Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Mim blowin’ it

HIGH
LOW

SUNNY,

91F
79F

FSTORM

Volume: 105 No.179

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

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allegations
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Police investigate
‘suspicious’ death

By TANEKA THOMPSON
and DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Staff Reporters

POLICE are probing the
horror death of a man found
bound, gagged and hanged
from a tree by a car seat belt.

While there were “no signs
of injuries” to his body, offi-
cers are treating the death as
suspicious.

According to investigators,
a male resident of Johnson
Road, in the Fox Hill area of
Nassau, found the hanged
man around 3.25 pm on Sat-
urday in bushes near his
home.

Supt Elsworth Moss, head
of the Central Detective Unit,
said: "On arrival at the scene,
police observed a man hanged
from a tree with what
appeared to be a car seat belt
around his neck, his hands tied
behind his back and he
appeared to be gagged witha
white cloth around his
mouth."

Mr Moss said the man,
whose identity was not
released, had "no visible
injuries" to his body.

And while the circum-
stances surroundng his death

SEE page 11

AG calls for review of how

SHU ES





RICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

SEE PAGE FIFTEEN



Officer claims

detainees
were abused

Allegations about
Detention Centre

AN OFFICER has broken ranks to tell of the hor-
rors which he says have gone on for years behind the
gates of the Carmichael Road Detention Centre, far
from public view.

Among the abuses he alleges to have witnessed are
numerous beatings, constant sexual assaults and even
one murder — all of which, the officer says, have gone
unpunished.

He also backed several specific claims of cruelty and
violence levelled by current and former detainees and
published by The Tribune, but which the authorities say
there is no evidence to support.

"Tam ashamed by what I've seen my fellow officers do.
Most of them are in prominent positions who are doing
this foolishness, not the small man," he said.

The officer, who asked that his name and rank be
withheld as he fears for his safety, also told of chronic
hunger, a lack of medical attention and unbearable con-
ditions suffered by detainees.

He said the officials in charge of the detention centre
do not know what is going on because they are not doing
their jobs properly, and called for The Tribune to continue
to pressure the Government over the issue.

When asked to describe conditions at the centre, he
said: "It brings tears to my eyes. I'm telling you it’s sick-

SEE page nine

court business is conducted

THE Attorney General is calling for a review of the Bahamas’
Criminal Procedure Code that could radically change the country’s
court system.

Giving his contribution to the national budget in the Senate on
Friday, Attorney General Michael Barnett said there must be a
review of the way the court’s business is conducted. He is calling for
the elimination of preliminary inquiries and greater use of the
Voluntary Bill of Indictment.

Mr Barnett said a retired Justice has been retained to work on
reforming the Penal Code and Criminal Procedure Code. He
assumes office in October.

SEE page 11

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FAMILY of the man 1 found nanged point to the area where his body
was found.

Bahamas Bar Association
elects a new president

AFTER six years
of Wayne Munroe at
the helm of the
Bahamas Bar Associ-
ation, members of the
Bar on Friday elected
Ruth Bowe-Darville
as their new presi-
dent.

While Mr Munroe
had previously indi- §
cated he would stand
for re-election, it is
understood he announced on
either Tuesday or Wednesday
of last week that he would not
be running.

Speaking with The
Tribune yesterday,
Mrs Bowe-Darville
said she was not sur-
prised that Mr
Munroe chose to
withdraw from the
election.

i «=6The Tribune also
® understands that the
wemeeee law partnership of
Meanie Lockhart and
Munroe — of which
Mr Munroe is managing part-
ner and Elliot Lockhart is

SEE page nine

Io



IKFAST S



THE MEN’S 4 x 400 metre
relay team (left) and
Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie
(above) with their medals.

“Bahamian athletes finally
get their 2001 gold medals

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

AFTER being elevated from
silver to gold from the 2001
IAAF World Championships in
athletics, the men’s 4 x 400
metre relay team of Avard
Moncur, Chris Brown, Troy
McIntosh, Timothy Munnings
and Carl Oliver, as well as
sprinter Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie, finally got their
hardware.

As the curtain came down at
the conclusion of the rain-inter-
rupted Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations’ National
Open Track and Field Cham-
pionships on Saturday night, the
athletes received their gold
medals from Minister of Sports,

.9

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS

LEADING NEWSPAPER

SANDWIC
92.90

Desmond Bannister and
BAAA’s president Curt
Hollingsworth.

They also each receive a
cheque from the Bahamas gov-
ernment, the amount undis-
closed to reflect the incentive
gold medalists collect from the
World Championships and the
Olympic Games.

The IAAF stripped the Unit-
ed States’ 4 x 4 relay team of
their gold from the champi-
onships in Edmonton, Canada,
after it was discovered that
American Andrew Pettigrew
had tested positive for the use
an illegal substance.

Each member of the team
took the historic moment in
their stride as they celebrated

SEE page nine

1





PAGE 2, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS



Report says youth programme Ryser em itt iene
had become ‘military boot cap’

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A PRELIMINARY report
conducted on the now sus-
pended National Youth Ser-
vices Programme in North
Abaco indicates the site had
deteriorated into a military
"boot camp” with "little or no
therapeutic, educational or
after-care programme values".

According to the report, the
team found that educational
and mental health services at
the camp "remained in the
same underdeveloped state
with untrained staff as was the
case in February, 2008".

Observations from the
report state that at the time of
the study, the camp was still
operating as a "classical 'boot
camp' style of delinquent
intervention, where the para-
military structure become(s)
dominant and the educational,
mental health and after-care
have become un-structured
and dysfunctional".

ie
Ut)
tts
PHONE: 322-2157

This created a "major con-
cern" for the researchers who
reported that unstructured
environments can cause more
disruptive behaviour.

Staff members suggested
that the boot camp physical
components - eight RBDF
instructors and nine wardens
or one physical worker to each
three boys - mentality had
become the driving force
in the camp's programme
instead of mental health or
education.

Concern

"This condition still remains
a major concern for the evalu-
ation team because psycho-
logical research show(s) that
treating children with major
conduct disorders requires a
consistently structured treat-
ment environment or inter-
vention efforts are very likely
to elicit the opposite effects,
namely, the child is likely to
become more resolute in con-
tinued conduct disorder," said
the report.

The 2008/2009 evaluation
was prepared by Sterling Gar-
diner of the School Psycho-
logical Services Unit and pre-
sented to the Acting Director
of Youth and Sports in

November, 2008.

Between October 27 to
November 1, 2008 five school
psychologists from the Min-
istry of Education in partner-
ship with the Ministry of
Youth and Sports carried out
the research compiled in the
report.

Camp

According to the paper, the
programme - which was
formed in September, 2004 -
intended to remove at-risk
youth - those who exhibited
serious behavioral, academic
and social problems - from a
socially enabling environment
to the Andros camp.

A curriculum of physical
education, mathematics, Eng-
lish language, spirituality, par-
enting skills, self-awareness,
arts and crafts, and civics com-
bined in a 17-hour day with an
“overall physical intense train-
ing regiment” from 5.30 am to
11 pm was "expected to
change prior behaviour", said
the report.

The camp closed last Friday,
amidst controversy, but gov-
ernment said they plan to
retool the programme and re-
launch it later this year in New
Providence.

..Felipé Major/Tribune staff










































is robbed by gunman

A GUNMAN robbed the Solomon's Mines
store in Bay Street yesterday making off with
an undisclosed amount of jewelry.

Details were minimal up to press time last
night, but head of the Central Detective Unit
Elsworth Moss said the incident occured
around 1.22 pm yesterday when a lone gun-
man entered the store.

He brandished a firearm and held employ-

ee a

ees at bay before making good his escape,
said Mr Moss.

According to police, a scared employee hid
in the back of the store while the gunman
helped himself to luxury items.

Police said no shots were fired and no one
was injured during the robbery.

No description of the gunman was avail-
able. Police investigations continue.

PARAMEDICS take
part in a drill at the
Police health fair held
at the Police College
at the weekend.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 3



Contractor claims

officials approached
him to buy quarry

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE contractor responsible
for excavating Crown land and
allegedly selling quarry to gov-
ernment said officials gave him
permission to excavate and then
approached him to purchase the
product.

Cardinal Newman, 54, of Long
Island, maintains he is excavating
the three acre site north of Cow-
pen Road and south of Millars
Heights, off Carmichael Road,
to prepare the land for farming.

He said the hard rock eight
feet deep is unsuitable for agri-
culture and he was given verbal
permission from officers in the
department of physical planning
to excavate the land.

Environmental health workers
then approached Mr Newman
and offered to pay him $130 per
bag of fill, he said. And a source
told The Tribune the fill is then
used to cover the sanitary landfill
site in Harrold Road.

© In brief

Two men in
hospital after
drive-by
shooting

TWO men are in hospital
following a drive-by shooting
in the Milton Street area yes-
terday, police said.

The men, one in his early
20s and the other 19, were
standing on the street outside
a house around 12.40 pm
Sunday when a car pulled up
alongside them and occu-
pants began shooting.

Central Detective Unit
Superintendent Elsworth
Moss said: "People from that
vehicle fired several shots at
these men hitting one to the
right thigh and the other to
the chest and right side of his
body.”

Up to press time police did
not have a description of the
gunmen or their car.

The victims, whose injuries
are not life threatening, were
in hospital yesterday but are
expected to make a full
recovery, police said.

In other crime news, police
recovered two illegal
firearms over the weekend.

Acting on information
from the public, the police
retrieved a .44 Desert Eagle
pistol from the Eastern Road
area on June 26, said Mr
Moss.

Later that day, police exe-
cuted a search warrant on a
Pinewood Gardens home
where a 12-gauge shotgun
was confiscated, said Mr
Moss.

“The government are aware of
what I’m doing,” Mr Newman
said.

“Physical planning gave me the
okay from last year or the year
before, by word of mouth, but
not on paper.

“They have sent the inspectors
out and they said they don’t have
a problem with what I’m doing
and tell me to go ahead.

“And until they come and say
don’t go further with it, I will con-
tinue what I’m doing.”

Following excavation Mr New-
man fills the craters with
biodegradable waste — trees,
leaves, and wood — to prepare
the land as farmers do in Long
Island, Mr Newman said.

He insists it is not a money-
making scheme as he pays $160
per hour to rent each excavation
machine and therefore earns just
$4 per bag of fill.

But as he needs to excavate
the land for farming, he did not
turn down the opportunity to sell
the fill, Mr Newman said. He
insists that other Crown land






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leaseholders are doing the same.

Mr Newman, whois also a con-
tractor for Newman’s Construc-
tion, explained he has completed
excavation of about two acres of
the site, which is now being filled,
and he is digging the last portion
of the site set aside for excava-
tion, a 90ft by 90ft area.

On the cultivated land he
hopes to grow 784 banana trees
and around 200 Persian lime
trees, with okra and watermelon
dotted in between.

Mr Newman said: “You can’t
grow anything on rock, so what
was left for me to do? If they did-
n’t want me to cultivate the land
they shouldn’t have given me the
land.

“T have to cultivate my land.

“Tf the government doesn’t
give you permission to cut this
type of land down there’s only
one thing left to do, and that’s
build houses on it.

“T don’t want to build a house,
if I did I wouldn’t cut it down. I
want to farm because I know
what I can make of this.”



WORK TAKES sues maith a
Cowpen Road and south of
Millars Heights.

Environment Minister Earl
Deveaux did not respond to press
inquiries Friday, but passed them
on to the department of environ-
mental health services and
the department of physical plan-
ning.

Nothing was received from
either department.










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MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News Seen ier es) Ob nie
ECitOnal BEMEISaectasecseeecesteeescetccreenea: fa
Sports Eley toes
BUSINESS SECTION

Business PleZ 73 4a 57 6s eniz
INSIGHT SECTION

Insight

Comics

Weather

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES
REAL ESTATE GUIDE 24 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

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news

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from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
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PAGE 4, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Rebutting Senator over Police Chief

IT SEEMS the political sleuths are still
hounding Police Commissioner Reginald Fer-
guson. He shouldn’t be chief, one of their num-
bers told the Senate Friday.

For the past seven years they have agitated
over the presence of a man, who, when it comes
to investigating a crime, cannot be swayed,
regardless of the status of the suspect. For some
reason this seems to agitate certain members of
the Opposition, and those of their political per-
suasion who serve on the police force. Howev-
er, the public probably feels safer with a man
who believes all persons are equal before the
law, and is prepared to do his duty to get the law
breaker, whatever his political views, before
the courts.

It was during Friday’s Senate budget debate
that Senator Jerome Fitzgerald, himself the son
of a former police officer, criticised govern-
ment for having sent two young police officers
to Canada for training, but instead of appoint-
ing one of them Police Commissioner and the
other his deputy on their return, confirmed Mr
Ferguson in the top position, with the other
two under him. Senator Fitzgerald pointed out
that Mr Ferguson, an Acklins man, was the old-
est officer on the force. He failed to mention
that he was also the man with the most experi-
ence having spent 44 of his 63 years working his
way from the bottom ranks to the position of
Commissioner. One does not get that kind of
experience from a classroom text book, as those
of us in the newspaper profession appreciate,
but the ill informed believe that anyone who can
string two sentences together — and hopefully
know where to put a full stop — is capable of
being an editor. It’s the same in the police force
where years of experience is one of the most
important ingredients in being able to lead an
effective team.

Mr Fitzgerald believed the Ingraham gov-
ernment would have been wiser to have
appointed a “young, qualified, respected senior
police officer who has the full support of the
police force and the community at large and
allow him to recommend and advise on the
restructuring of a police force he was to lead.”

There was no “logical rationale” for having
a commissioner being party to reshuffling a
police force that he would not lead into the
future, said Mr Fitzgerald.

“It makes no sense,” he told the Senate.
“But then again, this is the age of foolishness. If
we were in the age of wisdom, the most qualified
and respected senior police officer would be
commissioner of police today.”

Now let’s examine this sense and nonsense.

It is known that before the 2007 election the
PLP government had its own plans on the retire-
ment of Police Commissioner Paul Farquharson,

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who, we understand, knew only too well the
heavy hand of the politician on his shoulder.
They had earmarked two young men — one to
be commissioner and the other his deputy — on
Mr Farquharson’s retirement. They would have
bypassed Mr Ferguson, then Mr Farquharson-
*s deputy, and created a new position — Advis-
er to the Commissioner. The person it is said
they had identified for this position was a retired
police officer, one of their political supporters,
who, probably, because of the lack of experience
of the two they had chosen, was to guide them
in their new positions. If this had happened,
the PLP would have had complete control of the
Royal Bahamas Police Force. It would have
also meant an unnecessary expense on the
force’s budget and the taxpayer’s pocket book.

However, the PLP lost the election. The
FNM became the government, and Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham looked at the problem
through different spectacles.

He took two of the force’s top officers, young
men, already with a good educational back-
ground and a great deal of promise and sent
them to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police for
further training. On their return they were
appointed top positions under an experienced
Commissioner already active on the force at
no extra expense to the Treasury — in other
words no extra body had to be hired to give
them advice. During these few years, until Mr
Ferguson’s retirement, they will have time to
build their reputation with the public and their
fellow officers, so that they can win the full sup-
port of both groups — support that Senator
Fitzgerald assumes they already have. And they
will do it with the help of Mr Ferguson’s years of
experience. With their extra training and Com-
missioner Ferguson’s background, the three
working together should be able to form a
strong police force for the future.

And when it’s time for Commissioner Fer-
guson to retire the new commissioner must be a
man of knowledge, integrity and above all inde-
pendence. A man who cannot be swayed by
any political party. A man who is prepared to
police this country with sternness, tempered by
fairness. And because we believe the matter is
being dealt with wisely, we should have a well
trained future commissioner.

One would have thought that controlling
crime would have been the most important item
on our daily agenda. Instead of making Com-
missioner Ferguson’s job more difficult, every
patriotic Bahamian should be trying to assist
him and his force.

It is true that this is an age of foolishness
made more foolish by politicians trying to play
interference with a man who is responsible for
this community’s security.



Explanation
needed from
Chief Justice

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I rite to express my concerns
concerning a recent experience
with the Supreme Court Reg-
istry of The Bahamas.

As you may know, creditors
of CLICO were required to file
their claims with the Registry
and serve it on the Liquidators
no later than May 22, 2009.

Tam one such creditor hold-
ing a pension policy with CLI-
CO

I live on a remote Family
Island and flew into Nassau on
the morning of May 22, 2009
for the purpose of filing my
Affidavit of Proof and serving it
on the Liquidators.

I arrived at the Supreme
Court Registry at about lpm

letters@tribunemedia net



only to find out that the Reg-
istry was closed from 12.30 for
the personnel to attend a lun-
cheon and not expected to
reopen until three for one hour
as it closes at 4pm.

I was totally bewildered as I
could not fathom that the Chief
Justice would allow the entire
judicial system to shut down
with the public unable to file
documents with the Registry for
their court matters.

Is it any wonder that the pub-
lic has no confidence in the judi-
ciary?

Could this luncheon not have
been held on the weekend so
as not to inconvenience the
public?

In addition to the possibility
of not recouping my full invest-
ment with CLICO I had to trav-
el to Nassau at some cost to
myself, take a taxi to the Reg-
istry only to be met with this
situation.

Will the Chief Justice explain
these actions and at the very
least offer an apology to the
public?

WILLIAM G
STRACHAN
Nassau,

May, 2009.

Into the Ark of Culture

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Before the memory of Bahamian History was
formed, stands a testament to Native Indians who
strove to marry culture with every minute detail of
their lives, in this land.

Of course we do not expect the same as society
unfolds upon pages of change and progress, nor do
we envision that same pristine ecological diversity;
however, the insouciant attitudes of this people
towards conservation far outweighs the burdens of
industrial growth.

Today, we take a slight turn from the course of
the three previous letters, into the headwind of
incontrovertible fact, as it were.

Culture is without question the plenipotent source
of any society, the backbone of any nation; we also
know that the employ and/or study of all great dis-
bursements of time: medicine, religion, art, science,
philosophy etc, ultimately depend upon the astute
understanding of culture for their various measure-
ments and definitions.

So it is into this ark, life finds refuge when storm
floods of time descend. Even as culture lends itself
to everything and everyone, it is at once secure in
ownership of self. It is of this quintessence T. H.
Huxley speaks when referring to the “spirit of
catholicity” in writings of “our chief apostle of cul-
ture” Matthew Arnold, in Science and Culture. Cul-
ture, though being a distinct chapter differentiat-
ing peoples, remains the all-encompassing perpetu-
al rule that governs mankind. Here at home, we
vigilantly seek to understand the mental taxation

placed upon Bahamians by excessive failures of suc-
cessive governments to quell the eruptions we con-
tinue to see in our communities; Why? Because cul-
ture is always relegated to the most meager impor-
tance. How long will Bahamians be satisfied with liv-
ing conditions that breed discontent — disrupting a
person's right to freedom from beastly intrusions eg,
noise pollution. How much longer this society dilly-
dallies, “fiddling while Rome burns”, despite chaot-
ic disproportions of a national crisis, remains to be
seen. Let us turn this argument upon the universal
poles of truth, culture is the epicentre of all, in that
who God is, was, will ever be, was meted out from
himself to bring forth all that becomes.

Culture orders the designations, assignments and
appropriations of the Eternal Blueprint; it secures
investment within the Human Estate. We are a
debt-ridden people in multiple areas of our nation-
al lives; and until strict lines of moral redemption are
drawn and assiduously followed, we will continue to
see foreclosures on our citizens and communities.

The Chinese propounds, “the journey of a thou-
sand miles begins with the first step”, however I
submit, “the journey to a Nation’s soul begins with
the first voice.” Remember, when a people become
afraid to speak, they question, challenge and deny
the wisdom of God. Thank you for your continued
advancement of social awareness.

GREGORY NEELY
Nassau,
June 15, 2009.

Disgusted at wanton and casual cruelty inflicted on dogs

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please permit me space in your
valuable columns to express my
disgust at the wanton and casual
cruelty inflicted on dogs in this
country.

It seems a fully acceptable pas-
time for children and adults to
“lick” dogs wherever they
encounter them.

In fact, the local potcakes seem
more inclined to follow tourists
and vagabonds around because
they are assured no harm will
come to them from these quar-
ters.

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On Tuesday, June 2, I wit-
nessed a young man in Grants
Town hit a wandering dog with a
stick, nearly fracturing one of the
animal’s hind legs.

I saw glee on his face as if the
heavens had opened and show-
ered him with grace unmeasured.

Everywhere on this island we
see scarred and crippled dogs,
damning evidence of our cruel,
nastier and darker sides.

In fact, if you believe in rein-
carnation, the worst form to
return as would be an over-the-
hill potcake dog. That would be
tantamount to residing eternally

in the left wing of hell. The coun-
try sorely needs a crack down on
cruelty to animals.

In addition to fines, or short
jail term, perpetrators could be
required to give community ser-
vice via the Bahamas Humane
Society and through the natural
expansion of its facilities to truly
sensitise Bahamians on the sub-
ject.

“Nuff said.”

W LESTER BOWLEG
ANIMAL LOVER
Nassau,

June 11, 2009.

Correcting Mr Leslie Miller’s statement

EDITOR, The Tribune.

While we wish Mr Leslie Miller every success in his undertaking
in the construction and operation of Mario’s Bowling and Enter-
tainment Centre, we must correct his statement as it appeared on
page 3B of today’s Tribune and which we understand he also

made earlier on a local talk show.

Never, from the time we purchased the land and built Village
Lanes did we receive government’s relief whether from stamp tax
on our conveyance, customs duty on building materials, lanes and
machines, real property tax, business license or any other items
related thereto. When we sold the property some 20 years later, all
real property taxes, business licenses, National Insurance and util-
ities were paid in full. Again, we wish Mr Miller every success, he
has undertaken a massive challenge.

SYDNEY& IVY FRENCH
Nassau,
June 26, 2009.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



New passenger

terminal opens at |
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By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Freeport
Harbour Company and Dis-
covery Cruises officially opened
the newly refurbished passen-
ger terminal on Friday.

Orlando Forbes, port direc-
tor at the harbour, and Hans
Hahn, president of Discovery,
attended the ribbon-cutting cer-
emony for the completion of
Phase I.

Mr Forbes said that an invest-
ment of $1.2 million has been
budgeted for a three-phase
improvement project of the har-
bour facility, including the pas-
senger terminal, baggage and
Customs sections.

He said with Phase I com-
pleted, the passenger terminal
has gained 1,600 square feet in
space that allows accommoda-
tion for an additional 250 pas-
sengers.

Mr Forbes said the Discov-
ery terminal is now capable of
accommodating some 450 to
500 passengers.

“We were able to add more
room for the passenger line-up
area, which is critical for us on
wet days,” he said.

Discovery president Mr Hahn
said the terminal has “come a
long way” over the past 11 years
since the cruise’ line
started sailing at Freeport Har-
bour.

“T remember 11 years ago it
was not much of a terminal.
(Back then) we took about
1,000 passengers a day and
when it rained people were
standing in mud, and when the
sun shone people were stand-
ing in the sweltering heat.

“We then added a Customs
hole and a tent, and the hurri-
cane came and blew it away.
We put on a roof and finally we
came to the stage where we
needed a little more space
because after all our passengers,
the first thing and the last thing

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Part of a three-phase
improvement of facility | tisnisssss:

they see is Freeport terminal. I
think it is very nice,” he said.

Mr Hahns commended
Freeport Harbour for the
improvements. He noted that
while passenger numbers have
fallen, they are hoping to see
the numbers go up again to
1,000 passengers daily.

Mr Forbes said Phase I and
IIT will involve the further
expansion of the passenger ter-
minal, baggage section and
Customs area, respectively.

He stressed that the process
of baggage collection and clear-
ing Customs must be improved
for both passengers and Cus-
toms officers.

Mr Forbes said Freeport Har-

bour is committed to doing its
part to ensure that the termi-
nal is at the highest standards in
terms of security and passenger
accommodation.

“We are aware of the efforts
being made by Discovery and
the government in seeking to
keep Discovery coming to this
island.

“This investment we made
here represents our part of the
partnership. As caretakers of
this gateway. It is our obliga-
tion to ensure that security stan-
dards are met and that all
guests, Bahamian and tourists
who utilise the terminal are in a
comfortable environment,” he
said.

Honduran military
_ Ousts president
ahead of vote

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras
SOLDIERS ousted the demo-
cratically elected president of

dent Hugo Chavez denounced

? what he called an illegal coup

? and vowed to stay in power,
? according to Associated Press.

The first military takeover of a

Central American government

Latin America and the world,
: and Chavez vowed to overthrow
? the country’s apparent new
i leader.
President Manuel Zelaya was
? awakened Sunday by gunfire
? and detained while still in his
? pajamas, hours before an unpop-
: ular constitutional referendum
? many saw as a power grab. An
? air force plane flew him into
? forced exile in Costa Rica as
? armored military vehicles with
? machine guns rolled through the
: streets of the Honduran capital
? and soldiers seized the national
? palace.
: = “T want to return to my coun-
? try,” Zelaya said in Costa Rica.
? “I am president of Honduras.”
: Congress voted to accept what
i it said was Zelaya’s letter of res-
? ignation, with even Zelaya’s for-
? mer allies turning against him.

HAVE you ever overdressed
for an event? Perhaps you
understood the dress to be for-
mal, but when you arrived in
your sequin dress or black tuxe-
do, everyone else was wearing
jeans and turtlenecks. You may
recall how everyone stared as
you entered the room, looking a
bit out of place.

That happens to homeown-
ers too, but it’s not called over-
dressing — it’s called over-
improving. It happens when
property owners remodel a
home to the point where its new
value far exceeds all others in
the neighbourhood.

Let’s say that your family has
grown, and you begin your
improvements by adding a wing
with two more bedrooms and
another bath. You expand toa

Bahamas real
estate today

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three-car garage, and install an
outdoor deck. In the process,
you add $100,000 in improve-
ments to your $250,000 home.

As long as you continue living
in the home, that’s not a prob-
lem. When it’s time to sell, how-
ever, you'll face an unexpected
challenge. You’ve — spent
$100,000 on improvements, but
buyers are unlikely to be
impressed as they compare the
prices of other homes in the
area, and expect yours to be in
line.

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be glad you did.

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students to attend The College of The Bahamas.

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THE TRIBUNE



Caricom leaders
must move the
region forward |

or pay the price ff

insight |

WORLD VIEW

@ By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean
diplomat)

W HEN heads of
government of the

Caribbean Community and
Common Market (Caricom)
meet in early July, a big
responsibility will fall on the
shoulders of Guyana’s Presi-
dent Bharat Jagdeo as chair-
man to heal the wounds that
are causing the regional pro-
ject to haemorrhage.

President Jagdeo will have
to dig deep within himself for
the diplomatic skills that will
be necessary not only to sup-
press his own annoyance over
recent events in Caricom, but
also to guide his colleague
leaders to practical measures
that will fix the rifts between
them and set the Caricom ship
upon an agreed course of fur-
ther progress that benefits all.

All other Caricom leaders
will have to contribute to the
healing process by showing a
high level of maturity in their
discourse with each other and
by eschewing a desire for
purely short-term national
advantage in favour of longer
term gain for all.

The economic prospects
that Caricom countries face
are deeply troubling.
Addressing them at every lev-
el, especially international bar-
gaining, calls for a united Cari-
com, not a fractious one.

The current Chairman of
Caricom, the Prime Minister
of Belize Dean Barrow, cap-
tured the dire conditions con-
fronting Caricom countries
when, on June 24, he told a
special session of the UN
General Assembly that for the
Caribbean “the current set of
economic conditions is the
worst to have overtaken us
since independence.”

There was no exaggeration
in this declaration by Mr Bar-
row, nor was there any hyper-
bole in his further assertion
that “there is now no prospect
of our countries achieving the
time-bound Millennium
Development Goals”.

The reality is that given the
decline in the prices of their
principal exports, reduction in
aid, the significant downturn
in tourism, the dramatic fall
in remittances from their
Diaspora, and the severe stric-
tures in borrowing money on
the commercial market, Cari-
com countries are experienc-
ing a new level of desperation
particularly as many of them
have a debt to GDP ratio of
over 100 per cent. If they were
companies, many of these
countries would be regarded
as bankrupt.

Turning to the Internation-
al Monetary Fund (IMF) is of
little help to them in the pre-
sent circumstances.

For they can only borrow in
proportion to their quotas and
their quotas — particularly for
the six small countries of the
Organization of Eastern
Caribbean States (OECS) — is
too small to contribute effec-
tively to their needs. Further,
IMF money is the one source
of funding that cannot be writ-
ten-off so there is no prospect
of relief from this debt.

Of course, several countries
are in such dire straits that
they will end up in IMF pro-
grammes, not only because of
the effect of the current glob-
al crisis on their economies,
but also because of poor poli-
cies pursued in the past.

Some countries have
already sought help from spe-
cial IMF windows — Grenada
and St Vincent and the
Grenadines among them. Oth-

ers, such as Jamaica and
Antigua and Barbuda, are
now teetering on the edge of
full IMF programmes and will
shortly be there.

The situation is worse now
for Caricom countries, except
for Guyana, because over the
last three decades in which a
new generation has reached
adulthood, the region has
enjoyed a summer of relative
plenty making the current
insufficiency difficult to man-
age.

A big contribution to the
season of plenty in the decade
of the 1980’s was preferential
access to the European Union
(EU) market for sugar,
bananas and rum and a high
level of aid from the US, the
EU and Canada. But the sum-
mer of plenty has now turned
to the winter of drought, and
the full Economic Partnership
Agreement that Caricom
countries signed with the EU
last year bears no resemblance
to the treaties of the past.

|: Guyana’s case, it has
been a Highly Indebted

Poor Country for most of the
last three decades only recent-
ly being pulled out of the most
difficult economic circum-
stances by virtue of debt write-
offs. Nonetheless, Guyana too
is now plagued with falling
prices for bauxite, a decline in
remittances, and the loss of its
preferential market in the EU
for sugar.

Only relatively high prices
for its gold production make a
significant contribution to the
economy.

Unemployment levels have
already begun to increase in
every country, including
Trinidad and Tobago, despite
its comparative wealth in oil
and gas.

And, the forecast for
improvement is not encour-
aging.

It is clear that Caricom
countries will suffer the effects
of the recession in the US and
Europe for some time after
these areas begin to recover.

Given the very high levels
of unemployment in the US
and UK especially, there will
be a lag time before employ-
ment reaches a stage where
tourism and remittances
return to their 2007 levels for
the Caribbean.

Given this troubling inter-
national environment, the first
business of Caricom Heads of
Government as they gather
for their 30th meeting should
be to agree that there was nev-
er a time in their history when



BACK To SCHoo!

LAYAWAY



NO interest -



SIR RONALD SANDERS



there was a greater need fora
Caribbean Community and
for Caricom itself.

The problems that beset
Caricom countries in coping
with the severe challenges of
the global environment will
not be overcome by national
action alone.

If they were to come to
such an agreement and to
publicly declare it, they will
have to grab the nettle of
some issues that are ripe for
resolution by reasonable but
frank discussion.

One of them is the matter of
migration of Caricom people
within the Community; anoth-
er is the seeming division with-
in Caricom being caused by
the proposal for an Economic
Union between members of
the OECS and Trinidad and
Tobago; a third is the abject
failure to put in place effec-
tive governance of Caricom;
and the last and most impor-
tant is an agreed plan for
implementing the single mar-
ket and economy with penal-
ties for every infraction.

This cannot be beyond the
capacity of the Heads of Gov-
ernment of Caricom.

This is crunch time, and
time for leaders to deliver the
regional project over which
generations of Caribbean peo-
ple have laboured.

In the words of the Dean
Barrow, Caricom’s Chairman,
talking about the United
Nations on June 24, “What do
we tell our people? That we
attended yet another dress
rehearsal for a shadow play?
Another instalment in this
drama of progress that never
actually takes place”?

Mr Barrow’s answer to his
own poignant questions was
“No”. And, so it must be also
at the Caricom Summit in
Guyana in July. It must be a
resounding “No” to further
shadow plays.

Consequent upon this Sum-
mit, measurable advances
must be made by Caricom
leaders or they will have failed
their people and a price will
be paid.

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com

MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 7

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PAGE 8, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





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NORTH Andros The
Bahamas Agricultural and Indus-
trial Corporation (BAIC) and
Carter Marketing are set to join
forces to promote the ‘Buy Fresh,
Buy Bahamian’ initiative.

Veteran broadcast executive
Charles Carter of spoke about the
project during a farmers meeting
on the island last weekend.

He was a member of a high lev-
el BAIC delegation led by execu-
tive chairman Edison Key. It
included a team from Bahamas
Agricultural Producers Associa-
tion headed by I G Stubbs.

Fulfilling a commitment made
to farmers here, BAIC has pur-
chased more equipment for their
use as they prepare for winter
crops. Equipment include a
mulcher, a fertiliser distributor, a
slasher, and a bedder.

And, the former North
Andros Farmers Association is
now the Big Yard Farmers Com-
pany with Cecil Gaitor as its pres-
ident.

“With this additional equipment
we are looking forward to a
bumper year,” said BAIC domes-
tic investment officer for North
Andros Alphonso Smith.

“For example, instead of one
tractor which we had last year, we
now have three more which means
that the waiting time for farmers to
prepare their fields has been short-
ened considerably. In another
week, farmers will have their own
spray machine.”

Mr Key pledged his continued
support of farmers in North
Andros.

“T am trying to do everything
possible to support you. But I want

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a ye ; 5
BAIC EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN Edison Key (second from right) and his

team are shown sponge harvested by fishermen from Red Bays, North
Andros during a visit there last weekend.

to see more young people
involved,” he said.

He confirmed that, in the name
of BAIC, the government has pur-
chased 561 acres of prime farm
land in the vicinity of the North
Andros airport.

“We are going to us this prop-
erty strictly for agriculture,” he
said. “We are going to subdivide it
into plots so that whoever wants to
get involved in agriculture we will
make land available to them.”

Mr Carter hailed Mr Key’s
appointment as BAIC’s executive
chairman.

“Mr Key’s ideas for BAIC are
the most sensible we have heard
for agriculture in a long time,” he
said.

He warned that the way the
world is evolving, “if we don’t
make a stand for Bahamian agri-

culture now, there will be no stand
to make in the future.”

A problem with the country, he
said, “is that everything Bahamian
is jeopardised.”

“Too many of us are convinced
that if it comes from overseas it is
better than what we have right
here. That’s our problem. We just
like foreign things.”

To effect a change in attitude, he
said, “we have to organise our-
selves to go at the consumers and
make them feel that it is in their
best interest to buy Bahamian-
made and produced goods.

“Just saying ‘buy Bahamian’
isn’t going to do it. We have to
educate the consumer and in the
process of educating the consumer,
that is where BAIC and Carter
Marketing are going to intersect,”
he said.

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BAIC EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN Edison Key at the farmers meeting in
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BAIC EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN Edison Key inspects lime produced from
conch shells. Pictured from left are BAIC domestic investment officer
Alphonso Smith; Alfie Stubbs; Mr Key, and Sean Evans. Mr Stubbs and Mr
Evans operate the project in North Andros.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS

Bahamas Bar Association [Sn

elects a new president

FROM page one

senior partner — will be dissolved. Mr
Munroe could not be reached for com-
ment and Mr Lockhart said he is not at
liberty to discuss the matter with the
press.

Ms Bowe-Darville served as the Bar
Association’s vice-president under Mr
Munroe for the past six years. Taking
over her former post, is the new vice-
president Cathleen Johnson-Hassan, sis-
ter of former Speaker of the House of
Assembly Italia Johnson.

In her new role as Bar Association pres-
ident Mrs Bowe-Darville said that a goal
that is “very close to her heart” is the
rehabilitation of the Bar’s reputation,
which in her view has “suffered terribly”
in recent years.

She said she also aims to achieve a
“total reconstruction” of the Bar’s admin-
istration, and wants to work on develop-
ing the legal profession more.

Addressing some of the pertinent issues
concerning the Bahamian judiciary at this
time, Ms Bowe-Darville said that she is
concerned about the upcoming vacancies
on the bench and hopes replacements can

FROM page one

the Bahamas’ first gold medal in
a men’s relay event at one of

be found as quickly as possible.

As it concerns the departure of Chief
Justice Sir Burton Hall, she said that it is
“regrettable” that he will serve outside
the country, but she is confident that a
qualified and experienced Bahamian can
be found to replace him.

“We have nothing but talent at the Bar,
we just don’t use it (properly),” she said.

Ms Bowe-Darville said she is a great
advocate of creating a strong Bahamian-
run judiciary, and is not in favour of
bringing in foreigners to fill posts that
she believes can easily be filled by local
legal professionals.

“Tf we create a strong Bar, I feel we
will create a strong bench,” she said.

Other contenders for the executive
positions within the Bar Association were
Cheryl Buzard, who ran for the position
of president, and Craig Butler, who ran
unsuccessfully for vice-president.

The positions of secretary and treasur-
er went unchallenged and Rachel Culmer
will continue on as secretary, while Sidney
Cambridge remains the Bar Association’s
treasurer.

Ms Bowe-Darville said there was some
chaos during the election process on Fri-
day and the ballot had to be taken a sec-

ond time. However, she said that the elec-
tions had a great turn-out and that 132
members of the Bar attended.

It is understood that on the first ballot
there were more ballots than persons vot-
ing.
Ms Bowe-Darville was educated at the
Government High School and continued
her tertiary education at the University of
Waterloo and York University in Ontario,
Canada. In May, 1985 she was called to
the Bahamas Bar.

She articled in the law firm of Bost-
wick and Bostwick, and in 1990, she
joined the law firm of Graham, Thompson
and Co. She was appointed senior execu-
tive assistant to the Prime Minister of the
Bahamas in September, 1994 and served
in that capacity until May of 1998. She
then joined the firm of Bannister and Co.
On several occasions, Ms Bowe-Darville
has acted as Stipendiary and Circuit Mag-
istrate.

She also served as chairperson of the
National Women's Advisory Council and
as a member of the Licensing Authority
and the Hospitals and Health Care Facil-
ities Licensing Board. She was appointed
as amember of the Securities Commission
of the Bahamas in June 2001.

Bahamian athletes finally get their medals

medals sentenced to six months

the two prestigious internation-
al meets.

Moncur, the lead off com-
petitor, said: “It seemed as if it
was never going to come to
fruition, so to finally have it,
especially in front of the home
crowd, is a great feeling.”

Moncur passed the baton off
to Brown, who after all these
years of hard work, they finally

got a gold medal, although it
wasn’t an Olympic gold.
“World Championship gold
is better than no gold at all,”
Brown said. “I just want to
thank my team-mates for
believing in me and sticking
with me and the Bahamian peo-
ple for their support.”
McIntosh, who got the baton
from Brown, said it’s good to
finally rejoin his team-mates

Officer claims detainees were abused

FROM page one

ening. At the end I was sick and tired of the job."

According to the officer, the recently announced improve-
ments at the centre will be short-lived - as have all such efforts
in the past — unless more far-reaching and comprehensive action
is taken.

The officer's full interview can be read in today's Insight.

after officially retiring to claim
the gold that they should have
gotten in Edmonton.

“Now, we are officially pre-
sented with these medals. It’s a
dream come through,” McIn-
tosh said. “This is something I
have been waiting on because
[ve won a medal at every inter-
national championship, but to
get that gold really put the nail
in the coffin for me.”

Although he’s semi-retired,
Munnings, the anchor of the
team, said: “It’s been a long
time coming, it’s vindication
that the hard work has finally
paid off. It pays to do it clean.
I’m very happy.”

In 2007, American sprint
queen Marion Jones came clean
that she cheated about the use
of performance-enhancing sub-
stances. She was stripped her

in jail.

One of the medals was the
gold she won in the 200 at the
IAAF World’s in Edmonton
which saw Ferguson-McKenzie
moved up from the silver to
claim the top spot.

“It feels fantastic,” said Fer-
guson-McKenzie, who received
her medal after posting a double
victory at the Nationals in the
100 and 200.

“T must thank the [AAF, the
BAAA’s and the Bahamas Gov-
ernment, who all pitched in and
made it work. It has my name
on it: ‘Bahamas 200 metre wom-
en’s Edmonton.’ It took seven
plus years, but you would think
that they had forgotten. But I
got the silver then. Now I’m the
gold medalist. I’m ecstatic.”

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PAGE 10, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE
























































































































PROPERTIES FOR SALE

























. BAY STREET

1. ALLEN DRIVE CARMICHAEL

NASSAU LISTINGS

LOT NO. Parcel of Land
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Two-Storey Commercial Building
(Millie’s Place)

PROPERTY SIZE: 3,744 sq. ft.
LOCATION: On the southern side
of Bay Street between Deveaux
Street and Gomez Alley
APPRAISED VALUE: $993,000

. BEL-AIR ESTATES -

CARMICHAEL ROAD

LOT NO. 259

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence,

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east on
Carmichael Road from Faith
Avenue take the fourth corner on
the right (Turtle Drive) property is
fourth house on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $186,000

. CARMICHAEL ROAD

LOT NO. Parcel of Land
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residence

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 12,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travelling east on
Carmichael Road from Bacardi
Road take the first asphalt paved
easement on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $401 ,882

. CHIPPINGHAM SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 96

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

3 beds / 1 bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: From Nassau Street
onto Boyd Road, take the fifth
corner on the right - Dunmore
Street and then second corner
on the right Musgrove Street. The
property is the first house on the
corner left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $120,000

CORAL MEADOWS

SUBDIVISION - WESTERN
DISTRICT

LOT NO. 4

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 7,500 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Western side of
Symonette Road and 150 feet
northward of Adelaide Road and
approximately a mile westward of
Coral Harbour Roundabout.
APPRAISED VALUE: $260,000

. DESTINY GARDEN

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 147

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

3 Beds /2Baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travelling west

on Carmichael Road from the
intersection of Gladstone Road

- about 2,000 feet - turn right at
the entrance of Destiny Garden
Subdivision; turn left at t-junction.
The property is the 19th house on
the right.

APPRAISED VALUE: $137,000

ROAD

LOT NO. 2

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Duplex Lot

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travelling west along
Carmichael Road turn through the
corner by Geneva Brass Seafood.
Take the third corner on the left
and travel to the end of the road.
The vacant lot is on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $65,000

. MALVARIC ESTATES

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 5

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Multi-Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 9,114 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travelling south along
High Vista Drive from East Bay
Street, take the 1st corner left

and then first right (Mango Drive).
Heading south take the 4th corner
right. At the t- junction, turn left
then take the first corner right.
The vacant lot is the third property
on the left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $109,000

. ELIZABETH ESTATES



SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 178

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

5 beds / 1 bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Enter Elizabeth
Estates from Prince Charles, take
the first right and follow the curve.
The property is located on the
corner of St. Vincent Avenue and
Ghana Circle.

APPRAISED VALUE: $118,000

. ENGLERSTON SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 19 Block 22
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residence

2-beds / 1-bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: On the western side
of St. Charles Vincent Street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $64,000

. ENGLERSTON SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 4 Block 7
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Triplex Apartment building
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east on
Cordeaux Avenue from East
Street take the second right (Key
West Street). Heading south

on Key West Street the subject
property is the sixth building on
the left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $243,000

10. FAITH GARDENS SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 23 Block 4
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-family Residence

2 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: From Faith Avenue
enter Faith Gardens and travel
east along Cleveland Boulevard
then take the fourth corner

on the left. The property is

the 13th house on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $184,000

11. GOLDEN GATES TWO

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 1010

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on
Carmichael Road, turn south onto
Jack Fish Drive; turn through the
fourth corner on the right. The
property is the third lot on the
right.

APPRAISED VALUE: $112,000

12. HAWKINS HILL

LOT NO. 52

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 6.175 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Southern side of
Windwhistle Street just east on
Hawkins Hill.

APPRAISED VALUE: $275,000

. OPULENT HEIGHTS
SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 28

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,597 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on
Carmichael Road, take the first
paved road after “Outdoor Patio”
on the left. Take the second
corner left, then the first corner
right. The vacant lot is second
to the last on the right before the
road ends.

APPRAISED VALUE: $75,000

. SOUTH OCEAN ESTATES
SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 9 Block 4

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 11,566 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling south of
Lyford Cay, immediately pass
Mount Pleasant turn left on South
Ocean Boulevard to new South
Ocean Estates. The vacant lot is
number 9 in Block 4.
APPRAISED VALUE: $110,000

6

13. JUBILEE GARDENS

16. NASSAU EAST SUBDIVISION

17

18. PARADISE CONDOMINIUMS

. SOUTH SEAS SUBDIVISION

DEVELOPED RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 48

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

3 beds / 1 bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: From Fire Trail road
enter Jubilee Gardens and

take the first corner on the left
then the first right, the property is
the second house on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $128,000

14. MARSHALL ROAD

LOT NO. 17D

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Triplex Apartment

One 2-bedroom/ 2-bath & Two
2-bedroom /1-bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 10,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west along
Marshall Road from South Beach
Road, take the first corner on the
right (Tiao End Road). The subject
property is the fourth building on
the left painted green with white
trim.

APPRAISED VALUE: $288,000

15. MILLENNIUM GARDENS

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 85

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence,

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,952 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling north

on Bethel Avenue from Harold
Road take the third corner on
the right, Heading east pass the
third T-junction around the curve
to the junction of Sis. Theresa
Symonette Drive then turn left
onto Sis. Maria Rahming Drive.
The property is the 14th house on
the right.

APPRAISED VALUE: $182,000

LOT NO. 4 Block 8
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Apartment Building/Commercial
Complex

PROPERTY SIZE: 14,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Eastern district of
New Providence. The subject
property is on Yamacraw Hill
Road opposite Treasure Cove.
APPRAISED VALUE: $686,000

. NASSAU VILLAGE SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 10 & 11 Block 48
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

5 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 10,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travelling east along
Taylor street take a left

at the T-junction onto Alexandria
Boulevard, then take the third
right onto Matthews Street. The
property is located on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $257,000

LOT NO. 65

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Townhouse Unit 1 — Two-storey
apartment

PROPERTY SIZE: Floor area
1,215 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Eastern side of Faith
Avenue North - 100 feet south of
Hamster Road.

APPRAISED VALUE: $150,000

LOT NO. 199

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,983 sq. ft.
LOCATION: From Carmichael
Road turn onto Barcardi Road,
take the seventh corner on the left
then turn into the entrance gate.
The vacant lot is located on the
southern side of Channel Drive off
Eastward Drive.

APPRAISED VALUE: $90,000

. SOUTH SEAS SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 261

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,500 sq. ft.
LOCATION: From Carmichael
Road turn onto Barcardi Road,
take the seventh corner on left.
Turn into the entrance gate and
take the first right then second
left. The vacant lot is the twenty-
second property on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $90,000

7. VICTORIA GARDENS

SUBDIVISION

19. PINEWOOD GARDENS

21

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 1438

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Two-
storey Residence 3 beds / 3 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: South on Wild Guava
Avenue

APPRAISED VALUE: $315,000

20. SANDILANDS VILLAGE

LOT NOS. 7 and 8

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence, with 3
apartments under construction
PROPERTY SIZE: Lot 7 - 7,970
sq. ft / Lot 8 - 8,419 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west along
Sandilands Village Road from Fox
Hill Road, take the ninth paved
road (Vanessa Close) on the left.
The properties are situated at the
northwestern side of the street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $277,000

. SOLDIER ROAD

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Two-storey Commercial Building
PROPERTY SIZE: 4,750 sq. ft.
LOCATION: On Soldier Road
1,000 feet east of Lady Slipper
Road

APPRAISED VALUE: $309,000

22.SOUTH BEACH ESTATES

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 1 Block 22

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Split
Level Residential Building with 3
Apartment Units.

PROPERTY SIZE:

Land 6,600 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Travel south along
East Street from Bamboo
Boulevard take the first corner on
right (Bougainvillea Boulevard).
Heading west on Bougainvillea
Boulevard, take the second
corner on the right, turn left at
the t-junction onto Oxford Drive.
The property is third house on
the right at the western corner of
Serville Drive and Oxford Avenue.
APPRAISED VALUE: $297,000

23. TWYNAM HEIGHTS

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 61

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Two-storey Residence, 2 beds / 1
bath/ with one apartment unit
PROPERTY SIZE: 9,100 sq. ft.
LOCATION: On the corner of
Victoria Street and Coronation
Road immediately east of
Wendy’s off Mackey Street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $203,000

24.YAMACRAW BEACH ESTATES

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 470

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Two-
storey Residence 3 beds / 3 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,200 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Southern side of
Mayaguana Avenue approximately
99 feet east of Yamacraw Beach
Drive.

APPRAISED VALUE: $402,000

VACANT LOTS

LOT NO. 60

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travel south on
Gladstone Road from JFK Drive

take the first corner on the left,

entrance to Victoria Gardens.
Heading east, proceed to the
second T-junction, the property is
directly opposite.

APPRAISED VALUE: $66,000

. VICTORIA PARK SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 6

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
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Lets all he
winners

FOR at least the last two
decades, I have heard the stories
about services being available to
buy tickets in the Bahamas for
lotteries operated in the United
States.

I have also heard conversa-
tions which indicated that money
was being sent abroad to be bet
on sports events. Activities such
as these are clearly not in the
interest of the Bahamas.

Most Bahamians do not think
such gambling is immoral. Nei-
ther does this column. Gambling
to excess is clearly wrong. No one
can argue that the person who
gambles the money that his or
her family needs for their house-
hold expenses is not doing some-
thing wrong. Someone who
wagers some of their recreation
funds is clearly well within the
realm of normal behaviour. That,
however, doesn’t even matter
because governments shouldn’t
and really can’t legislate morality.
This may be the reason why his-
tory teaches us that Theocracies
have never succeeded.

We are fighting our way
through very testing economic
conditions. We all know there will
be an end to this struggle, but
none of us knows when this will
be. Our earnings from overseas
for tourism, property sales and
Offshore services are all under
pressure. So I must ask how much
longer we can afford to send our
bets overseas depleting our for-
eign exchange reserves and fat-
tening the tax coffers of various
states in the US?

Clearly the answer is no
longer. I am encouraged to hear
the current debate about taxing
illegal gambling. The simpler and
more elegant solution would be
the introduction of a national lot-
tery. Most of those who bet on
the national lottery are likely to
be losers but the certainty is that
we as a nation would all be win-
ners.

Sophisticated
weather satellite
rockets into orbit

m CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

A SOPHISTICATED new
weather satellite rocketed into
orbit Saturday, giving forecasters
another powerful tool for tracking
hurricanes and tornadoes, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

An unmanned rocket carrying
the nation’s latest Geostationary
Operational Environmental Satel-
lite blasted off early Saturday
evening, a day late because of
thunderstorms. The satellite
headed toward a 22,000-mile-high
orbit, where it will undergo six
months of testing. It will circle
Earth as a spare and be called
into service when needed.

The GOES satellite network
provides continuous weather
monitoring for 60 percent of the
planet, including the United
States. The newer ones also mon-
itor solar flares that can disrupt
communications on Earth, and
track climate change.

This is the second of the more
advanced GOES satellites to be
launched, containing sensors
capable of providing better loca-
tion data and higher resolution
pictures of storms.

“These are probably about the
most sophisticated weather satel-
lites that we actually have on this
planet ... off this planet,” said
Andre Dress, deputy project
manager for NASA.

NASA manages the develop-
ment and launch of GOES satel-
lites for the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration. The
one launched Saturday, Goes O,
will be renamed GOES 14 once it
reaches its proper orbit in 1 1/2
weeks.

The mission cost $499 million,
including the cost of the Delta TV
rocket.



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 11

Hanged man found

bound and gagged

FROM page one

indicate an apparent homi-
cide, police yesterday
deemed it as "suspicious"
and were reluctant to classify
the death as a murder, or
possible suicide, until an
autopsy is performed.

"It appears to be a murder
but we can't say at this
stage," said Mr Moss, adding
that he did not know how
long the man had been dead
before his body was discov-
ered.

Police said they hoped to
have a positive identification
of the deceased by today.

The Tribune understands
he is a resident of Nassau Vil-
lage, believed to be in his 30s.

Meanwhile, officers in
Grand Bahama are investi-
gating the homicide of a man
who was shot to death.

Grand Bahama recorded
its fourth homicide following
the shooting near an apart-
ment in Freeport.

Police confirmed that the

victim was a Haitian man
who is believed to about 59
or 60 years of age. A motive
for the killing is unknown,
however, police last night
said a 31-year-old man was
assisting them in their inves-
tigations.

Asst Supt Clarence Reck-
ley said the police are not
releasing the victim’s identity
until an official identification
by next of kin is conducted
today.

“When we have matters of
this nature, a certain process
takes place where the body
is officially identified at the
morgue,” he said.

According to reports, an
anonymous caller telephoned
the police to report a shoot-
ing at Garden Villas in the
area of the basketball court.

Officers were dispatched
to investigate. Upon arrival,
they were directed to an
apartment where they saw a
man sitting on a sofa with
injuries to his body.

“We don’t know if the vic-
tim was home alone," said
Mr Reckley. "The informa-
tion we received is that the
door was open and maybe
someone walked in on him.”

Mr Reckley said the victim

had sustained wounds to the
left underarm and shoulder.
The victim was taken by
EMS personnel to the Rand
Memorial Hospital, where he
died soon after 11.30pm.
Police are thought to be
following some significant
leads in the matter and they
hope to have an arrest soon.
“We are pleased with the
progress of our investigation.
We are following significant
leads and hopefully will bring
closure to this matter in short
order,” added Mr Reckley.
“We are looking for a sus-
pect, but the name of the sus-
pect is unknown at this time
and officers are still out try-
ing to confirm some things."

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passed away peacefully on
Monday, 22nd June 2009 at the
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in Dallas, Texas. She was born
on the 6th, March 1916 at Singer
Island, Florida. At the age of six,
she moved back to the Bahamas
with her parents John B. Pinder
and Olive Pinder. Agnes married
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twelve children.

Funeral services will be held on

Saturday, 4th July 2009 at
10:000am at St. Anne's Church in Fox Hill. Officiating will be
Fr. Crosley Walkine and interment will follow immediately after
the service in the Church's Cemetery.

AG calls for review of how
court business is conducted
FROM page one

Agnes was predeceased by her husband Alexander C. Knowles
and her son James F. Knowles M.-P. She is survived by one
brother: Hilbert B. Pinder; eleven children: Ethlyn (Jean) Pinder,
Ruby Collins, Doris Anderson, Yvonne Knowles, Alexander C.

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Addressing the elimination of
the preliminary inquiry, the Attor-
ney General said there is no need
for “two criminal trials for one
offence.”

“Tt is inconvenient to victims, to
witnesses, to the resources of the
public,” he said. “(The) elimina-
tion (of preliminary inquiries) can
be done without infringing an
accused person’s right to a fair
hearing within a reasonable time.”

Doing away with preliminary
inquiries can also reduce the time
over which a trial can be conduct-
ed “by a greater use of written
evidence as opposed to requiring
persons to attend court to give
oral testimony as to what are
essentially facts that are not disputed,” he said.

Addressing law reform in general, the Attorney General asked
if it is necessary for a family member to attend court to identify a
victim whose identity is not in dispute, and if a ‘trial within a trial’
is really necessary.

“Should the value of any statement by an accused simply be left
to the jury for its due consideration,” he asked.

Mr Barnett added that his ministry is committed to ensuring that
the work of the Law Reform Commissioner continues unabated.

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The family would be grateful to all if in lieu of flowers a donation
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Friends may pay their last respects at Pinders Funeral Home
Palmdale, Ave., Palmdale on Friday July 3rd, 2009 from 5:00pm
until 7:00pm.

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009



Sports

TENNIS
KNOWLES /BHUPATHI QUARTERS

Mark Knowles and Mahesh Bhupathi will begin the second and
final week of competition at Wimbledon in London, England as
they play in the men's doubles quarter-final against the team of
Orakash Amritraj from India and Aisam-Ui-Haq Quireshi from
Parkinstan.

The number four seeds will play immedately following the top
seeded team of Americans Bob and Mike Bryan, who face a Czech
Republic team of Leos Friedl and David Skoch.

Meanwhile in mixed doubles, Knowles and Anna-Lena Groene-
feld of Germany are the No.9 seeds in mixed doubles. After winning
their opener, Knowles and Groenefeld are scheduled to face his for-
mer doubles partner Daniel Nestor of Canada and Russian Elena
Vesnina, the No.5 seeds, in the third round. That match is scheduled
for Tuesday.

On the other hand, Bhupathi and his Indian partner Sania Mirza,
seeded No.13, will play their third round match today against Indian
Leander Paes and Cara Black of Zimbabwe, the top seeds.

TENNIS
T-REX NATIONALS

FRESH on the heels of the Security & General International
Tournament, the Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association will begin their
T-Rex Junior National Tennis Tournament at the National Tennis
Center.

The action will pick up today at 9 am with the first round in the
singles in both the boys and girls divisions.

The tournament will continue daily through Saturday.

SPORTS

Lat Lih

Sluggish Carey undone by
King’s majestic performance

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ON the one hand he was glad
to have been in the boys’ 18 final
against his doubles partner Dari-
an King from Barbados.

But on the other hand, Rod-
ney Carey Jr. wished he had
played much better on Saturday
at the Security & General Inter-
national Tournament.

The much anticipated show-
down at the National Tennis Cen-
ter between the two travelling
buddies on the international tour
didn't live up to its advanced
billing as King dominated from
start to finish in a 6-1, 6-3 deci-
sion. "When I woke up, I was a
little tired this morning. So when
I went out there my legs fell kind
of heavy," said Carey Jr. about
his sluggish performance.

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"Throughout the week, I had a
lot of tough matches.

"It took me a while to get into
the match. I had a three hour
match in the semifinal yesterday.
He (King) just basically went on
the court and got through his
matches and came off. He was
fresher than I was and he had a
lot more energy."

With the match being played
at home, the Grand Bahamian
wished that he had put up a better
showing and at least taken King
to a third set, if not win the title.

"I guess I will have other
chances," said Carey Jr. who will
take a long vacation break before
he back on the tour in July.

King, in his second straight tri-
umph over Carey Jr. in as many
outings this year, said he was just
delighted to have been crowned
the champion to add to his vic-
tory he clinched in their initial
meeting in Barbados a couple
weeks ago.

"I felt pretty good and I'm glad
I came out victorious," he said.
"T played pretty good today. I
think I saved the best for the last.
Rodney didn't play that bad. I'm
just glad that I was victorious."

After breaking to and holding
to go up 2-0 in the first set, King
surged ahead on another break
at 4-1 and again at 6-1. In the sec-
ond set, King got a break to go up
4-2 and they both held serve for
the set and the match.

It was probably more difficult
for King, coming here and beat-
ing his doubles partner on his
home turf. "It was pretty tough at
first, but we made sure we played
a fair game," said King, the No.2
seed about his No.3 seed team-
mate. "If we were on serve, we
gave each other the benefit of the
doubt."

Before leaving town, King and
Carey Jr. were awarded the dou-
bles title after their opponents
Gabriel Flores of Puerto Rico and
Diego DeCosta of Ecuador failed
to show up. Flores apparently had
an injury.

On their way to the final, King
swept Flores in two straight sets,
6-3, 6-2, but Carey Jr. had to
endure a tough three setter 7-6
(4), 4-6, 6-1 over DeCosta in their
semifinal matches on Friday.

Meanwhile, two more doubles
partners played in the girls 18 sin-
gle finals. In the end, American
Kelsey Laurente lived up to her
prediction that she would be the
champion as she prevailed with
a 6-4, 6-3 win over compatriot
Victoria Duval, the No.2 seed.

The week-long tournament
hosted by the Bahamas Lawn
Tennis Association saw Bermu-
da's No.2 seed Tyler Smith out-
lasted Grand Bahaman Danielle
Thompson 6-2, 6-4 for the girls
14 crown. The duo teamed up to
win the doubles. And in the boys’
14 singles final, Gian Issa of Suri-
name claimed the singles title
over Bahamian Kevin Major Jr.
on Thursday.

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS
ECGS Tay

Double
triumph

for Debbie
Ferguson

FROM page 15

To her credit on a wet Friday
night, Ferguson-McKenzie sped
to the A qualifying time (11.30
seconds) in her winning time of
11.12 to dethrone veteran Chan-
dra Sturrup, who had to settle for
second in 11.41 with collegian
Sheniqua 'Q' Ferguson taking
third in 11.50.

Ferguson-McKenzie, who came
back on Saturday night to pull off
the sprint double in the 200, said
she was more concerned about
running a faster time in the cen-
tury than winning the title.

"I was trying to see if I could
run a 10.9 today. I felt it was
there, but I'm having a little prob-
lem trying to set my race up,” said
Ferguson-McKenzie, who led
from start to finish.

And it couldn't have come at a
better place before the home
crowd as she dedicated the race to
her long time ‘Godfather,’ mentor
and motivator, legendary Tom-
my A. Robinson, who will be
honoured at a luncheon on July
26 at Sandals Royal Bahamian
for pioneering the Bahamas’
international track programme.

Despite the fact that she lost
her title, Sturrup said when she
saw Ferguson-McKenzie surged
ahead of her, she tried to catch
her, but was unable to do so.

"She ran a very good race. Hats
of to her,” said Sturrup, who have
always seemed geared up to win
at her best when she come home.
"Physically I felt fine. The rain
and the delay sot of set me back.
Hopefully next week when I go to
Oslo, I will run a better race."

Sheniqua Ferguson, a member
of the Olympic Games team last
year for the 100, said she knew
that she had the potential to run
with the elite senior sprinters.

"T just was focusing on getting a
good start. I know I have good
top end speed, so basically for
me, it was just getting a good start
and getting out there," Ferguson
said.

In her speciality, Ferguson-
McKenzie clocked 22.83 to out-
last two rising young collegians
in Sheniqua Ferguson (23.48) and
Jernise Saunders (24.45).

ATKINS WIN AGAIN

The men's straight away race
drew a little more excitement as
the race was almost finished
before the starter eventually
called back the field for a false
start.

But when they re-ran the fea-
tured race on day one of the
nationals, the fans stood to watch
reigning World Championship sil-
ver medalist Derrick Atkins held
off a pesky field to stop the clock
in 10.25, which was just shy of the
A qualifying time of 10.21 for this
year's World Championships.

Adrian Griffith ended up sec-
ond in 10.44 with 110 hurdles spe-
cialist Shamar Sands cmng in
third in 10.54.

"Basically, I just want to thank
God I was able to finish the
rounds," Atkins said. "This year,
I've been up and down, so I'm
just happy to come here for the
win."

Not sure that he would have
been able to run here because of
the nagging hamstring injury,
Atkins said he's just trying to get
back into his old form before he
head to Berlin for the World's in
August."

Also hoping to make the trip to
Germany as well for the 100 is
Griffith, who felt he ran better in
the heats.

"In the final, I just lost con-
trol," he said. "I had the race. I
should have kept my exposure."

After slipping coming out of
the blocks, Sands said he didn't
get the start he wanted and that
made the difference in his per-
formance.

"I just wanted to be good in
the drive phrase," he said. "I feel



Delroy Boothe runs away with the title

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BACK for his first appearance since win-
ning the title about five years ago, Grand
Bahamian Delroy Boothe ran away from
the field to easily take the Bahamas
Olympic Association 22nd Olympic Day
run on Saturday.

Boothe, who was holding off to run the
5,000 metres at the Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations’ National Open
Track and Field Championships later in
the evening, was unchallenged as he topped
the field in 23 minutes and 15 seconds in
the five-mile early riser.

His nearest rival in the race that started
from the Thomas A. Robinson Track and
Field Stadium and ended on Paradise
Island after covering a route along Thomp-
son Boulevard to Nassau Street to Bay
Street, was Sidney Collie in 23.53. Ash-

land Murray Sr. was third in 31.48.

"I didn't go out the way I really wanted
to," Boothe said after the race. "The race
was alright so far. It was a pretty early start
because I really got to bed late after going
to the Nationals last night (Friday)."

Boothe admitted that he didn't allow
his rivals to get close to me after he surged
out front in the first 1,500. After that, it was
smooth sailing as he coasted to the victory.

Taking the women's title was Ravonne
Bethel in 32.01. Meanwhile from Mon-
tague foreshore, organizers staged the walk
segment of the race that traveled west on
Bay Street and headed over the new bridge
to the finish line on Paradise Island.

With perennial champion Phil Moss opt-
ing to run where he was fifth overall, vet-
eran Richard Adderley emerged as the
new champion stopping the clock in 21.39
well ahead of former Member of Parlia-
ment for Blue Hills, Leslie Miller, in 22.38.

"I think it was a very good race. A lady

set an early pace at the beginning, but I
decided to stay behind her and bide my
time," Adderley stressed. "I thought I had
missed the race, but I'm glad that I didn't.”

After setting the stage at the beginning,
Cheryl Rolle had to settle for third overall
to clinch the women's segment in 22.55.

Not that many participants competed in
the first race organized by the new admin-
istration headed by Wellington Miller. Don
Cornish, one of the six first vice presidents,
said it was a good indication of the work
they have to do.

"We had some challenges finding a date
because June when it is normally held was
full," Cornish said. "We finally got the cal-
endar cleared, but we had a clash with the
swim nationals and the track nationals this
weekend. We just wanted to ensure that we
gave the public the opportunity to com-
pete in the annual fun run and walk as we
celebrate the anniversary of the IOC."

Miller said they were just delighted to

have put this year's run on the shelve, but
they will be planning for an event bigger
event next year.

With no more major events on the cal-
ender for this year after the Caribbean
Games were called off, Miller said he and
Algernon Cargill, another vice president,
will head to Mexico in August for the Sol-
idarity Course.

Following that, Miller and secretary gen-
eral Rommel Knowles will head to Copen-
hagen to attend the IOC Convention.
Miller will be kept busy as he and Roy
Colebrooke, another vice president, will
travel to India for the Commonwealth
Games Confederation Meeting.

Next year, the BOA will be branching
into new territory with Korath Wright
going to the Winter Olympic Games for the
snowboarding competition in February.
Also next year is the Central American
and Caribbean Games, the World Youth
Olympics and the Commonwealth Games.

BAHAMAS NATIONAL OPEN TRACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS

‘Fireman’ proves too hot to handle

FROM page 15

The Eleuthera native said
every year the field gets deeper
and he has to exert more energy
to pull it off, but he's pleased with
his performance.

"After I saw what happened to
him, that threw me off a bit,"
Brown said of Latoy Williams.

"T didn't expect it. I felt a little
sorry for what happened to him,
but I had to keep my compo-
sure."

Miller, thankful that he enter-
tained the crowd, said he was
"training hard all year and watch-
ing the guys running faster than
me. I'm in North Dakato and this
was the hardest winter ever for
me. But today, I came out here
prepared to run."

Coming off a hamstring injury
a couple months ago, Andretti
Bain wasn't sure if he would have
been in any condition to run, but
he didn't want to miss the "war,"
so he was prepared to step to the
line and just finish in the top four
to ensure he's on the team for the
World's.

Although he had already qual-
ified with the A standard for the
World's, Latoy Williams wanted
to prove that his Bahamian lead-
ing time of 44.72 was no fluke in
his coming out party.

"T felt I could run a really fast
time, but everything happen for a
reason," said Williams about the
cramp in his left leg that forced
him to hobble on the track as he
stopped and rolled over in pain
on the back stretch.

In the women's one-lapper,
there was no real challenge for
Christine Amertil as she surged to
the title in 51.96. Grand Bahami-
ans Shakeitha Henfield (54.07)
and Sasha Rolle (54.08) battled
it out behind her and just ahead
of 15-year-old high school sensa-
tion Shaunae Miller (55.52).

"It went pretty well. I think I
gave away too much at the start,
but I had it together coming
home," Amertil said.



TREVOR BARRY, who dethroned Raymond Higgs.

"The girls are up and coming. I
ran with them on the 4 x 4, sol
knew what to expect from them."

SANDS PRed

Just as the 400s were being ran,
Olympic triple jump bronze
medalist Leevan 'Superman'
Sands used his only attempt to
clear a season's best of 56-feet,
3-inches to surpass the World’s
A qualifying standard.

"I just came to have fun. I love
coming home and jumping before
the home crowd," Sands said.
"That was my best jump for the
year. I had a little injury earlier in
the year, but I'm back and ready."

THOMAS UPSET AGAIN

Hoping to make a comeback
after losing his title last year,
World champion Donald Thomas
had to settle for a disappointing
third place in the men's high jump
with a leap of 7-1 1/2.

"I'm jumping good but I just
couldn't put it together after I
slipped,” said Thomas, who
bowed out at 7-3 when he had a
slight problem with the run way.
"T jumped higher at practice. I
just lost focus."

Trevor Barry claimed the

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crown with 7-3 3/4 dethroning
champion Raymond Higgs, who
did 7-2 1/4 for second. But he
called it a "mediocre" perfor-
mance.

"I walked away uninjured, so
that was a blessing,” Barry said.
“The condition was good for me.
Can't get anybody than this. I just
should have come in at a later
height with only a few jumpers."

Higgs, on the other hand, said
he tried his best, but Barry was
the better man on the day.

STUART NOT PLEASED

With only two competitors,
Bianca Stuart cleared 20-10 to
repeat as champion in the wom-
en's long jump as Keythra
Richards did 18-3 1/4.

"It was not good," Stuart said.
"I didn't have enough recovery
time, so I just tried to jump
through it. I just need six more
centimeters (to qualify for
World's). I'm trying."

Strongwoman Lavern Eve,
recovering from a back injury,
threw the women’s javelin 178-2.

"I felt good, but today was just
a feel for where I'm at with the
injury,” she said.

"It's not really hurting, but I
feel good about where I'm at."

(eXsh

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

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Karlton Rolle, fresh of his
appearance in the NCAA Cham-
plonships, took the men's deuce
in 21.20, holding off Adrian Grif-
fith (21.27) at the tape.

"T felt really good. I didn't run
like I wanted to run, but I knew
things would have gone the way I
wanted it," he said. "I'm just hap-
py that I came out with the win."

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PAGE 14, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

Brilliant Barracudas national champions again

With a dominating and bal-
anced team effort, the country’s
largest swim club easily retained
its position as national champi-
ons.

The Barracuda Swim club
totalled 2152.5 points to win the
38th Annual Royal Bank of

Canada (RBC) National Cham-
pionships hosted by the Bahamas
Swimming Federation, over the
weekend at the Betty Kelly Ken-
ning Aquatic Center.

The Sea Bees (1369) edged out
Swift Swimming for second place
(1326) while Dolphin Swimming

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Club was fourth with 745.5 points.

The YMCA Waverunners out
of Grand Bahama closed out the
top five with 369 points.

Freeport Aquatic Club posted
29 points while the Flamingoes
ended with two.

The Barracudas were led by
the dynamic duo of Dionisio
Carey and Dustin Tynes who
dominated the Boys’ 11-12 divi-
sion. In individual events, the pair
had 16 first place, 11 second place
and two third place finishes
between them.

The 12-year-old Tynes, in his
final year in the division, record-
ed his eight first place finishes in
the 50m, 100m, and 200m Breast-
stroke; 100m, 200m and 400m
Freestyle; and finished with the
200m and 400m Individual Med-
ley. He finished second in the
50m, 100m and 200m Butterfly;
and the 100m and 200m Butterfly
with a third place finish in the
50m Freestyle.

Carey, at just 11-years-old and
with another year of eligibility in
the division also took eight first
place titles.

He took first in the 50m, 100m
200m Backstroke; 50m, 100m,
and 200 Butterfly; 50m Freestyle
and 200m Breaststroke.

Carey finished second in the
50m and 100m Breaststroke,
100m Freestyle, 200m Freestyle,
200 and 400m Individual Medley
and a third place in the 400m
Freestyle. Both swimmers
reached numerous qualifying
marks in Caribbean Island Swim-
ming Championships and Central
American and Caribbean Ama-
teur Swimming Confederation
Championships.

The female sector of the Bar-
racudas also played a vital in the
team’s championship perfor-
mance. Bria Deveaux took sev-
en first place finishes in the Girls
13-14 age group. Deveaux,
younger sister of the country’s
first female Swimming Olympian,

CHARLIE ‘Softly’ Robins has
coached so many teams in his day
that he knows a good one when

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BSC’s Bria Deveaux.

Nikia Deveaux, won the 50m,
100m, 400m and 800m Freestyle;
100m Backstroke; 200m Butterfly
and 200m Individual Medley.

In the Girls 15 and Over, Alicia
Lightbourne took a quartet of
first place finishes in the 50m,
100m and 200m Breaststroke; and
400m Freestyle.

Other top performers from the
meet included Evante Gibson
from the YMCA Waverunners
(six individual medals: 50m, 100m
Freestyle; 50m, 100m Butterfly;
50m Breaststroke and 200m Indi-
vidual Medley) and a myriad of
athletes that qualified for inter-
national competition.

Eighteen swimmers qualified
for the CISC, nine produced qual-
ifying marks for the Central
American and Caribbean Games,
while Arianna Vanderpool-Wal-
lace passed the standard for the
Youth Olympic Games.

It was the 26th consecutive year
RBC chiefly sponsored the
Bahamas National Swimming
Championships in partnership
with the Bahamas Swim Federa-
tion. RBC was also the inaugur-
al sponsor of the Academic All
Bahamas Swimming Team
Award.

he see it. Robins, assisted by Ivan
Butler and Mario Bowleg, will
take a mixture of youth and expe-
rience to the Caribbean Basket-
ball Confederation Champi-
onships in Tortola, British Virgin
Islands.

The team, managed by Rod-
ney Wilson, was expected to leave
town today with the following
players: Quentin Hall, Scott
Forbes, Alonzo Hinds, Doyle
Hudson, Cordero Seymour, Jef-
frey Henfield, Quentin Demertte,
Gijo Bain, Lorenzo Davis, Brian
Bain, Torrington Cox and Jeremy
Hutchinson.

Sharon 'the General’ Storr will
travel as the technical director.

According to Robins, who is
coaching his fifth national team,
the team will have finish the
week-long tournament with at
least the bronze medal in order to
advance to the next level.

"We're looking pretty good.
We were skeptical at the begin-
ning with ball players saying that
they are coming in, but due to
circumstances beyond their con-
trol, they couldn't come," said
Robins, of two key players in
Magnum Rolle and Benoit Davis.

"When a fellow is looking after



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PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Robins banks of youth and experience

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

his career, you can't stop him.
Maybe the timing is just a little off
right no, but we were able to set-
tle down and got in players like
Scott Forbes, Quentin, Brian
Bain, Jeremy Hutchinson and
Gijo Bain. So we have guys with
the experience, having played on
this circuit before."

Confident

Robins, however, said although
they are lacking in height, he's
confident that they can make the
necessary adjustment and play
with who they have.

The Bahamas will open play
on Tuesday against Barbados in
Group A.

Their second game on Wednes-
day will be against Jamaica and
they will close out the round
robin play on Thursday against
Trinidad & Tobago.

The team will have to finish in
the top two to advance to the
playoff that start on Friday.

The top two teams from Group
B will come from either Cuba,
Antigua, British Virgin Islands or
Bermuda.

"I think the magnitude of this

a

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tournament, we should have suf-
ficient height to qualify for the
next round," Robins projected.
"If we go to the next round, we
will need all of the horses.

“But right now, we have a very
experienced team, led by what I
feel is the best guards assembled
to make up for our height disad-
vantage."

Jeffrey Henfleld, back home
after playing in the ABA League
in New Mexico, said the team
have the potential to win the gold
medal.

"At every position, we have
players who can hold their own,”
he said. " As for myself, I'm ready
to go out there and do whatever it
takes for us to get the win.”

Ask Scott Forbes and he will
concur with everybody in saying
that the federation indeed put
together a very good team.

"We have a lot of firepower.
Once as we can gel, we should do
very well," Forbes stated.

"This team should be one of
the best in the Caribbean, so
there's no reason why we should
not come back with a medal,
maybe even win it.”

The tournament wraps up on
July 4.










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MONDAY, JUNE 29,

2009

‘Fireman too
not to hantle





CHRIS BROWN heads the field in the men’s 400 metres. At left is Ramon Miller.

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

HRIS ‘Fireman’

Brown exploded

down the home

stretch to avoid
NAIA champion Ramon Miller
raining on his parade at the
Bahamas National Open Track
and Field Championships on Sat-
urday night.

Latoy Williams p

With the field depleted a bit
after the fastest two quarter-mil-
ers this year, newcomer Latoy
Williams pulled up after the first
turn and Andrae Williams didn't
make it to the starting line, Brown
had to contend with a couple of
his 4 x 400 relay team-mates.

But in the grand finale at the
Thomas A. Robinson Track and
Field Stadium, Brown had a little
too much down the stretch to pull
off the win in 45.21.

In a whisker behind him hoping

Patrick Hanna/BIS

DEBBIE FERGUSON-MCKENZIE cruises to victory in the
women’s 200 metres ahead of Sheniqua Ferguson.

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ON the eve of officially bring crowned as the new 200 metre cham-
pion at the 2001 World Championships in Edmonton, Canada, Debbie
Ferguson-McKenzie sped to victory in the women's 100 at the Thomas
S. Robinson Track and Field Stadium.

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for the upset was Miller, the new-
comer last year, in 45.35 with last
year's NCAA champion Andret-
ti Bain setting for third in 46.02.

"T just want to thank the Lord
for allowing me to come out here
and finish," said Brown in defend-
ing his title. "It was a tough race,
but I knew a lot of fans wanted to
see me come through, so this was
for them."

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PAGE 16, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





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The transformation
of Centreville House

SOMETHING unique is tak-
ing place on Shirley Street.

Centreville House and its
grounds are undergoing a restora-
tion. Eventually, the house itself
will be fully renovated to its for-
mer splendour at which time it
will become the home of the
National Museum of The
Bahamas.

In the meantime, the first
phase, a creative transformation
of the long-neglected grounds,
was initiated on March 30.

Spearheaded by Orjan Lin-
droth, a Bahamian developer, and
Antonius Roberts, sculptor and
open space designer, under the
auspices of the Antiquities, Mon-
uments and Museum Corpora-
tion (AMMC), work commenced
on that date and, barely three
months later, is almost completed.

The vision and direction of this
project was built on a foundation
of several important guiding prin-
ciples - to make it a community
project; to create a city park
accessible to and for Bahamians
from all walks of life; to reflect
and preserve aspects of Bahami-
an history that belong uniquely
to these islands and to maximise
the use of native wood, plants and
trees and observe a ‘green’ phi-
losophy by recycling organic
material and mulching it back
into the ground.

Design

Earthstone Construction is
responsible for the design, fabri-
cation and implementation of the
pond and sculpture garden, the
fountain, the amphitheatre-style
seating and the perimeter path-
way; Native Sun Nursery provid-
ed and planted trees, transported
logs and donated crane time;
Design Elements serve as the
consulting botanist and landscap-
ers; Rocky Farms and Fox Hill
Nursery are providing many of
the native plants and shrubs;
Tony’s Carpentry built the
Lucayan style tree house and
huts, drawing on his own native
Guyanian and Indian heritage for
authenticity, and Robin Hardy
was responsible for milling some
of the wood on site for the bench-
es.

Several artists have created
work specifically for this site.
Antonius Roberts has donated
and installed his “Driftwood”



CHILDREN FROM the Bahamas Children's Emergency Hostel visited on Fri-
day June 26 and enjoyed playing by the pond. They also enjoyed the
Arawak-style Tree House and Huts.

sculpture; Jessica Colebrooke has
created her lovely ceramic tiles
picturing various Bahamian fish -
these will be installed in the main
fountain in front of the house;
Chantal Bethel carved a wooden
bench in honour of her late
father, a well respected agrono-
mist in the country; Tyrone Fer-
guson is fabricating a bronze sun-
dial for the pond area; Lavar
Munroe is creating a mural
inspired by the Lucayan Indian
heritage, the placement of which
is still to be decided; John Cox
and his summer students will add
their creativity to adding
hieroglypics to the huts; addi-
tionally, local schoolchildren guid-
ed by Kelley Knowles, Antonius
Roberts‘ assistant, painted
the local found stones that
form the Turtle effigy in the
ground.

Local citizens such as Jermaine
and LIttle Mitch Finley collect-
ed stones on the shore, carried
them to the site and placed them
all around the perimeter of the
central area. Many generous
donors have shared in the expe-
rience by giving trees, plants and
herbs and helping dig them in.

This now beautiful green space
boasts a pond with a fountain and
sculpture garden and a labyrinth
- perfect for a quiet reflective
stroll.

The stones painted by the chil-
dren form a giant turtle and the
path which circles the entire area
has sculpted Madeira wood
benches placed at intervals
throughout the area.

ary ona

a

y

Orjan Lindroth, Lindroth
Development Company &
Schooner Bay, Abaco, facilitat-
ed the donation of a massive
boulder from the New Providence
Development Company now
placed close to the entrance from
Shirley Street and a smaller boul-
der was placed on the easterly
side of the main driveway and
nestled into a sandy area planted
out with low growing shrubs and
vines.

Garden

At the southerly end of the
park is a herb garden in the form
of an hutea which abuts the space
designated as a children’s play
area.

This includes the existing giant
rubber tree now graced with
wooden swings and benches
offering some cooling shade as
well as amphitheatre style seat-
ing for parents to watch their chil-
dren play in a safe environment
or, in the future, audiences to
watch musical or dramatic per-
formances on the main lawn.

This area is completed by an
amazing wooden tree house and
two smaller huts in the style of a
Lucayan Indian village.

The easterly portion of the
grounds immediately in front of
the house have also been restored
and re-planted.

The original fountain on this
part of the property is now under
re-construction and is scheduled
for completion by the end of
June.

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THE TRIBUNE
D yu



Jackson Ritchie



Global United
loses Bahamas
UPS contract

* Replaced by Bahamas
Couriers, business owned
by Edward Fitzgerald

* Mr Fitzgerald helped
build Mr Ritchie's business
through selling former
firms to him in 2005

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

GLOBAL United, the trou-
bled logistics/transshipment
business headed by Captain
Jackson Ritchie, has suffered a
fresh blow by losing the con-
tract to act as Bahamas country
representative for UPS, Tribune
Business can reveal.

Officials for UPS, the global
courier and package delivery
business, confirmed via a tele-
phone interview and in writing
that Bahamas Couriers Ltd
replaced Global United as their
Bahamian-based contractor for
all business with effect from Sat-
urday.

Ironically, Bahamas Couriers
is owned and headed by
Edward Fitzgerald, father of
PLP Senator Jerome Fitzger-
ald. It was Mr Fitzgerald’s deci-
sion to sell his former business-
es, Global Customs Brokers &
Trucking and World Bound
Couriers, to Mr Ritchie in 2005
that allowed the latter to enter
the Nassau market and form
Global United by integrating
those firms with his then-Tanja
Enterprises.

Now, it seems as if Global
United and Mr Ritchie’s finan-
cial difficulties have given Mr
Fitzgerald a new lease of life
and enabled him to re-enter a
market in which he was once a
major player.

A June 26, 2009, letter from
UPS country manager Paul
Capote to his Bahamian corpo-
rate customers, a copy of which
has been seen by Tribune Busi-
ness, said: “We would like to
announce that effective imme-
diately, Bahamas Couriers will

SEE page 11B

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MONDAY,

ine

TUNGE 2-9 ©

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net



2009



Colinalmperial.

Confidence For Life

Checkers ‘reinvents brand’
through $3.2m expansion

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

heckers Café is celebrating

20 years in business with a

$3.2 million expansion that

involves the construction of
its fourth New Providence location,
which will have a full service, 24-hour
wash house attached to it.

Owner and operator of the all-
Bahamian eatery, Gus Cartwright, told
Tribune Business that the chain’s newest
restaurant is meant to enhance the com-
munity in which it is built.

He added that the latest café was an
opportunity to reinvent the Checkers
brand, which will be turned over to his
daughter as he moves closer to retire-
ment. The café interior is almost fully
tiled with the same branded colours of
the exterior. The kitchen has been
upgraded with two large walk-in freezers.

“We just can’t be the same old Check-
ers that we were before,” Mr Cartwright
said.

Give the size of the investment to con-
struct the café and wash house, Mr
Cartwright said he expects a return in
10-15 years, but is hopeful of quick suc-

Chamber chief
calls for Private
Sector Office

* Owner celebrates 20 years in business with fourth
eatery location that combines wash house

* Move to create 30 permanent jobs, and key
part in plans for succession by daughter

* Investment return eyed in 10-15 years

* Cartwright says Bahamian eateries must match
foreign rivals on food and presentation

cess for a location which is expected to
create 30 permanent jobs.

“It’s going to be a little bit longer and
harder,” he said. “But I’m not so much
concerned about crying about what’s
going on in the foreign markets. I must
learn from them and raise my product to
the same level, where the same customer
who goes to them would feel comfort-
able coming to me.”

Mr Cartwright said eateries through-
out the Bahamas, such as his own, have
to raise their product to the level of for-
eign competitors, as “the food may be
good but the presentation is not”.

Nestled on the southwest corner of
the intersection between Fox Hill and

EU considered slashing
Bahamas grant funding

* Nation ‘a very low performer’ in

implementing European-financed projects

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s president has sug-
gested to the Prime Minister
that the Government establish
an Office for Private Sector
Development, in a bid to cre-
ate a ‘one-stop shop’ for all per-
mitting/approval issues and
bring “more focus” to expand-
ing commerce.

Khaalis Rolle told Tribune
Business he put forward the
suggestion when Chamber exec-
utives met with Mr Ingraham
on Monday last week as part of
Chamber week activities.

“One of the issues that I sug-
gested to the Prime Minister
was establishing an Office for
Private Sector Development,”
Mr Rolle said. “If we’re going
to expand the private sector and
take some of the burden off the
public sector with respect to
employment, we need to have a
focused effort.

“Dealing with all the govern-
ment departments on various
issues is not the best way for us.
Some might say the private sec-
tor controls its own destiny, but
the legislative creates the frame-
work and the environment, and

SEE page 6B

|

rd
i

* Set to get 4.7m Euros in 10th EDF for
Family Island infrastructure projects

* Move aims to alleviate poverty and create
‘one Bahamas economic space’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

THE European Union (EU) considered slash-
ing the only form of grant funding available to the
Bahamas because this nation is "a very low per-
former" in implementing projects Brussels is
financing, with some 4.7 million Euros - largely

SEE page 8B

Joe Farrington Roads, the new restau-
rant’s red and white facade contrasts
with the dismal, grey rock walls of Fox
Hill Prison. Checkers’ signature tiled
walls invigorate the intersection, which
has become a commercial zone teeming
with small Bahamian-owned business-
es. Mr Cartwright said it was crucial that
the new building complement the Fox
Hill community. A lot of these people
don’t have the convenience of having
this kind of stuff in their immediate com-
munity, and I felt like this would be a
complement to where they live. We have
had that kind of reception,” he said. “We
want to do it right, so it is impressive.”
Like its sister Carmichael location, the

Bank invests $2m on
in-house card process

* Investment designed to realise internal

synergies, raise transaction volumes
and link to e-commerce plans

* Managing director says: "Who can ask for
better?' given economic environment

and strategic investments

* Non-accrual loans below industry average

at 5.1-5.2%, although delinquencies
‘more challenging’

* 30 new accounts per month at Miami

branch, with $23m net loan growth
since year-start

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

BANK of the Bahamas International is invest-
ing $2 million in bringing all its credit card pro-

SEE page 4B

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Fox Hill restaurant features a drive-
through that will be open late. Mr
Cartwright argued that the drive-through
was a Safe alternative to having the
establishment’s door open at night, and
will protect customers and employees
alike.

The addition of the 180-washer and
dryer laundromat seemed a necessary
and innovative upgrade to the Check-
ers brand, said Mr Cartwright, who is
already in that business via the Sunrise
coin laundry on Bar 20 corner.

This latest Sunrise laundry features
state-of-the-art washers and dryers, and
will include while-you-wait pressing ser-
vices. Mr Cartwright said Sunrise Fox
Hill would not be directly competing for
business with the nearby Superwash out-
let, but it was simply considered it a nec-
essary addition to the community.

“T don’t think it is direct competition,
but a complement to the area,” said Mr
Cartwright.

“Superwash has a long-time out-
standing business, but that doesn’t mean
there aren’t avenues for others.”

Mr Cartwright was nominated for the
Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s Out-
standing Business Person of the year
award.

; | a
The information co a dis from
party and The Tribune can not be hel
responsible for errors and/or omis ion
fromthe daily report,



ColinaImperial.





PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

Oe eA eT



@ By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

al Bank (CIB) released unau-
dited results for the six
months ended April 30, 2009.

$3.2 billiob respectively, com-
pared to $4.1 billion and $3.5
billion at year-end 2008. A

dends accumulated but unpaid
to the redemption date."

THE TRIBUNE

The Bahamian Stock Market

LAST week, investors trad- | CIB reported net income of decline of $378 million in total Annual General Meeting
ed in seven out of the 24 listed $13.9 million for the most deposits to $3.1 billion, com- (AGM) Notes: FINDEX 785.60 (-5.90% ) YTD
securities, of which two recent quarter, a decline of pared to year-end, accounted
advanced, one declined and $12.3 million or 47 per cent for the drop in total liabilities. Abaco Markets (AML) BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
four remained unchanged. compared to $26.2 million in Correspondingly a decline of announced it will be holding SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE

the same period last year. $351 million in securities its Annual General Meeting

EQUITY MARKET Net interest income of $32.1. investments of $730 million on Tuesday, July 21, 2009, at AML $1.39 $- 0 -18.71%

A total of 21,261 shares million for the quarter was contributed to the reduction in 6pm at the Wyndam Nassau BBL $0.63 $- 0 4.55%
changed hands, representing down by $8.5 million or 21 per _ total assets. Resort & Crystal Palace Casi- BOB $6.94 S- 0 -9.16%
an increase of 9,813 shares or cent, while operating income no, West Bay Street, Nassau, Be $11.00 $- 0 -6.78%
86 per cent, compared to last of $5.8 million was up by $2.1 CARIBBEAN CROSS- Bahamas. BSL $7.92 $- 0 -22.28%
week's trading volume of million from the $3.7 million INGS LTD - Notice of Shareholders of record as of BWL $3.15 S- 0 0.00%
11,448 shares. reported in 2008. Redemption Installment Pay- June 19, 2009, will be qualified CAB $11.39 $- 0 -18.82%

Commonwealth Bank Operating expenses of $17.9 ment to vote at the Annual Meet- CBL $5.64 $0.14 920) -19.43%
(CBL) was the volume leader million were up $1.5 million or The company would like to ing. CHL $2.74 $- 0 -3.18%
with 9,220 shares trading 9 per cent from $16.5 million inform all holders of CIB $10.38 $- 0 -0.67%
hands, its stock increasing by in the same quarter in 2008, Caribbean Crossings 8 per Benchmark (Bahamas) CWCB $3.33 $-0.14 2,805 48.00%
$0.14 to end the week at $5.64. which management attributed — cent Series A Preference (BBL) announced it will be DHS SL.77 $0.17 6,200 -30.59%

Doctors Hospital Health to increases in salaries and Shares that the scheduled holding its Annual General FAM $7.76 $- 0 -0.51%
Systems (DHS) was the lead benefits and bank license fees. | Fourth Redemption Install- Meeting on Thursday, July 23, FBB $2.37 $- 36 0.00%
advancer for the second con- FirstCaribbean said it was ment payment will be made 2009, at 6.30pm at the British FCC $0.30 $- 0 0.00%
secutive week, its share price proactively managing these on July 1, 2009, to all share- Colonial Hilton, Governor's FCL $5.09 $- 0 “1.55%
rising by $0.17 to end the expenses. holders of record June 1, 2009. — Ballroom, Bay Street, Nassau, FCLB $1.00 $- 3,000 0.00%
week at $1.77 on a volume of CIB increased its loan loss This payment is being made —_ Bahamas. Shareholders of FIN $10.97 $- 0 -7.58%
6,200 shares. expense by $4.4 million to $5.9 in accordance with the terms record as of June 23, 2009, will ICD $5.50 $- 0 -10.28%

million, compared to $1.6 mil- | and conditions attached tothe be qualified to vote at the JSJ $10.50 $- 0 -5.41%
BOND MARKET lion in the 2008 second quar- Series A preference shares, Annual Meeting. PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%

Investors traded $20,000
(par value), Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) Series B Notes
Due 2022 (FBB22), and
$6,000 (par value) Fidelity

ter, due to increased provi-
sioning by the bank.

Earnings per share for the
six month period of $0.248 fell
by $0.006 from $0.254 for the

which are as follows: “The
company will make five annu-
al redemption installment pay-
ments of $2 per share, com-
mencing on July 1, 2006, and













Dividend Notes:

FirstCaribbean Internation-
al Bank (CIB) has declared a

International Markets



Bank (Bahamas) Series D 2008 second quarter. CIB said = on each July 1 thereafter dividend of $0.15 per share, Pose as Weekl %Ch
Notes Due 2015 (FBB15). the results reflect current eco- __ through and including July 1, payable on June 29, 2009, to ed eeneney
nomic conditions and are in 2010. all shareholders of record date CAD$ 0.8675 1.60
COMPANY NEWS line with management's The Series A Preferred June 19, 2009. . e.
expectation. Shares will be redeemed for GBP 1.6540 +0.16
Releases: CIB’s total assets and total cash through such annual $2 Cable Bahamas (CAB) has EUR 1.4075 +0.86
FirstCaribbean Internation- _ liabilities were $3.8 billion and = July 1 payments, plus any divi- declared a dividend of $0.07
per share, payable on June 30, a
2009, to all shareholders of Commodities
record date June 15, 2009. Weekly % Change
oO ;
Pe o Commonwealth Bank Crude Oil $69.42 -0.97
T (CBL) has declared a dividend Gold $940.10 +0.53
e =) ge ; O ie of $0.05 per share, payable on
June 30, 2009, to all share-
a CRUISE holders of record date June International Stock Market Indexes:
15, 2009.
o LINE Weekly % Change
o Consolidated Water
: (CWCO) has declared a divi- DJIA 8,438.39 -1.19
. dend of $0.013 per share, S & P 500 918.90 -0.25
| payable on August 10, 2009, to NASDAQ 1,838.22 +0.59
Ps I | u all shareholders of record date Nikkei 9,877.39 +0).93




July 1, 2009.



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THE TRIBUNE



PM: No business flow impact from Customs changes

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham believes the enforcement of
new processes relating to the C19
or 10-day bond Customs decla-
ration form will “not impede the
flow or speed of business”, as
some in the private sector fear,
Tribune Business can reveal.

Mr Ingraham informed
Bahamas Chamber of Commerce
executives of his position when
they met with him last Monday as
part of Chamber week activities,
the organisation’s president con-
firmed to Tribune Business.

Khaalis Rolle said Chamber
executives had raised several Cus-
toms-related issues with the
Prime Minister, including the pre-
vious controversy of the C13 bag-
gage declaration form process
changes, which many courier
companies felt would negatively
impact their business, as well as
the latest amendments regarding
C19 processes.

Mr Rolle said neither issue had
been addressed fully by the
Chamber as an organisation, the
C13 issue having been tackled
chiefly by the companies affected,
who had formed the Bahamas
Transhipment and Logistics Asso-
ciation.

Members of that Association
had provided feedback to the
Chamber, and on both Customs
issues Mr Rolle said: “They have
some valid concerns, but the
Prime Minister’s position is that
these new processes will not
impact the flow or speed of busi-
ness. All it does is enforce the
existing law. The Prime Minister
believes taxes due are not being
fully collected.”

The Chamber chief suggested
that importers, brokers and couri-
ers needed “reassurance” from
the Government and Customs
Department “that the processes
will not significantly impact the
flow of business, and if that is
achieved it puts us in a win-win
situation.

‘The Government will be bet-
ter able to track the flow of
goods, and service providers will
be able to provide expedited ser-
vices.”

However, brokers and
importers are continuing to
express concern over the pro-
posed C19 changes. One broker,
speaking on condition of
anonymity, said all companies
importing goods under this form
were required to lodge a 10-day
bond as security for payment with
Customs. This meant they had 10

days after the
goods were
removed from
the dock in
which to submit
entries and pay
the required
Customs duties
and Excise tax-
es.

The broker
suggested that
the changed C19 process, which
will now only allow perishables,
gold, bullion and coins to be
removed before due taxes are
paid, effectively represented a
breach of contract between Cus-
toms and the industry.

To obtain a 10-day bond, the
broker said the security payment
had to be signed-off by a com-
mercial bank and then go to the
Public Treasury, where Stamp
Tax was paid. It then went to
Customs, and the bond was
lodged.

The broker, like other major
Bahamian companies who
import, also questioned why it
was necessary to change the
processes when all Customs had
to do, in the event of non-pay-
ment of due taxes and entries
within the 10-day period, was to
enforce the bond. Customs could
also warn importers and brokers
it encountered problems with that
it would not permit the clearance
of any more shipments until due
taxes were paid.

Bahamian businesses had last
week told Tribune Business that
they feared consumer prices
would increase as a result of the
C19 changes, due to the increased
costs of holding extra inventory to
counter the likelihood that prod-
uct shipments would be delayed
in clearing the dock.

They also expressed concern
over cash flow issues, as compa-
nies would now be required to
pay taxes and duties on all
imports up front, instead of after
a portion of them may have been
sold.

Glen Gomez, Comptroller of
Customs, told Tribune Business
last week that this latest enforce-
ment measure was designed to
prevent “abuse” of the C19,
which had seen it used as a ‘catch-
all for all manner of goods to be
removed from the docks without
due taxes being paid.

This, he added, had allowed
many businesses and individual
residents to ultimately evade pay-
ing their taxes because they nev-
er returned to pay due Customs
duties and Stamp Tax post-deliv-
ery.

PM Ingraham



Mr Gomez told Tribune Busi-
ness last week: “The C19 is now
being utilised in the manner for
which it was designed by law, for
perishables, gold, bullion and
coins.

“They’ve been abusing that
form, and now that abuse has
been stopped. They have been
clearing motor cars, furniture and
heaven knows what else on that
form. Why should I allow you to
abuse that form, take delivery of
goods and not pay?”

Mr Gomez said the vast major-
ity of items outstanding before
Customs, many of which dated
back several years, related to C19
form declarations. “You can’t
have your cake and eat it too,”
he added.

The Comptroller added that
there were so many outstanding
items that Customs had not
placed a dollar value on what it
was owed, but he described the
sum as “substantial”.

And he questioned why
Bahamian companies and
importers, knowing a shipment
of product was coming in, did not
pay the Customs duties and
Excise Tax up front if they did
not want to have a wait for clear-
ance and submission of entries.

“There’s a provision in law to
pay for goods before they arrive,
but no one wants to do it.

“Everyone wants to get a free-
bie, and the Government has to
bear the costs of having those
goods come in and people do not
come back to pay,” Mr Gomez
said.

“There’s just too many loop-
holes in Customs, and it’s time to
bring the loopholes to a stop.
Whether internally or external-
ly, we have to address these
issues.”

Mr Gomez said Customs was
trying to improve its clearance
times, adding: “We’re trying to
turnaround shipments in 24
hours. Only shipments with 15
pages or more might take 24
hours to check."

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A major financial institution with both commercial and private yee ck
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NETWORK OPERATIONS TECHNICIAN
Core Responsibilities:

* Provides user support for the company’s networked systems, by
investigating and performing resolutions to problems that are

reported.

Performs routine installations, preventative maintenance and repairs
to hardware, operating systems and application installations.
Troubleshoots system hardware and application problems, including

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Assists with documentation and maintenance of technical standards

and operations.

Assists with the implementation of new technologies and information
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Assist with the administration of the company’s networked anti-
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these systems are current and operate as scheduled.

Knowl ill

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Advanced knowledge of Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP
operating systems (AIX Unix 5.0 a plus) to provide help desk support
and to troubleshoot end-user and back office systems.

Ability to communicate clearly and effectively in providing help desk
support and troubleshooting end-user and back office systems.
Sound knowledge of computer hardware to execute hardware
repairs and upgrades.
Advanced knowledge of networking, especially protocols and
systems in use by the company to troubleshoot and assist in
rectifying network issues.
Sharp analytical and problem solving skills to assess issues and
technical information, examine alternatives, and use judgment to
provide reasoned recommendations.
Must be open to new technology and ability to problem solve in
support of the network and central database systems.

Must be able to work independently and as a team player when

required.

Microsoft MSCE and/or MCP Certifications a plus.

Bachelor of Science degree in a computer-related field, industry
Standard network certifications required, plus two (2) or more years
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Nassau, Bahamas

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Ve OM Meee tees ee ics sae rT ete mee mre cae»

MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 3B

Society of Trust & Estate
S T E P Practitioners (Bahamas)

The Society of Trust and Estate Practitioners

STEP BAHAMAS BRANCH

Invites applicatwons for a scholarship for one module of the STEP Diploma program in
International Trust Management
Applicants should meet the following criteria-

® Bahamian citizen
© Must have a Foundation Certificate or have been officially exempted from the
Foundation Certificate Program
Cumeatly employed mm the trust industry or seeking a career in the trust industry

Application forms should be obtained from STEP Bahamas at its administrative office below, and
submutted together with the following:

¢ Proof of Bahamian citizenship (certified copy passport]

¢ Current resume detailing employment history and career
aspirations

® Details of any other funding sources

Completed applications should be submitted ‘delivered to -

STEP Bahamas

Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre, First Floor
P.O. Box N-1764

Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: 323-6012

Deadline for applications is July 31, 2009



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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

FAMILY GUARDIAN INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

BALANCE SHEET
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2008
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)
















































ASSETS
Cash and bank balances $
Short-term deposits
Bank term deposits
Financial Investment Assets:
Fair value through profit and loss -
Available for sale
Held-to-maturity
Loans
Total investment assets
Receivables and other assets
Premiums receivable
Property, plant and equipment, net

TOTAL

1,783,470 $
339,737
13,402,046

2,050,995
325,795
10,406,809

8,561,549
7,243,165 :
44,255,404 39,063,136
73,038,462 69,930,844
140,062,284 130,339,128
2,975,284 2,064,805
2,749,750 3,184,888
12,761,820 11,724,764

$ 158,549,138 $ 147,313,585

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
LIABILITIES:
Reserves for future policyholders’ benefits

Other policyholders’ funds

$ 102,902,989
7,756,601

110,659,590
6,240,408

116,899,998

$ 94,481,860
6,653,463

101,135,323
6,116,640

107,251,963

Policy liabilities
Payables and accruals

Total liabilities

EQUITY:
Share capital
Share premium
Revaluation reserves
Retained earnings
Total equity

TOTAL

1,707,462
11,401,314
2,021,294
26,519,070
41,649,140

$ 158,549,138

1,707,462
11,401,314
2,518,187
24,434,659
40,061,622

$ 147,313,585





These financial statements were approved by the Board of Directors on
March 26, 2009 and are signed on its behalf by:

_ Za

Director

aif
Ay SAA

eg liaye <.



Director

/

The complete set of audited financial statements is available on the
company’s website at www.familyguardian.com

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Bank invests

FROM page 1B

cessing in-house, its managing
director telling Tribune Busi-
ness that given it was able to
maintain "healthy profits" while
enhancing its operational and
capital base: "Who can ask for
better?"

Commenting on the institu-
tion's nine-month and 2009 fis-
cal third quarter results, Paul
McWeeney said Bank of the
Bahamas International had
"done a remarkable job in bal-
ancing these aspects” at a time
when the Bahamian economy
was mired in recession, in addi-
tion to keeping its non-per-
forming loan level below indus-

"From the bank's perspective
we're pleased without a doubt,
given the economic circum-
stances we're facing and the fact
that the bank has forged ahead
with strategic initiatives, not
only with the capital base but
also with strategic initiatives to
expand our operational func-
tions,” Mr McWeeney told Tri-
bune Business.

"One of the projects we're
working on is to bring the entire
credit card processing in-
house.” Mr McWeeney said
Bank of the Bahamas Interna-
tional currently outsourced pro-
cessing for its entire card port-
folio to First Data, and the pro-
ject to bring that back in-house
was scheduled to be completed

August 2009.

Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national had invested some $2
million in bringing the card
portfolio processing in-house,
and Mr McWeeney said: "The
bank expects there to be
tremendous internal synergies
from that, in the sense of being
able to reduce the expense that
results from outsourcing.

"With that coming in-house
we will be able to benefit from
transaction volumes and offer
more to the public, because we
will control the whole process.
We have plans to do more in
terms of e-commerce activity,
and payment card processes
with that will help us to launch
e-commerce in the not too dis-

try average.

NOTICE

IM THE ESTATE OF HA

Harley Strect in the Eastern District
Providence one of the [slands
Bahamas

DECEASED

NOTICE is he reby given that all persons hay Ing, any

demand against the aboy

before 13th July, 2009 to send their names and addresses, and

partic ulars of their debts

so required by netice in writing from the undersigned, te

come in and prove such debts or clairns,

they will be excluded from the benefit

in late July and go live in

YWARD MALACHI WELLS late of
of the [sland of New
of the Commonwealth of The

named Estate are required, on or

or claims to the undersigned,

of any distribution

tant future."

Despite Bank of the Bahamas
International suffering an
almost-75 per cent drop in net
income in the three months to
March 31, 2009, from $4.009
million in 2008 to $1.052 mil-
lion this time around, a 73.8 per
cent drop, Mr McWeeney said it
had to long beyond the current
recession and "plan for when
you come out of it”.

And while net income for the
first nine months of the current
year had dropped by 41 per
cent, to $6.063 million com-
pared to $10.26 million the year
before, Mr McWeeney said
positioning the bank for long-

claim or

amd if

or in default theread

SEE next page

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all persons indebted
to the said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or

before the date

of the
WELLS wall be distributed amon

mentioned, the assets

then have had notice.

Dated this 26th day of June, A. D. 2008

Execulors of the Estate of Hayward Malachi Wells
clo JEROME E. PYFROM & CO.

Attorneys for the Executors

ind Floor, Charlotte Howse

Charlotte & Shirley Streets
P.O. Box NW - 3950
Nassau, Bahamas

your goals

hereinbefore mentioned AND NOTICE is
hereby given that at the expiration of the date
late HAYWARD MALACHI
¢ the persons entitled thereto
having regard only to the claims of which the Executors shall

hereinbefore

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area or have won an
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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 5B



2m on in-house card process

term growth through "new
types of process to expand the
product and service base" was
essential.

"Tf you want to be successful
in this day and age, you cannot
let one of your foundation legs
falter,” Mr McWeeney
explained. "We have to move
forward on different fronts, and
we've been able to demonstrate
the bank's ability to do that and
deliver future value. As long as
we expand the capital base and
profits, there's no reason why
we will not continue to do that.

"The focus is on building the
bank's financial strength, build-
ing up capital and a strong oper-
ating platform to provide the
products and services for the
future. And given this point in
time, and given the economic
circumstances, our focus is to
ensure the bank maintains very
strong prudential standards."

The Bank of the Bahamas
International managing direc-
tor said the institution was
working on “other enhance-
ments to systems and operating
platforms that he declined to
identify. While these invest-
ments were "a calculated risk",
he added that the bank was
"pretty confident a return on
the investment will be achieved
in the near term".

One area where Bank of the
Bahamas International is ahead
of 2008 comparatives is on pro-
visions for loan losses, which
stand at $990,315 for the year-
to-date compared to $1.393 mil-
lion last year.

Mr McWeeney told Tribune
Business that the bank was "still
holding up really well” on non-
accrual or non-performing
loans, those that are 90 days or
more past due. He said they
were "slightly above 5 per cent,
hovering at about 5.1-5.2 per
cent" as a percentage of Bank
of the Bahamas International's
total $546 million loan portfolio,
a figure below the Bahamian
commercial bank average of
more than 6 per cent.

"It is below average,” he con-
firmed, although acknowledg-
ing that Bank of the Bahamas
International was "challenged
on delinquencies" - those loans
between 30 to 90 days past due.

The bank, he added, had been
working hard to prevent delin-
quent loans from becoming
non-performing, and had
enjoyed some success.

"Delinquencies are slightly
above industry average, but our
asset quality rating, as measured
by non-performing loans, is bet-
ter than the industry average,”
Mr McWeeney said.

He added that Bank of the

Bahamas International was also
planning to launch "exciting
new products" at its Miami
branch, which was still opening
an average of 30 new accounts
per month.

And Bank of the Bahamas
International had generated net
loan growth of $23 million for
the first nine months of the cur-
rent financial year, growth of
between $2-$3 million per

month. The bank has also asked
the architect responsible for
designing its new West Bay
Street headquarters to develop
a plan for the phased construc-
tion of the facility.

Mr McWeeney said the bank
had no expansion plans apart
from the increase in size at its
Village Road branch in the next

six to 12 months, which might
result in the hiring of extra staff.
There were also some internal
restructuring initiatives the insti-
tution had been working on,
which were partly responsible
for the increased non-interest
expenses during the third quar-
ter and year-to-date.

The Bank of the Bahamas

International managing direc-
tor added that a change in
accounting treatments at year-
end 2008 had been partially
responsible for the drop in
interest income for the third
quarter, as loan fee income was
now amortised over the lifetime
of the loan rather than recog-
nised as one lump sum up front.



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

Chapter One Bookstore will be closed
from June 29, 2009 to June 30, 2009,
for year-end inventory.

It will reopen for business on July 1, 2009.

The Business Office Cashier's Cage will close
at 1:00pm on June 30, 2009 and reopen for
normal operation on Wednesday, July 1, 2009.

We apologize for
any inconvenience caused.

TECHROLOGY

Stock Taking

JUNE 29th & 30th, 2009
Re-onen July 1st at a.m.

We apologize for any inconvenience caused
Tel: 242-328-0048
Fax: 242-328-0049
#4 Patton & Rosetta Streets
Palmdale
Nassau, Bahamas
Email: sales@detpe.com

INTER-AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION

IABA XLV" CONFERENCE

Nassau, Bahamas

Central Theme: World Financial Crisis: What Does the Future Hold?

Networking Luncheon - Leg
Onenfation for first time pa

June 30 = July 4, 2009

, dene 30, 2009
Registration

Wednesday, July 7, 2009

Breakfast for the IABA Executive Committne

Pesan

MBA Counal Meeting
& Financial Professions (must be registered]
pants by A4 President
Opening Ceramon

Welcoming Cocklal Reception

Thursday, July 2, 2009

Acadanve Sessions

“Voy Contigo” Charity Luncheon (by ticket)

“Puerto Rican Night", bosted by the Colefio de Abogados de Puerto Aico and the [ABA's Puerto Rican Chapter
Young Lawyers and Law Students Section Social Program

Prayer Greakfast (by tic

Friday 3, 2009

| (Pastor Myles Munroe & Jannier Deveaux)
Feqisiration

BLUE STAR EVENT

spresented by lABA Committeas and Academic Sections

Luncheon of the Inter-American Bar Foundation (by ticked) Presentation of Thee Wiliam Roy Vavance Award

Gahemas Bar Association Dinner (by ticket)

afirday, July a, 200
Brealtas! for former MEA Presidents
(AGA Councl Meeting

Meeting of ihe mew Exacotive Commiboe

Closing Ceremony





Co-sponsored by The Bahamas Bar Association
Special accommadations for Bahamian lawyers
$200.00 Registration
For further information contact www.iaba.org OR
laba. bahamashostifgmail. com

Tel: 325-5335



(-\) THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

Dade: Pooky G4 —Toky PR, SOS
ox
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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A major financial institution with both commercial and private banking
operations, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

APPLICATION SUPPORT

TECHNICIAN/PROGRAMMER

Core Responsibilities:

Provides support and maintenance of core applications and database
infrastructure.

Assist with application and reports development within the company
as required

Assists with documentation and maintenance of technical standards
and operations.

Troubleshoots system and application problems, including server
related issues.

Reviews and tests technologies for potential purchase by researching
computer industry information.

Interfaces with all staff and IT vendors in carrying out duties.
Performs application installations and configurations, preventative
maintenance and repairs.

Executes, coordinates and assists in the implementation of new
technologies.

Knowledge Skills and Abilities:

Advanced programming skills with knowledge in Java, VB, C#, PL
SQL and T-SQL.

Working knowledge of Database interfacing technologies including
Oracle 10g, Microsoft SOL Server and AS400 DB files.

Strong Operating System and troubleshooting knowledge and
experience using IBM AIX, Redhat Linux and Microsoft Windows.
Knowledge of networking, especially protocols in use by company
to troubleshoot and rectify the source(s) of network problems.
Analytical and problem-solving skills to assess issues and technical
information, examine alternatives, and use judgment to provide
reasoned recommendations.

Must be open to new technology and ability to problem solve in
support of the network and central database systems.

Bachelor of Science degree in a computer-related field, industry
standard network certifications required, plus two (2) or more years
of proven network systems experience.

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience
and qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and life
insurance; pension scheme.
Interested persons should apply no later than June 26, 2009 to:
DA#61099B
c/o The Tribune
Nassau, Bahamas

institutional leadership@gmail.com





PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Court Order
SAL E

Action#623/2000
Judgement Creditor; Premier Importers Limited
Judgement Debtors: Brendan Foulkes
White 2002 Ford Escape

Action# 267 /2007
Judgement Creditor: Premier Importers Limited
Judgement Debtors: Dario Rolle
2001 Ford Explorer

Action# 00572/2008
Judgement Creditor: Premier Importers Limited
Judgement Debtors: Lionel Glinton
2001 Ford F150

Action#01002/2005
Judgement Creditor: Premier Importers Limited
Judgement Debtor: Jasongriffin
2001 Avalon

Vehicles Can Be Viewed
From 7.30 Am To 4.30pm
At Premier Importers St. Alban S Drive.

Bids Must Be In Writing On Or
Before July 13th, 2009.

Contact 322-8396 @ Extn 232

For Any Additional Information.

BSi

BS! OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BS| Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established
international private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is
presently accepting applications for:

HEAD OF PRIVATE BANKING

Applicants for the position of Head of Private Banking must have ai least 20
years experience in the offshore banking sector, have extensive knowledge of
intemational financial products and ability to lead and partner with team
members. Applicants must also be confident regarding customer relations with
excellent capability to generate New Money and have thorough knowledge of
local legislation, regulatory & statutory matters as well as international banking
practices. Fluency in Italian & French is absolutely required.

Personal qualities :-

Strong management skills

Leadership skills

Excellent communication skil

Goal-onented, self-motivated and able to motivate team members
Positive attitude and outlook

Commitment to quality and service excellence

Excellent aoquisitian skills

Flexibility in office hours and hands-on aporoach when necessary
Must be able to work under pressure

Available to travel on a frequent bass

Responsibilities :-

Manage and lead Private Banking Team

Meet target in terms of Profitability and Acquisition of Net New Money

Meet deadlines on timely basis

Contribute to the management of the Bank a5 senior management officer
Faster and maintain communication with intemal/external banking
professionals

Acquire new clients in target markets

service & advee allocated customers

submit their

Interested persons with should

resume/curriculum vitae to:-

such qualifications

Human Resources Manager
BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre
P.O. Box N-7130
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kern@bsibank.com
(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above aitributes will be contacted



Chamber Private Sector Office

FROM page 1B

if we do not have the right envi-
ronment” business and com-
merce will suffer.

Mr Rolle added: “Looking at
it from a macroeconomic stand-
point, there has to be a major
focus from the Government to

develop the private sector,
understanding its needs and the
role it plays in the economy.
That is something that needs to
take place.”

The Chamber president
added that while the private sec-
tor played a “critical role in
nationbuilding”, the dialogue

Employment Opportunity

Sales Manager

We are in search of a talented, innovative, charismatic
and creative leader with a passion for success, an
aptitude for sales and the ability to initiate progress,

Skill Requirements

Excellent oral and communication skills

Excellent motivation, training, and coaching skills
Ability to operate POS systems

Strong ability to drive team sales

Proficient in Microsoft Office applications

Strong multitasking ability

Possess excellent planning, organizational and

implementation skills

Strong leadership & management skills
Strong internet skills i.e. Emailing, group messaging

and research

Ability to execute priority based workload

Ability to exert initiative

Minimum Experience & Job Requirements
Tertiary level - with degree in related field;
Sales executive with at least ten years experience in

sales and marketing;

At least three years experience in supervisory post;
Strong knowledge and application of MS Microsoft

Suite

APPLY VIA EMAIL TO:
salesmanageropportunity2009@gmail.com



that had taken place previously
between itself and the Govern-
ment/public sector had “not
been of the quality to drive the
effort. There isn’t enough of it,

“We look at what’s wrong
and we poke and we poke and
we poke, but we need to look at
how best to move the process
forward,” Mr Rolle explained.
“That is the type of discussion
we should be having, with a
long-term view of development
leading to a national develop-
ment plan.

“Tm tired of the back and
forth and tit-for-tat. I can tell
you that it’s not productive,
because we’re still in the same
state we were in 10 years ago.
It’s not only government’s fault;
it’s both parties’ fault. We’ve
not made a conscious decision
to establish a plan for the path
forward together. I do not want
to suggest a huge discrepancy,
but it’s not strong enough.”

Mr Rolle said his work
throughout the Caribbean,
when he was an Organisation
of American States (OAS) and
Inter-American Development
Bank (IDB) representative, had
exposed him to the public and
private sector dialogue that had
been established.

While other countries were
facing the same issues as the
Bahamas, the Chamber presi-
dent said they at least had the
“framework” in place to
address them through public
sector/private sector discussions.

“We have appreciation for
the awesome job government
has, with a fiscal deficit that con-
tinues to widen and the devel-
opment of revenue streams
being extremely difficult in this
economic climate. That’s why
it’s important for us to estab-
lish the path forward together,”
Mr Rolle said.

The Chamber president
added that he and fellow exec-
utives also discussed energy
with the Prime Minister, and
“touched on the status of the
National Energy Policy and
what’s happening with that”.

A meeting had been sched-
uled to discuss that with Phen-
ton Neymour, minister of state
for the environment, either this
week or next.

THE DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS
Business Establishment

Survey

The Department of Statistics is conducting its Annual
Business Establishment Survey from June until
September 2009. The Survey requires that businesses
and institutions provide the following information:

- Number of employees

- Wages and Salaries

* Annual hours worked

- Revenues and Expenditures
» Depreciation and Acquisitions

The data generated from the survey will be used to
measure each sector’s contribution to the estimation of

the national income and the gross national product of
The Bahamas.

If you are involved in the production of goods and
services, you can help contribute to our national
statistics, as well as learn more about your sector’s
performance by completing the Annual Business
Establishment Survey questionnaire accurately and in a
timely fashion.

All survey questionnaires should be returned to the
Department of Statistics.

The Department of Statistics:

Star General Insurance Bldg.
second Floor

P.O. Box F-42561

Freeport, Grand Bahama
Tel: 352-7196

Fax: 352-6120

Summerwinds Plaza

P.O. Box N 3904

Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: 397-3704, 397-3706, or
397-3707

Fax: 326-0379





THE TRIBUNE



Real property tax change was a ‘good compromise’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government’s decision
to lower the 1 per cent real
property tax threshold from
$7.5 million to $5 million was
described as “a good compro-
mise” by the Bahamas Real
Estate Association’s (BREA)
president, who added that the
industry now needed “to stabi-
lize the market and get busi-
ness back to the Bahamas
again”.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham unveiled the amendment
last week during the debate on
the Real Property Tax Act
amendments in the House of
Assembly, and William Wong
described the move as “some-
thing we'll live with. It’s a good
compromise”.

While BREA had initially
argued for the $35,000 real
property tax cap, which was
removed in the 2008-2009 Bud-
get, to be restated, Mr Wong
said the Association had “been
suggesting all along” that the
Government could bring it back
at a higher threshold — increas-
ing it by possibly $15,000 or
$25,000, and taking the cap as
high as $60,000-$70,000.

The main beneficiaries from
the change will be those
Bahamas-based properties val-
ued at between $5 million and
$7.5 million, who would have
had to pay a 1 per cent rate on
the value above the first
$250,000, which is exempt.

At the high-end, a $7.5 mil-
lion property, paying real prop-
erty tax at 1 per cent on $7.25
million, would have had to pay
$72,500 per annum to the Pub-
lic Treasury — more than double
the previous $35,000 cap.

Now, following the amend-
ment, a $7.5 million property
will pay real property tax at 1
per cent on the first $4.75 mil-
lion and 0.25 per cent on the
next $2.5 million. This works
out at $53,750, a reduction of
$18,750 in annual tax payments.

“We can live with this, and
we’re grateful that we were able
to come to a compromise on
this very, very sore issue,” Mr
Wong told Tribune Business.
“We’ve crossed a major hurdle
and need to start marketing and
getting business back to the
Bahamas.”

This newspaper understands

YOUR FUTURE

IS ABOUT TO GET BRIGHTER

that the initial removal of the
$35,000 real property tax cap
caused problems for major real
estate developers who were
marketing to foreign buyers, as
this had been a major plank in
their marketing campaign. This
was taken away almost instant-
ly, and had the effect of causing
credibility problems with poten-
tial buyers.

Mr Wong said the 2008-2009
Budget amendments caused
prospective buyers of Bahami-
an real estate to “take a second
look”. He added: “I think we
lost quite a bit of business, but
with the new tax structure, it
puts us in a more competitive
position and allows us to be a
bit more competitive with oth-
ers in the region. I’m glad the
Government had a chance to
take it in the right direction.
The lawyers should be happy.

“Pm glad the Government
showed wisdom in looking at it
again. It shows maturity.” If for-
eign second home buyers
increased their purchases of
Bahamian real estate, realtors,
attommeys, contractors and oth-
er businesses would all benefit,
and “the cash registers will be
chinging in the Treasury”.

Mr Wong, though, urged the
Government to review the
amendment that requires for-
eign home owners to stay in
their properties for at least none
months per year to qualify for
the real property tax exemp-
tion.

“T think the Government
needs to clear that up,” he
explained. How can you ask
someone to spend $5 million
and stay put for nine months,
and how are they going to mon-
itor that?”

St. Andrew’s School Foundation

Development Officer

The Founckition 1 committed tes the heéliss

amal St. Amdrew's

School thragh tts financial support ot eat hers. scholarship
stuidents and balding prapeels, The Pounder 1 presen,
aeek ing a person to lead its Office of Developnvent

The Development Officer,

A Tull-time pasition. reports to

ihe St. Anirews School Bouncation and will:

he responsible for designing and overseeing: fundraising
CHMpAlens In support of the Koundatian’s strategic pools;

develop marketing strategies and materials for public

relations ancl dich ertising:

- PARAL relationships hedween the School and varies
oranizations, including the St. Andrew's Alumni and

Fricnds Assocation:

cuagitins

The successful candidate will POSER knowledge ainal
understanding of the School's history and culture; be a goal-
dnven individual with strong organizational and social skills;

Picks aS
experienced in fundraising.

Interested c
TLS Le

uominimum of a Bachelor's Degree:

una be

andidates should send their CV and a lemer of

Development Officer Position
St. Andrew's School Foundation
Fok Bow As
Alassuill, Ha hmas



MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 7B

Excellent Em red oyment

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challenging environment?

Are you a Confident communicator, with a
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* Sales Associace

coounts (loncral Officers
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For more information on cach position, please visit our website page

wow fumnitureplus.com/ careers

Plus Group af Companies is an established Bahamian owned group
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We offer a competitive salary and benefirs package as well as ongoing

professional training and develapment.

FURNES pe

Nassau = Grand Bahama * World Wide VWeb

Please submit your application by Mail ta:
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or email: jobe®cheplusgrp.com

We thank all applcancs, however only chose

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COME SPEAK TO THE EXPERTS

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RSVP 364-6766

c/o Bahamas Baptist Community College
8 Jean Street.

NOVA SoUTHeastERN
Bahamas





PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EU considered slashing Bahamas

FROM page 1B

targeted at Family Island infra-
structure projects - set to be
made available in the latest
financing round.

The EU's 2008-2013 Country
Strategy Paper for the
Bahamas, a copy of which has
been obtained by Tribune Busi-
ness despite it never being made
public, found that 6.83 million
Euros made available to the
Bahamas in the last funding
round - known as the ninth
European Development Fund
(EDF) - failed to achieve their
goal to ‘build capacity’ in the

Family Islands.

Finding that the Bahamas
had been "very slow" in com-
mitting these funds to agreed
projects, with a "protracted
process" in setting up technical
help, the Strategy Paper said:
"Unfortunately, implementa-
tion of the ninth EDF has expe-
rienced significant delays...

"This is at least in part due
to lack of communication on
project implementation issues.
The intervention framework
had not been updated by the
end of 2004, and no output or
outcome sector-wide indicators
were made available.

"The Mid-Term Review con-

~\ )) HE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

Chapter One Bookstore will be closed
from June 29, 2009 to June 30, 2009,

cluded that the Bahamas was a
very low performer in terms of
implementation of EU assis-
tance, and that a reduction of
the overall allocation could be
contemplated at the End-of-
Term Review if things did not
improve.”
Risking

Risking a cut in EDF financ-
ing would likely be viewed as
sheer folly for the Bahamas, giv-
en that it is the only grant fund-
ing this nation can access. This
is largely due to it being viewed
by many as a relatively devel-
oped nation with high living
standards.

Grant funding is financing
without any repayment or inter-
est rates attached, making it
especially valuable to the
Bahamas given the expanding
fiscal deficits and national debt
due to weakness in the public
finances.

And the EU funding is tar-
geted at an area in desperate
need of financing - Family

Island infrastructure. It is debat-
able whether the Government -
especially in the current climate
- could afford to do them.

For example, the ninth EDF
recommended focusing on six
projects - an eco-tourism train-
ing centre in Andros; rehabili-
tating the dock at Fresh Creek
in north Andros; a new airport
terminal and runway, known as
New Bight International Air-
port, for Cat Island; rehabilita-
tion of roads in Acklins; and
upgrades to the airport and
dredging/upgrades to the dock
in Duncan Town, Ragged
Island.

The 10th EDF is focused on
much the same, namely Family
Island infrastructure develop-
ment in those islands supposed
to have benefited from the
ninth EDF round.

The Strategy Paper said the
EU and Bahamian government
wanted to concentrate on
reducing "regional socio-eco-
nomic imbalances" within the
Bahamas. "This should be done
by means of capacity-building

in infrastructure development
on the south-easterly islands of
the Bahamas, bringing them up
to the level of New Providence,
Grand Bahama, Abaco and the
other more developed islands,"
the document said.

"The thrust of the strategy is
to achieve sustainable econom-
ic growth and stability, and con-
tinuous improvement in living
standards. Support for the Fam-
ily Islands’ integration into the
Bahamas economy is aimed at
establishing one Bahamas eco-
nomic space for future genera-
tions of sustainable and equi-
table economic growth.

Intent

"The intent is to facilitate a
structural transformation of the
least developed islands in the
south-east, repositioning these
islands and bringing them into
line with the whole economy
through inter-island as well as
international direct trade, which
should ultimately achieve the

central common objective of
poverty reduction."

The Strategy Paper added:
"Providing adequate physical
infrastructure is considered to
be a critical requirement for
continued growth and competi-
tiveness, particularly in the
tourism industry.

"This could also be relevant
for the Bahamas’ economic
relations with the EU, and
could be part of a regional
effort to promote the services
trade." Overall, the Strategy
Paper said the outcome from
the 10th EDF should be
improved ports, runways,
drainage systems and sea walls
in the Family Islands, and
"increased economic activity in
goods and services due to better
access from and to markets”.
This, in turn, is no doubt intend-
ed to reverse the migration
from the Family Islands to Nas-
sau in search of work, some-

SEE next page

for year-end inventory.
It will reopen for business on July 1, 2009.

aeseasinest Oftre/Oashiete case aa WANTED
e Business Office Cashier's Cage will close a oaniWarchance Clork
at 1:00pm on June 30, 2009 and reopen for ae eA 4

normal operation on Wednesday, July 1, 2009.

NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that, in accordance
with Section 50 (1) (b) of the Supreme Court
Act, 1996, anyone having claims againts the
estate of Fernando Rafael Zanartu Velasco
should send written notification thereof to
Santander Bank & Trust Ltd., 3rd Floor,
Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre, P.O. Box
N1682, Nassau, Bahamas.

A medical supplies company is seeking the
services of an individual primarily to make
deliveries, run errands, and be responsible
for the maintenance and control of the
company warehouse and physical
environment.

We apologize for
any inconvenience caused.

candidate should be
responsible, honest, punctual, have good
communication skills, must interact well
with customers and staff, be a team player,
have good time management skills and the
ability to prioritize and accomplish tasks.
The psy candidate must possess a
valid driver's license.

The successful

BKG/410.03

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT TREASURY BILLS

Sealed tenders for B$71,000,000.00 of 91-Day Treasury Bills
will be received by the Banking Manager, The Central Bank
of The Bahamas, Frederick Street, Nassau up to 3:00 p.m on
Wednesday, July 1, 2009. Successful tenderers, who will be
advised should take up their bills against payment on Friday,
July 3, 2009. These bills will be in minimum multiples of
B$100.00.

Interested persons may fax their resume to
328-5052, email to:
bmhumanresouces@ gmail.com or
mail to P.O. Box -1483,

Nassau, Bahamas

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No. 45 of 2000)
HIGH KICK PRODUCTIONS LIMITED
\ In Voluntary liquidation

Tenders are to be on special forms obtainable from the Central
Bank of The Bahamas or Commercial Banks.

Tenders must state the net price percent (in multiples of one
cent) and should be marked “Tender”. The Central Bank of the
Bahamas reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act (No.

Vacancy for a

45 of 2000). HIGH KICK PRODUCTIONS LIMITED is in

OOK OR OK OOK OR OK I OK OK OK OS OK OK OK OK OR OK TK OK OR OK A OK OR OK OI OK OK OK OK OK OK OK OK OR OK OK OK

Employment Opportunity

Delivery Driver

We are seeking to employ a team player with a passion for
success and a desire to get ahead.

Skills and Requirements

Excellent navigation and geographic knowledge

Good driving record

Strong communication skills

Ability to operate all equipment to perform the job ie.
trucks, lift

A, team player

Ability to read, count, and write to accurately complete
all documentation,

A keen sense of punctuality and time management
Physical dexterity

Amiable and reliable

Strong understanding of traffic laws.

Professional appearance

Minimum Requirements

High school Diploma

Valid Driver's License

Minimum two years driving experience

Truck driving experience desired, but not essential

APPLY VIA EMAIL TO:
driveropportunity(@gmail.com



Pastry Chef

Overall Responsibilities

Create and maintain a posilive work environment
through coaching and leading staff while establishing
Creative anal exciting TOME Ta produc [s, hoy appelsing
und visually appealing.
= Work and maintain an ‘ll working relationships with
other work areas.
Meet with meeting planners and social catering event
coordinators to develop personalized dessert products.
- Direct, train and monitor performance of Pastry staff,
- Maintain organization, cleanliness and sanitation of
work areas and equipment,

Specific Joh Summary

Tram, coach, lead and hokl Pastry team accountable ter the
job fumeticns listed below,

Meet claily tn review assignments, schedules, anticipated
business lewels, employes: periormance tues anc wher
Information pentinent io joo pectormance

Maintain and strictly abicle by sanitation’health regulations
and the hotel's fond safety program requirements

Ensure all Pastry employees maintain food handlers
certification

- Meet with Executive Chef to review assignments,
anticipated business levels, changes ane other information
pertinent to the job performance on a
daily basis
- Prepare and assign production and prep work for Pastry
stait to complete; review priorities,

- Communicate additions or changes to the assignments as
they arise throughout the shitt, Identify situations, which
compromise the department's standards and delegate these
tasks -

- Prep are | amenity orders. for room service in accordance with
cifed requirements ond hotel standards

eae all dishes following recipes and yield guides,

aeconding to Ritz-Carlton standards

- Monitor performance of Pastry staff and ensure all
procedures are completed to the department standards

- Assist Pastry staff wherever required to ensure excellent
Service tO vests

- Ensure all Pastry staff assignments are completed before
they leave work area

- Review status of work and follow- “Up actions required
with the Executive Chef before leaving,

Qualifications and Specific Candidate Profile

Certification of culinary ramming or apprentoceshup.

- 5 years experience in FAB leadership position ata
luxury Club, hotel or restaurant.

- Knowledge of food and beverage cost controds,
AbTILY bo plan and develop menus anal recipes.

Please send resume to the attention af:
Thirector of Human Resources
The Ahacoe (lub on Winding Hay
P.O. Bow AB-20571
Marsh Harbour, Abacu
Bahamas
OR
Email: abacohumanresources@ ritzcarlion.com

Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 25th day

of June, 2009.

Andium Trust Company Limited

of 12-14 David Place, St. Helier, Jersey JE2 4TD
Liquidator

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

PROPERTY MANAGER

REQUIRED:

An intelligent and energetic person to
manage a warehouse facility.

Responsibilities include, but are not limited to:

e@ Overseeing facility, office and

maintenance staff

Maintaining office hours from 8:30am - 5:00om
weekdays and 8:30am - 1:00pm on Saturdays

Operating and managing computer systems

Processing of billings and collections and

making bank deposits

Operating and managing the security systems

Marketing, showing and leasing vacant areas

to tenants

Preparing monthly reports

Maintaining the facility to a high professional

standard

Applicants should apply in writing to the following
e-mail address: baha.accounts2009@gmail.com

Please provide educational background and
employment history together
with references from previous employers.





THE TRIBUNE



grant funding

thing the so-called ‘anchor
property’ strategy was also
designed to achieve.

The 10th EDF is divided into
two components, with some
4.23 million Euros earmarked
for Family Island infrastructure
projects and the remaining
470,000 Euros forming a Tech-
nical Cooperation Facility. And
it is quite possible that the 6.83
million Euro balance from the
ninth EDF may also still be
available.

The Strategy Paper warned
that economic development in
the Family Islands would
depend heavily on capital
investment "from other invest-
ment sources", as the Govern-
ment “does not have the nec-

essary financial resources to do
it all”. And that was before the
full impact of the global eco-
nomic downturn was realized.

Infrastructure development,
the paper said, was critical to
eliminating "pockets of pover-
ty" that existed in the south-
eastern Bahamas, especially on
islands such as Acklins,
Crooked Island and Mayagua-
na.

Poverty

"Despite the levels of pover-
ty, these south-easterly islands
are an untapped resource with
limitless potential for economic
growth and development,” the
Strategy Paper said. "It is there-

fore the view of the Govern-
ment that the time has come to
take these islands to a new lev-
el of development.

"The small size of the
Bahamas prevents it from
achieving economies of scale in
many areas. Similarly, the small
size of the population, com-
bined with geographic frag-
mentation, raises the unit cost of
infrastructure provision, partic-
ularly in the Family Islands.

"The challenge is to provide
and maintain infrastructures
such that citizens in all parts of
the country can be guaranteed a
higher quality of life, and all of
the inhabited islands can par-
ticipate meaningfully in eco-
nomic development."

MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 9B

BSi



BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BS! Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established
international private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is
presently accepting applications for:








INVESTMENT SPECIALIST/RELATIONSHIP MANAGER





Applicants for the positon of Investment Specialist/Relationship Manager must have
at least 10 years’ years experience in the offshore banking sector and extensive
knowledge of international mvestment instruments & money market. The successful
candidate must have in-depth knowledge of international financial markets; and
excellent capabilities in managing relationships with Clients, Client Advisors &
internal Relationship Managers. Fluency in Italian and Spanish is required.













Personal qualities :-
Management skills
Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
Commitment to quality and service excellence
strong team attitude
Financial and analytical background
Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary
Must be able to work under pressure
Available to travel

Summit Insurance Company Limited
(Incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas)

Balance Sheet
As of 31 December 2008
(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)

ASSETS
Cash in hand and at banks
Term deposits
Due from reinsurers
Due from agents
Deferred commission expense
Prepayments and other assets
Investments in securities:
Available-for-sale
Loans and receivables
Investment property
Plant and equipment

Responsibilities :-
Research, develop and implement strategies for new products
Provide investment proposals and markets’ analysis to Chents, Externa
Advisors and other Relationship Managers and Senior Management
Guide and assist staff in the training of Bank's products
Provide advisory services to sophisticated clientele
Manage allocated clients

980,204
17,173,805
1,265,144
7,256,857
3,481,610
136,242

1,344,315
15,211,795
2,181,831
7,363,794
3,286,375
127,621

4,854,168
836,650
206,117
442,433

5,126,931
1,119,203
210,966
468,299

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum

Total assets vitae to:-

36,633,230 36,441,130
LIABILITIES
General insurance funds:
Unearned premium reserve
Uneamed commission income
Outstanding claims reserve

Human Resources Manager

BS! Overseas (Bahamas) Limited

Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre

P. 0. Box N-7130

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kKerr@bsibank.com

9,885,921
2,375,820
5,611,075

10,108,362
1,859,273
6,903,248

17,872,816 18,870,883
Other liabilities:
Due to reinsurers
Accounts payable and accrued expenses

2,419,842
386,818

2,570,274
406,231
Total liabilities

20,679,476 21,847,388

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

Summit Insurance Company Limited
(Incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas)

Balance Sheet

As of 31 December 2008

(Continued)

(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)

Internal Audit

EQUITY

Share capital:
Authorized: 10,000,000 shares of $1 each
Issued and fully paid: 5,000,000 shares of $1 each
Treasury shares

General reserve

Fair value reserve

Retained earnings

5,000,000 5,000,000

(910,000) .
1,000,000 1,000,000
1,120,007 1,450,070
9,743,747 7,143,672

Pasche Bank & Trust Limited is looking for:

Permanent Internal Auditor (Junior)

Main tasks:

Tetal equity 15,953,754 14,593,742

Perform regular and recurrent controls to have the
ongoing insurance that the bank’s activity is properly
controlled and managed in compliance with applicable
laws, regulations, internal guidelines and best business
practices.

Measure and monitor the bank’s major risk areas.
Collaborate with the Board of Directors, the CEO and
the Head of The Group Internal Audit.

Realize unexpected and punctual audit following your
own initiative or upon request of the Board of Directors,
the Chief Executive Officer or the Head of the Group
Internal Audit.

Total liabilities and equity 36,633,230 36,441,130

APPROVED BY THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND SIGNED ON ITS BEHALF BY:

LEAL



Director

21 May 2009
Date



Profile:

- University degree in Business Administration or
Accounting,

- 2-3 years of professional experience in Banking or

accounting firm,

Personal skills: candidate should show great sense of

adaptability and initiative. Accuracy and consistency

required as well.

Computer skills : Technically efficient in MS Excel,

Word, Powerpoint, Internet,

Foreign languages: English, Spanish. French would be

appreciated.

Full Financial Statements are available at www.summitbahamas.com =

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

Please send you CV to:

Pasche Bank & Trust

Attn. Olivier Giaume

Head of Internal Audit

Bay Side Executive Park Lake Road, West Bay Street
P.O. Box AP 59241

Nassau, Bahamas

RU ee]
the #1 newspaper in circulation,
just call 02-2371 today!

Olivier.giaume@pasche.ch





PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INES
Power plant

deliveries for BEC
on two islands

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PROSPECT MADISON LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

VANESE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)















































Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas. Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JCR HOLDINGS LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Employment Opportunity

Senior Accounts Assistant

We seek to employ a talented, innovative, leader with a
passion for success, the ability to initiate progress, an

: . Notice is hereby given that the above-named
aptitude for Accounting and a desire to succeed.

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of June 2009. The Liquidator

ene rereeres is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

® Possess strong foundation of accounting practices and
procedures
Excellent oral and communication skills
Excellent motivation & coaching skills
Ability to operate and familiarity with POS systems
Strong ability to drive team sales
Proficient in Microsoft Office, GL and Accounting
applications
Strong multitasking ability
Possess excellent planning, organizational and
implementation skills
Strong leadership & managerial skills

Strong internet skills i.e. Emailing, group messaging
and research

Ability to execute priority based workload
Ability to exert initiative

Recording, summarizing, analyzing, verifying and
reporting of results of financial transactions

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RAINBOW ASSET PTE LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of June 2009. The Liquidator

2% ; is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Minimum Experience Requirements

Tertiary level - with degree in related field;

Accounts executive with at least 4 years experience in
Accounting ;

At least three years experience in supervisory post;
Strong knowledge and application of MS Microsoft Suite

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

APPLY VIA EMAIL TO: (Liquidator)

sraccountassistanti00%@egma il.com

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

Zu

Cy LCI NT A LL

&

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Wark

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 26 JUNE 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,579.39 | CHG 0.37 | %CHG 0.02 | YTD -132.97 | YTD % -7.77
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.53 | YTD -5.43% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit y Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund

Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank ($1)

Consolidated Water BDRs

Doctor's Hospital

Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J.S. Johnson 10.50 10.50

Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Last Sale Change Daily Vol.

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + 100.00 : 7%

Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + 100.00 : 20 Prime + 1.75%

Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + 100.00 : 7%

Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + 100.00 i 5 Prime + 1.75%

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Last Price

Previous Close Today's Close Change

10.00

52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest

52wk-Hi

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

EPS $ Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

Symbol Yield
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

52wk-Low Weekly Vol.

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
YTD% Last 12 Months

ABDAB
RND Holdings

0.000
0.000
Fund Name Div $ Yield %
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund i
FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.74
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

30-Apr-09
31-May-09
31-May-09
31-May-09

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

crobards@tribunemedia.net

BIMINI and Eleuthera
received diesel engine ship-
ments last Friday, according to a
heavy equipment website, as
$40 million worth of BEC pow-
er plant construction initiatives
for those two islands gain legs in
a big way.

Heavyliftpfi.com announced
that two 100 tonne engines,
originating in Korea, were deliv-
ered to Bimini and four 72-
tonne engines, originating in
Denmark, were delivered to
Eleuthera.

According to the site, the
power plants were consolidat-
ed at a heavy lift facility in the
UK, then shipped to both
islands. It also announced that
the power generators had been
installed in their respective facil-
ities.

The “on schedule” delivery
and installation of the engines
seems to be in line with the
Government’s plan to have the
new power facilities up and run-
ning by August.

According to the online news
release, delivery of the massive
engines was a challenge because
of the islands’ unfavourable
docking facilities.

“Delivery to two minor
islands in the Bahamas, requir-
ing the transfer of equipment
from normal heavy lift ships to
small landing craft, was neces-
sary as the islands do not have
proper port facilities. The con-
tract included moving UK-

based Collett Vehicles, equip-
ment and staff to the islands to
carry out the work,” said the
release.

Minister of State for the Envi-
ronment, Phenton Neymour,
revealed during his Budget con-
tribution to Parliament that the
Bimini power station was being
expanded to the tune of $14 mil-
lion, while the newly construct-
ed Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera,
power plant would cost $26 mil-
lion. A new facility is also being
constructed in Wilson City,
Abaco, at a

cost of $90 million and should
be completed by January 2010,
while $300 million worth of
expansions, for which govern-
ment is awaiting financing, are
planned for New Providence.

The Government recently
revealed its need to borrow
$211 million to cover existing
loan facilities for the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation.

“Tn the last two years we have
had to put in place new capital
investment,” said Mr Neymour.

He said of BEC during his
budget address to parliament:
“The global situation has wors-
ened and BEC’s financial posi-
tion has done the same, as there
are encumbrances with collec-
tions in all areas — whether res-
idential, small commercial and
some large commercial cus-
tomers.

“As of May 2009, BEC’s
accounts receivable was approx-
imately $99 million and
accounts payable for April 2009
was approximately $134 mil-
lion.”

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CIRCUITPOINT INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

VIDA DULCE VENTURES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EAST ALLIANCE EQUITY
CORPORATION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



PAGE 12B, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



‘Transformers 2’ takes to sky with $112m weekend

@ By DAVID GERMAIN
AP Movie Writer

LOS ANGELES (AP) —
Alien robots have transformed
into box-office superstars with
$200 million in domestic ticket
sales in just five days.

“Transformers: Revenge of
the Fallen” took in $112 million
in the sequel’s first weekend and
$201.2 million since opening
Wednesday, according to Sun-
day estimates from Paramount,
which is distributing the Dream-
Works movie.

It was well on the way to
becoming the year’s top-gross-
ing movie.

That was a few million dol-
lars higher than other studios
were expecting for the movie,
and the figures could change a
bit when final numbers are
released Monday.

IAL OROUP

ATOM AL

Still, it was a colossal start for
the “Transformers” sequel,
whose opening five days
amounted to nearly two-thirds
of the $319 million domestic
total the franchise’s first movie
did over its entire run in 2007.

Now playing in almost every
other country except India, the
movie added $185.8 million
overseas, for a worldwide total
of $387 million. That’s well over
half the $708 million global total
for the first “Transformers.”

That first movie began with a
$70.5 million weekend. Based
on how well the sequel has
done, “Revenge of the Fallen”
could join the handful of movies
that have topped the $400 mil-
lion mark domestically.

“Td say given the momentum
it has, it’s got a real shot,” said
Rob Moore, vice chairman at
Paramount.

For the first five days, the
“Transformers” sequel was sec-
ond only to last summer’s “The
Dark Knight” with $203.8 mil-
lion.

This was the biggest opening
weekend of this year, surpass-
ing the $85.1 million debut of
“X-Men Origins: Wolverine” in
early May.

The sequel began with $60.6
million on its opening day
Wednesday. That also was sec-
ond only to “The Dark Knight,”
which had the biggest box-office
day ever with $67.2 million on
opening day.

With $14.4 million at 169
IMAX theaters, “Transformers”
set a record for a five-day open-
ing in the giant-screen format,
nearly doubling the previous
best of $7.3 million set by “Har-
ry Potter and the Order of the
Phoenix.”

“Transformers” overcame
harsh reviews from critics, who
called it a visual-effects extrav-
aganza without much story or
human heart. Director Michael
Bay has a history of bad reviews
and big box office with
“Armageddon” and “Pearl Har-
bor.”

“Michael Bay knows how to
build the perfect summer box-
office beast,” said Paul Der-
garabedian, box-office analyst
for Hollywood.com. “He
squarely aimed right at the
demographic, right at what sum-
mer movie-goers want, and he
put it on the screen. And audi-
ences can’t seem to get enough
of it.”

The sequel broadened the
franchise’s fan base. Females
accounted for just 40 percent of
the audience for the first “Trans-
formers” but 46 percent for the

sequel, Moore said.

Much of that was due to the
on-screen romance for the char-
acters played by Shia LaBeouf
and Megan Fox, who were rela-
tive unknowns when the first
movie came out.

With a $13 million weekend,
Disney and Pixar Animation’s
“Up” became the year’s top-
grossing film domestically at
$250.2 million. It surpassed
Paramount’s “Star Trek,” which
did $3.6 million over the week-
end to hit a $246.2 million total.

The reign of “Up” at the top
of the year’s box-office chart
will be short-lived, though. The
“Transformers” sequel should
shoot past it in a matter of days.

The Warner Bros. melodra-
ma “My Sister’s Keeper,” with
Cameron Diaz and Abigail
Breslin, had a so-so debut, com-
ing in at No. 5 with $12 million.

Breslin plays a daughter con-
ceived as a donor for her older
sister, who has leukemia.

Summit Entertainment’s Iraq
War drama “The Hurt Locker”
had a strong start in limited
release, taking in $144,000 in
four theaters for an average of
$36,000 a cinema. That com-
pares to an average of $26,453 in
4,234 theaters for “Transform-
ers.”

Starring Jeremy Renner and
Anthony Mackie as members of
a U.S. bomb squad in Baghdad,
“The Hurt Locker” has a chance
to become the first real com-
mercial success among recent
war-on-terror movies, which
audiences generally have avoid-
ed. “The Hurt Locker” has
earned stellar reviews since
debuting at film festivals last
year. It rolls out to more the-
aters on July 10.

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Si Cir 1

The stories behind the news



Officer: detainees were
Subjected to horrific abuse

Allegations about
Carmichael Road
Detention Centre

By INSIGHT TEAM

Pee years, the Immigra-
tion Detention Centre on
Carmichael Road has been the
subject of allegations of detainee
abuse and inhumane conditions.

Successive governments have
promised to investigate and from
time to time a few changes have
been instituted, but former
detainees say these are usually
cosmetic and short lived.

A few months ago, under
intense publicity, the Immigration
Department announced yet
another inquiry, and a fact-finding
team composed of government
officials, social workers and psy-
chologists visited the centre.

The resulting report has yet to
be made public, but those well
acquainted with the matter doubt
it will admit to finding any evi-
dence of cruelty or violence.

History seems to support this
view: During the facility's more
than two decades in operation,
and despite countless allegations,
not a single publicised instance of
beating, torture, or sexual abuse
has been acknowledged by
Bahamian authorities.

Yet, according to a senior offi-
cer formerly stationed at the cen-
tre, detainees are routinely sub-
jected to the most horrific abuses
— which take place right under the
noses of the administrators, who
are often too disinterested to
notice.

As the Immigration Depart-
ment prepares to announce yet
another plan to improve condi-
tions for detainees, the officer
breaks his silence for the first time
in an exclusive interview with
Insight.

The text of this interview has
been edited for continuity and to
protect the identity of the indi-
viduals mentioned.

Insight (I): Over the years,
there have been countless allega-
tions about what goes on at the
Carmichael Road Detention Cen-
tre, but journalists have not been
allowed in to see for themselves.
How would you describe condi-
tions at the centre during the time
you were there?

Officer (O): It was poor, it was
an insult. It's inhumane how the
place is run. There is sewage
everywhere. Piles of garbage. And
the Immigration officers in charge,
they can smell it, see it, but won't
come in the back there or send
someone to fix it. There are pud-
dles of faeces everywhere.

Sometimes after I left for the



day, I poured bleach from head
to toe in the shower. Because I
can't lay beside my wife after
being in there, or play with my
children. My dirty clothes, I used
to leave them outside in the trunk,
and then wash them later.

(1): What is the experience like
for detainees?

(O) It is a detention centre, but
it’s run like a prison. That is not
how it is supposed to be. These
are detainees. These people, you
don’t know what they have been
through. Some of them spent all
their money just to make it to par-
adise. Now they reach paradise,
and they are captured.

Some are just ... like the
Jamaicans, when they come
through the airport they don’t
have anyone to sign for them, and
they don’t have enough money in
their pocket — and that is wrong,
that’s a bunch of foolishness. ’m
a tourist, I come here with $100 in
my pocket and spend a week and
leave. If I overstay my week, of
course put me in the detention
centre, but don’t turn me away at
the airport, or put me in that filth.

I: Jamaican tourists are taken
from the airport to the detention
centre because they don’t have
$100 on them when they get here?

O: They take them if they don’t
have $500 in their pocket. Imme-
diately. They say: “You don’t have
enough to sustain yourself.”

I: Suppose they are staying
with someone here for that week,
and don’t need to buy a hotel
room?

O: They say that person have
to come out to the airport and
sign for them. Or else they take
them to the detention centre.

I: Why do you think conditions
at the centre have deteriorated to
such an extent?

O: The main problem is too
many people with no experience
but high ranks dabbling too much
in the running of the place. It
needs to be managed — not run,
managed. If they want to have a
detention centre, do it the right
way.

See, you have born leaders and
then you have leaders — for them
it’s about power. They believe this
textbook stuff they learn in school
is all they need. But experience
causes you to learn how to deal
with people.

They are not prisoners, they
are detainees.

The officers have to learn not to
aggravate people. They are
already aggravated.

I: What is the food like at the
centre?

O: The food supplied by Social
Services is lousy, it’s unfit for

DETAINEES can be seen at the Immigration Penn Centre on Carmichael Road.



“We have a lot of immature and
unprofessional officers, and it
hurts my heart. What are they
harassing these people for?
There is only so much abuse

people can take.”



human beings. I wouldn’t give it to
a dog.

I: But Minister Branville
McCartney and Immigration
Director Jack Thompson ate
lunch there, and said the food was
good.

O: Mr Thompson and the min-
ister, they are good people, very
good people. I think they get
swing — you remember the song
‘You get swing’? They are being
fooled. Because I've seen the peo-
ple only get water and just a slice
of cheddar cheese between two
slices of dry bread. Breakfast grits
are supposed to be soft. But there,
hard as rock. And the portions
are lousy.

All the meals are late. Plenty of
times I have seen food fresh on
the counter, and the officers
would not come out to open the
gates to feed the people. They
would just sit in the air condition
and not do their job. Sometimes
the garbage was overflowing at
each unit. There were flies every-
where.

And you know what hurts me
so much, because I love kids —
why build a playground if you
won't let the children use it?

I: What is it for, if the children
don't use it?

O: They have it for show, for
show and tell. It's a game. When-
ever visitors come, they let them
play, so everyone thinks every-
thing is all right. It's like the
phones. They put pay phones in
the back there, but they don't let
anyone use them.

I: We now want to ask you
about the allegations of beatings
and other physical abuse at the
centre. Let’s start with the case of
(name withheld) within the last
few years. We were told the
guards broke both his legs and
knocked several of his teeth out.

O: Yes. The guy who broke his
Knees was (officer's name with-
held). We have a lot of immature
and unprofessional officers, and
it hurts my heart. What are they
harassing these people for? There
is only so much abuse people can
take. Leave them alone. Give
them love. Do you know what it
must be to spend a heap of cash to
make it to paradise, and once you
make it, get caught and put in the
detention centre? They have
issues on their mind.

Regardless of whatever the

34 mpg (EPA highway rating

detainees did, the officers are not
magistrates. They only detain
personnel until the magistrate
decides to let them go, make them
pay a fine, or let them buy a tick-
et to leave. That is not up to the
officers. How can they — and they
do this a lot — how can they take
away funds confiscated from
detainees, and keep them or give
them to someone else? That is not
their call. They have no right to
take people's property.

I: Does this happen often?

O: It's just like a flea market.
See, they believe that these people
will just be deported. They don't
realise some of them will get sta-
tus. When they do, it’s like, ‘Oh
your phone? I didn't see it, I don't
know what it looks like’ — playing
stupid.

Some Haitians are taken into
custody with a lot of money and it
disappears. They have a lot
because they may work here for
years, but because they are ille-
gal, they put money under the
mattress, in coffee cans, they bury
it, all over the place, because they
can't open an account. And they
are not extravagant people. They
are like the Chinese, they live
humbly. They just work, feed the
family and save and save and save.

Every time their money goes
missing (after being confiscated),
the officers try and blame indi-
vidual migrants. But no cash ever
is supposed to enter the detention
centre. Whenever you are com-
mitted, your possessions are sup-
posed to be put in an envelope.
The officer is supposed to sign
across the envelope, tape it, let
the individual sign, and it goes in a
safe.

Regardless of if a person is



deported, goes to jail, or is
released, that is his cash. What
some are doing is stealing by
means of employment. And you
are not supposed to get fired, you
are supposed to go to jail for
things like this. And I am
ashamed by what I seen some of
my fellow officers do. It's a crying
shame. Most of them are in
prominent positions who are
doing this foolishness, not the
small man.

I: Can you remember any spe-
cific beatings that took place dur-
ing your time at the centre?

O: I have watched individuals
being snatched up by their clothes.
They would take them in a pri-
vate room, beat them on the bot-
tom of their feet, their stomach,
soft tissue where it wouldn’t show.
But then it got to the point where
they just don’t care no more.
Across the face, across the back.
They just do it in front of every-
one, they just don't care, and its
inhumane.

My parents grew me up a dif-
ferent way. What they are doing is
wrong.

I told you they used to extract
them. But later even if they did
that, it was to a building with win-
dows and no blinds. All the
detainees could see this Gestapo
foolishness going on. What is this,
a prisoner of war camp now?

I watched them beat one so
bad, the guy was on the ground
and moaned and groaned all
night. They took him to the hos-
pital, eventually. It brings tears to
my eyes sometimes. It's not right,
it's not right. I think what the gov-
ernment needs to do is insert

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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

Jackson’s phenomenal
music selling record



a
ae
=







i
= |.
. =: MICHAEL Jackson’s Thriller is the best sell- 1983: "The Girl Is Mine" (with Paul
= : ~ ing album of all time with as many as 109 million McCartney) #2
. s copies sold worldwide. 1983: "Billie Jean" #1
a a Overall he is the third best selling music artist 1983: "Beat It" #1
2 of all time following the Beatles, Elvis Presley 1983: "Wanna Be Startin' Somethin'" #5
~ and Bing Crosby, selling between 500 and 999 1984: "Human Nature" #7
— - million records. 1984: "P.Y.T.” #10
q r 1984: "Say Say Say" (with Paul McCartney) #1
7 i JACKSON’S US NUMBER ONES 1984: "Thriller" #4
eee. Michael Jackson had 13 number one hits on 1985: "We Are The World" #1
wie Zr the Billboard Hot 100 charts, and 1 number one 1987: "I Just Can't Stop Loving You" (with
: collaboration, "Say Say Say", featuring Paul Siedah Garrett) #1
aa id McCartney. 1987: "Bad" #1
1988: "The Way You Make Me Feel" #1
1972: "Ben" (1 week) 1988: "Man In The Mirror" #1
me. +? 1979: "Don't Stop "Til 1988: "Dirty Diana" #1
ie You Get Enough" (1 week) 1989: "Smooth Criminal" #7
al 1980: "Rock with You" (4 weeks) 1991: "Black or White” #1
MICHAEL JACKSON with fan Irva Weech at Cody’s Music and Video Centre, East Bay Street, on June 17, 1996. 1983: "Billie Jean" (7 weeks) 1992: "Remember The Time" #3
1983: "Beat It" (3 weeks) 1992: "In The Closet" #6
e 9 QO ® 1983: "Say Say Say" (6 weeks) 1993: "Will You Be There" #7
M 1C hael Ss mus 1C video Ss 1985: "We Are The World” (4 weeks) (this 1995: "Scream" (with Janet Jackson) #5
track is counted extra officially, considering 1995: "You Are Not Alone" #1
. . : that was credited to USA for Africa). 2001: "You Rock My World” #10
1979 "Man in the Mirror” "Will You Be There” 1987: "I Just Can't Stop Loving You" (with
"Don't Stop ‘til You Get "Another Part of Me" "Gone Too Soon" Siedah Garrett) (1 week)
Enough" oo ea 1987: "Bad" (2 weeks) JACKSON'S US R&B NUMBER ONES
"Rock with You" "Come Together" 1995 an 7 : :
"HIStory T, 7 1987: "The Way You Make Me Feel” (1 Michael Jackson had 13 number one hits on the
y Teaser ;
1980 1989 "Scream" week) ; ; Billboard R&B charts.
"She's Out of My Life" "Leave Me Alone" "Childhood" 1988: " Man in the Mirror" (2 weeks) ;
"Liberian Girl" "You Are Not Alone" 1988: "Dirty Diana" (1 week) 1979: "Don't Stop 'Til You Get Enough" (5
1983 "Earth Song" 1991: "Black or White" (7 weeks) weeks)
"Billie Jean" 199] 1995: "You Are Not Alone" (1 week). 1980: "Rock with You"
"Beat It” "Black or White" 1996 1983: "The Girl Is Mine" (3 weeks)
"Say Say Say" "They Don't Care About Us" MICHAEL JACKSON HAD 29 TOP 10 HITS 1983: "Billie Jean" (9 weeks)
Thriller 1992 "Stranger in Moscow" ON THE BILLBOARD HOT 100 CHARTS. 1983: "Beat It"
"Remember the Time" 1987: "I Just Can't Stop Loving You"
1987 "In the Closet" 1997 * 1971: "Got to Be There" #4 1987: "Bad"
"Bad" "Who Is It" "Blood on the Dance Floor" * 1972: "Rockin Robin" #2 1987: "The Way You Make Me Feel"
“The Way You Make Me ‘Jam " , Ghosts * 1972: "Ben" #1 1988: "Man in the Mirror"
Feel Heal the World rr * 1979: "Don't Stop Till You Get Enough" #1 1988: "Another Part of Me”
1988 1993 "You Rock My World" : ia ' Rock With You "#1 1m: ' Remember the Time"
"Dirty Diana" "Give in to Me" t Cry tt 980: ; Off ‘The Wall" #10 a 1991: "In the Closet ;
* 1980: "She's Out Of My Life" #10 1995: "You Are Not Alone" (4 weeks)



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THE TRIBUNE



Ue TSO) OL Aida Ta Coya sxe) neta nrareut me Music and Video Centre,

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

eniuses whose

influence spans

continents,

age, class and

race are once-
in-a-generation anomalies
whose time with us always
seems too short.

Michael Jackson, perhaps
the most beloved modern
entertainer aside from Elvis
Presley, in my opinion can best
be compared to 15th century
painter and scientist Leonar-
do da Vinci, considered the
most diversely talented person
who ever lived. Both were
innovators, inventors and
artists who not only inspired
and enthralled their contem-
poraries, but who have
become an inspiration to those
who follow.

Like Thomas Edison who
seemed to emulate Da Vinci’s
catalogue of inventions with
his own lengthy list of accom-
plishments, most notably the
electric light bulb, there are a
litany of dancers, singers and
musicians in Jackson’s wake
who have drawn from his jaw-
dropping signature style to
capture their own success.

Jackson burst onto the music
scene as a child prodigy,
fronting the family band the
Jackson Five at age 11, but



spent the earlier years of his
life being shaped by a Sven-
gali-like father hell-bent on
seeing his children capture the
musical success that he could
not.

Born August 28, 1959 to
humble beginnings in Gary,
Indiana, Jackson spent his lost
childhood performing in sleazy
bars and honing his talent until
the band scored a record deal
with Motown Records in 1968.

He launched a solo career
during his years with the Jack-
son Five, scoring such hits as
“Got to Be There” and “Ben”
during the 1970s.

He later paired with notable
producer Quincy Jones for the

Jackson won
VBC
awards

American Music Awards: 22
Billboard Awards: 40

BRIT Awards: 7

Golden Globe Awards: 1
Grammy Awards: 19
Guinness World Records: 13
MTV Awards: 13

NAACP Image Awards: 14
RIAA Awards: 56

World Music Awards: 12

INSIGHT

Michael Jackson: a musical genius

hel
I iD
a: b,

East Bay Street, on June 17, 1996.

album “Off The Wall”,
released in 1979, which
spawned four top 10 hits on
the US music charts and later
sold more than 20 million
copies worldwide.

He reached the pinnacle of
his illustrious career with
1982’s “Thriller”, to date the
most successful album of
all time with upwards of
109 million units sold world-
wide.

The title video of the album
was groundbreaking and
paved the way for black stars
to be showcased on video sta-
tion MTV. Jackson moon-
walked into the hearts of many
during a televised performance

of “Billie Jean” at the Motown
Records 25th anniversary spe-
cial a year later.

On Friday night his brother
Jermaine told Larry King on
the Larry King Live show that
Michael was “unique from day
one.” He had never taken a
dancing or vocal lesson. “It

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THE TRIBUNE



detainees were subjected to horrific abuse

Officer:

FROM page 1C

someone inside there, and get
some info. These animals are not
supposed to be in service.

One time, (another
detainee) couldn’t take it no
more because his girlfriend
was in there. So he jumped
the fence and ended up in the
female barracks. A man is just
aman and he couldn’t take it
anymore. I don’t understand
why, if one of them has a girl-
friend or a wife in there, why
when we have visiting hours,
they can’t be together, like in
any sensible country, right?
But they don't do that. It's not
run professionally. Not even
five per cent of it is profes-
sionally. Anyway, when they
caught him they dragged him
out, they beat him so badly,
he couldn’t walk he couldn’t
wear slippers. All night, all
night they beat him. Just for
seeing his girlfriend, and she
was his; he wasn’t going to
rape no one.



| alee Pe
vee
=

Another was (third
detainee). He is a Bahamian
of Haitian descent. His pass-
port was getting renewed
when they picked him up.
And they beat this man, he
was bleeding all over his face.
He could come in and tell you
that, if you could find him.
They beat this man and this
man was a Bahamian citizen.
And he speaks clear English,
just like us. The man is a con-
tractor, he has people who
work for him, it's not like he's
a man off the street or any-
thing.

I: Are most of the offend-
ers young soldiers?

O: No, some of them are
the oldest officers out there.
Like (second officer, name
withheld) — this Haitian girl,
pregnant, she wasn't walking
fast enough for him. He
punched this woman in the
face, dropped her to the
ground.

Even senior people. (Third

At DLt eels

Ministry Of Public
Works & Transport

NORTH ACKLINS ROAD
REHABILITATION







Tender Publication No.: FIR/207/15/1 (GOB)
EUROPEAID/128742/M/WKS/BS (EU)

The Government of The Bahamas intends to award a works
contract for the rehabilitation of the Queen’s Highway on Acklins.
The works contract consists in the rehabilitation and provision
of periodic maintenance (pavement patching and sealing) for
about 32.3 miles (approx. 52 km) of a two-lane single carriageway
road (Queen’s Highway. About 290,000 square yards of the road
pavement will require patching and sealing maintenance, and
about 100,000 square yards of the road pavement will require the
replacement of the base course layer and the placement of a new

surface seal.

The works are co-financed by the Government of The Bahamas
and the 9th European Development Fund.

The Tender dossier is available for inspection and purchase at

the following address:

Department of Public Works
of the Ministry of Works and Transport,
John F. Kennedy Drive,

1st Floor, East Wing

Nassau, (N.P.), The Bahamas

Tel.: +242-322-4830
Fax: +242-326-7344

Sealed Tender Submissions are to be deposited in the Tender Box

located at:

Tenders Board

Ministry of Finance

3rd Floor

Sir Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre

West Bay Street

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tender submissions will be received no later than 4:00pm, Monday,
24th August, 2009. Any tender received after this deadline will

not be considered.

Tenders are invited to attend the Tender opening at 10am Tuesday,
25th August, 2009 at the Tenders Board.

Possible additional information or clarifications/questions shall

be published on

the

EuropeAid website:

http://ec.ouropa.eu/europeaid/work/funding/index_en.htm
(Select Contracts link) and will be communicated in writing to

all tenderers.

Signed,
PERMANENT SECRETARY

DETAINEES can be seen at the Immigration Detention Centre on Carmichael Road.

officer, name withheld), he
will beat those people to a
pulp. Kick them.

I: Do you think these offi-
cers are just allowed to get
away with the beatings, or has

it become policy to...

O: (Interrupting) That is
not policy. There is a mandate
there; it is against policy to
lay one hand on those people.

I: But the senior officers,

Temple Christian High School
Shirley Street
TEACHING VACANCY

Invites applications from qualified Christian
teachers for the following positions for the
2009 - 2010 School Year.

Health Science/General Science (Gr.7-9)
Language Arts/ (Gr.10-12)

Applicants must:

Be a practicing born-again Christian who is
willing to subscribe to the Statement of Faith of

Temple Christian School.

Have a bachelor’s Degree in Education or higher from a
recognized College or University in the area of

Specialization.

Have a valid Teacher’s Certificate or Diploma.
Have at least two years teaching experience in the
relevant subject area with excellent communication

skills.

Applicants must have the ability to prepare students for
all examinations to the BJC/BGCSE levels.
Be willing to participate in the high school’s extra

curricular programmes.

Applications must be picked up at the High School Office on
Shirley Street and be returned with a full curriculum vitae,
recent coloured photograph and three references to:

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is July 3rd, 2009

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

CULINARY & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE,
INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSES — FALL SEMESTER 2009 - 042009

sec. | CODE

| Bahamian Culsine

| Gourmet Cooking |

Gourmet Cooking Il
Cake & Pastry
Making |

Cake & Pastry
Making Il

| Bread Making

Cake Decorating |

| Cake Decorating Il

BEGINS | ENDS

| Sept.40 | Oct. 22
|
Sep. 7 | Get 19

Gict. 24

DURA THOM

6 weeks

DAYS

| Thursday

| 6 wenks

6 weeks

3380.00

3465.00

SS
| s30000 | x
| ss250 | px

3325.00 | FR.

$375.00 | Px

| ‘Aled rpcariary | AOpen

All fees are included in the price queted above: ew students pay a one-time application fee of SM. (ho REFUNDABLE)

Application Deadline: August 28, 2009 at 4:00 p.m.
For further information or te pick up an application please contact the Industry Training Department of the Culinary & Hospitality
Managemen Institube, 223-5404, J23-hF1M or fax 323-1207,

The t

aliens af the Bahu nenerees the rink fa choape Trtian, Fase, Course Conte, Course Schedule and Course Adfcalerteals



do they want it to happen?

O: Do they want it to hap-
pen? Some of them are there
helping! But not the bosses,
because they are hardly ever
there, they don't do their job.
People are not doing what
they are being paid for. That's
the major problem. Another
thing is that we have strayed
away from discipline. There
is no way that children should
be hungry. There is no way
that Social Services should
cook food, and it's not served
until it’s cold, because officers
are sitting down gossiping, or
on the phone or something.
And these people are hungry.
It brings tears to my eyes, I'm
telling you it’s sickening. At
the end I was sick and tired
of the job.

You know something? The
only way we can end this — I
don't know if it's legal or not,
but they need to put a spy cam
in there or something. Expose
them for what they are. And
print it, and print it, until
something changes.

I: We intend to.

I: There has also been an
allegation that a man was
beaten to death not too long
ago at the centre. We heard
the incident was witnessed by
everybody, and that they kept
beating the body long after
the man was dead.

O: Yes, he was a Haitian
guy. They just kept beating
him with the long batons.
They did it in front everyone.

I: But if he was killed, what
happened to the body? If they
disposed of it, surely the
senior officers must know.
What about top Defence
Force and Immigration offi-
cials?

O: I don't think it goes to
the top. But it was swept
under the rug. Nothing came
out of it.

I: Is that the only time
someone has been killed as
far as you know?

O: Yes, as far as I know.

I: After it happened, were
the officers scared?

O: I guess not. Nothing
changed. That got swept
under the rug. When they
write their reports that's just a
death. The coroner doesn't
investigate.

I: Do the officers drink
when they beat detainees?

O: Some of them don't.
They are just naturally stink.
At least a man who is drink-
ing, he can say he was under
the influence. But they are
just cruel.

You know what else I hat-
ed? We had some very sick
people down there. People
crying. But they are told they
have to wait. They won't call
an ambulance for them. I'm
talking girls in the female
dorms, crying tears and tears.
You know what they tell
them? "Shut up.”

They don't check for the
people down there. Immigra-
tion is lousy. The Defence
Force, some are monsters.

They have an officer down
there named (fourth officer,
name withheld). He beats
them like conch. Sorry to say
it like that, but he beats them
bad. I can remember a couple
of years ago, when people
used to come visit and stand
along the gate, (fourth offi-
cer) came and slapped a Hait-
ian who was visiting. He
popped the chain off his neck
— he didn't take the chain but
he slapped him so hard his
chain popped. There was a big
row inside there. You ran the
pictures.



I: We have also heard sto-
ries about sexual abuse, rapes
by officers at the centre. Do
you know anything about
that?

O: I have watched it plenty
of times. What happens is,
officers come with the key,
“Oh we need to do some
paperwork.” They log in. And
you see them disappear with a
female detainee. To take a girl
out, you have to sign for it.

And they take them out,
and you see them disappear.
They don't take them off the
complex. And hours later,
they come back, all sweaty,
their hair all shaggy. I hear
some of them were paid, or
made deals for food or money
or whatever, because they are
hungry. But the majority of
them were raped. Raped. That
is no big secret in there.

I: What do you think
should be done?

O: There is help needed for
the detention centre. Other-
wise... Tourism is our main
industry. We lose that, we lose
everything. We don't need no
big spy eye coming down from
the United States. We don't
need that. Why wait till that
happens, when we could avoid
it?

I: But it’s not that simple.
As far as we can tell, politi-
cians think that to go down
there, and ask: “Did you beat
anybody? No? All right” is
enough. Investigation done.

O: Thank you very much.
That is it. They walk in, next
thing you know they are all
laughing and talking together
and then they walk out. They
never, hardly ever, come in
the back. Because it stinks. If
they want to talk to a
detainee, they bring him to
the front. They should come
in the back and walk around.

And the bosses? Any time
there is an investigation, it’s
like: Is anything going on?
“No no, what ya'll talking
about? No man, that's only
foolishness, only rumours.”

You know what they say:
Everyone in jail says they are
innocent.

What you (The Tribune)
should do is show up, with the
minister and my prime minis-
ter, Mr Ingraham. Break with
protocol. Don't publicise it,
publicise it after. Hit them
with aggression, and go down
there and see what is going
on.

My prime minister,
Hubiggety, he don't play. The
PLP was a sweep under the
carpet government. But my
boss, my prime minister, Mr
Ingraham, Hubert Alexander,
and Mr Symonette, if they
know the facts, they will make
sure someone goes down.

Another thing is, you know
what the song says: “Who you
workin’ for? The government
dem. When you going to
work? When I ready.” Let
Social Services do what it is
supposed to do — direct the
job from the office. Let's hire
a private company to go in
there and make sure those
nice people eat properly, that
those kids are healthy.

And they have no proper
medical screening down there.
There has been tuberculosis
and other diseases. Think
about it — you have Immigra-
tion officers down there,
Defence Force officers. If they
get sick and go home, the
whole of Nassau can end up
with the same outbreak.

We are gonna lose our
country. Y'all have to do
something.



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 5C



Michael Jackson:
a musical genius

FROM page 3C

was natural, man” said Jer-
maine.

In the 1990s Jackson
dominated the music indus-
try and spawned a cult-like
fan following and two
albums of new material, but
with the unparalleled suc-
cess came intense scrutiny,
a series of botched plastic
surgeries, bizarre antics,
the allegations of child
molestation and an eventu-
al fall from grace that
placed the King of Pop on
the receiving end of
ridicule.

His 2001 offering of
“Invincible” was met with
dismal sales and a luke-
warm reception.

In 2005, he was tried and
acquitted of charges of
child molestation, conspir-
acy and alcohol charges
which could have landed
him in prison for nearly 20
years. The trial — and the
eccentric lifestyle it
exposed — tarnished Jack-
son’s image and took a
heavy toll on him emotion-
ally, physically and finan-
cially.

The father of three who
once made fans faint at first
sight spent the last years of
his life as a recluse, shroud-
ed in isolation. He was left
a Shell of his former self,
but many supporters held
out hope that he would
catch hold of an elusive
comeback.

But it seems the sudden
death of the larger-than-life
icon has given the mysteri-
ous star what he craved —
and some would say
deserved as the most influ-
ential artist of our time — a
resurgence of adulation
bordering on deity-like
worship. The man who pio-
neered the music video
over 20 years ago is now
once again on heavy rota-
tion on major music video
stations like MTV and VH1
— who broke away from
their normal programming
to pay homage to the leg-
end.

His death was felt the
world over; social network-
ing sites were buzzing with

the news of his death, and
countless celebrities
mourned the loss.

"We have lost a genius
and a true ambassador of
not only Pop music but of
all music," Justin Timber-
lake, whose music shows a
direct influence from Jack-
son, posted on his personal
Web site. "He has been an
inspiration to multiple gen-
erations, and I will always
cherish the moments I
shared with him on stage
and all of the things I
learned about music from
him and the time we spent
together. My heart goes out
to his family and loved
ones."

"I can't stop crying over
the sad news. I have always
admired Michael Jackson.
The world has lost one of
the greats, but his music
will live on forever! My
heart goes out to his three
children and other mem-
bers of his family,” said a
statement released by
Madonna.

His ex-wife Lisa Marie
Presley, who was married
to Jackson from 1994 to
1996, said, "I am so very
sad and confused with
every emotion possible. I
am heartbroken for his

INSIGHT

children, who I know were
everything to him, and for
his family. This is such a
massive loss on so many
levels, words fail me."

His death came weeks
before a highly anticipated
tour throughout London,
billed as the comeback that
would thrust the reclusive
singer back to the forefront
of popular music. But at
age 50, and 12 years since
his last tour, sceptics won-
dered if Jackson would be
able to recapture the pre-
cise dance moves that mes-
merised the world during
his heyday 20 years ago.
Now the world will never
know if Jackson would
have reclaimed his rele-
vance in today’s ever shift-
ing music scene. But his
fans have his flawless body
of work to turn to and
remember why Jackson is
indeed, the King of Pop.

A controversial figure,
Jackson will be remem-
bered as a paradox, a "man
boy” in the words of
estranged friend and for-
mer Beatle, Sir Paul
McCartney, a recluse, musi-
cal genius, philanthropist
and perhaps the most inspi-
rational figure in modern
music history.

| J [ “ LS A 7)
Lee as
-

@)) THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

Sidney Poitier International Conference

and Film Festival

Nassau, The Bahamas, February 23-27, 2010

CALL FOR PAPERS

Deadline for Submissions: July 31, 2009

The College of the Bahamas presents the Sidney Poitier International Conference and Film
Festival. We invite critics, historians, filmmakers, artists and cultural practitioners from around
the world to examine the artistic and social endeavours of acclaimed actor, director, author, and

diplomat Sir Sidney Poitier, who turns 83 on February 20, 2010.

We invite papers or panel presentations that explore the broad spectrum of critical issues sum-
moned up by Poitier’s work as actor, director, and author. Presentations should be 20 minutes
in length. Papers will be considered for publication in an upcoming scholarly text dedicated

to Poitier’s work.

Possible Panel and Paper Topics Include (but are not limited to):
Caribbean Sense and Sensibilities in American Cinema
Constructions of Blackness in Poitier’s Films
Representations of Women in Poitier’s Films

The Iconic Black Male in America

Black Skin, White Masks

Poitier and the White/Black Gaze
Poitier and the Global Politics of Race and Liberation
Poitier, Bahamian Politics and Identity

Sexing the Asexual

Black Christs and the White Conscience
Desire, Sexuality and Transgression

Poitier and Censorship
Poitier in the Classroom
The Actor as Activist
Poitier and Film Theory

Poitier and the Black Power Movement

Poitier and the Digital Age

Autobiography and Refashioning

Poitier as Director
Poitier as Writer

Please send abstracts via email to: istrachan @ cob.edu.bs.
Abstracts should be submitted by July 31, 2009, and should be no longer than 250 words.

For more information on the conference please go to:http://poitierconference.synthasite.com/.

For any questions feel free to contact Ian Strachan at istrachan@cob.edu.bs, or Marjorie
Brooks-Jones at mjones @cob.edu.bs or call the School of English Studies at (242) 302-4381.





































































ORD ie) Bales
THE RIGHT TO BE

Ai Ce) em lm
Stop the Tears
Stop the ABUSE

National Child Protection Council
ree eeeL Re i t |
- > ee

OD eid clean

“T ensure that vital
equipment around the
hospital are in perfect
working condition
according to Strict
specifications,
ensuring that you and
your family receive
safe and comfortable
treatment, each and
every time.. ”

Benjamin Forbes, Associate
Engineering Technician

We Welcome you

to be a part of our WOW service team.

ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN

Qualifications
* Graduate of BTVI technical program;
* Previous experience with basic electrical and plumbing duties;
¢ Ability to troubleshoot machines and servicing of machines
related to Healthcare services
Excellent oral and written communication skills;
Good customer service/organizational skills
Ability to work independently

The successful Candidate will:
Maintain the hospital environment in a state of the art condition;
Perform basic repairs and service of machines; Be responsible for the

general upkeep of the hospital and extending buildings.

Excellent benefits | Salary commensurate with experience


Health For Life

Please submit resume to: Human Resources Department | Doctors Hospital
P.O. Box N-3018 | | Nassau, Bahamas | or Email: nwatkins@doctorshosp.com

w w w octorshosp.com



THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST

i

TAMPA
High: 91° F/33° C
Low: 78° F/26° C
@ i

a

J
Fi
é

a
r

&

KEY WEST
High: 87° F/31°C
Low: 79° F/26° C

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's

ORLANDO |
_ High:92° F/33°C a:
Low: 75°F/24°C
@

cw,

highs and tonights's lows.

FT. LAUDERDALE



“i

ABACO
High: 91° F/33°C

— Low: 82° F/28°C
e”,

@ WEST PALM BEACH
High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 73° F/23°C

FREEPORT
High: 90° F/32°C

High: 88°F/31°C
Low: 80° F/27°C

Low: 74° F/23°C

@
MIAMI
” High: 90° F/32°C

Low: 77° F/25° C NASSAU

cm a
ANDROS %

High: 95° F/35° C
Low: 82° F/28° C



High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 79° F/26° C

e~

e~

=a Partly sunny with a Partly cloudy, a Partly sunny, a Partly sunny, a Mostly sunny.
” thunderstorm. t-storm; breezy. t-storm; breezy. t-storm possible.
ist | High: 91° High: 91° High: 90°
F High: 91° Low: 79° Low: 79° Low: 79° Low: 79°
r PETE
f 98°-88° F 98°-89° F 98°-86° F

=

Partly sunny, a
t-storm possible.





The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
Temperature

Normal high ....

Normal low
Last year's high
Last year's low

Today

High Low W High

F/C F/C F/C
Albuquerque 90/32 67/19 c 91/32
Anchorage 70/21 5442 pe 71/21
Atlanta 92/33 66/18 pe 90/82
Atlantic City 86/30 63/17 pc 82/27
Baltimore 86/30 64/117 pce 82/27
Boston 72/22 6146 sh 75/23
Buffalo 73/22 59/115 t 65/18
Charleston, SC 95/35 74/23 t 93/33
Chicago 80/26 60/15 t 71/21
Cleveland 77/25 60/15 t 67/19
Dallas 95/35 68/20 t 95/35
Denver 92/33 58/14 t 93/33
Detroit 76/24 55/12 t 69/20
Honolulu 88/31 73/22 pce 87/30
Houston 97/36 77/25 t 97/36

Tuesday

Low

F/C
66/18
55/12
65/18
62/16
64/17
63/17
56/13
70/21
57/13
56/13
70/21
60/15
55/12
73/22
74/23

Ww

— Of +t O° Cc ee Cte st eo

oO

3

oO

Today Tuesday Today
High Low W High Low W High Low W

F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C
Indianapolis 82/27 59/15 t 76/24 57/13 pe Philadelphia 83/28 68/20 p
Jacksonville 94/34 74/23 t 91/382 71/21 t Phoenix 106/41 35/29 t
Kansas City 89/31 65/18 s 89/31 66/18 s Pittsburgh 77/25 59/15 t
Las Vegas 106/41 80/26 s 105/40 83/28 pc Portland, OR 78/25 54/12 $s
Little Rock 92/33 66/18 s 97/36 68/20 s Raleigh-Durham 93/33 65/18 s
Los Angeles 82/27 66/18 pc 81/27 64/17 pc St. Louis 88/31 66/18 s
Louisville 87/30 65/18 $s 82/27 62/16 pc Salt Lake City 93/83 65/18 s
Memphis 91/32 69/20 s 93/33 69/20 s San Antonio 99/37 74/23 pc
Miami 90/32 77/25 t 88/31 77/25 t San Diego 75/23 66/18 pc
Minneapolis 77/25 59/15 pe 79/26 60/15 pc San Francisco 76/24 55/12 pc
Nashville 87/30 63/17 $s 88/31 64/17 $s Seattle 73/22 52/11 s
New Orleans 94/34 76/24 t 94/34 75/23 t Tallahassee 96/35 74/23 t
New York 84/28 67/119 c 81/27 69/20 t Tampa 91/32 78/25 t
Oklahoma City 92/33 66/18 pc 93/83 68/20 s Tucson 96/35 76/24 t
Orlando 92/33 75/23 t 89/31 74/23 t Washington, DC 87/30 67/19 s

High
F/C
82/27
106/41
67/19
78/25
93/33
84/28
96/35
93/33
76/24
74/23
73/22
95/35
838/31
101/38
84/28

Precipitation Suntise...... 6:23 a.m. Moonrise .... 1:29 p.m.
As of 2 p.m. yesterday .....cccccscssssssscsssssseeeen 0.00" Sunset....... 8:04 p.m. Moonset .... 12:36 a.m.
Year to date 7. i
Normal year to date 0... cccceccceseeceneee 17.95" First Full /_ New
AccuWeather.com ae mi eh
Forecasts and graphics provided by . a: ay
ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jun. 29 Jul. 7 Jul. 15 Jul. 21
High: 94° F/34° C
Low: 80° F/27°C
cA
al J: CATISLAND
High: 88° F/31°C
Low: 75° F/24°C
ort
all
GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR
High: 90° F/32°C High: 91° F/33° C
Low:77° F/25° C Low: 76° F/24° c
cA &
, (ail )
ee HX
LONGISLAND
High: 91°F/33°C
Low: 76° F/24° C ‘
Tuesday a MAYAGUANA
low W ie , High: 91° F/33° C
F/C ey Low: 75° F/24°C
66/18 t
De CROOKED ISLAND /ACKLINS
si2 t = RAGGEDISLAND [or sreronec
53/1 s High: 90° F/32° C OW:
65/18 s tp 73° F/23°C
64/17 s ow: oe
ae GREAT INAGUA
66/18 pe High: 91° F/33°C
55/12 pc Low: 77° F/25° C
51/10 s
68/20 t = *
78/25 t
78/25 t “YT
65/18 pc



Aiea, 86° F/30° C

81° F/27° C
87° F/31° C
74° F/24° C

ress 91° F/33° C
diets 79° F/26° C



AY rn NY

o|1|2

LOW



The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the

3|4[5

MODERATE



[alah

HIGH |



\. HIGH

greater the need for eye and skin protection.

ea Posy

Low _Ht. (ft

Thursday 4°
ursday 54







High: 90°
Low: 80°
AccuWeather RealFeel
98°-85° F High

Tod 1:46 a.m.
= 2:24 p.m.
Tuesd 2:44 a.m.
Uae 3:23 p.m.
Wednesday? >> a

39 a.m.
5 p.m.

Ht. (ft.

25
28

24
28

2.2
2.8

2.2
28

7:53 a.m.
8:40 p.m.

8:46 a.m.
9:41 p.m.

9:39 a.m.

10:41 p.m.

10:33 a.m.
11:36 p.m.

0.0
0.2

0.1
0.3

0.1
0.3

0.2
0.3





|

ith An is

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
88/31
78/25
79/26
85/29
57/13
93/33
86/30
80/26
95/35
86/30
81/27
82/27
82/27
64/17
80/26
86/30
55/12
100/37
93/33
69/20
91/32
82/27
84/28
75/23
68/20
84/28
82/27
62/16
87/30
72/22
838/31
117/47
88/31
83/28
58/14
838/31
71/21
82/27
90/32
91/32
74/23
102/38
72/22
75/23
77/25
80/26
106/41
83/28
89/31
82/27
78/25
111/43
82/27
838/31
62/16
83/28
54/12
86/30
74/23
86/30
75/23
68/20
95/35
77/25
74/23
91/32
67/19
79/26
87/30
66/18

ii

Today

Low
F/C
75/23
59/15
55/12
70/21
43/8
79/26
77/25
69/20
70/21
73/22
67/19
67/19
73/22
46/7
61/16
68/20
47/8
75/23
81/27
43/8
73/22
71/21
63/17
65/18
52/11
70/21
59/15
53/11
5/28
55/12
81/27
85/29
72/22
61/16
33/0
79/26
ale
64/17
61/16
79/26
56/13
76/24
63/17
52/11
60/15
56/13
88/31
60/15
65/18
61/16
69/20
88/31
66/18
78/25







=

oO

|) hac Gee See tec fe

oO

oO

nnD
i —

wn
—

31/0 s

73/22

37/2
73/22
59/15
68/20
59/15
52/11
80/26
70/21
61/16
66/18
52/11
69/20
65/18
52/11

oO Bao men ga Beet
oO on oO

ae fn me

Ss

High
F/C
89/31
76/24
82/27
86/30
55/12
91/32
86/30
81/27
95/35
80/26
87/30
81/27
82/27
65/18
81/27
92/33
59/15
105/40
95/35
66/18
89/31
81/27
81/27
78/25
68/20
84/28
83/28
60/15
89/31
68/20
90/32
114/45
90/32
88/31
56/13
88/31
69/20
82/27
97/36
90/32
73/22
105/40
73/22
73/22
81/27
76/24
102/38
77/25
88/31
84/28
84/28
104/40
84/28
88/31
62/16
82/27
48/8
85/29
74/23
86/30
72/22
70/21
93/33
81/27
67/19
88/31
69/20
82/27
88/31
69/20

Tuesday

Low
F/C
77/25
60/15
57/13
70/21
46/7
79/26
78/25
69/20
72/22
75/23
69/20
68/20
70/21
45/7
63/17
69/20
44/6
74/23
81/27
46/7
M5123
71/21
66/18
64/17
54/12
67/19
58/14
54/12
5/28
52/11
81/27
82/27
71/21
63/17
38/3
78/25
58/14
63/17
68/20
77/25
56/13
75/23
63/17
50/10
60/15
54/12
82/27
58/14
64/17
63/17
71/21
80/26
68/20
79/26
33/0
73/22
39/3
74/23
57/13
64/17
54/12
54/12
79/26
72/22
60/15
64/17
53/11
69/20
66/18
52/11

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storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace

MONDAY, JUNE 29th, 2009, PAGE 7C



INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Marine FORECAST

WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SW at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-15 Miles 82° F
Tuesday: SW at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-15 Miles 82° F
FREEPORT Today: SW at 10-15 Knots 2-3 Feet 5-15 Miles 81°F
Tuesday: SW at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
ABACO Today: SW at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
Tuesday: SW at 7-14 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F



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91/59,

Denver
92/58

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BREEZY
Kansas City;
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82/66





Showers
T-storms







Rain Fronts
[x4 Elumies Shown are noon positions of weather systems and =

PKK] Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm iit
[v=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Mengumfi-
10s Os [/0s/ 10s 20s [305i] 40s (50s Gos 70s (80s [S0s//i00SI iis]



bon gy

Blown
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_ Or you_can rest easy knowing
that you have excellent insurance
coverage no matter which
way the wind blows.

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PAGE 8C, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



Father doubts concert
stress sickened Jackson

mg By NEKESA MUMBI MOODY
AP Music Writer

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The father
of Michael Jackson says he does not
believe stress over the intense series
of concerts the King of Pop planned for
his comeback led to his death.

Joe Jackson also said in an interview
airing Sunday that he believes his son
will be larger in death than he was in
life. The patriarch of the Jackson 5 said
he wished Michael Jackson were
around to see the outpouring of affec-
tion since his death.

“Michael was the biggest superstar in
the world and in history,” Joe Jackson
told Fox News Channel’s “Geraldo at
Large.” “He was loved by everybody,
whether poor or wealthy or whatever
may be.”

Michael Jackson was to begin a
strenuous series of 50 concerts in Lon-
don in July.

Three days after the pop icon died,
celebrities descended on Los Angeles
for what promised to be a spectacular
celebration of Jackson’s life at the
annual BET awards show.

Media requests for the Sunday night
show doubled following the death, and
the red carpet was lengthened. It was
not immediately clear whether any
members of the Jackson family, who



JOE JACKSON (far right), father of the late pop star Michael Jackson, speaks with Rev
Jesse Jackson (far left) and his son Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr outside the Jackson family home
in the Encino neighbourhood of Los Angeles on Friday...

gathered at their Encino compound
over the weekend, planned to take
part.

Previously announced performers
including Beyonce and Ne-Yo, were
working to overhaul performances they
had planned for weeks so they could
honor Jackson. Other stars who had

(AP Photo: Jason Redmond)

not planned to attend, including Usher
and Justin Timberlake, tried to catch
last-minute flights, producers said.

On Saturday, the cardiologist who
was with Jackson during his final
moments sat down with investigators
for three hours. His spokeswoman said
he is not a suspect in the death.

Dr. Conrad Murray “helped identify
the circumstances around the death of
the pop icon and clarified some incon-
sistencies,” spokeswoman Miranda
Sevcik said. She said the doctor
remains “a witness to this tragedy.”

Police confirmed they had inter-
viewed Murray and said he was coop-
erative.

Meanwhile, Jackson’s mother select-
ed a lawyer who represented Jackson
last year in a breach-of-contract suit
and has advised other high-profile
clients to help the family, said a person
who requested anonymity because the
matter is private.

The legal move came as the Rev.
Jesse Jackson revealed that Michael
Jackson’s family wants a second, pri-
vate autopsy of the pop superstar
because of unanswered questions
about how he died.

“It’s abnormal,” Jesse Jackson said
from Chicago a day after visiting the
Jackson family. “We don’t know what
happened. Was he injected and with
what? All reasonable doubt should be
addressed.”

People close to Jackson have said
since his death that they were con-
cerned about his use of painkillers. Los
Angeles County medical examiners
completed their autopsy Friday and
said Jackson had taken prescription

medication.

Medical officials also said there was
no indication of trauma or foul play.
An official cause of death could take
weeks to determine.

There was no word from the Jackson
family on funeral plans. Many of Jack-
son’s relatives have gathered at the
family’s Encino compound, caring
there for Jackson’s three children.

It remains unclear whom Jackson
designated as potential guardians for
his children. Those details, likely con-
tained in the 50-year-old singer’s will,
have not been released.

An attorney for Deborah Rowe, the
mother of Jackson’s two oldest chil-
dren, issued a statement Saturday ask-
ing that the Jackson family “be able
to say goodbye to their loved one in
peace.”

A White House adviser said on
NBC’s “Meet the Press” that Presi-
dent Barack Obama had written to the
Jackson family to express his condo-
lences.

¢ Associated Press writers Anthony
McCartney; Sophia Tareen in Chica-
go; Juan A. Lozano in Houston; and
Gillian Flaccus, Brooke Donald, Beth
Harris and Mike Blood and AP Glob-
al Media Services Production Manager
Nico Maounis in Los Angeles con-
tributed to this report





Full Text



PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K WEATHER SUNNY, T-STORM HIGH 91F LOW 79F SEEINSIGHTFRONTPAGE S P O R T S Officer makes Detention Centre allegations SEEPAGEFIFTEEN ‘Fireman’ too hot to handle By TANEKA THOMPSON and DENISE MAYCOCKT ribune Staff Reporters POLICE are probing the horror death of a man found bound, gagged and hangedf rom a tree by a car seat belt. While there were “no signs of injuries” to his body, offi cers are treating the death as suspicious. A ccording to investigators, a male resident of Johnson Road, in the Fox Hill area of Nassau, found the hanged man around 3.25 pm on Sat-u rday in bushes near his home. Supt Elsworth Moss, head o f the Central Detective Unit, said: "On arrival at the scene, police observed a man hangedf rom a tree with what appeared to be a car seat belt a round his neck, his hands tied behind his back and he appeared to be gagged with aw hite cloth around his mouth." Mr Moss said the man, whose identity was not released, had "no visiblei njuries" to his body. And while the circums tances surroundng his death The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR BBQ CHIPOTLE SNACK WRAP www.tribune242.com I N S I G H T C M Y K C M Y K T h e T r i b u n e I N S I G H T M O N D A Y , J U N E 2 9 , 2 0 0 9 T h e s t o r i e s b e h i n d t h e n e w s B y I N S I G H T T E A M FO R y e a r s , t h e I m m i g r a t i o n D e t e n t i o n C e n t r e o n C a r m i c h a e l R o a d h a s b e e n t h e s u b j e c t o f a l l e g a t i o n s o f d e t a i n e e a b u s e a n d i n h u m a n e c o n d i t i o n s . S u c c e s s i v e g o v e r n m e n t s h a v e p r o m i s e d t o i n v e s t i g a t e a n d f r o m t i m e t o t i m e a f e w c h a n g e s h a v e b e e n i n s t i t u t e d , b u t f o r m e r d e t a i n e e s s a y t h e s e a r e u s u a l l y c o s m e t i c a n d s h o r t l i v e d . A f e w m o n t h s a g o , u n d e r i n t e n s e p u b l i c i t y , t h e I m m i g r a t i o n D e p a r t m e n t a n n o u n c e d y e t a n o t h e r i n q u i r y , a n d a f a c t f i n d i n g t e a m c o m p o s e d o f g o v e r n m e n t o f f i c i a l s , s o c i a l w o r k e r s a n d p s y c h o l o g i s t s v i s i t e d t h e c e n t r e . T h e r e s u l t i n g r e p o r t h a s y e t t o b e m a d e p u b l i c , b u t t h o s e w e l l a c q u a i n t e d w i t h t h e m a t t e r d o u b t i t w i l l a d m i t t o f i n d i n g a n y e v i d e n c e o f c r u e l t y o r v i o l e n c e . H i s t o r y s e e m s t o s u p p o r t t h i s v i e w : D u r i n g t h e f a c i l i t y ' s m o r e t h a n t w o d e c a d e s i n o p e r a t i o n , a n d d e s p i t e c o u n t l e s s a l l e g a t i o n s , n o t a s i n g l e p u b l i c i s e d i n s t a n c e o f b e a t i n g , t o r t u r e , o r s e x u a l a b u s e h a s b e e n a c k n o w l e d g e d b y B a h a m i a n a u t h o r i t i e s . Y e t , a c c o r d i n g t o a s e n i o r o f f i c e r f o r m e r l y s t a t i o n e d a t t h e c e n t r e , d e t a i n e e s a r e r o u t i n e l y s u b j e c t e d t o t h e m o s t h o r r i f i c a b u s e s w h i c h t a k e p l a c e r i g h t u n d e r t h e n o s e s o f t h e a d m i n i s t r a t o r s , w h o a r e o f t e n t o o d i s i n t e r e s t e d t o n o t i c e . A s t h e I m m i g r a t i o n D e p a r t m e n t p r e p a r e s t o a n n o u n c e y e t a n o t h e r p l a n t o i m p r o v e c o n d i t i o n s f o r d e t a i n e e s , t h e o f f i c e r b r e a k s h i s s i l e n c e f o r t h e f i r s t t i m e i n a n e x c l u s i v e i n t e r v i e w w i t h I n s i g h t . T h e t e x t o f t h i s i n t e r v i e w h a s b e e n e d i t e d f o r c o n t i n u i t y a n d t o p r o t e c t t h e i d e n t i t y o f t h e i n d i v i d u a l s m e n t i o n e d . I n s i g h t ( I ) : O v e r t h e y e a r s , t h e r e h a v e b e e n c o u n t l e s s a l l e g a t i o n s a b o u t w h a t g o e s o n a t t h e C a r m i c h a e l R o a d D e t e n t i o n C e n t r e , b u t j o u r n a l i s t s h a v e n o t b e e n a l l o w e d i n t o s e e f o r t h e m s e l v e s . H o w w o u l d y o u d e s c r i b e c o n d i t i o n s a t t h e c e n t r e d u r i n g t h e t i m e y o u w e r e t h e r e ? O f f i c e r ( O ) : I t w a s p o o r , i t w a s a n i n s u l t . I t ' s i n h u m a n e h o w t h e p l a c e i s r u n . T h e r e i s s e w a g e e v e r y w h e r e . P i l e s o f g a r b a g e . A n d t h e I m m i g r a t i o n o f f i c e r s i n c h a r g e , t h e y c a n s m e l l i t , s e e i t , b u t w o n ' t c o m e i n t h e b a c k t h e r e o r s e n d s o m e o n e t o f i x i t . T h e r e a r e p u d d l e s o f f a e c e s e v e r y w h e r e . S o m e t i m e s a f t e r I l e f t f o r t h e d a y , I p o u r e d b l e a c h f r o m h e a d t o t o e i n t h e s h o w e r . B e c a u s e I c a n ' t l a y b e s i d e m y w i f e a f t e r b e i n g i n t h e r e , o r p l a y w i t h m y c h i l d r e n . M y d i r t y c l o t h e s , I u s e d t o l e a v e t h e m o u t s i d e i n t h e t r u n k , a n d t h e n w a s h t h e m l a t e r . ( I ) : W h a t i s t h e e x p e r i e n c e l i k e f o r d e t a i n e e s ? ( O ) I t i s a d e t e n t i o n c e n t r e , b u t i t s r u n l i k e a p r i s o n . T h a t i s n o t h o w i t i s s u p p o s e d t o b e . T h e s e a r e d e t a i n e e s . T h e s e p e o p l e , y o u d o n t k n o w w h a t t h e y h a v e b e e n t h r o u g h . S o m e o f t h e m s p e n t a l l t h e i r m o n e y j u s t t o m a k e i t t o p a r a d i s e . N o w t h e y r e a c h p a r a d i s e , a n d t h e y a r e c a p t u r e d . S o m e a r e j u s t l i k e t h e J a m a i c a n s , w h e n t h e y c o m e t h r o u g h t h e a i r p o r t t h e y d o n t h a v e a n y o n e t o s i g n f o r t h e m , a n d t h e y d o n t h a v e e n o u g h m o n e y i n t h e i r p o c k e t a n d t h a t i s w r o n g , t h a t s a b u n c h o f f o o l i s h n e s s . I m a t o u r i s t , I c o m e h e r e w i t h $ 1 0 0 i n m y p o c k e t a n d s p e n d a w e e k a n d l e a v e . I f I o v e r s t a y m y w e e k , o f c o u r s e p u t m e i n t h e d e t e n t i o n c e n t r e , b u t d o n t t u r n m e a w a y a t t h e a i r p o r t , o r p u t m e i n t h a t f i l t h . I : J a m a i c a n t o u r i s t s a r e t a k e n f r o m t h e a i r p o r t t o t h e d e t e n t i o n c e n t r e b e c a u s e t h e y d o n t h a v e $ 1 0 0 o n t h e m w h e n t h e y g e t h e r e ? O : T h e y t a k e t h e m i f t h e y d o n t h a v e $ 5 0 0 i n t h e i r p o c k e t . I m m e d i a t e l y . T h e y s a y : Y o u d o n t h a v e e n o u g h t o s u s t a i n y o u r s e l f . I : S u p p o s e t h e y a r e s t a y i n g w i t h s o m e o n e h e r e f o r t h a t w e e k , a n d d o n t n e e d t o b u y a h o t e l r o o m ? O : T h e y s a y t h a t p e r s o n h a v e t o c o m e o u t t o t h e a i r p o r t a n d s i g n f o r t h e m . O r e l s e t h e y t a k e t h e m t o t h e d e t e n t i o n c e n t r e . I : W h y d o y o u t h i n k c o n d i t i o n s a t t h e c e n t r e h a v e d e t e r i o r a t e d t o s u c h a n e x t e n t ? O : T h e m a i n p r o b l e m i s t o o m a n y p e o p l e w i t h n o e x p e r i e n c e b u t h i g h r a n k s d a b b l i n g t o o m u c h i n t h e r u n n i n g o f t h e p l a c e . I t n e e d s t o b e m a n a g e d n o t r u n , m a n a g e d . I f t h e y w a n t t o h a v e a d e t e n t i o n c e n t r e , d o i t t h e r i g h t w a y . S e e , y o u h a v e b o r n l e a d e r s a n d t h e n y o u h a v e l e a d e r s f o r t h e m i t s a b o u t p o w e r . T h e y b e l i e v e t h i s t e x t b o o k s t u f f t h e y l e a r n i n s c h o o l i s a l l t h e y n e e d . B u t e x p e r i e n c e c a u s e s y o u t o l e a r n h o w t o d e a l w i t h p e o p l e . T h e y a r e n o t p r i s o n e r s , t h e y a r e d e t a i n e e s . T h e o f f i c e r s h a v e t o l e a r n n o t t o a g g r a v a t e p e o p l e . T h e y a r e a l r e a d y a g g r a v a t e d . I : W h a t i s t h e f o o d l i k e a t t h e c e n t r e ? O : T h e f o o d s u p p l i e d b y S o c i a l S e r v i c e s i s l o u s y , i t s u n f i t f o r h u m a n b e i n g s . I w o u l d n t g i v e i t t o a d o g . I : B u t M i n i s t e r B r a n v i l l e M c C a r t n e y a n d I m m i g r a t i o n D i r e c t o r J a c k T h o m p s o n a t e l u n c h t h e r e , a n d s a i d t h e f o o d w a s g o o d . O : M r T h o m p s o n a n d t h e m i n i s t e r , t h e y a r e g o o d p e o p l e , v e r y g o o d p e o p l e . I t h i n k t h e y g e t s w i n g y o u r e m e m b e r t h e s o n g Y o u g e t s w i n g ? T h e y a r e b e i n g f o o l e d . B e c a u s e I ' v e s e e n t h e p e o p l e o n l y g e t w a t e r a n d j u s t a s l i c e o f c h e d d a r c h e e s e b e t w e e n t w o s l i c e s o f d r y b r e a d . B r e a k f a s t g r i t s a r e s u p p o s e d t o b e s o f t . B u t t h e r e , h a r d a s r o c k . A n d t h e p o r t i o n s a r e l o u s y . A l l t h e m e a l s a r e l a t e . P l e n t y o f t i m e s I h a v e s e e n f o o d f r e s h o n t h e c o u n t e r , a n d t h e o f f i c e r s w o u l d n o t c o m e o u t t o o p e n t h e g a t e s t o f e e d t h e p e o p l e . T h e y w o u l d j u s t s i t i n t h e a i r c o n d i t i o n a n d n o t d o t h e i r j o b . S o m e t i m e s t h e g a r b a g e w a s o v e r f l o w i n g a t e a c h u n i t . T h e r e w e r e f l i e s e v e r y w h e r e . A n d y o u k n o w w h a t h u r t s m e s o m u c h , b e c a u s e I l o v e k i d s w h y b u i l d a p l a y g r o u n d i f y o u w o n t l e t t h e c h i l d r e n u s e i t ? I : W h a t i s i t f o r , i f t h e c h i l d r e n d o n ' t u s e i t ? O : T h e y h a v e i t f o r s h o w , f o r s h o w a n d t e l l . I t ' s a g a m e . W h e n e v e r v i s i t o r s c o m e , t h e y l e t t h e m p l a y , s o e v e r y o n e t h i n k s e v e r y t h i n g i s a l l r i g h t . I t ' s l i k e t h e p h o n e s . T h e y p u t p a y p h o n e s i n t h e b a c k t h e r e , b u t t h e y d o n ' t l e t a n y o n e u s e t h e m . I : W e n o w w a n t t o a s k y o u a b o u t t h e a l l e g a t i o n s o f b e a t i n g s a n d o t h e r p h y s i c a l a b u s e a t t h e c e n t r e . L e t s s t a r t w i t h t h e c a s e o f ( n a m e w i t h h e l d ) w i t h i n t h e l a s t f e w y e a r s . W e w e r e t o l d t h e g u a r d s b r o k e b o t h h i s l e g s a n d k n o c k e d s e v e r a l o f h i s t e e t h o u t . O : Y e s . T h e g u y w h o b r o k e h i s k n e e s w a s ( o f f i c e r ' s n a m e w i t h h e l d ) . W e h a v e a l o t o f i m m a t u r e a n d u n p r o f e s s i o n a l o f f i c e r s , a n d i t h u r t s m y h e a r t . W h a t a r e t h e y h a r a s s i n g t h e s e p e o p l e f o r ? T h e r e i s o n l y s o m u c h a b u s e p e o p l e c a n t a k e . L e a v e t h e m a l o n e . G i v e t h e m l o v e . D o y o u k n o w w h a t i t m u s t b e t o s p e n d a h e a p o f c a s h t o m a k e i t t o p a r a d i s e , a n d o n c e y o u m a k e i t , g e t c a u g h t a n d p u t i n t h e d e t e n t i o n c e n t r e ? T h e y h a v e i s s u e s o n t h e i r m i n d . R e g a r d l e s s o f w h a t e v e r t h e d e t a i n e e s d i d , t h e o f f i c e r s a r e n o t m a g i s t r a t e s . T h e y o n l y d e t a i n p e r s o n n e l u n t i l t h e m a g i s t r a t e d e c i d e s t o l e t t h e m g o , m a k e t h e m p a y a f i n e , o r l e t t h e m b u y a t i c k e t t o l e a v e . T h a t i s n o t u p t o t h e o f f i c e r s . H o w c a n t h e y a n d t h e y d o t h i s a l o t h o w c a n t h e y t a k e a w a y f u n d s c o n f i s c a t e d f r o m d e t a i n e e s , a n d k e e p t h e m o r g i v e t h e m t o s o m e o n e e l s e ? T h a t i s n o t t h e i r c a l l . T h e y h a v e n o r i g h t t o t a k e p e o p l e ' s p r o p e r t y . I : D o e s t h i s h a p p e n o f t e n ? O : I t ' s j u s t l i k e a f l e a m a r k e t . S e e , t h e y b e l i e v e t h a t t h e s e p e o p l e w i l l j u s t b e d e p o r t e d . T h e y d o n ' t r e a l i s e s o m e o f t h e m w i l l g e t s t a t u s . W h e n t h e y d o , i t s l i k e , O h y o u r p h o n e ? I d i d n ' t s e e i t , I d o n ' t k n o w w h a t i t l o o k s l i k e p l a y i n g s t u p i d . S o m e H a i t i a n s a r e t a k e n i n t o c u s t o d y w i t h a l o t o f m o n e y a n d i t d i s a p p e a r s . T h e y h a v e a l o t b e c a u s e t h e y m a y w o r k h e r e f o r y e a r s , b u t b e c a u s e t h e y a r e i l l e g a l , t h e y p u t m o n e y u n d e r t h e m a t t r e s s , i n c o f f e e c a n s , t h e y b u r y i t , a l l o v e r t h e p l a c e , b e c a u s e t h e y c a n ' t o p e n a n a c c o u n t . A n d t h e y a r e n o t e x t r a v a g a n t p e o p l e . T h e y a r e l i k e t h e C h i n e s e , t h e y l i v e h u m b l y . T h e y j u s t w o r k , f e e d t h e f a m i l y a n d s a v e a n d s a v e a n d s a v e . E v e r y t i m e t h e i r m o n e y g o e s m i s s i n g ( a f t e r b e i n g c o n f i s c a t e d ) , t h e o f f i c e r s t r y a n d b l a m e i n d i v i d u a l m i g r a n t s . B u t n o c a s h e v e r i s s u p p o s e d t o e n t e r t h e d e t e n t i o n c e n t r e . W h e n e v e r y o u a r e c o m m i t t e d , y o u r p o s s e s s i o n s a r e s u p p o s e d t o b e p u t i n a n e n v e l o p e . T h e o f f i c e r i s s u p p o s e d t o s i g n a c r o s s t h e e n v e l o p e , t a p e i t , l e t t h e i n d i v i d u a l s i g n , a n d i t g o e s i n a s a f e . R e g a r d l e s s o f i f a p e r s o n i s d e p o r t e d , g o e s t o j a i l , o r i s r e l e a s e d , t h a t i s h i s c a s h . W h a t s o m e a r e d o i n g i s s t e a l i n g b y m e a n s o f e m p l o y m e n t . A n d y o u a r e n o t s u p p o s e d t o g e t f i r e d , y o u a r e s u p p o s e d t o g o t o j a i l f o r t h i n g s l i k e t h i s . A n d I a m a s h a m e d b y w h a t I s e e n s o m e o f m y f e l l o w o f f i c e r s d o . I t ' s a c r y i n g s h a m e . M o s t o f t h e m a r e i n p r o m i n e n t p o s i t i o n s w h o a r e d o i n g t h i s f o o l i s h n e s s , n o t t h e s m a l l m a n . I : C a n y o u r e m e m b e r a n y s p e c i f i c b e a t i n g s t h a t t o o k p l a c e d u r i n g y o u r t i m e a t t h e c e n t r e ? O : I h a v e w a t c h e d i n d i v i d u a l s b e i n g s n a t c h e d u p b y t h e i r c l o t h e s . T h e y w o u l d t a k e t h e m i n a p r i v a t e r o o m , b e a t t h e m o n t h e b o t t o m o f t h e i r f e e t , t h e i r s t o m a c h , s o f t t i s s u e w h e r e i t w o u l d n t s h o w . B u t t h e n i t g o t t o t h e p o i n t w h e r e t h e y j u s t d o n t c a r e n o m o r e . A c r o s s t h e f a c e , a c r o s s t h e b a c k . T h e y j u s t d o i t i n f r o n t o f e v e r y o n e , t h e y j u s t d o n ' t c a r e , a n d i t s i n h u m a n e . M y p a r e n t s g r e w m e u p a d i f f e r e n t w a y . W h a t t h e y a r e d o i n g i s w r o n g . I t o l d y o u t h e y u s e d t o e x t r a c t t h e m . B u t l a t e r e v e n i f t h e y d i d t h a t , i t w a s t o a b u i l d i n g w i t h w i n d o w s a n d n o b l i n d s . A l l t h e d e t a i n e e s c o u l d s e e t h i s G e s t a p o f o o l i s h n e s s g o i n g o n . W h a t i s t h i s , a p r i s o n e r o f w a r c a m p n o w ? I w a t c h e d t h e m b e a t o n e s o b a d , t h e g u y w a s o n t h e g r o u n d a n d m o a n e d a n d g r o a n e d a l l n i g h t . T h e y t o o k h i m t o t h e h o s p i t a l , e v e n t u a l l y . I t b r i n g s t e a r s t o m y e y e s s o m e t i m e s . I t ' s n o t r i g h t , i t ' s n o t r i g h t . I t h i n k w h a t t h e g o v e r n m e n t n e e d s t o d o i s i n s e r t O f f i c e r : d e t a i n e e sw e r e s u b j e c t e d t o h o r r i f i c a b u s e D E T A I N E E S c a n b e s e e n a t t h e I m m i g r a t i o n D e t e n t i o n C e n t r e o n C a r m i c h a e l R o a d . A l l e g a t i o n s a b o u t C a r m i c h a e l R o a d D e t e n t i o n C e n t r eS E E p a g e 4 C W W e e h h a a v v e e a a l l o o t t o o f f i i m m m m a a t t u u r r e e a a n n d d u u n n p p r r o o f f e e s s s s i i o o n n a a l l o o f f f f i i c c e e r r s s , , a a n n d d i i t t h h u u r r t t s s m m y y h h e e a a r r t t . . W W h h a a t t a a r r e e t t h h e e y y h h a a r r a a s s s s i i n n g g t t h h e e s s e e p p e e o o p p l l e e f f o o r r ? ? T T h h e e r r e e i i s s o o n n l l y y s s o o m m u u c c h h a a b b u u s s e e p e e o o p p l l e e c c a a n n t t a a k k e e . . I N S I G H T I N S I D E SECTIONINSIDE Real Estate Volume: 105 No.179MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 Hanged man found bound and gagged SEE page 11 Officer claims detainees were abused AN OFFICER has broken ranks to tell of the horrors which he says have gone on for years behind the gates of the Carmichael Road Detention Centre, far from public view. A mong the abuses he alleges to have witnessed are numerous beatings, constant sexual assaults and even one murder – all of which, the officer says, have goneu npunished. He also backed several specific claims of cruelty and v iolence levelled by current and former detainees and published by The Tribune , but which the authorities say there is no evidence to support. " I am ashamed by what I've seen my fellow officers do. Most of them are in prominent positions who are doing this foolishness, not the small man," he said. The officer, who asked that his name and rank be withheld as he fears for his safety, also told of chronich unger, a lack of medical attention and unbearable conditions suffered by detainees. He said the officials in charge of the detention centre do not know what is going on because they are not doing their jobs properly, and called for The Tribune to continue t o pressure the Government over the issue. When asked to describe conditions at the centre, he said: "It brings tears to my eyes. I'm telling you it’s sickAllegations about Detention Centre Police investigate ‘suspicious’ death SEE page nine FAMILY of the man found hanged point to the area where his body was found. AFTER six years of Wayne Munroe at the helm of the Bahamas Bar Association, members of the Bar on Friday elected Ruth Bowe-Darville as their new presi dent. While Mr Munroe had previously indi cated he would stand for re-election, it is understood he announced on either Tuesday or Wednesday of last week that he would not be running. Speaking with The Tribune yesterday, Mrs Bowe-Darville said she was not surprised that Mr Munroe chose to withdraw from the election. The Tribune also understands that the law partnership of Lockhart and Munroe of which Mr Munroe is managing part ner and Elliot Lockhart is Ruth Bowe-Darville SEE page nine By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net AFTER being elevated from silver to gold from the 2001 IAAF World Championships in athletics, the men’s 4 x 400 metre relay team of Avard Moncur, Chris Brown, Troy McIntosh, Timothy Munnings and Carl Oliver, as well as sprinter Debbie FergusonMcKenzie, finally got their hardware. As the curtain came down at the conclusion of the rain-interrupted Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations’ National Open Track and Field Championships on Saturday night, the athletes received their gold medals from Minister of Sports, Desmond Bannister and BAAA’s president Curt Hollingsworth. They also each receive a cheque from the Bahamas gov ernment, the amount undis closed to reflect the incentive gold medalists collect from the World Championships and the Olympic Games. The IAAF stripped the Unit ed States’ 4 x 4 relay team of their gold from the champi onships in Edmonton, Canada, after it was discovered that American Andrew Pettigrew had tested positive for the use an illegal substance. Each member of the team took the historic moment in their stride as they celebrated Bahamian athletes finally get their 2001 gold medals THE MEN’S 4 x 400 metre relay team (left Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie (above Bahamas Bar Association elects a new president SEE page nine Photos/ Kermit Taylor AG calls for review of how court business is conducted THE Attorney General is calling for a review of the Bahamas’ Criminal Procedure Code that could radically change the country’s court system. Giving his contribution to the national budget in the Senate on Friday, Attorney General Michael Barnett said there must be a review of the way the court’s business is conducted. He is calling for the elimination of preliminary inquiries and greater use of the Voluntary Bill of Indictment. Mr Barnett said a retired Justice has been retained to work on reforming the Penal Code and Criminal Procedure Code. He assumes office in October. SEE page 11 F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net A PRELIMINARY report conducted on the now suspended National Youth Services Programme in NorthA baco indicates the site had deteriorated into a military "boot camp" with "little or no therapeutic, educational or after-care programme values". A ccording to the report, the team found that educational and mental health services at the camp "remained in thes ame underdeveloped state with untrained staff as was the case in February, 2008". O bservations from the report state that at the time of t he study, the camp was still operating as a "classical 'boot camp' style of delinquenti ntervention, where the paramilitary structure become(s d ominant and the educational, mental health and after-care have become un-structureda nd dysfunctional". This created a "major concern" for the researchers who reported that unstructured environments can cause mored isruptive behaviour. Staff members suggested that the boot camp physical components eight RBDF instructors and nine wardenso r one physical worker to each t hree boys mentality had become the driving force in the camp's programme instead of mental health or education. Concern "This condition still remains a major concern for the evalua tion team because psychological research show(s t reating children with major conduct disorders requires a consistently structured treat-m ent environment or intervention efforts are very likely t o elicit the opposite effects, namely, the child is likely to become more resolute in con-t inued conduct disorder," said the report. T he 2008/2009 evaluation was prepared by Sterling Gardiner of the School Psycho-l ogical Services Unit and presented to the Acting Director of Youth and Sports in November, 2008. Between October 27 to November 1, 2008 five school psychologists from the Min-i stry of Education in partnership with the Ministry of Youth and Sports carried out the research compiled in the report. Camp According to the paper, the p rogramme which was formed in September, 2004 intended to remove at-risk youth those who exhibiteds erious behavioral, academic and social problems from a socially enabling environmentt o the Andros camp. A curriculum of physical e ducation, mathematics, English language, spirituality, parenting skills, self-awareness,a rts and crafts, and civics combined in a 17-hour day with an " overall physical intense training regiment" from 5.30 am to 11 pm was "expected toc hange prior behaviour", said the report. T he camp closed last Friday, amidst controversy, but government said they plan tor etool the programme and relaunch it later this year in New Providence. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE A GUNMAN robbed the Solomon's Mines store in Bay Street yesterday making off witha n undisclosed amount of jewelry. D etails were minimal up to press time last night, but head of the Central Detective Unit Elsworth Moss said the incident occured around 1.22 pm yesterday when a lone gunman entered the store. H e brandished a firearm and held employees at bay before making good his escape, said Mr Moss. A ccording to police, a scared employee hid i n the back of the store while the gunman helped himself to luxury items. Police said no shots were fired and no one was injured during the robbery. No description of the gunman was availa ble. Police investigations continue. Solomon’s Mines store is robbed by gunman Report says youth programme had become ‘military boot cap’ PARAMEDICS take p art in a drill at the Police health fair held at the Police College at the weekend. POLICE HEALTH FAIR F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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B y MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net THE contractor responsible for excavating Crown land and allegedly selling quarry to gove rnment said officials gave him permission to excavate and then approached him to purchase the product. Cardinal Newman, 54, of Long I sland, maintains he is excavating the three acre site north of Cowp en Road and south of Millars Heights, off Carmichael Road, to prepare the land for farming. He said the hard rock eight f eet deep is unsuitable for agriculture and he was given verbal permission from officers in thed epartment of physical planning to excavate the land. Environmental health workers t hen approached Mr Newman a nd offered to pay him $130 per bag of fill, he said. And a source told The Tribune the fill is then u sed to cover the sanitary landfill site in Harrold Road. The government are aware of what I’m doing,” Mr Newman said. “Physical planning gave me the okay from last year or the yearb efore, by word of mouth, but not on paper. They have sent the inspectors out and they said they don’t have a problem with what I’m doing and tell me to go ahead. “And until they come and say d on’t go further with it, I will continue what I’m doing.” Following excavation Mr Newman fills the craters with biodegradable waste trees, l eaves, and wood to prepare t he land as farmers do in Long Island, Mr Newman said. He insists it is not a moneym aking scheme as he pays $160 per hour to rent each excavation machine and therefore earns just $ 4 per bag of fill. B ut as he needs to excavate the land for farming, he did not turn down the opportunity to sellt he fill, Mr Newman said. He insists that other Crown land l easeholders are doing the same. Mr Newman, who is also a contractor for Newman’s Construction, explained he has completed excavation of about two acres oft he site, which is now being filled, and he is digging the last portiono f the site set aside for excavation, a 90ft by 90ft area. On the cultivated land he hopes to grow 784 banana trees and around 200 Persian limet rees, with okra and watermelon dotted in between. Mr Newman said: “You can’t grow anything on rock, so what was left for me to do? If they didn ’t want me to cultivate the land t hey shouldn’t have given me the land. “I have to cultivate my land. If the government doesn’t give you permission to cut this type of land down there’s only o ne thing left to do, and that’s b uild houses on it. “I don’t want to build a house, if I did I wouldn’t cut it down. Iw ant to farm because I know what I can make of this.” Environment Minister Earl Deveaux did not respond to press inquiries Friday, but passed themo n to the department of environmental health services and t he department of physical planning. Nothing was received from either department. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 3 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Q ueen 8 Pc Q ueen 8 Pc $ 3,730 $ 3,730 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $3,940 $3,940Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street ( 242)326 ( 242)326 2 335 2 335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank L L a a F F r r o o n n t t e e r r a a L L a a F F r r o o n n t t e e r r a a INDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION L ocal News.............P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,16 E ditorial/Letters..........................................P4 Sports........................................P12,13,14,15 B USINESS SECTION B usiness..............P1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12 INSIGHT SECTION I nsight..........................................P1,2,3,4,5,8 Comics........................................................P6 Weather.......................................................P7 CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES R EAL ESTATE GUIDE 24 PAGES USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES TWO men are in hospital following a drive-by shootingi n the Milton Street area yesterday, police said. The men, one in his early 2 0s and the other 19, were standing on the street outsidea house around 12.40 pm Sunday when a car pulled upa longside them and occupants began shooting. Central Detective Unit S uperintendent Elsworth Moss said: "People from that vehicle fired several shots att hese men hitting one to the r ight thigh and the other to the chest and right side of his body." U p to press time police did not have a description of the gunmen or their car. The victims, whose injuries a re not life threatening, were in hospital yesterday but are expected to make a fullr ecovery, police said. In other crime news, police recovered two illegalf irearms over the weekend. Acting on information from the public, the police retrieved a .44 Desert Eagle pistol from the Eastern Road area on June 26, said Mr Moss. Later that day, police executed a search warrant on a Pinewood Gardens home where a 12-gauge shotgun was confiscated, said Mr Moss. Two men in hospital after drive-by shooting In br ief Contractor claims officials approached him to buy quarry WORKTAKES place north of Cowpen Road and south of Millars Heights. Share your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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EDITOR, The Tribune. I rite to express my concerns concerning a recent experience with the Supreme Court Registry of The Bahamas. As you may know, creditors o f CLICO were required to file t heir claims with the Registry and serve it on the Liquidators no later than May 22, 2009. I am one such creditor holding a pension policy with CLICO. I live on a remote Family Island and flew into Nassau on the morning of May 22, 2009 for the purpose of filing my Affidavit of Proof and serving it on the Liquidators. I arrived at the Supreme Court Registry at about 1pm only to find out that the Registry was closed from 12.30 for the personnel to attend a luncheon and not expected to reopen until three for one hour as it closes at 4pm. I was totally bewildered as I could not fathom that the Chief Justice would allow the entire judicial system to shut down with the public unable to file documents with the Registry for their court matters. Is it any wonder that the public has no confidence in the judiciary? Could this luncheon not have been held on the weekend so as not to inconvenience the public? In addition to the possibility of not recouping my full investment with CLICO I had to travel to Nassau at some cost to myself, take a taxi to the Registry only to be met with this situation. Will the Chief Justice explain these actions and at the very least offer an apology to the public? WILLIAM G STRACHAN Nassau, May, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm I T SEEMS the political sleuths are still hounding Police Commissioner Reginald Ferguson. He shouldn’t be chief, one of their numb ers told the Senate Friday. F or the past seven years they have agitated o ver the presence of a man, who, when it comes to investigating a crime, cannot be swayed, r egardless of the status of the suspect. For some reason this seems to agitate certain members of t he Opposition, and those of their political persuasion who serve on the police force. However, the public probably feels safer with a man who believes all persons are equal before thel aw, and is prepared to do his duty to get the law b reaker, whatever his political views, before the courts. I t was during Friday’s Senate budget debate that Senator Jerome Fitzgerald, himself the son o f a former police officer, criticised government for having sent two young police officers to Canada for training, but instead of appointing one of them Police Commissioner and the other his deputy on their return, confirmed Mr F erguson in the top position, with the other two under him. Senator Fitzgerald pointed out t hat Mr Ferguson, an Acklins man, was the oldest officer on the force. He failed to mention t hat he was also the man with the most experience having spent 44 of his 63 years working his w ay from the bottom ranks to the position of Commissioner. One does not get that kind of experience from a classroom text book, as thoseof us in the newspaper profession appreciate, but the ill informed believe that anyone who can s tring two sentences together and hopefully know where to put a full stop is capable ofb eing an editor. It’s the same in the police force where years of experience is one of the most i mportant ingredients in being able to lead an effective team. Mr Fitzgerald believed the Ingraham gov ernment would have been wiser to have appointed a “young, qualified, respected senior p olice officer who has the full support of the police force and the community at large anda llow him to recommend and advise on the restructuring of a police force he was to lead.” T here was no “logical rationale” for having a commissioner being party to reshuffling a police force that he would not lead into the future, said Mr Fitzgerald. “It makes no sense,” he told the Senate. But then again, this is the age of foolishness. If we were in the age of wisdom, the most qualified a nd respected senior police officer would be commissioner of police today.” N ow let’s examine this sense and nonsense. It is known that before the 2007 election the P LP government had its own plans on the retire ment of Police Commissioner Paul Farquharson, w ho, we understand, knew only too well the heavy hand of the politician on his shoulder. They had earmarked two young men one to b e commissioner and the other his deputy on M r Farquharson’s retirement. They would have b ypassed Mr Ferguson, then Mr Farquharson- ’s deputy, and created a new position Advise r to the Commissioner. The person it is said they had identified for this position was a retired p olice officer, one of their political supporters, who, probably, because of the lack of experience of the two they had chosen, was to guide them in their new positions. If this had happened,t he PLP would have had complete control of the R oyal Bahamas Police Force. It would have also meant an unnecessary expense on the f orce’s budget and the taxpayer’s pocket book. However, the PLP lost the election. The F NM became the government, and Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham looked at the problem through different spectacles. He took two of the force’s top officers, young men, already with a good educational back g round and a great deal of promise and sent them to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police for f urther training. On their return they were appointed top positions under an experienced C ommissioner already active on the force at no extra expense to the Treasury in other w ords no extra body had to be hired to give them advice. During these few years, until Mr Ferguson’s retirement, they will have time to build their reputation with the public and their fellow officers, so that they can win the full sup p ort of both groups support that Senator Fitzgerald assumes they already have. And theyw ill do it with the help of Mr Ferguson’s years of experience. With their extra training and Comm issioner Ferguson’s background, the three working together should be able to form a strong police force for the future. And when it’s time for Commissioner Fer guson to retire the new commissioner must be a m an of knowledge, integrity and above all independence. A man who cannot be swayed bya ny political party. A man who is prepared to police this country with sternness, tempered by f airness. And because we believe the matter is being dealt with wisely, we should have a well trained future commissioner. One would have thought that controlling crime would have been the most important itemo n our daily agenda. Instead of making Commissioner Ferguson’s job more difficult, every p atriotic Bahamian should be trying to assist him and his force. I t is true that this is an age of foolishness made more foolish by politicians trying to play i nterference with a man who is responsible for this community’s security. Explanation needed from Chief Justice LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Rebutting Senator over Police Chief 7+($/((1' $//$/(6 'LVFRXQWWRUHZLGH H[FHSWKH&KULVWPDV&RUQHU 6RPHJLIWLWHPVb /RDGHGDOHDEOHV bVHOHFWHG&KLOGUHQV:HDU $FFHSWLQJ 6XQ&DUG_,6$_DVWHU&DUG_$PHULFDQ([SUHVV EDITOR, The Tribune. While we wish Mr Leslie Miller every success in his undertaking in the construction and operation of Mario’s Bowling and Enter tainment Centre, we must correct his statement as it appeared on page 3B of today’s Tribune and which we understand he also made earlier on a local talk show. Never, from the time we purchased the land and built Village Lanes did we receive government’s relief whether from stamp tax on our conveyance, customs duty on building materials, lanes and machines, real property tax, business license or any other items related thereto. When we sold the property some 20 years later, all real property taxes, business licenses, National Insurance and util ities were paid in full. Again, we wish Mr Miller every success, he has undertaken a massive challenge. SYDNEY& IVY FRENCH Nassau, June 26, 2009. Correcting Mr Leslie Miller’ s statement EDITOR, The Tribune. Before the memory of Bahamian History was f ormed, stands a testament to Native Indians who s trove to marry culture with every minute detail of t heir lives, in this land. O f course we do not expect the same as society u nfolds upon pages of change and progress, nor do we envision that same pristine ecological diversity; h owever, the insouciant attitudes of this people t owards conservation far outweighs the burdens of industrial growth. Today, we take a slight turn from the course of the three previous letters, into the headwind of incontrovertible fact, as it were. Culture is without question the plenipotent source of any society, the backbone of any nation; we also know that the employ and/or study of all great disb ursements of time: medicine, religion, art, science, p hilosophy etc, ultimately depend upon the astute u nderstanding of culture for their various measurem ents and definitions. S o it is into this ark, life finds refuge when storm f loods of time descend. Even as culture lends itself t o everything and everyone, it is at once secure in ownership of self. It is of this quintessence T. H. Huxley speaks when referring to the “spirit of catholicity” in writings of “our chief apostle of culture” Matthew Arnold, in Science and Culture. Culture, though being a distinct chapter differentiat ing peoples, remains the all-encompassing perpetual rule that governs mankind. Here at home, we v igilantly seek to understand the mental taxation placed upon Bahamians by excessive failures of suc cessive governments to quell the eruptions we cont inue to see in our communities; Why? Because culture is always relegated to the most meager importance. How long will Bahamians be satisfied with liv-i ng conditions that breed discontent disrupting a person's right to freedom from beastly intrusions eg, noise pollution. How much longer this society dillydallies, “fiddling while Rome burns”, despite chaoti c disproportions of a national crisis, remains to be seen. Let us turn this argument upon the universal poles of truth, culture is the epicentre of all, in that w ho God is, was, will ever be, was meted out from himself to bring forth all that becomes. Culture orders the designations, assignments and appropriations of the Eternal Blueprint; it securesi nvestment within the Human Estate. We are a debt-ridden people in multiple areas of our national lives; and until strict lines of moral redemption are drawn and assiduously followed, we will continue to see foreclosures on our citizens and communities. The Chinese propounds, “the journey of a thou sand miles begins with the first step”, however Is ubmit, “the journey to a Nation’s soul begins with the first voice.” Remember, when a people become afraid to speak, they question, challenge and deny the wisdom of God. Thank you for your continued advancement of social awareness. GREGORY NEELY N assau, June 15, 2009. Into the Ark of Culture EDITOR, The Tribune. P lease permit me space in your valuable columns to express my disgust at the wanton and casual cruelty inflicted on dogs in this c ountry. I t seems a fully acceptable pastime for children and adults to “lick” dogs wherever they e ncounter them. In fact, the local potcakes seem more inclined to follow tourists and vagabonds around because they are assured no harm will come to them from these quarters. On Tuesday, June 2, I wit n essed a young man in Grants T own hit a wandering dog with a stick, nearly fracturing one of the animal’s hind legs. I saw glee on his face as if the h eavens had opened and showe red him with grace unmeasured. Everywhere on this island we see scarred and crippled dogs, d amning evidence of our cruel, nastier and darker sides. In fact, if you believe in reincarnation, the worst form to return as would be an over-thehill potcake dog. That would be tantamount to residing eternally in the left wing of hell. The coun t ry sorely needs a crack down on c ruelty to animals. In addition to fines, or short jail term, perpetrators could be required to give community serv ice via the Bahamas Humane S ociety and through the natural expansion of its facilities to truly sensitise Bahamians on the sub j ect. “Nuff said.” W LESTER BOWLEG ANIMAL LOVER Nassau, June 11, 2009. Disgusted at wanton and casual cruelty inflicted on dogs

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE ApplicationsareavailableatanyCommonwealthBankBranchorat TheCollegeofTheBahamas,FinancialAid&HousingDepartment, 2ndFloor,PortiaSmithBuilding. APPLICATIONSMUSTBESUBMITTEDTO: OFFICEOFTHEDIRECTOR FINANCIALAID&HOUSING THECOLLEGEOFTHEBAHAMAS P.O.BOXN-4912 NASSAU,BAHAMASDEADLINEFORAPPLICATIONSISJULY17,2009 “LeaderinPersonalBankingServices”www.combankltd.com 2 0 0 9 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e t2 009SCHOLARSHIP AWARDPROGRAM Commonwealth Bank is offering Scholarship Awards to Bahamian students to attend The College of The Bahamas.(StudentsfromtheFamilyIslandsareinvitedtoapply). B y DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – The Freeport Harbour Company and Discovery Cruises officially openedt he newly refurbished passeng er terminal on Friday. Orlando Forbes, port director at the harbour, and Hans Hahn, president of Discovery, attended the ribbon-cutting ceremony for the completion of Phase I. M r Forbes said that an investment of $1.2 million has been budgeted for a three-phase improvement project of the harbour facility, including the passenger terminal, baggage and C ustoms sections. He said with Phase I com p leted, the passenger terminal has gained 1,600 square feet in space that allows accommodation for an additional 250 pass engers. M r Forbes said the Discovery terminal is now capable of a ccommodating some 450 to 5 00 passengers. “We were able to add more room for the passenger line-up area, which is critical for us on w et days,” he said. Discovery president Mr Hahn said the terminal has “come al ong way” over the past 11 years since the cruise line s tarted sailing at Freeport Harb our. I remember 11 years ago it w as not much of a terminal. (Back then 1 ,000 passengers a day and when it rained people were standing in mud, and when thes un shone people were standing in the sweltering heat. “We then added a Customs h ole and a tent, and the hurri cane came and blew it away. We put on a roof and finally we came to the stage where we n eeded a little more space because after all our passengers, the first thing and the last thing they see is Freeport terminal. I think it is very nice,” he said. Mr Hahns commended Freeport Harbour for the improvements. He noted thatw hile passenger numbers have fallen, they are hoping to see the numbers go up again to 1,000 passengers daily. M r Forbes said Phase I and I II will involve the further e xpansion of the passenger terminal, baggage section and C ustoms area, respectively. H e stressed that the process of baggage collection and cleari ng Customs must be improved for both passengers and Customs officers. Mr Forbes said Freeport Harbour is committed to doing its part to ensure that the terminal is at the highest standards in terms of security and passenger accommodation. We are aware of the efforts being made by Discovery and the government in seeking to keep Discovery coming to this i sland. This investment we made h ere represents our part of the partnership. As caretakers of t his gateway. It is our obliga t ion to ensure that security standards are met and that all g uests, Bahamian and tourists who utilise the terminal are in a comfortable environment,” he said. New passenger terminal opens at Freeport Harbour H AVE you ever overdressed f or an event? Perhaps you understood the dress to be formal, but when you arrived in y our sequin dress or black tuxe do, everyone else was wearing jeans and turtlenecks. You mayr ecall how everyone stared as you entered the room, looking a bit out of place. That happens to homeowne rs too, but it’s not called overdressing it’s called overimproving. It happens whenp roperty owners remodel a home to the point where its new value far exceeds all others in the neighbourhood. L et’s say that your family has grown, and you begin your improvements by adding a wing with two more bedrooms and another bath. You expand to a t hree-car garage, and install an outdoor deck. In the process, you add $100,000 in improvements to your $250,000 home. As long as you continue living in the home, that’s not a prob-l em. When it’s time to sell, howe ver, you'll face an unexpected challenge.You’ve spent $100,000 on improvements, butb uyers are unlikely to be impressed as they compare the prices of other homes in thea rea, and expect yours to be in line. B efore beginning a major project, determine the impact on your home’s value. Consider “upgrading” to a l arger home vs remodelling, get ting advice from a lender and a BREA real estate agent. W hen it’s time to sell, you’ll b e glad you did. TWO WAYS TO UPGRADE Bahamas real estate today Carmen Massoni TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras SOLDIERS ousted the democratically elected president of Honduras on Sunday and Congress named a successor, but the leftist ally of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez denounced what he called an illegal coup and vowed to stay in power, according to Associated Press. The first military takeover of a Central American government in 16 years drew widespread condemnation from governments in Latin America and the world, and Chavez vowed to overthrow the country’s apparent new leader. President Manuel Zelaya was awakened Sunday by gunfire and detained while still in his pajamas, hours before an unpopular constitutional referendum many saw as a power grab. An air force plane flew him into forced exile in Costa Rica as armored military vehicles with machine guns rolled through the streets of the Honduran capital and soldiers seized the nationalp alace. “I want to return to my country,” Zelaya said in Costa Rica. I am president of Honduras.” Congress voted to accept what it said was Zelaya’s letter of resignation, with even Zelaya’s former allies turning against him. Honduran military ousts presidenta head of vote Part of a three-phase improvement of facility

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n B ySIR RONALD S ANDERS (The writer is a Consultant a nd former Caribbean diplomat) W HEN heads of government of the Caribbean Community and Common Market (Caricom meet in early July, a big responsibility will fall on the s houlders of Guyana’s Presid ent Bharat Jagdeo as chair m an to heal the wounds that a re causing the regional proj ect to haemorrhage. P resident Jagdeo will have to dig deep within himself for the diplomatic skills that willbe necessary not only to suppress his own annoyance over recent events in Caricom, but also to guide his colleague l eaders to practical measures that will fix the rifts between them and set the Caricom ship upon an agreed course of fur t her progress that benefits all. All other Caricom leaders will have to contribute to the healing process by showing ah igh level of maturity in their discourse with each other and by eschewing a desire forp urely short-term national a dvantage in favour of longer term gain for all. The economic prospects that Caricom countries facea re deeply troubling. Addressing them at every lev el, especially international bar g aining, calls for a united Caricom, not a fractious one. The current Chairman of Caricom, the Prime Minister of Belize Dean Barrow, captured the dire conditions confronting Caricom countries when, on June 24, he told a special session of the UN General Assembly that for the Caribbean “the current set of economic conditions is the worst to have overtaken us since independence.” There was no exaggeration in this declaration by Mr Bar row, nor was there any hyper bole in his further assertion that “there is now no prospect of our countries achieving the time-bound Millennium Development Goals”. The reality is that given the decline in the prices of their principal exports, reduction in aid, the significant downturn in tourism, the dramatic fall in remittances from their Diaspora, and the severe stric tures in borrowing money on the commercial market, Caricom countries are experienc ing a new level of desperation particularly as many of them have a debt to GDP ratio of over 100 per cent. If they were companies, many of these countries would be regarded as bankrupt. Turning to the International Monetary Fund (IMF little help to them in the present circumstances. For they can only borrow in proportion to their quotas and their quotas – particularly for the six small countries of the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS too small to contribute effec tively to their needs. Further, IMF money is the one source of funding that cannot be writ ten-off so there is no prospect of relief from this debt. Of course, several countries are in such dire straits that they will end up in IMF programmes, not only because of the effect of the current global crisis on their economies, but also because of poor poli cies pursued in the past. Some countries have already sought help from spe cial IMF windows – Grenada and St Vincent and the Grenadines among them. Othe rs, such as Jamaica and A ntigua and Barbuda, are n ow teetering on the edge of full IMF programmes and will shortly be there. T he situation is worse now for Caricom countries, except f or Guyana, because over the last three decades in which a new generation has reached adulthood, the region has enjoyed a summer of relativep lenty making the current insufficiency difficult to mana ge. A big contribution to the season of plenty in the decade o f the 1980’s was preferential access to the European Union ( EU) market for sugar, bananas and rum and a high level of aid from the US, the E U and Canada. But the summer of plenty has now turned t o the winter of drought, and the full Economic Partnership Agreement that Caricomc ountries signed with the EU last year bears no resemblance t o the treaties of the past. I n Guyana’s case, it has been a Highly Indebted Poor Country for most of the last three decades only recently being pulled out of the mostd ifficult economic circum stances by virtue of debt writeoffs. Nonetheless, Guyana too is now plagued with falling prices for bauxite, a decline in remittances, and the loss of its preferential market in the EUf or sugar. O nly relatively high prices for its gold production make a significant contribution to the economy. Unemployment levels have already begun to increase in every country, including Trinidad and Tobago, despite its comparative wealth in oil and gas. And, the forecast for improvement is not encour aging. It is clear that Caricom countries will suffer the effects of the recession in the US and Europe for some time after these areas begin to recover. Given the very high levels of unemployment in the US and UK especially, there will be a lag time before employment reaches a stage where tourism and remittances return to their 2007 levels for the Caribbean. Given this troubling inter national environment, the first business of Caricom Heads of Government as they gather for their 30th meeting should be to agree that there was nev er a time in their history when t here was a greater need for a Caribbean Community and for Caricom itself. The problems that beset Caricom countries in coping with the severe challenges of the global environment will n ot be overcome by national a ction alone. I f they were to come to s uch an agreement and to p ublicly declare it, they will h ave to grab the nettle of some issues that are ripe for resolution by reasonable but frank discussion. One of them is the matter of migration of Caricom people within the Community; anoth e r is the seeming division within Caricom being caused by the proposal for an Economic Union between members oft he OECS and Trinidad and T obago; a third is the abject failure to put in place effective governance of Caricom;a nd the last and most impor tant is an agreed plan for implementing the single mar ket and economy with penal t ies for every infraction. T his cannot be beyond the capacity of the Heads of Government of Caricom. This is crunch time, and time for leaders to deliver the regional project over which g enerations of Caribbean peop le have laboured. I n the words of the Dean Barrow, Caricom’s Chairman, talking about the United Nations on June 24, “What do we tell our people? That we attended yet another dress rehearsal for a shadow play? Another instalment in this drama of progress that never actually takes place”? Mr Barrow’s answer to his own poignant questions was “No”. And, so it must be also at the Caricom Summit in Guyana in July. It must be a resounding “No” to further shadow plays. Consequent upon this Sum mit, measurable advances must be made by Caricom leaders or they will have failed their people and a price will be paid. Responses to: ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 7 Caricom leaders must move the region forward or pay the price WORLDVIEW S IRRONALD SANDERS

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NORTH Andros The Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation (BAIC Carter Marketing are set to join forces to promote the ‘Buy Fresh, Buy Bahamian’ initiative. Veteran broadcast executive Charles Carter of spoke about the project during a farmers meeting on the island last weekend. He was a member of a high level BAIC delegation led by executive chairman Edison Key. It included a team from Bahamas Agricultural Producers Association headed by I G Stubbs. Fulfilling a commitment made to farmers here, BAIC has purchased more equipment for their use as they prepare for winter crops. Equipment include a mulcher, a fertiliser distributor, a slasher, and a bedder. And, the former North Andros Farmers Association is now the Big Yard Farmers Company with Cecil Gaitor as its president. “With this additional equipment we are looking forward to a bumper year,” said BAIC domestic investment officer for North Andros Alphonso Smith. “For example, instead of one tractor which we had last year, we now have three more which means that the waiting time for farmers to prepare their fields has been shortened considerably. In anotherw eek, farmers will have their own spray machine.” Mr Key pledged his continued support of farmers in North Andros. “I am trying to do everything possible to support you. But I want to see more young people involved,” he said. He confirmed that, in the name of BAIC, the government has purchased 561 acres of prime farm land in the vicinity of the North Andros airport. “We are going to us this property strictly for agriculture,” he said. “We are going to subdivide it into plots so that whoever wants to get involved in agriculture we will make land available to them.” Mr Carter hailed Mr Key’s appointment as BAIC’s executive chairman. “Mr Key’s ideas for BAIC are the most sensible we have heard for agriculture in a long time,” he said. He warned that the way the world is evolving, “if we don’t make a stand for Bahamian agriculture now, there will be no stand to make in the future.” A problem with the country, he said, “is that everything Bahamian is jeopardised.” “Too many of us are convinced that if it comes from overseas it is better than what we have right here. That’s our problem. We just like foreign things.” To effect a change in attitude, he said, “we have to organise ourselves to go at the consumers and make them feel that it is in their best interest to buy Bahamianmade and produced goods. “Just saying ‘buy Bahamian’ isn’t going to do it. We have to educate the consumer and in the process of educating the consumer, that is where BAIC and Carter Marketing are going to intersect,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 'VO 4VNNFS $BNQ7LUHGRIWKHDPH 2OG%RULQJXPPHU 6 FKRRO" 7U\RPHWKLQJ 1HZt&UHDWLY$ FWLYLWLHV,QFOXGH $UWVt&UDIWV'UDZLQJtDLQWLQJ0XVLFt'UDPD / HVVRQV 6ZLPPLQJDQG 6 SRUWV & $//:$1' 5 (6(59(<285 % ()25(,7/$7( RU( PDLOZHVWPRRU#KRWPDLOFRP ‘Buy Fresh, Buy Bahamian’ initiative BAIC EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN Edison Key (second from right team are shown sponge harvested by fishermen from Red Bays, North Andros during a visit there last weekend. BAIC EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN Edison Key at the farmers meeting in North Andros last weekend. B AIC EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN E dison Key inspects lime produced from conch shells. Pictured from left are BAIC domestic investment officer A lphonso Smith; Alfie Stubbs; Mr Key, and Sean Evans. Mr Stubbs and Mr Evans operate the project in North Andros. G l a d s t o n e T h u r s t o n / B I S

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senior partner will be dissolved. Mr Munroe could not be reached for comment and Mr Lockhart said he is not at liberty to discuss the matter with the press. Ms Bowe-Darville served as the Bar Association’s vice-president under Mr Munroe for the past six years. Taking over her former post, is the new vicepresident Cathleen Johnson-Hassan, sister of former Speaker of the House of Assembly Italia Johnson. In her new role as Bar Association president Mrs Bowe-Darville said that a goal that is “very close to her heart” is the rehabilitation of the Bar’s reputation, which in her view has “suffered terribly” in recent years. She said she also aims to achieve a “total reconstruction” of the Bar’s administration, and wants to work on developing the legal profession more. Addressing some of the pertinent issues concerning the Bahamian judiciary at this time, Ms Bowe-Darville said that she is concerned about the upcoming vacancies on the bench and hopes replacements can be found as quickly as possible. As it concerns the departure of Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall, she said that it is “regrettable” that he will serve outside the country, but she is confident that a qualified and experienced Bahamian can be found to replace him. “We have nothing but talent at the Bar, we just don’t use it (properly Ms Bowe-Darville said she is a great advocate of creating a strong Bahamianr un judiciary, and is not in favour of b ringing in foreigners to fill posts that s he believes can easily be filled by local legal professionals. “If we create a strong Bar, I feel we will create a strong bench,” she said. Other contenders for the executive positions within the Bar Association were Cheryl Buzard, who ran for the position of president, and Craig Butler, who ran unsuccessfully for vice-president. The positions of secretary and treasurer went unchallenged and Rachel Culmer will continue on as secretary, while Sidney Cambridge remains the Bar Association’s treasurer. Ms Bowe-Darville said there was some chaos during the election process on Friday and the ballot had to be taken a second time. However, she said that the elections had a great turn-out and that 132 members of the Bar attended. It is understood that on the first ballot there were more ballots than persons voting. Ms Bowe-Darville was educated at the Government High School and continued her tertiary education at the University of Waterloo and York University in Ontario, Canada. In May, 1985 she was called to t he Bahamas Bar. S he articled in the law firm of Bostw ick and Bostwick, and in 1990, she joined the law firm of Graham, Thompson and Co. She was appointed senior executive assistant to the Prime Minister of the Bahamas in September, 1994 and served in that capacity until May of 1998. She then joined the firm of Bannister and Co. On several occasions, Ms Bowe-Darville has acted as Stipendiary and Circuit Magistrate. She also served as chairperson of the National Women's Advisory Council and as a member of the Licensing Authority and the Hospitals and Health Care Facilities Licensing Board. She was appointed as a member of the Securities Commission of the Bahamas in June 2001. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 9 The Mercedes M-Class. Beauty, brains and brawn. TYREFLEX STAR MOTORSCall us today for your new Mercedes-Benz M-Class at 325.4961Wulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas Fax: 323.4667When you think of the average SUV on the road today, you think of roadhogging, air-polluting gas guzzlers that wouldnt know the meaning of high precision and fuel efficiency if it were emblazoned on their windshields. But there is an alternative. The refined M-Class from Mercedes-Benz. Withits superior German styling utilising only high-grade materials, its robust engine power delivering exemplary turn-on-a-dime performance whilst still being frugal on fuel and its handling of pot-holed roads and 1.5 ft. flooded streets, the Mercedes-Benz M-Class is clearly the best choice in SUVs. Please note that all offices of ColinaImperial will be CLOSED on Friday 3 July 2009 for the company’s Annual Employee Fun Day. Our Pay Station at 21 Collins Avenue will offer extended weekend hours on Saturday 4 July from 8:30am to 4pm for your convenience. Thank you. To Our Valued Clients the Bahamas’ first gold medal in a men’s relay event at one of the two prestigious international meets. Moncur, the lead off com petitor, said: “It seemed as if it was never going to come to fruition, so to finally have it, especially in front of the home crowd, is a great feeling.” Moncur passed the baton off to Brown, who after all these years of hard work, they finally got a gold medal, although it wasn’t an Olympic gold. “World Championship gold is better than no gold at all,” Brown said. “I just want to thank my team-mates for believing in me and sticking with me and the Bahamian people for their support.” McIntosh, who got the baton from Brown, said it’s good to finally rejoin his team-mates after officially retiring to claim the gold that they should have gotten in Edmonton. “Now, we are officially presented with these medals. It’s a dream come through,” McIntosh said. “This is something I have been waiting on because I’ve won a medal at every inter national championship, but to get that gold really put the nail in the coffin for me.” Although he’s semi-retired, Munnings, the anchor of the team, said: “It’s been a long time coming, it’s vindication that the hard work has finally paid off. It pays to do it clean. I’m very happy.” In 2007, American sprint queen Marion Jones came clean that she cheated about the use of performance-enhancing substances. She was stripped her medals sentenced to six months in jail. One of the medals was the gold she won in the 200 at the IAAF World’s in Edmonton which saw Ferguson-McKenzie moved up from the silver to claim the top spot. “It feels fantastic,” said Fer guson-McKenzie, who received her medal after posting a double victory at the Nationals in the 100 and 200. “I must thank the IAAF, the BAAA’s and the Bahamas Gov ernment, who all pitched in and made it work. It has my name on it: ‘Bahamas 200 metre wom en’s Edmonton.’ It took seven plus years, but you would think that they had forgotten. But I got the silver then. Now I’m the gold medalist. I’m ecstatic.” SEE SPORTS SECTION ening. At the end I was sick and tired of the job." According to the officer, the recently announced improvements at the centre will be short-lived as have all such efforts in the past – unless more far-reaching and comprehensive actioni s taken. The officer's full interview can be read in today's Insight . F ROM page one Bahamas Bar Association elects a new president FROM page one FROM page one Officer claims detainees were abused Bahamian athletes finally get their medals

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C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 10, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE NASSAU LISTINGS D EVELOPED RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL VACANT LOTS P R O P E R T I E S F O R S A L E 1.ALLEN DRIVE CARMICHAEL ROAD LOT NO. 2 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: DuplexLot PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000sq.ft. LOCATION: Travellingwestalong CarmichaelRoadturnthroughthe cornerbyGenevaBrassSeafood. Takethethirdcornerontheleft andtraveltotheendoftheroad. Thevacantlotisontheleft. APPRAISEDVALUE: $65,000 2.MALVARICESTATES SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 5 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Multi-FamilyResidentialLot PROPERTY SIZE: 9,114sq.ft. LOCATION: Travellingsouthalong HighVistaDrivefromEastBay Street,takethe1stcornerleft Headingsouthtakethe4thcorner right.Atthet-junction,turnleft Thevacantlotisthethirdproperty ontheleft. APPRAISEDVALUE: $109,000 3.OPULENTHEIGHTS SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 28 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: SingleFamilyResidentialLot PROPERTY SIZE: 7,597sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingweston pavedroadafter“OutdoorPatio” ontheleft.Takethesecond right.Thevacantlotissecond tothelastontherightbeforethe roadends. APPRAISEDVALUE: $75,000 4.SOUTH OCEANESTATES SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 9Block4 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: SingleFamilyResidentialLot PROPERTY SIZE: 11,566sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingsouthof LyfordCay,immediatelypass MountPleasantturnleftonSouth OceanBoulevardtonewSouth OceanEstates.Thevacantlotis number9inBlock4. APPRAISEDVALUE: $110,000 5.SOUTH SEAS SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 199 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: SingleFamilyResidentialLot PROPERTY SIZE: 6,983sq.ft. LOCATION: FromCarmichael RoadturnontoBarcardiRoad, taketheseventhcornerontheleft thenturnintotheentrancegate. Thevacantlotislocatedonthe southernsideofChannelDriveoff EastwardDrive. APPRAISEDVALUE: $90,000 6.SOUTH SEAS SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 261 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: SingleFamilyResidentialLot PROPERTY SIZE: 7,500sq.ft. LOCATION: FromCarmichael RoadturnontoBarcardiRoad, taketheseventhcorneronleft. Turnintotheentrancegateand left.Thevacantlotisthetwentysecondpropertyontheleft. APPRAISEDVALUE: $90,000 7.VICTORIA GARDENS SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 60 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: SingleFamilyResidentialLot PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelsouthon GladstoneRoadfromJFKDrive entrancetoVictoriaGardens. Headingeast,proceedtothe secondT-junction,thepropertyis directlyopposite. APPRAISEDVALUE: $66,000 8.VICTORIA PARK SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 6 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Multi-familylot PROPERTY SIZE: 6,707sq.ft. LOCATION: Onthenorthernside ofBunchStreetabout60feed southofEastStreetandopposite CalvaryDeliveranceChurch APPRAISEDVALUE: $67,000 1.BAY STREET LOT NO. ParcelofLand PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:T wo-StoreyCommercialBuilding PROPERTY SIZE: 3,744sq.ft. LOCATION: Onthesouthernside ofBayStreetbetweenDeveauxS treetandGomezAlley APPRAISEDVALUE: $993,000 2.BEL-AIRESTATES – CARMICHAEL ROAD LOT NO. 259 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence, 3beds/2baths PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingeaston CarmichaelRoadfromFaith Avenuetakethefourthcorneron fourthhouseontheright. APPRAISEDVALUE: $186,000 3.CARMICHAEL ROAD LOT NO. ParcelofLand PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: SingleFamilyResidence 3beds/2baths PROPERTY SIZE: 12,000sq.ft. LOCATION: Travellingeaston CarmichaelRoadfromBacardi easementontheright. APPRAISEDVALUE: $401,882 4.CHIPPINGHAMSUBDIVISION LOT NO. 96 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:S ingle-storeyResidence 3beds/1bath PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000sq.ft. LOCATION: FromNassauStreet c ornerontheright-Dunmore Streetandthensecondcorner ontherightMusgroveStreet.The cornerleft. APPRAISEDVALUE: $120,000 5CORAL MEADOWS SUBDIVISION – WESTERN D ISTRICT LOT NO. 4 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence 3beds/2baths P ROPERTY SIZE: 7,500sq.ft. LOCATION: Westernsideof SymonetteRoadand150feet northwardofAdelaideRoadand a pproximatelyamilewestwardof CoralHarbourRoundabout. APPRAISEDVALUE: $260,000 6.DESTINY GARDEN SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 147 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence 3Beds/2Baths PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000sq.ft. LOCATION: Travellingwest onCarmichaelRoadfromthe intersectionofGladstoneRoad -about2,000feet-turnrightat theentranceofDestinyGarden Subdivision;turnleftatt-junction. Thepropertyisthe19thhouseon theright. APPRAISEDVALUE: $137,000 7.ELIZABETH ESTATES SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 178 P ROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence 5beds/1bath PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000sq.ft. LOCATION: EnterElizabeth E statesfromPrinceCharles,take Thepropertyislocatedonthe cornerofSt.VincentAvenueand GhanaCircle. APPRAISEDVALUE: $118,000 8.ENGLERSTONSUBDIVISION L OT NO. 19Block22 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: SingleFamilyResidence 2-beds/1-bath PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000sq.ft. L OCATION: Onthewesternside ofSt.CharlesVincentStreet. APPRAISEDVALUE: $64,000 9.ENGLERSTONSUBDIVISION LOT NO. 4Block7 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: TriplexApartmentbuildingP ROPERTY SIZE: 7,000sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingeaston CordeauxAvenuefromEast onKeyWestStreetthesubject propertyisthesixthbuildingon theleft. APPRAISEDVALUE: $243,000 10.FAITH GARDENS SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 23Block4 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-familyResidence 2beds/2baths PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000sq.ft. L OCATION: FromFaithAvenue enterFaithGardensandtravel eastalongClevelandBoulevard thentakethefourthcornero ntheleft.Thepropertyis the13thhouseontheleft. APPRAISEDVALUE: $184,000 11.GOLDEN GATES TWO S UBDIVISION LOT NO. 1010 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence 3 beds/2baths PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingweston CarmichaelRoad,turnsouthonto JackFishDrive;turnthroughthe fourthcornerontheright.The propertyisthethirdlotonthe right. APPRAISEDVALUE: $112,000 12.HAWKINS HILL LOT NO. 52 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:S ingle-storeyResidence 3beds/2baths PROPERTY SIZE: 6.175sq.ft. LOCATION: Southernsideof WindwhistleStreetjusteaston HawkinsHill. APPRAISEDVALUE: $275,000 13.JUBILEE GARDENS SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 48 P ROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence 3beds/1bath PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000sq.ft. LOCATION: FromFireTrailroad e nterJubileeGardensand thesecondhouseontheright. APPRAISEDVALUE: $128,000 14.MARSHALL ROAD LOT NO. 17D P ROPERTY DESCRIPTION: TriplexApartment One2-bedroom/2-bath&Two 2-bedroom/1-bath PROPERTY SIZE: 10,000sq.ft. L OCATION: Travelingwestalong MarshallRoadfromSouthBeach propertyisthefourthbuildingon theleftpaintedgreenwithwhite trim. APPRAISEDVALUE: $288,000 15.MILLENNIUM GARDENS SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 85 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence, 3beds/2baths P ROPERTY SIZE: 5,952sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingnorth onBethelAvenuefromHarold Roadtakethethirdcorneron theright,Headingeastpassthe t hirdT-junctionaroundthecurve tothejunctionofSis.Theresa SymonetteDrivethenturnleft ontoSis.MariaRahmingDrive. Thepropertyisthe14thhouseon theright. APPRAISEDVALUE: $182,000 16.NASSAUEASTSUBDIVISION LOT NO. 4Block8 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: ApartmentBuilding/Commercial ComplexP ROPERTY SIZE: 14,000sq.ft. LOCATION: Easterndistrictof NewProvidence.Thesubject propertyisonYamacrawHillR oadoppositeTreasureCove. APPRAISEDVALUE: $686,000 17.NASSAUVILLAGE SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 10&11Block48 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence 5beds/2baths PROPERTY SIZE: 10,000sq.ft. L OCATION: Travellingeastalong Taylorstreettakealeft attheT-junctionontoAlexandria Boulevard,thentakethethirdr ightontoMatthewsStreet.The propertyislocatedontheleft. APPRAISEDVALUE: $257,000 18.PARADISE CONDOMINIUMS LOT NO. 65 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: TownhouseUnit1Two-storey apartment P ROPERTY SIZE: Floorarea 1,215sq.ft. LOCATION: EasternsideofFaith AvenueNorth-100feetsouthof HamsterRoad. APPRAISEDVALUE: $150,000 19.PINEWOOD GARDENS SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 1438 P ROPERTY DESCRIPTION: TwostoreyResidence3beds/3baths PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000sq.ft. LOCATION: SouthonWildGuava AvenueA PPRAISEDVALUE: $315,000 20.SANDILANDS VILLAGE LOT NOS. 7and8 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence,with3 apartmentsunderconstruction PROPERTY SIZE: Lot77,970 s q.ft/Lot88,419sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingwestalong SandilandsVillageRoadfromFox HillRoad,taketheninthpaved T hepropertiesaresituatedatthe northwesternsideofthestreet. APPRAISEDVALUE: $277,000 21.SOLDIER ROAD PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Two-storeyCommercialBuilding PROPERTY SIZE: 4,750sq.ft. L OCATION: OnSoldierRoad 1,000feeteastofLadySlipper Road APPRAISEDVALUE: $309,000 22.SOUTH BEACH ESTATES SUBDIVISIONL OT NO. 1Block22 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Split LevelResidentialBuildingwith3 ApartmentUnits. PROPERTY SIZE: L and6,600sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelsouthalong EastStreetfromBamboo HeadingwestonBougainvillea Boulevard,takethesecond cornerontheright,turnleftat thet-junctionontoOxfordDrive. Thepropertyisthirdhouseon therightatthewesterncornerof ServilleDriveandOxfordAvenue. APPRAISEDVALUE: $297,000 23.TWYNAMHEIGHTS SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 61 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Two-storeyResidence,2beds/1 bath/withoneapartmentunit PROPERTY SIZE: 9,100sq.ft. LOCATION: Onthecornerof VictoriaStreetandCoronation Roadimmediatelyeastof APPRAISEDVALUE: $203,000 24.YAMACRAW BEACH ESTATES SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 470 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: TwostoreyResidence3beds/3baths PROPERTY SIZE: 7,200sq.ft. LOCATION: Southernsideof MayaguanaAvenueapproximately 99feeteastofYamacrawBeach Drive. APPRAISEDVALUE: $402,000 INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS INCLUSIVEOF TELEPHONE CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS TO: CB DISTRESSEDPROPERTIES, CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT, P.OBOX SS-6263 NASSAU, BAHAMAS OR EMAIL USAT: DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM* WE RESERVE THE RIGHTTO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS. FOR at least the last two decades, I have heard the stories about services being available to buy tickets in the Bahamas for lotteries operated in the United States. I have also heard conversations which indicated that money was being sent abroad to be bet on sports events. Activities such as these are clearly not in the interest of the Bahamas. Most Bahamians do not think such gambling is immoral. Neither does this column. Gambling to excess is clearly wrong. No one can argue that the person who gambles the money that his or her family needs for their household expenses is not doing something wrong. Someone who wagers some of their recreation funds is clearly well within the realm of normal behaviour. That, however, doesn’t even matter because governments shouldn’t and really can’t legislate morality. This may be the reason why his tory teaches us that Theocracies have never succeeded. We are fighting our way through very testing economic conditions. We all know there will be an end to this struggle, but none of us knows when this will be. Our earnings from overseas for tourism, property sales and Offshore services are all under pressure. So I must ask how much longer we can afford to send our bets overseas depleting our for eign exchange reserves and fattening the tax coffers of various states in the US? Clearly the answer is no longer. I am encouraged to hear the current debate about taxing illegal gambling. The simpler and more elegant solution would be the introduction of a national lottery. Most of those who bet on the national lottery are likely to be losers but the certainty is that we as a nation would all be winners. Let’s all be winners V IEW FROM A FAR J OHN I SSA n CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. A SOPHISTICATEDnew weather satellite rocketed into orbit Saturday, giving forecasters another powerful tool for tracking hurricanes and tornadoes, according to Associated Press. An unmanned rocket carrying the nation’s latest Geostationary Operational Environmental Satel lite blasted off early Saturday evening, a day late because of thunderstorms. The satellite headed toward a 22,000-mile-high orbit, where it will undergo six months of testing. It will circle Earth as a spare and be called into service when needed. The GOES satellite network provides continuous weather monitoring for 60 percent of the planet, including the United States. The newer ones also monitor solar flares that can disrupt communications on Earth, and track climate change. This is the second of the more advanced GOES satellites to be launched, containing sensors capable of providing better loca tion data and higher resolution pictures of storms. “These are probably about the most sophisticated weather satellites that we actually have on this planet ... off this planet,” said Andre Dress, deputy project manager for NASA. NASA manages the develop ment and launch of GOES satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The one launched Saturday, Goes O, will be renamed GOES 14 once it reaches its proper orbit in 1 1/2 weeks. The mission cost $499 million, including the cost of the Delta IV rocket. Sophisticated weather satellite rockets into orbit

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indicate an apparent homic ide, police yesterday deemed it as "suspicious" and were reluctant to classify the death as a murder, or possible suicide, until an autopsy is performed. " It appears to be a murder b ut we can't say at this stage," said Mr Moss, adding that he did not know how l ong the man had been dead before his body was discovered. Police said they hoped to have a positive identificationo f the deceased by today. T he Tribune understands he is a resident of Nassau Village, believed to be in his 30s. Meanwhile, officers in Grand Bahama are investigating the homicide of a manw ho was shot to death. Grand Bahama recorded i ts fourth homicide following t he shooting near an apartment in Freeport. P olice confirmed that the victim was a Haitian man who is believed to about 59o r 60 years of age. A motive for the killing is unknown, however, police last night said a 31-year-old man was assisting them in their inves-t igations. Asst Supt Clarence Reckley said the police are not releasing the victim’s identity until an official identificationb y next of kin is conducted today. “When we have matters of this nature, a certain process takes place where the body is officially identified at them orgue,” he said. A ccording to reports, an anonymous caller telephoned t he police to report a shooting at Garden Villas in the area of the basketball court. Officers were dispatched to investigate. Upon arrival,t hey were directed to an apartment where they saw a man sitting on a sofa with injuries to his body. “We don’t know if the vict im was home alone," said Mr Reckley. "The information we received is that the door was open and maybe someone walked in on him.” M r Reckley said the victim had sustained wounds to the left underarm and shoulder.T he victim was taken by EMS personnel to the Rand Memorial Hospital, where he died soon after 11.30pm. Police are thought to be f ollowing some significant leads in the matter and they hope to have an arrest soon. “We are pleased with the progress of our investigation. We are following significant l eads and hopefully will bring c losure to this matter in short order,” added Mr Reckley. “We are looking for a suspect, but the name of the sus-p ect is unknown at this time a nd officers are still out trying to confirm some things." C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 11 Addressing the elimination of the preliminary inquiry, the Attorney General said there is no need for “two criminal trials for one offence.” “It is inconvenient to victims, to witnesses, to the resources of the public,” he said. “(The tion (of preliminary inquiries be done without infringing an accused person’s right to a fair hearing within a reasonable time.” Doing away with preliminary inquiries can also reduce the time over which a trial can be conducted “by a greater use of written evidence as opposed to requiring persons to attend court to give oral testimony as to what are essentially facts that are not disputed,” he said. Addressing law reform in general, the Attorney General asked if it is necessary for a family member to attend court to identify a victim whose identity is not in dispute, and if a ‘trial within a trial’is really necessary. “Should the value of any statement by an accused simply be left to the jury for its due consideration,” he asked. Mr Barnett added that his ministry is committed to ensuring that the work of the Law Reform Commissioner continues unabated. Michael Barnett F ROM page one AGcalls for review of how court business is conducted F ROM page one Hanged man found bound and gagged

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By BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net ON the one hand he was glad t o have been in the boys’ 18 final against his doubles partner Darian King from Barbados. But on the other hand, Rodney Carey Jr. wished he hadp layed much better on Saturday at the Security & General International Tournament. The much anticipated showd own at the National Tennis Center between the two travelling buddies on the international tour didn't live up to its advanced billing as King dominated froms tart to finish in a 6-1, 6-3 decision. "When I woke up, I was a little tired this morning. So whenI went out there my legs fell kind o f heavy," said Carey Jr. about his sluggish performance. "Throughout the week, I had a lot of tough matches. "It took me a while to get into t he match. I had a three hour match in the semifinal yesterday. He (King the court and got through his m atches and came off. He was f resher than I was and he had a lot more energy." With the match being played at home, the Grand Bahamian w ished that he had put up a better showing and at least taken King to a third set, if not win the title. "I guess I will have other c hances," said Carey Jr. who will t ake a long vacation break before he back on the tour in July. King, in his second straight triumph over Carey Jr. in as many o utings this year, said he was just delighted to have been crowned the champion to add to his victory he clinched in their initial m eeting in Barbados a couple weeks ago. "I felt pretty good and I'm glad I came out victorious," he said. " I played pretty good today. I think I saved the best for the last.R odney didn't play that bad. I'm just glad that I was victorious." A fter breaking to and holding to go up 2-0 in the first set, King surged ahead on another break at 4-1 and again at 6-1. In the second set, King got a break to go up4 -2 and they both held serve for the set and the match. I t was probably more difficult for King, coming here and beati ng his doubles partner on his home turf. "It was pretty tough at first, but we made sure we played a fair game," said King, the No.2 seed about his No.3 seed teamm ate. "If we were on serve, we gave each other the benefit of the d oubt." Before leaving town, King and C arey Jr. were awarded the doubles title after their opponents Gabriel Flores of Puerto Rico and Diego DeCosta of Ecuador failed to show up. Flores apparently had a n injury. On their way to the final, King s wept Flores in two straight sets, 6-3, 6-2, but Carey Jr. had to e ndure a tough three setter 7-6 (4 semifinal matches on Friday. Meanwhile, two more doubles partners played in the girls 18 sin g le finals. In the end, American Kelsey Laurente lived up to her p rediction that she would be the champion as she prevailed witha 6-4, 6-3 win over compatriot Victoria Duval, the No.2 seed. T he week-long tournament hosted by the Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association saw Bermuda's No.2 seed Tyler Smith outlasted Grand Bahaman Danielle T hompson 6-2, 6-4 for the girls 14 crown. The duo teamed up to w in the doubles. And in the boys’ 14 singles final, Gian Issa of Suriname claimed the singles title over Bahamian Kevin Major Jr. on Thursday. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS Sluggish Carey undone by King’s majestic performance T ENNIS KNOWLES/BHUPATHI QUARTERS Mark Knowles and Mahesh Bhupathi will begin the second and f inal week of competition at Wimbledon in London, England as they play in the men's doubles quarter-final against the team of Orakash Amritraj from India and Aisam-Ui-Haq Quireshi from Parkinstan. T he number four seeds will play immedately following the top s eeded team of Americans Bob and Mike Bryan, who face a Czech Republic team of Leos Friedl and David Skoch. Meanwhile in mixed doubles, Knowles and Anna-Lena Groenefeld of Germany are the No.9 seeds in mixed doubles. After winning t heir opener, Knowles and Groenefeld are scheduled to face his former doubles partner Daniel Nestor of Canada and Russian Elena Vesnina, the No.5 seeds, in the third round. That match is scheduled for Tuesday. O n the other hand, Bhupathi and his Indian partner Sania Mirza, seeded No.13, will play their third round match today against Indian Leander Paes and Cara Black of Zimbabwe, the top seeds. TENNIS T -REX NATIONALS FRESH on the heels of the Security & General International Tournament, the Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association will begin their T -Rex Junior National Tennis Tournament at the National Tennis Center. The action will pick up today at 9 am with the first round in the singles in both the boys and girls divisions. The tournament will continue daily through Saturday. sports NOTES TENNIS D ARIAN KING , who was in majestic form. R ODNEY CAREY , tired after a lot of tough matches. K ELSEY LAURENTE , who lived up to her confident prediction. VICTORIA DUVAL , who lost to her compatriot. PHOTOS: Felip Major /T ribune staff

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 13 The Eleuthera native said e very year the field gets deeper and he has to exert more energyt o pull it off, but he's pleased with his performance. " After I saw what happened to him, that threw me off a bit," Brown said of Latoy Williams. "I didn't expect it. I felt a little sorry for what happened to him,b ut I had to keep my composure." M iller, thankful that he entertained the crowd, said he was " training hard all year and watching the guys running faster than me. I'm in North Dakato and this was the hardest winter ever for me. But today, I came out here prepared to run." Coming off a hamstring injury a couple months ago, Andretti Bain wasn't sure if he would have b een in any condition to run, but he didn't want to miss the "war," s o he was prepared to step to the line and just finish in the top four t o ensure he's on the team for the World's. Although he had already qual ified with the A standard for the World's, Latoy Williams wanted t o prove that his Bahamian lead ing time of 44.72 was no fluke inh is coming out party. "I felt I could run a really fast t ime, but everything happen for a reason," said Williams about the cramp in his left leg that forced him to hobble on the track as he stopped and rolled over in pain o n the back stretch. In the women's one-lapper, t here was no real challenge for Christine Amertil as she surged to t he title in 51.96. Grand Bahami ans Shakeitha Henfield (54.07 and Sasha Rolle (54.08 it out behind her and just ahead of 15-year-old high school sensat ion Shaunae Miller (55.52 "It went pretty well. I think I g ave away too much at the start, but I had it together coming home," Amertil said. " The girls are up and coming. I ran with them on the 4 x 4, so I k new what to expect from them." SANDS PRed Just as the 400s were being ran, O lympic triple jump bronze medalist Leevan 'Superman' S ands used his only attempt to clear a season's best of 56-feet,3 -inches to surpass the World’s A qualifying standard. " I just came to have fun. I love coming home and jumping before the home crowd," Sands said. "That was my best jump for the year. I had a little injury earlier in t he year, but I'm back and ready." T HOMAS UPSET AGAIN H oping to make a comeback after losing his title last year, World champion Donald Thomas had to settle for a disappointing third place in the men's high jump w ith a leap of 7-1 1/2. "I'm jumping good but I just c ouldn't put it together after I slipped," said Thomas, who bowed out at 7-3 when he had a slight problem with the run way. "I jumped higher at practice. Ij ust lost focus." Trevor Barry claimed the c rown with 7-3 3/4 dethroning champion Raymond Higgs, who d id 7-2 1/4 for second. But he called it a "mediocre" perfor mance. "I walked away uninjured, so that was a blessing,” Barry said. The condition was good for me. Can't get anybody than this. I just s hould have come in at a later height with only a few jumpers." H iggs, on the other hand, said he tried his best, but Barry was t he better man on the day. STUART NOT PLEASED With only two competitors, B ianca Stuart cleared 20-10 to repeat as champion in the wom e n's long jump as Keythra Richards did 18-3 1/4. " It was not good," Stuart said. "I didn't have enough recovery time, so I just tried to jump through it. I just need six more centimeters (to qualify for W orld's). I'm trying." Strongwoman Lavern Eve, r ecovering from a back injury, threw the women’s javelin 178-2. "I felt good, but today was just a feel for where I'm at with the injury," she said. " It's not really hurting, but I feel good about where I'm at." ‘Fireman’ proves too hot to handle FROM page 15 To her credit on a wet Friday night, Ferguson-McKenzie sped to the A qualifying time (11.30 seconds) in her winning time of 11.12 to dethrone veteran Chandra Sturrup, who had to settle for second in 11.41 with collegian S heniqua 'Q' Ferguson taking third in 11.50. Ferguson-McKenzie, who came back on Saturday night to pull off the sprint double in the 200, said she was more concerned about running a faster time in the century than winning the title. "I was trying to see if I could r un a 10.9 today. I felt it was there, but I'm having a little problem trying to set my race up," said Ferguson-McKenzie, who led from start to finish. And it couldn't have come at a b etter place before the home crowd as she dedicated the race to h er long time 'Godfather,' mentor and motivator, legendary Tomm y A. Robinson, who will be honoured at a luncheon on July2 6 at Sandals Royal Bahamian for pioneering the Bahamas' i nternational track programme. Despite the fact that she lost her title, Sturrup said when she saw Ferguson-McKenzie surged ahead of her, she tried to catchh er, but was unable to do so. "She ran a very good race. Hats o f to her," said Sturrup, who have always seemed geared up to win a t her best when she come home. "Physically I felt fine. The rain and the delay sot of set me back. Hopefully next week when I go to Oslo, I will run a better race." S heniqua Ferguson, a member of the Olympic Games team lasty ear for the 100, said she knew that she had the potential to run w ith the elite senior sprinters. "I just was focusing on getting a good start. I know I have good top end speed, so basically for me, it was just getting a good start a nd getting out there," Ferguson said. I n her speciality, FergusonMcKenzie clocked 22.83 to outl ast two rising young collegians in Sheniqua Ferguson (23.48 Jernise Saunders (24.45 ATKINS WIN AGAIN The men's straight away race d rew a little more excitement as the race was almost finished b efore the starter eventually called back the field for a false start. But when they re-ran the fea tured race on day one of then ationals, the fans stood to watch reigning World Championship sil-v er medalist Derrick Atkins held off a pesky field to stop the clock i n 10.25, which was just shy of the A qualifying time of 10.21 for this year's World Championships. A drian Griffith ended up second in 10.44 with 110 hurdles spe c ialist Shamar Sands cmng in third in 10.54. "Basically, I just want to thank God I was able to finish the rounds," Atkins said. "This year, I've been up and down, so I'm just happy to come here for the win." Not sure that he would have been able to run here because of the nagging hamstring injury, Atkins said he's just trying to get back into his old form before he head to Berlin for the World's in August." Also hoping to make the trip to Germany as well for the 100 is Griffith, who felt he ran better in the heats. "In the final, I just lost control," he said. "I had the race. I should have kept my exposure." After slipping coming out of the blocks, Sands said he didn't get the start he wanted and that made the difference in his per formance. "I just wanted to be good in the drive phrase," he said. "I feel great about my times (in the 110 hurdles where he's lowered his national record twice this year). I think the 100 will only help me." ROLLE TRIUMPH Karlton Rolle, fresh of his appearance in the NCAA Championships, took the men's deucein 21.20, holding off Adrian Griffith (21.27 "I felt really good. I didn't run like I wanted to run, but I knew things would have gone the way I wanted it," he said. "I'm just hap-py that I came out with the win." By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net BACK for his first appearance since winning the title about five years ago, Grand Bahamian Delroy Boothe ran away from the field to easily take the Bahamas Olympic Association 22nd Olympic Day run on Saturday. Boothe, who was holding off to run the 5,000 metres at the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations' National Open Track and Field Championships later in the evening, was unchallenged as he topped the field in 23 minutes and 15 seconds in the five-mile early riser. His nearest rival in the race that started from the Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium and ended on Paradise Island after covering a route along Thomp-s on Boulevard to Nassau Street to Bay Street, was Sidney Collie in 23.53. Ashland Murray Sr. was third in 31.48. "I didn't go out the way I really wanted to," Boothe said after the race. "The race w as alright so far. It was a pretty early start b ecause I really got to bed late after going to the Nationals last night (Friday Boothe admitted that he didn't allow h is rivals to get close to me after he surged out front in the first 1,500. After that, it was smooth sailing as he coasted to the victory. Taking the women's title was Ravonne Bethel in 32.01. Meanwhile from Montague foreshore, organizers staged the walk segment of the race that traveled west onB ay Street and headed over the new bridge t o the finish line on Paradise Island. With perennial champion Phil Moss opting to run where he was fifth overall, vet-e ran Richard Adderley emerged as the new champion stopping the clock in 21.39 well ahead of former Member of Parliament for Blue Hills, Leslie Miller, in 22.38. " I think it was a very good race. A lady set an early pace at the beginning, but I decided to stay behind her and bide my time," Adderley stressed. "I thought I had m issed the race, but I'm glad that I didn't." A fter setting the stage at the beginning, Cheryl Rolle had to settle for third overall to clinch the women's segment in 22.55. N ot that many participants competed in the first race organized by the new administration headed by Wellington Miller. Don Cornish, one of the six first vice presidents, said it was a good indication of the work they have to do. "We had some challenges finding a date b ecause June when it is normally held was f ull," Cornish said. "We finally got the calendar cleared, but we had a clash with the swim nationals and the track nationals thisw eekend. We just wanted to ensure that we gave the public the opportunity to compete in the annual fun run and walk as we celebrate the anniversary of the IOC." M iller said they were just delighted to have put this year's run on the shelve, but they will be planning for an event bigger event next year. W ith no more major events on the cale nder for this year after the Caribbean Games were called off, Miller said he and Algernon Cargill, another vice president,w ill head to Mexico in August for the Solidarity Course. Following that, Miller and secretary general Rommel Knowles will head to Copenhagen to attend the IOC Convention. Miller will be kept busy as he and Roy Colebrooke, another vice president, willt ravel to India for the Commonwealth G ames Confederation Meeting. Next year, the BOA will be branching into new territory with Korath Wrightg oing to the Winter Olympic Games for the snowboarding competition in February. Also next year is the Central American and Caribbean Games, the World YouthO lympics and the Commonwealth Games. Delroy Boothe runs away with the title TRACKANDFIELD Double triumph for Debbie Ferguson F ROM page 15 I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s DONALD THOMAS, who settled for third place. BAHAMAS NATIONAL OPEN TRACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS TREVOR BARRY, who dethroned Raymond Higgs. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f Felip Major /Tribune staff

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With a dominating and balanced team effort, the country’s largest swim club easily retainedits position as national champions. The Barracuda Swim club totalled 2152.5 points to win the3 8th Annual Royal Bank of Canada (RBC pionships hosted by the Bahamas Swimming Federation, over the weekend at the Betty Kelly Kenning Aquatic Center. The Sea Bees (1369 Swift Swimming for second place( 1326) while Dolphin Swimming Club was fourth with 745.5 points. The YMCA Waverunners out of Grand Bahama closed out the top five with 369 points. F reeport Aquatic Club posted 29 points while the Flamingoes e nded with two. The Barracudas were led by the dynamic duo of Dionisio Carey and Dustin Tynes who dominated the Boys’ 11-12 division. In individual events, the pair had 16 first place, 11 second place a nd two third place finishes between them. The 12-year-old Tynes, in his f inal year in the division, recorded his eight first place finishes in t he 50m, 100m, and 200m Breaststroke; 100m, 200m and 400m Freestyle; and finished with the 200m and 400m Individual Medley. He finished second in the 50m, 100m and 200m Butterfly; and the 100m and 200m Butterfly with a third place finish in the 50m Freestyle. Carey, at just 11-years-old and w ith another year of eligibility in the division also took eight first p lace titles. He took first in the 50m, 100m 200m Backstroke; 50m, 100m,a nd 200 Butterfly; 50m Freestyle a nd 200m Breaststroke. Carey finished second in the 50m and 100m Breaststroke, 100m Freestyle, 200m Freestyle, 200 and 400m Individual Medley and a third place in the 400m Freestyle. Both swimmers reached numerous qualifying marks in Caribbean Island Swimming Championships and CentralA merican and Caribbean Amat eur Swimming Confederation C hampionships. The female sector of the Barracudas also played a vital in the team’s championship performance. Bria Deveaux took sev en first place finishes in the Girls1 3-14 age group. Deveaux, younger sister of the country’s first female Swimming Olympian, N ikia Deveaux, won the 50m, 100m, 400m and 800m Freestyle; 100m Backstroke; 200m Butterfly and 200m Individual Medley. In the Girls 15 and Over, Alicia Lightbourne took a quartet of first place finishes in the 50m,1 00m and 200m Breaststroke; and 4 00m Freestyle. Other top performers from the meet included Evante Gibson from the YMCA Waverunners ( six individual medals: 50m, 100m Freestyle; 50m, 100m Butterfly; 50m Breaststroke and 200m Indi v idual Medley) and a myriad of a thletes that qualified for international competition. Eighteen swimmers qualified f or the CISC, nine produced quali fying marks for the Central American and Caribbean Games, while Arianna Vanderpool-Wallace passed the standard for theY outh Olympic Games. It was the 26th consecutive year RBC chiefly sponsored theB ahamas National Swimming Championships in partnership with the Bahamas Swim Federat ion. RBC was also the inaugur a l sponsor of the Academic All Bahamas Swimming Team Award. B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net C HARLIE 'Softly' Robins has coached so many teams in his day that he knows a good one when h e see it. Robins, assisted by Ivan Butler and Mario Bowleg, will t ake a mixture of youth and expe rience to the Caribbean Basketball Confederation Champi onships in Tortola, British Virgin Islands. T he team, managed by Rodney Wilson, was expected to leavet own today with the following players: Quentin Hall, Scott Forbes, Alonzo Hinds, Doyle Hudson, Cordero Seymour, Jef frey Henfield, Quentin Demertte,G ijo Bain, Lorenzo Davis, Brian Bain, Torrington Cox and Jeremy H utchinson. Sharon 'the General' Storr will travel as the technical director. According to Robins, who is coaching his fifth national team, t he team will have finish the week-long tournament with at l east the bronze medal in order to advance to the next level. " We're looking pretty good. We were skeptical at the beginning with ball players saying that they are coming in, but due to circumstances beyond their cont rol, they couldn't come," said Robins, of two key players in Magnum Rolle and Benoit Davis. "When a fellow is looking after h is career, you can't stop him. Maybe the timing is just a little off r ight no, but we were able to settle down and got in players like Scott Forbes, Quentin, Brian Bain, Jeremy Hutchinson and Gijo Bain. So we have guys with t he experience, having played on t his circuit before." Confident Robins, however, said although they are lacking in height, he's confident that they can make the necessary adjustment and play with who they have. The Bahamas will open play o n Tuesday against Barbados in G roup A. T heir second game on Wednesday will be against Jamaica and they will close out the round robin play on Thursday against Trinidad & Tobago. The team will have to finish in the top two to advance to the playoff that start on Friday. The top two teams from Group B will come from either Cuba, Antigua, British Virgin Islands or Bermuda. "I think the magnitude of this t ournament, we should have sufficient height to qualify for then ext round," Robins projected. "If we go to the next round, we w ill need all of the horses. “But right now, we have a very experienced team, led by what I feel is the best guards assembled to make up for our height disadv antage." Jeffrey Henfleld, back home a fter playing in the ABA League in New Mexico, said the team h ave the potential to win the gold medal. "At every position, we have players who can hold their own," he said. "As for myself, I'm ready t o go out there and do whatever it takes for us to get the win." A sk Scott Forbes and he will concur with everybody in saying t hat the federation indeed put together a very good team. "We have a lot of firepower. Once as we can gel, we should do very well," Forbes stated. "This team should be one of the best in the Caribbean, sot here's no reason why we should not come back with a medal, maybe even win it." The tournament wraps up on July 4. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS Robins banks of youth and experience SWIMMING CARIBBEAN BASKETBALL CONFEDERA TION CHAMPIONSHIPS Brilliant Barracudas national champions again BSC’s Bria Deveaux. SBAC’s Tremaine Allen. PHOTOS: Felip Major /Tribune staff

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C M Y K C M Y K MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 I NSIDE Trevor Barry outjumps rivals Somethin’ for EveryoneON THE GO.NOW OPENAT THE LYNDEN PINDLING INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT IN THE U.S. DEPARTURE LOUNGE AND THE DOMESTIC / INTERNATIONAL TERMINAL.DOWNTOWN LOCATION COMING SOON.(OPPOSITE THE BRITISH COLONIAL HILTON) By BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net C HRIS 'Fireman' Brown exploded down the home stretch to avoid NAIA champion Ramon Miller r aining on his parade at the Bahamas National Open Track and Field Championships on Saturday night. With the field depleted a bit a fter the fastest two quarter-mil ers this year, newcomer Latoy Williams pulled up after the first turn and Andrae Williams didn't make it to the starting line, Brown had to contend with a couple of his 4 x 400 relay team-mates. But in the grand finale at the Thomas A. Robinson Track and F ield Stadium, Brown had a little too much down the stretch to pull off the win in 45.21. In a whisker behind him hoping for the upset was Miller, the newc omer last year, in 45.35 with last year's NCAA champion Andretti Bain setting for third in 46.02. "I just want to thank the Lord for allowing me to come out here and finish," said Brown in defending his title. "It was a tough race, but I knew a lot of fans wanted to see me come through, so this was f or them." ‘Fireman’ too hot to handle P a t r i c k H a n n a / B I S P a t r i c k H a n n a / B I S By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net ON the eve of officially bring crowned as the new 200 metre champion at the 2001 World Championships in Edmonton, Canada, Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie sped to victory in the women's 100 at the Thomas S. Robinson Track and Field Stadium. C HRIS BROWN h eads the field in the men’s 400 metres. At left is Ramon Miller. DEBBIE FERGUSON-MCKENZIE cruises to victory in the women’s 200 metres ahead of Sheniqua Ferguson. Latoy Williams pulls up with cramp SEE page 13 DOUBLE TRIUMPH F OR DEBBIE FER GUSON SEE page 13

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 16, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE S OMETHING unique is taking place on Shirley Street. Centreville House and its grounds are undergoing a restoration. Eventually, the house itself will be fully renovated to its former splendour at which time it will become the home of the National Museum of TheB ahamas. In the meantime, the first phase, a creative transformation of the long-neglected grounds, was initiated on March 30. Spearheaded by Orjan Lindroth, a Bahamian developer, and Antonius Roberts, sculptor and open space designer, under thea uspices of the Antiquities, Monuments and Museum Corporation (AMMC on that date and, barely three months later, is almost completed. The vision and direction of this project was built on a foundation of several important guiding principles to make it a communityp roject; to create a city park accessible to and for Bahamians from all walks of life; to reflect and preserve aspects of Bahamian history that belong uniquely to these islands and to maximiset he use of native wood, plants and trees and observe a ‘green’ phil osophy by recycling organic material and mulching it back into the ground. Design Earthstone Construction is responsible for the design, fabrication and implementation of the pond and sculpture garden, the fountain, the amphitheatre-style seating and the perimeter pathway; Native Sun Nursery provided and planted trees, transported logs and donated crane time; Design Elements serve as the consulting botanist and landscapers; Rocky Farms and Fox Hill Nursery are providing many of the native plants and shrubs; Tony’s Carpentry built the Lucayan style tree house and huts, drawing on his own native Guyanian and Indian heritage for authenticity, and Robin Hardyw as responsible for milling some of the wood on site for the bench es. Several artists have created work specifically for this site. Antonius Roberts has donated and installed his “Driftwood” sculpture; Jessica Colebrooke has created her lovely ceramic tiles picturing various Bahamian fish these will be installed in the main fountain in front of the house; Chantal Bethel carved a wooden bench in honour of her late father, a well respected agrono m ist in the country; Tyrone Ferguson is fabricating a bronze sund ial for the pond area; Lavar Munroe is creating a mural inspired by the Lucayan Indian heritage, the placement of which is still to be decided; John Cox and his summer students will add their creativity to adding h ieroglypics to the huts; additionally, local schoolchildren guide d by Kelley Knowles, Antonius Roberts‘ assistant, painted the local found stones that form the Turtle effigy in the ground. Local citizens such as Jermaine and LIttle Mitch Finley collect-e d stones on the shore, carried them to the site and placed them all around the perimeter of the central area. Many generous donors have shared in the expe rience by giving trees, plants and herbs and helping dig them in. This now beautiful green space boasts a pond with a fountain and sculpture garden and a labyrinthperfect for a quiet reflective stroll. The stones painted by the chil dren form a giant turtle and the path which circles the entire area has sculpted Madeira wood benches placed at intervals throughout the area. Orjan Lindroth, Lindroth Development Company & Schooner Bay, Abaco, facilitated the donation of a massive boulder from the New Providence Development Company now placed close to the entrance from Shirley Street and a smaller boul d er was placed on the easterly side of the main driveway and n estled into a sandy area planted out with low growing shrubs and vines. Garden At the southerly end of the park is a herb garden in the form of an hutea which abuts the space designated as a children’s play area. This includes the existing giant rubber tree now graced with wooden swings and benches offering some cooling shade as well as amphitheatre style seating for parents to watch their children play in a safe environment or, in the future, audiences to watch musical or dramatic performances on the main lawn. This area is completed by an amazing wooden tree house andt wo smaller huts in the style of a Lucayan Indian village. The easterly portion of the grounds immediately in front of the house have also been restored and re-planted. The original fountain on this part of the property is now under re-construction and is scheduledf or completion by the end of June. The transformation of Centreville House EARTHSTONE CONSTUCTION working on the Central Fountain. CHILDREN FROM the Bahamas Children's Emergency Hostel visited on Friday June 26 and enjoyed playing by the pond. They also enjoyed the Arawak-style Tree House and Huts.

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EU considered slashing Bahamas grant funding C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.97 $4.03 $4.25 n n n n !!! bn #&'"t&&''#"#)% ## n'*#&'#%, '&', (+(%,& %)*& $%#" ,#%&*'&'#" (&'#!"'&!#$## $#'"' #"-'!&&,#(%#$$#%'("','# (+(%,,#(% rtf * Replaced by Bahamas Couriers, business owned b y Edward Fitzgerald * Mr Fitzgerald helped build Mr Ritchie’s business through selling former firms to him in 2005 n By NEIL HARTNELL Business Editor GLOBAL United, the troubled logistics/transshipment business headed by Captain Jackson Ritchie, has suffered a fresh blow by losing the contract to act as Bahamas country representative for UPS, Tribune Business can reveal. Officials for UPS, the global courier and package delivery business, confirmed via a telephone interview and in writing that Bahamas Couriers Ltd replaced Global United as their Bahamian-based contractor for all business with effect from Saturday. Ironically, Bahamas Couriers is owned and headed byEdward Fitzgerald, father of PLP Senator Jerome Fitzgerald. It was Mr Fitzgerald’s decision to sell his former businesses, Global Customs Brokers &T rucking and World Bound Couriers, to Mr Ritchie in 2005 that allowed the latter to enter the Nassau market and form Global United by integrating those firms with his then-Tanja Enterprises. Now, it seems as if Global United and Mr Ritchie’s financial difficulties have given Mr Fitzgerald a new lease of life and enabled him to re-enter a market in which he was once a major player. A June 26, 2009, letter from UPS country manager Paul Capote to his Bahamian corporate customers, a copy of which has been seen by Tribune Business, said: “We would like to announce that effective immediately, Bahamas Couriers will Global United loses Bahamas UPS contract n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net C heckers Caf is celebrating 20 years in business with a $3.2 million expansion that involves the construction of its fourth New Providence location, which will have a full service, 24-hour wash house attached to it. Owner and operator of the allBahamian eatery, Gus Cartwright, told Tribune Business that the chain’s newest restaurant is meant to enhance the community in which it is built. He added that the latest caf was an opportunity to reinvent the Checkers brand, which will be turned over to his daughter as he moves closer to retirement. The caf interior is almost fully tiled with the same branded colours of the exterior. The kitchen has been upgraded with two large walk-in freezers. “We just can’t be the same old Checkers that we were before,” Mr Cartwright said. Give the size of the investment to con struct the caf and wash house, Mr Cartwright said he expects a return in 10-15 years, but is hopeful of quick success for a location which is expected to create 30 permanent jobs. “It’s going to be a little bit longer and harder,” he said. “But I’m not so much concerned about crying about what’s going on in the foreign markets. I must learn from them and raise my product to the same level, where the same customer who goes to them would feel comfortable coming to me.” Mr Cartwright said eateries throughout the Bahamas, such as his own, have to raise their product to the level of for eign competitors, as “the food may be good but the presentation is not”. Nestled on the southwest corner of the intersection between Fox Hill and Joe Farrington Roads, the new restaurant’s red and white faade contrasts with the dismal, grey rock walls of Fox Hill Prison. Checkers’ signature tiled walls invigorate the intersection, which has become a commercial zone teeming with small Bahamian-owned businesses. Mr Cartwright said it was crucial that the new building complement the Fox Hill community. A lot of these people don’t have the convenience of having this kind of stuff in their immediate community, and I felt like this would be a complement to where they live. We have had that kind of reception,” he said. “We want to do it right, so it is impressive.” Like its sister Carmichael location, the Fox Hill restaurant features a drivethrough that will be open late. Mr Cartwright argued that the drive-through was a safe alternative to having the establishment’s door open at night, and w ill protect customers and employees a like. T he addition of the 180-washer and dryer laundromat seemed a necessary and innovative upgrade to the Checkers brand, said Mr Cartwright, who is already in that business via the Sunrise coin laundry on Bar 20 corner. This latest Sunrise laundry features state-of-the-art washers and dryers, and will include while-you-wait pressing services. Mr Cartwright said Sunrise Fox Hill would not be directly competing for business with the nearby Superwash outlet, but it was simply considered it a necessary addition to the community. “I don’t think it is direct competition, but a complement to the area,” said Mr Cartwright. “Superwash has a long-time outstanding business, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t avenues for others.” Mr Cartwright was nominated for the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’sOutstanding Business Person of the year award. Checkers ‘reinvents brand’ through $3.2m expansion * Owner celebrates 20 years in business with fourth eatery location that combines wash house * Move to create 30 permanent jobs, and key part in plans for succession by daughter * Investment return eyed in 10-15 years * Cartwright says Bahamian eateries must match f oreign rivals on food and presentation Jackson Ritchie S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 1 1 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL Business Editor THE Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s president has sug gested to the Prime Minister that the Government establish an Office for Private Sector Development, in a bid to cre ate a ‘one-stop shop’ for all permitting/approval issues and bring “more focus” to expanding commerce. Khaalis Rolle told Tribune Business he put forward the suggestion when Chamber executives met with Mr Ingraham on Monday last week as part of Chamber week activities. “One of the issues that I suggested to the Prime Minister was establishing an Office for Private Sector Development,” Mr Rolle said. “If we’re going to expand the private sector and take some of the burden off the public sector with respect to employment, we need to have a focused effort. “Dealing with all the government departments on various issues is not the best way for us. Some might say the private sec tor controls its own destiny, but the legislative creates the frame work and the environment, and Chamber chief calls for Private Sector Office S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B * Nation ‘a very low performer’ in implementing European-financed projects * Set to get 4.7m Euros in 10th EDF for Family Island infrastructure projects * Move aims to alleviate poverty and create ‘one Bahamas economic space’ n By NEIL HARTNELL Business Editor THE European Union (EU ing the only form of grant funding available to the Bahamas because this nation is "a very low per former" in implementing projects Brussels is financing, with some 4.7 million Euros largely S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B * * I I n n v v e e s s t t m m e e n n t t d d e e s s i i g g n n e e d d t t o o r r e e a a l l i i s s e e i i n n t t e e r r n n a a l l s s y y n n e e r r g g i i e e s s , , r r a a i i s s e e t t r r a a n n s s a a c c t t i i o o n n v v o o l l u u m m e e s s a a n n d d l l i i n n k k t t o o e e c c o o m m m m e e r r c c e e p p l l a a n n s s * * M M a a n n a a g g i i n n g g d d i i r r e e c c t t o o r r s s a a y y s s : : ' ' W W h h o o c c a a n n a a s s k k f f o o r r b b e e t t t t e e r r ? ? ' ' g g i i v v e e n n e e c c o o n n o o m m i i c c e e n n v v i i r r o o n n m m e e n n t t a a n n d d s s t t r r a a t t e e g g i i c c i i n n v v e e s s t t m m e e n n t t s s * * N N o o n n a a c c c c r r u u a a l l l l o o a a n n s s b b e e l l o o w w i i n n d d u u s s t t r r y y a a v v e e r r a a g g e e a a t t 5 5 . . 1 1 5 5 . . 2 2 % % , , a a l l t t h h o o u u g g h h d d e e l l i i n n q q u u e e n n c c i i e e s s ' ' m m o o r r e e c c h h a a l l l l e e n n g g i i n n g g ' ' * * 3 3 0 0 n n e e w w a a c c c c o o u u n n t t s s p p e e r r m m o o n n t t h h a a t t M M i i a a m m i i b b r r a a n n c c h h , , w w i i t t h h $ $ 2 2 3 3 m m n n e e t t l l o o a a n n g g r r o o w w t t h h s s i i n n c c e e y y e e a a r r s s t t a a r r t t n By NEIL HARTNELL Business Editor BANK of the Bahamas International is invest ing $2 million in bringing all its credit card proBank invests $2m on in-house card process S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B

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n By RoyalFidelity Capital Markets LAST week, investors traded in seven out of the 24 listed securities, of which two advanced, one declined and four remained unchanged. E E Q Q U U I I T T Y Y M M A A R R K K E E T T A total of 21,261 shares changed hands, representing an increase of 9,813 shares or 86 per cent, compared to last week's trading volume of 11,448 shares. Commonwealth Bank (CBL with 9,220 shares trading hands, its stock increasing by $0.14 to end the week at $5.64. Doctors Hospital Health Systems (DHS advancer for the second consecutive week, its share price rising by $0.17 to end the week at $1.77 on a volume of 6,200 shares. B B O O N N D D M M A A R R K K E E T T Investors traded $20,000 (par value (Bahamas Due 2022 (FBB22 $6,000 (par value Bank (Bahamas Notes Due 2015 (FBB15 C C O O M M P P A A N N Y Y N N E E W W S S E E a a r r n n i i n n g g s s R R e e l l e e a a s s e e s s : : FirstCaribbean Internationa l Bank (CIB d ited results for the six months ended April 30, 2009. CIB reported net income of $13.9 million for the most recent quarter, a decline of $12.3 million or 47 per cent compared to $26.2 million in the same period last year. Net interest income of $32.1 million for the quarter was down by $8.5 million or 21 per cent, while operating income of $5.8 million was up by $2.1 million from the $3.7 million reported in 2008. Operating expenses of $17.9 million were up $1.5 million or 9 per cent from $16.5 million in the same quarter in 2008, which management attributed to increases in salaries and benefits and bank license fees. FirstCaribbean said it was proactively managing these expenses. CIB increased its loan loss expense by $4.4 million to $5.9 million, compared to $1.6 million in the 2008 second quarter, due to increased provisioning by the bank. E arnings per share for the s ix month period of $0.248 fell b y $0.006 from $0.254 for the 2008 second quarter. CIB said the results reflect current economic conditions and are in line with management's expectation. CIB’s total assets and total liabilities were $3.8 billion and $ 3.2 billiob respectively, comp ared to $4.1 billion and $3.5 billion at year-end 2008. A decline of $378 million in total deposits to $3.1 billion, compared to year-end, accounted for the drop in total liabilities. Correspondingly a decline of $351 million in securities investments of $730 million contributed to the reduction in total assets. CARIBBEAN CROSSINGS LTD Notice of Redemption Installment Payment The company would like to inform all holders of Caribbean Crossings 8 per cent Series A Preference Shares that the scheduled Fourth Redemption Installment payment will be made on July 1, 2009, to all shareholders of record June 1, 2009. This payment is being made in accordance with the terms and conditions attached to the Series A preference shares, which are as follows: “The company will make five annua l redemption installment paym ents of $2 per share, comm encing on July 1, 2006, and on each July 1 thereafter through and including July 1, 2010. The Series A Preferred Shares will be redeemed for cash through such annual $2 July 1 payments, plus any divid ends accumulated but unpaid t o the redemption date." A A n n n n u u a a l l G G e e n n e e r r a a l l M M e e e e t t i i n n g g ( ( A A G G M M ) ) N N o o t t e e s s : : Abaco Markets (AML announced it will be holding its Annual General Meeting on Tuesday, July 21, 2009, at 6pm at the Wyndam Nassau Resort & Crystal Palace Casino, West Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas. Shareholders of record as of June 19, 2009, will be qualified to vote at the Annual Meeting. Benchmark (Bahamas (BBL holding its Annual General Meeting on Thursday, July 23, 2009, at 6.30pm at the British Colonial Hilton, Governor's Ballroom, Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas. Shareholders of record as of June 23, 2009, will be qualified to vote at the Annual Meeting. D D i i v v i i d d e e n n d d N N o o t t e e s s : : F irstCaribbean Internationa l Bank (CIB dividend of $0.15 per share, payable on June 29, 2009, to all shareholders of record date June 19, 2009. Cable Bahamas (CAB declared a dividend of $0.07 per share, payable on June 30, 2009, to all shareholders of record date June 15, 2009. Commonwealth Bank (CBL of $0.05 per share, payable on June 30, 2009, to all shareholders of record date June 15, 2009. Consolidated Water (CWCO dend of $0.013 per share, payable on August 10, 2009, to all shareholders of record date July 1, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE ROYAL FIDELITY MARKETWRAP The Bahamian Stock Market F F I I N N D D E E X X 7 7 8 8 5 5 . . 6 6 0 0 ( ( 5 5 . . 9 9 0 0 % % ) ) Y Y T T D D B B I I S S X X C C L L O O S S I I N N G G C C H H A A N N G G E E V V O O L L U U M M E E Y Y T T D D P P R R I I C C E E S S Y Y M M B B O O L L P P R R I I C C E E C C H H A A N N G G E E AML$1.39 $-0-18.71% BBL$0.63 $-0-4.55% BOB$6.94 $-0-9.16% BPF$11.00 $-0-6.78% BSL$7.92 $-0-22.28% BWL$3.15 $-00.00% CAB$11.39$-0-18.82% CBL$5.64 $0.14 9,220-19.43% CHL$2.74 $-0-3.18% CIB$10.38 $-0-0.67% CWCB$3.33 $-0.142,80548.00% DHS$1.77 $0.176,200-30.59% FAM$7.76 $-0-0.51% FBB$2.37 $-360.00% FCC$0.30 $-00.00% FCL$5.09 $-0-1.55% FCLB$1.00 $-3,0000.00% FIN$10.97$-0-7.58% ICD$5.50 $-0-10.28% JSJ$10.50 $-0-5.41% PRE$10.00 $-00.00% International Markets F F O O R R E E X X R R a a t t e e s s W W e e e e k k l l y y % % C C h h a a n n g g e e C C A A D D $ $ 0 .8675 -1.60 G G B B P P 1.6540+0.16 E E U U R R 1 .4075 +0.86 C C o o m m m m o o d d i i t t i i e e s s W W e e e e k k l l y y % % C C h h a a n n g g e e C C r r u u d d e e O O i i l l $ 69.42-0.97 G G o o l l d d $940.10 + 0.53 I I n n t t e e r r n n a a t t i i o o n n a a l l S S t t o o c c k k M M a a r r k k e e t t I I n n d d e e x x e e s s : : W W e e e e k k l l y y % % C C h h a a n n g g e e D D J J I I A A 8,438.39 -1.19 S S & & P P 5 5 0 0 0 0 9 18.90-0.25 N N A A S S D D A A Q Q 1,838.22+0.59 N N i i k k k k e e i i 9,877.39 +0.93 Share your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your story. INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Business Editor PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham believes the enforcement ofn ew processes relating to the C19 or 10-day bond Customs declaration form will “not impede the flow or speed of business”, as s ome in the private sector fear, Tribune Business can reveal. Mr Ingraham informed Bahamas Chamber of Commerce executives of his position when they met with him last Monday as part of Chamber week activities, the organisation’s president confirmed to Tribune Business. K haalis Rolle said Chamber executives had raised several Customs-related issues with the Prime Minister, including the previous controversy of the C13 baggage declaration form process changes, which many courier companies felt would negatively impact their business, as well as t he latest amendments regarding C19 processes. Mr Rolle said neither issue had been addressed fully by the Chamber as an organisation, the C13 issue having been tackled chiefly by the companies affected,who had formed the Bahamas Transhipment and Logistics Association. M embers of that Association had provided feedback to theC hamber, and on both Customs i ssues Mr Rolle said: “They have some valid concerns, but theP rime Minister’s position is that these new processes will not i mpact the flow or speed of business. All it does is enforce the e xisting law. The Prime Minister believes taxes due are not beingf ully collected.” T he Chamber chief suggested that importers, brokers and couri-e rs needed “reassurance” from the Government and Customs D epartment “that the processes will not significantly impact the f low of business, and if that is achieved it puts us in a win-win s ituation. ‘The Government will be bet ter able to track the flow of goods, and service providers willbe able to provide expedited ser v ices.” However, brokers and i mporters are continuing to express concern over the prop osed C19 changes. One broker, speaking on condition of anonymity, said all companies importing goods under this formwere required to lodge a 10-day b ond as security for payment with Customs. This meant they had 10 days after the goods were removed from t he dock in which to submit entries and pay the required Customs dutiesa nd Excise taxes. The broker suggested that t he changed C19 process, which will now only allow perishables, gold, bullion and coins to be removed before due taxes are paid, effectively represented ab reach of contract between Customs and the industry. To obtain a 10-day bond, the broker said the security payment h ad to be signed-off by a commercial bank and then go to the Public Treasury, where Stamp Tax was paid. It then went to Customs, and the bond wasl odged. The broker, like other major Bahamian companies who import, also questioned why it w as necessary to change the processes when all Customs had to do, in the event of non-payment of due taxes and entries within the 10-day period, was toe nforce the bond. Customs could a lso warn importers and brokers it encountered problems with that i t would not permit the clearance of any more shipments until duet axes were paid. Bahamian businesses had last w eek told Tribune Business that t hey feared consumer prices would increase as a result of the C 19 changes, due to the increased costs of holding extra inventory to c ounter the likelihood that product shipments would be delayedi n clearing the dock. They also expressed concern o ver cash flow issues, as companies would now be required to pay taxes and duties on all i mports up front, instead of after a portion of them may have been s old. Glen Gomez, Comptroller of C ustoms, told Tribune Business last week that this latest enforcement measure was designed to prevent “abuse” of the C19, which had seen it used as a ‘catcha ll’ for all manner of goods to be removed from the docks withoutd ue taxes being paid. This, he added, had allowed m any businesses and individual residents to ultimately evade pay ing their taxes because they nev-er returned to pay due Customs duties and Stamp Tax post-deliv e ry. Mr Gomez told Tribune Business last week: “The C19 is now being utilised in the manner for w hich it was designed by law, for perishables, gold, bullion and coins. “They’ve been abusing that form, and now that abuse hasb een stopped. They have been clearing motor cars, furniture and heaven knows what else on that form. Why should I allow you to a buse that form, take delivery of goods and not pay?” Mr Gomez said the vast majority of items outstanding before Customs, many of which datedb ack several years, related to C19 form declarations. “You can’t have your cake and eat it too,” he added. T he Comptroller added that there were so many outstanding items that Customs had not placed a dollar value on what it was owed, but he described thes um as “substantial”. And he questioned why Bahamian companies and importers, knowing a shipment o f product was coming in, did not pay the Customs duties and Excise Tax up front if they did not want to have a wait for clearance and submission of entries. There’s a provision in law to p ay for goods before they arrive, but no one wants to do it. Everyone wants to get a freebie, and the Government has tob ear the costs of having those goods come in and people do not c ome back to pay,” Mr Gomez s aid. “There’s just too many looph oles in Customs, and it’s time to bring the loopholes to a stop. W hether internally or externally, we have to address thesei ssues.” Mr Gomez said Customs was t rying to improve its clearance times, adding: “We’re trying to turnaround shipments in 24 h ours. Only shipments with 15 pages or more might take 24h ours to check." C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 3B PM: No business flow impact from Customs changes PM Ingraham

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cessing in-house, its managing director telling Tribune Business that given it was able to maintain "healthy profits" while enhancing its operational and capital base: "Who can ask for better?" Commenting on the institution's nine-month and 2009 fiscal third quarter results, Paul McWeeney said Bank of the Bahamas International had "done a remarkable job in balancing these aspects" at a time when the Bahamian economy was mired in recession, in addition to keeping its non-performing loan level below indust ry average. "From the bank's perspective we're pleased without a doubt, given the economic circumstances we're facing and the fact that the bank has forged ahead with strategic initiatives, not only with the capital base but also with strategic initiatives to expand our operational functions," Mr McWeeney told Tribune Business. "One of the projects we're working on is to bring the entire credit card processing inhouse." Mr McWeeney said Bank of the Bahamas International currently outsourced processing for its entire card portfolio to First Data, and the project to bring that back in-house was scheduled to be completed in late July and go live in August 2009. Bank of the Bahamas International had invested some $2 million in bringing the card portfolio processing in-house, and Mr McWeeney said: "The bank expects there to be tremendous internal synergies from that, in the sense of being able to reduce the expense that results from outsourcing. "With that coming in-house we will be able to benefit from transaction volumes and offer more to the public, because we will control the whole process. We have plans to do more in terms of e-commerce activity, and payment card processes with that will help us to launch e-commerce in the not too distant future." Despite Bank of the Bahamas International suffering an almost-75 per cent drop in net income in the three months to March 31, 2009, from $4.009 m illion in 2008 to $1.052 million this time around, a 73.8 per cent drop, Mr McWeeney said it had to long beyond the current recession and "plan for when you come out of it". And while net income for the first nine months of the current year had dropped by 41 per cent, to $6.063 million compared to $10.26 million the year before, Mr McWeeney said positioning the bank for longC M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE www.rdicaribbean.com Recruiting Now for the July 2009 intake 27499 Riverview Center Boulevard, Suite 111, Bonita Springs, Florida 34134 USA • Tel 1 239 444 1730 • email info@rdicaribbean.com your goals MASTERSMBA University of Bradford, University of Sunderland, University of Wales MSc in Public Administration & Development University of Birmingham MSc Marketing & Management University of Bradford MSc Finance, Accounting & Management University of Bradford MA Education University of Derby LLM University of Derby MSc Information Technology University of Teesside MSc Telecommunications Birmingham City University MSc International Hospitality Management Diploma in Management University of Wales (pre-MBA for non-degree holders University of Wales BACHELOR DEGREE COURSES University of Wales specialisms in Marketing, Finance, Banking University of Sunderland Accountancy & Financial Management (top up) University of Derby Psychology University of Teesside Computing (top up Develop your career while studying • No attendance requirement • Tutor and student support included • Free membership of International Management months months HigherNationalDiploma(entrytotopup Degreesthrough2-yearHND)inBusinessand Management,InformationTechnology,Travel andTourism,Marketing,Finance FAMILY GUARDIAN INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITEDB ALANCE SHEET AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2008(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)ASSETS C ash and bank balances S hort-term deposits B ank term deposits Financial Investment Assets: Fair value through prot and loss Available for sale Held-to-maturity L oans Total investment assets R eceivables and other assets Premiums receivable Property, plant and equipment, netT OTALLIABILITIES AND EQUITYL IABILITIES:Reserves for future policyholders’ benets Other policyholders’ funds Policy liabilities Payables and accruals Total liabilitiesE QUITY:Share capital Share premium Revaluation reserves Retained earnings Total equityTOTALThese financial statements were approved by the Board of Directors on M arch 26, 2009 and are signed on its behalf by:D irectorDirectorT he complete set of audited nancial statements is available on the c ompanys website at www.familyguardian.com 2 0081,783,470 3 39,737 13,402,046 7,243,165 44,255,404 7 3,038,462 1 40,062,284 2 ,975,284 2,749,750 12,761,820 1 58,549,138 102,902,989 7 ,756,601 110,659,590 6 ,240,408 116,899,998 1 ,707,462 11,401,314 2,021,294 26,519,070 4 1,649,140 158,549,138 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $2 0072,050,995 3 25,795 10,406,809 8,561,549 39,063,136 6 9,930,844 1 30,339,128 2 ,064,805 3,184,888 11,724,764 1 47,313,585 94,481,860 6 ,653,463 101,135,323 6 ,116,640 107,251,963 1 ,707,462 11,401,314 2,518,187 24,434,659 4 0,061,622 147,313,585 Bank invests Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B S S E E E E n n e e x x t t p p a a g g e e

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term growth through "new types of process to expand the product and service base" was essential. "If you want to be successful in this day and age, you cannot let one of your foundation legs falter," Mr McWeeney explained. "We have to move forward on different fronts, and we've been able to demonstrate the bank's ability to do that and deliver future value. As long as we expand the capital base and profits, there's no reason why we will not continue to do that. "The focus is on building the bank's financial strength, building up capital and a strong operating platform to provide the products and services for the future. And given this point in time, and given the economic circumstances, our focus is to ensure the bank maintains very strong prudential standards." The Bank of the Bahamas International managing director said the institution was working on "other enhancements to systems and operating platforms that he declined to identify. While these investments were "a calculated risk", he added that the bank was "pretty confident a return on the investment will be achieved in the near term". One area where Bank of the Bahamas International is ahead of 2008 comparatives is on provisions for loan losses, which stand at $990,315 for the yearto-date compared to $1.393 million last year. Mr McWeeney told Tribune Business that the bank was "still holding up really well" on nonaccrual or non-performing loans, those that are 90 days or more past due. He said they were "slightly above 5 per cent,h overing at about 5.1-5.2 per c ent" as a percentage of Bank of the Bahamas International's total $546 million loan portfolio,a figure below the Bahamian commercial bank average ofmore than 6 per cent. "It is below average," he conf irmed, although acknowledging that Bank of the Bahamas International was "challenged on delinquencies" those loans between 30 to 90 days past due. The bank, he added, had been working hard to prevent delinquent loans from becoming non-performing, and had enjoyed some success. "Delinquencies are slightly above industry average, but our asset quality rating, as measured by non-performing loans, is better than the industry average," Mr McWeeney said. He added that Bank of the Bahamas International was also planning to launch "exciting new products" at its Miami branch, which was still opening an average of 30 new accounts per month. And Bank of the Bahamas International had generated net loan growth of $23 million for the first nine months of the current financial year, growth of between $2-$3 million per month. The bank has also asked the architect responsible for designing its new West Bay Street headquarters to develop a plan for the phased construction of the facility. Mr McWeeney said the bank had no expansion plans apart from the increase in size at its Village Road branch in the next six to 12 months, which might result in the hiring of extra staff. There were also some internal restructuring initiatives the institution had been working on, which were partly responsible for the increased non-interest expenses during the third quarter and year-to-date. The Bank of the Bahamas International managing director added that a change in accounting treatments at yearend 2008 had been partially responsible for the drop in interest income for the third quarter, as loan fee income was now amortised over the lifetime of the loan rather than recognised as one lump sum up front. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 5B Tel: 242-328-0048 Fax: 242-328-0049 #4 Patton & Rosetta Streets Palmdale Nassau, Bahamas Email: sales@dctpc.com Closed for Stock TakingJ UNE 29th & 30th, 2009 Re-open July 1st at 9a.m. We apologize for any inconvenience caused THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMASV isit our website at www.cob.edu.bsChapter One Bookstore will be closed f rom June 29, 2009 to June 30, 2009, f or year-end inventory. I t will reopen for business on July 1, 2009. The Business Office Cashier's Cage will close at 1:00pm on June 30, 2009 and reopen for normal operation on Wednesday, July 1, 2009. We apologize for a ny inconvenience caused. THE COLLEGE OFTHE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bs $2m on in-house card process

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i f we do not have the right envir onment” business and commerce will suffer. Mr Rolle added: “Looking at it from a macroeconomic standpoint, there has to be a major focus from the Government to develop the private sector, understanding its needs and the role it plays in the economy. That is something that needs to take place.” The Chamber president added that while the private sector played a “critical role in nationbuilding”, the dialogue that had taken place previously between itself and the Government/public sector had “not been of the quality to drive the effort. There isn’t enough of it, and the quality of it is questionable”. “We look at what’s wrong and we poke and we poke and we poke, but we need to look at how best to move the process forward,” Mr Rolle explained. “That is the type of discussion we should be having, with a long-term view of development leading to a national development plan. “I’m tired of the back and forth and tit-for-tat. I can tell you that it’s not productive, because we’re still in the same state we were in 10 years ago. It’s not only government’s fault; it’s both parties’ fault. We’ve not made a conscious decision to establish a plan for the path forward together. I do not want to suggest a huge discrepancy, but it’s not strong enough.” Mr Rolle said his work throughout the Caribbean, when he was an Organisation of American States (OAS Inter-American Development Bank (IDB exposed him to the public and private sector dialogue that had been established. While other countries were facing the same issues as the Bahamas, the Chamber president said they at least had the “framework” in place to address them through public sector/private sector discussions. “We have appreciation for the awesome job government has, with a fiscal deficit that continues to widen and the development of revenue streams being extremely difficult in this economic climate. That’s why it’s important for us to establish the path forward together,” Mr Rolle said. The Chamber president added that he and fellow executives also discussed energy with the Prime Minister, and “touched on the status of the National Energy Policy and what’s happening with that”. A meeting had been sched uled to discuss that with Phen ton Neymour, minister of state for the environment, either this week or next. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Chamber Private Sector Office F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Government’s decision to lower the 1 per cent real property tax threshold from $ 7.5 million to $5 million was described as “a good compromise” by the Bahamas Real Estate Association’s (BREAp resident, who added that the industry now needed “to stabilize the market and get business back to the Bahamas a gain”. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham unveiled the amendment last week during the debate on t he Real Property TaxAct amendments in the House of Assembly, and William Wong described the move as “something we’ll live with. It’s a good compromise”. While BREA had initially argued for the $35,000 real p roperty tax cap, which was removed in the 2008-2009 Budg et, to be reinstated, Mr Wong s aid the Association had “been suggesting all along” that the Government could bring it back at a higher threshold – increasing it by possibly $15,000 or$ 25,000, and taking the cap as high as $60,000-$70,000. The main beneficiaries from the change will be those Bahamas-based properties valued at between $5 million and $ 7.5 million, who would have had to pay a 1 per cent rate on the value above the first $250,000, which is exempt. At the high-end, a $7.5 million property, paying real prope rty tax at 1 per cent on $7.25 million, would have had to pay $72,500 per annum to the Public Treasury – more than double the previous $35,000 cap. Now, following the amend m ent, a $7.5 million property will pay real property tax at 1 per cent on the first $4.75 mil lion and 0.25 per cent on the n ext $2.5 million. This works out at $53,750, a reduction of $18,750 in annual tax payments. “We can live with this, and we’re grateful that we were able to come to a compromise on this very, very sore issue,” Mr Wong told Tribune Business. “We’ve crossed a major hurdle and need to start marketing and getting business back to the Bahamas.” This newspaper understands t hat the initial removal of the $35,000 real property tax cap caused problems for major real estate developers who were marketing to foreign buyers, ast his had been a major plank in their marketing campaign. This was taken away almost instantly, and had the effect of causing credibility problems with potential buyers. Mr Wong said the 2008-2009 Budget amendments causedp rospective buyers of Bahamian real estate to “take a second look”. He added: “I think we lost quite a bit of business, but with the new tax structure, it puts us in a more competitive position and allows us to be a bit more competitive with others in the region. I’m glad the Government had a chance to take it in the right direction. The lawyers should be happy. I’m glad the Government showed wisdom in looking at it again. It shows maturity.” If foreign second home buyers increased their purchases ofB ahamian real estate, realtors, attorneys, contractors and other businesses would all benefit, and “the cash registers will be chinging in the Treasury”. Mr Wong, though, urged the Government to review the amendment that requires for-e ign home owners to stay in their properties for at least none months per year to qualify for the real property tax exemption. “I think the Government needs to clear that up,” he explained. How can you ask someone to spend $5 million and stay put for nine months, and how are they going to monitor that?” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 7B Real property tax change was a ‘good compromise’

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targeted at Family Island infrastructure projects set to bemade available in the latest financing round. The EU's 2008-2013 Country Strategy Paper for the Bahamas, a copy of which has been obtained by Tribune Business despite it never being made public, found that 6.83 million Euros made available to the Bahamas in the last funding round known as the ninth European Development Fund (EDF goal to 'build capacity' in the F amily Islands. F inding that the Bahamas had been "very slow" in committing these funds to agreed projects, with a "protracted process" in setting up technical help, the Strategy Paper said: "Unfortunately, implementation of the ninth EDF has experienced significant delays... "This is at least in part due to lack of communication on project implementation issues. The intervention framework had not been updated by the end of 2004, and no output or outcome sector-wide indicators were made available. "The Mid-Term Review conc luded that the Bahamas was a v ery low performer in terms of implementation of EU assistance, and that a reduction of the overall allocation could be contemplated at the End-ofTerm Review if things did not improve." R isking Risking a cut in EDF financing would likely be viewed as sheer folly for the Bahamas, given that it is the only grant funding this nation can access. This is largely due to it being viewed by many as a relatively developed nation with high living standards. Grant funding is financing without any repayment or interest rates attached, making it especially valuable to the Bahamas given the expanding fiscal deficits and national debt due to weakness in the public finances. And the EU funding is targeted at an area in desperate need of financing Family I sland infrastructure. It is debata ble whether the Government especially in the current climatecould afford to do them. For example, the ninth EDF recommended focusing on six projects an eco-tourism training centre in Andros; rehabilitating the dock at Fresh Creek in north Andros; a new airport terminal and runway, known as New Bight International Airport, for Cat Island; rehabilitation of roads in Acklins; and upgrades to the airport and dredging/upgrades to the dock in Duncan Town, Ragged Island. The 10th EDF is focused on much the same, namely Family Island infrastructure development in those islands supposed to have benefited from the ninth EDF round. The Strategy Paper said the EU and Bahamian government wanted to concentrate on reducing "regional socio-economic imbalances" within the Bahamas. "This should be done by means of capacity-building i n infrastructure development o n the south-easterly islands of the Bahamas, bringing them up to the level of New Providence, Grand Bahama, Abaco and the other more developed islands," the document said. "The thrust of the strategy is to achieve sustainable economic growth and stability, and continuous improvement in living standards. Support for the Family Islands' integration into the Bahamas economy is aimed at establishing one Bahamas economic space for future generations of sustainable and equitable economic growth. Intent "The intent is to facilitate a structural transformation of the least developed islands in the south-east, repositioning these islands and bringing them into line with the whole economy through inter-island as well as international direct trade, which should ultimately achieve the c entral common objective of p overty reduction." The Strategy Paper added: "Providing adequate physical infrastructure is considered to be a critical requirement for continued growth and competitiveness, particularly in the tourism industry. 'This could also be relevant for the Bahamas' economic relations with the EU, and could be part of a regional effort to promote the services trade." Overall, the Strategy Paper said the outcome from the 10th EDF should be improved ports, runways, drainage systems and sea walls in the Family Islands, and "increased economic activity in goods and services due to better access from and to markets". This, in turn, is no doubt intended to reverse the migration from the Family Islands to Nassau in search of work, someC M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMASV isit our website at www.cob.edu.bsChapter One Bookstore will be closed f rom June 29, 2009 to June 30, 2009, for year-end inventory. It will reopen for business on July 1, 2009. The Business Office Cashier's Cage will close at 1:00pm on June 30, 2009 and reopen for normal operation on Wednesday, July 1, 2009. We apologize for any inconvenience caused. EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITYREQUIRED:An intelligent and energetic person to manage a warehouse facility.Overseeing facility, office and maintenance staff Maintaining office hours from 8:30am 5:00pm weekdays and 8:30am 1:00pm on Saturdays Operating and managing computer systems Processing of billings and collections and making bank deposits Operating and managing the security systems Marketing, showing and leasing vacant areas to tenants Preparing monthly reports Maintaining the facility to a high professional standard Responsibilities include, but are not limited to: Applicants should apply in writing to the following e-mail address: baha.accounts2009@gmail.com Please provide educational background and employment history together with references from previous employers. PROPERTY MANAGER EU considered slashing Bahamas F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B S S E E E E n n e e x x t t p p a a g g e e

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 9B grant funding t hing the so-called 'anchor p roperty' strategy was also designed to achieve. The 10th EDF is divided into two components, with some 4.23 million Euros earmarked for Family Island infrastructure projects and the remaining 470,000 Euros forming a Technical Cooperation Facility. And it is quite possible that the 6.83 million Euro balance from the ninth EDF may also still be available. The Strategy Paper warned that economic development in the Family Islands would depend heavily on capital investment "from other investment sources", as the Government "does not have the nece ssary financial resources to do i t all". And that was before the full impact of the global economic downturn was realized. Infrastructure development, the paper said, was critical to eliminating "pockets of poverty" that existed in the southeastern Bahamas, especially on islands such as Acklins, Crooked Island and Mayaguana. Poverty "Despite the levels of poverty, these south-easterly islands are an untapped resource with limitless potential for economic growth and development," the Strategy Paper said. "It is theref ore the view of the Governm ent that the time has come to take these islands to a new level of development. "The small size of the Bahamas prevents it from achieving economies of scale in many areas. Similarly, the small size of the population, combined with geographic fragmentation, raises the unit cost of infrastructure provision, particularly in the Family Islands. "The challenge is to provide and maintain infrastructures such that citizens in all parts of the country can be guaranteed a higher quality of life, and all of the inhabited islands can participate meaningfully in economic development." To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in circulation, just call 502-2371 today!

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.841.28Abaco Markets1.391.390.000.1270.00010.90.00% 1 1.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9 .436.94Bank of Bahamas6.946.940.000.2440.26028.43.75% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.603.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.2010.18Cable Bahamas11.3911.390.001.4060.2508.12.19% 2 .902.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.000.2490.04011.01.46% 7.505.50Commonwealth Bank (S15.645.640.000.4190.36013.56.38% 4.781.27Consolidated Water BDRs2.973.320.350.1110.05229.91.57%2 .951.32Doctor's Hospital1.771.770.000.2400.0807.44.52% 8 .207.50Famguard7.767.760.000.4200.30018.53.87% 12.5010.00Finco10.9710.970.000.3220.52034.14.74% 11.7910.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.3810.380.000.7940.35013.13.37% 5.554.95Focol (S5.095.090.000.3320.15015.32.95% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.003,0000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9.025.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.0010.50J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.0020 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.005 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.37871.3124CFAL Bond Fund1.37871.874.83 3.03512.8988CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.8988-1.40-3.35 1.47301.3940CFAL Money Market Fund1.47302.745.66 3.60903.1821Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.18216.01-13.90 12.920912.2702Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.92092.405.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.5448-0.020.54 100.000093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund93.1992-3.33-6.76 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.56119.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.25111.724.12 1.05781.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.05782.135.78 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0271-0.572.71 1.05541.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.05541.745.54 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L L L L : : C C O O L L I I N N A A 2 24 4 2 2 5 5 0 0 2 27 70 0 1 1 0 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L LF F I I D D E E L LI I T T Y Y 2 24 4 2 2-3 35 5 6 6 7 7 7 7 6 6 4 4 | | F FG G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K KE E T T S S 2 2 4 4 2 23 3 9 9 6 6-4 40 0 0 00 0 | | C C O O L L O O N N I I A A L L 2 24 4 2 2 5 50 02 2 7 7 5 5 2 2 5 5FINDEX: CLOSE 789.53 | YTD -5.43% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSFRIDAY, 26 JUNE 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,579.39 | CHG 0.37 | %CHG 0.02 | YTD -132.97 | YTD % -7.77BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 31-May-09 31-Mar-09 31-Dec-07 30-Apr-09 31-May-09 31-May-09 W W W WW W . .B B I I S S X X B B A A H H A A M M A A S S . .C C O O M M | | T T E E L L E E P P H HO ON N E E : :2 2 4 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 2 2 3 3 3 3 0 0 | | F F A A C C S S I I M M I I L L E E : : 2 24 42 2 -3 32 2 3 3 2 23 3 2 20 0NAV Date 31-May-09 19-Jun-09 30-Apr-09 31-May-09 31-Mar-09 31-May-09 /HJDORWLFH 127,&( 9,'$'8/&((1785(6/7' ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-XQH 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( -&5+2/',1*6/,0,7(' ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-XQH 7KH/LTXLGDWRU L V $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX % DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ($67$//,$1&((48,7< &25325$7,21 ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-XQH 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( 9$1(6(,1& ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG R Q GD\RI-XQH 7KH/LTXLGDWRU L V $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 127,&( 5$,1%2:$66(7(/7' ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-XQH 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( 3 5263(&7$',621/,0,7(' ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-XQH 7KH/LTXLGDWRU L V $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( &,5&8,732,17,1& ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-XQH 7KH/LTXLGDWRU L V $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net BIMINI and Eleuthera received diesel engine shipments last Friday, according to a heavy equipment website, as $40 million worth of BEC power plant construction initiatives for those two islands gain legs in a big way. Heavyliftpfi.com announced that two 100 tonne engines, originating in Korea, were delivered to Bimini and four 72tonne engines, originating in Denmark, were delivered to Eleuthera. According to the site, the p ower plants were consolidated at a heavy lift facility in the UK, then shipped to both islands. It also announced that the power generators had been installed in their respective facilities. The “on schedule” delivery and installation of the engines seems to be in line with the Government’s plan to have the new power facilities up and running by August. According to the online news release, delivery of the massive engines was a challenge because of the islands’ unfavourable docking facilities. “Delivery to two minor islands in the Bahamas, requiring the transfer of equipment from normal heavy lift ships to small landing craft, was neces sary as the islands do not have proper port facilities. The con tract included moving UKb ased Collett Vehicles, equipment and staff to the islands to carry out the work,” said the release. Minister of State for the Environment, Phenton Neymour, revealed during his Budget contribution to Parliament that the Bimini power station was being expanded to the tune of $14 million, while the newly constructed Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera, power plant would cost $26 mill ion. A new facility is also being constructed in Wilson City, Abaco, at a cost of $90 million and should be completed by January 2010, while $300 million worth of expansions, for which government is awaiting financing, are planned for New Providence. The Government recently revealed its need to borrow $211 million to cover existing loan facilities for the Bahamas Electricity Corporation. “In the last two years we have had to put in place new capital investment,” said Mr Neymour. He said of BEC during his b udget address to parliament: The global situation has worse ned and BEC’s financial position has done the same, as there are encumbrances with collections in all areas – whether residential, small commercial and some large commercial customers. “As of May 2009, BEC’s accounts receivable was approximately $99 million and accounts payable for April 2009 was approximately $134 million.” Power plant deliveries for BEC on two islands

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PAGE 12B, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n B y DAVID GERMAIN A P Movie Writer LOS ANGELES (AP Alien robots have transformed into box-office superstars with $200 million in domestic ticket sales in just five days. “Transformers: Revenge of t he Fallen” took in $112 million i n the sequel’s first weekend and $201.2 million since opening Wednesday, according to Sunday estimates from Paramount, which is distributing the DreamWorks movie. It was well on the way to becoming the year’s top-grossi ng movie. T hat was a few million dollars higher than other studios were expecting for the movie, and the figures could change a bit when final numbers are released Monday. S till, it was a colossal start for t he “Transformers” sequel, whose opening five days amounted to nearly two-thirds of the $319 million domestic total the franchise’s first movie did over its entire run in 2007. Now playing in almost every other country except India, the m ovie added $185.8 million o verseas, for a worldwide total of $387 million. That’s well over half the $708 million global total for the first “Transformers.” That first movie began with a $70.5 million weekend. Based on how well the sequel has done, “Revenge of the Fallen” could join the handful of movies that have topped the $400 mill ion mark domestically. I’d say given the momentum it has, it’s got a real shot,” said Rob Moore, vice chairman at Paramount. F or the first five days, the Transformers” sequel was second only to last summer’s “The Dark Knight” with $203.8 million. This was the biggest opening weekend of this year, surpassing the $85.1 million debut of “X-Men Origins: Wolverine” in e arly May. T he sequel began with $60.6 million on its opening day Wednesday. That also was second only to “The Dark Knight,” which had the biggest box-office day ever with $67.2 million on opening day. With $14.4 million at 169 IMAX theaters, “Transformers” set a record for a five-day openi ng in the giant-screen format, n early doubling the previous best of $7.3 million set by “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix.” Transformers” overcame h arsh reviews from critics, who called it a visual-effects extravaganza without much story or human heart. Director Michael Bay has a history of bad reviews and big box office with “Armageddon” and “Pearl Harbor.” Michael Bay knows how to b uild the perfect summer boxoffice beast,” said Paul Dergarabedian, box-office analyst for Hollywood.com. “He squarely aimed right at the demographic, right at what summer movie-goers want, and he put it on the screen. And audiences can’t seem to get enough of it.” T he sequel broadened the f ranchise’s fan base. Females accounted for just 40 percent of the audience for the first “Transformers” but 46 percent for the s equel, Moore said. M uch of that was due to the on-screen romance for the characters played by Shia LaBeouf and Megan Fox, who were relative unknowns when the first movie came out. With a $13 million weekend, Disney and Pixar Animation’s Up” became the year’s topg rossing film domestically at $250.2 million. It surpassed Paramount’s “Star Trek,” which did $3.6 million over the weekend to hit a $246.2 million total. The reign of “Up” at the top of the year’s box-office chart will be short-lived, though. The “Transformers” sequel should shoot past it in a matter of days. T he Warner Bros. melodram a “My Sister’s Keeper,” with Cameron Diaz and Abigail Breslin, had a so-so debut, coming in at No. 5 with $12 million. B reslin plays a daughter conc eived as a donor for her older sister, who has leukemia. Summit Entertainment’s Iraq War drama “The Hurt Locker” had a strong start in limited release, taking in $144,000 in four theaters for an average of $36,000 a cinema. That comp ares to an average of $26,453 in 4 ,234 theaters for “Transformers.” Starring Jeremy Renner and Anthony Mackie as members of a U.S. bomb squad in Baghdad, “The Hurt Locker” has a chance to become the first real commercial success among recent war-on-terror movies, which audiences generally have avoide d. “The Hurt Locker” has e arned stellar reviews since debuting at film festivals last year. It rolls out to more theaters on July 10. ransformers 2’ takes to sky with $112m weekend

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INSIGHT C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune INSIGHT M ONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009 The stories behind the news By INSIGHT TEAM F OR years, the Immigration Detention Centre on Carmichael Road has been the subject of allegations of detainee abuse and inhumane conditions. Successive governments have promised to investigate and from time to time a few changes have been instituted, but former detainees say these are usually cosmetic and short lived. A few months ago, under intense publicity, the Immigration Department announced yet another inquiry, and a fact-finding team composed of government officials, social workers and psychologists visited the centre. The resulting report has yet to be made public, but those well acquainted with the matter doubt it will admit to finding any evi dence of cruelty or violence. History seems to support this view: During the facility's more than two decades in operation, and despite countless allegations, not a single publicised instance of beating, torture, or sexual abuse has been acknowledged by Bahamian authorities. Yet, according to a senior offi cer formerly stationed at the centre, detainees are routinely sub jected to the most horrific abuses – which take place right under the noses of the administrators, who are often too disinterested to notice. As the Immigration Depart ment prepares to announce yet another plan to improve condi tions for detainees, the officer breaks his silence for the first time in an exclusive interview with Insight. The text of this interview has been edited for continuity and to protect the identity of the individuals mentioned. Insight (I there have been countless allega tions about what goes on at the Carmichael Road Detention Cen tre, but journalists have not been allowed in to see for themselves. How would you describe condi tions at the centre during the time you were there? Officer (O an insult. It's inhumane how the place is run. There is sewage everywhere. Piles of garbage. And the Immigration officers in charge, they can smell it, see it, but won't come in the back there or send someone to fix it. There are puddles of faeces everywhere. Sometimes after I left for the day, I poured bleach from head to toe in the shower. Because I can't lay beside my wife after being in there, or play with my children. My dirty clothes, I used to leave them outside in the trunk, and then wash them later. (I for detainees? (O it’s run like a prison. That is not how it is supposed to be. These are detainees. These people, you don’t know what they have been through. Some of them spent all their money just to make it to paradise. Now they reach paradise, and they are captured. Some are just like the Jamaicans, when they come through the airport they don’t have anyone to sign for them, and they don’t have enough money in their pocket and that is wrong, that’s a bunch of foolishness. I’m a tourist, I come here with $100 in my pocket and spend a week and leave. If I overstay my week, of course put me in the detention centre, but don’t turn me away at the airport, or put me in that filth. I: Jamaican tourists are taken from the airport to the detention centre because they don’t have $100 on them when they get here? O: They take them if they don’t have $500 in their pocket. Imme diately. They say: “You don’t have enough to sustain yourself.” I: Suppose they are staying with someone here for that week, and don’t need to buy a hotel room? O: They say that person have to come out to the airport and sign for them. Or else they take them to the detention centre. I: Why do you think conditions at the centre have deteriorated to such an extent? O: The main problem is too many people with no experience but high ranks dabbling too much in the running of the place. It needs to be managed – not run, managed. If they want to have a detention centre, do it the right way. See, you have born leaders and then you have leaders for them it’s about power. They believe this textbook stuff they learn in school is all they need. But experience causes you to learn how to deal with people. They are not prisoners, they are detainees. The officers have to learn not to aggravate people. They are already aggravated. I: What is the food like at the centre? O: The food supplied by Social Services is lousy, it’s unfit for human beings. I wouldn’t give it to a dog. I: But Minister Branville McCartney and Immigration Director Jack Thompson ate lunch there, and said the food was good. O: Mr Thompson and the min ister, they are good people, very good people. I think they get swing – you remember the song ‘You get swing’? They are being fooled. Because I've seen the people only get water and just a slice of cheddar cheese between two slices of dry bread. Breakfast grits are supposed to be soft. But there, hard as rock. And the portions are lousy. All the meals are late. Plenty of times I have seen food fresh on the counter, and the officers would not come out to open the gates to feed the people. They would just sit in the air condition and not do their job. Sometimes the garbage was overflowing at each unit. There were flies every where. And you know what hurts me so much, because I love kids why build a playground if you won’t let the children use it? I: What is it for, if the children don't use it? O: They have it for show, for show and tell. It's a game. Whenever visitors come, they let them play, so everyone thinks everything is all right. It's like the phones. They put pay phones in the back there, but they don't let anyone use them. I: We now want to ask you about the allegations of beatings and other physical abuse at the centre. Let’s start with the case of (name withheld few years. We were told the guards broke both his legs and knocked several of his teeth out. O: Yes. The guy who broke his knees was (officer's name withheld). We have a lot of immature and unprofessional officers, and it hurts my heart. What are they harassing these people for? There is only so much abuse people can take. Leave them alone. Give them love. Do you know what it must be to spend a heap of cash to make it to paradise, and once you make it, get caught and put in the detention centre? They have issues on their mind. Regardless of whatever the detainees did, the officers are not magistrates. They only detain personnel until the magistrate decides to let them go, make them pay a fine, or let them buy a tick et to leave. That is not up to the officers. How can they – and they do this a lot – how can they take away funds confiscated from detainees, and keep them or give them to someone else? That is not their call. They have no right to take people's property. I: Does this happen often? O: It's just like a flea market. See, they believe that these people will just be deported. They don't realise some of them will get sta tus. When they do, it’s like, ‘Oh your phone? I didn't see it, I don't know what it looks like’ playing stupid. Some Haitians are taken into custody with a lot of money and it disappears. They have a lot because they may work here for years, but because they are ille gal, they put money under the mattress, in coffee cans, they bury it, all over the place, because they can't open an account. And they are not extravagant people. They are like the Chinese, they live humbly. They just work, feed the family and save and save and save. Every time their money goes missing (after being confiscated the officers try and blame indi vidual migrants. But no cash ever is supposed to enter the detention centre. Whenever you are com mitted, your possessions are supposed to be put in an envelope. The officer is supposed to sign across the envelope, tape it, let the individual sign, and it goes in a safe. Regardless of if a person is deported, goes to jail, or is released, that is his cash. What some are doing is stealing by means of employment. And you are not supposed to get fired, you are supposed to go to jail for things like this. And I am ashamed by what I seen some of my fellow officers do. It's a crying shame. Most of them are in prominent positions who are doing this foolishness, not the small man. I: Can you remember any spe cific beatings that took place during your time at the centre? O: I have watched individuals being snatched up by their clothes. They would take them in a private room, beat them on the bottom of their feet, their stomach, soft tissue where it wouldn’t show. But then it got to the point where they just don’t care no more. Across the face, across the back. They just do it in front of everyone, they just don't care, and its inhumane. My parents grew me up a different way. What they are doing is wrong. I told you they used to extract them. But later even if they did that, it was to a building with windows and no blinds. All the detainees could see this Gestapo foolishness going on. What is this, a prisoner of war camp now? I watched them beat one so bad, the guy was on the ground and moaned and groaned all night. They took him to the hospital, eventually. It brings tears to my eyes sometimes. It's not right, it's not right. I think what the government needs to do is insert Officer:detainees were subjected to horrific abuse DETAINEES can be seen at the Immigration Detention Centre on Carmichael Road. Allegations about Carmichael Road Detention Centre SEE page 4C W W e e h h a a v v e e a a l l o o t t o o f f i i m m m m a a t t u u r r e e a a n n d d u u n n p p r r o o f f e e s s s s i i o o n n a a l l o o f f f f i i c c e e r r s s , , a a n n d d i i t t h h u u r r t t s s m m y y h h e e a a r r t t . . W W h h a a t t a a r r e e t t h h e e y y h h a a r r a a s s s s i i n n g g t t h h e e s s e e p p e e o o p p l l e e f f o o r r ? ? T T h h e e r r e e i i s s o o n n l l y y s s o o m m u u c c h h a a b b u u s s e e p p e e o o p p l l e e c c a a n n t t a a k k e e . .

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C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 2C, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 1979 "Don't Stop 'til You Get E nough" "Rock with You" 1980 " She's Out of My Life" 1983 "Billie Jean" "Beat It" " Say Say Say" T hriller 1 987 " Bad" " The Way You Make Me Feel" 1988 " Dirty Diana" "Man in the Mirror" "Another Part of Me" " Smooth Criminal" "Come Together" 1989 " Leave Me Alone" "Liberian Girl" 1991 "Black or White" 1 992 "Remember the Time" " In the Closet" " Who Is It" " Jam" "Heal the World" 1993 " Give in to Me" "Will You Be There" "Gone Too Soon" 1995 "HIStory Teaser" "Scream" " Childhood" "You Are Not Alone" "Earth Song" 1996 " They Don't Care About Us" " Stranger in Moscow" 1 997 " Blood on the Dance Floor" G hosts 2001 "You Rock My World" " Cry" Michael’s music videos MICHAEL Jackson’s Thriller is the best selling album of all time with as many as 109 million copies sold worldwide. Overall he is the third best selling music artist of all time following the Beatles, Elvis Presley a nd Bing Crosby, selling between 500 and 999 million records. JACKSON’S US NUMBER ONES Michael Jackson had 13 number one hits on the Billboard Hot 100 charts, and 1 number one collaboration, "Say Say Say", featuring PaulM cCartney. * 1972: "Ben" (1 week * 1979: "Don't Stop 'Til You Get Enough" (1 week * 1980: "Rock with You" (4 weeks * 1983: "Billie Jean" (7 weeks * 1983: "Beat It" (3 weeks * 1983: "Say Say Say" (6 weeks * 1985: "We Are The World" (4 weeks) (this track is counted extra officially, considering t hat was credited to USA for Africa). * 1987: "I Just Can't Stop Loving You" (with S iedah Garrett) (1 week) * 1987: "Bad" (2 weeks * 1987: "The Way You Make Me Feel" (1 w eek) * 1988: "Man in the Mirror" (2 weeks * 1988: "Dirty Diana" (1 week * 1991: "Black or White" (7 weeks * 1995: "You Are Not Alone" (1 week MICHAEL JACKSON HAD 29 TOP 10 HITS ON THE BILLBOARD HOT 100 CHARTS. * 1971: "Got to Be There" #4 * 1972: "Rockin Robin" #2 * 1972: "Ben" #1 * 1979: "Don't Stop Till You Get Enough" #1 * 1980: "Rock With You" #1 * 1980: "Off The Wall" #10 * 1980: "She's Out Of My Life" #10 * 1983: "The Girl Is Mine" (with Paul McCartney) #2 * 1983: "Billie Jean" #1 * 1983: "Beat It" #1 * 1983: "Wanna Be Startin' Somethin'" #5 * 1984: "Human Nature" #7 * 1984: "P.Y.T." #10 * 1984: "Say Say Say" (with Paul McCartney * 1984: "Thriller" #4 * 1985: "We Are The World" #1 * 1987: "I Just Can't Stop Loving You" (with Siedah Garrett) #1* 1987: "Bad" #1 * 1988: "The Way You Make Me Feel" #1 * 1988: "Man In The Mirror" #1 * 1988: "Dirty Diana" #1 * 1989: "Smooth Criminal" #7 * 1991: "Black or White" #1 * 1992: "Remember The Time" #3 * 1992: "In The Closet" #6 * 1993: "Will You Be There" #7 * 1995: "Scream"(with Janet Jackson * 1995: "You Are Not Alone" #1 * 2001: "You Rock My World" #10 J ACKSON'S US R&B NUMBER ONES M ichael Jackson had 13 number one hits on the B illboard R&B charts. * 1979: "Don't Stop 'Til You Get Enough" (5 w eeks) * 1980: "Rock with You" * 1983: "The Girl Is Mine" (3 weeks * 1983: "Billie Jean" (9 weeks * 1983: "Beat It" * 1987: "I Just Can't Stop Loving You" * 1987: "Bad" * 1987: "The Way You Make Me Feel" * 1988: "Man in the Mirror" * 1988: "Another Part of Me" * 1991: "Remember the Time" * 1991: "In the Closet" * 1995: "You Are Not Alone" (4 weeks Jackson’s phenomenal music selling record MICHAEL JACKSON with fan Irva Weech at Cody’s Music and Video Centre, East Bay Street, on June 17, 1996.

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By TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net G eniuses whose influence spans continents, age, class and race are oncei n-a-generation anomalies w hose time with us always seems too short. M ichael Jackson, perhaps t he most beloved modern e ntertainer aside from Elvis Presley, in my opinion can best be compared to 15th centuryp ainter and scientist Leonardo da Vinci, considered the most diversely talented person who ever lived. Both were i nnovators, inventors and artists who not only inspired and enthralled their contemp oraries, but who have b ecome an inspiration to those w ho follow. Like Thomas Edison who s eemed to emulate Da Vinci’s c atalogue of inventions with his own lengthy list of accom plishments, most notably the e lectric light bulb, there are a l itany of dancers, singers and musicians in Jackson’s wake who have drawn from his jawdropping signature style toc apture their own success. Jackson burst onto the music scene as a child prodigy,f ronting the family band the Jackson Five at age 11, but s pent the earlier years of his l ife being shaped by a Svengali-like father hell-bent on seeing his children capture the musical success that he could not. B orn August 28, 1959 to humble beginnings in Gary, I ndiana, Jackson spent his lost childhood performing in sleazy bars and honing his talent untilt he band scored a record deal with Motown Records in 1968. H e launched a solo career during his years with the Jackson Five, scoring such hits as Got to Be There” and “Ben” during the 1970s. H e later paired with notable producer Quincy Jones for the album “Off The Wall”, released in 1979, which spawned four top 10 hits on t he US music charts and later s old more than 20 million copies worldwide. H e reached the pinnacle of h is illustrious career with 1 982’s “Thriller”, to date the most successful album of all time with upwards of 1 09 million units sold worldwide. The title video of the album was groundbreaking and paved the way for black stars to be showcased on video station MTV. Jackson moonw alked into the hearts of many d uring a televised performance of “Billie Jean” at the Motown Records 25th anniversary spec ial a year later. O n Friday night his brother J ermaine told Larry King on the Larry King Live show thatM ichael was “unique from day o ne.” He had never taken a dancing or vocal lesson. “It C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 3C Email: 2 0 0 9 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e t It’sElectric! Michael Jackson: a musical genius American Music Awards: 22 Billboard Awards: 40 BRIT Awards: 7 Golden Globe Awards: 1 Grammy Awards: 19 Guinness World Records: 13 MTV Awards: 13 NAACP Image Awards: 14 RIAA Awards: 56W orld Music Awards: 12 Jackson won 197 major awards MICHAEL JACKSON with Marlon Bonamy at Cody’s Music and Video Centre, East Bay Street, on June 17, 1996. I N THIS 1 984 AP picture, Michael Jackson poses on stage during the Jacksons’ Victory Tour. Michael Jackson d ied in Los Angeles at the age of 50 on Thursday, June 25, 2009. SEE page 5C

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someone inside there, and get some info. These animals are not supposed to be in service. O ne time, (another detainee) couldn’t take it no more because his girlfriend was in there. So he jumpedthe fence and ended up in the female barracks. A man is just a man and he couldn’t take it a nymore. I don’t understand why, if one of them has a girlfriend or a wife in there, why when we have visiting hours, they can’t be together, like in any sensible country, right?B ut they don't do that. It's not r un professionally. Not even five per cent of it is professionally. Anyway, when they caught him they dragged himout, they beat him so badly, he couldn’t walk he couldn’t w ear slippers. All night, all night they beat him. Just for s eeing his girlfriend, and she w as his; he wasn’t going to r ape no one. Another was (third detainee). He is a Bahamian of Haitian descent. His pass-p ort was getting renewed when they picked him up.A nd they beat this man, he was bleeding all over his face. He could come in and tell you that, if you could find him. They beat this man and thism an was a Bahamian citizen. And he speaks clear English,j ust like us. The man is a contractor, he has people who work for him, it's not like he's a man off the street or anything. I : Are most of the offenders young soldiers? O: No, some of them are the oldest officers out there. Like (second officer, name withheld) – this Haitian girl, pregnant, she wasn't walking f ast enough for him. He punched this woman in the f ace, dropped her to the ground. Even senior people. (Third o fficer, name withheld), he will beat those people to ap ulp. Kick them. I : Do you think these offic ers are just allowed to get away with the beatings, or has i t become policy to... O: (Interrupting n ot policy. There is a mandate t here; it is against policy to l ay one hand on those people. I: But the senior officers, d o they want it to happen? O: Do they want it to happ en? Some of them are there h elping! But not the bosses, b ecause they are hardly ever there, they don't do their job. People are not doing whatt hey are being paid for. That's the major problem. Anothert hing is that we have strayed a way from discipline. There i s no way that children should be hungry. There is no way that Social Services should c ook food, and it's not served until it’s cold, because officers are sitting down gossiping, oro n the phone or something. A nd these people are hungry. It brings tears to my eyes, I'm telling you it’s sickening. Att he end I was sick and tired of the job. You know something? The o nly way we can end this – I don't know if it's legal or not, but they need to put a spy cam in there or something. Expose t hem for what they are. And print it, and print it, until something changes. I: We intend to. I: There has also been an allegation that a man wasb eaten to death not too long ago at the centre. We heard the incident was witnessed by e verybody, and that they kept beating the body long after the man was dead. O: Yes, he was a Haitian guy. They just kept beating him with the long batons. They did it in front everyone. I : But if he was killed, what happened to the body? If they disposed of it, surely the senior officers must know. What about top Defence Force and Immigration offi cials? O: I don't think it goes to the top. But it was swept under the rug. Nothing came out of it. I: Is that the only time someone has been killed as far as you know? O: Yes, as far as I know. I: After it happened, were the officers scared? O: I guess not. Nothing changed. That got swept under the rug. When they write their reports that's just a death. The coroner doesn't investigate. I: Do the officers drink when they beat detainees? O: Some of them don't. They are just naturally stink. At least a man who is drinking, he can say he was under the influence. But they are just cruel. You know what else I hat ed? We had some very sick people down there. People crying. But they are told they have to wait. They won't call an ambulance for them. I'm talking girls in the female dorms, crying tears and tears. You know what they tell them? "Shut up." They don't check for the people down there. Immigra tion is lousy. The Defence Force, some are monsters. They have an officer down there named (fourth officer, name withheld). He beats them like conch. Sorry to say it like that, but he beats them bad. I can remember a couple of years ago, when people used to come visit and stand along the gate, (fourth offi cer) came and slapped a Haitian who was visiting. He popped the chain off his neck he didn't take the chain but he slapped him so hard his chain popped. There was a big row inside there. You ran the pictures. I : We have also heard stories about sexual abuse, rapesb y officers at the centre. Do y ou know anything about t hat? O: I have watched it plenty of times. What happens is,o fficers come with the key, “Oh we need to do somep aperwork.” They log in. And y ou see them disappear with a f emale detainee. To take a girl out, you have to sign for it. And they take them out, a nd you see them disappear. They don't take them off the complex. And hours later,t hey come back, all sweaty, t heir hair all shaggy. I hear some of them were paid, or made deals for food or moneyo r whatever, because they are hungry. But the majority of them were raped. Raped. That i s no big secret in there. I: What do you think should be done? O: There is help needed for t he detention centre. Otherwise... Tourism is our main industry. We lose that, we lose everything. We don't need no big spy eye coming down from the United States. We don'tn eed that. Why wait till that happens, when we could avoid it? I : But it’s not that simple. As far as we can tell, politicians think that to go down there, and ask: “Did you beat anybody? No? All right” is enough. Investigation done. O: Thank you very much. T hat is it. They walk in, next thing you know they are all laughing and talking together and then they walk out. They never, hardly ever, come in the back. Because it stinks. If they want to talk to a detainee, they bring him to the front. They should come in the back and walk around. And the bosses? Any time there is an investigation, it’s like: Is anything going on? “No no, what ya'll talking about? No man, that's only foolishness, only rumours.” You know what they say: Everyone in jail says they are innocent. What you (The Tribune should do is show up, with the minister and my prime minis ter, Mr Ingraham. Break with protocol. Don't publicise it, publicise it after. Hit them with aggression, and go down there and see what is going on. My prime minister, Hubiggety, he don't play. The PLP was a sweep under the carpet government. But my boss, my prime minister, Mr Ingraham, Hubert Alexander, and Mr Symonette, if they know the facts, they will make sure someone goes down. Another thing is, you know what the song says: “Who you workin’ for? The government dem. When you going to work? When I ready.” Let Social Services do what it is supposed to do direct the job from the office. Let's hirea private company to go in there and make sure those nice people eat properly, that those kids are healthy. And they have no proper medical screening down there. There has been tuberculosis and other diseases. Think about it – you have Immigra tion officers down there, Defence Force officers. If they get sick and go home, the whole of Nassau can end up with the same outbreak. We are gonna lose our country. Y'all have to do something. C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 4C, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bs +HDOWKFLHQFH*HQHUDOFLHQFH*U /DQJXDJH$UWV*U Officer:detainees were subjected to horrific abuse DETAINEES can be seen at the Immigration Detention Centre on Carmichael Road. F ROM page 1C

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was natural, man” said Jermaine. In the 1990s Jackson dominated the music industry and spawned a cult-like fan following and two a lbums of new material, but w ith the unparalleled succ ess came intense scrutiny, a series of botched plastic surgeries, bizarre antics,the allegations of child m olestation and an eventual fall from grace that placed the King of Pop on t he receiving end of r idicule. H is 2001 offering of Invincible” was met with d ismal sales and a lukew arm reception. In 2005, he was tried and acquitted of charges of child molestation, conspiracy and alcohol charges which could have landed him in prison for nearly 20 y ears. The trial and the e ccentric lifestyle it exposed tarnished Jacks on’s image and took a h eavy toll on him emotiona lly, physically and financially. The father of three who o nce made fans faint at first sight spent the last years of his life as a recluse, shrouded in isolation. He was left a shell of his former self, but many supporters held out hope that he would catch hold of an elusivec omeback. B ut it seems the sudden death of the larger-than-lifei con has given the mysterio us star what he craved and some would say deserved as the most influential artist of our time ar esurgence of adulation bordering on deity-like worship. The man who pio-n eered the music video over 20 years ago is now once again on heavy rota tion on major music video s tations like MTV and VH1 who broke away from t heir normal programming to pay homage to the legend. H is death was felt the world over; social networking sites were buzzing with the news of his death, and countless celebrities mourned the loss. "We have lost a genius and a true ambassador of not only Pop music but of a ll music," Justin Timberl ake, whose music shows a d irect influence from Jackson, posted on his personal Web site. "He has been an inspiration to multiple gene rations, and I will always c herish the moments I shared with him on stage a nd all of the things I l earned about music from h im and the time we spent together. My heart goes outt o his family and loved o nes." "I can't stop crying over the sad news. I have always admired Michael Jackson. The world has lost one of the greats, but his music will live on forever! My h eart goes out to his three c hildren and other memb ers of his family,” said a s tatement released by M adonna. H is ex-wife Lisa Marie Presley, who was married to Jackson from 1994 to 1996, said, "I am so very sad and confused with every emotion possible. I am heartbroken for his children, who I know were everything to him, and for his family. This is such a massive loss on so many levels, words fail me." His death came weeks b efore a highly anticipated t our throughout London, b illed as the comeback that would thrust the reclusive singer back to the forefront of popular music. But at a ge 50, and 12 years since h is last tour, sceptics wondered if Jackson would be a ble to recapture the prec ise dance moves that mes m erised the world during his heyday 20 years ago.N ow the world will never k now if Jackson would have reclaimed his relevance in today’s ever shifting music scene. But his fans have his flawless body of work to turn to and remember why Jackson is i ndeed, the King of Pop. A controversial figure, J ackson will be rememb ered as a paradox, a "man b oy" in the words of e stranged friend and former Beatle, Sir Paul McCartney, a recluse, musi cal genius, philanthropist and perhaps the most inspirational figure in modern music history. C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 5C THE COLLEGE OFTHE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bsSidney Poitier International Conference and Film Festival Nassau, The Bahamas, February 23-27, 2010CALL FOR PAPERS Deadline for Submissions: July 31, 2009The College of the Bahamas presents the Sidney Poitier International Conference and Film Festival. We invite critics, historians, filmmakers, artists and cultural practitioners from around theworld to examine the artistic and social endeavours of acclaimed actor, director, author, and diplomat Sir Sidney Poitier, who turns 83 on February 20, 2010. We invite papers or panel presentations that explore the broad spectrum of critical issues summoned up by Poitier’s work as actor, director, and author. Presentations should be 20 minutes in length. Papers will be considered for publication in an upcoming scholarly text dedicated toPoitier’s work. Possible Panel and Paper Topics Include (but are not limited to Caribbean Sense and Sensibilities in American Cinema Constructions of Blackness in Poitier’s Films Representations of Women in Poitier’s Films The Iconic Black Male in America Black Skin, White Masks Poitier and the White/Black Gaze Poitier and the Global Politics of Race and Liberation Poitier, Bahamian Politics and Identity Sexing the Asexual Black Christs and the White Conscience Desire, Sexuality and Transgression Poitier and Censorship Poitier in the Classroom The Actor as Activist Poitier and Film Theory Poitier and the Black Power Movement Poitier and the Digital Age Autobiography and Refashioning Poitier as Director Poitier as Writer Please send abstracts via email to: istrachan@cob.edu.bs. Abstracts should be submitted by July 31, 2009 ,and should be no longer than 250 words . For more information on the conference please go to:http://poitierconference.synthasite.com/ . For any questions feel free to contact Ian Strachan at istrachan@cob.edu.bs ,orMarjorie Brooks-Jones at mjones@cob.edu.bs or call the School of English Studies at (242 Please submit resumeto: Human ResourcesDepartment | Doctors Hospital P.O.BoxN-3018||Nassau,Bahamas|orEmail:nwatkins@doctorshosp.com to be a part of ourWOW service team. WeWelcome you “I ensure that vital equipment around the hospital are in perfect working condition according to strictensuring that you and your family receive safe and comfortable tr every time.. ”GraduateofBTVItechicalprogram; Previousexperiecewithbasicelectricaladplumbigduties; Abilitytotroubleshootofrelated to Healthcare services oralskills; Goodcustomerservice/orskills AbilitytoworkThesuccessful will: thehospital astateoftheart Performbasicrepairs serviceof Be forthe upkeepofthehospital | Salary with ENGINEERINGTECHNICIANBe jami Forbes,AssociateEngineeringTechnicianwww.doctorshosp.com Michael Jackson: a musical genius FROM page 3C

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 75F/24C Low: 78F/26C Low: 73F/23C Low: 74F/23C Low: 77 F/25 C Low: 79F/26C Low: 79 F/26 C Low: 80 F/27 C High: 92F/33C High: 91F/33C High: 91 F/33 C High: 88 F/31 C High: 90F/32C High: 87 F/31C High: 91F/33C Low: 82F/28C High: 91F/33C Low: 80 F/27 C High: 94F/34C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 73F/23C High: 90 F/32 C Low: 77F/25C High: 90 F/32 Low: 75F/24C High: 88F/31C Low: 76 F/24C High: 91F/33C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 93F/34C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 91F/33C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 91F/33C Low: 77F/25C High: 91 F/33 C Low: 82F/28C High: 95F/35C High: 90 F/32 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JUNE 29 TH , 2009, PAGE 7C THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Partly sunny with a thunderstorm. Partly cloudy, a t-storm; breezy. Partly sunny, a t-storm; breezy. Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. Mostly sunny. High: 91 Low: 79 High: 91 High: 91 High: 90 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 90 Low: 79 Low: 79 Low: 79 AccuWeather RealFeel 98F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 82F 98-88F 98-89F 98-86F 98-85F Low: 80 TODAYTONIGHTTUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................86F/30C Low ....................................................81F/27C Normal high ......................................87F/31C Normal low ........................................74F/24C Last year's high .................................. 91 F/33C Last year's low .................................. 79 F/26C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ................................................17.24" Normal year to date ....................................17.95" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU First Full Last New Jun. 29 Jul. 7Jul. 15Jul. 21 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:23 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 8:04 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 1:29 p.m. Moonset . . . . 12:36 a.m. Today Tuesday Wednesday Thursday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 1:46 a.m.2.57:53 a.m.0.0 2:24 p.m.2.88:40 p.m.0.2 2:44 a.m.2.48:46 a.m.0.1 3:23 p.m.2.89:41 p.m.0.3 3:42 a.m.2.29:39 a.m.0.1 4:20 p.m.2.810:41 p.m.0.3 4:39 a.m.2.210:33 a.m.0.2 5:15 p.m.2.811:36 p.m.0.3 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco88/3175/23s89/3177/25pc Amsterdam78/2559/15s76/2460/15s Ankara, Turkey79/2655/12pc82/2757/13t Athens85/2970/21s86/3070/21s Auckland57/1348/8r55/1246/7r Bangkok93/3379/26t91/3279/26t Barbados86/3077/25s86/3078/25sh Barcelona80/2669/20s81/2769/20s Beijing95/3570/21s95/3572/22pc Beirut86/3073/22s80/2675/23s Belgrade81/2767/19t87/3069/20t Berlin82/2767/19sh81/2768/20sh Bermuda82/2773/22pc82/2770/21sh Bogota64/1746/7sh65/1845/7c Brussels80/2661/16pc81/2763/17s Budapest86/3068/20t92/3369/20t Buenos Aires55/1247/8r59/1544/6s Cairo100/3775/23s105/4074/23s Calcutta93/3381/27t95/3581/27t Calgary69/2048/8pc66/1846/7pc Cancun91/3273/22sh89/3175/23sh Caracas82/2771/21t81/2771/21t Casablanca84/2863/17s81/2766/18s Copenhagen75/2365/18pc78/2564/17pc Dublin68/2052/11pc68/2054/12pc Frankfurt84/2870/21r84/2867/19t Geneva 82/27 59/15 t 83/2858/14t Halifax 62/16 53/11 r 60/15 54/12 c Havana 87/30 75/23 r 89/31 75/23 sh Helsinki 72/22 55/12pc68/2052/11pc Hong Kong 88/31 81/27 t 90/32 81/27t Islamabad 117/47 85/29 s 114/45 82/27 s Istanbul88/3172/22s90/3271/21pc Jerusalem 83/28 61/16s88/3163/17s Johannesburg 58/1433/0s56/1338/3pc Kingston 88/3179/26r88/3178/25r Lima71/2157/13s69/2058/14pc London82/2764/17s82/2763/17pc Madrid90/3261/16pc97/3668/20s Manila91/3279/26t90/3277/25t Mexico City74/2356/13t73/2256/13sh Monterrey102/3876/24s105/4075/23s Montreal72/2263/17t73/2263/17t Moscow75/2352/11pc73/2250/10sh Munich77/2560/15t81/2760/15t Nairobi80/2656/13t76/2454/12r New Delhi 106/4188/31s102/3882/27t Oslo83/2860/15pc77/2558/14pc Paris89/3165/18s88/3164/17s Prague 82/27 61/16 sh 84/28 63/17 t Rio de Janeiro78/2569/20pc84/2871/21s Riyadh111/4388/31s104/4080/26s Rome 82/27 66/18 s 84/28 68/20 s St. Thomas88/3178/25sh88/3179/26s San Juan62/1631/0s62/1633/0s San Salvador 83/28 73/22 t 82/27 73/22 t Santiago 54/1237/2pc48/839/3r Santo Domingo86/3073/22r85/2974/23s Sao Paulo 74/23 59/15 s 74/23 57/13s Seoul86/3068/20sh86/3064/17t Stockholm 75/23 59/15 pc 72/22 54/12 pc Sydney 68/20 52/11 s70/2154/12s Taipei95/3580/26pc93/3379/26s T okyo 77/25 70/21 c 81/27 72/22 t T oronto 74/2361/16t67/1960/15t Trinidad91/3266/18s88/3164/17sh V ancouver 67/19 52/11 s 69/2053/11pc Vienna 79/2669/20r82/2769/20t W arsaw 87/30 65/18 s 88/31 66/18 pc Winnipeg 66/18 52/11 s 69/2052/11s H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayTuesday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SW at 10-15 Knots2-4 Feet5-15 Miles82F Tuesday:SW at 10-15 Knots2-4 Feet5-15 Miles82F Today:SW at 10-15 Knots2-3 Feet5-15 Miles81F Tuesday:SW at 8-16 Knots2-4 Feet5-10 Miles81F Today:SW at 10-15 Knots2-4 Feet5-10 Miles81F Tuesday:SW at 7-14 Knots2-4 Feet5-10 Miles81F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque90/3267/19c91/3266/18pc Anchorage70/2154/12pc71/2155/12s Atlanta92/3366/18pc90/3265/18s Atlantic City86/3063/17pc82/2762/16t Baltimore86/3064/17pc82/2764/17t Boston72/2261/16sh75/2363/17t Buffalo73/2259/15t65/1856/13t Charleston, SC95/3574/23t93/3370/21pc Chicago80/2660/15t71/2157/13c Cleveland77/2560/15t67/1956/13c Dallas95/3568/20t95/3570/21pc Denver92/3358/14t93/3360/15t Detroit76/2455/12t69/2055/12c Honolulu88/3173/22pc87/3073/22s Houston97/3677/25t97/3674/23t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayTuesday TodayTuesdayTodayTuesday Indianapolis82/2759/15t76/2457/13pc Jacksonville94/3474/23t91/3271/21t Kansas City89/3165/18s89/3166/18s Las Vegas106/4180/26s105/4083/28pc Little Rock92/3366/18s97/3668/20s Los Angeles82/2766/18pc81/2764/17pc Louisville87/3065/18s82/2762/16pc Memphis91/3269/20s93/3369/20s Miami90/3277/25t88/3177/25t Minneapolis77/2559/15pc79/2660/15pc Nashville87/3063/17s88/3164/17s New Orleans94/3476/24t94/3475/23t New York84/2867/19c81/2769/20t Oklahoma City92/3366/18pc93/3368/20s Orlando92/3375/23t89/3174/23t Philadelphia83/2868/20pc82/2766/18t Phoenix 106/41 85/29 t 106/4185/29c Pittsburgh77/2559/15t67/1954/12t Portland, OR 78/2554/12s78/2553/11s Raleigh-Durham 93/33 65/18 s 93/33 65/18 s St. Louis88/3166/18s84/2864/17s Salt Lake City 93/33 65/18 s 96/3568/20pc San Antonio 99/37 74/23 pc 93/33 72/22 t San Diego75/2366/18pc76/2466/18pc San Francisco 76/24 55/12 pc 74/2355/12pc Seattle73/2252/11s73/2251/10s T allahassee 96/3574/23t95/3568/20t T ampa 91/32 78/25 t 88/31 78/25t Tucson96/3576/24t101/3878/25t W ashington, DC 87/30 67/19s84/2865/18pc UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. T emperature bands are highs for the day . Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T -storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

PAGE 33

C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 8C, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By NEKESA MUMBI MOODY AP Music Writer L OS ANGELES (AP o f Michael Jackson says he does not believe stress over the intense series of concerts the King of Pop planned for his comeback led to his death. Joe Jackson also said in an interview a iring Sunday that he believes his son w ill be larger in death than he was in life. The patriarch of the Jackson 5 said he wished Michael Jackson were around to see the outpouring of affection since his death. “Michael was the biggest superstar in the world and in history,” Joe Jackson told Fox News Channel’s “Geraldo atL arge.” “He was loved by everybody, whether poor or wealthy or whateverm ay be.” M ichael Jackson was to begin a s trenuous series of 50 concerts in London in July. Three days after the pop icon died, c elebrities descended on Los Angeles for what promised to be a spectacular celebration of Jackson’s life at thea nnual BET awards show. M edia requests for the Sunday night show doubled following the death, and the red carpet was lengthened. It was not immediately clear whether any m embers of the Jackson family, who g athered at their Encino compound o ver the weekend, planned to take part. Previously announced performers including Beyonce and Ne-Yo, were working to overhaul performances theyh ad planned for weeks so they could honor Jackson. Other stars who had n ot planned to attend, including Usher a nd Justin Timberlake, tried to catch last-minute flights, producers said. On Saturday, the cardiologist who was with Jackson during his final moments sat down with investigatorsf or three hours. His spokeswoman said he is not a suspect in the death. Dr. Conrad Murray “helped identify the circumstances around the death of the pop icon and clarified some inconsistencies,” spokeswoman MirandaS evcik said. She said the doctor r emains “a witness to this tragedy.” Police confirmed they had interviewed Murray and said he was cooperative. Meanwhile, Jackson’s mother selected a lawyer who represented Jacksonl ast year in a breach-of-contract suit and has advised other high-profile clients to help the family, said a person who requested anonymity because the matter is private. The legal move came as the Rev. J esse Jackson revealed that Michael Jackson’s family wants a second, priv ate autopsy of the pop superstar b ecause of unanswered questions a bout how he died. It’s abnormal,” Jesse Jackson said from Chicago a day after visiting the Jackson family. “We don’t know what happened. Was he injected and with w hat? All reasonable doubt should be a ddressed.” People close to Jackson have said since his death that they were con-c erned about his use of painkillers. Los Angeles County medical examiners completed their autopsy Friday and s aid Jackson had taken prescription medication. Medical officials also said there was no indication of trauma or foul play. An official cause of death could takew eeks to determine. T here was no word from the Jackson family on funeral plans. Many of Jackson’s relatives have gathered at the family’s Encino compound, caring there for Jackson’s three children. It remains unclear whom Jackson d esignated as potential guardians for his children. Those details, likely contained in the 50-year-old singer’s will, have not been released. An attorney for Deborah Rowe, the mother of Jackson’s two oldest child ren, issued a statement Saturday asking that the Jackson family “be able t o say goodbye to their loved one in p eace.” A White House adviser said on N BC’s “Meet the Press” that President Barack Obama had written to the Jackson family to express his condolences. Associated Press writers Anthony M cCartney; Sophia Tareen in Chicago; Juan A. Lozano in Houston; and Gillian Flaccus, Brooke Donald, Beth H arris and Mike Blood and AP Global Media Services Production Manager Nico Maounis in Los Angeles cont ributed to this report Father doubts concert stress sickened Jackson JOE JACKSON (far right J esse Jackson (far left in the Encino neighbourhood of Los Angeles on Friday... ( AP Photo: Jason Redmond)


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FILES


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Mim blowin’ it

HIGH
LOW

SUNNY,

91F
79F

FSTORM

Volume: 105 No.179

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

P







ag wert

mes

ec OMA

allegations
SSN Ut

Police investigate
‘suspicious’ death

By TANEKA THOMPSON
and DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Staff Reporters

POLICE are probing the
horror death of a man found
bound, gagged and hanged
from a tree by a car seat belt.

While there were “no signs
of injuries” to his body, offi-
cers are treating the death as
suspicious.

According to investigators,
a male resident of Johnson
Road, in the Fox Hill area of
Nassau, found the hanged
man around 3.25 pm on Sat-
urday in bushes near his
home.

Supt Elsworth Moss, head
of the Central Detective Unit,
said: "On arrival at the scene,
police observed a man hanged
from a tree with what
appeared to be a car seat belt
around his neck, his hands tied
behind his back and he
appeared to be gagged witha
white cloth around his
mouth."

Mr Moss said the man,
whose identity was not
released, had "no visible
injuries" to his body.

And while the circum-
stances surroundng his death

SEE page 11

AG calls for review of how

SHU ES





RICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

SEE PAGE FIFTEEN



Officer claims

detainees
were abused

Allegations about
Detention Centre

AN OFFICER has broken ranks to tell of the hor-
rors which he says have gone on for years behind the
gates of the Carmichael Road Detention Centre, far
from public view.

Among the abuses he alleges to have witnessed are
numerous beatings, constant sexual assaults and even
one murder — all of which, the officer says, have gone
unpunished.

He also backed several specific claims of cruelty and
violence levelled by current and former detainees and
published by The Tribune, but which the authorities say
there is no evidence to support.

"Tam ashamed by what I've seen my fellow officers do.
Most of them are in prominent positions who are doing
this foolishness, not the small man," he said.

The officer, who asked that his name and rank be
withheld as he fears for his safety, also told of chronic
hunger, a lack of medical attention and unbearable con-
ditions suffered by detainees.

He said the officials in charge of the detention centre
do not know what is going on because they are not doing
their jobs properly, and called for The Tribune to continue
to pressure the Government over the issue.

When asked to describe conditions at the centre, he
said: "It brings tears to my eyes. I'm telling you it’s sick-

SEE page nine

court business is conducted

THE Attorney General is calling for a review of the Bahamas’
Criminal Procedure Code that could radically change the country’s
court system.

Giving his contribution to the national budget in the Senate on
Friday, Attorney General Michael Barnett said there must be a
review of the way the court’s business is conducted. He is calling for
the elimination of preliminary inquiries and greater use of the
Voluntary Bill of Indictment.

Mr Barnett said a retired Justice has been retained to work on
reforming the Penal Code and Criminal Procedure Code. He
assumes office in October.

SEE page 11

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FAMILY of the man 1 found nanged point to the area where his body
was found.

Bahamas Bar Association
elects a new president

AFTER six years
of Wayne Munroe at
the helm of the
Bahamas Bar Associ-
ation, members of the
Bar on Friday elected
Ruth Bowe-Darville
as their new presi-
dent.

While Mr Munroe
had previously indi- §
cated he would stand
for re-election, it is
understood he announced on
either Tuesday or Wednesday
of last week that he would not
be running.

Speaking with The
Tribune yesterday,
Mrs Bowe-Darville
said she was not sur-
prised that Mr
Munroe chose to
withdraw from the
election.

i «=6The Tribune also
® understands that the
wemeeee law partnership of
Meanie Lockhart and
Munroe — of which
Mr Munroe is managing part-
ner and Elliot Lockhart is

SEE page nine

Io



IKFAST S



THE MEN’S 4 x 400 metre
relay team (left) and
Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie
(above) with their medals.

“Bahamian athletes finally
get their 2001 gold medals

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

AFTER being elevated from
silver to gold from the 2001
IAAF World Championships in
athletics, the men’s 4 x 400
metre relay team of Avard
Moncur, Chris Brown, Troy
McIntosh, Timothy Munnings
and Carl Oliver, as well as
sprinter Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie, finally got their
hardware.

As the curtain came down at
the conclusion of the rain-inter-
rupted Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations’ National
Open Track and Field Cham-
pionships on Saturday night, the
athletes received their gold
medals from Minister of Sports,

.9

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS

LEADING NEWSPAPER

SANDWIC
92.90

Desmond Bannister and
BAAA’s president Curt
Hollingsworth.

They also each receive a
cheque from the Bahamas gov-
ernment, the amount undis-
closed to reflect the incentive
gold medalists collect from the
World Championships and the
Olympic Games.

The IAAF stripped the Unit-
ed States’ 4 x 4 relay team of
their gold from the champi-
onships in Edmonton, Canada,
after it was discovered that
American Andrew Pettigrew
had tested positive for the use
an illegal substance.

Each member of the team
took the historic moment in
their stride as they celebrated

SEE page nine

1


PAGE 2, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS



Report says youth programme Ryser em itt iene
had become ‘military boot cap’

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A PRELIMINARY report
conducted on the now sus-
pended National Youth Ser-
vices Programme in North
Abaco indicates the site had
deteriorated into a military
"boot camp” with "little or no
therapeutic, educational or
after-care programme values".

According to the report, the
team found that educational
and mental health services at
the camp "remained in the
same underdeveloped state
with untrained staff as was the
case in February, 2008".

Observations from the
report state that at the time of
the study, the camp was still
operating as a "classical 'boot
camp' style of delinquent
intervention, where the para-
military structure become(s)
dominant and the educational,
mental health and after-care
have become un-structured
and dysfunctional".

ie
Ut)
tts
PHONE: 322-2157

This created a "major con-
cern" for the researchers who
reported that unstructured
environments can cause more
disruptive behaviour.

Staff members suggested
that the boot camp physical
components - eight RBDF
instructors and nine wardens
or one physical worker to each
three boys - mentality had
become the driving force
in the camp's programme
instead of mental health or
education.

Concern

"This condition still remains
a major concern for the evalu-
ation team because psycho-
logical research show(s) that
treating children with major
conduct disorders requires a
consistently structured treat-
ment environment or inter-
vention efforts are very likely
to elicit the opposite effects,
namely, the child is likely to
become more resolute in con-
tinued conduct disorder," said
the report.

The 2008/2009 evaluation
was prepared by Sterling Gar-
diner of the School Psycho-
logical Services Unit and pre-
sented to the Acting Director
of Youth and Sports in

November, 2008.

Between October 27 to
November 1, 2008 five school
psychologists from the Min-
istry of Education in partner-
ship with the Ministry of
Youth and Sports carried out
the research compiled in the
report.

Camp

According to the paper, the
programme - which was
formed in September, 2004 -
intended to remove at-risk
youth - those who exhibited
serious behavioral, academic
and social problems - from a
socially enabling environment
to the Andros camp.

A curriculum of physical
education, mathematics, Eng-
lish language, spirituality, par-
enting skills, self-awareness,
arts and crafts, and civics com-
bined in a 17-hour day with an
“overall physical intense train-
ing regiment” from 5.30 am to
11 pm was "expected to
change prior behaviour", said
the report.

The camp closed last Friday,
amidst controversy, but gov-
ernment said they plan to
retool the programme and re-
launch it later this year in New
Providence.

..Felipé Major/Tribune staff










































is robbed by gunman

A GUNMAN robbed the Solomon's Mines
store in Bay Street yesterday making off with
an undisclosed amount of jewelry.

Details were minimal up to press time last
night, but head of the Central Detective Unit
Elsworth Moss said the incident occured
around 1.22 pm yesterday when a lone gun-
man entered the store.

He brandished a firearm and held employ-

ee a

ees at bay before making good his escape,
said Mr Moss.

According to police, a scared employee hid
in the back of the store while the gunman
helped himself to luxury items.

Police said no shots were fired and no one
was injured during the robbery.

No description of the gunman was avail-
able. Police investigations continue.

PARAMEDICS take
part in a drill at the
Police health fair held
at the Police College
at the weekend.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 3



Contractor claims

officials approached
him to buy quarry

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE contractor responsible
for excavating Crown land and
allegedly selling quarry to gov-
ernment said officials gave him
permission to excavate and then
approached him to purchase the
product.

Cardinal Newman, 54, of Long
Island, maintains he is excavating
the three acre site north of Cow-
pen Road and south of Millars
Heights, off Carmichael Road,
to prepare the land for farming.

He said the hard rock eight
feet deep is unsuitable for agri-
culture and he was given verbal
permission from officers in the
department of physical planning
to excavate the land.

Environmental health workers
then approached Mr Newman
and offered to pay him $130 per
bag of fill, he said. And a source
told The Tribune the fill is then
used to cover the sanitary landfill
site in Harrold Road.

© In brief

Two men in
hospital after
drive-by
shooting

TWO men are in hospital
following a drive-by shooting
in the Milton Street area yes-
terday, police said.

The men, one in his early
20s and the other 19, were
standing on the street outside
a house around 12.40 pm
Sunday when a car pulled up
alongside them and occu-
pants began shooting.

Central Detective Unit
Superintendent Elsworth
Moss said: "People from that
vehicle fired several shots at
these men hitting one to the
right thigh and the other to
the chest and right side of his
body.”

Up to press time police did
not have a description of the
gunmen or their car.

The victims, whose injuries
are not life threatening, were
in hospital yesterday but are
expected to make a full
recovery, police said.

In other crime news, police
recovered two illegal
firearms over the weekend.

Acting on information
from the public, the police
retrieved a .44 Desert Eagle
pistol from the Eastern Road
area on June 26, said Mr
Moss.

Later that day, police exe-
cuted a search warrant on a
Pinewood Gardens home
where a 12-gauge shotgun
was confiscated, said Mr
Moss.

“The government are aware of
what I’m doing,” Mr Newman
said.

“Physical planning gave me the
okay from last year or the year
before, by word of mouth, but
not on paper.

“They have sent the inspectors
out and they said they don’t have
a problem with what I’m doing
and tell me to go ahead.

“And until they come and say
don’t go further with it, I will con-
tinue what I’m doing.”

Following excavation Mr New-
man fills the craters with
biodegradable waste — trees,
leaves, and wood — to prepare
the land as farmers do in Long
Island, Mr Newman said.

He insists it is not a money-
making scheme as he pays $160
per hour to rent each excavation
machine and therefore earns just
$4 per bag of fill.

But as he needs to excavate
the land for farming, he did not
turn down the opportunity to sell
the fill, Mr Newman said. He
insists that other Crown land






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leaseholders are doing the same.

Mr Newman, whois also a con-
tractor for Newman’s Construc-
tion, explained he has completed
excavation of about two acres of
the site, which is now being filled,
and he is digging the last portion
of the site set aside for excava-
tion, a 90ft by 90ft area.

On the cultivated land he
hopes to grow 784 banana trees
and around 200 Persian lime
trees, with okra and watermelon
dotted in between.

Mr Newman said: “You can’t
grow anything on rock, so what
was left for me to do? If they did-
n’t want me to cultivate the land
they shouldn’t have given me the
land.

“T have to cultivate my land.

“Tf the government doesn’t
give you permission to cut this
type of land down there’s only
one thing left to do, and that’s
build houses on it.

“T don’t want to build a house,
if I did I wouldn’t cut it down. I
want to farm because I know
what I can make of this.”



WORK TAKES sues maith a
Cowpen Road and south of
Millars Heights.

Environment Minister Earl
Deveaux did not respond to press
inquiries Friday, but passed them
on to the department of environ-
mental health services and
the department of physical plan-
ning.

Nothing was received from
either department.










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PAGE 4, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Rebutting Senator over Police Chief

IT SEEMS the political sleuths are still
hounding Police Commissioner Reginald Fer-
guson. He shouldn’t be chief, one of their num-
bers told the Senate Friday.

For the past seven years they have agitated
over the presence of a man, who, when it comes
to investigating a crime, cannot be swayed,
regardless of the status of the suspect. For some
reason this seems to agitate certain members of
the Opposition, and those of their political per-
suasion who serve on the police force. Howev-
er, the public probably feels safer with a man
who believes all persons are equal before the
law, and is prepared to do his duty to get the law
breaker, whatever his political views, before
the courts.

It was during Friday’s Senate budget debate
that Senator Jerome Fitzgerald, himself the son
of a former police officer, criticised govern-
ment for having sent two young police officers
to Canada for training, but instead of appoint-
ing one of them Police Commissioner and the
other his deputy on their return, confirmed Mr
Ferguson in the top position, with the other
two under him. Senator Fitzgerald pointed out
that Mr Ferguson, an Acklins man, was the old-
est officer on the force. He failed to mention
that he was also the man with the most experi-
ence having spent 44 of his 63 years working his
way from the bottom ranks to the position of
Commissioner. One does not get that kind of
experience from a classroom text book, as those
of us in the newspaper profession appreciate,
but the ill informed believe that anyone who can
string two sentences together — and hopefully
know where to put a full stop — is capable of
being an editor. It’s the same in the police force
where years of experience is one of the most
important ingredients in being able to lead an
effective team.

Mr Fitzgerald believed the Ingraham gov-
ernment would have been wiser to have
appointed a “young, qualified, respected senior
police officer who has the full support of the
police force and the community at large and
allow him to recommend and advise on the
restructuring of a police force he was to lead.”

There was no “logical rationale” for having
a commissioner being party to reshuffling a
police force that he would not lead into the
future, said Mr Fitzgerald.

“It makes no sense,” he told the Senate.
“But then again, this is the age of foolishness. If
we were in the age of wisdom, the most qualified
and respected senior police officer would be
commissioner of police today.”

Now let’s examine this sense and nonsense.

It is known that before the 2007 election the
PLP government had its own plans on the retire-
ment of Police Commissioner Paul Farquharson,

at)

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who, we understand, knew only too well the
heavy hand of the politician on his shoulder.
They had earmarked two young men — one to
be commissioner and the other his deputy — on
Mr Farquharson’s retirement. They would have
bypassed Mr Ferguson, then Mr Farquharson-
*s deputy, and created a new position — Advis-
er to the Commissioner. The person it is said
they had identified for this position was a retired
police officer, one of their political supporters,
who, probably, because of the lack of experience
of the two they had chosen, was to guide them
in their new positions. If this had happened,
the PLP would have had complete control of the
Royal Bahamas Police Force. It would have
also meant an unnecessary expense on the
force’s budget and the taxpayer’s pocket book.

However, the PLP lost the election. The
FNM became the government, and Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham looked at the problem
through different spectacles.

He took two of the force’s top officers, young
men, already with a good educational back-
ground and a great deal of promise and sent
them to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police for
further training. On their return they were
appointed top positions under an experienced
Commissioner already active on the force at
no extra expense to the Treasury — in other
words no extra body had to be hired to give
them advice. During these few years, until Mr
Ferguson’s retirement, they will have time to
build their reputation with the public and their
fellow officers, so that they can win the full sup-
port of both groups — support that Senator
Fitzgerald assumes they already have. And they
will do it with the help of Mr Ferguson’s years of
experience. With their extra training and Com-
missioner Ferguson’s background, the three
working together should be able to form a
strong police force for the future.

And when it’s time for Commissioner Fer-
guson to retire the new commissioner must be a
man of knowledge, integrity and above all inde-
pendence. A man who cannot be swayed by
any political party. A man who is prepared to
police this country with sternness, tempered by
fairness. And because we believe the matter is
being dealt with wisely, we should have a well
trained future commissioner.

One would have thought that controlling
crime would have been the most important item
on our daily agenda. Instead of making Com-
missioner Ferguson’s job more difficult, every
patriotic Bahamian should be trying to assist
him and his force.

It is true that this is an age of foolishness
made more foolish by politicians trying to play
interference with a man who is responsible for
this community’s security.



Explanation
needed from
Chief Justice

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I rite to express my concerns
concerning a recent experience
with the Supreme Court Reg-
istry of The Bahamas.

As you may know, creditors
of CLICO were required to file
their claims with the Registry
and serve it on the Liquidators
no later than May 22, 2009.

Tam one such creditor hold-
ing a pension policy with CLI-
CO

I live on a remote Family
Island and flew into Nassau on
the morning of May 22, 2009
for the purpose of filing my
Affidavit of Proof and serving it
on the Liquidators.

I arrived at the Supreme
Court Registry at about lpm

letters@tribunemedia net



only to find out that the Reg-
istry was closed from 12.30 for
the personnel to attend a lun-
cheon and not expected to
reopen until three for one hour
as it closes at 4pm.

I was totally bewildered as I
could not fathom that the Chief
Justice would allow the entire
judicial system to shut down
with the public unable to file
documents with the Registry for
their court matters.

Is it any wonder that the pub-
lic has no confidence in the judi-
ciary?

Could this luncheon not have
been held on the weekend so
as not to inconvenience the
public?

In addition to the possibility
of not recouping my full invest-
ment with CLICO I had to trav-
el to Nassau at some cost to
myself, take a taxi to the Reg-
istry only to be met with this
situation.

Will the Chief Justice explain
these actions and at the very
least offer an apology to the
public?

WILLIAM G
STRACHAN
Nassau,

May, 2009.

Into the Ark of Culture

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Before the memory of Bahamian History was
formed, stands a testament to Native Indians who
strove to marry culture with every minute detail of
their lives, in this land.

Of course we do not expect the same as society
unfolds upon pages of change and progress, nor do
we envision that same pristine ecological diversity;
however, the insouciant attitudes of this people
towards conservation far outweighs the burdens of
industrial growth.

Today, we take a slight turn from the course of
the three previous letters, into the headwind of
incontrovertible fact, as it were.

Culture is without question the plenipotent source
of any society, the backbone of any nation; we also
know that the employ and/or study of all great dis-
bursements of time: medicine, religion, art, science,
philosophy etc, ultimately depend upon the astute
understanding of culture for their various measure-
ments and definitions.

So it is into this ark, life finds refuge when storm
floods of time descend. Even as culture lends itself
to everything and everyone, it is at once secure in
ownership of self. It is of this quintessence T. H.
Huxley speaks when referring to the “spirit of
catholicity” in writings of “our chief apostle of cul-
ture” Matthew Arnold, in Science and Culture. Cul-
ture, though being a distinct chapter differentiat-
ing peoples, remains the all-encompassing perpetu-
al rule that governs mankind. Here at home, we
vigilantly seek to understand the mental taxation

placed upon Bahamians by excessive failures of suc-
cessive governments to quell the eruptions we con-
tinue to see in our communities; Why? Because cul-
ture is always relegated to the most meager impor-
tance. How long will Bahamians be satisfied with liv-
ing conditions that breed discontent — disrupting a
person's right to freedom from beastly intrusions eg,
noise pollution. How much longer this society dilly-
dallies, “fiddling while Rome burns”, despite chaot-
ic disproportions of a national crisis, remains to be
seen. Let us turn this argument upon the universal
poles of truth, culture is the epicentre of all, in that
who God is, was, will ever be, was meted out from
himself to bring forth all that becomes.

Culture orders the designations, assignments and
appropriations of the Eternal Blueprint; it secures
investment within the Human Estate. We are a
debt-ridden people in multiple areas of our nation-
al lives; and until strict lines of moral redemption are
drawn and assiduously followed, we will continue to
see foreclosures on our citizens and communities.

The Chinese propounds, “the journey of a thou-
sand miles begins with the first step”, however I
submit, “the journey to a Nation’s soul begins with
the first voice.” Remember, when a people become
afraid to speak, they question, challenge and deny
the wisdom of God. Thank you for your continued
advancement of social awareness.

GREGORY NEELY
Nassau,
June 15, 2009.

Disgusted at wanton and casual cruelty inflicted on dogs

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please permit me space in your
valuable columns to express my
disgust at the wanton and casual
cruelty inflicted on dogs in this
country.

It seems a fully acceptable pas-
time for children and adults to
“lick” dogs wherever they
encounter them.

In fact, the local potcakes seem
more inclined to follow tourists
and vagabonds around because
they are assured no harm will
come to them from these quar-
ters.

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On Tuesday, June 2, I wit-
nessed a young man in Grants
Town hit a wandering dog with a
stick, nearly fracturing one of the
animal’s hind legs.

I saw glee on his face as if the
heavens had opened and show-
ered him with grace unmeasured.

Everywhere on this island we
see scarred and crippled dogs,
damning evidence of our cruel,
nastier and darker sides.

In fact, if you believe in rein-
carnation, the worst form to
return as would be an over-the-
hill potcake dog. That would be
tantamount to residing eternally

in the left wing of hell. The coun-
try sorely needs a crack down on
cruelty to animals.

In addition to fines, or short
jail term, perpetrators could be
required to give community ser-
vice via the Bahamas Humane
Society and through the natural
expansion of its facilities to truly
sensitise Bahamians on the sub-
ject.

“Nuff said.”

W LESTER BOWLEG
ANIMAL LOVER
Nassau,

June 11, 2009.

Correcting Mr Leslie Miller’s statement

EDITOR, The Tribune.

While we wish Mr Leslie Miller every success in his undertaking
in the construction and operation of Mario’s Bowling and Enter-
tainment Centre, we must correct his statement as it appeared on
page 3B of today’s Tribune and which we understand he also

made earlier on a local talk show.

Never, from the time we purchased the land and built Village
Lanes did we receive government’s relief whether from stamp tax
on our conveyance, customs duty on building materials, lanes and
machines, real property tax, business license or any other items
related thereto. When we sold the property some 20 years later, all
real property taxes, business licenses, National Insurance and util-
ities were paid in full. Again, we wish Mr Miller every success, he
has undertaken a massive challenge.

SYDNEY& IVY FRENCH
Nassau,
June 26, 2009.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



New passenger

terminal opens at |
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By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Freeport
Harbour Company and Dis-
covery Cruises officially opened
the newly refurbished passen-
ger terminal on Friday.

Orlando Forbes, port direc-
tor at the harbour, and Hans
Hahn, president of Discovery,
attended the ribbon-cutting cer-
emony for the completion of
Phase I.

Mr Forbes said that an invest-
ment of $1.2 million has been
budgeted for a three-phase
improvement project of the har-
bour facility, including the pas-
senger terminal, baggage and
Customs sections.

He said with Phase I com-
pleted, the passenger terminal
has gained 1,600 square feet in
space that allows accommoda-
tion for an additional 250 pas-
sengers.

Mr Forbes said the Discov-
ery terminal is now capable of
accommodating some 450 to
500 passengers.

“We were able to add more
room for the passenger line-up
area, which is critical for us on
wet days,” he said.

Discovery president Mr Hahn
said the terminal has “come a
long way” over the past 11 years
since the cruise’ line
started sailing at Freeport Har-
bour.

“T remember 11 years ago it
was not much of a terminal.
(Back then) we took about
1,000 passengers a day and
when it rained people were
standing in mud, and when the
sun shone people were stand-
ing in the sweltering heat.

“We then added a Customs
hole and a tent, and the hurri-
cane came and blew it away.
We put on a roof and finally we
came to the stage where we
needed a little more space
because after all our passengers,
the first thing and the last thing

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Part of a three-phase
improvement of facility | tisnisssss:

they see is Freeport terminal. I
think it is very nice,” he said.

Mr Hahns commended
Freeport Harbour for the
improvements. He noted that
while passenger numbers have
fallen, they are hoping to see
the numbers go up again to
1,000 passengers daily.

Mr Forbes said Phase I and
IIT will involve the further
expansion of the passenger ter-
minal, baggage section and
Customs area, respectively.

He stressed that the process
of baggage collection and clear-
ing Customs must be improved
for both passengers and Cus-
toms officers.

Mr Forbes said Freeport Har-

bour is committed to doing its
part to ensure that the termi-
nal is at the highest standards in
terms of security and passenger
accommodation.

“We are aware of the efforts
being made by Discovery and
the government in seeking to
keep Discovery coming to this
island.

“This investment we made
here represents our part of the
partnership. As caretakers of
this gateway. It is our obliga-
tion to ensure that security stan-
dards are met and that all
guests, Bahamian and tourists
who utilise the terminal are in a
comfortable environment,” he
said.

Honduran military
_ Ousts president
ahead of vote

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras
SOLDIERS ousted the demo-
cratically elected president of

dent Hugo Chavez denounced

? what he called an illegal coup

? and vowed to stay in power,
? according to Associated Press.

The first military takeover of a

Central American government

Latin America and the world,
: and Chavez vowed to overthrow
? the country’s apparent new
i leader.
President Manuel Zelaya was
? awakened Sunday by gunfire
? and detained while still in his
? pajamas, hours before an unpop-
: ular constitutional referendum
? many saw as a power grab. An
? air force plane flew him into
? forced exile in Costa Rica as
? armored military vehicles with
? machine guns rolled through the
: streets of the Honduran capital
? and soldiers seized the national
? palace.
: = “T want to return to my coun-
? try,” Zelaya said in Costa Rica.
? “I am president of Honduras.”
: Congress voted to accept what
i it said was Zelaya’s letter of res-
? ignation, with even Zelaya’s for-
? mer allies turning against him.

HAVE you ever overdressed
for an event? Perhaps you
understood the dress to be for-
mal, but when you arrived in
your sequin dress or black tuxe-
do, everyone else was wearing
jeans and turtlenecks. You may
recall how everyone stared as
you entered the room, looking a
bit out of place.

That happens to homeown-
ers too, but it’s not called over-
dressing — it’s called over-
improving. It happens when
property owners remodel a
home to the point where its new
value far exceeds all others in
the neighbourhood.

Let’s say that your family has
grown, and you begin your
improvements by adding a wing
with two more bedrooms and
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THE TRIBUNE



Caricom leaders
must move the
region forward |

or pay the price ff

insight |

WORLD VIEW

@ By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean
diplomat)

W HEN heads of
government of the

Caribbean Community and
Common Market (Caricom)
meet in early July, a big
responsibility will fall on the
shoulders of Guyana’s Presi-
dent Bharat Jagdeo as chair-
man to heal the wounds that
are causing the regional pro-
ject to haemorrhage.

President Jagdeo will have
to dig deep within himself for
the diplomatic skills that will
be necessary not only to sup-
press his own annoyance over
recent events in Caricom, but
also to guide his colleague
leaders to practical measures
that will fix the rifts between
them and set the Caricom ship
upon an agreed course of fur-
ther progress that benefits all.

All other Caricom leaders
will have to contribute to the
healing process by showing a
high level of maturity in their
discourse with each other and
by eschewing a desire for
purely short-term national
advantage in favour of longer
term gain for all.

The economic prospects
that Caricom countries face
are deeply troubling.
Addressing them at every lev-
el, especially international bar-
gaining, calls for a united Cari-
com, not a fractious one.

The current Chairman of
Caricom, the Prime Minister
of Belize Dean Barrow, cap-
tured the dire conditions con-
fronting Caricom countries
when, on June 24, he told a
special session of the UN
General Assembly that for the
Caribbean “the current set of
economic conditions is the
worst to have overtaken us
since independence.”

There was no exaggeration
in this declaration by Mr Bar-
row, nor was there any hyper-
bole in his further assertion
that “there is now no prospect
of our countries achieving the
time-bound Millennium
Development Goals”.

The reality is that given the
decline in the prices of their
principal exports, reduction in
aid, the significant downturn
in tourism, the dramatic fall
in remittances from their
Diaspora, and the severe stric-
tures in borrowing money on
the commercial market, Cari-
com countries are experienc-
ing a new level of desperation
particularly as many of them
have a debt to GDP ratio of
over 100 per cent. If they were
companies, many of these
countries would be regarded
as bankrupt.

Turning to the Internation-
al Monetary Fund (IMF) is of
little help to them in the pre-
sent circumstances.

For they can only borrow in
proportion to their quotas and
their quotas — particularly for
the six small countries of the
Organization of Eastern
Caribbean States (OECS) — is
too small to contribute effec-
tively to their needs. Further,
IMF money is the one source
of funding that cannot be writ-
ten-off so there is no prospect
of relief from this debt.

Of course, several countries
are in such dire straits that
they will end up in IMF pro-
grammes, not only because of
the effect of the current glob-
al crisis on their economies,
but also because of poor poli-
cies pursued in the past.

Some countries have
already sought help from spe-
cial IMF windows — Grenada
and St Vincent and the
Grenadines among them. Oth-

ers, such as Jamaica and
Antigua and Barbuda, are
now teetering on the edge of
full IMF programmes and will
shortly be there.

The situation is worse now
for Caricom countries, except
for Guyana, because over the
last three decades in which a
new generation has reached
adulthood, the region has
enjoyed a summer of relative
plenty making the current
insufficiency difficult to man-
age.

A big contribution to the
season of plenty in the decade
of the 1980’s was preferential
access to the European Union
(EU) market for sugar,
bananas and rum and a high
level of aid from the US, the
EU and Canada. But the sum-
mer of plenty has now turned
to the winter of drought, and
the full Economic Partnership
Agreement that Caricom
countries signed with the EU
last year bears no resemblance
to the treaties of the past.

|: Guyana’s case, it has
been a Highly Indebted

Poor Country for most of the
last three decades only recent-
ly being pulled out of the most
difficult economic circum-
stances by virtue of debt write-
offs. Nonetheless, Guyana too
is now plagued with falling
prices for bauxite, a decline in
remittances, and the loss of its
preferential market in the EU
for sugar.

Only relatively high prices
for its gold production make a
significant contribution to the
economy.

Unemployment levels have
already begun to increase in
every country, including
Trinidad and Tobago, despite
its comparative wealth in oil
and gas.

And, the forecast for
improvement is not encour-
aging.

It is clear that Caricom
countries will suffer the effects
of the recession in the US and
Europe for some time after
these areas begin to recover.

Given the very high levels
of unemployment in the US
and UK especially, there will
be a lag time before employ-
ment reaches a stage where
tourism and remittances
return to their 2007 levels for
the Caribbean.

Given this troubling inter-
national environment, the first
business of Caricom Heads of
Government as they gather
for their 30th meeting should
be to agree that there was nev-
er a time in their history when



BACK To SCHoo!

LAYAWAY



NO interest -



SIR RONALD SANDERS



there was a greater need fora
Caribbean Community and
for Caricom itself.

The problems that beset
Caricom countries in coping
with the severe challenges of
the global environment will
not be overcome by national
action alone.

If they were to come to
such an agreement and to
publicly declare it, they will
have to grab the nettle of
some issues that are ripe for
resolution by reasonable but
frank discussion.

One of them is the matter of
migration of Caricom people
within the Community; anoth-
er is the seeming division with-
in Caricom being caused by
the proposal for an Economic
Union between members of
the OECS and Trinidad and
Tobago; a third is the abject
failure to put in place effec-
tive governance of Caricom;
and the last and most impor-
tant is an agreed plan for
implementing the single mar-
ket and economy with penal-
ties for every infraction.

This cannot be beyond the
capacity of the Heads of Gov-
ernment of Caricom.

This is crunch time, and
time for leaders to deliver the
regional project over which
generations of Caribbean peo-
ple have laboured.

In the words of the Dean
Barrow, Caricom’s Chairman,
talking about the United
Nations on June 24, “What do
we tell our people? That we
attended yet another dress
rehearsal for a shadow play?
Another instalment in this
drama of progress that never
actually takes place”?

Mr Barrow’s answer to his
own poignant questions was
“No”. And, so it must be also
at the Caricom Summit in
Guyana in July. It must be a
resounding “No” to further
shadow plays.

Consequent upon this Sum-
mit, measurable advances
must be made by Caricom
leaders or they will have failed
their people and a price will
be paid.

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com

MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 7

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LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





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NORTH Andros The
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trial Corporation (BAIC) and
Carter Marketing are set to join
forces to promote the ‘Buy Fresh,
Buy Bahamian’ initiative.

Veteran broadcast executive
Charles Carter of spoke about the
project during a farmers meeting
on the island last weekend.

He was a member of a high lev-
el BAIC delegation led by execu-
tive chairman Edison Key. It
included a team from Bahamas
Agricultural Producers Associa-
tion headed by I G Stubbs.

Fulfilling a commitment made
to farmers here, BAIC has pur-
chased more equipment for their
use as they prepare for winter
crops. Equipment include a
mulcher, a fertiliser distributor, a
slasher, and a bedder.

And, the former North
Andros Farmers Association is
now the Big Yard Farmers Com-
pany with Cecil Gaitor as its pres-
ident.

“With this additional equipment
we are looking forward to a
bumper year,” said BAIC domes-
tic investment officer for North
Andros Alphonso Smith.

“For example, instead of one
tractor which we had last year, we
now have three more which means
that the waiting time for farmers to
prepare their fields has been short-
ened considerably. In another
week, farmers will have their own
spray machine.”

Mr Key pledged his continued
support of farmers in North
Andros.

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BAIC EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN Edison Key (second from right) and his

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to see more young people
involved,” he said.

He confirmed that, in the name
of BAIC, the government has pur-
chased 561 acres of prime farm
land in the vicinity of the North
Andros airport.

“We are going to us this prop-
erty strictly for agriculture,” he
said. “We are going to subdivide it
into plots so that whoever wants to
get involved in agriculture we will
make land available to them.”

Mr Carter hailed Mr Key’s
appointment as BAIC’s executive
chairman.

“Mr Key’s ideas for BAIC are
the most sensible we have heard
for agriculture in a long time,” he
said.

He warned that the way the
world is evolving, “if we don’t
make a stand for Bahamian agri-

culture now, there will be no stand
to make in the future.”

A problem with the country, he
said, “is that everything Bahamian
is jeopardised.”

“Too many of us are convinced
that if it comes from overseas it is
better than what we have right
here. That’s our problem. We just
like foreign things.”

To effect a change in attitude, he
said, “we have to organise our-
selves to go at the consumers and
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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS

Bahamas Bar Association [Sn

elects a new president

FROM page one

senior partner — will be dissolved. Mr
Munroe could not be reached for com-
ment and Mr Lockhart said he is not at
liberty to discuss the matter with the
press.

Ms Bowe-Darville served as the Bar
Association’s vice-president under Mr
Munroe for the past six years. Taking
over her former post, is the new vice-
president Cathleen Johnson-Hassan, sis-
ter of former Speaker of the House of
Assembly Italia Johnson.

In her new role as Bar Association pres-
ident Mrs Bowe-Darville said that a goal
that is “very close to her heart” is the
rehabilitation of the Bar’s reputation,
which in her view has “suffered terribly”
in recent years.

She said she also aims to achieve a
“total reconstruction” of the Bar’s admin-
istration, and wants to work on develop-
ing the legal profession more.

Addressing some of the pertinent issues
concerning the Bahamian judiciary at this
time, Ms Bowe-Darville said that she is
concerned about the upcoming vacancies
on the bench and hopes replacements can

FROM page one

the Bahamas’ first gold medal in
a men’s relay event at one of

be found as quickly as possible.

As it concerns the departure of Chief
Justice Sir Burton Hall, she said that it is
“regrettable” that he will serve outside
the country, but she is confident that a
qualified and experienced Bahamian can
be found to replace him.

“We have nothing but talent at the Bar,
we just don’t use it (properly),” she said.

Ms Bowe-Darville said she is a great
advocate of creating a strong Bahamian-
run judiciary, and is not in favour of
bringing in foreigners to fill posts that
she believes can easily be filled by local
legal professionals.

“Tf we create a strong Bar, I feel we
will create a strong bench,” she said.

Other contenders for the executive
positions within the Bar Association were
Cheryl Buzard, who ran for the position
of president, and Craig Butler, who ran
unsuccessfully for vice-president.

The positions of secretary and treasur-
er went unchallenged and Rachel Culmer
will continue on as secretary, while Sidney
Cambridge remains the Bar Association’s
treasurer.

Ms Bowe-Darville said there was some
chaos during the election process on Fri-
day and the ballot had to be taken a sec-

ond time. However, she said that the elec-
tions had a great turn-out and that 132
members of the Bar attended.

It is understood that on the first ballot
there were more ballots than persons vot-
ing.
Ms Bowe-Darville was educated at the
Government High School and continued
her tertiary education at the University of
Waterloo and York University in Ontario,
Canada. In May, 1985 she was called to
the Bahamas Bar.

She articled in the law firm of Bost-
wick and Bostwick, and in 1990, she
joined the law firm of Graham, Thompson
and Co. She was appointed senior execu-
tive assistant to the Prime Minister of the
Bahamas in September, 1994 and served
in that capacity until May of 1998. She
then joined the firm of Bannister and Co.
On several occasions, Ms Bowe-Darville
has acted as Stipendiary and Circuit Mag-
istrate.

She also served as chairperson of the
National Women's Advisory Council and
as a member of the Licensing Authority
and the Hospitals and Health Care Facil-
ities Licensing Board. She was appointed
as amember of the Securities Commission
of the Bahamas in June 2001.

Bahamian athletes finally get their medals

medals sentenced to six months

the two prestigious internation-
al meets.

Moncur, the lead off com-
petitor, said: “It seemed as if it
was never going to come to
fruition, so to finally have it,
especially in front of the home
crowd, is a great feeling.”

Moncur passed the baton off
to Brown, who after all these
years of hard work, they finally

got a gold medal, although it
wasn’t an Olympic gold.
“World Championship gold
is better than no gold at all,”
Brown said. “I just want to
thank my team-mates for
believing in me and sticking
with me and the Bahamian peo-
ple for their support.”
McIntosh, who got the baton
from Brown, said it’s good to
finally rejoin his team-mates

Officer claims detainees were abused

FROM page one

ening. At the end I was sick and tired of the job."

According to the officer, the recently announced improve-
ments at the centre will be short-lived - as have all such efforts
in the past — unless more far-reaching and comprehensive action
is taken.

The officer's full interview can be read in today's Insight.

after officially retiring to claim
the gold that they should have
gotten in Edmonton.

“Now, we are officially pre-
sented with these medals. It’s a
dream come through,” McIn-
tosh said. “This is something I
have been waiting on because
[ve won a medal at every inter-
national championship, but to
get that gold really put the nail
in the coffin for me.”

Although he’s semi-retired,
Munnings, the anchor of the
team, said: “It’s been a long
time coming, it’s vindication
that the hard work has finally
paid off. It pays to do it clean.
I’m very happy.”

In 2007, American sprint
queen Marion Jones came clean
that she cheated about the use
of performance-enhancing sub-
stances. She was stripped her

in jail.

One of the medals was the
gold she won in the 200 at the
IAAF World’s in Edmonton
which saw Ferguson-McKenzie
moved up from the silver to
claim the top spot.

“It feels fantastic,” said Fer-
guson-McKenzie, who received
her medal after posting a double
victory at the Nationals in the
100 and 200.

“T must thank the [AAF, the
BAAA’s and the Bahamas Gov-
ernment, who all pitched in and
made it work. It has my name
on it: ‘Bahamas 200 metre wom-
en’s Edmonton.’ It took seven
plus years, but you would think
that they had forgotten. But I
got the silver then. Now I’m the
gold medalist. I’m ecstatic.”

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THE TRIBUNE
























































































































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the right (Turtle Drive) property is
fourth house on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $186,000

. CARMICHAEL ROAD

LOT NO. Parcel of Land
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residence

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 12,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travelling east on
Carmichael Road from Bacardi
Road take the first asphalt paved
easement on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $401 ,882

. CHIPPINGHAM SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 96

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

3 beds / 1 bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: From Nassau Street
onto Boyd Road, take the fifth
corner on the right - Dunmore
Street and then second corner
on the right Musgrove Street. The
property is the first house on the
corner left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $120,000

CORAL MEADOWS

SUBDIVISION - WESTERN
DISTRICT

LOT NO. 4

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 7,500 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Western side of
Symonette Road and 150 feet
northward of Adelaide Road and
approximately a mile westward of
Coral Harbour Roundabout.
APPRAISED VALUE: $260,000

. DESTINY GARDEN

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 147

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

3 Beds /2Baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travelling west

on Carmichael Road from the
intersection of Gladstone Road

- about 2,000 feet - turn right at
the entrance of Destiny Garden
Subdivision; turn left at t-junction.
The property is the 19th house on
the right.

APPRAISED VALUE: $137,000

ROAD

LOT NO. 2

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Duplex Lot

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travelling west along
Carmichael Road turn through the
corner by Geneva Brass Seafood.
Take the third corner on the left
and travel to the end of the road.
The vacant lot is on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $65,000

. MALVARIC ESTATES

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 5

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Multi-Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 9,114 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travelling south along
High Vista Drive from East Bay
Street, take the 1st corner left

and then first right (Mango Drive).
Heading south take the 4th corner
right. At the t- junction, turn left
then take the first corner right.
The vacant lot is the third property
on the left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $109,000

. ELIZABETH ESTATES



SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 178

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

5 beds / 1 bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Enter Elizabeth
Estates from Prince Charles, take
the first right and follow the curve.
The property is located on the
corner of St. Vincent Avenue and
Ghana Circle.

APPRAISED VALUE: $118,000

. ENGLERSTON SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 19 Block 22
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residence

2-beds / 1-bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: On the western side
of St. Charles Vincent Street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $64,000

. ENGLERSTON SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 4 Block 7
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Triplex Apartment building
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east on
Cordeaux Avenue from East
Street take the second right (Key
West Street). Heading south

on Key West Street the subject
property is the sixth building on
the left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $243,000

10. FAITH GARDENS SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 23 Block 4
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-family Residence

2 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: From Faith Avenue
enter Faith Gardens and travel
east along Cleveland Boulevard
then take the fourth corner

on the left. The property is

the 13th house on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $184,000

11. GOLDEN GATES TWO

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 1010

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on
Carmichael Road, turn south onto
Jack Fish Drive; turn through the
fourth corner on the right. The
property is the third lot on the
right.

APPRAISED VALUE: $112,000

12. HAWKINS HILL

LOT NO. 52

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 6.175 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Southern side of
Windwhistle Street just east on
Hawkins Hill.

APPRAISED VALUE: $275,000

. OPULENT HEIGHTS
SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 28

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,597 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on
Carmichael Road, take the first
paved road after “Outdoor Patio”
on the left. Take the second
corner left, then the first corner
right. The vacant lot is second
to the last on the right before the
road ends.

APPRAISED VALUE: $75,000

. SOUTH OCEAN ESTATES
SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 9 Block 4

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 11,566 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling south of
Lyford Cay, immediately pass
Mount Pleasant turn left on South
Ocean Boulevard to new South
Ocean Estates. The vacant lot is
number 9 in Block 4.
APPRAISED VALUE: $110,000

6

13. JUBILEE GARDENS

16. NASSAU EAST SUBDIVISION

17

18. PARADISE CONDOMINIUMS

. SOUTH SEAS SUBDIVISION

DEVELOPED RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 48

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

3 beds / 1 bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: From Fire Trail road
enter Jubilee Gardens and

take the first corner on the left
then the first right, the property is
the second house on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $128,000

14. MARSHALL ROAD

LOT NO. 17D

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Triplex Apartment

One 2-bedroom/ 2-bath & Two
2-bedroom /1-bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 10,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west along
Marshall Road from South Beach
Road, take the first corner on the
right (Tiao End Road). The subject
property is the fourth building on
the left painted green with white
trim.

APPRAISED VALUE: $288,000

15. MILLENNIUM GARDENS

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 85

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence,

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,952 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling north

on Bethel Avenue from Harold
Road take the third corner on
the right, Heading east pass the
third T-junction around the curve
to the junction of Sis. Theresa
Symonette Drive then turn left
onto Sis. Maria Rahming Drive.
The property is the 14th house on
the right.

APPRAISED VALUE: $182,000

LOT NO. 4 Block 8
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Apartment Building/Commercial
Complex

PROPERTY SIZE: 14,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Eastern district of
New Providence. The subject
property is on Yamacraw Hill
Road opposite Treasure Cove.
APPRAISED VALUE: $686,000

. NASSAU VILLAGE SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 10 & 11 Block 48
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

5 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 10,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travelling east along
Taylor street take a left

at the T-junction onto Alexandria
Boulevard, then take the third
right onto Matthews Street. The
property is located on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $257,000

LOT NO. 65

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Townhouse Unit 1 — Two-storey
apartment

PROPERTY SIZE: Floor area
1,215 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Eastern side of Faith
Avenue North - 100 feet south of
Hamster Road.

APPRAISED VALUE: $150,000

LOT NO. 199

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,983 sq. ft.
LOCATION: From Carmichael
Road turn onto Barcardi Road,
take the seventh corner on the left
then turn into the entrance gate.
The vacant lot is located on the
southern side of Channel Drive off
Eastward Drive.

APPRAISED VALUE: $90,000

. SOUTH SEAS SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 261

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,500 sq. ft.
LOCATION: From Carmichael
Road turn onto Barcardi Road,
take the seventh corner on left.
Turn into the entrance gate and
take the first right then second
left. The vacant lot is the twenty-
second property on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $90,000

7. VICTORIA GARDENS

SUBDIVISION

19. PINEWOOD GARDENS

21

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 1438

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Two-
storey Residence 3 beds / 3 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: South on Wild Guava
Avenue

APPRAISED VALUE: $315,000

20. SANDILANDS VILLAGE

LOT NOS. 7 and 8

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence, with 3
apartments under construction
PROPERTY SIZE: Lot 7 - 7,970
sq. ft / Lot 8 - 8,419 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west along
Sandilands Village Road from Fox
Hill Road, take the ninth paved
road (Vanessa Close) on the left.
The properties are situated at the
northwestern side of the street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $277,000

. SOLDIER ROAD

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Two-storey Commercial Building
PROPERTY SIZE: 4,750 sq. ft.
LOCATION: On Soldier Road
1,000 feet east of Lady Slipper
Road

APPRAISED VALUE: $309,000

22.SOUTH BEACH ESTATES

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 1 Block 22

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Split
Level Residential Building with 3
Apartment Units.

PROPERTY SIZE:

Land 6,600 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Travel south along
East Street from Bamboo
Boulevard take the first corner on
right (Bougainvillea Boulevard).
Heading west on Bougainvillea
Boulevard, take the second
corner on the right, turn left at
the t-junction onto Oxford Drive.
The property is third house on
the right at the western corner of
Serville Drive and Oxford Avenue.
APPRAISED VALUE: $297,000

23. TWYNAM HEIGHTS

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 61

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Two-storey Residence, 2 beds / 1
bath/ with one apartment unit
PROPERTY SIZE: 9,100 sq. ft.
LOCATION: On the corner of
Victoria Street and Coronation
Road immediately east of
Wendy’s off Mackey Street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $203,000

24.YAMACRAW BEACH ESTATES

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 470

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Two-
storey Residence 3 beds / 3 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,200 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Southern side of
Mayaguana Avenue approximately
99 feet east of Yamacraw Beach
Drive.

APPRAISED VALUE: $402,000

VACANT LOTS

LOT NO. 60

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travel south on
Gladstone Road from JFK Drive

take the first corner on the left,

entrance to Victoria Gardens.
Heading east, proceed to the
second T-junction, the property is
directly opposite.

APPRAISED VALUE: $66,000

. VICTORIA PARK SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 6

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Multi-family lot

PROPERTY SIZE: 6,707 sq. ft.
LOCATION: On the northern side
of Bunch Street about 60 feed
south of East Street and opposite
Calvary Deliverance Church

INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS INCLUSIVE OF TELEPHONE CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS

APPRAISED VALUE: $67,000

TO: CB DISTRESSED PROPERTIES, CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT, P.O BOX - SS-6263 NASSAU, BAHAMAS OR

EMAIL US AT: DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM * WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS.





Lets all he
winners

FOR at least the last two
decades, I have heard the stories
about services being available to
buy tickets in the Bahamas for
lotteries operated in the United
States.

I have also heard conversa-
tions which indicated that money
was being sent abroad to be bet
on sports events. Activities such
as these are clearly not in the
interest of the Bahamas.

Most Bahamians do not think
such gambling is immoral. Nei-
ther does this column. Gambling
to excess is clearly wrong. No one
can argue that the person who
gambles the money that his or
her family needs for their house-
hold expenses is not doing some-
thing wrong. Someone who
wagers some of their recreation
funds is clearly well within the
realm of normal behaviour. That,
however, doesn’t even matter
because governments shouldn’t
and really can’t legislate morality.
This may be the reason why his-
tory teaches us that Theocracies
have never succeeded.

We are fighting our way
through very testing economic
conditions. We all know there will
be an end to this struggle, but
none of us knows when this will
be. Our earnings from overseas
for tourism, property sales and
Offshore services are all under
pressure. So I must ask how much
longer we can afford to send our
bets overseas depleting our for-
eign exchange reserves and fat-
tening the tax coffers of various
states in the US?

Clearly the answer is no
longer. I am encouraged to hear
the current debate about taxing
illegal gambling. The simpler and
more elegant solution would be
the introduction of a national lot-
tery. Most of those who bet on
the national lottery are likely to
be losers but the certainty is that
we as a nation would all be win-
ners.

Sophisticated
weather satellite
rockets into orbit

m CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

A SOPHISTICATED new
weather satellite rocketed into
orbit Saturday, giving forecasters
another powerful tool for tracking
hurricanes and tornadoes, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

An unmanned rocket carrying
the nation’s latest Geostationary
Operational Environmental Satel-
lite blasted off early Saturday
evening, a day late because of
thunderstorms. The satellite
headed toward a 22,000-mile-high
orbit, where it will undergo six
months of testing. It will circle
Earth as a spare and be called
into service when needed.

The GOES satellite network
provides continuous weather
monitoring for 60 percent of the
planet, including the United
States. The newer ones also mon-
itor solar flares that can disrupt
communications on Earth, and
track climate change.

This is the second of the more
advanced GOES satellites to be
launched, containing sensors
capable of providing better loca-
tion data and higher resolution
pictures of storms.

“These are probably about the
most sophisticated weather satel-
lites that we actually have on this
planet ... off this planet,” said
Andre Dress, deputy project
manager for NASA.

NASA manages the develop-
ment and launch of GOES satel-
lites for the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration. The
one launched Saturday, Goes O,
will be renamed GOES 14 once it
reaches its proper orbit in 1 1/2
weeks.

The mission cost $499 million,
including the cost of the Delta TV
rocket.
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 11

Hanged man found

bound and gagged

FROM page one

indicate an apparent homi-
cide, police yesterday
deemed it as "suspicious"
and were reluctant to classify
the death as a murder, or
possible suicide, until an
autopsy is performed.

"It appears to be a murder
but we can't say at this
stage," said Mr Moss, adding
that he did not know how
long the man had been dead
before his body was discov-
ered.

Police said they hoped to
have a positive identification
of the deceased by today.

The Tribune understands
he is a resident of Nassau Vil-
lage, believed to be in his 30s.

Meanwhile, officers in
Grand Bahama are investi-
gating the homicide of a man
who was shot to death.

Grand Bahama recorded
its fourth homicide following
the shooting near an apart-
ment in Freeport.

Police confirmed that the

victim was a Haitian man
who is believed to about 59
or 60 years of age. A motive
for the killing is unknown,
however, police last night
said a 31-year-old man was
assisting them in their inves-
tigations.

Asst Supt Clarence Reck-
ley said the police are not
releasing the victim’s identity
until an official identification
by next of kin is conducted
today.

“When we have matters of
this nature, a certain process
takes place where the body
is officially identified at the
morgue,” he said.

According to reports, an
anonymous caller telephoned
the police to report a shoot-
ing at Garden Villas in the
area of the basketball court.

Officers were dispatched
to investigate. Upon arrival,
they were directed to an
apartment where they saw a
man sitting on a sofa with
injuries to his body.

“We don’t know if the vic-
tim was home alone," said
Mr Reckley. "The informa-
tion we received is that the
door was open and maybe
someone walked in on him.”

Mr Reckley said the victim

had sustained wounds to the
left underarm and shoulder.
The victim was taken by
EMS personnel to the Rand
Memorial Hospital, where he
died soon after 11.30pm.
Police are thought to be
following some significant
leads in the matter and they
hope to have an arrest soon.
“We are pleased with the
progress of our investigation.
We are following significant
leads and hopefully will bring
closure to this matter in short
order,” added Mr Reckley.
“We are looking for a sus-
pect, but the name of the sus-
pect is unknown at this time
and officers are still out try-
ing to confirm some things."

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PHONE: 322-4570/ 393-1351 * CELL: 357-3617
RANNIE PINDER President

Funeral Service for

Mrs. Agnes Louise Knowles
(Nee Pinder)

passed away peacefully on
Monday, 22nd June 2009 at the
home of her daughter Deborah
in Dallas, Texas. She was born
on the 6th, March 1916 at Singer
Island, Florida. At the age of six,
she moved back to the Bahamas
with her parents John B. Pinder
and Olive Pinder. Agnes married
Mr. Alexander C. Knowles Sr. on
17th August 1933 and they had

pre-owned cars, with warranty!
Trade-ins on new car sales

twelve children.

Funeral services will be held on

Saturday, 4th July 2009 at
10:000am at St. Anne's Church in Fox Hill. Officiating will be
Fr. Crosley Walkine and interment will follow immediately after
the service in the Church's Cemetery.

AG calls for review of how
court business is conducted
FROM page one

Agnes was predeceased by her husband Alexander C. Knowles
and her son James F. Knowles M.-P. She is survived by one
brother: Hilbert B. Pinder; eleven children: Ethlyn (Jean) Pinder,
Ruby Collins, Doris Anderson, Yvonne Knowles, Alexander C.

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Michelle D iJ Knowles Jr., Ri Knowles, Kimberl
‘0 4 HYU N D Al S ANTA FE Knowles, Trisha Wiethucher, Olivier Knowles, Vanessa Knowle,
Ryan Knowles, Bianca Carter, Christian Knowles, Amanda
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Pinder, Andrew and Scott Pinder, Holly Cartwright, Cheryl
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relatives and friends including: mPatau Regent, Ann Knowles,

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Addressing the elimination of
the preliminary inquiry, the Attor-
ney General said there is no need
for “two criminal trials for one
offence.”

“Tt is inconvenient to victims, to
witnesses, to the resources of the
public,” he said. “(The) elimina-
tion (of preliminary inquiries) can
be done without infringing an
accused person’s right to a fair
hearing within a reasonable time.”

Doing away with preliminary
inquiries can also reduce the time
over which a trial can be conduct-
ed “by a greater use of written
evidence as opposed to requiring
persons to attend court to give
oral testimony as to what are
essentially facts that are not disputed,” he said.

Addressing law reform in general, the Attorney General asked
if it is necessary for a family member to attend court to identify a
victim whose identity is not in dispute, and if a ‘trial within a trial’
is really necessary.

“Should the value of any statement by an accused simply be left
to the jury for its due consideration,” he asked.

Mr Barnett added that his ministry is committed to ensuring that
the work of the Law Reform Commissioner continues unabated.

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Mer Edith Knowles, Elva Knowles, Dawn Knowles, Renee Roth,

Barbara Algreen, Olive Nairn, Meriam Pinder and caregiver
Shirley Henderson.

The family would be grateful to all if in lieu of flowers a donation
be made to St. Ann's Church, Fox Hill Road.

Friends may pay their last respects at Pinders Funeral Home
Palmdale, Ave., Palmdale on Friday July 3rd, 2009 from 5:00pm
until 7:00pm.

inland freight.

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009



Sports

TENNIS
KNOWLES /BHUPATHI QUARTERS

Mark Knowles and Mahesh Bhupathi will begin the second and
final week of competition at Wimbledon in London, England as
they play in the men's doubles quarter-final against the team of
Orakash Amritraj from India and Aisam-Ui-Haq Quireshi from
Parkinstan.

The number four seeds will play immedately following the top
seeded team of Americans Bob and Mike Bryan, who face a Czech
Republic team of Leos Friedl and David Skoch.

Meanwhile in mixed doubles, Knowles and Anna-Lena Groene-
feld of Germany are the No.9 seeds in mixed doubles. After winning
their opener, Knowles and Groenefeld are scheduled to face his for-
mer doubles partner Daniel Nestor of Canada and Russian Elena
Vesnina, the No.5 seeds, in the third round. That match is scheduled
for Tuesday.

On the other hand, Bhupathi and his Indian partner Sania Mirza,
seeded No.13, will play their third round match today against Indian
Leander Paes and Cara Black of Zimbabwe, the top seeds.

TENNIS
T-REX NATIONALS

FRESH on the heels of the Security & General International
Tournament, the Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association will begin their
T-Rex Junior National Tennis Tournament at the National Tennis
Center.

The action will pick up today at 9 am with the first round in the
singles in both the boys and girls divisions.

The tournament will continue daily through Saturday.

SPORTS

Lat Lih

Sluggish Carey undone by
King’s majestic performance

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ON the one hand he was glad
to have been in the boys’ 18 final
against his doubles partner Dari-
an King from Barbados.

But on the other hand, Rod-
ney Carey Jr. wished he had
played much better on Saturday
at the Security & General Inter-
national Tournament.

The much anticipated show-
down at the National Tennis Cen-
ter between the two travelling
buddies on the international tour
didn't live up to its advanced
billing as King dominated from
start to finish in a 6-1, 6-3 deci-
sion. "When I woke up, I was a
little tired this morning. So when
I went out there my legs fell kind
of heavy," said Carey Jr. about
his sluggish performance.

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"Throughout the week, I had a
lot of tough matches.

"It took me a while to get into
the match. I had a three hour
match in the semifinal yesterday.
He (King) just basically went on
the court and got through his
matches and came off. He was
fresher than I was and he had a
lot more energy."

With the match being played
at home, the Grand Bahamian
wished that he had put up a better
showing and at least taken King
to a third set, if not win the title.

"I guess I will have other
chances," said Carey Jr. who will
take a long vacation break before
he back on the tour in July.

King, in his second straight tri-
umph over Carey Jr. in as many
outings this year, said he was just
delighted to have been crowned
the champion to add to his vic-
tory he clinched in their initial
meeting in Barbados a couple
weeks ago.

"I felt pretty good and I'm glad
I came out victorious," he said.
"T played pretty good today. I
think I saved the best for the last.
Rodney didn't play that bad. I'm
just glad that I was victorious."

After breaking to and holding
to go up 2-0 in the first set, King
surged ahead on another break
at 4-1 and again at 6-1. In the sec-
ond set, King got a break to go up
4-2 and they both held serve for
the set and the match.

It was probably more difficult
for King, coming here and beat-
ing his doubles partner on his
home turf. "It was pretty tough at
first, but we made sure we played
a fair game," said King, the No.2
seed about his No.3 seed team-
mate. "If we were on serve, we
gave each other the benefit of the
doubt."

Before leaving town, King and
Carey Jr. were awarded the dou-
bles title after their opponents
Gabriel Flores of Puerto Rico and
Diego DeCosta of Ecuador failed
to show up. Flores apparently had
an injury.

On their way to the final, King
swept Flores in two straight sets,
6-3, 6-2, but Carey Jr. had to
endure a tough three setter 7-6
(4), 4-6, 6-1 over DeCosta in their
semifinal matches on Friday.

Meanwhile, two more doubles
partners played in the girls 18 sin-
gle finals. In the end, American
Kelsey Laurente lived up to her
prediction that she would be the
champion as she prevailed with
a 6-4, 6-3 win over compatriot
Victoria Duval, the No.2 seed.

The week-long tournament
hosted by the Bahamas Lawn
Tennis Association saw Bermu-
da's No.2 seed Tyler Smith out-
lasted Grand Bahaman Danielle
Thompson 6-2, 6-4 for the girls
14 crown. The duo teamed up to
win the doubles. And in the boys’
14 singles final, Gian Issa of Suri-
name claimed the singles title
over Bahamian Kevin Major Jr.
on Thursday.

PHOTOS:
Felipé Major/Tribune staff

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS
ECGS Tay

Double
triumph

for Debbie
Ferguson

FROM page 15

To her credit on a wet Friday
night, Ferguson-McKenzie sped
to the A qualifying time (11.30
seconds) in her winning time of
11.12 to dethrone veteran Chan-
dra Sturrup, who had to settle for
second in 11.41 with collegian
Sheniqua 'Q' Ferguson taking
third in 11.50.

Ferguson-McKenzie, who came
back on Saturday night to pull off
the sprint double in the 200, said
she was more concerned about
running a faster time in the cen-
tury than winning the title.

"I was trying to see if I could
run a 10.9 today. I felt it was
there, but I'm having a little prob-
lem trying to set my race up,” said
Ferguson-McKenzie, who led
from start to finish.

And it couldn't have come at a
better place before the home
crowd as she dedicated the race to
her long time ‘Godfather,’ mentor
and motivator, legendary Tom-
my A. Robinson, who will be
honoured at a luncheon on July
26 at Sandals Royal Bahamian
for pioneering the Bahamas’
international track programme.

Despite the fact that she lost
her title, Sturrup said when she
saw Ferguson-McKenzie surged
ahead of her, she tried to catch
her, but was unable to do so.

"She ran a very good race. Hats
of to her,” said Sturrup, who have
always seemed geared up to win
at her best when she come home.
"Physically I felt fine. The rain
and the delay sot of set me back.
Hopefully next week when I go to
Oslo, I will run a better race."

Sheniqua Ferguson, a member
of the Olympic Games team last
year for the 100, said she knew
that she had the potential to run
with the elite senior sprinters.

"T just was focusing on getting a
good start. I know I have good
top end speed, so basically for
me, it was just getting a good start
and getting out there," Ferguson
said.

In her speciality, Ferguson-
McKenzie clocked 22.83 to out-
last two rising young collegians
in Sheniqua Ferguson (23.48) and
Jernise Saunders (24.45).

ATKINS WIN AGAIN

The men's straight away race
drew a little more excitement as
the race was almost finished
before the starter eventually
called back the field for a false
start.

But when they re-ran the fea-
tured race on day one of the
nationals, the fans stood to watch
reigning World Championship sil-
ver medalist Derrick Atkins held
off a pesky field to stop the clock
in 10.25, which was just shy of the
A qualifying time of 10.21 for this
year's World Championships.

Adrian Griffith ended up sec-
ond in 10.44 with 110 hurdles spe-
cialist Shamar Sands cmng in
third in 10.54.

"Basically, I just want to thank
God I was able to finish the
rounds," Atkins said. "This year,
I've been up and down, so I'm
just happy to come here for the
win."

Not sure that he would have
been able to run here because of
the nagging hamstring injury,
Atkins said he's just trying to get
back into his old form before he
head to Berlin for the World's in
August."

Also hoping to make the trip to
Germany as well for the 100 is
Griffith, who felt he ran better in
the heats.

"In the final, I just lost con-
trol," he said. "I had the race. I
should have kept my exposure."

After slipping coming out of
the blocks, Sands said he didn't
get the start he wanted and that
made the difference in his per-
formance.

"I just wanted to be good in
the drive phrase," he said. "I feel



Delroy Boothe runs away with the title

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BACK for his first appearance since win-
ning the title about five years ago, Grand
Bahamian Delroy Boothe ran away from
the field to easily take the Bahamas
Olympic Association 22nd Olympic Day
run on Saturday.

Boothe, who was holding off to run the
5,000 metres at the Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations’ National Open
Track and Field Championships later in
the evening, was unchallenged as he topped
the field in 23 minutes and 15 seconds in
the five-mile early riser.

His nearest rival in the race that started
from the Thomas A. Robinson Track and
Field Stadium and ended on Paradise
Island after covering a route along Thomp-
son Boulevard to Nassau Street to Bay
Street, was Sidney Collie in 23.53. Ash-

land Murray Sr. was third in 31.48.

"I didn't go out the way I really wanted
to," Boothe said after the race. "The race
was alright so far. It was a pretty early start
because I really got to bed late after going
to the Nationals last night (Friday)."

Boothe admitted that he didn't allow
his rivals to get close to me after he surged
out front in the first 1,500. After that, it was
smooth sailing as he coasted to the victory.

Taking the women's title was Ravonne
Bethel in 32.01. Meanwhile from Mon-
tague foreshore, organizers staged the walk
segment of the race that traveled west on
Bay Street and headed over the new bridge
to the finish line on Paradise Island.

With perennial champion Phil Moss opt-
ing to run where he was fifth overall, vet-
eran Richard Adderley emerged as the
new champion stopping the clock in 21.39
well ahead of former Member of Parlia-
ment for Blue Hills, Leslie Miller, in 22.38.

"I think it was a very good race. A lady

set an early pace at the beginning, but I
decided to stay behind her and bide my
time," Adderley stressed. "I thought I had
missed the race, but I'm glad that I didn't.”

After setting the stage at the beginning,
Cheryl Rolle had to settle for third overall
to clinch the women's segment in 22.55.

Not that many participants competed in
the first race organized by the new admin-
istration headed by Wellington Miller. Don
Cornish, one of the six first vice presidents,
said it was a good indication of the work
they have to do.

"We had some challenges finding a date
because June when it is normally held was
full," Cornish said. "We finally got the cal-
endar cleared, but we had a clash with the
swim nationals and the track nationals this
weekend. We just wanted to ensure that we
gave the public the opportunity to com-
pete in the annual fun run and walk as we
celebrate the anniversary of the IOC."

Miller said they were just delighted to

have put this year's run on the shelve, but
they will be planning for an event bigger
event next year.

With no more major events on the cal-
ender for this year after the Caribbean
Games were called off, Miller said he and
Algernon Cargill, another vice president,
will head to Mexico in August for the Sol-
idarity Course.

Following that, Miller and secretary gen-
eral Rommel Knowles will head to Copen-
hagen to attend the IOC Convention.
Miller will be kept busy as he and Roy
Colebrooke, another vice president, will
travel to India for the Commonwealth
Games Confederation Meeting.

Next year, the BOA will be branching
into new territory with Korath Wright
going to the Winter Olympic Games for the
snowboarding competition in February.
Also next year is the Central American
and Caribbean Games, the World Youth
Olympics and the Commonwealth Games.

BAHAMAS NATIONAL OPEN TRACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS

‘Fireman’ proves too hot to handle

FROM page 15

The Eleuthera native said
every year the field gets deeper
and he has to exert more energy
to pull it off, but he's pleased with
his performance.

"After I saw what happened to
him, that threw me off a bit,"
Brown said of Latoy Williams.

"T didn't expect it. I felt a little
sorry for what happened to him,
but I had to keep my compo-
sure."

Miller, thankful that he enter-
tained the crowd, said he was
"training hard all year and watch-
ing the guys running faster than
me. I'm in North Dakato and this
was the hardest winter ever for
me. But today, I came out here
prepared to run."

Coming off a hamstring injury
a couple months ago, Andretti
Bain wasn't sure if he would have
been in any condition to run, but
he didn't want to miss the "war,"
so he was prepared to step to the
line and just finish in the top four
to ensure he's on the team for the
World's.

Although he had already qual-
ified with the A standard for the
World's, Latoy Williams wanted
to prove that his Bahamian lead-
ing time of 44.72 was no fluke in
his coming out party.

"T felt I could run a really fast
time, but everything happen for a
reason," said Williams about the
cramp in his left leg that forced
him to hobble on the track as he
stopped and rolled over in pain
on the back stretch.

In the women's one-lapper,
there was no real challenge for
Christine Amertil as she surged to
the title in 51.96. Grand Bahami-
ans Shakeitha Henfield (54.07)
and Sasha Rolle (54.08) battled
it out behind her and just ahead
of 15-year-old high school sensa-
tion Shaunae Miller (55.52).

"It went pretty well. I think I
gave away too much at the start,
but I had it together coming
home," Amertil said.



TREVOR BARRY, who dethroned Raymond Higgs.

"The girls are up and coming. I
ran with them on the 4 x 4, sol
knew what to expect from them."

SANDS PRed

Just as the 400s were being ran,
Olympic triple jump bronze
medalist Leevan 'Superman'
Sands used his only attempt to
clear a season's best of 56-feet,
3-inches to surpass the World’s
A qualifying standard.

"I just came to have fun. I love
coming home and jumping before
the home crowd," Sands said.
"That was my best jump for the
year. I had a little injury earlier in
the year, but I'm back and ready."

THOMAS UPSET AGAIN

Hoping to make a comeback
after losing his title last year,
World champion Donald Thomas
had to settle for a disappointing
third place in the men's high jump
with a leap of 7-1 1/2.

"I'm jumping good but I just
couldn't put it together after I
slipped,” said Thomas, who
bowed out at 7-3 when he had a
slight problem with the run way.
"T jumped higher at practice. I
just lost focus."

Trevor Barry claimed the

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crown with 7-3 3/4 dethroning
champion Raymond Higgs, who
did 7-2 1/4 for second. But he
called it a "mediocre" perfor-
mance.

"I walked away uninjured, so
that was a blessing,” Barry said.
“The condition was good for me.
Can't get anybody than this. I just
should have come in at a later
height with only a few jumpers."

Higgs, on the other hand, said
he tried his best, but Barry was
the better man on the day.

STUART NOT PLEASED

With only two competitors,
Bianca Stuart cleared 20-10 to
repeat as champion in the wom-
en's long jump as Keythra
Richards did 18-3 1/4.

"It was not good," Stuart said.
"I didn't have enough recovery
time, so I just tried to jump
through it. I just need six more
centimeters (to qualify for
World's). I'm trying."

Strongwoman Lavern Eve,
recovering from a back injury,
threw the women’s javelin 178-2.

"I felt good, but today was just
a feel for where I'm at with the
injury,” she said.

"It's not really hurting, but I
feel good about where I'm at."

(eXsh

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

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Karlton Rolle, fresh of his
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"T felt really good. I didn't run
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PAGE 14, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

Brilliant Barracudas national champions again

With a dominating and bal-
anced team effort, the country’s
largest swim club easily retained
its position as national champi-
ons.

The Barracuda Swim club
totalled 2152.5 points to win the
38th Annual Royal Bank of

Canada (RBC) National Cham-
pionships hosted by the Bahamas
Swimming Federation, over the
weekend at the Betty Kelly Ken-
ning Aquatic Center.

The Sea Bees (1369) edged out
Swift Swimming for second place
(1326) while Dolphin Swimming

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Club was fourth with 745.5 points.

The YMCA Waverunners out
of Grand Bahama closed out the
top five with 369 points.

Freeport Aquatic Club posted
29 points while the Flamingoes
ended with two.

The Barracudas were led by
the dynamic duo of Dionisio
Carey and Dustin Tynes who
dominated the Boys’ 11-12 divi-
sion. In individual events, the pair
had 16 first place, 11 second place
and two third place finishes
between them.

The 12-year-old Tynes, in his
final year in the division, record-
ed his eight first place finishes in
the 50m, 100m, and 200m Breast-
stroke; 100m, 200m and 400m
Freestyle; and finished with the
200m and 400m Individual Med-
ley. He finished second in the
50m, 100m and 200m Butterfly;
and the 100m and 200m Butterfly
with a third place finish in the
50m Freestyle.

Carey, at just 11-years-old and
with another year of eligibility in
the division also took eight first
place titles.

He took first in the 50m, 100m
200m Backstroke; 50m, 100m,
and 200 Butterfly; 50m Freestyle
and 200m Breaststroke.

Carey finished second in the
50m and 100m Breaststroke,
100m Freestyle, 200m Freestyle,
200 and 400m Individual Medley
and a third place in the 400m
Freestyle. Both swimmers
reached numerous qualifying
marks in Caribbean Island Swim-
ming Championships and Central
American and Caribbean Ama-
teur Swimming Confederation
Championships.

The female sector of the Bar-
racudas also played a vital in the
team’s championship perfor-
mance. Bria Deveaux took sev-
en first place finishes in the Girls
13-14 age group. Deveaux,
younger sister of the country’s
first female Swimming Olympian,

CHARLIE ‘Softly’ Robins has
coached so many teams in his day
that he knows a good one when

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BSC’s Bria Deveaux.

Nikia Deveaux, won the 50m,
100m, 400m and 800m Freestyle;
100m Backstroke; 200m Butterfly
and 200m Individual Medley.

In the Girls 15 and Over, Alicia
Lightbourne took a quartet of
first place finishes in the 50m,
100m and 200m Breaststroke; and
400m Freestyle.

Other top performers from the
meet included Evante Gibson
from the YMCA Waverunners
(six individual medals: 50m, 100m
Freestyle; 50m, 100m Butterfly;
50m Breaststroke and 200m Indi-
vidual Medley) and a myriad of
athletes that qualified for inter-
national competition.

Eighteen swimmers qualified
for the CISC, nine produced qual-
ifying marks for the Central
American and Caribbean Games,
while Arianna Vanderpool-Wal-
lace passed the standard for the
Youth Olympic Games.

It was the 26th consecutive year
RBC chiefly sponsored the
Bahamas National Swimming
Championships in partnership
with the Bahamas Swim Federa-
tion. RBC was also the inaugur-
al sponsor of the Academic All
Bahamas Swimming Team
Award.

he see it. Robins, assisted by Ivan
Butler and Mario Bowleg, will
take a mixture of youth and expe-
rience to the Caribbean Basket-
ball Confederation Champi-
onships in Tortola, British Virgin
Islands.

The team, managed by Rod-
ney Wilson, was expected to leave
town today with the following
players: Quentin Hall, Scott
Forbes, Alonzo Hinds, Doyle
Hudson, Cordero Seymour, Jef-
frey Henfield, Quentin Demertte,
Gijo Bain, Lorenzo Davis, Brian
Bain, Torrington Cox and Jeremy
Hutchinson.

Sharon 'the General’ Storr will
travel as the technical director.

According to Robins, who is
coaching his fifth national team,
the team will have finish the
week-long tournament with at
least the bronze medal in order to
advance to the next level.

"We're looking pretty good.
We were skeptical at the begin-
ning with ball players saying that
they are coming in, but due to
circumstances beyond their con-
trol, they couldn't come," said
Robins, of two key players in
Magnum Rolle and Benoit Davis.

"When a fellow is looking after



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PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Robins banks of youth and experience

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

his career, you can't stop him.
Maybe the timing is just a little off
right no, but we were able to set-
tle down and got in players like
Scott Forbes, Quentin, Brian
Bain, Jeremy Hutchinson and
Gijo Bain. So we have guys with
the experience, having played on
this circuit before."

Confident

Robins, however, said although
they are lacking in height, he's
confident that they can make the
necessary adjustment and play
with who they have.

The Bahamas will open play
on Tuesday against Barbados in
Group A.

Their second game on Wednes-
day will be against Jamaica and
they will close out the round
robin play on Thursday against
Trinidad & Tobago.

The team will have to finish in
the top two to advance to the
playoff that start on Friday.

The top two teams from Group
B will come from either Cuba,
Antigua, British Virgin Islands or
Bermuda.

"I think the magnitude of this

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tournament, we should have suf-
ficient height to qualify for the
next round," Robins projected.
"If we go to the next round, we
will need all of the horses.

“But right now, we have a very
experienced team, led by what I
feel is the best guards assembled
to make up for our height disad-
vantage."

Jeffrey Henfleld, back home
after playing in the ABA League
in New Mexico, said the team
have the potential to win the gold
medal.

"At every position, we have
players who can hold their own,”
he said. " As for myself, I'm ready
to go out there and do whatever it
takes for us to get the win.”

Ask Scott Forbes and he will
concur with everybody in saying
that the federation indeed put
together a very good team.

"We have a lot of firepower.
Once as we can gel, we should do
very well," Forbes stated.

"This team should be one of
the best in the Caribbean, so
there's no reason why we should
not come back with a medal,
maybe even win it.”

The tournament wraps up on
July 4.










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MONDAY, JUNE 29,

2009

‘Fireman too
not to hantle





CHRIS BROWN heads the field in the men’s 400 metres. At left is Ramon Miller.

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

HRIS ‘Fireman’

Brown exploded

down the home

stretch to avoid
NAIA champion Ramon Miller
raining on his parade at the
Bahamas National Open Track
and Field Championships on Sat-
urday night.

Latoy Williams p

With the field depleted a bit
after the fastest two quarter-mil-
ers this year, newcomer Latoy
Williams pulled up after the first
turn and Andrae Williams didn't
make it to the starting line, Brown
had to contend with a couple of
his 4 x 400 relay team-mates.

But in the grand finale at the
Thomas A. Robinson Track and
Field Stadium, Brown had a little
too much down the stretch to pull
off the win in 45.21.

In a whisker behind him hoping

Patrick Hanna/BIS

DEBBIE FERGUSON-MCKENZIE cruises to victory in the
women’s 200 metres ahead of Sheniqua Ferguson.

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ON the eve of officially bring crowned as the new 200 metre cham-
pion at the 2001 World Championships in Edmonton, Canada, Debbie
Ferguson-McKenzie sped to victory in the women's 100 at the Thomas
S. Robinson Track and Field Stadium.

SEE page 13

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8" Block Was $1.86
Now $1.69

Come in to
JBR and take
advantage of
these summer

savings!

Delivery
Charges On
Block
was 15¢

ulls up with cramp
en aii] 3 TA

1 } ue: |

Patrick Hanna/BIS

for the upset was Miller, the new-
comer last year, in 45.35 with last
year's NCAA champion Andret-
ti Bain setting for third in 46.02.

"T just want to thank the Lord
for allowing me to come out here
and finish," said Brown in defend-
ing his title. "It was a tough race,
but I knew a lot of fans wanted to
see me come through, so this was
for them."

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PAGE 16, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





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The transformation
of Centreville House

SOMETHING unique is tak-
ing place on Shirley Street.

Centreville House and its
grounds are undergoing a restora-
tion. Eventually, the house itself
will be fully renovated to its for-
mer splendour at which time it
will become the home of the
National Museum of The
Bahamas.

In the meantime, the first
phase, a creative transformation
of the long-neglected grounds,
was initiated on March 30.

Spearheaded by Orjan Lin-
droth, a Bahamian developer, and
Antonius Roberts, sculptor and
open space designer, under the
auspices of the Antiquities, Mon-
uments and Museum Corpora-
tion (AMMC), work commenced
on that date and, barely three
months later, is almost completed.

The vision and direction of this
project was built on a foundation
of several important guiding prin-
ciples - to make it a community
project; to create a city park
accessible to and for Bahamians
from all walks of life; to reflect
and preserve aspects of Bahami-
an history that belong uniquely
to these islands and to maximise
the use of native wood, plants and
trees and observe a ‘green’ phi-
losophy by recycling organic
material and mulching it back
into the ground.

Design

Earthstone Construction is
responsible for the design, fabri-
cation and implementation of the
pond and sculpture garden, the
fountain, the amphitheatre-style
seating and the perimeter path-
way; Native Sun Nursery provid-
ed and planted trees, transported
logs and donated crane time;
Design Elements serve as the
consulting botanist and landscap-
ers; Rocky Farms and Fox Hill
Nursery are providing many of
the native plants and shrubs;
Tony’s Carpentry built the
Lucayan style tree house and
huts, drawing on his own native
Guyanian and Indian heritage for
authenticity, and Robin Hardy
was responsible for milling some
of the wood on site for the bench-
es.

Several artists have created
work specifically for this site.
Antonius Roberts has donated
and installed his “Driftwood”



CHILDREN FROM the Bahamas Children's Emergency Hostel visited on Fri-
day June 26 and enjoyed playing by the pond. They also enjoyed the
Arawak-style Tree House and Huts.

sculpture; Jessica Colebrooke has
created her lovely ceramic tiles
picturing various Bahamian fish -
these will be installed in the main
fountain in front of the house;
Chantal Bethel carved a wooden
bench in honour of her late
father, a well respected agrono-
mist in the country; Tyrone Fer-
guson is fabricating a bronze sun-
dial for the pond area; Lavar
Munroe is creating a mural
inspired by the Lucayan Indian
heritage, the placement of which
is still to be decided; John Cox
and his summer students will add
their creativity to adding
hieroglypics to the huts; addi-
tionally, local schoolchildren guid-
ed by Kelley Knowles, Antonius
Roberts‘ assistant, painted
the local found stones that
form the Turtle effigy in the
ground.

Local citizens such as Jermaine
and LIttle Mitch Finley collect-
ed stones on the shore, carried
them to the site and placed them
all around the perimeter of the
central area. Many generous
donors have shared in the expe-
rience by giving trees, plants and
herbs and helping dig them in.

This now beautiful green space
boasts a pond with a fountain and
sculpture garden and a labyrinth
- perfect for a quiet reflective
stroll.

The stones painted by the chil-
dren form a giant turtle and the
path which circles the entire area
has sculpted Madeira wood
benches placed at intervals
throughout the area.

ary ona

a

y

Orjan Lindroth, Lindroth
Development Company &
Schooner Bay, Abaco, facilitat-
ed the donation of a massive
boulder from the New Providence
Development Company now
placed close to the entrance from
Shirley Street and a smaller boul-
der was placed on the easterly
side of the main driveway and
nestled into a sandy area planted
out with low growing shrubs and
vines.

Garden

At the southerly end of the
park is a herb garden in the form
of an hutea which abuts the space
designated as a children’s play
area.

This includes the existing giant
rubber tree now graced with
wooden swings and benches
offering some cooling shade as
well as amphitheatre style seat-
ing for parents to watch their chil-
dren play in a safe environment
or, in the future, audiences to
watch musical or dramatic per-
formances on the main lawn.

This area is completed by an
amazing wooden tree house and
two smaller huts in the style of a
Lucayan Indian village.

The easterly portion of the
grounds immediately in front of
the house have also been restored
and re-planted.

The original fountain on this
part of the property is now under
re-construction and is scheduled
for completion by the end of
June.

The Center has an ATM on site and friendly staff to assist you in conducting non-cash transactions.
Come and visit Scotiabank's Retail Sales Center and experience a whole new level of banking.

Hours of Operation:


THE TRIBUNE
D yu



Jackson Ritchie



Global United
loses Bahamas
UPS contract

* Replaced by Bahamas
Couriers, business owned
by Edward Fitzgerald

* Mr Fitzgerald helped
build Mr Ritchie's business
through selling former
firms to him in 2005

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

GLOBAL United, the trou-
bled logistics/transshipment
business headed by Captain
Jackson Ritchie, has suffered a
fresh blow by losing the con-
tract to act as Bahamas country
representative for UPS, Tribune
Business can reveal.

Officials for UPS, the global
courier and package delivery
business, confirmed via a tele-
phone interview and in writing
that Bahamas Couriers Ltd
replaced Global United as their
Bahamian-based contractor for
all business with effect from Sat-
urday.

Ironically, Bahamas Couriers
is owned and headed by
Edward Fitzgerald, father of
PLP Senator Jerome Fitzger-
ald. It was Mr Fitzgerald’s deci-
sion to sell his former business-
es, Global Customs Brokers &
Trucking and World Bound
Couriers, to Mr Ritchie in 2005
that allowed the latter to enter
the Nassau market and form
Global United by integrating
those firms with his then-Tanja
Enterprises.

Now, it seems as if Global
United and Mr Ritchie’s finan-
cial difficulties have given Mr
Fitzgerald a new lease of life
and enabled him to re-enter a
market in which he was once a
major player.

A June 26, 2009, letter from
UPS country manager Paul
Capote to his Bahamian corpo-
rate customers, a copy of which
has been seen by Tribune Busi-
ness, said: “We would like to
announce that effective imme-
diately, Bahamas Couriers will

SEE page 11B

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MONDAY,

ine

TUNGE 2-9 ©

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net



2009



Colinalmperial.

Confidence For Life

Checkers ‘reinvents brand’
through $3.2m expansion

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

heckers Café is celebrating

20 years in business with a

$3.2 million expansion that

involves the construction of
its fourth New Providence location,
which will have a full service, 24-hour
wash house attached to it.

Owner and operator of the all-
Bahamian eatery, Gus Cartwright, told
Tribune Business that the chain’s newest
restaurant is meant to enhance the com-
munity in which it is built.

He added that the latest café was an
opportunity to reinvent the Checkers
brand, which will be turned over to his
daughter as he moves closer to retire-
ment. The café interior is almost fully
tiled with the same branded colours of
the exterior. The kitchen has been
upgraded with two large walk-in freezers.

“We just can’t be the same old Check-
ers that we were before,” Mr Cartwright
said.

Give the size of the investment to con-
struct the café and wash house, Mr
Cartwright said he expects a return in
10-15 years, but is hopeful of quick suc-

Chamber chief
calls for Private
Sector Office

* Owner celebrates 20 years in business with fourth
eatery location that combines wash house

* Move to create 30 permanent jobs, and key
part in plans for succession by daughter

* Investment return eyed in 10-15 years

* Cartwright says Bahamian eateries must match
foreign rivals on food and presentation

cess for a location which is expected to
create 30 permanent jobs.

“It’s going to be a little bit longer and
harder,” he said. “But I’m not so much
concerned about crying about what’s
going on in the foreign markets. I must
learn from them and raise my product to
the same level, where the same customer
who goes to them would feel comfort-
able coming to me.”

Mr Cartwright said eateries through-
out the Bahamas, such as his own, have
to raise their product to the level of for-
eign competitors, as “the food may be
good but the presentation is not”.

Nestled on the southwest corner of
the intersection between Fox Hill and

EU considered slashing
Bahamas grant funding

* Nation ‘a very low performer’ in

implementing European-financed projects

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s president has sug-
gested to the Prime Minister
that the Government establish
an Office for Private Sector
Development, in a bid to cre-
ate a ‘one-stop shop’ for all per-
mitting/approval issues and
bring “more focus” to expand-
ing commerce.

Khaalis Rolle told Tribune
Business he put forward the
suggestion when Chamber exec-
utives met with Mr Ingraham
on Monday last week as part of
Chamber week activities.

“One of the issues that I sug-
gested to the Prime Minister
was establishing an Office for
Private Sector Development,”
Mr Rolle said. “If we’re going
to expand the private sector and
take some of the burden off the
public sector with respect to
employment, we need to have a
focused effort.

“Dealing with all the govern-
ment departments on various
issues is not the best way for us.
Some might say the private sec-
tor controls its own destiny, but
the legislative creates the frame-
work and the environment, and

SEE page 6B

|

rd
i

* Set to get 4.7m Euros in 10th EDF for
Family Island infrastructure projects

* Move aims to alleviate poverty and create
‘one Bahamas economic space’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

THE European Union (EU) considered slash-
ing the only form of grant funding available to the
Bahamas because this nation is "a very low per-
former" in implementing projects Brussels is
financing, with some 4.7 million Euros - largely

SEE page 8B

Joe Farrington Roads, the new restau-
rant’s red and white facade contrasts
with the dismal, grey rock walls of Fox
Hill Prison. Checkers’ signature tiled
walls invigorate the intersection, which
has become a commercial zone teeming
with small Bahamian-owned business-
es. Mr Cartwright said it was crucial that
the new building complement the Fox
Hill community. A lot of these people
don’t have the convenience of having
this kind of stuff in their immediate com-
munity, and I felt like this would be a
complement to where they live. We have
had that kind of reception,” he said. “We
want to do it right, so it is impressive.”
Like its sister Carmichael location, the

Bank invests $2m on
in-house card process

* Investment designed to realise internal

synergies, raise transaction volumes
and link to e-commerce plans

* Managing director says: "Who can ask for
better?' given economic environment

and strategic investments

* Non-accrual loans below industry average

at 5.1-5.2%, although delinquencies
‘more challenging’

* 30 new accounts per month at Miami

branch, with $23m net loan growth
since year-start

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

BANK of the Bahamas International is invest-
ing $2 million in bringing all its credit card pro-

SEE page 4B

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Fox Hill restaurant features a drive-
through that will be open late. Mr
Cartwright argued that the drive-through
was a Safe alternative to having the
establishment’s door open at night, and
will protect customers and employees
alike.

The addition of the 180-washer and
dryer laundromat seemed a necessary
and innovative upgrade to the Check-
ers brand, said Mr Cartwright, who is
already in that business via the Sunrise
coin laundry on Bar 20 corner.

This latest Sunrise laundry features
state-of-the-art washers and dryers, and
will include while-you-wait pressing ser-
vices. Mr Cartwright said Sunrise Fox
Hill would not be directly competing for
business with the nearby Superwash out-
let, but it was simply considered it a nec-
essary addition to the community.

“T don’t think it is direct competition,
but a complement to the area,” said Mr
Cartwright.

“Superwash has a long-time out-
standing business, but that doesn’t mean
there aren’t avenues for others.”

Mr Cartwright was nominated for the
Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s Out-
standing Business Person of the year
award.

; | a
The information co a dis from
party and The Tribune can not be hel
responsible for errors and/or omis ion
fromthe daily report,



ColinaImperial.


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

Oe eA eT



@ By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

al Bank (CIB) released unau-
dited results for the six
months ended April 30, 2009.

$3.2 billiob respectively, com-
pared to $4.1 billion and $3.5
billion at year-end 2008. A

dends accumulated but unpaid
to the redemption date."

THE TRIBUNE

The Bahamian Stock Market

LAST week, investors trad- | CIB reported net income of decline of $378 million in total Annual General Meeting
ed in seven out of the 24 listed $13.9 million for the most deposits to $3.1 billion, com- (AGM) Notes: FINDEX 785.60 (-5.90% ) YTD
securities, of which two recent quarter, a decline of pared to year-end, accounted
advanced, one declined and $12.3 million or 47 per cent for the drop in total liabilities. Abaco Markets (AML) BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
four remained unchanged. compared to $26.2 million in Correspondingly a decline of announced it will be holding SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE

the same period last year. $351 million in securities its Annual General Meeting

EQUITY MARKET Net interest income of $32.1. investments of $730 million on Tuesday, July 21, 2009, at AML $1.39 $- 0 -18.71%

A total of 21,261 shares million for the quarter was contributed to the reduction in 6pm at the Wyndam Nassau BBL $0.63 $- 0 4.55%
changed hands, representing down by $8.5 million or 21 per _ total assets. Resort & Crystal Palace Casi- BOB $6.94 S- 0 -9.16%
an increase of 9,813 shares or cent, while operating income no, West Bay Street, Nassau, Be $11.00 $- 0 -6.78%
86 per cent, compared to last of $5.8 million was up by $2.1 CARIBBEAN CROSS- Bahamas. BSL $7.92 $- 0 -22.28%
week's trading volume of million from the $3.7 million INGS LTD - Notice of Shareholders of record as of BWL $3.15 S- 0 0.00%
11,448 shares. reported in 2008. Redemption Installment Pay- June 19, 2009, will be qualified CAB $11.39 $- 0 -18.82%

Commonwealth Bank Operating expenses of $17.9 ment to vote at the Annual Meet- CBL $5.64 $0.14 920) -19.43%
(CBL) was the volume leader million were up $1.5 million or The company would like to ing. CHL $2.74 $- 0 -3.18%
with 9,220 shares trading 9 per cent from $16.5 million inform all holders of CIB $10.38 $- 0 -0.67%
hands, its stock increasing by in the same quarter in 2008, Caribbean Crossings 8 per Benchmark (Bahamas) CWCB $3.33 $-0.14 2,805 48.00%
$0.14 to end the week at $5.64. which management attributed — cent Series A Preference (BBL) announced it will be DHS SL.77 $0.17 6,200 -30.59%

Doctors Hospital Health to increases in salaries and Shares that the scheduled holding its Annual General FAM $7.76 $- 0 -0.51%
Systems (DHS) was the lead benefits and bank license fees. | Fourth Redemption Install- Meeting on Thursday, July 23, FBB $2.37 $- 36 0.00%
advancer for the second con- FirstCaribbean said it was ment payment will be made 2009, at 6.30pm at the British FCC $0.30 $- 0 0.00%
secutive week, its share price proactively managing these on July 1, 2009, to all share- Colonial Hilton, Governor's FCL $5.09 $- 0 “1.55%
rising by $0.17 to end the expenses. holders of record June 1, 2009. — Ballroom, Bay Street, Nassau, FCLB $1.00 $- 3,000 0.00%
week at $1.77 on a volume of CIB increased its loan loss This payment is being made —_ Bahamas. Shareholders of FIN $10.97 $- 0 -7.58%
6,200 shares. expense by $4.4 million to $5.9 in accordance with the terms record as of June 23, 2009, will ICD $5.50 $- 0 -10.28%

million, compared to $1.6 mil- | and conditions attached tothe be qualified to vote at the JSJ $10.50 $- 0 -5.41%
BOND MARKET lion in the 2008 second quar- Series A preference shares, Annual Meeting. PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%

Investors traded $20,000
(par value), Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) Series B Notes
Due 2022 (FBB22), and
$6,000 (par value) Fidelity

ter, due to increased provi-
sioning by the bank.

Earnings per share for the
six month period of $0.248 fell
by $0.006 from $0.254 for the

which are as follows: “The
company will make five annu-
al redemption installment pay-
ments of $2 per share, com-
mencing on July 1, 2006, and













Dividend Notes:

FirstCaribbean Internation-
al Bank (CIB) has declared a

International Markets



Bank (Bahamas) Series D 2008 second quarter. CIB said = on each July 1 thereafter dividend of $0.15 per share, Pose as Weekl %Ch
Notes Due 2015 (FBB15). the results reflect current eco- __ through and including July 1, payable on June 29, 2009, to ed eeneney
nomic conditions and are in 2010. all shareholders of record date CAD$ 0.8675 1.60
COMPANY NEWS line with management's The Series A Preferred June 19, 2009. . e.
expectation. Shares will be redeemed for GBP 1.6540 +0.16
Releases: CIB’s total assets and total cash through such annual $2 Cable Bahamas (CAB) has EUR 1.4075 +0.86
FirstCaribbean Internation- _ liabilities were $3.8 billion and = July 1 payments, plus any divi- declared a dividend of $0.07
per share, payable on June 30, a
2009, to all shareholders of Commodities
record date June 15, 2009. Weekly % Change
oO ;
Pe o Commonwealth Bank Crude Oil $69.42 -0.97
T (CBL) has declared a dividend Gold $940.10 +0.53
e =) ge ; O ie of $0.05 per share, payable on
June 30, 2009, to all share-
a CRUISE holders of record date June International Stock Market Indexes:
15, 2009.
o LINE Weekly % Change
o Consolidated Water
: (CWCO) has declared a divi- DJIA 8,438.39 -1.19
. dend of $0.013 per share, S & P 500 918.90 -0.25
| payable on August 10, 2009, to NASDAQ 1,838.22 +0.59
Ps I | u all shareholders of record date Nikkei 9,877.39 +0).93




July 1, 2009.



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THE TRIBUNE



PM: No business flow impact from Customs changes

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham believes the enforcement of
new processes relating to the C19
or 10-day bond Customs decla-
ration form will “not impede the
flow or speed of business”, as
some in the private sector fear,
Tribune Business can reveal.

Mr Ingraham informed
Bahamas Chamber of Commerce
executives of his position when
they met with him last Monday as
part of Chamber week activities,
the organisation’s president con-
firmed to Tribune Business.

Khaalis Rolle said Chamber
executives had raised several Cus-
toms-related issues with the
Prime Minister, including the pre-
vious controversy of the C13 bag-
gage declaration form process
changes, which many courier
companies felt would negatively
impact their business, as well as
the latest amendments regarding
C19 processes.

Mr Rolle said neither issue had
been addressed fully by the
Chamber as an organisation, the
C13 issue having been tackled
chiefly by the companies affected,
who had formed the Bahamas
Transhipment and Logistics Asso-
ciation.

Members of that Association
had provided feedback to the
Chamber, and on both Customs
issues Mr Rolle said: “They have
some valid concerns, but the
Prime Minister’s position is that
these new processes will not
impact the flow or speed of busi-
ness. All it does is enforce the
existing law. The Prime Minister
believes taxes due are not being
fully collected.”

The Chamber chief suggested
that importers, brokers and couri-
ers needed “reassurance” from
the Government and Customs
Department “that the processes
will not significantly impact the
flow of business, and if that is
achieved it puts us in a win-win
situation.

‘The Government will be bet-
ter able to track the flow of
goods, and service providers will
be able to provide expedited ser-
vices.”

However, brokers and
importers are continuing to
express concern over the pro-
posed C19 changes. One broker,
speaking on condition of
anonymity, said all companies
importing goods under this form
were required to lodge a 10-day
bond as security for payment with
Customs. This meant they had 10

days after the
goods were
removed from
the dock in
which to submit
entries and pay
the required
Customs duties
and Excise tax-
es.

The broker
suggested that
the changed C19 process, which
will now only allow perishables,
gold, bullion and coins to be
removed before due taxes are
paid, effectively represented a
breach of contract between Cus-
toms and the industry.

To obtain a 10-day bond, the
broker said the security payment
had to be signed-off by a com-
mercial bank and then go to the
Public Treasury, where Stamp
Tax was paid. It then went to
Customs, and the bond was
lodged.

The broker, like other major
Bahamian companies who
import, also questioned why it
was necessary to change the
processes when all Customs had
to do, in the event of non-pay-
ment of due taxes and entries
within the 10-day period, was to
enforce the bond. Customs could
also warn importers and brokers
it encountered problems with that
it would not permit the clearance
of any more shipments until due
taxes were paid.

Bahamian businesses had last
week told Tribune Business that
they feared consumer prices
would increase as a result of the
C19 changes, due to the increased
costs of holding extra inventory to
counter the likelihood that prod-
uct shipments would be delayed
in clearing the dock.

They also expressed concern
over cash flow issues, as compa-
nies would now be required to
pay taxes and duties on all
imports up front, instead of after
a portion of them may have been
sold.

Glen Gomez, Comptroller of
Customs, told Tribune Business
last week that this latest enforce-
ment measure was designed to
prevent “abuse” of the C19,
which had seen it used as a ‘catch-
all for all manner of goods to be
removed from the docks without
due taxes being paid.

This, he added, had allowed
many businesses and individual
residents to ultimately evade pay-
ing their taxes because they nev-
er returned to pay due Customs
duties and Stamp Tax post-deliv-
ery.

PM Ingraham



Mr Gomez told Tribune Busi-
ness last week: “The C19 is now
being utilised in the manner for
which it was designed by law, for
perishables, gold, bullion and
coins.

“They’ve been abusing that
form, and now that abuse has
been stopped. They have been
clearing motor cars, furniture and
heaven knows what else on that
form. Why should I allow you to
abuse that form, take delivery of
goods and not pay?”

Mr Gomez said the vast major-
ity of items outstanding before
Customs, many of which dated
back several years, related to C19
form declarations. “You can’t
have your cake and eat it too,”
he added.

The Comptroller added that
there were so many outstanding
items that Customs had not
placed a dollar value on what it
was owed, but he described the
sum as “substantial”.

And he questioned why
Bahamian companies and
importers, knowing a shipment
of product was coming in, did not
pay the Customs duties and
Excise Tax up front if they did
not want to have a wait for clear-
ance and submission of entries.

“There’s a provision in law to
pay for goods before they arrive,
but no one wants to do it.

“Everyone wants to get a free-
bie, and the Government has to
bear the costs of having those
goods come in and people do not
come back to pay,” Mr Gomez
said.

“There’s just too many loop-
holes in Customs, and it’s time to
bring the loopholes to a stop.
Whether internally or external-
ly, we have to address these
issues.”

Mr Gomez said Customs was
trying to improve its clearance
times, adding: “We’re trying to
turnaround shipments in 24
hours. Only shipments with 15
pages or more might take 24
hours to check."

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A major financial institution with both commercial and private yee ck
operations, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

NETWORK OPERATIONS TECHNICIAN
Core Responsibilities:

* Provides user support for the company’s networked systems, by
investigating and performing resolutions to problems that are

reported.

Performs routine installations, preventative maintenance and repairs
to hardware, operating systems and application installations.
Troubleshoots system hardware and application problems, including

Server ISSues.

Assists with documentation and maintenance of technical standards

and operations.

Assists with the implementation of new technologies and information
systems and the decommissioning and disposal of old technologies.
Assist with the administration of the company’s networked anti-
virus, data back-up systems, firewalls and routers by checking that
these systems are current and operate as scheduled.

Knowl ill

nd Abilities:

Advanced knowledge of Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP
operating systems (AIX Unix 5.0 a plus) to provide help desk support
and to troubleshoot end-user and back office systems.

Ability to communicate clearly and effectively in providing help desk
support and troubleshooting end-user and back office systems.
Sound knowledge of computer hardware to execute hardware
repairs and upgrades.
Advanced knowledge of networking, especially protocols and
systems in use by the company to troubleshoot and assist in
rectifying network issues.
Sharp analytical and problem solving skills to assess issues and
technical information, examine alternatives, and use judgment to
provide reasoned recommendations.
Must be open to new technology and ability to problem solve in
support of the network and central database systems.

Must be able to work independently and as a team player when

required.

Microsoft MSCE and/or MCP Certifications a plus.

Bachelor of Science degree in a computer-related field, industry
Standard network certifications required, plus two (2) or more years
of proven network systems experience.

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience
and qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and life
insurance; pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later than June 26, 2009 to:

DA#61099.A
c/o The Tribune
Nassau, Bahamas

institutional. leadership@gmail.com



Ve OM Meee tees ee ics sae rT ete mee mre cae»

MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 3B

Society of Trust & Estate
S T E P Practitioners (Bahamas)

The Society of Trust and Estate Practitioners

STEP BAHAMAS BRANCH

Invites applicatwons for a scholarship for one module of the STEP Diploma program in
International Trust Management
Applicants should meet the following criteria-

® Bahamian citizen
© Must have a Foundation Certificate or have been officially exempted from the
Foundation Certificate Program
Cumeatly employed mm the trust industry or seeking a career in the trust industry

Application forms should be obtained from STEP Bahamas at its administrative office below, and
submutted together with the following:

¢ Proof of Bahamian citizenship (certified copy passport]

¢ Current resume detailing employment history and career
aspirations

® Details of any other funding sources

Completed applications should be submitted ‘delivered to -

STEP Bahamas

Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre, First Floor
P.O. Box N-1764

Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: 323-6012

Deadline for applications is July 31, 2009



need a home phone?

Sign up today & take
your phone home today!
Get FREE local ‘242’ number

Get FREE long distance number
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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

FAMILY GUARDIAN INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

BALANCE SHEET
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2008
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)
















































ASSETS
Cash and bank balances $
Short-term deposits
Bank term deposits
Financial Investment Assets:
Fair value through profit and loss -
Available for sale
Held-to-maturity
Loans
Total investment assets
Receivables and other assets
Premiums receivable
Property, plant and equipment, net

TOTAL

1,783,470 $
339,737
13,402,046

2,050,995
325,795
10,406,809

8,561,549
7,243,165 :
44,255,404 39,063,136
73,038,462 69,930,844
140,062,284 130,339,128
2,975,284 2,064,805
2,749,750 3,184,888
12,761,820 11,724,764

$ 158,549,138 $ 147,313,585

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
LIABILITIES:
Reserves for future policyholders’ benefits

Other policyholders’ funds

$ 102,902,989
7,756,601

110,659,590
6,240,408

116,899,998

$ 94,481,860
6,653,463

101,135,323
6,116,640

107,251,963

Policy liabilities
Payables and accruals

Total liabilities

EQUITY:
Share capital
Share premium
Revaluation reserves
Retained earnings
Total equity

TOTAL

1,707,462
11,401,314
2,021,294
26,519,070
41,649,140

$ 158,549,138

1,707,462
11,401,314
2,518,187
24,434,659
40,061,622

$ 147,313,585





These financial statements were approved by the Board of Directors on
March 26, 2009 and are signed on its behalf by:

_ Za

Director

aif
Ay SAA

eg liaye <.



Director

/

The complete set of audited financial statements is available on the
company’s website at www.familyguardian.com

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Bank invests

FROM page 1B

cessing in-house, its managing
director telling Tribune Busi-
ness that given it was able to
maintain "healthy profits" while
enhancing its operational and
capital base: "Who can ask for
better?"

Commenting on the institu-
tion's nine-month and 2009 fis-
cal third quarter results, Paul
McWeeney said Bank of the
Bahamas International had
"done a remarkable job in bal-
ancing these aspects” at a time
when the Bahamian economy
was mired in recession, in addi-
tion to keeping its non-per-
forming loan level below indus-

"From the bank's perspective
we're pleased without a doubt,
given the economic circum-
stances we're facing and the fact
that the bank has forged ahead
with strategic initiatives, not
only with the capital base but
also with strategic initiatives to
expand our operational func-
tions,” Mr McWeeney told Tri-
bune Business.

"One of the projects we're
working on is to bring the entire
credit card processing in-
house.” Mr McWeeney said
Bank of the Bahamas Interna-
tional currently outsourced pro-
cessing for its entire card port-
folio to First Data, and the pro-
ject to bring that back in-house
was scheduled to be completed

August 2009.

Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national had invested some $2
million in bringing the card
portfolio processing in-house,
and Mr McWeeney said: "The
bank expects there to be
tremendous internal synergies
from that, in the sense of being
able to reduce the expense that
results from outsourcing.

"With that coming in-house
we will be able to benefit from
transaction volumes and offer
more to the public, because we
will control the whole process.
We have plans to do more in
terms of e-commerce activity,
and payment card processes
with that will help us to launch
e-commerce in the not too dis-

try average.

NOTICE

IM THE ESTATE OF HA

Harley Strect in the Eastern District
Providence one of the [slands
Bahamas

DECEASED

NOTICE is he reby given that all persons hay Ing, any

demand against the aboy

before 13th July, 2009 to send their names and addresses, and

partic ulars of their debts

so required by netice in writing from the undersigned, te

come in and prove such debts or clairns,

they will be excluded from the benefit

in late July and go live in

YWARD MALACHI WELLS late of
of the [sland of New
of the Commonwealth of The

named Estate are required, on or

or claims to the undersigned,

of any distribution

tant future."

Despite Bank of the Bahamas
International suffering an
almost-75 per cent drop in net
income in the three months to
March 31, 2009, from $4.009
million in 2008 to $1.052 mil-
lion this time around, a 73.8 per
cent drop, Mr McWeeney said it
had to long beyond the current
recession and "plan for when
you come out of it”.

And while net income for the
first nine months of the current
year had dropped by 41 per
cent, to $6.063 million com-
pared to $10.26 million the year
before, Mr McWeeney said
positioning the bank for long-

claim or

amd if

or in default theread

SEE next page

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all persons indebted
to the said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or

before the date

of the
WELLS wall be distributed amon

mentioned, the assets

then have had notice.

Dated this 26th day of June, A. D. 2008

Execulors of the Estate of Hayward Malachi Wells
clo JEROME E. PYFROM & CO.

Attorneys for the Executors

ind Floor, Charlotte Howse

Charlotte & Shirley Streets
P.O. Box NW - 3950
Nassau, Bahamas

your goals

hereinbefore mentioned AND NOTICE is
hereby given that at the expiration of the date
late HAYWARD MALACHI
¢ the persons entitled thereto
having regard only to the claims of which the Executors shall

hereinbefore

Share
your
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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 5B



2m on in-house card process

term growth through "new
types of process to expand the
product and service base" was
essential.

"Tf you want to be successful
in this day and age, you cannot
let one of your foundation legs
falter,” Mr McWeeney
explained. "We have to move
forward on different fronts, and
we've been able to demonstrate
the bank's ability to do that and
deliver future value. As long as
we expand the capital base and
profits, there's no reason why
we will not continue to do that.

"The focus is on building the
bank's financial strength, build-
ing up capital and a strong oper-
ating platform to provide the
products and services for the
future. And given this point in
time, and given the economic
circumstances, our focus is to
ensure the bank maintains very
strong prudential standards."

The Bank of the Bahamas
International managing direc-
tor said the institution was
working on “other enhance-
ments to systems and operating
platforms that he declined to
identify. While these invest-
ments were "a calculated risk",
he added that the bank was
"pretty confident a return on
the investment will be achieved
in the near term".

One area where Bank of the
Bahamas International is ahead
of 2008 comparatives is on pro-
visions for loan losses, which
stand at $990,315 for the year-
to-date compared to $1.393 mil-
lion last year.

Mr McWeeney told Tribune
Business that the bank was "still
holding up really well” on non-
accrual or non-performing
loans, those that are 90 days or
more past due. He said they
were "slightly above 5 per cent,
hovering at about 5.1-5.2 per
cent" as a percentage of Bank
of the Bahamas International's
total $546 million loan portfolio,
a figure below the Bahamian
commercial bank average of
more than 6 per cent.

"It is below average,” he con-
firmed, although acknowledg-
ing that Bank of the Bahamas
International was "challenged
on delinquencies" - those loans
between 30 to 90 days past due.

The bank, he added, had been
working hard to prevent delin-
quent loans from becoming
non-performing, and had
enjoyed some success.

"Delinquencies are slightly
above industry average, but our
asset quality rating, as measured
by non-performing loans, is bet-
ter than the industry average,”
Mr McWeeney said.

He added that Bank of the

Bahamas International was also
planning to launch "exciting
new products" at its Miami
branch, which was still opening
an average of 30 new accounts
per month.

And Bank of the Bahamas
International had generated net
loan growth of $23 million for
the first nine months of the cur-
rent financial year, growth of
between $2-$3 million per

month. The bank has also asked
the architect responsible for
designing its new West Bay
Street headquarters to develop
a plan for the phased construc-
tion of the facility.

Mr McWeeney said the bank
had no expansion plans apart
from the increase in size at its
Village Road branch in the next

six to 12 months, which might
result in the hiring of extra staff.
There were also some internal
restructuring initiatives the insti-
tution had been working on,
which were partly responsible
for the increased non-interest
expenses during the third quar-
ter and year-to-date.

The Bank of the Bahamas

International managing direc-
tor added that a change in
accounting treatments at year-
end 2008 had been partially
responsible for the drop in
interest income for the third
quarter, as loan fee income was
now amortised over the lifetime
of the loan rather than recog-
nised as one lump sum up front.



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

Chapter One Bookstore will be closed
from June 29, 2009 to June 30, 2009,
for year-end inventory.

It will reopen for business on July 1, 2009.

The Business Office Cashier's Cage will close
at 1:00pm on June 30, 2009 and reopen for
normal operation on Wednesday, July 1, 2009.

We apologize for
any inconvenience caused.

TECHROLOGY

Stock Taking

JUNE 29th & 30th, 2009
Re-onen July 1st at a.m.

We apologize for any inconvenience caused
Tel: 242-328-0048
Fax: 242-328-0049
#4 Patton & Rosetta Streets
Palmdale
Nassau, Bahamas
Email: sales@detpe.com

INTER-AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION

IABA XLV" CONFERENCE

Nassau, Bahamas

Central Theme: World Financial Crisis: What Does the Future Hold?

Networking Luncheon - Leg
Onenfation for first time pa

June 30 = July 4, 2009

, dene 30, 2009
Registration

Wednesday, July 7, 2009

Breakfast for the IABA Executive Committne

Pesan

MBA Counal Meeting
& Financial Professions (must be registered]
pants by A4 President
Opening Ceramon

Welcoming Cocklal Reception

Thursday, July 2, 2009

Acadanve Sessions

“Voy Contigo” Charity Luncheon (by ticket)

“Puerto Rican Night", bosted by the Colefio de Abogados de Puerto Aico and the [ABA's Puerto Rican Chapter
Young Lawyers and Law Students Section Social Program

Prayer Greakfast (by tic

Friday 3, 2009

| (Pastor Myles Munroe & Jannier Deveaux)
Feqisiration

BLUE STAR EVENT

spresented by lABA Committeas and Academic Sections

Luncheon of the Inter-American Bar Foundation (by ticked) Presentation of Thee Wiliam Roy Vavance Award

Gahemas Bar Association Dinner (by ticket)

afirday, July a, 200
Brealtas! for former MEA Presidents
(AGA Councl Meeting

Meeting of ihe mew Exacotive Commiboe

Closing Ceremony





Co-sponsored by The Bahamas Bar Association
Special accommadations for Bahamian lawyers
$200.00 Registration
For further information contact www.iaba.org OR
laba. bahamashostifgmail. com

Tel: 325-5335



(-\) THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A major financial institution with both commercial and private banking
operations, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

APPLICATION SUPPORT

TECHNICIAN/PROGRAMMER

Core Responsibilities:

Provides support and maintenance of core applications and database
infrastructure.

Assist with application and reports development within the company
as required

Assists with documentation and maintenance of technical standards
and operations.

Troubleshoots system and application problems, including server
related issues.

Reviews and tests technologies for potential purchase by researching
computer industry information.

Interfaces with all staff and IT vendors in carrying out duties.
Performs application installations and configurations, preventative
maintenance and repairs.

Executes, coordinates and assists in the implementation of new
technologies.

Knowledge Skills and Abilities:

Advanced programming skills with knowledge in Java, VB, C#, PL
SQL and T-SQL.

Working knowledge of Database interfacing technologies including
Oracle 10g, Microsoft SOL Server and AS400 DB files.

Strong Operating System and troubleshooting knowledge and
experience using IBM AIX, Redhat Linux and Microsoft Windows.
Knowledge of networking, especially protocols in use by company
to troubleshoot and rectify the source(s) of network problems.
Analytical and problem-solving skills to assess issues and technical
information, examine alternatives, and use judgment to provide
reasoned recommendations.

Must be open to new technology and ability to problem solve in
support of the network and central database systems.

Bachelor of Science degree in a computer-related field, industry
standard network certifications required, plus two (2) or more years
of proven network systems experience.

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience
and qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and life
insurance; pension scheme.
Interested persons should apply no later than June 26, 2009 to:
DA#61099B
c/o The Tribune
Nassau, Bahamas

institutional leadership@gmail.com


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Court Order
SAL E

Action#623/2000
Judgement Creditor; Premier Importers Limited
Judgement Debtors: Brendan Foulkes
White 2002 Ford Escape

Action# 267 /2007
Judgement Creditor: Premier Importers Limited
Judgement Debtors: Dario Rolle
2001 Ford Explorer

Action# 00572/2008
Judgement Creditor: Premier Importers Limited
Judgement Debtors: Lionel Glinton
2001 Ford F150

Action#01002/2005
Judgement Creditor: Premier Importers Limited
Judgement Debtor: Jasongriffin
2001 Avalon

Vehicles Can Be Viewed
From 7.30 Am To 4.30pm
At Premier Importers St. Alban S Drive.

Bids Must Be In Writing On Or
Before July 13th, 2009.

Contact 322-8396 @ Extn 232

For Any Additional Information.

BSi

BS! OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BS| Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established
international private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is
presently accepting applications for:

HEAD OF PRIVATE BANKING

Applicants for the position of Head of Private Banking must have ai least 20
years experience in the offshore banking sector, have extensive knowledge of
intemational financial products and ability to lead and partner with team
members. Applicants must also be confident regarding customer relations with
excellent capability to generate New Money and have thorough knowledge of
local legislation, regulatory & statutory matters as well as international banking
practices. Fluency in Italian & French is absolutely required.

Personal qualities :-

Strong management skills

Leadership skills

Excellent communication skil

Goal-onented, self-motivated and able to motivate team members
Positive attitude and outlook

Commitment to quality and service excellence

Excellent aoquisitian skills

Flexibility in office hours and hands-on aporoach when necessary
Must be able to work under pressure

Available to travel on a frequent bass

Responsibilities :-

Manage and lead Private Banking Team

Meet target in terms of Profitability and Acquisition of Net New Money

Meet deadlines on timely basis

Contribute to the management of the Bank a5 senior management officer
Faster and maintain communication with intemal/external banking
professionals

Acquire new clients in target markets

service & advee allocated customers

submit their

Interested persons with should

resume/curriculum vitae to:-

such qualifications

Human Resources Manager
BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre
P.O. Box N-7130
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kern@bsibank.com
(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above aitributes will be contacted



Chamber Private Sector Office

FROM page 1B

if we do not have the right envi-
ronment” business and com-
merce will suffer.

Mr Rolle added: “Looking at
it from a macroeconomic stand-
point, there has to be a major
focus from the Government to

develop the private sector,
understanding its needs and the
role it plays in the economy.
That is something that needs to
take place.”

The Chamber president
added that while the private sec-
tor played a “critical role in
nationbuilding”, the dialogue

Employment Opportunity

Sales Manager

We are in search of a talented, innovative, charismatic
and creative leader with a passion for success, an
aptitude for sales and the ability to initiate progress,

Skill Requirements

Excellent oral and communication skills

Excellent motivation, training, and coaching skills
Ability to operate POS systems

Strong ability to drive team sales

Proficient in Microsoft Office applications

Strong multitasking ability

Possess excellent planning, organizational and

implementation skills

Strong leadership & management skills
Strong internet skills i.e. Emailing, group messaging

and research

Ability to execute priority based workload

Ability to exert initiative

Minimum Experience & Job Requirements
Tertiary level - with degree in related field;
Sales executive with at least ten years experience in

sales and marketing;

At least three years experience in supervisory post;
Strong knowledge and application of MS Microsoft

Suite

APPLY VIA EMAIL TO:
salesmanageropportunity2009@gmail.com



that had taken place previously
between itself and the Govern-
ment/public sector had “not
been of the quality to drive the
effort. There isn’t enough of it,

“We look at what’s wrong
and we poke and we poke and
we poke, but we need to look at
how best to move the process
forward,” Mr Rolle explained.
“That is the type of discussion
we should be having, with a
long-term view of development
leading to a national develop-
ment plan.

“Tm tired of the back and
forth and tit-for-tat. I can tell
you that it’s not productive,
because we’re still in the same
state we were in 10 years ago.
It’s not only government’s fault;
it’s both parties’ fault. We’ve
not made a conscious decision
to establish a plan for the path
forward together. I do not want
to suggest a huge discrepancy,
but it’s not strong enough.”

Mr Rolle said his work
throughout the Caribbean,
when he was an Organisation
of American States (OAS) and
Inter-American Development
Bank (IDB) representative, had
exposed him to the public and
private sector dialogue that had
been established.

While other countries were
facing the same issues as the
Bahamas, the Chamber presi-
dent said they at least had the
“framework” in place to
address them through public
sector/private sector discussions.

“We have appreciation for
the awesome job government
has, with a fiscal deficit that con-
tinues to widen and the devel-
opment of revenue streams
being extremely difficult in this
economic climate. That’s why
it’s important for us to estab-
lish the path forward together,”
Mr Rolle said.

The Chamber president
added that he and fellow exec-
utives also discussed energy
with the Prime Minister, and
“touched on the status of the
National Energy Policy and
what’s happening with that”.

A meeting had been sched-
uled to discuss that with Phen-
ton Neymour, minister of state
for the environment, either this
week or next.

THE DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS
Business Establishment

Survey

The Department of Statistics is conducting its Annual
Business Establishment Survey from June until
September 2009. The Survey requires that businesses
and institutions provide the following information:

- Number of employees

- Wages and Salaries

* Annual hours worked

- Revenues and Expenditures
» Depreciation and Acquisitions

The data generated from the survey will be used to
measure each sector’s contribution to the estimation of

the national income and the gross national product of
The Bahamas.

If you are involved in the production of goods and
services, you can help contribute to our national
statistics, as well as learn more about your sector’s
performance by completing the Annual Business
Establishment Survey questionnaire accurately and in a
timely fashion.

All survey questionnaires should be returned to the
Department of Statistics.

The Department of Statistics:

Star General Insurance Bldg.
second Floor

P.O. Box F-42561

Freeport, Grand Bahama
Tel: 352-7196

Fax: 352-6120

Summerwinds Plaza

P.O. Box N 3904

Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: 397-3704, 397-3706, or
397-3707

Fax: 326-0379


THE TRIBUNE



Real property tax change was a ‘good compromise’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government’s decision
to lower the 1 per cent real
property tax threshold from
$7.5 million to $5 million was
described as “a good compro-
mise” by the Bahamas Real
Estate Association’s (BREA)
president, who added that the
industry now needed “to stabi-
lize the market and get busi-
ness back to the Bahamas
again”.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham unveiled the amendment
last week during the debate on
the Real Property Tax Act
amendments in the House of
Assembly, and William Wong
described the move as “some-
thing we'll live with. It’s a good
compromise”.

While BREA had initially
argued for the $35,000 real
property tax cap, which was
removed in the 2008-2009 Bud-
get, to be restated, Mr Wong
said the Association had “been
suggesting all along” that the
Government could bring it back
at a higher threshold — increas-
ing it by possibly $15,000 or
$25,000, and taking the cap as
high as $60,000-$70,000.

The main beneficiaries from
the change will be those
Bahamas-based properties val-
ued at between $5 million and
$7.5 million, who would have
had to pay a 1 per cent rate on
the value above the first
$250,000, which is exempt.

At the high-end, a $7.5 mil-
lion property, paying real prop-
erty tax at 1 per cent on $7.25
million, would have had to pay
$72,500 per annum to the Pub-
lic Treasury — more than double
the previous $35,000 cap.

Now, following the amend-
ment, a $7.5 million property
will pay real property tax at 1
per cent on the first $4.75 mil-
lion and 0.25 per cent on the
next $2.5 million. This works
out at $53,750, a reduction of
$18,750 in annual tax payments.

“We can live with this, and
we’re grateful that we were able
to come to a compromise on
this very, very sore issue,” Mr
Wong told Tribune Business.
“We’ve crossed a major hurdle
and need to start marketing and
getting business back to the
Bahamas.”

This newspaper understands

YOUR FUTURE

IS ABOUT TO GET BRIGHTER

that the initial removal of the
$35,000 real property tax cap
caused problems for major real
estate developers who were
marketing to foreign buyers, as
this had been a major plank in
their marketing campaign. This
was taken away almost instant-
ly, and had the effect of causing
credibility problems with poten-
tial buyers.

Mr Wong said the 2008-2009
Budget amendments caused
prospective buyers of Bahami-
an real estate to “take a second
look”. He added: “I think we
lost quite a bit of business, but
with the new tax structure, it
puts us in a more competitive
position and allows us to be a
bit more competitive with oth-
ers in the region. I’m glad the
Government had a chance to
take it in the right direction.
The lawyers should be happy.

“Pm glad the Government
showed wisdom in looking at it
again. It shows maturity.” If for-
eign second home buyers
increased their purchases of
Bahamian real estate, realtors,
attommeys, contractors and oth-
er businesses would all benefit,
and “the cash registers will be
chinging in the Treasury”.

Mr Wong, though, urged the
Government to review the
amendment that requires for-
eign home owners to stay in
their properties for at least none
months per year to qualify for
the real property tax exemp-
tion.

“T think the Government
needs to clear that up,” he
explained. How can you ask
someone to spend $5 million
and stay put for nine months,
and how are they going to mon-
itor that?”

St. Andrew’s School Foundation

Development Officer

The Founckition 1 committed tes the heéliss

amal St. Amdrew's

School thragh tts financial support ot eat hers. scholarship
stuidents and balding prapeels, The Pounder 1 presen,
aeek ing a person to lead its Office of Developnvent

The Development Officer,

A Tull-time pasition. reports to

ihe St. Anirews School Bouncation and will:

he responsible for designing and overseeing: fundraising
CHMpAlens In support of the Koundatian’s strategic pools;

develop marketing strategies and materials for public

relations ancl dich ertising:

- PARAL relationships hedween the School and varies
oranizations, including the St. Andrew's Alumni and

Fricnds Assocation:

cuagitins

The successful candidate will POSER knowledge ainal
understanding of the School's history and culture; be a goal-
dnven individual with strong organizational and social skills;

Picks aS
experienced in fundraising.

Interested c
TLS Le

uominimum of a Bachelor's Degree:

una be

andidates should send their CV and a lemer of

Development Officer Position
St. Andrew's School Foundation
Fok Bow As
Alassuill, Ha hmas



MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 7B

Excellent Em red oyment

Opportunities

Do you love working in a fast-paced.

challenging environment?

Are you a Confident communicator, with a
passion to work with a professional ‘leam?

If you want to know more, Let's ‘Talk!

We are seeki ing, qu: alihed Persoms to All che Followi ing positions:

« Senior Graphic Designer
* Sales Associace

coounts (loncral Officers
* Retail Sales Manager

®* Showroom Floor Assistant

For more information on cach position, please visit our website page

wow fumnitureplus.com/ careers

Plus Group af Companies is an established Bahamian owned group
thar is growing and continuing to build its team of professionals in
Various arcas,

We offer a competitive salary and benefirs package as well as ongoing

professional training and develapment.

FURNES pe

Nassau = Grand Bahama * World Wide VWeb

Please submit your application by Mail ta:
Director of Human Resources

The Plus Group

EO. Box NWF13, Nassau. Bahamas

or email: jobe®cheplusgrp.com

We thank all applcancs, however only chose

sciccocd for an interview will be comraccedt.



COME SPEAK TO THE EXPERTS

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PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EU considered slashing Bahamas

FROM page 1B

targeted at Family Island infra-
structure projects - set to be
made available in the latest
financing round.

The EU's 2008-2013 Country
Strategy Paper for the
Bahamas, a copy of which has
been obtained by Tribune Busi-
ness despite it never being made
public, found that 6.83 million
Euros made available to the
Bahamas in the last funding
round - known as the ninth
European Development Fund
(EDF) - failed to achieve their
goal to ‘build capacity’ in the

Family Islands.

Finding that the Bahamas
had been "very slow" in com-
mitting these funds to agreed
projects, with a "protracted
process" in setting up technical
help, the Strategy Paper said:
"Unfortunately, implementa-
tion of the ninth EDF has expe-
rienced significant delays...

"This is at least in part due
to lack of communication on
project implementation issues.
The intervention framework
had not been updated by the
end of 2004, and no output or
outcome sector-wide indicators
were made available.

"The Mid-Term Review con-

~\ )) HE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

Chapter One Bookstore will be closed
from June 29, 2009 to June 30, 2009,

cluded that the Bahamas was a
very low performer in terms of
implementation of EU assis-
tance, and that a reduction of
the overall allocation could be
contemplated at the End-of-
Term Review if things did not
improve.”
Risking

Risking a cut in EDF financ-
ing would likely be viewed as
sheer folly for the Bahamas, giv-
en that it is the only grant fund-
ing this nation can access. This
is largely due to it being viewed
by many as a relatively devel-
oped nation with high living
standards.

Grant funding is financing
without any repayment or inter-
est rates attached, making it
especially valuable to the
Bahamas given the expanding
fiscal deficits and national debt
due to weakness in the public
finances.

And the EU funding is tar-
geted at an area in desperate
need of financing - Family

Island infrastructure. It is debat-
able whether the Government -
especially in the current climate
- could afford to do them.

For example, the ninth EDF
recommended focusing on six
projects - an eco-tourism train-
ing centre in Andros; rehabili-
tating the dock at Fresh Creek
in north Andros; a new airport
terminal and runway, known as
New Bight International Air-
port, for Cat Island; rehabilita-
tion of roads in Acklins; and
upgrades to the airport and
dredging/upgrades to the dock
in Duncan Town, Ragged
Island.

The 10th EDF is focused on
much the same, namely Family
Island infrastructure develop-
ment in those islands supposed
to have benefited from the
ninth EDF round.

The Strategy Paper said the
EU and Bahamian government
wanted to concentrate on
reducing "regional socio-eco-
nomic imbalances" within the
Bahamas. "This should be done
by means of capacity-building

in infrastructure development
on the south-easterly islands of
the Bahamas, bringing them up
to the level of New Providence,
Grand Bahama, Abaco and the
other more developed islands,"
the document said.

"The thrust of the strategy is
to achieve sustainable econom-
ic growth and stability, and con-
tinuous improvement in living
standards. Support for the Fam-
ily Islands’ integration into the
Bahamas economy is aimed at
establishing one Bahamas eco-
nomic space for future genera-
tions of sustainable and equi-
table economic growth.

Intent

"The intent is to facilitate a
structural transformation of the
least developed islands in the
south-east, repositioning these
islands and bringing them into
line with the whole economy
through inter-island as well as
international direct trade, which
should ultimately achieve the

central common objective of
poverty reduction."

The Strategy Paper added:
"Providing adequate physical
infrastructure is considered to
be a critical requirement for
continued growth and competi-
tiveness, particularly in the
tourism industry.

"This could also be relevant
for the Bahamas’ economic
relations with the EU, and
could be part of a regional
effort to promote the services
trade." Overall, the Strategy
Paper said the outcome from
the 10th EDF should be
improved ports, runways,
drainage systems and sea walls
in the Family Islands, and
"increased economic activity in
goods and services due to better
access from and to markets”.
This, in turn, is no doubt intend-
ed to reverse the migration
from the Family Islands to Nas-
sau in search of work, some-

SEE next page

for year-end inventory.
It will reopen for business on July 1, 2009.

aeseasinest Oftre/Oashiete case aa WANTED
e Business Office Cashier's Cage will close a oaniWarchance Clork
at 1:00pm on June 30, 2009 and reopen for ae eA 4

normal operation on Wednesday, July 1, 2009.

NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that, in accordance
with Section 50 (1) (b) of the Supreme Court
Act, 1996, anyone having claims againts the
estate of Fernando Rafael Zanartu Velasco
should send written notification thereof to
Santander Bank & Trust Ltd., 3rd Floor,
Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre, P.O. Box
N1682, Nassau, Bahamas.

A medical supplies company is seeking the
services of an individual primarily to make
deliveries, run errands, and be responsible
for the maintenance and control of the
company warehouse and physical
environment.

We apologize for
any inconvenience caused.

candidate should be
responsible, honest, punctual, have good
communication skills, must interact well
with customers and staff, be a team player,
have good time management skills and the
ability to prioritize and accomplish tasks.
The psy candidate must possess a
valid driver's license.

The successful

BKG/410.03

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT TREASURY BILLS

Sealed tenders for B$71,000,000.00 of 91-Day Treasury Bills
will be received by the Banking Manager, The Central Bank
of The Bahamas, Frederick Street, Nassau up to 3:00 p.m on
Wednesday, July 1, 2009. Successful tenderers, who will be
advised should take up their bills against payment on Friday,
July 3, 2009. These bills will be in minimum multiples of
B$100.00.

Interested persons may fax their resume to
328-5052, email to:
bmhumanresouces@ gmail.com or
mail to P.O. Box -1483,

Nassau, Bahamas

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No. 45 of 2000)
HIGH KICK PRODUCTIONS LIMITED
\ In Voluntary liquidation

Tenders are to be on special forms obtainable from the Central
Bank of The Bahamas or Commercial Banks.

Tenders must state the net price percent (in multiples of one
cent) and should be marked “Tender”. The Central Bank of the
Bahamas reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act (No.

Vacancy for a

45 of 2000). HIGH KICK PRODUCTIONS LIMITED is in

OOK OR OK OOK OR OK I OK OK OK OS OK OK OK OK OR OK TK OK OR OK A OK OR OK OI OK OK OK OK OK OK OK OK OR OK OK OK

Employment Opportunity

Delivery Driver

We are seeking to employ a team player with a passion for
success and a desire to get ahead.

Skills and Requirements

Excellent navigation and geographic knowledge

Good driving record

Strong communication skills

Ability to operate all equipment to perform the job ie.
trucks, lift

A, team player

Ability to read, count, and write to accurately complete
all documentation,

A keen sense of punctuality and time management
Physical dexterity

Amiable and reliable

Strong understanding of traffic laws.

Professional appearance

Minimum Requirements

High school Diploma

Valid Driver's License

Minimum two years driving experience

Truck driving experience desired, but not essential

APPLY VIA EMAIL TO:
driveropportunity(@gmail.com



Pastry Chef

Overall Responsibilities

Create and maintain a posilive work environment
through coaching and leading staff while establishing
Creative anal exciting TOME Ta produc [s, hoy appelsing
und visually appealing.
= Work and maintain an ‘ll working relationships with
other work areas.
Meet with meeting planners and social catering event
coordinators to develop personalized dessert products.
- Direct, train and monitor performance of Pastry staff,
- Maintain organization, cleanliness and sanitation of
work areas and equipment,

Specific Joh Summary

Tram, coach, lead and hokl Pastry team accountable ter the
job fumeticns listed below,

Meet claily tn review assignments, schedules, anticipated
business lewels, employes: periormance tues anc wher
Information pentinent io joo pectormance

Maintain and strictly abicle by sanitation’health regulations
and the hotel's fond safety program requirements

Ensure all Pastry employees maintain food handlers
certification

- Meet with Executive Chef to review assignments,
anticipated business levels, changes ane other information
pertinent to the job performance on a
daily basis
- Prepare and assign production and prep work for Pastry
stait to complete; review priorities,

- Communicate additions or changes to the assignments as
they arise throughout the shitt, Identify situations, which
compromise the department's standards and delegate these
tasks -

- Prep are | amenity orders. for room service in accordance with
cifed requirements ond hotel standards

eae all dishes following recipes and yield guides,

aeconding to Ritz-Carlton standards

- Monitor performance of Pastry staff and ensure all
procedures are completed to the department standards

- Assist Pastry staff wherever required to ensure excellent
Service tO vests

- Ensure all Pastry staff assignments are completed before
they leave work area

- Review status of work and follow- “Up actions required
with the Executive Chef before leaving,

Qualifications and Specific Candidate Profile

Certification of culinary ramming or apprentoceshup.

- 5 years experience in FAB leadership position ata
luxury Club, hotel or restaurant.

- Knowledge of food and beverage cost controds,
AbTILY bo plan and develop menus anal recipes.

Please send resume to the attention af:
Thirector of Human Resources
The Ahacoe (lub on Winding Hay
P.O. Bow AB-20571
Marsh Harbour, Abacu
Bahamas
OR
Email: abacohumanresources@ ritzcarlion.com

Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 25th day

of June, 2009.

Andium Trust Company Limited

of 12-14 David Place, St. Helier, Jersey JE2 4TD
Liquidator

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

PROPERTY MANAGER

REQUIRED:

An intelligent and energetic person to
manage a warehouse facility.

Responsibilities include, but are not limited to:

e@ Overseeing facility, office and

maintenance staff

Maintaining office hours from 8:30am - 5:00om
weekdays and 8:30am - 1:00pm on Saturdays

Operating and managing computer systems

Processing of billings and collections and

making bank deposits

Operating and managing the security systems

Marketing, showing and leasing vacant areas

to tenants

Preparing monthly reports

Maintaining the facility to a high professional

standard

Applicants should apply in writing to the following
e-mail address: baha.accounts2009@gmail.com

Please provide educational background and
employment history together
with references from previous employers.


THE TRIBUNE



grant funding

thing the so-called ‘anchor
property’ strategy was also
designed to achieve.

The 10th EDF is divided into
two components, with some
4.23 million Euros earmarked
for Family Island infrastructure
projects and the remaining
470,000 Euros forming a Tech-
nical Cooperation Facility. And
it is quite possible that the 6.83
million Euro balance from the
ninth EDF may also still be
available.

The Strategy Paper warned
that economic development in
the Family Islands would
depend heavily on capital
investment "from other invest-
ment sources", as the Govern-
ment “does not have the nec-

essary financial resources to do
it all”. And that was before the
full impact of the global eco-
nomic downturn was realized.

Infrastructure development,
the paper said, was critical to
eliminating "pockets of pover-
ty" that existed in the south-
eastern Bahamas, especially on
islands such as Acklins,
Crooked Island and Mayagua-
na.

Poverty

"Despite the levels of pover-
ty, these south-easterly islands
are an untapped resource with
limitless potential for economic
growth and development,” the
Strategy Paper said. "It is there-

fore the view of the Govern-
ment that the time has come to
take these islands to a new lev-
el of development.

"The small size of the
Bahamas prevents it from
achieving economies of scale in
many areas. Similarly, the small
size of the population, com-
bined with geographic frag-
mentation, raises the unit cost of
infrastructure provision, partic-
ularly in the Family Islands.

"The challenge is to provide
and maintain infrastructures
such that citizens in all parts of
the country can be guaranteed a
higher quality of life, and all of
the inhabited islands can par-
ticipate meaningfully in eco-
nomic development."

MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 9B

BSi



BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BS! Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established
international private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is
presently accepting applications for:








INVESTMENT SPECIALIST/RELATIONSHIP MANAGER





Applicants for the positon of Investment Specialist/Relationship Manager must have
at least 10 years’ years experience in the offshore banking sector and extensive
knowledge of international mvestment instruments & money market. The successful
candidate must have in-depth knowledge of international financial markets; and
excellent capabilities in managing relationships with Clients, Client Advisors &
internal Relationship Managers. Fluency in Italian and Spanish is required.













Personal qualities :-
Management skills
Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
Commitment to quality and service excellence
strong team attitude
Financial and analytical background
Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary
Must be able to work under pressure
Available to travel

Summit Insurance Company Limited
(Incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas)

Balance Sheet
As of 31 December 2008
(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)

ASSETS
Cash in hand and at banks
Term deposits
Due from reinsurers
Due from agents
Deferred commission expense
Prepayments and other assets
Investments in securities:
Available-for-sale
Loans and receivables
Investment property
Plant and equipment

Responsibilities :-
Research, develop and implement strategies for new products
Provide investment proposals and markets’ analysis to Chents, Externa
Advisors and other Relationship Managers and Senior Management
Guide and assist staff in the training of Bank's products
Provide advisory services to sophisticated clientele
Manage allocated clients

980,204
17,173,805
1,265,144
7,256,857
3,481,610
136,242

1,344,315
15,211,795
2,181,831
7,363,794
3,286,375
127,621

4,854,168
836,650
206,117
442,433

5,126,931
1,119,203
210,966
468,299

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum

Total assets vitae to:-

36,633,230 36,441,130
LIABILITIES
General insurance funds:
Unearned premium reserve
Uneamed commission income
Outstanding claims reserve

Human Resources Manager

BS! Overseas (Bahamas) Limited

Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre

P. 0. Box N-7130

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kKerr@bsibank.com

9,885,921
2,375,820
5,611,075

10,108,362
1,859,273
6,903,248

17,872,816 18,870,883
Other liabilities:
Due to reinsurers
Accounts payable and accrued expenses

2,419,842
386,818

2,570,274
406,231
Total liabilities

20,679,476 21,847,388

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

Summit Insurance Company Limited
(Incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas)

Balance Sheet

As of 31 December 2008

(Continued)

(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)

Internal Audit

EQUITY

Share capital:
Authorized: 10,000,000 shares of $1 each
Issued and fully paid: 5,000,000 shares of $1 each
Treasury shares

General reserve

Fair value reserve

Retained earnings

5,000,000 5,000,000

(910,000) .
1,000,000 1,000,000
1,120,007 1,450,070
9,743,747 7,143,672

Pasche Bank & Trust Limited is looking for:

Permanent Internal Auditor (Junior)

Main tasks:

Tetal equity 15,953,754 14,593,742

Perform regular and recurrent controls to have the
ongoing insurance that the bank’s activity is properly
controlled and managed in compliance with applicable
laws, regulations, internal guidelines and best business
practices.

Measure and monitor the bank’s major risk areas.
Collaborate with the Board of Directors, the CEO and
the Head of The Group Internal Audit.

Realize unexpected and punctual audit following your
own initiative or upon request of the Board of Directors,
the Chief Executive Officer or the Head of the Group
Internal Audit.

Total liabilities and equity 36,633,230 36,441,130

APPROVED BY THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND SIGNED ON ITS BEHALF BY:

LEAL



Director

21 May 2009
Date



Profile:

- University degree in Business Administration or
Accounting,

- 2-3 years of professional experience in Banking or

accounting firm,

Personal skills: candidate should show great sense of

adaptability and initiative. Accuracy and consistency

required as well.

Computer skills : Technically efficient in MS Excel,

Word, Powerpoint, Internet,

Foreign languages: English, Spanish. French would be

appreciated.

Full Financial Statements are available at www.summitbahamas.com =

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

Please send you CV to:

Pasche Bank & Trust

Attn. Olivier Giaume

Head of Internal Audit

Bay Side Executive Park Lake Road, West Bay Street
P.O. Box AP 59241

Nassau, Bahamas

RU ee]
the #1 newspaper in circulation,
just call 02-2371 today!

Olivier.giaume@pasche.ch


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INES
Power plant

deliveries for BEC
on two islands

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PROSPECT MADISON LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

VANESE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)















































Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas. Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JCR HOLDINGS LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Employment Opportunity

Senior Accounts Assistant

We seek to employ a talented, innovative, leader with a
passion for success, the ability to initiate progress, an

: . Notice is hereby given that the above-named
aptitude for Accounting and a desire to succeed.

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of June 2009. The Liquidator

ene rereeres is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

® Possess strong foundation of accounting practices and
procedures
Excellent oral and communication skills
Excellent motivation & coaching skills
Ability to operate and familiarity with POS systems
Strong ability to drive team sales
Proficient in Microsoft Office, GL and Accounting
applications
Strong multitasking ability
Possess excellent planning, organizational and
implementation skills
Strong leadership & managerial skills

Strong internet skills i.e. Emailing, group messaging
and research

Ability to execute priority based workload
Ability to exert initiative

Recording, summarizing, analyzing, verifying and
reporting of results of financial transactions

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RAINBOW ASSET PTE LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of June 2009. The Liquidator

2% ; is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Minimum Experience Requirements

Tertiary level - with degree in related field;

Accounts executive with at least 4 years experience in
Accounting ;

At least three years experience in supervisory post;
Strong knowledge and application of MS Microsoft Suite

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

APPLY VIA EMAIL TO: (Liquidator)

sraccountassistanti00%@egma il.com

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

Zu

Cy LCI NT A LL

&

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Wark

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 26 JUNE 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,579.39 | CHG 0.37 | %CHG 0.02 | YTD -132.97 | YTD % -7.77
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.53 | YTD -5.43% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit y Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund

Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank ($1)

Consolidated Water BDRs

Doctor's Hospital

Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J.S. Johnson 10.50 10.50

Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Last Sale Change Daily Vol.

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + 100.00 : 7%

Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + 100.00 : 20 Prime + 1.75%

Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + 100.00 : 7%

Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + 100.00 i 5 Prime + 1.75%

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Last Price

Previous Close Today's Close Change

10.00

52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest

52wk-Hi

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

EPS $ Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

Symbol Yield
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

52wk-Low Weekly Vol.

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
YTD% Last 12 Months

ABDAB
RND Holdings

0.000
0.000
Fund Name Div $ Yield %
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund i
FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.74
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

30-Apr-09
31-May-09
31-May-09
31-May-09

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

crobards@tribunemedia.net

BIMINI and Eleuthera
received diesel engine ship-
ments last Friday, according to a
heavy equipment website, as
$40 million worth of BEC pow-
er plant construction initiatives
for those two islands gain legs in
a big way.

Heavyliftpfi.com announced
that two 100 tonne engines,
originating in Korea, were deliv-
ered to Bimini and four 72-
tonne engines, originating in
Denmark, were delivered to
Eleuthera.

According to the site, the
power plants were consolidat-
ed at a heavy lift facility in the
UK, then shipped to both
islands. It also announced that
the power generators had been
installed in their respective facil-
ities.

The “on schedule” delivery
and installation of the engines
seems to be in line with the
Government’s plan to have the
new power facilities up and run-
ning by August.

According to the online news
release, delivery of the massive
engines was a challenge because
of the islands’ unfavourable
docking facilities.

“Delivery to two minor
islands in the Bahamas, requir-
ing the transfer of equipment
from normal heavy lift ships to
small landing craft, was neces-
sary as the islands do not have
proper port facilities. The con-
tract included moving UK-

based Collett Vehicles, equip-
ment and staff to the islands to
carry out the work,” said the
release.

Minister of State for the Envi-
ronment, Phenton Neymour,
revealed during his Budget con-
tribution to Parliament that the
Bimini power station was being
expanded to the tune of $14 mil-
lion, while the newly construct-
ed Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera,
power plant would cost $26 mil-
lion. A new facility is also being
constructed in Wilson City,
Abaco, at a

cost of $90 million and should
be completed by January 2010,
while $300 million worth of
expansions, for which govern-
ment is awaiting financing, are
planned for New Providence.

The Government recently
revealed its need to borrow
$211 million to cover existing
loan facilities for the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation.

“Tn the last two years we have
had to put in place new capital
investment,” said Mr Neymour.

He said of BEC during his
budget address to parliament:
“The global situation has wors-
ened and BEC’s financial posi-
tion has done the same, as there
are encumbrances with collec-
tions in all areas — whether res-
idential, small commercial and
some large commercial cus-
tomers.

“As of May 2009, BEC’s
accounts receivable was approx-
imately $99 million and
accounts payable for April 2009
was approximately $134 mil-
lion.”

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CIRCUITPOINT INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

VIDA DULCE VENTURES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EAST ALLIANCE EQUITY
CORPORATION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)
PAGE 12B, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



‘Transformers 2’ takes to sky with $112m weekend

@ By DAVID GERMAIN
AP Movie Writer

LOS ANGELES (AP) —
Alien robots have transformed
into box-office superstars with
$200 million in domestic ticket
sales in just five days.

“Transformers: Revenge of
the Fallen” took in $112 million
in the sequel’s first weekend and
$201.2 million since opening
Wednesday, according to Sun-
day estimates from Paramount,
which is distributing the Dream-
Works movie.

It was well on the way to
becoming the year’s top-gross-
ing movie.

That was a few million dol-
lars higher than other studios
were expecting for the movie,
and the figures could change a
bit when final numbers are
released Monday.

IAL OROUP

ATOM AL

Still, it was a colossal start for
the “Transformers” sequel,
whose opening five days
amounted to nearly two-thirds
of the $319 million domestic
total the franchise’s first movie
did over its entire run in 2007.

Now playing in almost every
other country except India, the
movie added $185.8 million
overseas, for a worldwide total
of $387 million. That’s well over
half the $708 million global total
for the first “Transformers.”

That first movie began with a
$70.5 million weekend. Based
on how well the sequel has
done, “Revenge of the Fallen”
could join the handful of movies
that have topped the $400 mil-
lion mark domestically.

“Td say given the momentum
it has, it’s got a real shot,” said
Rob Moore, vice chairman at
Paramount.

For the first five days, the
“Transformers” sequel was sec-
ond only to last summer’s “The
Dark Knight” with $203.8 mil-
lion.

This was the biggest opening
weekend of this year, surpass-
ing the $85.1 million debut of
“X-Men Origins: Wolverine” in
early May.

The sequel began with $60.6
million on its opening day
Wednesday. That also was sec-
ond only to “The Dark Knight,”
which had the biggest box-office
day ever with $67.2 million on
opening day.

With $14.4 million at 169
IMAX theaters, “Transformers”
set a record for a five-day open-
ing in the giant-screen format,
nearly doubling the previous
best of $7.3 million set by “Har-
ry Potter and the Order of the
Phoenix.”

“Transformers” overcame
harsh reviews from critics, who
called it a visual-effects extrav-
aganza without much story or
human heart. Director Michael
Bay has a history of bad reviews
and big box office with
“Armageddon” and “Pearl Har-
bor.”

“Michael Bay knows how to
build the perfect summer box-
office beast,” said Paul Der-
garabedian, box-office analyst
for Hollywood.com. “He
squarely aimed right at the
demographic, right at what sum-
mer movie-goers want, and he
put it on the screen. And audi-
ences can’t seem to get enough
of it.”

The sequel broadened the
franchise’s fan base. Females
accounted for just 40 percent of
the audience for the first “Trans-
formers” but 46 percent for the

sequel, Moore said.

Much of that was due to the
on-screen romance for the char-
acters played by Shia LaBeouf
and Megan Fox, who were rela-
tive unknowns when the first
movie came out.

With a $13 million weekend,
Disney and Pixar Animation’s
“Up” became the year’s top-
grossing film domestically at
$250.2 million. It surpassed
Paramount’s “Star Trek,” which
did $3.6 million over the week-
end to hit a $246.2 million total.

The reign of “Up” at the top
of the year’s box-office chart
will be short-lived, though. The
“Transformers” sequel should
shoot past it in a matter of days.

The Warner Bros. melodra-
ma “My Sister’s Keeper,” with
Cameron Diaz and Abigail
Breslin, had a so-so debut, com-
ing in at No. 5 with $12 million.

Breslin plays a daughter con-
ceived as a donor for her older
sister, who has leukemia.

Summit Entertainment’s Iraq
War drama “The Hurt Locker”
had a strong start in limited
release, taking in $144,000 in
four theaters for an average of
$36,000 a cinema. That com-
pares to an average of $26,453 in
4,234 theaters for “Transform-
ers.”

Starring Jeremy Renner and
Anthony Mackie as members of
a U.S. bomb squad in Baghdad,
“The Hurt Locker” has a chance
to become the first real com-
mercial success among recent
war-on-terror movies, which
audiences generally have avoid-
ed. “The Hurt Locker” has
earned stellar reviews since
debuting at film festivals last
year. It rolls out to more the-
aters on July 10.

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Panahire, Life


MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

be





Si Cir 1

The stories behind the news



Officer: detainees were
Subjected to horrific abuse

Allegations about
Carmichael Road
Detention Centre

By INSIGHT TEAM

Pee years, the Immigra-
tion Detention Centre on
Carmichael Road has been the
subject of allegations of detainee
abuse and inhumane conditions.

Successive governments have
promised to investigate and from
time to time a few changes have
been instituted, but former
detainees say these are usually
cosmetic and short lived.

A few months ago, under
intense publicity, the Immigration
Department announced yet
another inquiry, and a fact-finding
team composed of government
officials, social workers and psy-
chologists visited the centre.

The resulting report has yet to
be made public, but those well
acquainted with the matter doubt
it will admit to finding any evi-
dence of cruelty or violence.

History seems to support this
view: During the facility's more
than two decades in operation,
and despite countless allegations,
not a single publicised instance of
beating, torture, or sexual abuse
has been acknowledged by
Bahamian authorities.

Yet, according to a senior offi-
cer formerly stationed at the cen-
tre, detainees are routinely sub-
jected to the most horrific abuses
— which take place right under the
noses of the administrators, who
are often too disinterested to
notice.

As the Immigration Depart-
ment prepares to announce yet
another plan to improve condi-
tions for detainees, the officer
breaks his silence for the first time
in an exclusive interview with
Insight.

The text of this interview has
been edited for continuity and to
protect the identity of the indi-
viduals mentioned.

Insight (I): Over the years,
there have been countless allega-
tions about what goes on at the
Carmichael Road Detention Cen-
tre, but journalists have not been
allowed in to see for themselves.
How would you describe condi-
tions at the centre during the time
you were there?

Officer (O): It was poor, it was
an insult. It's inhumane how the
place is run. There is sewage
everywhere. Piles of garbage. And
the Immigration officers in charge,
they can smell it, see it, but won't
come in the back there or send
someone to fix it. There are pud-
dles of faeces everywhere.

Sometimes after I left for the



day, I poured bleach from head
to toe in the shower. Because I
can't lay beside my wife after
being in there, or play with my
children. My dirty clothes, I used
to leave them outside in the trunk,
and then wash them later.

(1): What is the experience like
for detainees?

(O) It is a detention centre, but
it’s run like a prison. That is not
how it is supposed to be. These
are detainees. These people, you
don’t know what they have been
through. Some of them spent all
their money just to make it to par-
adise. Now they reach paradise,
and they are captured.

Some are just ... like the
Jamaicans, when they come
through the airport they don’t
have anyone to sign for them, and
they don’t have enough money in
their pocket — and that is wrong,
that’s a bunch of foolishness. ’m
a tourist, I come here with $100 in
my pocket and spend a week and
leave. If I overstay my week, of
course put me in the detention
centre, but don’t turn me away at
the airport, or put me in that filth.

I: Jamaican tourists are taken
from the airport to the detention
centre because they don’t have
$100 on them when they get here?

O: They take them if they don’t
have $500 in their pocket. Imme-
diately. They say: “You don’t have
enough to sustain yourself.”

I: Suppose they are staying
with someone here for that week,
and don’t need to buy a hotel
room?

O: They say that person have
to come out to the airport and
sign for them. Or else they take
them to the detention centre.

I: Why do you think conditions
at the centre have deteriorated to
such an extent?

O: The main problem is too
many people with no experience
but high ranks dabbling too much
in the running of the place. It
needs to be managed — not run,
managed. If they want to have a
detention centre, do it the right
way.

See, you have born leaders and
then you have leaders — for them
it’s about power. They believe this
textbook stuff they learn in school
is all they need. But experience
causes you to learn how to deal
with people.

They are not prisoners, they
are detainees.

The officers have to learn not to
aggravate people. They are
already aggravated.

I: What is the food like at the
centre?

O: The food supplied by Social
Services is lousy, it’s unfit for

DETAINEES can be seen at the Immigration Penn Centre on Carmichael Road.



“We have a lot of immature and
unprofessional officers, and it
hurts my heart. What are they
harassing these people for?
There is only so much abuse

people can take.”



human beings. I wouldn’t give it to
a dog.

I: But Minister Branville
McCartney and Immigration
Director Jack Thompson ate
lunch there, and said the food was
good.

O: Mr Thompson and the min-
ister, they are good people, very
good people. I think they get
swing — you remember the song
‘You get swing’? They are being
fooled. Because I've seen the peo-
ple only get water and just a slice
of cheddar cheese between two
slices of dry bread. Breakfast grits
are supposed to be soft. But there,
hard as rock. And the portions
are lousy.

All the meals are late. Plenty of
times I have seen food fresh on
the counter, and the officers
would not come out to open the
gates to feed the people. They
would just sit in the air condition
and not do their job. Sometimes
the garbage was overflowing at
each unit. There were flies every-
where.

And you know what hurts me
so much, because I love kids —
why build a playground if you
won't let the children use it?

I: What is it for, if the children
don't use it?

O: They have it for show, for
show and tell. It's a game. When-
ever visitors come, they let them
play, so everyone thinks every-
thing is all right. It's like the
phones. They put pay phones in
the back there, but they don't let
anyone use them.

I: We now want to ask you
about the allegations of beatings
and other physical abuse at the
centre. Let’s start with the case of
(name withheld) within the last
few years. We were told the
guards broke both his legs and
knocked several of his teeth out.

O: Yes. The guy who broke his
Knees was (officer's name with-
held). We have a lot of immature
and unprofessional officers, and
it hurts my heart. What are they
harassing these people for? There
is only so much abuse people can
take. Leave them alone. Give
them love. Do you know what it
must be to spend a heap of cash to
make it to paradise, and once you
make it, get caught and put in the
detention centre? They have
issues on their mind.

Regardless of whatever the

34 mpg (EPA highway rating

detainees did, the officers are not
magistrates. They only detain
personnel until the magistrate
decides to let them go, make them
pay a fine, or let them buy a tick-
et to leave. That is not up to the
officers. How can they — and they
do this a lot — how can they take
away funds confiscated from
detainees, and keep them or give
them to someone else? That is not
their call. They have no right to
take people's property.

I: Does this happen often?

O: It's just like a flea market.
See, they believe that these people
will just be deported. They don't
realise some of them will get sta-
tus. When they do, it’s like, ‘Oh
your phone? I didn't see it, I don't
know what it looks like’ — playing
stupid.

Some Haitians are taken into
custody with a lot of money and it
disappears. They have a lot
because they may work here for
years, but because they are ille-
gal, they put money under the
mattress, in coffee cans, they bury
it, all over the place, because they
can't open an account. And they
are not extravagant people. They
are like the Chinese, they live
humbly. They just work, feed the
family and save and save and save.

Every time their money goes
missing (after being confiscated),
the officers try and blame indi-
vidual migrants. But no cash ever
is supposed to enter the detention
centre. Whenever you are com-
mitted, your possessions are sup-
posed to be put in an envelope.
The officer is supposed to sign
across the envelope, tape it, let
the individual sign, and it goes in a
safe.

Regardless of if a person is



deported, goes to jail, or is
released, that is his cash. What
some are doing is stealing by
means of employment. And you
are not supposed to get fired, you
are supposed to go to jail for
things like this. And I am
ashamed by what I seen some of
my fellow officers do. It's a crying
shame. Most of them are in
prominent positions who are
doing this foolishness, not the
small man.

I: Can you remember any spe-
cific beatings that took place dur-
ing your time at the centre?

O: I have watched individuals
being snatched up by their clothes.
They would take them in a pri-
vate room, beat them on the bot-
tom of their feet, their stomach,
soft tissue where it wouldn’t show.
But then it got to the point where
they just don’t care no more.
Across the face, across the back.
They just do it in front of every-
one, they just don't care, and its
inhumane.

My parents grew me up a dif-
ferent way. What they are doing is
wrong.

I told you they used to extract
them. But later even if they did
that, it was to a building with win-
dows and no blinds. All the
detainees could see this Gestapo
foolishness going on. What is this,
a prisoner of war camp now?

I watched them beat one so
bad, the guy was on the ground
and moaned and groaned all
night. They took him to the hos-
pital, eventually. It brings tears to
my eyes sometimes. It's not right,
it's not right. I think what the gov-
ernment needs to do is insert

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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

Jackson’s phenomenal
music selling record



a
ae
=







i
= |.
. =: MICHAEL Jackson’s Thriller is the best sell- 1983: "The Girl Is Mine" (with Paul
= : ~ ing album of all time with as many as 109 million McCartney) #2
. s copies sold worldwide. 1983: "Billie Jean" #1
a a Overall he is the third best selling music artist 1983: "Beat It" #1
2 of all time following the Beatles, Elvis Presley 1983: "Wanna Be Startin' Somethin'" #5
~ and Bing Crosby, selling between 500 and 999 1984: "Human Nature" #7
— - million records. 1984: "P.Y.T.” #10
q r 1984: "Say Say Say" (with Paul McCartney) #1
7 i JACKSON’S US NUMBER ONES 1984: "Thriller" #4
eee. Michael Jackson had 13 number one hits on 1985: "We Are The World" #1
wie Zr the Billboard Hot 100 charts, and 1 number one 1987: "I Just Can't Stop Loving You" (with
: collaboration, "Say Say Say", featuring Paul Siedah Garrett) #1
aa id McCartney. 1987: "Bad" #1
1988: "The Way You Make Me Feel" #1
1972: "Ben" (1 week) 1988: "Man In The Mirror" #1
me. +? 1979: "Don't Stop "Til 1988: "Dirty Diana" #1
ie You Get Enough" (1 week) 1989: "Smooth Criminal" #7
al 1980: "Rock with You" (4 weeks) 1991: "Black or White” #1
MICHAEL JACKSON with fan Irva Weech at Cody’s Music and Video Centre, East Bay Street, on June 17, 1996. 1983: "Billie Jean" (7 weeks) 1992: "Remember The Time" #3
1983: "Beat It" (3 weeks) 1992: "In The Closet" #6
e 9 QO ® 1983: "Say Say Say" (6 weeks) 1993: "Will You Be There" #7
M 1C hael Ss mus 1C video Ss 1985: "We Are The World” (4 weeks) (this 1995: "Scream" (with Janet Jackson) #5
track is counted extra officially, considering 1995: "You Are Not Alone" #1
. . : that was credited to USA for Africa). 2001: "You Rock My World” #10
1979 "Man in the Mirror” "Will You Be There” 1987: "I Just Can't Stop Loving You" (with
"Don't Stop ‘til You Get "Another Part of Me" "Gone Too Soon" Siedah Garrett) (1 week)
Enough" oo ea 1987: "Bad" (2 weeks) JACKSON'S US R&B NUMBER ONES
"Rock with You" "Come Together" 1995 an 7 : :
"HIStory T, 7 1987: "The Way You Make Me Feel” (1 Michael Jackson had 13 number one hits on the
y Teaser ;
1980 1989 "Scream" week) ; ; Billboard R&B charts.
"She's Out of My Life" "Leave Me Alone" "Childhood" 1988: " Man in the Mirror" (2 weeks) ;
"Liberian Girl" "You Are Not Alone" 1988: "Dirty Diana" (1 week) 1979: "Don't Stop 'Til You Get Enough" (5
1983 "Earth Song" 1991: "Black or White" (7 weeks) weeks)
"Billie Jean" 199] 1995: "You Are Not Alone" (1 week). 1980: "Rock with You"
"Beat It” "Black or White" 1996 1983: "The Girl Is Mine" (3 weeks)
"Say Say Say" "They Don't Care About Us" MICHAEL JACKSON HAD 29 TOP 10 HITS 1983: "Billie Jean" (9 weeks)
Thriller 1992 "Stranger in Moscow" ON THE BILLBOARD HOT 100 CHARTS. 1983: "Beat It"
"Remember the Time" 1987: "I Just Can't Stop Loving You"
1987 "In the Closet" 1997 * 1971: "Got to Be There" #4 1987: "Bad"
"Bad" "Who Is It" "Blood on the Dance Floor" * 1972: "Rockin Robin" #2 1987: "The Way You Make Me Feel"
“The Way You Make Me ‘Jam " , Ghosts * 1972: "Ben" #1 1988: "Man in the Mirror"
Feel Heal the World rr * 1979: "Don't Stop Till You Get Enough" #1 1988: "Another Part of Me”
1988 1993 "You Rock My World" : ia ' Rock With You "#1 1m: ' Remember the Time"
"Dirty Diana" "Give in to Me" t Cry tt 980: ; Off ‘The Wall" #10 a 1991: "In the Closet ;
* 1980: "She's Out Of My Life" #10 1995: "You Are Not Alone" (4 weeks)



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THE TRIBUNE



Ue TSO) OL Aida Ta Coya sxe) neta nrareut me Music and Video Centre,

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

eniuses whose

influence spans

continents,

age, class and

race are once-
in-a-generation anomalies
whose time with us always
seems too short.

Michael Jackson, perhaps
the most beloved modern
entertainer aside from Elvis
Presley, in my opinion can best
be compared to 15th century
painter and scientist Leonar-
do da Vinci, considered the
most diversely talented person
who ever lived. Both were
innovators, inventors and
artists who not only inspired
and enthralled their contem-
poraries, but who have
become an inspiration to those
who follow.

Like Thomas Edison who
seemed to emulate Da Vinci’s
catalogue of inventions with
his own lengthy list of accom-
plishments, most notably the
electric light bulb, there are a
litany of dancers, singers and
musicians in Jackson’s wake
who have drawn from his jaw-
dropping signature style to
capture their own success.

Jackson burst onto the music
scene as a child prodigy,
fronting the family band the
Jackson Five at age 11, but



spent the earlier years of his
life being shaped by a Sven-
gali-like father hell-bent on
seeing his children capture the
musical success that he could
not.

Born August 28, 1959 to
humble beginnings in Gary,
Indiana, Jackson spent his lost
childhood performing in sleazy
bars and honing his talent until
the band scored a record deal
with Motown Records in 1968.

He launched a solo career
during his years with the Jack-
son Five, scoring such hits as
“Got to Be There” and “Ben”
during the 1970s.

He later paired with notable
producer Quincy Jones for the

Jackson won
VBC
awards

American Music Awards: 22
Billboard Awards: 40

BRIT Awards: 7

Golden Globe Awards: 1
Grammy Awards: 19
Guinness World Records: 13
MTV Awards: 13

NAACP Image Awards: 14
RIAA Awards: 56

World Music Awards: 12

INSIGHT

Michael Jackson: a musical genius

hel
I iD
a: b,

East Bay Street, on June 17, 1996.

album “Off The Wall”,
released in 1979, which
spawned four top 10 hits on
the US music charts and later
sold more than 20 million
copies worldwide.

He reached the pinnacle of
his illustrious career with
1982’s “Thriller”, to date the
most successful album of
all time with upwards of
109 million units sold world-
wide.

The title video of the album
was groundbreaking and
paved the way for black stars
to be showcased on video sta-
tion MTV. Jackson moon-
walked into the hearts of many
during a televised performance

of “Billie Jean” at the Motown
Records 25th anniversary spe-
cial a year later.

On Friday night his brother
Jermaine told Larry King on
the Larry King Live show that
Michael was “unique from day
one.” He had never taken a
dancing or vocal lesson. “It

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PAGE 4C, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



detainees were subjected to horrific abuse

Officer:

FROM page 1C

someone inside there, and get
some info. These animals are not
supposed to be in service.

One time, (another
detainee) couldn’t take it no
more because his girlfriend
was in there. So he jumped
the fence and ended up in the
female barracks. A man is just
aman and he couldn’t take it
anymore. I don’t understand
why, if one of them has a girl-
friend or a wife in there, why
when we have visiting hours,
they can’t be together, like in
any sensible country, right?
But they don't do that. It's not
run professionally. Not even
five per cent of it is profes-
sionally. Anyway, when they
caught him they dragged him
out, they beat him so badly,
he couldn’t walk he couldn’t
wear slippers. All night, all
night they beat him. Just for
seeing his girlfriend, and she
was his; he wasn’t going to
rape no one.



| alee Pe
vee
=

Another was (third
detainee). He is a Bahamian
of Haitian descent. His pass-
port was getting renewed
when they picked him up.
And they beat this man, he
was bleeding all over his face.
He could come in and tell you
that, if you could find him.
They beat this man and this
man was a Bahamian citizen.
And he speaks clear English,
just like us. The man is a con-
tractor, he has people who
work for him, it's not like he's
a man off the street or any-
thing.

I: Are most of the offend-
ers young soldiers?

O: No, some of them are
the oldest officers out there.
Like (second officer, name
withheld) — this Haitian girl,
pregnant, she wasn't walking
fast enough for him. He
punched this woman in the
face, dropped her to the
ground.

Even senior people. (Third

At DLt eels

Ministry Of Public
Works & Transport

NORTH ACKLINS ROAD
REHABILITATION







Tender Publication No.: FIR/207/15/1 (GOB)
EUROPEAID/128742/M/WKS/BS (EU)

The Government of The Bahamas intends to award a works
contract for the rehabilitation of the Queen’s Highway on Acklins.
The works contract consists in the rehabilitation and provision
of periodic maintenance (pavement patching and sealing) for
about 32.3 miles (approx. 52 km) of a two-lane single carriageway
road (Queen’s Highway. About 290,000 square yards of the road
pavement will require patching and sealing maintenance, and
about 100,000 square yards of the road pavement will require the
replacement of the base course layer and the placement of a new

surface seal.

The works are co-financed by the Government of The Bahamas
and the 9th European Development Fund.

The Tender dossier is available for inspection and purchase at

the following address:

Department of Public Works
of the Ministry of Works and Transport,
John F. Kennedy Drive,

1st Floor, East Wing

Nassau, (N.P.), The Bahamas

Tel.: +242-322-4830
Fax: +242-326-7344

Sealed Tender Submissions are to be deposited in the Tender Box

located at:

Tenders Board

Ministry of Finance

3rd Floor

Sir Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre

West Bay Street

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tender submissions will be received no later than 4:00pm, Monday,
24th August, 2009. Any tender received after this deadline will

not be considered.

Tenders are invited to attend the Tender opening at 10am Tuesday,
25th August, 2009 at the Tenders Board.

Possible additional information or clarifications/questions shall

be published on

the

EuropeAid website:

http://ec.ouropa.eu/europeaid/work/funding/index_en.htm
(Select Contracts link) and will be communicated in writing to

all tenderers.

Signed,
PERMANENT SECRETARY

DETAINEES can be seen at the Immigration Detention Centre on Carmichael Road.

officer, name withheld), he
will beat those people to a
pulp. Kick them.

I: Do you think these offi-
cers are just allowed to get
away with the beatings, or has

it become policy to...

O: (Interrupting) That is
not policy. There is a mandate
there; it is against policy to
lay one hand on those people.

I: But the senior officers,

Temple Christian High School
Shirley Street
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Applications must be picked up at the High School Office on
Shirley Street and be returned with a full curriculum vitae,
recent coloured photograph and three references to:

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is July 3rd, 2009

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do they want it to happen?

O: Do they want it to hap-
pen? Some of them are there
helping! But not the bosses,
because they are hardly ever
there, they don't do their job.
People are not doing what
they are being paid for. That's
the major problem. Another
thing is that we have strayed
away from discipline. There
is no way that children should
be hungry. There is no way
that Social Services should
cook food, and it's not served
until it’s cold, because officers
are sitting down gossiping, or
on the phone or something.
And these people are hungry.
It brings tears to my eyes, I'm
telling you it’s sickening. At
the end I was sick and tired
of the job.

You know something? The
only way we can end this — I
don't know if it's legal or not,
but they need to put a spy cam
in there or something. Expose
them for what they are. And
print it, and print it, until
something changes.

I: We intend to.

I: There has also been an
allegation that a man was
beaten to death not too long
ago at the centre. We heard
the incident was witnessed by
everybody, and that they kept
beating the body long after
the man was dead.

O: Yes, he was a Haitian
guy. They just kept beating
him with the long batons.
They did it in front everyone.

I: But if he was killed, what
happened to the body? If they
disposed of it, surely the
senior officers must know.
What about top Defence
Force and Immigration offi-
cials?

O: I don't think it goes to
the top. But it was swept
under the rug. Nothing came
out of it.

I: Is that the only time
someone has been killed as
far as you know?

O: Yes, as far as I know.

I: After it happened, were
the officers scared?

O: I guess not. Nothing
changed. That got swept
under the rug. When they
write their reports that's just a
death. The coroner doesn't
investigate.

I: Do the officers drink
when they beat detainees?

O: Some of them don't.
They are just naturally stink.
At least a man who is drink-
ing, he can say he was under
the influence. But they are
just cruel.

You know what else I hat-
ed? We had some very sick
people down there. People
crying. But they are told they
have to wait. They won't call
an ambulance for them. I'm
talking girls in the female
dorms, crying tears and tears.
You know what they tell
them? "Shut up.”

They don't check for the
people down there. Immigra-
tion is lousy. The Defence
Force, some are monsters.

They have an officer down
there named (fourth officer,
name withheld). He beats
them like conch. Sorry to say
it like that, but he beats them
bad. I can remember a couple
of years ago, when people
used to come visit and stand
along the gate, (fourth offi-
cer) came and slapped a Hait-
ian who was visiting. He
popped the chain off his neck
— he didn't take the chain but
he slapped him so hard his
chain popped. There was a big
row inside there. You ran the
pictures.



I: We have also heard sto-
ries about sexual abuse, rapes
by officers at the centre. Do
you know anything about
that?

O: I have watched it plenty
of times. What happens is,
officers come with the key,
“Oh we need to do some
paperwork.” They log in. And
you see them disappear with a
female detainee. To take a girl
out, you have to sign for it.

And they take them out,
and you see them disappear.
They don't take them off the
complex. And hours later,
they come back, all sweaty,
their hair all shaggy. I hear
some of them were paid, or
made deals for food or money
or whatever, because they are
hungry. But the majority of
them were raped. Raped. That
is no big secret in there.

I: What do you think
should be done?

O: There is help needed for
the detention centre. Other-
wise... Tourism is our main
industry. We lose that, we lose
everything. We don't need no
big spy eye coming down from
the United States. We don't
need that. Why wait till that
happens, when we could avoid
it?

I: But it’s not that simple.
As far as we can tell, politi-
cians think that to go down
there, and ask: “Did you beat
anybody? No? All right” is
enough. Investigation done.

O: Thank you very much.
That is it. They walk in, next
thing you know they are all
laughing and talking together
and then they walk out. They
never, hardly ever, come in
the back. Because it stinks. If
they want to talk to a
detainee, they bring him to
the front. They should come
in the back and walk around.

And the bosses? Any time
there is an investigation, it’s
like: Is anything going on?
“No no, what ya'll talking
about? No man, that's only
foolishness, only rumours.”

You know what they say:
Everyone in jail says they are
innocent.

What you (The Tribune)
should do is show up, with the
minister and my prime minis-
ter, Mr Ingraham. Break with
protocol. Don't publicise it,
publicise it after. Hit them
with aggression, and go down
there and see what is going
on.

My prime minister,
Hubiggety, he don't play. The
PLP was a sweep under the
carpet government. But my
boss, my prime minister, Mr
Ingraham, Hubert Alexander,
and Mr Symonette, if they
know the facts, they will make
sure someone goes down.

Another thing is, you know
what the song says: “Who you
workin’ for? The government
dem. When you going to
work? When I ready.” Let
Social Services do what it is
supposed to do — direct the
job from the office. Let's hire
a private company to go in
there and make sure those
nice people eat properly, that
those kids are healthy.

And they have no proper
medical screening down there.
There has been tuberculosis
and other diseases. Think
about it — you have Immigra-
tion officers down there,
Defence Force officers. If they
get sick and go home, the
whole of Nassau can end up
with the same outbreak.

We are gonna lose our
country. Y'all have to do
something.
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009, PAGE 5C



Michael Jackson:
a musical genius

FROM page 3C

was natural, man” said Jer-
maine.

In the 1990s Jackson
dominated the music indus-
try and spawned a cult-like
fan following and two
albums of new material, but
with the unparalleled suc-
cess came intense scrutiny,
a series of botched plastic
surgeries, bizarre antics,
the allegations of child
molestation and an eventu-
al fall from grace that
placed the King of Pop on
the receiving end of
ridicule.

His 2001 offering of
“Invincible” was met with
dismal sales and a luke-
warm reception.

In 2005, he was tried and
acquitted of charges of
child molestation, conspir-
acy and alcohol charges
which could have landed
him in prison for nearly 20
years. The trial — and the
eccentric lifestyle it
exposed — tarnished Jack-
son’s image and took a
heavy toll on him emotion-
ally, physically and finan-
cially.

The father of three who
once made fans faint at first
sight spent the last years of
his life as a recluse, shroud-
ed in isolation. He was left
a Shell of his former self,
but many supporters held
out hope that he would
catch hold of an elusive
comeback.

But it seems the sudden
death of the larger-than-life
icon has given the mysteri-
ous star what he craved —
and some would say
deserved as the most influ-
ential artist of our time — a
resurgence of adulation
bordering on deity-like
worship. The man who pio-
neered the music video
over 20 years ago is now
once again on heavy rota-
tion on major music video
stations like MTV and VH1
— who broke away from
their normal programming
to pay homage to the leg-
end.

His death was felt the
world over; social network-
ing sites were buzzing with

the news of his death, and
countless celebrities
mourned the loss.

"We have lost a genius
and a true ambassador of
not only Pop music but of
all music," Justin Timber-
lake, whose music shows a
direct influence from Jack-
son, posted on his personal
Web site. "He has been an
inspiration to multiple gen-
erations, and I will always
cherish the moments I
shared with him on stage
and all of the things I
learned about music from
him and the time we spent
together. My heart goes out
to his family and loved
ones."

"I can't stop crying over
the sad news. I have always
admired Michael Jackson.
The world has lost one of
the greats, but his music
will live on forever! My
heart goes out to his three
children and other mem-
bers of his family,” said a
statement released by
Madonna.

His ex-wife Lisa Marie
Presley, who was married
to Jackson from 1994 to
1996, said, "I am so very
sad and confused with
every emotion possible. I
am heartbroken for his

INSIGHT

children, who I know were
everything to him, and for
his family. This is such a
massive loss on so many
levels, words fail me."

His death came weeks
before a highly anticipated
tour throughout London,
billed as the comeback that
would thrust the reclusive
singer back to the forefront
of popular music. But at
age 50, and 12 years since
his last tour, sceptics won-
dered if Jackson would be
able to recapture the pre-
cise dance moves that mes-
merised the world during
his heyday 20 years ago.
Now the world will never
know if Jackson would
have reclaimed his rele-
vance in today’s ever shift-
ing music scene. But his
fans have his flawless body
of work to turn to and
remember why Jackson is
indeed, the King of Pop.

A controversial figure,
Jackson will be remem-
bered as a paradox, a "man
boy” in the words of
estranged friend and for-
mer Beatle, Sir Paul
McCartney, a recluse, musi-
cal genius, philanthropist
and perhaps the most inspi-
rational figure in modern
music history.

| J [ “ LS A 7)
Lee as
-

@)) THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

Sidney Poitier International Conference

and Film Festival

Nassau, The Bahamas, February 23-27, 2010

CALL FOR PAPERS

Deadline for Submissions: July 31, 2009

The College of the Bahamas presents the Sidney Poitier International Conference and Film
Festival. We invite critics, historians, filmmakers, artists and cultural practitioners from around
the world to examine the artistic and social endeavours of acclaimed actor, director, author, and

diplomat Sir Sidney Poitier, who turns 83 on February 20, 2010.

We invite papers or panel presentations that explore the broad spectrum of critical issues sum-
moned up by Poitier’s work as actor, director, and author. Presentations should be 20 minutes
in length. Papers will be considered for publication in an upcoming scholarly text dedicated

to Poitier’s work.

Possible Panel and Paper Topics Include (but are not limited to):
Caribbean Sense and Sensibilities in American Cinema
Constructions of Blackness in Poitier’s Films
Representations of Women in Poitier’s Films

The Iconic Black Male in America

Black Skin, White Masks

Poitier and the White/Black Gaze
Poitier and the Global Politics of Race and Liberation
Poitier, Bahamian Politics and Identity

Sexing the Asexual

Black Christs and the White Conscience
Desire, Sexuality and Transgression

Poitier and Censorship
Poitier in the Classroom
The Actor as Activist
Poitier and Film Theory

Poitier and the Black Power Movement

Poitier and the Digital Age

Autobiography and Refashioning

Poitier as Director
Poitier as Writer

Please send abstracts via email to: istrachan @ cob.edu.bs.
Abstracts should be submitted by July 31, 2009, and should be no longer than 250 words.

For more information on the conference please go to:http://poitierconference.synthasite.com/.

For any questions feel free to contact Ian Strachan at istrachan@cob.edu.bs, or Marjorie
Brooks-Jones at mjones @cob.edu.bs or call the School of English Studies at (242) 302-4381.





































































ORD ie) Bales
THE RIGHT TO BE

Ai Ce) em lm
Stop the Tears
Stop the ABUSE

National Child Protection Council
ree eeeL Re i t |
- > ee

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THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST

i

TAMPA
High: 91° F/33° C
Low: 78° F/26° C
@ i

a

J
Fi
é

a
r

&

KEY WEST
High: 87° F/31°C
Low: 79° F/26° C

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's

ORLANDO |
_ High:92° F/33°C a:
Low: 75°F/24°C
@

cw,

highs and tonights's lows.

FT. LAUDERDALE



“i

ABACO
High: 91° F/33°C

— Low: 82° F/28°C
e”,

@ WEST PALM BEACH
High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 73° F/23°C

FREEPORT
High: 90° F/32°C

High: 88°F/31°C
Low: 80° F/27°C

Low: 74° F/23°C

@
MIAMI
” High: 90° F/32°C

Low: 77° F/25° C NASSAU

cm a
ANDROS %

High: 95° F/35° C
Low: 82° F/28° C



High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 79° F/26° C

e~

e~

=a Partly sunny with a Partly cloudy, a Partly sunny, a Partly sunny, a Mostly sunny.
” thunderstorm. t-storm; breezy. t-storm; breezy. t-storm possible.
ist | High: 91° High: 91° High: 90°
F High: 91° Low: 79° Low: 79° Low: 79° Low: 79°
r PETE
f 98°-88° F 98°-89° F 98°-86° F

=

Partly sunny, a
t-storm possible.





The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
Temperature

Normal high ....

Normal low
Last year's high
Last year's low

Today

High Low W High

F/C F/C F/C
Albuquerque 90/32 67/19 c 91/32
Anchorage 70/21 5442 pe 71/21
Atlanta 92/33 66/18 pe 90/82
Atlantic City 86/30 63/17 pc 82/27
Baltimore 86/30 64/117 pce 82/27
Boston 72/22 6146 sh 75/23
Buffalo 73/22 59/115 t 65/18
Charleston, SC 95/35 74/23 t 93/33
Chicago 80/26 60/15 t 71/21
Cleveland 77/25 60/15 t 67/19
Dallas 95/35 68/20 t 95/35
Denver 92/33 58/14 t 93/33
Detroit 76/24 55/12 t 69/20
Honolulu 88/31 73/22 pce 87/30
Houston 97/36 77/25 t 97/36

Tuesday

Low

F/C
66/18
55/12
65/18
62/16
64/17
63/17
56/13
70/21
57/13
56/13
70/21
60/15
55/12
73/22
74/23

Ww

— Of +t O° Cc ee Cte st eo

oO

3

oO

Today Tuesday Today
High Low W High Low W High Low W

F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C
Indianapolis 82/27 59/15 t 76/24 57/13 pe Philadelphia 83/28 68/20 p
Jacksonville 94/34 74/23 t 91/382 71/21 t Phoenix 106/41 35/29 t
Kansas City 89/31 65/18 s 89/31 66/18 s Pittsburgh 77/25 59/15 t
Las Vegas 106/41 80/26 s 105/40 83/28 pc Portland, OR 78/25 54/12 $s
Little Rock 92/33 66/18 s 97/36 68/20 s Raleigh-Durham 93/33 65/18 s
Los Angeles 82/27 66/18 pc 81/27 64/17 pc St. Louis 88/31 66/18 s
Louisville 87/30 65/18 $s 82/27 62/16 pc Salt Lake City 93/83 65/18 s
Memphis 91/32 69/20 s 93/33 69/20 s San Antonio 99/37 74/23 pc
Miami 90/32 77/25 t 88/31 77/25 t San Diego 75/23 66/18 pc
Minneapolis 77/25 59/15 pe 79/26 60/15 pc San Francisco 76/24 55/12 pc
Nashville 87/30 63/17 $s 88/31 64/17 $s Seattle 73/22 52/11 s
New Orleans 94/34 76/24 t 94/34 75/23 t Tallahassee 96/35 74/23 t
New York 84/28 67/119 c 81/27 69/20 t Tampa 91/32 78/25 t
Oklahoma City 92/33 66/18 pc 93/83 68/20 s Tucson 96/35 76/24 t
Orlando 92/33 75/23 t 89/31 74/23 t Washington, DC 87/30 67/19 s

High
F/C
82/27
106/41
67/19
78/25
93/33
84/28
96/35
93/33
76/24
74/23
73/22
95/35
838/31
101/38
84/28

Precipitation Suntise...... 6:23 a.m. Moonrise .... 1:29 p.m.
As of 2 p.m. yesterday .....cccccscssssssscsssssseeeen 0.00" Sunset....... 8:04 p.m. Moonset .... 12:36 a.m.
Year to date 7. i
Normal year to date 0... cccceccceseeceneee 17.95" First Full /_ New
AccuWeather.com ae mi eh
Forecasts and graphics provided by . a: ay
ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jun. 29 Jul. 7 Jul. 15 Jul. 21
High: 94° F/34° C
Low: 80° F/27°C
cA
al J: CATISLAND
High: 88° F/31°C
Low: 75° F/24°C
ort
all
GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR
High: 90° F/32°C High: 91° F/33° C
Low:77° F/25° C Low: 76° F/24° c
cA &
, (ail )
ee HX
LONGISLAND
High: 91°F/33°C
Low: 76° F/24° C ‘
Tuesday a MAYAGUANA
low W ie , High: 91° F/33° C
F/C ey Low: 75° F/24°C
66/18 t
De CROOKED ISLAND /ACKLINS
si2 t = RAGGEDISLAND [or sreronec
53/1 s High: 90° F/32° C OW:
65/18 s tp 73° F/23°C
64/17 s ow: oe
ae GREAT INAGUA
66/18 pe High: 91° F/33°C
55/12 pc Low: 77° F/25° C
51/10 s
68/20 t = *
78/25 t
78/25 t “YT
65/18 pc



Aiea, 86° F/30° C

81° F/27° C
87° F/31° C
74° F/24° C

ress 91° F/33° C
diets 79° F/26° C



AY rn NY

o|1|2

LOW



The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the

3|4[5

MODERATE



[alah

HIGH |



\. HIGH

greater the need for eye and skin protection.

ea Posy

Low _Ht. (ft

Thursday 4°
ursday 54







High: 90°
Low: 80°
AccuWeather RealFeel
98°-85° F High

Tod 1:46 a.m.
= 2:24 p.m.
Tuesd 2:44 a.m.
Uae 3:23 p.m.
Wednesday? >> a

39 a.m.
5 p.m.

Ht. (ft.

25
28

24
28

2.2
2.8

2.2
28

7:53 a.m.
8:40 p.m.

8:46 a.m.
9:41 p.m.

9:39 a.m.

10:41 p.m.

10:33 a.m.
11:36 p.m.

0.0
0.2

0.1
0.3

0.1
0.3

0.2
0.3





|

ith An is

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
88/31
78/25
79/26
85/29
57/13
93/33
86/30
80/26
95/35
86/30
81/27
82/27
82/27
64/17
80/26
86/30
55/12
100/37
93/33
69/20
91/32
82/27
84/28
75/23
68/20
84/28
82/27
62/16
87/30
72/22
838/31
117/47
88/31
83/28
58/14
838/31
71/21
82/27
90/32
91/32
74/23
102/38
72/22
75/23
77/25
80/26
106/41
83/28
89/31
82/27
78/25
111/43
82/27
838/31
62/16
83/28
54/12
86/30
74/23
86/30
75/23
68/20
95/35
77/25
74/23
91/32
67/19
79/26
87/30
66/18

ii

Today

Low
F/C
75/23
59/15
55/12
70/21
43/8
79/26
77/25
69/20
70/21
73/22
67/19
67/19
73/22
46/7
61/16
68/20
47/8
75/23
81/27
43/8
73/22
71/21
63/17
65/18
52/11
70/21
59/15
53/11
5/28
55/12
81/27
85/29
72/22
61/16
33/0
79/26
ale
64/17
61/16
79/26
56/13
76/24
63/17
52/11
60/15
56/13
88/31
60/15
65/18
61/16
69/20
88/31
66/18
78/25







=

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|) hac Gee See tec fe

oO

oO

nnD
i —

wn
—

31/0 s

73/22

37/2
73/22
59/15
68/20
59/15
52/11
80/26
70/21
61/16
66/18
52/11
69/20
65/18
52/11

oO Bao men ga Beet
oO on oO

ae fn me

Ss

High
F/C
89/31
76/24
82/27
86/30
55/12
91/32
86/30
81/27
95/35
80/26
87/30
81/27
82/27
65/18
81/27
92/33
59/15
105/40
95/35
66/18
89/31
81/27
81/27
78/25
68/20
84/28
83/28
60/15
89/31
68/20
90/32
114/45
90/32
88/31
56/13
88/31
69/20
82/27
97/36
90/32
73/22
105/40
73/22
73/22
81/27
76/24
102/38
77/25
88/31
84/28
84/28
104/40
84/28
88/31
62/16
82/27
48/8
85/29
74/23
86/30
72/22
70/21
93/33
81/27
67/19
88/31
69/20
82/27
88/31
69/20

Tuesday

Low
F/C
77/25
60/15
57/13
70/21
46/7
79/26
78/25
69/20
72/22
75/23
69/20
68/20
70/21
45/7
63/17
69/20
44/6
74/23
81/27
46/7
M5123
71/21
66/18
64/17
54/12
67/19
58/14
54/12
5/28
52/11
81/27
82/27
71/21
63/17
38/3
78/25
58/14
63/17
68/20
77/25
56/13
75/23
63/17
50/10
60/15
54/12
82/27
58/14
64/17
63/17
71/21
80/26
68/20
79/26
33/0
73/22
39/3
74/23
57/13
64/17
54/12
54/12
79/26
72/22
60/15
64/17
53/11
69/20
66/18
52/11

=

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=

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Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace

MONDAY, JUNE 29th, 2009, PAGE 7C



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WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SW at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-15 Miles 82° F
Tuesday: SW at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-15 Miles 82° F
FREEPORT Today: SW at 10-15 Knots 2-3 Feet 5-15 Miles 81°F
Tuesday: SW at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
ABACO Today: SW at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
Tuesday: SW at 7-14 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F



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91/59,

Denver
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Oo

(H)

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W8o/65
osyAngeles!

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Showers
T-storms







Rain Fronts
[x4 Elumies Shown are noon positions of weather systems and =

PKK] Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm iit
[v=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Mengumfi-
10s Os [/0s/ 10s 20s [305i] 40s (50s Gos 70s (80s [S0s//i00SI iis]



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PAGE 8C, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



Father doubts concert
stress sickened Jackson

mg By NEKESA MUMBI MOODY
AP Music Writer

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The father
of Michael Jackson says he does not
believe stress over the intense series
of concerts the King of Pop planned for
his comeback led to his death.

Joe Jackson also said in an interview
airing Sunday that he believes his son
will be larger in death than he was in
life. The patriarch of the Jackson 5 said
he wished Michael Jackson were
around to see the outpouring of affec-
tion since his death.

“Michael was the biggest superstar in
the world and in history,” Joe Jackson
told Fox News Channel’s “Geraldo at
Large.” “He was loved by everybody,
whether poor or wealthy or whatever
may be.”

Michael Jackson was to begin a
strenuous series of 50 concerts in Lon-
don in July.

Three days after the pop icon died,
celebrities descended on Los Angeles
for what promised to be a spectacular
celebration of Jackson’s life at the
annual BET awards show.

Media requests for the Sunday night
show doubled following the death, and
the red carpet was lengthened. It was
not immediately clear whether any
members of the Jackson family, who



JOE JACKSON (far right), father of the late pop star Michael Jackson, speaks with Rev
Jesse Jackson (far left) and his son Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr outside the Jackson family home
in the Encino neighbourhood of Los Angeles on Friday...

gathered at their Encino compound
over the weekend, planned to take
part.

Previously announced performers
including Beyonce and Ne-Yo, were
working to overhaul performances they
had planned for weeks so they could
honor Jackson. Other stars who had

(AP Photo: Jason Redmond)

not planned to attend, including Usher
and Justin Timberlake, tried to catch
last-minute flights, producers said.

On Saturday, the cardiologist who
was with Jackson during his final
moments sat down with investigators
for three hours. His spokeswoman said
he is not a suspect in the death.

Dr. Conrad Murray “helped identify
the circumstances around the death of
the pop icon and clarified some incon-
sistencies,” spokeswoman Miranda
Sevcik said. She said the doctor
remains “a witness to this tragedy.”

Police confirmed they had inter-
viewed Murray and said he was coop-
erative.

Meanwhile, Jackson’s mother select-
ed a lawyer who represented Jackson
last year in a breach-of-contract suit
and has advised other high-profile
clients to help the family, said a person
who requested anonymity because the
matter is private.

The legal move came as the Rev.
Jesse Jackson revealed that Michael
Jackson’s family wants a second, pri-
vate autopsy of the pop superstar
because of unanswered questions
about how he died.

“It’s abnormal,” Jesse Jackson said
from Chicago a day after visiting the
Jackson family. “We don’t know what
happened. Was he injected and with
what? All reasonable doubt should be
addressed.”

People close to Jackson have said
since his death that they were con-
cerned about his use of painkillers. Los
Angeles County medical examiners
completed their autopsy Friday and
said Jackson had taken prescription

medication.

Medical officials also said there was
no indication of trauma or foul play.
An official cause of death could take
weeks to determine.

There was no word from the Jackson
family on funeral plans. Many of Jack-
son’s relatives have gathered at the
family’s Encino compound, caring
there for Jackson’s three children.

It remains unclear whom Jackson
designated as potential guardians for
his children. Those details, likely con-
tained in the 50-year-old singer’s will,
have not been released.

An attorney for Deborah Rowe, the
mother of Jackson’s two oldest chil-
dren, issued a statement Saturday ask-
ing that the Jackson family “be able
to say goodbye to their loved one in
peace.”

A White House adviser said on
NBC’s “Meet the Press” that Presi-
dent Barack Obama had written to the
Jackson family to express his condo-
lences.

¢ Associated Press writers Anthony
McCartney; Sophia Tareen in Chica-
go; Juan A. Lozano in Houston; and
Gillian Flaccus, Brooke Donald, Beth
Harris and Mike Blood and AP Glob-
al Media Services Production Manager
Nico Maounis in Los Angeles con-
tributed to this report