading to the US
Departures tenminal will be reduced
to ane lana of vehicular trattic
commencing on Thursday, July
2, 2009 until further notice. Please
observe any trafic dirachons and
signage while driving along the
entrance road.

We apolagize for any inconvenience
ceEused.



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Govt criticised for ‘callous’
civil service restructuring

Political hopeful responds
to NIB announcement

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

POLITICAL hopeful Paul
Moss condemned government for
its "callous" restructuring of the
civil service and argued that it will
have a negative effect on the econ-
omy.

His comments came in response
to an announcement from the
National Insurance Board (NIB)
that four bosses at the board were
made redundant.

According to NIB Director
Algernon Cargill, the decision was
made as the board aims to address
"deficiencies identified by several
internal and external operational
assessments”.

But Mr Moss, an attorney and
financial services advisor, criticised
the government as unsympathetic
for making these and other posts
redundant during a recession,
as some of those affected could
have years of outstanding debts
to pay.

"Over the past year and a half,
the government has systematical-
ly been ‘restructuring’ the civil ser-
vice and by doing so they have
devastated families and destroyed
lives. Many still have years left on
their mortgages with children in
school and it is catastrophic to be
summarily dismissed without care-
ful planning. No caring govern-
ment does this to its people know-
ing that they will join the unem-
ployment line in a time when
unemployment is expected to
increase," he said in a statement
released yesterday.

Senior Deputy Director Antho-
ny Curtis, Deputy Director of Spe-
cial Projects Cecile Bethel, Deputy
Director of Information Technol-
ogy Andre Bethel and Assistant
Director of Buildings Melincianna
Bethel were told their fate on
Monday.

A fifth position — Deputy Direc-
tor of the Family Islands — is also
on its way out The Tribune under-
stands, but this has not been con-
firmed.

Mr Cargill said the restructuring
will "strategically position" NIB
for the future and streamline oper-
ational efficiency in terms of con-
tribution collections and expense
management while improving cus-
tomer service levels.

But Mr Moss questioned if the
redundancies were part of an eco-
nomic coping mechanism on part
of government as it struggles with
a ballooning deficit and shrinking
revenues.

“Could it be that the govern-
ment is not being honest and
telling us the truth that the econ-
omy has tanked and they cannot
afford to make payroll? It must

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear from
people who are making news in
their neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a good
cause, campaigning for
improvements in the area or
have won an award. If so, call us
on 322-1986 and share your

story.


























be the most callous act by this gov-
ernment so far. This is so, particu-
larly when the government has not
been proactive to ensure that there
is a mandatory pension plan for
these people to fall on," said Mr
Moss, adding that he has not seen
this practice anywhere else in the
region.

Government recently restruc-
tured the ranks of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force and the
Customs and Immigration Depart-
ments to mixed reviews.

While some argued that the
moves may have been political,
some in the private sector
applauded the government for the
decision, saying that it will prove
crucial to the enhancement of effi-
ciency and competitiveness when

the economy rebounds. Paul Moss

Fst.
tlie
105
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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





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LOCAL NEWS

Marine cadets graduate
into global opportunities

By GENA GIBBS
Bahamas Information
Services

THE Ministry of the Envi-
ronment and the Bahamas
Maritime Authority celebrat-
ed the graduation of 57
Bahamas Maritime Cadet
Corps (BMCC) students during
ceremonies at the British Colo-
nial Hilton.

Thirty-three of the graduates
are off to Canada for interna-
tional certification.

The BMCC was established
in 2003 with the objective of
sensitising high school students
to opportunities available in
the maritime industry.

The programme draws from
all government and private
high schools in New Provi-
dence, Abaco and Grand
Bahama.

To date, 301 cadets have
passed through the pro-
gramme.

“We have a retention rate of
78 per cent,” Mr Deveaux said
during the ceremonies on June
24

“This means that more than
200 young Bahamians are
employed around the world
seeking to become Master
Mariners, Chief Engineers, and
other industry-related profes-
sionals.”

The Bahamas Maritime
Authority (BMA) is the gov-
ermment’s agent responsible for
administering the Bahamas
Ship Register, the collection of
all ship registration and related
fees, and for meeting
the Bahamas’ expenses in
respect of international obliga-
tions.

The BMA currently has
offices in Nassau, New York
and London; representation in
Japan, Greece, and Germany;
and projects the opening of an
office in Hong Kong.

He pointed out that the
Bahamas, with the third largest
ship registry in the world, plays
“a leading role” in the Inter-

ST E Ppretivoner (kame)

The Society of Trust and Estate Practitioners

STEP BAHAMAS BRANCH

Invites applications for a scholarship for one module of the STEP Diploma program in

International Trust Management

Applicants should meet the following critena-

Bahamian citizen

© Must have a Foundation Certificate or have been officially exempted from the

Foundation Certificate Prooram

Currently employed im the trust industry or seeking a career 1n the trust industry

Application forms should be obtamed from STEP Bahamas at its administrative office below, and

submutted together with the following:

¢ Proof of Bahamian citizenship (certified copy passport]
¢ Current resume detailing employment history and career

aspirations

@ Details of any other funding sources

Completed applications should be submitted ‘delivered to -

STEP Bahamas

Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre, First Floor

P.O. Box N-1 764
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 323-6012

Deadline for applications is July 31, 2009



Derek Smith/BIS

BMCC CADETS who are off to Canada for international certification are metic during the graduation ceremony.

national Maritime Organisa-
tion (IMO).

The Bahamas maintains
membership on the Council of
the International Maritime
Organisation in Category 'C’,
to which it is the third largest
contributor.

“When we boast about a reg-
istry of almost 1,700 vessels
with more than 55 million gross
tonnes,” said Mr Deveaux, “it
must be borne in mind that
some of these ships have 2,000
people employed.

“So one can readily grasp the
vast opportunities available for
cadets who are willing to seek
the proper training and dedi-
cate themselves to maritime
professions.”

He said his ministry is “work-
ing closely” with the College
of the Bahamas and other pri-
vate sector partners to estab-
lish a Maritime Institution in
the Bahamas so that cadets can
receive world-class training and
maritime education at home.

Signing on to the Interna-
tional Convention on Stan-
dards of Training, Certification
and Watchkeeping for Seafar-
ers has had a positive impact
on inter-island mailboat ser-
vice, he noted.

“This action provides for

minimum training and certifi-
cation for all personnel
employed on domestic vessels,”
said Minister Deveaux. “The
BMA was actively involved in
the efforts to establish a cen-
tre at the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force base where
local seafarers could obtain

Odless a



these minimum standards.

“Since its implementation,
seafarers in the Bahamas have
not only sought to better them-
selves but also to make their
vessels compliant with interna-
tional standards, and to pursue
excellence in the domestic mar-
itime sector.”

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS

Plans for Arawak Cay
upgrade ‘on course’

By GENA GIBBS

THE government says its
plan to upgrade the Arawak
Cay Cultural and Heritage Cen-
tre into “a cultural mecca in the
region” remains on course.

Minister of Agriculture and
Marine Resources Larry

cartwright confirmed that
250,000 has been allocated for
additional improvements.

The money will be used to
increase operational efficiency
and effectiveness, and improve
the area’s appearance, security
and sanitation, he said.

In a statement issued yester-
day, the government also said
Arawak Cay vendors are fever-
ishly preparing to host contes-
tants of the Miss Universe
Pageant on August 5.

“The Miss Universe contes-
tants will come here for cock-
tails and a taste of Bahamian
culture,” said operations man-
ager Sonny Russell.

Improved

At the moment, the sewer
main at Arawak Cay is being
improved to allow the larger
restaurants and bars to install
private bathrooms.

Mr Russell spoke of “cor-
recting infrastructural problems
to make the experience more
comfortable for patrons.”

He said cruise passengers
“who complain that there is
nothing for them to do” are
being targeted for a taste of the
islands.

Thus, plans are already afoot
for Bahamian music and enter-
tainment to become a regular
feature at Arawak Cay.

Security is not an issue for
customers, said Mr Russell, as
the cultural centre has its own
police station and officers patrol
the area frequently.

“We all work together with
the police,” he said. “It’s a cor-
dial relationship. The police are
playing a big role in being com-
munity-minded and customer-
friendly.”

As most of the structures at
the cultural centre are made of
wood, fire hydrants are also to

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be installed, and vendors are to
be trained in basic fire fighting
techniques.

Frequent inspections by the
Department of Environmental
Health Services will ensure that
pests are kept under control,
Mr Russell added.

“The Ministry of Environ-
ment is doing a very good job in
that regard,” he said.

“They have commenced
monthly inspections and any
vendor not operating in a
sanitary way will be dealt
with.”

A new area at the western
end of the cultural centre has
been turned into a parking lot
with 30 new slots.

Plans are afoot to erect a craft
centre for authentically Bahami-
an products. About 24 thatch-
sheltered tropically-colored
booths are to be constructed for
artisans, Mr Russell said.

He said the Bahamas Culi-
nary Association is willing to
give seminars to assist vendors
with menu planning, food pro-
cessing, and other points.

Mr Russell said his office will
be contacting the Public Hos-
pital Authority for assistance in
conducting first aid seminars for
all employees at the cultural
centre.

And, insurance companies
have already been contacted
about providing some kind of
coverage for the vendors and
their operations.

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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 13

LOCAL NEWS

Union president allegedly
attempts to reprimand member
over comments in The Tribune



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To the Shareholders of Raval Fidelity Merchant Mask & Trot Laraited

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Charter’ Acca
24 Jone 2

NOTICE

WILLOW TREE LIMITED

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) WILLOWTREELIMITED isin voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 26th
June, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to
and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Manex Limited, The
Bahamas Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets,
Nassau, Bahamas

Dated this 2nd day of July, A. D. 2009



Manex Limited
Liquidator



FROM page one

rent economy cannot support across-the-board
increases. Additionally, the present industrial
agreement does not support across-the-board
increases being given, but speaks of bringing
workers on par with salaries of their counter-
parts at the sister corporations which the gov-
ernment stated in The Tribune that they were
willing to do by “fixing” any anomalies that exist.

In that previous article, Mr Forbes said, “I sup-
port the union 100 per cent, but my problem is
what she is trying to achieve in an economic
downturn is not realistic.”

Ms Kemp at that time was reportedly attempt-
ing to push the government for a 15 per cent pay
increase for all union members. However this
industrial unrest followed an initial proposal from
Ms Kemp to the government to sell the WSC to a
“private investor”.

With WSC already overstaffed by 117 people,
this action, sources revealed, could only have led

Man is charged
with forcible

detention and rape
FROM page one

charges were read to him. He pleaded not
guilty to the charge of forcible detention and
was not required to enter a plea to the rape
charge.

Sergeant Sean Thurston, the prosecutor,
objected to Poitier being granted bail. He told
the court he was already on bail from the
Supreme Court for a matter of similar nature.

Poitier was remanded to Her Majesty’s
Prison. The case has been adjourned to July 7
and transferred to Court 10, Nassau Street.



NOTICE

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) HIGH YIELD HOLDINGS LIMITED is

June 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
and registered by the Registrar General.
Ting of 1 Raffles Link #05-02 Singapore 039393

Dated this 30" day of June A. D. 2009

HIGH YIELD HOLDINGS LIMITED

dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 29"

The Liquidator of the said company is Ms. Celene Koh Chwee

to massive lay offs of mostly union members at
the corporation.

In his response to Ms Kemp’s initial request for
a disciplinary meeting which was copied to all
union members, Mr Forbes is quoted questioning
the president as to how she could orchestrate a
sick out “to which you garnered support by
threatening to ‘grind’ the members”.

“T, a responsible and learned unionist, still
await the vote of the union body to sanction said
‘sick out’ therein making it a legal unionized
activity. Can the minutes of the meeting reflect
the ‘sick out’ being a union sanction event,” Mr
Forbes asked.

Noting therefore that the president essentially
organized an unsanctioned, unauthorized “illegal”
action against the WSC, Mr Forbes reminded
the president that it is her duty to ensure that
such activities are done properly and by the law.

“Madame to ensure that you and your cohorts
understand what Parliamentary procedure dic-
tates, I would like for them to reflect upon the
joint management and non-management union
meeting where the motion for a vote was moved
and seconded then subsequently passed to the
floor. That Madame president is parliamentary
procedure.

“Should I not educate the members as to your
duties and articulate how the experience you
claim is a farce, as by your actions it shows that
you have never negotiated any salary increases or
engineered any industrial action, as the mistakes
made consistently by your with respect to pro-
tecting the jobs of your members by simply fol-
lowing the law are of dynamic proportions and
can not and should not be tolerated,” he said.

Mr Forbes concluded his letter by reminding
the union president and the entire body itself
that as a prospective candidate for president he
was simply exerting his constitutionally obligated
right to campaign and spread the message to his
fellow union members in New Providence and
the Family Islands.

Attempts to reach Ms Kemp or Mr Forbes for
comment on these letters were unsuccessful up to

Mother of
three found
guilty of
manslaughter

FROM page one

in voluntary

submitted to

ply made up a story about her
and Mr Carey getting into an
argument at their apartment
on August 17. Mrs Bethel told
the jury that Pratt’s story made
no sense and that she had
staged the murder scene.

She noted that the pill on
the front room table, which



Ms. Celene Koh Chwee Ting
Liquidator

NOTICE
VATULELE LIMITED

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a)
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
Business Companies Act 2000.

June, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
and registered by the Registrar General.

Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI

Dated this 2nd day of July, A. D. 2009

VATULELE LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 30th

The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated Ltd.,

had initially been suspected to
be Viagra, had been placed
there by Pratt as a part of
stage management. She told
the jury that Pratt had been
heartless and showed no mercy
in Mr Carey’s senseless and
brutal killing.

Pratt’s attorney Romona
Farquharson told the jury that
the prosecution’s case didn’t
make sense. She questioned as
to why Pratt who have used a
rat tail comb if she had intend-
ed to kill Mr Carey.

Ms Farquharson argued that
the prosecution had proved no
motive for the killing.

She pointed out that Mr
Carey paid most of Pratt’s
bills, including the $800 per
month rent for her apartment.
Ms Farquharson also told the
jury that police had not prop-
erly investigated Mr Carey’s
death.

The trial began on June 17
before Senior Justice Anita
Allen.

Pratt’s sentencing hearing is
scheduled for August 10.
When asked if her client would

International

submitted to



Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator

NOTICE

MIMIZAN LIMITED



appeal the verdict, Ms Far-
quharson said she would like
to reserve comment on the
matter until after the sentenc-
ing.

NOTICE

OLVAR LIMITED

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) MIMIZAN LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 30th
June, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to
and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated Ltd.,
Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI

Dated this 2nd day of July, A. D. 2009



Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) OLVAR LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 30th
June, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to
and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated Ltd.,
Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI

Dated this 2nd day of July, A. D. 2009



Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator







PAGE 14, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009

re oe

BAHAMA ISLAND RESORTS & CASINO
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

Saturday, 4 July, 2009, 10a.m.* sharp
at the Hilton British Colonial,
West Bay Street

*Note: Registration is from 9a.m.-10a.m.

In accordance with Section 21 Subsections (2)(4) of the
Cooperative Societies Act, 2005, A Special Call Meeting of the
Bahama Island Resorts & Casino Cooperative Credit Union
Limited will be held on Saturday, 4 July, 2009, 10:00a.m. at the
Conference Centre, Police Headquarters, East Street, Nassau,
Bahamas. The purpose is to hold the Annual General Meeting
and satisfy requirements of the Cooperative Societies Act, 2005.

The Meeting is called to:-

(a) confirm the minutes of the previous annual general meeting
and of any intervening special meeting;

(b) consider the reports of the board, the credit committee and
the supervisory committee;

(c) examine the balance sheet together with the report on the
audit of the accounts of the registered society for the previous
year as prepared by a person authorized by the Director of
Societies pursuant to section 85 of the Act;

(d) approve the accounts, or, if the accounts are not approved to
cause the secretary to notify the Director of Societies who shall
consider the matter and make his decision therein, and the
Director of Societies decision as to the correctness of the
accounts shall be final;

(e) set the maximum liability pursuant to regulation 20;

(f) hear and decide upon any complaint brought by a member or
members aggrieved by a decision of the Board;

(g) conduct any other general business of the registered society;
and

(h) elect officers to the Board.

All members are urged to attend and
participate in this Meeting



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SALE!



THE TRIBUNE



Plan to sue over
bishop’s dead wife
in mausoleum

FROM page one

However, after complaints
from those living in the area,
who say the presence of the
mausoleum will bring down
property values, smells, and
“scares children”, the Town
Planning Committee subse-
quently rescinded its approval
and asked the Bishop to move
the mausoleum.

Director of Physical Plan-
ning Michael Major wrote to
resident Emily Knowles on
May 6, 2009, informing her

that the Department will
“make every effort to have
the structure and the burial
remains removed in a timely
fashion.”

Yesterday Ms Knowles,
who has been vocal in her
demand for the mausoleum to
go, said that almost two
months later nothing has
changed and residents “are
still suffering mental stress and
hardship.”

“We think we have given
the Department of Physical
Planning enough time to
resolve this matter. Therefore



SHOES and ACCESSORIES

= NI >TI 2

GARDEN and PET SUPPLIES

AT JOHN’S PLAZA on CARMICHEL ROAD

PRIZES!

Death sentence for
murder of businessman

FROM page one

year sentence. According to evidence adduced at the trial, Knowles
and Brown sat in the getaway car while Glinton shot and robbed
Carey.

Carey's cousin, Vaughn, who had originally been charged with
conspiracy to commit armed robbery, testified for the prosecu-
tion in exchange for having the charge against him dropped. Carey
had testified that Dwight Knowles had approached him about set-
ting up the robbery in exchange for $9,000 which he claimed he was
never paid.

Justice Jon Isaacs also sentenced Glinton to 30 years imprison-
ment on the armed robbery charge and 10 years imprisonment
on the conspiracy to commit armed robbery charge. The sentences
are to run concurrently beginning the date of his conviction. Glin-
ton was represented by attorneys Craig Butler and Devard Francis.
Deputy Director of Public Prosecutions Cheryl Grant-Bethel,
Anthony Delaney, Stephanie Pintard and Lennox Coleby repre-
sented the Crown.

In March 2006, the London Privy Council ruled that the
Bahamas’ mandatory death penalty was unconstitutional and that
the appropriate sentence would be left to the discretion of the tri-
al judge.



Next door to Bamboo Shack

FRIDAY, 3rd - SATURDAY 4th JULY
SURPRISES! °*

we have no other choice but
to commence legal proceed-
ings to the Supreme Court in
our collective names to sue
the Department of Physical
Planning, Environmental
Health and any other Gov-
ernment Department that
should have made sure that
his matter was taken care of,”
she said in a letter to the press,
signed by herself “on behalf
of the Community of Garden
Hills number two.”

Meanwhile, Sharon Hunter,
who lives adjacent to the
church grounds, supports the
legal action. S as se claims to
have already suffered loss of
income due to the departure
of a tenant from an apartment
she owned in part as a result
of its proximity to the mau-
soleum.

The residents further
alleged that a foul smell can at
times be detected emanating
from the tomb.

Commenting on the com-
plaints in April, Bishop Sey-
mour told another local daily
that “people today have no
love, no compassion and no
scruples.”

“I’m through with it,
because as far as I’m con-
cerned, (laying her to rest)
was the closure I had. If any-
body else wants to move her,
they could move her... but
wouldn’t give consent. I will
not give consent,” he report-
edly said.

A message left for
Mr Major seeking comment
was not returned up to press
time. Attempts to reach Bish-
op Seymour were unsuccess-
ful.



ee an
ie
ee





THE TRIBUNE PAGE 16

or

THURSDAY, JULY 2,



2009



ts

PAGE 18 ¢ Brent Stubbs’ opinion...





Wimbledon

semis all set:
Federer-Haas,
Roddick-Murray...

See page 17



Duo suffer defeat in quarterfinals

Knowles and mixed pairs partner victorious



MARK KNOWLES (right) and MAHESH BHUPATHI

a Mi
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CLEVELAND (AP) —
Shaquille O’Neal took his first
look at his new basketball

The 15-time All-Star center

m By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

ff the heels of his 1,000th

career win, Mark Knowles

suffered a heartbreaking

loss in perhaps the most
thrilling and suspenseful match thus far at
Wimbledon.

Knowles and partner Mahesh Bhu-
pathi were eliminated from the grand
slam quarterfinal at the hands of Wesley
Moodie of South Africa and Dick Nor-
man of Belgium 6-7 (11), 6-4, 6-7(9), 7-5,
4-6. A mammoth 48 minute opening set
foreshadowed the tone for the remainder
of the match which would total nearly
four hours to complete. In the first set
Moodie and Norman scored on 10 aces,
had a perfect winning percentage (11-
11) on second serves, scored 32 winners
with a total of 43 points won.

Bhupathi and Knowles scored just 20
winners with 37 points won. For the
match, Knowles and Bhupathi scored on
15 aces but faltered with a total of 17
unforced errors, while their opponents
had less than half their total with just
eight. They also had an uncharacteristi-

cally high number of errors with eight
double faults.

Knowles and Bhupathi also had 76
winners with 153 points won, while
Moodie and Norman scored 98 winners
with 162 points won.

Percentage

While the winning percentage on first
service was fairly even at 89 and 87 per-
cent, however Moodie and Norman held
a discernable advantage in winning per-
centage on second serves 77 Moodie and
Norman the tournament’s ninth ranked
team unseeded the fourth seeded team of
the tournament just prior to a showdown
with the top seeded pair.

The South African and Belgian pair
will face Bob and Mike Bryan in the
semifinals. The other half of the semifinal
round will feature unseeded James Blake
and Mardy Fish taking on former
Knowles teammate Daniel Nestor of
Canada and Nenad Zimonjic of Serbia.
Just two matches later, Knowles returned
to court two, and received redemption
with a win in mixed doubles.

Knowles, partnered with Anna-Lena
Groenfeld of Germany to advance to the

quarterfinals of the draw. They defeated
Nestor and Elena Vesnina of Russia in
straight sets, 6-4,6-4. In a nearly com-
plete turnaround from his first match of
the day, Knowles and Groenefeld took
the match in just 67 minutes.

After being upset by a lower seed in
men’s doubles, Knowles returned in the
mixed draw as the ninth seed to upend
the fifth seed. Knowles and Groenefeld
overcame a whopping 17 unforced errors
while their opponents committed just
three, but held a crucial advantage in
break point conversions, taking 2-3 for 67
percent and 40 winners. They will
advance to play Bob Bryan and Saman-
tha Stosur of Australia in the quarterfi-
nals.

Other notable pairs in the quarterfinals
include Leander Paes (India) and Cara
Black (Zimbabwe), the top seed, Kevin
Ullyett (Zimbabwe) and Su-Wei Hsiesh
(Chinese Tapei), the fourth ranked team,
Andre Sa (Brazil) and Ai Sugiyama
(Japan), eleventh ranked team, and
Stephen Huss (Australia) and Virginia
Pascual (Span), the twelfth ranked team.
Knowles and Groenfeld take the court
today in the fourth round for the right to
advance to the semifinals.

Shag to team up with ‘King James’

B By TOM WITHERS
AP Sports Writer

Experience in hardware, networking, Windows based
operuling systems and software.

Professional certifications an advantage (At, MCSE}
Must have good communication skills

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Must have own transportation and cell phone

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line: Computer Tech.) or fax to:

Computer Tech.

clo Service Manager
Micromet Ltd.

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Nassau, Bahamas

Email: pobs{emicronet.bs
Fax: 328-3043



toured the Cavaliers’ suburban
practice facility and took his
physical on Wednesday, one
day before he is formally intro-
duced as superstar LeBron
James’ newest teammate.

O’Neal and a small group of
associates met briefly with Cavs
coach Mike Brown and others
at the Cleveland Clinic Courts
in Independence, Ohio. The
Cavaliers are hoping O’Neal,
who has won four NBA titles,
can be the missing piece to help
James win his first champi-
onship and end the city’s title
drought dating to 1964.

The Cavaliers have scheduled
a lpm news conference on
Thursday to welcome O’Neal.
He was acquired in a trade with
the Phoenix Suns last week.

It is not known if James, who
was vacationing outside the
country when O’Neal was trad-
ed, will be at the news confer-
ence. The league MVP was in
Los Angeles last Sunday for the
BET Awards.

O’Neal, who will wear jersey

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT

NOTICE

BAY STREET

NASSAU STREET TO VICTORIA AVENUE
ROADWAY CONSTRUCTION

30" June to 14" July 2009

In an effort to relieve current traffic congestion problems
BAHAMAS HOT MIX has been contracted for the paving of
West Bay Street between Blake Rd and Nassau St, Marlborough
St, Navy Lion Rd, and Bay Street to Mackey St. Paving works
will be commencing from Blake Rd, which require _ traffic

management involving road closures, and diversions for the route.

Paving Works include the following times:

¢ 7:00 pm to 6:30 am

Local diversions will be sign posted in due course and further

information will be provided in local media.



IN THIS file photo, Shaquille O'Neal (right) and LeBron James of the Cleveland Cavaliers dance together during
an All-Star basketball practice in Las Vegas. The Cavaliers completed a blockbuster trade, bringing the super-
star center O’Neal from Phoenix Suns to play with current MVP LeBron James, two people with knowledge of
the deal told The Associated Press. The people spoke on condition of anonymity because the trade had not been

officially announced...

No. 33 — his high school and
college number — in Cleveland,
is staying at a posh downtown
hotel during this visit. He hasn’t
decided if he will buy a house,
rent or stay in a hotel during

his time with the Cavaliers, his
fifth NBA team.

Cleveland is the first cold-
weather city where O’Neal has
played after stops in Orlando,
Fla., Los Angeles, Miami and

(AP Photo: Kevork Djansezian)

Phoenix.

O’Neal has one season left
under contract, but the 37-year-
old center recently indicated on
his Twitter page that he can
play three more seasons.

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TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 17



Wimbledon semifinals

all set: Federer-Haas,
Roddick-Murray

@ By STEPHEN WILSON
AP Sports Writer

WIMBLEDON, England
(AP) — Roger Federer neu-
tralized Ivo Karlovic’s huge
serves Wednesday to reach the
Wimbledon semifinals and
move a step closer to a record
15th Grand Slam champi-
onship. Two-time finalist Andy
Roddick, Andy Murray and
Tommy Haas completed the
final four.

In a match featuring short
points and few rallies, Federer
conjured up a few great returns
to break the 6-foot-10 Croatian
twice and secure a 6-3, 7-5, 7-6
(3) victory on another sunbaked
day at the All England Club.

Federer, closing in on his
sixth Wimbledon title, reached
his 21st consecutive semifinal
at a Grand Slam tournament
and extended his winning streak
to 17 matches with another vin-
tage performance on his
favorite Centre Court.

“T love the record I have of
reaching so many semifinals in
Grand Slams in a row — 21 is
quite a number,” Federer said.
“Tt shows how consistent I’ve
been.”

Tt was Federer’s ninth win in
10 matches against Karlovic,
who was playing in his first
Grand Slam quarterfinal.

Federer’s next opponent will
be Germany’s Haas, who upset
fourth-seeded Novak Djokovic
7-5, 7-6 (6), 4-6, 6-3 to advance
to his first Wimbledon semifi-
nal. The 31-year-old Haas was
the oldest player in the quar-
ters, while the 22-year-old
Djokovic was the youngest.

The third-seeded Murray
swept Juan Carlos Ferrero 7-5,
6-3, 6-2 to reach his first Wim-
bledon semifinal and keep up
his bid to become the first
British player to win the men’s
title since Fred Perry in 1936.

Murray will face the sixth-
seeded Roddick, who served 43
aces and outlasted 2002 cham-
pion Lleyton Hewitt 6-3, 6-7
(10), 7-6 (1), 4-6, 6-4 in the day’s
most competitive match. Hewitt
battled back from two sets to
one down, before Roddick
broke for 5-4 in the fifth and
then served out the match —
which ended after 3 hours, 50
minutes when the Australian
popped up a forehand half-vol-
ley past the baseline.

“Tt’s a testament to the type
of player he is that he kept
going and made it such a fight,”
said the 26-year-old Roddick,
who lost to Federer in the 2004
and ’05 Wimbledon finals. “I
think there’s a lot of respect
there. We used to get into it a
little bit when we were younger,
but I think we definitely earned
each other’s respect. Now we’re
just a couple of old married
dudes, so maybe we’ve grown
up a little bit.”

Hewitt, who had 21 aces him-
self, said he did all that he could
to deal with Roddick’s rocket
serves.

“You know you’re going to
get aced a lot,” he said. “I knew
that going into the match.
You're going to get some break
pomts and you’re going to see
them go pretty quickly as well.
It was a matter of trying to hang
in there as much as possible and
make him play that extra shot. I
was nearly able to do it.”

Murray broke Ferrero five
times, served 18 aces and lost
serve only once. Murray had 49
winners, compared to 20 for the
Spaniard, a former No. 1 and
only third wild card to reach
the Wimbledon quarters.

It was a dominant perfor-
mance by Murray, the first
Briton to reach the semifinals
since Tim Henman did it for
the fourth time in 2002.

“T feel confident because I’ve
won a lot of matches on the
grass,” Murray said. “But every
day, when I get up to play the
matches, I know that I’m going
to have to perform very well,
and that gets the nerves and the
adrenaline going and makes me
play better.”

Karlovic served 23 aces to
raise his tournament total to
160, but it was Federer who
never faced a break point. The
second-ranked Swiss star won
74 of 85 points on serve and
was taken to deuce only once,
in the sixth game of the third
set. Federer got out of that jam
with a 129 mph service winner
and a 128 mph ace.

“Tt’s difficult because there’s
not really any baseline rallies

EDA UTE Ciel eT

face Andy Roddick in one

half of the semifinals...
(AP Photos)

on his serve or on my serve,”
Federer said. “You expect a
tough scoreline all the time. It’s
not easy to break him. ’'m very
happy to break him twice and
win the match.”

The statistics told the story:
Federer had 39 winners and
only seven unforced errors, to
29 winners (almost all on serve)
and 17 errors for Karlovic.

Federer grabbed the upper
hand early when he broke
Karlovic in the fourth game of
the match with flashes of bril-
liance.

He got to break point with a
reflex backhand return winner
off a 130 mph serve and then
ripped a forehand return win-
ner off a 122 mph serve, pump-
ing his fist and shouting, “Come
on!”

It was the first time Karlovic
had been broken during the
tournament after winning 80
consecutive service games.

“He returned unbelievable
few shots and I could not really
react on it,” said Karlovic, who
added that he was bothered by
the sun in his eyes before
putting on sunglasses for the
rest of the match.

The first extended rally of the
match — and one of only a
handful during the entire con-
test — didn’t take place until

the fourth game of the second
set, a 15-stroke point that end-
ed with a Federer forehand
winner 35 minutes into the
match.

The second set turned Fed-
erer’s way when he broke
Karlovic in the 11th game with
four straight winners: an over-
head, a forehand passing shot
down the line, a reflex back-
hand return off a 126 mph serve
and a passing shot that glanced
off Karlovic’s racket frame.

The third set ended with the
13th tiebreaker the two men
have played against each oth-
er in 25 sets of tennis. Karlovic’s
limitations were exposed as he
made several glaring errors,
missing badly on what should
have been easy putaways. Fed-
erer finished him off with an
inside-out forehand winner on
the first match point.

The 24th-seeded Haas saved
three straight set points against
Djokovic after going down 6-3
in the second-set tiebreaker. He
broke in the fourth game of the
fourth set and sealed the win
when Djokovic netted a fore-
hand return on the first match
point.

The result wasn’t a complete
surprise: Haas beat Djokovic in
the grass-court final at Halle,
Germany, last month.

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Haas led Federer two sets to
love in the fourth round of the
French Open, only to lose in
five. He said he hopes to make
amends on Friday.

“That would be nice,” he
said. “Ill give it my best shot.
There’s not much he (Federer)
can’t do. He’s obviously the
favorite to win the title. I’m
going to go out there and try
to annoy him a little bit and see
what happens.”



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PAGE 18, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SPORTS



“Tribute to a legend’ luncheon

n Sunday, July 26, at San-
dals Royal Bahamian
resort, the Friends of
Tommy A Robinson are
slated to honour perhaps the country’s
greatest track and field athlete.

“The tribute to a legend’ luncheon
was originally planned for last year,
but had to be called off until now
because of one or two reasons, includ-
ing the fact that Robinson had to
undergo surgery.

The committee, headed by Alpheus
“Hawk” Finlayson, could not have
selected a better individual to honour.
He is an icon, a legend and national
hero who many people have lauded
and tried to emulate for his achieve-
ment.

The only thing, according to former
journalist Ed Bethel who covered many
stories about Robinson’s exploits dur-
ing his heyday, is that he has not been
blessed with a knighthood from the
Queen.

Before the year is out, Bethel hopes
to call his long-time friend ‘Sir Tommy
Robinson,’ he said at a recent press
conference to officially announce the
luncheon and to encourage the gener-
al public to come out and show their
support.

Robinson, who has his name inked
on the National Track and Field Sta-
dium, which is soon to be replaced by
the new facility being built by the Chi-
nese government, has been the pio-
neer sprinter in the country long before
we heard about the success of the
‘Golden Girls.’

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her gold medal from the 2001 IAAF
World Championships in Athletics in
Edmonton, Canada, Ferguson-McKen-
zie said Saturday night that Robinson
was really an “inspiration and motiva-
tion” to her.

In fact, she credited a lot of her suc-
cess to the support she got from Robin-
son, who stepped in and acted as her
father, although he is her “godfather.”

Robinson has indeed been consid-
ered the “godfather” of track and field
in the country. He was the first
Bahamian to participate in track and
field at the Olympic Games in Mel-
bourne, Australia, in 1956 where he
finished fourth in the first round of the
100m and 200m.

A year later, Robinson made history
again when he became the first
Bahamian to win a medal in an inter-
national competition at the West Indi-
an Federation Games in Kingston,
Jamaica, where he got a bronze in the
100m.

At the 1964 Olympics in Tokyo,
Japan, Robinson went on to become
the first Bahamian track and field ath-
lete to advance to an Olympic final
after he placed second in the 100m
semifinal behind then world record
holder Bob Haynes of the United
States.

For a number of years, Robinson
held the national record in both the
100m and 200m. But if there was any
shortfall, it would have been the fact
that he was not successful in winning an
Olympic medal.

When asked how he felt about the
performances of the current sprinters,

Building’ =

led by IAAF
World Champi-
onship in Athlet- f
ics’ silver medallist
Derrick Atkins,
Robinson said he’s
disappointed that
they have not
been able to sur-
pass the many
accomplishments
that Robinson was
able to achieve.

Yes, Atkins
broke the barrier
when he won the
silver medal in
Osaka, Japan,
behind American
champion Tyson Gay in 2007 and in
the process became the fastest Bahami-
an ever when he lowered his national
record to 9.91 seconds.

And yes, Dominic Demeritte left his
mark on the 2006 World Indoor Cham-
pionships when he listed as the last
champion in the 2004 Championships
in Budapest, Hungary, an event that
has now been erased from the schedule
because of the disadvantage that was
presented to the athletes with regard to
who would draw the outside lane six.

Indeed, Robinson has been consid-
ered the greatest Bahamian sprinter
because of the consistency in which he
competed, the majority of times as a
“lone ranger” carrying the Bahamian
flag.

In fact, if you sit down long enough
to listen, Robinson can probably clear-
ly recall so many of his performances

STUBBS

OPINION

a
_



that it will amaze you as to the incred-
ible achievements that he has been able
to secure.

Some day, the story on the life of
Tommy Robinson must be put to pen
in a book for everyone to be able to fol-
low and remember for years to come.
It’s such a fantasy story, one that
should be a great copy to read.

The Friends of Tommy Robinson
should be commended for honouring
this Bahamian giant, who has already
been inducted into the National Hall of
Fame. If there is anybody who deserves
to continue to smell his flowers while
he’s alive, it’s Tommy Robinson.

Another is Sir Durward “Sea Wolf”
Knowles. But that’s another topic for
discussion at another time.

So [just want to encourage the gen-
eral public to start making plans to join
the committee in honouring Robinson,
who from all indications, is in goods
spirits despite his illness. The luncheon
on July 26 could be your way of saying
“thank you Tommy” for his contribu-
tion to the development of sports in
the country and track and field in gen-
eral.

Talking about track and field, the
BAAA hosted its National Track and
Field Championships at the Thomas
A Robinson Track and Field Stadium
over the weekend and for the first time
since they have been putting it on in
the last decade, there was no major
sponsor.

There was hardly any advanced pub-
licity as it was in the past, but the ath-
letes turned out, as expected, and per-
formed up to par for the most part.

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As usual, the nationals clashed with
the Bahamas Swimming Federation’s
Royal Bank of Canada National Swim-
ming Championships at the Betty Kel-
ly Kenning Aquatic Center.

And at the National Tennis Center,
there was the Security & General Inter-
national Tennis Tournament, featur-
ing some of the top junior players in he
world.

If that wasn’t enough, the New Prov-
idence Softball Association had a big
double header at the Banker’s Field
at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex.

So whether or not people think that
the numbers could have been better
at the track to watch just about all of
the country’s elite athletes in action,
there were just too many things going
on at the same time.

And although there are those who
will argue that with a little more pub-
licity, the BAAA would have attracted
more, I tend to disagree because we
have really seen a falloff in the sup-
port for the fans in just about all sports,
not just track and field.

But it was good that despite the rain
and the fact that the ceremonies were
constantly delayed, the fans waited
until the end to watch as the men’s 4x
400m relay team and Ferguson-
McKenzie finally got their gold medals
from the 2001 World Championships in
Edmonton, Canada, after the US were
disqualified in both events for testing
positive for the use of illegal sub-
stances.

At least there were a number of fans
who were eager to see the athletes
receive their just rewards.

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THE TRIBUNE





lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

AIRLINES operating at the
Lynden Pindling International
Airport (LPIA) could face an-
almost 24 per cent increase in
landing fees being proposed by
the Nassau Airport Develop-
ment Company (NAD), which
could be transferred on to pas-
sengers and increase the cost of
travel to the Bahamas, nega-
tively impacting tourism.

Some airlines reacted with
dismay yesterday as NAD
released the details of its pro-
posed fee increases, highlighting
a proposed 23.6 per cent
increase to landing fees, and a
6.1 per cent increase to terminal
fees, aircraft loading bridge fees
and aircraft parking fees.

British Airways’ airport man-
ager, Nathaniel Rappel, told
Tribune Business that airlines
are generally “not happy” about
any manner of fee increase.

He argued that the fee
increases come at the worst pos-
sible time for airlines in general

isin

THURSDAY,





TUL ae



I

2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Airline fears
over 24% rise
in landing fee

NAD proposing 6.1% fee
hike for other charges,
prompting concern over
increased travel costs to
the Bahamas impacting
tourism

and, with the state of the econ-
omy, the worst time for the cost
of air travel.

“T can’t make any specific
comments about the issue, but
you will find that airlines in this
time and in the current eco-
nomic situation will not be hap-
py about increases in fees,” said
Mr Rappel. “And in this day
and age, having increases in fees
may actually affect the way air-
lines see destinations.

“From the tourism industry
level, people oppose the
increase in that it makes the
cost of our service higher.”

Airlines have been suffering
high overhead costs for several

SEE page 4B

Bahamas Waste profits ‘about
50% higher’ than budgeted

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMAS Waste said yes-
terday the $207,785 in net
income generated during its
2009 first quarter exceeded
Budget expectations by “about
50 per cent”, with construction
on its recently-approved
biodiesel production facility
anticipated to start within the
next eight weeks.

Disa Harper, the BISX-list-
ed company’s chief financial
officer, told Tribune Business:
“We exceeded expectations. We
were probably about 50 per cent
higher than we wrote in our
Budget in terms of net income.”

Bahamas Waste’s net income
for the three months to March
31, 2009, was only 9.1 per cent
down on 2008’s $228,469 com-
parative. Ms Harper said the
result was due to a “concerted
effort to cut back on costs”, cou-
pled with the benefits of a
decrease in fuel prices and rev-
enue levels holding up well
against 2008 levels.

The BISX-listed company
was “really working hard” to
maintain its current staff com-
plement of 94, and not lay any-
one off. For the 2009 first quar-
ter, while revenues were down
just over 4 per cent, at $1.931
million compared to $2.013 mil-
lion, the cost of sales had also
decreased by 5.2 per cent to

* Construction on recently-
approved biodiesel facility
likely to start in eight weeks,
as company moves to
rebuild client base

* Cardboard recycling to
start during 2009 Q3

* Accounts receivables
tackled by bringing cut-off
deadline down from
90 to 60 days past due

$1.234 million.

And operating expenses were
held relatively flat, at $482,566
compared to $475,350 the year
before.

But, sounding a note of cau-
tion about what the remainder
of 2009 held, Ms Harper told
Tribune Business: “This quar-
ter, we’ve seen fuel prices start
to kick-in again. Now we’re get-
ting into the second quarter,
more businesses are feeling the
effects of the slowdown. This
quarter will be a much better
indicator of what the rest of the
year will look like for us.”

To reduce costs, Ms Harper
said Bahamas Waste had cut
back on discretionary spending,
trimming advertising and car-
rying out more maintenance in-

SEE page 9B

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Financial sector ‘can
grow to 25% of GDP

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

he Bahamian

financial services

industry’s direct

contribution to this
nation’s gross domestic prod-
uct (GDP) “could grow” from
a current 18-18 per cent to 25
per cent over a five to seven-
year period, a leading attor-
ney said yesterday, “if we got
it right”.

Brian Moree, senior part-
ner at McKinney, Bancroft &
Hughes, told Tribune Busi-
ness that if the private and
public sectors worked togeth-
er and “came up with a new
business plan and model to
facilitate the expansion” of
the financial services indus-
try, and got it correct, there
would be “generous and
major rewards” extending
right through the Bahamian
economy and society.

Pointing out that the Cen-
tral Bank of the Bahamas sur-
vey on the financial services
industry’s overall contribu-
tion to the Bahamian econo-
my in 2008 had provided a

BRIAN MOREE

“timely” reminder of the sec-
tor’s importance, Mr Moree
told Tribune Business: “The
financial services industry is
a major contributor to our
middle class, which provides
thousands of Bahamians with
mobility in the labour force,
because of the high salary lev-
els, and the training and
opportunities to advance in
that sector.

“T don’t think we would
suffer a severe diminution of
business in the financial ser-

vices sector without affecting
the national economy.”

As a result, it was “critical-
ly important” for the
Bahamas “to get it right” in
developing its response to
international initiatives, such
as the G-20/OECD thrust
demanding higher levels of
transparency and tax infor-
mation exchange.

Mr Moree urged the
Bahamas to “get in a proac-
tive mode” in developing such
responses, which could only
be put together by a joint
public/private sector
approach. And, if the
Bahamas got it right, he sug-
gested that the rewards could
be immense.

“My own view is that over a
five-year period, five to seven
years at the maximum, if we
got it right and did what was
necessary, we would grow the
financial services sector from
what it is now, 15-18 per cent
of GDP, to 25 per cent,” Mr
Moree told Tribune Business.

“That is achievable in a five
to seven-year period. We

SEE page 5B



No hotel ‘rebound’ despite
decrease in air arrivals fall-off

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

WHILE air arrival fall-offs
appear to be decreasing month-
over-month, “especially from
Florida”, the Bahamas Hotel
Association’s (BHA) president
yesterday said this was “not a
true indications things are
rebounding” because aggregate
revenues earned by major
hotels were still more than 20
per cent down on 2008 compar-
isons.

Robert Sands said that while
the percentage decline in air
arrivals, in comparison to 2008

{|
UUM I
il!

* Hotel president says that while year-over-year arrivals

declines from key markets,

‘especially Florida’,

reducing, hotel revenues still down by ‘plus-20 per cent’
* Industry ‘still digging itself out of hole’, and hoping
to ‘get through 2009 without any major casualties’
* Hopes for airlift boost with elimination of
Customs/Immigration overtime charges

figures, was becoming less as
2009 progressed, many other
factors were involved in deter-
mining the hotel industry’s
financial performance and the
sector “still has a big hole to dig

ourselves out of”.

The BHA president said the
Bahamian hotel industry was
hoping for “some stabilisation

SEE page 8B



Online at

BankBahamasOnline.com

Ahaco Markets:
dividend decision
set for early 2010

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ABACO
Markets hopes
to be in a posi-
tion to resume
dividend pay-
ments to long-
suffering
shareholders
after its cur-
rent fiscal year
ends on Janu-
ary 31, 2010,
its chief exec-
utive yesterday telling Tribune
Business the Board was likely
to make its decision in Febru-
ary/March once the financial
performance was known.

Gavin Watchorn, who is also
the BISX-listed food retail
group’s president, said the
resumption of dividend pay-
ments would be the last sign
needed to confirm it had
returned to “full health” fol-
lowing a five-year turnaround
programme that appears to have
restored it to consistent prof-
itability.

However, he added that while
understanding shareholder
expectations that they would
receive a return on their invest-

SEE page 10B

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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Chamber honours

THE owner of Checkers Cafe, Gus
Cartwright, was named Outstanding
Businessperson of the Year as the
Bahamas Chamber of Commerce paid
tribute to leading Bahamian business
leaders at its 38th annual awards ball
on Saturday.

The highlight was the presentation of
the 2009 Annual Business Awards and
the Lifetime Achievement Award,
which went to George Myers, chair-
man of the Myers Group of Compa-
nies. More than 350 business, govern-
ment and industry leaders were in
attendance.

Dr Wendy Stuart received the
Developing Entrepreneur of the Year
Award for her successful body-care
business, Botani Bath.

Two Bahamian businesses had the
distinction of being heralded as Out-
standing Business of the Year, which is
awarded for two categories - business-
es with over 50 employees, and those
with less.

In Category A, businesses with more
than 50 employees, Furniture Plus was
presented with the Outstanding Busi-
ness Award. The Plait Lady, (Clare
Sands) received the designation for
Outstanding Business of the Year for
Category B (less than 50 employees).

Receiving the Chamber’s prestigious
Lifetime Achievement Award, Mr
Myers thanked his team and the many
individuals he has worked with over
the course of his 40-year career.

Keynote speaker for the evening,
Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, minis-
ter of tourism and aviation, gave a
colorful account of his journey and
friendship with Mr Myers, having
worked closely with him over the
course of his career in the tourism
industry, beginning in 1982 at Resorts

woM@rsl\elgclilela

os



al
r Sas

THE BAHAMAS Chamber of Commerce pre-
sented its 2009 Annual Business Awards at
their 38th annual awards ball. The evening’s
winners are pictured with the event’s
keynote speaker, Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace, minister of tourism and aviation, the
Chamber president, Khaalis Rolle, and Philip
Simon, the Chamber executive director

International.

Acknowledging that he could think
of none more deserving than Mr
Myers, the minister reflected on how
much he had learned from him and
called him, “the smartest man in the
world”.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace also
encouraged the business community
to become active stakeholders in the
tourism sector, noting that it will take
more than promotions to stimulate
the industry.

The development of infrastructure
needed to grow and diversify the
Bahamian tourism product was essen-
tial. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace stressed
that the accessibility factor was just as
crucial an ingredient to success as
reducing the cost of the destination to
competitiveness.

CRUISE
LINE

business leaders



THE BAHAMAS Chamber of Commerce gave its Lifetime Achievement Award to George Myers, chairman of the Myers Group of Com-
panies. Pictured (L-R) Khaalis Rolle, Chamber president; George Myers; Dr Sophia Rolle, chairperson of Chamber week 2009.

Philip Simon, the Chamber’s execu-
tive director, acknowledged Mr Myers’
achievements, saying: “Having played
an integral role in the success of the
Bahamian tourism industry, Mr Myers
is undoubtedly deserving of the Cham-
ber’s prestigious 2009 Lifetime
Achievement Award for his immea-
surable contributions to the growth of
tourism and business in the Bahamas.
His body of work speaks for itself.”

The Chamber of Commerce also bid
farewell officially to outgoing presi-
dent Dionisio D’Aguilar, recognised
for his outstanding work and service to
the organisation and the business com-
munity over his two-year term.

Mr D’ Aguilar was presented with a
commemorative photo collage of some
of his highlights as president.

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Newly-elected Chamber president,
Khaalis Rolle, said of all the finalists:
“They are all indeed outstanding final-
ists, and the selection of winners was no
easy process.”

As for the winners, he added: “They
represent the success stories of the
Bahamian business community. They
are market leaders, who have demon-
strated their commitment to ethical
business practices and are actively con-
tributing to the overall development
of the Bahamian economy and com-
munity.”

Although they did not go home with
the top award, the Chamber recog-
nised the outstanding achievements of
the other finalists. In the category of
Outstanding Business Person of the
Year, finalists Dr Charles Diggiss, pres-

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president of Galleria Cinemas and
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mended.

Kenwood Kerr, president of Provi-
dence Advisors, and Farrell Goff and
Deran Thompson, principals of
Bahamas Woodworking Studio, were
finalists for the Developing Entrepre-
neur Award.

The Mall at Marathon and Bahamas
Waste were recognised as finalists in
the very competitive Business of the
Year ‘50 employees or more’ category.

Caribbean Civil Group and Bahamas
Orthodontic Centre were saluted in
that category for businesses with less
than 50 employees.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 2 2009, PAGE 3B



a oS ee
Watersports operators
fear 70% income loss

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

WATERSPORTS operators
could lose as much as 70 per
cent of their income when an
area of Arawak Cay used for
launching boats and jet skis is
blocked by a 35-inch pipe,
which will pump dredged debris
and a silt screen used to keep
that debris off Long Wharf
Beach.

The pipe is related to the
upcoming dredging of Nassau
Harbour to accommodate the
Genesis class cruise ships. The
works manager for Boskalis,
Ronald Both, said the dredging
of the harbour should begin in
earnest by the third week of
July.

He added that the pipe which
will deter the watersports oper-
ators will be put in place as ear-
ly as next week.

Yet as early as yesterday,
workers had placed cones
joined by red tape and two
enormous steel pipes on the
western end of Long Wharf
Beach, where the operators
launch their boats and jet skis
into the water.

Many of the operators sim-
ply ignored the makeshift bar-
rier, running over the cones and
launching their equipment as
they have always done.

Owner of Reno Watersports,
Reno Deveaux, said the Gov-
ernment needs to create a new
area for operators to launch
their boats, as many of the
ramps along East Bay Street are
not fit to do so - especially dur-

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$2,100 per month

eT
bhcc@coralwave.com

BSi

| Personal qualities:

| Responsibilities:

| Qualifications:

Industry,

| ta:

Bayside Executive Park
P. 0. Box CB-10976
Nassau, Bahamas













































ing low tide.

Mr Deveaux said it is likely
government will suggest opera-
tors launch at the ramp on Mon-
tague, though they were asked
several years ago to discontinue
its use because it was causing
severe traffic congestion.

He and vice-president of the
Bahamas Watersports Associ-
ation, Patrick Glinton, said that
apart from the traffic conges-
tion 70 - 80 watersports opera-
tors will cause dropping their
equipment at the Montague
ramp, the conditions there at
what is also a fish market are
unsanitary.

“T caught a fungus there from
getting cut in that water more
than once,” said Mr Glinton.

He and Mr Deveaux also fear
that a mass movement to that
area will breed arguments
amongst the operators, who all
vie for the ramp in order to be
the first over to Paradise Island.

At the Arawak Cay location
there is enough space for two
or three operators to launch
boats and jet skis simultaneous-
ly, and ample parking for their
trucks and trailers.

Mr Deveaux said the Port
Department yesterday deemed
the area an illegal ramp, only
after it was decided to place the
dredging pipe at the location,
though nothing was said about
the illegality of its use in previ-




ous years.

He said the Government now
needs to find an appropriate
place for boat launches, in order
for the operators to maintain
their livelihood.

During the Chamber of Com-
merce’s meet the ministers
forum last Thursday, Mr
Deveaux voiced his concern
about the possible closure of
the Arawak Cay ramp to Min-
ister of Public Works, Neko
Grant.

Mr Grant replied that boat
ramps did not fall under his
ministry and suggested that Mr
Deveaux speak to Minister of
the the Environment, Dr Earl
Deveaux, who was also sched-
uled to speak at the forum.

Mr Grant, though, reassured
Mr Deveaux that if the Gov-
ernment decided to close any
ramps, operators would be
alerted and informed of alter-
native ramps.

Mr Deveaux said the Port
Department sent a representa-
tive to Arawak Cay to speak to
some of the operators, but noth-
ing was received in writing.

He suggested the Port
Department has often been
fickle when dealing with the
Bahamas Watersports Associ-
ation. “They sit up there and
speak down to us here,” he said.
“They recognise us only when
they want to.”

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The successful candidate for the position of Trust Officer must have extensive
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Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Positive attitude and outlook

Problam-solving skills

Commitment to quality and service excellence
Ability to partner with team members.

Advise and support the business on trust related matters

Administer a graup of Trusts, Foundations & Companies pursuant to respective
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Oversee a group of complex chent relationships
Review all governing documents of Trusts, Foundations & Companies for legal
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Liaise with Relatonshio Managers, Financial Planners and Clients
Report directly to the Head of Trust

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Candidate should possess the TEP designation; bachelors degree:

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For more information on each position, please visit our website page
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PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JULY 2 2009

THE TRIBUNE



[Ee rr oar 00S: ee ree ee
Airline fears over 24% rise in landing fee

FROM page 1B

years, with increasing costs per
barrel of oil driving travel costs
higher and higher.

Mr Rappel said increased
fees have always been a deter-
rent to air travel, as they often
translate into higher costs for
the travelling public. The cost of
airline tickets on some discount
websites is only marginally high-






er than the taxes and fees
attached to the final purchase.

This, he said, makes it diffi-
cult for airlines to incentivise
travel and remain competitive.

Mr Rappel said there is an
air of “astonishment” industry-
wide when there are increases
in fees, and suggested that it
was no surprise when airlines
opposed such changes.

NAD has proposed a 23.6

KS

Colinalmperial

To Our Valued Clients

Please note that all offices of
Colinalmperial will be CLOSED on
Friday 3 July 2009
for the company’s
Annual Employee Fun Day.




















Our Pay Station at 21 Collins Avenue will
offer extended weekend hours on
Saturday 4 July from 8:30am to 4pm
for your convenience.

percent increase to their landing
fees and a 6.1 per cent to
increase to aircraft loading
bridge fees, terminal fees and
aircraft parking fees.

For one Bahamas-owned air-
line, this translates into an
added $13 on the $51 landing
fee for their 19-seater aircraft.

According to a representa-
tive of that airline, who wished
to remain anonymous, landing
fees are not reflected in the cost
of tickets. However, that rep-
resentative said any increase in
fees is inevitably “going to affect
us and it has to be passed on to
the passengers”.

Mr Rappel said NAD men-
tioned the impending increas-
es to LPIA airlines. However, it
appears they were not involved
in a consultative capacity, as
several managers at smaller air-
lines seemed not to know of the
changes.

“We have been in discussions
with them about various
increased and fees that they are
proposing to go into,” said Mr
Rappel.

“T will reserve commenting
on that (NAD conferring with
airlines on fee increases)
because they briefly mentioned

it.”

NAD has argued that the fees
are necessary for maintaining
its “financial covenants”, but
contended that LPIA’s rates
after the increases remain com-
petitive and less than the
Caribbean average.

Increases

“The gradual increases con-
tained within the financial mod-
el are necessary for the Nassau
Airport Development Compa-
ny to meet its operational needs
and the financial covenants of
the Phase 2, stage 1 financing,”
said the online NAD release.

If the fee increases, which
combine the 2010 and deferred
2009 rises, do not take place,
NAD said it risked breaching
is banking covenants for the
$265 million financing.

“In accordance with its
financing obligations ,the Nas-
sau Airport Development Com-
pany must maintain a debt ser-
vice coverage ratio (DSCR) of
not less than 1.3 to 1. The aver-
age DSCR ratio for the 10 year
period of 2011 to 2020 is cur-
rently projected at 1.48 to 1,”
NAD said.

“The financial model includes
the proposed fees and charges
increases, in addition to increas-
es planned for 2011, 2012 and
2013, followed by annual con-
sumer price index [inflation]
type increases.

*The proposed fees and
charges increases include the
deferred 2009 rate increases
adjusted by the planned 2010
rate increase. More specifically
,the deferred increases planned
for 2009, which were to be 20
per cent for landing fees and 3
per cent for the other fees, must
be applied prior to the 2010 rate
increase of 3 per cent. Thus in
determining the proposed rate
increase, the 2009 rate increase
is multiplied by the 2010 rate
increase and the result is added
to the 2010 rate increase.”

Mr Rappel said the bench-
marking done by NAD based
on airports in the region was
being scrutinised by several air-

lines.

“A group of airlines have dis-
cussed the premise on which
these assumptions were made,”
he said. “The Bahamas econo-
my is not the same as other
Caribbean islands.”

NAD’s benchmarking was
based on a Boeing 737 700 with
a passenger load factor of 75
per cent (102 passengers) and
90-minute turnaround time that
included use of a jet bridge for
fuel loading.

“Excluding government tax-
es, LPIA’s costs are currently
$29.58, and with the recom-
mended increase become $30.03
per passenger, an increase of
1.5 per cent. The average cost of
the Caribbean airports present-
ed in the graph, excluding
LPIA, is $35.39 per passenger.
LPIA’s recommended rates are
very competitive at $5.36 or 15
per cent less than the Caribbean
average,” NAD said.

NOTICE

OF

ZONICAL HILL LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 30th day of June, 2009.
Credit Suisse Limited of Bahamas Finacial Centre,
Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, The Bahamas has
been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Thank you.

Employment Opportunity

Senior Accounts Assistant

We seek to employ a talented, innovative, leader with a
passion for success, the ability to initiate progress, an
aptitude for Accounting and a desire to succeed.

Skill Requirements

Possess strong foundation of accounting practices and
procedures

Excellent oral and communication skills

Excellent motivation & coaching skills

Ability to operate and familiarity with POS systems
Strong ability to drive team sales

Proficient in Microsoft Office, GL and Accounting
applications

strong multitasking ability

Possess excellent planning, organizational and
implementation skills

Strong leadership & managerial skills

Strong internet skills i.e, Emailing, group messaging
and research

Ability to execute priority based workload

Ability to exert initiative

Recording, summarizing, analyzing, verifying and
reporting of results of financial transactions

Minimum Experience Requirements

.

.

Tertiary level - with degree in related field;

Accounts executive with at least 4 years experience in
Accounting ;

At least three years experience in supervisory post;
Strong knowledge and application of MS Microsoft Suite

APPLY VIA EMAIL TO:

sraccountassistant2009@gmail.com

GOLD EE

rerio Decor——

MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL
HEALTH SERVICES

GOVERNMENT NOTICE
INVITATION FOR TENDERS

The Government of The Bahamas is inviting tenders for
the supply of proposal for the design of sanitary landfill
cell #2 off Tonique Williams Darling Highway.

Interested parties may obtain further information including
eligibility to participate and may collect the bidding
document upon payment of a non refundable fee of fifty
dollars ($50.00) as of June 22nd 2009 from:

The Department of Environmental Health Services
Farrington Road

Nassau, The Bahamas

P. O. Box SS-19048

Telephone No. (242) 322-8037, Facsimile No. (242) 322-
8073 between the hours of 9:00am and 5:00pm Monday
to Friday.

The method of payment will be certified cheque of cash.
Tenders are to be submitted in triplicate (3) in sealed
envelope (s) addressed to:

The Tenders Board

c/o The Financial Secretary
Ministry of Finance

Cecil V. Wallace Whitfield Centre
P.O. Box N-3017

Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

No later than July 3rd 2009.

Tenders will be open at 10am on July 7th, 2009 at the
office of the Tenders Board, Ministry of Finance.

The government reserves the right to reject any or all
Tenders.

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GN-878



MINISTRY OF FINANCE
TREASURY DEPARTMENT

PUBLIC NOTICE

The Treasurer of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas advises
all Pensioners, Parliamentary, Judicial, Official, World War
1 Veterans & Widows, Bahamas Widows & Orphans and
Re-employed, whose pension payments are paid directly into
their bank accounts to verify during the July, 2009 verification
exercise.

Pensioners are required to visit the Pension Section of the
Treasury Department situated on the ground floor of the
British American Insurance House,Marlborough St and Navy
Lion Road, Nassau, during the hours of 9am and 4pm
weekdays or the C. R, Walker Senior High School, School
Lane, off Blue Hill Road and Market Street during the hours
of 10am and 3pm weekdays for the month of July only,
bringing with them a form of identification such as Passport,
Voters Card, National Insurance Card or Drivers’ licence.

Pensioners submitting Life and Payment Certificates as
verification must ensure that the certificate is completed, duly
signed by one of the persons designated on the said form and
that the signed date falls within the designated period.

Failing to present oneself or the appropriate Life and Payment
Certificate for verification, will result in the disruption of
payments directly into their bank account, for the month of
December, 2009 and thereafter until verified.

The following Life and Payment Certificates are available at
the Treasury Department, Nassau and Freeport, and at Family
Island Administration offices:

¢ Parliamentary Pension Life & Payment Certificate - for
retired Parliamentarians.

* Official Pension (Judicial) Life & Payment Certificate -
for retired Judges.

* Official Pension Life & Payment Certificate - for retired
Public Officers.

* World War 1 Veterans and Widows Life & Payment
Certificate - for Veterans & Widows of World War 1.

* Bahamas Widows’ & Orphans’ Pension Fund Certificate
- for Widows’ & Orphans’.

Pensioners residing within The Bahamas should note that the
submission of Life and Payment certificates on a monthly
basis is no longer required. However, all pensioners are
expected to verify during January and July of each year to
avoid any inconvenience.

For further details please contact the Pension Section,
Treasury Department, at telephone numbers (242) 302-
0539, 302-0565 or 302-0524. Life and Payment Certificates
may be forwarded via facsimile to (242) 323-1459.







THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 2 2009, PAGE 5B



a = =~
Financial sector ‘can grow’ to 25% of GDP

FROM page 1B

could grow the direct GDP con-
tribution made by the financial
services sector to around 25 per
cent of GDP, and the indirect
contribution would grow in pro-
portion to that.

“T think there would be an
impact on jobs, and I don’t only
mean jobs in the financial ser-
vices industry, because there is
a spin-off effect.”

As aresult, Mr Moree said it
was the perfect time for the
Government and its agencies to
work with the Bahamas Finan-
cial Services Board (BFSB) and
other industry associations on
“developing a national plan that
focuses on this sector with a
concerted view to not only
maintain the industry, but how
it can be developed and expand-
ed given the realities of the mar-
ketplace that we are facing”.

Describing this as “a big
task”, the McKinney, Bancroft
& Hughes senior partner added:
“It’s not business as usual. It’s
not more of the same and the
status quo.”

It involved “re-examining the
business model of this jurisdic-
tion, looking at the realities of
the market, and come up with a
new business plan and model
that facilitates the expansion of
the industry”.

And Mr Moree told Tribune
Business: “If we got it right, I
think the rewards would be very
significant for this country. Con-
versely, if we do not get it right,
it could be very difficult for us
going forward. That’s the other
side of the same coin.

“This effort requires high pri-
ority, because it has such gen-
erous and major rewards for the
country. If we get it right, it will
pay enormous dividends, not

just for that sole sector but the
whole society, right the way
through the whole economy,
because of the impact financial
services has on the whole econ-
omy.”

The Central Bank reported
on Tuesday that Bahamians
working in the financial services
industry saw an average 6.2 per
cent increase in take-home pay
during 2008 despite a slight

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT

decline in expatriate employ-
ees’ salaries, as the industry
bucked the recessionary trend
with a modest expansion in its
economic contribution.

The Central Bank survey
found that stripping out bonus-
es, the Bahamian financial
industry’s average base salary
rose by 4.6 per cent to $50,488
in 2008, well ahead of the pre-
vious year’s 0.7 per cent

2008
CLE quill 65

Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER of the Quicting Tithes Act, 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Petthon of Mertland Tumauest

AND

increase and above the 1.1 per
cent average rise enjoyed
between 2003-2007.

The survey again highlight-
ed the financial services indus-
try’s importance to the Bahami-
an economy, especially in terms
of providing top-end, high-
salaried jobs. The sector was
estimated to have paid out $521
million in total salaries, includ-
ing bonuses, during 2008, a 7.6

per cent increase upon the pre-
vious year’s $484.4 million total.
Those salaries generate a rel-
atively high disposable income
level for Bahamian financial
services employees, which in
turn translates into a purchasing
and spending power that cre-
ates jobs and business in other
industries, in addition to boost-
ing the velocity of money cir-
culation in this economy.

Employment Opportunity

Sales Manager

We are in search of a talented, innovative, charismatic
and creative leader with a passion for success, an
aptitude for sales and the ability to initiate progress.

Skill Requirements
Excellent oral and communication skills
Excellent motivation, training, and coaching skills
Ability to operate POS systems.
Strang ability to drive team sales
Proficient in Microsoft Office applications
Strang multitasking ability

Possess excellent planning, organizational and
implementation skills

Strong leadership & management skills

Strang internet skills i.e, Emailing, group messaging
and research

Ability to execute priority based workload
Ability to exert initiative

———— — See Serer IM THE MATTER of a picee, parcel or lot of land containing
ENERGY SAVING 41,468 Sq. ft., Deadman’s Cay, Long Island, Bahamas

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* Tankless Water coo

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NOTICE

TAKE NOTICE that MERTLAND TURNQUEST of
Deadman'’s Cay, Long Island has filed a petition pursuant to the
Quieting Tithes Act, 1959 claiming tithe over all that piece parcel
or bot of land that ts a portion of an area known as the Tumaquest
Estate and contaming 41.468 Sq. tt. near Deadman’s Cay, Long
Island

FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that copies of the plan may be

inpected dung nonnal office hours at:

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street and Bank
Lane, Nassau, Bahamas:
The Notice Board of the local Administrator's Office, Simm’s
Long Island: amd

(c) The Chambers of the Petitioner's athomey, Calkenders & Co,
One Millars Court in the City ot Nassau

Minimum Experience & Job Requirements
Tertiary level - with degree in related field;

Sales executive with at least ten years experience in
sales and marketing:

At least three years experience in supervisory post;
Strong knowledge and application of MS Microsoft
Suite

For more information or survey
Email: energysavingsconsultants @hotmail.com

Contact 326-6121

NOTICE is hereby given that any persons having dower or right
to dower or an adverse claim of a claim not recornised in the
Petition shall before the 4th day of August, A.D. 2009 file with
the Supreme Court and serve on the undersigned a statement of
his or her claim in the prescribed form, verified by an affidavit to
be fled therewith. Failure of any such person to file and serve
statement of his claim on or before the sad 4th day of August,
ALD, 2009 wall operate as a bar to such claim

Montrose Avenue

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/QUI/NO.00164

APPLY VIA EMAIL TO:

DATED the 10th day of March, : .
salesmanageropportunity2009@gmail.com

20049
CALLENDERS & CO.,
Ome Millar's Court
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Ms. Courmey Pearce
Telephone: 322-2511
Counsel & Attormey tor the Petitroner

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land
comprising the Eastern portion of Lot Number Twenty-One (21)
containing 26,120 square feet and originally granted to Crispin
Benjamin and being Crown Grant A4-63 situate Two thousand feet
east of Gladstone Road in the Gladstone Road Crown Allotments in
the Western District of the Island of New Providence












IN THE MATTER OF THE Quieting Title Act, 1959

LOGISTIC

CENTRE

AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE Petition of
JONATHAN LIVINGSTON SANDS

NOTICE

he Petition of JONATHAN LIVINGSTON SANDS of Cambridge
Drive, South Beach in the Southern District of the Island of New
Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, in respect of:-

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land comprising the Eastern
portion of Lot Number Twenty-One (21) containing 26,120 square
eet and originally granted to Crispin Benjamin and being Crown
Grant A4-63 situate Two thousand feet east of Gladstone Road in
he Gladstone Road Crown Allotments in the Western District of the
sland of New Providence which said piece parcel or lot of land
is bounded NORTHWARDLY by Lot Number Twenty-Two (22)
originally granted to Francis A. Garraway and running thereon Five
hundred and Seventy-Seven and Eighty-Five hundredths (577.85)
eet EASTWARDLY by Lot Number Twenty-Six (26) originally
granted to Rhonda Louis Wallace Wildgoose and running thereon
Six NUNdred and Thirty-Four and Sixty hundredths (634.60) feet
SOUTHWARDLY by a Thirty (30) feet wide Road Reservation
nown as and called “Rocky Pine Road” separating it from Lot
umber Twenty (20) originally granted to Herbert Cleveland
Walkine and running thereon Five hundred and Seventy-Seven
and Eighty-Five hundredths (577.85) feet and SOUTHWARDLY
by the Western Portion of Lot Number Twenty-One (21) originally
granted to Crispin Benjamin and running thereon Six hundred and
Thirty-Four and Sixty hundredths (634.60) feet; which said piece
parcel or lot of land has such position shape marks and dimensions
as are more particularly described and delineated on the diagram
or plan attached hereto and thereon coloured GREEN





SERVICES
AVAILABLE

* IMPORTERS

ie en ee),
FOR SAFE BUSINESS STORAGE

JONATHAN LIVINGSTON SANDS, claims to be the beneficial
owner in fee simple in possession of the parcel of land hereinbefore
described and such ownership arise by virtue of possession of the
said land.

bey Es tc) rej ats TI
Hurricane Proof storage
facility offering 56 units
(they can also be
eM] |] 8) =O)
fol 1A ea toe ta ore
the latest concepts for
Tet Te
storage for a vanety of
at i semen ao

Centrally located in a
= | ees ea

The goal is to minimize
ees OMe Le elm
aes een eee |
a secure shelter that can
withstand extreme
weather ee] Te eo
Fenced and secured area
with 24 hour surveillance.
Each unit provides 1,200
cubic yards of usable
ar eae Le 8 LT
Te moet)

* DISTRIBUTORS

Copies of the filled plan may be inspected during normal office
hours at:- * OFFICE SPACE
The Registry of the Supreme Court, Anasbacher House, East Street.

Nassau, Bahamas;

The Chambers of Richard L. Boodle & Co., 3% Floor, Columbus * FOOD STORAGE eis
House, East & Shirley Streets, Nassau, Bahamas ie
Notice is hereby given to any person(s) wishing to make a claim
shall do so by filing an Adverse Claim in the Supreme Court and
serving such Statement on the Petitioners or his Attorneys by the
30!" day after the last day on which on which this Notice appears
in the daily papers. Failure by any person to file and serve a
statement of such claim on or before the said date will operate as
a bar to such claim.

« DISASTER
RECOVERYFACILITY

Richard L, Boodle & Ca.
RICHARD L. BOODLE & CO.
Counsels €» Atterneys-At-Law
Chambers,
3"¢ Floor, Columbus House
East & Shirley Street

ee te ee a Lett

art ee) Eee

OS Pe ed el Pe

Attorneys for the Petitioner





THE TRIBUNE

THE Certified Financial
Analyst (CFA) Society of the
Bahamas has elected Christo-
pher Dorsett, of Citigroup Cor-
porate and Investment Bank,
to serve as president of the non-
profit professional society for
financial advisors.

Sonia Beneby, CFA, of Sco-
tiaTrust Bahamas will serve as
vice-president. Each will serve a
one-year term, which officially
begins on July 1, 2009.

The Certified Financial Ana-
lyst Society of the Bahamas
(CFASB) elected six other
members to its Board for one-
year terms. The additional
CFASB leaders are:

ASB treasurer: Karen Pin-
der, CFA, CATA, EFG Bank
& Trust (Bahamas).

THURSDAY, JULY 2 2009, PAGE 7B

Financial analysts
elect new Board

CFASB secretary: Andrew
Strachan, Clariden Leu.

CFASB programme chair:
Velma Miller, CFA, Royal
Fidelity Merchant Bank &
Trust.

CFASB education chair:
Jeremy Dyck, CFA, LOM
Securities (Bahamas).

CFASB membership chair:
Fazillah Pirani, CFA, Scotia
Capital

CFASB scholarship chair:
Alberto Lopez, CFA, Foyil
Asset Management.

Warren Pustam, CFA, CPA,
EverKey Global Partners, was
appointed as CFASB pro-
gramme co-chair.

“T look forward to working
with the other members of our
board, CFA Institute, and other

GROWING MULTI-MEDIA & TRANSPORTATION
COMPANY REQUIRES

FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

Rapidly growing company is inviting applications for the
position of “Financial Controller”. Applicants should have
a Bachelors Degree in Accounting and a CPA, ACCA, CA
qualification or any other qualification recognized by the
Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants.

Successful candidate should:
have at least 4 years experience in an established

accounting firm

be able to work as a part of a team
be able to prepare budgets and financial reports

liaise with banking officers

be able to communicate effectively with all levels

of management

be proficient in meeting and keeping all deadlines
have proficient knowledge of QuickBooks

For a confidential interview please mail resume to:
c/o Financial Controller,
P O Box N 4271, Nassau, N. P., The Bahamas
or email financialcontrollerposition@yahoo.com

BSi

local societies,” said Mr Dorsett.

“All of the diverse talent in
the CFASB’s membership will
help to carry out our chief man-
date - advancing the investment
profession by establishing and
maintaining the highest stan-
dards of professional excellence
and integrity.”

Ms Beneby added: “As CFA
Institute and its member soci-
eties and chapters around the
globe continue to set the stan-
dards for excellence in the
investment management indus-
try around the world, I am
eager to work closely with
Christopher Dorsett and the
CFA Institute to continue to
elevate our commitment to
strong ethics, continuing edu-
cation and consummate profes-
sionalism.”

The CFASB, with a current
membership of 58 profession-
als, including 47 CFA charter
holders, is affiliated to the CFA
Institute. CFA Institute is the
global, non-profit professional
association that administers the
Chartered Financial Analyst
curriculum and examination
programme worldwide.

CFASB’s mission is to
advance the interests of the
investment community and to
maintain the highest standards
of professional excellence and
integrity.

The CFASB board of direc-
tors is composed of nine invest-
ment professionals, all of whom
are elected by the members of
the CFASB for a one-year term.

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

BS! OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BS| Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established
international private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is
presently accepting applications for:

HEAD OF PRIVATE BANKING

Applicants for the position of Head of Private Banking must have at least 20
years experience in the offshore banking sector, have extensive knowledge of
intemational financial products and ability to lead and partner with team
members. Applicants must also be confident regarding customer relations with
excellent capability to generate New Maney and have thorough knowledge of
local legislation, regulatory & staiutory matters as well as international banking
practices. Fluency in Italian & French ss absolutely required.

Personal qualities -

Strong management skills

Leadership skills

Excellent communication skills

Goal-onented, self-motivated and able to motivate team members
Positive attitude and outlook

Cammitment to Quality and service excellence

Excellant acquisitian skills

Flexibility in office hours and hands-on aporoach when necessary
Must be able to work under pressure

Available to travel on a frequent bass

Responsibillies :-

Manage and lead Private Banking Team

Meet target in terms of Profitability and Acquisition of Net New Money
Meet deadlines on timely basis

Cantribute to the management of the Bank as senior management officer
Faster and maintain communication with intamal/external banking
professionals

Acquire new clients in target markets

Service & advee allocated customers

submit their

Interested persons with should

resume/curriculum vitae to:-

such qualifications

Human Resources Manager
BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre
P.O. Box N-7130
Nassau, Bahamas.
Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kern@bsibank.com
(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted





PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, JULY 2 2009



THE TRIBUNE

For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight
on Mondays



ESSAY COMPETITION

TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK

The Department of Public Service will host an Essay
Competition as one of the activities for the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week. The Competition is open to Junior
and Senior Students in New Providence.

Additionally, this year, a speech competition will be
for schools in the Northern & Southern Bahamas,
respectively. Students interested in participating in the
Essay Competition should write a 250 - 300 words (Junior
High), and 450 - 500 words (Senior High), essay on the
topic: “ The Public Service-Striving for Excellence in
Customer Service.”

The deadlines for entries, which should be referred
to the attention of Mrs. Antoinette Thompson, Deputy
Permanent Secretary, Department of Public Service, is
Friday 24th July, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 Computer System will be awarded to
the winner each category. The first runners-up for both the
Essay and Speech Competition in the Junior & Senior High
School category, will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.

The winners will be announced during the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week Awards Ceremony scheduled for
Saturday 10th October 2009.

Students interested in the Speech Competition for the
Northern and Southern Bahamas should contact their
Language Arts Teacher.



FROM page 1B

in early 2010”, and was encour-
aged that the Government was
putting in the ‘building blocks’
for tourism’s growth by actions
such as eliminating the Customs
and Immigration overtime
charges levied on airlines flying
into Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport (LPIA).

While some initial excitement
had been generated by the fact
April 2009 air arrivals to Nas-
sau/Paradise Island were only
down by 0.4 per cent or less
than 1,500 persons year-over-
year, and were off 5 per cent
for the Bahamas as a whole, the
comparisons were somewhat
misleading. This was because
Easter, traditionally a peak trav-
el period for the Bahamian
tourism industry, fell in March
during 2008, not April.

But Mr Sands said yesterday:
“There still remain signs of
some difficult times throughout
the summer. We continue to see
some softness in the market,
although the level of fall-off
month-over-month seems to be
decreasing.

“But that’s not a true indica-
tion things are on the rebound.
Not at all. The hotel industry
still faces a difficult remainder
of 2009, and looks forward to
some stabilisation in 2010, mov-
ing forward.”

The BHA president said it
“remains to be seen” whether
the numerous discounts hotels
are offering this summer on
room rates and other charges
would be enough to counter the
single greatest factor impacting
the Bahamian tourism industry,
namely US consumer confi-
dence of lack of it.

Chester Bonefish Lodge

for reservations:
Telapkones 242) 356-3418

Cell-242-557-9597
berylferguson@yaboo.cons

Welcomes you to the

Annual Acklins Home Coming & Regatta

Weekend July 30th - August 3rd

Features Hotel Packages

Laundry) Room
Flat Screen Television

Microwave®™

Refrigerator.

Hair Dryerll
Toaster

While the downward trend
impacting rates was persisting,
Mr Sands told Tribune Busi-
ness: “What is significant is that
the fall-off in air arrivals from
our primary market, Florida,
seems to have decreased, so the
percentage fall-off every month
seems to be less, especially from
Florida.

“But when you add up the
aggregate revenues from the
major hotels, they’re still; in the
plus-20 per cent negative posi-
tion year-over-year. We still
have a big hold to dig ourselves
out of this year.”

Mr Sands said the more than
20 per cent decline in year-over-
year revenue comparatives was
caused by a mixture of dis-
counted rates and lower occu-
pancy levels.

“Unfortunately, operating
expenses are not decreasing at
that level, so the erosion of fore-
cast income is great for many
properties,” he said. “I’m
assured that companies are
doing their best to re-engineer
themselves to manage expenses
in a variety of ways to mitigate
against that level of fall-off, but
they’re not able to do that for
all concerned.

“It’s still a very difficult trad-
ing period, and we need to get
through the rest of the year
without any major casualties,
and then take advantage of
opportunities that present them-
selves in 2010.”

On a more optimistic note,
the BHA president added that
the Government and private
sector were continuing to work
on expanding airlift - and the
number of airlines serving the
Bahamas - as this would
increase the destination’s attrac-
tiveness.

Referring to the Customs and
Immigration overtime charges
that incoming airlines had been
forced to pay at Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport
(LPIA), Mr Sands told Tribune
Business: “That is a fundamen-
tal element that has been elim-
inated. That is greatly going to
assist us in 2010.”

The Government, and its
minister of tourism and avia-

Share
your

No hotel ‘rebound despite
decrease in air arrivals fall-off

tion, had secured a “victory in
eliminating this impediment to
the cost of air travel”, some-
thing that would “lay a solid
foundation for improvements,
certainly in 2010”.

Asked about the overtime
charges’ negative impact on air-
lift into New Providence and
other Bahamian destinations,
Mr Sands said: “When you see

The Public is hereby advised that |, PAUL OLOAM
BOLLE of 707 Cottonwood, Pinewood Gardens in the
Southern District of the Iskand of New Providence, intend
to change my name to PAUL ALLISION ROLLE. If there
are any obyections to this change of name by Deed Pall,
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, AO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas, no later than
thirty (20) days after the date of publication of this notice.

an air fare costing ‘x’ dollars,

that amount or a significant part
of it, it makes the cost of air

ly expensive.

“And when you have com-
peting destinations that can be
accessed at lower air fare costs,
it puts us in a very negative
competitive position.”

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SERG SLOPES LTD.

—

rd
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of SERG SLOPES LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
QUANTUM PLACE INC.

——

ri

and taxes and levies are double

travel to the Bahamas extreme-

lron, Ironing Board Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
Two Queen Beds in cach room
Satellite television
i Air-conditioning
Free Airport Transfers

Restaurant on Property

news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Fie’ 3

Tce CaM See TEOMA Uae a [ess

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of QUANTUM PLACE INC. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Planning yousrip hos'mevet hee easier with
(Chester Bonatish Lodge vecotion packoges.

Celebrate our special offer
Stay 7 nights
get the 1 night FREE

Complimentary bahroom amenities including:
soap, Shampoo, conditioner, lotion

Packages as low a5 $135.00 per night

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



NOTICE

THE BAHAMAS MORTGAGE CORPORATION
TENDER FOR GROUP HAZARD INSURANCE

The Bahamas Mortgage Corporation is inviting proposals
from insurance companies for the provision of hazard
insurance coverage to contractors and homeowners of
properties mortgaged to the Corporation.

Everywhere Lu Bu yers Are!

1
.
tn
+
7.

Se

ead mi ial aa

os
2

The proposal should be for a three year period 1st
September, 2009 to 31st August, 2012.

Companies interested in submitting a proposal may collect
an information package from The Bahamas Mortgage
Corporation’s Head Office, Russell Road, Oakes Field,
Nassau, Bahamas.

The deadline for collection of the information package is
Friday, July 09, 2009 no later than 4:00 p.m.





THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, JULY 2 2009, PAGE 9B



Bahamas Waste profits

‘about 50% higher’
than budgeted

FROM page 1B

house. Staff attrition had also
factored into the mix, with
departing employees not
replaced and existing salaries
maintained at the same level
across the board.

Meanwhile, Ms Harper said
Bahamas Waste expected to
start cardboard recycling from
its purpose-built facility during
the current 2009 third quarter,
which lasts from July to Sep-
tember.

The main customers (suppli-
ers of waste cardboard) will be
the likes of Bahamian whole-
salers and liquor stores, those
firms possessing “the richer
cardboard that does not have
the food waste”.

And with government
approval having been recently
received, Ms Harper said

Bahamas Waste was now
“sourcing equipment” for its
$500,000 biodiesel facility.

“We are preparing the land,
and I think that within another
eight weeks we will see some
construction going on in terms
of the basic structure to house
that operation,” Ms Harper told
Tribune Business.

Produced

Bahamas Waste had been
told by the Government that
any biodiesel it produced was
for its own internal uses only,
and the company anticipated
that the benefits from using it as
a fuel source for its vehicle fleet
and in other parts of its opera-
tions would increase in line with
fuel price rises.

“We’re just now generating
a client base, touching base with
waste oil customers,” Ms Harp-

er said. “We had some people
who jumped ahead of us with-
out waiting for government
approval. We’ve been told some
of the cruise ships have made
arrangements with other coun-
tries. We’re starting from
scratch with that, so we’re hop-
ing some of the resources are
still there.”

Bahamas Waste was also able
to reduce its accounts receiv-
able during the 2009 first quar-
ter, bringing them down to
$1.471 million from $1.496 mil-
lion at 2008 year-end.

Ms Harper attributed this to

the fact that Bahamas Waste
had now stopped collecting
from customers once accounts
were 60 days past due, as
opposed to the previous 90-day
limit.

Majority

The vast majority of Bahamas
Waste’s customers are busi-
nesses and commercial estab-
lishments, with residential waste
and garbage collections largely
confined to gated communities
and those who did not want the
government service.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BARRY PACKINGTON
of TREASURE COVE, P.O. BOX FH-14010, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 2" day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Nassau Airport

Development Gom pany

Proposed Modification to Airport
Fees and Charges Notice

The Nassau Airport Development Company is
proposing a modification of Fees and Charges,
effective January 1, 2010, pursuant to article 4 of
the Airport Authority (Fees and Charges) Regulations, 2009.

The proposed increase is to aircraft landing
fees, terminal fees, aircraft bridge fees and
aircraft parking charges only. Car parking
rates and the Passenger Facility Charge are
not impacted by the proposed modification.

For more information or to comment on the
proposed modification please visit our website
at www.nas.bs.

St. Andrew’s School Foundation

Development Officer

The Foundation is committed to the Mission of St. Andrew's
School through its financial support of teachers, scholarship
sludents and building projects. The Foundation is presently
secking a person bo lead its Office af Dev clapment.

The Development Officer, a full-time position, reports to
the St. Andrew's School Foundation and will:

be responsible for designing and overseeing fundraising
campaiens in support of the Foundation’s strategic coals:

develop marketing strategies and materials for public
relations and advertising:

promote relationships between the School and various
organizations, including the St. Andrew's Alum and
Friends Association:

oversee the day today administrator of inlemational
charities

oe gurl
understanding of the School's history and culture: be a goal-

The successful candidate will possess knowledge

dnven individual with strong organizational and social skills:

possess a minimum of a Bachelor's Degree; and be
expericnced in fundraising.

Interested candidates should send their CV and a letter of
Interest tc:

Development Officer Position
St. Andrew's School Foundation
FO. Box W-4695
Nassau, Bahamas

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MAGDALENA DELVA
of FRITZ LANE, P.O. Box GT-2738, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 25" day of June, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

WANTED

Delivery Person/Warehouse Clerk

A medical supplies company is seeking the
services of an individual primarily to make
deliveries, run errands, and be responsible
for the maintenance and control of the
company warehouse and physical
environment.

The successful candidate should be
responsible, honest, punctual, have good
communication skills, must interact well
with customers and staff, be a team player,
have good time management skills and the
ability to pnoritize and accomplish tasks.
The successful candidate must possess a
valid driver's license.

Interested persons may fax their resume to
328-5052, email to:
bmhumanresources@ gmail.com or
mail to P.O. Box -1483,

Nassau, Bahamas

LEGAL MOTHCE

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act,

MAXALEX CORPORATION
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice t hereby given that in accordance with Secthon 1357/4)
of the International Business Companies Act. (No. 45 of
2000), MAXALEX CORPORATION is in dissolution.

The date of commencement of the dissolution is 24h June,
aaa
AULA

R. Clive. Moore (Liquidator)
Octogone Fund Management Limited
P.O. Box SP-63157
No. 3 Offices at Old Fort Bay
Western Road
Nast, Bahamas

LEGAL SOTHOE

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act,

COITXEM LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice ts hereby given that in accordance with sectron 1357/4)
of the Internatronal Business Companies Act. (No. 45 of
2000), COMEM LTD. is in dissolution.

The date of commencement of the dissolution is 26th June,
eee
ALLS
ie 1

RK. Clive, Moore (Liquidator)
Octogone Fund Management Limited
P.O. Box SP-63157
No. 3 Offices at Old Fort Bay
Western Road
Nassau, Bahamas

LEGAL KOTICE

NOTICE

TARVILLE COMMERCIAL CORP.
In Voluntary Liquidation


























Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
1 38/4) of the International Business Companies Act. 2000),
TARVILLE COMMERCIAL CORP. ts in dissolution
as of June 29, 2009,

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Recent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

OF

CHINCHA LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 30th day of June, 2009.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Finacial
Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, The Baha-
mas has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE

OF

SHINE HILL LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 30th day of June, 2009.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Finacial
Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, The Baha-
mas has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

LEGAL MOTHER

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act.

GELSOMINA LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137(4) of the Intemational Business Companies Act. (No
45 of 2000), GELSOMINA LTD. is in dissolution.

The date of commencement of the dissolution is 26th June,
“hil
eg

R. Clive, Moore (Liquidator)
Octegone Fund Management Limited
P.O. Box SP-63157
No. 3 Offices at Old Fort Bay
Western Road
Nasian, Bahamas

LEGAL SOTHOE

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act,

GUSE LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice ts hereby given that in accordance with Sectron 137/44)
of the Internatronal Business Companies Act. (No. 45 of
2000), GUSE LTD. is in dissolution.

The date of commencement of the dissolution is 26th June,
teri
ALILS
rs 1

R. Clive, Moore (Liquidator)
Octegone Fund Management Limited
P.O. Bow SP-63157
No. 3 Offices at Old Fort Bay
Western Road
Nassau, Babams



PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, JULY 2 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Legal Notice

NOTICE
MOONBEAM VENTURES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 23rd day of June 2009. The Liquidator

is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
CLEAR GLASS
HOLDINGS LTD.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CLEAR GLASS HOLDINGS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SEA OF CORAL INC.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of SEA OF CORAL INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ROYAL DFIDELITY

Money at Work

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BB & BB HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 23rd day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
MAYASOMARIK INC.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of MAYASOMARIK INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DELTA JUNCTION LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

KS

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

zai

C2Cy 1.3 NT A TL

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 29 JUNE 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,579.12 | CHG -0.27 | %CHG -0.02 | YTD -133.24 | YTD % -7.78
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.53 | YTD -5.43% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM [| TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit y
Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

6.94
0.63
3.15
2.14

6.94
0.63
3.15
2.37

2.74
5.50
1.27
1.32
7.50
10.00
10.35
4.95
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

2.74
5.64
3.32
1.77
7.76
10.97
10.38
5.09
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

10.97
10.38

10.50
10.00

EPS $
0.127
0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

Div $ P/E
10.9
11.1
28.4
N/M
40.4
43.1
8.1
11.0
13.5
27.6
7.4
18.5
34.1
13.1
15.3
N/M
8.6
13.5
11.0
55.6

Change Daily Vol. Yield
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.26
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

6.94
0.63
3.15
2.37

2.74
5.64
3.06
1.77
7.76

5.09
1.00
0.30
5.50

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

52wk-Hi _52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale

100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

Interest
7%
Prime + 1.75%
7%
Prime + 1.75%

Change
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Daily Vol. Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

52wk-Low
14.25
6.00
0.20

Bid $
7.92
4.00
0.35

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Ask $

8.42
6.25
0.40

EPS $
-0.041
0.000
0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E
N/M
N/M

256.6

Last Price Yield
14.60
6.00

0.35

Weekly Vol.

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

29.00
0.40

ABDAB
RND Holdings

30.13
0.45

31.59

0.55

29.00
0.55

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

52wk-Low
1.3124

NA V
1.3787

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund





2.8988 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.8988
1.4730 1.3940 CFAL Money Market Fund 1.4730
3.6090 3.1821 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.1821
12.9209 12.2702 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.9209
100.5606 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.5448
100.0000 93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund 93.1992
1.0000 1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.0000
19.5611 9.0775 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.2511
1.0578 1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0578
1.0364 1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0271
1.0554 1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.0554

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks.

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

YTD%

1.87
-1.40
2.74
6.01
2.40
-0.02
-3.33
0.00
1.72
2.13
-0.57
1.74



Last 12 Months Div $ Yield % NAV Date



4.83 31-May-09
-3.35 31-May-09
5.66 19-Jun-09
-13.90 30-Apr-09
5.79 31-May-09
0.54 31-Mar-09
-6.76 31-Mar-09
0.00 31-Dec-07
4.12 30-Apr-09
5.78 31-May-09
2.71 31-May-09
5.54 31-May-09

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

DIVIDEND, from 1B

ment, it was important that
Abaco Markets be “prudent”
and build up its liquidity/cash
position - especially given the
current economic slowdown.

Emphasising that the compa-
ny’s position had not changed
from the one announced at the
annual general meeting (AGM)
for the year that ended on Jan-
uary 31, 2008, Mr Watchorn said
the Board and management
would review the dividend situ-
ation “
once the results for the fiscal
year ended January 31, 2010,
were in”.

“At this point in time, we will
wait until then,” Mr Watchorn
told Tribune Business. “I know
there is an expectation of divi-
dends, but people need to
[understand] that we incurred
significant losses over a four to
five-year period, repaid a sig-
nificant amount of debt, and the
company needs to be in a
healthy position before it can

resume dividend payments.

“We hope that will be at the
end of this financial year. By the
end of February, March, we will
know the results, and the Board
will sit down and make its deci-
sion as to whether we resume
dividend payments. You have
to build up your reserves before
you look at dividend payments
again.”

Mr Watchorn added: “We'll
be prudent and take into
account the economic factors
next year. We know our share-
holders need a return on their
investment, and they’ve not had
one for a number of years.

“We’re working to get back
to the full dividend. That’s a sign
of the company getting back to
full health.”

Given the relatively large
number of issued shares, some
15.3 million, Mr Watchorn said
the Board was likely to calcu-
late any dividend by determin-
ing the total sum it would be
prudent to return to investors,
rather than set a dividends per
share figure.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
AGENCY MANAGEMENT INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
FAIRHAVEN GROUP LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 23rd day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KEELER CORPORATION

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of KEELER CORPORATION has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
AMHERSTBURY LIMITED

—

#





Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section




138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of AMHERSTBURY LIMITED has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and









the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.









ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)










THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST
oN on

Partial sunshine. Partly sunny, a










lm
ORLANDO
High: 90° F/32° C
















Partly sunny, a Patchy clouds. Mostly sunny. Times of clouds and


























fie, Sh

UV rn NY



os2)3s6]o|shoh
LOW MODERATE HIGH V. HIGH EXT.







The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the





r Low: 74° F/23°C a t-storm in the p.m. t-storm possible. sun. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
@ Ht . High: 90° High: 89° High: 91° High: 92°
r High: 90° Low: 79° Low: 80° Low: 79° Low: 80° Low: 81° see EOE
TAMPA jf Cee Ue
High: 88° F/31°C ys [bar High _Ht.(ft.)_Low __Ht. (ft.
Low: 76° F/24°C mD r, ee ee es ae ee ee Today 4:39am. 2.2 10:33am. 0.2
ae @ - 7 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 5:15pm. 28 11:36pm. 0.3
Oe iy ee
' - :06 p.m. Bow
J met a Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Saturday 623am. 02 1227am. 03
{ r ABACO Temperate aero 6:54pm. 28 12:14pm. 0.2
- ago ° WOM, tunecaduaseaslacetnciesetecaduatel lccagsaeee ° ° 7-10 am. oy} Ti3am. 02
- yy aim - eile irc vi see eeeeeaeeeenens 81" F27° C Sunday 7:38 p.m. 28 1:01pm. 0.2
5 e : ormal high .... 88° F/31° C ee ss
- Py i. "a Normal low 75° F/24° C
a of @ WEST PALM BEACH a Last year's WIgh ...ccccsscsseeseuestee serrzo°c | NYT TIM UCI
4 os High: 88° F/31°C : Last year's lOW oo. eeeeeeeeeeeeeees 73° F/23° C aa i a a
a Low: 76° F/24° C i ~~ Precipitation =———————CsSSunrise....... ‘24am. Moonrise .... 4:20 p.m.
~~» a . a, As of 2 p.m. yesterday ....ccccscsssesssssseeeessseeees 0.00" Sunset....... 8:04 p.m. Moonset... 2:25 a.m.
Wall . FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date 7. Full Last New First
High: 87°F/31°C @ High: 88° F/31°C Normal year to date .......c.ccsecsecssssseseseeseeee 18.60" ag a ‘
Low: 77° F/25°C a. Low: 78° F/26° C c
> /. AccuWeather.com es
ee @ Forecasts and graphics provided by talc: ay
a ———- MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jul.7 = Jul. 15 00 Jul. 21 Jul. 28
a High: 88° F/31°C AW anc ao
ies Low: 78° F/26° C NASSAU melheg2’ F/aa'G
High: 90° F/32° Cc Low: 80 F/27 C
= Low: 79° F/26° C
ie i. @.
KEY WEST a CATISLAND
High: 88° F/31°C High: 87° F/31°C
Low: 80°F/27°G eye Low: 74° F/23°C
eG the
c Oo
aX acre € High Fac
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS .
highs and tonights's lows. High: 95° F/35° C ©.
Low: 82° F/28° C
ce
LONGISLAND
Low: 76° F/24°C
Today Friday Today Friday Today Friday i MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 92° F/33° C
FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FC FC FIC FC Me Low: 75° F/24° C
Albuquerque 92/33 67/19 t 90/32 67/19 t Indianapolis 76/24 58/14 pce 82/27 66/18 s Philadelphia 82/27 64/17 t 80/26 65/18 t
Anchorage 73/22 54/12 p 70/21 5412 ¢ Jacksonville 94/34 74/23 t 95/35 75/23 t Phoenix 106/41 86/30 t 104/40 85/29 t CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 92/33 66/18 s 90/32 68/20 pc Kansas City 83/28 68/20 t 84/28 67/19 t Pittsburgh 70/21 5613 t 73/22 58/14 t RAGGEDISLAND — Tigh:94°F/34"c
Atlantic City 78/25 64/17 t 83/28 64/17 t Las Vegas 100/37 79/26 t 104/40 84/28 pc Portland, OR 94/34 57/13 s 92/33 59/15 s High: 90° F/32° C Low: 77° F/25°C
Baltimore 83/28 62/16 t 82/27 64/17 t Little Rock 93/33 68/20 pce 93/83 72/22 pc Raleigh-Durham 90/32 65/18 t 89/31 65/18 s Low: 72°F/22°C i
Boston 72/22 6317 © 79/26 64/17 t Los Angeles 80/26 66/18 pc 80/26 64/17 pc St. Louis 82/27 67/19 pc 85/29 69/20 gs .
Buffalo 68/20 58/14 t 69/20 58/14 t Louisville 79/26 64/17 pce 85/29 67/19 s Salt Lake City 84/28 64/17 t 88/31 66/18 t GREATINAGUA
Charleston, SC 96/35 74/23 t 94/34 71/21 pc Memphis 92/33 72/22 pce 87/30 70/21 pc San Antonio 100/37 76/24 pce 98/86 77/25 s High: 94° F/34° C
Chicago 74/23 57/13 p 84/28 60/15 s Miami 88/31 78/25 t 90/32 77/25 t San Diego 75/23 68/20 pe 76/24 66/18 pc Low. 77°F/25°C
Cleveland 70/21 59/15 c 75/23 60/15 pc Minneapolis 78/25 62/16 pe 83/28 61/16 s San Francisco 78/25 57/143 pe 75/23 57/13 pe .
Dallas 100/37 76/24 s 100/37 79/26 pc Nashville 83/28 60/15 pce 87/30 65/18 pc Seattle 84/28 54/12 s 84/28 56/13 s
Denver 82/27 58/14 t 81/27 59/15 t New Orleans 95/35 79/26 t 96/35 77/25 t Tallahassee 97/36 75/23 t 95/35 74/23 t =F
Detroit 70/21 57/13 ¢ 81/27 62/16 pc New York 78/25 68/20 r 78/25 67/19 t Tampa 88/31 76/24 t 89/31 77/25 t
Honolulu 88/31 75/23 s 88/31 75/23 s Oklahoma City 98/36 71/21 pce 100/37 75/23 pc Tucson 96/35 77/25 t 97/36 79/26 t — Be
Houston 99/37 77/25 t 99/37 78/25 t Orlando 90/32 74/23 t 94/34 76/24 t Washington, DC 84/28 65/18 t 82/27 66/18 t








Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
88/31
83/28
86/30
838/31
59/15
91/32
86/30
81/27
100/37
80/26
838/31
84/28
82/27
66/18
86/30
93/33
57/13
101/38
91/32
72/22
90/32
79/26
82/27
80/26
68/20
86/30
85/29
66/18
90/32
81/27
90/32
106/41
86/30
85/29
57/13
90/32
72/22
838/31
95/35
91/32
70/21
104/40
72/22
72/22
78/25
80/26
99/37
82/27
90/32
82/27
78/25
106/41
86/30
89/31
65/18
88/31
61/16
85/29
65/18
81/27
81/27
64/17
93/33
79/26
66/18
91/32
75/23
87/30
85/29
70/21

ealil

Today

Low
F/C
78/25
61/16
55/12
73/22
52/11
79/26
77/25
71/21
70/21
75/23
69/20
64/17
73/22
45/7
65/18
68/20
46/7
73/22
84/28
45/7
76/24
71/21
69/20
62/16
55/12
68/20
60/15
56/13
72/22
55/12
81/27
79/26
71/21
59/15
33/3
78/25
59/15
61/16
64/17
77/25
55/12
75/23
64/17
55/12
60/15
51/10
79/26
61/16
66/18
59/15
68/20
79/26
66/18
81/27
32/0
73/22
44/6
73/22
55/12
66/18
59/15
46/7
77/25
70/21
59/15
67/19
58/14
71/21
63/17
49/9




Onrnntrnntrn

+A NH FR SFCD STAR N
= og=> =

pe

High
F/C
88/31
85/29
84/28
90/32
60/15
91/32
86/30
82/27
100/37
76/24
87/30
86/30
82/27
65/18
86/30
93/33
59/15
98/36
92/33
67/19
91/32
82/27
82/27
81/27
70/21
88/31
84/28
69/20
90/32
72/22
88/31
104/40
89/31
80/26
57/13
89/31
71/21
82/27
97/36
87/30
70/21
100/37
72/22
68/20
83/28
79/26
101/38
83/28
88/31
82/27
74/23
105/40
88/31
90/32
68/20
87/30
57/13
86/30
65/18
81/27
75/23
61/16
94/34
79/26
17/25
84/28
17/25
87/30
84/28
68/20

Friday

Low
F/C
77/25
63/17
54/12
73/22
51/10
77/25
77/25
71/21
74/23
76/24
69/20
64/17
72/22
45/7
61/16
64/17
51/10
75/23
83/28
46/7
74/23
71/21
68/20
64/17
55/12
68/20
63/17
53/11
73/22
48/8
81/27
78/25
71/21
60/15
37/2
78/25
ae
59/15
64/17
78/25
55/12
76/24
63/17
45/7
56/13
52/11
79/26
59/15
64/17
57/13
68/20
80/26
68/20
82/27
35/1
74/23
43/6
73/22
56/13
66/18
50/10
46/7
81/27
70/21
61/16
64/17
59/15
68/20
58/14
51/10

Ww

pc
sh
C
S
sh
sh

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace

THURSDAY, JULY 2np, 2009, PAGE 11B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

MARINE FORECAST










WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SE at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-15 Miles 82° F
Friday: SE at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-15 Miles 82° F
FREEPORT Today: SE at 10-15 Knots 2-3 Feet 5-15 Miles 81°F
Friday: SE at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
ABACO Today: SE at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
Friday: SE at 7-14 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

Showers
T-storms

Rain

* _*| Flurries
3] Snow

[v_Â¥] Ice



mas 7
Minneapolis

18/62

New-York|
78/68

(COOLER) <<
Lt

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

Stationary Mogul

Os (5) 10s 20s [30S]) 40s 50s 60s 70s sos [S0s///iG0S0/Aiie)

HURRICANE INSURANCE

“You
Away |

Or you can rest easy

that yo

New Providence
Tet: (242) I-55

co
way

e wind

an Be Blown
yA Hurric Sane

knowing

Nobody does it better.

have excellent insurance
rage no matter which
blows.

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS



Seng fc nef Tel: (242) erataaiivicanen Tel: (242) 396-2280



PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, JULY 2 2009

ae

HALSBURY
CHAMBERS

Counsel and Attorneys-at-Law
Notaries Public

will be closed
CL
Friday, 3rd July, 2009

due to the observance of the Firm’s
PVE me eek

The office will re-open
OF

Monday, 6th July, 2009

LIVING Waters Kingdom
Ministries International is plan-
ning to host a business trade
show this Saturday, featuring
firms owned by its congregation
members.

The Kingdom Business Trade
Show will bring together a vari-
ety of businesses in one loca-
tion at the church grounds on
Warren Street from 10am to
Spm.

Some of the booths will
include retailers, health, beauty,

We regret any inconvenience caused.

UVR eG ite || LV 89



ORGANISERS of the Kingdom Business Trade Show...

attorneys, repair/building spe-
clalists, business services and
more.

Senior pastor and founder of
Living Waters Kingdom Min-
istries, Raymond Wells said:
“The trade show will provide a
great opportunity for the public
to identify businesses that are
operating within the Kingdom
requirements, while addressing
the needs of today’s con-
sumers.”

Trade show chairman Tori-

Enhance your possibilities

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At FirstCaribbean, you have the

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2 FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

FirstCaribbean International Bank is a member of the CIBC Group.

GET THERE. TOGETHER.



ano Lloyd noted that all of the
businesses participating in the
event are owned by members
of the church.

Organisers of the event said
there would be special perfor-
mances by locally-renowned
Christian artists and over $5,000
worth of free gifts and prizes
up for grabs.

“We will be hosting this trade
show under the theme, Koinon-
ia, which relates to the unity of
like minded believers,” he
added. “This trade show will
provide the community with an
assurance that all is well, and
that Kingdom business will not
falter to an economic depres-
sion with the grace of God. The

THE TRIBUNE



Church plans to host business trade show

business owners of LWKM are
very thrilled about this new ven-
ture and excited to showcase
their various services and prod-
ucts on such an impressive lev-
el. The trade show is open to
the community, and all are wel-
come to join in this time of net-
working.”

Since being founded by Pas-
tor Wells in 1998, the church
now increased its membership
to 1,500 and hosts weekly Sun-
day morning services, bible
studies and marriage workshops
and seminars. For additional
information on The Kingdom
Business trade show contact the
church’s office at 242-326-7756
or e-mail info@.lwkm.org

Kelly's Team
Security Officers

Kelly’s is seeking mature, reliable, honest
and hardworking individuals to fill the
position of Security Officer.

Prospective candidates must be available to

work evening shifts. Past security experience

would be an asset. This position is ideal for
retired police or prison officers.

We offer excellent pay, benefits
and working conditions.

Interested persons may collect an application
form from the Customer Service counter at
Kelly's House & Home, Mall at Marathon.

No phone calls please

‘s Houseg Mon-Fri - 8:00am - 8:00pm
Home set- 8:00am - 9:00pm

Show Your Colors!)

Cuenilelaal tl ae ley





The Tribune -”"”""”
OBMUARIES
RELIGION



\ -< The Tribune
a OLT | tty Arcee, My Mowspaper!

—‘\ ene
» \8
707.9

SS hour chaice for ine family:



PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009








Irene

Leona Davis
May 24, 1924 - July 4th, 2003

"It seams like Just yesterday
you were here, but six years
have gone by and we miss
you! We know that God's
garden must be even more
beautiful because you are
S there! Our hearts still aches
in sadness, and secret tears
» | still flow. What it meant to
‘lose you, no one will ever
|} know",

} Left to cherish those won-
derful memories are her
children: Elizabeth, Alfred,
Leslie, Phillip & Teresa, one
sister Morlene, grand, great
grand and great great grand
children, numerous relatives
and friends.

May she continue to rest in the arms of Jesus!



Touts "G Meme ‘t

In Loving Memory
_. ~ = of _ =
Olivia OY rginia Williams

1950 - 2005

When trouble comes
as it does to us all
God is so great
and we are so small
But there is nothing
that we need know
If we have faith that
wherever we go,
God will be waiting
to help us bear
our pain and sorrow,
our suffering and care
for no pain or suffering
is ever too much
to yield itself,
to God merciful touch!

Sadly missed by her children, Renee &
Felipe Major; grandchildren Felipe Jr.,
brother, sisters and a host of other
relatives and friends.

Gone but not forgotten.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 3

REE
114 East Coral Rood, F | SB. Bohames
P.O. Box F 12

Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 = Fox: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 40-8043 = Fox: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

CALVIN FRANKLIN
MUNROE JR,, 18

Road, Officiating will be Rev, Denzle
Hutchinson, assisted by Minister Johnson
and Interment will follow in Woodlawn
Gardens, Solider Road.

Lett to cherish his memories are his mother:
Raguel Woodside; father: Calvin Munroe
Sr.; daughter: Kellisha Munroe; Special
Friend: Tracy Sands; sisters: Ronnisha, Calvinique, Tanisha, Opal, Ketra
and Breanna Munroe; brothers: Javon and Shavargo Munroe; grand neother:
Delores Gould; aunts: Laticia Sturrup, Sherrine Fowler, Jennifer and Louise
Munroe and Rosemary Moxey; uncles: Owen Rolle, Theodore Burrows,

grand aunt: Dorean Finch of Miami Florida; uncles-in-law: Peter Sturrup :

and Dillion Fowler; aunts-in-law: Wendy Ambrose and Sabrina Belle
King, Darad Munroe, Demetrius, Jarvis and Latheria Sturrup, Crystal and
Lashan Fowler, Deante Tinker, Chelsea and Dejah Gibson; other relatives
and friends Such as Raquel Strachan, Geneva Bodie, The staff of choices
Snack, the entire Peardale Community, The Union Village Community
and the entire Claridge Road Community.

Viewing will be held in the Halcyon Suite at Restwiew Memorial Mortuary

to 6:00pm and at the church on Saturday from 9:30am to service time.

MR. EUGENE SAMUEL
BAIN, 81

Elvardo Tumquest, assisted by other ministers
of the gospel and Interment will follow in
the Catholic Cemetery Tyler Street.

Tshombe, Ricardo, Brandon, Aaron, Joel, William, Kyah, Braeden, Jaxon,

i & Nieces: Oswald Munnings and siblings, Kendal Munnings and siblings,
: the children of the late Delores Colebrooke and Rodger Munnings especially
? Sabrina and Kim Munnings. The children of Dorothy Colebrooke, Vivian
i Bain, Rodney E Bain, Rowena Cleare and Angela Johnson, In-laws: Father
. . : and Mother-in-law, Mr and Mrs Harrison Kelly, sons-in-law, James Mackey,

of Peardale will be held at 11:00am at The |
" New Good Will Church of God Peardale ;

Brad Lightbourne, Ricardo Demeritte; daughters-in-law, Lillian, Marion
and Charlene Bain; sisters-in-law Delores Mounts and Marina Smith,

| Dianna, Karen, and Joy Kelly; brothers-in-law Craig. Hilverson and Terrell

Kelly, Other Relatives and Friends including: Ophelia Munnings and
family, cousins, Wilhemina and Dell, Joseph and Beryl Strachan and

| family, Mr Scavella, The Barber and family, Joseph Johnson and family,
: Pearl Turnquest and family, Audrey Wright and family, Basil Dean and
: family, Edney Pickstock and family, the Smith family, Enc and Alfreda
i Cooper, Bishop Laish Boyd and family, Virgil and Telzena Coakley, Hiram
> and Dorothy Lockhart, Asa and Pamrica Ferguson and family, Sherrine
? Russell and family, Everette Sweeting and family, Maceo and Mizpah and
? family, Melvin Saunders and family, Henry, Michael, Valerie and Irvin
? Lightbourn, Sharon Saunders and family, Godfrey and Carmetta Basden
i i | : ? and family, Paul and Grace Meicholas, Robert Gibson and Annette Whymns,
Dwight Gordon Issac, Edrick and Edwin Munroe; grand aunts: Sarah Earns = the Lightbourne family, Delores Nottage and family, Dorothy Lightbourne
and Kathleen Gould; grand uncles: Presley, Jerry and Jerold Gould great :

and family, Charles and Dorith Grant and family, Janet Gilbert, Maxine

? Fox; his caregiver, vy Bowles and family, Hermane Thompson and family,
ag ft : ay. and 38 Me | The Butler family, Tezel Butler and family, Calvese Walkes, Beverly Bain,
Cousins; Monique, Karen and Kevin Davis Shanika Poitier, Tina and Dika © Anna ‘Dolamae’ Wilson and family, Samuel Bookie Johnson, Charles
us, JE a SS | Clarke, Ricardo Fox, Phae and Andre Rahming, Garland Knowles, Dino
Owenique Belle, Tharon and Tanisha Burrows, Dillion, Devaughn and |

Bethel, Fr Michael Kelly, Pastoral Team and members of Our Lady's of
the Holy Souls Catholic Church, Fr Glen Nixon, Fr Elvado Tumquest and

| members of St Francis Xavier Cathedral, Pastor and members of St Margaret
| Road Native Baptist Church, Former neighbors of Farrington Road,
| especially the Deans, Boyd Subdivision, Hanna Road, Kool Acres, Mastic
: Point especially the Pickstocks and Smiths, the Mennonite family of
a \ tT : Andros, the Kelly fanuly of Lower Bogue, Eleuthera. Statf of Royal Bank
and Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and Soldier Road on Friday trom 10:00am : of Canada (Main Branch), ScotiaTrust, Scotiabank family especially
? Mackey Street, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Bahamas Electricity Corporation,
? Our Lady's Catholic School and others too numerous to mention but not
: forgotten. Please note that Eugene's immediate family is most thankful
? to all who helped to care for him in any way. They are indeed grateful to
? Doctors Antonio-Collie, Brown, Francis, Curling, Turnquest, Evans and
? Gibson; to the staffof Doctor’s Hospital; Dorothy Roberts and staff of the

of Hanna Road, Fox Till will be held on | Physio Department, Sandilands Hospital, Maxine Fox, caregiver, Fr Michael
Thursday, July 2nd, 2009 at 11:00am at St. | tee the : Ses adn T nce Be itlen bles :
Francis ‘Xavier Cathedral West Hill Street. | Martin de Porres Monastery, Fr Elvado Turnquest, Fr Glen Nixon and the
Officiating will be Father Glen Nixon , Father |

Kelly and Joseph Johnson, spiritual mentor, the Benedictine Sisters of St

Parish of St Francis Xavier Cathedral, Fr Simeon Roberts, Fr Martin Gomes
and the parish community of St Joseph's Church.

Viewing will be held in the Serenity Suite at Restview Memorial Mortuary

& Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and Soldier Roads on Tuesday June 30tht
ga ee eee > 2008 trom 12:00 noon to 3:00pm and on Wednesday July lst 2009 trom
Left to cherish his memories are: His wife, :

Wendy Bain; Sister: Dorothy Colebrooke; :
Daughters: Donna Nottage, Janice Mackey, Deborah and Jean Bain, Chery] : Or Wy - KT - 1
Lightbourne, Melvern Demeritte; Step-daughter: Tatrinka Thompson; : THERE WILL BE NO VIEWING AT THE CHURCH.

Sons: Bradley, Everette, Myron, Corey; Grandchildren: Khalia, Khalif, = J), 1 iow of Flowers donations can be sent to Bahamas National Trust and

Jacobe, Gia, Vernard, Ashley, Nikita, Sade, Myron IT and Venice; Great- Our Ladyis of the Holy Souls Catholic Church.

grandchildren: Jasmine and Mikai Foster; Brother: Tellis Smith; Nephews :

10:00am to 6:00pm.





PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

and Crematorium Limited

od Cacnclnie Gi”

111A Bost © |Bood, Freeport 6.B., Bahomeas
ord
312

eleaphone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
ae (242) 340-8043 * Fox: (242) 373-3005

Robinson and Soldier ies oo ibaa ALP. Bolomos
P.O. Box CB-12072

Talaphone: (242) 394-6043 / (242) 394-6047
Poger: (242) 340-8044 « Fox: (249) 340-6034

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

MS. ZHILPHA
LOUISE CHARLTON,
86

ee

July 4th,

Old Trail Road.

Left to mourn her passing are sisters: Bloneva Adel Bain, |

Agnes Deleveaux and Dorothy Mortimer; nieces and nephews:

Charity Carey and Terrancia Johnson; Wilkin Bain, Lealon
Jones; grandnieces and grandnephews: Ivamae (Martin) :
Williams, Sharon Carey, Dr. Allison Anyanwu, Celeta (Jones) |

Dean, Patricia (Carey) Hughes, Sally Jones, Sharlene Carey,

Pratt, Keshi Bain, Shelicena Johnson, Melissa (Johnson)
Knowles, Lashan Jones and Monique Harden, Kevin Carey,
Gerard Bain, Jullian Bain, Lealon Jones Jr., Lincoln Johnson,
Edward Knowles, Bebe Anyanwu, Kevin Hughes, Tony Dean,
John Williams and Daniel Harden; great grand nieces, great
grand nephews: Cindy, Deandrea, Kendice, Olivia, Ashley,
Khalilah, Charity, Nathalie and Edvernique; Javon, Angelo,
Shannon, Jarron, Nicholas, Valentino, Anton, Andre, Olin Jr,

Elrick, Durran, Christian, Caleb and Justin; great great grand |
nieces: Jala and Jahxera Robinson; Other relatives and friends. -
including: Frannie Schatsmen and family, Sandra and |
Raymond Francis and family, Helen Fritz, Ruth Smith, :
Roselyn, Inez, Bricemae, Myrtis, Carlton, Victor, Livingston, :
Douglas, Paulette and Vernice Gibson, Anwar Lewis, Inez :
Williams Gibson, Nor Thompson, Dotlene Edgecombe, |
Dorrine Woodside, Anne Bain, Sylvia Amold, Terry, Harriet :
Davis, Ethelyn Deleveaux, Rowena, Arthur, Margarette :
Charlton, Franklyn Deleveaux, Melvin Ferguson, David :
Cuaninghan, Nelly Walks, Almacdor Deleventoe ae : brothers: Sedrick Thomas, Godfrey; and a host of other
Wilson and Whinnie hunt and a host of other relatives and :

friends too numerous to mention.

a of Palm Beach Street and formerly |
of Mayguana will be held on Saturday, :
2009 at 11:00am at :
Ce Deliverance Revival Center East :

Street and Coconut Grove. Officiating :

will be Pastor Raymond Duncombe, assisted by other ministers. :
of the gospel and interment will follow in Old Trail Cemetery :

Viewing will be held in the Perpetual Suite at Restview
_ Memorial Mortuary and Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and
_ Soldier Roads on Friday from 10:00am to 6:00pm and at the
| church from 9:30am to service time.

DEATH NOTICES

\ MRS. ERICA DENISE
STUBBS-KELLY, 35

of Seven Hills Drive died at the
Pnncess Margaret Hospital on 24th
June 2009,

She is survived by her husband: John
Kelly sons: Vencell Thompson;
sisters: Alruda Joseph, Shawana

. . _ Dawkins, Victoria Darville, Maria Curtis brothers: Elvis
Deanine Jones, Terrancia Carey, Bloneva Jones, Loma (Carey) |

Parker and Rodney Darville nieces D’ Eureka Bastian, Alseanda
Johnson, Rashae, Shandera, Grace, Dashad, Rodney, Nicolas,

_ Bradston other relatives and friends including: Franklyn

Murphy.

Funeral annoucements will be announced at a later date.

MR. HUBERT
CLARKE, 51

of Blue Hill Estates died at his
residence on June 28th 2009.

He is survived by his wife: Lavern
Clarke; sons: Hubert Leo Clarke,
Javon Clarke, Torrino Clarke;
daughter: Lanishka Clarke; sisters: Larene, Janet, Sharon;

relatives and friends.

: Funeral arrrangements will be announced at a later date.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

if
a

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 5

Conmonfeealth Funeral Home,
Independence Drive * Phone: 341-4055 7

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENT FOR

NEVILLE
COURTNEY MAJOR,

64
affectionately called
"Barretta"

of Harbour Island, will be held

on Saturday 1:00 p.m. at St.

John's Anglican Parish, Harbour

Island. Rev'd Father Oswald

Pinder will officiate and
shin will follow in St. Catherine's Cemetery, Harbour
sland.

Left to cherish his life testimony and memories is his loving
wife of thirty four years and eleven months, Lorna Major;
their children, Marcey Major-Neilly, Caleb and Antoinette
Major, Sherwin Major, Charmaine and David Wallace;
adopted daughter, Terry Deveaux; grandchildren, Braxton
Neilly, Logan and Hannah Major and Atyrell Barnes; siblings,
Edith Cleare, Frank and Garla Nixon, Emily Saunders, Pastor
Curtlin and Percival Johnson; mother-in-law, Evelyn
Wallace; other family members, Elijah and Sherrie Brice,
Marletha and Maxwell Bethel, Mildred Wallace, Dorothy
Strachan, Margavine Wallace, Victoria and Gerald Wright,
Zonia Wallace, Sadiemae and Gloria Wallace, Frederick

Ruby "Ma" Percentie; uncle, Anthony Percentie; nieces
and nephews, Larry Cleare, Lashay and Glen Bullard,
Lenora Dean, Patrice, Keith Nixon, Brent and Sean Saunders,
Mackell and Bishop Charles Dean, Rev. Timothy and Dianne
Johnson, Darell and Marie Johnson, Jamal Johnson, Dr.
and Mrs. Leonard Johnson and Jamal and Shelby Brice,
Frances, Michelle, Jason, Fredericka Rollins, Nykia, Natalyia,

Jarrad, Keithra, Quintin, Martie, Donya Hall, Sasha, Lashonte,
Royann, Ronda, Deno, Shireen, Shavanna, Charlane, Candia,

Kristen, Monte, Shondra, Dorlon Jr., Crystal, Darien, Kailey :
and Keilis; cousins, Maria Barry, Rosalyn Clarke, John :
Percentie, Eloise Knowles, Shelia Saunders, Daphne :

Hepburn, Donald Higgs, Carol Jones, Jackswell, Richard,

Victor, Bronell Percentie, Rosalie McPhee, Valarie, Nancy |
and Dr. Lee Percentie, Lantasha, Don, Duke and Gleanor |
: Of Harbour Island, will be held on Thursday 7:00 p.m. at
: Ghurch of God, Harbour Island. Bishop Samuel Higgs will

: officiate.
Dwight Stewart, Martin Grant, Tanya Hutchinson, Jose :

Percentie, Vylma Curling, Emerson, Vance, Bertram Sawyer,
Dedrie and Vanna Barry, Erma Davis and family, families of
the late Eunice Sweeting and Earie Johnson; god children,

: Roberts, Jr.,
: Johnson; a host of relatives and friends, Christina
: Thompson (god mother), Mr. and Mrs. Archie Nairn, Mr and
' Mrs Franklyn Ferguson, Mr and Mrs Joshua Culmer, Reggie
| Major, Florine Major and family, Gloria Major and family, Mr
and Mrs Peter Stanton, Edward Hutchinson, Mr and Mrs
Samuel Cartwright, Mr and Mrs Vincent Mather, Mrs Margaret
| Grant and family, Mr and Mrs Glenroy Aranha and family,
| Mr Simeon Higgs and family, Joe Cleare and family,
: Gurry and family, Bishop Dudley and lonie Kelly,
‘ Bowe and family, Bishop Ghaly Swann and family, Richard
and Lemmie Malcolm, Mark Messier and family, Richard
| Haskell and family, Alfred Asbury and family, Jessilee Mackey
| and family, Leonie Neely and farnily, Mr and Mrs Carl Higgs
: and family, Rocky and Melonie Saunders, Janet and Jane

Neeve Bullard, Aldon Davis and Rennie

Nita
ishop

Sawyer, Mr and Mrs Robert Albury, Jolton Johnson, Joe

: Ferguson, (Administrator), Alexander Williams, Father Oswald
: Pinder and members of the St. John’s Anglican Church,
| Bishop Samuel Pinder and members of the Lighthouse
: Church of God, Rev. Marie Neely and members of the
: Wesley Methodist Church, The Right Honorable Perry G.
: Christie, Honorable Obie Wilchcombe, Honorable Bradley
: Roberts, Aurelia Brice and famil
‘ Councilors and members of The Progressive Liberal Party,
i Management and staff of South Party Club, management
‘ and staff of Coral Sands Hotel, staff of Royal Bank of
| Ganada, Private Medical (PMH), Dr. Harold Munnings, Dr.
| Debauch Curling, Water Taxi Operators, Taxi Drivers, Golf
: Gart Operators and the entire community of Harbour Island.
and Cynthia Wallace; aunts, Olga Higgs, Jacqueline and :

: Relatives and friends may view the remains at THE
: PROGRESSIVE LIBERAL PARTY HEADQUARTERS,
‘ Farrington Road on Thursday from 10:30am - 4:00 p.m.,

i at THE CHAPEL OF MEMORIES, COMMONWEALTH
: FUNERAL HOME, INDEPENDENCE DRIVE on Thursday
' from 5:30 - 8:00 p.m. and at the church in Harbour Island
‘ on Friday from 3:00 p.m. to service time on Saturday.
Bridgette Kemp, Marion and Frederick Jr., Kaylisa and |

Dorlen Curtis; grand nieces and nephews, Nicole, Natinka, |

. The Officers, Stabwart

A MEMORIAL SERVICE

There will be a Memorial Service for

NEVILLE COURTNEY MAJOR, 64
affectionately called "Barretta"





PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A Funeral Service For

MR. LESLIE ANDRE
PYFROM, 51

of Oxford Road, Stapledon Gardens,
Nassau, The Bahamas, will be held
at Christ Church Cathedral, George
Street, Nassau, on Wednesday, 8th
July, 2009 at 11:00a.m.

The Very Reverend Patrick L.

Adderley, Dean of Nassau and

Reverend Father Michael Gittens,

Priest Vicar, will officiate and

interment will follow in Woodlawn

Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Road,
Nassau.

Mr. Pyfrom is survived by his wife Jennifer, daughters, Janay Pyfrom
and ‘Yantel and husband Vaseo Marshall; granddaughter, Eliana Marshall
mother, Thelma Pyfrom; aunt, Rosamund Thrower, sister, Suzette and
her husband Richard Unasz, and sister, Emily Pyfrom; nieces, Nicole
and Ashleigh Unasz; father-in-law, Robert Thompson, mother-in-law,
Delores Thompson; brothers-in-law, Ricardo Thompson and Donovan
Nevymour; sisters-in law, Beth Carey, Clarice Neymour, Daniella
Thompson; uncle, Oswald Pyfrom; aunts, Emestine Jones, Evelyn
Klapp, Helen Degoumois, Thelma Brice, Shelia Brice, Conchita Pyfrom
and Eunice Green; his nephews, Bryant Carey, Damien and Dylan
Neymour, other nieces, Darryn and Drew Neymour, Jaiden, Janayah
and Jalani Thompson; grandniece #ion Carey; cousins, Patricia Smith,
Mary and Susan Culmer, Chuck Simms, Wilfred and Cecile Knowles,
Carl and Gladys Brice, Joan Nixon, Aaron and Carol, Mizpah, Isracl,
Pauline, Paul, Gilbert Bnce, Douglas, Walerie, Deborah, Ruth, Emestine,
Carol, Freddie, Rudolph Pytrom, Ken and Brian Albury, Tyrone, Craig,
Tracey Pyfrom, Ronald Jones, Dianne Havey, Brian, Tiffany Thompson,
Rosine Moutardier Ann Mosotti, Karen and Pamela Klapp, Stephen
Conliffe, Joann Heggan, Michelle and Madeline Degoumois, Bernadette
Davis, Ricardo, Enrique Pyfrom, Mario, Michael, Marina Edsel, Carmie,
Anthony Simms, The Archer's, The Swaby’s and The Cheney's,
Imperial Park Family: Jacqueline, Enoch Pedro and Anna Maria Roberts,
John, Eric, Andrew, Pamela and John Jr. Godget, Gregory and Sandra
Brennan, Dr. Clive, Joseph Gaskin, Henderson Burrows and Family,

The Thrower Family (U.K.) and Ramon Kelly, godchildren Nyjo and
Shandia Brennen; friends: Chns Justilien ‘& Members of Colors
Entertainment and I unkanoo Organization Family, Alfred & Wermique
Stubbs, Lynette Barry, Omar & Gerona Bernard, Stephanie Knowles
& The John Bull Family, U.S. Embassy Family, the CB family, Chauntez
Wilson, Lydia Lochan, Kweku Symonette, Melissa Lightbourne, Rachel
Peters, Ruvania Deveaux, Desmin Bullard, Kristi Bullard, Jackie and
Deyar Knowles, Craig, Paula, Naomi and Blanche, Anthony Bellot,
Queen's College class of 1974 and The residents of Oxford Road;
Stapledon Gardens, other Family and Friends too numerous to mention.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to help defray the cost of
Janay Pyfrom (Leslie's daughter) education to Mrs. Jennifer Pyfrom,
P.O. Box 5.5. 3061, Nassau in memory of Mr. Leslie A. Pyfrom.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited, 22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale, Nassau, on Tuesday, 7th July,
2009 from 10:00 to 6:00p.m

THERE WILL BE NO VIEWING AT THE CATHEDRAL.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, W.P.. The Bahamas

A Funeral Service For

MR. A. BRADLEY
ROBERTS, 78

of Gleniston Gardens,

Nassau, The Bahamas,

who died at Doctors

Hospital, Collins

Avenue, Nassau, on

Tuesday, 30th June,
. 2009, will be held at
Trinity ) Methodist Church, Trinity Place and
Frederick Street, Nassau, on Saturday, 4th July,
2009 at 3:00p.m.

Reverend Bill Higgs, President of The Bahamas
Conference of The Methodist Church will
officiate and interment will be in Ebenezer
Methodist Cemetery, East Shirley Street,
Nassau.

Mr. Roberts was predeceased by his wife,
Isabelle Roberts and son, Phillip Roberts and
is survived by his son, Anthony G. Roberts;
daughter-in-law, Jenyne Roberts; sister, Lois
Higgs; grandchildren, Aaron and Grayson
Roberts; sisters-in-law, Christine Bowles, Irene
Heller and Amaryllis Malone; brothers-in-law,
Stephen Heller and Lisbon Higgs; numerous
nieces, nephews other relatives and friends
including Jennifer Banton, the Trinity Methodist
Church family and his Breakfast Club.

Instead of flowers the family request that
donations be sent to the Cancer Society of The
Bahamas, P.O. Box 8.8. 6539, Nassau in
memory of Mr. A. Bradley Roberts.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

(: eS ag anedit

i; ie
Emerald Ridge Wortnary =
& donanent Company itr. (a)
Mr. Wendell G. Dean II, 07.4. Trine

Presidear / Managing Feaeral Director

r vis Hare
(Rape

Our Services Inchodes:
Treditiosal aed Penomalice! Pusere| Seren, DVS
“hance Too Ani tis, Lard and Femdhy Loiand Cremation, Grint

Eerie,
Cortney Bue Fiose Hee Sere snd tang Ditrace Reraraly Saaneat Song “ewig

rr ons ee ae SST ae
Himes ec ei rers) tte eM Pee
TURE UU eet tam Melt be win

Turquoise Funeral Service
For

MR. PRINCE ALBERT
BODIE SR., 52

of Treasure Cay, Abaco and formerly of
Nassau and Freeport will be held on Saturday,
July U4, 2009 at llam at Full Gospel
Assembly Church, Sand Bank Treasure Cay,
Abaco, Buhumas. Pastor Stafford Symonette
will officiate and burial will be in Treasure
Public Cemetery, Treasure Cay Abaco,
Bahamas.

The Radiance of this “Turguotse of A Ger’ vill always glow in the hearts of
his:

Seven Children: Omar, Nykera, Vasta, Prince Jr, Prinice, Justin and Kobe
Boxdie:

Two Grand Children: Khynec Bodie and Lashawanti’ Russell:

Foster Mother: Nethilee Bodie of Treasure Cay, Abaco;

Special Friend: Coral Farrington,

Four Brothers: Joseph Bodie, Richard Walker, Romeo Archer Sr. and Steven
Fines;

Ten Sisters: Shammaine Hart, Pastor Emma Forbes, Sandra Bodie, Jennifer
Watkin, Violet Roberts, Marilyn Kemp, Monique Storr, Melvern Cornish,
Edna Ferguson and Debbie Cooper;

Daughter-in-law: Pamela Boobie;

Five Brothers-in-law: Sidney Hart, Pastor Don Forbes, William Watkin, Peter
Roberts and Ruben Storr,

Two Sisters-in-law: Iva Bodie and Marinette Walker;

Fifteen Nephews: Sidnardo, Shenmal and Shavez Hart, Sean, Kino, Albino,
Javargo Sr, Zavia, Troyvante, Jordon, Lastello, Lucim, Joey, Maceo and Romeo
Ir;

Ten Nieces: Shaque, Sarat Hart, Latasha, Ishka, Dominique, Nakita, Jasmin,
Katrina, Whitney and Micky;

One Aunt: Leanza Pople;

Nine Grand Nephews and Nieces: Phoenix, Katrell, Dwight, Kiara, Javareo
Ir., Bryson, Kacdon, Robe and Mike:

Many other loving family and friends including: Chnstina Gibson, Jerry
Sr and Beryl Lowe, Edith Lightbourne, Carmilla Russell, pl a Bowie,
Lewis and Faye Caldwell of Miami, Florida, Joseph Dames of Texas, Cliff
and Hartley Bootle, Sylvia, Jenny, Abigail, Robert, Annie, Patrice, Janneth,
Sonja, Linda and Montia, Mildred McKinney, Alexander and Barbara Bain,
Myrtle Carroll, Samuel Archer, Kirk, Mike and Kathy Sawyer, Jamel McDonald,
Roosevelt McIntosh, Delvera Wallace and their families, The Williams, Murray
and Boothe families, the Russell and Forbes families of Nassau, Pure! Wells,
Brenda Russell, Gary and Donna Hudson, Curtis and Audrey Cooper,
Management and Staff of Treasure Cay Resort, Full Gospel Assembly Church
family, The entire Treasure Cay and Crossing Rock Communities.

Visitation will be at Full Gospel Assembly Church, Sand Bank Treasure Cay
Abaco, Bahamas on Priday, July 03, 2008 from 3:00pm to service time on
Saturday, July 04, 2009,

Visit our website: www.emeraldridgemortuary.com view video
tributes, sign guest book, send condolence, sympathy, share
memories and make funeral arrangements.



THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 7

oar By)

KENNETH
MICHAEL
DARVILLE, 79

Of Roses, Long Island, will
be held at Our Lady of

Church, Hamilton’s, Long
Island on Saturday July
04th, 2009 at 10:30 a.m.
Officiating will be Fr.
Patrick Fanning, Asst. by Deacon Patrick Darville.
Interment will follow in Holy Trinity Catholic
Church Cemetery, Tait’s, Long Island.

Precious memories will always remain in the hearts
of his wife: Diannah Darville; 2 Sons: Earol
Michael Darville of Sarasota, Fla. and Timothy
Addington Darville; 2 Daughters: Indiana Davis
Ferguson and Nancy Cooper; 17 Adopted
Daughters and Sons including: Joneth Eden of
Freeport and Naroshee Roberts of Nassau; 8
Grandchildren including: Deleano, Jaran, and
Zavargo Darville; 2 Sisters: Edna Darville of
Freeport and Margaret McCardy of Nassau; 1
Brother: Alfred Darville of New Jersey; Mother-
in-law: Daisy Dean; Daughter-in-law: Jackie
Darville; Son-in-law: Jason Cooper; 3 Brothers-
in-law: Hewitt Dean of Cat Island, David Dean
and Obie Ferguson of New Providence; 9 Sisters-
in-law: Nancy Darville of New Jersey, Annamae
Darville of Boyton Beach, Fla., Maggie Bain,
Deborah Stuart, Quennie Ferguson, Alfreda Dean,
Daphne Dean of New Providence, and Elva
Williams of Freeport, Grand Bahama, and Rose
Dean of Cat Island. Numerous nieces, nephews
and friends including the entire island of Long
Island from Seymours to Gordons, also including
Dr. Sanpal and the staff at the Health Centre, Nurse
Fernander and Nurse Minnis at Clarence Town
Clinic, Fr. Patrick Fanning, Fr. Ernest Pratt and
Deacon Patrick Darville.

Viewing will be held at the church in Hamilton’s
from 6p.m. Friday until service time Saturday.



PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JULY 2,

2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

(Cedar Crest Funeral Home

DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street « PO.Box N-603 « Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

Funeral Services For

ETOY
McKENZIE, 69

formerly of Cove, Cat Island, will :
be held 2:00 p.m., Saturday, July :
4th, 2009 at St. John's Native :
Baptist Cathedral, Meeting Street. :
Officiating will be Rev. Dr. Alonzo :
Hinsey, assisted by other Ministers. :
Interment will be made in Lakeview :
Memorial Gardens, John F. :

Kennedy Drive.

Left with cherish memories are her husband, Dudley McKenzie; her :
children, John Johnson, Alton and [an McKenzie, Ruthmae Smith, :
Erin Strapp, Vanillin McKenzie and Margaret Storr; two sisters, :
Shirley Strachan and Mazie Kemp; three sons-in-law, Paul Smith, ;
Wesley Strapp Sr. and Holbrook Storr; three daughters-in-law, Angela ;
Johnson, Christine and Sha McKenzie; six step children, Helena ;
Thompson, Lorene McKenzie, Tadesee Davis, Tiffany Williamson :
and Bradford and Carno McKenzie; twenty-eight grandchildren, :

— oe ' cues Fike Rvien 2a = ce are 3 a resident of Mermaid Boulevard, and formerly of Chesters, Acklins
Ethan, Wesley Jr Justin, Alexander, Marvin, Alferez, Renard, _ and Puts Well Mayaguana, wil held 06pm Saturday, uy
nthony, Jerado, Edwin, Terrance and Keshawn; her father-in-law, : ,~ - eo 7

Ben icVanvie- £ . = ; * + be Pastor Dan Simmons, Pastor Deansa Cunningham, Pastor Ellison
roars | EorceeMaenice 5 eee ete Greenslade, Pastor Aligan Malcolm and Minister Elvin Taylor.
and Tana McKenzie, Dorothy and Stella Seymour and Rev. Rosenell : ala a be made in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, John F.
Forbes and other relatives including, Mavis Douglas and family, : ““ 5
Rudell Brisset and family, Enid Roker and family, Gretal Hanna and : . ea fees er
family, Ms. Thompson and family, Ms. iembeisier and family, Deloris. : Mins. Taylor was predeceased by her busband Captain Nathaniel Taylor
Braynen and family, the Coakley family, Tetry Brooks and family, : and her son and daughter Lincoln Taylor and Althea Brown.

Ms. Swann and family, the Praying Sisters and the Young Adult Choit : | 4% with cherished memories are her five sons, Clayton, Elton,
eee ee ee ee : Captain's Eddins, Limas and Elvin Taylor; four daughters, Alvene
Faith. H d Chari Bi Si 7 Ric. Hineevanl fi ar | Gay, Elra Ward, Elma Taylor, Velna Burrows; one adopted son,
‘oct i kes Phecd f B. Bisheo Red cM Roberts, Frederic : Audley Bain; five adopted daughters, Cynthia Brown, Mildred
ihe Golden Gates Church family, Bishop Rodney .. hoberts, Freceneka | Williamson, Daisy Black, Barbara Stubbs and Glenda Hepbum; three
Minus and family, Silbert Evans, Moses Deveaux, Louanna Evans, ; sons-in-law, Hartman Brown, James Gay of San Salvador and Errol

; “a ae 4. | Ward; five daughters-in-law, Carmetha, Carlas, Janet, Donell and
Stephanie Marshall, Cherine Jackson, Michelle T aylor and fami *: Agusta Taylor; forty-nine grandchildren, fifty-three great grandchildren,
Jane Knowles, Louise Moncur, Demique Moncur, Norman Smith, : nine great creat-crandenildren. ooe devoted aister. Era Ferausory
Jenice Rolle and Rev. Hervist Bain and family, British American ; TINS 86a! grea’ granechildren, one Cevoted sister, Era Ferguson,
Company, Meteorology Department, Light & Life Community Church, : aan sof Ba a : oe Johnson tiem tt New ao Edith
Ellen Smith & family, Ernest McKenzie and family, Sharon Lewis } (“?. 6 0! betsey Gay. Mayaguana and Vnice Collie, one brother-in-
and family, Burton, Vapoen, Jennifer and Jessica McKenzie, Tina, | 2Â¥; Stanley Collie of Betsy Bay, Mayaguana; numerous nieces and
Vashinella, Mornette, Conrad and Conwill McKenzie, Estermae nephews and . host of other relatives and friends and others too
Stubbs and family, St, John's Church family, Kerr family, Constance | Mâ„¢stous lo mention.

Rolle and family, Monique McDonald and family, George Jones and ; Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest Funeral

: Home, Robinson Road and First Street on Friday from 12:00 noon

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest Funeral wile p-m. and at the church on Saturday from 11:30 am until service
Home, Robinson Road and First Street on Friday from 12:00 noon : =

Garett Deveaux, Eloise Mackey, Hilbert Brooks, Albertha Smith,

others too numerous to mention.

> to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon and at
; the church from 12:30 p.m. until service time.

_

> A MEMORIAL
: SERVICE

A Memonal Service to celebrate
the life and work of

MATHILDA
COLLIE TAYLOR

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENT

MATHILDA COLLIE TAYLOR, 91





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Yager Luneral Home @ Crematorium

Queen's Highway
FO. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 * Paging: 352-6222 #1724
Fax: 351-3301

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

GEORGE HERBERT
THOMPSON, 67

‘| a resident of #3 Grenfell

}) Avenue, Freeport and formerly

of Green Castle, Eleuthera will

be held on Saturday, July 4,

2009 at 11:00 a.m. at The Pro-

Cathedral of Christ the King,

East Atlantic Drive and

Pioneer's Way, Freeport.

Officiating will be Rev'd Canon

Harry Bain, assisted by Revid

Tellison Glover and interment will follow in the Grand Bahama
Memorial Park, Frobisher Drive.

Left to cherish his memories are his wife of many years: Elva
Miller-Butler and loving children: Delarise, Diane, Sybil,

Francina, David, Samuel, George Jr., Charles and Robert; six
adopted children: Ingrid, Cheryl, Darlene, Deborah, Lisa and
Collin; three sisters: Carolyn, Sybil and Ivy; two brothers:
Johnathan and Richard; 18 grandchildren: Shantell, Lavette,
Moe, Donnalee, Teddy, Davyvonne, DJ, Ray, Destiny, Eugina,
Georgia, Trevor Jr., Tavera, Bianca, Sam Jr., Deangelo, Lexi
and Shavenne; six great grandchildren: Wrayray, Tyesha,
Latalya, T’nya, Erick and Aliash aunts Ruby and Ann Sands
of Rock Sound, Eleuthera; one daughter-in-law: Monica Butler;
two sons-in-law: Anthony Francis and Raymond Williams;
godchild: Dkosi Ewing and a host of other relatives and fends
including: Merlene, Florence, Rose, Gaylean and family,
Beatrice, Ruby, Shirley Smith of Washington DC, Annimae,
Mizpah, Shirley, Doreen, Vera, Woman Inspector Betty Bodie,
Evangelist Predricka Watson of Green Castle, Eleuthera,
Emily, Vernell, Geneva, Agnes, Ethel Butler, Sheila, Levan,
Culin, Rudolph Sands, Allan Butler, Tyrone “T’, Ronnie Butler,
Jack Gardiner, Bradley, Stanford, Elvis, Renu, Jeffrey, Jack
Bahl and Freeport Transfer Family, Rector Hary Bain and
Christ the King Family, Grenfell Avenue Residents, Long
Island Family, Emmanuel Smith, Simmy Baptiste, Ashaki
Miller, Gibson family, Inez, Gloria Johnson, Olive, Shirley,
Ms. Moxey, Douglas Ewing, James Albury, Alberto, Joeslin
Pierre, Bradley McIntosh, Grits and Toast.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral
Home & Crematorium on Friday, July 3, 2009 from 12:00
noon until 6:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday from 9:30
am. until service time.

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 9

Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel

Wulff Road & Pinedale
Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 * Fax: 328-8852

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

en it Gi \) JOHN GREGORY

a ry “Peck”
a 8 83=—ls se MOXEY, 59

of Golden Gates 42, will be held
on Saturday, July 4", 2009 at 10:00
a.m. Golden Gates Native Baptist
Church, Lobster Avenue,
Officiating will be Rev. Dr. Alonzo
Hinsey, Sr., assisted by Other
Ministers of the Gospel, Interment:
Southem Cemetery, Cowpen &
Spikenard Roads,

He is survived by his mother, Ms,
Louise P. Archer; Four (4) children: Perissa Moxey of New York, Joann
Moxey of Freeport, Grand Bahama, John Moxey II of Minnesota, &
Gwen Moxey of Nassau; Four (4) grandchildren: Calvin, Jacob, Calista
& Tatianna Moxey; Three (3) sisters: Karen Moxey, Valeria Lightbourne
of Sandy Point, Abaco & Lynette Sands; Five (5) brothers: Ernest
“Timmy” Moxey, Dennison “Denny” Moxey & Clifton, Wayne & Brian
Miller; Two (2) sisters-in-law: Sherry Moxey & Linda Miller; Six (6)
aunts: Veronica Gibbs; Christine Fountain; Sylvia, Sheila & Gloria Archer
& Brezetta Moxey; Five (5) umeles: Norman, Howard & Oswald Archer,
Hallet Fountain & James “Uncle Higgs’ Moxey of Mangrove Cay, Andros;
Two (2) grand-uncles: William “Yama” Butler & Sam Brown of Bomim;
One (1) grand-aunt: Ivy Brown of Bimini; Nieces: Bianca Moxey,
Willeisa Francis of New York; Lesa Sands; Kara Smith; Crystal Saunders;
Jade Sands & Noya Moxey; Nephews: Shannon & Vaughn Moxey;
Brandon Lighthourne of Sandy Point, Abaco; Dancko & Dario Miller;
Daryl Bain; C harles Gilcud; Kevin Sands; Durell, Dennison & Darron
Moxey; Grand-nieces: Reghan Ingraham; De" Asha Bain; Kiara Williams;
Lashontae & Ariah Miller; Grand-nephews: Nathan Sands; Andre
Lockhart & Caleb Goodman; Cousins: Eugene Gibbs; Comell & Lesa
Moss: Keva Williams: Janice Moss; Jane Archer-Rolle: Kevin, Dion
Andrea Archer; Meshelle, Stevie Corey Archer; Faye, George & Marcelle
Smith; Carol Gomez; Renae Robins; Arthur, Copeland, Graylin & Daniel
& Dianne Moxey; Special Friends: Rey, Alonzo & Sister Jessie Hinsey
& Family; Other relatives & friends including Beatrice Thompson of
Bimini; Marge King & Family; Henrietta Maycock & Family; Marina
Strachan & Family; Sylvia Hepburn & Family; Christine Ferguson &
Family; Evangelist Marguerite Lewis & Family; Willie “Mays” Francis;
Willie Masena; Keshan & Daniel; Clarice Morley; Ruthmae & Paul Smith
& Family; Charlene Newbold & Family; Wir. Mackey; Inger Brown, Eltha
Bannister & Family; Leonard Miller & Family; Mrs. Lezura Rolle &
Family; Revin “Huddy” Hudson; Dion Watkins: Ricardo Ferguson; Brian
Rolle; Nay, Norman, Rebecca & Keva Jefferies; Ricardo Fernander; Peter
Gilcud; Monique & Myra Ferguson; Randolf, Donell Bullard of Freeport;
Agatha Russell of Freeport; Gerrard Cleare; Elsie Moxey of Freeport;
Anthony “Polka” Huyler: Golden Gates Native Baptist Church Family
& the community of Golden Gates #2; Friends in Freeport, Grand Bahama;
Pat Ingraham; Bemard Aranha; Neville “Hammer” Cartwright; Sanford
Culmer; Gregory Christie, and others too numerous to mention.

FRIENDS MAW PAY THEIR RESPECTS AT ROCK OF AGES
FUNERAL CHAPEL ON WULFF ROAD & PINEDALE OWN
FRIDAY FROM 10 .4.M. TO 6 P.M AND ON SATURDAY AT THE
CHURCH FROM 9:00 A.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME,







PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009

ghn O. Jones
MEMORIAL CENTER

“Honoring the memories of loved ones”
INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED

ANNIE
ARCHER, 85

of Murphyville and formerhy of Clarence
Town, Long island will be held on Saturday
July 4, 2006 at 11:00 a.m. at Mi Pleasant
CGireen Baptist Church, East and Quako
Streets, Officiating will be Rev. Wesley L.
Thempsen, assisted by Rev, Nelson MMeFall,
Rey. Garth Johnson and Rey. Mary Johnson.
Interment will follow in Ebenezer Cemetery,
Shirley Strect.
Precious menvories will forever linger in
the hearts of ber bowing and dewoted by her
son and daughter: Leroy and Anya Munnings: daughter: Linda Fitegerald:
Stepdaughter: Nicola Eve of Fort Lauderdale, Florida; Two granddaughters:
Franchyn Johnson and Sanya Munnings: Two grandsons: Byron and Wayde
Munnings; Granddaughter-in-law: Raquel Munnings of the Royal Bahamas
Defence Foree; Four great grandchildren: Edee Johnson, Kushna, Waynette and
Andrew Munnings: Ome great grandchild: Akeim Johnson; One sister: Alma
Sands: In Laws: Leonard and Eloise Archer, Duke Errol and Dorrie Strachan,
Julia Thompeon & Family, and John Neymour; Seven nieces: Melanie Rahming-
Thompson, Faith Rahming-Ene, Laurie Rahming-Williams, Dr. Inyang Ene.,
Evelyn Watson, Angie and Jan Rahming; Eight Nephews: Richard Dawkins,
Edgar and Sam Watson, Philip, Ricky, Gail, Alex and Deleno Rahming Efiong
Amaku Ene; Other relatives and fiends including: The family of the late Alonea
Mackey, The late Thomas Mackey & Family, Mrs, Grace Seymour and family,
the family of the late Rosalte North; Including Dr, Hubert Minnis Bertram,
Miriam, Marto, Mark and Detdre Smith, Dien Dean Ferguson, Marcella Dean,
Edward and Samuel Rahming, Alanare Newton Jones & Family Mickey Knowles
Palmer, Nurse Eloise Nicholls and Family, Gwendolyn Cunningham and Family,
Gerlene Jones and Family, Linwood and Juliette Wilson, Etienne Taylor, Rosaler
Taylor, Lashan Munnings, Paticia Whitfield, Delores Russell and family, Mickey
Palmer and Famuly Linda Fitzgerald and Family, Viola Rahming and family,
Winifted Munnings and family, The late Audley Munning and Family, Cleso
amd Jamal Munnings and Family, Lenora Weech and famuly, Annamac Dorsette
and family, Reva Potter and her beauty sabon staff, Reggie Knowles and Family,
Reggie Carey and family, Clif Thompeon and family, Joseph Butler and Family,
Qeme Knowles, Elva Munnings and family, Doris Fitzgerald and Family Leroy
(Pemmic) and Gwendolyn Hanna and family, Audrey Munnings-Francis, the
Staff of Hospital and Health Care Facilities Licensing Board and The Ministry
of Health Councils, George Capron, James Catlan, Leroy Archer, Maureen
Duvalier, Elizabeth Deveaux , Debbie Smith & Family, Reverend Garth Johnsen
and family, Deacon lan McPhee, Or Wesley Thompson and Mrs. Marsha
Thompson; Special Friends: Doris Fitzgerald, Louis Hanchell, Helena Dorsette,
Lerraine Munings Porbes, Rachel Penn , eka Munnings, Alanre Newton Jones,
Deris Fitzgerald, Mis, Jenne, Patricia Whitfield, Viola Rahming, Franceta Forbes,
Sharon Rahming, Danette Cleare, Annamae Dorsette, Linwood and Juliette
Wilson; A Very Very Speci Heartfelt Thank You To Mr, Lowis Hanechell and
Mrs. Helena Dorsett, Thank you to Dr. Ene and the staff of the Accident and
Emergency Department at The Princess Margaret Hospital, Mrs. Janet Butler and
the staff of Limty House on East Street South, Dr. Farquharson and bis Medical
team, Dr. Cyprian Strachan and Dr. Omally and Staff of Javon Medical Center,
Dr, Weech and Staff of the Operating Theater P_M.H, the Nursing Staff of Female
Surgical I at P.MLH and the Staff of Nassau Harbor Pilots.

Wiewing will be held in the ‘Legacy Suite’ of Vaughn O. Jones Menvorial Center,
Wultf Road and Primrose Street on Friday from 10:00 om. to 6:09) pom. and at
the church on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to service time.

Wulff Road and Primrose Street,
Opposite Studio of Draperies
Telephone: 326-9800/1 * 24 Hour Emergency
434-9220/380-8077

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Pinder’s Funeral Home

“Service Beyond Measure *

PALMDALE AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
PHONE: 322-4570/ 395-1351 « CELL: 357-3617
RANNIE PINDER President

Belescia Tem els

Mrs. Agnes Louise Knowles
(Nee Pinder)

passed away peacefully on Monday,
22nd June 2009 at the home of her
daughter Deborah in Dallas, Texas.
She was born on the 6th, March 1916
at Singer Island, Florida. At the age
of six, she moved back to the
Bahamas with her parents John B.
Pinder and Olive Pinder. Agnes
married Mr. Alexander C. Knowles
Sr. on 17th August 1933 and they had
twelve children.

Funeral services will be held on
Saturday, 4th July 2009 at 10:000am
at St. Anne's Church in Fox Hill.
Officiating will be Fr. Crosley Walkine and interment will follow
immediately after the service in the Church's Cemetery.

Agnes was predeceased by her husband Alexander C. Knowles and
her son James F. Knowles M.P. She 1s survived by one brother:
Hilbert B. Pinder; eleven children: Ethlyn (Jean) Pinder, Ruby Collins,
Doris Anderson, Yvonne Knowles, Alexander (C. Knowles Jr, Emerick
A. Knowles, Patrick A. Knowles, Geottrey W. Knowles, Charlton
V. Knowles, Deborah S$. Knowles and Julianna Green, In-laws:
William (Bill) Pinder, Richard Anderson 5r., Shirley Knowles,
Amarylis Knowles, Brenda Knowles, Rosa Knowles, Linda Knowles
and James Green; grandchildren: Craig Pinder, Perry Pinder, Stephen
Collins, Gina White, Karen Leonard, Richard (Ricky) Anderson,
Brian Anderson, Cyndy Woodward, Joanne Aranha, Michael Knowles,
Andrew (Andy) Knowles, Michelle Doura, James Knowles Jr.,
Roman Knowles, Kimberley Knowles, Trisha Wiethucher, Olivier
Knowles, Vanessa Knowles, Ryan Knowles, Bianca Carter, Christian
Knowles, Amanda Knowles, David Knowles, Daniela Knowles,
Marissa Knowles, Brittany Green and Matthew Green; nephews and
nieces: Bruce Pinder, Andrew and Scott Pinder, Holly Cartwright,
Cheryl (Bunny) Eickelbeck, Donna Wells, Gregory Pinder and
Michelle Lightbourne; eighteen great grandchildren, and a host of
other relatives and friends including: mPatau Regent, Ann Knowles,
Edith Knowles, Elva Knowles, Dawn Knowles, Renee Roth, Barbara
Algreen, Olive Naim, Menam Pinder and caregiver Shirkey Henderson.

The family would be grateful to all if in lieu of flowers a donation
be made to St. Ann's Church, Fox Hill Road.

Friends may pay their last respects at Pinders Funeral Home
Palmdale, Ave., Palmdale on Friday July 3rd, 2009 from 5:00pm
wail 7 Apa.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009,

Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Memorial Service for
GAIUS CORNELIUS BETHEL, 45

of Governor's Harbour, Eleuthera and |
formerly of Palmetto Point will be held Friday, :
July 3rd, 8pm at the People's Restoration |
Baptist Church, Queen's Highway, Governor's ;

Harbour, Eleuthera.

Funeral Service for
GAIUS CORNELIUS
BETHEL, 45

of Governor's Harbour, Eleuthera and |

formerly of Palmetto Point will be held on |

Saturday July 4th, 11:00 a.m., at the Worker's :

House, Queen's Highway, Governor's |

Harbour, Eleuthera. Pastor Patrick V. Smith ;

assisted by Pastor Ronald Bastian, Rev. ;

LeCari Sands, Rev. Charlotte Davis and Rev. :

Dr. Baltron Bethel will officiate. Interment will follow in the "Krypton" Garden of :

Remembrance, Spanish Maine, Palmetto Point, Eleuthera.

He is survived by his parents, Former Cabinet Minister, Reverend, The Honorable :
Philip M. Bethel, Sr. and Elder Yvonne Bethel; two (2) sisters, Deborah Asenath and :
Tryphena Yvonne; three (3) brothers, Philip Herman, Luke Francis and Philip Michael, :
Jr.; one (1) adopted sister, Lillymae Williams; seven nephews including, Triasen, :
Franzano, Michael, Salathiel, Zelotes, Aram, and Noah; seven nieces including, Philisea, :
Philan, Darlia, Pyleia, Tiara, Yvonne, Zoriah; grandfather, Evangelist Francis Moon }
Carey, Sr.; step grandmother, Pastor Marina Carey; uncles and aunts, Mrs. Iris & Austin :
Knowles, Sr., Mrs. Agatha & Joshua E. Culmer, Sr., Mrs. Helen & Theodore Allen, :
Mrs. Sandra Mae & Obediah Goodman, Sir. Baltron & Lady Helen Bethel, Elder :
Francis, Jr. & Betty Carey, James Carey, Levard Carey, and Lester Maycock; grand :
aunts & uncles:, Mrs. Velma & Dr. Ed Allen, Mrs. Arnette Knowles, Mrs. Patricia ;
Archer, Mr. Durward Archer, Mrs. Tessie Stubbs & family, Mary Moss & family, :
Emma Cooper & family, Pastor Hilda Allen & family, James Carey & family, Ralph :
Carey & family; special relatives including: Themica Pinder, Keno Thompson, Philip :
& Felicia Bethel, Marilyn Culmer, Zelda Evans and Joyce; brother-in-law, Richard ;
Jean; sisters-in-law, Takasa, Stacey, and Inga Bethel; other relatives including, Lukeisha, :
Mikeisha, Micarlos and Pastacia Bethel, Diamond, Dawn, Christian, Zachary, Shamar, }
Lamont Forbes, Lakeira & Omyio Williams, Ronaldo & Ronette Tinker, Pastor Patrick }
Smith, Rev'd Lecarl Sands, Deacon Benjamin and Rev'd Charlotte Davis, Miss ;
Jacqueline Gibson, officers and Members of the People's Restoration Baptist Church, |
Palmetto Point, Eleuthera; the staff of Eleuthera Supply Ltd., Ron Sparks, Brunson }
Sands, Matthew Gordon, Philippa Kelly, Jerome Davis, David, Gwen, Austin Jr., ;
Ricardo, Dr. Hadassah Knowles, Bertina Emmanuel; Charles & Anthony Culmer, :
Yvette Stuart, Tanya Deal; George & Jason Allen, Delphine Turner, Helena Edwards; :
Javan & Timna Goodman, Vashni Carey; Gregory, Dr. Ian, Brian & Leslie Bethel, |
Sharon Gill; Francis, Lashanda, and Laquel Carey, Melissa Rolle; Jamal and James |
Carey; Donalee and Guild Maycock; Nurse Freda Cooper & family, Pastor Arlene |
Isaacs & family, Mrs. Vernita Bethel & family, Mrs. Sheemah Darling & family, Emily |
Munnings, Mr. & Mrs. Gibbs, management and staff of Southern Air, Minister Ena }
Culmer & family, Mrs. Brenda Johnson, Gaynell Rolle, Mrs. Bertha Culmer & family, |
Elizabeth Knowles & family, Mitchlyn Joseph, Yvette Robinson & family, Ricky |
Mackey & family, Sherry Neely, Ruschell Mcklewhite, Pastor Henry Whyte & family, |
Sr. Administrator Ivan Ferguson, Pastor Hilda Sands & family Rodney Dayley, Nadia |
Johnson (Former Miss Bahamas), Pamela, Kelda, Shantel, Graylin, Dwight and Hank |
Gibson, Edith Sturrup, Melrose Butterfield, Renea Ettiene, Gail Archer, Beverly Smith, |

Shona Davies, Dedidra Cook, Elizabeth Stubbs, a host of special godchildren and the
entire Island of Eleuthera including Harbour Island.

Special Thanks To Dr. Ajero Of Governor's Harbour, Dr. Elisa Krill and staff at Mount
Sinai Cancer Center, Miami, Florida; Medical And Nursing Staff At Doctor's Hospital.

Friends may pay their last respects at the People's Restoration Baptist Church, Queen's
Highway, Palmetto Point, Eleuthera on Friday from 10:00 a.m., and at the Worker's
House on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

Arrangements handled by Bethel Brothers Morticians.

EVANGELIST CORAL J. MISSICK, 52

of #1002 Croton Street, Pinewood Gardens
will be held on Saturday July 4th, 10:00 a.m.
at Glad Tidings Tabernacle, Kemp Road.
Bishop Adline Jones assisted by Minister
Creswell Pratt will officiate. Interment will
follow in Woodlawn Memorial Gardens,
Soldier Road.

She is survived by her children, Quincy,

Lemorne, Dina, and Frederick Williams and

Shantel Bain; mother, Mrs. Elva Missick;

sisters, Linda Wildgoose, Delores Whylly,

Janet Johnson, Shandira Ferguson,

Lashawnda Missick, Cindy McKenzie,

Bernadette (Bunny) and Glenda Storr;

brothers: Charles Capron, Thomas Missick

Jr. and Ronnie Missick; grandchildren,

Deesean, Shaliza, Lamika, Lemorne Jr.,

Shaquille, Dontae, Tkai, Quiaden, Nathaniel,

Cierra; aunts, Hazel Alfonso, Sylvia Campbell, Naomi Hamilton, Monique Hamilton,

Mettie Hamilton, Ruth Hamilton, Carolee Hamilton, Elvira Missick, Annarine

Missick, Jane Missick, Jeweline Missick; uncles: Calford Hamilton, Sherlock

Hamilton, Christopher Missick, Lloyd Missick, Nehemiah Missick, nieces: Breana,

Aliya, Nigeria, Rakeisha, Ajhonae, Rayeisa, Donique, Kenneia, Rhonae, Nadia,

Brendeeka, Sheryl, Jakai, Tina; nephews: Brandon, Jeremiah, Alton, Charles Jr.

Xadensio, Jaryn, Jereno, Janesko, Theron, Ronnie Jr., Rommel Jr., Leonardo Jr.

David Jr, Chadwick; grand aunt: Roseta Butterfield; grand uncle: John Missick;

daughter-in-law: Shakeva Williams Brothers in Law: Stanley Wildgoose, Donald

Whylly, Anthony Johnson, Rommel Ferguson, Anthony McKenzie; sister-in-law:

Beverley Capron Relatives and Friends: Mr. Roosevelt Moss & Family, The Moss

Family, Dene & Family, Sandra & Family, Sherry, Sandra Gray & Family, Neely,

Mr. Gary Parks, Mrs. Marcia Missick & Family, Agnus Pratt, Sarg. Clayton

McKenzie, Mr. Mario Pugh & Family, Creswell & Agnus Pratt, Mr. Rudy Grant,

Ms. Catherine Simmons & Family, Sarg. Woodside, Peggy, Mr. John Bain &

Family, Leon Missick, Hon. Amanda Missick, Hartlean Pryor, Theodore Mott, Mr.

Shirland Solo Williams, Tyrone Mr. Ezekiel Williams, Mrs. Tracy Dorsett, Mr.

Ricardo Wilson & Family, Mr. Alkeinah Walker, Insp. Innis, Shantel Aleverez,

New Beginnings Prayer Ministries Family, Bahamas In-flight Family, Bruno
Gibson.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians #44 Nassau
Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday at the church from
9:00 a.m. until service time.



PAGE 11



PAGE 12, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009

‘@)) Bethel Brothers Morticians
“= " ‘Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

Funeral Service For

HUGH EVERET TURNQUEST, 67

of Gregory Town, Eleuthera will be
held on Saturday July 4th, 3:00 p.n.
at St. Agnes Anglican Church,
Gregory Town, Eleuthera. Fr.
Jonathon Archer will officiate.
Interment will follow in the Public
Cemetery, Gregory Town,
Eleuthera.

He is survived by his wife, Mildred
Turnquest; son, Leighton Turnquest;
step-children, Dave and Paula
McGhie; grandchildren, Malik
Turnquest, Brie, Mark and Jordan
Clarke; sisters, Sylvia Cambridge,
Joan Powell, Winifred Ferguson,
Rebecca Bethell and Pauline
Johnson; brothers, Audley and
Douglas Turnquest; bothers-in-law, Harcourt Cambridge, Cuthbert
Bethell, Ferdinand and Edward Hinds; sisters-in-law:, Jacqueline
Turnquest, Ethel Johnson, Willamae Turnquest, Eileen Robinson,
Edna Myles, Martha and Maureen Hinds; nieces, Diane Fernander,
Daphne Delva, Corinna Neely, Schevon Cunningham, Sharene
Ferguson, Kimberly and Diondra Turnquest, Shaundica and Tanya
Johnson, Sonja Moss Moultrie, Marchanille Folly, Nicole Rolle,
Sherry Cambridge and Keva Bethell; nephews, Craig, Dwight, Kevin
and Andre Cambridge, Demory, Dereck, Darrell and Donald
Fernander, Craig, Kim, Dion, Dwayne and Julian Turnquest, Basil
Merres, Omar Bethell and Keenan Johnson; cousins, Ruth Morgan,
Leila Wood, Euphemia Belle of Georgia, Hensel, James and Oswald
Belle of Florida, Theodore Johnson, Kingsley Wood, Ruby Murdock,
Jacqueline Pittman, Carl, Daphne, Bernard, Patrick, Augustine,
David, Reginald, Angela and Janet Turnquest, Barbara Tynes, Lois
Cleare, Patricia Nichols, Gwendolyn Duncanson, Elizabeth Rolle,
Carmel Charles, Joyce Quant, Karen Lightbourne, Patsy Johnson,
Mae Albury, Veronica Daniels, Rose Kemp, Randolph and Robert
Lee, Althea and Noel Conliffe; other relatives and friends, James
Johnson and family, Clarence Gibson, Rose and Zinnis Mackey,
Kirk Johnson, Gloria Finley, Margaret Rolle, Addie Carey and
family, Lucille Cleare and family, Melanie Clarke and family of
Florida, Willie Maurice, Tyrone Neely, Lisa, Joanne, Monique and
Rosanna Cambridge, Tanya Turnquest, Hector Delva, the Turnquest
family, the Bethell and Johnson families of James Cistern, Eleuthera,
the entire community of Gregory Town, Eleuthera, Flora Hanna,
Holy Spirit Church family, Fr. Jonathon Archer and Fr. Harry Ward;
special thanks to, Fr. Jonathon Archer, Evangelist Miss White,
Gregory Town Prayer Group who gave him spiritual refreshment,
Miss Olga Goldsmith and Rosalyn "Rose", his caretakers, to many
Doctors who gave him home visits, nurses Priscilla Scavella, Patrice
Johnson and the many others who attended to his health needs
especially his sister Sylvia Cambridge and Harcourt Cambridge,
who were always there for him.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians,
#44 Nassau Street on Thursday from 2:00p.m. to 5:00p.m. and on
Friday at the Church in Gregory Town, Eleuthera from 6:00 p.rn.
unti/12:00 midnight, and on Saturday from 10..00 a.m. until service
time.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

NEWBOLD BROTHERS
CHAPEL

#10 Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street
PO. Box N-3572
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 326-5773

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR
John Miller, 64

will be held on
Thursday, July 2nd,
2009, at 11:00 am, at
the gravesite of
Southern Cemetery,
Cowpen & Spikenard
Roads. Officiating
will be Minister
Derek Roberts.

Left to cherish fond

memories are two
brothers, Wendel and Fredrick Miller; eight
sisters, Patsy Roker, Faye Roberts, Debbie
Butler, Carolyn Miller-Fowler, Vernita Black,
Rose Deal, Joan Rolle and Ingrid McKennie;
twenty-one nieces and nephews, Brendalee
Fawkes, Ernestine Markland, Tiffany
Bullard, Ticla McKennie, Monique Whylly,
Jasmine Miller, Denequa Sweeting, Carlton
Fowler, Quetell Cox, Samantha Rahming,
Keva, Latisha, Lashanda, Latoya, Laura,
Gina, Donnie, Omar, Annie Williams and
Peter Rolle Jr.; six brothers-in-law, Hansel
Black, Vernon Butler, John Fowler, Delly
Deal, Arthur McKennie and Corporal 1138
Peter Rolle and a host of other relatives and
friends.

Relatives and friends may pay their last
respects on Thursday at the gravesite of
Southern Cemetery from 10:00 a.m. until
service.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

aN! My,

EAST SUN IN RSE MORTUARY

ANTHONY
“Fat Back”
MARSHALL, 44

of Goklen Gates #2 will be held on Satumlay at 10
ina. at Mit. Tabor Full Gospel Bapties Church, Willew |
Tree Avenue and Mt. Tabor Dre. Officiating will |
be Bishop Neil C, Ellis, assisted by Pastor Lorenae
Clarke, Interment will follow in Woodlawn (lardens,
Soldier Road.

He is survived by his children: Jnamine, Ebony,
Roben & Shanishka Higgs; Granddaughter: Aznire |
Samuels; Son-Im-Lew: Glenn Higgs Sisters: Mavis |
Taykr-Soott, Chery] Marshall-Campbell de Carmita |
Marshall-Nesbitt; Brother: Joseph Taylor, Brothers-
in-law: Clement Campbell, Cornelius Nesbin and
Rustis Scott; Sleter-in-law: Janse Taylor; Sieees:
Chervita K. Campbell, Ann Scoci-Woed ‘ynthia Leais, Joyoe Soot, Tawnnna Taylor (Detron), ¥olands
Taylor (DetrotLAvery Taylor (Detront Bunks Walkes, Charmaine Walkes, ( “rystal Nesbitt, Shantavia
Mesbetl, Nephews: C. McMahon, Campbell Martin TeyhorPatick Nesbut, Nepbew-in-law: Cicrald
Lewis; 5 Grandnicces: 7 Grandmephews: Aunta: Hortense Harris-Smith, Hester Johnsen, Enid
Ferguson, (North Carolina),Hazel Young (Miami), Frances Lede and Shirkew Clarke (West Palen).
Unele:Herbert Marshall; Aunt-In-Law: Linda Marshall; Unele-[n-Lawse George Young, Samael
AL Hasris-Soniths a host of relatives amd friends: Susan Roberts A Family, Edath Clarke & Family.
Franklyn Clarke & Family, Barbara Rolle & Family , Cindy Sherman, Beatrice Clarke | { Exumal.
Roshyn Clarke (Tampa), Lisa Wilder & Family (Ft. Lauderdale}, Terry Olacke (West Paleo), Alfred
Clarke (Tampa), Marion Clarke & Family, Wenrick “Chnar’ Clarke & Family, Bert & Vernac
rae Barbara & Sol Bostwick, Lula Gainer (Antonio), Valerie Patterson (Mianei}, Timothy
Strachan & Famaly (Miami), Sand Jackson & Family [Miamib. ‘Oquendo Strachan (Califommiat
Arives Fielder (hdmi), Quan Jackson {Miami}, Brian ‘Williams (Miami), Laverne Camphell-
Dunoambe & Family, Portia Clarke {Miami}, Rose Humes, Dr. Eduarde Humes & Farmaily (Mew
‘Yore} Huenes, Der Michelle Grant & Family, Victoria Grant, Teney Fergugon & Family | Feu
Virgina Ferguson (Exemal, Augusta Bodie, Bishop Clarence: 2 Armbrister & Family, John Armbeister,
Solomon Anmbrister, Priscilla Armbrister, Althea Fergeson, lona, Alberta Williams-Moackey, Johe
Willams, Annette Williams. Victoria Williams &Family, Beatrice Curtis AFamily, Mary Taybar
(Exumal, Vernewe Bode , Dale Joseph, Henretia Smith, Dede Uirey Framcseon Fereusin. Olga
Forbes, Sorctha Clarke, Della Clarke, Philip Griffin, Vernoica Griffin (ermany), Bishop Astiar
Ferguson &Family, Pastor Roy & Judy Mayeock & Family, Paul & Joye Ross & Family, Valentino
& Lisa Berkeley & Family, Bishop Christopher Fergus & Family, Bishop Rudelph Bodie &
Family, Edith Johnson & Family (Freepeet}, Duphne Mixon & Family (Freeport), Sandra Sbsart &
Family {Freeport}, Brando Stewart & Family (Freeport), Paaletic Smith & Farealy, Gish Smath, Ken
Meomand & Family, Grodiney MecAlpon & Family, Arvckell Stuart & Farnily, Beverley Taylor.

Virginia Jones (Virginia), Freddie Newohurch & Family (Freeport), Marilve Johnson & Family of

(Freeport), Bartar Albury & Panoily (Grind Cav), Leona Wallace &Family (Freeport }. Marthe
Pander a. Fansily (Freeport), Sandra Duhaney & Family (Freeport), The F amily & Seat of the “The
Best Music Om The Planet’. MORE 9.9 FM, Troy Thompson & Famaly, Palm & Kerk Thomas
(Ohio), Lynn Thomas & Family (Philadelphia), Latoya Cooper & Family, Bridgette Samael &
Family, Exanna Dormeles & Family, “ern Johneoe, Svivia Roberts & Family, Terrell Tinker &
Family, Residents of Bridge, The Fathack Kids Clubs, Dr, Digeis (Doctors Hospital), Ricarde
Lighthourne (Freeport, Pauline Bowen-Forhes (Freeport), Natalie Martinborough (Freeport), Nurse
Aunme Stubbs-Girants (Freepeat), flr. Ramsey & Famuly (Berry Iskind), R.N. Gomez (Berry Islands).
- cn Ruachanisin, Hawksbill High Class af 1982, Ingrid Romer, Gibson Family, Anastica Lamb,

Tomoya Cooper, Princess Miargarct Nurse’ Male Medecal | de fl, ICU, Princess Marpaeet Hospital,
The Bows Clubs, Kiwanis of Nassau, Junkanoo Groupe, ZNS Staff, Me, Leslie Miller, Hon. Desnond
Bannister, MP Carmichael, The Royal Bahamas Police Force, The ht. Tabor Family, The Church
of God of Prophecy Members, Sponsors 4 Clients, More Bounce Clients, Child Abuse Council,
Sylva Canty & Faroly (Ft. Laaderdale), Carloyn Thompson & Family, Drarthry McPhee & Family,
Kentrce Williaens & Family, Charming MeCardy & Family, Alicia Baillou (Freeport), and a host
of other relacives and friends 100 mumerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bast Sunrise Mortuary, Rosetta Street, Palmdale from 10 a.m.
io fi p.m om Friday and again from 9 acm. at the Cherch om Saturday until service time

EAST SUNRISE MORTUARY.

“A New Commitment To Service"

#27 Rosetta Street, P.O.Box C.B. 12248 / Palmdale,
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 323-EAST — (242) 326-4209 Fax: 356-2957
24 hrs. Emergency Service
ere) eee Ee c=) elo teeeeele] aes

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 13

Sweeting’s Colonial
Mortuary And Crematorivm

84 Blue Hill Road « P.O. Bow N-8161 + Tel: 325-7857
* Fax: 325-7R67

for the late
Retired Deputy
Superintendent of Police

MR. HOSEA
DOUGLAS JR., 66

a resident of Sowh Beach Estates and
formerly of ios Town, Exuma, will be held
wt Church of God Cathedral, East Street and
Lily of the Valley Comer on Friday, 3rd July,
2009 at 11200 am. Officiating will be Bishop
Moses Johnson, assisted by Rev. Harvey
Cash and Interment will follow at Woodlawn
Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Road.

Left to cherish his memories are his Wife: Verna, Two Sons Inspector Kirk and
Natuno Douglas, Five Daughters: Kim, Bridgette, Tiffany, Deidre and Registered
Nurse Kaylor Dowelas, Two Adopted Daughters: Lynette Whylly and Denise
Sears, Mother-in-Law: Victoria Smith, Two Brothers: Rudolph and Leonard
Douglas, Sister: Pearl Rahming; Daughter-in-Law: Lakeva Douglas, Son-in-
Law: Bobby Jones, Eighteen Grandchildren: Tianya, Candace, [talia, Kayliza,
Tativyanna, Kirk Jr. Rychee, Nataria, Indira, Laveka, Shaniqua, Cordero and
Angela Douglas, Dawndria Taylor, Koreas Cox, Neveah Caley, Alicia McPhee
and Kaylisa Rolle, Thinee Brothers-in-lLaw: Hollid Smith, Fetward Hanchell and
Rev. Deacon Peter Rahming, Five Sisters-in-LLaw: Paula Smith, Eleanor and
Naomi Douglas, Verlene Taylor and Lease Smith, Four Aunts: Dahli Kelly,
Dolly Stunup, Dons Comer and lamer Musgrove, Two Uneles: Hosea Musgrove
and Joseph Butler, Numerous Nieces and Nephews Including: Carolyn and
Ricardo Douglas, Antoinette Deveaux, Donel Joyner, Joanne Romero, Michael,
Shawn, Shirrel, Garvin and Erica Douglas, Patreece, Peter [I and Preston Rahening,
Antoinette Smith, Yvonne, Elvaria, Yvette, Sharon, Deidre and Shantell Hanchell,
Shery] and Garth Whylly, Elder Maurice, Debbie and Keith Arthur, Pamela
Reckley, Michael Taylor, Holly, Leonardo, Lavardo, Catherine and Charles
Smith, Aljunac Johnson and Makeshla Cleare and A host of other Relatives and
Friends Including: Luke Carey, Dennis Woodside, Moses Johnsen Jr., Elvis
Johnson, Estella Butler, DC 2790 Jared McPhee, Jenny Bullard, Deborah,
Stephanic, Charles, Tyrone, Nora, Glen and Wilshire Smith, Corcne Robinson
(Boynton Beach Fl), Heslyn Fernander, Carnetta Rahming, Flint and Preecola
Musgrove, Jane and Sylvia Taylor, Susan Hunt, Lorenre Douglas, Jacqueline
Seymour, Ernestine Douglas, Barbara Davis, Linda Rolle, Kayla Lightbourne,
Chiford World Smith, Delors Robinson, Patricia and Terell Lightheume, Lilymae
Brown, Doreen Cooper, Sherry Smith, Kelly Rolle, Elva Bodie, Rev. Elan
Musgrove, Threva Anmbrister, Archie Sands, Jackue Smuth, Hester Clarke-Bowe,
Aremina and Charles Musgrove, Roscoc Sands, Rev. Mitchell Jones and the
Annex Church Family, Ena Dean, Inell Adderley, Bishop Moses and Sis. Cynthia
Johnson and the entire East Street Cathedral Family, Father Andrew Toppin,

Leanza and Rena Whylly, Gloria and Irene Dorsett, Teazel Wright, Lily Burrows,

Larry Butler, Patsy Rahming, Leonie Strachan-Bethel, Richard (Green Castle),

Governor General the Hon, Arthur D. Hanna, Hon. Phenton Neymour (MP for
South Beach), Sir Orville Tumquest, Rosina Johnson, Cleomie Whymns, Charlton
and Collie Families, Wayne Edgecombe, Jenniemac Stuart, Patricia Wewbold,
Sandra Moncur, Carmita Rolle, Ricomdo Johnson, Soup, Yvette Sweeting, Phillipa
Smith, Melanic Hall, Jacqueline Logis, Viola Roxbury, Constance Major, Dedric
Pinder, Darnell Roker, Kayla Ingraham, Cindy King, Sclena Stuart, The Nurses
of Male Medical 1, Nurses of the Dialysis Unit, Dr, Wloyd, Dr, Morgan and staff
of Accident and Emergency Department, Commissioner of Police Reginald
Ferguson and the Royal Bahamas Police Force and the Fire Department, Mr

Gratton [fill (President Royal Baohamas Police Force Retired Officers Association).
the entire Staffof Goverment House, Bahamasair, Bahamas Telocommunication
Company, the Communities of South Beach Estate, the entire Family of Moss
Town and Hemitage Exuma and Green Castle, Eleuthera and Rum Cay Families.

The body will repose at the Chapel of the Saints Sweeting’s Colonial Mortuary
and Crematonum, 64 Glue Hill Rd. from 10:00am on Thursday until 6; (pm
and on Friday from 9:45 am. at the Church until service time.





PAGE 14,

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Mutler’s Funeral Homes & Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

Funeral Announcement

MRS. FRANCELA
RUTH
WILHELMINA
WINT-CAREY, 69

East St. South, will be :
held on Saturday 4" July,
2009 at 10:00 a.m. at St. |
| Margaret’s Anglican |
Church, Kemp Road. |
Officiating will be Rev'd |

Fr. Joseph L.

Mycklewhyte, assisted by Rev'd. Angela Palacious.

Cremation will follow.

Thamsyn Rahming,
grandchildren; Philip Moss, Jr. and Allie Miller Jr.,

sixteen nieces and nephews; Katherine and Colin |
| Shelly, Bonnie, Nefa; numerous grand and great

Johnson, Sharraine and Peter Walkes, Errol Jr. ,

Antoinette, Michael, Lucinda, Brian, Verne ,Scott |
Jasmine and Marie Rolle, Nadia and Mervin Evans |
five god children; Toni | ’
Mitchell Antonia Albury, Sandra Deveaux, Rhonda ; 4nd Family, Carlton, Edward, Kendrick, and Rodney
Clarke and Andrea Adderley and a host of other |
relatives and friends too numerous to mention |

including Bahamas Customs Family and the Staff : th 7
- Carolina and Gerard Hanna and Family, and a host

- of other relatives and friends too numerous to
In lieu of flowers the family has requested that |

and Patricia Edgecombe,

of the Bahamas Heart Certre.

donations be made to St. Margaret's Parish P. O. |
Box SS 5695, Nassau, Bahamas.

Memorial
Announcement
for
MR. KENDRICK
NAPOLEON
HANNA, 67

of Carmichael Road, will
be held on Saturday 4"
July, 2009 at 10:00 a.m,
at St. Barnabas Anglican
Church, Wulff Road.
Officiating will be Rev.
Canon Basil Tynes.

: He is survived by his four brothers; Pembroke of
: Goulds Florida, Dewitt, Oscar and Earnel Rollington
She is survived by her two daughters; Edda Carey
Rahming and Alisa Ingraham, one son-in-law; A.S.P. :
Edmund Rahming, one sister; Melitza Rolle; one |
brother-in-law; Errol Rolle, seven grand children; |
Latia, Lynette and Lillian Smith, :

Lathario, Janaya and Devontae Ingraham, two great |
| Sweeting, Tameka Hanna, Teneshia and Dwight Innis,

Hanna (ER); two sisters; Melba Iris Hanna and Ellen
lonette Adderley; twenty eight nieces and nephews:
Rudolph Hanna, Claude and Melanie Hanna, Gary
and Rochelle Hanna, Brain and Wanda Hanna, Dewitt,
Irvin, Berkley Adderley, Timothy, Tyson, Theadore,
Trevor, Trineil, Dawn Hanna, Terah and Lyndon

Tyiece Hanna, Tania, Nicole, and Tyra Adderley,
grand nieces and nephews; three sisters-in-law;

Flora, Carol and Eartha Hanna: numerous cousins
including; The Governor General Arthur D. Hanna

Williams and Families and Gloria Hanna and Family,
Shirley Francis, Jacqueline Smith, Paula Sands,
Dorothea Ritchie and Family, Samone Hanna of North

mention.

| Funeral arrangements are being handled by

| Butlers’ Funeral Homes and Crematorium Ernest
| and York Streets.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Butler's Funeral Homes
& Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

DEATH NOTICE FOR

MR. GARY
CANCINO, 72

of Coral Harbour died at
his residence on Friday
June 26th, 2009.

He is survived by one
brother; Peter Cancino,
four sisters—in —law;
Thelma Cancino, Lorraine
Cancino, Constance
Cancino and Edna
Cancino, one adopted
daughter and grandson; Jean-Patrice and Jon Travis
Sweeting, ten nieces and nephews; Stephen , Michael,

Anthony, Lindsey and Linda Cancino, Deborah Nixon,
Joy Burrows, Ronnie North, Sean Hall, and Judith Pinder.

See eeem
A special thanks to those friends who kept him in their
thoughts:
* Aggie, Patricia, Emily & Michael who called all the
time to keep him ‘up to date’.
Marilyn for always making him laugh and giving him
the right dose of medicine for a good day.
Shirley Hanna for making that long trek from East to
West to sit down with him on Sundays and just chat
and watch movies, his favorite pastime.
Pat, who always made his day start right with the
moming newspaper.
And last, but most certamly not least, Sharlene who
was always there to give him great care and even
greater ‘drama stories’.

To all of you, he is surely thankful that you were in his
life.

2 oo oe eo aks os a

Al"M Tio":

Usted es entrado cuerpo pero usted siempre estara en el
corazon y las muy profundidades de mi alma. Yo le perderé
profundamente. Usted fue mi MEJOR amigo, y el
confidente mas grande de mundo. Te quiero SIEMPRE
... Patrice.

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 15

Evergreen Mortuary

EXCELLENT IM THE SERVICE WE PROVIDE

For all of your Funeral Service Needs,
We will be pleased to serve you with honor.

Tel: 242-3 4-7
Fax: 242-24 7900
24hns; 242-341-5309
or 322-3242
Cell365-97 38

DENMALEE EB. PENW LPT
MARGIN PF LUINERAL DIRECTOR

) Steet Soath
(Opposite Minute Muffler) Nassau, Rekamas

Funeral Service For

IVAN BANKS THOMPSON, 67

of Carmichael Road and formerly of
Bailey Town, Bimini will be held on
Monday. July 6th, 2009 at Temple
Fellowship Ministies, Davis Strect, Oakes.
Field at 2:00 p.m. Officiating will be
Bishop Kirkwood Murptry. Interment will
follow in the Bailey Town Public
Cemetery, Bimini.

Left to cherish fond memories are his
wife: Nathalie Francis Thompson; four
sons: Frederick, Peciro, Nathan Thompson
and Franklyn Francis; sewen daughters:
Mirs. Dellearses Jones, Arctha Thompson,
Mrs. Nicole Ash, Mrs, Carmen Dames,
Gloria Stuan, Shavonne Marshall and
Esther Pinder; grandchildren: Ivrica, Ivan,
Ricardo Jr, Richard, Raquel, Malik, Kedo'r, Frednicka, Shantell, Lakeisha,
Fredrick Jr, Dan, Tanica, Dominique, Pedrico, Brittany, Branderia, Briston,
Amarion, Marica "Chervon Roker, Mandell, Cavron, Ce Ce, Marcus,
Greevonea Lewis, Shavonta Marshall and Kobe and Kayanna Rolle; five
great grandchildren: Mariah, Tia, Rende], Donavan and Shenia; two sisters:
Eloise Strachan and Deborah Thompson; two brothers: Cedric and Gadirey;
three aunts: Elva Minnis, Havel Thompson and Louise Sweeting of Deep
Creck, Eleuthera; numerous mieces and nephews: Lione] & Lavone Harms,
Anton & Hope Sealy, John & Carla Wildgoase, Lisa & Larry Anmnbrister,
Trevor & Phyllis Thompson, Wanda, Kara, Sherry, Dr. Christina Pratt, Sophia
& Wayne Wilkinson, Nicole & Devon Allen, Lateisha & Angelo Knowles,
Vera & Darvin McKinney, April Thompson, Darrin, Dwayne, Gregory and
Gerard; sisters-in-law: Audrey Pamela, Diana, & Helen Thompson, Adnamna
Wright, Peggy Roach and Corrine Smith, brothers-in-law: Benjamin Wright,
David Smith, Philip Smith and Jefferey Strachan; two daughters-in-law:
Karen and Willamac Thompson; three sons-in-law: Cecil Dames, Ricardo
Jones Sr, and Lawrence Ash; and a host of other relatives and friends
incloding: Cleola Thompson and family, Warren Doc Thompson and family,
Kirk & Brentwood Thompson and family, Mervin Sweeting and family, The
Anderson Family, Cedric and Edna Hanna and family, Mary, Marporic, Paul,
Donna Hanna, Elijah Clarke and family, Stankey Fulford and family, Sandra
and Tyrone Russell and family, Martha, Anthony, Donakd, Dave Marshall
and family, Susan Moxey and family, Vincent and Denise Mackey and family,
Leroy and Veronica Mackey and family, Wilfred & Shantell Moxey and
family, Clayton and Natasha Williams and family, The Entire Bimini North
& South Communities, beep Creek, Eleuthera Community, Balls Alley, St
James Road, Abraham Street and Okra Hill Communities, Big John Family,
Bimini Bay, Bimini Big Game, Bimini Blue Water, Ray, Andrew "Blood"
& Marva Roberts and family, the Oncology Department, James Curtis and
family, the Airport Airline and Allied Worker's Union Executives Officers,
Kemer International Security Department, Bishop Revy Francis and family,
Angela Cartwright and family, Mrs. Laura Rolle and family, Bahamas Hotel
Catering & Allied Worker's Union, Gregory Mott and family, Oral and
Geneva Pinder and family, The Sweeting Family, The Thompson Family
and The Pride of Bimini.

Relatives and frends may pay their respects at Evergreen Mortuary, Mackey
Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m, and at the church on Monday

from 1 0K) p.m, until service time,





PAGE 16,

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

HAemeritte’s Funeral Aome

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET « P.O. BOX GT-2097 « TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

JEFFREY LAVARON i

"Outlaw, Fingers"
COLEBROOKE, 24

a resident of Oxford Avenue, |
who died on 19 June, 2009, |
be held at New.
Bethlehem Baptist Church, :
Independence Drive, on |
Saturday at 11 :00 a.m. |
Officiating will be Rev. Dr. |
Everette J. Brown, assisted |
by Rev. Joseph Saunders, Rev. Tyrone Laing, Minister | Spikenard Roads.
Derek Muoe & Evangelist Denie Fountain. Interment |
follows in Old Trail Cemetery, Old Trail Road. |

will

Bernadette Colebrooke; sisters: Lavara, Jeffette, Jecel :
and Jaliyah Colebrooke; brothers: Jeffame & Jevantae |
Colebrooke; niece: Jatish; nephew: Javontae IJr.; |
grandmothers: Ruth Kerr & Cleomi Saunders; aunts: |
Meshell Kerr Bethel, Annamarie Kerr, Monique Delancey, |
Ruby Russell, Starita Robertson, Astride Nottage; uncles: |
Charles, Anthony & Wenzel Kerr, Lynden & Garfinelli |
Saunders, Bullamo Colebrooke, Marvon Bethel & Cordell
Delancy; grandaunts: Syrene Russell, Beatrice Russell, |
Edith Russell, Ruth Ward, Mavis Gaitor, Wendy Jones, |
Mavis Dean, Emily Knowles, Mazie Darville, Isoleme |
Colebrooke & Shirley Francis; granduncles: Garnet Miller, :
Sam Miller, Wenzel Jones, George, Edgar, Rodney & | |
Isaiah Colebrooke; cousins too numerous to mention; a | Barbara Morris & family, Suna Adderley, Sherry & Albert
host of other relatives & friends including: Kenneth |
Symonette & family, Bernard Dupuch & family, Ricardo |
Lightbourne Sr., the Thurston, Strachan & Newbold |
families, C. V. Bethe] Crew Graduating Class of 2002, |
Tiffany, Teresa, Crystal, Mona, Snake, the Oxford Avenue |
boys, & the entire neighbourhood of Oxford Avenue past |
: Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m, on Friday & on
| Saturday from 9 a.m.-1:00 p.m. & at the church from
Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral |
Home, Market Street, from 10 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday |
& on Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service |

& present.

time.

DERECK JOHN
LEWIS, 31

a resident of Eneas Jumper
Corer, who died on 24 June,
2009, will be held at St.
Georges Anglican Church,
Montrose Ave., on Saturday
at 3:00 p.m. Officiating will
be Fr. Kingsley Knowles.
Interment follows in Southern
Cemetery, Cowpen &

Left to cherish his memories are his mother: Mariette

| Storr; | son: Lavardo Lee; | daughter: Shandy Mackey;
Left to cherish his memories are his mother: Euneska |
Kerr; father: Jeffrey Colebrooke Sr.; stepmother: |

1 son-in-law: Stephen Mackey; grandchildren: Jerimiah
& Stephanie Mackey; 3 sisters: Delisa Forbes, Bianca &
Ruthmae Walkes; | brother: Norman Thompson; | brother-
in-law: Henry Clarke; | aunt: Bernice Sturrup; 6 nephews:
Javon Clarke, Aquin, Wilfred & Stephen Walkes, Hakeem
Thompson & Ashton Fernander; 7 nieces: Dalette, Dareaka
& Anell Walkes, Rokeisha Roker, Avreann Fernander,
Christnell & Normareaka Thompson; 7 grand nieces:
Sancia, Alexus & Brinae Walkes, Shanya Bethel, Dael
Gaitor & Jalisha Clarke; 6 grand nephews: Jacoby Clarke,
D'vonta Rolle, Sean Taylor Jr., Stephen, Stefon & Wilfred
Walkes Jr.; other relatives & friends including: Shirley,
Wilamae, Edith Sturrup, Delores, Melinda & Duranda
Carter, Charles, Edwin, Bruno, Delrick, Tyrone, Jeffery,
Pedro Sturrup, Patricia, Monique & Navardo Glinton,

Deveaux, Natasha & Toby Deveaux, Kimberly Hepburn,
Simone Taylor, Ronald Storr of Cocoa Florida, Prince
Adderley, Prince Sweeting, Sean Taylor Sr., Tino, resident
of Eneas Jumper Corner & Fritz Lane.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral

2:00 p.m. until service time.





PAGE 18, THURSDAY, JULY 2,

2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

and Crematlouum Limited

on Crcmatniuns Gincad”

11A East Coral Road. Freep: | G.B., Bahamas
Telephone: (24) aa 373-1471
Poger: (242) 340-8043 » Fax: (242) 373-3005

Robinson and Soldier Roads, N Nassau, M.P., Boharnas
Telephone: a) 394-6049 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 = Fox: (242) 340-8034

DEATH NOTICES he) is

MR. APPOLON
‘Popo’

NORTELUS JR., 44

of #24 Wood Rogers, South Bahamia,

on Sunday, June 28, 2009,

He is survived by his parents: Appolon Sr. |
and Frida Nortelus; children: Alton ‘Bats’, Unch, Vashon and Ahmad :
Nortelus; sisters: Amette Jones, Irene Nortelus, Monique and Katrina :
Nortelus, Maria McIntosh; brothers: Arlington Sr., Audley Sr., Fritz |
Sr, Ramus Sr, and Craig Nortelus Sr.; numerous aunts, uncles, nieces, :

nephews, cousins and a host of other relatives and friends.

Funeral Arrangements will be announced at a later date.

MR. BERTRAM LESLIE
WARD, 62

of #83 Sugar Plum Road, Freeport, Grand |

Bahama died at his residence on Monday,
June 29, 2009,

He is survived by his wife: Inavie Ward: |
daughters: Monique, Marissa, Ordissa and |
Cyntina Ward; son: Jamal Ward; sister:
Janet Ward; niece: Patricia Brown and a :

host of other relatives and friends.

Funeral arrangements will be announced at a later date.

MR. DILLON OTNEAL
‘A.K.A Tyler’ ‘Pop’
HAMILTON, 79

| Of #102B Gordon Avenue, Freeport, Grand

Bahama And Formerly Of Grand Turk,

rs Turks And Caicos Islands died at his |
23 residence on Saturday, June 27, 2009. :

He is survived by his wife: Helena :

i Hamilton; § daughters: Maude O'Brian, Deloris Stubbs, Pearline
i Hamilton, McKeba Palmer and Wealthy Hanna of Nassau, Bahamas;
: 2 sons: Noel and Floyd Hamilton; brother: Eugene Hamilton; numerous
i grandchildren, nieces, nephews and a host of other relatives and
| friends.

| Funeral Arrangements will be announced at a later.

Freeport, Grand Bahama died at the Rand |
Memorial Hospital, Freeport, Grand Bahama |

MR. JEAN MAQUES
NOEL, 58

4 of #4 Garden Villas, Freeport, Grand
Bahama and formerly of Milot, Haiti, died
at The Rand Memonal Hospital, Freeport,

®) Grand Bahama on Sunday, June 28, 2009.

) Funeral arrangements will be announced
at a later date.

MR. LENWOOD LEONARD
BULLARD, 37

) of Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama died
| at the Rand Memorial Hospital, Freeport,
Grand Bahama on Sunday, June 28, 2008.

He is survived by his wife: Precious
Bullard; daughters: Natasha Bullard Miller,
Miranda Bullard-Taylor, Marion Arlene
and Medris Bullard; brothers: Simeon,

| Stanley, Bobby, Manfred and Joshua Bullard, Garth Jackson and Chery!

Dean Bullard and a host of other relatives and friends,

FUNERAL ARRANGEMENT WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT A

| LATER DATE.

‘a
fae
e oe ate





THURSDAY
July 2, 2009

The Tribune

ae
NEWS,
STORIES
AND
CHURCH
SNES





PG 20 ® Thursday, July 2, 2009 RELIGION The Tribune


































































Setting a new standard
in gospel music

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

AMAS Faith Ministries’ (BFM)

er conference titled The

ment is setting a new standard in
gospel ministry as several church and
community artists have collaborated to

create a soundtrack for the event. €ALSO on the
Produced by local gospel artist and youth minister Appointment album is

DJ Counsellor, the music album features a cross sec- 21-year-old Ryan Jupp,
tion of genres all under the theme ‘Living Right In A who recently performed
World Gone Wrong.’ ALUM Uae Tatts ace

DJ Counsellor explained: “For this soundtrack I CRUSTAL
wanted to bring a different flavor, mixture, and vari- of BFMs 2008 talent Eup
ety. From R&B, Reggae, Culture, Reggae Dance-
Hall, Hip Hop, and also Calypso and Rake n’ Scrape.
“It’s a straight-up gospel album not in the tradition-
al church way, it is basically something that you can
take to the streets that connects with everyone.”

Also having a song and several features on this lat-
est album, DJ Counsellor explained that the sound-
track also serves as an opportunity for exposure to
some of the new artists he has rallied for the project.
Aleithia Sweeting, 21, who hails from Five Porches
of Deliverance Church said: “For as long as I could
remember music has been a part of my life, with both
of my parents and brother being involved in the field.
“T’ve just always been tagging along, but when I i
really started to develop a passion for music was last | Ye ;

year while I was off to school, I started to play the A areca fe cet the
guitar and IJ just started to sing and write music.” / music scene but is hop-
Aleithia said the tone her lyrics is one which ing to establish a pres-
encourages people to follow Christ , evangelises ence as a gospel artist
through song, and shares her love relationship with eMC LMUte: Sse TICE

SEE page 24 soundtrack.



The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, July 2, 2009 ® PG 21

‘@m@iiien

Showers of blessings

WE are having rain storms that come
so thick and fast that the ground seems
unable to absorb it. Grass requires
mowing weekly now, and the flowers
are in profusion.

The colour green is everywhere and
the dry and thirsty earth has been
drenched for hours on end.

What does this mean if you have
planned a cookout, outdoor wedding or
sporting event? It means postpone-
ment, cancellations and disappoint-
ment. Sudden shifts to indoor arrange-
ments may alter the ambience and
dampen the spirit of the occasion.

Pedestrians have puddles to avoid
and speeding cars to anticipate as vehi-
cles driven by uncaring or distracted
motorists provide unsolicited and unex-
pected mud baths.

What does it mean to gardeners? It
means answered prayers after months
of drought bringing long awaited flow-
ers and vegetables dying in the heat. It
means the reward for long hours of

Brothers of Alpha
Phi Alpha
Fraternity attends
St. George’s
Anglican Church

The brothers of the Iota Epsilon
Lambda Chapter of Alpha Phi
Alpha Fraternity, Inc. recently
attended the 9am worship service
at St George's Anglican Church
on Montrose Ave. The brothers
and their families attended the
service in recognition of the instal-
lation of Chapter President Dave
Forbes and his new Executive
Team. The brothers of the frater-

nity were pleased to join their fra-
ternity brother, Fr Kingsley
Knowles, Rector of St George's
Anglican Church.

* Pictured with Fr Knowles
Back Row L-R

L Gerarr Archer (Associate
Editor of the Sphinx), Oscar
Dorsette (Member), Warren
Rolle (member), Trevino
Russell (Financial Secretary)
Front Row L-R

Ricardo Deveaux (Historian),
Lynden Maycock (Immediate
Past President), Kevin Basden
(member), Dave Forbes
(President), Marcus Lang (Vice-
President)

REV. ANGELA
C BOSFIELD
PALACIOUS



back-breaking labour for farmers, and
bountiful harvests to sell and share with
family and friends.

We need a spiritual rainstorm to
inundate our islands, to wash us of sor-
did sins, and “re-green” our parched
souls. We truly need an anointing by
the Holy Spirit such as never before
experienced in the Bahamas. We need
the Lord. We need the reign of God in
our lives and the love of God in our
hearts.

What does this mean for those who
reject God? It means a life that could
have climbed more mountains, forded
more streams and followed more rain-

bows in order to realise more God-
inspired dreams. It means no sweet fel-
lowship with the Holy Spirit, and no
promise that the best is yet to come for
all eternity.

For those who accept a life founded
on godly principles, who seek Jesus
Christ as Saviour, and follow our
Redeemer as Lord, the glory of God
may be glimpsed from time to time, the
comfort of the Lord is real, and even
suffering will be used to bring praise to
God’s name.

Allow God to so shower you with the
blessings of peace, love, joy, hope and
faith. Admit your need for order in the
chaos, patience in the delays, stamina
for the deadlines, and forgiveness for
your own failures and those of others.

When next you hear the rain, why
not pray for a personal saturation by
the Spirit? Don’t put up the umbrella of
doubt or denial. Accept God’s gift of a
new life and then tell someone about
the benefits of a shower of blessing.





w God to so
ou with the
ssings of peace,
love, joy, hope and
raith. Admit your
need for order in the
chaos, patience in
the delays, stamina
for the deadlines,
and forgiveness for
your own failures
and those of others.





PG 22 @ Thursday, July 2, 2009

RELI

The Tribune



(Coy THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS ore

The Methodist Church
in Andros 1930 - 1986

A plethora of churches

During the early 1930's the work of
the Methodist Church was adversely
affected by the activities of other
denominations. Rev Walker in the
report to the Synod of 1932 informed
the Synod that “at Staniard Creek we
suffer from a plethora of churches."
But the same report that speaks of the
proselitising activities of one church in
particular, has at least two notes of
hope: the request made by the children
of the ‘Sunday School for a "portion of
ground” be given them to clear and
cultivate and the statement that “at
Stafford Creek we have a good cause ...

One of the interesting highlights of
the history of the Methodist Church in
Andros is the "Spongers’ Mission."
There was a committee called "The
Andros and Spongers'’ Mission
Committee.” In 1936, such persons as
Revs R P Dyer, M.A. and E.M. Walker
along with Messrs J.A. Bethel, J.P,
GW.K. Roberts, G.M. Cole and K.
Moss served on this committee.

The following extract comes from
the reports of the circuits for the 1936
Synod. "Special mention must be made
of the work among the spongers at
"The Mud.’ Lantern services are held
whenever the minister at Andros goes
to these cays, and we can report con-
gregations of four and five hundred
men at these services."

The 1936 reports from the circuits
also point out that "In Andros circuit
too, the minister in charge does a great
deal of medical work ... this unity of

JIM
| . LAWLOR



healing, spiritual and physical is some-
thing for which we give thanks to
God." On one of his trips around the
circuit lasting 16 days, 12 teeth were
extracted, 14 bottles of medicine dis-
pensed, and a fishhook removed from
a finger.

During the 1930's the ministers, who
lived at Staniard Creek, used the mis-
sion sloop "William Turton" as a
means of transportation around the
circuit. The journey from Staniard
Creek to Mastic Point would take
about two hours in good weather and
much longer in poor weather condi-
tions. The minister would sometimes
stop in at Stafford Creek and then
journey to Mastic Point where he
would spend one or two weeks carry-
ing out pastoral duties. He would then
move on to Nicholl's Town before
making the journey back to Staniard
Creek.

One of the highlights of the 1950's
was the arrival of the Rev Edwin
Taylor in the Bahamas. Another high-
light was the ministry of the Rev W
Makepeace.

It is reported that the Rev Henley B
Perry was the first minister to reside in

the present manse/mission house at
Mastic Point (ie, on a permanent
basis). Rev Perry spearheaded the ren-
ovation of the Mastic Point church dur-
ing his term of service in the circuit
(late 1960's early 1970's). The new
extension on the chapel at Mastic
Point, complete with a youth hall,
kitchen and toilet facilities, was dedi-
cated on June 29, 1985 during the min-
istry of the Rev Dr Kenneth A
Huggins, who was also serving as
Chairman of the Bahamas District.
Rev Dr Colin B Archer served as
superintendent of the circuit on two
occasions: during the 1975-76 church
year and during the 1985-86 church
year.

Thanks be to Almighty God for His
servants who have laboured faithfully
in the extension of His kingdom on the
island of Andros, sons and daughters
of Methodism whose only business was
to cry "Behold the Lamb!"

Rev J Barrett Brindley served the
circuit from 1902-1908; Rev James W
Dinsdale 1909-1910 and Rev John Park
Jackson 1910-1914. These were pre-
ceded and followed by many others,
some we name here: Revs Whitefield,
Charles Curry and William
Makepeace, Eric M Walker. Lay peo-
ple played a vital part in the life of the
Methodist Church on Andros. We
name a few: Shadrack Woodside,
Elisabeth Butler, Pearline Scott,
Beatrice Evans, John Wilson, Terevous
Watkins, John Hedden, Jacob S Rolle,
Sarah Bain, Ezekiel Bain, Virginia
McQueen and Roxanna. We thank

God for those who are still making his-
tory as they continue to labour for
Him.

The Mission of the Andros Circuit

In 1986 the question was raised:
What of the future? And the answer
given: The future of the Methodist
Church on Andros has to be consid-
ered along with economic and social
factors. It is within the framework of
the society that we make our contribu-
tion. Therefore, as we think of the
future, we think of what we can do to
affect conditions on the island. The
mission of the Andros circuit is tied up
with the development of people and
resources.

There are good prospects for the
work of our church. We say this
because of the loyalty and_ the
Christian witness of our people,
because of the presence of enthusiastic
young people in our churches and
because of our abiding faith that God
has a mission for His church in this
place. The emphasis of our circuit as
we look to the future is on our young
people -preparing our youth to be
valuable members of church and socie-
ty. To this end we seek to establish chil-
dren's clubs and youth meetings. A
library which was started in Mastic
Point years ago still continues to pro-
vide a very important service for the
children of the area, Methodist and
non-Methodist alike. The general con-
sensus of the circuit is summed up in
these words: "We are expecting great
things from God."

May God strengthen the Andros cir-
cuit of Methodist Churches that we
may be steadfast in our determination
that we will not lower the flame of
Christian witness held by the
Methodist Church, but will aspire with
all our power, God being our helper, to
keep the flame alight so that we may
prove worthy of our heritage.

We ask the question: Is the flame
fully alight or just flickering in 2009?

(Next time: Part 35 — The Greek Orthodox
Church of the Annunciation)



a:

WN Cm UU creme ene Te

Power Conference in Dallas Texas



- Friday, June 26 eight thousand men
gathered at the world famous Potter's
House for the annual Man Power
Conference hosted by prince of preach-
ers T.D. Jakes. For the past ten years
Bishop Jakes has brought together over
70,000 men at these strategic meetings
to address the unique needs of men and
their challenges in the 21st century. The
Bahamas’ own Dr Myles Munroe wasa_
conference speaker at the event and was | |:
invited for the past four years to “
address the men’s conference. The
theme of this year’s conference was
“Men and Vision and Dreams.”



The Tribune
(Cy FEARLESS

RELIGION

The spiritual lessons I've learnt from

5 popular Michael

1) "BEAT IT" (1983)

Emerging from the Grammy Award
Winning masterpiece, Thriller, the cool
mix of Van Halen’s heavy metal and
Jackson’s easy, albeit electrifying
vocals, made this song an instant hit.
However, as fierce as the song sounds,
there is also a timely lesson to be
learnt, and that my readers is- “Beat It,
just Beat It!’ Simply put, whether you
walk, run, drive or fly, stay away from
trouble; you know, evil, in all it’s forms.
Because at the end of the day, ‘It does-
n’t matter whose wrong or right.’

Romans 13:13-14

2) "BILLIE JEAN" (1983)

Well upon discovering the event, or

TONI
STYLES



alleged one, behind one of MJ’s most
popular songs, it only validated the
life lesson to be learnt. Needless to
say, young persons tend to act consid-
erably faster than they think- but, if
they want to avoid a real life scare,
maybe they should * Beat It’ before
they meet a ‘ Billie Jean’.

Matthew 26:41

Jackson songs

3) "WE ARE THE WORLD" (1935)

While we strive to do what is right
in every aspect of our lives, we ought
to realise that even as individuals, we
are in this reality, this world- together,
and maybe well intended actions are
great, but true love for one another
lasts longer.

1 Corinthians 13

4) "MAN IN THE MIRROR" (1923)

Self-evaluation! Are there really,
any, fitting words to elaborate on the
importance of such a crucial assess-
ment we all need to embrace? Yes and
no. It’s just so personal, so honest and
so necessary. So draw your finest
breath, as you gaze at the maze in your

Thursday, July 2, 2009 ® PG 23

reflection, and as you release, allow the
impurities to both solve and dissolve.
1 John 2:15-17

5) "BLACK OR WHITE" (1991)

Lastly, I have heard and read
numerous tributes for the ‘King of
Pop’, a title given to Jackson by friend
and actress Elizabeth Taylor. And
although his closest friends and indus-
try associates, all have their special,
personal memories of the man behind
the icon, many tend to agree with the
millions of fans worldwide, who give
Jackson credit for his successful and
genuine fusion of black and white cul-
ture for a generation, particularly with
the release of, ‘ Black or White’- a
song that to this day never fails to
unite all people; when many a prob-
lem seeks to sever such a connection.

In closing, I will remember above
all else Mr Jackson’s incredible pas-
sion for life, his ability to be truly
present, and undeniably himself.

Luke 10:27

R.I.P - Michael Jackson, Farrah
Fawcett , Fatback & Rodger (a pet).
God bless the families.



Where are we going?

I BELIEVE that there is nothing
worse than a grown man who is in a
good frame of mind; but yet doesn’t
know where he’s going in life. Or, have
you ever seen a family that is working
well together as a unit and soon after
the parents die, the family falls apart;
the house, the car, the yard and every-
thing else goes to the dumps. Then this
is what can often be heard from per-
sons in the community: “Boy, if Mr and
Mrs John Doe were alive this place
would have never looked like this”

Here’s what is being said in the above
statement even though it’s not being
heard: “the children of Mr and Mrs
John Doe are very irresponsible and
immature.”

Now, I know that just about everyone
of us knows a family or two that may
fallin the category of Mr and Mrs John
Doe’s family; or maybe that’s your fam-
ily, but P’'ve got good news for you; all is
not lost, as long as there is life there is
hope. The road to success in life for the
grown man who doesn’t know where
he’s going and the John Doe type fami-
ly has not nor will it ever catch Father
Yahweh off guard or by surprise; for
He’s the Alpha and Omega, the all
knowing God.

As long as we’re here on earth, God
will always put people in our path to
give a word of wisdom and direction;
now whether we receive it is another
story. The refusal of such wisdom and
direction could result in a person expe-
riencing Hell on earth.

As a nation the Bahamas is about to




PASTOR

celebrate its 36th Independence on July
10. Yet

based upon the way things are today
in this country, the only logical question
is “Where are we going, and what are
our plans to get there?”

The passing of a great Bahamian (Fat
Back Marshall), and others is truly sad
news; but the saddest news of all is to
hear the present prime minister,
Hubert Ingraham say that he’s going to
offer himself for the position of prime
minister the next time around. Then, to
add insult to injury, the leader of the
opposition Perry Christie has also fas-
ten his seat belt.

Something is seriously wrong with us
as a people when we’ve got to settle for
the one dimensional leadership of Old
Sitting Bull and the Rock of Gibraltar;
it’s obvious that personal desire for
power has blinded the eyes of these two
great men, and they’re not looking at a
futuristic Bahamas that will empower
Bahamians. It’s all about the GUN /
POWER who has it? The Rabbit or
The Farmer; and as a result the nation
has to go through the wilderness expe-
rience for another four to eight years.

If there is ever a time that the word

worthless or “wutless” hits home that
time is now; I do believe that Prime
Minister Ingraham is a very good
leader and so is Mr Christie; but their
political power plays has placed them
in the category of failures for not
preparing successors.

Watch this! As a man, a real man
with leadership potentials and aspira-
tions, I could not be a member of par-
liament today and seeing the direction
in which this country is heading, and
the deterioration of the state of affairs
of our citizens and infrastructure; and
not make known my intentions to chal-
lenge the present leader’s seats of both
FNM and PLP.

I must give props to Mr Ingraham
and Mr Christie for methodically tak-
ing away whatever kind of fire and
desire the (children) other members of
parliament may have had to become
the next prime minister.

Sir Lynden did his twenty five; and it
seems as if his two political sons have
concluded to share the next twenty five
between themselves 10-15 or 15-10
whatever; and God help the person
who tries to disrupt their plans. The
prime minister made his and Perry
Christie’s secret decisions, public when
he indicated his return for a third term
to beat the PLP.

This was done just to stoke the fire of
the silly grassroots, political junkies
who ignorantly think that Mr Ingraham
and Mr Christie are arch-enemies;
nothing could be further from the truth.
From a natural perspective my only

question to you two political genius is
this: ‘As a nation, where are we going?”

I have accepted the fact that there is
no other minister or minister of state
with the testosterone to stand up and
seek to bring about visionary leader-
ship for a Bahamas of tomorrow. But
rest assured Mr Farmer and Mr Rabbit,
the gun / power will be taken from your
hands in such an embarrassing manner
if you don’t gracefully bow out.

As it is in the natural, so is it in the
spiritual; the religious leaders are just
as guilty for the mess that this nation
find it’s self in.

The older church leaders today have
done such a hatchet job with their erro-
neous

religious ways and financially raping
the people; to the point that 95 per cent
of the younger church leaders have
broken away and started their own
ministries in order to get wealth. The
proper exchange and affirmation of
sons by fathers have not taken place;
therefore the thousands of divided
small churches will never reach their
full potential due to the spirit of strife
and competition. As soon as these reli-
gious fools can stop being immature
and put down their petty differences,
come together as a unit; the politicians
will have a true body (not the religious
Sanhedrin /Christian Council) that they
can go to for Godly advice as to which
direction the country should be
taking.

¢ E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or
Ph.225-3850 or 1-242-441-2021
Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen
Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int’!



PG 24 @ Thursday, July 2, 2009

RELIGION

The Tribune

CAT ISLANDERS CELEBRAT
ANOTHER PATRONAL FESTIVAL

ANGLICANS marked the feast day
of St Peter’s in Knowles, Cat Island by
turning out in droves to ‘welcome new
Diocesan Bishop Laish Zane Boyd.
This was his first time he visited the
island as Diocesan Bishop.

During his visit, Bishop Boyd met
with the congregation of St Mary’s in
Old Bight to assure them of his con-
tinued support in their efforts to
restore St Mary the Virgin.

On Sunday morning Bishop Boyd
celebrated and preached in the quaint
settlement of Orange Creek in the
parish church of St. Agnes.

For the patronal festival, Bishop
Boyd took his text from John’s Gospel
Chapter 21 vs. 15-19 in which Jesus
admonishes Simon Peter to feed his
sheep. He reminded the congregation
that the whole Eucharist celebration is
an act of feeding. Bishop Boyd told
them that it is not only the priest or
bishop responsibility to feed the mass-
es but also the task of the laity
(laypersons/persons sitting in the
pews). He commented that everyone
wants to be fed sumptuously when
they are invited for dinner or a social
gathering but feeding the physical
man’s need is not enough. He said
there is also a spiritual need that
needs to be met and satisfied. And
only after these two needs are met
will Christians reach the realms of St

eee len y
= 4

on
we

Procession by members

Peter’s and St. Paul’s.

During the service Eulie LaFleur
from Christ the King, Ridgeland Park,
Nassau presented Fr Chester Burton
with a brand new funeral pall (used to
drape coffins during the funeral mass)
given in memory of her dear departed

The Assignment

FROM page 20

God. On the Assignment soundtrack
she has one track titled I Just Want You
Jesus.

“It’s a song of satisfaction in that I am
satisfied with Christ, but it is also about
desperation. Meaning now that [ve
found Christ, it’s all I want, and I’m
going to pursue and give my all to know
him more. This song is really about get-
ting to a place where you really don’t
pursue anything but God, and anything
that gets in the way must be released.”

As artist, her greatest hope is to share
the glory and love of God, and with so
many unable to find that love, she hopes
her music will help point them in the
right direction.

Universal Soldiers of Christ (USC),
members 15-year-old Deando Whitfield
and EJ ‘Merchandise’ Johnson say about
two years ago they were approached by
gospel artist Najie Dunn to join him in

studio to further develop their talents.

From there they started writing more
lyrics which at first were non-Christian,
but eventually decided that their greater
calling was to minister through gospel-
rap.

In a world where so many are influ-
enced negatively by the lyrics inside pop-
ular music, they felt they could use those
same beats to minister a different mes-
sage.

“It’s very effective, especially coming
from young people like us going to peo-
ple both young and old in the communi-
ty, our rap speaks to everyone.

“Through our lyrics we try to prevent
crime, we try to change the minds of the
youth, many of whom grow up in the
ghetto not knowing the difference
between right from wrong.”

Having two tracks featured on the
Appointment compilation CD, USC
said the first song Just Praise God incor-
porates the instrumental of Lil Wayne’s
song Get Off The Corner.



mother and father.

At the culmination of the
Eucharistic celebration the members
processed singing some of the ancient
hymns of the church to the summit of
Mount St Peter’s to the home of Eloise
Drusilla Seymour for refreshments.

“This song says no matter what you
do, whatever comes your way, any trial
or tribulation we must always praise
God because it’s going to be a brighter
day.”

The second song which features DJ
Counsellor is called Overcome, and is
about overcoming the things that pre-
vent people from getting closer to Christ.

Also on the album is 21-year-old Ryan
Jupp, who recently performed with the
artist Heavy Metal in his debut concert
last month.

First appearing on the local music
scene last October with the release of his
hit single Inside Crying, which helped
him to win BFMs talent jam, Ryan said
he has no plans of slowing down as he
intends to pursue music as a main career.

“This is what I will be doing for a liv-
ing, in no less than four years God has
promised and made provisions for me to
move and do this full time.”

His songs Do Your Thing and
Opportunity, both help in sharing the
story of Christ and his purpose for each
of us.

Ryan said as a young man coming
from a place of being lost in the world



TRUM UM) CEST Mel L

and then being found by God, helping
others to see the beauty and reward of
Christ has become his life’s mission.

Last but not least is Jakewood
Ferguson also known as Lyrically Bless,
who has been on the scene as a gospel
artist for a number of years.

He said his ultimate message to the
youth is to take control of their lives
rather than just having it pass them by.

“Everyday I see youth who are not on
that positive run, they’re just basically
sluggish and tend to forget who keeps
them alive. My approach is to try and
find a stronger way to pull them in, and I
want to use music as a positive way of
reaching them.”

With one song on the Assignment
soundtrack with Ryan, Jakewood said he
is looking toward to the two of them
producing a future project to share the
word of God through rap.

“A lot of secular artist out there push
so hard for the things they want, and we
want to push even harder for something
greater than fame of fortune, it’s for the
love of God.”

The Assignment soundtrack is now
available at BFM on Carmichael Road.



Full Text
{T\

Pim blowin’ it

90F
79F

SUNSHINE,
FSTORM

Volume: 105 No.182

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009

HIGH
LOW

Mt. Royal Ave:
Tel:326-1875



Was

MAUL
UN ST 3





Verdict returned over
stabbing death of
Defence Force officer

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

MOTHER-OF-THREE
Shimeakima Delores Pratt broke
down sobbing in court last night
after she was found guilty of the
manslaughter of Defence Force
officer Gary Leon Carey Sr.

The 12-member jury deliber-
ated for several hours yesterday
and returned with a eight to four
not guilty verdict on the murder
charge, but a unanimous guilty
verdict on the manslaughter
charge.

Pratt’s lawyer, Romona Far-
quharson, told The Tribune that
her client did not take the ver-
dict well, and “completely broke
down sobbing.”

Pratt, 30, was Mr Carey’s girl-
friend for eight-and-a-half years.
The 54-year-old Royal Bahamas
Defence Force officer was found
stabbed to death in Pratt’s Minnis
Subdivision apartment off
Carmichael Road on Sunday,
August 17, 2008. She denied mur-
dering him.

During closing submissions in
the murder trial yesterday, lead
prosecutor and Deputy Director
of Public Prosecutions Cheryl
Grant-Bethel told the jury that

Shimeakima Delores Pratt



Pratt was a liar and stage man-
ager.

She said the prosecution has
established a clear circumstantial
case to show that Pratt had had
intended to kill Mr Carey.

Mrs Bethel said Pratt had sim-

SEE page 13

Jr. Twister Combo
ak Toilet

Regular Fries

{bea Orink

I Snacker Combo

Sache
Regular Fries
iicg Drink







Union president allegedly

attempts to reprimand member
over comments in The Tribune

A HEATED battle is brew-
ing in the Bahamas Utilities
Service and Allied Workers
Union as the president has
allegedly attempted to repri-
mand a union member for
voicing his concerns in The
Tribune .

In the June 11, 2009, edition
of The Tribune Delgardo
Forbes, a former candidate for
president of the BUSAWU
was quoted advising union
members they were under no
obligation to give in to Presi-
dent Carmen Kemp’s threats
of action being taken against
them if they did not support

the industrial actions being
taken by the union.

At that time, the BUSAWU
were protesting the comments
made by Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham, who said
that there would be no across-
the-board salary increases at
the Water and Sewerage Cor-
poration.

Mr Forbes, along with those
who opposed the ideals of the
current union executive, claim
that while they support the
union 100 per cent, the cur-

SEE page 13

Mother of three foun
guity of manslaughter

LINCOLN POITIER outside of
court yesterday.

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net



A 48-YEAR-OLD Gam-
bier Village man charged with
the forcible detention and rape
of an 18-year-old woman was
arraigned in a magistrates
court yesterday afternoon.

It is alleged that Lincoln
Poitier, forcibly detained the
teenager between Wednesday,
June 17, and Friday, June 19.
It is further alleged that during
that time, Poitier raped her.
Poitier, who was brought to
the courtroom shackled, bare-
footed and visibly in pain, was
not represented by an attor-
ney.

The accused, who had a
bruise under his right eye,
winced noticeably as he asked
to stand in the dock while the

SEE page 13





















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NASSAU AND BAHAMA

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LEADING NEWSPAPER









Death sentence
for murder of
businessman

CONVICTED murder-
er Jamal Glinton received
the death sentence yes-
terday for the murder of
businessman Keith Carey.

Prosecutors had sought
the death penalty for
Glinton who they claimed
shot Mr Carey, 43, twice
on the steps of the Bank
of the Bahamas, Tonique
Williams Darling High-
way, on February 27,
2006.

Mr Carey had been
attempting to deposit
$40,000 belonging to the
Esso Service Station
which he operated.

Glinton, alias ‘Bumper’,
was unanimously found
guilty of his murder and
armed robbery on April

Glinton had been
charged along with
Dwight Knowles and
Sean Brown who were
unanimously convicted of
robbery and conspiracy to
commit robbery.

Justice Jon Isaacs had
directed the jury not to
consider the charge of
murder against Knowles
and Brown. Knowles was
given an 11-year sentence
and Brown received a 10-

SEE page 14



Plan to sue
over bishop’s
dead wife in
mausoleum

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FURIOUS residents are
planning to sue the Govern-
ment for failing to get a local
bishop to remove his dead
wife’s body from a mausoleum
near their homes.

In March, some members of
the Garden Hills community
were up in arms after Bishop
Stanley Seymour of the Evan-
gelistic Pentecostal Church
created a purpose-built mau-
soleum in the grounds of his
church to house his wife’s
remains.

Police were called to her
funeral service on March 21
when it was claimed that Bish-
op Seymour did not have
approval to go ahead with the
burial.

After delaying the service
for a week in order to obtain
approval from the Depart-
ment of Physical Planning, the
woman was laid to rest.

SEE page 14


PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Fe Gifts for Miss Bahamas Universe

jor/Tribune staff





; “iS a et ._. Des :
NEWLY-CROWNED Miss Bahamas Universe Kiara Sherman (right) took
to Bay Street yesterday, along with 2005 Miss USA Chelsea Cooley, to
receive gifts to mark her victory.

IMPORTANT

Starbucks Barista Blade Grinder

Starbucks Coffee Company is
voluntarily recalling its Starbucks
Barista Blade Grinder due to a
potential safety hazard if the
operating and cleaning instructions
aren't followed. When emptying the
ground coffee there is a risk that the
grinder blade could continue to spin
after the machine is turned off.

If you purchased a Starbucks

Barista Blade Grinder (sold between
March 2002 and March 2009), please
return your grinder to any Starbucks
Coffee Bahamas store to receive a
store credit.

Please visit Starbucks.com for more
information on this product recall.

At Starbucks your safety is important to us.

We apologize for any inconvenience this
voluntary recall may cause.

© 2009 Starbucks Coffee Company. All rights reserved.




The Embassy of the United States of America
is saddened by the loss of our
ee dear friend and colleague
Leslie Pyfrom

a.k.a Diplomat DL

The Embassy ‘Family mourns his passing
and offers condolences to his family, friends and loved ones.





ABOVE: Inga Bowleg, director
of business development

for the John Bull group of
companies, shows Miss
Bahamas Universe Kiara
Sherman her gifts yesterday
from David Yurman and Tous.

LEFT: Ineisy Rodgers, sales
assistant, places a Tous piece
on Miss Bahamas Universe
Kiara Sherman yesterday.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Call for unity as Bahamas
celebrates Independence

By LINDSAY THOMPSON

WITH the theme ‘towards a
common loftier goal’, the
Bahamas is celebrating 36 years
of Independence.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham is urging Bahamians to cele-
brate the day “in a spirit of pride
and gratitude,” despite being in
the midst of global and protracted
economic crisis.

Many activities to commemo-
rate that historic event on July 10,
1973 have been planned.

“Tn the spirit of unity, let us pur-
sue the loftier goal of peace and
goodwill,” said Governor General
Arthur Hanna in his Indepen-
dence Day message.

Since July 10, 1973, he said, the
goal of successive governments
and society at large has been the
advancement of social and eco-
nomic equity for all Bahamians.

“Over the years much has been
accomplished and going forward
there will be greater accomplish-

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

RR UE
PHONE: 322-2157



ments as we work together
towards the realisation of this lofty
goal,” the Governor General said.
“We remain one people, patriotic
Bahamians, standing proud and
tall.”

The Independence celebrations
include a showcase of heritage and
culture, story-telling and singing,
all reflective of the country’s his-
tory.

“This Independence we are cog-
nisant that the Bahamas, like the
rest of the world, is experiencing a
recession,” he said.

“But we have hope, and shall
with God’s help successfully
weather this economic storm.”

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said: “Our economy has been
hard hit, especially the hospitality
sector which is the principal engine
of our economy, resulting in the
lay-offs of many Bahamian work-
ers with consequent hardship for
their families and for the whole
community.”

However, he urged Bahamians
to still celebrate the sacrifices and
resourcefulness of their ancestors
and the hard-won achievements
in more recent times.

“It is through their struggles,
resilience and spirit of self-reliance
that we have arrived at where we
are today, that we have become a
proud nation with our heads held

high in the community of nations,
having achieved a distinct cultural
identity, a stable parliamentary
democracy, and a large measure of
prosperity,” Mr Ingraham said.

Independence activities include:
Friday, July 3 — National Pride
Day and E Clement Bethel
National Arts Festival and Cul-
tural Show, Rawson Square, 9am

to 9pm.

Saturday, July 4 — Independence
Beat Retreat, Rawson Square,
6pm to 7.30pm.

Sunday, July 5 — Ecumenical
Church Service, Bahamas Faith
Ministries, Carmichael Road, 3pm.

Thursday, July 9 - Clifford Park
Celebrations — Cultural show,
inspection, prayers, flag raising
ceremony, and fireworks, 8pm to
12.30am.

Friday, July 10 — The People’s
Rush, Rawson Square to Arawak
Cay, lam to 9am.

Saturday, July 11 and Sunday,
July 12 - National Fun Walk.
Starting points: Windsor Park,
Golden Gates, Montagu Beach,
Goodman’s Bay to Clifford Park,
6am.

. WEW CHEESY
BREAKFAST

INCLUDES

reba. 5 +e
Reg. Hash Brown
& Reg. Coffee or Tea
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 3



Meh dN yal Ys) Se

0 In brief

Harl Taylor
murder trial
set to start
this morning



Felipé Major/Tribune staff
TROYNIKO MCNEIL, who is
charged with Har! Taylor’s murder,
is shown at court yesterday.

THE trial of the man accused
of the murder of internationally
known handbag designer Harl
Taylor is scheduled to begin this
morning.

The case was expected to
begin yesterday at 2pm, howev-
er, Senior Justice Anita Allen
was still engaged in the trial of
Shimeakima Pratt, 30, who was
last night found guilty of the
manslaughter of Gary Leon
Carey, 54. Troyniko McNeil,
22, is charged in Mr Taylor’s
murder. It is alleged that
McNeil caused the designer’s
death between Saturday,
November 17 and Sunday,
November 18, 2007. He has
pleaded not guilty to the murder
charge and is being represented
by attorney Murrio Ducille.

Mr Taylor, 37, was found
stabbed to death at Mountbat-
ten House on West Hill Street,
two days after Dr Thaddeus
McDonald, 59, a senior academ-
ic at the College of the
Bahamas, was found blud-
geoned to death, apparently
with a clothing iron, in his near-
by Queen Street guest house.

To date, no charges have
been filed in relation to Dr
McDonald’s murder. The trial
into Mr Taylor’s death will be
heard before Senior Supreme
Court Justice Allen. Prosecutors
are expected to call some 25
witnesses during the trial.

Man arraigned on
murder charge

BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A 31-year-old
man who is accused of murder-
ing a 59-year-old Haitian man at
Garden Villas was arraigned in
the Freeport Magistrates Court
yesterday. Orman Osrick Dean
appeared in Court Three before
Acting Deputy Chief Magistrate
Helen Jones. He was not repre-
sented by counsel.

Dean was charged with the
murder of Jean Maquez Noel. It
is alleged that on June 27, at
Freeport, Grand Bahama, the
accused unlawfully and inten-
tionally caused the death of Mr
Noel. Magistrate Jones
informed Dean that he was not
required to enter a plea to the
charge.

She remanded Dean to Fox
Hill Prison until October 6
when a preliminary inquiry will
be held to determine whether
there is sufficient evidence for
him to stand trial in the
Supreme Court for murder. In
other court news, Jermaine
Duncombe, 27, was charged in
Court Three with assaulting his
girlfriend, causing her harm,
and making threats of harm
against her. It is alleged that on
June 22, the accused intention-
ally and unlawfully assaulted
Michelle Deveaux. He pleaded
not guilty to the charge.

Asked about his relationship
to the complainant, Duncombe
told the magistrate that Ms
Deveaux was his girlfriend. He
said they lived together at the
time. Magistrate Jones
adjourned the matter to March
29, 2010 for trial. She granted
Duncombe $500 bail with one
surety. She also warned that he
is not to have contact with Ms
Deveaux or his bail would be
revoked and he would be
remanded to prison.

Duncombe also pleaded not
guilty to causing harm and
threatening to harm Ms
Deveaux. The magistrate
adjourned the matters to March
29, 2010. She granted the
accused $1,000 bail with one
surety.

eR Be Bales
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
IAG Ti Rn

Ue Paty
322-2157



FRUSTRATION OVER BULLET WOUND DEATH MYSTERY
Grieving family asks police:
why was Kristoff Cooper shot?

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

The frustrated family of a young man found to
have died of a bullet wound to the head after he was
first thought to have been killed in a police chase car
crash say officers still have not given them any
insight into when or why he was shot on that night.

Kristoff Cooper, 22, was killed almost two months
ago on the morning of Sunday, May 3 after the car
that he and his brother Caleb were travelling in
crashed through a wall on the corner of Robinson
Road and East Street.

The pair had been chased by the police and fam-
ily members were initially led to believe that Kristoff
died as a result of the injuries he received when he
was flung from the car on impact.

However, an autopsy subsequently revealed a
bullet wound to the head was the actual cause of
death.

Caleb, 25, who survived but suffered major
injuries, said he did not recall any gun shots before
the car crashed. Once ejected from the vehicle, he
suffered concussion and cannot recall what hap-

pened. Having met with the commissioner of police
in mid-May, the family said that Reginald Ferguson
told them that he cannot not explain the bullet
wound until he sees a police report.

When contacted about the matter on June 7, the
commissioner said he still does not have the report
and investigations into the matter are continuing.

The following story in The Tribune sparked com-
mentary on the matter in parliament when PLP
chairman Glenys Hanna-Martin said it represented
yet another episode — in addition to the hanging
death of 15 year-old Michael Knowles in a police cell
— that warranted the creation of an independent
body to investigate matters involving police offi-
cers.

Yesterday Phil Cooper, the victim’s father, said he
agreed with this sentiment, telling The Tribune that
almost two months after Kristoff’s death, no further
light has been shed on how it happened.

“We are still here wondering when are they going
to come to us and say what’s going on.

I feel like they just don’t want to apologise to say
that they are wrong,” said Mr Cooper.

Attempts to reach Commissioner Ferguson yes-
terday were unsuccessful.

Limestone rock excavation and waste



dumping a ‘legitimate’ operation, says MP



By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE excavation of limestone
rock and the dumping of waste
in its place has met with approval
from Golden Isles MP Charles
Maynard despite the outcry from
his constituents.

Mr Maynard maintains that
digging eight feet down to the
water table and filling the resul-
tant hole with bio-degradable
waste on Crown Land farmland is
a legitimate agricultural tech-
nique, one which he is not able to
prevent.

Charles Maynard



ment for the sanitary landfill in
Harrold Road, and those dump-
ing waste in the quarry are con-
tracted by government to clean
up New Providence.

As trucks were lining up to col-
lect quarry from the site yester-
day, Ms Lundy said: “Something
needs to be done to protect the
health and welfare of the people,
because if they contaminate the
water table they are putting our
health at risk. And it is our only
access to water in this area.

“This man is digging govern-
ment land and selling it back to
the government on a verbal
approval. And the government is

However, Minister of Agricul-
ture and Marine Resources Larry
Cartwright said the practice can
only be done for agricultural rea-
sons by leaseholders with a
license to excavate.

And farmer/contractor Cardi-
nal Newman, responsible for the
excavation of more than two
acres of Crown Land north of
Cowpen Road and south of Mil-
lars Heights, told The Tribune he
had no license, but was given ver-
bal permission to excavate by
physical planning officials.

Residents of Millars Heights
are concerned the practice will
contaminate the water table and
put the health of thousands at
risk. Mr Maynard said he saw a
refrigerator, stoves, beds and mat-
tresses dumped in the quarry
when he visited the site around
six months ago, but on his latest
official visit to the site, the oper-
ation appeared to have been
cleaned up.

He said: “It was a cause for
concern in the community, but if

you look at the land now it gives
you the impression that it’s a
legitimate operation.

“You can’t grow things on
rock, so you dig down to the
water table and replace it with
soil, so the water can feed the
plants. Bio-degradable stuff is not
going to hurt the soil or the water
table. It’s an accepted farming
technique — they don’t need per-
mission.”

Mr Maynard maintains his con-
stituents’ discomfort stems from
residential areas bordering on
industrial zones, and he assured
the community that he will close-
ly supervise the site to prevent
indiscriminate dumping.

Millars Heights resident Jeanne
Lundy maintains the farmer leas-
ing an adjacent plot is successful-
ly growing bananas and peas
without ever having excavated
the land. And a source in the
Department of Environmental
Health told The Tribune that Mr
Newman sells fill to the depart-

using taxpayers’ money to pay for
fill they already own.”

The Ministry of Agriculture
and Marine Resources maintains
the operation of heavy duty
equipment, removal of soil, rock,
quarry, fill or sand from Crown
Land designated for agriculture
is absolutely prohibited. As is
dumping refuse of any kind.

Although the minister said
excavation for agricultural rea-
sons is common in the Family
Islands, it can only be done with a
license from the government.
And it is not a technique recom-
mended by his department.

Mr Cartwright said: “A lot of
land in Cowpen has been exca-
vated and a lot of it is agricultur-
al land, but before you can exca-
vate on Crown Land you need to
have a lease from the government
and a permit to excavate.

“Tf you do not have a lease or a
permit and are excavating on the
land illegally there’s a penalty for
that. Verbal permission is defi-
nitely not enough.”

Packed external negotiations agenda for the region

CARICOM is embarking on a busy period of
trade negotiations as the region prepares to imple-
ment already signed trade agreements while at the
same time embark on negotiations for new agree-
ments with a number of states.

This period of intense work will also pose some
challenges in light of the work to be done to inte-
grate the Regional Negotiating Machinery (RNM)
into the CARICOM Secretariat, according to chair-
man of the CARICOM Prime Ministerial Sub Com-
mittee on External Negotiations, Prime Minister of
Jamaica Bruce Golding.

Speaking at the CARICOM Secretariat yesterday
at a meeting of the sub-committee, Prime Minister
Golding highlighted some of the trade issues which
would engage the region.

These include:






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isation (WTO)

Mr Golding said the discussions with the Domini-
can Republic now need to be considered in line
with the request of that country for membership of
CARICOM.

He added that the Copenhagen negotiations on a
new global climate change agreement would also
engage the attention of the Prime Ministerial Sub
Committee.





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380-FLIX


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

These shameful

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

US cap-and-trade energy bill

There is much in the House cap-and-trade
energy bill that just passed that I absolutely
hate. It is too weak in key areas and way too
complicated in others. A simple, straightfor-
ward carbon tax would have made much more
sense than this Rube Goldberg contraption. It is
pathetic that we couldn’t do better. It is
appalling that so much had to be given away to
polluters. It stinks. It’s a mess. I detest it.

Now let’s get it passed in the Senate and
make it law.

Why? Because, for all its flaws, this bill is
the first comprehensive attempt by America to
mitigate climate change by putting a price on
carbon emissions. Rejecting this bill would have
been read in the world as America voting
against the reality and urgency of climate change
and would have undermined clean energy ini-
tiatives everywhere.

More important, my gut tells me that if the
USS. government puts a price on carbon, even a
weak one, it will usher in a new mind-set among
consumers, investors, farmers, innovators and
entrepreneurs that in time will make a big dif-
ference — much like the first warnings that cig-
arettes could cause cancer. The morning after
that warning no one ever looked at smoking
the same again.

Ditto if this bill passes. Henceforth, every
investment decision made in America — about
how homes are built, products manufactured
or electricity generated — will look for the
least-cost low-carbon option. And weaving car-
bon emissions into every business decision will
drive innovation and deployment of clean tech-
nologies to a whole new level and make energy
efficiency much more affordable. That ain’t
beanbag.

Now that the bill is heading for the Senate,
though, we must, ideally, try to improve it, but,
at a minimum, guard against diluting it any fur-
ther. To do that we need the help of the three
parties most responsible for how weak the bill
already is: the Republican Party, President
Barack Obama and We the People.

This bill is not weak because its framers,
Reps. Henry Waxman and Ed Markey, wanted
it this way. “They had to make the compromis-
es they did,” said Dan Becker, director of the
Safe Climate Campaign, “because almost every
House Republican voted against the bill and
did nothing to try to improve it. So to get it
passed, they needed every coal-state Democrat,
and that meant they had to water it down to
bring them on board.”

What are Republicans thinking? It is not as if
they put forward a different strategy, like a car-
bon tax. Does the GOP want to be the party of
sex scandals and polluters or does it want to
be a partner in helping America dominate the
next great global industry: ET — energy tech-
nology? How could Republicans become so
anti-environment, just when the country is going
green?

Historically speaking, “Republicans can claim
as much credit for America’s environmental
leadership as Democrats,” noted Glenn Prick-
ett, senior vice president at Conservation Inter-
national. “The two greatest environmental pres-
idents in American history were Teddy Roo-
sevelt, who created our national park system,
and Richard Nixon, whose administration gave
us the Clean Air Act and the Environmental
Protection Agency.” The elder George Bush
signed the 1993 Rio Treaty, to preserve biodi-
versity.

Yes, this bill’s goal of reducing U.S. carbon
emissions to 17 percent below 2005 levels by
2020 is nowhere near what science tells us we
need to mitigate climate change. But it also
contains significant provisions to prevent new
buildings from becoming energy hogs, to make
our appliances the most energy efficient in the
world and to help preserve forests in places like
the Amazon.

We need Republicans who believe in fiscal
conservatism and conservation joining this leg-
islation in the Senate.

We want a bill that transforms the whole
country not one that just threads a political
needle.

T hope they start listening to green Republi-
cans like Dick Lugar, George Shultz and Arnold
Schwarzenegger.

I also hope we will hear more from Obama.
Something feels very calculating in how he has
approached this bill, as if he doesn’t quite want
to get his hands dirty, as if he is ready to twist
arms in private, but not so much that if the bill
goes down he will get tarnished.

That is no way to fight this war. He is going to
have to mobilize the whole country to pressure
the Senate — by educating Americans, with
speech after speech, about the opportunities
and necessities of a serious climate/energy bill.
If he is not ready to risk failure by going all
out, failure will be the most likely result.

(This article is by THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
c.2009 New York Times News Service)



parenting practices are
costing us our sons!

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Iam angry and frustrated
beyond words with the seeming
careless unconcern of Bahamian
parents towards their young sons!
T have spoken passionately of this
issue to friends and family alike
for years and now feel the time
has come to speak of it to a wider
audience. Why do we continue to
neglect our young boys and then
wonder why they get “sucked in”
by the streets, fall into criminal
activity, exhibit irresponsible
behaviour and become more or
less unfit persons? God have
mercy on us, but we will not be
blameless before Him!

I used to volunteer to spend
nights at a home for young
women and on numerous occa-
sions travelling there around 11
o’clock at night, used to see very
young boys roaming the streets.
This grieved me greatly because
these young boys were not being
attended to but allowed to basi-
cally do whatever they wanted.
Most of us know the passages
from the Bible that read: “Fool-
ishness is bound up in the heart of
a child but the rod of correction
drives it away,” and “The rod and
reproof bring wisdom but a child
left to himself brings his mother
shame.” From roaming the
streets these young boys could
easily start entering people’s
yards, progressing from there to
breaking into cars, homes, etc.
From there it is not a long stretch
to drinking, using drugs and car-
rying loaded weapons with the
intent to use them.

How can we justify training and
teaching our young girls but leav-
ing our young boys to bring up
themselves? For shame! The
Lord Himself says that if we leave
children to themselves, they will
only perform the foolishness that
is within their hearts. Why do we
continue to do it then? Why
don’t we give them the same
amount of time and attention that
we give our girls? Why? Why do
we not call it for what it is? Self-
ishness and neglect! Sadly, at the
end of the day, which group suf-
fers the higher mortality rate,
incarceration rates, alcoholism

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



and drug addiction rates, disen-
franchisement rates, etc? Yes, you
guessed it, our males.

Due to some of the debased
and low-minded among us, we
have had to take great care with
our young females, watching their
friends and keeping them at
home for the most part. This is a
sad fact. However, we seemed to
have gotten it into our heads that
our young boys do not need to
be guarded and watched because
no one would rape or molest
them.

How wrong we have been
proven! Have we not learnt from
the tragic deaths of those young
boys in Freeport, who we can
assume, were brutally violated
before being unceremoniously
disposed of?

What about the young boys
who have been molested in our
malls or kidnapped off our
streets?

What about the young boys
who are allowed to wander about
by themselves and later turn up
dead?

Ask persons in Adelaide about
their recent loss. How much
longer shall we ignorantly pay the
price for our shameful parenting
practices?

Over the weekend we heard of
the deaths of another set of boys:
brothers, ages nine and five years
of age.

They were allowed to go out
crabbing by themselves. Would
we have allowed girls of nine and
five to go wandering about by
themselves? Most of us would say
“absolutely not!” Why were these
two boys not accompanied by an
older person? When I hear of
these stories, my insides cringe
and the thought comes “oh, not
again!”

It is very easy for parents (and
I say parents, not just mothers), to
cast off the responsibility for rais-
ing their sons with the thought
that boys don’t need much atten-
tion. We have already shown,

however, that this viewpoint is a
death sentence for many of our
young males both now and in the
future.

There is a law on the books of
this country about child neglect
which is failure to provide a child
with all that is necessary for their
health and happiness. Many of
our young boys roam the street
looking dirty and unkempt.

We do not even bother to teach
them grooming skills. How then
can we blame them, if, as young
men, they come sweaty and
unkempt into our presence?
There is something stinking here,
and it is not our young men!

Fathers and mothers,
guardians: it is our God-given
duty to train and raise up our chil-
dren so that they have the knowl-
edge and skills to become suc-
cessful and useful members of
society.

Not only does the Lord require
it of us, the law of the land man-
dates it as well.

Let’s watch over our young
boys; they are valuable and pre-
cious. Let’s stop the one-sided
parenting — yes our girls need
attention, but our boys do as well.
Remember, what we put into
something (sow) is what we will
get out of it (reap): if we sow
attention, love and training into
our young boys from the cradle,
we will reap the positive rewards.

A word to fathers: to the very
young and the very old. The Lord
never instructed mothers to teach
and raise their children. He
instructed you as fathers to do so.

Do not let anyone take away
your right to watch over and raise
your children. You may not have
had a father when you were grow-
ing up who took any interest in
you, but that does not mean that
you yourself cannot be a good
father. Shatter the mould of
incompetence and apathy!

You do not need to conform
to that. This generation and the
next one, will thank you because
you took the time to show that
you care.

DIONE PRATT (MS)
Nassau,
June 15, 2009.

Was the full moon to blame for these statements?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

This past weekend was a full
moon which probably explains
much of the content from cer-
tain people.

The union leaders proposed
that in any future senate the
unions must be guaranteed an
automatic senate seat.

Okay we will discriminate
against every organisation that
has a larger membership than
the collective count of the
union.

As the unions do not by a
large percentage represent the
majority of those working,
government discriminates
against those not members of

a union and never listen to or
even ask for their opinion, but
the non-union employee is by
far the majority of the working
force, never heard and simply
ignored.

Union recognition should
only be as long as their col-
lective agreement stands —
six-months prior to the expiry
of the collective agreement all
unions should be required to
revert to their membership
and employees of the busi-
nesses to see if the unions are
still their choice for represen-
tation.

It is absolutely ridiculous
that once recognition is
achieved that is till death do us
come.

Numbers — do you really
think any government will
make them legal?

Far, far too much money
flows here and there and the
numbers boys will guarantee
at election time to write big
cheques and whether anyone
is willing to admit, I really take
an alleged statement of one
leader in the numbers busi-
ness that he offered to pay 35
per cent of his sales as that
would be less than what he
pays-out for silence and pro-
tection today — in that he
talked a mouth full.

ABRAHAM MOSS
Nassau,
June 8, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

DPM challenges
freemasons to
help out with
nation building

DEPUTY Prime Minister
Brent Symonette challenged the
freemasons and other local fra-
ternities to serve as a channel
through which the government
can impact the lives of Bahami-
ans.

As an autonomous entity, he
said, the masons can also take
the lead, formulate plans, and
proposition government collec-
tively, to benefit national pur-
poses.

Speaking at
the official
opening of the
Most Worship-
ful Prince Hall
Grand Lodge
on June 29, Mr
Symonette
told those
gathered: “T
must impress
upon you that
you being
organised as
you are, could ably assist gov-
ernment initiatives and social
programmes.

“Through the methods which
bind you as a cohesive body of
people, united to improve
brotherly and sisterly love, you
are already equipped to speak
with one voice.”

“You could serve as a conduit
to the government on national
issues. Once you establish your
collective force, the government
would be obliged to at least con-
sider our collective position,”
Mr Symonette said.

“Tt must always be your goal
to improve on this living co-
operatively experience to
enhance financial benefits for
each other.”

Prince Hall (Bahamas)
reached the top rung of The
Bahamas Masonic status on
June 13, 2006 when the “amity
visitation agreements were
signed between Prince Hall
affiliation Masons and the Eng-
lish, Irish and Scottish Constitu-
tion Masons, attaining world
recognition, Mr Symonette said.

Having reached such historic
status, “can you afford to sit by
and be contented with a meagre
effort in maintaining your lofty
status built by your forefathers?

“It is your duty to thank them
(forefathers) continuously for
their broad shoulders on which
you now stand.”



BRENT
SYMONETTE

OPPOSITION SENATOR ALLYSON MAYNARD-GIBSON LASHES OUT

Government under fire over
Nassau Harbour dredging plans

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

OPPOSITION Senator Allyson
Maynard-Gibson took the gov-
ernment to task yesterday for its
plans to go ahead with the dredg-
ing of Nassau Harbour in spite of
the current economic situation.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson also
questioned why renewals of the
incentives for cruise lines are
scheduled for every six years
instead of every three and accused
the government of working to the
agendas of special interest groups.

"Why are we building, in this
economy, an automatic six-year
concession situation? The FNM
continues to make significant
grants, not explain to the public,
and divert money that could be
spent on national development
objectives and under the present
FNM plans, FNM special inter-
ests are being guaranteed that
their pockets will be lined for six
years," she charged.

She also noted that the harbour
dredging — which will facilitate
the arrival of more cruise ship
passengers to the Bahamas on the
huge Genesis ships — will provide
"a key area of growth to the sec-
tor" but argued that there has not
been a proper cost-benefit analy-
sis with regard the concessions
given to cruise companies in the
process.

"The (International Monetary
Fund) IMF has just told us...
that we need to be careful about
the incentives that we are giving
investors and developers and that
includes cruise lines," she said
while giving her contribution to
the debate on a Bill for an Act to
Amend the Cruise Ship's
Overnighting Incentives Act yes-
terday.

Ms Maynard-Gibson also said
Deputy Prime Minister Brent
Symonette ran the risk of being
accused of a conflict of interest
by agreeing to sit on the commit-
tee that deliberated on the pro-
posal to move the container port
from southwest New Providence
to Arawak Cay.

"The harbour dredging, to the
benefit of FNM special interests,
will result at the western end of
Bay Street where the deputy
prime minister and other FNM
special interests own land, bene-



“We support the
dredging, but not
now ... there’s a
downturn in the
economy and we
think that money
is not being well-
spent by sending it
abroad at this
time.”



fiting from the Woodes Rodgers
to Armstrong Street expansion
paid for by the Bahamian peo-
ple,” she said.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson, leader
of opposition business in the Sen-
ate, also said the impending
dredging is not in the best inter-
ests of the public because there
is no guarantee that more ships
will visit the Bahamas.

"Tn this economic environment,
will these ships come to the
Bahamas? After we have spent
$55 million dredging the harbour
will the actually come to the
Bahamas? There is no evidence
before the Bahamian people that
these two ships actually will come
to the Bahamas".

"We support the dredging, but
not now ... there's a downturn in
the economy and we think that
money is not being well-spent by
sending it abroad at this time,”
she said.

Ms Maynard-Gibson also
argued that the concessions given
in the Bill will negatively affect
local nightclub owners as cruise
ships will now only be required
to spend 13 hours in port, down
from 18 hours.

Under the old law, ships were
required to stay in port until 3am
and passengers would typically
leave a venue to return to the ship
at lam, said Ms Maynard-Gibson.

"The FNM by its ill-considered
concessions is depriving Bahami-
an entrepreneurs of the opportu-
nity to benefit from those three
hours," she said.

The Bill was passed in the Sen-
ate yesterday. The Senate
adjourned until July 16.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



JUSTICE SWORN IN :

JUSTICE STANLEY JOHN (left) was yesterday sworn in as a
Justice of the Court of Appeal by the Governor General Arthur
Hanna at Government House.

Kingsway Academy High School Invites
qualified applicants for the following
teaching positions for September, 2009.

Spanish
French

Art and Design
Music

Successful applicants must:
e¢ Be born again Christians, with



PM reveals designs for straw
“market, Supreme Court complex

By BAHAMAS
INFORMATION SERVICES

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham
on Tuesday unveiled architectural
drawings for the proposed multi-mil-
lion dollar straw market and for the
new Supreme Court complex on Bank
Lane.

Renovation and extension to the
Supreme Court building should com-
mence within this fiscal period, which
started July 1. More than $4 million
have been earmarked for this project.

During the 2009/10 budget debate in
parliament, Minister of Public Works
and Transport Neko Grant shared
plans for the new straw market to be
built on the old site. The old straw mar-
ket was destroyed by fire in September
2001.

In December 2008, a contract was
awarded to Patrick Rahming to execute
the duties of project architect for the
design of the Bay Street Straw Market.

“The architectural design of the
building has been completed,” Mr
Grant told the House of Assembly.

“The new straw market is not to
exceed $10 million in construction cost,
a portion of which has been allocated
in the new budget.”

A tendering process is expected to be
completed by August 2009 and con-
struction of the new market is expected
to commence at the end of September.
The market is to be completed over a
16 to 18 month period.

“This project along with other ongo-
ing projects in the downtown area such
as works at the Nassau Harbour, the
Prince George Wharf, Woodes
Rodgers Walk and the repaving of Bay
Street will all contribute to the

Hubert Ingraham shows
off architectural drawings
for a new straw market
for downtown Nassau in
parliament on Tuesday.

minimum qualifications of a
Bachelor’s Degree in the
appropriate subject areas

Have a valid Teachers Certificate
Be willing to participate in

Extra Curricular activities, etc

debate.

Application Forms can be collected from
the Human Resources section at the
Business Office, Bernard Road,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Tel. 242-324-6269 / 324-6887

THE Bahamas Reef Envi-
ronment Educational Founda-
tion has received a $50,000
donation from the Nassau
office of the Swiss private bank
Lombard Odier for support
the “A Return of the Drum-
beat” fundraiser.

The event, to be held on
November 28, aims to raise
funds which are vital to
BREEP’s efforts to protect the
Bahamian marine environ-
ment.

BREEF was founded in 1993

Deadline for Applications:
Friday, July 17, 2009






































PE oR KM Co Se wae Dre
Kelly’s Dock, Twenty-One days after the date of arrival
will be sold to cover storage fees.

Please contact our Customer Service Dept. at

322-2142/322-2813/356-0575

MANAGEMENT
Betty K. Agencies Limited
East Street North
Nassau, Bahamas

Anniversary

Sal

enhancement of our tourism product,”
Mr Grant said during the budget



PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham displays architectural drawings for a new Supreme Court

complex for Bank Lane.

$50,000 donated to
BREEF fundraiser

by the late Sir Nicholas Nut-
tall to address growing threats
to our marine resources, and
is now a leader in educating
Bahamians and visitors about
its diverse and essential
marine ecosystem of the
Bahamas.

The organisation also works
to build government and pub-
lic support for marine envi-
ronmental protection.

BREEF has held 10 inten-
sive marine conservation
teacher training workshops,
which have provided insight to
more than 260 Bahamian edu-
cators, allowing them to be
ambassadors for the Bahamas’
seas, and train the next gener-
ation of environmental stew-
ards.

BREEF played an instru-
mental role in the establish-
ment of a Nassau grouper
closed season to protect the
spawning stocks of this impor-
tant fish and has long been an
advocate for the establishment
of a network of Marine Pro-
tected Areas in the Bahamas.

The fundraiser promises to
take guests back to an “ole
Nassau town” of the 1950s and
60s, with musical performances
and other entertainment from
that era relived for one night
only.

Performers will include
Peanuts Taylor and many oth-
er esteemed Bahamian enter-
tainers. The notion behind the
theme of the evening is to take
attendees back in time to when
the waters of the Bahamas
were full of marine life and
clear as crystal.

The donation by Lombard
Odier is part of both its com-
mitment to support worthwhile
endeavours in the Bahamas,
and its global commitment to

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BREEF is now a leader in educating
Bahamians and visitors about its
diverse and essential marine
ecosystem of the Bahamas.

environmental organisations
around the world.

“Lombard Odier is very
proud to contribute towards
raising the awareness about
our precious and fragile envi-
ronment. Endangering our nat-
ural resources is endangering
our economy. Without our
beautiful waters, the Bahamian
economy would be very bleak
and we must respect that,” said
Christian Coquoz, managing
director of the Nassau office.

“In celebration of our 30th
anniversary in Nassau, we
would like to demonstrate our
support and commitment to
the Bahamas,” said Mr
Coquoz. Lombard Odier has
been an active advocate of sus-
tainable energy and tackling
long term environmental chal-
lenges.

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Public Advisory

The public is advised that due to the
LPIA Expansion Project, the
entrance road leading to the US
Departures tenminal will be reduced
to ane lana of vehicular trattic
commencing on Thursday, July
2, 2009 until further notice. Please
observe any trafic dirachons and
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entrance road.

We apolagize for any inconvenience
ceEused.
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Govt criticised for ‘callous’
civil service restructuring

Political hopeful responds
to NIB announcement

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

POLITICAL hopeful Paul
Moss condemned government for
its "callous" restructuring of the
civil service and argued that it will
have a negative effect on the econ-
omy.

His comments came in response
to an announcement from the
National Insurance Board (NIB)
that four bosses at the board were
made redundant.

According to NIB Director
Algernon Cargill, the decision was
made as the board aims to address
"deficiencies identified by several
internal and external operational
assessments”.

But Mr Moss, an attorney and
financial services advisor, criticised
the government as unsympathetic
for making these and other posts
redundant during a recession,
as some of those affected could
have years of outstanding debts
to pay.

"Over the past year and a half,
the government has systematical-
ly been ‘restructuring’ the civil ser-
vice and by doing so they have
devastated families and destroyed
lives. Many still have years left on
their mortgages with children in
school and it is catastrophic to be
summarily dismissed without care-
ful planning. No caring govern-
ment does this to its people know-
ing that they will join the unem-
ployment line in a time when
unemployment is expected to
increase," he said in a statement
released yesterday.

Senior Deputy Director Antho-
ny Curtis, Deputy Director of Spe-
cial Projects Cecile Bethel, Deputy
Director of Information Technol-
ogy Andre Bethel and Assistant
Director of Buildings Melincianna
Bethel were told their fate on
Monday.

A fifth position — Deputy Direc-
tor of the Family Islands — is also
on its way out The Tribune under-
stands, but this has not been con-
firmed.

Mr Cargill said the restructuring
will "strategically position" NIB
for the future and streamline oper-
ational efficiency in terms of con-
tribution collections and expense
management while improving cus-
tomer service levels.

But Mr Moss questioned if the
redundancies were part of an eco-
nomic coping mechanism on part
of government as it struggles with
a ballooning deficit and shrinking
revenues.

“Could it be that the govern-
ment is not being honest and
telling us the truth that the econ-
omy has tanked and they cannot
afford to make payroll? It must

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear from
people who are making news in
their neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a good
cause, campaigning for
improvements in the area or
have won an award. If so, call us
on 322-1986 and share your

story.


























be the most callous act by this gov-
ernment so far. This is so, particu-
larly when the government has not
been proactive to ensure that there
is a mandatory pension plan for
these people to fall on," said Mr
Moss, adding that he has not seen
this practice anywhere else in the
region.

Government recently restruc-
tured the ranks of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force and the
Customs and Immigration Depart-
ments to mixed reviews.

While some argued that the
moves may have been political,
some in the private sector
applauded the government for the
decision, saying that it will prove
crucial to the enhancement of effi-
ciency and competitiveness when

the economy rebounds. Paul Moss

Fst.
tlie
105
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THE TRIBUNE





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LOCAL NEWS

Marine cadets graduate
into global opportunities

By GENA GIBBS
Bahamas Information
Services

THE Ministry of the Envi-
ronment and the Bahamas
Maritime Authority celebrat-
ed the graduation of 57
Bahamas Maritime Cadet
Corps (BMCC) students during
ceremonies at the British Colo-
nial Hilton.

Thirty-three of the graduates
are off to Canada for interna-
tional certification.

The BMCC was established
in 2003 with the objective of
sensitising high school students
to opportunities available in
the maritime industry.

The programme draws from
all government and private
high schools in New Provi-
dence, Abaco and Grand
Bahama.

To date, 301 cadets have
passed through the pro-
gramme.

“We have a retention rate of
78 per cent,” Mr Deveaux said
during the ceremonies on June
24

“This means that more than
200 young Bahamians are
employed around the world
seeking to become Master
Mariners, Chief Engineers, and
other industry-related profes-
sionals.”

The Bahamas Maritime
Authority (BMA) is the gov-
ermment’s agent responsible for
administering the Bahamas
Ship Register, the collection of
all ship registration and related
fees, and for meeting
the Bahamas’ expenses in
respect of international obliga-
tions.

The BMA currently has
offices in Nassau, New York
and London; representation in
Japan, Greece, and Germany;
and projects the opening of an
office in Hong Kong.

He pointed out that the
Bahamas, with the third largest
ship registry in the world, plays
“a leading role” in the Inter-

ST E Ppretivoner (kame)

The Society of Trust and Estate Practitioners

STEP BAHAMAS BRANCH

Invites applications for a scholarship for one module of the STEP Diploma program in

International Trust Management

Applicants should meet the following critena-

Bahamian citizen

© Must have a Foundation Certificate or have been officially exempted from the

Foundation Certificate Prooram

Currently employed im the trust industry or seeking a career 1n the trust industry

Application forms should be obtamed from STEP Bahamas at its administrative office below, and

submutted together with the following:

¢ Proof of Bahamian citizenship (certified copy passport]
¢ Current resume detailing employment history and career

aspirations

@ Details of any other funding sources

Completed applications should be submitted ‘delivered to -

STEP Bahamas

Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre, First Floor

P.O. Box N-1 764
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 323-6012

Deadline for applications is July 31, 2009



Derek Smith/BIS

BMCC CADETS who are off to Canada for international certification are metic during the graduation ceremony.

national Maritime Organisa-
tion (IMO).

The Bahamas maintains
membership on the Council of
the International Maritime
Organisation in Category 'C’,
to which it is the third largest
contributor.

“When we boast about a reg-
istry of almost 1,700 vessels
with more than 55 million gross
tonnes,” said Mr Deveaux, “it
must be borne in mind that
some of these ships have 2,000
people employed.

“So one can readily grasp the
vast opportunities available for
cadets who are willing to seek
the proper training and dedi-
cate themselves to maritime
professions.”

He said his ministry is “work-
ing closely” with the College
of the Bahamas and other pri-
vate sector partners to estab-
lish a Maritime Institution in
the Bahamas so that cadets can
receive world-class training and
maritime education at home.

Signing on to the Interna-
tional Convention on Stan-
dards of Training, Certification
and Watchkeeping for Seafar-
ers has had a positive impact
on inter-island mailboat ser-
vice, he noted.

“This action provides for

minimum training and certifi-
cation for all personnel
employed on domestic vessels,”
said Minister Deveaux. “The
BMA was actively involved in
the efforts to establish a cen-
tre at the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force base where
local seafarers could obtain

Odless a



these minimum standards.

“Since its implementation,
seafarers in the Bahamas have
not only sought to better them-
selves but also to make their
vessels compliant with interna-
tional standards, and to pursue
excellence in the domestic mar-
itime sector.”

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS

Plans for Arawak Cay
upgrade ‘on course’

By GENA GIBBS

THE government says its
plan to upgrade the Arawak
Cay Cultural and Heritage Cen-
tre into “a cultural mecca in the
region” remains on course.

Minister of Agriculture and
Marine Resources Larry

cartwright confirmed that
250,000 has been allocated for
additional improvements.

The money will be used to
increase operational efficiency
and effectiveness, and improve
the area’s appearance, security
and sanitation, he said.

In a statement issued yester-
day, the government also said
Arawak Cay vendors are fever-
ishly preparing to host contes-
tants of the Miss Universe
Pageant on August 5.

“The Miss Universe contes-
tants will come here for cock-
tails and a taste of Bahamian
culture,” said operations man-
ager Sonny Russell.

Improved

At the moment, the sewer
main at Arawak Cay is being
improved to allow the larger
restaurants and bars to install
private bathrooms.

Mr Russell spoke of “cor-
recting infrastructural problems
to make the experience more
comfortable for patrons.”

He said cruise passengers
“who complain that there is
nothing for them to do” are
being targeted for a taste of the
islands.

Thus, plans are already afoot
for Bahamian music and enter-
tainment to become a regular
feature at Arawak Cay.

Security is not an issue for
customers, said Mr Russell, as
the cultural centre has its own
police station and officers patrol
the area frequently.

“We all work together with
the police,” he said. “It’s a cor-
dial relationship. The police are
playing a big role in being com-
munity-minded and customer-
friendly.”

As most of the structures at
the cultural centre are made of
wood, fire hydrants are also to

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be installed, and vendors are to
be trained in basic fire fighting
techniques.

Frequent inspections by the
Department of Environmental
Health Services will ensure that
pests are kept under control,
Mr Russell added.

“The Ministry of Environ-
ment is doing a very good job in
that regard,” he said.

“They have commenced
monthly inspections and any
vendor not operating in a
sanitary way will be dealt
with.”

A new area at the western
end of the cultural centre has
been turned into a parking lot
with 30 new slots.

Plans are afoot to erect a craft
centre for authentically Bahami-
an products. About 24 thatch-
sheltered tropically-colored
booths are to be constructed for
artisans, Mr Russell said.

He said the Bahamas Culi-
nary Association is willing to
give seminars to assist vendors
with menu planning, food pro-
cessing, and other points.

Mr Russell said his office will
be contacting the Public Hos-
pital Authority for assistance in
conducting first aid seminars for
all employees at the cultural
centre.

And, insurance companies
have already been contacted
about providing some kind of
coverage for the vendors and
their operations.

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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 13

LOCAL NEWS

Union president allegedly
attempts to reprimand member
over comments in The Tribune



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Charter’ Acca
24 Jone 2

NOTICE

WILLOW TREE LIMITED

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) WILLOWTREELIMITED isin voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 26th
June, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to
and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Manex Limited, The
Bahamas Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets,
Nassau, Bahamas

Dated this 2nd day of July, A. D. 2009



Manex Limited
Liquidator



FROM page one

rent economy cannot support across-the-board
increases. Additionally, the present industrial
agreement does not support across-the-board
increases being given, but speaks of bringing
workers on par with salaries of their counter-
parts at the sister corporations which the gov-
ernment stated in The Tribune that they were
willing to do by “fixing” any anomalies that exist.

In that previous article, Mr Forbes said, “I sup-
port the union 100 per cent, but my problem is
what she is trying to achieve in an economic
downturn is not realistic.”

Ms Kemp at that time was reportedly attempt-
ing to push the government for a 15 per cent pay
increase for all union members. However this
industrial unrest followed an initial proposal from
Ms Kemp to the government to sell the WSC to a
“private investor”.

With WSC already overstaffed by 117 people,
this action, sources revealed, could only have led

Man is charged
with forcible

detention and rape
FROM page one

charges were read to him. He pleaded not
guilty to the charge of forcible detention and
was not required to enter a plea to the rape
charge.

Sergeant Sean Thurston, the prosecutor,
objected to Poitier being granted bail. He told
the court he was already on bail from the
Supreme Court for a matter of similar nature.

Poitier was remanded to Her Majesty’s
Prison. The case has been adjourned to July 7
and transferred to Court 10, Nassau Street.



NOTICE

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) HIGH YIELD HOLDINGS LIMITED is

June 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
and registered by the Registrar General.
Ting of 1 Raffles Link #05-02 Singapore 039393

Dated this 30" day of June A. D. 2009

HIGH YIELD HOLDINGS LIMITED

dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 29"

The Liquidator of the said company is Ms. Celene Koh Chwee

to massive lay offs of mostly union members at
the corporation.

In his response to Ms Kemp’s initial request for
a disciplinary meeting which was copied to all
union members, Mr Forbes is quoted questioning
the president as to how she could orchestrate a
sick out “to which you garnered support by
threatening to ‘grind’ the members”.

“T, a responsible and learned unionist, still
await the vote of the union body to sanction said
‘sick out’ therein making it a legal unionized
activity. Can the minutes of the meeting reflect
the ‘sick out’ being a union sanction event,” Mr
Forbes asked.

Noting therefore that the president essentially
organized an unsanctioned, unauthorized “illegal”
action against the WSC, Mr Forbes reminded
the president that it is her duty to ensure that
such activities are done properly and by the law.

“Madame to ensure that you and your cohorts
understand what Parliamentary procedure dic-
tates, I would like for them to reflect upon the
joint management and non-management union
meeting where the motion for a vote was moved
and seconded then subsequently passed to the
floor. That Madame president is parliamentary
procedure.

“Should I not educate the members as to your
duties and articulate how the experience you
claim is a farce, as by your actions it shows that
you have never negotiated any salary increases or
engineered any industrial action, as the mistakes
made consistently by your with respect to pro-
tecting the jobs of your members by simply fol-
lowing the law are of dynamic proportions and
can not and should not be tolerated,” he said.

Mr Forbes concluded his letter by reminding
the union president and the entire body itself
that as a prospective candidate for president he
was simply exerting his constitutionally obligated
right to campaign and spread the message to his
fellow union members in New Providence and
the Family Islands.

Attempts to reach Ms Kemp or Mr Forbes for
comment on these letters were unsuccessful up to

Mother of
three found
guilty of
manslaughter

FROM page one

in voluntary

submitted to

ply made up a story about her
and Mr Carey getting into an
argument at their apartment
on August 17. Mrs Bethel told
the jury that Pratt’s story made
no sense and that she had
staged the murder scene.

She noted that the pill on
the front room table, which



Ms. Celene Koh Chwee Ting
Liquidator

NOTICE
VATULELE LIMITED

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a)
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
Business Companies Act 2000.

June, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
and registered by the Registrar General.

Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI

Dated this 2nd day of July, A. D. 2009

VATULELE LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 30th

The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated Ltd.,

had initially been suspected to
be Viagra, had been placed
there by Pratt as a part of
stage management. She told
the jury that Pratt had been
heartless and showed no mercy
in Mr Carey’s senseless and
brutal killing.

Pratt’s attorney Romona
Farquharson told the jury that
the prosecution’s case didn’t
make sense. She questioned as
to why Pratt who have used a
rat tail comb if she had intend-
ed to kill Mr Carey.

Ms Farquharson argued that
the prosecution had proved no
motive for the killing.

She pointed out that Mr
Carey paid most of Pratt’s
bills, including the $800 per
month rent for her apartment.
Ms Farquharson also told the
jury that police had not prop-
erly investigated Mr Carey’s
death.

The trial began on June 17
before Senior Justice Anita
Allen.

Pratt’s sentencing hearing is
scheduled for August 10.
When asked if her client would

International

submitted to



Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator

NOTICE

MIMIZAN LIMITED



appeal the verdict, Ms Far-
quharson said she would like
to reserve comment on the
matter until after the sentenc-
ing.

NOTICE

OLVAR LIMITED

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) MIMIZAN LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 30th
June, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to
and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated Ltd.,
Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI

Dated this 2nd day of July, A. D. 2009



Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) OLVAR LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 30th
June, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to
and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated Ltd.,
Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI

Dated this 2nd day of July, A. D. 2009



Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator




PAGE 14, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009

re oe

BAHAMA ISLAND RESORTS & CASINO
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

Saturday, 4 July, 2009, 10a.m.* sharp
at the Hilton British Colonial,
West Bay Street

*Note: Registration is from 9a.m.-10a.m.

In accordance with Section 21 Subsections (2)(4) of the
Cooperative Societies Act, 2005, A Special Call Meeting of the
Bahama Island Resorts & Casino Cooperative Credit Union
Limited will be held on Saturday, 4 July, 2009, 10:00a.m. at the
Conference Centre, Police Headquarters, East Street, Nassau,
Bahamas. The purpose is to hold the Annual General Meeting
and satisfy requirements of the Cooperative Societies Act, 2005.

The Meeting is called to:-

(a) confirm the minutes of the previous annual general meeting
and of any intervening special meeting;

(b) consider the reports of the board, the credit committee and
the supervisory committee;

(c) examine the balance sheet together with the report on the
audit of the accounts of the registered society for the previous
year as prepared by a person authorized by the Director of
Societies pursuant to section 85 of the Act;

(d) approve the accounts, or, if the accounts are not approved to
cause the secretary to notify the Director of Societies who shall
consider the matter and make his decision therein, and the
Director of Societies decision as to the correctness of the
accounts shall be final;

(e) set the maximum liability pursuant to regulation 20;

(f) hear and decide upon any complaint brought by a member or
members aggrieved by a decision of the Board;

(g) conduct any other general business of the registered society;
and

(h) elect officers to the Board.

All members are urged to attend and
participate in this Meeting



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SALE!



THE TRIBUNE



Plan to sue over
bishop’s dead wife
in mausoleum

FROM page one

However, after complaints
from those living in the area,
who say the presence of the
mausoleum will bring down
property values, smells, and
“scares children”, the Town
Planning Committee subse-
quently rescinded its approval
and asked the Bishop to move
the mausoleum.

Director of Physical Plan-
ning Michael Major wrote to
resident Emily Knowles on
May 6, 2009, informing her

that the Department will
“make every effort to have
the structure and the burial
remains removed in a timely
fashion.”

Yesterday Ms Knowles,
who has been vocal in her
demand for the mausoleum to
go, said that almost two
months later nothing has
changed and residents “are
still suffering mental stress and
hardship.”

“We think we have given
the Department of Physical
Planning enough time to
resolve this matter. Therefore



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GARDEN and PET SUPPLIES

AT JOHN’S PLAZA on CARMICHEL ROAD

PRIZES!

Death sentence for
murder of businessman

FROM page one

year sentence. According to evidence adduced at the trial, Knowles
and Brown sat in the getaway car while Glinton shot and robbed
Carey.

Carey's cousin, Vaughn, who had originally been charged with
conspiracy to commit armed robbery, testified for the prosecu-
tion in exchange for having the charge against him dropped. Carey
had testified that Dwight Knowles had approached him about set-
ting up the robbery in exchange for $9,000 which he claimed he was
never paid.

Justice Jon Isaacs also sentenced Glinton to 30 years imprison-
ment on the armed robbery charge and 10 years imprisonment
on the conspiracy to commit armed robbery charge. The sentences
are to run concurrently beginning the date of his conviction. Glin-
ton was represented by attorneys Craig Butler and Devard Francis.
Deputy Director of Public Prosecutions Cheryl Grant-Bethel,
Anthony Delaney, Stephanie Pintard and Lennox Coleby repre-
sented the Crown.

In March 2006, the London Privy Council ruled that the
Bahamas’ mandatory death penalty was unconstitutional and that
the appropriate sentence would be left to the discretion of the tri-
al judge.



Next door to Bamboo Shack

FRIDAY, 3rd - SATURDAY 4th JULY
SURPRISES! °*

we have no other choice but
to commence legal proceed-
ings to the Supreme Court in
our collective names to sue
the Department of Physical
Planning, Environmental
Health and any other Gov-
ernment Department that
should have made sure that
his matter was taken care of,”
she said in a letter to the press,
signed by herself “on behalf
of the Community of Garden
Hills number two.”

Meanwhile, Sharon Hunter,
who lives adjacent to the
church grounds, supports the
legal action. S as se claims to
have already suffered loss of
income due to the departure
of a tenant from an apartment
she owned in part as a result
of its proximity to the mau-
soleum.

The residents further
alleged that a foul smell can at
times be detected emanating
from the tomb.

Commenting on the com-
plaints in April, Bishop Sey-
mour told another local daily
that “people today have no
love, no compassion and no
scruples.”

“I’m through with it,
because as far as I’m con-
cerned, (laying her to rest)
was the closure I had. If any-
body else wants to move her,
they could move her... but
wouldn’t give consent. I will
not give consent,” he report-
edly said.

A message left for
Mr Major seeking comment
was not returned up to press
time. Attempts to reach Bish-
op Seymour were unsuccess-
ful.



ee an
ie
ee


THE TRIBUNE PAGE 16

or

THURSDAY, JULY 2,



2009



ts

PAGE 18 ¢ Brent Stubbs’ opinion...





Wimbledon

semis all set:
Federer-Haas,
Roddick-Murray...

See page 17



Duo suffer defeat in quarterfinals

Knowles and mixed pairs partner victorious



MARK KNOWLES (right) and MAHESH BHUPATHI

a Mi
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CLEVELAND (AP) —
Shaquille O’Neal took his first
look at his new basketball

The 15-time All-Star center

m By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

ff the heels of his 1,000th

career win, Mark Knowles

suffered a heartbreaking

loss in perhaps the most
thrilling and suspenseful match thus far at
Wimbledon.

Knowles and partner Mahesh Bhu-
pathi were eliminated from the grand
slam quarterfinal at the hands of Wesley
Moodie of South Africa and Dick Nor-
man of Belgium 6-7 (11), 6-4, 6-7(9), 7-5,
4-6. A mammoth 48 minute opening set
foreshadowed the tone for the remainder
of the match which would total nearly
four hours to complete. In the first set
Moodie and Norman scored on 10 aces,
had a perfect winning percentage (11-
11) on second serves, scored 32 winners
with a total of 43 points won.

Bhupathi and Knowles scored just 20
winners with 37 points won. For the
match, Knowles and Bhupathi scored on
15 aces but faltered with a total of 17
unforced errors, while their opponents
had less than half their total with just
eight. They also had an uncharacteristi-

cally high number of errors with eight
double faults.

Knowles and Bhupathi also had 76
winners with 153 points won, while
Moodie and Norman scored 98 winners
with 162 points won.

Percentage

While the winning percentage on first
service was fairly even at 89 and 87 per-
cent, however Moodie and Norman held
a discernable advantage in winning per-
centage on second serves 77 Moodie and
Norman the tournament’s ninth ranked
team unseeded the fourth seeded team of
the tournament just prior to a showdown
with the top seeded pair.

The South African and Belgian pair
will face Bob and Mike Bryan in the
semifinals. The other half of the semifinal
round will feature unseeded James Blake
and Mardy Fish taking on former
Knowles teammate Daniel Nestor of
Canada and Nenad Zimonjic of Serbia.
Just two matches later, Knowles returned
to court two, and received redemption
with a win in mixed doubles.

Knowles, partnered with Anna-Lena
Groenfeld of Germany to advance to the

quarterfinals of the draw. They defeated
Nestor and Elena Vesnina of Russia in
straight sets, 6-4,6-4. In a nearly com-
plete turnaround from his first match of
the day, Knowles and Groenefeld took
the match in just 67 minutes.

After being upset by a lower seed in
men’s doubles, Knowles returned in the
mixed draw as the ninth seed to upend
the fifth seed. Knowles and Groenefeld
overcame a whopping 17 unforced errors
while their opponents committed just
three, but held a crucial advantage in
break point conversions, taking 2-3 for 67
percent and 40 winners. They will
advance to play Bob Bryan and Saman-
tha Stosur of Australia in the quarterfi-
nals.

Other notable pairs in the quarterfinals
include Leander Paes (India) and Cara
Black (Zimbabwe), the top seed, Kevin
Ullyett (Zimbabwe) and Su-Wei Hsiesh
(Chinese Tapei), the fourth ranked team,
Andre Sa (Brazil) and Ai Sugiyama
(Japan), eleventh ranked team, and
Stephen Huss (Australia) and Virginia
Pascual (Span), the twelfth ranked team.
Knowles and Groenfeld take the court
today in the fourth round for the right to
advance to the semifinals.

Shag to team up with ‘King James’

B By TOM WITHERS
AP Sports Writer

Experience in hardware, networking, Windows based
operuling systems and software.

Professional certifications an advantage (At, MCSE}
Must have good communication skills

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line: Computer Tech.) or fax to:

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clo Service Manager
Micromet Ltd.

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Nassau, Bahamas

Email: pobs{emicronet.bs
Fax: 328-3043



toured the Cavaliers’ suburban
practice facility and took his
physical on Wednesday, one
day before he is formally intro-
duced as superstar LeBron
James’ newest teammate.

O’Neal and a small group of
associates met briefly with Cavs
coach Mike Brown and others
at the Cleveland Clinic Courts
in Independence, Ohio. The
Cavaliers are hoping O’Neal,
who has won four NBA titles,
can be the missing piece to help
James win his first champi-
onship and end the city’s title
drought dating to 1964.

The Cavaliers have scheduled
a lpm news conference on
Thursday to welcome O’Neal.
He was acquired in a trade with
the Phoenix Suns last week.

It is not known if James, who
was vacationing outside the
country when O’Neal was trad-
ed, will be at the news confer-
ence. The league MVP was in
Los Angeles last Sunday for the
BET Awards.

O’Neal, who will wear jersey

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT

NOTICE

BAY STREET

NASSAU STREET TO VICTORIA AVENUE
ROADWAY CONSTRUCTION

30" June to 14" July 2009

In an effort to relieve current traffic congestion problems
BAHAMAS HOT MIX has been contracted for the paving of
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Local diversions will be sign posted in due course and further

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IN THIS file photo, Shaquille O'Neal (right) and LeBron James of the Cleveland Cavaliers dance together during
an All-Star basketball practice in Las Vegas. The Cavaliers completed a blockbuster trade, bringing the super-
star center O’Neal from Phoenix Suns to play with current MVP LeBron James, two people with knowledge of
the deal told The Associated Press. The people spoke on condition of anonymity because the trade had not been

officially announced...

No. 33 — his high school and
college number — in Cleveland,
is staying at a posh downtown
hotel during this visit. He hasn’t
decided if he will buy a house,
rent or stay in a hotel during

his time with the Cavaliers, his
fifth NBA team.

Cleveland is the first cold-
weather city where O’Neal has
played after stops in Orlando,
Fla., Los Angeles, Miami and

(AP Photo: Kevork Djansezian)

Phoenix.

O’Neal has one season left
under contract, but the 37-year-
old center recently indicated on
his Twitter page that he can
play three more seasons.

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INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 17



Wimbledon semifinals

all set: Federer-Haas,
Roddick-Murray

@ By STEPHEN WILSON
AP Sports Writer

WIMBLEDON, England
(AP) — Roger Federer neu-
tralized Ivo Karlovic’s huge
serves Wednesday to reach the
Wimbledon semifinals and
move a step closer to a record
15th Grand Slam champi-
onship. Two-time finalist Andy
Roddick, Andy Murray and
Tommy Haas completed the
final four.

In a match featuring short
points and few rallies, Federer
conjured up a few great returns
to break the 6-foot-10 Croatian
twice and secure a 6-3, 7-5, 7-6
(3) victory on another sunbaked
day at the All England Club.

Federer, closing in on his
sixth Wimbledon title, reached
his 21st consecutive semifinal
at a Grand Slam tournament
and extended his winning streak
to 17 matches with another vin-
tage performance on his
favorite Centre Court.

“T love the record I have of
reaching so many semifinals in
Grand Slams in a row — 21 is
quite a number,” Federer said.
“Tt shows how consistent I’ve
been.”

Tt was Federer’s ninth win in
10 matches against Karlovic,
who was playing in his first
Grand Slam quarterfinal.

Federer’s next opponent will
be Germany’s Haas, who upset
fourth-seeded Novak Djokovic
7-5, 7-6 (6), 4-6, 6-3 to advance
to his first Wimbledon semifi-
nal. The 31-year-old Haas was
the oldest player in the quar-
ters, while the 22-year-old
Djokovic was the youngest.

The third-seeded Murray
swept Juan Carlos Ferrero 7-5,
6-3, 6-2 to reach his first Wim-
bledon semifinal and keep up
his bid to become the first
British player to win the men’s
title since Fred Perry in 1936.

Murray will face the sixth-
seeded Roddick, who served 43
aces and outlasted 2002 cham-
pion Lleyton Hewitt 6-3, 6-7
(10), 7-6 (1), 4-6, 6-4 in the day’s
most competitive match. Hewitt
battled back from two sets to
one down, before Roddick
broke for 5-4 in the fifth and
then served out the match —
which ended after 3 hours, 50
minutes when the Australian
popped up a forehand half-vol-
ley past the baseline.

“Tt’s a testament to the type
of player he is that he kept
going and made it such a fight,”
said the 26-year-old Roddick,
who lost to Federer in the 2004
and ’05 Wimbledon finals. “I
think there’s a lot of respect
there. We used to get into it a
little bit when we were younger,
but I think we definitely earned
each other’s respect. Now we’re
just a couple of old married
dudes, so maybe we’ve grown
up a little bit.”

Hewitt, who had 21 aces him-
self, said he did all that he could
to deal with Roddick’s rocket
serves.

“You know you’re going to
get aced a lot,” he said. “I knew
that going into the match.
You're going to get some break
pomts and you’re going to see
them go pretty quickly as well.
It was a matter of trying to hang
in there as much as possible and
make him play that extra shot. I
was nearly able to do it.”

Murray broke Ferrero five
times, served 18 aces and lost
serve only once. Murray had 49
winners, compared to 20 for the
Spaniard, a former No. 1 and
only third wild card to reach
the Wimbledon quarters.

It was a dominant perfor-
mance by Murray, the first
Briton to reach the semifinals
since Tim Henman did it for
the fourth time in 2002.

“T feel confident because I’ve
won a lot of matches on the
grass,” Murray said. “But every
day, when I get up to play the
matches, I know that I’m going
to have to perform very well,
and that gets the nerves and the
adrenaline going and makes me
play better.”

Karlovic served 23 aces to
raise his tournament total to
160, but it was Federer who
never faced a break point. The
second-ranked Swiss star won
74 of 85 points on serve and
was taken to deuce only once,
in the sixth game of the third
set. Federer got out of that jam
with a 129 mph service winner
and a 128 mph ace.

“Tt’s difficult because there’s
not really any baseline rallies

EDA UTE Ciel eT

face Andy Roddick in one

half of the semifinals...
(AP Photos)

on his serve or on my serve,”
Federer said. “You expect a
tough scoreline all the time. It’s
not easy to break him. ’'m very
happy to break him twice and
win the match.”

The statistics told the story:
Federer had 39 winners and
only seven unforced errors, to
29 winners (almost all on serve)
and 17 errors for Karlovic.

Federer grabbed the upper
hand early when he broke
Karlovic in the fourth game of
the match with flashes of bril-
liance.

He got to break point with a
reflex backhand return winner
off a 130 mph serve and then
ripped a forehand return win-
ner off a 122 mph serve, pump-
ing his fist and shouting, “Come
on!”

It was the first time Karlovic
had been broken during the
tournament after winning 80
consecutive service games.

“He returned unbelievable
few shots and I could not really
react on it,” said Karlovic, who
added that he was bothered by
the sun in his eyes before
putting on sunglasses for the
rest of the match.

The first extended rally of the
match — and one of only a
handful during the entire con-
test — didn’t take place until

the fourth game of the second
set, a 15-stroke point that end-
ed with a Federer forehand
winner 35 minutes into the
match.

The second set turned Fed-
erer’s way when he broke
Karlovic in the 11th game with
four straight winners: an over-
head, a forehand passing shot
down the line, a reflex back-
hand return off a 126 mph serve
and a passing shot that glanced
off Karlovic’s racket frame.

The third set ended with the
13th tiebreaker the two men
have played against each oth-
er in 25 sets of tennis. Karlovic’s
limitations were exposed as he
made several glaring errors,
missing badly on what should
have been easy putaways. Fed-
erer finished him off with an
inside-out forehand winner on
the first match point.

The 24th-seeded Haas saved
three straight set points against
Djokovic after going down 6-3
in the second-set tiebreaker. He
broke in the fourth game of the
fourth set and sealed the win
when Djokovic netted a fore-
hand return on the first match
point.

The result wasn’t a complete
surprise: Haas beat Djokovic in
the grass-court final at Halle,
Germany, last month.

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Haas led Federer two sets to
love in the fourth round of the
French Open, only to lose in
five. He said he hopes to make
amends on Friday.

“That would be nice,” he
said. “Ill give it my best shot.
There’s not much he (Federer)
can’t do. He’s obviously the
favorite to win the title. I’m
going to go out there and try
to annoy him a little bit and see
what happens.”



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PAGE 18, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SPORTS



“Tribute to a legend’ luncheon

n Sunday, July 26, at San-
dals Royal Bahamian
resort, the Friends of
Tommy A Robinson are
slated to honour perhaps the country’s
greatest track and field athlete.

“The tribute to a legend’ luncheon
was originally planned for last year,
but had to be called off until now
because of one or two reasons, includ-
ing the fact that Robinson had to
undergo surgery.

The committee, headed by Alpheus
“Hawk” Finlayson, could not have
selected a better individual to honour.
He is an icon, a legend and national
hero who many people have lauded
and tried to emulate for his achieve-
ment.

The only thing, according to former
journalist Ed Bethel who covered many
stories about Robinson’s exploits dur-
ing his heyday, is that he has not been
blessed with a knighthood from the
Queen.

Before the year is out, Bethel hopes
to call his long-time friend ‘Sir Tommy
Robinson,’ he said at a recent press
conference to officially announce the
luncheon and to encourage the gener-
al public to come out and show their
support.

Robinson, who has his name inked
on the National Track and Field Sta-
dium, which is soon to be replaced by
the new facility being built by the Chi-
nese government, has been the pio-
neer sprinter in the country long before
we heard about the success of the
‘Golden Girls.’

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her gold medal from the 2001 IAAF
World Championships in Athletics in
Edmonton, Canada, Ferguson-McKen-
zie said Saturday night that Robinson
was really an “inspiration and motiva-
tion” to her.

In fact, she credited a lot of her suc-
cess to the support she got from Robin-
son, who stepped in and acted as her
father, although he is her “godfather.”

Robinson has indeed been consid-
ered the “godfather” of track and field
in the country. He was the first
Bahamian to participate in track and
field at the Olympic Games in Mel-
bourne, Australia, in 1956 where he
finished fourth in the first round of the
100m and 200m.

A year later, Robinson made history
again when he became the first
Bahamian to win a medal in an inter-
national competition at the West Indi-
an Federation Games in Kingston,
Jamaica, where he got a bronze in the
100m.

At the 1964 Olympics in Tokyo,
Japan, Robinson went on to become
the first Bahamian track and field ath-
lete to advance to an Olympic final
after he placed second in the 100m
semifinal behind then world record
holder Bob Haynes of the United
States.

For a number of years, Robinson
held the national record in both the
100m and 200m. But if there was any
shortfall, it would have been the fact
that he was not successful in winning an
Olympic medal.

When asked how he felt about the
performances of the current sprinters,

Building’ =

led by IAAF
World Champi-
onship in Athlet- f
ics’ silver medallist
Derrick Atkins,
Robinson said he’s
disappointed that
they have not
been able to sur-
pass the many
accomplishments
that Robinson was
able to achieve.

Yes, Atkins
broke the barrier
when he won the
silver medal in
Osaka, Japan,
behind American
champion Tyson Gay in 2007 and in
the process became the fastest Bahami-
an ever when he lowered his national
record to 9.91 seconds.

And yes, Dominic Demeritte left his
mark on the 2006 World Indoor Cham-
pionships when he listed as the last
champion in the 2004 Championships
in Budapest, Hungary, an event that
has now been erased from the schedule
because of the disadvantage that was
presented to the athletes with regard to
who would draw the outside lane six.

Indeed, Robinson has been consid-
ered the greatest Bahamian sprinter
because of the consistency in which he
competed, the majority of times as a
“lone ranger” carrying the Bahamian
flag.

In fact, if you sit down long enough
to listen, Robinson can probably clear-
ly recall so many of his performances

STUBBS

OPINION

a
_



that it will amaze you as to the incred-
ible achievements that he has been able
to secure.

Some day, the story on the life of
Tommy Robinson must be put to pen
in a book for everyone to be able to fol-
low and remember for years to come.
It’s such a fantasy story, one that
should be a great copy to read.

The Friends of Tommy Robinson
should be commended for honouring
this Bahamian giant, who has already
been inducted into the National Hall of
Fame. If there is anybody who deserves
to continue to smell his flowers while
he’s alive, it’s Tommy Robinson.

Another is Sir Durward “Sea Wolf”
Knowles. But that’s another topic for
discussion at another time.

So [just want to encourage the gen-
eral public to start making plans to join
the committee in honouring Robinson,
who from all indications, is in goods
spirits despite his illness. The luncheon
on July 26 could be your way of saying
“thank you Tommy” for his contribu-
tion to the development of sports in
the country and track and field in gen-
eral.

Talking about track and field, the
BAAA hosted its National Track and
Field Championships at the Thomas
A Robinson Track and Field Stadium
over the weekend and for the first time
since they have been putting it on in
the last decade, there was no major
sponsor.

There was hardly any advanced pub-
licity as it was in the past, but the ath-
letes turned out, as expected, and per-
formed up to par for the most part.

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As usual, the nationals clashed with
the Bahamas Swimming Federation’s
Royal Bank of Canada National Swim-
ming Championships at the Betty Kel-
ly Kenning Aquatic Center.

And at the National Tennis Center,
there was the Security & General Inter-
national Tennis Tournament, featur-
ing some of the top junior players in he
world.

If that wasn’t enough, the New Prov-
idence Softball Association had a big
double header at the Banker’s Field
at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex.

So whether or not people think that
the numbers could have been better
at the track to watch just about all of
the country’s elite athletes in action,
there were just too many things going
on at the same time.

And although there are those who
will argue that with a little more pub-
licity, the BAAA would have attracted
more, I tend to disagree because we
have really seen a falloff in the sup-
port for the fans in just about all sports,
not just track and field.

But it was good that despite the rain
and the fact that the ceremonies were
constantly delayed, the fans waited
until the end to watch as the men’s 4x
400m relay team and Ferguson-
McKenzie finally got their gold medals
from the 2001 World Championships in
Edmonton, Canada, after the US were
disqualified in both events for testing
positive for the use of illegal sub-
stances.

At least there were a number of fans
who were eager to see the athletes
receive their just rewards.

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THE TRIBUNE





lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

AIRLINES operating at the
Lynden Pindling International
Airport (LPIA) could face an-
almost 24 per cent increase in
landing fees being proposed by
the Nassau Airport Develop-
ment Company (NAD), which
could be transferred on to pas-
sengers and increase the cost of
travel to the Bahamas, nega-
tively impacting tourism.

Some airlines reacted with
dismay yesterday as NAD
released the details of its pro-
posed fee increases, highlighting
a proposed 23.6 per cent
increase to landing fees, and a
6.1 per cent increase to terminal
fees, aircraft loading bridge fees
and aircraft parking fees.

British Airways’ airport man-
ager, Nathaniel Rappel, told
Tribune Business that airlines
are generally “not happy” about
any manner of fee increase.

He argued that the fee
increases come at the worst pos-
sible time for airlines in general

isin

THURSDAY,





TUL ae



I

2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Airline fears
over 24% rise
in landing fee

NAD proposing 6.1% fee
hike for other charges,
prompting concern over
increased travel costs to
the Bahamas impacting
tourism

and, with the state of the econ-
omy, the worst time for the cost
of air travel.

“T can’t make any specific
comments about the issue, but
you will find that airlines in this
time and in the current eco-
nomic situation will not be hap-
py about increases in fees,” said
Mr Rappel. “And in this day
and age, having increases in fees
may actually affect the way air-
lines see destinations.

“From the tourism industry
level, people oppose the
increase in that it makes the
cost of our service higher.”

Airlines have been suffering
high overhead costs for several

SEE page 4B

Bahamas Waste profits ‘about
50% higher’ than budgeted

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMAS Waste said yes-
terday the $207,785 in net
income generated during its
2009 first quarter exceeded
Budget expectations by “about
50 per cent”, with construction
on its recently-approved
biodiesel production facility
anticipated to start within the
next eight weeks.

Disa Harper, the BISX-list-
ed company’s chief financial
officer, told Tribune Business:
“We exceeded expectations. We
were probably about 50 per cent
higher than we wrote in our
Budget in terms of net income.”

Bahamas Waste’s net income
for the three months to March
31, 2009, was only 9.1 per cent
down on 2008’s $228,469 com-
parative. Ms Harper said the
result was due to a “concerted
effort to cut back on costs”, cou-
pled with the benefits of a
decrease in fuel prices and rev-
enue levels holding up well
against 2008 levels.

The BISX-listed company
was “really working hard” to
maintain its current staff com-
plement of 94, and not lay any-
one off. For the 2009 first quar-
ter, while revenues were down
just over 4 per cent, at $1.931
million compared to $2.013 mil-
lion, the cost of sales had also
decreased by 5.2 per cent to

* Construction on recently-
approved biodiesel facility
likely to start in eight weeks,
as company moves to
rebuild client base

* Cardboard recycling to
start during 2009 Q3

* Accounts receivables
tackled by bringing cut-off
deadline down from
90 to 60 days past due

$1.234 million.

And operating expenses were
held relatively flat, at $482,566
compared to $475,350 the year
before.

But, sounding a note of cau-
tion about what the remainder
of 2009 held, Ms Harper told
Tribune Business: “This quar-
ter, we’ve seen fuel prices start
to kick-in again. Now we’re get-
ting into the second quarter,
more businesses are feeling the
effects of the slowdown. This
quarter will be a much better
indicator of what the rest of the
year will look like for us.”

To reduce costs, Ms Harper
said Bahamas Waste had cut
back on discretionary spending,
trimming advertising and car-
rying out more maintenance in-

SEE page 9B

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Financial sector ‘can
grow to 25% of GDP

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

he Bahamian

financial services

industry’s direct

contribution to this
nation’s gross domestic prod-
uct (GDP) “could grow” from
a current 18-18 per cent to 25
per cent over a five to seven-
year period, a leading attor-
ney said yesterday, “if we got
it right”.

Brian Moree, senior part-
ner at McKinney, Bancroft &
Hughes, told Tribune Busi-
ness that if the private and
public sectors worked togeth-
er and “came up with a new
business plan and model to
facilitate the expansion” of
the financial services indus-
try, and got it correct, there
would be “generous and
major rewards” extending
right through the Bahamian
economy and society.

Pointing out that the Cen-
tral Bank of the Bahamas sur-
vey on the financial services
industry’s overall contribu-
tion to the Bahamian econo-
my in 2008 had provided a

BRIAN MOREE

“timely” reminder of the sec-
tor’s importance, Mr Moree
told Tribune Business: “The
financial services industry is
a major contributor to our
middle class, which provides
thousands of Bahamians with
mobility in the labour force,
because of the high salary lev-
els, and the training and
opportunities to advance in
that sector.

“T don’t think we would
suffer a severe diminution of
business in the financial ser-

vices sector without affecting
the national economy.”

As a result, it was “critical-
ly important” for the
Bahamas “to get it right” in
developing its response to
international initiatives, such
as the G-20/OECD thrust
demanding higher levels of
transparency and tax infor-
mation exchange.

Mr Moree urged the
Bahamas to “get in a proac-
tive mode” in developing such
responses, which could only
be put together by a joint
public/private sector
approach. And, if the
Bahamas got it right, he sug-
gested that the rewards could
be immense.

“My own view is that over a
five-year period, five to seven
years at the maximum, if we
got it right and did what was
necessary, we would grow the
financial services sector from
what it is now, 15-18 per cent
of GDP, to 25 per cent,” Mr
Moree told Tribune Business.

“That is achievable in a five
to seven-year period. We

SEE page 5B



No hotel ‘rebound’ despite
decrease in air arrivals fall-off

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

WHILE air arrival fall-offs
appear to be decreasing month-
over-month, “especially from
Florida”, the Bahamas Hotel
Association’s (BHA) president
yesterday said this was “not a
true indications things are
rebounding” because aggregate
revenues earned by major
hotels were still more than 20
per cent down on 2008 compar-
isons.

Robert Sands said that while
the percentage decline in air
arrivals, in comparison to 2008

{|
UUM I
il!

* Hotel president says that while year-over-year arrivals

declines from key markets,

‘especially Florida’,

reducing, hotel revenues still down by ‘plus-20 per cent’
* Industry ‘still digging itself out of hole’, and hoping
to ‘get through 2009 without any major casualties’
* Hopes for airlift boost with elimination of
Customs/Immigration overtime charges

figures, was becoming less as
2009 progressed, many other
factors were involved in deter-
mining the hotel industry’s
financial performance and the
sector “still has a big hole to dig

ourselves out of”.

The BHA president said the
Bahamian hotel industry was
hoping for “some stabilisation

SEE page 8B



Online at

BankBahamasOnline.com

Ahaco Markets:
dividend decision
set for early 2010

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ABACO
Markets hopes
to be in a posi-
tion to resume
dividend pay-
ments to long-
suffering
shareholders
after its cur-
rent fiscal year
ends on Janu-
ary 31, 2010,
its chief exec-
utive yesterday telling Tribune
Business the Board was likely
to make its decision in Febru-
ary/March once the financial
performance was known.

Gavin Watchorn, who is also
the BISX-listed food retail
group’s president, said the
resumption of dividend pay-
ments would be the last sign
needed to confirm it had
returned to “full health” fol-
lowing a five-year turnaround
programme that appears to have
restored it to consistent prof-
itability.

However, he added that while
understanding shareholder
expectations that they would
receive a return on their invest-

SEE page 10B

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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Chamber honours

THE owner of Checkers Cafe, Gus
Cartwright, was named Outstanding
Businessperson of the Year as the
Bahamas Chamber of Commerce paid
tribute to leading Bahamian business
leaders at its 38th annual awards ball
on Saturday.

The highlight was the presentation of
the 2009 Annual Business Awards and
the Lifetime Achievement Award,
which went to George Myers, chair-
man of the Myers Group of Compa-
nies. More than 350 business, govern-
ment and industry leaders were in
attendance.

Dr Wendy Stuart received the
Developing Entrepreneur of the Year
Award for her successful body-care
business, Botani Bath.

Two Bahamian businesses had the
distinction of being heralded as Out-
standing Business of the Year, which is
awarded for two categories - business-
es with over 50 employees, and those
with less.

In Category A, businesses with more
than 50 employees, Furniture Plus was
presented with the Outstanding Busi-
ness Award. The Plait Lady, (Clare
Sands) received the designation for
Outstanding Business of the Year for
Category B (less than 50 employees).

Receiving the Chamber’s prestigious
Lifetime Achievement Award, Mr
Myers thanked his team and the many
individuals he has worked with over
the course of his 40-year career.

Keynote speaker for the evening,
Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, minis-
ter of tourism and aviation, gave a
colorful account of his journey and
friendship with Mr Myers, having
worked closely with him over the
course of his career in the tourism
industry, beginning in 1982 at Resorts

woM@rsl\elgclilela

os



al
r Sas

THE BAHAMAS Chamber of Commerce pre-
sented its 2009 Annual Business Awards at
their 38th annual awards ball. The evening’s
winners are pictured with the event’s
keynote speaker, Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace, minister of tourism and aviation, the
Chamber president, Khaalis Rolle, and Philip
Simon, the Chamber executive director

International.

Acknowledging that he could think
of none more deserving than Mr
Myers, the minister reflected on how
much he had learned from him and
called him, “the smartest man in the
world”.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace also
encouraged the business community
to become active stakeholders in the
tourism sector, noting that it will take
more than promotions to stimulate
the industry.

The development of infrastructure
needed to grow and diversify the
Bahamian tourism product was essen-
tial. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace stressed
that the accessibility factor was just as
crucial an ingredient to success as
reducing the cost of the destination to
competitiveness.

CRUISE
LINE

business leaders



THE BAHAMAS Chamber of Commerce gave its Lifetime Achievement Award to George Myers, chairman of the Myers Group of Com-
panies. Pictured (L-R) Khaalis Rolle, Chamber president; George Myers; Dr Sophia Rolle, chairperson of Chamber week 2009.

Philip Simon, the Chamber’s execu-
tive director, acknowledged Mr Myers’
achievements, saying: “Having played
an integral role in the success of the
Bahamian tourism industry, Mr Myers
is undoubtedly deserving of the Cham-
ber’s prestigious 2009 Lifetime
Achievement Award for his immea-
surable contributions to the growth of
tourism and business in the Bahamas.
His body of work speaks for itself.”

The Chamber of Commerce also bid
farewell officially to outgoing presi-
dent Dionisio D’Aguilar, recognised
for his outstanding work and service to
the organisation and the business com-
munity over his two-year term.

Mr D’ Aguilar was presented with a
commemorative photo collage of some
of his highlights as president.

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Newly-elected Chamber president,
Khaalis Rolle, said of all the finalists:
“They are all indeed outstanding final-
ists, and the selection of winners was no
easy process.”

As for the winners, he added: “They
represent the success stories of the
Bahamian business community. They
are market leaders, who have demon-
strated their commitment to ethical
business practices and are actively con-
tributing to the overall development
of the Bahamian economy and com-
munity.”

Although they did not go home with
the top award, the Chamber recog-
nised the outstanding achievements of
the other finalists. In the category of
Outstanding Business Person of the
Year, finalists Dr Charles Diggiss, pres-

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ident of the Med-Net Group of Com-
panies and chief medical officer at
Doctors Hospital, and Chris Mortimer,
president of Galleria Cinemas and
Bennigan’s Grill & Tavern, were com-
mended.

Kenwood Kerr, president of Provi-
dence Advisors, and Farrell Goff and
Deran Thompson, principals of
Bahamas Woodworking Studio, were
finalists for the Developing Entrepre-
neur Award.

The Mall at Marathon and Bahamas
Waste were recognised as finalists in
the very competitive Business of the
Year ‘50 employees or more’ category.

Caribbean Civil Group and Bahamas
Orthodontic Centre were saluted in
that category for businesses with less
than 50 employees.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 2 2009, PAGE 3B



a oS ee
Watersports operators
fear 70% income loss

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

WATERSPORTS operators
could lose as much as 70 per
cent of their income when an
area of Arawak Cay used for
launching boats and jet skis is
blocked by a 35-inch pipe,
which will pump dredged debris
and a silt screen used to keep
that debris off Long Wharf
Beach.

The pipe is related to the
upcoming dredging of Nassau
Harbour to accommodate the
Genesis class cruise ships. The
works manager for Boskalis,
Ronald Both, said the dredging
of the harbour should begin in
earnest by the third week of
July.

He added that the pipe which
will deter the watersports oper-
ators will be put in place as ear-
ly as next week.

Yet as early as yesterday,
workers had placed cones
joined by red tape and two
enormous steel pipes on the
western end of Long Wharf
Beach, where the operators
launch their boats and jet skis
into the water.

Many of the operators sim-
ply ignored the makeshift bar-
rier, running over the cones and
launching their equipment as
they have always done.

Owner of Reno Watersports,
Reno Deveaux, said the Gov-
ernment needs to create a new
area for operators to launch
their boats, as many of the
ramps along East Bay Street are
not fit to do so - especially dur-

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ing low tide.

Mr Deveaux said it is likely
government will suggest opera-
tors launch at the ramp on Mon-
tague, though they were asked
several years ago to discontinue
its use because it was causing
severe traffic congestion.

He and vice-president of the
Bahamas Watersports Associ-
ation, Patrick Glinton, said that
apart from the traffic conges-
tion 70 - 80 watersports opera-
tors will cause dropping their
equipment at the Montague
ramp, the conditions there at
what is also a fish market are
unsanitary.

“T caught a fungus there from
getting cut in that water more
than once,” said Mr Glinton.

He and Mr Deveaux also fear
that a mass movement to that
area will breed arguments
amongst the operators, who all
vie for the ramp in order to be
the first over to Paradise Island.

At the Arawak Cay location
there is enough space for two
or three operators to launch
boats and jet skis simultaneous-
ly, and ample parking for their
trucks and trailers.

Mr Deveaux said the Port
Department yesterday deemed
the area an illegal ramp, only
after it was decided to place the
dredging pipe at the location,
though nothing was said about
the illegality of its use in previ-




ous years.

He said the Government now
needs to find an appropriate
place for boat launches, in order
for the operators to maintain
their livelihood.

During the Chamber of Com-
merce’s meet the ministers
forum last Thursday, Mr
Deveaux voiced his concern
about the possible closure of
the Arawak Cay ramp to Min-
ister of Public Works, Neko
Grant.

Mr Grant replied that boat
ramps did not fall under his
ministry and suggested that Mr
Deveaux speak to Minister of
the the Environment, Dr Earl
Deveaux, who was also sched-
uled to speak at the forum.

Mr Grant, though, reassured
Mr Deveaux that if the Gov-
ernment decided to close any
ramps, operators would be
alerted and informed of alter-
native ramps.

Mr Deveaux said the Port
Department sent a representa-
tive to Arawak Cay to speak to
some of the operators, but noth-
ing was received in writing.

He suggested the Port
Department has often been
fickle when dealing with the
Bahamas Watersports Associ-
ation. “They sit up there and
speak down to us here,” he said.
“They recognise us only when
they want to.”

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Administer a graup of Trusts, Foundations & Companies pursuant to respective
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Oversee a group of complex chent relationships
Review all governing documents of Trusts, Foundations & Companies for legal
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PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JULY 2 2009

THE TRIBUNE



[Ee rr oar 00S: ee ree ee
Airline fears over 24% rise in landing fee

FROM page 1B

years, with increasing costs per
barrel of oil driving travel costs
higher and higher.

Mr Rappel said increased
fees have always been a deter-
rent to air travel, as they often
translate into higher costs for
the travelling public. The cost of
airline tickets on some discount
websites is only marginally high-






er than the taxes and fees
attached to the final purchase.

This, he said, makes it diffi-
cult for airlines to incentivise
travel and remain competitive.

Mr Rappel said there is an
air of “astonishment” industry-
wide when there are increases
in fees, and suggested that it
was no surprise when airlines
opposed such changes.

NAD has proposed a 23.6

KS

Colinalmperial

To Our Valued Clients

Please note that all offices of
Colinalmperial will be CLOSED on
Friday 3 July 2009
for the company’s
Annual Employee Fun Day.




















Our Pay Station at 21 Collins Avenue will
offer extended weekend hours on
Saturday 4 July from 8:30am to 4pm
for your convenience.

percent increase to their landing
fees and a 6.1 per cent to
increase to aircraft loading
bridge fees, terminal fees and
aircraft parking fees.

For one Bahamas-owned air-
line, this translates into an
added $13 on the $51 landing
fee for their 19-seater aircraft.

According to a representa-
tive of that airline, who wished
to remain anonymous, landing
fees are not reflected in the cost
of tickets. However, that rep-
resentative said any increase in
fees is inevitably “going to affect
us and it has to be passed on to
the passengers”.

Mr Rappel said NAD men-
tioned the impending increas-
es to LPIA airlines. However, it
appears they were not involved
in a consultative capacity, as
several managers at smaller air-
lines seemed not to know of the
changes.

“We have been in discussions
with them about various
increased and fees that they are
proposing to go into,” said Mr
Rappel.

“T will reserve commenting
on that (NAD conferring with
airlines on fee increases)
because they briefly mentioned

it.”

NAD has argued that the fees
are necessary for maintaining
its “financial covenants”, but
contended that LPIA’s rates
after the increases remain com-
petitive and less than the
Caribbean average.

Increases

“The gradual increases con-
tained within the financial mod-
el are necessary for the Nassau
Airport Development Compa-
ny to meet its operational needs
and the financial covenants of
the Phase 2, stage 1 financing,”
said the online NAD release.

If the fee increases, which
combine the 2010 and deferred
2009 rises, do not take place,
NAD said it risked breaching
is banking covenants for the
$265 million financing.

“In accordance with its
financing obligations ,the Nas-
sau Airport Development Com-
pany must maintain a debt ser-
vice coverage ratio (DSCR) of
not less than 1.3 to 1. The aver-
age DSCR ratio for the 10 year
period of 2011 to 2020 is cur-
rently projected at 1.48 to 1,”
NAD said.

“The financial model includes
the proposed fees and charges
increases, in addition to increas-
es planned for 2011, 2012 and
2013, followed by annual con-
sumer price index [inflation]
type increases.

*The proposed fees and
charges increases include the
deferred 2009 rate increases
adjusted by the planned 2010
rate increase. More specifically
,the deferred increases planned
for 2009, which were to be 20
per cent for landing fees and 3
per cent for the other fees, must
be applied prior to the 2010 rate
increase of 3 per cent. Thus in
determining the proposed rate
increase, the 2009 rate increase
is multiplied by the 2010 rate
increase and the result is added
to the 2010 rate increase.”

Mr Rappel said the bench-
marking done by NAD based
on airports in the region was
being scrutinised by several air-

lines.

“A group of airlines have dis-
cussed the premise on which
these assumptions were made,”
he said. “The Bahamas econo-
my is not the same as other
Caribbean islands.”

NAD’s benchmarking was
based on a Boeing 737 700 with
a passenger load factor of 75
per cent (102 passengers) and
90-minute turnaround time that
included use of a jet bridge for
fuel loading.

“Excluding government tax-
es, LPIA’s costs are currently
$29.58, and with the recom-
mended increase become $30.03
per passenger, an increase of
1.5 per cent. The average cost of
the Caribbean airports present-
ed in the graph, excluding
LPIA, is $35.39 per passenger.
LPIA’s recommended rates are
very competitive at $5.36 or 15
per cent less than the Caribbean
average,” NAD said.

NOTICE

OF

ZONICAL HILL LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 30th day of June, 2009.
Credit Suisse Limited of Bahamas Finacial Centre,
Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, The Bahamas has
been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Thank you.

Employment Opportunity

Senior Accounts Assistant

We seek to employ a talented, innovative, leader with a
passion for success, the ability to initiate progress, an
aptitude for Accounting and a desire to succeed.

Skill Requirements

Possess strong foundation of accounting practices and
procedures

Excellent oral and communication skills

Excellent motivation & coaching skills

Ability to operate and familiarity with POS systems
Strong ability to drive team sales

Proficient in Microsoft Office, GL and Accounting
applications

strong multitasking ability

Possess excellent planning, organizational and
implementation skills

Strong leadership & managerial skills

Strong internet skills i.e, Emailing, group messaging
and research

Ability to execute priority based workload

Ability to exert initiative

Recording, summarizing, analyzing, verifying and
reporting of results of financial transactions

Minimum Experience Requirements

.

.

Tertiary level - with degree in related field;

Accounts executive with at least 4 years experience in
Accounting ;

At least three years experience in supervisory post;
Strong knowledge and application of MS Microsoft Suite

APPLY VIA EMAIL TO:

sraccountassistant2009@gmail.com

GOLD EE

rerio Decor——

MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL
HEALTH SERVICES

GOVERNMENT NOTICE
INVITATION FOR TENDERS

The Government of The Bahamas is inviting tenders for
the supply of proposal for the design of sanitary landfill
cell #2 off Tonique Williams Darling Highway.

Interested parties may obtain further information including
eligibility to participate and may collect the bidding
document upon payment of a non refundable fee of fifty
dollars ($50.00) as of June 22nd 2009 from:

The Department of Environmental Health Services
Farrington Road

Nassau, The Bahamas

P. O. Box SS-19048

Telephone No. (242) 322-8037, Facsimile No. (242) 322-
8073 between the hours of 9:00am and 5:00pm Monday
to Friday.

The method of payment will be certified cheque of cash.
Tenders are to be submitted in triplicate (3) in sealed
envelope (s) addressed to:

The Tenders Board

c/o The Financial Secretary
Ministry of Finance

Cecil V. Wallace Whitfield Centre
P.O. Box N-3017

Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

No later than July 3rd 2009.

Tenders will be open at 10am on July 7th, 2009 at the
office of the Tenders Board, Ministry of Finance.

The government reserves the right to reject any or all
Tenders.

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Tel: 356-2781

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Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator



GN-878



MINISTRY OF FINANCE
TREASURY DEPARTMENT

PUBLIC NOTICE

The Treasurer of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas advises
all Pensioners, Parliamentary, Judicial, Official, World War
1 Veterans & Widows, Bahamas Widows & Orphans and
Re-employed, whose pension payments are paid directly into
their bank accounts to verify during the July, 2009 verification
exercise.

Pensioners are required to visit the Pension Section of the
Treasury Department situated on the ground floor of the
British American Insurance House,Marlborough St and Navy
Lion Road, Nassau, during the hours of 9am and 4pm
weekdays or the C. R, Walker Senior High School, School
Lane, off Blue Hill Road and Market Street during the hours
of 10am and 3pm weekdays for the month of July only,
bringing with them a form of identification such as Passport,
Voters Card, National Insurance Card or Drivers’ licence.

Pensioners submitting Life and Payment Certificates as
verification must ensure that the certificate is completed, duly
signed by one of the persons designated on the said form and
that the signed date falls within the designated period.

Failing to present oneself or the appropriate Life and Payment
Certificate for verification, will result in the disruption of
payments directly into their bank account, for the month of
December, 2009 and thereafter until verified.

The following Life and Payment Certificates are available at
the Treasury Department, Nassau and Freeport, and at Family
Island Administration offices:

¢ Parliamentary Pension Life & Payment Certificate - for
retired Parliamentarians.

* Official Pension (Judicial) Life & Payment Certificate -
for retired Judges.

* Official Pension Life & Payment Certificate - for retired
Public Officers.

* World War 1 Veterans and Widows Life & Payment
Certificate - for Veterans & Widows of World War 1.

* Bahamas Widows’ & Orphans’ Pension Fund Certificate
- for Widows’ & Orphans’.

Pensioners residing within The Bahamas should note that the
submission of Life and Payment certificates on a monthly
basis is no longer required. However, all pensioners are
expected to verify during January and July of each year to
avoid any inconvenience.

For further details please contact the Pension Section,
Treasury Department, at telephone numbers (242) 302-
0539, 302-0565 or 302-0524. Life and Payment Certificates
may be forwarded via facsimile to (242) 323-1459.




THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 2 2009, PAGE 5B



a = =~
Financial sector ‘can grow’ to 25% of GDP

FROM page 1B

could grow the direct GDP con-
tribution made by the financial
services sector to around 25 per
cent of GDP, and the indirect
contribution would grow in pro-
portion to that.

“T think there would be an
impact on jobs, and I don’t only
mean jobs in the financial ser-
vices industry, because there is
a spin-off effect.”

As aresult, Mr Moree said it
was the perfect time for the
Government and its agencies to
work with the Bahamas Finan-
cial Services Board (BFSB) and
other industry associations on
“developing a national plan that
focuses on this sector with a
concerted view to not only
maintain the industry, but how
it can be developed and expand-
ed given the realities of the mar-
ketplace that we are facing”.

Describing this as “a big
task”, the McKinney, Bancroft
& Hughes senior partner added:
“It’s not business as usual. It’s
not more of the same and the
status quo.”

It involved “re-examining the
business model of this jurisdic-
tion, looking at the realities of
the market, and come up with a
new business plan and model
that facilitates the expansion of
the industry”.

And Mr Moree told Tribune
Business: “If we got it right, I
think the rewards would be very
significant for this country. Con-
versely, if we do not get it right,
it could be very difficult for us
going forward. That’s the other
side of the same coin.

“This effort requires high pri-
ority, because it has such gen-
erous and major rewards for the
country. If we get it right, it will
pay enormous dividends, not

just for that sole sector but the
whole society, right the way
through the whole economy,
because of the impact financial
services has on the whole econ-
omy.”

The Central Bank reported
on Tuesday that Bahamians
working in the financial services
industry saw an average 6.2 per
cent increase in take-home pay
during 2008 despite a slight

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT

decline in expatriate employ-
ees’ salaries, as the industry
bucked the recessionary trend
with a modest expansion in its
economic contribution.

The Central Bank survey
found that stripping out bonus-
es, the Bahamian financial
industry’s average base salary
rose by 4.6 per cent to $50,488
in 2008, well ahead of the pre-
vious year’s 0.7 per cent

2008
CLE quill 65

Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER of the Quicting Tithes Act, 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Petthon of Mertland Tumauest

AND

increase and above the 1.1 per
cent average rise enjoyed
between 2003-2007.

The survey again highlight-
ed the financial services indus-
try’s importance to the Bahami-
an economy, especially in terms
of providing top-end, high-
salaried jobs. The sector was
estimated to have paid out $521
million in total salaries, includ-
ing bonuses, during 2008, a 7.6

per cent increase upon the pre-
vious year’s $484.4 million total.
Those salaries generate a rel-
atively high disposable income
level for Bahamian financial
services employees, which in
turn translates into a purchasing
and spending power that cre-
ates jobs and business in other
industries, in addition to boost-
ing the velocity of money cir-
culation in this economy.

Employment Opportunity

Sales Manager

We are in search of a talented, innovative, charismatic
and creative leader with a passion for success, an
aptitude for sales and the ability to initiate progress.

Skill Requirements
Excellent oral and communication skills
Excellent motivation, training, and coaching skills
Ability to operate POS systems.
Strang ability to drive team sales
Proficient in Microsoft Office applications
Strang multitasking ability

Possess excellent planning, organizational and
implementation skills

Strong leadership & management skills

Strang internet skills i.e, Emailing, group messaging
and research

Ability to execute priority based workload
Ability to exert initiative

———— — See Serer IM THE MATTER of a picee, parcel or lot of land containing
ENERGY SAVING 41,468 Sq. ft., Deadman’s Cay, Long Island, Bahamas

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* Tankless Water coo

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NOTICE

TAKE NOTICE that MERTLAND TURNQUEST of
Deadman'’s Cay, Long Island has filed a petition pursuant to the
Quieting Tithes Act, 1959 claiming tithe over all that piece parcel
or bot of land that ts a portion of an area known as the Tumaquest
Estate and contaming 41.468 Sq. tt. near Deadman’s Cay, Long
Island

FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that copies of the plan may be

inpected dung nonnal office hours at:

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street and Bank
Lane, Nassau, Bahamas:
The Notice Board of the local Administrator's Office, Simm’s
Long Island: amd

(c) The Chambers of the Petitioner's athomey, Calkenders & Co,
One Millars Court in the City ot Nassau

Minimum Experience & Job Requirements
Tertiary level - with degree in related field;

Sales executive with at least ten years experience in
sales and marketing:

At least three years experience in supervisory post;
Strong knowledge and application of MS Microsoft
Suite

For more information or survey
Email: energysavingsconsultants @hotmail.com

Contact 326-6121

NOTICE is hereby given that any persons having dower or right
to dower or an adverse claim of a claim not recornised in the
Petition shall before the 4th day of August, A.D. 2009 file with
the Supreme Court and serve on the undersigned a statement of
his or her claim in the prescribed form, verified by an affidavit to
be fled therewith. Failure of any such person to file and serve
statement of his claim on or before the sad 4th day of August,
ALD, 2009 wall operate as a bar to such claim

Montrose Avenue

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/QUI/NO.00164

APPLY VIA EMAIL TO:

DATED the 10th day of March, : .
salesmanageropportunity2009@gmail.com

20049
CALLENDERS & CO.,
Ome Millar's Court
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Ms. Courmey Pearce
Telephone: 322-2511
Counsel & Attormey tor the Petitroner

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land
comprising the Eastern portion of Lot Number Twenty-One (21)
containing 26,120 square feet and originally granted to Crispin
Benjamin and being Crown Grant A4-63 situate Two thousand feet
east of Gladstone Road in the Gladstone Road Crown Allotments in
the Western District of the Island of New Providence












IN THE MATTER OF THE Quieting Title Act, 1959

LOGISTIC

CENTRE

AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE Petition of
JONATHAN LIVINGSTON SANDS

NOTICE

he Petition of JONATHAN LIVINGSTON SANDS of Cambridge
Drive, South Beach in the Southern District of the Island of New
Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, in respect of:-

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land comprising the Eastern
portion of Lot Number Twenty-One (21) containing 26,120 square
eet and originally granted to Crispin Benjamin and being Crown
Grant A4-63 situate Two thousand feet east of Gladstone Road in
he Gladstone Road Crown Allotments in the Western District of the
sland of New Providence which said piece parcel or lot of land
is bounded NORTHWARDLY by Lot Number Twenty-Two (22)
originally granted to Francis A. Garraway and running thereon Five
hundred and Seventy-Seven and Eighty-Five hundredths (577.85)
eet EASTWARDLY by Lot Number Twenty-Six (26) originally
granted to Rhonda Louis Wallace Wildgoose and running thereon
Six NUNdred and Thirty-Four and Sixty hundredths (634.60) feet
SOUTHWARDLY by a Thirty (30) feet wide Road Reservation
nown as and called “Rocky Pine Road” separating it from Lot
umber Twenty (20) originally granted to Herbert Cleveland
Walkine and running thereon Five hundred and Seventy-Seven
and Eighty-Five hundredths (577.85) feet and SOUTHWARDLY
by the Western Portion of Lot Number Twenty-One (21) originally
granted to Crispin Benjamin and running thereon Six hundred and
Thirty-Four and Sixty hundredths (634.60) feet; which said piece
parcel or lot of land has such position shape marks and dimensions
as are more particularly described and delineated on the diagram
or plan attached hereto and thereon coloured GREEN





SERVICES
AVAILABLE

* IMPORTERS

ie en ee),
FOR SAFE BUSINESS STORAGE

JONATHAN LIVINGSTON SANDS, claims to be the beneficial
owner in fee simple in possession of the parcel of land hereinbefore
described and such ownership arise by virtue of possession of the
said land.

bey Es tc) rej ats TI
Hurricane Proof storage
facility offering 56 units
(they can also be
eM] |] 8) =O)
fol 1A ea toe ta ore
the latest concepts for
Tet Te
storage for a vanety of
at i semen ao

Centrally located in a
= | ees ea

The goal is to minimize
ees OMe Le elm
aes een eee |
a secure shelter that can
withstand extreme
weather ee] Te eo
Fenced and secured area
with 24 hour surveillance.
Each unit provides 1,200
cubic yards of usable
ar eae Le 8 LT
Te moet)

* DISTRIBUTORS

Copies of the filled plan may be inspected during normal office
hours at:- * OFFICE SPACE
The Registry of the Supreme Court, Anasbacher House, East Street.

Nassau, Bahamas;

The Chambers of Richard L. Boodle & Co., 3% Floor, Columbus * FOOD STORAGE eis
House, East & Shirley Streets, Nassau, Bahamas ie
Notice is hereby given to any person(s) wishing to make a claim
shall do so by filing an Adverse Claim in the Supreme Court and
serving such Statement on the Petitioners or his Attorneys by the
30!" day after the last day on which on which this Notice appears
in the daily papers. Failure by any person to file and serve a
statement of such claim on or before the said date will operate as
a bar to such claim.

« DISASTER
RECOVERYFACILITY

Richard L, Boodle & Ca.
RICHARD L. BOODLE & CO.
Counsels €» Atterneys-At-Law
Chambers,
3"¢ Floor, Columbus House
East & Shirley Street

ee te ee a Lett

art ee) Eee

OS Pe ed el Pe

Attorneys for the Petitioner


THE TRIBUNE

THE Certified Financial
Analyst (CFA) Society of the
Bahamas has elected Christo-
pher Dorsett, of Citigroup Cor-
porate and Investment Bank,
to serve as president of the non-
profit professional society for
financial advisors.

Sonia Beneby, CFA, of Sco-
tiaTrust Bahamas will serve as
vice-president. Each will serve a
one-year term, which officially
begins on July 1, 2009.

The Certified Financial Ana-
lyst Society of the Bahamas
(CFASB) elected six other
members to its Board for one-
year terms. The additional
CFASB leaders are:

ASB treasurer: Karen Pin-
der, CFA, CATA, EFG Bank
& Trust (Bahamas).

THURSDAY, JULY 2 2009, PAGE 7B

Financial analysts
elect new Board

CFASB secretary: Andrew
Strachan, Clariden Leu.

CFASB programme chair:
Velma Miller, CFA, Royal
Fidelity Merchant Bank &
Trust.

CFASB education chair:
Jeremy Dyck, CFA, LOM
Securities (Bahamas).

CFASB membership chair:
Fazillah Pirani, CFA, Scotia
Capital

CFASB scholarship chair:
Alberto Lopez, CFA, Foyil
Asset Management.

Warren Pustam, CFA, CPA,
EverKey Global Partners, was
appointed as CFASB pro-
gramme co-chair.

“T look forward to working
with the other members of our
board, CFA Institute, and other

GROWING MULTI-MEDIA & TRANSPORTATION
COMPANY REQUIRES

FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

Rapidly growing company is inviting applications for the
position of “Financial Controller”. Applicants should have
a Bachelors Degree in Accounting and a CPA, ACCA, CA
qualification or any other qualification recognized by the
Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants.

Successful candidate should:
have at least 4 years experience in an established

accounting firm

be able to work as a part of a team
be able to prepare budgets and financial reports

liaise with banking officers

be able to communicate effectively with all levels

of management

be proficient in meeting and keeping all deadlines
have proficient knowledge of QuickBooks

For a confidential interview please mail resume to:
c/o Financial Controller,
P O Box N 4271, Nassau, N. P., The Bahamas
or email financialcontrollerposition@yahoo.com

BSi

local societies,” said Mr Dorsett.

“All of the diverse talent in
the CFASB’s membership will
help to carry out our chief man-
date - advancing the investment
profession by establishing and
maintaining the highest stan-
dards of professional excellence
and integrity.”

Ms Beneby added: “As CFA
Institute and its member soci-
eties and chapters around the
globe continue to set the stan-
dards for excellence in the
investment management indus-
try around the world, I am
eager to work closely with
Christopher Dorsett and the
CFA Institute to continue to
elevate our commitment to
strong ethics, continuing edu-
cation and consummate profes-
sionalism.”

The CFASB, with a current
membership of 58 profession-
als, including 47 CFA charter
holders, is affiliated to the CFA
Institute. CFA Institute is the
global, non-profit professional
association that administers the
Chartered Financial Analyst
curriculum and examination
programme worldwide.

CFASB’s mission is to
advance the interests of the
investment community and to
maintain the highest standards
of professional excellence and
integrity.

The CFASB board of direc-
tors is composed of nine invest-
ment professionals, all of whom
are elected by the members of
the CFASB for a one-year term.

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

BS! OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BS| Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established
international private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is
presently accepting applications for:

HEAD OF PRIVATE BANKING

Applicants for the position of Head of Private Banking must have at least 20
years experience in the offshore banking sector, have extensive knowledge of
intemational financial products and ability to lead and partner with team
members. Applicants must also be confident regarding customer relations with
excellent capability to generate New Maney and have thorough knowledge of
local legislation, regulatory & staiutory matters as well as international banking
practices. Fluency in Italian & French ss absolutely required.

Personal qualities -

Strong management skills

Leadership skills

Excellent communication skills

Goal-onented, self-motivated and able to motivate team members
Positive attitude and outlook

Cammitment to Quality and service excellence

Excellant acquisitian skills

Flexibility in office hours and hands-on aporoach when necessary
Must be able to work under pressure

Available to travel on a frequent bass

Responsibillies :-

Manage and lead Private Banking Team

Meet target in terms of Profitability and Acquisition of Net New Money
Meet deadlines on timely basis

Cantribute to the management of the Bank as senior management officer
Faster and maintain communication with intamal/external banking
professionals

Acquire new clients in target markets

Service & advee allocated customers

submit their

Interested persons with should

resume/curriculum vitae to:-

such qualifications

Human Resources Manager
BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre
P.O. Box N-7130
Nassau, Bahamas.
Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kern@bsibank.com
(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, JULY 2 2009



THE TRIBUNE

For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight
on Mondays



ESSAY COMPETITION

TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK

The Department of Public Service will host an Essay
Competition as one of the activities for the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week. The Competition is open to Junior
and Senior Students in New Providence.

Additionally, this year, a speech competition will be
for schools in the Northern & Southern Bahamas,
respectively. Students interested in participating in the
Essay Competition should write a 250 - 300 words (Junior
High), and 450 - 500 words (Senior High), essay on the
topic: “ The Public Service-Striving for Excellence in
Customer Service.”

The deadlines for entries, which should be referred
to the attention of Mrs. Antoinette Thompson, Deputy
Permanent Secretary, Department of Public Service, is
Friday 24th July, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 Computer System will be awarded to
the winner each category. The first runners-up for both the
Essay and Speech Competition in the Junior & Senior High
School category, will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.

The winners will be announced during the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week Awards Ceremony scheduled for
Saturday 10th October 2009.

Students interested in the Speech Competition for the
Northern and Southern Bahamas should contact their
Language Arts Teacher.



FROM page 1B

in early 2010”, and was encour-
aged that the Government was
putting in the ‘building blocks’
for tourism’s growth by actions
such as eliminating the Customs
and Immigration overtime
charges levied on airlines flying
into Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport (LPIA).

While some initial excitement
had been generated by the fact
April 2009 air arrivals to Nas-
sau/Paradise Island were only
down by 0.4 per cent or less
than 1,500 persons year-over-
year, and were off 5 per cent
for the Bahamas as a whole, the
comparisons were somewhat
misleading. This was because
Easter, traditionally a peak trav-
el period for the Bahamian
tourism industry, fell in March
during 2008, not April.

But Mr Sands said yesterday:
“There still remain signs of
some difficult times throughout
the summer. We continue to see
some softness in the market,
although the level of fall-off
month-over-month seems to be
decreasing.

“But that’s not a true indica-
tion things are on the rebound.
Not at all. The hotel industry
still faces a difficult remainder
of 2009, and looks forward to
some stabilisation in 2010, mov-
ing forward.”

The BHA president said it
“remains to be seen” whether
the numerous discounts hotels
are offering this summer on
room rates and other charges
would be enough to counter the
single greatest factor impacting
the Bahamian tourism industry,
namely US consumer confi-
dence of lack of it.

Chester Bonefish Lodge

for reservations:
Telapkones 242) 356-3418

Cell-242-557-9597
berylferguson@yaboo.cons

Welcomes you to the

Annual Acklins Home Coming & Regatta

Weekend July 30th - August 3rd

Features Hotel Packages

Laundry) Room
Flat Screen Television

Microwave®™

Refrigerator.

Hair Dryerll
Toaster

While the downward trend
impacting rates was persisting,
Mr Sands told Tribune Busi-
ness: “What is significant is that
the fall-off in air arrivals from
our primary market, Florida,
seems to have decreased, so the
percentage fall-off every month
seems to be less, especially from
Florida.

“But when you add up the
aggregate revenues from the
major hotels, they’re still; in the
plus-20 per cent negative posi-
tion year-over-year. We still
have a big hold to dig ourselves
out of this year.”

Mr Sands said the more than
20 per cent decline in year-over-
year revenue comparatives was
caused by a mixture of dis-
counted rates and lower occu-
pancy levels.

“Unfortunately, operating
expenses are not decreasing at
that level, so the erosion of fore-
cast income is great for many
properties,” he said. “I’m
assured that companies are
doing their best to re-engineer
themselves to manage expenses
in a variety of ways to mitigate
against that level of fall-off, but
they’re not able to do that for
all concerned.

“It’s still a very difficult trad-
ing period, and we need to get
through the rest of the year
without any major casualties,
and then take advantage of
opportunities that present them-
selves in 2010.”

On a more optimistic note,
the BHA president added that
the Government and private
sector were continuing to work
on expanding airlift - and the
number of airlines serving the
Bahamas - as this would
increase the destination’s attrac-
tiveness.

Referring to the Customs and
Immigration overtime charges
that incoming airlines had been
forced to pay at Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport
(LPIA), Mr Sands told Tribune
Business: “That is a fundamen-
tal element that has been elim-
inated. That is greatly going to
assist us in 2010.”

The Government, and its
minister of tourism and avia-

Share
your

No hotel ‘rebound despite
decrease in air arrivals fall-off

tion, had secured a “victory in
eliminating this impediment to
the cost of air travel”, some-
thing that would “lay a solid
foundation for improvements,
certainly in 2010”.

Asked about the overtime
charges’ negative impact on air-
lift into New Providence and
other Bahamian destinations,
Mr Sands said: “When you see

The Public is hereby advised that |, PAUL OLOAM
BOLLE of 707 Cottonwood, Pinewood Gardens in the
Southern District of the Iskand of New Providence, intend
to change my name to PAUL ALLISION ROLLE. If there
are any obyections to this change of name by Deed Pall,
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, AO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas, no later than
thirty (20) days after the date of publication of this notice.

an air fare costing ‘x’ dollars,

that amount or a significant part
of it, it makes the cost of air

ly expensive.

“And when you have com-
peting destinations that can be
accessed at lower air fare costs,
it puts us in a very negative
competitive position.”

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SERG SLOPES LTD.

—

rd
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of SERG SLOPES LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
QUANTUM PLACE INC.

——

ri

and taxes and levies are double

travel to the Bahamas extreme-

lron, Ironing Board Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
Two Queen Beds in cach room
Satellite television
i Air-conditioning
Free Airport Transfers

Restaurant on Property

news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Fie’ 3

Tce CaM See TEOMA Uae a [ess

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of QUANTUM PLACE INC. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Planning yousrip hos'mevet hee easier with
(Chester Bonatish Lodge vecotion packoges.

Celebrate our special offer
Stay 7 nights
get the 1 night FREE

Complimentary bahroom amenities including:
soap, Shampoo, conditioner, lotion

Packages as low a5 $135.00 per night

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



NOTICE

THE BAHAMAS MORTGAGE CORPORATION
TENDER FOR GROUP HAZARD INSURANCE

The Bahamas Mortgage Corporation is inviting proposals
from insurance companies for the provision of hazard
insurance coverage to contractors and homeowners of
properties mortgaged to the Corporation.

Everywhere Lu Bu yers Are!

1
.
tn
+
7.

Se

ead mi ial aa

os
2

The proposal should be for a three year period 1st
September, 2009 to 31st August, 2012.

Companies interested in submitting a proposal may collect
an information package from The Bahamas Mortgage
Corporation’s Head Office, Russell Road, Oakes Field,
Nassau, Bahamas.

The deadline for collection of the information package is
Friday, July 09, 2009 no later than 4:00 p.m.


THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, JULY 2 2009, PAGE 9B



Bahamas Waste profits

‘about 50% higher’
than budgeted

FROM page 1B

house. Staff attrition had also
factored into the mix, with
departing employees not
replaced and existing salaries
maintained at the same level
across the board.

Meanwhile, Ms Harper said
Bahamas Waste expected to
start cardboard recycling from
its purpose-built facility during
the current 2009 third quarter,
which lasts from July to Sep-
tember.

The main customers (suppli-
ers of waste cardboard) will be
the likes of Bahamian whole-
salers and liquor stores, those
firms possessing “the richer
cardboard that does not have
the food waste”.

And with government
approval having been recently
received, Ms Harper said

Bahamas Waste was now
“sourcing equipment” for its
$500,000 biodiesel facility.

“We are preparing the land,
and I think that within another
eight weeks we will see some
construction going on in terms
of the basic structure to house
that operation,” Ms Harper told
Tribune Business.

Produced

Bahamas Waste had been
told by the Government that
any biodiesel it produced was
for its own internal uses only,
and the company anticipated
that the benefits from using it as
a fuel source for its vehicle fleet
and in other parts of its opera-
tions would increase in line with
fuel price rises.

“We’re just now generating
a client base, touching base with
waste oil customers,” Ms Harp-

er said. “We had some people
who jumped ahead of us with-
out waiting for government
approval. We’ve been told some
of the cruise ships have made
arrangements with other coun-
tries. We’re starting from
scratch with that, so we’re hop-
ing some of the resources are
still there.”

Bahamas Waste was also able
to reduce its accounts receiv-
able during the 2009 first quar-
ter, bringing them down to
$1.471 million from $1.496 mil-
lion at 2008 year-end.

Ms Harper attributed this to

the fact that Bahamas Waste
had now stopped collecting
from customers once accounts
were 60 days past due, as
opposed to the previous 90-day
limit.

Majority

The vast majority of Bahamas
Waste’s customers are busi-
nesses and commercial estab-
lishments, with residential waste
and garbage collections largely
confined to gated communities
and those who did not want the
government service.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BARRY PACKINGTON
of TREASURE COVE, P.O. BOX FH-14010, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 2" day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Nassau Airport

Development Gom pany

Proposed Modification to Airport
Fees and Charges Notice

The Nassau Airport Development Company is
proposing a modification of Fees and Charges,
effective January 1, 2010, pursuant to article 4 of
the Airport Authority (Fees and Charges) Regulations, 2009.

The proposed increase is to aircraft landing
fees, terminal fees, aircraft bridge fees and
aircraft parking charges only. Car parking
rates and the Passenger Facility Charge are
not impacted by the proposed modification.

For more information or to comment on the
proposed modification please visit our website
at www.nas.bs.

St. Andrew’s School Foundation

Development Officer

The Foundation is committed to the Mission of St. Andrew's
School through its financial support of teachers, scholarship
sludents and building projects. The Foundation is presently
secking a person bo lead its Office af Dev clapment.

The Development Officer, a full-time position, reports to
the St. Andrew's School Foundation and will:

be responsible for designing and overseeing fundraising
campaiens in support of the Foundation’s strategic coals:

develop marketing strategies and materials for public
relations and advertising:

promote relationships between the School and various
organizations, including the St. Andrew's Alum and
Friends Association:

oversee the day today administrator of inlemational
charities

oe gurl
understanding of the School's history and culture: be a goal-

The successful candidate will possess knowledge

dnven individual with strong organizational and social skills:

possess a minimum of a Bachelor's Degree; and be
expericnced in fundraising.

Interested candidates should send their CV and a letter of
Interest tc:

Development Officer Position
St. Andrew's School Foundation
FO. Box W-4695
Nassau, Bahamas

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MAGDALENA DELVA
of FRITZ LANE, P.O. Box GT-2738, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 25" day of June, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

WANTED

Delivery Person/Warehouse Clerk

A medical supplies company is seeking the
services of an individual primarily to make
deliveries, run errands, and be responsible
for the maintenance and control of the
company warehouse and physical
environment.

The successful candidate should be
responsible, honest, punctual, have good
communication skills, must interact well
with customers and staff, be a team player,
have good time management skills and the
ability to pnoritize and accomplish tasks.
The successful candidate must possess a
valid driver's license.

Interested persons may fax their resume to
328-5052, email to:
bmhumanresources@ gmail.com or
mail to P.O. Box -1483,

Nassau, Bahamas

LEGAL MOTHCE

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act,

MAXALEX CORPORATION
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice t hereby given that in accordance with Secthon 1357/4)
of the International Business Companies Act. (No. 45 of
2000), MAXALEX CORPORATION is in dissolution.

The date of commencement of the dissolution is 24h June,
aaa
AULA

R. Clive. Moore (Liquidator)
Octogone Fund Management Limited
P.O. Box SP-63157
No. 3 Offices at Old Fort Bay
Western Road
Nast, Bahamas

LEGAL SOTHOE

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act,

COITXEM LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice ts hereby given that in accordance with sectron 1357/4)
of the Internatronal Business Companies Act. (No. 45 of
2000), COMEM LTD. is in dissolution.

The date of commencement of the dissolution is 26th June,
eee
ALLS
ie 1

RK. Clive, Moore (Liquidator)
Octogone Fund Management Limited
P.O. Box SP-63157
No. 3 Offices at Old Fort Bay
Western Road
Nassau, Bahamas

LEGAL KOTICE

NOTICE

TARVILLE COMMERCIAL CORP.
In Voluntary Liquidation


























Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
1 38/4) of the International Business Companies Act. 2000),
TARVILLE COMMERCIAL CORP. ts in dissolution
as of June 29, 2009,

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Recent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

OF

CHINCHA LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 30th day of June, 2009.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Finacial
Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, The Baha-
mas has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE

OF

SHINE HILL LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 30th day of June, 2009.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Finacial
Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, The Baha-
mas has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

LEGAL MOTHER

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act.

GELSOMINA LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137(4) of the Intemational Business Companies Act. (No
45 of 2000), GELSOMINA LTD. is in dissolution.

The date of commencement of the dissolution is 26th June,
“hil
eg

R. Clive, Moore (Liquidator)
Octegone Fund Management Limited
P.O. Box SP-63157
No. 3 Offices at Old Fort Bay
Western Road
Nasian, Bahamas

LEGAL SOTHOE

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act,

GUSE LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice ts hereby given that in accordance with Sectron 137/44)
of the Internatronal Business Companies Act. (No. 45 of
2000), GUSE LTD. is in dissolution.

The date of commencement of the dissolution is 26th June,
teri
ALILS
rs 1

R. Clive, Moore (Liquidator)
Octegone Fund Management Limited
P.O. Bow SP-63157
No. 3 Offices at Old Fort Bay
Western Road
Nassau, Babams
PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, JULY 2 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Legal Notice

NOTICE
MOONBEAM VENTURES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 23rd day of June 2009. The Liquidator

is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
CLEAR GLASS
HOLDINGS LTD.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CLEAR GLASS HOLDINGS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SEA OF CORAL INC.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of SEA OF CORAL INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ROYAL DFIDELITY

Money at Work

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BB & BB HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 23rd day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
MAYASOMARIK INC.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of MAYASOMARIK INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DELTA JUNCTION LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

KS

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

zai

C2Cy 1.3 NT A TL

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 29 JUNE 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,579.12 | CHG -0.27 | %CHG -0.02 | YTD -133.24 | YTD % -7.78
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.53 | YTD -5.43% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM [| TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit y
Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

6.94
0.63
3.15
2.14

6.94
0.63
3.15
2.37

2.74
5.50
1.27
1.32
7.50
10.00
10.35
4.95
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

2.74
5.64
3.32
1.77
7.76
10.97
10.38
5.09
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

10.97
10.38

10.50
10.00

EPS $
0.127
0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

Div $ P/E
10.9
11.1
28.4
N/M
40.4
43.1
8.1
11.0
13.5
27.6
7.4
18.5
34.1
13.1
15.3
N/M
8.6
13.5
11.0
55.6

Change Daily Vol. Yield
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.26
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

6.94
0.63
3.15
2.37

2.74
5.64
3.06
1.77
7.76

5.09
1.00
0.30
5.50

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

52wk-Hi _52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale

100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

Interest
7%
Prime + 1.75%
7%
Prime + 1.75%

Change
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Daily Vol. Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

52wk-Low
14.25
6.00
0.20

Bid $
7.92
4.00
0.35

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Ask $

8.42
6.25
0.40

EPS $
-0.041
0.000
0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E
N/M
N/M

256.6

Last Price Yield
14.60
6.00

0.35

Weekly Vol.

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

29.00
0.40

ABDAB
RND Holdings

30.13
0.45

31.59

0.55

29.00
0.55

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

52wk-Low
1.3124

NA V
1.3787

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund





2.8988 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.8988
1.4730 1.3940 CFAL Money Market Fund 1.4730
3.6090 3.1821 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.1821
12.9209 12.2702 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.9209
100.5606 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.5448
100.0000 93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund 93.1992
1.0000 1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.0000
19.5611 9.0775 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.2511
1.0578 1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0578
1.0364 1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0271
1.0554 1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.0554

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks.

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

YTD%

1.87
-1.40
2.74
6.01
2.40
-0.02
-3.33
0.00
1.72
2.13
-0.57
1.74



Last 12 Months Div $ Yield % NAV Date



4.83 31-May-09
-3.35 31-May-09
5.66 19-Jun-09
-13.90 30-Apr-09
5.79 31-May-09
0.54 31-Mar-09
-6.76 31-Mar-09
0.00 31-Dec-07
4.12 30-Apr-09
5.78 31-May-09
2.71 31-May-09
5.54 31-May-09

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

DIVIDEND, from 1B

ment, it was important that
Abaco Markets be “prudent”
and build up its liquidity/cash
position - especially given the
current economic slowdown.

Emphasising that the compa-
ny’s position had not changed
from the one announced at the
annual general meeting (AGM)
for the year that ended on Jan-
uary 31, 2008, Mr Watchorn said
the Board and management
would review the dividend situ-
ation “
once the results for the fiscal
year ended January 31, 2010,
were in”.

“At this point in time, we will
wait until then,” Mr Watchorn
told Tribune Business. “I know
there is an expectation of divi-
dends, but people need to
[understand] that we incurred
significant losses over a four to
five-year period, repaid a sig-
nificant amount of debt, and the
company needs to be in a
healthy position before it can

resume dividend payments.

“We hope that will be at the
end of this financial year. By the
end of February, March, we will
know the results, and the Board
will sit down and make its deci-
sion as to whether we resume
dividend payments. You have
to build up your reserves before
you look at dividend payments
again.”

Mr Watchorn added: “We'll
be prudent and take into
account the economic factors
next year. We know our share-
holders need a return on their
investment, and they’ve not had
one for a number of years.

“We’re working to get back
to the full dividend. That’s a sign
of the company getting back to
full health.”

Given the relatively large
number of issued shares, some
15.3 million, Mr Watchorn said
the Board was likely to calcu-
late any dividend by determin-
ing the total sum it would be
prudent to return to investors,
rather than set a dividends per
share figure.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
AGENCY MANAGEMENT INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
FAIRHAVEN GROUP LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 23rd day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KEELER CORPORATION

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of KEELER CORPORATION has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
AMHERSTBURY LIMITED

—

#





Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section




138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of AMHERSTBURY LIMITED has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and









the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.









ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)







THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST
oN on

Partial sunshine. Partly sunny, a










lm
ORLANDO
High: 90° F/32° C
















Partly sunny, a Patchy clouds. Mostly sunny. Times of clouds and


























fie, Sh

UV rn NY



os2)3s6]o|shoh
LOW MODERATE HIGH V. HIGH EXT.







The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the





r Low: 74° F/23°C a t-storm in the p.m. t-storm possible. sun. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
@ Ht . High: 90° High: 89° High: 91° High: 92°
r High: 90° Low: 79° Low: 80° Low: 79° Low: 80° Low: 81° see EOE
TAMPA jf Cee Ue
High: 88° F/31°C ys [bar High _Ht.(ft.)_Low __Ht. (ft.
Low: 76° F/24°C mD r, ee ee es ae ee ee Today 4:39am. 2.2 10:33am. 0.2
ae @ - 7 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 5:15pm. 28 11:36pm. 0.3
Oe iy ee
' - :06 p.m. Bow
J met a Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Saturday 623am. 02 1227am. 03
{ r ABACO Temperate aero 6:54pm. 28 12:14pm. 0.2
- ago ° WOM, tunecaduaseaslacetnciesetecaduatel lccagsaeee ° ° 7-10 am. oy} Ti3am. 02
- yy aim - eile irc vi see eeeeeaeeeenens 81" F27° C Sunday 7:38 p.m. 28 1:01pm. 0.2
5 e : ormal high .... 88° F/31° C ee ss
- Py i. "a Normal low 75° F/24° C
a of @ WEST PALM BEACH a Last year's WIgh ...ccccsscsseeseuestee serrzo°c | NYT TIM UCI
4 os High: 88° F/31°C : Last year's lOW oo. eeeeeeeeeeeeeees 73° F/23° C aa i a a
a Low: 76° F/24° C i ~~ Precipitation =———————CsSSunrise....... ‘24am. Moonrise .... 4:20 p.m.
~~» a . a, As of 2 p.m. yesterday ....ccccscsssesssssseeeessseeees 0.00" Sunset....... 8:04 p.m. Moonset... 2:25 a.m.
Wall . FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date 7. Full Last New First
High: 87°F/31°C @ High: 88° F/31°C Normal year to date .......c.ccsecsecssssseseseeseeee 18.60" ag a ‘
Low: 77° F/25°C a. Low: 78° F/26° C c
> /. AccuWeather.com es
ee @ Forecasts and graphics provided by talc: ay
a ———- MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jul.7 = Jul. 15 00 Jul. 21 Jul. 28
a High: 88° F/31°C AW anc ao
ies Low: 78° F/26° C NASSAU melheg2’ F/aa'G
High: 90° F/32° Cc Low: 80 F/27 C
= Low: 79° F/26° C
ie i. @.
KEY WEST a CATISLAND
High: 88° F/31°C High: 87° F/31°C
Low: 80°F/27°G eye Low: 74° F/23°C
eG the
c Oo
aX acre € High Fac
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS .
highs and tonights's lows. High: 95° F/35° C ©.
Low: 82° F/28° C
ce
LONGISLAND
Low: 76° F/24°C
Today Friday Today Friday Today Friday i MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 92° F/33° C
FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FC FC FIC FC Me Low: 75° F/24° C
Albuquerque 92/33 67/19 t 90/32 67/19 t Indianapolis 76/24 58/14 pce 82/27 66/18 s Philadelphia 82/27 64/17 t 80/26 65/18 t
Anchorage 73/22 54/12 p 70/21 5412 ¢ Jacksonville 94/34 74/23 t 95/35 75/23 t Phoenix 106/41 86/30 t 104/40 85/29 t CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 92/33 66/18 s 90/32 68/20 pc Kansas City 83/28 68/20 t 84/28 67/19 t Pittsburgh 70/21 5613 t 73/22 58/14 t RAGGEDISLAND — Tigh:94°F/34"c
Atlantic City 78/25 64/17 t 83/28 64/17 t Las Vegas 100/37 79/26 t 104/40 84/28 pc Portland, OR 94/34 57/13 s 92/33 59/15 s High: 90° F/32° C Low: 77° F/25°C
Baltimore 83/28 62/16 t 82/27 64/17 t Little Rock 93/33 68/20 pce 93/83 72/22 pc Raleigh-Durham 90/32 65/18 t 89/31 65/18 s Low: 72°F/22°C i
Boston 72/22 6317 © 79/26 64/17 t Los Angeles 80/26 66/18 pc 80/26 64/17 pc St. Louis 82/27 67/19 pc 85/29 69/20 gs .
Buffalo 68/20 58/14 t 69/20 58/14 t Louisville 79/26 64/17 pce 85/29 67/19 s Salt Lake City 84/28 64/17 t 88/31 66/18 t GREATINAGUA
Charleston, SC 96/35 74/23 t 94/34 71/21 pc Memphis 92/33 72/22 pce 87/30 70/21 pc San Antonio 100/37 76/24 pce 98/86 77/25 s High: 94° F/34° C
Chicago 74/23 57/13 p 84/28 60/15 s Miami 88/31 78/25 t 90/32 77/25 t San Diego 75/23 68/20 pe 76/24 66/18 pc Low. 77°F/25°C
Cleveland 70/21 59/15 c 75/23 60/15 pc Minneapolis 78/25 62/16 pe 83/28 61/16 s San Francisco 78/25 57/143 pe 75/23 57/13 pe .
Dallas 100/37 76/24 s 100/37 79/26 pc Nashville 83/28 60/15 pce 87/30 65/18 pc Seattle 84/28 54/12 s 84/28 56/13 s
Denver 82/27 58/14 t 81/27 59/15 t New Orleans 95/35 79/26 t 96/35 77/25 t Tallahassee 97/36 75/23 t 95/35 74/23 t =F
Detroit 70/21 57/13 ¢ 81/27 62/16 pc New York 78/25 68/20 r 78/25 67/19 t Tampa 88/31 76/24 t 89/31 77/25 t
Honolulu 88/31 75/23 s 88/31 75/23 s Oklahoma City 98/36 71/21 pce 100/37 75/23 pc Tucson 96/35 77/25 t 97/36 79/26 t — Be
Houston 99/37 77/25 t 99/37 78/25 t Orlando 90/32 74/23 t 94/34 76/24 t Washington, DC 84/28 65/18 t 82/27 66/18 t








Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
88/31
83/28
86/30
838/31
59/15
91/32
86/30
81/27
100/37
80/26
838/31
84/28
82/27
66/18
86/30
93/33
57/13
101/38
91/32
72/22
90/32
79/26
82/27
80/26
68/20
86/30
85/29
66/18
90/32
81/27
90/32
106/41
86/30
85/29
57/13
90/32
72/22
838/31
95/35
91/32
70/21
104/40
72/22
72/22
78/25
80/26
99/37
82/27
90/32
82/27
78/25
106/41
86/30
89/31
65/18
88/31
61/16
85/29
65/18
81/27
81/27
64/17
93/33
79/26
66/18
91/32
75/23
87/30
85/29
70/21

ealil

Today

Low
F/C
78/25
61/16
55/12
73/22
52/11
79/26
77/25
71/21
70/21
75/23
69/20
64/17
73/22
45/7
65/18
68/20
46/7
73/22
84/28
45/7
76/24
71/21
69/20
62/16
55/12
68/20
60/15
56/13
72/22
55/12
81/27
79/26
71/21
59/15
33/3
78/25
59/15
61/16
64/17
77/25
55/12
75/23
64/17
55/12
60/15
51/10
79/26
61/16
66/18
59/15
68/20
79/26
66/18
81/27
32/0
73/22
44/6
73/22
55/12
66/18
59/15
46/7
77/25
70/21
59/15
67/19
58/14
71/21
63/17
49/9




Onrnntrnntrn

+A NH FR SFCD STAR N
= og=> =

pe

High
F/C
88/31
85/29
84/28
90/32
60/15
91/32
86/30
82/27
100/37
76/24
87/30
86/30
82/27
65/18
86/30
93/33
59/15
98/36
92/33
67/19
91/32
82/27
82/27
81/27
70/21
88/31
84/28
69/20
90/32
72/22
88/31
104/40
89/31
80/26
57/13
89/31
71/21
82/27
97/36
87/30
70/21
100/37
72/22
68/20
83/28
79/26
101/38
83/28
88/31
82/27
74/23
105/40
88/31
90/32
68/20
87/30
57/13
86/30
65/18
81/27
75/23
61/16
94/34
79/26
17/25
84/28
17/25
87/30
84/28
68/20

Friday

Low
F/C
77/25
63/17
54/12
73/22
51/10
77/25
77/25
71/21
74/23
76/24
69/20
64/17
72/22
45/7
61/16
64/17
51/10
75/23
83/28
46/7
74/23
71/21
68/20
64/17
55/12
68/20
63/17
53/11
73/22
48/8
81/27
78/25
71/21
60/15
37/2
78/25
ae
59/15
64/17
78/25
55/12
76/24
63/17
45/7
56/13
52/11
79/26
59/15
64/17
57/13
68/20
80/26
68/20
82/27
35/1
74/23
43/6
73/22
56/13
66/18
50/10
46/7
81/27
70/21
61/16
64/17
59/15
68/20
58/14
51/10

Ww

pc
sh
C
S
sh
sh

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace

THURSDAY, JULY 2np, 2009, PAGE 11B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

MARINE FORECAST










WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SE at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-15 Miles 82° F
Friday: SE at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-15 Miles 82° F
FREEPORT Today: SE at 10-15 Knots 2-3 Feet 5-15 Miles 81°F
Friday: SE at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
ABACO Today: SE at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
Friday: SE at 7-14 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

Showers
T-storms

Rain

* _*| Flurries
3] Snow

[v_Â¥] Ice



mas 7
Minneapolis

18/62

New-York|
78/68

(COOLER) <<
Lt

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

Stationary Mogul

Os (5) 10s 20s [30S]) 40s 50s 60s 70s sos [S0s///iG0S0/Aiie)

HURRICANE INSURANCE

“You
Away |

Or you can rest easy

that yo

New Providence
Tet: (242) I-55

co
way

e wind

an Be Blown
yA Hurric Sane

knowing

Nobody does it better.

have excellent insurance
rage no matter which
blows.

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS



Seng fc nef Tel: (242) erataaiivicanen Tel: (242) 396-2280
PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, JULY 2 2009

ae

HALSBURY
CHAMBERS

Counsel and Attorneys-at-Law
Notaries Public

will be closed
CL
Friday, 3rd July, 2009

due to the observance of the Firm’s
PVE me eek

The office will re-open
OF

Monday, 6th July, 2009

LIVING Waters Kingdom
Ministries International is plan-
ning to host a business trade
show this Saturday, featuring
firms owned by its congregation
members.

The Kingdom Business Trade
Show will bring together a vari-
ety of businesses in one loca-
tion at the church grounds on
Warren Street from 10am to
Spm.

Some of the booths will
include retailers, health, beauty,

We regret any inconvenience caused.

UVR eG ite || LV 89



ORGANISERS of the Kingdom Business Trade Show...

attorneys, repair/building spe-
clalists, business services and
more.

Senior pastor and founder of
Living Waters Kingdom Min-
istries, Raymond Wells said:
“The trade show will provide a
great opportunity for the public
to identify businesses that are
operating within the Kingdom
requirements, while addressing
the needs of today’s con-
sumers.”

Trade show chairman Tori-

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FirstCaribbean International Bank is a member of the CIBC Group.

GET THERE. TOGETHER.



ano Lloyd noted that all of the
businesses participating in the
event are owned by members
of the church.

Organisers of the event said
there would be special perfor-
mances by locally-renowned
Christian artists and over $5,000
worth of free gifts and prizes
up for grabs.

“We will be hosting this trade
show under the theme, Koinon-
ia, which relates to the unity of
like minded believers,” he
added. “This trade show will
provide the community with an
assurance that all is well, and
that Kingdom business will not
falter to an economic depres-
sion with the grace of God. The

THE TRIBUNE



Church plans to host business trade show

business owners of LWKM are
very thrilled about this new ven-
ture and excited to showcase
their various services and prod-
ucts on such an impressive lev-
el. The trade show is open to
the community, and all are wel-
come to join in this time of net-
working.”

Since being founded by Pas-
tor Wells in 1998, the church
now increased its membership
to 1,500 and hosts weekly Sun-
day morning services, bible
studies and marriage workshops
and seminars. For additional
information on The Kingdom
Business trade show contact the
church’s office at 242-326-7756
or e-mail info@.lwkm.org

Kelly's Team
Security Officers

Kelly’s is seeking mature, reliable, honest
and hardworking individuals to fill the
position of Security Officer.

Prospective candidates must be available to

work evening shifts. Past security experience

would be an asset. This position is ideal for
retired police or prison officers.

We offer excellent pay, benefits
and working conditions.

Interested persons may collect an application
form from the Customer Service counter at
Kelly's House & Home, Mall at Marathon.

No phone calls please

‘s Houseg Mon-Fri - 8:00am - 8:00pm
Home set- 8:00am - 9:00pm

Show Your Colors!)

Cuenilelaal tl ae ley


The Tribune -”"”""”
OBMUARIES
RELIGION



\ -< The Tribune
a OLT | tty Arcee, My Mowspaper!

—‘\ ene
» \8
707.9

SS hour chaice for ine family:
PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009








Irene

Leona Davis
May 24, 1924 - July 4th, 2003

"It seams like Just yesterday
you were here, but six years
have gone by and we miss
you! We know that God's
garden must be even more
beautiful because you are
S there! Our hearts still aches
in sadness, and secret tears
» | still flow. What it meant to
‘lose you, no one will ever
|} know",

} Left to cherish those won-
derful memories are her
children: Elizabeth, Alfred,
Leslie, Phillip & Teresa, one
sister Morlene, grand, great
grand and great great grand
children, numerous relatives
and friends.

May she continue to rest in the arms of Jesus!



Touts "G Meme ‘t

In Loving Memory
_. ~ = of _ =
Olivia OY rginia Williams

1950 - 2005

When trouble comes
as it does to us all
God is so great
and we are so small
But there is nothing
that we need know
If we have faith that
wherever we go,
God will be waiting
to help us bear
our pain and sorrow,
our suffering and care
for no pain or suffering
is ever too much
to yield itself,
to God merciful touch!

Sadly missed by her children, Renee &
Felipe Major; grandchildren Felipe Jr.,
brother, sisters and a host of other
relatives and friends.

Gone but not forgotten.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 3

REE
114 East Coral Rood, F | SB. Bohames
P.O. Box F 12

Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 = Fox: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 40-8043 = Fox: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

CALVIN FRANKLIN
MUNROE JR,, 18

Road, Officiating will be Rev, Denzle
Hutchinson, assisted by Minister Johnson
and Interment will follow in Woodlawn
Gardens, Solider Road.

Lett to cherish his memories are his mother:
Raguel Woodside; father: Calvin Munroe
Sr.; daughter: Kellisha Munroe; Special
Friend: Tracy Sands; sisters: Ronnisha, Calvinique, Tanisha, Opal, Ketra
and Breanna Munroe; brothers: Javon and Shavargo Munroe; grand neother:
Delores Gould; aunts: Laticia Sturrup, Sherrine Fowler, Jennifer and Louise
Munroe and Rosemary Moxey; uncles: Owen Rolle, Theodore Burrows,

grand aunt: Dorean Finch of Miami Florida; uncles-in-law: Peter Sturrup :

and Dillion Fowler; aunts-in-law: Wendy Ambrose and Sabrina Belle
King, Darad Munroe, Demetrius, Jarvis and Latheria Sturrup, Crystal and
Lashan Fowler, Deante Tinker, Chelsea and Dejah Gibson; other relatives
and friends Such as Raquel Strachan, Geneva Bodie, The staff of choices
Snack, the entire Peardale Community, The Union Village Community
and the entire Claridge Road Community.

Viewing will be held in the Halcyon Suite at Restwiew Memorial Mortuary

to 6:00pm and at the church on Saturday from 9:30am to service time.

MR. EUGENE SAMUEL
BAIN, 81

Elvardo Tumquest, assisted by other ministers
of the gospel and Interment will follow in
the Catholic Cemetery Tyler Street.

Tshombe, Ricardo, Brandon, Aaron, Joel, William, Kyah, Braeden, Jaxon,

i & Nieces: Oswald Munnings and siblings, Kendal Munnings and siblings,
: the children of the late Delores Colebrooke and Rodger Munnings especially
? Sabrina and Kim Munnings. The children of Dorothy Colebrooke, Vivian
i Bain, Rodney E Bain, Rowena Cleare and Angela Johnson, In-laws: Father
. . : and Mother-in-law, Mr and Mrs Harrison Kelly, sons-in-law, James Mackey,

of Peardale will be held at 11:00am at The |
" New Good Will Church of God Peardale ;

Brad Lightbourne, Ricardo Demeritte; daughters-in-law, Lillian, Marion
and Charlene Bain; sisters-in-law Delores Mounts and Marina Smith,

| Dianna, Karen, and Joy Kelly; brothers-in-law Craig. Hilverson and Terrell

Kelly, Other Relatives and Friends including: Ophelia Munnings and
family, cousins, Wilhemina and Dell, Joseph and Beryl Strachan and

| family, Mr Scavella, The Barber and family, Joseph Johnson and family,
: Pearl Turnquest and family, Audrey Wright and family, Basil Dean and
: family, Edney Pickstock and family, the Smith family, Enc and Alfreda
i Cooper, Bishop Laish Boyd and family, Virgil and Telzena Coakley, Hiram
> and Dorothy Lockhart, Asa and Pamrica Ferguson and family, Sherrine
? Russell and family, Everette Sweeting and family, Maceo and Mizpah and
? family, Melvin Saunders and family, Henry, Michael, Valerie and Irvin
? Lightbourn, Sharon Saunders and family, Godfrey and Carmetta Basden
i i | : ? and family, Paul and Grace Meicholas, Robert Gibson and Annette Whymns,
Dwight Gordon Issac, Edrick and Edwin Munroe; grand aunts: Sarah Earns = the Lightbourne family, Delores Nottage and family, Dorothy Lightbourne
and Kathleen Gould; grand uncles: Presley, Jerry and Jerold Gould great :

and family, Charles and Dorith Grant and family, Janet Gilbert, Maxine

? Fox; his caregiver, vy Bowles and family, Hermane Thompson and family,
ag ft : ay. and 38 Me | The Butler family, Tezel Butler and family, Calvese Walkes, Beverly Bain,
Cousins; Monique, Karen and Kevin Davis Shanika Poitier, Tina and Dika © Anna ‘Dolamae’ Wilson and family, Samuel Bookie Johnson, Charles
us, JE a SS | Clarke, Ricardo Fox, Phae and Andre Rahming, Garland Knowles, Dino
Owenique Belle, Tharon and Tanisha Burrows, Dillion, Devaughn and |

Bethel, Fr Michael Kelly, Pastoral Team and members of Our Lady's of
the Holy Souls Catholic Church, Fr Glen Nixon, Fr Elvado Tumquest and

| members of St Francis Xavier Cathedral, Pastor and members of St Margaret
| Road Native Baptist Church, Former neighbors of Farrington Road,
| especially the Deans, Boyd Subdivision, Hanna Road, Kool Acres, Mastic
: Point especially the Pickstocks and Smiths, the Mennonite family of
a \ tT : Andros, the Kelly fanuly of Lower Bogue, Eleuthera. Statf of Royal Bank
and Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and Soldier Road on Friday trom 10:00am : of Canada (Main Branch), ScotiaTrust, Scotiabank family especially
? Mackey Street, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Bahamas Electricity Corporation,
? Our Lady's Catholic School and others too numerous to mention but not
: forgotten. Please note that Eugene's immediate family is most thankful
? to all who helped to care for him in any way. They are indeed grateful to
? Doctors Antonio-Collie, Brown, Francis, Curling, Turnquest, Evans and
? Gibson; to the staffof Doctor’s Hospital; Dorothy Roberts and staff of the

of Hanna Road, Fox Till will be held on | Physio Department, Sandilands Hospital, Maxine Fox, caregiver, Fr Michael
Thursday, July 2nd, 2009 at 11:00am at St. | tee the : Ses adn T nce Be itlen bles :
Francis ‘Xavier Cathedral West Hill Street. | Martin de Porres Monastery, Fr Elvado Turnquest, Fr Glen Nixon and the
Officiating will be Father Glen Nixon , Father |

Kelly and Joseph Johnson, spiritual mentor, the Benedictine Sisters of St

Parish of St Francis Xavier Cathedral, Fr Simeon Roberts, Fr Martin Gomes
and the parish community of St Joseph's Church.

Viewing will be held in the Serenity Suite at Restview Memorial Mortuary

& Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and Soldier Roads on Tuesday June 30tht
ga ee eee > 2008 trom 12:00 noon to 3:00pm and on Wednesday July lst 2009 trom
Left to cherish his memories are: His wife, :

Wendy Bain; Sister: Dorothy Colebrooke; :
Daughters: Donna Nottage, Janice Mackey, Deborah and Jean Bain, Chery] : Or Wy - KT - 1
Lightbourne, Melvern Demeritte; Step-daughter: Tatrinka Thompson; : THERE WILL BE NO VIEWING AT THE CHURCH.

Sons: Bradley, Everette, Myron, Corey; Grandchildren: Khalia, Khalif, = J), 1 iow of Flowers donations can be sent to Bahamas National Trust and

Jacobe, Gia, Vernard, Ashley, Nikita, Sade, Myron IT and Venice; Great- Our Ladyis of the Holy Souls Catholic Church.

grandchildren: Jasmine and Mikai Foster; Brother: Tellis Smith; Nephews :

10:00am to 6:00pm.


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

and Crematorium Limited

od Cacnclnie Gi”

111A Bost © |Bood, Freeport 6.B., Bahomeas
ord
312

eleaphone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
ae (242) 340-8043 * Fox: (242) 373-3005

Robinson and Soldier ies oo ibaa ALP. Bolomos
P.O. Box CB-12072

Talaphone: (242) 394-6043 / (242) 394-6047
Poger: (242) 340-8044 « Fox: (249) 340-6034

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

MS. ZHILPHA
LOUISE CHARLTON,
86

ee

July 4th,

Old Trail Road.

Left to mourn her passing are sisters: Bloneva Adel Bain, |

Agnes Deleveaux and Dorothy Mortimer; nieces and nephews:

Charity Carey and Terrancia Johnson; Wilkin Bain, Lealon
Jones; grandnieces and grandnephews: Ivamae (Martin) :
Williams, Sharon Carey, Dr. Allison Anyanwu, Celeta (Jones) |

Dean, Patricia (Carey) Hughes, Sally Jones, Sharlene Carey,

Pratt, Keshi Bain, Shelicena Johnson, Melissa (Johnson)
Knowles, Lashan Jones and Monique Harden, Kevin Carey,
Gerard Bain, Jullian Bain, Lealon Jones Jr., Lincoln Johnson,
Edward Knowles, Bebe Anyanwu, Kevin Hughes, Tony Dean,
John Williams and Daniel Harden; great grand nieces, great
grand nephews: Cindy, Deandrea, Kendice, Olivia, Ashley,
Khalilah, Charity, Nathalie and Edvernique; Javon, Angelo,
Shannon, Jarron, Nicholas, Valentino, Anton, Andre, Olin Jr,

Elrick, Durran, Christian, Caleb and Justin; great great grand |
nieces: Jala and Jahxera Robinson; Other relatives and friends. -
including: Frannie Schatsmen and family, Sandra and |
Raymond Francis and family, Helen Fritz, Ruth Smith, :
Roselyn, Inez, Bricemae, Myrtis, Carlton, Victor, Livingston, :
Douglas, Paulette and Vernice Gibson, Anwar Lewis, Inez :
Williams Gibson, Nor Thompson, Dotlene Edgecombe, |
Dorrine Woodside, Anne Bain, Sylvia Amold, Terry, Harriet :
Davis, Ethelyn Deleveaux, Rowena, Arthur, Margarette :
Charlton, Franklyn Deleveaux, Melvin Ferguson, David :
Cuaninghan, Nelly Walks, Almacdor Deleventoe ae : brothers: Sedrick Thomas, Godfrey; and a host of other
Wilson and Whinnie hunt and a host of other relatives and :

friends too numerous to mention.

a of Palm Beach Street and formerly |
of Mayguana will be held on Saturday, :
2009 at 11:00am at :
Ce Deliverance Revival Center East :

Street and Coconut Grove. Officiating :

will be Pastor Raymond Duncombe, assisted by other ministers. :
of the gospel and interment will follow in Old Trail Cemetery :

Viewing will be held in the Perpetual Suite at Restview
_ Memorial Mortuary and Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and
_ Soldier Roads on Friday from 10:00am to 6:00pm and at the
| church from 9:30am to service time.

DEATH NOTICES

\ MRS. ERICA DENISE
STUBBS-KELLY, 35

of Seven Hills Drive died at the
Pnncess Margaret Hospital on 24th
June 2009,

She is survived by her husband: John
Kelly sons: Vencell Thompson;
sisters: Alruda Joseph, Shawana

. . _ Dawkins, Victoria Darville, Maria Curtis brothers: Elvis
Deanine Jones, Terrancia Carey, Bloneva Jones, Loma (Carey) |

Parker and Rodney Darville nieces D’ Eureka Bastian, Alseanda
Johnson, Rashae, Shandera, Grace, Dashad, Rodney, Nicolas,

_ Bradston other relatives and friends including: Franklyn

Murphy.

Funeral annoucements will be announced at a later date.

MR. HUBERT
CLARKE, 51

of Blue Hill Estates died at his
residence on June 28th 2009.

He is survived by his wife: Lavern
Clarke; sons: Hubert Leo Clarke,
Javon Clarke, Torrino Clarke;
daughter: Lanishka Clarke; sisters: Larene, Janet, Sharon;

relatives and friends.

: Funeral arrrangements will be announced at a later date.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

if
a

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 5

Conmonfeealth Funeral Home,
Independence Drive * Phone: 341-4055 7

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENT FOR

NEVILLE
COURTNEY MAJOR,

64
affectionately called
"Barretta"

of Harbour Island, will be held

on Saturday 1:00 p.m. at St.

John's Anglican Parish, Harbour

Island. Rev'd Father Oswald

Pinder will officiate and
shin will follow in St. Catherine's Cemetery, Harbour
sland.

Left to cherish his life testimony and memories is his loving
wife of thirty four years and eleven months, Lorna Major;
their children, Marcey Major-Neilly, Caleb and Antoinette
Major, Sherwin Major, Charmaine and David Wallace;
adopted daughter, Terry Deveaux; grandchildren, Braxton
Neilly, Logan and Hannah Major and Atyrell Barnes; siblings,
Edith Cleare, Frank and Garla Nixon, Emily Saunders, Pastor
Curtlin and Percival Johnson; mother-in-law, Evelyn
Wallace; other family members, Elijah and Sherrie Brice,
Marletha and Maxwell Bethel, Mildred Wallace, Dorothy
Strachan, Margavine Wallace, Victoria and Gerald Wright,
Zonia Wallace, Sadiemae and Gloria Wallace, Frederick

Ruby "Ma" Percentie; uncle, Anthony Percentie; nieces
and nephews, Larry Cleare, Lashay and Glen Bullard,
Lenora Dean, Patrice, Keith Nixon, Brent and Sean Saunders,
Mackell and Bishop Charles Dean, Rev. Timothy and Dianne
Johnson, Darell and Marie Johnson, Jamal Johnson, Dr.
and Mrs. Leonard Johnson and Jamal and Shelby Brice,
Frances, Michelle, Jason, Fredericka Rollins, Nykia, Natalyia,

Jarrad, Keithra, Quintin, Martie, Donya Hall, Sasha, Lashonte,
Royann, Ronda, Deno, Shireen, Shavanna, Charlane, Candia,

Kristen, Monte, Shondra, Dorlon Jr., Crystal, Darien, Kailey :
and Keilis; cousins, Maria Barry, Rosalyn Clarke, John :
Percentie, Eloise Knowles, Shelia Saunders, Daphne :

Hepburn, Donald Higgs, Carol Jones, Jackswell, Richard,

Victor, Bronell Percentie, Rosalie McPhee, Valarie, Nancy |
and Dr. Lee Percentie, Lantasha, Don, Duke and Gleanor |
: Of Harbour Island, will be held on Thursday 7:00 p.m. at
: Ghurch of God, Harbour Island. Bishop Samuel Higgs will

: officiate.
Dwight Stewart, Martin Grant, Tanya Hutchinson, Jose :

Percentie, Vylma Curling, Emerson, Vance, Bertram Sawyer,
Dedrie and Vanna Barry, Erma Davis and family, families of
the late Eunice Sweeting and Earie Johnson; god children,

: Roberts, Jr.,
: Johnson; a host of relatives and friends, Christina
: Thompson (god mother), Mr. and Mrs. Archie Nairn, Mr and
' Mrs Franklyn Ferguson, Mr and Mrs Joshua Culmer, Reggie
| Major, Florine Major and family, Gloria Major and family, Mr
and Mrs Peter Stanton, Edward Hutchinson, Mr and Mrs
Samuel Cartwright, Mr and Mrs Vincent Mather, Mrs Margaret
| Grant and family, Mr and Mrs Glenroy Aranha and family,
| Mr Simeon Higgs and family, Joe Cleare and family,
: Gurry and family, Bishop Dudley and lonie Kelly,
‘ Bowe and family, Bishop Ghaly Swann and family, Richard
and Lemmie Malcolm, Mark Messier and family, Richard
| Haskell and family, Alfred Asbury and family, Jessilee Mackey
| and family, Leonie Neely and farnily, Mr and Mrs Carl Higgs
: and family, Rocky and Melonie Saunders, Janet and Jane

Neeve Bullard, Aldon Davis and Rennie

Nita
ishop

Sawyer, Mr and Mrs Robert Albury, Jolton Johnson, Joe

: Ferguson, (Administrator), Alexander Williams, Father Oswald
: Pinder and members of the St. John’s Anglican Church,
| Bishop Samuel Pinder and members of the Lighthouse
: Church of God, Rev. Marie Neely and members of the
: Wesley Methodist Church, The Right Honorable Perry G.
: Christie, Honorable Obie Wilchcombe, Honorable Bradley
: Roberts, Aurelia Brice and famil
‘ Councilors and members of The Progressive Liberal Party,
i Management and staff of South Party Club, management
‘ and staff of Coral Sands Hotel, staff of Royal Bank of
| Ganada, Private Medical (PMH), Dr. Harold Munnings, Dr.
| Debauch Curling, Water Taxi Operators, Taxi Drivers, Golf
: Gart Operators and the entire community of Harbour Island.
and Cynthia Wallace; aunts, Olga Higgs, Jacqueline and :

: Relatives and friends may view the remains at THE
: PROGRESSIVE LIBERAL PARTY HEADQUARTERS,
‘ Farrington Road on Thursday from 10:30am - 4:00 p.m.,

i at THE CHAPEL OF MEMORIES, COMMONWEALTH
: FUNERAL HOME, INDEPENDENCE DRIVE on Thursday
' from 5:30 - 8:00 p.m. and at the church in Harbour Island
‘ on Friday from 3:00 p.m. to service time on Saturday.
Bridgette Kemp, Marion and Frederick Jr., Kaylisa and |

Dorlen Curtis; grand nieces and nephews, Nicole, Natinka, |

. The Officers, Stabwart

A MEMORIAL SERVICE

There will be a Memorial Service for

NEVILLE COURTNEY MAJOR, 64
affectionately called "Barretta"


PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A Funeral Service For

MR. LESLIE ANDRE
PYFROM, 51

of Oxford Road, Stapledon Gardens,
Nassau, The Bahamas, will be held
at Christ Church Cathedral, George
Street, Nassau, on Wednesday, 8th
July, 2009 at 11:00a.m.

The Very Reverend Patrick L.

Adderley, Dean of Nassau and

Reverend Father Michael Gittens,

Priest Vicar, will officiate and

interment will follow in Woodlawn

Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Road,
Nassau.

Mr. Pyfrom is survived by his wife Jennifer, daughters, Janay Pyfrom
and ‘Yantel and husband Vaseo Marshall; granddaughter, Eliana Marshall
mother, Thelma Pyfrom; aunt, Rosamund Thrower, sister, Suzette and
her husband Richard Unasz, and sister, Emily Pyfrom; nieces, Nicole
and Ashleigh Unasz; father-in-law, Robert Thompson, mother-in-law,
Delores Thompson; brothers-in-law, Ricardo Thompson and Donovan
Nevymour; sisters-in law, Beth Carey, Clarice Neymour, Daniella
Thompson; uncle, Oswald Pyfrom; aunts, Emestine Jones, Evelyn
Klapp, Helen Degoumois, Thelma Brice, Shelia Brice, Conchita Pyfrom
and Eunice Green; his nephews, Bryant Carey, Damien and Dylan
Neymour, other nieces, Darryn and Drew Neymour, Jaiden, Janayah
and Jalani Thompson; grandniece #ion Carey; cousins, Patricia Smith,
Mary and Susan Culmer, Chuck Simms, Wilfred and Cecile Knowles,
Carl and Gladys Brice, Joan Nixon, Aaron and Carol, Mizpah, Isracl,
Pauline, Paul, Gilbert Bnce, Douglas, Walerie, Deborah, Ruth, Emestine,
Carol, Freddie, Rudolph Pytrom, Ken and Brian Albury, Tyrone, Craig,
Tracey Pyfrom, Ronald Jones, Dianne Havey, Brian, Tiffany Thompson,
Rosine Moutardier Ann Mosotti, Karen and Pamela Klapp, Stephen
Conliffe, Joann Heggan, Michelle and Madeline Degoumois, Bernadette
Davis, Ricardo, Enrique Pyfrom, Mario, Michael, Marina Edsel, Carmie,
Anthony Simms, The Archer's, The Swaby’s and The Cheney's,
Imperial Park Family: Jacqueline, Enoch Pedro and Anna Maria Roberts,
John, Eric, Andrew, Pamela and John Jr. Godget, Gregory and Sandra
Brennan, Dr. Clive, Joseph Gaskin, Henderson Burrows and Family,

The Thrower Family (U.K.) and Ramon Kelly, godchildren Nyjo and
Shandia Brennen; friends: Chns Justilien ‘& Members of Colors
Entertainment and I unkanoo Organization Family, Alfred & Wermique
Stubbs, Lynette Barry, Omar & Gerona Bernard, Stephanie Knowles
& The John Bull Family, U.S. Embassy Family, the CB family, Chauntez
Wilson, Lydia Lochan, Kweku Symonette, Melissa Lightbourne, Rachel
Peters, Ruvania Deveaux, Desmin Bullard, Kristi Bullard, Jackie and
Deyar Knowles, Craig, Paula, Naomi and Blanche, Anthony Bellot,
Queen's College class of 1974 and The residents of Oxford Road;
Stapledon Gardens, other Family and Friends too numerous to mention.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to help defray the cost of
Janay Pyfrom (Leslie's daughter) education to Mrs. Jennifer Pyfrom,
P.O. Box 5.5. 3061, Nassau in memory of Mr. Leslie A. Pyfrom.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited, 22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale, Nassau, on Tuesday, 7th July,
2009 from 10:00 to 6:00p.m

THERE WILL BE NO VIEWING AT THE CATHEDRAL.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, W.P.. The Bahamas

A Funeral Service For

MR. A. BRADLEY
ROBERTS, 78

of Gleniston Gardens,

Nassau, The Bahamas,

who died at Doctors

Hospital, Collins

Avenue, Nassau, on

Tuesday, 30th June,
. 2009, will be held at
Trinity ) Methodist Church, Trinity Place and
Frederick Street, Nassau, on Saturday, 4th July,
2009 at 3:00p.m.

Reverend Bill Higgs, President of The Bahamas
Conference of The Methodist Church will
officiate and interment will be in Ebenezer
Methodist Cemetery, East Shirley Street,
Nassau.

Mr. Roberts was predeceased by his wife,
Isabelle Roberts and son, Phillip Roberts and
is survived by his son, Anthony G. Roberts;
daughter-in-law, Jenyne Roberts; sister, Lois
Higgs; grandchildren, Aaron and Grayson
Roberts; sisters-in-law, Christine Bowles, Irene
Heller and Amaryllis Malone; brothers-in-law,
Stephen Heller and Lisbon Higgs; numerous
nieces, nephews other relatives and friends
including Jennifer Banton, the Trinity Methodist
Church family and his Breakfast Club.

Instead of flowers the family request that
donations be sent to the Cancer Society of The
Bahamas, P.O. Box 8.8. 6539, Nassau in
memory of Mr. A. Bradley Roberts.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

(: eS ag anedit

i; ie
Emerald Ridge Wortnary =
& donanent Company itr. (a)
Mr. Wendell G. Dean II, 07.4. Trine

Presidear / Managing Feaeral Director

r vis Hare
(Rape

Our Services Inchodes:
Treditiosal aed Penomalice! Pusere| Seren, DVS
“hance Too Ani tis, Lard and Femdhy Loiand Cremation, Grint

Eerie,
Cortney Bue Fiose Hee Sere snd tang Ditrace Reraraly Saaneat Song “ewig

rr ons ee ae SST ae
Himes ec ei rers) tte eM Pee
TURE UU eet tam Melt be win

Turquoise Funeral Service
For

MR. PRINCE ALBERT
BODIE SR., 52

of Treasure Cay, Abaco and formerly of
Nassau and Freeport will be held on Saturday,
July U4, 2009 at llam at Full Gospel
Assembly Church, Sand Bank Treasure Cay,
Abaco, Buhumas. Pastor Stafford Symonette
will officiate and burial will be in Treasure
Public Cemetery, Treasure Cay Abaco,
Bahamas.

The Radiance of this “Turguotse of A Ger’ vill always glow in the hearts of
his:

Seven Children: Omar, Nykera, Vasta, Prince Jr, Prinice, Justin and Kobe
Boxdie:

Two Grand Children: Khynec Bodie and Lashawanti’ Russell:

Foster Mother: Nethilee Bodie of Treasure Cay, Abaco;

Special Friend: Coral Farrington,

Four Brothers: Joseph Bodie, Richard Walker, Romeo Archer Sr. and Steven
Fines;

Ten Sisters: Shammaine Hart, Pastor Emma Forbes, Sandra Bodie, Jennifer
Watkin, Violet Roberts, Marilyn Kemp, Monique Storr, Melvern Cornish,
Edna Ferguson and Debbie Cooper;

Daughter-in-law: Pamela Boobie;

Five Brothers-in-law: Sidney Hart, Pastor Don Forbes, William Watkin, Peter
Roberts and Ruben Storr,

Two Sisters-in-law: Iva Bodie and Marinette Walker;

Fifteen Nephews: Sidnardo, Shenmal and Shavez Hart, Sean, Kino, Albino,
Javargo Sr, Zavia, Troyvante, Jordon, Lastello, Lucim, Joey, Maceo and Romeo
Ir;

Ten Nieces: Shaque, Sarat Hart, Latasha, Ishka, Dominique, Nakita, Jasmin,
Katrina, Whitney and Micky;

One Aunt: Leanza Pople;

Nine Grand Nephews and Nieces: Phoenix, Katrell, Dwight, Kiara, Javareo
Ir., Bryson, Kacdon, Robe and Mike:

Many other loving family and friends including: Chnstina Gibson, Jerry
Sr and Beryl Lowe, Edith Lightbourne, Carmilla Russell, pl a Bowie,
Lewis and Faye Caldwell of Miami, Florida, Joseph Dames of Texas, Cliff
and Hartley Bootle, Sylvia, Jenny, Abigail, Robert, Annie, Patrice, Janneth,
Sonja, Linda and Montia, Mildred McKinney, Alexander and Barbara Bain,
Myrtle Carroll, Samuel Archer, Kirk, Mike and Kathy Sawyer, Jamel McDonald,
Roosevelt McIntosh, Delvera Wallace and their families, The Williams, Murray
and Boothe families, the Russell and Forbes families of Nassau, Pure! Wells,
Brenda Russell, Gary and Donna Hudson, Curtis and Audrey Cooper,
Management and Staff of Treasure Cay Resort, Full Gospel Assembly Church
family, The entire Treasure Cay and Crossing Rock Communities.

Visitation will be at Full Gospel Assembly Church, Sand Bank Treasure Cay
Abaco, Bahamas on Priday, July 03, 2008 from 3:00pm to service time on
Saturday, July 04, 2009,

Visit our website: www.emeraldridgemortuary.com view video
tributes, sign guest book, send condolence, sympathy, share
memories and make funeral arrangements.



THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 7

oar By)

KENNETH
MICHAEL
DARVILLE, 79

Of Roses, Long Island, will
be held at Our Lady of

Church, Hamilton’s, Long
Island on Saturday July
04th, 2009 at 10:30 a.m.
Officiating will be Fr.
Patrick Fanning, Asst. by Deacon Patrick Darville.
Interment will follow in Holy Trinity Catholic
Church Cemetery, Tait’s, Long Island.

Precious memories will always remain in the hearts
of his wife: Diannah Darville; 2 Sons: Earol
Michael Darville of Sarasota, Fla. and Timothy
Addington Darville; 2 Daughters: Indiana Davis
Ferguson and Nancy Cooper; 17 Adopted
Daughters and Sons including: Joneth Eden of
Freeport and Naroshee Roberts of Nassau; 8
Grandchildren including: Deleano, Jaran, and
Zavargo Darville; 2 Sisters: Edna Darville of
Freeport and Margaret McCardy of Nassau; 1
Brother: Alfred Darville of New Jersey; Mother-
in-law: Daisy Dean; Daughter-in-law: Jackie
Darville; Son-in-law: Jason Cooper; 3 Brothers-
in-law: Hewitt Dean of Cat Island, David Dean
and Obie Ferguson of New Providence; 9 Sisters-
in-law: Nancy Darville of New Jersey, Annamae
Darville of Boyton Beach, Fla., Maggie Bain,
Deborah Stuart, Quennie Ferguson, Alfreda Dean,
Daphne Dean of New Providence, and Elva
Williams of Freeport, Grand Bahama, and Rose
Dean of Cat Island. Numerous nieces, nephews
and friends including the entire island of Long
Island from Seymours to Gordons, also including
Dr. Sanpal and the staff at the Health Centre, Nurse
Fernander and Nurse Minnis at Clarence Town
Clinic, Fr. Patrick Fanning, Fr. Ernest Pratt and
Deacon Patrick Darville.

Viewing will be held at the church in Hamilton’s
from 6p.m. Friday until service time Saturday.
PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JULY 2,

2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

(Cedar Crest Funeral Home

DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street « PO.Box N-603 « Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

Funeral Services For

ETOY
McKENZIE, 69

formerly of Cove, Cat Island, will :
be held 2:00 p.m., Saturday, July :
4th, 2009 at St. John's Native :
Baptist Cathedral, Meeting Street. :
Officiating will be Rev. Dr. Alonzo :
Hinsey, assisted by other Ministers. :
Interment will be made in Lakeview :
Memorial Gardens, John F. :

Kennedy Drive.

Left with cherish memories are her husband, Dudley McKenzie; her :
children, John Johnson, Alton and [an McKenzie, Ruthmae Smith, :
Erin Strapp, Vanillin McKenzie and Margaret Storr; two sisters, :
Shirley Strachan and Mazie Kemp; three sons-in-law, Paul Smith, ;
Wesley Strapp Sr. and Holbrook Storr; three daughters-in-law, Angela ;
Johnson, Christine and Sha McKenzie; six step children, Helena ;
Thompson, Lorene McKenzie, Tadesee Davis, Tiffany Williamson :
and Bradford and Carno McKenzie; twenty-eight grandchildren, :

— oe ' cues Fike Rvien 2a = ce are 3 a resident of Mermaid Boulevard, and formerly of Chesters, Acklins
Ethan, Wesley Jr Justin, Alexander, Marvin, Alferez, Renard, _ and Puts Well Mayaguana, wil held 06pm Saturday, uy
nthony, Jerado, Edwin, Terrance and Keshawn; her father-in-law, : ,~ - eo 7

Ben icVanvie- £ . = ; * + be Pastor Dan Simmons, Pastor Deansa Cunningham, Pastor Ellison
roars | EorceeMaenice 5 eee ete Greenslade, Pastor Aligan Malcolm and Minister Elvin Taylor.
and Tana McKenzie, Dorothy and Stella Seymour and Rev. Rosenell : ala a be made in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, John F.
Forbes and other relatives including, Mavis Douglas and family, : ““ 5
Rudell Brisset and family, Enid Roker and family, Gretal Hanna and : . ea fees er
family, Ms. Thompson and family, Ms. iembeisier and family, Deloris. : Mins. Taylor was predeceased by her busband Captain Nathaniel Taylor
Braynen and family, the Coakley family, Tetry Brooks and family, : and her son and daughter Lincoln Taylor and Althea Brown.

Ms. Swann and family, the Praying Sisters and the Young Adult Choit : | 4% with cherished memories are her five sons, Clayton, Elton,
eee ee ee ee : Captain's Eddins, Limas and Elvin Taylor; four daughters, Alvene
Faith. H d Chari Bi Si 7 Ric. Hineevanl fi ar | Gay, Elra Ward, Elma Taylor, Velna Burrows; one adopted son,
‘oct i kes Phecd f B. Bisheo Red cM Roberts, Frederic : Audley Bain; five adopted daughters, Cynthia Brown, Mildred
ihe Golden Gates Church family, Bishop Rodney .. hoberts, Freceneka | Williamson, Daisy Black, Barbara Stubbs and Glenda Hepbum; three
Minus and family, Silbert Evans, Moses Deveaux, Louanna Evans, ; sons-in-law, Hartman Brown, James Gay of San Salvador and Errol

; “a ae 4. | Ward; five daughters-in-law, Carmetha, Carlas, Janet, Donell and
Stephanie Marshall, Cherine Jackson, Michelle T aylor and fami *: Agusta Taylor; forty-nine grandchildren, fifty-three great grandchildren,
Jane Knowles, Louise Moncur, Demique Moncur, Norman Smith, : nine great creat-crandenildren. ooe devoted aister. Era Ferausory
Jenice Rolle and Rev. Hervist Bain and family, British American ; TINS 86a! grea’ granechildren, one Cevoted sister, Era Ferguson,
Company, Meteorology Department, Light & Life Community Church, : aan sof Ba a : oe Johnson tiem tt New ao Edith
Ellen Smith & family, Ernest McKenzie and family, Sharon Lewis } (“?. 6 0! betsey Gay. Mayaguana and Vnice Collie, one brother-in-
and family, Burton, Vapoen, Jennifer and Jessica McKenzie, Tina, | 2Â¥; Stanley Collie of Betsy Bay, Mayaguana; numerous nieces and
Vashinella, Mornette, Conrad and Conwill McKenzie, Estermae nephews and . host of other relatives and friends and others too
Stubbs and family, St, John's Church family, Kerr family, Constance | Mâ„¢stous lo mention.

Rolle and family, Monique McDonald and family, George Jones and ; Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest Funeral

: Home, Robinson Road and First Street on Friday from 12:00 noon

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest Funeral wile p-m. and at the church on Saturday from 11:30 am until service
Home, Robinson Road and First Street on Friday from 12:00 noon : =

Garett Deveaux, Eloise Mackey, Hilbert Brooks, Albertha Smith,

others too numerous to mention.

> to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon and at
; the church from 12:30 p.m. until service time.

_

> A MEMORIAL
: SERVICE

A Memonal Service to celebrate
the life and work of

MATHILDA
COLLIE TAYLOR

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENT

MATHILDA COLLIE TAYLOR, 91


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Yager Luneral Home @ Crematorium

Queen's Highway
FO. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 * Paging: 352-6222 #1724
Fax: 351-3301

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

GEORGE HERBERT
THOMPSON, 67

‘| a resident of #3 Grenfell

}) Avenue, Freeport and formerly

of Green Castle, Eleuthera will

be held on Saturday, July 4,

2009 at 11:00 a.m. at The Pro-

Cathedral of Christ the King,

East Atlantic Drive and

Pioneer's Way, Freeport.

Officiating will be Rev'd Canon

Harry Bain, assisted by Revid

Tellison Glover and interment will follow in the Grand Bahama
Memorial Park, Frobisher Drive.

Left to cherish his memories are his wife of many years: Elva
Miller-Butler and loving children: Delarise, Diane, Sybil,

Francina, David, Samuel, George Jr., Charles and Robert; six
adopted children: Ingrid, Cheryl, Darlene, Deborah, Lisa and
Collin; three sisters: Carolyn, Sybil and Ivy; two brothers:
Johnathan and Richard; 18 grandchildren: Shantell, Lavette,
Moe, Donnalee, Teddy, Davyvonne, DJ, Ray, Destiny, Eugina,
Georgia, Trevor Jr., Tavera, Bianca, Sam Jr., Deangelo, Lexi
and Shavenne; six great grandchildren: Wrayray, Tyesha,
Latalya, T’nya, Erick and Aliash aunts Ruby and Ann Sands
of Rock Sound, Eleuthera; one daughter-in-law: Monica Butler;
two sons-in-law: Anthony Francis and Raymond Williams;
godchild: Dkosi Ewing and a host of other relatives and fends
including: Merlene, Florence, Rose, Gaylean and family,
Beatrice, Ruby, Shirley Smith of Washington DC, Annimae,
Mizpah, Shirley, Doreen, Vera, Woman Inspector Betty Bodie,
Evangelist Predricka Watson of Green Castle, Eleuthera,
Emily, Vernell, Geneva, Agnes, Ethel Butler, Sheila, Levan,
Culin, Rudolph Sands, Allan Butler, Tyrone “T’, Ronnie Butler,
Jack Gardiner, Bradley, Stanford, Elvis, Renu, Jeffrey, Jack
Bahl and Freeport Transfer Family, Rector Hary Bain and
Christ the King Family, Grenfell Avenue Residents, Long
Island Family, Emmanuel Smith, Simmy Baptiste, Ashaki
Miller, Gibson family, Inez, Gloria Johnson, Olive, Shirley,
Ms. Moxey, Douglas Ewing, James Albury, Alberto, Joeslin
Pierre, Bradley McIntosh, Grits and Toast.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral
Home & Crematorium on Friday, July 3, 2009 from 12:00
noon until 6:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday from 9:30
am. until service time.

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 9

Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel

Wulff Road & Pinedale
Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 * Fax: 328-8852

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

en it Gi \) JOHN GREGORY

a ry “Peck”
a 8 83=—ls se MOXEY, 59

of Golden Gates 42, will be held
on Saturday, July 4", 2009 at 10:00
a.m. Golden Gates Native Baptist
Church, Lobster Avenue,
Officiating will be Rev. Dr. Alonzo
Hinsey, Sr., assisted by Other
Ministers of the Gospel, Interment:
Southem Cemetery, Cowpen &
Spikenard Roads,

He is survived by his mother, Ms,
Louise P. Archer; Four (4) children: Perissa Moxey of New York, Joann
Moxey of Freeport, Grand Bahama, John Moxey II of Minnesota, &
Gwen Moxey of Nassau; Four (4) grandchildren: Calvin, Jacob, Calista
& Tatianna Moxey; Three (3) sisters: Karen Moxey, Valeria Lightbourne
of Sandy Point, Abaco & Lynette Sands; Five (5) brothers: Ernest
“Timmy” Moxey, Dennison “Denny” Moxey & Clifton, Wayne & Brian
Miller; Two (2) sisters-in-law: Sherry Moxey & Linda Miller; Six (6)
aunts: Veronica Gibbs; Christine Fountain; Sylvia, Sheila & Gloria Archer
& Brezetta Moxey; Five (5) umeles: Norman, Howard & Oswald Archer,
Hallet Fountain & James “Uncle Higgs’ Moxey of Mangrove Cay, Andros;
Two (2) grand-uncles: William “Yama” Butler & Sam Brown of Bomim;
One (1) grand-aunt: Ivy Brown of Bimini; Nieces: Bianca Moxey,
Willeisa Francis of New York; Lesa Sands; Kara Smith; Crystal Saunders;
Jade Sands & Noya Moxey; Nephews: Shannon & Vaughn Moxey;
Brandon Lighthourne of Sandy Point, Abaco; Dancko & Dario Miller;
Daryl Bain; C harles Gilcud; Kevin Sands; Durell, Dennison & Darron
Moxey; Grand-nieces: Reghan Ingraham; De" Asha Bain; Kiara Williams;
Lashontae & Ariah Miller; Grand-nephews: Nathan Sands; Andre
Lockhart & Caleb Goodman; Cousins: Eugene Gibbs; Comell & Lesa
Moss: Keva Williams: Janice Moss; Jane Archer-Rolle: Kevin, Dion
Andrea Archer; Meshelle, Stevie Corey Archer; Faye, George & Marcelle
Smith; Carol Gomez; Renae Robins; Arthur, Copeland, Graylin & Daniel
& Dianne Moxey; Special Friends: Rey, Alonzo & Sister Jessie Hinsey
& Family; Other relatives & friends including Beatrice Thompson of
Bimini; Marge King & Family; Henrietta Maycock & Family; Marina
Strachan & Family; Sylvia Hepburn & Family; Christine Ferguson &
Family; Evangelist Marguerite Lewis & Family; Willie “Mays” Francis;
Willie Masena; Keshan & Daniel; Clarice Morley; Ruthmae & Paul Smith
& Family; Charlene Newbold & Family; Wir. Mackey; Inger Brown, Eltha
Bannister & Family; Leonard Miller & Family; Mrs. Lezura Rolle &
Family; Revin “Huddy” Hudson; Dion Watkins: Ricardo Ferguson; Brian
Rolle; Nay, Norman, Rebecca & Keva Jefferies; Ricardo Fernander; Peter
Gilcud; Monique & Myra Ferguson; Randolf, Donell Bullard of Freeport;
Agatha Russell of Freeport; Gerrard Cleare; Elsie Moxey of Freeport;
Anthony “Polka” Huyler: Golden Gates Native Baptist Church Family
& the community of Golden Gates #2; Friends in Freeport, Grand Bahama;
Pat Ingraham; Bemard Aranha; Neville “Hammer” Cartwright; Sanford
Culmer; Gregory Christie, and others too numerous to mention.

FRIENDS MAW PAY THEIR RESPECTS AT ROCK OF AGES
FUNERAL CHAPEL ON WULFF ROAD & PINEDALE OWN
FRIDAY FROM 10 .4.M. TO 6 P.M AND ON SATURDAY AT THE
CHURCH FROM 9:00 A.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME,




PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009

ghn O. Jones
MEMORIAL CENTER

“Honoring the memories of loved ones”
INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED

ANNIE
ARCHER, 85

of Murphyville and formerhy of Clarence
Town, Long island will be held on Saturday
July 4, 2006 at 11:00 a.m. at Mi Pleasant
CGireen Baptist Church, East and Quako
Streets, Officiating will be Rev. Wesley L.
Thempsen, assisted by Rev, Nelson MMeFall,
Rey. Garth Johnson and Rey. Mary Johnson.
Interment will follow in Ebenezer Cemetery,
Shirley Strect.
Precious menvories will forever linger in
the hearts of ber bowing and dewoted by her
son and daughter: Leroy and Anya Munnings: daughter: Linda Fitegerald:
Stepdaughter: Nicola Eve of Fort Lauderdale, Florida; Two granddaughters:
Franchyn Johnson and Sanya Munnings: Two grandsons: Byron and Wayde
Munnings; Granddaughter-in-law: Raquel Munnings of the Royal Bahamas
Defence Foree; Four great grandchildren: Edee Johnson, Kushna, Waynette and
Andrew Munnings: Ome great grandchild: Akeim Johnson; One sister: Alma
Sands: In Laws: Leonard and Eloise Archer, Duke Errol and Dorrie Strachan,
Julia Thompeon & Family, and John Neymour; Seven nieces: Melanie Rahming-
Thompson, Faith Rahming-Ene, Laurie Rahming-Williams, Dr. Inyang Ene.,
Evelyn Watson, Angie and Jan Rahming; Eight Nephews: Richard Dawkins,
Edgar and Sam Watson, Philip, Ricky, Gail, Alex and Deleno Rahming Efiong
Amaku Ene; Other relatives and fiends including: The family of the late Alonea
Mackey, The late Thomas Mackey & Family, Mrs, Grace Seymour and family,
the family of the late Rosalte North; Including Dr, Hubert Minnis Bertram,
Miriam, Marto, Mark and Detdre Smith, Dien Dean Ferguson, Marcella Dean,
Edward and Samuel Rahming, Alanare Newton Jones & Family Mickey Knowles
Palmer, Nurse Eloise Nicholls and Family, Gwendolyn Cunningham and Family,
Gerlene Jones and Family, Linwood and Juliette Wilson, Etienne Taylor, Rosaler
Taylor, Lashan Munnings, Paticia Whitfield, Delores Russell and family, Mickey
Palmer and Famuly Linda Fitzgerald and Family, Viola Rahming and family,
Winifted Munnings and family, The late Audley Munning and Family, Cleso
amd Jamal Munnings and Family, Lenora Weech and famuly, Annamac Dorsette
and family, Reva Potter and her beauty sabon staff, Reggie Knowles and Family,
Reggie Carey and family, Clif Thompeon and family, Joseph Butler and Family,
Qeme Knowles, Elva Munnings and family, Doris Fitzgerald and Family Leroy
(Pemmic) and Gwendolyn Hanna and family, Audrey Munnings-Francis, the
Staff of Hospital and Health Care Facilities Licensing Board and The Ministry
of Health Councils, George Capron, James Catlan, Leroy Archer, Maureen
Duvalier, Elizabeth Deveaux , Debbie Smith & Family, Reverend Garth Johnsen
and family, Deacon lan McPhee, Or Wesley Thompson and Mrs. Marsha
Thompson; Special Friends: Doris Fitzgerald, Louis Hanchell, Helena Dorsette,
Lerraine Munings Porbes, Rachel Penn , eka Munnings, Alanre Newton Jones,
Deris Fitzgerald, Mis, Jenne, Patricia Whitfield, Viola Rahming, Franceta Forbes,
Sharon Rahming, Danette Cleare, Annamae Dorsette, Linwood and Juliette
Wilson; A Very Very Speci Heartfelt Thank You To Mr, Lowis Hanechell and
Mrs. Helena Dorsett, Thank you to Dr. Ene and the staff of the Accident and
Emergency Department at The Princess Margaret Hospital, Mrs. Janet Butler and
the staff of Limty House on East Street South, Dr. Farquharson and bis Medical
team, Dr. Cyprian Strachan and Dr. Omally and Staff of Javon Medical Center,
Dr, Weech and Staff of the Operating Theater P_M.H, the Nursing Staff of Female
Surgical I at P.MLH and the Staff of Nassau Harbor Pilots.

Wiewing will be held in the ‘Legacy Suite’ of Vaughn O. Jones Menvorial Center,
Wultf Road and Primrose Street on Friday from 10:00 om. to 6:09) pom. and at
the church on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to service time.

Wulff Road and Primrose Street,
Opposite Studio of Draperies
Telephone: 326-9800/1 * 24 Hour Emergency
434-9220/380-8077

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Pinder’s Funeral Home

“Service Beyond Measure *

PALMDALE AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
PHONE: 322-4570/ 395-1351 « CELL: 357-3617
RANNIE PINDER President

Belescia Tem els

Mrs. Agnes Louise Knowles
(Nee Pinder)

passed away peacefully on Monday,
22nd June 2009 at the home of her
daughter Deborah in Dallas, Texas.
She was born on the 6th, March 1916
at Singer Island, Florida. At the age
of six, she moved back to the
Bahamas with her parents John B.
Pinder and Olive Pinder. Agnes
married Mr. Alexander C. Knowles
Sr. on 17th August 1933 and they had
twelve children.

Funeral services will be held on
Saturday, 4th July 2009 at 10:000am
at St. Anne's Church in Fox Hill.
Officiating will be Fr. Crosley Walkine and interment will follow
immediately after the service in the Church's Cemetery.

Agnes was predeceased by her husband Alexander C. Knowles and
her son James F. Knowles M.P. She 1s survived by one brother:
Hilbert B. Pinder; eleven children: Ethlyn (Jean) Pinder, Ruby Collins,
Doris Anderson, Yvonne Knowles, Alexander (C. Knowles Jr, Emerick
A. Knowles, Patrick A. Knowles, Geottrey W. Knowles, Charlton
V. Knowles, Deborah S$. Knowles and Julianna Green, In-laws:
William (Bill) Pinder, Richard Anderson 5r., Shirley Knowles,
Amarylis Knowles, Brenda Knowles, Rosa Knowles, Linda Knowles
and James Green; grandchildren: Craig Pinder, Perry Pinder, Stephen
Collins, Gina White, Karen Leonard, Richard (Ricky) Anderson,
Brian Anderson, Cyndy Woodward, Joanne Aranha, Michael Knowles,
Andrew (Andy) Knowles, Michelle Doura, James Knowles Jr.,
Roman Knowles, Kimberley Knowles, Trisha Wiethucher, Olivier
Knowles, Vanessa Knowles, Ryan Knowles, Bianca Carter, Christian
Knowles, Amanda Knowles, David Knowles, Daniela Knowles,
Marissa Knowles, Brittany Green and Matthew Green; nephews and
nieces: Bruce Pinder, Andrew and Scott Pinder, Holly Cartwright,
Cheryl (Bunny) Eickelbeck, Donna Wells, Gregory Pinder and
Michelle Lightbourne; eighteen great grandchildren, and a host of
other relatives and friends including: mPatau Regent, Ann Knowles,
Edith Knowles, Elva Knowles, Dawn Knowles, Renee Roth, Barbara
Algreen, Olive Naim, Menam Pinder and caregiver Shirkey Henderson.

The family would be grateful to all if in lieu of flowers a donation
be made to St. Ann's Church, Fox Hill Road.

Friends may pay their last respects at Pinders Funeral Home
Palmdale, Ave., Palmdale on Friday July 3rd, 2009 from 5:00pm
wail 7 Apa.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009,

Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Memorial Service for
GAIUS CORNELIUS BETHEL, 45

of Governor's Harbour, Eleuthera and |
formerly of Palmetto Point will be held Friday, :
July 3rd, 8pm at the People's Restoration |
Baptist Church, Queen's Highway, Governor's ;

Harbour, Eleuthera.

Funeral Service for
GAIUS CORNELIUS
BETHEL, 45

of Governor's Harbour, Eleuthera and |

formerly of Palmetto Point will be held on |

Saturday July 4th, 11:00 a.m., at the Worker's :

House, Queen's Highway, Governor's |

Harbour, Eleuthera. Pastor Patrick V. Smith ;

assisted by Pastor Ronald Bastian, Rev. ;

LeCari Sands, Rev. Charlotte Davis and Rev. :

Dr. Baltron Bethel will officiate. Interment will follow in the "Krypton" Garden of :

Remembrance, Spanish Maine, Palmetto Point, Eleuthera.

He is survived by his parents, Former Cabinet Minister, Reverend, The Honorable :
Philip M. Bethel, Sr. and Elder Yvonne Bethel; two (2) sisters, Deborah Asenath and :
Tryphena Yvonne; three (3) brothers, Philip Herman, Luke Francis and Philip Michael, :
Jr.; one (1) adopted sister, Lillymae Williams; seven nephews including, Triasen, :
Franzano, Michael, Salathiel, Zelotes, Aram, and Noah; seven nieces including, Philisea, :
Philan, Darlia, Pyleia, Tiara, Yvonne, Zoriah; grandfather, Evangelist Francis Moon }
Carey, Sr.; step grandmother, Pastor Marina Carey; uncles and aunts, Mrs. Iris & Austin :
Knowles, Sr., Mrs. Agatha & Joshua E. Culmer, Sr., Mrs. Helen & Theodore Allen, :
Mrs. Sandra Mae & Obediah Goodman, Sir. Baltron & Lady Helen Bethel, Elder :
Francis, Jr. & Betty Carey, James Carey, Levard Carey, and Lester Maycock; grand :
aunts & uncles:, Mrs. Velma & Dr. Ed Allen, Mrs. Arnette Knowles, Mrs. Patricia ;
Archer, Mr. Durward Archer, Mrs. Tessie Stubbs & family, Mary Moss & family, :
Emma Cooper & family, Pastor Hilda Allen & family, James Carey & family, Ralph :
Carey & family; special relatives including: Themica Pinder, Keno Thompson, Philip :
& Felicia Bethel, Marilyn Culmer, Zelda Evans and Joyce; brother-in-law, Richard ;
Jean; sisters-in-law, Takasa, Stacey, and Inga Bethel; other relatives including, Lukeisha, :
Mikeisha, Micarlos and Pastacia Bethel, Diamond, Dawn, Christian, Zachary, Shamar, }
Lamont Forbes, Lakeira & Omyio Williams, Ronaldo & Ronette Tinker, Pastor Patrick }
Smith, Rev'd Lecarl Sands, Deacon Benjamin and Rev'd Charlotte Davis, Miss ;
Jacqueline Gibson, officers and Members of the People's Restoration Baptist Church, |
Palmetto Point, Eleuthera; the staff of Eleuthera Supply Ltd., Ron Sparks, Brunson }
Sands, Matthew Gordon, Philippa Kelly, Jerome Davis, David, Gwen, Austin Jr., ;
Ricardo, Dr. Hadassah Knowles, Bertina Emmanuel; Charles & Anthony Culmer, :
Yvette Stuart, Tanya Deal; George & Jason Allen, Delphine Turner, Helena Edwards; :
Javan & Timna Goodman, Vashni Carey; Gregory, Dr. Ian, Brian & Leslie Bethel, |
Sharon Gill; Francis, Lashanda, and Laquel Carey, Melissa Rolle; Jamal and James |
Carey; Donalee and Guild Maycock; Nurse Freda Cooper & family, Pastor Arlene |
Isaacs & family, Mrs. Vernita Bethel & family, Mrs. Sheemah Darling & family, Emily |
Munnings, Mr. & Mrs. Gibbs, management and staff of Southern Air, Minister Ena }
Culmer & family, Mrs. Brenda Johnson, Gaynell Rolle, Mrs. Bertha Culmer & family, |
Elizabeth Knowles & family, Mitchlyn Joseph, Yvette Robinson & family, Ricky |
Mackey & family, Sherry Neely, Ruschell Mcklewhite, Pastor Henry Whyte & family, |
Sr. Administrator Ivan Ferguson, Pastor Hilda Sands & family Rodney Dayley, Nadia |
Johnson (Former Miss Bahamas), Pamela, Kelda, Shantel, Graylin, Dwight and Hank |
Gibson, Edith Sturrup, Melrose Butterfield, Renea Ettiene, Gail Archer, Beverly Smith, |

Shona Davies, Dedidra Cook, Elizabeth Stubbs, a host of special godchildren and the
entire Island of Eleuthera including Harbour Island.

Special Thanks To Dr. Ajero Of Governor's Harbour, Dr. Elisa Krill and staff at Mount
Sinai Cancer Center, Miami, Florida; Medical And Nursing Staff At Doctor's Hospital.

Friends may pay their last respects at the People's Restoration Baptist Church, Queen's
Highway, Palmetto Point, Eleuthera on Friday from 10:00 a.m., and at the Worker's
House on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

Arrangements handled by Bethel Brothers Morticians.

EVANGELIST CORAL J. MISSICK, 52

of #1002 Croton Street, Pinewood Gardens
will be held on Saturday July 4th, 10:00 a.m.
at Glad Tidings Tabernacle, Kemp Road.
Bishop Adline Jones assisted by Minister
Creswell Pratt will officiate. Interment will
follow in Woodlawn Memorial Gardens,
Soldier Road.

She is survived by her children, Quincy,

Lemorne, Dina, and Frederick Williams and

Shantel Bain; mother, Mrs. Elva Missick;

sisters, Linda Wildgoose, Delores Whylly,

Janet Johnson, Shandira Ferguson,

Lashawnda Missick, Cindy McKenzie,

Bernadette (Bunny) and Glenda Storr;

brothers: Charles Capron, Thomas Missick

Jr. and Ronnie Missick; grandchildren,

Deesean, Shaliza, Lamika, Lemorne Jr.,

Shaquille, Dontae, Tkai, Quiaden, Nathaniel,

Cierra; aunts, Hazel Alfonso, Sylvia Campbell, Naomi Hamilton, Monique Hamilton,

Mettie Hamilton, Ruth Hamilton, Carolee Hamilton, Elvira Missick, Annarine

Missick, Jane Missick, Jeweline Missick; uncles: Calford Hamilton, Sherlock

Hamilton, Christopher Missick, Lloyd Missick, Nehemiah Missick, nieces: Breana,

Aliya, Nigeria, Rakeisha, Ajhonae, Rayeisa, Donique, Kenneia, Rhonae, Nadia,

Brendeeka, Sheryl, Jakai, Tina; nephews: Brandon, Jeremiah, Alton, Charles Jr.

Xadensio, Jaryn, Jereno, Janesko, Theron, Ronnie Jr., Rommel Jr., Leonardo Jr.

David Jr, Chadwick; grand aunt: Roseta Butterfield; grand uncle: John Missick;

daughter-in-law: Shakeva Williams Brothers in Law: Stanley Wildgoose, Donald

Whylly, Anthony Johnson, Rommel Ferguson, Anthony McKenzie; sister-in-law:

Beverley Capron Relatives and Friends: Mr. Roosevelt Moss & Family, The Moss

Family, Dene & Family, Sandra & Family, Sherry, Sandra Gray & Family, Neely,

Mr. Gary Parks, Mrs. Marcia Missick & Family, Agnus Pratt, Sarg. Clayton

McKenzie, Mr. Mario Pugh & Family, Creswell & Agnus Pratt, Mr. Rudy Grant,

Ms. Catherine Simmons & Family, Sarg. Woodside, Peggy, Mr. John Bain &

Family, Leon Missick, Hon. Amanda Missick, Hartlean Pryor, Theodore Mott, Mr.

Shirland Solo Williams, Tyrone Mr. Ezekiel Williams, Mrs. Tracy Dorsett, Mr.

Ricardo Wilson & Family, Mr. Alkeinah Walker, Insp. Innis, Shantel Aleverez,

New Beginnings Prayer Ministries Family, Bahamas In-flight Family, Bruno
Gibson.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians #44 Nassau
Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday at the church from
9:00 a.m. until service time.



PAGE 11
PAGE 12, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009

‘@)) Bethel Brothers Morticians
“= " ‘Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

Funeral Service For

HUGH EVERET TURNQUEST, 67

of Gregory Town, Eleuthera will be
held on Saturday July 4th, 3:00 p.n.
at St. Agnes Anglican Church,
Gregory Town, Eleuthera. Fr.
Jonathon Archer will officiate.
Interment will follow in the Public
Cemetery, Gregory Town,
Eleuthera.

He is survived by his wife, Mildred
Turnquest; son, Leighton Turnquest;
step-children, Dave and Paula
McGhie; grandchildren, Malik
Turnquest, Brie, Mark and Jordan
Clarke; sisters, Sylvia Cambridge,
Joan Powell, Winifred Ferguson,
Rebecca Bethell and Pauline
Johnson; brothers, Audley and
Douglas Turnquest; bothers-in-law, Harcourt Cambridge, Cuthbert
Bethell, Ferdinand and Edward Hinds; sisters-in-law:, Jacqueline
Turnquest, Ethel Johnson, Willamae Turnquest, Eileen Robinson,
Edna Myles, Martha and Maureen Hinds; nieces, Diane Fernander,
Daphne Delva, Corinna Neely, Schevon Cunningham, Sharene
Ferguson, Kimberly and Diondra Turnquest, Shaundica and Tanya
Johnson, Sonja Moss Moultrie, Marchanille Folly, Nicole Rolle,
Sherry Cambridge and Keva Bethell; nephews, Craig, Dwight, Kevin
and Andre Cambridge, Demory, Dereck, Darrell and Donald
Fernander, Craig, Kim, Dion, Dwayne and Julian Turnquest, Basil
Merres, Omar Bethell and Keenan Johnson; cousins, Ruth Morgan,
Leila Wood, Euphemia Belle of Georgia, Hensel, James and Oswald
Belle of Florida, Theodore Johnson, Kingsley Wood, Ruby Murdock,
Jacqueline Pittman, Carl, Daphne, Bernard, Patrick, Augustine,
David, Reginald, Angela and Janet Turnquest, Barbara Tynes, Lois
Cleare, Patricia Nichols, Gwendolyn Duncanson, Elizabeth Rolle,
Carmel Charles, Joyce Quant, Karen Lightbourne, Patsy Johnson,
Mae Albury, Veronica Daniels, Rose Kemp, Randolph and Robert
Lee, Althea and Noel Conliffe; other relatives and friends, James
Johnson and family, Clarence Gibson, Rose and Zinnis Mackey,
Kirk Johnson, Gloria Finley, Margaret Rolle, Addie Carey and
family, Lucille Cleare and family, Melanie Clarke and family of
Florida, Willie Maurice, Tyrone Neely, Lisa, Joanne, Monique and
Rosanna Cambridge, Tanya Turnquest, Hector Delva, the Turnquest
family, the Bethell and Johnson families of James Cistern, Eleuthera,
the entire community of Gregory Town, Eleuthera, Flora Hanna,
Holy Spirit Church family, Fr. Jonathon Archer and Fr. Harry Ward;
special thanks to, Fr. Jonathon Archer, Evangelist Miss White,
Gregory Town Prayer Group who gave him spiritual refreshment,
Miss Olga Goldsmith and Rosalyn "Rose", his caretakers, to many
Doctors who gave him home visits, nurses Priscilla Scavella, Patrice
Johnson and the many others who attended to his health needs
especially his sister Sylvia Cambridge and Harcourt Cambridge,
who were always there for him.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians,
#44 Nassau Street on Thursday from 2:00p.m. to 5:00p.m. and on
Friday at the Church in Gregory Town, Eleuthera from 6:00 p.rn.
unti/12:00 midnight, and on Saturday from 10..00 a.m. until service
time.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

NEWBOLD BROTHERS
CHAPEL

#10 Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street
PO. Box N-3572
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 326-5773

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR
John Miller, 64

will be held on
Thursday, July 2nd,
2009, at 11:00 am, at
the gravesite of
Southern Cemetery,
Cowpen & Spikenard
Roads. Officiating
will be Minister
Derek Roberts.

Left to cherish fond

memories are two
brothers, Wendel and Fredrick Miller; eight
sisters, Patsy Roker, Faye Roberts, Debbie
Butler, Carolyn Miller-Fowler, Vernita Black,
Rose Deal, Joan Rolle and Ingrid McKennie;
twenty-one nieces and nephews, Brendalee
Fawkes, Ernestine Markland, Tiffany
Bullard, Ticla McKennie, Monique Whylly,
Jasmine Miller, Denequa Sweeting, Carlton
Fowler, Quetell Cox, Samantha Rahming,
Keva, Latisha, Lashanda, Latoya, Laura,
Gina, Donnie, Omar, Annie Williams and
Peter Rolle Jr.; six brothers-in-law, Hansel
Black, Vernon Butler, John Fowler, Delly
Deal, Arthur McKennie and Corporal 1138
Peter Rolle and a host of other relatives and
friends.

Relatives and friends may pay their last
respects on Thursday at the gravesite of
Southern Cemetery from 10:00 a.m. until
service.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

aN! My,

EAST SUN IN RSE MORTUARY

ANTHONY
“Fat Back”
MARSHALL, 44

of Goklen Gates #2 will be held on Satumlay at 10
ina. at Mit. Tabor Full Gospel Bapties Church, Willew |
Tree Avenue and Mt. Tabor Dre. Officiating will |
be Bishop Neil C, Ellis, assisted by Pastor Lorenae
Clarke, Interment will follow in Woodlawn (lardens,
Soldier Road.

He is survived by his children: Jnamine, Ebony,
Roben & Shanishka Higgs; Granddaughter: Aznire |
Samuels; Son-Im-Lew: Glenn Higgs Sisters: Mavis |
Taykr-Soott, Chery] Marshall-Campbell de Carmita |
Marshall-Nesbitt; Brother: Joseph Taylor, Brothers-
in-law: Clement Campbell, Cornelius Nesbin and
Rustis Scott; Sleter-in-law: Janse Taylor; Sieees:
Chervita K. Campbell, Ann Scoci-Woed ‘ynthia Leais, Joyoe Soot, Tawnnna Taylor (Detron), ¥olands
Taylor (DetrotLAvery Taylor (Detront Bunks Walkes, Charmaine Walkes, ( “rystal Nesbitt, Shantavia
Mesbetl, Nephews: C. McMahon, Campbell Martin TeyhorPatick Nesbut, Nepbew-in-law: Cicrald
Lewis; 5 Grandnicces: 7 Grandmephews: Aunta: Hortense Harris-Smith, Hester Johnsen, Enid
Ferguson, (North Carolina),Hazel Young (Miami), Frances Lede and Shirkew Clarke (West Palen).
Unele:Herbert Marshall; Aunt-In-Law: Linda Marshall; Unele-[n-Lawse George Young, Samael
AL Hasris-Soniths a host of relatives amd friends: Susan Roberts A Family, Edath Clarke & Family.
Franklyn Clarke & Family, Barbara Rolle & Family , Cindy Sherman, Beatrice Clarke | { Exumal.
Roshyn Clarke (Tampa), Lisa Wilder & Family (Ft. Lauderdale}, Terry Olacke (West Paleo), Alfred
Clarke (Tampa), Marion Clarke & Family, Wenrick “Chnar’ Clarke & Family, Bert & Vernac
rae Barbara & Sol Bostwick, Lula Gainer (Antonio), Valerie Patterson (Mianei}, Timothy
Strachan & Famaly (Miami), Sand Jackson & Family [Miamib. ‘Oquendo Strachan (Califommiat
Arives Fielder (hdmi), Quan Jackson {Miami}, Brian ‘Williams (Miami), Laverne Camphell-
Dunoambe & Family, Portia Clarke {Miami}, Rose Humes, Dr. Eduarde Humes & Farmaily (Mew
‘Yore} Huenes, Der Michelle Grant & Family, Victoria Grant, Teney Fergugon & Family | Feu
Virgina Ferguson (Exemal, Augusta Bodie, Bishop Clarence: 2 Armbrister & Family, John Armbeister,
Solomon Anmbrister, Priscilla Armbrister, Althea Fergeson, lona, Alberta Williams-Moackey, Johe
Willams, Annette Williams. Victoria Williams &Family, Beatrice Curtis AFamily, Mary Taybar
(Exumal, Vernewe Bode , Dale Joseph, Henretia Smith, Dede Uirey Framcseon Fereusin. Olga
Forbes, Sorctha Clarke, Della Clarke, Philip Griffin, Vernoica Griffin (ermany), Bishop Astiar
Ferguson &Family, Pastor Roy & Judy Mayeock & Family, Paul & Joye Ross & Family, Valentino
& Lisa Berkeley & Family, Bishop Christopher Fergus & Family, Bishop Rudelph Bodie &
Family, Edith Johnson & Family (Freepeet}, Duphne Mixon & Family (Freeport), Sandra Sbsart &
Family {Freeport}, Brando Stewart & Family (Freeport), Paaletic Smith & Farealy, Gish Smath, Ken
Meomand & Family, Grodiney MecAlpon & Family, Arvckell Stuart & Farnily, Beverley Taylor.

Virginia Jones (Virginia), Freddie Newohurch & Family (Freeport), Marilve Johnson & Family of

(Freeport), Bartar Albury & Panoily (Grind Cav), Leona Wallace &Family (Freeport }. Marthe
Pander a. Fansily (Freeport), Sandra Duhaney & Family (Freeport), The F amily & Seat of the “The
Best Music Om The Planet’. MORE 9.9 FM, Troy Thompson & Famaly, Palm & Kerk Thomas
(Ohio), Lynn Thomas & Family (Philadelphia), Latoya Cooper & Family, Bridgette Samael &
Family, Exanna Dormeles & Family, “ern Johneoe, Svivia Roberts & Family, Terrell Tinker &
Family, Residents of Bridge, The Fathack Kids Clubs, Dr, Digeis (Doctors Hospital), Ricarde
Lighthourne (Freeport, Pauline Bowen-Forhes (Freeport), Natalie Martinborough (Freeport), Nurse
Aunme Stubbs-Girants (Freepeat), flr. Ramsey & Famuly (Berry Iskind), R.N. Gomez (Berry Islands).
- cn Ruachanisin, Hawksbill High Class af 1982, Ingrid Romer, Gibson Family, Anastica Lamb,

Tomoya Cooper, Princess Miargarct Nurse’ Male Medecal | de fl, ICU, Princess Marpaeet Hospital,
The Bows Clubs, Kiwanis of Nassau, Junkanoo Groupe, ZNS Staff, Me, Leslie Miller, Hon. Desnond
Bannister, MP Carmichael, The Royal Bahamas Police Force, The ht. Tabor Family, The Church
of God of Prophecy Members, Sponsors 4 Clients, More Bounce Clients, Child Abuse Council,
Sylva Canty & Faroly (Ft. Laaderdale), Carloyn Thompson & Family, Drarthry McPhee & Family,
Kentrce Williaens & Family, Charming MeCardy & Family, Alicia Baillou (Freeport), and a host
of other relacives and friends 100 mumerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bast Sunrise Mortuary, Rosetta Street, Palmdale from 10 a.m.
io fi p.m om Friday and again from 9 acm. at the Cherch om Saturday until service time

EAST SUNRISE MORTUARY.

“A New Commitment To Service"

#27 Rosetta Street, P.O.Box C.B. 12248 / Palmdale,
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 323-EAST — (242) 326-4209 Fax: 356-2957
24 hrs. Emergency Service
ere) eee Ee c=) elo teeeeele] aes

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 13

Sweeting’s Colonial
Mortuary And Crematorivm

84 Blue Hill Road « P.O. Bow N-8161 + Tel: 325-7857
* Fax: 325-7R67

for the late
Retired Deputy
Superintendent of Police

MR. HOSEA
DOUGLAS JR., 66

a resident of Sowh Beach Estates and
formerly of ios Town, Exuma, will be held
wt Church of God Cathedral, East Street and
Lily of the Valley Comer on Friday, 3rd July,
2009 at 11200 am. Officiating will be Bishop
Moses Johnson, assisted by Rev. Harvey
Cash and Interment will follow at Woodlawn
Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Road.

Left to cherish his memories are his Wife: Verna, Two Sons Inspector Kirk and
Natuno Douglas, Five Daughters: Kim, Bridgette, Tiffany, Deidre and Registered
Nurse Kaylor Dowelas, Two Adopted Daughters: Lynette Whylly and Denise
Sears, Mother-in-Law: Victoria Smith, Two Brothers: Rudolph and Leonard
Douglas, Sister: Pearl Rahming; Daughter-in-Law: Lakeva Douglas, Son-in-
Law: Bobby Jones, Eighteen Grandchildren: Tianya, Candace, [talia, Kayliza,
Tativyanna, Kirk Jr. Rychee, Nataria, Indira, Laveka, Shaniqua, Cordero and
Angela Douglas, Dawndria Taylor, Koreas Cox, Neveah Caley, Alicia McPhee
and Kaylisa Rolle, Thinee Brothers-in-lLaw: Hollid Smith, Fetward Hanchell and
Rev. Deacon Peter Rahming, Five Sisters-in-LLaw: Paula Smith, Eleanor and
Naomi Douglas, Verlene Taylor and Lease Smith, Four Aunts: Dahli Kelly,
Dolly Stunup, Dons Comer and lamer Musgrove, Two Uneles: Hosea Musgrove
and Joseph Butler, Numerous Nieces and Nephews Including: Carolyn and
Ricardo Douglas, Antoinette Deveaux, Donel Joyner, Joanne Romero, Michael,
Shawn, Shirrel, Garvin and Erica Douglas, Patreece, Peter [I and Preston Rahening,
Antoinette Smith, Yvonne, Elvaria, Yvette, Sharon, Deidre and Shantell Hanchell,
Shery] and Garth Whylly, Elder Maurice, Debbie and Keith Arthur, Pamela
Reckley, Michael Taylor, Holly, Leonardo, Lavardo, Catherine and Charles
Smith, Aljunac Johnson and Makeshla Cleare and A host of other Relatives and
Friends Including: Luke Carey, Dennis Woodside, Moses Johnsen Jr., Elvis
Johnson, Estella Butler, DC 2790 Jared McPhee, Jenny Bullard, Deborah,
Stephanic, Charles, Tyrone, Nora, Glen and Wilshire Smith, Corcne Robinson
(Boynton Beach Fl), Heslyn Fernander, Carnetta Rahming, Flint and Preecola
Musgrove, Jane and Sylvia Taylor, Susan Hunt, Lorenre Douglas, Jacqueline
Seymour, Ernestine Douglas, Barbara Davis, Linda Rolle, Kayla Lightbourne,
Chiford World Smith, Delors Robinson, Patricia and Terell Lightheume, Lilymae
Brown, Doreen Cooper, Sherry Smith, Kelly Rolle, Elva Bodie, Rev. Elan
Musgrove, Threva Anmbrister, Archie Sands, Jackue Smuth, Hester Clarke-Bowe,
Aremina and Charles Musgrove, Roscoc Sands, Rev. Mitchell Jones and the
Annex Church Family, Ena Dean, Inell Adderley, Bishop Moses and Sis. Cynthia
Johnson and the entire East Street Cathedral Family, Father Andrew Toppin,

Leanza and Rena Whylly, Gloria and Irene Dorsett, Teazel Wright, Lily Burrows,

Larry Butler, Patsy Rahming, Leonie Strachan-Bethel, Richard (Green Castle),

Governor General the Hon, Arthur D. Hanna, Hon. Phenton Neymour (MP for
South Beach), Sir Orville Tumquest, Rosina Johnson, Cleomie Whymns, Charlton
and Collie Families, Wayne Edgecombe, Jenniemac Stuart, Patricia Wewbold,
Sandra Moncur, Carmita Rolle, Ricomdo Johnson, Soup, Yvette Sweeting, Phillipa
Smith, Melanic Hall, Jacqueline Logis, Viola Roxbury, Constance Major, Dedric
Pinder, Darnell Roker, Kayla Ingraham, Cindy King, Sclena Stuart, The Nurses
of Male Medical 1, Nurses of the Dialysis Unit, Dr, Wloyd, Dr, Morgan and staff
of Accident and Emergency Department, Commissioner of Police Reginald
Ferguson and the Royal Bahamas Police Force and the Fire Department, Mr

Gratton [fill (President Royal Baohamas Police Force Retired Officers Association).
the entire Staffof Goverment House, Bahamasair, Bahamas Telocommunication
Company, the Communities of South Beach Estate, the entire Family of Moss
Town and Hemitage Exuma and Green Castle, Eleuthera and Rum Cay Families.

The body will repose at the Chapel of the Saints Sweeting’s Colonial Mortuary
and Crematonum, 64 Glue Hill Rd. from 10:00am on Thursday until 6; (pm
and on Friday from 9:45 am. at the Church until service time.


PAGE 14,

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Mutler’s Funeral Homes & Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

Funeral Announcement

MRS. FRANCELA
RUTH
WILHELMINA
WINT-CAREY, 69

East St. South, will be :
held on Saturday 4" July,
2009 at 10:00 a.m. at St. |
| Margaret’s Anglican |
Church, Kemp Road. |
Officiating will be Rev'd |

Fr. Joseph L.

Mycklewhyte, assisted by Rev'd. Angela Palacious.

Cremation will follow.

Thamsyn Rahming,
grandchildren; Philip Moss, Jr. and Allie Miller Jr.,

sixteen nieces and nephews; Katherine and Colin |
| Shelly, Bonnie, Nefa; numerous grand and great

Johnson, Sharraine and Peter Walkes, Errol Jr. ,

Antoinette, Michael, Lucinda, Brian, Verne ,Scott |
Jasmine and Marie Rolle, Nadia and Mervin Evans |
five god children; Toni | ’
Mitchell Antonia Albury, Sandra Deveaux, Rhonda ; 4nd Family, Carlton, Edward, Kendrick, and Rodney
Clarke and Andrea Adderley and a host of other |
relatives and friends too numerous to mention |

including Bahamas Customs Family and the Staff : th 7
- Carolina and Gerard Hanna and Family, and a host

- of other relatives and friends too numerous to
In lieu of flowers the family has requested that |

and Patricia Edgecombe,

of the Bahamas Heart Certre.

donations be made to St. Margaret's Parish P. O. |
Box SS 5695, Nassau, Bahamas.

Memorial
Announcement
for
MR. KENDRICK
NAPOLEON
HANNA, 67

of Carmichael Road, will
be held on Saturday 4"
July, 2009 at 10:00 a.m,
at St. Barnabas Anglican
Church, Wulff Road.
Officiating will be Rev.
Canon Basil Tynes.

: He is survived by his four brothers; Pembroke of
: Goulds Florida, Dewitt, Oscar and Earnel Rollington
She is survived by her two daughters; Edda Carey
Rahming and Alisa Ingraham, one son-in-law; A.S.P. :
Edmund Rahming, one sister; Melitza Rolle; one |
brother-in-law; Errol Rolle, seven grand children; |
Latia, Lynette and Lillian Smith, :

Lathario, Janaya and Devontae Ingraham, two great |
| Sweeting, Tameka Hanna, Teneshia and Dwight Innis,

Hanna (ER); two sisters; Melba Iris Hanna and Ellen
lonette Adderley; twenty eight nieces and nephews:
Rudolph Hanna, Claude and Melanie Hanna, Gary
and Rochelle Hanna, Brain and Wanda Hanna, Dewitt,
Irvin, Berkley Adderley, Timothy, Tyson, Theadore,
Trevor, Trineil, Dawn Hanna, Terah and Lyndon

Tyiece Hanna, Tania, Nicole, and Tyra Adderley,
grand nieces and nephews; three sisters-in-law;

Flora, Carol and Eartha Hanna: numerous cousins
including; The Governor General Arthur D. Hanna

Williams and Families and Gloria Hanna and Family,
Shirley Francis, Jacqueline Smith, Paula Sands,
Dorothea Ritchie and Family, Samone Hanna of North

mention.

| Funeral arrangements are being handled by

| Butlers’ Funeral Homes and Crematorium Ernest
| and York Streets.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Butler's Funeral Homes
& Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

DEATH NOTICE FOR

MR. GARY
CANCINO, 72

of Coral Harbour died at
his residence on Friday
June 26th, 2009.

He is survived by one
brother; Peter Cancino,
four sisters—in —law;
Thelma Cancino, Lorraine
Cancino, Constance
Cancino and Edna
Cancino, one adopted
daughter and grandson; Jean-Patrice and Jon Travis
Sweeting, ten nieces and nephews; Stephen , Michael,

Anthony, Lindsey and Linda Cancino, Deborah Nixon,
Joy Burrows, Ronnie North, Sean Hall, and Judith Pinder.

See eeem
A special thanks to those friends who kept him in their
thoughts:
* Aggie, Patricia, Emily & Michael who called all the
time to keep him ‘up to date’.
Marilyn for always making him laugh and giving him
the right dose of medicine for a good day.
Shirley Hanna for making that long trek from East to
West to sit down with him on Sundays and just chat
and watch movies, his favorite pastime.
Pat, who always made his day start right with the
moming newspaper.
And last, but most certamly not least, Sharlene who
was always there to give him great care and even
greater ‘drama stories’.

To all of you, he is surely thankful that you were in his
life.

2 oo oe eo aks os a

Al"M Tio":

Usted es entrado cuerpo pero usted siempre estara en el
corazon y las muy profundidades de mi alma. Yo le perderé
profundamente. Usted fue mi MEJOR amigo, y el
confidente mas grande de mundo. Te quiero SIEMPRE
... Patrice.

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 15

Evergreen Mortuary

EXCELLENT IM THE SERVICE WE PROVIDE

For all of your Funeral Service Needs,
We will be pleased to serve you with honor.

Tel: 242-3 4-7
Fax: 242-24 7900
24hns; 242-341-5309
or 322-3242
Cell365-97 38

DENMALEE EB. PENW LPT
MARGIN PF LUINERAL DIRECTOR

) Steet Soath
(Opposite Minute Muffler) Nassau, Rekamas

Funeral Service For

IVAN BANKS THOMPSON, 67

of Carmichael Road and formerly of
Bailey Town, Bimini will be held on
Monday. July 6th, 2009 at Temple
Fellowship Ministies, Davis Strect, Oakes.
Field at 2:00 p.m. Officiating will be
Bishop Kirkwood Murptry. Interment will
follow in the Bailey Town Public
Cemetery, Bimini.

Left to cherish fond memories are his
wife: Nathalie Francis Thompson; four
sons: Frederick, Peciro, Nathan Thompson
and Franklyn Francis; sewen daughters:
Mirs. Dellearses Jones, Arctha Thompson,
Mrs. Nicole Ash, Mrs, Carmen Dames,
Gloria Stuan, Shavonne Marshall and
Esther Pinder; grandchildren: Ivrica, Ivan,
Ricardo Jr, Richard, Raquel, Malik, Kedo'r, Frednicka, Shantell, Lakeisha,
Fredrick Jr, Dan, Tanica, Dominique, Pedrico, Brittany, Branderia, Briston,
Amarion, Marica "Chervon Roker, Mandell, Cavron, Ce Ce, Marcus,
Greevonea Lewis, Shavonta Marshall and Kobe and Kayanna Rolle; five
great grandchildren: Mariah, Tia, Rende], Donavan and Shenia; two sisters:
Eloise Strachan and Deborah Thompson; two brothers: Cedric and Gadirey;
three aunts: Elva Minnis, Havel Thompson and Louise Sweeting of Deep
Creck, Eleuthera; numerous mieces and nephews: Lione] & Lavone Harms,
Anton & Hope Sealy, John & Carla Wildgoase, Lisa & Larry Anmnbrister,
Trevor & Phyllis Thompson, Wanda, Kara, Sherry, Dr. Christina Pratt, Sophia
& Wayne Wilkinson, Nicole & Devon Allen, Lateisha & Angelo Knowles,
Vera & Darvin McKinney, April Thompson, Darrin, Dwayne, Gregory and
Gerard; sisters-in-law: Audrey Pamela, Diana, & Helen Thompson, Adnamna
Wright, Peggy Roach and Corrine Smith, brothers-in-law: Benjamin Wright,
David Smith, Philip Smith and Jefferey Strachan; two daughters-in-law:
Karen and Willamac Thompson; three sons-in-law: Cecil Dames, Ricardo
Jones Sr, and Lawrence Ash; and a host of other relatives and friends
incloding: Cleola Thompson and family, Warren Doc Thompson and family,
Kirk & Brentwood Thompson and family, Mervin Sweeting and family, The
Anderson Family, Cedric and Edna Hanna and family, Mary, Marporic, Paul,
Donna Hanna, Elijah Clarke and family, Stankey Fulford and family, Sandra
and Tyrone Russell and family, Martha, Anthony, Donakd, Dave Marshall
and family, Susan Moxey and family, Vincent and Denise Mackey and family,
Leroy and Veronica Mackey and family, Wilfred & Shantell Moxey and
family, Clayton and Natasha Williams and family, The Entire Bimini North
& South Communities, beep Creek, Eleuthera Community, Balls Alley, St
James Road, Abraham Street and Okra Hill Communities, Big John Family,
Bimini Bay, Bimini Big Game, Bimini Blue Water, Ray, Andrew "Blood"
& Marva Roberts and family, the Oncology Department, James Curtis and
family, the Airport Airline and Allied Worker's Union Executives Officers,
Kemer International Security Department, Bishop Revy Francis and family,
Angela Cartwright and family, Mrs. Laura Rolle and family, Bahamas Hotel
Catering & Allied Worker's Union, Gregory Mott and family, Oral and
Geneva Pinder and family, The Sweeting Family, The Thompson Family
and The Pride of Bimini.

Relatives and frends may pay their respects at Evergreen Mortuary, Mackey
Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m, and at the church on Monday

from 1 0K) p.m, until service time,


PAGE 16,

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

HAemeritte’s Funeral Aome

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET « P.O. BOX GT-2097 « TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

JEFFREY LAVARON i

"Outlaw, Fingers"
COLEBROOKE, 24

a resident of Oxford Avenue, |
who died on 19 June, 2009, |
be held at New.
Bethlehem Baptist Church, :
Independence Drive, on |
Saturday at 11 :00 a.m. |
Officiating will be Rev. Dr. |
Everette J. Brown, assisted |
by Rev. Joseph Saunders, Rev. Tyrone Laing, Minister | Spikenard Roads.
Derek Muoe & Evangelist Denie Fountain. Interment |
follows in Old Trail Cemetery, Old Trail Road. |

will

Bernadette Colebrooke; sisters: Lavara, Jeffette, Jecel :
and Jaliyah Colebrooke; brothers: Jeffame & Jevantae |
Colebrooke; niece: Jatish; nephew: Javontae IJr.; |
grandmothers: Ruth Kerr & Cleomi Saunders; aunts: |
Meshell Kerr Bethel, Annamarie Kerr, Monique Delancey, |
Ruby Russell, Starita Robertson, Astride Nottage; uncles: |
Charles, Anthony & Wenzel Kerr, Lynden & Garfinelli |
Saunders, Bullamo Colebrooke, Marvon Bethel & Cordell
Delancy; grandaunts: Syrene Russell, Beatrice Russell, |
Edith Russell, Ruth Ward, Mavis Gaitor, Wendy Jones, |
Mavis Dean, Emily Knowles, Mazie Darville, Isoleme |
Colebrooke & Shirley Francis; granduncles: Garnet Miller, :
Sam Miller, Wenzel Jones, George, Edgar, Rodney & | |
Isaiah Colebrooke; cousins too numerous to mention; a | Barbara Morris & family, Suna Adderley, Sherry & Albert
host of other relatives & friends including: Kenneth |
Symonette & family, Bernard Dupuch & family, Ricardo |
Lightbourne Sr., the Thurston, Strachan & Newbold |
families, C. V. Bethe] Crew Graduating Class of 2002, |
Tiffany, Teresa, Crystal, Mona, Snake, the Oxford Avenue |
boys, & the entire neighbourhood of Oxford Avenue past |
: Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m, on Friday & on
| Saturday from 9 a.m.-1:00 p.m. & at the church from
Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral |
Home, Market Street, from 10 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday |
& on Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service |

& present.

time.

DERECK JOHN
LEWIS, 31

a resident of Eneas Jumper
Corer, who died on 24 June,
2009, will be held at St.
Georges Anglican Church,
Montrose Ave., on Saturday
at 3:00 p.m. Officiating will
be Fr. Kingsley Knowles.
Interment follows in Southern
Cemetery, Cowpen &

Left to cherish his memories are his mother: Mariette

| Storr; | son: Lavardo Lee; | daughter: Shandy Mackey;
Left to cherish his memories are his mother: Euneska |
Kerr; father: Jeffrey Colebrooke Sr.; stepmother: |

1 son-in-law: Stephen Mackey; grandchildren: Jerimiah
& Stephanie Mackey; 3 sisters: Delisa Forbes, Bianca &
Ruthmae Walkes; | brother: Norman Thompson; | brother-
in-law: Henry Clarke; | aunt: Bernice Sturrup; 6 nephews:
Javon Clarke, Aquin, Wilfred & Stephen Walkes, Hakeem
Thompson & Ashton Fernander; 7 nieces: Dalette, Dareaka
& Anell Walkes, Rokeisha Roker, Avreann Fernander,
Christnell & Normareaka Thompson; 7 grand nieces:
Sancia, Alexus & Brinae Walkes, Shanya Bethel, Dael
Gaitor & Jalisha Clarke; 6 grand nephews: Jacoby Clarke,
D'vonta Rolle, Sean Taylor Jr., Stephen, Stefon & Wilfred
Walkes Jr.; other relatives & friends including: Shirley,
Wilamae, Edith Sturrup, Delores, Melinda & Duranda
Carter, Charles, Edwin, Bruno, Delrick, Tyrone, Jeffery,
Pedro Sturrup, Patricia, Monique & Navardo Glinton,

Deveaux, Natasha & Toby Deveaux, Kimberly Hepburn,
Simone Taylor, Ronald Storr of Cocoa Florida, Prince
Adderley, Prince Sweeting, Sean Taylor Sr., Tino, resident
of Eneas Jumper Corner & Fritz Lane.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral

2:00 p.m. until service time.


PAGE 18, THURSDAY, JULY 2,

2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

and Crematlouum Limited

on Crcmatniuns Gincad”

11A East Coral Road. Freep: | G.B., Bahamas
Telephone: (24) aa 373-1471
Poger: (242) 340-8043 » Fax: (242) 373-3005

Robinson and Soldier Roads, N Nassau, M.P., Boharnas
Telephone: a) 394-6049 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 = Fox: (242) 340-8034

DEATH NOTICES he) is

MR. APPOLON
‘Popo’

NORTELUS JR., 44

of #24 Wood Rogers, South Bahamia,

on Sunday, June 28, 2009,

He is survived by his parents: Appolon Sr. |
and Frida Nortelus; children: Alton ‘Bats’, Unch, Vashon and Ahmad :
Nortelus; sisters: Amette Jones, Irene Nortelus, Monique and Katrina :
Nortelus, Maria McIntosh; brothers: Arlington Sr., Audley Sr., Fritz |
Sr, Ramus Sr, and Craig Nortelus Sr.; numerous aunts, uncles, nieces, :

nephews, cousins and a host of other relatives and friends.

Funeral Arrangements will be announced at a later date.

MR. BERTRAM LESLIE
WARD, 62

of #83 Sugar Plum Road, Freeport, Grand |

Bahama died at his residence on Monday,
June 29, 2009,

He is survived by his wife: Inavie Ward: |
daughters: Monique, Marissa, Ordissa and |
Cyntina Ward; son: Jamal Ward; sister:
Janet Ward; niece: Patricia Brown and a :

host of other relatives and friends.

Funeral arrangements will be announced at a later date.

MR. DILLON OTNEAL
‘A.K.A Tyler’ ‘Pop’
HAMILTON, 79

| Of #102B Gordon Avenue, Freeport, Grand

Bahama And Formerly Of Grand Turk,

rs Turks And Caicos Islands died at his |
23 residence on Saturday, June 27, 2009. :

He is survived by his wife: Helena :

i Hamilton; § daughters: Maude O'Brian, Deloris Stubbs, Pearline
i Hamilton, McKeba Palmer and Wealthy Hanna of Nassau, Bahamas;
: 2 sons: Noel and Floyd Hamilton; brother: Eugene Hamilton; numerous
i grandchildren, nieces, nephews and a host of other relatives and
| friends.

| Funeral Arrangements will be announced at a later.

Freeport, Grand Bahama died at the Rand |
Memorial Hospital, Freeport, Grand Bahama |

MR. JEAN MAQUES
NOEL, 58

4 of #4 Garden Villas, Freeport, Grand
Bahama and formerly of Milot, Haiti, died
at The Rand Memonal Hospital, Freeport,

®) Grand Bahama on Sunday, June 28, 2009.

) Funeral arrangements will be announced
at a later date.

MR. LENWOOD LEONARD
BULLARD, 37

) of Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama died
| at the Rand Memorial Hospital, Freeport,
Grand Bahama on Sunday, June 28, 2008.

He is survived by his wife: Precious
Bullard; daughters: Natasha Bullard Miller,
Miranda Bullard-Taylor, Marion Arlene
and Medris Bullard; brothers: Simeon,

| Stanley, Bobby, Manfred and Joshua Bullard, Garth Jackson and Chery!

Dean Bullard and a host of other relatives and friends,

FUNERAL ARRANGEMENT WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT A

| LATER DATE.

‘a
fae
e oe ate


THURSDAY
July 2, 2009

The Tribune

ae
NEWS,
STORIES
AND
CHURCH
SNES


PG 20 ® Thursday, July 2, 2009 RELIGION The Tribune


































































Setting a new standard
in gospel music

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

AMAS Faith Ministries’ (BFM)

er conference titled The

ment is setting a new standard in
gospel ministry as several church and
community artists have collaborated to

create a soundtrack for the event. €ALSO on the
Produced by local gospel artist and youth minister Appointment album is

DJ Counsellor, the music album features a cross sec- 21-year-old Ryan Jupp,
tion of genres all under the theme ‘Living Right In A who recently performed
World Gone Wrong.’ ALUM Uae Tatts ace

DJ Counsellor explained: “For this soundtrack I CRUSTAL
wanted to bring a different flavor, mixture, and vari- of BFMs 2008 talent Eup
ety. From R&B, Reggae, Culture, Reggae Dance-
Hall, Hip Hop, and also Calypso and Rake n’ Scrape.
“It’s a straight-up gospel album not in the tradition-
al church way, it is basically something that you can
take to the streets that connects with everyone.”

Also having a song and several features on this lat-
est album, DJ Counsellor explained that the sound-
track also serves as an opportunity for exposure to
some of the new artists he has rallied for the project.
Aleithia Sweeting, 21, who hails from Five Porches
of Deliverance Church said: “For as long as I could
remember music has been a part of my life, with both
of my parents and brother being involved in the field.
“T’ve just always been tagging along, but when I i
really started to develop a passion for music was last | Ye ;

year while I was off to school, I started to play the A areca fe cet the
guitar and IJ just started to sing and write music.” / music scene but is hop-
Aleithia said the tone her lyrics is one which ing to establish a pres-
encourages people to follow Christ , evangelises ence as a gospel artist
through song, and shares her love relationship with eMC LMUte: Sse TICE

SEE page 24 soundtrack.
The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, July 2, 2009 ® PG 21

‘@m@iiien

Showers of blessings

WE are having rain storms that come
so thick and fast that the ground seems
unable to absorb it. Grass requires
mowing weekly now, and the flowers
are in profusion.

The colour green is everywhere and
the dry and thirsty earth has been
drenched for hours on end.

What does this mean if you have
planned a cookout, outdoor wedding or
sporting event? It means postpone-
ment, cancellations and disappoint-
ment. Sudden shifts to indoor arrange-
ments may alter the ambience and
dampen the spirit of the occasion.

Pedestrians have puddles to avoid
and speeding cars to anticipate as vehi-
cles driven by uncaring or distracted
motorists provide unsolicited and unex-
pected mud baths.

What does it mean to gardeners? It
means answered prayers after months
of drought bringing long awaited flow-
ers and vegetables dying in the heat. It
means the reward for long hours of

Brothers of Alpha
Phi Alpha
Fraternity attends
St. George’s
Anglican Church

The brothers of the Iota Epsilon
Lambda Chapter of Alpha Phi
Alpha Fraternity, Inc. recently
attended the 9am worship service
at St George's Anglican Church
on Montrose Ave. The brothers
and their families attended the
service in recognition of the instal-
lation of Chapter President Dave
Forbes and his new Executive
Team. The brothers of the frater-

nity were pleased to join their fra-
ternity brother, Fr Kingsley
Knowles, Rector of St George's
Anglican Church.

* Pictured with Fr Knowles
Back Row L-R

L Gerarr Archer (Associate
Editor of the Sphinx), Oscar
Dorsette (Member), Warren
Rolle (member), Trevino
Russell (Financial Secretary)
Front Row L-R

Ricardo Deveaux (Historian),
Lynden Maycock (Immediate
Past President), Kevin Basden
(member), Dave Forbes
(President), Marcus Lang (Vice-
President)

REV. ANGELA
C BOSFIELD
PALACIOUS



back-breaking labour for farmers, and
bountiful harvests to sell and share with
family and friends.

We need a spiritual rainstorm to
inundate our islands, to wash us of sor-
did sins, and “re-green” our parched
souls. We truly need an anointing by
the Holy Spirit such as never before
experienced in the Bahamas. We need
the Lord. We need the reign of God in
our lives and the love of God in our
hearts.

What does this mean for those who
reject God? It means a life that could
have climbed more mountains, forded
more streams and followed more rain-

bows in order to realise more God-
inspired dreams. It means no sweet fel-
lowship with the Holy Spirit, and no
promise that the best is yet to come for
all eternity.

For those who accept a life founded
on godly principles, who seek Jesus
Christ as Saviour, and follow our
Redeemer as Lord, the glory of God
may be glimpsed from time to time, the
comfort of the Lord is real, and even
suffering will be used to bring praise to
God’s name.

Allow God to so shower you with the
blessings of peace, love, joy, hope and
faith. Admit your need for order in the
chaos, patience in the delays, stamina
for the deadlines, and forgiveness for
your own failures and those of others.

When next you hear the rain, why
not pray for a personal saturation by
the Spirit? Don’t put up the umbrella of
doubt or denial. Accept God’s gift of a
new life and then tell someone about
the benefits of a shower of blessing.





w God to so
ou with the
ssings of peace,
love, joy, hope and
raith. Admit your
need for order in the
chaos, patience in
the delays, stamina
for the deadlines,
and forgiveness for
your own failures
and those of others.


PG 22 @ Thursday, July 2, 2009

RELI

The Tribune



(Coy THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS ore

The Methodist Church
in Andros 1930 - 1986

A plethora of churches

During the early 1930's the work of
the Methodist Church was adversely
affected by the activities of other
denominations. Rev Walker in the
report to the Synod of 1932 informed
the Synod that “at Staniard Creek we
suffer from a plethora of churches."
But the same report that speaks of the
proselitising activities of one church in
particular, has at least two notes of
hope: the request made by the children
of the ‘Sunday School for a "portion of
ground” be given them to clear and
cultivate and the statement that “at
Stafford Creek we have a good cause ...

One of the interesting highlights of
the history of the Methodist Church in
Andros is the "Spongers’ Mission."
There was a committee called "The
Andros and Spongers'’ Mission
Committee.” In 1936, such persons as
Revs R P Dyer, M.A. and E.M. Walker
along with Messrs J.A. Bethel, J.P,
GW.K. Roberts, G.M. Cole and K.
Moss served on this committee.

The following extract comes from
the reports of the circuits for the 1936
Synod. "Special mention must be made
of the work among the spongers at
"The Mud.’ Lantern services are held
whenever the minister at Andros goes
to these cays, and we can report con-
gregations of four and five hundred
men at these services."

The 1936 reports from the circuits
also point out that "In Andros circuit
too, the minister in charge does a great
deal of medical work ... this unity of

JIM
| . LAWLOR



healing, spiritual and physical is some-
thing for which we give thanks to
God." On one of his trips around the
circuit lasting 16 days, 12 teeth were
extracted, 14 bottles of medicine dis-
pensed, and a fishhook removed from
a finger.

During the 1930's the ministers, who
lived at Staniard Creek, used the mis-
sion sloop "William Turton" as a
means of transportation around the
circuit. The journey from Staniard
Creek to Mastic Point would take
about two hours in good weather and
much longer in poor weather condi-
tions. The minister would sometimes
stop in at Stafford Creek and then
journey to Mastic Point where he
would spend one or two weeks carry-
ing out pastoral duties. He would then
move on to Nicholl's Town before
making the journey back to Staniard
Creek.

One of the highlights of the 1950's
was the arrival of the Rev Edwin
Taylor in the Bahamas. Another high-
light was the ministry of the Rev W
Makepeace.

It is reported that the Rev Henley B
Perry was the first minister to reside in

the present manse/mission house at
Mastic Point (ie, on a permanent
basis). Rev Perry spearheaded the ren-
ovation of the Mastic Point church dur-
ing his term of service in the circuit
(late 1960's early 1970's). The new
extension on the chapel at Mastic
Point, complete with a youth hall,
kitchen and toilet facilities, was dedi-
cated on June 29, 1985 during the min-
istry of the Rev Dr Kenneth A
Huggins, who was also serving as
Chairman of the Bahamas District.
Rev Dr Colin B Archer served as
superintendent of the circuit on two
occasions: during the 1975-76 church
year and during the 1985-86 church
year.

Thanks be to Almighty God for His
servants who have laboured faithfully
in the extension of His kingdom on the
island of Andros, sons and daughters
of Methodism whose only business was
to cry "Behold the Lamb!"

Rev J Barrett Brindley served the
circuit from 1902-1908; Rev James W
Dinsdale 1909-1910 and Rev John Park
Jackson 1910-1914. These were pre-
ceded and followed by many others,
some we name here: Revs Whitefield,
Charles Curry and William
Makepeace, Eric M Walker. Lay peo-
ple played a vital part in the life of the
Methodist Church on Andros. We
name a few: Shadrack Woodside,
Elisabeth Butler, Pearline Scott,
Beatrice Evans, John Wilson, Terevous
Watkins, John Hedden, Jacob S Rolle,
Sarah Bain, Ezekiel Bain, Virginia
McQueen and Roxanna. We thank

God for those who are still making his-
tory as they continue to labour for
Him.

The Mission of the Andros Circuit

In 1986 the question was raised:
What of the future? And the answer
given: The future of the Methodist
Church on Andros has to be consid-
ered along with economic and social
factors. It is within the framework of
the society that we make our contribu-
tion. Therefore, as we think of the
future, we think of what we can do to
affect conditions on the island. The
mission of the Andros circuit is tied up
with the development of people and
resources.

There are good prospects for the
work of our church. We say this
because of the loyalty and_ the
Christian witness of our people,
because of the presence of enthusiastic
young people in our churches and
because of our abiding faith that God
has a mission for His church in this
place. The emphasis of our circuit as
we look to the future is on our young
people -preparing our youth to be
valuable members of church and socie-
ty. To this end we seek to establish chil-
dren's clubs and youth meetings. A
library which was started in Mastic
Point years ago still continues to pro-
vide a very important service for the
children of the area, Methodist and
non-Methodist alike. The general con-
sensus of the circuit is summed up in
these words: "We are expecting great
things from God."

May God strengthen the Andros cir-
cuit of Methodist Churches that we
may be steadfast in our determination
that we will not lower the flame of
Christian witness held by the
Methodist Church, but will aspire with
all our power, God being our helper, to
keep the flame alight so that we may
prove worthy of our heritage.

We ask the question: Is the flame
fully alight or just flickering in 2009?

(Next time: Part 35 — The Greek Orthodox
Church of the Annunciation)



a:

WN Cm UU creme ene Te

Power Conference in Dallas Texas



- Friday, June 26 eight thousand men
gathered at the world famous Potter's
House for the annual Man Power
Conference hosted by prince of preach-
ers T.D. Jakes. For the past ten years
Bishop Jakes has brought together over
70,000 men at these strategic meetings
to address the unique needs of men and
their challenges in the 21st century. The
Bahamas’ own Dr Myles Munroe wasa_
conference speaker at the event and was | |:
invited for the past four years to “
address the men’s conference. The
theme of this year’s conference was
“Men and Vision and Dreams.”
The Tribune
(Cy FEARLESS

RELIGION

The spiritual lessons I've learnt from

5 popular Michael

1) "BEAT IT" (1983)

Emerging from the Grammy Award
Winning masterpiece, Thriller, the cool
mix of Van Halen’s heavy metal and
Jackson’s easy, albeit electrifying
vocals, made this song an instant hit.
However, as fierce as the song sounds,
there is also a timely lesson to be
learnt, and that my readers is- “Beat It,
just Beat It!’ Simply put, whether you
walk, run, drive or fly, stay away from
trouble; you know, evil, in all it’s forms.
Because at the end of the day, ‘It does-
n’t matter whose wrong or right.’

Romans 13:13-14

2) "BILLIE JEAN" (1983)

Well upon discovering the event, or

TONI
STYLES



alleged one, behind one of MJ’s most
popular songs, it only validated the
life lesson to be learnt. Needless to
say, young persons tend to act consid-
erably faster than they think- but, if
they want to avoid a real life scare,
maybe they should * Beat It’ before
they meet a ‘ Billie Jean’.

Matthew 26:41

Jackson songs

3) "WE ARE THE WORLD" (1935)

While we strive to do what is right
in every aspect of our lives, we ought
to realise that even as individuals, we
are in this reality, this world- together,
and maybe well intended actions are
great, but true love for one another
lasts longer.

1 Corinthians 13

4) "MAN IN THE MIRROR" (1923)

Self-evaluation! Are there really,
any, fitting words to elaborate on the
importance of such a crucial assess-
ment we all need to embrace? Yes and
no. It’s just so personal, so honest and
so necessary. So draw your finest
breath, as you gaze at the maze in your

Thursday, July 2, 2009 ® PG 23

reflection, and as you release, allow the
impurities to both solve and dissolve.
1 John 2:15-17

5) "BLACK OR WHITE" (1991)

Lastly, I have heard and read
numerous tributes for the ‘King of
Pop’, a title given to Jackson by friend
and actress Elizabeth Taylor. And
although his closest friends and indus-
try associates, all have their special,
personal memories of the man behind
the icon, many tend to agree with the
millions of fans worldwide, who give
Jackson credit for his successful and
genuine fusion of black and white cul-
ture for a generation, particularly with
the release of, ‘ Black or White’- a
song that to this day never fails to
unite all people; when many a prob-
lem seeks to sever such a connection.

In closing, I will remember above
all else Mr Jackson’s incredible pas-
sion for life, his ability to be truly
present, and undeniably himself.

Luke 10:27

R.I.P - Michael Jackson, Farrah
Fawcett , Fatback & Rodger (a pet).
God bless the families.



Where are we going?

I BELIEVE that there is nothing
worse than a grown man who is in a
good frame of mind; but yet doesn’t
know where he’s going in life. Or, have
you ever seen a family that is working
well together as a unit and soon after
the parents die, the family falls apart;
the house, the car, the yard and every-
thing else goes to the dumps. Then this
is what can often be heard from per-
sons in the community: “Boy, if Mr and
Mrs John Doe were alive this place
would have never looked like this”

Here’s what is being said in the above
statement even though it’s not being
heard: “the children of Mr and Mrs
John Doe are very irresponsible and
immature.”

Now, I know that just about everyone
of us knows a family or two that may
fallin the category of Mr and Mrs John
Doe’s family; or maybe that’s your fam-
ily, but P’'ve got good news for you; all is
not lost, as long as there is life there is
hope. The road to success in life for the
grown man who doesn’t know where
he’s going and the John Doe type fami-
ly has not nor will it ever catch Father
Yahweh off guard or by surprise; for
He’s the Alpha and Omega, the all
knowing God.

As long as we’re here on earth, God
will always put people in our path to
give a word of wisdom and direction;
now whether we receive it is another
story. The refusal of such wisdom and
direction could result in a person expe-
riencing Hell on earth.

As a nation the Bahamas is about to




PASTOR

celebrate its 36th Independence on July
10. Yet

based upon the way things are today
in this country, the only logical question
is “Where are we going, and what are
our plans to get there?”

The passing of a great Bahamian (Fat
Back Marshall), and others is truly sad
news; but the saddest news of all is to
hear the present prime minister,
Hubert Ingraham say that he’s going to
offer himself for the position of prime
minister the next time around. Then, to
add insult to injury, the leader of the
opposition Perry Christie has also fas-
ten his seat belt.

Something is seriously wrong with us
as a people when we’ve got to settle for
the one dimensional leadership of Old
Sitting Bull and the Rock of Gibraltar;
it’s obvious that personal desire for
power has blinded the eyes of these two
great men, and they’re not looking at a
futuristic Bahamas that will empower
Bahamians. It’s all about the GUN /
POWER who has it? The Rabbit or
The Farmer; and as a result the nation
has to go through the wilderness expe-
rience for another four to eight years.

If there is ever a time that the word

worthless or “wutless” hits home that
time is now; I do believe that Prime
Minister Ingraham is a very good
leader and so is Mr Christie; but their
political power plays has placed them
in the category of failures for not
preparing successors.

Watch this! As a man, a real man
with leadership potentials and aspira-
tions, I could not be a member of par-
liament today and seeing the direction
in which this country is heading, and
the deterioration of the state of affairs
of our citizens and infrastructure; and
not make known my intentions to chal-
lenge the present leader’s seats of both
FNM and PLP.

I must give props to Mr Ingraham
and Mr Christie for methodically tak-
ing away whatever kind of fire and
desire the (children) other members of
parliament may have had to become
the next prime minister.

Sir Lynden did his twenty five; and it
seems as if his two political sons have
concluded to share the next twenty five
between themselves 10-15 or 15-10
whatever; and God help the person
who tries to disrupt their plans. The
prime minister made his and Perry
Christie’s secret decisions, public when
he indicated his return for a third term
to beat the PLP.

This was done just to stoke the fire of
the silly grassroots, political junkies
who ignorantly think that Mr Ingraham
and Mr Christie are arch-enemies;
nothing could be further from the truth.
From a natural perspective my only

question to you two political genius is
this: ‘As a nation, where are we going?”

I have accepted the fact that there is
no other minister or minister of state
with the testosterone to stand up and
seek to bring about visionary leader-
ship for a Bahamas of tomorrow. But
rest assured Mr Farmer and Mr Rabbit,
the gun / power will be taken from your
hands in such an embarrassing manner
if you don’t gracefully bow out.

As it is in the natural, so is it in the
spiritual; the religious leaders are just
as guilty for the mess that this nation
find it’s self in.

The older church leaders today have
done such a hatchet job with their erro-
neous

religious ways and financially raping
the people; to the point that 95 per cent
of the younger church leaders have
broken away and started their own
ministries in order to get wealth. The
proper exchange and affirmation of
sons by fathers have not taken place;
therefore the thousands of divided
small churches will never reach their
full potential due to the spirit of strife
and competition. As soon as these reli-
gious fools can stop being immature
and put down their petty differences,
come together as a unit; the politicians
will have a true body (not the religious
Sanhedrin /Christian Council) that they
can go to for Godly advice as to which
direction the country should be
taking.

¢ E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or
Ph.225-3850 or 1-242-441-2021
Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen
Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int’!
PG 24 @ Thursday, July 2, 2009

RELIGION

The Tribune

CAT ISLANDERS CELEBRAT
ANOTHER PATRONAL FESTIVAL

ANGLICANS marked the feast day
of St Peter’s in Knowles, Cat Island by
turning out in droves to ‘welcome new
Diocesan Bishop Laish Zane Boyd.
This was his first time he visited the
island as Diocesan Bishop.

During his visit, Bishop Boyd met
with the congregation of St Mary’s in
Old Bight to assure them of his con-
tinued support in their efforts to
restore St Mary the Virgin.

On Sunday morning Bishop Boyd
celebrated and preached in the quaint
settlement of Orange Creek in the
parish church of St. Agnes.

For the patronal festival, Bishop
Boyd took his text from John’s Gospel
Chapter 21 vs. 15-19 in which Jesus
admonishes Simon Peter to feed his
sheep. He reminded the congregation
that the whole Eucharist celebration is
an act of feeding. Bishop Boyd told
them that it is not only the priest or
bishop responsibility to feed the mass-
es but also the task of the laity
(laypersons/persons sitting in the
pews). He commented that everyone
wants to be fed sumptuously when
they are invited for dinner or a social
gathering but feeding the physical
man’s need is not enough. He said
there is also a spiritual need that
needs to be met and satisfied. And
only after these two needs are met
will Christians reach the realms of St

eee len y
= 4

on
we

Procession by members

Peter’s and St. Paul’s.

During the service Eulie LaFleur
from Christ the King, Ridgeland Park,
Nassau presented Fr Chester Burton
with a brand new funeral pall (used to
drape coffins during the funeral mass)
given in memory of her dear departed

The Assignment

FROM page 20

God. On the Assignment soundtrack
she has one track titled I Just Want You
Jesus.

“It’s a song of satisfaction in that I am
satisfied with Christ, but it is also about
desperation. Meaning now that [ve
found Christ, it’s all I want, and I’m
going to pursue and give my all to know
him more. This song is really about get-
ting to a place where you really don’t
pursue anything but God, and anything
that gets in the way must be released.”

As artist, her greatest hope is to share
the glory and love of God, and with so
many unable to find that love, she hopes
her music will help point them in the
right direction.

Universal Soldiers of Christ (USC),
members 15-year-old Deando Whitfield
and EJ ‘Merchandise’ Johnson say about
two years ago they were approached by
gospel artist Najie Dunn to join him in

studio to further develop their talents.

From there they started writing more
lyrics which at first were non-Christian,
but eventually decided that their greater
calling was to minister through gospel-
rap.

In a world where so many are influ-
enced negatively by the lyrics inside pop-
ular music, they felt they could use those
same beats to minister a different mes-
sage.

“It’s very effective, especially coming
from young people like us going to peo-
ple both young and old in the communi-
ty, our rap speaks to everyone.

“Through our lyrics we try to prevent
crime, we try to change the minds of the
youth, many of whom grow up in the
ghetto not knowing the difference
between right from wrong.”

Having two tracks featured on the
Appointment compilation CD, USC
said the first song Just Praise God incor-
porates the instrumental of Lil Wayne’s
song Get Off The Corner.



mother and father.

At the culmination of the
Eucharistic celebration the members
processed singing some of the ancient
hymns of the church to the summit of
Mount St Peter’s to the home of Eloise
Drusilla Seymour for refreshments.

“This song says no matter what you
do, whatever comes your way, any trial
or tribulation we must always praise
God because it’s going to be a brighter
day.”

The second song which features DJ
Counsellor is called Overcome, and is
about overcoming the things that pre-
vent people from getting closer to Christ.

Also on the album is 21-year-old Ryan
Jupp, who recently performed with the
artist Heavy Metal in his debut concert
last month.

First appearing on the local music
scene last October with the release of his
hit single Inside Crying, which helped
him to win BFMs talent jam, Ryan said
he has no plans of slowing down as he
intends to pursue music as a main career.

“This is what I will be doing for a liv-
ing, in no less than four years God has
promised and made provisions for me to
move and do this full time.”

His songs Do Your Thing and
Opportunity, both help in sharing the
story of Christ and his purpose for each
of us.

Ryan said as a young man coming
from a place of being lost in the world



TRUM UM) CEST Mel L

and then being found by God, helping
others to see the beauty and reward of
Christ has become his life’s mission.

Last but not least is Jakewood
Ferguson also known as Lyrically Bless,
who has been on the scene as a gospel
artist for a number of years.

He said his ultimate message to the
youth is to take control of their lives
rather than just having it pass them by.

“Everyday I see youth who are not on
that positive run, they’re just basically
sluggish and tend to forget who keeps
them alive. My approach is to try and
find a stronger way to pull them in, and I
want to use music as a positive way of
reaching them.”

With one song on the Assignment
soundtrack with Ryan, Jakewood said he
is looking toward to the two of them
producing a future project to share the
word of God through rap.

“A lot of secular artist out there push
so hard for the things they want, and we
want to push even harder for something
greater than fame of fortune, it’s for the
love of God.”

The Assignment soundtrack is now
available at BFM on Carmichael Road.



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PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Mother of three found guilty of manslaughter C M Y K C M Y K WEATHER SUNSHINE, T-STORM HIGH 90F LOW 79F By NATARIO McKENZIE T ribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net MOTHER-OF-THREE Shimeakima Delores Pratt broke down sobbing in court last night after she was found guilty of the manslaughter of Defence Force officer Gary Leon Carey Sr. The 12-member jury deliberated for several hours yesterday and returned with a eight to four not guilty verdict on the murder charge, but a unanimous guilty verdict on the manslaughter charge. Pratt’s lawyer, Romona Far quharson, told The Tribune that her client did not take the ver dict well, and “completely broke down sobbing.” Pratt, 30, was Mr Carey’s girlfriend for eight-and-a-half years. The 54-year-old Royal Bahamas Defence Force officer was found stabbed to death in Pratt’s Minnis Subdivision apartment off Carmichael Road on Sunday, August 17, 2008. She denied murdering him. During closing submissions in the murder trial yesterday, lead prosecutor and Deputy Director of Public Prosecutions Cheryl Grant-Bethel told the jury that Pratt was a liar and stage man ager. She said the prosecution has established a clear circumstantial case to show that Pratt had had intended to kill Mr Carey. Mrs Bethel said Pratt had sim V erdict returned over stabbing death of Defence Force officer The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR BBQ CHIPOTLE SNACK WRAP www.tribune242.com Shimeakima Delores Pratt SEE page 13 MAN CHAR GED WITH F ORCIBLE DETENTION AND RAPE By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net A 48-YEAR-OLDGambier Village man charged with the forcible detention and rape of an 18-year-old woman was arraigned in a magistrates court yesterday afternoon. It is alleged that Lincoln Poitier, forcibly detained the teenager between Wednesday, June 17, and Friday, June 19. It is further alleged that during that time, Poitier raped her. Poitier, who was brought to the courtroom shackled, bare footed and visibly in pain, was not represented by an attorney. The accused, who had a bruise under his right eye, winced noticeably as he asked to stand in the dock while the SEE page 13 LINCOLN POITIER outside of court yesterday. C ONVICTED murderer Jamal Glinton received the death sentence yesterday for the murder of businessman Keith Carey. Prosecutors had sought t he death penalty for G linton who they claimed shot Mr Carey, 43, twice on the steps of the Banko f the Bahamas, Tonique Williams Darling Highway, on February 27, 2 006. M r Carey had been attempting to deposit $40,000 belonging to the E sso Service Station which he operated. Glinton, alias ‘Bumper’, was unanimously found g uilty of his murder and armed robbery on April 9. G linton had been charged along with Dwight Knowles andS ean Brown who were unanimously convicted of robbery and conspiracy to commit robbery. J ustice Jon Isaacs had directed the jury not to consider the charge of m urder against Knowles and Brown. Knowles was given an 11-year sentencea nd Brown received a 10Death sentence for murder of businessman By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net FURIOUS residents are planning to sue the Government for failing to get a local bishop to remove his dead wife’s body from a mausoleum near their homes. In March, some members of the Garden Hills community were up in arms after Bishop Stanley Seymour of the Evan gelistic Pentecostal Church created a purpose-built mausoleum in the grounds of his church to house his wife’s remains. Police were called to her funeral service on March 21 when it was claimed that Bish op Seymour did not have approval to go ahead with the burial. After delaying the service for a week in order to obtain approval from the Depart ment of Physical Planning, the woman was laid to rest. Plan to sue over bishop’ s dead wife in mausoleum SEE page 14 A HEATED battle is brew ing in the Bahamas Utilities Service and Allied Workers Union as the president has allegedly attempted to repri mand a union member for voicing his concerns in The Tribune . In the June 11, 2009, edition of The Tribune Delgardo Forbes, a former candidate for president of the BUSAWU was quoted advising union members they were under no obligation to give in to Presi dent Carmen Kemp’s threats of action being taken against them if they did not support the industrial actions being taken by the union. At that time, the BUSAWU were protesting the comments made by Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, who said that there would be no acrossthe-board salary increases at the Water and Sewerage Corporation. Mr Forbes, along with those who opposed the ideals of the current union executive, claim that while they support the union 100 per cent, the cur Union president allegedly attempts to reprimand member over comments in The Tribune SEE page 13 I N S I D E CLASSIFIEDSTRADER I N S I D E OBITUARIES and RELIGION INTODAY’STRIBUNE JOBSAND HELPWANTED L L O O A A D D S S O O F F V olume: 105 No.182THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 SEE page 14 Olympic Day and Papafest with the puppies SEEPAGES 21, 24, 25

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By LINDSAY THOMPSON WITH the theme ‘towards a common loftier goal’, the Bahamas is celebrating 36 years of Independence. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham is urging Bahamians to celebrate the day “in a spirit of pride and gratitude,” despite being in the midst of global and protracted economic crisis. Many activities to commemo rate that historic event on July 10, 1973 have been planned. “In the spirit of unity, let us pursue the loftier goal of peace and goodwill,” said Governor General Arthur Hanna in his Indepen dence Day message. Since July 10, 1973, he said, the goal of successive governments and society at large has been the advancement of social and economic equity for all Bahamians. “Over the years much has been accomplished and going forward there will be greater accomplishments as we work together towards the realisation of this lofty goal,” the Governor General said. “We remain one people, patriotic Bahamians, standing proud and tall.” The Independence celebrations include a showcase of heritage and culture, story-telling and singing, all reflective of the country’s his tory. “This Independence we are cog nisant that the Bahamas, like the rest of the world, is experiencing a recession,” he said. “But we have hope, and shall with God’s help successfully weather this economic storm.” Prime Minister Hubert Ingra ham said: “Our economy has been hard hit, especially the hospitality sector which is the principal engine of our economy, resulting in the lay-offs of many Bahamian workers with consequent hardship for their families and for the whole community.” However, he urged Bahamians to still celebrate the sacrifices and resourcefulness of their ancestors and the hard-won achievements in more recent times. “It is through their struggles, resilience and spirit of self-reliance that we have arrived at where we are today, that we have become a proud nation with our heads held high in the community of nations, having achieved a distinct cultural identity, a stable parliamentary democracy, and a large measure of prosperity,” Mr Ingraham said. Independence activities include: Friday, July 3 – National Pride Day and E Clement Bethel National Arts Festival and Cul tural Show, Rawson Square, 9am to 9pm. Saturday, July 4 – Independence Beat Retreat, Rawson Square, 6pm to 7.30pm. Sunday, July 5 – Ecumenical Church Service, Bahamas Faith Ministries, Carmichael Road, 3pm. Thursday, July 9 – Clifford Park Celebrations – Cultural show, inspection, prayers, flag raising ceremony, and fireworks, 8pm to 12.30am. Friday, July 10 – The People’s Rush, Rawson Square to Arawak Cay, 1am to 9am. Saturday, July 11 and Sunday, July 12 – National Fun Walk. Starting points: Windsor Park, Golden Gates, Montagu Beach, Goodman’s Bay to Clifford Park, 6am. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE IMPORTANTStarbucks Barista Blade GrinderSAFETY RECALL 2009 Starbucks Coffee Company. All rights reserved. S tarbucks Coffee Company is voluntarily recalling its Starbucks B arista Blade Grinder due to a p otential safety hazard if the operating and cleaning instructions arent followed. When emptying the g round coffee there is a risk that the grinder blade could continue to spin a fter the machine isturned off. If you purchased a Starbucks Barista Blade Grinder (sold between March 2002 and March 2009), please return your grinder to any Starbucks Coffee Bahamas store to receive a store credit. P lease visit Starbucks.com for more information on this product recall.At Starbucks your safety is important to us. We apologize for any inconvenience this voluntary recall may cause. Call for unity as Bahamas celebrates Independence NEWLY-CROWNED Miss Bahamas Universe Kiara Sherman (right to Bay Street yesterday, along with 2005 Miss USA Chelsea Cooley, to receive gifts to mark her victory. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f Gifts for Miss Bahamas Universe A BOVE: I nga Bowleg, director of business development for the John Bull group of companies, shows Miss Bahamas Universe Kiara S herman her gifts yesterday from David Yurman and Tous. LEFT: Ineisy Rodgers, sales assistant, places a Tous pieceo n Miss Bahamas Universe Kiara Sherman yesterday. Felip Major /Tribune staff

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 3 Harl Taylor murder trials et to start this morning In brief By ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net The frustrated family of a young man found to h ave died of a bullet wound to the head after he was first thought to have been killed in a police chase car crash say officers still have not given them any insight into when or why he was shot on that night. Kristoff Cooper, 22, was killed almost two months a go on the morning of Sunday, May 3 after the car that he and his brother Caleb were travelling in crashed through a wall on the corner of Robinson Road and East Street. T he pair had been chased by the police and family members were initially led to believe that Kristoff died as a result of the injuries he received when he was flung from the car on impact. However, an autopsy subsequently revealed a b ullet wound to the head was the actual cause of death. Caleb, 25, who survived but suffered major injuries, said he did not recall any gun shots before t he car crashed. Once ejected from the vehicle, he suffered concussion and cannot recall what happened. Having met with the commissioner of police in mid-May, the family said that Reginald Ferguson told them that he cannot not explain the bullet w ound until he sees a police report. When contacted about the matter on June 7, the commissioner said he still does not have the report and investigations into the matter are continuing. T he following story in T he Tribune s parked commentary on the matter in parliament when PLP chairman Glenys Hanna-Martin said it represented yet another episode – in addition to the hanging death of 15 year-old Michael Knowles in a police cell that warranted the creation of an independent body to investigate matters involving police officers. Yesterday Phil Cooper, the victim’s father, said he a greed with this sentiment, telling T he Tribune t hat almost two months after Kristoff’s death, no further light has been shed on how it happened. “We are still here wondering when are they going to come to us and say what’s going on. I feel like they just don’t want to apologise to say that they are wrong,” said Mr Cooper. Attempts to reach Commissioner Ferguson yesterday were unsuccessful. Grieving family asks police: why was Kristoff Cooper shot? F RUSTRATIONOVERBULLETWOUNDDEATHMYSTERY B y MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net THE excavation of limestone rock and the dumping of waste i n its place has met with approval from Golden Isles MP Charles Maynard despite the outcry from h is constituents. Mr Maynard maintains that digging eight feet down to the water table and filling the result ant hole with bio-degradable w aste on Crown Land farmland is a legitimate agricultural tech nique, one which he is not able to prevent. However, Minister of Agriculture and Marine Resources Larry C artwright said the practice can only be done for agricultural reasons by leaseholders with a license to excavate. And farmer/contractor Cardi nal Newman, responsible for thee xcavation of more than two acres of Crown Land north of Cowpen Road and south of Mil lars Heights, told The Tribune he had no license, but was given verbal permission to excavate by physical planning officials. R esidents of Millars Heights are concerned the practice will contaminate the water table and put the health of thousands at risk. Mr Maynard said he saw a refrigerator, stoves, beds and mat-t resses dumped in the quarry when he visited the site around six months ago, but on his latest official visit to the site, the oper ation appeared to have been cleaned up. He said: “It was a cause for c oncern in the community, but if you look at the land now it gives y ou the impression that it’s a legitimate operation. You can’t grow things on rock, so you dig down to the water table and replace it with soil, so the water can feed thep lants. Bio-degradable stuff is not going to hurt the soil or the water table. It’s an accepted farming technique – they don’t need per mission.” M r Maynard maintains his constituents’ discomfort stems from r esidential areas bordering on industrial zones, and he assured t he community that he will closely supervise the site to prevent i ndiscriminate dumping. Millars Heights resident Jeanne Lundy maintains the farmer leasing an adjacent plot is successfully growing bananas and peas w ithout ever having excavated the land. And a source in the D epartment of Environmental Health told The Tribune that Mr N ewman sells fill to the departm ent for the sanitary landfill in H arrold Road, and those dumping waste in the quarry are con-t racted by government to clean u p New Providence. As trucks were lining up to collect quarry from the site yesterd ay, Ms Lundy said: “Something needs to be done to protect theh ealth and welfare of the people, b ecause if they contaminate the water table they are putting our health at risk. And it is our only a ccess to water in this area. “This man is digging govern ment land and selling it back to the government on a verbal approval. And the government is u sing taxpayers’ money to pay for fill they already own.” The Ministry of Agriculture a nd Marine Resources maintains the operation of heavy duty equipment, removal of soil, rock,q uarry, fill or sand from Crown Land designated for agriculture is absolutely prohibited. As isd umping refuse of any kind. Although the minister said excavation for agricultural reasons is common in the FamilyI slands, it can only be done with a license from the government. And it is not a technique recom-m ended by his department. Mr Cartwright said: “A lot of l and in Cowpen has been excavated and a lot of it is agricultural land, but before you can exca-v ate on Crown Land you need to have a lease from the government and a permit to excavate. If you do not have a lease or a permit and are excavating on the land illegally there’s a penalty fort hat. Verbal permission is definitely not enough.” Limestone rock excavation and waste dumping a ‘legitimate’ operation, says MP T HE trial of the man accused o f the murder of internationally k nown handbag designer Harl Taylor is scheduled to begin this m orning. The case was expected to b egin yesterday at 2pm, however, Senior Justice Anita Allenw as still engaged in the trial of S himeakima Pratt, 30, who was l ast night found guilty of the m anslaughter of Gary Leon Carey, 54. Troyniko McNeil, 2 2, is charged in Mr Taylor’s murder. It is alleged that M cNeil caused the designer’s death between Saturday,N ovember 17 and Sunday, November 18, 2007. He has p leaded not guilty to the murder charge and is being represented by attorney Murrio Ducille. Mr Taylor, 37, was found stabbed to death at Mountbat t en House on West Hill Street, two days after Dr Thaddeus M cDonald, 59, a senior academ ic at the College of the B ahamas, was found blud geoned to death, apparently with a clothing iron, in his nearby Queen Street guest house. To date, no charges have b een filed in relation to Dr McDonald’s murder. The trial i nto Mr Taylor’s death will be heard before Senior Supreme C ourt Justice Allen. Prosecutors are expected to call some 25 witnesses during the trial. Felip Major /Tribune staff TROYNIKO MCNEIL, who is charged with Harl Taylor’s murder, is shown at court yesterday. BY DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT A 31-year-old man who is accused of murderi ng a 59-year-old Haitian man at Garden Villas was arraigned in t he Freeport Magistrates Court yesterday. Orman Osrick Dean appeared in Court Three beforeA cting Deputy Chief Magistrate Helen Jones. He was not repre s ented by counsel. Dean was charged with the m urder of Jean Maquez Noel. It is alleged that on June 27, at Freeport, Grand Bahama, the accused unlawfully and intentionally caused the death of Mr Noel. Magistrate Jones informed Dean that he was not required to enter a plea to the charge. She remanded Dean to Fox Hill Prison until October 6 when a preliminary inquiry will be held to determine whether there is sufficient evidence for him to stand trial in the Supreme Court for murder. In other court news, Jermaine Duncombe, 27, was charged in Court Three with assaulting his girlfriend, causing her harm, and making threats of harm against her. It is alleged that on June 22, the accused intentionally and unlawfully assaulted Michelle Deveaux. He pleaded not guilty to the charge. Asked about his relationship to the complainant, Duncombe told the magistrate that Ms Deveaux was his girlfriend. He said they lived together at the time. Magistrate Jones adjourned the matter to March 29, 2010 for trial. She granted Duncombe $500 bail with one surety. She also warned that he is not to have contact with Ms Deveaux or his bail would be revoked and he would be remanded to prison. Duncombe also pleaded not guilty to causing harm and threatening to harm Ms Deveaux. The magistrate adjourned the matters to March 29, 2010. She granted the accused $1,000 bail with one surety. Man ar raigned on mur der char ge Charles Maynard CARICOM is embarking on a busy period of t rade negotiations as the region prepares to implement already signed trade agreements while at the s ame time embark on negotiations for new agreements with a number of states. T his period of intense work will also pose some challenges in light of the work to be done to inte grate the Regional Negotiating Machinery (RNM into the CARICOM Secretariat, according to chair man of the CARICOM Prime Ministerial Sub Committee on External Negotiations, Prime Minister of Jamaica Bruce Golding. Speaking at the CARICOM Secretariat yesterday at a meeting of the sub-committee, Prime Minister Golding highlighted some of the trade issues which would engage the region. These include: The programme for the implementation of the E conomic Partnership Agreement (EPA last October between the Caribbean Forum of A frican Caribbean and Pacific States (CARIFORUM) and the European Union Upcoming negotiations with Canada and the Dominican Republic and the plan to complete the Doha Round at the level of the World Trade Organisation (WTO Mr Golding said the discussions with the Dominican Republic now need to be considered in line with the request of that country for membership of CARICOM. He added that the Copenhagen negotiations on a new global climate change agreement would also engage the attention of the Prime Ministerial Sub Committee. Packed external negotiations agenda for the region

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EDITOR, The Tribune. T his past weekend was a full moon which probably explains much of the content from cer tain people. The union leaders proposed t hat in any future senate the unions must be guaranteed an automatic senate seat. O kay we will discriminate against every organisation that has a larger membership than the collective count of the union. As the unions do not by a large percentage represent the majority of those working, government discriminates against those not members of a union and never listen to or even ask for their opinion, butt he non-union employee is by far the majority of the working force, never heard and simply ignored. Union recognition should o nly be as long as their col lective agreement stands six-months prior to the expiryo f the collective agreement all unions should be required to revert to their membership and employees of the businesses to see if the unions are still their choice for representation. It is absolutely ridiculous that once recognition is achieved that is till death do us come. Numbers do you really think any government willm ake them legal? Far, far too much money flows here and there and the numbers boys will guarantee at election time to write bigc heques and whether anyone is willing to admit, I really take an alleged statement of onel eader in the numbers business that he offered to pay 35 per cent of his sales as that would be less than what he pays-out for silence and pro tection today in that he talked a mouth full. ABRAHAM MOSS Nassau, June 8, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. I am angry and frustrated b eyond words with the seeming careless unconcern of Bahamian p arents towards their young sons! I have spoken passionately of this issue to friends and family alike for years and now feel the time has come to speak of it to a wider audience. Why do we continue to neglect our young boys and then wonder why they get “sucked in” by the streets, fall into criminal a ctivity, exhibit irresponsible behaviour and become more or less unfit persons? God have mercy on us, but we will not be blameless before Him! I used to volunteer to spend n ights at a home for young women and on numerous occas ions travelling there around 11 o’clock at night, used to see very y oung boys roaming the streets. This grieved me greatly because these young boys were not being attended to but allowed to basically do whatever they wanted. Most of us know the passages from the Bible that read: “Foolishness is bound up in the heart of a child but the rod of correction drives it away,” and “The rod and r eproof bring wisdom but a child left to himself brings his mother shame.” From roaming the streets these young boys could easily start entering people’s yards, progressing from there to breaking into cars, homes, etc. From there it is not a long stretch to drinking, using drugs and carrying loaded weapons with the intent to use them. How can we justify training and teaching our young girls but leaving our young boys to bring up themselves? For shame! The Lord Himself says that if we leave children to themselves, they will only perform the foolishness that i s within their hearts. Why do we c ontinue to do it then? Why don’t we give them the same a mount of time and attention that w e give our girls? Why? Why do w e not call it for what it is? Selfi shness and neglect! Sadly, at the e nd of the day, which group suffers the higher mortality rate, incarceration rates, alcoholism and drug addiction rates, disenf ranchisement rates, etc? Yes, you guessed it, our males. Due to some of the debased and low-minded among us, we have had to take great care witho ur young females, watching their friends and keeping them at home for the most part. This is a sad fact. However, we seemed to h ave gotten it into our heads that our young boys do not need to be guarded and watched because no one would rape or molest them. H ow wrong we have been proven! Have we not learnt from the tragic deaths of those young boys in Freeport, who we can a ssume, were brutally violated b efore being unceremoniously d isposed of? W hat about the young boys w ho have been molested in our malls or kidnapped off our s treets? What about the young boys w ho are allowed to wander about by themselves and later turn upd ead? A sk persons in Adelaide about t heir recent loss. How much l onger shall we ignorantly pay the price for our shameful parenting p ractices? Over the weekend we heard of t he deaths of another set of boys: brothers, ages nine and five yearso f age. They were allowed to go out c rabbing by themselves. Would we have allowed girls of nine and five to go wandering about by themselves? Most of us would say “absolutely not!” Why were these t wo boys not accompanied by an older person? When I hear of t hese stories, my insides cringe and the thought comes “oh, not a gain!” It is very easy for parents (and I say parents, not just mothers), to cast off the responsibility for raising their sons with the thought t hat boys don’t need much attention. We have already shown, however, that this viewpoint is a death sentence for many of our young males both now and in the f uture. There is a law on the books of t his country about child neglect which is failure to provide a child with all that is necessary for their health and happiness. Many of our young boys roam the street looking dirty and unkempt. We do not even bother to teach them grooming skills. How then can we blame them, if, as young m en, they come sweaty and unkempt into our presence? There is something stinking here, and it is not our young men! Fathers and mothers, guardians: it is our God-given d uty to train and raise up our children so that they have the knowle dge and skills to become successful and useful members of s ociety. Not only does the Lord require it of us, the law of the land mandates it as well. Let’s watch over our young boys; they are valuable and precious. Let’s stop the one-sided parenting – yes our girls need a ttention, but our boys do as well. Remember, what we put into s omething (sow get out of it (reap attention, love and training into our young boys from the cradle, we will reap the positive rewards. A word to fathers: to the very young and the very old. The Lord never instructed mothers to teach and raise their children. He instructed you as fathers to do so. Do not let anyone take away your right to watch over and raise your children. You may not have had a father when you were growing up who took any interest in you, but that does not mean that you yourself cannot be a good father. Shatter the mould of i ncompetence and apathy! Y ou do not need to conform to that. This generation and the n ext one, will thank you because y ou took the time to show that y ou care. D IONE PRATT (MS Nassau, June 15, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm There is much in the House cap-and-trade e nergy bill that just passed that I absolutely hate. It is too weak in key areas and way tooc omplicated in others. A simple, straightfor ward carbon tax would have made much more s ense than this Rube Goldberg contraption. It is pathetic that we couldn’t do better. It is appalling that so much had to be given away to polluters. It stinks. It’s a mess. I detest it. Now let’s get it passed in the Senate and m ake it law. Why? Because, for all its flaws, this bill is t he first comprehensive attempt by America to mitigate climate change by putting a price on carbon emissions. Rejecting this bill would have been read in the world as America voting against the reality and urgency of climate change a nd would have undermined clean energy initiatives everywhere. M ore important, my gut tells me that if the U.S. government puts a price on carbon, even a w eak one, it will usher in a new mind-set among consumers, investors, farmers, innovators and entrepreneurs that in time will make a big difference much like the first warnings that cigarettes could cause cancer. The morning after t hat warning no one ever looked at smoking the same again. D itto if this bill passes. Henceforth, every investment decision made in America about h ow homes are built, products manufactured or electricity generated will look for the least-cost low-carbon option. And weaving carbon emissions into every business decision will drive innovation and deployment of clean tech n ologies to a whole new level and make energy efficiency much more affordable. That ain’t b eanbag. Now that the bill is heading for the Senate, t hough, we must, ideally, try to improve it, but, at a minimum, guard against diluting it any fur ther. To do that we need the help of the three parties most responsible for how weak the bill already is: the Republican Party, President Barack Obama and We the People. This bill is not weak because its framers, R eps. Henry Waxman and Ed Markey, wanted it this way. “They had to make the compromises they did,” said Dan Becker, director of the Safe Climate Campaign, “because almost everyH ouse Republican voted against the bill and did nothing to try to improve it. So to get it p assed, they needed every coal-state Democrat, and that meant they had to water it down to bring them on board.” What are Republicans thinking? It is not as if t hey put forward a different strategy, like a carbon tax. Does the GOP want to be the party ofs ex scandals and polluters or does it want to be a partner in helping America dominate the n ext great global industry: ET energy technology? How could Republicans become so anti-environment, just when the country is going green? Historically speaking, “Republicans can claim a s much credit for America’s environmental leadership as Democrats,” noted Glenn Prick e tt, senior vice president at Conservation Inter national. “The two greatest environmental presidents in American history were Teddy Roosevelt, who created our national park system, and Richard Nixon, whose administration gave u s the Clean Air Act and the Environmental Protection Agency.” The elder George Bushs igned the 1993 Rio Treaty, to preserve biodiversity. Y es, this bill’s goal of reducing U.S. carbon emissions to 17 percent below 2005 levels by 2020 is nowhere near what science tells us we need to mitigate climate change. But it also contains significant provisions to prevent new b uildings from becoming energy hogs, to make our appliances the most energy efficient in the w orld and to help preserve forests in places like the Amazon. W e need Republicans who believe in fiscal conservatism and conservation joining this leg islation in the Senate. We want a bill that transforms the whole country not one that just threads a political n eedle. I hope they start listening to green Republi c ans like Dick Lugar, George Shultz and Arnold Schwarzenegger. I also hope we will hear more from Obama. Something feels very calculating in how he has approached this bill, as if he doesn’t quite want to get his hands dirty, as if he is ready to twist arms in private, but not so much that if the bill goes down he will get tarnished. That is no way to fight this war. He is going to h ave to mobilize the whole country to pressure the Senate by educating Americans, with speech after speech, about the opportunities and necessities of a serious climate/energy bill.I f he is not ready to risk failure by going all out, failure will be the most likely result. (This article is by THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN c.2009 New York Times News Service) These shameful parenting practices are costing us our sons! LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net US cap-and-trade energy bill Was the full moon to blame for these statements?

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By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net OPPOSITION Senator Allyson Maynard-Gibson took the government to task yesterday for its plans to go ahead with the dredging of Nassau Harbour in spite of the current economic situation. Mrs Maynard-Gibson also q uestioned why renewals of the incentives for cruise lines are scheduled for every six years instead of every three and accused the government of working to the agendas of special interest groups. "Why are we building, in this economy, an automatic six-year concession situation? The FNM c ontinues to make significant grants, not explain to the public, and divert money that could be spent on national development objectives and under the present FNM plans, FNM special intere sts are being guaranteed that their pockets will be lined for six y ears," she charged. She also noted that the harbour dredging – which will facilitate the arrival of more cruise shipp assengers to the Bahamas on the h uge Genesis ships – will provide "a key area of growth to the sector" but argued that there has not been a proper cost-benefit analys is with regard the concessions given to cruise companies in the process. "The (International Monetary F und) IMF has just told us . . . t hat we need to be careful about the incentives that we are giving investors and developers and that includes cruise lines," she said w hile giving her contribution to the debate on a Bill for an Act toA mend the Cruise Ship's Overnighting Incentives Act yest erday. Ms Maynard-Gibson also said Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette ran the risk of being accused of a conflict of interest b y agreeing to sit on the commit tee that deliberated on the pro p osal to move the container port from southwest New Providence t o Arawak Cay. "The harbour dredging, to the benefit of FNM special interests, will result at the western end of Bay Street where the deputy prime minister and other FNM special interests own land, bene fiting from the Woodes Rodgers to Armstrong Street expansion paid for by the Bahamian people," she said. Mrs Maynard-Gibson, leader of opposition business in the Sen ate, also said the impending dredging is not in the best interests of the public because therei s no guarantee that more ships will visit the Bahamas. " In this economic environment, will these ships come to the B ahamas? After we have spent $55 million dredging the harbour will the actually come to the Bahamas? There is no evidence before the Bahamian people thatt hese two ships actually will come to the Bahamas". " We support the dredging, but not now . . . there's a downturn in t he economy and we think that money is not being well-spent by sending it abroad at this time," she said. Ms Maynard-Gibson also a rgued that the concessions given in the Bill will negatively affectl ocal nightclub owners as cruise ships will now only be required t o spend 13 hours in port, down from 18 hours. Under the old law, ships were required to stay in port until 3am and passengers would typically l eave a venue to return to the ship at 1am, said Ms Maynard-Gibson. " The FNM by its ill-considered concessions is depriving Bahami a n entrepreneurs of the opportunity to benefit from those three hours," she said. The Bill was passed in the Sen ate yesterday. The Senate adjourned until July 16. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 5 Government under fire over Nassau Harbour dredging plans DEPUTY Prime Minister Brent Symonette challenged the freemasons and other local fra-t ernities to serve as a channel through which the government can impact the lives of Bahamians. A s an autonomous entity, he said, the masons can also take the lead, formulate plans, and proposition government collectively, to benefit national pur-p oses. Speaking at the official opening of the M ost Worshipful Prince Hall Grand Lodge on June 29, Mr Symonettet old those gathered: “I must impress upon you that y ou being o rganised as y ou are, could ably assist gove rnment initiatives and social p rogrammes. “Through the methods which b ind you as a cohesive body of people, united to improve b rotherly and sisterly love, you are already equipped to speakw ith one voice.” You could serve as a conduit t o the government on national i ssues. Once you establish your collective force, the government w ould be obliged to at least consider our collective position,” M r Symonette said. “It must always be your goal t o improve on this living cooperatively experience to e nhance financial benefits for each other.” Prince Hall (Bahamas reached the top rung of The Bahamas Masonic status on J une 13, 2006 when the “amity visitation agreements were s igned between Prince Hall affiliation Masons and the Engl ish, Irish and Scottish Constitu tion Masons, attaining world recognition, Mr Symonette said. Having reached such historic status, “can you afford to sit by a nd be contented with a meagre effort in maintaining your lofty s tatus built by your forefathers? “It is your duty to thank them ( forefathers) continuously for their broad shoulders on which you now stand.” DPM challenges freemasons toh elp out with nation building In brief O PPOSITION S ENATOR A LLYSON M AYNARD G IBSONLASHESOUT ALLYSON MAYNARD-GIBSON BRENT SYMONETTE We support the dredging, but not now ... there’s ad ownturn in the e conomy and we think that money i s not being wells pent by sending it abroad at this time.”

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THE Bahamas Reef Envi r onment Educational Foundation has received a $50,000 donation from the Nassau o ffice of the Swiss private bank Lombard Odier for support the “A Return of the Drumbeat” fundraiser. T he event, to be held on November 28, aims to raise funds which are vital toB REEF’s efforts to protect the Bahamian marine environ ment. B REEF was founded in 1993 by the late Sir Nicholas Nut t all to address growing threats to our marine resources, and is now a leader in educating B ahamians and visitors about its diverse and essential marine ecosystem of the Bahamas. T he organisation also works to build government and pub lic support for marine envir onmental protection. BREEF has held 10 inten sive marine conservation t eacher training workshops, which have provided insight to more than 260 Bahamian edu-c ators, allowing them to be ambassadors for the Bahamas’ seas, and train the next generation of environmental stew-a rds. BREEF played an instru mental role in the establish m ent of a Nassau grouper closed season to protect the spawning stocks of this important fish and has long been an advocate for the establishment of a network of Marine Protected Areas in the Bahamas. The fundraiser promises to take guests back to an “ole Nassau town” of the 1950s and 60s, with musical performances and other entertainment from that era relived for one night only. Performers will include Peanuts Taylor and many oth er esteemed Bahamian entertainers. The notion behind the theme of the evening is to take attendees back in time to when the waters of the Bahamas were full of marine life and clear as crystal. The donation by Lombard Odier is part of both its commitment to support worthwhile endeavours in the Bahamas, and its global commitment to e nvironmental organisations around the world. “Lombard Odier is very p roud to contribute towards raising the awareness about our precious and fragile environment. Endangering our nat ural resources is endangering our economy. Without our beautiful waters, the Bahamian economy would be very bleak and we must respect that,” said Christian Coquoz, managing director of the Nassau office. “In celebration of our 30th anniversary in Nassau, we would like to demonstrate our support and commitment to the Bahamas,” said Mr Coquoz. Lombard Odier has been an active advocate of sustainable energy and tackling long term environmental challenges. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE By BAHAMAS INFORMATION SERVICES P RIME Minister Hubert Ingraham o n Tuesday unveiled architectural drawings for the proposed multi-million dollar straw market and for the new Supreme Court complex on Bank Lane. Renovation and extension to the Supreme Court building should commence within this fiscal period, which started July 1. More than $4 million have been earmarked for this project. During the 2009/10 budget debate in parliament, Minister of Public Works and Transport Neko Grant sharedp lans for the new straw market to be built on the old site. The old straw market was destroyed by fire in September 2001. I n December 2008, a contract was awarded to Patrick Rahming to execute the duties of project architect for the d esign of the Bay Street Straw Market. “The architectural design of the b uilding has been completed,” Mr Grant told the House of Assembly. “The new straw market is not to e xceed $10 million in construction cost, a portion of which has been allocated in the new budget.” A tendering process is expected to be completed by August 2009 and construction of the new market is expected to commence at the end of September. T he market is to be completed over a 1 6 to 18 month period. “This project along with other ongoi ng projects in the downtown area such a s works at the Nassau Harbour, the P rince George Wharf, Woodes Rodgers Walk and the repaving of Bay Street will all contribute to the enhancement of our tourism product,” Mr Grant said during the budget debate. PM reveals designs for straw market, Supreme Court complex $50,000 donated to BREEF fundraiser P RIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham shows off architectural drawings for a new straw market for downtown Nassau in parliament on Tuesday. PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham displays architectural drawings for a new Supreme Court complex for Bank Lane. BREEF is now a leader in educating B ahamians and visitors about its diverse and essential marine ecosystem of the Bahamas. JUSTICE STANLEY JOHN (left Justice of the Court of Appeal by the Governor General Arthur H anna at Government House. JUSTICE SWORN IN

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By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net POLITICAL hopeful Paul Moss condemned government for its "callous" restructuring of the civil service and argued that it will have a negative effect on the economy. His comments came in response to an announcement from the National Insurance Board (NIB that four bosses at the board were made redundant. According to NIB Director Algernon Cargill, the decision was made as the board aims to address "deficiencies identified by several internal and external operational assessments". B ut Mr Moss, an attorney and financial services advisor, criticised the government as unsympathetic for making these and other posts redundant during a recession, as some of those affected could have years of outstanding debts to pay. "Over the past year and a half, t he government has systematically been 'restructuring' the civil service and by doing so they have devastated families and destroyed lives. Many still have years left on their mortgages with children in school and it is catastrophic to be summarily dismissed without careful planning. No caring governm ent does this to its people knowing that they will join the unemployment line in a time when unemployment is expected to increase," he said in a statement released yesterday. Senior Deputy Director Antho ny Curtis, Deputy Director of Spe cial Projects Cecile Bethel, DeputyD irector of Information Technology Andre Bethel and Assistant Director of Buildings Melincianna Bethel were told their fate on Monday. A fifth position – Deputy Direc tor of the Family Islands – is alsoon its way out The Tribune under stands, but this has not been con-f irmed. Mr Cargill said the restructuring will "strategically position" NIB for the future and streamline oper ational efficiency in terms of con tribution collections and expense management while improving cus tomer service levels. But Mr Moss questioned if the r edundancies were part of an eco nomic coping mechanism on partof government as it struggles with a ballooning deficit and shrinking revenues. “Could it be that the government is not being honest and telling us the truth that the economy has tanked and they cannot a fford to make payroll? It must be the most callous act by this government so far. This is so, particularly when the government has not been proactive to ensure that there is a mandatory pension plan for these people to fall on," said Mr Moss, adding that he has not seen this practice anywhere else in the region. Government recently restructured the ranks of the Royal Bahamas Police Force and the Customs and Immigration Departments to mixed reviews. While some argued that the moves may have been political, some in the private sector applauded the government for the decision, saying that it will prove crucial to the enhancement of effi ciency and competitiveness when the economy rebounds. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 7 Govt criticised for ‘callous’ civil service restructuring P aul Moss Political hopeful responds to NIB announcement Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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By GENA GIBBS Bahamas Information Services T HE Ministry of the Envir onment and the Bahamas Maritime Authority celebrated the graduation of 57 Bahamas Maritime Cadet Corps (BMCC ceremonies at the British Colonial Hilton. T hirty-three of the graduates are off to Canada for international certification. The BMCC was established in 2003 with the objective of sensitising high school students t o opportunities available in t he maritime industry. T he programme draws from a ll government and private h igh schools in New Provid ence, Abaco and Grand Bahama. To date, 301 cadets have passed through the programme. “We have a retention rate of 78 per cent,” Mr Deveaux said d uring the ceremonies on June 24. “This means that more than 2 00 young Bahamians are e mployed around the world s eeking to become Master Mariners, Chief Engineers, and other industry-related profes-s ionals.” The Bahamas Maritime Authority (BMA ernment’s agent responsible for administering the Bahamas Ship Register, the collection of all ship registration and related f ees, and for meeting t he Bahamas’ expenses in respect of international obligations. T he BMA currently has offices in Nassau, New York and London; representation in Japan, Greece, and Germany;a nd projects the opening of an o ffice in Hong Kong. He pointed out that the Bahamas, with the third largests hip registry in the world, plays “a leading role” in the International Maritime Organisation (IMO The Bahamas maintains m embership on the Council of the International Maritime O rganisation in Category 'C', t o which it is the third largest contributor. When we boast about a registry of almost 1,700 vessels w ith more than 55 million gross tonnes,” said Mr Deveaux, “it must be borne in mind that s ome of these ships have 2,000 people employed. So one can readily grasp the vast opportunities available for cadets who are willing to seekt he proper training and dedicate themselves to maritime p rofessions.” He said his ministry is “working closely” with the College o f the Bahamas and other private sector partners to establish a Maritime Institution in the Bahamas so that cadets canr eceive world-class training and m aritime education at home. Signing on to the International Convention on Stan-d ards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafar ers has had a positive impact on inter-island mailboat ser-v ice, he noted. This action provides for minimum training and certification for all personnel employed on domestic vessels,” s aid Minister Deveaux. “The BMA was actively involved in t he efforts to establish a cent re at the Royal Bahamas Defence Force base where l ocal seafarers could obtain these minimum standards. “Since its implementation, seafarers in the Bahamas have n ot only sought to better themselves but also to make their v essels compliant with internat ional standards, and to pursue excellence in the domestic mari time sector.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 7+($/((1' $//$/(6 'LVFRXQWWRUHZLGH H[FHSWKH&KULVWPDV&RUQHU 6RPHJLIWLWHPVb /RDGHGDOHDEOHV bVHOHFWHG&KLOGUHQV:HDU $ FFHSWLQJ 6XQ&DUG_,6$_DVWHU&DUG_$PHULFDQ([SUHVV Marine cadets graduate into global opportunities BMCC CADETS who are off to Canada for international certification are pictured during the graduation ceremony. D e r e k S m i t h / B I S

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By GENA GIBBS THE government says its plan to upgrade the Arawak Cay Cultural and Heritage Centre into “a cultural mecca in the r egion” remains on course. Minister of Agriculture and M arine Resources Larry Cartwright confirmed that $250,000 has been allocated for additional improvements. The money will be used to i ncrease operational efficiency and effectiveness, and improve the area’s appearance, security and sanitation, he said. In a statement issued yesterday, the government also said Arawak Cay vendors are feverishly preparing to host contes-t ants of the Miss Universe Pageant on August 5. The Miss Universe contestants will come here for cocktails and a taste of Bahamian c ulture,” said operations mana ger Sonny Russell. Improved A t the moment, the sewer main at Arawak Cay is being improved to allow the larger r estaurants and bars to install private bathrooms. Mr Russell spoke of “corr ecting infrastructural problems t o make the experience more comfortable for patrons.” He said cruise passengers “who complain that there is nothing for them to do” are being targeted for a taste of the i slands. Thus, plans are already afoot for Bahamian music and entertainment to become a regular feature at Arawak Cay. S ecurity is not an issue for c ustomers, said Mr Russell, as t he cultural centre has its own police station and officers patrol the area frequently. We all work together with the police,” he said. “It’s a cor-dial relationship. The police are playing a big role in being com m unity-minded and customerfriendly.” As most of the structures at t he cultural centre are made of wood, fire hydrants are also to be installed, and vendors are to be trained in basic fire fighting techniques. F requent inspections by the Department of Environmental Health Services will ensure that p ests are kept under control, M r Russell added. “The Ministry of Environment is doing a very good job in that regard,” he said. “They have commenced monthly inspections and any v endor not operating in a s anitary way will be dealt with.” A new area at the western e nd of the cultural centre has been turned into a parking lot with 30 new slots. P lans are afoot to erect a craft c entre for authentically Bahamian products. About 24 thatchsheltered tropically-colored b ooths are to be constructed for artisans, Mr Russell said. He said the Bahamas Culi n ary Association is willing to g ive seminars to assist vendors with menu planning, food processing, and other points. M r Russell said his office will be contacting the Public Hos pital Authority for assistance in c onducting first aid seminars for all employees at the cultural centre. And, insurance companies h ave already been contacted about providing some kind of coverage for the vendors and t heir operations. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 9 'VO 4VNNFS $BNQ7 LUHGRIWKHDPH 2 OG%RULQJXPPHU 6FKRRO" 7 U\ 6RPHWKLQJ 1HZt&UHDWLY$ FWLYLWLHV,QFOXGH $UWVt&UDIWV'UDZLQJtDLQWLQJ0XVLFt'UDPD / HVVRQV 6ZLPPLQJDQG 6SRUWV &$//:$1' 5(6(59(<285 %()25(,7/$7( RU(PDLOZHVWPRRU#KRWPDLOFRP The New C-ClassY our most enjoyable drive ever.T he new C-Class is a pleasure to behold o ffering a new interpretation of driving pleasure. Its taut lines lend it an air of e ffortless superiority while the wide radiator grille and distinctive rear section announce a vehicle with a real presence and dynamic personality. F ew cars can compete with its ability to adjust so many facets of its character f rom the interior to the drive technology so quickly and precisely in response toexternal conditions and your own particular needs. The key to this flexible r esponse is the standard-fit Agility Control Package which includes selective damping. T he interior offers noticeably more space and a more distinctive atmosphere tosuit your taste. As you will see, the n ew C-Class is the perfect embodiment of the Mercedes-Benz philosophy.Tyreflex Star MotorsWulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas, Tel 242.325.4961 Fax 242.323.4667O UR PARTS DEPARTMENT IS FULLY STOCKED WITH EVERY COMPONENT NECESSARY TO ENSURE THAT YOUR MERCEDES R UNS TROUBLE FREE. TRAINED TECHNICIANS ON DUTY. Plans for Arawak Cay upgrade ‘on course’ OPERATIONS MANAGER Sonny Russell is pictured at Arawak Cay.

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 13 r ent economy cannot support across-the-board increases. Additionally, the present industrial agreement does not support across-the-board increases being given, but speaks of bringing workers on par with salaries of their counterparts at the sister corporations which the government stated in The Tribune that they were w illing to do by “fixing” any anomalies that exist. In that previous article, Mr Forbes said, “I support the union 100 per cent, but my problem is what she is trying to achieve in an economic downturn is not realistic.” Ms Kemp at that time was reportedly attempting to push the government for a 15 per cent payi ncrease for all union members. However this industrial unrest followed an initial proposal from Ms Kemp to the government to sell the WSC to a “private investor”. W ith WSC already overstaffed by 117 people, t his action, sources revealed, could only have led to massive lay offs of mostly union members at the corporation. In his response to Ms Kemp’s initial request for a disciplinary meeting which was copied to all union members, Mr Forbes is quoted questioningt he president as to how she could orchestrate a sick out “to which you garnered support by threatening to ‘grind’ the members”. “I, a responsible and learned unionist, still await the vote of the union body to sanction said ‘sick out’ therein making it a legal unionized a ctivity. Can the minutes of the meeting reflect t he ‘sick out’ being a union sanction event,” Mr Forbes asked. Noting therefore that the president essentially organized an unsanctioned, unauthorized “illegal” action against the WSC, Mr Forbes reminded the president that it is her duty to ensure that such activities are done properly and by the law. “Madame to ensure that you and your cohorts u nderstand what Parliamentary procedure dict ates, I would like for them to reflect upon the joint management and non-management union m eeting where the motion for a vote was moved a nd seconded then subsequently passed to the floor. That Madame president is parliamentary procedure. “Should I not educate the members as to your d uties and articulate how the experience you claim is a farce, as by your actions it shows that y ou have never negotiated any salary increases or e ngineered any industrial action, as the mistakes made consistently by your with respect to protecting the jobs of your members by simply foll owing the law are of dynamic proportions and c an not and should not be tolerated,” he said. M r Forbes concluded his letter by reminding the union president and the entire body itself t hat as a prospective candidate for president he was simply exerting his constitutionally obligated right to campaign and spread the message to hisf ellow union members in New Providence and t he Family Islands. A ttempts to reach Ms Kemp or Mr Forbes for comment on these letters were unsuccessful up to press time last night. c harges were read to him. He pleaded not guilty to the charge of forcible detention and was not required to enter a plea to the rapec harge. Sergeant Sean Thurston, the prosecutor, objected to Poitier being granted bail. He told t he court he was already on bail from the S upreme Court for a matter of similar nature. Poitier was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. The case has been adjourned to July 7 a nd transferred to Court 10, Nassau Street. ply made up a story about her and Mr Carey getting into an argument at their apartment on August 17. Mrs Bethel told the jury that Pratt’s story made no sense and that she had staged the murder scene. She noted that the pill on the front room table, which had initially been suspected to be Viagra, had been placed there by Pratt as a part of stage management. She told the jury that Pratt had been heartless and showed no mercy in Mr Carey’s senseless and brutal killing. Pratt’s attorney Romona Farquharson told the jury that the prosecution’s case didn’t make sense. She questioned as to why Pratt who have used a rat tail comb if she had intend ed to kill Mr Carey. Ms Farquharson argued that the prosecution had proved no motive for the killing. She pointed out that Mr Carey paid most of Pratt’s bills, including the $800 per month rent for her apartment. Ms Farquharson also told the jury that police had not prop erly investigated Mr Carey’s death. The trial began on June 17 before Senior Justice Anita Allen. Pratt’s sentencing hearing is scheduled for August 10. When asked if her client would appeal the verdict, Ms Farquharson said she would like to reserve comment on the matter until after the sentencing. Mother of three found guilty of manslaughter FROM page one Man is c harged with forcible detention and rape FROM page one Union president allegedly attempts to reprimand member over comments in The Tribune F ROM page one

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 14, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE However, after complaints f rom those living in the area, w ho say the presence of the m ausoleum will bring down property values, smells, and scares children”, the Town P lanning Committee subsequently rescinded its approval and asked the Bishop to move the mausoleum. D irector of Physical Planning Michael Major wrote to resident Emily Knowles on M ay 6, 2009, informing her that the Department will “make every effort to have the structure and the burial r emains removed in a timely fashion.” Yesterday Ms Knowles, w ho has been vocal in her demand for the mausoleum to go, said that almost two m onths later nothing has c hanged and residents “are s till suffering mental stress and h ardship.” “We think we have given t he Department of Physical Planning enough time to r esolve this matter. Therefore we have no other choice but to commence legal proceedings to the Supreme Court in o ur collective names to sue the Department of Physical Planning, Environmental H ealth and any other Government Department that should have made sure that h is matter was taken care of,” s he said in a letter to the press, s igned by herself “on behalf o f the Community of Garden Hills number two.” M eanwhile, Sharon Hunter, who lives adjacent to the c hurch grounds, supports the legal action. S as se claims to have already suffered loss of i ncome due to the departure of a tenant from an apartment s he owned in part as a result of its proximity to the mausoleum. T he residents further alleged that a foul smell can at t imes be detected emanating from the tomb. C ommenting on the comp laints in April, Bishop Seymour told another local daily t hat “people today have no love, no compassion and no scruples.” “I’m through with it, because as far as I’m con-c erned, (laying her to rest was the closure I had. If anyb ody else wants to move her, they could move her... but wouldn’t give consent. I willn ot give consent,” he reportedly said. A message left for Mr Major seeking commentw as not returned up to press t ime. Attempts to reach Bish op Seymour were unsuccess ful. Plan to sue over bishop’s dead wife in mausoleum year sentence. According to evidence adduced at the trial, Knowles a nd Brown sat in the getaway car while Glinton shot and robbed C arey. C arey's cousin, Vaughn, who had originally been charged with conspiracy to commit armed robbery, testified for the prosecution in exchange for having the charge against him dropped. Careyh ad testified that Dwight Knowles had approached him about setting up the robbery in exchange for $9,000 which he claimed he wasn ever paid. Justice Jon Isaacs also sentenced Glinton to 30 years imprison m ent on the armed robbery charge and 10 years imprisonment on the conspiracy to commit armed robbery charge. The sentences are to run concurrently beginning the date of his conviction. Glin t on was represented by attorneys Craig Butler and Devard Francis. Deputy Director of Public Prosecutions Cheryl Grant-Bethel, Anthony Delaney, Stephanie Pintard and Lennox Coleby repre-s ented the Crown. I n March 2006, the London Privy Council ruled that the Bahamas’ mandatory death penalty was unconstitutional and that the appropriate sentence would be left to the discretion of the tri-a l judge. FROM page one Death sentence for murder of businessman FROM page one

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n B y RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net O f f the heels of his 1,000th career win, Mark Knowles suffered a heartbreaking loss in perhaps the most t hrilling and suspenseful match thus far at W imbledon. Knowles and partner Mahesh Bhupathi were eliminated from the grand slam quarterfinal at the hands of WesleyM oodie of South Africa and Dick Norman of Belgium 6-7 (119 4-6. A mammoth 48 minute opening set foreshadowed the tone for the remainder of the match which would total nearly four hours to complete. In the first setM oodie and Norman scored on 10 aces, had a perfect winning percentage (11-1 1) on second serves, scored 32 winners with a total of 43 points won. B hupathi and Knowles scored just 20 winners with 37 points won. For the match, Knowles and Bhupathi scored on 15 aces but faltered with a total of 17 unforced errors, while their opponentsh ad less than half their total with just eight. They also had an uncharacteristically high number of errors with eight double faults. K nowles and Bhupathi also had 76 winners with 153 points won, while Moodie and Norman scored 98 winners with 162 points won. Percentage While the winning percentage on first service was fairly even at 89 and 87 per-c ent, however Moodie and Norman held a discernable advantage in winning percentage on second serves 77 Moodie and Norman the tournament’s ninth ranked team unseeded the fourth seeded team of t he tournament just prior to a showdown w ith the top seeded pair. T he South African and Belgian pair w ill face Bob and Mike Bryan in the semifinals. The other half of the semifinal r ound will feature unseeded James Blake and Mardy Fish taking on former K nowles teammate Daniel Nestor of Canada and Nenad Zimonjic of Serbia.J ust two matches later, Knowles returned to court two, and received redemption w ith a win in mixed doubles. Knowles, partnered with Anna-Lena Groenfeld of Germany to advance to the quarterfinals of the draw. They defeated Nestor and Elena Vesnina of Russia ins traight sets, 6-4,6-4. In a nearly complete turnaround from his first match of the day, Knowles and Groenefeld took the match in just 67 minutes. A fter being upset by a lower seed in men’s doubles, Knowles returned in the mixed draw as the ninth seed to upend the fifth seed. Knowles and Groenefeld overcame a whopping 17 unforced errorsw hile their opponents committed just three, but held a crucial advantage in break point conversions, taking 2-3 for 67 percent and 40 winners. They will advance to play Bob Bryan and Samant ha Stosur of Australia in the quarterfi n als. O ther notable pairs in the quarterfinals i nclude Leander Paes (India Black (Zimbabwe U llyett (Zimbabwe (Chinese Tapei A ndre Sa (Brazil (JapanS tephen Huss (Australia Pascual (Span K nowles and Groenfeld take the court today in the fourth round for the right to advance to the semifinals. C M Y K C M Y K THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 16 P AGE 18 Brent Stubbs’ opinion... 0,1,675<:25.6t75$163257127,&(%$<((7 1$66$8((779,&725,$$9(18( 52$':$<&216758&7,21 WKWK,QDQHIIRUWRUHOLHYHFXUUHQWWUDIFFRQJHVWLRQSUREOHPV %$+$0$6+270,;KDVEHHQFRQWUDFWHGIRUWKHSDYLQJRI :HVW%D\6WUHHWEHWZHHQ%ODNH5GDQG1DVVDX0DUOERURXJK 1DY\/LRQDQG%D\6WUHHWWR0DFNH\3DYLQJZRUNV ZLOOEHFRPPHQFLQJIURP%ODNHZKLFKUHTXLUHWUDIF PDQDJHPHQWLQYROYLQJURDGFORVXUHVDQGGLYHUVLRQVIRUWKHURXWH 3DYLQJ:RUNVLQFOXGHWKHIROORZLQJWLPHV /RFDOGLYHUVLRQVZLOOEHVLJQSRVWHGLQGXHFRXUVHDQGIXUWKHU LQIRUPDWLRQZLOOEHSURYLGHGLQORFDOPHGLD n By TOM WITHERS AP Sports Writer CLEVELAND (AP Shaquille O’Neal took his first look at his new basketball home. The 15-time All-Star center toured the Cavaliers’ suburban practice facility and took his physical on Wednesday, one day before he is formally introduced as superstar LeBron James’ newest teammate. O’Neal and a small group of associates met briefly with Cavs coach Mike Brown and others at the Cleveland Clinic Courts in Independence, Ohio. The Cavaliers are hoping O’Neal, who has won four NBA titles, can be the missing piece to help James win his first championship and end the city’s title drought dating to 1964. The Cavaliers have scheduled a 1pm news conference on Thursday to welcome O’Neal. He was acquired in a trade with the Phoenix Suns last week. It is not known if James, who was vacationing outside the c ountry when O’Neal was traded, will be at the news conference. The league MVP was in Los Angeles last Sunday for the BET Awards. O’Neal, who will wear jersey No. 33 his high school and college number in Cleveland, is staying at a posh downtown hotel during this visit. He hasn’t decided if he will buy a house, rent or stay in a hotel during his time with the Cavaliers, his fifth NBA team. Cleveland is the first coldweather city where O’Neal has played after stops in Orlando, Fla., Los Angeles, Miami and Phoenix. O’Neal has one season left under contract, but the 37-yearold center recently indicated on his Twitter page that he can play three more seasons. Shaq to team up with ‘King James’ IN THIS file photo, Shaquille O'Neal (right an All-Star basketball practice in Las Vegas. The Cavaliers completed a blockbuster trade, bringing the superstar center O’Neal from Phoenix Suns to play with current MVP LeBron James, two people with knowledge of the deal told The Associated Press. The people spoke on condition of anonymity because the trade had not been officially announced... (AP Photo: Kevork Djansezian W imbledon semis all set: Federer-Haas, Roddick-Murray... See page 17 Duo suffer defeat in quarterfinals Knowles and mixed pairs partner victorious MARK KNOWLES (right

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n By STEPHEN WILSON AP Sports Writer WIMBLEDON, England (AP tralized Ivo Karlovic’s huges erves Wednesday to reach the Wimbledon semifinals and move a step closer to a record 15th Grand Slam championship. Two-time finalist Andy Roddick, Andy Murray and Tommy Haas completed the f inal four. In a match featuring short p oints and few rallies, Federer conjured up a few great returns t o break the 6-foot-10 Croatian twice and secure a 6-3, 7-5, 7-6( 3) victory on another sunbaked day at the All England Club. Federer, closing in on his sixth Wimbledon title, reached his 21st consecutive semifinal at a Grand Slam tournament a nd extended his winning streak t o 17 matches with another vintage performance on his favorite Centre Court. “I love the record I have of reaching so many semifinals inG rand Slams in a row 21 is q uite a number,” Federer said. “It shows how consistent I’ve been.” It was Federer’s ninth win in 1 0 matches against Karlovic, who was playing in his first G rand Slam quarterfinal. Federer’s next opponent will be Germany’s Haas, who upset fourth-seeded Novak Djokovic7 -5, 7-6 (6 to his first Wimbledon semifin al. The 31-year-old Haas was the oldest player in the quart ers, while the 22-year-old Djokovic was the youngest. T he third-seeded Murray swept Juan Carlos Ferrero 7-5, 6 -3, 6-2 to reach his first Wim bledon semifinal and keep up h is bid to become the first British player to win the men’st itle since Fred Perry in 1936. Murray will face the sixthseeded Roddick, who served 43aces and outlasted 2002 champ ion Lleyton Hewitt 6-3, 6-7 (101 most competitive match. Hewitt battled back from two sets to one down, before Roddick broke for 5-4 in the fifth and then served out the match which ended after 3 hours, 50 minutes when the Australian popped up a forehand half-vol l ey past the baseline. “It’s a testament to the type of player he is that he kept going and made it such a fight,” said the 26-year-old Roddick, who lost to Federer in the 2004 and Wimbledon finals. “I think there’s a lot of respect there. We used to get into it a little bit when we were younger,but I think we definitely earned each other’s respect. Now we’re just a couple of old married dudes, so maybe we’ve grown up a little bit.” Hewitt, who had 21 aces him self, said he did all that he could to deal with Roddick’s rocket serves. “You know you’re going to get aced a lot,” he said. “I knew that going into the match. You’re going to get some break points and you’re going to see them go pretty quickly as well.It was a matter of trying to hang in there as much as possible and make him play that extra shot. I was nearly able to do it.” Murray broke Ferrero five times, served 18 aces and lost serve only once. Murray had 49 winners, compared to 20 for the Spaniard, a former No. 1 and only third wild card to reach the Wimbledon quarters. It was a dominant performance by Murray, the first Briton to reach the semifinals since Tim Henman did it forthe fourth time in 2002. “I feel confident because I’ve won a lot of matches on the grass,” Murray said. “But every day, when I get up to play the matches, I know that I’m going to have to perform very well, and that gets the nerves and the adrenaline going and makes me play better.” Karlovic served 23 aces to raise his tournament total to 160, but it was Federer who never faced a break point. The second-ranked Swiss star won 74 of 85 points on serve and was taken to deuce only once, in the sixth game of the third set. Federer got out of that jam with a 129 mph service winner and a 128 mph ace. “It’s difficult because there’s not really any baseline rallies on his serve or on my serve,” Federer said. “You expect a tough scoreline all the time. It’s not easy to break him. I’m very happy to break him twice and win the match.” T he statistics told the story: Federer had 39 winners and only seven unforced errors, to 29 winners (almost all on servea nd 17 errors for Karlovic. Federer grabbed the upper h and early when he broke Karlovic in the fourth game of t he match with flashes of bril liance. H e got to break point with a reflex backhand return winnero ff a 130 mph serve and then ripped a forehand return winner off a 122 mph serve, pump ing his fist and shouting, “Come o n!” It was the first time Karlovic had been broken during the tournament after winning 80c onsecutive service games. “He returned unbelievable few shots and I could not really react on it,” said Karlovic, who added that he was bothered by the sun in his eyes before putting on sunglasses for the rest of the match. The first extended rally of the match and one of only a handful during the entire con test didn’t take place until the fourth game of the second set, a 15-stroke point that end ed with a Federer forehand winner 35 minutes into the match. The second set turned Fede rer’s way when he broke Karlovic in the 11th game with four straight winners: an overhead, a forehand passing shotd own the line, a reflex backhand return off a 126 mph servea nd a passing shot that glanced off Karlovic’s racket frame. T he third set ended with the 13th tiebreaker the two men h ave played against each other in 25 sets of tennis. Karlovic’sl imitations were exposed as he made several glaring errors, missing badly on what should have been easy putaways. Fed e rer finished him off with an inside-out forehand winner on the first match point. The 24th-seeded Haas saved t hree straight set points against Djokovic after going down 6-3 in the second-set tiebreaker. He broke in the fourth game of the fourth set and sealed the win when Djokovic netted a forehand return on the first match point. The result wasn’t a complete surprise: Haas beat Djokovic in the grass-court final at Halle, Germany, last month. Haas led Federer two sets to love in the fourth round of the French Open, only to lose in five. He said he hopes to make amends on Friday. “That would be nice,” he s aid. “I’ll give it my best shot. There’s not much he (Federer can’t do. He’s obviously the favorite to win the title. I’mg oing to go out there and try to annoy him a little bit and seew hat happens.” C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009, PAGE 17 INGRAHAMs AUTO ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES CO. LTD. 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To advertise, call 502-2371 Wimbledon semifinals all set: Federer-Haas, Roddick-Murray ANDY MURRAY (right face Andy Roddick in one half of the semifinals... (AP Photos

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 18, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE O n Sunday, July 26, at Sandals Royal Bahamian resort, the Friends of Tommy A Robinson are s lated to honour perhaps the country’s greatest track and field athlete. ‘The tribute to a legend’ luncheon was originally planned for last year, but had to be called off until now because of one or two reasons, including the fact that Robinson had to undergo surgery. The committee, headed by Alpheus Hawk” Finlayson, could not have selected a better individual to honour. H e is an icon, a legend and national hero who many people have lauded a nd tried to emulate for his achievement. T he only thing, according to former journalist Ed Bethel who covered many stories about Robinson’s exploits during his heyday, is that he has not beenb lessed with a knighthood from the Queen. B efore the year is out, Bethel hopes t o call his long-time friend ‘Sir Tommy R obinson,’ he said at a recent press c onference to officially announce the l uncheon and to encourage the genera l public to come out and show their support. Robinson, who has his name inked on the National Track and Field Stadium, which is soon to be replaced by t he new facility being built by the Chin ese government, has been the pioneer sprinter in the country long before w e heard about the success of the Golden Girls.’ M oments after being presented with her gold medal from the 2001 IAAF W orld Championships in Athletics in Edmonton, Canada, Ferguson-McKenzie said Saturday night that Robinson was really an “inspiration and motivat ion” to her. In fact, she credited a lot of her succ ess to the support she got from Robinson, who stepped in and acted as her father, although he is her “godfather.” Robinson has indeed been conside red the “godfather” of track and field in the country. He was the first Bahamian to participate in track and field at the Olympic Games in Melbourne, Australia, in 1956 where he finished fourth in the first round of the 100m and 200m. A year later, Robinson made history again when he became the first B ahamian to win a medal in an international competition at the West India n Federation Games in Kingston, Jamaica, where he got a bronze in the 1 00m. At the 1964 Olympics in Tokyo, Japan, Robinson went on to become the first Bahamian track and field athl ete to advance to an Olympic final a fter he placed second in the 100m s emifinal behind then world record holder Bob Haynes of the United S tates. F or a number of years, Robinson h eld the national record in both the 1 00m and 200m. But if there was any s hortfall, it would have been the fact t hat he was not successful in winning an Olympic medal. When asked how he felt about the performances of the current sprinters, led by IAAF W orld Championship in Athletics’ silver medallist Derrick Atkins, R obinson said he’s disappointed that t hey have not been able to surpass the many accomplishmentst hat Robinson was able to achieve. Yes, Atkins broke the barrier when he won the silver medal in Osaka, Japan, behind American champion Tyson Gay in 2007 and in t he process became the fastest Bahamian ever when he lowered his national r ecord to 9.91 seconds. And yes, Dominic Demeritte left his m ark on the 2006 World Indoor Championships when he listed as the last champion in the 2004 Championships in Budapest, Hungary, an event that h as now been erased from the schedule b ecause of the disadvantage that was p resented to the athletes with regard to who would draw the outside lane six. I ndeed, Robinson has been conside red the greatest Bahamian sprinter b ecause of the consistency in which he c ompeted, the majority of times as a lone ranger” carrying the Bahamian f lag. In fact, if you sit down long enough to listen, Robinson can probably clearly recall so many of his performances that it will amaze you as to the incredi ble achievements that he has been able to secure. Some day, the story on the life of Tommy Robinson must be put to pen i n a book for everyone to be able to follow and remember for years to come. I t’s such a fantasy story, one that should be a great copy to read. The Friends of Tommy Robinson should be commended for honouringt his Bahamian giant, who has already been inducted into the National Hall of Fame. If there is anybody who deserves to continue to smell his flowers while he’s alive, it’s Tommy Robinson. Another is Sir Durward “Sea Wolf” Knowles. But that’s another topic for discussion at another time. So I just want to encourage the gene ral public to start making plans to join the committee in honouring Robinson, w ho from all indications, is in goods spirits despite his illness. The luncheon o n July 26 could be your way of saying “thank you Tommy” for his contribution to the development of sports in the country and track and field in gene ral. T alking about track and field, the B AAA hosted its National Track and Field Championships at the Thomas A Robinson Track and Field Stadium o ver the weekend and for the first time s ince they have been putting it on in t he last decade, there was no major s ponsor. T here was hardly any advanced publicity as it was in the past, but the athletes turned out, as expected, and performed up to par for the most part. As usual, the nationals clashed with t he Bahamas Swimming Federation’s Royal Bank of Canada National Swimming Championships at the Betty Kelly Kenning Aquatic Center. A nd at the National Tennis Center, there was the Security & General Intern ational Tennis Tournament, featuring some of the top junior players in he world. If that wasn’t enough, the New Provi dence Softball Association had a big double header at the Banker’s Field at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex. So whether or not people think that the numbers could have been better at the track to watch just about all of the country’s elite athletes in action, there were just too many things going on at the same time. A nd although there are those who will argue that with a little more publ icity, the BAAA would have attracted more, I tend to disagree because we h ave really seen a falloff in the support for the fans in just about all sports, not just track and field. But it was good that despite the rain a nd the fact that the ceremonies were c onstantly delayed, the fans waited u ntil the end to watch as the men’s 4 x 400m relay team and FergusonM cKenzie finally got their gold medals f rom the 2001 World Championships in E dmonton, Canada, after the US were d isqualified in both events for testing p ositive for the use of illegal subs tances. At least there were a number of fans who were eager to see the athletes receive their just rewards. ribute to a legend’ luncheon OPINION STUBBS

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Financial sector ‘can grow’ to 25% of GDP n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net AIRLINES operating at the Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA almost 24 per cent increase in landing fees being proposed by the Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD could be transferred on to passengers and increase the cost of travel to the Bahamas, negatively impacting tourism. Some airlines reacted with dismay yesterday as NAD released the details of its proposed fee increases, highlighting a proposed 23.6 per cent increase to landing fees, and a 6.1 per cent increase to terminal fees, aircraft loading bridge fees and aircraft parking fees. British Airways’ airport manager, Nathaniel Rappel, told Tribune Business that airlines are generally “not happy” about any manner of fee increase. He argued that the fee increases come at the worst possible time for airlines in general and, with the state of the economy, the worst time for the cost of air travel. “I can’t make any specific comments about the issue, but you will find that airlines in this time and in the current economic situation will not be happy about increases in fees,” said Mr Rappel. “And in this day and age, having increases in fees may actually affect the way airlines see destinations. “From the tourism industry level, people oppose the increase in that it makes the cost of our service higher.” Airlines have been suffering high overhead costs for several n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor ABACO Markets hopes to be in a position to resume dividend paym ents to longs uffering shareholdersa fter its curr ent fiscal year ends on January 31, 2010, its chief executive yesterday telling Tribune Business the Board was likely to make its decision in February/March once the financial performance was known. G avin Watchorn, who is also the BISX-listed food retail group’s president, said ther esumption of dividend payments would be the last sign needed to confirm it hadr eturned to “full health” following a five-year turnaround programme that appears to haver estored it to consistent profitability. However, he added that while u nderstanding shareholder expectations that they would receive a return on their investC M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29T he information c ontained is from a third party and The T ribune can not be h eld responsible for errors and/or omission from the d aily report. $4.21 $4.30 $4.25 n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor WHILE air arrival fall-offs appear to be decreasing monthover-month, “especially from Florida”, the Bahamas Hotel Association’s (BHA yesterday said this was “not a true indications things are rebounding” because aggregate revenues earned by major hotels were still more than 20 per cent down on 2008 comparisons. Robert Sands said that while the percentage decline in air arrivals, in comparison to 2008 figures, was becoming less as 2009 progressed, many other factors were involved in determining the hotel industry’s financial performance and the sector “still has a big hole to dig ourselves out of”. The BHA president said the Bahamian hotel industry was hoping for “some stabilisation No hotel ‘r ebound’ despite decr ease in air ar r iv als f all-of f * Hotel president says that while year-over-year arrivals declines from key markets, ‘especially Florida’, reducing, hotel revenues still down by ‘plus-20 per cent’ * Industry ‘still digging itself out of hole’, and hoping to ‘get through 2009 without any major casualties’ * Hopes for airlift boost with elimination of Customs/Immigration overtime charges S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BAHAMAS Waste said yesterday the $207,785 in net income generated during its 2009 first quarter exceeded Budget expectations by “about 50 per cent”, with construction on its recently-approved biodiesel production facility anticipated to start within the next eight weeks. Disa Harper, the BISX-listed company’s chief financial officer, told Tribune Business: “We exceeded expectations. We were probably about 50 per cent higher than we wrote in our Budget in terms of net income.” Bahamas Waste’s net income for the three months to March 31, 2009, was only 9.1 per cent down on 2008’s $228,469 comparative. Ms Harper said the result was due to a “concerted effort to cut back on costs”, cou pled with the benefits of a decrease in fuel prices and rev enue levels holding up well against 2008 levels. The BISX-listed company was “really working hard” to maintain its current staff complement of 94, and not lay anyone off. For the 2009 first quar ter, while revenues were down just over 4 per cent, at $1.931 million compared to $2.013 mil lion, the cost of sales had also decreased by 5.2 per cent to $1.234 million. And operating expenses were held relatively flat, at $482,566 compared to $475,350 the year before. But, sounding a note of cau tion about what the remainder of 2009 held, Ms Harper told Tribune Business: “This quarter, we’ve seen fuel prices start to kick-in again. Now we’re getting into the second quarter, more businesses are feeling the effects of the slowdown. This quarter will be a much better indicator of what the rest of the year will look like for us.” To reduce costs, Ms Harper said Bahamas Waste had cut back on discretionary spending, trimming advertising and car rying out more maintenance inBahamas Waste profits ‘about 50% higher’ than budgeted * Construction on recentlyapproved biodiesel facility likely to start in eight weeks, as company moves to rebuild client base * Cardboard recycling to start during 2009 Q3 * Accounts receivables tackled by bringing cut-off deadline down from 90 to 60 days past due S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 B B Abaco Markets: dividend decision set for early 2010 Watchorn Airline fears over 24% rise in landing fee NAD proposing 6.1% fee hike for other charges, prompting concern over increased travel costs to t he Bahamas impacting tourism n By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor T he Bahamian financial services industry’s direct contribution to this nation’s gross domestic product (GDP a current 18-18 per cent to 25 per cent over a five to sevenyear period, a leading attorney said yesterday, “if we got it right”. Brian Moree, senior partner at McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes, told Tribune Business that if the private and p ublic sectors worked togethe r and “came up with a new business plan and model to facilitate the expansion” of the financial services industry, and got it correct, there would be “generous and major rewards” extending right through the Bahamian economy and society. Pointing out that the Central Bank of the Bahamas survey on the financial services industry’s overall contribu-t ion to the Bahamian econom y in 2008 had provided a “timely” reminder of the sector’s importance, Mr Moree told Tribune Business: “The financial services industry is a major contributor to our middle class, which provides t housands of Bahamians with m obility in the labour force, b ecause of the high salary levels, and the training and opportunities to advance in that sector. “I don’t think we would suffer a severe diminution of business in the financial ser vices sector without affecting the national economy.” As a result, it was “critically important” for the Bahamas “to get it right” in developing its response to international initiatives, such as the G-20/OECD thrust demanding higher levels of transparency and tax information exchange. Mr Moree urged the B ahamas to “get in a proactive mode” in developing such responses, which could only be put together by a joint public/private sector approach. And, if the Bahamas got it right, he suggested that the rewards could be immense. “My own view is that over a five-year period, five to seven years at the maximum, if we got it right and did what was n ecessary, we would grow the f inancial services sector from w hat it is now, 15-18 per cent of GDP, to 25 per cent,” Mr Moree told Tribune Business. “That is achievable in a five to seven-year period. We BRIAN MOREE S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE THE owner of Checkers Cafe, Gus Cartwright, was named Outstanding Businessperson of the Year as the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce paid tribute to leading Bahamian business leaders at its 38th annual awards ballon Saturday. T he highlight was the presentation of t he 2009 Annual Business Awards and t he Lifetime Achievement Award, which went to George Myers, chairman of the Myers Group of Companies. More than 350 business, government and industry leaders were in attendance. Dr Wendy Stuart received the Developing Entrepreneur of the Year Award for her successful body-care business, Botani Bath. Two Bahamian businesses had the distinction of being heralded as Outstanding Business of the Year, which is a warded for two categories businesses with over 50 employees, and those with less. In Category A, businesses with more than 50 employees, Furniture Plus was presented with the Outstanding Business Award. The Plait Lady, (Clare Sands) received the designation for Outstanding Business of the Year for Category B (less than 50 employees Receiving the Chamber’s prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award, Mr Myers thanked his team and the many individuals he has worked with over the course of his 40-year career. Keynote speaker for the evening, Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, minister of tourism and aviation, gave a c olorful account of his journey and f riendship with Mr Myers, having w orked closely with him over the course of his career in the tourism industry, beginning in 1982 at Resorts International. Acknowledging that he could think of none more deserving than Mr Myers, the minister reflected on how much he had learned from him and called him, “the smartest man in the world”. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace also encouraged the business community t o become active stakeholders in the t ourism sector, noting that it will take m ore than promotions to stimulate the industry. The development of infrastructure needed to grow and diversify the Bahamian tourism product was essential. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace stressed that the accessibility factor was just as crucial an ingredient to success as reducing the cost of the destination to competitiveness. Philip Simon, the Chamber’s executive director, acknowledged Mr Myers’ achievements, saying: “Having played an integral role in the success of the Bahamian tourism industry, Mr Myers is undoubtedly deserving of the Chamber’s prestigious 2009 Lifetime Achievement Award for his immeas urable contributions to the growth of t ourism and business in the Bahamas. H is body of work speaks for itself.” The Chamber of Commerce also bid farewell officially to outgoing presi dent Dionisio D’Aguilar, recognised for his outstanding work and service to the organisation and the business community over his two-year term. Mr D’Aguilar was presented with a commemorative photo collage of some of his highlights as president. Newly-elected Chamber president, Khaalis Rolle, said of all the finalists: “They are all indeed outstanding finalists, and the selection of winners was no easy process.” As for the winners, he added: “They represent the success stories of the Bahamian business community. They a re market leaders, who have demons trated their commitment to ethical b usiness practices and are actively contributing to the overall development of the Bahamian economy and com munity.” Although they did not go home with the top award, the Chamber recognised the outstanding achievements of the other finalists. In the category of Outstanding Business Person of the Year, finalists Dr Charles Diggiss, president of the Med-Net Group of Companies and chief medical officer at Doctors Hospital, and Chris Mortimer, president of Galleria Cinemas and Bennigan’s Grill & Tavern, were commended. Kenwood Kerr, president of Providence Advisors, and Farrell Goff and D eran Thompson, principals of B ahamas Woodworking Studio, were f inalists for the Developing Entrepreneur Award. The Mall at Marathon and Bahamas Waste were recognised as finalists in the very competitive Business of the Year employees or more’ category. Caribbean Civil Group and Bahamas Orthodontic Centre were saluted in that category for businesses with less than 50 employees. Chamber honours business leaders THE BAHAMAS Chamber of Commerce presented its 2009 Annual Business Awards at their 38th annual awards ball. The evening’s winners are pictured with the event’s keynote speaker, Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, minister of tourism and aviation, the Chamber president, Khaalis Rolle, and Philip Simon, the Chamber executive director THE BAHAMAS Chamber of Commerce gave its Lifetime Achievement Award to George Myers, chairman of the Myers Group of Comp anies. Pictured (L-R

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n By CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net WATERSPORTS operators c ould lose as much as 70 per cent of their income when an a rea of Arawak Cay used for launching boats and jet skis isb locked by a 35-inch pipe, which will pump dredged debris and a silt screen used to keep that debris off Long WharfB each. The pipe is related to the upcoming dredging of NassauHarbour to accommodate the Genesis class cruise ships. The works manager for Boskalis, Ronald Both, said the dredging o f the harbour should begin in earnest by the third week of J uly. He added that the pipe which will deter the watersports operators will be put in place as earl y as next week. Yet as early as yesterday, workers had placed cones j oined by red tape and two e normous steel pipes on the w estern end of Long Wharf B each, where the operators l aunch their boats and jet skis i nto the water. Many of the operators simply ignored the makeshift bar r ier, running over the cones and launching their equipment as they have always done. Owner of Reno Watersports, Reno Deveaux, said the Government needs to create a new area for operators to launch t heir boats, as many of the r amps along East Bay Street are n ot fit to do so especially during low tide. M r Deveaux said it is likely government will suggest operat ors launch at the ramp on Montague, though they were asked s everal years ago to discontinue its use because it was causings evere traffic congestion. He and vice-president of the B ahamas Watersports Association, Patrick Glinton, said thata part from the traffic congestion 70 80 watersports operators will cause dropping their equipment at the Montague ramp, the conditions there at what is also a fish market are unsanitary. “I caught a fungus there from getting cut in that water more t han once,” said Mr Glinton. He and Mr Deveaux also fear that a mass movement to that area will breed arguments amongst the operators, who all v ie for the ramp in order to be the first over to Paradise Island. A t the Arawak Cay location there is enough space for two o r three operators to launch b oats and jet skis simultaneously, and ample parking for their t rucks and trailers. M r Deveaux said the Port D epartment yesterday deemed the area an illegal ramp, onlya fter it was decided to place the d redging pipe at the location, though nothing was said about the illegality of its use in previous years. H e said the Government now needs to find an appropriate p lace for boat launches, in order for the operators to maintain t heir livelihood. During the Chamber of Comm erce’s meet the ministers forum last Thursday, Mr D eveaux voiced his concern about the possible closure oft he Arawak Cay ramp to Minister of Public Works, Neko Grant. Mr Grant replied that boat ramps did not fall under his ministry and suggested that Mr Deveaux speak to Minister of the the Environment, Dr Earl Deveaux, who was also schedu led to speak at the forum. Mr Grant, though, reassured Mr Deveaux that if the Government decided to close any ramps, operators would be a lerted and informed of alternative ramps. M r Deveaux said the Port Department sent a representat ive to Arawak Cay to speak to s ome of the operators, but nothing was received in writing. H e suggested the Port D epartment has often been f ickle when dealing with the Bahamas Watersports Associ-a tion. “They sit up there and s peak down to us here,” he said. “They recognise us only when they want to.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 2 2009, PAGE 3B Watersports operators fear 70% income loss

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years, with increasing costs per barrel of oil driving travel costs higher and higher. Mr Rappel said increased fees have always been a deterrent to air travel, as they often translate into higher costs for the travelling public. The cost of airline tickets on some discount websites is only marginally higher than the taxes and fees attached to the final purchase. This, he said, makes it difficult for airlines to incentivise travel and remain competitive. Mr Rappel said there is an air of “astonishment” industrywide when there are increases in fees, and suggested that it was no surprise when airlines opposed such changes. NAD has proposed a 23.6 percent increase to their landing fees and a 6.1 per cent to increase to aircraft loading bridge fees, terminal fees and aircraft parking fees. For one Bahamas-owned airline, this translates into an added $13 on the $51 landing fee for their 19-seater aircraft. According to a representative of that airline, who wished to remain anonymous, landing fees are not reflected in the cost of tickets. However, that representative said any increase in fees is inevitably “going to affect us and it has to be passed on to the passengers”. Mr Rappel said NAD mentioned the impending increases to LPIA airlines. However, it appears they were not involved in a consultative capacity, as several managers at smaller airlines seemed not to know of the changes. “We have been in discussions with them about various increased and fees that they are proposing to go into,” said Mr Rappel. “I will reserve commenting on that (NAD conferring with airlines on fee increases) because they briefly mentioned it.” NAD has argued that the fees are necessary for maintaining its “financial covenants”, but contended that LPIA’s rates after the increases remain competitive and less than the Caribbean average. Increases “The gradual increases contained within the financial model are necessary for the Nassau Airport Development Company to meet its operational needs and the financial covenants of the Phase 2, stage 1 financing,” said the online NAD release. If the fee increases, which combine the 2010 and deferred 2009 rises, do not take place, NAD said it risked breaching is banking covenants for the $265 million financing. “In accordance with its financing obligations ,the Nassau Airport Development Company must maintain a debt service coverage ratio (DSCR not less than 1.3 to 1. The average DSCR ratio for the 10 year period of 2011 to 2020 is currently projected at 1.48 to 1,” NAD said. “The financial model includes the proposed fees and charges increases, in addition to increases planned for 2011, 2012 and 2013, followed by annual consumer price index [inflation] type increases. ”The proposed fees and charges increases include the deferred 2009 rate increases adjusted by the planned 2010 rate increase. More specifically ,the deferred increases planned for 2009, which were to be 20 per cent for landing fees and 3 per cent for the other fees, must be applied prior to the 2010 rate increase of 3 per cent. Thus in determining the proposed rate increase, the 2009 rate increase is multiplied by the 2010 rate increase and the result is added to the 2010 rate increase.” Mr Rappel said the benchmarking done by NAD based on airports in the region was being scrutinised by several airlines. “A group of airlines have discussed the premise on which these assumptions were made,” he said. “The Bahamas economy is not the same as other Caribbean islands.” NAD’s benchmarking was based on a Boeing 737 700 with a passenger load factor of 75 per cent (102 passengers 90-minute turnaround time that included use of a jet bridge for fuel loading. “Excluding government taxes, LPIA’s costs are currently $29.58, and with the recommended increase become $30.03 per passenger, an increase of 1.5 per cent. The average cost of the Caribbean airports presented in the graph, excluding LPIA, is $35.39 per passenger. LPIA’s recommended rates are very competitive at $5.36 or 15 per cent less than the Caribbean average,” NAD said. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JULY 2 2009 THE TRIBUNE Please note that all offices of ColinaImperial will be CLOSED on Friday 3 July 2009 for the company’s Annual Employee Fun Day. Our Pay Station at 21 Collins Avenue will offer extended weekend hours on Saturday 4 July from 8:30am to 4pm for your convenience. Thank you. To Our Valued Clients Airline fears over 24% rise in landing fee F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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could grow the direct GDP contribution made by the financial services sector to around 25 per cent of GDP, and the indirect contribution would grow in proportion to that. “I think there would be an impact on jobs, and I don’t only mean jobs in the financial services industry, because there is a spin-off effect.” As a result, Mr Moree said it was the perfect time for the Government and its agencies to work with the Bahamas Financial Services Board (BFSB other industry associations on “developing a national plan that focuses on this sector with a concerted view to not only maintain the industry, but how it can be developed and expanded given the realities of the marketplace that we are facing”. Describing this as “a big task”, the McKinney, Bancroft& Hughes senior partner added: “It’s not business as usual. It’s not more of the same and the status quo.” It involved “re-examining the business model of this jurisdiction, looking at the realities of the market, and come up with a new business plan and model that facilitates the expansion of the industry”. And Mr Moree told Tribune Business: “If we got it right, I think the rewards would be very significant for this country. Conversely, if we do not get it right, it could be very difficult for us going forward. That’s the other side of the same coin. “This effort requires high priority, because it has such generous and major rewards for the country. If we get it right, it will pay enormous dividends, not just for that sole sector but the whole society, right the way through the whole economy, because of the impact financial services has on the whole economy.” The Central Bank reported on Tuesday that Bahamians working in the financial services industry saw an average 6.2 per cent increase in take-home pay during 2008 despite a slight decline in expatriate employees’ salaries, as the industry bucked the recessionary trend w ith a modest expansion in its economic contribution. The Central Bank survey f ound that stripping out bonuses, the Bahamian financial industry’s average base salary r ose by 4.6 per cent to $50,488 in 2008, well ahead of the previous year’s 0.7 per cent increase and above the 1.1 per cent average rise enjoyed between 2003-2007. T he survey again highlighted the financial services industry’s importance to the Bahamia n economy, especially in terms of providing top-end, highsalaried jobs. The sector was e stimated to have paid out $521 million in total salaries, including bonuses, during 2008, a 7.6 per cent increase upon the previous year’s $484.4 million total. Those salaries generate a rela tively high disposable income level for Bahamian financial services employees, which in t urn translates into a purchasing and spending power that creates jobs and business in other i ndustries, in addition to boosting the velocity of money circulation in this economy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tKLUOH\WUHHWVDVVDX%DKDPDV 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWRDQ\SHUVRQVfZLVKLQJWRPDNHFODLP VKDOOGRVROLQJDQ$GYHUVH&ODLPLQWKH6XSUHPH&RXUWDQG VHUYLQJVXFK6WDWHPHQWRQWKH3HWLWLRQHUVRUKLV$WWRUQH\VWKHWKGD\DIWHUWKHODVWGD\RQZKLFKRQZKLFKWKLV1RWLFHDSSHDUV LQWKHGDLO\SDSHUV)DLOXUHDQ\SHUVRQWRDQGVHUYH VWDWHPHQWRIVXFKFODLPRQRUEHIRUHWKHVDLGGDWHZLOORSHUDWHDVD EDUWRVXFKFODLP 5LFKDUG/%RRGOHt&R 5,&+$5'/%22'/(t&2 &RXQVHOVt$WWRUQH\V$W/DZ &KDPEHUV UG)ORRU&ROXPEXV+RXVH (DVWtKLUOH\WUHHW $WWRUQH\VIRUWKHHWLWLRQHU Financial sector ‘can grow’ to 25% of GDP F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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THE Certified Financial A nalyst (CFA B ahamas has elected Christop her Dorsett, of Citigroup Corporate and Investment Bank, to serve as president of the nonprofit professional society for financial advisors. Sonia Beneby, CFA, of ScotiaTrust Bahamas will serve as vice-president. Each will serve a one-year term, which officially begins on July 1, 2009. The Certified Financial Analyst Society of the Bahamas (CFASB m embers to its Board for oney ear terms. The additional CFASB leaders are: CFASB treasurer: Karen Pinder, CFA, CAIA, EFG Bank& Trust (Bahamas CFASB secretary: Andrew S trachan, Clariden Leu. C FASB programme chair: V elma Miller, CFA, Royal Fidelity Merchant Bank & Trust. CFASB education chair: Jeremy Dyck, CFA, LOM Securities (Bahamas CFASB membership chair: Fazillah Pirani, CFA, Scotia Capital CFASB scholarship chair: Alberto Lopez, CFA, Foyil Asset Management. Warren Pustam, CFA, CPA, E verKey Global Partners, was a ppointed as CFASB programme co-chair. “I look forward to working with the other members of our board, CFA Institute, and other local societies,” said Mr Dorsett. All of the diverse talent in t he CFASB’s membership will h elp to carry out our chief mandate advancing the investment profession by establishing and maintaining the highest standards of professional excellence and integrity.” Ms Beneby added: “As CFA Institute and its member societies and chapters around the globe continue to set the standards for excellence in the investment management industry around the world, I am e ager to work closely with C hristopher Dorsett and the CFA Institute to continue to elevate our commitment to strong ethics, continuing education and consummate professionalism.” The CFASB, with a current membership of 58 professionals, including 47 CFA charter holders, is affiliated to the CFA Institute. CFA Institute is the global, non-profit professional association that administers the Chartered Financial Analyst curriculum and examination programme worldwide. CFASB’s mission is to advance the interests of the i nvestment community and to m aintain the highest standards of professional excellence and integrity. The CFASB board of directors is composed of nine investment professionals, all of whom are elected by the members oft he CFASB for a one-year term. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 2 2009, PAGE 7B Financial analysts elect new Board I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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in early 2010”, and was encouraged that the Government was putting in the ‘building blocks’ for tourism’s growth by actions such as eliminating the Customs and Immigration overtime charges levied on airlines flying into Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA While some initial excitement had been generated by the fact April 2009 air arrivals to Nassau/Paradise Island were only down by 0.4 per cent or less than 1,500 persons year-overyear, and were off 5 per cent for the Bahamas as a whole, the comparisons were somewhat m isleading. This was because Easter, traditionally a peak travel period for the Bahamian tourism industry, fell in March during 2008, not April. But Mr Sands said yesterday: “There still remain signs of some difficult times throughout the summer. We continue to see some softness in the market, although the level of fall-off month-over-month seems to be decreasing. “But that’s not a true indication things are on the rebound. Not at all. The hotel industry still faces a difficult remainder of 2009, and looks forward to some stabilisation in 2010, moving forward.” The BHA president said it “remains to be seen” whether the numerous discounts hotels are offering this summer on room rates and other charges would be enough to counter the single greatest factor impacting the Bahamian tourism industry, namely US consumer confidence of lack of it. While the downward trend impacting rates was persisting, Mr Sands told Tribune Business: “What is significant is that the fall-off in air arrivals from our primary market, Florida, seems to have decreased, so the percentage fall-off every month seems to be less, especially from Florida. “But when you add up the aggregate revenues from the major hotels, they’re still; in the plus-20 per cent negative position year-over-year. We still have a big hold to dig ourselves out of this year.” Mr Sands said the more than 20 per cent decline in year-overyear revenue comparatives was caused by a mixture of discounted rates and lower occupancy levels. “Unfortunately, operating expenses are not decreasing at that level, so the erosion of forecast income is great for many properties,” he said. “I’m assured that companies are doing their best to re-engineer themselves to manage expenses in a variety of ways to mitigate against that level of fall-off, but they’re not able to do that for all concerned. “It’s still a very difficult trading period, and we need to get through the rest of the year without any major casualties, and then take advantage of opportunities that present themselves in 2010.” On a more optimistic note, the BHA president added that the Government and private sector were continuing to work on expanding airlift and the number of airlines serving the Bahamas as this would increase the destination’s attractiveness. Referring to the Customs and Immigration overtime charges that incoming airlines had been forced to pay at Lynden Pin dling International Airport (LPIA Business: “That is a fundamental element that has been eliminated. That is greatly going to assist us in 2010.” The Government, and its minister of tourism and aviation, had secured a “victory in eliminating this impediment to the cost of air travel”, something that would “lay a solid foundation for improvements, certainly in 2010”. Asked about the overtime charges’ negative impact on airlift into New Providence and other Bahamian destinations, Mr Sands said: “When you see an air fare costing ‘x’ dollars, and taxes and levies are double that amount or a significant part of it, it makes the cost of air travel to the Bahamas extremely expensive. “And when you have competing destinations that can be accessed at lower air fare costs, it puts us in a very negative competitive position.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, JULY 2 2009 THE TRIBUNE No hotel ‘rebound’ despite decrease in air arrivals fall-off F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s Share your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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house. Staff attrition had also factored into the mix, with departing employees not replaced and existing salaries maintained at the same level across the board. Meanwhile, Ms Harper said Bahamas Waste expected to start cardboard recycling from its purpose-built facility during the current 2009 third quarter, which lasts from July to September. The main customers (suppliers of waste cardboard) will be the likes of Bahamian wholesalers and liquor stores, those firms possessing “the richer cardboard that does not have the food waste”. And with government approval having been recently received, Ms Harper said B ahamas Waste was now sourcing equipment” for its $500,000 biodiesel facility. “We are preparing the land, and I think that within another eight weeks we will see some construction going on in terms of the basic structure to house that operation,” Ms Harper told Tribune Business. Produced Bahamas Waste had been told by the Government that any biodiesel it produced was for its own internal uses only, and the company anticipated that the benefits from using it asa fuel source for its vehicle fleet and in other parts of its operations would increase in line with fuel price rises. “We’re just now generating a client base, touching base with waste oil customers,” Ms Harpe r said. “We had some people w ho jumped ahead of us without waiting for government approval. We’ve been told some of the cruise ships have made arrangements with other countries. We’re starting from scratch with that, so we’re hoping some of the resources are still there.” Bahamas Waste was also able to reduce its accounts receivable during the 2009 first quarter, bringing them down to $1.471 million from $1.496 million at 2008 year-end. Ms Harper attributed this to t he fact that Bahamas Waste h ad now stopped collecting from customers once accounts were 60 days past due, as opposed to the previous 90-day limit. Majority The vast majority of Bahamas Waste’s customers are businesses and commercial establishments, with residential waste and garbage collections largely confined to gated communities and those who did not want the government service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f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ahamas Waste profits bout 50% higher’ than budgeted F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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ment, it was important that Abaco Markets be “prudent” and build up its liquidity/cash position especially given the current economic slowdown. Emphasising that the company’s position had not changed from the one announced at the annual general meeting (AGM for the year that ended on Jan-u ary 31, 2008, Mr Watchorn said the Board and management would review the dividend situation “ once the results for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2010,w ere in”. “At this point in time, we will wait until then,” Mr Watchorn told Tribune Business. “I know there is an expectation of dividends, but people need to[ understand] that we incurred significant losses over a four to five-year period, repaid a significant amount of debt, and the company needs to be in a healthy position before it can resume dividend payments. “We hope that will be at the e nd of this financial year. By the end of February, March, we will know the results, and the Board will sit down and make its decision as to whether we resume dividend payments. You have to build up your reserves before you look at dividend payments again.” Mr Watchorn added: “We’ll be prudent and take intoa ccount the economic factors next year. We know our shareholders need a return on their investment, and they’ve not had one for a number of years. “We’re working to get back t o the full dividend. That’s a sign of the company getting back to full health.” Given the relatively large number of issued shares, some 15.3 million, Mr Watchorn saidt he Board was likely to calculate any dividend by determining the total sum it would be prudent to return to investors, rather than set a dividends per share figure. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, JULY 2 2009 THE TRIBUNE 5 2wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y P revious CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1 .841.28Abaco Markets1.391.390.000.1270.00010.90.00% 11.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.436.94Bank of Bahamas6.946.940.000.2440.26028.43.75% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.603.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2 .372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.2010.18Cable Bahamas11.3911.390.001.4060.2508.12.19% 2.902.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.005410.2490.04011.01.46% 7.505.50Commonwealth Bank (S15.645.640.000.4190.36013.56.38% 4 .781.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.323.06-0.260.1110.05227.61.70% 2.951.32Doctor's Hospital1.771.770.000.2400.0807.44.52% 8.207.50Famguard7.767.760.000.4200.30018.53.87% 12.5010.00Finco10.9710.970.000.3220.52034.14.74% 1 1.7910.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.3810.380.000.7940.35013.13.37% 5.554.95Focol (S5.095.090.000.3320.15015.32.95% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9.025.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.0010.50J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.37871.3124CFAL Bond Fund1.37871.874.83 3.03512.8988CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.8988-1.40-3.35 1.47301.3940CFAL Money Market Fund1.47302.745.66 3.60903.1821Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.18216.01-13.90 12.920912.2702Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.92092.405.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.5448-0.020.54 100.000093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund93.1992-3.33-6.76 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.56119.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.25111.724.12 1.05781.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.05782.135.78 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0271-0.572.71 1.05541.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.05541.745.54 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L L L L : : C C O O L L I I N N A A 2 24 4 2 2 5 5 0 0 2 2 7 70 0 1 1 0 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L LF F I I D D E E L LI I T T Y Y 2 24 4 2 23 35 5 6 6 7 7 7 7 6 6 4 4 | | F FG G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K KE E T T S S 2 2 4 4 2 23 3 9 9 6 64 40 0 0 00 0 | | C C O O L L O ON N I I A A L L 2 24 4 2 2 -5 50 02 2 7 7 5 5 2 2 5 5F INDEX: CLOSE 789.53 | YTD -5.43% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSMONDAY, 29 JUNE 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,579.12 | CHG -0.27 | %CHG -0.02 | YTD -133.24 | YTD % -7.78BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 31-May-09 31-Mar-09 31-Dec-07 30-Apr-09 31-May-09 31-May-09 W W W WW W . .B B I I S S X X B B A A H H A A M M A A S S . .C C O O M M | | T T E E L L E E P P H HO ON N E E : :2 2 4 4 2 2 -3 32 2 3 3 -2 23 3 3 3 0 0 | | F F A A C C S S I I M M I I L L E E : : 2 2 4 42 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 -2 23 3 2 2 0 0NAV Date 31-May-09 19-Jun-09 30-Apr-09 31-May-09 31-Mar-09 31-May-09 /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-XQH 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-XQH 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-XQH 7KH/LTXLGDWRU L V $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-XQH 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-XQH 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV D D I I V V I I D D E E N N D D , , f f r r o o m m 1 1 B B

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 74F/23C Low: 76F/24C Low: 76F/24C Low: 77F/25C Low: 78 F/26 C Low: 80F/27C Low: 79 F/26 C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 90F/32C High: 88F/31C High: 88 F/31 C High: 87 F/31 C High: 88F/31C High: 88 F/31C High: 90F/32C Low: 82F/28C High: 92F/33C Low: 80 F/27 C High: 92F/33C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 72F/22C High: 90 F/32 C Low: 77F/25C High: 88 F/31 Low: 74F/23C High: 87F/31C Low: 75 F/24C High: 91F/33C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 94F/34C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 92F/33C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 92F/33C Low: 77F/25C High: 94 F/34 C Low: 82F/28C High: 95F/35C High: 88 F/31 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 2 ND , 2009, PAGE 11B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Partly sunny, a t-storm in the p.m. Patchy clouds.Partial sunshine.Mostly sunny. Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 90 Low: 79 High: 90 High: 89 High: 91 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Times of clouds and sun. High: 92 Low: 80 Low: 79 Low: 80 AccuWeather RealFeel 113F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 89F 107-87F 100-84F 100-93F 100-93F Low: 81 TODAYTONIGHTFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................93F/34C Low ....................................................81F/27C Normal high ......................................88F/31C Normal low ........................................75F/24C Last year's high .................................. 86 F/30C Last year's low .................................. 73 F/23C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ................................................17.70" Normal year to date ....................................18.60" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Full Last New First Jul. 7 Jul. 15Jul. 21Jul. 28 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:24 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 8:04 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 4:20 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 2:25 a.m. Today Friday Saturday Sunday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 4:39 a.m.2.210:33 a.m.0.2 5:15 p.m.2.811:36 p.m.0.3 5:33 a.m.2.111:25 a.m.0.2 6:06 p.m.2.8----6:23 a.m.2.212:27 a.m.0.3 6:54 p.m.2.812:14 p.m.0.2 7:10 a.m.2.21:13 a.m.0.3 7:38 p.m.2.81:01 p.m.0.2 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco88/3178/25c88/3177/25pc Amsterdam83/2861/16s85/2963/17sh Ankara, Turkey86/3055/12pc84/2854/12c Athens88/3173/22s90/3273/22s Auckland59/1552/11r60/1551/10sh Bangkok91/3279/26sh91/3277/25sh Barbados86/3077/25sh86/3077/25pc Barcelona81/2771/21pc82/2771/21s Beijing100/3770/21s100/3774/23s Beirut80/2675/23s76/2476/24s Belgrade88/3169/20t87/3069/20pc Berlin84/2864/17sh86/3064/17s Bermuda82/2773/22r82/2772/22sh Bogota66/1845/7t65/1845/7t Brussels86/3065/18sh86/3061/16r Budapest93/3368/20s93/3364/17pc Buenos Aires57/1346/7pc59/1551/10s Cairo101/3873/22s98/3675/23s Calcutta91/3284/28t92/3383/28t Calgary72/2245/7s67/1946/7pc Cancun90/3276/24sh91/3274/23t Caracas79/2671/21t82/2771/21t Casablanca82/2769/20s82/2768/20pc Copenhagen80/2662/16sh81/2764/17s Dublin68/2055/12r70/2155/12sh Frankfurt86/3068/20sh88/3168/20t Geneva 85/29 60/15 sh 84/2863/17t Halifax 66/18 56/13 c 69/20 53/11 sh Havana 90/32 72/22 t 90/32 73/22 sh Helsinki 81/27 55/12pc72/2248/8sh Hong Kong 90/32 81/27 t 88/31 81/27r Islamabad 106/41 79/26 t 104/40 78/25 pc Istanbul86/3071/21s89/3171/21s Jerusalem 85/29 59/15s80/2660/15s Johannesburg 57/1338/3s57/1337/2s Kingston 90/3278/25sh89/3178/25s Lima72/2259/15s71/2157/13pc London88/3161/16pc82/2759/15pc Madrid95/3564/17pc97/3664/17s Manila91/3277/25t87/3078/25r Mexico City70/2155/12t70/2155/12t Monterrey104/4075/23s100/3776/24t Montreal72/2264/17r72/2263/17t Moscow72/2255/12sh68/2045/7pc Munich78/2560/15t83/2856/13t Nairobi80/2651/10pc79/2652/11c New Delhi 99/3779/26t101/3879/26t Oslo82/2761/16s83/2859/15s Paris90/3266/18sh88/3164/17sh Prague 82/27 59/15 t 82/27 57/13 t Rio de Janeiro78/2568/20s74/2368/20sh Riyadh106/4179/26s105/4080/26s Rome 86/30 66/18 t 88/31 68/20 pc St. Thomas89/3181/27s90/3282/27sh San Juan65/1832/0s68/2035/1pc San Salvador 88/31 73/22 t 87/30 74/23 t Santiago 61/1644/6s57/1343/6c Santo Domingo85/2973/22sh86/3073/22sh Sao Paulo 65/18 55/12 r 65/18 56/13r Seoul81/2766/18sh81/2766/18sh Stockholm 81/27 59/15 pc 75/23 50/10 pc Sydney 64/17 46/7 pc61/1646/7t Taipei93/3377/25t94/3481/27r T okyo 79/26 70/21 r 79/26 70/21 r T oronto 66/1859/15t77/2561/16t Trinidad91/3267/19sh84/2864/17sh V ancouver 75/23 58/14 s 77/2559/15s Vienna 87/3071/21s87/3068/20t W arsaw 85/29 63/17 t 84/28 58/14 s Winnipeg 70/21 49/9 pc 68/2051/10t H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayFriday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SE at 10-15 Knots2-4 Feet5-15 Miles82F Friday:SE at 10-15 Knots2-4 Feet5-15 Miles82F Today:SE at 10-15 Knots2-3 Feet5-15 Miles81F Friday:SE at 8-16 Knots2-4 Feet5-10 Miles81F Today:SE at 10-15 Knots2-4 Feet5-10 Miles81F Friday:SE at 7-14 Knots2-4 Feet5-10 Miles81F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque92/3367/19t90/3267/19t Anchorage73/2254/12pc70/2154/12c Atlanta92/3366/18s90/3268/20pc Atlantic City78/2564/17t83/2864/17t Baltimore83/2862/16t82/2764/17t Boston72/2263/17r79/2664/17t Buffalo68/2058/14t69/2058/14t Charleston, SC96/3574/23t94/3471/21pc Chicago74/2357/13pc84/2860/15s Cleveland70/2159/15c75/2360/15pc Dallas100/3776/24s100/3779/26pc Denver82/2758/14t81/2759/15t Detroit70/2157/13c81/2762/16pc Honolulu88/3175/23s88/3175/23s Houston99/3777/25t99/3778/25t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayFriday TodayFridayTodayFriday Indianapolis76/2458/14pc82/2766/18s Jacksonville94/3474/23t95/3575/23t Kansas City83/2868/20t84/2867/19t Las Vegas100/3779/26t104/4084/28pc Little Rock93/3368/20pc93/3372/22pc Los Angeles80/2666/18pc80/2664/17pc Louisville79/2664/17pc85/2967/19s Memphis92/3372/22pc87/3070/21pc Miami88/3178/25t90/3277/25t Minneapolis78/2562/16pc83/2861/16s Nashville83/2860/15pc87/3065/18pc New Orleans95/3579/26t96/3577/25t New York78/2568/20r78/2567/19t Oklahoma City98/3671/21pc100/3775/23pc Orlando90/3274/23t94/3476/24t Philadelphia82/2764/17t80/2665/18t Phoenix 106/41 86/30 t 104/4085/29t Pittsburgh70/2156/13t73/2258/14t Portland, OR 94/3457/13s92/3359/15s Raleigh-Durham 90/32 65/18 t 89/31 65/18 s St. Louis82/2767/19pc85/2969/20s Salt Lake City 84/28 64/17 t 88/3166/18t San Antonio 100/37 76/24 pc 98/36 77/25 s San Diego75/2368/20pc76/2466/18pc San Francisco 78/25 57/13 pc 75/2357/13pc Seattle84/2854/12s84/2856/13s T allahassee 97/3675/23t95/3574/23t T ampa 88/31 76/24 t 89/31 77/25t Tucson96/3577/25t97/3679/26t W ashington, DC 84/28 65/18t82/2766/18t UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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L IVING Waters Kingdom Ministries International is planning to host a business trade show this Saturday, featuring firms owned by its congregation members. The Kingdom Business Trade Show will bring together a variety of businesses in one location at the church grounds on Warren Street from 10am to 5pm. Some of the booths will i nclude retailers, health, beauty, a ttorneys, repair/building specialists, business services and more. Senior pastor and founder of Living Waters Kingdom Ministries, Raymond Wells said: “The trade show will provide a great opportunity for the public to identify businesses that are operating within the Kingdom requirements, while addressing the needs of today’s consumers.” T rade show chairman Toria no Lloyd noted that all of the businesses participating in the event are owned by members of the church. Organisers of the event said there would be special performances by locally-renowned Christian artists and over $5,000 worth of free gifts and prizes up for grabs. “We will be hosting this trade show under the theme, Koinonia, which relates to the unity of l ike minded believers,” he added. “This trade show will provide the community with an assurance that all is well, and that Kingdom business will not falter to an economic depression with the grace of God. The b usiness owners of LWKM are very thrilled about this new venture and excited to showcase their various services and products on such an impressive level. The trade show is open to the community, and all are welcome to join in this time of networking.” Since being founded by Pastor Wells in 1998, the church now increased its membership to 1,500 and hosts weekly Sund ay morning services, bible studies and marriage workshops and seminars. For additional information on The Kingdom Business trade show contact the church’s office at 242-326-7756 or e-mail info@.lwkm.org C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, JULY 2 2009 THE TRIBUNE Church plans to host business trade show To advertise, call 502-3371 ORGANISERS of the Kingdom Business Trade Show...

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The Tribune The T ribune M y V o i c e , M y N e w s p a p e r ! Thursday, July 2nd, 2009

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RELIGIOUS NEWS, STORIES AND C HURCH EVENT S Pg. 19The Tribune THURSDAY July 2, 2009

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b The Tribune P G 20 Thursday, July 2, 2009 RELIGION By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net BAHAMAS Faith Ministries’ (BFM summer conference titled The Assignment is setting a new standard in gospel ministr y as se veral church and community artists have collaborated to cr eat e a soundtrack for the event. Pr oduced by local gospel artist and youth minister DJ Counsellor, the music album features a cross section of genres all under the theme ‘Living Right In A World Gone Wrong.’ DJ Counsellor explained: “For this soundtrack I wanted to bring a different flavor, mixture, and variety. From R&B, Reggae, Culture, Reggae DanceHall, Hip Hop, and also Calypso and Rake n’ Scrape. s a straight-up gospel album not in the traditional church way, it is basically something that you can take to the streets that connects with everyone.” Also having a song and several features on this latest album, DJ Counsellor explained that the soundtrack also serves as an opportunity for exposure to some of the new artists he has rallied for the project. Aleithia Sweeting, 21, who hails from Five Porches of Deliverance Chur ch said: “For as long as I could remember music has been a part of my life, with both of my parents and brother being involved in the field. “I’ve just always been tagging along, but when I really started to develop a passion for music was last year while I was off to school, I started to play the guitar and I just started to sing and write music.” Aleithia said the tone her lyrics is one which encourages people to follow Christ , evangelises thr ough song, and shar es her love relationship with 21 -year-old Aleitha Sweeting is new to the music scene but is hop ing to establish a pres ence as a gospel artist through the Assignment soundtrack. ALSO on the Appointment album is 21-year-old Ryan Jupp, who recently performed with the artist Heavy Metal, and is the winner of BFMs 2008 talent jam. SEE page 24 Setting a new standard in gospel music

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MEDITATION The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, July 2, 2009 PG 21 WEare having rain storms that come so thick and fast that the ground seems unable to absorb it. Grass requires mowing weekly now, and the flowersa re in profusion. The colour green is everywhere and the dry and thirsty earth has been drenched for hours on end. What does this mean if you have planned a cookout, outdoor wedding or spor ting event? It means postponem ent, cancellations and disappointm ent. Sudden shifts to indoor arrangements may alter the ambience and dampen the spirit of the occasion. Pedestrians have puddles to avoid and speeding cars to anticipate as vehicles driven by uncaring or distracted motorists provide unsolicited and unexpected mud baths. What does it mean to gardeners? It means answered prayers after months of drought bringing long awaited flowers and vegetables dying in the heat. It means the reward for long hours of back-breaking labour for farmers, and bountiful harvests to sell and share with family and friends. We need a spiritual rainstorm to inundate our islands, to wash us of sordid sins, and “r e-green” our parched souls. We truly need an anointing by the Holy Spirit such as never before experienced in the Bahamas. W e need the Lord. We need the reign of God in our lives and the love of God in our hearts. What does this mean for those who reject God? It means a life that could have climbed mor e mountains, forded more streams and followed more rainbows in order to realise more Godinspired dreams. It means no sweet fellowship with the Holy Spirit, and no promise that the best is yet to come fora ll eternity. For those who accept a life founded on godly principles, who seek Jesus Christ as Saviour, and follow our Redeemer as Lord, the glory of God may be glimpsed from time to time, the comfor t of the Lord is real, and even s uffering will be used to bring praise to G od’s name. Allow God to so shower you with the blessings of peace, love, joy, hope and faith. Admit your need for order in the chaos, patience in the delays, stamina for the deadlines, and forgiveness for your own failures and those of others. When next you hear the rain, why not pray for a personal saturation by the Spirit? Don’t put up the umbrella of doubt or denial. Accept God’s gift of a new life and then tell someone about the benefits of a shower of blessing. Showers of blessings REV.ANGELA C BOSFIELD PALACIOUS Allow God to so shower you with the blessings of peace, love, joy, hope and faith. Admit your need for order in the chaos, patience in the delays, stamina for the deadlines, and forgiveness for your own failures and those of others. The brothers of the Iota Epsilon Lambda Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Frater nity , Inc. r ecently attended the 9am worship service at St George's Anglican Church on Montrose Ave. The brothers and their families attended the ser vice in r ecognition of the instal lation of Chapter President Dave Forbes and his new ExecutiveT eam. The br others of the frater nity wer e pleased to join their fra ternity brother, Fr Kingsley Knowles, Rector of St George's Anglican Church. Pictured with Fr Knowles Back Row L R L Gerarr Archer (Associate Editor of the Sphinx), Oscar Dorsette (Member Rolle (member Russell (Financial Secretary Front Row L R Ricardo Deveaux (Historian Lynden Maycock (Immediate Past President), Kevin Basden (member (President), Marcus Lang (VicePresident) Brothers of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity attends St. George’s Anglican Church

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THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS The Tribune P G 22 Thursday, July 2, 2009 RELIGION A plethora of churches During the early 1930's the work of the Methodist Church was adversely affected by the activities of other denominations. Rev Walker in the report to the Synod of 1932 informed the Synod that "at Staniard Creek we suffer from a plethora of churches." But the same report that speaks of the proselitising activities of one church in particular, has at least two notes of hope: the request made by the children of the 'Sunday School for a "portion of ground" be given them to clear and cultivate and the statement that "at Stafford Creek we have a good cause ..." One of the inter esting highlights of the history of the Methodist Church in Andr os is the "Spongers' Mission." There was a committee called "The Andr os and Spongers' Mission Committee." In 1936, such persons as Revs R P Dyer, M.A. and E.M. Walker along with Messrs J.A. Bethel, J.P., GW.K. Roberts, G.M. Cole and K. Moss served on this committee. The following extract comes from the reports of the circuits for the 1936 Synod. "Special mention must be made of the work among the spongers at 'The Mud.' Lanter n services are held whenever the minister at Andros goes to these cays, and we can r epor t con gr egations of four and five hundr ed men at these services." The 1936 reports from the circuits also point out that "In Andros circuit too, the minister in charge does a great deal of medical work ... this unity of healing, spiritual and physical is something for which we give thanks to God." On one of his trips around the circuit lasting 16 days, 12 teeth were extracted, 14 bottles of medicine dispensed, and a fishhook removed froma finger. During the 1930's the ministers, who lived at Staniard Creek, used the mission sloop "W illiam Turton" as a means of transpor tation ar ound the cir cuit. The jour ney from Staniard Creek to Mastic Point would take about two hours in good weather and much longer in poor weather condi tions. The minister would sometimes stop in at Stafford Creek and then journey to Mastic Point where he would spend one or two weeks car r y ing out pastoral duties. He would then move on to Nicholl's Town before making the journey back to Staniard Creek. One of the highlights of the 1950's was the ar rival of the Rev Edwin T aylor in the Bahamas. Another highlight was the ministry of the Rev W Makepeace. It is r epor ted that the Rev Henley B Perry was the first minister to reside in the present manse/mission house at Mastic Point (ie, on a permanent basis). Rev Perry spearheaded the renovation of the Mastic Point church during his term of service in the circuit (late 1960's early 1970's extension on the chapel at Mastic Point, complete with a youth hall, kitchen and toilet facilities, was dedicated on June 29, 1985 during the ministry of the Rev Dr Kenneth A Huggins, who was also serving as Chairman of the Bahamas District. Rev Dr Colin B Archer served as superintendent of the circuit on two occasions: during the 1975-76 church year and during the 1985-86 chur ch year . Thanks be to Almighty God for His ser vants who have labour ed faithfully in the extension of His kingdom on the island of Andr os, sons and daughters of Methodism whose only business was to cry "Behold the Lamb!" Rev J Barrett Brindley served the circuit from 1902-1908; Rev James W Dinsdale 1909-1910 and Rev John Park Jackson 1910-1914. These were preceded and followed by many others, some we name here: Revs Whitefield, Charles Cur r y and W illiam Makepeace, Eric M W alker. Lay people played a vital part in the life of the Methodist Chur ch on Andr os. W e name a few: Shadrack W oodside, Elisabeth Butler, Pearline Scott, Beatrice Evans, John Wilson, Terevous Watkins, John Hedden, Jacob S Rolle, Sarah Bain, Ezekiel Bain, Virginia McQueen and Roxanna. W e thank G od for those who are still making history as they continue to labour for Him. The Mission of the Andros Circuit In 1986 the question was raised : What of the future? And the answer g iven: The future of the Methodist C hurch on Andros has to be considered along with economic and social factors. It is within the framework of the society that we make our contribution. Therefore, as we think of the future, we think of what we can do to affect conditions on the island. The mission of the Andros circuit is tied up with the development of people and resources. There are good prospects for the work of our church. We say this because of the loyalty and the Christian witness of our people, because of the presence of enthusiastic young people in our churches and because of our abiding faith that God has a mission for His church in this place. The emphasis of our circuit as we look to the future is on our young people -preparing our youth to be valuable members of church and society. To this end we seek to establish children's clubs and youth meetings. A library which was started in Mastic Point years ago still continues to pr ovide a ver y impor tant ser vice for the childr en of the ar ea, Methodist and non-Methodist alike. The general consensus of the cir cuit is summed up in these words: "We are expecting great things from God." May God str engthen the Andros circuit of Methodist Churches that we may be steadfast in our deter mination that we will not lower the flame of Christian witness held by the Methodist Church, but will aspire with all our power, God being our helper, to keep the flame alight so that we may pr ove wor thy of our heritage. W e ask the question: Is the flame fully alight or just flickering in 2009? (Next time: Part 35 – The Greek Orthodox Church of the Annunciation) The Methodist Church in Andros 1930 1986 PART 34 JIM LA WLOR Friday, June 26 eight thousand men gathered at the world famous Potter’s House for the annual Man Power Conference hosted by prince of preachers T.D. Jakes. For the past ten years Bishop Jakes has brought together over 70,000 men at these strategic meetings to address the unique needs of men and their challenges in the 21st century. The Bahamas’ own Dr Myles Munroe was a conference speaker at the event and was invited for the past four years to address the men’s conference. The theme of this year’s conference was “Men and Vision and Dreams.” Dr Myles Munroe attends the Man Power Conference in Dallas Texas

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FEARLESS The Tribune Thursday, July 2, 2009 PG 23 RELIGION 1) "BEAT IT" ( 1983) Emerging from the Grammy Award Winning masterpiece, Thriller , the cool mix of Van Halen’s heavy metal and Jackson’s easy, albeit electrifying vocals, made this song an instant hit. However, as fierce as the song sounds, there is also a timely lesson to be learnt, and that my readers is- ‘Beat It, just Beat It!’ Simply put, whether you walk, run, drive or fly, stay away from trouble; you know, evil, in all it’s forms. Because at the end of the day, ‘It doest matter whose wrong or right.’ Romans 13:13-14 2) "BILLIE JEAN" ( 1983) Well upon discovering the event, or alleged one, behind one of MJ’s most popular songs, it only validated the life lesson to be learnt. Needless to say, young persons tend to act considerably faster than they thinkbut, if they want to avoid a real life scare, maybe they should ‘ Beat It’ before they meet a ‘ Billie Jean’. Matthew 26:41 3) "WE ARE THE WORLD" ( 1985) While we strive to do what is right in every aspect of our lives, we ought to realise that even as individuals, we are in this reality, this worldtogether, and maybe well intended actions are great, but true love for one another lasts longer. 1 Corinthians 13 4) "MAN IN THE MIRROR" (1988) Self-evaluation! Are there really, any, fitting words to elaborate on the importance of such a crucial assessment we all need to embrace? Y es and no. It’s just so personal, so honest and so necessary. So draw your finest breath, as you gaze at the maze in your reflection, and as you release, allow the impurities to both solve and dissolve. 1 John 2:15-17 5) "BLACK OR WHITE" ( 1991) Lastly, I have heard and read numerous tributes for the ‘King of Pop’, a title given to Jackson by friend and actress Elizabeth Taylor. And although his closest friends and industry associates, all have their special, personal memories of the man behind the icon, many tend to agree with the millions of fans worldwide, who give Jackson credit for his successful and genuine fusion of black and white cultur e for a generation, particularly with the release of, ‘ Black or White’a song that to this day never fails to unite all people; when many a problem seeks to sever such a connection. In closing, I will remember above all else Mr Jackson’s incredible passion for life, his ability to be truly present, and undeniably himself. Luke 10:27 R.I.P Michael Jackson, Far rah Fawcett , Fatback & Rodger (a pet God bless the families. The spiritual lessons I've learnt from 5 popular Michael Jackson songs I BELIEVE that there is nothing worse than a grown man who is in a good frame of mind; but yet doesn’ t know wher e he’ s going in life. Or , have you ever seen a family that is working well together as a unit and soon after the parents die, the family falls apart; the house, the car, the yard and everything else goes to the dumps. Then this is what can often be hear d fr om per sons in the community: “Boy , if Mr and Mrs John Doe were alive this place would have never looked like this” Her s what is being said in the above statement even though it’s not being heard: “the children of Mr and Mrs John Doe are very irresponsible and immature.” Now , I know that just about ever yone of us knows a family or two that may fall in the category of Mr and Mrs John Doe’ s family; or maybe that’ s your fam ily , but I’ve got good news for you; all is not lost, as long as there is life there is hope. The road to success in life for the grown man who doesn’t know where he’s going and the John Doe type family has not nor will it ever catch Father Yahweh off guard or by surprise; for He’s the Alpha and Omega, the all knowing God. As long as we’r e her e on ear th, God will always put people in our path to give a word of wisdom and direction; now whether we receive it is another story. The refusal of such wisdom and dir ection could result in a person experiencing Hell on earth. As a nation the Bahamas is about to celebrate its 36th Independence on July 10. Yet based upon the way things ar e today in this countr y , the only logical question is “Where are we going, and what are our plans to get there?” The passing of a great Bahamian (Fat Back Marshall), and others is truly sad news; but the saddest news of all is to hear the present prime minister, Hubert Ingraham say that he’s going to of fer himself for the position of prime minister the next time ar ound. Then, to add insult to injury, the leader of the opposition Perry Christie has also fasten his seat belt. Something is seriously wrong with us as a people when we’ve got to settle for the one dimensional leadership of Old Sitting Bull and the Rock of Gibraltar; it’ s obvious that personal desir e for power has blinded the eyes of these two great men, and they’re not looking at a futuristic Bahamas that will empower Bahamians. It’s all about the GUN / POWER who has it? The Rabbit or The Far mer; and as a result the nation has to go through the wilderness experience for another four to eight years. If ther e is ever a time that the wor d wor thless or “wutless” hits home that time is now; I do believe that Prime Minister Ingraham is a ver y good leader and so is Mr Christie; but their political power plays has placed them in the category of failures for not preparing successors. Watch this!As a man, a real man with leadership potentials and aspirations, I could not be a member of par liament today and seeing the dir ection in which this country is heading, and the deterioration of the state of af fairs of our citizens and infrastr uctur e; and not make known my intentions to challenge the present leader’s seats of both FNM and PLP. I must give props to Mr Ingraham and Mr Christie for methodically tak ing away whatever kind of fire and desire the (children parliament may have had to become the next prime minister . Sir Lynden did his twenty five; and it seems as if his two political sons have concluded to share the next twenty five between themselves 10-15 or 15-10 whatever; and God help the person who tries to disrupt their plans. The prime minister made his and Perry Christie’ s secr et decisions, public when he indicated his r etur n for a thir d term to beat the PLP. This was done just to stoke the fire of the silly grassroots, political junkies who ignorantly think that Mr Ingraham and Mr Christie ar e arch-enemies; nothing could be further from the truth. From a natural perspective my only question to you two political genius is this: ‘As a nation, wher e ar e we going?” I have accepted the fact that there is no other minister or minister of state with the testosterone to stand up and seek to bring about visionary leadership for a Bahamas of tomorrow.But rest assured Mr Farmer and Mr Rabbit, the gun / power will be taken from your hands in such an embarrassing manner if you don’t gracefully bow out. As it is in the natural, so is it in the spiritual; the r eligious leaders ar e just as guilty for the mess that this nation find it’s self in. The older chur ch leaders today have done such a hatchet job with their er r o neous religious ways and financially raping the people; to the point that 95 per cent of the younger church leaders have br oken away and star ted their own ministries in order to get wealth. The proper exchange and affirmation of sons by fathers have not taken place; ther efor e the thousands of divided small churches will never reach their full potential due to the spirit of strife and competition. As soon as these religious fools can stop being immature and put down their petty dif fer ences, come together as a unit; the politicians will have a true body (not the religious Sanhedrin /Christian Council) that they can go to for Godly advice as to which direction the country should be taking. E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or Ph.225-3850 or 1-242-441-2021 Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int’l Where are we going? TONI STYLES PASTOR MATTHEW ALLEN

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The Tribune P G 24 Thursday, July 2, 2009 RELIGION God. On the Assignment soundtrack she has one track titled I Just Want You Jesus . s a song of satisfaction in that I am satisfied with Christ, but it is also about desperation. Meaning now that I’ve found Christ, it’ s all I want, and I’m going to pursue and give my all to know him more. This song is really about getting to a place where you really don’t pursue anything but God, and anything that gets in the way must be r eleased.” As artist, her greatest hope is to share the glory and love of God, and with so many unable to find that love, she hopes her music will help point them in the right direction. Universal Soldiers of Christ (USC members 15-year-old Deando Whitfield and EJ ‘Merchandise’ Johnson say about two years ago they wer e approached by gospel artist Najie Dunn to join him in studio to fur ther develop their talents. From there they started writing more lyrics which at first were non-Christian, but eventually decided that their gr eater calling was to minister thr ough gospelrap. In a world where so many are influenced negatively by the lyrics inside popular music, they felt they could use those same beats to minister a dif fer ent message. s very effective, especially coming fr om young people like us going to peo ple both young and old in the communi ty, our rap speaks to everyone. “Through our lyrics we try to prevent crime, we try to change the minds of the youth, many of whom grow up in the ghetto not knowing the dif ference between right from wrong.” Having two tracks featured on the Appointment compilation CD, USC said the first song Just Praise God incor porates the instrumental of Lil Wayne’s song Get Of f The Cor ner . “This song says no matter what you do, whatever comes your way, any trial or tribulation we must always praise God because it’ s going to be a brighter day The second song which features DJ Counsellor is called Over come, and is about over coming the things that pr e vent people from getting closer to Christ. Also on the album is 21-year-old Ryan Jupp, who recently performed with the artist Heavy Metal in his debut concert last month. First appearing on the local music scene last October with the release of his hit single Inside Cr ying , which helped him to win BFMs talent jam, R yan said he has no plans of slowing down as he intends to pursue music as a main career. “This is what I will be doing for a living, in no less than four years God haspr omised and made provisions for me to move and do this full time.” His songs Do Your Thing and Oppor tunity , both help in sharing the stor y of Christ and his purpose for each of us. Ryan said as a young man coming from a place of being lost in the world and then being found by God, helping others to see the beauty and reward of Christ has become his life’s mission. Last but not least is Jakewood Ferguson also known as Lyrically Bless, who has been on the scene as a gospel ar tist for a number of years. He said his ultimate message to the youth is to take control of their lives rather than just having it pass them by. “Everyday I see youth who are not on that positive run, they’re just basically sluggish and tend to for get who keeps them alive. My approach is to try and find a stronger way to pull them in, and I want to use music as a positive way ofr eaching them.” With one song on the Assignment soundtrack with Ryan, Jakewood said he is looking toward to the two of them producing a future project to share the wor d of God through rap. “A lot of secular artist out there push so hard for the things they want, and we want to push even har der for something gr eater than fame of for tune, it’s for the love of God.” The Assignment soundtrack is now available at BFM on Carmichael Road. FROM page 20 The Assignment ANGLICANSmarked the feast day of St Peter’s in Knowles, Cat Island by turning out in droves to welcome new Diocesan Bishop Laish Zane Boyd. This was his first time he visited the island as Diocesan Bishop. During his visit, Bishop Boyd met with the congregation of St Mary’s in Old Bight to assure them of his continued support in their efforts to restore St Mary the Virgin. On Sunday morning Bishop Boyd celebrated and preached in the quaint settlement of Orange Creek in the parish church of St. Agnes. For the patronal festival, Bishop Boyd took his text from John’s Gospel Chapter 21 vs. 15-19 in which Jesus admonishes Simon Peter to feed his sheep. He reminded the congregation that the whole Eucharist celebration is an act of feeding. Bishop Boyd told them that it is not only the priest or bishop responsibility to feed the masses but also the task of the laity (laypersons/persons sitting in the pews). He commented that everyone wants to be fed sumptuously when they are invited for dinner or a social gathering but feeding the physical man’s need is not enough. He said there is also a spiritual need that needs to be met and satisfied. And only after these two needs ar e met will Christians r each the realms of St Peter s and St. Paul’s. During the service Eulie LaFleur from Christ the King, Ridgeland Park, Nassau presented Fr Chester Burton with a brand new funeral pall (used to drape coffins during the funeral mass) given in memor y of her dear depar ted mother and father . At the culmination of the Eucharistic celebration the members processed singing some of the ancient hymns of the church to the summit of Mount St Peter’s to the home of Eloise Dr usilla Seymour for r efr eshments. CAT ISLANDERS CELEBRATE ANOTHER PATRONAL FESTIVAL Bishop Boyd blessing Pall Procession by members