Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
{J

Pim blowin’ it

S8F
78F

HIGH
LOW

\

~ SUNNY WITH
“ce HEAVY SHOWER

Volume: 105 No.169





No negotiations
until ‘illegal strike’

comes to

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham warned public health nurses
that his administration will not
negotiate with persons engaged
in an "illegal strike."

The nation's chief advised nurs-
es that their stand-off could be
resolved as early as Monday but
only if those nurses engaged in
the nearly two-week long "sick-
out" returned to work immedi-
ately.

While stressing that he under-
stood the nurses' frustration over
the government's decision to
defer their $10 million health
insurance plan, he also reminded
the nurses that they fell into the
category of essential services and
therefore could not strike.

"The government of the
Bahamas, which I lead, is not pre-
pared to do business with people
who are engaged in an illegal
strike, period. Any group of work-
ers can sit down with the govern-
ment to discuss and seek to
resolve any issues.

"If you choose to do an illegal
strike, don't expect the govern-
ment to entertain serious discus-

an end

sions with you while you remain
out. I regret that the nurses feel
that the government has not
shown respect or regard for them
because that was not our intent
— it is to help,” said Mr Ingra-
ham during an address in the
House of Assembly last night.

His statements came hours
after representatives from the
Bahamas Nurses Union, the Pub-
lic Hospital's Authority and the
Ministry of Health met at the
Department of Labour following
a trade dispute filed by the BNU.

Yesterday's meeting adjourned
with no resolution, much to the
chagrin of the union.

Mr Ingraham said government
told the union earlier in the year
that the projected revenue short-
fall was expected to top $200 mil-
lion. He said government again
met with the nurses a few days
before the 2009/2010 budget to
alert them that their insurance
plan would be deferred because of
this, adding that published state-
ments by the union head indicat-
ed that she understood the gov-
ernment's predicament.

"Something happened subse-
quent to that to cause them to

SEE page 12

NEW CHEESY
Pe By

INCLUDES

a ees.
Reg. Hash Brown
& Reg. Coffee or Tea

het



The Tribune

SA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

a

fh
in

Tim Clarke/Tribune

- io | :
OFFICERS SEARCH a vehicle Downtown as they lead

CENTRAL Police Station officers toured
downtown Nassau yesterday, highlighting a num-
ber of traffic violations and infractions that this
division wants to bring to the public’s attention
and correct.

Glen Miller, officer in charge, led the police
delegation and the media through Rawson
Square, down Bay Street and onto George Street.

Pointing out that the fixed penalty for persons
parking in no-parking areas downtown carries a
fee of $80, officer Jerry Philip Josey said that in
some cases, where a vehicle actually obstructs
the flow of traffic a fine of $100 can be issued.

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

WSS

Tm me
IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE

PIM gets tough
with nurses

a delegation on Bay Street highlighting traffic violations.

Young adult
has been
quarantined








While unable to identify exactly how many
parking spaces are available for the use of the
average citizen, Mr Josey explained that these
spaces would be clearly outlined with a white
line and can be used for half an hour.

Assistant Superintendent Leamond Deleveaux
said that the Tourism Division, which houses
some 39 officers, has issued more than 400 tickets
every month.

“Despite our best efforts people
continue to break the law. But we remain vigilant
and our officers are doing a terrific job,” he
said.












PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)





Perry Christie hits out
over unemployment

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

CHARGING that a
“national mood of misery
and discontent” is on the
rise, opposition leader Per-
ry Christie proposed that
government must show
greater commitment to
preserving and creating jobs.

Contributing to the debate on
the 2009/2010 budget in parliament
yesterday, Mr Christie said the
“large numbers of unemployed
Bahamians is a frightening spec-
tre for the stability of our coun-
try.”

Re-stating the criticisms of his

aA OASIS



fellow PLP parliamentari-
ans throughout the recent
debate, the former prime
minister suggested that the
budget prepared by the
Government is “sobering,
depressing and devoid of
any offer of hope as to
how Bahamians will get
through these tough and
intimidating times.”
Touching on a variety
of topics during his speech, Mr
Christie repeatedly came back to
the issue of how Government
could and should have produced
greater plans to lessen the unem-
ployment figures and stimulate
economic activity during tough

SEE page 14

PM criticises PLP
for complaints
over contracts

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net























PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham took the Opposi-
tion to task yesterday during
his summation of the Budget
debate, criticising the PLP’s
constant complaint that his
government “stopped,
reviewed and cancelled” a
number of contracts left in
place by the previous admin-
istration.

Referring to the much pub-
licized and bandied about I-

SEE page 12



NASSAU AND BA

HAMA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

‘available at

The Paint Depot

Mt. Royal Ave.
Tel:326-1875












First case of
Bahamian
resident with
swine flu

m@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

A YOUNG adult who
lives in the Bahamas has
become the country’s second
confirmed case of swine flu.

This comes a day after
Florida recorded its first A
(HIN1) related fatality.

A nine-year-old boy who
suffered from chronic asth-
ma died on Tuesday in Mia-
mi-Dade county just 24
hours after he developed
symptoms of the influenza
virus.

While the patient in the
Bahamas has been quaran-
tined at home and the Min-
istry of Health is monitoring
all persons who came in con-
tact with the person, author-
ities are advising Bahamians
to continue to follow influen-
za preventative measures to
ensure protection of individ-
uals, families and communi-
ties.

Like the first confirmed
case earlier this year, the
infected person travelled
from New York to the
Bahamas.

The Ministry of Health
reported yesterday that the
case of Influenza A (H1N1)
occurred in a Bahamas resi-
dent who had visited New

SEE page nine



Govt to take $30m
dividend from BTC
amid package of
projected measures

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

GOVERNMENT is planning
to take a $30 million dividend
from the Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company (BTC) before
privatisation, and transfer $7 mil-
lion in profits from the Central
Bank of the Bahamas, amid a
package of measures that has
pushed projected revenues for the
2009-2010 fiscal year some $151
million higher than initially pro-
jected.

The plans were revealed by the
International Monetary Fund
(IMF) in a supplement to its
recently-published Article IV
consultation on the Bahamian
economy, which analysed the
2009-2010 Budget’s measures.

The supplementary report, with

SEE page nine





PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE government has been
attacked for its plans to adjust
the National Youth Service to
lessen its emphasis on the most

Government under fire for plans to adjust National Youth Service

and involve more youngsters who
can be helped before they get into
trouble.

Responding to the govern-
ment’s announcement, opposition
leader Perry Christie claimed it
is critical that the government
continue to focus on unruly boys,
adding that “cost should not be an

issue” when it comes to this
effort, as the programme offers
them a “redemptive, second
chance” experience.

Mr Christie noted that having
spoken previously with parents
of children who graduated from
the programme, “they regarded
the admission of their child as the

unruly boys in Bahamian society

Father's Day

is June 21st

DAD Eats Free!

For parties of 8 adults or more one father eats free.
Call for group pricing.

Sime eC R CL a CRC
Freep ACC LER CLL
where you can choose from a scrumptious buffet fit for a king.
Restaurant hours: 12:00 noon to 3:00 pm

NRC aa atc
Three fathers will have an opportunity to win one of three great prizes:
- Weekend stay for two in a newly renovated room
TTY} TUM OLET fame eL9 ORE
- Two month membership to the Hilton Fitness Centre
$200 food and beverage credit for the new Bullion Bar
ian late summer 2009)

Ask about our special weekend Bahamian Resident Rates!

British Colonial Hilton

Nassau

©2009 Hilton Hospitality Inc.

Travel should take you places



Al Quality Bohemian
= Cran

—

bk
——
;

= rs as y
Ta
‘he a

one opportunity they had to save
his life.”

“Intervention into the lives of
young Bahamians who are at-risk
is vital to the orderly develop-
ment of the Bahamas,” he said.

On Monday, Minister of Youth
Sports and Culture Desmond
Bannister told parliament that the
government intends to “relaunch”
the National Youth Programme
in the Fall, moving it from North
Andros to New Providence, and a
location where “the greatest need
exists” for its resources.

He said that the government
intends to use it to reach out to
children before they have a
chance to get into trouble, not
just to help those who have
“already become menaces to soci-
ety. ”

Mr Bannister said that moving
the programme to New Provi-
dence will save taxpayer funds.

This comes as the budgetary
allocation for the programme was
reduced to $345,000 this year,
after it rose to $900,000 in last
year’s budget, from a meagre
$17,861 in 2003/2004.

Mr Christie said: “Expert eval-
uations of the Youth Service Pro-
gramme stated in their report that
the programme can be improved,
but that it is working and contin-
ues to be necessary for the long-
term stability and growth of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas
as a nation. They certified that
the programme is in fact having a
positive, life-changing impact on
its attendees. They concluded this
programme demonstrates the

merit to be funded long-term and
used as a model for expanding
this type of service across the
nation of the Bahamas.

“It is my understanding that
the Youth Service Programme
will be returned to New Provi-
dence. I can only hope that the
government has carefully weighed
the benefit of the attendees being
out of their normal environment,
together with the significant injec-
tion of funds into the local econ-
omy of North Andros against the
savings effected by relocating the
programme to New Providence.

“These are all important strate-
gies in the process of giving our
youth at risk a redemptive oppor-
tunity for a new life for them-
selves and their families,” he
added.

PM rejects Opposition attack On Cuts in budget funding

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

DESPITE cuts in funding to
many areas in this year’s budget,
the Government yesterday hit
back at Opposition claims that
reductions will hurt their perfor-
mance, saying “almost all” of
them will still receive more mon-
ey than they did in the last PLP
budget.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said: “When we say we cut
the budget, we mean we reduced
the increase we put on it (in 2008
and 2007). In almost every single
head we are allocating more mon-
ey for these services than (the for-
mer PLP government) did (in
their 2006/2007 budget).”

Minister of State Zhivargo
Laing, giving his contribution to
the 2009/2010 budget debate, said
that in light of this, he found it
“curious” that Opposition MPs
condemnd the Government for
the funding reductions during
hard times.

Current estimates peg recur-

THE police are still investi-
gating the fire that took the
life of an elderly man over the
weekend, Supt Jeffery Dele-
veaux told The Tribune yes-
terday. After losing her hus-
band and her home in the
tragic fire on Saturday, Emer-
ald Cooper, 72, said that she is
sustained by her faith.

“Tam right here in the
Lord’s hands,” said Mrs
Cooper, who saved the lives
of her three grand children by
rescuing them from the blaze.
“T lost my husband and my
home, but not my Saviour.

“God don't put more on
you than you can bear,” she
said. Mrs Cooper is now living
with her daughter in Elizabeth
Estates. The funeral service
for her husband, Leon Coop-
er will be held on Saturday,
June 27, at St Matthews
Church at 2pm.

Percival Roberts (Son SE POpE SOIT}

= ia Ll ll

Stone Crab Chiws

Eden Street Store Hours
fam - fpm (Mon. - Sat.)
fam - 2pm (Sundays)
Tam -12noo0n (Holidays)
Special #1(550.0)):
SLbs Tenderized Conchs
SLbs Snappers or Jacks

Pee - $110.00/Kit
s - $80.00 / Kit
Ge aah Tails - $16.95
Conch Trimmings - $1.00/lb
Snappers - $4.95/Ib
Tenderized Conch - $4.75/Ib
Mutton Snapper - $4.00/Ib

(Crawfish Tails

8am - ipm

20- Large Shrimps

Pe

Lean Snappers

Carmichael Rd. Store Hours
Bam - 6pm (Mon.

- Sat.)
(Sundays)

Closed (Holidays)
Special 42(350.00):

6-Soz Lobster Tails





rent revenue
for 2009/2010
to be $184.5
million - 11.8
per cent - less
than the
2008/2009
estimates.
“(The PLP)
did not take
(the various
ministries, departments, agencies)
to a level higher than where our
cuts will land them (despite gov-
erning) in a time when they said
that things were ‘unprecedented’,
‘historic’, extraordinary, unpar-
alleled and uniquely better than
they are now; yet these ministries
and departments will suffer
because of our cuts made when
things have never been worse in
world since the Great Depres-
sion?” said Mr Laing.

“How had these ministries
been able to perform so well with
less money under the former gov-
ernment but will be unable to per-
form well with more money
under this government?”

“Critical” areas which will

Zhivargo Laing

receive more funding than they
did in the last PLP budget,

according to the minister of state,
include: The prison department
(10 per cent more) police force
(eight per cent more), defence
force (17 per cent more), depart-
ment of education (eight per cent
more), ministry of education
(three per cent more), College of
the Bahamas (nine per cent
more), department of social ser-
vices (49 per cent more) and the
public hospitals authority (10 per
cent more). Meanwhile, Mr
Laing said the $12 million cut in
the Ministry of Tourism’s budget
this year, represents $778,630 less
than the Ministry was allocated
in the former government’s
2006/2007 budget. Various Oppo-
sition members had criticised the
tourism budget cut.

TROPICAL
se

RR UE
PHONE: 322-2157



lll iS

from

oles

Bernard Rd - Mackey St - Thompson Blvd

L)ress

s Pants trom

Boat Departs

June a 2009

PLAT oF

Ph: 363 551 o





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 3



REPORTS FROM THE HOUSE

You’ve mishandled nurses
‘sick-out’, Christie tells govt

Christie: no
effort mate to
justify container
port move

NO EFFORT has been
made by the government or
the developers to provide
justification for the decision
to have the Container Port
moved from Bay Street to
Arawak Cay instead of the
southwest of New Provi-
dence as the PLP intended,
former Prime Minister Perry
Christie said during his con-
tribution to the budget
debate yesterday.

“We continue to regard
the decision as a bad one.

“It is inconsistent with all
of the specialised advice that
we have received.

“It is obvious to me that
the minister (Earl Deveaux)
and his colleagues have
arrived at a formula which is
pleasing to a group who have
decided regardless of the
environ-
mental
implica-
tions, the
aesthetics
of the
operation,
the nui-
sance of it,
that
Arawak
Cay is
where
they want
the facility
and that is
where it

EARL DEVEAUX



will go,” he said.

Mr Christie chastised
Environment Minister Earl
Deveaux, who he claimed
ventured to suggest that the
“PLP government influenced
the environmental consul-
tants in their selection of the
site for the southwest port.”

“That is absolutely untrue.
The selection was that of the
consultants, with participa-
tion from persons who were
a part of the private sector
group,” Mr Christie said.

“What surprises me about
the minister’s view is that he
has access to a major body of
environmental assessments
which provide the details
behind the consultants’ rec-
ommendation.”

Significant

Mr Deveaux last week told
parliamentarians that the
proposed southwest port had
significant public sector par-
ticipation that is rarely
acknowledged.

The Environment Minister
said the move to the south-
west was a government-
directed initiative which
depended on government to
make it function — the own-
ership, the structure and the
operations.

Responding, Mr Christie
said yesterday, “I am,
frankly, very disturbed by
the minister’s expressed
view.

“Again, he is dead wrong.
He is trying too hard to justi-
fy a bad decision to locate
the port at Arawak Cay.

“A decision that serves
only special interests.”

“We were committed as a
government to inducing the
owners of the port facilities
on Bay Street to close their
facilities and move to a new
port.

“Tt could only happen if
they were going to be lead
participants,” the PLP leader
said.

He said his government
had established a genuine
public/private sector partner-
ship.

“We intended for Bahami-
ans to be the lead sharehold-
ers.

“All my government was
asking was for an allotment
of shares to offer the
Bahamian public,” Mr
Christie said.

“As far as the offer froma
private company to develop
the Arawak Cay site, lam
also aware that private com-
panies were interested in
developing or participating
in the southwest port.”

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
SAA OO Leis

ye Pete
822-2157



m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



LEADER of the opposition
Perry Christie admonished gov-
ernment for its handling of the
almost two-week long "sick-out"
by public health nurses.

Speaking in the House of
Assembly during his contribution
to the 2009/2010 budget debate,
Mr Christie said he was astound-
ed that the government and
Health Minister Dr Hubert Min-
nis allowed so much time to pass
before sitting down to negotiate
an end to the nurses’ stand-off.

"I am very surprised at the way
in which the industrial action by
the nurses has been handled by
the government. It is astounding
that the minister of health and
the minister of labour have
allowed so much time to pass
without addressing the outstand-
ing issues directly with the nurses
union.

"And even if it is a government
decision not to speak with the
nurses, I would have expected the
minister of health with his per-
sonal and professional connec-
tion to persuade his colleagues to
allow him to sit and solve the
problems," Mr Christie told par-
liament, adding that this lack of
action by government was irre-
sponsible.

Yesterday, representatives
from the Bahamas Nurses Union,
the Public Hospitals Authority,
the Ministry of Health and the
Department of Labour were
locked in a meeting for hours in
the hope of bringing an end to
the 10-day nurses sick-out that is
crippling the country's health-care
system.

Director of Labour Harcourt
Brown said the meeting was
adjourned to Monday — although
union officials say they want to
meet as early as Friday — with no
resolution, adding that govern-
ment representatives were

66

Iam very
surprised at
the way in
which the
industrial
action has
been handled

.
*
a
4
.
*
.
O

[(_ ="

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

wT) LEADER ar SRG ail m aU oM SICKO



mulling over proposals put forth
by the union.

Injunction

On Wednesday, nurses called
in sick for a ninth day in protest of
government's decision to defer
their promised $10 million health
insurance plan due to the current
economic crisis — in spite of a
court ordered injunction that they
return to work.

It is unclear if the sick-out con-
tinued yesterday, but The Tribune
understands that while some nurs-
es returned to work, those with
valid doctor's sick notes remained
at home.

Mr Christie, a former minister
of health, stressed that despite
any disappointment felt over the
nurses’ actions, it is government's
responsibility to intervene and
bring order to national issues.

Mr Christie suggested that if
the PLP's National Health Insur-
ance plan had been implemented,
the issue could have been avoid-
ed. He also suggested that gov-
ernment provide some level of
coverage for public nurses until
they are able to institute the full
health insurance plan.

"This is an issue that will not go
away for the simple reason that
some people who have no insur-
ance will die if affected by cer-
tain illnesses because of not being
able to afford the cost of care.
There is nothing more stark and
real than the inequalities in health
care that all of us are part of
maintaining in our country.

"Cabinet ministers have full
insurance coverage; members of
parliament have the same and the
nurses were promised their own
health insurance. This is a tough
challenge for nurses and for the
country,” he said.

Bannister condemned for linking PLP
with Nazi propaganda techniques



m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

OPPOSITION leader Perry Christie yesterday
condemned Youth, Sports and Culture Minister
Desmond Bannister for what he called an “unac-
ceptable and unaccountably vicious attack” in which
it was claimed that the PLP is using Nazi propa-

ganda techniques.

Addressing the House of Assembly yesterday
morning, the former prime minister said: “As we
have heard in this debate, there is still the necessity
to speak truth to power. It is therefore a sad duty for
me to refer to the statement by the Member for
Carmichael (Desmond Bannister). (He) could bring
himself to connect the PLP with the vile, repugnant
and abhorrent policies of Adolf Hitler.

“Whatever his intentions, Carmichael stands con-
demned for such an unacceptable and unaccountably
vicious attack,’ Mr Christie said as he made his
contribution to the 2009/2010 budget debate.

Hitler

Speaking in parliament on Monday, Mr Bannister
had said that the repetition of the phrase “stop,
review and cancel” by the Opposition amounted to
the PLP — intentionally or otherwise — using pro-
paganda techniques outlined by Nazi leader Adolf
Hitler in his book “Mein Kampf.”

“Members opposite have developed the refrain
‘stop, review and cancel’ almost to a science and I






i 4
rt is

PCT Rw erg
= 3





+2333 Paper Fans,



Best Quality
2 Ply Heavy Weight

Car Flags
$5 oS

s & Garlands (Ail in Flag Colours)
60” SATIN - $3.99





MAT ONE aaa

ed, “people will believe a big lie sooner than a little
one and if you repeat it frequently enough people
will sooner or later believe it.”

“These kind of political attacks are unwarranted
and disgraceful,” said Mr Christie yesterday, as he
also congratulated his party’s MPs for their “sterling
contributions” to the budget debate.

Opposition members have suggested for some-



want members oppo-
site to know that when-
ever they utter that
phrase they are follow-
ing the political theory
of one of history’s most
vicious tyrants, (whose)
big lie theory is well
known,” he said.

Mr Bannister sug-
gested that the PLP is
repeatedly using the
phrase in the hope
that, as Hitler suggest-

time, and reiterated throughout the 2009/2010 bud-
get debate, that by reviewing, delaying and in some
cases cancelling certain contracts signed under the
former PLP administration, the FNM caused eco-

fully in 2008.

nomic growth to slow down and made matters worse
for the country when the global financial crisis struck

In its assessment of the country last year, the
international credit rating agency Standard and Poor

said the move took the “growth momentum” out of

Gélebrate 56 years of
ndep endence

New! Coat of Arms Flag $25

Buntings and Pennants —

18x36 - Bunting $10
36x72 - Bunting $25
48x96 - Bunting $40

Lapel Pins

4°x6” Stick Flags $ 1.00
* 8"x12” Stick Flags $ 1.99

Bahamas Blankets
Flag Appliques from

Tri Colour Shakers
Bahamas Ties

Bahamas Beads From $ 2.99
Flag Cell Phone Cases $10.00

the economy — a statement which the Opposition
said validated their view.



Ba hamas



16ft - Pennant $7.50
6Oft - Pennant $30
Line of Flags $15 & $25





$20.00
$ 2.25
$ 2.25
$ 2.99
$18.00






Turquoise, Gold, Black, Solids

60” TriColour Satin Stripe

Just like the Flag! $8. 50

¢ 12”x18” Stick Flags $ 2.99
© ft x Sft Flags $10.00
© 4ft x 6ft Flags $20.00

SALE! 24”x36” Flags $5
< We also have USA flags, Bunting, Bows, Ribbon & Decorations

Madeira St. [242] 325-8233
Robinson Rd. [242] 322-3080

FLAGS

dabuies, '€ vif Te De



Home Fabrics, Abaco
[242] 367-6003

The Islander Shop, Spanish Wells
[242] 333-4104

Uae Le

info@homefabricsltd.com

| MYSTERY INCENTIVES, DISCOUNTS & PRIZES
with every purchase through Father's Day:

vi ineyard vines’
mariha’s vireryared

MORLEY
For *®
MEN !

Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6654/6

Bayparl Building, Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-8240 « Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com

CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

Tue Moet Tromonas Rretoaanoy & Cuore Ever, of Tun Jon & Far!
Bla" s Oty PRoronaL, Chemo Sos Cane & UPsousoey Caen Ses.

* Carpet, L Jpheliery, Stone and Marhic Coan o&
Reseraion Speciale.

a Prochen Cleaning Pans ToT aarp & Heavy
Sag, Hascteren, ‘Lireasc, Watermarks and Siaire inom
Cupeting & Femitire, restoring them to like acw
afb [recto of replacemene £161.

Cape, Sofa’s, Lowa. Chairs. Dining Ciairs, Cars,
Doan, Grown, Tiles, ietHe & Stose

Permian, Worl d& Silk Canpet Cleaning Specialist
* Aiehle Polishing. Reworation & Cane
+ Woed Floor Resteralion
Suited Stone Tech Profesional Crotracior
CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS
PHONE: 323-8083 o 323-1594
COVEY WE CAN CPT REY

ee perce cer? Beer tong ecb con © Heuer, ore
+ paper atc

AAS LAL, AAA OW FAT

PROCHEM SYSTEM (om)

JUME 2054

a SEE

| A bo

oorTiwiat + | 5 208 | wh_| 6 | |r
a | ts 40 | wn | as as |
uenevonan + | to a6 | wa | evo [as [rs
renwwronsanaon + | 40 [330 | wa| gon | |
rues a fo [ut ee

AME FLICK er | at | as | WA | ts | meas [tO |
JAMGELSH DEMONS =e | tt [min | MA | 00 | ik [t040 |

GALLERIA eae

LSE YUOUH E PME CSE Al 80- 4 WANE GALL He as a

mcerranue —c [ts [an [oa | a |e [00
aorricioer a] 140 | 940 [Wi 608 | a0 | 100
THE HANGOVER e | 410 | 3:35 | Mim | ean | 8:35 | 1040
jw» | [a0 | wn | 60 | 00 | 120
mewn 1 [ets | 5 [ wn | 815 | 60 | 15
(es

380-FLIX

LAH IU





PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Dishonesty not a good policy

IN DECEMBER 2001 The Tribune did an
exposé on how employees, aided and abetted by
unscrupulous doctors, were abusing “sick leave”
benefits. Employers complained that the abuse
was costing them thousands of dollars each

ear.
One retail outlet with a staff of about 250
Bahamians said that in the month of January
that year it had lost a total of 1,672 hours or 209
working days by staff being out “sick.” The sick
benefits “for the month of January were over
$10,000,” The Tribune was told.

We took the name of the doctors in question
and sent a robustly healthy looking reporter to
get a sick note.

The first doctor sent a nurse out to the wait-
ing room to get the details from our “patient.”
Back she came, not with an invitation to see
the doctor, but with a sick note for the time
our reporter had requested.

The same reporter then went to a second
doctor, only this time he decided to tell the
doctor that he needed a sick note because he
wanted to spend some time in Miami at a social
function and the note was the only way that he
could get off work.

The doctor was most obliging, asked him how
many days he thought he’d need, and wrote up
the required note — no examination. Each doc-
tor in a matter of minutes had made about $68
by being an accomplice in dishonesty.

Over a week ago more than 50 per cent of
this country’s hospital nursing staff staged a
“sick-out” — both in Nassau and Freeport.

They were protesting the fact that their group
health insurance plan, promised for this year,
had to be postponed until next year because of
insufficient funds.

There was a possibility that they could receive
the insurance sooner if the economic climate
improved.

The nurses were having none of it, and so
they walked out.

It was soon obvious that, although they were
calling their little interlude a “sick-out”, from
their public statements it was obvious that it
was a strike. In the end the Prime Minister got
a Supreme Court injunction ordering them back
to work, failing which they would be in con-
tempt of court.

When Sir Burton Hall’s order was read to
more than 200 nurses called to a meeting Mon-
day night by the Bahamas Nurses Union (BNU)
for that purpose, many insisted that they were
still sick.

Many also made it clear that they intended to
take all of their sick days, defy the court order,
risk being held in contempt and ordered to jail.
By the remarks of some of them it seemed that
they had doctors who would readily give them
the needed sick note.

Apparently, in some of these civil service
contracts, a specified number of “sick” days is
written into the contract as a part of the employ-
ee’s entitlement — sick or not sick, they are
extra days off. This, of course, is all wrong. If
they can take off without being sick, then the
“rest days” should be called just that, because
sickness it is not.

However, it appears that to justify this, they
have to have a doctor’s sick slip.

This article is being written for those doctors
who might become a party to their little enter-
prise — those nurses, that is, who are not sick.
This in no way refers to nurses who might have
a genuine illness.

In his sworn affidavit for the Supreme Court,
Mr Herbert Brown, managing director of the
Public Hospitals Authority, said he knew of
“no outbreak of any epidemic or other conta-
gious illness at any of the public hospital facili-
ties that would explain the widespread illness
among the nurses employed at the various facil-
ities” that would account for the 303 who called
in sick on June 8, and daily after that in varying
numbers.

We are writing this as a red flag of warning to
doctors who might have sympathy for nurses
who want “sick” notes, not because they are
sick in the ordinary sense of the word, but
because they are angry with their employer and
want to push an issue.

On June 15 the Supreme Court ordered the
nurses to return to work immediately or face
contempt charges that could mean jail and the
seizing of union funds.

But this is a warning to others — especially
the doctors —who might get caught up through
sympathy in this dispute.

The court has warned that anyone who does
anything to help the nurses break the terms of
the court order, may also he held in contempt of
court and may be committed to prison or fined
or “have his assets seized.”

So we suggest to doctors that their sick slips
should go to genuinely sick patients, especially
in view of the testimony of the head of the hos-
pital authority that he doesn’t know of any epi-
demic that would take down so many healthy
nurses at the same time.



Pirst Baptist Church

289 Markel St South « P.O. Box A-T6R4 = Nassau, Bahamas

THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

Our only hope here below is
our help from God above.

Difficult to justify
extra spending in
these tough times

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Many of us who served in the
Public Service had the option
of joining one or more group
medical plans offered by local
insurance companies.

However, many of us
also joined the Bahamas Pub-
lic Services Union Medplan and
remained with the BPSU even
after retirement.

It is believed that this same
option was available to public
servants in the Health Ministry
as well as other Ministries and
Departments.

Why did not Health Ministry
employees take advantage of
this option for themselves and
their families?

Also, are there still national
insurance benefits payable to
workers?

With the deep recession now
being experienced world wide,
it is difficult to justify any addi-
tional expenditure because rev-
enues have been decreasing in
our main industries of tourism
and financial services, while
there are current operational
overhead payments which have
to be met.

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



The traditional ways of
attacking this dilemma are
either to cut expenditure or
raise new taxes.

As one can readily appreci-
ate, many businesses here in
The Bahamas and world wide
have had to close and employ-
ees discharged when expendi-
ture exceeds income, and cus-
tomers are not buying their
product.

This can be seen in the auto-
mobile industry in the States.
Similarly, tourists from our
main markets are not travelling
as they used to.

Hence our industry has suf-
fered a down-turn.

More taxes are not the
answer either due to the job
losses and increases in public
spending for social services in
respect of those who have lost
jobs. Excessive borrowing is not
a prudent way out because the
loans have to be repaid with
interest by ourselves and pos-

sibly future generations. Fur-
ther, there are international
organisations who closely mon-
itor such activities by develop-
ing countries.

So one wonders in amaze-
ment why there are people who
are so unreasonable in these dif-
ficult times as to raise the topic
of more money for themselves
from the public purse.

Private sector businesses can-
not continue to operate when
their overheads reach a certain
limit and neither can any gov-
ernment make “blood out of
stone” and spend money which
they do not have.

Why is this so difficult for
some Bahamians to under-
stand?

CONCERNED
BAHAMIAN
Nassau,

June, 2009.

(It’s because they don’t want
to understand, and if our read-
ers would examine more close-
ly what is happening they will
see politics stirring the pot of
controversy. The unsophisticat-
ed worker is always a useful
ingredient. — Ed)

Lessons emerging from Air France disaster

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THE May 11, 1996 crash of a
ValuJet DC-9 — amid thick
sawerass, crocodiles and snakes
in the Florida Everglades —
that claimed the lives of
Maxwell and Lucille Newbold
and over 100 other people, is
listed on a Federal Aviation
Administration website as one
of “11 major airplane accidents
that made an impact on the way
the aviation industry and the
FAA conduct business today.”

The listing is part of an FAA
online safety library of “insti-
tutional knowledge” compiled
from accident investigations to
identify probable accident caus-
es and potentially, prevent any
similar occurrences.

It is now generally agreed
that such investigations have,
over the past twenty years,
helped commercial airlines to
achieve such an extraordinary
safety record that an air disaster
is now considered a statistical
anomaly.

According to their website,
the FAA plans “to stock the
library with 40 more historical-
ly significant accidents by the
end of 2009,” with the recent
crash of AF 447 certain to be
included.

The speculated mid-air
breakup of Air France Flight
447 — for whatever reason —
and the presumed loss of all 228
on board has presented avia-

DELTA

Inspiration for your kitchen & bath!

SUNDAY SEAVICES
F:00am, SO0am, 11:15am

PASTOR EARLE FRANCIS J.P.,0.0,
Mariage Officer, Counsellor, Intarcessor
c 323-6452 * 393-578
Fae 326-440 AS44518

tion safety professionals with a
challenging task. With recovery
of the aircraft’s tell-tale black
box and cockpit voice recorder
(CVR) considered unlikely,
experts are analysing the “fly-
by-wire” aircraft’s automatical-
ly generated maintenance alerts
indicating that a string of mal-
functions resulted in an even-
tual loss of cabin pressure and
complete electrical failure.

In a fly-by-wire system, elec-
tronic impulses are sent to air-
craft controls instead of direct
mechanical connections.

The effect of widely dispersed
thunderstorms towering up to
50,000 feet and producing
updrafts of up to 100 miles per
hour “that would have really
rocked that plane when it hit
it,” has not been completely
ruled out, in addition to human
error, flawed assumptions, pre-
existing failures, unintended
consequences of design choic-
es, terrorism and possible
organisational lapses.

With regard to the Air Traffic
Control system, with a Future
Air Navigation System (FANS)
using satellite technology still
some years away, the question
persists as to, “Why are we fol-



| The Consignment Shop |

Tel. 325-0077, Nassau Street,

lowing airplanes across the
ocean with World War II radio
technology? We’re still using
ground-based radar for the
ATC airspace system instead of
the GPS that can tell me how to
get to my driveway.”

An organisational lapse was
claimed to be behind the deci-
sion in 2000 to purchase a $3
million radar to replace the one
installed at the then-Nassau
International Airport in 1986,
but which, to date, remains
“mothballed” due to lack of
necessary software and upgrad-
ing.

On the ill-fated Air France
flight, the passenger comple-
ment was an airborne ‘Tower
of Babel’, with “the democrati-
sation of air travel” reflected in
the mix of nationalities
onboard: 61 French citizens; 58
Brazilians; nine Chinese; nine
Italians; six Swiss; five British;
five Lebanese; four Hungari-
ans; two Americans and others
from a total of 32 countries,
from Estonia to Gambia to
Morocco to the Philippines.

SIMON ARTZI
Nassau,
June, 2009.

Open from Tuesday to Saturday.

The place where your money has more value!
We sell good quality items 3 times cheaper than
anywhere else!

We convert all items you don’t use into CASH!

1-6ft. Gold Fishing Gaff

Near North Andros
in 2500ft. of water

@ . If found Please Contact
te GBP

@FINE BUILDERS HARDWARE & PLUMBING®

Established 1951

“es
IFT & BRIDAL REGISTR

Harbour Bay Shopping Centre oe
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448 4

Mr. John Treco
nan

; Dowdeswell Street * Tel: 322-1103
ow!





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



oln brief MB SUPREME COURT TRIAL: SHIMEAKIMA PRATT

Murder accused claimed to have stabbed Defence
Force officer with rat tail comb, court hears

Regional
integration
movement
‘stronger
than ever’

GUYANA president
Bharrat Jagdeo, incoming
chairman of CARICOM,
said regional integration
remains on course and called
on member states to support
the movement.

Speaking at a media brief-
ing ahead of the 13th meet-
ing of the Conference of
Heads of Government of
CARICOM, scheduled for
July 2-4, he said that in light
of the fragility of the global
climate, it was critical to
affirm that “the integration
movement is as strong as
ever before.”

President Jagdeo, who is
also the lead head of govern-
ment with responsibility for
agriculture in CARICOM’s
quasi cabinet, acknowledged
that the community is grap-
pling with “unprecedented
challenges” — many of which
have been induced by the
international economic cri-
sis, but said institutional
mechanisms set up to guide
CARICOM through this
period must be allowed to
work. He emphasised that
CARICOM leaders have a
“deep desire” to work
together, and that differ-
ences of opinions are
inevitable in the face of
diversity, but do not indicate
disunity.
















SIUC

PRR Sate oe
FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS
PHONE: 327-6464
WESEND ‘EM PACKIN’

m@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter i
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net |)

A CRIME scene investi-
gator testified in the
Supreme Court yesterday
that murder accused
Shimeakima Pratt claimed to
have stabbed Defence Force
officer Gary Carey with a rat
tail comb last August.

The trial into Carey’s
death opened before Senior
Supreme Court Justice Anita
Allen yesterday. Pratt, 31,
who is represented by attor-
ney Romona Farquharson,
is accused of causing the Tim Clarke/Tribune staff
death of Petty Officer ACCUSED: Shimeakima Pratt, 31, leaving

Carey, 54, on Sunday, court yesterday.
August 17, 2008. The vic-

tim was found dead in her

Minnis Subdivision apartment.

Detective Constable Napoleon Sands, a crime scene technician
attached to the Carmichael Road Division, told the court that
when he arrived at Pratt’s apartment on August 17, he saw Carey
laying face up in a pool of blood in the front room.

Shirtless

He told the court that Carey was shirtless and was only wearing
black sweat pants.

DC Sands said the victim appeared to have been foaming at
the mouth and nose and had puncture wounds in his chest. He said
he also saw that Carey’s right eye had been injured.

The officer said that upon entering the western bedroom, he
observed what appeared to be droplets of blood on the floor and
condom packets near the bed.

He told the court that he also discovered a mop in the bathroom
soaked with what appeared to be blood, and that he collected
swabs of blood from the deceased and a brown pill from the dining
room table.

DC Sands said that Pratt had told him that Carey was known to
take a male enhancement pill.

Sands testified that he took photographs of the scene and took the
mop, brown pill, swabs, and two towels with suspected blood on
them to the police forensic lab for testing on September 3.

He testified that he, several officers and the accused returned to
the apartment on August 22, and that the accused took them to the
western bedroom and showed them a rat tail comb with which
she claimed she had stabbed Carey.

The officer told the court that Pratt appeared calm and collect-
ed at the time.

During cross-examination by Ms Farquharson, DC Sands admit-
ted that Pratt had co-operated fully with police in their investiga-
tion and that no blood had been pouring from the puncture wounds
in Carey’s chest. The officer also admitted that he did not take a pic-
ture of the brown pill on the dining room table.

The trial continues at 10am today. Deputy director of public
prosecutions Cheryl Grant-Bethel, Stephanie Pintard and Terry
Archer are prosecuting the case.

DS meer sre tBu sri
a PGT WinGuard Impact
Resistant Window and get
tee LO ORs) Rees] eM liet isa

Saturday, June 6
Saturday, June 13
eRe! ITT 0

EFFORTLESS HURRICANE PROTECTION”

Fj WinQuard

IMPACT-RESETANT WINDOWS & DOORS

MAXIMUM HURRICANE PROTECTION. MIAMI DADE TEST RESULTS PROVE IT.

BAHAMAS

COMMONWEALTH BUILDING SUPPLIES

677.2100 * Robinson Rd * www.cbhsbahamas.com



Sco am



JUST WEST OF CITY MARKET, TONIQUE DARLING HIGHWAT

ee es ee es ete



Come see our

Including Hondas Starting at $8,900. 00

many to choose from...

5 Seater Vans
Starting at

Government
Workers

“IN-HOUSE FINANCING AVAILABLE”
$15,900.00) 2005/06 30 SEATER

gS ee

(242) 341-2249

FAX: (242) 361-1136

Visit our Website: www.autohl.com

~~

: rd i
Size 7-12

Gold Multi
Bronze Multi
Black Multi

Te
sneakerbour

Rosetta St. - Ph: 325-3336



PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009



eae BIC ‘yet to repair

AT 3 LOCATIONS

2 DAYS ONLY
Special FATHER’S DAY

Sale For



0, Off

All MEN’s Items



ot
oF



1 <>fY
eS he

—_ a i"

Branches
The Mall At Marathon
* Tel: 39347478
Mon = Fri:i0:30am = 7:30om
Sat 10:30am - 8:30pm

FREE GIFT
WRAPPING

Village Road Shopping Centre
* Tal: 393-2019
Mon - Sat 10am - 7pm

Main Store
Rosetta St. Tel: 322-8596
Store Hours:

Mon - Fri @:30am - §-309m
Sat Sam - Gom

ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ARE ACCEPTED
[SS] > =

SAV-A-CHEK VALID FOR REGULAR PRICED ITEMS ONLY

—
VISA

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

cut phone lines’

BTC has yet to repair phone
lines mistakenly cut by work-
ers in the East Bay Street area
three weeks ago, it was
claimed yesterday.

Angry business owners, who
say the situation is impacting
their livelihood, condemned
the telecommunications
provider for failing to rectify
the situation despite promis-
ing to do so.

They also claimed that at
first, BTC officials pretended
the rain was to blame for the
lines being down, only admit-
ting that a cable had been mis-
takenly cut during a trenching
exercise after almost a week
of the phones being out of ser-
vice.

At that point, BTC workers
finally showed up to look into
the matter, but in the end only
put in an inefficient “tempo-
rary line” which is subject to
frequent disconnections, The
Tribune was told.

mistakenly cut.

of the street.





ia = ae : Miata : : ae
WORK TAKING PLACE on East Bay Street (above), led to the line being

will not compensate us for all

Meanwhile, the severed
main line can still be seen
bundled up at the side

One businessman said: “This
is incredibly disruptive to our
business and we know BTC

the cell phone calls and drives
we have had to make to send
and receive faxes.”

Bahamians ‘want action



from government on crime’

BAHAMIANS are fed up with hollow speech-
es about crime and want action from the govern-
ment, a local anti-crime group said.

Bahamas Against Crime (BAC) issued a state-
ment to this effect yesterday in response to speech
by Minister of National Security Tommy Turn-
quest last week, in which he said that the Bahamas
must abandon “narrow approaches” to policing.

“While he did not explain what ‘narrow
approaches’ meant, the question that begs an
answer from the minister and the government is
whether they are now ready and willing to involve
other stakeholders in addressing crime, the
number one problem plaguing the nation,” BAC
said.

Rev CB Moss, executive director of the group,
said: “Crime in the Bahamas is increasing daily,
which was confirmed by the to-date crime fig-
ures presented in the House of Assembly last
Monday night by Minister Turnquest. And these

figures do not include unreported crimes which by
some estimates could be as much as the reported
crimes in some categories.

“Much precious time was wasted by the
appointment of the National Crime Commission
nearly two years ago, which is proving to be
almost useless.

“While the landscape of the Bahamas is being
increasingly stained by the blood of our people,
and many victims of crime and their families are
experiencing much pain, nice speeches are being
made in parliament often designed to deflect the
serious concerns of the people.”

The statement ended by stating that the time
has come to “take off the gloves” and seriously
address the crime crisis, as well as confront those
who are failing to do their job in the fight against
crime.

“The well-being of our children and future gen-
erations is at stake,” the statement said.



a ee

#
é
J
Ps
+
a

:
g
£
2

C=
Ld

|



i= 7
od re
a

James Franklin Knowles

The Knowles Family, would like to thank the many people who
supported and comforted us in the loss of our husband, father,
brother, uncle and confidant, James Franklin Knowles. We offer
special thanks to The Prime Minister, the Members of his Cabinet
and all of the Members of Parliament for their kind words and
tributes. We would also like to thank the Protocol Office, The
Royal Bahamas Defense Force and The Royal Bahamas Police
Force for their excellent organization. In addition to this, we would
like to thank the entire Bahamian community.

The honor and respect shown to our beloved Jimmy by everyone
has awed and humbled us in this most difficult time. The
Bahamian people showed our family and the world at large that
many and not just our family knew Jimmy for the man he was.
The ideals, values and morals that he adhered to, hold strong in
people's minds and that the fight he fought is something worth
striving for.

James Knowles loved his family and his country. His most lasting
legacy is us, the people of the Bahamas. If his funeral was any
indication of the integrity, honor and respect that we had for him
and each other, he would say that the road to the future is well
paved and that his work was done. He would have been proud
and honored for the service you have done for him and his family.
On his behalf and on behalf of the Knowles Family we'say our
sincerest thank you and you have our eternal gratitude.

Sincerely,

The Knowles Family



THE TRIBUNE

Widow with
Road Act policy

fined $400 for
no insurance

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A WIDOW paid a $400 court
fine for not having car insurance
— although she had a Road Act
policy at the time.

Housekeeper Annette But-
ler, 55, has spoken out to alert
other motorists covered under
the Road Act policy to be on
their guard.

Mrs Butler crashed into
another car on April, 1 ulti-
mately causing a three-car colli-
sion in the eastern area of New
Providence.

The Road Act coverage she
had in place at the time did not
cover the damage to the vehicles
involved in the wreck — which
cost her around $5,000 of per-
sonal savings to repair — but
Mrs Butler was shocked when
weeks later she was served with
a summons to appear in court
for not having her car insured.

Damage

Road Act insurance protects
a policy holder from liability for
the death or bodily injury of
another person involved in a car
accident, but not for damage to
property belonging to a third
party.

She said her husband, who
died four years ago, always han-
dled the insurance payments.
While on his deathbed, he
instructed his wife to collect
insurance papers and to contin-
ue paying for the same policy.

"Before he passed he said to
take the envelope that he always
keep in the car (to the insur-
ance company), give it to them
and they would take the old one
and give me a new one,” said
Mrs Butler. "And that's what
I've been doing for the past
three years."

The summons said Mrs Butler
drove while not covered
"against third party risk insur-

ance contrary to section 8 (1)
and (3) of the Road Traffic Act,
Chapter 220."

It ordered her to appear in
Court on May, 29 to answer to
the complaint.

She said she took the sum-
mons to her insurance company
for an explanation. She said they
were dumbfounded as Road
Act is still considered a legal
option for motorists.

Fearing a stiff penalty, Mrs
Butler paid a fine of $600 —
$400 for not having her car
insured and $200 for not exer-
cising due care and attention
while behind the wheel — the
day before she was due to
appear in court.

The Tribune was also given a
copy of Mrs Butler's payment
receipt and her Road Act poli-
cy, which expired a few weeks
after the accident.

An insurance insider told The
Tribune she had not heard of a
similar case and believes Mrs
Butler was fined because of a
misunderstanding of the law.

"The Act that (the summons)
is quoting is talking about third
party risk but they're thinking
that means third party insur-
ance. But third party risk means
you must be covered against any
bodily injury against themselves
or anyone else,” said the insider.
"He probably charged her with
it and she paid it not realising, so
that means she satisfied the
judgment but it really is a ficti-
tious fine. That's like you saying
you charged with murder and
the person never existed."

Comptroller of Road Traffic
Philip Turner told The Tribune
the relevant section of the Act is
up for interpretation.

Attempts to reach officials at
the Department of Prosecutions
or Court 6 proved fruitless.

Two weeks after the accident,
when her policy expired, Mrs
Butler said she switched her
coverage over to Third Party
Insurance.

Start looking for that Special Prom Dress
early and remember our flexible
layaway plan at

ORALEE’S FASHIONS

Mackey Street « Telephone: 393-0744
titer eT ar ce eee

THIS
FATHERS DAY
GIVE HIM A

5% OFF SALE
STOREWIDE

Luke & taurs co
Dowdeswell Street
322-1103

Sale Ends 6/20/09

THE Bahamas’ overseas
i offices are being set up to
i process applications for elec-
i tronic passports for Bahamians
i living abroad, Deputy Prime

? Minister and Minister of For-
i eign Affairs Brent Symonette
? confirmed.

Speaking in the House of
sembly during debate on the

i $1.7 billion national budget, he
: revealed that his ministry has
i been
: $21,889,462 for fiscal year
? beginning July 1.

given a budget of

This represents a decrease of

i $1,883,478 compared to the cur-
i rent budget
? matic of the hard economic
: times which we are presently
? experiencing,

“and is sympto-

”

Mr Symonette
id.
The Passport Office is one of

: the “critical areas” of the rev-
i enue-generating arm of the
? Ministry of Foreign Affairs, he
: said.

During the past 10 months,

: the Passport Office issued

19,072 e-passports, which gen-

erated $928,010, Mr Symonette
: reported.

And, the ministry’s combined

consular offices overseas
? processed 1,235 e-passports,
: which brought in $2

“We expect to see a substan-

; tial increase in these figures
: during the next fiscal period
i due to improvements to the
? Passport Office, and our over-
: seas consular offices coming
i online,” he said.

The e-passport system was

page

officially introduced
in December 2007.
The government
signed a contract
with Indusa Global,
a Greenville, South
Carolina-based
information tech-
nology develop-
ment and consulting
firm, for an estimat-
ed $12.7 million to
provide four sys-
tems to initiate the
project.

The Internation-
al Civil Aviation Organisation,
of which the Bahamas is a
member, has mandated that by
2010, all countries must be issu-
ing machine readable or e-pass-
ports.

242.422.4677

ken@erabahamas.com

ECs. === [=a By E/E

raves ey

CARRERA

Sy

; Te

%

BU

Brent Senn

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 7

Overseas offices to process e-passports

To correct many
of the difficulties
created by the
attempt to fulfil this
mandate, the Pass-
port Office has
occupied the second
floor of the Basden
Building on
Thompson Boule-
vard. Additional
staff was also hired,
Mr Symonette said.

He added that
the ministry is relo-
cating the section
dealing with the issuance of cer-
tificates of identity to the for-
mer Ministry of Foreign
Affairs, East Hill Street, in an

effort to reduce the number of

persons waiting for service.

AUT UR AT
Oe Fiver f

pe eit al

284 Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas (242) 302-2800
Marina Village * Crystal Court at Atlantis, Paradise Island
Marsh Harbour, Abaco * Harbour Island * Our Lucaya,
Freeport ,Grand Bahama * Bimini Bay, Bimini

www.erabahamas.com

_ Man sentenced for drug
_ anil Weapons charges

A MAGISTRATE has sen-

: tenced a man to two and a half
? years in prison on cocaine and
: weapons charges.

Donovan Kelvin Garvey, 38,

? of Grand Bahama, pleaded
? guilty to charges of cocaine and
? weapons possession before
: Magistrate Carolita Bethel who
i sentenced him on Monday.

Garvey had been charged

? in 2005. Court dockets stated
? that while at Freeport on Fri-
i? day, May 20, 2005, Garvey was
? found in possession of an unli-
: censed firearm, 19 rounds of .35

mmunition, and 24.2 pounds

? of cocaine.

Police said that the drugs

? and weapons were found at his
? Freeport home.

se.
ft
ERA

Dupuch Real Estate

TAGHeuer

SWISS AVANT-GARDE SINCE 1860





PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





The deafening silence of a nation
YOUR SAY

@ By ALESHA HART

Silence is our enemy. And in
silence an entire nation shows
fundamental flaws.

Ir THE modern
Bahamas is one where
society refuses to stand against
crime I denounce my citizen-
ship today.

For two minutes that
seemed like an eternity I held

my breath at the absence of a
nation at the Bahamas
Against Crime candlelight vig-
il

Our country’s inability to
show up against crime said
more to me than it could ever

Don Stainton (Protection) Ltd.

SERVING THE BAHAMAS SINCE 1978
HILLSIDE PLAZA, THOMPSON BOULEVARD
FREE ESTIMATES 322-8160/322-8219

or

=e = —|

¢ ROLL SHUTTERS

Aluminum rolling shutters are custom-fitted
and available in a choice of colours. They
provide security and hurricane protection.
Easily operated by hand crank or electric
motor, Roll shutters add beauty, security and
convenience to any home.

e We guarantee motors for 5 years, material |
and labour for two years and respond to
service calls within 48 hours, usually on the
same day.

key lock mech

gr
oO,

¢ ALUMINUM LOUVERED SHUTTERS

The look of colonial wooden shutters, but with
the strength and maintenance - free qualities of
aluminum. Add a finishing architectural touch to

your home with these functional yet decorative
shutters. Provides protection against storms,

sun and vandals.

© ALUMINUM ACCORDION SHUTTERS

Light enough to slide easily, yet strong enough to
withstand severe storm conditions. Heavy-duty

anisms for secure fastening.
=

as
¢ ALUMINUM HURRICANE AWNINGS

Economical and convenient, these easy-to-use
awnings are permanently installed and close
quickly for storm protection. They give everyday



This guide offers a look at the benefits of five varieties of Hurricane Shutters

0)
Z
0
V
i
fs
f
=
:
v
Z
z
C
C
v0

protection from heat and rain, and help prevent
ad fading of carpets and drapes.

* CLIP-LOCK ALUMINUM STORM PANELS

The most cost-effective protection available.
Lightweight, easy to store and to use. We give you
10% extra spring steel clips and use closed-end
headers to prevent the panels "creeping".



imagine. Lessons were taught.
Thank you Bahamas. Thank
you. Now when your grand-
mother is raped we must all
carry on with our regular day
as if nothing happened. When
your son of 14 is shot by a
stray bullet we should not be
enraged. Let’s carry on. When
your husband is robbed and
killed execution style because
he owns a business and some-
one thinks his life is too easy
we should carry on as if anoth-
er day has happened in par-
adise. Or, when your daughter
is beaten we should not look
at her blackened eyes. Just
stare at something else if she
crosses our path. Yes, let us
all be content.

I was not interested in who
organised the Bahamas
Against Crime candlelight vig-
il. Or that I got the news a bit
late.

It called on Bahamians to
stand against something and
I wanted to represent my fam-
ily because we stand together
against crime.

And this morning I am
more convinced that no state-
ment is too small. And as I lit
the little white candle for an
unnamed, I made my titanic
statement along with approx-
imately 150 others.

Perhaps we were mistaken

(those 150 who stood against
crime), and the criminal
resides in each of you and you
cannot stand because you are
the criminal.

The deafening silence of this
nation is haunting. Crime
elicited nary a public peep
from the Bahamian people.
Whatever they felt, Bahami-
ans largely kept it to them-
selves on Monday, June 15,
2009. The nation’s deafening
silence trampled our touted
values and marked the sad-
dest outcome of this time.

As Bahamian media should
tell its captive audience - we
are in disbelief at the submis-
sive national mood.

On that day the people did
not take to the streets. In
silence we have spoken. “We
will not forget” captured the
emotions of all who attended.
We understood that this gen-
eration of Bahamians did not
meet its duty.

We learned that this gener-
ation was tired, we understood
that this generation faltered,
and we disrespected the mem-
ory of innocent fallen victims
and tomorrow’s victims as
well.

Indifference to both crime
and politics may be responsi-
ble, plus the onslaught of self-
ishness spewed out by a peo-
ple unable and unwilling to
fight for anything. Is this the
story behind our violent nar-
ratives? Is this the reason that
within seconds of an apparent
retraction - and the “I will sue
you” hymnal accompanied by

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Civesry



If you're thinking
about health insurance,

. think of us.

When tough times come.








Cofmaimperial comes
through. Let The Boaharnes'
leader In life and health
Insurance Pele you meet thee
challenges of the day the
waoy we've been doing it for
over a century

— with confidence.

Stay confident.
Stay connected.

a _—_

= =
Colinalmperial

374.2000 346.8300

Wiew.colinaimpenialoam







“Silence is
consent. And
by consenting
to crime,
Bahamians bent
on keeping face
today at any
cost may be
sending instead
a message of
impunity to an
increasingly
lawless class.
In other words,
they can do as
they please.”



the rhythmic “my family was
insulted”- news stories and
talk shows were hectoring
people to accept an outcome,
however abhorrent—a shock-
ingly inappropriate, polarised
and unsolicited piece of
advice. Fact is, we should not
accept anything. We should
question everything. We
should be outraged in the face
of violence in any form. We
must.

However, the partisan
media and legal brainwashing
would not have worked if it
had not found a fertile ground
in the nation’s admirable
respect for silence.

The nation’s silent compo-
sure is based on the belief that
there will always be another
day, another injustice, another
court ruling, another decision.
That there will always be
another opportunity to right
the wrongs of today. Bahami-
ans know their democracy has
so far balanced its deep con-
servatism with a flexible, lim-
ber yet sluggish indifferent
streak. The losers of today
accept defeat because they
know they can be the winners

of tomorrow. Nothing is ever
completely lost in Bahamian
politics of survival.

You probably believe that
injustice will be rectified later.
But is it? And will it?

I’m not so sure. But the
absence of your presence is a
far more dangerous blow to
the very democratic institu-
tions the nation is being called
on to protect with obedient
silence.

Silence is consent. And by
consenting to crime, Bahami-
ans bent on keeping face
today at any cost may be send-
ing instead a message of
impunity to an increasingly
lawless class. In other words,
they can do as they please.

I suspect that history will
not be kind to us. We have
been the perpetrators of crim-
inal usurpation. We have been
the enablers.

The damage is done. No
amount of September demon-
strations, let alone October
political strife, will undo it.
Soon it will be in poor taste
to raise the silence issue. Prag-
matism will prevail: The Chris-
tian Council will be blasted as
uncaring, Bahamas Against
Crime will be bullied for poor
publicity, the government will
be charged with responsibility
for crime and individuals will
bear no personal accountabil-
ity. With a weakened Opposi-
tion to keep the issue of anti-
crime alive, the nation will for-
get and the criminal can legit-
imise himself just by virtue of
living in the Bahamas, as we
are a Silent nation. The
process has already begun.

I used to sleep soundly
every night knowing that the
famously resilient Bahamian
society and social system
would be there next morning
when I woke up. Not any-
more.

How could I when we are
the sons and daughters of
silence? A silence that ensures
rape, incest, murder and theft,
to name four, continues. Now
I wonder who will speak clear-
ly if something happens to me.

The Bahamas Cancer Centre at Centreville

Medical

Pavilion will

be hosting

individual

cancer clinics with two of the world's most
renowned specialists on Monday, June 22nd.
The clinics are open to the public.

The Hon. Prof. Dr. Arthur Porter
PC, MD, MBA, FACR, FACRO, FAAMA

Dr. Porter serves as Managing Director of The

Cancer

Centre and _ Director

of Radiation

Oncology. He is also the current Director
General and CEO of McGill University Health
Centre and author of more than 300 articles on
cancer research.

Dr. Karol Sikora
MA, MBBCh, PhD, FRCR, FRCP, FFPM

Dr. Sikora is the Director of Medical Oncology at
The Cancer Centre. He also serves as the Dean
of Britain's first independent Medical School at
the University of Buckingham and is the author
of the most widely-used cancer textbook in
graduate medical school in the United Kingdom.

The Bahamas Cancer Centre is one of only two
medical facilities outside the U.S. certified by the
American College of Radiation Oncology (ACRO)
and the only non-U.S. facility in the Western
Hemisphere to qualify for ACRO certification.

For more information,
Centreville Medical Pavilion



please contact: 502-9610.
¢ 72 Collins Avenue



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS



Swine flu (Official funeral for Milo B Butler

FROM page one

York from May 29
to June 3.

“The patient
experienced
symptoms upon
returning to the
Bahamas and
immediately
sought medical
attention,” the
Ministry said.
The patient has
undergone tests

home.

A specimen was sent to an }

ate rna eboratory and sults foyer of the House of Assembly from 11am
confirming the presence of the } ios Frid Gated 9
virus were received by the Min- } - som ah eee oT sbli 2 aie 7
istry of Health om Monday } o 5pm. The general public is invited to

evening.

The first confirmed case of the }
Influenza A (H1N1) virus in the }
Bahamas occurred in a young }

American tourist who arrived in i its details on the planned BTC

: dividend and Central Bank prof-

i it transfer, clearly shows the Gov-

At that time, staff at the Lyn- $ ernment is desperate to get its

den Pindling International Air- } hands on any revenues it can ina

? bid to fill the $374 million total

officials and hotel personnel : fiscal deficit, keep the national

were among a group of less than : gebt under control and dampen

20 people who were tested for i the looming public finances crisis.

the Bahamas on a flight from
New York on May 25.

port, Immigration and Customs

the influenza virus.

It was determined shortly } projected revenues of $1.411 bil-

afterwards that the tourist had ; [jon for 2009-2010 were some
: $151 million higher than antici-

: pated.

not infected anyone in the
Bahamas.
In this second confirmed case,

the Surveillance Unit of the } enue gain detailed here, the high-

Department of Public Health is } er forecasts were said to be based

also involved with the tracing } on legal and administrative

and monitoring of all people } improvements to Customs admin-

who have been in close contact ; istration and $114 million in extra
ae ? real property taxes and business
Health Minister Dr Hubert :

Minnis could not release any fur- }

ther information regarding the : tions came true, the IMF agreed

identity of the patient yesterday. } with its Budgetary projections

: ne ? that the GFS fiscal deficit —
Keys also confirmed its first case i which strips out $88 million in
? debt principal redemption—
The Monroe County Health } would come in at $286 million or

Department reported that a } 3.9 per cent of gross domestic

} product (GDP).

with the patient.

Also yesterday, the Florida

of swine flu.

young girl was treated for the
virus last week.

The Ministry of Health reit- | yield from planned revenue mea-

erated that precautionary mea- { sures appears uncertain, given the

sures against contracting the } reliance on improvements in tax

virus include covering your nose : administration. If revenues/pri-

and mouth with a tissue when } vatisation receipts are lower than

you cough or sneeze, disposing ; planned or take longer to materi-

of the tissue in the trash after ; alise, additional expenditure

use, along with frequent hand ; adjustment may be required in

? order to contain the deficit at 5.8

“Additionally, if you are expe- } per cent of GDP or below.”

riencing flu like symptoms, to }

washing with soap and water.

decrease the potential spread,

avoid contact with others, and : needed to buttress medium-term

; debt sustainability,” which is code

stay away from group settings,”
the ministry said.



THE Cabinet Office has announced that

? an official funeral for Milo Boughton But-
: ler Jr, former Speaker of the House of
? Assembly and parliamentarian, will be held
? on Monday, June 22, at Christ Church
? Cathedral, George Street.

Most Rev Drexel W Gomez, Archbish-

? op, Rt Rev Gilbert Thompson, Assistant
? Bishop, the Rev Dr James B Moultrie and
? the Venerable Archdeacon James E Pala-
? cious will officiate. The ceremony of inter-
? ment will follow at the Eastern Cemetery,

nO) or 1a YTS : Dowdeswell Street.

for possible influenza and is vol- :
untarily self-quarantined at }

Public

Mr Butler’s body will lie in state in the

view the remains and sign the Book of
Condolences.

The House of Assembly will be draped
in the colours of mourning and flags at
both Houses of Parliament will be flown at
half mast beginning on Friday, June 19
until after the funeral.

Mr Butler, the third son and sixth child
of the late Sir Milo B Butler Sr, and Lady
Caroline Butler, was born on November
30, 1936 in Nassau.

He received his primary education at
Worrell’s School and Eastern Senior
School and his secondary education at
Government High School.

Mr Butler later attended Dundee Tech-
nical College, Dundee Scotland and Middle
Temple Inns of Court, London, England.

Mr Butler ran unsuccessfully as a Pro-
gressive Liberal Party candidate during
the 1967 general elections for the City of

Nassau. He served as Chairman of the PLP
in 1969; as a Senator from 1969 to 1974,
becoming Vice President of the Senate
from 1972 to 1974.

In August 1974 Mr Butler became the
first Bahamian Consul-General, serving in
Miami, Florida, from 1974 through 1977.

Election

In 1977 he successfully contested the
seat for the Pinedale Constituency, which
he represented until 1992. During his
tenure in Parliament, Mr. Butler served as
Deputy Speaker of the House of Assembly
from 1987 to 1991 and as Speaker
from 1991 until the General Election of
1992.

During his political career he served as
Chairman of the following entities: the

Jr, former House Speaker

Transport Licensing Board; Town Plan-
ning Committee; the Bahamas Broadcast-
ing and Television Commission; the
Bahamas Electricity Corporation and the
Gaming Board.

He grew up in the Anglican tradition
and served as an altar boy.

Until his death, Mr Butler was a faithful
member of St Matthew’s Anglican Church,
serving as a member of the Vestry, the
Bishop’s Council, the Synod and the
Provincial Synod.

Mr Butler is survived by his sons, Milo
III, Godwin and Jevon; daughters, Angela
and Bernadette; former wives, Winfred,
and Comfort Baker; brothers, Raleigh Sr,
Elder Basil and Matthew, sister, Juanita;
three grandsons, four granddaughters, four
sisters-in-law, three aunts, 20 nephews, and
16 nieces, including Labour Minister of
State Loretta Butler-Turner.

FROM page one

The IMF said Government’s

Apart from the $37 million rev-

licence fee.
If the Government’s projec-

Yet the Fund warned: “The

The IMF then reiterated that
“structural revenue measures are

The Mercedes M-Class.
Beauty, brains and brawn.

Govt to take $30m dividend from BIC

speak for: “New or increased tax-
es.”

While the Budget projections
placed the Government on a
course to reduce the overall fiscal
deficit by 1.5 per cent of GDP by
the 2011-2012 fiscal year, largely
through reduced public spending,
it would not be enough to get the
Bahamas back on track to reduce
its debt-to-GDP ratio to 30-35 per
cent in the medium term.

Highlighting inflexibilities and
rigidities in civil servant and pub-
lic sector wages, and the
Bahamas’ social security and
infrastructure needs, the IMF
warned: “While this level of
expenditure containment would
flatten the increase of the debt
trajectory, it would not change
medium-term debt dynamics.

“Given the need to protect pri-

ority social and infrastructure
spending, and rigidities in the
public sector wage bill, a struc-
tural change on the revenue side
would likely still be needed to
achieve the authorities’ medium-
term objective of reducing debt
back to 30-35 per cent of GDP.”

“Heavy risks on the down side”
still faced the Bahamian econo-
my, with the IMF adding that its
forecast of a 9.2 per cent drop in
tourism earnings for 2009 was in
line with the January-April drop
in tourist arrivals.

“Sea arrivals were up by 5.5
per cent over the same period last
year, partly reflecting increased
demand for shorter and cheaper
cruise trips. However, tourists
arriving by air — who spend three
times as much daily as cruise
tourists and stay six times longer

“\"Ghoices Unlimice i
(Panty Supplies & ‘Rent tals)

Z

2s
7+

7

ope
Pe:

\

Specializing In

“Theme Party” Items
Hannah Montana/High School Musical
Tinkerbell/Disney Princess/Dora/Diego

Spiderman/Backyardigans/Winnie the Pooh
Abby Caddabby/Elmo/Bratz
And Many More
Monday - Saturday, 9am - opm

Tel: 394-0907
Jerome Ave
i

OU



— dropped by 15.5 per cent,” the
IMF said.

“The number of commercial
property acquisitions by non-
Bahamians dropped 36 per cent
compared to the first quarter of
2008, with the total value
($70 million) declining by 65 per
cent.

“Similarly, the number of resi-
dential property purchases by
non-Bahamians dropped by 19
per cent, with a decline in total
value of 25 per cent.”



Love Beach
Cottage

Gated, Newly refurbished,
3 Bed, 2 bath, furnished,
private beach access

across road, private deck
and tropical garden

$2,100 per month

Call 356-3462
ee

weekdays

NOTICE

ASSISTANT
MANAGER
NEEDED

FOR SHOE VILLAGE SHOE STORE

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
REQUIREMENTS:
«5 Years or more experience in the retail
or customer service industry
* High School Graduate
* Strong communication skills
* Good motivator for achieving goals

SALARY COMMENSURATE WITH EXPERIENCE

*all applications received will be kept in confidence

APPLY VIA FAX TO 242-326-0570
or email to hr@grsbah.net



LORENECS





When you think of the average SUV on
the road today, you think of road-
hogging, air-polluting gas guzzlers
that wouldn’t know the meaning of
high precision and fuel efficiency if it
were emblazoned on their windshields.
But there is an alternative. The refined
M-Class from Mercedes-Benz.

With its superior German styling utilising
only high-grade materials, its robust
engine power delivering exemplary
turn-on-a-dime performance whilst still
being frugal on fuel and its handling of
pot-holed roads and 1.5 ft. flooded
streets, the Mercedes-Benz M-Class is
clearly the best choice in SUVs.




Celebrate

Ad



Mercedes-Benz



TYREFLEX STAR MOTORS

Call us today for your new Mercedes-Benz M-Class at 325.4961
Wulff Road, P. 0. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas ¢ Fax: 323.4667




Liz i

ENTIRE MEN’S DEPT
June 18th - 20th



NEW ARRIVALS

& UNDERWEAR

All Sales final. Sale excludes school uniforms and souvenirs
Oe ime site CRe elmer Ce

(Oa =) Sf

Palmdale * Harbour Bay * Town Centre Mail * Bay Street





PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Centreville House becomes

@ By GENA GIBBS

WITH the restoration of the
former Collins House on
Shirley Street, the Antiquities,
Monuments and Museums
Corporation (AMMC) is lead-

ing the way as downtown Nas-
sau gets a facelift.

Now called Centreville
House, headquarters of the
AMMC, it is being adorned
with lignum vitae, yellow elder
and a wide range of Bahamian

flower and fruit trees and
shrubs.

Bahamian environmental
artist, Antonius Roberts, has
been contracted to advise
AMMC on creating a space
that educates and appeals to

all the senses.

And, with Tanya Ferguson
of the Bahamas National
Trust as a consultant to the
landscaping project, they went
about creating what AMMC
director Dr Keith Tinker
described as “an oasis within a
mad setting.”

In this “oasis” can also be
found madera, horseflesh,
coco plum, joujou, sea grape,
coconut, sour sop, gua-






















































Fun
VT

aA
Tired of thé Same

Old Boring Summer
School?

FATHER’S DAY
AND SAVE

SPERRY@
40% OFF

Try Something
New & Creative!

Activities Include:
Arts & Crafts
Drawing & Painting

Music & Drama
Lessons

25% OFF
5% OFF

—e

Ae se Nan
el: 393-6897 —

"YT

Swimming and
Sports

OT Card 1 UA
TRIE CO RS LILL

CALL NOW AND
RESERVE YOUR SPOT
BEFORE IT’S TOO LATE

327-4133
or Email:

westmoor1@hotmail.com

ie

5 ei
Gifts for
Work or

ala ptops ,

Acer
Sony
an

A Toshiba
Apple

Down
Financing
Available

Rose Meo Sota etc 5 Mackey/st it
Parking Lot

Electrojack Business Centre Rose Ln.
West of KFC(Mackey St.) Drive Thru 393-6897

Also Available @:

Electrojack Town Centre Mall -3566206

Cyberjack-Mall@ Marathon - 3946254 /5

Gadgets & Gears- Mall@ Marathon - 3937781/2

malamee, among others.

Trees chosen were recom-
mended by the Bahamas
National Trust and the Nature
Conservancy to make sure the
botanical representation is
authentic and historically cor-
rect.

The grounds also feature a
pond, replica of a Lucayan
chief’s hut, and facilities where
children can play and learn
about the way of life of the
Lucayans, who inhabited the
Bahamas when Christopher
Columbus arrived more than
500 years ago.

Mr Roberts said his goal is
for visitors to enter and exit
the green-space at Centreville
House “with a five-dimen-
sional experience.”

“The guest will have com-
mitted to memory the sight,
sounds, smell, touch and taste
of the Bahamian historical and
cultural heritage,” he said.

The project is a product of
the Lindroff Development
Company which drafted the
proposal to the AMMC board
and assists with the funding.

Orian Lindroff, owner of
the company, is a graduate of
St Andrew’s School, class of
1961, when the school was still
located at Centreville House.

A similar project is the
Retreat at the Bahamas
National Trust Headquarters.

But Centreville House is
going a step beyond, Mr
Roberts said, by facilitating
space for a large capacity of
visitors with the grounds being
used for weddings or cultural
heritage programmes.

“There is a revitalisation of
downtown (Nassau) that has
to take place and we thought
that we would jump-start the
process by providing an adap-
tive use of a green space for
having a series of functions,”
said AMMC director Dr Tin-
ker.

Corporation chairman Dr
Davidson Hepburn noted that
Bahamian colonial architec-
ture “is unique to our envi-
ronment” and preserving what
is left of it has always been a
passion of his.



fl iV

iM

Derek Smith/BIS

AMMC CHAIRMAN Dr Davidson Hepburn outside the new Centre-

ville House, formerly Collins House.

“TI was very happy to have
this opportunity to deal with
this building,” he said, to bring
it back to its former glory, to
fit it into the revitalisation of
downtown.

“There are So many projects
we could do if we begin to
look at this place as a state-
of-the-art building and
grounds for the general public
and tourists alike,” he said.

With development, many
historic buildings have been
lost. Dr Hepburn pointed to
the once quaint colonial-style
Dowdeswell Street.

“You can’t even find one of
those buildings to represent
what was there” he said. “So
we are trying to preserve what
we can of whatever is left, to

S295 6.

keep that flavour of what we
had in the Bahamas.”

Dr Hepburn told of AMM-
C’s ‘Miracle Mile Project’
from George Street (west) to
Church Street (east).

The purpose is to restore all
the outstanding old buildings
along that route.

“We want Bahamians to be
aware of their culture, history,
and heritage,” said Dr Hep-
burn.

In partnership with the gov-
ernment to give downtown
Nassau a new look, “at
AMMC we are leading the
way in promoting a greater
understanding and apprecia-
tion of the natural and cultur-
al sites of Old Nassau,” said
Dr Hepburn.

Celebrating Five Decades af International Exchange

SAMUEL
JENNINGS,

a student in Nassau, Bahamas, will join a select
group of students representing their schools,
communities, and country as People to People
student leaders. Samuel Jennings has been
accepted into thé People to People Leadership
Summit in Stanford University, Palo Alto, California,
Aug. 9-15, 2009. All students accepted into a
People to People program must meet rigorous
academic and leadership requirements, Samuel
| Jannings was nominated and accepted for the
honor based on outstanding scholastic merit, civic

involvement and

Ilgadership potential.

The People to People Leadership Summits. bring
together outstanding student leaders from around the globe to focus leadership, team
building, community service, college admissions, and professional aspirations. Students
work on an action plan to make a difference in their communities, develop skills to
help them lead tomorrow's world, and build their collage resumes, while aarning
academic or service-learning credit.

Participants also gain insights to guide their educational and professional careers,
and benefit from a strong focus on college admissions. Through workshops,
presentations, excursions and discussions, student leaders attain a clear advantage
as they pursue and fine-tune their selected fields of interest. Students will have the
opportunity to meet with admissions officers and gain valuable advice for navigating
the college application process. In some locations, students will be able to tour several

area universities.

The 2009 People to People Leadership Surnmit will convene at Columbia University;
George Washington University: Johns Hopkins University; Harvard University; Stanford
University; and University of California, Los Angeles.

Samuel is a student of Lyford Cay Int'l School and also a Junior Achiever.
Congrataletions ancl we:

Special blessings from your parents, lan and Janet Jennings; brother,
Daniel; other family members, especially your spiritual mom, Bishop

Gloria Redd,

Ue love you.



THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 11

A POND with a fountain is also
featured at the ‘oasis’ that
Centreville House has become.

BELOW LEFT: Restoration
begins at home. AMMC chair-
man Dr Davidson Hepburn,
oversees restoration of the for-
mer Collins House, Shirley
Street, AMMC headquarters.

eee =

yew arrivaj, "yiny

15.% Off

Sale on Selected items : : P,
Up to 50.% Off :
VISIT US ON THE WEB
aebahamas.com Sizes XS to 3XL

For Fashion news & specials

a

ea Te he
———— -

CONFIDENCE
INSURANCE BROKERS
& AGENTS LTD.

Will be closed

on Friday, June 19, 2009

ee ee te a ee le

y
i :
: :

ror ©

—
|
ee
—_ 4 4

rll

for our staff
ANNUAL FUN DAY

Contidence Insurance Brokers & Agents Ltd.

Shirley Se. (2nd floor The Standard Howse
Phone: 323-6920 Fax: 325-8484

NOTICE

NEW TELEPHONE
NUMBER

To our valued Members, please be
advised that Teachers and Salaried
Workers Co-operative Credit Union
Limited, has upgraded their telephone

service to better asist our members.

Our new telephone number is
345.562.0500. IDAVID YURMAN

Please note that we can still be reached : Rr
John ;) Bull

at our old telephone numbers,
David Yurman Boutique, Bay Street, Nassau (242) 302-2878

242-323-4488/323-4492/ Crystal Court at Atlantis * Marina Village, Paradise Island

Marsh Harbour, Abaco * Harbour Island

323-4495-8/323-4411-4, Our Lucaya, Freeport, Grand Bahama « Bimini Bay, Bimini





PAGE 12, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



PM criticises PLP for complaints over contracts

FROM page one

Group deal in Mayaguana, Prime Minister
Ingraham said that his government did
not “interfere” in that deal, “but go to
Mayaguana now and see what is happen-
in ”

“Some of the agreements, Mr Speaker,
as I said we reviewed, some of them
required other action by the government
agencies which members opposite also
proved incapable of concluding before
they were kicked out of office in 2007,” Mr
Ingraham said.

Outlining how the Opposition cam-
paigned during its term in office as if most
of these projects had been signed and con-
cluded as “done deals”, Mr Ingraham said
he watched with amazement the cover-
age on the local news of the BahaMar
deal.

“So even when these investment pro-

posals were only in their conceptual stages
they were marketed to the public as done
deals. We never saw so many announce-
ments and ribbon cutting for ideas as we
were treated to between 2002 and 2007.
“You know, Mr Speaker, for routine
things, the appointment of Boards, we
would sit down in the Cabinet Office and
decide these are the appointed Boards
and we would send the conclusion out to
the various ministries and the permanent
secretaries would get in touch with the
people, etc, and they are appointed to the
Boards. Our first set of Board appointees
come to an end of this month, June, we
appointed the first set for two years.
“But when they won, they went from
place to place with big TV cameras, ‘I’ve

come to announce the Board for this cor-
poration today’. A big show!” Mr Ingra-
ham remarked.

Noting how he had not intended to
speak long, but now was stirred on to do
so because of the contribution earlier yes-
terday by Opposition Leader Perry
Christie, Mr Ingraham said that the PLP
“never” accepts blame for anything.

“Tf it’s good, oh yes. They blame others
for failures and shortcomings. They would
demonize others and be repetitious in
their stories. I heard the Leader of the
Opposition saying how when they invited
him down at Clifton that he felt he was not
appropriately dealt with at the ceremo-
ny — but he was invited.

“When we built a $12 million port in

Marsh Harbour and it was time to open it,
they faxed something to my law office the
night before. The night before! Now I
have to give it to the Leader of the Oppo-
sition; he called me one time when they
were opening the new clinic in Fox Town,
and I asked him ‘which clinic, you mean
the one I built?’

“T said man that has been built for sev-
eral years. But he still has his name on
the plaque. Or go to Dundas Town any
day and look at that little box building
clinic and see the big plaque there and
see how many people they took down to
open it. And then they closed it!” Mr
Ingraham laughed.

The Prime Minister also took grave
exception to Mr Christie’s claim that the

poor and under-privileged were better off
under Mr Christie’s administration as their
party was more sensitive to “their needs.”

“T never tire of telling him that he can
never ever feel for them like me. You
can’t ever! You have never been one of
us! You can’t be one of us! You don’t
understand us! You are not one of us!
Don’t pretend to be one of us. You never
even slept next to one of us!” Mr Ingra-
ham exclaimed.

Mr Ingraham also advised Mr Christie
not to refer to him as a “rich man.”

“You shouldn’t call me a rich man
because Iam not. But you are. And you
should not even get in that conversation.
Let’s not even go down that road,” he
said.

PM gets tough with nurses

EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY

Confidence Insurance Brokers
& Agents Ltd. is seeking to fill the
following position:

JUNIOR CLERK/
MESSENGER

Energetic Male
18-23 years old
Computer knowledge in
Microsoft Excel/ Word
Communicative & Writing skills
is an asset.
Ability to work with cash
Driver’s License required.

Please submit a resume by
hand or mail to:

Confidence Insurance Brokers
& Agents Ltd.
Shirley Street
P.O. box SS-6253

Nassau, Bahamas



FROM page one

change their mind. They
changed their mind and decid-
ed they would go on a sick-out.
Well, we understood that they
were disappointed and figured
that they would stay out for a
day or two and then they would
sit down and talk to the gov-
ernment.

“But it appears that people
believe that it is the govern-
ment who ought to go chasing
behind them while they were
out sick. No, that's not the way
how I do business.”

He said government waited
a week before filing an injunc-
tion in the Supreme Court
which ordered that the nurses
return to work or face possi-
ble jail time if found they had
exceeded their allotted sick
days.

He added that it was not
until a week into the sick-out
that BNU decided to take the
proper legal route and file a
trade dispute with the Depart-
ment of Labour.

"They waited an entire week
before they followed the law.
As soon as they followed the
law the Department of Labour
fixed the date to hear the par-
ties, and the government
showed up. The government
had discussions with them this
morning, they didn't get very
far, but the government had
discussions because the gov-
ernment insists that they must
go back to work first."

Mr Ingraham said govern-
ment will only engage in mean-
ingful discussions with the
union if public health facilities
return to a state of normalcy.

"But the government is
unwilling and will not budge
from its position of having dis-
cussions and agreements while
they continue their illegal

Fantastic
Fathers Day
Giveaway!

Shop at The Shoe Village

strike. They are an
essential service,
essential services
are not allowed to
do that.

"If you want
results, listen to
what I say, kindly
go back to work and
I will cause the min-
ister of labour and
the minister health
to meet with you on
Monday morning
and resolve the mat-
ter, Monday. It's
not a big issue to
resolve," he said.

Meanwhile the BNU is plan-
ning on filing an application to
overturn the injunction filed by
government which court
ordered the nurses who called
in sick to return to work or
face jail time, said lawyer and
trade unionist Obie Ferguson,
who represents BNU.

Mr Ferguson said the stage is
now set for possible industrial
action explaining that Minister
of Labour Dion Foulkes has to
decide tomorrow on the
union's application for a strike
vote.

He insisted that the sick-out
was not industrial action as the
nurses involved had not
exceeded their allotted 20 sick
days a year.

Bahamas Nurses Union Pres-
ident Cleola Hamilton told The
Tribune she was disappointed
in the outcome of the meeting
adding that it was evident the
government had "no sense of
urgency" in resolving the issue.

"We haven't gotten any con-
clusion from the government,"
she told The Tribune after the
meeting.

Details on exactly how many
nurses continued to call in sick
yesterday were unclear up to
press time although The Tri-
bune understands that while
some were said to be gradually
returning to work, those nurses
with doctor's sick notes
remained off the job.

Ms Hamilton could not con-
firm if the sick-out continued
yesterday.

Mr Ferguson said the union
simply wants a written agree-
ment outlining a date when the
promised insurance scheme

mLU ame UU



would be imple-
mented.

"The union is not
adverse to a differ-
ent date they just
want to sit down
and come to an
agreement and be
treated with
respect. . .it's in the
interest of the
union to serve the
Bahamian public
but you can't just
give one set of peo-
ple insurance and
not give it to anoth-
er set," he said.

One angry nurse told The
Tribune yesterday said gov-
ernment's delay in providing
comprehensive health insur-
ance may drive many qualified
nurses out of the country to
seek better employment.

"Government has been fight-

ing for years to keep nurses
here and when those scouts
(from abroad) come over they
come with packages and they
are not going to stop until they
have a mass exodus. How can
they expect to keep us here
when they have no incentives
to keep us here?" asked the
nine year veteran of Princess
Margaret Hospital.

Yesterday, Dr Minnis said
public health nurses were
returning to work gradually
and said PMH, clinics on
Grand Bahama and the family
islands were functioning.

"T have not gotten a com-
plete report but I know staff
since yesterday have been
returning to work slowly.

“And all the clinics were
open, all clinics on the family
islands and Grand Bahama
were functioning,” Dr Minnis
said.

FELLOWSHIP MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
Host: Community Outreach Day
Saturday June 20th 2009

Free: Health Screening ~

Free: Food

Legal Advice
Financial Advice
Counselling

) . ibwood Gardens

a

ny) Slelephone 392-4380



this Father's Day and
with any purchase of
$200 or more receive a

fk Cawer# Gor NEW YORK

belt or wallet.

Limited quantities, so shop early
for the special man in your life!

Promotion begins
Monday 15th June,
and ends

Monday 22nd June

The? Sweeting's



Hayy fathees Day

0 to our AS Fath’ and Mentor, The Rev. Mone N. Brown

Madeira Shopping Plaza - Tel:328-0703 from your children, grandchildren and great grandchildren.

Marathon Mall : Tel: 393-6113
RND Plaza, Freeport - Tel: 351-3274

We love you and may God's richest blessings continue to sustain
and follow you.





PAGE 14, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE






©Sports Locker

UPPER LEVEL, TOWN CENTRE MALL PHONE NO: 322-6593

FATHER'S DAY SALE!!




NIKE PUSH UP GRIPS

Lies |

tee

{pee

EVERLAST
NEOPRENE SHIRTS

pid | fy The
SAVE SAVE
, $150 .

Was $549.99 Was CED 99

Ses rsa Ca WEIDER 220 WEIGHT BENCH tie GLa HOME SYSTEM



$329,°°
SAVE










Men’s Men's Men’s

Renegade : Raider = 4 Fatherz Lot 29

Shits ; im Cotton Polo " Polo ail == Mi
i



WY &, Tshirts bay Shirt Shi




Men's i .
Cargo .







MEN’S NIKE AIR MAX DREAM BASKETBALL SHOE
(White/Blue/Silver)




WE HAVE 100's OF
GIFT IDEAS FOR DAD!

Or get a Sports Locker
Gift Certificate and let Dad choose!

MEN’S NIKE AIR FORCE 1 MEN’S ECKO JIGSAW MEN'S JORDAN JUMPMAN MEN’S JORDAN 2.5 TEAM
ele ai Call fon titg) REFLEXES SHOE (Wh/Copp) ELITE SHOE (Wh/Blue) BASKETBALL SHOE (Wh/Rd/BIk

WAS $169.99 WAS TA 79.99
NOW a.
Mi

EE




MEN’S ROCKPORT BRIDGE MEN’S ROCKPORT BRIDGE MEN’S ROCKPORT BRIDGE MEN’S NIKE RECRUIT
CASUAL SHOE (Dk.Brn/Chest) CASUAL SHOE (Nvy/Org/Wh) CASUAL SHOE (BIk/Wh) SANDALS (Black/Silver)

WAS $49.99
NOW

PRICES ARE GOOD UNTIL JUNE 28TH WHILE STOCKS LAST.
























Christie

FROM page one

times.

He claimed the PLP too faced
challenges when it came to power
in 2002 — the recent 9/11 attack in
New York City, and the looming
war in Iraq — but yet managed to
take “bold” action to better con-
ditions.

Mr Christie noted that his
administration left the country with
increased revenue flows and exter-
nal reserves, enhanced GDP
growth and reduced unemploy-
ment.

The PLP leader alleged that,
having revealed a lack of ideas, the
current Government “needs help”,
must “stop being bloody minded”
but instead turn to other “brains”
in the country to find new solu-
tions to the problems it faces.

He suggested that even though
— as Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham stated — “the economic text-
books” have no answers to the cur-
rent crisis, the Government must
“act as the sovereign Government
of the Bahamas” and may find a
“way outside of the textbooks to
make progress.”

“Tt must be the obligation of the
government to protect and pro-
mote the highest possible level of
sustainable employment for all
Bahamians,” said Mr Christie.

“The country needs today to
have the Government act on my
recommendation to appoint a
group to devise strategies to assist
the country in the way ahead.”

One taskforce could “aggres-
sively assess the current hotel prop-
erties and their challenges and
those investments that were in
process prior to the global reces-
sion,” said Mr Christie

Another could focus on the
financial services sector, looking
at ways to “create new products
and whatever it takes to be more
competitive and productive, again
with a view to creating jobs,” he
proposed.

Meanwhile, he questioned
whether more could have been
done to save jobs recently lost in
the hotel sector, particularly
through the “creative and sus-
tained” use of financial conces-
sions which could be offered to
hotels.

The Opposition leader added
that the operators of the now
closed Four Seasons Emerald Bay
hotel in Exuma had previously
made known to Government their
“frustrations” about the cost of
operating in Exuma and he ques-
tioned why further subsidy was not
provided by the Government to
help them remain afloat.

“They felt some consideration
should have been given to Emerald
Bay (by the Government) in light
of their remote location and their
cost structure,” said Mr Christie.

He called on Government to
work as “closely as is necessary”
with the Bahamar developers to
bring the “critical” Cable Beach
project to fruition, and the jobs
that will come with it, as well as
to make “every effort” to
“relaunch” the I-Group develop-
ment in Mayaguana which now
employs a small fraction of those it
did in previous years.

Meanwhile, he said that a recent
public address by BahaMar CEO
Sarkis Izmirlian in which he
revealed how the government of
Qatar rejected the option of invest-
ing in BahaMar during this reces-
sion, but instead chose to invest
millions in a 250-room hotel in
Cuba, should cause the Govern-
ment to “ask why these things are
happening.”

Mr Christie stated that just as
Sol Kerzner and the Atlantis devel-
opment showed investors that
“money could be made in the
Bahamas” in the hotel industry,
the country cannot allow hotel clo-
sures and poor performance to
“redefine the image of our econo-
my.”

Speaking of its potential to pro-
mote the Bahamas as a financial
services centre, to attract foreign
direct investment and through this
to create jobs in the construction
industry and the financial services
sector, Mr Christie said Govern-
ment must re-establish the Min-
istry of Financial Services and
Investments, set up under his
administration.

“This government did not main-
tain such a ministry and as a result,
we believe they made a mistake,”
said Mr Christie.

Turning to the youth, the Oppo-
sition leader claimed they have
been ignored in this year’s budget,
and proposed that Government
appoint a “special commission” to
make recommendations on how
more jobs can be created for young
people soon to graduate from col-
lege abroad, the College of the
Bahamas and high school.

“Left alone, many of them may
have to wait years to have their
legitimate needs met.

“The Government cannot
ignore this issue. We must all be
engaged in...working relentlessly
identifying workable economic
options for them,” added Mr
Christie.

Prior to lay-offs at Exuma’s
Emerald Bay hotel and the emer-
gence of thousands of new gradu-
ates, figures released by the
Department of Statistics in March
pegged unemployment at the high-
est level in 15 years.

It was found that 12.1 per cent of
people in New Providence and 14.6
per cent in Grand Bahama were
out of a job at that time.





15

r

THE TRIBUNE PAGE

S]

BAAA to honour
top junior athletes

‘Mighty Mouse’
to represent the
» Bahamas at ‘09
World Games...
See page 17

>

tis

2009



THURSDAY, JUNE 18,

TO bridge the gap between academic and
athletic excellence, the local governing body
for track and field is gearing up to honour its
top athletes of the ‘08-09 school year.

The Bahamas Association of Athletic
Associations is set to recognise its top junior
athletes at the All Bahamian Award Cere-
mony.

The official presentations are scheduled
for 7:30pm June 23 at Government House.

Governor General Arthur D Hanna is the
patron of this event and will be presenting the
awards.

A reception will follow the award ceremo-

ny.
The All Bahamian awards are given to
high school track and field athletes who have
met the standards set by the BAAA for their
events and also maintained a 2.5 or higher
grade point average for the academic year.

Each year an honourary All Bahamian
award is given to a male and female athlete
who have contributed to the sport of track
and field in the past.

The award was modeled after the All
American awards which honours outstanding
college athletes in academics and sports.

All-Bahamian Team

MEN

Warren Fraser - 100m, 200m

Marcus Thompson - 100m

Karlton Rolle - 200m

Jeffrey Gibson - 400m, 400m hurdles
Chris Nesbitt - 800m, 1500m
Kenneth Wallace-Whitfield - 800m, 1500m
Laquardo Newbold - 1500m

Kristin Hepburn - 110m hurdles
Nejmi Burnside - 400m hurdles
Jaquan Williams - 110m hurdles
Dennis Bain - 110m hurdles
Raymond Higgs - high jump

Bahamas junior paseball
team to play in tourney

JUST two days remain until the Bahamas’ Dominican Republic, Panama, Puerto Rico Russell. In the second row (I-r) are Jonathan

WOMEN

Nivea Smith - 200m

Shellyka Rolle - 400m

Rashan Brown - 400m
V'Alonee Robinson - long jump
Sparky] Cash - long jump

Honourary All Bahamians

junior national team sets off for interna-
tional competition.

The 16-18 team is slated to participate in
the 2009 Latin American Big League
Caribbean Zone Baseball Tournament, to
be held in Zulia State, Venezuela.

The tournament, hosted by Little League,
will also feature, Aruba, Curacao, Colombia,

and the host country Venezuela.

The team will be led by Richard Bain who
was recently selected in the 45th round of
the Major League Baseball draft by the
Philadelphia Phillies organisation.

Shown seated in the front row (I-r) are
Aneko Knowles, Tyrell Smith, Dale Davis Jr,
Patrick Knowles Jr, Kyle Hall and Desmond

Groezinger, Stephen Curtis, Brandon Mur-
ray, Anthony Miaulis II and Jordan Gib-
son. And in the third row (I-r) are Daniel
Cash, Patrick Waugh, Lynden Pindling,
Sedale McKenzie, Richard Bain and Leon
Cooper. Standing in the back row (I-r) are
manager Terran Rodgers and coach Patrick
Knowles Sr

Thomas A. Robinson
Shonel Ferguson



aay

vi

ll | | lll
[SaviCHEe | | Rae CHE
“=a — =a i

|
alla

ae J Ne CT Oar COLUe pee oe

ENDS JUNE 24th
CITY MARKET’S
CV WERT od Ey: Keg|
PROGRAM ENDS
WED. JUNE 24th, 2009
AT ALL CITY MARKETS
& PARTICIPATING
PARTNERS

4i¢gemgdee

DEEDS ON

been: a

FP eae
i
Aare tera,

Jiii
wer’
DONRMRDS So Aear

SSEURLEC SPREE CEE EY

Claeere
‘freer
phage

oh de ie lt a

UnsNnieneN on aR

|

Redeem Dollar for Dollar
at any City Market except on
tobacco products

NER

LOPROLLA
SWAP SAC FOR NEW STAMPS

You can swap “filled” SaveA+ Chek cards
for the new Smart Shopper Savings STAMPS
at any City Market Customer Service Desk
only “until” June 24th, 2009!

a oe

a ee

a1 Be

Dae

ae e Pee) a COLLISIGN RAEBITAHCE SYSTER AMD A

GATHER YOUR SAV-A-CHEK
COUPONS AND MAKE IT A
FUN PROJECT! You can use
ele ers) 8) ance al ep
bundle (staple) filled $1.00
ce ea ae

ACT QUICKLY!

ee a a] Re tr Pee YOUR DRIVING PLEA

BUTLTED GOWER THE TAADITIOMSL CORGLLA RITH & BETTER

ed ae

PERFORMAKCE. COMFORT AND QUALITY

EXECUTIVE Open €e - Bam - 3:30pm
“| Sat Bam - |2noon

E-mail: execmotoria!/ batelnet. bs

ALTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER Parts and service guaranteed

Awailable in Grand Bahama at Quality Auto Sales |Freeport] * Queens Hwy, 352-8122 «Abaco Motor Mal, Don |





PAGE 16, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS
SPORTS



























RM FRAME W volleyball team must
be commended

Nassau's Leading Manufacturer of Vinyl Windows and Vinyl Doors

You Can Check Our Competitors -

THEY did it. They did tt... where their destination was
1 Yes, the Bahamas Volley- STUBBS going to be for the next
ball Federation women’s round.

national team have qualified
for the third round of the

Had they not been side-
tracked by the robbery, who

NORCECA 2010 World knows what would have hap-
Championships. pened in their playoff match
Despite the fact that they against Jamaica. The team
Call for your FREE quote or played with a heavy heart, could have easily folded up,

having lost their personal pos-
sessions during a robbery of
their lockers at the gym, the
team was able to stay motivat-
ed enough to get the job done.

packed up whatever they had
left and decided to return
home.

Instead, they worked
through the three straight-set
loss to Jamaica. Had they
won, that would have put
them im a position to be able
to travel to Disneyland in
Orlando, Florida, instead of
going to Puerto Rico.

The loss put the team in a
must-win situation against St
Lucia as the team prevailed

and in the process secured a

berth into the second round
KDA KD TOR Si CYIIAG E : where they will travel to Puer-
The Power te Surprise” 1% . to Rico. I’m sure it didn’t mat-

ter as much to the women
where they were going as it
was who they played in the
playoffs.

This is the first time, like
the men who earned the right
to travel to Cuba in July, that
the women have reached this
in . far and so they should be
The Bahamas Electricity Corporation | commended for their achieve-
ment, especially considering

the unfortunate circumstances
e n ¢ r that they found themselves in.

It’s just so unfortunate that

Come visit our factory located on 74 Mount Royal Avenue, Nassau,

TEL: 1-242-325-6633
FAX: 1-242-325-6638 The team must be com-
een acm mney
PEERS S SEES SS

setter that could have turned
things around in terms of

++ e +

re



Consultancy Services the team had to go through
the ordeal that they encoun-
The Bahamas Electricity Corporation tered.
invites Tenders for the services described below: The team is due to return
home today, no doubt with
Bidders are required to collect packages from the some remorse against the
Corporation's Administration Office, Glue Hill & Tucker Roads Barbados Volleyball Federa-
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158 tion, who just simply aban-
doned them (not the Bahamas
Tenders are to ise addressed ta: Volleyball Federation, as indi-
Mr. Kevin Basden cated in Wednesday’s article).
General Mana ger The Bahamas Volleyball

‘ Bahamas Electricity Corporation ldt aries
. Executive Offices - Blue Hill & Tocker Roads one ‘ll relaxed and a
BEST QUALI ry, BEST PRICES Nassau, Bahamas i i
for the Barbados Police Force
to carry out their investiga-
Best Sa les Se rvices & Parts July 3, 2009 majority of their items being
, no later than 4:00 p.m. recovered.
Test Drive A Spotage Today! Moe” Smith is the federa-
tion’s first vice president and

Federation did all that they
ease as they waited patiently
Puts This In A Class Of Its Own
Deadline for delivery to BEC: an or before tion, which resulted in the
Head coach Joseph “Joe
Submissions should be marked as follows:
Tender No. 704/05 national team director. Also

ELITE MOTORS LTD. SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED — Hs stornnancinc wis CONSULTANCY SERVICES/ eee,
WIRD Wisk Rood Thompson Blvd. = Gakes Field FROPOSAL TO INVESTIGATE CONCRETE was treasurer Raymond _
PC) Bax Maou 1. 202.326.6377" 1<.202326.6315 eee DELAMINATING AT STATION “A” BUILDING “Rhymes” Wilson and assis-
t. (242) Pea? fk] dae @. tanpingicoralwave.com BROKERS & ENTS LID. CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION i. treasurer, Lloyd “Ratty”
avis.
The Corporation reserves the right ta In contacting the team ona
accept of repect any oF all proposals. daily basis, the three men
n n | talked constantly about their
lo alvertise il The gilts - te a newspaper For all enquiries regarding the tenders and site visits, contact efforts to ensure that the
Mr. Stefan Edgecombe at telephone 302-1505. ladies, including assistant

. . Py Py coach Jackie Conyers, were
il MATURED TRY | Call 502-20/1 toa ; Site visit will take place on Friday, June 26, 2009 at 10:00 a.m. all made comfortable even
i : at BEC, Clifton Pier Power Station when they had to leave the

games village for another
hotel that they had to pay for
since Monday.

How can the federation and
even the players, who have
become familiar with the

Bahamian players, turn their
backs on them in such a cri-
sis? If the situation was
reversed, I’m sure that the
Bahamas Volleyball Federa-

tion, nor the players, would
have done the same to Barba-
dos or any other country.

It just shows the level of
GRAND PRIZE $1,000 ae
9 exhibits.
Over the years, we have
* heard so many stories from
Second Prize $500 ou players about the way
they are treated whenever
= = * they travel to one of the
Th d p 2 5 O Caribbean Islands or Latin
r ri ze American countries to com-
pete. Sometimes you just did-
¥ F n’t believe that they would
Pr us lots of oth er ' : have been treated in the man-
4 3 i , ! ner that they claimed they
: were.
i n-sto re Ss pe Cc i a | Ss = , a a The women’s trip to Barba-
q — i oo dos is definitely the height of

tt. Thank God the players
were able to recover the
majority of their possessions
and none of them were physi-

b * i - cally harmed.
, oe : — They just have to put this

- F , = egg experience behind them and

r . a move on. It could have hap-
’ a a =i pened to anyone. It’s ust
a : ) wt y + unfortunate that we were the
: Me .- ™“ A only ones who were the vic-
i = ” = ifm tims. When they head to
aif o - Puerto Rico in August, we are

Ehigt to, wit with each looking forward to them step-
ping up and performing just as
spectacular as they did in Bar-

; ’ BurchAee over $25.00.
Promotion ends June 20th’ May, bados.

: “n ;
| See: stores for further details. Congratulations and wel-

" come home ladies. We are
very proud of how you han-

dled the whole experience.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 17



SPORTS



‘Mighty Mouse’ to represent
Bahamas at ‘09 World Games

FOR the first time in seven
years, a Bahamian has been
selected to represent the coun-
try and the region at one of the
world’s most prestigious body-
building contests.

Paul “Mighty Mouse” Wilson
has been selected to compete
at the 2009 World Games, slat-
ed for July 16 in Kaohsiung,
Taiwan. He was selected by the
International Bodybuilding
Federation to represent the
Caribbean region in the event.

At five foot two inches tall
and 152 pounds, Wilson is a 26
year-old bodybuilding champi-
on in the lightweight amateur
division.

He started the sport nine
years ago while in high school
and spent the last eight years
dominating the sport.

Among his titles are the
reigning Central American
Caribbean champion gold
medallist, the reigning national
lightweight champion, and the
two-time champion of the
Southern States Body Building
Competition in Fort Laud-



PAUL WILSON (centre) at a press conference with his manager Keith Rolle (left) and Danny Sumner, president
of the Bahamas Bodybuilding & Fitness Federation...

erdale, Florida.

While representing the
Bahamas for the past eight
years, Wilson earned one gold,
two silvers, and a bronze medal

at four of those competitions.

In 2006, he placed 17th out
of 71 competitors at the World
Championships in the Czech
Republic.



. PAUL WILSON has been selected




to compete at the 2009 World
Games, slated for July 16 in




Kaohsiung, Taiwan...

“Pve been doing this sport
since I was a teenager,” Wilson
reflects. “In fact, I entered my
first competition the day after I
graduated Faith Temple Chris-
tian High School. I became a
certified fitness instructor in
Nevada and now I’m one of the
personal fitness instructors at
Mystikal Fitness, where I also
train. All in all, 1am more than
ready to compete.”

have anyone known for drug
abuse at these competitions.”

As for his pending competi-
tion, Wilson is ready to make
the nation proud on his first trip
to Asia.

“T’m excited about going to
Chinese Taipei,” he said. “I’ve

seen some of the top notch ath-
letes at other competitions and
I’m ready. I’ve faced off against
some of them before and I
know the calibre of athletes on
that level. Overall, ?’m moti-
vated to compete and bring
what I’ve got to the forefront.”

Quality Auto Sales
DRO RO MITC GS

For the best deal in town on
Se cars, with warranty!
Trade-ins on new car sales

NOW
IN STOCK!

‘01 TOYOTA CAMRY

‘05 TOYOTA CAMRY :
‘07 TOYOTA YARIS

pn

w

‘06 HYUNDAI TERRACAN

























Another thing that Wilson is
ready to do is bring more atten-
tion to the sport and he’s deter-
mined to get the financial back-
ing he needs to accomplish his
goals.

“T think that bodybuilding in
the Bahamas is being stunted
because of the downturn in the
economy and the stigmatism
that goes along with the sport,”
he noted.

“It does take a lot of money
to stick to the proper diet, the
vitamins, supplements and gym
membership but at the same
time, Bahamians have not only
proven to be successful in the
sport, but also are serious when
it comes to abusing their bodies
with steroids. I’m proud to say
that we (the Bahamas) don’t

‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE
‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
‘06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA

‘06 HYUNDAI SONATA

‘01 HYUNDAI HD-65 TRUCK
‘94 MITSUBISHI DIAMANTE
‘94 TOYOTA CAMRY

@ QUALITY: ©

#7 AUTO GEALER IN) THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET - 322-3775 + 325-3079

Wath car ehceercars of Gh Bip Marto oben [Peamgor) bid for derilardeah, Queene Mey, 19)-6172
af boc ieior All Can dcp Bed, Jd7-39 14



Courtney Cashes In On

Wendy’ s lk Win!

Sit. Anne’s School
Kid’s Kamp

4 weeks

list of activities on forms
June 29th — July
24th for ages 5-12
8:00am to 12 noon
Monday — Friday

Cost: $150.00
per week

AST DRAWING 4

St. Andrew’s School

Kid’s Kamp — 3 weeks — list of activities on forms
July 13th — 31st for ages 5-12 - 8:00am to 12 noon
Monday -— Friday - Cost: $150.00 per week

Lio: Michelle Lewis, Markeling Manager Coca Cola; Cynthia Thompson,
Winnersi Mother: Courtney Thompson, Week 3 Winner; Randy Sands, Director
Of Operations Wendyis; Yolanda Pawar, Marketing Manager Wendyis; Maxine
Seymour, Marketing Manager E Radio House.

Swim America/Fitness/Competitive/Masters
6 weeks — various costs on forms

June 29th — August 8th 5:30-7:00am Mon. Wed. & Fri.
4:00- 7:00pm Mon. - Fri.

- =SswiF T iz

SWIMMING SUMMER PROGRAMMES
Tel: 324-1167 » Forms available at the school office LP
OR Visit our web site: www.swimswift.com and click Forms

Courtney Thompson's purchase of a large Spicy Chicken Combo
recently paid out some big dividends when he became the third instant
winner of $1000 in Wendy's, Coca Cola, 100 Jamz, Joy FM, Cool 6,
and Y PM's “Upgrade Me™ promotion, Courtney's triumph proves
that winning at Wendy's is so easy even a kid can do it!

For the past two years, this industrious young student of Doris Johnson
High School has been working part-time to eam extra money at a local
food store. Now that he’s won the week three cash giveaway, Courtney
says hell be more than prepared for the “back-to-school season.”

Lyford Cay School

Kid’s Kamp — 2 weeks — list of activities on forms

June 29th — July 9th for ages 5-12 - 8:00 am to 12 noon
Monday - Friday - Cost: $150.00 per week

With a bright smile and a twinkle in his eyes Courtney happily boasts.
“T can buy all of my own school uniforms, supplies and shoes plus
have some left over.” Being as wise as he is hardworking, young
Swim America/Fitness/Competitive/Masters — 6 Courtney intends to put some of his winnings away for “rainy day.”
weeks — various costs on forms

June 29th — August 8th 4:00 — 7:00 pm Monday - Friday In adclition to the chance to go for the cash, every large combo upgrade
comes with a Scratch Card good for immediately redeemable food
prizes, Customers can play to win at all cight of the country’s Wendy's
restaurants including the Domestic Airport and Freeport. All Freeport
entries will be flown to the capital to be entered in the weekly drawings

courtesy of Sky Bahamas.

The fourth and final installment of $1 000.00 will be won at this
Friday's live remote, on 100 Jamz, scheduled for Wendy’s, Thompson
Blvd. The “U /perade Me™ promotion will then climax with the MEG A
Jackpot Drawing of $10,000 scheduled for Friday, June 26"



PAGE 18, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

_ EXTRA, EXTRA,

Large Shipment

i)

Used Cars

COME CHECK





) ow

— Hurry, Hurry and

US OUT

., New shipments Arrived

Get Your First Choice
For Easy Financing

Bank And Indurance










DATE:

On Premises
Check Our Prices
Before buying

ae

To advertise in The Tritune -
ea AS ETT

























MIR) rere va TEL

Hangers
Tié/Belt Racks
Containers
Laundry Organizers
Kitchen Organizers

WAREHOUSE SALE

"Cc

loset Authority

SATURDAY, JUNE 20TH, 2009
Time: 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 P.M
PLACE: AIRPORT INDUSTRIAL PARK
OPPOSITE VIRGO CAR RENTAL

Bath Organizers

shoe Organizers

Pantry Organizers
Sports Organizers
Drawer Organizers



Rafael Nadal (AP)

Nadal, Safina seeded
No. 1 for Wimbledon

WIMBLEDON, England
(AP) — Defending champion
Rafael Nadal and top-ranked
women's player Dinara Safina
were seeded No. 1 for Wimble-
don on Wednesday.

There were no big surprises
when the All England Club
announced the seedings for the
grass-court Grand Slam tour-
nament, which opens Monday.
The draw will be released Fri-
day.

The top-ranked Nadal has
been having trouble with his
knees the past few months and
received treatment after pulling
out of the Wimbledon warm-
up event at Queen's Club.

The Spaniard plans to test
them by playing exhibition
matches on grass against Lley-
ton Hewitt on Thursday and
Stanislas Wawrinka on Friday
at the Hurlingham Club in Lon-
don.

Wimbledon stuck closely to
the world rankings in deter-
mining the seeding lists for the
two-week tournament.

The top six spots in the men's
list follow the rankings. Five-
time champion Roger Federer
is No. 2, with Andy Murray at
No. 3. Murray won his first

grass-court title at Queen's Club
on Sunday, becoming the first
Briton to win the tournament
since Bunny Austin in 1938,
who then went on to become
the last British men’s finalist at
Wimbledon.

They are followed by No. 4
Novak Djokovic, No. 5 Juan
Martin Del Porto and No. 6
Andy Roddick.

Eighth-ranked Fernando
Verdasco is seeded No. 7 ahead
of Gilles Simon.

Marat Safin, a semifinalist last
year, is the No. 15 seed despite
being ranked 23rd, while the
big-serving Ivo Karlovic is at
No. 23 while having a ranking of
31.

Among the women, Safina of
Russia is followed by Serena
Williams and defending cham-
pion Venus Williams.

The only major change from
the rankings is 2004 Wimble-
don champion Maria Sharapova
as the No. 24 seed despite being
ranked 59th.

Sharapova has plunged down
the rankings after nine months
out with a shoulder injury but
reached the semifinals of the
Aegon Classic in Birmingham
last week.



e idedel 851 37 10-08 Pr Rr eer Ti band

Quantum “IR” Grill 50,000 BTU

with Burner Designer Gas Grill
tankless) all stoinless,/tankless

fii F| Leen i
$ 79999 4 ous

We ber Summit
5-650 Grill stainless

stoinless/fankless
$2,40000

eked ATO oe

40,000 BTU Deluxe Gas
Grill with Burner

tankless
es

reg $324,997

Aiceded ddd Oe

40,000 BTU Gas Grill
with Burner/‘tankless

oe reg S287 99

Weber Sum mit
5-420 Grill stainless

$ tankless . sn
1 999° 40,000 BTU
ail Gas Grill/tonkless
reg $259.79

BS 17999

a Acedel eed S

AAccked Gd b-PSOE 26 500 BTU
35,000 BTU Gas Gas Grill/tankless

rill wit rag $159.99
bumer/orties — SEMES 1 1999
16999

Ones
Charcoal Grill

poe ee ie ek

Clear ne

Pr

while supplies last

pee ees |

wae Riis
§-310 Grill

stainless top/tankless
reg $750.00

wot SY toy ON

PE ———

birch] SORSAAON American Gourmet
Renegade Charcoal, ; moker
Charcoal Grill Grill

$22999 $16999 Fo: (243) 3934502 Sy aaa

Kelly’s "&;.

Mall eat tome



THE TRIBUNE
D yu



ine

THURSDAY,

2009



TUNE 16.

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Training initiative
must be ‘long-term
and self-sustaining’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE head of the Govern-
ment’s newly-established
National Training Programme
yesterday said he was “working
diligently to make this a long-
term, self-sustaining” initiative,
broadening it beyond its initial
remit because it was “critical to
our long-term economic com-
petitiveness”.

Khaalis Rolle, the newly-
elected Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce president, who is
heading the body charged by
the Government with oversee-
ing the retraining of some 1,000
unemployed Bahamians, said
private sector funding would
likely be needed long-term to
sustain the programme, the
Ingraham administration hav-
ing initially allocated $250,000
for the programme.

Pointing out that education
and training had always been
the “achilles heel” of the
Bahamian economy and soci-
ety, Mr Rolle said initiatives
such as the National Training
Programme were critical to
preparing companies and their
workforces for all eventualities,
as many had been “caught with
their pants down” by the cur-
rent recession.

“T think it is critical to our
long-term competitiveness,” Mr
Rolle said of the National
Training Programme and simi-
lar initiatives.

“The message I’m going to
be sending, through my posi-
tion as Chamber president, is
that we need to develop a com-
petent and professional work-
force. That is through educa-
tion and training, and that has
always been our achilles heel.

“We do have a section of the
workforce that is extremely tal-
ented, and possesses some of
the brightest minds in the region
living in the Bahamas. Yet we
do, like most other countries,
have a segment that is just not
adequately prepared.”

The Bahamas, the Chamber
president added, had some



* Chamber head looks to
make government plan
to target unemployment
long-lasting and tackle
‘achilles heel’ that is
‘critical to economic

competitiveness’

* Businesses ‘caught
with pants down’ by
economic crisis

* Says own business,
Bahamas Ferries, needs
well-trainied workforce
to maintain required
growth rate

* Private sector support
needed to buttress
government’s initial
$250k funding

“structural deficiencies”, while
the problems and challenges of
the public school education sys-
tem were well-known.
“Companies do not invest as
much as they should in train-
ing,” Mr Rolle said. “One of

SEE page 8B

BTC cellular charging
branded an ‘anomaly’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company’s (BTC)
practice of charging cellular cus-
tomers for receiving fixed-line
and overseas calls was yester-
day branded as an “anomaly”,
which is “not best practice and
not in the interest of the
Bahamian public going for-
ward”.

The consultation document
on retail price regulation in the
Bahamian communications
industry, published yesterday
by the committee overseeing
BTC’s privatisation, said that
while the caller usually paid for
telephone calls, it was actually
the receiving party that paid to
receive fixed-line and overseas
calls on both pre-paid and post-



* Practice of charging
Bahamian cellular
customers for receipt
of fixed-line and overseas
calls labelled ‘anti-
consumer’ by
privatisation committee

paid cell phones.

Pointing out that this had “a
number of disadvantages”, the
document said this essentially
allowed BTC to ‘double dip’
through having access to “two,
overlapping sources of revenue
from incoming international
calls to cellular numbers”.

While BTC received rev-
enues from Bahamian cell
phone customers through the
“domestic charging system”, the
consultation document added:
“International arrangements
provide BTC with revenue for
the terminating service for
incoming international calls to
Bahamian mobile numbers.

“For example, when a cus-
tomer based in the US calls a
Bahamian mobile number, BTC
receives payment from the cor-
responding US operator for
delivering that call to the
Bahamian mobile customer.
Such arrangements between
operators apply irrespective of
whether a fixed or mobile num-
ber is called in the Bahamas.”

This meant BTC received
revenue from two sources for
providing the same connection
service. The BTC privatisation
committee document added
that the state-owned firm’s cel-
lular customers were also “in

SEE page 9B



Money Safe.
Money Fast.

Bank of The Bahamas

IBTERRMATIOMAL

Online at
BankBahamas@nline.com



FOCOL wins airport
gas Station contract

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Nassau Airport Develop-

ment Company (NAD) has

awarded the airport gas sta-

tion contract to BISX-listed
Freeport Oil Holdings (FOCOL) and its
Sun Oil subsidiary, Tribune Business was
told yesterday, with a senior executive
adding that so-called ‘incentive fees’ did
not apply to bidding on small retail con-
cession contracts.

John Spinks, NAD’s vice-president of
commercial operations, said ‘incentive
fees’ - the one-time payment of a lump
sum fee to the airport operator, as an
inducement for the paying party to be
offered the relevant contract - only
applied to larger concessions where there
was a small number of large bidders, such
as the gas station.

Tribune Business had been contacted
by some of the 150-200 Bahamian busi-
nesses and entrepreneurs who had attend-
ed a NAD briefing session on Monday,
and expressed concern about the use of

* Airport kiosk and cart tenants will have to re-bid for contracts
when new US departure terminal comes on stream

* But NAD executive says ‘incentive fees’ only apply to large contracts
with small bidder numbers, not small retail concessions

* Airport losses drop from $7m at NAD
takeover to around $3.5-$4m today

* Airport Authority Board signs-off on general contractor award

‘incentive fees’ as a tiebreaker to deter-
mine who the airport retail and restaurant
concessions would be awarded to if two
bidders were ranked equally.

These sources, who had requested
anonymity, feared that ‘incentive fees’
would provide larger, more established
companies with an advantage over small-
er firms and entrepreneurs, as their deep-
er pockets would leave them better-
placed to pay incentive fees.

The same sources suggested that after
obtaining bank financing to pay for inven-
tory and outfitting their kiosks/carts/con-

cessions at the Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport (LPIA), it would be virtu-
ally impossible for smaller bidders to
finance an ‘incentive fee’ with either equi-
ty or further debt.

They also expressed concern that, by
squeezing out small Bahamian business-
es, the airport would lack a distinctly
‘Bahamian’ feel in terms of products and
identity, thus failing to meet NAD’s
objective of providing ‘a sense of place’.

Responding to those concerns, Mr

SEE page 4B

‘Multiple play’ start-up still seeking major $14m bite

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A BAHAMIAN start-up
seeking to launch a ‘multiple
play’ bundle of Internet services
was yesterday said to be assess-
ing how it “should be properly
structured”, with efforts to raise
the $14 million in capital that
it needs to start operations
ongoing.

Owen Bethel, a director of
IP Solutions International
(IPSI), said the company was
still looking for investors to
pick-up the majority of its pri-
vate placement, having expand-
ed this from $6 million to $14
million after broadening the ini-
tial launch beyond the Bahamas
to include the wider Caribbean.

“Tt’s still in motion, but we’re
looking to see how it should be
properly structured,” Mr Bethel
said of IPSI.

“Since we moved it up to the

a |

Company assessing how it should be ‘properly structured’

regional level, we were looking
at $14 million for that. We’ve
had strong investor interest, but
certainly not to carry the major
part of it.”

When asked whether the
global recession and preceding
financial crisis had impacted IP
Solutions International’s
chances of raising the required
capital, Mr Bethel told Tribune
Business: “I think very much
so.
“The uncertainty in the finan-
cial markets, and persons want-
ing to hold on to their cash, and
it being a start-up as opposed to
an existing, established opera-
tion, lends to the risk factor.”

Mr Bethel, who heads Nas-
sau-based financial services
provider, the Montaque Group,
told Tribune Business that there
was still much interest in IP

Solutions International’s prod-
uct from its initial target cus-
tomers, chiefly private gated
communities and hotels/resorts.

“There continues to be inter-
est in it. It’s literally a matter
of being able to deliver the
intended services to them,” Mr
Bethel said.

IP Solutions International is
targeting that customer base for
a variety of services it will trans-
mit down just one Internet line,
hence the ‘Multiple Play’
description. The services will
include Internet, TV via Inter-
net Protocol, video-on-demand
(VOD) games, and Voice over
Internet Protocol (VoIP) phone
services.

Given Cable Bahamas cur-
rent cable TV monopoly, which

SEE page 4B



Cable TV costs
‘appear high’
against rivals

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CABLE television and tele-
coms costs in the Bahamas
“appear high” in comparison to
other island economies of simi-
lar size and living standards, a
document released yesterday by
the Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Company’s (BTC) pri-
vatisation committee said.

The document said Cable
Bahamas’ basic cable television
package, priced at $30 per
month since inception, “appears
expensive in relation to other
small island states, with the
exception of the Cayman
Islands”. It added that a similar

SEE page 4B

ARE YOU PREPARED FOR THIS
UPCOMING HURRICANE SEASON?

APPLY FOR A
l°BOB HOME

PROTECTION

LOAN

_——_

‘TODAY!
FINANGING; UR TO 7 YEARS

HURRICANE SHUTTERS
HURRICANE SUPPLIES
GENERATORS
INSURANCE PROTECTION

Bank of The Bahamas

INTERNATIONAL
Revolutionizing The Way You Bank!

New Providence « Grand Bahama + Andros = Inagua * Exuma
San Salvador « Cat Island « Coral Gables, FL

Head Office Nassau: (242) 397-3000

we, BankBahamas Online.com





PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Union to Royal Bank statt: ‘Step up to the plate’

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tripunemedia.net

THE BAHAMAS Financial
Services Union (BFSU) yes-
terday urged Royal Bank of
Canada employees to “step up
to the plate” and unionise, rais-
ing the spectre of lay-offs fol-
lowing the merger between the
Royal Bank of Canada (RBC)
and the RBTT Financial

Group.

The BFSU president, There-
sa Mortimer, said Royal Bank
employees in the Bahamas
were missing out on an array of
benefits afforded their
Caribbean colleagues because
they were not unionised.

The move represented the
latest step in the union’s lob-
bying campaign to urge the
bank’s employees to join it and
unionise, following their First-

| Pharmacy Technician |
Course

American Certification

Summer Session

Register Today!

Call Hepson at:
356-4860

=
"Whitipéal
ieee

The pewer le pel mare deed



Whirlpool

The gaeer be get more dome.

See ee

Tel ae) ae
ee

.

os

y all

hee)

Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas) counterparts.

Ms Mortimer said the most
imminent benefit that Royal
Bank employees would enjoy
from joining the BFSU was the
redundancy benefit that can be
negotiated by the union.

Impending

The impending RBC /RBTT
merger will find the company
moving its corporate head-
quarters form the Bahamas to
a new building in Trinidad and
Tobago. And the BFSU pre-
dicts major job losses with the

loss of the regional headquar-
ters.

“We all know what happens
in mergers, and the current
environment says, and the eco-
nomic situation says. that the
finance sector is going to do
the same thing,” said Ms Mor-
timer.

She said another important
benefit Royal Bank workers
will receive immediately is the
BFSU’s negotiating body in
discussion with the bank’s
managers.

Royal Bank’s president and
country head, Nathaniel Bene-
by, said he was not opposed to

the bank’s employees unionis-
ing. He insisted, however, that
the management of Royal
Bank has had a traditional
open door policy with employ-
ees, and suggested that he has
not heard any major grievances
at the bank’s regular round
table discussions with staff.

Obligated

The BFSU’s secretary-gen-
eral, Lashon Sawyer, said Mr
Beneby was obligated to make
such statements.

According to her, 18 of the
21 Caribbean territories where

Royal Bank operates have
union members within the
ranks of the bank.

She said the Bahamas, Bar-
bados and Trinidad are the
only territories without union
representation within Royal
Bank, though Trinidad is mov-
ing towards that now.

“We need the staff of Royal
Bank (Bahamas) to step up to
the plate,” said Ms Mortimer.

“When you look at it,
Trinidad and Barbados have
general workers unions. They
(Royal Bank Bahamas) have
to get a union so that we will
all be on the same page.”

Two Bahamians reach final 10 in bank contest

TWO Bahamians have been
named among the 10 finalists
for Scotiabank’s Change-Maker
Challenge.

The 2009 Change-Maker
Challenge contest asked young
adults from 14 Caribbean coun-
tries to share their marketing
vision for Scotiabank’s new
young adult-focused pro-
gramme, Scotiabank Be. More
than 1300 original ideas were
submitted.

The 10 Caribbean finalists
selected to move on include
Fabian Fernander and Janairo
Turnquest of the Bahamas. The
others are Debbie-Ann Estwick
of Barbados, Kayla Hall of

7

Classic

Cavicw

[ oistes of

Belize, Roma Singh of Guyana,
Janelle Brown and Sandre Mal-
colm of Jamaica, Tarek
Mohammed and Afeisha
Williams of Trinidad & Tobago,
and Roleza Samuel of St. Vin-
cent.

“The number of responses we
received this year far outpaced
our estimates,” said Pat
Minicucci, Scotiabank’s senior
vice-president for the
Caribbean.

“The calibre of creativity in
the Caribbean is outstanding,
and the submissions to this
year’s challenge have further
confirmed this. The essays
showcase the unbelievable tal-

ent coming from the future
business leaders of the region.”

Contestants were asked to
create a marketing strategy for
Scotiabank Be, Scotiabank’s
young adult banking platform.

Summaries of the finalists’
submissions have been posted
on the contest website
http:/Avww.change-makerchal-
lenge.com) for peer evaluation.
A panel of judges, made up of
senior Scotiabank executives,
as well as local academic leaders
and media persons, will evalu-
ate the submissions, examine
the peer evaluations and nar-
row the group to three.

In July, the top three final-

ists will be flown to Jamaica to
personally present their sub-
missions to the judging panel.
The individual with the most
innovative idea will take home
the $10,000 grand prize.

The second and third placed
entrants will take home $5,000
and $3,000, respectively.

The winners will be
announced by the judging pan-
el at a press conference in
Kingston, Jamaica, on July 17,
2009.

The Scotiabank Change-
Maker challenge was developed
to reflect the importance the
bank places on its young cus-
tomers and their ideas.

*0) Celebration

O

CRUISE
a

ae IPMS e Cruises

lenin $ 8 Y
eta

SMe Oe eee
Meee Peeler Lanes tet leme jer Cece ler)
casino, complete spa, fitness room, three

age-appropriate kids' clubs, adult pool/spas
and children's pool with 180-foot slide.

Call 866-957-2276

Ce

lebrationBS.com

Prout 1

Ea Ded

Ce Che Cee



Large Spacious Units

3 Bedroom, 2 % Bath Townhomes with Garage

Low Down Payment of $33,900 MOVEIN NOW!

In-House Financing Available at 74%, Immediate Occupancy

Gated Community with Grotto Pool
First Time Homeowners Incentive

Many Upgrades Included!! Hurricane Engineered Wall System

T: 323-6146 / 424-6755 __ E: EstatesOfSeaview.com





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 3B





Combating crime key to
financial sector’s success

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

crobards@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT’s first pri-
ority for the financial services
sector is to create a secure,
crime free environment for the
Bahamas, the minister of state
for finance said yesterday, while
touting the great responsibility
regulators have for helping the
Government keep the integri-
ty of the industry “sound”.

Zhivargo Liang said the Gov-
ernment has an overarching
responsibility to create eco-
nomic growth by stabilizing the
environment in which citizens
and foreigners in pursuit of eco-
nomic opportunities must do
business.

He said security for citizens
and residents was a top priority
for the Government with
respect to financial services.

“Tf you think this is unrelated
to promoting a financial services
industry development, you tell
me how the work that you do in
the places that you do them
would be affected by a disor-
derly, crime-ridden Bahamas.
Tell me whether there is any
OECD initiative that will cause
your industry to shut down
more quickly than an out-of-
control crime problem in the
Bahamas,” said Mr Liang.

‘de

ily ish, 7000

Drama Each Night

Live Concert: Friday, July 3rd

$10 in advance, $12 at Door

Sessions ore FREE except for vomcert



ane Ae}

He said the Bahamas WAS
in need of a serious discussion
on fundamental developmental
issues, which has not been car-
ried out in his time.

According to him, the role of
the Government need to be
properly established so that it
can put itself in a position to
duly assist the financial services
sector.

“So the Government has, at
the very fundamental level, to

M
Pie

do that because the pursuit of
every other noble objective is
easier in an environment with
peace and order,” Mr Laing
said.

“Once the Government has
been able to put the physical
infrastructure in place, govern-
ment has to listen to the finan-
cial services sector.”

Mr Liang said the Bahamas
government’s relationship with
the financial services sector, par-
ticularly through the Bahamas
Financial Services Board
(BFSB), was one that is split
down the middle and equally
distributed.

“We established a relation-
ship with the BFSB, whose
responsibility it is to do promo-
tions,” he said.

“We fund it to the tune of
$500,000, and they match the
funds within the industry. We
give them funds to promote; we
also participate with them
strategically in overseas mis-
sions where they think our pres-
ence would lend to the promo-
tion exercise they are doing, and
so in that joint partnership we
try to work together.

“Government is the protec-
tor of the integrity of the finan-
cial services sector. If the sys-
tem is abused and misused, it is
the responsibility of the gov-
ernment.”

GNMENT

low! $35.00

eaisiea ccnp are ‘edie,

neludes Event ticket, Tanirt, Zook, Music OD
4A Eligibility for Spacal Prine Dressings

Rasir $14.00 = lacheles Book & B a bl Hy Tue lees Py ues Dirsasiegp

Schedule

Dey Seas onda ond Pedoy from 30on to |p

Might Sensiom: WVedneudoy oad Thundoy of F30pe

Concert Friday of 70pm * Youth Alive Seper sunday af [kS0am

423-461-6430 + WEB: www.youthalivel.com + EMAIL: youn

July : ard. 24th 2009
Bannerman Town, Eleuthera

Camp Fees

Ages 7 to
Ages 11
Aes 12 to 19

PRICES INCLUDE:

$175.00
$175.00
$230.00

Junior week ;

Transportation to and from Campsite,

three meals daily, T-shirt and all
additional Camp materials.

4 non refundable registration fee
of $50.00 must be paid before
Zist June 2009

Primary week:

Who can come ?
Senior Week: Ages 15-19
Ages 11-14
Ages 7-10

July 3-10
July 12 - 17
July 19-24

Please contact us!

Eva Culmer

Registration Co-ordinator

(a part of overall fees)

(iading Wher ow Wey Be
Ages 7-10 $130.00
ages 11-19 $160.00

All outstanding fees must be paid
15 days before travel

Tel: 392-2428
(evenings & week-ends)

Eunice Thompson

‘ai ity i

Emmanuel Gospel Chapel
Monday - Friday 9am - 4pm
Tel: 361-2072

Website: koinonabahamas.org

Spencored by: Lawes Wholesale Drag Agemey Lid.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that NATILEE ATKINS of 9
WINDWARD ROAD, IMPERIAL PARK, P.O. BOX EE-

15587, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, P.O Box SS 1956 is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and

Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 18 day of June, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

RAWAK

OMMES'

EXTENDED
HOURS

Open until 7 00 1

Shirley Street Office
June 18"









































The Bahamas
Development Bank

is recruiting a

Managing Director

The Bahamas Development Bank is undergoing a critical period of transformation and
renewal and is looking for a Managing Director (MD) to lead the Bank’s financial turnaround.

The MD is responsible for providing strategic leadership of the Bank by working with the
Board of Directors, management, and shareholders to establish, implement and oversee the
long-range goals, strategies, plans and policies of the Bank. The MD reports directly to the
Board and will enjoy substantial autonomy to shape overall operations in order to deliver
improved financial performance and customer service levels.

Duties and Responsibilities:

1. peadersiie and Corporate Responsibility
Lead the management team to be effective developers of solutions to business
challenges and establish credibility throughout the organization and with the
Board
Hold responsibility for driving the Bank to achieve and surpass profitability,
cash flow, and other business goals and objectives
Motivate and lead a results-oriented management team and staff; recruit members
to the executive team not currently in place and retain existing executive and
front-line talent
Represent the Bank and its renewed values with existing and prospective clients,
creditors, government, other stakeholders and the public in general

Business Management and Strategy
Spearhead the development, communication and implementation of effective
growth strategies and processes
Collaborate with the Board to develop and implement plans for the operational
infrastructure of systems, processes and personnel, designed to accommodate
the Bank’s growth objectives
Assist, as required, in raising additional capital to enable the Bank to meet growth
and market share objectives
Direct the development and implementation of business strategies
Foster a success-oriented, performance-driven, and accountable environment
within the Bank
Lead the Bank’s cultural transformation

Corporate Governance and Disclosure

* Oversee the development, implementation, and compliance with key corporate
policies, including policies regarding corporate governance, risk management,
financial reporting as well as compliance with applicable legislative requirements

The ideal candidate will have strong leadership skills, a solid financial services background,
and broad knowledge of the Bahamian business environment. A demonstrated ability to
execute and deliver results is essential. Likewise, a proven track record in strategic plan
development with a clear ability to turn strategy into actions without over complication of
business process is critical.

The successful candidate will enjoy an attractive, highly competitive, and performance-
based compensation package.

Printed CVs are to be addressed in confidence to The Chairman, and delivered or mailed
to the
Bahamas Development Bank,
Cable Beach, West Bay,
P. O. Box N-3034,
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas

The deadline for applications is June 30, 2009.



PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



PRC SMW
MIR) Perey aR CTE

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES -
a ~~

FirstCaribbean @h..7: #

Are you seeking an
exciting career opportunity?

Find what you’re looking for with FirstCaribbean Careers.
AVAILABLE POSITIONS:

Oma E er Oise oe mcm uel ian)

Chief Financial Officer-Corporate Investment Banking
Manager-Group Financial Reporting
Head-Syndications

Head-Credit Analytics

Senior Analyst-Hospitality

Visit firstcaribbeanbank.com/careers.htm for job
descriptions, requirements and other available positions.

@ FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK
www. firstcaribbeanbank.com/careers.htm GET THERE: TOGETHER:

COHEN & KLEIN CONSULTING

WwW. cohenandklein,.com

In conjunction with:

FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY

The Most Practical & Comprehensive
Debt Collection Training Available

@ CK 700 Debt Collection Strategies, for new & experienced Collectors
& Compliance Officers, June 23 - 26

@ CK G00 Revenue & Debt Collection Management, for Managers &
supervisors, June 30 - July 3

COURSES WILL BE HELD @ THE PEGASUS HOTEL.

AEROS REVS, ec RDG
2009 training brochures, course outling, other locations and details visit
www.cohenandklein.com OR e-mail us at: collect@gate.net






















CATALYN & CURRY'S |
oo
=the

GuUANAHANI *

Book & Lyrics by James |. Catalyn Music by Andrew R, Curry |

The Domdas Centre for the Perlorning Arts ;
June 24th - 27th June 27th 2009 at 8:00 pom. nighih
Dockets 330,00)

‘Opening Sight tala Toeslay Jaume 2rd at f:040 p.m.
Vickets 3:20), 00

Boa Mee at the Dumas (ielephones 393-3728 304-7 1 TO
tay ties M wena Doh diate, 93a, io OH eam. tha ily ‘i
Adhunoed ticked bookings email juloatt 1! hbotmnadloon
é Hew 7rree. fen if rai Ae muy ve hi 1

LA nua an arya eerie anil fie natal)

‘Multiple play’
Start-up still
seeking major
$14m bite

expires in October 2009, the company cannot yet deliver its services

to the Bahamian public.

Tribune Business had previously reported that IP Solutions
International was in talks with Systems Resource Group (SRG),
parent company of IndiGo Networks, to use parts of its infra-
structure to deliver its services. It is not known how far talks have

progressed, though.

IP Solutions International had previously told Tribune Busi-
ness that it had aimed to serve more than 5,000 Bahamians hotel
rooms during its first year of operation.

The company had also been talking to a ‘foreign partner’ who
had offered to finance construction of its IP (Internet Protocol)
head-end technology for $2 million.

FOCOL wins airport
gas station contract

FROM page 1B

Spinks told Tribune Business
that he apologised for not mak-
ing it clear at Monday’s meeting
that the incentive fee payments
only applied to larger conces-
sion contracts, not the small
retail outlets, carts and kiosks.
Therefore, there would be no
discrimination against smaller
Bahamian firms.

“The incentive fee would not
apply to the small stores,” Mr
Spinks told Tribune Business.
“Tt’s an option if someone puts
that into their bid, but it’s
intended only to apply to the
larger contracts, such as the gas
station, where we only had
three bidders.

“T didn’t make that clear at
the meeting. The incentive only
applies to the larger contracts,
not the 400 square foot retail
stores.”

Pace Ml oti

eee eis

a a |

arth
Ue ks
The Diocetan Chorale
eeu eee cE
James Catalyn & Friends

Er (a) 1 UU)
Peer

Teale
Performing Arts

Wild Seed Designs

Please be advised that the following offices will be closed on

Friday, June 19, 2009 and will re-open on Monday, June 22,

2009 at the usual business hours.

BAHAMAS FIRST GENERAL
INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

NASSAU UNDERWRITERS
INSURANCE AGENCY LTD. - COLLINS AVENUE AND
HARBOUR BAY LOCATIONS

We regret any inconveniences caused.

Signed: Management

Mr Spinks said of the six cart
and kiosk concessions already
awarded at LPIA, some 80 per
cent of them were being oper-
ated by Bahamian small busi-
nesses. “We certainly support
small business entities in there,
and the incentive fee does not
apply to those leases,” he
added.

Meanwhile, Mr Spinks con-
firmed reports reaching Tribune
Business that the companies
currently operating those kiosks
and carts would have to re-bid
for the contracts when the new
US international departures
building was opened in 2011.
They will have to compete not
only with each other, but also
with new hopefuls.

“That’s correct,” Mr Spinks
confirmed to tribune Business.
“That was made clear to them
right from the beginning. The
leases on the carts are for one
year, with a one-year extension.

“It was only for the current
location [the current US depar-
tures terminal]. The one reason
that we did the kiosks and carts
in the current terminal building
was that there was no room for
more stores. We had to get
retail in there somehow.”

When the $409 million LPIA

Owen Bethel



redevelopment is completed,
Tribune Business understands
the airport will have a total of
35,000 square feet of space for
retail, restaurants and storage
space.

Mr Spinks said the retail mix
in the new US departures ter-
minal, when constructed, would
be different from the current
terminal with more “stores” and
less kiosks and carts.

The current plan is for eight
stores of between 300-400
square feet, with two kiosks and
“one or two carts” in the new
US departures terminal. The
new international departures
building, when completed, will
have four kiosks and “a couple
of carts”.

Mr Spinks said existing kiosk
and cart tenants, such as
Uniquely Bahamian, Sun Drops
and My Ocean, had all
expressed satisfaction with the
performance of their airport
businesses. And their rental
income, along with the passen-
ger facility fee, has been to
NAD’s benefit.

“Our annual losses, which
were about $7 million when we
took over, are down somewhere
around $3 million-something or
$4 million. We’ve picked up $3-

$4 million in cost savings and
revenues,” Mr Spinks said.

The NAD executive also con-
firmed that the gas station “con-
tract is going to Sun Oil”, the
FOCOL subsidiary that oper-
ates under the Shell brand. Both
NAD and Sun Oil were now
waiting on the Ministry of
Works to finalise its plan for
widening JFK Drive, which
includes a roundabout by the
‘conch shell’ on the airport
access road.

NAD, explained Mr Spinks,
was waiting for the Ministry to
produce roundabout designs so
that it could then assess how far
back from the road the gas sta-
tion’s location needed to be.
Once this happened, a planning
permission application could
then be made.

Mr Spinks added, though,
that NAD had put plans for a
fast food restaurant or retail
outlet next to the gas station
“on the shelf right now”, after
not receiving the amount or
quality of bids expected.

He added that the Airport
Authority Board had just signed
off on the appointment of the
general contractor for the LPIA
redevelopment, a decision now
awaiting ministerial approval.

Cable TV costs ‘appear high’ against rivals

FROM page 1B

number of channels to Cable’s
basic offering were priced at
between $10-$23 per month in
Malta and Jamaica.

“Cable Bahamas’ prices
appear high despite the fact that
the price for these services has
not increased for the last 15
years,” the BTC privatisation
committee’s consultation doc-

HOME AA aor
FROM HOME
aie in Comforable

ument said.

The same “appears expen-
sive” conclusion was reached
with regard to BTC’s cellular
and fixed-line international call
prices. The former found that
BTC’s calls per minute prices
to the US, Canada and the UK
were “slightly higher than peak
rate calls in the Cayman Islands
and Jamaica, and substantially
higher than peak rates in other

small jurisdictions such as
Guernsey, Jamaica and Malta”.

On the cellular side, BTC’s
tariffs for pre-paid and post-
paid calls at a domestic level
were also “relatively expensive”
when set against international
comparatives, while the cost of
services was increased by the
fact customers paid to receive
fixed-line and international
calls.

Coming to NASSAU
for a WEDDING

or FUNERAL!

STAY WITH US

Starting at

FRIDAY-SUNDAY $1 5 ()

BAHAMAS
HOME AWAY FROM HOME

cai: 3 26-2325

ernie: batornashoreerayptremiaree(ierad com

(72) THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

ORIENTATION AND ADVISEMENT FOR
FALL SEMESTER 2009

ORIENTATION AND ADVISEMENT WILL TAKE PLACE FRIDAY, JUNE 19,
2009 FROM 9 AM TO 1 PM IN ROOMS B-5 AND B-6 FOR THE FOLLOWING
STUDENTS ACCEPTED IN THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS (BBA) PRO-

GRAMMES:

1 STUDENTS WITH EARLY ACCEPTANCE
2 STUDENTS WHO HAVE COMPLETED COLLEGE PREP
3. STUDENTS WHO HAVE COMPLETED THE UPGRADING PROGRAM

(CEES)

ALL STUDENTS SHOULD BRING COPIES OF ACCEPTANCE LETTERS, COM-
PLETION LETTERS AND RELEVANT EXAM RESULTS SUCH AS THE BGCSE.





THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 5B



Push to repeal
cell phone tax

Bm By STEPHEN
OHLEMACHER
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Company-issued cell phones
might feel like a tether to the
office even in workers’ off-
hours. The phones also are a
taxable fringe benefit, and the
Obama administration wants to
change that.

The administration has asked
Congress to repeal the widely
ignored tax on the personal use
of company cell phones, saying
it is outdated and difficult to
enforce. The request Tuesday
came a week after the Internal
Revenue Service caused an
uproar when it sought ideas for
how better to enforce the law.

A 1989 law says workers are
supposed to count the value of
personal calls on a company cell
phone as taxable income. The
cell phone tax, however, can be
a pain for workers who increas-
ingly use mobile devices for tex-
ting, e-mailing and browsing the
Internet — sometimes for work,
sometimes for personal use.

“There’s been very uneven
enforcement, said Marianna
Dyson, a former IRS lawyer
who now is an employment tax
and fringe benefits expert with
Miller & Chevalier in Washing-
ton.

“T think most employers are
reasonable. But do I see
employers requiring employees
to document every single busi-
ness call?” Dyson said. “It’s
administratively burdensome.”

IRS Commissioner Doug
Shulman said the tax is “poorly
understood by taxpayers,” and
acknowledged it was difficult to
enforce consistently.

“The passage of time,
advances in technology and the

nature of communication in the
modern workplace have ren-
dered this law obsolete,” Shul-
man said in a statement.

Shulman said he and Trea-
sury Secretary Timothy Geith-
ner were asking Congress to
repeal the tax. The House
passed a bill to repeal the tax
last year, but it stalled in the
Senate. This year, bipartisan
bills have been introduced in
both chambers.

“We need to modernize the
laws to reflect the reality that
cell phones, BlackBerrys and
text messaging are an everyday
extension of the workplace and
are here to stay,” said Sen. John
Kerry, D-Mass. “Cell phones
are no longer executive perks
or luxury items, and our tax
code cannot treat them that way
anymore.”

Just last week, the IRS issued
a request for comments on ways
to improve compliance with the
law. One option suggested by
the IRS would assume that per-
sonal use accounts for a quarter
of the phone’s overall use.
Another would require work-
ers to document their personal
use of company cell phones.

Shulman denied that the IRS
had been trying to “crack
down” on workers who don’t
pay the tax. Instead, he said, the
IRS was “attempting to simpli-
fy the rules and eliminate uncer-
tainty for businesses and indi-
viduals.”

Some employers have faced
big tax bills after failing to com-
ply with the law.

In 2008, the IRS audited two
University of California branch-
es, in Los Angeles and San
Diego. As part of a settlement,
UCLA paid a tax assessment of
$238,474 and UCSD paid
$186,471.

Advanced Family Medicine
eae

Family Medicine &
okin Care Clinte
Pht -326-1111

Mon-Fri: 9-6, Sak | 0-5
Shirley Se
Opp Cioctor's Hospital Pertikag lo

“Hotty Filer ebay
“Free Health Chocks fi!”
Father's day week end

TUNE fae Fa, Sot 0 MS

Free: Blood pressure,

welRI chacks,

Body Mags index (BMI) Calculations,
Blood Sugar Test,

Blood Choalssteral pest

©

Temple Christian High School
Shirley Street
TEACHING VACANCY

Invites applications from qualified Christian
teachers for the following positions for the
2009 - 2010 School Year.

Health Science/General Science (Gr.7-9)
Language Arts/ (Gr.10-12)

Applicants must:

Be a practicing born-again Christian who is
willing to subscribe to the Statement of Faith of

Temple Christian School.

Have a bachelor’s Degree in Education or higher from a
recognized College or University in the area of

Specialization.

Have a valid Teacher’s Certificate or Diploma.
Have at least two years teaching experience in the
relevant subject area with excellent communication

skills.

Applicants must have the ability to prepare students for
all examinations to the BJC/BGCSE levels.
Be willing to participate in the high school’s extra

curricular programmes.

Applications must be picked up at the High School Office on
Shirley Street and be returned with a full curriculum vitae,
recent coloured photograph and three references to:

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is July 3rd, 2009





Industry representatives said
they were pleased that the IRS
changed its position.

“We just think that this law
was put into effect in a bygone
era,” said John Walls, vice pres-
ident of public affairs for CTIA-
The Wireless Association, a
trade group.

“In 1989, cell phones were
considered a luxury item that
were actually referred to as car
phones,” Walls said. “Now, we
have unlimited calling on our
cell phones. We have free nights
and weekends. The company is
not even paying for that. Why
should I get taxed for that?”

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

SERVICES
AVAILABLE

* IMPORTERS

« DISTRIBUTORS

* OFFICE SPACE

*» FOOD STORAGE

» ODMbASTER

ee Fao ELT

err ere

RECOVERYFACILITY

Fax (242) 327-8214

“T ensure that vital
equipment around the
hospital are in perfect
working condition
according to strict
specifications,
ensuring that you and
your family receive
safe and comfortable
treatment, each and
every time.. ”

Benjamin Forbes, Associate
Engineering Technician

We Welcome you

to be a part of our WOW service team.

ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN

Qualifications
* Graduate of BTVI technical program;
¢ Previous experience with basic electrical and plumbing duties;
¢ Ability to troubleshoot machines and servicing of machines
related to Healthcare services
Excellent oral and written communication skills;
Good customer service/organizational skills
Ability to work independently

The successful Candidate will:

Maintain the hospital environment in a state of the art condition;
Perform basic repairs and service of machines; Be responsible for the
general upkeep of the hospital and extending buildings.

Excellent benefits | Salary commensurate with experience

re" DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life

Please submit resume to: Human Resources Department | Doctors Hospital
P.O. Box N-3018 | | Nassau, Bahamas | or Email: nwatkins@doctorshosp.com

www.doctorshosp.com









, BAHAMAS
2 LOGISTIC

*” CENTRE



NEW SOLUTION
FOR SAFE BUSINESS STORAGE

State of the ET
Hurricane Proof storage
Pele OL eels Et
{they can also be
available jointly). This
facility Is designed with
the latest concepts for
efficient and es |)
C0) 0 |
ae teste

Centrally located in a
traffic free zone.

The goal is to minimize
cost and facilitate your
eye Tre LMR Mm eet ae
ee ease |
withstand extreme
weather feral ee
Fenced and secured area
with 24 hour surveillance.
Each unit provides 1,200
cubic yards of usable
space with independent
Fle oot

WWW. BAHAMASLOGISTIC.COM



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 7B

Energy bill advances
in the US Senate

@ By H JOSEF HEBERT
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Legislation that would require
greater use of renewable ener-
gy, make it easier to build pow-
er lines and allow oil and gas
drilling near Florida’s coast
advanced Wednesday in the
Senate.

The Energy and Natural
Resources Committee voted 15-
8 to clear the measure, although
both Democrats and Republi-
cans — for different reasons —
said they had concerns about
the bill and hoped to make
major changes on the Senate
floor.

The legislation’s primary
thrust is to expand the use of
renewable sources of energy
such as wind, solar and geot-
hermal sources as well as deal
with the growing concerns
about the inadequacies of the
nation’s high-voltage power
grid.

But the bill also would
remove the last congressional
barrier to offshore oil and gas
development, lifting a ban on
drilling across a vast area in the

SWNT CLUB
OF BASSAL, RAI AWLAS

eastern Gulf of Mexico that had
been put off limits by Congress
three years ago. Drilling would
be allowed within 45 miles of
most of Florida’s coast and as
close as 10 miles off the state’s
Panhandle area.

The Senate bill for the first
time would establish a national
requirement for utilities to pro-
duce 15 percent of their elec-
tricity from renewable sources,
a contentious issue that is likely
to attract heated debate once
the bill is taken up by the full
Senate, probably in the fall.

Twenty-eight states currently
have some renewable energy
requirement for utilities, but
supporters of the measure argue
a national mandate is needed
to spur such energy develop-
ment.

The legislation also would
give much wider authority to
federal regulators over the
nation’s electricity grid.

The Federal Energy Regula-
tory Commission would be giv-
en authority to approve the sit-
ing of high voltage power lines
if states fail to act and would
be given additional powers over
cyber security on the grid.

SUMMER “LEARN TO SWIM”
CLASSES
June 29" to July 24", 2009

REGISTRATION AT
QUEEN’S COLLEGE POOL
SATURDAY JUNE 207, 2009

9:00 A.M. TO 12:00 NOON

Registration forms available on the website:
www, barracudaswimming.org

WonGenng
Wiidt LO

sfeyt

Fatners

Del fed

NPN ee
ar cena fhel| di

Pe

Senate Majority Leader Har-
ry Reid, D-Nev., has said he
hopes to take up energy legis-
lation after the August recess,
although it’s uncertain whether
it will be merged with separate
legislation addressing climate
change. The House is working
on a climate bill that includes
many of the same energy issues
addressed by the Senate bill.

While the bill was approved
by a safe margin in the commit-
tee its prospects in the full Sen-
ate are anything but certain.
Several senators called it too
weak in its support of renew-
able energy development, while
others said it ignored nuclear
energy and greater domestic oil
and gas production.

“None of us got all we want-
ed,” said Sen. Jeff Bingaman,
D-N.M., the committee’s chair-
man, who was forced to agree
to a variety of compromises to
give the bill a chance of advanc-
ing.

That was apparent in the way
the bill deals with renewable
energy mandate.

Bingaman, and many of the
panel’s other Democrats, had
wanted at least a 20 per cent
renewable energy requirement.
The bill requires 15 per cent
renewable use by 2021, but also
would allow utilities to avoid a
fourth of that mandate by show-
ing efficiency improvements.
Renewable energy use could be
cut further for utilities that
increase their use of nuclear
energy either from a new reac-
tor or increased reactor output.

“This is an extraordinary
weak bill,” said Sen. Bernie
Sanders, I-Vt.

But Sanders voted to advance
the bill, as did Sen. Bob Corker,
R-Tenn. Both senators said they
hoped the bill will be strength-
ened.

“T suspect their definition of
strengthening might be some-
what different,” quipped Sen.
Evan Bayh, D-Ind., whose own
support of the bill came despite
strong opposition to the federal
renewable energy requirements
on utilities.

Sanders wants the renewable
energy requirement to be much
higher, at 25 per cent. Corker
said the bill needs more to pro-
mote nuclear energy and
domestic oil and gas produc-
tion.

The bill also calls for:

Establishing a new office
to steer grants and loan guar-
antees to clean energy projects.

Creating an oil products
reserve to be used if there are
supply problems.

—Creating federal standards
for efficiency standards for new
building.

7 | 242.322.7371 | 242.

ravelbahamas.com





PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a |) > =; ;
Training initiative must be ‘long-term and self-sustaining’

FROM page 1B

the things I will be harping on
about over the next few months
is to begin addressing education
issues, begin addressing train-
ing issues, and to be begin
addressing the competitiveness
of small and medium-sized busi-
nesses in the country.”
Regardless of whether the
Bahamas entered into more
free trade agreements such as
the Economic Partnership
Agreement (EPA), Mr Rolle
said addressing the competi-
tiveness of a sector that
accounted for 80 per cent of

Bahamian businesses was key
to this nation’s future econom-
ic success.

“We still have, as a private
sector, to develop better strate-
gies to manage businesses,” he
added. “We don’t know when
the next crisis is going to hit,
and with this one we got caught
with our pants down. A lot of
small and medium-sized busi-
nesses went out of business
because they were just not pre-
pared.”

Mr Rolle pointed to the com-
pany he works for as market-
ing director, Bahamas Ferries,
as an example of a Bahamian
business whose ability to

Ministry of Finance
Treasury Department

Announcement
To All Merchant and Vendors

The Treasurer wishes to advise that for goods
and services supplied or rendered to Government
Ministries and Departments during the 2008/2009
fiscal year, you are hereby requested to submit:

. The original of all outstanding invoices to
the Accounts Section of the relevant Ministry or
Department

2. A copy of those invoices to:
The Public Treasury Department
First Floor
British American House
(George Street & Navy Lion Road)

NO LATER THAN THURSDAY 24th, JUNE 2009

Please note that the PURCHASE ORDER NO.
Must be indicated on all invoices.

Signed
The Treasurer

GN-871

MINISTRY OF PUBLIC
WORKS & TRANSPORT

Public Notice

TENDER FOR EXTERIOR PAINTING AT
GENERAL POST OFFICE
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

:
2

The Government of the Bahamas, through the Ministry
of Works and Transport is inviting Tenders from painting
contractors to carry out repairs and painting at the General
Post Office.

Schedule for Tender Opening

Companies interested in tendering may contact Project
Officer, Mr. Dominic Wilson at the Ministry of Public Works
and Transport (302-9506) for further information and
arrangement of site visit.

All tender bids should include the following:
‘Complete Tender Document

* Copy of current Business License

* National Insurance board letter of good standing

Tenders must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked
“Tender for Fencing at the Ministry of Public Works and
Transport” and delivered to:

Chairman

Tenders Board

Ministry of Finance

3rd Floor Reception Desk
Cecil Wallace-Whitfield Centre
P.O. Box N-3017,

Cable Beach, West Bay Street
Nassau, The Bahamas

All Tenders must be received at the above address on or before
10:00 am Tuesday, 23rd June 2009.

All persons who submit bids are invited to attend the opening
of Tenders at the Ministry of Finance. 3rd Floor, Cecil Wallace-
Whitfield Centre, Cable Beach, West Bay Street, Nassau, The
Bahamas at 10:00 am. on Tuesday. 23rd June, 2009

The Ministry of Public Works and Transport reserves the right to
reject any or all Tenders.



expand as needed hinged heav-
ily on the competency and
expertise of its workforce.

“My company, Bahamas Fer-
ries, needs more people trained
in the marine industry. We’ve
been growing at an astonishing
rate,” he explained. “Over the
past 10 years, we’ve really posi-
tioned ourselves as a leading
operator.

“Tf you look at the number
of vessels in a business like ours,
and the rate of growth of those
vessels in an operation of our
size and geographic reach, those
companies usually grow by one
vessel every five to seven years,
and we’ve been getting one ves-
sel every two years.

“Tf we’re going to continue
on that growth path, we need
that technical expertise to be
consistent with that. Our
employees have to be techni-
cally qualified, because of our



specialist needs that need spe-
cialist training.”

Although the Government’s
National Training Programme
was focused on _ the
training/retraining of 1,000
unemployed Bahamians select-
ed from those who had regis-
tered with the National Insur-
ance Board’s (NIB) unemploy-
ment benefit scheme, Mr Rolle
said he was also looking long-
term.

“One of the things that Iam
keenly aware of is we usually
make short-term decisions,” Mr
Rolle added. “With this partic-
ular project, ’'m working dili-
gently to make this a long-term,
self-sustaining programme. It
has tremendous merit.

“Tt requires a lot of funding, a
well-oiled, sustainable machine.
That is why the Chamber is
actively involved in this. It ben-
efits our members. It’s a starting

ETTER LIVING
SPP LV ero lis)
QUALITY WATER.”

The Sterling Water System provides a healthy,
safe and cost effective means of providing quality
water to residential, commercial and institutional

properties.

Safe:

¢ Safe for use in drinking water, complying with

toxicity requirements.

Effective:

Independently tested and approved by IAPMP
Testing & Services as an effective solution for

hard water

Calcium carbonate,

the dissovled mineral

compound that caused hard water does not form
build up on pipes, fixtures and surfaces

Environmental Friendly:

¢ Engergy and conservation value enhances

property values

¢ No salt or other additives are used nor waste
water through regeneration of backwashing

For more information call:
Renovation Ineovation

1(242) 364-2329
1(242) 434-7451

1(242) 364-8401
1(242) 445-5661

email us at: rickboww@hotmail.com or
zzionpaul@ yahoo.com

Please be advised that
the following offices

WILL BE
CLOSED

on Friday, June 19, 2009
and will re-open on
Monday, June 22, 2009

at the usual business hours.

BAHAMAS FIRST

GENERAL INSURANCE COMPANY

NASSAU UNDERWRITERS
INSURANCE AGENCY LTD.

Collins Avenue and Harbour Bay Locations

We regret any
inconveniences caused.

Signed: Management

point. I see it as a springboard
to a much larger initiative that
addresses a much wider labour
pool and a much wider skill set.
If you have an educated and
well-trained workforce, that
goes directly to the bottom
line.”

Mr Rolle said the committee
charged with overseeing and
developing the National Train-
ing Programme was now devel-
oping the structure for the ini-
tiative, the process for select-
ing the 1,000 workers, the insti-
tutions that would be involved
and ensuring “there is some
long-term benefit”.

Mr Rolle said the committee
also wanted to ensure persons
who completed the programme

cation. The institutions involved
will be the Bahamas Technical
and Vocational Institute
(BTVI) and the College of the
Bahamas (COB).

The committee was targeting
summer 2009 for the program-
me’s start, which Mr Rolle
acknowledged was an “aggres-
sive” timescale, and autumn was
the fall-back start date.

The committee was also
working on developing candi-
date profiles to ensure persons
in the programme were placed
on the appropriate course, and
Mr Rolle said they were looking
at a ‘work-study’ arrangement
where course entrants could
gain experience working in the
private sector while also study-

received some form of certifi- ing.

IN HOUSE
INVESTMENTS LTD

NOTICE TO
SHAREHOLDERS

The Board of directors of In House Investments Limited has
declared a quarterly dividend for Preferred Shares to all
shareholders of record at June 15, 2009 as follows:
Preferred Shares 7.25% per annum (payment quarterly).
The payment will be made June 30, 2009 through Royal
Fidelity Share Registrars & Transfer Agents Limited in the

usual manner.

To advertise in The Tribune -
eR rere ya BCL

NOTICE

OF

JB CONSULTING LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 16th day of June, 2009.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Finacial
Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, The Baha-
mas has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

ESSAY COMPETITION

TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK

The Department of Public Service will host an Essay
Competition as one of the activities for the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week. The Competition is open to Junior
and Senior Students in New Providence.

Additionally, this year, a speech competition will be
for schools in the Northern & Southern Bahamas,
respectively. Students interested in participating in the
Essay Competition should write a 250 - 300 words (Junior
High), and 450 - 500 words (Senior High), essay on the
topic: “ The Public Service-Striving for Excellence in
Customer Service.”

The deadlines for entries, which should be referred
to the attention of Mrs. Antoinette Thompson, Deputy
Permanent Secretary, Department of Public Service, is
Friday 24th July, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 Computer System will be awarded to
the winner each category. The first runners-up for both the
Essay and Speech Competition in the Junior & Senior High
School category, will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.

The winners will be announced during the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week Awards Ceremony scheduled for
Saturday 10th October 2009.

Students interested in the Speech Competition for the
Northern and Southern Bahamas should contact their
Language Arts Teacher.





THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 9B



5
US banks plan to repay about S68bn in bailout money

@ By DANIEL WAGNER
AP Business Writers

warrants, the banks will remain
tied to the federal programme.
Several banks said they had told

ment guarantees. But the banks
still rely on some government
subsidies, including debt guar-

antees from the Federal Deposit
Insurance Corp. and discount-
ed credit lines from the Federal

Reserve. Wednesday was the
first day the banks were eligi-
ble to repay the money. Gold-

man disclosed its plans in let-
ters to congressional leaders
Tuesday.

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Ten large US banks planned to
repay about $68 billion in
bailout money Wednesday,
marking a new phase for the
most visible government effort
to relieve the credit crisis.

The Treasury Department
last week said the banks could
begin repaying money they

received last fall under the $700 plans were described by three i ‘ Z 1 “> ya
billion financial system bailout industry officials who spoke on “¥/ ‘il ‘ 5 ; ft ; bey
known as the Troubled Asset condition of anonymity because ivr / d-} ff —e A at | [ 4 i
Relief Programme, or TARP. not all the banks had yet made ; ' — _, / }
The programme was the cen- their official announcements. Fa i : wf

terpiece of the government
effort to relieve a global credit
crunch and teetering financial
markets last October.

The banks have since been
negotiating with Treasury over
the prices of stock warrants they
issued as part of the TARP deal.
When Treasury made its initial
investments, it recetved the war-
rants, which give it the oppor-
tunity to buy the banks’ com-
mon shares in the future at a
fixed price. The value of the
warrants would depend on the
shares’ future performance.

The pricing of warrants has
been a point of contention, slow-
ing the repayment process.
Banks want to pay less to tear
up the warrants than Treasury
says they’re worth. But until
banks have bought back the

BIC cellular
charging branded
an ‘anomaly’

effect, cross-subsidising the
fixed-line customer and ser-
vice”.

In addition, the ‘receiver
pays’ principle also eroded the
ability of BTC’s pre-paid cellu-
lar customers to control their
telecoms costs - the very rea-
son they had selected this ser-
vice - and made them reluctant
to answer their phones, again
defeating the product’s very
purpose.

It also meant that interna-
tional and domestic-orginated
fixed-line calls would be termi-
nated if BTC’s pre-paid cellular
customers did not have suffi-
cient credit on their phones for
the call’s duration.

“Tt appears that the charging
anomalies outlined in the fore-
going paragraphs are not best
practice, and are not in the best
interest of the Bahamian public
going forward,” the BTC pri-
vatisation committee’s paper
said.

“A move towards calling par-
ty pays for all domestic and
international calls would enable
a single, consistent charging
approach without anomalies
and without overlapping rev-
enues.”

The paper added that the cur-
rent absence of competition in
the cellular market, where BTC
enjoys monopoly status - and
will do until effectively two
years after privatisation - meant
that Bahamian consumer cur-
rently had no choice over the
charging/payment plan they
preferred.

The BTC privatisation com-
mittee is also looking to move
away from the ‘discretionary’
approach to retail price regula-
tion in the communications
market, as employed by the
soon-to-be-replaced Public Util-
ities Commission (PUC), and
adopt a process that is “more
transparent”.

Pointing to the fact that both
the PUC and BTC had con-
cerns over the “high level of dis-
cretion” employed currently,
the consultation document said:
“The process for approval of
price changes has proved time-
consuming and provides very
little incentive for BTC to be
efficient.

“All price changes, including
decreases, are required to be
the subject of public consulta-
tions. The requirement to apply
for permission for all price
changes appears to be more
onerous than in many other reg-
ulatory regimes.

“International best practice
is to move away from this sort
of discretionary price setting to
amore transparent process that
provides a balance between
consumer protection, flexibili-
ty and incentives for operators
to be innovative whilst promot-
ing efficiency.”

The consultation paper said
that while regulators in more
developed countries only regu-
lated pricing at the wholesale
level in their communications
sectors, the Government felt
retail price regulation was nec-
essary because “the level of
competition in the Bahamas
may be too low at present and
in the near future”.

The Government is looking
at the ‘price cap’ approach to
regulation of the Bahamian
communications sector.

Treasury they wished to buy the
warrants, officially starting the
negotiation process.

TARP became a flashpoint
for critics of government inter-
vention last fall, when Congress
debated whether to commit
$700 billion of taxpayer money
to the effort.

Wednesday’s repayment

The banks repaying TARP
are some of the industry’s
largest, including JPMorgan
Chase & Co., American Express
Co., Goldman Sachs Group Inc.
and Morgan Stanley. BB&T
Corp. and U.S. Bancorp. also
said they were repaying their
TARP money.

Banks have been itching to
quit TARP because it subjects
them to limits on executive com-
pensation and other rules.

Before getting permission to
repay their TARP money, the
banks had to meet a series of
government requirements. Nine
of the 10 were subject to a
“stress test” designed to show
how they would withstand a
deeper recession. They also had
to raise equity from investors
and raise debt without govern-





Ic,

—"
— im ———.

-

“Fathers day”

-
Shera bon

om Cable Beach

[a — 300

Insurance Company
of The Bahamas

“All You Can Lat Buffet

Insurance Company of The Bahamas Limited
Balance Sheet
Year ended December 31, 2008, with corresponding figures for 2007

ASSETS

Cash and bank balances (Notes 5,18)
Term deposits (Notes 6,18)
Reinsurance recoveries (Notes 4,12,18)
Due from agent (Notes 7,18)
Deferred commission reserve (Notes 7,18)
Prepaid reinsurance premiums (Notes 12,18)
Prepayments and other receivables (Note 18)
Investments in securities
- fair value through profit and loss (Notes 7, 8,18)
- held-to-maturity (Notes 8,18)
- available for sale (Notes 8,18)
Investment property (Note 9)
Property, plant and equipment (Notel0)

Total assets

LIABILITIES

General insurance funds:
Unearned premium reserve (Notes 12,18)
Outstanding claims (Notes 12,18)

Other liabilities:

Unearned commission reserve (Note 18)
Due To reinsurers (Note 4,18)
Accounts payable and accruals (Note 7,18)

Total liabilities

NET ASSETS

Represented by:
Share capital
Authorized, issued and fully paid:-
3,000,000 ordinary shares of $1.00 each
General reserve (Note 14)
Retained earnings

§ 15,768,111

Statement of Changes in Shareholders’ Equity

Year ended December 31, 2008, with corresponding figures for 2007
Expressed in Bahamian dollars

2008 2007

2,469,148
5,856,614
14,901,166
4,526,005
5,582,346
20,251,890
54,661

862,794
5,148,030
14,444,488
6,241,574
5,600,044
20,081,005
42,370

General
Reserve

Share
Capital

Balance at December 31, 2006 $ 3,000,000 2,000,000

Net Income

3,203,906
5,848,090
2,162,500
1,601,464
1,314,602

3,605,515
6,835,381
2,212,500

536,917
1,361,687

Dividends (Note 17)

Balance at December 31, 2007 $§ 3,000,000 2,000,000

Net Income

67,772,392 66,972,305

Dividends (Note 17)

Balance at December 31, 2008 $ 3,000,000 2,000,000
24,785,444

17,381,917
42,167,361

24,628,586
16,902,927

41,531,513

5,052,287
4,383,927
A0Q0, 706

52,004,281
15,768,111

5,056,626
4,629,046
377,190

51,594,375
15,377,930

Statement of Cash Flows
Year ended December 31, 2008, with corresponding figures for 2007

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Net income
Adjustments for:
Unearned premium reserve
Interest income
Dividend income
Interest expense
Change in net unrealized gains on investments in securities
Depreciation

3,000,000

2,000,000
10,768,111

3,000,000

2,000,000
10,377,930

15,377,930

See accompanying notes to financial staternents

These financial statements were authorized for issue on behalf of the Board of Directors on April 7, 2009 by:

Director K
4 4)

Director L_ d Land

Statement of Income
Year ended December 31, 2008, with corresponding figures for 2007

INCOME

Gross written premiums (Note 7)
Premium tax

Ceded to reinsurers

Net retained premiums
Decrease in unearned premium reserve (Note 12)
Portfolio transfer (Note 13)

Net premiums earned
EXPENSES
Net claims incurred (Note 12)

Net commissions incurred (Notes 7, 11)
Excess of loss reinsurance

Underwriting profit

OPERATING INCOME AND EXPENSES
Interest income (Notes 5, 6, 8)
Dividend and other income (Note 7)

Change in net unrealized gains
on investments in securities (Note 8)

Personnel expenses (Notes 7, 16)

Depreciation (Notes 9, 10)
Interest expenses

General and administrative expenses (Note 7)

NET INCOME

(Increase) decrease in assets:
Reinsurance recoveries

Due from agent

Deferred commission reserve
Prepaid reinsurance premiums
Prepayments and other receivables

Increase (decrease) in liabilities:
Unearned premium reserve
Outstanding claims

Unearned commission reserve
Due to reinsurers

Accounts payable and accruals

Net cash provided by operating activities
Expressed in Bahamian dollars
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Net placement of term deposits
Purchase of investment properties
Purchase of property, plant and equipment
Maturity/(purchase) of investments in securities and bonds
Proceeds from sale of investments in securities
Interest received
Dividends received

2008 2007

$ 51,734,059 51,793,130
(1,500,133) (1,476,230)

50,233,926
(40,888,440)

50,316,900
(40,975,310)

9,345,486 Net cash provided by/(used in) investing activities

14,027

9,341,590
210,952
(373,786)

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES
Dividends paid

Interest paid

9,359,513 9,178,756

Net cash used in financing activities
Net increase in cash and cash equivalents
2,862,505
312,089
4,593,465

1,834,578
302,207
4,287,271

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year

Cash and cash equivalents at end of year

Supplemental information:
Premium tax paid

7,768,059 6,424,156

1,591,454 2,754,600

842,389
421,808

683,338
507,614

(401,609) 1,058,888

2,454,042 5,004,440

(520,119) (440,397)

(62,454)
(15,287)

(60,626)
(1,750)
(466,001) (374,384)

1,390,181 4,127,283

$

$

Sunday 2 lst June, 2009

Nassau Ke qe h Resort

Expressed in Bahamian dollars

Retained
Earnings

7,000,647
4,127,283

(750,000)

10,377,930
1,390,181

(1,000,000)

10,768,111

Total

12,000,647
4,127,283

(750,000)

15,377,930
1,390,181

(1,000,000)

15,768,111

Expressed in Bahamian dollars

2008
1,390,181

14,027
(842,389)
(251,597)
15,287
(401,609)
62,454

789,572

(456,678)
1,715,569
17,698

(170,885)
10,079

142,831
478,990
(4,339)
(245,119)
23,516

2,301,234

(643,229)
(1,068,586)
(11,330)
1,000,000
50,000
764,325
229,227

320,407

(1,000,000)
(15,287)

(1,015,287)
1,606,35
862,794

2,469,148

1,524,843

The full audited Financial Statements

including the notes which form an
intergral part of the Financial Statements
are available on the Company's website
at www.icbbahamas.com

2007
4,127,283

210,952
(683,338)
(276,270)

1,750

(1,058,888)

60,626

2,382,115

(1,120,934)

3,711,974
80,606
46,416
(23,261)

(468,320)
775,226
(6,862)
(287,884)
(650,204)

4,438,872

(1,579,783)

(28,157)
(1,416,431)
50,000
630,195
276,270

(2,067,906)

(750,000)
(1,750)

(751,750)
1,619,216
(756,422)

862,794

2,125,762





PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Obama unveils ‘new rules of
roa@ for financial regulation

@ By JIM KUHNHENN
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
President Barack Obama pro-
posed new “rules of the road”
for the nation’s financial system
yesterday, casting the changes
as an essential response to the
economic crisis and the great-
est regulatory transformation

since the Great Depression.
Obama blamed the crisis on
“a culture of irresponsibility”
that he said had taken root from
Wall Street to Washington to
Main Street, and he said regu-
lations crafted to deal with the
depression of the 1930s had
been “overwhelmed by the
speed, scope and sophistication
of a 21st century global econo-

oir wi Harel

SWIMMING LESSONS

af
CUSTOMS AQUATICS

Professional Trainer
Private/Semi Private
Your small group

Individual attention brings best results
Ages 3 to ageless adults
Qur temperature controlled pool
Or your family pool.

a, Call:-362-1492 a 6














Ae
NAD

Nassau Airport
Dovelapmont Company



Tender

C118 Medium Waltage Sedteh House and Duct Bank








Maaedu Ajepepel Dheyarke opmieel Company (AD) i pleased Lo



anmounie the: reieneet:

of Tender

118 Mediu Voliage Seatch

House and Duel Bank for Stage 1 of the Lyeden Finding

niemabonal Anon Expansion

The scope of work includes

Construction of a new medem voltage (77kW] swiich house tor
BEG ond MAD aanich eer: Bulbs 6 apprcoarglety Ml SF,
8 inch block walls, aleronem hasdrals, and a standing seam

Métal roa

Corl works ncluding approamately f

B00 LF of eecenion

bedding. duct instalation, supply and aslallaion of manhotes

beckiil
vollage duct bank

cOMpacion, Culiey and pang lor anew medium

Purchase and inslalalion of MAD Switchgear

nlerested Bidders: mus! be licensed and aporoved by fhe Baharia

Biecine ©

Afporahon in parton medium voltage (11k) work

The (118 Tender Documents wil be avaiable for pick up after
1900 pm, Tuesday June 16th, 2009 Abeer meeting wll
be held at 10200 am, Thursday Jume 28th, 2009 Pease
Gonlael Traci Breby br regeter al the MAC! Project office

Contact: TRAC! BRISRY
Contracts and Procurement Manager

LPUA Expemcenn Prngect

Ph: (242) OE-9086 | Feu: (280) S777

PO Bom AP S229, Massey, Bahamas

Email traci brshyifiress bs

my.” The Obama plan would
give new powers to the Federal
Reserve to oversee the entire
financial system and would also
create a new consumer protec-
tion agency to guard against
credit and other abuses that
played a big role in the current
crisis.

In remarks prepared for
delivery later in the day, Obama
attributed much of the country’s
current problem to “a cascade
of mistakes and missed oppor-
tunities” that happened over
decades.

The Fed’s expanded authori-
ty and the rest of the new rules
would reach into currently
unregulated regions of the
financial markets. An 88-page
white paper released by the
administration detailed an effort
to change a regime that Oba-
ma’s economic team maintained
had become too porous for the
innovations and intricacies of
today’s financial markets.

Obama said the plan was
designed in consultation with
lawmakers, regulators and the
institutions it seeks to police.

“We seek a careful balance,”



Obama said.

The plan would do away with
the Office of Thrift Supervision,
replacing it with a system aimed
at closing gaps in coverage and
keeping institutions from shop-
ping for the most lenient bank
regulator. The consumer agency
would place new restrictions on
lenders and mortgage brokers,
requiring them to offer simple
loans to consumers.

“Mortgage brokers will be
held to higher standards, exotic
mortgages that hide exploding
costs will no longer be the norm,
home mortgage disclosures will
be reasonable, clearly written,
and concise,” Obama said.

The president offered his ver-
sion of the source of the finan-
cial crisis, tracing the troubles
to complex financial instruments
such as asset-backed securities
that ended up concentrating
risk. “It was easy money,” he
said. “But these schemes were
built on a pile of sand.”

The regulatory system either
had gaps or overlaps with little
accountability, he said.

“Millions of Americans who
have worked hard and behaved

NOTICE



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT




No. 45 of 2000





Trainvest Consultants Ltd.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

137 of The International Business Companies Act
No. 45 of 2000, Trainvest Consultants Ltd. is
in dissolution. The date of commencement of
dissolution was the 16th day of June, 2009. Dillon
Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of

Trainvest Consultants Ltd.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

No. 45 of 2000

Violena Consulting SA

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

137 of The International Business Companies Act No.

45 of 2000, Violena Consulting SA is in dissolution.

The date of commencement of dissolution was the

16th day of June, 2009.

Dillon Dean of Nassau,

Bahamas is the Liquidator of Violena Consulting

SA.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Morey at Work

EG CAF CAPITAL

MARKETS
E & ADVISORY SERVICES

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 16 JUNE 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,571.51 | CHG 0.45 | %CHG 0.03 | YTD -140.85|YTD%
FINDEX: CLOSE 780.49 | YTD -6.51% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

5S2wk-Low Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.28 0.127
10.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
2.14
10.18
2.74
5.50
1.27
1.32
7.50
10.00
10.35
4.95
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

-8.23

Securit
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste

Previous Close _ Today's Close
1.39 1.39
11.00 11.00
6.94 6.94
0.63 0.63
3.15 3.15
2.37 2.37
11.39 11.39
2.74 2.74
5.50 5.50
3.45
1.50
7.76
10.97
10.38
5.09
1.00
0.30
5.50

Change

0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Symbol Last Sale Daily Vol.
FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3758 1.65 4.83
2.8962 -1.49 -3.35
1.4672 2.34 5.43
6.01 -13.90
2.40 5.79
0.56 0.56
-3.59 -3.59
0.00 0.00
1.72 4.12
2.13 5.78

Pee eo errr
29000009

oo
°
5

3.39
1.60
7.76
10.97
10.38
5.09
1.00
0.30

5.50 0.00

S52wk-Hi 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

52wk-Low Symbol
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

52wk-Low
1.3124
2.9230
1.3915

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund

Div $ Yield %
30-Apr-09
31-Mar-09
29-May-09
30-Apr-09
31-May-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
30-Apr-09
31-May-09
31-May-09
31-May-09

3.1821
12.2702
100.0000
96.4070

Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund

3.1821
12.9209
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.0000
9.2511
1.0578
1.0271 -0.57
1.0554 1.74
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

2.71
5.54

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Des 02 = 1,000.00
52wWk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

Barack Obama (AP)



responsibly have seen their life
dreams eroded by the irrespon-
sibility of others and the failure
of their government to provide
adequate oversight,” Obama
said.

The financial sector and law-
makers from both parties con-
cede the need for significant
changes in the rules that gov-
ern the intricate and intercon-
nected world of banking and
investment. But the details of
Obama’s proposal already are
facing resistance, signaling a
tough sell for a president who is
spending major political capital
on his health care overhaul.

Under Obama’s plan, the
Federal Reserve would gain
power to supervise holding com-
panies and large financial insti-
tutions considered so big that
their failure could undermine
the nation’s financial system.

But even as it gained new pow-
ers, the Fed would lose some
banking authority to the new
Consumer Financial Protection
Agency.

Obama’s proposal would
require the Federal Reserve,
which now can independently
use emergency powers to bail
out failing banks, to first obtain
Treasury Department approval
before extending credit to insti-
tutions in “unusual and exigent
circumstances.”

The president predicted that
critics will find that his efforts go
too far or fall short. The
expanded Fed role and the new
consumer regulator will be sub-
jects of fierce debate in Con-
gress. Many bankers oppose a
new consumer protection regu-
lator, and many lawmakers wor-
ry the Fed could become too
powerful.

VACANCY

COOK/CHEF

Downtown restaurant seeks talented and
experienced cook to prepare native and
contemporary dishes and manage all kitchen
operations. Please email resume to:

ENERGY SAVING
Sean elatee ni

Cut Your Electic

Up To 40%

* Tankless Water coo
* Compact Fluorescent Bulbs
* Energy Saving Capacitors for
Motors, A/C, Pumps etc.
* Fridgi-tech oil additive to increase A/C

efficiency

For more information or survey

Email: enengysavingsconsultants hotmail.com

Contact 326-6121





NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000
Travona Holding Ltd.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act No.
45 of 2000, Travona Holding Ltd. is in dissolution.
The date of commencement of dissolution was the
16th day of June, 2009. Dillon Dean of Nassau,
Bahamas is the Liquidator of Travona Holding Ltd.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

P(e Pee N= we










THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST

THURSDAY, JUNE 18TH, 2009, PAGE 11B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MARINE FORECAST





FA










































































} =: Today Friday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
n } rt . a v High = Low W High Low W WASSAU Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82°F
A = — 9 -, _ o| 1 |2 3 |4| 51617 8|9|10 Fic FIC FIC FIC Friday: § at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
SS f il pl Acapulco 91/32 77/25 pe 89/31 76/24 t FREEPORT Today: —_—‘SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
-_, Qk — i LOW | MODERATE J HIGH | V.HIGH | EXT = Amsterdam 6719 52/11 ¢ 63/17 50/10 sh Friday: § at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
k me ORLANDO BD Ankara, Turkey 77/25 46/7 pe 79/26 48/8 Ss ABACO ‘Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
High:94°F34°C = Partly sunny with a Mainly clear with a Partly sunny with a A full day of Partial sunshine. Partly sunny with a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 86/30 70/21 s 84/28 67/19 s Friday: § at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
rH 7° F230 , heavy shower. shower late. thunderstorm. sunshine. shower possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 56/13 47/8 s 57/13 43/6 s
PF OW: Fs fi i High: gg° High: 90° High: 90° High: 88° Bangkok 90/32 79/26 r 90/32 78/25 t
ce @ he High: 88° Low: 78° Low: 79° Low: 78° Low: 79° Low: 77° rl N Barbados 86/30 76/24 pc 86/30 76/24 s r
TAMPA Ls if : : : : : : IDES FOR NASSAU Barcelona 80/26 68/20 s AAC TODAY'S U.S. FORECAST
[mu ie r CN Ur Beijin 91/32 741/21 pc 77/25 62/16 pc
High: 93° F/34° C : i 103° F 101°-90° F 108°-88° F 109°-86° F 108°-81° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low _Hft.(ft. ar ET : 78/95 73/00 ;
Low: 78° F/26°C as r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 4:01am. 22 10:01am. 0.1 Belgrade 87/30 61/16 s 97/36 67/19 s
a, @ - s elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 434pm. 29 11:07 p.m. 03 Berlin 76/24 50/10 c 68/20 48/8
; a CUT ne Friday o02am. 22 1058am. 00 Bermuda 77/25 70/21 sh 79/26 74/21 sh
a € | oat 5:33pm. 3.0 9 ---- Bogota 6618 45/7 c 66/18 46/7 pc pilings
2 ei a Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Saturday 60lam. 23 1206am. 01 Brussels 68/20 50/10 pc 64/17 48/8 sh
1 — ABACO Temperature 6:31pm. 3.2 11:55am. -0.1 Budapest 87/30 60/15 pc 93/33 55/12 s (BREEZY)
r z hi i x ", ’ High: 88° F/31° C oO sisesseteiadeas lace sctevtetedeecs aes ce : Sinday 658am. 24 103am 00 — Aires aE a pc aE — pc
a - Sa) Low: 78° F/26°C Normal high aregice __ 28pm. 33° 12:52pm. 02 {07/41 88/31 po 97/36 85/29 po apemey
7 ; Normal low . 74° F/23° C Calgary 72/22 48/8 pc 68/20 46/7 pc
A, ie _ thet @ WEST PALM BEACH iy Last year's igh wo... 91° F/33° C SUN AND ity Cancun 90/32 75/23 t 88/31 72/22 ¢
' —— High: 88° F/31°C Last year's VOW ese eeeeeeesseeeeeeesees 75° F/24° C ; Caracas 82/27 71/21 pc 81/27 71/21 t
— Low: 75° F/24° C e Precipitation SuntisessiaiaB20 sit: Maoniisei As of 2 p.m. yesterday oo... cece 0.05" unset....... ‘Uc p.m. Moonset... ... “OU p.m. Copenhagen 67/19 51/10 pe 63/17 51/10 sh
& FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT oie alg New First Full Last Dublin Bie 45/7 sh 6317 46/7 pc
High: 88°F/31°C @ High: 88° F/31°C Normal year to date .......c.ccsecscssesssseeeseeeeeee 15.54" ~ = - Frankfurt 72/22 54/12 c 63/17. 46/7 r
Low: 77° F/25°C Low: 75° F/24°C > Mere i Geneva 83/28 61/16 sh 68/20 52/11 t
_ AccuWeather.com ea i pu Halifax 74/23 50/10 s 64/17 50/10 c -
- @ i. Forecasts and graphics provided by _ a: Havana 90/32 70/21 t 89/31 72/22 sh Showers Mara
MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jun. 22 Jun. 290 Jul. 7) Jul. 150—sHelsinki 63/17 45/7 s 6116 46/7 sh T-storms
ra High: 89° F/32° C ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 87/30 79/26 sh 87/30 80/26 s Rain Fronts
i Low: 78° F/26°C NASSAU High: 89° F/32°C Islamabad 108/42 74/23 s 112/44 77/25 s [*, # Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and nen
High: 88° F/31°C Low: 78° F/26° C Istanbul 77/25 62/16 pe 80/26 68/20 s Bk] Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm fitenfitnfite
Low: 78° F/26°C Jerusalem 81/27 60/15 s 84/28 61/16 s [v_¥] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Manguali-
e Johannesburg 58/14 46/7 t 58/14 45/7 t
KEY WEST 2 eae cr Seu0 7s | ha 1G 105 206 [RY ats 55) ts rs (5 SEO
tieeaeanetad i AY ZAT ISLANI Lima 72/22 58/14 s 72/22 59/15 s
Low: 79° F/26°C High: 85° F/29° C London 68/20 50/10 pc 68/20 52/11 pc
we —— a so ag) Re ae
anila t r
i of Mexico City 77/25 55/12 t 73/22 55/12 + e ta 8 es C !
oie ~ Monterrey 97/36 73/22 pc 97/36 74/23 s is x x pay » - » RA N e
a GREAT EXUMA ei SAN SALVADOR Montreal 68/20 59/15 6 72/22 63/7 c
High: 87° F/31°C High: 87°F/31°C Moscow 66/18 45/7 pc 6417 48/8 pc
~~“ Low: 75°F/24°C Lew: 75°F/24°C Munich 83/28 57/13 s 58/14 48/8 +
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | : Nairobi 79/26 54/12 sh 80/26 54/12 c “6 :
highs and tonights's lows. ve High: 92° F/33°C New Delhi 105/40 84/28 s 106/41 86/30 s ia ¥en
Za Low: 79° F/26°C Oslo 68/20 46/7 sh 63/17 50/10 sh »F Y u an B Blo wn
‘an. Paris 72/22 52/11 sh 68/20 50/10 pc i=
Prague 78/25 56/13 pc 66/18 48/8 t ] A = hy
LONGISLAND Rio de Janeiro 74/23 65/18 pc 75/23 66/18 s Away Vy ul Tl Cane
CA er ier erzet Rome ‘seo 668 saa cans in
Low: 76° F/24°C Rome 86/30 66/18 s 85/29 63/17 s ’
Today Friday Today Friday Today Friday MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 87/30 79/26 sh 88/31 79/26 sh an Seidalave eeeelin . wins
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 88° F/31°C San Juan 72/22 45/7 pe 73/22 38/3 pe t at yo ave excellent Insurance
FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC Fic FIC a Low: 75° F/24° C gee a eae t a nn t coverage no m atter which
Albuquerque 84/28 62/416 t 84/28 62/16 t Indianapolis «87/30 71/21 t 90/32 68/20 t Philadelphia 75/23 64/17 + 83/28 ‘66/18 antiago r r .
Anchorage 64/17 52/11 pc 67/19 53/11 pc Jacksonville 97/36 76/24 t 100/37 77/25 t Phoenix 101/38 78/25 s 97/36 75/23 ¢ CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS santo Daring ete = sh Soi tees Si Way Ue wind blows.
Atlanta 97/36 73/22 po 96/35 74/23 s Kansas City 95/35 74/23 pc 88/31 69/20 t Pittsburgh 75/23 6015 c 82/27 64/17 t RAGGEDISLAND — High:S1°F/83°c - — oar a C com Tn s . :
Allantic City 73/22 6447 + 82/27 70/21 c Las Vegas 97/36 73/22 pc 100/37 79/26 s Portland, OR 77/25 57/13 pe 71/21 55/12 pc High: 87° F/31°C Low: 76° F/24°C Sikh oa cn ee oer ears Fe Nobody does it better
Baltimore 78/25 64/17 t 86/30 68/20 t Little Rock 96/35 74/23 s 97/36 75/23 s Raleigh-Durham 92/33 72/22 t 97/36 71/21 t Low: 73° F/23°C sen 5 ae on [ Ae, ee sR
Boston 65/18 58/14 r+ 67/19 62/16 sh LosAngeles 80/26 64/17 pc 78/25 64/17 pc St. Louis 97/36 77/25 s 94/34 71/21 t . om ae a ETIDS oh ee =
Buffalo 66/18 54/12 sh 69/20 62416 t Louisville 92/33 75/23 t 94/34 75/23 pc SaltLake City 76/24 5814 pc 84/28 65/18 s GREATINAGUA Tava mae Gare mn von) Bone Ch
Charleston, SC 94/34 75/23 t 100/37 77/25 s Memphis 97/36 76/24 s 96/35 74/23 s SanAntonio 100/37 76/24 pc 98/36 75/23 s ie SRR ean TTMETENGS TED EETH SES INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
Chicago 79/26 66/18 82/27 6317 t Miami 89/31 78/25 t 91/32 78/25 pc San Diego 72/22 66/18 po 71/21 66/18 pc Low. 77°F25°C Trinidad 84/28 68/20 pc 87/30 68/20 pc
Cleveland 72/22 61/416 pc 82/27 68/20 t Minneapolis 79/26 63/17 t 79/26 64/17 ¢t San Francisco 74/23 56/13 s 72/22 54/12 ss : Vemeamnnai 63/20 55/12 c 69/20 56/13 pc (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Dallas 99/37 76/24 s 97/36 75/23 s Nashville 96/35 73/22 s 95/35 74/23 s Seattle 71/21 56/13 po 69/20 53/11 pc Viana 84/28 68/20 s 91/32 59/15 Grand in rs a
Denver 81/27 52/11 81/27 55/12 pc NewOrleans 95/35 77/25 s 95/35 77/25 s Tallahassee 99/37 75/23 s 102/38 74/23 s a New Providence
i Warsaw 70/21 50/10 c 6417 48/8 +
SS te i mes sae SU TE epaiaesol weeaperno ecco were | eyo
onolulu s s anoma Ul pe pe ucson pe Cc eo 2 = 7 _ _ -
Houston 96/35 77/25 s 96/35 77/25 s Orlando 94/34 74/23 t 96/35 76/24 t Washington,DC 81/27 65/18 t 87/80 73/22 t Nhe ee



THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

MeN

PURCHASE
GET THE DOORIT’S 1 TOPPIh GP

Domino's ee 99 E





The Tribune oo"""”
OBIMUARIES
RELIGION



| -< The Tribune
a OLT | tty Arcee, My Mowspaper!

—‘\ ene
» \8
707.9

SS hour chaice for ihe family:



PAGE 2,

THURSDAY, JUNE 18,

2009



IN LOVING MEMORY OF :

ete ALVIN ELCOCK

any, 1938 - 18th June 2007



A father lies in peaceful sleep,
His earthly cares are o'er;
And we who are left to mourn him,
Will see him smile no more.
But he is not gone forever,
We shall meet him once again;
In the cloudless land with God
above,

Where happiness knows no end.
We need not weep or shed a tear,
For the days are near at hand;
When we again will see him,
In that ever-promised land,

Missed by your loving wife, Verna,
children, Avril, Randy and Hal, your
sisters Barbara and Monica, brothers

Christopher, Peter and Leslie and
your many nieces, nephews and
friends.

Card of thanks for the late

MR. ROBERT LIVINGSTON CARTWRIGHT
12th April 1920 - 15th April 2009

We the Cartwright Fareiiy woud file te eater! our sincere Maks ke oner anny melanie

and friends for their kind e_pnensions of avnipaiity ccuring words, provers, vistas

ielephone cols, flava! aragemenis and other swnnietic gestures shown fo wt dering
far Mitre ay arrow.

Special tanks to father Michael (ritting
Minister Lawrence Cartwright M.P. for Long Island and the entire
Long Island Commianity

The Cartwright Family





ee * Seas OBITUARIES

vard of The Thanks

for the late



O'carsin >»

August 1967 - February 2009

ne family wishes to express heartfelt gratitude and
appreciation to all of you who conveyed
condolences to us during our time of bereavement. We are
grateful for the many telephone calls, prayers, words of
encouragement, well wishes and for every kind gesture.
May God richly bless you for your kindness and may His peace
forever be yours is our prayer

The Jamily
CARD —

OF
THANKS

: Ingrid
“Yvonne Evans

_ "| have fought a good fight, | have finished my course, | have kept

the faith: Henceforth there is laid up for me a crown of
righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge,
shall give me at that day."

The family of the Celebrated Ingrid Yvonne Evans, would like to ex-

press our gratitude for all those persons far and near who have
reached out to our family during our
time of transition.
May the blessings of the Most High God rest on you.

The Family.



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

IN LOVING MEMORY
OF

Thomas Albert Sands Sr., O.B.E.
Born: September 24th, 1941
Died: June 17th, 2005

The best portion of a good man’s life ts not his
jame, wealth or ability...

“The best portion of a good man's life is his
little; nameless, unremembered acts of
kindness and love”, -William Wordsworth

Albert, Daddy, Pappy, Grandfather...
You bestowed many acts of kindness on
others ......and are
remembered, respected and loved.

‘SYOU WILL NEVER BE FORGOTTEN.

Claudia, Thomas, Christel, Chandra,
Lamont, Natsaha, Thomas IT, William &
Natalia.

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 3

‘@ard of Thanks

RUPERT CHARLES BUTLER SR

Our First Father's Day Without You
Sept. 6, 1936 - April 5, 2009

How can we say thanks for ALL you have done for us? Our most
heartfelt thanks and appreciation is extended to all both far and
near, as you have been a source of strength and encouragement to
our family, during this time of bereavement.

Special thanks are extended to Pastors F. Edward Allen, Gil
Maycock, James Knowles, Algernon Malcolm, Rick Dean, and Garth
Johnson. Pastor Allen's message entitled "Your Passport must be
in Order" greatly reassured us, and we are so grateful to know that
our Father's passport was indeed in order.

Thank you to the members of Abundant Life Bible Church, and
Family of Faith Ministries Int, for your prayers and concern. To the
Abundant Life Chapel Singers, the Ladies Prayer Fellowship and Mr.
Franklyn Stewart (organist), the Accounts Dept. and blood donors
of the R.B.0.F., Officers and members ofthe 30th Co. of Boys’
Brigade, members of The Helping Hands Neighbor Club, persons
who visited, called, prayed, sent food, drinks or floral tributes,
Thank you.

To the staff of NapCo Printing, John $. George, Kingsway Academy,
PMH Male Surgical Ward #2, Dialysis Unit, Bethel Brother's
Morticians and Woodlawn Gardens, our deepest gratitude for the
support you provided and the assistance given. To Constance
Evans (God daughter), Joyce Knowles, Delores Nottage, Kevin and
Edna Glinton, Brent Deveaux, Alvina Taylor, Gertrude Gibson,
Vanria Smith and others far too numerous to mention, may God
continue to bless you, as you too played a very instrumental role in
our Father's life and helped us to bear the burden of his passing.

Happy Father's Day Daddy. We love you and miss you.
Cynthia “Diamond” Butler & Family





PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

To Lining Manory

Onthe occasion of the 70th Birth date of our
mom June 17th 1939-March 3rd, 2009

Bessiemae Violet Greene

You have always personified
strength and the exhilarating drive
you maintained while pioneering
the way of our matriarchal trail
deepens our reflection on your life;
You have stimulated our pursuits

for better and should we leave an
imprint only one-half that of yours
would mean rmoteworthy accom-
plishment-an inspiration for praise.

Mom, you have truly been to us an
‘inspiration for praise, and we
Thank God for you always; we
shall never forget the path that You
have traveled before us.

Card if DLpank
; 1 WR

ag a ‘a Es,
pg age

=

Williams

September 23, 1931 - February B, 209

Cred saa you w2ttine tired and acure wes
mot lo be, su he pul his aren around vou
anid lifted view er rest

With teartul eyes we watched you, end aaw
you Pass wey. Although we loved pou
slewly, bul Jesus Iowes eu best.

Your work on cath waa done, and therstore your heort has taken reac Ve ve
lel us precbous TaemuTies: your laws will be uur aodde. Lb boob wor beacks
to lose sou, for part ofus weol vith you on the day Ged called you ome.

We, the family of che late Ambrose Qaltoste Williams wishes to express
gu deep apprecialion for your wun expressions of compusstin. affection
and suppork during our boss, Your thoughts andl eTorts have genuinely
touched our hears and lives in a way that we could never express.

“Litmk eu wed) coer Cound euutioue Le Bless your Les,
Rosamond, Desiree, Touna, Cardinal Teenise, Deanne atl Danas

and family, including his wslers and their humilics, Edo Daley, Evanvelioe
McFall und Christine Rolle.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel

Wulff Road & Pinedale

Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 © Fax: 328-8852

for the late

MINISTER
GLORIA NAOMI
DELANCY

The Family of the Late Minister
Gloria Naomi Delancey would
like to extend our sincere
thanks and gratitude to our
many relatives and friends for
their kind expressions of
sympathy, assuring words,
prayers visitations, telephone
calls, floral arrangements, and
other sympathetic gestures shown to us during our time of
sorrow.

aed Sf c

We would like to say a special thank you to the following,
Bishop Brice H. Thompson General Presbyter Church of God
of ae Bishop Elgarnet B. Rahming sr. National Overseer
Church of God of Prophecy, Bishop Joseph M. Swann, Bishop
Sterling Moss, Bishop Rudolph Bowe District Overseer Bishop
Franklin Ferguson, Bishop Solomon Humes, Bishop Eliakim
Ferguson, Minister Gladstone Thurston Associate Pastors,
Minister Dr. Barbara F. Williams National Evangelism and Home
Mission Director and family, Minister Punchetta Taylor and the
National Harvest Team, Alda Williams and the National Prayer
Team Church of God of Prophecy, Pastor R. J. Deleveaux Holy
Spirit Church of God, Pastor Elias Ferguson, Hon. T. Desmond
Bannister MP, Sancuatry Choir and Members of the Church
of God of Prophecy Gambier Village, Church of God of
Prophecy San Salvador, Bahama Brass Band and Junior Band,
Gambier Community Development Association, Management
and staff of Bahamasair, St. Peters Baptist Church Gambier
Village, Mt. Zion Baptist Church Gambier Village, Rev.
Christopher Roberts, Mrs. Sharon Chase, Sis. Sonia Williamson,
Bahamas Airline Pilot Association, Sis. Victoria Beneby and
Family, Sis. Helen Alleyne and Family, Minister Diana McDonald
and Family, Bro. Denver Dames and Family, Mr Michael Dames
and ae Staff Best Western Bay View Suites, Bro. Ronald
Johnson, Bro. Michael Swann, Mr. Ezekiel Stubbs and Family,
Mr. Michael Ramsey and neighbors on Mussaendra Avenue
Garden Hill #2, The entire Gambier Village Community and
the Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel & Crematorium.

Fram her sons Richard and Captain Borris Delancy, Grand
children, Great grand Ghild, Sisters and Brothers.







THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

11A Eost Cora Rood. Heep. G.B., Bohames
P.O. Boe Feast? _

Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager. (242) 340-8043 « Fox: (242) 373-3005

THURSDAY, JUNE 18,

Releiae Memorial Mortuary

2009, PAGE 5

72
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 24-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fox: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

SIDNEY
BRICE JR., 42

of Morgan Lane, Freeport, Grand Bahama will :
be held on Saturday, June 20, 2009 at 11:00 am, =

at Agape House, Pronger’s Loop #22 & 23,

Pioneer's Way East, Freeport, Grand Bahama. :
Officiating will be Pastor Willard Munroe. :

Cremation will follow,

Cherished Memories will forever linger in the :
Hearts of father: Sidney Brice; mother: Verna ;

Brice; grandmother: Lou E Pommells-Warley:
daughter: Sequioa and Shaniqua Brice;
erandchild: Naser Woight-Brice; brothers: Cyril,
Leon, Micheel, Jason, Salvanis and Justice Brice;

sister: Linetra Brice: umeles: Leon Brice, Samuel Moneur, Samuel Ruiz and Andrew |

Wallace: aumts: Sylvia Bethel, Cynthia Sands-Armbrister, Paula Brice, Rose
Michelle, Julia Bodie, Francita Brice, Patricia Warley, Ruthie Wallace and Eva-
Cookie Ruiz; nieces: Brianna, Ebony, Aisa, Janae, Lauren, Tamia, Aaleyho Brice,
Nichole, Jasmine, Allegra amd Jana‘e; nephews: Michael Jr.. Isaiah Brice and Dylan

Ruiz: sisters-in-law: Colette and Tammy Brice; and @ fost ofether relatives and |
Jhend: incindings Adeshia Brice Briggs, Clifford and Nako Brice, Henry Brice |
and Family, Prince Albert and David Brice, Joan Rolle and Family, Kevin Ferguson :
and Family, Alphonao, Rodger, Sean, Mathew, Timothy, King and Sheena Johnson, §
Neville and Margaret Woodside, Willimae Scott and Family, Chris and Joseph :
Cooper, George Brennen, Wesley Thompson, Jonathon and Terry Cox, Herbert i
Carolyn :
Anita Armbrister, Elvise Bain-Seide, Patsy Bain, Sean Carey, Monique :
Taylor, Nicole Farrington, Dr, Wiona Pratt, Rev, Willard, Monroe and Candlestick :

Burnes, Denetra Fowler, Cindy, Bemadette, Tony and Remand Bethel,
Kelle,

Ministry, Rev. Anthony and Anne Grant and the Agape House family, Lee Miller,
Susan Williams, Christine Walker & family, Pastor Jarrod and Mrs. Anihe Newbold,
Savon Strachan, Sean Burrey and Shanique Delancy.

Viewing Will be held in the “Perpetual Suite” of Restview Memorial Mortuary

and Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama on :
Friday from 10200 au. to 6:00 p.m. and at the Church on Saturday from 9230 asm. :

until Service time,

MARIO
POLYCARPE, 17

of Murphy Town, Abaco and formerly of Freeport,
Grand Bahama will be held on Saturday, June 20,

2009 at 10200 am, at Calvary Temple Assemblies |

of God, Clive Avenue, Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Officiating will be Pastor Deon Gibson. Internment
will follow in the Grand Bahama Memorial Park |
Section #2, Frobisher Drive, Freeport, Cirand |

Bahama

Precious memories will forever linger in the heart :
of his mother; Maryann Bonaby; stepfather: =
Terrance Bonaby; father: Lu Evans; 2 brothers: :
Terrance Jr. and Delano Bonaby; grandparents: Mr. St. John, Mrs. Silvina :
Aumustave, Wir and Mrs. George Bonaby: special grandmother: Mrs. Talio Pierre- :
Louis; $ ants: Palora, Elizabeth, Guerla, Melissa, Tina, Bridgette, Reece and :
Geneva; $ uneles: Lucien, Lano, Parret, Adrian and Nixon; special aunt and uncke: ?
Mr, and Mrs, Henry Corneille; godparents: Karen Mathurin and Evelyn; special i
friend: Clinesha; numerous cousins and @ frost of offer relatives and friends 3

inciidireg: the Polycarpe family, the Bonaby family, Cynthia Curry, Yolanda Levy,
the Major farnily, the Curry family, Principle, staff and students at Abaco Central
High School especially grade 9, First Assembly of Ged, the Joseph family, the Jean
Baptiste family, Mrs, Celia Smith and family and the entire community of Columbus
Park, Freeport, Grand Baharna.

Viewing will be held in the “Serenity Suite™ of Restview Memorial Mortuary and
Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama on Friday
from 10:00 aum. to 6:00 pom. and at the Church on Saturday trom 8:30 a.m. until
Service time.

ELKYNE WAYNE PRINCE
FINLEY, 45

oF f2il Kean Yin, Freeport, Grand Bahama and
formerly of Matthew Town, Inagua will be held
on Saturday, June 20, 200% at | 1:00 am at New
Canaan Baptist Church, Bolao Read, Freepert,
Grand Bahama. Officiating will be the Rt. Rev.
Bishop Washington Williams, assisted by Rev.
Douglas Williams. Intenment will follow in the
Grand Bahama Memorial Park Section #2,
Frobisher Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Lett to cherish his fond and precious memories
are his 3 daughters: Elkyndrea, Terrell and Ciera: son: Elkyne Finley Irs mother:
Cestina Louise Finley; father: Berkley Finley Sr. 4 sisters: Pastor Rehfie D.
Rhodriquez, Marva Ford, Veronda Williams and Namae Ingraham of Matthew
Town, Inagua; § brothers: Douglas of Matthew Town, Inagua, Berkley Jr.,
Desmardo, Terrance and Rervieo Finley: umeles: Samuel, Aulric, Cecil and Dwayne
Williams, Maxwell, Sanwel, Listen, Jonathan Jr. McKinnely and McDonald Jones,
Mitchel, Oswald and David Finley; aunts: Ida Brown, Stephanie Cefort, Annis
Capron, Puncheita Taylor, Marty and Denise Jones, Barbara Michelle, Annie
Charlton, Prudence Palaceos, Louse and Emm Finley and Ette Williams: great
grandaunts: Maric Moss of Perrine, Fla. and Clara Bell Hanna; gransduneles:
Kelson Cox, Leo Gardiner and Alphonse Hanna,: step grandfather: Patrick Williams
of Inagua; nieces: Marica, Matrina, Johnneika, Richara, Patreka, Patacia, Richardlete,
Oph, Antonice, Berkel, Donnely and Temque; nephews: Paciourek, Peron, Patrick
Jr... Philando Jr., John Jr., Torino, Michael, Berkley Jr, Richard Jr., Besmardo Ir.
Derek Jr. Rervio Jr, Douglas Jr: grandniece: Liara Gilbert: grandnephew: Rereldo
Bennett Jr; brothers-in-law: Bishop Patrick Rhodriquez, Derek Williams $r., John
Ford Sr, and Richard Ingraham: sister-in-law: Porchsha Finley; godchildren:
Rolando, Marthyn, oranda and Andres anda fost of other relatives ana fries
inefudieg: Dr. Carolyn Rolle and family, Sharon Seymour and family, Chester,
Lorry, Michelle, Beryl, Beverly, Renae and Martha William, lan, Donnavin,
Jermaine, Adrian, Nickey and Nicola. Gamett Gray, Jarvis, Ragan, Rodrick, Pernell,
Joevanny, Cecil Jr., Sharvis, Natasha, Shadkey, Shantley, Bastian, Daven, Samuel,
Dexter, Shannie, Dewitt, Allison, Antonio, Cpl. Cleophus Capron, Melia, Matlia,
Pastor Godfrey Bain and family, Mav and Jane. Emmanuel Ceforn, Manfred Brown,
Denise Curtis, Jackie Miller, Dorene, Irena, Drucilla, Pastor Mally, Raical, Dorcus,
Belly, Phillip, Link, Franklyn, the Cver the Hill crew of Matthew Town, Inagua,
families of Prophetic Care Church, Nassau, Bahama, Zion Baptist, Inagua, Church
of God of Prophecy, Inagua, families of New Canaan Baptist Church, Pastor
Washington Williams and family, Taxi Driver Company, Workers of Freeport,
Grand Bahama Taxi Union and the entire community of Mathew Town, Inagua
and Freeport.

Viewing will be held in the “Irenie Suite” of Restview Memorial Mortuary and
Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama on Friday
from 10:00 aun. to 6900 pum. and at the Church on Saturday from 9:30 aum. until
Service lime,





PAGE 6,

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

and Cremalouum

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Limiled

ed Cased vio Lint

FREEPORT
EA Eee! one OOS, Peeps fa, Bonny

Telephone: (242) Ses ee ee
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fox: (2a2) 373-3005

Robinson and Soldier Boods, Nasecu, NLP., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072

Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 = Fox: (242) 440-8034

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

AARON GILBERT MOSS
Affectionately called “Aaree”
“D" “Boy Boy” “Lover Boy”

“Biggie” HAT 58
of Woodlawn Gardens Way who died on June 9th
2009 wall be held on Saturday, June 20th, 20879 at

11:08) al Ebenezer Baptist Church, Charles Vincent
Street. Officiating will be Rev. Dr. Elkin Symonette

assisted by Pastor Jacob Moss and Interment will i

follow in Lakeview Menvorial Gardens John F,
Kennedy Drive.

Left to cherish fis wonderful life is his deveted wife of thirty six years: Zelma :
Moss; son: Craig Moss; daughters: Tesma Moss and Tanya Moss-Thompson son- :
grandchildren: Chardonnay Moss, Tangia, Jamaine :
Jr. Thompson and Jermaine Musgrove; brothers: Minister Asa, Pastor Jacob and :
Minister Philip Moss: sisters: Shirelymae Martin, Acting Pastor Julie Farquharson, :
Evangelist Loreen Johnson, Naomi Thurston, Katruah McKinney and Leah Seavella, :
sisters-in-law: Marion, Judy and Rosemary Moss, Idella Albries, Orian Forbes, i
Joycelyn Musgrove, Ruthlyn Miller, Jovee, Claudette, Naomi, Ruth and Vernita :
Ferguson; brothers-in-law: Kendal Farquharson, Fredrick Johnson, Glenville :

in-law: Jamine Thompeon Sr.:

Scavella, Chief Inspector Samuel McKinney, Gladstone Thurston, Hany, Starringion,

and Ted Ferguson, Emmauel Albries, Philip Forbes, Gregory Musgrove and Bob |

Miller Aunts: Sarah Ferguson and Eloise Swain; Unele: Joel Moss: numerous nieces
and nephews and Cousins. Other relatives and friends including: Rev. Lockwood

Delevenux amd fimily, Rev. Randolph Delevewux and Family , Obie Ferguson und |
Family, Harry Gotfe and Family, Brenda Thompson and Family, Pleasant Moss |
and Family, Faith Gardiner and Family, Deno Moss Family, Delores Carter and |
Family, The Williamson Family, Sharon Sweeting and Family, Clarence Major and :
Family, Doreen Campbell and Family, Nora McClain and Family, Verlene Lafleur :
and Family, Gelen Moss and Family, Rev. Dr. Elkin Symonette and Family, Ebenezer :
The Acklins Association Hillside Baptist Church and :
Family, the Montague Beach [nn Family, Immigration Department Family and the :
Woodlawn Gardens Community. And a host of other relatives and friends too =

Baptist Church and Family,

NUM eRe to mention.

Viewing will be held in the Serenity suite at Restview Memorial Mortuary and :
Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and Soldier Roads on Friday from 10:00am to é:00pm !

and at the Church on Saturday trom 9:30am to service time.

MR. HOWARD FREEMON
SMITH, 63

of Elizabeth Estates who died on June 7th 2CKrO,

will be held on Saturday, June 20th, 2004 at | lam |
at Arrow of Deliverance Church Cox Way off East :
Street South Officiating will be Pastor Luther :
Thurston, assisted by other ministers of the gospel |

and Cremation will follow.

Precious memories will live

on in the hearts of his
darling wife: Louise (veesy) Smith; children: Shane :
Bon, Meed and Sandra; sisters: Brenda Johnson, :
Flizabeth Taylor, Chery! and Charlene Smith: Brothers: Clarence 1, William and :

Ricardo Smith; nieces: Rhond Martinborough, Denise, Dovwella and Darlene Ewing,
Kiara Sherman, Keva Sands, tana, Tame and “ia Smith, Anessa Stubbs, Vivian
Forbes, Shelley Bowe, Linda Smith, Shearon Bullock, Pamela Crispo; nephews:
Dr Julien Smith, Mark Wilkinson, Bishop Reno Smith, Valentina and Lawrence
Taylor, Ricardo Smith 1, Michael Smith, Clarence Smith 10; aunts: Mizie Hanna
of Oplalocha, Gerry Bronson of Colorado; in-laws: Kathy Smith, Adassa Smith,
Bernard Johnson, Douglas Ewing, Anthony Pearce; Daugthers-in-law: Leslyn.
Suzzette and Karolange Smith; Cousins: Florence Duke of Milwaukee, Bishop
Albert Hepburn, Enril Rebinson, Julia Bain, Edis Raluming, Gwen Seymour, Edkgar
Hepburm, Arthur Hepbum, Maggie Monecur, Artis Neely, Gwen Reid, Ed and Tracey
Strachan; other relatives and friends including: Rosalind Davis, Shirley Williams,
Ermestine Bethel, Shirley Ferguson Nixon, Ruth Bell, Ida Seymour, Phyllis Sullivan,
Pearl Hollingsworth, Brenda Plakaris, Shelia Smith, Esther Kaowles, Vernal
Martinborough, George and Lee Sweeting, Families of Werdell Pinder, Genevive
Russell, Uriel Smith all of Grand Bahama, Larenso Smith and a host of other
relatives and friends.

Viewing will be held tn the Perpetual Sutte at Restview Memorial Mortuary and
Crematorium Lid, Robinson and Soldier Roads on Friday from LOs00am to 60m
and at the church on Saturday from 9:30am to service time.

DEATH NOTICES

MS. SHIRLEY LOUISE
MUNROE, 71

of Shrimp Road died at the Princess Margaret
Hospital on June 1th, 2004,

She is survived by her sons: Stephen and Valentine
Munroe; adopted son: Wesley Munroe and Timothy
Pennenman; daughters: Elgrenita Munroe Woodside.
Jennifer Munroe Anderson and Kimberly Evans:
brothers: Harcourt Froswell, Timothy and Basil
Wallace; sisters: Edna Oliver, Rosenell Evans, Irene
Barr: fourteen grand children, three great grand
children other relatives and friends.

Funeral annoucements will be announced at a later date.

ANTHONY ALEXANDER
ROMER, 65

of Bailey Town, Bimini, Born - February 28, 1944,
Died Thursday, June 11, 2009,

Survivors include his witt Deanna Romer. 4 Sons,

Anthony Jr.. Julian, Marcelle & Gannon Romer. |

Dauchter-in-law Charisse Romer, 3 grand-children:

| Roxy, Gannon Jr, Kaikan, Epiphany & Kaley Romer.

1 Sister Edith Romer-Johnson; 6 Brothers:

Mohammed Ali Clarke, Crestwell, Dr Hayward,

Rev Grandville, Kendall & Justin Romer; 2 Adopted

sisters, Rowena Bowe and Eleanor Robing: | adopted

Brother, Eddie Smith; numerous nieces, nephews and a host of relatives and friends.

Prnera! cancvcements will be announced af a later dare.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PRES PURI |
[LA Ene (eral Head, Freeport, CHL shone Aaiestsa4 ared Saker
Fi. Pave Fad2512 PD. Boe CB-thirt
Terkephanray: (PET) T7S- 14105 fd) 3-0 Ta
Pager 247) 04 © Pas; G47) 373-3e8

Funeral Service For

SHARRIE
FORBES, 32

of Murphy Town, Abaco who died on June 11th
2009. will be held on Sunday June 21st 2009 at
| loam at Hillview Seventh Day Adventist Church
Tonikque Williams Darling Highway Officiating, will
be Pastor Peter Jogeph assisted by other ministers
of the gospel and Interment will follow in the
Woodlawn Gardens Soldier Roads.

Fond memories of her will forever be cherished by

her daughter: Shanquel Reckley; an adopted |

daughter: Fayneisha Archer, § sisters: Betty Mapor,

Judymae Melntosh, Muntrella Woodard, Mertis

Clarke, Mavis Wilchcombe and Barbara Forbes, Angela Taylor and Deborah Mackey;
4 brothers: Stanley, Jr, Cedric, Theodore and Gregory Forbes: | sister-in-law: Lillian
Relle; 2 brothers-in-law: Joseph Mapor and Ricarde Clarke; 1 aunt; Mae McPhee;
Luncle: Frank Clarke; 36 nieces: Gaynell Vital, Sophia Rolle-Kemp, Bernadette,
Bernadine, Sonia and Voilet Rolle, Fabia Johnson, Veronica Smith, Andrea Rolle,
Janelle Russell, Sheral Northe, Natasha and Raquel Bootle, Dusher and Leslie
Melniosh, Annamae Burke, Samantha, Reva, Monique, Jestina, and Deborah Forbes,
Janice Cooper, Stephanie Bannister, Ernestine Poitier, Cathy Storr, Sharon Ferguson,
Borathy Wilchoombe, Carol Thompson, Charmaine Strachan, Deshawn Fox, Elta
Ferguson, Paulette Colehy, Denise Cash, Portia Clarke, Deanza and Albertha Rodgers;
21 nephews: Dock Woxdard, Crvie, Darrell, Trov, Lenny, Demetrius and Franklyn
Rolle, Carlos, Mario, Enrico and Damien Knowles, Leroy, Geno, Tracey, Trevor
and Travis Forbes, Romdino Dean, Philip Gibson, Anwold Ferguson, Anthony and
Syon Clarke: 28 grandnieces including: Kennethsia, Crystal, Rrova, and Lenique
Rolle, Jade Johnson, DeAndres, Gemesia and Deontillee Wilson, Nasasha, Emmanique
and Azariel Bootle, Shanley and Lashan Nonhe, Yasmin Melntosh, Courtney Burke,
Paige and Tracea Forbes; DeAndrea, Demesia and Deontillee Wilson: 32 grandnephews
including: Nickolas, Troy, Jr, Samuel Russell, Deante Wilson, Stanley, Jr. and
Stephano Morthe, Jonathan Bootle, Jr. and Drewshorn Mcintosh; a host of other
relatives and friends including: Stanley Morthe, Sr, Reginald Wilson, Emitie and
Jonathan Bootle, Sr., Marvann Dickson, Janice Demeritte, Millicent Laney, Pastor
Leonard Johnsen, Pastor Desmond Sturrup, Pastor Leonardo Rahming, Pastor Patnck
Tyill, Pastor Peter Joseph and Hillview S04, Gentry and Natasha Mortis, Peggy
Sands and Family, Sylvie Cooper and Family, the Reckley and Bootle family, [CU
and Female Medical [ and UT at the Princess Margaret Hospital and the staff of
Restview Memonal Mortuary and Crematorium,

Os Memorial Mortuary

ALP, Baherrena

Tesh cena FS) A-BNE). | (a) EM -AT
Pager; (247) 3-45 © Pas; 47) de-da

Fiewiag will be feel in fhe Celestial Suite at Restwew Mortuary Robinson and
Sdier Reads on Serardeny from / eon fo & io ane at the chech fron 9: ita
fo service fine.

MR. EUGENE SAMUEL
BAIN, 81

of Hanna Rod Feedhill died at Doctoris Hospital on
June lh 2009,

He is survived by his. wife: Wendy Bain sons: Bradley,

Everette, Myron and Coree Bain daughters: Donna

Nottage, Janice Mackey, Deborah Bain, Cheryl

Lightbourne, Melvern Demeritte and Jean Gin step

daughter: Tatrinka Thompson sister: Dorothy

Colehrooke adopted brother: Tellis Smith nieces:
Camille Hall, Angela Colebrooke, Patricia Johnson and Sabrina Munnines. nephews:
Ruts Munnings, Glen Colebrooke, Oswald Munnings Numerous other relatives and
friends.

Funeral anncucements will be announced ata later dane,



THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 7

Butler’s Funeral Homes

& Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O, Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

Oded ele ae)

The former MP of Pinedale and
Speaker of the Howse of Assembly

MILO BOUGHTON
BUTLER JR., 72

will be held on Monday, June 22,
209 at 11:00am... at Christ Church
Cathedral, George Street. Officiating
will be Bishop Larsh Boyd, assisted
by The Most Rev'd Drexel W.
Gomez, The Rt. Rev'd Gilbert
Thompson, The Rev'd Dr. James
B. Moultrie and the Venerable
Archdeacon James Palacious,
Interment will follow in The Eastem
Cemetery, Dowdeswell Street.

Left to cherish his memories are

his sons; Milo Butler [11], Godwin

Butler and Jevon Butler, his daughters: Angela Butler and Bernadette Butler;
grandsons: Achim Abdallah, Godwin Butler Jr. and Andre’us Butler
pranddaughters: Nagiyah Abdallah and Comfort Juanita Butler, Ryely
Butler, ond Elizabeth Anne Butler, daughters-in-law: Mary and Alicia Butler,
former wife: Winifred Butler, brothers: Raleigh Sr, Elder Basil and Matthew
Butler sister: Juanita Butler sisters-in-law: Rose-Marie Butler; Princess
Butler, Clementine Butler; Antoinette Butler aumts: Jane Bethel and Elder
Allison (Halson) Butler, Maria Major nephews: Kendal Butler; Dr. Raleigh
Jr,, Craig and Charles Butler; Jerome, Jonathan, Samuel, David and Joseph
Butler Jr.; Dominic, Damian, Franklyn Jr. and Martm Butler, Prerre, Paul and
Antoine Butler; Dwight, Allan and Bruce Butler, Mark Ferguson. oleces:
Clarice Butler, Denise Docema, Valarie Osbourne-Walkine, Claudette Butler
and Hon. Loretta Butler-Turner; Dr. Farth Butler; Genia Pinder; Donna
Butler, Anastacia Moss, Janice Ramsey, Whitney Brice, Juanita and Rochelle
Butler; Janet Forbes, Sharon Baim, Lisa Ingraham and Anne Ferguson.
nephews-intaw: Edward Turner; Jeffery Pinder mieces-intaw: Dr. Rosamund
Erskine-Butler, Tina Butler; Moerza Butler and Suzette Butler cousins; Joshua
and Samuel MeIntosh; Honourable Kendal and Ruby Nottage, Dr. Pamela
Etuk, Dr. Marcus and Chantal Bethel, Dr. Paulette Bethel, Michacl Bethel,
Honourable Alfred Sears and Marion Bethel-Sears, Owen Bethel; Margaret
Major and Family and Clarice Bodie and Family, Extended Family: Comtort
Baker and Family; Marjorie Thompson and Family; The Family of Jeffrey
Thompson; Eugene Thompson and Family Marina Walcott and Family; The
McKinney and Stuart families of Eleuthera; The Watson, Major and Dean
families of Long Island; The Strachan Family of Rum Cay, Friends and
Loved Ones: Sir Arlington and Lady Sheila Butler, Godfrey and Sandy
Encas, Mr. Vincent Johnson, Mr. Loftus Roker, Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Lowe,
Mr. Stafford Rolle and Family, Mr. Vibart Wills, Ms, Elizabeth Johnson, Mr,
Samuel Thompson Jr. and Family, Ms. Lulamae Smith and Family, Mr.
George Gibson and Family; Ms. Thelma Calma, Mr. and Mrs. Reno Brown
amd Family, Mr. and Mrs. Darrell Rolle and Farnily, Mr. Ervin Knowles and
Family, Mr. and Mrs. Pierre Dupwch and Family, Mr. and Mrs. Martland
Cates, The Progressive Liberal Party, Mr. Joseph Hollingsworth and Family,
The Management and Staffof Milo B. Butler and Sons, Mr. and Mrs. Charles
Wallace, Mrs. Angela Archer and Family, The Rewerend Dr. James B. and
Mrs, Angela Moultrie, Father Don Haynes, Canon Weil and Joan Roach, The
St. Matthew's Church Family, Mr. Harvey Tynes and Family, The Honourable
Henry and Honourable Janet Bostwick, and the entire “Pondite Community”.

Mr. Butler will lic in state at the House of Assembly on Friday June 14,
2009 from 9:00a.m. until 6:00p.m. and on Saturday June 20, 2009 from
9:00am. until $Mip.m. On Sunday June 21, 2009 at Butlers’ Funeral
Homes and Crematorium Erocst and York Strects from 10;(acm. until
4:0 p.m.





PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JUNE 18,

2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

(Cedar Crest funeral Home

DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street * PO.Box N-603 « Nassau, N.P, Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

Funeral Services For

RANDOL ALPHONSO :

DARVILLE, 60

a resident of High Vista Drive, will
be held 2:00 p.m. Saturday, June |
20th, 2009 at St Barnabas Anglican |
Church, Wulff and Baillou Hill :
Roads. Officiating will be Canon |
Basil Tynes, assisted by other |
Ministers. Interment will be made in :
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road. :

Randol will be lovingly remembered |

by his wife of 40 years, Christina L

Darville, their children Rhamda Renee ;

Darville, their sons and their wives ;

Christopher and Temidayo Darville, |

Richard and Kayla Darville, and their children Joshua, Ikea, Kristen, Tyr and |
Tyler, Renee’, Richard Jr and Rhyan; his other children include Rolando and |
his wife Gianna Darville, their children Gejointe, Roshae and Shy-ro Darville, |
Dave and his wife Charlene and their children Van, Sherir and Randon :
Darville, other Grandchildren, Evante, Vanisea, Andres, Nicholas and Nasithan :
Darville and Devon Taylor; 4 brothers, Elijah, Holland, Robert, Conrad and :
Jeffrey Darville; 6 sisters, Marietha Smith, Delores Joseph, Yvonne and ;
Magdalene Joseph, Renee Turnquest and Dorothy Hield: 9 brothers-in-law, :
Elcin Joseph, Jean, Walter (Joey) Turnquest, Donald Hield, Clarence, Walter, :
Llewellyn and Lynx Jones and Milton Grant Sr.; § sisters-in-law, Sandra:
Porter, Donna Grant, Theresa, Dellareese and Belinda Jones, Lisa, Paulette |
and Rhona Darville; his nephews, Alexander Laroda, Roosvet Joseph, Andre |
Wells, Junior and Reynaud Hield, Desmond, Elijah and Elisha Darville, :

Milton Sunny Grant Jr, Oscar "Tony" and Vernon Porter, Gerard and Alphonse,

his nieces Estelle Ferguson, Elisa Fox, Olivia and Daleina Hield, Anetria :
Greene, Alicia and Alissa Grant, Daphane Fox, Candace Durrett, Heather, ;
Brittany, Sarah, Analisa, Theodora and AnaChristina Jones, Nancy, Maxine |
and Kikianna; and other relatives including, Ethel and Edith Rolle, Ken |
Gittens, Virginia Major & family, John Knowles and his mother, Pastor Idez, |
Alex Jr, and Andrew Laroda, Halson and Haliah Ferguson, Sierra Joseph, |
John, Antionette and Alex Fox, Chante Saunders, Calvinae Russell, Alaina :
Moxey, Gabrielle McDonald, Kaistan and Sophiwna Hield, Nikki, Cynthia |
and Andre Wells, Philip Smith & family, Dereck Smith & family, Shane :
Albury & family, Keyshora Stubbs, Darryl Bartlette & family, Stephen :
Turnquest & farnily, Lincoln Deal & family, Bradley Pinder & family, Barbara :
Knowles & family, Eleanor Bain, Valarie Darville and the Duncombe family, :
Garth & Val Greene & family, Heather Hanlan and family, Flora Sawyer and |
family, Vanderson Ferguson and family, Carmmander $.T. Evans (Royal |
Bahamas Defence Force), Orset and Jerrimae Symonette, Eric (Trane) Knowles, |
the management, staff and fnends at Co Co Mo, Stan Sweeting and family, :

Monique Strachan and family, Dania Sargent and family, Canon Basil and

Mrs Sonia Tynes, Fr. Michael Maragh, St. Barnabas Prayer and Visitation :
Team, St. Barnabas Church family, the Clergy and Congregation of St. |
Stephen's Anglican Church, Enxght Mile Rock, Grand Bahama, Dr. Kevin |
Moss and statf of Private Medical Ward Princess Margaret Hospital and other |

too TUMEeroUs to mention,

Relatives and frends may pay their respects al Cedar Crest Funeral Home,
Robinson Road and First Street on Friday from 12:00 noon to 6:00 p.m. and |
on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon and at the church from 12:30 :

1m, until service time.

ERSKINE RONEY
WILLIAMS, 76

a resident of Faith Avenue, and
formerly of Mangrove Cay, Andros,
will be held 11:00a.m. Saturday, June
20th 2009 at First Baptist Church,
Market Street, Officiating will be
Rev Diana Francis, assisted by other
Ministers. Interment will be made in
Southern Cemetery, Cowpen &
Spikenard Roads.

Left with cherish memories are his
devoted life long partner Rosalie, 1
son, Randy Williams; 6 daughters,
Curlene Milhouse, Fermaninia Jones,
Hycinth and Ethel Williams, Vivian Smith and Kimberley Adderley; 2 sons-
in-law, Rebert Milhouse and Francis Adderley; 4 sisters, Lillian Bowe, Maxine
Thompson, Marion Williams and Alice Sandyford of Ft Pierce Florida; 1
brother, Bertram Williams Jr: 11 Grandchildren, Andrew, Kallen and Marion
Jackson, Marcus Williams, Kyacha and Nicole Morgan, Randy Jr and Brandon
Williams, Vadalia Cash, Gerron Turner and Benjumin Walkes, Tavaris, Taniqua
and Tanielle Adderley, Randy and Brandon Williams; 7 Great Grand Children,
31 nieces, Millie Stubbs, Matilda Walters of Ft Lauderdale Fla, Nadine Lorrie
of Germany, Ettamae Bowe, Patricia Munnings, Ingrid Seymour, Raquel
Dorsette, Nicole and Keva Thompson, Mana Williams, Andrea McKenzie,
Sherma Thompson of Pt Lauderdale Fla, Jenny and Jennifer Stubbs, McKesa
and Latoya Walters, Shonkey Cartwright, Raquel Brown, Inciera Edgecombe,
Tiffany Brown and Sheba Mortimer, Nickesha, Hyacinth, Nickesha, Michelle
und Devin Griffin, Gwendolyn Williams, Jemilia Seymour, Sophia Hepburn
and Dedrie Carter, Persis and Stacey Adderley, Sheila Colmer and Aldicla
Evans; 29 nephews, Harry and Kirk Bowe, Peter Verella, Arnold, Mark,
Trevor and Nick Thompson, Bennet Seymour, Dwayne and Floyd Griffin,
Roland Tynes, 1085 Police Cprporal Dennis McKenzie, James Stubbs, Ray
Brown, Keith, Scottie, and Pedro Bowe, David Cartwright, Dwayne Griff
Jr, Marvin Bowe of Ft Lauderdale Fla, Dave Mortimer, Raphael Lynes, Casey
Griffin, Andrian Bowe, Shavon Walters, Gary Bowe, Nikito, Marvin and
Garvin Johnson, and other relatives and fiends including Joycelyn Bain,
Shebamac Morley of Freeport, Elizabeth Grey, Vernita Rolle, Marian Rolle
of Cleveland Ohio, Norman Horton, Walter Grey, Benjamin Bain, Joseph
Rolle, Wilbert Rolle, of Cleveland Ohio, Bishop Samuel Greene, Bishop
Patrick Pinder, Rev Samuel Pinder, Paulette Turngquest, Gorts Burrows, Elon,
Moody and Milton Moxey, Ivan and Edison Miller, Venus and Trinee King
of Mangrove Cay, Andros, Marta, Iris and Perey Brown & family, Florence
Wallace, Rosa Evans, Lillymae Williams, Magnola Rolle, Curlene and Carl
Hepburn, Lawerence and Nathaniel Rolle, Hyacinth Curtis & family, Lycithies
Forbes, Shirley and Debbie Cartwright, Elsaida Bastian, [tha Musgrove,
Laura, Joyce, Magaret and Linda Naim & family, Thelma Johnson & family,
The Williams, Greene, Moxey, King, Thompson and Dean Families, The
entire community of Mangrove Cay Andros and others too numerous to
mente.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest Funeral Home,
Robinson Road and First Street on Friday from 12:00 noon to 6:00 pum. and
at the church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. until service time.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 9

Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel

Wulff Road & Pinedale
Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 © Fax: 328-8852

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

| UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

GERTRUDE
PERSIS EVANS,
61

of Thompson Lane, will be
held on Saturday, 20th June,
2009 at 1:00 p.m. Church of
God Cathedral, East Street &
7 Lily of the Valley Corner.
8 Officiating: Rev. Dr. Moses A.
Johnson, assisted by other —
Ministers of the Gospel. |
Interment: Southern Cemetery, Cowpen & Spikenard Roads. —

Memories of her will linger in the hearts of her: Children: |
Betty Coakley, Eugina Hunt, Carla Mcintosh-Nielsen and |
Valentina Evans; Three (3) Adopted Daughters: Emily, |
Sheba and Rita Stubbs; Six (6) Grandchildren: Michael
Cooper, Jonathon and Alvin Mackey, Princess and Prinesha
Miller and Teadrea Evans; Twelve (12) Sisters: Gloria
Strachan, Deaconess Ceeelia Moncur, Minister Ethel Sands,
Albertha Williams, Deaconess Geneva Mortimer, Claramae,
Violet, Daphne and Elder Christine Evans, Elizabeth Walker,
Merlene Miller and Geraldene Neely; Two (2) Brothers: |
Wenzel King and Sgt. 1619 Roland Evans; One (1) Son- |
in-law: Jess Nielsen; One (1) Aunt: Sylvia Williams; Three |
(3) Uncles: Dr. Joseph Evans, David Evans and Arthur |
Neilly; One (1) Cousin: Daron Higgs; and a host of other |
relatives and friends including: Maria Campbell and Family, |
Lisa Atherley Smith and Family, Fred Brennen Jr. and |
Family; Shaquan Higgs, Tanya Russell and Family, Ms.
Goodman and Family, Sharlene and Junior Wildgoose and
Family, Sybeline Davis and Family, Muggie and Family,
the Entire Malcolm Lane Family, Thompson Lane and Gibbs
Corner Communities, the entire Harbour Island Community
and the Management and Staff of The Break Waters.

FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR RESPECTS AT ROCK OF -
AGES FUNERAL CHAPEL ON WULFF ROAD & |
PINEDALE ON FRIDAY FROM 10 A4.M.TO 6PM AND |
ON SATURDAY AT THE CHURCH FROM 12 P.M. |

RUTH
KATRINA MILLER,
71

of Roland & Ridgeland
Streets, Ridgeland Park, will
be held on Saturday, 20th
June, 2009 at 10:00 a.m. at
Curry Memorial Methodist
Church Zion Boulevard, South
Beach. Officiating, Rev.
William Higgs, assisted by
other Ministers of the Gospel. Interment: Southern Cemetery,
Cowpen & Spikenard Roads

Her memories will be cherished by her mother: Hilda Taylor
Thurston; one (1) brother: Fred Miller;- two (2) sister's:
Shirley Greene and Angela Sawyer; two (2) aunts: Naomi
Runnion and Beatrice Taylor; two (2) nephews: Patrick and
Andrew Greene; four (4) nieces: Ilsa Evans, Deborah Greene,
Lisa McCartney and Lynelle Sawyer; four (4) grand-nieces
and grand-nephews; aunt-in-law: Mary Taylor; uncle-in-
law: Elbert Rolle; other’ farmly members and special fnends
including: Tracey and Ronnie Taylor, Valarie Sweeting,
Betty Sweeting, Tony & Gregory Sweeting, Melanie
Thompson, the Taylor Family of Fox Hill, Betty Lightbourne,
Shenique Smith, Gwendolyn Spence, Maxine Miller, John
Burns, Paul Adderley, Beth Carey, Patricia Johnson, the
Staff and Residents of Naomi Christie Home for the Aged,
Rev. Charles Sweeting and the members of Curry Memorial
Methodist Church.

FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR RESPECTS AT ROCK OF
AGES FUNERAL CHAPEL ON WULFF ROAD &
PINEDALE ON FRIDAY FROM 10 A.M. TO 6 P.M. AND
ON SATURDAY AT THE CHURCH FROM 9:00 A.M.
UNTIL SERVICE TIME.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

BABY BOY
EMMANUEL JOSHUA
McHARDY, 27 days

will be held on Friday, June
19th, 2009 at Woodlawn
Memorial Gardens, Soldier
Road. Pastor Kirkwood
Murphy will officiate.

He is survived by his Mother:

Elizabeth McHardy; Father:

Raji Dean; Grandparents: Leo
and Charmaine McHardy and Thelma Bean;
Greatgrandparents: Brenda Taylor and Richard and Thelma
McHardy; Uncles: Nathaniel, Nathan, Nigel, Brian, Erza,
Richard and Barry McHardy, Robert, Kendrick, Douglas,
Hilton, Solomon, Wilfred and Randy Taylor, Roland Sands,
Alrick Dussie, Anthony (Fat Back) Marshall, Timmy and
Chad Thpmpson, Jonathon Bethel, Adam Darville, Thomas
Kemp, Charles Johnson, Richard Cartwright, Jeffrey King,
Rev. Harold Bodie, Henry Johnson, David Jones, Kingsley
Rahming, James Minnis, Bishop Ruben Deleveaux, Robert,
William Cartwright, Terrance, Travis and Travaghn Bowe;
Aunts: Charmaine, Ann, Carolyn, Ovina, Charity and Amala
McHardy, Renee Cartwright, Eleanor Perigord, Leotha
Sands, Carolyn Dussie, Patrice Johnson, Christine, Edrika,
Lidia, Vira and Enid Taylor, Granelda Bodie, Sandra Johnson,
Margaret Jones, Leona Minnis, Janet King, Violet Williams,
Dorothy King, Dianna Thompson, Elizabeth Deleveaux,
Mary Simmons, Candy Kemp, Althea Bowe, Emma and
Birdie Cartwright and Wendy Bowe; numerous cousins and
other relatives and Godparents including: Bishop Kirkwood
and Kelly Murphy, Gia Smith, Emestine Hepburn, Merrilen
Hepburn, Lennis and Ginger Rahming, Viola Serrette, Dina,
Shornelle Nesbitt, Perrise Simon, Rickeya Moss, Savan
Barr, Ginger Rolle, Leona Young, Tiffany Pickstock, Wonda
Ellis, Jessica Bailey, Jenny, Loretta Evans, Charcea Pritchard,
Armethe Sands, Rick and Judy Thompson, the McKenzie
Family, the Holder Family, the Grant Family, the Garnet
Family, the Brown Family, the McPhee Family, the Lyford
Cay Club, Handel Sands, Drucella Davis, the Temple
Fellowship Family, Donnalee and Bernadette Evans, the
Minnis Family, the Campbell Family, the Carol Family,
Charnelle Marshall and the entire Faith Gardens Community.

There will be no public viewing.



THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 11

Sweeting’s Colonial
dortuary And Crematorium

84 Blue Hill Road - P.O. Box N-8161 - Tel: 325-7867
= Fax: 325-TS6T

MR. ELSWORTH
REGINALD
MAJOR, 61

a resident of Thompson Lane off

East Street, will be held at St. James

Native Baptist Church, St. James

Road on Saturday 20th June, 2009

at 10:00 a.m, Officiating will be

Rev. Dr. Michael C. Symonette,

Rev. Dr. Hilda Symonctte, Rev.

Daniel Beneby, Rev. William
Hepburn and Rev. Charles Rolle and Interment will follow at
Western Cemetery, Nassau Street.

Left to cherish his memories are his Four Sisters: Jacqueline
Alleyne, Patricia Major, Antoinette and Joanne Poitier; Brother:
Sidney Peter Poitier, Aunt: Maxine Brown; Godmother: Roselind
Thompson; Nephews: Trevor and Sheldon Alleyne, Sean, Inza,
Joseph and Theodora Major, Adrian and Gayl LaRoda, Ricardo
and Cynthia Adderley, Raj Major, Marvin Babbs, Antoine
McQuay, Delvin Sherman and Carlos Poitier; Nieces: Lisa
Tucker, Patrice Thompson, Xavier Archer, Denise Rolle, Nicola
(Nickie), Selina McQuay, Remona and Charles Edgecombe and
Deldra Munroe and A host of other Relatives and Friends
Including: Rev. Dr. Jeffrey and Cynthia Ingraham of Connecticut,
Vineent and Dawn Clarke of Freeport, Rev. Charles and Pauline
Rolle, Carlos Austin, LaVon and Rashaad Harris-Smith, Tatanisha
Capron, Hasani Clarke, Chavar and Chavoya Rolle, Austin and
Janice Knowles, Claudia and Lenore Rolle, Jill Saunders, Iris
Joseph, Paulamae Miller, Yvonne Mortimer, Annie Gibson,
Shirley Ellis, Beverley Burns, Stephen Adderley, Stephanie
Armbrister, Leslie, Gerald, Terrance and Leon Strachan, Deborah
Taylor, Millicent Deane, Sandra and Patsy Knowles, Mr. Walter
and Mrs. Susan Palmer (devoted Landlady), staff of Susie's
Beauty Salon, Bahamasair, the Royal Bank of Canada Palmdale
Branch, the Chairman and Staff at Security Services (Bahamas)
Limited, Mr. Harry Simmons and Members of the Bahamas
Public Officers Choir, Rev. Drs. Michael and Hilda Symonette
and the entire Membership of St. James Native Baptist Church,
Cedric Poitier, Kingsley Pickering, Myrtle and Ted Sweeting,
Neighbors of Thompson Lane, Griffith Moxey of the U.S.A.,
Sandra Sweeting, Brenda McFall, Mildred Adderley and
Neighbors of Yellow Elder Gardens and Families.

The body will repose at the Chapel of the Saints Sweeting's

Colonial Mortuary and Crematorium, #84 Blue Hill Rd. from
10:00 am on Friday until 6:00 pm and on Saturday from 9:00
am. at the Church until service time.





PAGE 12,

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Vaughn O. Jones
MEMORIAL CENTER

“Honoring the memories of loved ones”

INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

WILLIS "Unka Doad"
THOMPSON, 84

of Behring Point, Andros will be held

on Saturday June 20, 2009 at 11:00 a.m. Saturday,

at St. Bartholomew Anglican Church,

Behring Point, Andros. Officiating will
Fr. Donald Kerr, assisted by :
other Ministers of the Gospel. Interment :
will follow in the Public Cemetery, |

be Bley,

Behring Point, Andros.

Precious memories will forever linger }
in the hearts of his eight sons: Berthrum :
Thompson, Rev. Oswald Poitier, Dudley, Willis (Jr.), Timothy, Garnet, :

Audley and Noland Thompson; Five daughters: Mersada Anderson, :
Beryl Neymour, Sandra Mackey, Lavern Thompson, and Jessica King; :
One Brother: Nathaniel Wallace; One Adopted-sister: Daisy Nottage; :
Three brothers-in-law: Apostle Charles Wallace, Hazel Braynen, Ulnick |
Wallace; Four Sisters-in-law: Yvonne Russell, Janet Coakley, Adline |
Wallace, Marilyn Wallace; Three sons-in-law: Elan Anderson, Elvis |
Neymour, Terry King; Five daughters-in-law: Rosena Thompson, !
Sebrena Poitier, Nicoya, Elsene, Norma Thompson; Twenty-five |

- y ee ! in the hearts of his Wife: Dolly Fermander; Mother: Ethel Fernander;
grandsons: Berthrum Jr., Jacob, Mitchell, Oswald Jr., sammie Start, ; Five Stepchildren: Ryan Andrews, Daymar Leadon, Fredricka Minns,
Clement, Norman, Terrell, Wellington, Michael, Jazz, GametJr, Haaquis, : Vjjiska Minns & Ann Knowles; Step grandson: Lorenzo Grant; Sister:
Elvis Jr, lan, Rico, Tito, Elroy, Nolan Il, Akeem, Valentino, Jestin, | joria Rernander: Brother: George Fernander; Twelve Nieces: Christine
Elliott, Nolan Jr., Shando, Christopher, Twenty-three granddaughters: | @jeare, Margo Sturrup, Shevaun Stubbs, Brenda Nottage, Anita Femander

Tiffany, Lisa, Ashley, Tina, Elshadi, Brooke, Anthae, April, Dorothy,

WPCpl. Desree Cartwright, Margo, Shantell, Tiska a.k.a. "Black | Gardiner, Bernadette Fernander, Lynette Brown; Thirteen Nephews:
+ Cardinal, Michael and Conrad Fernander, Keith Burrows, Kevin, Trevor
: and Sheldon Fernander, Dion and Jeffrey Stubbs, Shawn

> : | Tyrone Bonaby, Perry Fernander and Marvin Thompson; Two Uncles:
Leona, Barbara, Laura, Laverne Bowe, Viola, Marion, Margaret, Sandra- i Emperor and Earnest McKenzie: Ten Sisters-in-law: Virginia Miller,
Mae, Netlene King; Nine-teen nephews: Theophilus, Kirk, Jerald, Pastor } Sandra Saunders, Prescola Thompson, Sophia Deveaux, Nicole Deveaux,
| Walburger Collie, Mable Femander & Harricth Fernander; Ten Brothers-

James "Killer" Coakley, Glister Wallace, Tarby, Samuel Bookie Johnson, : jn jaw: Ronald Deveaux, Kendall Deveaux, Steven Collie, Gary Deveaux,

Michael Johnson, Elijah, Evangelist Lency Coakley, Harold Bain, } grian Deveaux, Perry Deveaux, Marlon Thompson, Rev. Reginald
' Saunders, Irvin Stubbs & Hubert Rolle: and a host of other relatives

' and friends.
Mery] Rolle, Father Donald Kerr, Bishop Ellis Farrington, Rev. Harold :

Mackey, William Braynen, Charles Smith, Rev. Raymond Mackey, : yjeyinoe will be held in the "Legacy Suite" of Vaughn O. Jones
Armold Coakley, Althea Bell, Mispah Braynen, Prescola Sawyer, the : \gemorial Center, Wulff Road and Primrose Street on Friday from
Seymour family, the Bain Family, the Neymour Family, the Smith ;

Chinese,” Shantell, Toya, Wendy, Melissa, Sanches, Keioshi, Thyronique,
Lady Shema, Samantha, Selah; Thirty-three great-grandchildren:
Fourteen nieces: Patricia Coakley, Petrona, Charmene, Machelle, Perlene,

Darren Coakley, Jamaine, Shadika, Gregory, Covin, Kerone, Elkin,
Kenneth Bain; Numerous other relatives and friends including: Rosalie

Sweeting, Maxwell Braynen, Peter Mackey, Adrian Gloria Johnson,

family, the Anglican Church family in Calabash Bay, Fresh Creek,

' Behring Point and neighboring areas.

: Viewing will be held in the "Legacy Suite" of Vaughn O. Jones
' Memorial Center, Wulff Road . and Primrose Street on Thursday from

12:00 noon to 5:00 p.m. and at St. Bartholomew Anglican Church,
Behring Point, Andros on Friday from 2:00 p.m, to service time on

ALFRED
ADOLPHUS "Adell"
FERNANDER, 37

@ of Peach Street and formerly of South

4 Andros will be held on Saturday June
20, 2009 at 2:00 p.m. at Metropolitan

26 Baptist Church, Blue Hill Road.
Se. Officiating will be Rev. Dr. George Kelly,
= assisted by other Ministers of the Gospel.
Interment will follow in Southern
Cemetery, Cowpen & Spikenard Roads.

Precious memories will forever linger

Ruth Fernander, Gwendolyn Moss, Elva Bethel, Catherine Pinder, Ann

Seymour,

10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and again on Saturday from 9-00 a.m. to 12-00

‘ noon and at the church on Saturday from 1:00 p.m. to service time.

Wulff Road and Primrose meet
site Studio of Dra

Telephone: 326-9800

e 24 Hour Emergency 434-9220/ 380-8077





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Commontoealth Suneral Home

Independence Drive * Phone: 341-4055 y

Ue ee

Retired
Mechanic
Fireman
KENNETH
HARRY
KNOWLES, 61

of Summer Haven Estates,
died at the Princess Margaret Hospital on
Thursday, June 11, 2009.

WORNA MARIA
WILLIAMSON
BROWN, 66

of Hampster Road and

formerly of Anderson Hill,

Acklins, died at the

Princess Margaret Hospital
on Sunday, June 14, 2009.

EMMERLINE
ELIZABETH
GREEN, 44

died at her residence in
Dundas Town, Abaco on
Thursday, June 11th, 2009,

Funeral arrangements will be announced later.

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 13

EAST SUN qg RISE MORTUARY
=—Y SS

“A New Commitment To Service’

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

MINISTER
MARILYN A. COLLIE,
7

of Kenilworth Avenue, South
Beach Estates and formerly of
Duncan Town, Ragged Island will
be held on Saturday at 10 a.m. at
the Church of God of Prophecy,
East Street, Tabernacle.
Officiating will be Bishop
Elgarnet B. Rahming, National
Overseer, assisted by Bishop Franklin M. Ferguson, Bishop
Woodley C. Thompson and Minister Kendal C. Simmons,
Interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

She is survived by her daughters: Sharon Deveaux, Dorothea
and Antoinette Collie, Patricia Pratt, Juliet Collie-Daxon,
Monica, Claudine and Kim Collie, Anne Grant, Cynthia Wilson,
Agatha Thompson and Enid Arthur; her sons: Donnithorne
and Dorlan Collie, Livingston Deveaux, Kenneth Pratt, Trevor
Daxon, Rev. Anthony Grant, Sen. David Thompson, Charles
Wilson and Minister Carlson Anthur; grandchildren: Donzel
and Jared Deveaux, Donnithorne Jr., and Dominic Collie;
Jamaal, Jillian and Jermain Pratt, Christopher Rolle, Dorlan
Jr., D’riaen, Daniel, Delaena and Areion Collie, Odetta, Cherisse
and Anthony Grant Jn, N°Kem, N°Kia and NKira Wilson,
Troy, Vashan and Destiny Thompson, Carlisa, Carnid and
Angela Arthur; brothers: Arch Deacon E. Etienne E. Bowleg
and Cathechist Anthony Hepburn of West

End, G.B., sisters: Cathechist Earlene Thompson of Wemmy's
Bight, Eleuthera; Cheryl Bowleg and Stella Hepburn; | aunt:
Gweneth Lockhart; 25 nieces, 41 ne ephews and a host of other
relatives and friends.

Friends may pay their last respects at East Sunrise Mortuary,
#27 Rosetta Street, Palmdale from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday
and from 8:30 a.m. at the Tabermacle on Saturday until service
time.

EAST SUNRISE MORTUARY.

“A New Commitment To Service”

#27 Rosetta Street, aii Box C.B. 12248 / Palmdale,
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) ret ort my Ty ere lige 356-2957
hrs. Emergency Servic
Cell #: 357- rae Beeper: 380-1450 se 380-1117





PAGE 14, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

fel, IDs Jet) Hie be Poi ste
a var Lal 4 [Pow bE Des

HARRIET ROLLE,
S4

ofthe Blutt, South Andros. Services
will be held on Saturday, June 20,
2009 at Loiclock pm at the Church
of God Auditorium, Joe Farrington
Road. Officiating will be Pastor
Clement Neely; he will be assisted
by other ministers of the Gospel.
Interment will follow in Woodlawn
Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Road.
Services have been entrusted to
Giateway Memorial Funeral Chapel.

Left to cherish her fond memories are her: Four Sons: Ivan, Clyde,
Alexander and Alton Rolle; Eight Daughters: Arabella, Maxine,
Ezerene, Magnola, Mable and Bery! Rolle, Eloise Watkins and
Lucine Darcy; Three Sisters: Viola Sands, Prudence Johnson, Lula
Bain; Three Brothers: Whitfield, George and Nathaniel McKinney;
Two Daughters-in-law: Neenah and Barbara Rolle; One Son-in-law:
Aubert Darey; Four Sisters-in-law: Pearinieva and Eureka McKinney,
Florence Rolle and Miriam Greene; Sixty-one Grand Children:
Delgzardo, Chakera, Chapelle, Krishna, Carl, Tikita, Twana, Nadia,
Alton Ir, Valerie, Vernice, Kendra, Suezette, Daphne, Princess,
Shanell Phillips, Gaylene, Godfrey, Samuel, Micheala, Lacora,
Lakeisha, Shantell, Bradley, Kelvin, Jeff, Rodrick, Torrie, Kevin,
Keith, Bodeisha, Kenneth, Ricardo, Shena, Lorenzo, Dezerene,
Vanessa, Hartley, Lorpond, Comelle, Karen, Kim, Kendyke and
Yolette Brown, Lavana, Francisca and Bradley Miller Jr, Dray, Pam,
Steven, Florine, Cassidy, Darius, Erin, Michelle, Lance, Paulette,
Lloyd and Sherine Kerr, Two Grands-in-law: Lindamae Rolle,
Anthony Phillip, Corey Brown. Eighty-seven Great-grand children,
One Great-great-grand child, Numerous Nieces including: Gladys
Saunders, Alice Edwards, Betty Hanna, Sherel Bain, Eulease Spencer,
Samethria, Barbara, Maurine Edwards, Maiselyn Demeritte, Carol,
Hazel, Brenda, Margery, Eureka, Birdiemae Storr, Elvita Gibson,
Olga and Prudence Johnson; Numerous Nephews including: Phillip
and Harry Johnson, Frank Andrews, Andrew, Peter, One Hundred
Sixty-nine Grand Nieces, One Hundred Twenty-seven Grand
Nephews and other family and friends too numerous to mention.
They include the Bluff and High Rock, South Andros community,

the Fort Fincastle community, Joyce and Otmell Lewis, Carolyn and
Marva Rolle and Family, the Greene Family, the Smith F ‘amily, Dr.

Clement M Neely and Family, Maria Johnson and the Adderley
Family, Anna Neely Forbes and Family, Cecil Smith and Family,
Ruby Green and Family, Jeenie Neely and Family, Rev. Theopholus
Neely and Family, Rev, Elisha Ferguson and Family and Rev, Fefield
Smith and Family.

Friends may pay their last respects at Gateway Memorial Funeral
Chapel, Mount Royal Avenue and Kenmore Street, on Friday from
10 am to 6 pm, on Saturday at the funeral home from 9 am to 11
am, and at the auditorium from 11:30 am to service time.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

RUSSELL & PINDER’S
FUNERAL HOME

Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama
Telephone: (242) 348-2340/348-2131/352-9398/353-7250
P.O). Box F-40557 - Freeport, Grand Bahamas

Funeral Service for the late

MICHAEL
“RHINO”
WILLIAMS, 39

of Fowler Street, Nassau and

formerly of Jones Town, Eight

Mile Rock will be held on

Saturday, June 20, 2009 at 2:00

F— p.m. at St. Stephen’s Anglice

Church, Eight Mile Rock.

Officiating will be Rev'd Father

Rudolph V. Cooper. Interment will follow in the Harbour
West Cemetery.

He is survived by his mother: Hilda Williams; one son:
Derren; four brothers: Patrick Williams, Allan King, Larry
King and Glen Major; one uncle: Lewis Major; two aunts:
Glandina Pratt and Jane Smith of Burnt Ground, Long
Island; then nieces: Ancka, Shameka, Khia, Tatiana King,
Pakell Williams, Cecely Major, Latrice Pinder, Latricia,
Lauren and Latrell King; five nephews: Patrick Williams
Jr., Lamardo, Kristoff, Christoph and Cameron King;
sisters-in-law: Lorraine King; numerous other relatives
and friends including: Earlin Williams, Set. Betram
Williams of Nassau, Paulette Rolle and family, Judith and
Charles Major and the Major family of Nassau, Gladstone
Major, Harris, Jocl, Whitfield and Audley Pratt, Wilton
and Set, Andy Smith, Andrew and Rosetta Carey of Fowler
Street, Delores Ingraham and family, Nurse Audrey
Williams and family and the King family of Marathon
Estates, Calvin Meely and family, Basil Neymour and
family, Gus “Big Ju" and family, George Fisher of S and
G Scrap Metal, Leron “Giggy” Mortimer, Shirley Strachan
and family, Elvis Major and family, George Adderley and
family, The Garland family of Pine Forest, Shelia and
Emily Pratt, Hubert Williams and family, Henry Dean,
Roland Lamour, Campbell Trucking family, Henry and
Linda Romer and family, Vilda Richardson and family
and a host of other relatives and friends,

Friends may pay their last respects at Russell’s & Pinder's
Funeral Home on Friday, June 19, 2009 from 1:00 p.m.
to 7:00 p.m. and on Saturday, June 20 from 1:00 p.m. until
service time at the church.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009,

| , ,
DAemeritie’s Funeral
BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET * PO. BOX GT-2097 * TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

CASTOL CLIFTON
McKENZIE, 64

a resident of #6 Beldock Ave., Bel ;

Air Estates & formerly of Barraterre,
Exuma, who died on 13th June,
2009, will be held at First Baptist
Church, Market Street & Coconut
Grove Ave... on Saturday at 2:00 p.m.

Officiating will be Rev, Earle }
Francis, assisted by Rev. Diana ;
Francis & Rev. Sullavin McKenzie. :
Interment follows in Woodlawn ;

Gardens, Soldier Road,

A TIME TO MOURN

Left to cherish his memories is his wife Vernie McKenzie, three sons, : | eft to cherish her fond memories are her daughter, Jacinta; her sons,
i Dwayne, Nelson Je. and Micah: her grandchildren, Alexandraia Adderley,
Anthon; onc daughter, Crystal McKenzie; three daughter-in-law, Tina i Pyarig Si aie aie ;

peak ; ee ‘aia eee : 7 i Dario Munroe and Antonia Johnson; six sisters, Agnes Farrington,
and Vernika Mckenzie, and Marcia Anthon: two sisters, Loletha Thurston ; e é

and Idella Laing: two brothers, Benjamin and Anthony MeKengie; six i

Pastor's Shawn and Rev Sullavin McKenzie, and Charles Eugene

brothers-in-law, Phillip Laing, Tyrone Thurston, Lindop of New York,
Sydney, Amold & Gladstone "Moon" McPhee of Freeport: six Sisters-
ia-law, Maralyn Gardiner, Vernita Mitchell, Gloria Gardiner, Lynda
Marshall, Juanita Armbrister and Susan Demeritte: five grandchildren,
Rashed, Shawnique & Shawn McKenzic, Mariska & Antonise, Anthon;

nieces, Pamela Nixon, Camille "Kim" Pratt, Shemeka Forbes, Tyranique, ;
Tylitha, & Tylesha Thurston, Natalie McKenzie, Sophia Moss, Tania | Solomon, Mildred Maurice, Valderine Cargill, Mildred McKenzie, Etlyh
Bethel-White, Monalisa Thompson, Denise Marshall and Dawn ; Kemp, Inez Gibson, Valderine Altidor and family, Deaconess Amanda
Demeritte; nephews. Brain McKenzie, Jerremy Laing, John Nixon, } Colebrooke and family, Gloria McKenzie and family, Deloris Chipman-
Danny Pratt, Robert Forbes and Sandy McPhee; one aunt, Pearline i Pgyis, Shirley Smith and family, Remelda and family, Tammy Hepbum
McKenzie, cousins; Eukel, Dorothy, Ruthmae, Beryl, Caroline, Eleanor, ¢ and family, Fredricka Brown and family, Pastor Dorinda Dean and
Maggic, Linda, Brenda, Majoric, Bessic, Jennifer, Patrice, Eunal, Rose, family, Rev. Eugene and Evangelist Sandra Patton and family, Keith
McNeil, Agatha, Emma, Marina, Ismae, Wena, Elder John, Dr. P, Preston, : and Debbie Toote and family, Nixon family, John Dean, Thelma Deveaux
Grace, Ikic, Wakley, Val, Rollin, Prince, Andrew, Dotlin, Rev, Alfred ? and family, Allen, Stephanie, Rudie and Jeffrey; numerous relatives
Ferguson, Elsada, Vivan, Thelma and Mackey Rolle, Venice, Joycelyn. | and friends including, Patricia Smith, Nelson Johnson, Rebecca Nesbitt

Madelyn, Vernika, Ethyl, Irene, Maryanne and Phillip Sands, Nellie

Mae Walkes, Edpa, Estella, Lillian, Brightly, Lavaughn, Leslie, Freeman, }

Rudolph, Randolph, John (Olie), Marvin, Harris, Allison; other relatives
and friends, Jacquelyn Romer & family, Maggie Williams & family,
Linda Gomez, Gloria Lightboume, Brenda Martin & family, Beverly
& Edward Deveaux, Sheila Butterfield & family, Anita Bartlett, Patsy

Pinder, Gaitor family, John Woodside & family, Quebel Rolle & family, }
Donald Demeritte, Albert Armbnster, Herbert Marshall, Janet Davis, :
Henry Smith & family, Luther Johnson and family, Shirleymae Small, j Baptist Cathedral family, The Girls Brigade of St. Mark's, the staff of
Latoya Turnbul Ethel & Daisy McPhee, Richie family, Pratt family, ¢ the Princess Margaret Hospital, Oncology, Hematology, Blood Bank,
Francis family, Bahamas Customs Department, Indulgence Shoe & Bag i Female Medical I and IL, the Bastian family, Gaynell and family, Love
Boutique, Male Medical I & Oncology Dept of the Princess Margaret : 14311 Andros family, The Bain, Grants Town, Step Street and Grant Street

Hospital, McKenzie family, Burrows family and the entire Barraterre i families and many more too numerous to mention,

Community, Rev Earle Francis and family, First Baptist family, Sunrise i

Ministries.

Fnends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market i
Street, on Friday from 10-6:00 p.m. & on Saturday from 9-12:00 noon }

: & at the church from | 700 p.m. until service time.

SIS. ANGELA
DELORES
ROLLE-JOHNSON, 58

a resident of Step Street, Fox Hill,
who died on 31 May, 2009, will be
held at St. Mark's Native Baptist
Church, Romer Street, Fox Hill, on
Saturday at 11 :00 a.m. Officiating
will be Rev. Dr. Carrington 3. Pinder,
assisted by other Ministers. Internment
follow in St. Mark's Church
Cemetery.

Josephine Kraus, Margaret Simplice, Patrice Brown, Debra Alexander
of New York, and Kayla Cooper; two aunts, Coreen Lockhart of New
York and Myrtis Chipman of North Carolina; mother-in-law,
MeivinaJohnson: brothers-in-law, Ron Pinder and Yves Simplice; sister-
in-law, Caroline Davis; eleven nieces, Quetell, Bruann, Monalisa, Kevia,
Keisha, Kevia, Kelly, Demia, Shauna, Shriqueca and Rhonda: eight
nephews, Timothy, Sean, Romeo, Jason, Emmanuel, Myles, Ricardo
and Michael; cousins, Marion Kee, Linda Dean, Victoria Pearce, Hattie

and family, Patricia Gibson and family, Gwendolyn and family, The
Hinsey, McKenzie, Thompson, Dean, Cargill, Rolle families, Sarah
Dames and family, The Gibson and Smith families, Charlene Miller
and family, Patrice Brown and family, Sharon Norville and family, Rev.
Dr, Carrington and Rev, Sabrina Pinder and family, Mother Catherine
Pratt, Rev, Dr, Michael Symonette and Rev, Dr. Hilda Symonette and
family, The St. Mark's Church family, The St. Mark's Sanctuary Choir,
The St. John’s Native Baptist Society Choir, The St. John's Native

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Puneral Home, Market
i Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the church from

10:00 a.m, until service time,



PAGE 15



PAGE 16,

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Aemeritte’s Funeral
MARKET STREET « PO. BOX GT-2097 « TEL: 323-5782

me ata) A el ela



ELDIN ALEXANDER
FERGUSON, JR. 57

aresident of West Bay Street, Cable |
Beach, who died on 9 June, 2009, will |
be held at St. Matthew's Anglican !
Church, Shirley Street, on Saturday |
at 10:00 a.m. Officiating will be ;
Moss, |

Archdeacon 1 Ranfurly Brown, Rev'd :

Dr. James Moultne & The Revd br;
+ Dwitght M. Bowe. Interment follows }

in St. Margaret's Cemetery, Shirley

Archdeacon Cornell J.

— f Strect.

Sy ~~

Lett to cherish his memory are his devoted wife of 27 years, Sharon |
Ferguson; two sons, Eldin Ferguson, UI] and Enin Ferguson: two daughters, |

Alicia Ward and Eldri Ferguson; two grandchildren, Rinicia Rolle and
Keanna Ward: one sister, Arabella Cambridge; ten brothers-in-law, Derek

Cambridge, Sr. Audrick Smith, Leslie Smith, Andrew Smith, Donald |
Smith, Dexter Smith, Richard Demeritte, Willard Hanna, Alvin Hodges |
and Nigel Ingraham: six sisters-in-law, Latisha Smith; Lorraine Smith, |
Angela Hanna, Ruth Demeritte, Laverne Hodges and Ann Ingraham nieces, }
Derica Cambridge, Tillesia, Kim, Audrey, and Ruth Smith, Sophia Palahicky, :
Elsie Gray, Anna Knowles, Esther "Princess" Mayet, Peggy-Ann Demeritte,
Tamika “Penny” Bain, Tanya Hall, Petra Hanna-Weekes, Indira Francis, }
‘Tina Rove, Shonalee Gamble, Alicia Hodges, Tshesha Ingraham, ‘Tara ;
Taylor, Angelique Smith, Denika Smith, Tanya Hanna, Lakiska Russell |
and Demi Smith; nephews, Keino and Derek Cambridge, Jr., Hildre, Reggie, }
Murphy, Aric, Ashton, Salvatore, Wilfred, Mark Evans, John, Whylly, |
Dion, Donnie, Doreoni and Domenio Smith, Nigel Ingraham, Valentina |
Hanna, Esmond Weekes, Damion Francis, Torrence Gamble, Howard |

Roye, Jessie Bain and Frank Hall: and others; adopted children, Andrew

Anderson, Frederick Johnson [1], D’angelo Forbes, Le Var Boyd, Tavaran | |
Ferguson, Quincy Harp, Chad Davis, Kyle Spence, Keron Blair, Andrea |
Burton, William Roberts and Tylon Axson, other relatives, Fnincis Family: }
Rev. Earle Francis, Carvel Francis, Kenncth Francis, Basil Francis, Dorrie :
Francis, Hiram Francis, Wendal Francis, Peggy Francis, Nehemiah Francis, ;
Rev. Beryl Francis Culmer, Mabelle Sands, Rev. Henry Francis, Percy :
‘Vola’ Francis, Monique, Donnie and Charles Clarke, Willie Francis, Prince |
Francis, Louise Francis, Virginia Francis, Naomi Seymour, Roscoe Francis, }
Stephen and Linda Francis, Kenrah Francis, Patricia Francis, Debbie |
Francis, Joyanne Fritz, Fayne Thompson; Ferguson and Knowles family, |
Willie and Michael Moss, Hubert and Kelly Russell, Lucille Ferguson, |
Barbara Ferguson, Anthony Ferguson, Florence Ferguson, Marsha Ferguson, |
Edwin, Rhunette, Edwin Jr, and DO’ Brnickashaw Ferguson, Garth Ferguson, |

Margo Ferguson-Adderley, Raleigh Ferguson, Bianca Ferguson, Clement,

Delano, Deloris Ferguson, Pam and Solomon Cox, Raymond Ferguson, |
Dorcus and Ken Ferguson, Debbie Strachan, Franklyn (Pancho) Rahming, |
Ervin Knowles, Agnes and Phil Cooper, Richard Munnings, Rita Miller, :
Harold Knowles, Jr. Minera and Harold Munnings, The Rahming family ;
and Collie family; Mary Ferguson, Thomas Jr, Solomon, Migel and Alron }
Ferguson, Rhunette” Adelaide Pinder, Rudy LeVarity, Prescola Lockhart, :
Iris Miller, Mabelle Le Vanity: friends, Donnie Armbrister, Sherwin and }
Stephanie Armstrong, Robert Johnson, Kelly and Hubert Russell, Charles :
Malpress, Patrice McDonald, Archdeacon Comell and Carol Moss, Michael :
Edwards, Carlson Shurland, Jackson Burnside, Sir Arlington and Lady |
Shiela Butler, Clyde and Margaret Ferguson, Demarion Almanzar, Jerome |

Sawyer, Altovise Munnings, Calliope Smith, Shelly Ingraham, Hon. Perry,
Bernadette, Alex, Stephan, and Adam Christie, Nathalie, Rosalie, Ethlyn,
Patty and Keith Harvey, Jan and Keith Mullings, Terah Rahming, Eva
Reeves, Beverly Chin, Cynthia Donaldson, Gaye Knowles, Elcott Coleby,
Faye Lockhart-Smith, Lorenzo and Ann Taylor, Eulis Strachan, Eulita and
Robert Strachan, Preben Olsen, Harlington and Helen Hanna, Paula Hanna-
Miller and Trixie Hanna, Dr, Phillip Thompson, Kendall "Funky" Demeritte,
Monty Pratt, Frank Claude, Ernest Burrows, Lawerence Rolle. Ronnie
Butler, Eva Schafiner, Al, Kathy, Adam, Robert and Alana Dillette, “ncdra,
Michaella, Flora, Karen, and Courtney Strachan, Steve McKinney, Paul
Moss, Peter Ramsay. Vanlock Fowler, Raymond Harrison, Helen Mitchell,
Betty and Joe Stuart, Margaret Lockhart, Hyacinthia Becton, Canon
Howarth and Dianna Lewis, Philip Galanis, Betty Knowles, Allison Smith,
Canon Harry and Ann Bain, Dr. Bridgette Hampton, Dr. Carnille
Fatquharson, Colleen Nottage, Julian and Anthony Weech, Brenda Russell,
Carolyn Aonbrister, Church of Ascension Family (Freeport), The CocoNuts
Family, The Gems Family, 4NS Family, Orthland Bodie Jr, Pleasant
Bridgewater, Michael Foster, The PLP, Freeport, Fox Hill, Kemp Road
& Ft. Fincastle Families; Many other friends and relatives too numerous
to mention,

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte’s Funeral Home, Market
Street, from 10-6:00pm on Friday & on Saturday at the church from
O:00a.m. until service time.

ESLEME ALES CINE
(SINEUS), 69

aresident of Palmetto Point, Eleuthera
& formerly of La Croix, St. Joseph,
Haiti, who died on 13 June, 7004, will
be held at Church of the Nazarene,
Palmetto Point, Eleuthera on Saturday
at 10:00 a.m. Officiating will be Rev.
Godfrey Bethel & Pastor Lucner Noel.
Interment follows in Palmetto Point
Public Cemetery.

Left to cherish his memories are his

wife, Arnette; daughters, Enid
Belflaurre & Fennun Milam; sons, Wallace, Elline & Leslie Sineus:
daughters-in-law, Maria & Thelia (Nicky) Sineus & Eugenie Woodside;
sons-in-law, Belina Belfleurre & Philip Milam; grandchildren, Anna
Marrius, Maria Jean, Nikera, Benaldo & Shalunda Belfleurre, Leslia &
Alyssa Sineus, Kevin & Luvins Milom, Brady Sineus, Omar, Lannar,
Wallace Jr. & Britney Sineus, Acasia Anderson & Tristan: special friends
and other relatives including, Omila, Ada & Samuel, Malila Johnson, Mr.
& Mrs. Daniel Ferguson, Mr. & Mrs. Eustace Punch, Nicola Sands, Suzanne
Nelus, Colby & family, the Nazarene Church family, The Bible Truth Hall
family, Full Gospel House Temple, The entire Palmetto Point community,
the staff at the Governor's Harbour Clinic and many others too numerous
to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects al Demeritte's Funeral Home, Rock
Sound, Eleuthera on Friday from 3-3:00 p.m. & at the church in Palmetto
Point from 7:00 p.m, until service time on Saturday.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009,

Dremeritte’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS' OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET « P.O. BOX GT-2097 * TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

MR. ARTHUR
MICHAEL WOOD,
52

a resident of Fowler Sureet, who died }

on? June, 2008, will be held at Our
Lady of the Holy Souls Catholic

Church, Deveaux Street, on Saturday j
at 12:00 noon. Officiating will be Fr. :
Michael Kelly, ss.cc., assisted by }
Rev, Deacon Peter Rahming & }
Deacon Maxwell Johnson, Interment i
follows in Catholic Cemetery, Tyler }

Street.

Arthur's life will forever linger in the hearts of his, Wife, Georgina

Wood; sons, Michael Wood, Arthur Wood Jr. and Aaron Wood; daughters, ;
Arthura Woodside, Nyoshi Curry and Quadelia Carey Taylor; soms-in- :
law, Deancy Woodside, D'vano Curry and Cardwell Taylor; grandchildren,
Deancy, D'neisha, Cadre, Deante and Austin; father, Hartman Arnold ;
Wood: mother, elma Wood: brothers, Amold Edmund Wood, Stephen j

Wood, Bradley J. Wood, Dario Wood and Rodrick Wood; sisters, Esther
Isabell Wood, Frances Collie, Avis Munroe and Verna Wood: uncles,

Harry Seymour, Hubert Hepburn, Gregory Wood, Rufus Johnson, |

Mervin Brown, Joseph M. Woodside Sr., James Wood, James Adderley,

Rosemary Johnson, Theresa Poitier, Betty Woodside, Monica Woodside,
Era Thurston, Ruth Adderley, Eva Wood, Evelyn Wood, Julictte Hanna, ;
Barbara Musgrove, Emily Walkes and Shirleymae Russell; nephews, ;

Don Lightbourn, Kenlee Wilson, Ryan Wood, Jason Wood, Bernard
Collie Jr, Bradley J. Wood Ir, Malcolm Rahming, Matthew Rahming,
Davano, Jeremy, Shawn Jr., Trayton, Rashad; nieces, Kelsie Collie,
Melissa Major, Seline Munroc, Simone Munroc, Sophia Munroc,

Edgecombe and Family, Margaret Innis and family, Mr, & Mrs, Gerard
Elliott, Gwen King and Kenneth Seymour.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market
? Street, from 10-6:00 p,m, on Friday & on Saturday at the church from

11:00 a.m, until service time.

HILDRED
ALEXANDER
" Glen"
SMITH, 65

a resident of Soldier Road & formerly
of Long Bay Cay, Andros, who died
on 4 June, 2004, will be held at The
New Apostolic Church, Rupert Dean
Lane, Bain Town, on Saturday at
1:00 p.m. Officiating will be
Evangelist Wellington B. Wallace,
assisted by Rev. Willis Stubbs &
other Ministers. Interment follows
in Southern Cemetery, Cowpen & Spikenard Roads.

: ~?* i He is survived by his beloved wife of twenty-eight years, Princess Maria
Anthony Hanna, Andre Musgrove and Nathaniel Russell: aunts, Veronica { siith: one son. Dr. Richard Kelson IL four dauchters. Aneela Newhold
Seymour, Agnes Hepburn, Andra Wood, Betsheba Wood, Catherine | p.ricc. Heatield Natalie Aan Wilton and Shersl Kelle: cewenteen

Patricia Henfield, Natalie Ann Wilson and Sheryl Kelly: seventeen
grandchildren, Charlene and Chester Johnson, Shaniece Chan, Lakeisha
Knowles, Marvin and Calvin Henfield Jr, Erica Mackey, Warren Wilson,
Richard II, Riclesha and Gabrielle D’ Angel Kelson, Keithtell Culmer,
Lateisha Symonette, Deron and Dominic McKenzie and Brickell and
Brian Kelly; eighteen great-grandchildren, Kar Hing, Pik Ying and Kar

i Kei Chan, Calron, Laron, Shaquil, Leonaldo and Alisha, Maliha, Mya,

Lightbourn: grandnieces, Danielle Emma Wood; father-in-law, George i

Collie: brothers-in-law, Bernard Collie $r., Eugene Munroe, Rev, Shawn i Ernestine Kelson; four grandsons-in-law, Jimmy Chan, Vincent Knowles,

McKenzie, Rev. Sullivan McKenzie, Derek Woodburn, Jean Martial,
Min. John Saunders, Lexus Collic, Ralph Collie and Anthony Collie;
ssters-in-law, Sheryl Wood, Sheila Wood, Avon Wood, Stacy Woodbum,
Tracy Martial, Vernika McKenzie, Tina McKenzie and Ruby Saunders,

Fernander, Pam, Gertrude, Wilfred, Monique Kemp, Brenda Bowe, i

Charles Reid, Sherry, Enid Tynes, Charlene, Clint, Richie, Tinny, Lana,
Mr. & Mr. Beneby, Mr. & Mrs, Duncombe, Cleophas Adderley &

Bahamas National Youth Choir, Claudette "Cookie" Allen, Customers |
of Arthur Michael, Flora Gelsey, Rosena Dawson, Marieanne Johnson ;

& family, JennieMae Neeley & family, Hazel Sturrup & family, : prjends may pay their last respects : St fark
i ; So eee : : tsi : y pay their last respects at Demenitte’s Funeral Home, Market
Greensalde Family, Ellioa Family, Farm Road Community, Our Lady's 7 Street, from 10-6:00pm on Friday & on Saturday from 9-11-00 a.m. &
Church family, Church of The Resurrection family, Music Makers, i op the church from 12-00 noon until service time.

Saxons, Valleyboys, Roots, Redland Soldiers, Sting, Tribes, Runez i

: 1. i Desuria and D’Vonte Henfield, D'Ankea and D'Yontae, Shawn, Shawnette
Brashae Wood, Darriel Wood, Jawnette, Jenise, Johnelle, Davania, : and Seanciko and Bryanna; two nieces, Carolyn McKinney & family,
Lindesha, Shawnique, Rohnesha and Ebany; grandnephew. Nicholas i ang Pastor Martha Duvalier & family; three sons-in-law, Garnett

Newbold: Calvin Henfield Sr. and George Wilson: one daughter-in-law,

Deon Mackey and Aldon Culmer; one granddaughter-in-law, Desimona
Henfield; four brothers-in-law & six sisters-in-law, Roselda Sawyer:
Joseph & Patrice Whyms & family; Mildred Butler & family; Henry

ier vats ies inna neon cities feck: ad elas | & Judy Weymess & family; Raphael & Elrena Whyms & tamily, Andrew
Seen paral ainsi gee deaememabio., 7PT. : & Theresa Burrows & family and the family of the late Samuel Sr. &
John Johnson of Eleuthera, Wenzel Davis & family, Sabrina Francis, : carn ee eee ae ue ea ;
Gladys Beneby, Demetrius Kemp & family, Shirley Wood, Roker, Hunt, i ciart and the Stuart family, Rev, Roseynell Forbes & family of L
Tucker, Lance, Kendal Munroe, Dwight Knowles, Bishop Delton ; ee ee ee ee ee

Eva Weymes; numerous other relatives and fiends including, Christopher

Bay Cay, Andros, Joseph Hamilton, Leon Hall, Keith Moss, Charles
Greene, Marlon Hall, Keith Symonette, Trevor Johnson, Joseph Brown,
Charlene Scavella, Patrick Rolle, Philip Prerre, Danielle McKenzie, the
Wallace family, Charles McKenzie and the Environmental Health
Department.



PAGE 17



PAGE 18, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

HOWLAND C. BOTTOMLEY

Howland Croft Bottomley, age 80, a former fifty year resident of George
Town, Exuma, Bahamas and a resident of Easton, MD, for three years died
on Wednesday, June 10, 2009 after a long illness at Talbot Hospice House,
Easton, Maryland.

He was the long time Chairman of the Out Island Regatta Race Committee,
now the Family Island Regatta Committee in George Town, Exuma,
Bahamas.

Born on May 1, 1929 in Camden, New Jersey, he was the son of the late
Gordon Frederick Bottomley and Constance Sharpe Bottomley.

His earlier years were spent in Merchantville, New Jersey. After attending
the University of Virginia he served during the Korean War. Mr. Bottomley
served his country in the U.S. Navy from March 30, 1951 to March 28,
1955 and upon his honorable discharge was awarded the National Defense
Service Medal, Navy Occupation Service (Europe) Medal and the Good
Conduct Medal.

In 1956 he began cruising the Bahamas in his ketch Albatross before
building a home on Little Exuma. After eight years at “The Cut”, he moved
to George Town where he built and operated Regatta Point. Throughout
these years he served on the Regatta Race Committee becoming Chairman
in 1962 until retiring from that post in 1992. He served as Commodore
of the Out Island Squadron, the founding organization of the Regatta in
1996. He was elected to the Regatta Hall of Fame in October 1990 and was
later made Commodore Emeritus for his valuable services to the Regatta.
During his years as Chairman in close collaboration with the late R.H.
Bobby Symonette, he developed and implemented the racing rules and
requirements that govern sloop racing in the Bahamas.

Commodore Bottomley 1s survived by two daughters from the union of his
first marriage, Sharpe Beaton of Point Pleasant Beach, NJ, Louise Corish
of Sag Harbor, Long Island, NY and two children from his second union
of marriage, Howland Croft Bottomley, Jr. and Jane Abell of Oxford,
MD; six siblings James R. Bottomley, Kathleen Landskroener and her
husband Theodore, Nancy Dunphey and her husband Richard, Donald T.
Bottomley and his wife Lucy, William E. Bottomley and his wife Ellen;
five grandchildren Rachel Beaton, Olivia Corish, William Abell, Abigail
Corish and Miles Abell; numerous nieces, nephews and cousins.

A memorial service will be held at a later date in George Town, Exuma.

In lieu of flowers, memorial offerings may be made in Commodore
Bottomley’s memory to the Talbot Hospice Foundation, 586 Cynwood Dr.,
Easton, MD 21601.

Arrangements have been entrusted to Mid Shore Cremation Center,
Cambridge, MD. Letters of condolences may be sent to www.curran-
bromwell.com.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Kenneth George Allen

Affectionately called “Dread-Up”
Sunrise September 4, 1953 - Sunset May 17, 2009

Special thanks is extended to all those that played a special part in our father's
life and final tribute; Josepha Allen, Barbara and Freta Moss and Families, Freddie
and Michelle Evans and family, Eddie Evans, Patrick Brown, Ricky McDonald
and family, Bobby Lightbourne and Family, Obead Joseph and family, Demeritte's
Funeral Home, Pastor Preston Collins and other members of One Accord
Pentecostal Prayer Ministries, The Gaitor Family, Residents of the Tall Pines
Community, Sue Allen, The Tribune Newspaper, St Cecilia’s School, Derrick
Atkins Sr and family, Keta, Donna Edgecombe and family, Jocelyn Ramsey and
family, Carolyn Emmanuel and family, Paulette Whylly and family, Gertrude
Turner and family, Bamboo Shack, Audrey, Marie, Kiddies World Academy,
Zelrona Mackey, Naomi Blatch Primary, and many others who made this difficult
time bearable for the family.

From your children, Nioshi, Kenneth Jr, Alvin, Lloyd, Zandrika, Kenice, Kendra, Kendalee, and Amoya.
Gone, But not forgotten.





The Tribune

RELIGION



¥ ¢



Thursday, June 18, 2009 ® PG 19

aF

THIS father of three has devoted himself to them, being as active, concerned, and
committed to their lives as his father was to him.

FINDING THE RIGHT

FORMULA

FOR BEING A GOOD

rATHER

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THIS Sunday is Father's
Day, and the question being
asked is what are the ele-
ments that contribute to
being a good father.

There have been significant cries
throughout the local community in
recent times calling for more fathers
to step up to the plate and it seems
somewhat futile to expect those
Absent Without Leave (AWOL)
fathers to become good ones especial-
ly if they don‘t know how.

While a turn around for these men
may seem far fetched, some men
argue that it is a real possibility and
must first begin with their acknowl-
edgment of responsibility.

Proverbs 22 verse 6 says : “Train up
a child in the way he should go, and
when he is old he will not depart from
it.”

The responsibility for the rearing
and training a child specifically boys is
the duty of the father.

Joy FM 101.9 radio personality
Kermit “T’ aka Kermit Taylor, said the
good life he shares with his family
today would not have been possible
without the help of his father.

He explained: “As a child growing
up, my father worked as a family
island commissioner. So it meant that
every three to five years I was always
on a new family island.

“Living in the family island with my
father being commissioner was fun,
because my dad was known as the
‘Chief.’ However he was always busy,
but my dad was the kind of person
who made it a point that all of his kids
got an education.”

Coming from a family of six chil-
dren, he remembers his father being
present and rooting for all the kids to
get the most out of school.

His biggest challenge was in math,
and his father always made certain
that he attended after school classes.

“I remember on one occasion I
skipped those classes for about three
days out of the week, and my tutor
told my dad that she hadn’t seen me.

SEE page 23



PG 20 ® Thursday, June 18, 2009

a ener et

RELIGION

The Tribune



@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMAS Wisdom
Academy will be hosting an
educational seminar under the
theme: “A Heart to Give,” as a
continued effort to raise aware-
ness throughout the Bahamian
community about special needs
children and the importance of

education.

The seminar will stretch over a two day
period at the Chapel on the Hill, Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway June 19 at
7.30pm and June 20 at Yam.

Seminar host and founder of Bahamas
Wisdom Academy, Michelle Wildgoose,
said she decided to start a special needs
school because of her son, Mikhail.

“Thave difficulty finding schools for him.
So I had to go about and change my whole
career path over the past 12 years. I got my
degree in education and then my Master in
Business Administration. I then went to
University if Phoenix and did my Masters in
Special Education. There are so many per-
sons out there in our community who need
help with their special needs children and
during this time when everything is so
expensive, we want to share something with
the community,” Mrs Wildgoose said.

Mrs Wildgoose said the seminar’s main
goal is to give information to the communi-

(Cy MEDITATION

Holy! Hol

Mighty, God in three persons, blessed
Trinity” and “Ever Three And Ever
One, Consubstantial, Co-eternal” are
some of the phrases to be found in
hymns which celebrate the Most Holy
Trinity. Individual hymns based on a
particular person of the Trinity such
as Praise to the Lord the Almighty the
King of Creation, What a Friend we
have in Jesus, Come Down O love
Divine, capture some of the distinc-
tive characteristics associated with
these persons of the Trinity. It is very
uplifting and informative to read,
study, pray and sing the hymns.

Matthew 28:19 states: “Therefore
go and make disciples baptising them
in the name of

Father and the Son, and of the Holy
Spirit.” This is our charge to put into
practice. We are commanded to build

“Holy!Holy! Holy! Merciful and l

ty from different perspectives.

“Information is key now a days and with
the lack of information we find ourselves
not knowing what to do when we have chal-
lenges with our children. However, when
we share information, those of us who don’t
know, we will then understand how to han-
dle our kids better,” Mrs Wildgoose said.

Speakers include Arthurlue Rahming,
who will share on the heart of an advocate
for adult literacy, Michelle Thring, a special
educator, Gary Reece, will speak on a heart
of an overcomer and to parents who have
challenges with teenagers and young adults,
Dr Norman Gay, will speak on a heart of a
physician offering information on various
supplements kids need, and Opposition
Leader Perry Christie.

“Mr Christie will be speaking on the
heart of a parent due to the fact that he has
a special needs child. I am sure the nation
would benefit hearing from him. So many
of us don’t want to share relative to our per-
sonal information but hearing it coming
from a man, would really touch the heart of
others and encourage people not to give in
or give up on their kids,” Mrs Wildgoose
said.

Mrs Wildgoose said she would like to
ensure persons get at least gain wisdom
from the experience.

“We want this educational seminar to
become a stimulus to awaken our nation to
the many educational challenges and
resolve to find solutions as a nation to help
with the challenges we face in our everyday
situations. So together, we can make a dif-
ference here.”

y! Holy!

= ~~
, a
a ~ REV. ANGELA
a C BOSFIELD
PALACIOUS



the Kingdom of God using the name
of the Trinity as depicted by their
relationship One to Another (Father,
Son, and Holy Spirit.).

Some questions worth asking our-
selves are: Are we going? Are we
encouraging anyone to consider a
relationship with our Lord and
Saviour? Are we making any disciples
at home or abroad? Some questions
to put to friends, family members and
colleagues are:

Do you know that you are created

in God the Creator’s image?

Do you know that God, the Son,
Jesus Christ, died on the cross to save
you from sin?

Do you know that God the Holy
Spirit will live within you if you allow
it?

The actual word Trinity is not men-
tioned in the Bible but here are some
passages from the New International
Version which capture the nature of
the roles and relationships between
the members of our triune Godhead:
Let them bring you to a place of awe,
wonder and worship:

Mark 1:10-12: “As Jesus was com-
ing up out of the water, he saw heav-
en being torn open and the Spirit
descending on him like a dove. And a
voice came from heaven:

"You are my Son, whom I love;
with you I am well pleased." At once
the Spirit sent him out into the
desert”

Acts 1:4-5: On one occasion, while
he was eating with them, he gave
them this command: "Do not leave
Jerusalem, but wait for the gift my

MICHELLE
WILDGOOSE,
Founder and
Principal of
Bahamas

si Aeseteyan
Academy.





Father promised, which you have
heard me speak about. For John bap-
tised with[a] water, but in a few days
you will be baptised with the Holy
Spirit.”

John 3:5 and 16: “Jesus answered,
"T tell you the truth, no one can enter
the kingdom of God unless he is born
of water and the Spirit. Flesh gives
birth to flesh, but the Spirit[b] gives
birth to spirit..."For God so loved the
world that he gave his one and only
Son,[f] that whoever believes in him
shall not perish but have eternal life.”

Romans :5: 5-6: “And hope does
not disappoint us, because God has
poured out his love into our hearts by
the Holy Spirit, whom he has given
us. You see, at just the right time,
when we were still powerless, Christ
died for the ungodly.”

Roman 8: 15-“you received the
Spirit of sonship.[g] And by him we
cry, “Abba,[h] Father." The Spirit
himself testifies with our spirit that
we are God's children. Now if we are
children, then we are heirs—heirs of
God and co-heirs with Christ.”



The Tribune

The Methodist

METHODIST work on Andros
began during the year 1841. We extract
the following account from the
"Report of the Societies and Schools in
the Bahamas" for the year ending
December 1845:

As soon as possible after the arrival
of the late Wm Wheelock among us, J
Wm Pearson visited the society at
Andros Island and reported on his
return that he found them united and
pious and a few were added to their
number during his short sojourn
among them. The voyage thither was
very rough and stormy and on their
return perilous in the extreme as the
vessel sprung a leak and became
unmanageable; but through ceaseless
exertions at the pump and the mechan-
ical ingenuity of the passengers and
crew and the animating exhortations of
Mr Pearson they made the west end of
Providence. We hear of the leaders the
most pleasing accounts of the consis-
tent deportment of the members and
hope soon as the committee shall send
us additional help not only to visit the
society at Coakley Town but our mem-
bers scattered everywhere around the
shores of that large fertile island.”

This account gives us a glimpse into
the history of the early days of
Methodist work on Andros. It appears
that by 1845 the Methodist members

A father’s affirmation

Matt.3:17. And lo a voice from heav-
en, saying. This is my beloved Son, in
whom I am well pleased.

As we religiously celebrate the day
and concepts of Father's day and based
upon the deterioration of our nation, it
is quite clear to me that as educated
and as spiritually spooky as we are; a
vast majority of the fathers within and
outside our homes have yet to under-
stand the importance of a Father's
Affirmation.

Again, who am I to speak on such
issue? Seeing that I'm not one of the
country's religious bishops, doctors,
apostles, etc; and I don't have a big
church building, I host no conferences
nor do I have a TV ministry.

Well, with that being said I hasten to
say that if these religious clowns
(themselves) understood the impor-
tance of a Father's Affirmation the
church in the Bahamas would be a
force to be reckoned with in both the
spirit and natural realm; but it’s obvi-
ous this is not the case with the church
today.

RELIGION



om
& LAWLOR

were not to be found in one particular
locality, but "scattered everywhere."

When one of the "charity" schools at
Nicholl's Town was transferred to the
Methodists "the wooden school house
was now also used as a chapel and a
day school." A teacher was employed
from 1843-45 (Bicentenary Souvenir
Magazine, 1960). The day school
teacher had to be withdrawn because
of "want of means to remunerate his
services." (The Report of the Societies
and Schools, 1846).

The membership of the society on
the island was 31 in 1847 and 22 in
1848. By 1856 when the report on
Andros appears under the New
Providence Circuit report, there were
20 members meeting under the charge
of one male and one female leader.
These leaders were "steady and faith-
ful souls" who reported "favourably"
on the state of their classes.

The account with which this outline
was opened gives us an indication of




PASTOR
ALLEN

Watch this!

Even Yeshuwa Messiah, before He
began His earthly ministry waited to be
affirmed by His Father (Matt.3:17b.
This is my beloved Son, in whom I am
well pleased)

From the religious perspective I can
assure you that with the over four
thousand churches we've got through-
out the Bahamas; about 60 per cent of
them have broken away from another
church due to some strife or confusion.
And if the truth be told many of their
spiritual fathers can't honestly say that
“This is my beloved son or daughter, in
whom I am well pleased”

There are some dynamics at work as
it relates to the so-called spiritual
fathers of today not being able to
affirm sons and daughters in the min-

the difficult circumstances under which
the work of ministry was carried out on
Andros. Added to this, the report for
1863 reveals that: "Andros Island and
the Biminis have not been visited dur-
ing the year." The reason given is the
absence of the New Providence
preachers in Abaco and Eleuthera for
Missionary purpose.

The membership continued to
decline, howbeit, very slightly. The
1864 report on Bimini and Andros
shows 16 members at Bimini and 19 at
Andros and adds, "for the present we
have nothing special to report”.

A society was formed at Staniard
Creek in 1887 and a chapel was built in
1888. Local sources on Andros inform
us that the Methodist Church at
Stafford Creek was built when the Rev
J Barrett (Bahamian minister) was the
resident minister and William
Woodside was a local preacher in the
society. The chapel was completed in
1899 and was used as a place of refuge
during the hurricane of 1899. However,
the Bicentenary Souvenir Magazine
(1960) indicates that this chapel was
built in 1904 and rebuilt in 1928. The
hurricane of 1899 almost wrecked the
chapel at Nicholl's Town.

The Synod of 1902 reported the fol-
lowing statistics for Andros: 95 mem-
bers, 1 missionary, 4 local preachers, 6

istry; let's look at a few of them.

1. Many of the church fathers today,
themselves have not been affirmed by
a spiritual father; and it is a proven fact
that people who were hurt before have
no problem hurting others.

2. The church fathers are more
focused on building their empire rather
than preparing and giving birth to spir-
itual sons and daughters to further
advance the kingdom of God

3. The affirmation and nurturing of
sons and daughters is a costly process
both spiritually and naturally. Watch
this! In the natural, a good father will
stop at nothing, and spear no expense
to see to it that his son or daughter suc-
ceeds in life; even greater than he has
done.

The father, son relationship is so
important to the kingdom of God;
here's what Yeshuwa said.

John 5:20. For the Father loveth the
Son, and showeth him all things that
himself doeth: and he will show him
greater works than these, that ye may
marvel.

Thursday, June 18, 2009® PG 21

hurch in Andros 1841] - 1929

class leaders and 20 Sunday School
teachers.

Up to the Synod of 1903 there were
four churches and one other preaching
place. The Synod of 1906 reported that
a new chapel was in the course of erec-
tion at Mastic Point. "This is a new
cause and is most successful and prom-
ising. The people are working willingly
and giving generously. At present serv-
ices are held in the houses of some of
the members." The chapel at Mastic
Point was completed in 1909.

By the Synod of 1914 a new rest
house at Calabash Bay was completed
and was being used for divine worship.
In 1918 the rest house at Calabash Bay
was slated to be removed to Stafford
Creek. In 1919 the chapel at Nicholl’s
Town was completed and the rest
house at Staniard Creek was renovat-
ed. The chapel at Mastic Point was
destroyed by hurricane in 1926 and
rebuilt in 1929. During the period of
the construction of the new chapel,
worship services were held in the
rest/mission house. This construction
was a community affair. Some mem-
bers recall that the Rev Eric M Walker,
the resident minister, also assisted, car-
rying baskets of lime on his shoulders.

(Next time — Part 34 — The Methodist
Church in Andros 1841 — 1929)

So, instead of just religiously cele-
brating Father's Day; why not take the
bull by its horn and properly deal with
the issues of fathers in this country. We
can't keep on beating fathers and ask-
ing them to step up to the plate, where-
as many of them went into fatherhood
without the true knowledge and wis-
dom of being a father; and also being
affirmed by their fathers.

Religion, tradition and thinking have
compiled all the junk together and
came up with what we now celebrate
and call Father's Day. What we've yet
to understand is that there is a huge
difference between a father and a
daddy; being the educated, religious
people that we are, I need not give the
Greek and Hebrew translation / inter-
pretation of the word father. For I
know quite well that you've gotten just
about every book, tape, video and cd
there is from the powerful conferences
you've attended. Yet our homes and
nation are still crying out for the mani-
festation of fathers.

I'm not hating on the men, because
there are truly some very good fathers
out there; but the numbers are greater
on the daddies’ side. The havoc that

SEE page 23



PG 22 @ Thursday, June 18, 2009

RELIGION

The Tribune

Essential traits of a Godly dad

m@ By PASTOR WILBUR OUTTEN
Senior Pastor Freeport
Bible Church

“Tam not writing this to shame you, but
to warn you, as my dear children. Even
though you have ten thousand
guardians in Christ, you do not have
many fathers, for in Christ Jesus I
became your father through the gospel.
Therefore I urge you to imitate me.”

(1 Corinthians 4:14-16-NIV)

Fathers play a pivotal role in the lives
of their children. A US News and World
Report article stated that more than vir-
tually any other factor, a father's pres-
ence in the family will determine a
child's success and happiness. The article
went on to say that the importance of
fathers is demonstrated by what occurs
when fathers aren't around and
involved. Studies show that children who
grow up without fathers are more likely
to drop out of high school, commit delin-
quent acts or engage in drugs and alco-
hol use.

A local study showed that 90 per cent
of Bahamian young men incarcerated,
did not have a relationship with their
fathers.

In order to have good fathers, we need
good men who are prepared to model
what God wants. Here are six essential
traits of a Godly man and father:

1. A Godly man or father leads with clarity
Ephesians chapter 5 states that the
husband is the head of the wife as
Christ is the head of the church. This
therefore suggests that the husband or
the father is the head of the home. A
Godly man and father should paint a
clear picture of the future he envisions
for his family that will inspire and moti-
vate them to pursue it. In order to lead,
however, you must have some sense of
direction as to where you are going. As
fathers you have the responsibility and
obligation to lead, you must therefore
also model the life you wish your chil-
dren to emulate. If you are following
Christ, you can tell your children with
confidence to follow your lead.

2. A Godly father loves unconditionally

It is easy to love your children when
they are doing well, getting good grades
in school etc., however, when they are
not doing well some parents find it hard
to love them. Love is not performance
based. Unconditional love is love in
spite of; that is the way God loves us.
“While we were still sinners, Christ died
for us”. (Romans 5:8-NIV) Can you
love your children that way?

3. A Godly father labours tirelessly
Godly fathers work hard to meet the
essential needs of their families. A lazy
man is an ungodly man. “Jf anyone does
not provide for his relatives, and espe-

cially for his immediate family, he has
denied the faith and is worse than an
unbeliever” (1Timothy 5:8-NIV)
Mothers should not have to be around
the court trying to get $20 a week from
you to take care of your children.

4. A Godly father listens intently

Fathers have a responsibility to listen
to what is going on with their children.
God, the model father is a listener; that
is why he said, “call unto me and I will
answer.” In order to lead properly, you
must learn to listen. Listening commu-
nicates love. You place value on a per-
son when you listen to them. It is
affirming.

5. A Godly father leans confidently on
Christ

As fathers in a complicated, complex
world, you must lean on the Lord for
directives. Godly fathers lean on the
Lord for salvation; “For it is by grace
you have been saved, through faith-and
this not from yourselves, it is the gift of
God-not by works, so that no one can
boast” (Ephesians 2:8-9 NIV), sound-
ness; the capacity to make good deci-
sions, “If any of you lacks wisdom, he
should ask God, who gives generously
to all without finding fault, and it will be
given to him” (James 1:5-NIV) — and
supply; “But my God shall supply all
your needs according to His riches in
glory by Christ Jesus” (Philippians 4:19-
KJV)

6. A Godly father leaves a lasting legacy

Godly fathers leave a lasting legacy
of integrity, morality and faith. “A good
man leaves an inheritance for his chil-
dren's children”. (Proverbs 13:22) This
not only applies to money, but also the
way you live is passed on to your chil-
dren. How can you create and leave a
lasting, Godly legacy? Your habits now
become your legacy later. The habits
that your children are noticing are
going to be the legacy you leave behind
for them. You determine what you are
going to leave by your practices now.

Fathers do play a pivotal role in the
destiny of their children's lives. God has
given you the wherewithal to determine
whether that destiny is going to be one
filled with good things or one filled with
bitterness. The Bible says in Ephesians
6:4: “Fathers, provoke not your children
to wrath, but bring them up in the nature
and admonition of the Lord”.

¢ This is just a brief summary of the mes-
sage “Essential Traits of a Godly Dad.” To
purchase a cassette tape or CD of the mes-
sage in its entirety, you may visit Freeport
Bible Church on West Atlantic Drive,
Freeport. For questions or comments con-
cerning the message you may email
freeportbiblechurch@coralwave.com or
telephone 352-6065.





The Tribune RELIGION

Thursday, June 18, 2009 ® PG 23

Finding the right formula —
for being a good father

FROM page 19

: the enemy is wreaking within our fam-
i ilies and nation is due to the lack of
? true Godly Fathers. If I didn't know
i any better I would have strongly
? advised that the day and celebration be
i called (Happy Daddy's Day, rather

“So you never know the contribution
you make to your children by simply

“My dad took me there the next
week, and I might as well tell you after
disciplining me, I never missed a class
after that whether I liked it or not.”

He added that while their relation-
ship did have it’s challenges particular-
ly after his parent’s divorce, he remem-
bers his father always being an active
part of his life. And just as he was taken
care of by his father in his childhood,
he along with his other siblings were
also given the responsibility of taking
care of their him when he got older and
fell ill.

Kermit said after his father was diag-
nosed with Parkinson’s disease, he
gladly took care of him until his death
in 2005.

Even today, he has devoted himself
to his three children, being as active,
concerned, and committed to their lives
as his father was to him.

Kermit explained that being a real
father in every sense of the word can
seem daunting, but is necessary.

“IT remember one year my youngest
son Kristen was competing in a long
jump competition and was expecting
me to be there when he was perform-
ing. The events that day were running
ahead of time, and by the time I got
there he had already finished jumping,
and said to me ‘Daddy I didn’t do too
well, but if you was here I would have
done better you know,’ and those
words echo in my head today.

being there. I want to encourage par-
ents to be active in the lives of their
children.”

Youth activist Carlos Reid told
Tribune Religion that although he did
not have a bad relationship with his
father, he always felt like he was seek-
ing his approval.

“Growing up I think I got the kind of
discipline that most people would call
abuse, but my father was the kind of
man who never wasted time or energy
when it came to disciplining his chil-
dren.”

Mr Reid said even after becoming an
adult, their relationship was still some-
what difficult and he always seemed to
be have to prove himself.

He said he never really felt validated
by his father until after writing and
publishing his first book.

“He was all over the island telling his
friends and everyone else that his son
was the writer of this book, that made
me feel good, but it also made me think
on how many other children wait on
this approval and never get it from
their parent.”

Mr Reid said this is the reason so
many children resort to gangs, sex, and
drugs, using them as a Band-Aids to
cover to feelings of emptiness and
worthlessness.

“The father plays an important role
when it comes to the right-of-passage
for a boy going into manhood, and the



“Growing up | think | got the kind
of discipline that most people
would call abuse, but my rather
was the kind of man who never
wasted time or energy when it
came fo disciplining his children.”

CARLOS REID

frequentness of fathers failing to do

this has to change.”

As most adult men can biologically }
contribute to the creation of a child, Mr
Reid said they must also give more of }
themselves to their kids which in }
essence is the one thing they ultimately }

need to feel complete.

Anglicans to celebrate diocesan patronal festival

ANGLICANS will gather this
Father’s Day, Sunday, June 21,
2009, at 7pm at Christ Church
Cathedral, for a Solemn Pontifical
Evensong, Sermon, Procession
and Benediction, in anticipation
of the Feast of the Nativity of St
John on June 24.

St John The Baptist is the
Patron Saint of The Anglican
Diocese of The Bahamas and the
Turks & Caicos Islands.

Reverend Laish Zane Boyd, Sr.,
Bishop of The Diocese of The
Bahamas and The Turks & Caicos
Islands will officiate and preach
the sermon for this special service.
Music will be provided by the
choir of the Parish of The Most
Holy Trinity, and Preston
Ferguson will be the organist.

“According to Holy Scripture,
St John the Baptist was the kins-

man of Jesus, and the son of the
priest Zechariah and his wife
Elizabeth. Scripture says that
John was six months older than
Jesus).

According to the tradition of the
Church, St John The Baptist, the
last of the Old Testament
prophets, was born June 24 circa
3/2 BC. He was thirty years old
when he began his mission to call
the covenant people to a baptism
(ritual purification) of repentance
in order to prepare them for the
coming of the Messiah and the
promised “new covenant.”

There will be no services in any
New Providence Anglican church-
es on Sunday evening, and all
Church organisations are request-
ed to attend the service in full uni-
form. ZNS TV 13 will record the
service for airing at a later date.

? than Happy Father's Day).
i Now, I serve notice to the religious
? leaders. This is the last year when all of
? the attention and spot light is going to
? be upon you. If you are a true father,
? you would seek to honour faithful sons
? and daughters in the ministry; rather
? than every year you're the one driving
? off in the new car or receiving the spe-
? cial offering. What about that faithful
? user, the parking lot attendant, the
? church maintenance man or the strug-
? gling family man in the ministry that
? you are well aware of? How about hon-
? oring one of them on Father's Day with
? a $10 or $20,000 gift?
? The happiness and joy of a father is
? tosee his children's children walking in
? the in-heritance he has set up for them.
? Again, with that being said we've got a
i long way to go as a nation to truly
? appreciate the concept and sayings of
? Happy Father's Day.
? reminded that with God, all things are
? possible; so to the few real Fathers out
? there, I do salute you in saying Happy
? Father's Day.

e Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen,
? Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int’

ES 0 a
CaM ATRL

UTR MCE



| SUNDAY: Worship - 9:30 am & 11 :00 am

| SERMON:
TUESDAY:

MINISTER:
Email: manse1@live.com
Phone: 322-5475
Bringing All People Closer to God
Through Worship, Ministry & Service

“Facing Your Giants ’
Bible Study 7:30 pm

At The Manse #37 Harmony Hill - Blair
Rev. John Macleod



Herein, I'm



PG 24 © Thursday, June 18, 2009 RELIGION The Tribune

“Living Right in a World Gone Wrong”

A response
to current
youth issues

ANOTHER year in the Bahamas
approaches the midway point and we
have already had 28 murders. Most of
the crime and major social problems are
attributed to youth and in particular
males. The vast majority of the murder
accused and the victims have been
young men. Increasingly our females are
following the lead of males in anti social
or self destructive behaviour. Our youth
are obviously in need of guidance and
intervention.

Youth Alive, considered one of the
premier Youth Conferences in this
region and the world is an annual con-
ference that is designed to minister to
youth, youth leaders, youth pastors and
others interested in the development
and training of young people. It address-
es the topics and issues today’s youth are
faced with and provides practical, rele-
vant answers to these challenges in a
way that young people can relate to,
stressing leadership training.

The event has attracted over 5,000
youth from the Bahamas, United States,
Canada, and Europe and is a lively,
energetic event with dynamic teaching,
music, drama and special events

This year’s event is scheduled for July
1-5 at The Diplomat Center, Carmichael
Road under the Theme: The
Assignment: “Living Right in a World
Gone Wrong,” and will include speakers
such as motivational speaker and
author and former Miss California,
Lakita Garth, Pastor Durre Thomas of
Calvary Temple, Freeport, youth pastor
Terren Dames (Bahamian) of Dallas
Texas, minister and communications
specialist DJ Roker of West Palm
Beach, Ricardo Miller of Dallas Texas a
world renowned Children and Youth
ministry specialist, Brooke Eneas, min-
ister and former Miss _ Florida
Panhandle, Myles Munroe, Dave
Burrows and Angie Burrows.

Ricardo Clark, Mr Lynxx, Christian
Massive, Mr Beeds, Naje Dun,
Landlord and a host of others, some
who are featured on the newly released
Youth Alive Soundtrack will provide
musical selections. The event begins
with a a spectacular Drama production
titled “Showtime.” Day and night ses-
sions follow Thursday and Friday with
special sessions for Youth and Youth
Leaders as well as pastors and parents.
Friday night is a huge concert and after
party. Admission is free, however spe-
cial incentives and discounts are offered
in Registration Packages ranging from
$15 - $85. Concert tickets are $10
advance and $12 at the door.




YOUTH ALIVE considered
one of the premier Youth
_ Conferences in this region
/ and the world addresses
| the topics and issues
today's youth are faced
with and provides practi-
cal, relevant answers to
these challenges in a way
that young people can
—— relate to by stressing
i © Be leadership training.

4 ! Pictured are scenes from
last year’s successful

= succes
event. -This year's event
WE is scheduled for July 1-5.



Full Text



PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R PM gets tough with nurses C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.169THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY WITH HEAVYSHOWER HIGH 88F LOW 78F The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com I N S I D E CLASSIFIEDSTRADER CLASSIFIEDSTRADER I N S I D E CARS! CARS! CARS! OBITUARIES and RELIGION INTODAY’STRIBUNE JOBSAND HELPWANTED L L O O A A D D S S O O F F n B y TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham warned public health nurses that his administration will not negotiate with persons engaged in an "illegal strike." T he nation's chief advised nurses that their stand-off could be resolved as early as Monday but only if those nurses engaged in the nearly two-week long "sickout" returned to work immediately. While stressing that he understood the nurses' frustration over t he government's decision to defer their $10 million health insurance plan, he also reminded the nurses that they fell into the category of essential services and therefore could not strike. "The government of the Bahamas, which I lead, is not prepared to do business with people who are engaged in an illegal strike, period. Any group of workers can sit down with the govern ment to discuss and seek to resolve any issues. "If you choose to do an illegal strike, don't expect the government to entertain serious discus sions with you while you remain out. I regret that the nurses feel that the government has not shown respect or regard for them because that was not our intent it is to help," said Mr Ingraham during an address in the House of Assembly last night. His statements came hours after representatives from the B ahamas Nurses Union, the Pub lic Hospital's Authority and the Ministry of Health met at the Department of Labour following a trade dispute filed by the BNU. Yesterday's meeting adjourned with no resolution, much to the chagrin of the union. Mr Ingraham said government told the union earlier in the year that the projected revenue shortfall was expected to top $200 mil lion. He said government again met with the nurses a few days before the 2009/2010 budget to alert them that their insurance plan would be deferred because of this, adding that published statements by the union head indicated that she understood the government's predicament. "Something happened subsequent to that to cause them to SEE page 12 First case of Bahamian resident with swine flu n By KARIN HERIG Tribune Staff Reporter kherig@tribunemedia.net A YOUNG adult who lives in the Bahamas has become the country’s second confirmed case of swine flu. This comes a day after Florida recorded its first A (H1N1 A nine-year-old boy who suffered from chronic asthma died on Tuesday in Mia mi-Dade county just 24 hours after he developed symptoms of the influenza virus. While the patient in the Bahamas has been quarantined at home and the Min istry of Health is monitoring all persons who came in contact with the person, author ities are advising Bahamians to continue to follow influen za preventative measures to ensure protection of individ uals, families and communi ties. Like the first confirmed case earlier this year, the infected person travelled from New York to the Bahamas. The Ministry of Health reported yesterday that the case of Influenza A (H1N1 occurred in a Bahamas resi dent who had visited New No neg otiations until ‘illegal str ik comes to an end Young adult has been quar antined CENTRAL Police Station officers toured downtown Nassau yesterday, highlighting a number of traffic violations and infractions that this division wants to bring to the public’s attention and correct. Glen Miller, officer in charge, led the police delegation and the media through Rawson Square, down Bay Street and onto George Street. Pointing out that the fixed penalty for persons parking in no-parking areas downtown carries a fee of $80, officer Jerry Philip Josey said that in some cases, where a vehicle actually obstructs the flow of traffic a fine of $100 can be issued. While unable to identify exactly how many parking spaces are available for the use of the average citizen, Mr Josey explained that these spaces would be clearly outlined with a white line and can be used for half an hour. Assistant Superintendent Leamond Deleveaux said that the Tourism Division, which houses some 39 officers, has issued more than 400 tickets every month. “Despite our best efforts people continue to break the law. But we remain vigilant and our officers are doing a terrific job,” he said. TRAFFICVIOLATIONSHIGHLIGHTED OFFICERS SEARCH a vehicle Downtown as they lead a delegation on Bay Street highlighting traffic violations. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor GOVERNMENT is planning to take a $30 million dividend from the Bahamas Telecommu nications Company (BTC privatisation, and transfer $7 million in profits from the Central Bank of the Bahamas, amid a package of measures that has pushed projected revenues for the 2009-2010 fiscal year some $151 million higher than initially projected. The plans were revealed by the International Monetary Fund (IMF recently-published Article IV consultation on the Bahamian economy, which analysed the 2009-2010 Budget’s measures. The supplementary report, with Govt to take $30m dividend from BTC amid package of projected measures SEE page nine SEE page nine n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net CHARGING that a “national mood of misery and discontent” is on the rise, opposition leader Perry Christie proposed that government must show greater commitment to preserving and creating jobs. Contributing to the debate on the 2009/2010 budget in parliament yesterday, Mr Christie said the “large numbers of unemployed Bahamians is a frightening spectre for the stability of our coun try.” Re-stating the criticisms of his fellow PLP parliamentarians throughout the recent debate, the former prime minister suggested that the budget prepared by the Government is “sobering, depressing and devoid of any offer of hope as to how Bahamians will get through these tough and intimidating times.” Touching on a variety of topics during his speech, Mr Christie repeatedly came back to the issue of how Government could and should have produced greater plans to lessen the unem ployment figures and stimulate economic activity during tough Perry Christie hits out over unemployment Perry Christie SEE page 14 n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham took the Opposition to task yesterday during his summation of the Budget debate, criticising the PLP’s constant complaint that his government“stopped, reviewed and cancelled” a number of contracts left in place by the previous admin istration. Referring to the much pub licized and bandied about IPM criticises PLP for complaints over contracts SEE page 12

PAGE 2

n By ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net DESPITE cuts in funding to many areas in this year’s budget,t he Government yesterday hit back at Opposition claims that reductions will hurt their performance, saying “almost all” of them will still receive more money than they did in the last PLP b udget. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said: “When we say we cut the budget, we mean we reducedt he increase we put on it (in 2008 a nd 2007). In almost every single head we are allocating more money for these services than (the former PLP government) did (in t heir 2006/2007 budget).” Minister of State Zhivargo Laing, giving his contribution to the 2009/2010 budget debate, saidt hat in light of this, he found it “curious” that Opposition MPs condemnd the Government for the funding reductions during hard times. C urrent estimates peg recurrent revenue for 2009/2010 to be $184.5 million 11.8 p er cent less than the 2008/2009 estimates. “(The PLP d id not take (the various ministries, departments, agencies) to a level higher than where our cuts will land them (despite gov e rning) in a time when they said that things were ‘unprecedented’, historic’, extraordinary, unpar alleled and uniquely better than t hey are now; yet these ministries and departments will suffer because of our cuts made when things have never been worse in world since the Great Depres s ion?” said Mr Laing. “How had these ministries b een able to perform so well with less money under the former government but will be unable to perform well with more money under this government?” Critical” areas which will receive more funding than they did in the last PLP budget, according to the minister of state, include: The prison department ( 10 per cent more) police force (eight per cent more force (17 per cent more ment of education (eight per cent more), ministry of education ( three per cent more), College of the Bahamas (nine per cent more), department of social services (49 per cent more public hospitals authority (10 perc ent more). Meanwhile, Mr Laing said the $12 million cut int he Ministry of Tourism’s budget this year, represents $778,630 less t han the Ministry was allocated in the former government’s 2006/2007 budget. Various Opposition members had criticised the tourism budget cut. n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE government has been attacked for its plans to adjust the National Youth Service to l essen its emphasis on the most u nruly boys in Bahamian society and involve more youngsters who c an be helped before they get into trouble. Responding to the government’s announcement, opposition leader Perry Christie claimed it is critical that the government continue to focus on unruly boys, adding that “cost should not be an issue” when it comes to this e ffort, as the programme offers them a “redemptive, second chance” experience. Mr Christie noted that having spoken previously with parents of children who graduated from the programme, “they regarded the admission of their child as the one opportunity they had to save h is life.” “Intervention into the lives of young Bahamians who are at-risk is vital to the orderly development of the Bahamas,” he said. On Monday, Minister of Youth Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister told parliament that the government intends to “relaunch” t he National Youth Programme in the Fall, moving it from North Andros to New Providence, and a location where “the greatest need exists” for its resources. He said that the government intends to use it to reach out to children before they have a chance to get into trouble, not j ust to help those who have “already become menaces to society.” Mr Bannister said that moving t he programme to New Providence will save taxpayer funds. This comes as the budgetary allocation for the programme was reduced to $345,000 this year, after it rose to $900,000 in last year’s budget, from a meagre $17,861 in 2003/2004. Mr Christie said: “Expert evalu ations of the Youth Service Programme stated in their report that the programme can be improved, but that it is working and continues to be necessary for the longterm stability and growth of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas as a nation. They certified that the programme is in fact having a p ositive, life-changing impact on its attendees. They concluded this programme demonstrates the merit to be funded long-term and u sed as a model for expanding this type of service across the nation of the Bahamas. “It is my understanding that the Youth Service Programme will be returned to New Providence. I can only hope that the government has carefully weighed the benefit of the attendees being o ut of their normal environment, together with the significant injection of funds into the local economy of North Andros against the savings effected by relocating the programme to New Providence. “These are all important strategies in the process of giving our youth at risk a redemptive opport unity for a new life for themselves and their families,” he added. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 2 0 0 9 H i l t o n H o s p i t a l i t y I n c .Travel should take you placesForreservationscal l:322-3301 Fathers Dayis June 21st D AD Eats F ree!For parties of 8 adults or more one father eats ee.Call for group pricing.Tr eat your Dad to a delicious meal at Porto“ no Restaurant where you can choose om a scrumptious buet “t for a king.Restaurant hours: 12:00 noon to 3:00 pmStay the weekend!Three fathers will have an opportunity to win one of three great prizes:Weekend stay for two in a newly renovated room inclusive of full buet breakfastTwo month membership to the Hilton Fitness Centre$200 food and beverage credit for the new Bullion Bar (opening late summer 2009Ask about our special weekend Bahamian Resident Rates! THE police are still investigating the fire that took the life of an elderly man over the weekend, Supt Jeffery Dele veaux told The Tribune yes terday. After losing her husb and and her home in the tragic fire on Saturday, Emer ald Cooper, 72, said that she is sustained by her faith. “I am right here in the Lord’s hands,” said Mrs Cooper, who saved the lives of her three grand children by rescuing them from the blaze. I lost my husband and my home, but not my Saviour. “God don't put more on you than you can bear,” she said. Mrs Cooper is now living with her daughter in Elizabeth Estates. The funeral service for her husband, Leon Cooper will be held on Saturday, June 27, at St Matthews Church at 2pm. REPORTSFROMTHEHOUSE Government under fire for plans to adjust National Youth Service Police continue fatal fir e pr obe PM rejects Opposition attack on cuts in budget funding Zhivargo Laing

PAGE 3

Bannister condemned for linking PLP with Nazi pr opaganda techniques C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 3 Christie: no effort made to justify container port move n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net L EADER of the opposition Perry Christie admonished government for its handling of the almost two-week long "sick-out" by public health nurses. Speaking in the House of A ssembly during his contribution to the 2009/2010 budget debate, Mr Christie said he was astounded that the government and Health Minister Dr Hubert Min-n is allowed so much time to pass before sitting down to negotiate an end to the nurses' stand-off. "I am very surprised at the way in which the industrial action by the nurses has been handled by the government. It is astounding that the minister of health and the minister of labour have allowed so much time to pass w ithout addressing the outstanding issues directly with the nurses u nion. "And even if it is a government d ecision not to speak with the nurses, I would have expected the m inister of health with his pers onal and professional connection to persuade his colleagues to allow him to sit and solve thep roblems," Mr Christie told parliament, adding that this lack of action by government was irresponsible. Y esterday, representatives f rom the Bahamas Nurses Union, the Public Hospitals Authority, t he Ministry of Health and the Department of Labour were locked in a meeting for hours int he hope of bringing an end to the 10-day nurses sick-out that isc rippling the country's health-care system. Director of Labour Harcourt B rown said the meeting was adjourned to Monday – although union officials say they want tom eet as early as Friday – with no resolution, adding that governm ent representatives were mulling over proposals put forth by the union. Injunction O n Wednesday, nurses called i n sick for a ninth day in protest of government's decision to defer their promised $10 million health i nsurance plan due to the current economic crisis – in spite of a court ordered injunction that they r eturn to work. It is unclear if the sick-out continued yesterday, but The Tribune understands that while some nurs e s returned to work, those with valid doctor's sick notes remained at home. M r Christie, a former minister o f health, stressed that despite any disappointment felt over then urses' actions, it is government's r esponsibility to intervene and bring order to national issues. Mr Christie suggested that if the PLP's National Health Insurance plan had been implemented,t he issue could have been avoided. He also suggested that gov-e rnment provide some level of coverage for public nurses until t hey are able to institute the full health insurance plan. "This is an issue that will not go away for the simple reason that some people who have no insur-a nce will die if affected by certain illnesses because of not beinga ble to afford the cost of care. There is nothing more stark and r eal than the inequalities in health care that all of us are part of m aintaining in our country. "Cabinet ministers have full insurance coverage; members of parliament have the same and the nurses were promised their own h ealth insurance. This is a tough challenge for nurses and for thec ountry,” he said. N O EFFORT has been made by the government or the developers to provide justification for the decision to have the Container Portm oved from Bay Street to Arawak Cay instead of the southwest of New Providence as the PLP intended, former Prime Minister PerryC hristie said during his cont ribution to the budget debate yesterday. “We continue to regard t he decision as a bad one. “It is inconsistent with all o f the specialised advice that we have received. “It is obvious to me that t he minister (Earl Deveaux and his colleagues have arrived at a formula which isp leasing to a group who have decided regardless of the e nvironmental implica-t ions, the aesthetics o f the operation, the nui-s ance of it, that A rawak Cay is where t hey want the facility and that is w here it will go,” he said. Mr Christie chastised E nvironment Minister Earl Deveaux, who he claimed v entured to suggest that the “PLP government influenced the environmental consul-t ants in their selection of the site for the southwest port.” “That is absolutely untrue. The selection was that of the consultants, with participa-t ion from persons who were a part of the private sector group,” Mr Christie said. “What surprises me about the minister’s view is that heh as access to a major body of environmental assessments which provide the details behind the consultants’ recommendation.” Significant Mr Deveaux last week told parliamentarians that the proposed southwest port hads ignificant public sector participation that is rarely acknowledged. The Environment Minister said the move to the southwest was a governmentdirected initiative which depended on government to make it function the ownership, the structure and the operations. Responding, Mr Christie said yesterday, “I am, frankly, very disturbed by the minister’s expressed view. “Again, he is dead wrong. He is trying too hard to justify a bad decision to locate the port at Arawak Cay. “A decision that serves only special interests.” “We were committed as a government to inducing the owners of the port facilitieson Bay Street to close their facilities and move to a new port. “It could only happen if they were going to be lead participants,” the PLP leader said. He said his government had established a genuine public/private sector partnership. “We intended for Bahami ans to be the lead shareholders. “All my government was asking was for an allotmentof shares to offer the Bahamian public,” Mr Christie said. “As far as the offer from a private company to develop the Arawak Cay site, I am also aware that private companies were interested in developing or participating in the southwest port.” n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net O PPOSITION leader Perry Christie yesterday condemned Youth, Sports and Culture MinisterD esmond Bannister for what he called an “unacceptable and unaccountably vicious attack” in which i t was claimed that the PLP is using Nazi propa ganda techniques. Addressing the House of Assembly yesterday morning, the former prime minister said: “As we have heard in this debate, there is still the necessity t o speak truth to power. It is therefore a sad duty for me to refer to the statement by the Member for C armichael (Desmond BannisterHe himself to connect the PLP with the vile, repugnant and abhorrent policies of Adolf Hitler. “Whatever his intentions, Carmichael stands con demned for such an unacceptable and unaccountably v icious attack,” Mr Christie said as he made his contribution to the 2009/2010 budget debate. Hitler Speaking in parliament on Monday, Mr Bannister had said that the repetition of the phrase “stop, review and cancel” by the Opposition amounted to the PLP intentionally or otherwise using pro paganda techniques outlined by Nazi leader Adolf Hitler in his book “Mein Kampf.” “Members opposite have developed the refrain ‘stop, review and cancel’ almost to a science and I want members oppos ite to know that when ever they utter that phrase they are following the political theory of one of history’s most v icious tyrants, (whose big lie theory is well k nown,” he said. Mr Bannister sug g ested that the PLP is repeatedly using the phrase in the hope that, as Hitler suggested, “people will believe a big lie sooner than a little one and if you repeat it frequently enough people will sooner or later believe it.” These kind of political attacks are unwarranted and disgraceful,” said Mr Christie yesterday, as he a lso congratulated his party’s MPs for their “sterling contributions” to the budget debate. Opposition members have suggested for sometime, and reiterated throughout the 2009/2010 bud get debate, that by reviewing, delaying and in some cases cancelling certain contracts signed under the former PLP administration, the FNM caused eco nomic growth to slow down and made matters worse for the country when the global financial crisis struck fully in 2008. In its assessment of the country last year, the international credit rating agency Standard and Poor said the move took the “growth momentum” out of the economy a statement which the Opposition said validated their view. REPORTSFROMTHEHOUSE You’ve mishandled nurses ‘sick-out’, Christie tells govt T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f PLP LEADER Perry Christie in the House yesterday. D ESMOND BANNISTER E ARL DEVEAUX I am very surprised at the way in which the industrial action has been handled

PAGE 4

E DITOR, The Tribune. THE May 11, 1996 crash of a ValuJet DC-9 amid thick sawgrass, crocodiles and snakes in the Florida Everglades that claimed the lives of Maxwell and Lucille Newbold and over 100 other people, is listed on a Federal Aviation Administration website as one of major airplane accidents that made an impact on the way the aviation industry and the FAA conduct business today.” The listing is part of an FAA online safety library of “insti tutional knowledge” compiled from accident investigations to identify probable accident causes and potentially, prevent any similar occurrences. It is now generally agreed that such investigations have, over the past twenty years, helped commercial airlines to achieve such an extraordinary safety record that an air disaster is now considered a statistical anomaly. According to their website, the FAA plans “to stock the library with 40 more historical ly significant accidents by the end of 2009,” with the recent crash of AF 447 certain to be included. The speculated mid-air breakup of Air France Flight 447 for whatever reason and the presumed loss of all 228 on board has presented avia t ion safety professionals with a challenging task. With recovery of the aircraft’s tell-tale black box and cockpit voice recorder (CVR experts are analysing the “flyby-wire” aircraft’s automatically generated maintenance alerts indicating that a string of mal functions resulted in an eventual loss of cabin pressure and complete electrical failure. In a fly-by-wire system, electronic impulses are sent to air craft controls instead of direct mechanical connections. The effect of widely dispersed thunderstorms towering up to 50,000 feet and producing updrafts of up to 100 miles per hour “that would have really rocked that plane when it hit it,” has not been completely ruled out, in addition to human error, flawed assumptions, preexisting failures, unintended consequences of design choic es, terrorism and possible organisational lapses. With regard to the Air Traffic Control system, with a Future Air Navigation System (FANS using satellite technology still some years away, the question persists as to, “Why are we foll owing airplanes across the ocean with World War II radio technology? We’re still using ground-based radar for the ATC airspace system instead of the GPS that can tell me how to get to my driveway.” An organisational lapse was claimed to be behind the deci sion in 2000 to purchase a $3 million radar to replace the one installed at the then-Nassau International Airport in 1986, but which, to date, remains “mothballed” due to lack of necessary software and upgrading. On the ill-fated Air France flight, the passenger complement was an airborne ‘Tower of Babel’, with “the democratisation of air travel” reflected in the mix of nationalities onboard: 61 French citizens; 58 Brazilians; nine Chinese; nine Italians; six Swiss; five British; five Lebanese; four Hungari ans; two Americans and others from a total of 32 countries, from Estonia to Gambia to Morocco to the Philippines. SIMON ARTZI Nassau, June, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. Many of us who served in the Public Service had the option of joining one or more group medical plans offered by local insurance companies. However, many of us alsojoined the Bahamas Public Services Union Medplan and remained with the BPSU even after retirement. It is believed that this same option was available to public servants in the Health Ministry as well as other Ministries and Departments. Why did not Health Ministry employees take advantage of this option for themselves and their families? Also,are therestill national insurance benefits payable to workers? With the deep recession now being experienced world wide, it is difficult to justify any additional expenditure because revenues have been decreasing in our main industries of tourism and financial services, while there are current operational overhead paymentswhich have to be met. The traditional ways of attacking this dilemma are either to cut expenditure or raise new taxes. As one can readily appreciate, many businesses here in The Bahamas and world wide have had to close and employees discharged when expenditure exceedsincome, and customers are not buying their product. This can be seen in the automobile industry in the States. Similarly, touristsfrom our main markets are nottravelling as they used to. Hence our industry hassuffered a down-turn. More taxes are not the answereither due to the job losses and increases inpublic spending for social services in respect of thosewho have lost jobs. Excessive borrowing is not a prudent way out because the loans have to be repaid with interest by ourselves and possibly future generations. Further,there are international o rganisations who closely monitorsuch activities by developing countries. So one wonders in amazement why there are people whoa re so unreasonable in these difficult times asto raise the topic of more money for themselves from the public purse. Private sector businesses cannot continue to operate when their overheadsreach a certain limit and neither can any government make “blood out ofs tone” and spend money which they do not have. Why is this so difficult for some Bahamians to understand? CONCERNED BAHAMIAN Nassau, June, 2009. (It’s because they don’t want to understand, and if our readers would examine more closel y what is happening they will see politics stirring the pot of controversy. The unsophisticated worker is always a useful ingredient. Ed) C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm I N DECEMBER 2001 The Tribune did an expos on how employees, aided and abetted by u nscrupulous doctors, were abusing “sick leave” benefits. Employers complained that the abuse was costing them thousands of dollars each year. One retail outlet with a staff of about 250 B ahamians said that in the month of January that year it had lost a total of 1,672 hours or 209w orking days by staff being out “sick.” The sick benefits “for the month of January were over $ 10,000,” The Tribune was told. We took the name of the doctors in question a nd sent a robustly healthy looking reporter to get a sick note. The first doctor sent a nurse out to the waiting room to get the details from our “patient.” Back she came, not with an invitation to see t he doctor, but with a sick note for the time our reporter had requested. T he same reporter then went to a second doctor, only this time he decided to tell the d octor that he needed a sick note because he wanted to spend some time in Miami at a social function and the note was the only way that he could get off work. The doctor was most obliging, asked him how m any days he thought he’d need, and wrote up the required note no examination. Each doct or in a matter of minutes had made about $68 by being an accomplice in dishonesty. O ver a week ago more than 50 per cent of this country’s hospital nursing staff staged a “sick-out” both in Nassau and Freeport. They were protesting the fact that their group health insurance plan, promised for this year, had to be postponed until next year because of insufficient funds. T here was a possibility that they could receive the insurance sooner if the economic climatei mproved. The nurses were having none of it, and so t hey walked out. It was soon obvious that, although they were calling their little interlude a “sick-out”, from their public statements it was obvious that it was a strike. In the end the Prime Minister got a Supreme Court injunction ordering them back to work, failing which they would be in contempt of court. When Sir Burton Hall’s order was read to more than 200 nurses called to a meeting Monday night by the Bahamas Nurses Union (BNU for that purpose, many insisted that they were still sick. M any also made it clear that they intended to take all of their sick days, defy the court order, r isk being held in contempt and ordered to jail. By the remarks of some of them it seemed that they had doctors who would readily give them the needed sick note. Apparently, in some of these civil service c ontracts, a specified number of “sick” days is written into the contract as a part of the employ-e e’s entitlement sick or not sick, they are extra days off. This, of course, is all wrong. If t hey can take off without being sick, then the “rest days” should be called just that, because s ickness it is not. However, it appears that to justify this, they have to have a doctor’s sick slip. This article is being written for those doctors who might become a party to their little enter p rise those nurses, that is, who are not sick. This in no way refers to nurses who might have a genuine illness. In his sworn affidavit for the Supreme Court, M r Herbert Brown, managing director of the Public Hospitals Authority, said he knew of “no outbreak of any epidemic or other contagious illness at any of the public hospital facili ties that would explain the widespread illnessa mong the nurses employed at the various facilities” that would account for the 303 who called i n sick on June 8, and daily after that in varying numbers. W e are writing this as a red flag of warning to doctors who might have sympathy for nurses who want “sick” notes, not because they are sick in the ordinary sense of the word, but because they are angry with their employer and want to push an issue. On June 15 the Supreme Court ordered the n urses to return to work immediately or face contempt charges that could mean jail and thes eizing of union funds. But this is a warning to others especially t he doctors who might get caught up through sympathy in this dispute. The court has warned that anyone who does anything to help the nurses break the terms of the court order, may also he held in contempt of court and may be committed to prison or fined or “have his assets seized.” So we suggest to doctors that their sick slips should go to genuinely sick patients, especially in view of the testimony of the head of the hospital authority that he doesn’t know of any epidemic that would take down so many healthy nurses at the same time. Difficult to justify extra spending in these tough times LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Dishonesty not a good policy 7 SHQIURPXHVGD\WRDWXUGD\ /267 5(:$5'))(5('0U-RKQUHFR Lessons emerging from Air France disaster

PAGE 5

n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net A CRIME scene investigator testified in the Supreme Court yesterday that murder accused Shimeakima Pratt claimed to have stabbed Defence Force officer Gary Carey with a rat tail comb last August. The trial into Carey’s death opened before Senior Supreme Court Justice Anita Allen yesterday. Pratt, 31, who is represented by attorney Romona Farquharson, is accused of causing the death of Petty Officer Carey, 54, on Sunday, August 17, 2008. The victim was found dead in her Minnis Subdivision apartment. Detective Constable Napoleon Sands, a crime scene technician a ttached to the Carmichael Road Division, told the court that when he arrived at Pratt’s apartment on August 17, he saw Carey laying face up in a pool of blood in the front room. Shirtless He told the court that Carey was shirtless and was only wearing black sweat pants. DC Sands said the victim appeared to have been foaming at the mouth and nose and had puncture wounds in his chest. He said h e also saw that Carey’s right eye had been injured. T he officer said that upon entering the western bedroom, he o bserved what appeared to be droplets of blood on the floor and condom packets near the bed. He told the court that he also discovered a mop in the bathroom soaked with what appeared to be blood, and that he collected swabs of blood from the deceased and a brown pill from the dining room table. DC Sands said that Pratt had told him that Carey was known to take a male enhancement pill. Sands testified that he took photographs of the scene and took the mop, brown pill, swabs, and two towels with suspected blood on them to the police forensic lab for testing on September 3. He testified that he, several officers and the accused returned to the apartment on August 22, and that the accused took them to the western bedroom and showed them a rat tail comb with which she claimed she had stabbed Carey. The officer told the court that Pratt appeared calm and collected at the time. During cross-examination by Ms Farquharson, DC Sands admitted that Pratt had co-operated fully with police in their investiga tion and that no blood had been pouring from the puncture wounds in Carey’s chest. The officer also admitted that he did not take a picture of the brown pill on the dining room table. The trial continues at 10am today. Deputy director of public prosecutions Cheryl Grant-Bethel, Stephanie Pintard and Terry Archer are prosecuting the case. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 5 RATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, F LIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS PHONE: 327-6464W E SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!STRUCKUM( DF55) GUYANA president Bharrat Jagdeo, incoming chairman of CARICOM,s aid regional integration remains on course and called on member states to support the movement. S peaking at a media briefing ahead of the 13th meeting of the Conference ofH eads of Government of CARICOM, scheduled for J uly 2-4, he said that in light of the fragility of the global climate, it was critical toa ffirm that “the integration movement is as strong as e ver before.” President Jagdeo, who is also the lead head of govern-m ent with responsibility for agriculture in CARICOM’s quasi cabinet, acknowledgedt hat the community is grap pling with “unprecedented c hallenges” – many of which have been induced by the international economic cri-s is, but said institutional mechanisms set up to guide C ARICOM through this period must be allowed to work. He emphasised thatC ARICOM leaders have a “deep desire” to work t ogether, and that differ ences of opinions are inevitable in the face ofd iversity, but do not indicate disunity. Regional integration movement ‘stronger than ever’ In brief Murder accused claimed to have stabbed Defence Force officer with rat tail comb, court hears SUPREMECOURTTRIAL: SHIMEAKIMA PRATT Tim Clarke /Tribune staff ACCUSED: Shimeakima Pratt, 31, leaving court yesterday.

PAGE 6

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE BTC has yet to repair phone lines mistakenly cut by workers in the East Bay Street area three weeks ago, it was claimed yesterday. Angry business owners, who say the situation is impacting their livelihood, condemned the telecommunications provider for failing to rectify the situation despite promising to do so. They also claimed that at f irst, BTC officials pretended t he rain was to blame for the l ines being down, only admitt ing that a cable had been mist akenly cut during a trenching exercise after almost a week o f the phones being out of serv ice. A t that point, BTC workers finally showed up to look intot he matter, but in the end only p ut in an inefficient “temporary line” which is subject to frequent disconnections, The Tribune was told. Meanwhile, the severed main line can still be seen bundled up at the side o f the street. O ne businessman said: “This i s incredibly disruptive to our b usiness and we know BTC w ill not compensate us for all t he cell phone calls and drives w e have had to make to send a nd receive faxes.” BTC ‘yet to repair cut phone lines’ B AHAMIANS are fed up with hollow speech es about crime and want action from the government, a local anti-crime group said. B ahamas Against Crime (BAC m ent to this effect yesterday in response to speech by Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest last week, in which he said that the Bahamas m ust abandon “narrow approaches” to policing. “While he did not explain what ‘narrow approaches’ meant, the question that begs ana nswer from the minister and the government is whether they are now ready and willing to involve other stakeholders in addressing crime, the n umber one problem plaguing the nation,” BAC said. Rev CB Moss, executive director of the group, said: “Crime in the Bahamas is increasing daily, w hich was confirmed by the to-date crime fig ures presented in the House of Assembly last Monday night by Minister Turnquest. And these f igures do not include unreported crimes which by some estimates could be as much as the reported crimes in some categories. Much precious time was wasted by the a ppointment of the National Crime Commission nearly two years ago, which is proving to be almost useless. While the landscape of the Bahamas is being increasingly stained by the blood of our people, and many victims of crime and their families aree xperiencing much pain, nice speeches are being made in parliament often designed to deflect the serious concerns of the people.” T he statement ended by stating that the time has come to “take off the gloves” and seriously address the crime crisis, as well as confront those who are failing to do their job in the fight against c rime. “The well-being of our children and future generations is at stake,” the statement said. Bahamians ‘want action from government on crime’ WORK TAKING PLACE on East Bay Street (above mistakenly cut.

PAGE 7

n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net A WIDOW paid a $400 court fine for not having car insurance although she had a Road Act policy at the time. H ousekeeper Annette Butler, 55, has spoken out to alert other motorists covered under the Road Act policy to be on their guard. M rs Butler crashed into another car on April, 1 ulti m ately causing a three-car collision in the eastern area of New P rovidence. T he Road Act coverage she had in place at the time did not c over the damage to the vehicles involved in the wreck which cost her around $5,000 of personal savings to repair but M rs Butler was shocked when weeks later she was served with a summons to appear in court for not having her car insured. Damage R oad Act insurance protects a policy holder from liability for the death or bodily injury of another person involved in a car accident, but not for damage to p roperty belonging to a third party. S he said her husband, who died four years ago, always hand led the insurance payments. While on his deathbed, he i nstructed his wife to collect insurance papers and to contin-u e paying for the same policy. "Before he passed he said to take the envelope that he always keep in the car (to the insur ance company), give it to them a nd they would take the old one and give me a new one," said M rs Butler. "And that's what I've been doing for the past t hree years." The summons said Mrs Butler drove while not covered "against third party risk insur ance contrary to section 8 (1 and (3 Chapter 220." It ordered her to appear in Court on May, 29 to answer tot he complaint. S he said she took the summons to her insurance company for an explanation. She said they were dumbfounded as Road Act is still considered a legal option for motorists. Fearing a stiff penalty, Mrs Butler paid a fine of $600 $ 400 for not having her car i nsured and $200 for not exerc ising due care and attention while behind the wheel the day before she was due toa ppear in court. T he Tribune w as also given a copy of Mrs Butler's payment receipt and her Road Act poli-c y, which expired a few weeks a fter the accident. An insurance insider told The Tribune she had not heard of a s imilar case and believes Mrs Butler was fined because of a misunderstanding of the law. "The Act that (the summons i s quoting is talking about third party risk but they're thinking that means third party insurance. But third party risk meansy ou must be covered against any bodily injury against themselveso r anyone else," said the insider. "He probably charged her with it and she paid it not realising, so that means she satisfied thej udgment but it really is a ficti tious fine. That's like you saying you charged with murder and the person never existed." C omptroller of Road Traffic Philip Turner told The Tribune the relevant section of the Act is u p for interpretation. A ttempts to reach officials at the Department of Prosecutions or Court 6 proved fruitless. Two weeks after the accident, when her policy expired, Mrs Butler said she switched her coverage over to Third Party Insurance. T HE Bahamas’ overseas o ffices are being set up to process applications for electronic passports for Bahamians living abroad, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of For-e ign Affairs Brent Symonette confirmed. S peaking in the House of Assembly during debate on the $1.7 billion national budget, he revealed that his ministry has been given a budget of$ 21,889,462 for fiscal year beginning July 1. This represents a decrease of $1,883,478 compared to the current budget “and is symptomatic of the hard economic times which we are presentlye xperiencing,” Mr Symonette said. The Passport Office is one of the “critical areas” of the revenue-generating arm of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, he said. D uring the past 10 months, the Passport Office issued 1 9,072 e-passports, which generated $928,010, Mr Symonette r eported. A nd, the ministry’s combined c onsular offices overseas p rocessed 1,235 e-passports, which brought in $31,572. We expect to see a substan tial increase in these figures during the next fiscal periodd ue to improvements to the P assport Office, and our overseas consular offices coming online,” he said. T he e-passport system was o fficially introduced i n December 2007. The government signed a contract with Indusa Global,a Greenville, South C arolina-based information tech-n ology development and consulting firm, for an estimated $12.7 million to provide four sys-t ems to initiate the project. The International Civil Aviation Organisation, of which the Bahamas is a member, has mandated that by 2010, all countries must be issu-i ng machine readable or e-passports. T o correct many o f the difficulties created by the attempt to fulfil this mandate, the Passport Office haso ccupied the second floor of the BasdenB uilding on Thompson Boulevard. Additional staff was also hired, Mr Symonette said. H e added that the ministry is relocating the section dealing with the issuance of certificates of identity to the former Ministry of Foreign Affairs, East Hill Street, in ane ffort to reduce the number of persons waiting for service. Overseas offices to process e-passports Widow with Road Act policy fined $400 for no insurance C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 7 242.422.4677ken@erabahamas.comwww.erabahamas.comDupuch Real Estate when no one else can help you sell your home 284 Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas (242 Marina Village * Crystal Court at Atlantis, Paradise Island Marsh Harbour, Abaco * Harbour Island * Our Lucaya, Freeport , Grand Bahama * Bimini Bay, Bimini THIS FATHERSDAY GIVEHIMA Luke&LauraCo DowdeswellStreet 322-1103 15%OFFSALE STOREWIDE S a l e E n d s 6 / 2 0 / 0 9 A MAGISTRATE has sentenced a man to two and a half years in prison on cocaine and weapons charges. Donovan Kelvin Garvey, 38, of Grand Bahama, pleaded guilty to charges of cocaine and weapons possession before Magistrate Carolita Bethel who sentenced him on Monday. Garvey had been charged in 2005. Court dockets stated that while at Freeport on Friday, May 20, 2005, Garvey was found in possession of an unlicensed firearm, 19 rounds of .35 ammunition, and 24.2 pounds of cocaine. Police said that the drugs and weapons were found at his Freeport home. Man sentenced for drug and weapons charges B rent Symonette

PAGE 8

n By ALESHA HART S ilence is our enemy. And in s ilence an entire nation shows f undamental flaws. I F THE modern Bahamas is one where society refuses to stand against crime I denounce my citizenship today. For two minutes that seemed like an eternity I held my breath at the absence of a nation at the Bahamas Against Crime candlelight vigil. Our country’s inability to s how up against crime said m ore to me than it could ever imagine. Lessons were taught. Thank you Bahamas. Thank you. Now when your grandmother is raped we must all carry on with our regular day a s if nothing happened. When y our son of 14 is shot by a s tray bullet we should not be enraged. Let’s carry on. When your husband is robbed and killed execution style because h e owns a business and someo ne thinks his life is too easy w e should carry on as if another day has happened in par-a dise. Or, when your daughter i s beaten we should not look at her blackened eyes. Just stare at something else if she crosses our path. Yes, let us all be content. I was not interested in who organised the Bahamas A gainst Crime candlelight vigi l. Or that I got the news a bit l ate. I t called on Bahamians to s tand against something and I wanted to represent my family because we stand together against crime. And this morning I am more convinced that no statement is too small. And as I lit the little white candle for an u nnamed, I made my titanic statement along with approximately 150 others. P erhaps we were mistaken (those 150 who stood against crime), and the criminal resides in each of you and you cannot stand because you are the criminal. The deafening silence of this nation is haunting. Crime elicited nary a public peep from the Bahamian people. Whatever they felt, Bahamia ns largely kept it to thems elves on Monday, June 15, 2 009. The nation’s deafening silence trampled our touted values and marked the saddest outcome of this time. As Bahamian media should tell its captive audience wea re in disbelief at the submissive national mood. O n that day the people did n ot take to the streets. In silence we have spoken. “We will not forget” captured the emotions of all who attended. We understood that this generation of Bahamians did not meet its duty. W e learned that this genera tion was tired, we understood t hat this generation faltered, a nd we disrespected the memory of innocent fallen victims a nd tomorrow’s victims as well. I ndifference to both crime and politics may be responsible, plus the onslaught of selfi shness spewed out by a people unable and unwilling to f ight for anything. Is this the story behind our violent narratives? Is this the reason thatw ithin seconds of an apparent retraction and the “I will sue y ou” hymnal accompanied by the rhythmic “my family was insulted”news stories and t alk shows were hectoring p eople to accept an outcome, however abhorrenta shocki ngly inappropriate, polarised a nd unsolicited piece of a dvice. Fact is, we should not accept anything. We should question everything. Wes hould be outraged in the face of violence in any form. We must. However, the partisan media and legal brainwashing would not have worked if it had not found a fertile ground i n the nation’s admirable r espect for silence. T he nation’s silent composure is based on the belief thatt here will always be another d ay, another injustice, another court ruling, another decision. That there will always be another opportunity to rightt he wrongs of today. Bahami ans know their democracy has so far balanced its deep con servatism with a flexible, lim ber yet sluggish indifferent streak. The losers of today accept defeat because theyk now they can be the winners of tomorrow. Nothing is ever completely lost in Bahamian politics of survival. You probably believe that injustice will be rectified later. But is it? And will it? I’m not so sure. But the absence of your presence is a far more dangerous blow to the very democratic institut ions the nation is being called o n to protect with obedient s ilence. Silence is consent. And by consenting to crime, Bahamians bent on keeping face today at any cost may be sending instead a message ofi mpunity to an increasingly lawless class. In other words,t hey can do as they please. I suspect that history will not be kind to us. We have been the perpetrators of criminal usurpation. We have been the enablers. The damage is done. No amount of September demons trations, let alone October p olitical strife, will undo it. S oon it will be in poor taste t o raise the silence issue. Pragmatism will prevail: The Christ ian Council will be blasted as uncaring, Bahamas Against C rime will be bullied for poor publicity, the government will be charged with responsibility f or crime and individuals will bear no personal accountabili ty. With a weakened Opposition to keep the issue of anticrime alive, the nation will for-g et and the criminal can legitimise himself just by virtue of l iving in the Bahamas, as we are a silent nation. The process has already begun. I used to sleep soundly every night knowing that the f amously resilient Bahamian society and social systemw ould be there next morning w hen I woke up. Not any more. How could I when we are t he sons and daughters of silence? A silence that ensures rape, incest, murder and theft, to name four, continues. NowI wonder who will speak clearl y if something happens to me. C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE NOTICE The Bahamas Cancer Centre at Centreville Medical Pavilion will be hosting individual cancer clinics with two of the world's most renowned specialists on Monday, June 22nd. The clinics are open to the public. The Hon. Prof. Dr. Arthur PorterPC, MD, MBA, FACR, FACRO, FAAMA Dr. Porter serves as Managing Director of The Cancer Centre and Director of Radiation Oncology. He is also the current Director General and CEO of McGill University Health Centre and author of more than 300 articles on cancer research.Dr. Karol SikoraMA, MBBCh, PhD, FRCR, FRCP, FFPM Dr. Sikora is the Director of Medical Oncology at The Cancer Centre. He also serves as the Dean of Britain's first independent Medical School at the University of Buckingham and is the author of the most widely-used cancer textbook in graduate medical school in the United Kingdom. The Bahamas Cancer Centre is one of only two medical facilities outside the U.S. certified by the American College of Radiation Oncology (ACRO and the only non-U.S. facility in the Western Hemisphere to qualify for ACRO certification. For more information, please contact: 502-9610. Centreville Medical Pavilion y y 72 Collins Avenue The deafening silence of a nation Y OUR S AY S S i i l l e e n n c c e e i i s s c c o o n n s s e e n n t t . . A A n n d d b b y y c c o o n n s s e e n n t t i i n n g g t t o o c c r r i i m m e e , , B B a a h h a a m m i i a a n n s s b b e e n n t t o o n n k k e e e e p p i i n n g g f f a a c c e e t t o o d d a a y y a a t t a a n n y y c c o o s s t t m m a a y y b b e e s s e e n n d d i i n n g g i i n n s s t t e e a a d d a a m m e e s s s s a a g g e e o o f f i i m m p p u u n n i i t t y y t t o o a a n n i i n n c c r r e e a a s s i i n n g g l l y y l l a a w w l l e e s s s s c c l l a a s s s s . . I I n n o o t t h h e e r r w w o o r r d d s s , , t t h h e e y y c c a a n n d d o o a a s s t t h h e e y y p p l l e e a a s s e e . . Share your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your story.

PAGE 9

its details on the planned BTC dividend and Central Bank profit transfer, clearly shows the Government is desperate to get its hands on any revenues it can in a bid to fill the $374 million total fiscal deficit, keep the national debt under control and dampen the looming public finances crisis. The IMF said Government’s projected revenues of $1.411 billion for 2009-2010 were some $151 million higher than anticipated. Apart from the $37 million revenue gain detailed here, the higher forecasts were said to be based on legal and administrative improvements to Customs administration and $114 million in extra real property taxes and business licence fee. If the Government’s projec tions came true, the IMF agreed with its Budgetary projections that the GFS fiscal deficit which strips out $88 million in debt principal redemption would come in at $286 million or 3.9 per cent of gross domestic product (GDP Yet the Fund warned: “The yield from planned revenue measures appears uncertain, given the reliance on improvements in tax administration. If revenues/privatisation receipts are lower than planned or take longer to materialise, additional expenditure adjustment may be required in order to contain the deficit at 5.8 per cent of GDP or below.” The IMF then reiterated that “structural revenue measures are needed to buttress medium-term debt sustainability,” which is code speak for: “New or increased taxes.” While the Budget projections placed the Government on a c ourse to reduce the overall fiscal deficit by 1.5 per cent of GDP by the 2011-2012 fiscal year, largely through reduced public spending, it would not be enough to get the Bahamas back on track to reduce its debt-to-GDP ratio to 30-35 per cent in the medium term. Highlighting inflexibilities and rigidities in civil servant and public sector wages, and the Bahamas’ social security and infrastructure needs, the IMF warned: “While this level of expenditure containment would flatten the increase of the debt trajectory, it would not change medium-term debt dynamics. “Given the need to protect priority social and infrastructure spending, and rigidities in the public sector wage bill, a structural change on the revenue side w ould likely still be needed to achieve the authorities’ mediumterm objective of reducing debt back to 30 per cent of GDP.” “Heavy risks on the down side” still faced the Bahamian economy, with the IMF adding that its forecast of a 9.2 per cent drop in tourism earnings for 2009 was in line with the January-April drop in tourist arrivals. “Sea arrivals were up by 5.5 per cent over the same period last year, partly reflecting increased demand for shorter and cheaper cruise trips. However, tourists arriving by air who spend three times as much daily as cruise tourists and stay six times longer dropped by 15.5 per cent,” the IMF said. “The number of commercial property acquisitions by nonBahamians dropped 36 per cent compared to the first quarter of 2008, with the total value ($70 million cent. “Similarly, the number of residential property purchases by non-Bahamians dropped by 19 per cent, with a decline in total value of 25 per cent.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 9 The Mercedes M-Class. Beauty, brains and brawn. TYREFLEX STAR MOTORSCall us today for your new Mercedes-Benz M-Class at 325.4961Wulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas Fax: 323.4667When you think of the average SUV on the road today, you think of roadhogging, air-polluting gas guzzlers that wouldnt know the meaning of high precision and fuel efficiency if it were emblazoned on their windshields. But there is an alternative. The refined M-Class from Mercedes-Benz. Withits superior German styling utilising only high-grade materials, its robust engine power delivering exemplary turn-on-a-dime performance whilst still being frugal on fuel and its handling of pot-holed roads and 1.5 ft. flooded streets, the Mercedes-Benz M-Class is clearly the best choice in SUVs. York from May 29 to June 3. “The patient experienced symptoms upon returningtothe Bahamasand immediately s ought medical attention,” the Ministry said. The patient has undergone tests for possible influenza and is voluntarily self-quarantined at home. A specimen was sent to an e xternal laboratory and results confirming the presence of the virus were received by the Ministry of Health on Monday evening. The first confirmed case of the Influenza A (H1N1 Bahamas occurred in a young American tourist who arrived in t he Bahamas on a flight from New York on May 25. At that time, staff at the Lynden Pindling International Airport, Immigration and Customs officials and hotel personnel were among a group of less than 20 people who were tested for the influenza virus. It was determined shortly a fterwards that the tourist had not infected anyone in the Bahamas. In this second confirmed case, the Surveillance Unit of the Department of Public Health is also involved with the tracinga nd monitoring of all people who have been in close contact w ith the patient. Health Minister Dr Hubert Minnis could not release any further information regarding the identity of the patient yesterday. Also yesterday, the Florida Keys also confirmed its first caseo f swine flu. The Monroe County Health D epartment reported that a young girl was treated for the virus last week. The Ministry of Health reiterated that precautionary measures against contracting the virus include covering your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, disposing of the tissue in the trash afteruse, along with frequent hand washing with soap and water. “Additionally, if you are expe riencing flu like symptoms, to decrease the potential spread, avoid contact with others, and stay away from group settings,” the ministry said. THE Cabinet Office has announced that an official funeral for Milo Boughton Butler Jr, former Speaker of the House of Assembly and parliamentarian, will be held on Monday, June 22, at Christ Church Cathedral, George Street. Most Rev Drexel W Gomez, Archbishop, Rt Rev Gilbert Thompson, Assistant Bishop, the Rev Dr James B Moultrie and the Venerable Archdeacon James E Palacious will officiate. The ceremony of interment will follow at the Eastern Cemetery, Dowdeswell Street. Public Mr Butler’s body will lie in state in the foyer of the House of Assembly from 11am t o 5pm on Friday and Saturday from 9am to 5pm. The general public is invited to view the remains and sign the Book of Condolences. The House of Assembly will be draped in the colours of mourning and flags at both Houses of Parliament will be flown at half mast beginning on Friday, June 19 until after the funeral. Mr Butler, the third son and sixth child of the late Sir Milo B Butler Sr, and Lady Caroline Butler, was born on November 30, 1936 in Nassau. He received his primary education at Worrell’s School and Eastern Senior School and his secondary education at Government High School. Mr Butler later attended Dundee Technical College, Dundee Scotland and Middle Temple Inns of Court, London, England. Mr Butler ran unsuccessfully as a Progressive Liberal Party candidate during the 1967 general elections for the City of Nassau. He served as Chairman of the PLP in 1969; as a Senator from 1969 to 1974, becoming Vice President of the Senate from 1972 to 1974. In August 1974 Mr Butler became the first Bahamian Consul-General, serving in Miami, Florida, from 1974 through 1977. Election In 1977 he successfully contested the seat for the Pinedale Constituency, which he represented until 1992. During his tenure in Parliament, Mr. Butler served as Deputy Speaker of the House of Assembly from 1987 to 1991 and as Speaker from 1991 until the General Election of 1992. D uring his political career he served as Chairman of the following entities: the Transport Licensing Board; Town Planning Committee; the Bahamas Broadcasting and Television Commission; the Bahamas Electricity Corporation and the Gaming Board. He grew up in the Anglican tradition and served as an altar boy. Until his death, Mr Butler was a faithful member of St Matthew’s Anglican Church, serving as a member of the Vestry, the Bishop’s Council, the Synod and the Provincial Synod. Mr Butler is survived by his sons, Milo III, Godwin and Jevon; daughters, Angela and Bernadette; former wives, Winfred, and Comfort Baker; brothers, Raleigh Sr, Elder Basil and Matthew, sister, Juanita; three grandsons, four granddaughters, four sisters-in-law, three aunts, 20 nephews, and 16 nieces, including Labour Minister of State Loretta Butler-Turner. Official funeral for Milo B Butler Jr, former House Speaker FROM page one Govt to take $30m dividend from BTC Swine flu F ROM page one Hubert Minnis

PAGE 10

n By GENA GIBBS W ITH the restoration of the f ormer Collins House on S hirley Street, the Antiquities, Monuments and Museums Corporation (AMMC ing the way as downtown Nassau gets a facelift. Now called Centreville House, headquarters of the AMMC, it is being adorned w ith lignum vitae, yellow elder and a wide range of Bahamian flower and fruit trees and shrubs. Bahamian environmental artist, Antonius Roberts, has been contracted to advise A MMC on creating a space that educates and appeals to all the senses. And, with Tanya Ferguson of the Bahamas National Trust as a consultant to the landscaping project, they went a bout creating what AMMC d irector Dr Keith Tinker d escribed as “an oasis within a mad setting.” In this “oasis” can also be found madera, horseflesh, c oco plum, joujou, sea grape, c oconut, sour sop, guamalamee, among others. Trees chosen were recommended by the Bahamas National Trust and the Nature Conservancy to make sure the b otanical representation is authentic and historically correct. The grounds also feature a pond, replica of a Lucayan chief’s hut, and facilities where children can play and learn a bout the way of life of the L ucayans, who inhabited the B ahamas when Christopher Columbus arrived more than 500 years ago. Mr Roberts said his goal is f or visitors to enter and exit t he green-space at Centreville H ouse “with a five-dimens ional experience.” The guest will have comm itted to memory the sight, sounds, smell, touch and taste of the Bahamian historical and cultural heritage,” he said. The project is a product of t he Lindroff Development Company which drafted the p roposal to the AMMC board and assists with the funding. Orian Lindroff, owner of t he company, is a graduate of St Andrew’s School, class of 1 961, when the school was still located at Centreville House. A similar project is the R etreat at the Bahamas National Trust Headquarters. B ut Centreville House is going a step beyond, Mr Roberts said, by facilitating space for a large capacity of visitors with the grounds beingu sed for weddings or cultural heritage programmes. There is a revitalisation of downtown (Nassau to take place and we thought t hat we would jump-start the process by providing an adaptive use of a green space for having a series of functions,”s aid AMMC director Dr Tink er. Corporation chairman Dr D avidson Hepburn noted that B ahamian colonial architec ture “is unique to our environment” and preserving what is left of it has always been ap assion of his. “I was very happy to have t his opportunity to deal with this building,” he said, to bring it back to its former glory, to fit it into the revitalisation of downtown. There are so many projects we could do if we begin to l ook at this place as a stateof-the-art building and grounds for the general public a nd tourists alike,” he said. With development, many historic buildings have been lost. Dr Hepburn pointed tot he once quaint colonial-style D owdeswell Street. “You can’t even find one of t hose buildings to represent w hat was there” he said. “So we are trying to preserve what we can of whatever is left, to keep that flavour of what we h ad in the Bahamas.” Dr Hepburn told of AMMC’s ‘Miracle Mile Project’ from George Street (west Church Street (east T he purpose is to restore all the outstanding old buildings a long that route. “We want Bahamians to be aware of their culture, history, a nd heritage,” said Dr Hepburn. In partnership with the gov ernment to give downtown N assau a new look, “at A MMC we are leading the way in promoting a greateru nderstanding and appreciat ion of the natural and cultur al sites of Old Nassau,” said Dr Hepburn. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 'VO 4VNNFS $BNQ7 LUHGRIWKHDPH 2OG%RULQJXPPHU 6 FKRRO" 7U\RPHWKLQJ 1HZt&UHDWLY$FWLYLWLHV,QFOXGH $UWVt&UDIWV'UDZLQJtDLQWLQJ0 XVLFt'UDPD /HVVRQV 6ZLPPLQJDQG 6SRUWV &$//:$1' 5(6(59(<285 %()25(,7/$7( RU( PDLOZ HVWPRRU#KRWPDLOFRP Centreville House becomes ‘an oasis’ D e r e k S m i t h / B I S A MMC CHAIRMAN D r Davidson Hepburn outside the new Centrev ille House, formerly Collins House.

PAGE 11

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 11 Harbour Bay S S i i z z e e s s X X S S t t o o 3 3 X X L L Sale on Selected items Up to 50.% Off ALL CLOTHING V ISIT US ON THE WEB aebahamas.comFor Fashion news & specials ‘an oasis’ A POND with a fountain is also featured at the ‘oasis’ that Centreville House has become. BELOWLEFT: Restoration begins at home. AMMC chairm an Dr Davidson Hepburn, o versees restoration of the form er Collins House, Shirley Street, AMMC headquarters.

PAGE 12

change their mind. They changed their mind and decided they would go on a sick-out. Well, we understood that they were disappointed and figured that they would stay out for a day or two and then they would sit down and talk to the government. “But it appears that people believe that it is the government who ought to go chasing behind them while they were out sick. No, that's not the way how I do business." He said government waited a week before filing an injunction in the Supreme Court which ordered that the nurses return to work or face possible jail time if found they had exceeded their allotted sick days. He added that it was not until a week into the sick-out that BNU decided to take the proper legal route and file a trade dispute with the Department of Labour. "They waited an entire week before they followed the law. As soon as they followed the l aw the Department of Labour fixed the date to hear the parties, and the government showed up. The government had discussions with them this morning, they didn't get very far, but the government had discussions because the government insists that they mustg o back to work first." Mr Ingraham said government will only engage in mean ingful discussions with the union if public health facilities return to a state of normalcy. "But the government is unwilling and will not budge from its position of having dis c ussions and agreements while they continue their illegal strike. They are an essential service, essential services are not allowed to do that. "If you want results, listen to what I say, kindly go back to work and I will cause the minister of labour and the minister health to meet with you on Monday morning and resolve the mat ter, Monday. It's not a big issue to resolve," he said. Meanwhile the BNU is planning on filing an application to overturn the injunction filed by government which court ordered the nurses who called in sick to return to work or face jail time, said lawyer and trade unionist Obie Ferguson, who represents BNU. Mr Ferguson said the stage is now set for possible industrial action explaining that Minister of Labour Dion Foulkes has to decide tomorrow on the union's application for a strike vote. He insisted that the sick-out w as not industrial action as the nurses involved had not exceeded their allotted 20 sick days a year. Bahamas Nurses Union President Cleola Hamilton told The Tribune she was disappointed in the outcome of the meeting adding that it was evident theg overnment had "no sense of urgency" in resolving the issue. "We haven't gotten any conclusion from the government," she told The Tribune after the meeting. Details on exactly how many nurses continued to call in sick yesterday were unclear up top ress time although The Tribune understands that while some were said to be gradually returning to work, those nurses with doctor's sick notes remained off the job. Ms Hamilton could not confirm if the sick-out continued yesterday. Mr Ferguson said the union simply wants a written agreement outlining a date when the promised insurance scheme would be implemented. "The union is not adverse to a different date they just want to sit down and come to an agreement and be treated with respect. . .it's in the interest of the union to serve the Bahamian public but you can't just give one set of peo ple insurance and not give it to another set," he said. One angry nurse told The Tribune yesterday said government's delay in providing comprehensive health insurance may drive many qualified nurses out of the country to seek better employment. "Government has been fighting for years to keep nurses here and when those scouts (from abroad come with packages and they are not going to stop until they have a mass exodus. How can they expect to keep us here when they have no incentives to keep us here?" asked the nine year veteran of Princess Margaret Hospital. Yesterday, Dr Minnis said public health nurses were returning to work gradually and said PMH, clinics on Grand Bahama and the family islands were functioning. "I have not gotten a complete report but I know staff since yesterday have been returning to work slowly. “And all the clinics were open, all clinics on the family islands and Grand Bahama were functioning," Dr Minnis said. Group deal in Mayaguana, Prime Minister Ingraham said that his government did not “interfere” in that deal, “but go to Mayaguana now and see what is happening.” “Some of the agreements, Mr Speaker, as I said we reviewed, some of them required other action by the government agencies which members opposite also proved incapable of concluding before they were kicked out of office in 2007,” Mr Ingraham said. Outlining how the Opposition campaigned during its term in office as if most of these projects had been signed and concluded as “done deals”, Mr Ingraham said he watched with amazement the coverage on the local news of the BahaMar deal. “So even when these investment proposals were only in their conceptual stages they were marketed to the public as done deals. We never saw so many announcements and ribbon cutting for ideas as we were treated to between 2002 and 2007. “You know, Mr Speaker, for routine things, the appointment of Boards, we would sit down in the Cabinet Office and decide these are the appointed Boards and we would send the conclusion out to the various ministries and the permanent secretaries would get in touch with the people, etc, and they are appointed to the Boards. Our first set of Board appointees come to an end of this month, June, we appointed the first set for two years. “But when they won, they went from place to place with big TV cameras, ‘I’ve come to announce the Board for this corporation today’. A big show!” Mr Ingraham remarked. Noting how he had not intended to speak long, but now was stirred on to do so because of the contribution earlier yesterday by Opposition Leader Perry Christie, Mr Ingraham said that the PLP “never” accepts blame for anything. “If it’s good, oh yes. They blame others for failures and shortcomings. They would demonize others and be repetitious in their stories. I heard the Leader of the Opposition saying how when they invited him down at Clifton that he felt he was not appropriately dealt with at the ceremony but he was invited. “When we built a $12 million port in Marsh Harbour and it was time to open it, they faxed something to my law office the night before. The night before! Now I have to give it to the Leader of the Opposition; he called me one time when they were opening the new clinic in Fox Town, and I asked him ‘which clinic, you mean the one I built?’ “I said man that has been built for several years. But he still has his name on the plaque. Or go to Dundas Town any day and look at that little box building clinic and see the big plaque there and see how many people they took down to open it. And then they closed it!” Mr Ingraham laughed. The Prime Minister also took grave exception to Mr Christie’s claim that the poor and under-privileged were better off under Mr Christie’s administration as their party was more sensitive to “their needs.” “I never tire of telling him that he can never ever feel for them like me. You can’t ever! You have never been one of us! You can’t be one of us! You don’t understand us! You are not one of us! Don’t pretend to be one of us. You never even slept next to one of us!” Mr Ingraham exclaimed. Mr Ingraham also advised Mr Christie not to refer to him as a “rich man.” “You shouldn’t call me a rich man because I am not. But you are. And you should not even get in that conversation. Let’s not even go down that road,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE PM gets tough with nurses F ROM page one Hubert Ingraham FROM page one PM criticises PLP for complaints over contracts

PAGE 13

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 14, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 99 EVERLAST N EOPRENE SHIRTSNIKE PUSH UP GRIPSWILSON GRAND SLAM TENNIS RACKETS T ROY 40LB. DUMB BELLS SAVE $70Was $399.99GOLD’S XR 17 WEIGHT BENCH SAVE $100Was $549.99WEIDER 220 WEIGHT BENCH SAVE $150Was $799.99WEIDER 2250 HOME SYSTEM 5SAVE $100Was $699.99FIT. QUEST TOTAL GYM 1700Men’s 4 Fatherz Polo Shirt $ 13 99 13 99 $ $ 14 99 14 99 $ M en’s Galaxy Carpenter S horts Men’s Renegade Striped Shirts $ 15 99 15 99 $ M en’s Renegade Cargo P ants $ 12 99 12 99 $ $ 15 99 15 99 $ Men’s L ot 29 Polo Shirts Men’s R enegade Jean Shorts $ 15 99 15 99 $ $ 14 99 14 99 $ Men’s Raider Cotton T-Shirts M en’s Raider Denim J eans $ 19 99 19 99 $ $ 15 99 15 99 $ Men’s G alaxy ButtonDown S hirts Men’s 2 12 Twill Cargo S horts $ 15 99 15 99 $ $ 4 99 4 99 $ Men’s G alaxy Tanks Men’s S tarter Shorts $ 8 99 8 99 $ WEHAVE10sOF GIFTIDEASFORDAD! MEN’SNIKEAIRMAXDREAMBASKETBALLSHOE (White/Blue/Silver)WAS$169.99 NOW$ 139 99 139 99 $ MEN’SNIKEAIRFORCE1 SHOE(White/Yellow)WAS$119.99 NOW$ 99 99 99 99 $ WAS$99.99 NOW$ 79 99 79 99 $ MEN’SECKOJIGSAW REFLEXESSHOE(Wh/Copp WAS$169.99 NOWMEN’SJORDANJUMPMAN ELITESHOE(Wh/Blue$ 139 99 139 99 $ MEN’SJORDAN2.5TEAM BASKETBALLSHOE(Wh/Rd/BlkWAS$179.99 NOW$ 149 99 149 99 $ MEN’SROCKPORTBRIDGE CASUALSHOE(Dk.Brn/Chest) MEN’SROCKPORTBRIDGE CASUALSHOE(Nvy/Org/WhWAS$89.99 NOW$ 69 99 69 99 $ WAS$89.99 NOW$ 69 99 69 99 $ WAS$99.99 NOW$ 79 99 79 99 $ MEN’SROCKPORTBRIDGE CASUALSHOE(Blk/Wh MEN’SNIKERECRUIT SANDALS(Black/Silver WAS$49.99 NOW$ 39 99 39 99 $ PRICESAREGOODUNTILJUNE28THWHILESTOCKSLAST.Or get a Sports Locker Gift Certificate and let Dad choose! times. He claimed the PLP too faced challenges when it came to power in 2002 the recent 9/11 attack in New York City, and the looming war in Iraq but yet managed to take “bold” action to better conditions. Mr Christie noted that his administration left the country with increased revenue flows and external reserves, enhanced GDP growth and reduced unemployment. The PLP leader alleged that, having revealed a lack of ideas, the current Government “needs help”, must “stop being bloody minded” but instead turn to other “brains” in the country to find new solutions to the problems it faces. He suggested that even though as Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham stated “the economic textbooks” have no answers to the current crisis, the Government must “act as the sovereign Government of the Bahamas” and may find a “way outside of the textbooks to make progress.” “It must be the obligation of the government to protect and pro mote the highest possible level of sustainable employment for all Bahamians,” said Mr Christie. “The country needs today to have the Government act on my recommendation to appoint a group to devise strategies to assist the country in the way ahead.” One taskforce could “aggressively assess the current hotel properties and their challenges and those investments that were in process prior to the global recession,” said Mr Christie Another could focus on the financial services sector, looking at ways to “create new products and whatever it takes to be more competitive and productive, again with a view to creating jobs,” he proposed. Meanwhile, he questioned whether more could have been done to save jobs recently lost in the hotel sector, particularly through the “creative and sustained” use of financial concessions which could be offered to hotels. The Opposition leader added that the operators of the now closed Four Seasons Emerald Bay hotel in Exuma had previously made known to Government their “frustrations” about the cost of operating in Exuma and he ques tioned why further subsidy was not provided by the Government to help them remain afloat. “They felt some consideration should have been given to Emerald Bay (by the Government of their remote location and their cost structure,” said Mr Christie. He called on Government to work as “closely as is necessary” with the Bahamar developers to bring the “critical” Cable Beach project to fruition, and the jobs that will come with it, as well as to make “every effort” to “relaunch” the I-Group development in Mayaguana which now employs a small fraction of those it did in previous years. Meanwhile, he said that a recent public address by BahaMar CEO Sarkis Izmirlian in which he revealed how the government of Qatar rejected the option of investing in BahaMar during this recession, but instead chose to invest millions in a 250-room hotel in Cuba, should cause the Govern ment to “ask why these things are happening.” Mr Christie stated that just as Sol Kerzner and the Atlantis development showed investors that “money could be made in the Bahamas” in the hotel industry, the country cannot allow hotel clo sures and poor performance to “redefine the image of our economy.” Speaking of its potential to pro mote the Bahamas as a financial services centre, to attract foreign direct investment and through this to create jobs in the construction industry and the financial services sector, Mr Christie said Government must re-establish the Min istry of Financial Services and Investments, set up under his administration. “This government did not main tain such a ministry and as a result, we believe they made a mistake,” said Mr Christie. Turning to the youth, the Opposition leader claimed they have been ignored in this year’s budget, and proposed that Government appoint a “special commission” to make recommendations on how more jobs can be created for young people soon to graduate from col lege abroad, the College of the Bahamas and high school. “Left alone, many of them may have to wait years to have their legitimate needs met. “The Government cannot ignore this issue. We must all be engaged in...working relentlessly identifying workable economic options for them,” added Mr Christie. Prior to lay-offs at Exuma’s Emerald Bay hotel and the emer gence of thousands of new gradu ates, figures released by the Department of Statistics in March pegged unemployment at the high est level in 15 years. It was found that 12.1 per cent of people in New Providence and 14.6 per cent in Grand Bahama were out of a job at that time. Christie FROM page one

PAGE 14

C M Y K C M Y K THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 P AGE 18 Nadal, Safina seeded No. 1 for Wimbledon... ‘Mighty Mouse’ to represent the Bahamas at World Games... See page 17 TO bridge the gap between academic and athletic excellence, the local governing bodyf or track and field is gearing up to honour its top athletes of the -09 school year. The Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations is set to recognise its top junior athletes at the All Bahamian Award Ceremony. The official presentations are scheduled for 7:30pm June 23 at Government House. Governor General Arthur D Hanna is the patron of this event and will be presenting the awards. A reception will follow the award ceremony. The All Bahamian awards are given to high school track and field athletes who havemet the standards set by the BAAA for their events and also maintained a 2.5 or higher grade point average for the academic year. Each year an honourary All Bahamian award is given to a male and female athlete who have contributed to the sport of track and field in the past. The award was modeled after the All American awards which honours outstanding college athletes in academics and sports. A A l l l l B B a a h h a a m m i i a a n n T T e e a a m m MEN Warren Fraser 100m, 200m Marcus Thompson 100m Karlton Rolle 200m Jeffrey Gibson 400m, 400m hurdles Chris Nesbitt 800m, 1500m Kenneth Wallace-Whitfield 800m, 1500m Laquardo Newbold 1500m Kristin Hepburn 110m hurdles Nejmi Burnside 400m hurdles Jaquan Williams 110m hurdles Dennis Bain 110m hurdles Raymond Higgs high jump W OMEN Nivea Smith 200m Shellyka Rolle 400m Rashan Brown 400m V'Alonee Robinson long jump Sparkyl Cash long jump H H o o n n o o u u r r a a r r y y A A l l l l B B a a h h a a m m i i a a n n s s T homas A. Robinson Shonel Ferguson BAAA to honour top junior athletes JUST two days remain until the Bahamas’ junior national team sets off for international competition. The 16-18 team is slated to participate in the 2009 Latin American Big League Caribbean Zone Baseball Tournament, to be held in Zulia State, Venezuela. The tournament, hosted by Little League, will also feature, Aruba, Curacao, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Panama, Puerto Rico and the host country Venezuela. The team will be led by Richard Bain who was recently selected in the 45th round of the Major League Baseball draft by the Philadelphia Phillies organisation. Shown seated in the front row (l-r Aneko Knowles, Tyrell Smith, Dale Davis Jr, Patrick Knowles Jr, Kyle Hall and Desmond Russell. In the second row (l-r Groezinger, Stephen Curtis, Brandon Murray, Anthony Miaulis II and Jordan Gibson. And in the third row (l-r Cash, Patrick Waugh, Lynden Pindling, Sedale McKenzie, Richard Bain and Leon Cooper. Standing in the back row (l-r manager Terran Rodgers and coach Patrick Knowles Sr Bahamas’ junior baseball team to play in tourney

PAGE 15

Our women’s national volleyball team must be commended THEY did it. They did it... Yes, the Bahamas Volleyball Federation women’s national team have qualified for the third round of the NORCECA 2010 World Championships. Despite the fact that they played with a heavy heart, having lost their personal possessions during a robbery of their lockers at the gym, the team was able to stay motivated enough to get the job done. The team must be commended, especially after learning that they were r obbed while playing host Barbados in a thrilling fivesetter that could have turned things around in terms of where their destination was going to be for the next round. Had they not been sidetracked by the robbery, who knows what would have happened in their playoff match against Jamaica. The team could have easily folded up, packed up whatever they had left and decided to return home. Instead, they worked through the three straight-set loss to Jamaica. Had they won, that would have put them in a position to be able t o travel to Disneyland in Orlando, Florida, instead of going to Puerto Rico. The loss put the team in a must-win situation against St Lucia as the team prevailed and in the process secured a berth into the second round where they will travel to Puerto Rico. I’m sure it didn’t mat ter as much to the women where they were going as it was who they played in the playoffs. This is the first time, like the men who earned the right t o travel to Cuba in July, that the women have reached this far and so they should be commended for their achievement, especially considering the unfortunate circumstances that they found themselves in. It’s just so unfortunate that the team had to go through the ordeal that they encoun tered. The team is due to return home today, no doubt with some remorse against the Barbados Volleyball Federat ion, who just simply aban doned them (not the Bahamas Volleyball Federation, as indicated in Wednesday’s article). The Bahamas Volleyball Federation did all that they could to ensure that the play ers were all relaxed and at ease as they waited patiently for the Barbados Police Force to carry out their investiga tion, which resulted in the majority of their items being recovered. Head coach Joseph “Joe Moe” Smith is the federation’s first vice president and national team director. Also representing the federation was treasurer Raymond “Rhymes” Wilson and assis tant treasurer, Lloyd “Ratty” Davis. In contacting the team on a daily basis, the three men talked constantly about their efforts to ensure that the ladies, including assistant coach Jackie Conyers, were all made comfortable even when they had to leave the games village for another hotel that they had to pay for since Monday. How can the federation and even the players, who have become familiar with the Bahamian players, turn their backs on them in such a cri sis? If the situation was reversed, I’m sure that the Bahamas Volleyball Federation, nor the players, would have done the same to Barba dos or any other country. It just shows the level of hospitality that the Bahamas exhibits. Over the years, we have heard so many stories from our players about the way they are treated whenever they travel to one of the Caribbean Islands or Latin American countries to compete. Sometimes you just did n’t believe that they would have been treated in the man ner that they claimed they were. The women’s trip to Barbados is definitely the height of it. Thank God the players were able to recover the majority of their possessions and none of them were physically harmed. They just have to put this experience behind them and move on. It could have happened to anyone. It’s just unfortunate that we were the only ones who were the victims. When they head to Puerto Rico in August, we are looking forward to them step ping up and performing just as spectacular as they did in Barbados. Congratulations and welcome home ladies. We are very proud of how you han dled the whole experience. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 16, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS (QW HU WR ZLQZL WK HDFK SXUFKD VHRYH 3URPRWLR QHQ GV-XQH W 6 HH VWRUHV IRUIXUWKHUGHW DLO To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in cir culation, just call 502-2371 today! OPINION STUBBS

PAGE 16

FOR the first time in seven years, a Bahamian has been selected to represent the country and the region at one of the world’s most prestigious bodybuilding contests. Paul “Mighty Mouse” Wilson has been selected to compete at the 2009 World Games, slat-ed for July 16 in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. He was selected by the International Bodybuilding Federation to represent the Caribbean region in the event. At five foot two inches tall and 152 pounds, Wilson is a 26 year-old bodybuilding champion in the lightweight amateur division. H e started the sport nine y ears ago while in high school a nd spent the last eight years dominating the sport. Among his titles are the reigning Central American Caribbean champion gold medallist, the reigning national lightweight champion, and the two-time champion of the Southern States Body Building Competition in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. While representing the Bahamas for the past eight years, Wilson earned one gold, two silvers, and a bronze medal at four of those competitions. In 2006, he placed 17th out of 71 competitors at the World Championships in the Czech Republic. “I’ve been doing this sport since I was a teenager,” Wilson reflects. “In fact, I entered my first competition the day after I graduated Faith Temple Christian High School. I became a certified fitness instructor in Nevada and now I’m one of the personal fitness instructors at Mystikal Fitness, where I also train. All in all, I am more than ready to compete.” Another thing that Wilson is ready to do is bring more attention to the sport and he’s determined to get the financial backing he needs to accomplish his goals. “I think that bodybuilding in the Bahamas is being stunted because of the downturn in the economy and the stigmatism that goes along with the sport,” he noted. “It does take a lot of money to stick to the proper diet, the vitamins, supplements and gym membership but at the same time, Bahamians have not only proven to be successful in the sport, but also are serious when it comes to abusing their bodies with steroids. I’m proud to say that we (the Bahamas have anyone known for drug abuse at these competitions.” As for his pending competition, Wilson is ready to make the nation proud on his first trip to Asia. “I’m excited about going to Chinese Taipei,” he said. “I’ve seen some of the top notch athletes at other competitions and I’m ready. I’ve faced off against some of them before and I know the calibre of athletes on that level. Overall, I’m motivated to compete and bring what I’ve got to the forefront.” C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 17 ‘Mighty Mouse’ to represent Bahamas at World Games PAUL WILSON (centreleft of the Bahamas Bodybuilding & Fitness Federation... PAUL WILSON has been selected to compete at the 2009 World Games, slated for July 16 in Kaohsiung, Taiwan...

PAGE 17

WIMBLEDON, England (AP Rafael Nadal and top-ranked women's player Dinara Safina were seeded No. 1 for Wimbledon on Wednesday. There were no big surprises when the All England Club announced the seedings for the grass-court Grand Slam tournament, which opens Monday. The draw will be released Frid ay. T he top-ranked Nadal has been having trouble with his knees the past few months and received treatment after pulling out of the Wimbledon warmup event at Queen's Club. The Spaniard plans to test them by playing exhibition matches on grass against Lleyton Hewitt on Thursday and Stanislas Wawrinka on Friday at the Hurlingham Club in London. Wimbledon stuck closely to the world rankings in deter mining the seeding lists for the two-week tournament. The top six spots in the men's list follow the rankings. Fivetime champion Roger Federer is No. 2, with Andy Murray at No. 3. Murray won his first grass-court title at Queen's Club on Sunday, becoming the first Briton to win the tournament since Bunny Austin in 1938, who then went on to become the last British men's finalist at Wimbledon. They are followed by No. 4 Novak Djokovic, No. 5 Juan Martin Del Porto and No. 6 Andy Roddick. Eighth-ranked Fernando V erdasco is seeded No. 7 ahead o f Gilles Simon. Marat Safin, a semifinalist last year, is the No. 15 seed despite being ranked 23rd, while the big-serving Ivo Karlovic is at No. 23 while having a ranking of 31. Among the women, Safina of Russia is followed by Serena Williams and defending champion Venus Williams. The only major change from the rankings is 2004 Wimbledon champion Maria Sharapova as the No. 24 seed despite being ranked 59th. Sharapova has plunged down the rankings after nine months out with a shoulder injury but reached the semifinals of the Aegon Classic in Birmingham last week. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS PAGE 18, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS Nadal, Safina seeded No. 1 for Wimbledon T o advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in cir culation, just call 502-2371 today! Rafael Nadal (AP

PAGE 18

FOCOL wins airport gas station contract n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A BAHAMIAN start-up seeking to launch a ‘multiple play’ bundle of Internet services was yesterday said to be assessing how it “should be properly structured”, with efforts to raiset he $14 million in capital that it needs to start operations ongoing. Owen Bethel, a director of I P Solutions International (IPSI s till looking for investors to pick-up the majority of its pri vate placement, having expanded this from $6 million to $14m illion after broadening the ini tial launch beyond the Bahamas t o include the wider Caribbean. “It’s still in motion, but we’re looking to see how it should be properly structured,” Mr Bethel s aid of IPSI. “Since we moved it up to the regional level, we were looking at $14 million for that. We’veh ad strong investor interest, but certainly not to carry the major p art of it.” When asked whether the g lobal recession and preceding financial crisis had impacted IP S olutions International’s chances of raising the requiredc apital, Mr Bethel told Tribune Business: “I think very much so. “The uncertainty in the finan c ial markets, and persons wanting to hold on to their cash, and it being a start-up as opposed to an existing, established opera tion, lends to the risk factor.” Mr Bethel, who heads Nassau-based financial services provider, the Montaque Group, t old Tribune Business that there was still much interest in IP Solutions International’s product from its initial target cus-t omers, chiefly private gated communities and hotels/resorts. There continues to be inter est in it. It’s literally a matter o f being able to deliver the intended services to them,” Mr B ethel said. IP Solutions International is t argeting that customer base for a variety of services it will transmit down just one Internet line, hence the ‘Multiple Play’d escription. The services will include Internet, TV via Inter net Protocol, video-on-demand (VOD Internet Protocol (VoIP services. Given Cable Bahamas current cable TV monopoly, which n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas Telecommu nications Company’s (BTC practice of charging cellular cus tomers for receiving fixed-line and overseas calls was yesterday branded as an “anomaly”, which is “not best practice and not in the interest of the Bahamian public going forward”. The consultation document on retail price regulation in the Bahamian communications industry, published yesterday by the committee overseeing BTC’s privatisation, said that while the caller usually paid for telephone calls, it was actually the receiving party that paid to receive fixed-line and overseas calls on both pre-paid and postpaid cell phones. Pointing out that this had “a number of disadvantages”, the document said this essentially allowed BTC to ‘double dip’ through having access to “two, overlapping sources of revenue from incoming international calls to cellular numbers”. While BTC received revenues from Bahamian cell phone customers through the “domestic charging system”, the consultation document added: “International arrangements provide BTC with revenue for the terminating service for incoming international calls to Bahamian mobile numbers. “For example, when a customer based in the US calls a Bahamian mobile number, BTC receives payment from the cor responding US operator for delivering that call to the Bahamian mobile customer. Such arrangements between operators apply irrespective of whether a fixed or mobile number is called in the Bahamas.” This meant BTC received revenue from two sources for providing the same connection service. The BTC privatisation committee document added that the state-owned firm’s cellular customers were also “in C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report. $3.97 $4.03 $4.04 BTC cellular char ging branded an ‘anomaly’ * Practice of charging Bahamian cellular customers for receipt of fixed-line and overseas calls labelled ‘anticonsumer’ by privatisation committee S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 B B ‘Multiple play’ start-up still seeking major $14m bite C ompany assessing how it should be ‘properly structured’ n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE head of the Government’s newly-established National Training Programme yesterday said he was “working diligently to make this a longterm, self-sustaining” initiative, broadening it beyond its initial remit because it was “critical to our long-term economic competitiveness”. Khaalis Rolle, the newlyelected Bahamas Chamber of Commerce president, who is heading the body charged by the Government with overseeing the retraining of some 1,000 unemployed Bahamians, said private sector funding would likely be needed long-term to sustain the programme, the Ingraham administration having initially allocated $250,000 for the programme. Pointing out that education and training had always been the “achilles heel” of the Bahamian economy and soci ety, Mr Rolle said initiatives s uch as the National Training P rogramme were critical to preparing companies and their workforces for all eventualities, as many had been “caught with their pants down” by the current recession. “I think it is critical to our l ong-term competitiveness,” Mr Rolle said of the National Training Programme and similar initiatives. “The message I’m going to be sending, through my position as Chamber president, is that we need to develop a com petent and professional work force. That is through education and training, and that has always been our achilles heel. “We do have a section of the workforce that is extremely tal ented, and possesses some of the brightest minds in the region living in the Bahamas. Yet we do, like most other countries, have a segment that is just not adequately prepared.” The Bahamas, the Chamber president added, had some “structural deficiencies”, while the problems and challenges of the public school education system were well-known. “Companies do not invest as much as they should in training,” Mr Rolle said. “One of Training initiative must be ‘long-term and self-sustaining’ * Chamber head looks to make government plan to target unemployment long-lasting and tackle ‘achilles heel’ that is critical to economic competitiveness’ * Businesses ‘caught with pants down’ by economic crisis * Says own business, Bahamas Ferries, needs well-trainied workforce to maintain required growth rate * Private sector support needed to buttress government’s initial $250k funding Khaalis Rolle S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T he Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD awarded the airport gas station contract to BISX-listed Freeport Oil Holdings (FOCOL Sun Oil subsidiary, Tribune Business was told yesterday, with a senior executive adding that so-called ‘incentive fees’ did not apply to bidding on small retail concession contracts. John Spinks, NAD’s vice-president of commercial operations, said ‘incentive fees’ the one-time payment of a lump sum fee to the airport operator, as an inducement for the paying party to be offered the relevant contract only applied to larger concessions where there was a small number of large bidders, such as the gas station. Tribune Business had been contacted by some of the 150-200 Bahamian busi-n esses and entrepreneurs who had attended a NAD briefing session on Monday, and expressed concern about the use of ‘incentive fees’ as a tiebreaker to determine who the airport retail and restaurant concessions would be awarded to if two bidders were ranked equally. These sources, who had requested anonymity, feared that ‘incentive fees’ would provide larger, more established companies with an advantage over smaller firms and entrepreneurs, as their deeper pockets would leave them betterp laced to pay incentive fees. T he same sources suggested that after obtaining bank financing to pay for inventory and outfitting their kiosks/carts/concessions at the Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA ally impossible for smaller bidders to finance an ‘incentive fee’ with either equity or further debt. They also expressed concern that, by squeezing out small Bahamian businesses, the airport would lack a distinctly ‘Bahamian’ feel in terms of products and identity, thus failing to meet NAD’s o bjective of providing ‘a sense of place’. R esponding to those concerns, Mr * Airport kiosk and cart tenants will have to re-bid for contracts when new US departure terminal comes on stream * But NAD executive says ‘incentive fees’ only apply to large contracts with small bidder numbers, not small retail concessions * Airport losses drop from $7m at NAD takeover to around $3.5-$4m today * Airport Authority Board signs-off on general contractor award S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor CABLE television and telecoms costs in the Bahamas “appear high” in comparison to other island economies of similar size and living standards, a document released yesterday by the Bahamas Telecommunications Company’s (BTC vatisation committee said. The document said Cable Bahamas’ basic cable television package, priced at $30 per month since inception, “appears expensive in relation to other small island states, with the exception of the Cayman Islands”. It added that a similar Cable TV costs ‘appear high’ against rivals S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B

PAGE 19

n B y CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE BAHAMAS Financial S ervices Union (BFSU t erday urged Royal Bank of Canada employees to “step up to the plate” and unionise, raisi ng the spectre of lay-offs following the merger between the Royal Bank of Canada (RBC and the RBTT Financial Group. The BFSU president, Theres a Mortimer, said Royal Bank employees in the Bahamas w ere missing out on an array of b enefits afforded their Caribbean colleagues because t hey were not unionised. T he move represented the latest step in the union’s lobbying campaign to urge theb ank’s employees to join it and unionise, following their FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas M s Mortimer said the most imminent benefit that Royal B ank employees would enjoy f rom joining the BFSU was the redundancy benefit that can be n egotiated by the union. Impending T he impending RBC /RBTT merger will find the company moving its corporate head-q uarters form the Bahamas to a new building in Trinidad and Tobago. And the BFSU pred icts major job losses with the loss of the regional headquarters. We all know what happens in mergers, and the current e nvironment says, and the econ omic situation says. that the finance sector is going to do t he same thing,” said Ms Mort imer. She said another important benefit Royal Bank workersw ill receive immediately is the BFSU’s negotiating body in discussion with the bank’sm anagers. Royal Bank’s president and country head, Nathaniel Beneb y, said he was not opposed to the bank’s employees unionising. He insisted, however, that t he management of Royal Bank has had a traditional o pen door policy with employe es, and suggested that he has not heard any major grievances a t the bank’s regular round t able discussions with staff. Obligated The BFSU’s secretary-general, Lashon Sawyer, said MrB eneby was obligated to make such statements. According to her, 18 of the 2 1 Caribbean territories where Royal Bank operates have union members within the r anks of the bank. She said the Bahamas, Barb ados and Trinidad are the o nly territories without union representation within Royal B ank, though Trinidad is movi ng towards that now. “We need the staff of Royal Bank (Bahamast he plate,” said Ms Mortimer. “When you look at it, Trinidad and Barbados haveg eneral workers unions. They (Royal Bank Bahamas to get a union so that we will a ll be on the same page.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TWO Bahamians have been named among the 10 finalists for Scotiabank’s Change-Maker Challenge. The 2009 Change-Maker Challenge contest asked young adults from 14 Caribbean countries to share their marketing vision for Scotiabank’s new young adult-focused programme, Scotiabank Be. More than 1300 original ideas were submitted. The 10 Caribbean finalists selected to move on include Fabian Fernander and Janairo Turnquest of the Bahamas. The others are Debbie-Ann Estwick of Barbados, Kayla Hall of Belize, Roma Singh of Guyana, Janelle Brown and Sandre Malcolm of Jamaica, Tarek Mohammed and Afeisha Williams of Trinidad & Tobago, and Roleza Samuel of St. Vincent. “The number of responses we received this year far outpaced our estimates,” said Pat Minicucci, Scotiabank’s senior vice-president for the Caribbean. “The calibre of creativity in the Caribbean is outstanding, and the submissions to this year’s challenge have further confirmed this. The essays showcase the unbelievable talent coming from the future business leaders of the region.” Contestants were asked to create a marketing strategy for Scotiabank Be, Scotiabank’s young adult banking platform. Summaries of the finalists’ submissions have been posted on the contest website http://www.change-makerchallenge.com) for peer evaluation.A panel of judges, made up of senior Scotiabank executives, as well as local academic leaders and media persons, will evaluate the submissions, examine the peer evaluations and narrow the group to three. In July, the top three finalists will be flown to Jamaica to personally present their submissions to the judging panel. The individual with the most innovative idea will take home the $10,000 grand prize. The second and third placed entrants will take home $5,000 and $3,000, respectively. The winners will be announced by the judging panel at a press conference in Kingston, Jamaica, on July 17, 2009. The Scotiabank ChangeMaker challenge was developed to reflect the importance the bank places on its young customers and their ideas. Two Bahamians reach final 10 in bank contest Union to Royal Bank staff: ‘Step up to the plate’

PAGE 20

C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 3B is recruiting aThe Bahamas Development Bank Managing Director 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW 1$7,/(($7.,16RI :,1':$5'52$',03(5,$/33%2; 1$66$8%$+$0$63%R[66 LV DSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU1DWLRQDOLW\DQG &LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQDVFLWL]HQRI 7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQZKRNQRZVDQ\UHDVRQ ZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHG VKRXOGVHQGZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWV ZLWKLQWZHQW\HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH W K GD\ RI -XQH WRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS 3 n B y CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter c robards@tribunemedia.net GOVERNMENT’s first priority for the financial services sector is to create a secure, crime free environment for the Bahamas, the minister of state for finance said yesterday, while touting the great responsibility regulators have for helping the Government keep the integrity of the industry “sound”. Zhivargo Liang said the Government has an overarching responsibility to create economic growth by stabilizing the environment in which citizens and foreigners in pursuit of economic opportunities must do business. He said security for citizens and residents was a top priorityfor the Government with respect to financial services. “If you think this is unrelated to promoting a financial services industry development, you tell me how the work that you do in the places that you do them would be affected by a disorderly, crime-ridden Bahamas. Tell me whether there is anyOECD initiative that will cause your industry to shut down more quickly than an out-ofcontrol crime problem in the Bahamas,” said Mr Liang. He said the Bahamas WAS i n need of a serious discussion o n fundamental developmental i ssues, which has not been carried out in his time. According to him, the role of the Government need to be properly established so that it can put itself in a position to duly assist the financial services sector. “So the Government has, at the very fundamental level, to do that because the pursuit of every other noble objective is easier in an environment with peace and order,” Mr Laing said. “Once the Government has been able to put the physical infrastructure in place, government has to listen to the financial services sector.” Mr Liang said the Bahamas government’s relationship with the financial services sector, particularly through the Bahamas Financial Services Board (BFSB down the middle and equally distributed. “We established a relationship with the BFSB, whose responsibility it is to do promot ions,” he said. We fund it to the tune of $ 500,000, and they match the funds within the industry. We give them funds to promote; we also participate with them strategically in overseas missions where they think our presence would lend to the promotion exercise they are doing, and so in that joint partnership we try to work together. “Government is the protector of the integrity of the financial services sector. If the syst em is abused and misused, it is t he responsibility of the government.” Combating crime key to financial sector’s success Zhivargo Laing

PAGE 21

expires in October 2009, the company cannot yet deliver its services t o the Bahamian public. Tribune Business had previously reported that IP Solutions International was in talks with Systems Resource Group (SRG parent company of IndiGo Networks, to use parts of its infra-s tructure to deliver its services. It is not known how far talks have progressed, though. IP Solutions International had previously told Tribune Business that it had aimed to serve more than 5,000 Bahamians hotel rooms during its first year of operation. The company had also been talking to a ‘foreign partner’ who had offered to finance construction of its IP (Internet Protocol head-end technology for $2 million. number of channels to Cable’s basic offering were priced at between $10-$23 per month in Malta and Jamaica. “Cable Bahamas’ prices appear high despite the fact that the price for these services has not increased for the last 15 years,” the BTC privatisation committee’s consultation document said. The same “appears expensive” conclusion was reached with regard to BTC’s cellular and fixed-line international call prices. The former found that BTC’s calls per minute prices to the US, Canada and the UK were “slightly higher than peak rate calls in the Cayman Islands and Jamaica, and substantially higher than peak rates in other small jurisdictions such as Guernsey, Jamaica and Malta”. On the cellular side, BTC’s tariffs for pre-paid and postpaid calls at a domestic level were also “relatively expensive” when set against international comparatives, while the cost of services was increased by the fact customers paid to receive fixed-line and international calls. Spinks told Tribune Business that he apologised for not making it clear at Monday’s meeting that the incentive fee payments only applied to larger concession contracts, not the small retail outlets, carts and kiosks. Therefore, there would be nod iscrimination against smaller Bahamian firms. “The incentive fee would not apply to the small stores,” Mr Spinks told Tribune Business. “It’s an option if someone puts that into their bid, but it’s intended only to apply to the larger contracts, such as the gas station, where we only had three bidders. “I didn’t make that clear at the meeting. The incentive only applies to the larger contracts, not the 400 square foot retail stores.” Mr Spinks said of the six cart and kiosk concessions already awarded at LPIA, some 80 per cent of them were being operated by Bahamian small businesses. “We certainly support small business entities in there, and the incentive fee does not apply to those leases,” he added. Meanwhile, Mr Spinks confirmed reports reaching Tribune Business that the companies currently operating those kiosks and carts would have to re-bid for the contracts when the new US international departures building was opened in 2011. They will have to compete not only with each other, but also with new hopefuls. “That’s correct,” Mr Spinks confirmed to tribune Business. “That was made clear to them right from the beginning. The leases on the carts are for one year, with a one-year extension. “It was only for the current location [the current US departures terminal]. The one reason that we did the kiosks and carts in the current terminal building was that there was no room for more stores. We had to get retail in there somehow.” When the $409 million LPIA redevelopment is completed, Tribune Business understands the airport will have a total of 35,000 square feet of space for retail, restaurants and storage space. Mr Spinks said the retail mix in the new US departures terminal, when constructed, would be different from the current terminal with more “stores” and less kiosks and carts. The current plan is for eight stores of between 300-400 square feet, with two kiosks and “one or two carts” in the new US departures terminal. The new international departures building, when completed, will have four kiosks and “a couple of carts”. Mr Spinks said existing kiosk and cart tenants, such as Uniquely Bahamian, Sun Drops and My Ocean, had all expressed satisfaction with the performance of their airport businesses. And their rental income, along with the passenger facility fee, has been to NAD’s benefit. “Our annual losses, which were about $7 million when we took over, are down somewhere around $3 million-something or $4 million. We’ve picked up $3$4 million in cost savings and revenues,” Mr Spinks said. The NAD executive also confirmed that the gas station “contract is going to Sun Oil”, the FOCOL subsidiary that operates under the Shell brand. Both NAD and Sun Oil were now waiting on the Ministry of Works to finalise its plan for widening JFK Drive, which includes a roundabout by the ‘conch shell’ on the airport access road. NAD, explained Mr Spinks, was waiting for the Ministry to produce roundabout designs so that it could then assess how far back from the road the gas station’s location needed to be. Once this happened, a planning permission application could then be made. Mr Spinks added, though, that NAD had put plans for a fast food restaurant or retail outlet next to the gas station “on the shelf right now”, after not receiving the amount or quality of bids expected. He added that the Airport Authority Board had just signed off on the appointment of the general contractor for the LPIA redevelopment, a decision now awaiting ministerial approval. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE THE COLLEGE OFTHE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bsSCHOOL OF BUSINESSORIENTATION AND ADVISEMENT FOR FALL SEMESTER 2009ORIENTATION AND ADVISEMENT WILL TAKE PLACE FRIDAY, JUNE 19, 2009 FROM 9 AM TO 1 PM IN ROOMS B-5 AND B-6 FOR THE FOLLOWING STUDENTS ACCEPTED IN THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS (BBA GRAMMES: 1STUDENTS WITH EARLY ACCEPTANCE 2STUDENTS WHO HAVE COMPLETED COLLEGE PREP 3STUDENTS WHO HAVE COMPLETED THE UPGRADING PROGRAM (CEES ALL STUDENTS SHOULD BRING COPIES OF ACCEPTANCE LETTERS, COMPLETION LETTERS AND RELEVANT EXAM RESULTS SUCH AS THE BGCSE. To advertise in The Tribune just call 502-2371 today! FOCOL wins airport gas station contract ‘Multiple pla start-up still seeking major $14m bite Cable TV costs ‘appear high’ against rivals F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Owen Bethel

PAGE 22

C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 5B +HDOWKFLHQFH*HQHUDOFLHQFH*U /DQJXDJH$UWV*U Please submit resumeto: Human ResourcesDepartment | Doctors Hospital P.O.BoxN-3018||Nassau,Bahamas|orEmail:nwatkins@doctorshosp.com to be a part of ourWOW service team. WeWelcome you I ensure that vital equipment around the hospital are in perfect working condition according to strict ensuring that you and y our family receive safe and comfortable tr every time.. ”GraduateofBTVItechicalprogram; Previousexperiecewithbasicelectricaladplumbigduties; Abilitytotroubleshootofrelated to Healthcare services oralskills; Goodcustomerservice/or s kills AbilitytoworkT hesuccessful will: thehospital astateoftheart Performbasicrepairs serviceof Be forthe upkeepofthehospital | Salary with ENGINEERINGTECHNICIANBe jami Forbes,AssociateEngineeringTechnicianwww.doctorshosp.com n By STEPHEN OHLEMACHER Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP Company-issued cell phones might feel like a tether to the office even in workers’ offhours. The phones also are a taxable fringe benefit, and the Obama administration wants to change that. The administration has asked Congress to repeal the widely ignored tax on the personal use of company cell phones, saying it is outdated and difficult to enforce. The request Tuesday came a week after the Internal Revenue Service caused an uproar when it sought ideas for how better to enforce the law. A 1989 law says workers are supposed to count the value of personal calls on a company cell phone as taxable income. The cell phone tax, however, can be a pain for workers who increas ingly use mobile devices for texting, e-mailing and browsing the Internet sometimes for work, sometimes for personal use. “There’s been very uneven enforcement, said Marianna Dyson, a former IRS lawyer who now is an employment tax and fringe benefits expert with Miller & Chevalier in Washington. “I think most employers are reasonable. But do I see employers requiring employeesto document every single business call?” Dyson said. “It’s administratively burdensome.” IRS Commissioner Doug Shulman said the tax is “poorly understood by taxpayers,” and acknowledged it was difficult to enforce consistently. “The passage of time, advances in technology and the nature of communication in the modern workplace have rendered this law obsolete,” Shulman said in a statement. Shulman said he and Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner were asking Congress to repeal the tax. The House passed a bill to repeal the tax last year, but it stalled in the Senate. This year, bipartisan bills have been introduced in both chambers. “We need to modernize the laws to reflect the reality that cell phones, BlackBerrys and text messaging are an everyday extension of the workplace and are here to stay,” said Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass. “Cell phones are no longer executive perks or luxury items, and our tax code cannot treat them that way anymore.” J ust last week, the IRS issued a request for comments on ways to improve compliance with the law. One option suggested by the IRS would assume that personal use accounts for a quarter of the phone’s overall use. Another would require workers to document their personal use of company cell phones. Shulman denied that the IRS had been trying to “crack down” on workers who don’t p ay the tax. Instead, he said, the I RS was “attempting to simplif y the rules and eliminate uncertainty for businesses and individuals.” Some employers have faced big tax bills after failing to comply with the law. In 2008, the IRS audited two University of California branch es, in Los Angeles and San Diego. As part of a settlement, UCLA paid a tax assessment of $238,474 and UCSD paid $186,471. Industry representatives said they were pleased that the IRS changed its position. “We just think that this law was put into effect in a bygone era,” said John Walls, vice president of public affairs for CTIAThe Wireless Association, a trade group. “In 1989, cell phones were considered a luxury item that were actually referred to as car phones,” Walls said. “Now, we have unlimited calling on our cell phones. We have free nights and weekends. The company is not even paying for that. Why should I get taxed for that?” Push to repeal cell phone tax Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

PAGE 23

n By H JOSEF HEBERT Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP Legislation that would require greater use of renewable energy, make it easier to build power lines and allow oil and gas drilling near Florida’s coast advanced Wednesday in the Senate. The Energy and Natural Resources Committee voted 158 to clear the measure, although both Democrats and Republicans for different reasons said they had concerns about the bill and hoped to make major changes on the Senate floor. The legislation’s primary thrust is to expand the use of r enewable sources of energy such as wind, solar and geothermal sources as well as deal with the growing concerns about the inadequacies of the nation’s high-voltage power grid. But the bill also would remove the last congressional barrier to offshore oil and gas development, lifting a ban on drilling across a vast area in the e astern Gulf of Mexico that had b een put off limits by Congress t hree years ago. Drilling would be allowed within 45 miles of most of Florida’s coast and as close as 10 miles off the state’s Panhandle area. The Senate bill for the first time would establish a national requirement for utilities to produce 15 percent of their electricity from renewable sources, a contentious issue that is likely to attract heated debate once the bill is taken up by the full S enate, probably in the fall. Twenty-eight states currently have some renewable energy requirement for utilities, but supporters of the measure arguea national mandate is needed to spur such energy development. The legislation also would give much wider authority to federal regulators over the nation’s electricity grid. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission would be given authority to approve the siting of high voltage power lines if states fail to act and would be given additional powers over c yber security on the grid. S enate Majority Leader Harr y Reid, D-Nev., has said he h opes to take up energy legislation after the August recess, although it’s uncertain whether it will be merged with separate legislation addressing climate change. The House is working on a climate bill that includes many of the same energy issues addressed by the Senate bill. While the bill was approved by a safe margin in the committee its prospects in the full Senate are anything but certain. S everal senators called it too weak in its support of renewable energy development, while others said it ignored nuclear energy and greater domestic oil and gas production. “None of us got all we wanted,” said Sen. Jeff Bingaman, D-N.M., the committee’s chairman, who was forced to agree to a variety of compromises to give the bill a chance of advancing. That was apparent in the way the bill deals with renewable energy mandate. Bingaman, and many of the panel’s other Democrats, had w anted at least a 20 per cent r enewable energy requirement. T he bill requires 15 per cent renewable use by 2021, but also would allow utilities to avoid a fourth of that mandate by showing efficiency improvements. Renewable energy use could be cut further for utilities that increase their use of nuclear energy either from a new reactor or increased reactor output. “This is an extraordinary weak bill,” said Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt. But Sanders voted to advance the bill, as did Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn. Both senators said they hoped the bill will be strengthened. “I suspect their definition of strengthening might be some what different,” quipped Sen. Evan Bayh, D-Ind., whose own support of the bill came despite strong opposition to the federal renewable energy requirements on utilities. Sanders wants the renewable energy requirement to be much higher, at 25 per cent. Corker said the bill needs more to promote nuclear energy and domestic oil and gas production. The bill also calls for: Establishing a new office to steer grants and loan guar antees to clean energy projects. Creating an oil products reserve to be used if there are supply problems. Creating federal standards for efficiency standards for new building. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 7B Energy bill advances in the US Senate

PAGE 24

the things I will be harping on about over the next few months is to begin addressing education issues, begin addressing training issues, and to be begin addressing the competitiveness of small and medium-sized businesses in the country.” Regardless of whether the Bahamas entered into more free trade agreements such as the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA said addressing the competitiveness of a sector that accounted for 80 per cent of Bahamian businesses was key to this nation’s future economic success. “We still have, as a private sector, to develop better strategies to manage businesses,” he added. “We don’t know when the next crisis is going to hit, and with this one we got caught with our pants down. A lot of small and medium-sized businesses went out of business because they were just not prepared.” Mr Rolle pointed to the company he works for as marketing director, Bahamas Ferries, as an example of a Bahamian business whose ability to expand as needed hinged heavily on the competency and expertise of its workforce. “My company, Bahamas Ferries, needs more people trained in the marine industry. We’ve been growing at an astonishing rate,” he explained. “Over the past 10 years, we’ve really positioned ourselves as a leading operator. “If you look at the number of vessels in a business like ours, and the rate of growth of those vessels in an operation of our size and geographic reach, those companies usually grow by one vessel every five to seven years, and we’ve been getting one vessel every two years. “If we’re going to continue on that growth path, we need that technical expertise to be consistent with that. Our employees have to be technically qualified, because of our specialist needs that need specialist training.” Although the Government’s National Training Programme was focused on the training/retraining of 1,000 unemployed Bahamians selected from those who had registered with the National Insurance Board’s (NIB ment benefit scheme, Mr Rolle said he was also looking longterm. “One of the things that I am keenly aware of is we usually make short-term decisions,” Mr Rolle added. “With this particular project, I’m working diligently to make this a long-term, self-sustaining programme. It has tremendous merit. “It requires a lot of funding, a well-oiled, sustainable machine. That is why the Chamber is actively involved in this. It benefits our members. It’s a starting point. I see it as a springboard to a much larger initiative that addresses a much wider labour pool and a much wider skill set. If you have an educated and well-trained workforce, that goes directly to the bottom line.” Mr Rolle said the committee charged with overseeing and developing the National Training Programme was now developing the structure for the initiative, the process for selecting the 1,000 workers, the institutions that would be involved and ensuring “there is some long-term benefit”. Mr Rolle said the committee also wanted to ensure persons who completed the programme received some form of certification. The institutions involved will be the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI Bahamas (COB The committee was targeting summer 2009 for the programme’s start, which Mr Rolle acknowledged was an “aggressive” timescale, and autumn was the fall-back start date. The committee was also working on developing candidate profiles to ensure persons in the programme were placed on the appropriate course, and Mr Rolle said they were looking at a ‘work-study’ arrangement where course entrants could gain experience working in the private sector while also studying. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 48$/,7<:$7(5 Training initiative must be ‘long-term and self-sustaining’ T o adver tise in The Tribune just call 502-2371 today! F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

PAGE 25

n By DANIEL WAGNER AP Business Writers WASHINGTON (AP T en large US banks planned to r epay about $68 billion in b ailout money Wednesday, marking a new phase for the most visible government effortto relieve the credit crisis. The Treasury Department last week said the banks could begin repaying money they r eceived last fall under the $700 b illion financial system bailout k nown as the Troubled Asset Relief Programme, or TARP. The programme was the centerpiece of the government effort to relieve a global credit crunch and teetering financial markets last October. T he banks have since been n egotiating with Treasury over t he prices of stock warrants they issued as part of the TARP deal. When Treasury made its initial investments, it received the warrants, which give it the opportunity to buy the banks’ comm on shares in the future at a f ixed price. The value of the w arrants would depend on the shares’ future performance. The pricing of warrants has been a point of contention, slowing the repayment process. Banks want to pay less to tear up the warrants than Treasury s ays they’re worth. But until b anks have bought back the warrants, the banks will remain tied to the federal programme. Several banks said they had told Treasury they wished to buy the warrants, officially starting the negotiation process. T ARP became a flashpoint for critics of government intervention last fall, when Congress debated whether to commit $700 billion of taxpayer money to the effort. Wednesday’s repayment plans were described by three industry officials who spoke on c ondition of anonymity because not all the banks had yet made their official announcements. The banks repaying TARP are some of the industry’s largest, including JPMorgan Chase & Co., American Express Co., Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and Morgan Stanley. BB&TC orp. and U.S. Bancorp. also s aid they were repaying their T ARP money. Banks have been itching to quit TARP because it subjects them to limits on executive compensation and other rules. Before getting permission to r epay their TARP money, the banks had to meet a series of government requirements. Nine o f the 10 were subject to a stress test” designed to show h ow they would withstand a deeper recession. They also had to raise equity from investors and raise debt without government guarantees. But the banks still rely on some government subsidies, including debt guarantees from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. and discounted credit lines from the Federal Reserve. Wednesday was the first day the banks were eligible to repay the money. Goldman disclosed its plans in letters to congressional leaders Tuesday. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 9B rt "3)".%#".+#",".$&33 f &2-%&0/3*43/4&3b &*.352".$&2&$/6&2*&33tf &'2/-"(&.43f &'&22&%$/--*33*/.2&3&26&3r nbff 2&0"*%2&*.352".$&02&-*5-33n bbr 2&0"9-&.43".%/4)&22&$&*6"#,&3r .6&34-&.43*.3&$52*4*&3 '"*26",5&4)2/5()02/'*4".%,/333 rtr )&,%/-"452*49 /4&3r b "6"*,"#,&'/23",&3n .6&34-&.402/0&249t 2/0&2490,".4".%&15*0-&.4tbt /4","33&43 n r &.&2",*.352".$&'5.%3 .&"2.&%02&-*5-2&3&26&3n ".%*.($,"*-33n rt 4)&2,*"#*,*4*& .&"2.&%$/--*33*/.2&3&26& /4&n 5&4/2&*.352&23f $$/5.430"9"#,&".%"$$25",3 /4&f /4",,*"#*,*4*&3rnnr t ttt &02&3&.4&%#9 )"2&$"0*4", 54)/2*:&%*335&%".%'5,,90" bbb/2%*."293)"2&3/'&"$) &.&2",2&3&26&n &4"*.&%&"2.*.(3bt ttt&&"$$/-0".9*.(./4&34/'*.".$*",34"4&-&.43 )&3&'*.".$*",34"4&-&.437&2&"54)/2*:&%'/2*335&/.#&)",'/'4)&/"2%/'2&$4/23/.02*,nbb#9 *2&$4/2*2&$4/2 !&"2&.%&%&$&-#&27*4)$/22&30/.%*.('*(52&3'/2 802&33&%*.")"-*".%/,,"23 .#+"*('&#&! #!,) ') '**.)#++&()%#,%* %#,%+/ bf +')#&*,))*t )(%#,%* *#&(%#,%)* ')+ '$#'+)&* )2f (%#,%*f $#%*#& '%%#**#'&*#&,)) ' $'**)#&*,)&nr ).)#+#&!(' #+ bn )*+#&* '+")#&'%fn #&&+,&)#&* '&#&-*+%&+*#&+#* &$* '&fb )*+**r &#*+)+#n t /(#&$$)* ,%&'' ##!&' b nbt .. n #'.. .. b bb #'.. bbbbbbt + ($&&%$# #'$& 5$5(.(/50)$4+-084 %!1%-$%$%#%,"%16)3(#.11%2/.-$)-'&)'41%2&.1/1%22%$)-!(!,$.++!12 %3)-#.,% $*423,%-32&. -%!1-%$/1%,)4,1%2%15% -3%1%23)-#.,% )5)$%-$)-#.,% -3%1%23%7/%-2% (!-'%)--%34-1%!+)9%$'!)-2.-)-5%23,%-32)-2%#41)3)%2 %/1%#)!3).rtr &3($4('(&3($4(,/$44(54 %)-241!-#%1%#.5%1)%2 4%&1.,!'%-3tr %&%11%$#.,,)22).-1%2%15%b %/!)$1%)-241!-#%/1%,)4,2 %/!8,%-32!-$.3(%11%#%)5!"+%2 /&3($4('(&3($,/-,$%,-,5,(4 -%!1-%$/1%,)4,1%2%15%tfn !-$)-'#+!),2 -%!1-%$#.,,)22).-1%2%15% %3.1%)-241%12r ##.4-32/!8!"+%!-$!##14!+2 (5&$4+1307,'('%901(3$5,/*$&5,7,5,(4 " %3/+!#%,%-3.&3%1,$%/.2)32 41#(!2%.&)-5%23,%-3/1./%13)%2br: #(!2%.&/1./%138/+!-3!-$%04)/,%-3btr !341)38/41#(!2%.&)-5%23,%-32)-2%#41)3)%2!-$".-$2 .#%%$2&1.,2!+%.&)-5%23,%-32)-2%#41)3)%2rbbbb -3%1%231%#%)5%$ )5)$%-$21%#%)5%$n &$4+1307,'('%9(',/,/7(45,/*$&5,7,5,(4 )5)$%-$2/!)$ -3%1%23/!)$rnt &$4+64(',/),/$/&,/*$&5,7,5,(4 ,/&3($4(,/&$4+$/'&$4+(26,7$-(/54 !2(!-$#!2(%04)5!+%-32!3"%')--)-'.&8%!1 $4+$/'&$4+(26,7$-(/54$5(/'0)9($3f //+%,%-3!+)-&.1,!3).%,)4,3!7/!)$tfn BTC cellular charging branded an ‘anomaly’ e ffect, cross-subsidising the f ixed-line customer and serv ice”. In addition, the ‘receiver pays’ principle also eroded the ability of BTC’s pre-paid cellu lar customers to control their telecoms costs the very reason they had selected this ser vice and made them reluctant to answer their phones, again defeating the product’s very purpose. It also meant that international and domestic-orginated fixed-line calls would be terminated if BTC’s pre-paid cellular customers did not have suffi cient credit on their phones for the call’s duration. “It appears that the charging anomalies outlined in the foregoing paragraphs are not best practice, and are not in the best interest of the Bahamian public going forward,” the BTC privatisation committee’s paper said. “A move towards calling party pays for all domestic and international calls would enablea single, consistent charging approach without anomalies and without overlapping revenues.” The paper added that the current absence of competition in the cellular market, where BTC enjoys monopoly status and will do until effectively two years after privatisation meant that Bahamian consumer cur rently had no choice over the charging/payment plan they preferred. The BTC privatisation committee is also looking to move away from the ‘discretionary’ approach to retail price regula tion in the communications market, as employed by the soon-to-be-replaced Public Utilities Commission (PUC adopt a process that is “more transparent”. Pointing to the fact that both the PUC and BTC had concerns over the “high level of dis cretion” employed currently, the consultation document said: “The process for approval of price changes has proved timeconsuming and provides very little incentive for BTC to be efficient. “All price changes, including decreases, are required to be the subject of public consultations. The requirement to apply for permission for all price changes appears to be more onerous than in many other regulatory regimes. “International best practice is to move away from this sortof discretionary price setting to a more transparent process that provides a balance between consumer protection, flexibility and incentives for operators to be innovative whilst promoting efficiency.” The consultation paper said that while regulators in more developed countries only regu lated pricing at the wholesale level in their communications sectors, the Government felt retail price regulation was necessary because “the level of competition in the Bahamas may be too low at present and in the near future”. The Government is looking at the ‘price cap’ approach to regulation of the Bahamian communications sector. US banks plan to repay about $68bn in bailout money

PAGE 26

n By JIM KUHNHENN Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP President Barack Obama proposed new “rules of the road” for the nation’s financial system yesterday, casting the changes as an essential response to the economic crisis and the greatest regulatory transformation since the Great Depression. Obama blamed the crisis on “a culture of irresponsibility” that he said had taken root from Wall Street to Washington to Main Street, and he said regulations crafted to deal with the depression of the 1930s had been “overwhelmed by the speed, scope and sophistication of a 21st century global economy.” The Obama plan would give new powers to the Federal Reserve to oversee the entire financial system and would also create a new consumer protection agency to guard against credit and other abuses that played a big role in the current crisis. In remarks prepared for delivery later in the day, Obama attributed much of the country’s current problem to “a cascade of mistakes and missed opportunities” that happened over decades. The Fed’s expanded authority and the rest of the new rules would reach into currently unregulated regions of the financial markets. An 88-page white paper released by the administration detailed an effort to change a regime that Obama’s economic team maintained had become too porous for the innovations and intricacies of today’s financial markets. Obama said the plan was designed in consultation with lawmakers, regulators and the institutions it seeks to police. “We seek a careful balance,” Obama said. The plan would do away with the Office of Thrift Supervision, replacing it with a system aimed at closing gaps in coverage and keeping institutions from shopping for the most lenient bank regulator. The consumer agency would place new restrictions on lenders and mortgage brokers, requiring them to offer simple loans to consumers. “Mortgage brokers will be held to higher standards, exotic mortgages that hide exploding costs will no longer be the norm, home mortgage disclosures will be reasonable, clearly written, and concise,” Obama said. The president offered his version of the source of the financial crisis, tracing the troubles to complex financial instruments such as asset-backed securities that ended up concentrating risk. “It was easy money,” he said. “But these schemes were built on a pile of sand.” The regulatory system either had gaps or overlaps with little accountability, he said. “Millions of Americans who have worked hard and behaved responsibly have seen their life dreams eroded by the irresponsibility of others and the failure of their government to provide adequate oversight,” Obama said. The financial sector and law makers from both parties concede the need for significant changes in the rules that gov ern the intricate and intercon nected world of banking and investment. But the details of Obama’s proposal already are facing resistance, signaling a tough sell for a president who iss pending major political capital on his health care overhaul. Under Obama’s plan, the Federal Reserve would gain power to supervise holding companies and large financial insti tutions considered so big that their failure could undermine the nation’s financial system. But even as it gained new powers, the Fed would lose some banking authority to the new Consumer Financial Protection Agency. Obama’s proposal would require the Federal Reserve, which now can independently use emergency powers to bail out failing banks, to first obtain Treasury Department approval before extending credit to institutions in “unusual and exigent circumstances.” The president predicted that critics will find that his efforts got oo far or fall short. The expanded Fed role and the new consumer regulator will be sub jects of fierce debate in Con gress. Many bankers oppose a new consumer protection regu lator, and many lawmakers worry the Fed could become too powerful. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1 .841.28Abaco Markets1.391.390.000.1270.00010.90.00% 11.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.436.94Bank of Bahamas6.946.940.000.2440.26028.43.75%0 .890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3 .603.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.2010.18Cable Bahamas11.3911.390.001.4060.2508.12.19%2 .902.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.000.2490.04011.01.46% 7.505.50Commonwealth Bank (S15.505.500.001,5000.4190.36013.16.55% 4.781.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.453.39-0.060.1110.05230.51.53%2 .951.32Doctor's Hospital1.501.600.102,4340.2400.0806.75.00% 8 .207.50Famguard7.767.760.000.4200.30018.53.87% 12.5010.00Finco10.9710.970.000.3220.52034.14.74% 11.7910.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.3810.380.000.7940.40013.13.85%5 .554.95Focol (S5.095.090.000.3320.15015.32.95% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9.025.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.0010.50J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.37581.3124Colina Bond Fund1.37581.654.83 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8962-1.49-3.35 1.46721.3915Colina Money Market Fund1.46722.345.43 3.60903.1821Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.18216.01-13.90 12.920912.2702Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.92092.405.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.56119.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.25111.724.12 1.05781.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.05782.135.78 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0271-0.572.71 1.05541.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.05541.745.54 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S131-May-09 31-May-09 W W W WW W . .B B I I S S X X B B A A H H A A M M A A S S . .C C O O M M | | T T E E L L E E P P H HO ON N E E : :2 2 4 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 -2 23 3 3 3 0 0 | | F F A A C C S S I I M M I I L L E E : : 2 2 4 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 2 23 3 2 2 0 0NAV Date 31-Mar-09 29-May-09 30-Apr-09 31-May-09 31-Dec-08 31-May-09 30-Apr-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 30-Apr-09 Prime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7%T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L L L L : : C C O O L L I I N N A A 2 24 4 2 2 5 5 0 0 2 2 7 70 0 1 1 0 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L LF F I I D D E E L LI I T T Y Y 2 24 4 2 23 35 5 6 6 7 7 7 7 6 64 4 | | F FG G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K K E E T T S S 2 24 4 2 23 3 9 9 6 6-4 40 0 0 00 0 | | C C O O L L O O N N I I A A L L 2 24 4 2 2 5 50 0 2 2 7 75 5 2 2 5 5FINDEX: CLOSE 780.49 | YTD -6.51% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSTUESDAY, 16 JUNE 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,571.51 | CHG 0.45 | %CHG 0.03 | YTD -140.85 | YTD % -8.23BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases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bama unveils ‘new rules of road’ for financial regulation Barack Obama (AP

PAGE 27

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 74F/23C Low: 78F/26C Low: 75F/24C Low: 77F/25C Low: 78 F/26 C Low: 79F/26C Low: 78 F/26 C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 94F/34C High: 93F/34C High: 88 F/31 C High: 88 F/31 C High: 89F/32C High: 88 F/31C High: 88F/31C Low: 78F/26C High: 88F/31C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 89F/32C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 73F/23C High: 87 F/31 C Low: 75F/24C High: 87 F/31 Low: 73F/23C High: 85F/29C Low: 75 F/24C High: 87F/31C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 91F/33C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 89F/32C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 88F/31C Low: 77F/25C High: 91 F/33 C Low: 79F/26C High: 92F/33C High: 88 F/31 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JUNE 18 TH , 2009, PAGE 11B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Partly sunny with a heavy shower. Mainly clear with a shower late. Partly sunny with a thunderstorm. A full day of sunshine. Partial sunshine. High: 88 Low: 78 High: 89 High: 90 High: 90 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny with a shower possible. High: 88 Low: 79 Low: 78 Low: 79 AccuWeather RealFeel 103F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 90F 101-90F 108-88F 109-86F 108-81F Low: 77 TODAYTONIGHTFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................93F/34C Low ....................................................77F/25C Normal high ......................................87F/31C Normal low ........................................74F/23C Last year's high .................................. 91 F/33C Last year's low .................................. 75 F/24C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.05" Year to date ................................................13.74" Normal year to date ....................................15.54" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU New First Full Last Jun. 22 Jun. 29Jul. 7Jul. 15 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:20 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 8:02 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 2:22 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 3:50 p.m. Today Friday Saturday Sunday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 4:01 a.m.2.210:01 a.m.0.1 4:34 p.m.2.911:07 p.m.0.3 5:02 a.m.2.210:58 a.m.0.0 5:33 p.m.3.0----6:01 a.m.2.312:06 a.m.0.1 6:31 p.m.3.211:55 a.m.-0.1 6:58 a.m.2.41:03 a.m.0.0 7:28 p.m.3.312:52 p.m.-0.2 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco91/3277/25pc89/3176/24t Amsterdam67/1952/11c63/1750/10sh Ankara, Turkey77/2546/7pc79/2648/8s Athens86/3070/21s84/2867/19s Auckland56/1347/8s57/1343/6s Bangkok90/3279/26r90/3278/25t Barbados86/3076/24pc86/3076/24s Barcelona80/2668/20s81/2767/19sh Beijing91/3271/21pc77/2562/16pc Beirut84/2864/17s78/2573/22s Belgrade87/3061/16s97/3667/19s Berlin76/2450/10c68/2048/8r Bermuda77/2570/21sh79/2671/21sh Bogota66/1845/7c66/1846/7pc Brussels68/2050/10pc64/1748/8sh Budapest87/3060/15pc93/3355/12s Buenos Aires64/1752/11pc66/1855/12pc Cairo97/3671/21s101/3873/22s Calcutta107/4188/31pc97/3685/29pc Calgary72/2248/8pc68/2046/7pc Cancun90/3275/23t88/3172/22r Caracas82/2771/21pc81/2771/21t Casablanca88/3170/21s92/3369/20s Copenhagen67/1951/10pc63/1751/10sh Dublin61/1645/7sh63/1746/7pc Frankfurt72/2254/12c63/1746/7r Geneva 83/28 61/16 sh 68/2052/11t Halifax 74/23 50/10 s 64/17 50/10 c Havana 90/32 70/21 t 89/31 72/22 sh Helsinki 63/17 45/7s61/1646/7sh Hong Kong 87/30 79/26 sh 87/30 80/26s Islamabad 108/42 74/23 s 112/44 77/25 s Istanbul77/2562/16pc80/2668/20s Jerusalem 81/27 60/15s84/2861/16s Johannesburg 58/1446/7t58/1445/7t Kingston 86/3077/25t88/3178/25r Lima72/2258/14s72/2259/15s London68/2050/10pc68/2052/11pc Madrid88/3164/17t95/3564/17pc Manila82/2777/25t83/2878/25r Mexico City77/2555/12t73/2255/12r Monterrey97/3673/22pc97/3674/23s Montreal68/2059/15r72/2263/17c Moscow66/1845/7pc64/1748/8pc Munich83/2857/13s58/1448/8r Nairobi79/2654/12sh80/2654/12c New Delhi 105/4084/28s106/4186/30s Oslo68/2046/7sh63/1750/10sh Paris72/2252/11sh68/2050/10pc Prague 78/25 56/13 pc 66/18 48/8 t Rio de Janeiro74/2365/18pc75/2366/18s Riyadh113/4584/28s104/4081/27s Rome 86/30 66/18 s 85/29 63/17 s St. Thomas87/3079/26sh88/3179/26sh San Juan72/2245/7pc73/2238/3pc San Salvador 84/28 70/21 t 85/29 73/22 t Santiago 52/1141/5r48/841/5r Santo Domingo86/3074/23sh85/2974/23sh Sao Paulo 68/20 52/11 c 69/20 54/12s Seoul88/3167/19pc87/3064/17pc Stockholm 59/15 48/8 r 61/16 50/10 sh Sydney 62/16 49/9 sh61/1649/9sh Taipei89/3177/25pc89/3177/25sh T okyo 70/21 66/18 sh 72/22 62/16 sh T oronto 71/2159/15pc75/2361/16sh Trinidad84/2868/20pc87/3068/20pc V ancouver 68/20 55/12 c 69/2056/13pc Vienna 84/2868/20s91/3259/15s W arsaw 70/21 50/10 c 64/17 48/8 r Winnipeg 77/25 63/17 t 79/2660/15t H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayFriday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles82F Friday:S at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles82F Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Friday:S at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Friday:S at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque84/2862/16t84/2862/16t Anchorage64/1752/11pc67/1953/11pc Atlanta97/3673/22pc96/3574/23s Atlantic City73/2264/17r82/2770/21c Baltimore78/2564/17t86/3068/20t Boston65/1858/14r67/1962/16sh Buffalo66/1854/12sh69/2062/16t Charleston, SC94/3475/23t100/3777/25s Chicago79/2666/18t82/2763/17t Cleveland72/2261/16pc82/2768/20t Dallas99/3776/24s97/3675/23s Denver81/2752/11t81/2755/12pc Detroit78/2560/15pc86/3066/18t Honolulu88/3176/24s88/3176/24s Houston96/3577/25s96/3577/25s HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayFriday TodayFridayTodayFriday Indianapolis87/3071/21t90/3268/20t Jacksonville97/3676/24t100/3777/25t Kansas City95/3574/23pc88/3169/20t Las Vegas97/3673/22pc100/3779/26s Little Rock96/3574/23s97/3675/23s Los Angeles80/2664/17pc78/2564/17pc Louisville92/3375/23t94/3475/23pc Memphis97/3676/24s96/3574/23s Miami89/3178/25t91/3278/25pc Minneapolis79/2663/17t79/2664/17t Nashville96/3573/22s95/3574/23s New Orleans95/3577/25s95/3577/25s New York68/2061/16r79/2666/18c Oklahoma City98/3674/23pc94/3471/21pc Orlando94/3474/23t96/3576/24t Philadelphia75/2364/17r83/2866/18c Phoenix 101/38 78/25 s 97/3675/23c Pittsburgh75/2360/15c82/2764/17t Portland, OR 77/2557/13pc71/2155/12pc Raleigh-Durham 92/33 72/22 t 97/36 71/21 t St. Louis97/3677/25s94/3471/21t Salt Lake City 76/24 58/14 pc 84/2865/18s San Antonio 100/37 76/24 pc 98/36 75/23 s San Diego72/2266/18pc71/2166/18pc San Francisco 74/23 56/13 s 72/2254/12s Seattle71/2156/13pc69/2053/11pc T allahassee 99/3775/23s102/3874/23s T ampa 93/33 78/25 t 93/33 78/25t Tucson94/3472/22pc88/3168/20c W ashington, DC 81/27 65/18t87/3073/22t UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T -storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

PAGE 28

C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Somethin’ for EveryoneON THE GO.NOW OPENAT THE LYNDEN PINDLING INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT IN THE U.S. DEPARTURE LOUNGE AND THE DOMESTIC / INTERNATIONAL TERMINAL.DOWNTOWN LOCATION COMING SOON.(OPPOSITE THE BRITISH COLONIAL HILTON)

PAGE 29

The Tribune The T ribune M y V o i c e , M y N e w s p a p e r ! Thursday, June 18th, 2009

PAGE 30

PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PAGE 31

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 3

PAGE 32

PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PAGE 33

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 5

PAGE 34

PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PAGE 35

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 7

PAGE 36

PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PAGE 37

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 9

PAGE 38

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 11

PAGE 39

PAGE 12, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PAGE 40

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 13

PAGE 41

PAGE 14, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PAGE 42

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 15

PAGE 43

PAGE 16, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PAGE 44

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 17

PAGE 45

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f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
PAGE 46

The Tribune Thursday, June 18, 2009 PG 19 RELIGION RELIGIOUS NEWS, STORIES AND CHURCH EVENTS n By LLOYD ALLEN T rib une Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net THIS Sunday is Father’s Day, and the question being asked is what are the elements that contribute to being a good father. There have been significant cries throughout the local community in recent times calling for more fathers to step up to the plate and it seems somewhat futile to expect those Absent W ithout Leave (A WOL) fathers to become good ones especial ly if they don‘t know how . While a tur n ar ound for these men may seem far fetched, some men argue that it is a real possibility and must first begin with their acknowl edgment of responsibility. Proverbs 22 verse 6 says : “Train up a child in the way he should go, and when he is old he will not depar t fr om it.” The r esponsibility for the r earing and training a child specifically boys is the duty of the father. Joy FM 101.9 radio personality Ker mit ‘T’ aka Ker mit T aylor , said the good life he shares with his family today would not have been possible without the help of his father. He explained: “As a child growing up, my father worked as a family island commissioner. So it meant that every three to five years I was always on a new family island. “Living in the family island with my father being commissioner was fun, because my dad was known as the ‘Chief.’ However he was always busy, but my dad was the kind of person who made it a point that all of his kids got an education.” Coming from a family of six childr en, he r emembers his father being pr esent and r ooting for all the kids to get the most out of school. His biggest challenge was in math, and his father always made certain that he attended after school classes. “I r emember on one occasion I skipped those classes for about three days out of the week, and my tutor told my dad that she hadn’ t seen me. SEE page 23 FINDING THE RIGHT FORMULA F A THER FOR BEING A GOOD THIS father of three has devoted himself to them, being as active, concerned, and committed to their lives as his father was to him.

PAGE 47

The Tribune P G 20 Thursday, June 18, 2009 RELIGION “Holy!Holy! Holy! Merciful and Mighty, God in three persons, blessed Trinity” and “Ever Three And Ever One, Consubstantial, Co-eternal” are some of the phrases to be found in hymns which celebrate the Most Holy Trinity. Individual hymns based on a particular person of the Trinity such as Praise to the Lor d the Almighty the King of Cr eation , What a Friend we have in Jesus , Come Down O love Divine , capture some of the distinctive characteristics associated with these persons of the T rinity . It is ver y uplifting and infor mative to read, study, pray and sing the hymns. Matthew 28:19 states: “Ther efor e go and make disciples baptising them in the name of Father and the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.” This is our charge to put into practice. We are commanded to build the Kingdom of God using the name of the Trinity as depicted by their relationship One to Another (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.). Some questions worth asking ourselves are: Are we going? Are we encouraging anyone to consider ar elationship with our Lor d and Saviour? Are we making any disciples at home or abr oad? Some questions to put to friends, family members and colleagues are: Do you know that you ar e created in God the Creator’s image? Do you know that God, the Son, Jesus Christ, died on the cr oss to save you from sin? Do you know that God the Holy Spirit will live within you if you allow it? The actual word Trinity is not mentioned in the Bible but her e ar e some passages from the New International Version which capture the nature of the r oles and r elationships between the members of our triune Godhead: Let them bring you to a place of awe, wonder and worship: Mark 1:10-12: “As Jesus was coming up out of the water, he saw heaven being tor n open and the Spirit descending on him like a dove. And a voice came fr om heaven: "Y ou ar e my Son, whom I love; with you I am well pleased." At once the Spirit sent him out into the desert” Acts 1:4-5: On one occasion, while he was eating with them, he gave them this command: "Do not leave Jerusalem, but wait for the gift my Father promised, which you have heard me speak about. For John baptised with[a] water , but in a few days you will be baptised with the Holy Spirit." John 3:5 and 16: “Jesus answered, "I tell you the truth, no one can enter the kingdom of God unless he is born of water and the Spirit. Flesh gives birth to flesh, but the Spirit[b] gives birth to spirit"For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son,[f] that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.” Romans :5: 5-6: “And hope does not disappoint us, because God has poured out his love into our hearts by the Holy Spirit, whom he has given us. You see, at just the right time, when we wer e still powerless, Christ died for the ungodly Roman 8: 15“you r eceived the Spirit of sonship.[g] And by him we cry, "Abba,[h] Father." The Spirit himself testifies with our spirit that we ar e God's childr en. Now if we ar e children, then we are heirsheirs of God and co-heirs with Christ.” Holy! Holy! Holy! REV.ANGELA C BOSFIELD P ALA CIOUS MEDIT ATION n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net BAHAMAS Wisdom Academy will be hosting an educational seminar under the theme: “A Heart to Give,” as a continued effort to raise awareness throughout the Bahamian community about special needs children and the importance of education. The seminar will stretch over a two day period at the Chapel on the Hill, Tonique Williams-Darling Highway June 19 at 7.30pm and June 20 at 9am. Seminar host and founder of Bahamas Wisdom Academy, Michelle Wildgoose, said she decided to start a special needs school because of her son, Mikhail. “I have dif ficulty finding schools for him. So I had to go about and change my whole car eer path over the past 12 years. I got my degree in education and then my Master in Business Administration. I then went to University if Phoenix and did my Masters in Special Education. There are so many persons out ther e in our community who need help with their special needs childr en and during this time when everything is so expensive, we want to shar e something with the community,” Mrs Wildgoose said. Mrs W ildgoose said the seminar s main goal is to give information to the community from different perspectives. “Information is key now a days and with the lack of information we find ourselves not knowing what to do when we have challenges with our children. However, when we share information, those of us who don’t know, we will then understand how to handle our kids better,” Mrs Wildgoose said. Speakers include Arthurlue Rahming, who will share on the heart of an advocate for adult literacy, Michelle Ihring, a special educator, Gary Reece, will speak on a heart of an overcomer and to parents who have challenges with teenagers and young adults, Dr Norman Gay, will speak on a heart of a physician offering information on various supplements kids need, and Opposition Leader Perry Christie. “Mr Christie will be speaking on the heart of a parent due to the fact that he has a special needs child. I am sure the nation would benefit hearing from him. So many of us don’t want to share relative to our personal information but hearing it coming from a man, would really touch the heart of others and encourage people not to give in or give up on their kids,” Mrs W ildgoose said. Mrs W ildgoose said she would like to ensure persons get at least gain wisdom from the experience. e want this educational seminar to become a stimulus to awaken our nation to the many educational challenges and resolve to find solutions as a nation to help with the challenges we face in our everyday situations. So together, we can make a differ ence her e.” AT THE HEART OF SPECIAL EDUCATION MICHELLE WILDGOOSE, Founder and Principal of Bahamas Wisdom Academy.

PAGE 48

THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, June 18, 2009 PG 21 METHODIST work on Andros b egan during the year 1841. We extract t he following account from the "Report of the Societies and Schools in the Bahamas" for the year ending December 1845: As soon as possible after the arrival of the late Wm Wheelock among us, J Wm Pearson visited the society at Andros Island and reported on his return that he found them united and pious and a few were added to their number during his short sojourn among them. The voyage thither was very rough and stormy and on their return perilous in the extreme as the vessel sprung a leak and became unmanageable; but through ceaseless exertions at the pump and the mechanical ingenuity of the passengers and crew and the animating exhortations of Mr Pearson they made the west end of Providence. We hear of the leaders the most pleasing accounts of the consistent deportment of the members and hope soon as the committee shall send us additional help not only to visit the society at Coakley T own but our members scatter ed ever ywher e ar ound the shor es of that lar ge fertile island.” This account gives us a glimpse into the histor y of the early days of Methodist work on Andros. It appears that by 1845 the Methodist members were not to be found in one particular locality, but "scattered everywhere." When one of the "charity" schools at Nicholl's Town was transferred to the Methodists "the wooden school house was now also used as a chapel and a day school." A teacher was employed from 1843-45 (Bicentenary Souvenir Magazine, 1960). The day school teacher had to be withdrawn because of "want of means to remunerate his services." (The Report of the Societies and Schools, 1846). The membership of the society on the island was 31 in 1847 and 22 in 1848. By 1856 when the report on Andros appears under the New Pr ovidence Circuit report, there were 20 members meeting under the char ge of one male and one female leader . These leaders were "steady and faithful souls" who r epor ted "favourably" on the state of their classes. The account with which this outline was opened gives us an indication of the difficult circumstances under which t he work of ministry was carried out on A ndros. Added to this, the report for 1863 reveals that: "Andros Island and the Biminis have not been visited during the year." The reason given is the absence of the New Providence preachers in Abaco and Eleuthera for Missionary purpose. The membership continued to decline, howbeit, very slightly. The 1864 report on Bimini and Andros shows 16 members at Bimini and 19 at Andros and adds, "for the present we have nothing special to report”. A society was formed at Staniard Creek in 1887 and a chapel was built in 1888. Local sources on Andros inform us that the Methodist Church at Stafford Creek was built when the RevJ Barrett (Bahamian minister resident minister and William Woodside was a local preacher in the society. The chapel was completed in 1899 and was used as a place of refuge during the hurricane of 1899. However, the Bicentenary Souvenir Magazine (1960 built in 1904 and r ebuilt in 1928. The hur ricane of 1899 almost wr ecked the chapel at Nicholl's Town. The Synod of 1902 r epor ted the following statistics for Andros: 95 members, 1 missionary, 4 local preachers, 6 class leaders and 20 Sunday School t eachers. U p to the Synod of 1903 there were four churches and one other preaching place. The Synod of 1906 reported thata new chapel was in the course of erection at Mastic Point. "This is a new cause and is most successful and promising. The people are working willingly and giving generously. At present services are held in the houses of some of the members." The chapel at Mastic Point was completed in 1909. By the Synod of 1914 a new rest house at Calabash Bay was completed and was being used for divine worship. In 1918 the rest house at Calabash Bay was slated to be removed to Stafford Creek. In 1919 the chapel at Nicholl's Town was completed and the rest house at Staniard Creek was renovated. The chapel at Mastic Point was destroyed by hurricane in 1926 and rebuilt in 1929. During the period of the construction of the new chapel, worship services were held in the rest/mission house. This construction was a community af fair. Some members r ecall that the Rev Eric M W alker , the r esident minister , also assisted, carrying baskets of lime on his shoulders. (Next time – Part 34 – The Methodist Church in Andros 1841 – 1929) JIM LAWLOR The Methodist Church in Andros 1841 1929 PART 33 Matt.3:17. And lo a voice fr om heav en, saying. This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased. As we r eligiously celebrate the day and concepts of Father's day and based upon the deterioration of our nation, it is quite clear to me that as educated and as spiritually spooky as we are; a vast majority of the fathers within and outside our homes have yet to understand the importance of a Father's Af fir mation. Again, who am I to speak on such issue? Seeing that I'm not one of the country's religious bishops, doctors, apostles, etc; and I don't have a big church building, I host no conferences nor do I have a TV ministr y . Well, with that being said I hasten to say that if these religious clowns (themselves tance of a Father's Af fir mation the church in the Bahamas would be a force to be reckoned with in both the spirit and natural realm; but it's obvious this is not the case with the church today . Watch this! Even Yeshuwa Messiah, before He began His ear thly ministr y waited to be af fir med by His Father (Matt.3:17b. This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased) From the religious perspective I can assure you that with the over four thousand chur ches we've got thr oughout the Bahamas; about 60 per cent of them have broken away from another chur ch due to some strife or confusion. And if the tr uth be told many of their spiritual fathers can't honestly say that “This is my beloved son or daughter, in whom I am well pleased” There are some dynamics at work as it r elates to the so-called spiritual fathers of today not being able to affirm sons and daughters in the ministr y; let's look at a few of them. 1. Many of the chur ch fathers today, themselves have not been affirmed by a spiritual father; and it is a pr oven fact that people who wer e hur t befor e have no problem hurting others. 2. The church fathers are more focused on building their empire rather than preparing and giving birth to spiritual sons and daughters to fur ther advance the kingdom of God 3. The affirmation and nurturing of sons and daughters is a costly pr ocess both spiritually and naturally . W atch this! In the natural, a good father will stop at nothing, and spear no expense to see to it that his son or daughter succeeds in life; even greater than he has done. The father, son relationship is so impor tant to the kingdom of God; her e's what Y eshuwa said. John 5:20. For the Father loveth the Son, and showeth him all things that himself doeth: and he will show him greater works than these, that ye may mar vel. So, instead of just religiously celebrating Father's Day; why not take the bull by its hor n and pr operly deal with the issues of fathers in this countr y. We can't keep on beating fathers and asking them to step up to the plate, wher e as many of them went into father hood without the true knowledge and wisdom of being a father; and also being affirmed by their fathers. Religion, tradition and thinking have compiled all the junk together and came up with what we now celebrate and call Father's Day. What we've yet to understand is that ther e is a huge dif fer ence between a father and a daddy; being the educated, religious people that we are, I need not give the Greek and Hebrew translation / interpretation of the word father. For I know quite well that you've gotten just about every book, tape, video and cd there is from the powerful conferences you've attended. Y et our homes and nation ar e still cr ying out for the mani festation of fathers. I'm not hating on the men, because there are truly some very good fathers out there; but the numbers are greater on the daddies' side. The havoc that A father’s affirmation PASTOR MATTHEW ALLEN SEE page 23

PAGE 49

The Tribune P G 22 Thursday, June 18, 2009 RELIGION n By PASTOR WILBUR OUTTEN Senior Pastor Freeport Bible Church “I am not writing this to shame you, but to warn you, as my dear children. Event hough you have ten thousand guardians in Christ, you do not havem any fathers, for in Christ Jesus I became your father through the gospel. Therefore I urge you to imitate me.” (1 Corinthians 4:14-16-NIV Fathers play a pivotal role in the lives of their children. A US News and World Report article stated that more than virtually any other factor, a father's presence in the family will determine a child's success and happiness. The article went on to say that the importance of fathers is demonstrated by what occurs when fathers aren't around and involved. Studies show that children who grow up without fathers are more likely to drop out of high school, commit delinquent acts or engage in drugs and alcohol use. A local study showed that 90 per cent of Bahamian young men incarcerated, did not have a r elationship with their fathers. In order to have good fathers, we need good men who ar e prepared to model what God wants. Her e are six essential traits of a Godly man and father: 1. A Godly man or father leads with clarity Ephesians chapter 5 states that the husband is the head of the wife as Christ is the head of the church. This ther efore suggests that the husband or the father is the head of the home. A Godly man and father should paint a clear pictur e of the future he envisions for his family that will inspire and motivate them to pursue it. In order to lead, however, you must have some sense of dir ection as to wher e you are going. As fathers you have the r esponsibility and obligation to lead, you must ther efor e also model the life you wish your chil dr en to emulate. If you ar e following Christ, you can tell your children with confidence to follow your lead. 2. A Godly father loves unconditionally It is easy to love your children when they are doing well, getting good grades in school etc., however, when they are not doing well some parents find it hard to love them. Love is not performance based. Unconditional love is love in spite of; that is the way God loves us. “While we wer e still sinners, Christ died for us”. (Romans 5:8-NIV love your childr en that way? 3. A Godly father labours tirelessly Godly fathers work har d to meet the essential needs of their families. A lazy man is an ungodly man. “If anyone does not provide for his relatives, and especially for his immediate family, he has denied the faith and is worse than an unbeliever” (1Timothy 5:8-NIV) Mothers should not have to be around the court trying to get $20 a week from you to take care of your children. 4. A Godly father listens intently Fathers have a responsibility to listen to what is going on with their children. God, the model father is a listener; that is why he said, “call unto me and I will answer.” In order to lead properly, you must learn to listen. Listening communicates love. You place value on a person when you listen to them. It is affirming. 5. A Godly father leans confidently on Christ As fathers in a complicated, complex world, you must lean on the Lord for directives. Godly fathers lean on the Lord for salvation; “For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith-and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God-not by works, so that no one can boast” (Ephesians 2:8-9 NIV ness; the capacity to make good deci sions, “If any of you lacks wisdom, he should ask God, who gives generously to all without finding fault, and it will be given to him” (James 1:5-NIV supply; “But my God shall supply all your needs according to His riches in glory by Christ Jesus” (Philippians 4:19KJV) 6. A Godly father leaves a lasting legacy Godly fathers leave a lasting legacy of integrity, morality and faith. “A good man leaves an inheritance for his children's children”. (Proverbs 13:22 not only applies to money, but also the way you live is passed on to your chil dren. How can you create and leave a lasting, Godly legacy? Your habits now become your legacy later. The habits that your children are noticing are going to be the legacy you leave behind for them. Y ou deter mine what you are going to leave by your practices now. Fathers do play a pivotal role in the destiny of their children's lives. God has given you the wher ewithal to deter mine whether that destiny is going to be one filled with good things or one filled with bitter ness. The Bible says in Ephesians 6:4: “Fathers, pr ovoke not your childr en to wrath, but bring them up in the nature and admonition of the Lord”. This is just a brief summary of the message “Essential Traits of a Godly Dad.” To purchase a cassette tape or CD of the message in its entirety, you may visit Freeport Bible Chur ch on W est Atlantic Drive, Freeport. For questions or comments concerning the message you may email freeportbiblechur ch@coralwave.com or telephone 352-6065. Essential traits of a Godly dad

PAGE 50

The Tribune Thursday, June 18, 2009 PG 23 RELIGION ANGLICANSwill gather this Father’s Day, Sunday, June 21, 2009, at 7pm at Christ Church Cathedral, for a Solemn Pontifical Evensong, Sermon, Procession and Benediction, in anticipation of the Feast of the Nativity of St John on June 24. St John The Baptist is the Patron Saint of The Anglican Diocese of The Bahamas and the Turks & Caicos Islands. Rever end Laish Zane Boyd, Sr., Bishop of The Diocese of The Bahamas and The T urks & Caicos Islands will officiate and preach the ser mon for this special ser vice. Music will be pr ovided by the choir of the Parish of The Most Holy T rinity , and Pr eston Fer guson will be the or ganist. “Accor ding to Holy Scriptur e, St John the Baptist was the kins man of Jesus, and the son of the priest Zechariah and his wife Elizabeth. Scripture says that John was six months older than Jesus). According to the tradition of the Church, St John The Baptist, the last of the Old Testament prophets, was born June 24 circa 3/2 BC. He was thirty years old when he began his mission to call the covenant people to a baptism (ritual purification epentance in or der to pr epar e them for the coming of the Messiah and the promised “new covenant.” Ther e will be no ser vices in any New Pr ovidence Anglican chur ch es on Sunday evening, and all Chur ch or ganisations ar e r equest ed to attend the ser vice in full uni for m. ZNS TV 13 will r ecor d the ser vice for airing at a later date. the enemy is wreaking within our families and nation is due to the lack of true Godly Fathers. If I didn't know any better I would have strongly advised that the day and celebration be called (Happy Daddy's Day, rather than Happy Father's Day). Now, I serve notice to the religious leaders. This is the last year when all of the attention and spot light is going to be upon you. If you are a true father, you would seek to honour faithful sons and daughters in the ministry; rather than every year you're the one driving off in the new car or receiving the special offering. What about that faithful user, the parking lot attendant, the church maintenance man or the struggling family man in the ministry that you are well aware of? How about honoring one of them on Father's Day witha $10 or S20,000 gift? The happiness and joy of a father is to see his children's children walking in the in-heritance he has set up for them. Again, with that being said we've got a long way to go as a nation to truly appreciate the concept and sayings of Happy Father's Day . Her ein, I'm r eminded that with God, all things ar e possible; so to the few real Fathers out ther e, I do salute you in saying Happy Father's Day. Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen, Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int' FROM page 21 A father’s affirmation Anglicans to celebrate diocesan patronal festival To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in cir culation, just call 322-1986 today! “My dad took me there the next week, and I might as well tell you after disciplining me, I never missed a class after that whether I liked it or not.” He added that while their relationship did have it’s challenges particularly after his par ent’s divorce, he remembers his father always being an active p art of his life. And just as he was taken care of by his father in his childhood, he along with his other siblings were also given the responsibility of taking care of their him when he got older and fell ill. Kermit said after his father was diagnosed with Parkinson’ s disease, he gladly took care of him until his death in 2005. Even today, he has devoted himself to his three children, being as active, concerned, and committed to their lives as his father was to him. Kermit explained that being a real father in every sense of the word can seem daunting, but is necessary. “I r emember one year my youngest son Kristen was competing in a long jump competition and was expecting me to be ther e when he was per forming. The events that day were running ahead of time, and by the time I got there he had already finished jumping, and said to me ‘Daddy I didn’ t do too well, but if you was her e I would have done better you know ,’ and those words echo in my head today. “So you never know the contribution you make to your children by simply being there. I want to encourage parents to be active in the lives of their children.” Youth activist Carlos Reid told Tribune Religion that although he did not have a bad relationship with his father, he always felt like he was seeking his approval. “Growing up I think I got the kind of discipline that most people would call abuse, but my father was the kind of man who never wasted time or energy when it came to disciplining his children.” Mr Reid said even after becoming an adult, their relationship was still somewhat difficult and he always seemed to be have to prove himself. He said he never really felt validated by his father until after writing and publishing his first book. “He was all over the island telling his friends and everyone else that his son was the writer of this book, that made me feel good, but it also made me think on how many other childr en wait on this approval and never get it from their parent.” Mr Reid said this is the reason so many children resort to gangs, sex, and drugs, using them as a Band-Aids to cover to feelings of emptiness and wor thlessness. “The father plays an important role when it comes to the right-of-passage for a boy going into manhood, and the frequentness of fathers failing to do this has to change.” As most adult men can biologically contribute to the creation of a child, Mr Reid said they must also give more of themselves to their kids which in essence is the one thing they ultimately need to feel complete. FROM page 19 Finding the right formula for being a good father CARLOS REID Growing up I think I got the kind of discipline that most people would call abuse, but my father was the kind of man who never wasted time or energy when it came to disciplining his children.

PAGE 51

The Tribune P G 24 Thursday, June 18, 2009 RELIGION ANOTHERyear in the Bahamas approaches the midway point and we have already had 28 murders. Most of the crime and major social problems are attributed to youth and in particular males. The vast majority of the murder accused and the victims have been young men. Increasingly our females are following the lead of males in anti socialor self destructive behaviour. Our youth are obviously in need of guidance and intervention. Youth Alive, considered one of the premier Youth Conferences in this region and the world is an annual conference that is designed to minister to youth, youth leaders, youth pastors and others interested in the development and training of young people. It addresses the topics and issues today's youth are faced with and provides practical, relevant answers to these challenges in a way that young people can r elate to, str essing leadership training. The event has attracted over 5,000 youth fr om the Bahamas, United States, Canada, and Europe and is a lively, energetic event with dynamic teaching, music, drama and special events This year's event is scheduled for July 1-5 at The Diplomat Center , Car michael Road under the Theme: The Assignment: “Living Right in a World Gone Wrong,” and will include speakers such as motivational speaker and author and former Miss California, Lakita Gar th, Pastor Dur r e Thomas of Calvar y Temple, Freeport, youth pastor Terren Dames (Bahamian T exas, minister and communications specialist DJ Roker of W est Palm Beach, Ricardo Miller of Dallas Texas a world renowned Children and Youth ministry specialist, Brooke Eneas, minister and former Miss Florida Panhandle, Myles Munr oe, Dave Burrows and Angie Burrows. Ricardo Clark, Mr Lynxx, Christian Massive, Mr Beeds, Naje Dun, Landlor d and a host of others, some who are featured on the newly released Youth Alive Soundtrack will provide musical selections. The event begins with a a spectacular Drama production titled “Showtime.” Day and night ses sions follow Thursday and Friday with special sessions for Youth and Youth Leaders as well as pastors and par ents. Friday night is a huge concer t and after party. Admission is free, however special incentives and discounts are offered in Registration Packages ranging from $15 $85. Concert tickets are $10 advance and $12 at the door . “Living Right in a World Gone Wrong” A response to current youth issues YOUTH ALIVE considered one of the premier Youth Conferences in this region and the world addresses the topics and issues today's youth are faced with and provides practical, relevant answers to these challenges in a way that young people can relate to by stressing leadership training. Pictured are scenes from last year’ s successful event. -This year's event is scheduled for July 1-5.


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EZ1VROJEX_AYJZ1Z INGEST_TIME 2012-01-26T19:21:39Z PACKAGE UF00084249_01339
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


{J

Pim blowin’ it

S8F
78F

HIGH
LOW

\

~ SUNNY WITH
“ce HEAVY SHOWER

Volume: 105 No.169





No negotiations
until ‘illegal strike’

comes to

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham warned public health nurses
that his administration will not
negotiate with persons engaged
in an "illegal strike."

The nation's chief advised nurs-
es that their stand-off could be
resolved as early as Monday but
only if those nurses engaged in
the nearly two-week long "sick-
out" returned to work immedi-
ately.

While stressing that he under-
stood the nurses' frustration over
the government's decision to
defer their $10 million health
insurance plan, he also reminded
the nurses that they fell into the
category of essential services and
therefore could not strike.

"The government of the
Bahamas, which I lead, is not pre-
pared to do business with people
who are engaged in an illegal
strike, period. Any group of work-
ers can sit down with the govern-
ment to discuss and seek to
resolve any issues.

"If you choose to do an illegal
strike, don't expect the govern-
ment to entertain serious discus-

an end

sions with you while you remain
out. I regret that the nurses feel
that the government has not
shown respect or regard for them
because that was not our intent
— it is to help,” said Mr Ingra-
ham during an address in the
House of Assembly last night.

His statements came hours
after representatives from the
Bahamas Nurses Union, the Pub-
lic Hospital's Authority and the
Ministry of Health met at the
Department of Labour following
a trade dispute filed by the BNU.

Yesterday's meeting adjourned
with no resolution, much to the
chagrin of the union.

Mr Ingraham said government
told the union earlier in the year
that the projected revenue short-
fall was expected to top $200 mil-
lion. He said government again
met with the nurses a few days
before the 2009/2010 budget to
alert them that their insurance
plan would be deferred because of
this, adding that published state-
ments by the union head indicat-
ed that she understood the gov-
ernment's predicament.

"Something happened subse-
quent to that to cause them to

SEE page 12

NEW CHEESY
Pe By

INCLUDES

a ees.
Reg. Hash Brown
& Reg. Coffee or Tea

het



The Tribune

SA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

a

fh
in

Tim Clarke/Tribune

- io | :
OFFICERS SEARCH a vehicle Downtown as they lead

CENTRAL Police Station officers toured
downtown Nassau yesterday, highlighting a num-
ber of traffic violations and infractions that this
division wants to bring to the public’s attention
and correct.

Glen Miller, officer in charge, led the police
delegation and the media through Rawson
Square, down Bay Street and onto George Street.

Pointing out that the fixed penalty for persons
parking in no-parking areas downtown carries a
fee of $80, officer Jerry Philip Josey said that in
some cases, where a vehicle actually obstructs
the flow of traffic a fine of $100 can be issued.

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

WSS

Tm me
IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE

PIM gets tough
with nurses

a delegation on Bay Street highlighting traffic violations.

Young adult
has been
quarantined








While unable to identify exactly how many
parking spaces are available for the use of the
average citizen, Mr Josey explained that these
spaces would be clearly outlined with a white
line and can be used for half an hour.

Assistant Superintendent Leamond Deleveaux
said that the Tourism Division, which houses
some 39 officers, has issued more than 400 tickets
every month.

“Despite our best efforts people
continue to break the law. But we remain vigilant
and our officers are doing a terrific job,” he
said.












PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)





Perry Christie hits out
over unemployment

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

CHARGING that a
“national mood of misery
and discontent” is on the
rise, opposition leader Per-
ry Christie proposed that
government must show
greater commitment to
preserving and creating jobs.

Contributing to the debate on
the 2009/2010 budget in parliament
yesterday, Mr Christie said the
“large numbers of unemployed
Bahamians is a frightening spec-
tre for the stability of our coun-
try.”

Re-stating the criticisms of his

aA OASIS



fellow PLP parliamentari-
ans throughout the recent
debate, the former prime
minister suggested that the
budget prepared by the
Government is “sobering,
depressing and devoid of
any offer of hope as to
how Bahamians will get
through these tough and
intimidating times.”
Touching on a variety
of topics during his speech, Mr
Christie repeatedly came back to
the issue of how Government
could and should have produced
greater plans to lessen the unem-
ployment figures and stimulate
economic activity during tough

SEE page 14

PM criticises PLP
for complaints
over contracts

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net























PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham took the Opposi-
tion to task yesterday during
his summation of the Budget
debate, criticising the PLP’s
constant complaint that his
government “stopped,
reviewed and cancelled” a
number of contracts left in
place by the previous admin-
istration.

Referring to the much pub-
licized and bandied about I-

SEE page 12



NASSAU AND BA

HAMA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

‘available at

The Paint Depot

Mt. Royal Ave.
Tel:326-1875












First case of
Bahamian
resident with
swine flu

m@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

A YOUNG adult who
lives in the Bahamas has
become the country’s second
confirmed case of swine flu.

This comes a day after
Florida recorded its first A
(HIN1) related fatality.

A nine-year-old boy who
suffered from chronic asth-
ma died on Tuesday in Mia-
mi-Dade county just 24
hours after he developed
symptoms of the influenza
virus.

While the patient in the
Bahamas has been quaran-
tined at home and the Min-
istry of Health is monitoring
all persons who came in con-
tact with the person, author-
ities are advising Bahamians
to continue to follow influen-
za preventative measures to
ensure protection of individ-
uals, families and communi-
ties.

Like the first confirmed
case earlier this year, the
infected person travelled
from New York to the
Bahamas.

The Ministry of Health
reported yesterday that the
case of Influenza A (H1N1)
occurred in a Bahamas resi-
dent who had visited New

SEE page nine



Govt to take $30m
dividend from BTC
amid package of
projected measures

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

GOVERNMENT is planning
to take a $30 million dividend
from the Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company (BTC) before
privatisation, and transfer $7 mil-
lion in profits from the Central
Bank of the Bahamas, amid a
package of measures that has
pushed projected revenues for the
2009-2010 fiscal year some $151
million higher than initially pro-
jected.

The plans were revealed by the
International Monetary Fund
(IMF) in a supplement to its
recently-published Article IV
consultation on the Bahamian
economy, which analysed the
2009-2010 Budget’s measures.

The supplementary report, with

SEE page nine


PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE government has been
attacked for its plans to adjust
the National Youth Service to
lessen its emphasis on the most

Government under fire for plans to adjust National Youth Service

and involve more youngsters who
can be helped before they get into
trouble.

Responding to the govern-
ment’s announcement, opposition
leader Perry Christie claimed it
is critical that the government
continue to focus on unruly boys,
adding that “cost should not be an

issue” when it comes to this
effort, as the programme offers
them a “redemptive, second
chance” experience.

Mr Christie noted that having
spoken previously with parents
of children who graduated from
the programme, “they regarded
the admission of their child as the

unruly boys in Bahamian society

Father's Day

is June 21st

DAD Eats Free!

For parties of 8 adults or more one father eats free.
Call for group pricing.

Sime eC R CL a CRC
Freep ACC LER CLL
where you can choose from a scrumptious buffet fit for a king.
Restaurant hours: 12:00 noon to 3:00 pm

NRC aa atc
Three fathers will have an opportunity to win one of three great prizes:
- Weekend stay for two in a newly renovated room
TTY} TUM OLET fame eL9 ORE
- Two month membership to the Hilton Fitness Centre
$200 food and beverage credit for the new Bullion Bar
ian late summer 2009)

Ask about our special weekend Bahamian Resident Rates!

British Colonial Hilton

Nassau

©2009 Hilton Hospitality Inc.

Travel should take you places



Al Quality Bohemian
= Cran

—

bk
——
;

= rs as y
Ta
‘he a

one opportunity they had to save
his life.”

“Intervention into the lives of
young Bahamians who are at-risk
is vital to the orderly develop-
ment of the Bahamas,” he said.

On Monday, Minister of Youth
Sports and Culture Desmond
Bannister told parliament that the
government intends to “relaunch”
the National Youth Programme
in the Fall, moving it from North
Andros to New Providence, and a
location where “the greatest need
exists” for its resources.

He said that the government
intends to use it to reach out to
children before they have a
chance to get into trouble, not
just to help those who have
“already become menaces to soci-
ety. ”

Mr Bannister said that moving
the programme to New Provi-
dence will save taxpayer funds.

This comes as the budgetary
allocation for the programme was
reduced to $345,000 this year,
after it rose to $900,000 in last
year’s budget, from a meagre
$17,861 in 2003/2004.

Mr Christie said: “Expert eval-
uations of the Youth Service Pro-
gramme stated in their report that
the programme can be improved,
but that it is working and contin-
ues to be necessary for the long-
term stability and growth of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas
as a nation. They certified that
the programme is in fact having a
positive, life-changing impact on
its attendees. They concluded this
programme demonstrates the

merit to be funded long-term and
used as a model for expanding
this type of service across the
nation of the Bahamas.

“It is my understanding that
the Youth Service Programme
will be returned to New Provi-
dence. I can only hope that the
government has carefully weighed
the benefit of the attendees being
out of their normal environment,
together with the significant injec-
tion of funds into the local econ-
omy of North Andros against the
savings effected by relocating the
programme to New Providence.

“These are all important strate-
gies in the process of giving our
youth at risk a redemptive oppor-
tunity for a new life for them-
selves and their families,” he
added.

PM rejects Opposition attack On Cuts in budget funding

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

DESPITE cuts in funding to
many areas in this year’s budget,
the Government yesterday hit
back at Opposition claims that
reductions will hurt their perfor-
mance, saying “almost all” of
them will still receive more mon-
ey than they did in the last PLP
budget.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said: “When we say we cut
the budget, we mean we reduced
the increase we put on it (in 2008
and 2007). In almost every single
head we are allocating more mon-
ey for these services than (the for-
mer PLP government) did (in
their 2006/2007 budget).”

Minister of State Zhivargo
Laing, giving his contribution to
the 2009/2010 budget debate, said
that in light of this, he found it
“curious” that Opposition MPs
condemnd the Government for
the funding reductions during
hard times.

Current estimates peg recur-

THE police are still investi-
gating the fire that took the
life of an elderly man over the
weekend, Supt Jeffery Dele-
veaux told The Tribune yes-
terday. After losing her hus-
band and her home in the
tragic fire on Saturday, Emer-
ald Cooper, 72, said that she is
sustained by her faith.

“Tam right here in the
Lord’s hands,” said Mrs
Cooper, who saved the lives
of her three grand children by
rescuing them from the blaze.
“T lost my husband and my
home, but not my Saviour.

“God don't put more on
you than you can bear,” she
said. Mrs Cooper is now living
with her daughter in Elizabeth
Estates. The funeral service
for her husband, Leon Coop-
er will be held on Saturday,
June 27, at St Matthews
Church at 2pm.

Percival Roberts (Son SE POpE SOIT}

= ia Ll ll

Stone Crab Chiws

Eden Street Store Hours
fam - fpm (Mon. - Sat.)
fam - 2pm (Sundays)
Tam -12noo0n (Holidays)
Special #1(550.0)):
SLbs Tenderized Conchs
SLbs Snappers or Jacks

Pee - $110.00/Kit
s - $80.00 / Kit
Ge aah Tails - $16.95
Conch Trimmings - $1.00/lb
Snappers - $4.95/Ib
Tenderized Conch - $4.75/Ib
Mutton Snapper - $4.00/Ib

(Crawfish Tails

8am - ipm

20- Large Shrimps

Pe

Lean Snappers

Carmichael Rd. Store Hours
Bam - 6pm (Mon.

- Sat.)
(Sundays)

Closed (Holidays)
Special 42(350.00):

6-Soz Lobster Tails





rent revenue
for 2009/2010
to be $184.5
million - 11.8
per cent - less
than the
2008/2009
estimates.
“(The PLP)
did not take
(the various
ministries, departments, agencies)
to a level higher than where our
cuts will land them (despite gov-
erning) in a time when they said
that things were ‘unprecedented’,
‘historic’, extraordinary, unpar-
alleled and uniquely better than
they are now; yet these ministries
and departments will suffer
because of our cuts made when
things have never been worse in
world since the Great Depres-
sion?” said Mr Laing.

“How had these ministries
been able to perform so well with
less money under the former gov-
ernment but will be unable to per-
form well with more money
under this government?”

“Critical” areas which will

Zhivargo Laing

receive more funding than they
did in the last PLP budget,

according to the minister of state,
include: The prison department
(10 per cent more) police force
(eight per cent more), defence
force (17 per cent more), depart-
ment of education (eight per cent
more), ministry of education
(three per cent more), College of
the Bahamas (nine per cent
more), department of social ser-
vices (49 per cent more) and the
public hospitals authority (10 per
cent more). Meanwhile, Mr
Laing said the $12 million cut in
the Ministry of Tourism’s budget
this year, represents $778,630 less
than the Ministry was allocated
in the former government’s
2006/2007 budget. Various Oppo-
sition members had criticised the
tourism budget cut.

TROPICAL
se

RR UE
PHONE: 322-2157



lll iS

from

oles

Bernard Rd - Mackey St - Thompson Blvd

L)ress

s Pants trom

Boat Departs

June a 2009

PLAT oF

Ph: 363 551 o


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 3



REPORTS FROM THE HOUSE

You’ve mishandled nurses
‘sick-out’, Christie tells govt

Christie: no
effort mate to
justify container
port move

NO EFFORT has been
made by the government or
the developers to provide
justification for the decision
to have the Container Port
moved from Bay Street to
Arawak Cay instead of the
southwest of New Provi-
dence as the PLP intended,
former Prime Minister Perry
Christie said during his con-
tribution to the budget
debate yesterday.

“We continue to regard
the decision as a bad one.

“It is inconsistent with all
of the specialised advice that
we have received.

“It is obvious to me that
the minister (Earl Deveaux)
and his colleagues have
arrived at a formula which is
pleasing to a group who have
decided regardless of the
environ-
mental
implica-
tions, the
aesthetics
of the
operation,
the nui-
sance of it,
that
Arawak
Cay is
where
they want
the facility
and that is
where it

EARL DEVEAUX



will go,” he said.

Mr Christie chastised
Environment Minister Earl
Deveaux, who he claimed
ventured to suggest that the
“PLP government influenced
the environmental consul-
tants in their selection of the
site for the southwest port.”

“That is absolutely untrue.
The selection was that of the
consultants, with participa-
tion from persons who were
a part of the private sector
group,” Mr Christie said.

“What surprises me about
the minister’s view is that he
has access to a major body of
environmental assessments
which provide the details
behind the consultants’ rec-
ommendation.”

Significant

Mr Deveaux last week told
parliamentarians that the
proposed southwest port had
significant public sector par-
ticipation that is rarely
acknowledged.

The Environment Minister
said the move to the south-
west was a government-
directed initiative which
depended on government to
make it function — the own-
ership, the structure and the
operations.

Responding, Mr Christie
said yesterday, “I am,
frankly, very disturbed by
the minister’s expressed
view.

“Again, he is dead wrong.
He is trying too hard to justi-
fy a bad decision to locate
the port at Arawak Cay.

“A decision that serves
only special interests.”

“We were committed as a
government to inducing the
owners of the port facilities
on Bay Street to close their
facilities and move to a new
port.

“Tt could only happen if
they were going to be lead
participants,” the PLP leader
said.

He said his government
had established a genuine
public/private sector partner-
ship.

“We intended for Bahami-
ans to be the lead sharehold-
ers.

“All my government was
asking was for an allotment
of shares to offer the
Bahamian public,” Mr
Christie said.

“As far as the offer froma
private company to develop
the Arawak Cay site, lam
also aware that private com-
panies were interested in
developing or participating
in the southwest port.”

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
SAA OO Leis

ye Pete
822-2157



m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



LEADER of the opposition
Perry Christie admonished gov-
ernment for its handling of the
almost two-week long "sick-out"
by public health nurses.

Speaking in the House of
Assembly during his contribution
to the 2009/2010 budget debate,
Mr Christie said he was astound-
ed that the government and
Health Minister Dr Hubert Min-
nis allowed so much time to pass
before sitting down to negotiate
an end to the nurses’ stand-off.

"I am very surprised at the way
in which the industrial action by
the nurses has been handled by
the government. It is astounding
that the minister of health and
the minister of labour have
allowed so much time to pass
without addressing the outstand-
ing issues directly with the nurses
union.

"And even if it is a government
decision not to speak with the
nurses, I would have expected the
minister of health with his per-
sonal and professional connec-
tion to persuade his colleagues to
allow him to sit and solve the
problems," Mr Christie told par-
liament, adding that this lack of
action by government was irre-
sponsible.

Yesterday, representatives
from the Bahamas Nurses Union,
the Public Hospitals Authority,
the Ministry of Health and the
Department of Labour were
locked in a meeting for hours in
the hope of bringing an end to
the 10-day nurses sick-out that is
crippling the country's health-care
system.

Director of Labour Harcourt
Brown said the meeting was
adjourned to Monday — although
union officials say they want to
meet as early as Friday — with no
resolution, adding that govern-
ment representatives were

66

Iam very
surprised at
the way in
which the
industrial
action has
been handled

.
*
a
4
.
*
.
O

[(_ ="

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

wT) LEADER ar SRG ail m aU oM SICKO



mulling over proposals put forth
by the union.

Injunction

On Wednesday, nurses called
in sick for a ninth day in protest of
government's decision to defer
their promised $10 million health
insurance plan due to the current
economic crisis — in spite of a
court ordered injunction that they
return to work.

It is unclear if the sick-out con-
tinued yesterday, but The Tribune
understands that while some nurs-
es returned to work, those with
valid doctor's sick notes remained
at home.

Mr Christie, a former minister
of health, stressed that despite
any disappointment felt over the
nurses’ actions, it is government's
responsibility to intervene and
bring order to national issues.

Mr Christie suggested that if
the PLP's National Health Insur-
ance plan had been implemented,
the issue could have been avoid-
ed. He also suggested that gov-
ernment provide some level of
coverage for public nurses until
they are able to institute the full
health insurance plan.

"This is an issue that will not go
away for the simple reason that
some people who have no insur-
ance will die if affected by cer-
tain illnesses because of not being
able to afford the cost of care.
There is nothing more stark and
real than the inequalities in health
care that all of us are part of
maintaining in our country.

"Cabinet ministers have full
insurance coverage; members of
parliament have the same and the
nurses were promised their own
health insurance. This is a tough
challenge for nurses and for the
country,” he said.

Bannister condemned for linking PLP
with Nazi propaganda techniques



m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

OPPOSITION leader Perry Christie yesterday
condemned Youth, Sports and Culture Minister
Desmond Bannister for what he called an “unac-
ceptable and unaccountably vicious attack” in which
it was claimed that the PLP is using Nazi propa-

ganda techniques.

Addressing the House of Assembly yesterday
morning, the former prime minister said: “As we
have heard in this debate, there is still the necessity
to speak truth to power. It is therefore a sad duty for
me to refer to the statement by the Member for
Carmichael (Desmond Bannister). (He) could bring
himself to connect the PLP with the vile, repugnant
and abhorrent policies of Adolf Hitler.

“Whatever his intentions, Carmichael stands con-
demned for such an unacceptable and unaccountably
vicious attack,’ Mr Christie said as he made his
contribution to the 2009/2010 budget debate.

Hitler

Speaking in parliament on Monday, Mr Bannister
had said that the repetition of the phrase “stop,
review and cancel” by the Opposition amounted to
the PLP — intentionally or otherwise — using pro-
paganda techniques outlined by Nazi leader Adolf
Hitler in his book “Mein Kampf.”

“Members opposite have developed the refrain
‘stop, review and cancel’ almost to a science and I






i 4
rt is

PCT Rw erg
= 3





+2333 Paper Fans,



Best Quality
2 Ply Heavy Weight

Car Flags
$5 oS

s & Garlands (Ail in Flag Colours)
60” SATIN - $3.99





MAT ONE aaa

ed, “people will believe a big lie sooner than a little
one and if you repeat it frequently enough people
will sooner or later believe it.”

“These kind of political attacks are unwarranted
and disgraceful,” said Mr Christie yesterday, as he
also congratulated his party’s MPs for their “sterling
contributions” to the budget debate.

Opposition members have suggested for some-



want members oppo-
site to know that when-
ever they utter that
phrase they are follow-
ing the political theory
of one of history’s most
vicious tyrants, (whose)
big lie theory is well
known,” he said.

Mr Bannister sug-
gested that the PLP is
repeatedly using the
phrase in the hope
that, as Hitler suggest-

time, and reiterated throughout the 2009/2010 bud-
get debate, that by reviewing, delaying and in some
cases cancelling certain contracts signed under the
former PLP administration, the FNM caused eco-

fully in 2008.

nomic growth to slow down and made matters worse
for the country when the global financial crisis struck

In its assessment of the country last year, the
international credit rating agency Standard and Poor

said the move took the “growth momentum” out of

Gélebrate 56 years of
ndep endence

New! Coat of Arms Flag $25

Buntings and Pennants —

18x36 - Bunting $10
36x72 - Bunting $25
48x96 - Bunting $40

Lapel Pins

4°x6” Stick Flags $ 1.00
* 8"x12” Stick Flags $ 1.99

Bahamas Blankets
Flag Appliques from

Tri Colour Shakers
Bahamas Ties

Bahamas Beads From $ 2.99
Flag Cell Phone Cases $10.00

the economy — a statement which the Opposition
said validated their view.



Ba hamas



16ft - Pennant $7.50
6Oft - Pennant $30
Line of Flags $15 & $25





$20.00
$ 2.25
$ 2.25
$ 2.99
$18.00






Turquoise, Gold, Black, Solids

60” TriColour Satin Stripe

Just like the Flag! $8. 50

¢ 12”x18” Stick Flags $ 2.99
© ft x Sft Flags $10.00
© 4ft x 6ft Flags $20.00

SALE! 24”x36” Flags $5
< We also have USA flags, Bunting, Bows, Ribbon & Decorations

Madeira St. [242] 325-8233
Robinson Rd. [242] 322-3080

FLAGS

dabuies, '€ vif Te De



Home Fabrics, Abaco
[242] 367-6003

The Islander Shop, Spanish Wells
[242] 333-4104

Uae Le

info@homefabricsltd.com

| MYSTERY INCENTIVES, DISCOUNTS & PRIZES
with every purchase through Father's Day:

vi ineyard vines’
mariha’s vireryared

MORLEY
For *®
MEN !

Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6654/6

Bayparl Building, Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-8240 « Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com

CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

Tue Moet Tromonas Rretoaanoy & Cuore Ever, of Tun Jon & Far!
Bla" s Oty PRoronaL, Chemo Sos Cane & UPsousoey Caen Ses.

* Carpet, L Jpheliery, Stone and Marhic Coan o&
Reseraion Speciale.

a Prochen Cleaning Pans ToT aarp & Heavy
Sag, Hascteren, ‘Lireasc, Watermarks and Siaire inom
Cupeting & Femitire, restoring them to like acw
afb [recto of replacemene £161.

Cape, Sofa’s, Lowa. Chairs. Dining Ciairs, Cars,
Doan, Grown, Tiles, ietHe & Stose

Permian, Worl d& Silk Canpet Cleaning Specialist
* Aiehle Polishing. Reworation & Cane
+ Woed Floor Resteralion
Suited Stone Tech Profesional Crotracior
CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS
PHONE: 323-8083 o 323-1594
COVEY WE CAN CPT REY

ee perce cer? Beer tong ecb con © Heuer, ore
+ paper atc

AAS LAL, AAA OW FAT

PROCHEM SYSTEM (om)

JUME 2054

a SEE

| A bo

oorTiwiat + | 5 208 | wh_| 6 | |r
a | ts 40 | wn | as as |
uenevonan + | to a6 | wa | evo [as [rs
renwwronsanaon + | 40 [330 | wa| gon | |
rues a fo [ut ee

AME FLICK er | at | as | WA | ts | meas [tO |
JAMGELSH DEMONS =e | tt [min | MA | 00 | ik [t040 |

GALLERIA eae

LSE YUOUH E PME CSE Al 80- 4 WANE GALL He as a

mcerranue —c [ts [an [oa | a |e [00
aorricioer a] 140 | 940 [Wi 608 | a0 | 100
THE HANGOVER e | 410 | 3:35 | Mim | ean | 8:35 | 1040
jw» | [a0 | wn | 60 | 00 | 120
mewn 1 [ets | 5 [ wn | 815 | 60 | 15
(es

380-FLIX

LAH IU


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Dishonesty not a good policy

IN DECEMBER 2001 The Tribune did an
exposé on how employees, aided and abetted by
unscrupulous doctors, were abusing “sick leave”
benefits. Employers complained that the abuse
was costing them thousands of dollars each

ear.
One retail outlet with a staff of about 250
Bahamians said that in the month of January
that year it had lost a total of 1,672 hours or 209
working days by staff being out “sick.” The sick
benefits “for the month of January were over
$10,000,” The Tribune was told.

We took the name of the doctors in question
and sent a robustly healthy looking reporter to
get a sick note.

The first doctor sent a nurse out to the wait-
ing room to get the details from our “patient.”
Back she came, not with an invitation to see
the doctor, but with a sick note for the time
our reporter had requested.

The same reporter then went to a second
doctor, only this time he decided to tell the
doctor that he needed a sick note because he
wanted to spend some time in Miami at a social
function and the note was the only way that he
could get off work.

The doctor was most obliging, asked him how
many days he thought he’d need, and wrote up
the required note — no examination. Each doc-
tor in a matter of minutes had made about $68
by being an accomplice in dishonesty.

Over a week ago more than 50 per cent of
this country’s hospital nursing staff staged a
“sick-out” — both in Nassau and Freeport.

They were protesting the fact that their group
health insurance plan, promised for this year,
had to be postponed until next year because of
insufficient funds.

There was a possibility that they could receive
the insurance sooner if the economic climate
improved.

The nurses were having none of it, and so
they walked out.

It was soon obvious that, although they were
calling their little interlude a “sick-out”, from
their public statements it was obvious that it
was a strike. In the end the Prime Minister got
a Supreme Court injunction ordering them back
to work, failing which they would be in con-
tempt of court.

When Sir Burton Hall’s order was read to
more than 200 nurses called to a meeting Mon-
day night by the Bahamas Nurses Union (BNU)
for that purpose, many insisted that they were
still sick.

Many also made it clear that they intended to
take all of their sick days, defy the court order,
risk being held in contempt and ordered to jail.
By the remarks of some of them it seemed that
they had doctors who would readily give them
the needed sick note.

Apparently, in some of these civil service
contracts, a specified number of “sick” days is
written into the contract as a part of the employ-
ee’s entitlement — sick or not sick, they are
extra days off. This, of course, is all wrong. If
they can take off without being sick, then the
“rest days” should be called just that, because
sickness it is not.

However, it appears that to justify this, they
have to have a doctor’s sick slip.

This article is being written for those doctors
who might become a party to their little enter-
prise — those nurses, that is, who are not sick.
This in no way refers to nurses who might have
a genuine illness.

In his sworn affidavit for the Supreme Court,
Mr Herbert Brown, managing director of the
Public Hospitals Authority, said he knew of
“no outbreak of any epidemic or other conta-
gious illness at any of the public hospital facili-
ties that would explain the widespread illness
among the nurses employed at the various facil-
ities” that would account for the 303 who called
in sick on June 8, and daily after that in varying
numbers.

We are writing this as a red flag of warning to
doctors who might have sympathy for nurses
who want “sick” notes, not because they are
sick in the ordinary sense of the word, but
because they are angry with their employer and
want to push an issue.

On June 15 the Supreme Court ordered the
nurses to return to work immediately or face
contempt charges that could mean jail and the
seizing of union funds.

But this is a warning to others — especially
the doctors —who might get caught up through
sympathy in this dispute.

The court has warned that anyone who does
anything to help the nurses break the terms of
the court order, may also he held in contempt of
court and may be committed to prison or fined
or “have his assets seized.”

So we suggest to doctors that their sick slips
should go to genuinely sick patients, especially
in view of the testimony of the head of the hos-
pital authority that he doesn’t know of any epi-
demic that would take down so many healthy
nurses at the same time.



Pirst Baptist Church

289 Markel St South « P.O. Box A-T6R4 = Nassau, Bahamas

THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

Our only hope here below is
our help from God above.

Difficult to justify
extra spending in
these tough times

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Many of us who served in the
Public Service had the option
of joining one or more group
medical plans offered by local
insurance companies.

However, many of us
also joined the Bahamas Pub-
lic Services Union Medplan and
remained with the BPSU even
after retirement.

It is believed that this same
option was available to public
servants in the Health Ministry
as well as other Ministries and
Departments.

Why did not Health Ministry
employees take advantage of
this option for themselves and
their families?

Also, are there still national
insurance benefits payable to
workers?

With the deep recession now
being experienced world wide,
it is difficult to justify any addi-
tional expenditure because rev-
enues have been decreasing in
our main industries of tourism
and financial services, while
there are current operational
overhead payments which have
to be met.

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



The traditional ways of
attacking this dilemma are
either to cut expenditure or
raise new taxes.

As one can readily appreci-
ate, many businesses here in
The Bahamas and world wide
have had to close and employ-
ees discharged when expendi-
ture exceeds income, and cus-
tomers are not buying their
product.

This can be seen in the auto-
mobile industry in the States.
Similarly, tourists from our
main markets are not travelling
as they used to.

Hence our industry has suf-
fered a down-turn.

More taxes are not the
answer either due to the job
losses and increases in public
spending for social services in
respect of those who have lost
jobs. Excessive borrowing is not
a prudent way out because the
loans have to be repaid with
interest by ourselves and pos-

sibly future generations. Fur-
ther, there are international
organisations who closely mon-
itor such activities by develop-
ing countries.

So one wonders in amaze-
ment why there are people who
are so unreasonable in these dif-
ficult times as to raise the topic
of more money for themselves
from the public purse.

Private sector businesses can-
not continue to operate when
their overheads reach a certain
limit and neither can any gov-
ernment make “blood out of
stone” and spend money which
they do not have.

Why is this so difficult for
some Bahamians to under-
stand?

CONCERNED
BAHAMIAN
Nassau,

June, 2009.

(It’s because they don’t want
to understand, and if our read-
ers would examine more close-
ly what is happening they will
see politics stirring the pot of
controversy. The unsophisticat-
ed worker is always a useful
ingredient. — Ed)

Lessons emerging from Air France disaster

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THE May 11, 1996 crash of a
ValuJet DC-9 — amid thick
sawerass, crocodiles and snakes
in the Florida Everglades —
that claimed the lives of
Maxwell and Lucille Newbold
and over 100 other people, is
listed on a Federal Aviation
Administration website as one
of “11 major airplane accidents
that made an impact on the way
the aviation industry and the
FAA conduct business today.”

The listing is part of an FAA
online safety library of “insti-
tutional knowledge” compiled
from accident investigations to
identify probable accident caus-
es and potentially, prevent any
similar occurrences.

It is now generally agreed
that such investigations have,
over the past twenty years,
helped commercial airlines to
achieve such an extraordinary
safety record that an air disaster
is now considered a statistical
anomaly.

According to their website,
the FAA plans “to stock the
library with 40 more historical-
ly significant accidents by the
end of 2009,” with the recent
crash of AF 447 certain to be
included.

The speculated mid-air
breakup of Air France Flight
447 — for whatever reason —
and the presumed loss of all 228
on board has presented avia-

DELTA

Inspiration for your kitchen & bath!

SUNDAY SEAVICES
F:00am, SO0am, 11:15am

PASTOR EARLE FRANCIS J.P.,0.0,
Mariage Officer, Counsellor, Intarcessor
c 323-6452 * 393-578
Fae 326-440 AS44518

tion safety professionals with a
challenging task. With recovery
of the aircraft’s tell-tale black
box and cockpit voice recorder
(CVR) considered unlikely,
experts are analysing the “fly-
by-wire” aircraft’s automatical-
ly generated maintenance alerts
indicating that a string of mal-
functions resulted in an even-
tual loss of cabin pressure and
complete electrical failure.

In a fly-by-wire system, elec-
tronic impulses are sent to air-
craft controls instead of direct
mechanical connections.

The effect of widely dispersed
thunderstorms towering up to
50,000 feet and producing
updrafts of up to 100 miles per
hour “that would have really
rocked that plane when it hit
it,” has not been completely
ruled out, in addition to human
error, flawed assumptions, pre-
existing failures, unintended
consequences of design choic-
es, terrorism and possible
organisational lapses.

With regard to the Air Traffic
Control system, with a Future
Air Navigation System (FANS)
using satellite technology still
some years away, the question
persists as to, “Why are we fol-



| The Consignment Shop |

Tel. 325-0077, Nassau Street,

lowing airplanes across the
ocean with World War II radio
technology? We’re still using
ground-based radar for the
ATC airspace system instead of
the GPS that can tell me how to
get to my driveway.”

An organisational lapse was
claimed to be behind the deci-
sion in 2000 to purchase a $3
million radar to replace the one
installed at the then-Nassau
International Airport in 1986,
but which, to date, remains
“mothballed” due to lack of
necessary software and upgrad-
ing.

On the ill-fated Air France
flight, the passenger comple-
ment was an airborne ‘Tower
of Babel’, with “the democrati-
sation of air travel” reflected in
the mix of nationalities
onboard: 61 French citizens; 58
Brazilians; nine Chinese; nine
Italians; six Swiss; five British;
five Lebanese; four Hungari-
ans; two Americans and others
from a total of 32 countries,
from Estonia to Gambia to
Morocco to the Philippines.

SIMON ARTZI
Nassau,
June, 2009.

Open from Tuesday to Saturday.

The place where your money has more value!
We sell good quality items 3 times cheaper than
anywhere else!

We convert all items you don’t use into CASH!

1-6ft. Gold Fishing Gaff

Near North Andros
in 2500ft. of water

@ . If found Please Contact
te GBP

@FINE BUILDERS HARDWARE & PLUMBING®

Established 1951

“es
IFT & BRIDAL REGISTR

Harbour Bay Shopping Centre oe
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448 4

Mr. John Treco
nan

; Dowdeswell Street * Tel: 322-1103
ow!


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



oln brief MB SUPREME COURT TRIAL: SHIMEAKIMA PRATT

Murder accused claimed to have stabbed Defence
Force officer with rat tail comb, court hears

Regional
integration
movement
‘stronger
than ever’

GUYANA president
Bharrat Jagdeo, incoming
chairman of CARICOM,
said regional integration
remains on course and called
on member states to support
the movement.

Speaking at a media brief-
ing ahead of the 13th meet-
ing of the Conference of
Heads of Government of
CARICOM, scheduled for
July 2-4, he said that in light
of the fragility of the global
climate, it was critical to
affirm that “the integration
movement is as strong as
ever before.”

President Jagdeo, who is
also the lead head of govern-
ment with responsibility for
agriculture in CARICOM’s
quasi cabinet, acknowledged
that the community is grap-
pling with “unprecedented
challenges” — many of which
have been induced by the
international economic cri-
sis, but said institutional
mechanisms set up to guide
CARICOM through this
period must be allowed to
work. He emphasised that
CARICOM leaders have a
“deep desire” to work
together, and that differ-
ences of opinions are
inevitable in the face of
diversity, but do not indicate
disunity.
















SIUC

PRR Sate oe
FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS
PHONE: 327-6464
WESEND ‘EM PACKIN’

m@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter i
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net |)

A CRIME scene investi-
gator testified in the
Supreme Court yesterday
that murder accused
Shimeakima Pratt claimed to
have stabbed Defence Force
officer Gary Carey with a rat
tail comb last August.

The trial into Carey’s
death opened before Senior
Supreme Court Justice Anita
Allen yesterday. Pratt, 31,
who is represented by attor-
ney Romona Farquharson,
is accused of causing the Tim Clarke/Tribune staff
death of Petty Officer ACCUSED: Shimeakima Pratt, 31, leaving

Carey, 54, on Sunday, court yesterday.
August 17, 2008. The vic-

tim was found dead in her

Minnis Subdivision apartment.

Detective Constable Napoleon Sands, a crime scene technician
attached to the Carmichael Road Division, told the court that
when he arrived at Pratt’s apartment on August 17, he saw Carey
laying face up in a pool of blood in the front room.

Shirtless

He told the court that Carey was shirtless and was only wearing
black sweat pants.

DC Sands said the victim appeared to have been foaming at
the mouth and nose and had puncture wounds in his chest. He said
he also saw that Carey’s right eye had been injured.

The officer said that upon entering the western bedroom, he
observed what appeared to be droplets of blood on the floor and
condom packets near the bed.

He told the court that he also discovered a mop in the bathroom
soaked with what appeared to be blood, and that he collected
swabs of blood from the deceased and a brown pill from the dining
room table.

DC Sands said that Pratt had told him that Carey was known to
take a male enhancement pill.

Sands testified that he took photographs of the scene and took the
mop, brown pill, swabs, and two towels with suspected blood on
them to the police forensic lab for testing on September 3.

He testified that he, several officers and the accused returned to
the apartment on August 22, and that the accused took them to the
western bedroom and showed them a rat tail comb with which
she claimed she had stabbed Carey.

The officer told the court that Pratt appeared calm and collect-
ed at the time.

During cross-examination by Ms Farquharson, DC Sands admit-
ted that Pratt had co-operated fully with police in their investiga-
tion and that no blood had been pouring from the puncture wounds
in Carey’s chest. The officer also admitted that he did not take a pic-
ture of the brown pill on the dining room table.

The trial continues at 10am today. Deputy director of public
prosecutions Cheryl Grant-Bethel, Stephanie Pintard and Terry
Archer are prosecuting the case.

DS meer sre tBu sri
a PGT WinGuard Impact
Resistant Window and get
tee LO ORs) Rees] eM liet isa

Saturday, June 6
Saturday, June 13
eRe! ITT 0

EFFORTLESS HURRICANE PROTECTION”

Fj WinQuard

IMPACT-RESETANT WINDOWS & DOORS

MAXIMUM HURRICANE PROTECTION. MIAMI DADE TEST RESULTS PROVE IT.

BAHAMAS

COMMONWEALTH BUILDING SUPPLIES

677.2100 * Robinson Rd * www.cbhsbahamas.com



Sco am



JUST WEST OF CITY MARKET, TONIQUE DARLING HIGHWAT

ee es ee es ete



Come see our

Including Hondas Starting at $8,900. 00

many to choose from...

5 Seater Vans
Starting at

Government
Workers

“IN-HOUSE FINANCING AVAILABLE”
$15,900.00) 2005/06 30 SEATER

gS ee

(242) 341-2249

FAX: (242) 361-1136

Visit our Website: www.autohl.com

~~

: rd i
Size 7-12

Gold Multi
Bronze Multi
Black Multi

Te
sneakerbour

Rosetta St. - Ph: 325-3336
PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009



eae BIC ‘yet to repair

AT 3 LOCATIONS

2 DAYS ONLY
Special FATHER’S DAY

Sale For



0, Off

All MEN’s Items



ot
oF



1 <>fY
eS he

—_ a i"

Branches
The Mall At Marathon
* Tel: 39347478
Mon = Fri:i0:30am = 7:30om
Sat 10:30am - 8:30pm

FREE GIFT
WRAPPING

Village Road Shopping Centre
* Tal: 393-2019
Mon - Sat 10am - 7pm

Main Store
Rosetta St. Tel: 322-8596
Store Hours:

Mon - Fri @:30am - §-309m
Sat Sam - Gom

ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ARE ACCEPTED
[SS] > =

SAV-A-CHEK VALID FOR REGULAR PRICED ITEMS ONLY

—
VISA

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

cut phone lines’

BTC has yet to repair phone
lines mistakenly cut by work-
ers in the East Bay Street area
three weeks ago, it was
claimed yesterday.

Angry business owners, who
say the situation is impacting
their livelihood, condemned
the telecommunications
provider for failing to rectify
the situation despite promis-
ing to do so.

They also claimed that at
first, BTC officials pretended
the rain was to blame for the
lines being down, only admit-
ting that a cable had been mis-
takenly cut during a trenching
exercise after almost a week
of the phones being out of ser-
vice.

At that point, BTC workers
finally showed up to look into
the matter, but in the end only
put in an inefficient “tempo-
rary line” which is subject to
frequent disconnections, The
Tribune was told.

mistakenly cut.

of the street.





ia = ae : Miata : : ae
WORK TAKING PLACE on East Bay Street (above), led to the line being

will not compensate us for all

Meanwhile, the severed
main line can still be seen
bundled up at the side

One businessman said: “This
is incredibly disruptive to our
business and we know BTC

the cell phone calls and drives
we have had to make to send
and receive faxes.”

Bahamians ‘want action



from government on crime’

BAHAMIANS are fed up with hollow speech-
es about crime and want action from the govern-
ment, a local anti-crime group said.

Bahamas Against Crime (BAC) issued a state-
ment to this effect yesterday in response to speech
by Minister of National Security Tommy Turn-
quest last week, in which he said that the Bahamas
must abandon “narrow approaches” to policing.

“While he did not explain what ‘narrow
approaches’ meant, the question that begs an
answer from the minister and the government is
whether they are now ready and willing to involve
other stakeholders in addressing crime, the
number one problem plaguing the nation,” BAC
said.

Rev CB Moss, executive director of the group,
said: “Crime in the Bahamas is increasing daily,
which was confirmed by the to-date crime fig-
ures presented in the House of Assembly last
Monday night by Minister Turnquest. And these

figures do not include unreported crimes which by
some estimates could be as much as the reported
crimes in some categories.

“Much precious time was wasted by the
appointment of the National Crime Commission
nearly two years ago, which is proving to be
almost useless.

“While the landscape of the Bahamas is being
increasingly stained by the blood of our people,
and many victims of crime and their families are
experiencing much pain, nice speeches are being
made in parliament often designed to deflect the
serious concerns of the people.”

The statement ended by stating that the time
has come to “take off the gloves” and seriously
address the crime crisis, as well as confront those
who are failing to do their job in the fight against
crime.

“The well-being of our children and future gen-
erations is at stake,” the statement said.



a ee

#
é
J
Ps
+
a

:
g
£
2

C=
Ld

|



i= 7
od re
a

James Franklin Knowles

The Knowles Family, would like to thank the many people who
supported and comforted us in the loss of our husband, father,
brother, uncle and confidant, James Franklin Knowles. We offer
special thanks to The Prime Minister, the Members of his Cabinet
and all of the Members of Parliament for their kind words and
tributes. We would also like to thank the Protocol Office, The
Royal Bahamas Defense Force and The Royal Bahamas Police
Force for their excellent organization. In addition to this, we would
like to thank the entire Bahamian community.

The honor and respect shown to our beloved Jimmy by everyone
has awed and humbled us in this most difficult time. The
Bahamian people showed our family and the world at large that
many and not just our family knew Jimmy for the man he was.
The ideals, values and morals that he adhered to, hold strong in
people's minds and that the fight he fought is something worth
striving for.

James Knowles loved his family and his country. His most lasting
legacy is us, the people of the Bahamas. If his funeral was any
indication of the integrity, honor and respect that we had for him
and each other, he would say that the road to the future is well
paved and that his work was done. He would have been proud
and honored for the service you have done for him and his family.
On his behalf and on behalf of the Knowles Family we'say our
sincerest thank you and you have our eternal gratitude.

Sincerely,

The Knowles Family
THE TRIBUNE

Widow with
Road Act policy

fined $400 for
no insurance

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A WIDOW paid a $400 court
fine for not having car insurance
— although she had a Road Act
policy at the time.

Housekeeper Annette But-
ler, 55, has spoken out to alert
other motorists covered under
the Road Act policy to be on
their guard.

Mrs Butler crashed into
another car on April, 1 ulti-
mately causing a three-car colli-
sion in the eastern area of New
Providence.

The Road Act coverage she
had in place at the time did not
cover the damage to the vehicles
involved in the wreck — which
cost her around $5,000 of per-
sonal savings to repair — but
Mrs Butler was shocked when
weeks later she was served with
a summons to appear in court
for not having her car insured.

Damage

Road Act insurance protects
a policy holder from liability for
the death or bodily injury of
another person involved in a car
accident, but not for damage to
property belonging to a third
party.

She said her husband, who
died four years ago, always han-
dled the insurance payments.
While on his deathbed, he
instructed his wife to collect
insurance papers and to contin-
ue paying for the same policy.

"Before he passed he said to
take the envelope that he always
keep in the car (to the insur-
ance company), give it to them
and they would take the old one
and give me a new one,” said
Mrs Butler. "And that's what
I've been doing for the past
three years."

The summons said Mrs Butler
drove while not covered
"against third party risk insur-

ance contrary to section 8 (1)
and (3) of the Road Traffic Act,
Chapter 220."

It ordered her to appear in
Court on May, 29 to answer to
the complaint.

She said she took the sum-
mons to her insurance company
for an explanation. She said they
were dumbfounded as Road
Act is still considered a legal
option for motorists.

Fearing a stiff penalty, Mrs
Butler paid a fine of $600 —
$400 for not having her car
insured and $200 for not exer-
cising due care and attention
while behind the wheel — the
day before she was due to
appear in court.

The Tribune was also given a
copy of Mrs Butler's payment
receipt and her Road Act poli-
cy, which expired a few weeks
after the accident.

An insurance insider told The
Tribune she had not heard of a
similar case and believes Mrs
Butler was fined because of a
misunderstanding of the law.

"The Act that (the summons)
is quoting is talking about third
party risk but they're thinking
that means third party insur-
ance. But third party risk means
you must be covered against any
bodily injury against themselves
or anyone else,” said the insider.
"He probably charged her with
it and she paid it not realising, so
that means she satisfied the
judgment but it really is a ficti-
tious fine. That's like you saying
you charged with murder and
the person never existed."

Comptroller of Road Traffic
Philip Turner told The Tribune
the relevant section of the Act is
up for interpretation.

Attempts to reach officials at
the Department of Prosecutions
or Court 6 proved fruitless.

Two weeks after the accident,
when her policy expired, Mrs
Butler said she switched her
coverage over to Third Party
Insurance.

Start looking for that Special Prom Dress
early and remember our flexible
layaway plan at

ORALEE’S FASHIONS

Mackey Street « Telephone: 393-0744
titer eT ar ce eee

THIS
FATHERS DAY
GIVE HIM A

5% OFF SALE
STOREWIDE

Luke & taurs co
Dowdeswell Street
322-1103

Sale Ends 6/20/09

THE Bahamas’ overseas
i offices are being set up to
i process applications for elec-
i tronic passports for Bahamians
i living abroad, Deputy Prime

? Minister and Minister of For-
i eign Affairs Brent Symonette
? confirmed.

Speaking in the House of
sembly during debate on the

i $1.7 billion national budget, he
: revealed that his ministry has
i been
: $21,889,462 for fiscal year
? beginning July 1.

given a budget of

This represents a decrease of

i $1,883,478 compared to the cur-
i rent budget
? matic of the hard economic
: times which we are presently
? experiencing,

“and is sympto-

”

Mr Symonette
id.
The Passport Office is one of

: the “critical areas” of the rev-
i enue-generating arm of the
? Ministry of Foreign Affairs, he
: said.

During the past 10 months,

: the Passport Office issued

19,072 e-passports, which gen-

erated $928,010, Mr Symonette
: reported.

And, the ministry’s combined

consular offices overseas
? processed 1,235 e-passports,
: which brought in $2

“We expect to see a substan-

; tial increase in these figures
: during the next fiscal period
i due to improvements to the
? Passport Office, and our over-
: seas consular offices coming
i online,” he said.

The e-passport system was

page

officially introduced
in December 2007.
The government
signed a contract
with Indusa Global,
a Greenville, South
Carolina-based
information tech-
nology develop-
ment and consulting
firm, for an estimat-
ed $12.7 million to
provide four sys-
tems to initiate the
project.

The Internation-
al Civil Aviation Organisation,
of which the Bahamas is a
member, has mandated that by
2010, all countries must be issu-
ing machine readable or e-pass-
ports.

242.422.4677

ken@erabahamas.com

ECs. === [=a By E/E

raves ey

CARRERA

Sy

; Te

%

BU

Brent Senn

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 7

Overseas offices to process e-passports

To correct many
of the difficulties
created by the
attempt to fulfil this
mandate, the Pass-
port Office has
occupied the second
floor of the Basden
Building on
Thompson Boule-
vard. Additional
staff was also hired,
Mr Symonette said.

He added that
the ministry is relo-
cating the section
dealing with the issuance of cer-
tificates of identity to the for-
mer Ministry of Foreign
Affairs, East Hill Street, in an

effort to reduce the number of

persons waiting for service.

AUT UR AT
Oe Fiver f

pe eit al

284 Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas (242) 302-2800
Marina Village * Crystal Court at Atlantis, Paradise Island
Marsh Harbour, Abaco * Harbour Island * Our Lucaya,
Freeport ,Grand Bahama * Bimini Bay, Bimini

www.erabahamas.com

_ Man sentenced for drug
_ anil Weapons charges

A MAGISTRATE has sen-

: tenced a man to two and a half
? years in prison on cocaine and
: weapons charges.

Donovan Kelvin Garvey, 38,

? of Grand Bahama, pleaded
? guilty to charges of cocaine and
? weapons possession before
: Magistrate Carolita Bethel who
i sentenced him on Monday.

Garvey had been charged

? in 2005. Court dockets stated
? that while at Freeport on Fri-
i? day, May 20, 2005, Garvey was
? found in possession of an unli-
: censed firearm, 19 rounds of .35

mmunition, and 24.2 pounds

? of cocaine.

Police said that the drugs

? and weapons were found at his
? Freeport home.

se.
ft
ERA

Dupuch Real Estate

TAGHeuer

SWISS AVANT-GARDE SINCE 1860


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





The deafening silence of a nation
YOUR SAY

@ By ALESHA HART

Silence is our enemy. And in
silence an entire nation shows
fundamental flaws.

Ir THE modern
Bahamas is one where
society refuses to stand against
crime I denounce my citizen-
ship today.

For two minutes that
seemed like an eternity I held

my breath at the absence of a
nation at the Bahamas
Against Crime candlelight vig-
il

Our country’s inability to
show up against crime said
more to me than it could ever

Don Stainton (Protection) Ltd.

SERVING THE BAHAMAS SINCE 1978
HILLSIDE PLAZA, THOMPSON BOULEVARD
FREE ESTIMATES 322-8160/322-8219

or

=e = —|

¢ ROLL SHUTTERS

Aluminum rolling shutters are custom-fitted
and available in a choice of colours. They
provide security and hurricane protection.
Easily operated by hand crank or electric
motor, Roll shutters add beauty, security and
convenience to any home.

e We guarantee motors for 5 years, material |
and labour for two years and respond to
service calls within 48 hours, usually on the
same day.

key lock mech

gr
oO,

¢ ALUMINUM LOUVERED SHUTTERS

The look of colonial wooden shutters, but with
the strength and maintenance - free qualities of
aluminum. Add a finishing architectural touch to

your home with these functional yet decorative
shutters. Provides protection against storms,

sun and vandals.

© ALUMINUM ACCORDION SHUTTERS

Light enough to slide easily, yet strong enough to
withstand severe storm conditions. Heavy-duty

anisms for secure fastening.
=

as
¢ ALUMINUM HURRICANE AWNINGS

Economical and convenient, these easy-to-use
awnings are permanently installed and close
quickly for storm protection. They give everyday



This guide offers a look at the benefits of five varieties of Hurricane Shutters

0)
Z
0
V
i
fs
f
=
:
v
Z
z
C
C
v0

protection from heat and rain, and help prevent
ad fading of carpets and drapes.

* CLIP-LOCK ALUMINUM STORM PANELS

The most cost-effective protection available.
Lightweight, easy to store and to use. We give you
10% extra spring steel clips and use closed-end
headers to prevent the panels "creeping".



imagine. Lessons were taught.
Thank you Bahamas. Thank
you. Now when your grand-
mother is raped we must all
carry on with our regular day
as if nothing happened. When
your son of 14 is shot by a
stray bullet we should not be
enraged. Let’s carry on. When
your husband is robbed and
killed execution style because
he owns a business and some-
one thinks his life is too easy
we should carry on as if anoth-
er day has happened in par-
adise. Or, when your daughter
is beaten we should not look
at her blackened eyes. Just
stare at something else if she
crosses our path. Yes, let us
all be content.

I was not interested in who
organised the Bahamas
Against Crime candlelight vig-
il. Or that I got the news a bit
late.

It called on Bahamians to
stand against something and
I wanted to represent my fam-
ily because we stand together
against crime.

And this morning I am
more convinced that no state-
ment is too small. And as I lit
the little white candle for an
unnamed, I made my titanic
statement along with approx-
imately 150 others.

Perhaps we were mistaken

(those 150 who stood against
crime), and the criminal
resides in each of you and you
cannot stand because you are
the criminal.

The deafening silence of this
nation is haunting. Crime
elicited nary a public peep
from the Bahamian people.
Whatever they felt, Bahami-
ans largely kept it to them-
selves on Monday, June 15,
2009. The nation’s deafening
silence trampled our touted
values and marked the sad-
dest outcome of this time.

As Bahamian media should
tell its captive audience - we
are in disbelief at the submis-
sive national mood.

On that day the people did
not take to the streets. In
silence we have spoken. “We
will not forget” captured the
emotions of all who attended.
We understood that this gen-
eration of Bahamians did not
meet its duty.

We learned that this gener-
ation was tired, we understood
that this generation faltered,
and we disrespected the mem-
ory of innocent fallen victims
and tomorrow’s victims as
well.

Indifference to both crime
and politics may be responsi-
ble, plus the onslaught of self-
ishness spewed out by a peo-
ple unable and unwilling to
fight for anything. Is this the
story behind our violent nar-
ratives? Is this the reason that
within seconds of an apparent
retraction - and the “I will sue
you” hymnal accompanied by

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Civesry



If you're thinking
about health insurance,

. think of us.

When tough times come.








Cofmaimperial comes
through. Let The Boaharnes'
leader In life and health
Insurance Pele you meet thee
challenges of the day the
waoy we've been doing it for
over a century

— with confidence.

Stay confident.
Stay connected.

a _—_

= =
Colinalmperial

374.2000 346.8300

Wiew.colinaimpenialoam







“Silence is
consent. And
by consenting
to crime,
Bahamians bent
on keeping face
today at any
cost may be
sending instead
a message of
impunity to an
increasingly
lawless class.
In other words,
they can do as
they please.”



the rhythmic “my family was
insulted”- news stories and
talk shows were hectoring
people to accept an outcome,
however abhorrent—a shock-
ingly inappropriate, polarised
and unsolicited piece of
advice. Fact is, we should not
accept anything. We should
question everything. We
should be outraged in the face
of violence in any form. We
must.

However, the partisan
media and legal brainwashing
would not have worked if it
had not found a fertile ground
in the nation’s admirable
respect for silence.

The nation’s silent compo-
sure is based on the belief that
there will always be another
day, another injustice, another
court ruling, another decision.
That there will always be
another opportunity to right
the wrongs of today. Bahami-
ans know their democracy has
so far balanced its deep con-
servatism with a flexible, lim-
ber yet sluggish indifferent
streak. The losers of today
accept defeat because they
know they can be the winners

of tomorrow. Nothing is ever
completely lost in Bahamian
politics of survival.

You probably believe that
injustice will be rectified later.
But is it? And will it?

I’m not so sure. But the
absence of your presence is a
far more dangerous blow to
the very democratic institu-
tions the nation is being called
on to protect with obedient
silence.

Silence is consent. And by
consenting to crime, Bahami-
ans bent on keeping face
today at any cost may be send-
ing instead a message of
impunity to an increasingly
lawless class. In other words,
they can do as they please.

I suspect that history will
not be kind to us. We have
been the perpetrators of crim-
inal usurpation. We have been
the enablers.

The damage is done. No
amount of September demon-
strations, let alone October
political strife, will undo it.
Soon it will be in poor taste
to raise the silence issue. Prag-
matism will prevail: The Chris-
tian Council will be blasted as
uncaring, Bahamas Against
Crime will be bullied for poor
publicity, the government will
be charged with responsibility
for crime and individuals will
bear no personal accountabil-
ity. With a weakened Opposi-
tion to keep the issue of anti-
crime alive, the nation will for-
get and the criminal can legit-
imise himself just by virtue of
living in the Bahamas, as we
are a Silent nation. The
process has already begun.

I used to sleep soundly
every night knowing that the
famously resilient Bahamian
society and social system
would be there next morning
when I woke up. Not any-
more.

How could I when we are
the sons and daughters of
silence? A silence that ensures
rape, incest, murder and theft,
to name four, continues. Now
I wonder who will speak clear-
ly if something happens to me.

The Bahamas Cancer Centre at Centreville

Medical

Pavilion will

be hosting

individual

cancer clinics with two of the world's most
renowned specialists on Monday, June 22nd.
The clinics are open to the public.

The Hon. Prof. Dr. Arthur Porter
PC, MD, MBA, FACR, FACRO, FAAMA

Dr. Porter serves as Managing Director of The

Cancer

Centre and _ Director

of Radiation

Oncology. He is also the current Director
General and CEO of McGill University Health
Centre and author of more than 300 articles on
cancer research.

Dr. Karol Sikora
MA, MBBCh, PhD, FRCR, FRCP, FFPM

Dr. Sikora is the Director of Medical Oncology at
The Cancer Centre. He also serves as the Dean
of Britain's first independent Medical School at
the University of Buckingham and is the author
of the most widely-used cancer textbook in
graduate medical school in the United Kingdom.

The Bahamas Cancer Centre is one of only two
medical facilities outside the U.S. certified by the
American College of Radiation Oncology (ACRO)
and the only non-U.S. facility in the Western
Hemisphere to qualify for ACRO certification.

For more information,
Centreville Medical Pavilion



please contact: 502-9610.
¢ 72 Collins Avenue
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS



Swine flu (Official funeral for Milo B Butler

FROM page one

York from May 29
to June 3.

“The patient
experienced
symptoms upon
returning to the
Bahamas and
immediately
sought medical
attention,” the
Ministry said.
The patient has
undergone tests

home.

A specimen was sent to an }

ate rna eboratory and sults foyer of the House of Assembly from 11am
confirming the presence of the } ios Frid Gated 9
virus were received by the Min- } - som ah eee oT sbli 2 aie 7
istry of Health om Monday } o 5pm. The general public is invited to

evening.

The first confirmed case of the }
Influenza A (H1N1) virus in the }
Bahamas occurred in a young }

American tourist who arrived in i its details on the planned BTC

: dividend and Central Bank prof-

i it transfer, clearly shows the Gov-

At that time, staff at the Lyn- $ ernment is desperate to get its

den Pindling International Air- } hands on any revenues it can ina

? bid to fill the $374 million total

officials and hotel personnel : fiscal deficit, keep the national

were among a group of less than : gebt under control and dampen

20 people who were tested for i the looming public finances crisis.

the Bahamas on a flight from
New York on May 25.

port, Immigration and Customs

the influenza virus.

It was determined shortly } projected revenues of $1.411 bil-

afterwards that the tourist had ; [jon for 2009-2010 were some
: $151 million higher than antici-

: pated.

not infected anyone in the
Bahamas.
In this second confirmed case,

the Surveillance Unit of the } enue gain detailed here, the high-

Department of Public Health is } er forecasts were said to be based

also involved with the tracing } on legal and administrative

and monitoring of all people } improvements to Customs admin-

who have been in close contact ; istration and $114 million in extra
ae ? real property taxes and business
Health Minister Dr Hubert :

Minnis could not release any fur- }

ther information regarding the : tions came true, the IMF agreed

identity of the patient yesterday. } with its Budgetary projections

: ne ? that the GFS fiscal deficit —
Keys also confirmed its first case i which strips out $88 million in
? debt principal redemption—
The Monroe County Health } would come in at $286 million or

Department reported that a } 3.9 per cent of gross domestic

} product (GDP).

with the patient.

Also yesterday, the Florida

of swine flu.

young girl was treated for the
virus last week.

The Ministry of Health reit- | yield from planned revenue mea-

erated that precautionary mea- { sures appears uncertain, given the

sures against contracting the } reliance on improvements in tax

virus include covering your nose : administration. If revenues/pri-

and mouth with a tissue when } vatisation receipts are lower than

you cough or sneeze, disposing ; planned or take longer to materi-

of the tissue in the trash after ; alise, additional expenditure

use, along with frequent hand ; adjustment may be required in

? order to contain the deficit at 5.8

“Additionally, if you are expe- } per cent of GDP or below.”

riencing flu like symptoms, to }

washing with soap and water.

decrease the potential spread,

avoid contact with others, and : needed to buttress medium-term

; debt sustainability,” which is code

stay away from group settings,”
the ministry said.



THE Cabinet Office has announced that

? an official funeral for Milo Boughton But-
: ler Jr, former Speaker of the House of
? Assembly and parliamentarian, will be held
? on Monday, June 22, at Christ Church
? Cathedral, George Street.

Most Rev Drexel W Gomez, Archbish-

? op, Rt Rev Gilbert Thompson, Assistant
? Bishop, the Rev Dr James B Moultrie and
? the Venerable Archdeacon James E Pala-
? cious will officiate. The ceremony of inter-
? ment will follow at the Eastern Cemetery,

nO) or 1a YTS : Dowdeswell Street.

for possible influenza and is vol- :
untarily self-quarantined at }

Public

Mr Butler’s body will lie in state in the

view the remains and sign the Book of
Condolences.

The House of Assembly will be draped
in the colours of mourning and flags at
both Houses of Parliament will be flown at
half mast beginning on Friday, June 19
until after the funeral.

Mr Butler, the third son and sixth child
of the late Sir Milo B Butler Sr, and Lady
Caroline Butler, was born on November
30, 1936 in Nassau.

He received his primary education at
Worrell’s School and Eastern Senior
School and his secondary education at
Government High School.

Mr Butler later attended Dundee Tech-
nical College, Dundee Scotland and Middle
Temple Inns of Court, London, England.

Mr Butler ran unsuccessfully as a Pro-
gressive Liberal Party candidate during
the 1967 general elections for the City of

Nassau. He served as Chairman of the PLP
in 1969; as a Senator from 1969 to 1974,
becoming Vice President of the Senate
from 1972 to 1974.

In August 1974 Mr Butler became the
first Bahamian Consul-General, serving in
Miami, Florida, from 1974 through 1977.

Election

In 1977 he successfully contested the
seat for the Pinedale Constituency, which
he represented until 1992. During his
tenure in Parliament, Mr. Butler served as
Deputy Speaker of the House of Assembly
from 1987 to 1991 and as Speaker
from 1991 until the General Election of
1992.

During his political career he served as
Chairman of the following entities: the

Jr, former House Speaker

Transport Licensing Board; Town Plan-
ning Committee; the Bahamas Broadcast-
ing and Television Commission; the
Bahamas Electricity Corporation and the
Gaming Board.

He grew up in the Anglican tradition
and served as an altar boy.

Until his death, Mr Butler was a faithful
member of St Matthew’s Anglican Church,
serving as a member of the Vestry, the
Bishop’s Council, the Synod and the
Provincial Synod.

Mr Butler is survived by his sons, Milo
III, Godwin and Jevon; daughters, Angela
and Bernadette; former wives, Winfred,
and Comfort Baker; brothers, Raleigh Sr,
Elder Basil and Matthew, sister, Juanita;
three grandsons, four granddaughters, four
sisters-in-law, three aunts, 20 nephews, and
16 nieces, including Labour Minister of
State Loretta Butler-Turner.

FROM page one

The IMF said Government’s

Apart from the $37 million rev-

licence fee.
If the Government’s projec-

Yet the Fund warned: “The

The IMF then reiterated that
“structural revenue measures are

The Mercedes M-Class.
Beauty, brains and brawn.

Govt to take $30m dividend from BIC

speak for: “New or increased tax-
es.”

While the Budget projections
placed the Government on a
course to reduce the overall fiscal
deficit by 1.5 per cent of GDP by
the 2011-2012 fiscal year, largely
through reduced public spending,
it would not be enough to get the
Bahamas back on track to reduce
its debt-to-GDP ratio to 30-35 per
cent in the medium term.

Highlighting inflexibilities and
rigidities in civil servant and pub-
lic sector wages, and the
Bahamas’ social security and
infrastructure needs, the IMF
warned: “While this level of
expenditure containment would
flatten the increase of the debt
trajectory, it would not change
medium-term debt dynamics.

“Given the need to protect pri-

ority social and infrastructure
spending, and rigidities in the
public sector wage bill, a struc-
tural change on the revenue side
would likely still be needed to
achieve the authorities’ medium-
term objective of reducing debt
back to 30-35 per cent of GDP.”

“Heavy risks on the down side”
still faced the Bahamian econo-
my, with the IMF adding that its
forecast of a 9.2 per cent drop in
tourism earnings for 2009 was in
line with the January-April drop
in tourist arrivals.

“Sea arrivals were up by 5.5
per cent over the same period last
year, partly reflecting increased
demand for shorter and cheaper
cruise trips. However, tourists
arriving by air — who spend three
times as much daily as cruise
tourists and stay six times longer

“\"Ghoices Unlimice i
(Panty Supplies & ‘Rent tals)

Z

2s
7+

7

ope
Pe:

\

Specializing In

“Theme Party” Items
Hannah Montana/High School Musical
Tinkerbell/Disney Princess/Dora/Diego

Spiderman/Backyardigans/Winnie the Pooh
Abby Caddabby/Elmo/Bratz
And Many More
Monday - Saturday, 9am - opm

Tel: 394-0907
Jerome Ave
i

OU



— dropped by 15.5 per cent,” the
IMF said.

“The number of commercial
property acquisitions by non-
Bahamians dropped 36 per cent
compared to the first quarter of
2008, with the total value
($70 million) declining by 65 per
cent.

“Similarly, the number of resi-
dential property purchases by
non-Bahamians dropped by 19
per cent, with a decline in total
value of 25 per cent.”



Love Beach
Cottage

Gated, Newly refurbished,
3 Bed, 2 bath, furnished,
private beach access

across road, private deck
and tropical garden

$2,100 per month

Call 356-3462
ee

weekdays

NOTICE

ASSISTANT
MANAGER
NEEDED

FOR SHOE VILLAGE SHOE STORE

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
REQUIREMENTS:
«5 Years or more experience in the retail
or customer service industry
* High School Graduate
* Strong communication skills
* Good motivator for achieving goals

SALARY COMMENSURATE WITH EXPERIENCE

*all applications received will be kept in confidence

APPLY VIA FAX TO 242-326-0570
or email to hr@grsbah.net



LORENECS





When you think of the average SUV on
the road today, you think of road-
hogging, air-polluting gas guzzlers
that wouldn’t know the meaning of
high precision and fuel efficiency if it
were emblazoned on their windshields.
But there is an alternative. The refined
M-Class from Mercedes-Benz.

With its superior German styling utilising
only high-grade materials, its robust
engine power delivering exemplary
turn-on-a-dime performance whilst still
being frugal on fuel and its handling of
pot-holed roads and 1.5 ft. flooded
streets, the Mercedes-Benz M-Class is
clearly the best choice in SUVs.




Celebrate

Ad



Mercedes-Benz



TYREFLEX STAR MOTORS

Call us today for your new Mercedes-Benz M-Class at 325.4961
Wulff Road, P. 0. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas ¢ Fax: 323.4667




Liz i

ENTIRE MEN’S DEPT
June 18th - 20th



NEW ARRIVALS

& UNDERWEAR

All Sales final. Sale excludes school uniforms and souvenirs
Oe ime site CRe elmer Ce

(Oa =) Sf

Palmdale * Harbour Bay * Town Centre Mail * Bay Street


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Centreville House becomes

@ By GENA GIBBS

WITH the restoration of the
former Collins House on
Shirley Street, the Antiquities,
Monuments and Museums
Corporation (AMMC) is lead-

ing the way as downtown Nas-
sau gets a facelift.

Now called Centreville
House, headquarters of the
AMMC, it is being adorned
with lignum vitae, yellow elder
and a wide range of Bahamian

flower and fruit trees and
shrubs.

Bahamian environmental
artist, Antonius Roberts, has
been contracted to advise
AMMC on creating a space
that educates and appeals to

all the senses.

And, with Tanya Ferguson
of the Bahamas National
Trust as a consultant to the
landscaping project, they went
about creating what AMMC
director Dr Keith Tinker
described as “an oasis within a
mad setting.”

In this “oasis” can also be
found madera, horseflesh,
coco plum, joujou, sea grape,
coconut, sour sop, gua-






















































Fun
VT

aA
Tired of thé Same

Old Boring Summer
School?

FATHER’S DAY
AND SAVE

SPERRY@
40% OFF

Try Something
New & Creative!

Activities Include:
Arts & Crafts
Drawing & Painting

Music & Drama
Lessons

25% OFF
5% OFF

—e

Ae se Nan
el: 393-6897 —

"YT

Swimming and
Sports

OT Card 1 UA
TRIE CO RS LILL

CALL NOW AND
RESERVE YOUR SPOT
BEFORE IT’S TOO LATE

327-4133
or Email:

westmoor1@hotmail.com

ie

5 ei
Gifts for
Work or

ala ptops ,

Acer
Sony
an

A Toshiba
Apple

Down
Financing
Available

Rose Meo Sota etc 5 Mackey/st it
Parking Lot

Electrojack Business Centre Rose Ln.
West of KFC(Mackey St.) Drive Thru 393-6897

Also Available @:

Electrojack Town Centre Mall -3566206

Cyberjack-Mall@ Marathon - 3946254 /5

Gadgets & Gears- Mall@ Marathon - 3937781/2

malamee, among others.

Trees chosen were recom-
mended by the Bahamas
National Trust and the Nature
Conservancy to make sure the
botanical representation is
authentic and historically cor-
rect.

The grounds also feature a
pond, replica of a Lucayan
chief’s hut, and facilities where
children can play and learn
about the way of life of the
Lucayans, who inhabited the
Bahamas when Christopher
Columbus arrived more than
500 years ago.

Mr Roberts said his goal is
for visitors to enter and exit
the green-space at Centreville
House “with a five-dimen-
sional experience.”

“The guest will have com-
mitted to memory the sight,
sounds, smell, touch and taste
of the Bahamian historical and
cultural heritage,” he said.

The project is a product of
the Lindroff Development
Company which drafted the
proposal to the AMMC board
and assists with the funding.

Orian Lindroff, owner of
the company, is a graduate of
St Andrew’s School, class of
1961, when the school was still
located at Centreville House.

A similar project is the
Retreat at the Bahamas
National Trust Headquarters.

But Centreville House is
going a step beyond, Mr
Roberts said, by facilitating
space for a large capacity of
visitors with the grounds being
used for weddings or cultural
heritage programmes.

“There is a revitalisation of
downtown (Nassau) that has
to take place and we thought
that we would jump-start the
process by providing an adap-
tive use of a green space for
having a series of functions,”
said AMMC director Dr Tin-
ker.

Corporation chairman Dr
Davidson Hepburn noted that
Bahamian colonial architec-
ture “is unique to our envi-
ronment” and preserving what
is left of it has always been a
passion of his.



fl iV

iM

Derek Smith/BIS

AMMC CHAIRMAN Dr Davidson Hepburn outside the new Centre-

ville House, formerly Collins House.

“TI was very happy to have
this opportunity to deal with
this building,” he said, to bring
it back to its former glory, to
fit it into the revitalisation of
downtown.

“There are So many projects
we could do if we begin to
look at this place as a state-
of-the-art building and
grounds for the general public
and tourists alike,” he said.

With development, many
historic buildings have been
lost. Dr Hepburn pointed to
the once quaint colonial-style
Dowdeswell Street.

“You can’t even find one of
those buildings to represent
what was there” he said. “So
we are trying to preserve what
we can of whatever is left, to

S295 6.

keep that flavour of what we
had in the Bahamas.”

Dr Hepburn told of AMM-
C’s ‘Miracle Mile Project’
from George Street (west) to
Church Street (east).

The purpose is to restore all
the outstanding old buildings
along that route.

“We want Bahamians to be
aware of their culture, history,
and heritage,” said Dr Hep-
burn.

In partnership with the gov-
ernment to give downtown
Nassau a new look, “at
AMMC we are leading the
way in promoting a greater
understanding and apprecia-
tion of the natural and cultur-
al sites of Old Nassau,” said
Dr Hepburn.

Celebrating Five Decades af International Exchange

SAMUEL
JENNINGS,

a student in Nassau, Bahamas, will join a select
group of students representing their schools,
communities, and country as People to People
student leaders. Samuel Jennings has been
accepted into thé People to People Leadership
Summit in Stanford University, Palo Alto, California,
Aug. 9-15, 2009. All students accepted into a
People to People program must meet rigorous
academic and leadership requirements, Samuel
| Jannings was nominated and accepted for the
honor based on outstanding scholastic merit, civic

involvement and

Ilgadership potential.

The People to People Leadership Summits. bring
together outstanding student leaders from around the globe to focus leadership, team
building, community service, college admissions, and professional aspirations. Students
work on an action plan to make a difference in their communities, develop skills to
help them lead tomorrow's world, and build their collage resumes, while aarning
academic or service-learning credit.

Participants also gain insights to guide their educational and professional careers,
and benefit from a strong focus on college admissions. Through workshops,
presentations, excursions and discussions, student leaders attain a clear advantage
as they pursue and fine-tune their selected fields of interest. Students will have the
opportunity to meet with admissions officers and gain valuable advice for navigating
the college application process. In some locations, students will be able to tour several

area universities.

The 2009 People to People Leadership Surnmit will convene at Columbia University;
George Washington University: Johns Hopkins University; Harvard University; Stanford
University; and University of California, Los Angeles.

Samuel is a student of Lyford Cay Int'l School and also a Junior Achiever.
Congrataletions ancl we:

Special blessings from your parents, lan and Janet Jennings; brother,
Daniel; other family members, especially your spiritual mom, Bishop

Gloria Redd,

Ue love you.
THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 11

A POND with a fountain is also
featured at the ‘oasis’ that
Centreville House has become.

BELOW LEFT: Restoration
begins at home. AMMC chair-
man Dr Davidson Hepburn,
oversees restoration of the for-
mer Collins House, Shirley
Street, AMMC headquarters.

eee =

yew arrivaj, "yiny

15.% Off

Sale on Selected items : : P,
Up to 50.% Off :
VISIT US ON THE WEB
aebahamas.com Sizes XS to 3XL

For Fashion news & specials

a

ea Te he
———— -

CONFIDENCE
INSURANCE BROKERS
& AGENTS LTD.

Will be closed

on Friday, June 19, 2009

ee ee te a ee le

y
i :
: :

ror ©

—
|
ee
—_ 4 4

rll

for our staff
ANNUAL FUN DAY

Contidence Insurance Brokers & Agents Ltd.

Shirley Se. (2nd floor The Standard Howse
Phone: 323-6920 Fax: 325-8484

NOTICE

NEW TELEPHONE
NUMBER

To our valued Members, please be
advised that Teachers and Salaried
Workers Co-operative Credit Union
Limited, has upgraded their telephone

service to better asist our members.

Our new telephone number is
345.562.0500. IDAVID YURMAN

Please note that we can still be reached : Rr
John ;) Bull

at our old telephone numbers,
David Yurman Boutique, Bay Street, Nassau (242) 302-2878

242-323-4488/323-4492/ Crystal Court at Atlantis * Marina Village, Paradise Island

Marsh Harbour, Abaco * Harbour Island

323-4495-8/323-4411-4, Our Lucaya, Freeport, Grand Bahama « Bimini Bay, Bimini


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



PM criticises PLP for complaints over contracts

FROM page one

Group deal in Mayaguana, Prime Minister
Ingraham said that his government did
not “interfere” in that deal, “but go to
Mayaguana now and see what is happen-
in ”

“Some of the agreements, Mr Speaker,
as I said we reviewed, some of them
required other action by the government
agencies which members opposite also
proved incapable of concluding before
they were kicked out of office in 2007,” Mr
Ingraham said.

Outlining how the Opposition cam-
paigned during its term in office as if most
of these projects had been signed and con-
cluded as “done deals”, Mr Ingraham said
he watched with amazement the cover-
age on the local news of the BahaMar
deal.

“So even when these investment pro-

posals were only in their conceptual stages
they were marketed to the public as done
deals. We never saw so many announce-
ments and ribbon cutting for ideas as we
were treated to between 2002 and 2007.
“You know, Mr Speaker, for routine
things, the appointment of Boards, we
would sit down in the Cabinet Office and
decide these are the appointed Boards
and we would send the conclusion out to
the various ministries and the permanent
secretaries would get in touch with the
people, etc, and they are appointed to the
Boards. Our first set of Board appointees
come to an end of this month, June, we
appointed the first set for two years.
“But when they won, they went from
place to place with big TV cameras, ‘I’ve

come to announce the Board for this cor-
poration today’. A big show!” Mr Ingra-
ham remarked.

Noting how he had not intended to
speak long, but now was stirred on to do
so because of the contribution earlier yes-
terday by Opposition Leader Perry
Christie, Mr Ingraham said that the PLP
“never” accepts blame for anything.

“Tf it’s good, oh yes. They blame others
for failures and shortcomings. They would
demonize others and be repetitious in
their stories. I heard the Leader of the
Opposition saying how when they invited
him down at Clifton that he felt he was not
appropriately dealt with at the ceremo-
ny — but he was invited.

“When we built a $12 million port in

Marsh Harbour and it was time to open it,
they faxed something to my law office the
night before. The night before! Now I
have to give it to the Leader of the Oppo-
sition; he called me one time when they
were opening the new clinic in Fox Town,
and I asked him ‘which clinic, you mean
the one I built?’

“T said man that has been built for sev-
eral years. But he still has his name on
the plaque. Or go to Dundas Town any
day and look at that little box building
clinic and see the big plaque there and
see how many people they took down to
open it. And then they closed it!” Mr
Ingraham laughed.

The Prime Minister also took grave
exception to Mr Christie’s claim that the

poor and under-privileged were better off
under Mr Christie’s administration as their
party was more sensitive to “their needs.”

“T never tire of telling him that he can
never ever feel for them like me. You
can’t ever! You have never been one of
us! You can’t be one of us! You don’t
understand us! You are not one of us!
Don’t pretend to be one of us. You never
even slept next to one of us!” Mr Ingra-
ham exclaimed.

Mr Ingraham also advised Mr Christie
not to refer to him as a “rich man.”

“You shouldn’t call me a rich man
because Iam not. But you are. And you
should not even get in that conversation.
Let’s not even go down that road,” he
said.

PM gets tough with nurses

EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY

Confidence Insurance Brokers
& Agents Ltd. is seeking to fill the
following position:

JUNIOR CLERK/
MESSENGER

Energetic Male
18-23 years old
Computer knowledge in
Microsoft Excel/ Word
Communicative & Writing skills
is an asset.
Ability to work with cash
Driver’s License required.

Please submit a resume by
hand or mail to:

Confidence Insurance Brokers
& Agents Ltd.
Shirley Street
P.O. box SS-6253

Nassau, Bahamas



FROM page one

change their mind. They
changed their mind and decid-
ed they would go on a sick-out.
Well, we understood that they
were disappointed and figured
that they would stay out for a
day or two and then they would
sit down and talk to the gov-
ernment.

“But it appears that people
believe that it is the govern-
ment who ought to go chasing
behind them while they were
out sick. No, that's not the way
how I do business.”

He said government waited
a week before filing an injunc-
tion in the Supreme Court
which ordered that the nurses
return to work or face possi-
ble jail time if found they had
exceeded their allotted sick
days.

He added that it was not
until a week into the sick-out
that BNU decided to take the
proper legal route and file a
trade dispute with the Depart-
ment of Labour.

"They waited an entire week
before they followed the law.
As soon as they followed the
law the Department of Labour
fixed the date to hear the par-
ties, and the government
showed up. The government
had discussions with them this
morning, they didn't get very
far, but the government had
discussions because the gov-
ernment insists that they must
go back to work first."

Mr Ingraham said govern-
ment will only engage in mean-
ingful discussions with the
union if public health facilities
return to a state of normalcy.

"But the government is
unwilling and will not budge
from its position of having dis-
cussions and agreements while
they continue their illegal

Fantastic
Fathers Day
Giveaway!

Shop at The Shoe Village

strike. They are an
essential service,
essential services
are not allowed to
do that.

"If you want
results, listen to
what I say, kindly
go back to work and
I will cause the min-
ister of labour and
the minister health
to meet with you on
Monday morning
and resolve the mat-
ter, Monday. It's
not a big issue to
resolve," he said.

Meanwhile the BNU is plan-
ning on filing an application to
overturn the injunction filed by
government which court
ordered the nurses who called
in sick to return to work or
face jail time, said lawyer and
trade unionist Obie Ferguson,
who represents BNU.

Mr Ferguson said the stage is
now set for possible industrial
action explaining that Minister
of Labour Dion Foulkes has to
decide tomorrow on the
union's application for a strike
vote.

He insisted that the sick-out
was not industrial action as the
nurses involved had not
exceeded their allotted 20 sick
days a year.

Bahamas Nurses Union Pres-
ident Cleola Hamilton told The
Tribune she was disappointed
in the outcome of the meeting
adding that it was evident the
government had "no sense of
urgency" in resolving the issue.

"We haven't gotten any con-
clusion from the government,"
she told The Tribune after the
meeting.

Details on exactly how many
nurses continued to call in sick
yesterday were unclear up to
press time although The Tri-
bune understands that while
some were said to be gradually
returning to work, those nurses
with doctor's sick notes
remained off the job.

Ms Hamilton could not con-
firm if the sick-out continued
yesterday.

Mr Ferguson said the union
simply wants a written agree-
ment outlining a date when the
promised insurance scheme

mLU ame UU



would be imple-
mented.

"The union is not
adverse to a differ-
ent date they just
want to sit down
and come to an
agreement and be
treated with
respect. . .it's in the
interest of the
union to serve the
Bahamian public
but you can't just
give one set of peo-
ple insurance and
not give it to anoth-
er set," he said.

One angry nurse told The
Tribune yesterday said gov-
ernment's delay in providing
comprehensive health insur-
ance may drive many qualified
nurses out of the country to
seek better employment.

"Government has been fight-

ing for years to keep nurses
here and when those scouts
(from abroad) come over they
come with packages and they
are not going to stop until they
have a mass exodus. How can
they expect to keep us here
when they have no incentives
to keep us here?" asked the
nine year veteran of Princess
Margaret Hospital.

Yesterday, Dr Minnis said
public health nurses were
returning to work gradually
and said PMH, clinics on
Grand Bahama and the family
islands were functioning.

"T have not gotten a com-
plete report but I know staff
since yesterday have been
returning to work slowly.

“And all the clinics were
open, all clinics on the family
islands and Grand Bahama
were functioning,” Dr Minnis
said.

FELLOWSHIP MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
Host: Community Outreach Day
Saturday June 20th 2009

Free: Health Screening ~

Free: Food

Legal Advice
Financial Advice
Counselling

) . ibwood Gardens

a

ny) Slelephone 392-4380



this Father's Day and
with any purchase of
$200 or more receive a

fk Cawer# Gor NEW YORK

belt or wallet.

Limited quantities, so shop early
for the special man in your life!

Promotion begins
Monday 15th June,
and ends

Monday 22nd June

The? Sweeting's



Hayy fathees Day

0 to our AS Fath’ and Mentor, The Rev. Mone N. Brown

Madeira Shopping Plaza - Tel:328-0703 from your children, grandchildren and great grandchildren.

Marathon Mall : Tel: 393-6113
RND Plaza, Freeport - Tel: 351-3274

We love you and may God's richest blessings continue to sustain
and follow you.


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE






©Sports Locker

UPPER LEVEL, TOWN CENTRE MALL PHONE NO: 322-6593

FATHER'S DAY SALE!!




NIKE PUSH UP GRIPS

Lies |

tee

{pee

EVERLAST
NEOPRENE SHIRTS

pid | fy The
SAVE SAVE
, $150 .

Was $549.99 Was CED 99

Ses rsa Ca WEIDER 220 WEIGHT BENCH tie GLa HOME SYSTEM



$329,°°
SAVE










Men’s Men's Men’s

Renegade : Raider = 4 Fatherz Lot 29

Shits ; im Cotton Polo " Polo ail == Mi
i



WY &, Tshirts bay Shirt Shi




Men's i .
Cargo .







MEN’S NIKE AIR MAX DREAM BASKETBALL SHOE
(White/Blue/Silver)




WE HAVE 100's OF
GIFT IDEAS FOR DAD!

Or get a Sports Locker
Gift Certificate and let Dad choose!

MEN’S NIKE AIR FORCE 1 MEN’S ECKO JIGSAW MEN'S JORDAN JUMPMAN MEN’S JORDAN 2.5 TEAM
ele ai Call fon titg) REFLEXES SHOE (Wh/Copp) ELITE SHOE (Wh/Blue) BASKETBALL SHOE (Wh/Rd/BIk

WAS $169.99 WAS TA 79.99
NOW a.
Mi

EE




MEN’S ROCKPORT BRIDGE MEN’S ROCKPORT BRIDGE MEN’S ROCKPORT BRIDGE MEN’S NIKE RECRUIT
CASUAL SHOE (Dk.Brn/Chest) CASUAL SHOE (Nvy/Org/Wh) CASUAL SHOE (BIk/Wh) SANDALS (Black/Silver)

WAS $49.99
NOW

PRICES ARE GOOD UNTIL JUNE 28TH WHILE STOCKS LAST.
























Christie

FROM page one

times.

He claimed the PLP too faced
challenges when it came to power
in 2002 — the recent 9/11 attack in
New York City, and the looming
war in Iraq — but yet managed to
take “bold” action to better con-
ditions.

Mr Christie noted that his
administration left the country with
increased revenue flows and exter-
nal reserves, enhanced GDP
growth and reduced unemploy-
ment.

The PLP leader alleged that,
having revealed a lack of ideas, the
current Government “needs help”,
must “stop being bloody minded”
but instead turn to other “brains”
in the country to find new solu-
tions to the problems it faces.

He suggested that even though
— as Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham stated — “the economic text-
books” have no answers to the cur-
rent crisis, the Government must
“act as the sovereign Government
of the Bahamas” and may find a
“way outside of the textbooks to
make progress.”

“Tt must be the obligation of the
government to protect and pro-
mote the highest possible level of
sustainable employment for all
Bahamians,” said Mr Christie.

“The country needs today to
have the Government act on my
recommendation to appoint a
group to devise strategies to assist
the country in the way ahead.”

One taskforce could “aggres-
sively assess the current hotel prop-
erties and their challenges and
those investments that were in
process prior to the global reces-
sion,” said Mr Christie

Another could focus on the
financial services sector, looking
at ways to “create new products
and whatever it takes to be more
competitive and productive, again
with a view to creating jobs,” he
proposed.

Meanwhile, he questioned
whether more could have been
done to save jobs recently lost in
the hotel sector, particularly
through the “creative and sus-
tained” use of financial conces-
sions which could be offered to
hotels.

The Opposition leader added
that the operators of the now
closed Four Seasons Emerald Bay
hotel in Exuma had previously
made known to Government their
“frustrations” about the cost of
operating in Exuma and he ques-
tioned why further subsidy was not
provided by the Government to
help them remain afloat.

“They felt some consideration
should have been given to Emerald
Bay (by the Government) in light
of their remote location and their
cost structure,” said Mr Christie.

He called on Government to
work as “closely as is necessary”
with the Bahamar developers to
bring the “critical” Cable Beach
project to fruition, and the jobs
that will come with it, as well as
to make “every effort” to
“relaunch” the I-Group develop-
ment in Mayaguana which now
employs a small fraction of those it
did in previous years.

Meanwhile, he said that a recent
public address by BahaMar CEO
Sarkis Izmirlian in which he
revealed how the government of
Qatar rejected the option of invest-
ing in BahaMar during this reces-
sion, but instead chose to invest
millions in a 250-room hotel in
Cuba, should cause the Govern-
ment to “ask why these things are
happening.”

Mr Christie stated that just as
Sol Kerzner and the Atlantis devel-
opment showed investors that
“money could be made in the
Bahamas” in the hotel industry,
the country cannot allow hotel clo-
sures and poor performance to
“redefine the image of our econo-
my.”

Speaking of its potential to pro-
mote the Bahamas as a financial
services centre, to attract foreign
direct investment and through this
to create jobs in the construction
industry and the financial services
sector, Mr Christie said Govern-
ment must re-establish the Min-
istry of Financial Services and
Investments, set up under his
administration.

“This government did not main-
tain such a ministry and as a result,
we believe they made a mistake,”
said Mr Christie.

Turning to the youth, the Oppo-
sition leader claimed they have
been ignored in this year’s budget,
and proposed that Government
appoint a “special commission” to
make recommendations on how
more jobs can be created for young
people soon to graduate from col-
lege abroad, the College of the
Bahamas and high school.

“Left alone, many of them may
have to wait years to have their
legitimate needs met.

“The Government cannot
ignore this issue. We must all be
engaged in...working relentlessly
identifying workable economic
options for them,” added Mr
Christie.

Prior to lay-offs at Exuma’s
Emerald Bay hotel and the emer-
gence of thousands of new gradu-
ates, figures released by the
Department of Statistics in March
pegged unemployment at the high-
est level in 15 years.

It was found that 12.1 per cent of
people in New Providence and 14.6
per cent in Grand Bahama were
out of a job at that time.


15

r

THE TRIBUNE PAGE

S]

BAAA to honour
top junior athletes

‘Mighty Mouse’
to represent the
» Bahamas at ‘09
World Games...
See page 17

>

tis

2009



THURSDAY, JUNE 18,

TO bridge the gap between academic and
athletic excellence, the local governing body
for track and field is gearing up to honour its
top athletes of the ‘08-09 school year.

The Bahamas Association of Athletic
Associations is set to recognise its top junior
athletes at the All Bahamian Award Cere-
mony.

The official presentations are scheduled
for 7:30pm June 23 at Government House.

Governor General Arthur D Hanna is the
patron of this event and will be presenting the
awards.

A reception will follow the award ceremo-

ny.
The All Bahamian awards are given to
high school track and field athletes who have
met the standards set by the BAAA for their
events and also maintained a 2.5 or higher
grade point average for the academic year.

Each year an honourary All Bahamian
award is given to a male and female athlete
who have contributed to the sport of track
and field in the past.

The award was modeled after the All
American awards which honours outstanding
college athletes in academics and sports.

All-Bahamian Team

MEN

Warren Fraser - 100m, 200m

Marcus Thompson - 100m

Karlton Rolle - 200m

Jeffrey Gibson - 400m, 400m hurdles
Chris Nesbitt - 800m, 1500m
Kenneth Wallace-Whitfield - 800m, 1500m
Laquardo Newbold - 1500m

Kristin Hepburn - 110m hurdles
Nejmi Burnside - 400m hurdles
Jaquan Williams - 110m hurdles
Dennis Bain - 110m hurdles
Raymond Higgs - high jump

Bahamas junior paseball
team to play in tourney

JUST two days remain until the Bahamas’ Dominican Republic, Panama, Puerto Rico Russell. In the second row (I-r) are Jonathan

WOMEN

Nivea Smith - 200m

Shellyka Rolle - 400m

Rashan Brown - 400m
V'Alonee Robinson - long jump
Sparky] Cash - long jump

Honourary All Bahamians

junior national team sets off for interna-
tional competition.

The 16-18 team is slated to participate in
the 2009 Latin American Big League
Caribbean Zone Baseball Tournament, to
be held in Zulia State, Venezuela.

The tournament, hosted by Little League,
will also feature, Aruba, Curacao, Colombia,

and the host country Venezuela.

The team will be led by Richard Bain who
was recently selected in the 45th round of
the Major League Baseball draft by the
Philadelphia Phillies organisation.

Shown seated in the front row (I-r) are
Aneko Knowles, Tyrell Smith, Dale Davis Jr,
Patrick Knowles Jr, Kyle Hall and Desmond

Groezinger, Stephen Curtis, Brandon Mur-
ray, Anthony Miaulis II and Jordan Gib-
son. And in the third row (I-r) are Daniel
Cash, Patrick Waugh, Lynden Pindling,
Sedale McKenzie, Richard Bain and Leon
Cooper. Standing in the back row (I-r) are
manager Terran Rodgers and coach Patrick
Knowles Sr

Thomas A. Robinson
Shonel Ferguson



aay

vi

ll | | lll
[SaviCHEe | | Rae CHE
“=a — =a i

|
alla

ae J Ne CT Oar COLUe pee oe

ENDS JUNE 24th
CITY MARKET’S
CV WERT od Ey: Keg|
PROGRAM ENDS
WED. JUNE 24th, 2009
AT ALL CITY MARKETS
& PARTICIPATING
PARTNERS

4i¢gemgdee

DEEDS ON

been: a

FP eae
i
Aare tera,

Jiii
wer’
DONRMRDS So Aear

SSEURLEC SPREE CEE EY

Claeere
‘freer
phage

oh de ie lt a

UnsNnieneN on aR

|

Redeem Dollar for Dollar
at any City Market except on
tobacco products

NER

LOPROLLA
SWAP SAC FOR NEW STAMPS

You can swap “filled” SaveA+ Chek cards
for the new Smart Shopper Savings STAMPS
at any City Market Customer Service Desk
only “until” June 24th, 2009!

a oe

a ee

a1 Be

Dae

ae e Pee) a COLLISIGN RAEBITAHCE SYSTER AMD A

GATHER YOUR SAV-A-CHEK
COUPONS AND MAKE IT A
FUN PROJECT! You can use
ele ers) 8) ance al ep
bundle (staple) filled $1.00
ce ea ae

ACT QUICKLY!

ee a a] Re tr Pee YOUR DRIVING PLEA

BUTLTED GOWER THE TAADITIOMSL CORGLLA RITH & BETTER

ed ae

PERFORMAKCE. COMFORT AND QUALITY

EXECUTIVE Open €e - Bam - 3:30pm
“| Sat Bam - |2noon

E-mail: execmotoria!/ batelnet. bs

ALTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER Parts and service guaranteed

Awailable in Grand Bahama at Quality Auto Sales |Freeport] * Queens Hwy, 352-8122 «Abaco Motor Mal, Don |


PAGE 16, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS
SPORTS



























RM FRAME W volleyball team must
be commended

Nassau's Leading Manufacturer of Vinyl Windows and Vinyl Doors

You Can Check Our Competitors -

THEY did it. They did tt... where their destination was
1 Yes, the Bahamas Volley- STUBBS going to be for the next
ball Federation women’s round.

national team have qualified
for the third round of the

Had they not been side-
tracked by the robbery, who

NORCECA 2010 World knows what would have hap-
Championships. pened in their playoff match
Despite the fact that they against Jamaica. The team
Call for your FREE quote or played with a heavy heart, could have easily folded up,

having lost their personal pos-
sessions during a robbery of
their lockers at the gym, the
team was able to stay motivat-
ed enough to get the job done.

packed up whatever they had
left and decided to return
home.

Instead, they worked
through the three straight-set
loss to Jamaica. Had they
won, that would have put
them im a position to be able
to travel to Disneyland in
Orlando, Florida, instead of
going to Puerto Rico.

The loss put the team in a
must-win situation against St
Lucia as the team prevailed

and in the process secured a

berth into the second round
KDA KD TOR Si CYIIAG E : where they will travel to Puer-
The Power te Surprise” 1% . to Rico. I’m sure it didn’t mat-

ter as much to the women
where they were going as it
was who they played in the
playoffs.

This is the first time, like
the men who earned the right
to travel to Cuba in July, that
the women have reached this
in . far and so they should be
The Bahamas Electricity Corporation | commended for their achieve-
ment, especially considering

the unfortunate circumstances
e n ¢ r that they found themselves in.

It’s just so unfortunate that

Come visit our factory located on 74 Mount Royal Avenue, Nassau,

TEL: 1-242-325-6633
FAX: 1-242-325-6638 The team must be com-
een acm mney
PEERS S SEES SS

setter that could have turned
things around in terms of

++ e +

re



Consultancy Services the team had to go through
the ordeal that they encoun-
The Bahamas Electricity Corporation tered.
invites Tenders for the services described below: The team is due to return
home today, no doubt with
Bidders are required to collect packages from the some remorse against the
Corporation's Administration Office, Glue Hill & Tucker Roads Barbados Volleyball Federa-
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158 tion, who just simply aban-
doned them (not the Bahamas
Tenders are to ise addressed ta: Volleyball Federation, as indi-
Mr. Kevin Basden cated in Wednesday’s article).
General Mana ger The Bahamas Volleyball

‘ Bahamas Electricity Corporation ldt aries
. Executive Offices - Blue Hill & Tocker Roads one ‘ll relaxed and a
BEST QUALI ry, BEST PRICES Nassau, Bahamas i i
for the Barbados Police Force
to carry out their investiga-
Best Sa les Se rvices & Parts July 3, 2009 majority of their items being
, no later than 4:00 p.m. recovered.
Test Drive A Spotage Today! Moe” Smith is the federa-
tion’s first vice president and

Federation did all that they
ease as they waited patiently
Puts This In A Class Of Its Own
Deadline for delivery to BEC: an or before tion, which resulted in the
Head coach Joseph “Joe
Submissions should be marked as follows:
Tender No. 704/05 national team director. Also

ELITE MOTORS LTD. SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED — Hs stornnancinc wis CONSULTANCY SERVICES/ eee,
WIRD Wisk Rood Thompson Blvd. = Gakes Field FROPOSAL TO INVESTIGATE CONCRETE was treasurer Raymond _
PC) Bax Maou 1. 202.326.6377" 1<.202326.6315 eee DELAMINATING AT STATION “A” BUILDING “Rhymes” Wilson and assis-
t. (242) Pea? fk] dae @. tanpingicoralwave.com BROKERS & ENTS LID. CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION i. treasurer, Lloyd “Ratty”
avis.
The Corporation reserves the right ta In contacting the team ona
accept of repect any oF all proposals. daily basis, the three men
n n | talked constantly about their
lo alvertise il The gilts - te a newspaper For all enquiries regarding the tenders and site visits, contact efforts to ensure that the
Mr. Stefan Edgecombe at telephone 302-1505. ladies, including assistant

. . Py Py coach Jackie Conyers, were
il MATURED TRY | Call 502-20/1 toa ; Site visit will take place on Friday, June 26, 2009 at 10:00 a.m. all made comfortable even
i : at BEC, Clifton Pier Power Station when they had to leave the

games village for another
hotel that they had to pay for
since Monday.

How can the federation and
even the players, who have
become familiar with the

Bahamian players, turn their
backs on them in such a cri-
sis? If the situation was
reversed, I’m sure that the
Bahamas Volleyball Federa-

tion, nor the players, would
have done the same to Barba-
dos or any other country.

It just shows the level of
GRAND PRIZE $1,000 ae
9 exhibits.
Over the years, we have
* heard so many stories from
Second Prize $500 ou players about the way
they are treated whenever
= = * they travel to one of the
Th d p 2 5 O Caribbean Islands or Latin
r ri ze American countries to com-
pete. Sometimes you just did-
¥ F n’t believe that they would
Pr us lots of oth er ' : have been treated in the man-
4 3 i , ! ner that they claimed they
: were.
i n-sto re Ss pe Cc i a | Ss = , a a The women’s trip to Barba-
q — i oo dos is definitely the height of

tt. Thank God the players
were able to recover the
majority of their possessions
and none of them were physi-

b * i - cally harmed.
, oe : — They just have to put this

- F , = egg experience behind them and

r . a move on. It could have hap-
’ a a =i pened to anyone. It’s ust
a : ) wt y + unfortunate that we were the
: Me .- ™“ A only ones who were the vic-
i = ” = ifm tims. When they head to
aif o - Puerto Rico in August, we are

Ehigt to, wit with each looking forward to them step-
ping up and performing just as
spectacular as they did in Bar-

; ’ BurchAee over $25.00.
Promotion ends June 20th’ May, bados.

: “n ;
| See: stores for further details. Congratulations and wel-

" come home ladies. We are
very proud of how you han-

dled the whole experience.
TRIBUNE SPORTS

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 17



SPORTS



‘Mighty Mouse’ to represent
Bahamas at ‘09 World Games

FOR the first time in seven
years, a Bahamian has been
selected to represent the coun-
try and the region at one of the
world’s most prestigious body-
building contests.

Paul “Mighty Mouse” Wilson
has been selected to compete
at the 2009 World Games, slat-
ed for July 16 in Kaohsiung,
Taiwan. He was selected by the
International Bodybuilding
Federation to represent the
Caribbean region in the event.

At five foot two inches tall
and 152 pounds, Wilson is a 26
year-old bodybuilding champi-
on in the lightweight amateur
division.

He started the sport nine
years ago while in high school
and spent the last eight years
dominating the sport.

Among his titles are the
reigning Central American
Caribbean champion gold
medallist, the reigning national
lightweight champion, and the
two-time champion of the
Southern States Body Building
Competition in Fort Laud-



PAUL WILSON (centre) at a press conference with his manager Keith Rolle (left) and Danny Sumner, president
of the Bahamas Bodybuilding & Fitness Federation...

erdale, Florida.

While representing the
Bahamas for the past eight
years, Wilson earned one gold,
two silvers, and a bronze medal

at four of those competitions.

In 2006, he placed 17th out
of 71 competitors at the World
Championships in the Czech
Republic.



. PAUL WILSON has been selected




to compete at the 2009 World
Games, slated for July 16 in




Kaohsiung, Taiwan...

“Pve been doing this sport
since I was a teenager,” Wilson
reflects. “In fact, I entered my
first competition the day after I
graduated Faith Temple Chris-
tian High School. I became a
certified fitness instructor in
Nevada and now I’m one of the
personal fitness instructors at
Mystikal Fitness, where I also
train. All in all, 1am more than
ready to compete.”

have anyone known for drug
abuse at these competitions.”

As for his pending competi-
tion, Wilson is ready to make
the nation proud on his first trip
to Asia.

“T’m excited about going to
Chinese Taipei,” he said. “I’ve

seen some of the top notch ath-
letes at other competitions and
I’m ready. I’ve faced off against
some of them before and I
know the calibre of athletes on
that level. Overall, ?’m moti-
vated to compete and bring
what I’ve got to the forefront.”

Quality Auto Sales
DRO RO MITC GS

For the best deal in town on
Se cars, with warranty!
Trade-ins on new car sales

NOW
IN STOCK!

‘01 TOYOTA CAMRY

‘05 TOYOTA CAMRY :
‘07 TOYOTA YARIS

pn

w

‘06 HYUNDAI TERRACAN

























Another thing that Wilson is
ready to do is bring more atten-
tion to the sport and he’s deter-
mined to get the financial back-
ing he needs to accomplish his
goals.

“T think that bodybuilding in
the Bahamas is being stunted
because of the downturn in the
economy and the stigmatism
that goes along with the sport,”
he noted.

“It does take a lot of money
to stick to the proper diet, the
vitamins, supplements and gym
membership but at the same
time, Bahamians have not only
proven to be successful in the
sport, but also are serious when
it comes to abusing their bodies
with steroids. I’m proud to say
that we (the Bahamas) don’t

‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE
‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
‘06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA

‘06 HYUNDAI SONATA

‘01 HYUNDAI HD-65 TRUCK
‘94 MITSUBISHI DIAMANTE
‘94 TOYOTA CAMRY

@ QUALITY: ©

#7 AUTO GEALER IN) THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET - 322-3775 + 325-3079

Wath car ehceercars of Gh Bip Marto oben [Peamgor) bid for derilardeah, Queene Mey, 19)-6172
af boc ieior All Can dcp Bed, Jd7-39 14



Courtney Cashes In On

Wendy’ s lk Win!

Sit. Anne’s School
Kid’s Kamp

4 weeks

list of activities on forms
June 29th — July
24th for ages 5-12
8:00am to 12 noon
Monday — Friday

Cost: $150.00
per week

AST DRAWING 4

St. Andrew’s School

Kid’s Kamp — 3 weeks — list of activities on forms
July 13th — 31st for ages 5-12 - 8:00am to 12 noon
Monday -— Friday - Cost: $150.00 per week

Lio: Michelle Lewis, Markeling Manager Coca Cola; Cynthia Thompson,
Winnersi Mother: Courtney Thompson, Week 3 Winner; Randy Sands, Director
Of Operations Wendyis; Yolanda Pawar, Marketing Manager Wendyis; Maxine
Seymour, Marketing Manager E Radio House.

Swim America/Fitness/Competitive/Masters
6 weeks — various costs on forms

June 29th — August 8th 5:30-7:00am Mon. Wed. & Fri.
4:00- 7:00pm Mon. - Fri.

- =SswiF T iz

SWIMMING SUMMER PROGRAMMES
Tel: 324-1167 » Forms available at the school office LP
OR Visit our web site: www.swimswift.com and click Forms

Courtney Thompson's purchase of a large Spicy Chicken Combo
recently paid out some big dividends when he became the third instant
winner of $1000 in Wendy's, Coca Cola, 100 Jamz, Joy FM, Cool 6,
and Y PM's “Upgrade Me™ promotion, Courtney's triumph proves
that winning at Wendy's is so easy even a kid can do it!

For the past two years, this industrious young student of Doris Johnson
High School has been working part-time to eam extra money at a local
food store. Now that he’s won the week three cash giveaway, Courtney
says hell be more than prepared for the “back-to-school season.”

Lyford Cay School

Kid’s Kamp — 2 weeks — list of activities on forms

June 29th — July 9th for ages 5-12 - 8:00 am to 12 noon
Monday - Friday - Cost: $150.00 per week

With a bright smile and a twinkle in his eyes Courtney happily boasts.
“T can buy all of my own school uniforms, supplies and shoes plus
have some left over.” Being as wise as he is hardworking, young
Swim America/Fitness/Competitive/Masters — 6 Courtney intends to put some of his winnings away for “rainy day.”
weeks — various costs on forms

June 29th — August 8th 4:00 — 7:00 pm Monday - Friday In adclition to the chance to go for the cash, every large combo upgrade
comes with a Scratch Card good for immediately redeemable food
prizes, Customers can play to win at all cight of the country’s Wendy's
restaurants including the Domestic Airport and Freeport. All Freeport
entries will be flown to the capital to be entered in the weekly drawings

courtesy of Sky Bahamas.

The fourth and final installment of $1 000.00 will be won at this
Friday's live remote, on 100 Jamz, scheduled for Wendy’s, Thompson
Blvd. The “U /perade Me™ promotion will then climax with the MEG A
Jackpot Drawing of $10,000 scheduled for Friday, June 26"
PAGE 18, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

_ EXTRA, EXTRA,

Large Shipment

i)

Used Cars

COME CHECK





) ow

— Hurry, Hurry and

US OUT

., New shipments Arrived

Get Your First Choice
For Easy Financing

Bank And Indurance










DATE:

On Premises
Check Our Prices
Before buying

ae

To advertise in The Tritune -
ea AS ETT

























MIR) rere va TEL

Hangers
Tié/Belt Racks
Containers
Laundry Organizers
Kitchen Organizers

WAREHOUSE SALE

"Cc

loset Authority

SATURDAY, JUNE 20TH, 2009
Time: 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 P.M
PLACE: AIRPORT INDUSTRIAL PARK
OPPOSITE VIRGO CAR RENTAL

Bath Organizers

shoe Organizers

Pantry Organizers
Sports Organizers
Drawer Organizers



Rafael Nadal (AP)

Nadal, Safina seeded
No. 1 for Wimbledon

WIMBLEDON, England
(AP) — Defending champion
Rafael Nadal and top-ranked
women's player Dinara Safina
were seeded No. 1 for Wimble-
don on Wednesday.

There were no big surprises
when the All England Club
announced the seedings for the
grass-court Grand Slam tour-
nament, which opens Monday.
The draw will be released Fri-
day.

The top-ranked Nadal has
been having trouble with his
knees the past few months and
received treatment after pulling
out of the Wimbledon warm-
up event at Queen's Club.

The Spaniard plans to test
them by playing exhibition
matches on grass against Lley-
ton Hewitt on Thursday and
Stanislas Wawrinka on Friday
at the Hurlingham Club in Lon-
don.

Wimbledon stuck closely to
the world rankings in deter-
mining the seeding lists for the
two-week tournament.

The top six spots in the men's
list follow the rankings. Five-
time champion Roger Federer
is No. 2, with Andy Murray at
No. 3. Murray won his first

grass-court title at Queen's Club
on Sunday, becoming the first
Briton to win the tournament
since Bunny Austin in 1938,
who then went on to become
the last British men’s finalist at
Wimbledon.

They are followed by No. 4
Novak Djokovic, No. 5 Juan
Martin Del Porto and No. 6
Andy Roddick.

Eighth-ranked Fernando
Verdasco is seeded No. 7 ahead
of Gilles Simon.

Marat Safin, a semifinalist last
year, is the No. 15 seed despite
being ranked 23rd, while the
big-serving Ivo Karlovic is at
No. 23 while having a ranking of
31.

Among the women, Safina of
Russia is followed by Serena
Williams and defending cham-
pion Venus Williams.

The only major change from
the rankings is 2004 Wimble-
don champion Maria Sharapova
as the No. 24 seed despite being
ranked 59th.

Sharapova has plunged down
the rankings after nine months
out with a shoulder injury but
reached the semifinals of the
Aegon Classic in Birmingham
last week.



e idedel 851 37 10-08 Pr Rr eer Ti band

Quantum “IR” Grill 50,000 BTU

with Burner Designer Gas Grill
tankless) all stoinless,/tankless

fii F| Leen i
$ 79999 4 ous

We ber Summit
5-650 Grill stainless

stoinless/fankless
$2,40000

eked ATO oe

40,000 BTU Deluxe Gas
Grill with Burner

tankless
es

reg $324,997

Aiceded ddd Oe

40,000 BTU Gas Grill
with Burner/‘tankless

oe reg S287 99

Weber Sum mit
5-420 Grill stainless

$ tankless . sn
1 999° 40,000 BTU
ail Gas Grill/tonkless
reg $259.79

BS 17999

a Acedel eed S

AAccked Gd b-PSOE 26 500 BTU
35,000 BTU Gas Gas Grill/tankless

rill wit rag $159.99
bumer/orties — SEMES 1 1999
16999

Ones
Charcoal Grill

poe ee ie ek

Clear ne

Pr

while supplies last

pee ees |

wae Riis
§-310 Grill

stainless top/tankless
reg $750.00

wot SY toy ON

PE ———

birch] SORSAAON American Gourmet
Renegade Charcoal, ; moker
Charcoal Grill Grill

$22999 $16999 Fo: (243) 3934502 Sy aaa

Kelly’s "&;.

Mall eat tome
THE TRIBUNE
D yu



ine

THURSDAY,

2009



TUNE 16.

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Training initiative
must be ‘long-term
and self-sustaining’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE head of the Govern-
ment’s newly-established
National Training Programme
yesterday said he was “working
diligently to make this a long-
term, self-sustaining” initiative,
broadening it beyond its initial
remit because it was “critical to
our long-term economic com-
petitiveness”.

Khaalis Rolle, the newly-
elected Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce president, who is
heading the body charged by
the Government with oversee-
ing the retraining of some 1,000
unemployed Bahamians, said
private sector funding would
likely be needed long-term to
sustain the programme, the
Ingraham administration hav-
ing initially allocated $250,000
for the programme.

Pointing out that education
and training had always been
the “achilles heel” of the
Bahamian economy and soci-
ety, Mr Rolle said initiatives
such as the National Training
Programme were critical to
preparing companies and their
workforces for all eventualities,
as many had been “caught with
their pants down” by the cur-
rent recession.

“T think it is critical to our
long-term competitiveness,” Mr
Rolle said of the National
Training Programme and simi-
lar initiatives.

“The message I’m going to
be sending, through my posi-
tion as Chamber president, is
that we need to develop a com-
petent and professional work-
force. That is through educa-
tion and training, and that has
always been our achilles heel.

“We do have a section of the
workforce that is extremely tal-
ented, and possesses some of
the brightest minds in the region
living in the Bahamas. Yet we
do, like most other countries,
have a segment that is just not
adequately prepared.”

The Bahamas, the Chamber
president added, had some



* Chamber head looks to
make government plan
to target unemployment
long-lasting and tackle
‘achilles heel’ that is
‘critical to economic

competitiveness’

* Businesses ‘caught
with pants down’ by
economic crisis

* Says own business,
Bahamas Ferries, needs
well-trainied workforce
to maintain required
growth rate

* Private sector support
needed to buttress
government’s initial
$250k funding

“structural deficiencies”, while
the problems and challenges of
the public school education sys-
tem were well-known.
“Companies do not invest as
much as they should in train-
ing,” Mr Rolle said. “One of

SEE page 8B

BTC cellular charging
branded an ‘anomaly’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company’s (BTC)
practice of charging cellular cus-
tomers for receiving fixed-line
and overseas calls was yester-
day branded as an “anomaly”,
which is “not best practice and
not in the interest of the
Bahamian public going for-
ward”.

The consultation document
on retail price regulation in the
Bahamian communications
industry, published yesterday
by the committee overseeing
BTC’s privatisation, said that
while the caller usually paid for
telephone calls, it was actually
the receiving party that paid to
receive fixed-line and overseas
calls on both pre-paid and post-



* Practice of charging
Bahamian cellular
customers for receipt
of fixed-line and overseas
calls labelled ‘anti-
consumer’ by
privatisation committee

paid cell phones.

Pointing out that this had “a
number of disadvantages”, the
document said this essentially
allowed BTC to ‘double dip’
through having access to “two,
overlapping sources of revenue
from incoming international
calls to cellular numbers”.

While BTC received rev-
enues from Bahamian cell
phone customers through the
“domestic charging system”, the
consultation document added:
“International arrangements
provide BTC with revenue for
the terminating service for
incoming international calls to
Bahamian mobile numbers.

“For example, when a cus-
tomer based in the US calls a
Bahamian mobile number, BTC
receives payment from the cor-
responding US operator for
delivering that call to the
Bahamian mobile customer.
Such arrangements between
operators apply irrespective of
whether a fixed or mobile num-
ber is called in the Bahamas.”

This meant BTC received
revenue from two sources for
providing the same connection
service. The BTC privatisation
committee document added
that the state-owned firm’s cel-
lular customers were also “in

SEE page 9B



Money Safe.
Money Fast.

Bank of The Bahamas

IBTERRMATIOMAL

Online at
BankBahamas@nline.com



FOCOL wins airport
gas Station contract

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Nassau Airport Develop-

ment Company (NAD) has

awarded the airport gas sta-

tion contract to BISX-listed
Freeport Oil Holdings (FOCOL) and its
Sun Oil subsidiary, Tribune Business was
told yesterday, with a senior executive
adding that so-called ‘incentive fees’ did
not apply to bidding on small retail con-
cession contracts.

John Spinks, NAD’s vice-president of
commercial operations, said ‘incentive
fees’ - the one-time payment of a lump
sum fee to the airport operator, as an
inducement for the paying party to be
offered the relevant contract - only
applied to larger concessions where there
was a small number of large bidders, such
as the gas station.

Tribune Business had been contacted
by some of the 150-200 Bahamian busi-
nesses and entrepreneurs who had attend-
ed a NAD briefing session on Monday,
and expressed concern about the use of

* Airport kiosk and cart tenants will have to re-bid for contracts
when new US departure terminal comes on stream

* But NAD executive says ‘incentive fees’ only apply to large contracts
with small bidder numbers, not small retail concessions

* Airport losses drop from $7m at NAD
takeover to around $3.5-$4m today

* Airport Authority Board signs-off on general contractor award

‘incentive fees’ as a tiebreaker to deter-
mine who the airport retail and restaurant
concessions would be awarded to if two
bidders were ranked equally.

These sources, who had requested
anonymity, feared that ‘incentive fees’
would provide larger, more established
companies with an advantage over small-
er firms and entrepreneurs, as their deep-
er pockets would leave them better-
placed to pay incentive fees.

The same sources suggested that after
obtaining bank financing to pay for inven-
tory and outfitting their kiosks/carts/con-

cessions at the Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport (LPIA), it would be virtu-
ally impossible for smaller bidders to
finance an ‘incentive fee’ with either equi-
ty or further debt.

They also expressed concern that, by
squeezing out small Bahamian business-
es, the airport would lack a distinctly
‘Bahamian’ feel in terms of products and
identity, thus failing to meet NAD’s
objective of providing ‘a sense of place’.

Responding to those concerns, Mr

SEE page 4B

‘Multiple play’ start-up still seeking major $14m bite

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A BAHAMIAN start-up
seeking to launch a ‘multiple
play’ bundle of Internet services
was yesterday said to be assess-
ing how it “should be properly
structured”, with efforts to raise
the $14 million in capital that
it needs to start operations
ongoing.

Owen Bethel, a director of
IP Solutions International
(IPSI), said the company was
still looking for investors to
pick-up the majority of its pri-
vate placement, having expand-
ed this from $6 million to $14
million after broadening the ini-
tial launch beyond the Bahamas
to include the wider Caribbean.

“Tt’s still in motion, but we’re
looking to see how it should be
properly structured,” Mr Bethel
said of IPSI.

“Since we moved it up to the

a |

Company assessing how it should be ‘properly structured’

regional level, we were looking
at $14 million for that. We’ve
had strong investor interest, but
certainly not to carry the major
part of it.”

When asked whether the
global recession and preceding
financial crisis had impacted IP
Solutions International’s
chances of raising the required
capital, Mr Bethel told Tribune
Business: “I think very much
so.
“The uncertainty in the finan-
cial markets, and persons want-
ing to hold on to their cash, and
it being a start-up as opposed to
an existing, established opera-
tion, lends to the risk factor.”

Mr Bethel, who heads Nas-
sau-based financial services
provider, the Montaque Group,
told Tribune Business that there
was still much interest in IP

Solutions International’s prod-
uct from its initial target cus-
tomers, chiefly private gated
communities and hotels/resorts.

“There continues to be inter-
est in it. It’s literally a matter
of being able to deliver the
intended services to them,” Mr
Bethel said.

IP Solutions International is
targeting that customer base for
a variety of services it will trans-
mit down just one Internet line,
hence the ‘Multiple Play’
description. The services will
include Internet, TV via Inter-
net Protocol, video-on-demand
(VOD) games, and Voice over
Internet Protocol (VoIP) phone
services.

Given Cable Bahamas cur-
rent cable TV monopoly, which

SEE page 4B



Cable TV costs
‘appear high’
against rivals

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CABLE television and tele-
coms costs in the Bahamas
“appear high” in comparison to
other island economies of simi-
lar size and living standards, a
document released yesterday by
the Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Company’s (BTC) pri-
vatisation committee said.

The document said Cable
Bahamas’ basic cable television
package, priced at $30 per
month since inception, “appears
expensive in relation to other
small island states, with the
exception of the Cayman
Islands”. It added that a similar

SEE page 4B

ARE YOU PREPARED FOR THIS
UPCOMING HURRICANE SEASON?

APPLY FOR A
l°BOB HOME

PROTECTION

LOAN

_——_

‘TODAY!
FINANGING; UR TO 7 YEARS

HURRICANE SHUTTERS
HURRICANE SUPPLIES
GENERATORS
INSURANCE PROTECTION

Bank of The Bahamas

INTERNATIONAL
Revolutionizing The Way You Bank!

New Providence « Grand Bahama + Andros = Inagua * Exuma
San Salvador « Cat Island « Coral Gables, FL

Head Office Nassau: (242) 397-3000

we, BankBahamas Online.com


PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Union to Royal Bank statt: ‘Step up to the plate’

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tripunemedia.net

THE BAHAMAS Financial
Services Union (BFSU) yes-
terday urged Royal Bank of
Canada employees to “step up
to the plate” and unionise, rais-
ing the spectre of lay-offs fol-
lowing the merger between the
Royal Bank of Canada (RBC)
and the RBTT Financial

Group.

The BFSU president, There-
sa Mortimer, said Royal Bank
employees in the Bahamas
were missing out on an array of
benefits afforded their
Caribbean colleagues because
they were not unionised.

The move represented the
latest step in the union’s lob-
bying campaign to urge the
bank’s employees to join it and
unionise, following their First-

| Pharmacy Technician |
Course

American Certification

Summer Session

Register Today!

Call Hepson at:
356-4860

=
"Whitipéal
ieee

The pewer le pel mare deed



Whirlpool

The gaeer be get more dome.

See ee

Tel ae) ae
ee

.

os

y all

hee)

Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas) counterparts.

Ms Mortimer said the most
imminent benefit that Royal
Bank employees would enjoy
from joining the BFSU was the
redundancy benefit that can be
negotiated by the union.

Impending

The impending RBC /RBTT
merger will find the company
moving its corporate head-
quarters form the Bahamas to
a new building in Trinidad and
Tobago. And the BFSU pre-
dicts major job losses with the

loss of the regional headquar-
ters.

“We all know what happens
in mergers, and the current
environment says, and the eco-
nomic situation says. that the
finance sector is going to do
the same thing,” said Ms Mor-
timer.

She said another important
benefit Royal Bank workers
will receive immediately is the
BFSU’s negotiating body in
discussion with the bank’s
managers.

Royal Bank’s president and
country head, Nathaniel Bene-
by, said he was not opposed to

the bank’s employees unionis-
ing. He insisted, however, that
the management of Royal
Bank has had a traditional
open door policy with employ-
ees, and suggested that he has
not heard any major grievances
at the bank’s regular round
table discussions with staff.

Obligated

The BFSU’s secretary-gen-
eral, Lashon Sawyer, said Mr
Beneby was obligated to make
such statements.

According to her, 18 of the
21 Caribbean territories where

Royal Bank operates have
union members within the
ranks of the bank.

She said the Bahamas, Bar-
bados and Trinidad are the
only territories without union
representation within Royal
Bank, though Trinidad is mov-
ing towards that now.

“We need the staff of Royal
Bank (Bahamas) to step up to
the plate,” said Ms Mortimer.

“When you look at it,
Trinidad and Barbados have
general workers unions. They
(Royal Bank Bahamas) have
to get a union so that we will
all be on the same page.”

Two Bahamians reach final 10 in bank contest

TWO Bahamians have been
named among the 10 finalists
for Scotiabank’s Change-Maker
Challenge.

The 2009 Change-Maker
Challenge contest asked young
adults from 14 Caribbean coun-
tries to share their marketing
vision for Scotiabank’s new
young adult-focused pro-
gramme, Scotiabank Be. More
than 1300 original ideas were
submitted.

The 10 Caribbean finalists
selected to move on include
Fabian Fernander and Janairo
Turnquest of the Bahamas. The
others are Debbie-Ann Estwick
of Barbados, Kayla Hall of

7

Classic

Cavicw

[ oistes of

Belize, Roma Singh of Guyana,
Janelle Brown and Sandre Mal-
colm of Jamaica, Tarek
Mohammed and Afeisha
Williams of Trinidad & Tobago,
and Roleza Samuel of St. Vin-
cent.

“The number of responses we
received this year far outpaced
our estimates,” said Pat
Minicucci, Scotiabank’s senior
vice-president for the
Caribbean.

“The calibre of creativity in
the Caribbean is outstanding,
and the submissions to this
year’s challenge have further
confirmed this. The essays
showcase the unbelievable tal-

ent coming from the future
business leaders of the region.”

Contestants were asked to
create a marketing strategy for
Scotiabank Be, Scotiabank’s
young adult banking platform.

Summaries of the finalists’
submissions have been posted
on the contest website
http:/Avww.change-makerchal-
lenge.com) for peer evaluation.
A panel of judges, made up of
senior Scotiabank executives,
as well as local academic leaders
and media persons, will evalu-
ate the submissions, examine
the peer evaluations and nar-
row the group to three.

In July, the top three final-

ists will be flown to Jamaica to
personally present their sub-
missions to the judging panel.
The individual with the most
innovative idea will take home
the $10,000 grand prize.

The second and third placed
entrants will take home $5,000
and $3,000, respectively.

The winners will be
announced by the judging pan-
el at a press conference in
Kingston, Jamaica, on July 17,
2009.

The Scotiabank Change-
Maker challenge was developed
to reflect the importance the
bank places on its young cus-
tomers and their ideas.

*0) Celebration

O

CRUISE
a

ae IPMS e Cruises

lenin $ 8 Y
eta

SMe Oe eee
Meee Peeler Lanes tet leme jer Cece ler)
casino, complete spa, fitness room, three

age-appropriate kids' clubs, adult pool/spas
and children's pool with 180-foot slide.

Call 866-957-2276

Ce

lebrationBS.com

Prout 1

Ea Ded

Ce Che Cee



Large Spacious Units

3 Bedroom, 2 % Bath Townhomes with Garage

Low Down Payment of $33,900 MOVEIN NOW!

In-House Financing Available at 74%, Immediate Occupancy

Gated Community with Grotto Pool
First Time Homeowners Incentive

Many Upgrades Included!! Hurricane Engineered Wall System

T: 323-6146 / 424-6755 __ E: EstatesOfSeaview.com


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 3B





Combating crime key to
financial sector’s success

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

crobards@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT’s first pri-
ority for the financial services
sector is to create a secure,
crime free environment for the
Bahamas, the minister of state
for finance said yesterday, while
touting the great responsibility
regulators have for helping the
Government keep the integri-
ty of the industry “sound”.

Zhivargo Liang said the Gov-
ernment has an overarching
responsibility to create eco-
nomic growth by stabilizing the
environment in which citizens
and foreigners in pursuit of eco-
nomic opportunities must do
business.

He said security for citizens
and residents was a top priority
for the Government with
respect to financial services.

“Tf you think this is unrelated
to promoting a financial services
industry development, you tell
me how the work that you do in
the places that you do them
would be affected by a disor-
derly, crime-ridden Bahamas.
Tell me whether there is any
OECD initiative that will cause
your industry to shut down
more quickly than an out-of-
control crime problem in the
Bahamas,” said Mr Liang.

‘de

ily ish, 7000

Drama Each Night

Live Concert: Friday, July 3rd

$10 in advance, $12 at Door

Sessions ore FREE except for vomcert



ane Ae}

He said the Bahamas WAS
in need of a serious discussion
on fundamental developmental
issues, which has not been car-
ried out in his time.

According to him, the role of
the Government need to be
properly established so that it
can put itself in a position to
duly assist the financial services
sector.

“So the Government has, at
the very fundamental level, to

M
Pie

do that because the pursuit of
every other noble objective is
easier in an environment with
peace and order,” Mr Laing
said.

“Once the Government has
been able to put the physical
infrastructure in place, govern-
ment has to listen to the finan-
cial services sector.”

Mr Liang said the Bahamas
government’s relationship with
the financial services sector, par-
ticularly through the Bahamas
Financial Services Board
(BFSB), was one that is split
down the middle and equally
distributed.

“We established a relation-
ship with the BFSB, whose
responsibility it is to do promo-
tions,” he said.

“We fund it to the tune of
$500,000, and they match the
funds within the industry. We
give them funds to promote; we
also participate with them
strategically in overseas mis-
sions where they think our pres-
ence would lend to the promo-
tion exercise they are doing, and
so in that joint partnership we
try to work together.

“Government is the protec-
tor of the integrity of the finan-
cial services sector. If the sys-
tem is abused and misused, it is
the responsibility of the gov-
ernment.”

GNMENT

low! $35.00

eaisiea ccnp are ‘edie,

neludes Event ticket, Tanirt, Zook, Music OD
4A Eligibility for Spacal Prine Dressings

Rasir $14.00 = lacheles Book & B a bl Hy Tue lees Py ues Dirsasiegp

Schedule

Dey Seas onda ond Pedoy from 30on to |p

Might Sensiom: WVedneudoy oad Thundoy of F30pe

Concert Friday of 70pm * Youth Alive Seper sunday af [kS0am

423-461-6430 + WEB: www.youthalivel.com + EMAIL: youn

July : ard. 24th 2009
Bannerman Town, Eleuthera

Camp Fees

Ages 7 to
Ages 11
Aes 12 to 19

PRICES INCLUDE:

$175.00
$175.00
$230.00

Junior week ;

Transportation to and from Campsite,

three meals daily, T-shirt and all
additional Camp materials.

4 non refundable registration fee
of $50.00 must be paid before
Zist June 2009

Primary week:

Who can come ?
Senior Week: Ages 15-19
Ages 11-14
Ages 7-10

July 3-10
July 12 - 17
July 19-24

Please contact us!

Eva Culmer

Registration Co-ordinator

(a part of overall fees)

(iading Wher ow Wey Be
Ages 7-10 $130.00
ages 11-19 $160.00

All outstanding fees must be paid
15 days before travel

Tel: 392-2428
(evenings & week-ends)

Eunice Thompson

‘ai ity i

Emmanuel Gospel Chapel
Monday - Friday 9am - 4pm
Tel: 361-2072

Website: koinonabahamas.org

Spencored by: Lawes Wholesale Drag Agemey Lid.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that NATILEE ATKINS of 9
WINDWARD ROAD, IMPERIAL PARK, P.O. BOX EE-

15587, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, P.O Box SS 1956 is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and

Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 18 day of June, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

RAWAK

OMMES'

EXTENDED
HOURS

Open until 7 00 1

Shirley Street Office
June 18"









































The Bahamas
Development Bank

is recruiting a

Managing Director

The Bahamas Development Bank is undergoing a critical period of transformation and
renewal and is looking for a Managing Director (MD) to lead the Bank’s financial turnaround.

The MD is responsible for providing strategic leadership of the Bank by working with the
Board of Directors, management, and shareholders to establish, implement and oversee the
long-range goals, strategies, plans and policies of the Bank. The MD reports directly to the
Board and will enjoy substantial autonomy to shape overall operations in order to deliver
improved financial performance and customer service levels.

Duties and Responsibilities:

1. peadersiie and Corporate Responsibility
Lead the management team to be effective developers of solutions to business
challenges and establish credibility throughout the organization and with the
Board
Hold responsibility for driving the Bank to achieve and surpass profitability,
cash flow, and other business goals and objectives
Motivate and lead a results-oriented management team and staff; recruit members
to the executive team not currently in place and retain existing executive and
front-line talent
Represent the Bank and its renewed values with existing and prospective clients,
creditors, government, other stakeholders and the public in general

Business Management and Strategy
Spearhead the development, communication and implementation of effective
growth strategies and processes
Collaborate with the Board to develop and implement plans for the operational
infrastructure of systems, processes and personnel, designed to accommodate
the Bank’s growth objectives
Assist, as required, in raising additional capital to enable the Bank to meet growth
and market share objectives
Direct the development and implementation of business strategies
Foster a success-oriented, performance-driven, and accountable environment
within the Bank
Lead the Bank’s cultural transformation

Corporate Governance and Disclosure

* Oversee the development, implementation, and compliance with key corporate
policies, including policies regarding corporate governance, risk management,
financial reporting as well as compliance with applicable legislative requirements

The ideal candidate will have strong leadership skills, a solid financial services background,
and broad knowledge of the Bahamian business environment. A demonstrated ability to
execute and deliver results is essential. Likewise, a proven track record in strategic plan
development with a clear ability to turn strategy into actions without over complication of
business process is critical.

The successful candidate will enjoy an attractive, highly competitive, and performance-
based compensation package.

Printed CVs are to be addressed in confidence to The Chairman, and delivered or mailed
to the
Bahamas Development Bank,
Cable Beach, West Bay,
P. O. Box N-3034,
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas

The deadline for applications is June 30, 2009.
PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



PRC SMW
MIR) Perey aR CTE

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES -
a ~~

FirstCaribbean @h..7: #

Are you seeking an
exciting career opportunity?

Find what you’re looking for with FirstCaribbean Careers.
AVAILABLE POSITIONS:

Oma E er Oise oe mcm uel ian)

Chief Financial Officer-Corporate Investment Banking
Manager-Group Financial Reporting
Head-Syndications

Head-Credit Analytics

Senior Analyst-Hospitality

Visit firstcaribbeanbank.com/careers.htm for job
descriptions, requirements and other available positions.

@ FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK
www. firstcaribbeanbank.com/careers.htm GET THERE: TOGETHER:

COHEN & KLEIN CONSULTING

WwW. cohenandklein,.com

In conjunction with:

FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY

The Most Practical & Comprehensive
Debt Collection Training Available

@ CK 700 Debt Collection Strategies, for new & experienced Collectors
& Compliance Officers, June 23 - 26

@ CK G00 Revenue & Debt Collection Management, for Managers &
supervisors, June 30 - July 3

COURSES WILL BE HELD @ THE PEGASUS HOTEL.

AEROS REVS, ec RDG
2009 training brochures, course outling, other locations and details visit
www.cohenandklein.com OR e-mail us at: collect@gate.net






















CATALYN & CURRY'S |
oo
=the

GuUANAHANI *

Book & Lyrics by James |. Catalyn Music by Andrew R, Curry |

The Domdas Centre for the Perlorning Arts ;
June 24th - 27th June 27th 2009 at 8:00 pom. nighih
Dockets 330,00)

‘Opening Sight tala Toeslay Jaume 2rd at f:040 p.m.
Vickets 3:20), 00

Boa Mee at the Dumas (ielephones 393-3728 304-7 1 TO
tay ties M wena Doh diate, 93a, io OH eam. tha ily ‘i
Adhunoed ticked bookings email juloatt 1! hbotmnadloon
é Hew 7rree. fen if rai Ae muy ve hi 1

LA nua an arya eerie anil fie natal)

‘Multiple play’
Start-up still
seeking major
$14m bite

expires in October 2009, the company cannot yet deliver its services

to the Bahamian public.

Tribune Business had previously reported that IP Solutions
International was in talks with Systems Resource Group (SRG),
parent company of IndiGo Networks, to use parts of its infra-
structure to deliver its services. It is not known how far talks have

progressed, though.

IP Solutions International had previously told Tribune Busi-
ness that it had aimed to serve more than 5,000 Bahamians hotel
rooms during its first year of operation.

The company had also been talking to a ‘foreign partner’ who
had offered to finance construction of its IP (Internet Protocol)
head-end technology for $2 million.

FOCOL wins airport
gas station contract

FROM page 1B

Spinks told Tribune Business
that he apologised for not mak-
ing it clear at Monday’s meeting
that the incentive fee payments
only applied to larger conces-
sion contracts, not the small
retail outlets, carts and kiosks.
Therefore, there would be no
discrimination against smaller
Bahamian firms.

“The incentive fee would not
apply to the small stores,” Mr
Spinks told Tribune Business.
“Tt’s an option if someone puts
that into their bid, but it’s
intended only to apply to the
larger contracts, such as the gas
station, where we only had
three bidders.

“T didn’t make that clear at
the meeting. The incentive only
applies to the larger contracts,
not the 400 square foot retail
stores.”

Pace Ml oti

eee eis

a a |

arth
Ue ks
The Diocetan Chorale
eeu eee cE
James Catalyn & Friends

Er (a) 1 UU)
Peer

Teale
Performing Arts

Wild Seed Designs

Please be advised that the following offices will be closed on

Friday, June 19, 2009 and will re-open on Monday, June 22,

2009 at the usual business hours.

BAHAMAS FIRST GENERAL
INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

NASSAU UNDERWRITERS
INSURANCE AGENCY LTD. - COLLINS AVENUE AND
HARBOUR BAY LOCATIONS

We regret any inconveniences caused.

Signed: Management

Mr Spinks said of the six cart
and kiosk concessions already
awarded at LPIA, some 80 per
cent of them were being oper-
ated by Bahamian small busi-
nesses. “We certainly support
small business entities in there,
and the incentive fee does not
apply to those leases,” he
added.

Meanwhile, Mr Spinks con-
firmed reports reaching Tribune
Business that the companies
currently operating those kiosks
and carts would have to re-bid
for the contracts when the new
US international departures
building was opened in 2011.
They will have to compete not
only with each other, but also
with new hopefuls.

“That’s correct,” Mr Spinks
confirmed to tribune Business.
“That was made clear to them
right from the beginning. The
leases on the carts are for one
year, with a one-year extension.

“It was only for the current
location [the current US depar-
tures terminal]. The one reason
that we did the kiosks and carts
in the current terminal building
was that there was no room for
more stores. We had to get
retail in there somehow.”

When the $409 million LPIA

Owen Bethel



redevelopment is completed,
Tribune Business understands
the airport will have a total of
35,000 square feet of space for
retail, restaurants and storage
space.

Mr Spinks said the retail mix
in the new US departures ter-
minal, when constructed, would
be different from the current
terminal with more “stores” and
less kiosks and carts.

The current plan is for eight
stores of between 300-400
square feet, with two kiosks and
“one or two carts” in the new
US departures terminal. The
new international departures
building, when completed, will
have four kiosks and “a couple
of carts”.

Mr Spinks said existing kiosk
and cart tenants, such as
Uniquely Bahamian, Sun Drops
and My Ocean, had all
expressed satisfaction with the
performance of their airport
businesses. And their rental
income, along with the passen-
ger facility fee, has been to
NAD’s benefit.

“Our annual losses, which
were about $7 million when we
took over, are down somewhere
around $3 million-something or
$4 million. We’ve picked up $3-

$4 million in cost savings and
revenues,” Mr Spinks said.

The NAD executive also con-
firmed that the gas station “con-
tract is going to Sun Oil”, the
FOCOL subsidiary that oper-
ates under the Shell brand. Both
NAD and Sun Oil were now
waiting on the Ministry of
Works to finalise its plan for
widening JFK Drive, which
includes a roundabout by the
‘conch shell’ on the airport
access road.

NAD, explained Mr Spinks,
was waiting for the Ministry to
produce roundabout designs so
that it could then assess how far
back from the road the gas sta-
tion’s location needed to be.
Once this happened, a planning
permission application could
then be made.

Mr Spinks added, though,
that NAD had put plans for a
fast food restaurant or retail
outlet next to the gas station
“on the shelf right now”, after
not receiving the amount or
quality of bids expected.

He added that the Airport
Authority Board had just signed
off on the appointment of the
general contractor for the LPIA
redevelopment, a decision now
awaiting ministerial approval.

Cable TV costs ‘appear high’ against rivals

FROM page 1B

number of channels to Cable’s
basic offering were priced at
between $10-$23 per month in
Malta and Jamaica.

“Cable Bahamas’ prices
appear high despite the fact that
the price for these services has
not increased for the last 15
years,” the BTC privatisation
committee’s consultation doc-

HOME AA aor
FROM HOME
aie in Comforable

ument said.

The same “appears expen-
sive” conclusion was reached
with regard to BTC’s cellular
and fixed-line international call
prices. The former found that
BTC’s calls per minute prices
to the US, Canada and the UK
were “slightly higher than peak
rate calls in the Cayman Islands
and Jamaica, and substantially
higher than peak rates in other

small jurisdictions such as
Guernsey, Jamaica and Malta”.

On the cellular side, BTC’s
tariffs for pre-paid and post-
paid calls at a domestic level
were also “relatively expensive”
when set against international
comparatives, while the cost of
services was increased by the
fact customers paid to receive
fixed-line and international
calls.

Coming to NASSAU
for a WEDDING

or FUNERAL!

STAY WITH US

Starting at

FRIDAY-SUNDAY $1 5 ()

BAHAMAS
HOME AWAY FROM HOME

cai: 3 26-2325

ernie: batornashoreerayptremiaree(ierad com

(72) THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

ORIENTATION AND ADVISEMENT FOR
FALL SEMESTER 2009

ORIENTATION AND ADVISEMENT WILL TAKE PLACE FRIDAY, JUNE 19,
2009 FROM 9 AM TO 1 PM IN ROOMS B-5 AND B-6 FOR THE FOLLOWING
STUDENTS ACCEPTED IN THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS (BBA) PRO-

GRAMMES:

1 STUDENTS WITH EARLY ACCEPTANCE
2 STUDENTS WHO HAVE COMPLETED COLLEGE PREP
3. STUDENTS WHO HAVE COMPLETED THE UPGRADING PROGRAM

(CEES)

ALL STUDENTS SHOULD BRING COPIES OF ACCEPTANCE LETTERS, COM-
PLETION LETTERS AND RELEVANT EXAM RESULTS SUCH AS THE BGCSE.


THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 5B



Push to repeal
cell phone tax

Bm By STEPHEN
OHLEMACHER
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Company-issued cell phones
might feel like a tether to the
office even in workers’ off-
hours. The phones also are a
taxable fringe benefit, and the
Obama administration wants to
change that.

The administration has asked
Congress to repeal the widely
ignored tax on the personal use
of company cell phones, saying
it is outdated and difficult to
enforce. The request Tuesday
came a week after the Internal
Revenue Service caused an
uproar when it sought ideas for
how better to enforce the law.

A 1989 law says workers are
supposed to count the value of
personal calls on a company cell
phone as taxable income. The
cell phone tax, however, can be
a pain for workers who increas-
ingly use mobile devices for tex-
ting, e-mailing and browsing the
Internet — sometimes for work,
sometimes for personal use.

“There’s been very uneven
enforcement, said Marianna
Dyson, a former IRS lawyer
who now is an employment tax
and fringe benefits expert with
Miller & Chevalier in Washing-
ton.

“T think most employers are
reasonable. But do I see
employers requiring employees
to document every single busi-
ness call?” Dyson said. “It’s
administratively burdensome.”

IRS Commissioner Doug
Shulman said the tax is “poorly
understood by taxpayers,” and
acknowledged it was difficult to
enforce consistently.

“The passage of time,
advances in technology and the

nature of communication in the
modern workplace have ren-
dered this law obsolete,” Shul-
man said in a statement.

Shulman said he and Trea-
sury Secretary Timothy Geith-
ner were asking Congress to
repeal the tax. The House
passed a bill to repeal the tax
last year, but it stalled in the
Senate. This year, bipartisan
bills have been introduced in
both chambers.

“We need to modernize the
laws to reflect the reality that
cell phones, BlackBerrys and
text messaging are an everyday
extension of the workplace and
are here to stay,” said Sen. John
Kerry, D-Mass. “Cell phones
are no longer executive perks
or luxury items, and our tax
code cannot treat them that way
anymore.”

Just last week, the IRS issued
a request for comments on ways
to improve compliance with the
law. One option suggested by
the IRS would assume that per-
sonal use accounts for a quarter
of the phone’s overall use.
Another would require work-
ers to document their personal
use of company cell phones.

Shulman denied that the IRS
had been trying to “crack
down” on workers who don’t
pay the tax. Instead, he said, the
IRS was “attempting to simpli-
fy the rules and eliminate uncer-
tainty for businesses and indi-
viduals.”

Some employers have faced
big tax bills after failing to com-
ply with the law.

In 2008, the IRS audited two
University of California branch-
es, in Los Angeles and San
Diego. As part of a settlement,
UCLA paid a tax assessment of
$238,474 and UCSD paid
$186,471.

Advanced Family Medicine
eae

Family Medicine &
okin Care Clinte
Pht -326-1111

Mon-Fri: 9-6, Sak | 0-5
Shirley Se
Opp Cioctor's Hospital Pertikag lo

“Hotty Filer ebay
“Free Health Chocks fi!”
Father's day week end

TUNE fae Fa, Sot 0 MS

Free: Blood pressure,

welRI chacks,

Body Mags index (BMI) Calculations,
Blood Sugar Test,

Blood Choalssteral pest

©

Temple Christian High School
Shirley Street
TEACHING VACANCY

Invites applications from qualified Christian
teachers for the following positions for the
2009 - 2010 School Year.

Health Science/General Science (Gr.7-9)
Language Arts/ (Gr.10-12)

Applicants must:

Be a practicing born-again Christian who is
willing to subscribe to the Statement of Faith of

Temple Christian School.

Have a bachelor’s Degree in Education or higher from a
recognized College or University in the area of

Specialization.

Have a valid Teacher’s Certificate or Diploma.
Have at least two years teaching experience in the
relevant subject area with excellent communication

skills.

Applicants must have the ability to prepare students for
all examinations to the BJC/BGCSE levels.
Be willing to participate in the high school’s extra

curricular programmes.

Applications must be picked up at the High School Office on
Shirley Street and be returned with a full curriculum vitae,
recent coloured photograph and three references to:

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is July 3rd, 2009





Industry representatives said
they were pleased that the IRS
changed its position.

“We just think that this law
was put into effect in a bygone
era,” said John Walls, vice pres-
ident of public affairs for CTIA-
The Wireless Association, a
trade group.

“In 1989, cell phones were
considered a luxury item that
were actually referred to as car
phones,” Walls said. “Now, we
have unlimited calling on our
cell phones. We have free nights
and weekends. The company is
not even paying for that. Why
should I get taxed for that?”

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

SERVICES
AVAILABLE

* IMPORTERS

« DISTRIBUTORS

* OFFICE SPACE

*» FOOD STORAGE

» ODMbASTER

ee Fao ELT

err ere

RECOVERYFACILITY

Fax (242) 327-8214

“T ensure that vital
equipment around the
hospital are in perfect
working condition
according to strict
specifications,
ensuring that you and
your family receive
safe and comfortable
treatment, each and
every time.. ”

Benjamin Forbes, Associate
Engineering Technician

We Welcome you

to be a part of our WOW service team.

ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN

Qualifications
* Graduate of BTVI technical program;
¢ Previous experience with basic electrical and plumbing duties;
¢ Ability to troubleshoot machines and servicing of machines
related to Healthcare services
Excellent oral and written communication skills;
Good customer service/organizational skills
Ability to work independently

The successful Candidate will:

Maintain the hospital environment in a state of the art condition;
Perform basic repairs and service of machines; Be responsible for the
general upkeep of the hospital and extending buildings.

Excellent benefits | Salary commensurate with experience

re" DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life

Please submit resume to: Human Resources Department | Doctors Hospital
P.O. Box N-3018 | | Nassau, Bahamas | or Email: nwatkins@doctorshosp.com

www.doctorshosp.com









, BAHAMAS
2 LOGISTIC

*” CENTRE



NEW SOLUTION
FOR SAFE BUSINESS STORAGE

State of the ET
Hurricane Proof storage
Pele OL eels Et
{they can also be
available jointly). This
facility Is designed with
the latest concepts for
efficient and es |)
C0) 0 |
ae teste

Centrally located in a
traffic free zone.

The goal is to minimize
cost and facilitate your
eye Tre LMR Mm eet ae
ee ease |
withstand extreme
weather feral ee
Fenced and secured area
with 24 hour surveillance.
Each unit provides 1,200
cubic yards of usable
space with independent
Fle oot

WWW. BAHAMASLOGISTIC.COM
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 7B

Energy bill advances
in the US Senate

@ By H JOSEF HEBERT
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Legislation that would require
greater use of renewable ener-
gy, make it easier to build pow-
er lines and allow oil and gas
drilling near Florida’s coast
advanced Wednesday in the
Senate.

The Energy and Natural
Resources Committee voted 15-
8 to clear the measure, although
both Democrats and Republi-
cans — for different reasons —
said they had concerns about
the bill and hoped to make
major changes on the Senate
floor.

The legislation’s primary
thrust is to expand the use of
renewable sources of energy
such as wind, solar and geot-
hermal sources as well as deal
with the growing concerns
about the inadequacies of the
nation’s high-voltage power
grid.

But the bill also would
remove the last congressional
barrier to offshore oil and gas
development, lifting a ban on
drilling across a vast area in the

SWNT CLUB
OF BASSAL, RAI AWLAS

eastern Gulf of Mexico that had
been put off limits by Congress
three years ago. Drilling would
be allowed within 45 miles of
most of Florida’s coast and as
close as 10 miles off the state’s
Panhandle area.

The Senate bill for the first
time would establish a national
requirement for utilities to pro-
duce 15 percent of their elec-
tricity from renewable sources,
a contentious issue that is likely
to attract heated debate once
the bill is taken up by the full
Senate, probably in the fall.

Twenty-eight states currently
have some renewable energy
requirement for utilities, but
supporters of the measure argue
a national mandate is needed
to spur such energy develop-
ment.

The legislation also would
give much wider authority to
federal regulators over the
nation’s electricity grid.

The Federal Energy Regula-
tory Commission would be giv-
en authority to approve the sit-
ing of high voltage power lines
if states fail to act and would
be given additional powers over
cyber security on the grid.

SUMMER “LEARN TO SWIM”
CLASSES
June 29" to July 24", 2009

REGISTRATION AT
QUEEN’S COLLEGE POOL
SATURDAY JUNE 207, 2009

9:00 A.M. TO 12:00 NOON

Registration forms available on the website:
www, barracudaswimming.org

WonGenng
Wiidt LO

sfeyt

Fatners

Del fed

NPN ee
ar cena fhel| di

Pe

Senate Majority Leader Har-
ry Reid, D-Nev., has said he
hopes to take up energy legis-
lation after the August recess,
although it’s uncertain whether
it will be merged with separate
legislation addressing climate
change. The House is working
on a climate bill that includes
many of the same energy issues
addressed by the Senate bill.

While the bill was approved
by a safe margin in the commit-
tee its prospects in the full Sen-
ate are anything but certain.
Several senators called it too
weak in its support of renew-
able energy development, while
others said it ignored nuclear
energy and greater domestic oil
and gas production.

“None of us got all we want-
ed,” said Sen. Jeff Bingaman,
D-N.M., the committee’s chair-
man, who was forced to agree
to a variety of compromises to
give the bill a chance of advanc-
ing.

That was apparent in the way
the bill deals with renewable
energy mandate.

Bingaman, and many of the
panel’s other Democrats, had
wanted at least a 20 per cent
renewable energy requirement.
The bill requires 15 per cent
renewable use by 2021, but also
would allow utilities to avoid a
fourth of that mandate by show-
ing efficiency improvements.
Renewable energy use could be
cut further for utilities that
increase their use of nuclear
energy either from a new reac-
tor or increased reactor output.

“This is an extraordinary
weak bill,” said Sen. Bernie
Sanders, I-Vt.

But Sanders voted to advance
the bill, as did Sen. Bob Corker,
R-Tenn. Both senators said they
hoped the bill will be strength-
ened.

“T suspect their definition of
strengthening might be some-
what different,” quipped Sen.
Evan Bayh, D-Ind., whose own
support of the bill came despite
strong opposition to the federal
renewable energy requirements
on utilities.

Sanders wants the renewable
energy requirement to be much
higher, at 25 per cent. Corker
said the bill needs more to pro-
mote nuclear energy and
domestic oil and gas produc-
tion.

The bill also calls for:

Establishing a new office
to steer grants and loan guar-
antees to clean energy projects.

Creating an oil products
reserve to be used if there are
supply problems.

—Creating federal standards
for efficiency standards for new
building.

7 | 242.322.7371 | 242.

ravelbahamas.com


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a |) > =; ;
Training initiative must be ‘long-term and self-sustaining’

FROM page 1B

the things I will be harping on
about over the next few months
is to begin addressing education
issues, begin addressing train-
ing issues, and to be begin
addressing the competitiveness
of small and medium-sized busi-
nesses in the country.”
Regardless of whether the
Bahamas entered into more
free trade agreements such as
the Economic Partnership
Agreement (EPA), Mr Rolle
said addressing the competi-
tiveness of a sector that
accounted for 80 per cent of

Bahamian businesses was key
to this nation’s future econom-
ic success.

“We still have, as a private
sector, to develop better strate-
gies to manage businesses,” he
added. “We don’t know when
the next crisis is going to hit,
and with this one we got caught
with our pants down. A lot of
small and medium-sized busi-
nesses went out of business
because they were just not pre-
pared.”

Mr Rolle pointed to the com-
pany he works for as market-
ing director, Bahamas Ferries,
as an example of a Bahamian
business whose ability to

Ministry of Finance
Treasury Department

Announcement
To All Merchant and Vendors

The Treasurer wishes to advise that for goods
and services supplied or rendered to Government
Ministries and Departments during the 2008/2009
fiscal year, you are hereby requested to submit:

. The original of all outstanding invoices to
the Accounts Section of the relevant Ministry or
Department

2. A copy of those invoices to:
The Public Treasury Department
First Floor
British American House
(George Street & Navy Lion Road)

NO LATER THAN THURSDAY 24th, JUNE 2009

Please note that the PURCHASE ORDER NO.
Must be indicated on all invoices.

Signed
The Treasurer

GN-871

MINISTRY OF PUBLIC
WORKS & TRANSPORT

Public Notice

TENDER FOR EXTERIOR PAINTING AT
GENERAL POST OFFICE
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

:
2

The Government of the Bahamas, through the Ministry
of Works and Transport is inviting Tenders from painting
contractors to carry out repairs and painting at the General
Post Office.

Schedule for Tender Opening

Companies interested in tendering may contact Project
Officer, Mr. Dominic Wilson at the Ministry of Public Works
and Transport (302-9506) for further information and
arrangement of site visit.

All tender bids should include the following:
‘Complete Tender Document

* Copy of current Business License

* National Insurance board letter of good standing

Tenders must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked
“Tender for Fencing at the Ministry of Public Works and
Transport” and delivered to:

Chairman

Tenders Board

Ministry of Finance

3rd Floor Reception Desk
Cecil Wallace-Whitfield Centre
P.O. Box N-3017,

Cable Beach, West Bay Street
Nassau, The Bahamas

All Tenders must be received at the above address on or before
10:00 am Tuesday, 23rd June 2009.

All persons who submit bids are invited to attend the opening
of Tenders at the Ministry of Finance. 3rd Floor, Cecil Wallace-
Whitfield Centre, Cable Beach, West Bay Street, Nassau, The
Bahamas at 10:00 am. on Tuesday. 23rd June, 2009

The Ministry of Public Works and Transport reserves the right to
reject any or all Tenders.



expand as needed hinged heav-
ily on the competency and
expertise of its workforce.

“My company, Bahamas Fer-
ries, needs more people trained
in the marine industry. We’ve
been growing at an astonishing
rate,” he explained. “Over the
past 10 years, we’ve really posi-
tioned ourselves as a leading
operator.

“Tf you look at the number
of vessels in a business like ours,
and the rate of growth of those
vessels in an operation of our
size and geographic reach, those
companies usually grow by one
vessel every five to seven years,
and we’ve been getting one ves-
sel every two years.

“Tf we’re going to continue
on that growth path, we need
that technical expertise to be
consistent with that. Our
employees have to be techni-
cally qualified, because of our



specialist needs that need spe-
cialist training.”

Although the Government’s
National Training Programme
was focused on _ the
training/retraining of 1,000
unemployed Bahamians select-
ed from those who had regis-
tered with the National Insur-
ance Board’s (NIB) unemploy-
ment benefit scheme, Mr Rolle
said he was also looking long-
term.

“One of the things that Iam
keenly aware of is we usually
make short-term decisions,” Mr
Rolle added. “With this partic-
ular project, ’'m working dili-
gently to make this a long-term,
self-sustaining programme. It
has tremendous merit.

“Tt requires a lot of funding, a
well-oiled, sustainable machine.
That is why the Chamber is
actively involved in this. It ben-
efits our members. It’s a starting

ETTER LIVING
SPP LV ero lis)
QUALITY WATER.”

The Sterling Water System provides a healthy,
safe and cost effective means of providing quality
water to residential, commercial and institutional

properties.

Safe:

¢ Safe for use in drinking water, complying with

toxicity requirements.

Effective:

Independently tested and approved by IAPMP
Testing & Services as an effective solution for

hard water

Calcium carbonate,

the dissovled mineral

compound that caused hard water does not form
build up on pipes, fixtures and surfaces

Environmental Friendly:

¢ Engergy and conservation value enhances

property values

¢ No salt or other additives are used nor waste
water through regeneration of backwashing

For more information call:
Renovation Ineovation

1(242) 364-2329
1(242) 434-7451

1(242) 364-8401
1(242) 445-5661

email us at: rickboww@hotmail.com or
zzionpaul@ yahoo.com

Please be advised that
the following offices

WILL BE
CLOSED

on Friday, June 19, 2009
and will re-open on
Monday, June 22, 2009

at the usual business hours.

BAHAMAS FIRST

GENERAL INSURANCE COMPANY

NASSAU UNDERWRITERS
INSURANCE AGENCY LTD.

Collins Avenue and Harbour Bay Locations

We regret any
inconveniences caused.

Signed: Management

point. I see it as a springboard
to a much larger initiative that
addresses a much wider labour
pool and a much wider skill set.
If you have an educated and
well-trained workforce, that
goes directly to the bottom
line.”

Mr Rolle said the committee
charged with overseeing and
developing the National Train-
ing Programme was now devel-
oping the structure for the ini-
tiative, the process for select-
ing the 1,000 workers, the insti-
tutions that would be involved
and ensuring “there is some
long-term benefit”.

Mr Rolle said the committee
also wanted to ensure persons
who completed the programme

cation. The institutions involved
will be the Bahamas Technical
and Vocational Institute
(BTVI) and the College of the
Bahamas (COB).

The committee was targeting
summer 2009 for the program-
me’s start, which Mr Rolle
acknowledged was an “aggres-
sive” timescale, and autumn was
the fall-back start date.

The committee was also
working on developing candi-
date profiles to ensure persons
in the programme were placed
on the appropriate course, and
Mr Rolle said they were looking
at a ‘work-study’ arrangement
where course entrants could
gain experience working in the
private sector while also study-

received some form of certifi- ing.

IN HOUSE
INVESTMENTS LTD

NOTICE TO
SHAREHOLDERS

The Board of directors of In House Investments Limited has
declared a quarterly dividend for Preferred Shares to all
shareholders of record at June 15, 2009 as follows:
Preferred Shares 7.25% per annum (payment quarterly).
The payment will be made June 30, 2009 through Royal
Fidelity Share Registrars & Transfer Agents Limited in the

usual manner.

To advertise in The Tribune -
eR rere ya BCL

NOTICE

OF

JB CONSULTING LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 16th day of June, 2009.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Finacial
Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, The Baha-
mas has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

ESSAY COMPETITION

TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK

The Department of Public Service will host an Essay
Competition as one of the activities for the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week. The Competition is open to Junior
and Senior Students in New Providence.

Additionally, this year, a speech competition will be
for schools in the Northern & Southern Bahamas,
respectively. Students interested in participating in the
Essay Competition should write a 250 - 300 words (Junior
High), and 450 - 500 words (Senior High), essay on the
topic: “ The Public Service-Striving for Excellence in
Customer Service.”

The deadlines for entries, which should be referred
to the attention of Mrs. Antoinette Thompson, Deputy
Permanent Secretary, Department of Public Service, is
Friday 24th July, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 Computer System will be awarded to
the winner each category. The first runners-up for both the
Essay and Speech Competition in the Junior & Senior High
School category, will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.

The winners will be announced during the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week Awards Ceremony scheduled for
Saturday 10th October 2009.

Students interested in the Speech Competition for the
Northern and Southern Bahamas should contact their
Language Arts Teacher.


THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 9B



5
US banks plan to repay about S68bn in bailout money

@ By DANIEL WAGNER
AP Business Writers

warrants, the banks will remain
tied to the federal programme.
Several banks said they had told

ment guarantees. But the banks
still rely on some government
subsidies, including debt guar-

antees from the Federal Deposit
Insurance Corp. and discount-
ed credit lines from the Federal

Reserve. Wednesday was the
first day the banks were eligi-
ble to repay the money. Gold-

man disclosed its plans in let-
ters to congressional leaders
Tuesday.

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Ten large US banks planned to
repay about $68 billion in
bailout money Wednesday,
marking a new phase for the
most visible government effort
to relieve the credit crisis.

The Treasury Department
last week said the banks could
begin repaying money they

received last fall under the $700 plans were described by three i ‘ Z 1 “> ya
billion financial system bailout industry officials who spoke on “¥/ ‘il ‘ 5 ; ft ; bey
known as the Troubled Asset condition of anonymity because ivr / d-} ff —e A at | [ 4 i
Relief Programme, or TARP. not all the banks had yet made ; ' — _, / }
The programme was the cen- their official announcements. Fa i : wf

terpiece of the government
effort to relieve a global credit
crunch and teetering financial
markets last October.

The banks have since been
negotiating with Treasury over
the prices of stock warrants they
issued as part of the TARP deal.
When Treasury made its initial
investments, it recetved the war-
rants, which give it the oppor-
tunity to buy the banks’ com-
mon shares in the future at a
fixed price. The value of the
warrants would depend on the
shares’ future performance.

The pricing of warrants has
been a point of contention, slow-
ing the repayment process.
Banks want to pay less to tear
up the warrants than Treasury
says they’re worth. But until
banks have bought back the

BIC cellular
charging branded
an ‘anomaly’

effect, cross-subsidising the
fixed-line customer and ser-
vice”.

In addition, the ‘receiver
pays’ principle also eroded the
ability of BTC’s pre-paid cellu-
lar customers to control their
telecoms costs - the very rea-
son they had selected this ser-
vice - and made them reluctant
to answer their phones, again
defeating the product’s very
purpose.

It also meant that interna-
tional and domestic-orginated
fixed-line calls would be termi-
nated if BTC’s pre-paid cellular
customers did not have suffi-
cient credit on their phones for
the call’s duration.

“Tt appears that the charging
anomalies outlined in the fore-
going paragraphs are not best
practice, and are not in the best
interest of the Bahamian public
going forward,” the BTC pri-
vatisation committee’s paper
said.

“A move towards calling par-
ty pays for all domestic and
international calls would enable
a single, consistent charging
approach without anomalies
and without overlapping rev-
enues.”

The paper added that the cur-
rent absence of competition in
the cellular market, where BTC
enjoys monopoly status - and
will do until effectively two
years after privatisation - meant
that Bahamian consumer cur-
rently had no choice over the
charging/payment plan they
preferred.

The BTC privatisation com-
mittee is also looking to move
away from the ‘discretionary’
approach to retail price regula-
tion in the communications
market, as employed by the
soon-to-be-replaced Public Util-
ities Commission (PUC), and
adopt a process that is “more
transparent”.

Pointing to the fact that both
the PUC and BTC had con-
cerns over the “high level of dis-
cretion” employed currently,
the consultation document said:
“The process for approval of
price changes has proved time-
consuming and provides very
little incentive for BTC to be
efficient.

“All price changes, including
decreases, are required to be
the subject of public consulta-
tions. The requirement to apply
for permission for all price
changes appears to be more
onerous than in many other reg-
ulatory regimes.

“International best practice
is to move away from this sort
of discretionary price setting to
amore transparent process that
provides a balance between
consumer protection, flexibili-
ty and incentives for operators
to be innovative whilst promot-
ing efficiency.”

The consultation paper said
that while regulators in more
developed countries only regu-
lated pricing at the wholesale
level in their communications
sectors, the Government felt
retail price regulation was nec-
essary because “the level of
competition in the Bahamas
may be too low at present and
in the near future”.

The Government is looking
at the ‘price cap’ approach to
regulation of the Bahamian
communications sector.

Treasury they wished to buy the
warrants, officially starting the
negotiation process.

TARP became a flashpoint
for critics of government inter-
vention last fall, when Congress
debated whether to commit
$700 billion of taxpayer money
to the effort.

Wednesday’s repayment

The banks repaying TARP
are some of the industry’s
largest, including JPMorgan
Chase & Co., American Express
Co., Goldman Sachs Group Inc.
and Morgan Stanley. BB&T
Corp. and U.S. Bancorp. also
said they were repaying their
TARP money.

Banks have been itching to
quit TARP because it subjects
them to limits on executive com-
pensation and other rules.

Before getting permission to
repay their TARP money, the
banks had to meet a series of
government requirements. Nine
of the 10 were subject to a
“stress test” designed to show
how they would withstand a
deeper recession. They also had
to raise equity from investors
and raise debt without govern-





Ic,

—"
— im ———.

-

“Fathers day”

-
Shera bon

om Cable Beach

[a — 300

Insurance Company
of The Bahamas

“All You Can Lat Buffet

Insurance Company of The Bahamas Limited
Balance Sheet
Year ended December 31, 2008, with corresponding figures for 2007

ASSETS

Cash and bank balances (Notes 5,18)
Term deposits (Notes 6,18)
Reinsurance recoveries (Notes 4,12,18)
Due from agent (Notes 7,18)
Deferred commission reserve (Notes 7,18)
Prepaid reinsurance premiums (Notes 12,18)
Prepayments and other receivables (Note 18)
Investments in securities
- fair value through profit and loss (Notes 7, 8,18)
- held-to-maturity (Notes 8,18)
- available for sale (Notes 8,18)
Investment property (Note 9)
Property, plant and equipment (Notel0)

Total assets

LIABILITIES

General insurance funds:
Unearned premium reserve (Notes 12,18)
Outstanding claims (Notes 12,18)

Other liabilities:

Unearned commission reserve (Note 18)
Due To reinsurers (Note 4,18)
Accounts payable and accruals (Note 7,18)

Total liabilities

NET ASSETS

Represented by:
Share capital
Authorized, issued and fully paid:-
3,000,000 ordinary shares of $1.00 each
General reserve (Note 14)
Retained earnings

§ 15,768,111

Statement of Changes in Shareholders’ Equity

Year ended December 31, 2008, with corresponding figures for 2007
Expressed in Bahamian dollars

2008 2007

2,469,148
5,856,614
14,901,166
4,526,005
5,582,346
20,251,890
54,661

862,794
5,148,030
14,444,488
6,241,574
5,600,044
20,081,005
42,370

General
Reserve

Share
Capital

Balance at December 31, 2006 $ 3,000,000 2,000,000

Net Income

3,203,906
5,848,090
2,162,500
1,601,464
1,314,602

3,605,515
6,835,381
2,212,500

536,917
1,361,687

Dividends (Note 17)

Balance at December 31, 2007 $§ 3,000,000 2,000,000

Net Income

67,772,392 66,972,305

Dividends (Note 17)

Balance at December 31, 2008 $ 3,000,000 2,000,000
24,785,444

17,381,917
42,167,361

24,628,586
16,902,927

41,531,513

5,052,287
4,383,927
A0Q0, 706

52,004,281
15,768,111

5,056,626
4,629,046
377,190

51,594,375
15,377,930

Statement of Cash Flows
Year ended December 31, 2008, with corresponding figures for 2007

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Net income
Adjustments for:
Unearned premium reserve
Interest income
Dividend income
Interest expense
Change in net unrealized gains on investments in securities
Depreciation

3,000,000

2,000,000
10,768,111

3,000,000

2,000,000
10,377,930

15,377,930

See accompanying notes to financial staternents

These financial statements were authorized for issue on behalf of the Board of Directors on April 7, 2009 by:

Director K
4 4)

Director L_ d Land

Statement of Income
Year ended December 31, 2008, with corresponding figures for 2007

INCOME

Gross written premiums (Note 7)
Premium tax

Ceded to reinsurers

Net retained premiums
Decrease in unearned premium reserve (Note 12)
Portfolio transfer (Note 13)

Net premiums earned
EXPENSES
Net claims incurred (Note 12)

Net commissions incurred (Notes 7, 11)
Excess of loss reinsurance

Underwriting profit

OPERATING INCOME AND EXPENSES
Interest income (Notes 5, 6, 8)
Dividend and other income (Note 7)

Change in net unrealized gains
on investments in securities (Note 8)

Personnel expenses (Notes 7, 16)

Depreciation (Notes 9, 10)
Interest expenses

General and administrative expenses (Note 7)

NET INCOME

(Increase) decrease in assets:
Reinsurance recoveries

Due from agent

Deferred commission reserve
Prepaid reinsurance premiums
Prepayments and other receivables

Increase (decrease) in liabilities:
Unearned premium reserve
Outstanding claims

Unearned commission reserve
Due to reinsurers

Accounts payable and accruals

Net cash provided by operating activities
Expressed in Bahamian dollars
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Net placement of term deposits
Purchase of investment properties
Purchase of property, plant and equipment
Maturity/(purchase) of investments in securities and bonds
Proceeds from sale of investments in securities
Interest received
Dividends received

2008 2007

$ 51,734,059 51,793,130
(1,500,133) (1,476,230)

50,233,926
(40,888,440)

50,316,900
(40,975,310)

9,345,486 Net cash provided by/(used in) investing activities

14,027

9,341,590
210,952
(373,786)

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES
Dividends paid

Interest paid

9,359,513 9,178,756

Net cash used in financing activities
Net increase in cash and cash equivalents
2,862,505
312,089
4,593,465

1,834,578
302,207
4,287,271

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year

Cash and cash equivalents at end of year

Supplemental information:
Premium tax paid

7,768,059 6,424,156

1,591,454 2,754,600

842,389
421,808

683,338
507,614

(401,609) 1,058,888

2,454,042 5,004,440

(520,119) (440,397)

(62,454)
(15,287)

(60,626)
(1,750)
(466,001) (374,384)

1,390,181 4,127,283

$

$

Sunday 2 lst June, 2009

Nassau Ke qe h Resort

Expressed in Bahamian dollars

Retained
Earnings

7,000,647
4,127,283

(750,000)

10,377,930
1,390,181

(1,000,000)

10,768,111

Total

12,000,647
4,127,283

(750,000)

15,377,930
1,390,181

(1,000,000)

15,768,111

Expressed in Bahamian dollars

2008
1,390,181

14,027
(842,389)
(251,597)
15,287
(401,609)
62,454

789,572

(456,678)
1,715,569
17,698

(170,885)
10,079

142,831
478,990
(4,339)
(245,119)
23,516

2,301,234

(643,229)
(1,068,586)
(11,330)
1,000,000
50,000
764,325
229,227

320,407

(1,000,000)
(15,287)

(1,015,287)
1,606,35
862,794

2,469,148

1,524,843

The full audited Financial Statements

including the notes which form an
intergral part of the Financial Statements
are available on the Company's website
at www.icbbahamas.com

2007
4,127,283

210,952
(683,338)
(276,270)

1,750

(1,058,888)

60,626

2,382,115

(1,120,934)

3,711,974
80,606
46,416
(23,261)

(468,320)
775,226
(6,862)
(287,884)
(650,204)

4,438,872

(1,579,783)

(28,157)
(1,416,431)
50,000
630,195
276,270

(2,067,906)

(750,000)
(1,750)

(751,750)
1,619,216
(756,422)

862,794

2,125,762


PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Obama unveils ‘new rules of
roa@ for financial regulation

@ By JIM KUHNHENN
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
President Barack Obama pro-
posed new “rules of the road”
for the nation’s financial system
yesterday, casting the changes
as an essential response to the
economic crisis and the great-
est regulatory transformation

since the Great Depression.
Obama blamed the crisis on
“a culture of irresponsibility”
that he said had taken root from
Wall Street to Washington to
Main Street, and he said regu-
lations crafted to deal with the
depression of the 1930s had
been “overwhelmed by the
speed, scope and sophistication
of a 21st century global econo-

oir wi Harel

SWIMMING LESSONS

af
CUSTOMS AQUATICS

Professional Trainer
Private/Semi Private
Your small group

Individual attention brings best results
Ages 3 to ageless adults
Qur temperature controlled pool
Or your family pool.

a, Call:-362-1492 a 6














Ae
NAD

Nassau Airport
Dovelapmont Company



Tender

C118 Medium Waltage Sedteh House and Duct Bank








Maaedu Ajepepel Dheyarke opmieel Company (AD) i pleased Lo



anmounie the: reieneet:

of Tender

118 Mediu Voliage Seatch

House and Duel Bank for Stage 1 of the Lyeden Finding

niemabonal Anon Expansion

The scope of work includes

Construction of a new medem voltage (77kW] swiich house tor
BEG ond MAD aanich eer: Bulbs 6 apprcoarglety Ml SF,
8 inch block walls, aleronem hasdrals, and a standing seam

Métal roa

Corl works ncluding approamately f

B00 LF of eecenion

bedding. duct instalation, supply and aslallaion of manhotes

beckiil
vollage duct bank

cOMpacion, Culiey and pang lor anew medium

Purchase and inslalalion of MAD Switchgear

nlerested Bidders: mus! be licensed and aporoved by fhe Baharia

Biecine ©

Afporahon in parton medium voltage (11k) work

The (118 Tender Documents wil be avaiable for pick up after
1900 pm, Tuesday June 16th, 2009 Abeer meeting wll
be held at 10200 am, Thursday Jume 28th, 2009 Pease
Gonlael Traci Breby br regeter al the MAC! Project office

Contact: TRAC! BRISRY
Contracts and Procurement Manager

LPUA Expemcenn Prngect

Ph: (242) OE-9086 | Feu: (280) S777

PO Bom AP S229, Massey, Bahamas

Email traci brshyifiress bs

my.” The Obama plan would
give new powers to the Federal
Reserve to oversee the entire
financial system and would also
create a new consumer protec-
tion agency to guard against
credit and other abuses that
played a big role in the current
crisis.

In remarks prepared for
delivery later in the day, Obama
attributed much of the country’s
current problem to “a cascade
of mistakes and missed oppor-
tunities” that happened over
decades.

The Fed’s expanded authori-
ty and the rest of the new rules
would reach into currently
unregulated regions of the
financial markets. An 88-page
white paper released by the
administration detailed an effort
to change a regime that Oba-
ma’s economic team maintained
had become too porous for the
innovations and intricacies of
today’s financial markets.

Obama said the plan was
designed in consultation with
lawmakers, regulators and the
institutions it seeks to police.

“We seek a careful balance,”



Obama said.

The plan would do away with
the Office of Thrift Supervision,
replacing it with a system aimed
at closing gaps in coverage and
keeping institutions from shop-
ping for the most lenient bank
regulator. The consumer agency
would place new restrictions on
lenders and mortgage brokers,
requiring them to offer simple
loans to consumers.

“Mortgage brokers will be
held to higher standards, exotic
mortgages that hide exploding
costs will no longer be the norm,
home mortgage disclosures will
be reasonable, clearly written,
and concise,” Obama said.

The president offered his ver-
sion of the source of the finan-
cial crisis, tracing the troubles
to complex financial instruments
such as asset-backed securities
that ended up concentrating
risk. “It was easy money,” he
said. “But these schemes were
built on a pile of sand.”

The regulatory system either
had gaps or overlaps with little
accountability, he said.

“Millions of Americans who
have worked hard and behaved

NOTICE



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT




No. 45 of 2000





Trainvest Consultants Ltd.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

137 of The International Business Companies Act
No. 45 of 2000, Trainvest Consultants Ltd. is
in dissolution. The date of commencement of
dissolution was the 16th day of June, 2009. Dillon
Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of

Trainvest Consultants Ltd.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

No. 45 of 2000

Violena Consulting SA

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

137 of The International Business Companies Act No.

45 of 2000, Violena Consulting SA is in dissolution.

The date of commencement of dissolution was the

16th day of June, 2009.

Dillon Dean of Nassau,

Bahamas is the Liquidator of Violena Consulting

SA.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Morey at Work

EG CAF CAPITAL

MARKETS
E & ADVISORY SERVICES

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 16 JUNE 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,571.51 | CHG 0.45 | %CHG 0.03 | YTD -140.85|YTD%
FINDEX: CLOSE 780.49 | YTD -6.51% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

5S2wk-Low Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.28 0.127
10.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
2.14
10.18
2.74
5.50
1.27
1.32
7.50
10.00
10.35
4.95
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

-8.23

Securit
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste

Previous Close _ Today's Close
1.39 1.39
11.00 11.00
6.94 6.94
0.63 0.63
3.15 3.15
2.37 2.37
11.39 11.39
2.74 2.74
5.50 5.50
3.45
1.50
7.76
10.97
10.38
5.09
1.00
0.30
5.50

Change

0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Symbol Last Sale Daily Vol.
FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3758 1.65 4.83
2.8962 -1.49 -3.35
1.4672 2.34 5.43
6.01 -13.90
2.40 5.79
0.56 0.56
-3.59 -3.59
0.00 0.00
1.72 4.12
2.13 5.78

Pee eo errr
29000009

oo
°
5

3.39
1.60
7.76
10.97
10.38
5.09
1.00
0.30

5.50 0.00

S52wk-Hi 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

52wk-Low Symbol
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

52wk-Low
1.3124
2.9230
1.3915

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund

Div $ Yield %
30-Apr-09
31-Mar-09
29-May-09
30-Apr-09
31-May-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
30-Apr-09
31-May-09
31-May-09
31-May-09

3.1821
12.2702
100.0000
96.4070

Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund

3.1821
12.9209
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.0000
9.2511
1.0578
1.0271 -0.57
1.0554 1.74
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

2.71
5.54

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Des 02 = 1,000.00
52wWk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

Barack Obama (AP)



responsibly have seen their life
dreams eroded by the irrespon-
sibility of others and the failure
of their government to provide
adequate oversight,” Obama
said.

The financial sector and law-
makers from both parties con-
cede the need for significant
changes in the rules that gov-
ern the intricate and intercon-
nected world of banking and
investment. But the details of
Obama’s proposal already are
facing resistance, signaling a
tough sell for a president who is
spending major political capital
on his health care overhaul.

Under Obama’s plan, the
Federal Reserve would gain
power to supervise holding com-
panies and large financial insti-
tutions considered so big that
their failure could undermine
the nation’s financial system.

But even as it gained new pow-
ers, the Fed would lose some
banking authority to the new
Consumer Financial Protection
Agency.

Obama’s proposal would
require the Federal Reserve,
which now can independently
use emergency powers to bail
out failing banks, to first obtain
Treasury Department approval
before extending credit to insti-
tutions in “unusual and exigent
circumstances.”

The president predicted that
critics will find that his efforts go
too far or fall short. The
expanded Fed role and the new
consumer regulator will be sub-
jects of fierce debate in Con-
gress. Many bankers oppose a
new consumer protection regu-
lator, and many lawmakers wor-
ry the Fed could become too
powerful.

VACANCY

COOK/CHEF

Downtown restaurant seeks talented and
experienced cook to prepare native and
contemporary dishes and manage all kitchen
operations. Please email resume to:

ENERGY SAVING
Sean elatee ni

Cut Your Electic

Up To 40%

* Tankless Water coo
* Compact Fluorescent Bulbs
* Energy Saving Capacitors for
Motors, A/C, Pumps etc.
* Fridgi-tech oil additive to increase A/C

efficiency

For more information or survey

Email: enengysavingsconsultants hotmail.com

Contact 326-6121





NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000
Travona Holding Ltd.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act No.
45 of 2000, Travona Holding Ltd. is in dissolution.
The date of commencement of dissolution was the
16th day of June, 2009. Dillon Dean of Nassau,
Bahamas is the Liquidator of Travona Holding Ltd.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

P(e Pee N= we







THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST

THURSDAY, JUNE 18TH, 2009, PAGE 11B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MARINE FORECAST





FA










































































} =: Today Friday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
n } rt . a v High = Low W High Low W WASSAU Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82°F
A = — 9 -, _ o| 1 |2 3 |4| 51617 8|9|10 Fic FIC FIC FIC Friday: § at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
SS f il pl Acapulco 91/32 77/25 pe 89/31 76/24 t FREEPORT Today: —_—‘SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
-_, Qk — i LOW | MODERATE J HIGH | V.HIGH | EXT = Amsterdam 6719 52/11 ¢ 63/17 50/10 sh Friday: § at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
k me ORLANDO BD Ankara, Turkey 77/25 46/7 pe 79/26 48/8 Ss ABACO ‘Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
High:94°F34°C = Partly sunny with a Mainly clear with a Partly sunny with a A full day of Partial sunshine. Partly sunny with a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 86/30 70/21 s 84/28 67/19 s Friday: § at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
rH 7° F230 , heavy shower. shower late. thunderstorm. sunshine. shower possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 56/13 47/8 s 57/13 43/6 s
PF OW: Fs fi i High: gg° High: 90° High: 90° High: 88° Bangkok 90/32 79/26 r 90/32 78/25 t
ce @ he High: 88° Low: 78° Low: 79° Low: 78° Low: 79° Low: 77° rl N Barbados 86/30 76/24 pc 86/30 76/24 s r
TAMPA Ls if : : : : : : IDES FOR NASSAU Barcelona 80/26 68/20 s AAC TODAY'S U.S. FORECAST
[mu ie r CN Ur Beijin 91/32 741/21 pc 77/25 62/16 pc
High: 93° F/34° C : i 103° F 101°-90° F 108°-88° F 109°-86° F 108°-81° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low _Hft.(ft. ar ET : 78/95 73/00 ;
Low: 78° F/26°C as r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 4:01am. 22 10:01am. 0.1 Belgrade 87/30 61/16 s 97/36 67/19 s
a, @ - s elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 434pm. 29 11:07 p.m. 03 Berlin 76/24 50/10 c 68/20 48/8
; a CUT ne Friday o02am. 22 1058am. 00 Bermuda 77/25 70/21 sh 79/26 74/21 sh
a € | oat 5:33pm. 3.0 9 ---- Bogota 6618 45/7 c 66/18 46/7 pc pilings
2 ei a Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Saturday 60lam. 23 1206am. 01 Brussels 68/20 50/10 pc 64/17 48/8 sh
1 — ABACO Temperature 6:31pm. 3.2 11:55am. -0.1 Budapest 87/30 60/15 pc 93/33 55/12 s (BREEZY)
r z hi i x ", ’ High: 88° F/31° C oO sisesseteiadeas lace sctevtetedeecs aes ce : Sinday 658am. 24 103am 00 — Aires aE a pc aE — pc
a - Sa) Low: 78° F/26°C Normal high aregice __ 28pm. 33° 12:52pm. 02 {07/41 88/31 po 97/36 85/29 po apemey
7 ; Normal low . 74° F/23° C Calgary 72/22 48/8 pc 68/20 46/7 pc
A, ie _ thet @ WEST PALM BEACH iy Last year's igh wo... 91° F/33° C SUN AND ity Cancun 90/32 75/23 t 88/31 72/22 ¢
' —— High: 88° F/31°C Last year's VOW ese eeeeeeesseeeeeeesees 75° F/24° C ; Caracas 82/27 71/21 pc 81/27 71/21 t
— Low: 75° F/24° C e Precipitation SuntisessiaiaB20 sit: Maoniisei As of 2 p.m. yesterday oo... cece 0.05" unset....... ‘Uc p.m. Moonset... ... “OU p.m. Copenhagen 67/19 51/10 pe 63/17 51/10 sh
& FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT oie alg New First Full Last Dublin Bie 45/7 sh 6317 46/7 pc
High: 88°F/31°C @ High: 88° F/31°C Normal year to date .......c.ccsecscssesssseeeseeeeeee 15.54" ~ = - Frankfurt 72/22 54/12 c 63/17. 46/7 r
Low: 77° F/25°C Low: 75° F/24°C > Mere i Geneva 83/28 61/16 sh 68/20 52/11 t
_ AccuWeather.com ea i pu Halifax 74/23 50/10 s 64/17 50/10 c -
- @ i. Forecasts and graphics provided by _ a: Havana 90/32 70/21 t 89/31 72/22 sh Showers Mara
MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jun. 22 Jun. 290 Jul. 7) Jul. 150—sHelsinki 63/17 45/7 s 6116 46/7 sh T-storms
ra High: 89° F/32° C ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 87/30 79/26 sh 87/30 80/26 s Rain Fronts
i Low: 78° F/26°C NASSAU High: 89° F/32°C Islamabad 108/42 74/23 s 112/44 77/25 s [*, # Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and nen
High: 88° F/31°C Low: 78° F/26° C Istanbul 77/25 62/16 pe 80/26 68/20 s Bk] Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm fitenfitnfite
Low: 78° F/26°C Jerusalem 81/27 60/15 s 84/28 61/16 s [v_¥] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Manguali-
e Johannesburg 58/14 46/7 t 58/14 45/7 t
KEY WEST 2 eae cr Seu0 7s | ha 1G 105 206 [RY ats 55) ts rs (5 SEO
tieeaeanetad i AY ZAT ISLANI Lima 72/22 58/14 s 72/22 59/15 s
Low: 79° F/26°C High: 85° F/29° C London 68/20 50/10 pc 68/20 52/11 pc
we —— a so ag) Re ae
anila t r
i of Mexico City 77/25 55/12 t 73/22 55/12 + e ta 8 es C !
oie ~ Monterrey 97/36 73/22 pc 97/36 74/23 s is x x pay » - » RA N e
a GREAT EXUMA ei SAN SALVADOR Montreal 68/20 59/15 6 72/22 63/7 c
High: 87° F/31°C High: 87°F/31°C Moscow 66/18 45/7 pc 6417 48/8 pc
~~“ Low: 75°F/24°C Lew: 75°F/24°C Munich 83/28 57/13 s 58/14 48/8 +
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | : Nairobi 79/26 54/12 sh 80/26 54/12 c “6 :
highs and tonights's lows. ve High: 92° F/33°C New Delhi 105/40 84/28 s 106/41 86/30 s ia ¥en
Za Low: 79° F/26°C Oslo 68/20 46/7 sh 63/17 50/10 sh »F Y u an B Blo wn
‘an. Paris 72/22 52/11 sh 68/20 50/10 pc i=
Prague 78/25 56/13 pc 66/18 48/8 t ] A = hy
LONGISLAND Rio de Janeiro 74/23 65/18 pc 75/23 66/18 s Away Vy ul Tl Cane
CA er ier erzet Rome ‘seo 668 saa cans in
Low: 76° F/24°C Rome 86/30 66/18 s 85/29 63/17 s ’
Today Friday Today Friday Today Friday MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 87/30 79/26 sh 88/31 79/26 sh an Seidalave eeeelin . wins
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 88° F/31°C San Juan 72/22 45/7 pe 73/22 38/3 pe t at yo ave excellent Insurance
FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC Fic FIC a Low: 75° F/24° C gee a eae t a nn t coverage no m atter which
Albuquerque 84/28 62/416 t 84/28 62/16 t Indianapolis «87/30 71/21 t 90/32 68/20 t Philadelphia 75/23 64/17 + 83/28 ‘66/18 antiago r r .
Anchorage 64/17 52/11 pc 67/19 53/11 pc Jacksonville 97/36 76/24 t 100/37 77/25 t Phoenix 101/38 78/25 s 97/36 75/23 ¢ CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS santo Daring ete = sh Soi tees Si Way Ue wind blows.
Atlanta 97/36 73/22 po 96/35 74/23 s Kansas City 95/35 74/23 pc 88/31 69/20 t Pittsburgh 75/23 6015 c 82/27 64/17 t RAGGEDISLAND — High:S1°F/83°c - — oar a C com Tn s . :
Allantic City 73/22 6447 + 82/27 70/21 c Las Vegas 97/36 73/22 pc 100/37 79/26 s Portland, OR 77/25 57/13 pe 71/21 55/12 pc High: 87° F/31°C Low: 76° F/24°C Sikh oa cn ee oer ears Fe Nobody does it better
Baltimore 78/25 64/17 t 86/30 68/20 t Little Rock 96/35 74/23 s 97/36 75/23 s Raleigh-Durham 92/33 72/22 t 97/36 71/21 t Low: 73° F/23°C sen 5 ae on [ Ae, ee sR
Boston 65/18 58/14 r+ 67/19 62/16 sh LosAngeles 80/26 64/17 pc 78/25 64/17 pc St. Louis 97/36 77/25 s 94/34 71/21 t . om ae a ETIDS oh ee =
Buffalo 66/18 54/12 sh 69/20 62416 t Louisville 92/33 75/23 t 94/34 75/23 pc SaltLake City 76/24 5814 pc 84/28 65/18 s GREATINAGUA Tava mae Gare mn von) Bone Ch
Charleston, SC 94/34 75/23 t 100/37 77/25 s Memphis 97/36 76/24 s 96/35 74/23 s SanAntonio 100/37 76/24 pc 98/36 75/23 s ie SRR ean TTMETENGS TED EETH SES INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
Chicago 79/26 66/18 82/27 6317 t Miami 89/31 78/25 t 91/32 78/25 pc San Diego 72/22 66/18 po 71/21 66/18 pc Low. 77°F25°C Trinidad 84/28 68/20 pc 87/30 68/20 pc
Cleveland 72/22 61/416 pc 82/27 68/20 t Minneapolis 79/26 63/17 t 79/26 64/17 ¢t San Francisco 74/23 56/13 s 72/22 54/12 ss : Vemeamnnai 63/20 55/12 c 69/20 56/13 pc (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Dallas 99/37 76/24 s 97/36 75/23 s Nashville 96/35 73/22 s 95/35 74/23 s Seattle 71/21 56/13 po 69/20 53/11 pc Viana 84/28 68/20 s 91/32 59/15 Grand in rs a
Denver 81/27 52/11 81/27 55/12 pc NewOrleans 95/35 77/25 s 95/35 77/25 s Tallahassee 99/37 75/23 s 102/38 74/23 s a New Providence
i Warsaw 70/21 50/10 c 6417 48/8 +
SS te i mes sae SU TE epaiaesol weeaperno ecco were | eyo
onolulu s s anoma Ul pe pe ucson pe Cc eo 2 = 7 _ _ -
Houston 96/35 77/25 s 96/35 77/25 s Orlando 94/34 74/23 t 96/35 76/24 t Washington,DC 81/27 65/18 t 87/80 73/22 t Nhe ee
THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

MeN

PURCHASE
GET THE DOORIT’S 1 TOPPIh GP

Domino's ee 99 E


The Tribune oo"""”
OBIMUARIES
RELIGION



| -< The Tribune
a OLT | tty Arcee, My Mowspaper!

—‘\ ene
» \8
707.9

SS hour chaice for ihe family:
PAGE 2,

THURSDAY, JUNE 18,

2009



IN LOVING MEMORY OF :

ete ALVIN ELCOCK

any, 1938 - 18th June 2007



A father lies in peaceful sleep,
His earthly cares are o'er;
And we who are left to mourn him,
Will see him smile no more.
But he is not gone forever,
We shall meet him once again;
In the cloudless land with God
above,

Where happiness knows no end.
We need not weep or shed a tear,
For the days are near at hand;
When we again will see him,
In that ever-promised land,

Missed by your loving wife, Verna,
children, Avril, Randy and Hal, your
sisters Barbara and Monica, brothers

Christopher, Peter and Leslie and
your many nieces, nephews and
friends.

Card of thanks for the late

MR. ROBERT LIVINGSTON CARTWRIGHT
12th April 1920 - 15th April 2009

We the Cartwright Fareiiy woud file te eater! our sincere Maks ke oner anny melanie

and friends for their kind e_pnensions of avnipaiity ccuring words, provers, vistas

ielephone cols, flava! aragemenis and other swnnietic gestures shown fo wt dering
far Mitre ay arrow.

Special tanks to father Michael (ritting
Minister Lawrence Cartwright M.P. for Long Island and the entire
Long Island Commianity

The Cartwright Family





ee * Seas OBITUARIES

vard of The Thanks

for the late



O'carsin >»

August 1967 - February 2009

ne family wishes to express heartfelt gratitude and
appreciation to all of you who conveyed
condolences to us during our time of bereavement. We are
grateful for the many telephone calls, prayers, words of
encouragement, well wishes and for every kind gesture.
May God richly bless you for your kindness and may His peace
forever be yours is our prayer

The Jamily
CARD —

OF
THANKS

: Ingrid
“Yvonne Evans

_ "| have fought a good fight, | have finished my course, | have kept

the faith: Henceforth there is laid up for me a crown of
righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge,
shall give me at that day."

The family of the Celebrated Ingrid Yvonne Evans, would like to ex-

press our gratitude for all those persons far and near who have
reached out to our family during our
time of transition.
May the blessings of the Most High God rest on you.

The Family.
THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

IN LOVING MEMORY
OF

Thomas Albert Sands Sr., O.B.E.
Born: September 24th, 1941
Died: June 17th, 2005

The best portion of a good man’s life ts not his
jame, wealth or ability...

“The best portion of a good man's life is his
little; nameless, unremembered acts of
kindness and love”, -William Wordsworth

Albert, Daddy, Pappy, Grandfather...
You bestowed many acts of kindness on
others ......and are
remembered, respected and loved.

‘SYOU WILL NEVER BE FORGOTTEN.

Claudia, Thomas, Christel, Chandra,
Lamont, Natsaha, Thomas IT, William &
Natalia.

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 3

‘@ard of Thanks

RUPERT CHARLES BUTLER SR

Our First Father's Day Without You
Sept. 6, 1936 - April 5, 2009

How can we say thanks for ALL you have done for us? Our most
heartfelt thanks and appreciation is extended to all both far and
near, as you have been a source of strength and encouragement to
our family, during this time of bereavement.

Special thanks are extended to Pastors F. Edward Allen, Gil
Maycock, James Knowles, Algernon Malcolm, Rick Dean, and Garth
Johnson. Pastor Allen's message entitled "Your Passport must be
in Order" greatly reassured us, and we are so grateful to know that
our Father's passport was indeed in order.

Thank you to the members of Abundant Life Bible Church, and
Family of Faith Ministries Int, for your prayers and concern. To the
Abundant Life Chapel Singers, the Ladies Prayer Fellowship and Mr.
Franklyn Stewart (organist), the Accounts Dept. and blood donors
of the R.B.0.F., Officers and members ofthe 30th Co. of Boys’
Brigade, members of The Helping Hands Neighbor Club, persons
who visited, called, prayed, sent food, drinks or floral tributes,
Thank you.

To the staff of NapCo Printing, John $. George, Kingsway Academy,
PMH Male Surgical Ward #2, Dialysis Unit, Bethel Brother's
Morticians and Woodlawn Gardens, our deepest gratitude for the
support you provided and the assistance given. To Constance
Evans (God daughter), Joyce Knowles, Delores Nottage, Kevin and
Edna Glinton, Brent Deveaux, Alvina Taylor, Gertrude Gibson,
Vanria Smith and others far too numerous to mention, may God
continue to bless you, as you too played a very instrumental role in
our Father's life and helped us to bear the burden of his passing.

Happy Father's Day Daddy. We love you and miss you.
Cynthia “Diamond” Butler & Family


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

To Lining Manory

Onthe occasion of the 70th Birth date of our
mom June 17th 1939-March 3rd, 2009

Bessiemae Violet Greene

You have always personified
strength and the exhilarating drive
you maintained while pioneering
the way of our matriarchal trail
deepens our reflection on your life;
You have stimulated our pursuits

for better and should we leave an
imprint only one-half that of yours
would mean rmoteworthy accom-
plishment-an inspiration for praise.

Mom, you have truly been to us an
‘inspiration for praise, and we
Thank God for you always; we
shall never forget the path that You
have traveled before us.

Card if DLpank
; 1 WR

ag a ‘a Es,
pg age

=

Williams

September 23, 1931 - February B, 209

Cred saa you w2ttine tired and acure wes
mot lo be, su he pul his aren around vou
anid lifted view er rest

With teartul eyes we watched you, end aaw
you Pass wey. Although we loved pou
slewly, bul Jesus Iowes eu best.

Your work on cath waa done, and therstore your heort has taken reac Ve ve
lel us precbous TaemuTies: your laws will be uur aodde. Lb boob wor beacks
to lose sou, for part ofus weol vith you on the day Ged called you ome.

We, the family of che late Ambrose Qaltoste Williams wishes to express
gu deep apprecialion for your wun expressions of compusstin. affection
and suppork during our boss, Your thoughts andl eTorts have genuinely
touched our hears and lives in a way that we could never express.

“Litmk eu wed) coer Cound euutioue Le Bless your Les,
Rosamond, Desiree, Touna, Cardinal Teenise, Deanne atl Danas

and family, including his wslers and their humilics, Edo Daley, Evanvelioe
McFall und Christine Rolle.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel

Wulff Road & Pinedale

Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 © Fax: 328-8852

for the late

MINISTER
GLORIA NAOMI
DELANCY

The Family of the Late Minister
Gloria Naomi Delancey would
like to extend our sincere
thanks and gratitude to our
many relatives and friends for
their kind expressions of
sympathy, assuring words,
prayers visitations, telephone
calls, floral arrangements, and
other sympathetic gestures shown to us during our time of
sorrow.

aed Sf c

We would like to say a special thank you to the following,
Bishop Brice H. Thompson General Presbyter Church of God
of ae Bishop Elgarnet B. Rahming sr. National Overseer
Church of God of Prophecy, Bishop Joseph M. Swann, Bishop
Sterling Moss, Bishop Rudolph Bowe District Overseer Bishop
Franklin Ferguson, Bishop Solomon Humes, Bishop Eliakim
Ferguson, Minister Gladstone Thurston Associate Pastors,
Minister Dr. Barbara F. Williams National Evangelism and Home
Mission Director and family, Minister Punchetta Taylor and the
National Harvest Team, Alda Williams and the National Prayer
Team Church of God of Prophecy, Pastor R. J. Deleveaux Holy
Spirit Church of God, Pastor Elias Ferguson, Hon. T. Desmond
Bannister MP, Sancuatry Choir and Members of the Church
of God of Prophecy Gambier Village, Church of God of
Prophecy San Salvador, Bahama Brass Band and Junior Band,
Gambier Community Development Association, Management
and staff of Bahamasair, St. Peters Baptist Church Gambier
Village, Mt. Zion Baptist Church Gambier Village, Rev.
Christopher Roberts, Mrs. Sharon Chase, Sis. Sonia Williamson,
Bahamas Airline Pilot Association, Sis. Victoria Beneby and
Family, Sis. Helen Alleyne and Family, Minister Diana McDonald
and Family, Bro. Denver Dames and Family, Mr Michael Dames
and ae Staff Best Western Bay View Suites, Bro. Ronald
Johnson, Bro. Michael Swann, Mr. Ezekiel Stubbs and Family,
Mr. Michael Ramsey and neighbors on Mussaendra Avenue
Garden Hill #2, The entire Gambier Village Community and
the Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel & Crematorium.

Fram her sons Richard and Captain Borris Delancy, Grand
children, Great grand Ghild, Sisters and Brothers.




THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

11A Eost Cora Rood. Heep. G.B., Bohames
P.O. Boe Feast? _

Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager. (242) 340-8043 « Fox: (242) 373-3005

THURSDAY, JUNE 18,

Releiae Memorial Mortuary

2009, PAGE 5

72
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 24-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fox: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

SIDNEY
BRICE JR., 42

of Morgan Lane, Freeport, Grand Bahama will :
be held on Saturday, June 20, 2009 at 11:00 am, =

at Agape House, Pronger’s Loop #22 & 23,

Pioneer's Way East, Freeport, Grand Bahama. :
Officiating will be Pastor Willard Munroe. :

Cremation will follow,

Cherished Memories will forever linger in the :
Hearts of father: Sidney Brice; mother: Verna ;

Brice; grandmother: Lou E Pommells-Warley:
daughter: Sequioa and Shaniqua Brice;
erandchild: Naser Woight-Brice; brothers: Cyril,
Leon, Micheel, Jason, Salvanis and Justice Brice;

sister: Linetra Brice: umeles: Leon Brice, Samuel Moneur, Samuel Ruiz and Andrew |

Wallace: aumts: Sylvia Bethel, Cynthia Sands-Armbrister, Paula Brice, Rose
Michelle, Julia Bodie, Francita Brice, Patricia Warley, Ruthie Wallace and Eva-
Cookie Ruiz; nieces: Brianna, Ebony, Aisa, Janae, Lauren, Tamia, Aaleyho Brice,
Nichole, Jasmine, Allegra amd Jana‘e; nephews: Michael Jr.. Isaiah Brice and Dylan

Ruiz: sisters-in-law: Colette and Tammy Brice; and @ fost ofether relatives and |
Jhend: incindings Adeshia Brice Briggs, Clifford and Nako Brice, Henry Brice |
and Family, Prince Albert and David Brice, Joan Rolle and Family, Kevin Ferguson :
and Family, Alphonao, Rodger, Sean, Mathew, Timothy, King and Sheena Johnson, §
Neville and Margaret Woodside, Willimae Scott and Family, Chris and Joseph :
Cooper, George Brennen, Wesley Thompson, Jonathon and Terry Cox, Herbert i
Carolyn :
Anita Armbrister, Elvise Bain-Seide, Patsy Bain, Sean Carey, Monique :
Taylor, Nicole Farrington, Dr, Wiona Pratt, Rev, Willard, Monroe and Candlestick :

Burnes, Denetra Fowler, Cindy, Bemadette, Tony and Remand Bethel,
Kelle,

Ministry, Rev. Anthony and Anne Grant and the Agape House family, Lee Miller,
Susan Williams, Christine Walker & family, Pastor Jarrod and Mrs. Anihe Newbold,
Savon Strachan, Sean Burrey and Shanique Delancy.

Viewing Will be held in the “Perpetual Suite” of Restview Memorial Mortuary

and Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama on :
Friday from 10200 au. to 6:00 p.m. and at the Church on Saturday from 9230 asm. :

until Service time,

MARIO
POLYCARPE, 17

of Murphy Town, Abaco and formerly of Freeport,
Grand Bahama will be held on Saturday, June 20,

2009 at 10200 am, at Calvary Temple Assemblies |

of God, Clive Avenue, Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Officiating will be Pastor Deon Gibson. Internment
will follow in the Grand Bahama Memorial Park |
Section #2, Frobisher Drive, Freeport, Cirand |

Bahama

Precious memories will forever linger in the heart :
of his mother; Maryann Bonaby; stepfather: =
Terrance Bonaby; father: Lu Evans; 2 brothers: :
Terrance Jr. and Delano Bonaby; grandparents: Mr. St. John, Mrs. Silvina :
Aumustave, Wir and Mrs. George Bonaby: special grandmother: Mrs. Talio Pierre- :
Louis; $ ants: Palora, Elizabeth, Guerla, Melissa, Tina, Bridgette, Reece and :
Geneva; $ uneles: Lucien, Lano, Parret, Adrian and Nixon; special aunt and uncke: ?
Mr, and Mrs, Henry Corneille; godparents: Karen Mathurin and Evelyn; special i
friend: Clinesha; numerous cousins and @ frost of offer relatives and friends 3

inciidireg: the Polycarpe family, the Bonaby family, Cynthia Curry, Yolanda Levy,
the Major farnily, the Curry family, Principle, staff and students at Abaco Central
High School especially grade 9, First Assembly of Ged, the Joseph family, the Jean
Baptiste family, Mrs, Celia Smith and family and the entire community of Columbus
Park, Freeport, Grand Baharna.

Viewing will be held in the “Serenity Suite™ of Restview Memorial Mortuary and
Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama on Friday
from 10:00 aum. to 6:00 pom. and at the Church on Saturday trom 8:30 a.m. until
Service time.

ELKYNE WAYNE PRINCE
FINLEY, 45

oF f2il Kean Yin, Freeport, Grand Bahama and
formerly of Matthew Town, Inagua will be held
on Saturday, June 20, 200% at | 1:00 am at New
Canaan Baptist Church, Bolao Read, Freepert,
Grand Bahama. Officiating will be the Rt. Rev.
Bishop Washington Williams, assisted by Rev.
Douglas Williams. Intenment will follow in the
Grand Bahama Memorial Park Section #2,
Frobisher Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Lett to cherish his fond and precious memories
are his 3 daughters: Elkyndrea, Terrell and Ciera: son: Elkyne Finley Irs mother:
Cestina Louise Finley; father: Berkley Finley Sr. 4 sisters: Pastor Rehfie D.
Rhodriquez, Marva Ford, Veronda Williams and Namae Ingraham of Matthew
Town, Inagua; § brothers: Douglas of Matthew Town, Inagua, Berkley Jr.,
Desmardo, Terrance and Rervieo Finley: umeles: Samuel, Aulric, Cecil and Dwayne
Williams, Maxwell, Sanwel, Listen, Jonathan Jr. McKinnely and McDonald Jones,
Mitchel, Oswald and David Finley; aunts: Ida Brown, Stephanie Cefort, Annis
Capron, Puncheita Taylor, Marty and Denise Jones, Barbara Michelle, Annie
Charlton, Prudence Palaceos, Louse and Emm Finley and Ette Williams: great
grandaunts: Maric Moss of Perrine, Fla. and Clara Bell Hanna; gransduneles:
Kelson Cox, Leo Gardiner and Alphonse Hanna,: step grandfather: Patrick Williams
of Inagua; nieces: Marica, Matrina, Johnneika, Richara, Patreka, Patacia, Richardlete,
Oph, Antonice, Berkel, Donnely and Temque; nephews: Paciourek, Peron, Patrick
Jr... Philando Jr., John Jr., Torino, Michael, Berkley Jr, Richard Jr., Besmardo Ir.
Derek Jr. Rervio Jr, Douglas Jr: grandniece: Liara Gilbert: grandnephew: Rereldo
Bennett Jr; brothers-in-law: Bishop Patrick Rhodriquez, Derek Williams $r., John
Ford Sr, and Richard Ingraham: sister-in-law: Porchsha Finley; godchildren:
Rolando, Marthyn, oranda and Andres anda fost of other relatives ana fries
inefudieg: Dr. Carolyn Rolle and family, Sharon Seymour and family, Chester,
Lorry, Michelle, Beryl, Beverly, Renae and Martha William, lan, Donnavin,
Jermaine, Adrian, Nickey and Nicola. Gamett Gray, Jarvis, Ragan, Rodrick, Pernell,
Joevanny, Cecil Jr., Sharvis, Natasha, Shadkey, Shantley, Bastian, Daven, Samuel,
Dexter, Shannie, Dewitt, Allison, Antonio, Cpl. Cleophus Capron, Melia, Matlia,
Pastor Godfrey Bain and family, Mav and Jane. Emmanuel Ceforn, Manfred Brown,
Denise Curtis, Jackie Miller, Dorene, Irena, Drucilla, Pastor Mally, Raical, Dorcus,
Belly, Phillip, Link, Franklyn, the Cver the Hill crew of Matthew Town, Inagua,
families of Prophetic Care Church, Nassau, Bahama, Zion Baptist, Inagua, Church
of God of Prophecy, Inagua, families of New Canaan Baptist Church, Pastor
Washington Williams and family, Taxi Driver Company, Workers of Freeport,
Grand Bahama Taxi Union and the entire community of Mathew Town, Inagua
and Freeport.

Viewing will be held in the “Irenie Suite” of Restview Memorial Mortuary and
Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama on Friday
from 10:00 aun. to 6900 pum. and at the Church on Saturday from 9:30 aum. until
Service lime,


PAGE 6,

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

and Cremalouum

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Limiled

ed Cased vio Lint

FREEPORT
EA Eee! one OOS, Peeps fa, Bonny

Telephone: (242) Ses ee ee
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fox: (2a2) 373-3005

Robinson and Soldier Boods, Nasecu, NLP., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072

Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 = Fox: (242) 440-8034

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

AARON GILBERT MOSS
Affectionately called “Aaree”
“D" “Boy Boy” “Lover Boy”

“Biggie” HAT 58
of Woodlawn Gardens Way who died on June 9th
2009 wall be held on Saturday, June 20th, 20879 at

11:08) al Ebenezer Baptist Church, Charles Vincent
Street. Officiating will be Rev. Dr. Elkin Symonette

assisted by Pastor Jacob Moss and Interment will i

follow in Lakeview Menvorial Gardens John F,
Kennedy Drive.

Left to cherish fis wonderful life is his deveted wife of thirty six years: Zelma :
Moss; son: Craig Moss; daughters: Tesma Moss and Tanya Moss-Thompson son- :
grandchildren: Chardonnay Moss, Tangia, Jamaine :
Jr. Thompson and Jermaine Musgrove; brothers: Minister Asa, Pastor Jacob and :
Minister Philip Moss: sisters: Shirelymae Martin, Acting Pastor Julie Farquharson, :
Evangelist Loreen Johnson, Naomi Thurston, Katruah McKinney and Leah Seavella, :
sisters-in-law: Marion, Judy and Rosemary Moss, Idella Albries, Orian Forbes, i
Joycelyn Musgrove, Ruthlyn Miller, Jovee, Claudette, Naomi, Ruth and Vernita :
Ferguson; brothers-in-law: Kendal Farquharson, Fredrick Johnson, Glenville :

in-law: Jamine Thompeon Sr.:

Scavella, Chief Inspector Samuel McKinney, Gladstone Thurston, Hany, Starringion,

and Ted Ferguson, Emmauel Albries, Philip Forbes, Gregory Musgrove and Bob |

Miller Aunts: Sarah Ferguson and Eloise Swain; Unele: Joel Moss: numerous nieces
and nephews and Cousins. Other relatives and friends including: Rev. Lockwood

Delevenux amd fimily, Rev. Randolph Delevewux and Family , Obie Ferguson und |
Family, Harry Gotfe and Family, Brenda Thompson and Family, Pleasant Moss |
and Family, Faith Gardiner and Family, Deno Moss Family, Delores Carter and |
Family, The Williamson Family, Sharon Sweeting and Family, Clarence Major and :
Family, Doreen Campbell and Family, Nora McClain and Family, Verlene Lafleur :
and Family, Gelen Moss and Family, Rev. Dr. Elkin Symonette and Family, Ebenezer :
The Acklins Association Hillside Baptist Church and :
Family, the Montague Beach [nn Family, Immigration Department Family and the :
Woodlawn Gardens Community. And a host of other relatives and friends too =

Baptist Church and Family,

NUM eRe to mention.

Viewing will be held in the Serenity suite at Restview Memorial Mortuary and :
Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and Soldier Roads on Friday from 10:00am to é:00pm !

and at the Church on Saturday trom 9:30am to service time.

MR. HOWARD FREEMON
SMITH, 63

of Elizabeth Estates who died on June 7th 2CKrO,

will be held on Saturday, June 20th, 2004 at | lam |
at Arrow of Deliverance Church Cox Way off East :
Street South Officiating will be Pastor Luther :
Thurston, assisted by other ministers of the gospel |

and Cremation will follow.

Precious memories will live

on in the hearts of his
darling wife: Louise (veesy) Smith; children: Shane :
Bon, Meed and Sandra; sisters: Brenda Johnson, :
Flizabeth Taylor, Chery! and Charlene Smith: Brothers: Clarence 1, William and :

Ricardo Smith; nieces: Rhond Martinborough, Denise, Dovwella and Darlene Ewing,
Kiara Sherman, Keva Sands, tana, Tame and “ia Smith, Anessa Stubbs, Vivian
Forbes, Shelley Bowe, Linda Smith, Shearon Bullock, Pamela Crispo; nephews:
Dr Julien Smith, Mark Wilkinson, Bishop Reno Smith, Valentina and Lawrence
Taylor, Ricardo Smith 1, Michael Smith, Clarence Smith 10; aunts: Mizie Hanna
of Oplalocha, Gerry Bronson of Colorado; in-laws: Kathy Smith, Adassa Smith,
Bernard Johnson, Douglas Ewing, Anthony Pearce; Daugthers-in-law: Leslyn.
Suzzette and Karolange Smith; Cousins: Florence Duke of Milwaukee, Bishop
Albert Hepburn, Enril Rebinson, Julia Bain, Edis Raluming, Gwen Seymour, Edkgar
Hepburm, Arthur Hepbum, Maggie Monecur, Artis Neely, Gwen Reid, Ed and Tracey
Strachan; other relatives and friends including: Rosalind Davis, Shirley Williams,
Ermestine Bethel, Shirley Ferguson Nixon, Ruth Bell, Ida Seymour, Phyllis Sullivan,
Pearl Hollingsworth, Brenda Plakaris, Shelia Smith, Esther Kaowles, Vernal
Martinborough, George and Lee Sweeting, Families of Werdell Pinder, Genevive
Russell, Uriel Smith all of Grand Bahama, Larenso Smith and a host of other
relatives and friends.

Viewing will be held tn the Perpetual Sutte at Restview Memorial Mortuary and
Crematorium Lid, Robinson and Soldier Roads on Friday from LOs00am to 60m
and at the church on Saturday from 9:30am to service time.

DEATH NOTICES

MS. SHIRLEY LOUISE
MUNROE, 71

of Shrimp Road died at the Princess Margaret
Hospital on June 1th, 2004,

She is survived by her sons: Stephen and Valentine
Munroe; adopted son: Wesley Munroe and Timothy
Pennenman; daughters: Elgrenita Munroe Woodside.
Jennifer Munroe Anderson and Kimberly Evans:
brothers: Harcourt Froswell, Timothy and Basil
Wallace; sisters: Edna Oliver, Rosenell Evans, Irene
Barr: fourteen grand children, three great grand
children other relatives and friends.

Funeral annoucements will be announced at a later date.

ANTHONY ALEXANDER
ROMER, 65

of Bailey Town, Bimini, Born - February 28, 1944,
Died Thursday, June 11, 2009,

Survivors include his witt Deanna Romer. 4 Sons,

Anthony Jr.. Julian, Marcelle & Gannon Romer. |

Dauchter-in-law Charisse Romer, 3 grand-children:

| Roxy, Gannon Jr, Kaikan, Epiphany & Kaley Romer.

1 Sister Edith Romer-Johnson; 6 Brothers:

Mohammed Ali Clarke, Crestwell, Dr Hayward,

Rev Grandville, Kendall & Justin Romer; 2 Adopted

sisters, Rowena Bowe and Eleanor Robing: | adopted

Brother, Eddie Smith; numerous nieces, nephews and a host of relatives and friends.

Prnera! cancvcements will be announced af a later dare.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PRES PURI |
[LA Ene (eral Head, Freeport, CHL shone Aaiestsa4 ared Saker
Fi. Pave Fad2512 PD. Boe CB-thirt
Terkephanray: (PET) T7S- 14105 fd) 3-0 Ta
Pager 247) 04 © Pas; G47) 373-3e8

Funeral Service For

SHARRIE
FORBES, 32

of Murphy Town, Abaco who died on June 11th
2009. will be held on Sunday June 21st 2009 at
| loam at Hillview Seventh Day Adventist Church
Tonikque Williams Darling Highway Officiating, will
be Pastor Peter Jogeph assisted by other ministers
of the gospel and Interment will follow in the
Woodlawn Gardens Soldier Roads.

Fond memories of her will forever be cherished by

her daughter: Shanquel Reckley; an adopted |

daughter: Fayneisha Archer, § sisters: Betty Mapor,

Judymae Melntosh, Muntrella Woodard, Mertis

Clarke, Mavis Wilchcombe and Barbara Forbes, Angela Taylor and Deborah Mackey;
4 brothers: Stanley, Jr, Cedric, Theodore and Gregory Forbes: | sister-in-law: Lillian
Relle; 2 brothers-in-law: Joseph Mapor and Ricarde Clarke; 1 aunt; Mae McPhee;
Luncle: Frank Clarke; 36 nieces: Gaynell Vital, Sophia Rolle-Kemp, Bernadette,
Bernadine, Sonia and Voilet Rolle, Fabia Johnson, Veronica Smith, Andrea Rolle,
Janelle Russell, Sheral Northe, Natasha and Raquel Bootle, Dusher and Leslie
Melniosh, Annamae Burke, Samantha, Reva, Monique, Jestina, and Deborah Forbes,
Janice Cooper, Stephanie Bannister, Ernestine Poitier, Cathy Storr, Sharon Ferguson,
Borathy Wilchoombe, Carol Thompson, Charmaine Strachan, Deshawn Fox, Elta
Ferguson, Paulette Colehy, Denise Cash, Portia Clarke, Deanza and Albertha Rodgers;
21 nephews: Dock Woxdard, Crvie, Darrell, Trov, Lenny, Demetrius and Franklyn
Rolle, Carlos, Mario, Enrico and Damien Knowles, Leroy, Geno, Tracey, Trevor
and Travis Forbes, Romdino Dean, Philip Gibson, Anwold Ferguson, Anthony and
Syon Clarke: 28 grandnieces including: Kennethsia, Crystal, Rrova, and Lenique
Rolle, Jade Johnson, DeAndres, Gemesia and Deontillee Wilson, Nasasha, Emmanique
and Azariel Bootle, Shanley and Lashan Nonhe, Yasmin Melntosh, Courtney Burke,
Paige and Tracea Forbes; DeAndrea, Demesia and Deontillee Wilson: 32 grandnephews
including: Nickolas, Troy, Jr, Samuel Russell, Deante Wilson, Stanley, Jr. and
Stephano Morthe, Jonathan Bootle, Jr. and Drewshorn Mcintosh; a host of other
relatives and friends including: Stanley Morthe, Sr, Reginald Wilson, Emitie and
Jonathan Bootle, Sr., Marvann Dickson, Janice Demeritte, Millicent Laney, Pastor
Leonard Johnsen, Pastor Desmond Sturrup, Pastor Leonardo Rahming, Pastor Patnck
Tyill, Pastor Peter Joseph and Hillview S04, Gentry and Natasha Mortis, Peggy
Sands and Family, Sylvie Cooper and Family, the Reckley and Bootle family, [CU
and Female Medical [ and UT at the Princess Margaret Hospital and the staff of
Restview Memonal Mortuary and Crematorium,

Os Memorial Mortuary

ALP, Baherrena

Tesh cena FS) A-BNE). | (a) EM -AT
Pager; (247) 3-45 © Pas; 47) de-da

Fiewiag will be feel in fhe Celestial Suite at Restwew Mortuary Robinson and
Sdier Reads on Serardeny from / eon fo & io ane at the chech fron 9: ita
fo service fine.

MR. EUGENE SAMUEL
BAIN, 81

of Hanna Rod Feedhill died at Doctoris Hospital on
June lh 2009,

He is survived by his. wife: Wendy Bain sons: Bradley,

Everette, Myron and Coree Bain daughters: Donna

Nottage, Janice Mackey, Deborah Bain, Cheryl

Lightbourne, Melvern Demeritte and Jean Gin step

daughter: Tatrinka Thompson sister: Dorothy

Colehrooke adopted brother: Tellis Smith nieces:
Camille Hall, Angela Colebrooke, Patricia Johnson and Sabrina Munnines. nephews:
Ruts Munnings, Glen Colebrooke, Oswald Munnings Numerous other relatives and
friends.

Funeral anncucements will be announced ata later dane,



THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 7

Butler’s Funeral Homes

& Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O, Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

Oded ele ae)

The former MP of Pinedale and
Speaker of the Howse of Assembly

MILO BOUGHTON
BUTLER JR., 72

will be held on Monday, June 22,
209 at 11:00am... at Christ Church
Cathedral, George Street. Officiating
will be Bishop Larsh Boyd, assisted
by The Most Rev'd Drexel W.
Gomez, The Rt. Rev'd Gilbert
Thompson, The Rev'd Dr. James
B. Moultrie and the Venerable
Archdeacon James Palacious,
Interment will follow in The Eastem
Cemetery, Dowdeswell Street.

Left to cherish his memories are

his sons; Milo Butler [11], Godwin

Butler and Jevon Butler, his daughters: Angela Butler and Bernadette Butler;
grandsons: Achim Abdallah, Godwin Butler Jr. and Andre’us Butler
pranddaughters: Nagiyah Abdallah and Comfort Juanita Butler, Ryely
Butler, ond Elizabeth Anne Butler, daughters-in-law: Mary and Alicia Butler,
former wife: Winifred Butler, brothers: Raleigh Sr, Elder Basil and Matthew
Butler sister: Juanita Butler sisters-in-law: Rose-Marie Butler; Princess
Butler, Clementine Butler; Antoinette Butler aumts: Jane Bethel and Elder
Allison (Halson) Butler, Maria Major nephews: Kendal Butler; Dr. Raleigh
Jr,, Craig and Charles Butler; Jerome, Jonathan, Samuel, David and Joseph
Butler Jr.; Dominic, Damian, Franklyn Jr. and Martm Butler, Prerre, Paul and
Antoine Butler; Dwight, Allan and Bruce Butler, Mark Ferguson. oleces:
Clarice Butler, Denise Docema, Valarie Osbourne-Walkine, Claudette Butler
and Hon. Loretta Butler-Turner; Dr. Farth Butler; Genia Pinder; Donna
Butler, Anastacia Moss, Janice Ramsey, Whitney Brice, Juanita and Rochelle
Butler; Janet Forbes, Sharon Baim, Lisa Ingraham and Anne Ferguson.
nephews-intaw: Edward Turner; Jeffery Pinder mieces-intaw: Dr. Rosamund
Erskine-Butler, Tina Butler; Moerza Butler and Suzette Butler cousins; Joshua
and Samuel MeIntosh; Honourable Kendal and Ruby Nottage, Dr. Pamela
Etuk, Dr. Marcus and Chantal Bethel, Dr. Paulette Bethel, Michacl Bethel,
Honourable Alfred Sears and Marion Bethel-Sears, Owen Bethel; Margaret
Major and Family and Clarice Bodie and Family, Extended Family: Comtort
Baker and Family; Marjorie Thompson and Family; The Family of Jeffrey
Thompson; Eugene Thompson and Family Marina Walcott and Family; The
McKinney and Stuart families of Eleuthera; The Watson, Major and Dean
families of Long Island; The Strachan Family of Rum Cay, Friends and
Loved Ones: Sir Arlington and Lady Sheila Butler, Godfrey and Sandy
Encas, Mr. Vincent Johnson, Mr. Loftus Roker, Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Lowe,
Mr. Stafford Rolle and Family, Mr. Vibart Wills, Ms, Elizabeth Johnson, Mr,
Samuel Thompson Jr. and Family, Ms. Lulamae Smith and Family, Mr.
George Gibson and Family; Ms. Thelma Calma, Mr. and Mrs. Reno Brown
amd Family, Mr. and Mrs. Darrell Rolle and Farnily, Mr. Ervin Knowles and
Family, Mr. and Mrs. Pierre Dupwch and Family, Mr. and Mrs. Martland
Cates, The Progressive Liberal Party, Mr. Joseph Hollingsworth and Family,
The Management and Staffof Milo B. Butler and Sons, Mr. and Mrs. Charles
Wallace, Mrs. Angela Archer and Family, The Rewerend Dr. James B. and
Mrs, Angela Moultrie, Father Don Haynes, Canon Weil and Joan Roach, The
St. Matthew's Church Family, Mr. Harvey Tynes and Family, The Honourable
Henry and Honourable Janet Bostwick, and the entire “Pondite Community”.

Mr. Butler will lic in state at the House of Assembly on Friday June 14,
2009 from 9:00a.m. until 6:00p.m. and on Saturday June 20, 2009 from
9:00am. until $Mip.m. On Sunday June 21, 2009 at Butlers’ Funeral
Homes and Crematorium Erocst and York Strects from 10;(acm. until
4:0 p.m.


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JUNE 18,

2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

(Cedar Crest funeral Home

DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street * PO.Box N-603 « Nassau, N.P, Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

Funeral Services For

RANDOL ALPHONSO :

DARVILLE, 60

a resident of High Vista Drive, will
be held 2:00 p.m. Saturday, June |
20th, 2009 at St Barnabas Anglican |
Church, Wulff and Baillou Hill :
Roads. Officiating will be Canon |
Basil Tynes, assisted by other |
Ministers. Interment will be made in :
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road. :

Randol will be lovingly remembered |

by his wife of 40 years, Christina L

Darville, their children Rhamda Renee ;

Darville, their sons and their wives ;

Christopher and Temidayo Darville, |

Richard and Kayla Darville, and their children Joshua, Ikea, Kristen, Tyr and |
Tyler, Renee’, Richard Jr and Rhyan; his other children include Rolando and |
his wife Gianna Darville, their children Gejointe, Roshae and Shy-ro Darville, |
Dave and his wife Charlene and their children Van, Sherir and Randon :
Darville, other Grandchildren, Evante, Vanisea, Andres, Nicholas and Nasithan :
Darville and Devon Taylor; 4 brothers, Elijah, Holland, Robert, Conrad and :
Jeffrey Darville; 6 sisters, Marietha Smith, Delores Joseph, Yvonne and ;
Magdalene Joseph, Renee Turnquest and Dorothy Hield: 9 brothers-in-law, :
Elcin Joseph, Jean, Walter (Joey) Turnquest, Donald Hield, Clarence, Walter, :
Llewellyn and Lynx Jones and Milton Grant Sr.; § sisters-in-law, Sandra:
Porter, Donna Grant, Theresa, Dellareese and Belinda Jones, Lisa, Paulette |
and Rhona Darville; his nephews, Alexander Laroda, Roosvet Joseph, Andre |
Wells, Junior and Reynaud Hield, Desmond, Elijah and Elisha Darville, :

Milton Sunny Grant Jr, Oscar "Tony" and Vernon Porter, Gerard and Alphonse,

his nieces Estelle Ferguson, Elisa Fox, Olivia and Daleina Hield, Anetria :
Greene, Alicia and Alissa Grant, Daphane Fox, Candace Durrett, Heather, ;
Brittany, Sarah, Analisa, Theodora and AnaChristina Jones, Nancy, Maxine |
and Kikianna; and other relatives including, Ethel and Edith Rolle, Ken |
Gittens, Virginia Major & family, John Knowles and his mother, Pastor Idez, |
Alex Jr, and Andrew Laroda, Halson and Haliah Ferguson, Sierra Joseph, |
John, Antionette and Alex Fox, Chante Saunders, Calvinae Russell, Alaina :
Moxey, Gabrielle McDonald, Kaistan and Sophiwna Hield, Nikki, Cynthia |
and Andre Wells, Philip Smith & family, Dereck Smith & family, Shane :
Albury & family, Keyshora Stubbs, Darryl Bartlette & family, Stephen :
Turnquest & farnily, Lincoln Deal & family, Bradley Pinder & family, Barbara :
Knowles & family, Eleanor Bain, Valarie Darville and the Duncombe family, :
Garth & Val Greene & family, Heather Hanlan and family, Flora Sawyer and |
family, Vanderson Ferguson and family, Carmmander $.T. Evans (Royal |
Bahamas Defence Force), Orset and Jerrimae Symonette, Eric (Trane) Knowles, |
the management, staff and fnends at Co Co Mo, Stan Sweeting and family, :

Monique Strachan and family, Dania Sargent and family, Canon Basil and

Mrs Sonia Tynes, Fr. Michael Maragh, St. Barnabas Prayer and Visitation :
Team, St. Barnabas Church family, the Clergy and Congregation of St. |
Stephen's Anglican Church, Enxght Mile Rock, Grand Bahama, Dr. Kevin |
Moss and statf of Private Medical Ward Princess Margaret Hospital and other |

too TUMEeroUs to mention,

Relatives and frends may pay their respects al Cedar Crest Funeral Home,
Robinson Road and First Street on Friday from 12:00 noon to 6:00 p.m. and |
on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon and at the church from 12:30 :

1m, until service time.

ERSKINE RONEY
WILLIAMS, 76

a resident of Faith Avenue, and
formerly of Mangrove Cay, Andros,
will be held 11:00a.m. Saturday, June
20th 2009 at First Baptist Church,
Market Street, Officiating will be
Rev Diana Francis, assisted by other
Ministers. Interment will be made in
Southern Cemetery, Cowpen &
Spikenard Roads.

Left with cherish memories are his
devoted life long partner Rosalie, 1
son, Randy Williams; 6 daughters,
Curlene Milhouse, Fermaninia Jones,
Hycinth and Ethel Williams, Vivian Smith and Kimberley Adderley; 2 sons-
in-law, Rebert Milhouse and Francis Adderley; 4 sisters, Lillian Bowe, Maxine
Thompson, Marion Williams and Alice Sandyford of Ft Pierce Florida; 1
brother, Bertram Williams Jr: 11 Grandchildren, Andrew, Kallen and Marion
Jackson, Marcus Williams, Kyacha and Nicole Morgan, Randy Jr and Brandon
Williams, Vadalia Cash, Gerron Turner and Benjumin Walkes, Tavaris, Taniqua
and Tanielle Adderley, Randy and Brandon Williams; 7 Great Grand Children,
31 nieces, Millie Stubbs, Matilda Walters of Ft Lauderdale Fla, Nadine Lorrie
of Germany, Ettamae Bowe, Patricia Munnings, Ingrid Seymour, Raquel
Dorsette, Nicole and Keva Thompson, Mana Williams, Andrea McKenzie,
Sherma Thompson of Pt Lauderdale Fla, Jenny and Jennifer Stubbs, McKesa
and Latoya Walters, Shonkey Cartwright, Raquel Brown, Inciera Edgecombe,
Tiffany Brown and Sheba Mortimer, Nickesha, Hyacinth, Nickesha, Michelle
und Devin Griffin, Gwendolyn Williams, Jemilia Seymour, Sophia Hepburn
and Dedrie Carter, Persis and Stacey Adderley, Sheila Colmer and Aldicla
Evans; 29 nephews, Harry and Kirk Bowe, Peter Verella, Arnold, Mark,
Trevor and Nick Thompson, Bennet Seymour, Dwayne and Floyd Griffin,
Roland Tynes, 1085 Police Cprporal Dennis McKenzie, James Stubbs, Ray
Brown, Keith, Scottie, and Pedro Bowe, David Cartwright, Dwayne Griff
Jr, Marvin Bowe of Ft Lauderdale Fla, Dave Mortimer, Raphael Lynes, Casey
Griffin, Andrian Bowe, Shavon Walters, Gary Bowe, Nikito, Marvin and
Garvin Johnson, and other relatives and fiends including Joycelyn Bain,
Shebamac Morley of Freeport, Elizabeth Grey, Vernita Rolle, Marian Rolle
of Cleveland Ohio, Norman Horton, Walter Grey, Benjamin Bain, Joseph
Rolle, Wilbert Rolle, of Cleveland Ohio, Bishop Samuel Greene, Bishop
Patrick Pinder, Rev Samuel Pinder, Paulette Turngquest, Gorts Burrows, Elon,
Moody and Milton Moxey, Ivan and Edison Miller, Venus and Trinee King
of Mangrove Cay, Andros, Marta, Iris and Perey Brown & family, Florence
Wallace, Rosa Evans, Lillymae Williams, Magnola Rolle, Curlene and Carl
Hepburn, Lawerence and Nathaniel Rolle, Hyacinth Curtis & family, Lycithies
Forbes, Shirley and Debbie Cartwright, Elsaida Bastian, [tha Musgrove,
Laura, Joyce, Magaret and Linda Naim & family, Thelma Johnson & family,
The Williams, Greene, Moxey, King, Thompson and Dean Families, The
entire community of Mangrove Cay Andros and others too numerous to
mente.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest Funeral Home,
Robinson Road and First Street on Friday from 12:00 noon to 6:00 pum. and
at the church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. until service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 9

Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel

Wulff Road & Pinedale
Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 © Fax: 328-8852

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

| UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

GERTRUDE
PERSIS EVANS,
61

of Thompson Lane, will be
held on Saturday, 20th June,
2009 at 1:00 p.m. Church of
God Cathedral, East Street &
7 Lily of the Valley Corner.
8 Officiating: Rev. Dr. Moses A.
Johnson, assisted by other —
Ministers of the Gospel. |
Interment: Southern Cemetery, Cowpen & Spikenard Roads. —

Memories of her will linger in the hearts of her: Children: |
Betty Coakley, Eugina Hunt, Carla Mcintosh-Nielsen and |
Valentina Evans; Three (3) Adopted Daughters: Emily, |
Sheba and Rita Stubbs; Six (6) Grandchildren: Michael
Cooper, Jonathon and Alvin Mackey, Princess and Prinesha
Miller and Teadrea Evans; Twelve (12) Sisters: Gloria
Strachan, Deaconess Ceeelia Moncur, Minister Ethel Sands,
Albertha Williams, Deaconess Geneva Mortimer, Claramae,
Violet, Daphne and Elder Christine Evans, Elizabeth Walker,
Merlene Miller and Geraldene Neely; Two (2) Brothers: |
Wenzel King and Sgt. 1619 Roland Evans; One (1) Son- |
in-law: Jess Nielsen; One (1) Aunt: Sylvia Williams; Three |
(3) Uncles: Dr. Joseph Evans, David Evans and Arthur |
Neilly; One (1) Cousin: Daron Higgs; and a host of other |
relatives and friends including: Maria Campbell and Family, |
Lisa Atherley Smith and Family, Fred Brennen Jr. and |
Family; Shaquan Higgs, Tanya Russell and Family, Ms.
Goodman and Family, Sharlene and Junior Wildgoose and
Family, Sybeline Davis and Family, Muggie and Family,
the Entire Malcolm Lane Family, Thompson Lane and Gibbs
Corner Communities, the entire Harbour Island Community
and the Management and Staff of The Break Waters.

FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR RESPECTS AT ROCK OF -
AGES FUNERAL CHAPEL ON WULFF ROAD & |
PINEDALE ON FRIDAY FROM 10 A4.M.TO 6PM AND |
ON SATURDAY AT THE CHURCH FROM 12 P.M. |

RUTH
KATRINA MILLER,
71

of Roland & Ridgeland
Streets, Ridgeland Park, will
be held on Saturday, 20th
June, 2009 at 10:00 a.m. at
Curry Memorial Methodist
Church Zion Boulevard, South
Beach. Officiating, Rev.
William Higgs, assisted by
other Ministers of the Gospel. Interment: Southern Cemetery,
Cowpen & Spikenard Roads

Her memories will be cherished by her mother: Hilda Taylor
Thurston; one (1) brother: Fred Miller;- two (2) sister's:
Shirley Greene and Angela Sawyer; two (2) aunts: Naomi
Runnion and Beatrice Taylor; two (2) nephews: Patrick and
Andrew Greene; four (4) nieces: Ilsa Evans, Deborah Greene,
Lisa McCartney and Lynelle Sawyer; four (4) grand-nieces
and grand-nephews; aunt-in-law: Mary Taylor; uncle-in-
law: Elbert Rolle; other’ farmly members and special fnends
including: Tracey and Ronnie Taylor, Valarie Sweeting,
Betty Sweeting, Tony & Gregory Sweeting, Melanie
Thompson, the Taylor Family of Fox Hill, Betty Lightbourne,
Shenique Smith, Gwendolyn Spence, Maxine Miller, John
Burns, Paul Adderley, Beth Carey, Patricia Johnson, the
Staff and Residents of Naomi Christie Home for the Aged,
Rev. Charles Sweeting and the members of Curry Memorial
Methodist Church.

FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR RESPECTS AT ROCK OF
AGES FUNERAL CHAPEL ON WULFF ROAD &
PINEDALE ON FRIDAY FROM 10 A.M. TO 6 P.M. AND
ON SATURDAY AT THE CHURCH FROM 9:00 A.M.
UNTIL SERVICE TIME.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

BABY BOY
EMMANUEL JOSHUA
McHARDY, 27 days

will be held on Friday, June
19th, 2009 at Woodlawn
Memorial Gardens, Soldier
Road. Pastor Kirkwood
Murphy will officiate.

He is survived by his Mother:

Elizabeth McHardy; Father:

Raji Dean; Grandparents: Leo
and Charmaine McHardy and Thelma Bean;
Greatgrandparents: Brenda Taylor and Richard and Thelma
McHardy; Uncles: Nathaniel, Nathan, Nigel, Brian, Erza,
Richard and Barry McHardy, Robert, Kendrick, Douglas,
Hilton, Solomon, Wilfred and Randy Taylor, Roland Sands,
Alrick Dussie, Anthony (Fat Back) Marshall, Timmy and
Chad Thpmpson, Jonathon Bethel, Adam Darville, Thomas
Kemp, Charles Johnson, Richard Cartwright, Jeffrey King,
Rev. Harold Bodie, Henry Johnson, David Jones, Kingsley
Rahming, James Minnis, Bishop Ruben Deleveaux, Robert,
William Cartwright, Terrance, Travis and Travaghn Bowe;
Aunts: Charmaine, Ann, Carolyn, Ovina, Charity and Amala
McHardy, Renee Cartwright, Eleanor Perigord, Leotha
Sands, Carolyn Dussie, Patrice Johnson, Christine, Edrika,
Lidia, Vira and Enid Taylor, Granelda Bodie, Sandra Johnson,
Margaret Jones, Leona Minnis, Janet King, Violet Williams,
Dorothy King, Dianna Thompson, Elizabeth Deleveaux,
Mary Simmons, Candy Kemp, Althea Bowe, Emma and
Birdie Cartwright and Wendy Bowe; numerous cousins and
other relatives and Godparents including: Bishop Kirkwood
and Kelly Murphy, Gia Smith, Emestine Hepburn, Merrilen
Hepburn, Lennis and Ginger Rahming, Viola Serrette, Dina,
Shornelle Nesbitt, Perrise Simon, Rickeya Moss, Savan
Barr, Ginger Rolle, Leona Young, Tiffany Pickstock, Wonda
Ellis, Jessica Bailey, Jenny, Loretta Evans, Charcea Pritchard,
Armethe Sands, Rick and Judy Thompson, the McKenzie
Family, the Holder Family, the Grant Family, the Garnet
Family, the Brown Family, the McPhee Family, the Lyford
Cay Club, Handel Sands, Drucella Davis, the Temple
Fellowship Family, Donnalee and Bernadette Evans, the
Minnis Family, the Campbell Family, the Carol Family,
Charnelle Marshall and the entire Faith Gardens Community.

There will be no public viewing.



THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 11

Sweeting’s Colonial
dortuary And Crematorium

84 Blue Hill Road - P.O. Box N-8161 - Tel: 325-7867
= Fax: 325-TS6T

MR. ELSWORTH
REGINALD
MAJOR, 61

a resident of Thompson Lane off

East Street, will be held at St. James

Native Baptist Church, St. James

Road on Saturday 20th June, 2009

at 10:00 a.m, Officiating will be

Rev. Dr. Michael C. Symonette,

Rev. Dr. Hilda Symonctte, Rev.

Daniel Beneby, Rev. William
Hepburn and Rev. Charles Rolle and Interment will follow at
Western Cemetery, Nassau Street.

Left to cherish his memories are his Four Sisters: Jacqueline
Alleyne, Patricia Major, Antoinette and Joanne Poitier; Brother:
Sidney Peter Poitier, Aunt: Maxine Brown; Godmother: Roselind
Thompson; Nephews: Trevor and Sheldon Alleyne, Sean, Inza,
Joseph and Theodora Major, Adrian and Gayl LaRoda, Ricardo
and Cynthia Adderley, Raj Major, Marvin Babbs, Antoine
McQuay, Delvin Sherman and Carlos Poitier; Nieces: Lisa
Tucker, Patrice Thompson, Xavier Archer, Denise Rolle, Nicola
(Nickie), Selina McQuay, Remona and Charles Edgecombe and
Deldra Munroe and A host of other Relatives and Friends
Including: Rev. Dr. Jeffrey and Cynthia Ingraham of Connecticut,
Vineent and Dawn Clarke of Freeport, Rev. Charles and Pauline
Rolle, Carlos Austin, LaVon and Rashaad Harris-Smith, Tatanisha
Capron, Hasani Clarke, Chavar and Chavoya Rolle, Austin and
Janice Knowles, Claudia and Lenore Rolle, Jill Saunders, Iris
Joseph, Paulamae Miller, Yvonne Mortimer, Annie Gibson,
Shirley Ellis, Beverley Burns, Stephen Adderley, Stephanie
Armbrister, Leslie, Gerald, Terrance and Leon Strachan, Deborah
Taylor, Millicent Deane, Sandra and Patsy Knowles, Mr. Walter
and Mrs. Susan Palmer (devoted Landlady), staff of Susie's
Beauty Salon, Bahamasair, the Royal Bank of Canada Palmdale
Branch, the Chairman and Staff at Security Services (Bahamas)
Limited, Mr. Harry Simmons and Members of the Bahamas
Public Officers Choir, Rev. Drs. Michael and Hilda Symonette
and the entire Membership of St. James Native Baptist Church,
Cedric Poitier, Kingsley Pickering, Myrtle and Ted Sweeting,
Neighbors of Thompson Lane, Griffith Moxey of the U.S.A.,
Sandra Sweeting, Brenda McFall, Mildred Adderley and
Neighbors of Yellow Elder Gardens and Families.

The body will repose at the Chapel of the Saints Sweeting's

Colonial Mortuary and Crematorium, #84 Blue Hill Rd. from
10:00 am on Friday until 6:00 pm and on Saturday from 9:00
am. at the Church until service time.


PAGE 12,

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Vaughn O. Jones
MEMORIAL CENTER

“Honoring the memories of loved ones”

INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

WILLIS "Unka Doad"
THOMPSON, 84

of Behring Point, Andros will be held

on Saturday June 20, 2009 at 11:00 a.m. Saturday,

at St. Bartholomew Anglican Church,

Behring Point, Andros. Officiating will
Fr. Donald Kerr, assisted by :
other Ministers of the Gospel. Interment :
will follow in the Public Cemetery, |

be Bley,

Behring Point, Andros.

Precious memories will forever linger }
in the hearts of his eight sons: Berthrum :
Thompson, Rev. Oswald Poitier, Dudley, Willis (Jr.), Timothy, Garnet, :

Audley and Noland Thompson; Five daughters: Mersada Anderson, :
Beryl Neymour, Sandra Mackey, Lavern Thompson, and Jessica King; :
One Brother: Nathaniel Wallace; One Adopted-sister: Daisy Nottage; :
Three brothers-in-law: Apostle Charles Wallace, Hazel Braynen, Ulnick |
Wallace; Four Sisters-in-law: Yvonne Russell, Janet Coakley, Adline |
Wallace, Marilyn Wallace; Three sons-in-law: Elan Anderson, Elvis |
Neymour, Terry King; Five daughters-in-law: Rosena Thompson, !
Sebrena Poitier, Nicoya, Elsene, Norma Thompson; Twenty-five |

- y ee ! in the hearts of his Wife: Dolly Fermander; Mother: Ethel Fernander;
grandsons: Berthrum Jr., Jacob, Mitchell, Oswald Jr., sammie Start, ; Five Stepchildren: Ryan Andrews, Daymar Leadon, Fredricka Minns,
Clement, Norman, Terrell, Wellington, Michael, Jazz, GametJr, Haaquis, : Vjjiska Minns & Ann Knowles; Step grandson: Lorenzo Grant; Sister:
Elvis Jr, lan, Rico, Tito, Elroy, Nolan Il, Akeem, Valentino, Jestin, | joria Rernander: Brother: George Fernander; Twelve Nieces: Christine
Elliott, Nolan Jr., Shando, Christopher, Twenty-three granddaughters: | @jeare, Margo Sturrup, Shevaun Stubbs, Brenda Nottage, Anita Femander

Tiffany, Lisa, Ashley, Tina, Elshadi, Brooke, Anthae, April, Dorothy,

WPCpl. Desree Cartwright, Margo, Shantell, Tiska a.k.a. "Black | Gardiner, Bernadette Fernander, Lynette Brown; Thirteen Nephews:
+ Cardinal, Michael and Conrad Fernander, Keith Burrows, Kevin, Trevor
: and Sheldon Fernander, Dion and Jeffrey Stubbs, Shawn

> : | Tyrone Bonaby, Perry Fernander and Marvin Thompson; Two Uncles:
Leona, Barbara, Laura, Laverne Bowe, Viola, Marion, Margaret, Sandra- i Emperor and Earnest McKenzie: Ten Sisters-in-law: Virginia Miller,
Mae, Netlene King; Nine-teen nephews: Theophilus, Kirk, Jerald, Pastor } Sandra Saunders, Prescola Thompson, Sophia Deveaux, Nicole Deveaux,
| Walburger Collie, Mable Femander & Harricth Fernander; Ten Brothers-

James "Killer" Coakley, Glister Wallace, Tarby, Samuel Bookie Johnson, : jn jaw: Ronald Deveaux, Kendall Deveaux, Steven Collie, Gary Deveaux,

Michael Johnson, Elijah, Evangelist Lency Coakley, Harold Bain, } grian Deveaux, Perry Deveaux, Marlon Thompson, Rev. Reginald
' Saunders, Irvin Stubbs & Hubert Rolle: and a host of other relatives

' and friends.
Mery] Rolle, Father Donald Kerr, Bishop Ellis Farrington, Rev. Harold :

Mackey, William Braynen, Charles Smith, Rev. Raymond Mackey, : yjeyinoe will be held in the "Legacy Suite" of Vaughn O. Jones
Armold Coakley, Althea Bell, Mispah Braynen, Prescola Sawyer, the : \gemorial Center, Wulff Road and Primrose Street on Friday from
Seymour family, the Bain Family, the Neymour Family, the Smith ;

Chinese,” Shantell, Toya, Wendy, Melissa, Sanches, Keioshi, Thyronique,
Lady Shema, Samantha, Selah; Thirty-three great-grandchildren:
Fourteen nieces: Patricia Coakley, Petrona, Charmene, Machelle, Perlene,

Darren Coakley, Jamaine, Shadika, Gregory, Covin, Kerone, Elkin,
Kenneth Bain; Numerous other relatives and friends including: Rosalie

Sweeting, Maxwell Braynen, Peter Mackey, Adrian Gloria Johnson,

family, the Anglican Church family in Calabash Bay, Fresh Creek,

' Behring Point and neighboring areas.

: Viewing will be held in the "Legacy Suite" of Vaughn O. Jones
' Memorial Center, Wulff Road . and Primrose Street on Thursday from

12:00 noon to 5:00 p.m. and at St. Bartholomew Anglican Church,
Behring Point, Andros on Friday from 2:00 p.m, to service time on

ALFRED
ADOLPHUS "Adell"
FERNANDER, 37

@ of Peach Street and formerly of South

4 Andros will be held on Saturday June
20, 2009 at 2:00 p.m. at Metropolitan

26 Baptist Church, Blue Hill Road.
Se. Officiating will be Rev. Dr. George Kelly,
= assisted by other Ministers of the Gospel.
Interment will follow in Southern
Cemetery, Cowpen & Spikenard Roads.

Precious memories will forever linger

Ruth Fernander, Gwendolyn Moss, Elva Bethel, Catherine Pinder, Ann

Seymour,

10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and again on Saturday from 9-00 a.m. to 12-00

‘ noon and at the church on Saturday from 1:00 p.m. to service time.

Wulff Road and Primrose meet
site Studio of Dra

Telephone: 326-9800

e 24 Hour Emergency 434-9220/ 380-8077


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Commontoealth Suneral Home

Independence Drive * Phone: 341-4055 y

Ue ee

Retired
Mechanic
Fireman
KENNETH
HARRY
KNOWLES, 61

of Summer Haven Estates,
died at the Princess Margaret Hospital on
Thursday, June 11, 2009.

WORNA MARIA
WILLIAMSON
BROWN, 66

of Hampster Road and

formerly of Anderson Hill,

Acklins, died at the

Princess Margaret Hospital
on Sunday, June 14, 2009.

EMMERLINE
ELIZABETH
GREEN, 44

died at her residence in
Dundas Town, Abaco on
Thursday, June 11th, 2009,

Funeral arrangements will be announced later.

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009, PAGE 13

EAST SUN qg RISE MORTUARY
=—Y SS

“A New Commitment To Service’

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

MINISTER
MARILYN A. COLLIE,
7

of Kenilworth Avenue, South
Beach Estates and formerly of
Duncan Town, Ragged Island will
be held on Saturday at 10 a.m. at
the Church of God of Prophecy,
East Street, Tabernacle.
Officiating will be Bishop
Elgarnet B. Rahming, National
Overseer, assisted by Bishop Franklin M. Ferguson, Bishop
Woodley C. Thompson and Minister Kendal C. Simmons,
Interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

She is survived by her daughters: Sharon Deveaux, Dorothea
and Antoinette Collie, Patricia Pratt, Juliet Collie-Daxon,
Monica, Claudine and Kim Collie, Anne Grant, Cynthia Wilson,
Agatha Thompson and Enid Arthur; her sons: Donnithorne
and Dorlan Collie, Livingston Deveaux, Kenneth Pratt, Trevor
Daxon, Rev. Anthony Grant, Sen. David Thompson, Charles
Wilson and Minister Carlson Anthur; grandchildren: Donzel
and Jared Deveaux, Donnithorne Jr., and Dominic Collie;
Jamaal, Jillian and Jermain Pratt, Christopher Rolle, Dorlan
Jr., D’riaen, Daniel, Delaena and Areion Collie, Odetta, Cherisse
and Anthony Grant Jn, N°Kem, N°Kia and NKira Wilson,
Troy, Vashan and Destiny Thompson, Carlisa, Carnid and
Angela Arthur; brothers: Arch Deacon E. Etienne E. Bowleg
and Cathechist Anthony Hepburn of West

End, G.B., sisters: Cathechist Earlene Thompson of Wemmy's
Bight, Eleuthera; Cheryl Bowleg and Stella Hepburn; | aunt:
Gweneth Lockhart; 25 nieces, 41 ne ephews and a host of other
relatives and friends.

Friends may pay their last respects at East Sunrise Mortuary,
#27 Rosetta Street, Palmdale from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday
and from 8:30 a.m. at the Tabermacle on Saturday until service
time.

EAST SUNRISE MORTUARY.

“A New Commitment To Service”

#27 Rosetta Street, aii Box C.B. 12248 / Palmdale,
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) ret ort my Ty ere lige 356-2957
hrs. Emergency Servic
Cell #: 357- rae Beeper: 380-1450 se 380-1117


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

fel, IDs Jet) Hie be Poi ste
a var Lal 4 [Pow bE Des

HARRIET ROLLE,
S4

ofthe Blutt, South Andros. Services
will be held on Saturday, June 20,
2009 at Loiclock pm at the Church
of God Auditorium, Joe Farrington
Road. Officiating will be Pastor
Clement Neely; he will be assisted
by other ministers of the Gospel.
Interment will follow in Woodlawn
Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Road.
Services have been entrusted to
Giateway Memorial Funeral Chapel.

Left to cherish her fond memories are her: Four Sons: Ivan, Clyde,
Alexander and Alton Rolle; Eight Daughters: Arabella, Maxine,
Ezerene, Magnola, Mable and Bery! Rolle, Eloise Watkins and
Lucine Darcy; Three Sisters: Viola Sands, Prudence Johnson, Lula
Bain; Three Brothers: Whitfield, George and Nathaniel McKinney;
Two Daughters-in-law: Neenah and Barbara Rolle; One Son-in-law:
Aubert Darey; Four Sisters-in-law: Pearinieva and Eureka McKinney,
Florence Rolle and Miriam Greene; Sixty-one Grand Children:
Delgzardo, Chakera, Chapelle, Krishna, Carl, Tikita, Twana, Nadia,
Alton Ir, Valerie, Vernice, Kendra, Suezette, Daphne, Princess,
Shanell Phillips, Gaylene, Godfrey, Samuel, Micheala, Lacora,
Lakeisha, Shantell, Bradley, Kelvin, Jeff, Rodrick, Torrie, Kevin,
Keith, Bodeisha, Kenneth, Ricardo, Shena, Lorenzo, Dezerene,
Vanessa, Hartley, Lorpond, Comelle, Karen, Kim, Kendyke and
Yolette Brown, Lavana, Francisca and Bradley Miller Jr, Dray, Pam,
Steven, Florine, Cassidy, Darius, Erin, Michelle, Lance, Paulette,
Lloyd and Sherine Kerr, Two Grands-in-law: Lindamae Rolle,
Anthony Phillip, Corey Brown. Eighty-seven Great-grand children,
One Great-great-grand child, Numerous Nieces including: Gladys
Saunders, Alice Edwards, Betty Hanna, Sherel Bain, Eulease Spencer,
Samethria, Barbara, Maurine Edwards, Maiselyn Demeritte, Carol,
Hazel, Brenda, Margery, Eureka, Birdiemae Storr, Elvita Gibson,
Olga and Prudence Johnson; Numerous Nephews including: Phillip
and Harry Johnson, Frank Andrews, Andrew, Peter, One Hundred
Sixty-nine Grand Nieces, One Hundred Twenty-seven Grand
Nephews and other family and friends too numerous to mention.
They include the Bluff and High Rock, South Andros community,

the Fort Fincastle community, Joyce and Otmell Lewis, Carolyn and
Marva Rolle and Family, the Greene Family, the Smith F ‘amily, Dr.

Clement M Neely and Family, Maria Johnson and the Adderley
Family, Anna Neely Forbes and Family, Cecil Smith and Family,
Ruby Green and Family, Jeenie Neely and Family, Rev. Theopholus
Neely and Family, Rev, Elisha Ferguson and Family and Rev, Fefield
Smith and Family.

Friends may pay their last respects at Gateway Memorial Funeral
Chapel, Mount Royal Avenue and Kenmore Street, on Friday from
10 am to 6 pm, on Saturday at the funeral home from 9 am to 11
am, and at the auditorium from 11:30 am to service time.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

RUSSELL & PINDER’S
FUNERAL HOME

Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama
Telephone: (242) 348-2340/348-2131/352-9398/353-7250
P.O). Box F-40557 - Freeport, Grand Bahamas

Funeral Service for the late

MICHAEL
“RHINO”
WILLIAMS, 39

of Fowler Street, Nassau and

formerly of Jones Town, Eight

Mile Rock will be held on

Saturday, June 20, 2009 at 2:00

F— p.m. at St. Stephen’s Anglice

Church, Eight Mile Rock.

Officiating will be Rev'd Father

Rudolph V. Cooper. Interment will follow in the Harbour
West Cemetery.

He is survived by his mother: Hilda Williams; one son:
Derren; four brothers: Patrick Williams, Allan King, Larry
King and Glen Major; one uncle: Lewis Major; two aunts:
Glandina Pratt and Jane Smith of Burnt Ground, Long
Island; then nieces: Ancka, Shameka, Khia, Tatiana King,
Pakell Williams, Cecely Major, Latrice Pinder, Latricia,
Lauren and Latrell King; five nephews: Patrick Williams
Jr., Lamardo, Kristoff, Christoph and Cameron King;
sisters-in-law: Lorraine King; numerous other relatives
and friends including: Earlin Williams, Set. Betram
Williams of Nassau, Paulette Rolle and family, Judith and
Charles Major and the Major family of Nassau, Gladstone
Major, Harris, Jocl, Whitfield and Audley Pratt, Wilton
and Set, Andy Smith, Andrew and Rosetta Carey of Fowler
Street, Delores Ingraham and family, Nurse Audrey
Williams and family and the King family of Marathon
Estates, Calvin Meely and family, Basil Neymour and
family, Gus “Big Ju" and family, George Fisher of S and
G Scrap Metal, Leron “Giggy” Mortimer, Shirley Strachan
and family, Elvis Major and family, George Adderley and
family, The Garland family of Pine Forest, Shelia and
Emily Pratt, Hubert Williams and family, Henry Dean,
Roland Lamour, Campbell Trucking family, Henry and
Linda Romer and family, Vilda Richardson and family
and a host of other relatives and friends,

Friends may pay their last respects at Russell’s & Pinder's
Funeral Home on Friday, June 19, 2009 from 1:00 p.m.
to 7:00 p.m. and on Saturday, June 20 from 1:00 p.m. until
service time at the church.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009,

| , ,
DAemeritie’s Funeral
BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET * PO. BOX GT-2097 * TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

CASTOL CLIFTON
McKENZIE, 64

a resident of #6 Beldock Ave., Bel ;

Air Estates & formerly of Barraterre,
Exuma, who died on 13th June,
2009, will be held at First Baptist
Church, Market Street & Coconut
Grove Ave... on Saturday at 2:00 p.m.

Officiating will be Rev, Earle }
Francis, assisted by Rev. Diana ;
Francis & Rev. Sullavin McKenzie. :
Interment follows in Woodlawn ;

Gardens, Soldier Road,

A TIME TO MOURN

Left to cherish his memories is his wife Vernie McKenzie, three sons, : | eft to cherish her fond memories are her daughter, Jacinta; her sons,
i Dwayne, Nelson Je. and Micah: her grandchildren, Alexandraia Adderley,
Anthon; onc daughter, Crystal McKenzie; three daughter-in-law, Tina i Pyarig Si aie aie ;

peak ; ee ‘aia eee : 7 i Dario Munroe and Antonia Johnson; six sisters, Agnes Farrington,
and Vernika Mckenzie, and Marcia Anthon: two sisters, Loletha Thurston ; e é

and Idella Laing: two brothers, Benjamin and Anthony MeKengie; six i

Pastor's Shawn and Rev Sullavin McKenzie, and Charles Eugene

brothers-in-law, Phillip Laing, Tyrone Thurston, Lindop of New York,
Sydney, Amold & Gladstone "Moon" McPhee of Freeport: six Sisters-
ia-law, Maralyn Gardiner, Vernita Mitchell, Gloria Gardiner, Lynda
Marshall, Juanita Armbrister and Susan Demeritte: five grandchildren,
Rashed, Shawnique & Shawn McKenzic, Mariska & Antonise, Anthon;

nieces, Pamela Nixon, Camille "Kim" Pratt, Shemeka Forbes, Tyranique, ;
Tylitha, & Tylesha Thurston, Natalie McKenzie, Sophia Moss, Tania | Solomon, Mildred Maurice, Valderine Cargill, Mildred McKenzie, Etlyh
Bethel-White, Monalisa Thompson, Denise Marshall and Dawn ; Kemp, Inez Gibson, Valderine Altidor and family, Deaconess Amanda
Demeritte; nephews. Brain McKenzie, Jerremy Laing, John Nixon, } Colebrooke and family, Gloria McKenzie and family, Deloris Chipman-
Danny Pratt, Robert Forbes and Sandy McPhee; one aunt, Pearline i Pgyis, Shirley Smith and family, Remelda and family, Tammy Hepbum
McKenzie, cousins; Eukel, Dorothy, Ruthmae, Beryl, Caroline, Eleanor, ¢ and family, Fredricka Brown and family, Pastor Dorinda Dean and
Maggic, Linda, Brenda, Majoric, Bessic, Jennifer, Patrice, Eunal, Rose, family, Rev. Eugene and Evangelist Sandra Patton and family, Keith
McNeil, Agatha, Emma, Marina, Ismae, Wena, Elder John, Dr. P, Preston, : and Debbie Toote and family, Nixon family, John Dean, Thelma Deveaux
Grace, Ikic, Wakley, Val, Rollin, Prince, Andrew, Dotlin, Rev, Alfred ? and family, Allen, Stephanie, Rudie and Jeffrey; numerous relatives
Ferguson, Elsada, Vivan, Thelma and Mackey Rolle, Venice, Joycelyn. | and friends including, Patricia Smith, Nelson Johnson, Rebecca Nesbitt

Madelyn, Vernika, Ethyl, Irene, Maryanne and Phillip Sands, Nellie

Mae Walkes, Edpa, Estella, Lillian, Brightly, Lavaughn, Leslie, Freeman, }

Rudolph, Randolph, John (Olie), Marvin, Harris, Allison; other relatives
and friends, Jacquelyn Romer & family, Maggie Williams & family,
Linda Gomez, Gloria Lightboume, Brenda Martin & family, Beverly
& Edward Deveaux, Sheila Butterfield & family, Anita Bartlett, Patsy

Pinder, Gaitor family, John Woodside & family, Quebel Rolle & family, }
Donald Demeritte, Albert Armbnster, Herbert Marshall, Janet Davis, :
Henry Smith & family, Luther Johnson and family, Shirleymae Small, j Baptist Cathedral family, The Girls Brigade of St. Mark's, the staff of
Latoya Turnbul Ethel & Daisy McPhee, Richie family, Pratt family, ¢ the Princess Margaret Hospital, Oncology, Hematology, Blood Bank,
Francis family, Bahamas Customs Department, Indulgence Shoe & Bag i Female Medical I and IL, the Bastian family, Gaynell and family, Love
Boutique, Male Medical I & Oncology Dept of the Princess Margaret : 14311 Andros family, The Bain, Grants Town, Step Street and Grant Street

Hospital, McKenzie family, Burrows family and the entire Barraterre i families and many more too numerous to mention,

Community, Rev Earle Francis and family, First Baptist family, Sunrise i

Ministries.

Fnends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market i
Street, on Friday from 10-6:00 p.m. & on Saturday from 9-12:00 noon }

: & at the church from | 700 p.m. until service time.

SIS. ANGELA
DELORES
ROLLE-JOHNSON, 58

a resident of Step Street, Fox Hill,
who died on 31 May, 2009, will be
held at St. Mark's Native Baptist
Church, Romer Street, Fox Hill, on
Saturday at 11 :00 a.m. Officiating
will be Rev. Dr. Carrington 3. Pinder,
assisted by other Ministers. Internment
follow in St. Mark's Church
Cemetery.

Josephine Kraus, Margaret Simplice, Patrice Brown, Debra Alexander
of New York, and Kayla Cooper; two aunts, Coreen Lockhart of New
York and Myrtis Chipman of North Carolina; mother-in-law,
MeivinaJohnson: brothers-in-law, Ron Pinder and Yves Simplice; sister-
in-law, Caroline Davis; eleven nieces, Quetell, Bruann, Monalisa, Kevia,
Keisha, Kevia, Kelly, Demia, Shauna, Shriqueca and Rhonda: eight
nephews, Timothy, Sean, Romeo, Jason, Emmanuel, Myles, Ricardo
and Michael; cousins, Marion Kee, Linda Dean, Victoria Pearce, Hattie

and family, Patricia Gibson and family, Gwendolyn and family, The
Hinsey, McKenzie, Thompson, Dean, Cargill, Rolle families, Sarah
Dames and family, The Gibson and Smith families, Charlene Miller
and family, Patrice Brown and family, Sharon Norville and family, Rev.
Dr, Carrington and Rev, Sabrina Pinder and family, Mother Catherine
Pratt, Rev, Dr, Michael Symonette and Rev, Dr. Hilda Symonette and
family, The St. Mark's Church family, The St. Mark's Sanctuary Choir,
The St. John’s Native Baptist Society Choir, The St. John's Native

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Puneral Home, Market
i Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the church from

10:00 a.m, until service time,



PAGE 15
PAGE 16,

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Aemeritte’s Funeral
MARKET STREET « PO. BOX GT-2097 « TEL: 323-5782

me ata) A el ela



ELDIN ALEXANDER
FERGUSON, JR. 57

aresident of West Bay Street, Cable |
Beach, who died on 9 June, 2009, will |
be held at St. Matthew's Anglican !
Church, Shirley Street, on Saturday |
at 10:00 a.m. Officiating will be ;
Moss, |

Archdeacon 1 Ranfurly Brown, Rev'd :

Dr. James Moultne & The Revd br;
+ Dwitght M. Bowe. Interment follows }

in St. Margaret's Cemetery, Shirley

Archdeacon Cornell J.

— f Strect.

Sy ~~

Lett to cherish his memory are his devoted wife of 27 years, Sharon |
Ferguson; two sons, Eldin Ferguson, UI] and Enin Ferguson: two daughters, |

Alicia Ward and Eldri Ferguson; two grandchildren, Rinicia Rolle and
Keanna Ward: one sister, Arabella Cambridge; ten brothers-in-law, Derek

Cambridge, Sr. Audrick Smith, Leslie Smith, Andrew Smith, Donald |
Smith, Dexter Smith, Richard Demeritte, Willard Hanna, Alvin Hodges |
and Nigel Ingraham: six sisters-in-law, Latisha Smith; Lorraine Smith, |
Angela Hanna, Ruth Demeritte, Laverne Hodges and Ann Ingraham nieces, }
Derica Cambridge, Tillesia, Kim, Audrey, and Ruth Smith, Sophia Palahicky, :
Elsie Gray, Anna Knowles, Esther "Princess" Mayet, Peggy-Ann Demeritte,
Tamika “Penny” Bain, Tanya Hall, Petra Hanna-Weekes, Indira Francis, }
‘Tina Rove, Shonalee Gamble, Alicia Hodges, Tshesha Ingraham, ‘Tara ;
Taylor, Angelique Smith, Denika Smith, Tanya Hanna, Lakiska Russell |
and Demi Smith; nephews, Keino and Derek Cambridge, Jr., Hildre, Reggie, }
Murphy, Aric, Ashton, Salvatore, Wilfred, Mark Evans, John, Whylly, |
Dion, Donnie, Doreoni and Domenio Smith, Nigel Ingraham, Valentina |
Hanna, Esmond Weekes, Damion Francis, Torrence Gamble, Howard |

Roye, Jessie Bain and Frank Hall: and others; adopted children, Andrew

Anderson, Frederick Johnson [1], D’angelo Forbes, Le Var Boyd, Tavaran | |
Ferguson, Quincy Harp, Chad Davis, Kyle Spence, Keron Blair, Andrea |
Burton, William Roberts and Tylon Axson, other relatives, Fnincis Family: }
Rev. Earle Francis, Carvel Francis, Kenncth Francis, Basil Francis, Dorrie :
Francis, Hiram Francis, Wendal Francis, Peggy Francis, Nehemiah Francis, ;
Rev. Beryl Francis Culmer, Mabelle Sands, Rev. Henry Francis, Percy :
‘Vola’ Francis, Monique, Donnie and Charles Clarke, Willie Francis, Prince |
Francis, Louise Francis, Virginia Francis, Naomi Seymour, Roscoe Francis, }
Stephen and Linda Francis, Kenrah Francis, Patricia Francis, Debbie |
Francis, Joyanne Fritz, Fayne Thompson; Ferguson and Knowles family, |
Willie and Michael Moss, Hubert and Kelly Russell, Lucille Ferguson, |
Barbara Ferguson, Anthony Ferguson, Florence Ferguson, Marsha Ferguson, |
Edwin, Rhunette, Edwin Jr, and DO’ Brnickashaw Ferguson, Garth Ferguson, |

Margo Ferguson-Adderley, Raleigh Ferguson, Bianca Ferguson, Clement,

Delano, Deloris Ferguson, Pam and Solomon Cox, Raymond Ferguson, |
Dorcus and Ken Ferguson, Debbie Strachan, Franklyn (Pancho) Rahming, |
Ervin Knowles, Agnes and Phil Cooper, Richard Munnings, Rita Miller, :
Harold Knowles, Jr. Minera and Harold Munnings, The Rahming family ;
and Collie family; Mary Ferguson, Thomas Jr, Solomon, Migel and Alron }
Ferguson, Rhunette” Adelaide Pinder, Rudy LeVarity, Prescola Lockhart, :
Iris Miller, Mabelle Le Vanity: friends, Donnie Armbrister, Sherwin and }
Stephanie Armstrong, Robert Johnson, Kelly and Hubert Russell, Charles :
Malpress, Patrice McDonald, Archdeacon Comell and Carol Moss, Michael :
Edwards, Carlson Shurland, Jackson Burnside, Sir Arlington and Lady |
Shiela Butler, Clyde and Margaret Ferguson, Demarion Almanzar, Jerome |

Sawyer, Altovise Munnings, Calliope Smith, Shelly Ingraham, Hon. Perry,
Bernadette, Alex, Stephan, and Adam Christie, Nathalie, Rosalie, Ethlyn,
Patty and Keith Harvey, Jan and Keith Mullings, Terah Rahming, Eva
Reeves, Beverly Chin, Cynthia Donaldson, Gaye Knowles, Elcott Coleby,
Faye Lockhart-Smith, Lorenzo and Ann Taylor, Eulis Strachan, Eulita and
Robert Strachan, Preben Olsen, Harlington and Helen Hanna, Paula Hanna-
Miller and Trixie Hanna, Dr, Phillip Thompson, Kendall "Funky" Demeritte,
Monty Pratt, Frank Claude, Ernest Burrows, Lawerence Rolle. Ronnie
Butler, Eva Schafiner, Al, Kathy, Adam, Robert and Alana Dillette, “ncdra,
Michaella, Flora, Karen, and Courtney Strachan, Steve McKinney, Paul
Moss, Peter Ramsay. Vanlock Fowler, Raymond Harrison, Helen Mitchell,
Betty and Joe Stuart, Margaret Lockhart, Hyacinthia Becton, Canon
Howarth and Dianna Lewis, Philip Galanis, Betty Knowles, Allison Smith,
Canon Harry and Ann Bain, Dr. Bridgette Hampton, Dr. Carnille
Fatquharson, Colleen Nottage, Julian and Anthony Weech, Brenda Russell,
Carolyn Aonbrister, Church of Ascension Family (Freeport), The CocoNuts
Family, The Gems Family, 4NS Family, Orthland Bodie Jr, Pleasant
Bridgewater, Michael Foster, The PLP, Freeport, Fox Hill, Kemp Road
& Ft. Fincastle Families; Many other friends and relatives too numerous
to mention,

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte’s Funeral Home, Market
Street, from 10-6:00pm on Friday & on Saturday at the church from
O:00a.m. until service time.

ESLEME ALES CINE
(SINEUS), 69

aresident of Palmetto Point, Eleuthera
& formerly of La Croix, St. Joseph,
Haiti, who died on 13 June, 7004, will
be held at Church of the Nazarene,
Palmetto Point, Eleuthera on Saturday
at 10:00 a.m. Officiating will be Rev.
Godfrey Bethel & Pastor Lucner Noel.
Interment follows in Palmetto Point
Public Cemetery.

Left to cherish his memories are his

wife, Arnette; daughters, Enid
Belflaurre & Fennun Milam; sons, Wallace, Elline & Leslie Sineus:
daughters-in-law, Maria & Thelia (Nicky) Sineus & Eugenie Woodside;
sons-in-law, Belina Belfleurre & Philip Milam; grandchildren, Anna
Marrius, Maria Jean, Nikera, Benaldo & Shalunda Belfleurre, Leslia &
Alyssa Sineus, Kevin & Luvins Milom, Brady Sineus, Omar, Lannar,
Wallace Jr. & Britney Sineus, Acasia Anderson & Tristan: special friends
and other relatives including, Omila, Ada & Samuel, Malila Johnson, Mr.
& Mrs. Daniel Ferguson, Mr. & Mrs. Eustace Punch, Nicola Sands, Suzanne
Nelus, Colby & family, the Nazarene Church family, The Bible Truth Hall
family, Full Gospel House Temple, The entire Palmetto Point community,
the staff at the Governor's Harbour Clinic and many others too numerous
to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects al Demeritte's Funeral Home, Rock
Sound, Eleuthera on Friday from 3-3:00 p.m. & at the church in Palmetto
Point from 7:00 p.m, until service time on Saturday.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009,

Dremeritte’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS' OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET « P.O. BOX GT-2097 * TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

MR. ARTHUR
MICHAEL WOOD,
52

a resident of Fowler Sureet, who died }

on? June, 2008, will be held at Our
Lady of the Holy Souls Catholic

Church, Deveaux Street, on Saturday j
at 12:00 noon. Officiating will be Fr. :
Michael Kelly, ss.cc., assisted by }
Rev, Deacon Peter Rahming & }
Deacon Maxwell Johnson, Interment i
follows in Catholic Cemetery, Tyler }

Street.

Arthur's life will forever linger in the hearts of his, Wife, Georgina

Wood; sons, Michael Wood, Arthur Wood Jr. and Aaron Wood; daughters, ;
Arthura Woodside, Nyoshi Curry and Quadelia Carey Taylor; soms-in- :
law, Deancy Woodside, D'vano Curry and Cardwell Taylor; grandchildren,
Deancy, D'neisha, Cadre, Deante and Austin; father, Hartman Arnold ;
Wood: mother, elma Wood: brothers, Amold Edmund Wood, Stephen j

Wood, Bradley J. Wood, Dario Wood and Rodrick Wood; sisters, Esther
Isabell Wood, Frances Collie, Avis Munroe and Verna Wood: uncles,

Harry Seymour, Hubert Hepburn, Gregory Wood, Rufus Johnson, |

Mervin Brown, Joseph M. Woodside Sr., James Wood, James Adderley,

Rosemary Johnson, Theresa Poitier, Betty Woodside, Monica Woodside,
Era Thurston, Ruth Adderley, Eva Wood, Evelyn Wood, Julictte Hanna, ;
Barbara Musgrove, Emily Walkes and Shirleymae Russell; nephews, ;

Don Lightbourn, Kenlee Wilson, Ryan Wood, Jason Wood, Bernard
Collie Jr, Bradley J. Wood Ir, Malcolm Rahming, Matthew Rahming,
Davano, Jeremy, Shawn Jr., Trayton, Rashad; nieces, Kelsie Collie,
Melissa Major, Seline Munroc, Simone Munroc, Sophia Munroc,

Edgecombe and Family, Margaret Innis and family, Mr, & Mrs, Gerard
Elliott, Gwen King and Kenneth Seymour.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market
? Street, from 10-6:00 p,m, on Friday & on Saturday at the church from

11:00 a.m, until service time.

HILDRED
ALEXANDER
" Glen"
SMITH, 65

a resident of Soldier Road & formerly
of Long Bay Cay, Andros, who died
on 4 June, 2004, will be held at The
New Apostolic Church, Rupert Dean
Lane, Bain Town, on Saturday at
1:00 p.m. Officiating will be
Evangelist Wellington B. Wallace,
assisted by Rev. Willis Stubbs &
other Ministers. Interment follows
in Southern Cemetery, Cowpen & Spikenard Roads.

: ~?* i He is survived by his beloved wife of twenty-eight years, Princess Maria
Anthony Hanna, Andre Musgrove and Nathaniel Russell: aunts, Veronica { siith: one son. Dr. Richard Kelson IL four dauchters. Aneela Newhold
Seymour, Agnes Hepburn, Andra Wood, Betsheba Wood, Catherine | p.ricc. Heatield Natalie Aan Wilton and Shersl Kelle: cewenteen

Patricia Henfield, Natalie Ann Wilson and Sheryl Kelly: seventeen
grandchildren, Charlene and Chester Johnson, Shaniece Chan, Lakeisha
Knowles, Marvin and Calvin Henfield Jr, Erica Mackey, Warren Wilson,
Richard II, Riclesha and Gabrielle D’ Angel Kelson, Keithtell Culmer,
Lateisha Symonette, Deron and Dominic McKenzie and Brickell and
Brian Kelly; eighteen great-grandchildren, Kar Hing, Pik Ying and Kar

i Kei Chan, Calron, Laron, Shaquil, Leonaldo and Alisha, Maliha, Mya,

Lightbourn: grandnieces, Danielle Emma Wood; father-in-law, George i

Collie: brothers-in-law, Bernard Collie $r., Eugene Munroe, Rev, Shawn i Ernestine Kelson; four grandsons-in-law, Jimmy Chan, Vincent Knowles,

McKenzie, Rev. Sullivan McKenzie, Derek Woodburn, Jean Martial,
Min. John Saunders, Lexus Collic, Ralph Collie and Anthony Collie;
ssters-in-law, Sheryl Wood, Sheila Wood, Avon Wood, Stacy Woodbum,
Tracy Martial, Vernika McKenzie, Tina McKenzie and Ruby Saunders,

Fernander, Pam, Gertrude, Wilfred, Monique Kemp, Brenda Bowe, i

Charles Reid, Sherry, Enid Tynes, Charlene, Clint, Richie, Tinny, Lana,
Mr. & Mr. Beneby, Mr. & Mrs, Duncombe, Cleophas Adderley &

Bahamas National Youth Choir, Claudette "Cookie" Allen, Customers |
of Arthur Michael, Flora Gelsey, Rosena Dawson, Marieanne Johnson ;

& family, JennieMae Neeley & family, Hazel Sturrup & family, : prjends may pay their last respects : St fark
i ; So eee : : tsi : y pay their last respects at Demenitte’s Funeral Home, Market
Greensalde Family, Ellioa Family, Farm Road Community, Our Lady's 7 Street, from 10-6:00pm on Friday & on Saturday from 9-11-00 a.m. &
Church family, Church of The Resurrection family, Music Makers, i op the church from 12-00 noon until service time.

Saxons, Valleyboys, Roots, Redland Soldiers, Sting, Tribes, Runez i

: 1. i Desuria and D’Vonte Henfield, D'Ankea and D'Yontae, Shawn, Shawnette
Brashae Wood, Darriel Wood, Jawnette, Jenise, Johnelle, Davania, : and Seanciko and Bryanna; two nieces, Carolyn McKinney & family,
Lindesha, Shawnique, Rohnesha and Ebany; grandnephew. Nicholas i ang Pastor Martha Duvalier & family; three sons-in-law, Garnett

Newbold: Calvin Henfield Sr. and George Wilson: one daughter-in-law,

Deon Mackey and Aldon Culmer; one granddaughter-in-law, Desimona
Henfield; four brothers-in-law & six sisters-in-law, Roselda Sawyer:
Joseph & Patrice Whyms & family; Mildred Butler & family; Henry

ier vats ies inna neon cities feck: ad elas | & Judy Weymess & family; Raphael & Elrena Whyms & tamily, Andrew
Seen paral ainsi gee deaememabio., 7PT. : & Theresa Burrows & family and the family of the late Samuel Sr. &
John Johnson of Eleuthera, Wenzel Davis & family, Sabrina Francis, : carn ee eee ae ue ea ;
Gladys Beneby, Demetrius Kemp & family, Shirley Wood, Roker, Hunt, i ciart and the Stuart family, Rev, Roseynell Forbes & family of L
Tucker, Lance, Kendal Munroe, Dwight Knowles, Bishop Delton ; ee ee ee ee ee

Eva Weymes; numerous other relatives and fiends including, Christopher

Bay Cay, Andros, Joseph Hamilton, Leon Hall, Keith Moss, Charles
Greene, Marlon Hall, Keith Symonette, Trevor Johnson, Joseph Brown,
Charlene Scavella, Patrick Rolle, Philip Prerre, Danielle McKenzie, the
Wallace family, Charles McKenzie and the Environmental Health
Department.



PAGE 17
PAGE 18, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

HOWLAND C. BOTTOMLEY

Howland Croft Bottomley, age 80, a former fifty year resident of George
Town, Exuma, Bahamas and a resident of Easton, MD, for three years died
on Wednesday, June 10, 2009 after a long illness at Talbot Hospice House,
Easton, Maryland.

He was the long time Chairman of the Out Island Regatta Race Committee,
now the Family Island Regatta Committee in George Town, Exuma,
Bahamas.

Born on May 1, 1929 in Camden, New Jersey, he was the son of the late
Gordon Frederick Bottomley and Constance Sharpe Bottomley.

His earlier years were spent in Merchantville, New Jersey. After attending
the University of Virginia he served during the Korean War. Mr. Bottomley
served his country in the U.S. Navy from March 30, 1951 to March 28,
1955 and upon his honorable discharge was awarded the National Defense
Service Medal, Navy Occupation Service (Europe) Medal and the Good
Conduct Medal.

In 1956 he began cruising the Bahamas in his ketch Albatross before
building a home on Little Exuma. After eight years at “The Cut”, he moved
to George Town where he built and operated Regatta Point. Throughout
these years he served on the Regatta Race Committee becoming Chairman
in 1962 until retiring from that post in 1992. He served as Commodore
of the Out Island Squadron, the founding organization of the Regatta in
1996. He was elected to the Regatta Hall of Fame in October 1990 and was
later made Commodore Emeritus for his valuable services to the Regatta.
During his years as Chairman in close collaboration with the late R.H.
Bobby Symonette, he developed and implemented the racing rules and
requirements that govern sloop racing in the Bahamas.

Commodore Bottomley 1s survived by two daughters from the union of his
first marriage, Sharpe Beaton of Point Pleasant Beach, NJ, Louise Corish
of Sag Harbor, Long Island, NY and two children from his second union
of marriage, Howland Croft Bottomley, Jr. and Jane Abell of Oxford,
MD; six siblings James R. Bottomley, Kathleen Landskroener and her
husband Theodore, Nancy Dunphey and her husband Richard, Donald T.
Bottomley and his wife Lucy, William E. Bottomley and his wife Ellen;
five grandchildren Rachel Beaton, Olivia Corish, William Abell, Abigail
Corish and Miles Abell; numerous nieces, nephews and cousins.

A memorial service will be held at a later date in George Town, Exuma.

In lieu of flowers, memorial offerings may be made in Commodore
Bottomley’s memory to the Talbot Hospice Foundation, 586 Cynwood Dr.,
Easton, MD 21601.

Arrangements have been entrusted to Mid Shore Cremation Center,
Cambridge, MD. Letters of condolences may be sent to www.curran-
bromwell.com.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Kenneth George Allen

Affectionately called “Dread-Up”
Sunrise September 4, 1953 - Sunset May 17, 2009

Special thanks is extended to all those that played a special part in our father's
life and final tribute; Josepha Allen, Barbara and Freta Moss and Families, Freddie
and Michelle Evans and family, Eddie Evans, Patrick Brown, Ricky McDonald
and family, Bobby Lightbourne and Family, Obead Joseph and family, Demeritte's
Funeral Home, Pastor Preston Collins and other members of One Accord
Pentecostal Prayer Ministries, The Gaitor Family, Residents of the Tall Pines
Community, Sue Allen, The Tribune Newspaper, St Cecilia’s School, Derrick
Atkins Sr and family, Keta, Donna Edgecombe and family, Jocelyn Ramsey and
family, Carolyn Emmanuel and family, Paulette Whylly and family, Gertrude
Turner and family, Bamboo Shack, Audrey, Marie, Kiddies World Academy,
Zelrona Mackey, Naomi Blatch Primary, and many others who made this difficult
time bearable for the family.

From your children, Nioshi, Kenneth Jr, Alvin, Lloyd, Zandrika, Kenice, Kendra, Kendalee, and Amoya.
Gone, But not forgotten.


The Tribune

RELIGION



¥ ¢



Thursday, June 18, 2009 ® PG 19

aF

THIS father of three has devoted himself to them, being as active, concerned, and
committed to their lives as his father was to him.

FINDING THE RIGHT

FORMULA

FOR BEING A GOOD

rATHER

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THIS Sunday is Father's
Day, and the question being
asked is what are the ele-
ments that contribute to
being a good father.

There have been significant cries
throughout the local community in
recent times calling for more fathers
to step up to the plate and it seems
somewhat futile to expect those
Absent Without Leave (AWOL)
fathers to become good ones especial-
ly if they don‘t know how.

While a turn around for these men
may seem far fetched, some men
argue that it is a real possibility and
must first begin with their acknowl-
edgment of responsibility.

Proverbs 22 verse 6 says : “Train up
a child in the way he should go, and
when he is old he will not depart from
it.”

The responsibility for the rearing
and training a child specifically boys is
the duty of the father.

Joy FM 101.9 radio personality
Kermit “T’ aka Kermit Taylor, said the
good life he shares with his family
today would not have been possible
without the help of his father.

He explained: “As a child growing
up, my father worked as a family
island commissioner. So it meant that
every three to five years I was always
on a new family island.

“Living in the family island with my
father being commissioner was fun,
because my dad was known as the
‘Chief.’ However he was always busy,
but my dad was the kind of person
who made it a point that all of his kids
got an education.”

Coming from a family of six chil-
dren, he remembers his father being
present and rooting for all the kids to
get the most out of school.

His biggest challenge was in math,
and his father always made certain
that he attended after school classes.

“I remember on one occasion I
skipped those classes for about three
days out of the week, and my tutor
told my dad that she hadn’t seen me.

SEE page 23
PG 20 ® Thursday, June 18, 2009

a ener et

RELIGION

The Tribune



@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMAS Wisdom
Academy will be hosting an
educational seminar under the
theme: “A Heart to Give,” as a
continued effort to raise aware-
ness throughout the Bahamian
community about special needs
children and the importance of

education.

The seminar will stretch over a two day
period at the Chapel on the Hill, Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway June 19 at
7.30pm and June 20 at Yam.

Seminar host and founder of Bahamas
Wisdom Academy, Michelle Wildgoose,
said she decided to start a special needs
school because of her son, Mikhail.

“Thave difficulty finding schools for him.
So I had to go about and change my whole
career path over the past 12 years. I got my
degree in education and then my Master in
Business Administration. I then went to
University if Phoenix and did my Masters in
Special Education. There are so many per-
sons out there in our community who need
help with their special needs children and
during this time when everything is so
expensive, we want to share something with
the community,” Mrs Wildgoose said.

Mrs Wildgoose said the seminar’s main
goal is to give information to the communi-

(Cy MEDITATION

Holy! Hol

Mighty, God in three persons, blessed
Trinity” and “Ever Three And Ever
One, Consubstantial, Co-eternal” are
some of the phrases to be found in
hymns which celebrate the Most Holy
Trinity. Individual hymns based on a
particular person of the Trinity such
as Praise to the Lord the Almighty the
King of Creation, What a Friend we
have in Jesus, Come Down O love
Divine, capture some of the distinc-
tive characteristics associated with
these persons of the Trinity. It is very
uplifting and informative to read,
study, pray and sing the hymns.

Matthew 28:19 states: “Therefore
go and make disciples baptising them
in the name of

Father and the Son, and of the Holy
Spirit.” This is our charge to put into
practice. We are commanded to build

“Holy!Holy! Holy! Merciful and l

ty from different perspectives.

“Information is key now a days and with
the lack of information we find ourselves
not knowing what to do when we have chal-
lenges with our children. However, when
we share information, those of us who don’t
know, we will then understand how to han-
dle our kids better,” Mrs Wildgoose said.

Speakers include Arthurlue Rahming,
who will share on the heart of an advocate
for adult literacy, Michelle Thring, a special
educator, Gary Reece, will speak on a heart
of an overcomer and to parents who have
challenges with teenagers and young adults,
Dr Norman Gay, will speak on a heart of a
physician offering information on various
supplements kids need, and Opposition
Leader Perry Christie.

“Mr Christie will be speaking on the
heart of a parent due to the fact that he has
a special needs child. I am sure the nation
would benefit hearing from him. So many
of us don’t want to share relative to our per-
sonal information but hearing it coming
from a man, would really touch the heart of
others and encourage people not to give in
or give up on their kids,” Mrs Wildgoose
said.

Mrs Wildgoose said she would like to
ensure persons get at least gain wisdom
from the experience.

“We want this educational seminar to
become a stimulus to awaken our nation to
the many educational challenges and
resolve to find solutions as a nation to help
with the challenges we face in our everyday
situations. So together, we can make a dif-
ference here.”

y! Holy!

= ~~
, a
a ~ REV. ANGELA
a C BOSFIELD
PALACIOUS



the Kingdom of God using the name
of the Trinity as depicted by their
relationship One to Another (Father,
Son, and Holy Spirit.).

Some questions worth asking our-
selves are: Are we going? Are we
encouraging anyone to consider a
relationship with our Lord and
Saviour? Are we making any disciples
at home or abroad? Some questions
to put to friends, family members and
colleagues are:

Do you know that you are created

in God the Creator’s image?

Do you know that God, the Son,
Jesus Christ, died on the cross to save
you from sin?

Do you know that God the Holy
Spirit will live within you if you allow
it?

The actual word Trinity is not men-
tioned in the Bible but here are some
passages from the New International
Version which capture the nature of
the roles and relationships between
the members of our triune Godhead:
Let them bring you to a place of awe,
wonder and worship:

Mark 1:10-12: “As Jesus was com-
ing up out of the water, he saw heav-
en being torn open and the Spirit
descending on him like a dove. And a
voice came from heaven:

"You are my Son, whom I love;
with you I am well pleased." At once
the Spirit sent him out into the
desert”

Acts 1:4-5: On one occasion, while
he was eating with them, he gave
them this command: "Do not leave
Jerusalem, but wait for the gift my

MICHELLE
WILDGOOSE,
Founder and
Principal of
Bahamas

si Aeseteyan
Academy.





Father promised, which you have
heard me speak about. For John bap-
tised with[a] water, but in a few days
you will be baptised with the Holy
Spirit.”

John 3:5 and 16: “Jesus answered,
"T tell you the truth, no one can enter
the kingdom of God unless he is born
of water and the Spirit. Flesh gives
birth to flesh, but the Spirit[b] gives
birth to spirit..."For God so loved the
world that he gave his one and only
Son,[f] that whoever believes in him
shall not perish but have eternal life.”

Romans :5: 5-6: “And hope does
not disappoint us, because God has
poured out his love into our hearts by
the Holy Spirit, whom he has given
us. You see, at just the right time,
when we were still powerless, Christ
died for the ungodly.”

Roman 8: 15-“you received the
Spirit of sonship.[g] And by him we
cry, “Abba,[h] Father." The Spirit
himself testifies with our spirit that
we are God's children. Now if we are
children, then we are heirs—heirs of
God and co-heirs with Christ.”
The Tribune

The Methodist

METHODIST work on Andros
began during the year 1841. We extract
the following account from the
"Report of the Societies and Schools in
the Bahamas" for the year ending
December 1845:

As soon as possible after the arrival
of the late Wm Wheelock among us, J
Wm Pearson visited the society at
Andros Island and reported on his
return that he found them united and
pious and a few were added to their
number during his short sojourn
among them. The voyage thither was
very rough and stormy and on their
return perilous in the extreme as the
vessel sprung a leak and became
unmanageable; but through ceaseless
exertions at the pump and the mechan-
ical ingenuity of the passengers and
crew and the animating exhortations of
Mr Pearson they made the west end of
Providence. We hear of the leaders the
most pleasing accounts of the consis-
tent deportment of the members and
hope soon as the committee shall send
us additional help not only to visit the
society at Coakley Town but our mem-
bers scattered everywhere around the
shores of that large fertile island.”

This account gives us a glimpse into
the history of the early days of
Methodist work on Andros. It appears
that by 1845 the Methodist members

A father’s affirmation

Matt.3:17. And lo a voice from heav-
en, saying. This is my beloved Son, in
whom I am well pleased.

As we religiously celebrate the day
and concepts of Father's day and based
upon the deterioration of our nation, it
is quite clear to me that as educated
and as spiritually spooky as we are; a
vast majority of the fathers within and
outside our homes have yet to under-
stand the importance of a Father's
Affirmation.

Again, who am I to speak on such
issue? Seeing that I'm not one of the
country's religious bishops, doctors,
apostles, etc; and I don't have a big
church building, I host no conferences
nor do I have a TV ministry.

Well, with that being said I hasten to
say that if these religious clowns
(themselves) understood the impor-
tance of a Father's Affirmation the
church in the Bahamas would be a
force to be reckoned with in both the
spirit and natural realm; but it’s obvi-
ous this is not the case with the church
today.

RELIGION



om
& LAWLOR

were not to be found in one particular
locality, but "scattered everywhere."

When one of the "charity" schools at
Nicholl's Town was transferred to the
Methodists "the wooden school house
was now also used as a chapel and a
day school." A teacher was employed
from 1843-45 (Bicentenary Souvenir
Magazine, 1960). The day school
teacher had to be withdrawn because
of "want of means to remunerate his
services." (The Report of the Societies
and Schools, 1846).

The membership of the society on
the island was 31 in 1847 and 22 in
1848. By 1856 when the report on
Andros appears under the New
Providence Circuit report, there were
20 members meeting under the charge
of one male and one female leader.
These leaders were "steady and faith-
ful souls" who reported "favourably"
on the state of their classes.

The account with which this outline
was opened gives us an indication of




PASTOR
ALLEN

Watch this!

Even Yeshuwa Messiah, before He
began His earthly ministry waited to be
affirmed by His Father (Matt.3:17b.
This is my beloved Son, in whom I am
well pleased)

From the religious perspective I can
assure you that with the over four
thousand churches we've got through-
out the Bahamas; about 60 per cent of
them have broken away from another
church due to some strife or confusion.
And if the truth be told many of their
spiritual fathers can't honestly say that
“This is my beloved son or daughter, in
whom I am well pleased”

There are some dynamics at work as
it relates to the so-called spiritual
fathers of today not being able to
affirm sons and daughters in the min-

the difficult circumstances under which
the work of ministry was carried out on
Andros. Added to this, the report for
1863 reveals that: "Andros Island and
the Biminis have not been visited dur-
ing the year." The reason given is the
absence of the New Providence
preachers in Abaco and Eleuthera for
Missionary purpose.

The membership continued to
decline, howbeit, very slightly. The
1864 report on Bimini and Andros
shows 16 members at Bimini and 19 at
Andros and adds, "for the present we
have nothing special to report”.

A society was formed at Staniard
Creek in 1887 and a chapel was built in
1888. Local sources on Andros inform
us that the Methodist Church at
Stafford Creek was built when the Rev
J Barrett (Bahamian minister) was the
resident minister and William
Woodside was a local preacher in the
society. The chapel was completed in
1899 and was used as a place of refuge
during the hurricane of 1899. However,
the Bicentenary Souvenir Magazine
(1960) indicates that this chapel was
built in 1904 and rebuilt in 1928. The
hurricane of 1899 almost wrecked the
chapel at Nicholl's Town.

The Synod of 1902 reported the fol-
lowing statistics for Andros: 95 mem-
bers, 1 missionary, 4 local preachers, 6

istry; let's look at a few of them.

1. Many of the church fathers today,
themselves have not been affirmed by
a spiritual father; and it is a proven fact
that people who were hurt before have
no problem hurting others.

2. The church fathers are more
focused on building their empire rather
than preparing and giving birth to spir-
itual sons and daughters to further
advance the kingdom of God

3. The affirmation and nurturing of
sons and daughters is a costly process
both spiritually and naturally. Watch
this! In the natural, a good father will
stop at nothing, and spear no expense
to see to it that his son or daughter suc-
ceeds in life; even greater than he has
done.

The father, son relationship is so
important to the kingdom of God;
here's what Yeshuwa said.

John 5:20. For the Father loveth the
Son, and showeth him all things that
himself doeth: and he will show him
greater works than these, that ye may
marvel.

Thursday, June 18, 2009® PG 21

hurch in Andros 1841] - 1929

class leaders and 20 Sunday School
teachers.

Up to the Synod of 1903 there were
four churches and one other preaching
place. The Synod of 1906 reported that
a new chapel was in the course of erec-
tion at Mastic Point. "This is a new
cause and is most successful and prom-
ising. The people are working willingly
and giving generously. At present serv-
ices are held in the houses of some of
the members." The chapel at Mastic
Point was completed in 1909.

By the Synod of 1914 a new rest
house at Calabash Bay was completed
and was being used for divine worship.
In 1918 the rest house at Calabash Bay
was slated to be removed to Stafford
Creek. In 1919 the chapel at Nicholl’s
Town was completed and the rest
house at Staniard Creek was renovat-
ed. The chapel at Mastic Point was
destroyed by hurricane in 1926 and
rebuilt in 1929. During the period of
the construction of the new chapel,
worship services were held in the
rest/mission house. This construction
was a community affair. Some mem-
bers recall that the Rev Eric M Walker,
the resident minister, also assisted, car-
rying baskets of lime on his shoulders.

(Next time — Part 34 — The Methodist
Church in Andros 1841 — 1929)

So, instead of just religiously cele-
brating Father's Day; why not take the
bull by its horn and properly deal with
the issues of fathers in this country. We
can't keep on beating fathers and ask-
ing them to step up to the plate, where-
as many of them went into fatherhood
without the true knowledge and wis-
dom of being a father; and also being
affirmed by their fathers.

Religion, tradition and thinking have
compiled all the junk together and
came up with what we now celebrate
and call Father's Day. What we've yet
to understand is that there is a huge
difference between a father and a
daddy; being the educated, religious
people that we are, I need not give the
Greek and Hebrew translation / inter-
pretation of the word father. For I
know quite well that you've gotten just
about every book, tape, video and cd
there is from the powerful conferences
you've attended. Yet our homes and
nation are still crying out for the mani-
festation of fathers.

I'm not hating on the men, because
there are truly some very good fathers
out there; but the numbers are greater
on the daddies’ side. The havoc that

SEE page 23
PG 22 @ Thursday, June 18, 2009

RELIGION

The Tribune

Essential traits of a Godly dad

m@ By PASTOR WILBUR OUTTEN
Senior Pastor Freeport
Bible Church

“Tam not writing this to shame you, but
to warn you, as my dear children. Even
though you have ten thousand
guardians in Christ, you do not have
many fathers, for in Christ Jesus I
became your father through the gospel.
Therefore I urge you to imitate me.”

(1 Corinthians 4:14-16-NIV)

Fathers play a pivotal role in the lives
of their children. A US News and World
Report article stated that more than vir-
tually any other factor, a father's pres-
ence in the family will determine a
child's success and happiness. The article
went on to say that the importance of
fathers is demonstrated by what occurs
when fathers aren't around and
involved. Studies show that children who
grow up without fathers are more likely
to drop out of high school, commit delin-
quent acts or engage in drugs and alco-
hol use.

A local study showed that 90 per cent
of Bahamian young men incarcerated,
did not have a relationship with their
fathers.

In order to have good fathers, we need
good men who are prepared to model
what God wants. Here are six essential
traits of a Godly man and father:

1. A Godly man or father leads with clarity
Ephesians chapter 5 states that the
husband is the head of the wife as
Christ is the head of the church. This
therefore suggests that the husband or
the father is the head of the home. A
Godly man and father should paint a
clear picture of the future he envisions
for his family that will inspire and moti-
vate them to pursue it. In order to lead,
however, you must have some sense of
direction as to where you are going. As
fathers you have the responsibility and
obligation to lead, you must therefore
also model the life you wish your chil-
dren to emulate. If you are following
Christ, you can tell your children with
confidence to follow your lead.

2. A Godly father loves unconditionally

It is easy to love your children when
they are doing well, getting good grades
in school etc., however, when they are
not doing well some parents find it hard
to love them. Love is not performance
based. Unconditional love is love in
spite of; that is the way God loves us.
“While we were still sinners, Christ died
for us”. (Romans 5:8-NIV) Can you
love your children that way?

3. A Godly father labours tirelessly
Godly fathers work hard to meet the
essential needs of their families. A lazy
man is an ungodly man. “Jf anyone does
not provide for his relatives, and espe-

cially for his immediate family, he has
denied the faith and is worse than an
unbeliever” (1Timothy 5:8-NIV)
Mothers should not have to be around
the court trying to get $20 a week from
you to take care of your children.

4. A Godly father listens intently

Fathers have a responsibility to listen
to what is going on with their children.
God, the model father is a listener; that
is why he said, “call unto me and I will
answer.” In order to lead properly, you
must learn to listen. Listening commu-
nicates love. You place value on a per-
son when you listen to them. It is
affirming.

5. A Godly father leans confidently on
Christ

As fathers in a complicated, complex
world, you must lean on the Lord for
directives. Godly fathers lean on the
Lord for salvation; “For it is by grace
you have been saved, through faith-and
this not from yourselves, it is the gift of
God-not by works, so that no one can
boast” (Ephesians 2:8-9 NIV), sound-
ness; the capacity to make good deci-
sions, “If any of you lacks wisdom, he
should ask God, who gives generously
to all without finding fault, and it will be
given to him” (James 1:5-NIV) — and
supply; “But my God shall supply all
your needs according to His riches in
glory by Christ Jesus” (Philippians 4:19-
KJV)

6. A Godly father leaves a lasting legacy

Godly fathers leave a lasting legacy
of integrity, morality and faith. “A good
man leaves an inheritance for his chil-
dren's children”. (Proverbs 13:22) This
not only applies to money, but also the
way you live is passed on to your chil-
dren. How can you create and leave a
lasting, Godly legacy? Your habits now
become your legacy later. The habits
that your children are noticing are
going to be the legacy you leave behind
for them. You determine what you are
going to leave by your practices now.

Fathers do play a pivotal role in the
destiny of their children's lives. God has
given you the wherewithal to determine
whether that destiny is going to be one
filled with good things or one filled with
bitterness. The Bible says in Ephesians
6:4: “Fathers, provoke not your children
to wrath, but bring them up in the nature
and admonition of the Lord”.

¢ This is just a brief summary of the mes-
sage “Essential Traits of a Godly Dad.” To
purchase a cassette tape or CD of the mes-
sage in its entirety, you may visit Freeport
Bible Church on West Atlantic Drive,
Freeport. For questions or comments con-
cerning the message you may email
freeportbiblechurch@coralwave.com or
telephone 352-6065.


The Tribune RELIGION

Thursday, June 18, 2009 ® PG 23

Finding the right formula —
for being a good father

FROM page 19

: the enemy is wreaking within our fam-
i ilies and nation is due to the lack of
? true Godly Fathers. If I didn't know
i any better I would have strongly
? advised that the day and celebration be
i called (Happy Daddy's Day, rather

“So you never know the contribution
you make to your children by simply

“My dad took me there the next
week, and I might as well tell you after
disciplining me, I never missed a class
after that whether I liked it or not.”

He added that while their relation-
ship did have it’s challenges particular-
ly after his parent’s divorce, he remem-
bers his father always being an active
part of his life. And just as he was taken
care of by his father in his childhood,
he along with his other siblings were
also given the responsibility of taking
care of their him when he got older and
fell ill.

Kermit said after his father was diag-
nosed with Parkinson’s disease, he
gladly took care of him until his death
in 2005.

Even today, he has devoted himself
to his three children, being as active,
concerned, and committed to their lives
as his father was to him.

Kermit explained that being a real
father in every sense of the word can
seem daunting, but is necessary.

“IT remember one year my youngest
son Kristen was competing in a long
jump competition and was expecting
me to be there when he was perform-
ing. The events that day were running
ahead of time, and by the time I got
there he had already finished jumping,
and said to me ‘Daddy I didn’t do too
well, but if you was here I would have
done better you know,’ and those
words echo in my head today.

being there. I want to encourage par-
ents to be active in the lives of their
children.”

Youth activist Carlos Reid told
Tribune Religion that although he did
not have a bad relationship with his
father, he always felt like he was seek-
ing his approval.

“Growing up I think I got the kind of
discipline that most people would call
abuse, but my father was the kind of
man who never wasted time or energy
when it came to disciplining his chil-
dren.”

Mr Reid said even after becoming an
adult, their relationship was still some-
what difficult and he always seemed to
be have to prove himself.

He said he never really felt validated
by his father until after writing and
publishing his first book.

“He was all over the island telling his
friends and everyone else that his son
was the writer of this book, that made
me feel good, but it also made me think
on how many other children wait on
this approval and never get it from
their parent.”

Mr Reid said this is the reason so
many children resort to gangs, sex, and
drugs, using them as a Band-Aids to
cover to feelings of emptiness and
worthlessness.

“The father plays an important role
when it comes to the right-of-passage
for a boy going into manhood, and the



“Growing up | think | got the kind
of discipline that most people
would call abuse, but my rather
was the kind of man who never
wasted time or energy when it
came fo disciplining his children.”

CARLOS REID

frequentness of fathers failing to do

this has to change.”

As most adult men can biologically }
contribute to the creation of a child, Mr
Reid said they must also give more of }
themselves to their kids which in }
essence is the one thing they ultimately }

need to feel complete.

Anglicans to celebrate diocesan patronal festival

ANGLICANS will gather this
Father’s Day, Sunday, June 21,
2009, at 7pm at Christ Church
Cathedral, for a Solemn Pontifical
Evensong, Sermon, Procession
and Benediction, in anticipation
of the Feast of the Nativity of St
John on June 24.

St John The Baptist is the
Patron Saint of The Anglican
Diocese of The Bahamas and the
Turks & Caicos Islands.

Reverend Laish Zane Boyd, Sr.,
Bishop of The Diocese of The
Bahamas and The Turks & Caicos
Islands will officiate and preach
the sermon for this special service.
Music will be provided by the
choir of the Parish of The Most
Holy Trinity, and Preston
Ferguson will be the organist.

“According to Holy Scripture,
St John the Baptist was the kins-

man of Jesus, and the son of the
priest Zechariah and his wife
Elizabeth. Scripture says that
John was six months older than
Jesus).

According to the tradition of the
Church, St John The Baptist, the
last of the Old Testament
prophets, was born June 24 circa
3/2 BC. He was thirty years old
when he began his mission to call
the covenant people to a baptism
(ritual purification) of repentance
in order to prepare them for the
coming of the Messiah and the
promised “new covenant.”

There will be no services in any
New Providence Anglican church-
es on Sunday evening, and all
Church organisations are request-
ed to attend the service in full uni-
form. ZNS TV 13 will record the
service for airing at a later date.

? than Happy Father's Day).
i Now, I serve notice to the religious
? leaders. This is the last year when all of
? the attention and spot light is going to
? be upon you. If you are a true father,
? you would seek to honour faithful sons
? and daughters in the ministry; rather
? than every year you're the one driving
? off in the new car or receiving the spe-
? cial offering. What about that faithful
? user, the parking lot attendant, the
? church maintenance man or the strug-
? gling family man in the ministry that
? you are well aware of? How about hon-
? oring one of them on Father's Day with
? a $10 or $20,000 gift?
? The happiness and joy of a father is
? tosee his children's children walking in
? the in-heritance he has set up for them.
? Again, with that being said we've got a
i long way to go as a nation to truly
? appreciate the concept and sayings of
? Happy Father's Day.
? reminded that with God, all things are
? possible; so to the few real Fathers out
? there, I do salute you in saying Happy
? Father's Day.

e Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen,
? Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int’

ES 0 a
CaM ATRL

UTR MCE



| SUNDAY: Worship - 9:30 am & 11 :00 am

| SERMON:
TUESDAY:

MINISTER:
Email: manse1@live.com
Phone: 322-5475
Bringing All People Closer to God
Through Worship, Ministry & Service

“Facing Your Giants ’
Bible Study 7:30 pm

At The Manse #37 Harmony Hill - Blair
Rev. John Macleod



Herein, I'm
PG 24 © Thursday, June 18, 2009 RELIGION The Tribune

“Living Right in a World Gone Wrong”

A response
to current
youth issues

ANOTHER year in the Bahamas
approaches the midway point and we
have already had 28 murders. Most of
the crime and major social problems are
attributed to youth and in particular
males. The vast majority of the murder
accused and the victims have been
young men. Increasingly our females are
following the lead of males in anti social
or self destructive behaviour. Our youth
are obviously in need of guidance and
intervention.

Youth Alive, considered one of the
premier Youth Conferences in this
region and the world is an annual con-
ference that is designed to minister to
youth, youth leaders, youth pastors and
others interested in the development
and training of young people. It address-
es the topics and issues today’s youth are
faced with and provides practical, rele-
vant answers to these challenges in a
way that young people can relate to,
stressing leadership training.

The event has attracted over 5,000
youth from the Bahamas, United States,
Canada, and Europe and is a lively,
energetic event with dynamic teaching,
music, drama and special events

This year’s event is scheduled for July
1-5 at The Diplomat Center, Carmichael
Road under the Theme: The
Assignment: “Living Right in a World
Gone Wrong,” and will include speakers
such as motivational speaker and
author and former Miss California,
Lakita Garth, Pastor Durre Thomas of
Calvary Temple, Freeport, youth pastor
Terren Dames (Bahamian) of Dallas
Texas, minister and communications
specialist DJ Roker of West Palm
Beach, Ricardo Miller of Dallas Texas a
world renowned Children and Youth
ministry specialist, Brooke Eneas, min-
ister and former Miss _ Florida
Panhandle, Myles Munroe, Dave
Burrows and Angie Burrows.

Ricardo Clark, Mr Lynxx, Christian
Massive, Mr Beeds, Naje Dun,
Landlord and a host of others, some
who are featured on the newly released
Youth Alive Soundtrack will provide
musical selections. The event begins
with a a spectacular Drama production
titled “Showtime.” Day and night ses-
sions follow Thursday and Friday with
special sessions for Youth and Youth
Leaders as well as pastors and parents.
Friday night is a huge concert and after
party. Admission is free, however spe-
cial incentives and discounts are offered
in Registration Packages ranging from
$15 - $85. Concert tickets are $10
advance and $12 at the door.




YOUTH ALIVE considered
one of the premier Youth
_ Conferences in this region
/ and the world addresses
| the topics and issues
today's youth are faced
with and provides practi-
cal, relevant answers to
these challenges in a way
that young people can
—— relate to by stressing
i © Be leadership training.

4 ! Pictured are scenes from
last year’s successful

= succes
event. -This year's event
WE is scheduled for July 1-5.