Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009

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SEE “THE ARTS’ SECTION

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Nurses union
consider govt
healthcare
proposal

Offer of treatment

lor teen rap

Stevie S gets one
year sentence

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Bahamian
entertainer Stevie S, also known
as Lemuel Smith, was sentenced
by the Supreme Court
Tuesday to one year in prison
for rape.

Justice Vera Watkins also
ordered that Smith to be placed
on three years probation after
his release from prison.

She noted that a person con-
victed of rape could be sen-
tenced to a maximum of seven
years. She urged Smith to use
the time in prison to think about
what he had done.

Smith, 47, pleaded guilty to
raping a 13-year-old minor at his
trial on April 30. Sentencing was
suspended twice — on May 30
and June 9 - after Smith was
unable to travel to Freeport for
the hearing.

At Tuesday’s sentence hear-
ing, lawyer Murrio Ducille told
the Court that Smith suffers
from a severe spinal cord injury
that has left him crippled and
barely able to walk.

He felt that a custodial sen-
tence should not be imposed as a
result of Smith’s medical condi-
tion, which would present chal-
lenges not only for his client, but

STEVIE S$ pictured yesterday.



also for the prison staff at Fox
Hill Prison.

Mr Ducille stated that a cus-
todial sentence would be detri-
mental and referred to the
report of Dr Clyde Munnings,
who noted that Smith suffers

SEE page eight

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elipé Major/Tribune staff

7

MINISTER OF LABOUR Dion Foulkes shakes hands with Bahama
Cleola Hamilton yesterday.

Girl testifies that Archdeacon
‘choked and slapped her’

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A TEENAGE girl testified in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday that Anglican Archdeacon Ivan Ran-
furly Brown choked and slapped her at a church
picnic on Nirvana Beach last October.

Archdeacon Brown, the rector of St Agnes
Church on Baillou Hill Road, is accused of physi-
cally assaulting the girl on October 13, 2008. He is
represented by lawyers Wayne Munroe and Antho-
ny McKinney.

The girl, who was 14 years old at the time of the

SEE page eight

ANOTHER SETBACK FOR DISABLED
FATHER AWAITING COMPENSATION

THE RAPE TRIAL OF MP’S SON RESUMES

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gs Nurses Union President

FNM faction ‘praying’ PM

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A FACTION of FNM support-
ers are "praying" that Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham commits
himself to another term as leader
of the party because they believe
there is no potential candidate
capable of leading the country.

According to two FNM stal-
warts, the present economic cri-
sis requires the talents of a confi-
dent, strong leader with the con-

will commit to another term

Hubert
Ingraham

viction to lead the nation out of its current finan-

cial stranglehold.

The supporters also noted that there are cur-
rently no would-be leaders who can connect with
the less fortunate voter base as successfully as
Mr Ingraham, a man who came from a humble

North Abaco upbringing.

And while there are several members within the
party who may be ready after a few years of
"grooming" none is presently ready to fill Mr
Ingraham's shoes, said the supporters.

"All the FNM's with whom I have spoken to

SEE page eight

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ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER





By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A PROPOSAL that
Government will this year
cover the full cost for nurses
to receive treatment for
work-related illnesses while
implementing full health
insurance coverage for them
in 2010 was to be consid-
ered by nurses last night.

The proposal was put for-
ward by Government dur-
ing a tense and drawn-out
meeting with the Bahamas
Nurses Union at the
Department of Labour yes-
terday afternoon.

Bahamas Nurses Union
President Cleola Hamilton
said she felt there is now
“hope” and expressed her
“appreciation” that the talks
were able to take place.

“Who knows, maybe (the
nurses) will agree (to the
proposal),” she said.

“We are still open to see
what the members have to
say.”

Speaking at a press con-
ference at the Department
of Labour, Minister of
Labour Dion Foulkes,
accompanied by Minister of
Health Dr Hubert Minnis,

SEE page eight

Newspaper is hit with
$1.5m defamation lawsuit

THE Nassau Guardian has
been slapped with a $1.5 mil-
lion lawsuit for defamation after
two of three persons accused in
a 2004 car theft ring recently
obtained a judgment against the
police for malicious prosecu-
tion.

The Guardian has denied
that statements in the article
were defamatory or that they
referred to the plaintiffs. The
newspaper also held that the
occasion of publication was one
of qualified privilege.

In their statements of claim,
the plaintiffs assert that the
Guardian’s article on the theft
ring on April 6, 2004 and April
8, 2004 were defamatory as
when it referred to them it
included their addresses in the
reports.

According to Atisha Tinker’s
writ of summons against the
newspaper, she was arrested

SEE page eight

CPL ea arx
REACT COLE

ACTION



PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

The Bahamas is ‘complying’ with

international human trafficking laws |

By LINDSAY THOMPSON
Bahamas Information Services

THE Bahamas continues to
meet its obligations in combatting
and eliminating human trafficking,
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs has
confirmed.

The ministry was responding to
the Trafficking in Persons Report
2009 on the Bahamas issued by the
United States’ State Department
last week.

It re-classified the Bahamas
from the Special Cases status to a
Tier 2 country of non-compliance
with international laws regarding
human trafficking.

“The Bahamas advises that it
will continue its efforts in compli-
ance with its obligations under the
Palermo Convention and the Pro-
tocol to Prevent, Suppress and Pun-
ish Trafficking in Persons, Espe-
cially Women and Children, and in
compliance with its national law,”
the ministry said in a statement
issued yesterday.

The Bahamas government has
reviewed the US State Depart-
ment’s Trafficking in Persons
Report 2009 and its recommenda-
tions to facilitate the country’s full
compliance with the minimum stan-
dards for the elimination of traf-
ficking in the context of the United
States’ Trafficking Victims Protec-
tion Act 2000.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs
noted that a Tier 2 country is one
that has been determined not to
have made “increasing efforts” to
combat human trafficking over the
past year, and to be making signif-
icant efforts based on commitments
of anti-trafficking reforms over the
next year, or to have a very signifi-
cant number of trafficking victims
or a significantly increasing victim
population.”

The Palermo Convention and
its three Protocols have been rati-
fied by the United States and the
Bahamas. On behalf of the
Bahamas, the requisite instrument
of ratification was deposited with
the Secretary-General on October
26, 2008, the ministry explained.

"In response to the findings and
recommendations in the report, the
Bahamas notes that the report fails
to acknowledge that the legislation
has been enacted in compliance
with the country’s obligations under
the Palermo Convention and its
Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and
Punish Trafficking in Persons,
Especially Women and Children,
and that the provisions of that leg-
islation are entirely informed by
the provisions found under those
international instruments,” stated
the ministry.

"The Bahamas reminds that the ;
Trafficking in Persons legislation |
was enacted in December, 2008,
and consequently, there could bed
no prosecution of human trafficking

offender within The Bahamas as :
required under the Palermo Con- }
vention and the Protocol for an }
appreciable length of time during }

the reporting period."

The ministry also queried any :
finding that the Bahamas “is a des- }
tination country for men and :
women trafficked from Haiti and }
other Caribbean countries primar- }
ily for the purposes of forced }
labour, and women from Jamaica :
and other countries trafficked for }
the purpose of commercial and sex-
ual exploitation, specifically in the i
context of its significant illegal :
migration problem in the first
instance, and particularly as such a }
conclusion suggests that there isa }

positive evidence of such activity.”

With respect to the legal and }
illegal migrant or temporary work- }
er, the ministry noted that the alle- }
gation is made that there may in }
fact be instances of forced labour }
occurring within the Bahamas with }

respect to such persons.

The US State Department’s }
report cites in support of this con-
clusion claims of employers’ coer- }
cion of such persons “to work }
longer hours, at lower pay and in :
conditions not permitted under }
local labour law by changing the i
terms of contracts, withholding ;
travel documents, refusing trans- :
portation back home, threatening
to withdraw the employer-specific
and employer-held permits, or to }
turn the employee over to Immi- }

gration.”

“While the occurrence of any }
such incident is condemned," said }
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, :
"the Bahamas maintains that inci- }
dences of employer coercion cannot }
by itself ground the offence of traf- i
ficking in persons or be evidence }

that persons are being trafficked.

“Consequently, the Bahamas }
rejects any attempt to define or }
classify as trafficking in persons :
conduct which, though reprehen- }
sible, does not fit within the criteria i

set by Article 3 of the Protocol.

“Consequently, within the con-
text of the provisions of the }
Bahamian legislation, which is }
acknowledged in the report as }
affording immunity to and protec- ;
tion of victims of trafficking, there }
must be recognition of the fact that }
even if victims of trafficking are }
identified, the issue is always :
whether they will be prepared to
provide the evidence necessary to }
sustain a prosecution,” the ministry }

said.

Another setback for disabled
father awaiting compensation

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

A DISABLED father of four is
still awaiting compensation
awarded by the Supreme Court
two years ago as his case has suf-
fered yet another setback.

Wayne Anthony John, 45, of
Canaan Lane, off Shirley Street, is
living in poverty as he has been
unable to work since he suffered
severe injuries in a fall from a
flatbed tractor trailer on the Feb-
ruary Point jobsite in Exuma six
years ago.

He took supreme court action
against February Point Resorts
Ltd and Justice Anita Allen ruled
in his favour as she found that
the company “failed to attain the
standard of care required of a rea-
sonable prudent employer” and
was therefore guilty of negligence
in July 2007.

Justice Allen made the firm
liable for costs and left damages
to be assessed by the registrar,
but it was not until 17 months lat-
er that the registrar ordered Feb-
ruary Point to pay Mr John
$310,504.

Mr John is still
awaiting compensation
as February Point has
now filed a notice of
appeal contesting the
amount.

February Point
maintains the supreme
court registrar based
his findings on inad-
missible evidence
when he ordered the
company to pay
$149,320 for Mr John’s
future loss of earnings, |.
and another $20,592 [us
because he has been
unable to obtain and
sustain employment as a result of
the injury.

The record was settled before
the Appeal Court registrar on
June 16 and February Point has
four to six weeks to pay a bond
before a date for the hearing will
be set.

Meanwhile Mr John continues
to suffer great distress because of
his condition and is struggling to
care for his family.

He said he has been unable to
work in his job as a construction
tradesman since the accident

Wayne Anthony John



because he can’t lift
heavy loads.

The disability bene-
fit he receives and
small contributions
from his employed 17-
year-old son and 22-
year-old stepson fail to
cover the cost of his
family’s basic needs,
and Mr John has been
forced to borrow from
friends an acquain-
tances.

As his case has
dragged on, Mr John’s
debts have mounted to
over $25,000, and he
claims to have been threatened
by some of his money-lenders.

“T’ve been threatened and ’'m
in danger,” he said.

“T can’t sleep at night.”

He added: “We have no cable,
no phone, no gas, no water, no
groceries, and I’m at the point
where I’m ready to call Social
Services and give up.

“The main problem is my 14-
year-old son who suffers seizures.
He needs pills and if I don’t have
them, he has problems.

“But we have nothing right

now. I have nothing to give him.”

Mr John is also the sole carer
for his daughters Cynthia, 9, and
Diana, 13 months, as his wife
Joyetta died just months after his
stepson Clifton Smith, 23, was
killed in a cruise boat tragedy
three years ago.

His case dates back to Novem-
ber 2003 when he was working
on the February Point resort job-
site in Exuma and received foot,
hip and wrist injuries when he fell
off a flatbed tractor trailer.

In his court action, Mr John
alleged negligence against his
employers, saying they failed to
provide proper equipment and/or
manpower for the unloading task
he was required to do.

The company filed a defence,
claiming Mr John’s injuries were
caused or contributed to by his
own negligence in failing to
ensure his feet were properly
placed while maneuvering around
the trailer, and neglecting to wear
proper protective footwear.

However, the judge accepted
Mr John’s version of events, that
no steel-toe boots were provided
and that he was given no instruc-
tions to wear such boots.

FIREFIGHTERS BRANCH OUT FOR FOREST FIRE TRAINING



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

FIREFIGHTERS take part in a one-day forest fire training session yesterday. An environmental group from Florida, Nature’s Conservancy,
yesterday hosted the session at East Street Police Headquarters, in partnership with the Bahamas National Trust and NEMA (National Emergency

Management Agency).





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Swine flu
victim fully
recovered,
says Minnis

HUBERT MINNIS



By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

The Bahamian resident who
became the country’s second
case of influenza A (H1N1)
has completely recovered, and
all others who came in contact
with that person are also fine,
according to Minister of
Health Hubert Minnis.

The young adult, who was
never identified, was said yes-
terday to now be “completely
well.”

With the seven day incuba-
tion period for swine flu now
also passed without any of
those who the individual came
in contact with showing symp-
toms, Dr Minnis said the
Bahamas can safely say it has
“gotten over that particular
case.”

The young adult was the
second case of Influenza A
(H1N1) confirmed in the
Bahamas on June 17.

The individual had returned
a six-day trip to New York on
June 3, 2009.

Tests

Having experienced symp-
toms upon their return to the
Bahamas, the individual
sought medical attention and
underwent tests for swine flu.

Before and after receiving
results, the person was volun-
tarily quarantined to mitigate
against the spread of the virus.

The Surveillance Unit of the
Department of Public Health
made efforts to contact and
monitor persons who had
come into close contact with
the individual. The first case
of the H1N1 virus reported in
the Bahamas was detected in
an adult visitor from New
York in May. Having experi-
enced symptoms, the visitor
stayed in the country for only
a day, undergoing tests, before
returning to the US.

AF Ta UI

IN an article published in
the June 19 edition of The
Tribune under the headline
“First phase of Hilton
makeover almost com-
plete”, it was reported that

the extensive renovations
cost $70 million.

However, The Tribune
would like to clarify that
the renovations —
upgrades to the hotel's 288
rooms and meeting spaces,
the construction of a new
bar and a facelift to the
property's restaurant —
cost $17 million and not $70
million.



Umbrellas
Loungers
Drinks Trolleys

Record May rainfall

13.66 inches of rain recorded
— more than triple the average

en

UNDER WATER: A common sight during May.

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

RAINFALL in May was at
the highest level since records
began almost 80 years ago.

A total of 13.66 inches of rain
were recorded at the Lynden
Pindling International Airport
Meteorological Department last
month, which is more than
triple the average of 4.17 inches
of rainfall recorded for the
month of May since the 1930s.

The previous record was
12.71 inches of rain in May
1958.

And storms continue to
drench the islands, with 8.08
inches of rain recorded in June
so far, including 1.68 inches in
New Providence on Monday
and Tuesday.

A surface trough currently



“,.. | wouldn’t
tell people to
relax their
guard just
yet.”

Geoffrey Greene

passing over the northern
Bahamas brought on Tuesday’s
dramatic lightening storm and is
expected to cause severe weath-
er conditions today.

Senior meteorological officer
Geoffrey Greene said the rain
should clear up tomorrow
before more thunderstorm
activity moves in on the week-

ern Piaqds
ll te A



end. He said the heavy rainfall
of recent weeks is welcome
after the long dry spell over the
winter months.

“This winter was especially
dry, and we had a lot of forest
fires, so this is a time for rain —
we should enjoy it.”

However, Mr Greene does
not expect the increased rain-
fall to affect the chance of hur-
ricanes hitting the Bahamas
when the season peaks.

He said: “We would hope
that because it’s raining we are
getting less development in
thunderstorm activity, and trop-
ical storms are not forming.

“But the height of the hurri-
cane season is in August and
September, with a mini-peak in
October, so we haven’t reached
that stage yet; I wouldn’t tell
people to relax their guard just
yet.”

FNM right not to give more jobs

to supporters, says former DPM

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

WHILE some FNMs may
want the party to emulate the
former administration and give
out more jobs to supporters, for-
mer deputy prime minister
Frank Watson believes the par-
ty is doing right by its members.

"Sometimes some members
of our team, FNM supporters,
tend to feel that we ought to
behave the same way as the PLP
and give consultant (jobs) and
contracts for nonexistent jobs,
and to that extent there may be
criticisms to our support that
claim that their not taken care
of," said Mr Watson, current
chairman of the Airport
Authority.

"But they fail to realise that
the funds that the FNM controls
are the people's funds and we
don't have the capacity to dole
out funds to whoever we like.
The job of the government is to
create an atmosphere where
Bahamians can reach full poten-
tial in whatever they pursue and
even though times are difficult,

the government has been doing
that and reaching beyond that.

"My response to that is: Yes,
the FNM always seeks to ensure
that their supporters have an
opportunity to make a decent
living and take care of their fam-
ily and so forth,” he said.

Some political observers have
noted that some FNM support-
ers were unhappy before the
2002 election — which the party
lost to the PLP — because they
felt they had not been “taken
care of".

Grumbling

But yesterday Mr Watson
argued that such grumbling will
not negatively affect the FNM in
the next election, slated for
2012.

"T think well-thinking FNMs
appreciate that the government
is doing all it can within the law
that will cause FNMs to work
and create opportunities for all
Bahamians," he said.

But a dissenting FNM said
that if the PLP is known for
making sure its supporters have
work, the FNM might need to

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do the same if it wants to win
elections. "The PLP has left
their people entrenched in all
these ministries and they are
making sure that their people
are getting jobs. I don't try to
play politics but I think we need
to look out for some of our peo-
ple. We stood up for the gov-
ernment and they need to look
after us, if it can be done with-
out being unfair,” he said.

"T think its something that the
government needs to monitor
very closely,” said the supporter,
who did not want to be identi-
fied.

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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master























































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

The water problem in Nassau

the mid-seventies with a very upset UN repre-
sentative at the side of St Andrew’s swimming
pool as we both waited for our sons to com-
plete their swimming lessons. He was nervous,
because in those days we lived in what John
Marquis called “a frightened society.” He obvi-
ously was wary about being seen in deep con-
versation with a Tribune writer. But that day he
had to talk with someone, and we were that
someone standing by his side. He was particu-
larly upset because politics had become deeply
imbedded in a UN-sponsored experimental pro-
gramme to give New Providence a steady sup-
ply of potable water. He and his team were
confident of its success. New Providence was
chosen as the site for the pilot scheme, which,
when perfected, could be replicated in other
developing countries.

He said people consider Ireland a land of
abundant rain, but in fact during its rainy season
New Providence has more rain than Ireland. If
this rain could be harnessed, New Providence
would always have a good supply of water. His
team had found a promising run-off shed some-
where in the airport area and were confident of
success. Because of his nervous condition, we
could not get details on what exactly they were
building as catchment for this abundance of
water.

Ireland for example averages 30 inches of
rain a year. In recent years New Providence
had its heaviest annual rainfall in 1995 — 76.33
inches; in 2007 — 60.39 and in 2008 — 44.98.
The heaviest rainfall for the month of May
since records were started almost 80 years ago
fell last month — a record 13.66 inches.

That morning by St Andrew’s swimming
pool was the first we heard of the Andros barg-
ing proposal, which Loftus Roker was pushing
for his constituency. My friend thought it was a
colossal mistake that Bahamians would live to
regret.

He was angry. Politics had entered and
spoiled what his team considered a project that
would have greatly benefited the people of
these islands. He didn’t want to go into further
detail, but he had said enough to make it clear
that a philanthropic scheme that could have
satisfied many of this island’s needs had been
scuttled by the meddling of inexperienced, small
island politicians — again putting their own
political ambitions before the long term good of
the people.

He said his team’s report — we gathered
what had gone wrong had also been included in
that report — had been left with the PLP gov-
ernment. He urged us to find and publish it.
He and his scientists packed their bags and left,
we believe for Barbados.

In the meantime we were left to try to ferret
out a report, which under the PLP administra-
tion was like trying to find gold dust at the end
of a rainbow.

The report was never found.

“WATER, water everywhere, nor any drop
to drink” or to bath in, or to flush toilets with or
do the laundry or any of the other essentials nec-
essary for living a healthy and hygienic life.

This has been the cry of many householders
throughout New Providence over the past sev-
eral weeks. Potable water has always been a
challenge for most Family Islanders, but New
Providence has been particularly unlucky this
year as the Corporation struggles with the inter-
mittent faults of its technology.

In his presentation to parliament during the
budget debate last week Phenton Neymour,
State Minister of the Environment, listed the
seven challenges faced by the Water and Sew-
erage Corporation (WSC). He said they were
non-revenue water, that is water that is lost
from the system; the reliability of the water
supply; the high expenses of shipping/barging
and staffing; constrained revenue; improving
sewerage infrastructure and providing services
to the Family Islands.

He pointed out that the Corporation was
hard-pressed in its attempts to tackle these
issues, particularly in the current economic sit-
uation.

The Corporation estimates that it loses about
five million imperial gallons a day through leaks,
or apparent losses through theft or metering
inaccuracies.

He said that every one million imperial gal-
lons lost was the equivalent of an annual $3
million. If this one million gallons of lost water
had been sold it would have brought in an annu-
al $5 million. One only has to do elementary
mathematics to estimate the wealth of the trea-
sury if the five million gallons lost daily in a
year could have been turned into cash. It would
probably bring in more revenue than a casino.

He said the World Bank had recommended
that developing countries should keep the water
they lose below 23 per cent. WSC estimates its
water loss at 50 per cent.

Mr Neymour said that until the WSC can
effectively address this problem the Corporation
“will not have any chance of becoming a finan-
cially viable entity.”

He said the shipping of water from Andros
was originally considered a “temporary solu-
tion,” but 25 years later we are still struggling
with the “temporary solution.” Summer storms,
hurricanes and barge break-downs have delayed
the water barges arriving in New Providence
on time. Of course, this resulted in water short-
ages and dissatisfied customers.

Mr Neymour pointed out that although there
have been improvements in both the efficiency
of the operation and the volumes of water
shipped, “it has out-lived its ability to satisfy
the demands of New Providence.” Barging
water from Andros, he said, “is no longer less
expensive than the alternative reverse osmosis
supply.”

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Philip ‘Brave’ Davis
abused parliamentary
privilege to defame
Sir Harold Christie

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Mr Philip “Brave” Davis
abused his parliamentary priv-
ilege at the 11th June sitting of
the House of Assembly to
defame the good name of my
uncle, the late Sir Harold
Christie concerning his own-
ership of the 2,600 acre Union
Estate at Old Bight, Cat
Island, a part of which was
sold nearly a year ago to a
group of American developers
who are building “Cat Island
Golf and Beach Resort”,
thereon. This beautifully
designed project will focus the
world’s spotlight on the extra-
ordinary beauty of Cat Island
and its people and in doing so
will fulfil the vision of Sir
Harold.

Sir Harold loved Cat Island
and its people whom he rep-
resented in the House of
Assembly for 32 years and he
was known for his generosity
to them.

Sir Harold did not “take”
the land from anyone! The
Union Estate was a sisal plan-
tation owned and operated by
an English family headed by
Samuel Harris in the late eigh-
teen hundreds. When the sisal
plantation failed, the then
owners left the land in charge
of overseers who permitted
the people of the neighbour-
ing Old Bight settlement to
have farms thereon provided
they paid over a share of their
crops to their overseers, a
common practice in the
islands. On the 26th of Feb-
ruary 1951, Sir Harold’s com-
pany Cat Island Farms Lim-
ited purchased the Union
Estate from the Estate of Mr
and Mrs Henry M Rumball
who had purchased the same
from the Estate of Stanley
Harris in 1927 and continued

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



the arrangement of allowing
the people of the Old Bight
to farm on the Estate provid-
ed they paid a small share of
their crops to his overseers.
Sir Harold built a house on
the estate, called Highwood
House, and created a large
farm around the house where
they raised Nubian goats and
charolais cattle.

In the early 1960’s many of
the Old Bight Tenant Farmers
refused to pay over a share of
their crops to Sir Harold’s
overseers and started to make
claims of ownership of the
areas they were farming, while
many others continued farm-
ing and paying shares to the
overseers, recognising Sir
Harold’s Company’s owner-
ship. At this time, Sir Harold
on the advice of his attorneys,
started an action under the
Quieting Titles Act to have
his perfect documentary title
to the land adjudicated by the
Supreme Court under which
all persons making claim to
parts of the Estate could also
have their claims heard.

The Quieting Titles Act was
created to investigate and set-
tle land title disputes.

In this Action Number 81
of 1964, many claimants from
Old Bight filed claims and
they and their witnesses were
heard by Supreme court
judges who at the end of the
hearing gave detailed judg-
ments of each claim dismissing
all of them as lacking truth
and not sufficient to prove
their occupation of a particu-
lar parcel of land for the
required 20 years, or their

ouster of the documentary
owner.

The Old Bight claimants
were represented by promi-
nent attorneys Sir Lynden O
Pindling, Sir Cecil Wallace-
Whitfield and Arthur D Han-
na and had their claims adju-
dicated in court. Sir Harold’s
Company was represented by
Eugene Dupuch OC and
myself. Mr Davis should read
the judgments, to understand
why the Old Bight claimants
were not successful. I am not
aware that any appeal was
ever filed. No farmers ever
lived on the land and there-
fore none of them lost their
homes as claimed. They only
cultivated fields on the Union
Estate and they lived in the
settlement of Old Bight.

Concerning the three
women who were put in jail
for a few days for defying an
order of the court to “stop cut-
ting bush for new fields”,
pending the hearing of the
petition, they could have
purged their contempt and not
gone to jail by appearing
before the court and agreeing
to stop cutting, but this they
refused to do. The rule of Law
had to prevail as it must in this
country.

The Estate of Sir Harold in
May resolved to establish a
fund to provide scholarships
to the College of the Bahamas
for Cat Island students.

Your newspaper published
the claims made by the Mem-
ber of Parliament without
checking their accuracy or
veracity and I ask that you
give this letter equal cover-
age.

WILLIAM McP
CHRISTIE
Nassau,

June, 2009.

Seeking the middle road between the
extremes of capitalism and socialism

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please allow me a little space in which to
thank Mr Rick Lowe of The Nassau Institute
for his response to my letter appearing in your
June 3rd edition and to express my apprecia-
tion for his letter appearing in your June 12th
edition opposite the article “Euro-Socialism
has pluses and minuses” by Llewellyn King of

Hearst Newspapers.

Mr Lowe agrees with me on a very limited
number of points raised in my original letter of
June 3rd but he has not addressed my basic
assertion that a middle road exists between
the extremes of selfish and unregulated capi-
talism and the painful excesses of socialism at
the other end of the political spectrum.

Mr Lowe appears to assume that I am
opposed to capitalism per se and that is not
the case. However, I recognise that by its very
nature capitalism focuses interest on the indi-
vidual at the expense of the larger society.

In a world of ever expanding population
most civilised societies seek to provide some
form of social safety net for the less fortunate
(or less ambitious or less favoured) members of
society in an effort to avoid degeneration into
a lawless environment and ultimately a “failed

State.”

Since politicians do not actively propose a
plan seeking zero population growth there are
a few options which we as members of the gen-

eral public can examine unless we are prepared
to watch helplessly as societies become more

crowded and desperate as the few unregulated
capitalists become wealthier and the masses
become more repressed and disenfranchised.

I agree with Mr Lowe’s assertion that
“ereed” is not limited to the capitalist world but
surely this is not an observation of which we
can be proud.

Also, constant reference to the theories of

Nassau,
June, 2009.

the late Milton Friedman and his “Chicago
Boys” obscures the fact that Franklin D. Roo-
sevelt had recourse to the theories of the late
John Maynard Keynes when he put into place
(against considerable opposition) a number of
public programmes intended to lift the USA
out of the Great Depression following the Wall
Street crash of October, 1929.

It appears that Bahamians such as Mr Lowe
and myself don’t like change but we have to be
more imaginative and realistic about the direc-
tion in which inevitable change will take our
country and whether we will be able to exert
any sort of positive and beneficial influence
upon the direction of that change.

Perhaps I am a naive seeker of that very elu-
sive Utopia where “capitalism with a human
face” resides.

AVID READER

“ay THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

ORIENTATION AND ADVISEMENT FOR
FALL SEMESTER 2009

ORIENTATION AND ADVISEMENT WILL TAKE PLACE FRIDAY, JUNE 26,
2009 FROM 9 AM TO 1 PM IN ROOMS B-5 AND B-6 FOR THE FOLLOWING
STUDENTS ACCEPTED IN THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS (BBA) PRO-

GRAMMES:

1 STUDENTS WITH EARLY ACCEPTANCE
2 STUDENTS WHO HAVE COMPLETED COLLEGE PREP
3. STUDENTS WHO HAVE COMPLETED THE UPGRADING PROGRAM

(CEES)

ALL STUDENTS SHOULD BRING COPIES OF ACCEPTANCE LETTERS, COM-
PLETION LETTERS AND RELEVANT EXAM RESULTS SUCH AS THE BGCSE.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Foreign fishermen
are allegedly
Caught poaching

ELEVEN foreign fisher-
men are expected to arrive
in the capital today for pro-
cessing after they were
caught allegedly poaching in
Bahamian waters.

Royal Bahamas Defence
Force press officer Lieu-
tenant Sonia Miller said the
crew was apprehended on
board a 40-foot Dominican-
registered fishing vessel, the
Lancha Dana Laura,
approximately one nautical
mile northwest off Little
Inagua.

Acting on information
received from US authori-
ties, RBDF officers on the
Enduring Friendship and P-
38 vessels — both stationed
at HMBS base in Mathew
Town, Inagua — apprehend-
ed the 11 men around
6.44pm last Saturday.

The vessel was found with
an unknown quantity of
small scale fish on board, Ms
Miller said. The total weight
of the seizure was not
known up to press time yes-
terday.

Woman taken to hospital
following traffic accident

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

BYSTANDERS watched
in horror as a young woman
was involved in an accident
on a busy street yesterday.

Witnesses claimed she was
knocked down by a car and
the driver then sped off.

But when stopped by
police and brought back to
the scene, the young driver
denied responsibility, claim-
ing the woman had “tripped”
in front of her vehicle and
she didn’t stop because the
traffic was too heavy.

The incident took place on

Shirley Street outside Doc-
tor’s Hospital at around
1.30pm.

According to the 36-year-
old “victim”, who did not
wish to be named, she was
waiting to cross the busy
thoroughfare when she made
eye contact with the driver
of a green Toyota Wyndham,
who was waiting to enter
Shirley Street from Christie
Street.

The woman, who appeared
to have suffered no major
injuries, claimed the young
female driver then gestured
that it was okay for her to
cross,

“That was the only reason I

took the chance to cross,”
said the woman.

However, as she started
walking across the road she
claimed the car knocked her
down.

Witness

A witness, who had been
driving behind the Toyota
Wyndham, said she parked
her vehicle and ran out to
help the woman who was on
the road in front of the car.

As they moved to the side
of the road, the driver then
allegedly left the scene.

The woman, who was tak-
en into the hospital by wheel-

PLP hits back over ‘unqualified’ prison officers



THE PLP has denied responsibility for

“We were also faced with a second set of

creating a situation that led to the hiring
and promotion of a group of prison offi-
cers described by Minister of National Secu-
rity Tommy Turnquest as “unqualified.”

Opposition spokesman on the public ser-
vice, Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell, said yes-
terday that he personally confronted Mr
Turnquest outside parliament over the mat-
ter, telling him to “cease and desist blaming
the PLP for a situation which was entirely
FNM-created at the prison and one which
we tried to settle before we left office.”

Speaking during the 2009/2010 budget
debate, Mr Turnquest said that the govern-
ment had taken the “decisive action” to
promote and recruit certain officers after
having struggled with some “vexing human
resources issues.”

He said that when the FNM came to
office in 2007 they met with a number of
people working at the prison who had been
told “on the eve of the election” that they
were to be promoted, while another group
had been recruited despite not having the
requisite qualifications.

Mr Turnquest said that government took
the position that it was not the fault of these
“unfortunate people” that they had been
dealt with in a manner which appeared to be
an effort to “circumvent the rules and reg-
ulations of the public service.”

However, he said that the decision does

Educators encouraged
to ‘play active role’

Tommy anes

Fred Mitchell



not “set a precedent.”

Mr Mitchell claimed yesterday that the
PLP, when it came to office in 2002, met
with a group of people who had been work-
ing at the prison but had their training “cut
short” and were taken on prematurely due
to a staffing shortage.

Calling this situation “untenable and
unsatisfactory”, Mr Mitchell said the Public
Service Commission, “then headed by an
FNM appointee, refused to confirm the offi-
cers because their training was not com-
plete.”

“They were unable to get the salary that
was due to them as officers as a result of that
issue being unresolved,” said Mr Mitchell.



officers who were recommended for pro-
motions by the Prison Service. Half of those
recommended for promotions were refused
promotions by the FNM-appointed Public
Service Commission. The reason given was
that they did not fulfil the criterion for pro-
motions laid down by the FNM, which gave
academic qualifications as one way to be
promoted; and alternatively, years of ser-
vice,” said Mr Mitchell.

He said this had caused a “morale prob-
lem” at the prison and it was agreed upon
that a “special course would be designed
for all those who had not been promoted
and that those who were successful in that
course, all other things being equal, would
be promoted.”

The Fox Hill MP added: “That course
was designed and done. The Prison Staff
Association made representations to me as
minister of the public service that several
people had been overlooked and requested
inclusion of other people to have an oppor-
tunity for promotion. I agreed and this was
facilitated.”

Denying any action was taken by the
PLP in this regard on the basis of “political
affiliation”, Mr Mitchell accused the FNM of
“delaying and sabotaging the system”, claim-
ing they have “much to answer for.”

He said he is thankful that “this sordid
chapter” is soon to be resolved.

By BETTY VEDRINE

ONE hundred educators
are being immersed in the
hotel and tourism industry
this week as part of the
Bahamas Hotel Association’s
sixth annual Summer Educa-
tor Internship Programme.

The group of educators,
who are being exposed to the
vast opportunities available
in tourism, were encouraged

0 “play an active role” in
moving the country forward.

They were addressed by
Director of Higher Education
and Lifelong Learning Dr
Leon Higgs at the sixth annu-
al Educators Industry Intern-
ship Programme held at the
College of the Bahamas’ Culi-
nary Hospitality Management
Institute on Monday.

“We are building a country
that is forward moving and
forward thinking, thus giving
it the ability to sustain itself
during difficult economic
times such as now,” said Dr
Higgs.

“However, in order for us
to accomplish our goals, we
must collaborate with and

involve all stakeholders in the
education process. After all,
nation building is the respon-
sibility of all of us Bahami-
ans.”

Already stakeholders have
taken an active role such as
forming the National Tourism
Task Force on Education, he
said. This workshop is anoth-
er of these initiatives.

Activities

“Through activities such as
training sessions for industry
and educators, internships in
industry, and constant evalu-
ation of the programme, the
knowledge that is offered to
educators is relevant,” he said.

With the advent of the
internet, the onset of globali-
sation, and the signing of
trade agreements between
nations, students can now
compete for almost any job
for which they qualify in any
region in the world, Dr Higgs
said.

“In some instances, (stu-
dents) may not have to leave
their homes to find employ-
ment in the future. Therefore,









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our students must be educat-
ed to compete at all levels.

“They must be trained to
deliver service with excel-
lence.”

However, educators will
have to continue to focus on
their own professional train-
ing and development in order
for this to happen, he said.

So far, the Summer Educa-
tor Internship Programme has
benefitted more than 500 edu-
cators.

The workshop is a collabo-
rative effort between the Min-
istry of Education, the Min-
istry of Tourism and Aviation,
and the College of the
Bahamas’ Culinary Hospital-
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DIRECTOR of Higher Education
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the sixth annual Educators Indus-
try Internship Programme.

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chair, said she was “disorien-
tated” and her legs and arms
were in some pain from the
impact and the fall, but “oth-
erwise OK.”

The driver, who was
brought back to the scene by
police around 20 minutes
afterwards, said that after she
called to the other driver to
ask if the woman was all
right, and was told the
woman ‘would be OK’, she
continued to drive, as she
“couldn’t stop because of all
the traffic.”

“T didn’t leave her,” she
maintained.

She admitted having

motioned to the woman to
cross the road, but then stat-
ed that another car “sped
up.”

“T tried to quickly go over
so the other guy could move.
She was crossing at the same
time. At the same time I
thought she stopped to not
cross the road anymore. I did
not knock her — she tripped. I
stopped suddenly when I saw
her crossing the road. I did
not hit her,” said the woman.

The driver said she kept
going because when she tried
to stop to check on the
woman, “people started
honking at (her).”

Wood stork population
flying higher in Everglades

@ MIAMI

OFFICIALS say wood storks have been breeding at their
highest rate in decades in the Everglades, according to Associ-

ated Press.

Preliminary surveys estimate that 3,500 of the ungainly duck-
lings will leave South Florida nests this year.

The wood storks are the only Florida wading bird on the
federal list of endangered species.

Rain in the last month of nesting season took its toll, leaving
half the weakened fledglings prey for waiting gators.

But even so, officials say more wood storks will survive this
season than they have since the 1930s.

Environmentalists say the stork has rebounded from a low of
about 2,500 pairs in 1978 to perhaps as many as 10,000 pairs this

year.

But they also point out the bird’s range and habits have been
radically altered and believe it is still a threatened species.

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Single mother set to sue

Honorary degree for

SuperClubs’ chiet

THIS November,
SuperClubs’ execu-
tive chairman John
Issa will be awarded
an honorary Doctor
of Laws degree by
the University of the
West Indies in Mona,
Jamaica.

Praised for his
contributions to
Jamaica’s tourism
industry, the univer-
sity recognised Mr
Issa as one of the
field’s most influential consul-
tants and entrepreneurs.

Known for many firsts in the
Jamaican hospitality sector, Mr
Issa pioneered the all-inclusive
hotel concept on the island
when he opened Negril Beach
Village in 1976.

Reshaping the resort indus-
try, Mr Issa then introduced
the Super-Inclusive holiday
with the inception of the adults-
only playground Hedonism II
in 1981. He also launched the
island’s first all-inclusive fami-
ly resort, Boscobel Beach, in
1983.

Mr Issa’s vision has grown
beyond the isle of Irie, with 11
all-inclusive resorts throughout
the Caribbean and two more
under development in Panama
and Brazil, slated to open this
Fall.

“Tt is a privilege and honour
to receive this prestigious
award from the University of
the West Indies,” said Mr Issa.

“Tam proud to be recognised
by an institution whose mission
matches my own — to inspire
and propel the success and
growth of the West Indian
community.”

Beyond his hotel ventures,
Mr Issa has deep roots in
Jamaica. He served as a sena-
tor from 1983 to 1989, chair-

Atel i pen



man of the Jamaica
Tourist Board during
the same years, and
sy} president of the

1972.

(1904-2004).

Throughout the years Mr }
Issa has received numerous :
accolades for his achievements, ;
including being honoured with }
the Order of Jamaica, the }
country’s fourth highest nation- i
al order (1998), and the Brazil- :
ian Order of the Southern }

Cross (Officer Rank, 2001).

Ernst & Young named him
“Caribbean Master Entrepre- :
neur of the Year” (2003), he }
received the Jamaica Tourist
Board’s “Trail Blazer Award” }
(2005); Caribbean World }
named him “Premier Hotelier
of the Year” (2006) and most
recently, the magazine extend- }
ed Mr Issa the “Lifetime
Achievement Award in Travel ;

and Tourism” (2007).

Along with Mr Issa, 16 recip- }
ients are set to receive hon- }
orary degrees from the univer- }
sity during graduation cere- }
monies, including Barbados’ }
former Prime Minister Sir }
Lloyd Erskine Sandiford; Gov- }
ernor General of St Vincent
and the Grenadines Frederick }
Ballantyne; journalist and envi-
John i
Maxwell; prolific scholar and
historian Professor Colin A }
Palmer, and chairman and }
managing director of the }
Gleaner Company Oliver }

ronmental activist

Clarke.

Bintish Colonial Halton Hotel
Marlborough St., Sheog #4]

Clearance
SALE

Everything for $20

Until the end of July

P.O.Box EE-15827
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 242-323-1665

Email: gems-pearlsiehotmail,com

Tender

The Bshamas Electricity Corporation

A unique honour, :
Mr Issa even has his }
own 40-cent postage
stamp, which was cre- }
ated tocommemorate i
the centenary of the }
Jamaica Hotel Law ;

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds @tribunemedia.net

A SINGLE mother who
waited three years for the con-
struction of her flood-prone
home intends to sue her for-
mer contractor for delays and
defective work.

Joyce Roberts, 29, claims
the contractor she hired in
February 2006 should have
completed construction with-
in six months, but repeatedly
delayed work on her four bed-
room home on New
Jerusalem Way, off
Carmichael Road.

And when she finally
moved in last month, the
ground floor of the two-storey
house flooded in heavy rain
as water poured through elec-
trical sockets and seeped
through the walls.

Her daughters, aged three
and six, are now sharing their
mother’s upstairs room as the
lower floor is uninhabitable.

Miss Roberts, a former
Atlantis employee who was
laid off in November last year,
said the contractor was rec-
ommended by her attorney,
who she found through her
bank loan officer.

An agreement with the con-
tractor stipulated building
work would be completed by
November 2006, or interest on
the loan would be paid by the
builder, Miss Roberts claimed.

But the completion date
was delayed to April 2007, and
then October 2007, Miss
Roberts said.

In the meantime she paid
an additional $8,000 in May
2007 for the basement/ground
floor to be built.

However, five months later
only the structure and roof of
the house had been complet-
ed.



“The whole
downstairs is
uninhabitable
because water
is coming in
and every time
it rains we
have to turn
the power off —
otherwise ’'m
afraid the
house is going
to burn down.”



Joyce Roberts

Miss Roberts terminated
the building contract in May
2008, and hired another con-
tractor to finish the job.

When she finally moved
into the house in April this
year, heavy rains flooded her
new home within weeks.

Miss Roberts said: “We are
not even three months in the
house and we are already hav-
ing so many complications.
The whole downstairs is unin-
habitable because water is
coming in and every time it
rains we have to turn the pow-
er off — otherwise I’m afraid
the house is going to burn
down.”

Miss Roberts has been
informed the water is seeping
in from underneath the foun-
dations of her home and will
cost around $3,000 to repair.

But having borrowed over
$158,000 to build the house,
and because she was unem-
ployed for five months until

WATER is Peete Menon enter Joyce Roberts.

a



she got her new job as a med-
ical assistant, Miss Roberts has
trouble even paying the bills.

She said: “I lived in dark-
ness for six weeks until I got
the money to pay BEC to turn
on my lights.

“TI make a total of $966 a
month and my mortgage alone
is $1,015.

“T have to come up with
money for light, water, food
and gas in order for my chil-
dren to live comfortably.

“T barely can afford the
necessities of life.”

She has been unable to con-
tact her original contractor or

over flood-prone home

Jamaica Hotel and }
Tourist Association in ;

a.

her attorney, and when she
can afford legal services she
intends to sue them for com-
pensation.

“T am living in a house that
requires me to turn off the
power every times it rains,”
Miss Roberts said.

“Tam so afraid and don’t
know what to do.

“T don’t think that this is fair
for me to have to be dealing
with after waiting three long
years to get into my home.

“IT am finally in and now I
have to sleep in fear every
time it rains, and we are now
in the hurricane season.”

CARICOM Secretariat moves on

social care tor substance abuse

THE Caribbean Community (CARI-
COM) Secretariat has intensified its offen-
sive against illicit drug use with the focus
on developing and strengthening social
care and rehabilitation programmes for
drug users, in a bid to mitigate the social
and health consequences of substance
abuse.

With funding from the European Union,
the Secretariat has organised a regional
workshop on “Minimising the Social and
Health Consequences of Substance
Abuse”, with special focus on street-based
programmes and the establishment of low
threshold drop-in-centres for substance
abusers and their relatives who may need
counselling.

The workshop, set to take place in
Jamaica on June 24-25, aims to sensitise
and increase the knowledge and skills of
non-government organisations, policy-
makers and service providers from the
public sector on current and emerging
trends in minimising the social and health
consequences of substance abuse. It will
also draw on best practices of existing low
threshold drop-in centres within the
Caribbean.

shop will identify and develop national
and regional advocacy strategies to lob-
by for the establishment of low threshold
drop-in centres where none currently exist,
and other programmes that can help min-
imise health consequences of substance
abuse on individuals, families and com-
munities.

The workshop will also identify areas
for in-country technical support to
strengthen or establish such existing pro-
grammes, and explore the issue of imple-
menting a human rights based approach in
programme development — the Caribbean
experience.

Another spin-off from the workshop is
the provision of a platform for the devel-
opment and strengthening of networking
among service providers of low threshold
drop-in centres in non-government and
government agencies to exchange infor-
mation and sharing of best practices.

Over 20 participants, drawn primarily
from non-government organisations across
the region, are expected to attend and
benefit from this workshop which starts
just two days ahead of World Interna-
tional Day against Drug Abuse and Illicit





























Bahamas Red
Cross elects
new president

THE Bahamas Red Cross Society
has elected Brendon Watson as its
new president.

A native of Long Island, Mr Watson
has served on the executive board of
the Bahamas Red Cross for the past
three years.

As a member of the board, Mr
Watson was chairman of the property
management committee and co-chair-
man of the fair committee.

Mr Watson is the founder and own-
er of Watson Construction Company
Ltd and serves as the assistant gover-
nor of Rotary International District
7020, Bahamas.

He has also served as chairman of
the Rotary International District 7020




Conference.
Invites Tenders far the services described below:

In addition, participants in the work- Trafficking, to be observed on June 26.
THE PURCHASE AMID REMOVAL OF

THE CONTENTS OF TWO CONTAINERS

CONTAINING USED COPPER & ALUMINUM CABLE
LOCATED AT
BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
BIG POND COMPOUND
BLUE HILL ROAD
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

eR RE eB ltsrim erin me MCLE l® lice]
experience in the fast food industry?

Bidders are required to collect bid packages from the
Corporation's Administration OMee, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
by contacting Mrs. Delmeta Seymour, Telephone No. 302-1158.

lf your answer Is “yes” then a growing fast
food chain wants you to be a leader of its
Management team!

Tenders are to be delivered on or before 42900 pum.
on July 6, 2009, and addressed as fallaws;

Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Qualified applicants should:

« have experience as a General Manager (a plus)

« be energetic & able fo supervise & motivate stat

« know the dynamics of providing superb Customer Service
be able to plan and understand budgets
be able to execute cost control measures
be able to execute inventory controls

Marked: Tender Mo. 706/09
Purchase and Removal of the Contents of
Two Containers
Containing Used Copper & Aluminum Cable
Located at Big Pond Compound
Blue Hill Road, Massau, Bahamas

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject the
whole or such part of any Tender the Corporation
deems necessary.

Interested persons should e-mail a résumé to
fantasticjobopportunity@gmail.com by June 30th, 2009





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009, PAGE 7





What economic crisis
holds in store for us

"The most we can say is that
there has been a general lack
of judgment...We have learned
that we are not so big as we
thought we were."

Former US president
Calvin Coolidge on
the Great Depression

[Ronicaney, the
gloomiest economic
doomsayers of today are often
the staunchest advocates of
free market capitalism. And
one of them was in town last
week to speak at a public
meeting organised by the Nas-
sau Institute.

Dr Robert Murphy is an
economist who works for a
plethora of libertarian think
tanks in the US. At the Nassau
Institute meeting, he offered a
devastating critique of current
American policy, touching
briefly on the likely fall-out for
the Bahamas from the current
economic Crisis.

In his view we are all in this
recession for the long haul
(read 10 years or more), and
we are very likely to suffer the
kind of stagflation last experi-
enced in the 1970s — only
squared. According to Mur-
phy, US government policies
are destroying the dollar and
setting us all on a course
towards hyperinflation.

Murphy is the author of the
Politically Incorrect Guide to
the Great Depression and the
New Deal, which insists that
the greatest economic disaster
of the 20th century was caused
by government interference
with the free market, and led
inexorably to a “central plan-
ning” assault on liberty.

This is, of course, a favourite
talking point among conserva-
tive economists, who believe
that the "official" history of
the 1930s is fake. Their revi-
sionist account not only seeks
to demonise US President
Franklin Roosevelt, but argues
that his “big government” poli-
cies only made the Depression
longer and worse — just as
President Obama's policies
promise to do today.

ECONOMIC
BENCHMARKS

The scale of the Great
Depression is familiar to most
of us by now. It featured an
unprecedented fall in stock val-
ues, a 28 per cent drop in eco-
nomic output, unemployment
that peaked at 28 per cent, and
a near collapse of the banking
system. Other countries fared
as badly as the US, and world
trade plunged by more than
half. Nothing like this had ever
happened before or since —
until now.

The Depression began with
a stock market crash in 1929
that led directly to Roosevelt's
landslide election in 1933. His
New Deal went on to change
the face of American govern-
ment, creating new institutions
like the Securities and
Exchange Commission to reg-
ulate the stock market, the

Federal Deposit Insurance

Corp to insure savings
accounts, and Social Security
to provide a safety net for the
elderly.

According to Murphy and
his libertarian colleagues, the
Depression was all about big,
bad government.

They say it was caused by
the US central bank flooding
the market with easy credit,
which artificially pushed down
interest rates. Lower rates
exaggerated the feeling of
prosperity that had developed
during the Roaring 20s, which
produced an unsustainable
boom that crashed in 1929.

In this view, recessions are
caused by financing loans over
and above the amount of mon-
ey that is available from real
savings, which creates a boom.
And government efforts to
delay the inevitable bust by
stimulating demand and keep-
ing credit inflated only make
things worse.

This runs counter to the
views of that influential British
economist John Maynard
Keynes, who died in 1945. He
stated that, in the midst of an
economic depression, the cor-
rect course of action is to
encourage spending and dis-
courage saving.

Explaining the origins of the
current crisis, Murphy said that
after the dot.com crash of the
early 2000s, the US central
bank under Alan Greenspan
began pumping up the money
supply.

This easy credit created the
housing bubble, which led to
our present predicament. In
other words, low interest rates
caused people to save less and
consume more, creating a false
prosperity followed by a crash.

So what should we about it?
Basically nothing, Murphy
says, and let the chips fall
where they may, which is what
the US government supposed-
ly did in every economic slump
from 1819 until the Great
Depression. Unfortunately,
this overlooks the fact that it is
politically impossible for any
modern, elected government
to simply do nothing in the face
of an economic downturn.

WORLD ECONOMY
TANKING

Until recently, the consen-
sus was that while things are
bad today, they are not as bad
as they were during the Great
Depression. But a widely cir-
culated analysis by two lead-
ing economic historians shows
that the world economy — in
terms of industrial production,
trade and stock markets — is
now tanking even faster than it
did in the first year of the
Great Depression.

Barry Eichengreen of the
University of California, and



Kevin O’Rourke of Trinity
College, Dublin, date the
beginning of the current glob-
al recession to April, 2008 and
their research demonstrates a
close match with the first year
of the Great Depression.

Using monthly data up to
April 2009, they find that world
industrial production closely
tracks the 1930s fall, with no
clear signs of “green shoots”.

In their paper for the Lon-
don-based Centre for Eco-
nomic Policy Research, they
show that the global decline in
output over the last nine
months has been at least as
severe as in the same period
following the 1929 peak.

The fall in the US stock mar-
ket has tracked 1929, but glob-
al markets are falling even
faster. And world trade is
falling much faster now than
in 1929-30.

"Globally, we are tracking
or doing even worse than the
Great Depression,” they wrote,
“whether the metric is indus-
trial production, exports or
equity valuations. Focusing on
the US causes one to minimise
this alarming fact. The “Great
Recession” label may turn out
to be too optimistic. This is a
Depression-sized event."

However, their research also
shows that while fiscal deficits
expanded only modestly after
1929, the willingness of gov-
ernments to follow the advice
of Keynes and run big deficits
today is much greater. The
question is whether this
unprecedented policy response
in the form of massive govern-
ment stimulus programmes will
work.

The alternative outcome —
as Murphy insists — is that it
will produce unsustainable lev-
els of public debt leading to a
loss of confidence in monetary
stability that will usher in a new
era of "malign stagflation".
This is a term coined in the
1970s to describe runaway
inflation combined with stag-
nant business activity and rising
unemployment.

PREPARING
FOR THE WORST

Murphy himself is preparing
for the worst. He wants interest
rates to soar to levels that
reflect the true price of capital,
and workers in the most affect-
ed economic sectors left to
fend for themselves and find
new jobs in more productive
areas. This is quite the opposite
of Keynesian prescriptions to
boost public spending when
private sector investment
declines.

"The current US govern-
ment policies to freeze the
economy by propping up fail-
ing companies are perverse,"
Murphy told the Nassau Insti-
tute. "They are simply trying to

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reflate the bubble. What we
need is to cut consumption and
save more in order to readjust.
In other words, we have to live
below our means."

Murphy says the US is now
forecasting trillion-dollar
deficits for the next 10 years,
and federal debt has topped
$11 trillion — more than 82
per cent of gross domestic
product. He is appalled that
the US government now owns
large portions of several major
banks as well as auto makers,
and wants to control the
healthcare and energy sectors
too.

"This is a huge power grab
and move towards central
planning, so I am very pes-
simistic about the economic
outlook for the next 10 years."

Turning to the Bahamas, he
said the government's ideas for
revenue reform were good,
although he deplored the intro-
duction of unemployment
insurance: "Paying people not
to work only perpetuates the
problem. Subsidizing unem-
ployment will stall the recov-
ery. Workers must be encour-
aged to find new employment
in more productive sectors."

Again, this is opposite to
what mainstream economists
would advise. In its recent
report on the Bahamas, for
example, the International
Monetary Fund said increased
social spending through the
National Insurance Board "to
protect the most vulnerable
Bahamians", and public infra-
structure investment projects
"to sustain employment in the
construction sector", are
appropriate. But the IMF, too,
is worried about rising debt.

For the past decade the
Bahamian fiscal deficit has
averaged around 2 per cent,
while public debt levels as a
percentage of GDP have

MANGOS

remained relatively low. Since
mid-2008, however, the global
downturn has caused our econ-
omy to shrink rapidly, with
preliminary figures showing
unemployment topping 14 per
cent this spring.

Without more taxes or
spending cuts, government
debt will rise to unsustainable
levels within a few years, the
IMF says.

EXIT STRATEGIES

This is the same conclusion
the Fund drew about the
American economy. It urged
the US government to reassure
markets about its stimulus exit
strategies, and said fiscal policy
would need to be tightened by
$700 billion a year from extra
taxes or lower spending. The
fiscal deficit in the US is
expected to reach almost 14
per cent of GDP.

The IMF believes the
Bahamian currency should
remain pegged to the US dol-
lar in order to promote a "sta-
ble investment climate." But
Murphy's prediction that
American prices will rise at
double digits argues for a
reconsideration of this link.
Since most of our imports are
from the United States, Mur-
phy says we will suffer the
same hyperinflation as the US.

That means prices rising at
more than 50 per cent a month,
which would wipe out both pri-
vate and public purchasing
power. So Murphy is building a
stock of gold and silver coins as
a hedge of last resort to weath-
er the storm he believes is com-
ing. And he is not alone. As
the US government continues
to pump money into the econ-
omy, many investors have
started to worry about infla-
tion.

But according to Murphy the

stakes are much higher. In his
“politically incorrect” book he
argues that the economic crisis
was caused by Americans liv-
ing beyond their means —
which they were encouraged
to do by a reckless govern-
ment.

And he says the govern-
ment’s trillion-dollar stimulus
package and related handouts
will saddle taxpayers with more
government debt than at any
time since the Second World
War.

Whether or not a collapse of
the world as we know it is in
store, there is no doubt that
we are in for a very rough ride.
In January, Carmen Reinhart
of the University of Maryland
and Kenneth Rogoff of Har-
vard University produced a
key paper for the non-partisan
National Bureau of Economic
Research that focused on what
happens after a severe financial
crisis.

They found that, historically,
such crises show deep and last-
ing effects on asset prices,
industrial output and employ-
ment extending out over sev-
eral years. And the real value
of public debt tends to explode
due to a collapse in tax rev-
enues as well as to fiscal poli-
cies aimed at mitigating the
downturn.

It seems clear that none of
this will play out in the short
term, and we can expect many
lean and difficult years ahead.
We should use them as an
opportunity to achieve vital
structural reforms in the
Bahamian economy to leave a
worthwhile legacy for our chil-
dren.

What do you think?
Send comments to

larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit www.bahamapundit.com



Monday through Saturday for lunch

Wednesday through Saturday for dinner

SCE

VTL Giles
Handamaae PiZZ4S

hat

CAVES VILLAGE, WEST BAY STREET

CALL 327-2218
EMAIL MANGOSCAFE@CORALWAVE.COM





PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Newspaper The rape trial of MP’s son resumes

FROM page one



By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

Cranberry juice to drink. He
allegedly took the girls home
where he had sex with them sep-
arately in a bedroom.

Dr Signson testified in court
on Tuesday that he examined the
girls. He said they had both sus-
tained injuries to their vagina.
One of the girls, he said, had also
sustained injuries and bleeding
to the rectum and anus.

Inspector Michael Brathwaite
said he put Sergeant Vaughn
Pratt under arrest at the Central
Detective Unit around 1.10pm
on May 25, 2007.

“T cautioned him and charged
him with two counts of unlawful sexual inter-
course,” said Insp Brathwaite.

Inspector Hilton Cash testified that after
receiving certain information around 6pm

an incident where Sergeant Pratt
had become a suspect,” he told
the Court.

Insp Cash said he later went to
CDU where he saw Ms Paula
Marshall from Social Services,
along with two minors, ages 14
and 15 years old at the time, who
gave him certain information.

He stated that sometime
around 10.45am on May 7
Sergeant Pratt came to CDU.
Mr Cash said he informed Pratt
of a complaint that was filed
against him. He cautioned Pratt
and arrested him for the offence.

“Pratt replied, ‘I did not both-
er those girls. I did not touch them. They
spend most of their time with the neighbour;
they stay in their own bedroom.”

Inspector Cash said that sometime around
11.56am on May 7, he and several officers
went to Pratt’s residence at No 16 Duke Dri-
ve to execute a search warrant.

He said that Pratt was also present and

gave officers permission to search the resi-
dence, including the master-bedroom,
kitchen and guest room.

Inspector Cash said that sometime around
2.30pm the two minor girls, accompanied by
social worker Fran Brice, directed officers to
the Bowling Alley.

The girls also directed officers to a bar
near the Lucayan Circle, and then took them
to House No 16 at Duke Drive, where they
gave officers certain information.

During cross-examination, lawyer Murrio
Ducille asked Inspector Cash whether Pratt
was cooperative with officers. Inspector Cash
replied that Pratt was cooperative, but did
not answer questions put to him by officers.

Mr Ducille noted that while Pratt had a
right to remain silent, he was very coopera-
tive and allowed officers in his house.

“All you had really were the words of
those two girls against him?” he asked.

The Prosecution closed its case. The trial
was adjourned for continuation on August 17
when Mr Ducille is expected to make a no
case submission.

with three other persons on
April 2, 2004 in the parking
lot near the old straw market
downtown for damage to and
stealing from a vehicle.

She was later arraigned in
Magistrate’s court and
charged with the offence. The
police then held a press con-
ference and as a result the
newspaper published a story

FREEPORT - The rape trial of Police
Sergeant Vaughn Pratt, the son of St Cecilia
MP Cynthia Pratt, resumed in the Freeport
Magistrate’s Court on Tuesday.

Pratt is charged with two counts of having
unlawful sexual intercourse with two minors,
aged 14 and 15, on May 6, 2007.

The summary trial, which started in
November 2007, is being held in Court 3
J before Magistrate Helen Jones.
that reportedly contained the Lawyer Murrio Ducille of New Providence
defamatory statements about : is representing Pratt. Valeria Pyfrom and
her. ? Lorna Longley-Rolle of the Attorney Gen-

However, after more thana : — eral’s Office are the prosecutors.
year, no evidence was pro- According to the particulars, it is alleged
duced against Ms Tinker and that Pratt had sexual intercourse with two
all charges were withdrawn young girls who were put in the care of him
on November 29, 2005. and his wife at their home in Freeport. on Sunday, May 6, 2007, he went to the Rand

According to Ms Tinker’s It is alleged that while his wife was off the | Memorial Hospital to conduct an investiga-
attorney Dorsey McPhee, Ms island Pratt took the girls to a local bar and tion.

Tinker subsequently obtained bought them several rounds of Vodka and “They contacted me and updated me on

Sergeant Vaughn Pratt



a judgment against the police
and the Attorney General for
malicious prosecution in 2006.

In Ms Tinker’s claim she is
seeking general aggravated
and exemplary damages for
defamation and libel, costs,
interest pursuant to a civil
procedure award and what-
ever other relief the court
may deem just.

However, in its defence
against the other plaintiff,
filed on June 2, 2009, The
Nassau Guardian admits that
a press conference took place
and that it published a story

as set out in paragraph four of

the statement of claim.

However, the newspaper
denies that the statements
contained in the story were
defamatory or that they were
understood to refer or are
capable of referring to the
plaintiff.

Further, the Guardian

asserts that the occasion of

publication was an occasion
of qualified privilege.

“The defendant denies
paragraph 10 of the statement

of claim and puts the plaintiff

to strict proof in respect both
of his allegation that the
words complained of were
published maliciously and to
her claim to have suffered
loss and damage.”

The plaintiffs in this mat-
ter are reportedly seeking a
“reasonable” out of court set-
tlement.

The Nassau Guardian is
represented by Alexiou

FNM faction

‘praying’ PM

will commit to another term

FROM page one

don't quite know how to ask the prime minis-
ter to remain, but pray every night that he will
return because we are in difficult times, more
difficult than we've ever seen before.

"Unless somebody comes out of the blue, we
would welcome the prime minister staying for
some further period of time," Chairman of the
Airport Authority Frank Watson told The Tri-
bune during an interview yesterday.

Mr Watson, who served as deputy prime
minister and minister of national security dur-
ing the former Ingraham administration, said
there is an absence of charismatic politicians
who can broadly connect with the voter base as
well as can Mr Ingraham.

"We have many brilliant Bahamians who
run many successful businesses, but in order to
lead a country one has to have other quali-
ties. A leader must be able to touch people in
a way which gives them confidence that you
will protect their broad interests — so we have
to wait for that person to emerge who can con-
nect with the Bahamian public," said Mr Wat-
son.

"It would be my biggest nightmare if he did-
n't,” said another long-standing FNM sup-
porter when asked by The Tribune about the
possibility of Mr Ingraham offering for anoth-
er term.

He pointed to several members of Mr Ingra-
ham's Cabinet — current Deputy Prime Min-
ister Brent Symonette, Health Minister Dr
Hubert Minnis, State Immigration Minister
Branville McCartney and State Finance Min-
ister Zhirvargo Laing — as front-runners to

replace him as party leader.

According to the supporter, Mr Symonette
currently holds the most support within the
FNM to follow Mr Ingraham, but said that Mr
Symonette's skin colour may be an obstacle too
huge for him to overcome.

The supporter also reasoned that Mr Symon-
ette may be staying on the sidelines until Mr
Ingraham formally announces whether he will
stay on as leader of the party or not before
possibly galvanising support for a potential
leadership bid.

"I don't think you will see that out of Brent
until he knows what the prime minister is going
to do, whether he is going to step down or run
for another term. But one good thing about
Brent, all Bahamians know he is a man who
isn't there to get what he can get (from the
public purse), he doesn't need that," said the
supporter of the wealthy MP for the St Anne's
constituency.

Mr Ingraham became leader of the FNM in
1990 and served as prime minister from 1992 to
2002, when he stepped down as head of the
party.

Tommy Turnquest, current National Secu-
rity Minister, won a hotly contestant leadership
race to succeed Mr Ingraham, but was defeat-
ed in the 2002 election by PLP leader Perry
Christie.

Previously, Mr Ingraham had said he intend-
ed to serve two consecutive terms as leader, but
returned to the party's helm in late 2005 after
requests from his supporters.

Since his return to front-line politics, there
has been much speculation about Mr Ingra-
ham's future as leader of the FNM.

FROM page one

from spinal cord compression and
that additional surgery was required.

Smith was injured in 2001. He
underwent two surgeries and was
required to have a third, but was
unable to do so for financial rea-
sons.

His attorney expressed concern
about the overcrowded conditions
and the limited medical staff at the
prison to treat Smith.

“He cannot survive in prison. If
he goes to prison you will be sending
him to die. They cannot afford treat-
ment (in prison),” he said during a
very lengthy plea to the Court.

Mr Ducille described Smith as a
“productive citizen” who brought
joy to people through his talent as a
singer.

Smith, a native of Bimini, has pro-
duced a number of popular hit songs,
such as One More Sweet Song,
Gone to Jail, Lay Low in Bimini,
Hold Your Head, You Gat Me
Thinking.

Mr Ducille also noted that his
client was very remorseful and
pleaded guilty to the offence at the
trial. He said Smith deserves a sec-
ond chance.

“Prison should be a last resort.
Productive citizens should not be
placed in prison.

“Allow him to continue his life,
allow him to continue to be a good
person and productive citizen in soci-
ety,” he said.

However, Prosecutor Jillian
Williams stated that Smith lured his
13-year-old victim in his car on Jan-
uary 12, 2004, and took her to an
unknown location on Farm Road,
where he had sexual intercourse with

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FROM page one

alleged incident, recalled that Father Brown
approached her while she, her cousins and friends
were on the beach talking with a group of boys she
knew. She told the court that Father Brown went
behind the boys, who were 16 and 17 years old, and

told her to move away.

The young girl told the court that after she moved
away to talk to her cousin, Father Brown followed
her and told her to move a second time. According
to the witness, she and her cousin walked further
across the beach. She said that when she stopped to
talk to a young male friend, Father Brown remind-
ed her that he had already told her to move and

began to push her.

“He started to push me and I turned around and
said ‘don’t push me,’” she told the court. The girl
said that Father Brown kept pushing her in the back
and grabbed her shirt. She said that she again told
him not to touch her and she pushed him away. She
said that when she spun around Father Brown
slapped her. The girl told the court that she hit
Father Brown back, but could not recall where. She
claimed that the priest started to fight her and

pushed her into the sand.

“He was hitting me and I was hitting him. He sat
on top of me and choked me and slapped me,” she
said. The girl told the court that the senior master of
her school along with several church parishioners lift-

ed Father Brown off her.

During cross-examination by Mr Munroe, the
girl said that Father had probably thought she did
not know the boys on the beach. She told the court
that she never “cursed” at Father Brown and expect-

FROM page one

expressed his satisfaction that the
“door is not closed” to the Gov-
ernment’s offer.

Describing the afternoon’s
talks as “constructive,” he said
the parties would meet again next
Wednesday to further discuss the
issue and seek to finally resolve
the matter.

While going beyond its own
previous proposals, Governmen-
t’s offer was not the one the BNU
had put forward yesterday.

They made a verbal proposal
that they should get their full
health insurance coverage imme-
diately, while deferring their four
per cent pay increase until July
1, 2010. They plan to put this in
writing to the Government as ear-
ly as today.

Government’s latest offer to
the nurses goes far beyond its ini-
tial proposal. During the budget
debate, Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham said economic condi-
tions meant their promised $10.5
million healthcare coverage could
not start until 2012, when the
economy is expected to start its
recovery.

Allowing for healthcare cover-
age to come into effect on July
1, 2010, the new offer adds that in
the meantime, nurses can have
one hundred per cent of their
healthcare costs paid — more
than if they used their insurance,
which usually covers up to 80 per
cent of costs, noted Dr Minnis —

Singer jailed
for teen rape

her against her will.

She said that injuries to the victim,
who was a student at Jack Hayward
High School at the time, were sup-
ported by medical evidence.

Ms Williams noted that Smith opt-
ed to plead guilty after the prosecu-
tion had called the complainant to
the stand.

“T know that Mr Smith’s injuries
would present challenges for the
prison staff, but they would have to
deal with it,” she said.

After taking the doctor’s report
and Smith’s medical condition into
consideration, Justice Watkins
stressed that the victim must also be
considered.

“Mr Smith, I have listened to
counsel, I have read the probation
report and the medical reports of
Dr Munnings.

“T have to consider the victim, a
young girl who is scarred for the rest
of her life. Her mother is saying to
give you beyond the maximum sen-
tence of seven years.

“Your counsel is saying not to
impose custodial sentence because
it would not serve any useful pur-
pose, but I do not share that view. I
feel that a custodial sentence is
appropriate,” she said.

Mr Ducille thanked Justice
Watkins for exercising compassion in
her sentencing of Smith.

“We express a great deal of grati-
tude to you,” he said.

Girl testifies

Nurses

if they seek medical treatment
for a “job-related” ailment.

They would first of all be
offered all-costs-covered treat-
ment at the Princess Margaret
Hospital. If the care they required
was not available there, at a pri-
vate facility, and lastly abroad,
said Dr Minnis.

Meanwhile, they would get the
four per cent salary increase they
had initially expected to come
along with the insurance cover-
age in 2009 in 2010 instead, as
they called for in their own
counter-proposal.

Nurses said it is a fact that they
work in an environment that puts
them at high risk for illness that
means health insurance is so crit-
ical to them.

Hundreds of nurses called in
“sick” at their various stations in
the last 14 days when the Prime
Minister announced in present-
ing the 2009/2010 Budget to the
House that government would
have to postpone their group
health insurance to next year
because of the serious economic
downturn.

Before next week’s meeting
government will be looking at
“trends” to see how many nurses
were taking sick days before the
“sick-out” and how many are at
present out to see whether things
are back to normal.

ed to be disciplined by her parents, but not someone
she didn’t really know. She admitted during cross-
examination that she had sucked her teeth when
Father Brown had told her to move. The girl admit-
ted she had done it intentionally and that it had
been a rude gesture.

The girl’s mother told the court that she met her
daughter at the Cable Beach Police Station where
she was making a complaint about the incident.
During cross-examination she admitted that she
would not approve of her daughter performing a
sex act on a man, being openly promiscuous, or
cursing and carrying on. She said that if she were at
the beach and her daughter had refused to move she
would have physically removed her herself.

A 15-year-old friend of the complainant said that
while they were talking to a friend Father Brown
tapped the complainant on her shoulder and told her
to go where she should be. She said that the com-
plainant walked off and stopped to talk to a friend
again. She said that Father Brown tapped her on the
shoulder again and she pulled away. She told the
court that Father Brown pulled the complainant’s
arm and slapped her. She told the court that the
complainant started fighting and he hit her again.
She said that Father Brown fell on top of the com-
plainant and began to choke and hit her. Two other
young girls who witnessed the incident also gave
similar testimony. The prosecution is expected to call
two more witnesses when the trial resumes on Sep-
tember 3 before Magistrate Ancella Williams.

Father Brown if convicted could receive a $150
fine or three months in prison.

This will determine whether
the Government is willing to pro-
ceed with resolving the dispute,
he suggested.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham had told parliament that gov-
ernment would be unwilling to
do so if the nurses continued to
engage in what he termed an
“illegal strike.”

Downplaying the idea that
nurses had been engaged in a
“sick out”, Mrs Hamilton yester-
day said many nurses have dis-
covered over the last two weeks
that they are ill.

“This exercise would have
forced nurses to go and have a
physical, and we found that a lot
of nurses are sick. I think this sub-
stantiates the fact that we need
insurance,” she said.

She rejected the idea that nurs-
es could be insured under the
Bahamas Public Service Union’s
medical plan, as was suggested
by that union’s president on Mon-
day, pointing out that some physi-
cians do not accept the BPSU’s
insurance.

“That’s not an option,” she
said.

President of the Bahamas
Christian Council, Reverend
Patrick Paul, was present at the
meeting and said he felt there was
now a “light at the end of the tun-
nel.”

Mr Foulkes said the BCC had
been “working behind the
scenes” to help find a solution to
the impasse between the parties.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009, PAGE 9



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



AP source:
Bucks
to sent
Jefferson
to Spurs

@ By COLIN FLY
AP Sports Writer

MILWAUKEE (AP) — A
Bucks official with knowledge
of the deal said Tuesday that
Milwaukee plans to trade scor-
ing forward Richard Jefferson
to the San Antonio Spurs for
Bruce Bowen, Kurt Thomas
and Fabricio Oberto, giving
them a veteran cast and finan-
cial flexibility.

The person confirmed the
pending trade to The Associat-
ed Press and requested
anonymity because the deal is
not official until a call later
Tuesday. ESPN.com first
reported details of the deal.

The Bucks are sending Jef-
ferson away less than a year
after acquiring the scoring for-
ward in a draft day trade last
season with New Jersey for Yi
Jianlian and Bobby Simmons.
Jefferson’s contract has two
years and $29.2 million remain-
ing on it.

Jefferson was a steady offen-
sive force for Milwaukee last
season after spending his first
seven years in New Jersey. He
averaged 19.6 points and shot
a career-high 39.7 per cent from
3-point range while starting all
82 games.

Jefferson became the Bucks’
biggest offensive threat after
Michael Redd and Andrew
Bogut suffered season-ending
injuries, but the Bucks’ tight
financial situation made a move
necessary. Milwaukee does not
want to pay the NBA’s luxury
tax, which last year hit teams
dollar-for-dollar once they
reach $71.15 million in total
payroll.

Redd, Bogut and Jefferson
are scheduled to make more
than $41 million combined this
season.

The trade was a shock to at
least one Bucks player: Charlie
Villanueva posted “RJ traded
to Spurs. Wow” on his Twitter
account before the trade was
official.

The deal actually might allow
the Bucks to keep Ramon Ses-
sions or Villanueva himself,
since both are restricted free
agents.

Bowen, Thomas and Oberto
give the Bucks a veteran group.
None is signed beyond the
upcoming season.

Bowen, 38, is a 13-year vet-
eran known for his defensive
efforts against the Western
Conference’s top guards.
Thomas, 36, has played 14 years
in the NBA, primarily at for-
ward and center, and has been a
bench player each of the last
three seasons, averaging 4.3
points last year.

Oberto, 34, has played four
years in San Antonio, averaging
3.6 points per game in his NBA
career. Last season he under-
went a procedure to correct an
irregular heartbeat.

Soccer fans
in Argentina
cemetery try
to save team

BUENOS AIRES, Argenti-
na (AP) — It’s the ultimate
grave situation.

Fans of Gimnasia La Plata
looking for help to save the
team from relegation to the
second division are visiting
local cemeteries and praying
near the tombs of some of
Argentina’s former leaders,
including Juan Domingo Peron
and Raul Alfonsin.

Supporters have been leav-
ing flowers and other gifts near
gravesides in the Recoleta
cemetery in Buenos Aires.
Curiously, neither Peron nor
Alfonsin were Gimnasia fans.

“This is what some fans are
doing, but the club has nothing
to do with this,” Gimnasia
spokesman Jose Luis Arrien
said. “It’s a bit quirky.”

The newspaper Clarin said
supporters have been praying
at the tomb of the club’s for-
mer president, Saturnino Per-
driel.

Wimbledon: Venus
defeats Voegele

@ By STEVEN WINE
AP Sports Writer

WIMBLEDON, England
(AP) — Five points into her
opening match at Wimbledon,
Venus Williams slipped and
went sprawling on the grass she
loves.

The five-time champion
recovered from her stumble at
the start Tuesday and defeated
Stefanie Voegele 6-3, 6-2.

It was Williams’ first appear-
ance on Centre Court since the
2008 final, when she beat sister
Serena for her second Wimble-
don title in a row.

“T really enjoyed being out
there,” Venus said. “It’s a spe-
cial moment when you walk
back as defending champion on
that court.”

Williams’ tumble was one of
several wobbly moments as she
began her bid for a three-peat.
She double-faulted in the open-
ing game and had to erase two
break points. She was passed
the first two times she reached
the net. She slipped and nearly
fell a second time.

“It’s grass,” she said. “Youre
going to slip sometimes.”

Williams found her footing,
winning 14 consecutive points
to help take a 5-1 lead. She had
another spurt in the second set
after losing serve for 2-all, and
swept the final four games.

“Having won this title multi-
ple times, you get that sense of
what it takes to win,” she said.
“And I definitely have a good
grip on that — what it takes to
win this title.”

Other players also took a
tumble — Andy Roddick fell
once during his victory, and
even a ball boy fell on his face.
But for the second day in a row,
there were no big upsets,
although American Melanie
Oudin pulled off a surprise in
her tournament debut. The 17-
year-old from Marietta, Ga.,
earned her first win in a major
event by beating No. 29-seeded
Sybille Bammer 4-6, 6-4, 6-2.

“T was really nervous most of
the match today, but finally in
the third I started to calm
down,” Oudin said. “I’m really
glad I pulled it out.”

Roddick followed Williams
onto Centre Court and beat
Jeremy Chardy 6-3, 7-6 (3), 4-6,
6-3. Roddick, seeded sixth, had
only nine unforced errors and
hit 46 winners, including 20
aces. He improved to 20-3 in
tiebreakers this year.

Roddick was Wimbledon
runner-up to Roger Federer in
2004 and 2005, but Andy Mur-
ray of Britain is considered the



VENUS WILLIAMS of the US serves to Stefanie Voegele of Switzerland in
their first round singles match at Wimbledon yesterday...

3

Lourdes Dominguez Lino 7-5,
6-3. Safina said she was ham-
pered by left knee tendinitis
that has bothered her at times
the past two months, although
she reached the French Open
final less than three weeks ago.

Former No. 1 Jelena Jankovic
beat Julia Goerges 6-4, 7-6 (0).
Kimiko Date Krumm, a 38-
year-old wild card who came
out of retirement last year, lost
in her first Wimbledon match
since 1996 to No. 9-seeded Car-
oline Wozniacki, 5-7, 6-3, 6-1.

No. 17 Amelie Mauresmo,
the 2006 champion, defeated
Melinda Czink 6-1, 4-6, 6-2.

On the men’s side, No. 3-
seeded Andy Murray began his
bid to become the first British
man to win Wimbledon since
1936 by beating American
Robert Kendrick 7-5, 6-7 (3),
6-3, 6-4. Americans Robby
Ginepri, Kevin Kim, Bobby
Reynolds and Wayne Odesnik
also lost.

Ginepri won the first three
games, then lost 18 of the next
21 to fall to 2002 champion
Lleyton Hewitt 6-4, 6-1, 6-1.
Ginepri was bothered by a neck
injury he suffered last week and
received treatment from a train-
er three times during the match.

The unseeded Hewitt and
Federer are the only former
champions in the men’s draw.
Hewitt next plays No. 5-seed-
ed Juan Martin del Potro, who
never faced a break point and
swept Arnaud Clement 6-3, 6-1,
6-2.

No. 12 Nikolay Davydenko
beat Daniel Evans 6-2, 6-3, 6-3.
British wild card Alex Bog-
danovic’s record at Wimbledon
fell to 0-8 when he lost to No. 20
Tomas Berdych 6-3, 6-4, 6-4.

Williams prepared for Wim-
bledon as usual on hard courts
back home in Florida, and did-
mt play a grass-court warmup
tournament. But after her slow
start she looked at home on the
lawn.

In one game she smacked a
backhand return up the line for
a winner, then did the same
thing from the other wing. Her
second serve was unsteady, but
she lost only six points on her
first serve while hitting 29 win-
ners and committing only 11
unforced errors.

“On the grass, I think you
have the opportunity to make
fantastic shots that are very
entertaining and great plays,”
Williams said. “I think the game
is more fast-paced. In a lot of
ways, it makes it a lot more
exciting.”

Williams is only 6-4 since ear-
ly April, but Wimbledon always

ao.
=
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=
na
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Poel
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n
—
4

biggest obstacle for Federer this
year.

“As far as who’s talking
about what, I don’t really care,”
Roddick said. “I just want to go
out and win matches.”

The new retractable roof

again worked well, keeping rain
away for a second successive
day. A cloudless afternoon
prompted an official on the
club’s public-address system to
urge that fans use sun block.
“It looks really nice, the

roof,” Williams said. “We
haven’t had to use it yet. It’s
kind of ironic. But ’m very sure
it will get some use.”
Top-ranked Dinara Safina
opened another bid for her first
Grand Slam title by beating

brings her out of the doldrums.
She’s 51-4 at the All England
Club since 2000, when she won
the title for the first time. She’s
seeded third but the tourna-
ment favourite with London
bookmakers.

Another test: US to face top-ranked Spain

m By ANDREW DAMPF
AP Sports Writer

BLOEMFONTEIN, South Africa (AP)
— Talk about tests: After reaching the Con-
federations Cup semifinals in unlikely fash-
ion, the reward for the US soccer team is a
matchup Wednesday with top-ranked
Spain.

“The team is on a high for sure,” US
coach Bob Bradley said Tuesday. “From a
football standpoint, it’s a great challenge
but we couldn’t be more excited for this
chance.”

The United States is 0-3 against Spain,
losing 3-1 in the first round of the 1950
World Cup, 2-0 in a 1992 exhibition at Val-
ladolid and 1-0 in an exhibition on June 4
last year at Santander, when Xavi Hernan-
dez beat backup goalkeeper Brad Guzan
with a low shot in the 79th minute.

“They have less pressure. They have
nothing to lose. For them, it’s a positive
that we assume the title of favourite, the
responsibility and the pressure,” Spanish
midfielder Xavi Hernandez said. “We
assume the mantle of favourites but it won’t
be an easy match. Not at all.”

Spain, the European champion, has set an
international record with 15 straight victo-
ries and will be trying to stretch its unbeat-
en streak to a record 36, breaking the mark
set by Brazil from December 1993 to Janu-
ary 1996. Brazil’s streak includes a loss on
penalty kicks to Uruguay in the 1995 Copa
America final, which is considered a tie in
FIFA’s records.

“A big part of playing them is not getting
frustrated because you don’t have the ball,”
Landon Donovan said. “The other side of
that is trying to put them under pressure.
That’s our goal, and if we can do that we
have a chance.”

After losing 3-1 to world champion Italy
and 3-0 to South American champion
Brazil, the 14th-rannked United States



CHARLIE DAVIES controls a ball as coach Bob
Bradley stands nearby, at the start of a US
national soccer team training session at the
Seisa Ramabodu Stadium, in Bloemfontein,
South Africa on Tuesday...

(AP Photo: Rebecca Blackwell)

reached the semis with a 3-0 victory over
African champion Egypt as Brazil beat the
Azzurri 3-0. The winner of Wednesday’s
game advances to the final against Brazil or
host South Africa on Sunday, while the los-
er goes to the third-place match the same
day.

FIFA said there were about 6,000 tickets
still on sale for the match at the 38,000-seat
Free State Stadium in Bloemfontein.

“There will be a certain number of tickets
given on a complimentary basis,” FIFA
spokesman Nicolas Maingot said. “Again,
it’s a gesture from FIFA ... for people to
have a chance to enjoy this game.”

The US is 1-7-1 against top-ranked teams,
beating Brazil in the 1998 CONCACAF
Gold Cup, losing to Brazil seven times and
tying Argentina on June 8 last year during
a downpour at Giants Stadium.

“We have to be very careful,” Spain
coach Vicente del Bosque said. “They have
avery talented midfield that pushes upfield
easily. They play very direct, attacking foot-
ball.”

Spain’s forwards, Fernando Torres and
David Villa, are complemented by Her-
nandez and talented defenders such as Car-
les Puyol and Joan Capdevila. Del Bosque,
who replaced Luis Aragones as coach fol-
lowing the European title, has won 13 con-
secutive games.

“Different types of players are essential
for a great national team. Torres is such a
great forward, Xabi Alonso is in the middle
of everything they do. Puyol, on top of
everything else, plays with so much heart, so
much fight,” Bradley said. “Aragones and
now Del Bosque have taken all that talent
and turned it into something special.
They’re on an incredible run now and we’ve
got to find a way to break it.”

US captain Carlos Bocanegra, sidelined
since injury a hamstring in the June 6 World
Cup qualifier against Honduras, had near-
ly recovered and would boost the American
defense against Spain, coming off its first
major title in 44 years. Regular goalkeeper
Tim Howard will return after Guzan faced
the Egyptians.

“Carlos is back into full training,” Bradley
said. “We still have to test him a little bit but
he certainly becomes an option in this
game.”

One of the biggest challenges for the
Americans will be maintaining their com-
posure while Spain taps the ball back and
forth in midfield.

“T’m not a big stat guy in soccer,” Bradley
said, “but in every game Spain plays they
always dominate possession.”

e AP Sports Writers Raf Casert and Paul
Logothetis in Bloemfontein and AP Sports
Writer Chris Lehourites in Johannesburg
contributed to this report

ar Game
pier
be true

scorcher

m By RB FALLSTROM
AP Sports Writer

ST LOUIS (AP) — Joel
Pineiro’s right leg gave way at
the end of his seven-inning stint
in 90-degree heat last week, the
cramping in his calf so painful
that his teammates had to carry
the Cardinals pitcher off the
field. He tried to walk it off in
the dugout, but wound up beg-
ging trainer Barry Weinberg for
help.

“T was like "Barry, it hurts too
much,” Pineiro recalled.

Infielder Brendan Ryan also
had cramps and second base-
man Skip Schumaker required
IV fluids for dehydration. Two
days earlier, Tigers pitcher
Justin Verlander wilted in the
St. Louis heat.

“T was exhausted,” Verlan-
der said after lasting only four
innings. “I think after the first
inning, I was just gassed. I
couldn’t get my legs underneath
me.”

All this and there’s still three
weeks to go before St. Louis
hosts its first All-Star Game
since 1966 — that one memo-
rable for being held in 105-
degree temperatures at old
Busch Stadium.

Having all the reserves for
the July 14 game could be a
good thing: The new Busch Sta-
dium, now four years old, does-
n't have the artificial turf that
made hot days extra miserable.
But triple-digit temperatures
are a distinct possibility and the
elements could play a role.

On steamy days like Pineiro’s
last start, messages on the score-
board advise fans to drink plen-
ty of fluids. Players don’t have
to be reminded, but Pineiro
would up changing three soaked
undershirts plus his uniform top
during his outing. He retired 16
batters in a row after giving up
four runs in the first inning
before fading.

Schumaker had company tak-
ing IV fluids.

“There’s a lot of guys that
have done that,” he said. “It’s
not easy to stay hydrated, it’s
really difficult. I don’t know
how the pitchers and catchers
do it.”

Tigers manager Jim Leyland,
whose team was around for the
first truly searing series this
year, said overcoming the heat
is largely a case of mind over
matter. His advice for rookie
pitcher Rick Porcello before
pitching the finale of a three-
game series last week: “I think
you drink a lot of water, you
drink a lot of fluids, you do
what your mommy told you.”

Leyland remembers when it
was much worse, before the
Cardinals scrapped artificial turf
leading into the 1996 season.
The present scenario is a “piece
of cake” compared to the days
when thermometers on the field
approached 130 degrees and the
glass windows from the stadi-
um club produced a magnify-
ing effect.

The only conditions more
onerous from a personal stand-
point was the time he had to
catch both ends of a minor
league double at Savannah, Ga.,
back in the 1960s. Leyland said
he lost 11 pounds and “TI only
weighed like 175 to start with.”

“Tt’s humid, it’s hot, but I can
assure you it’s not nearly as bad
as when they had the turf,” Ley-
land said. “When the turf was
here it was the hottest place I’d
ever been in the summertime.

“Guys used to have to come
in between innings and put their
feet in buckets. You can see the
steam coming up.”

Sort of like Tuesday in St.
Louis, where it was 98 degrees
with a heat index of 104 shortly
after midday. And like it very
well could be for the All-Star
Game.

“It’s just part of the game,”
Pineiro said. “We’re just start-
ing now, wait until July and
August roll around.”

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays





PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Roberts to get

exposure on tour

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

EVERY year, at least one
Bahamian is included on the
Caribbean, Latin American
and Central American Tennis
Confederation’s summer tour
where players are exposed to
international competition.

This year’s recipient is
Justin Roberts, who is travel-
ing with coach Bradley Bain
and teaming up in doubles
with Gian Issa of Suriname.

The trio are in town with
Roberts and Issa to compete
in the Security & General
International Junior Champi-
onships that is currently
underway at the National
Tennis Center.

Bain, who has traveled with
the duo from the first leg of
the tour in El Salvador three
weeks ago, said the tour — set
to wrap up in August — is
designed to get players 14
years and younger in action.

“The only thing the kids are
lacking is match play and the
only way they can get it is by
playing in these matches,”
Bain said.

Bain said he’s responsible
for taking Roberts, who is
ranked at No.9 on the tour, to
at least eight tournaments
with a goal of trying to get him
down to at least one or two.

“We have embarked on a
programme to get him ready
for next year when he turns
15,” Bain said. “By then, he
would have gained enough
experience to get him ready
to play in more tournaments
in the under 18 division.”

Issa, according to Bain, was
the top player last year and
together this year, they are
hoping to emerge as the top
doubles team on the tour.

Roberts said he’s delighted
to be back home and compet-
ing in the tournament.

[>



READY FOR SUMMER TOUR — Shown are coach Bradley Bain (centre), Justin Roberts (right) of the Bahamas and Gian Issa of Suriname...

“Tt’s been good, but I hope
to improve as the tournament
goes on,” said Roberts, who
admitted that he needs to
work a little more on his con-
centration.

The 12-year-old Lyford Cay
student said that having
played so many tournaments
with international players, he
can only get better as he con-
tinues to improve on his per-

formance.

And with 14-year-old Issa
as a traveling partner, Roberts
said they have been able to
help each other with their
game.

Issa, here on his second trip,
said the difference here as
opposed to the other coun-
tries they competed in, is the
altitude. He said he prefers
playing here because there’s

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not that much pressure.

As for Roberts, Issa said
“he’s a very good player, but
he just needs to work on his
self-control and his serve a lit-
tle more. But we play doubles
very well together.”

On Friday, Bain and the
two players will head to Aru-
ba to play in their next tour-
nament. From there, they will
go to St Martin on July 3.

After taking a short break
at home, they will head back
on the road for their final four
tournaments tn late July, end-
ing up with the completion of
the tour in August.

“By then, hopefully both of
them will be in the top five,”
Bain said. “Once they do that,
they will then be invited to
compete in a number of other
tournaments.”

BLIA’s annual

SOME trex champs

all set for
next week

Bm By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

RIGHT on the heels of the Securi-
ty & General International Junior
Tennis Championships, the Bahamas
Lawn Tennis Association is getting
ready to host its annual T-Rex Junior
National Tennis Championships.

The championships is scheduled to
get underway Monday and run
through Saturday, July 4 at the
National Tennis Center.

“All of the players from Grand
Bahama will stay on,” said BLTA
president Steve Turnquest of the play-
ers who are already in town for the
Security & General International
Tournament at the NTC.

“This is the biggest tournament for
the year for our players in terms of
getting points for their rankings. And
to date, we already have over 60 play-
ers lined up to compete from New
Providence and Grand Bahama.”

The players will get a chance to
compete in the boys and girls singles in
the 10-and-under, 12, 14, 16 and 18
divisions. However, they will only
compete in the doubles for boys and
girls 18 and 12 divisions.

A total of 38 boys have registered to
compete, while there are only 10 girls
so far.

Based on their performances, the
BLTA will select a national team that
will compete in the JITIC Tourna-
ment in the Dominican Republic in
the 14s and 16s divisions.

Among some of the players to
watch for at this year’s tournament
are Kevin Major in the boys’ 14s,
Johnathan Taylor in the boys’ 16s,
Gabrielle Moxey in the girls 16s, Chel-
si Russell in the girls’ 14s, Iesha Shep-
herd in the girls 10s and Joshua Turn-
quest of Eleuthera in the boys’ 12s.

“The tournament has always been a
very exciting and competitive one and
we expect that with the list of players
entered this year, the tournament
should be very good,” Turnquest said.

“We are having a very competitive
Security & General Tournament and
the players have been able to fine tune
their game, so we expect that they will
be ready for the Jr Nationals.”

At the end of the tournament, play-
ers will also receive points for their
national rankings.

More than 300
to compete at RBC
swimming champs

THE Royal Bank of Canada

(Bahamas) National Swimming
Championships is slated to
begin today and splash though
Saturday at the Betty Kelly
Kenning National Swim Com-
plex.

Facilitated by the Bahamas
Swimming Federation (BSF),
the event features seven swim
clubs and over 300 swimmers.
Morning sessions are expected
to start at 9am and evening ses-
sions at 6pm.

“This year’s swimming
nationals feature a highly tal-
ented pool of athletes,” said
Algernon Cargill, president of
the BSF. “We are anticipating a
highly competitive meet and are
pleased that RBC is again part-
nering with us as the main spon-
sor of this event.”

“RBC will celebrate its 26th
consecutive anniversary of
sponsoring the RBC Bahamas
National Swimming Champi-
onships in partnership with the
Bahamas Swim Federation.

“In addition to sponsoring
this year’s national meet, RBC
will be the inaugural sponsor of
the Academic All Bahamas
Swimming Team Award.

“This new initiative aims to
recognise and support BSF stu-

TEs
Dali;

TRACK

BAHAMASAIR will
operate a B737 scheduled
to leave Nassau for
Havana, Cuba, for the Cen-
tral American and
Caribbean Championships
on Thursday, July 2 at
1:30pm and returning on
Monday, July 6 at 5pm.





RBC sponsors the RBC Bahamas National Swimming Championships.
Shown (I-r) are Jan Knowles, RBC regional manager of public relations,
Joyce Riviere, area manager for the Family Islands, Algernon Cargill,
president of the Bahamas Swim Federation and Deborah Zonicle, region-
al manager of marketing and product management.

dent athletes who display excel-
lence in sports and academics,”
said Jan Knowles, regional man-
ager of public relations for
RBC.

To be recognised as part of
the Academic All Bahamas
Swimming Team, students must
have a grade point average of
3.5 or higher and have achieved
a BSF national time standard
in an individual swimming
event.

“This is in keeping with
RBC’s commitment to youth

and education,” Knowles said.

The swimming nationals will
be televised live on Cable Chan-
nel 12 June 24-27.

The official opening cere-
monies and first presentation
of the Academic All Bahamas
Swimming Team Awards is set
for 6pm June 25.

Tickets for each day’s events
can be purchased at the door.
The Betty Kelly Kenning
National Swim Complex is
located at the Queen Elizabeth
Sports Centre.

Rodney Carey Jr advances

FROM page 11

so great, but I played as well as
I could,” she said. “I didn’t
know much about the girl, so I
didn’t know how she played.
She played very well.”

Another upset on the girls’
side came from American
Kelsey Laurente, who disposed
of No.7 Rocio Ortela of Puerto
Rico in an impressive 6-0, 6-0
win.

“T was just on today. I tried to
play as best as I could. Every-
thing came together for me,”
said Laurente, who hasn’t

played that many matches com-
ing into the tournament.

“T just hope that I can con-
tinue to play as well as I did
today. Hopefully I can play
through to the final and even
possibly win the title.”

The door was opened when
another American Hai-Li Kong
sent top seed Gaia Samesi of
Italy packing with a 6-3, 6-4
decision.

From the 14-and-under divi-
sion, a number of Bahamians
were in action, including Justin
Roberts, who remained unde-
feated through three matches
by not losing a single game.



THE TRIBUNE



@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

DESPITE getting off to a slow start,
Rodney Carey managed to prevail with
a two-set victory over German Delf
Gohlke to advance to the next round of
the Security & General International
Junior Championships.

Seeded No.3 in the boys’ 18-and-
under singles, Carey pulled off a 7-5, 6-
2 decision in the Bahamian-German
showdown yesterday at the National
Tennis Center as the International
Tennis Federation sanctioned event,
hosted by the Bahamas Lawn Tennis
Association, swung into high gear.

“It was a good match overall, but
I’ve been struggling quite a bit,” said
Carey, who saw flashes of a previous
tournament he played in Bermuda. “I

PAGE 1

0

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24,



rt

2009





probably have to get
on the court a little
earlier to get warmed
up so I can be ready
for my matches.”

The 16-year-old
Grand Bahamian,
preparing to play on
the Davis Cup team
in July, despite the
way he played, was
still pleased that he
won his opener and
now he can look forward to the rest
of the tournament.

Not so fortunate in staying alive in
the main draw on the boys’ side was
Johnathan Taylor, who got ousted in
identical set scores of 6-2, 6-2 by Denil
Sirota of Russia.

“T actually played well, but the guy
just overpowered me,” said Taylor, the

Oe ant

RESULTS: S&G International Junior Championships

Here’s a look at some of the results posted yesterday:

14-and-under

Philip Major Jr. (Bah) def. Stefan Copper (GBR) w/o

Jodi Arconada (Arg) def. Kevin Major Jr. (Bah) 4-2, 4-1
Justin Roberts (Bah) def. Conor Outerbridge (Ber) 4-0, 4-0
Loran Minns (Bah) def. Ryan Simms (Jam) 4-2, 1-4 (13-11)
Juan Bisono (Dom) def. Christian Cargill (Bah) 2-4, 4-0, 10-4
James Finnigan (GBR) def. Dylan Walker (Bah) 2-4, 4-2, 10-6
Michael Wallace (Bah) def. Isaac Klonaris (Bah) 4-0, 4-2
Rasheed Carey (Bah) def. Shannon Francis (Bah) 4-0, 4-2
Nicoy Rolle (Bah) def. Michael Cooper (Bah) 4-2, 5-4

Tyler Smith (Ber) def. Danielle Thompson (Bah) 3-5, 5-4, 10-8
Emily Sneddon (Can) def. Eva Frazzoni (Ber) 4-2, 4-0

18-and-under

Skylar Kuykendall (USA) def. Kalotina Klonaris (Bah) 6-4, 6-2
Connor Farren (USA) def. Yifan Dang (CHN) 6-3, 7-5

Anna Rudolfova (CZE) def. Zaire Simmons (Ber) 6-1, 6-0
Hai-Li Kong (USA) def. Gaia Sanesi (Itl) (1) 6-3, 6-4

Kelsey Laurente (USA) def. Rocio Ortela (Pur) (7) 6-0,
Denil Sirota (Rus) (7) def. Johnathan Taylor (Bah) 6-2,

6-0
6-2

Rodney Carey (Bah) (3) def. Delf Gohlke (Ger) 7-5, 6-2
Fausthyara Pietersz (Aho) (3) def. Maci Epstein (USA) 6-4, 6-1
Dhanielly Quevedo (USA) def. Thais Romero (Mex) (6) 6-4, 6-1
Paula Montoya (ven) def. Chelsi Russell (Bah) 6-0, 7-6 (4)







PAGE 9 ¢ International sports news

Carey Jr advances with two-

KELSEY LAURENTE

only Bahamian who won his first round
match in the main draw on day one
Monday.

If there’s any consolation for Taylor,
it’s the fact that he advanced to the
main draw after he got eliminated in
the qualifying round last year.

“Next year, I will probably do bet-
ter,” said the 15-year-old. “I just have
to work on my game a little more.”

The Russian, seeded at No.7, admit-
ted that he didn’t play up to par
because he wasn’t feeling that well.

“Last year, I played him and it was a
really tough match,” Sirota said. “This







|

i
{

Photos: Tim Clarke/Tribune 31 fi



JOHNATHAN TAYLOR

year, it was another tough match. It
was my first match for the tournament,
but he played very well.”

If he plays up to par, Sirota is con-
vinced that “nobody in the tournament
can beat me.”

On the girls’ side, Grand Bahamian
Kalotina Klonaris was one of the three
seeded players knocked out of the
tournament.

Klonaris, seeded at No.8, didn’t sur-
vive in her match against American
Skylar Kuykendall, who prevailed with
a 6-4, 6-2 decision.

“Tt was very rough for me today. I

Wimbledon:
Venus defeats
Voegele...

See page 9

et victory

KALOTINA KLONARIS

tried my best, but she played very good
today,” said Klonaris, who was coming
off an injured shoulder that hampered
her movement.

“T played as best as I could, but she
just played better. I should have been
able to keep the ball in play more, but
it wasn’t working for me. You have
some days when things just don’t work.
Today was mine.”

For Kuykendall, she said she simply
did what she had to do to win.

“IT moved my feet, my serving wasn’t

SEE page 10

aT Tdi







$3m signal

fee rise hits

Cable hasic
margins

BISX-listed firm
says survey
suggesting prices
high ‘slanted
from beginning’
due to poor
comparisons

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas’ basic
cable TV margins are being
compressed by ever-rising signal
fees which rose by “almost $3
million in the last year”, Tri-
bune Business was told yester-
day, with a senior executive
explaining that a survey sug-
gesting the company’s prices
‘appear high’ was “slanted from
the beginning”.

David Burrows, Cable
Bahamas’ marketing director,
responding to a consultation
document produced by the
BTC privatisation committee,
said the countries with which
the company’s cable TV prices
were compared - Cayman
Islands, Jamaica and Malta -
were not ‘apples for apples’ or
like-for-lie comparisons.

Mr Burrows said all three
countries were either single
island nations or, at most, con-
sisted of two to three islands,
whereas the Bahamas was an
archipelago of multiple islands.
As a result, Cable Bahamas
incurred extra costs in providing
services, especially to islands
which had a minimal popula-
tion, forcing it to keep cable TV
prices at a certain level to
ensure it covered its costs.

The Cable Bahamas execu-
tive also explained that the
Bahamas’ living standards and
disposable income levels were
much higher than Jamaica’s,
thus making that comparison
more difficult than it appeared.

Pointing out that the BTC
privatisation committee docu-
ment had acknowledged the
price comparisons were chal-
lenging, Mr Burrows told Tri-
bune Business: “Neither of the
three countries are of the same
density, size and geography as
the Bahamas, and definitely not
the same living standards.
Those comparisons are slanted
from the beginning”.

Disposable income and cus-
tomer sophistication “drive pric-
ing”, he added, implying that
this was one factor why the
Bahamas’ prices might appear
high, Mr Burrows said: “The
significant labour, network and
equipment costs in a high liv-
ing standard country like the
Bahamas creates a higher cost
base, which is reflected in the
price.”

While the Bahamas’ demo-
graphics were more in line with
the Cayman Islands, Mr Bur-
rows said cable TV prices there

SEE page 6B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

THE TRIBUNE

uSiINness

WEDNESDAY,

TUNE e, 2c

2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Car dealers brace for
5-10% price increase

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ahamian motor dealers

have been warned by their

suppliers to expect price

increases “of up to 10 per

cent” on new car models
in 2010, Tribune Business was told yes-
terday, at a time when new vehicle sales
for the year to end-May 2009 are down
46.14 per cent year-over-year.

Data supplied by the Bahamas Motor
Dealers Association (BMDA) said that
while its members were “holding their
own in spite of a slumping economy”,
new car sales for May 2009 dropped by
37.82 per cent compared to May 2008.

For the first two months of the 2009
second quarter, April and May, new car
sales industry-wide were said to be down
by 41.9 per cent compared to the year-
before period.

Rick Lowe, the director/operations
manager for Nassau Motor Company,

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* Manufacturers deliver warning, as new car sales to Bahamian
consumers down 46% for first five months in 2009

* Sales off 38% for May, and 41.9 per cent

for first two months in second quarter

told Tribune Business that some
Bahamian new car dealers had been told
by their manufacturer suppliers that the
price of vehicles would go up by between
5-10 per cent on models scheduled for
2010 delivery.

The price increases were blamed by
the manufacturers on a combination of
increased parts prices, gasoline prices
and steel prices, and Mr Lowe said it
was likely that Bahamian dealers would
have to pass the increases - at least part
of them - on to consumers.

“We’ve been told by some of our sup-
pliers to expect price increases of up to
10 per cent on 2010 models,” Mr Lowe
told Tribune Business. “That’s a hefty
chunk.

“The manufacturers are still facing
higher costs in regard to petrol, steel and
parts prices. They’ve warned us to expect
between a minimum of 5 per cent and a
maximum of 10 per cent increase. We’re
on price control, but prices will increase
at the consumer end.”

On a brighter note, Mr Lowe said

inventories being held by Bahamian new
car dealers were now coming more into
line with industry norms. They had been
left with excess stock as a result of the
sales slowdown.

He added: “Normally, we hope to
have 60 days supply on the lot, so when
you’ve got 10 months’ supply, you’re out
of whack. Most retailers’ supply is shrink-
ing to in line with industry standards, so
people will start to order more. It’s been



10 issues cited

in Guana Cay’s
Privy Council
legal appeal

Three-day hearing
over bid to stop
multi-million dollar
Baker’s Bay project
set for July 6-9

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Save Guana Cay Reef
Association will attempt to halt
the multi-million dollar Baker’s
Bay Golf & Ocean Club pro-
ject with a three-day hearing
before the London-based Privy
Council that begins on July 6,
having cited 10 different
grounds for their appeal to the
Bahamas’ highest court.

The Association, through its
Bahamian and London-based
attorneys, is asking the Privy
Council to determine issues that
include whether the Govern-
ment had a duty to consult Gua-
na Cay residents on the project,
being developed by Arizona-
headquartered Discovery Land
Company, before the two par-
ties entered into their Heads of
Agreement in early 2005.

If this was so, the Association
is asking the Privy Council to
determine whether proper con-
sultation took place and, if not,
whether the failure to consul-
tant residents of the Abaco cay
should be remedied.

Other appeal grounds include
asking the Privy Council to
determine the legal effect of the
Heads of Agreement, and
whether this constituted an
agreement to grant Crown and
Treasury land leases, and confer
other rights and incentives,
upon the developers.

The appeal challenges the
then-Cabinet Secretary Wen-
dall Major’s power to confer
these leases, rights and incen-
tives upon Discovery Land
Company, and asks it to rule on
whether the decision to do so
was “irrational” and “constitut-
ed an unlawful fettering of the
powers of other government
agencies.

The Privy Council’s decision
could have major implications
for the process governing how
developments, especially major
ones, are approved in the
Bahamas, and the rights of per-
sons impacted by them to be
consulted and heard. It could
potentially cause a major shake-
up of the Bahamas’ develop-
ment model, depending on
which way the Council rules.

On the consultation issue, the
Association said the judge at
first instance, Acting Supreme
Court Justice Carroll, found

SEE page 4B

End-July target for policy

on medical tourism

Bm By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE MINISTRY of
Tourism could roll out a draft
policy on Medical Tourism
for the Bahamas by end-July
2009, the Minister of Tourism
revealed to Tribune Business
yesterday, as the Centerville
Medical Pavilion positions
itself to be a pioneering facil-
ity with an almost 23,000
Euro ($32,377 ) grant from
the Caribbean Export Devel-
opment Agency (CEDA).

Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace said that before any
institution can label itself as a
medical tourism facility prop-
er, it was necessary for the
Government to have a policy

Facility aims to be
‘gateway’ for new
tourism opportunity
and economic
diversification

in position. And he said what
the Government has drafted
is fairly exciting and excep-
tional.

“We didn’t want to talk
about something until we had
the policy of the Govern-
ment,” he said. “Probably by
the end of July you will see
something that will be able
to be sustained and pro-
longed.”

Founder of the Centerville

SEE page 5B



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SEE page 6B

$500k investment in
Mall medical facility

m By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE TOWN Centre Mall is
opening a medical facility
through an initial investment of
more than $500,000, and could
see its inception as early as end-
September 2009, the proposed
facility’s cxhief executive and
coordinator said yesterday. This
was despite foot traffic through
the Mall diminishing as a result
of the recession.

Dr Thomas Rolle said it was
hoped that the facility will play
the dual role of attracting
patrons to the Mall and provid-
ing “cutting edge health care” to
the average Bahamian.

He said the planned Com-
munity Health Wellness Net-
work, which will have 10 in-

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house doctors, child care facili-
ties and psychological consul-
tants — among other services —
was envisaged to be a virtually
comprehensive ‘Walk-in’-style
medical facility that will have a
triage area.

Dr Rolle said the new facility
was envisioned to one day be
an emergency medical facility
to decentralise the emergency
medical units at the Princess
Margaret Hospital and Doctors
Hospital.

However, he said there was
much ground work to be done
to get the approvals for such a
facility, but he hoped the Gov-
ernment will be receptive to
such an idea.

Dr Rolle said the doctors
who have expressed interest in
practicing in the facility, and

SEE page 6B

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





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work in a growing and dynamic organization and

must be a self-starter, team player, work at the highest
standards of performance, and meet deadlines.

If you are progressive and prepared to advance your
career, submit your resume to the attention of the Director
of HR & Training, hr@bakersbyclub.com or by fax at
242-367-0613.

“Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!”

LRT Se 7001
just call 502-2371 today!

Shoot with the straight arrow

THERE are two sides to
every sword and both are
sharp. Clients and sales pro-
fessionals. Both can be honest
and dishonest.

Naturally, our biological
make-up contains a self-moni-
toring gauge that enables us to
know when we are telling the
truth or when one is dishonest.
This is true for both sales per-
sons and clients. Your body
language and eye movement
all portray signs of being honest
or dishonest. There is also an

intangible mechanism we are
biologically wired with, which I
like to call ‘instincts’ that can
detect the difference.

Let’s first discuss the sales
professional.

Professional........ hmmm, I
think [ll save that for another
discussion and just stick with
honesty for now.

As you may all know, I’m
blunt. I don’t have time to sug-
ar coat, play politics aka (pile-
of-tricks) beat around da bush
and so forth.





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NOTICE

To All Our Valued Customers

Bahamas Welding And Fire Co.,
Ltd. #70 Wilton Street East

Will Be CLOSED
For Annual Stocktaking
Friday June 26th &
Saturday June 27th, 2009.

We apologize for any
Inconvenience caused,
Thanks for your patronage
throughout the year.

Management



Promotional
Marketing

AN eO tana eI Cey



A straight arrow pointed in
the right direction will find its
target, and a bent or crooked
arrow...... who knows what tar-
get it may hit? This is true with
honest sales professionals; they
set goals, client targets and
attain their objectives.

I know this suggestion may
sound condescending but it is
not meant to be. The simplest
and quickest way to be suc-
cessful in sales is to be honest
with your clients; straight,
blunt, direct. Admit if you
don’t know the answer to
something. Admit if you screw
up or make a mistake. Be the
first to call your client and tell
them if you have made an
error. However, before calling
also have a solution or few
solutions available. This may
sound like common sense, but
we all know sense is not so
common.

Little white lies. Are they
worth the risk? That’s your call,
not mine. We have all heard
that it is ‘OK’ to tell little white
lies (as opposed to colorful
lies). Abh, they will never
know the difference, right?
Here is where the yesterday,
today and tomorrow comes
into play.

I tell any new client: “I don’t
want to do business with you
today!” They look at me like
I’m from outer space. Howev-
er, I quickly follow with: “We
want to do business with you
today, tomorrow, next weck,
next month and next year.” In
order to do that one must have
a history (yesterday), a pre-

INSIGHT

For stories behind news,
reat dnsight Mondays

sent (today) and they take care
of tomorrow. If one has been
dishonest with their clients,
obviously their yesterdays will
grow in size, opportunities for
today will diminish and
prospects for tomorrow will
eventually cease . It’s not worth
it. All sales professionals will
tell you: shoot with a straight
arrow.

Dishonest clients

This is simple. Fire them
from your prospect and or
client list and move on. Just as
they will fire you from any
opportunities today or tomor-
row.

Here is where the double-
edged sword comes into play.
We rarely hear of a client or
prospect getting fired, right?
We normally always here about
sales teams or persons being
fired. Well, here is the other
side of the sword. Fire them.
Yes, that’s right, there are some
clients and prospects you do
not want to do business with.

There may be some clients
you already have that you
should terminate. (I can dis-
cuss later how to sort out the
good from the bad and down-
right ugly). Don’t waste your
time with this sort of client.
They will diminish your tomor-
rows, and in sales and business
tomorrows are a blood line.

All of these marketing strate-
gies are certain to keep your
business on top during these
challenging economic times.
Have a productive and prof-
itable week! Remember:
“THOSE WHO MARKET
WILL MAKE IT “

NB: Scott Farrington is pres-
ident of SunTee EmbroidMe, a
promotional and marketing
company specialising in pro-
motional products. Established
over 27 years ago, SunTee
EmbroidMe has assisted local
businesses, ranging from indus-
tries such as tourism and bank-
ing to telecommunications, in
marketing themselves. Read-
ers can contact Mr Farrington
at SunTee EmbroidMe on East
Shirley Street, by e-mail at
scott@sun-tee.com or by tele-
phone at 242-393-3104.





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009, PAGE 3B



Bahamas

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas is “probably
the worst in the region” for
property-based taxes that make
this nation “uncompetitive” in
the battle to attract wealthy sec-
ond homeowners to these
shores, the Bahamas Real
Estate Association’s (BREA)
president yesterday question-
ing whether “the Government
understands what they’re
doing” with recent tax reforms.

William Wong, speaking after
hopes that the Government
would reconsider its Budget real
property tax amendments were
dashed with the Bill’s tabling
on Friday, told Tribune Busi-
ness he found it “amazing” that
other professions impacted by
the changes, particularly the
Bahamas Bar Association, had
not lobbied the administration
over the changes.

The BREA president said the
increased real property tax
rates, especially for real estate
valued in the $3-$7.5 million
bracket, would result in the
Government “losing on both
sides” in terms of tax revenue.
With buyers deterred from
entering the market, fewer high-
end home sales and construc-
tion projects would take place.

As aresult, Mr Wong said
the Government would ulti-
mately lose out on both real
property tax paid over a series
of years, plus millions of dol-
lars in Stamp Tax associated
with the initial purchase of high-
end real estate.

Construction companies
would miss out on new second-
home related projects, result-
ing in a reduction of duty and
taxes earned on imported build-
ing materials. Home appliance
sales would also suffer.

“They’re losing, losing, los-
ing, and I don’t understand,”
Mr Wong told Tribune Busi-
ness of the Government’s likely
revenue intake from real prop-
erty taxes and the second home
market.

“Why doesn’t the Govern-
ment see what we’re trying to
tell them? Why are they being
so stubborn and not looking at
it with more sense?

“The Government is losing
on the Stamp Tax up front, the
real property taxes, the builders
are not finding jobs, and the
appliances, the lawn keeper, the
housemaid and everyone else
loses out. It’s absolutely ridicu-
lous.”

He added: “What is amazing
is that the lawyers are not
speaking up. The Bar Associa-
tion, the lawyers are not speak-
ing up and they’re being impact-
ed as much as we are. They are
sitting back, waiting for a mira-
cle to happen. But if we don’t
make any sales, they will not
get anything” from conveyanc-
ing work.

While the second home mar-
ket is seen as critical to the
Bahamas’ ability to attract high-
net worth, high spending indi-
viduals who create spin-off
industry and employment
opportunities for Bahamians,
the Government would argue
that it has to get its tax revenues
from somewhere.

Wealthy second home own-
ers are far more able to pay
than Bahamians, especially dur-
ing times of economic crisis, and
in doing so pay much more in
taxes per head.

And it is more politically
palatable to impose taxes on
foreigners, as opposed to
Bahamians, with the Govern-
ment having increased its rev-
enue estimates for the 2009-

‘probably worst in Caribbean’ for property taxes

Fears Bahamas still ‘uncompetitive’ for second home sector, with

government likely ‘losing on both ends’ in terms of tax revenue



have paid real property taxes
in excess of $35,000 a year in
the amount of $4.1 million.

“Can it be that we should
design a special tax rate to
accommodate 57 or 68 home-
owners among the thousands of
homeowners in the country, and
to accommodate only the
wealthiest home-owners?” Mr
Ingraham asked.

However, Mr Wong said the
Government should not have
introduced the real property tax
amendments - which seem like-
ly to increase the tax burden on
properties valued between $3-
$7.5 million - at a time when
the real estate industry and
wider economy were struggling.

As to the impact on poten-
tial second home buyers, he
said: “The Bahamas is not the
be all. They [second home own-

ers] have oth-
er choices to
go to which
are a_ lot
cheaper. We [i]
are just pric-
ing ourselves
out of the

market.”
T hoe
BREA presi-

dent said the
wor d
“uncompeti-
tive” would be best to describe
the Bahamas in relation to sec-
ond home owners, adding:
“We’re probably the worst in
the region, and this is not the
time to doit. At least, the Gov-
ernment could wait until busi-
ness was up and running, going
good, then introduce a high-end
tax. This is not the time to do it.

~ CLOSURE OF NEW PROVIDENCE OFFICES~



“Some of the big develop-
ments on New Providence are
feeling the pinch. People are
not buying, and they’re taking a
very, very close look at how
they spend their money.”

Mr Wong said he had called
Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, twice on the
real property tax amendments
and was now waiting to hear
back from him.

He questioned whether the
Government, in raising one real
property tax rate, was likely to
experience the law of diminish-
ing returns in revenues
obtained, having pushed the
rate past the point where it
would maximise its take.

Mr Wong also urged the
Government to do a better job
on collecting real property tax-
es, pointing out that the bulk of

NATH

i
a.
i
z
TL

tance?

The National Ingurance Board 4 ishes na ady ise the general public that most

of its departments /o ffices in New Providence, including the Pay Windows
at the two Post Ofhees, will be closed on Friday, June 26, 2009. Only the
Jumbey Village Local Office will remain open to the public to facili-
tate basic services, such as the distributions of short-term, long-term

and unemployment benefits cheques, the payment of contributions,
the intake of claims, registration, and pension verification. (laimants
with Short-Term Benefit cheques at any of the other Offices in New Provi-
dence, may collect them from the Cashiers Department between the hours
of 9:00 acm. and 4:0 p.m.

The Board’s New Providence offices will re-open on Monday at the usual

HT.

The Board apologizes for any inconvenience caused.

DELTEC BANK & TRUST LIMITED

Invites applications for the position of

INVESTMENT PORTFOLIO MANAGER

Responsibilities will include:

¢ Maintaining a thorough knowledge of global investment markets

¢ Monitoring client investment portfolios and proposing modifications
consistent with policies, procedures and client guidelines
Initiating and checking the execution of trades
Liaising with Investment Fund Managers and Due Diligence Providers
Marketing portfolio management services to prospective and current clients

this was paid by foreigners and
expatriates, with Bahamians
paying only when they sold
their real estate.

SUGAR-CANE INVESTMENTS LTD.
(Company number 154,779 B)

An International Business Company
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

We, Pine Limited, Liquidator of SUGAR-CANE
INVESTMENTS LTD.
winding up and dissolution of
INVESTMENTS LTD. has been completed in
accordance with the Articles of Dissolution and
that
been dissolved as of

hereby certify that the
SUGAR-CANE

SUGAR-CANE INVESTMENTS LTD. has
9th day of June, 2009.

Dated this 22nd day of June, 2009

Pine Limited
Liquidator

New Hours

Je CAT FD Da

hi Cae ae ar led

MONDAY - FRIDAY
9:30AM - 5:30PM
CLOSED (FoR LUNCH) 1PM - 2PM

SATURDAY 9AM - IPM

(CLOSED ON HOLIDAY WEEKENDS)

68 Village Road
Ph: 702-0238

jreat fo Sure Adan}

Ph: 393-6330
Fax: 393-6333

Airport Office: 702-0241
info@ zipxbahamas.com

Wiaker's Wap

Great Guana Cay, Abaco
The Bahamas

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
You are invited to apply for the following
position currently available.

Design Manager

Key Responsibilities

* Sit on design review committee that ensures

design guidelines and adherence to project.

¢ Assist architect of record with securing necessary
building permits.

« Respond to ASI/RFI questions during building
process.

¢ Listrequests and change orders including pricing etc.

The successful candidate should have:
* Bachelors degree in Finance or Economics
Series 7 or CFA certification
Strong analytical skills with ability to operate independently and under

2010 Budget by $151 million at
the last minute, largely due to
an anticipated $114 million
increase in real property and
business licence fee-based taxes.

BREA has been lobbying for

the return of the $35,000 maxi-
mum payment ceiling for real
property taxes, which was elim-
inated in the 2008-2009 Budget.
That also reduced the real prop-
erty tax rate for owner-occu-
pied properties to 0.75 per cent,
down from 1 per cent on prop-
erties valued in excess of $5 mil-
lion.

The Government attempted a
compromise in the 2009-2010
Budget, reducing the real prop-
erty tax rate to 0.25 per cent on
the property value in excess of

pressure

Excellent relationship and communication skills
Minimum of five years experience in portfolio management in a wealth
management environment

We offer an excellent benefit package and salary will be commensurate with
experience and qualifications.

from owners.

* Provide field reports and punch lists, and ensuring
the contractors compliance with the plans and
technical specifications.

* Coordinate the design of new facilities.

Qualifications

* Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in Architecture from an
accredited university

Minimum of 10 years of progressive experience
in architecture and interior design and construction

Interested persons may submit resumes to the Human
Resources Manager either by email to anh@deltecbank.com
or by fax to 362-4623.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS!

$7.5 million, but increasing the
rate on the portion valued
between $250,000 and $7.5 mil-
lion back to 1 per cent.

In a recent address to BREA,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham noted that before the
$35,000 cap was introduced in
2003, 17 owner-occupied prop-
erties paid annual real property
taxes in excess of $35,000, for a
total amount of $1.1 million.

When the cap was in place
between 2003-2007, 57 proper-
ties paid taxes of $35,000 a year
in the amount of $2 million.

Since the ceiling was lifted in
July 2008, 68 such properties

administration of commercial and residential structures.
The successful candidate will have the opportunity to
work in a growing and dynamic organization and must be
a self-starter, team player, work at the highest standards
of performance, and meet deadlines.

lf you are progressive and prepared to advance your
career, submit your resume to the attention of the Director

of HR & Training, hr@bakersbyclub.com or by fax at
242-367-0613.

All applications will be held in the strictest confidence and only candidates
under consideration will be contacted.

“Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!”





PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



USI
10 issues cited in Guana Cay’s Privy Council legal appeal

FROM page 1B

that it had a right to be heard
and consulted over the pro-
posed development.

ela

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



“The Government’s decision
to enter into the agreement was
one that affected, or was likely
to affect, the individual rights
and freedoms of the residents
of Great Guana Cay,”the Asso-
ciation alleged.

“In particular, the develop-
ment that is envisaged by the
agreement will interfere with
the local residents’ right to free-
dom of movement throughout
the Bahamas, which is protect-
ed by Article 25 of the Consti-
tution of the Bahamas.”

This point, the Association
alleged, had been identified by
Dame Joan Sawyer, president
of the Court of Appeal, who
had said in her ruling: “There is,
however, one matter which the
learned judge mentioned
towards the end of his judgment
about the effect of the percep-

tion the existence of the devel-
opers’ gated community, lying
between the existing inhabitants
of the southern part of Guana
Cay and the northern part of
that island to which those inhab-
itants previously had free access
along either the existing roads
or tract roads.

“It appears also that that
community will bestride the
new ‘public’ (?) road. Be that
as it may, it is possible that
questions about the infringe-
ment of those inhabitants’ con-
stitutional rights to freedom of
movement within the Bahamas
may arise under Article 25 of
the Constitution.”

Drawing on this, the Associ-
ation’s attorneys alleged: “The
Government’s decision to enter
into the agreement was one that
would result in the liberty of

the local residents being restrict-
ed in important respects. In par-
ticular, the development
deprives the local residents of
traditional fishing and crabbing
grounds, and is thus restricting
their liberty to earn a living as
they choose.

“In any event, the Govern-
ment’s decision to enter in the
Agreement was one that it was
absolutely clear would have a
profound impact upon the lives
and lifestyles of the residents of
Guana Cay. The land that is the
subject of the agreement plain-
ly constitutes an important site
on the island, and it is clear that
the development is of consid-
erable local public interest.

“Further, the [government
and developers] were well
aware that the residents of Gua-
na Cay desired to be consulted

and to make representations,
and that the objectors to the
development enjoyed consider-
able local public support. It is
also relevant that the residents
of Guana Cay are relatively few
in number and will be affected
by the development to a far
greater extent than other
Bahamians.”

The Association is also chal-
lenging the Supreme Court and
Court of Appeal findings that
two meetings held in February
and August 2004 fulfilled the
Government’s requirement to
consult residents.

It is alleging that “the Gov-

ernment deliberately intended
to make its decision as to
whether to approve the devel-
opment before engaging in con-
sultation”, and claiming that
previous evidence filed with the
courts shows no detailed infor-
mation on the Baker’s Bay pro-
ject was made available at the
February 2004 meeting.

As for the August 2004 meet-
ing, the Association is alleging
that copies of important docu-
ments relating to Baker’s Bay
were not lodged with local gov-
ernment offices as promised,
and pledges of further consul-
tation never materialised.

Lagal Notice

Lagal Notice

ZONE END CORP.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of ZONE
END CORP. has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Lagal Notice

SAPHIRE & DIAMONDS INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
SAPHIRE & DIAMONDS INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Lagal Notice

JATTMORE LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
JATTMORE LTD. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

MAROULA-THEO LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
MAROULA-THEO LTD. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Lagal Notice

MONTAQUE ALPS INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
MONTAQUE ALPS INC. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

LENORE INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
LENORE INC. has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Lagal Notice

SEMPER VERDE CORP.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
SEMPER VERDE CORP. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Lagal Notice

DICIEMBRE INCORPORATED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
DICIEMBRE INCORPORATED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

VILLASUSSO LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
VILLASUSSO LIMITED has been completed:
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Lagal Notice

VAZE INVESTMENTS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of VAZE
INVESTMENTS LIMITED has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Ww

Hiaker's Hap

Great Guana Cay, Abaco
The Bahamas

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
You are invited to apply for the following
position currently available.

Sous Chef

Key Responsibilities

¢ Required to skillfully prepare international cuisine.

* Assist in ordering food supplies and kitchen equipment
as needed.

* Will be required to oversee majority of cooking and
methods of food preparation.

¢ Along with the Executive Chef, instruct kitchen
employees in the finer points of cooking.

* Assist in planning meals; making of menus, and
assigning prices.

* Assist in butchering and/or prepares meats and poultry
for cooking.

Qualifications
High School diploma or equivalent
Culinary degree from approved school or completion of
an approved apprentice program is preferred
5 to 10 years in different supervisory positions in
the kitchens including sous chef and/or chef d’ cuisine
position.
Previous experience in a hotel or private club preferred.
Highly skilled cooking ability in all areas of kitchen
including the ability to prepare various ethnic cuisines.
Experience working in multiple operations preferred.
A minimum of two years international experience an
asset.
Experience in opening a property a plus

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work in a
growin and dynamic organization and must be a self-starter,
eam player, work at the highest standards of performance, and
meet deadlines.

lf you are Fah ld and pa _to advance your
ae submit your resume to the attention of the Director

° & Training, hr@bakersbyclub.com or by fax at:
242-367-0613.

“Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!”





THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009, PAGE 5B

End-July target

for the policy on

medical tourism

FROM page 1B

Medical Pavilion, Dr Conville
Brown, said he hopes his facili-
ty can be the gateway for med-
ical tourism in the Bahamas.

The facility, which specialises
in the diagnosis and treatment
of problems stemming from
heart and cancer ailments, will
be marketed to countries in the
Caribbean through two grants
of 5,000 Euros and 18,000 Euros
each, totaling 23,000 Euros
($32,377.89). The two grants
come from the European Union
(EU) through CEDA.

According to Dr Brown, the
facility is one of about four in
the region offering similar ser-
vices. Others are located in
Jamaica, Trinidad and Barba-
dos.

However, the Centerville
Medical Pavilion is the only of
its kind in the region, and one of
only two in the world outside
of the US, to be accredited by
the American College of Radi-
ation and Oncology (ACRO).

Dr Brown said the facility will
use pamphlets, print and broad-
cast ads and a “robust” website,
all funded through the grant, to
market itself to countries in the
Caribbean and the US.

He said his facility had done
work for the Turks and Caicos
for years, as well as the Cay-
man Islands and Bermuda.

“We are going to be the gate-
way to international medicine
instead of us fattening South
Florida,” said Dr Brown.

“And this is during a time
when the Bahamas needs to
have further diversification of
its economy and Bahamians are
grappling with health care costs
and advanced care.”

Dr Brown said the cost of
some treatments at the Center-
ville Medical Pavilion will be
less costly than procedures done
in the US, but could appear
more expensive than those at
similar facilities in the
Caribbean due to currency
exchange rates.

However, he touts the
Bahamas’ proximity to the US
as a draw for Americans who
would have considered other
popular medical tourism locales,
such as India and the Philip-
pines.

Dr Brown said many of the
specialists providing treatment
at the facility are highly quali-
fied specialists from abroad.

“We intend to be the initial
entrée to medical tourism in the
Bahamas,” he said

Legal Notice

SUNSHOCK VALLEY LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
SUNSHOCK VALLEY LTD. has been
completed: a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

CHEVROUX BAYROCK INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
CHEVROUX BAYROCK INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

PATHOS SHORES INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of PATHOS
SHORES INC. has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

IN THE ESTATE OF HERBERT
HILTON MINNIS late of Carmichael
Road in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence, Bahamas,
deceased.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
any claim or demand against the said estate are require to
send the same duly certified in writing to the undersigned
on or before the 6" day of July, A.D. 2009, after which

date the Administratrix will proceed to distribute the estate
having regard only to the claims of which she shall have had
notice.

AND notice is hereby given that all persons
indebted to the estate are required to make full settlement
on or before the date heremabove mentioned.

CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.
Attorneys for the Executor
9 Rusty Bethel Drive
Nassau, Bahamas



Lagal Notipe

FULLYSTRASSE LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
FULLYSTRASSE LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

INTEGRATED SYNERGY
TECHNOLOGIES LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
INTEGRATED SYNERGY TECHNOLOGIES
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Lagal Notice

SONY ET KALY CORP.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of SONY
ET KALY CORP. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Administrative Assistant

Summary Description
oe Company Seeks to Employ Administrative
sistant

Duties Summary
The successful candidate will support our management
team and will assist with back office operations.

Candidates must possess the following qualifications

Have a minimum of an Associate's Degree or higher
college education.

Must have a minimum of two years experience in a
similar capacity

Ideal candidate must possess strong analytical and
communication skills

Have extensive knowledge of MS Office and related
software products

Be highly motivated team player and walling to adapt
to a dynamic work environment

A strong business/customer onentation skill is
essential

Please send resumes on or before June 25th, 2009 to:
dheastie¢mibeclbahamas.cam

Bannerhouse Gompany Ltd.

Palm Cay

Nassau, The Bahamas

—_
NAD

Nassau Airport
Dovelapmont Company

Tender

C-118 Mediuin Valtage Sedtch House ancl Duct Bark

Nassau Aieporl Developme! Company (MAD) 2 pleased Lo
announce the minase of Tender 118 Medium Voltage Seatch
House and Duc Bank for Stage 1 of the Lyeden Finding
niematonal Apart Expansion

The scope of work includes

* Construction of a new modem voltage (71k v) swich house for
BEG end MAL) aanieh goer: Boiling 4 apprcarnalaly Fe) SF.
@ inch block walls, alernem handrails, anda sianding seam
metal nog

* Gaal orks including approamately 1,800 LF of excention
bedding. duct iteialaton, supply and islallabon of manhoies
backfill, compaction, cufing and patching for a new medium
voli duct bank

* Purchase and insallalion of MAD Switchgear

nlerestied Bidders: mus! be licensed and aporoved by he Bahan
Biecine Comporation to perform euedum vollage (11k) work

The © 118 Tender Documents wil be avaiable for pick up afer
1200 pm, Tiesday June 16th, 2009 Abide meeting wll
be held at 10200 am, Thursday June 28th, 2008 Pease
Gonlael Traci Breby to regeter af the MAD Project office

‘Contact: TRAC BRISEY

Ph: (242) FOP-0086 | Fae: (242) 377-27
PO Boo AP S622), Masse, Bahamas
Emal tac brehyiiires bs

Hiaker's Hap

Great Guana Cay, Abaco
The Bahamas

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
You are invited to apply for the following
position currently available.

Golf Course Construction
Manager
Key Requirements and Qualifications

* 5-8 years experience in Golf Course
Construction and Management at leading
Golf Club.
Turf Management Degree
Knowledge of all phases of Golf course
design and construction activities including
vertical golf construction (club houses,
maintenance facilities irrigation pump stations)
A thorough understanding of all phases of
maintenance and repair to courses, practice
range and equipment
Extensive experience working with city planners,
engineers, architects, and contractors
Knowledgeable in all phases of construction
contracts related to golf projects
Detail oriented, a skilled planner, ability to
prioritize with excellent communication skills
Computer literate
Willing to live on an out island
Ability to work on own initiative

The successful candidate will have the opportunity
to work in a growing and dynamic organization
and must be a self-starter, team player, work at
the highest standards of performance, and meet
deadlines.

If you are progressive and prepared to advance your
career, submit your resume to the attention of the

Director of HR & Training, hr@bakersbyclub.com
or by fax at 242-367-0613.

“Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!”





PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



I = 0 = >\—
¢500k investment $38m signal fee rise hits Cable hasic margins

in Mall medical
facility

FROM page 1B

will also be investors in the
endeavour, are well-recognised
and duly qualified.

“One hundred per cent of
the doctors we have talked to
have become investors,” he
said. Dr Rolle said the facility
required an initial investment
of $100,000, while $250,000 had
been slated for infrastructural
changes, $60,000 for training
and $150,000 for equipment —
as a conservative estimate.

The 44,000 square foot facil-
ity, located on the second floor
of the Mall, was once a clothing
store and its only video arcade.

Dr Rolle said he had been in

talks with general manager of
the Mall, Frank McGuire, about
opening the facility since Octo-
ber 2008.

The architects for the facility,
Nation Builders, are experi-
enced mall medical facility plan-
ners in the US.

Public relations manager for
the Mall, Laquinta Curry, said
the facility’s biggest focus was to
provide affordable health care,
but also to create added foot
traffic through the Mall.

“We have had our ups and
downs,” she said. “We had our
peaks, like back to school and
when we have our health fairs.
Those are kind of busy for us. It
could be better but we’re grate-
ful.”

NOTICE

NOTICE is heraby given that JOSHUA MERICE OF
STAPLEDON GARDENS, P.O. BOX SB-50202, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for

Nationality and Citizenship, for regisiration/‘naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahanias, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration’ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-enght days from the 24TH day of JUNE,
2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.0.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.










Davis & Co.

TO OUR VALUABLE CLIENTS

Please be advised that our office

WILL BE CLOSED
to the public on Friday, June 26th,

2009. We will be RELOCATING
to our new address TURNER HOUSE,
700 East Bay Street.

Business will resume as usual on
Monday, June 29th, 2009
Jrom 9am to 5pm.

Thank you for your
continuous business.

Management

Lagal Notice

VIOLET LIGHT INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of VIOLET
LIGHT INC. has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

DAWN HORIZON LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of DAWN
HORIZON LIMITED has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

FROM page 1B

were “triple” what Cable
Bahamas charged.

He added that channel line-
up also needed to be factored
into the assessment, given that
all cable companies’ offerings
were different, and some signal
fees more expensive than oth-
ers. Product quality was anoth-
er factor, Mr Burrows describ-
ing what Cable Bahamas
offered as “second to none”.

Describing the heavy infra-
structure investment needed to
supply cable TV services to a
variety of islands as a “tremen-
dous factor” in Cable Bahamas’
cost base and pricing, Mr Bur-
rows said: “As we start to get
into the smaller islands, the cost
per customer to build, let’s say
in Bimini, is tremendous
because there are only a few
hundred subscribers at most on
the island. “As we get into the
smaller islands and cays, the
cost of building is astronomical
on a per capita basis. All of
these things impact us. Then

there is the cost of power, elec-
tricity. All our nodes are pow-
ered by BEC, and there are
high electricity costs here.”

The Cable Bahamas execu-
tive said a better comparison
for the BISX-listed utility
provider’s products was with
the North American market
operators, such as Comcast and
Time-Warner Cable, given the
similarity in service quality and
channel offerings.

Mr Burrows argued that
Cable Bahamas’ Digital 125
package, offering 125 channels
for $35.95 (the $30 basic price
plus $5.95 per month) stood up
well against its US peers, with
Comcast and Time-Warner
charging $55 and $56 per month
respectively for digital packages
featuring 100 channels.

He added that the consulta-
tion document had listed Cable
Bahamas’ prices incorrectly, as
Digital 125 cost $35.05 per
month, not $65.95 as the paper
stated. In addition, the Digital
150 and Digital 175 packages
cost $44.95 and $54.95 per

month, and not $73.95 and
$83.95 as the consultation paper
had wrongly listed.

Mr Burrows said Cable
Bahamas, through the Digital
175 package, was providing 175
channels at the same price as
Comcast was providing 100
channels in the US.

This was happening despite
the shrinking margins Cable
Bahamas was experiencing for
its $30 per month basic cable
TV package every year, the
result of being unable to obtain
permission for an increase from
the Government during the past
15 years.

“Just this year alone, our sig-
nal fees increased by almost $3
million,” Mr Burrows
explained. “So when you start
looking at every single year,
there’s an increase in signal fees
every year. It impacts us, our
bottom line, and our margins
shrink every year as costs
increase.”

Trying to minimise costs asso-
ciated with signal fees for its
basic package had been Cable

Bahamas’ “most challenging”
feature, with signal providers
unable to give the company a
break because they had already
built these fee increases into
their own budgets for the year.

Mr Burrows said that when
Cable Bahamas was first
formed in 1994, its basic TV
package was largely in line with
what was charged by others.
Now, Time-Warner Cable had
just increased its basic price
from $52.90 to $56, a $3.10 rise
that was likely associated with
living and signal cost rises.

Mr Burrows added that when
Cable Bahamas began digital
services, it compared itself to
both US cable and satellite
operators to ensure its line-up
and service quality compared
well. “Cable Bahamas is quite
in-line,” he added. “The
Bahamian people can be
assured that Cable Bahamas
offers true value for money, and
service standards as required in
this world climate.” The com-
pany’s services were “world
class”.

Car dealers brace for 5-10% price increase

FROM page 1B

a slow process to get inventory
down to where you put in more
orders.”

The slowdown in new car

For the stories
behind the news,

syle Mary (e ats

orders is likely to have had a
major impact on government
revenues, as new cars are
among the items attracting the
highest duty rates. Given the
three to four-month time lag
between placing orders and the
vehicle’s arrival in the Bahamas,
the BMDA said government
tax revenues from the industry
should start improving in the
2009 fourth quarter.

Mr Lowe said that obtaining
debt financing from Bahamian

few new car buyers in the mar-
ket, and while there had been a
temporary spike following the
April car show, sales had again
tailed off in May.

Small SUV vehicles remained
the “bright spot” for the indus-

try.

The BMDA said: “BMDA
members remain hopeful that
the marginal economic recov-
ery showing signs in the US will
benefit the economy of the
Bahamas going forward.

“With inventories getting
more in line with industry
norms, BMDA members will
begin to consider ordering for
the next model year. This
should begin to positively
impact government revenue by
the fourth quarter. While
BMDA members expectations
are for a sluggish third quarter,
we anticipate we can weather
the storm.”

So far, there have been no
lay-offs by BMDA members.



on Mondays

commercial banks was among
the biggest challenges facing the

Lagal Notice

NORVILLE MOUNTAIN INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
NORVILLE MOUNTAIN INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Lagal Notice

SCHONE MIRIAM LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
SCHONE MIRIAM LTD. has been completed:
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidatar)

Lagal Notice

BLUE WHATE LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of BLUE
WHATE LTD. has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MONA RENNA OF CHURCHILL
SUBDIVISION, OFF SOLDIER ROAD, RO. BOX N-356,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as. a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows:
any reason why registration’ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 24TH day of JUNE,
2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
PU.Box Ne? 147, Nassau, Baharrers.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FRANCKY ST. FLEUR of
Mackey Street, P.O. Box SS-1956, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 24'" day of June, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Lagal Notice

BREATH OF DAWN LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of BREATH
OF DAWN LTD. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

CAPITAL HOTELS
(ASIA PACIFIC) LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act,
No. 45 of 2000, the Dissolution of CAPITAL HOTELS
(ASIA PACIFIC) LIMITED has been completed, a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-
pany has therefore been struck off the Register. The date
of completion of the dissolution was the 12th day of June,
2009.

(Le
— eee
ete |

J
fi
1 fi ‘





PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
tS








The Tribune




) etWwOork
th-century
h ee









By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

SU ued ite
you may find yourself attending
a lot more outdoor parties than
usual. During these events, the
men usually handle the cooking
by opening up those heat

drenched grills to give every-
one’s taste buds that one of a | i } e
kind summer barbecue taste.

According to foodnetwork.com, barbe-
UDLO Lm KOCeK ENED byte OM N item cCLMUEeerOLAll as
colonial America, specifically the settle-
ments along the Southeastern seaboard.
“The direct descendant of that original
American barbecue is Eastern Carolina-
style pit barbecue, which traditionally
starts with the whole hog and, after as
many as fourteen hours over coals, culmi-
nates in a glorious mess of pulled pork
doused with vinegar sauce and eaten on a
hamburger bun, with coleslaw on the
side,” the website noted.
Many of the self proclaimed “grill mas- a




ters” are mostly amateurs experimenting
with different flavors and sharing grilling
secrets from man to man. Desmond

Miller, a prison officer at Her Majesty’s a -
Prison, is a grill master and chef by hobby. a . os

“T always loved to cook, so grilling 7 vi
came naturally. Iam probably behind the - :



grill more than a dozen times a year. I
used to do it around the house then for
friends and then friends of friends,” Mr
Miller said.

When it comes to the perfect piece of
meat to conquer, Mr Miller said there are
a few key components to attain grilled
meat perfection.

“Quality meat is the key but you can
OC homacer lia GUUCUuTMy ZIM melecemeeelnCoyIIhy
friendly costing meats. Also seasonings
and marinating your meat are important.
Make sure the grill is at the right tempera-
ture and use tongs instead of forks. The
product will be more moist if not poked
and prodded. Let the grill do its job you
don't need to turn the meat to soon too
often. Also let the meat rest so as to redis-
tribute the juices throughout the meat,”
Mr Miller said.

While there are a variety of meat com-
binations that can taste great fresh from
the grill, Mr Miller said there are some he
enjoys working with more.

“T like working with chicken, fish, ribs,
pork and shell fish but at some time I
have probably grilled mostly all meats.
My most requested grilled specialties are
BBQ ribs, jerk pork and chicken, shrimp
Kabobs and steak,” Mr Miller said.

Just as important as the savory meat on
the grill is the succulent sauce that compli-
ments it. To give the meat its rich flavor,
Mr Miller said he has his own special
Seu teren

“T make my own jerk and pepper sauces
one mild for the faint of heart and anoth-
er I call the "more fire" sauce one taste
and you'd be saying more water,” Mr
Miller said.

As for up and coming young men who
want to become grill masters, Mr Miller
said he would advise them to not be afraid
KOS UUT= Cem AUD TIEN Con

“Research recipes online or in books
and add your own flair to it. Don't be
afraid of criticism everyone has different
tastes and tolerances. Be adventurous in
id oKom elke oCcsome-reCeuclmNotoma allem



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009, PAGE 9B





The Tribune

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

AS the Summer season
gets into full swing, many
locals hit the beaches to
escape the scorching heat.
Tribune Entertainment has
found the perfect summer
oasis for your
entertainment.

Terneille “TaDa” Bur-

rows is slated to per-
form at the Mall at
Marathon’s third annual
Music and Food Festival on
Saturday. The festival which
will offer food samples from
several restaurants in the
mall’s food court, will also
present TaDa and a secret
performer at no charge. The
event will begin at 10 am and
the malls’ stores will also
hold sidewalk sales. Organ-
isers are excited about the
event and promise more fun,
music, and an all around
family experience.

. The Express Yourself
2 Movement is once

again announcing its
popular Open Mic night
which will be held inside its
new home at the Hard Rock
Café on Charlotte Street. The
event which frequently reels
in spoken word hopefuls,
musicians, poets, and the
like, is the perfect Thursday
night spot to soothe the mid-
week work pangs. An easy
getaway from the hectic hus-
tle and bustle of life, the
event adds loads of enter-
tainment through one simple
medium, artistic expression.

. Two very special
3 icons in Bahamian

drama are being hon-
ored in the newest produc-
tion of the play Guanahani.
James Catalyn who originally
directed the play, and
Andrew Curry who was its
first music director, are the
honorees as this newest ver-
sion of the play premiers at
the Dundas Centre for The
Performing Arts on June 23.
An original Bahamian musi-
cal, with whimsical lines and
catchy tunes, the play pre-
sents the unofficial and satir-
ical true story of Christopher
Columbus’ discovery of The
Bahamas on behalf of the
European world. The produc-
tion which will run until Sat-
urday, is said to be an on
time reminder of true
Bahamian history, through
music and dance. Tickets are
priced at $20 and are quickly
selling out, so get yours
today.

. The Bahamas
4 National Trust (BNT)
is doing its part in

entertaining kids this sum-
mer, by kicking off its first
ever movie night this
Wednesday at its Village
Road retreat at 69m. Sched-
uled for showing is the
movie “The Great Polar Bear
Adventure,” which is a 2006
production focusing on the
realities of global warming.
The film paints an uncertain
reality for a polar bear family
who are forced to live in a
world ever changing because
of global warming. The
mother bear Ikuk and her
cubs Cassie and Asak, find
help along the way from arc-
tic fox Papu who directs
them to food and newfound
hope. Priced at just $1, the
film is the first of a list of
summer flicks planned to be
shown at the centre.

. Thought Catcher
5 Enterprise presents

Poetry Night at the
BNT this Friday starting at
7pm. Featuring some of the
performers from the Dundas’
annual production SPOT, the
event will include various
skits, and improvisations.
Also included is an open mic
segment allowing attendants
the chance to share their
poetry or related works.
Priced at $5, there will also
be appetizers and beverages
on sale.

| . Local entertainer

tereprise

*Guanahani



A tribute James Catalyn and Andrew Curry

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

ALMOST every Bahamian at one
time or another has heard the story
of famous maritime explorer Christo-
pher Columbus, whom history
records as the discoverer of the

New World.

What if someone told you, that all you know
about Columbus and his historical discovery
was a lie. In-fact, this is exactly what a local
playwright did in his on stage creation of Gua-

nahani in 1992.

Fusing fact, fiction, and a little humor, the
play tells a story of a Columbus far different
than the one portrayed in the history books.

It alleges that instead of arriving in the East
Indies as he had originally intended, Columbus
ended in the West Indies, and thus used that
accidental land fall as his claim to discovering
the new world and Guanahani (San Salvador).

As the production unfolds, the Indians of
Guanahani learned that Columbus was the man
that their forefathers had warned of who
would arrive on their land to convert them to

slavery.

Described as light hearted, lively, and enter-
taining, this musical tells a unique story of the
much different life that Columbus and the Indi-
ans lived during the late fifteenth century.

Now fast forward to 2009, where a small
group of actors, singers, and culture enthusiasts
have teamed up to recreate this production to

MOVIEREVIEW



The Hangover

By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

STARING- Bradley Cooper, (Phil
Wenneck) Ed Helms (Stu Price)
Zach Galifianakis (Allan Garner),
Justin Bartha (Doug Billings)
and Heather Graham (Jade)

There is a reason The Hang-
over has been the surprise hit of
the year. The movie is head and
shoulders above the current crop
of broad comedies and will leave
you rolling in your seat with
laughter.

Granted the plot is silly and
the events more than a little
exaggerated, but somehow given
the talents of the cast, the story-
line just works.

In the movie, Doug and
three of his friends- Phil, Stu and
Allan head to Las Vegas for his
bachelor party with a rooftop
toast that what happens in Vegas
will definitely stay in Vegas. That

is until the three groomsmen
wake up with the worst hang-
overs of their lives and realise
that they don’t remember any-
thing about the night before and
that the groom is missing.

The rest of the movie is the
threesome’s mad dash to find
Doug before its too late by
retracing their steps as best they
can -Just how did they end up
with a tiger and a baby in their
suite. Why is there a naked man
in their trunk and although it
wasr’t Doug who got married,
which one of them did?

With a cameo appearance by
Mike Tyson, at least a dozen
hilarious one liners and the back-
drop of Vegas as the ultimate
bachelor’s playground, The
Hangover is a must see, that you
won't need a drop of alcohol to
enjoy. Just make sure you stay to
the end to watch the final credits
which give a glimpse into what
really happened during the bach-
elor party every bride dreads.

pay homage to the men who created Guana-
hani.

First is James Catalayn, who is one of the
most talked about figures in the local theatrical
circle, and creator of several stage productions
including; An’ a don’ mean Cola, Lost Love, A
weddin’ tale, and You say! I say!

Also a familiar face to the performing arts,
Andrew Curry is the founder of the Diocesan
Choral, and a former Instructor of Aquinas Col-
lege where he was involved in various plays
such as Seven Brides for seven brothers, and
South Pacific.

The newest musical director for Guanahani
Antoine Wallace explained, that as he has been
familiar with Mr Catalyn and Mr Curry for sev-
eral years, he has always been interested in
working with the two legends.

After working alongside Mr Catalyn as a
national adjudicator for the recent Bahamas
National Arts Festival, Mr Wallace said the
time seemed fitting to propose a collaboration
between the Diocesan Choral, James Catalyn
and Friends, and other related groups.

“We (Antoine Wallace, Lakisha Bostwick,
Andrew Curry and James Catalyn) were won-
dering, what could we do to collaborate James
Catalyn & Friends, the Diocesan Choral, the
Allegro Singers, and the National Dance
School, so we thought Guanahani.”

Mr Wallace said as the old adage about recog-
nition suggest: ‘give me my flowers while I liv-
ing,’ he felt the time was now to pay tribute to
Mr Catalyn and Mr Curry.

Using the blueprint from the original produc-
tion, Mr Wallace said the new cast and crew
have revamped the music, and have added some





@ DURING their
final rehearsals
this past week-
end, the cast of
the revamped
Guanahani
promise a show
like none other.

extra layers of range and
diversity.

He said: “We have the
ring play, we have
quadrille, Junkanoo, and
rake-n-scrape, we have
everything Bahamian in
this production, and this
is also a pre-Indepen-
dence show.”

Apart from the cultural
significance of this pro-
duction, Mr Wallace said each of the members
from the various groups have used the play as
an opportunity to learn and share bits of each
others talents.

“We are all learning, the actors are becoming
singers, the singers are becoming actors, so all
of us are becoming all around musicians and
actors.”

For overall director Omar Williams, this was
a good sign considering he had the mammoth
task of arranging the production.

He said it felt good to have his name attached
to a play with such historical relevance as Gua-
nahani as he made his directorial debut.

Mr Williams explained: “With this being the
third time this play has been done, what makes
this time different is that we have a cast that is
at least three times larger than ever before.

“This show hinges on everybody being indi-
viduals, so we have diversity when it comes to
the singing, the acting, the dancing, everything
is different.”

Mr Williams said from the days of watching
James Catalyn and Friends on stage and now
joining them, he has great respect for Mr
Catalyn because he has helped in telling the sto-
ry of the Bahamas over the past 30 plus years.

“T think the thing that came over in this show
was mentorship, the same way that Andrew was
amentor to Antoine, and Mr Catalyn being a
mentor to me and several of the people in the
play, those people will now have the ability to
become mentors to others.

“T think that’s the best part about Andrew
and James, how they can use their talents to
help improve the lives and talents of others, that
is what being a leader is all about.”

Guanahani premiered yesterday at the Dun-
das Centre for the Performing Arts, and runs
until Saturday with showtime set for 8pm.



Frank Masi/AP Photo

IN THIS film publicity image released by Warner Bros., Zach Galifianakis, left, Bradley Cooper,
center, and Ed Helms are shown in a scene from "The Hangover."



PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Summit Academy puts on exhibition to
promote environmental preservation



By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

DOZENS of students from
Summit Academy recently
staged a collective exhibi-
tion at Popop studio, where
they used art as their voice
to promote the importance
of environmental preserva-

tion.

According to principal Gillian Wil-
son, the art project was organised to
help the students identify useful ways
of reusing everyday items like soda
bottles, which could help in reducing
the overall trash buildup on the island
and throughout the world.

She explained: “We are an inquiry
based school, so we thought it was
extremely important to expose our
children to various forms of art.

“In January we collaborated with
John Cox and other artists at Popop

STUDENTS are seen observing their

one of a kind tree baring leaves
hand-painted by them.



where we came up with a six month
plan to give the kids an in studio expe-
rience, and with this event being com-
bined with our annual science fair we
were really trying to get the message
to our kids of saving the earth and
what they can do as responsible citi-
zens.”

Totaling more than 50 pieces, the
exhibition included various spherical
creations made from plexy-wood, plas-
tic bottles and wood glue. Then there
were several hand painted recycled
clothes, pictures, and even an artifi-
cial tree that was made by the chil-
dren.

Director of Popop Studio John Cox
explained that with part of Popops’
mission being to share the joy and
importance of art to all students, the
experience with Summit was both
interesting and rewarding.

“When Popop first started about 10
years ago, we were dealing with a lot of
alternative and experimental work.”

He said continuing with that vision,
the educational art experience offered
the students a chance to bridge the
changing concepts artists use to com-
municate with the relevance of earth
preservation.

He said: “Here at Popop, we are try-
ing to nurture a critical standard of art
appreciation in the country, and what





PRINCIPAL Gillian Wilson explained:
“We are an inquiry based school, so
we thought it was extremely impor-

tant to expose our children to vari-
ous forms of art.”



we are really about, less so than having
students make objects that they take
home and say that this is mine, it is
about them having the art experience.”

During the course of the project, Mr
Cox said the students were exposed
to other art exhibits at places like the
Bahamas National Art Gallery to offer
a broader scope of what art is.

Mr Cox said the reality is that most
people who are exposed to art, or who
even go on to study art, hardly ever
work as professional artists. However
one thing that does remain is an aware-
ness of the way art speaks. He said
when these children grow up to
become lawyers, doctors, or teachers,
the seed planted through the project
will hopefully become useful to allow
them to contribute in some way to art
development in the future.

Although the exhibition has already
ended, Mrs Wilson said many of her
students have since enrolled in private
summer art classes because of their
newfound freedom in speaking
through art.



Cleveland returns home
to share vocal talents

By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

SELF expression through music and the
arts have been the lifeblood of Bahamian
society for decades allowing great talents to
become legends in their own right all over
the world. However, one of those legends
after 29 years has returned home to lend a
helping hand to those who also deserve a
chance to shine on stage.

Cleveland Williams, born and raised in
New Providence, got his musical start at
an early age. Mr Williams obtained a bach-
elors degree in Music Education and a mas-
ters in Vocal Performance from Prairie
View A&M University in Texas.

“As a youngster, I used to sit on my
grandmother’s step with her hymn book
and sing- there grew the love for singing.
My first solo was at Yellow Elder primary
school and I had asked to sing at the assem-
bly. In the eleventh grade, I was singing in
the choir and we were preparing for the
National Arts Festival. I wanted to enter
and sing soprano, and ended up winning
first place that year,” Mr Williams said.

In 1992, Mr Williams obtained his Doc-
torate from the University of Naples, in
Tourism Studies, allowing him as a bari-
tone to perform in numerous recitals and
concerts with the Italian Chamber Orches-
tra, the “Interpreti Veneziani” throughout
Italy, Sweden, Norway, Finland and the
Bahamas.

“T wanted to study opera, not just to sing
and grace the world stage. My intention
was to study that discipline so that once I
had studied that and been on stage with
the professionals and saw how the mechan-
ics of it worked, I would be able to come
home and say to my students ‘this is how it
should be done’ because I have ‘tasted the
waters’ through that experience. I am a
grass root person, having had the opportu-
nity to be blessed with the gift of singing
and had the good fortune of having met
people along the way who saw that there
was some talent there and decided to help
and be instrumental in getting me to go off
to school and do the type of studies neces-
sary,” Mr Williams said.

Mr Williams said it is because of those
persons who helped him, that it is time he
helped someone else.

“When I returned home I said to myself
that I hope I don’t just sit there and collect
dust because it would be a complete shame.
I think it is my duty as a Bahamian to
return to the islands of the Bahamas and to
assist with the nation building of our coun-

try through the further development of
what ever our cultural resources are. Hope-
fully I want to create opportunities where
other young Bahamians who may not have
had the opportunity or the exposure that I
was fortunate to have. I would like to help
channel them in the direction they should
be going or to help groom them to aspire to
become the artist or the singer they want to
become,” Mr Williams said.

Mr Williams said one of the first things
he noticed when he returned home, was
the repetitiveness of the independence day
celebrations prompting him to want to add
something more to the event, something
unheard of —an opera.

“T thought that independence for the
Bahamas is a very significant time in our
lives because as a country we celebrate the
anniversary of our independence. One of
the ways that we can be instrumental or
even more effective in doing something of
great significance is trying to pool together
all the various talents of the younger people
and of the cultural institutions we have
here and put them in a production. This
production will allow them to come
together as a cohesive team
to do a particular major
work. That work being
Scott Joplin’s three act
opera ‘Treemon- |
isha’,” Mr Williams
said. i

Mr Williams
said another
thing he noticed |
when he came
home is the
immense amount
of talent he has
found.

“Since I have |
been home I have
put out the
announcement
of the opera
and held audi-
tions. We here
in the
Bahamas
have

‘Nes

a


























been blessed. Bahamians have this built in
thing for song and dance and I am amazed
by the wealth of talent we have here that is
still untapped. While Iam home I want to
take the talent, be it cultivated or raw, and
try to shape, chisel, and mold them into
the direction they should be going,” Mr
Williams said.

Mr Williams said he has had several per-
sons from the wider community from dif-
ferent church choirs singing with him and
one of the groups he has reached out to is
the Catholic Diocesan Chorale.

Mr Williams said he wants to continue
with his work through the support of others
in the Bahamian community.

“T would like the support from the pow-
ers to do more of this type of stuff. Not
just operas, but also do oratorios, requiems,
and masses. With the wealth of talent we
have here, this is the area I feel in which we
can engage the talent. As a developing
country, the infrastructure needs to be put
into place for more cultural and artistic
things that the youth of our nation can real-
ly sink their teeth into because the arts and
culture in itself is a discipline. Once you
have them in the school system and in the
wider community, it will help the young
people to develop character, disciplined
minds and it brings some form of structure
into their lives. A lot of the young people
have been side tracked into other areas of
their lives and so I am hoping I will become

an agent of change to enhance

what we have culturally in the

Bahamas,” Mr Williams
said.

Beauty of tiles

FROM page 12

? career as a professional ceram-
} icist in the Bahamas, and bring

a fresh and competitive spirit

i in the realm of this art form.

“The focus of JTS would be

to push the limits of what can be

done with the medium, chal-

E lenge and encourage the growth
? of ceramics as an art form
: throughout the islands of The
: Bahamas, and to demonstrate
? through hard work and the per-
: fection of one’s craft, that any

artist (young or old) could enjoy
a successful career as a full time

? potter and/or ceramicist as our
: painting counterparts,” Mrs

Colebrooke said.
The first challenge for Mrs
Colebrooke was to stimulate

: interest in the field by not only
: teaching ceramics public and
i privately, but also by partici-
: pating in exhibits.

Although Mrs Colebrooke

: has participated in many
; exhibits locally and interna-
tionally the “Sump’n Familiar”
: exhibition held at the Central
? Bank of The Bahamas Gallery
i in 1997 was the most significant
? to her.

“Sump’n Familiar was like a

coming of age exhibit. Up to
CLEVELAND :
WILLIAMS :

? tors that I was now a profes-
? sional, producing serious work

that point I was just exhibiting
work as a student, but that show
proved to the Bahamian collec-

and making an impact on the

: local art scene. Attended by the
=: then Governor General Sir.

Orville Turnquest, the exhibit
featured 10 tile murals,” Mrs
Colebrooke said.

Mrs Colebrooke believes that
it was that show, and the many
others that followed, which
awakened interest in ceramics
in the country. She is the first
Bahamian female tile manufac-
turer in the country and her
works can be seen throughout
Nassau, Eleuthera, Freeport
and Abaco.

“The work has steadily grown
in range and become very pop-
ular in most of the family
islands. Most of my work can
be seen and purchased in local
stores in Nassau such as,
Andeana Designs (The Shera-
ton, Cable Beach,) Doongalik

Art Gallery, and The Plait Lady
located in the Marina Village,
Paradise Island, the Blue Pearl,
located in the International
Bazar, Bay Street, the Unique-
ly Bahamian Kiosk in the Inter-
national Departure Lounge in
the Lynden Pindling Airport)or
you can just visit the gallery and
studio in Gleniston,” Mrs Cole-
brooke said.

As a local manufacturer of
art tiles, JTS gives Bahamians a
choice beyond the imported
European and American art
tiles—works that are infused
with the beauties of the
Bahamian environment. JTS
has been manufacturing per-
sonalised tiles for bathrooms
and kitchens, restaurants and
business establishments.

One of Mrs Colebrooke’s
most recent commissions was a
client who owns a private winter
home on Harbour Island,and
asked her producing seashell
tiles to accent their bathrooms.

In regards to future plans for
Jessica’s Tileworks Studio &
Gallery, Mrs Colebrooke will
be hosting the first All Bahami-
an Ceramics and Potters exhi-
bition, which will be held at
Popop studios in October.
Some of the exhibiting artists
in that show will be Sue Ben-
nett-Williams, Imogene
Walkine, Tamara Russell, Kel-
ley Knowles, Nicole Sweeting
and Vincent McSweeney

Due to her strong love for the
arts and to see young people
express their creative side, Mrs
Colebrooke will be offering a
summer workshop from June
29 to July 24 for children ages 7-
15

“This workshop will be
focused towards engaging kids
to focus on basic skills and/or
talents in creative arts, cooking
and decorating,” Mrs Cole-
brooke said.

Cost for the workshop is
$500.00 per child ($20 per day)
and includes 1 / 12 Ib bag of
clay per child, craft materials,
use of studio space, kilns and
in studio glazes. Space is limited
to 10 students. Interested par-
ents who want to have their
children attend or are interested
in Jessica’s art can contact her at
324-3533 or via e-mail jessicas-
tileworks@gmail.com.



THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST

SUN A Se Si

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

| (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MAarINE FORECAST

Lats ang Tere TTS

































7 Today Thursday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
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5a ma a Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Friday T734am. 29 52lam. 03 Brussels 76/24 55/12 pc 77/25 59/15 sh aia ea
4 — ABACO Temperature 14:57pm. 29 5:38pm. -0.1 Budapest 77/25 57/13 ¢ 81/27 59/15 t
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Low: 76° F/24°C Low: 75° F/24° C i be Geneva 77/25 58/14 s 78/25 59/15 s
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wen Low:77°F/25°C NASSAU High: 92° F/33° Islamabad 115/46 79/26 s 115/46 81/27 s [+ *| Flurries a
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oh High: 90° F/32° C Low: 78° F/26° C Istanbul 88/31 66/18 s 84/28 64/17 pe be.) Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
se Low: 78° F/26°C Jerusalem 87/30 64/17 s 89/31 68/20 s [v_¥] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary angunli-
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Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS om Nairobi 83/28 57/13 t 82/27 57/13 pe
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Today Thursday Today Thursday Today Thursday Bs MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 87/30 79/26 sh 88/31 79/26 s that yo have ercatintd insurance
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W i High: 90° F/32° C San Juan 60/15 31/0 s 62/16 33/0 ¢ coverace no matter which
Fc FIC Fc FIC Fc FIC Fc FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC “Agie Low: 75° F/24° C San Salvador 88/31 68/20 t 87/30 73/22 t h d bl
Albuquerque 90/32 69/20 t 92/33 67/19 pc Indianapolis 92/33 72/22 s 88/31 65/18 t Philadelphia © 8/28 68/20 pc 89/31 71/21 s CROOKED ISLAND /ACKLINS Santiago 61/16 41/5 55/12 45/7 sh Way the win OWS.
Anchorage 60/15 49/9 c 60/15 50/10 pc Jacksonville 91/32 71/21 s 92/83 70/21 pc Phoenix 107/41 85/29 s 107/41 85/29 pc ti Se : ea Sms ST EmEean
Atlanta 93/33 70/21 s 90/32 72/22 s Kansas City 98/36 75/23 s 96/35 73/22 pc Pittsburgh 86/30 63/17 s 87/30 64/17 t RAGGEDISLAND — High:92°F/33" a0 Paulo r r eT :
Atlantic City 79/26 65/18 pc 87/30 69/20 pc LasVegas 104/40 78/25 s 99/37 78/25 pc Portland, OR 90/26 58/14 pc 76/24 54/12 pc cee Low: 77° F/25°C aaa aa ca s mae rege t Nobody does it better.
Baltimore 85/29 65/18 pc 90/32 70/21 s Little Rock 98/36 73/22 s 99/37 74/23 pc Raleigh-Durham 90/32 68/20 s 93/33 72/22 s Low: 73° F/23°C “an a = Pie. dee pe Trae .
Boston 68/20 60/15 sh 80/26 65/18 pc LosAngeles 79/26 62/16 pc 79/26 6246 pc St. Louis 96/35 76/24 s 91/32 73/22 t . om ae TORRID : aE ie
Buffalo 85/29 65/18 s 80/26 64/17 t Louisville 94/34 74/23 s 93/33 70/21 pc SaltLake City 89/31 6719 s 89/31 60/15 t GREATINAGUA ~ te Tawa or Tae ee ee
Charleston, SC 90/32 72/22 pc 93/83 73/22 pc Memphis 97/36 75/23 s 96/35 76/24 s San Antonio 101/38 77/25 pce 100/87 76/24 s High: 91° F/33°C aaa 89/97 63/17 s 99/97 59/15 t i ke ee - _ :
Chicago 92/33 65/18 pc 87/30 60/15 t Miami 90/32 77/25 t 90/32 77/25 t San Diego 72/22 6618 pc 74/23 64/17 pc Low. 76°F/24°C Trinidad 63/17 54/12 1 79199 59/15 c (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Cleveland 87/30 64/17 s 86/30 65/18 t Minneapolis 88/31 67/19 t 88/31 68/20 s — SanFrancisco 73/22 56/13 s 70/21 54412 pc ; Grand
: Vancouver 65/18 56/13 r 67/19 53/11 ¢
Denver 96/35 62/16 t 92/33 6146 pc NewOrleans 98/36 80/26 s 96/35 80/26 pc Tallahassee 97/36 72/22 t 93/33 69/20 t ad Ew 79/99 57/13 t 70/21 59/15 t i
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Full Text


The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009

{T\

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SEE “THE ARTS’ SECTION

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Offer of treatment

lor teen rap

Stevie S gets one
year sentence

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Bahamian
entertainer Stevie S, also known
as Lemuel Smith, was sentenced
by the Supreme Court
Tuesday to one year in prison
for rape.

Justice Vera Watkins also
ordered that Smith to be placed
on three years probation after
his release from prison.

She noted that a person con-
victed of rape could be sen-
tenced to a maximum of seven
years. She urged Smith to use
the time in prison to think about
what he had done.

Smith, 47, pleaded guilty to
raping a 13-year-old minor at his
trial on April 30. Sentencing was
suspended twice — on May 30
and June 9 - after Smith was
unable to travel to Freeport for
the hearing.

At Tuesday’s sentence hear-
ing, lawyer Murrio Ducille told
the Court that Smith suffers
from a severe spinal cord injury
that has left him crippled and
barely able to walk.

He felt that a custodial sen-
tence should not be imposed as a
result of Smith’s medical condi-
tion, which would present chal-
lenges not only for his client, but

STEVIE S$ pictured yesterday.



also for the prison staff at Fox
Hill Prison.

Mr Ducille stated that a cus-
todial sentence would be detri-
mental and referred to the
report of Dr Clyde Munnings,
who noted that Smith suffers

SEE page eight

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7

MINISTER OF LABOUR Dion Foulkes shakes hands with Bahama
Cleola Hamilton yesterday.

Girl testifies that Archdeacon
‘choked and slapped her’

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A TEENAGE girl testified in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday that Anglican Archdeacon Ivan Ran-
furly Brown choked and slapped her at a church
picnic on Nirvana Beach last October.

Archdeacon Brown, the rector of St Agnes
Church on Baillou Hill Road, is accused of physi-
cally assaulting the girl on October 13, 2008. He is
represented by lawyers Wayne Munroe and Antho-
ny McKinney.

The girl, who was 14 years old at the time of the

SEE page eight

ANOTHER SETBACK FOR DISABLED
FATHER AWAITING COMPENSATION

THE RAPE TRIAL OF MP’S SON RESUMES

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FNM faction ‘praying’ PM

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A FACTION of FNM support-
ers are "praying" that Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham commits
himself to another term as leader
of the party because they believe
there is no potential candidate
capable of leading the country.

According to two FNM stal-
warts, the present economic cri-
sis requires the talents of a confi-
dent, strong leader with the con-

will commit to another term

Hubert
Ingraham

viction to lead the nation out of its current finan-

cial stranglehold.

The supporters also noted that there are cur-
rently no would-be leaders who can connect with
the less fortunate voter base as successfully as
Mr Ingraham, a man who came from a humble

North Abaco upbringing.

And while there are several members within the
party who may be ready after a few years of
"grooming" none is presently ready to fill Mr
Ingraham's shoes, said the supporters.

"All the FNM's with whom I have spoken to

SEE page eight

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ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER





By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A PROPOSAL that
Government will this year
cover the full cost for nurses
to receive treatment for
work-related illnesses while
implementing full health
insurance coverage for them
in 2010 was to be consid-
ered by nurses last night.

The proposal was put for-
ward by Government dur-
ing a tense and drawn-out
meeting with the Bahamas
Nurses Union at the
Department of Labour yes-
terday afternoon.

Bahamas Nurses Union
President Cleola Hamilton
said she felt there is now
“hope” and expressed her
“appreciation” that the talks
were able to take place.

“Who knows, maybe (the
nurses) will agree (to the
proposal),” she said.

“We are still open to see
what the members have to
say.”

Speaking at a press con-
ference at the Department
of Labour, Minister of
Labour Dion Foulkes,
accompanied by Minister of
Health Dr Hubert Minnis,

SEE page eight

Newspaper is hit with
$1.5m defamation lawsuit

THE Nassau Guardian has
been slapped with a $1.5 mil-
lion lawsuit for defamation after
two of three persons accused in
a 2004 car theft ring recently
obtained a judgment against the
police for malicious prosecu-
tion.

The Guardian has denied
that statements in the article
were defamatory or that they
referred to the plaintiffs. The
newspaper also held that the
occasion of publication was one
of qualified privilege.

In their statements of claim,
the plaintiffs assert that the
Guardian’s article on the theft
ring on April 6, 2004 and April
8, 2004 were defamatory as
when it referred to them it
included their addresses in the
reports.

According to Atisha Tinker’s
writ of summons against the
newspaper, she was arrested

SEE page eight

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ACTION
PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

The Bahamas is ‘complying’ with

international human trafficking laws |

By LINDSAY THOMPSON
Bahamas Information Services

THE Bahamas continues to
meet its obligations in combatting
and eliminating human trafficking,
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs has
confirmed.

The ministry was responding to
the Trafficking in Persons Report
2009 on the Bahamas issued by the
United States’ State Department
last week.

It re-classified the Bahamas
from the Special Cases status to a
Tier 2 country of non-compliance
with international laws regarding
human trafficking.

“The Bahamas advises that it
will continue its efforts in compli-
ance with its obligations under the
Palermo Convention and the Pro-
tocol to Prevent, Suppress and Pun-
ish Trafficking in Persons, Espe-
cially Women and Children, and in
compliance with its national law,”
the ministry said in a statement
issued yesterday.

The Bahamas government has
reviewed the US State Depart-
ment’s Trafficking in Persons
Report 2009 and its recommenda-
tions to facilitate the country’s full
compliance with the minimum stan-
dards for the elimination of traf-
ficking in the context of the United
States’ Trafficking Victims Protec-
tion Act 2000.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs
noted that a Tier 2 country is one
that has been determined not to
have made “increasing efforts” to
combat human trafficking over the
past year, and to be making signif-
icant efforts based on commitments
of anti-trafficking reforms over the
next year, or to have a very signifi-
cant number of trafficking victims
or a significantly increasing victim
population.”

The Palermo Convention and
its three Protocols have been rati-
fied by the United States and the
Bahamas. On behalf of the
Bahamas, the requisite instrument
of ratification was deposited with
the Secretary-General on October
26, 2008, the ministry explained.

"In response to the findings and
recommendations in the report, the
Bahamas notes that the report fails
to acknowledge that the legislation
has been enacted in compliance
with the country’s obligations under
the Palermo Convention and its
Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and
Punish Trafficking in Persons,
Especially Women and Children,
and that the provisions of that leg-
islation are entirely informed by
the provisions found under those
international instruments,” stated
the ministry.

"The Bahamas reminds that the ;
Trafficking in Persons legislation |
was enacted in December, 2008,
and consequently, there could bed
no prosecution of human trafficking

offender within The Bahamas as :
required under the Palermo Con- }
vention and the Protocol for an }
appreciable length of time during }

the reporting period."

The ministry also queried any :
finding that the Bahamas “is a des- }
tination country for men and :
women trafficked from Haiti and }
other Caribbean countries primar- }
ily for the purposes of forced }
labour, and women from Jamaica :
and other countries trafficked for }
the purpose of commercial and sex-
ual exploitation, specifically in the i
context of its significant illegal :
migration problem in the first
instance, and particularly as such a }
conclusion suggests that there isa }

positive evidence of such activity.”

With respect to the legal and }
illegal migrant or temporary work- }
er, the ministry noted that the alle- }
gation is made that there may in }
fact be instances of forced labour }
occurring within the Bahamas with }

respect to such persons.

The US State Department’s }
report cites in support of this con-
clusion claims of employers’ coer- }
cion of such persons “to work }
longer hours, at lower pay and in :
conditions not permitted under }
local labour law by changing the i
terms of contracts, withholding ;
travel documents, refusing trans- :
portation back home, threatening
to withdraw the employer-specific
and employer-held permits, or to }
turn the employee over to Immi- }

gration.”

“While the occurrence of any }
such incident is condemned," said }
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, :
"the Bahamas maintains that inci- }
dences of employer coercion cannot }
by itself ground the offence of traf- i
ficking in persons or be evidence }

that persons are being trafficked.

“Consequently, the Bahamas }
rejects any attempt to define or }
classify as trafficking in persons :
conduct which, though reprehen- }
sible, does not fit within the criteria i

set by Article 3 of the Protocol.

“Consequently, within the con-
text of the provisions of the }
Bahamian legislation, which is }
acknowledged in the report as }
affording immunity to and protec- ;
tion of victims of trafficking, there }
must be recognition of the fact that }
even if victims of trafficking are }
identified, the issue is always :
whether they will be prepared to
provide the evidence necessary to }
sustain a prosecution,” the ministry }

said.

Another setback for disabled
father awaiting compensation

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

A DISABLED father of four is
still awaiting compensation
awarded by the Supreme Court
two years ago as his case has suf-
fered yet another setback.

Wayne Anthony John, 45, of
Canaan Lane, off Shirley Street, is
living in poverty as he has been
unable to work since he suffered
severe injuries in a fall from a
flatbed tractor trailer on the Feb-
ruary Point jobsite in Exuma six
years ago.

He took supreme court action
against February Point Resorts
Ltd and Justice Anita Allen ruled
in his favour as she found that
the company “failed to attain the
standard of care required of a rea-
sonable prudent employer” and
was therefore guilty of negligence
in July 2007.

Justice Allen made the firm
liable for costs and left damages
to be assessed by the registrar,
but it was not until 17 months lat-
er that the registrar ordered Feb-
ruary Point to pay Mr John
$310,504.

Mr John is still
awaiting compensation
as February Point has
now filed a notice of
appeal contesting the
amount.

February Point
maintains the supreme
court registrar based
his findings on inad-
missible evidence
when he ordered the
company to pay
$149,320 for Mr John’s
future loss of earnings, |.
and another $20,592 [us
because he has been
unable to obtain and
sustain employment as a result of
the injury.

The record was settled before
the Appeal Court registrar on
June 16 and February Point has
four to six weeks to pay a bond
before a date for the hearing will
be set.

Meanwhile Mr John continues
to suffer great distress because of
his condition and is struggling to
care for his family.

He said he has been unable to
work in his job as a construction
tradesman since the accident

Wayne Anthony John



because he can’t lift
heavy loads.

The disability bene-
fit he receives and
small contributions
from his employed 17-
year-old son and 22-
year-old stepson fail to
cover the cost of his
family’s basic needs,
and Mr John has been
forced to borrow from
friends an acquain-
tances.

As his case has
dragged on, Mr John’s
debts have mounted to
over $25,000, and he
claims to have been threatened
by some of his money-lenders.

“T’ve been threatened and ’'m
in danger,” he said.

“T can’t sleep at night.”

He added: “We have no cable,
no phone, no gas, no water, no
groceries, and I’m at the point
where I’m ready to call Social
Services and give up.

“The main problem is my 14-
year-old son who suffers seizures.
He needs pills and if I don’t have
them, he has problems.

“But we have nothing right

now. I have nothing to give him.”

Mr John is also the sole carer
for his daughters Cynthia, 9, and
Diana, 13 months, as his wife
Joyetta died just months after his
stepson Clifton Smith, 23, was
killed in a cruise boat tragedy
three years ago.

His case dates back to Novem-
ber 2003 when he was working
on the February Point resort job-
site in Exuma and received foot,
hip and wrist injuries when he fell
off a flatbed tractor trailer.

In his court action, Mr John
alleged negligence against his
employers, saying they failed to
provide proper equipment and/or
manpower for the unloading task
he was required to do.

The company filed a defence,
claiming Mr John’s injuries were
caused or contributed to by his
own negligence in failing to
ensure his feet were properly
placed while maneuvering around
the trailer, and neglecting to wear
proper protective footwear.

However, the judge accepted
Mr John’s version of events, that
no steel-toe boots were provided
and that he was given no instruc-
tions to wear such boots.

FIREFIGHTERS BRANCH OUT FOR FOREST FIRE TRAINING



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

FIREFIGHTERS take part in a one-day forest fire training session yesterday. An environmental group from Florida, Nature’s Conservancy,
yesterday hosted the session at East Street Police Headquarters, in partnership with the Bahamas National Trust and NEMA (National Emergency

Management Agency).


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Swine flu
victim fully
recovered,
says Minnis

HUBERT MINNIS



By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

The Bahamian resident who
became the country’s second
case of influenza A (H1N1)
has completely recovered, and
all others who came in contact
with that person are also fine,
according to Minister of
Health Hubert Minnis.

The young adult, who was
never identified, was said yes-
terday to now be “completely
well.”

With the seven day incuba-
tion period for swine flu now
also passed without any of
those who the individual came
in contact with showing symp-
toms, Dr Minnis said the
Bahamas can safely say it has
“gotten over that particular
case.”

The young adult was the
second case of Influenza A
(H1N1) confirmed in the
Bahamas on June 17.

The individual had returned
a six-day trip to New York on
June 3, 2009.

Tests

Having experienced symp-
toms upon their return to the
Bahamas, the individual
sought medical attention and
underwent tests for swine flu.

Before and after receiving
results, the person was volun-
tarily quarantined to mitigate
against the spread of the virus.

The Surveillance Unit of the
Department of Public Health
made efforts to contact and
monitor persons who had
come into close contact with
the individual. The first case
of the H1N1 virus reported in
the Bahamas was detected in
an adult visitor from New
York in May. Having experi-
enced symptoms, the visitor
stayed in the country for only
a day, undergoing tests, before
returning to the US.

AF Ta UI

IN an article published in
the June 19 edition of The
Tribune under the headline
“First phase of Hilton
makeover almost com-
plete”, it was reported that

the extensive renovations
cost $70 million.

However, The Tribune
would like to clarify that
the renovations —
upgrades to the hotel's 288
rooms and meeting spaces,
the construction of a new
bar and a facelift to the
property's restaurant —
cost $17 million and not $70
million.



Umbrellas
Loungers
Drinks Trolleys

Record May rainfall

13.66 inches of rain recorded
— more than triple the average

en

UNDER WATER: A common sight during May.

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

RAINFALL in May was at
the highest level since records
began almost 80 years ago.

A total of 13.66 inches of rain
were recorded at the Lynden
Pindling International Airport
Meteorological Department last
month, which is more than
triple the average of 4.17 inches
of rainfall recorded for the
month of May since the 1930s.

The previous record was
12.71 inches of rain in May
1958.

And storms continue to
drench the islands, with 8.08
inches of rain recorded in June
so far, including 1.68 inches in
New Providence on Monday
and Tuesday.

A surface trough currently



“,.. | wouldn’t
tell people to
relax their
guard just
yet.”

Geoffrey Greene

passing over the northern
Bahamas brought on Tuesday’s
dramatic lightening storm and is
expected to cause severe weath-
er conditions today.

Senior meteorological officer
Geoffrey Greene said the rain
should clear up tomorrow
before more thunderstorm
activity moves in on the week-

ern Piaqds
ll te A



end. He said the heavy rainfall
of recent weeks is welcome
after the long dry spell over the
winter months.

“This winter was especially
dry, and we had a lot of forest
fires, so this is a time for rain —
we should enjoy it.”

However, Mr Greene does
not expect the increased rain-
fall to affect the chance of hur-
ricanes hitting the Bahamas
when the season peaks.

He said: “We would hope
that because it’s raining we are
getting less development in
thunderstorm activity, and trop-
ical storms are not forming.

“But the height of the hurri-
cane season is in August and
September, with a mini-peak in
October, so we haven’t reached
that stage yet; I wouldn’t tell
people to relax their guard just
yet.”

FNM right not to give more jobs

to supporters, says former DPM

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

WHILE some FNMs may
want the party to emulate the
former administration and give
out more jobs to supporters, for-
mer deputy prime minister
Frank Watson believes the par-
ty is doing right by its members.

"Sometimes some members
of our team, FNM supporters,
tend to feel that we ought to
behave the same way as the PLP
and give consultant (jobs) and
contracts for nonexistent jobs,
and to that extent there may be
criticisms to our support that
claim that their not taken care
of," said Mr Watson, current
chairman of the Airport
Authority.

"But they fail to realise that
the funds that the FNM controls
are the people's funds and we
don't have the capacity to dole
out funds to whoever we like.
The job of the government is to
create an atmosphere where
Bahamians can reach full poten-
tial in whatever they pursue and
even though times are difficult,

the government has been doing
that and reaching beyond that.

"My response to that is: Yes,
the FNM always seeks to ensure
that their supporters have an
opportunity to make a decent
living and take care of their fam-
ily and so forth,” he said.

Some political observers have
noted that some FNM support-
ers were unhappy before the
2002 election — which the party
lost to the PLP — because they
felt they had not been “taken
care of".

Grumbling

But yesterday Mr Watson
argued that such grumbling will
not negatively affect the FNM in
the next election, slated for
2012.

"T think well-thinking FNMs
appreciate that the government
is doing all it can within the law
that will cause FNMs to work
and create opportunities for all
Bahamians," he said.

But a dissenting FNM said
that if the PLP is known for
making sure its supporters have
work, the FNM might need to

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do the same if it wants to win
elections. "The PLP has left
their people entrenched in all
these ministries and they are
making sure that their people
are getting jobs. I don't try to
play politics but I think we need
to look out for some of our peo-
ple. We stood up for the gov-
ernment and they need to look
after us, if it can be done with-
out being unfair,” he said.

"T think its something that the
government needs to monitor
very closely,” said the supporter,
who did not want to be identi-
fied.

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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master























































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

The water problem in Nassau

the mid-seventies with a very upset UN repre-
sentative at the side of St Andrew’s swimming
pool as we both waited for our sons to com-
plete their swimming lessons. He was nervous,
because in those days we lived in what John
Marquis called “a frightened society.” He obvi-
ously was wary about being seen in deep con-
versation with a Tribune writer. But that day he
had to talk with someone, and we were that
someone standing by his side. He was particu-
larly upset because politics had become deeply
imbedded in a UN-sponsored experimental pro-
gramme to give New Providence a steady sup-
ply of potable water. He and his team were
confident of its success. New Providence was
chosen as the site for the pilot scheme, which,
when perfected, could be replicated in other
developing countries.

He said people consider Ireland a land of
abundant rain, but in fact during its rainy season
New Providence has more rain than Ireland. If
this rain could be harnessed, New Providence
would always have a good supply of water. His
team had found a promising run-off shed some-
where in the airport area and were confident of
success. Because of his nervous condition, we
could not get details on what exactly they were
building as catchment for this abundance of
water.

Ireland for example averages 30 inches of
rain a year. In recent years New Providence
had its heaviest annual rainfall in 1995 — 76.33
inches; in 2007 — 60.39 and in 2008 — 44.98.
The heaviest rainfall for the month of May
since records were started almost 80 years ago
fell last month — a record 13.66 inches.

That morning by St Andrew’s swimming
pool was the first we heard of the Andros barg-
ing proposal, which Loftus Roker was pushing
for his constituency. My friend thought it was a
colossal mistake that Bahamians would live to
regret.

He was angry. Politics had entered and
spoiled what his team considered a project that
would have greatly benefited the people of
these islands. He didn’t want to go into further
detail, but he had said enough to make it clear
that a philanthropic scheme that could have
satisfied many of this island’s needs had been
scuttled by the meddling of inexperienced, small
island politicians — again putting their own
political ambitions before the long term good of
the people.

He said his team’s report — we gathered
what had gone wrong had also been included in
that report — had been left with the PLP gov-
ernment. He urged us to find and publish it.
He and his scientists packed their bags and left,
we believe for Barbados.

In the meantime we were left to try to ferret
out a report, which under the PLP administra-
tion was like trying to find gold dust at the end
of a rainbow.

The report was never found.

“WATER, water everywhere, nor any drop
to drink” or to bath in, or to flush toilets with or
do the laundry or any of the other essentials nec-
essary for living a healthy and hygienic life.

This has been the cry of many householders
throughout New Providence over the past sev-
eral weeks. Potable water has always been a
challenge for most Family Islanders, but New
Providence has been particularly unlucky this
year as the Corporation struggles with the inter-
mittent faults of its technology.

In his presentation to parliament during the
budget debate last week Phenton Neymour,
State Minister of the Environment, listed the
seven challenges faced by the Water and Sew-
erage Corporation (WSC). He said they were
non-revenue water, that is water that is lost
from the system; the reliability of the water
supply; the high expenses of shipping/barging
and staffing; constrained revenue; improving
sewerage infrastructure and providing services
to the Family Islands.

He pointed out that the Corporation was
hard-pressed in its attempts to tackle these
issues, particularly in the current economic sit-
uation.

The Corporation estimates that it loses about
five million imperial gallons a day through leaks,
or apparent losses through theft or metering
inaccuracies.

He said that every one million imperial gal-
lons lost was the equivalent of an annual $3
million. If this one million gallons of lost water
had been sold it would have brought in an annu-
al $5 million. One only has to do elementary
mathematics to estimate the wealth of the trea-
sury if the five million gallons lost daily in a
year could have been turned into cash. It would
probably bring in more revenue than a casino.

He said the World Bank had recommended
that developing countries should keep the water
they lose below 23 per cent. WSC estimates its
water loss at 50 per cent.

Mr Neymour said that until the WSC can
effectively address this problem the Corporation
“will not have any chance of becoming a finan-
cially viable entity.”

He said the shipping of water from Andros
was originally considered a “temporary solu-
tion,” but 25 years later we are still struggling
with the “temporary solution.” Summer storms,
hurricanes and barge break-downs have delayed
the water barges arriving in New Providence
on time. Of course, this resulted in water short-
ages and dissatisfied customers.

Mr Neymour pointed out that although there
have been improvements in both the efficiency
of the operation and the volumes of water
shipped, “it has out-lived its ability to satisfy
the demands of New Providence.” Barging
water from Andros, he said, “is no longer less
expensive than the alternative reverse osmosis
supply.”

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Philip ‘Brave’ Davis
abused parliamentary
privilege to defame
Sir Harold Christie

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Mr Philip “Brave” Davis
abused his parliamentary priv-
ilege at the 11th June sitting of
the House of Assembly to
defame the good name of my
uncle, the late Sir Harold
Christie concerning his own-
ership of the 2,600 acre Union
Estate at Old Bight, Cat
Island, a part of which was
sold nearly a year ago to a
group of American developers
who are building “Cat Island
Golf and Beach Resort”,
thereon. This beautifully
designed project will focus the
world’s spotlight on the extra-
ordinary beauty of Cat Island
and its people and in doing so
will fulfil the vision of Sir
Harold.

Sir Harold loved Cat Island
and its people whom he rep-
resented in the House of
Assembly for 32 years and he
was known for his generosity
to them.

Sir Harold did not “take”
the land from anyone! The
Union Estate was a sisal plan-
tation owned and operated by
an English family headed by
Samuel Harris in the late eigh-
teen hundreds. When the sisal
plantation failed, the then
owners left the land in charge
of overseers who permitted
the people of the neighbour-
ing Old Bight settlement to
have farms thereon provided
they paid over a share of their
crops to their overseers, a
common practice in the
islands. On the 26th of Feb-
ruary 1951, Sir Harold’s com-
pany Cat Island Farms Lim-
ited purchased the Union
Estate from the Estate of Mr
and Mrs Henry M Rumball
who had purchased the same
from the Estate of Stanley
Harris in 1927 and continued

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



the arrangement of allowing
the people of the Old Bight
to farm on the Estate provid-
ed they paid a small share of
their crops to his overseers.
Sir Harold built a house on
the estate, called Highwood
House, and created a large
farm around the house where
they raised Nubian goats and
charolais cattle.

In the early 1960’s many of
the Old Bight Tenant Farmers
refused to pay over a share of
their crops to Sir Harold’s
overseers and started to make
claims of ownership of the
areas they were farming, while
many others continued farm-
ing and paying shares to the
overseers, recognising Sir
Harold’s Company’s owner-
ship. At this time, Sir Harold
on the advice of his attorneys,
started an action under the
Quieting Titles Act to have
his perfect documentary title
to the land adjudicated by the
Supreme Court under which
all persons making claim to
parts of the Estate could also
have their claims heard.

The Quieting Titles Act was
created to investigate and set-
tle land title disputes.

In this Action Number 81
of 1964, many claimants from
Old Bight filed claims and
they and their witnesses were
heard by Supreme court
judges who at the end of the
hearing gave detailed judg-
ments of each claim dismissing
all of them as lacking truth
and not sufficient to prove
their occupation of a particu-
lar parcel of land for the
required 20 years, or their

ouster of the documentary
owner.

The Old Bight claimants
were represented by promi-
nent attorneys Sir Lynden O
Pindling, Sir Cecil Wallace-
Whitfield and Arthur D Han-
na and had their claims adju-
dicated in court. Sir Harold’s
Company was represented by
Eugene Dupuch OC and
myself. Mr Davis should read
the judgments, to understand
why the Old Bight claimants
were not successful. I am not
aware that any appeal was
ever filed. No farmers ever
lived on the land and there-
fore none of them lost their
homes as claimed. They only
cultivated fields on the Union
Estate and they lived in the
settlement of Old Bight.

Concerning the three
women who were put in jail
for a few days for defying an
order of the court to “stop cut-
ting bush for new fields”,
pending the hearing of the
petition, they could have
purged their contempt and not
gone to jail by appearing
before the court and agreeing
to stop cutting, but this they
refused to do. The rule of Law
had to prevail as it must in this
country.

The Estate of Sir Harold in
May resolved to establish a
fund to provide scholarships
to the College of the Bahamas
for Cat Island students.

Your newspaper published
the claims made by the Mem-
ber of Parliament without
checking their accuracy or
veracity and I ask that you
give this letter equal cover-
age.

WILLIAM McP
CHRISTIE
Nassau,

June, 2009.

Seeking the middle road between the
extremes of capitalism and socialism

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please allow me a little space in which to
thank Mr Rick Lowe of The Nassau Institute
for his response to my letter appearing in your
June 3rd edition and to express my apprecia-
tion for his letter appearing in your June 12th
edition opposite the article “Euro-Socialism
has pluses and minuses” by Llewellyn King of

Hearst Newspapers.

Mr Lowe agrees with me on a very limited
number of points raised in my original letter of
June 3rd but he has not addressed my basic
assertion that a middle road exists between
the extremes of selfish and unregulated capi-
talism and the painful excesses of socialism at
the other end of the political spectrum.

Mr Lowe appears to assume that I am
opposed to capitalism per se and that is not
the case. However, I recognise that by its very
nature capitalism focuses interest on the indi-
vidual at the expense of the larger society.

In a world of ever expanding population
most civilised societies seek to provide some
form of social safety net for the less fortunate
(or less ambitious or less favoured) members of
society in an effort to avoid degeneration into
a lawless environment and ultimately a “failed

State.”

Since politicians do not actively propose a
plan seeking zero population growth there are
a few options which we as members of the gen-

eral public can examine unless we are prepared
to watch helplessly as societies become more

crowded and desperate as the few unregulated
capitalists become wealthier and the masses
become more repressed and disenfranchised.

I agree with Mr Lowe’s assertion that
“ereed” is not limited to the capitalist world but
surely this is not an observation of which we
can be proud.

Also, constant reference to the theories of

Nassau,
June, 2009.

the late Milton Friedman and his “Chicago
Boys” obscures the fact that Franklin D. Roo-
sevelt had recourse to the theories of the late
John Maynard Keynes when he put into place
(against considerable opposition) a number of
public programmes intended to lift the USA
out of the Great Depression following the Wall
Street crash of October, 1929.

It appears that Bahamians such as Mr Lowe
and myself don’t like change but we have to be
more imaginative and realistic about the direc-
tion in which inevitable change will take our
country and whether we will be able to exert
any sort of positive and beneficial influence
upon the direction of that change.

Perhaps I am a naive seeker of that very elu-
sive Utopia where “capitalism with a human
face” resides.

AVID READER

“ay THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

ORIENTATION AND ADVISEMENT FOR
FALL SEMESTER 2009

ORIENTATION AND ADVISEMENT WILL TAKE PLACE FRIDAY, JUNE 26,
2009 FROM 9 AM TO 1 PM IN ROOMS B-5 AND B-6 FOR THE FOLLOWING
STUDENTS ACCEPTED IN THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS (BBA) PRO-

GRAMMES:

1 STUDENTS WITH EARLY ACCEPTANCE
2 STUDENTS WHO HAVE COMPLETED COLLEGE PREP
3. STUDENTS WHO HAVE COMPLETED THE UPGRADING PROGRAM

(CEES)

ALL STUDENTS SHOULD BRING COPIES OF ACCEPTANCE LETTERS, COM-
PLETION LETTERS AND RELEVANT EXAM RESULTS SUCH AS THE BGCSE.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Foreign fishermen
are allegedly
Caught poaching

ELEVEN foreign fisher-
men are expected to arrive
in the capital today for pro-
cessing after they were
caught allegedly poaching in
Bahamian waters.

Royal Bahamas Defence
Force press officer Lieu-
tenant Sonia Miller said the
crew was apprehended on
board a 40-foot Dominican-
registered fishing vessel, the
Lancha Dana Laura,
approximately one nautical
mile northwest off Little
Inagua.

Acting on information
received from US authori-
ties, RBDF officers on the
Enduring Friendship and P-
38 vessels — both stationed
at HMBS base in Mathew
Town, Inagua — apprehend-
ed the 11 men around
6.44pm last Saturday.

The vessel was found with
an unknown quantity of
small scale fish on board, Ms
Miller said. The total weight
of the seizure was not
known up to press time yes-
terday.

Woman taken to hospital
following traffic accident

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

BYSTANDERS watched
in horror as a young woman
was involved in an accident
on a busy street yesterday.

Witnesses claimed she was
knocked down by a car and
the driver then sped off.

But when stopped by
police and brought back to
the scene, the young driver
denied responsibility, claim-
ing the woman had “tripped”
in front of her vehicle and
she didn’t stop because the
traffic was too heavy.

The incident took place on

Shirley Street outside Doc-
tor’s Hospital at around
1.30pm.

According to the 36-year-
old “victim”, who did not
wish to be named, she was
waiting to cross the busy
thoroughfare when she made
eye contact with the driver
of a green Toyota Wyndham,
who was waiting to enter
Shirley Street from Christie
Street.

The woman, who appeared
to have suffered no major
injuries, claimed the young
female driver then gestured
that it was okay for her to
cross,

“That was the only reason I

took the chance to cross,”
said the woman.

However, as she started
walking across the road she
claimed the car knocked her
down.

Witness

A witness, who had been
driving behind the Toyota
Wyndham, said she parked
her vehicle and ran out to
help the woman who was on
the road in front of the car.

As they moved to the side
of the road, the driver then
allegedly left the scene.

The woman, who was tak-
en into the hospital by wheel-

PLP hits back over ‘unqualified’ prison officers



THE PLP has denied responsibility for

“We were also faced with a second set of

creating a situation that led to the hiring
and promotion of a group of prison offi-
cers described by Minister of National Secu-
rity Tommy Turnquest as “unqualified.”

Opposition spokesman on the public ser-
vice, Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell, said yes-
terday that he personally confronted Mr
Turnquest outside parliament over the mat-
ter, telling him to “cease and desist blaming
the PLP for a situation which was entirely
FNM-created at the prison and one which
we tried to settle before we left office.”

Speaking during the 2009/2010 budget
debate, Mr Turnquest said that the govern-
ment had taken the “decisive action” to
promote and recruit certain officers after
having struggled with some “vexing human
resources issues.”

He said that when the FNM came to
office in 2007 they met with a number of
people working at the prison who had been
told “on the eve of the election” that they
were to be promoted, while another group
had been recruited despite not having the
requisite qualifications.

Mr Turnquest said that government took
the position that it was not the fault of these
“unfortunate people” that they had been
dealt with in a manner which appeared to be
an effort to “circumvent the rules and reg-
ulations of the public service.”

However, he said that the decision does

Educators encouraged
to ‘play active role’

Tommy anes

Fred Mitchell



not “set a precedent.”

Mr Mitchell claimed yesterday that the
PLP, when it came to office in 2002, met
with a group of people who had been work-
ing at the prison but had their training “cut
short” and were taken on prematurely due
to a staffing shortage.

Calling this situation “untenable and
unsatisfactory”, Mr Mitchell said the Public
Service Commission, “then headed by an
FNM appointee, refused to confirm the offi-
cers because their training was not com-
plete.”

“They were unable to get the salary that
was due to them as officers as a result of that
issue being unresolved,” said Mr Mitchell.



officers who were recommended for pro-
motions by the Prison Service. Half of those
recommended for promotions were refused
promotions by the FNM-appointed Public
Service Commission. The reason given was
that they did not fulfil the criterion for pro-
motions laid down by the FNM, which gave
academic qualifications as one way to be
promoted; and alternatively, years of ser-
vice,” said Mr Mitchell.

He said this had caused a “morale prob-
lem” at the prison and it was agreed upon
that a “special course would be designed
for all those who had not been promoted
and that those who were successful in that
course, all other things being equal, would
be promoted.”

The Fox Hill MP added: “That course
was designed and done. The Prison Staff
Association made representations to me as
minister of the public service that several
people had been overlooked and requested
inclusion of other people to have an oppor-
tunity for promotion. I agreed and this was
facilitated.”

Denying any action was taken by the
PLP in this regard on the basis of “political
affiliation”, Mr Mitchell accused the FNM of
“delaying and sabotaging the system”, claim-
ing they have “much to answer for.”

He said he is thankful that “this sordid
chapter” is soon to be resolved.

By BETTY VEDRINE

ONE hundred educators
are being immersed in the
hotel and tourism industry
this week as part of the
Bahamas Hotel Association’s
sixth annual Summer Educa-
tor Internship Programme.

The group of educators,
who are being exposed to the
vast opportunities available
in tourism, were encouraged

0 “play an active role” in
moving the country forward.

They were addressed by
Director of Higher Education
and Lifelong Learning Dr
Leon Higgs at the sixth annu-
al Educators Industry Intern-
ship Programme held at the
College of the Bahamas’ Culi-
nary Hospitality Management
Institute on Monday.

“We are building a country
that is forward moving and
forward thinking, thus giving
it the ability to sustain itself
during difficult economic
times such as now,” said Dr
Higgs.

“However, in order for us
to accomplish our goals, we
must collaborate with and

involve all stakeholders in the
education process. After all,
nation building is the respon-
sibility of all of us Bahami-
ans.”

Already stakeholders have
taken an active role such as
forming the National Tourism
Task Force on Education, he
said. This workshop is anoth-
er of these initiatives.

Activities

“Through activities such as
training sessions for industry
and educators, internships in
industry, and constant evalu-
ation of the programme, the
knowledge that is offered to
educators is relevant,” he said.

With the advent of the
internet, the onset of globali-
sation, and the signing of
trade agreements between
nations, students can now
compete for almost any job
for which they qualify in any
region in the world, Dr Higgs
said.

“In some instances, (stu-
dents) may not have to leave
their homes to find employ-
ment in the future. Therefore,









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our students must be educat-
ed to compete at all levels.

“They must be trained to
deliver service with excel-
lence.”

However, educators will
have to continue to focus on
their own professional train-
ing and development in order
for this to happen, he said.

So far, the Summer Educa-
tor Internship Programme has
benefitted more than 500 edu-
cators.

The workshop is a collabo-
rative effort between the Min-
istry of Education, the Min-
istry of Tourism and Aviation,
and the College of the
Bahamas’ Culinary Hospital-
ity Management Institute. It is
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DIRECTOR of Higher Education
and Lifelong Learning Dr Leon
Higgs addressing educators at
the sixth annual Educators Indus-
try Internship Programme.

Derek Smith/BIS

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FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157

chair, said she was “disorien-
tated” and her legs and arms
were in some pain from the
impact and the fall, but “oth-
erwise OK.”

The driver, who was
brought back to the scene by
police around 20 minutes
afterwards, said that after she
called to the other driver to
ask if the woman was all
right, and was told the
woman ‘would be OK’, she
continued to drive, as she
“couldn’t stop because of all
the traffic.”

“T didn’t leave her,” she
maintained.

She admitted having

motioned to the woman to
cross the road, but then stat-
ed that another car “sped
up.”

“T tried to quickly go over
so the other guy could move.
She was crossing at the same
time. At the same time I
thought she stopped to not
cross the road anymore. I did
not knock her — she tripped. I
stopped suddenly when I saw
her crossing the road. I did
not hit her,” said the woman.

The driver said she kept
going because when she tried
to stop to check on the
woman, “people started
honking at (her).”

Wood stork population
flying higher in Everglades

@ MIAMI

OFFICIALS say wood storks have been breeding at their
highest rate in decades in the Everglades, according to Associ-

ated Press.

Preliminary surveys estimate that 3,500 of the ungainly duck-
lings will leave South Florida nests this year.

The wood storks are the only Florida wading bird on the
federal list of endangered species.

Rain in the last month of nesting season took its toll, leaving
half the weakened fledglings prey for waiting gators.

But even so, officials say more wood storks will survive this
season than they have since the 1930s.

Environmentalists say the stork has rebounded from a low of
about 2,500 pairs in 1978 to perhaps as many as 10,000 pairs this

year.

But they also point out the bird’s range and habits have been
radically altered and believe it is still a threatened species.

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Single mother set to sue

Honorary degree for

SuperClubs’ chiet

THIS November,
SuperClubs’ execu-
tive chairman John
Issa will be awarded
an honorary Doctor
of Laws degree by
the University of the
West Indies in Mona,
Jamaica.

Praised for his
contributions to
Jamaica’s tourism
industry, the univer-
sity recognised Mr
Issa as one of the
field’s most influential consul-
tants and entrepreneurs.

Known for many firsts in the
Jamaican hospitality sector, Mr
Issa pioneered the all-inclusive
hotel concept on the island
when he opened Negril Beach
Village in 1976.

Reshaping the resort indus-
try, Mr Issa then introduced
the Super-Inclusive holiday
with the inception of the adults-
only playground Hedonism II
in 1981. He also launched the
island’s first all-inclusive fami-
ly resort, Boscobel Beach, in
1983.

Mr Issa’s vision has grown
beyond the isle of Irie, with 11
all-inclusive resorts throughout
the Caribbean and two more
under development in Panama
and Brazil, slated to open this
Fall.

“Tt is a privilege and honour
to receive this prestigious
award from the University of
the West Indies,” said Mr Issa.

“Tam proud to be recognised
by an institution whose mission
matches my own — to inspire
and propel the success and
growth of the West Indian
community.”

Beyond his hotel ventures,
Mr Issa has deep roots in
Jamaica. He served as a sena-
tor from 1983 to 1989, chair-

Atel i pen



man of the Jamaica
Tourist Board during
the same years, and
sy} president of the

1972.

(1904-2004).

Throughout the years Mr }
Issa has received numerous :
accolades for his achievements, ;
including being honoured with }
the Order of Jamaica, the }
country’s fourth highest nation- i
al order (1998), and the Brazil- :
ian Order of the Southern }

Cross (Officer Rank, 2001).

Ernst & Young named him
“Caribbean Master Entrepre- :
neur of the Year” (2003), he }
received the Jamaica Tourist
Board’s “Trail Blazer Award” }
(2005); Caribbean World }
named him “Premier Hotelier
of the Year” (2006) and most
recently, the magazine extend- }
ed Mr Issa the “Lifetime
Achievement Award in Travel ;

and Tourism” (2007).

Along with Mr Issa, 16 recip- }
ients are set to receive hon- }
orary degrees from the univer- }
sity during graduation cere- }
monies, including Barbados’ }
former Prime Minister Sir }
Lloyd Erskine Sandiford; Gov- }
ernor General of St Vincent
and the Grenadines Frederick }
Ballantyne; journalist and envi-
John i
Maxwell; prolific scholar and
historian Professor Colin A }
Palmer, and chairman and }
managing director of the }
Gleaner Company Oliver }

ronmental activist

Clarke.

Bintish Colonial Halton Hotel
Marlborough St., Sheog #4]

Clearance
SALE

Everything for $20

Until the end of July

P.O.Box EE-15827
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 242-323-1665

Email: gems-pearlsiehotmail,com

Tender

The Bshamas Electricity Corporation

A unique honour, :
Mr Issa even has his }
own 40-cent postage
stamp, which was cre- }
ated tocommemorate i
the centenary of the }
Jamaica Hotel Law ;

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds @tribunemedia.net

A SINGLE mother who
waited three years for the con-
struction of her flood-prone
home intends to sue her for-
mer contractor for delays and
defective work.

Joyce Roberts, 29, claims
the contractor she hired in
February 2006 should have
completed construction with-
in six months, but repeatedly
delayed work on her four bed-
room home on New
Jerusalem Way, off
Carmichael Road.

And when she finally
moved in last month, the
ground floor of the two-storey
house flooded in heavy rain
as water poured through elec-
trical sockets and seeped
through the walls.

Her daughters, aged three
and six, are now sharing their
mother’s upstairs room as the
lower floor is uninhabitable.

Miss Roberts, a former
Atlantis employee who was
laid off in November last year,
said the contractor was rec-
ommended by her attorney,
who she found through her
bank loan officer.

An agreement with the con-
tractor stipulated building
work would be completed by
November 2006, or interest on
the loan would be paid by the
builder, Miss Roberts claimed.

But the completion date
was delayed to April 2007, and
then October 2007, Miss
Roberts said.

In the meantime she paid
an additional $8,000 in May
2007 for the basement/ground
floor to be built.

However, five months later
only the structure and roof of
the house had been complet-
ed.



“The whole
downstairs is
uninhabitable
because water
is coming in
and every time
it rains we
have to turn
the power off —
otherwise ’'m
afraid the
house is going
to burn down.”



Joyce Roberts

Miss Roberts terminated
the building contract in May
2008, and hired another con-
tractor to finish the job.

When she finally moved
into the house in April this
year, heavy rains flooded her
new home within weeks.

Miss Roberts said: “We are
not even three months in the
house and we are already hav-
ing so many complications.
The whole downstairs is unin-
habitable because water is
coming in and every time it
rains we have to turn the pow-
er off — otherwise I’m afraid
the house is going to burn
down.”

Miss Roberts has been
informed the water is seeping
in from underneath the foun-
dations of her home and will
cost around $3,000 to repair.

But having borrowed over
$158,000 to build the house,
and because she was unem-
ployed for five months until

WATER is Peete Menon enter Joyce Roberts.

a



she got her new job as a med-
ical assistant, Miss Roberts has
trouble even paying the bills.

She said: “I lived in dark-
ness for six weeks until I got
the money to pay BEC to turn
on my lights.

“TI make a total of $966 a
month and my mortgage alone
is $1,015.

“T have to come up with
money for light, water, food
and gas in order for my chil-
dren to live comfortably.

“T barely can afford the
necessities of life.”

She has been unable to con-
tact her original contractor or

over flood-prone home

Jamaica Hotel and }
Tourist Association in ;

a.

her attorney, and when she
can afford legal services she
intends to sue them for com-
pensation.

“T am living in a house that
requires me to turn off the
power every times it rains,”
Miss Roberts said.

“Tam so afraid and don’t
know what to do.

“T don’t think that this is fair
for me to have to be dealing
with after waiting three long
years to get into my home.

“IT am finally in and now I
have to sleep in fear every
time it rains, and we are now
in the hurricane season.”

CARICOM Secretariat moves on

social care tor substance abuse

THE Caribbean Community (CARI-
COM) Secretariat has intensified its offen-
sive against illicit drug use with the focus
on developing and strengthening social
care and rehabilitation programmes for
drug users, in a bid to mitigate the social
and health consequences of substance
abuse.

With funding from the European Union,
the Secretariat has organised a regional
workshop on “Minimising the Social and
Health Consequences of Substance
Abuse”, with special focus on street-based
programmes and the establishment of low
threshold drop-in-centres for substance
abusers and their relatives who may need
counselling.

The workshop, set to take place in
Jamaica on June 24-25, aims to sensitise
and increase the knowledge and skills of
non-government organisations, policy-
makers and service providers from the
public sector on current and emerging
trends in minimising the social and health
consequences of substance abuse. It will
also draw on best practices of existing low
threshold drop-in centres within the
Caribbean.

shop will identify and develop national
and regional advocacy strategies to lob-
by for the establishment of low threshold
drop-in centres where none currently exist,
and other programmes that can help min-
imise health consequences of substance
abuse on individuals, families and com-
munities.

The workshop will also identify areas
for in-country technical support to
strengthen or establish such existing pro-
grammes, and explore the issue of imple-
menting a human rights based approach in
programme development — the Caribbean
experience.

Another spin-off from the workshop is
the provision of a platform for the devel-
opment and strengthening of networking
among service providers of low threshold
drop-in centres in non-government and
government agencies to exchange infor-
mation and sharing of best practices.

Over 20 participants, drawn primarily
from non-government organisations across
the region, are expected to attend and
benefit from this workshop which starts
just two days ahead of World Interna-
tional Day against Drug Abuse and Illicit





























Bahamas Red
Cross elects
new president

THE Bahamas Red Cross Society
has elected Brendon Watson as its
new president.

A native of Long Island, Mr Watson
has served on the executive board of
the Bahamas Red Cross for the past
three years.

As a member of the board, Mr
Watson was chairman of the property
management committee and co-chair-
man of the fair committee.

Mr Watson is the founder and own-
er of Watson Construction Company
Ltd and serves as the assistant gover-
nor of Rotary International District
7020, Bahamas.

He has also served as chairman of
the Rotary International District 7020




Conference.
Invites Tenders far the services described below:

In addition, participants in the work- Trafficking, to be observed on June 26.
THE PURCHASE AMID REMOVAL OF

THE CONTENTS OF TWO CONTAINERS

CONTAINING USED COPPER & ALUMINUM CABLE
LOCATED AT
BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
BIG POND COMPOUND
BLUE HILL ROAD
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

eR RE eB ltsrim erin me MCLE l® lice]
experience in the fast food industry?

Bidders are required to collect bid packages from the
Corporation's Administration OMee, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
by contacting Mrs. Delmeta Seymour, Telephone No. 302-1158.

lf your answer Is “yes” then a growing fast
food chain wants you to be a leader of its
Management team!

Tenders are to be delivered on or before 42900 pum.
on July 6, 2009, and addressed as fallaws;

Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Qualified applicants should:

« have experience as a General Manager (a plus)

« be energetic & able fo supervise & motivate stat

« know the dynamics of providing superb Customer Service
be able to plan and understand budgets
be able to execute cost control measures
be able to execute inventory controls

Marked: Tender Mo. 706/09
Purchase and Removal of the Contents of
Two Containers
Containing Used Copper & Aluminum Cable
Located at Big Pond Compound
Blue Hill Road, Massau, Bahamas

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject the
whole or such part of any Tender the Corporation
deems necessary.

Interested persons should e-mail a résumé to
fantasticjobopportunity@gmail.com by June 30th, 2009


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009, PAGE 7





What economic crisis
holds in store for us

"The most we can say is that
there has been a general lack
of judgment...We have learned
that we are not so big as we
thought we were."

Former US president
Calvin Coolidge on
the Great Depression

[Ronicaney, the
gloomiest economic
doomsayers of today are often
the staunchest advocates of
free market capitalism. And
one of them was in town last
week to speak at a public
meeting organised by the Nas-
sau Institute.

Dr Robert Murphy is an
economist who works for a
plethora of libertarian think
tanks in the US. At the Nassau
Institute meeting, he offered a
devastating critique of current
American policy, touching
briefly on the likely fall-out for
the Bahamas from the current
economic Crisis.

In his view we are all in this
recession for the long haul
(read 10 years or more), and
we are very likely to suffer the
kind of stagflation last experi-
enced in the 1970s — only
squared. According to Mur-
phy, US government policies
are destroying the dollar and
setting us all on a course
towards hyperinflation.

Murphy is the author of the
Politically Incorrect Guide to
the Great Depression and the
New Deal, which insists that
the greatest economic disaster
of the 20th century was caused
by government interference
with the free market, and led
inexorably to a “central plan-
ning” assault on liberty.

This is, of course, a favourite
talking point among conserva-
tive economists, who believe
that the "official" history of
the 1930s is fake. Their revi-
sionist account not only seeks
to demonise US President
Franklin Roosevelt, but argues
that his “big government” poli-
cies only made the Depression
longer and worse — just as
President Obama's policies
promise to do today.

ECONOMIC
BENCHMARKS

The scale of the Great
Depression is familiar to most
of us by now. It featured an
unprecedented fall in stock val-
ues, a 28 per cent drop in eco-
nomic output, unemployment
that peaked at 28 per cent, and
a near collapse of the banking
system. Other countries fared
as badly as the US, and world
trade plunged by more than
half. Nothing like this had ever
happened before or since —
until now.

The Depression began with
a stock market crash in 1929
that led directly to Roosevelt's
landslide election in 1933. His
New Deal went on to change
the face of American govern-
ment, creating new institutions
like the Securities and
Exchange Commission to reg-
ulate the stock market, the

Federal Deposit Insurance

Corp to insure savings
accounts, and Social Security
to provide a safety net for the
elderly.

According to Murphy and
his libertarian colleagues, the
Depression was all about big,
bad government.

They say it was caused by
the US central bank flooding
the market with easy credit,
which artificially pushed down
interest rates. Lower rates
exaggerated the feeling of
prosperity that had developed
during the Roaring 20s, which
produced an unsustainable
boom that crashed in 1929.

In this view, recessions are
caused by financing loans over
and above the amount of mon-
ey that is available from real
savings, which creates a boom.
And government efforts to
delay the inevitable bust by
stimulating demand and keep-
ing credit inflated only make
things worse.

This runs counter to the
views of that influential British
economist John Maynard
Keynes, who died in 1945. He
stated that, in the midst of an
economic depression, the cor-
rect course of action is to
encourage spending and dis-
courage saving.

Explaining the origins of the
current crisis, Murphy said that
after the dot.com crash of the
early 2000s, the US central
bank under Alan Greenspan
began pumping up the money
supply.

This easy credit created the
housing bubble, which led to
our present predicament. In
other words, low interest rates
caused people to save less and
consume more, creating a false
prosperity followed by a crash.

So what should we about it?
Basically nothing, Murphy
says, and let the chips fall
where they may, which is what
the US government supposed-
ly did in every economic slump
from 1819 until the Great
Depression. Unfortunately,
this overlooks the fact that it is
politically impossible for any
modern, elected government
to simply do nothing in the face
of an economic downturn.

WORLD ECONOMY
TANKING

Until recently, the consen-
sus was that while things are
bad today, they are not as bad
as they were during the Great
Depression. But a widely cir-
culated analysis by two lead-
ing economic historians shows
that the world economy — in
terms of industrial production,
trade and stock markets — is
now tanking even faster than it
did in the first year of the
Great Depression.

Barry Eichengreen of the
University of California, and



Kevin O’Rourke of Trinity
College, Dublin, date the
beginning of the current glob-
al recession to April, 2008 and
their research demonstrates a
close match with the first year
of the Great Depression.

Using monthly data up to
April 2009, they find that world
industrial production closely
tracks the 1930s fall, with no
clear signs of “green shoots”.

In their paper for the Lon-
don-based Centre for Eco-
nomic Policy Research, they
show that the global decline in
output over the last nine
months has been at least as
severe as in the same period
following the 1929 peak.

The fall in the US stock mar-
ket has tracked 1929, but glob-
al markets are falling even
faster. And world trade is
falling much faster now than
in 1929-30.

"Globally, we are tracking
or doing even worse than the
Great Depression,” they wrote,
“whether the metric is indus-
trial production, exports or
equity valuations. Focusing on
the US causes one to minimise
this alarming fact. The “Great
Recession” label may turn out
to be too optimistic. This is a
Depression-sized event."

However, their research also
shows that while fiscal deficits
expanded only modestly after
1929, the willingness of gov-
ernments to follow the advice
of Keynes and run big deficits
today is much greater. The
question is whether this
unprecedented policy response
in the form of massive govern-
ment stimulus programmes will
work.

The alternative outcome —
as Murphy insists — is that it
will produce unsustainable lev-
els of public debt leading to a
loss of confidence in monetary
stability that will usher in a new
era of "malign stagflation".
This is a term coined in the
1970s to describe runaway
inflation combined with stag-
nant business activity and rising
unemployment.

PREPARING
FOR THE WORST

Murphy himself is preparing
for the worst. He wants interest
rates to soar to levels that
reflect the true price of capital,
and workers in the most affect-
ed economic sectors left to
fend for themselves and find
new jobs in more productive
areas. This is quite the opposite
of Keynesian prescriptions to
boost public spending when
private sector investment
declines.

"The current US govern-
ment policies to freeze the
economy by propping up fail-
ing companies are perverse,"
Murphy told the Nassau Insti-
tute. "They are simply trying to

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reflate the bubble. What we
need is to cut consumption and
save more in order to readjust.
In other words, we have to live
below our means."

Murphy says the US is now
forecasting trillion-dollar
deficits for the next 10 years,
and federal debt has topped
$11 trillion — more than 82
per cent of gross domestic
product. He is appalled that
the US government now owns
large portions of several major
banks as well as auto makers,
and wants to control the
healthcare and energy sectors
too.

"This is a huge power grab
and move towards central
planning, so I am very pes-
simistic about the economic
outlook for the next 10 years."

Turning to the Bahamas, he
said the government's ideas for
revenue reform were good,
although he deplored the intro-
duction of unemployment
insurance: "Paying people not
to work only perpetuates the
problem. Subsidizing unem-
ployment will stall the recov-
ery. Workers must be encour-
aged to find new employment
in more productive sectors."

Again, this is opposite to
what mainstream economists
would advise. In its recent
report on the Bahamas, for
example, the International
Monetary Fund said increased
social spending through the
National Insurance Board "to
protect the most vulnerable
Bahamians", and public infra-
structure investment projects
"to sustain employment in the
construction sector", are
appropriate. But the IMF, too,
is worried about rising debt.

For the past decade the
Bahamian fiscal deficit has
averaged around 2 per cent,
while public debt levels as a
percentage of GDP have

MANGOS

remained relatively low. Since
mid-2008, however, the global
downturn has caused our econ-
omy to shrink rapidly, with
preliminary figures showing
unemployment topping 14 per
cent this spring.

Without more taxes or
spending cuts, government
debt will rise to unsustainable
levels within a few years, the
IMF says.

EXIT STRATEGIES

This is the same conclusion
the Fund drew about the
American economy. It urged
the US government to reassure
markets about its stimulus exit
strategies, and said fiscal policy
would need to be tightened by
$700 billion a year from extra
taxes or lower spending. The
fiscal deficit in the US is
expected to reach almost 14
per cent of GDP.

The IMF believes the
Bahamian currency should
remain pegged to the US dol-
lar in order to promote a "sta-
ble investment climate." But
Murphy's prediction that
American prices will rise at
double digits argues for a
reconsideration of this link.
Since most of our imports are
from the United States, Mur-
phy says we will suffer the
same hyperinflation as the US.

That means prices rising at
more than 50 per cent a month,
which would wipe out both pri-
vate and public purchasing
power. So Murphy is building a
stock of gold and silver coins as
a hedge of last resort to weath-
er the storm he believes is com-
ing. And he is not alone. As
the US government continues
to pump money into the econ-
omy, many investors have
started to worry about infla-
tion.

But according to Murphy the

stakes are much higher. In his
“politically incorrect” book he
argues that the economic crisis
was caused by Americans liv-
ing beyond their means —
which they were encouraged
to do by a reckless govern-
ment.

And he says the govern-
ment’s trillion-dollar stimulus
package and related handouts
will saddle taxpayers with more
government debt than at any
time since the Second World
War.

Whether or not a collapse of
the world as we know it is in
store, there is no doubt that
we are in for a very rough ride.
In January, Carmen Reinhart
of the University of Maryland
and Kenneth Rogoff of Har-
vard University produced a
key paper for the non-partisan
National Bureau of Economic
Research that focused on what
happens after a severe financial
crisis.

They found that, historically,
such crises show deep and last-
ing effects on asset prices,
industrial output and employ-
ment extending out over sev-
eral years. And the real value
of public debt tends to explode
due to a collapse in tax rev-
enues as well as to fiscal poli-
cies aimed at mitigating the
downturn.

It seems clear that none of
this will play out in the short
term, and we can expect many
lean and difficult years ahead.
We should use them as an
opportunity to achieve vital
structural reforms in the
Bahamian economy to leave a
worthwhile legacy for our chil-
dren.

What do you think?
Send comments to

larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit www.bahamapundit.com



Monday through Saturday for lunch

Wednesday through Saturday for dinner

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Handamaae PiZZ4S

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CAVES VILLAGE, WEST BAY STREET

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EMAIL MANGOSCAFE@CORALWAVE.COM


PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Newspaper The rape trial of MP’s son resumes

FROM page one



By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

Cranberry juice to drink. He
allegedly took the girls home
where he had sex with them sep-
arately in a bedroom.

Dr Signson testified in court
on Tuesday that he examined the
girls. He said they had both sus-
tained injuries to their vagina.
One of the girls, he said, had also
sustained injuries and bleeding
to the rectum and anus.

Inspector Michael Brathwaite
said he put Sergeant Vaughn
Pratt under arrest at the Central
Detective Unit around 1.10pm
on May 25, 2007.

“T cautioned him and charged
him with two counts of unlawful sexual inter-
course,” said Insp Brathwaite.

Inspector Hilton Cash testified that after
receiving certain information around 6pm

an incident where Sergeant Pratt
had become a suspect,” he told
the Court.

Insp Cash said he later went to
CDU where he saw Ms Paula
Marshall from Social Services,
along with two minors, ages 14
and 15 years old at the time, who
gave him certain information.

He stated that sometime
around 10.45am on May 7
Sergeant Pratt came to CDU.
Mr Cash said he informed Pratt
of a complaint that was filed
against him. He cautioned Pratt
and arrested him for the offence.

“Pratt replied, ‘I did not both-
er those girls. I did not touch them. They
spend most of their time with the neighbour;
they stay in their own bedroom.”

Inspector Cash said that sometime around
11.56am on May 7, he and several officers
went to Pratt’s residence at No 16 Duke Dri-
ve to execute a search warrant.

He said that Pratt was also present and

gave officers permission to search the resi-
dence, including the master-bedroom,
kitchen and guest room.

Inspector Cash said that sometime around
2.30pm the two minor girls, accompanied by
social worker Fran Brice, directed officers to
the Bowling Alley.

The girls also directed officers to a bar
near the Lucayan Circle, and then took them
to House No 16 at Duke Drive, where they
gave officers certain information.

During cross-examination, lawyer Murrio
Ducille asked Inspector Cash whether Pratt
was cooperative with officers. Inspector Cash
replied that Pratt was cooperative, but did
not answer questions put to him by officers.

Mr Ducille noted that while Pratt had a
right to remain silent, he was very coopera-
tive and allowed officers in his house.

“All you had really were the words of
those two girls against him?” he asked.

The Prosecution closed its case. The trial
was adjourned for continuation on August 17
when Mr Ducille is expected to make a no
case submission.

with three other persons on
April 2, 2004 in the parking
lot near the old straw market
downtown for damage to and
stealing from a vehicle.

She was later arraigned in
Magistrate’s court and
charged with the offence. The
police then held a press con-
ference and as a result the
newspaper published a story

FREEPORT - The rape trial of Police
Sergeant Vaughn Pratt, the son of St Cecilia
MP Cynthia Pratt, resumed in the Freeport
Magistrate’s Court on Tuesday.

Pratt is charged with two counts of having
unlawful sexual intercourse with two minors,
aged 14 and 15, on May 6, 2007.

The summary trial, which started in
November 2007, is being held in Court 3
J before Magistrate Helen Jones.
that reportedly contained the Lawyer Murrio Ducille of New Providence
defamatory statements about : is representing Pratt. Valeria Pyfrom and
her. ? Lorna Longley-Rolle of the Attorney Gen-

However, after more thana : — eral’s Office are the prosecutors.
year, no evidence was pro- According to the particulars, it is alleged
duced against Ms Tinker and that Pratt had sexual intercourse with two
all charges were withdrawn young girls who were put in the care of him
on November 29, 2005. and his wife at their home in Freeport. on Sunday, May 6, 2007, he went to the Rand

According to Ms Tinker’s It is alleged that while his wife was off the | Memorial Hospital to conduct an investiga-
attorney Dorsey McPhee, Ms island Pratt took the girls to a local bar and tion.

Tinker subsequently obtained bought them several rounds of Vodka and “They contacted me and updated me on

Sergeant Vaughn Pratt



a judgment against the police
and the Attorney General for
malicious prosecution in 2006.

In Ms Tinker’s claim she is
seeking general aggravated
and exemplary damages for
defamation and libel, costs,
interest pursuant to a civil
procedure award and what-
ever other relief the court
may deem just.

However, in its defence
against the other plaintiff,
filed on June 2, 2009, The
Nassau Guardian admits that
a press conference took place
and that it published a story

as set out in paragraph four of

the statement of claim.

However, the newspaper
denies that the statements
contained in the story were
defamatory or that they were
understood to refer or are
capable of referring to the
plaintiff.

Further, the Guardian

asserts that the occasion of

publication was an occasion
of qualified privilege.

“The defendant denies
paragraph 10 of the statement

of claim and puts the plaintiff

to strict proof in respect both
of his allegation that the
words complained of were
published maliciously and to
her claim to have suffered
loss and damage.”

The plaintiffs in this mat-
ter are reportedly seeking a
“reasonable” out of court set-
tlement.

The Nassau Guardian is
represented by Alexiou

FNM faction

‘praying’ PM

will commit to another term

FROM page one

don't quite know how to ask the prime minis-
ter to remain, but pray every night that he will
return because we are in difficult times, more
difficult than we've ever seen before.

"Unless somebody comes out of the blue, we
would welcome the prime minister staying for
some further period of time," Chairman of the
Airport Authority Frank Watson told The Tri-
bune during an interview yesterday.

Mr Watson, who served as deputy prime
minister and minister of national security dur-
ing the former Ingraham administration, said
there is an absence of charismatic politicians
who can broadly connect with the voter base as
well as can Mr Ingraham.

"We have many brilliant Bahamians who
run many successful businesses, but in order to
lead a country one has to have other quali-
ties. A leader must be able to touch people in
a way which gives them confidence that you
will protect their broad interests — so we have
to wait for that person to emerge who can con-
nect with the Bahamian public," said Mr Wat-
son.

"It would be my biggest nightmare if he did-
n't,” said another long-standing FNM sup-
porter when asked by The Tribune about the
possibility of Mr Ingraham offering for anoth-
er term.

He pointed to several members of Mr Ingra-
ham's Cabinet — current Deputy Prime Min-
ister Brent Symonette, Health Minister Dr
Hubert Minnis, State Immigration Minister
Branville McCartney and State Finance Min-
ister Zhirvargo Laing — as front-runners to

replace him as party leader.

According to the supporter, Mr Symonette
currently holds the most support within the
FNM to follow Mr Ingraham, but said that Mr
Symonette's skin colour may be an obstacle too
huge for him to overcome.

The supporter also reasoned that Mr Symon-
ette may be staying on the sidelines until Mr
Ingraham formally announces whether he will
stay on as leader of the party or not before
possibly galvanising support for a potential
leadership bid.

"I don't think you will see that out of Brent
until he knows what the prime minister is going
to do, whether he is going to step down or run
for another term. But one good thing about
Brent, all Bahamians know he is a man who
isn't there to get what he can get (from the
public purse), he doesn't need that," said the
supporter of the wealthy MP for the St Anne's
constituency.

Mr Ingraham became leader of the FNM in
1990 and served as prime minister from 1992 to
2002, when he stepped down as head of the
party.

Tommy Turnquest, current National Secu-
rity Minister, won a hotly contestant leadership
race to succeed Mr Ingraham, but was defeat-
ed in the 2002 election by PLP leader Perry
Christie.

Previously, Mr Ingraham had said he intend-
ed to serve two consecutive terms as leader, but
returned to the party's helm in late 2005 after
requests from his supporters.

Since his return to front-line politics, there
has been much speculation about Mr Ingra-
ham's future as leader of the FNM.

FROM page one

from spinal cord compression and
that additional surgery was required.

Smith was injured in 2001. He
underwent two surgeries and was
required to have a third, but was
unable to do so for financial rea-
sons.

His attorney expressed concern
about the overcrowded conditions
and the limited medical staff at the
prison to treat Smith.

“He cannot survive in prison. If
he goes to prison you will be sending
him to die. They cannot afford treat-
ment (in prison),” he said during a
very lengthy plea to the Court.

Mr Ducille described Smith as a
“productive citizen” who brought
joy to people through his talent as a
singer.

Smith, a native of Bimini, has pro-
duced a number of popular hit songs,
such as One More Sweet Song,
Gone to Jail, Lay Low in Bimini,
Hold Your Head, You Gat Me
Thinking.

Mr Ducille also noted that his
client was very remorseful and
pleaded guilty to the offence at the
trial. He said Smith deserves a sec-
ond chance.

“Prison should be a last resort.
Productive citizens should not be
placed in prison.

“Allow him to continue his life,
allow him to continue to be a good
person and productive citizen in soci-
ety,” he said.

However, Prosecutor Jillian
Williams stated that Smith lured his
13-year-old victim in his car on Jan-
uary 12, 2004, and took her to an
unknown location on Farm Road,
where he had sexual intercourse with

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FROM page one

alleged incident, recalled that Father Brown
approached her while she, her cousins and friends
were on the beach talking with a group of boys she
knew. She told the court that Father Brown went
behind the boys, who were 16 and 17 years old, and

told her to move away.

The young girl told the court that after she moved
away to talk to her cousin, Father Brown followed
her and told her to move a second time. According
to the witness, she and her cousin walked further
across the beach. She said that when she stopped to
talk to a young male friend, Father Brown remind-
ed her that he had already told her to move and

began to push her.

“He started to push me and I turned around and
said ‘don’t push me,’” she told the court. The girl
said that Father Brown kept pushing her in the back
and grabbed her shirt. She said that she again told
him not to touch her and she pushed him away. She
said that when she spun around Father Brown
slapped her. The girl told the court that she hit
Father Brown back, but could not recall where. She
claimed that the priest started to fight her and

pushed her into the sand.

“He was hitting me and I was hitting him. He sat
on top of me and choked me and slapped me,” she
said. The girl told the court that the senior master of
her school along with several church parishioners lift-

ed Father Brown off her.

During cross-examination by Mr Munroe, the
girl said that Father had probably thought she did
not know the boys on the beach. She told the court
that she never “cursed” at Father Brown and expect-

FROM page one

expressed his satisfaction that the
“door is not closed” to the Gov-
ernment’s offer.

Describing the afternoon’s
talks as “constructive,” he said
the parties would meet again next
Wednesday to further discuss the
issue and seek to finally resolve
the matter.

While going beyond its own
previous proposals, Governmen-
t’s offer was not the one the BNU
had put forward yesterday.

They made a verbal proposal
that they should get their full
health insurance coverage imme-
diately, while deferring their four
per cent pay increase until July
1, 2010. They plan to put this in
writing to the Government as ear-
ly as today.

Government’s latest offer to
the nurses goes far beyond its ini-
tial proposal. During the budget
debate, Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham said economic condi-
tions meant their promised $10.5
million healthcare coverage could
not start until 2012, when the
economy is expected to start its
recovery.

Allowing for healthcare cover-
age to come into effect on July
1, 2010, the new offer adds that in
the meantime, nurses can have
one hundred per cent of their
healthcare costs paid — more
than if they used their insurance,
which usually covers up to 80 per
cent of costs, noted Dr Minnis —

Singer jailed
for teen rape

her against her will.

She said that injuries to the victim,
who was a student at Jack Hayward
High School at the time, were sup-
ported by medical evidence.

Ms Williams noted that Smith opt-
ed to plead guilty after the prosecu-
tion had called the complainant to
the stand.

“T know that Mr Smith’s injuries
would present challenges for the
prison staff, but they would have to
deal with it,” she said.

After taking the doctor’s report
and Smith’s medical condition into
consideration, Justice Watkins
stressed that the victim must also be
considered.

“Mr Smith, I have listened to
counsel, I have read the probation
report and the medical reports of
Dr Munnings.

“T have to consider the victim, a
young girl who is scarred for the rest
of her life. Her mother is saying to
give you beyond the maximum sen-
tence of seven years.

“Your counsel is saying not to
impose custodial sentence because
it would not serve any useful pur-
pose, but I do not share that view. I
feel that a custodial sentence is
appropriate,” she said.

Mr Ducille thanked Justice
Watkins for exercising compassion in
her sentencing of Smith.

“We express a great deal of grati-
tude to you,” he said.

Girl testifies

Nurses

if they seek medical treatment
for a “job-related” ailment.

They would first of all be
offered all-costs-covered treat-
ment at the Princess Margaret
Hospital. If the care they required
was not available there, at a pri-
vate facility, and lastly abroad,
said Dr Minnis.

Meanwhile, they would get the
four per cent salary increase they
had initially expected to come
along with the insurance cover-
age in 2009 in 2010 instead, as
they called for in their own
counter-proposal.

Nurses said it is a fact that they
work in an environment that puts
them at high risk for illness that
means health insurance is so crit-
ical to them.

Hundreds of nurses called in
“sick” at their various stations in
the last 14 days when the Prime
Minister announced in present-
ing the 2009/2010 Budget to the
House that government would
have to postpone their group
health insurance to next year
because of the serious economic
downturn.

Before next week’s meeting
government will be looking at
“trends” to see how many nurses
were taking sick days before the
“sick-out” and how many are at
present out to see whether things
are back to normal.

ed to be disciplined by her parents, but not someone
she didn’t really know. She admitted during cross-
examination that she had sucked her teeth when
Father Brown had told her to move. The girl admit-
ted she had done it intentionally and that it had
been a rude gesture.

The girl’s mother told the court that she met her
daughter at the Cable Beach Police Station where
she was making a complaint about the incident.
During cross-examination she admitted that she
would not approve of her daughter performing a
sex act on a man, being openly promiscuous, or
cursing and carrying on. She said that if she were at
the beach and her daughter had refused to move she
would have physically removed her herself.

A 15-year-old friend of the complainant said that
while they were talking to a friend Father Brown
tapped the complainant on her shoulder and told her
to go where she should be. She said that the com-
plainant walked off and stopped to talk to a friend
again. She said that Father Brown tapped her on the
shoulder again and she pulled away. She told the
court that Father Brown pulled the complainant’s
arm and slapped her. She told the court that the
complainant started fighting and he hit her again.
She said that Father Brown fell on top of the com-
plainant and began to choke and hit her. Two other
young girls who witnessed the incident also gave
similar testimony. The prosecution is expected to call
two more witnesses when the trial resumes on Sep-
tember 3 before Magistrate Ancella Williams.

Father Brown if convicted could receive a $150
fine or three months in prison.

This will determine whether
the Government is willing to pro-
ceed with resolving the dispute,
he suggested.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham had told parliament that gov-
ernment would be unwilling to
do so if the nurses continued to
engage in what he termed an
“illegal strike.”

Downplaying the idea that
nurses had been engaged in a
“sick out”, Mrs Hamilton yester-
day said many nurses have dis-
covered over the last two weeks
that they are ill.

“This exercise would have
forced nurses to go and have a
physical, and we found that a lot
of nurses are sick. I think this sub-
stantiates the fact that we need
insurance,” she said.

She rejected the idea that nurs-
es could be insured under the
Bahamas Public Service Union’s
medical plan, as was suggested
by that union’s president on Mon-
day, pointing out that some physi-
cians do not accept the BPSU’s
insurance.

“That’s not an option,” she
said.

President of the Bahamas
Christian Council, Reverend
Patrick Paul, was present at the
meeting and said he felt there was
now a “light at the end of the tun-
nel.”

Mr Foulkes said the BCC had
been “working behind the
scenes” to help find a solution to
the impasse between the parties.
TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009, PAGE 9



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



AP source:
Bucks
to sent
Jefferson
to Spurs

@ By COLIN FLY
AP Sports Writer

MILWAUKEE (AP) — A
Bucks official with knowledge
of the deal said Tuesday that
Milwaukee plans to trade scor-
ing forward Richard Jefferson
to the San Antonio Spurs for
Bruce Bowen, Kurt Thomas
and Fabricio Oberto, giving
them a veteran cast and finan-
cial flexibility.

The person confirmed the
pending trade to The Associat-
ed Press and requested
anonymity because the deal is
not official until a call later
Tuesday. ESPN.com first
reported details of the deal.

The Bucks are sending Jef-
ferson away less than a year
after acquiring the scoring for-
ward in a draft day trade last
season with New Jersey for Yi
Jianlian and Bobby Simmons.
Jefferson’s contract has two
years and $29.2 million remain-
ing on it.

Jefferson was a steady offen-
sive force for Milwaukee last
season after spending his first
seven years in New Jersey. He
averaged 19.6 points and shot
a career-high 39.7 per cent from
3-point range while starting all
82 games.

Jefferson became the Bucks’
biggest offensive threat after
Michael Redd and Andrew
Bogut suffered season-ending
injuries, but the Bucks’ tight
financial situation made a move
necessary. Milwaukee does not
want to pay the NBA’s luxury
tax, which last year hit teams
dollar-for-dollar once they
reach $71.15 million in total
payroll.

Redd, Bogut and Jefferson
are scheduled to make more
than $41 million combined this
season.

The trade was a shock to at
least one Bucks player: Charlie
Villanueva posted “RJ traded
to Spurs. Wow” on his Twitter
account before the trade was
official.

The deal actually might allow
the Bucks to keep Ramon Ses-
sions or Villanueva himself,
since both are restricted free
agents.

Bowen, Thomas and Oberto
give the Bucks a veteran group.
None is signed beyond the
upcoming season.

Bowen, 38, is a 13-year vet-
eran known for his defensive
efforts against the Western
Conference’s top guards.
Thomas, 36, has played 14 years
in the NBA, primarily at for-
ward and center, and has been a
bench player each of the last
three seasons, averaging 4.3
points last year.

Oberto, 34, has played four
years in San Antonio, averaging
3.6 points per game in his NBA
career. Last season he under-
went a procedure to correct an
irregular heartbeat.

Soccer fans
in Argentina
cemetery try
to save team

BUENOS AIRES, Argenti-
na (AP) — It’s the ultimate
grave situation.

Fans of Gimnasia La Plata
looking for help to save the
team from relegation to the
second division are visiting
local cemeteries and praying
near the tombs of some of
Argentina’s former leaders,
including Juan Domingo Peron
and Raul Alfonsin.

Supporters have been leav-
ing flowers and other gifts near
gravesides in the Recoleta
cemetery in Buenos Aires.
Curiously, neither Peron nor
Alfonsin were Gimnasia fans.

“This is what some fans are
doing, but the club has nothing
to do with this,” Gimnasia
spokesman Jose Luis Arrien
said. “It’s a bit quirky.”

The newspaper Clarin said
supporters have been praying
at the tomb of the club’s for-
mer president, Saturnino Per-
driel.

Wimbledon: Venus
defeats Voegele

@ By STEVEN WINE
AP Sports Writer

WIMBLEDON, England
(AP) — Five points into her
opening match at Wimbledon,
Venus Williams slipped and
went sprawling on the grass she
loves.

The five-time champion
recovered from her stumble at
the start Tuesday and defeated
Stefanie Voegele 6-3, 6-2.

It was Williams’ first appear-
ance on Centre Court since the
2008 final, when she beat sister
Serena for her second Wimble-
don title in a row.

“T really enjoyed being out
there,” Venus said. “It’s a spe-
cial moment when you walk
back as defending champion on
that court.”

Williams’ tumble was one of
several wobbly moments as she
began her bid for a three-peat.
She double-faulted in the open-
ing game and had to erase two
break points. She was passed
the first two times she reached
the net. She slipped and nearly
fell a second time.

“It’s grass,” she said. “Youre
going to slip sometimes.”

Williams found her footing,
winning 14 consecutive points
to help take a 5-1 lead. She had
another spurt in the second set
after losing serve for 2-all, and
swept the final four games.

“Having won this title multi-
ple times, you get that sense of
what it takes to win,” she said.
“And I definitely have a good
grip on that — what it takes to
win this title.”

Other players also took a
tumble — Andy Roddick fell
once during his victory, and
even a ball boy fell on his face.
But for the second day in a row,
there were no big upsets,
although American Melanie
Oudin pulled off a surprise in
her tournament debut. The 17-
year-old from Marietta, Ga.,
earned her first win in a major
event by beating No. 29-seeded
Sybille Bammer 4-6, 6-4, 6-2.

“T was really nervous most of
the match today, but finally in
the third I started to calm
down,” Oudin said. “I’m really
glad I pulled it out.”

Roddick followed Williams
onto Centre Court and beat
Jeremy Chardy 6-3, 7-6 (3), 4-6,
6-3. Roddick, seeded sixth, had
only nine unforced errors and
hit 46 winners, including 20
aces. He improved to 20-3 in
tiebreakers this year.

Roddick was Wimbledon
runner-up to Roger Federer in
2004 and 2005, but Andy Mur-
ray of Britain is considered the



VENUS WILLIAMS of the US serves to Stefanie Voegele of Switzerland in
their first round singles match at Wimbledon yesterday...

3

Lourdes Dominguez Lino 7-5,
6-3. Safina said she was ham-
pered by left knee tendinitis
that has bothered her at times
the past two months, although
she reached the French Open
final less than three weeks ago.

Former No. 1 Jelena Jankovic
beat Julia Goerges 6-4, 7-6 (0).
Kimiko Date Krumm, a 38-
year-old wild card who came
out of retirement last year, lost
in her first Wimbledon match
since 1996 to No. 9-seeded Car-
oline Wozniacki, 5-7, 6-3, 6-1.

No. 17 Amelie Mauresmo,
the 2006 champion, defeated
Melinda Czink 6-1, 4-6, 6-2.

On the men’s side, No. 3-
seeded Andy Murray began his
bid to become the first British
man to win Wimbledon since
1936 by beating American
Robert Kendrick 7-5, 6-7 (3),
6-3, 6-4. Americans Robby
Ginepri, Kevin Kim, Bobby
Reynolds and Wayne Odesnik
also lost.

Ginepri won the first three
games, then lost 18 of the next
21 to fall to 2002 champion
Lleyton Hewitt 6-4, 6-1, 6-1.
Ginepri was bothered by a neck
injury he suffered last week and
received treatment from a train-
er three times during the match.

The unseeded Hewitt and
Federer are the only former
champions in the men’s draw.
Hewitt next plays No. 5-seed-
ed Juan Martin del Potro, who
never faced a break point and
swept Arnaud Clement 6-3, 6-1,
6-2.

No. 12 Nikolay Davydenko
beat Daniel Evans 6-2, 6-3, 6-3.
British wild card Alex Bog-
danovic’s record at Wimbledon
fell to 0-8 when he lost to No. 20
Tomas Berdych 6-3, 6-4, 6-4.

Williams prepared for Wim-
bledon as usual on hard courts
back home in Florida, and did-
mt play a grass-court warmup
tournament. But after her slow
start she looked at home on the
lawn.

In one game she smacked a
backhand return up the line for
a winner, then did the same
thing from the other wing. Her
second serve was unsteady, but
she lost only six points on her
first serve while hitting 29 win-
ners and committing only 11
unforced errors.

“On the grass, I think you
have the opportunity to make
fantastic shots that are very
entertaining and great plays,”
Williams said. “I think the game
is more fast-paced. In a lot of
ways, it makes it a lot more
exciting.”

Williams is only 6-4 since ear-
ly April, but Wimbledon always

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biggest obstacle for Federer this
year.

“As far as who’s talking
about what, I don’t really care,”
Roddick said. “I just want to go
out and win matches.”

The new retractable roof

again worked well, keeping rain
away for a second successive
day. A cloudless afternoon
prompted an official on the
club’s public-address system to
urge that fans use sun block.
“It looks really nice, the

roof,” Williams said. “We
haven’t had to use it yet. It’s
kind of ironic. But ’m very sure
it will get some use.”
Top-ranked Dinara Safina
opened another bid for her first
Grand Slam title by beating

brings her out of the doldrums.
She’s 51-4 at the All England
Club since 2000, when she won
the title for the first time. She’s
seeded third but the tourna-
ment favourite with London
bookmakers.

Another test: US to face top-ranked Spain

m By ANDREW DAMPF
AP Sports Writer

BLOEMFONTEIN, South Africa (AP)
— Talk about tests: After reaching the Con-
federations Cup semifinals in unlikely fash-
ion, the reward for the US soccer team is a
matchup Wednesday with top-ranked
Spain.

“The team is on a high for sure,” US
coach Bob Bradley said Tuesday. “From a
football standpoint, it’s a great challenge
but we couldn’t be more excited for this
chance.”

The United States is 0-3 against Spain,
losing 3-1 in the first round of the 1950
World Cup, 2-0 in a 1992 exhibition at Val-
ladolid and 1-0 in an exhibition on June 4
last year at Santander, when Xavi Hernan-
dez beat backup goalkeeper Brad Guzan
with a low shot in the 79th minute.

“They have less pressure. They have
nothing to lose. For them, it’s a positive
that we assume the title of favourite, the
responsibility and the pressure,” Spanish
midfielder Xavi Hernandez said. “We
assume the mantle of favourites but it won’t
be an easy match. Not at all.”

Spain, the European champion, has set an
international record with 15 straight victo-
ries and will be trying to stretch its unbeat-
en streak to a record 36, breaking the mark
set by Brazil from December 1993 to Janu-
ary 1996. Brazil’s streak includes a loss on
penalty kicks to Uruguay in the 1995 Copa
America final, which is considered a tie in
FIFA’s records.

“A big part of playing them is not getting
frustrated because you don’t have the ball,”
Landon Donovan said. “The other side of
that is trying to put them under pressure.
That’s our goal, and if we can do that we
have a chance.”

After losing 3-1 to world champion Italy
and 3-0 to South American champion
Brazil, the 14th-rannked United States



CHARLIE DAVIES controls a ball as coach Bob
Bradley stands nearby, at the start of a US
national soccer team training session at the
Seisa Ramabodu Stadium, in Bloemfontein,
South Africa on Tuesday...

(AP Photo: Rebecca Blackwell)

reached the semis with a 3-0 victory over
African champion Egypt as Brazil beat the
Azzurri 3-0. The winner of Wednesday’s
game advances to the final against Brazil or
host South Africa on Sunday, while the los-
er goes to the third-place match the same
day.

FIFA said there were about 6,000 tickets
still on sale for the match at the 38,000-seat
Free State Stadium in Bloemfontein.

“There will be a certain number of tickets
given on a complimentary basis,” FIFA
spokesman Nicolas Maingot said. “Again,
it’s a gesture from FIFA ... for people to
have a chance to enjoy this game.”

The US is 1-7-1 against top-ranked teams,
beating Brazil in the 1998 CONCACAF
Gold Cup, losing to Brazil seven times and
tying Argentina on June 8 last year during
a downpour at Giants Stadium.

“We have to be very careful,” Spain
coach Vicente del Bosque said. “They have
avery talented midfield that pushes upfield
easily. They play very direct, attacking foot-
ball.”

Spain’s forwards, Fernando Torres and
David Villa, are complemented by Her-
nandez and talented defenders such as Car-
les Puyol and Joan Capdevila. Del Bosque,
who replaced Luis Aragones as coach fol-
lowing the European title, has won 13 con-
secutive games.

“Different types of players are essential
for a great national team. Torres is such a
great forward, Xabi Alonso is in the middle
of everything they do. Puyol, on top of
everything else, plays with so much heart, so
much fight,” Bradley said. “Aragones and
now Del Bosque have taken all that talent
and turned it into something special.
They’re on an incredible run now and we’ve
got to find a way to break it.”

US captain Carlos Bocanegra, sidelined
since injury a hamstring in the June 6 World
Cup qualifier against Honduras, had near-
ly recovered and would boost the American
defense against Spain, coming off its first
major title in 44 years. Regular goalkeeper
Tim Howard will return after Guzan faced
the Egyptians.

“Carlos is back into full training,” Bradley
said. “We still have to test him a little bit but
he certainly becomes an option in this
game.”

One of the biggest challenges for the
Americans will be maintaining their com-
posure while Spain taps the ball back and
forth in midfield.

“T’m not a big stat guy in soccer,” Bradley
said, “but in every game Spain plays they
always dominate possession.”

e AP Sports Writers Raf Casert and Paul
Logothetis in Bloemfontein and AP Sports
Writer Chris Lehourites in Johannesburg
contributed to this report

ar Game
pier
be true

scorcher

m By RB FALLSTROM
AP Sports Writer

ST LOUIS (AP) — Joel
Pineiro’s right leg gave way at
the end of his seven-inning stint
in 90-degree heat last week, the
cramping in his calf so painful
that his teammates had to carry
the Cardinals pitcher off the
field. He tried to walk it off in
the dugout, but wound up beg-
ging trainer Barry Weinberg for
help.

“T was like "Barry, it hurts too
much,” Pineiro recalled.

Infielder Brendan Ryan also
had cramps and second base-
man Skip Schumaker required
IV fluids for dehydration. Two
days earlier, Tigers pitcher
Justin Verlander wilted in the
St. Louis heat.

“T was exhausted,” Verlan-
der said after lasting only four
innings. “I think after the first
inning, I was just gassed. I
couldn’t get my legs underneath
me.”

All this and there’s still three
weeks to go before St. Louis
hosts its first All-Star Game
since 1966 — that one memo-
rable for being held in 105-
degree temperatures at old
Busch Stadium.

Having all the reserves for
the July 14 game could be a
good thing: The new Busch Sta-
dium, now four years old, does-
n't have the artificial turf that
made hot days extra miserable.
But triple-digit temperatures
are a distinct possibility and the
elements could play a role.

On steamy days like Pineiro’s
last start, messages on the score-
board advise fans to drink plen-
ty of fluids. Players don’t have
to be reminded, but Pineiro
would up changing three soaked
undershirts plus his uniform top
during his outing. He retired 16
batters in a row after giving up
four runs in the first inning
before fading.

Schumaker had company tak-
ing IV fluids.

“There’s a lot of guys that
have done that,” he said. “It’s
not easy to stay hydrated, it’s
really difficult. I don’t know
how the pitchers and catchers
do it.”

Tigers manager Jim Leyland,
whose team was around for the
first truly searing series this
year, said overcoming the heat
is largely a case of mind over
matter. His advice for rookie
pitcher Rick Porcello before
pitching the finale of a three-
game series last week: “I think
you drink a lot of water, you
drink a lot of fluids, you do
what your mommy told you.”

Leyland remembers when it
was much worse, before the
Cardinals scrapped artificial turf
leading into the 1996 season.
The present scenario is a “piece
of cake” compared to the days
when thermometers on the field
approached 130 degrees and the
glass windows from the stadi-
um club produced a magnify-
ing effect.

The only conditions more
onerous from a personal stand-
point was the time he had to
catch both ends of a minor
league double at Savannah, Ga.,
back in the 1960s. Leyland said
he lost 11 pounds and “TI only
weighed like 175 to start with.”

“Tt’s humid, it’s hot, but I can
assure you it’s not nearly as bad
as when they had the turf,” Ley-
land said. “When the turf was
here it was the hottest place I’d
ever been in the summertime.

“Guys used to have to come
in between innings and put their
feet in buckets. You can see the
steam coming up.”

Sort of like Tuesday in St.
Louis, where it was 98 degrees
with a heat index of 104 shortly
after midday. And like it very
well could be for the All-Star
Game.

“It’s just part of the game,”
Pineiro said. “We’re just start-
ing now, wait until July and
August roll around.”

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays


PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Roberts to get

exposure on tour

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

EVERY year, at least one
Bahamian is included on the
Caribbean, Latin American
and Central American Tennis
Confederation’s summer tour
where players are exposed to
international competition.

This year’s recipient is
Justin Roberts, who is travel-
ing with coach Bradley Bain
and teaming up in doubles
with Gian Issa of Suriname.

The trio are in town with
Roberts and Issa to compete
in the Security & General
International Junior Champi-
onships that is currently
underway at the National
Tennis Center.

Bain, who has traveled with
the duo from the first leg of
the tour in El Salvador three
weeks ago, said the tour — set
to wrap up in August — is
designed to get players 14
years and younger in action.

“The only thing the kids are
lacking is match play and the
only way they can get it is by
playing in these matches,”
Bain said.

Bain said he’s responsible
for taking Roberts, who is
ranked at No.9 on the tour, to
at least eight tournaments
with a goal of trying to get him
down to at least one or two.

“We have embarked on a
programme to get him ready
for next year when he turns
15,” Bain said. “By then, he
would have gained enough
experience to get him ready
to play in more tournaments
in the under 18 division.”

Issa, according to Bain, was
the top player last year and
together this year, they are
hoping to emerge as the top
doubles team on the tour.

Roberts said he’s delighted
to be back home and compet-
ing in the tournament.

[>



READY FOR SUMMER TOUR — Shown are coach Bradley Bain (centre), Justin Roberts (right) of the Bahamas and Gian Issa of Suriname...

“Tt’s been good, but I hope
to improve as the tournament
goes on,” said Roberts, who
admitted that he needs to
work a little more on his con-
centration.

The 12-year-old Lyford Cay
student said that having
played so many tournaments
with international players, he
can only get better as he con-
tinues to improve on his per-

formance.

And with 14-year-old Issa
as a traveling partner, Roberts
said they have been able to
help each other with their
game.

Issa, here on his second trip,
said the difference here as
opposed to the other coun-
tries they competed in, is the
altitude. He said he prefers
playing here because there’s

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not that much pressure.

As for Roberts, Issa said
“he’s a very good player, but
he just needs to work on his
self-control and his serve a lit-
tle more. But we play doubles
very well together.”

On Friday, Bain and the
two players will head to Aru-
ba to play in their next tour-
nament. From there, they will
go to St Martin on July 3.

After taking a short break
at home, they will head back
on the road for their final four
tournaments tn late July, end-
ing up with the completion of
the tour in August.

“By then, hopefully both of
them will be in the top five,”
Bain said. “Once they do that,
they will then be invited to
compete in a number of other
tournaments.”

BLIA’s annual

SOME trex champs

all set for
next week

Bm By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

RIGHT on the heels of the Securi-
ty & General International Junior
Tennis Championships, the Bahamas
Lawn Tennis Association is getting
ready to host its annual T-Rex Junior
National Tennis Championships.

The championships is scheduled to
get underway Monday and run
through Saturday, July 4 at the
National Tennis Center.

“All of the players from Grand
Bahama will stay on,” said BLTA
president Steve Turnquest of the play-
ers who are already in town for the
Security & General International
Tournament at the NTC.

“This is the biggest tournament for
the year for our players in terms of
getting points for their rankings. And
to date, we already have over 60 play-
ers lined up to compete from New
Providence and Grand Bahama.”

The players will get a chance to
compete in the boys and girls singles in
the 10-and-under, 12, 14, 16 and 18
divisions. However, they will only
compete in the doubles for boys and
girls 18 and 12 divisions.

A total of 38 boys have registered to
compete, while there are only 10 girls
so far.

Based on their performances, the
BLTA will select a national team that
will compete in the JITIC Tourna-
ment in the Dominican Republic in
the 14s and 16s divisions.

Among some of the players to
watch for at this year’s tournament
are Kevin Major in the boys’ 14s,
Johnathan Taylor in the boys’ 16s,
Gabrielle Moxey in the girls 16s, Chel-
si Russell in the girls’ 14s, Iesha Shep-
herd in the girls 10s and Joshua Turn-
quest of Eleuthera in the boys’ 12s.

“The tournament has always been a
very exciting and competitive one and
we expect that with the list of players
entered this year, the tournament
should be very good,” Turnquest said.

“We are having a very competitive
Security & General Tournament and
the players have been able to fine tune
their game, so we expect that they will
be ready for the Jr Nationals.”

At the end of the tournament, play-
ers will also receive points for their
national rankings.

More than 300
to compete at RBC
swimming champs

THE Royal Bank of Canada

(Bahamas) National Swimming
Championships is slated to
begin today and splash though
Saturday at the Betty Kelly
Kenning National Swim Com-
plex.

Facilitated by the Bahamas
Swimming Federation (BSF),
the event features seven swim
clubs and over 300 swimmers.
Morning sessions are expected
to start at 9am and evening ses-
sions at 6pm.

“This year’s swimming
nationals feature a highly tal-
ented pool of athletes,” said
Algernon Cargill, president of
the BSF. “We are anticipating a
highly competitive meet and are
pleased that RBC is again part-
nering with us as the main spon-
sor of this event.”

“RBC will celebrate its 26th
consecutive anniversary of
sponsoring the RBC Bahamas
National Swimming Champi-
onships in partnership with the
Bahamas Swim Federation.

“In addition to sponsoring
this year’s national meet, RBC
will be the inaugural sponsor of
the Academic All Bahamas
Swimming Team Award.

“This new initiative aims to
recognise and support BSF stu-

TEs
Dali;

TRACK

BAHAMASAIR will
operate a B737 scheduled
to leave Nassau for
Havana, Cuba, for the Cen-
tral American and
Caribbean Championships
on Thursday, July 2 at
1:30pm and returning on
Monday, July 6 at 5pm.





RBC sponsors the RBC Bahamas National Swimming Championships.
Shown (I-r) are Jan Knowles, RBC regional manager of public relations,
Joyce Riviere, area manager for the Family Islands, Algernon Cargill,
president of the Bahamas Swim Federation and Deborah Zonicle, region-
al manager of marketing and product management.

dent athletes who display excel-
lence in sports and academics,”
said Jan Knowles, regional man-
ager of public relations for
RBC.

To be recognised as part of
the Academic All Bahamas
Swimming Team, students must
have a grade point average of
3.5 or higher and have achieved
a BSF national time standard
in an individual swimming
event.

“This is in keeping with
RBC’s commitment to youth

and education,” Knowles said.

The swimming nationals will
be televised live on Cable Chan-
nel 12 June 24-27.

The official opening cere-
monies and first presentation
of the Academic All Bahamas
Swimming Team Awards is set
for 6pm June 25.

Tickets for each day’s events
can be purchased at the door.
The Betty Kelly Kenning
National Swim Complex is
located at the Queen Elizabeth
Sports Centre.

Rodney Carey Jr advances

FROM page 11

so great, but I played as well as
I could,” she said. “I didn’t
know much about the girl, so I
didn’t know how she played.
She played very well.”

Another upset on the girls’
side came from American
Kelsey Laurente, who disposed
of No.7 Rocio Ortela of Puerto
Rico in an impressive 6-0, 6-0
win.

“T was just on today. I tried to
play as best as I could. Every-
thing came together for me,”
said Laurente, who hasn’t

played that many matches com-
ing into the tournament.

“T just hope that I can con-
tinue to play as well as I did
today. Hopefully I can play
through to the final and even
possibly win the title.”

The door was opened when
another American Hai-Li Kong
sent top seed Gaia Samesi of
Italy packing with a 6-3, 6-4
decision.

From the 14-and-under divi-
sion, a number of Bahamians
were in action, including Justin
Roberts, who remained unde-
feated through three matches
by not losing a single game.
THE TRIBUNE



@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

DESPITE getting off to a slow start,
Rodney Carey managed to prevail with
a two-set victory over German Delf
Gohlke to advance to the next round of
the Security & General International
Junior Championships.

Seeded No.3 in the boys’ 18-and-
under singles, Carey pulled off a 7-5, 6-
2 decision in the Bahamian-German
showdown yesterday at the National
Tennis Center as the International
Tennis Federation sanctioned event,
hosted by the Bahamas Lawn Tennis
Association, swung into high gear.

“It was a good match overall, but
I’ve been struggling quite a bit,” said
Carey, who saw flashes of a previous
tournament he played in Bermuda. “I

PAGE 1

0

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24,



rt

2009





probably have to get
on the court a little
earlier to get warmed
up so I can be ready
for my matches.”

The 16-year-old
Grand Bahamian,
preparing to play on
the Davis Cup team
in July, despite the
way he played, was
still pleased that he
won his opener and
now he can look forward to the rest
of the tournament.

Not so fortunate in staying alive in
the main draw on the boys’ side was
Johnathan Taylor, who got ousted in
identical set scores of 6-2, 6-2 by Denil
Sirota of Russia.

“T actually played well, but the guy
just overpowered me,” said Taylor, the

Oe ant

RESULTS: S&G International Junior Championships

Here’s a look at some of the results posted yesterday:

14-and-under

Philip Major Jr. (Bah) def. Stefan Copper (GBR) w/o

Jodi Arconada (Arg) def. Kevin Major Jr. (Bah) 4-2, 4-1
Justin Roberts (Bah) def. Conor Outerbridge (Ber) 4-0, 4-0
Loran Minns (Bah) def. Ryan Simms (Jam) 4-2, 1-4 (13-11)
Juan Bisono (Dom) def. Christian Cargill (Bah) 2-4, 4-0, 10-4
James Finnigan (GBR) def. Dylan Walker (Bah) 2-4, 4-2, 10-6
Michael Wallace (Bah) def. Isaac Klonaris (Bah) 4-0, 4-2
Rasheed Carey (Bah) def. Shannon Francis (Bah) 4-0, 4-2
Nicoy Rolle (Bah) def. Michael Cooper (Bah) 4-2, 5-4

Tyler Smith (Ber) def. Danielle Thompson (Bah) 3-5, 5-4, 10-8
Emily Sneddon (Can) def. Eva Frazzoni (Ber) 4-2, 4-0

18-and-under

Skylar Kuykendall (USA) def. Kalotina Klonaris (Bah) 6-4, 6-2
Connor Farren (USA) def. Yifan Dang (CHN) 6-3, 7-5

Anna Rudolfova (CZE) def. Zaire Simmons (Ber) 6-1, 6-0
Hai-Li Kong (USA) def. Gaia Sanesi (Itl) (1) 6-3, 6-4

Kelsey Laurente (USA) def. Rocio Ortela (Pur) (7) 6-0,
Denil Sirota (Rus) (7) def. Johnathan Taylor (Bah) 6-2,

6-0
6-2

Rodney Carey (Bah) (3) def. Delf Gohlke (Ger) 7-5, 6-2
Fausthyara Pietersz (Aho) (3) def. Maci Epstein (USA) 6-4, 6-1
Dhanielly Quevedo (USA) def. Thais Romero (Mex) (6) 6-4, 6-1
Paula Montoya (ven) def. Chelsi Russell (Bah) 6-0, 7-6 (4)







PAGE 9 ¢ International sports news

Carey Jr advances with two-

KELSEY LAURENTE

only Bahamian who won his first round
match in the main draw on day one
Monday.

If there’s any consolation for Taylor,
it’s the fact that he advanced to the
main draw after he got eliminated in
the qualifying round last year.

“Next year, I will probably do bet-
ter,” said the 15-year-old. “I just have
to work on my game a little more.”

The Russian, seeded at No.7, admit-
ted that he didn’t play up to par
because he wasn’t feeling that well.

“Last year, I played him and it was a
really tough match,” Sirota said. “This







|

i
{

Photos: Tim Clarke/Tribune 31 fi



JOHNATHAN TAYLOR

year, it was another tough match. It
was my first match for the tournament,
but he played very well.”

If he plays up to par, Sirota is con-
vinced that “nobody in the tournament
can beat me.”

On the girls’ side, Grand Bahamian
Kalotina Klonaris was one of the three
seeded players knocked out of the
tournament.

Klonaris, seeded at No.8, didn’t sur-
vive in her match against American
Skylar Kuykendall, who prevailed with
a 6-4, 6-2 decision.

“Tt was very rough for me today. I

Wimbledon:
Venus defeats
Voegele...

See page 9

et victory

KALOTINA KLONARIS

tried my best, but she played very good
today,” said Klonaris, who was coming
off an injured shoulder that hampered
her movement.

“T played as best as I could, but she
just played better. I should have been
able to keep the ball in play more, but
it wasn’t working for me. You have
some days when things just don’t work.
Today was mine.”

For Kuykendall, she said she simply
did what she had to do to win.

“IT moved my feet, my serving wasn’t

SEE page 10

aT Tdi




$3m signal

fee rise hits

Cable hasic
margins

BISX-listed firm
says survey
suggesting prices
high ‘slanted
from beginning’
due to poor
comparisons

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas’ basic
cable TV margins are being
compressed by ever-rising signal
fees which rose by “almost $3
million in the last year”, Tri-
bune Business was told yester-
day, with a senior executive
explaining that a survey sug-
gesting the company’s prices
‘appear high’ was “slanted from
the beginning”.

David Burrows, Cable
Bahamas’ marketing director,
responding to a consultation
document produced by the
BTC privatisation committee,
said the countries with which
the company’s cable TV prices
were compared - Cayman
Islands, Jamaica and Malta -
were not ‘apples for apples’ or
like-for-lie comparisons.

Mr Burrows said all three
countries were either single
island nations or, at most, con-
sisted of two to three islands,
whereas the Bahamas was an
archipelago of multiple islands.
As a result, Cable Bahamas
incurred extra costs in providing
services, especially to islands
which had a minimal popula-
tion, forcing it to keep cable TV
prices at a certain level to
ensure it covered its costs.

The Cable Bahamas execu-
tive also explained that the
Bahamas’ living standards and
disposable income levels were
much higher than Jamaica’s,
thus making that comparison
more difficult than it appeared.

Pointing out that the BTC
privatisation committee docu-
ment had acknowledged the
price comparisons were chal-
lenging, Mr Burrows told Tri-
bune Business: “Neither of the
three countries are of the same
density, size and geography as
the Bahamas, and definitely not
the same living standards.
Those comparisons are slanted
from the beginning”.

Disposable income and cus-
tomer sophistication “drive pric-
ing”, he added, implying that
this was one factor why the
Bahamas’ prices might appear
high, Mr Burrows said: “The
significant labour, network and
equipment costs in a high liv-
ing standard country like the
Bahamas creates a higher cost
base, which is reflected in the
price.”

While the Bahamas’ demo-
graphics were more in line with
the Cayman Islands, Mr Bur-
rows said cable TV prices there

SEE page 6B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

THE TRIBUNE

uSiINness

WEDNESDAY,

TUNE e, 2c

2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Car dealers brace for
5-10% price increase

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ahamian motor dealers

have been warned by their

suppliers to expect price

increases “of up to 10 per

cent” on new car models
in 2010, Tribune Business was told yes-
terday, at a time when new vehicle sales
for the year to end-May 2009 are down
46.14 per cent year-over-year.

Data supplied by the Bahamas Motor
Dealers Association (BMDA) said that
while its members were “holding their
own in spite of a slumping economy”,
new car sales for May 2009 dropped by
37.82 per cent compared to May 2008.

For the first two months of the 2009
second quarter, April and May, new car
sales industry-wide were said to be down
by 41.9 per cent compared to the year-
before period.

Rick Lowe, the director/operations
manager for Nassau Motor Company,

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* Manufacturers deliver warning, as new car sales to Bahamian
consumers down 46% for first five months in 2009

* Sales off 38% for May, and 41.9 per cent

for first two months in second quarter

told Tribune Business that some
Bahamian new car dealers had been told
by their manufacturer suppliers that the
price of vehicles would go up by between
5-10 per cent on models scheduled for
2010 delivery.

The price increases were blamed by
the manufacturers on a combination of
increased parts prices, gasoline prices
and steel prices, and Mr Lowe said it
was likely that Bahamian dealers would
have to pass the increases - at least part
of them - on to consumers.

“We’ve been told by some of our sup-
pliers to expect price increases of up to
10 per cent on 2010 models,” Mr Lowe
told Tribune Business. “That’s a hefty
chunk.

“The manufacturers are still facing
higher costs in regard to petrol, steel and
parts prices. They’ve warned us to expect
between a minimum of 5 per cent and a
maximum of 10 per cent increase. We’re
on price control, but prices will increase
at the consumer end.”

On a brighter note, Mr Lowe said

inventories being held by Bahamian new
car dealers were now coming more into
line with industry norms. They had been
left with excess stock as a result of the
sales slowdown.

He added: “Normally, we hope to
have 60 days supply on the lot, so when
you’ve got 10 months’ supply, you’re out
of whack. Most retailers’ supply is shrink-
ing to in line with industry standards, so
people will start to order more. It’s been



10 issues cited

in Guana Cay’s
Privy Council
legal appeal

Three-day hearing
over bid to stop
multi-million dollar
Baker’s Bay project
set for July 6-9

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Save Guana Cay Reef
Association will attempt to halt
the multi-million dollar Baker’s
Bay Golf & Ocean Club pro-
ject with a three-day hearing
before the London-based Privy
Council that begins on July 6,
having cited 10 different
grounds for their appeal to the
Bahamas’ highest court.

The Association, through its
Bahamian and London-based
attorneys, is asking the Privy
Council to determine issues that
include whether the Govern-
ment had a duty to consult Gua-
na Cay residents on the project,
being developed by Arizona-
headquartered Discovery Land
Company, before the two par-
ties entered into their Heads of
Agreement in early 2005.

If this was so, the Association
is asking the Privy Council to
determine whether proper con-
sultation took place and, if not,
whether the failure to consul-
tant residents of the Abaco cay
should be remedied.

Other appeal grounds include
asking the Privy Council to
determine the legal effect of the
Heads of Agreement, and
whether this constituted an
agreement to grant Crown and
Treasury land leases, and confer
other rights and incentives,
upon the developers.

The appeal challenges the
then-Cabinet Secretary Wen-
dall Major’s power to confer
these leases, rights and incen-
tives upon Discovery Land
Company, and asks it to rule on
whether the decision to do so
was “irrational” and “constitut-
ed an unlawful fettering of the
powers of other government
agencies.

The Privy Council’s decision
could have major implications
for the process governing how
developments, especially major
ones, are approved in the
Bahamas, and the rights of per-
sons impacted by them to be
consulted and heard. It could
potentially cause a major shake-
up of the Bahamas’ develop-
ment model, depending on
which way the Council rules.

On the consultation issue, the
Association said the judge at
first instance, Acting Supreme
Court Justice Carroll, found

SEE page 4B

End-July target for policy

on medical tourism

Bm By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE MINISTRY of
Tourism could roll out a draft
policy on Medical Tourism
for the Bahamas by end-July
2009, the Minister of Tourism
revealed to Tribune Business
yesterday, as the Centerville
Medical Pavilion positions
itself to be a pioneering facil-
ity with an almost 23,000
Euro ($32,377 ) grant from
the Caribbean Export Devel-
opment Agency (CEDA).

Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace said that before any
institution can label itself as a
medical tourism facility prop-
er, it was necessary for the
Government to have a policy

Facility aims to be
‘gateway’ for new
tourism opportunity
and economic
diversification

in position. And he said what
the Government has drafted
is fairly exciting and excep-
tional.

“We didn’t want to talk
about something until we had
the policy of the Govern-
ment,” he said. “Probably by
the end of July you will see
something that will be able
to be sustained and pro-
longed.”

Founder of the Centerville

SEE page 5B



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SEE page 6B

$500k investment in
Mall medical facility

m By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE TOWN Centre Mall is
opening a medical facility
through an initial investment of
more than $500,000, and could
see its inception as early as end-
September 2009, the proposed
facility’s cxhief executive and
coordinator said yesterday. This
was despite foot traffic through
the Mall diminishing as a result
of the recession.

Dr Thomas Rolle said it was
hoped that the facility will play
the dual role of attracting
patrons to the Mall and provid-
ing “cutting edge health care” to
the average Bahamian.

He said the planned Com-
munity Health Wellness Net-
work, which will have 10 in-

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house doctors, child care facili-
ties and psychological consul-
tants — among other services —
was envisaged to be a virtually
comprehensive ‘Walk-in’-style
medical facility that will have a
triage area.

Dr Rolle said the new facility
was envisioned to one day be
an emergency medical facility
to decentralise the emergency
medical units at the Princess
Margaret Hospital and Doctors
Hospital.

However, he said there was
much ground work to be done
to get the approvals for such a
facility, but he hoped the Gov-
ernment will be receptive to
such an idea.

Dr Rolle said the doctors
who have expressed interest in
practicing in the facility, and

SEE page 6B

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





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Shoot with the straight arrow

THERE are two sides to
every sword and both are
sharp. Clients and sales pro-
fessionals. Both can be honest
and dishonest.

Naturally, our biological
make-up contains a self-moni-
toring gauge that enables us to
know when we are telling the
truth or when one is dishonest.
This is true for both sales per-
sons and clients. Your body
language and eye movement
all portray signs of being honest
or dishonest. There is also an

intangible mechanism we are
biologically wired with, which I
like to call ‘instincts’ that can
detect the difference.

Let’s first discuss the sales
professional.

Professional........ hmmm, I
think [ll save that for another
discussion and just stick with
honesty for now.

As you may all know, I’m
blunt. I don’t have time to sug-
ar coat, play politics aka (pile-
of-tricks) beat around da bush
and so forth.





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A straight arrow pointed in
the right direction will find its
target, and a bent or crooked
arrow...... who knows what tar-
get it may hit? This is true with
honest sales professionals; they
set goals, client targets and
attain their objectives.

I know this suggestion may
sound condescending but it is
not meant to be. The simplest
and quickest way to be suc-
cessful in sales is to be honest
with your clients; straight,
blunt, direct. Admit if you
don’t know the answer to
something. Admit if you screw
up or make a mistake. Be the
first to call your client and tell
them if you have made an
error. However, before calling
also have a solution or few
solutions available. This may
sound like common sense, but
we all know sense is not so
common.

Little white lies. Are they
worth the risk? That’s your call,
not mine. We have all heard
that it is ‘OK’ to tell little white
lies (as opposed to colorful
lies). Abh, they will never
know the difference, right?
Here is where the yesterday,
today and tomorrow comes
into play.

I tell any new client: “I don’t
want to do business with you
today!” They look at me like
I’m from outer space. Howev-
er, I quickly follow with: “We
want to do business with you
today, tomorrow, next weck,
next month and next year.” In
order to do that one must have
a history (yesterday), a pre-

INSIGHT

For stories behind news,
reat dnsight Mondays

sent (today) and they take care
of tomorrow. If one has been
dishonest with their clients,
obviously their yesterdays will
grow in size, opportunities for
today will diminish and
prospects for tomorrow will
eventually cease . It’s not worth
it. All sales professionals will
tell you: shoot with a straight
arrow.

Dishonest clients

This is simple. Fire them
from your prospect and or
client list and move on. Just as
they will fire you from any
opportunities today or tomor-
row.

Here is where the double-
edged sword comes into play.
We rarely hear of a client or
prospect getting fired, right?
We normally always here about
sales teams or persons being
fired. Well, here is the other
side of the sword. Fire them.
Yes, that’s right, there are some
clients and prospects you do
not want to do business with.

There may be some clients
you already have that you
should terminate. (I can dis-
cuss later how to sort out the
good from the bad and down-
right ugly). Don’t waste your
time with this sort of client.
They will diminish your tomor-
rows, and in sales and business
tomorrows are a blood line.

All of these marketing strate-
gies are certain to keep your
business on top during these
challenging economic times.
Have a productive and prof-
itable week! Remember:
“THOSE WHO MARKET
WILL MAKE IT “

NB: Scott Farrington is pres-
ident of SunTee EmbroidMe, a
promotional and marketing
company specialising in pro-
motional products. Established
over 27 years ago, SunTee
EmbroidMe has assisted local
businesses, ranging from indus-
tries such as tourism and bank-
ing to telecommunications, in
marketing themselves. Read-
ers can contact Mr Farrington
at SunTee EmbroidMe on East
Shirley Street, by e-mail at
scott@sun-tee.com or by tele-
phone at 242-393-3104.


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009, PAGE 3B



Bahamas

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas is “probably
the worst in the region” for
property-based taxes that make
this nation “uncompetitive” in
the battle to attract wealthy sec-
ond homeowners to these
shores, the Bahamas Real
Estate Association’s (BREA)
president yesterday question-
ing whether “the Government
understands what they’re
doing” with recent tax reforms.

William Wong, speaking after
hopes that the Government
would reconsider its Budget real
property tax amendments were
dashed with the Bill’s tabling
on Friday, told Tribune Busi-
ness he found it “amazing” that
other professions impacted by
the changes, particularly the
Bahamas Bar Association, had
not lobbied the administration
over the changes.

The BREA president said the
increased real property tax
rates, especially for real estate
valued in the $3-$7.5 million
bracket, would result in the
Government “losing on both
sides” in terms of tax revenue.
With buyers deterred from
entering the market, fewer high-
end home sales and construc-
tion projects would take place.

As aresult, Mr Wong said
the Government would ulti-
mately lose out on both real
property tax paid over a series
of years, plus millions of dol-
lars in Stamp Tax associated
with the initial purchase of high-
end real estate.

Construction companies
would miss out on new second-
home related projects, result-
ing in a reduction of duty and
taxes earned on imported build-
ing materials. Home appliance
sales would also suffer.

“They’re losing, losing, los-
ing, and I don’t understand,”
Mr Wong told Tribune Busi-
ness of the Government’s likely
revenue intake from real prop-
erty taxes and the second home
market.

“Why doesn’t the Govern-
ment see what we’re trying to
tell them? Why are they being
so stubborn and not looking at
it with more sense?

“The Government is losing
on the Stamp Tax up front, the
real property taxes, the builders
are not finding jobs, and the
appliances, the lawn keeper, the
housemaid and everyone else
loses out. It’s absolutely ridicu-
lous.”

He added: “What is amazing
is that the lawyers are not
speaking up. The Bar Associa-
tion, the lawyers are not speak-
ing up and they’re being impact-
ed as much as we are. They are
sitting back, waiting for a mira-
cle to happen. But if we don’t
make any sales, they will not
get anything” from conveyanc-
ing work.

While the second home mar-
ket is seen as critical to the
Bahamas’ ability to attract high-
net worth, high spending indi-
viduals who create spin-off
industry and employment
opportunities for Bahamians,
the Government would argue
that it has to get its tax revenues
from somewhere.

Wealthy second home own-
ers are far more able to pay
than Bahamians, especially dur-
ing times of economic crisis, and
in doing so pay much more in
taxes per head.

And it is more politically
palatable to impose taxes on
foreigners, as opposed to
Bahamians, with the Govern-
ment having increased its rev-
enue estimates for the 2009-

‘probably worst in Caribbean’ for property taxes

Fears Bahamas still ‘uncompetitive’ for second home sector, with

government likely ‘losing on both ends’ in terms of tax revenue



have paid real property taxes
in excess of $35,000 a year in
the amount of $4.1 million.

“Can it be that we should
design a special tax rate to
accommodate 57 or 68 home-
owners among the thousands of
homeowners in the country, and
to accommodate only the
wealthiest home-owners?” Mr
Ingraham asked.

However, Mr Wong said the
Government should not have
introduced the real property tax
amendments - which seem like-
ly to increase the tax burden on
properties valued between $3-
$7.5 million - at a time when
the real estate industry and
wider economy were struggling.

As to the impact on poten-
tial second home buyers, he
said: “The Bahamas is not the
be all. They [second home own-

ers] have oth-
er choices to
go to which
are a_ lot
cheaper. We [i]
are just pric-
ing ourselves
out of the

market.”
T hoe
BREA presi-

dent said the
wor d
“uncompeti-
tive” would be best to describe
the Bahamas in relation to sec-
ond home owners, adding:
“We’re probably the worst in
the region, and this is not the
time to doit. At least, the Gov-
ernment could wait until busi-
ness was up and running, going
good, then introduce a high-end
tax. This is not the time to do it.

~ CLOSURE OF NEW PROVIDENCE OFFICES~



“Some of the big develop-
ments on New Providence are
feeling the pinch. People are
not buying, and they’re taking a
very, very close look at how
they spend their money.”

Mr Wong said he had called
Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, twice on the
real property tax amendments
and was now waiting to hear
back from him.

He questioned whether the
Government, in raising one real
property tax rate, was likely to
experience the law of diminish-
ing returns in revenues
obtained, having pushed the
rate past the point where it
would maximise its take.

Mr Wong also urged the
Government to do a better job
on collecting real property tax-
es, pointing out that the bulk of

NATH

i
a.
i
z
TL

tance?

The National Ingurance Board 4 ishes na ady ise the general public that most

of its departments /o ffices in New Providence, including the Pay Windows
at the two Post Ofhees, will be closed on Friday, June 26, 2009. Only the
Jumbey Village Local Office will remain open to the public to facili-
tate basic services, such as the distributions of short-term, long-term

and unemployment benefits cheques, the payment of contributions,
the intake of claims, registration, and pension verification. (laimants
with Short-Term Benefit cheques at any of the other Offices in New Provi-
dence, may collect them from the Cashiers Department between the hours
of 9:00 acm. and 4:0 p.m.

The Board’s New Providence offices will re-open on Monday at the usual

HT.

The Board apologizes for any inconvenience caused.

DELTEC BANK & TRUST LIMITED

Invites applications for the position of

INVESTMENT PORTFOLIO MANAGER

Responsibilities will include:

¢ Maintaining a thorough knowledge of global investment markets

¢ Monitoring client investment portfolios and proposing modifications
consistent with policies, procedures and client guidelines
Initiating and checking the execution of trades
Liaising with Investment Fund Managers and Due Diligence Providers
Marketing portfolio management services to prospective and current clients

this was paid by foreigners and
expatriates, with Bahamians
paying only when they sold
their real estate.

SUGAR-CANE INVESTMENTS LTD.
(Company number 154,779 B)

An International Business Company
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

We, Pine Limited, Liquidator of SUGAR-CANE
INVESTMENTS LTD.
winding up and dissolution of
INVESTMENTS LTD. has been completed in
accordance with the Articles of Dissolution and
that
been dissolved as of

hereby certify that the
SUGAR-CANE

SUGAR-CANE INVESTMENTS LTD. has
9th day of June, 2009.

Dated this 22nd day of June, 2009

Pine Limited
Liquidator

New Hours

Je CAT FD Da

hi Cae ae ar led

MONDAY - FRIDAY
9:30AM - 5:30PM
CLOSED (FoR LUNCH) 1PM - 2PM

SATURDAY 9AM - IPM

(CLOSED ON HOLIDAY WEEKENDS)

68 Village Road
Ph: 702-0238

jreat fo Sure Adan}

Ph: 393-6330
Fax: 393-6333

Airport Office: 702-0241
info@ zipxbahamas.com

Wiaker's Wap

Great Guana Cay, Abaco
The Bahamas

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
You are invited to apply for the following
position currently available.

Design Manager

Key Responsibilities

* Sit on design review committee that ensures

design guidelines and adherence to project.

¢ Assist architect of record with securing necessary
building permits.

« Respond to ASI/RFI questions during building
process.

¢ Listrequests and change orders including pricing etc.

The successful candidate should have:
* Bachelors degree in Finance or Economics
Series 7 or CFA certification
Strong analytical skills with ability to operate independently and under

2010 Budget by $151 million at
the last minute, largely due to
an anticipated $114 million
increase in real property and
business licence fee-based taxes.

BREA has been lobbying for

the return of the $35,000 maxi-
mum payment ceiling for real
property taxes, which was elim-
inated in the 2008-2009 Budget.
That also reduced the real prop-
erty tax rate for owner-occu-
pied properties to 0.75 per cent,
down from 1 per cent on prop-
erties valued in excess of $5 mil-
lion.

The Government attempted a
compromise in the 2009-2010
Budget, reducing the real prop-
erty tax rate to 0.25 per cent on
the property value in excess of

pressure

Excellent relationship and communication skills
Minimum of five years experience in portfolio management in a wealth
management environment

We offer an excellent benefit package and salary will be commensurate with
experience and qualifications.

from owners.

* Provide field reports and punch lists, and ensuring
the contractors compliance with the plans and
technical specifications.

* Coordinate the design of new facilities.

Qualifications

* Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in Architecture from an
accredited university

Minimum of 10 years of progressive experience
in architecture and interior design and construction

Interested persons may submit resumes to the Human
Resources Manager either by email to anh@deltecbank.com
or by fax to 362-4623.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS!

$7.5 million, but increasing the
rate on the portion valued
between $250,000 and $7.5 mil-
lion back to 1 per cent.

In a recent address to BREA,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham noted that before the
$35,000 cap was introduced in
2003, 17 owner-occupied prop-
erties paid annual real property
taxes in excess of $35,000, for a
total amount of $1.1 million.

When the cap was in place
between 2003-2007, 57 proper-
ties paid taxes of $35,000 a year
in the amount of $2 million.

Since the ceiling was lifted in
July 2008, 68 such properties

administration of commercial and residential structures.
The successful candidate will have the opportunity to
work in a growing and dynamic organization and must be
a self-starter, team player, work at the highest standards
of performance, and meet deadlines.

lf you are progressive and prepared to advance your
career, submit your resume to the attention of the Director

of HR & Training, hr@bakersbyclub.com or by fax at
242-367-0613.

All applications will be held in the strictest confidence and only candidates
under consideration will be contacted.

“Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!”


PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



USI
10 issues cited in Guana Cay’s Privy Council legal appeal

FROM page 1B

that it had a right to be heard
and consulted over the pro-
posed development.

ela

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



“The Government’s decision
to enter into the agreement was
one that affected, or was likely
to affect, the individual rights
and freedoms of the residents
of Great Guana Cay,”the Asso-
ciation alleged.

“In particular, the develop-
ment that is envisaged by the
agreement will interfere with
the local residents’ right to free-
dom of movement throughout
the Bahamas, which is protect-
ed by Article 25 of the Consti-
tution of the Bahamas.”

This point, the Association
alleged, had been identified by
Dame Joan Sawyer, president
of the Court of Appeal, who
had said in her ruling: “There is,
however, one matter which the
learned judge mentioned
towards the end of his judgment
about the effect of the percep-

tion the existence of the devel-
opers’ gated community, lying
between the existing inhabitants
of the southern part of Guana
Cay and the northern part of
that island to which those inhab-
itants previously had free access
along either the existing roads
or tract roads.

“It appears also that that
community will bestride the
new ‘public’ (?) road. Be that
as it may, it is possible that
questions about the infringe-
ment of those inhabitants’ con-
stitutional rights to freedom of
movement within the Bahamas
may arise under Article 25 of
the Constitution.”

Drawing on this, the Associ-
ation’s attorneys alleged: “The
Government’s decision to enter
into the agreement was one that
would result in the liberty of

the local residents being restrict-
ed in important respects. In par-
ticular, the development
deprives the local residents of
traditional fishing and crabbing
grounds, and is thus restricting
their liberty to earn a living as
they choose.

“In any event, the Govern-
ment’s decision to enter in the
Agreement was one that it was
absolutely clear would have a
profound impact upon the lives
and lifestyles of the residents of
Guana Cay. The land that is the
subject of the agreement plain-
ly constitutes an important site
on the island, and it is clear that
the development is of consid-
erable local public interest.

“Further, the [government
and developers] were well
aware that the residents of Gua-
na Cay desired to be consulted

and to make representations,
and that the objectors to the
development enjoyed consider-
able local public support. It is
also relevant that the residents
of Guana Cay are relatively few
in number and will be affected
by the development to a far
greater extent than other
Bahamians.”

The Association is also chal-
lenging the Supreme Court and
Court of Appeal findings that
two meetings held in February
and August 2004 fulfilled the
Government’s requirement to
consult residents.

It is alleging that “the Gov-

ernment deliberately intended
to make its decision as to
whether to approve the devel-
opment before engaging in con-
sultation”, and claiming that
previous evidence filed with the
courts shows no detailed infor-
mation on the Baker’s Bay pro-
ject was made available at the
February 2004 meeting.

As for the August 2004 meet-
ing, the Association is alleging
that copies of important docu-
ments relating to Baker’s Bay
were not lodged with local gov-
ernment offices as promised,
and pledges of further consul-
tation never materialised.

Lagal Notice

Lagal Notice

ZONE END CORP.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of ZONE
END CORP. has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Lagal Notice

SAPHIRE & DIAMONDS INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
SAPHIRE & DIAMONDS INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Lagal Notice

JATTMORE LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
JATTMORE LTD. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

MAROULA-THEO LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
MAROULA-THEO LTD. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Lagal Notice

MONTAQUE ALPS INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
MONTAQUE ALPS INC. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

LENORE INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
LENORE INC. has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Lagal Notice

SEMPER VERDE CORP.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
SEMPER VERDE CORP. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Lagal Notice

DICIEMBRE INCORPORATED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
DICIEMBRE INCORPORATED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

VILLASUSSO LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
VILLASUSSO LIMITED has been completed:
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Lagal Notice

VAZE INVESTMENTS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of VAZE
INVESTMENTS LIMITED has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Ww

Hiaker's Hap

Great Guana Cay, Abaco
The Bahamas

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
You are invited to apply for the following
position currently available.

Sous Chef

Key Responsibilities

¢ Required to skillfully prepare international cuisine.

* Assist in ordering food supplies and kitchen equipment
as needed.

* Will be required to oversee majority of cooking and
methods of food preparation.

¢ Along with the Executive Chef, instruct kitchen
employees in the finer points of cooking.

* Assist in planning meals; making of menus, and
assigning prices.

* Assist in butchering and/or prepares meats and poultry
for cooking.

Qualifications
High School diploma or equivalent
Culinary degree from approved school or completion of
an approved apprentice program is preferred
5 to 10 years in different supervisory positions in
the kitchens including sous chef and/or chef d’ cuisine
position.
Previous experience in a hotel or private club preferred.
Highly skilled cooking ability in all areas of kitchen
including the ability to prepare various ethnic cuisines.
Experience working in multiple operations preferred.
A minimum of two years international experience an
asset.
Experience in opening a property a plus

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work in a
growin and dynamic organization and must be a self-starter,
eam player, work at the highest standards of performance, and
meet deadlines.

lf you are Fah ld and pa _to advance your
ae submit your resume to the attention of the Director

° & Training, hr@bakersbyclub.com or by fax at:
242-367-0613.

“Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!”


THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009, PAGE 5B

End-July target

for the policy on

medical tourism

FROM page 1B

Medical Pavilion, Dr Conville
Brown, said he hopes his facili-
ty can be the gateway for med-
ical tourism in the Bahamas.

The facility, which specialises
in the diagnosis and treatment
of problems stemming from
heart and cancer ailments, will
be marketed to countries in the
Caribbean through two grants
of 5,000 Euros and 18,000 Euros
each, totaling 23,000 Euros
($32,377.89). The two grants
come from the European Union
(EU) through CEDA.

According to Dr Brown, the
facility is one of about four in
the region offering similar ser-
vices. Others are located in
Jamaica, Trinidad and Barba-
dos.

However, the Centerville
Medical Pavilion is the only of
its kind in the region, and one of
only two in the world outside
of the US, to be accredited by
the American College of Radi-
ation and Oncology (ACRO).

Dr Brown said the facility will
use pamphlets, print and broad-
cast ads and a “robust” website,
all funded through the grant, to
market itself to countries in the
Caribbean and the US.

He said his facility had done
work for the Turks and Caicos
for years, as well as the Cay-
man Islands and Bermuda.

“We are going to be the gate-
way to international medicine
instead of us fattening South
Florida,” said Dr Brown.

“And this is during a time
when the Bahamas needs to
have further diversification of
its economy and Bahamians are
grappling with health care costs
and advanced care.”

Dr Brown said the cost of
some treatments at the Center-
ville Medical Pavilion will be
less costly than procedures done
in the US, but could appear
more expensive than those at
similar facilities in the
Caribbean due to currency
exchange rates.

However, he touts the
Bahamas’ proximity to the US
as a draw for Americans who
would have considered other
popular medical tourism locales,
such as India and the Philip-
pines.

Dr Brown said many of the
specialists providing treatment
at the facility are highly quali-
fied specialists from abroad.

“We intend to be the initial
entrée to medical tourism in the
Bahamas,” he said

Legal Notice

SUNSHOCK VALLEY LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
SUNSHOCK VALLEY LTD. has been
completed: a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

CHEVROUX BAYROCK INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
CHEVROUX BAYROCK INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

PATHOS SHORES INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of PATHOS
SHORES INC. has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

IN THE ESTATE OF HERBERT
HILTON MINNIS late of Carmichael
Road in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence, Bahamas,
deceased.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
any claim or demand against the said estate are require to
send the same duly certified in writing to the undersigned
on or before the 6" day of July, A.D. 2009, after which

date the Administratrix will proceed to distribute the estate
having regard only to the claims of which she shall have had
notice.

AND notice is hereby given that all persons
indebted to the estate are required to make full settlement
on or before the date heremabove mentioned.

CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.
Attorneys for the Executor
9 Rusty Bethel Drive
Nassau, Bahamas



Lagal Notipe

FULLYSTRASSE LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
FULLYSTRASSE LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

INTEGRATED SYNERGY
TECHNOLOGIES LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
INTEGRATED SYNERGY TECHNOLOGIES
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Lagal Notice

SONY ET KALY CORP.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of SONY
ET KALY CORP. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Administrative Assistant

Summary Description
oe Company Seeks to Employ Administrative
sistant

Duties Summary
The successful candidate will support our management
team and will assist with back office operations.

Candidates must possess the following qualifications

Have a minimum of an Associate's Degree or higher
college education.

Must have a minimum of two years experience in a
similar capacity

Ideal candidate must possess strong analytical and
communication skills

Have extensive knowledge of MS Office and related
software products

Be highly motivated team player and walling to adapt
to a dynamic work environment

A strong business/customer onentation skill is
essential

Please send resumes on or before June 25th, 2009 to:
dheastie¢mibeclbahamas.cam

Bannerhouse Gompany Ltd.

Palm Cay

Nassau, The Bahamas

—_
NAD

Nassau Airport
Dovelapmont Company

Tender

C-118 Mediuin Valtage Sedtch House ancl Duct Bark

Nassau Aieporl Developme! Company (MAD) 2 pleased Lo
announce the minase of Tender 118 Medium Voltage Seatch
House and Duc Bank for Stage 1 of the Lyeden Finding
niematonal Apart Expansion

The scope of work includes

* Construction of a new modem voltage (71k v) swich house for
BEG end MAL) aanieh goer: Boiling 4 apprcarnalaly Fe) SF.
@ inch block walls, alernem handrails, anda sianding seam
metal nog

* Gaal orks including approamately 1,800 LF of excention
bedding. duct iteialaton, supply and islallabon of manhoies
backfill, compaction, cufing and patching for a new medium
voli duct bank

* Purchase and insallalion of MAD Switchgear

nlerestied Bidders: mus! be licensed and aporoved by he Bahan
Biecine Comporation to perform euedum vollage (11k) work

The © 118 Tender Documents wil be avaiable for pick up afer
1200 pm, Tiesday June 16th, 2009 Abide meeting wll
be held at 10200 am, Thursday June 28th, 2008 Pease
Gonlael Traci Breby to regeter af the MAD Project office

‘Contact: TRAC BRISEY

Ph: (242) FOP-0086 | Fae: (242) 377-27
PO Boo AP S622), Masse, Bahamas
Emal tac brehyiiires bs

Hiaker's Hap

Great Guana Cay, Abaco
The Bahamas

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
You are invited to apply for the following
position currently available.

Golf Course Construction
Manager
Key Requirements and Qualifications

* 5-8 years experience in Golf Course
Construction and Management at leading
Golf Club.
Turf Management Degree
Knowledge of all phases of Golf course
design and construction activities including
vertical golf construction (club houses,
maintenance facilities irrigation pump stations)
A thorough understanding of all phases of
maintenance and repair to courses, practice
range and equipment
Extensive experience working with city planners,
engineers, architects, and contractors
Knowledgeable in all phases of construction
contracts related to golf projects
Detail oriented, a skilled planner, ability to
prioritize with excellent communication skills
Computer literate
Willing to live on an out island
Ability to work on own initiative

The successful candidate will have the opportunity
to work in a growing and dynamic organization
and must be a self-starter, team player, work at
the highest standards of performance, and meet
deadlines.

If you are progressive and prepared to advance your
career, submit your resume to the attention of the

Director of HR & Training, hr@bakersbyclub.com
or by fax at 242-367-0613.

“Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!”


PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



I = 0 = >\—
¢500k investment $38m signal fee rise hits Cable hasic margins

in Mall medical
facility

FROM page 1B

will also be investors in the
endeavour, are well-recognised
and duly qualified.

“One hundred per cent of
the doctors we have talked to
have become investors,” he
said. Dr Rolle said the facility
required an initial investment
of $100,000, while $250,000 had
been slated for infrastructural
changes, $60,000 for training
and $150,000 for equipment —
as a conservative estimate.

The 44,000 square foot facil-
ity, located on the second floor
of the Mall, was once a clothing
store and its only video arcade.

Dr Rolle said he had been in

talks with general manager of
the Mall, Frank McGuire, about
opening the facility since Octo-
ber 2008.

The architects for the facility,
Nation Builders, are experi-
enced mall medical facility plan-
ners in the US.

Public relations manager for
the Mall, Laquinta Curry, said
the facility’s biggest focus was to
provide affordable health care,
but also to create added foot
traffic through the Mall.

“We have had our ups and
downs,” she said. “We had our
peaks, like back to school and
when we have our health fairs.
Those are kind of busy for us. It
could be better but we’re grate-
ful.”

NOTICE

NOTICE is heraby given that JOSHUA MERICE OF
STAPLEDON GARDENS, P.O. BOX SB-50202, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for

Nationality and Citizenship, for regisiration/‘naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahanias, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration’ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-enght days from the 24TH day of JUNE,
2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.0.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.










Davis & Co.

TO OUR VALUABLE CLIENTS

Please be advised that our office

WILL BE CLOSED
to the public on Friday, June 26th,

2009. We will be RELOCATING
to our new address TURNER HOUSE,
700 East Bay Street.

Business will resume as usual on
Monday, June 29th, 2009
Jrom 9am to 5pm.

Thank you for your
continuous business.

Management

Lagal Notice

VIOLET LIGHT INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of VIOLET
LIGHT INC. has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

DAWN HORIZON LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of DAWN
HORIZON LIMITED has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

FROM page 1B

were “triple” what Cable
Bahamas charged.

He added that channel line-
up also needed to be factored
into the assessment, given that
all cable companies’ offerings
were different, and some signal
fees more expensive than oth-
ers. Product quality was anoth-
er factor, Mr Burrows describ-
ing what Cable Bahamas
offered as “second to none”.

Describing the heavy infra-
structure investment needed to
supply cable TV services to a
variety of islands as a “tremen-
dous factor” in Cable Bahamas’
cost base and pricing, Mr Bur-
rows said: “As we start to get
into the smaller islands, the cost
per customer to build, let’s say
in Bimini, is tremendous
because there are only a few
hundred subscribers at most on
the island. “As we get into the
smaller islands and cays, the
cost of building is astronomical
on a per capita basis. All of
these things impact us. Then

there is the cost of power, elec-
tricity. All our nodes are pow-
ered by BEC, and there are
high electricity costs here.”

The Cable Bahamas execu-
tive said a better comparison
for the BISX-listed utility
provider’s products was with
the North American market
operators, such as Comcast and
Time-Warner Cable, given the
similarity in service quality and
channel offerings.

Mr Burrows argued that
Cable Bahamas’ Digital 125
package, offering 125 channels
for $35.95 (the $30 basic price
plus $5.95 per month) stood up
well against its US peers, with
Comcast and Time-Warner
charging $55 and $56 per month
respectively for digital packages
featuring 100 channels.

He added that the consulta-
tion document had listed Cable
Bahamas’ prices incorrectly, as
Digital 125 cost $35.05 per
month, not $65.95 as the paper
stated. In addition, the Digital
150 and Digital 175 packages
cost $44.95 and $54.95 per

month, and not $73.95 and
$83.95 as the consultation paper
had wrongly listed.

Mr Burrows said Cable
Bahamas, through the Digital
175 package, was providing 175
channels at the same price as
Comcast was providing 100
channels in the US.

This was happening despite
the shrinking margins Cable
Bahamas was experiencing for
its $30 per month basic cable
TV package every year, the
result of being unable to obtain
permission for an increase from
the Government during the past
15 years.

“Just this year alone, our sig-
nal fees increased by almost $3
million,” Mr Burrows
explained. “So when you start
looking at every single year,
there’s an increase in signal fees
every year. It impacts us, our
bottom line, and our margins
shrink every year as costs
increase.”

Trying to minimise costs asso-
ciated with signal fees for its
basic package had been Cable

Bahamas’ “most challenging”
feature, with signal providers
unable to give the company a
break because they had already
built these fee increases into
their own budgets for the year.

Mr Burrows said that when
Cable Bahamas was first
formed in 1994, its basic TV
package was largely in line with
what was charged by others.
Now, Time-Warner Cable had
just increased its basic price
from $52.90 to $56, a $3.10 rise
that was likely associated with
living and signal cost rises.

Mr Burrows added that when
Cable Bahamas began digital
services, it compared itself to
both US cable and satellite
operators to ensure its line-up
and service quality compared
well. “Cable Bahamas is quite
in-line,” he added. “The
Bahamian people can be
assured that Cable Bahamas
offers true value for money, and
service standards as required in
this world climate.” The com-
pany’s services were “world
class”.

Car dealers brace for 5-10% price increase

FROM page 1B

a slow process to get inventory
down to where you put in more
orders.”

The slowdown in new car

For the stories
behind the news,

syle Mary (e ats

orders is likely to have had a
major impact on government
revenues, as new cars are
among the items attracting the
highest duty rates. Given the
three to four-month time lag
between placing orders and the
vehicle’s arrival in the Bahamas,
the BMDA said government
tax revenues from the industry
should start improving in the
2009 fourth quarter.

Mr Lowe said that obtaining
debt financing from Bahamian

few new car buyers in the mar-
ket, and while there had been a
temporary spike following the
April car show, sales had again
tailed off in May.

Small SUV vehicles remained
the “bright spot” for the indus-

try.

The BMDA said: “BMDA
members remain hopeful that
the marginal economic recov-
ery showing signs in the US will
benefit the economy of the
Bahamas going forward.

“With inventories getting
more in line with industry
norms, BMDA members will
begin to consider ordering for
the next model year. This
should begin to positively
impact government revenue by
the fourth quarter. While
BMDA members expectations
are for a sluggish third quarter,
we anticipate we can weather
the storm.”

So far, there have been no
lay-offs by BMDA members.



on Mondays

commercial banks was among
the biggest challenges facing the

Lagal Notice

NORVILLE MOUNTAIN INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
NORVILLE MOUNTAIN INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Lagal Notice

SCHONE MIRIAM LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
SCHONE MIRIAM LTD. has been completed:
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidatar)

Lagal Notice

BLUE WHATE LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of BLUE
WHATE LTD. has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MONA RENNA OF CHURCHILL
SUBDIVISION, OFF SOLDIER ROAD, RO. BOX N-356,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as. a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows:
any reason why registration’ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 24TH day of JUNE,
2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
PU.Box Ne? 147, Nassau, Baharrers.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FRANCKY ST. FLEUR of
Mackey Street, P.O. Box SS-1956, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 24'" day of June, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Lagal Notice

BREATH OF DAWN LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of BREATH
OF DAWN LTD. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

CAPITAL HOTELS
(ASIA PACIFIC) LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act,
No. 45 of 2000, the Dissolution of CAPITAL HOTELS
(ASIA PACIFIC) LIMITED has been completed, a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-
pany has therefore been struck off the Register. The date
of completion of the dissolution was the 12th day of June,
2009.

(Le
— eee
ete |

J
fi
1 fi ‘


PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
tS








The Tribune




) etWwOork
th-century
h ee









By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

SU ued ite
you may find yourself attending
a lot more outdoor parties than
usual. During these events, the
men usually handle the cooking
by opening up those heat

drenched grills to give every-
one’s taste buds that one of a | i } e
kind summer barbecue taste.

According to foodnetwork.com, barbe-
UDLO Lm KOCeK ENED byte OM N item cCLMUEeerOLAll as
colonial America, specifically the settle-
ments along the Southeastern seaboard.
“The direct descendant of that original
American barbecue is Eastern Carolina-
style pit barbecue, which traditionally
starts with the whole hog and, after as
many as fourteen hours over coals, culmi-
nates in a glorious mess of pulled pork
doused with vinegar sauce and eaten on a
hamburger bun, with coleslaw on the
side,” the website noted.
Many of the self proclaimed “grill mas- a




ters” are mostly amateurs experimenting
with different flavors and sharing grilling
secrets from man to man. Desmond

Miller, a prison officer at Her Majesty’s a -
Prison, is a grill master and chef by hobby. a . os

“T always loved to cook, so grilling 7 vi
came naturally. Iam probably behind the - :



grill more than a dozen times a year. I
used to do it around the house then for
friends and then friends of friends,” Mr
Miller said.

When it comes to the perfect piece of
meat to conquer, Mr Miller said there are
a few key components to attain grilled
meat perfection.

“Quality meat is the key but you can
OC homacer lia GUUCUuTMy ZIM melecemeeelnCoyIIhy
friendly costing meats. Also seasonings
and marinating your meat are important.
Make sure the grill is at the right tempera-
ture and use tongs instead of forks. The
product will be more moist if not poked
and prodded. Let the grill do its job you
don't need to turn the meat to soon too
often. Also let the meat rest so as to redis-
tribute the juices throughout the meat,”
Mr Miller said.

While there are a variety of meat com-
binations that can taste great fresh from
the grill, Mr Miller said there are some he
enjoys working with more.

“T like working with chicken, fish, ribs,
pork and shell fish but at some time I
have probably grilled mostly all meats.
My most requested grilled specialties are
BBQ ribs, jerk pork and chicken, shrimp
Kabobs and steak,” Mr Miller said.

Just as important as the savory meat on
the grill is the succulent sauce that compli-
ments it. To give the meat its rich flavor,
Mr Miller said he has his own special
Seu teren

“T make my own jerk and pepper sauces
one mild for the faint of heart and anoth-
er I call the "more fire" sauce one taste
and you'd be saying more water,” Mr
Miller said.

As for up and coming young men who
want to become grill masters, Mr Miller
said he would advise them to not be afraid
KOS UUT= Cem AUD TIEN Con

“Research recipes online or in books
and add your own flair to it. Don't be
afraid of criticism everyone has different
tastes and tolerances. Be adventurous in
id oKom elke oCcsome-reCeuclmNotoma allem
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009, PAGE 9B





The Tribune

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

AS the Summer season
gets into full swing, many
locals hit the beaches to
escape the scorching heat.
Tribune Entertainment has
found the perfect summer
oasis for your
entertainment.

Terneille “TaDa” Bur-

rows is slated to per-
form at the Mall at
Marathon’s third annual
Music and Food Festival on
Saturday. The festival which
will offer food samples from
several restaurants in the
mall’s food court, will also
present TaDa and a secret
performer at no charge. The
event will begin at 10 am and
the malls’ stores will also
hold sidewalk sales. Organ-
isers are excited about the
event and promise more fun,
music, and an all around
family experience.

. The Express Yourself
2 Movement is once

again announcing its
popular Open Mic night
which will be held inside its
new home at the Hard Rock
Café on Charlotte Street. The
event which frequently reels
in spoken word hopefuls,
musicians, poets, and the
like, is the perfect Thursday
night spot to soothe the mid-
week work pangs. An easy
getaway from the hectic hus-
tle and bustle of life, the
event adds loads of enter-
tainment through one simple
medium, artistic expression.

. Two very special
3 icons in Bahamian

drama are being hon-
ored in the newest produc-
tion of the play Guanahani.
James Catalyn who originally
directed the play, and
Andrew Curry who was its
first music director, are the
honorees as this newest ver-
sion of the play premiers at
the Dundas Centre for The
Performing Arts on June 23.
An original Bahamian musi-
cal, with whimsical lines and
catchy tunes, the play pre-
sents the unofficial and satir-
ical true story of Christopher
Columbus’ discovery of The
Bahamas on behalf of the
European world. The produc-
tion which will run until Sat-
urday, is said to be an on
time reminder of true
Bahamian history, through
music and dance. Tickets are
priced at $20 and are quickly
selling out, so get yours
today.

. The Bahamas
4 National Trust (BNT)
is doing its part in

entertaining kids this sum-
mer, by kicking off its first
ever movie night this
Wednesday at its Village
Road retreat at 69m. Sched-
uled for showing is the
movie “The Great Polar Bear
Adventure,” which is a 2006
production focusing on the
realities of global warming.
The film paints an uncertain
reality for a polar bear family
who are forced to live in a
world ever changing because
of global warming. The
mother bear Ikuk and her
cubs Cassie and Asak, find
help along the way from arc-
tic fox Papu who directs
them to food and newfound
hope. Priced at just $1, the
film is the first of a list of
summer flicks planned to be
shown at the centre.

. Thought Catcher
5 Enterprise presents

Poetry Night at the
BNT this Friday starting at
7pm. Featuring some of the
performers from the Dundas’
annual production SPOT, the
event will include various
skits, and improvisations.
Also included is an open mic
segment allowing attendants
the chance to share their
poetry or related works.
Priced at $5, there will also
be appetizers and beverages
on sale.

| . Local entertainer

tereprise

*Guanahani



A tribute James Catalyn and Andrew Curry

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

ALMOST every Bahamian at one
time or another has heard the story
of famous maritime explorer Christo-
pher Columbus, whom history
records as the discoverer of the

New World.

What if someone told you, that all you know
about Columbus and his historical discovery
was a lie. In-fact, this is exactly what a local
playwright did in his on stage creation of Gua-

nahani in 1992.

Fusing fact, fiction, and a little humor, the
play tells a story of a Columbus far different
than the one portrayed in the history books.

It alleges that instead of arriving in the East
Indies as he had originally intended, Columbus
ended in the West Indies, and thus used that
accidental land fall as his claim to discovering
the new world and Guanahani (San Salvador).

As the production unfolds, the Indians of
Guanahani learned that Columbus was the man
that their forefathers had warned of who
would arrive on their land to convert them to

slavery.

Described as light hearted, lively, and enter-
taining, this musical tells a unique story of the
much different life that Columbus and the Indi-
ans lived during the late fifteenth century.

Now fast forward to 2009, where a small
group of actors, singers, and culture enthusiasts
have teamed up to recreate this production to

MOVIEREVIEW



The Hangover

By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

STARING- Bradley Cooper, (Phil
Wenneck) Ed Helms (Stu Price)
Zach Galifianakis (Allan Garner),
Justin Bartha (Doug Billings)
and Heather Graham (Jade)

There is a reason The Hang-
over has been the surprise hit of
the year. The movie is head and
shoulders above the current crop
of broad comedies and will leave
you rolling in your seat with
laughter.

Granted the plot is silly and
the events more than a little
exaggerated, but somehow given
the talents of the cast, the story-
line just works.

In the movie, Doug and
three of his friends- Phil, Stu and
Allan head to Las Vegas for his
bachelor party with a rooftop
toast that what happens in Vegas
will definitely stay in Vegas. That

is until the three groomsmen
wake up with the worst hang-
overs of their lives and realise
that they don’t remember any-
thing about the night before and
that the groom is missing.

The rest of the movie is the
threesome’s mad dash to find
Doug before its too late by
retracing their steps as best they
can -Just how did they end up
with a tiger and a baby in their
suite. Why is there a naked man
in their trunk and although it
wasr’t Doug who got married,
which one of them did?

With a cameo appearance by
Mike Tyson, at least a dozen
hilarious one liners and the back-
drop of Vegas as the ultimate
bachelor’s playground, The
Hangover is a must see, that you
won't need a drop of alcohol to
enjoy. Just make sure you stay to
the end to watch the final credits
which give a glimpse into what
really happened during the bach-
elor party every bride dreads.

pay homage to the men who created Guana-
hani.

First is James Catalayn, who is one of the
most talked about figures in the local theatrical
circle, and creator of several stage productions
including; An’ a don’ mean Cola, Lost Love, A
weddin’ tale, and You say! I say!

Also a familiar face to the performing arts,
Andrew Curry is the founder of the Diocesan
Choral, and a former Instructor of Aquinas Col-
lege where he was involved in various plays
such as Seven Brides for seven brothers, and
South Pacific.

The newest musical director for Guanahani
Antoine Wallace explained, that as he has been
familiar with Mr Catalyn and Mr Curry for sev-
eral years, he has always been interested in
working with the two legends.

After working alongside Mr Catalyn as a
national adjudicator for the recent Bahamas
National Arts Festival, Mr Wallace said the
time seemed fitting to propose a collaboration
between the Diocesan Choral, James Catalyn
and Friends, and other related groups.

“We (Antoine Wallace, Lakisha Bostwick,
Andrew Curry and James Catalyn) were won-
dering, what could we do to collaborate James
Catalyn & Friends, the Diocesan Choral, the
Allegro Singers, and the National Dance
School, so we thought Guanahani.”

Mr Wallace said as the old adage about recog-
nition suggest: ‘give me my flowers while I liv-
ing,’ he felt the time was now to pay tribute to
Mr Catalyn and Mr Curry.

Using the blueprint from the original produc-
tion, Mr Wallace said the new cast and crew
have revamped the music, and have added some





@ DURING their
final rehearsals
this past week-
end, the cast of
the revamped
Guanahani
promise a show
like none other.

extra layers of range and
diversity.

He said: “We have the
ring play, we have
quadrille, Junkanoo, and
rake-n-scrape, we have
everything Bahamian in
this production, and this
is also a pre-Indepen-
dence show.”

Apart from the cultural
significance of this pro-
duction, Mr Wallace said each of the members
from the various groups have used the play as
an opportunity to learn and share bits of each
others talents.

“We are all learning, the actors are becoming
singers, the singers are becoming actors, so all
of us are becoming all around musicians and
actors.”

For overall director Omar Williams, this was
a good sign considering he had the mammoth
task of arranging the production.

He said it felt good to have his name attached
to a play with such historical relevance as Gua-
nahani as he made his directorial debut.

Mr Williams explained: “With this being the
third time this play has been done, what makes
this time different is that we have a cast that is
at least three times larger than ever before.

“This show hinges on everybody being indi-
viduals, so we have diversity when it comes to
the singing, the acting, the dancing, everything
is different.”

Mr Williams said from the days of watching
James Catalyn and Friends on stage and now
joining them, he has great respect for Mr
Catalyn because he has helped in telling the sto-
ry of the Bahamas over the past 30 plus years.

“T think the thing that came over in this show
was mentorship, the same way that Andrew was
amentor to Antoine, and Mr Catalyn being a
mentor to me and several of the people in the
play, those people will now have the ability to
become mentors to others.

“T think that’s the best part about Andrew
and James, how they can use their talents to
help improve the lives and talents of others, that
is what being a leader is all about.”

Guanahani premiered yesterday at the Dun-
das Centre for the Performing Arts, and runs
until Saturday with showtime set for 8pm.



Frank Masi/AP Photo

IN THIS film publicity image released by Warner Bros., Zach Galifianakis, left, Bradley Cooper,
center, and Ed Helms are shown in a scene from "The Hangover."
PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Summit Academy puts on exhibition to
promote environmental preservation



By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

DOZENS of students from
Summit Academy recently
staged a collective exhibi-
tion at Popop studio, where
they used art as their voice
to promote the importance
of environmental preserva-

tion.

According to principal Gillian Wil-
son, the art project was organised to
help the students identify useful ways
of reusing everyday items like soda
bottles, which could help in reducing
the overall trash buildup on the island
and throughout the world.

She explained: “We are an inquiry
based school, so we thought it was
extremely important to expose our
children to various forms of art.

“In January we collaborated with
John Cox and other artists at Popop

STUDENTS are seen observing their

one of a kind tree baring leaves
hand-painted by them.



where we came up with a six month
plan to give the kids an in studio expe-
rience, and with this event being com-
bined with our annual science fair we
were really trying to get the message
to our kids of saving the earth and
what they can do as responsible citi-
zens.”

Totaling more than 50 pieces, the
exhibition included various spherical
creations made from plexy-wood, plas-
tic bottles and wood glue. Then there
were several hand painted recycled
clothes, pictures, and even an artifi-
cial tree that was made by the chil-
dren.

Director of Popop Studio John Cox
explained that with part of Popops’
mission being to share the joy and
importance of art to all students, the
experience with Summit was both
interesting and rewarding.

“When Popop first started about 10
years ago, we were dealing with a lot of
alternative and experimental work.”

He said continuing with that vision,
the educational art experience offered
the students a chance to bridge the
changing concepts artists use to com-
municate with the relevance of earth
preservation.

He said: “Here at Popop, we are try-
ing to nurture a critical standard of art
appreciation in the country, and what





PRINCIPAL Gillian Wilson explained:
“We are an inquiry based school, so
we thought it was extremely impor-

tant to expose our children to vari-
ous forms of art.”



we are really about, less so than having
students make objects that they take
home and say that this is mine, it is
about them having the art experience.”

During the course of the project, Mr
Cox said the students were exposed
to other art exhibits at places like the
Bahamas National Art Gallery to offer
a broader scope of what art is.

Mr Cox said the reality is that most
people who are exposed to art, or who
even go on to study art, hardly ever
work as professional artists. However
one thing that does remain is an aware-
ness of the way art speaks. He said
when these children grow up to
become lawyers, doctors, or teachers,
the seed planted through the project
will hopefully become useful to allow
them to contribute in some way to art
development in the future.

Although the exhibition has already
ended, Mrs Wilson said many of her
students have since enrolled in private
summer art classes because of their
newfound freedom in speaking
through art.



Cleveland returns home
to share vocal talents

By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

SELF expression through music and the
arts have been the lifeblood of Bahamian
society for decades allowing great talents to
become legends in their own right all over
the world. However, one of those legends
after 29 years has returned home to lend a
helping hand to those who also deserve a
chance to shine on stage.

Cleveland Williams, born and raised in
New Providence, got his musical start at
an early age. Mr Williams obtained a bach-
elors degree in Music Education and a mas-
ters in Vocal Performance from Prairie
View A&M University in Texas.

“As a youngster, I used to sit on my
grandmother’s step with her hymn book
and sing- there grew the love for singing.
My first solo was at Yellow Elder primary
school and I had asked to sing at the assem-
bly. In the eleventh grade, I was singing in
the choir and we were preparing for the
National Arts Festival. I wanted to enter
and sing soprano, and ended up winning
first place that year,” Mr Williams said.

In 1992, Mr Williams obtained his Doc-
torate from the University of Naples, in
Tourism Studies, allowing him as a bari-
tone to perform in numerous recitals and
concerts with the Italian Chamber Orches-
tra, the “Interpreti Veneziani” throughout
Italy, Sweden, Norway, Finland and the
Bahamas.

“T wanted to study opera, not just to sing
and grace the world stage. My intention
was to study that discipline so that once I
had studied that and been on stage with
the professionals and saw how the mechan-
ics of it worked, I would be able to come
home and say to my students ‘this is how it
should be done’ because I have ‘tasted the
waters’ through that experience. I am a
grass root person, having had the opportu-
nity to be blessed with the gift of singing
and had the good fortune of having met
people along the way who saw that there
was some talent there and decided to help
and be instrumental in getting me to go off
to school and do the type of studies neces-
sary,” Mr Williams said.

Mr Williams said it is because of those
persons who helped him, that it is time he
helped someone else.

“When I returned home I said to myself
that I hope I don’t just sit there and collect
dust because it would be a complete shame.
I think it is my duty as a Bahamian to
return to the islands of the Bahamas and to
assist with the nation building of our coun-

try through the further development of
what ever our cultural resources are. Hope-
fully I want to create opportunities where
other young Bahamians who may not have
had the opportunity or the exposure that I
was fortunate to have. I would like to help
channel them in the direction they should
be going or to help groom them to aspire to
become the artist or the singer they want to
become,” Mr Williams said.

Mr Williams said one of the first things
he noticed when he returned home, was
the repetitiveness of the independence day
celebrations prompting him to want to add
something more to the event, something
unheard of —an opera.

“T thought that independence for the
Bahamas is a very significant time in our
lives because as a country we celebrate the
anniversary of our independence. One of
the ways that we can be instrumental or
even more effective in doing something of
great significance is trying to pool together
all the various talents of the younger people
and of the cultural institutions we have
here and put them in a production. This
production will allow them to come
together as a cohesive team
to do a particular major
work. That work being
Scott Joplin’s three act
opera ‘Treemon- |
isha’,” Mr Williams
said. i

Mr Williams
said another
thing he noticed |
when he came
home is the
immense amount
of talent he has
found.

“Since I have |
been home I have
put out the
announcement
of the opera
and held audi-
tions. We here
in the
Bahamas
have

‘Nes

a


























been blessed. Bahamians have this built in
thing for song and dance and I am amazed
by the wealth of talent we have here that is
still untapped. While Iam home I want to
take the talent, be it cultivated or raw, and
try to shape, chisel, and mold them into
the direction they should be going,” Mr
Williams said.

Mr Williams said he has had several per-
sons from the wider community from dif-
ferent church choirs singing with him and
one of the groups he has reached out to is
the Catholic Diocesan Chorale.

Mr Williams said he wants to continue
with his work through the support of others
in the Bahamian community.

“T would like the support from the pow-
ers to do more of this type of stuff. Not
just operas, but also do oratorios, requiems,
and masses. With the wealth of talent we
have here, this is the area I feel in which we
can engage the talent. As a developing
country, the infrastructure needs to be put
into place for more cultural and artistic
things that the youth of our nation can real-
ly sink their teeth into because the arts and
culture in itself is a discipline. Once you
have them in the school system and in the
wider community, it will help the young
people to develop character, disciplined
minds and it brings some form of structure
into their lives. A lot of the young people
have been side tracked into other areas of
their lives and so I am hoping I will become

an agent of change to enhance

what we have culturally in the

Bahamas,” Mr Williams
said.

Beauty of tiles

FROM page 12

? career as a professional ceram-
} icist in the Bahamas, and bring

a fresh and competitive spirit

i in the realm of this art form.

“The focus of JTS would be

to push the limits of what can be

done with the medium, chal-

E lenge and encourage the growth
? of ceramics as an art form
: throughout the islands of The
: Bahamas, and to demonstrate
? through hard work and the per-
: fection of one’s craft, that any

artist (young or old) could enjoy
a successful career as a full time

? potter and/or ceramicist as our
: painting counterparts,” Mrs

Colebrooke said.
The first challenge for Mrs
Colebrooke was to stimulate

: interest in the field by not only
: teaching ceramics public and
i privately, but also by partici-
: pating in exhibits.

Although Mrs Colebrooke

: has participated in many
; exhibits locally and interna-
tionally the “Sump’n Familiar”
: exhibition held at the Central
? Bank of The Bahamas Gallery
i in 1997 was the most significant
? to her.

“Sump’n Familiar was like a

coming of age exhibit. Up to
CLEVELAND :
WILLIAMS :

? tors that I was now a profes-
? sional, producing serious work

that point I was just exhibiting
work as a student, but that show
proved to the Bahamian collec-

and making an impact on the

: local art scene. Attended by the
=: then Governor General Sir.

Orville Turnquest, the exhibit
featured 10 tile murals,” Mrs
Colebrooke said.

Mrs Colebrooke believes that
it was that show, and the many
others that followed, which
awakened interest in ceramics
in the country. She is the first
Bahamian female tile manufac-
turer in the country and her
works can be seen throughout
Nassau, Eleuthera, Freeport
and Abaco.

“The work has steadily grown
in range and become very pop-
ular in most of the family
islands. Most of my work can
be seen and purchased in local
stores in Nassau such as,
Andeana Designs (The Shera-
ton, Cable Beach,) Doongalik

Art Gallery, and The Plait Lady
located in the Marina Village,
Paradise Island, the Blue Pearl,
located in the International
Bazar, Bay Street, the Unique-
ly Bahamian Kiosk in the Inter-
national Departure Lounge in
the Lynden Pindling Airport)or
you can just visit the gallery and
studio in Gleniston,” Mrs Cole-
brooke said.

As a local manufacturer of
art tiles, JTS gives Bahamians a
choice beyond the imported
European and American art
tiles—works that are infused
with the beauties of the
Bahamian environment. JTS
has been manufacturing per-
sonalised tiles for bathrooms
and kitchens, restaurants and
business establishments.

One of Mrs Colebrooke’s
most recent commissions was a
client who owns a private winter
home on Harbour Island,and
asked her producing seashell
tiles to accent their bathrooms.

In regards to future plans for
Jessica’s Tileworks Studio &
Gallery, Mrs Colebrooke will
be hosting the first All Bahami-
an Ceramics and Potters exhi-
bition, which will be held at
Popop studios in October.
Some of the exhibiting artists
in that show will be Sue Ben-
nett-Williams, Imogene
Walkine, Tamara Russell, Kel-
ley Knowles, Nicole Sweeting
and Vincent McSweeney

Due to her strong love for the
arts and to see young people
express their creative side, Mrs
Colebrooke will be offering a
summer workshop from June
29 to July 24 for children ages 7-
15

“This workshop will be
focused towards engaging kids
to focus on basic skills and/or
talents in creative arts, cooking
and decorating,” Mrs Cole-
brooke said.

Cost for the workshop is
$500.00 per child ($20 per day)
and includes 1 / 12 Ib bag of
clay per child, craft materials,
use of studio space, kilns and
in studio glazes. Space is limited
to 10 students. Interested par-
ents who want to have their
children attend or are interested
in Jessica’s art can contact her at
324-3533 or via e-mail jessicas-
tileworks@gmail.com.
THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST

SUN A Se Si

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

| (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MAarINE FORECAST

Lats ang Tere TTS

































7 Today Thursday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
r lon = = spe = a High Low W High Low W = NASSAU Today: NWat 12-25 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-15 Miles 82°F
# - - Po f ee Veal ~_— — ele EES ee 89/31 78/25 pc FREEPORT Today: NWat 12-25 Knots 2-3Feet 5-15 Miles 81°F
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é ORLANDO A Ankara, Turkey 88/31 54/12 s 86/30 54/12 s ABACO ‘Today: NW at 12-25 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
High:93°FR4°C | Variably cloudy, a Patchy clouds, a Variably cloudy, a few Clouds and sun, a Mostly cloudy, a Cloudy with t-storms The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 83/28 64/17 s 79/26 68/20 s Thursday: _W at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
- tae F230 t-storm or two. couple of t-storms. t-storms. t-storm possible. t-storm possible. possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 55/12 44/6 pc 55/12 52/11 pc
13 ® é é 3 6 Bangkok 89/31 79/26 t 90/32 78/25 t
12 @ 84 Hiah: 90° owe gie To a ee - roe be ie e T T Barbados 86/30 77/25 t 86/30 77/25 sh ;
; ; J 4 ; : : arcelona 7 65, pc 7 pc a
TAMPA IDES FOR NASSAU Barcel 82/27 65/18 6/24 68/20 Topay's U.S. FORECAST
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High: 91° F/33°C : Tl TI F [116-85 F 98°-91° F [ o4-76°F | 91°-84° F High Ht(ft.) Low Htc) — Belling HORBS: 7812'S SSBF SIRS"
Low: 77° F/25°C oe F, The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 944am. 28 3:40am. -0.3 SEG ies a 5 a a. :
: “ 2 levati the h body— thing that effects h Id feels. Te tt flect the high and the low for the day. : : -
@Q@ elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day 10:10 p.m. 3.3 3:42pm. -0.3 Berlin 79/28 57/13 75/23 55/12 sh
+ — CUT nn Thursday 10:39am. 28 43am. 03 Bermuda 77/25 72/22 80/26 72/22 sh
_ a | aa 11:03pm. 31 4:39pm. -0.2 Bogota 67/19 46/7 © 66/18 46/7 t
5a ma a Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Friday T734am. 29 52lam. 03 Brussels 76/24 55/12 pc 77/25 59/15 sh aia ea
4 — ABACO Temperature 14:57pm. 29 5:38pm. -0.1 Budapest 77/25 57/13 ¢ 81/27 59/15 t
F, bs loft High: 90° F/32° C High Scadtenmechineetaiesscihaanestssediiers uncccismest 84° F/29° C Saturday 12:30 p.m 29 614iam. -0.2 Buenos Aires 52/11 36/2 s 55/12 43/6 s
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a. i @ WEST PALM BEACH i Last year's fIQD sscsassnestsinncn, 95° F/35° C SUN AVM itn Cancun 91/32 77/25 pc 99/33 78/25 s
4 — High: 89° F/32° C ae Last year's low ssduseusshcaonccuaetasaesanneeh 81° F/27° C " " Caracas 81/27 71/21 t 82/27 71/21 t
Se Low: 75° F/24°C toa Precipitation a ae a a.m. La ge cal am. Casablanca 82/27 68/20 s 77/25 60/15 s
> ~ As of 2 p.m. yesterday .......c.cccccccceseeeceee 0.60" unsel....... ‘Yo p.m. Moonset... . 10-04 p.m. Copenhagen 76/24 55/12 s 77/25 59/15 s
fl FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT 3 Year to date i i
a. JER AB. First Full Last New Dublin 66/18 52/11 pc 64/17 54/12 pc
ee High: 89° F/32° C @ High: 90° F/32° C Normal year to date 0... 16.85" - = = Frankfurt 79/26 61/16 sh 79/26 63/17 t
Low: 76° F/24°C Low: 75° F/24° C i be Geneva 77/25 58/14 s 78/25 59/15 s
AccuWeather.com oe Halifax 64/17 54/12 + 68/20 54/12 c
“ a he Forecasts and graphics provided by : : a Havana 91/32 72/22 pe 90/32 76/24 r Showers
emg MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jun.29 Jule?) Jule 15 sJul21—‘Helsink 73/22 54/12 s 75/23 55/12 s T-storms
Ps High: 90° F/32°C = Hong Kong 93/33 82/27 pc 92/33 82/27 pc Rain
wen Low:77°F/25°C NASSAU High: 92° F/33° Islamabad 115/46 79/26 s 115/46 81/27 s [+ *| Flurries a
ow: ; = 7Q0 ° Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
oh High: 90° F/32° C Low: 78° F/26° C Istanbul 88/31 66/18 s 84/28 64/17 pe be.) Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
se Low: 78° F/26°C Jerusalem 87/30 64/17 s 89/31 68/20 s [v_¥] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary angunli-
* a — Johannesburg 55/12 36/2 s 56/13 32/0 s
KEY WEST ih. a ee cATISLAND ksi sre ra po Set rans t—-1 6 URN 10 BIR 40S 76 ST
High: 89° F/32°C oA ie High 84° F/29°C Lima 71/21 60/15 pc 72/22 59/15 pe
ane E97° - Igh: London 75/23 54/12 s 77/25 55/12 pe
Low: Sarees yy Low: 76° F/24°C Madrid 91/32 57/13 pc 88/31 55/12 pc
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(ey GREAT EXUMA Bh SAN SALVADOR Montreal 82/27 66/18 s 81/27 64/17 t
all, q High: 87° F/31°C High: 86° F/30° C Moscow 63/17 52/11 sh 66/18 52/11 pc
A Low: 75° F/24° C fe “79° F/26° C Munich 64/17 55/12 6 75/23 55/12 t
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS om Nairobi 83/28 57/13 t 82/27 57/13 pe
‘ants’ High: 92° F/33° C ——_ New Delhi 111/43 88/31 s 113/45 90/32 s
highs and tonights's lows. SS , B
Low: 82° F/28° C - " Oslo 75/23 55/12 s 77/25 56/13 sh OW
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# Prague 68/20 57/13 r 69/20 55/12 sh Aw A | -
LONG ISLAND Rio de Janeiro 78/25 67/19 s 77/25 70/21 pc Hay Ul r LIC Pane
High: 89° F/32°C Riyadh 103/39 80/26 s 103/39 81/27 s otf
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Today Thursday Today Thursday Today Thursday Bs MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 87/30 79/26 sh 88/31 79/26 s that yo have ercatintd insurance
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W i High: 90° F/32° C San Juan 60/15 31/0 s 62/16 33/0 ¢ coverace no matter which
Fc FIC Fc FIC Fc FIC Fc FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC “Agie Low: 75° F/24° C San Salvador 88/31 68/20 t 87/30 73/22 t h d bl
Albuquerque 90/32 69/20 t 92/33 67/19 pc Indianapolis 92/33 72/22 s 88/31 65/18 t Philadelphia © 8/28 68/20 pc 89/31 71/21 s CROOKED ISLAND /ACKLINS Santiago 61/16 41/5 55/12 45/7 sh Way the win OWS.
Anchorage 60/15 49/9 c 60/15 50/10 pc Jacksonville 91/32 71/21 s 92/83 70/21 pc Phoenix 107/41 85/29 s 107/41 85/29 pc ti Se : ea Sms ST EmEean
Atlanta 93/33 70/21 s 90/32 72/22 s Kansas City 98/36 75/23 s 96/35 73/22 pc Pittsburgh 86/30 63/17 s 87/30 64/17 t RAGGEDISLAND — High:92°F/33" a0 Paulo r r eT :
Atlantic City 79/26 65/18 pc 87/30 69/20 pc LasVegas 104/40 78/25 s 99/37 78/25 pc Portland, OR 90/26 58/14 pc 76/24 54/12 pc cee Low: 77° F/25°C aaa aa ca s mae rege t Nobody does it better.
Baltimore 85/29 65/18 pc 90/32 70/21 s Little Rock 98/36 73/22 s 99/37 74/23 pc Raleigh-Durham 90/32 68/20 s 93/33 72/22 s Low: 73° F/23°C “an a = Pie. dee pe Trae .
Boston 68/20 60/15 sh 80/26 65/18 pc LosAngeles 79/26 62/16 pc 79/26 6246 pc St. Louis 96/35 76/24 s 91/32 73/22 t . om ae TORRID : aE ie
Buffalo 85/29 65/18 s 80/26 64/17 t Louisville 94/34 74/23 s 93/33 70/21 pc SaltLake City 89/31 6719 s 89/31 60/15 t GREATINAGUA ~ te Tawa or Tae ee ee
Charleston, SC 90/32 72/22 pc 93/83 73/22 pc Memphis 97/36 75/23 s 96/35 76/24 s San Antonio 101/38 77/25 pce 100/87 76/24 s High: 91° F/33°C aaa 89/97 63/17 s 99/97 59/15 t i ke ee - _ :
Chicago 92/33 65/18 pc 87/30 60/15 t Miami 90/32 77/25 t 90/32 77/25 t San Diego 72/22 6618 pc 74/23 64/17 pc Low. 76°F/24°C Trinidad 63/17 54/12 1 79199 59/15 c (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Cleveland 87/30 64/17 s 86/30 65/18 t Minneapolis 88/31 67/19 t 88/31 68/20 s — SanFrancisco 73/22 56/13 s 70/21 54412 pc ; Grand
: Vancouver 65/18 56/13 r 67/19 53/11 ¢
Denver 96/35 62/16 t 92/33 6146 pc NewOrleans 98/36 80/26 s 96/35 80/26 pc Tallahassee 97/36 72/22 t 93/33 69/20 t ad Ew 79/99 57/13 t 70/21 59/15 t i
SS ee Sg vine St i
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Houston 100/37 77/25 s 100/37 77/25 s Orlando 93/33 73/22 t 91/32 74/23 t Washington, DC 89/31 69/20 s 93/33 73/22 s Thee ee




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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Singer jailed for teen rape C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.174WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER CLOUDY, T-STORM HIGH 90F LOW 78F F E A T U R E S SEE‘THEARTS’ SECTION The beauty of tiles SEEPAGESEVEN Larry Smith’s Tough Call B y DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Bahamian entertainer Stevie S, also known as Lemuel Smith, was sentenced bytheSupremeCourt Tuesday to one year in prison f or rape. Justice Vera Watkins also ordered that Smith to be placed on three years probation after his release from prison. She noted that a person convicted of rape could be sentenced to a maximum of seven years. She urged Smith to use the time in prison to think about what he had done. S mith, 47, pleaded guilty to raping a 13-year-old minor at his trial on April 30. Sentencing was suspended twice – on May 30 and June 9 after Smith was unable to travel to Freeport for the hearing. At Tuesday’s sentence hear ing, lawyer Murrio Ducille told the Court that Smith suffers from a severe spinal cord injury that has left him crippled and barely able to walk. He felt that a custodial sen tence should not be imposed as a result of Smith’s medical condition, which would present chal lenges not only for his client, but also for the prison staff at Fox Hill Prison. Mr Ducille stated that a cus todial sentence would be detrimental and referred to the report of Dr Clyde Munnings, who noted that Smith suffers Stevie S gets one y ear sentence The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR BBQ CHIPOTLE SNACK WRAP www.tribune242.com I N S I D E BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E SEE page eight Nurses union consider govt healthcare proposal By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A PROPOSAL that Government will this year cover the full cost for nurses to receive treatment for work-related illnesses while implementing full healthi nsurance coverage for them in 2010 was to be consid ered by nurses last night. The proposal was put forward by Government dur ing a tense and drawn-out meeting with the Bahamas Nurses Union at the Department of Labour yes t erday afternoon. Bahamas Nurses Union President Cleola Hamilton said she felt there is now “hope” and expressed her “appreciation” that the talks were able to take place. “Who knows, maybe (the nurses) will agree (to the proposal),” she said. “We are still open to see what the members have to say.” Speaking at a press con ference at the Department of Labour, Minister of Labour Dion Foulkes, accompanied by Minister of Health Dr Hubert Minnis, Offer of treatment for work-related illness, with full insurance in 2010 SEE page eight MINISTER OF LABOUR Dion Foulkes shakes hands with Bahamas Nurses Union President Cleola Hamilton yesterday. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f MINISTERIN TALKSWITHUNION STEVIE S pictured yesterday. THE Nassau Guardian has been slapped with a $1.5 mil lion lawsuit for defamation after two of three persons accused in a 2004 car theft ring recently obtained a judgment against the police for malicious prosecu tion. The Guardian has denied that statements in the article were defamatory or that they referred to the plaintiffs. The newspaper also held that the occasion of publication was one of qualified privilege. In their statements of claim, the plaintiffs assert that the Guardian’s article on the theft ring on April 6, 2004 and April 8, 2004 were defamatory as when it referred to them it included their addresses in the reports. According to Atisha Tinker’s writ of summons against the newspaper, she was arrested Newspaper is hit with $1.5m defamation lawsuit SEE page eight By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net A TEENAGE girl testified in Magistrate’s Court yesterday that Anglican Archdeacon Ivan Ranfurly Brown choked and slapped her at a church picnic on Nirvana Beach last October. Archdeacon Brown, the rector of St Agnes Church on Baillou Hill Road, is accused of physi cally assaulting the girl on October 13, 2008. He is represented by lawyers Wayne Munroe and Anthony McKinney. The girl, who was 14 years old at the time of the Girl testifies that Archdeacon ‘choked and slapped her’ SEE page eight By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net A FACTION of FNM supporters are "praying" that Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham commits himself to another term as leader of the party because they believe there is no potential candidate capable of leading the country. According to two FNM stal warts, the present economic crisis requires the talents of a confi dent, strong leader with the conviction to lead the nation out of its current financial stranglehold. The supporters also noted that there are cur rently no would-be leaders who can connect with the less fortunate voter base as successfully as Mr Ingraham, a man who came from a humble North Abaco upbringing. And while there are several members within the party who may be ready after a few years of "grooming" none is presently ready to fill Mr Ingraham's shoes, said the supporters. "All the FNM's with whom I have spoken to FNM faction ‘praying’ PM will commit to another term Hubert Ingraham SEE page eight INSIDE AN O THER SETBACK FOR DISABLED FATHER AWAITING COMPENSATION P AGETWO THE RAPE TRIAL OF MP’S SON RESUMES P AGEEIGHT

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A DISABLED father of four is still awaiting compensation awarded by the Supreme Court two years ago as his case has suffered yet another setback. Wayne Anthony John, 45, of Canaan Lane, off Shirley Street, is living in poverty as he has been unable to work since he suffered severe injuries in a fall from a flatbed tractor trailer on the February Point jobsite in Exuma six years ago. He took supreme court action against February Point Resorts Ltd and Justice Anita Allen ruled in his favour as she found that the company “failed to attain the standard of care required of a reasonable prudent employer” and was therefore guilty of negligence in July 2007. Justice Allen made the firm liable for costs and left damages to be assessed by the registrar, but it was not until 17 months later that the registrar ordered Feb ruary Point to pay Mr John $310,504. Mr John is still awaiting compensation as February Point has now filed a notice of appeal contesting the amount. February Point maintains the supreme court registrar based his findings on inadmissible evidence when he ordered the company to pay $149,320 for Mr John’s future loss of earnings, and another $20,592 because he has been unable to obtain and sustain employment as a result of the injury. The record was settled before the Appeal Court registrar on June 16 and February Point has four to six weeks to pay a bond before a date for the hearing will be set. Meanwhile Mr John continues to suffer great distress because of his condition and is struggling to care for his family. He said he has been unable to work in his job as a construction tradesman since the accident because he can’t lift heavy loads. The disability benefit he receives and small contributions from his employed 17year-old son and 22year-old stepson fail to cover the cost of his family’s basic needs, and Mr John has been forced to borrow from friends an acquaintances. As his case has dragged on, Mr John’s debts have mounted to over $25,000, and he claims to have been threatened by some of his money-lenders. “I’ve been threatened and I’m in danger,” he said. “I can’t sleep at night.” He added: “We have no cable, no phone, no gas, no water, no groceries, and I’m at the point where I’m ready to call Social Services and give up. “The main problem is my 14year-old son who suffers seizures. He needs pills and if I don’t have them, he has problems. “But we have nothing right now. I have nothing to give him.” Mr John is also the sole carer for his daughters Cynthia, 9, and Diana, 13 months, as his wife Joyetta died just months after his stepson Clifton Smith, 23, was killed in a cruise boat tragedy three years ago. His case dates back to November 2003 when he was working on the February Point resort jobsite in Exuma and received foot, hip and wrist injuries when he fell off a flatbed tractor trailer. In his court action, Mr John alleged negligence against his employers, saying they failed to provide proper equipment and/or manpower for the unloading task he was required to do. The company filed a defence, claiming Mr John’s injuries were caused or contributed to by his own negligence in failing to ensure his feet were properly placed while maneuvering around the trailer, and neglecting to wear proper protective footwear. However, the judge accepted Mr John’s version of events, that no steel-toe boots were provided and that he was given no instructions to wear such boots. Another setback for disabled father awaiting compensation ByLINDSAY THOMPSON Bahamas Information Services THE Bahamas continues to meet its obligations in combatting and eliminating human trafficking, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs has confirmed. The ministry was responding to the Trafficking in Persons Report 2009 on the Bahamas issued by the U nited States’ State Department last week. It re-classified the Bahamas from the Special Cases status to a Tier 2 country of non-compliance with international laws regarding human trafficking. “The Bahamas advises that it will continue its efforts in compliance with its obligations under the Palermo Convention and the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children, and in compliance with its national law,” the ministry said in a statement issued yesterday. The Bahamas government has reviewed the US State Department’s Trafficking in Persons Report 2009 and its recommendations to facilitate the country’s full compliance with the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking in the context of the United States’ Trafficking Victims Protection Act 2000. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs noted that a Tier 2 country is one that has been determined not to have made “increasing efforts” to combat human trafficking over the past year, and to be making significant efforts based on commitmentsof anti-trafficking reforms over the next year, or to have a very significant number of trafficking victimsor a significantly increasing victim population.” The Palermo Convention and its three Protocols have been ratified by the United States and the Bahamas. On behalf of the Bahamas, the requisite instrumentof ratification was deposited with the Secretary-General on October 26, 2008, the ministry explained. "In response to the findings and recommendations in the report, the Bahamas notes that the report failsto acknowledge that the legislation has been enacted in compliance with the country’s obligations under the Palermo Convention and its Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children,and that the provisions of that legislation are entirely informed bythe provisions found under those international instruments,” stated the ministry. "The Bahamas reminds that the Trafficking in Persons legislation was enacted in December, 2008, and consequently, there could be no prosecution of human trafficking offender within The Bahamas as r equired under the Palermo Convention and the Protocol for an appreciable length of time during the reporting period." The ministry also queried any finding that the Bahamas “is a destination country for men and women trafficked from Haiti and other Caribbean countries primarily for the purposes of forced labour, and women from Jamaica and other countries trafficked for the purpose of commercial and sexual exploitation, specifically in the context of its significant illegal migration problem in the first instance, and particularly as such a conclusion suggests that there is a positive evidence of such activity.” With respect to the legal and illegal migrant or temporary worker, the ministry noted that the allegation is made that there may in fact be instances of forced labour occurring within the Bahamas with respect to such persons. The US State Department’s report cites in support of this conclusion claims of employers’ coercion of such persons “to work longer hours, at lower pay and in conditions not permitted under local labour law by changing the terms of contracts, withholding travel documents, refusing transportation back home, threatening to withdraw the employer-specific a nd employer-held permits, or to turn the employee over to Immigration.” “While the occurrence of any such incident is condemned," said the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, "the Bahamas maintains that incidences of employer coercion cannot by itself ground the offence of traff icking in persons or be evidence that persons are being trafficked. “Consequently, the Bahamas rejects any attempt to define or classify as trafficking in persons conduct which, though reprehen sible, does not fit within the criteria set by Article 3 of the Protocol. “Consequently, within the con t ext of the provisions of the Bahamian legislation, which is acknowledged in the report as affording immunity to and protec tion of victims of trafficking, there must be recognition of the fact that even if victims of trafficking are identified, the issue is always whether they will be prepared top rovide the evidence necessary to sustain a prosecution,” the ministry said. The Bahamas is ‘complying’ with international human trafficking laws FIREFIGHTERS take part in a one-day forest fire training session yesterday. An environmental group from Florida, Nature’s Conservancy, yesterday hosted the session at East Street Police Headquarters, in partnership with the Bahamas National Trust and NEMA (National EmergencyM anagement Agency). T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f FIREFIGHTERSBRANCHOUTFORFORESTFIRETRAINING Wayne Anthony John

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By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net WHILE some FNMs may want the party to emulate the former administration and give out more jobs to supporters, for mer deputy prime minister Frank Watson believes the party is doing right by its members. "Sometimes some members of our team, FNM supporters, tend to feel that we ought to behave the same way as the PLP and give consultant (jobs contracts for nonexistent jobs, and to that extent there may be criticisms to our support that claim that their not taken care of," said Mr Watson, current chairman of the Airport Authority. "But they fail to realise that the funds that the FNM controls are the people's funds and we don't have the capacity to dole out funds to whoever we like. The job of the government is to create an atmosphere where Bahamians can reach full poten tial in whatever they pursue and even though times are difficult, the government has been doing that and reaching beyond that. "My response to that is: Yes, the FNM always seeks to ensure that their supporters have an opportunity to make a decent living and take care of their family and so forth," he said. Some political observers have noted that some FNM supporters were unhappy before the 2002 election – which the party lost to the PLP – because they felt they had not been "taken care of". Gr umb ling But yesterday Mr Watson argued that such grumbling will not negatively affect the FNM in the next election, slated for 2012. "I think well-thinking FNMs appreciate that the government is doing all it can within the law that will cause FNMs to work and create opportunities for all Bahamians," he said. But a dissenting FNM said that if the PLP is known for making sure its supporters have work, the FNM might need to do the same if it wants to win elections. "The PLP has left their people entrenched in all these ministries and they are making sure that their people are getting jobs. I don't try to play politics but I think we need to look out for some of our people. We stood up for the government and they need to look after us, if it can be done without being unfair," he said. "I think its something that the government needs to monitor very closely," said the supporter, who did not want to be identified. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009, PAGE 3 T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong Plaza • Madeira St. Wong’s Plaza • Madeira St. Tel: (242 Tel: (242 2335 2335 Soft and durable Diversatex Soft and durable DiversatexTM TMcushion is fade and mildew cushion is fade and mildew resistant and is available in resistant and is available in blue, green or terracotta blue, green or terracotta x xChairs Chairsx xTables Tablesx xBenches Benchesx xUmbrellas Umbrellasx xLoungers Loungersx xDrinks Trolleys Drinks Trolleysx xCoffee Tables Coffee Tablesx xEnd Tables End Tablesx xCushions CushionsOutdoor Elegance Outdoor Elegance By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net RAINFALL in May was at the highest level since records began almost 80 years ago. A total of 13.66 inches of rain were recorded at the Lynden Pindling International Airport Meteorological Department last month, which is more than triple the average of 4.17 inches of rainfall recorded for the month of May since the 1930s. The previous record was 12.71 inches of rain in May 1958. And storms continue to drench the islands, with 8.08 inches of rain recorded in June so far, including 1.68 inches in New Providence on Monday and Tuesday. A surface trough currently passing over the northern Bahamas brought on Tuesday’sd ramatic lightening storm and is e xpected to cause severe weath er conditions today. Senior meteorological officer Geoffrey Greene said the rain should clear up tomorrow before more thunderstorm activity moves in on the weekend. He said the heavy rainfall of recent weeks is welcome after the long dry spell over the winter months. “This winter was especially dry, and we had a lot of forest fires, so this is a time for rain we should enjoy it.” However, Mr Greene does not expect the increased rain fall to affect the chance of hur ricanes hitting the Bahamas when the season peaks. He said: “We would hope that because it’s raining we are getting less development in thunderstorm activity, and tropical storms are not forming. “But the height of the hurri cane season is in August and September, with a mini-peak in October, so we haven’t reached that stage yet; I wouldn’t tell people to relax their guard just yet.” Record May rainfall In brief CARS IN PINE WOOD had to drive slowly recently because of high waters from a two hour down fall . IN an article published in the June 19 edition of The Tribune under the headline “First phase of Hilton makeover almost complete”, it was reported that the extensive renovations cost $70 million. However, The Tribune would like to clarify that the renovations upgrades to the hotel's 288 rooms and meeting spaces, the construction of a new bar and a facelift to the property's restaurant cost $17 million and not $70 million. Clarification FNM right not to give more jobs to supporters, says former DPM 13.66 inches of rain recorded – more than triple the average U NDER WATER: A common sight during May. B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net The Bahamian resident who became the country’s second case of influenza A (H1N1 has completely recovered, and all others who came in contact with that person are also fine, according to Minister of Health Hubert Minnis. The young adult, who was never identified, was said yes terday to now be “completely well.” With the seven day incubation period for swine flu now also passed without any of those who the individual came in contact with showing symptoms, Dr Minnis said the Bahamas can safely say it has “gotten over that particular case.” The young adult was the second case of Influenza A (H1N1 Bahamas on June 17. The individual had returned a six-day trip to New York on June 3, 2009. T ests Having experienced symp toms upon their return to the Bahamas, the individual sought medical attention andu nderwent tests for swine flu. Before and after receiving results, the person was volun tarily quarantined to mitigate against the spread of the virus. The Surveillance Unit of the Department of Public Healthm ade efforts to contact and m onitor persons who had come into close contact with the individual. The first case of the H1N1 virus reported in the Bahamas was detected in an adult visitor from New York in May. Having experi enced symptoms, the visitor stayed in the country for only a day, undergoing tests, before returning to the US. Swine flu victim fully recovered, says Minnis HUBERT MINNIS “... I wouldn’t tell people to relax their guard just yet Geoffrey Greene

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E DITOR, The Tribune. Mr Philip “Brave” Davis abused his parliamentary privilege at the 11th June sitting of the House of Assembly to d efame the good name of my uncle, the late Sir Harold Christie concerning his own-e rship of the 2,600 acre Union Estate at Old Bight, Cat Island, a part of which was sold nearly a year ago to a group of American developers w ho are building “Cat Island Golf and Beach Resort”, t hereon. This beautifully designed project will focus the world’s spotlight on the extraordinary beauty of Cat Island and its people and in doing so will fulfil the vision of Sir Harold. S ir Harold loved Cat Island a nd its people whom he repr esented in the House of Assembly for 32 years and he was known for his generosity to them. Sir Harold did not “take” the land from anyone! The Union Estate was a sisal plantation owned and operated by an English family headed by Samuel Harris in the late eigh teen hundreds. When the sisal plantation failed, the then owners left the land in charge of overseers who permitted the people of the neighbouring Old Bight settlement to have farms thereon provided they paid over a share of their crops to their overseers, a common practice in the islands. On the 26th of February 1951, Sir Harold’s com pany Cat Island Farms Limited purchased the Union Estate from the Estate of Mr and Mrs Henry M Rumball who had purchased the same from the Estate of Stanley Harris in 1927 and continued t he arrangement of allowing t he people of the Old Bight t o farm on the Estate provided they paid a small share of their crops to his overseers. Sir Harold built a house on t he estate, called Highwood House, and created a large f arm around the house where t hey raised Nubian goats and charolais cattle. In the early 1960’s many of t he Old Bight Tenant Farmers refused to pay over a share of their crops to Sir Harold’so verseers and started to make c laims of ownership of the areas they were farming, while many others continued farmi ng and paying shares to the o verseers, recognising Sir Harold’s Company’s ownership. At this time, Sir Harold on the advice of his attorneys, started an action under the Quieting Titles Act to have h is perfect documentary title to the land adjudicated by the Supreme Court under whicha ll persons making claim to parts of the Estate could also have their claims heard. The Quieting Titles Act was created to investigate and sett le land title disputes. In this Action Number 81 of 1964, many claimants from Old Bight filed claims and they and their witnesses wereh eard by Supreme court judges who at the end of the h earing gave detailed judgments of each claim dismissing all of them as lacking truth and not sufficient to prove their occupation of a particular parcel of land for ther equired 20 years, or their o uster of the documentary o wner. The Old Bight claimants were represented by prominent attorneys Sir Lynden O Pindling, Sir Cecil WallaceW hitfield and Arthur D Hanna and had their claims adjudicated in court. Sir Harold’sC ompany was represented by Eugene Dupuch QC and myself. Mr Davis should read the judgments, to understand why the Old Bight claimants w ere not successful. I am not aware that any appeal was e ver filed. No farmers ever lived on the land and therefore none of them lost their homes as claimed. They only cultivated fields on the Union Estate and they lived in the settlement of Old Bight. C oncerning the three w omen who were put in jail f or a few days for defying an order of the court to “stop cutting bush for new fields”, pending the hearing of the petition, they could have purged their contempt and not gone to jail by appearing before the court and agreeing to stop cutting, but this they refused to do. The rule of Law had to prevail as it must in this country. The Estate of Sir Harold in May resolved to establish a fund to provide scholarships to the College of the Bahamas for Cat Island students. Your newspaper published the claims made by the Mem ber of Parliament without checking their accuracy or veracity and I ask that you give this letter equal coverage. WILLIAM McP CHRISTIE Nassau, June, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm “WATER, water everywhere, nor any drop t o drink” or to bath in, or to flush toilets with or d o the laundry or any of the other essentials nece ssary for living a healthy and hygienic life. T his has been the cry of many householders t hroughout New Providence over the past seve ral weeks. Potable water has always been a challenge for most Family Islanders, but New Providence has been particularly unlucky this year as the Corporation struggles with the intermittent faults of its technology. In his presentation to parliament during the budget debate last week Phenton Neymour,S tate Minister of the Environment, listed the seven challenges faced by the Water and Sewerage Corporation (WSCn on-revenue water, that is water that is lost f rom the system; the reliability of the water supply; the high expenses of shipping/barging and staffing; constrained revenue; improving sewerage infrastructure and providing services to the Family Islands. He pointed out that the Corporation was hard-pressed in its attempts to tackle thesei ssues, particularly in the current economic sit u ation. T he Corporation estimates that it loses about five million imperial gallons a day through leaks, o r apparent losses through theft or metering i naccuracies. He said that every one million imperial gallons lost was the equivalent of an annual $3 m illion. If this one million gallons of lost water had been sold it would have brought in an annual $5 million. One only has to do elementary mathematics to estimate the wealth of the treasury if the five million gallons lost daily in a year could have been turned into cash. It would probably bring in more revenue than a casino. He said the World Bank had recommended that developing countries should keep the water they lose below 23 per cent. WSC estimates its water loss at 50 per cent. Mr Neymour said that until the WSC can effectively address this problem the Corporation “will not have any chance of becoming a finan cially viable entity.” He said the shipping of water from Andros was originally considered a “temporary solu tion,” but 25 years later we are still struggling with the “temporary solution.” Summer storms,h urricanes and barge break-downs have delayed the water barges arriving in New Providence o n time. Of course, this resulted in water shorta ges and dissatisfied customers. M r Neymour pointed out that although there h ave been improvements in both the efficiency o f the operation and the volumes of water s hipped, “it has out-lived its ability to satisfy t he demands of New Providence.” Barging w ater from Andros, he said, “is no longer less expensive than the alternative reverse osmosis supply.” This recalls an early morning conversation in the mid-seventies with a very upset UN repres entative at the side of St Andrew’s swimming p ool as we both waited for our sons to comp lete their swimming lessons. He was nervous, b ecause in those days we lived in what John M arquis called “a frightened society.” He obvio usly was wary about being seen in deep conversation with a Tribune writer. But that day he had to talk with someone, and we were that someone standing by his side. He was particularly upset because politics had become deeply imbedded in a UN-sponsored experimental programme to give New Providence a steady sup p ly of potable water. He and his team were confident of its success. New Providence was chosen as the site for the pilot scheme, which,w hen perfected, could be replicated in other d eveloping countries. He said people consider Ireland a land of abundant rain, but in fact during its rainy season New Providence has more rain than Ireland. If this rain could be harnessed, New Providence would always have a good supply of water. His team had found a promising run-off shed some w here in the airport area and were confident of s uccess. Because of his nervous condition, we c ould not get details on what exactly they were building as catchment for this abundance of w ater. I reland for example averages 30 inches of rain a year. In recent years New Providence had its heaviest annual rainfall in 1995 76.33 i nches; in 2007 60.39 and in 2008 44.98. The heaviest rainfall for the month of May since records were started almost 80 years ago fell last month a record 13.66 inches. That morning by St Andrew’s swimming pool was the first we heard of the Andros barging proposal, which Loftus Roker was pushing for his constituency. My friend thought it was a colossal mistake that Bahamians would live to regret. He was angry. Politics had entered and spoiled what his team considered a project that would have greatly benefited the people of these islands. He didn’t want to go into further detail, but he had said enough to make it clear that a philanthropic scheme that could have satisfied many of this island’s needs had been scuttled by the meddling of inexperienced, small island politicians again putting their ownp olitical ambitions before the long term good of the people. H e said his team’s report we gathered w hat had gone wrong had also been included in t hat report had been left with the PLP gov e rnment. He urged us to find and publish it. H e and his scientists packed their bags and left, w e believe for Barbados. I n the meantime we were left to try to ferret o ut a report, which under the PLP administration was like trying to find gold dust at the end of a rainbow. The report was never found. Philip ‘Brave’ Davis abused parliamentary privilege to defame Sir Harold Christie LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net The water problem in Nassau THE COLLEGE OFTHE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bsSCHOOL OF BUSINESSORIENTATION AND ADVISEMENT FOR FALL SEMESTER 2009ORIENTATION AND ADVISEMENT WILL TAKE PLACE FRIDAY, JUNE 26, 2009 FROM 9 AM TO 1 PM IN ROOMS B-5 AND B-6 FOR THE FOLLOWING STUDENTS ACCEPTED IN THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS (BBA GRAMMES: 1STUDENTS WITH EARLY ACCEPTANCE 2STUDENTS WHO HAVE COMPLETED COLLEGE PREP 3STUDENTS WHO HAVE COMPLETED THE UPGRADING PROGRAM (CEES ALL STUDENTS SHOULD BRING COPIES OF ACCEPTANCE LETTERS, COMPLETION LETTERS AND RELEVANT EXAM RESULTS SUCH AS THE BGCSE. EDITOR, The Tribune. Please allow me a little space in which to thank Mr Rick Lowe of The Nassau Institute f or his response to my letter appearing in your June 3rd edition and to express my apprecia tion for his letter appearing in your June 12th edition opposite the article “Euro-Socialism has pluses and minuses” by Llewellyn King of Hearst Newspapers. Mr Lowe agrees with me on a very limited number of points raised in my original letter of June 3rd but he has not addressed my basic assertion that a middle road exists between the extremes of selfish and unregulated capi talism and the painful excesses of socialism at the other end of the political spectrum. Mr Lowe appears to assume that I am opposed to capitalism per se and that is not the case. However, I recognise that by its very nature capitalism focuses interest on the indi vidual at the expense of the larger society. In a world of ever expanding population most civilised societies seek to provide some form of social safety net for the less fortunate (or less ambitious or less favoured society in an effort to avoid degeneration into a lawless environment and ultimately a “failed state.” Since politicians do not actively propose a plan seeking zero population growth there are a few options which we as members of the general publiccanexamine unless we are prepared to watch helplessly as societies become more crowded and desperate as the few unregulated capitalists become wealthier and the masses b ecome more repressed and disenfranchised. I agree with Mr Lowe’s assertion that “greed” is not limited to the capitalist world but surely this is not an observation of which we can be proud. Also, constant reference to the theories of the late Milton Friedman and his “Chicago Boys” obscures the fact that Franklin D. Roo sevelt had recourse to the theories of the late John Maynard Keynes when he put into place (against considerable opposition public programmes intended to lift the USA out of the Great Depression following the Wall Street crash of October, 1929. It appears that Bahamians such as Mr Lowe and myself don’t like change but we have to be more imaginative and realistic about the direc tion in which inevitable change will take our country and whether we will be able to exert any sort of positive and beneficial influence upon the direction of that change. Perhaps I am a naive seeker of that very elusive Utopia where “capitalism with a human face” resides. AVID READER Nassau, June, 2009. Seeking the middle road between the extremes of capitalism and socialism

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By BETTY VEDRINE ONE hundred educators are being immersed in the hotel and tourism industry this week as part of the Bahamas Hotel Association’s sixth annual Summer Educa tor Internship Programme. The group of educators, who are being exposed to the vast opportunities available in tourism, were encouraged to “play an active role” in moving the country forward. They were addressed by Director of Higher Education and Lifelong Learning Dr Leon Higgs at the sixth annual Educators Industry Intern ship Programme held at the College of the Bahamas' Culinary Hospitality Management Institute on Monday. “We are building a country that is forward moving and forward thinking, thus giving it the ability to sustain itself during difficult economic times such as now,” said Dr Higgs. “However, in order for us to accomplish our goals, we must collaborate with and involve all stakeholders in the education process. After all, nation building is the responsibility of all of us Bahamians.” Already stakeholders have taken an active role such as forming the National Tourism Task Force on Education, he said. This workshop is another of these initiatives. Activities “Through activities such as training sessions for industry and educators, internships in industry, and constant evaluation of the programme, the knowledge that is offered to educators is relevant,” he said. With the advent of the internet, the onset of globalisation, and the signing of trade agreements between nations, students can now compete for almost any job for which they qualify in any region in the world, Dr Higgs said. “In some instances, (students) may not have to leave their homes to find employ ment in the future. Therefore, our students must be educated to compete at all levels. “They must be trained to deliver service with excellence.” However, educators will have to continue to focus on their own professional training and development in order for this to happen, he said. So far, the Summer Educator Internship Programme has benefitted more than 500 educators. The workshop is a collabo rative effort between the Ministry of Education, the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation, and the College of the Bahamas’ Culinary Hospital ity Management Institute. It is being held through June 26 at the Institute's campus. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009, PAGE 5 Foreign fishermen are allegedly caught poaching By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net BYSTANDERS watched i n horror as a young woman was involved in an accident on a busy street yesterday. Witnesses claimed she was knocked down by a car and the driver then sped off. But when stopped by police and brought back to the scene, the young driver d enied responsibility, claimi ng the woman had “tripped” i n front of her vehicle and s he didn’t stop because the t raffic was too heavy. T he incident took place on Shirley Street outside Doct or’s Hospital at around 1 .30pm. A ccording to the 36-yearold “victim”, who did not wish to be named, she was waiting to cross the busy thoroughfare when she made eye contact with the driver of a green Toyota Wyndham, w ho was waiting to enter S hirley Street from Christie S treet. The woman, who appeared to have suffered no major injuries, claimed the young female driver then gestured that it was okay for her to c ross. “That was the only reason I took the chance to cross,” s aid the woman. H owever, as she started w alking across the road she claimed the car knocked her down. Witness A witness, who had been d riving behind the Toyota Wyndham, said she parked her vehicle and ran out toh elp the woman who was on the road in front of the car. As they moved to the side of the road, the driver then a llegedly left the scene. The woman, who was taken into the hospital by wheelchair, said she was “disorient ated” and her legs and arms w ere in some pain from the i mpact and the fall, but “otherwise OK.” The driver, who was brought back to the scene by police around 20 minutes afterwards, said that after she called to the other driver to a sk if the woman was all r ight, and was told the w oman ‘would be OK’, she continued to drive, as she “couldn’t stop because of all the traffic.” “I didn’t leave her,” she maintained. S he admitted having motioned to the woman to c ross the road, but then state d that another car “sped u p.” “I tried to quickly go over so the other guy could move. She was crossing at the same time. At the same time I thought she stopped to not cross the road anymore. I did n ot knock her – she tripped. I s topped suddenly when I saw h er crossing the road. I did not hit her,” said the woman. The driver said she kept going because when she tried to stop to check on the woman, “people started h onking at (her Woman taken to hospital following traffic accident T HEPLP has denied responsibility for c reating a situation that led to the hiring a nd promotion of a group of prison officers described by Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest as “unqualified.” Opposition spokesman on the public service, Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell, said yes t erday that he personally confronted Mr Turnquest outside parliament over the matt er, telling him to “cease and desist blaming the PLP for a situation which was entirely FNM-created at the prison and one which we tried to settle before we left office.” Speaking during the 2009/2010 budget d ebate, Mr Turnquest said that the government had taken the “decisive action” to promote and recruit certain officers afterh aving struggled with some “vexing human resources issues.” He said that when the FNM came to o ffice in 2007 they met with a number of people working at the prison who had been told “on the eve of the election” that they were to be promoted, while another group h ad been recruited despite not having the requisite qualifications. Mr Turnquest said that government took t he position that it was not the fault of these “unfortunate people” that they had been dealt with in a manner which appeared to bea n effort to “circumvent the rules and reg u lations of the public service.” However, he said that the decision does not “set a precedent.” Mr Mitchell claimed yesterday that the PLP, when it came to office in 2002, metw ith a group of people who had been worki ng at the prison but had their training “cut short” and were taken on prematurely due to a staffing shortage. C alling this situation “untenable and unsatisfactory”, Mr Mitchell said the Public Service Commission, “then headed by anF NM appointee, refused to confirm the officers because their training was not complete.” “They were unable to get the salary that w as due to them as officers as a result of that issue being unresolved,” said Mr Mitchell. We were also faced with a second set of o fficers who were recommended for prom otions by the Prison Service. Half of those recommended for promotions were refused promotions by the FNM-appointed Public Service Commission. The reason given was that they did not fulfil the criterion for pro m otions laid down by the FNM, which gave academic qualifications as one way to be p romoted; and alternatively, years of service,” said Mr Mitchell. He said this had caused a “morale problem” at the prison and it was agreed upon that a “special course would be designed f or all those who had not been promoted and that those who were successful in that course, all other things being equal, wouldb e promoted.” The Fox Hill MP added: “That course was designed and done. The Prison StaffA ssociation made representations to me as minister of the public service that several people had been overlooked and requested inclusion of other people to have an oppor t unity for promotion. I agreed and this was facilitated.” Denying any action was taken by the P LP in this regard on the basis of “political affiliation”, Mr Mitchell accused the FNM of “delaying and sabotaging the system”, claim-i ng they have “much to answer for.” H e said he is thankful that “this sordid chapter” is soon to be resolved. PLP hits back over ‘unqualified’ prison officers Educators encouraged to ‘play active role’ T ommy Turnquest F red Mitchell DIRECTOR of Higher Education and Lifelong Learning Dr Leon Higgs addressing educators at the sixth annual Educators Industry Internship Programme. Derek Smith /BIS ELEVEN foreign fishermen are expected to arrive in the capital today for processing after they were caught allegedly poaching in Bahamian waters. Royal Bahamas Defence Force press officer Lieutenant Sonia Miller said the crew was apprehended on board a 40-foot Dominicanregistered fishing vessel, the Lancha Dana Laura , approximately one nautical mile northwest off Little Inagua. Acting on information received from US authorities, RBDF officers on the Enduring Friendship and P38 vessels both stationed at HMBS base in Mathew Town, Inagua apprehended the 11 men around 6.44pm last Saturday. The vessel was found with an unknown quantity of small scale fish on board, Ms Miller said. The total weight of the seizure was not known up to press time yesterday. n MIAMI O FFICIALSsay wood storks have been breeding at their h ighest rate in decades in the Everglades, a ccording to Associa ted Press. P reliminary surveys estimate that 3,500 of the ungainly duckl ings will leave South Florida nests this year. The wood storks are the only Florida wading bird on the federal list of endangered species. Rain in the last month of nesting season took its toll, leaving half the weakened fledglings prey for waiting gators. But even so, officials say more wood storks will survive this season than they have since the 1930s. E nvironmentalists say the stork has rebounded from a low of about 2,500 pairs in 1978 to perhaps as many as 10,000 pairs this year. B ut they also point out the bird’s range and habits have been r adically altered and believe it is still a threatened species. Wood stork population flying higher in Everglades

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A SINGLE mother who w aited three years for the construction of her flood-prone home intends to sue her former contractor for delays and defective work. Joyce Roberts, 29, claims the contractor she hired in F ebruary 2006 should have c ompleted construction withi n six months, but repeatedly delayed work on her four bedroom home on New Jerusalem Way, off Carmichael Road. And when she finally m oved in last month, the ground floor of the two-storey h ouse flooded in heavy rain a s water poured through electrical sockets and seeped t hrough the walls. Her daughters, aged three and six, are now sharing their mother’s upstairs room as the lower floor is uninhabitable. Miss Roberts, a former Atlantis employee who was l aid off in November last year, said the contractor was recommended by her attorney, w ho she found through her b ank loan officer. A n agreement with the contractor stipulated buildingw ork would be completed by N ovember 2006, or interest on the loan would be paid by the builder, Miss Roberts claimed. But the completion date was delayed to April 2007, and then October 2007, Miss Roberts said. In the meantime she paid a n additional $8,000 in May 2007 for the basement/ground floor to be built. H owever, five months later o nly the structure and roof of the house had been complet ed. Miss Roberts terminated the building contract in May 2008, and hired another contractor to finish the job. When she finally moved into the house in April this y ear, heavy rains flooded her n ew home within weeks. M iss Roberts said: “We are not even three months in theh ouse and we are already hav i ng so many complications. The whole downstairs is uninhabitable because water is coming in and every time it rains we have to turn the power off – otherwise I’m afraid the house is going to burn d own.” Miss Roberts has been informed the water is seeping in from underneath the foun d ations of her home and will c ost around $3,000 to repair. But having borrowed over $158,000 to build the house,a nd because she was unem ployed for five months until she got her new job as a medical assistant, Miss Roberts has trouble even paying the bills. She said: “I lived in darkness for six weeks until I got t he money to pay BEC to turn o n my lights. I make a total of $966 a month and my mortgage alone i s $1,015. “I have to come up with money for light, water, food and gas in order for my chil d ren to live comfortably. I barely can afford the necessities of life.” She has been unable to contact her original contractor or her attorney, and when she can afford legal services she intends to sue them for compensation. “I am living in a house that r equires me to turn off the p ower every times it rains,” M iss Roberts said. “I am so afraid and don’t k now what to do. “I don’t think that this is fair for me to have to be dealing with after waiting three longy ears to get into my home. I am finally in and now I have to sleep in fear every time it rains, and we are now in the hurricane season.” THE Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat has intensified its offensive against illicit drug use with the focus on developing and strengthening social care and rehabilitation programmes for drug users, in a bid to mitigate the social a nd health consequences of substance abuse. With funding from the European Union, the Secretariat has organised a regional workshop on “Minimising the Social and Health Consequences of Substance Abuse”, with special focus on street-based programmes and the establishment of low threshold drop-in-centres for substance abusers and their relatives who may need counselling. The workshop, set to take place in Jamaica on June 24-25, aims to sensitise and increase the knowledge and skills of non-government organisations, policymakers and service providers from the public sector on current and emerging trends in minimising the social and health consequences of substance abuse. It will also draw on best practices of existing low threshold drop-in centres within the Caribbean. In addition, participants in the workshop will identify and develop national and regional advocacy strategies to lobby for the establishment of low threshold drop-in centres where none currently exist, and other programmes that can help min imise health consequences of substancea buse on individuals, families and communities. The workshop will also identify areas for in-country technical support to strengthen or establish such existing programmes, and explore the issue of imple menting a human rights based approach in programme development – the Caribbean experience. Another spin-off from the workshop is the provision of a platform for the devel opment and strengthening of networking among service providers of low threshold drop-in centres in non-government and government agencies to exchange information and sharing of best practices. Over 20 participants, drawn primarily from non-government organisations across the region, are expected to attend and benefit from this workshop which starts just two days ahead of World International Day against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking, to be observed on June 26. Single mother set to sue over flood-prone home W ATER i s seeping into the home of Joyce Roberts. CARICOM Secretariat moves on social care for substance abuse T T h h e e w w h h o o l l e e d d o o w w n n s s t t a a i i r r s s i i s s u u n n i i n n h h a a b b i i t t a a b b l l e e b b e e c c a a u u s s e e w w a a t t e e r r i i s s c c o o m m i i n n g g i i n n a a n n d d e e v v e e r r y y t t i i m m e e i i t t r r a a i i n n s s w w e e h h a a v v e e t t o o t t u u r r n n t t h h e e p p o o w w e e r r o o f f f f o o t t h h e e r r w w i i s s e e I I m m a a f f r r a a i i d d t t h h e e h h o o u u s s e e i i s s g g o o i i n n g g t t o o b b u u r r n n d d o o w w n n . . Joyce Roberts THE Bahamas Red Cross Society has elected Brendon Watson as its new president. A native of Long Island, Mr Watson has served on the executive board of the Bahamas Red Cross for the past three years. As a member of the board, Mr Watson was chairman of the property management committee and co-chairman of the fair committee. Mr Watson is the founder and own er of Watson Construction Company Ltd and serves as the assistant governor of Rotary International District 7020, Bahamas. He has also served as chairman of the Rotary International District 7020 Conference. Bahamas Red Cr oss elects ne w pr esident The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. Shar e your news THIS November, S uperClubs’ execut ive chairman John I ssa will be awarded an honorary Doctor of Laws degree by the University of the West Indies in Mona,J amaica. P raised for his contributions to Jamaica’s tourism industry, the university recognised Mr Issa as one of thef ield’s most influential consult ants and entrepreneurs. Known for many firsts in the Jamaican hospitality sector, Mr Issa pioneered the all-inclusive hotel concept on the island when he opened Negril BeachV illage in 1976. R eshaping the resort indust ry, Mr Issa then introduced the Super-Inclusive holiday with the inception of the adultsonly playground Hedonism II in 1981. He also launched the island’s first all-inclusive family resort, Boscobel Beach, in1 983. Mr Issa’s vision has grown beyond the isle of Irie, with 11a ll-inclusive resorts throughout the Caribbean and two more under development in Panama a nd Brazil, slated to open this F all. “It is a privilege and honour to receive this prestigiousa ward from the University of the West Indies,” said Mr Issa. “I am proud to be recognised b y an institution whose mission m atches my own to inspire and propel the success and growth of the West Indian c ommunity.” Beyond his hotel ventures, Mr Issa has deep roots inJ amaica. He served as a senat or from 1983 to 1989, chairman of the Jamaica T ourist Board during t he same years, and p resident of the Jamaica Hotel and Tourist Association in 1972. A unique honour, M r Issa even has his o wn 40-cent postage stamp, which was created to commemorate the centenary of the Jamaica Hotel Law (1904-2004 T hroughout the years Mr I ssa has received numerous accolades for his achievements, including being honoured with the Order of Jamaica, the country’s fourth highest national order (1998i an Order of the Southern C ross (Officer Rank, 2001 E rnst & Young named him “Caribbean Master Entrepre neur of the Year” (2003 received the Jamaica Tourist Board’s “Trail Blazer Award” (2005 named him “Premier Hoteliero f the Year” (2006 recently, the magazine extended Mr Issa the “LifetimeA chievement Award in Travel and Tourism” (2007 Along with Mr Issa, 16 recipi ents are set to receive hono rary degrees from the university during graduation cere monies, including Barbados’ f ormer Prime Minister Sir Lloyd Erskine Sandiford; Governor General of St Vincent a nd the Grenadines Frederick B allantyne; journalist and environmental activist John Maxwell; prolific scholar and h istorian Professor Colin A Palmer, and chairman and managing director of theG leaner Company Oliver C larke. Honorary degree for SuperClubs’ chief John Issa

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"The most we can say is that there has been a general lack o f judgment...We have learned t hat we are not so big as we t hought we were." Former US president Calvin Coolidge on the Great Depression I R ONICALLY,the g loomiest economic d oomsayers of today are often the staunchest advocates of free market capitalism. And one of them was in town last week to speak at a public meeting organised by the Nassau Institute. D r Robert Murphy is an e conomist who works for a plethora of libertarian think t anks in the US. At the Nassau I nstitute meeting, he offered a d evastating critique of current American policy, touching briefly on the likely fall-out fort he Bahamas from the current economic crisis. In his view we are all in this recession for the long haul (read 10 years or more we are very likely to suffer the kind of stagflation last experie nced in the 1970s only s quared. According to Mur p hy, US government policies are destroying the dollar ands etting us all on a course t owards hyperinflation. Murphy is the author of the Politically Incorrect Guide tot he Great Depression and the N ew Deal , which insists that the greatest economic disasterof the 20th century was caused b y government interference with the free market, and led inexorably to a “central plan ning” assault on liberty. T his is, of course, a favourite t alking point among conserva tive economists, who believe that the "official" history oft he 1930s is fake. Their revi sionist account not only seeks to demonise US President Franklin Roosevelt, but arguest hat his “big government” policies only made the Depression longer and worse just as P resident Obama's policies p romise to do today. ECONOMIC B ENCHMARKS The scale of the Great Depression is familiar to most of us by now. It featured an unprecedented fall in stock val ues, a 28 per cent drop in eco nomic output, unemployment that peaked at 28 per cent, anda near collapse of the banking system. Other countries fared as badly as the US, and world trade plunged by more than half. Nothing like this had ever happened before or since until now. The Depression began with a stock market crash in 1929 that led directly to Roosevelt's landslide election in 1933. His New Deal went on to change the face of American govern ment, creating new institutions like the Securities and Exchange Commission to reg ulate the stock market, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp to insure savings accounts, and Social Security to provide a safety net for the e lderly. According to Murphy and his libertarian colleagues, the D epression was all about big, b ad government. T hey say it was caused by t he US central bank flooding t he market with easy credit, w hich artificially pushed down interest rates. Lower rates exaggerated the feeling of prosperity that had developed during the Roaring 20s, which produced an unsustainable boom that crashed in 1929. I n this view, recessions are c aused by financing loans over and above the amount of mone y that is available from real s avings, which creates a boom. A nd government efforts to delay the inevitable bust by stimulating demand and keep i ng credit inflated only make things worse. This runs counter to the views of that influential British economist John Maynard Keynes, who died in 1945. He stated that, in the midst of an e conomic depression, the corr ect course of action is to encourage spending and dis courage saving. E xplaining the origins of the current crisis, Murphy said that after the dot.com crash of the early 2000s, the US centralb ank under Alan Greenspan b egan pumping up the money supply. This easy credit created the h ousing bubble, which led to our present predicament. In other words, low interest rates caused people to save less andc onsume more, creating a false prosperity followed by a crash. So what should we about it? Basically nothing, Murphy says, and let the chips fall where they may, which is what the US government supposedly did in every economic slump from 1819 until the Great Depression. Unfortunately, this overlooks the fact that it is p olitically impossible for any modern, elected government to simply do nothing in the face of an economic downturn. WORLD ECONOMY TANKING Until recently, the consensus was that while things are bad today, they are not as bad as they were during the Great Depression. But a widely circulated analysis by two leading economic historians shows that the world economy in terms of industrial production, trade and stock markets is now tanking even faster than it did in the first year of the Great Depression. Barry Eichengreen of the University of California, and Kevin O’Rourke of Trinity College, Dublin, date the beginning of the current global recession to April, 2008 and t heir research demonstrates a close match with the first year of the Great Depression. U sing monthly data up to A pril 2009, they find that world i ndustrial production closely t racks the 1930s fall, with no c lear signs of “green shoots”. I n their paper for the London-based Centre for Economic Policy Research, they show that the global decline in output over the last nine months has been at least as severe as in the same period f ollowing the 1929 peak. T he fall in the US stock mar ket has tracked 1929, but glob-a l markets are falling even f aster. And world trade is f alling much faster now than in 1929-30. "Globally, we are tracking o r doing even worse than the Great Depression," they wrote, "whether the metric is indus trial production, exports or equity valuations. Focusing on the US causes one to minimise this alarming fact. The “Great R ecession” label may turn out t o be too optimistic. This is a Depression-sized event." However, their research also s hows that while fiscal deficits expanded only modestly after 1929, the willingness of governments to follow the adviceo f Keynes and run big deficits t oday is much greater. The question is whether this unprecedented policy responsei n the form of massive government stimulus programmes will work. The alternative outcome a s Murphy insists is that it will produce unsustainable levels of public debt leading to a loss of confidence in monetary stability that will usher in a new era of "malign stagflation". This is a term coined in the 1970s to describe runaway inflation combined with stag nant business activity and rising unemployment. PREPARING FOR THE WORST Murphy himself is preparing for the worst. He wants interest rates to soar to levels that reflect the true price of capital, and workers in the most affected economic sectors left to fend for themselves and find new jobs in more productive areas. This is quite the opposite of Keynesian prescriptions to boost public spending when private sector investment declines. "The current US govern ment policies to freeze the economy by propping up failing companies are perverse," Murphy told the Nassau Institute. "They are simply trying to reflate the bubble. What we need is to cut consumption and s ave more in order to readjust. I n other words, we have to live b elow our means." Murphy says the US is now forecasting trillion-dollar deficits for the next 10 years, and federal debt has topped $11 trillion more than 82p er cent of gross domestic p roduct. He is appalled that t he US government now owns l arge portions of several major banks as well as auto makers, and wants to control the healthcare and energy sectors too. "This is a huge power grab and move towards central p lanning, so I am very pess imistic about the economic outlook for the next 10 years." T urning to the Bahamas, he s aid the government's ideas for r evenue reform were good, although he deplored the introduction of unemploymenti nsurance: "Paying people not to work only perpetuates the problem. Subsidizing unem ployment will stall the recovery. Workers must be encouraged to find new employment in more productive sectors." A gain, this is opposite to w hat mainstream economists w ould advise. In its recent report on the Bahamas, fore xample, the International M onetary Fund said increased social spending through the National Insurance Board "top rotect the most vulnerable B ahamians", and public infra structure investment projects "to sustain employment in thec onstruction sector", are appropriate. But the IMF, too, is worried about rising debt. For the past decade the B ahamian fiscal deficit has a veraged around 2 per cent, while public debt levels as a percentage of GDP have remained relatively low. Since mid-2008, however, the global d ownturn has caused our econo my to shrink rapidly, with p reliminary figures showing unemployment topping 14 per cent this spring. Without more taxes or spending cuts, government debt will rise to unsustainablel evels within a few years, the I MF says. E XIT STRATEGIES This is the same conclusion the Fund drew about the American economy. It urged the US government to reassure markets about its stimulus exit s trategies, and said fiscal policy w ould need to be tightened by $700 billion a year from extra t axes or lower spending. The f iscal deficit in the US is e xpected to reach almost 14 per cent of GDP. The IMF believes the B ahamian currency should remain pegged to the US dollar in order to promote a "sta ble investment climate." But Murphy's prediction that American prices will rise at double digits argues for a r econsideration of this link. S ince most of our imports are f rom the United States, Murphy says we will suffer thes ame hyperinflation as the US. T hat means prices rising at more than 50 per cent a month, which would wipe out both pri-v ate and public purchasing p ower. So Murphy is building a stock of gold and silver coins asa hedge of last resort to weath e r the storm he believes is com ing. And he is not alone. As the US government continues to pump money into the econ o my, many investors have s tarted to worry about infla tion. But according to Murphy the stakes are much higher. In his “politically incorrect” book he a rgues that the economic crisis w as caused by Americans livi ng beyond their means which they were encouraged to do by a reckless government. And he says the government's trillion-dollar stimulusp ackage and related handouts w ill saddle taxpayers with more g overnment debt than at any t ime since the Second World War. Whether or not a collapse of the world as we know it is in store, there is no doubt that we are in for a very rough ride. In January, Carmen Reinhart o f the University of Maryland a nd Kenneth Rogoff of Har vard University produced ak ey paper for the non-partisan N ational Bureau of Economic R esearch that focused on what happens after a severe financial crisis. T hey found that, historically, such crises show deep and lasting effects on asset prices, industrial output and employment extending out over several years. And the real value of public debt tends to explode d ue to a collapse in tax reve nues as well as to fiscal poli c ies aimed at mitigating the downturn. I t seems clear that none of t his will play out in the short term, and we can expect many lean and difficult years ahead.W e should use them as an o pportunity to achieve vital structural reforms in the Bahamian economy to leave aw orthwhile legacy for our chil dren. W hat do you think? S end comments to larry@tribunemedia.net Or visit www.bahamapundit.com C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009, PAGE 7 What economic crisis holds in store for us

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from spinal cord compression and that additional surgery was required. Smith was injured in 2001. He underwent two surgeries and was required to have a third, but was unable to do so for financial reasons. His attorney expressed concern about the overcrowded conditions and the limited medical staff at the prison to treat Smith. He cannot survive in prison. If he goes to prison you will be sending him to die. They cannot afford treatment (in prison very lengthy plea to the Court. Mr Ducille described Smith as a “productive citizen” who brought joy to people through his talent as a singer. S mith, a native of Bimini, has produced a number of popular hit songs, such as One More Sweet Song, Gone to Jail, Lay Low in Bimini, Hold Your Head, You Gat Me Thinking. Mr Ducille also noted that his client was very remorseful and pleaded guilty to the offence at the t rial. He said Smith deserves a second chance. “Prison should be a last resort. Productive citizens should not be placed in prison. “Allow him to continue his life, allow him to continue to be a good person and productive citizen in soci ety,” he said. H owever, Prosecutor Jillian Williams stated that Smith lured his 13-year-old victim in his car on Jan uary 12, 2004, and took her to an unknown location on Farm Road, where he had sexual intercourse with her against her will. She said that injuries to the victim, who was a student at Jack Hayward High School at the time, were supported by medical evidence. M s Williams noted that Smith opted to plead guilty after the prosecut ion had called the complainant to the stand. “I know that Mr Smith’s injuries would present challenges for the prison staff, but they would have to deal with it,” she said. After taking the doctor’s report a nd Smith’s medical condition into consideration, Justice Watkins s tressed that the victim must also be considered. “Mr Smith, I have listened to counsel, I have read the probation report and the medical reports of Dr Munnings. “I have to consider the victim, a y oung girl who is scarred for the rest of her life. Her mother is saying to g ive you beyond the maximum sentence of seven years. “Your counsel is saying not to impose custodial sentence because it would not serve any useful purpose, but I do not share that view. I feel that a custodial sentence is appropriate,” she said. Mr Ducille thanked Justice W atkins for exercising compassion in her sentencing of Smith. “We express a great deal of grati tude to you,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE alleged incident, recalled that Father Brown a pproached her while she, her cousins and friends were on the beach talking with a group of boys she knew. She told the court that Father Brown went behind the boys, who were 16 and 17 years old, and told her to move away. The young girl told the court that after she moved away to talk to her cousin, Father Brown followed her and told her to move a second time. According to the witness, she and her cousin walked further across the beach. She said that when she stopped to talk to a young male friend, Father Brown reminded her that he had already told her to move and began to push her. “He started to push me and I turned around and said ‘don’t push me,’” she told the court. The girl said that Father Brown kept pushing her in the back and grabbed her shirt. She said that she again told him not to touch her and she pushed him away. She said that when she spun around Father Brown slapped her. The girl told the court that she hit Father Brown back, but could not recall where. She claimed that the priest started to fight her and pushed her into the sand. “He was hitting me and I was hitting him. He sat on top of me and choked me and slapped me,” she said. The girl told the court that the senior master of her school along with several church parishioners lifted Father Brown off her. During cross-examination by Mr Munroe, the girl said that Father had probably thought she did not know the boys on the beach. She told the court that she never “cursed” at Father Brown and expected to be disciplined by her parents, but not someone she didn’t really know. She admitted during crossexamination that she had sucked her teeth when Father Brown had told her to move. The girl admitted she had done it intentionally and that it had been a rude gesture. The girl’s mother told the court that she met her daughter at the Cable Beach Police Station where she was making a complaint about the incident. During cross-examination she admitted that she would not approve of her daughter performing a s ex act on a man, being openly promiscuous, or cursing and carrying on. She said that if she were at the beach and her daughter had refused to move she would have physically removed her herself. A 15-year-old friend of the complainant said that while they were talking to a friend Father Brown tapped the complainant on her shoulder and told her t o go where she should be. She said that the complainant walked off and stopped to talk to a friend again. She said that Father Brown tapped her on the shoulder again and she pulled away. She told the court that Father Brown pulled the complainant’s arm and slapped her. She told the court that the complainant started fighting and he hit her again. She said that Father Brown fell on top of the com plainant and began to choke and hit her. Two other young girls who witnessed the incident also gave similar testimony. The prosecution is expected to call two more witnesses when the trial resumes on September 3 before Magistrate Ancella Williams. Father Brown if convicted could receive a $150 fine or three months in prison. d on't quite know how to ask the prime minister to remain, but pray every night that he will r eturn because we are in difficult times, more difficult than we've ever seen before. "Unless somebody comes out of the blue, we would welcome the prime minister staying for some further period of time," Chairman of the Airport Authority Frank Watson told The Tribune during an interview yesterday. M r Watson, who served as deputy prime minister and minister of national security duri ng the former Ingraham administration, said there is an absence of charismatic politicians who can broadly connect with the voter base as well as can Mr Ingraham. "We have many brilliant Bahamians who run many successful businesses, but in order to lead a country one has to have other quali t ies. A leader must be able to touch people in a way which gives them confidence that you w ill protect their broad interests so we have to wait for that person to emerge who can connect with the Bahamian public," said Mr Wat son. "It would be my biggest nightmare if he did n't," said another long-standing FNM sup porter when asked by The Tribune about the possibility of Mr Ingraham offering for another term. He pointed to several members of Mr Ingraham's Cabinet current Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette, Health Minister Dr Hubert Minnis, State Immigration Minister Branville McCartney and State Finance Min ister Zhirvargo Laing as front-runners to replace him as party leader. According to the supporter, Mr Symonette currently holds the most support within the FNM to follow Mr Ingraham, but said that Mr Symonette's skin colour may be an obstacle too huge for him to overcome. The supporter also reasoned that Mr Symonette may be staying on the sidelines until Mr Ingraham formally announces whether he will stay on as leader of the party or not before possibly galvanising support for a potential leadership bid. "I don't think you will see that out of Brent until he knows what the prime minister is going to do, whether he is going to step down or run for another term. But one good thing about Brent, all Bahamians know he is a man who isn't there to get what he can get (from the public purse), he doesn't need that," said the supporter of the wealthy MP for the St Anne's constituency. Mr Ingraham became leader of the FNM in 1990 and served as prime minister from 1992 to 2002, when he stepped down as head of the party. Tommy Turnquest, current National Secu rity Minister, won a hotly contestant leadership race to succeed Mr Ingraham, but was defeat ed in the 2002 election by PLP leader Perry Christie. Previously, Mr Ingraham had said he intended to serve two consecutive terms as leader, but returned to the party's helm in late 2005 after requests from his supporters. Since his return to front-line politics, there has been much speculation about Mr Ingraham's future as leader of the FNM. expressed his satisfaction that the “door is not closed” to the Government’s offer. Describing the afternoon’s talks as “constructive,” he said the parties would meet again next Wednesday to further discuss the issue and seek to finally resolve the matter. While going beyond its own previous proposals, Government’s offer was not the one the BNU had put forward yesterday. They made a verbal proposal that they should get their full health insurance coverage immediately, while deferring their four per cent pay increase until July 1, 2010. They plan to put this in writing to the Government as early as today. Government’s latest offer to the nurses goes far beyond its ini tial proposal. During the budget debate, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said economic condi tions meant their promised $10.5 million healthcare coverage could not start until 2012, when the economy is expected to start its recovery. Allowing for healthcare coverage to come into effect on July 1, 2010, the new offer adds that in the meantime, nurses can have one hundred per cent of their healthcare costs paid more than if they used their insurance, which usually covers up to 80 per cent of costs, noted Dr Minnis if they seek medical treatment for a “job-related” ailment. They would first of all be offered all-costs-covered treatment at the Princess Margaret Hospital. If the care they required was not available there, at a private facility, and lastly abroad, said Dr Minnis. Meanwhile, they would get the four per cent salary increase they had initially expected to come along with the insurance coverage in 2009 in 2010 instead, as they called for in their own counter-proposal. Nurses said it is a fact that they work in an environment that puts them at high risk for illness that means health insurance is so critical to them. Hundreds of nurses called in “sick” at their various stations in the last 14 days when the Prime Minister announced in present ing the 2009/2010 Budget to the House that government would have to postpone their group health insurance to next year because of the serious economic downturn. Before next week’s meeting government will be looking at “trends” to see how many nurses were taking sick days before the “sick-out” and how many are at present out to see whether things are back to normal. This will determine whether the Government is willing to pro ceed with resolving the dispute, he suggested. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham had told parliament that government would be unwilling to do so if the nurses continued to engage in what he termed an “illegal strike.” Downplaying the idea that nurses had been engaged in a “sick out”, Mrs Hamilton yester day said many nurses have discovered over the last two weeks that they are ill. “This exercise would have forced nurses to go and have a physical, and we found that a lot of nurses are sick. I think this substantiates the fact that we need insurance,” she said. She rejected the idea that nurs es could be insured under the Bahamas Public Service Union’s medical plan, as was suggested by that union’s president on Mon day, pointing out that some physicians do not accept the BPSU’s insurance. “That’s not an option,” she said. President of the Bahamas Christian Council, Reverend Patrick Paul, was present at the meeting and said he felt there was now a “light at the end of the tun nel.” Mr Foulkes said the BCC had been “working behind the scenes” to help find a solution to the impasse between the parties. with three other persons on April 2, 2004 in the parkingl ot near the old straw market downtown for damage to and stealing from a vehicle. She was later arraigned in Magistrate’s court andc harged with the offence. The police then held a press conf erence and as a result the newspaper published a story that reportedly contained the defamatory statements about her. However, after more than a year, no evidence was produced against Ms Tinker and all charges were withdrawn on November 29, 2005. According to Ms Tinker’s attorney Dorsey McPhee, Ms Tinker subsequently obtaineda judgment against the police and the Attorney General form alicious prosecution in 2006. In Ms Tinker’s claim she is seeking general aggravated a nd exemplary damages for d efamation and libel, costs, interest pursuant to a civil p rocedure award and whate ver other relief the court may deem just. H owever, in its defence a gainst the other plaintiff, f iled on June 2, 2009, The N assau Guardian admits that a press conference took place and that it published a story as set out in paragraph four of t he statement of claim. H owever, the newspaper denies that the statements c ontained in the story were defamatory or that they were understood to refer or are capable of referring to the plaintiff. F urther, the Guardian asserts that the occasion of p ublication was an occasion o f qualified privilege. “The defendant denies paragraph 10 of the statement of claim and puts the plaintiff to strict proof in respect both of his allegation that the words complained of werep ublished maliciously and to her claim to have suffered loss and damage.” T he plaintiffs in this mat ter are reportedly seeking a “reasonable” out of court set t lement. T he Nassau Guardian is represented by Alexiou Knowles and Co. By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – The rape trial of Police Sergeant Vaughn Pratt, the son of St Cecilia MP Cynthia Pratt, resumed in the Freeport Magistrate’s Court on Tuesday. Pratt is charged with two counts of having unlawful sexual intercourse with two minors, aged 14 and 15, on May 6, 2007. The summary trial, which started in November 2007, is being held in Court 3 before Magistrate Helen Jones. Lawyer Murrio Ducille of New Providence is representing Pratt. Valeria Pyfrom and Lorna Longley-Rolle of the Attorney General’s Office are the prosecutors. According to the particulars, it is alleged that Pratt had sexual intercourse with two young girls who were put in the care of him and his wife at their home in Freeport. It is alleged that while his wife was off the island Pratt took the girls to a local bar and bought them several rounds of Vodka and Cranberry juice to drink. He allegedly took the girls home where he had sex with them separately in a bedroom. Dr Signson testified in court on Tuesday that he examined the girls. He said they had both sustained injuries to their vagina. One of the girls, he said, had also sustained injuries and bleeding to the rectum and anus. Inspector Michael Brathwaite said he put Sergeant Vaughn Pratt under arrest at the Central Detective Unit around 1.10pm on May 25, 2007. “I cautioned him and charged him with two counts of unlawful sexual intercourse,” said Insp Brathwaite. Inspector Hilton Cash testified that after receiving certain information around 6pm on Sunday, May 6, 2007, he went to the Rand Memorial Hospital to conduct an investigation. “They contacted me and updated me on an incident where Sergeant Pratt had become a suspect,” he told the Court. Insp Cash said he later went to CDU where he saw Ms Paula Marshall from Social Services, along with two minors, ages 14 and 15 years old at the time, who gave him certain information. He stated that sometime around 10.45am on May 7 Sergeant Pratt came to CDU. Mr Cash said he informed Pratt of a complaint that was filed against him. He cautioned Pratt and arrested him for the offence. “Pratt replied, ‘I did not bother those girls. I did not touch them. They spend most of their time with the neighbour; they stay in their own bedroom.’” Inspector Cash said that sometime around 11.56am on May 7, he and several officers went to Pratt’s residence at No 16 Duke Drive to execute a search warrant. He said that Pratt was also present and gave officers permission to search the residence, including the master-bedroom, kitchen and guest room. Inspector Cash said that sometime around 2.30pm the two minor girls, accompanied by social worker Fran Brice, directed officers to the Bowling Alley. The girls also directed officers to a bar near the Lucayan Circle, and then took them to House No 16 at Duke Drive, where they gave officers certain information. During cross-examination, lawyer Murrio Ducille asked Inspector Cash whether Pratt was cooperative with officers. Inspector Cash replied that Pratt was cooperative, but did not answer questions put to him by officers. Mr Ducille noted that while Pratt had a right to remain silent, he was very cooperative and allowed officers in his house. “All you had really were the words of those two girls against him?” he asked. The Prosecution closed its case. The trial was adjourned for continuation on August 17 when Mr Ducille is expected to make a no case submission. Sergeant Vaughn Pratt The rape trial of MP’s son resumes Newspaper FROM page one FNM faction ‘praying’ PM will commit to another term FROM page one Singer jailed for teen rape FROM page one FROM page one Girl testifies FROM page one Nurses

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Wimbledon: Venus defeats Voegele C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009, PAGE 9 n By STEVEN WINE A P Sports Writer WIMBLEDON, England (AP opening match at Wimbledon, Venus Williams slipped and went sprawling on the grass she loves. The five-time champion recovered from her stumble at the start Tuesday and defeated Stefanie Voegele 6-3, 6-2. It was Williams’ first appearance on Centre Court since the 2008 final, when she beat sister Serena for her second Wimbledon title in a row. “I really enjoyed being out t here,” Venus said. “It’s a spec ial moment when you walk b ack as defending champion on that court.” Williams’ tumble was one of several wobbly moments as she began her bid for a three-peat. She double-faulted in the opening game and had to erase two break points. She was passed the first two times she reached the net. She slipped and nearly fell a second time. “It’s grass,” she said. “You’re going to slip sometimes.” W illiams found her footing, winning 14 consecutive points to help take a 5-1 lead. She had another spurt in the second set after losing serve for 2-all, and swept the final four games. “Having won this title multiple times, you get that sense of what it takes to win,” she said. “And I definitely have a good grip on that what it takes to win this title.” Other players also took a tumble Andy Roddick fell once during his victory, and even a ball boy fell on his face. But for the second day in a row, there were no big upsets, although American Melanie Oudin pulled off a surprise in her tournament debut. The 17year-old from Marietta, Ga., earned her first win in a major event by beating No. 29-seeded Sybille Bammer 4-6, 6-4, 6-2. “I was really nervous most of the match today, but finally in the third I started to calm down,” Oudin said. “I’m really glad I pulled it out.” Roddick followed Williams onto Centre Court and beat Jeremy Chardy 6-3, 7-6 (3 6-3. Roddick, seeded sixth, had only nine unforced errors and hit 46 winners, including 20 aces. He improved to 20-3 in tiebreakers this year. Roddick was Wimbledon runner-up to Roger Federer in 2004 and 2005, but Andy Mur ray of Britain is considered the biggest obstacle for Federer this year. “As far as who’s talking about what, I don’t really care,” Roddick said. “I just want to go out and win matches.” The new retractable roof again worked well, keeping rain away for a second successive day. A cloudless afternoon prompted an official on the club’s public-address system to urge that fans use sun block. “It looks really nice, the roof,” Williams said. “We haven’t had to use it yet. It’s kind of ironic. But I’m very sure it will get some use.” Top-ranked Dinara Safina opened another bid for her first Grand Slam title by beating Lourdes Dominguez Lino 7-5, 6-3. Safina said she was hampered by left knee tendinitis that has bothered her at times the past two months, although she reached the French Open final less than three weeks ago. Former No. 1 Jelena Jankovic beat Julia Goerges 6-4, 7-6 (0 Kimiko Date Krumm, a 38year-old wild card who came out of retirement last year, lost in her first Wimbledon match since 1996 to No. 9-seeded Caroline Wozniacki, 5-7, 6-3, 6-1. No. 17 Amelie Mauresmo, the 2006 champion, defeated Melinda Czink 6-1, 4-6, 6-2. On the men’s side, No. 3seeded Andy Murray began his bid to become the first British man to win Wimbledon since 1936 by beating American Robert Kendrick 7-5, 6-7 (3 6-3, 6-4. Americans Robby Ginepri, Kevin Kim, Bobby Reynolds and Wayne Odesnik also lost. Ginepri won the first three games, then lost 18 of the next 21 to fall to 2002 champion Lleyton Hewitt 6-4, 6-1, 6-1. Ginepri was bothered by a neck injury he suffered last week and received treatment from a trainer three times during the match. The unseeded Hewitt and Federer are the only former champions in the men’s draw. Hewitt next plays No. 5-seeded Juan Martin del Potro, who never faced a break point and swept Arnaud Clement 6-3, 6-1, 6-2. No. 12 Nikolay Davydenko beat Daniel Evans 6-2, 6-3, 6-3.B ritish wild card Alex Bogd anovic’s record at Wimbledon fell to 0-8 when he lost to No. 20 Tomas Berdych 6-3, 6-4, 6-4. Williams prepared for Wim bledon as usual on hard courts back home in Florida, and didn’t play a grass-court warmupt ournament. But after her slow start she looked at home on the lawn. In one game she smacked a backhand return up the line for a winner, then did the same thing from the other wing. Her second serve was unsteady, but she lost only six points on her first serve while hitting 29 winners and committing only 11 unforced errors. “On the grass, I think you have the opportunity to make fantastic shots that are very entertaining and great plays,” Williams said. “I think the game is more fast-paced. In a lot of ways, it makes it a lot more exciting.” Williams is only 6-4 since early April, but Wimbledon always brings her out of the doldrums. She’s 51-4 at the All England Club since 2000, when she won the title for the first time. She’s seeded third but the tournament favourite with London bookmakers. VENUS WILLIAMS of the US serves to Stefanie Voegele of Switzerland in their first round singles match at Wimbledon yesterday...P h o t o s : K i r s t y W i g g l e s w o r t h / A P n By ANDREW DAMPF AP Sports Writer BLOEMFONTEIN, South Africa (AP Talk about tests: After reaching the Confederations Cup semifinals in unlikely fashion, the reward for the US soccer team is a matchup Wednesday with top-ranked Spain. “The team is on a high for sure,” US coach Bob Bradley said Tuesday. “From a football standpoint, it’s a great challenge but we couldn’t be more excited for this chance.” The United States is 0-3 against Spain, losing 3-1 in the first round of the 1950 World Cup, 2-0 in a 1992 exhibition at Valladolid and 1-0 in an exhibition on June 4 last year at Santander, when Xavi Hernandez beat backup goalkeeper Brad Guzan with a low shot in the 79th minute. “They have less pressure. They have nothing to lose. For them, it’s a positive that we assume the title of favourite, the responsibility and the pressure,” Spanish midfielder Xavi Hernandez said. “We assume the mantle of favourites but it won’t be an easy match. Not at all.” Spain, the European champion, has set an international record with 15 straight victo ries and will be trying to stretch its unbeaten streak to a record 36, breaking the mark set by Brazil from December 1993 to Janu ary 1996. Brazil’s streak includes a loss on penalty kicks to Uruguay in the 1995 Copa America final, which is considered a tie in FIFA’s records. “A big part of playing them is not getting frustrated because you don’t have the ball,” Landon Donovan said. “The other side of that is trying to put them under pressure. That’s our goal, and if we can do that we have a chance.” After losing 3-1 to world champion Italy and 3-0 to South American champion Brazil, the 14th-rannked United States reached the semis with a 3-0 victory over African champion Egypt as Brazil beat the Azzurri 3-0. The winner of Wednesday’s game advances to the final against Brazil or host South Africa on Sunday, while the los er goes to the third-place match the same day. FIFA said there were about 6,000 tickets still on sale for the match at the 38,000-seat Free State Stadium in Bloemfontein. “There will be a certain number of tickets given on a complimentary basis,” FIFA spokesman Nicolas Maingot said. “Again, it’s a gesture from FIFA ... for people to have a chance to enjoy this game.” The US is 1-7-1 against top-ranked teams, beating Brazil in the 1998 CONCACAF Gold Cup, losing to Brazil seven times and tying Argentina on June 8 last year during a downpour at Giants Stadium. “We have to be very careful,” Spain coach Vicente del Bosque said. “They have a very talented midfield that pushes upfield easily. They play very direct, attacking football.” Spain’s forwards, Fernando Torres and David Villa, are complemented by Her nandez and talented defenders such as Carles Puyol and Joan Capdevila. Del Bosque, who replaced Luis Aragones as coach following the European title, has won 13 consecutive games. “Different types of players are essential for a great national team. Torres is such a great forward, Xabi Alonso is in the middle of everything they do. Puyol, on top of everything else, plays with so much heart, so much fight,” Bradley said. “Aragones and now Del Bosque have taken all that talent and turned it into something special. They’re on an incredible run now and we’ve got to find a way to break it.” US captain Carlos Bocanegra, sidelined since injury a hamstring in the June 6 World Cup qualifier against Honduras, had near ly recovered and would boost the American defense against Spain, coming off its first major title in 44 years. Regular goalkeeper Tim Howard will return after Guzan faced the Egyptians. “Carlos is back into full training,” Bradley said. “We still have to test him a little bit but he certainly becomes an option in this game.” One of the biggest challenges for the Americans will be maintaining their composure while Spain taps the ball back and forth in midfield. “I’m not a big stat guy in soccer,” Bradley said, “but in every game Spain plays they always dominate possession.” AP Sports Writers Raf Casert and Paul Logothetis in Bloemfontein and AP Sports Writer Chris Lehourites in Johannesburg contributed to this report Another test: US to face top-ranked Spain CHARLIE DAVIES controls a ball as coach Bob Bradley stands nearby, at the start of a US national soccer team training session at the Seisa Ramabodu Stadium, in Bloemfontein, South Africa on Tuesday... (AP Photo: Rebecca Blackwell n By COLIN FLY AP Sports Writer MILWAUKEE (AP Bucks official with knowledge of the deal said Tuesday that Milwaukee plans to trade scori ng forward Richard Jefferson t o the San Antonio Spurs for B ruce Bowen, Kurt Thomas and Fabricio Oberto, giving them a veteran cast and financial flexibility. The person confirmed the pending trade to The Associated Press and requested anonymity because the deal is not official until a call later Tuesday. ESPN.com first reported details of the deal. The Bucks are sending Jefferson away less than a year after acquiring the scoring forward in a draft day trade last season with New Jersey for Yi Jianlian and Bobby Simmons. Jefferson’s contract has two years and $29.2 million remaining on it. Jefferson was a steady offensive force for Milwaukee last season after spending his first seven years in New Jersey. He averaged 19.6 points and shot a career-high 39.7 per cent from 3-point range while starting all 82 games. Jefferson became the Bucks’ biggest offensive threat after Michael Redd and Andrew Bogut suffered season-ending injuries, but the Bucks’ tight financial situation made a move necessary. Milwaukee does not want to pay the NBA’s luxury tax, which last year hit teams dollar-for-dollar once they reach $71.15 million in totalp ayroll. R edd, Bogut and Jefferson are scheduled to make more than $41 million combined this season. The trade was a shock to at least one Bucks player: Charlie Villanueva posted “RJ tradedt o Spurs. Wow” on his Twitter account before the trade was official. The deal actually might allow the Bucks to keep Ramon Sessions or Villanueva himself, since both are restricted free agents. Bowen, Thomas and Oberto give the Bucks a veteran group. None is signed beyond the upcoming season. Bowen, 38, is a 13-year vet eran known for his defensive efforts against the Western Conference’s top guards. Thomas, 36, has played 14 years in the NBA, primarily at forward and center, and has been a bench player each of the last three seasons, averaging 4.3 points last year. Oberto, 34, has played four years in San Antonio, averaging 3.6 points per game in his NBA career. Last season he underwent a procedure to correct an irregular heartbeat. AP source: Bucks to send Jefferson to Spurs BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP grave situation. Fans of Gimnasia La Plata looking for help to save the team from relegation to the second division are visiting local cemeteries and praying near the tombs of some of Argentina’s former leaders, including Juan Domingo Peron and Raul Alfonsin. Supporters have been leav ing flowers and other gifts near gravesides in the Recoleta cemetery in Buenos Aires. Curiously, neither Peron nor Alfonsin were Gimnasia fans. “This is what some fans are doing, but the club has nothing to do with this,” Gimnasia spokesman Jose Luis Arrien said. “It’s a bit quirky.” The newspaper Clarin said supporters have been praying at the tomb of the club’s former president, Saturnino Perdriel. Soccer fans in Argentina cemetery try to save team n By R B FALLSTROM AP Sports Writer ST LOUIS (AP Pineiro’s right leg gave way at the end of his seven-inning stint i n 90-degree heat last week, the c ramping in his calf so painful t hat his teammates had to carry the Cardinals pitcher off the field. He tried to walk it off in the dugout, but wound up begging trainer Barry Weinberg for help. “I was like ’Barry, it hurts too much,”’ Pineiro recalled. Infielder Brendan Ryan also had cramps and second baseman Skip Schumaker required IV fluids for dehydration. Two days earlier, Tigers pitcher Justin Verlander wilted in the St. Louis heat. “I was exhausted,” Verlander said after lasting only four innings. “I think after the first inning, I was just gassed. I couldn’t get my legs underneath me.” All this and there’s still three weeks to go before St. Louis hosts its first All-Star Game since 1966 that one memorable for being held in 105degree temperatures at old Busch Stadium. Having all the reserves for the July 14 game could be a good thing: The new Busch Stadium, now four years old, does n ’t have the artificial turf that made hot days extra miserable. But triple-digit temperatures are a distinct possibility and the elements could play a role. On steamy days like Pineiro’s last start, messages on the score-b oard advise fans to drink plent y of fluids. Players don’t have to be reminded, but Pineiro would up changing three soaked undershirts plus his uniform top during his outing. He retired 16 batters in a row after giving up four runs in the first inning before fading. Schumaker had company taking IV fluids. “There’s a lot of guys that have done that,” he said. “It’s not easy to stay hydrated, it’s really difficult. I don’t know how the pitchers and catchers do it.” Tigers manager Jim Leyland, whose team was around for the first truly searing series this year, said overcoming the heat is largely a case of mind over matter. His advice for rookie pitcher Rick Porcello before pitching the finale of a threegame series last week: “I think you drink a lot of water, you drink a lot of fluids, you do what your mommy told you.” Leyland remembers when it was much worse, before the Cardinals scrapped artificial turf leading into the 1996 season. The present scenario is a “piece of cake” compared to the days when thermometers on the field approached 130 degrees and the glass windows from the stadi um club produced a magnify ing effect. The only conditions more onerous from a personal standpoint was the time he had to catch both ends of a minor league double at Savannah, Ga., back in the 1960s. Leyland said he lost 11 pounds and “I only weighed like 175 to start with.” “It’s humid, it’s hot, but I can assure you it’s not nearly as bad as when they had the turf,” Leyland said. “When the turf was here it was the hottest place I’d ever been in the summertime. “Guys used to have to come in between innings and put their feet in buckets. You can see the steam coming up.” Sort of like Tuesday in St. Louis, where it was 98 degrees with a heat index of 104 shortly after midday. And like it very well could be for the All-Star Game. “It’s just part of the game,” Pineiro said. “We’re just start ing now, wait until July and August roll around.” MLB AllStar Game could be true scorcher I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net EVERY year, at least one Bahamian is included on the Caribbean, Latin American and Central American Tennis Confederation’s summer tour where players are exposed to international competition. This year’s recipient is Justin Roberts, who is traveling with coach Bradley Bain and teaming up in doubles with Gian Issa of Suriname. The trio are in town with Roberts and Issa to compete in the Security & General International Junior Championships that is currently underway at the National Tennis Center. Bain, who has traveled with the duo from the first leg of the tour in El Salvador three weeks ago, said the tour – set to wrap up in August – is designed to get players 14 years and younger in action. “The only thing the kids are lacking is match play and the o nly way they can get it is by playing in these matches,” Bain said. B ain said he’s responsible for taking Roberts, who is ranked at No.9 on the tour, to at least eight tournaments with a goal of trying to get him down to at least one or two. “We have embarked on a programme to get him ready for next year when he turns 15,” Bain said. “By then, he would have gained enough experience to get him ready to play in more tournaments i n the under 18 division.” Issa, according to Bain, was the top player last year and t ogether this year, they are hoping to emerge as the top doubles team on the tour. Roberts said he’s delighted to be back home and competing in the tournament. “It’s been good, but I hope to improve as the tournament goes on,” said Roberts, who admitted that he needs to work a little more on his concentration. The 12-year-old Lyford Cay student said that having played so many tournaments with international players, he can only get better as he con tinues to improve on his per formance. And with 14-year-old Issa as a traveling partner, Roberts said they have been able to help each other with their game. Issa, here on his second trip, said the difference here as opposed to the other countries they competed in, is the altitude. He said he prefers playing here because there’s not that much pressure. As for Roberts, Issa said “he’s a very good player, but he just needs to work on his self-control and his serve a little more. But we play doubles very well together.” On Friday, Bain and the two players will head to Aruba to play in their next tournament. From there, they will go to St Martin on July 3. After taking a short break at home, they will head back on the road for their final four tournaments in late July, end ing up with the completion of the tour in August. “By then, hopefully both of them will be in the top five,” Bain said. “Once they do that, they will then be invited to compete in a number of other tournaments.” BLTAs annual T-Rex champs all set for next week THE Royal Bank of Canada (Bahamas Championships is slated to begin today and splash though Saturday at the Betty Kelly Kenning National Swim Com plex. Facilitated by the Bahamas Swimming Federation (BSF the event features seven swim clubs and over 300 swimmers. Morning sessions are expected to start at 9am and evening sessions at 6pm. “This year’s swimming nationals feature a highly talented pool of athletes,” said Algernon Cargill, president of the BSF. “We are anticipating a highly competitive meet and are pleased that RBC is again part nering with us as the main sponsor of this event.” “RBC will celebrate its 26th consecutive anniversary of sponsoring the RBC Bahamas National Swimming Champi onships in partnership with the Bahamas Swim Federation. “In addition to sponsoring this year’s national meet, RBC will be the inaugural sponsor of the Academic All Bahamas Swimming Team Award. “This new initiative aims to recognise and support BSF stu dent athletes who display excellence in sports and academics,” said Jan Knowles, regional man ager of public relations for RBC. To be recognised as part of the Academic All Bahamas Swimming Team, students must have a grade point average of 3.5 or higher and have achieved a BSF national time standard in an individual swimming event. “This is in keeping with RBC’s commitment to youth and education,” Knowles said. The swimming nationals will be televised live on Cable Chan nel 12 June 24-27. The official opening ceremonies and first presentation of the Academic All Bahamas Swimming Team Awards is set for 6pm June 25. Tickets for each day’s events can be purchased at the door. The Betty Kelly Kenning National Swim Complex is located at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS More than 300 to compete at RBC swimming champs RBC sponsors the RBC Bahamas National Swimming Championships. Shown (l-r Joyce Riviere, area manager for the Family Islands, Algernon Cargill, president of the Bahamas Swim Federation and Deborah Zonicle, region al manager of marketing and product management. so great, but I played as well as I could,” she said. “I didn’t know much about the girl, so I didn’t know how she played. She played very well.” Another upset on the girls’ side came from American Kelsey Laurente, who disposed of No.7 Rocio Ortela of Puerto Rico in an impressive 6-0, 6-0 win. “I was just on today. I tried to play as best as I could. Everything came together for me,” said Laurente, who hasn’t played that many matches coming into the tournament. “I just hope that I can continue to play as well as I did today. Hopefully I can play through to the final and even possibly win the title.” The door was opened when another American Hai-Li Kong sent top seed Gaia Samesi of Italy packing with a 6-3, 6-4 decision. From the 14-and-under division, a number of Bahamians were in action, including Justin Roberts, who remained undefeated through three matches by not losing a single game. T T R R A A C C K K BAHAMASAIR will operate a B737 scheduled to leave Nassau for Havana, Cuba, for the Cen tral American and Caribbean Championships on Thursday, July 2 at 1:30pm and returning on Monday, July 6 at 5pm. SPORTS IN BRIEF F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 1 1 Rodney Carey Jr advances READY FOR SUMMER TOUR Shown are coach Bradley Bain (centreright Roberts to get some exposure on tour n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net RIGHT on the heels of the Security & General International Junior Tennis Championships, the Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association is getting ready to host its annual T-Rex Junior National Tennis Championships. The championships is scheduled to get underway Monday and run through Saturday, July 4 at the National Tennis Center. “All of the players from Grand Bahama will stay on,” said BLTA president Steve Turnquest of the players who are already in town for the Security & General International Tournament at the NTC. “This is the biggest tournament for the year for our players in terms of getting points for their rankings. And to date, we already have over 60 playe rs lined up to compete from New P rovidence and Grand Bahama.” T he players will get a chance to compete in the boys and girls singles in the 10-and-under, 12, 14, 16 and 18 divisions. However, they will only compete in the doubles for boys and girls 18 and 12 divisions. A total of 38 boys have registered to compete, while there are only 10 girls so far. Based on their performances, the BLTA will select a national team that will compete in the JITIC Tournament in the Dominican Republic in t he 14s and 16s divisions. A mong some of the players to watch for at this year’s tournament are Kevin Major in the boys’ 14s, Johnathan Taylor in the boys’ 16s, Gabrielle Moxey in the girls 16s, Chel si Russell in the girls’ 14s, Iesha Shepherd in the girls 10s and Joshua Turnquest of Eleuthera in the boys’ 12s. “The tournament has always been a very exciting and competitive one and we expect that with the list of players entered this year, the tournament should be very good,” Turnquest said. “We are having a very competitive Security & General Tournament and the players have been able to fine tune their game, so we expect that they will be ready for the Jr Nationals.” At the end of the tournament, players will also receive points for their national rankings.

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C M Y K C M Y K WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 P AGE 9 International sports news Wimbledon: Venus defeats Voegele... See page 9 n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net DESPITE getting off to a slow start, Rodney Carey managed to prevail with a two-set victory over German Delf Gohlke to advance to the next round of the Security & General International Junior Championships. Seeded No.3 in the boys’ 18-andunder singles, Carey pulled off a 7-5, 62 decision in the Bahamian-German showdown yesterday at the National Tennis Center as the International Tennis Federation sanctioned event, hosted by the Bahamas Lawn Tennis A ssociation, swung into high gear. It was a good match overall, but I ’ve been struggling quite a bit,” said Carey, who saw flashes of a previous tournament he played in Bermuda. “I probably have to get on the court a little earlier to get warmed up so I can be ready for my matches.” The 16-year-old Grand Bahamian, preparing to play on the Davis Cup team in July, despite the way he played, was still pleased that he won his opener and now he can look forward to the rest of the tournament. Not so fortunate in staying alive in the main draw on the boys’ side was Johnathan Taylor, who got ousted in identical set scores of 6-2, 6-2 by Denil Sirota of Russia. “I actually played well, but the guy just overpowered me,” said Taylor, the only Bahamian who won his first round match in the main draw on day one Monday. If there’s any consolation for Taylor, it’s the fact that he advanced to the main draw after he got eliminated in the qualifying round last year. “Next year, I will probably do bet ter,” said the 15-year-old. “I just have to work on my game a little more.” The Russian, seeded at No.7, admitted that he didn’t play up to par because he wasn’t feeling that well. “Last year, I played him and it was a really tough match,” Sirota said. “This year, it was another tough match. It was my first match for the tournament, but he played very well.” If he plays up to par, Sirota is con vinced that “nobody in the tournament can beat me.” On the girls’ side, Grand Bahamian Kalotina Klonaris was one of the three seeded players knocked out of the tournament. Klonaris, seeded at No.8, didn’t survive in her match against American Skylar Kuykendall, who prevailed witha 6-4, 6-2 decision. “It was very rough for me today. I tried my best, but she played very good today,” said Klonaris, who was coming off an injured shoulder that hampered her movement. “I played as best as I could, but she just played better. I should have been able to keep the ball in play more, but it wasn’t working for me. You have some days when things just don’t work. Today was mine.” For Kuykendall, she said she simply did what she had to do to win. “I moved my feet, my serving wasn’t Carey Jr advances with two-set victory Carey Jr KELSEY LAURENTE KALOTINA KLONARIS JOHNATHAN TAYLOR P h o t o s : T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 Here’s a look at some of the results posted yesterday: 1 1 4 4 a a n n d d u u n n d d e e r r Philip Major Jr. (BahGBR J odi Arconada (ArgBah Justin Roberts (BahBer Loran Minns (BahJam13-11 Juan Bisono (DomBah James Finnigan (GBRBah M ichael Wallace (BahBah Rasheed Carey (BahBah N icoy Rolle (BahBah Tyler Smith (BerBah E mily Sneddon (CanBer 1 1 8 8 a a n n d d u u n n d d e e r r Skylar Kuykendall (USABah Connor Farren (USACHN Anna Rudolfova (CZEBer H ai-Li Kong (USAItl1 Kelsey Laurente (USAPur7 D enil Sirota (Rus7Bah Rodney Carey (Bah3Ger F austhyara Pietersz (Aho3USA Dhanielly Quevedo (USAMex6 Paula Montoya (venBah4 RESULTS: S&G International Junior Championships

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End-July target for policy on medical tourism n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor B a hamian motor dealers have been warned by their suppliers to expect price increases “of up to 10 per cent” on new car models in 2010, Tribune Business was told yesterday, at a time when new vehicle sales for the year to end-May 2009 are down 46.14 per cent year-over-year. Data supplied by the Bahamas Motor Dealers Association (BMDA while its members were “holding their own in spite of a slumping economy”, new car sales for May 2009 dropped by 37.82 per cent compared to May 2008. For the first two months of the 2009 second quarter, April and May, new car sales industry-wide were said to be down by 41.9 per cent compared to the yearbefore period. Rick Lowe, the director/operations manager for Nassau Motor Company, told Tribune Business that some Bahamian new car dealers had been told by their manufacturer suppliers that the price of vehicles would go up by between 5-10 per cent on models scheduled for 2010 delivery. The price increases were blamed by the manufacturers on a combination of increased parts prices, gasoline prices and steel prices, and Mr Lowe said it was likely that Bahamian dealers would have to pass the increases at least part of them on to consumers. “We’ve been told by some of our suppliers to expect price increases of up to 10 per cent on 2010 models,” Mr Lowe told Tribune Business. “That’s a hefty chunk. “The manufacturers are still facing higher costs in regard to petrol, steel and parts prices. They’ve warned us to expect between a minimum of 5 per cent and a maximum of 10 per cent increase. We’re on price control, but prices will increase at the consumer end.” On a brighter note, Mr Lowe said inventories being held by Bahamian new car dealers were now coming more into line with industry norms. They had been left with excess stock as a result of the sales slowdown. He added: “Normally, we hope to have 60 days supply on the lot, so when you’ve got 10 months’ supply, you’re out of whack. Most retailers’ supply is shrinking to in line with industry standards, so people will start to order more. It’s been C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report. $3.97 $4.03 $4.25 Thr ee-da y hear ing over bid to stop m ulti-million dollar Bak er’ s Ba y project set for July 6-9 n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Save Guana Cay Reef Association will attempt to halt the multi-million dollar Baker’s Bay Golf & Ocean Club project with a three-day hearing before the London-based Privy Council that begins on July 6, having cited 10 different grounds for their appeal to the Bahamas’ highest court. The Association, through its Bahamian and London-based attorneys, is asking the Privy Council to determine issues that include whether the Government had a duty to consult Guana Cay residents on the project, being developed by Arizonaheadquartered Discovery Land Company, before the two parties entered into their Heads of Agreement in early 2005. If this was so, the Association is asking the Privy Council to determine whether proper consultation took place and, if not, whether the failure to consultant residents of the Abaco cay should be remedied. Other appeal grounds include asking the Privy Council to determine the legal effect of the Heads of Agreement, and whether this constituted an agreement to grant Crown and Treasury land leases, and confer other rights and incentives, upon the developers. The appeal challenges the then-Cabinet Secretary Wendall Major’s power to confer these leases, rights and incen tives upon Discovery Land Company, and asks it to rule on whether the decision to do so was “irrational” and “constituted an unlawful fettering of the powers of other government agencies. The Privy Council’s decision could have major implications for the process governing how developments, especially major ones, are approved in the Bahamas, and the rights of persons impacted by them to be consulted and heard. It could potentially cause a major shakeup of the Bahamas’ develop ment model, depending on which way the Council rules. On the consultation issue, the Association said the judge at first instance, Acting Supreme Court Justice Carroll, found 10 issues cited in Guana Cay’ s Privy Council legal appeal n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor CABLE Bahamas’ basic cable TV margins are being compressed by ever-rising signal fees which rose by “almost $3 million in the last year”, Tribune Business was told yesterday, with a senior executive explaining that a survey suggesting the company’s prices ‘appear high’ was “slanted from the beginning”. David Burrows, Cable Bahamas’ marketing director,r esponding to a consultation document produced by the BTC privatisation committee, said the countries with which the company’s cable TV prices were compared Cayman Islands, Jamaica and Malta -w ere not ‘apples for apples’ or like-for-lie comparisons. Mr Burrows said all three countries were either single island nations or, at most, consisted of two to three islands, whereas the Bahamas was ana rchipelago of multiple islands. As a result, Cable Bahamas incurred extra costs in providing services, especially to islands which had a minimal popula tion, forcing it to keep cable TV prices at a certain level to ensure it covered its costs. The Cable Bahamas execu tive also explained that the Bahamas’ living standards and disposable income levels were much higher than Jamaica’s, thus making that comparison more difficult than it appeared. Pointing out that the BTC privatisation committee document had acknowledged the price comparisons were challenging, Mr Burrows told Tri bune Business: “Neither of the three countries are of the same density, size and geography as the Bahamas, and definitely not the same living standards. Those comparisons are slanted from the beginning”. Disposable income and customer sophistication “drive pric ing”, he added, implying that this was one factor why the Bahamas’ prices might appear high, Mr Burrows said: “The significant labour, network and equipment costs in a high living standard country like the Bahamas creates a higher cost base, which is reflected in the price.” While the Bahamas’ demo graphics were more in line with the Cayman Islands, Mr Burrows said cable TV prices there $3m signal fee rise hits Cable basic margins Car dealers brace for 5-10% price increase B ISX-listed firm s ays survey suggesting prices high ‘slanted from beginning’ due to poor comparisons S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B n By CHESTER ROBARDSB usiness Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE MINISTRY of Tourism could roll out a draft policy on Medical Tourism for the Bahamas by end-July 2009, the Minister of Tourism revealed to Tribune Business yesterday, as the Centerville Medical Pavilion positions itself to be a pioneering facility with an almost 23,000 Euro ($32,377 the Caribbean Export Devel opment Agency (CEDA Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace said that before any institution can label itself as a medical tourism facility proper, it was necessary for the Government to have a policy in position. And he said what the Government has drafted is fairly exciting and exceptional. “We didn’t want to talk about something until we had the policy of the Government,” he said. “Probably by the end of July you will see something that will be able to be sustained and prolonged.” Founder of the Centerville * Manufacturers deliver warning, as new car sales to Bahamian consumers down 46% for first five months in 2009 * Sales off 38% for May, and 41.9 per cent for first two months in second quarter n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE TOWN Centre Mall is opening a medical facility through an initial investment of more than $500,000, and could see its inception as early as endSeptember 2009, the proposed facility’s cxhief executive and coordinator said yesterday. This was despite foot traffic through the Mall diminishing as a result of the recession. Dr Thomas Rolle said it was hoped that the facility will play the dual role of attracting patrons to the Mall and providing “cutting edge health care” to the average Bahamian. H e said the planned Community Health Wellness Network, which will have 10 inhouse doctors, child care facili ties and psychological consul tants – among other services – was envisaged to be a virtually comprehensive ‘Walk-in’-style medical facility that will have a triage area. Dr Rolle said the new facility was envisioned to one day be an emergency medical facility to decentralise the emergency medical units at the Princess Margaret Hospital and Doctors Hospital. However, he said there was much ground work to be done to get the approvals for such a facility, but he hoped the Gov ernment will be receptive to such an idea. Dr Rolle said the doctors who have expressed interest in practicing in the facility, and $500k investment in Mall medical facility S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B F acility aims to be gateway’ for new tour ism opportunity and economic diversification S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B

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THERE are two sides to every sword and both are sharp. Clients and sales professionals. Both can be honest and dishonest. Naturally, our biological make-up contains a self-monitoring gauge that enables us to know when we are telling thet ruth or when one is dishonest. This is true for both sales persons and clients. Your body language and eye movement all portray signs of being honest or dishonest. There is also an intangible mechanism we are biologically wired with, which I like to call ‘instincts’ that can detect the difference. Let’s first discuss the sales professional. Professional........ hmmm, I think I’ll save that for another discussion and just stick withh onesty for now. As you may all know, I’m blunt. I don’t have time to sugar coat, play politics aka (pileof-tricks) beat around da bush and so forth. A straight arrow pointed in the right direction will find its target, and a bent or crooked arrow...... who knows what target it may hit? This is true withh onest sales professionals; they set goals, client targets and attain their objectives. I know this suggestion may sound condescending but it is not meant to be. The simplest and quickest way to be suc-c essful in sales is to be honest with your clients; straight, blunt, direct. Admit if you don’t know the answer tos omething. Admit if you screw up or make a mistake. Be the first to call your client and tellt hem if you have made an error. However, before calling also have a solution or few solutions available. This may sound like common sense, but we all know sense is not so common. L ittle white lies. Are they worth the risk? That’s your call, not mine. We have all heardt hat it is ‘OK’ to tell little white lies (as opposed to colorful lies). Ahh, they will never know the difference, right? Here is where the yesterday, today and tomorrow comes into play. I tell any new client: “I don’t want to do business with you t oday!” They look at me like I ’m from outer space. However, I quickly follow with: “We want to do business with you today, tomorrow, next week, next month and next year.” In order to do that one must havea history (yesterday sent (today of tomorrow. If one has been dishonest with their clients, obviously their yesterdays will grow in size, opportunities for today will diminish and prospects for tomorrow will eventually cease . It’s not worth it. All sales professionals willt ell you: shoot with a straight arrow. D D i i s s h h o o n n e e s s t t c c l l i i e e n n t t s s This is simple. Fire them from your prospect and or client list and move on. Just ast hey will fire you from any opportunities today or tomorrow. Here is where the doubleedged sword comes into play. We rarely hear of a client or prospect getting fired, right? We normally always here abouts ales teams or persons being fired. Well, here is the other side of the sword. Fire them. Yes, that’s right, there are some clients and prospects you do not want to do business with. There may be some clients y ou already have that you should terminate. (I can discuss later how to sort out the good from the bad and downright ugly). Don’t waste yourt ime with this sort of client. They will diminish your tomor-r ows, and in sales and business tomorrows are a blood line. All of these marketing strategies are certain to keep your business on top during these challenging economic times. Have a productive and profitable week! Remember: “THOSE WHO MARKET WILL MAKE IT “ N N B B : : S S c c o o t t t t F F a a r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n i i s s p p r r e e s s i i d d e e n n t t o o f f S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e , , a a p p r r o o m m o o t t i i o o n n a a l l a a n n d d m m a a r r k k e e t t i i n n g g c c o o m m p p a a n n y y s s p p e e c c i i a a l l i i s s i i n n g g i i n n p p r r o o m m o o t t i i o o n n a a l l p p r r o o d d u u c c t t s s . . E E s s t t a a b b l l i i s s h h e e d d o o v v e e r r 2 2 7 7 y y e e a a r r s s a a g g o o , , S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e h h a a s s a a s s s s i i s s t t e e d d l l o o c c a a l l b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s e e s s , , r r a a n n g g i i n n g g f f r r o o m m i i n n d d u u s s t t r r i i e e s s s s u u c c h h a a s s t t o o u u r r i i s s m m a a n n d d b b a a n n k k i i n n g g t t o o t t e e l l e e c c o o m m m m u u n n i i c c a a t t i i o o n n s s , , i i n n m m a a r r k k e e t t i i n n g g t t h h e e m m s s e e l l v v e e s s . . R R e e a a d d e e r r s s c c a a n n c c o o n n t t a a c c t t M M r r F F a a r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n a a t t S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e o o n n E E a a s s t t S S h h i i r r l l e e y y S S t t r r e e e e t t , , b b y y e e m m a a i i l l a a t t s s c c o o t t t t @ @ s s u u n n t t e e e e . . c c o o m m o o r r b b y y t t e e l l e e p p h h o o n n e e a a t t 2 2 4 4 2 2 3 3 9 9 3 3 3 3 1 1 0 0 4 4 . . C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE *UHDW*XDQD&D\$EDFR 7 KH%DKDPDV(03/2<0(17,7<
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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas is “probably the worst in the region” for property-based taxes that make this nation “uncompetitive” in the battle to attract wealthy second homeowners to these shores, the Bahamas Real Estate Association’s (BREA president yesterday questioning whether “the Government understands what they’re doing” with recent tax reforms. William Wong, speaking after hopes that the Government would reconsider its Budget real property tax amendments were dashed with the Bill’s tabling on Friday, told Tribune Business he found it “amazing” that other professions impacted by the changes, particularly the Bahamas Bar Association, had not lobbied the administration over the changes. The BREA president said the increased real property tax rates, especially for real estate valued in the $3-$7.5 million bracket, would result in the Government “losing on both sides” in terms of tax revenue. With buyers deterred from entering the market, fewer highend home sales and construction projects would take place. As a result, Mr Wong said the Government would ultimately lose out on both real property tax paid over a series of years, plus millions of dollars in Stamp Tax associated with the initial purchase of highend real estate. Construction companies would miss out on new secondhome related projects, resulting in a reduction of duty and taxes earned on imported building materials. Home appliance sales would also suffer. “They’re losing, losing, losing, and I don’t understand,”Mr Wong told Tribune Busi ness of the Government’s likely revenue intake from real property taxes and the second home market. “Why doesn’t the Government see what we’re trying totell them? Why are they being so stubborn and not looking at it with more sense? “The Government is losing on the Stamp Tax up front, the real property taxes, the builders are not finding jobs, and the appliances, the lawn keeper, the housemaid and everyone else loses out. It’s absolutely ridiculous.” He added: “What is amazing is that the lawyers are not speaking up. The Bar Association, the lawyers are not speak ing up and they’re being impacted as much as we are. They are sitting back, waiting for a mira cle to happen. But if we don’t make any sales, they will not get anything” from conveyanc ing work. While the second home market is seen as critical to the Bahamas’ ability to attract highn et worth, high spending individuals who create spin-off industry and employment opportunities for Bahamians, the Government would argue that it has to get its tax revenues from somewhere. Wealthy second home owners are far more able to pay than Bahamians, especially during times of economic crisis, andin doing so pay much more in taxes per head. And it is more politically palatable to impose taxes on foreigners, as opposed to Bahamians, with the Government having increased its revenue estimates for the 20092010 Budget by $151 million at the last minute, largely due to an anticipated $114 million increase in real property and business licence fee-based taxes. BREA has been lobbying for the return of the $35,000 maximum payment ceiling for real property taxes, which was eliminated in the 2008-2009 Budget. That also reduced the real prop erty tax rate for owner-occupied properties to 0.75 per cent, down from 1 per cent on prop erties valued in excess of $5 million. The Government attempted a compromise in the 2009-2010 Budget, reducing the real property tax rate to 0.25 per cent on the property value in excess of $7.5 million, but increasing the rate on the portion valued between $250,000 and $7.5 million back to 1 per cent. In a recent address to BREA, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham noted that before the $35,000 cap was introduced in 2003, 17 owner-occupied properties paid annual real property taxes in excess of $35,000, for a total amount of $1.1 million. When the cap was in place between 2003-2007, 57 proper ties paid taxes of $35,000 a year in the amount of $2 million. Since the ceiling was lifted in July 2008, 68 such properties have paid real property taxes in excess of $35,000 a year in the amount of $4.1 million. “Can it be that we should design a special tax rate to accommodate 57 or 68 homeowners among the thousands of homeowners in the country, and to accommodate only the wealthiest home-owners?” Mr Ingraham asked. However, Mr Wong said the Government should not have introduced the real property tax amendments which seem likely to increase the tax burden on properties valued between $3$7.5 million at a time when the real estate industry and wider economy were struggling. As to the impact on potential second home buyers, he said: “The Bahamas is not the b e all. They [second home owners] have other choices to go to which are a lot cheaper. We are just pricing ourselves out of the market.” The BREA president said the word “uncompetitive” would be best to describe the Bahamas in relation to second home owners, adding: “We’re probably the worst in the region, and this is not the time to do it. At least, the Government could wait until business was up and running, going good, then introduce a high-end t ax. This is not the time to do it. “Some of the big developments on New Providence are feeling the pinch. People are not buying, and they’re taking a very, very close look at how they spend their money.” Mr Wong said he had called Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, twice on the real property tax amendments and was now waiting to hear back from him. He questioned whether the Government, in raising one real property tax rate, was likely to experience the law of diminishing returns in revenues obtained, having pushed the rate past the point where it would maximise its take. Mr Wong also urged the Government to do a better job on collecting real property taxe s, pointing out that the bulk of this was paid by foreigners and expatriates, with Bahamians paying only when they sold their real estate. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009, PAGE 3B *UHDW*XDQD&D\$EDFR 7KH%DKDPDV(03/2<0(17,7<
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that it had a right to be heard and consulted over the proposed development. “The Government’s decision to enter into the agreement was one that affected, or was likely to affect, the individual rights and freedoms of the residents of Great Guana Cay,”the Association alleged. In particular, the developm ent that is envisaged by the a greement will interfere with the local residents’ right to freedom of movement throughout the Bahamas, which is protected by Article 25 of the Constitution of the Bahamas.” This point, the Association alleged, had been identified by Dame Joan Sawyer, president of the Court of Appeal, who had said in her ruling: “There is, however, one matter which the learned judge mentioned t owards the end of his judgment about the effect of the perception the existence of the developers’ gated community, lying between the existing inhabitants of the southern part of Guana Cay and the northern part of that island to which those inhabitants previously had free access a long either the existing roads o r tract roads. It appears also that that community will bestride the new ‘public’ (? as it may, it is possible that questions about the infringement of those inhabitants’ constitutional rights to freedom of movement within the Bahamas may arise under Article 25 of the Constitution.” Drawing on this, the Association’s attorneys alleged: “The Government’s decision to enter i nto the agreement was one that would result in the liberty of the local residents being restricted in important respects. In particular, the development deprives the local residents of traditional fishing and crabbing grounds, and is thus restricting their liberty to earn a living as t hey choose. In any event, the Governm ent’s decision to enter in the Agreement was one that it was absolutely clear would have a profound impact upon the lives and lifestyles of the residents of Guana Cay. The land that is the subject of the agreement plainly constitutes an important site on the island, and it is clear that the development is of considerable local public interest. “Further, the [government and developers] were well a ware that the residents of Guana Cay desired to be consulted and to make representations, and that the objectors to the development enjoyed considerable local public support. It is also relevant that the residents of Guana Cay are relatively few in number and will be affected b y the development to a far g reater extent than other B ahamians.” The Association is also challenging the Supreme Court and Court of Appeal findings that two meetings held in February and August 2004 fulfilled the Government’s requirement to consult residents. It is alleging that “the Government deliberately intended to make its decision as to whether to approve the development before engaging in consultation”, and claiming that previous evidence filed with the courts shows no detailed inform ation on the Baker’s Bay proj ect was made available at the F ebruary 2004 meeting. As for the August 2004 meeting, the Association is alleging that copies of important documents relating to Baker’s Bay were not lodged with local government offices as promised, and pledges of further consultation never materialised. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE *UHDW*XDQD&D\$EDFR 7KH%DKDPDV(03/2<0(17,7<
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Medical Pavilion, Dr Conville Brown, said he hopes his facility can be the gateway for medical tourism in the Bahamas. The facility, which specialises in the diagnosis and treatment of problems stemming from heart and cancer ailments, willbe marketed to countries in the Caribbean through two grants of 5,000 Euros and 18,000 Euros each, totaling 23,000 Euros ($32,377.89 come from the European Union (EU According to Dr Brown, the facility is one of about four in the region offering similar services. Others are located in Jamaica, Trinidad and Barbados. However, the Centerville Medical Pavilion is the only of its kind in the region, and one of only two in the world outside of the US, to be accredited by the American College of Radiation and Oncology (ACRO Dr Brown said the facility will use pamphlets, print and broadcast ads and a “robust” website, all funded through the grant, to market itself to countries in the Caribbean and the US. He said his facility had done work for the Turks and Caicos for years, as well as the Cayman Islands and Bermuda. “We are going to be the gateway to international medicine instead of us fattening South Florida,” said Dr Brown. “And this is during a time when the Bahamas needs to have further diversification of its economy and Bahamians are grappling with health care costs and advanced care.” Dr Brown said the cost of some treatments at the Centerville Medical Pavilion will be less costly than procedures done in the US, but could appear more expensive than those at similar facilities in the Caribbean due to currency exchange rates. However, he touts the Bahamas’ proximity to the US as a draw for Americans who would have considered other popular medical tourism locales, such as India and the Philippines. Dr Brown said many of the s pecialists providing treatment at the facility are highly qualified specialists from abroad. “We intend to be the initial entre to medical tourism in the Bahamas,” he said C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009, PAGE 5B *UHDW*XDQD&D\$EDFR 7KH%DKDPDV(03/2<0(17,7<
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a slow process to get inventory down to where you put in more orders.” The slowdown in new car orders is likely to have had a major impact on government revenues, as new cars are among the items attracting the highest duty rates. Given the three to four-month time lag between placing orders and the vehicle’s arrival in the Bahamas, the BMDA said government tax revenues from the industrys hould start improving in the 2009 fourth quarter. Mr Lowe said that obtaining debt financing from Bahamian commercial banks was among the biggest challenges facing the few new car buyers in the market, and while there had been a temporary spike following the April car show, sales had again tailed off in May. Small SUV vehicles remained the “bright spot” for the industry. The BMDA said: “BMDA members remain hopeful thatt he marginal economic recovery showing signs in the US will benefit the economy of the Bahamas going forward. “With inventories getting more in line with industry norms, BMDA members will begin to consider ordering for the next model year. This should begin to positively impact government revenue by the fourth quarter. While BMDA members expectations are for a sluggish third quarter,w e anticipate we can weather the storm.” So far, there have been no lay-offs by BMDA members. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW )5$1&.<67)/(85RI 0 DFNH\6WUHHW3%R[ LV DSSO\LQJWRWKH 0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRU UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQDVFLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDV DQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQZKRNQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\ UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOG VHQGZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQ WZHQW\HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH W KGD\ RI -XQH WRWKH 0 LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3%R[ 1 127,&( were “triple” what Cable Bahamas charged. He added that channel lineup also needed to be factored into the assessment, given that all cable companies’ offerings were different, and some signal fees more expensive than others. Product quality was another factor, Mr Burrows describing what Cable Bahamas offered as “second to none”. Describing the heavy infras tructure investment needed to s upply cable TV services to a v ariety of islands as a “tremendous factor” in Cable Bahamas’ cost base and pricing, Mr Burrows said: “As we start to get into the smaller islands, the cost per customer to build, let’s say in Bimini, is tremendous because there are only a few hundred subscribers at most on the island. “As we get into the smaller islands and cays, the cost of building is astronomical on a per capita basis. All of these things impact us. Then there is the cost of power, electricity. All our nodes are powered by BEC, and there are high electricity costs here.” The Cable Bahamas executive said a better comparison for the BISX-listed utility provider’s products was with the North American market operators, such as Comcast and Time-Warner Cable, given the similarity in service quality and channel offerings. Mr Burrows argued that C able Bahamas’ Digital 125 p ackage, offering 125 channels for $35.95 (the $30 basic price plus $5.95 per month) stood up well against its US peers, with Comcast and Time-Warner charging $55 and $56 per month respectively for digital packages featuring 100 channels. He added that the consultation document had listed Cable Bahamas’ prices incorrectly, as Digital 125 cost $35.05 per month, not $65.95 as the paper stated. In addition, the Digital 150 and Digital 175 packages cost $44.95 and $54.95 per month, and not $73.95 and $83.95 as the consultation paper had wrongly listed. Mr Burrows said Cable Bahamas, through the Digital 175 package, was providing 175 channels at the same price as Comcast was providing 100 channels in the US. This was happening despite the shrinking margins Cable Bahamas was experiencing for its $30 per month basic cable TV package every year, the r esult of being unable to obtain p ermission for an increase from the Government during the past 15 years. “Just this year alone, our signal fees increased by almost $3 million,” Mr Burrows explained. “So when you start looking at every single year, there’s an increase in signal fees every year. It impacts us, our bottom line, and our margins shrink every year as costs increase.” Trying to minimise costs associated with signal fees for its basic package had been Cable Bahamas’ “most challenging” feature, with signal providers unable to give the company a break because they had already built these fee increases into their own budgets for the year. Mr Burrows said that when Cable Bahamas was first formed in 1994, its basic TV package was largely in line with what was charged by others. Now, Time-Warner Cable had just increased its basic price from $52.90 to $56, a $3.10 rise t hat was likely associated with l iving and signal cost rises. Mr Burrows added that when Cable Bahamas began digital services, it compared itself to both US cable and satellite operators to ensure its line-up and service quality compared well. “Cable Bahamas is quite in-line,” he added. “The Bahamian people can be assured that Cable Bahamas offers true value for money, and service standards as required in this world climate.” The company’s services were “world class”. $3m signal fee rise hits Cable basic margins Car dealers brace for 5-10% price increase $500k investment in Mall medical facility will also be investors in the endeavour, are well-recognised and duly qualified. “One hundred per cent of the doctors we have talked to have become investors,” he said. Dr Rolle said the facility required an initial investment of $100,000, while $250,000 had been slated for infrastructural changes, $60,000 for training and $150,000 for equipment – as a conservative estimate. T he 44,000 square foot facili ty, located on the second floor of the Mall, was once a clothing store and its only video arcade. Dr Rolle said he had been in talks with general manager of the Mall, Frank McGuire, about opening the facility since October 2008. The architects for the facility, N ation Builders, are experie nced mall medical facility planners in the US. Public relations manager for the Mall, Laquinta Curry, said the facility’s biggest focus was to provide affordable health care, but also to create added foot traffic through the Mall. “We have had our ups and downs,” she said. “We had our peaks, like back to school and when we have our health fairs. Those are kind of busy for us. It could be better but we’re grateful.” F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 73F/23C Low: 77F/25C Low: 75F/24C Low: 76F/24C Low: 77 F/25 C Low: 80F/27C Low: 78 F/26 C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 93F/34C High: 91F/33C High: 89 F/32 C High: 89 F/32 C High: 90F/32C High: 89 F/32C High: 90F/32C Low: 77F/25C High: 90F/32C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 92F/33C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 73F/23C High: 89 F/32 C Low: 75F/24C High: 87 F/31 Low: 76F/24C High: 84F/29C Low: 79 F/26C High: 86F/30C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 92F/33C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 89F/32C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 90F/32C Low: 76F/24C High: 91 F/33 C Low: 82F/28C High: 92F/33C High: 90 F/32 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24 TH , 2009, PAGE 11B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Variably cloudy, a t-storm or two. Patchy clouds, a couple of t-storms. Variably cloudy, a few t-storms. Clouds and sun, a t-storm possible. Mostly cloudy, a t-storm possible. High: 90 Low: 78 High: 90 High: 89 High: 86 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Cloudy with t-storms possible. High: 87 Low: 80 Low: 81 Low: 77 AccuWeather RealFeel 111F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 84F 116-85F 98-91F 94-76F 91-84F Low: 79 TODAYTONIGHTTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAY SUNDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................84F/29C Low ....................................................73F/23C Normal high ......................................87F/31C Normal low ........................................74F/23C Last year's high .................................. 95 F/35C Last year's low .................................. 81 F/27C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.60" Year to date ................................................15.44" Normal year to date ....................................16.85" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU First Full Last New Jun. 29 Jul. 7Jul. 15Jul. 21 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:22 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 8:03 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 8:16 a.m. Moonset . . . . 10:04 p.m. Today Thursday Friday Saturday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 9:44 a.m.2.83:40 a.m.-0.3 10:10 p.m.3.33:42 p.m.-0.3 10:39 a.m.2.84:31 a.m.-0.3 11:03 p.m.3.14:39 p.m.-0.2 11:34 a.m.2.95:21 a.m.-0.3 11:57 p.m.2.95:38 p.m.-0.1 12:30 p.m.2.96:11 a.m.-0.2 -----6:37 p.m.0.0 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco91/3279/26pc89/3178/25pc Amsterdam74/2352/11s70/2158/14pc Ankara, Turkey88/3154/12s86/3054/12s Athens83/2864/17s79/2668/20s Auckland55/1244/6pc55/1252/11pc Bangkok89/3179/26t90/3278/25t Barbados86/3077/25t86/3077/25sh Barcelona82/2765/18pc76/2468/20pc Beijing102/3873/22s99/3775/23s Beirut79/2677/25s82/2778/25s Belgrade79/2661/16pc81/2761/16t Berlin79/2657/13s75/2355/12sh Bermuda77/2572/22t80/2672/22sh Bogota67/1946/7r66/1846/7t Brussels76/2455/12pc77/2559/15sh Budapest77/2557/13c81/2759/15t Buenos Aires52/1136/2s55/1243/6s Cairo106/4176/24s101/3870/21s Calcutta98/3691/32t100/3790/32t Calgary75/2349/9s73/2244/6pc Cancun91/3277/25pc92/3378/25s Caracas81/2771/21t82/2771/21t Casablanca82/2768/20s77/2560/15s Copenhagen76/2455/12s77/2559/15s Dublin66/1852/11pc64/1754/12pc Frankfurt79/2661/16sh79/2663/17t Geneva 77/25 58/14 s 78/2559/15s Halifax 64/17 54/12 r 68/20 54/12 c Havana 91/32 72/22 pc 90/32 76/24 r Helsinki 73/22 54/12s75/2355/12s Hong Kong 93/33 82/27 pc 92/33 82/27pc Islamabad 115/46 79/26 s 115/46 81/27 s Istanbul88/3166/18s84/2864/17pc Jerusalem 87/30 64/17s89/3168/20s Johannesburg 55/1236/2s56/1332/0s Kingston 87/3079/26pc89/3178/25t Lima71/2160/15pc72/2259/15pc London75/2354/12s77/2555/12pc Madrid91/3257/13pc88/3155/12pc Manila86/3081/27r83/2877/25t Mexico City73/2255/12t71/2155/12r Monterrey93/3370/21t99/3775/23s Montreal82/2766/18s81/2764/17t Moscow63/1752/11sh66/1852/11pc Munich64/1755/12r75/2355/12t Nairobi83/2857/13t82/2757/13pc New Delhi 111/4388/31s113/4590/32s Oslo75/2355/12s77/2556/13sh Paris75/2359/15pc79/2661/16t Prague 68/20 57/13 r 69/20 55/12 sh Rio de Janeiro78/2567/19s77/2570/21pc Riyadh103/3980/26s103/3981/27s Rome 81/27 59/15 pc 82/27 59/15 sh St. Thomas87/3079/26sh88/3179/26s San Juan60/1531/0s62/1633/0c San Salvador 88/31 68/20 t 87/30 73/22 t Santiago 61/1641/5s55/1245/7sh Santo Domingo88/3174/23sh85/2974/23r Sao Paulo 64/17 53/11 r 67/19 57/13r Seoul84/2863/17s82/2764/17t Stockholm 72/22 54/12 pc 70/21 54/12 s Sydney 66/18 48/8 s64/1748/8pc Taipei90/3281/27t91/3278/25r T okyo 81/27 72/22 c 86/30 73/22 c T oronto 82/2763/17s82/2759/15t Trinidad63/1754/12r72/2259/15c V ancouver 65/18 56/13 r 67/1953/11c Vienna 72/2265/18t76/2465/18t W arsaw 72/22 57/13 t 70/21 59/15 t Winnipeg 81/27 54/12 pc 84/2862/16s H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayThursday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:NW at 12-25 Knots2-4 Feet5-15 Miles82F Thursday:W at 12-25 Knots2-4 Feet5-10 Miles82F Today:NW at 12-25 Knots2-3 Feet5-15 Miles81F Thursday:W at 12-25 Knots2-4 Feet5-10 Miles81F Today:NW at 12-25 Knots2-4 Feet5-10 Miles81F Thursday:W at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet5-10 Miles81F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque90/3269/20t92/3367/19pc Anchorage60/1549/9c60/1550/10pc Atlanta93/3370/21s90/3272/22s Atlantic City79/2665/18pc87/3069/20pc Baltimore85/2965/18pc90/3270/21s Boston68/2060/15sh80/2665/18pc Buffalo85/2965/18s80/2664/17t Charleston, SC90/3272/22pc93/3373/22pc Chicago92/3365/18pc87/3060/15t Cleveland87/3064/17s86/3065/18t Dallas101/3878/25s102/3879/26s Denver96/3562/16t92/3361/16pc Detroit92/3369/20s86/3062/16t Honolulu87/3075/23pc87/3073/22pc Houston100/3777/25s100/3777/25s HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayThursday TodayThursdayTodayThursday Indianapolis92/3372/22s88/3165/18t Jacksonville91/3271/21s92/3370/21pc Kansas City98/3675/23s96/3573/22pc Las Vegas104/4078/25s99/3778/25pc Little Rock98/3673/22s99/3774/23pc Los Angeles79/2662/16pc79/2662/16pc Louisville94/3474/23s93/3370/21pc Memphis97/3675/23s96/3576/24s Miami90/3277/25t90/3277/25t Minneapolis88/3167/19t88/3168/20s Nashville94/3468/20s95/3571/21s New Orleans98/3680/26s96/3580/26pc New York78/2568/20sh88/3173/22s Oklahoma City100/3774/23s101/3875/23s Orlando93/3373/22t91/3274/23t Philadelphia83/2868/20pc89/3171/21s Phoenix 107/41 85/29 s 107/4185/29pc Pittsburgh86/3063/17s87/3064/17t Portland, OR 80/2658/14pc76/2454/12pc Raleigh-Durham 90/32 68/20 s 93/33 72/22 s St. Louis96/3576/24s91/3273/22t Salt Lake City 89/31 67/19 s 89/3160/15t San Antonio 101/38 77/25 pc 100/37 76/24 s San Diego72/2266/18pc74/2364/17pc San Francisco 73/22 56/13 s 70/2154/12pc Seattle72/2255/12c71/2152/11c T allahassee 97/3672/22t93/3369/20t T ampa 91/32 77/25 t 90/32 77/25t Tucson99/3777/25pc100/3777/25pc W ashington, DC 89/31 69/20s93/3373/22s UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. T emperature bands are highs for the day . Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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C M Y K C M Y K TASTE PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE T h e T r i b u n e By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net WITH summer in full swing, you may find yourself attendinga lo t mor e outdoor par ties t han usual. During these events, the m en usually handle the cooking b y opening up t hose heat d renched grills to give everyone’s t a ste buds that one of a kind summer barbecue taste. According to foodnetwork.com, barbecuing goes as far back as the 18th-century colonial America, specifically the settle ments along the Southeastern seaboard. “The direct descendant of that original American barbecue is Eastern Carolinastyle pit barbecue, which traditionally starts with the whole hog and, after as many as fourteen hours over coals, culmi nates in a glorious mess of pulled pork doused with vinegar sauce and eaten on a hamburger bun, with coleslaw on the side,” the website noted. Many of the self proclaimed “grill masters” are mostly amateurs experimenting with different flavors and sharing grilling secrets from man to man. Desmond Miller, a prison officer at Her Majesty’s Prison, is a grill master and chef by hobby. “I always loved to cook, so grilling came naturally. I am probably behind the grill more than a dozen times a year. I used to do it around the house then for friends and then friends of friends,” Mr Miller said. When it comes to the perfect piece of meat to conquer, Mr Miller said there area few key components to attain grilled meat perfection. “Quality meat is the key but you can have great grilling with more economy friendly costing meats. Also seasonings and marinating your meat are important. Make sure the grill is at the right tempera ture and use tongs instead of forks. The product will be more moist if not poked and prodded. Let the grill do its job you don't need to turn the meat to soon too often. Also let the meat rest so as to redistribute the juices throughout the meat,” Mr Miller said. While there are a variety of meat combinations that can taste great fresh from the grill, Mr Miller said there are some he enjoys working with more. “I like working with chicken, fish, ribs, pork and shell fish but at some time I have probably grilled mostly all meats. My most requested grilled specialties are BBQ ribs, jerk pork and chicken, shrimp kabobs and steak,” Mr Miller said. Just as important as the savory meat on the grill is the succulent sauce that compliments it. To give the meat its rich flavor, Mr Miller said he has his own special sauce. “I make my own jerk and pepper sauces one mild for the faint of heart and anoth er I call the "more fire" sauce one taste and you'd be saying more water,” Mr Miller said. As for up and coming young men who want to become grill masters, Mr Miller said he would advise them to not be afraid to make mistakes. “Research recipes online or in books and add your own flair to it. Don't be afraid of criticism everyone has different tastes and tolerances. Be adventurous in the kitchen and at the grill.” Summertime S Z Z L e i ACCORDING to foodnetwork.com, barbecuing goes as far back as the 18th-century colonial America, specific ally the settlements along the Southeastern seaboard.

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C M Y K C M Y K TASTE THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009, PAGE 9B T h e T r i b u n e By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net AS the Summer season gets into full swing, many locals hit the beaches to escape the scorching heat. Tribune Entertainment has found the perfect summer oasis for your entertainment. 1 . Local entertainer Terneille “TaDa” Burrows is slated to perform at the Mall at Marathon’s third annual Music and Food Festival on Saturday. The festival which will offer food samples from several restaurants in the mall’s food court, will also present TaDa and a secret performer at no charge. The e vent will begin at 10 am and t he malls’ stores will also h old sidewalk sales. Organisers are excited about the event and promise more fun, music, and an all around family experience. 2 . The Express Yourself M ovement is once again announcing its popular Open Mic night which will be held inside its new home at the Hard Rock Caf on Charlotte Street. The event which frequently reels in spoken word hopefuls, musicians, poets, and the like, is the perfect Thursday night spot to soothe the midweek work pangs. An easy getaway from the hectic hustle and bustle of life, the event adds loads of entertainment through one simple medium, artistic expression. 3 . Two very special icons in Bahamian drama are being hon ored in the newest production of the play Guanahani. James Catalyn who originally directed the play, and Andrew Curry who was its first music director, are the honorees as this newest version of the play premiers at the Dundas Centre for The Performing Arts on June 23. An original Bahamian musical, with whimsical lines and catchy tunes, the play presents the unofficial and satirical true story of Christopher Columbus’ discovery of The Bahamas on behalf of the European world. The production which will run until Sat urday, is said to be an on time reminder of true Bahamian history, through music and dance. Tickets are priced at $20 and are quickly selling out, so get yours today. 4 . The Bahamas National Trust (BNT is doing its part in entertaining kids this summer, by kicking off its first ever movie night this Wednesday at its Village Road retreat at 6pm. Scheduled for showing is the movie “The Great Polar Bear Adventure,” which is a 2006 production focusing on the realities of global warming. The film paints an uncertain reality for a polar bear family who are forced to live in a world ever changing because of global warming. The mother bear Ikuk and her cubs Cassie and Asak, find help along the way from arctic fox Papu who directs them to food and newfound hope. Priced at just $1, the film is the first of a list of summer flicks planned to be shown at the centre. 5 . Thought Catcher Enterprise presents Poetry Night at the BNT this Friday starting at 7pm. Featuring some of the performers from the Dundas’ annual production SPOT , the event will include various skits, and improvisations. Also included is an open mic segment allowing attendants the chance to share their poetry or related works. Priced at $5, there will also be appetizers and beverages on sale. things 2 DO By CARA BRENNENBETHEL Tribune Features Editor STARINGBradley Cooper, ( Phil Wenneck ) Ed Helms ( Stu Price ) Zach Galifianakis ( Allan Garner ), Justin Bartha ( Doug Billings ) and Heather Graham ( Jade ) There is a reason The Hang over has been the surprise hit of the year. The movie is head and shoulders above the current crop of broad comedies and will leave you rolling in your seat with laughter. Granted the plot is silly and the events more than a little exaggerated, but somehow given the talents of the cast, the story line just works. In the movie, Doug and three of his friendsPhil, Stu and Allan head to Las Vegas for his bachelor party with a rooftop toast that what happens in Vegas will definitely stay in Vegas. That is until the three groomsmen wake up with the worst hang overs of their lives and realise that they don’t remember any thing about the night before and that the groom is missing. The rest of the movie is the threesome’s mad dash to find Doug before its too late by retracing their steps as best they can -Just how did they end up with a tiger and a baby in their suite. Why is there a naked man in their trunk and although it wasn’t Doug who got married, which one of them did? With a cameo appearance by Mike Tyson, at least a dozen hilarious one liners and the backdrop of Vegas as the ultimate bachelor’s playground, The Hangover is a must see, that you won’t need a drop of alcohol to enjoy. Just make sure you stay to the end to watch the final credits which give a glimpse into what really happened during the bachelor party every bride dreads. MOVIE REVIEW The Hangover IN THIS film publicity image released by Warner Bros., Zach Galifianakis, left, Bradley Cooper, center, and Ed Helms are shown in a scene from "The Hangover." F r a n k M a s i / A P P h o t o B y LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net ALMOS T every Bahamian at one time or another has heard the story of f amous mar itime e xplor er Chr ist o pher Columbus, whom hist ory records as the discoverer of the New World. What if someone told you, that all you know about Columbus and his historical discovery was a lie. In-fact, this is exactly what a local playwright did in his on stage creation of Guanahani in 1992. F using fact, fiction, and a little humor, the play tells a story of a Columbus far different than the one portrayed in the history books. It alleges that instead of arriving in the East Indies as he had originally intended, Columbus ended in the West Indies, and thus used that accidental land fall as his claim to discovering the new world and Guanahani (San Salvador As the production unfolds, the Indians of Guanahani learned that Columbus was the man that their forefathers had warned of who would arrive on their land to convert them to slavery. Described as light hearted, lively, and entertaining, this musical tells a unique story of the much different life that Columbus and the Indians lived during the late fifteenth century. Now fast forward to 2009, where a small group of actors, singers, and culture enthusiasts have teamed up to recreate this production to pay homage to the men who created Guanahani. First is James Catalayn, who is one of the most talked about figures in the local theatrical circle, and creator of several stage productions including; An’ a don’ mean Cola , Lost Love, A weddin’ tale , and You say! I say! Also a familiar face to the performing arts, Andrew Curry is the founder of the Diocesan Choral, and a former Instructor of Aquinas College where he was involved in various plays such as Seven Brides for seven brothers , and South Pacific . The newest musical director for Guanahani Antoine Wallace explained, that as he has been familiar with Mr Catalyn and Mr Curry for sev eral years, he has always been interested in working with the two legends. After working alongside Mr Catalyn as a national adjudicator for the recent Bahamas National Arts Festival, Mr Wallace said the time seemed fitting to propose a collaboration between the Diocesan Choral, James Catalyn and Friends, and other related groups. “We (Antoine Wallace, Lakisha Bostwick, Andrew Curry and James Catalyn) were wondering, what could we do to collaborate James Catalyn & Friends, the Diocesan Choral, the Allegro Singers, and the National Dance School, so we thought Guanahani.” Mr Wallace said as the old adage about recognition suggest: ‘give me my flowers while I living,’ he felt the time was now to pay tribute to Mr Catalyn and Mr Curry. Using the blueprint from the original production, Mr Wallace said the new cast and crew have revamped the music, and have added some extra layers of range and diversity. He said: “We have the ring play, we have quadrille, Junkanoo, and rake-n-scrape, we have everything Bahamian in this production, and this is also a pre-Indepen dence show.” Apart from the cultural significance of this production, Mr Wallace said each of the members from the various groups have used the play asa n opportunity to learn and share bits of each others talents. “We are all learning, the actors are becoming singers, the singers are becoming actors, so all of us are becoming all around musicians and actors.” For overall director Omar Williams, this was a good sign considering he had the mammoth t ask of arranging the production. He said it felt good to have his name attached to a play with such historical relevance as Gua nahani as he made his directorial debut. Mr Williams explained: “With this being the third time this play has been done, what makes this time different is that we have a cast that is at least three times larger than ever before. “This show hinges on everybody being individuals, so we have diversity when it comes to the singing, the acting, the dancing, everything is different.” Mr Williams said from the days of watching James Catalyn and Friends on stage and now joining them, he has great respect for Mr Catalyn because he has helped in telling the story of the Bahamas over the past 30 plus years. “I think the thing that came over in this show was mentorship, the same way that Andrew wasa mentor to Antoine, and Mr Catalyn being a mentor to me and several of the people in the play, those people will now have the ability to become mentors to others. “I think that’s the best part about Andrew and James, how they can use their talents to help improve the lives and talents of others, that is what being a leader is all about.” Guanahani premiered yesterday at the Dun das Centre for the Performing Arts, and runs until Saturday with showtime set for 8pm. the of reprise Guanahani A trib u te James Catalyn and Andrew Curry DURING their final rehearsals this past weekend, the cast of the revamped Guanahani promise a show like none other.

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C M Y K C M Y K ARTS PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE By LLOYD ALLEN T ribune Features Reporter l allen@tribunemedia.net DOZENS of students from Summit A cademy recently staged a collective exhibition at Popop studio, where they used art as their voice t o promote the importance o f environmental preservation. According to principal Gillian Wilson, the art project was organised to help the students identify useful ways of reusing everyday items like soda bottles, which could help in reducing the overall trash buildup on the island and throughout the world. She explained: “We are an inquiry based school, so we thought it was extremely important to expose our children to various forms of art. “In January we collaborated with John Cox and other artists at Popop where we came up with a six month plan to give the kids an in studio experience, and with this event being combined with our annual science fair we were really trying to get the message to our kids of saving the earth and what they can do as responsible citizens.” Totaling more than 50 pieces, the exhibition included various spherical creations made from plexy-wood, plastic bottles and wood glue. Then there were several hand painted recycled clothes, pictures, and even an artificial tree that was made by the children. Director of Popop Studio John Cox explained that with part of Popops’ mission being to share the joy and importance of art to all students, the experience with Summit was both interesting and rewarding. “When Popop first started about 10 years ago, we were dealing with a lot of alternative and experimental work.” He said continuing with that vision, the educational art experience offered the students a chance to bridge the changing concepts artists use to communicate with the relevance of earth preservation. He said: “Here at Popop, we are try i ng to nurture a critical standard of art appreciation in the country, and what we are really about, less so than having students make objects that they take home and say that this is mine, it is about them having the art experience.” During the course of the project, Mr Cox said the students were exposed to other art exhibits at places like the Bahamas National Art Gallery to offera broader scope of what art is. Mr Cox said the reality is that most people who are exposed to art, or who even go on to study art, hardly ever work as professional artists. However one thing that does remain is an awareness of the way art speaks. He said when these children grow up to become lawyers, doctors, or teachers, the seed planted through the project will hopefully become useful to allowt hem to contribute in some way to art development in the future. Although the exhibition has already ended, Mrs Wilson said many of her students have since enrolled in private summer art classes because of their newfound freedom in speakingt hrough art. USING ART TO WORLD SAVE THE Summit Academy puts on exhibition to promote environmental preservation PRINCIPAL Gillian Wilson explained: “We are an inquiry based school, so we thought it was extremely important to expose our children to various forms of art.” STUDENTS are seen observing their one of a kind tree baring leaves hand-painted by them. career as a professional ceramicist in the Bahamas, and bring a fresh and competitive spirit in the realm of this art form. “The focus of JTS would be to push the limits of what can be done with the medium, chal lenge and encourage the growth of ceramics as an art form throughout the islands of The Bahamas, and to demonstrate through hard work and the perfection of one’s craft, that any artist (young or old a successful career as a full time potter and/or ceramicist as our painting counterparts,” Mrs Colebrooke said. The first challenge for Mrs Colebrooke was to stimulate interest in the field by not only teaching ceramics public and privately, but also by partici pating in exhibits. Although Mrs Colebrooke has participated in many exhibits locally and internationally the “Sump’n Familiar” exhibition held at the Central Bank of The Bahamas Gallery in 1997 was the most significant to her. “Sump’n Familiar was like a coming of age exhibit. Up to that point I was just exhibiting work as a student, but that show proved to the Bahamian collectors that I was now a profes sional, producing serious work and making an impact on the local art scene. Attended by the then Governor General Sir. Orville Turnquest, the exhibit featured 10 tile murals,” Mrs Colebrooke said. Mrs Colebrooke believes that it was that show, and the many others that followed, which awakened interest in ceramics in the country. She is the first Bahamian female tile manufacturer in the country and her works can be seen throughout Nassau, Eleuthera, Freeport and Abaco. “The work has steadily grown in range and become very popular in most of the family islands. Most of my work can be seen and purchased in local stores in Nassau such as, Andeana Designs (The Sheraton, Cable Beach,) Doongalik Art Gallery, and The Plait Lady located in the Marina Village, Paradise Island, the Blue Pearl, located in the International Bazar, Bay Street, the Uniquely Bahamian Kiosk in the International Departure Lounge in the Lynden Pindling Airport)or you can just visit the gallery and studio in Gleniston,” Mrs Cole brooke said. As a local manufacturer of art tiles, JTS gives Bahamians a choice beyond the imported European and American art tilesworks that are infused with the beauties of the Bahamian environment. JTS has been manufacturing per sonalised tiles for bathrooms and kitchens, restaurants and business establishments. One of Mrs Colebrooke’s most recent commissions was a client who owns a private winter home on Harbour Island,and asked her producing seashell tiles to accent their bathrooms. In regards to future plans for Jessica’s Tileworks Studio & Gallery, Mrs Colebrooke will be hosting the first All Bahamian Ceramics and Potters exhibition, which will be held at Popop studios in October. Some of the exhibiting artists in that show will be Sue Ben nett-Williams, Imogene Walkine, Tamara Russell, Kelley Knowles, Nicole Sweeting and Vincent McSweeney Due to her strong love for the arts and to see young people express their creative side, Mrs Colebrooke will be offering a summer workshop from June 29 to July 24 for children ages 715. “This workshop will be focused towards engaging kids to focus on basic skills and/or talents in creative arts, cooking and decorating,” Mrs Colebrooke said. Cost for the workshop is $500.00 per child ($20 per day and includes 1 / 12 lb bag of clay per child, craft materials, use of studio space, kilns and in studio glazes. Space is limited to 10 students. Interested par ents who want to have their children attend or are interested in Jessica’s art can contact her at 324-3533 or via e-mail jessicas tileworks@gmail.com. FROM page 12 B y ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net S ELF expression through music and the arts have been the lifeblood of Bahamian society for decades allowing great talents to become legends in their own right all over the world. However, one of those legends after 29 years has returned home to lend a helping hand to those who also deserve a chance to shine on stage. Cleveland Williams, born and raised in New Providence, got his musical start at an early age. Mr Williams obtained a bachelors degree in Music Education and a mas ters in Vocal Performance from Prairie View A&M University in Texas. “As a youngster, I used to sit on my grandmother’s step with her hymn book and singthere grew the love for singing. My first solo was at Yellow Elder primary school and I had asked to sing at the assem bly. In the eleventh grade, I was singing in the choir and we were preparing for the National Arts Festival. I wanted to enter and sing soprano, and ended up winning first place that year,” Mr Williams said. In 1992, Mr Williams obtained his Doctorate from the University of Naples, in Tourism Studies, allowing him as a baritone to perform in numerous recitals and concerts with the Italian Chamber Orches tra, the “Interpreti Veneziani” throughout Italy, Sweden, Norway, Finland and the Bahamas. “I wanted to study opera, not just to sing and grace the world stage. My intention was to study that discipline so that once I had studied that and been on stage with the professionals and saw how the mechan ics of it worked, I would be able to come home and say to my students ‘this is how it should be done’ because I have ‘tasted the waters’ through that experience. I am a grass root person, having had the opportunity to be blessed with the gift of singing and had the good fortune of having met people along the way who saw that there was some talent there and decided to help and be instrumental in getting me to go off to school and do the type of studies necessary,” Mr Williams said. Mr Williams said it is because of those persons who helped him, that it is time he helped someone else. “When I returned home I said to myself that I hope I don’t just sit there and collect dust because it would be a complete shame. I think it is my duty as a Bahamian to return to the islands of the Bahamas and to assist with the nation building of our country through the further development of what ever our cultural resources are. Hopefully I want to create opportunities where other young Bahamians who may not have had the opportunity or the exposure that I was fortunate to have. I would like to help channel them in the direction they should be going or to help groom them to aspire to become the artist or the singer they want to become,” Mr Williams said. Mr Williams said one of the first things he noticed when he returned home, was the repetitiveness of the independence day celebrations prompting him to want to add something more to the event, something unheard of –an opera. “I thought that independence for the Bahamas is a very significant time in our lives because as a country we celebrate the anniversary of our independence. One of the ways that we can be instrumental or even more effective in doing something of great significance is trying to pool together all the various talents of the younger people and of the cultural institutions we have here and put them in a production. This production will allow them to come together as a cohesive team to do a particular major work. That work being Scott Joplin’s three act opera ‘Treemonisha’,” Mr Williams said. Mr Williams said another thing he noticed when he came home is the immense amount of talent he has found. “Since I have been home I have put out the announcement of the opera and held auditions. We here in the Bahamas have been blessed. Bahamians have this built in thing for song and dance and I am amazedb y the wealth of talent we have here that is still untapped. While I am home I want to take the talent, be it cultivated or raw, and try to shape, chisel, and mold them into the direction they should be going,” Mr Williams said. Mr Williams said he has had several persons from the wider community from dif ferent church choirs singing with him and one of the groups he has reached out to is the Catholic Diocesan Chorale. Mr Williams said he wants to continue with his work through the support of others in the Bahamian community. “I would like the support from the pow ers to do more of this type of stuff. Not just operas, but also do oratorios, requiems, and masses. With the wealth of talent we have here, this is the area I feel in which we can engage the talent. As a developing country, the infrastructure needs to be put into place for more cultural and artistic things that the youth of our nation can really sink their teeth into because the arts and culture in itself is a discipline. Once you have them in the school system and in the wider community, it will help the young people to develop character, disciplined minds and it brings some form of structure into their lives. A lot of the young people have been side tracked into other areas of their lives and so I am hoping I will become an agent of change to enhance what we have culturally in the Bahamas,” Mr Williams said. Beauty of tiles CLEVELAND WILLIAMS Cleveland returns home to share vocal talents


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