Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Mim blowin’ it

91F
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SUNNY WITH
“Sex STORM

Volume: 105 No.181

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009

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AND REAL a

BAHAMAS BIGGEST

Security a

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SEE ‘THE ARTS’ SECTION



BIC edging
closer to
privatisation

Wife’s death may have
led to tragedy at work

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are investigating
an apparent suicide on Prince
Charles Drive after a security
guard at the Pepsi Bottling
Company allegedly hanged
himself in his booth shortly
after 3pm yesterday.

The victim was last night
named as 33-year-old Mark
Campbell, of Fox Dale Road.

Reportedly depressed due
to his wife’s death in Octo-
ber last year, Mr Campbell is
alleged to have been experi-
encing financial difficulties in
the past few months, which
may have lead to him taking
his own life.

However, a fellow security
guard who discovered the
body during the shift change,
said he was shocked by the
tragedy as his co-worker and
friend was always “jovial.”

According to Police Super-
intendent Elsworth Moss, the
officer in charge of CDU,
attempts were made to revive
Mr Campbell but to no avail.

An initial review of the

body by the police found
there were no outward signs
of trauma, and neither his
feet, or his hands were bound
as in the case with 32-year-
old Adrian Major who was
found hanging from a tree on
Saturday evening in the Fox
Hill area.

At this stage, the police are
officially classifying this most
recent death as “suspicious”.

The police also yesterday
released the identify of the
young man who was gunned
down while shooting dice on
Balfour Avenue on Monday.

According to the police,
Dewitt Butler, 26, of
Carmichael Road, was shot a
number of times about the
body while gambling with a
group of other men at the
side of a building sometime
around 7.30pm.

Police have questioned a
number of individuals and are
actively searching for a “per-
son of interest” in this case.

Reportedly, Mr Butler was
shot after an argument erupt-
ed among the men.

Police investigations con-
tinue.

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PRIME MINISTER Hubert
Ingraham speaks in the House.



UNDER THE THEME ‘children have the right to be safe’, Bahamians gathered in Rawson Square last evening for
a special candle light vigil in protest of child abuse. The event was staged by the National Child Protection Coun-
cil, the Bahamas Christian Council and the Crisis Centre. The organisations urged Bahamians to come out and
bring their candles in the fight against child abuse.

‘Stop the hurt, stop the tears, stop the abuse,’ was the motto of the vigil.

Harl Taylor murder
trial to open today

Four NIB bosses to
he mate redundant
in sweeping changes

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

SWEEPING changes in the
executive structure of the
National Insurance Board will
see four bosses made redundant
today as the board aims to
address “deficiencies identified
by several internal and exter-
nal operational assessments” of
the board, Director Algernon
Cargill said yesterday.

Senior Deputy Director
Anthony Curtis, Deputy Direc-
tor of Special Projects Cecile
Bethel, Deputy Director of
Information Technology Andre
Bethel and Assistant Director

SEE page 10

AFTER a lengthy
jury selection process,
the trial into the mur-
der of international-
ly-recognised hand-
bag designer Harl
Taylor is expected to
open today.

Troyniko McNeil,
22, is charged with
murdering Mr Taylor
some time between
Saturday, November 17, and
Sunday, November 18, 2007.

McNeil, who has pleaded
not guilty, is being repre-
sented by attorneys Murrio
Ducille, Krysta Smith, Alex
Morley and Kenneth Wal-



1 4

Harl Taylor

lace Whitfield.

Mr Taylor, 37, was
found stabbed to
death at Mountbatten
House on West Hill
Street, two days after
Dr Thaddeus McDon-
ald, 59, a senior acade-
mic at the College of
the Bahamas, was
found bludgeoned to
death, apparently with
a clothing iron, in his nearby
Queen Street guest house. To
date, no charges have been
filed in relation to Dr
McDonald’s murder.

SEE page 10

ne |



THE stage is set for the
Bahamas Telecommuni-
cations Company to be
privatised after the regu-
latory structure is
approved and due dili-
gence completed by the
privatisation committee,
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham has confirmed.

In a communication to
the House of Assembly
yesterday, he said inter-
ested parties would be
invited to enter a pre-
qualification process in
order to be considered as
potential strategic part-
ners.

“This process is
designed to allow the gov-
ernment to determine
which potential partners
are appropriate from a
strategic as well as a finan-
cial standpoint,” he said.

“Those who pre-qualify
will then be invited to par-
ticipate in a formal due
diligence exercise, ulti-
mately resulting in an eco-
nomic bidding process for
the 51 percent stake in
BTC.”

In the coming weeks,
he said the government
would launch a formal
sale process relating to 51
percent of the ownership
of BTC.

SEE page 10

Nurses Union
president is
accused of

‘abandoning’

members

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Nurses Union
president has been accused of
“abandoning” her members
ahead of today’s scheduled meet-
ing with the Government to dis-
cuss health insurance coverage.

At around 3.15pm yesterday,
BNU President Cleola Hamil-
ton told The Tribune she was in
South Africa.

But a source close to the nego-
tiations between the BNU and
the Government, commenting
on Ms Hamilton’s “vacation” ,
claimed she “would have to be
superwoman” to make it back in

SEE page 10

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS” LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Dream of owning home

Man held in
connection with
John Bull robbery

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Police have apprehended a man in con-
nection with the armed robbery of the John Bull Store at the
Our Lucaya Resort last weekend.

Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle said the suspect, a 26-year-
old resident of Freeport, was taken into police custody yes-
terday morning.

The John Bull Store was robbed by a lone gunman on Sun-
day, June 21.

Shots

The robber entered the store around 1.05pm and fired sev-
eral shots at the watch display case and stole four Rolex
watches.

Afterwards, the robber is believed to have fled the scene
in a stolen vehicle - a 1999 Toyota Corolla - that was report-
edly stolen and used as the getaway vehicle.

Police recovered the vehicle on Royal Palm Way.

ASP Bootle also reported that three women, ages 30, 34,
and 55 years, were also taken into custody along with the sus-
pect in connection with the discovery of an unlicensed
firearm.

He reported that police seized a Glock pistol and ammu-
nition at a residence in Yeoman’s Wood.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News P1,2,3,5,6,10,14

Editorial/Letters. ......:ccccccccceeeeseeeeeeeeeeeeeeeerees P4

BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION
Business
Comics

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES



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‘has become a nightmare’

Owner of new house in Emerald Close speaks out

THE owner of a new house in the
gated community of Emerald Close in
western New Providence says her
dream of owning her own home has
become a nightmare.

Patricia Chatty says she shelled out
nearly $300,000, but the house that
has been handed over to her is not the
one which she was expecting - the
structure has serious flaws which she
claims are due to shoddy building
practices.

Among her complaints are leaky
ceilings, missing fixtures and unfin-
ished details throughout the house.

Worse, Ms Chatty said she fears for
the safety of her young daughter
because the sharp edges of counter
tops have not been smoothed down
and the house’s back door cannot be
locked.

Problems

Even with all these problems to
contend with, the situation is better
than it was when she moved in a year
and a half ago, when she had no tele-
phone or cable service for the first six
months, she said.

This was particularly challenging as
Ms Chatty runs her own business from
her home.

And it is not just the interior of the
house that is upsetting, she said, but
also the fact that it has to be
approached via a bumpy dirt track.

“As a prospective buyer, my
responsibility was to secure financing.
The developer was to deliver the
product, which in this case was the
home that I saw in the brochure. A
year and half later, I am not happy
with any of it, because just getting to
and from my home is an issue, and
then when I do get to my home I have
all of these issues that should have
been remedied,” said Ms Chatty.

Asked to comment on the matter, a
representative of Emerald Close said:
“The developer has attempted to
solve the issues with Ms Chatty on
several occasions and is open to any
reasonable solution.”

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EMERALD COAST homeowner Patricia Chatty points out a hole in the ceiling from which, she
says, water leaked from her bathroom tub into the kitchen.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Man charged
with murder

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

A 31-YEAR-OLD man
has been arrested and
charged by police in the
murder of Haitian Jean
Maquez Noel, who was
shot at his home in Garden
Villas on Saturday.

Mr Noel, 59, was discov-
ered sitting on a sofa with
gunshot wounds to his left

underarm and shoulder. He

was taken to hospital,
where he later succumbed
to his injuries around
11.30pm.

According to reports, an
anonymous caller tele-
phoned police shortly after
9.30pm about hearing gun-
shots being fired near the
basketball court at Garden
Villas.

Police went to the scene
to investigate and were
directed to an apartment
where Mr Noel resided.
His death is the fourth
homicide for the year for
Grand Bahama.

Charges in
connection

with raids on
suspected
humbers houses

MORE than a dozen
people were arraigned in
Magistrates Court yester-
day on charges stemming
from raids on suspected
number houses last Friday.

Latishka Campbell, 31,
Louise Augustin, 29 and
Leanora Taylor, 24,
appeared before Magis-
trate Derrence Rolle in

Court 5, Bank Lane yester-

day, charged with being
found on a premises where
a lottery is taking place,
namely Percy's Web Cafe
on Pitt Road. They have

also been charged with per-

mitting the premises to be
used for a lottery and per-
mitting the premises to
promote, conduct and
organise a lottery. They
pleaded not guilty to the
charges and remain on
police bail.

Jamal Rolle, 30; Jacinta
Johnson, 35; Pamela John-
son, 53; Shavanda Johnson,
27; Kizzy Curry, 30; Philip
Ferguson, 51; Olivia
Knowles, 26; Anthony
Jones, 41; Angela Stuart,
44: Margaret Wallace, 46,
and Bettrah Mitchell, 38,
pleaded not guilty to being
found on the premises
where a lottery was
allegedly taking place.
They will also remain on
police bail and the case has
been adjourned to August
19.

ed not guilty to being
found at a premises where
a lottery was taking place,
namely Sweetness Web
Shop on Thompson Boule-
vard. She also pleaded not
guilty to permitting the
premises to be used for a
lottery and permitting the
premises to promote, con-
duct and organise a lottery.
Patrick Knowles, 43, and
Ntari Wright, 33, pleaded
not guilty to being found
on the premises. The case
has been adjourned to
August 24 and they remain
on police bail.

Minister of State to

he guest speaker
at Kiwanis Club

MINISTER of State for
Immigration Branville
McCartney will be the
guest speaker at the
upcoming weekly meeting
of the Kiwanis Club of
Over-The-Hill.

The meeting is scheduled

to be held on Thursday,
July 2 at 8pm at the Holy
Cross Community Centre,
Soldier Road.

All Kiwanians and their
guests are welcome to
attend.

Tenisha Rolle, 22, plead-

Ministry investigates some of
RBC Trust management team

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

SOME members of Royal
Bank of Canada Trust Compa-
ny’s local management team are
under investigation by the
Departments of Labour and
Immigration after being accused
of favouring expatriates over
local employees.

RBC Trust staff claim expa-
triate workers are chosen over
equally qualified locals when it
comes to hiring, salaries and
compensation.

Foreigners are paid more and
their Bahamian counterparts
and have not been asked to take
‘voluntary’ unpaid leave to ease
the company’s financial con-
straints while Bahamians have,
staff say.

The employees further claim
job vacancies advertised locally
are simultaneously advertised
in foreign countries, and

Staff claim expatriate
workers chosen over locals

Bahamians are forced to under-
go a protracted interview
process — allegedly to encour-
age them to lose interest.

When Bahamians are offered
positions, the pay and compen-
sation proposed is far below
their expectations, and below
the packages offered to expats,
staff said.

Plans to use political connec-
tions to reapply for and secure
work permits have also been
rumoured, staff told officials.

“Often, Bahamian résumés
submitted for the position are
not even reviewed or consid-
ered initially, as the ministry is
ultimately unaware of who, and
how many, actually apply

directly to the company,” RBC
Trust staff told officers at
Labour and Immigration.

“Tn the event that a work per-
mit application for an expat is
not granted because a Bahami-
an could conceivably perform
the task, unjust labour practices
are simply employed to get
around this directive to find a
qualified Bahamian.

“As a prime example, in the
case of a recent investment
management position for which
a work permit was not granted
to an expat, who the company
had already secured housing for
in Sandyport, this individual was
sent to the Cayman Islands
office instead and periodically

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Felipé Major/Tribune staff



FOUR WOMEN were lucky to escape with only minor injuries yesterday after their vehicle crashed and flipped

over into the marsh.

The passengers were driving down John F Kennedy Drive, near the turn-off to Gladstone Road, in a Toyota Rav
4, when the driver lost control of the vehicle and crashed into a truck, overturning and hitting a white van in the
process. The Toyota ended up in the swampy area near the road.

The women were said to be “shaken up” and were taken to hospital to be treated for their injuries.

Downtown traders have mixed
feelings over cruise ship act

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

TRADERS in downtown
Nassau yesterday expressed
mixed feelings over the
amendments to the Cruise
Ship Overnighting Incentives
Act passed on Monday in par-
lament.

Although shop-owners and
restauranteurs welcome the
anticipated increase of at least
200,000 more passengers a
year, they are concerned about
an earlier departure time for
ships and the inclusion of pri-
vate islands in the tax break
scheme.

The amendments pave the
way for a government agree-
ment with Carnival Cruise
Lines expected to bring a min-
imum of 1.4 million passen-
gers to Nassau every year over
the next six years - that is
200,000 more than was
required last year - and
175,000 to Freeport.

Tax

At least 25 per cent of these
visitors are expected to stay in
port for at least 13 hours in
order for Carnival to continue
to benefit from significant tax
discounts, and the agreement
will also be open to other
interested cruise lines.

But retailers are concerned
the addition of private islands
as places where cruise lines
can dock to raise their passen-
ger quota.

Disney's Castaway Cay and
Royal Caribbean's Coco Cay,
as well as Rock Sound, Great
Stirrup Cay and Half Moon
Cay will now be added to the
original two ports of Nassau
and Grand Bahama.

And they are also con-
cerned the amendments to the
Cruise Ship Overnighting
Incentives Act will allow for
cruise ships to now set sail at

midnight rather than 3am.

Tony Gonzalez, who works
at Havana Café in downtown
Nassau said: “They are adding
five ports but they are private
islands, belonging to the cruise
line companies, and they are
saying they will be able to
dock there instead of Nassau -
so no one is going to benefit
but the cruise line.

“Why would you go down-
town if you can go to your pri-
vate island? But the thousands
of people working downtown,
and who are selling tours of
Atlantis, are going to miss
out,” he said.

“And if the ships are leay-
ing at midnight, clubs like
Bambu and Fluid are going to
get a lot less business.”

Proprietor

Old Nassau souvenir shop
proprietor Warren Bethel
agreed private islands should
not be included in the Bill.

He said: “They go to their
private islands because it does-
n't cost them anything - they
don't have to pay for dockage
or anything, so ships come
through now without touching
Nassau or Freeport.

“T don't think the govern-
ment should have allowed that
in the first place.”

Although Mr Bethel wel-
comes the increase of passen-
gers, he is concerned it will
not necessarily translate to
more spending in the local
economy.

“People on the three- or
four-day cruises buy them so
cheaply they don't have mon-
ey when they get on the boat,
so it doesn't make a difference
if we have more of them.

“A ten-day cruise will have
a different clientele; if we get a
ship with a longer itinerary
that stops here, we do better.”

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham said an approved
cruise line that brings in one

million passengers will pay an
average of $11.80 per person
to the government under the
Act.

This compares with $15 per
head if the cruise line fails to
bring in more than 800,000 vis-
itors.

When the original Act was
passed in 1996, passenger
arrivals doubled over the next
ten years and it boosted the
number of passengers staying
overnight.

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travelled to Nassau to service
Bahamian clients.

“As news of this was reported
to authorities, making it more
difficult for this practice to con-
tinue, only then were qualified
Bahamians considered for the
position, and even then, not
many were asked to interview.”

Director of Labour Harcourt
Brown said an investigation into
the complaints was launched
several months ago and Labour
Department officials inter-
viewed staff about their con-
cerns, as well as managers.

The department has not yet
had a chance to pass its find-
ings on to the Immigration
Department, Mr Brown said,
adding that Minister of Labour
Dion Foulkes and Minister of
Immigration Branville McCart-

mM K\'IC\

te ee

ney are aware of the complaints.

Meanwhile RBC Trust staff
hope to be given equal oppor-
tunities.

One said: “Sadly, all this has
transpired in the face of several
senior employees in the com-
pany who would be readily able
to rise to these opportunities.

“Unfortunately, because of
such unjust hiring and manage-
rial practices, on behalf of an
expatriate who fully enjoys the
benefits of living and working in
the Bahamas, they are not
afforded the chance.

“These practices only serve
to circumvent and diminish the
effectiveness of Bahamian
labour and immigration laws
and more importantly, displace
qualified Bahamians in the
process.”





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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Overworked police need relief

AT A PRESS conference held on Friday an
officer, speaking on behalf of the Police Staff
Association complained of the need of relief
for overworked and frustrated police officers.

“In the normal course of business,” said
Inspector Edric Poitier, “this (40-hour) work
week does not apply to the work schedule of the
Royal Bahamas Police Force because of our
unique duties and responsibilities. However,
police officers do not and cannot receive over-
time pay, yet some of them find themselves
working in excess of 60 hours a week without
any form of compensation, be it monetary or
extra time off. We are not advocating the gov-
ernment pay overtime because we understand
that is not possible.”

However, he suggested that instead of pay
their extra hours could be added to their vaca-
tion.

We can understand police officers being
stressed out, not only is it the nature of their job,
but it is the circumstances of the conditions
under which they now have to work with a fail-
ing court system. There is such a backlog of
criminal trials pending that accused persons are
now having to be returned to the streets because
to hold them any length of time would deny
them their constitutional rights of an early trial.

As far back as 1215 on the open fields of
Runnymede King John of England signed
Magna Carta in which clause 40 guaranteed
that “to no man will we sell, or deny, or delay,
right or justice.”

For 794 years that guarantee of justice has
been inherited from our Westminster system
of government. Nor can anyone be allowed to
languish in jail awaiting that trial. That is why we
have to tolerate every morning and afternoon
the prison bus breaking all speed limits to take
and return inmates to the court most of them
new prisoners, but others just being taken in
under the writ of habeas corpus (bring in the
body) to show their faces before the court to
make certain that they are not getting lost in the
complicated prison system.

Adding to the police officers’ long hours is
the fact that inmates with records are back on
the streets committing new crimes. It is difficult
to know if criminals are on the increase or if it
is just the well known lag back in circulation
increases the number of crimes committed.

When debating the Juries (Amendment) Bill
in October 2007 National Security Minister
Tommy Turnquest said the “criminal justice
system is challenged to provide a quick and

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speedy trial. Where it is unable to do so, the
accused is either released on bail or is remand-
ed to her Majesty’s prison.”

However, he expressed alarm at the number
of persons out on bail.

Of a prison population of 1,359 on October
1, 2007, some 587 were on remand, many having
been on remand for years. He said 106 were
on remand from 2006, 39 from 2005 and 17
from 2004, 15 from 2003, five from 2002 and one
from 2001.

“Tn 2006, 35 per cent of suspects charged with
murder were on bail at the time they committed
the offence,” said Mr Turnquest, “and between
January and September 2007, 42 per cent (22) of
murder suspects were on bail at the time of the
offence.”

We do not have up to date figures, but there
probably has been no improvement. For exam-
ple, for the month of April this year 11 per-
sons were released from prison on bail. A doc-
ument obtained by The Tribune in May records
that in April some 205 persons were released on
bail on multiple charges ranging from murder
and armed robbery to unlawful sexual inter-
course and rape. Of these 153 were released
on bail with 39 of them being classified by the
Central Intelligence Bureau as persons who
“should be monitored.” Of particular interest
was one of them who, although acquitted of
the charge by the court, was recommended to
the police for monitoring. His background of
crime listed possession of drugs, ammunition
and prohibited weapons. He was also accused of
murder. With all their other duties the police
have to pay special attention to this man. No
wonder the police are overworked.

The only way that this can be solved is to
increase the judiciary and court sittings to get
through the backlog of pending cases. Other
than the Chief Justice, the other justices of the
Supreme Court are appointed on the advice of
the Judicial and Legal Services Commission.
Of course, the Commission can do nothing with-
out permission of government to employ more
justices. It is now questionable with the eco-
nomic bind the country is now in as to where the
money will come from to pay them.

In an Act to Amend the Penal Code there
was a provision allowing the court to order
technical surveillance of accused persons grant-
ed bail by a system of electronic monitoring. It
is understood that a committee is still actively
considering how such a system can be imple-
mented.



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Government
must show it is
worthy of trust

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Thave just read Minister Byran
Woodside’s Contribution to The
2009/10 Budget Debate, in Par-
liament, carried in your Saturday,
June 13th edition, during the
course of which he mentioned the
Department of Lands and Sur-
veys’ most recent scandal involv-
ing the granting of Crown lands to
the wives and relatives of two
senior officers and the extent to
which proper application proto-
cols were ignored.

Of particular interest was Mr.
Woodside’s contention that pre-
liminary investigations revealed
that “nothing untoward” occurred
with respect to the “application
process” with respect to those
specific Grants.

Surely, the Minister does not
intend to imply that the granting
of Crown land to the wives of the
officers was beyond reproach and
that the requisite “application
process”, was adhered to. The
facts of this case suggests other-
wise and do not support the Min-
ister’s contention.

Let’s consider the following:

(a) According to the Minister:
“...all Bahamians have the right
to apply for Crown land, includ-
ing Public Officers and their fam-
ilies. However there are guide-
lines that are to be followed in
the review of applications by Pub-
lic Officers...”

(b) A husband and wife are
regarded as one — it therefore
follows that facilitating the grant
to a spouse is in fact facilitating a
grant to oneself.

letters@tribunemedia net



It is clear from the Minister’s
statement that the public officers,
in question, needed only to follow
procedures and apply for the
land, themselves as individuals or
as husband and wife. In both
these cases, however, the officers’
wives applied, alone! Why?

According to “General
Orders” the Lands and Surveys’
Officers, who personally benefit-
ed from the Grants to their
respective wives, were mandated
to apply through the Department
of Public Personnel. Is the Minis-
ter implying that, in these two
specific cases, the required pro-
cedure was followed?

Informed sources have
revealed that the requisite pro-
cedure was not followed in either
of these cases.

In one instance, the junior of
the two officer’s wife, her sisters
(incidentally, one of these sisters
turned out to be the Secretary of
the most recent former Director
of the Department) and a broth-
er were granted three contiguous
lots numbering 18, 19, 20 and lot
number 25 in the same tract of
land in Blackwood Village on the
island of Abaco while the senior
officer’s wife and son were grant-
ed lots 15 and 44 in Wood Cay
on the island of Abaco. The Min-
ister is also reported to contend
that while the public’s perception

is that these individuals “may
have been given preferential
treatment...._preliminary reports
do not indicate that anything
untoward occurred relative to the
application process.”

If the above mentioned inci-
dents do not indicate that pref-
erential consideration was given
to these relatives, then what
does?

In the circumstances, there-
fore, it is incumbent on the Min-
ister to provide the conclusive
findings of the investigation, expe-
ditiously, so that there is not the
slightest inkling of a cover-up. It
cannot be “Business as usual.

Left alone to deal with these
matters, the Civil Service, will
simply “circle the wagon.”

The public expects that the
practice of “transferring” com-
promised junior officers and
“restricting” the movements of
compromised senior officers and
allowing them to remain in office
must cease.

The Minister and the current
Administration have both been
presented with an excellent
opportunity to demonstrate that
they are yet worthy of the trust
sought and received from the
Bahamian people who in turn
were promised, the restoration
of:

e Transparency,

¢ Accountability,

¢ Change, and

¢ Order to civil society, etc.

INFORMED CITIZEN
Nassau,
June, 2009

Tribute to the King of Pop

EDITOR, The Tribune.

King of popular music
... master of the big stage

Entertainer extraordinary
... with deep and wide appeal

Michael Jackson, the cultural icon
... transcended all barriers with approval

Universally treasured
...arare talent undying

Tears for a fallen star...
... travelling gloriously beyond

Celebration for his inestimable gifts

... people love Michael Jackson

A revolutionary in song...
...an activist of note

A generation pleased
...with the masterful virtuoso

Michael Jackson, the spirit of groove

... his music of verve
... wakes up the dead

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Until then, the king of pop reigns
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With celebrated admiration and awe
... forever prized and sanctified

Nassau,
June, 2009.

DENNIS A DAMES



Sloppy BIC practices paint
ridiculous corporate image

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Over the weekend I received two phone calls from BTC with
a recorded message advising me that my telecom accounts were
overdue and service would be cut off Tuesday, June 9.

Having printed receipts showing that full payment had been
made on time as usual, I was very displeased to put it mildly.

Since no one in BTC could be reached on Saturday or Sunday
I sent a duplicate series of fax messages with copies of my
receipts to selected fax listings for BTC. I also pointed out that
such sloppy practices continued to paint a ridiculous corpo-

rate image for the corporation.

Surprisingly this morning I received four phone calls from
BTC. Two promptly offered what might pass for apologies,
while a third blathered on at length but finally found it within his
capability to simply say, “We are sorry, we made a mistake.”
With that I was content to end the matter.

However, one caller inferred that a substantial number of such
erroneous phone dunning notices had been dispatched to cus-
tomers. The number may in fact be sufficiently large that your
readers should be alerted to cushion their shock.

Isuspect that at some early future date the major pharmacies
will show a tremendous decrease in sales of blood pressure
reducing prescriptions soon after BTC is sold.

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June 23, 2009.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

PLP Senator touts a bold
national development plan

soveevereecvecsecorseessescrsrscsesceussesorssecssssseressssoerg

Man pleads
not guilty to
marijuana

possession

A 34-YEAR-OLD man
was granted $3,000 bail
yesterday after pleading
not guilty to a marijuana
possession charge.

Ramses Charles, of
Cargillsville off Faith
Avenue, is accused of
being found in possession
of a pound and seven
ounces of marijuana on
June 29 with the intent to
supply.

Charles was arraigned
yesterday before Magis-
trate Janet Bullard in

Court One, Bank Lane. He

is expected back in court
on July 6.

Minister of
slate criticises
former govt
over performing
arts centre

THE Bahamas could
have had the benefit of a
cost-free “transformation”
of the National Centre for
the Performing Arts had
the former government
not dropped the ball on
the issue, Minister of State
for Culture Charles May-
nard said.

He told parliament on
Monday that nothing was
done to advance the centre
between 2002 and 2007,
despite an offer from the
Chinese government to
renovate it for free.

Mr Maynard claimed
that this was due to the
former government’s fail-
ure to respond to corre-
spondence from the Chi-
nese.

we left it, and we should
not have met it the same
way we left it because the
Chinese government had
put in writing a commit-
ment to supply the
Bahamas government with
all equipment necessary to
transform that space,” he
said.

When he was appointed
Minister of State for Cul-
ture in 2007, Mr Maynard
said he “looked through
the file” relative to the
centre and made efforts to
ascertain whether there
was “some way of getting

the Chinese government to

re-offer that particular
thing.”

He said the Chinese had
sent correspondence to the
Bahamian government on
the issue but gave up on
the idea after not receiving
a response.

“Tt was just one simple
issue.

“T even met with the
(Chinese) Ambassador at
one point. He said they
had lost interest in that
particular project and were
now focused on the (Chi-
nese funded national)
stadium,” said Mr May-
nard.

“We met it the same way

PLP Senator Allyson Maynard-Gib-
son has put forward a bold national
development plan that would see more
Bahamian ownership in tourism, a vast-
ly improved national grade average and
a much more efficient judicial system.

Speaking in the Senate, she criticised
the government’s budget as lacking the
“vision” necessary to inspire the public
and rescue the nation from the grip of
the global economic crisis.

PLP Senator Allyson Maynard-Gib-
son said history shows that during extra-
ordinary times, “where there is vision-
ary leadership, people time and time
again rise to the challenge and take
their country to the next level”.

Noting that US President Barak Oba-
ma has set out strategies to lead Amer-
ica and the world out of the worst reces-
sion since the Great Depression, Mrs
Maynard-Gibson said: “Regrettably,
this budget gives no hope to Bahami-
ans. It is not visionary. It repeats the
same paradigm that has limited the
vision and power of our people for far
too long.

“I looked for the vision that would

raise the power, dignity
and self esteem of our peo-
ple. [found none. I looked
for the vision that would
bring our people more
empowerment. I found
none. I looked for the
vision that would give
hope and I found none.”

Mrs Maynard-Gibson,
former attorney general
and now leader of oppo-
sition business in the sen- |
ate, noted that the
Bahamas is the size of a
small multinational com-
pany. “When companies
budget, they budget to
achieve clear objectives.
The Bahamas should be no different.
What should be our ‘Vision 2020’?
What can we ask all Bahamians to buy
into, work towards and sacrifice for?”
she asked.

The senator then outlined a prospec-
tive “Vision 2020” which would include:
¢ Bahamians owning more than 50



Allyson Maynard-Gibson

per cent of the tourism
product

¢ Bahamians owning
more than 50 per cent of
the financial services prod-
uct

¢ A 100 per cent growth
in Bahamian entrepre-
neurship

¢ The satisfaction of 50
per cent the country’s food
needs with locally grown
products

e The improvement of
the national average in
English and Math from E
to B, and the improvement
of the national average
overall from D to C.

¢ A national plan for training, retrain-
ing and equipping citizens for cutting
edge, value added, 21st century service

¢ Universal health care for all
Bahamians including a national plan
for good health, including parks, recre-
ation and beach access

¢ A legal system where all matters
are brought to trial within two years

¢ A system of governance where rou-
tine applications, and major policy deci-
sions are “depoliticised” and where,
once all requirements are met, perma-
nent residence or any permit is auto-
matically granted

¢ A system of governance where the
people elect all persons who will make
decisions on their behalf

¢ The creation of a reliable and
affordable utility supply system and a 50
per cent decrease on fossil fuel depen-
dence

¢ E-government and easy access for
everyone desiring to do business with
government, full access to information
impacting government decisions (plan-
ning, environment, economic projec-
tions, et cetera) and the appointment of
aE Czar

¢ Universal access to the world wide
web

¢ A land policy that ensures access to
Bahamian land and patrimony for
future generations

¢ Policies evaluated to measure the
extent to which they enhance and
strengthen family life

The Bahamas plays host to
Florida film commissioners

IN an effort to forge an
even stronger working rela-
tionship with Florida’s film
industry, the Bahamas Film
Commission, in conjunction
with Bahamas FilmInvest
International Ltd, hosted
eight Florida film commis-
sioners to an extended week-
end of activities.

The commissioners, who
recently unanimously voted
the Bahamas Film Commis-
sion into their group,
engaged in dialogue with the
Ministry of Tourism and
local industry partners, and
toured to scout locations
throughout New Providence
and Harbour Island.

Bahamas Film Commis-
sioner Craig Woods said his
greatest hope is that the
Bahamas government will
become more appreciative of
the local film industry as the
Commission and Bahamas
FilmInvest International
strengthens ties with
the neighbouring power-
house.

Contribution

“['m not sure if it’s going
to be the third pillar of our

Film Commission in April
2003,
filmed 19 movies, six in the

*
4

the Bahamas has

that’s been going on for
many years,” he said.
This is the second visit for

= ma in a a Mi



PICTURED (L TO R) ARE: Owen Bethel, president of Bahamas FilmInvest International Ltd; Graham
Winick, president of Film Florida; and Craig Woods, president of the Bahamas Film Commission.

of the Pirates
Caribbean series.

of the

President of Film Florida

partnership as one of the
group’s best.

“We like to think of the
Bahamas as our really close
neighbours and we like to
look to you for all of the
advantages and opportuni-
ties as it presents and how
we can integrate some of
those possibilities,” he said.

Berlin

“When we went to Berlin
this year for the European
Film Market, so many pro-
ducers from Europe were
coming to us and saying ‘tell
us about the Bahamas, tell
us what the Bahamas can do
for us, tell us about their co-
production models.’ And we
kept saying, ‘let’s get back
to you on that.’

“We think this is a great
opportunity for our two
areas to really come together
and to attract projects that
are interested in both of us.”

Mr Winick, who is respon-
sible for Film Florida’s mar-
keting and legislative strate-
gy, expressed his gratitude
to Bahamas FilmInvest and
the Bahamas Film Commis-
sion for their continuing

economy,” Mr Woods said,
“but I know it can make a
significant contribution to
the development of Bahami-
ans in terms of developing
their artistic skills in front of
and behind the camera and
we have seen that happen.
“While we now have an
informal relationship, we’re
hoping to formalise it where-
by it can be enshrined in the
various film commissions’
jurisdictions’ policy,” he said.
Since Mr Woods joined the

last year alone. The Bahamas
is also the only country to
have been unanimously vot-
ed into Film Florida as an
associate member.

“That’s a tribute to the
synergy that exists between
Florida and the Bahamas

a ee
is)

a tah)
PHONE: 322-2157



NOTICE

All persons with vehicles remaining on
Kelly’s Dock, Twenty-One days after the date of arrival
will be sold to cover storage fees.

Please contact our Customer Service Dept. at

322-2142/322-2813/356-0575

MANAGEMENT

Betty K. Agencies Limited

East Street North
Nassau, Bahamas



Film Florida, who travelled
to Grand Bahama in 2006
after the phenomenal success

Graham Winick said the
group was excited to accept
the invitation and credits the

efforts to foster closer rela-
tions between both countries.

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT

NOTICE

BAY STREET

NASSAU STREET TO VICTORIA AVENUE
ROADWAY CONSTRUCTION

30" June to 14" July 2009

In an effort to relieve current traffic congestion problems
BAHAMAS HOT MIX has been contracted for the paving of
West Bay Street between Blake Rd and Nassau St, Marlborough
St, Navy Lion Rd, and Bay Street to Mackey St. Paving works
will be commencing from Blake Rd, which require traffic

management involving road closures, and diversions for the route.

Paving Works include the following times:

¢ 7:00 pm to 6:30 am

Local diversions will be sign posted in due course and further
information will be provided in local media.





PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Five heritage
Sites unveiled in
Grand Bahama

THE Ministry Of Tourism
and Aviation has unveiled five
new heritage sites on Grand
Bahama. They are the Mer-
maid Pond in Lewis Yard, the
Pinder’s Point Lighthouse,
Hawksbill Creek, the boiling
hole in Hepburn Town, and
Fern, Gully and Josey Cave.

The Mermaid Pond can be
heard sucking and blowing
each time the tide ebbs and
flows. The Pinder’s Point
Lighthouse was built in the
late 1700s to early 1800s.
Hawksbill Creek is named
after the now endangered tur-
tle that use to frequent its
waters. The boiling hole is
known for how its waters swirl
with the movement of the
tide. The cave was where res-
idents in the Holmes’ Rock
community took refuge from
a serious hurricane.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



The Bahamas is ‘ready to
assist’ crisis-hit Honduras

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas stands
“ready to assist” Honduras
wherever it can following the
forced removal of that coun-
try’s elected President Manuel
Zelaya on Sunday.

Bahamian Ambassador to
the Organisation of Ameri-
can States C A Smith said the
Bahamas condemns the “bru-
tal assault and the interrup-
tion of the democratic process
in Honduras and demands the
immediate reinstatement of
the democratically elected
government and the resump-
tion of peace in the region.”

Pro-Zelaya protesters have
clashed with authorities in the
streets of Honduras since Mr
Zelaya was forcibly ousted
from the country by the mili-
tary on the weekend.

His removal - denounced as
a coup by many world leaders
who have come out in sup-
port of Mr Zelaya - came on
the same day that he had
organised for a non-binding
referendum on extending
presidential term limits to be
held.

This intention had alarmed
certain sectors, who felt he
was trying to hold onto power
by irregular means.

Mr Zelaya, who was sent
off on a plane to Costa Rica,
claims he simply wanted to
canvass public opinion.

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Ambassador to OAS speaks out after
removal of that country’s president

While the outside world has
expressed its condemnation
of the military’s response,
inside Honduras the action is
supported by the country’s
Congress and Supreme Court,
which are of the view that
President Zelaya was acting
“illegally” by holding the ref-
erendum.

The “coup” represents the
first such action in the region
in over 16 years and is con-
sidered a major political crisis.

Joining the many world
leaders and diplomats who
have condemned the events
and called for the reinstate-
ment of President Zelaya, Mr
Smith also called for an imme-
diate meeting of foreign min-
isters “in order that they may
assist in bringing some sem-
blance of peace” to Hon-
duras.

Heightening the pressure
on the Central American
country, the United Nations

eR la)

OFFICIALS SIGN Tourist anaee Card agreements. Pictured (from

man, and Dr Johnathan Rodgers, TSP president.

THE new Tourist Mango
Card, a project by the Min-
istry of Tourism and Aviation
and Transfer Solution
Providers Ltd (TSP), is
expected to be available with-
in the next two months.

The Tourist Mango Cards
allows for cashless financial
transactions with merchants.
Visitors or other individuals
can make payments for ser-
vices or buy goods using the
card. The cards will be avail-
able for purchase in varying
amounts, up to $100.

Director General of
Tourism Vernice Walkine said
tourism professionals in the
Bahamas are always secking
to exceed the expectations of
guests, and the Mango Card
will allow this to be accom-
plished through enhanced
safety and convenience.

“Visitors to the Bahamas
will be able to make transac-
tions with added convenience
and in a much safer environ-
ment due to the electronic
payment system offered by
this Bahamian software and
technology company,” Ms
Walkine said.

“The safety of the card has

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General Assembly yesterday
passed a resolution calling for
the reinstatement of Mr
Zelaya.

The resolution calls “firmly
and categorically on all states
to recognise no government
other than that” of Mr
Zelaya.

CARICOM yesterday also
released an official statement,
condemning the military
action which has interrupted
the democratic process in
Honduras and which contra-
venes the principles of the
Inter-American Democratic
Charter.

“The Caribbean Communi-

ty is also deeply concerned by
reports that a number of gov-
ernment officials and diplo-
matic representatives have
been detained and may have
been physically harmed. The
Caribbean Community calls
on all the parties involved in
the developments in Hon-
duras to refrain from any
recourse to violence and to
pursue a peaceful resolution
to the current situation,” the
statement said.

Mr Zelaya has pledged to
see out his term as president,
which ends in January 2010,
and claims he will return to
the country on Thursday.

aS

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m left) are Vernice Walkine, Director General of Tourism; Julian Francis, TSP chair-

mango

i



MINISTRY OF TOURISM AND AVIATION officials and Transfer Service Providers (TSP) seal their partnership with
ahandshake. Pictured (from left) are Raymond Harrison, general manager of Tours and Entertainment in the
Ministry of Tourism and Aviation; Vernice Walkine, Director General of Tourism; Julian Francis, TSP chairman,
and Dr Johnathan Rodgers, TSP president.

benefits that will outlast our
guests’ time in the Bahamas.
When they return home, we
will be the beneficiaries of an
enhanced reputation due to
the improved safety that these
electronic payments will pro-

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Dr Johnathan Rodgers,
president of TSP, said 85 cents
of every tourist dollar even-
tually leaves the Bahamas. In
the case of arrivals by sea, esti-
mates are as high as $13 leav-
ing the country for each dollar
that remains, he said.

“This really shows that
there is a tremendous leakage
of money out of the Bahamas
and this economic model is
not sustainable,” he said. “We
have a GDP of about $6 bil-
lion and tourism accounts for
60 per cent of that GDP. If
we can increase the amount
of money that stays here by
five cents, this will translate
into another $1.2 billion stay-
ing in the Bahamian economy
every year, and this is almost
as much as government makes
in total every year.”

Julian Francis, chairman of
TSP, said the Bahamas has
not maximised the economic
possibilities of the tourism
business. He said there is a
market of roughly 4.5 million
tourists coming to the
Bahamas every year, and they
provide business opportuni-
ties that Bahamians can tap
into.

Mr Francis said tourists are
used to the convenience of
cashless transactions in their
home countries. He believes
that they will be eager to
utilise the Mango Card while
visiting the Bahamas.



PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



NIB bosses to be made redundant

Union president accused
of ‘abandoning’ members
FROM page one

time for today’s 1.30pm meeting at the
Department of Labour.

“T find it amazing she would leave the coun-
try at such a sensitive time in the negotia-
tions,” said the source, who asked to remain
anonymous.

Meanwhile, Minister
of Labour Dion Foulkes
told The Tribune the
government received the
nurse’s written rejection
of the offer it made to
them last week but it is
not prepared to budge.

“The nurses indicated
to (health) minister
(Hubert) Minnis that
they reject our proposal
and that they are insist-
ing that they receive full
insurance by an insur-
ance company immedi-
ately,” said Mr Foulkes, who attended last
week’s meeting where the Government put its
latest offer to the BNU.

“T have been advised by Dr Minnis that
the Government’s offer is not going to change.
That is the final offer by the Government,”
added the minister.

He said that neither he or Dr Minnis would
be attending today’s meeting but added that
officials fromthe Public Hospitals Authority
and the Department of Labour would be pre-
sent.

In Tuesday’s meeting last week, the Gov-
ernment proposed that it could implement
the postponed healthcare insurance cover-
age for the nurses - initially expected to come
into effect today - by July 1 2010, and in the
meantime, would cover the cost of treatment
for all work-related injuries.

This could take place at Princess Margaret
Hospital, in the Bahamian private sector or
abroad.

The nurses would also get their postponed
four per cent salary increase at that time and
the Government would make available sev-
eral “private rooms” at PMH in which they
would be eligible to receive treatment.

But last week Ms Hamilton said that nurs-
es have expressed their disappointment with
the Government’s proposal, saying they can
already apply for the cost of treatment for
work-related injuries to be covered by the
National Insurance Board.

“Tt doesn’t give us anything different,”
asserted Ms Hamilton, who said nurses who
suffer non-work related sickness and those
who cannot be accomodated in the three pri-
vate rooms will be left in the lurch.

Yesterday Mr Foulkes said he had been
informed that Ms Hamilton is out of the coun-
try and had no idea whether she would be
back in time for the meeting as she is legally
mandated to be.

Dion Foulkes



FROM page one

of Buildings, Melicianna Bethel were all informed
of their fate on Monday,

Meanwhile, The Tribune understands that a
fifth position - that of Deputy Director in charge
of the Family Islands - may also be on the chop-
ping board, although this has not been confirmed.

Mr Cargill said the changes will help “strate-
gically position the (National Insurance) Board
for the future”, streamlining it and enhancing
operational efficiency in terms of contribution
collections and expense management while
improving customer service levels.

In doing so, it reacts to red flags raised in a
number of actuarial reviews conducted with ref-
erence to the Board.

Under the old structure there was a “duplica-
tion of efforts” and new roles will require “a
completely different skill set” from those who
fill them, said Mr Cargill.

The Board will now “require a higher level of
performance from our executives as we move
forward” and each will be subject to goal-orien-
tated and “measurable” evaluations of their per-
formance, he added.

While the public will not see a noticeable
improvement in its work “immediately”, they
will do so in the “short term”.

In an official statement on the move, the NIB
said its original organisational structure was out-
dated and not relevant in today’s environment.

It added that “risk assessment studies” con-
ducted by Bahamian and external firms had “con-
firmed that NIB, in its current state, carries con-

siderable business risks” that could be addressed
through efforts to enhance operational efficien-

y.

“After reviewing the external recommenda-
tions, jointly with the unsatisfactory findings of
prior year Risk Assessment and the Internal
Control and System Assurance findings, the
Board concluded that expedient action was
required in order to re-align and reposition NIB
strategically for the longer term,” said Cargill in
the statement.

Under its new organisational structure, the
NIB is looking to fill the positions of: Vice Pres-
ident (VP) of Technology, VP of Business Sup-
port Services, VP of investments and VP of
Finance. These employees will join current VP of
Human Resources Regenda King, VP of Medical
Dr Kevin Bowe, VP of Legal Affairs Heather
Maynard, Actuary Derek Osborne, Financial
Controller Sonia Gill and a VP of Internal Audit-
ing.

They will work as part of the NIB’s new and far
more “centralised” operational model.

An ongoing effort to move in the direction of
centralisation has already been responsible for
the significant increase in the number of cases of
NIB defaulters being brought before the courts
for prosecution, said Mr Cargill.

Last week 20 companies were brought before
the courts for owing the NIB hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars in backpayments. Among them
were Jones Communications and Solomon’s
Mines. Most were adjourned to September 15.

Yesterday attorney and aspiring politician Paul
Moss released a statement responding to the

redundancies in which he criticised the Govern-
ment for “continuing to mow down people in
the civil service.”

“Over the past year and a half, the govern-
ment has systematically been ‘restructuring’ the
civil service and by doing so they have devastat-
ed families and destroyed lives. Many still have
years left on their mortgages with children in
school and it is catastrophic to be summarily dis-
missed without carful planning. No caring gov-
ernment does this to its people knowing that
they will join the unemployment line in a time
when unemployment is expected to increase,”
said Mr Moss, who hopes to run in the St Cecil-
ia constituency in the next general election.

He questioned whether the Government is
concealing the possibility that it “cannot afford to
make payroll.”

Responding to the criticism that NIB’s re-
organisation may be callous at a time when job
opportunities for those made unemployed are
more meagre than in previous years, Mr Cargill
said the NIB has been “criticised by Bahamian
public as well as political parties for a lacking
operational efficiency over several months and
years” and has recognised that if the “fund is to
remain sound” the “status quo can no longer
remain.”

“We are seeking to ensure we deliver on
promises of providing effective social security
benefit to Bahamians over the long term,” said
the Director.

The changes that are being implemented have
been “unanimously endorsed” by the Board of
Directors, he added.

FROM page one

In April this year, the Govern-

BIC edging closer to privatisation

latory regime will seek to increase a

relatively short

time, he

retail distribution, and real estate
development; increased domestic
and foreign investment; an enhanced
tourism product; and, a modernised

ment introduced in Parliament three
Bills aimed at “a modern, transpar-
ent regulatory framework” for the
communications sector in the
Bahamas.

The Communications Bill, the
Utilities Regulation and Competi-
tion Authority (URCA) Bill and the
Utilities Appeal Tribunal (UAT)
Bill were debated and passed in ear-
ly May.

“As the Government continues to
work towards the privatisation of
BTC and the liberalisation of the
Bahamas’ electronic communica-
tions sector, this regulatory reform
was a critical step towards ensuring
that international best practices stan-
dards are met, while also enhancing
the value proposition to potential
partners for BTC,” the Prime Min-
ister said.

With UCRA in place as an inde-
pendent regulator to promote good
business practices and foster a com-
petitive environment, the new regu-

investor and consumer confidence,
he explained.

“Now that the new regulatory
structure is approved and all other
due diligence largely completed by
the Privatisation Committee and its
team of advisors, the stage is set for
the commencement of the privati-
sation process,” the Prime Minister
said.

Any potential strategic partner
“must be a well-resourced entity or
consortium with established cre-
dentials in the telecommunications
industry that can provide the com-
pany with growth opportunities and
position BTC for long-term success.

“The strategy of those interested
parties must also be aligned with the
key objectives of the Government,
who will continue to hold a 49 per-
cent ownership stake in the compa-
ny,” he said.

The Government is “committed
to the execution of an efficient
process” to be completed within

said.

He said the new regulatory struc-
ture and liberalised market are
expected to drive growth in telecom-
munications, which will yield signif-
icant positive economic benefits for
the Bahamas including: job creation,
specifically in the areas of telecom-
munications infrastructure develop-
ment and maintenance, construction,

infrastructure for business.

“To encourage healthy competi-
tion, fixed line telecommunications
services, cable and IPTV and inter-
net services will be liberalised imme-
diately upon coming into force of
the Communications Act.

“Mobile services will be liberalised
two years following the privatisation
of BTC,” the Prime Minister said.

Harl Taylor murder trial to open

FROM page one

The trial into Mr Taylor’s death will be heard before Senior Supreme

Court Justice Anita Allen.

Prosecutors are expected to call some 25 witnesses during the trial,

most of whom are police officers.

Prosecuting the case is Bernard Turner, Direcector of Public Prosecu-
tions, along with Darnell Dorsette and Neil Brathwaite.
A jury of six men, six women and three alternates was selected yester-

day to hear the case.

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009, PAGE 11



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Williams sisters reach semis

@ By STEPHEN WILSON
AP Sports Writer

WIMBLEDON, England (AP) —
Venus and Serena Williams are one
round away from meeting in another
Wimbledon final.

Five-time champion Venus overpow-
ered Agnieszka Radwanska 6-1, 6-2 on
Tuesday, and two-time winner Serena
followed her into the semifinals with a 6-
2, 6-3 win over Victoria AzarenKa.

No. 3-seeded Venus will next face top-
ranked Dinara Safina, who overcame 15
double-faults and beat German teenag-
er Sabine Lisicki 6-7 (5), 6-4, 6-1 to reach
the Wimbledon semis for the first time.

In the bottom half of the draw, No. 4
Elena Dementieva defeated Italy’s
Francesca Schiavone 6-2, 6-2 to set up a
semifinal encounter with No. 2 Serena
Williams.

It’s the first time since 2006 that all
four top-seeded women reached the
semifinals at a Grand Slam tournament.

The Williams sisters overwhelmed
their opponents Tuesday with breath-
taking displays of power tennis, showing
why they have dominated on the grass of
the All England Club for most of the
past decade.

“We definitely upped our levels of
game today,” Serena said.

Venus, seeking her third straight Wim-
bledon title, outhit the 14th-ranked Pole
from all parts of the court and proved
again that she is the dominant female
player on grass.

“Do I feel invincible?” Williams said.
“T’d like to say yes, but I really do work
at it.”

Williams had her left leg taped up
again but showed no weakness at all as
she ripped 29 winners — compared to six
for Radwanska — in a match that lasted
just 68 minutes on a sunbaked Court 1.

“Tcan’t complain,” Williams said. “?’m
in the semifinals of Wimbledon, right
where I want to be. I just need to take
another step forward.”

With Venus looking on from the guest
box, Serena swept through the first set
against the eighth-ranked Azarenka in 26
minutes. After being broken to go down
3-2 in the second, she won four straight
games and held serve at love to finish the
match in commanding fashion. Serena
had nine aces and 26 winners, with only
seven unforced errors.

Azarenka had beaten Serena in
straight sets in their last match in the
final at Key Biscayne, Fla., in April.

“T really wanted to do well today,”
Serena said. “I didn’t do well the last
time we played. I was not feeling great. I
felt like I really wanted to show up

Boozer decides
to stay with Jazz

HB By DOUG ALDEN
AP Sports Writer

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) —
Carlos Boozer has reconsidered
free agency, or at least put it
off a year.

Boozer let the Utah Jazz
know on Tuesday that he will
stay with the team for the final
year of his contract rather than
opting out and becoming a free
agent — which he once said he
intended to do.

Boozer backed off his original
statement and said when the
season ended he wanted to con-
sider all of his options.

He chose not to chance an
iffy free agent market for more
money and possibly a long-term
deal, taking the $12.7 million
he’s guaranteed next season
from the Jazz.

Boozer took until the final
day to reach a decision.

Utah was still waiting Tues-
day to hear from center
Mehmet Okur, who also had
the option to return for the final
year of his contract.

When healthy, Boozer has
been the Jazz’s top scorer and
rebounder and helped lead
Utah to three straight playoff
appearances. He’s been an All-
Star twice and was a member



FIVE-TIME champion Venus Williams (above) overpowered Agnieszka Radwanska 6-1, 6-2 on
Tuesday, and two-time winner Serena Williams (top) followed her into the semifinals with a
6-2, 6-3 win over Victoria Azarenka.

today.”

Asked whether she also felt unbeat-
able at Wimbledon, Serena said: “I don’t
feel invincible, but I definitely should

IN THIS March 28 file photo, Utah Jazz’s Carlos Boozer celebrates after
making a shot in the first half of game against the Phoenix Suns in Salt
Lake City. Boozer told the Jazz on Tuesday, June 30, 2009, that he would
return to the team instead of opting out of the final year of his contract and
becoming a free agent. Boozer is scheduled to make $12.7 million next sea-
son, his sixth with the Jazz.
(AP Photo: George Frey)

(AP Photos)

have the same attitude. ’'m going to try
to feel that way, too.”

Only once in the last nine years has
there been a Wimbledon women’s final

that didn’t feature at least one of the
Williams sisters. The sisters were the
only two Grand Slam winners in the
women’s quarterfinals — Serena has 10
major titles and Venus seven.

The sisters have met in three Wim-
bledon finals, including last year. Serena
has won two of the three, in 2002 and ’03.
They are 10-10 in career meetings.

“T would love it to be a Williams final,
and so would she,” Venus said. “That
would be great.”

The sisters’ father, Richard Williams,
said he is certain his daughters will be in
the final again.

“T think they are both playing super
well,” he said. “They’re playing the
Williams way. And when you’re play-
ing the Williams way, it’s very difficult
for anyone to touch you.”

Venus is trying to become the first
woman since Steffi Graf in 1991-93 to
win three Wimbledon titles in a row.

Venus Williams raced to a 5-0 lead
against Radwanska, and finished off the
first set with back-to-back aces. Williams
dropped only two of 18 points on serve in
the set.

“That first set for me was almost per-
fect,” Williams said.

Safina, who has risen to No. 1 in the
world despite never having won a Grand
Slam title, struggled against the 19-year-
old Lisicki. The Russian had to come
from behind after double-faulting to lose
the first set tiebreaker, smashing her
racket to the turf and drawing a warning
from the chair umpire.

“T was Santa Claus on the court, serv-
ing so many double-faults,” Safina said.

Safina was down 3-2 on serve in the
second set, but got the one break in the
seventh game to force a third set. The
41st-ranked Lisicki received treatment
on her right calf after going down 4-1 in
the third. In the next game, Safina was
up 40-0 before serving three straight dou-
ble-faults. She still managed to hold and
then broke for the match.

“T was tough mentally, that was the
key today,” Safina said.

The men’s quarterfinals are set for
Wednesday with five-time champion
Roger Federer against 6-foot-10 Croat
Ivo Karlovic; No. 3 Andy Murray vs.
Spanish wild card Juan Carlos Ferrero;
2002 champion Lleyton Hewitt vs. two-
time finalist Andy Roddick; and No. 3
Novak Djokovic vs. Tommy Haas.

Temperatures topped 90 degrees on
Tuesday, with no need to close the roof
on Centre Court.

Medical officials on site said they treat-
ed more than 130 people, mostly for
heat-related problems. One person was
taken to a hospital.

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of last year’s U.S. Olympic gold
medal team, but injuries have
taken him out for large chunks
of three of his five seasons in
Utah.

“We are excited that Carlos
has decided to remain with the
Jazz,” general manager Kevin
O’Connor said in a release.
“We are hopeful he can contin-

Cuban, Mavs in hot pursuit of keeping Kidd

@ By JAIME ARON
AP Sports Writer

DALLAS (AP) — Mark
Cuban wants to be first in line
to talk to Jason Kidd.

Cuban posted Tuesday on
Twitter, “Getting ready to fly
up to NYC for Free Agent
meeting at 12:01,” and that free

ue to play at an All-Star level
and will have an injury-free sea-
son.”

Boozer has averaged 19
points and 10 rebounds since
Utah signed him away from the
Cleveland Cavaliers as a
restricted free agent five years
ago, but has only played in 276
of a possible 410 with the Jazz.

agent is Kidd, according to a
person with knowledge of the
situation. The person spoke on
condition of anonymity because
NBA rules prevent comment-
ing on such things.

Cuban has made it clear he
wants to keep Kidd, but it might
not be that easy. The New York
Knicks are believed to be inter-

He was limited to 37 games last
season, due largely to an injury
that required surgery on his left
knee in January.

Utah learned Monday that
reserve shooting guard Kyle
Korver exercised his option to
play out his contract for $5.2
million.

ested, too, as could LeBron
James and the Cavaliers or per-
haps Kobe Bryant and the Lak-
ers.

Kidd has never won an NBA
championship, but has won an
Olympic gold medal alongside
James and Bryant.

ESPN.com first reported
Cuban’s meeting with Kidd.

a

es

Nadal left off
Spain team
for Davis Cup

LONDON (AP) — Top-
ranked Rafael Nadal was left
off Spain’s team for the Davis
Cup quarterfinals on Tues-
day because of sore knees.

Nadal has struggled with
tendinitis in his knees, which
forced him to skip defending
his Wimbledon title. He has
not played a tour match since
losing in the fourth round at
the French Open.

Fernando Verdasco, Tom-
my Robredo, David Ferrer
and Feliciano Lopez will rep-
resent Spain when the
defending champions host
Germany on outdoor clay in
Marbella, the International
Tennis Federation said.

In the other quarterfinals
from July 10-12, it’s Czech
Republic vs. Argentina; Croa-
tia vs. United States; and
Israel vs. Russia.

Germany will play without
Wimbledon quarterfinalist
Tommy Haas and go with
Philipp Kohlschreiber, Nico-
las Kiefer, Mischa Zverev and
Andreas Beck.

The 32-time champion
Americans will again use
Andy Roddick, James Blake,
Bob Bryan and Mike Bryan
when they visit Croatia. They
will face Marin Cilic, Ivo
Karlovic, Roko Karanusic
and Lovro Zovko on indoor
clay in Porec.

Tomas Berdych, Radek
Stepanek, Ivo Minar and
Lukas Dlouhy will lead the
Czechs on hard indoor courts
in Ostrava against Argenti-
na’s Juan Martin del Potro,
Jose Acasuso, Leonardo
Mayer and Juan Monaco.

Israel, which made the
Davis Cup quarterfinals for
the first trme since 1987, will
be represented by Dudi Sela,
Harel Levy, Jonathan Erlich
and Andy Ram on indoor
hard courts in Tel Aviv. Rus-
sia’s lineup will be Dmitry
Tursunov, Marat Safin, Igor
Andreev and Mikhail Youzh-

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PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009

National 38th RBC National Swimming Championships...



Track &
Field
results

HERE is a look at the results of
the BAAA’s National Track and
Field Championships held over the
weekend:

Women’s Division

100 metres - 1, Debbie Fergu-
son-McKenzie, 11,12; 2, Chandra
Sturrup, 11.22; 3, Sheniqua Fergu-
son, 11.50; 4, Jernise Saunders,
11.80; 5, Tamica Clarke, 11.98; 6,
Tia Rolle, 12.14; 7, Tamara Rigby,
12.24; 8, V'Alonee Robinson, 12.28.

200 - 1, Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie, 22.83; 2, Sheniqua Fer-
guson, 23.48; 3, Jernise Saunders,
24.45; 4; - Courtney Patterson, US
Virgin Islands, 24.61.

400 - 1, Christine Armertil, 51.96;
2, Shakeitha Henfield, 54.07; 3,
Sasha Rolle, 54.08; 4, Shaunae
Miller, 55.52; 5, Ashley Hanna,
56.63; 6, Deandra Knowles, 1:01.24.

800 - 1, Hughnique Rolle, 2:21.19;
2, Ashley Johnson, 2:23.97.

100 hurdles - 1, Tiavanni Thomp-
son, 13.69; 2, Krystal Bodie, 13.94;
3, Petra McDonald, 14.35; - Kierre
Beckles, Barbados, 13.67.

Triple jump - 1, Donnevette Mar-
tin, 41-5 1/4; 2, Keythra Richards,
39-0 1/4.

High jump - 1, Kenya Culmer,
5-7 1/4.

Long jump - 1, Bianca Stuart, 20-
10; 2, Keythra Richards, 18-3 1/4.

Discus - 1, Gabrielle Nixon, 132-
Q; 2, Juliann Duncanson, 123-6.

Javelin - 1, Lavern Eve, 178-2;
Terae Sweeting, fouled.

Shot put - 1, Juiiann Duncombe,
35-3 3/4.

Men’s Division

100 metres - 1, Derrick Atkins,
10.25; 2, Adrian Griffith, 10.44; 3,
Shamar Sands, 10.54; 4, Rodney
Green, 10.70; 5, Karlton Rolle,
10.71; 6, Jamal Forbes, 10.75; 7,
Derek Carey, 10.80; 8, Kohfe
Miller, 10.95.

100 consolation - 1, Ramon Git-
tens, 10.46; 2, Woodrow Randal,
10.65; 3, Geno Jones, 10.93; 4,
Chamal Bethel, 11.24; 5, Michael
Sands, 12.25.

200 - Karlton Rolle, 21.20; Adri-
an Griffith, 21.27; Jamial Rolle,
21.50; Kareem Parker, 22.68.

400 - 1, Chris Brown, 45.21; 2,
Ramon Miller, 45.35; 3, Andrett
Bain, 46.02; 4, Aaron Cleare, 46.34;
5, Mchael Mathieu, 46.37; 6, Avard
Moncur, 47.52; Latoy Williams,
DNF; Andrae Williams, DNS.

400 consolation - 1, LaSean Pick-
stock, 47.24; 2, Delano Deveaux,
49.63; 3, Renaldo Gibson, 49.74;
Phillip Stubbs, DNF; Brandon
Miller, DNF.

800 - 1, Cerio Rolle, 1:55.49; 2,
Laquardo Newbold, 1:55.90; 3,
Kenneth Wallace-Whitfield,
1:56.85; 4, James Carey, 1:56.92; 5,
Lester Taylor, 2:05.96.

1,500 metres - 1, O'Neil Williams,
4:00.91; 2, James Carey, 4:04.95.

5,000 - 1, O'Neil Williams,
16:21.28; 2, Jason Williams,
17:26.33; Delroy Boothe, DNF;
Kevin Morris, DNF.

110 hurdles - 1, Ryan Brathwaite,
Barbados, 13.57; 2, Shane Brath-
waite, Barbados, 14.33; 3, Christo-
pher Bethel, DQ.

U-18 110 hurdles - 1, Patrick
Bodie, 14.39; 2, Aaron Wilmore,
14.60.

400 hurdles - 1, Carlyle Thomp-
son, 52.79; 2, Nathan Arnett, 53.29;
3, Ednal Rolle, 54.30.

U-18 400 hurdles - 1, Nejmi
Burnside, 53.84.

Long jump - 1, Osbourne Moxey,
26-0 3/4; 2, Rudon Bastian, 25-4
1/2; 3, Stanley Poitier, 22-9 3/4’; 4,
Justin Gray, 21-4 1/4; 5, Tehneil
Babbs, 20-10 3/4; 6, Permeko Mur-
ray, 20-9 3/4; 7, Rashad Moxey, 19-
0.

High jump - 1, Trevor Barry, 7-3
3/4; 2, Raymond Higgs, 7-2 1/4; 3,
Donald Thomas, 7-1 1/2; 4, Jamal
Wilson, 6-10 1/4.

Triple jump - 1, Leevan Sands,
56-03; 2, Antillio Bastian, 49-09; 3,
J'Vente Deveaux, 49-07; 4, Lamar
Delaney, 49-03.50; 5, Anjourn
Armaly, 48-11.75; 6, Lathone
Minns, 47-02.25; 7, Lathario Minns;
8, Craig Charlow, 45-00.50; — Samyr
Laine, Republic of Hait, 52-04.50; —
Tehneil Babbs, foul.

Javelin - 1, Ramond Farrington,
191-0; 2, Livingstone Brown, 171-
10; 3, Coyotito Gray, 167-3; 4,
Devon Rox, 160-10; 5, Benja Light-
bourne, 156-2; 6, Henry Butler, 149-
8

Discus - 1, Delron Innis, 114-5; 2,
Benja Lightbourne, 111-11; 3,
Shaun Miller, 107-2; 4, Rashad
McCoy, 106-11; 5, Mark Sterling,
91-2; 6, Bernard Newbold, 87-7.

Hammer - 1, Mark Sterling, 123-
6.

Javelin - 1, Raymond Farrington,
191-0; 2, Livingstone Brown, 171-
10; 3, Coyotito Gray, 167-3; 4,
Devon Rox, 160-10; 5, Benja Light-
bourne, 156-2; 6, Henry Butler, 149-
8

Shot put - 1, Delron Innis, 43-8
1/2; 2, Maurice Conyers, 40-0; 3,
Rashad McCoy, 34-4 1/2; 4, Shaun
Miller, 32-10 1/2; 5, Mark Sterling,
32-8 1/2.

Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff

The RBC National Swimming Championships,
hosted by Bahamas Swimming Federation,
produced a myriad of new national records,
international qualifiers and a repeat champion
in one of the most populated meets in BSF
history. Here are some action shots of the
event...

TRIBUNE SPORTS

rea RUT
Day road
RR wey! |S

HERE are the results of
the Bahamas Olympic Asso-
ciation’s 22nd Olympic Day
Road Race held on Satur-
day:

WOMEN’S RUN

Under-20 - 1, Paulette
Strachan, 18th, 45.57

20-29 - 1, Elizabeth
Shadeock, 15th, 35.08

30-39 - 1, Rayvonne
Bethel, 12th, 32.01

2nd, Jasmine Jones, 13th,
33.05

3rd, June Cartwright, 19th,
50.10

MEN’S RUN

Under-20 - 1, Ashland
Murray Jr., 31.48

20-29 - 1, Sidney Collie,
2nd, 23.53

30-39 - 1, Delroy Boothe,
23.15; 2, Roy Sanchez, 7th,
28.04; 3, Dereck Ferguson,
Oth, 28.55

40-49 1, Ashland Murray,
3rd, 27.05; 3, Zammie
Williams, 10th, 30.07

50-59 - 1, Raymond
Rudon, 4th, 27.46; 2, Philip
Moss, 5th, 27.58; 3, James
Bodie, 8th, 28.52

60-plus - 1, George Smith,
14th, 33.32

WOMEN’S WALK

U-20 - 1, Tenaz Cooper,
16th, 46.33

20-29 - 1, Kelsie Johnson,
27th, NT available

30-39 - 1, Anastacia Moul-
trie, 8th, 28.21; 2, Jannett
Cabistan, 9th, 29.20; 3, Mar-
cia Deleveaux, 11th, 30.47

40-49 - 1, Cheryl Rolle,
3rd, 22.55

50-59 - 1, Kathie Dillette,
12th, 35.55; 2, Denise Sands,
13th, 35.57; 3, Janet Coop-
er, 14th, 41.32

MEN’S WALK

40-49 - 1, Don Cornish,
6th, 26.18; 2, Clarence Not-
tage, 7th, 26.48

50-59 - 1, Anthony
Cartwright, 5th, 25.02; 2,
George Clarke, 10th, 30.41

60-plus - 1, Richard
Adderley, Ist, 21.39; 2,
Leslie Miller, 2nd, 22.38; 3,
Eric Seymour, 4th, 22.59





THE TRIBUNE

Si

WEDNESDAY, JULY 1,



PAGE 13

or



ts

2009

PAGE 11 ¢ International sports news





8

Williams
sisters reach

semifinals...
See page 11

More than 20 new national
records set at swim meet

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

he 38th RBC

National Swim-

ming Champi-

onships, hosted by

the Bahamas
Swimming Federation, pro-
duced a myriad of new national
records, international qualifiers
and a repeat champion in one of
the most populated meets in
BSF history.

More than 20 new national
records were set at the four day
meet, with many of the coun-
try’s elite collegiate athletes
assaulting the record books.

Arianna Vanderpool- Wallace
lowered three meet records in
the 50m freestyle - 25.8s, 100m
free - 55.8s, 100m butterfly -
1:02.35s and 200m free -
2:08.66s.

The sophomore at Auburn
University in Alabama reached
the qualifying mark for the Cen-
tral American and Caribbean
games in each of the aforemen-
tioned events and the 50m but-
terfly - 28.05s.

She also surpassed the quali-
fying standards for the upcom-

yo

oo
=

Vanderpool-Wallace



ing 2010 Singapore Youth
Olympic Games in the 50 free
and 100 free.

Vanderpool-Wallace’s team-
mate at Auburn, Alana Dillete,
also set three new marks at the
Nationals while qualifying for
the CAC games in four events.

Dillete lowered times in the
50m backstroke - 30.30s, 50m
butterfly - 27.62s, and 100m
backstroke - 1:06.16s, while also
reaching the qualifying mark in
the 100m butterfly.

In the men’s division, Ken-

48th RBC National Swimming Championships was
one of the most populated events in BSF history

tucky Wildcat Vereance Bur-
rows set a new standard and
qualified for the CAC games in
the 50m butterfly. He also
reached qualifying standards in

the 50m butterfly, 100m butter-
fly and 100m free.

Other CAC Games qualifiers
at the Open Nationals includ-
ed Alicia Lightbourne (50

breast, 100 breast), Inoa Charl-
ton (50 free, 100 free), McKay-
la Lightbourn (100 back),
Michael McIntosh (50 breast),
Ariel Weech (50 free) and Ash-

YOUR CONNECTIO

rO THE WORLD

ley Butler (50 free).

In addition, 18 swimmers also
qualified for the Caribbean
Island Swimming Champi-
onships.

UBLIC NOTICE
TENDER FOR PREMIUM
SPOT ADVERTISEMENTS

Double duties for
Knowles today

mg By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MARK Knowles will have
double duties today at Wim-
bledon.

First, he and Mahesh Bhu-
pathi will play in the quarter-
final of the men’s doubles
against the team of Wesley
Moodie of the Republic of
South Africa and Dick Norman
of Belgium.

Knowles and Bhupathi are
the No.4 seeds in the tourna-
ment, while Moodie and Nor-
man are No.9.

Knowles, at age 37, will be
playing in his historic 1,000th
career doubles match, but he
has indicated that the record is
not as important as it is win-
ning.

The winning team will
advance to the semifinal where
they will face the top seeded
team of American identical
twin brothers Bob and Mike
Bryan.

The Bryans earned their trip
to the semis with a 6-2, 6-1, 6-4
win over the No.5 team of
Bruno Soares of Brazil and
Kevin Ullyett of Zimbabwe.

On the other half of the draw,
the No.2 seeded team of Daniel
Nestor and Nenad Zimonjic are
also into the semis. They
advanced with a 6-2, 6-3, 6-4
win over the No.8 team of
Lukasz Kubot of Poland and
Oliver Marach of Austria.

Knowles and Nestor won
three of the four Grand Slam
titles except Wimbledon before
they split up about three years
ago. However, they made it to
the final at Wimbledon in 2002.

Last year, Nestor and Zimon-
jic won the Wimbledon crown
while Knowles and Bhupathi
got bounced in the first round.
But before their split, Knowles
and Nestor reached the semifi-
nals in 2006.

Following their doubles
match, Knowles will have
another doubles to play when
he and his mixed pairs partner
Anna-Lena Groenefeld of Ger-
many meet Nestor and his
Russian partner Elena Vesni-
na.

That match was actually
scheduled to be played yester-
day, but was put off until today.

Before the match, Knowles
said Monday that he was look-
ing forward to facing Nestor.

Dynasty Stars continue
their undefeated streak

THE Bahamas Cricket Asso-
ciation’s top team continued
their undefeated streak toward
the playoffs with another pen-
nant leading win.

The Dynasty Stars won by
eight wickets over the Police to
further their division lead this
weekend at Windsor Park.

The Police were bowled out
for 80 runs with Gary Arm-
strong and Mark Taylor lead-
ing in runs with 25 and 16 runs
apiece.

Bowling for the Stars,
Johnathan Barry took four
wickets while Lee Melville took
three.

In their turn at bat, the Stars
scored 81 runs for the loss of
two wickets to claim the win by
eight. Barry also starred at the
plate with 29 runs while Ren-
ford Davson added 24. They
were the top scorers.

The second matchup of the
weekend, scheduled between
the Dockendale Titans and St
Agnes, was postponed by offi-
cials due to “unprepared
grounds.”

In other related news, less
than a week remains before the
Bahamas’ Under 19 National
Team is slated to depart for
regional competition in Toron-
to, Canada.

The International Cricket
Council Tournament is set for
July 5 and will include teams
from Argentina, the United
States and Canada.

The Bahamas and Cayman
Islands are the only Caribbean
nations that will compete.

The Bahamas is scheduled to
begin the tournament against
the United States on the open-
ing day, Monday July 5 and are
set to face Canada on Tuesday.

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite ten-
ders from the qeneéral public whe wish to advertise in our premium spots in

the 2010 Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a

specification document from BIC's

Head Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, or
BIC’s Head Office located in The Government Complex, Mall Drive, Free-
port Grand Bahama between the hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to

Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm on Monday July 13, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “Tender for PREMIUM SPOT ADVERTISEMENT" fo the attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin or
Acting President & CEO

The Bahamas Telecommunications
Company Limitec

#21 John F. Kennedy Drive,

2” Box N-3048, Nassau N.P.. Bohoameas

Mr. Henry Romer
Vice President - Northern Bahamas

The Bohoamas Telecommunications

ny Limited

The Govemn jent Com plex, Kall Grive
P,Q, Box F-42483, Freeport G.B., Bahamas

Comp

Premium Spot Advertisements

BRKE 40

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fhe ed is coperderi
ped, Taal by Oe
ebed. "seg bodice for

dee ve 1 inches in inngan} The vie aah al
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Tears Ain; eh cht ed ce iy
oecorent of SAME AD

Spine Ad
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tine? Var der 7 -

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fra ler ahi of tha ie eciors This ad wil be decoded. wherever wo dieoeey the
Geri OF ed dieses. Sind Debkine be pee oe FSO OER TIE

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Maa Gt



Questions on cruise deal

THE TRIBUNE

usiness

WEDNESDAY,

Teele 200

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Sir Jack’s company
sues son for $230k

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

company ultimately con-

trolled by Sir Jack Hay-

ward is suing his son for

$229,760 in alleged

unpaid rent that his

three Port Lucaya Marketplace busi-

nesses have built up over an eight-month

period, Rick Hayward telling Tribune

Business his “main priority” was his 75

staff, whose $15,000 weekly wage bill he
paid last week from his own pocket.

Bourbon Street Ltd, the Port Group

Ltd subsidiary that owns the Port Lucaya

Marketplace, filed a writ and statement

benefits for Bahamians

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net
and NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

TOUR/excursion providers
and Bay Street retailers yester-
day gave a mixed reaction to
the Government’s amesnd-
ments to the Cruise Overnight
Incentive Act, with some chal-
lenging the Government to
explain how the deal reached
with Carnival would benefit
Bahamian businesses and their
employees.

Although many were waiting
to obtain copies of the actual
amendments to the Act, one
tour operator, speaking on con-
dition of anonymity, told Tri-
bune Business it would be “a
piece of cake” for the cruise
lines, especially Carnival and
Royal Caribbean, to reach the

various thresholds where the
passenger departure tax rebates

AN

of claim against Rick Hayward’s LDV
Ltd, the holding firm for his three busi-
nesses - the Pub at Port Lucaya, La
Dolce Vita and East Restaurant - on
Thursday, June 25, the same day he and
his staff were locked out from all three
premises.

In its statement of claim, Bourbon
Street Ltd is demanding that Mr Hay-
ward’s LDV Ltd, of which he is the 75
per cent majority owner, pay the out-
standing $229,760 outstanding rent, plus
mesne profits of $28,720 per month from
July 1, 2009. Interest and costs are also
being sought.

Mesne profits are a charge, usually
identical to the monthly lease payment,

EX-Grand Bahama

which are sought by landlords from ten-
ants when they have the right to imme-
diate occupation of their property.

Bourbon Street alleged that on April
1, 2004, it had entered into a lease agree-
ment with Mr Hayward and LDV Ltd
for units 1,2,3 and 10 in Building 12 at
the Port Lucaya Marketplace, where the
Pub at Port Lucaya and La Dolce Vita
now sit.

Then, on December 1, 2007, the two
sides entered into another commercial
rental lease agreement for Unit 11 in
Building 12 at the Port Lucaya Market-
place, the home of East Restaurant.

“That at all material times, the plaintiff
[Bourbon Street] was in discussion with

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010



the defendant through its president, Rick
Hayward, who acted as the lawful agent
of the defendant to bind the defendant to
such agreements,” the statement of
claim, drafted by attorneys Davis & Co,
alleged.

“The terms of both agreements were
memoralised in writing in two documents
titled ‘Lease Agreement’ dated April 1,
2004, and December 1, 2007, respective-
ly. However, the same were never for-
mally executed by the defendant.”

Bourbon Street Ltd alleged that the
April 2004 lease for the Pub at Port
Lucaya and La Dolce Vita was for a five-

SEE page 4B

Ex-Chamber chief backs Comptroller

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

: t ; * Kelly's (Freeport) backs move to ‘return Customs to written law’ over use of C19 10-day bond
Tribune Business Editor

* Agrees government has lost revenue, but urges Customs to improve import entry checking,
processing and clearing efficiency to ensure firm use ‘front door, not the back door’

kicked in.

Concern was also expressed
that by designating the cruise
lines’ private islands - Coco Cay,
Half Moon Cay, Castaway Cay
and Great Stirrup Cay - as ‘des-
ignated ports’, the Government
was effectively giving the lines
‘carte blanche’ to call their
either exclusively or first,
bypassing Nassau and Freeport
as the prime ports of call. This,
of course, would mean fewer
benefits for Bahamian busi-
nesses reliant on the cruise
industry.

With passengers landing on
the private islands still count-
ing towards departure tax head
counts, one sour said: “In effect,
it gives them [the cruise lines]
the ability to use Nassau as a

SEE page 5B

Water sports operator concerned
over closure of lone boat ramp

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

A PARADISE Island water
sports operator fears his busi-
ness will be hampered by clo-
sure of the lone boat ramp at
Arawak Cay, he told Tribune
Business yesterday, as con-
struction on the new container
port has moved the Govern-
ment to restrict access to the

area.
Reno Deveaux said he was


























The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
tesponsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

Sale Ends
July 11th

forced to break through the bar-
rier that restricted access to the
ramp yesterday in order to
launch his boats and jet skis,
which he and his team then ride
to the northern side of Paradise
Island, where they rent the
equipment to tourists and
Bahamians.

During the Chamber of Com-
merce’s Meet the Ministers
forum last Thursday, Mr
Deveaux voiced his concern
about the possible closure of
the ramp to Minister of Public
Works, Neko Grant.

Mr Grant replied that boat
ramps did not fall under his
Ministry, and suggested that Mr
Deveaux speak to Minister of
the Environment, Earl
Deveaux, who was also sched-
uled to speak at the forum.

Mr Grant, however, reas-
sured Mr Deveaux that if the
Government decided to close
any ramps, operators would be
alerted and informed of alter-
native ramp locations.

According to Mr Deveaux,
he was surprised to see the only
ramp that could easily accom-
modate his two 20-foot boats
closed yesterday, with no notice
from government on alterna-
tive locations. He suggested that
no other ramps along Bay
Street are fit for launching
boats.

The Goodman’s Bay ramp,

SEE page 5B

Chamber of Commerce presi-
dent yesterday backed the
Comptroller's move to "return
the Customs Department to a
Department of written law"
over the C19 10-day bond's use,
but urged that it improve
import clearance efficiency so
that companies “use the front
door and not the back".

Chris Lowe, who is also oper-
ations manager at Kelly's
(Freeport), told Tribune Busi-
ness that his firm had frequent-
ly been offered use of the 10-

day bond by Customs officials
in the past whenever it com-
plained about delays in clear-
ing its shipments, but declined
because to use it would not be
in accordance with the law.
Under the Customs Manage-
ment Act, the C19 is only sup-
posed to be used for perish-
ables, gold, bullion and curren-
cy, enabling them to be cleared
and collected by those the deliv-
eries are intended for prior to

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company

Customs duty/Excise Tax pay-
ments being received and the
entries logged.

Mr Lowe said that because
Kelly's (Freeport) did not sell
perishables, it was thus pre-
vented by law from using the
C19 10-day bond. He added
that he was also convinced the
Government had lost due rev-
enues because of C19 bond
abuse "in a great number of cas-

't

es.

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Agreeing with Customs
Comptroller Glen Gomez that
the C19 had been used improp-
erly to enable firms and
import/customs brokers to col-
lect all manner of goods from
the dock prior to payment, Mr
Lowe said: "I think it's laudable
that the Comptroller is trying
to return the Customs Depart-
ment to a department of written

SEE page 3B

| Learn more at royalfidelity.com |

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Financial sector workers
see 6.2% rise in incomes

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIANS working in

ON
7
RAP

the financial services industry
saw an average 6.2 per cent
increase in take-home pay dur-
ing 2008 despite a slight decline

Tender

-118 Mediuinn Voltage Seviteh House and Dac Bark

Nassau Airport Developmest Company (MAD ts pleased in
arenas the rises of Tanda: C-118 Medien Vollage Saetch
Howse and Duct Bank for Stage 7 of the Lyeden Pinding
Inkmatonal Anpon Eapantien

The se0pe of work mncunieg:

" Gonsiuchion of 4 haw modem votiage (Tk) swatch hous tor
BEC and NAD senich gear; Budding is approwmatety 750 SF,
inch Bock walks, alerenem hasdrads, anda stance seam

metal root

Carl mors including approsamately 1,30 LF of excavation,
bedding, duct imetallstion, supply and installabon of manholes
beckil compaction, cutieag and patching tor a new madam

voltage duct bank

+ Purchase and installation of NAL) Switchgear

Inkerested Bidders. mus! be licensed and approved by fhe Bahamas
Becine Corporation to perform medium volkage (1 1kV] work

The © 718 Tender Documents wil be avaiable for pick up aller
1200 pm, Tuesday June 16th, 2009 Ahidders meahng wl
be held af 10200 am. Thursday June 231h, 20008 Please
contact Traci Brshy to ragister at tha WALD Project office

Contact: TRACI BRISBY
Contracts and Procurement Manager
LPUA Expansson Project

Ph: (242) TOE-0088 | Feu: (240) 377-207

PG) Boe AP $6209, Massey, Bahamas
Email traci brechyiiieers bs



in expatriate employees’
salaries, it was revealed yester-
day, as the industry bucked the
recessionary trend with a mod-
est expansion in its economic
contribution.

The Central Bank of the
Bahamas’ annual survey on the
financial services industry’s
2008 contribution to the
Bahamian economy disclosed
that including bonuses, the
average compensation for sec-
tor employees last year
increased by 5.3 per cent to
$57,839, driven largely by a 6.2
per cent rise in Bahamian earn-
ings.

Expatriate employees, on the
other hand, experienced a 0.6
per cent decline in all earnings
- including bonuses.

The Central Bank survey
found that stripping out bonus-
es, the Bahamian financial
industry’s average base salary
rose by 4.6 per cent to $50,488
in 2008, well ahead of the pre-
vious year’s 0.7 per cent
increase and above the 1.1 per

Offshore sector’s assets rise $97bn to $503bn
due to impact from US capital outflows

cent average rise enjoyed
between 2003-2007.

The survey again highlight-
ed the financial services indus-
try’s importance to the Bahami-
an economy, especially in terms
of providing top-end, high-
salaried jobs. The sector was
estimated to have paid out $521
million in total salaries, includ-
ing bonuses, during 2008, a 7.6
per cent increase upon the pre-
vious year’s $484.4 million total.

Those salaries generate a rel-
atively high disposable income
level for Bahamian financial
services employees, which in
turn translates into a purchasing
and spending power that cre-
ates jobs and business in other
industries, in addition to boost-
ing the velocity of money cir-
culation in this economy.

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
Visit oor website at weew,cob.edu,by

SCHOOL OF NURSING AND
ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS

Persons wishing to enroll in the 4 year Bachelor

of Pharmacy Programme for Fall 2009 are
advised that the deadline for applications has
been extended to June 30th.

Interested persons can contact Dr, Zorene Curry
at the College of The Bahamas, School of
Nursing And Allied Health Professions at 325-
3551/20 ext. 217 or Mrs. Bonnie Longley at ext.

231.

“Reporting for The Tribune is a



Meanwhile, the Central Bank
survey said that the average
base salary for expatriate work-
ers in top level management
positions rose by 7.1 per cent
to $115,591, with Bahamian
salaries increasing by a corre-
sponding 4.2 per cent to
$46.012.

“Despite the adverse domes-
tic and international develop-
ments, which particularly
impacted the Bahamas’ finan-
cial sector during the latter half
of 2008, indications are that the
sector, which accounts for at
least 15 per cent of gross
domestic product (GDP),
recorded an increased contri-
bution to the economy in 2008,”
the Central Bank survey found.

Government revenues
derived from bank, trust com-
pany, insurance firm and Inter-
national Business Company
(IBC) licence fees rose by 25.3
per cent to $33.2 million, com-
pared to $26.5 million the year
before. This was largely due to
an increase in IBC licence fees
from $15.2 million in 2007 to
$21.3 million in 2008.

Add in $1.5 million and $0.1
million in investment fund and
financial and corporate services
provider licence fees respec-
tively, and the total $34.8 mil-
lion in licensing fees received
by the Government during 2008
was a 23.8 per cent increase on
the previous year’s $28.1 mil-
lion.

However, government rev-
enues from Stamp Tax on
transactions including mort-
gages, insurance premium tax,
instruments and bonds and oth-
er banking transactions,
declined by 22.2 per cent to
$84.3 million, compared to

$108.3 million in 2007.

This was largely due to an
almost 50 per cent decline in
Stamp Tax generated by mort-
gage transactions, which fell
from $42.4 million to $21.3 mil-
lion, further evidence of the
recession’s impact on house
buyer demand and the ability of
borrower’s to qualify for a loan.

The Central Bank survey
found that during 2008 bank
and trust company assets under
administration in the so-called
offshore sector advanced by 24
per cent or $97 billion to an
industry-wide total of $503 bil-
lion, largely due to capital out-
flows from the US as investors
sought a safe haven following
the September Wall Street
meltdown.

The Central Bank added:
“This corresponded to an
observed international pattern
benefiting Caribbean financial
centres during 2008, as
resources flowed out of the US
credit markets.”

However, a decline in
deposits and lowered portfolio
valuations on capital market
investments, due to the stock
market crash, led to a decline in
fiduciary assets under manage-
ment in the Bahamian offshore
sector.

Total assets in the Bahamian
domestic commercial banking
sector rose by $697.5 million or
8.3 per cent to $9.1 billion,
down from an 8.9 per cent
growth in 2007. Yet bad debt
provisions, as the economic cli-
mate worsened and borrowers
defaulted on their loans, saw
the commercial banking sec-
tor’s total profits contract by
10.4 per cent or $32.1 million
to $275.3 million.

BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BS| Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established
intemational private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is
presently accepting applications for:

HEAD OF PRIVATE BANKING

Applicants for the position of Head of Private Banking must have al least 20
years experience in the offshore banking sector, have extensive knowledge of
intemational financial products and ability to lead and partner with team
members. Applicants must also be confident regarding customer relations with
excellent capability to generate New Money and have thorough knowledge of
local legislation, regulatory & statutory matters as well as international banking
practices. Fluency in Italian & French ts absolutely required.

Personal qualities °-

Strong management skills

Leadership skills

Excellent communication skilk
Goal-onented, self-motivated and able to motivate team members
Positive attitude and outlook

Commitment to quality and service excellence
Excellant acquisition skills

Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary
Must be able to work under pressure
Available to travel on a frequent bass

Responsibilities :-

Manage and lead Private Banking Team
Meet target in terms of Profitability and Acquisition of Net New Money
Meet deadlines on timely basis
Contribute to the management of the Bank as senior management officer
Foster and maintain communication with intamalexternal banking

professionals

Acquire new clients in target markets

responsibility and privilege. We
service & advise allocated customers

respect and honour the peaple’s

right to know everyday. I’m Interested persons with should submit their

resume/curriculum vitae to:-

such qualifications
proud to be a part of the leading
print mecium in The Bahamas.
The Tribune is my newspaper.” Human Resources Manager
BS! Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre
P.O. Box N-7130
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kern@bsibank.com
(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above altributes will be contacted

RUPERT MISSICK, JR.
CHIEF REPORTER, THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune

My Voice. Vly Hlewspaper!

To report the news, call our
News Tips Line at 502-2359.





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009, PAGE 3B



ahamas fund’s 817m
settlement with SEC

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A FORMER Bahamas-based
hedge fund has paid $17 million
to settle a Securities &
Exchange Commission (SEC)
lawsuit that accused it and its
UK-based investment adviser of
earning $198 million in “illicit
profits from its late trading and
deceptive market timing” of US
mutual fund shares.

The Headstart Fund, which
was described as “defunct” after
being incorporated in the
Bahamas in 2001 “as an open-
ended company with limited lia-
bility”, was said in a release
issued by its investment adviser
to have paid $17 million to settle
the case. At its peak, the fund
had $500 million in assets under
management.

The statement, issued by its
investment adviser, Headstart
Advisers, and the firm’s chief
investment officer, Najy Nass-
er, both of whom were also
charged by the SEC, said Head-
start had ceased its involvement
in market timing in 2003, so that

Former Bahamian domiciled hedge fund with $500m

in assets under management settles US lawsuit that
accused it of gaining $198m in ‘illicit profits’

it could focus on other trading
strategies .

“Without admitting or deny-
ing the allegations” made by the
SEC, Headstart Advisers and
Mr Nasser had both joined the
former Bahamian investment
fund in reaching a settlement,
paying $200,000 and $600,000
respectively.

Mr Nasser said: “Headstart is
very pleased to have reached a
settlement. We responded to US
concerns about market timing
and immediately ceased this ele-
ment of Headstart’s business in
September 2003.

“We have since worked hard
to build up Headstart’s funds
using different strategies. As we
equalled or bettered our overall

returns against our benchmark,
we are especially pleased with
what we have achieved.”

The original SEC lawsuit,
filed against the Bahamian
hedge fund and its masterminds
on April 10 last year, alleged
that the Headstart Fund had
engaged in late trading and mar-
ket timing of US mutual fund
shares between September 1998
and September 2003 - a five-
year period.

The SEC had alleged the
scheme was carried out through
the Headstart Fund’s accounts
at two US-based broker/deal-
ers, With the fund and its advis-
ers placing orders to buy,
redeem or trade mutual fund
shares after the 4pm eastern

coast market close.

This ‘late trading’ practice
enabled the fund to exploit the
market close by obtaining the
pre-closing price for mutual
fund shares, their net asset value
(NAV). It could then exploit
events occurring after 4pm,
which were not reflected in the
price it paid for the shares to
benefit at the expense of other
shareholders.

To avoid detection of its mar-
ket timing practices, the SEC
alleged that Headstart Advisers
“opened numerous accounts”
for the Bahamian investment
fund at different US
broker/dealers and split its
trades between different
accounts, so that the transaction

Ex-Chamber chief backs Comptroller

law, and return us to the rules.

"It's unfortunate, as a new
Comptroller, that he's forced to
try and restore the rule of law to
the functioning of Bahamas
Customs."

He added of the reinforced
C19 processes: "It is going to
have an impact, because all and
sundry have become used to
using the processes that were
made available to them, but at
the same time I hope there is a
great move towards efficiency
in merchants and importers
being able to use the front door
expeditiously, rather than the
back door. That's what I want
to see."

While it was good that the
Comptroller was bringing the
Customs Department and its
processes back in line with the
Customs Management Act, Mr
Lowe said the department
needed to enhance efficiency in
entry checking and processing
to expedite the clearance of
import shipments.

For example, Mr Lowe said
that instead of one cashier, Cus-
toms needed six to collect due
revenues efficiently. "They need
more people in the entry check-
ing and processing line in order
to expedite, and not impede,
trade, which could thereby
impede the Treasury's rev-
enue,” he explained.

"At the same time, I hope
there will be a return to the

would increase as a result of the
C19 changes, due to the
increased costs of holding extra
inventory to counter the likeli-
hood that product shipments
would be delayed in clearing
the dock.

They also expressed concern
over cash flow issues, as com-
panies would now be required
to pay taxes and duties on all
imports up front, instead of
after a portion of them may
have been sold.

Glen Gomez, Comptroller of
Customs, told Tribune Business
last week that this latest
enforcement measure was
designed to prevent “abuse” of
the C19, which had seen it used
as a ‘catch-all’ for all manner
of goods to be removed from
the docks without due taxes
being paid.

This, he added, had allowed
many businesses and individual
residents to ultimately evade
paying their taxes because they
never returned to pay due Cus-
toms duties and Stamp Tax
post-delivery.

Mr Gomez told Tribune Busi-
ness last week: “The C19 is now
being utilised in the manner for
which it was designed by law,

for perishables, gold, bullion
and coins.

“They’ve been abusing that
form, and now that abuse has
been stopped. They have been
clearing motor cars, furniture
and heaven knows what else on
that form. Why should I allow
you to abuse that form, take
delivery of goods and not pay?”

Mr Gomez said the vast
majority of items outstanding
before Customs, many of which
dated back several years, relat-
ed to C19 form declarations.
“You can’t have your cake and
eat it too,” he added.

The Comptroller added that
there were so many outstand-
ing items that Customs had not
placed a dollar value on what
it was owed, but he described
the sum as “substantial”.

And he questioned why
Bahamian companies and
importers, knowing a shipment
of product was coming in, did
not pay the Customs duties and
Excise Tax up front if they did
not want to have a wait for
clearance and submission of
entries.

“There’s a provision in law
to pay for goods before they
arrive, but no one wants to do it.

“Everyone wants to get a
freebie, and the Government
has to bear the costs of having
those goods come in and people
do not come back to pay,” Mr
Gomez said.

“There’s just too many loop-
holes in Customs, and it’s time
to bring the loopholes to a stop.
Whether internally or external-
ly, we have to address these
issues.”

Mr Gomez said Customs was
trying to improve its clearance
times, adding: “We’re trying to
turnaround shipments in 24
hours. Only shipments with 15
pages or more might take 24
hours to check."

BSi

threshold would be concealed.

“Headstart Adviser, Nasser
and the Headstart Fund bene-
fited from this late trading and
deceptive market timing at the
expense of other shareholders
in the US mutual funds,” the
SEC alleged in its 2008 lawsuit.

“Headstart Fund earned illic-
it profits of approximately $198
million from its late trading and
deceptive market timing of US
mutual funds.

HALSBURY
CHAMBERS

Counsel and Attorneys-at-Law
Notaries Public

will be closed

CARL

Friday, 3rd July, 2009

due to the observance of the Firm’s

Annual Fun Day

The office will re-open

On

Monday, 6th July, 2009

We regret any inconvenience caused.



BS] OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BS! Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established
intemational private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is
presently accepting applications for:

INVESTMENT SPECIALIST/RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

written law internally at
Bahamas Customs as well as on
the written interaction side. It
will be no good telling us to toe
the line if they are not doing
the same inside. There will be
hell to pay.”

Confirming that Kelly's
(Freeport) had declined use of
the C19, Mr Lowe told Tribune
Business: "We were offered it.
Every time we complained
about delays in entries at the
front end, we were offered the
10-day bond. But we refused its
offer because we do not deal in
perishables.

"I want the front door to
work expeditiously, not the
back door. I want our stuff
cleared faster than six days.”

Bahamian businesses had last
week told Tribune Business that
they feared consumer prices

Brinsh Colonial Hilton Hotel
Marlborough St, Shop wl

Clearance

SALE

Everything for $20
Until the end of July
Free parking at the Hilten

P.O.Box EE-15827
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 242-323-1865

Email: gems-pearisi hotmail.com

Chester Bonefish Lodge

for reservations:
Telophones 242) 356-3418

Cell-242-557-3597
berylfergusom yahoo.com

Welcomes you to the
Annual Acklins Home Coming & Regatta
Weekend July 30th - August 3rd

Z e 5 Features Hote! Packages
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ee Flat Screen) Television
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soap, shampeo, conditioner, lotion





Packages as low as $135.00 per night

Applicants for the position of Investment Specialist/Relationship Manager must have
at least 10 years’ years experience in the offshore banking sector and extensive
knowledge of international investment instruments & money market. The successful
candidate must have in-depth knowledge of international financial markets; and
excellent capabilities in managing relationships with Clients, Client Advisors &
internal Relationship Managers. Fluency in Italian and Spanish is required.

Personal qualities :-
Management skills
Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
Commitment to quality and service excellence

Strong taam attitude

Financial and analytical background

Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary
Must be able to work under pressure

Available to travel

Responsibilities :-
Research, develop and implement strategies for new products
Provide investment proposals and markets’ analysis to Clents, External
Advisors and other Relationship Managers and Senior Management
Guide and assist staff in the training of Bank's products
Provide advisory services to sophisticated clientele
Manage allocated clients

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum
vitae to:

Human Resources Manager

BS! Overseas (Bahamas) Limited

Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre

P, 0. Box N-7130

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) $02 2303 or email: ruby.kerr@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted





PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Sir Jack’s company sues son for $230k

FROM page 1B

year period with an option to
renew for five years, and a
monthly rental payment of
$20,000.

The East Restaurant lease
was for one year and four
months, with a five-year renew-
al option, and an $8,720 month-
ly rent required. Interest at 1.5

wh.
NAD

Nassau Airport
Developement Gonspany

per cent per month could be
levied on any rental arrears
under either lease.

“Both lease agreements were
forwarded to the defendant for
execution. However, the same
were never executed and
returned to the plaintiff,” Bour-
bon Street alleged.

“Despite the leases not being
executed, the defendant took

Public Advisory

The public ia advieed that due to the
LPIA Expansion Praject, the
entrance road leading to the US
Departures terminal will be reduced
to one lane of vehicular traffic

possession of the units in accor-
dance with the terms of the
unexecuted leases and began
making monthly payments to
the plaintiff in accordance with
the unexecuted lease and, to
date, remains in occupation of
the units.”

The Port Group Ltd sub-
sidiary added: “The defendant
has failed to pay the monthly

rent in accordance with the
agreement, and as of today’s
date the defendant is eight
months in arrears of rent in
respect to units 1, 2, 3, 10 and
11, and as such is indebted to
the plaintiff in the sum of
$229,760 for the period of Sep-
tember 1, 2008, to June 1, 2009.”

Bourbon Street further
claimed that Mr Hayward’s

\ J.S. JOHNSON

INSURANCE AGENTS & HRORERS

NOTICE TO
SHAREHOLDERS

J.S. Johnson & Company Limited hereby notifies all

of its shareholders that based on unaudited results

for the quarter ended June 30, 2009, the Board of

company had failed to pay
despite receiving a “formal
demand letter” from it on April
29, 2009.

Mr Hayward yesterday said
his attorney, David Thompson,
and other advisers were assess-
ing the writ and statement of
claim to determine how they
would respond, but it was likely
that a defence would be filed.

Sir Jack’s son confirmed that
he and the 75-strong staff were
still locked out of the three
restaurants, which was costing
the businesses between $5,000-
$10,000 in revenue per day
between them.

He added that he had met the
staff’s $15,000 weekly payroll
last week from his own
resources, as he was unable to
access the company cheque
books due to the lock-out.

Suggesting that the writ was
designed to prevent any possi-
bility of the arbitration he had
called for, Mr Hayward said he
had only heard about its exis-
tence on Monday morning this
week and obtained a copy at
lpm the same day, four days

essary that these 75 people be
out of a job. It’s absolutely
ridiculous.”

He again reiterated that he
could easily pay the $230,000
rent outstanding and wanted to
do so, but “promises have not
been kept. I had hoped to get
their attention and did, but in a
very unfair way that is not sen-
sible given the economic situa-
tion’”.

Adding that it had taken four
years before La Dolce Vita pro-
duced a return on investment,
Mr Hayward also complained
that Port Lucaya Marketplace
tenants had no say over how
service charges levied upon
them were spent.

Mr Hayward last week said
he had been waiting for the
GBPA and Port Group Ltd to
explain why the monthly rent
at the former two restaurants
had been increased from
$10,000 per month five years
ago to $21,000 per month.

That amounts to a 110 per
cent increase, with the three
restaurants paying a collective
$360,000 in rent per annum. Sir

commencing on Thursday, July
=, 2009 until further notice. Please
observe any traffic directions and
signage while driving along the
entrance road.

Jack’s son said the lease for
East, a smaller property, was
$8,700 per month. Since 1982,
he estimated that his interests
had paid between $3.5-$4 mil-
lion in rent at Port Lucaya Mar-
ketplace, and he was not being
charged $42.50 per square foot
every month.

Mr Hayward said his busi-
nesses in the Port Lucaya Mar-
ketplace lost some $400,000 last
year, a figure that did not
include the $300,000 severance
pay. He added that he had also
invested between $650,000-
$700,000 in East, and was
unlikely “to get that back.”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FRANCKY ST. FLEUR of
Mackey Street, P.O. Box SS-1956, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 24" day of June, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MONA RENNA OF CHURCHILL
SUBDIVISION, OFF SOLDIER ROAD, FO. BOX N-356,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is anplying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citienship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows.
any reason why registration! naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 24TH day of JUNE,
2009 to the Manister responsinle for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.0.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSHUA MERICE OF
STAPLEDON GARDENS, P.O. BOX SB-50202, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizanship, for registration‘maturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration’ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 24TH day of JUNE,
2009 to the Manster response for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.0.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

after its filing with the Supreme
Court registry.

“My priority is the 75
employees,” Mr Hayward told
Tribune Business. “It’s unnec-

INSIGHT

For the stories

Directors has declared an interim dividend of
sixteen cents (16¢) per ordinary share to be paid on
July 15, 2009 to all shareholders of record as of July

8, 2009.

Vie apologize for any inconvenience
cauiced











LEGAL MOTHCE

NOTICE

ANOLIINVESTMENT SERVICES LIMITED

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

ANOLI INVESTMENT SERVICES
LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



NOTICE [Ss HEREBY GIVEN as. folkyas:

a) ANOLDINVESTMENT SERVICES LIMITED ts in dissolution
under the provisions of the Intermaponal Basiness Companies Act
2), Creditors having debts or claims against the above

named Company are required to send particulars thereof

to the undersigned at Ocean Centre, Montague Foreshore,

East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas as sole Liquidator on

or betore the 13th day of July, 200. In default thereot

they will be excluded trom the benefit of any distnibution
made by the Liquidator.

The dasolution of the said Company commenced on the Bodh day
of June, 3008 when its Artckes of Dissolution were subenined te and
regisicred by the Registrar Gemerall.

The Liquidator of the said Company is Mr. Dayan Bourne of Ocean
Centre, Montagu Foreshore, East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

aie 14 din nf 4
Dated the 2th day of Fume, 200% Dated the 29th day of June, 2009,
Dayan Bourne
Liguicator
Registered Agent of
for the above-named Company Anoli Investment Services Limited

Ss

H&] Corporate Services Ltd.

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

COoOLONTAL

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 29 JUNE 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,579.12 | CHG -0.27 | %CHG -0.02 | YTD -133.24 | YTD % -7.78
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.53 | YTD -5.43% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.28 0.00 0.127 10.9
10.00 0.00 0.992 11.1
6.94 0.00 0.244 28.4
0.63 0.00 -0.877 N/M
3.15 0.00 0.078 40.4
2.14 0.00 0.055 43.1
10.18 0.00 1.406 8.1
2.74 0.00 0.249 11.0
5.50 0.00 0.419 13.5
1.27 -0.26 0.111 27.6
1.32 0.00 0.240 7A
7.50 0.00 0.420 18.5
10.00 0.00 0.322 34.1
10.35 0.00 0.794 13.1
4.95 0.00 0.332 15.3
1.00 0.00 0.000 N/M
0.30 0.00 0.035 8.6
5.50 0.00 0.407 13.5
10.50 J.S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00 0.952 11.0
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.180 55.6
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA V YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3787 1.87 4.83
2.8988 -1.40 -3.35
1.4730 2.74 5.66
3.1821 6.01 -13.90
12.9209 2.40 5.79
100.5448 -0.02 0.54
93.1992 -3.33 -6.76
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.2511 1.72 4.12
1.0578 2.13 5.78
1.0271 -0.57 2.71
1.0554 1.74 5.54
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Securit y Yield
Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

Previous Close Today's Close
1.39 1.39
11.00 11.00
6.94 6.94
0.63 0.63
3.15 3.15
2.37 2.37
11.39 11.39
2.74 2.74
5.64 5.64
3.32 3.06
1.77 1.77
7.76 7.76
10.97 10.97
10.38 10.38
5.09 5.09
1.00 1.00
0.30 0.30
5.50 5.50

Nassau Aurport

Development (om pany

S2wk-Hi _52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Interest Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015
EPS $ Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

52wk-Low Symbol
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

Weekly Vol.
N/M
N/M

256.6

Proposed Modification to Airport
Fees and Charges Notice

The Nassau Airport Development Company is
proposing a modification of Fees and Charges,
effective January 1, 2010, pursuant to article 4 of
the Airport Authority (Fees and Charges) Regulations, 2009.

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90 0.00%
52wk-Low

1.3124
2.8988
1.3940
3.1821

12.2702

100.0000

93.1992

1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Div $ Yield % NAV Date
31-May-09
31-May-09
19-Jun-09
30-Apr-09
31-May-09
31-Mar-09
31-Mar-09
31-Dec-07
30-Apr-09
31-May-09
31-May-09
31-May-09

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

The proposed increase is to aircraft landing
fees, terminal fees, aircraft bridge fees and
aircraft parking charges only. Car parking
rates and the Passenger Facility Charge are
Se LEHANE ap eee ee not impacted by the proposed modification.
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

For more information or to comment on the
proposed modification please visit our website
at www.nas.bs.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009, PAGE 5B





Questions on
cruise deal benefits
for Bahamians

FROM page 1B

second port of call without com-
mitting to any financial obliga-
tions in Nassau.

“It’s everything they want.
They have the right, technically,
not to do business in Nassau.”
Describing the 350,000
‘overnight’ passenger in Nassau
target per cruise line, per
annum - one condition that
must be fulfilled for the depar-
ture tax rebate tpo kick-in - as
“extremely low”, the source
said: “The Government of the
Bahamas, three weeks after
debating its Budget and com-
plaining about the shortfalls,
does not have the courtesy to
rationalise the benefits for the
Bahamas from the amend-
ments, but instead rationalises
the benefits it’s giving away to
the cruise lines.”

Another tour operator,
speaking on condition of
anonymity, told Tribune Busi-
ness: “On the surface, it doesn’t
look good. It’s absolutely amaz-
ing.” It is understood that con-
sultation on the Cruise
Overnight Incentive Act
amendments and the talks with
Carnival was minimal to non-
existent.

The amendments create a
three-tier passenger tax rebate
structure for the second to sixth
years of a six-year agreement.
The rebate will be $8.50 per
head for passenger numbers
between 800,000 to one million,
and $10 per head for numbers
above one million. That will be
in addition to the $15 per head
rebate offered to the cruise lines
for passengers between zero to
800,000.

Meanwhilke, Charles
Klonaris, co-chair of the Down-

town Nassau Partnership and
the the Nassau Tourism and
Development Board’s chair-
man, said the Government had
done a good thing by encour-
aging the major cruise lines to
increase their passenger deliv-
ery. Yet he questioned whether
those passengers would be dis-
couraged from gambling, shop-
ping and dining onboard the
ship while in port.

It is hoped that the tax
rebates offered to the cruise
lines would translate into more
passengers, which would mean
more onshore spending. How-
ever, some individuals are not
convinced that would be reality.

Under the amended Act,
cruise lines must remain docked
in a designated or approved
port for at least 13 hours
between llam and midnight at
a minimum.

Manager at the Bambu

Nightclub, Dino Berdanis, said
he was not convinced that the
Government’s incentive plan
will mean much for Bay Street
merchants.

According to him, designating
five new ports under the Act,
four of which belong to the
cruise lines, does nothing to
encourage visitor spending
downtown.

Mr Berdanis said those ships
which encounter unfavourable
weather while en route to their
private islands often come into
Nassau Harbour ahead of
schedule. However, he argued
boat loads of them can be seen
bypassing Bay Street for a ferry
ride over to Atlantis.

Mr Berdanis contended that
there is nothing to lure the sur-
plus of passengers that the port
of Nassau is expecting to the
downtown area. “There is noth-
ing for them to do,” he said.

Water sports operator
concerned over closure

of lone boat ramp

FROM page 1B

he said, was not an actual ramp
at all and operators who launch
there are forced to lift their jet
skis some 30 feet to a waiting
trailer.

According to him, the ramp
adjacent to Brown’s Boat Bas-
in’s shipyard on East Bay Street
has no parking, is often too shal-
low to launch boats, and can
cause traffic congestion while
operators are dropping their
equipment in the water.

Mr Deveaux said his compa-
ny launched its jet skis and
boats from the Montague ramp
some time ago, but were dis-
couraged from doing so by
authorities because of the traffic
congestion the trucks caused
while dropping equipment in
the water.

And now, according to Mr

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

INSIGHT

For the stories
hehind the
news, real
Insight on
Mondays

Deveaux, that ramp has wors-
ened over the years, having lost
some of its concrete at the end,
leaving a steep drop-off into the
water.

Using

He also said that using the
Montague ramp would add one-
and-a-half hours to his loading
and off-load time.

"That would mean if we leave
the island at 6pm we won't



leave Montague until 9pm,”
said Mr Deveaux.

According to him, any ramp
farther than Montague or
Arawak Cay would mean using
more fuel to move the boats
and jet skis to Paradise Island.

"T already spend $200 per day
on fuel," he said.

Mr Deveaux said the Gov-
ernment has not built a new
ramp in more than 30 years,
despite the constant collection
of licensing fees and other mis-

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT








(No.45 of 2000)
AIRLEASE EIGHT LIMITED






Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137
(8) of the International Business Companies Act, No. 45
of 2000, the Dissolution of AIRLEASE EIGHT LIM-
ITED has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register. The date of completion of the dis-
solution was the 8th day of June, 2009.

GROWING MULTI-MEDIA & TRANSPORTATION
COMPANY REQUIRES

FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

Rapidly growing company is inviting applications for the
position of “Financial Controller’. Applicants should have
a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting and a CPA, ACCA, CA
qualification or any other qualification recognized by the
Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants.

Successful candidate should:



have at least 4 years experience in an established

accounting firm

be able to work as a part of a team
be able to prepare budgets and financial reports

liaise with banking officers

be able to communicate effectively with all levels

of management

be proficient in meeting and keeping all deadlines
have proficient knowledge of QuickBooks

For a confidential interview please mail resume to:
c/o Financial Controller,
P O Box N 4271, Nassau, N. P., The Bahamas
or email financialcontrollerposition@yahoo.com



cellaneous costs associated with
running a water sports business.

“T pay $12,000 in fees per
year,” he said. “They can at
least build a ramp.”



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

AIRLEASE FIVE LIMITED

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of
2000, the Dissolution of AIRLEASE FIVE LIMITED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was
the 8th day of June, 2009.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000)
AIRLEASE SIX LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (8) of the International Business Companies Act, No.
45 of 2000, the Dissolution of AIRLEASE SIX LIMIT-
ED has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck
off the Register. The date of completion of the dissolution
was the 8th day of June, 2009.

ECCT CS OU 071







ea MTSU
MIR) Perey a BEE

Schedule of Events

Date/Time
Fri, July 3rd

9:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

Sat, July 4th

6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.

Sun, July 5th
700 p.m.

Thurs, July 9th
8:00 p.m. -

Fri, July 10th

1:00 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.

& Sun July 11th & 12th

lah ;

12:30 a.m.

_
__. Various Points to Gi »

te

Event

National Pride Day

E. Clement Bethel National Arts
Festival Cultural Show

Rawson Square

Independence Beat Retreat
Rawson Square

Ecumenical Church Service
Bahamas Faith Ministries (BFM)

Clifford Park C elebrations .

Cultural Show, Inspection,Prayels,
Flag Raising Ceremony, Fy
Clifford Park a a

yee a

slp }

“The People’s Rus On
Rawson Seaaid to ms wh,

National Fun

.
hs

-
A

Stat {| | Common; ony Loftier, CrP

as





PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009

BAHAMAS WASTE LIMITED

Unaudited Financial Statements
Three months ended March 31, 2009

Bahamas Waste Limited
Condensed Balance Sheet (unaudited)

March 31 December 31
2009 2008
Assets
Current assets
Cash 205,216
Accounts receivable, net 1,471,267
Inventories 364,198
Prepaid expenses and other receivables 174,609
Deposits 12,900
Total current assets 2,228,190

160,456
1,496,303
304,064
77,835
12,900
2,051,558

Non-current assets

Investment in associate (note 6)
Property, plant and equipment, net
Total non-current assets

Total assets

143,248
7,393,558
7,536,806
9,764,996

143,248
7,391,968
7,535,216
9,586,774

Liabilities and shareholders’ equity
Liabilities

Current liabilities

Bank overdraft

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities
Current-portion of note payable (note 5)
Total current liabilities

17,802
397,783
98,384
513,969

407,946
100,116
508,062

Non-current liabilities
Security deposits

Note payable (note 5)
Total non-current liabilities
Total liabilities

409,921
229,252
639,173
1,147,235

407,889
254,940
662,829
1,176,798

Shareholders’ equity

Share capital

Contributed surplus

Retained earnings

Total shareholders’ equity

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity $

42,000
2,752,113
5,823,648
8,617,761
9,764,996

42,000
2,752,113
5,615,863
8,409,976

$ 9,586,774

Bahamas Waste Limited
Condensed Statements of Income and Retained Earnings (unaudited)

Three months ended
March 31
2009 2008
Income
Sales and services rendered
Cost of sales and direct expenses
Gross profit

1,931,247
1,233,875
697,372

2,012,583
1,301,507
711,076

Expenses

Operating expenses 482,566 475,350
Interest and bank charges (note 5) 7,021 7257
Total operating expenses 489,587 482,607
Net income 207,785 228,469
5,287,237
5,515,706

Retained earnings at beginning of year 5,615,863
Retained earnings at end of the year $5,823,648

Earnings per share $ 0.05 0.05
Bahamas Waste Limited

Condensed Statements of Cash Flows (unaudited)

Three months ended
March 31
2009 2008

Cash flows from operating activities
Net income $
Adjustments for items not involving use of cash:

Bad debt expense

Depreciation

207,785 $ 228,469

12,438
294,657
514,880

301,898

530,367
Change in non-cash working capital items:
Decrease in accounts receivable
Increase in inventories
Increase in prepaid expenses and other assets
Increase in accounts payable and accrued
liabilities
Increase in security deposits
Net cash flow provided by operating activities

12,598
(60,134)
(96,774)

(181,057)
(20,669)

10,163
2,032
382,765

27,369
15,792
371,802

Cash flows from investing activities
Purchases of property, plant and equipment
Investments in associate

Net cash flow used for investing activities

(296,247)

(142,405)
50,000

296,247) 192,405)

Cash flows from financing activities
Payment of Note Payable
Net cash flow used for financing activities

28,965) :
28,956) :

Net change in cash 62,562 179,397

Cash position at beginning of the period 142,654 191,960

Cash position at end of the period $205,216 $ (12,563

Cash represented by:

Cash $

Bank overdrafts -
$205,216 $

205,216 $ 3,061
15,624
12,653

See accompanying notes to unaudited condensed interim financial statements.
Bahamas Waste Limited
Notes to Unaudited Condensed Interim Financial Statements
March 31, 2009

1. Corporate Information

Bahamas Waste Limited (BWL”) was incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas on August 18, 1987 under the name of Bahamas Waste Systems Limited. On December
7, 1999, the Company changed its name to Bahamas Waste Limited. The Company is engaged in
the business of solid and medical waste collection and disposal, including the sale, installation,
rental and maintenance of waste compactors and containers. The Company has publicly traded
shares which are registered on the Bahamas International Stock Exchange. The latest audited
accounts of the BWL were prepared on December 31, 2008.

The quarter ends of BWL fall on March 31, June 30 and September 30, with the year end of the
Company being December 31.

The condensed interim financial statements for the three months ended March 31, 2009 were
authorized for issuance by the Board of Directors on June 29, 2009.

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Basis of preparation
These condensed interim financial statements for the three months ended March 31, 3009 have been
prepared in accordance with International Accounting Standard 34 Interim Financial Reporting.

The condensed interim financial statements do not include all of the information and disclosures
required in the annual financial statements, and should be read in conjunction with the December
31, 2008 audited financial statements.

The accounting policies adopted in the preparation of the interim condensed financial statements are
consistent with those followed in the preparation of the Company’s annual financial statements for
the year ended December 31, 2008, except for the adoption of certain new standards, interpretations
and amendments to existing standards that have been published that are mandatory for the
Company’s accounting periods beginning on or after January 1, 2009 or later periods, noted below.
Adoption of these Standards and Interpretations did not have any effect on the financial position or
performance of the Company.

IFRS 2
IFRS 3
IFRS 8
IAS 23

: Share Based Payments (Revised)
* IAS 27

Business Combinations (Revised)

Operating Segments

Borrowing Costs (Revised)

Consolidated and Separate Financial Statements (Revised)
Agreements for the Construction of Real Estate

Hedges of a Net Investment in Foreign Operation
Distributions of Non-Cash Assets to Owners

Transfers of Assets from Customers

IFRIC 15
IFRIC 16
IFRIC 17
IFRIC 18

3. Earnings Per Share

Earnings per share were calculated based on the shares outstanding at the end of the period, which
approximated average shares outstanding during the period.

2009 2008
4,200,000 4,200,000



Shares outstanding at March 31

4. Related Party Transactions
During the quarter, BWL entered into transactions with related parties. All transactions were
conducted at arms length and no significant obligations to the related parties existed at March 31,
2009.

Bahamas Waste Limited

Notes to Unaudited Condensed Interim Financial Statements

March 31, 2009

5. Note Payable

On June 1, 2008, the Company entered in agreement to purchase property adjacent to its existing
location for $500,000. Pursuant to that agreement, the Company has paid the vendor $100,000 and
entered into a $400,000 promissory note agreement with Davandon Holdings Limited. The term of
the note is five years with an interest rate of 7% per annum. The principals of Davandon Holdings
Limited are also the majority shareholders of the Company.

6. Commitments and Contingencies

The Company guarantees its compactors for a 60-day period from the date of purchase. The
Company is reimbursed by the manufacturer for any claims paid under such guarantees.



THE TRIBUNE



aa =e
China backs down from requirement for Web filter

By JOE McDONALD
AP Business Writer

BEIJING (AP) — In a rare
reversal, China’s government
gave in to domestic and inter-
national pressure and backed
down Tuesday from a rule that
would have required personal
computers sold in the country to
have Internet-filtering software.

Just hours before the rule was
to have taken effect, the gov-
ernment said it would postpone
the requirement for the “Green
Dam” software. The Ministry
of Industry and Information
Technology said it made the
decision partly because some
PC markets were having diffi-
culty meeting the deadline. It
did not say whether the plan
might be revived.

The change of course averted
a possible scuffle with Wash-
ington. Top US officials had

protested the plan after it was
imposed abruptly in May, call-
ing it a barrier to trade. Angry
Web users circulated online
petitions protesting Green
Dam, while industry groups
warned the software might cre-
ate computer security problems.

The controversy reflected the
conflict between the commu-
nist government’s desire to con-
trol information and China’s
high-tech ambitions. ‘The coun-
try has an increasingly
informed, vocal public and
tighter links to companies that
create urgently needed jobs and
tax revenue.

The decision was a “victory
for China’s civil society,” said
Li Fangping, a Beijing lawyer
who had demanded a public
hearing on the plan.

“Many citizens worked
together and voiced their oppo-
sition to the forced installation

of this filtering software and
forced the government to at
least think more deeply about
it,” Li said. “We hope now that
they will go ahead and com-
pletely drop this order.”

News of the announcement
spread in China quickly via
Twitter and the Chinese mini-
blogging site Fanfou. Some
bloggers said they expect the
government to look for a way to
carry out Green Dam that
attracts less attention.

“They are using the word
‘delay,’ instead of saying they
stopped the plan,” said Wen
Yunchao, a Chinese blogger
who has been among the most
vocal critics of Green Dam. “I
think that it’s possible that at
some point in the future the
government could still enforce
their policy and install software
on personal computers that fil-
ters the information people are

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INDEPESDEST ADDITORS’ REPORT

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able to look at. So, Iam calling
this an intermediary victory.”

China’s communist govern-
ment encourages Internet use
for education and business, and
the country has the biggest pop-
ulation of Web users, with more
than 298 million. But authorities
try to block access to material
deemed obscene or subversive,
and Beijing operates the world’s
most sweeping system of Inter-
net filtering.

US companies such as Yahoo
Inc., Microsoft Corp. and
Google Inc. have cooperated in
way or another with govern-
ment requests to tamp down
criticism.

The Green Dam software
would raise China’s controls to
a new level by putting a filter
inside each PC. Chinese author-
ities said it would be needed to
shield children from violent and
obscene material online.

Analysts who have reviewed
the programme Say it also con-
tains code to filter material the
government considers political-
ly objectionable. Separately, a
California company claimed
that Green Dam contained
stolen programming code.

Chinese Web © surfers
ridiculed Green Dam by saying
it would block access to photos
of animals and other innocuous
subjects. State media reported
extensively on the complaints, a
rare move. Chinese media usu-
ally uncritically support gov-
ernment policy.

Green Dam already is in use
in Internet cafes in China and
has been installed since the start
of this year in PCs sold under a
government programme that
subsidizes appliance sales in the
countryside.

Large PC makers such as
Toshiba Corp. and Taiwan’s
Acer Inc. said they were ready
to provide Green Dam on disks
beginning Wednesday. Indus-
try leaders Hewlett-Packard Co.
and Dell Inc. had declined to
discuss their plans, possibly
waiting for a diplomatic settle-
ment.

Dell spokesman Jess Black-
burn said the PC maker is hap-
py with the Green Dam delay.
He would not say what Dell had
done to prepare for China’s
deadline.

“We respect the Chinese gov-
ernment’s stated goal of pro-
tecting children by filtering
access to pornography through
the Internet,” Blackburn said
in a statement.

Representatives from US-
based technology groups,
including the Information Tech-
nology Industry Council and the
Software & Information Indus-
try Association, were in Beijing
trying to stop Green Dam.

“We welcome the delay in
implementation of the Green
Dam mandate, and we look for-
ward to working closely with
the US government to find mar-
ket-based solutions that enable
consumer choice and protect
children on the Internet,” said
John Neuffer, vice president for
global policy at the Information
Technology Industry Council,
which represents companies
including Dell, Hewlett-Packard
Co. and Apple Inc.

The Green Dam initiative
coincided with a tightening of
government controls on Inter-
net use. Last week, China’s
Health Ministry ordered health-
related Web sites that carry
research on sexually oriented
topics to allow access only to
medical professionals.

Also last week, the govern-
ment issued new rules on “vir-
tual currency” used by some
game Web Sites, saying it can-
not be used to purchase real
goods.

On Green Dam, the industry
ministry sounded a conciliatory
note. It promised to “solicit
opinions from all parties” in an
effort to improve its work.

“T think the cost of the move
from trade friction and gener-
ally a public relations black eye
was becoming pretty clear to
the government,” said Duncan
Clark, chairman of BDA China
Ltd., a Beijing research firm.
Postponing the filtering rule
“gets them out of the scrutiny of
the international media and
business.”

¢ Associated Press Writer
Alexa Olesen and Associated
Press researcher Bonnie Cao in
Beijing and AP Technology
Writer Jessica Mintz in Seattle
contributed to this report

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009

eS

THE TRIBUNE





By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter

amissick@tribunemedia.net

TAMING your inner
child from sweet treats
is always a battle. For-
tunately, Candyland
Creations knows all
about your needs and
is ready to share all
the sugary goodness
they have to offer.





The Tribune

WIDE arrangement of candy treats
from Candyland Creatioris.

Minarda Pow-
ell and Kimberly
Beneby, owners
of Candyland
Creations, since
2006 have been
specialising in
creating gourmet
candy arrange-
ments to satisfy
those sugar
urges.

“We met a few
years ago work-
ing together
doing tourists’
weddings. We
were both preg-
nant with our

second children and decided to stay home.
When we sat down to think of things to do,
candy was something that was on our short
list and we decided to go for it. A lot of it
was trial and error with the kids and the hus-

bands being ‘guinea pigs’,”

Mrs Powell said.

Mrs Powell said although they do hard
candy, they also take on some old Bahamian

favourites.

“We have many molds, different flavors
and can match the color of the candy with
your event. We have island themes such as
crabs, fish and pineapples to stuff for baby
showers and Christmas molds. We have a lot
of children’s characters such as batman for
birthday parties. We do a lot of arrange-
ments for Mother’s Day and other special



events. We also have four different kinds of
fudge and we are always working on finding
new ingredients from guava fudge to
caramel fudge. We also do coconut cream

Another favourite clients enjoy besides
the candy is the cheesecake.

“We do a few cakes such as our butter
rum cheese cake with butter rum sauce.
Instead of the traditional rum cake, we have
rum cheese cake. We also do the little butter
mints as well in a variety of shapes,” Mrs
Powell said.

As for the bouquets, Mrs Beneby said
they did not see a lot of sweet treat bouquets
and wanted to present something different
to the Bahamian public.

“We didn’t want to come out and be just
like everybody else-we wanted to give peo-
ple an option. We went with the candies and
we started making the arrangements. Com-
ing from the wedding background, we had
seen all the floral stuff and all the things you
can do so we wanted another option that
you can give people that gave the same pop,
but it was a different way of displaying it.
Flowers die but the candies last for weeks-
you can eat your bouquet,” Mrs Beneby
said.

Looking into the future of candy, Mrs
Powell said she hopes the business can be
something her children can carry on.

“This gives Kim and me a chance to be
what we are first and foremost-mothers and
wives and to do the work that we have to do
for our husbands and to be there for our
kids. Especially the way the economy is, it is
great to have things like this because there
will always be weddings and showers and
events that people need things for because
you still have to enjoy your life. So if we can
help someone enjoy their life, then that
helps us to come back and enjoy ours,” Mrs
Powell said.



a
candy
Christmas
bouquet.

that we call coconut ice, benny cakes, peanut
cakes, and benny cakes with peanuts,” Mrs
Powell said.

ry.com



A savory Grouper Melt with hand cut Cassava fries available at the Valentine’s Resort.

¢ To find out more about Candyland Creations, e-
mail them at candyland@btccybercell. blackber-

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

NESTLED at the heart of one of
the country’s most beautiful destina-
tions, is Harbour Island’s Valentine’s
Resort and Marina which features
some of the most exciting seaside dish-
es available in the country.

Just a five minute walk down from
the island’s dock, is the newly fitted
resort that offers both a breathtaking
view of the marina and fabulous island
food around the clock.

Property General Manager Harper
Sibley said, since the recent addition of
100 rooms, they have seen a rise in
overnight guests who prefer to eat at
the resort’s restaurant.

He explained: “We are able to pro-
vide breakfast, lunch, and dinner seven
days a week which is from 7am to
11pm.

“We can’t help but to focus on the
seafood that we have which comes right
off our own dock everyday, we have
four fisherman who are out there bring-
ing us groupers, Mahi Mahi, Tunas,
Yellow tail Snappers, it’s just fabulous.
We have those dishes in our restau-
rant every night and you can pick what

you like, and we "ll cook it up just the
way you want.”

Although this may sound too good to
be true, it most certainly is, at least
according to the property’s executive
chef who goes by the name Chef Hall.

The newly appointed chef said
despite his humble beginning, over the
years his love for cooking has allowed
him to train at some of the finest facil-
ities around the world including the
Belmont University, the Marriott, Walt
Disney World, Our Lucaya, and The
Hotel Training College.

Chef Hall described the resort’s food
as simply Bahamian with a flair.

During the summer months, the
kitchen serves lighter dishes that can
come in the form of jerk, blackened,
sautéed, grilled, lemon buttered, and
the works.

“We have hamburgers, hot dogs, we
have grilled cheese and things like that
for the kids in the day, because we have
families that come over for summer
vacation both from the US and Nas-
sau.”

For the alternative eaters, he said
there are also vegetarian dishes, pastas,
and steaks which are all served with
fresh ingredients.

There are also Key Lime Pies, short-





cakes, homemade ice-cream, guava
cakes, banana breads, “we just ensure
that everything we deliver to our guests
is fresh.”

Chef Hall said it was indeed a chal-
lenge acquiring fresh meats to the
resort on a daily basis considering most
fresh catches were sent to Nassau, but
his concern has always been on quality
so he refuses to settle for less.

“From time to time we may get a
guest requesting fresh grouper or
conch, and if we don’t have fresh prod-
ucts we don’t make it. If we can’t get
the best possible ingredients for all of
our dishes, we don’t make them.”

Chef Hall said when he makes a dish
like macaroni and cheese, his dish is
guaranteed to be more scrumptious
because he uses no less than six blends
of cheese which sets his kitchen apart
from the rest.

Looking toward the future of the
restaurant, Chef Hall said plans are on
the table for a dining experience like
none other.

“We have some things planned that
we think and hope are going to be sort
of a renaissance approach to the
Bahamian dining experience. This
includes new food, more fun, and fam-
ily centered events.”



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009, PAGE 9B







The Tribune

entertainment






By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

AS the Bahamian music
scene continues to break
down barriers, many artists
are continuing to spread a
message of success and tri-
umph. However, Mystro
Miller, a Bahamian Reggae
artist said he is ready to
spread his message- one filled
with consciousness and uplift-
ment.

“T started studying back in 1998, com-
ing out of high school. Before that I did

back ups for my dad’s band. I decided

to become a full fledged artist in 2008. I

got the name Mystro from my oldest
brother who traveled to Jamaica a lot.
Every time he came back, he brought
me a lot of the Sum Fest Shows and
reggae shows. I would sit down and

mimic the artist. I learned the Bass Gui-
tar as well so my friends really branded
the name Mystro as well,” Mystro said.

Through his faith in Rastafarism,
Mystro said he pushed his music fur-
ther.

“T saw a lot of stuff was going on with
the economy and the world. I know a lot
of young people are influenced by music

and tend to act out what they hear and

see on television. It is because of that I
am trying to bring a positive message to

try to fight against all those bad influ-

ences that they hear in music to let them

know the world is not about the show
cars and jewelry-it gets real,” Mystro
said.

As for his music career, Mystro has
just released is timely single called
“Recession.”

IN THIS reprise of
Scott Joplin’s
Treemonisha, more
than 57 Bahamian
Pleo) ecw UnlemetclA Les) ks
are involved in the
mega production
set to debut next

Le nToEN Almas
Dundas.

Take it away

YSTFO

Miller spreads
positive message
in his music

“Basically with the Recession album,
Thad heard about the persons in Exuma
out of jobs which meant more people
out of ajob, more people under pres-
sure to pay light bills, water bills, and so
on. Couple months back people from
Atlantis lost their jobs which had people
falling out and ending up in the hospital.
The key line on that track is ‘in this time
of recession, don’t let your mind fall in
the state of depression.’ Once you loose
your mind, you can do anything that you
would never think you can do. Right
now how the economy has slowed down,
every one is saying there is a recession
when the money never falls off of the
earth. With the recession single, it is just
to keep the people encouraged as broth-
ers and sisters. We need to come togeth-
er and help one another,” Mystro said.

Mystro said although he has been net-
working and doing a lot of work includ-
ing the Reggae All stars concert, Love
Fest, and most recently the Sand Trap,
he wants to continue to spread his mes-
sage not just the Bahamas but globally.

“To get my music across the world I
am taking steps to make that happen
along with my manager Supa B. The
Bahamian music scene has come a long
way although there are things that need
to be revamped as far as the artists
themselves. The artists have to know
their rights and the business side of it.
The music business is 90 per cent busi-
ness and 10 percent talent, but I encour-
age them to keep pushing what they are
doing and don’t quit. The same time
you quit is when your breakthrough can
come,” Mystro said.

To hear live music from Mystro, fol-
low him on Twitter at Mystro242.

. = be ihe
r ace! pea |
or.” ee Ee

CT





‘Treemonisha’ debuts at the Dundas Centre

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

IN less than a week a play written by
famous African American playwright
Scott Joplin will debut at Dundas Cen-
ter For the Performing Arts, connecting
Bahamians to an important moment in
history.

The director of the production Dr
Cleveland Williams, said it was an
extremely challenging task to bring to
life the essence of what this play repre-
sents.

“With directing an opera or direct-
ing a play, you have to be able to bring
it to life. You have to get the characters
in the opera to basically react to every-
thing that is happening on stage, and
also to interpret the composer’s music
and also the librettos.

“In my role, I am working on con-
veying to the cast how important it is to
understand what they are doing and
how they interact with each other, and
also the characters that they play as ex-
slaves and villagers connecting with
Treemonisha.”

The main characters Treemonisha
and Monisha are played by four differ-
ent actresses and Dr Williams said it
was fortunate that he was able to incor-
porate Candice Bostwick and Lakita
Wells-Thompson as Treemonisha.

Local actors Portia Barnet and Lil-
lian Bastian will play the role of Mon-
isha and are the perfect fit for the role
according to Dr Williams.

Ned is being played by Kermit Stra-
chan, and Remous by Demetrius Delan-
cy.
Treemonisha, tells the story of how
former slaves of a South American plan-

tation adapt to the new found freedom
when slavery was abolished in 1866.

The community of slaves are gov-
erned by two elders known as Ed and
Monisha. They cared for Treemonisha
from birth and she is 18 when the play
opens. Like most early black communi-
ties, this village has a witch doctor aka
Obeah Man, who was seen as a menace
to the community. He constantly tried to
sell his potions and bags of luck to the
villagers who were rarely interested in
them.

However one day the Obeah Man
approached Monisha and offered to sell
her the potion to keep her enemies away
and to gain some good fortune.

Her husband Ned happened to see
the exchange as it is taking place, and
attempts to discourage Monisha from
making the purchase.

As Treemonisha walks in on the com-

motion and urges the witch doctor to
stop selling his evil potions, he gets upset
at her and soon decided to take revenge
on her.

As the play progresses the issues of
community bonding, education, and reli-
gion arise.

Dr Willams said after returning home
after a long stay in Europe last June,
he then decided that an opera like
Treemonisha was something the
Bahamas needed for its independence
celebrations.

Having a longtime love for the arts
and its development in the country, he
said he hopes that Treemonisha will
help to share with the world and those at
home that “We can do more produc-
tions like this, and is something worth
seeing because it can help in our cul-
tural development.” The play opens on
Monday at the Dundas.

Ais






The Tribune’s Things 2 Da
countdown is taking you back to
the good old days this week.

Nearly 100 years after it was

written, Scott Joplin’s opera

Treemonisha will debut in
SMa M erie Seelm talc D ION Ose Oo1
tre for The Performing Arts on
July 6. Directed by Bahamian
drama connoisseur Dr Cleveland
Williams, Joplin’s three-act opera
will be performed by an all
SEVP UM lamer SIMO) MN OlE MINEO
artists commemorating the thir-
SME UN MOM SrlIC NEM
independence. Gala night pro-
TOM TMU MIN RST MMU (COlE
Sassoon Bahamas Heart Founda-
tion, and proceeds from the final
night will assist the Bahamas
National Dance company on their
upcoming trip to the Aberdeen
International Youth Festival in the
UK. The story is a realistic look
into the life of newly freed slaves
in the American post slavery era.
Performances will take place July
6, 7, 8, and 11 at the Dundas
Center for the Performing Arts
and tickets are $75 for the gala
night, and $35 on the other
nights.




















































»-The Alliance Francaise’s
French Cine Club presents
the movie Moliére, a roman-

tic comedy about the famous

French playwright Moliere. The

opening scene for the film is set

during the middle of the renais-
sance period where Moliere gets
the chance to perform before

King Louis XIV in France. Moliere

then has some tough luck and

eventually lands into some finan-
cial challenges. He is then thrown
into a debtor's prison but soon
regains his freedom when a local
businessman decides to pay his
debt only to ask of him a small
favour. He has to teach the gen-
tleman how to act so that he can
capture the attention of a recently
widowed woman. The twist begin
when Moliere happens to fall in
love with the businessman’s
neglected wife, and thus the dra-
ma begins. The two hour film will
be shown on Friday at 6pm at the

SG Hambros building West Bay

Street at a price of $5 which also

includes refreshments. To RSVP,

call 302-5141.

.The Junkanoo Summer Fes-

tival returns to Bay Street

this Saturday showcasing
traditional Goombay music, live
bands, and lots of local food and
fun. The all day event which will
be hosted every Saturday during
the month of July, will also fea-
ture local crafts, Bahamian litera-
ture, and a pineapple eating and
onion peeling competition. So
come out this Saturday between
noon and 10pm to experience
traditional life in the islands.

. The Bahamas Faith Min-
istry’s (BFM) Youth Alive
Center is about to launch its
Summer 2009 conference
labeled The Assignment, with the
theme ‘Living Right In A World
Gone Wrong.’ The five day event
which starts tonight at the Diplo-
mat Center features a nightly dra-
ma presentation free to all. There
will also be various speakers dur-
ing the day in conferences
including BFMs senior pastor Dr
Myles Munroe, pastor Dave Bur-
rows, and Lakita Garth. There will
also be performances by local
and regional gospel artists like DJ
Counsellor, Land Lord, Mr Lynx,
and Emrand Henry on Friday.
Registration is $15 basic, $35
local, and $75 for international
visitors. For tickets contact the
church office, or visit
www.youthalivel.com for details.

.The newly formed Bahamas

Arts Collective (BAC) is

hosting a public meeting at
the Bahamas National Trust
Retreat on Village Road this
Thursday at 6pm. The event will
introduce BAC as a group which
will allow members to share
upcoming goals and projects
related to local art and culture.
Included discussion topics are
lobbying, cultural policy,
resource sharing, and Carifesta
2010. The meeting starts at 6pm
and promises to be an exciting
moment in the local art and cul-
ture movement.



PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ARTS



HOLes in TH:

NAGB members

excavation on the beach

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

MEMBERS and par-
ticipants of the Nation-
al Art Gallery of the
Bahamas Art Beyond
The Studio conference,
took part in an excava-
tion exercise this past
weekend where they
collected several items
along a local beach, a
practice they say dates
back to the early days
of museums.

found unique items and stored them in cup-
boards later coined as Curiosity Cabinets- that
is the original birthplace of the mordern-day

museum.

Many of the items collected by the NAGB
team included cigarette buds, plastic bottles,
stones, and other everyday items that are com-

monly overlooked.

Mr Edwards said the exercise is to look deep-
er than just the external representation of the
items, to investigate the story of how they
arrived to where they were found.

conduct

Facilitator
Michael Edwards
explained: “These
items that we have
retrieved from
along the Western
Esplanade fore-
shore will cleaned
and categorise to
eventually be dis-
played in Curiosity
Cabinets.”

He said the con-
cept of the Curios-
ity Cabinet dates
as far back as the
fifteenth hundred.
It was a practice
that started with
the random selec-
tion of items in
various corners of
Europe. The early
art collectors







sand

Members of NAGB-
sort through items —
they recently col-
lected during the
beach excavation
execise.

BAHAMIAN DJ Anthony

‘FatBack’ Marshall

(above) died Thursdsay



after a long battle with
diabetes. He was 44-

years-old. Also to pass
away this week Farrah
Fawcett (left) and King

Remembering
local and
international

legends

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THURSDAY, June 25, 2009,
will forever be a sad day for the
entertainment industry,with the
passing of two international leg-
ends- the King of Pop Michael
Jackson, and movie vixen and
international sex symbol Far-
rah Fawcett and here in the
Bahamas- a very popular dj and
children’s advocate Anthony
*FatBack’ Marshall.

Fatback,44 was reported to



have suffered a heart attack late
Wednesday, and later died on
Thursday and entertained
Bahamians for more than 20
years, using humor and his love
for the Bahamas to spread pos-
itive messages.

Within the last 15 years, Mar-
shall has worked along with
several concerned parents in
starting and promoting The
‘FatBack’ Kids Club where he
used his status to get the mes-
sage of positive parenting to as
many parents as possible.

One of his longtime col-

A place for art

of Pop Michael Jackson

(right).

leagues and friend ZNS DJ
Eddie “The Virgo’ Meadows,
said: “Me and FatBack were
always friends, coworkers, and
I think he was a great person.
He always made me laugh, he
was hyped, energetic, and I
think he was a great disc jock-
ey. He was a great person, and
his death is a great loss to all
that knew him.”

Farrah Fawcett died after a
three year battle with cancer.
The 62-year-old icon was best
know for her role as Jill
Munroe in the 1976 television
series Charlie’s Angels.
Throughout her career she
appeared in several off broad-
way plays and movies includ-
ing The Burning Bed, Nazi
Hunter, The Beate Klarsfeld
Story, and Poor Little Rich
Girl: The Barbara Hutton Sto-
ry.
Apart from her movie roles,
Farrah was best known by
women for creating a new stan-
dard in beauty as she made
famous her hairstyle common-
ly called the ‘Farrah flip.’

Moreover Farrah proved to
women that being beautiful is
simply not enough, but with the

FROM page 12

“We are going to feature work from
students ages six to sixty that will
include paintings, collage, paper
mache, repoussage, drawings, etc. The
work these kids can do is excellent
and I want to highlight their achieve-
ment,” Mr Smith said.

Mr Smith said he would like to also
get the kids to visit an architect’s office
to witness first hand what architects
do.

“T want to have Jackson Burnside
walk us through Marina Village, and
talk about the challenges he might
have faced or why he put certain
buildings in certain places. We are
going down town to look at historic
examples of very 1700-1800 year old
buildings that they can study. Then,

they are going to do a three dimen-
sional model out of foam board of a
residential or commercial building and
it will have to feature elements of
Bahamian architecture,” Mr Smith
said.

Mr Smith said at the end of the day
he wants teens to become more aware
and appreciate the architecture in the
Bahamas.

“When they are old enough to buy a
house, it is not going to be something
of another culture, but something that
will fit into the landscape-something
Bahamian. You identify a place by its
architecture- you identify Paris
because of the Eiffel tower, and the
Sydney Opera house you can only find
in Australia. There are certain styles
of buildings here that are unique to
the Bahamas,” Mr Smith said.

right talent, courage, and ambi-
tion, anything can be accom-
plished.

Just a few short hours later,
the entertainment industry was
dealt another loss when pop
icon Michael Jackson died as a
result of cardiac arrest.

The 50-year-old singer first
gained popularity at the tender
age of 7 where he preformed
alongside his siblings Jackie,
Tito, Jermaine, and Marlon in
the group The Jackson Five.

The group became the first
African American teen sensa-
tions to appeal to white audi-
ences on the same level as
white groups, and thus broke
the colour barrier for other
groups to follow.

In his solo career, Michael
become best known for his hits
Billie Jean, Beat It, Thriller,
Black or White, and Scream.

He was also the first African
American to be featured on
MTV, where he was successful
in introducing black urban cul-
ture to whites throughout
America and the world.

During the early 1990s and
up to the time of his death,
Michael has also been at the

center of scandals and legal
troubles ranging from allega-
tions of child molestation, to
law suites and bankruptcy.

However many fans prefer
to remember the star for his
music, one of whom is ZNS
radio personality Eddie ‘The
Virgo’ Meadows.

Mr Meadows said: “He is the
king of music, he is the greatest
entertainer in the history of the
world. He is the greatest enter-
tainer who ever lived, he is the
richest entertainer, and no oth-
er artist will ever be able to sur-
pass his accomplishments.

“T personally believe that he
was created by God almighty
to give what he has given to the
world, and the blessing that
God has bestowed on King
David and King Solomon, he
too has gotten a bit of that spe-
cial blessing in the form of
music.”

Probably one of his biggest
fans owning practically all of
Michael's past albums and
movies, Eddie said he hosted a
four hour long memorial broad-
cast on Friday where he played
tune after tune of the star’s
music while allowing fans to





call in and share their memo-
ries.

Throughout the capital, other
fans too basked in the memories
they hold on the king of pop.

Lifelong fan Garnell Bannis-
ter-Johnson said she wished she
had a chance to meet Jackson
while he was still alive.

“T could remember when he
was here in 1996, he went to
Cody’s, and other music stores,
I remember hopping into my
car trying just to get a glimpse.

“Everytime I went to one
location, I was told that he had
alredy left, so I missed out on
meeting him while he was
here.”

Mrs Bannister-Johnson said
despite not meeting Michael,
she has over the years collected
every single CD ever produced,
as well as assorted memorabil-
ia like a Michael jacket, a glove,
and also a doll of Michael.

She said although she had
already decided not to attend
the comeback concert in Lon-
don, she did plan to see
Michael during his US tour.

Like the words of one of his
songs, she said “he’s gone too
soon.”



Shell still life
graphite pen-
cil drawing
Vaated elelH er
Delt F



~ Takea Valentine's Resort and Marina
Stroll down offers unique experience

cantylane _ See page eight
See page eight : —



EE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009

a
Bull Elephant pastel

OO al By ALEX MISSICK
Syne [ oie ae Tribune Features Reporter

amissick@tribunemedia.net

ROM the intricate attention to detail in the

crown moldings, to the twists and turns on

an iron fence, most of the best art in the
country is shown through the beauty of Bahami-
an Architecture.

This year, a Place For Art is hosting a summer programme for
teens focusing on Bahamian Architecture which will be held on
July 13-31 and the 8th annual art exhibition for students to be
held on July 5.

Established in 2001, the Place For Art is a specialised studio
offering art classes for both children and adults of all ages. K
Smith, an internationally renowned pencil artist and art educator
brings a wealth of over 30 years teaching experience in Canada,
The United Kingdom, and the Bahamas.

“T have always had a passion for architecture. Most of my
grand career has been architecture through homes and buildings.
A lot of times there are no summer programmes for teens so we
are going to be focusing on architecture. We are going to start at
the very beginning by defining the word and look at architectural
history from prehistoric times right through to modern times.
Just so they can have an idea of different periods of architecture
so that they can see it when they are traveling,” Mr Smith said.

As for the art show, Mr Smith said he is very pleased with the

quality of work being produced. 1 ji :
SEE page 10 S MN oaiaamertceliir!
- a Bee) el ese retro
drawing by Paul
Redgrave, age 13.
4

5

mer mast
Nicmere lite
pencil drawing
VAN ered
Butler, age 13.





THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST

WEDNESDAY, JULY 1st 2009, PAGE 11C

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT



| (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Ta NY Marine FORECAST





































a Today Thursday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
m | z = ve High = Low W High Low W NASSAU Today: SW at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-15 Miles 82°F
£ a = «= 7 '617/18/911 FC FIC FC FIC Thursday: _ SW at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-15 Miles 82° F
hs ts alll i. o| 1 |2 3|4|5\¢ ili |s|9l10 Acapulco 89/31 78/25 t 88/31 78/25 ¢ FREEPORT Today: : SW at 10-15 Knots 2-3 Feet 5-15 Miles 81°F
i -_, Sate LOW | MODERATE | HIGH | V.HIGH | EXT = Amsterdam 77/25 61/16 s 79/26 64/17 s Thursday: _ SW at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
c mm ORLANDO 8 Ankara, Turkey 86/30 55/12 s 86/30 57/13 pe ABACO Today: SW at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
High:88°F21°C | Partly sunny, an Clear and very warm. Partly sunny with an Sunshine. Plenty of sunshine. Mostly sunny, a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 88/31 72/22 s 90/32 72/22 s Thursday: SW at 7-14 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
Low:75°F/24°C Pas afternoon t-storm. afternoon t-storm t-storm possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 56/12 48/8 pc 50/15 52/11 s
13° an ‘ad HAG 5 ih BAG Span das Sot Qai6 Bangkok 90/32 79/26 sh 91/32 79/26 sh
L @Q fea ee ae High: 90" High: 30" High: 80 High: at Barbados 86/30 77/25 pc 86/30 77/25 sh PKI VA Se
TAMPA 7, | High: 93 Low: 81 Low: 79 Low: 80 Low: 79 Low: 80 SS ESS Barcelona 83/28 69/20 s 83/28 68/20 s
mu ie 3 Cea Uae Beijin 95/35 70/21 pc 97/36 70/21 s
High: 86° F/30° C t ae 113° F 110°-89° F 107°-82° F 99°-86° F 104°-93° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low _Ht.(ft. ar mas Tae 5 78/95 75/93
Low: 76° F/24°C a r, The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 3:42am. 22 9:39am. 0.1 Belgrade 98/31 67/19 t 90/32 69/20 t
am @ s : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 4:20p.m. 28 10:41pm. 0.3 Berlin 39/97 66/18 t 84/28 63/17 s Oe
7 —- Cee Thursday 429am. 22 10:33am. 02 Bermuda 82/27 75/23 t 82/27 75/23 1 ‘a
“a | oa 5:15pm. 28 11:36pm. 0.3 Bogota 65/18 44/6 pc 66/18 45/7 sh @
J i F Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Friday 535am. 01 1125am. 02 Brussels 82/27 63/17 pc 86/30 66/18 pc SOLS) “Te
L er ABACO Temperature 6:06 p.m. 28 — ---- Budapest 91/32 66/18 c 93/33 68/20 s
, 4 a High:87°F/31°C PGI es cscs crates Qacercreetatecaances ocemet 90° F/32° C 623 am 09 12207am. 03 Buenos Aires 59/15 45/7 pe 58/14 45/7 pe
A a lll: ea, [POW asscstesarsaeste gxaeg Sally ini 28 i2idom. 02 Cairo 100/37 74/23 s 98/36 73/22 s B
rs a Cy Low: 82° F/28°C Normal high... sereic A 95/35 85/29 t 95/35 84/28 t
? r Py Normal low 75° F/24° C Calgary 68/20 43/6 s 71/21 46/7 pc ease
- fe _ thet @ WEST PALM BEACH ~~ Last year's Nigh oo... 92° F/33° C SUN ay Ty ify Cancun 89/31 76/24 t 90/32 76/24 t
’ — High: 88° F/31°C —_ Last year's lOW o...seeeeeeeeeeeeeeeees 77° F/25° C " " Caracas 81/27 71/21 t 79/26 71/21 t
— Low: 75° F/24°C i. s Precipitation _ vente a a.m. Ly hee p.m. Casablanca 81/27 67/19 s 80/26 66/18 s
> i As of 2 p.m. yesterday .......cccccccccccececene 0.45" unsel....... ‘US p.m. Moonset. .... “4f a.M. Copenhagen 80/26 64/17 sh 83/28 65/18 s
& . FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT 3% Year to date ale Full inet New First Dublin 70/21 57/13 1 70/21 54/42 sh
High: 87°F/31°C @ High: 88° F/31°C Normal year to date .o....c.ccsecsecsesscseeeeeseeee 18.39" a a 7 Frankfurt 86/30 63/17 pc 88/31 64/17 pc
Low: 77° F/25°C _ Low: 80° F/27° C i fe * — Geneva 84/28 58/14 t 85/29 60/15 t
i. AccuWeather.com yaa ak i Halifax 6216 54/12 c 65/18 54/12 c FNSy Shower
7 @ 7 Forecasts and graphics provided by i: sai : Havana 90/32 73/22 t 90/32 72/22 t T-storms 88/78
MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jul.7 dul. 450 Jul.210 Jul. 28 Helsinki 79/26 55/12 pc 81/27 57/13 pc Rain Fronts
oa High: 88° F/31°C ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 90/32 82/27 pe 90/32 81/27 sh MET a¥ Fluries Sia
“0 Low: 78°F /26°C NASSAU High: 95° F/35° C Islamabad 108/42 79/26 t 106/41 79/26 t BER] Snow Shown are noon positions of weather systems and Gracie dae
% - Pi a a Low: 80° F/27° C Istanbul 88/31 71/21 s 86/30 71/21 5 precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. ;
High: 93° F/34° C TERIA 36/30 59/15 s 32/97 BO/15 s [z_¥] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Mengunfi-
—> Low: 81°F/27°C
i 7 hanes sos a7 pe sia 36s IY ans] a6 BN 1 20 ane RN os 7s 60ST
KEY WEST alll ; @ Kingston 88/31 78/25 c 90/32 78/25 pc
High: 88° F/31°C CAT ISLAND Lima 70/21 58/14 pe 72/22 59/15 s
Oe ead High: 90° F/32° C London 88/31 59/15 pc 86/30 59/15 t
Low: Sania _ y Low: 75° F/24°C Madrid 97/36 66/18 s 97/36 64/17 s
@ 474. Manila 88/31 77/25 sh 88/31 78/25 1 HURR .or-’ ies ) Ore Cc im
- ca Mexico City 73/22 56/13 t 70/21 55/12 t
Monterrey 98/36 76/24 pc 104/40 75/23 pc
GREAT EXUMA Montreal 72/22 63/17 t 70/21 63/7 1
in. High: 89° F/32° C eee Moscow 73/22 52/11 s 72/22 54/12 t
7 Low:77°F/25° C Lew: 76°F/24°C Munich 81/27 61/16 t 82/27 60/15 t J =e
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's Rect Nairobi fos B21 po S127 BIND pe ly, B BI
highs and tonights's lows. a : ew Veni roe
: , ef Low:81° F/27°C Oslo 77/25 63/17 po —=«79/26.- 6/18 s , ou an O Wr
Prague 83/28 62/16 t 82/27 63/17 t AVV c y Vy c
LONG ISLAND Rio de Janeiro 81/27 71/21 s 76/24 68/20 pc ,
ich: 90° F/32° Riyadh 106/41 78/25 s 104/40 79/26 s .
a crc fom size serie t 8680680 Or you can rest easy knowing
Today Thursday Today Thursday Today Thursday MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 89/31 79/26 s 89/31 81/27 sh that Yo have excellent Insurance
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 91° F/33° C San Juan 57/13 30/-1 pe 63/17 32/0 s coverace no matter which
Fe FIC Fe FIC Fe FIC Fe FIC Fc FIC Fic FIC nae Low: 74° F/23°C ee cae aan t ee aa t Vv : d bl
Albuquerque 92/33 68/20 t 90/32 67/19 t Indianapolis «68/20 56/13 t 77/25 60/15 s Philadelphia 82/27 66/18 t 78/25 64/17 t antiago pe pe Wa e@ Win OWS.
Anchorage 71/21 5512 s 73/22 54/12 s Jacksonville 92/33 74/28 t 97/86 74/28 t Phoenix 106/41 86/30 t 104/40 86/30 1 CRO eo nae aa moan: SE cee y
Atlanta 90/32 66/18 s 90/32 70/21 pc Kansas City 86/30 66/18 s 80/26 64/17 1 Pittsburgh 6719 56/13 t 68/20 56/13 t RAGGEDISLAND — Uligh:94°F/34" a0 Paulo pe r : ’
Atlantic City 79/26 64/17 t 81/27 6246 t Las Vegas 101/38 78/25 pc 104/40 85/29 t Portland, OR 90/32 55/12 s 92/83 5713 s es Low:77° F/25°C a aaa eee Nobody does it better.
Baltimore 93/28 64/17 t 80/26 62/16 t Little Rock 94/34 69/20 s 96/35 72/22 t Raleigh-Durham 93/33 65/18 s 93/33 65/18 s Low: 74° F/23°C sen _ dae pe i ae .
Boston 70/21 6246 t 72/22 63/17 t LosAngeles 82/27 64/17 pc 82/27 64417 pc _ St. Louis 84/28 64/17 s 79/26 65/18 c . a ae CEERI = SE REREGP IEG
Buffalo 68/20 5713 t 71/21 6015 t Louisville 76/24 61/16 t 81/27 6447 Salt Lake City 88/31 66/18 t 91/32 68/20 t GREATINAGUA Tok . oe ae Termeni :
Charleston, SC 94/34 73/22 s 97/36 74/23 t Memphis 92/33 69/20 s 91/32 72/22 t San Antonio 96/35 74/23 t 97/36 76/24 pc High: 93° F/34°C ara Eai0 SIE" 75S MCN
Chicago 66/18 54/12 po 76/24 6146 po Miami 88/31 78/25 t 89/31 78/25 t San Diego 72/22 68/20 po 75/23 67/19 pc Low. 78° F/26°C Trinidad 00/32 86/18 pc 91/92 67/19 sh '
Cleveland 68/20 55/12 t 72/22 6015 c Minneapolis 76/24 5015 s 81/27 60/15 t San Francisco 73/22 56/13 pce 74/23 57/13 pc : Te 74/93 55/2 s 75/93 58/14 s (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Dallas 96/35 76/24 s 97/36 77/25 s Nashville 86/30 63/17 s 86/30 6417 pc _ Seattle 80/26 53/11 s 84/28 54/12 5 Gaia 86/30 71/24 t 87/30 70/21 pc
Denver 88/31 56/13 t 78/25 56/413 t New Orleans 94/34 77/25 pc 95/35 77/25 t Tallahassee 96/35 74/23 pc 97/36 75/23 t San Abaco Eleuthera Exum
Warsaw 81/27 63/17 sh 83/28 63/17 t
SSS SS ae. in nit vos Sena wea a ae ct
onoliulu $ s anoma Ul s pce ucson bee 7 z 7 2 _
Houston 99/37 76/24 t 99/37 77/25 pc Orlando 88/31 75/23 t 90/32 74/23 t Washington, DC 82/27 66/18 t 82/27 6518 t Te he ee





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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Security guard is found hanged C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.181WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25) WEATHER SUNNYWITH T-STORM HIGH 91F LOW 81F F E A T U R E S S EE‘THEARTS’ SECTION S P O R T S A place SEEPAGETHIRTEEN for art New national records By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter p turnquest@tribunemedia.net P OLICE are investigating an apparent suicide on Prince Charles Drive after a securityg uard at the Pepsi Bottling Company allegedly hanged himself in his booth shortly after 3pm yesterday. The victim was last night n amed as 33-year-old Mark Campbell, of Fox Dale Road. Reportedly depressed due to his wife’s death in October last year, Mr Campbell is alleged to have been experiencing financial difficulties in the past few months, which may have lead to him taking his own life. However, a fellow security guard who discovered the body during the shift change, said he was shocked by the tragedy as his co-worker and friend was always “jovial.” According to Police Superintendent Elsworth Moss, the officer in charge of CDU, attempts were made to revive Mr Campbell but to no avail. An initial review of the body by the police found t here were no outward signs of trauma, and neither his feet, or his hands were bound as in the case with 32-yearold Adrian Major who wasf ound hanging from a tree on Saturday evening in the Fox Hill area. A t this stage, the police are officially classifying this most recent death as “suspicious”. The police also yesterday released the identify of the young man who was gunned down while shooting dice on Balfour Avenue on Monday. According to the police, Dewitt Butler, 26, of Carmichael Road, was shot a number of times about the body while gambling with a group of other men at the side of a building sometime around 7.30pm. Police have questioned a number of individuals and are actively searching for a “person of interest” in this case. Reportedly, Mr Butler was shot after an argument erupted among the men. Police investigations continue. Wife’s death may have led to tragedy at work The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR BBQ CHIPOTLE SNACK WRAP www.tribune242.com BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E THE stage is set for the Bahamas Telecommunications Company to be privatised after the regulatory structure is approved and due diligence completed by the privatisation committee, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham has confirmed. In a communication to the House of Assembly yesterday, he said interested parties would be invited to enter a prequalification process in order to be considered as potential strategic part ners. “This process is designed to allow the gov ernment to determine which potential partners are appropriate from a strategic as well as a financial standpoint,” he said. “Those who pre-qualify will then be invited to participate in a formal due diligence exercise, ulti mately resulting in an eco nomic bidding process for the 51 percent stake in BTC.” In the coming weeks, he said the government would launch a formal sale process relating to 51 percent of the ownership of BTC. BTCedging closer to privatisation PRIMEMINISTER Hubert Ingraham speaks in the House. SEE page 10 AFTER a lengthy jury selection process, the trial into the murder of internationally-recognised hand bag designer Harl Taylor is expected to open today. Troyniko McNeil, 22, is charged with murdering Mr Taylor some time between Saturday, November 17, and Sunday, November 18, 2007. McNeil, who has pleaded not guilty, is being represented by attorneys Murrio Ducille, Krysta Smith, Alex Morley and Kenneth Wallace Whitfield. Mr Taylor, 37, was found stabbed to death at Mountbatten House on West Hill Street, two days after Dr Thaddeus McDonald, 59, a senior acade mic at the College of the Bahamas, was found bludgeoned to death, apparently with a clothing iron, in his nearby Queen Street guest house. To date, no charges have been filed in relation to Dr McDonald’s murder. Harl Taylor murder trial to open today Harl Taylor SEE page 10 By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas Nurses Union president has been accused of “abandoning” her members ahead of today’s scheduled meeting with the Government to discuss health insurance coverage. At around 3.15pm yesterday, BNU President Cleola Hamilton told The Tribune she was in South Africa. But a source close to the negotiations between the BNU and the Government, commenting on Ms Hamilton’s “vacation” , claimed she “would have to be superwoman” to make it back in Nurses Union president is accused of bandoning’ member s SEE page 10 By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net SWEEPING changes in the executive structure of the National Insurance Board will see four bosses made redundant today as the board aims to address “deficiencies identified by several internal and external operational assessments” of the board, Director Algernon Cargill said yesterday. Senior Deputy Director Anthony Curtis, Deputy Direc tor of Special Projects Cecile Bethel, Deputy Director of Information Technology Andre Bethel and Assistant Director Four NIB bosses to be made redundant in sweeping changes SEE page 10 UNDER THE THEME ‘children have the right to be safe’, Bahamians gathered in Rawson Square last evening for a special candle light vigil in protest of child abuse. The event was staged by the National Child Protection Council, the Bahamas Christian Council and the Crisis Centre. The organisations urged Bahamians to come out and bring their candles in the fight against child abuse. ‘Stop the hurt, stop the tears, stop the abuse,’ was the motto of the vigil. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f TOPCHILDABUSE’ VIGIL P a t r i c k H a n n a

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE INDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News...........................P1,2,3,5,6,10,14 Editorial/Letters. .........................................P4 Advts ....................................................P7,8,9 Sports.............................................P11,12,13 B USINESS/ARTS SECTION Business......................................P1,2,3,4,5,6 Comics ........................................................ P7 Taste........................................................P8,9 Arts......................................................P10,12 W e ather ..................................................... P 11 C LASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES USA TODA Y MAIN SECTION 12 P A GES THE owner of a new house in the gated community of Emerald Close in western New Providence says her dream of owning her own home hasb ecome a nightmare. Patricia Chatty says she shelled out nearly $300,000, but the house that has been handed over to her is not the one which she was expecting thes tructure has serious flaws which she c laims are due to shoddy building practices. Among her complaints are leaky c eilings, missing fixtures and unfinished details throughout the house. W orse, Ms Chatty said she fears for t he safety of her young daughter because the sharp edges of counter t ops have not been smoothed down and the house’s back door cannot be locked. Pr oblems E ven with all these problems to contend with, the situation is better than it was when she moved in a yeara nd a half ago, when she had no telephone or cable service for the first six m onths, she said. This was particularly challenging as Ms Chatty runs her own business fromh er home. And it is not just the interior of the h ouse that is upsetting, she said, but also the fact that it has to be approached via a bumpy dirt track. As a prospective buyer, my responsibility was to secure financing. T he developer was to deliver the product, which in this case was the home that I saw in the brochure. A year and half later, I am not happy with any of it, because just getting toa nd from my home is an issue, and then when I do get to my home I have all of these issues that should have been remedied,” said Ms Chatty. Asked to comment on the matter, a r epresentative of Emerald Close said: “The developer has attempted to solve the issues with Ms Chatty ons everal occasions and is open to any reasonable solution.” By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Police have apprehended a man in connection with the armed robbery of the John Bull Store at theO ur Lucaya Resort last weekend. Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle said the suspect, a 26-yearold resident of Freeport, was taken into police custody yesterday morning. The John Bull Store was robbed by a lone gunman on Sund ay, June 21. Shots T he robber entered the store around 1.05pm and fired several shots at the watch display case and stole four Rolex w atches. Afterwards, the robber is believed to have fled the scene in a stolen vehicle a 1999 Toyota Corolla that was report-e dly stolen and used as the getaway vehicle. Police recovered the vehicle on Royal Palm Way. A SP Bootle also reported that three women, ages 30, 34, and 55 years, were also taken into custody along with the suspect in connection with the discovery of an unlicensed firearm. H e reported that police seized a Glock pistol and ammunition at a residence in Yeoman’s Wood. Man held in connection with John Bull robbery EMERALD COAST homeowner Patricia Chatty points out a hole in the ceiling from which, she says, water leaked from her bathroom tub into the kitchen. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f Dream of owning home ‘has become a nightmare’ Owner of new house in Emerald Close speaks out

PAGE 3

B y MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net TRADERS in downtown Nassau yesterday expressed mixed feelings over the amendments to the Cruise Ship Overnighting Incentives Act passed on Monday in parliament. Although shop-owners and restauranteurs welcome the anticipated increase of at least 200,000 more passengers a year, they are concerned about an earlier departure time for ships and the inclusion of private islands in the tax break scheme. The amendments pave the way for a government agreement with Carnival Cruise Lines expected to bring a minimum of 1.4 million passengers to Nassau every year over the next six years that is 200,000 more than was required last year and 175,000 to Freeport. Tax At least 25 per cent of these visitors are expected to stay in port for at least 13 hours in order for Carnival to continue to benefit from significant tax discounts, and the agreement will also be open to other interested cruise lines. But retailers are concerned the addition of private islands as places where cruise lines can dock to raise their passen ger quota. Disney's Castaway Cay and Royal Caribbean's Coco Cay, as well as Rock Sound, Great Stirrup Cay and Half Moon Cay will now be added to the original two ports of Nassau and Grand Bahama. And they are also con cerned the amendments to the Cruise Ship Overnighting Incentives Act will allow for cruise ships to now set sail at m idnight rather than 3am. Tony Gonzalez, who works at Havana Caf in downtown Nassau said: “They are adding five ports but they are private islands, belonging to the cruise line companies, and they are saying they will be able to dock there instead of Nassau so no one is going to benefit but the cruise line. “Why would you go down town if you can go to your private island? But the thousands of people working downtown, and who are selling tours of Atlantis, are going to miss out,” he said. “And if the ships are leaving at midnight, clubs like Bambu and Fluid are going to get a lot less business.” Proprietor Old Nassau souvenir shop proprietor Warren Bethel agreed private islands should not be included in the Bill. He said: “They go to their private islands because it doesn't cost them anything they don't have to pay for dockage or anything, so ships come through now without touching Nassau or Freeport. “I don't think the govern ment should have allowed that in the first place.” Although Mr Bethel welcomes the increase of passengers, he is concerned it will not necessarily translate to more spending in the local economy. “People on the threeor four-day cruises buy them so cheaply they don't have mon ey when they get on the boat, so it doesn't make a difference if we have more of them. “A ten-day cruise will have a different clientele; if we get a ship with a longer itinerary that stops here, we do better.” Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said an approved cruise line that brings in one m illion passengers will pay an average of $11.80 per person to the government under the Act. This compares with $15 per head if the cruise line fails to bring in more than 800,000 vis itors. When the original Act was passed in 1996, passenger arrivals doubled over the next ten years and it boosted the number of passengers staying overnight. By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net SOME members of Royal Bank of Canada Trust Company’s local management team are under investigation by theD epartments of Labour and I mmigration after being accused o f favouring expatriates over local employees. RBC Trust staff claim expatriate workers are chosen over equally qualified locals when itc omes to hiring, salaries and c ompensation. Foreigners are paid more and their Bahamian counterparts and have not been asked to take ‘voluntary’ unpaid leave to easet he company’s financial constraints while Bahamians have, s taff say. T he employees further claim j ob vacancies advertised locally a re simultaneously advertised in foreign countries, and Bahamians are forced to undergo a protracted interviewp rocess – allegedly to encourage them to lose interest. When Bahamians are offered positions, the pay and compensation proposed is far below their expectations, and below the packages offered to expats,s taff said. P lans to use political connect ions to reapply for and secure w ork permits have also been rumoured, staff told officials. “Often, Bahamian rsums s ubmitted for the position are not even reviewed or considered initially, as the ministry isu ltimately unaware of who, and how many, actually apply directly to the company,” RBC Trust staff told officers atL abour and Immigration. “In the event that a work permit application for an expat is not granted because a Bahamian could conceivably perform the task, unjust labour practices are simply employed to geta round this directive to find a q ualified Bahamian. As a prime example, in the c ase of a recent investment management position for which a work permit was not granted t o an expat, who the company had already secured housing for in Sandyport, this individual wass ent to the Cayman Islands office instead and periodically travelled to Nassau to service B ahamian clients. As news of this was reported t o authorities, making it more difficult for this practice to continue, only then were qualified Bahamians considered for the position, and even then, notm any were asked to interview.” Director of Labour Harcourt Brown said an investigation into the complaints was launched several months ago and Labour Department officials interviewed staff about their con-c erns, as well as managers. The department has not yet had a chance to pass its findings on to the ImmigrationD epartment, Mr Brown said, adding that Minister of Labour D ion Foulkes and Minister of Immigration Branville McCartney are aware of the complaints. M eanwhile RBC Trust staff h ope to be given equal opport unities. One said: “Sadly, all this has transpired in the face of several senior employees in the company who would be readily ablet o rise to these opportunities. “Unfortunately, because of such unjust hiring and managerial practices, on behalf of an expatriate who fully enjoys the benefits of living and working in the Bahamas, they are nota fforded the chance. “These practices only serve to circumvent and diminish the effectiveness of Bahamianl abour and immigration laws and more importantly, displace q ualified Bahamians in the process.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009, PAGE 3 x xChairs Chairsx xTables Tablesx xBenches Benchesx xUmbrellas Umbrellasx xLoungers Loungersx xDrinks Trolleys Drinks Trolleysx xCoffee Tables Coffee Tablesx xEnd Tables End Tablesx xCushions CushionsT T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y T T h he e J Ja a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza • Madeira St. Wong’s Plaza • Madeira St. Tel: (242 Tel: (242)326 2335 2335Outdoor Elegance Outdoor Elegance Ministry investigates some of RBC Trust management team FOUR WOMEN were lucky to escape with only minor injuries yesterday after their vehicle crashed and flipped o ver into the marsh. The passengers were driving down John F Kennedy Drive, near the turn-off to Gladstone Road, in a Toyota Rav 4, when the driver lost control of the vehicle and crashed into a truck, overturning and hitting a white van in the p rocess. The Toyota ended up in the swampy area near the road. The women were said to be “shaken up” and were taken to hospital to be treated for their injuries. WOMEN ESCAPE SERIOUS INJURY AFTER CRASH Felip Major /Tribune staff Downtown traders have mixed feelings over cruise ship act Staff claim expatriate workers chosen over locals By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune FreeportR eporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net A 31-YEAR-OLDman has been arrested and charged by police in the murder of Haitian Jean M aquez Noel, who was s hot at his home in Garden V illas on Saturday. Mr Noel, 59, was discovered sitting on a sofa with gunshot wounds to his left u nderarm and shoulder. He w as taken to hospital, w here he later succumbed to his injuries around 1 1.30pm. A ccording to reports, an anonymous caller telephoned police shortly after 9 .30pm about hearing gunshots being fired near the basketball court at GardenV illas. Police went to the scene t o investigate and were directed to an apartment where Mr Noel resided. H is death is the fourth h omicide for the year for G rand Bahama. Man charged with murder In brief MORE than a dozen people were arraigned in Magistrates Court yester-d ay on charges stemming f rom raids on suspected number houses last Friday. L atishka Campbell, 31, L ouise Augustin, 29 and Leanora Taylor, 24, appeared before Magistrate Derrence Rolle inC ourt 5, Bank Lane yester day, charged with being found on a premises wherea lottery is taking place, namely Percy's Web Cafeon Pitt Road. They have also been charged with per-m itting the premises to be u sed for a lottery and per mitting the premises to promote, conduct and o rganise a lottery. They pleaded not guilty to the charges and remain on p olice bail. J amal Rolle, 30; Jacinta J ohnson, 35; Pamela Johnson, 53; Shavanda Johnson, 27; Kizzy Curry, 30; Philip Ferguson, 51; Olivia Knowles, 26; Anthony Jones, 41; Angela Stuart, 44; Margaret Wallace, 46, and Bettrah Mitchell, 38, pleaded not guilty to being found on the premises where a lottery was allegedly taking place. They will also remain on police bail and the case has been adjourned to August 19. Tenisha Rolle, 22, pleaded not guilty to being found at a premises wherea lottery was taking place, namely Sweetness WebShop on Thompson Boule vard. She also pleaded not guilty to permitting the premises to be used for a lottery and permitting the premises to promote, con duct and organise a lottery. Patrick Knowles, 43, and Ntari Wright, 33, pleaded not guilty to being found on the premises. The case has been adjourned to August 24 and they remain on police bail. MINISTER of State for Immigration Branville McCartney will be the guest speaker at the upcoming weekly meeting of the Kiwanis Club of Over-The-Hill. The meeting is scheduled to be held on Thursday, July 2 at 8pm at the Holy Cross Community Centre, Soldier Road. All Kiwanians and their guests are welcome to attend. Charges in connection with raids on suspected numbers houses Minister of State to be guest speaker at Kiwanis Club

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EDITOR, The Tribune. King of popular music master of the big stage Entertainer extraordinary with deep and wide appeal Michael Jackson, the cultural icon transcended all barriers with approval Universally treasured a rare talent undying T ears for a fallen star travelling gloriously beyond C elebration for his inestimable gifts people love Michael Jackson A revolutionary in song an activist of note A generation pleased with the masterful virtuoso Michael Jackson, the spirit of groove his music of verve wakes up the dead Moonwalking the will paving the way Eliminating the barriers ...of discrimination one prized piece at a time His unifying music consolidative and curative Thank you Michael for it all Sleep well my brother we shall met again in timeless elation Until then, the king of pop reigns in our distinct hearts With celebrated admiration and awe forever prized and sanctified DENNIS A DAMES Nassau, June, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune . I have just read Minister Byran Woodside’s Contribution to The 2009/10 Budget Debate, in Parliament, carried in your Saturday, June 13th edition, during the course of which he mentioned the Department of Lands and Surveys’ most recent scandal involving the granting of Crown lands to t he wives and relatives of two senior officers and the extent to which proper application protoc ols were ignored. Of particular interest was Mr. Woodside’s contention that pre l iminary investigations revealed that“nothing untoward” occurred with respect to the “application process” with respect to those specific Grants. Surely, the Minister does not i ntend to imply that the granting of Crown land to the wives of the officers was beyond reproach and that the requisite “application process”, was adhered to. The facts of this case suggests otherwise and do not support the Mini ster’s contention. Let’s consider the following: (aAccording to the Minister: all Bahamians have the right t o apply for Crown land, including Public Officers and their fami lies. However there are guidel ines that are to be followed in the review of applications by Public Officers” ( b)A husband and wife are regarded as one it therefore follows that facilitating the grant to a spouse is in fact facilitating a g rant to oneself. It is clear from the Minister’s statement that the public officers, in question, needed only to follow procedures and apply for the land, themselves as individuals or as husband and wife.In both t hese cases, however, the officers’ wives applied, alone! Why? According to “General Orders” the Lands and Surveys’ Officers, who personally benefite d from the Grants to their r espective wives, were mandated to apply through the Department of Public Personnel.Is the Minister implying that, in these two specific cases, the required pro-c edure was followed? Informed sources have revealed that the requisite procedure was not followed in either of these cases. In one instance, the junior of t he two officer’s wife, her sisters ( incidentally, one of these sisters turned out to be the Secretary of t he most recent former Director of the Department) and a brother were granted three contiguous l ots numbering 18, 19, 20 and lot number 25 in the same tract of land in Blackwood Village on the i sland of Abaco while the senior officer’s wife and son were grant ed lots 15 and 44in Wood Cay on the island of Abaco. The Min ister is also reported to contend that while the public’s perception is that these individuals “may have been given preferential treatment.preliminary reports do not indicate that anything untoward occurred relative to the application process.” If the above mentioned incidents do not indicate that preferential consideration was given to these relatives, then what does? I n the circumstances, therefore, it is incumbent on the Minister to provide the conclusive f indings of the investigation, expeditiously, so that there is not the slightest inkling of a cover-up. It c annot be “Business as usual. Left alone to deal with these matters, the Civil Service, will simply “circle the wagon.” The public expects that the practice of “transferring” comp romised junior officers and “restricting” the movements of compromised senior officers and allowing them to remain in office must cease. The Minister and the current Administration have both been p resented with an excellent opportunity to demonstrate that they are yet worthy of the trust s ought and received from the B ahamian people who in turn were promised, the restoration o f: T ransparency, Accountability, Change, and Order to civil society, etc. INFORMED CITIZEN Nassau, J une, 2009 C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm AT A PRESS conference held on Friday an o fficer, speaking on behalf of the Police Staff Association complained of the need of relieff or overworked and frustrated police officers. “In the normal course of business,” said I nspector Edric Poitier, “this (40-hour week does not apply to the work schedule of the Royal Bahamas Police Force because of our unique duties and responsibilities. However, police officers do not and cannot receive over t ime pay, yet some of them find themselves working in excess of 60 hours a week without a ny form of compensation, be it monetary or extra time off. We are not advocating the government pay overtime because we understand that is not possible.” However, he suggested that instead of pay t heir extra hours could be added to their vacation. W e can understand police officers being stressed out, not only is it the nature of their job, b ut it is the circumstances of the conditions under which they now have to work with a failing court system. There is such a backlog of criminal trials pending that accused persons are now having to be returned to the streets because t o hold them any length of time would deny them their constitutional rights of an early trial. A s far back as 1215 on the open fields of Runnymede King John of England signed M agna Carta in which clause 40 guaranteed that “to no man will we sell, or deny, or delay, right or justice.” For 794 years that guarantee of justice has been inherited from our Westminster system o f government. Nor can anyone be allowed to languish in jail awaiting that trial. That is why we h ave to tolerate every morning and afternoon the prison bus breaking all speed limits to take a nd return inmates to the court most of them new prisoners, but others just being taken in under the writ of habeas corpus (bring in the body) to show their faces before the court to make certain that they are not getting lost in the complicated prison system. Adding to the police officers’ long hours is t he fact that inmates with records are back on the streets committing new crimes. It is difficult to know if criminals are on the increase or if it is just the well known lag back in circulationi ncreases the number of crimes committed. When debating the Juries (Amendment i n October 2007 National Security Minister Tommy Turnquest said the “criminal justice system is challenged to provide a quick and speedy trial. Where it is unable to do so, the a ccused is either released on bail or is remanded to her Majesty’s prison.” H owever, he expressed alarm at the number of persons out on bail. O f a prison population of 1,359 on October 1, 2007, some 587 were on remand, many having been on remand for years. He said 106 were on remand from 2006, 39 from 2005 and 17 from 2004, 15 from 2003, five from 2002 and onef rom 2001. “In 2006, 35 per cent of suspects charged with m urder were on bail at the time they committed the offence,” said Mr Turnquest, “and between January and September 2007, 42 per cent (22 murder suspects were on bail at the time of the offence.” W e do not have up to date figures, but there probably has been no improvement. For exam p le, for the month of April this year 11 persons were released from prison on bail. A doc u ment obtained by The Tribune in May records that in April some 205 persons were released on bail on multiple charges ranging from murder and armed robbery to unlawful sexual intercourse and rape. Of these 153 were released o n bail with 39 of them being classified by the Central Intelligence Bureau as persons who should be monitored.” Of particular interest was one of them who, although acquitted of t he charge by the court, was recommended to the police for monitoring. His background of crime listed possession of drugs, ammunition and prohibited weapons. He was also accused of murder. With all their other duties the police h ave to pay special attention to this man. No wonder the police are overworked. T he only way that this can be solved is to increase the judiciary and court sittings to get t hrough the backlog of pending cases. Other than the Chief Justice, the other justices of the Supreme Court are appointed on the advice of the Judicial and Legal Services Commission. Of course, the Commission can do nothing without permission of government to employ more justices. It is now questionable with the eco-n omic bind the country is now in as to where the money will come from to pay them. In an Act to Amend the Penal Code there was a provision allowing the court to ordert echnical surveillance of accused persons granted bail by a system of electronic monitoring. It i s understood that a committee is still actively considering how such a system can be implemented. Government must show it is worthy of trust LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Overworked police need relief Tribute to the King of Pop EDITOR, The Tribune. Over the weekend I received two phone calls from BTC with a recorded message advising me that my telecom accounts were overdue and service would be cut off Tuesday, June 9. Having printed receipts showing that full payment had been made on time as usual, I was very displeased to put it mildly. Since no one in BTC could be reached on Saturday or Sunday I sent a duplicate series of fax messages with copies of my receipts to selected fax listings for BTC. I also pointed out that such sloppy practices continued to paint a ridiculous corporate image for the corporation. Surprisingly this morning I received four phone calls from BTC. Two promptly offered what might pass for apologies, while a third blathered on at length but finally found it within his capability to simply say, “We are sorry, we made a mistake.” With that I was content to end the matter. However, one caller inferred that a substantial number of such erroneous phone dunning notices had been dispatched to cus tomers. The number may in fact be sufficiently large that your readers should be alerted to cushion their shock. I suspect that at some early future date the major pharmacies will show a tremendous decrease in sales of blood pressure reducing prescriptions soon after BTC is sold. WM E BARDELMEIER Nassau, June 8, 2009. Sloppy BTC practices paint ridiculous corporate image EDITOR, The Tribune. I was relieved to see in the press that the Prime Minister is thinking about leading the FNM into the 2012 general elections. It is obvious that he is the only one in the government who can beat Perry Christie in the 2012 general elections. If ya ask me if it aint broke don’t fix it. PAT STRACHAN Nassau, June 23, 2009. PM is only one in govt who can beat Christie

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IN an effort to forge an e ven stronger working relationship with Florida’s film industry, the Bahamas Film Commission, in conjunction with Bahamas FilmInvestI nternational Ltd, hosted eight Florida film commissioners to an extended week end of activities. The commissioners, who recently unanimously voted the Bahamas Film Commis s ion into their group, e ngaged in dialogue with the Ministry of Tourism and local industry partners, and toured to scout locations throughout New Providence and Harbour Island. Bahamas Film Commis s ioner Craig Woods said his g reatest hope is that the Bahamas government will become more appreciative of the local film industry as the Commission and Bahamas FilmInvest International strengthens ties with the neighbouring powerhouse. Contr ibution “I’m not sure if it’s going to be the third pillar of our economy,” Mr Woods said, “but I know it can make a significant contribution to the development of Bahamians in terms of developing their artistic skills in front of and behind the camera and we have seen that happen. “While we now have an informal relationship, we’re hoping to formalise it whereby it can be enshrined in the various film commissions’ jurisdictions’ policy,” he said. Since Mr Woods joined the Film Commission in April 2003, the Bahamas has filmed 19 movies, six in the last year alone. The Bahamas is also the only country to have been unanimously vot ed into Film Florida as an associate member. “That’s a tribute to the synergy that exists between Florida and the Bahamas that’s been going on for many years,” he said. This is the second visit for Film Florida, who travelled to Grand Bahama in 2006 after the phenomenal success of the Pirates of the Caribbean series. President of Film Florida Graham Winick said the group was excited to accept the invitation and credits the partnership as one of the g roup’s best. “We like to think of the Bahamas as our really close neighbours and we like to look to you for all of thea dvantages and opportuni ties as it presents and how we can integrate some of those possibilities,” he said. Berlin “When we went to Berlin this year for the EuropeanF ilm Market, so many pro ducers from Europe were coming to us and saying ‘tell us about the Bahamas, tellu s what the Bahamas can do for us, tell us about their coproduction models.’ And we kept saying, ‘let’s get back to you on that.’ “We think this is a great opportunity for our two areas to really come together and to attract projects that are interested in both of us.” Mr Winick, who is responsible for Film Florida’s mar keting and legislative strategy, expressed his gratitude to Bahamas FilmInvest and the Bahamas Film Commission for their continuing efforts to foster closer relations between both countries. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009, PAGE 5 0,1,675<:25.6t75$163257127,&(%$<((7 1$66$8((779,&725,$$9(18( 52$':$<&216758&7,21 WKWK,QDQHIIRUWRUHOLHYHFXUUHQWWUDIFFRQJHVWLRQSUREOHPV %$+$0$6+270,;KDVEHHQFRQWUDFWHGIRUWKHSDYLQJRI :HVW%D\6WUHHWEHWZHHQ%ODNH5GDQG1DVVDX0DUOERURXJK 1DY\/LRQDQG%D\6WUHHWWR0DFNH\3DYLQJZRUNV ZLOOEHFRPPHQFLQJIURP%ODNHZKLFKUHTXLUHWUDIF PDQDJHPHQWLQYROYLQJURDGFORVXUHVDQGGLYHUVLRQVIRUWKHURXWH 3DYLQJ:RUNVLQFOXGHWKHIROORZLQJWLPHV /RFDOGLYHUVLRQVZLOOEHVLJQSRVWHGLQGXHFRXUVHDQGIXUWKHU LQIRUPDWLRQZLOOEHSURYLGHGLQORFDOPHGLD PLP Senator Allyson Maynard-Gibson has put forward a bold national development plan that would see more Bahamian ownership in tourism, a vastly improved national grade average and a much more efficient judicial system. S peaking in the Senate, she criticised t he government’s budget as lacking the “vision” necessary to inspire the public and rescue the nation from the grip of the global economic crisis. P LP Senator Allyson Maynard-Gibs on said history shows that during extrao rdinary times, “where there is visiona ry leadership, people time and time a gain rise to the challenge and take t heir country to the next level”. Noting that US President Barak Obama has set out strategies to lead America and the world out of the worst recess ion since the Great Depression, Mrs Maynard-Gibson said: “Regrettably, t his budget gives no hope to Bahamians. It is not visionary. It repeats the s ame paradigm that has limited the v ision and power of our people for far t oo long. I looked for the vision that would raise the power, dignity and self esteem of our people. I found none. I looked for the vision that would bring our people more e mpowerment. I found n one. I looked for the v ision that would give hope and I found none.” Mrs Maynard-Gibson, former attorney general a nd now leader of oppos ition business in the sena te, noted that the B ahamas is the size of a s mall multinational comp any. “When companies budget, they budget to achieve clear objectives. The Bahamas should be no different. W hat should be our ‘Vision 2020’? What can we ask all Bahamians to buy i nto, work towards and sacrifice for?” she asked. T he senator then outlined a prospect ive “Vision 2020” which would include: Bahamians owning more than 50 per cent of the tourism product Bahamians owning more than 50 per cent of the financial services produ ct A 100 per cent growth i n Bahamian entrepreneurship The satisfaction of 50 per cent the country’s food n eeds with locally grown p roducts The improvement of t he national average in E nglish and Math from E t o B, and the improvement of the national average overall from D to C. A national plan for training, retraini ng and equipping citizens for cutting edge, value added, 21st century service Universal health care for all Bahamians including a national plan f or good health, including parks, recrea tion and beach access A legal system where all matters a re brought to trial within two years A system of governance where routine applications, and major policy decisions are “depoliticised” and where, once all requirements are met, permanent residence or any permit is autom atically granted A system of governance where the p eople elect all persons who will make decisions on their behalf The creation of a reliable and affordable utility supply system and a 50 p er cent decrease on fossil fuel depend ence E-government and easy access for e veryone desiring to do business with g overnment, full access to information i mpacting government decisions (planning, environment, economic projections, et cetera) and the appointment of a E Czar Universal access to the world wide web A land policy that ensures access to Bahamian land and patrimony for f uture generations Policies evaluated to measure the e xtent to which they enhance and s trengthen family life PLP Senator touts a bold national development plan A llyson Maynard-Gibson A 34-YEAR-OLDman was granted $3,000 bail yesterday after pleading not guilty to a marijuana possession charge. Ramses Charles, of C argillsville off Faith A venue, is accused of b eing found in possession of a pound and seven ounces of marijuana on June 29 with the intent to s upply. C harles was arraigned y esterday before Magist rate Janet Bullard in C ourt One, Bank Lane. He i s expected back in court on July 6. Man pleads not guilty to marijuana possession In brief T HE Bahamas could h ave had the benefit of a cost-free “transformation”o f the National Centre for t he Performing Arts had the former government not dropped the ball on the issue, Minister of State for Culture Charles Maynard said. He told parliament on M onday that nothing was d one to advance the centre between 2002 and 2007, despite an offer from the Chinese government tor enovate it for free. Mr Maynard claimed that this was due to the former government’s fail ure to respond to correspondence from the Chi nese. We met it the same way w e left it, and we should not have met it the same way we left it because the Chinese government had put in writing a commit ment to supply the Bahamas government witha ll equipment necessary to t ransform that space,” he said. When he was appointed Minister of State for Cul ture in 2007, Mr Maynard said he “looked through the file” relative to the centre and made efforts to ascertain whether therewas “some way of getting the Chinese government to re-offer that particular thing.” He said the Chinese had sent correspondence to the Bahamian government on the issue but gave up on the idea after not receivinga response. “It was just one simple issue. “I even met with the (Chinese one point. He said they had lost interest in that particular project and were now focused on the (Chi-nese funded national) stadium,” said Mr Maynard. Minister of State criticises former govt over performingar ts centre The Bahamas pla ys host to Florida film commissioners P ICTURED (L TO R O wen Bethel, president of Bahamas FilmInvest International Ltd; Graham Winick, president of Film Florida; and Craig Woods, president of the Bahamas Film Commission.

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THE new Tourist Mango Card, a project by the Min-i stry of Tourism and Aviation and Transfer Solution Providers Ltd (TSPe xpected to be available withi n the next two months. T he Tourist Mango Cards allows for cashless financial transactions with merchants.V isitors or other individuals can make payments for services or buy goods using the card. The cards will be available for purchase in varying amounts, up to $100. Director General of Tourism Vernice Walkine said tourism professionals in the Bahamas are always seeking to exceed the expectations of guests, and the Mango Card will allow this to be accom plished through enhanced safety and convenience. “Visitors to the Bahamas will be able to make transactions with added convenience and in a much safer environ ment due to the electronic payment system offered by this Bahamian software and technology company,” Ms Walkine said. “The safety of the card has benefits that will outlast our guests’ time in the Bahamas. When they return home, we will be the beneficiaries of an enhanced reputation due to the improved safety that these electronic payments will pro vide. We want to always be seen as a safe destination in which visitors move about freely. They can window shop and make purchases without hassle and without falling victim to crime.” Dr Johnathan Rodgers, president of TSP, said 85 cents of every tourist dollar eventually leaves the Bahamas. In the case of arrivals by sea, estimates are as high as $13 leaving the country for each dollar that remains, he said. “This really shows that there is a tremendous leakage of money out of the Bahamas and this economic model is not sustainable,” he said. “We have a GDP of about $6 bil lion and tourism accounts for 60 per cent of that GDP. If we can increase the amount of money that stays here by five cents, this will translate into another $1.2 billion stay ing in the Bahamian economy every year, and this is almost as much as government makes in total every year.” Julian Francis, chairman of TSP, said the Bahamas has not maximised the economic possibilities of the tourism business. He said there is a market of roughly 4.5 million tourists coming to the Bahamas every year, and they provide business opportuni ties that Bahamians can tap into. Mr Francis said tourists are used to the convenience of cashless transactions in their home countries. He believes that they will be eager to utilise the Mango Card while visiting the Bahamas. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas stands “ready to assist” Honduras w herever it can following the f orced removal of that count ry’s elected President Manuel Zelaya on Sunday. B ahamian Ambassador to the Organisation of American States C A Smith said the B ahamas condemns the “brut al assault and the interrupt ion of the democratic process i n Honduras and demands the i mmediate reinstatement of t he democratically elected government and the resumpt ion of peace in the region.” Pro-Zelaya protesters have clashed with authorities in thes treets of Honduras since Mr Zelaya was forcibly ousted f rom the country by the military on the weekend. His removal denounced as a coup by many world leaders w ho have come out in sup p ort of Mr Zelaya came on the same day that he had organised for a non-bindingr eferendum on extending presidential term limits to be held. This intention had alarmed certain sectors, who felt he was trying to hold onto power by irregular means. M r Zelaya, who was sent o ff on a plane to Costa Rica, c laims he simply wanted to canvass public opinion. While the outside world has expressed its condemnation of the military’s response, inside Honduras the action is supported by the country’sC ongress and Supreme Court, which are of the view that President Zelaya was acting “illegally” by holding the referendum. The “coup” represents the first such action in the region i n over 16 years and is cons idered a major political crisis. Joining the many world leaders and diplomats who have condemned the events and called for the reinstatement of President Zelaya, MrS mith also called for an immediate meeting of foreign ministers “in order that they may assist in bringing some semblance of peace” to Honduras. Heightening the pressure o n the Central American c ountry, the United Nations General Assembly yesterday passed a resolution calling for the reinstatement of Mr Zelaya. T he resolution calls “firmly and categorically on all states to recognise no government other than that” of Mr Zelaya. CARICOM yesterday also r eleased an official statement, condemning the military action which has interrupted the democratic process in H onduras and which contravenes the principles of the Inter-American Democratic C harter. The Caribbean Community is also deeply concerned by reports that a number of government officials and diplomatic representatives haveb een detained and may have been physically harmed. The Caribbean Community calls on all the parties involved in the developments in Honduras to refrain from anyr ecourse to violence and to pursue a peaceful resolution to the current situation,” the statement said. M r Zelaya has pledged to see out his term as president, which ends in January 2010, a nd claims he will return to t he country on Thursday. The Bahamas is ‘ready to assist’ crisis-hit Honduras THE Ministry Of Tourism a nd Aviation has unveiled five new heritage sites on Grand B ahama. They are the Mermaid Pond in Lewis Yard, the Pinder’s Point Lighthouse, Hawksbill Creek, the boiling hole in Hepburn Town, andF ern, Gully and Josey Cave. T he Mermaid Pond can be heard sucking and blowing each time the tide ebbs and flows. The Pinder’s Point Lighthouse was built in the late 1700s to early 1800s. H awksbill Creek is named a fter the now endangered turtle that use to frequent its waters. The boiling hole is known for how its waters swirl with the movement of the tide. The cave was where residents in the Holmes’ Rock community took refuge from a serious hurricane. Five heritage sites unveiled in Grand Bahama TOURIST MANGO CARD LAUNCHED MINISTRY OF TOURISM AND AVIATION officials and Transfer Service Providers (TSP a handshake. Pictured (from left Ministry of Tourism and Aviation; Vernice Walkine, Director General of Tourism; Julian Francis, TSP chairman, and Dr Johnathan Rodgers, TSP president. OFFICIALS SIGN Tourist Mango Card agreements. Pictured (from left man, and Dr Johnathan Rodgers, TSP president. D e r e k S m i t h / B I S Ambassador to OASspeaks out after removal of that country’s president Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won ana ward. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE of Buildings, Melicianna Bethel were all informed of their fate on Monday, Meanwhile, The Tribune understands that a fifth position that of Deputy Director in charge of the Family Islands may also be on the chopping board, although this has not been confirmed. M r Cargill said the changes will help “strategically position the (National Insurance for the future”, streamlining it and enhancing operational efficiency in terms of contribution collections and expense management while improving customer service levels. In doing so, it reacts to red flags raised in a n umber of actuarial reviews conducted with reference to the Board. Under the old structure there was a “duplication of efforts” and new roles will require “a completely different skill set” from those who fill them, said Mr Cargill. T he Board will now “require a higher level of p erformance from our executives as we move forward” and each will be subject to goal-orientated and “measurable” evaluations of their performance, he added. While the public will not see a noticeable i mprovement in its work “immediately”, they will do so in the “short term”. In an official statement on the move, the NIB said its original organisational structure was outd ated and not relevant in today’s environment. It added that “risk assessment studies” cond ucted by Bahamian and external firms had “conf irmed that NIB, in its current state, carries considerable business risks” that could be addressed through efforts to enhance operational efficiency. “After reviewing the external recommendations, jointly with the unsatisfactory findings of prior year Risk Assessment and the Internal Control and System Assurance findings, the Board concluded that expedient action was required in order to re-align and reposition NIBs trategically for the longer term,” said Cargill in the statement. Under its new organisational structure, the NIB is looking to fill the positions of: Vice President (VP port Services, VP of investments and VP of Finance. These employees will join current VP ofH uman Resources Regenda King, VP of Medical Dr Kevin Bowe, VP of Legal Affairs Heather Maynard, Actuary Derek Osborne, Financial Controller Sonia Gill and a VP of Internal Auditing. They will work as part of the NIB’s new and far more “centralised” operational model. A n ongoing effort to move in the direction of centralisation has already been responsible for the significant increase in the number of cases of NIB defaulters being brought before the courtsf or prosecution, said Mr Cargill. L ast week 20 companies were brought before the courts for owing the NIB hundreds of thous ands of dollars in backpayments. Among them were Jones Communications and Solomon’s Mines. Most were adjourned to September 15. Yesterday attorney and aspiring politician Paul M oss released a statement responding to the redundancies in which he criticised the Government for “continuing to mow down people in the civil service.” “Over the past year and a half, the government has systematically been ‘restructuring’ the civil service and by doing so they have devastated families and destroyed lives. Many still have years left on their mortgages with children in school and it is catastrophic to be summarily dis-m issed without carful planning. No caring government does this to its people knowing that they will join the unemployment line in a time when unemployment is expected to increase,” said Mr Moss, who hopes to run in the St Cecilia constituency in the next general election. He questioned whether the Government is c oncealing the possibility that it “cannot afford to make payroll.” Responding to the criticism that NIB’s reorganisation may be callous at a time when job opportunities for those made unemployed are more meagre than in previous years, Mr Cargill said the NIB has been “criticised by Bahamian p ublic as well as political parties for a lacking operational efficiency over several months and years” and has recognised that if the “fund is to remain sound” the “status quo can no longerr emain.” We are seeking to ensure we deliver on promises of providing effective social security b enefit to Bahamians over the long term,” said the Director. The changes that are being implemented have been “unanimously endorsed” by the Board of D irectors, he added. In April this year, the Government introduced in Parliament three Bills aimed at “a modern, transparent regulatory framework” for the c ommunications sector in the Bahamas. T he Communications Bill, the Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority (URCA Utilities Appeal Tribunal (UAT Bill were debated and passed in earl y May. As the Government continues to work towards the privatisation of B TC and the liberalisation of the Bahamas’ electronic communicat ions sector, this regulatory reform w as a critical step towards ensuring that international best practices stan dards are met, while also enhancing t he value proposition to potential partners for BTC,” the Prime Minister said. With UCRA in place as an inde p endent regulator to promote good business practices and foster a competitive environment, the new regu l atory regime will seek to increase investor and consumer confidence, he explained. “Now that the new regulatory structure is approved and all other due diligence largely completed byt he Privatisation Committee and its team of advisors, the stage is set for the commencement of the privatisation process,” the Prime Minister said. Any potential strategic partner must be a well-resourced entity or c onsortium with established credentials in the telecommunications industry that can provide the com-p any with growth opportunities and p osition BTC for long-term success. “The strategy of those interested p arties must also be aligned with the key objectives of the Government, who will continue to hold a 49 percent ownership stake in the compa n y,” he said. The Government is “committed to the execution of an efficient process” to be completed within a relatively short time, he said. He said the new regulatory structure and liberalised market are expected to drive growth in telecommunications, which will yield signif i cant positive economic benefits for the Bahamas including: job creation, specifically in the areas of telecommunications infrastructure development and maintenance, construction, retail distribution, and real estate development; increased domestic and foreign investment; an enhancedt ourism product; and, a modernised infrastructure for business. “To encourage healthy competition, fixed line telecommunications services, cable and IPTV and intern et services will be liberalised immed iately upon coming into force of t he Communications Act. “Mobile services will be liberalised two years following the privatisationo f BTC,” the Prime Minister said. time for today’s 1.30pm meeting at the D epartment of Labour. I find it amazing she would leave the count ry at such a sensitive time in the negotiations,” said the source, who asked to remain anonymous. Meanwhile, Minister of Labour Dion Foulkest old T he Tribune t he government received the nurse’s written rejection of the offer it made to them last week but it is not prepared to budge. “The nurses indicated t o (health (Hubert they reject our proposal and that they are insisting that they receive full insurance by an insura nce company immedia tely,” said Mr Foulkes, who attended last week’s meeting where the Government put its l atest offer to the BNU. have been advised by Dr Minnis that t he Government’s offer is not going to change. That is the final offer by the Government,” added the minister. He said that neither he or Dr Minnis would b e attending today’s meeting but added that o fficials fromthe Public Hospitals Authority and the Department of Labour would be pre sent. I n Tuesday’s meeting last week, the Government proposed that it could implementthe postponed healthcare insurance covera ge for the nurses initially expected to come i nto effect today by July 1 2010, and in the m eantime, would cover the cost of treatment for all work-related injuries. T his could take place at Princess Margaret Hospital, in the Bahamian private sector or abroad. T he nurses would also get their postponed f our per cent salary increase at that time and the Government would make available several “private rooms” at PMH in which they would be eligible to receive treatment. But last week Ms Hamilton said that nurses have expressed their disappointment with t he Government’s proposal, saying they can already apply for the cost of treatment for work-related injuries to be covered by the N ational Insurance Board. “It doesn’t give us anything different,” asserted Ms Hamilton, who said nurses whos uffer non-work related sickness and those w ho cannot be accomodated in the three pri vate rooms will be left in the lurch. Yesterday Mr Foulkes said he had been i nformed that Ms Hamilton is out of the coun try and had no idea whether she would be back in time for the meeting as she is legally m andated to be. T he trial into Mr Taylor’s death will be heard before Senior Supreme Court Justice Anita Allen. Prosecutors are expected to call some 25 witnesses during the trial, most of whom are police officers. P rosecuting the case is Bernard Turner, Direcector of Public Prosecut ions, along with Darnell Dorsette and Neil Brathwaite. A jury of six men, six women and three alternates was selected yester d ay to hear the case. Union president accused of ‘abandoning’ members FROM page one Dion Foulkes FROM page one Harl Taylor murder trial to open F ROM page one BTC edging closer to privatisation F ROM page one NIB bosses to be made redundant

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n By DOUG ALDEN AP Sports Writer SALT LAKE CITY (AP Carlos Boozer has reconsidered f ree agency, or at least put it off a year. Boozer let the Utah Jazz know on Tuesday that he will stay with the team for the final year of his contract rather than opting out and becoming a free agent which he once said he intended to do. Boozer backed off his original statement and said when the season ended he wanted to con sider all of his options. He chose not to chance an iffy free agent market for more money and possibly a long-term deal, taking the $12.7 million he’s guaranteed next season from the Jazz. Boozer took until the final day to reach a decision. Utah was still waiting Tuesday to hear from center Mehmet Okur, who also had the option to return for the final year of his contract. When healthy, Boozer has been the Jazz’s top scorer and rebounder and helped lead Utah to three straight playoff appearances. He’s been an AllStar twice and was a member of last year’s U.S. Olympic gold medal team, but injuries have taken him out for large chunks of three of his five seasons in Utah. “We are excited that Carlos has decided to remain with the Jazz,” general manager Kevin O’Connor said in a release. “We are hopeful he can contin ue to play at an All-Star level and will have an injury-free sea son.” Boozer has averaged 19 points and 10 rebounds since Utah signed him away from the Cleveland Cavaliers as a restricted free agent five years ago, but has only played in 276 of a possible 410 with the Jazz. He was limited to 37 games last season, due largely to an injury that required surgery on his left knee in January. Utah learned Monday that reserve shooting guard Kyle Korver exercised his option to play out his contract for $5.2 million. Nadal left off Spain team for Davis Cup C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009, PAGE 11 n By STEPHEN WILSON AP Sports Writer WIMBLEDON, England (AP Venus and Serena Williams are one round away from meeting in another Wimbledon final. Five-time champion Venus overpowered Agnieszka Radwanska 6-1, 6-2 on Tuesday, and two-time winner Serena followed her into the semifinals with a 62, 6-3 win over Victoria Azarenka. No. 3-seeded Venus will next face topranked Dinara Safina, who overcame 15 double-faults and beat German teenag-er Sabine Lisicki 6-7 (5 the Wimbledon semis for the first time. In the bottom half of the draw, No. 4 Elena Dementieva defeated Italy’s F rancesca Schiavone 6-2, 6-2 to set up a s emifinal encounter with No. 2 Serena W illiams. It’s the first time since 2006 that all four top-seeded women reached the semifinals at a Grand Slam tournament. The Williams sisters overwhelmed their opponents Tuesday with breathtaking displays of power tennis, showing why they have dominated on the grass of the All England Club for most of the past decade. “We definitely upped our levels of game today,” Serena said. Venus, seeking her third straight Wimbledon title, outhit the 14th-ranked Pole from all parts of the court and proved again that she is the dominant female player on grass. “Do I feel invincible?” Williams said. “I’d like to say yes, but I really do work at it.” Williams had her left leg taped up again but showed no weakness at all as she ripped 29 winners compared to six for Radwanska in a match that lasted just 68 minutes on a sunbaked Court 1. “I can’t complain,” Williams said. “I’m in the semifinals of Wimbledon, right where I want to be. I just need to take another step forward.” With Venus looking on from the guest box, Serena swept through the first set against the eighth-ranked Azarenka in 26m inutes. After being broken to go down 3-2 in the second, she won four straight games and held serve at love to finish the match in commanding fashion. Serenahad nine aces and 26 winners, with only seven unforced errors. Azarenka had beaten Serena in s traight sets in their last match in the f inal at Key Biscayne, Fla., in April. “I really wanted to do well today,” Serena said. “I didn’t do well the last time we played. I was not feeling great. I felt like I really wanted to show up today.” Asked whether she also felt unbeatable at Wimbledon, Serena said: “I don’tf eel invincible, but I definitely should have the same attitude. I’m going to try to feel that way, too.” Only once in the last nine years has t here been a Wimbledon women’s final that didn’t feature at least one of the Williams sisters. The sisters were the only two Grand Slam winners in the women’s quarterfinals Serena has 10 major titles and Venus seven. The sisters have met in three Wimbledon finals, including last year. Serena has won two of the three, in 2002 and . They are 10-10 in career meetings. “I would love it to be a Williams final, and so would she,” Venus said. “That would be great.” The sisters’ father, Richard Williams, said he is certain his daughters will be in the final again. “I think they are both playing super well,” he said. “They’re playing the Williams way. And when you’re playing the Williams way, it’s very difficult for anyone to touch you.” Venus is trying to become the first woman since Steffi Graf in 1991-93 to win three Wimbledon titles in a row. Venus Williams raced to a 5-0 lead against Radwanska, and finished off the first set with back-to-back aces. Williams dropped only two of 18 points on serve in t he set. “That first set for me was almost perfect,” Williams said. Safina, who has risen to No. 1 in the world despite never having won a Grand Slam title, struggled against the 19-yearold Lisicki. The Russian had to come from behind after double-faulting to lose the first set tiebreaker, smashing her racket to the turf and drawing a warning from the chair umpire. “I was Santa Claus on the court, serving so many double-faults,” Safina said. Safina was down 3-2 on serve in the second set, but got the one break in the seventh game to force a third set. The 41st-ranked Lisicki received treatment on her right calf after going down 4-1 in the third. In the next game, Safina was up 40-0 before serving three straight double-faults. She still managed to hold and then broke for the match. “I was tough mentally, that was the key today,” Safina said. The men’s quarterfinals are set for Wednesday with five-time champion Roger Federer against 6-foot-10 Croat Ivo Karlovic; No. 3 Andy Murray vs. Spanish wild card Juan Carlos Ferrero; 2002 champion Lleyton Hewitt vs. twotime finalist Andy Roddick; and No. 3 Novak Djokovic vs. Tommy Haas. Temperatures topped 90 degrees on Tuesday, with no need to close the roof on Centre Court. Medical officials on site said they treat ed more than 130 people, mostly for heat-related problems. One person was taken to a hospital. Williams sisters reach semis LONDON (AP r anked Rafael Nadal was left off Spain’s team for the Davis Cup quarterfinals on Tuesday because of sore knees. Nadal has struggled with tendinitis in his knees, which forced him to skip defending his Wimbledon title. He has not played a tour match since losing in the fourth round at the French Open. Fernando Verdasco, Tommy Robredo, David Ferrer and Feliciano Lopez will represent Spain when the defending champions host Germany on outdoor clay in Marbella, the International Tennis Federation said. In the other quarterfinals from July 10-12, it’s Czech Republic vs. Argentina; Croat ia vs. United States; and Israel vs. Russia. Germany will play without Wimbledon quarterfinalist Tommy Haas and go with Philipp Kohlschreiber, Nicolas Kiefer, Mischa Zverev and Andreas Beck. The 32-time champion Americans will again use Andy Roddick, James Blake, Bob Bryan and Mike Bryan when they visit Croatia. They w ill face Marin Cilic, Ivo Karlovic, Roko Karanusic and Lovro Zovko on indoor c lay in Porec. Tomas Berdych, Radek Stepanek, Ivo Minar and Lukas Dlouhy will lead the Czechs on hard indoor courts in Ostrava against Argenti na’s Juan Martin del Potro, Jose Acasuso, Leonardo Mayer and Juan Monaco. Israel, which made the Davis Cup quarterfinals for the first time since 1987, will be represented by Dudi Sela, Harel Levy, Jonathan Erlich and Andy Ram on indoor hard courts in Tel Aviv. Russia’s lineup will be Dmitry Tursunov, Marat Safin, Igor Andreev and Mikhail Youzh ny. FIVE-TIME champion Venus Williams (above Tuesday, and two-time winner Serena Williams (top 6-2, 6-3 win over Victoria Azarenka. (AP Photos n By JAIME ARON AP Sports Writer DALLAS (AP Cuban wants to be first in line to talk to Jason Kidd. Cuban posted Tuesday on Twitter, “Getting ready to fly up to NYC for Free Agent meeting at 12:01,” and that free agent is Kidd, according to a person with knowledge of the situation. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because NBA rules prevent commenting on such things. Cuban has made it clear he wants to keep Kidd, but it might not be that easy. The New York Knicks are believed to be interested, too, as could LeBron James and the Cavaliers or perhaps Kobe Bryant and the Lak ers. Kidd has never won an NBA championship, but has won an Olympic gold medal alongside James and Bryant. ESPN.com first reported Cuban’s meeting with Kidd. Cuban, Mavs in hot pursuit of keeping Kidd Boozer decides to stay with Jazz IN THIS March 28 file photo, Utah Jazz’s Carlos Boozer celebrates after making a shot in the first half of game against the Phoenix Suns in Salt Lake City. Boozer told the Jazz on Tuesday, June 30, 2009, that he would return to the team instead of opting out of the final year of his contract and becoming a free agent. Boozer is scheduled to make $12.7 million next sea son, his sixth with the Jazz. (AP Photo: George Frey

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National Track & Field results C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS HERE is a look at the results of the BAAA’s National Track and Field Championships held over the weekend: W W o o m m e e n n s s D D i i v v i i s s i i o o n n 100 metres 1, Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie, 11,12; 2, Chandra Sturrup, 11.22; 3, Sheniqua Ferguson, 11.50; 4, Jernise Saunders, 11.80; 5, Tamica Clarke, 11.98; 6, Tia Rolle, 12.14; 7, Tamara Rigby, 12.24; 8, V'Alonee Robinson, 12.28. 200 1, Debbie FergusonMcKenzie, 22.83; 2, Sheniqua Ferguson, 23.48; 3, Jernise Saunders, 24.45; 4; Courtney Patterson, US Virgin Islands, 24.61. 400 1, Christine Armertil, 51.96; 2, Shakeitha Henfield, 54.07; 3, Sasha Rolle, 54.08; 4, Shaunae Miller, 55.52; 5, Ashley Hanna, 56.63; 6, Deandra Knowles, 1:01.24. 800 1, Hughnique Rolle, 2:21.19; 2, Ashley Johnson, 2:23.97. 1 00 hurdles 1, Tiavanni Thomps on, 13.69; 2, Krystal Bodie, 13.94; 3 , Petra McDonald, 14.35; Kierre Beckles, Barbados, 13.67. Triple jump 1, Donnevette Mar tin, 41-5 1/4; 2, Keythra Richards, 39-0 1/4. High jump 1, Kenya Culmer, 5-7 1/4. Long jump 1, Bianca Stuart, 2010; 2, Keythra Richards, 18-3 1/4. Discus 1, Gabrielle Nixon, 1320; 2, Juliann Duncanson, 123-6. Javelin 1, Lavern Eve, 178-2; Terae Sweeting, fouled. S hot put 1, Juliann Duncombe, 3 5-3 3/4. M M e e n n s s D D i i v v i i s s i i o o n n 100 metres 1, Derrick Atkins, 10.25; 2, Adrian Griffith, 10.44; 3, Shamar Sands, 10.54; 4, Rodney Green, 10.70; 5, Karlton Rolle, 10.71; 6, Jamal Forbes, 10.75; 7, Derek Carey, 10.80; 8, Kohfe Miller, 10.95. 100 consolation 1, Ramon Git tens, 10.46; 2, Woodrow Randal, 10.65; 3, Geno Jones, 10.93; 4, Chamal Bethel, 11.24; 5, Michael Sands, 12.25. 200 Karlton Rolle, 21.20; Adri an Griffith, 21.27; Jamial Rolle, 21.50; Kareem Parker, 22.68. 400 1, Chris Brown, 45.21; 2, Ramon Miller, 45.35; 3, Andrett Bain, 46.02; 4, Aaron Cleare, 46.34; 5, Mchael Mathieu, 46.37; 6, Avard Moncur, 47.52; Latoy Williams, DNF; Andrae Williams, DNS. 400 consolation 1, LaSean Pick stock, 47.24; 2, Delano Deveaux, 49.63; 3, Renaldo Gibson, 49.74; Phillip Stubbs, DNF; Brandon Miller, DNF. 800 1, Cerio Rolle, 1:55.49; 2, Laquardo Newbold, 1:55.90; 3, Kenneth Wallace-Whitfield, 1:56.85; 4, James Carey, 1:56.92; 5, Lester Taylor, 2:05.96. 1,500 metres 1, O'Neil Williams, 4:00.91; 2, James Carey, 4:04.95. 5,000 1, O'Neil Williams, 16:21.28; 2, Jason Williams, 17:26.33; Delroy Boothe, DNF; Kevin Morris, DNF. 110 hurdles 1, Ryan Brathwaite, Barbados, 13.57; 2, Shane Brath waite, Barbados, 14.33; 3, Christopher Bethel, DQ. U-18 110 hurdles 1, Patrick Bodie, 14.39; 2, Aaron Wilmore, 14.60. 400 hurdles 1, Carlyle Thompson, 52.79; 2, Nathan Arnett, 53.29; 3, Ednal Rolle, 54.30. U-18 400 hurdles 1, Nejmi Burnside, 53.84. Long jump 1, Osbourne Moxey, 26-0 3/4; 2, Rudon Bastian, 25-4 1/2; 3, Stanley Poitier, 22-9 3/4'; 4, Justin Gray, 21-4 1/4; 5, Tehneil Babbs, 20-10 3/4; 6, Permeko Murray, 20-9 3/4; 7, Rashad Moxey, 190. High jump 1, Trevor Barry, 7-3 3/4; 2, Raymond Higgs, 7-2 1/4; 3, Donald Thomas, 7-1 1/2; 4, Jamal Wilson, 6-10 1/4. Triple jump 1, Leevan Sands, 56-03; 2, Antillio Bastian, 49-09; 3, J'Vente Deveaux, 49-07; 4, Lamar Delaney, 49-03.50; 5, Anjourn Armaly, 48-11.75; 6, Lathone Minns, 47-02.25; 7, Lathario Minns; 8, Craig Charlow, 45-00.50; – Samyr Laine, Republic of Hait, 52-04.50; – Tehneil Babbs, foul. Javelin 1, Ramond Farrington, 191-0; 2, Livingstone Brown, 17110; 3, Coyotito Gray, 167-3; 4, Devon Rox, 160-10; 5, Benja Light bourne, 156-2; 6, Henry Butler, 1498. Discus 1, Delron Innis, 114-5; 2, Benja Lightbourne, 111-11; 3, Shaun Miller, 107-2; 4, Rashad McCoy, 106-11; 5, Mark Sterling, 91-2; 6, Bernard Newbold, 87-7. Hammer 1, Mark Sterling, 1236. Javelin 1, Raymond Farrington, 191-0; 2, Livingstone Brown, 17110; 3, Coyotito Gray, 167-3; 4, Devon Rox, 160-10; 5, Benja Lightbourne, 156-2; 6, Henry Butler, 1498. Shot put 1, Delron Innis, 43-8 1/2; 2, Maurice Conyers, 40-0; 3, Rashad McCoy, 34-4 1/2; 4, Shaun Miller, 32-10 1/2; 5, Mark Sterling, 32-8 1/2. HERE are the results of the Bahamas Olympic Association’s 22nd Olympic Day Road Race held on Saturday: W W O O M M E E N N S S R R U U N N Under-20 1, Paulette Strachan, 18th, 45.57 20-29 1, Elizabeth Shadeock, 15th, 35.08 30-39 1, Rayvonne Bethel, 12th, 32.01 2nd, Jasmine Jones, 13th, 33.05 3rd, June Cartwright, 19th, 50.10 M M E E N N S S R R U U N N Under-20 1, Ashland Murray Jr., 31.48 20-29 1, Sidney Collie, 2nd, 23.53 30-39 1, Delroy Boothe, 23.15; 2, Roy Sanchez, 7th, 28.04; 3, Dereck Ferguson, 9th, 28.55 40-49 1, Ashland Murray, 3rd, 27.05; 3, Zammie Williams, 10th, 30.07 50-59 1, Raymond Rudon, 4th, 27.46; 2, Philip Moss, 5th, 27.58; 3, James Bodie, 8th, 28.52 60-plus 1, George Smith, 14th, 33.32 W W O O M M E E N N S S W W A A L L K K U-20 1, Tenaz Cooper, 16th, 46.33 20-29 1, Kelsie Johnson, 27th, NT available 30-39 1, Anastacia Moultrie, 8th, 28.21; 2, Jannett Cabistan, 9th, 29.20; 3, Marcia Deleveaux, 11th, 30.47 40-49 1, Cheryl Rolle, 3rd, 22.55 50-59 1, Kathie Dillette, 12th, 35.55; 2, Denise Sands, 13th, 35.57; 3, Janet Cooper, 14th, 41.32 M M E E N N S S W W A A L L K K 40-49 1, Don Cornish, 6th, 26.18; 2, Clarence Not tage, 7th, 26.48 50-59 1, Anthony Cartwright, 5th, 25.02; 2, George Clarke, 10th, 30.41 60-plus 1, Richard Adderley, 1st, 21.39; 2, Leslie Miller, 2nd, 22.38; 3, Eric Seymour, 4th, 22.59 22nd Olympic Day road race results 38th RBC National Swimming Championships... P h o t o s : F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f The RBC National Swimming Championships, hosted by Bahamas Swimming Federation, produced a myriad of new national records, international qualifiers and a repeat champion in one of the most populated meets in BSF history. Here are some action shots of the event...

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n B y RENALDO DORSETT S ports Reporter r dorsett@tribunemedia.net T he 38th RBC National Swimm ing Champi o nships, hosted by the Bahamas S wimming Federation, produced a myriad of new national records, international qualifiers and a repeat champion in one of the most populated meets in B SF history. More than 20 new national r ecords were set at the four day m eet, with many of the country’s elite collegiate athletes assaulting the record books. Arianna Vanderpool-Wallace l owered three meet records in t he 50m freestyle 25.8s, 100m free 55.8s, 100m butterfly 1 :02.35s and 200m free 2:08.66s. The sophomore at Auburn U niversity in Alabama reached the qualifying mark for the Cen tral American and Caribbean g ames in each of the aforementioned events and the 50m butterfly 28.05s. She also surpassed the quali f ying standards for the upcomi ng 2010 Singapore Youth Olympic Games in the 50 free and 100 free. V anderpool-Wallace’s teamm ate at Auburn, Alana Dillete, also set three new marks at the Nationals while qualifying fort he CAC games in four events. Dillete lowered times in the 50m backstroke 30.30s, 50m b utterfly 27.62s, and 100m backstroke 1:06.16s, while also reaching the qualifying mark in the 100m butterfly. I n the men’s division, Ken t ucky Wildcat Vereance Burrows set a new standard and qualified for the CAC games in the 50m butterfly. He also reached qualifying standards in t he 50m butterfly, 100m butterfly and 100m free. Other CAC Games qualifiers at the Open Nationals included Alicia Lightbourne (50 b reast, 100 breast), Inoa Charlton (50 free, 100 free la Lightbourn (100 back Michael McIntosh (50 breast Ariel Weech (50 free l ey Butler (50 free In addition, 18 swimmers also qualified for the Caribbean Island Swimming Championships. n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net MARK Knowles will have double duties today at Wimbledon. First, he and Mahesh Bhupathi will play in the quarterfinal of the men’s doubles against the team of Wesley Moodie of the Republic of South Africa and Dick Norman of Belgium. Knowles and Bhupathi are the No.4 seeds in the tournament, while Moodie and Norman are No.9. Knowles, at age 37, will be playing in his historic 1,000th career doubles match, but he has indicated that the record is not as important as it is winning. The winning team will advance to the semifinal where they will face the top seeded team of American identical twin brothers Bob and Mike Bryan. The Bryans earned their trip to the semis with a 6-2, 6-1, 6-4 win over the No.5 team of Bruno Soares of Brazil and Kevin Ullyett of Zimbabwe. On the other half of the draw, the No.2 seeded team of Daniel Nestor and Nenad Zimonjic are also into the semis. They advanced with a 6-2, 6-3, 6-4 win over the No.8 team of Lukasz Kubot of Poland and Oliver Marach of Austria. Knowles and Nestor won three of the four Grand Slam titles except Wimbledon before they split up about three years ago. However, they made it to the final at Wimbledon in 2002. Last year, Nestor and Zimonjic won the Wimbledon crown while Knowles and Bhupathi got bounced in the first round. But before their split, Knowles and Nestor reached the semifinals in 2006. Following their doubles match, Knowles will have another doubles to play when he and his mixed pairs partner Anna-Lena Groenefeld of Germany meet Nestor and his Russian partner Elena Vesni na. That match was actually scheduled to be played yesterday, but was put off until today. Before the match, Knowles said Monday that he was looking forward to facing Nestor. C M Y K C M Y K WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 13 PAGE 11 International sports news Williams sisters reach semifinals... S ee page 11 THE Bahamas Cricket Asso ciation’s top team continued their undefeated streak toward the playoffs with another pen nant leading win. The Dynasty Stars won by eight wickets over the Police to further their division lead this weekend at Windsor Park. The Police were bowled out for 80 runs with Gary Arm strong and Mark Taylor lead ing in runs with 25 and 16 runs apiece. Bowling for the Stars, Johnathan Barry took four wickets while Lee Melville took three. In their turn at bat, the Stars scored 81 runs for the loss of two wickets to claim the win by eight. Barry also starred at the plate with 29 runs while Ren ford Davson added 24. They were the top scorers. The second matchup of the weekend, scheduled between the Dockendale Titans and St Agnes, was postponed by offi cials due to “unprepared grounds.” In other related news, less than a week remains before the Bahamas’ Under 19 National Team is slated to depart for regional competition in Toron to, Canada. The International Cricket Council Tournament is set for July 5 and will include teams from Argentina, the United States and Canada. The Bahamas and Cayman Islands are the only Caribbean nations that will compete. The Bahamas is scheduled to begin the tournament against the United States on the open ing day, Monday July 5 and are set to face Canada on Tuesday. Dynasty Star s contin ue their undef eated str eak Double duties for Knowles today More than 20 new national records set at swim meet 38th RBC National Swimming Championships was one of the most populated events in BSF history Vanderpool-Wallace

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n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net and NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor TOUR/excursion providers and Bay Street retailers yester-day gave a mixed reaction to the Government’s amesnd ments to the Cruise Overnight Incentive Act, with some chal lenging the Government to explain how the deal reached with Carnival would benefit Bahamian businesses and their employees. Although many were waiting to obtain copies of the actual amendments to the Act, one tour operator, speaking on con dition of anonymity, told Tri bune Business it would be “a piece of cake” for the cruise lines, especially Carnival and Royal Caribbean, to reach the various thresholds where the passenger departure tax rebates kicked in. Concern was also expressed that by designating the cruise lines’ private islands Coco Cay, Half Moon Cay, Castaway Cay and Great Stirrup Cay as ‘designated ports’, the Government was effectively giving the lines ‘carte blanche’ to call their either exclusively or first, bypassing Nassau and Freeport as the prime ports of call. This, of course, would mean fewer benefits for Bahamian busi n esses reliant on the cruise industry. With passengers landing on the private islands still count ing towards departure tax head counts, one sour said: “In effect, it gives them [the cruise lines]t he ability to use Nassau as a n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net A PARADISE Island water sports operator fears his business will be hampered by closure of the lone boat ramp at Arawak Cay, he told Tribune Business yesterday, as con struction on the new container port has moved the Govern ment to restrict access to the area. Reno Deveaux said he was forced to break through the barrier that restricted access to the ramp yesterday in order to launch his boats and jet skis, which he and his team then ride to the northern side of Paradise Island, where they rent the equipment to tourists and Bahamians. During the Chamber of Commerce’s Meet the Ministers forum last Thursday, Mr Deveaux voiced his concern about the possible closure of the ramp to Minister of Public Works, Neko Grant. Mr Grant replied that boat ramps did not fall under his Ministry, and suggested that Mr Deveaux speak to Minister of the Environment, Earl Deveaux, who was also scheduled to speak at the forum. Mr Grant, however, reassured Mr Deveaux that if the Government decided to close any ramps, operators would be alerted and informed of alternative ramp locations. According to Mr Deveaux, he was surprised to see the only ramp that could easily accom modate his two 20-foot boats closed yesterday, with no notice from government on alternative locations. He suggested that no other ramps along Bay Street are fit for launching boats. The Goodman’s Bay ramp, n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A company ultimately controlled by Sir Jack Hayward is suing his son for $229,760 in alleged unpaid rent that his three Port Lucaya Marketplace businesses have built up over an eight-month period, Rick Hayward telling Tribune Business his “main priority” was his 75 staff, whose $15,000 weekly wage bill he paid last week from his own pocket. Bourbon Street Ltd, the Port Group Ltd subsidiary that owns the Port Lucaya Marketplace, filed a writ and statement of claim against Rick Hayward’s LDV Ltd, the holding firm for his three businesses the Pub at Port Lucaya, La Dolce Vita and East Restaurant on Thursday, June 25, the same day he and his staff were locked out from all three premises. In its statement of claim, Bourbon Street Ltd is demanding that Mr Hayward’s LDV Ltd, of which he is the 75 per cent majority owner, pay the outstanding $229,760 outstanding rent, plus mesne profits of $28,720 per month from July 1, 2009. Interest and costs are also being sought. Mesne profits are a charge, usually identical to the monthly lease payment, which are sought by landlords from tenants when they have the right to immediate occupation of their property. Bourbon Street alleged that on April 1, 2004, it had entered into a lease agreement with Mr Hayward and LDV Ltd for units 1,2,3 and 10 in Building 12 at the Port Lucaya Marketplace, where the Pub at Port Lucaya and La Dolce Vita now sit. Then, on December 1, 2007, the two sides entered into another commercial rental lease agreement for Unit 11 in Building 12 at the Port Lucaya Marketplace, the home of East Restaurant. “That at all material times, the plaintiff [Bourbon Street] was in discussion with the defendant through its president, Rick Hayward, who acted as the lawful agent of the defendant to bind the defendant to such agreements,” the statement of claim, drafted by attorneys Davis & Co, alleged. “The terms of both agreements were memoralised in writing in two documents titled ‘Lease Agreement’ dated April 1, 2004, and December 1, 2007, respectively. However, the same were never formally executed by the defendant.” Bourbon Street Ltd alleged that the April 2004 lease for the Pub at Port Lucaya and La Dolce Vita was for a fiven By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor AN EX-Grand Bahama Chamber of Commerce president yesterday backed the Comptroller's move to "return the Customs Department to a Department of written law" over the C19 10-day bond's use, but urged that it improve import clearance efficiency so that companies "use the front door and not the back". Chris Lowe, who is also oper ations manager at Kelly's (Freeport ness that his firm had frequent-l y been offered use of the 10day bond by Customs officials in the past whenever it complained about delays in clearing its shipments, but declined because to use it would not be in accordance with the law. U nder the Customs Management Act, the C19 is only sup posed to be used for perish ables, gold, bullion and currency, enabling them to be cleared and collected by those the deliveries are intended for prior to Customs duty/Excise Tax pay ments being received and the entries logged. Mr Lowe said that because Kelly's (Freeport perishables, it was thus pre-v ented by law from using the C19 10-day bond. He added that he was also convinced the Government had lost due revenues because of C19 bond abuse "in a great number of cases". Agreeing with Customs Comptroller Glen Gomez that the C19 had been used improperly to enable firms and import/customs brokers to col lect all manner of goods from t he dock prior to payment, Mr Lowe said: "I think it's laudable that the Comptroller is trying to return the Customs Department to a department of written Ex-Chamber chief backs Comptroller * Kelly’s (Freeport * Agrees government has lost revenue, but urges Customs to improve import entry checking, processing and clearing efficiency to ensure firm use ‘front door, not the back door’ C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, JULY1, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report. $3.97 $4.30 $4.25 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B Sir Jack’s company sues son for $230k Water sports operator concerned over closure of lone boat ramp R ICK HAYWARD Questions on cruise deal benefits for Bahamians S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BAHAMIANS working in the financial services industry saw an average 6.2 per cent increase in take-home pay during 2008 despite a slight decline in expatriate employees’ salaries, it was revealed yesterday, as the industry bucked the recessionary trend with a modest expansion in its economic contribution. The Central Bank of the Bahamas’ annual survey on the financial services industry’s 2008 contribution to the Bahamian economy disclosed that including bonuses, the average compensation for sector employees last year increased by 5.3 per cent to $57,839, driven largely by a 6.2 per cent rise in Bahamian earnings. Expatriate employees, on the other hand, experienced a 0.6 per cent decline in all earnings including bonuses. The Central Bank survey found that stripping out bonuses, the Bahamian financial industry’s average base salary rose by 4.6 per cent to $50,488 in 2008, well ahead of the previous year’s 0.7 per cent increase and above the 1.1 per cent average rise enjoyed between 2003-2007. The survey again highlighted the financial services industry’s importance to the Bahamian economy, especially in terms of providing top-end, highsalaried jobs. The sector was e stimated to have paid out $521 million in total salaries, including bonuses, during 2008, a 7.6 p er cent increase upon the previous year’s $484.4 million total. Those salaries generate a rela tively high disposable income level for Bahamian financial services employees, which in turn translates into a purchasing and spending power that creates jobs and business in other industries, in addition to boosting the velocity of money circulation in this economy. Meanwhile, the Central Bank survey said that the average base salary for expatriate workers in top level management positions rose by 7.1 per cent to $115,591, with Bahamian salaries increasing by a corresponding 4.2 per cent to $ 46.012. “Despite the adverse domestic and international developm ents, which particularly impacted the Bahamas’ financial sector during the latter half o f 2008, indications are that the sector, which accounts for at least 15 per cent of gross domestic product (GDP recorded an increased contribution to the economy in 2008,” the Central Bank survey found. Government revenues derived from bank, trust company, insurance firm and Inter national Business Company (IBC per cent to $33.2 million, com pared to $26.5 million the year before. This was largely due to an increase in IBC licence fees from $15.2 million in 2007 to $21.3 million in 2008. Add in $1.5 million and $0.1 million in investment fund and financial and corporate services provider licence fees respec tively, and the total $34.8 mil lion in licensing fees received by the Government during 2008 was a 23.8 per cent increase ont he previous year’s $28.1 million. However, government reve nues from Stamp Tax on transactions including mort gages, insurance premium tax, instruments and bonds and other banking transactions, declined by 22.2 per cent to $84.3 million, compared to $108.3 million in 2007. This was largely due to an almost 50 per cent decline in Stamp Tax generated by mortgage transactions, which fell from $42.4 million to $21.3 million, further evidence of the recession’s impact on house b uyer demand and the ability of borrower’s to qualify for a loan. The Central Bank survey f ound that during 2008 bank and trust company assets under administration in the so-called o ffshore sector advanced by 24 per cent or $97 billion to an industry-wide total of $503 billion, largely due to capital outflows from the US as investors sought a safe haven following the September Wall Street meltdown. The Central Bank added: “This corresponded to an observed international pattern benefiting Caribbean financial centres during 2008, as resources flowed out of the US credit markets.” However, a decline in deposits and lowered portfolio valuations on capital market investments, due to the stock market crash, led to a decline in fiduciary assets under management in the Bahamian offshore sector. Total assets in the Bahamian domestic commercial banking sector rose by $697.5 million or8 .3 per cent to $9.1 billion, down from an 8.9 per cent growth in 2007. Yet bad debtp rovisions, as the economic climate worsened and borrowers defaulted on their loans, saw the commercial banking sector’s total profits contract by 10.4 per cent or $32.1 million to $275.3 million. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Financial sector workers see 6.2% rise in incomes Offshore sector’s assets rise $97bn to $503bn due to impact from US capital outflows

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n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A FORMER Bahamas-based hedge fund has paid $17 million t o settle a Securities & E xchange Commission (SEC lawsuit that accused it and its UK-based investment adviser of earning $198 million in “illicit profits from its late trading and d eceptive market timing” of US mutual fund shares. The Headstart Fund, which was described as “defunct” after being incorporated in the Bahamas in 2001 “as an openended company with limited liab ility”, was said in a release i ssued by its investment adviser to have paid $17 million to settle t he case. At its peak, the fund h ad $500 million in assets under management. The statement, issued by its i nvestment adviser, Headstart Advisers, and the firm’s chief investment officer, Najy Nasse r, both of whom were also charged by the SEC, said Headstart had ceased its involvement i n market timing in 2003, so that it could focus on other trading s trategies . Without admitting or denying the allegations” made by the SEC, Headstart Advisers and Mr Nasser had both joined thef ormer Bahamian investment fund in reaching a settlement, paying $200,000 and $600,000r espectively. Mr Nasser said: “Headstart is v ery pleased to have reached a settlement. We responded to US concerns about market timing and immediately ceased this element of Headstart’s business in September 2003. “We have since worked hard to build up Headstart’s funds using different strategies. As we equalled or bettered our overall returns against our benchmark, w e are especially pleased with w hat we have achieved.” The original SEC lawsuit, filed against the Bahamian hedge fund and its mastermindso n April 10 last year, alleged that the Headstart Fund had engaged in late trading and mar-k et timing of US mutual fund shares between September 1998 a nd September 2003 a fiveyear period. The SEC had alleged the scheme was carried out through the Headstart Fund’s accounts at two US-based broker/dealers, with the fund and its advisers placing orders to buy, redeem or trade mutual fund shares after the 4pm eastern coast market close. T his ‘late trading’ practice e nabled the fund to exploit the market close by obtaining the pre-closing price for mutual fund shares, their net asset value( NAV). It could then exploit events occurring after 4pm, which were not reflected in thep rice it paid for the shares to benefit at the expense of other s hareholders. To avoid detection of its market timing practices, the SEC alleged that Headstart Advisers “opened numerous accounts” for the Bahamian investment fund at different US broker/dealers and split its trades between different accounts, so that the transaction threshold would be concealed. “Headstart Adviser, Nasser and the Headstart Fund benefited from this late trading and deceptive market timing at the expense of other shareholdersi n the US mutual funds,” the SEC alleged in its 2008 lawsuit. “Headstart Fund earned illicit profits of approximately $198 million from its late trading and deceptive market timing of USm utual funds. law, and return us to the rules. "It's unfortunate, as a new Comptroller, that he's forced to try and restore the rule of law to the functioning of Bahamas Customs." He added of the reinforced C19 processes: "It is going to have an impact, because all ands undry have become used to using the processes that were made available to them, but at the same time I hope there is a great move towards efficiency in merchants and importers being able to use the front doore xpeditiously, rather than the back door. That's what I want to see." While it was good that the Comptroller was bringing the Customs Department and its processes back in line with theC ustoms Management Act, Mr Lowe said the department needed to enhance efficiency in entry checking and processing to expedite the clearance of import shipments. For example, Mr Lowe said that instead of one cashier, Cus toms needed six to collect due revenues efficiently. 'They need more people in the entry checking and processing line in order to expedite, and not impede, trade, which could thereby impede the Treasury's rev enue," he explained. "At the same time, I hope there will be a return to the written law internally at Bahamas Customs as well as on the written interaction side. It will be no good telling us to toe the line if they are not doing the same inside. There will be hell to pay." Confirming that Kelly's (Freeport the C19, Mr Lowe told Tribune Business: "We were offered it. Every time we complained about delays in entries at the front end, we were offered the 10-day bond. But we refused its offer because we do not deal in perishables. "I want the front door to work expeditiously, not the back door. I want our stuff cleared faster than six days." Bahamian businesses had last week told Tribune Business that they feared consumer prices would increase as a result of the C19 changes, due to the increased costs of holding extra inventory to counter the likeli hood that product shipments would be delayed in clearing the dock. They also expressed concern over cash flow issues, as com-p anies would now be required to pay taxes and duties on all imports up front, instead of after a portion of them may have been sold. Glen Gomez, Comptroller of Customs, told Tribune Businessl ast week that this latest enforcement measure was designed to prevent “abuse” of the C19, which had seen it used as a ‘catch-all’ for all manner of goods to be removed from the docks without due taxesb eing paid. This, he added, had allowed many businesses and individual residents to ultimately evade paying their taxes because they never returned to pay due Customs duties and Stamp Tax post-delivery. Mr Gomez told Tribune Busi ness last week: “The C19 is now being utilised in the manner for which it was designed by law, for perishables, gold, bullion and coins. “They’ve been abusing that form, and now that abuse has been stopped. They have been clearing motor cars, furniture and heaven knows what else on that form. Why should I allow you to abuse that form, taked elivery of goods and not pay?” Mr Gomez said the vast majority of items outstanding before Customs, many of which dated back several years, related to C19 form declarations. “You can’t have your cake ande at it too,” he added. The Comptroller added that there were so many outstanding items that Customs had not placed a dollar value on what it was owed, but he described the sum as “substantial”. A nd he questioned why Bahamian companies and importers, knowing a shipment of product was coming in, did not pay the Customs duties and Excise Tax up front if they did not want to have a wait for clearance and submission of entries. “There’s a provision in law to pay for goods before they arrive, but no one wants to do it. “Everyone wants to get a freebie, and the Government has to bear the costs of having those goods come in and people do not come back to pay,” Mr Gomez said. “There’s just too many loop holes in Customs, and it’s time to bring the loopholes to a stop.W hether internally or externally, we have to address these issues.” Mr Gomez said Customs was trying to improve its clearance times, adding: “We’re trying to turnaround shipments in 24h ours. Only shipments with 15 pages or more might take 24 hours to check." C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009, PAGE 3B Bahamas fund’s $17m settlement with SEC Former Bahamian domiciled hedge fund with $500m in assets under management settles US lawsuit that accused it of gaining $198m in ‘illicit profits’ Ex-Chamber chief backs Comptroller

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year period with an option to renew for five years, and a monthly rental payment of $20,000. The East Restaurant lease was for one year and four months, with a five-year renewal option, and an $8,720 monthly rent required. Interest at 1.5 per cent per month could be levied on any rental arrears under either lease. Both lease agreements were f orwarded to the defendant for e xecution. However, the same were never executed and returned to the plaintiff,” Bourbon Street alleged. “Despite the leases not being executed, the defendant took possession of the units in accordance with the terms of the unexecuted leases and began m aking monthly payments to t he plaintiff in accordance with t he unexecuted lease and, to date, remains in occupation of the units.” The Port Group Ltd subsidiary added: “The defendant has failed to pay the monthly rent in accordance with the agreement, and as of today’s date the defendant is eight m onths in arrears of rent in r espect to units 1, 2, 3, 10 and 1 1, and as such is indebted to the plaintiff in the sum of $229,760 for the period of September 1, 2008, to June 1, 2009.” Bourbon Street further claimed that Mr Hayward’s company had failed to pay despite receiving a “formal demand letter” from it on April 2 9, 2009. M r Hayward yesterday said h is attorney, David Thompson, and other advisers were assessing the writ and statement of claim to determine how they would respond, but it was likely that a defence would be filed. Sir Jack’s son confirmed that he and the 75-strong staff were still locked out of the three restaurants, which was costing the businesses between $5,000$10,000 in revenue per day between them. He added that he had met the staff’s $15,000 weekly payroll last week from his own resources, as he was unable to access the company cheque books due to the lock-out. Suggesting that the writ was designed to prevent any possibility of the arbitration he had called for, Mr Hayward said he had only heard about its existence on Monday morning this week and obtained a copy at 1pm the same day, four days after its filing with the Supreme Court registry. “My priority is the 75 employees,” Mr Hayward told T ribune Business. “It’s unnecessary that these 75 people be out of a job. It’s absolutely ridiculous.” H e again reiterated that he c ould easily pay the $230,000 r ent outstanding and wanted to do so, but “promises have not been kept. I had hoped to get their attention and did, but in a very unfair way that is not sensible given the economic situation’”. Adding that it had taken four years before La Dolce Vita produced a return on investment, Mr Hayward also complained that Port Lucaya Marketplace tenants had no say over how service charges levied upon them were spent. Mr Hayward last week said he had been waiting for the GBPA and Port Group Ltd to explain why the monthly rent at the former two restaurants had been increased from $10,000 per month five years ago to $21,000 per month. That amounts to a 110 per cent increase, with the three restaurants paying a collective $360,000 in rent per annum. Sir Jack’s son said the lease for East, a smaller property, was $8,700 per month. Since 1982, he estimated that his interests h ad paid between $3.5-$4 mill ion in rent at Port Lucaya Mark etplace, and he was not being charged $42.50 per square foot every month. Mr Hayward said his businesses in the Port Lucaya Marketplace lost some $400,000 last year, a figure that did not include the $300,000 severance pay. He added that he had also invested between $650,000$700,000 in East, and was unlikely “to get that back.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.841.28Abaco Markets1.391.390.000.1270.00010.90.00% 11.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.436.94Bank of Bahamas6.946.940.000.2440.26028.43.75% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.603.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2 .372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.2010.18Cable Bahamas11.3911.390.001.4060.2508.12.19% 2.902.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.005410.2490.04011.01.46% 7.505.50Commonwealth Bank (S15.645.640.000.4190.36013.56.38% 4.781.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.323.06-0.260.1110.05227.61.70% 2 .951.32Doctor's Hospital1.771.770.000.2400.0807.44.52% 8.207.50Famguard7.767.760.000.4200.30018.53.87% 12.5010.00Finco10.9710.970.000.3220.52034.14.74% 11.7910.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.3810.380.000.7940.35013.13.37% 5.554.95Focol (S5.095.090.000.3320.15015.32.95% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9.025.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.0010.50J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.37871.3124CFAL Bond Fund1.37871.874.83 3.03512.8988CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.8988-1.40-3.35 1.47301.3940CFAL Money Market Fund1.47302.745.66 3.60903.1821Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.18216.01-13.90 12.920912.2702Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.92092.405.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.5448-0.020.54 100.000093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund93.1992-3.33-6.76 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.56119.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.25111.724.12 1.05781.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.05782.135.78 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0271-0.572.71 1.05541.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.05541.745.54 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L L L L : : C C O O L L I I N N A A 2 24 4 2 2 5 5 0 0 2 2 7 70 0 1 1 0 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L LF F I I D D E E L LI I T T Y Y 2 24 4 2 23 35 5 6 6 7 7 7 7 6 6 4 4 | | F FG G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K KE E T T S S 2 2 4 4 2 23 3 9 9 6 64 40 0 0 00 0 | | C C O O L L O ON N I I A A L L 2 24 4 2 2 -5 50 02 2 7 7 5 5 2 2 5 5FINDEX: CLOSE 789.53 | YTD -5.43% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSMONDAY, 29 JUNE 2009B ISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,579.12 | CHG -0.27 | %CHG -0.02 | YTD -133.24 | YTD % -7.78BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 31-May-09 31-Mar-09 31-Dec-07 30-Apr-09 31-May-09 31-May-09 W W W WW W . .B B I I S S X X B B A A H H A A M M A A S S . .C C O O M M | | T T E E L L E E P P H HO ON N E E : :2 2 4 4 2 2 -3 32 2 3 3 -2 23 3 3 3 0 0 | | F F A A C C S S I I M M I I L L E E : : 2 2 4 42 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 -2 23 3 2 2 0 0NAV Date 31-May-09 19-Jun-09 30-Apr-09 31-May-09 31-Mar-09 31-May-09 3URSRVHGRGLFDWLRQWR$LUSRUW )HHVDQG&KDUJHVRWLFH 7KH1DVVDX$LUSRUW'HYHORSPHQW&RPSDQ\LV SURSRVLQJPRGLFDWLRQRI)HHVDQG&KDU HIIHFWLYHSXUVXDQWWRDUWLFOHRI WKH$LUSRUW$XWKRULW\DQG&KDUJHVf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ir Jack’s company sues son for $230k F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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he said, was not an actual ramp at all and operators who launch there are forced to lift their jet skis some 30 feet to a waiting trailer. According to him, the ramp a djacent to Brown’s Boat Bas i n’s shipyard on East Bay Street has no parking, is often too shallow to launch boats, and can cause traffic congestion while operators are dropping their equipment in the water. Mr Deveaux said his compa n y launched its jet skis and boats from the Montague ramp some time ago, but were discouraged from doing so by authorities because of the traffic congestion the trucks caused while dropping equipment in the water. And now, according to Mr Deveaux, that ramp has worsened over the years, having lost some of its concrete at the end, leaving a steep drop-off into the water. Using He also said that using the Montague ramp would add oneand-a-half hours to his loading and off-load time. "That would mean if we leave the island at 6pm we won't leave Montague until 9pm," said Mr Deveaux. According to him, any ramp farther than Montague or Arawak Cay would mean using more fuel to move the boats and jet skis to Paradise Island. "I already spend $200 per day on fuel," he said. Mr Deveaux said the Government has not built a new ramp in more than 30 years, despite the constant collection of licensing fees and other miscellaneous costs associated with running a water sports business. “I pay $12,000 in fees per year,” he said. “They can at least build a ramp.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009, PAGE 5B Questions on cruise deal benefits for Bahamians second port of call without committing to any financial obligations in Nassau. “It’s everything they want. They have the right, technically, not to do business in Nassau.” Describing the 350,000 ‘overnight’ passenger in Nassau target per cruise line, per annum one condition that must be fulfilled for the departure tax rebate tpo kick-in as “extremely low”, the source said: “The Government of the Bahamas, three weeks after debating its Budget and complaining about the shortfalls, does not have the courtesy to rationalise the benefits for the Bahamas from the amend ments, but instead rationalises the benefits it’s giving away to the cruise lines.” Another tour operator, speaking on condition of anonymity, told Tribune Business: “On the surface, it doesn’t look good. It’s absolutely amazing.” It is understood that consultation on the Cruise Overnight Incentive Act amendments and the talks with Carnival was minimal to nonexistent. The amendments create a three-tier passenger tax rebate structure for the second to sixth years of a six-year agreement. The rebate will be $8.50 per head for passenger numbers between 800,000 to one million, and $10 per head for numbers above one million. That will be in addition to the $15 per head rebate offered to the cruise lines for passengers between zero to 800,000. Meanwhilke, Charles Klonaris, co-chair of the Downtown Nassau Partnership and the the Nassau Tourism and Development Board’s chairman, said the Government had done a good thing by encouraging the major cruise lines to increase their passenger delivery. Yet he questioned whether those passengers would be discouraged from gambling, shopping and dining onboard the ship while in port. It is hoped that the tax rebates offered to the cruise lines would translate into more passengers, which would mean more onshore spending. However, some individuals are not convinced that would be reality. Under the amended Act, cruise lines must remain docked in a designated or approved port for at least 13 hours between 11am and midnight at a minimum. Manager at the Bambu Nightclub, Dino Berdanis, said he was not convinced that the Government’s incentive plan will mean much for Bay Street merchants. According to him, designating five new ports under the Act, four of which belong to the cruise lines, does nothing to encourage visitor spending downtown. Mr Berdanis said those ships which encounter unfavourable weather while en route to their private islands often come into Nassau Harbour ahead of schedule. However, he argued boat loads of them can be seen bypassing Bay Street for a ferry ride over to Atlantis. Mr Berdanis contended that there is nothing to lure the surplus of passengers that the port of Nassau is expecting to the downtown area. “There is nothing for them to do,” he said. Water sports operator concerned over closure of lone boat ramp T o adver tise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in cir culation, just call 502-2371 today! F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Share your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays

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n B y JOE McDONALD AP Business Writer B EIJING (AP reversal, China’s government g ave in to domestic and intern ational pressure and backed d own Tuesday from a rule that w ould have required personal c omputers sold in the country to h ave Internet-filtering software. J ust hours before the rule was t o have taken effect, the gove rnment said it would postpone t he requirement for the “Green D am” software. The Ministry o f Industry and Information T echnology said it made the decision partly because someP C markets were having diffic ulty meeting the deadline. It did not say whether the planm ight be revived. T he change of course averted a possible scuffle with Washi ngton. Top US officials had protested the plan after it was imposed abruptly in May, calling it a barrier to trade. Angry Web users circulated online petitions protesting Green Dam, while industry groups warned the software might create computer security problems. The controversy reflected the conflict between the communist government’s desire to control information and China’s high-tech ambitions. The country has an increasingly informed, vocal public and tighter links to companies that create urgently needed jobs and tax revenue. The decision was a “victory for China’s civil society,” said Li Fangping, a Beijing lawyer who had demanded a public hearing on the plan. “Many citizens worked together and voiced their opposition to the forced installation of this filtering software and forced the government to at least think more deeply about it,” Li said. “We hope now that they will go ahead and completely drop this order.” News of the announcement spread in China quickly via Twitter and the Chinese miniblogging site Fanfou. Some bloggers said they expect the government to look for a way to carry out Green Dam that attracts less attention. “They are using the word ‘delay,’ instead of saying they stopped the plan,” said Wen Yunchao, a Chinese blogger who has been among the most vocal critics of Green Dam. “I think that it’s possible that at some point in the future the government could still enforce their policy and install software on personal computers that filters the information people are able to look at. So, I am calling this an intermediary victory.” China’s communist government encourages Internet use for education and business, and the country has the biggest population of Web users, with more than 298 million. But authorities try to block access to material deemed obscene or subversive, and Beijing operates the world’s most sweeping system of Internet filtering. US companies such as Yahoo Inc., Microsoft Corp. and Google Inc. have cooperated in way or another with government requests to tamp down criticism. The Green Dam software would raise China’s controls to a new level by putting a filter inside each PC. Chinese authorities said it would be needed to shield children from violent and obscene material online. Analysts who have reviewed the programme say it also contains code to filter material the government considers politically objectionable. Separately, a California company claimed that Green Dam contained stolen programming code. Chinese Web surfers ridiculed Green Dam by saying it would block access to photos of animals and other innocuouss ubjects. State media reported extensively on the complaints, a rare move. Chinese media usu a lly uncritically support government policy. Green Dam already is in use i n Internet cafes in China and has been installed since the start o f this year in PCs sold under a g overnment programme that subsidizes appliance sales in the c ountryside. L arge PC makers such as T oshiba Corp. and Taiwan’s A cer Inc. said they were ready t o provide Green Dam on disks b eginning Wednesday. Indust ry leaders Hewlett-Packard Co. a nd Dell Inc. had declined to d iscuss their plans, possibly w aiting for a diplomatic settle m ent. D ell spokesman Jess Black b urn said the PC maker is hap p y with the Green Dam delay. He would not say what Dell hadd one to prepare for China’s d eadline. “We respect the Chinese gov ernment’s stated goal of protecting children by filtering access to pornography through the Internet,” Blackburn said in a statement. Representatives from USbased technology groups, including the Information Technology Industry Council and the Software & Information Industry Association, were in Beijing trying to stop Green Dam. “We welcome the delay in implementation of the Green Dam mandate, and we look forward to working closely with the US government to find mar ket-based solutions that enable consumer choice and protect children on the Internet,” said John Neuffer, vice president for global policy at the Information Technology Industry Council, which represents companies including Dell, Hewlett-Packard Co. and Apple Inc. The Green Dam initiative coincided with a tightening of government controls on Internet use. Last week, China’s Health Ministry ordered healthrelated Web sites that carry research on sexually oriented topics to allow access only to medical professionals. Also last week, the government issued new rules on “vir tual currency” used by some game Web sites, saying it cannot be used to purchase real goods. On Green Dam, the industry ministry sounded a conciliatory note. It promised to “solicit opinions from all parties” in an effort to improve its work. “I think the cost of the move from trade friction and generally a public relations black eye was becoming pretty clear to the government,” said Duncan Clark, chairman of BDA China Ltd., a Beijing research firm. Postponing the filtering rule “gets them out of the scrutiny of the international media and business.” Associated Press Writer Alexa Olesen and Associated Press researcher Bonnie Cao in Beijing and AP Technology Writer Jessica Mintz in Seattle contributed to this report C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE BAHAMASWASTELIMITEDUnaudited FinancialStatements T hreemonthsended March 31,2009 March 31 200 9 December31 200 8 A ssets Currentassets Cash $ 205,216 $160,456 Accountsreceivable,net 1,471,267 1,496,303 Inventories 364,198 304,064 P repaidexpensesandotherreceivables 1 74,609 7 7,835 Deposits 12,900 12,900 Tota lcurrentassets 2, 228,190 2,051,558 Non c urrent a ssets I nvestment i nassociate(note6 ) 1 43,248 1 43,248 Property,plantande quipment,net 7,393,558 7,391,968 T otalnon c urrentassets 7 ,536,806 7 ,535,216 Totalassets $ 9,764,996 $ 9, 586,774 L iabilitiesandshareholdersequity Liabilities Currentliabilities Bankoverdraft $ $ 17,802 Accountspayableandaccruedliabilities 407,946 397,783 Current portionofnotepayable(note5 ) 100,116 9 8,384 Total current liabilities 508,062 513,969 Non currentliabilities S ecuritydeposits 4 09,921 4 07,889 N otepayable(note5 ) 2 29,252 2 5 4 , 940 Totalnon currentliabilities 639,173 662,829 T otalliabilities 1 , 1 47,235 1 ,176,798 Shareholder equity Sharecapital 42,000 42,000 C ontributedsurplus 2 ,752,113 2 ,752,113 Retainedearnings 5, 823,648 5,615,863 Totalshareholdersequity 8, 617,761 8,409,976 Totalliabilitiesandshareholdersequity $ 9,764,996 $ 9,586,774 Threemonthsended March31 2009 2008 Income Salesandservicesrendered $1 , 931,24 7 $ 2,012,583 Costofsalesanddirectexpenses 1,2 33,875 1,301,507 Grossprofit 697,372 711,076 Expenses Operatingexpenses 48 2,566 475,350 I nterestand bank charges (note5) 7 ,021 7 ,257 Totaloperatingexpenses 4 89,587 482,607 Neti ncome 207,785 228,469 Retainedearningsatbeginningofyear 5,615,863 5,287,237 Retainedearningsatendoftheyear $ 5,823,648 $ 5,515,706 Earningspershare $ 0. 0 5 $0.05 BahamasWasteLimited BahamasWasteLimited NotestoUnauditedCondensedInterimFinancialStatements March31,2009 CondensedStatementsofCashFlows(unaudited) Threemonthsended M arch31 2009 2008 Cashflowsfromo peratingactivities N etincome $ 2 07, 7 85 $ 228,469 Adjustmentsforitemsnotinvolvinguseofcash: Baddebtexpense 12,438 301,898 D epreciation 2 94,657 514,880 530,367 Changeinnon cashworkingcapitalitems: De creaseinaccountsreceivable 12,598 (181,057) Inc rease i ninventories ( 60,1 3 4 ) (20,669) Increaseinprepaidexpensesandotherassets ( 9 6,774 ) I ncreaseinaccountspayableandaccrued l iabilities 10,163 27,369 Increaseins ecuritydeposits 2,032 15,792 Netcashflowprovid edbyoperatingactivities 382,765 371,802 Cashflowsfrominvestingactivities Purchasesofproperty,plantandequipment (296,247 ) (142,405 ) Investmentsinassociate (50,000) Netcashflowusedforinvestingactivities ( 296,247 ) (192,405) Cashflowsfromfinancingactivities PaymentofNotePayable (28,965 ) N etcashflowusedforfinancingactivities ( 28 , 956) Netchangeincash 62,562 179,397 Cashpositionatbeginningofthe period 142,654 (191,960) Cashpositionatendof the period $ 205,216 $(12,563) Cashrepresentedby: Cash $205,216 $3,061 B ankoverdrafts ( 15,624) $205,216 $(12,653) Seeaccompanying notesto unaudited condensed interimfinancialstatements. 1.CorporateInformation BahamasWasteLimited(BWL)wasincorporatedunderthelawsoftheCommonwealthofThe BahamasonAugust18,1987underthenameofBahamasWasteSystemsLimited.OnDecember 7,1999,theCompanychangeditsnametoBahamasWasteLimited.TheCompanyisengagedin thebusinessofsolidandmedicalwastecollectionanddisposal,includingthesale,installation, rentalandmaintenanceofwastecompactorsandcontainers.TheCompanyhaspubliclytraded shareswhich areregisteredontheBahamasInternationalStockExchange.Thelatestaudited accountsoftheBWLwerepreparedonDecember31,2008. ThequarterendsofBWLfallonMarch31,June30andSeptember30,withtheyearendofthe CompanybeingDecember31. Thecondensed interimfinancialstatementsforthethreemonthsendedMarch31,2009were authorizedforissuancebytheBoardofDirectorson June29,2009. 2.SummaryofSignificantAccountingPolicies Basisofpreparation T hesecondensedinterimfinancialstatementsforthethreemonthsendedMarch31,3009havebeen preparedinaccordancewithInternationalAccountingStandard34InterimFinancialReporting. T hecondensedinterimfinancialstatementsdonotincludealloftheinformation anddisclosures requiredintheannualfinancialstatements,andshouldbereadinconjunctionwiththeDecember 31,2008auditedfinancialstatements. Theaccounting policiesadopted in thepreparationoftheinterimcondensedfinancialstatementsare consistentwiththosefollowedinthepreparationoftheCompanysannualfinancialstatementsfor theyearendedDecember31,2008,exceptfortheadoptionofcertainnewstandards,interpretations a ndamendmentstoexistingstandardsthathavebeenpublishedthataremandatoryforthe Company’saccountingperiodsbeginningonorafterJanuary1,2009orlaterperiods,notedbelow. A doptionoftheseStandardsandInterpretationsdid nothaveanyeffectonthefinancialpositionor performanceoftheCompany. IFRS2ShareBased Payments(Revised) IFRS3 BusinessCombinations(Revised) IFRS8 Operating Segments IAS23 Borrowing Costs(Revised) IAS27 Consolidated and SeparateFinancialStatements(Revised) IFRIC15 AgreementsfortheConstruction ofRealEstate IFRIC16 HedgesofaNetInvestmentin Foreign Operation IFRIC17 DistributionsofNon-Cash Assetsto Owners IFRIC18 TransfersofAssetsfromCustomers 3.EarningsPerShare Earningspersharewerecalculatedbasedonthesharesoutstandingattheendoftheperiod,which approximatedaveragesharesoutstandingduringtheperiod. 2009 2008 SharesoutstandingatMarch31 4,200,000 4,200,000 4.RelatedPartyTransactions Duringthequarter,BWLenteredintotransactionswithrelatedparties.Alltransactionswere conductedatarmslengthandnosignificantobligationstotherelatedpartiesexisted atMarch31, 2009. BahamasWasteLimited NotestoUnauditedCondensedInterimFinancialStatements March31,2009 5.NotePayable OnJune1,2008,theCompanyenteredinagreementtopurchasepropertyadjacenttoitsexisting locationfor$500,000.Pursuanttothatagreement,theCompanyhaspaidthevendor$100,000and enteredinto a$400,000promissorynoteagreementwithDavandonHoldingsLimited.Thetermof thenoteisfiveyearswithaninterestrateof7%perannum.TheprincipalsofDavandonHoldings LimitedarealsothemajorityshareholdersoftheCompany. 6.CommitmentsandContingencies TheCompanyguaranteesitscompactorsfora60-dayperiodfromthedateofpurchase.The Companyisreimbursedbythemanufacturerforany claimspaidundersuchguarantees. BahamasWasteLimited C ondensedBalanceSheet(unaudited) BahamasWasteLimited CondensedStatementsof IncomeandRetainedEarnings(unaudited) China backs down from requirement for Web filter I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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Minarda Powell and Kimberly Beneby, owners of CandylandC reations, since 2 006 have been specialising in creating gourmet candy arrangements to satisfy those sugar urges. “We met a few years ago working together doing tourists’ weddings. We were both preg nant with our second children and decided to stay home. When we sat down to think of things to do, candy was something that was on our short list and we decided to go for it. A lot of it was trial and error with the kids and the husbands being ‘guinea pigs’,” Mrs Powell said. Mrs Powell said although they do hard candy, they also take on some old Bahamian favourites. “We have many molds, different flavors and can match the color of the candy with your event. We have island themes such as crabs, fish and pineapples to stuff for baby showers and Christmas molds. We have a lot of children’s characters such as batman for birthday parties. We do a lot of arrangements for Mother’s Day and other special events. We also have four different kinds of fudge and we are always working on finding new ingredients from guava fudge to caramel fudge. We also do coconut cream that we call coconut ice, benny cakes, peanut cakes, and benny cakes with peanuts,” Mrs Powell said. Another favourite clients enjoy besides the candy is the cheesecake. “We do a few cakes such as our butter rum cheese cake with butter rum sauce.I nstead of the traditional rum cake, we have r um cheese cake. We also do the little butter mints as well in a variety of shapes,” Mrs Powell said. As for the bouquets, Mrs Beneby said they did not see a lot of sweet treat bouquets and wanted to present something different to the Bahamian public. “We didn’t want to come out and be just like everybody else-we wanted to give people an option. We went with the candies and we started making the arrangements. Com ing from the wedding background, we had seen all the floral stuff and all the things you can do so we wanted another option that you can give people that gave the same pop, but it was a different way of displaying it. Flowers die but the candies last for weeksyou can eat your bouquet,” Mrs Beneby said. Looking into the future of candy, Mrs Powell said she hopes the business can be something her children can carry on. “This gives Kim and me a chance to be what we are first and foremost-mothers and wives and to do the work that we have to do for our husbands and to be there for our kids. Especially the way the economy is, it is great to have things like this because there will always be weddings and showers and events that people need things for because you still have to enjoy your life. So if we can help someone enjoy their life, then that helps us to come back and enjoy ours,” Mrs Powell said. To find out more about Candyland Creations, email them at candyland@btccybercell.blackber ry.com C M Y K C M Y K TASTE PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE T h e T r i b u n e By ALEX MISSICK T ribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net T AMIN G y our inner c hild from sweet treats is alw a ys a battle. Fortunately, Candyland C reations knows all about your needs and is r eady t o shar e all the sugary goodness t he y ha v e to offer. s T ro LL c an DYL ane take a down By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net NESTLED at the heart of one of the country’s most beautiful destinations, is Harbour Island’s Valentine’s Resort and Marina which features some of the most exciting seaside dish es available in the country. Just a five minute walk down from the island’s dock, is the newly fitted resort that offers both a breathtaking view of the marina and fabulous island food around the clock. Property General Manager Harper Sibley said, since the recent addition of 100 rooms, they have seen a rise in overnight guests who prefer to eat at the resort’s restaurant. He explained: “We are able to provide breakfast, lunch, and dinner seven days a week which is from 7am to 11pm. “We can’t help but to focus on the seafood that we have which comes right off our own dock everyday, we have four fisherman who are out there bringing us groupers, Mahi Mahi, Tunas, Yellow tail Snappers, it’s just fabulous. We have those dishes in our restaurant every night and you can pick what you like, and we’ll cook it up just the way you want.” Although this may sound too good to be true, it most certainly is, at least according to the property’s executive chef who goes by the name Chef Hall. The newly appointed chef said despite his humble beginning, over the years his love for cooking has allowed him to train at some of the finest facilities around the world including the Belmont University, the Marriott, Walt Disney World, Our Lucaya, and The Hotel Training College. Chef Hall described the resort’s food as simply Bahamian with a flair. During the summer months, the kitchen serves lighter dishes that can come in the form of jerk, blackened, sauted, grilled, lemon buttered, and the works. “We have hamburgers, hot dogs, we have grilled cheese and things like that for the kids in the day, because we have families that come over for summer vacation both from the US and Nassau.” For the alternative eaters, he said there are also vegetarian dishes, pastas, and steaks which are all served with fresh ingredients. There are also Key Lime Pies, shortcakes, homemade ice-cream, guava cakes, banana breads, “we just ensure that everything we deliver to our guests is fresh.” Chef Hall said it was indeed a chal lenge acquiring fresh meats to the resort on a daily basis considering most fresh catches were sent to Nassau, but his concern has always been on quality so he refuses to settle for less. “From time to time we may get a guest requesting fresh grouper or conch, and if we don’t have fresh products we don’t make it. If we can’t get the best possible ingredients for all of our dishes, we don’t make them.” Chef Hall said when he makes a dish like macaroni and cheese, his dish is guaranteed to be more scrumptious because he uses no less than six blends of cheese which sets his kitchen apart from the rest. Looking toward the future of the restaurant, Chef Hall said plans are on the table for a dining experience like none other. “We have some things planned that we think and hope are going to be sort of a renaissance approach to the Bahamian dining experience. This includes new food, more fun, and family centered events.” Valentine’s Resort and Marina offers unique experience A savory Grouper Melt with hand cut Cassava fries available at the Valentine’s Resort. WIDE arrangement of candy treats from Candyland Creations. SWEET candy Christmas bouquet. CANDY airplanes.

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“I started studying back in 1998, com ing out of high school. Before that I did back ups for my dad’s band. I decided to become a full fledged artist in 2008. I got the name Mystro from my oldest brother who traveled to Jamaica a lot. Every time he came back, he brought me a lot of the Sum Fest Shows and reggae shows. I would sit down and mimic the artist. I learned the Bass Gui tar as well so my friends really branded the name Mystro as well,” Mystro said. Through his faith in Rastafarism, Mystro said he pushed his music fur ther. “I saw a lot of stuff was going on with the economy and the world. I know a lotof young people are influenced by music and tend to act out what they hear and see on television. It is because of that I am trying to bring a positive message tot ry to fight against all those bad influ ences that they hear in music to let them know the world is not about the showcars and jewelry-it gets real,” Mystro said. As for his music career, Mystro has just released is timely single called Recession.” “Basically with the Recession album, I had heard about the persons in Exuma out of jobs which meant more people out of a job, more people under pressure to pay light bills, water bills, and so on. Couple months back people fromA tlantis lost their jobs which had people falling out and ending up in the hospital. The key line on that track is ‘in this time of recession, don’t let your mind fall in the state of depression.’ Once you loose your mind, you can do anything that you would never think you can do. Right now how the economy has slowed down, every one is saying there is a recession when the money never falls off of the earth. With the recession single, it is just to keep the people encouraged as brothers and sisters. We need to come togethe r and help one another,” Mystro said. M ystro said although he has been netw orking and doing a lot of work including the Reggae All stars concert, Love Fest, and most recently the Sand Trap, he wants to continue to spread his mes sage not just the Bahamas but globally. “To get my music across the world I am taking steps to make that happen along with my manager Supa B. The Bahamian music scene has come a long way although there are things that need to be revamped as far as the artists themselves. The artists have to know their rights and the business side of it. The music business is 90 per cent business and 10 percent talent, but I encourage them to keep pushing what they are doing and don’t quit. The same time you quit is when your breakthrough can come,” Mystro said. To hear live music from Mystro, follow him on Twitter at Mystro242. C M Y K C M Y K TASTE THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009, PAGE 9B T h e T r i b u n e The Tribune’s Things 2 Do c ountdown is taking you back to t he good old days this week. 1 . Nearly 100 years after it was w ritten, Scott Joplin’s opera Treemonisha will debut in The Bahamas at the Dundas Cen-t re for The Performing Arts on July 6. Directed by Bahamian d rama connoisseur Dr Cleveland Williams, Joplin’s three-act opera will be performed by an allB ahamian cast of more than 57 artists commemorating the thirty-sixth anniversary of Bahamiani ndependence. Gala night proceeds will benefit the Sir Victor S assoon Bahamas Heart Foundation, and proceeds from the final night will assist the BahamasN ational Dance company on their upcoming trip to the Aberdeen I nternational Youth Festival in the UK. The story is a realistic look into the life of newly freed slavesi n the American post slavery era. Performances will take place July 6 , 7, 8, and 11 at the Dundas Center for the Performing Arts and tickets are $75 for the galan ight, and $35 on the other nights. 2 . T he Alliance Francaise’s French Cine Club presents the movie Molire , a romant ic comedy about the famous French playwright Moliere. The o pening scene for the film is set during the middle of the renaissance period where Moliere getst he chance to perform before King Louis XIV in France. Moliere then has some tough luck and eventually lands into some financial challenges. He is then throwni nto a debtor's prison but soon regains his freedom when a local businessman decides to pay his debt only to ask of him a small favour. He has to teach the gen-t leman how to act so that he can capture the attention of a recently widowed woman. The twist begin when Moliere happens to fall in love with the businessman’sn eglected wife, and thus the drama begins. The two hour film will be shown on Friday at 6pm at theS G Hambros building West Bay Street at a price of $5 which also includes refreshments. To RSVP, c all 302-5141. 3 . The Junkanoo Summer Fes tival returns to Bay Street this Saturday showcasing traditional Goombay music, live bands, and lots of local food and fun. The all day event which will be hosted every Saturday during the month of July, will also fea ture local crafts, Bahamian literature, and a pineapple eating and onion peeling competition. So come out this Saturday between noon and 10pm to experience traditional life in the islands. 4 . The Bahamas Faith Min istry’s (BFM Center is about to launch its Summer 2009 conference labeled The Assignment, with the theme ‘Living Right In A World Gone Wrong.’ The five day event which starts tonight at the Diplo mat Center features a nightly drama presentation free to all. There will also be various speakers dur ing the day in conferences including BFMs senior pastor Dr Myles Munroe, pastor Dave Bur rows, and Lakita Garth. There will also be performances by local and regional gospel artists like DJ Counsellor, Land Lord, Mr Lynx, and Emrand Henry on Friday. Registration is $15 basic, $35 local, and $75 for international visitors. For tickets contact the church office, or visit www.youthalive1.com for details. 5 . The newly formed Bahamas Arts Collective (BAC hosting a public meeting at the Bahamas National Trust Retreat on Village Road this Thursday at 6pm. The event will introduce BAC as a group which will allow members to share upcoming goals and projects related to local art and culture. Included discussion topics are lobbying, cultural policy, resource sharing, and Carifesta 2010. The meeting starts at 6pm and promises to be an exciting moment in the local art and cul ture movement. things 2 DO By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter a missick@tribunemedia.net AS the Bahamian music scene continues to break down barriers, many artists are continuing to spread a message of success and triu m ph. However, Mystro Miller, a Bahamian Reggae artist said he is ready to spread his messageone filled with consciousness and upliftment. Take it away By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net IN less than a week a play written by famous African American playwright Scott Joplin will debut at Dundas Center For the Performing Arts, connecting Bahamians to an important moment in history. The director of the production Dr Cleveland Williams, said it was an extremely challenging task to bring to life the essence of what this play represents. “With directing an opera or directing a play, you have to be able to bringit to life. You have to get the characters in the opera to basically react to every thing that is happening on stage, and also to interpret the composer’s music and also the librettos. “In my role, I am working on conveying to the cast how important it is to understand what they are doing and how they interact with each other, and also the characters that they play as exslaves and villagers connecting with Treemonisha.” The main characters Treemonisha and Monisha are played by four different actresses and Dr Williams said it was fortunate that he was able to incorporate Candice Bostwick and Lakita Wells-Thompson as Treemonisha. Local actors Portia Barnet and Lillian Bastian will play the role of Mon isha and are the perfect fit for the role according to Dr Williams. Ned is being played by Kermit Strachan, and Remous by Demetrius Delancy. Treemonisha, tells the story of how former slaves of a South American plantation adapt to the new found freedom when slavery was abolished in 1866. The community of slaves are gov erned by two elders known as Ed and Monisha. They cared for Treemonisha from birth and she is 18 when the play opens. Like most early black communities, this village has a witch doctor aka Obeah Man, who was seen as a menace to the community. He constantly tried to sell his potions and bags of luck to the villagers who were rarely interested in them. However one day the Obeah Man approached Monisha and offered to sell her the potion to keep her enemies away and to gain some good fortune. Her husband Ned happened to see the exchange as it is taking place, and attempts to discourage Monisha from making the purchase. As Treemonisha walks in on the commotion and urges the witch doctor to stop selling his evil potions, he gets upset at her and soon decided to take revenge on her. As the play progresses the issues of community bonding, education, and reli gion arise. Dr Williams said after returning home after a long stay in Europe last June, he then decided that an opera like Treemonisha was something the Bahamas needed for its independence celebrations. Having a longtime love for the arts and its development in the country, he said he hopes that Treemonisha will help to share with the world and those at home that “We can do more productions like this, and is something worth seeing because it can help in our cultural development.” The play opens on Monday at the Dundas. ‘Treemonisha’ debuts at the Dundas Centre Miller spreads positive message in his music m Y s T ro IN THIS reprise of Scott Joplin’s Treemonisha, more than 57 Bahamian actors and dancers are involved in the mega production set to debut next Monday at the Dundas.

PAGE 19

Facilitator Michael Edwards explained: “These items that we have retrieved from along the Western Esplanade foreshore will cleaned and categorise to eventually be displayed in Curiosity Cabinets.” He said the concept of the Curiosity Cabinet dates as far back as the fifteenth hundred. It was a practice that started with the random selection of items in various corners of Europe. The early art collectors found unique items and stored them in cupboards later coined as Curiosity Cabinetsthati s the original birthplace of the mordern-day museum. Many of the items collected by the NAGB team included cigarette buds, plastic bottles, stones, and other everyday items that are commonly overlooked. Mr Edwards said the exercise is to look deeper than just the external representation of the items, to investigate the story of how they arrived to where they were found. C M Y K C M Y K ARTS PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE “We are going to feature work from students ages six to sixty that will include paintings, collage, paper mache, repoussage, drawings, etc. The work these kids can do is excellent and I want to highlight their achievement,” Mr Smith said. Mr Smith said he would like to also get the kids to visit an architect’s officeto witness first hand what architects do. want to have Jackson Burnside walk us through Marina Village, and talk about the challenges he might have faced or why he put certain buildings in certain places. We are going down town to look at historic examples of very 1700-1800 year old buildings that they can study. Then, they are going to do a three dimensional model out of foam board of a residential or commercial building and it will have to feature elements of Bahamian architecture,” Mr Smith said. Mr Smith said at the end of the day he wants teens to become more aware and appreciate the architecture in the Bahamas. “When they are old enough to buy a house, it is not going to be something of another culture, but something that will fit into the landscape-something Bahamian. You identify a place by its architectureyou identify Paris because of the Eiffel tower, and the Sydney Opera house you can only find in Australia. There are certain styles of buildings here that are unique to the Bahamas,” Mr Smith said. By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net M EMBERS and participants of the National Art Gallery of the B ahamas A rt Beyond The Studio conference, took part in an excava-t ion exercise this past weekend where they collected several items along a local beach, a practice they say dates back to the early days o f museums. Ho L es in TH e sand NAGB members conduct excavation on the beach Members of NAGB sort through items they recently collected during the beach excavation execise. By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net THURSDAY, June 25, 2009, will forever be a sad day for the entertainment industry,with the passing of two international legendsthe King of Pop Michael Jackson, and movie vixen and international sex symbol Farrah Fawcett and here in the Bahamasa very popular dj and children’s advocate Anthony ‘FatBack’ Marshall. Fatback,44 was reported to have suffered a heart attack late Wednesday, and later died on Thursday and entertained Bahamians for more than 20 years, using humor and his love for the Bahamas to spread positive messages. Within the last 15 years, Mar shall has worked along with several concerned parents in starting and promoting The ‘FatBack’ Kids Club where he used his status to get the mes sage of positive parenting to as many parents as possible. One of his longtime colleagues and friend ZNS DJ Eddie ‘The Virgo’ Meadows, said: “Me and FatBack were always friends, coworkers, and I think he was a great person. He always made me laugh, he was hyped, energetic, and I think he was a great disc jockey. He was a great person, and his death is a great loss to all that knew him.” Farrah Fawcett died after a three year battle with cancer. The 62-year-old icon was best know for her role as Jill Munroe in the 1976 television series Charlie’s Angels. Throughout her career she appeared in several off broadway plays and movies including The Burning Bed, Nazi Hunter, The Beate Klarsfeld Story, and Poor Little Rich Girl: The Barbara Hutton Story. Apart from her movie roles, Farrah was best known by women for creating a new standard in beauty as she made famous her hairstyle common ly called the ‘Farrah flip.’ Moreover Farrah proved to women that being beautiful is simply not enough, but with the right talent, courage, and ambition, anything can be accomplished. Just a few short hours later, the entertainment industry was dealt another loss when pop icon Michael Jackson died as a result of cardiac arrest. The 50-year-old singer first gained popularity at the tender age of 7 where he preformed alongside his siblings Jackie, Tito, Jermaine, and Marlon in the group The Jackson Five. The group became the first African American teen sensations to appeal to white audiences on the same level as white groups, and thus broke the colour barrier for other groups to follow. In his solo career, Michael become best known for his hits Billie Jean, Beat It, Thriller, Black or White, and Scream. He was also the first African American to be featured on MTV, where he was successful in introducing black urban culture to whites throughout America and the world. During the early 1990s and up to the time of his death, Michael has also been at the center of scandals and legal troubles ranging from allegations of child molestation, to law suites and bankruptcy. However many fans prefer to remember the star for his music, one of whom is ZNS radio personality Eddie ‘The Virgo’ Meadows. Mr Meadows said: “He is the king of music, he is the greatest entertainer in the history of the world. He is the greatest entertainer who ever lived, he is the richest entertainer, and no oth er artist will ever be able to surpass his accomplishments. “I personally believe that he was created by God almighty to give what he has given to the world, and the blessing that God has bestowed on King David and King Solomon, he too has gotten a bit of that special blessing in the form of music.” Probably one of his biggest fans owning practically all of Michael‘s past albums and movies, Eddie said he hosted a four hour long memorial broadcast on Friday where he played tune after tune of the star’s music while allowing fans to call in and share their memories. Throughout the capital, other fans too basked in the memories they hold on the king of pop. Lifelong fan Garnell Bannis ter-Johnson said she wished she had a chance to meet Jackson while he was still alive. “I could remember when he was here in 1996, he went to Cody’s, and other music stores, I remember hopping into my car trying just to get a glimpse. “Everytime I went to one location, I was told that he had alredy left, so I missed out on meeting him while he was here.” Mrs Bannister-Johnson said despite not meeting Michael, she has over the years collected every single CD ever produced, as well as assorted memorabilia like a Michael jacket, a glove, and also a doll of Michael. She said although she had already decided not to attend the comeback concert in London, she did plan to see Michael during his US tour. Like the words of one of his songs, she said “he’s gone too soon.” Remembering local and international legends A place for art FROM page 12 Shell still life graphite pen cil drawing by Rebecca Dickson. B AHAMIAN D J Anthony ‘FatBack’ Marshall (above after a long battle with diabetes. He was 44years-old. Also to pass away this week Farrah Fawcett (left of Pop Michael Jackson (right

PAGE 20

C M Y K C M Y K I N S I D E Take a stroll down candylane S ee page eight Valentine’s Resort and Marina offers unique experience See page eight This year, a Place For Art is hosting a summer programme for teens focusing on Bahamian Architecture which will be held on July 13-31 and the 8th annual art exhibition for students to be held on July 5. Established in 2001, the Place For Art is a specialised studio offering art classes for both children and adults of all ages. K Smith, an internationally renowned pencil artist and art educator brings a wealth of over 30 years teaching experience in Canada, The United Kingdom, and the Bahamas. “I have always had a passion for architecture. Most of my grand career has been architecture through homes and buildings. A lot of times there are no summer programmes for teens so we are going to be focusing on architecture. We are going to start at the very beginning by defining the word and look at architectural history from prehistoric times right through to modern times. Just so they can have an idea of different periods of architecture so that they can see it when they are traveling,” Mr Smith said. As for the art show, Mr Smith said he is very pleased with the quality of work being produced. Bull Elephant pastel drawing by Alex Smith, age 12. Pear still life graphite pencil drawing by Mutazz Butler , age 13. Northern Cardinal coloured pencil drawing by Paul Redgrave, age 13. Matisse style cut out collage by Lesli Bartlett Roker . SEE page 10 By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net F ROM the intricate attention to detail in the cr own moldings, to the twists and turns on an iron fence, most of the best art in the country is shown through the beauty of Bahamian Architecture. The Tribune SECTIONB WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009 p L ace ar T for a

PAGE 21

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 75F/24C Low: 76F/24C Low: 75F/24C Low: 77F/25C Low: 78 F/26 C Low: 81F/27C Low: 81 F/27 C Low: 80 F/27 C High: 88F/31C High: 86F/30C High: 88 F/31 C High: 87 F/31 C High: 88F/31C High: 88 F/31C High: 93F/34C Low: 82F/28C High: 87F/31C Low: 80 F/27 C High: 95F/35C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 74F/23C High: 88 F/31 C Low: 77F/25C High: 89 F/32 Low: 75F/24C High: 90F/32C Low: 76 F/24C High: 90F/32C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 94F/34C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 90F/32C Low: 74 F/23 C High: 91F/33C Low: 78F/26C High: 93 F/34 C Low: 81F/27C High: 96F/36C High: 88 F/31 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 1 ST 2009, PAGE 11C THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Partly sunny, an afternoon t-storm. Clear and very warm.Partly sunny with an afternoon t-storm Sunshine. Plenty of sunshine. High: 93 Low: 81 High: 90 High: 90 High: 89 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Mostly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 91 Low: 79 Low: 80 Low: 79 AccuWeather RealFeel 113F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 90F 110-89F 107-82F 99-86F 104-93F Low: 80 TODAYTONIGHTTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................90F/32C Low ....................................................82F/28C Normal high ......................................88F/31C Normal low ........................................75F/24C Last year's high .................................. 92 F/33C Last year's low .................................. 77 F/25C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.45" Year to date ................................................17.70" Normal year to date ....................................18.39" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Full Last New First Jul. 7 Jul. 15Jul. 21Jul. 28 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:24 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 8:04 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 3:23 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 1:47 a.m. Today Thursday Friday Saturday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 3:42 a.m.2.29:39 a.m.0.1 4:20 p.m.2.810:41 p.m.0.3 4:39 a.m.2.210:33 a.m.0.2 5:15 p.m.2.811:36 p.m.0.3 5:33 a.m.2.111:25 a.m.0.2 6:06 p.m.2.8----6:23 a.m.2.212:27 a.m.0.3 6:54 p.m.2.812:14 p.m.0.2 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco89/3178/25t88/3178/25c Amsterdam77/2561/16s79/2664/17s Ankara, Turkey86/3055/12s86/3057/13pc Athens88/3172/22s90/3272/22s Auckland55/1248/8pc59/1552/11s Bangkok90/3279/26sh91/3279/26sh Barbados86/3077/25pc86/3077/25sh Barcelona83/2869/20s83/2868/20s Beijing95/3570/21pc97/3670/21s Beirut78/2576/24s78/2575/23s Belgrade88/3167/19t90/3269/20t Berlin82/2766/18t84/2863/17s Bermuda82/2775/23t82/2775/23t Bogota65/1844/6pc66/1845/7sh Brussels82/2763/17pc86/3066/18pc Budapest91/3266/18c93/3368/20s Buenos Aires59/1545/7pc58/1445/7pc Cairo100/3774/23s98/3673/22s Calcutta95/3585/29t95/3584/28t Calgary68/2043/6s71/2146/7pc Cancun89/3176/24t90/3276/24t Caracas81/2771/21t79/2671/21t Casablanca81/2767/19s80/2666/18s Copenhagen80/2664/17sh83/2865/18s Dublin70/2157/13r70/2154/12sh Frankfurt86/3063/17pc88/3164/17pc Geneva 84/28 58/14 t 85/2960/15t Halifax 62/16 54/12 c 65/18 54/12 c Havana 90/32 73/22 t 90/32 72/22 t Helsinki 79/26 55/12pc81/2757/13pc Hong Kong 90/32 82/27 pc 90/32 81/27sh Islamabad 108/42 79/26 t 106/41 79/26 t Istanbul88/3171/21s86/3071/21s Jerusalem 86/30 59/15s82/2759/15s Johannesburg 56/1337/2pc55/1238/3s Kingston 88/3178/25c90/3278/25pc Lima70/2158/14pc72/2259/15s London88/3159/15pc86/3059/15t Madrid97/3666/18s97/3664/17s Manila88/3177/25sh88/3178/25r Mexico City73/2256/13t70/2155/12t Monterrey98/3676/24pc104/4075/23pc Montreal72/2263/17t70/2163/17r Moscow73/2252/11s72/2254/12t Munich81/2761/16t82/2760/15t Nairobi79/2652/11pc81/2751/10pc New Delhi 102/3886/30t100/3785/29t Oslo77/2563/17pc79/2665/18s Paris88/3166/18pc90/3266/18pc Prague 83/28 62/16 t 82/27 63/17 t Rio de Janeiro81/2771/21s76/2468/20pc Riyadh106/4178/25s104/4079/26s Rome 84/28 66/18 t 86/30 68/20 s St. Thomas89/3179/26s89/3181/27sh San Juan57/1330/-1pc63/1732/0s San Salvador 86/30 72/22 t 86/30 73/22 t Santiago 57/1337/2pc61/1644/6pc Santo Domingo86/3073/22c85/2973/22sh Sao Paulo 74/23 57/13 pc 67/19 55/12r Seoul82/2768/20pc82/2765/18t Stockholm 79/26 59/15 pc 81/27 57/13 pc Sydney 70/21 47/8 s64/1748/8t Taipei97/3681/27pc95/3581/27pc T okyo 77/25 68/20 r 81/27 70/21 r T oronto 68/2061/16t75/2361/16t Trinidad90/3266/18pc91/3267/19sh V ancouver 74/23 55/12 s 75/2358/14s Vienna 86/3071/21t87/3070/21pc W arsaw 81/27 63/17 sh 83/28 63/17 t Winnipeg 70/21 50/10 s 68/2049/9t H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayThursday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SW at 10-15 Knots2-4 Feet5-15 Miles82F Thursday:SW at 10-15 Knots2-4 Feet5-15 Miles82F Today:SW at 10-15 Knots2-3 Feet5-15 Miles81F Thursday:SW at 8-16 Knots2-4 Feet5-10 Miles81F Today:SW at 10-15 Knots2-4 Feet5-10 Miles81F Thursday:SW at 7-14 Knots2-4 Feet5-10 Miles81F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque92/3368/20t90/3267/19t Anchorage71/2155/12s73/2254/12s Atlanta90/3266/18s90/3270/21pc Atlantic City79/2664/17t81/2762/16t Baltimore83/2864/17t80/2662/16t Boston70/2162/16t72/2263/17t Buffalo68/2057/13t71/2160/15t Charleston, SC94/3473/22s97/3674/23t Chicago66/1854/12pc76/2461/16pc Cleveland68/2055/12t72/2260/15c Dallas96/3576/24s97/3677/25s Denver88/3156/13t78/2556/13t Detroit68/2053/11sh74/2359/15c Honolulu88/3175/23s88/3175/23s Houston99/3776/24t99/3777/25pc HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayThursday TodayThursdayTodayThursday Indianapolis68/2056/13t77/2560/15s Jacksonville92/3374/23t97/3674/23t Kansas City86/3066/18s80/2664/17t Las Vegas101/3878/25pc104/4085/29t Little Rock94/3469/20s96/3572/22t Los Angeles82/2764/17pc82/2764/17pc Louisville76/2461/16t81/2764/17s Memphis92/3369/20s91/3272/22t Miami88/3178/25t89/3178/25t Minneapolis76/2459/15s81/2760/15t Nashville86/3063/17s86/3064/17pc New Orleans94/3477/25pc95/3577/25t New York78/2566/18t80/2668/20t Oklahoma City98/3672/22s99/3771/21pc Orlando88/3175/23t90/3274/23t Philadelphia82/2766/18t78/2564/17t Phoenix 106/41 86/30 t 104/4086/30t Pittsburgh67/1956/13t68/2056/13t Portland, OR 90/3255/12s92/3357/13s Raleigh-Durham 93/33 65/18 s 93/33 65/18 s St. Louis84/2864/17s79/2665/18c Salt Lake City 88/31 66/18 t 91/3268/20t San Antonio 96/35 74/23 t 97/36 76/24 pc San Diego72/2268/20pc75/2367/19pc San Francisco 73/22 56/13 pc 74/2357/13pc Seattle80/2653/11s84/2854/12s T allahassee 96/3574/23pc97/3675/23t T ampa 86/30 76/24 t 88/31 76/24t Tucson97/3676/24t98/3677/25t W ashington, DC 82/27 66/18t82/2765/18t UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com


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Volume: 105 No.181

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009

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BAHAMAS BIGGEST

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SEE ‘THE ARTS’ SECTION



BIC edging
closer to
privatisation

Wife’s death may have
led to tragedy at work

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are investigating
an apparent suicide on Prince
Charles Drive after a security
guard at the Pepsi Bottling
Company allegedly hanged
himself in his booth shortly
after 3pm yesterday.

The victim was last night
named as 33-year-old Mark
Campbell, of Fox Dale Road.

Reportedly depressed due
to his wife’s death in Octo-
ber last year, Mr Campbell is
alleged to have been experi-
encing financial difficulties in
the past few months, which
may have lead to him taking
his own life.

However, a fellow security
guard who discovered the
body during the shift change,
said he was shocked by the
tragedy as his co-worker and
friend was always “jovial.”

According to Police Super-
intendent Elsworth Moss, the
officer in charge of CDU,
attempts were made to revive
Mr Campbell but to no avail.

An initial review of the

body by the police found
there were no outward signs
of trauma, and neither his
feet, or his hands were bound
as in the case with 32-year-
old Adrian Major who was
found hanging from a tree on
Saturday evening in the Fox
Hill area.

At this stage, the police are
officially classifying this most
recent death as “suspicious”.

The police also yesterday
released the identify of the
young man who was gunned
down while shooting dice on
Balfour Avenue on Monday.

According to the police,
Dewitt Butler, 26, of
Carmichael Road, was shot a
number of times about the
body while gambling with a
group of other men at the
side of a building sometime
around 7.30pm.

Police have questioned a
number of individuals and are
actively searching for a “per-
son of interest” in this case.

Reportedly, Mr Butler was
shot after an argument erupt-
ed among the men.

Police investigations con-
tinue.

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PRIME MINISTER Hubert
Ingraham speaks in the House.



UNDER THE THEME ‘children have the right to be safe’, Bahamians gathered in Rawson Square last evening for
a special candle light vigil in protest of child abuse. The event was staged by the National Child Protection Coun-
cil, the Bahamas Christian Council and the Crisis Centre. The organisations urged Bahamians to come out and
bring their candles in the fight against child abuse.

‘Stop the hurt, stop the tears, stop the abuse,’ was the motto of the vigil.

Harl Taylor murder
trial to open today

Four NIB bosses to
he mate redundant
in sweeping changes

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

SWEEPING changes in the
executive structure of the
National Insurance Board will
see four bosses made redundant
today as the board aims to
address “deficiencies identified
by several internal and exter-
nal operational assessments” of
the board, Director Algernon
Cargill said yesterday.

Senior Deputy Director
Anthony Curtis, Deputy Direc-
tor of Special Projects Cecile
Bethel, Deputy Director of
Information Technology Andre
Bethel and Assistant Director

SEE page 10

AFTER a lengthy
jury selection process,
the trial into the mur-
der of international-
ly-recognised hand-
bag designer Harl
Taylor is expected to
open today.

Troyniko McNeil,
22, is charged with
murdering Mr Taylor
some time between
Saturday, November 17, and
Sunday, November 18, 2007.

McNeil, who has pleaded
not guilty, is being repre-
sented by attorneys Murrio
Ducille, Krysta Smith, Alex
Morley and Kenneth Wal-



1 4

Harl Taylor

lace Whitfield.

Mr Taylor, 37, was
found stabbed to
death at Mountbatten
House on West Hill
Street, two days after
Dr Thaddeus McDon-
ald, 59, a senior acade-
mic at the College of
the Bahamas, was
found bludgeoned to
death, apparently with
a clothing iron, in his nearby
Queen Street guest house. To
date, no charges have been
filed in relation to Dr
McDonald’s murder.

SEE page 10

ne |



THE stage is set for the
Bahamas Telecommuni-
cations Company to be
privatised after the regu-
latory structure is
approved and due dili-
gence completed by the
privatisation committee,
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham has confirmed.

In a communication to
the House of Assembly
yesterday, he said inter-
ested parties would be
invited to enter a pre-
qualification process in
order to be considered as
potential strategic part-
ners.

“This process is
designed to allow the gov-
ernment to determine
which potential partners
are appropriate from a
strategic as well as a finan-
cial standpoint,” he said.

“Those who pre-qualify
will then be invited to par-
ticipate in a formal due
diligence exercise, ulti-
mately resulting in an eco-
nomic bidding process for
the 51 percent stake in
BTC.”

In the coming weeks,
he said the government
would launch a formal
sale process relating to 51
percent of the ownership
of BTC.

SEE page 10

Nurses Union
president is
accused of

‘abandoning’

members

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Nurses Union
president has been accused of
“abandoning” her members
ahead of today’s scheduled meet-
ing with the Government to dis-
cuss health insurance coverage.

At around 3.15pm yesterday,
BNU President Cleola Hamil-
ton told The Tribune she was in
South Africa.

But a source close to the nego-
tiations between the BNU and
the Government, commenting
on Ms Hamilton’s “vacation” ,
claimed she “would have to be
superwoman” to make it back in

SEE page 10

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS” LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Dream of owning home

Man held in
connection with
John Bull robbery

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Police have apprehended a man in con-
nection with the armed robbery of the John Bull Store at the
Our Lucaya Resort last weekend.

Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle said the suspect, a 26-year-
old resident of Freeport, was taken into police custody yes-
terday morning.

The John Bull Store was robbed by a lone gunman on Sun-
day, June 21.

Shots

The robber entered the store around 1.05pm and fired sev-
eral shots at the watch display case and stole four Rolex
watches.

Afterwards, the robber is believed to have fled the scene
in a stolen vehicle - a 1999 Toyota Corolla - that was report-
edly stolen and used as the getaway vehicle.

Police recovered the vehicle on Royal Palm Way.

ASP Bootle also reported that three women, ages 30, 34,
and 55 years, were also taken into custody along with the sus-
pect in connection with the discovery of an unlicensed
firearm.

He reported that police seized a Glock pistol and ammu-
nition at a residence in Yeoman’s Wood.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News P1,2,3,5,6,10,14

Editorial/Letters. ......:ccccccccceeeeseeeeeeeeeeeeeeeerees P4

BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION
Business
Comics

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES



\ a 7 rn a, J - Val ;
yVelcome to banking

‘has become a nightmare’

Owner of new house in Emerald Close speaks out

THE owner of a new house in the
gated community of Emerald Close in
western New Providence says her
dream of owning her own home has
become a nightmare.

Patricia Chatty says she shelled out
nearly $300,000, but the house that
has been handed over to her is not the
one which she was expecting - the
structure has serious flaws which she
claims are due to shoddy building
practices.

Among her complaints are leaky
ceilings, missing fixtures and unfin-
ished details throughout the house.

Worse, Ms Chatty said she fears for
the safety of her young daughter
because the sharp edges of counter
tops have not been smoothed down
and the house’s back door cannot be
locked.

Problems

Even with all these problems to
contend with, the situation is better
than it was when she moved in a year
and a half ago, when she had no tele-
phone or cable service for the first six
months, she said.

This was particularly challenging as
Ms Chatty runs her own business from
her home.

And it is not just the interior of the
house that is upsetting, she said, but
also the fact that it has to be
approached via a bumpy dirt track.

“As a prospective buyer, my
responsibility was to secure financing.
The developer was to deliver the
product, which in this case was the
home that I saw in the brochure. A
year and half later, I am not happy
with any of it, because just getting to
and from my home is an issue, and
then when I do get to my home I have
all of these issues that should have
been remedied,” said Ms Chatty.

Asked to comment on the matter, a
representative of Emerald Close said:
“The developer has attempted to
solve the issues with Ms Chatty on
several occasions and is open to any
reasonable solution.”

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EMERALD COAST homeowner Patricia Chatty points out a hole in the ceiling from which, she
says, water leaked from her bathroom tub into the kitchen.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Man charged
with murder

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

A 31-YEAR-OLD man
has been arrested and
charged by police in the
murder of Haitian Jean
Maquez Noel, who was
shot at his home in Garden
Villas on Saturday.

Mr Noel, 59, was discov-
ered sitting on a sofa with
gunshot wounds to his left

underarm and shoulder. He

was taken to hospital,
where he later succumbed
to his injuries around
11.30pm.

According to reports, an
anonymous caller tele-
phoned police shortly after
9.30pm about hearing gun-
shots being fired near the
basketball court at Garden
Villas.

Police went to the scene
to investigate and were
directed to an apartment
where Mr Noel resided.
His death is the fourth
homicide for the year for
Grand Bahama.

Charges in
connection

with raids on
suspected
humbers houses

MORE than a dozen
people were arraigned in
Magistrates Court yester-
day on charges stemming
from raids on suspected
number houses last Friday.

Latishka Campbell, 31,
Louise Augustin, 29 and
Leanora Taylor, 24,
appeared before Magis-
trate Derrence Rolle in

Court 5, Bank Lane yester-

day, charged with being
found on a premises where
a lottery is taking place,
namely Percy's Web Cafe
on Pitt Road. They have

also been charged with per-

mitting the premises to be
used for a lottery and per-
mitting the premises to
promote, conduct and
organise a lottery. They
pleaded not guilty to the
charges and remain on
police bail.

Jamal Rolle, 30; Jacinta
Johnson, 35; Pamela John-
son, 53; Shavanda Johnson,
27; Kizzy Curry, 30; Philip
Ferguson, 51; Olivia
Knowles, 26; Anthony
Jones, 41; Angela Stuart,
44: Margaret Wallace, 46,
and Bettrah Mitchell, 38,
pleaded not guilty to being
found on the premises
where a lottery was
allegedly taking place.
They will also remain on
police bail and the case has
been adjourned to August
19.

ed not guilty to being
found at a premises where
a lottery was taking place,
namely Sweetness Web
Shop on Thompson Boule-
vard. She also pleaded not
guilty to permitting the
premises to be used for a
lottery and permitting the
premises to promote, con-
duct and organise a lottery.
Patrick Knowles, 43, and
Ntari Wright, 33, pleaded
not guilty to being found
on the premises. The case
has been adjourned to
August 24 and they remain
on police bail.

Minister of State to

he guest speaker
at Kiwanis Club

MINISTER of State for
Immigration Branville
McCartney will be the
guest speaker at the
upcoming weekly meeting
of the Kiwanis Club of
Over-The-Hill.

The meeting is scheduled

to be held on Thursday,
July 2 at 8pm at the Holy
Cross Community Centre,
Soldier Road.

All Kiwanians and their
guests are welcome to
attend.

Tenisha Rolle, 22, plead-

Ministry investigates some of
RBC Trust management team

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

SOME members of Royal
Bank of Canada Trust Compa-
ny’s local management team are
under investigation by the
Departments of Labour and
Immigration after being accused
of favouring expatriates over
local employees.

RBC Trust staff claim expa-
triate workers are chosen over
equally qualified locals when it
comes to hiring, salaries and
compensation.

Foreigners are paid more and
their Bahamian counterparts
and have not been asked to take
‘voluntary’ unpaid leave to ease
the company’s financial con-
straints while Bahamians have,
staff say.

The employees further claim
job vacancies advertised locally
are simultaneously advertised
in foreign countries, and

Staff claim expatriate
workers chosen over locals

Bahamians are forced to under-
go a protracted interview
process — allegedly to encour-
age them to lose interest.

When Bahamians are offered
positions, the pay and compen-
sation proposed is far below
their expectations, and below
the packages offered to expats,
staff said.

Plans to use political connec-
tions to reapply for and secure
work permits have also been
rumoured, staff told officials.

“Often, Bahamian résumés
submitted for the position are
not even reviewed or consid-
ered initially, as the ministry is
ultimately unaware of who, and
how many, actually apply

directly to the company,” RBC
Trust staff told officers at
Labour and Immigration.

“Tn the event that a work per-
mit application for an expat is
not granted because a Bahami-
an could conceivably perform
the task, unjust labour practices
are simply employed to get
around this directive to find a
qualified Bahamian.

“As a prime example, in the
case of a recent investment
management position for which
a work permit was not granted
to an expat, who the company
had already secured housing for
in Sandyport, this individual was
sent to the Cayman Islands
office instead and periodically

eas UN wu AFTER See)

Felipé Major/Tribune staff



FOUR WOMEN were lucky to escape with only minor injuries yesterday after their vehicle crashed and flipped

over into the marsh.

The passengers were driving down John F Kennedy Drive, near the turn-off to Gladstone Road, in a Toyota Rav
4, when the driver lost control of the vehicle and crashed into a truck, overturning and hitting a white van in the
process. The Toyota ended up in the swampy area near the road.

The women were said to be “shaken up” and were taken to hospital to be treated for their injuries.

Downtown traders have mixed
feelings over cruise ship act

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

TRADERS in downtown
Nassau yesterday expressed
mixed feelings over the
amendments to the Cruise
Ship Overnighting Incentives
Act passed on Monday in par-
lament.

Although shop-owners and
restauranteurs welcome the
anticipated increase of at least
200,000 more passengers a
year, they are concerned about
an earlier departure time for
ships and the inclusion of pri-
vate islands in the tax break
scheme.

The amendments pave the
way for a government agree-
ment with Carnival Cruise
Lines expected to bring a min-
imum of 1.4 million passen-
gers to Nassau every year over
the next six years - that is
200,000 more than was
required last year - and
175,000 to Freeport.

Tax

At least 25 per cent of these
visitors are expected to stay in
port for at least 13 hours in
order for Carnival to continue
to benefit from significant tax
discounts, and the agreement
will also be open to other
interested cruise lines.

But retailers are concerned
the addition of private islands
as places where cruise lines
can dock to raise their passen-
ger quota.

Disney's Castaway Cay and
Royal Caribbean's Coco Cay,
as well as Rock Sound, Great
Stirrup Cay and Half Moon
Cay will now be added to the
original two ports of Nassau
and Grand Bahama.

And they are also con-
cerned the amendments to the
Cruise Ship Overnighting
Incentives Act will allow for
cruise ships to now set sail at

midnight rather than 3am.

Tony Gonzalez, who works
at Havana Café in downtown
Nassau said: “They are adding
five ports but they are private
islands, belonging to the cruise
line companies, and they are
saying they will be able to
dock there instead of Nassau -
so no one is going to benefit
but the cruise line.

“Why would you go down-
town if you can go to your pri-
vate island? But the thousands
of people working downtown,
and who are selling tours of
Atlantis, are going to miss
out,” he said.

“And if the ships are leay-
ing at midnight, clubs like
Bambu and Fluid are going to
get a lot less business.”

Proprietor

Old Nassau souvenir shop
proprietor Warren Bethel
agreed private islands should
not be included in the Bill.

He said: “They go to their
private islands because it does-
n't cost them anything - they
don't have to pay for dockage
or anything, so ships come
through now without touching
Nassau or Freeport.

“T don't think the govern-
ment should have allowed that
in the first place.”

Although Mr Bethel wel-
comes the increase of passen-
gers, he is concerned it will
not necessarily translate to
more spending in the local
economy.

“People on the three- or
four-day cruises buy them so
cheaply they don't have mon-
ey when they get on the boat,
so it doesn't make a difference
if we have more of them.

“A ten-day cruise will have
a different clientele; if we get a
ship with a longer itinerary
that stops here, we do better.”

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham said an approved
cruise line that brings in one

million passengers will pay an
average of $11.80 per person
to the government under the
Act.

This compares with $15 per
head if the cruise line fails to
bring in more than 800,000 vis-
itors.

When the original Act was
passed in 1996, passenger
arrivals doubled over the next
ten years and it boosted the
number of passengers staying
overnight.

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travelled to Nassau to service
Bahamian clients.

“As news of this was reported
to authorities, making it more
difficult for this practice to con-
tinue, only then were qualified
Bahamians considered for the
position, and even then, not
many were asked to interview.”

Director of Labour Harcourt
Brown said an investigation into
the complaints was launched
several months ago and Labour
Department officials inter-
viewed staff about their con-
cerns, as well as managers.

The department has not yet
had a chance to pass its find-
ings on to the Immigration
Department, Mr Brown said,
adding that Minister of Labour
Dion Foulkes and Minister of
Immigration Branville McCart-

mM K\'IC\

te ee

ney are aware of the complaints.

Meanwhile RBC Trust staff
hope to be given equal oppor-
tunities.

One said: “Sadly, all this has
transpired in the face of several
senior employees in the com-
pany who would be readily able
to rise to these opportunities.

“Unfortunately, because of
such unjust hiring and manage-
rial practices, on behalf of an
expatriate who fully enjoys the
benefits of living and working in
the Bahamas, they are not
afforded the chance.

“These practices only serve
to circumvent and diminish the
effectiveness of Bahamian
labour and immigration laws
and more importantly, displace
qualified Bahamians in the
process.”





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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Overworked police need relief

AT A PRESS conference held on Friday an
officer, speaking on behalf of the Police Staff
Association complained of the need of relief
for overworked and frustrated police officers.

“In the normal course of business,” said
Inspector Edric Poitier, “this (40-hour) work
week does not apply to the work schedule of the
Royal Bahamas Police Force because of our
unique duties and responsibilities. However,
police officers do not and cannot receive over-
time pay, yet some of them find themselves
working in excess of 60 hours a week without
any form of compensation, be it monetary or
extra time off. We are not advocating the gov-
ernment pay overtime because we understand
that is not possible.”

However, he suggested that instead of pay
their extra hours could be added to their vaca-
tion.

We can understand police officers being
stressed out, not only is it the nature of their job,
but it is the circumstances of the conditions
under which they now have to work with a fail-
ing court system. There is such a backlog of
criminal trials pending that accused persons are
now having to be returned to the streets because
to hold them any length of time would deny
them their constitutional rights of an early trial.

As far back as 1215 on the open fields of
Runnymede King John of England signed
Magna Carta in which clause 40 guaranteed
that “to no man will we sell, or deny, or delay,
right or justice.”

For 794 years that guarantee of justice has
been inherited from our Westminster system
of government. Nor can anyone be allowed to
languish in jail awaiting that trial. That is why we
have to tolerate every morning and afternoon
the prison bus breaking all speed limits to take
and return inmates to the court most of them
new prisoners, but others just being taken in
under the writ of habeas corpus (bring in the
body) to show their faces before the court to
make certain that they are not getting lost in the
complicated prison system.

Adding to the police officers’ long hours is
the fact that inmates with records are back on
the streets committing new crimes. It is difficult
to know if criminals are on the increase or if it
is just the well known lag back in circulation
increases the number of crimes committed.

When debating the Juries (Amendment) Bill
in October 2007 National Security Minister
Tommy Turnquest said the “criminal justice
system is challenged to provide a quick and

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speedy trial. Where it is unable to do so, the
accused is either released on bail or is remand-
ed to her Majesty’s prison.”

However, he expressed alarm at the number
of persons out on bail.

Of a prison population of 1,359 on October
1, 2007, some 587 were on remand, many having
been on remand for years. He said 106 were
on remand from 2006, 39 from 2005 and 17
from 2004, 15 from 2003, five from 2002 and one
from 2001.

“Tn 2006, 35 per cent of suspects charged with
murder were on bail at the time they committed
the offence,” said Mr Turnquest, “and between
January and September 2007, 42 per cent (22) of
murder suspects were on bail at the time of the
offence.”

We do not have up to date figures, but there
probably has been no improvement. For exam-
ple, for the month of April this year 11 per-
sons were released from prison on bail. A doc-
ument obtained by The Tribune in May records
that in April some 205 persons were released on
bail on multiple charges ranging from murder
and armed robbery to unlawful sexual inter-
course and rape. Of these 153 were released
on bail with 39 of them being classified by the
Central Intelligence Bureau as persons who
“should be monitored.” Of particular interest
was one of them who, although acquitted of
the charge by the court, was recommended to
the police for monitoring. His background of
crime listed possession of drugs, ammunition
and prohibited weapons. He was also accused of
murder. With all their other duties the police
have to pay special attention to this man. No
wonder the police are overworked.

The only way that this can be solved is to
increase the judiciary and court sittings to get
through the backlog of pending cases. Other
than the Chief Justice, the other justices of the
Supreme Court are appointed on the advice of
the Judicial and Legal Services Commission.
Of course, the Commission can do nothing with-
out permission of government to employ more
justices. It is now questionable with the eco-
nomic bind the country is now in as to where the
money will come from to pay them.

In an Act to Amend the Penal Code there
was a provision allowing the court to order
technical surveillance of accused persons grant-
ed bail by a system of electronic monitoring. It
is understood that a committee is still actively
considering how such a system can be imple-
mented.



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Government
must show it is
worthy of trust

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Thave just read Minister Byran
Woodside’s Contribution to The
2009/10 Budget Debate, in Par-
liament, carried in your Saturday,
June 13th edition, during the
course of which he mentioned the
Department of Lands and Sur-
veys’ most recent scandal involv-
ing the granting of Crown lands to
the wives and relatives of two
senior officers and the extent to
which proper application proto-
cols were ignored.

Of particular interest was Mr.
Woodside’s contention that pre-
liminary investigations revealed
that “nothing untoward” occurred
with respect to the “application
process” with respect to those
specific Grants.

Surely, the Minister does not
intend to imply that the granting
of Crown land to the wives of the
officers was beyond reproach and
that the requisite “application
process”, was adhered to. The
facts of this case suggests other-
wise and do not support the Min-
ister’s contention.

Let’s consider the following:

(a) According to the Minister:
“...all Bahamians have the right
to apply for Crown land, includ-
ing Public Officers and their fam-
ilies. However there are guide-
lines that are to be followed in
the review of applications by Pub-
lic Officers...”

(b) A husband and wife are
regarded as one — it therefore
follows that facilitating the grant
to a spouse is in fact facilitating a
grant to oneself.

letters@tribunemedia net



It is clear from the Minister’s
statement that the public officers,
in question, needed only to follow
procedures and apply for the
land, themselves as individuals or
as husband and wife. In both
these cases, however, the officers’
wives applied, alone! Why?

According to “General
Orders” the Lands and Surveys’
Officers, who personally benefit-
ed from the Grants to their
respective wives, were mandated
to apply through the Department
of Public Personnel. Is the Minis-
ter implying that, in these two
specific cases, the required pro-
cedure was followed?

Informed sources have
revealed that the requisite pro-
cedure was not followed in either
of these cases.

In one instance, the junior of
the two officer’s wife, her sisters
(incidentally, one of these sisters
turned out to be the Secretary of
the most recent former Director
of the Department) and a broth-
er were granted three contiguous
lots numbering 18, 19, 20 and lot
number 25 in the same tract of
land in Blackwood Village on the
island of Abaco while the senior
officer’s wife and son were grant-
ed lots 15 and 44 in Wood Cay
on the island of Abaco. The Min-
ister is also reported to contend
that while the public’s perception

is that these individuals “may
have been given preferential
treatment...._preliminary reports
do not indicate that anything
untoward occurred relative to the
application process.”

If the above mentioned inci-
dents do not indicate that pref-
erential consideration was given
to these relatives, then what
does?

In the circumstances, there-
fore, it is incumbent on the Min-
ister to provide the conclusive
findings of the investigation, expe-
ditiously, so that there is not the
slightest inkling of a cover-up. It
cannot be “Business as usual.

Left alone to deal with these
matters, the Civil Service, will
simply “circle the wagon.”

The public expects that the
practice of “transferring” com-
promised junior officers and
“restricting” the movements of
compromised senior officers and
allowing them to remain in office
must cease.

The Minister and the current
Administration have both been
presented with an excellent
opportunity to demonstrate that
they are yet worthy of the trust
sought and received from the
Bahamian people who in turn
were promised, the restoration
of:

e Transparency,

¢ Accountability,

¢ Change, and

¢ Order to civil society, etc.

INFORMED CITIZEN
Nassau,
June, 2009

Tribute to the King of Pop

EDITOR, The Tribune.

King of popular music
... master of the big stage

Entertainer extraordinary
... with deep and wide appeal

Michael Jackson, the cultural icon
... transcended all barriers with approval

Universally treasured
...arare talent undying

Tears for a fallen star...
... travelling gloriously beyond

Celebration for his inestimable gifts

... people love Michael Jackson

A revolutionary in song...
...an activist of note

A generation pleased
...with the masterful virtuoso

Michael Jackson, the spirit of groove

... his music of verve
... wakes up the dead

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With celebrated admiration and awe
... forever prized and sanctified

Nassau,
June, 2009.

DENNIS A DAMES



Sloppy BIC practices paint
ridiculous corporate image

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Over the weekend I received two phone calls from BTC with
a recorded message advising me that my telecom accounts were
overdue and service would be cut off Tuesday, June 9.

Having printed receipts showing that full payment had been
made on time as usual, I was very displeased to put it mildly.

Since no one in BTC could be reached on Saturday or Sunday
I sent a duplicate series of fax messages with copies of my
receipts to selected fax listings for BTC. I also pointed out that
such sloppy practices continued to paint a ridiculous corpo-

rate image for the corporation.

Surprisingly this morning I received four phone calls from
BTC. Two promptly offered what might pass for apologies,
while a third blathered on at length but finally found it within his
capability to simply say, “We are sorry, we made a mistake.”
With that I was content to end the matter.

However, one caller inferred that a substantial number of such
erroneous phone dunning notices had been dispatched to cus-
tomers. The number may in fact be sufficiently large that your
readers should be alerted to cushion their shock.

Isuspect that at some early future date the major pharmacies
will show a tremendous decrease in sales of blood pressure
reducing prescriptions soon after BTC is sold.

WM E BARDELMEIER

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June 23, 2009.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

PLP Senator touts a bold
national development plan

soveevereecvecsecorseessescrsrscsesceussesorssecssssseressssoerg

Man pleads
not guilty to
marijuana

possession

A 34-YEAR-OLD man
was granted $3,000 bail
yesterday after pleading
not guilty to a marijuana
possession charge.

Ramses Charles, of
Cargillsville off Faith
Avenue, is accused of
being found in possession
of a pound and seven
ounces of marijuana on
June 29 with the intent to
supply.

Charles was arraigned
yesterday before Magis-
trate Janet Bullard in

Court One, Bank Lane. He

is expected back in court
on July 6.

Minister of
slate criticises
former govt
over performing
arts centre

THE Bahamas could
have had the benefit of a
cost-free “transformation”
of the National Centre for
the Performing Arts had
the former government
not dropped the ball on
the issue, Minister of State
for Culture Charles May-
nard said.

He told parliament on
Monday that nothing was
done to advance the centre
between 2002 and 2007,
despite an offer from the
Chinese government to
renovate it for free.

Mr Maynard claimed
that this was due to the
former government’s fail-
ure to respond to corre-
spondence from the Chi-
nese.

we left it, and we should
not have met it the same
way we left it because the
Chinese government had
put in writing a commit-
ment to supply the
Bahamas government with
all equipment necessary to
transform that space,” he
said.

When he was appointed
Minister of State for Cul-
ture in 2007, Mr Maynard
said he “looked through
the file” relative to the
centre and made efforts to
ascertain whether there
was “some way of getting

the Chinese government to

re-offer that particular
thing.”

He said the Chinese had
sent correspondence to the
Bahamian government on
the issue but gave up on
the idea after not receiving
a response.

“Tt was just one simple
issue.

“T even met with the
(Chinese) Ambassador at
one point. He said they
had lost interest in that
particular project and were
now focused on the (Chi-
nese funded national)
stadium,” said Mr May-
nard.

“We met it the same way

PLP Senator Allyson Maynard-Gib-
son has put forward a bold national
development plan that would see more
Bahamian ownership in tourism, a vast-
ly improved national grade average and
a much more efficient judicial system.

Speaking in the Senate, she criticised
the government’s budget as lacking the
“vision” necessary to inspire the public
and rescue the nation from the grip of
the global economic crisis.

PLP Senator Allyson Maynard-Gib-
son said history shows that during extra-
ordinary times, “where there is vision-
ary leadership, people time and time
again rise to the challenge and take
their country to the next level”.

Noting that US President Barak Oba-
ma has set out strategies to lead Amer-
ica and the world out of the worst reces-
sion since the Great Depression, Mrs
Maynard-Gibson said: “Regrettably,
this budget gives no hope to Bahami-
ans. It is not visionary. It repeats the
same paradigm that has limited the
vision and power of our people for far
too long.

“I looked for the vision that would

raise the power, dignity
and self esteem of our peo-
ple. [found none. I looked
for the vision that would
bring our people more
empowerment. I found
none. I looked for the
vision that would give
hope and I found none.”

Mrs Maynard-Gibson,
former attorney general
and now leader of oppo-
sition business in the sen- |
ate, noted that the
Bahamas is the size of a
small multinational com-
pany. “When companies
budget, they budget to
achieve clear objectives.
The Bahamas should be no different.
What should be our ‘Vision 2020’?
What can we ask all Bahamians to buy
into, work towards and sacrifice for?”
she asked.

The senator then outlined a prospec-
tive “Vision 2020” which would include:
¢ Bahamians owning more than 50



Allyson Maynard-Gibson

per cent of the tourism
product

¢ Bahamians owning
more than 50 per cent of
the financial services prod-
uct

¢ A 100 per cent growth
in Bahamian entrepre-
neurship

¢ The satisfaction of 50
per cent the country’s food
needs with locally grown
products

e The improvement of
the national average in
English and Math from E
to B, and the improvement
of the national average
overall from D to C.

¢ A national plan for training, retrain-
ing and equipping citizens for cutting
edge, value added, 21st century service

¢ Universal health care for all
Bahamians including a national plan
for good health, including parks, recre-
ation and beach access

¢ A legal system where all matters
are brought to trial within two years

¢ A system of governance where rou-
tine applications, and major policy deci-
sions are “depoliticised” and where,
once all requirements are met, perma-
nent residence or any permit is auto-
matically granted

¢ A system of governance where the
people elect all persons who will make
decisions on their behalf

¢ The creation of a reliable and
affordable utility supply system and a 50
per cent decrease on fossil fuel depen-
dence

¢ E-government and easy access for
everyone desiring to do business with
government, full access to information
impacting government decisions (plan-
ning, environment, economic projec-
tions, et cetera) and the appointment of
aE Czar

¢ Universal access to the world wide
web

¢ A land policy that ensures access to
Bahamian land and patrimony for
future generations

¢ Policies evaluated to measure the
extent to which they enhance and
strengthen family life

The Bahamas plays host to
Florida film commissioners

IN an effort to forge an
even stronger working rela-
tionship with Florida’s film
industry, the Bahamas Film
Commission, in conjunction
with Bahamas FilmInvest
International Ltd, hosted
eight Florida film commis-
sioners to an extended week-
end of activities.

The commissioners, who
recently unanimously voted
the Bahamas Film Commis-
sion into their group,
engaged in dialogue with the
Ministry of Tourism and
local industry partners, and
toured to scout locations
throughout New Providence
and Harbour Island.

Bahamas Film Commis-
sioner Craig Woods said his
greatest hope is that the
Bahamas government will
become more appreciative of
the local film industry as the
Commission and Bahamas
FilmInvest International
strengthens ties with
the neighbouring power-
house.

Contribution

“['m not sure if it’s going
to be the third pillar of our

Film Commission in April
2003,
filmed 19 movies, six in the

*
4

the Bahamas has

that’s been going on for
many years,” he said.
This is the second visit for

= ma in a a Mi



PICTURED (L TO R) ARE: Owen Bethel, president of Bahamas FilmInvest International Ltd; Graham
Winick, president of Film Florida; and Craig Woods, president of the Bahamas Film Commission.

of the Pirates
Caribbean series.

of the

President of Film Florida

partnership as one of the
group’s best.

“We like to think of the
Bahamas as our really close
neighbours and we like to
look to you for all of the
advantages and opportuni-
ties as it presents and how
we can integrate some of
those possibilities,” he said.

Berlin

“When we went to Berlin
this year for the European
Film Market, so many pro-
ducers from Europe were
coming to us and saying ‘tell
us about the Bahamas, tell
us what the Bahamas can do
for us, tell us about their co-
production models.’ And we
kept saying, ‘let’s get back
to you on that.’

“We think this is a great
opportunity for our two
areas to really come together
and to attract projects that
are interested in both of us.”

Mr Winick, who is respon-
sible for Film Florida’s mar-
keting and legislative strate-
gy, expressed his gratitude
to Bahamas FilmInvest and
the Bahamas Film Commis-
sion for their continuing

economy,” Mr Woods said,
“but I know it can make a
significant contribution to
the development of Bahami-
ans in terms of developing
their artistic skills in front of
and behind the camera and
we have seen that happen.
“While we now have an
informal relationship, we’re
hoping to formalise it where-
by it can be enshrined in the
various film commissions’
jurisdictions’ policy,” he said.
Since Mr Woods joined the

last year alone. The Bahamas
is also the only country to
have been unanimously vot-
ed into Film Florida as an
associate member.

“That’s a tribute to the
synergy that exists between
Florida and the Bahamas

a ee
is)

a tah)
PHONE: 322-2157



NOTICE

All persons with vehicles remaining on
Kelly’s Dock, Twenty-One days after the date of arrival
will be sold to cover storage fees.

Please contact our Customer Service Dept. at

322-2142/322-2813/356-0575

MANAGEMENT

Betty K. Agencies Limited

East Street North
Nassau, Bahamas



Film Florida, who travelled
to Grand Bahama in 2006
after the phenomenal success

Graham Winick said the
group was excited to accept
the invitation and credits the

efforts to foster closer rela-
tions between both countries.

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT

NOTICE

BAY STREET

NASSAU STREET TO VICTORIA AVENUE
ROADWAY CONSTRUCTION

30" June to 14" July 2009

In an effort to relieve current traffic congestion problems
BAHAMAS HOT MIX has been contracted for the paving of
West Bay Street between Blake Rd and Nassau St, Marlborough
St, Navy Lion Rd, and Bay Street to Mackey St. Paving works
will be commencing from Blake Rd, which require traffic

management involving road closures, and diversions for the route.

Paving Works include the following times:

¢ 7:00 pm to 6:30 am

Local diversions will be sign posted in due course and further
information will be provided in local media.


PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Five heritage
Sites unveiled in
Grand Bahama

THE Ministry Of Tourism
and Aviation has unveiled five
new heritage sites on Grand
Bahama. They are the Mer-
maid Pond in Lewis Yard, the
Pinder’s Point Lighthouse,
Hawksbill Creek, the boiling
hole in Hepburn Town, and
Fern, Gully and Josey Cave.

The Mermaid Pond can be
heard sucking and blowing
each time the tide ebbs and
flows. The Pinder’s Point
Lighthouse was built in the
late 1700s to early 1800s.
Hawksbill Creek is named
after the now endangered tur-
tle that use to frequent its
waters. The boiling hole is
known for how its waters swirl
with the movement of the
tide. The cave was where res-
idents in the Holmes’ Rock
community took refuge from
a serious hurricane.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



The Bahamas is ‘ready to
assist’ crisis-hit Honduras

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas stands
“ready to assist” Honduras
wherever it can following the
forced removal of that coun-
try’s elected President Manuel
Zelaya on Sunday.

Bahamian Ambassador to
the Organisation of Ameri-
can States C A Smith said the
Bahamas condemns the “bru-
tal assault and the interrup-
tion of the democratic process
in Honduras and demands the
immediate reinstatement of
the democratically elected
government and the resump-
tion of peace in the region.”

Pro-Zelaya protesters have
clashed with authorities in the
streets of Honduras since Mr
Zelaya was forcibly ousted
from the country by the mili-
tary on the weekend.

His removal - denounced as
a coup by many world leaders
who have come out in sup-
port of Mr Zelaya - came on
the same day that he had
organised for a non-binding
referendum on extending
presidential term limits to be
held.

This intention had alarmed
certain sectors, who felt he
was trying to hold onto power
by irregular means.

Mr Zelaya, who was sent
off on a plane to Costa Rica,
claims he simply wanted to
canvass public opinion.

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Ambassador to OAS speaks out after
removal of that country’s president

While the outside world has
expressed its condemnation
of the military’s response,
inside Honduras the action is
supported by the country’s
Congress and Supreme Court,
which are of the view that
President Zelaya was acting
“illegally” by holding the ref-
erendum.

The “coup” represents the
first such action in the region
in over 16 years and is con-
sidered a major political crisis.

Joining the many world
leaders and diplomats who
have condemned the events
and called for the reinstate-
ment of President Zelaya, Mr
Smith also called for an imme-
diate meeting of foreign min-
isters “in order that they may
assist in bringing some sem-
blance of peace” to Hon-
duras.

Heightening the pressure
on the Central American
country, the United Nations

eR la)

OFFICIALS SIGN Tourist anaee Card agreements. Pictured (from

man, and Dr Johnathan Rodgers, TSP president.

THE new Tourist Mango
Card, a project by the Min-
istry of Tourism and Aviation
and Transfer Solution
Providers Ltd (TSP), is
expected to be available with-
in the next two months.

The Tourist Mango Cards
allows for cashless financial
transactions with merchants.
Visitors or other individuals
can make payments for ser-
vices or buy goods using the
card. The cards will be avail-
able for purchase in varying
amounts, up to $100.

Director General of
Tourism Vernice Walkine said
tourism professionals in the
Bahamas are always secking
to exceed the expectations of
guests, and the Mango Card
will allow this to be accom-
plished through enhanced
safety and convenience.

“Visitors to the Bahamas
will be able to make transac-
tions with added convenience
and in a much safer environ-
ment due to the electronic
payment system offered by
this Bahamian software and
technology company,” Ms
Walkine said.

“The safety of the card has

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General Assembly yesterday
passed a resolution calling for
the reinstatement of Mr
Zelaya.

The resolution calls “firmly
and categorically on all states
to recognise no government
other than that” of Mr
Zelaya.

CARICOM yesterday also
released an official statement,
condemning the military
action which has interrupted
the democratic process in
Honduras and which contra-
venes the principles of the
Inter-American Democratic
Charter.

“The Caribbean Communi-

ty is also deeply concerned by
reports that a number of gov-
ernment officials and diplo-
matic representatives have
been detained and may have
been physically harmed. The
Caribbean Community calls
on all the parties involved in
the developments in Hon-
duras to refrain from any
recourse to violence and to
pursue a peaceful resolution
to the current situation,” the
statement said.

Mr Zelaya has pledged to
see out his term as president,
which ends in January 2010,
and claims he will return to
the country on Thursday.

aS

A new way to pay!

wy fo pay!



m left) are Vernice Walkine, Director General of Tourism; Julian Francis, TSP chair-

mango

i



MINISTRY OF TOURISM AND AVIATION officials and Transfer Service Providers (TSP) seal their partnership with
ahandshake. Pictured (from left) are Raymond Harrison, general manager of Tours and Entertainment in the
Ministry of Tourism and Aviation; Vernice Walkine, Director General of Tourism; Julian Francis, TSP chairman,
and Dr Johnathan Rodgers, TSP president.

benefits that will outlast our
guests’ time in the Bahamas.
When they return home, we
will be the beneficiaries of an
enhanced reputation due to
the improved safety that these
electronic payments will pro-

Pd

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Dr Johnathan Rodgers,
president of TSP, said 85 cents
of every tourist dollar even-
tually leaves the Bahamas. In
the case of arrivals by sea, esti-
mates are as high as $13 leav-
ing the country for each dollar
that remains, he said.

“This really shows that
there is a tremendous leakage
of money out of the Bahamas
and this economic model is
not sustainable,” he said. “We
have a GDP of about $6 bil-
lion and tourism accounts for
60 per cent of that GDP. If
we can increase the amount
of money that stays here by
five cents, this will translate
into another $1.2 billion stay-
ing in the Bahamian economy
every year, and this is almost
as much as government makes
in total every year.”

Julian Francis, chairman of
TSP, said the Bahamas has
not maximised the economic
possibilities of the tourism
business. He said there is a
market of roughly 4.5 million
tourists coming to the
Bahamas every year, and they
provide business opportuni-
ties that Bahamians can tap
into.

Mr Francis said tourists are
used to the convenience of
cashless transactions in their
home countries. He believes
that they will be eager to
utilise the Mango Card while
visiting the Bahamas.
PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



NIB bosses to be made redundant

Union president accused
of ‘abandoning’ members
FROM page one

time for today’s 1.30pm meeting at the
Department of Labour.

“T find it amazing she would leave the coun-
try at such a sensitive time in the negotia-
tions,” said the source, who asked to remain
anonymous.

Meanwhile, Minister
of Labour Dion Foulkes
told The Tribune the
government received the
nurse’s written rejection
of the offer it made to
them last week but it is
not prepared to budge.

“The nurses indicated
to (health) minister
(Hubert) Minnis that
they reject our proposal
and that they are insist-
ing that they receive full
insurance by an insur-
ance company immedi-
ately,” said Mr Foulkes, who attended last
week’s meeting where the Government put its
latest offer to the BNU.

“T have been advised by Dr Minnis that
the Government’s offer is not going to change.
That is the final offer by the Government,”
added the minister.

He said that neither he or Dr Minnis would
be attending today’s meeting but added that
officials fromthe Public Hospitals Authority
and the Department of Labour would be pre-
sent.

In Tuesday’s meeting last week, the Gov-
ernment proposed that it could implement
the postponed healthcare insurance cover-
age for the nurses - initially expected to come
into effect today - by July 1 2010, and in the
meantime, would cover the cost of treatment
for all work-related injuries.

This could take place at Princess Margaret
Hospital, in the Bahamian private sector or
abroad.

The nurses would also get their postponed
four per cent salary increase at that time and
the Government would make available sev-
eral “private rooms” at PMH in which they
would be eligible to receive treatment.

But last week Ms Hamilton said that nurs-
es have expressed their disappointment with
the Government’s proposal, saying they can
already apply for the cost of treatment for
work-related injuries to be covered by the
National Insurance Board.

“Tt doesn’t give us anything different,”
asserted Ms Hamilton, who said nurses who
suffer non-work related sickness and those
who cannot be accomodated in the three pri-
vate rooms will be left in the lurch.

Yesterday Mr Foulkes said he had been
informed that Ms Hamilton is out of the coun-
try and had no idea whether she would be
back in time for the meeting as she is legally
mandated to be.

Dion Foulkes



FROM page one

of Buildings, Melicianna Bethel were all informed
of their fate on Monday,

Meanwhile, The Tribune understands that a
fifth position - that of Deputy Director in charge
of the Family Islands - may also be on the chop-
ping board, although this has not been confirmed.

Mr Cargill said the changes will help “strate-
gically position the (National Insurance) Board
for the future”, streamlining it and enhancing
operational efficiency in terms of contribution
collections and expense management while
improving customer service levels.

In doing so, it reacts to red flags raised in a
number of actuarial reviews conducted with ref-
erence to the Board.

Under the old structure there was a “duplica-
tion of efforts” and new roles will require “a
completely different skill set” from those who
fill them, said Mr Cargill.

The Board will now “require a higher level of
performance from our executives as we move
forward” and each will be subject to goal-orien-
tated and “measurable” evaluations of their per-
formance, he added.

While the public will not see a noticeable
improvement in its work “immediately”, they
will do so in the “short term”.

In an official statement on the move, the NIB
said its original organisational structure was out-
dated and not relevant in today’s environment.

It added that “risk assessment studies” con-
ducted by Bahamian and external firms had “con-
firmed that NIB, in its current state, carries con-

siderable business risks” that could be addressed
through efforts to enhance operational efficien-

y.

“After reviewing the external recommenda-
tions, jointly with the unsatisfactory findings of
prior year Risk Assessment and the Internal
Control and System Assurance findings, the
Board concluded that expedient action was
required in order to re-align and reposition NIB
strategically for the longer term,” said Cargill in
the statement.

Under its new organisational structure, the
NIB is looking to fill the positions of: Vice Pres-
ident (VP) of Technology, VP of Business Sup-
port Services, VP of investments and VP of
Finance. These employees will join current VP of
Human Resources Regenda King, VP of Medical
Dr Kevin Bowe, VP of Legal Affairs Heather
Maynard, Actuary Derek Osborne, Financial
Controller Sonia Gill and a VP of Internal Audit-
ing.

They will work as part of the NIB’s new and far
more “centralised” operational model.

An ongoing effort to move in the direction of
centralisation has already been responsible for
the significant increase in the number of cases of
NIB defaulters being brought before the courts
for prosecution, said Mr Cargill.

Last week 20 companies were brought before
the courts for owing the NIB hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars in backpayments. Among them
were Jones Communications and Solomon’s
Mines. Most were adjourned to September 15.

Yesterday attorney and aspiring politician Paul
Moss released a statement responding to the

redundancies in which he criticised the Govern-
ment for “continuing to mow down people in
the civil service.”

“Over the past year and a half, the govern-
ment has systematically been ‘restructuring’ the
civil service and by doing so they have devastat-
ed families and destroyed lives. Many still have
years left on their mortgages with children in
school and it is catastrophic to be summarily dis-
missed without carful planning. No caring gov-
ernment does this to its people knowing that
they will join the unemployment line in a time
when unemployment is expected to increase,”
said Mr Moss, who hopes to run in the St Cecil-
ia constituency in the next general election.

He questioned whether the Government is
concealing the possibility that it “cannot afford to
make payroll.”

Responding to the criticism that NIB’s re-
organisation may be callous at a time when job
opportunities for those made unemployed are
more meagre than in previous years, Mr Cargill
said the NIB has been “criticised by Bahamian
public as well as political parties for a lacking
operational efficiency over several months and
years” and has recognised that if the “fund is to
remain sound” the “status quo can no longer
remain.”

“We are seeking to ensure we deliver on
promises of providing effective social security
benefit to Bahamians over the long term,” said
the Director.

The changes that are being implemented have
been “unanimously endorsed” by the Board of
Directors, he added.

FROM page one

In April this year, the Govern-

BIC edging closer to privatisation

latory regime will seek to increase a

relatively short

time, he

retail distribution, and real estate
development; increased domestic
and foreign investment; an enhanced
tourism product; and, a modernised

ment introduced in Parliament three
Bills aimed at “a modern, transpar-
ent regulatory framework” for the
communications sector in the
Bahamas.

The Communications Bill, the
Utilities Regulation and Competi-
tion Authority (URCA) Bill and the
Utilities Appeal Tribunal (UAT)
Bill were debated and passed in ear-
ly May.

“As the Government continues to
work towards the privatisation of
BTC and the liberalisation of the
Bahamas’ electronic communica-
tions sector, this regulatory reform
was a critical step towards ensuring
that international best practices stan-
dards are met, while also enhancing
the value proposition to potential
partners for BTC,” the Prime Min-
ister said.

With UCRA in place as an inde-
pendent regulator to promote good
business practices and foster a com-
petitive environment, the new regu-

investor and consumer confidence,
he explained.

“Now that the new regulatory
structure is approved and all other
due diligence largely completed by
the Privatisation Committee and its
team of advisors, the stage is set for
the commencement of the privati-
sation process,” the Prime Minister
said.

Any potential strategic partner
“must be a well-resourced entity or
consortium with established cre-
dentials in the telecommunications
industry that can provide the com-
pany with growth opportunities and
position BTC for long-term success.

“The strategy of those interested
parties must also be aligned with the
key objectives of the Government,
who will continue to hold a 49 per-
cent ownership stake in the compa-
ny,” he said.

The Government is “committed
to the execution of an efficient
process” to be completed within

said.

He said the new regulatory struc-
ture and liberalised market are
expected to drive growth in telecom-
munications, which will yield signif-
icant positive economic benefits for
the Bahamas including: job creation,
specifically in the areas of telecom-
munications infrastructure develop-
ment and maintenance, construction,

infrastructure for business.

“To encourage healthy competi-
tion, fixed line telecommunications
services, cable and IPTV and inter-
net services will be liberalised imme-
diately upon coming into force of
the Communications Act.

“Mobile services will be liberalised
two years following the privatisation
of BTC,” the Prime Minister said.

Harl Taylor murder trial to open

FROM page one

The trial into Mr Taylor’s death will be heard before Senior Supreme

Court Justice Anita Allen.

Prosecutors are expected to call some 25 witnesses during the trial,

most of whom are police officers.

Prosecuting the case is Bernard Turner, Direcector of Public Prosecu-
tions, along with Darnell Dorsette and Neil Brathwaite.
A jury of six men, six women and three alternates was selected yester-

day to hear the case.

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009, PAGE 11



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Williams sisters reach semis

@ By STEPHEN WILSON
AP Sports Writer

WIMBLEDON, England (AP) —
Venus and Serena Williams are one
round away from meeting in another
Wimbledon final.

Five-time champion Venus overpow-
ered Agnieszka Radwanska 6-1, 6-2 on
Tuesday, and two-time winner Serena
followed her into the semifinals with a 6-
2, 6-3 win over Victoria AzarenKa.

No. 3-seeded Venus will next face top-
ranked Dinara Safina, who overcame 15
double-faults and beat German teenag-
er Sabine Lisicki 6-7 (5), 6-4, 6-1 to reach
the Wimbledon semis for the first time.

In the bottom half of the draw, No. 4
Elena Dementieva defeated Italy’s
Francesca Schiavone 6-2, 6-2 to set up a
semifinal encounter with No. 2 Serena
Williams.

It’s the first time since 2006 that all
four top-seeded women reached the
semifinals at a Grand Slam tournament.

The Williams sisters overwhelmed
their opponents Tuesday with breath-
taking displays of power tennis, showing
why they have dominated on the grass of
the All England Club for most of the
past decade.

“We definitely upped our levels of
game today,” Serena said.

Venus, seeking her third straight Wim-
bledon title, outhit the 14th-ranked Pole
from all parts of the court and proved
again that she is the dominant female
player on grass.

“Do I feel invincible?” Williams said.
“T’d like to say yes, but I really do work
at it.”

Williams had her left leg taped up
again but showed no weakness at all as
she ripped 29 winners — compared to six
for Radwanska — in a match that lasted
just 68 minutes on a sunbaked Court 1.

“Tcan’t complain,” Williams said. “?’m
in the semifinals of Wimbledon, right
where I want to be. I just need to take
another step forward.”

With Venus looking on from the guest
box, Serena swept through the first set
against the eighth-ranked Azarenka in 26
minutes. After being broken to go down
3-2 in the second, she won four straight
games and held serve at love to finish the
match in commanding fashion. Serena
had nine aces and 26 winners, with only
seven unforced errors.

Azarenka had beaten Serena in
straight sets in their last match in the
final at Key Biscayne, Fla., in April.

“T really wanted to do well today,”
Serena said. “I didn’t do well the last
time we played. I was not feeling great. I
felt like I really wanted to show up

Boozer decides
to stay with Jazz

HB By DOUG ALDEN
AP Sports Writer

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) —
Carlos Boozer has reconsidered
free agency, or at least put it
off a year.

Boozer let the Utah Jazz
know on Tuesday that he will
stay with the team for the final
year of his contract rather than
opting out and becoming a free
agent — which he once said he
intended to do.

Boozer backed off his original
statement and said when the
season ended he wanted to con-
sider all of his options.

He chose not to chance an
iffy free agent market for more
money and possibly a long-term
deal, taking the $12.7 million
he’s guaranteed next season
from the Jazz.

Boozer took until the final
day to reach a decision.

Utah was still waiting Tues-
day to hear from center
Mehmet Okur, who also had
the option to return for the final
year of his contract.

When healthy, Boozer has
been the Jazz’s top scorer and
rebounder and helped lead
Utah to three straight playoff
appearances. He’s been an All-
Star twice and was a member



FIVE-TIME champion Venus Williams (above) overpowered Agnieszka Radwanska 6-1, 6-2 on
Tuesday, and two-time winner Serena Williams (top) followed her into the semifinals with a
6-2, 6-3 win over Victoria Azarenka.

today.”

Asked whether she also felt unbeat-
able at Wimbledon, Serena said: “I don’t
feel invincible, but I definitely should

IN THIS March 28 file photo, Utah Jazz’s Carlos Boozer celebrates after
making a shot in the first half of game against the Phoenix Suns in Salt
Lake City. Boozer told the Jazz on Tuesday, June 30, 2009, that he would
return to the team instead of opting out of the final year of his contract and
becoming a free agent. Boozer is scheduled to make $12.7 million next sea-
son, his sixth with the Jazz.
(AP Photo: George Frey)

(AP Photos)

have the same attitude. ’'m going to try
to feel that way, too.”

Only once in the last nine years has
there been a Wimbledon women’s final

that didn’t feature at least one of the
Williams sisters. The sisters were the
only two Grand Slam winners in the
women’s quarterfinals — Serena has 10
major titles and Venus seven.

The sisters have met in three Wim-
bledon finals, including last year. Serena
has won two of the three, in 2002 and ’03.
They are 10-10 in career meetings.

“T would love it to be a Williams final,
and so would she,” Venus said. “That
would be great.”

The sisters’ father, Richard Williams,
said he is certain his daughters will be in
the final again.

“T think they are both playing super
well,” he said. “They’re playing the
Williams way. And when you’re play-
ing the Williams way, it’s very difficult
for anyone to touch you.”

Venus is trying to become the first
woman since Steffi Graf in 1991-93 to
win three Wimbledon titles in a row.

Venus Williams raced to a 5-0 lead
against Radwanska, and finished off the
first set with back-to-back aces. Williams
dropped only two of 18 points on serve in
the set.

“That first set for me was almost per-
fect,” Williams said.

Safina, who has risen to No. 1 in the
world despite never having won a Grand
Slam title, struggled against the 19-year-
old Lisicki. The Russian had to come
from behind after double-faulting to lose
the first set tiebreaker, smashing her
racket to the turf and drawing a warning
from the chair umpire.

“T was Santa Claus on the court, serv-
ing so many double-faults,” Safina said.

Safina was down 3-2 on serve in the
second set, but got the one break in the
seventh game to force a third set. The
41st-ranked Lisicki received treatment
on her right calf after going down 4-1 in
the third. In the next game, Safina was
up 40-0 before serving three straight dou-
ble-faults. She still managed to hold and
then broke for the match.

“T was tough mentally, that was the
key today,” Safina said.

The men’s quarterfinals are set for
Wednesday with five-time champion
Roger Federer against 6-foot-10 Croat
Ivo Karlovic; No. 3 Andy Murray vs.
Spanish wild card Juan Carlos Ferrero;
2002 champion Lleyton Hewitt vs. two-
time finalist Andy Roddick; and No. 3
Novak Djokovic vs. Tommy Haas.

Temperatures topped 90 degrees on
Tuesday, with no need to close the roof
on Centre Court.

Medical officials on site said they treat-
ed more than 130 people, mostly for
heat-related problems. One person was
taken to a hospital.

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of last year’s U.S. Olympic gold
medal team, but injuries have
taken him out for large chunks
of three of his five seasons in
Utah.

“We are excited that Carlos
has decided to remain with the
Jazz,” general manager Kevin
O’Connor said in a release.
“We are hopeful he can contin-

Cuban, Mavs in hot pursuit of keeping Kidd

@ By JAIME ARON
AP Sports Writer

DALLAS (AP) — Mark
Cuban wants to be first in line
to talk to Jason Kidd.

Cuban posted Tuesday on
Twitter, “Getting ready to fly
up to NYC for Free Agent
meeting at 12:01,” and that free

ue to play at an All-Star level
and will have an injury-free sea-
son.”

Boozer has averaged 19
points and 10 rebounds since
Utah signed him away from the
Cleveland Cavaliers as a
restricted free agent five years
ago, but has only played in 276
of a possible 410 with the Jazz.

agent is Kidd, according to a
person with knowledge of the
situation. The person spoke on
condition of anonymity because
NBA rules prevent comment-
ing on such things.

Cuban has made it clear he
wants to keep Kidd, but it might
not be that easy. The New York
Knicks are believed to be inter-

He was limited to 37 games last
season, due largely to an injury
that required surgery on his left
knee in January.

Utah learned Monday that
reserve shooting guard Kyle
Korver exercised his option to
play out his contract for $5.2
million.

ested, too, as could LeBron
James and the Cavaliers or per-
haps Kobe Bryant and the Lak-
ers.

Kidd has never won an NBA
championship, but has won an
Olympic gold medal alongside
James and Bryant.

ESPN.com first reported
Cuban’s meeting with Kidd.

a

es

Nadal left off
Spain team
for Davis Cup

LONDON (AP) — Top-
ranked Rafael Nadal was left
off Spain’s team for the Davis
Cup quarterfinals on Tues-
day because of sore knees.

Nadal has struggled with
tendinitis in his knees, which
forced him to skip defending
his Wimbledon title. He has
not played a tour match since
losing in the fourth round at
the French Open.

Fernando Verdasco, Tom-
my Robredo, David Ferrer
and Feliciano Lopez will rep-
resent Spain when the
defending champions host
Germany on outdoor clay in
Marbella, the International
Tennis Federation said.

In the other quarterfinals
from July 10-12, it’s Czech
Republic vs. Argentina; Croa-
tia vs. United States; and
Israel vs. Russia.

Germany will play without
Wimbledon quarterfinalist
Tommy Haas and go with
Philipp Kohlschreiber, Nico-
las Kiefer, Mischa Zverev and
Andreas Beck.

The 32-time champion
Americans will again use
Andy Roddick, James Blake,
Bob Bryan and Mike Bryan
when they visit Croatia. They
will face Marin Cilic, Ivo
Karlovic, Roko Karanusic
and Lovro Zovko on indoor
clay in Porec.

Tomas Berdych, Radek
Stepanek, Ivo Minar and
Lukas Dlouhy will lead the
Czechs on hard indoor courts
in Ostrava against Argenti-
na’s Juan Martin del Potro,
Jose Acasuso, Leonardo
Mayer and Juan Monaco.

Israel, which made the
Davis Cup quarterfinals for
the first trme since 1987, will
be represented by Dudi Sela,
Harel Levy, Jonathan Erlich
and Andy Ram on indoor
hard courts in Tel Aviv. Rus-
sia’s lineup will be Dmitry
Tursunov, Marat Safin, Igor
Andreev and Mikhail Youzh-

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PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009

National 38th RBC National Swimming Championships...



Track &
Field
results

HERE is a look at the results of
the BAAA’s National Track and
Field Championships held over the
weekend:

Women’s Division

100 metres - 1, Debbie Fergu-
son-McKenzie, 11,12; 2, Chandra
Sturrup, 11.22; 3, Sheniqua Fergu-
son, 11.50; 4, Jernise Saunders,
11.80; 5, Tamica Clarke, 11.98; 6,
Tia Rolle, 12.14; 7, Tamara Rigby,
12.24; 8, V'Alonee Robinson, 12.28.

200 - 1, Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie, 22.83; 2, Sheniqua Fer-
guson, 23.48; 3, Jernise Saunders,
24.45; 4; - Courtney Patterson, US
Virgin Islands, 24.61.

400 - 1, Christine Armertil, 51.96;
2, Shakeitha Henfield, 54.07; 3,
Sasha Rolle, 54.08; 4, Shaunae
Miller, 55.52; 5, Ashley Hanna,
56.63; 6, Deandra Knowles, 1:01.24.

800 - 1, Hughnique Rolle, 2:21.19;
2, Ashley Johnson, 2:23.97.

100 hurdles - 1, Tiavanni Thomp-
son, 13.69; 2, Krystal Bodie, 13.94;
3, Petra McDonald, 14.35; - Kierre
Beckles, Barbados, 13.67.

Triple jump - 1, Donnevette Mar-
tin, 41-5 1/4; 2, Keythra Richards,
39-0 1/4.

High jump - 1, Kenya Culmer,
5-7 1/4.

Long jump - 1, Bianca Stuart, 20-
10; 2, Keythra Richards, 18-3 1/4.

Discus - 1, Gabrielle Nixon, 132-
Q; 2, Juliann Duncanson, 123-6.

Javelin - 1, Lavern Eve, 178-2;
Terae Sweeting, fouled.

Shot put - 1, Juiiann Duncombe,
35-3 3/4.

Men’s Division

100 metres - 1, Derrick Atkins,
10.25; 2, Adrian Griffith, 10.44; 3,
Shamar Sands, 10.54; 4, Rodney
Green, 10.70; 5, Karlton Rolle,
10.71; 6, Jamal Forbes, 10.75; 7,
Derek Carey, 10.80; 8, Kohfe
Miller, 10.95.

100 consolation - 1, Ramon Git-
tens, 10.46; 2, Woodrow Randal,
10.65; 3, Geno Jones, 10.93; 4,
Chamal Bethel, 11.24; 5, Michael
Sands, 12.25.

200 - Karlton Rolle, 21.20; Adri-
an Griffith, 21.27; Jamial Rolle,
21.50; Kareem Parker, 22.68.

400 - 1, Chris Brown, 45.21; 2,
Ramon Miller, 45.35; 3, Andrett
Bain, 46.02; 4, Aaron Cleare, 46.34;
5, Mchael Mathieu, 46.37; 6, Avard
Moncur, 47.52; Latoy Williams,
DNF; Andrae Williams, DNS.

400 consolation - 1, LaSean Pick-
stock, 47.24; 2, Delano Deveaux,
49.63; 3, Renaldo Gibson, 49.74;
Phillip Stubbs, DNF; Brandon
Miller, DNF.

800 - 1, Cerio Rolle, 1:55.49; 2,
Laquardo Newbold, 1:55.90; 3,
Kenneth Wallace-Whitfield,
1:56.85; 4, James Carey, 1:56.92; 5,
Lester Taylor, 2:05.96.

1,500 metres - 1, O'Neil Williams,
4:00.91; 2, James Carey, 4:04.95.

5,000 - 1, O'Neil Williams,
16:21.28; 2, Jason Williams,
17:26.33; Delroy Boothe, DNF;
Kevin Morris, DNF.

110 hurdles - 1, Ryan Brathwaite,
Barbados, 13.57; 2, Shane Brath-
waite, Barbados, 14.33; 3, Christo-
pher Bethel, DQ.

U-18 110 hurdles - 1, Patrick
Bodie, 14.39; 2, Aaron Wilmore,
14.60.

400 hurdles - 1, Carlyle Thomp-
son, 52.79; 2, Nathan Arnett, 53.29;
3, Ednal Rolle, 54.30.

U-18 400 hurdles - 1, Nejmi
Burnside, 53.84.

Long jump - 1, Osbourne Moxey,
26-0 3/4; 2, Rudon Bastian, 25-4
1/2; 3, Stanley Poitier, 22-9 3/4’; 4,
Justin Gray, 21-4 1/4; 5, Tehneil
Babbs, 20-10 3/4; 6, Permeko Mur-
ray, 20-9 3/4; 7, Rashad Moxey, 19-
0.

High jump - 1, Trevor Barry, 7-3
3/4; 2, Raymond Higgs, 7-2 1/4; 3,
Donald Thomas, 7-1 1/2; 4, Jamal
Wilson, 6-10 1/4.

Triple jump - 1, Leevan Sands,
56-03; 2, Antillio Bastian, 49-09; 3,
J'Vente Deveaux, 49-07; 4, Lamar
Delaney, 49-03.50; 5, Anjourn
Armaly, 48-11.75; 6, Lathone
Minns, 47-02.25; 7, Lathario Minns;
8, Craig Charlow, 45-00.50; — Samyr
Laine, Republic of Hait, 52-04.50; —
Tehneil Babbs, foul.

Javelin - 1, Ramond Farrington,
191-0; 2, Livingstone Brown, 171-
10; 3, Coyotito Gray, 167-3; 4,
Devon Rox, 160-10; 5, Benja Light-
bourne, 156-2; 6, Henry Butler, 149-
8

Discus - 1, Delron Innis, 114-5; 2,
Benja Lightbourne, 111-11; 3,
Shaun Miller, 107-2; 4, Rashad
McCoy, 106-11; 5, Mark Sterling,
91-2; 6, Bernard Newbold, 87-7.

Hammer - 1, Mark Sterling, 123-
6.

Javelin - 1, Raymond Farrington,
191-0; 2, Livingstone Brown, 171-
10; 3, Coyotito Gray, 167-3; 4,
Devon Rox, 160-10; 5, Benja Light-
bourne, 156-2; 6, Henry Butler, 149-
8

Shot put - 1, Delron Innis, 43-8
1/2; 2, Maurice Conyers, 40-0; 3,
Rashad McCoy, 34-4 1/2; 4, Shaun
Miller, 32-10 1/2; 5, Mark Sterling,
32-8 1/2.

Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff

The RBC National Swimming Championships,
hosted by Bahamas Swimming Federation,
produced a myriad of new national records,
international qualifiers and a repeat champion
in one of the most populated meets in BSF
history. Here are some action shots of the
event...

TRIBUNE SPORTS

rea RUT
Day road
RR wey! |S

HERE are the results of
the Bahamas Olympic Asso-
ciation’s 22nd Olympic Day
Road Race held on Satur-
day:

WOMEN’S RUN

Under-20 - 1, Paulette
Strachan, 18th, 45.57

20-29 - 1, Elizabeth
Shadeock, 15th, 35.08

30-39 - 1, Rayvonne
Bethel, 12th, 32.01

2nd, Jasmine Jones, 13th,
33.05

3rd, June Cartwright, 19th,
50.10

MEN’S RUN

Under-20 - 1, Ashland
Murray Jr., 31.48

20-29 - 1, Sidney Collie,
2nd, 23.53

30-39 - 1, Delroy Boothe,
23.15; 2, Roy Sanchez, 7th,
28.04; 3, Dereck Ferguson,
Oth, 28.55

40-49 1, Ashland Murray,
3rd, 27.05; 3, Zammie
Williams, 10th, 30.07

50-59 - 1, Raymond
Rudon, 4th, 27.46; 2, Philip
Moss, 5th, 27.58; 3, James
Bodie, 8th, 28.52

60-plus - 1, George Smith,
14th, 33.32

WOMEN’S WALK

U-20 - 1, Tenaz Cooper,
16th, 46.33

20-29 - 1, Kelsie Johnson,
27th, NT available

30-39 - 1, Anastacia Moul-
trie, 8th, 28.21; 2, Jannett
Cabistan, 9th, 29.20; 3, Mar-
cia Deleveaux, 11th, 30.47

40-49 - 1, Cheryl Rolle,
3rd, 22.55

50-59 - 1, Kathie Dillette,
12th, 35.55; 2, Denise Sands,
13th, 35.57; 3, Janet Coop-
er, 14th, 41.32

MEN’S WALK

40-49 - 1, Don Cornish,
6th, 26.18; 2, Clarence Not-
tage, 7th, 26.48

50-59 - 1, Anthony
Cartwright, 5th, 25.02; 2,
George Clarke, 10th, 30.41

60-plus - 1, Richard
Adderley, Ist, 21.39; 2,
Leslie Miller, 2nd, 22.38; 3,
Eric Seymour, 4th, 22.59


THE TRIBUNE

Si

WEDNESDAY, JULY 1,



PAGE 13

or



ts

2009

PAGE 11 ¢ International sports news





8

Williams
sisters reach

semifinals...
See page 11

More than 20 new national
records set at swim meet

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

he 38th RBC

National Swim-

ming Champi-

onships, hosted by

the Bahamas
Swimming Federation, pro-
duced a myriad of new national
records, international qualifiers
and a repeat champion in one of
the most populated meets in
BSF history.

More than 20 new national
records were set at the four day
meet, with many of the coun-
try’s elite collegiate athletes
assaulting the record books.

Arianna Vanderpool- Wallace
lowered three meet records in
the 50m freestyle - 25.8s, 100m
free - 55.8s, 100m butterfly -
1:02.35s and 200m free -
2:08.66s.

The sophomore at Auburn
University in Alabama reached
the qualifying mark for the Cen-
tral American and Caribbean
games in each of the aforemen-
tioned events and the 50m but-
terfly - 28.05s.

She also surpassed the quali-
fying standards for the upcom-

yo

oo
=

Vanderpool-Wallace



ing 2010 Singapore Youth
Olympic Games in the 50 free
and 100 free.

Vanderpool-Wallace’s team-
mate at Auburn, Alana Dillete,
also set three new marks at the
Nationals while qualifying for
the CAC games in four events.

Dillete lowered times in the
50m backstroke - 30.30s, 50m
butterfly - 27.62s, and 100m
backstroke - 1:06.16s, while also
reaching the qualifying mark in
the 100m butterfly.

In the men’s division, Ken-

48th RBC National Swimming Championships was
one of the most populated events in BSF history

tucky Wildcat Vereance Bur-
rows set a new standard and
qualified for the CAC games in
the 50m butterfly. He also
reached qualifying standards in

the 50m butterfly, 100m butter-
fly and 100m free.

Other CAC Games qualifiers
at the Open Nationals includ-
ed Alicia Lightbourne (50

breast, 100 breast), Inoa Charl-
ton (50 free, 100 free), McKay-
la Lightbourn (100 back),
Michael McIntosh (50 breast),
Ariel Weech (50 free) and Ash-

YOUR CONNECTIO

rO THE WORLD

ley Butler (50 free).

In addition, 18 swimmers also
qualified for the Caribbean
Island Swimming Champi-
onships.

UBLIC NOTICE
TENDER FOR PREMIUM
SPOT ADVERTISEMENTS

Double duties for
Knowles today

mg By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MARK Knowles will have
double duties today at Wim-
bledon.

First, he and Mahesh Bhu-
pathi will play in the quarter-
final of the men’s doubles
against the team of Wesley
Moodie of the Republic of
South Africa and Dick Norman
of Belgium.

Knowles and Bhupathi are
the No.4 seeds in the tourna-
ment, while Moodie and Nor-
man are No.9.

Knowles, at age 37, will be
playing in his historic 1,000th
career doubles match, but he
has indicated that the record is
not as important as it is win-
ning.

The winning team will
advance to the semifinal where
they will face the top seeded
team of American identical
twin brothers Bob and Mike
Bryan.

The Bryans earned their trip
to the semis with a 6-2, 6-1, 6-4
win over the No.5 team of
Bruno Soares of Brazil and
Kevin Ullyett of Zimbabwe.

On the other half of the draw,
the No.2 seeded team of Daniel
Nestor and Nenad Zimonjic are
also into the semis. They
advanced with a 6-2, 6-3, 6-4
win over the No.8 team of
Lukasz Kubot of Poland and
Oliver Marach of Austria.

Knowles and Nestor won
three of the four Grand Slam
titles except Wimbledon before
they split up about three years
ago. However, they made it to
the final at Wimbledon in 2002.

Last year, Nestor and Zimon-
jic won the Wimbledon crown
while Knowles and Bhupathi
got bounced in the first round.
But before their split, Knowles
and Nestor reached the semifi-
nals in 2006.

Following their doubles
match, Knowles will have
another doubles to play when
he and his mixed pairs partner
Anna-Lena Groenefeld of Ger-
many meet Nestor and his
Russian partner Elena Vesni-
na.

That match was actually
scheduled to be played yester-
day, but was put off until today.

Before the match, Knowles
said Monday that he was look-
ing forward to facing Nestor.

Dynasty Stars continue
their undefeated streak

THE Bahamas Cricket Asso-
ciation’s top team continued
their undefeated streak toward
the playoffs with another pen-
nant leading win.

The Dynasty Stars won by
eight wickets over the Police to
further their division lead this
weekend at Windsor Park.

The Police were bowled out
for 80 runs with Gary Arm-
strong and Mark Taylor lead-
ing in runs with 25 and 16 runs
apiece.

Bowling for the Stars,
Johnathan Barry took four
wickets while Lee Melville took
three.

In their turn at bat, the Stars
scored 81 runs for the loss of
two wickets to claim the win by
eight. Barry also starred at the
plate with 29 runs while Ren-
ford Davson added 24. They
were the top scorers.

The second matchup of the
weekend, scheduled between
the Dockendale Titans and St
Agnes, was postponed by offi-
cials due to “unprepared
grounds.”

In other related news, less
than a week remains before the
Bahamas’ Under 19 National
Team is slated to depart for
regional competition in Toron-
to, Canada.

The International Cricket
Council Tournament is set for
July 5 and will include teams
from Argentina, the United
States and Canada.

The Bahamas and Cayman
Islands are the only Caribbean
nations that will compete.

The Bahamas is scheduled to
begin the tournament against
the United States on the open-
ing day, Monday July 5 and are
set to face Canada on Tuesday.

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite ten-
ders from the qeneéral public whe wish to advertise in our premium spots in

the 2010 Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a

specification document from BIC's

Head Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, or
BIC’s Head Office located in The Government Complex, Mall Drive, Free-
port Grand Bahama between the hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to

Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm on Monday July 13, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “Tender for PREMIUM SPOT ADVERTISEMENT" fo the attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin or
Acting President & CEO

The Bahamas Telecommunications
Company Limitec

#21 John F. Kennedy Drive,

2” Box N-3048, Nassau N.P.. Bohoameas

Mr. Henry Romer
Vice President - Northern Bahamas

The Bohoamas Telecommunications

ny Limited

The Govemn jent Com plex, Kall Grive
P,Q, Box F-42483, Freeport G.B., Bahamas

Comp

Premium Spot Advertisements

BRKE 40

Tet opie Ad Appa
fhe ed is coperderi
ped, Taal by Oe
ebed. "seg bodice for

dee ve 1 inches in inngan} The vie aah al
: dreaciory. This mci iy ony

Tears Ain; eh cht ed ce iy
oecorent of SAME AD

Spine Ad
a fi a
THE BAHAMAS 204"

EDOE Pantin

The aedge of the directory in Gepeecend on the thickness of the disactory:
tine? Var der 7 -

eciorE
tere okie
black ink

FROAT COVER TIP
oe ford coer t 7 ceed oo Ow bottom of the front coma. ft pune acooes the

fra ler ahi of tha ie eciors This ad wil be decoded. wherever wo dieoeey the
Geri OF ed dieses. Sind Debkine be pee oe FSO OER TIE

Front Cover Tip






Maa Gt



Questions on cruise deal

THE TRIBUNE

usiness

WEDNESDAY,

Teele 200

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Sir Jack’s company
sues son for $230k

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

company ultimately con-

trolled by Sir Jack Hay-

ward is suing his son for

$229,760 in alleged

unpaid rent that his

three Port Lucaya Marketplace busi-

nesses have built up over an eight-month

period, Rick Hayward telling Tribune

Business his “main priority” was his 75

staff, whose $15,000 weekly wage bill he
paid last week from his own pocket.

Bourbon Street Ltd, the Port Group

Ltd subsidiary that owns the Port Lucaya

Marketplace, filed a writ and statement

benefits for Bahamians

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net
and NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

TOUR/excursion providers
and Bay Street retailers yester-
day gave a mixed reaction to
the Government’s amesnd-
ments to the Cruise Overnight
Incentive Act, with some chal-
lenging the Government to
explain how the deal reached
with Carnival would benefit
Bahamian businesses and their
employees.

Although many were waiting
to obtain copies of the actual
amendments to the Act, one
tour operator, speaking on con-
dition of anonymity, told Tri-
bune Business it would be “a
piece of cake” for the cruise
lines, especially Carnival and
Royal Caribbean, to reach the

various thresholds where the
passenger departure tax rebates

AN

of claim against Rick Hayward’s LDV
Ltd, the holding firm for his three busi-
nesses - the Pub at Port Lucaya, La
Dolce Vita and East Restaurant - on
Thursday, June 25, the same day he and
his staff were locked out from all three
premises.

In its statement of claim, Bourbon
Street Ltd is demanding that Mr Hay-
ward’s LDV Ltd, of which he is the 75
per cent majority owner, pay the out-
standing $229,760 outstanding rent, plus
mesne profits of $28,720 per month from
July 1, 2009. Interest and costs are also
being sought.

Mesne profits are a charge, usually
identical to the monthly lease payment,

EX-Grand Bahama

which are sought by landlords from ten-
ants when they have the right to imme-
diate occupation of their property.

Bourbon Street alleged that on April
1, 2004, it had entered into a lease agree-
ment with Mr Hayward and LDV Ltd
for units 1,2,3 and 10 in Building 12 at
the Port Lucaya Marketplace, where the
Pub at Port Lucaya and La Dolce Vita
now sit.

Then, on December 1, 2007, the two
sides entered into another commercial
rental lease agreement for Unit 11 in
Building 12 at the Port Lucaya Market-
place, the home of East Restaurant.

“That at all material times, the plaintiff
[Bourbon Street] was in discussion with

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010



the defendant through its president, Rick
Hayward, who acted as the lawful agent
of the defendant to bind the defendant to
such agreements,” the statement of
claim, drafted by attorneys Davis & Co,
alleged.

“The terms of both agreements were
memoralised in writing in two documents
titled ‘Lease Agreement’ dated April 1,
2004, and December 1, 2007, respective-
ly. However, the same were never for-
mally executed by the defendant.”

Bourbon Street Ltd alleged that the
April 2004 lease for the Pub at Port
Lucaya and La Dolce Vita was for a five-

SEE page 4B

Ex-Chamber chief backs Comptroller

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

: t ; * Kelly's (Freeport) backs move to ‘return Customs to written law’ over use of C19 10-day bond
Tribune Business Editor

* Agrees government has lost revenue, but urges Customs to improve import entry checking,
processing and clearing efficiency to ensure firm use ‘front door, not the back door’

kicked in.

Concern was also expressed
that by designating the cruise
lines’ private islands - Coco Cay,
Half Moon Cay, Castaway Cay
and Great Stirrup Cay - as ‘des-
ignated ports’, the Government
was effectively giving the lines
‘carte blanche’ to call their
either exclusively or first,
bypassing Nassau and Freeport
as the prime ports of call. This,
of course, would mean fewer
benefits for Bahamian busi-
nesses reliant on the cruise
industry.

With passengers landing on
the private islands still count-
ing towards departure tax head
counts, one sour said: “In effect,
it gives them [the cruise lines]
the ability to use Nassau as a

SEE page 5B

Water sports operator concerned
over closure of lone boat ramp

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

A PARADISE Island water
sports operator fears his busi-
ness will be hampered by clo-
sure of the lone boat ramp at
Arawak Cay, he told Tribune
Business yesterday, as con-
struction on the new container
port has moved the Govern-
ment to restrict access to the

area.
Reno Deveaux said he was


























The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
tesponsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

Sale Ends
July 11th

forced to break through the bar-
rier that restricted access to the
ramp yesterday in order to
launch his boats and jet skis,
which he and his team then ride
to the northern side of Paradise
Island, where they rent the
equipment to tourists and
Bahamians.

During the Chamber of Com-
merce’s Meet the Ministers
forum last Thursday, Mr
Deveaux voiced his concern
about the possible closure of
the ramp to Minister of Public
Works, Neko Grant.

Mr Grant replied that boat
ramps did not fall under his
Ministry, and suggested that Mr
Deveaux speak to Minister of
the Environment, Earl
Deveaux, who was also sched-
uled to speak at the forum.

Mr Grant, however, reas-
sured Mr Deveaux that if the
Government decided to close
any ramps, operators would be
alerted and informed of alter-
native ramp locations.

According to Mr Deveaux,
he was surprised to see the only
ramp that could easily accom-
modate his two 20-foot boats
closed yesterday, with no notice
from government on alterna-
tive locations. He suggested that
no other ramps along Bay
Street are fit for launching
boats.

The Goodman’s Bay ramp,

SEE page 5B

Chamber of Commerce presi-
dent yesterday backed the
Comptroller's move to "return
the Customs Department to a
Department of written law"
over the C19 10-day bond's use,
but urged that it improve
import clearance efficiency so
that companies “use the front
door and not the back".

Chris Lowe, who is also oper-
ations manager at Kelly's
(Freeport), told Tribune Busi-
ness that his firm had frequent-
ly been offered use of the 10-

day bond by Customs officials
in the past whenever it com-
plained about delays in clear-
ing its shipments, but declined
because to use it would not be
in accordance with the law.
Under the Customs Manage-
ment Act, the C19 is only sup-
posed to be used for perish-
ables, gold, bullion and curren-
cy, enabling them to be cleared
and collected by those the deliv-
eries are intended for prior to

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company

Customs duty/Excise Tax pay-
ments being received and the
entries logged.

Mr Lowe said that because
Kelly's (Freeport) did not sell
perishables, it was thus pre-
vented by law from using the
C19 10-day bond. He added
that he was also convinced the
Government had lost due rev-
enues because of C19 bond
abuse "in a great number of cas-

't

es.

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Agreeing with Customs
Comptroller Glen Gomez that
the C19 had been used improp-
erly to enable firms and
import/customs brokers to col-
lect all manner of goods from
the dock prior to payment, Mr
Lowe said: "I think it's laudable
that the Comptroller is trying
to return the Customs Depart-
ment to a department of written

SEE page 3B

| Learn more at royalfidelity.com |

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Financial sector workers
see 6.2% rise in incomes

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIANS working in

ON
7
RAP

the financial services industry
saw an average 6.2 per cent
increase in take-home pay dur-
ing 2008 despite a slight decline

Tender

-118 Mediuinn Voltage Seviteh House and Dac Bark

Nassau Airport Developmest Company (MAD ts pleased in
arenas the rises of Tanda: C-118 Medien Vollage Saetch
Howse and Duct Bank for Stage 7 of the Lyeden Pinding
Inkmatonal Anpon Eapantien

The se0pe of work mncunieg:

" Gonsiuchion of 4 haw modem votiage (Tk) swatch hous tor
BEC and NAD senich gear; Budding is approwmatety 750 SF,
inch Bock walks, alerenem hasdrads, anda stance seam

metal root

Carl mors including approsamately 1,30 LF of excavation,
bedding, duct imetallstion, supply and installabon of manholes
beckil compaction, cutieag and patching tor a new madam

voltage duct bank

+ Purchase and installation of NAL) Switchgear

Inkerested Bidders. mus! be licensed and approved by fhe Bahamas
Becine Corporation to perform medium volkage (1 1kV] work

The © 718 Tender Documents wil be avaiable for pick up aller
1200 pm, Tuesday June 16th, 2009 Ahidders meahng wl
be held af 10200 am. Thursday June 231h, 20008 Please
contact Traci Brshy to ragister at tha WALD Project office

Contact: TRACI BRISBY
Contracts and Procurement Manager
LPUA Expansson Project

Ph: (242) TOE-0088 | Feu: (240) 377-207

PG) Boe AP $6209, Massey, Bahamas
Email traci brechyiiieers bs



in expatriate employees’
salaries, it was revealed yester-
day, as the industry bucked the
recessionary trend with a mod-
est expansion in its economic
contribution.

The Central Bank of the
Bahamas’ annual survey on the
financial services industry’s
2008 contribution to the
Bahamian economy disclosed
that including bonuses, the
average compensation for sec-
tor employees last year
increased by 5.3 per cent to
$57,839, driven largely by a 6.2
per cent rise in Bahamian earn-
ings.

Expatriate employees, on the
other hand, experienced a 0.6
per cent decline in all earnings
- including bonuses.

The Central Bank survey
found that stripping out bonus-
es, the Bahamian financial
industry’s average base salary
rose by 4.6 per cent to $50,488
in 2008, well ahead of the pre-
vious year’s 0.7 per cent
increase and above the 1.1 per

Offshore sector’s assets rise $97bn to $503bn
due to impact from US capital outflows

cent average rise enjoyed
between 2003-2007.

The survey again highlight-
ed the financial services indus-
try’s importance to the Bahami-
an economy, especially in terms
of providing top-end, high-
salaried jobs. The sector was
estimated to have paid out $521
million in total salaries, includ-
ing bonuses, during 2008, a 7.6
per cent increase upon the pre-
vious year’s $484.4 million total.

Those salaries generate a rel-
atively high disposable income
level for Bahamian financial
services employees, which in
turn translates into a purchasing
and spending power that cre-
ates jobs and business in other
industries, in addition to boost-
ing the velocity of money cir-
culation in this economy.

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
Visit oor website at weew,cob.edu,by

SCHOOL OF NURSING AND
ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS

Persons wishing to enroll in the 4 year Bachelor

of Pharmacy Programme for Fall 2009 are
advised that the deadline for applications has
been extended to June 30th.

Interested persons can contact Dr, Zorene Curry
at the College of The Bahamas, School of
Nursing And Allied Health Professions at 325-
3551/20 ext. 217 or Mrs. Bonnie Longley at ext.

231.

“Reporting for The Tribune is a



Meanwhile, the Central Bank
survey said that the average
base salary for expatriate work-
ers in top level management
positions rose by 7.1 per cent
to $115,591, with Bahamian
salaries increasing by a corre-
sponding 4.2 per cent to
$46.012.

“Despite the adverse domes-
tic and international develop-
ments, which particularly
impacted the Bahamas’ finan-
cial sector during the latter half
of 2008, indications are that the
sector, which accounts for at
least 15 per cent of gross
domestic product (GDP),
recorded an increased contri-
bution to the economy in 2008,”
the Central Bank survey found.

Government revenues
derived from bank, trust com-
pany, insurance firm and Inter-
national Business Company
(IBC) licence fees rose by 25.3
per cent to $33.2 million, com-
pared to $26.5 million the year
before. This was largely due to
an increase in IBC licence fees
from $15.2 million in 2007 to
$21.3 million in 2008.

Add in $1.5 million and $0.1
million in investment fund and
financial and corporate services
provider licence fees respec-
tively, and the total $34.8 mil-
lion in licensing fees received
by the Government during 2008
was a 23.8 per cent increase on
the previous year’s $28.1 mil-
lion.

However, government rev-
enues from Stamp Tax on
transactions including mort-
gages, insurance premium tax,
instruments and bonds and oth-
er banking transactions,
declined by 22.2 per cent to
$84.3 million, compared to

$108.3 million in 2007.

This was largely due to an
almost 50 per cent decline in
Stamp Tax generated by mort-
gage transactions, which fell
from $42.4 million to $21.3 mil-
lion, further evidence of the
recession’s impact on house
buyer demand and the ability of
borrower’s to qualify for a loan.

The Central Bank survey
found that during 2008 bank
and trust company assets under
administration in the so-called
offshore sector advanced by 24
per cent or $97 billion to an
industry-wide total of $503 bil-
lion, largely due to capital out-
flows from the US as investors
sought a safe haven following
the September Wall Street
meltdown.

The Central Bank added:
“This corresponded to an
observed international pattern
benefiting Caribbean financial
centres during 2008, as
resources flowed out of the US
credit markets.”

However, a decline in
deposits and lowered portfolio
valuations on capital market
investments, due to the stock
market crash, led to a decline in
fiduciary assets under manage-
ment in the Bahamian offshore
sector.

Total assets in the Bahamian
domestic commercial banking
sector rose by $697.5 million or
8.3 per cent to $9.1 billion,
down from an 8.9 per cent
growth in 2007. Yet bad debt
provisions, as the economic cli-
mate worsened and borrowers
defaulted on their loans, saw
the commercial banking sec-
tor’s total profits contract by
10.4 per cent or $32.1 million
to $275.3 million.

BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BS| Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established
intemational private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is
presently accepting applications for:

HEAD OF PRIVATE BANKING

Applicants for the position of Head of Private Banking must have al least 20
years experience in the offshore banking sector, have extensive knowledge of
intemational financial products and ability to lead and partner with team
members. Applicants must also be confident regarding customer relations with
excellent capability to generate New Money and have thorough knowledge of
local legislation, regulatory & statutory matters as well as international banking
practices. Fluency in Italian & French ts absolutely required.

Personal qualities °-

Strong management skills

Leadership skills

Excellent communication skilk
Goal-onented, self-motivated and able to motivate team members
Positive attitude and outlook

Commitment to quality and service excellence
Excellant acquisition skills

Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary
Must be able to work under pressure
Available to travel on a frequent bass

Responsibilities :-

Manage and lead Private Banking Team
Meet target in terms of Profitability and Acquisition of Net New Money
Meet deadlines on timely basis
Contribute to the management of the Bank as senior management officer
Foster and maintain communication with intamalexternal banking

professionals

Acquire new clients in target markets

responsibility and privilege. We
service & advise allocated customers

respect and honour the peaple’s

right to know everyday. I’m Interested persons with should submit their

resume/curriculum vitae to:-

such qualifications
proud to be a part of the leading
print mecium in The Bahamas.
The Tribune is my newspaper.” Human Resources Manager
BS! Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre
P.O. Box N-7130
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kern@bsibank.com
(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above altributes will be contacted

RUPERT MISSICK, JR.
CHIEF REPORTER, THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune

My Voice. Vly Hlewspaper!

To report the news, call our
News Tips Line at 502-2359.


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009, PAGE 3B



ahamas fund’s 817m
settlement with SEC

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A FORMER Bahamas-based
hedge fund has paid $17 million
to settle a Securities &
Exchange Commission (SEC)
lawsuit that accused it and its
UK-based investment adviser of
earning $198 million in “illicit
profits from its late trading and
deceptive market timing” of US
mutual fund shares.

The Headstart Fund, which
was described as “defunct” after
being incorporated in the
Bahamas in 2001 “as an open-
ended company with limited lia-
bility”, was said in a release
issued by its investment adviser
to have paid $17 million to settle
the case. At its peak, the fund
had $500 million in assets under
management.

The statement, issued by its
investment adviser, Headstart
Advisers, and the firm’s chief
investment officer, Najy Nass-
er, both of whom were also
charged by the SEC, said Head-
start had ceased its involvement
in market timing in 2003, so that

Former Bahamian domiciled hedge fund with $500m

in assets under management settles US lawsuit that
accused it of gaining $198m in ‘illicit profits’

it could focus on other trading
strategies .

“Without admitting or deny-
ing the allegations” made by the
SEC, Headstart Advisers and
Mr Nasser had both joined the
former Bahamian investment
fund in reaching a settlement,
paying $200,000 and $600,000
respectively.

Mr Nasser said: “Headstart is
very pleased to have reached a
settlement. We responded to US
concerns about market timing
and immediately ceased this ele-
ment of Headstart’s business in
September 2003.

“We have since worked hard
to build up Headstart’s funds
using different strategies. As we
equalled or bettered our overall

returns against our benchmark,
we are especially pleased with
what we have achieved.”

The original SEC lawsuit,
filed against the Bahamian
hedge fund and its masterminds
on April 10 last year, alleged
that the Headstart Fund had
engaged in late trading and mar-
ket timing of US mutual fund
shares between September 1998
and September 2003 - a five-
year period.

The SEC had alleged the
scheme was carried out through
the Headstart Fund’s accounts
at two US-based broker/deal-
ers, With the fund and its advis-
ers placing orders to buy,
redeem or trade mutual fund
shares after the 4pm eastern

coast market close.

This ‘late trading’ practice
enabled the fund to exploit the
market close by obtaining the
pre-closing price for mutual
fund shares, their net asset value
(NAV). It could then exploit
events occurring after 4pm,
which were not reflected in the
price it paid for the shares to
benefit at the expense of other
shareholders.

To avoid detection of its mar-
ket timing practices, the SEC
alleged that Headstart Advisers
“opened numerous accounts”
for the Bahamian investment
fund at different US
broker/dealers and split its
trades between different
accounts, so that the transaction

Ex-Chamber chief backs Comptroller

law, and return us to the rules.

"It's unfortunate, as a new
Comptroller, that he's forced to
try and restore the rule of law to
the functioning of Bahamas
Customs."

He added of the reinforced
C19 processes: "It is going to
have an impact, because all and
sundry have become used to
using the processes that were
made available to them, but at
the same time I hope there is a
great move towards efficiency
in merchants and importers
being able to use the front door
expeditiously, rather than the
back door. That's what I want
to see."

While it was good that the
Comptroller was bringing the
Customs Department and its
processes back in line with the
Customs Management Act, Mr
Lowe said the department
needed to enhance efficiency in
entry checking and processing
to expedite the clearance of
import shipments.

For example, Mr Lowe said
that instead of one cashier, Cus-
toms needed six to collect due
revenues efficiently. "They need
more people in the entry check-
ing and processing line in order
to expedite, and not impede,
trade, which could thereby
impede the Treasury's rev-
enue,” he explained.

"At the same time, I hope
there will be a return to the

would increase as a result of the
C19 changes, due to the
increased costs of holding extra
inventory to counter the likeli-
hood that product shipments
would be delayed in clearing
the dock.

They also expressed concern
over cash flow issues, as com-
panies would now be required
to pay taxes and duties on all
imports up front, instead of
after a portion of them may
have been sold.

Glen Gomez, Comptroller of
Customs, told Tribune Business
last week that this latest
enforcement measure was
designed to prevent “abuse” of
the C19, which had seen it used
as a ‘catch-all’ for all manner
of goods to be removed from
the docks without due taxes
being paid.

This, he added, had allowed
many businesses and individual
residents to ultimately evade
paying their taxes because they
never returned to pay due Cus-
toms duties and Stamp Tax
post-delivery.

Mr Gomez told Tribune Busi-
ness last week: “The C19 is now
being utilised in the manner for
which it was designed by law,

for perishables, gold, bullion
and coins.

“They’ve been abusing that
form, and now that abuse has
been stopped. They have been
clearing motor cars, furniture
and heaven knows what else on
that form. Why should I allow
you to abuse that form, take
delivery of goods and not pay?”

Mr Gomez said the vast
majority of items outstanding
before Customs, many of which
dated back several years, relat-
ed to C19 form declarations.
“You can’t have your cake and
eat it too,” he added.

The Comptroller added that
there were so many outstand-
ing items that Customs had not
placed a dollar value on what
it was owed, but he described
the sum as “substantial”.

And he questioned why
Bahamian companies and
importers, knowing a shipment
of product was coming in, did
not pay the Customs duties and
Excise Tax up front if they did
not want to have a wait for
clearance and submission of
entries.

“There’s a provision in law
to pay for goods before they
arrive, but no one wants to do it.

“Everyone wants to get a
freebie, and the Government
has to bear the costs of having
those goods come in and people
do not come back to pay,” Mr
Gomez said.

“There’s just too many loop-
holes in Customs, and it’s time
to bring the loopholes to a stop.
Whether internally or external-
ly, we have to address these
issues.”

Mr Gomez said Customs was
trying to improve its clearance
times, adding: “We’re trying to
turnaround shipments in 24
hours. Only shipments with 15
pages or more might take 24
hours to check."

BSi

threshold would be concealed.

“Headstart Adviser, Nasser
and the Headstart Fund bene-
fited from this late trading and
deceptive market timing at the
expense of other shareholders
in the US mutual funds,” the
SEC alleged in its 2008 lawsuit.

“Headstart Fund earned illic-
it profits of approximately $198
million from its late trading and
deceptive market timing of US
mutual funds.

HALSBURY
CHAMBERS

Counsel and Attorneys-at-Law
Notaries Public

will be closed

CARL

Friday, 3rd July, 2009

due to the observance of the Firm’s

Annual Fun Day

The office will re-open

On

Monday, 6th July, 2009

We regret any inconvenience caused.



BS] OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BS! Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established
intemational private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is
presently accepting applications for:

INVESTMENT SPECIALIST/RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

written law internally at
Bahamas Customs as well as on
the written interaction side. It
will be no good telling us to toe
the line if they are not doing
the same inside. There will be
hell to pay.”

Confirming that Kelly's
(Freeport) had declined use of
the C19, Mr Lowe told Tribune
Business: "We were offered it.
Every time we complained
about delays in entries at the
front end, we were offered the
10-day bond. But we refused its
offer because we do not deal in
perishables.

"I want the front door to
work expeditiously, not the
back door. I want our stuff
cleared faster than six days.”

Bahamian businesses had last
week told Tribune Business that
they feared consumer prices

Brinsh Colonial Hilton Hotel
Marlborough St, Shop wl

Clearance

SALE

Everything for $20
Until the end of July
Free parking at the Hilten

P.O.Box EE-15827
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 242-323-1865

Email: gems-pearisi hotmail.com

Chester Bonefish Lodge

for reservations:
Telophones 242) 356-3418

Cell-242-557-3597
berylfergusom yahoo.com

Welcomes you to the
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Weekend July 30th - August 3rd

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Packages as low as $135.00 per night

Applicants for the position of Investment Specialist/Relationship Manager must have
at least 10 years’ years experience in the offshore banking sector and extensive
knowledge of international investment instruments & money market. The successful
candidate must have in-depth knowledge of international financial markets; and
excellent capabilities in managing relationships with Clients, Client Advisors &
internal Relationship Managers. Fluency in Italian and Spanish is required.

Personal qualities :-
Management skills
Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
Commitment to quality and service excellence

Strong taam attitude

Financial and analytical background

Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary
Must be able to work under pressure

Available to travel

Responsibilities :-
Research, develop and implement strategies for new products
Provide investment proposals and markets’ analysis to Clents, External
Advisors and other Relationship Managers and Senior Management
Guide and assist staff in the training of Bank's products
Provide advisory services to sophisticated clientele
Manage allocated clients

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum
vitae to:

Human Resources Manager

BS! Overseas (Bahamas) Limited

Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre

P, 0. Box N-7130

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) $02 2303 or email: ruby.kerr@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted


PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Sir Jack’s company sues son for $230k

FROM page 1B

year period with an option to
renew for five years, and a
monthly rental payment of
$20,000.

The East Restaurant lease
was for one year and four
months, with a five-year renew-
al option, and an $8,720 month-
ly rent required. Interest at 1.5

wh.
NAD

Nassau Airport
Developement Gonspany

per cent per month could be
levied on any rental arrears
under either lease.

“Both lease agreements were
forwarded to the defendant for
execution. However, the same
were never executed and
returned to the plaintiff,” Bour-
bon Street alleged.

“Despite the leases not being
executed, the defendant took

Public Advisory

The public ia advieed that due to the
LPIA Expansion Praject, the
entrance road leading to the US
Departures terminal will be reduced
to one lane of vehicular traffic

possession of the units in accor-
dance with the terms of the
unexecuted leases and began
making monthly payments to
the plaintiff in accordance with
the unexecuted lease and, to
date, remains in occupation of
the units.”

The Port Group Ltd sub-
sidiary added: “The defendant
has failed to pay the monthly

rent in accordance with the
agreement, and as of today’s
date the defendant is eight
months in arrears of rent in
respect to units 1, 2, 3, 10 and
11, and as such is indebted to
the plaintiff in the sum of
$229,760 for the period of Sep-
tember 1, 2008, to June 1, 2009.”

Bourbon Street further
claimed that Mr Hayward’s

\ J.S. JOHNSON

INSURANCE AGENTS & HRORERS

NOTICE TO
SHAREHOLDERS

J.S. Johnson & Company Limited hereby notifies all

of its shareholders that based on unaudited results

for the quarter ended June 30, 2009, the Board of

company had failed to pay
despite receiving a “formal
demand letter” from it on April
29, 2009.

Mr Hayward yesterday said
his attorney, David Thompson,
and other advisers were assess-
ing the writ and statement of
claim to determine how they
would respond, but it was likely
that a defence would be filed.

Sir Jack’s son confirmed that
he and the 75-strong staff were
still locked out of the three
restaurants, which was costing
the businesses between $5,000-
$10,000 in revenue per day
between them.

He added that he had met the
staff’s $15,000 weekly payroll
last week from his own
resources, as he was unable to
access the company cheque
books due to the lock-out.

Suggesting that the writ was
designed to prevent any possi-
bility of the arbitration he had
called for, Mr Hayward said he
had only heard about its exis-
tence on Monday morning this
week and obtained a copy at
lpm the same day, four days

essary that these 75 people be
out of a job. It’s absolutely
ridiculous.”

He again reiterated that he
could easily pay the $230,000
rent outstanding and wanted to
do so, but “promises have not
been kept. I had hoped to get
their attention and did, but in a
very unfair way that is not sen-
sible given the economic situa-
tion’”.

Adding that it had taken four
years before La Dolce Vita pro-
duced a return on investment,
Mr Hayward also complained
that Port Lucaya Marketplace
tenants had no say over how
service charges levied upon
them were spent.

Mr Hayward last week said
he had been waiting for the
GBPA and Port Group Ltd to
explain why the monthly rent
at the former two restaurants
had been increased from
$10,000 per month five years
ago to $21,000 per month.

That amounts to a 110 per
cent increase, with the three
restaurants paying a collective
$360,000 in rent per annum. Sir

commencing on Thursday, July
=, 2009 until further notice. Please
observe any traffic directions and
signage while driving along the
entrance road.

Jack’s son said the lease for
East, a smaller property, was
$8,700 per month. Since 1982,
he estimated that his interests
had paid between $3.5-$4 mil-
lion in rent at Port Lucaya Mar-
ketplace, and he was not being
charged $42.50 per square foot
every month.

Mr Hayward said his busi-
nesses in the Port Lucaya Mar-
ketplace lost some $400,000 last
year, a figure that did not
include the $300,000 severance
pay. He added that he had also
invested between $650,000-
$700,000 in East, and was
unlikely “to get that back.”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FRANCKY ST. FLEUR of
Mackey Street, P.O. Box SS-1956, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 24" day of June, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MONA RENNA OF CHURCHILL
SUBDIVISION, OFF SOLDIER ROAD, FO. BOX N-356,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is anplying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citienship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows.
any reason why registration! naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 24TH day of JUNE,
2009 to the Manister responsinle for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.0.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSHUA MERICE OF
STAPLEDON GARDENS, P.O. BOX SB-50202, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizanship, for registration‘maturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration’ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 24TH day of JUNE,
2009 to the Manster response for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.0.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

after its filing with the Supreme
Court registry.

“My priority is the 75
employees,” Mr Hayward told
Tribune Business. “It’s unnec-

INSIGHT

For the stories

Directors has declared an interim dividend of
sixteen cents (16¢) per ordinary share to be paid on
July 15, 2009 to all shareholders of record as of July

8, 2009.

Vie apologize for any inconvenience
cauiced











LEGAL MOTHCE

NOTICE

ANOLIINVESTMENT SERVICES LIMITED

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

ANOLI INVESTMENT SERVICES
LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



NOTICE [Ss HEREBY GIVEN as. folkyas:

a) ANOLDINVESTMENT SERVICES LIMITED ts in dissolution
under the provisions of the Intermaponal Basiness Companies Act
2), Creditors having debts or claims against the above

named Company are required to send particulars thereof

to the undersigned at Ocean Centre, Montague Foreshore,

East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas as sole Liquidator on

or betore the 13th day of July, 200. In default thereot

they will be excluded trom the benefit of any distnibution
made by the Liquidator.

The dasolution of the said Company commenced on the Bodh day
of June, 3008 when its Artckes of Dissolution were subenined te and
regisicred by the Registrar Gemerall.

The Liquidator of the said Company is Mr. Dayan Bourne of Ocean
Centre, Montagu Foreshore, East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

aie 14 din nf 4
Dated the 2th day of Fume, 200% Dated the 29th day of June, 2009,
Dayan Bourne
Liguicator
Registered Agent of
for the above-named Company Anoli Investment Services Limited

Ss

H&] Corporate Services Ltd.

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

COoOLONTAL

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 29 JUNE 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,579.12 | CHG -0.27 | %CHG -0.02 | YTD -133.24 | YTD % -7.78
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.53 | YTD -5.43% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.28 0.00 0.127 10.9
10.00 0.00 0.992 11.1
6.94 0.00 0.244 28.4
0.63 0.00 -0.877 N/M
3.15 0.00 0.078 40.4
2.14 0.00 0.055 43.1
10.18 0.00 1.406 8.1
2.74 0.00 0.249 11.0
5.50 0.00 0.419 13.5
1.27 -0.26 0.111 27.6
1.32 0.00 0.240 7A
7.50 0.00 0.420 18.5
10.00 0.00 0.322 34.1
10.35 0.00 0.794 13.1
4.95 0.00 0.332 15.3
1.00 0.00 0.000 N/M
0.30 0.00 0.035 8.6
5.50 0.00 0.407 13.5
10.50 J.S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00 0.952 11.0
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.180 55.6
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA V YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3787 1.87 4.83
2.8988 -1.40 -3.35
1.4730 2.74 5.66
3.1821 6.01 -13.90
12.9209 2.40 5.79
100.5448 -0.02 0.54
93.1992 -3.33 -6.76
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.2511 1.72 4.12
1.0578 2.13 5.78
1.0271 -0.57 2.71
1.0554 1.74 5.54
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Securit y Yield
Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

Previous Close Today's Close
1.39 1.39
11.00 11.00
6.94 6.94
0.63 0.63
3.15 3.15
2.37 2.37
11.39 11.39
2.74 2.74
5.64 5.64
3.32 3.06
1.77 1.77
7.76 7.76
10.97 10.97
10.38 10.38
5.09 5.09
1.00 1.00
0.30 0.30
5.50 5.50

Nassau Aurport

Development (om pany

S2wk-Hi _52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Interest Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015
EPS $ Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

52wk-Low Symbol
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

Weekly Vol.
N/M
N/M

256.6

Proposed Modification to Airport
Fees and Charges Notice

The Nassau Airport Development Company is
proposing a modification of Fees and Charges,
effective January 1, 2010, pursuant to article 4 of
the Airport Authority (Fees and Charges) Regulations, 2009.

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90 0.00%
52wk-Low

1.3124
2.8988
1.3940
3.1821

12.2702

100.0000

93.1992

1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Div $ Yield % NAV Date
31-May-09
31-May-09
19-Jun-09
30-Apr-09
31-May-09
31-Mar-09
31-Mar-09
31-Dec-07
30-Apr-09
31-May-09
31-May-09
31-May-09

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

The proposed increase is to aircraft landing
fees, terminal fees, aircraft bridge fees and
aircraft parking charges only. Car parking
rates and the Passenger Facility Charge are
Se LEHANE ap eee ee not impacted by the proposed modification.
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

For more information or to comment on the
proposed modification please visit our website
at www.nas.bs.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009, PAGE 5B





Questions on
cruise deal benefits
for Bahamians

FROM page 1B

second port of call without com-
mitting to any financial obliga-
tions in Nassau.

“It’s everything they want.
They have the right, technically,
not to do business in Nassau.”
Describing the 350,000
‘overnight’ passenger in Nassau
target per cruise line, per
annum - one condition that
must be fulfilled for the depar-
ture tax rebate tpo kick-in - as
“extremely low”, the source
said: “The Government of the
Bahamas, three weeks after
debating its Budget and com-
plaining about the shortfalls,
does not have the courtesy to
rationalise the benefits for the
Bahamas from the amend-
ments, but instead rationalises
the benefits it’s giving away to
the cruise lines.”

Another tour operator,
speaking on condition of
anonymity, told Tribune Busi-
ness: “On the surface, it doesn’t
look good. It’s absolutely amaz-
ing.” It is understood that con-
sultation on the Cruise
Overnight Incentive Act
amendments and the talks with
Carnival was minimal to non-
existent.

The amendments create a
three-tier passenger tax rebate
structure for the second to sixth
years of a six-year agreement.
The rebate will be $8.50 per
head for passenger numbers
between 800,000 to one million,
and $10 per head for numbers
above one million. That will be
in addition to the $15 per head
rebate offered to the cruise lines
for passengers between zero to
800,000.

Meanwhilke, Charles
Klonaris, co-chair of the Down-

town Nassau Partnership and
the the Nassau Tourism and
Development Board’s chair-
man, said the Government had
done a good thing by encour-
aging the major cruise lines to
increase their passenger deliv-
ery. Yet he questioned whether
those passengers would be dis-
couraged from gambling, shop-
ping and dining onboard the
ship while in port.

It is hoped that the tax
rebates offered to the cruise
lines would translate into more
passengers, which would mean
more onshore spending. How-
ever, some individuals are not
convinced that would be reality.

Under the amended Act,
cruise lines must remain docked
in a designated or approved
port for at least 13 hours
between llam and midnight at
a minimum.

Manager at the Bambu

Nightclub, Dino Berdanis, said
he was not convinced that the
Government’s incentive plan
will mean much for Bay Street
merchants.

According to him, designating
five new ports under the Act,
four of which belong to the
cruise lines, does nothing to
encourage visitor spending
downtown.

Mr Berdanis said those ships
which encounter unfavourable
weather while en route to their
private islands often come into
Nassau Harbour ahead of
schedule. However, he argued
boat loads of them can be seen
bypassing Bay Street for a ferry
ride over to Atlantis.

Mr Berdanis contended that
there is nothing to lure the sur-
plus of passengers that the port
of Nassau is expecting to the
downtown area. “There is noth-
ing for them to do,” he said.

Water sports operator
concerned over closure

of lone boat ramp

FROM page 1B

he said, was not an actual ramp
at all and operators who launch
there are forced to lift their jet
skis some 30 feet to a waiting
trailer.

According to him, the ramp
adjacent to Brown’s Boat Bas-
in’s shipyard on East Bay Street
has no parking, is often too shal-
low to launch boats, and can
cause traffic congestion while
operators are dropping their
equipment in the water.

Mr Deveaux said his compa-
ny launched its jet skis and
boats from the Montague ramp
some time ago, but were dis-
couraged from doing so by
authorities because of the traffic
congestion the trucks caused
while dropping equipment in
the water.

And now, according to Mr

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

INSIGHT

For the stories
hehind the
news, real
Insight on
Mondays

Deveaux, that ramp has wors-
ened over the years, having lost
some of its concrete at the end,
leaving a steep drop-off into the
water.

Using

He also said that using the
Montague ramp would add one-
and-a-half hours to his loading
and off-load time.

"That would mean if we leave
the island at 6pm we won't



leave Montague until 9pm,”
said Mr Deveaux.

According to him, any ramp
farther than Montague or
Arawak Cay would mean using
more fuel to move the boats
and jet skis to Paradise Island.

"T already spend $200 per day
on fuel," he said.

Mr Deveaux said the Gov-
ernment has not built a new
ramp in more than 30 years,
despite the constant collection
of licensing fees and other mis-

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT








(No.45 of 2000)
AIRLEASE EIGHT LIMITED






Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137
(8) of the International Business Companies Act, No. 45
of 2000, the Dissolution of AIRLEASE EIGHT LIM-
ITED has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register. The date of completion of the dis-
solution was the 8th day of June, 2009.

GROWING MULTI-MEDIA & TRANSPORTATION
COMPANY REQUIRES

FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

Rapidly growing company is inviting applications for the
position of “Financial Controller’. Applicants should have
a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting and a CPA, ACCA, CA
qualification or any other qualification recognized by the
Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants.

Successful candidate should:



have at least 4 years experience in an established

accounting firm

be able to work as a part of a team
be able to prepare budgets and financial reports

liaise with banking officers

be able to communicate effectively with all levels

of management

be proficient in meeting and keeping all deadlines
have proficient knowledge of QuickBooks

For a confidential interview please mail resume to:
c/o Financial Controller,
P O Box N 4271, Nassau, N. P., The Bahamas
or email financialcontrollerposition@yahoo.com



cellaneous costs associated with
running a water sports business.

“T pay $12,000 in fees per
year,” he said. “They can at
least build a ramp.”



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

AIRLEASE FIVE LIMITED

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of
2000, the Dissolution of AIRLEASE FIVE LIMITED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was
the 8th day of June, 2009.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000)
AIRLEASE SIX LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (8) of the International Business Companies Act, No.
45 of 2000, the Dissolution of AIRLEASE SIX LIMIT-
ED has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck
off the Register. The date of completion of the dissolution
was the 8th day of June, 2009.

ECCT CS OU 071







ea MTSU
MIR) Perey a BEE

Schedule of Events

Date/Time
Fri, July 3rd

9:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

Sat, July 4th

6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.

Sun, July 5th
700 p.m.

Thurs, July 9th
8:00 p.m. -

Fri, July 10th

1:00 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.

& Sun July 11th & 12th

lah ;

12:30 a.m.

_
__. Various Points to Gi »

te

Event

National Pride Day

E. Clement Bethel National Arts
Festival Cultural Show

Rawson Square

Independence Beat Retreat
Rawson Square

Ecumenical Church Service
Bahamas Faith Ministries (BFM)

Clifford Park C elebrations .

Cultural Show, Inspection,Prayels,
Flag Raising Ceremony, Fy
Clifford Park a a

yee a

slp }

“The People’s Rus On
Rawson Seaaid to ms wh,

National Fun

.
hs

-
A

Stat {| | Common; ony Loftier, CrP

as


PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009

BAHAMAS WASTE LIMITED

Unaudited Financial Statements
Three months ended March 31, 2009

Bahamas Waste Limited
Condensed Balance Sheet (unaudited)

March 31 December 31
2009 2008
Assets
Current assets
Cash 205,216
Accounts receivable, net 1,471,267
Inventories 364,198
Prepaid expenses and other receivables 174,609
Deposits 12,900
Total current assets 2,228,190

160,456
1,496,303
304,064
77,835
12,900
2,051,558

Non-current assets

Investment in associate (note 6)
Property, plant and equipment, net
Total non-current assets

Total assets

143,248
7,393,558
7,536,806
9,764,996

143,248
7,391,968
7,535,216
9,586,774

Liabilities and shareholders’ equity
Liabilities

Current liabilities

Bank overdraft

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities
Current-portion of note payable (note 5)
Total current liabilities

17,802
397,783
98,384
513,969

407,946
100,116
508,062

Non-current liabilities
Security deposits

Note payable (note 5)
Total non-current liabilities
Total liabilities

409,921
229,252
639,173
1,147,235

407,889
254,940
662,829
1,176,798

Shareholders’ equity

Share capital

Contributed surplus

Retained earnings

Total shareholders’ equity

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity $

42,000
2,752,113
5,823,648
8,617,761
9,764,996

42,000
2,752,113
5,615,863
8,409,976

$ 9,586,774

Bahamas Waste Limited
Condensed Statements of Income and Retained Earnings (unaudited)

Three months ended
March 31
2009 2008
Income
Sales and services rendered
Cost of sales and direct expenses
Gross profit

1,931,247
1,233,875
697,372

2,012,583
1,301,507
711,076

Expenses

Operating expenses 482,566 475,350
Interest and bank charges (note 5) 7,021 7257
Total operating expenses 489,587 482,607
Net income 207,785 228,469
5,287,237
5,515,706

Retained earnings at beginning of year 5,615,863
Retained earnings at end of the year $5,823,648

Earnings per share $ 0.05 0.05
Bahamas Waste Limited

Condensed Statements of Cash Flows (unaudited)

Three months ended
March 31
2009 2008

Cash flows from operating activities
Net income $
Adjustments for items not involving use of cash:

Bad debt expense

Depreciation

207,785 $ 228,469

12,438
294,657
514,880

301,898

530,367
Change in non-cash working capital items:
Decrease in accounts receivable
Increase in inventories
Increase in prepaid expenses and other assets
Increase in accounts payable and accrued
liabilities
Increase in security deposits
Net cash flow provided by operating activities

12,598
(60,134)
(96,774)

(181,057)
(20,669)

10,163
2,032
382,765

27,369
15,792
371,802

Cash flows from investing activities
Purchases of property, plant and equipment
Investments in associate

Net cash flow used for investing activities

(296,247)

(142,405)
50,000

296,247) 192,405)

Cash flows from financing activities
Payment of Note Payable
Net cash flow used for financing activities

28,965) :
28,956) :

Net change in cash 62,562 179,397

Cash position at beginning of the period 142,654 191,960

Cash position at end of the period $205,216 $ (12,563

Cash represented by:

Cash $

Bank overdrafts -
$205,216 $

205,216 $ 3,061
15,624
12,653

See accompanying notes to unaudited condensed interim financial statements.
Bahamas Waste Limited
Notes to Unaudited Condensed Interim Financial Statements
March 31, 2009

1. Corporate Information

Bahamas Waste Limited (BWL”) was incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas on August 18, 1987 under the name of Bahamas Waste Systems Limited. On December
7, 1999, the Company changed its name to Bahamas Waste Limited. The Company is engaged in
the business of solid and medical waste collection and disposal, including the sale, installation,
rental and maintenance of waste compactors and containers. The Company has publicly traded
shares which are registered on the Bahamas International Stock Exchange. The latest audited
accounts of the BWL were prepared on December 31, 2008.

The quarter ends of BWL fall on March 31, June 30 and September 30, with the year end of the
Company being December 31.

The condensed interim financial statements for the three months ended March 31, 2009 were
authorized for issuance by the Board of Directors on June 29, 2009.

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Basis of preparation
These condensed interim financial statements for the three months ended March 31, 3009 have been
prepared in accordance with International Accounting Standard 34 Interim Financial Reporting.

The condensed interim financial statements do not include all of the information and disclosures
required in the annual financial statements, and should be read in conjunction with the December
31, 2008 audited financial statements.

The accounting policies adopted in the preparation of the interim condensed financial statements are
consistent with those followed in the preparation of the Company’s annual financial statements for
the year ended December 31, 2008, except for the adoption of certain new standards, interpretations
and amendments to existing standards that have been published that are mandatory for the
Company’s accounting periods beginning on or after January 1, 2009 or later periods, noted below.
Adoption of these Standards and Interpretations did not have any effect on the financial position or
performance of the Company.

IFRS 2
IFRS 3
IFRS 8
IAS 23

: Share Based Payments (Revised)
* IAS 27

Business Combinations (Revised)

Operating Segments

Borrowing Costs (Revised)

Consolidated and Separate Financial Statements (Revised)
Agreements for the Construction of Real Estate

Hedges of a Net Investment in Foreign Operation
Distributions of Non-Cash Assets to Owners

Transfers of Assets from Customers

IFRIC 15
IFRIC 16
IFRIC 17
IFRIC 18

3. Earnings Per Share

Earnings per share were calculated based on the shares outstanding at the end of the period, which
approximated average shares outstanding during the period.

2009 2008
4,200,000 4,200,000



Shares outstanding at March 31

4. Related Party Transactions
During the quarter, BWL entered into transactions with related parties. All transactions were
conducted at arms length and no significant obligations to the related parties existed at March 31,
2009.

Bahamas Waste Limited

Notes to Unaudited Condensed Interim Financial Statements

March 31, 2009

5. Note Payable

On June 1, 2008, the Company entered in agreement to purchase property adjacent to its existing
location for $500,000. Pursuant to that agreement, the Company has paid the vendor $100,000 and
entered into a $400,000 promissory note agreement with Davandon Holdings Limited. The term of
the note is five years with an interest rate of 7% per annum. The principals of Davandon Holdings
Limited are also the majority shareholders of the Company.

6. Commitments and Contingencies

The Company guarantees its compactors for a 60-day period from the date of purchase. The
Company is reimbursed by the manufacturer for any claims paid under such guarantees.



THE TRIBUNE



aa =e
China backs down from requirement for Web filter

By JOE McDONALD
AP Business Writer

BEIJING (AP) — In a rare
reversal, China’s government
gave in to domestic and inter-
national pressure and backed
down Tuesday from a rule that
would have required personal
computers sold in the country to
have Internet-filtering software.

Just hours before the rule was
to have taken effect, the gov-
ernment said it would postpone
the requirement for the “Green
Dam” software. The Ministry
of Industry and Information
Technology said it made the
decision partly because some
PC markets were having diffi-
culty meeting the deadline. It
did not say whether the plan
might be revived.

The change of course averted
a possible scuffle with Wash-
ington. Top US officials had

protested the plan after it was
imposed abruptly in May, call-
ing it a barrier to trade. Angry
Web users circulated online
petitions protesting Green
Dam, while industry groups
warned the software might cre-
ate computer security problems.

The controversy reflected the
conflict between the commu-
nist government’s desire to con-
trol information and China’s
high-tech ambitions. ‘The coun-
try has an increasingly
informed, vocal public and
tighter links to companies that
create urgently needed jobs and
tax revenue.

The decision was a “victory
for China’s civil society,” said
Li Fangping, a Beijing lawyer
who had demanded a public
hearing on the plan.

“Many citizens worked
together and voiced their oppo-
sition to the forced installation

of this filtering software and
forced the government to at
least think more deeply about
it,” Li said. “We hope now that
they will go ahead and com-
pletely drop this order.”

News of the announcement
spread in China quickly via
Twitter and the Chinese mini-
blogging site Fanfou. Some
bloggers said they expect the
government to look for a way to
carry out Green Dam that
attracts less attention.

“They are using the word
‘delay,’ instead of saying they
stopped the plan,” said Wen
Yunchao, a Chinese blogger
who has been among the most
vocal critics of Green Dam. “I
think that it’s possible that at
some point in the future the
government could still enforce
their policy and install software
on personal computers that fil-
ters the information people are

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PRICEWAIERHOUSE( COPERS

INDEPESDEST ADDITORS’ REPORT

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able to look at. So, Iam calling
this an intermediary victory.”

China’s communist govern-
ment encourages Internet use
for education and business, and
the country has the biggest pop-
ulation of Web users, with more
than 298 million. But authorities
try to block access to material
deemed obscene or subversive,
and Beijing operates the world’s
most sweeping system of Inter-
net filtering.

US companies such as Yahoo
Inc., Microsoft Corp. and
Google Inc. have cooperated in
way or another with govern-
ment requests to tamp down
criticism.

The Green Dam software
would raise China’s controls to
a new level by putting a filter
inside each PC. Chinese author-
ities said it would be needed to
shield children from violent and
obscene material online.

Analysts who have reviewed
the programme Say it also con-
tains code to filter material the
government considers political-
ly objectionable. Separately, a
California company claimed
that Green Dam contained
stolen programming code.

Chinese Web © surfers
ridiculed Green Dam by saying
it would block access to photos
of animals and other innocuous
subjects. State media reported
extensively on the complaints, a
rare move. Chinese media usu-
ally uncritically support gov-
ernment policy.

Green Dam already is in use
in Internet cafes in China and
has been installed since the start
of this year in PCs sold under a
government programme that
subsidizes appliance sales in the
countryside.

Large PC makers such as
Toshiba Corp. and Taiwan’s
Acer Inc. said they were ready
to provide Green Dam on disks
beginning Wednesday. Indus-
try leaders Hewlett-Packard Co.
and Dell Inc. had declined to
discuss their plans, possibly
waiting for a diplomatic settle-
ment.

Dell spokesman Jess Black-
burn said the PC maker is hap-
py with the Green Dam delay.
He would not say what Dell had
done to prepare for China’s
deadline.

“We respect the Chinese gov-
ernment’s stated goal of pro-
tecting children by filtering
access to pornography through
the Internet,” Blackburn said
in a statement.

Representatives from US-
based technology groups,
including the Information Tech-
nology Industry Council and the
Software & Information Indus-
try Association, were in Beijing
trying to stop Green Dam.

“We welcome the delay in
implementation of the Green
Dam mandate, and we look for-
ward to working closely with
the US government to find mar-
ket-based solutions that enable
consumer choice and protect
children on the Internet,” said
John Neuffer, vice president for
global policy at the Information
Technology Industry Council,
which represents companies
including Dell, Hewlett-Packard
Co. and Apple Inc.

The Green Dam initiative
coincided with a tightening of
government controls on Inter-
net use. Last week, China’s
Health Ministry ordered health-
related Web sites that carry
research on sexually oriented
topics to allow access only to
medical professionals.

Also last week, the govern-
ment issued new rules on “vir-
tual currency” used by some
game Web Sites, saying it can-
not be used to purchase real
goods.

On Green Dam, the industry
ministry sounded a conciliatory
note. It promised to “solicit
opinions from all parties” in an
effort to improve its work.

“T think the cost of the move
from trade friction and gener-
ally a public relations black eye
was becoming pretty clear to
the government,” said Duncan
Clark, chairman of BDA China
Ltd., a Beijing research firm.
Postponing the filtering rule
“gets them out of the scrutiny of
the international media and
business.”

¢ Associated Press Writer
Alexa Olesen and Associated
Press researcher Bonnie Cao in
Beijing and AP Technology
Writer Jessica Mintz in Seattle
contributed to this report

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays
PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009

eS

THE TRIBUNE





By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter

amissick@tribunemedia.net

TAMING your inner
child from sweet treats
is always a battle. For-
tunately, Candyland
Creations knows all
about your needs and
is ready to share all
the sugary goodness
they have to offer.





The Tribune

WIDE arrangement of candy treats
from Candyland Creatioris.

Minarda Pow-
ell and Kimberly
Beneby, owners
of Candyland
Creations, since
2006 have been
specialising in
creating gourmet
candy arrange-
ments to satisfy
those sugar
urges.

“We met a few
years ago work-
ing together
doing tourists’
weddings. We
were both preg-
nant with our

second children and decided to stay home.
When we sat down to think of things to do,
candy was something that was on our short
list and we decided to go for it. A lot of it
was trial and error with the kids and the hus-

bands being ‘guinea pigs’,”

Mrs Powell said.

Mrs Powell said although they do hard
candy, they also take on some old Bahamian

favourites.

“We have many molds, different flavors
and can match the color of the candy with
your event. We have island themes such as
crabs, fish and pineapples to stuff for baby
showers and Christmas molds. We have a lot
of children’s characters such as batman for
birthday parties. We do a lot of arrange-
ments for Mother’s Day and other special



events. We also have four different kinds of
fudge and we are always working on finding
new ingredients from guava fudge to
caramel fudge. We also do coconut cream

Another favourite clients enjoy besides
the candy is the cheesecake.

“We do a few cakes such as our butter
rum cheese cake with butter rum sauce.
Instead of the traditional rum cake, we have
rum cheese cake. We also do the little butter
mints as well in a variety of shapes,” Mrs
Powell said.

As for the bouquets, Mrs Beneby said
they did not see a lot of sweet treat bouquets
and wanted to present something different
to the Bahamian public.

“We didn’t want to come out and be just
like everybody else-we wanted to give peo-
ple an option. We went with the candies and
we started making the arrangements. Com-
ing from the wedding background, we had
seen all the floral stuff and all the things you
can do so we wanted another option that
you can give people that gave the same pop,
but it was a different way of displaying it.
Flowers die but the candies last for weeks-
you can eat your bouquet,” Mrs Beneby
said.

Looking into the future of candy, Mrs
Powell said she hopes the business can be
something her children can carry on.

“This gives Kim and me a chance to be
what we are first and foremost-mothers and
wives and to do the work that we have to do
for our husbands and to be there for our
kids. Especially the way the economy is, it is
great to have things like this because there
will always be weddings and showers and
events that people need things for because
you still have to enjoy your life. So if we can
help someone enjoy their life, then that
helps us to come back and enjoy ours,” Mrs
Powell said.



a
candy
Christmas
bouquet.

that we call coconut ice, benny cakes, peanut
cakes, and benny cakes with peanuts,” Mrs
Powell said.

ry.com



A savory Grouper Melt with hand cut Cassava fries available at the Valentine’s Resort.

¢ To find out more about Candyland Creations, e-
mail them at candyland@btccybercell. blackber-

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

NESTLED at the heart of one of
the country’s most beautiful destina-
tions, is Harbour Island’s Valentine’s
Resort and Marina which features
some of the most exciting seaside dish-
es available in the country.

Just a five minute walk down from
the island’s dock, is the newly fitted
resort that offers both a breathtaking
view of the marina and fabulous island
food around the clock.

Property General Manager Harper
Sibley said, since the recent addition of
100 rooms, they have seen a rise in
overnight guests who prefer to eat at
the resort’s restaurant.

He explained: “We are able to pro-
vide breakfast, lunch, and dinner seven
days a week which is from 7am to
11pm.

“We can’t help but to focus on the
seafood that we have which comes right
off our own dock everyday, we have
four fisherman who are out there bring-
ing us groupers, Mahi Mahi, Tunas,
Yellow tail Snappers, it’s just fabulous.
We have those dishes in our restau-
rant every night and you can pick what

you like, and we "ll cook it up just the
way you want.”

Although this may sound too good to
be true, it most certainly is, at least
according to the property’s executive
chef who goes by the name Chef Hall.

The newly appointed chef said
despite his humble beginning, over the
years his love for cooking has allowed
him to train at some of the finest facil-
ities around the world including the
Belmont University, the Marriott, Walt
Disney World, Our Lucaya, and The
Hotel Training College.

Chef Hall described the resort’s food
as simply Bahamian with a flair.

During the summer months, the
kitchen serves lighter dishes that can
come in the form of jerk, blackened,
sautéed, grilled, lemon buttered, and
the works.

“We have hamburgers, hot dogs, we
have grilled cheese and things like that
for the kids in the day, because we have
families that come over for summer
vacation both from the US and Nas-
sau.”

For the alternative eaters, he said
there are also vegetarian dishes, pastas,
and steaks which are all served with
fresh ingredients.

There are also Key Lime Pies, short-





cakes, homemade ice-cream, guava
cakes, banana breads, “we just ensure
that everything we deliver to our guests
is fresh.”

Chef Hall said it was indeed a chal-
lenge acquiring fresh meats to the
resort on a daily basis considering most
fresh catches were sent to Nassau, but
his concern has always been on quality
so he refuses to settle for less.

“From time to time we may get a
guest requesting fresh grouper or
conch, and if we don’t have fresh prod-
ucts we don’t make it. If we can’t get
the best possible ingredients for all of
our dishes, we don’t make them.”

Chef Hall said when he makes a dish
like macaroni and cheese, his dish is
guaranteed to be more scrumptious
because he uses no less than six blends
of cheese which sets his kitchen apart
from the rest.

Looking toward the future of the
restaurant, Chef Hall said plans are on
the table for a dining experience like
none other.

“We have some things planned that
we think and hope are going to be sort
of a renaissance approach to the
Bahamian dining experience. This
includes new food, more fun, and fam-
ily centered events.”
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009, PAGE 9B







The Tribune

entertainment






By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

AS the Bahamian music
scene continues to break
down barriers, many artists
are continuing to spread a
message of success and tri-
umph. However, Mystro
Miller, a Bahamian Reggae
artist said he is ready to
spread his message- one filled
with consciousness and uplift-
ment.

“T started studying back in 1998, com-
ing out of high school. Before that I did

back ups for my dad’s band. I decided

to become a full fledged artist in 2008. I

got the name Mystro from my oldest
brother who traveled to Jamaica a lot.
Every time he came back, he brought
me a lot of the Sum Fest Shows and
reggae shows. I would sit down and

mimic the artist. I learned the Bass Gui-
tar as well so my friends really branded
the name Mystro as well,” Mystro said.

Through his faith in Rastafarism,
Mystro said he pushed his music fur-
ther.

“T saw a lot of stuff was going on with
the economy and the world. I know a lot
of young people are influenced by music

and tend to act out what they hear and

see on television. It is because of that I
am trying to bring a positive message to

try to fight against all those bad influ-

ences that they hear in music to let them

know the world is not about the show
cars and jewelry-it gets real,” Mystro
said.

As for his music career, Mystro has
just released is timely single called
“Recession.”

IN THIS reprise of
Scott Joplin’s
Treemonisha, more
than 57 Bahamian
Pleo) ecw UnlemetclA Les) ks
are involved in the
mega production
set to debut next

Le nToEN Almas
Dundas.

Take it away

YSTFO

Miller spreads
positive message
in his music

“Basically with the Recession album,
Thad heard about the persons in Exuma
out of jobs which meant more people
out of ajob, more people under pres-
sure to pay light bills, water bills, and so
on. Couple months back people from
Atlantis lost their jobs which had people
falling out and ending up in the hospital.
The key line on that track is ‘in this time
of recession, don’t let your mind fall in
the state of depression.’ Once you loose
your mind, you can do anything that you
would never think you can do. Right
now how the economy has slowed down,
every one is saying there is a recession
when the money never falls off of the
earth. With the recession single, it is just
to keep the people encouraged as broth-
ers and sisters. We need to come togeth-
er and help one another,” Mystro said.

Mystro said although he has been net-
working and doing a lot of work includ-
ing the Reggae All stars concert, Love
Fest, and most recently the Sand Trap,
he wants to continue to spread his mes-
sage not just the Bahamas but globally.

“To get my music across the world I
am taking steps to make that happen
along with my manager Supa B. The
Bahamian music scene has come a long
way although there are things that need
to be revamped as far as the artists
themselves. The artists have to know
their rights and the business side of it.
The music business is 90 per cent busi-
ness and 10 percent talent, but I encour-
age them to keep pushing what they are
doing and don’t quit. The same time
you quit is when your breakthrough can
come,” Mystro said.

To hear live music from Mystro, fol-
low him on Twitter at Mystro242.

. = be ihe
r ace! pea |
or.” ee Ee

CT





‘Treemonisha’ debuts at the Dundas Centre

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

IN less than a week a play written by
famous African American playwright
Scott Joplin will debut at Dundas Cen-
ter For the Performing Arts, connecting
Bahamians to an important moment in
history.

The director of the production Dr
Cleveland Williams, said it was an
extremely challenging task to bring to
life the essence of what this play repre-
sents.

“With directing an opera or direct-
ing a play, you have to be able to bring
it to life. You have to get the characters
in the opera to basically react to every-
thing that is happening on stage, and
also to interpret the composer’s music
and also the librettos.

“In my role, I am working on con-
veying to the cast how important it is to
understand what they are doing and
how they interact with each other, and
also the characters that they play as ex-
slaves and villagers connecting with
Treemonisha.”

The main characters Treemonisha
and Monisha are played by four differ-
ent actresses and Dr Williams said it
was fortunate that he was able to incor-
porate Candice Bostwick and Lakita
Wells-Thompson as Treemonisha.

Local actors Portia Barnet and Lil-
lian Bastian will play the role of Mon-
isha and are the perfect fit for the role
according to Dr Williams.

Ned is being played by Kermit Stra-
chan, and Remous by Demetrius Delan-
cy.
Treemonisha, tells the story of how
former slaves of a South American plan-

tation adapt to the new found freedom
when slavery was abolished in 1866.

The community of slaves are gov-
erned by two elders known as Ed and
Monisha. They cared for Treemonisha
from birth and she is 18 when the play
opens. Like most early black communi-
ties, this village has a witch doctor aka
Obeah Man, who was seen as a menace
to the community. He constantly tried to
sell his potions and bags of luck to the
villagers who were rarely interested in
them.

However one day the Obeah Man
approached Monisha and offered to sell
her the potion to keep her enemies away
and to gain some good fortune.

Her husband Ned happened to see
the exchange as it is taking place, and
attempts to discourage Monisha from
making the purchase.

As Treemonisha walks in on the com-

motion and urges the witch doctor to
stop selling his evil potions, he gets upset
at her and soon decided to take revenge
on her.

As the play progresses the issues of
community bonding, education, and reli-
gion arise.

Dr Willams said after returning home
after a long stay in Europe last June,
he then decided that an opera like
Treemonisha was something the
Bahamas needed for its independence
celebrations.

Having a longtime love for the arts
and its development in the country, he
said he hopes that Treemonisha will
help to share with the world and those at
home that “We can do more produc-
tions like this, and is something worth
seeing because it can help in our cul-
tural development.” The play opens on
Monday at the Dundas.

Ais






The Tribune’s Things 2 Da
countdown is taking you back to
the good old days this week.

Nearly 100 years after it was

written, Scott Joplin’s opera

Treemonisha will debut in
SMa M erie Seelm talc D ION Ose Oo1
tre for The Performing Arts on
July 6. Directed by Bahamian
drama connoisseur Dr Cleveland
Williams, Joplin’s three-act opera
will be performed by an all
SEVP UM lamer SIMO) MN OlE MINEO
artists commemorating the thir-
SME UN MOM SrlIC NEM
independence. Gala night pro-
TOM TMU MIN RST MMU (COlE
Sassoon Bahamas Heart Founda-
tion, and proceeds from the final
night will assist the Bahamas
National Dance company on their
upcoming trip to the Aberdeen
International Youth Festival in the
UK. The story is a realistic look
into the life of newly freed slaves
in the American post slavery era.
Performances will take place July
6, 7, 8, and 11 at the Dundas
Center for the Performing Arts
and tickets are $75 for the gala
night, and $35 on the other
nights.




















































»-The Alliance Francaise’s
French Cine Club presents
the movie Moliére, a roman-

tic comedy about the famous

French playwright Moliere. The

opening scene for the film is set

during the middle of the renais-
sance period where Moliere gets
the chance to perform before

King Louis XIV in France. Moliere

then has some tough luck and

eventually lands into some finan-
cial challenges. He is then thrown
into a debtor's prison but soon
regains his freedom when a local
businessman decides to pay his
debt only to ask of him a small
favour. He has to teach the gen-
tleman how to act so that he can
capture the attention of a recently
widowed woman. The twist begin
when Moliere happens to fall in
love with the businessman’s
neglected wife, and thus the dra-
ma begins. The two hour film will
be shown on Friday at 6pm at the

SG Hambros building West Bay

Street at a price of $5 which also

includes refreshments. To RSVP,

call 302-5141.

.The Junkanoo Summer Fes-

tival returns to Bay Street

this Saturday showcasing
traditional Goombay music, live
bands, and lots of local food and
fun. The all day event which will
be hosted every Saturday during
the month of July, will also fea-
ture local crafts, Bahamian litera-
ture, and a pineapple eating and
onion peeling competition. So
come out this Saturday between
noon and 10pm to experience
traditional life in the islands.

. The Bahamas Faith Min-
istry’s (BFM) Youth Alive
Center is about to launch its
Summer 2009 conference
labeled The Assignment, with the
theme ‘Living Right In A World
Gone Wrong.’ The five day event
which starts tonight at the Diplo-
mat Center features a nightly dra-
ma presentation free to all. There
will also be various speakers dur-
ing the day in conferences
including BFMs senior pastor Dr
Myles Munroe, pastor Dave Bur-
rows, and Lakita Garth. There will
also be performances by local
and regional gospel artists like DJ
Counsellor, Land Lord, Mr Lynx,
and Emrand Henry on Friday.
Registration is $15 basic, $35
local, and $75 for international
visitors. For tickets contact the
church office, or visit
www.youthalivel.com for details.

.The newly formed Bahamas

Arts Collective (BAC) is

hosting a public meeting at
the Bahamas National Trust
Retreat on Village Road this
Thursday at 6pm. The event will
introduce BAC as a group which
will allow members to share
upcoming goals and projects
related to local art and culture.
Included discussion topics are
lobbying, cultural policy,
resource sharing, and Carifesta
2010. The meeting starts at 6pm
and promises to be an exciting
moment in the local art and cul-
ture movement.
PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ARTS



HOLes in TH:

NAGB members

excavation on the beach

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

MEMBERS and par-
ticipants of the Nation-
al Art Gallery of the
Bahamas Art Beyond
The Studio conference,
took part in an excava-
tion exercise this past
weekend where they
collected several items
along a local beach, a
practice they say dates
back to the early days
of museums.

found unique items and stored them in cup-
boards later coined as Curiosity Cabinets- that
is the original birthplace of the mordern-day

museum.

Many of the items collected by the NAGB
team included cigarette buds, plastic bottles,
stones, and other everyday items that are com-

monly overlooked.

Mr Edwards said the exercise is to look deep-
er than just the external representation of the
items, to investigate the story of how they
arrived to where they were found.

conduct

Facilitator
Michael Edwards
explained: “These
items that we have
retrieved from
along the Western
Esplanade fore-
shore will cleaned
and categorise to
eventually be dis-
played in Curiosity
Cabinets.”

He said the con-
cept of the Curios-
ity Cabinet dates
as far back as the
fifteenth hundred.
It was a practice
that started with
the random selec-
tion of items in
various corners of
Europe. The early
art collectors







sand

Members of NAGB-
sort through items —
they recently col-
lected during the
beach excavation
execise.

BAHAMIAN DJ Anthony

‘FatBack’ Marshall

(above) died Thursdsay



after a long battle with
diabetes. He was 44-

years-old. Also to pass
away this week Farrah
Fawcett (left) and King

Remembering
local and
international

legends

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THURSDAY, June 25, 2009,
will forever be a sad day for the
entertainment industry,with the
passing of two international leg-
ends- the King of Pop Michael
Jackson, and movie vixen and
international sex symbol Far-
rah Fawcett and here in the
Bahamas- a very popular dj and
children’s advocate Anthony
*FatBack’ Marshall.

Fatback,44 was reported to



have suffered a heart attack late
Wednesday, and later died on
Thursday and entertained
Bahamians for more than 20
years, using humor and his love
for the Bahamas to spread pos-
itive messages.

Within the last 15 years, Mar-
shall has worked along with
several concerned parents in
starting and promoting The
‘FatBack’ Kids Club where he
used his status to get the mes-
sage of positive parenting to as
many parents as possible.

One of his longtime col-

A place for art

of Pop Michael Jackson

(right).

leagues and friend ZNS DJ
Eddie “The Virgo’ Meadows,
said: “Me and FatBack were
always friends, coworkers, and
I think he was a great person.
He always made me laugh, he
was hyped, energetic, and I
think he was a great disc jock-
ey. He was a great person, and
his death is a great loss to all
that knew him.”

Farrah Fawcett died after a
three year battle with cancer.
The 62-year-old icon was best
know for her role as Jill
Munroe in the 1976 television
series Charlie’s Angels.
Throughout her career she
appeared in several off broad-
way plays and movies includ-
ing The Burning Bed, Nazi
Hunter, The Beate Klarsfeld
Story, and Poor Little Rich
Girl: The Barbara Hutton Sto-
ry.
Apart from her movie roles,
Farrah was best known by
women for creating a new stan-
dard in beauty as she made
famous her hairstyle common-
ly called the ‘Farrah flip.’

Moreover Farrah proved to
women that being beautiful is
simply not enough, but with the

FROM page 12

“We are going to feature work from
students ages six to sixty that will
include paintings, collage, paper
mache, repoussage, drawings, etc. The
work these kids can do is excellent
and I want to highlight their achieve-
ment,” Mr Smith said.

Mr Smith said he would like to also
get the kids to visit an architect’s office
to witness first hand what architects
do.

“T want to have Jackson Burnside
walk us through Marina Village, and
talk about the challenges he might
have faced or why he put certain
buildings in certain places. We are
going down town to look at historic
examples of very 1700-1800 year old
buildings that they can study. Then,

they are going to do a three dimen-
sional model out of foam board of a
residential or commercial building and
it will have to feature elements of
Bahamian architecture,” Mr Smith
said.

Mr Smith said at the end of the day
he wants teens to become more aware
and appreciate the architecture in the
Bahamas.

“When they are old enough to buy a
house, it is not going to be something
of another culture, but something that
will fit into the landscape-something
Bahamian. You identify a place by its
architecture- you identify Paris
because of the Eiffel tower, and the
Sydney Opera house you can only find
in Australia. There are certain styles
of buildings here that are unique to
the Bahamas,” Mr Smith said.

right talent, courage, and ambi-
tion, anything can be accom-
plished.

Just a few short hours later,
the entertainment industry was
dealt another loss when pop
icon Michael Jackson died as a
result of cardiac arrest.

The 50-year-old singer first
gained popularity at the tender
age of 7 where he preformed
alongside his siblings Jackie,
Tito, Jermaine, and Marlon in
the group The Jackson Five.

The group became the first
African American teen sensa-
tions to appeal to white audi-
ences on the same level as
white groups, and thus broke
the colour barrier for other
groups to follow.

In his solo career, Michael
become best known for his hits
Billie Jean, Beat It, Thriller,
Black or White, and Scream.

He was also the first African
American to be featured on
MTV, where he was successful
in introducing black urban cul-
ture to whites throughout
America and the world.

During the early 1990s and
up to the time of his death,
Michael has also been at the

center of scandals and legal
troubles ranging from allega-
tions of child molestation, to
law suites and bankruptcy.

However many fans prefer
to remember the star for his
music, one of whom is ZNS
radio personality Eddie ‘The
Virgo’ Meadows.

Mr Meadows said: “He is the
king of music, he is the greatest
entertainer in the history of the
world. He is the greatest enter-
tainer who ever lived, he is the
richest entertainer, and no oth-
er artist will ever be able to sur-
pass his accomplishments.

“T personally believe that he
was created by God almighty
to give what he has given to the
world, and the blessing that
God has bestowed on King
David and King Solomon, he
too has gotten a bit of that spe-
cial blessing in the form of
music.”

Probably one of his biggest
fans owning practically all of
Michael's past albums and
movies, Eddie said he hosted a
four hour long memorial broad-
cast on Friday where he played
tune after tune of the star’s
music while allowing fans to





call in and share their memo-
ries.

Throughout the capital, other
fans too basked in the memories
they hold on the king of pop.

Lifelong fan Garnell Bannis-
ter-Johnson said she wished she
had a chance to meet Jackson
while he was still alive.

“T could remember when he
was here in 1996, he went to
Cody’s, and other music stores,
I remember hopping into my
car trying just to get a glimpse.

“Everytime I went to one
location, I was told that he had
alredy left, so I missed out on
meeting him while he was
here.”

Mrs Bannister-Johnson said
despite not meeting Michael,
she has over the years collected
every single CD ever produced,
as well as assorted memorabil-
ia like a Michael jacket, a glove,
and also a doll of Michael.

She said although she had
already decided not to attend
the comeback concert in Lon-
don, she did plan to see
Michael during his US tour.

Like the words of one of his
songs, she said “he’s gone too
soon.”



Shell still life
graphite pen-
cil drawing
Vaated elelH er
Delt F
~ Takea Valentine's Resort and Marina
Stroll down offers unique experience

cantylane _ See page eight
See page eight : —



EE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 2009

a
Bull Elephant pastel

OO al By ALEX MISSICK
Syne [ oie ae Tribune Features Reporter

amissick@tribunemedia.net

ROM the intricate attention to detail in the

crown moldings, to the twists and turns on

an iron fence, most of the best art in the
country is shown through the beauty of Bahami-
an Architecture.

This year, a Place For Art is hosting a summer programme for
teens focusing on Bahamian Architecture which will be held on
July 13-31 and the 8th annual art exhibition for students to be
held on July 5.

Established in 2001, the Place For Art is a specialised studio
offering art classes for both children and adults of all ages. K
Smith, an internationally renowned pencil artist and art educator
brings a wealth of over 30 years teaching experience in Canada,
The United Kingdom, and the Bahamas.

“T have always had a passion for architecture. Most of my
grand career has been architecture through homes and buildings.
A lot of times there are no summer programmes for teens so we
are going to be focusing on architecture. We are going to start at
the very beginning by defining the word and look at architectural
history from prehistoric times right through to modern times.
Just so they can have an idea of different periods of architecture
so that they can see it when they are traveling,” Mr Smith said.

As for the art show, Mr Smith said he is very pleased with the

quality of work being produced. 1 ji :
SEE page 10 S MN oaiaamertceliir!
- a Bee) el ese retro
drawing by Paul
Redgrave, age 13.
4

5

mer mast
Nicmere lite
pencil drawing
VAN ered
Butler, age 13.


THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST

WEDNESDAY, JULY 1st 2009, PAGE 11C

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT



| (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Ta NY Marine FORECAST





































a Today Thursday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
m | z = ve High = Low W High Low W NASSAU Today: SW at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-15 Miles 82°F
£ a = «= 7 '617/18/911 FC FIC FC FIC Thursday: _ SW at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-15 Miles 82° F
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i -_, Sate LOW | MODERATE | HIGH | V.HIGH | EXT = Amsterdam 77/25 61/16 s 79/26 64/17 s Thursday: _ SW at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
c mm ORLANDO 8 Ankara, Turkey 86/30 55/12 s 86/30 57/13 pe ABACO Today: SW at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
High:88°F21°C | Partly sunny, an Clear and very warm. Partly sunny with an Sunshine. Plenty of sunshine. Mostly sunny, a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 88/31 72/22 s 90/32 72/22 s Thursday: SW at 7-14 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
Low:75°F/24°C Pas afternoon t-storm. afternoon t-storm t-storm possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 56/12 48/8 pc 50/15 52/11 s
13° an ‘ad HAG 5 ih BAG Span das Sot Qai6 Bangkok 90/32 79/26 sh 91/32 79/26 sh
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TAMPA 7, | High: 93 Low: 81 Low: 79 Low: 80 Low: 79 Low: 80 SS ESS Barcelona 83/28 69/20 s 83/28 68/20 s
mu ie 3 Cea Uae Beijin 95/35 70/21 pc 97/36 70/21 s
High: 86° F/30° C t ae 113° F 110°-89° F 107°-82° F 99°-86° F 104°-93° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low _Ht.(ft. ar mas Tae 5 78/95 75/93
Low: 76° F/24°C a r, The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 3:42am. 22 9:39am. 0.1 Belgrade 98/31 67/19 t 90/32 69/20 t
am @ s : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 4:20p.m. 28 10:41pm. 0.3 Berlin 39/97 66/18 t 84/28 63/17 s Oe
7 —- Cee Thursday 429am. 22 10:33am. 02 Bermuda 82/27 75/23 t 82/27 75/23 1 ‘a
“a | oa 5:15pm. 28 11:36pm. 0.3 Bogota 65/18 44/6 pc 66/18 45/7 sh @
J i F Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Friday 535am. 01 1125am. 02 Brussels 82/27 63/17 pc 86/30 66/18 pc SOLS) “Te
L er ABACO Temperature 6:06 p.m. 28 — ---- Budapest 91/32 66/18 c 93/33 68/20 s
, 4 a High:87°F/31°C PGI es cscs crates Qacercreetatecaances ocemet 90° F/32° C 623 am 09 12207am. 03 Buenos Aires 59/15 45/7 pe 58/14 45/7 pe
A a lll: ea, [POW asscstesarsaeste gxaeg Sally ini 28 i2idom. 02 Cairo 100/37 74/23 s 98/36 73/22 s B
rs a Cy Low: 82° F/28°C Normal high... sereic A 95/35 85/29 t 95/35 84/28 t
? r Py Normal low 75° F/24° C Calgary 68/20 43/6 s 71/21 46/7 pc ease
- fe _ thet @ WEST PALM BEACH ~~ Last year's Nigh oo... 92° F/33° C SUN ay Ty ify Cancun 89/31 76/24 t 90/32 76/24 t
’ — High: 88° F/31°C —_ Last year's lOW o...seeeeeeeeeeeeeeeees 77° F/25° C " " Caracas 81/27 71/21 t 79/26 71/21 t
— Low: 75° F/24°C i. s Precipitation _ vente a a.m. Ly hee p.m. Casablanca 81/27 67/19 s 80/26 66/18 s
> i As of 2 p.m. yesterday .......cccccccccccececene 0.45" unsel....... ‘US p.m. Moonset. .... “4f a.M. Copenhagen 80/26 64/17 sh 83/28 65/18 s
& . FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT 3% Year to date ale Full inet New First Dublin 70/21 57/13 1 70/21 54/42 sh
High: 87°F/31°C @ High: 88° F/31°C Normal year to date .o....c.ccsecsecsesscseeeeeseeee 18.39" a a 7 Frankfurt 86/30 63/17 pc 88/31 64/17 pc
Low: 77° F/25°C _ Low: 80° F/27° C i fe * — Geneva 84/28 58/14 t 85/29 60/15 t
i. AccuWeather.com yaa ak i Halifax 6216 54/12 c 65/18 54/12 c FNSy Shower
7 @ 7 Forecasts and graphics provided by i: sai : Havana 90/32 73/22 t 90/32 72/22 t T-storms 88/78
MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jul.7 dul. 450 Jul.210 Jul. 28 Helsinki 79/26 55/12 pc 81/27 57/13 pc Rain Fronts
oa High: 88° F/31°C ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 90/32 82/27 pe 90/32 81/27 sh MET a¥ Fluries Sia
“0 Low: 78°F /26°C NASSAU High: 95° F/35° C Islamabad 108/42 79/26 t 106/41 79/26 t BER] Snow Shown are noon positions of weather systems and Gracie dae
% - Pi a a Low: 80° F/27° C Istanbul 88/31 71/21 s 86/30 71/21 5 precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. ;
High: 93° F/34° C TERIA 36/30 59/15 s 32/97 BO/15 s [z_¥] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Mengunfi-
—> Low: 81°F/27°C
i 7 hanes sos a7 pe sia 36s IY ans] a6 BN 1 20 ane RN os 7s 60ST
KEY WEST alll ; @ Kingston 88/31 78/25 c 90/32 78/25 pc
High: 88° F/31°C CAT ISLAND Lima 70/21 58/14 pe 72/22 59/15 s
Oe ead High: 90° F/32° C London 88/31 59/15 pc 86/30 59/15 t
Low: Sania _ y Low: 75° F/24°C Madrid 97/36 66/18 s 97/36 64/17 s
@ 474. Manila 88/31 77/25 sh 88/31 78/25 1 HURR .or-’ ies ) Ore Cc im
- ca Mexico City 73/22 56/13 t 70/21 55/12 t
Monterrey 98/36 76/24 pc 104/40 75/23 pc
GREAT EXUMA Montreal 72/22 63/17 t 70/21 63/7 1
in. High: 89° F/32° C eee Moscow 73/22 52/11 s 72/22 54/12 t
7 Low:77°F/25° C Lew: 76°F/24°C Munich 81/27 61/16 t 82/27 60/15 t J =e
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's Rect Nairobi fos B21 po S127 BIND pe ly, B BI
highs and tonights's lows. a : ew Veni roe
: , ef Low:81° F/27°C Oslo 77/25 63/17 po —=«79/26.- 6/18 s , ou an O Wr
Prague 83/28 62/16 t 82/27 63/17 t AVV c y Vy c
LONG ISLAND Rio de Janeiro 81/27 71/21 s 76/24 68/20 pc ,
ich: 90° F/32° Riyadh 106/41 78/25 s 104/40 79/26 s .
a crc fom size serie t 8680680 Or you can rest easy knowing
Today Thursday Today Thursday Today Thursday MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 89/31 79/26 s 89/31 81/27 sh that Yo have excellent Insurance
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 91° F/33° C San Juan 57/13 30/-1 pe 63/17 32/0 s coverace no matter which
Fe FIC Fe FIC Fe FIC Fe FIC Fc FIC Fic FIC nae Low: 74° F/23°C ee cae aan t ee aa t Vv : d bl
Albuquerque 92/33 68/20 t 90/32 67/19 t Indianapolis «68/20 56/13 t 77/25 60/15 s Philadelphia 82/27 66/18 t 78/25 64/17 t antiago pe pe Wa e@ Win OWS.
Anchorage 71/21 5512 s 73/22 54/12 s Jacksonville 92/33 74/28 t 97/86 74/28 t Phoenix 106/41 86/30 t 104/40 86/30 1 CRO eo nae aa moan: SE cee y
Atlanta 90/32 66/18 s 90/32 70/21 pc Kansas City 86/30 66/18 s 80/26 64/17 1 Pittsburgh 6719 56/13 t 68/20 56/13 t RAGGEDISLAND — Uligh:94°F/34" a0 Paulo pe r : ’
Atlantic City 79/26 64/17 t 81/27 6246 t Las Vegas 101/38 78/25 pc 104/40 85/29 t Portland, OR 90/32 55/12 s 92/83 5713 s es Low:77° F/25°C a aaa eee Nobody does it better.
Baltimore 93/28 64/17 t 80/26 62/16 t Little Rock 94/34 69/20 s 96/35 72/22 t Raleigh-Durham 93/33 65/18 s 93/33 65/18 s Low: 74° F/23°C sen _ dae pe i ae .
Boston 70/21 6246 t 72/22 63/17 t LosAngeles 82/27 64/17 pc 82/27 64417 pc _ St. Louis 84/28 64/17 s 79/26 65/18 c . a ae CEERI = SE REREGP IEG
Buffalo 68/20 5713 t 71/21 6015 t Louisville 76/24 61/16 t 81/27 6447 Salt Lake City 88/31 66/18 t 91/32 68/20 t GREATINAGUA Tok . oe ae Termeni :
Charleston, SC 94/34 73/22 s 97/36 74/23 t Memphis 92/33 69/20 s 91/32 72/22 t San Antonio 96/35 74/23 t 97/36 76/24 pc High: 93° F/34°C ara Eai0 SIE" 75S MCN
Chicago 66/18 54/12 po 76/24 6146 po Miami 88/31 78/25 t 89/31 78/25 t San Diego 72/22 68/20 po 75/23 67/19 pc Low. 78° F/26°C Trinidad 00/32 86/18 pc 91/92 67/19 sh '
Cleveland 68/20 55/12 t 72/22 6015 c Minneapolis 76/24 5015 s 81/27 60/15 t San Francisco 73/22 56/13 pce 74/23 57/13 pc : Te 74/93 55/2 s 75/93 58/14 s (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Dallas 96/35 76/24 s 97/36 77/25 s Nashville 86/30 63/17 s 86/30 6417 pc _ Seattle 80/26 53/11 s 84/28 54/12 5 Gaia 86/30 71/24 t 87/30 70/21 pc
Denver 88/31 56/13 t 78/25 56/413 t New Orleans 94/34 77/25 pc 95/35 77/25 t Tallahassee 96/35 74/23 pc 97/36 75/23 t San Abaco Eleuthera Exum
Warsaw 81/27 63/17 sh 83/28 63/17 t
SSS SS ae. in nit vos Sena wea a ae ct
onoliulu $ s anoma Ul s pce ucson bee 7 z 7 2 _
Houston 99/37 76/24 t 99/37 77/25 pc Orlando 88/31 75/23 t 90/32 74/23 t Washington, DC 82/27 66/18 t 82/27 6518 t Te he ee