Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
WEATHER

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The Tribune

ANY TIME..-ANY PLACE, WE’RE #71

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009

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AND REAL Alias



HIGH
LOW



Volume: 105 No.167 PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Brown storms
standings

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Police
Chi SEX TIM

U-TURN ON EXCAVATION?



Fury over video
of molested
three-year-old

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

POLICE have pledged to
investigate a pornographic
video that is circulating through-
out Nassau by e-mail with what
is reported to be a Bahamian
man engaging in sexual rela-
tions with a three-year-old girl.

The disturbing footage has
been forwarded to local police
and the Federal Bureau of
Investigation to ascertain the
nationality of the man and pos-
sibly lead to his capture and
imprisonment.

Yesterday countless recipi-
ents of the e-mail responded to
the initial message calling for
the man in the video to be jailed
or even tortured to death for
defiling the young girl.

“It is with great pain and
mixed emotions that Iam send-
ing you this e-mail. It is my
belief that people, like the per-
son(s) involved in this or similar
clips, should not be shot, hung
or whatever instant death penal-
ty there exists.

“No, instead they should be
put to death in a slow, long and
painful manner. Pain that can
go on for years, where they wish
every single day they were dead.
In a way of speaking they would
be welcoming death every day.
This way it would be a constant
reminder to them and many
others out there of the debauch-
ery they do to other innocent
human beings,” the blogger
wrote.

“Take care of your kids!”
wrote another recipient, while
others simply called for the man
to be “shot”.

In view of a similar case, the
Crisis Centre has recently called
on Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham to establish a special
court focused primarily on child
sexual abuse matters.

Director of the Crisis Centre
Dr Sandra Dean-Patterson said
that to hear that 15 teachers are
currently being investigated for
sexual impropriety with stu-
dents they are supposed to be

SEE page 12

HURRICANE INSURANCE

TUS jes Sy

ibe

SEE

Nt



Nurses call
in sick for
a ninth day

‘Only one or

two’ return
to hospitals
and clinics

AFTER THE TRIBUNE reported yesterday that entrepreneurs are allegedly excavating farmland to sell quarry
to developers and filling the cavity with waste, tractors were seen pushing dirt back into the holes on land
behind Millars Heights off Carmichael Road.

Mother fears
missing boys
may have been
kidnapped

THE distraught mother of
the two boys missing on South
Andros now fears the young-
sters may have been kidnapped.

Police yesterday called off the
search for Deangelo Clarke,

PUES ELSE RTT UT TT
SCT CTS CTT ECE TG CCT

WHILE the
Bahamas is making
efforts to combat
human trafficking,
the country contin-
ues to fail to fully
comply with the min-
imum standards set
for its elimination.

ily for the purpose of
forced labour, and
women from
Jamaica and other
countries for the
purpose of commer-
cial sexual exploita-
tion.

The report found



mg By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia. net

PATIENTS lives contin-
ued to be put at risk yester-
day as public health nurses
called in sick for the ninth
day despite an injunction
prohibiting industrial action.

Although the Public
Health Authority (PHA)
did not disclose how many
nurses failed to show up for
work, a senior medic told
The Tribune only ‘one or
two’ returned to public hos-
pitals and clinics.

She said nurses would not
be intimidated by the court
ruling as they have, “lost all
respect for the justice sys-
tem, the Prime Minister and
Dr Minnis.”

And because the nurses
have doctor’s notes they do
not fear being jailed.

The Government has
sought to end the sick-out
with a court injunction.

According to an affidavit
submitted to the Supreme
Court by PHA managing
director Herbert Brown on
Monday, the actions of the
union and the nurses “seri-
ously undermined and
impaired the ability of the
Public Health Authority to
provide required medical
and health services to the

SEE page 11



Police believe
murder victim
was targeted
deliberately

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

POLICE believe the killers
of a 20-year-old man from Blue
Hill Heights deliberately tar-
geted their victim.

Jeffrey Johnson, also known
as Jeffrey Rolle, and his broth-
er were walking in the Derby
Road area around 10pm on

These are the find-
ings of the 2009 Traf-
ficking in Persons Tyr pepgRT
(TIP) report released was released by
yesterday by eg Hillary Clinton (AP)
States Secretary o
State Hillary Chto. in 2008.

the Bahamas made
j only “minimal
efforts” to protect
victims of the crime
and to prosecute
trafficking offenders

nine, and his five-year-old
brother Marcelo after a week
of unsuccessfully scouring a
large area of the island.

But their heartbroken moth-
er Vera Clarke, 32, said that
although she has no evidence

You

an Be Blown

Away

y A Hurricane

Or you can rest easy knowing
that you have excellent insurance
coverage no matter which

to go on, her “feeling” tells her
the boys were kidnapped.

Ms Clarke said she came to
this conclusion after a week of
intensive searching by relatives,

SEE page 12

In it, the US State Depart-
ment describes the Bahamas
as a destination country for
men and women trafficked
from Haiti and other
Caribbean countries primar-

The Bahamian govern-
ment demonstrated “limited
efforts” to prevent trafficking
over the reporting period. It

SEE page 12

Monday when they saw a group
of men approach, according to
police reports.

The brothers turned to flee,

SEE page 12



ray ‘the wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(RABAMAS) UMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

ce hbaco i Ema
Te OE) AGI) Te 267-0 Te ef Tet oS





NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS” LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



girl plans to sue over allegations

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE bereaved family of five-
month-old Lynera Saunders still
plans to issue law suits over the
dissemination of allegations that
the child —- who died of respiratory
failure last week — may have been
molested.

Legal action has not yet been

pwwuwTw

initiated, but family lawyer Paul
Moss said this is because the griev-
ing family has been focused on
making funeral arrangements.
“They are still planning to sue —
certainly after the family has had a
time to conclude the funeral
(arrangements) they are going to
get up to deal with these matters.
Someone has to be held responsi-
ble for what has happened to the
family so that is what they intend

to pursue with vigour,” Mr Moss
told The Tribune yesterday.

He said “every agency
involved" in the airing of the
molestation allegations — includ-
ing the Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal, the Royal Bahamas Police
Force and various electronic and
print media outlets — is a potential
target of legal action.

While he did not specify how
much compensation the family will

seek, he said he is hopeful the mat-
ter can be settled out of court.
"Some (parties) have been very
reckless as we've seen with the
story in (a local tabloid) yester-
day and some stories carried (on
the internet) and also on some
radio stations," he said, adding
that he is still in the process of
compiling information to corrob-

SEE page 12

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i the call for an inde-
? pendent inquiry as
i? what is
: released from the
: police and the minis-
ter suggests conclu-
? sions even before an
? investigation has
: been completed,”
: she said.

the 2009/2010 budget

; By ALISON LOWE

Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

IT REMAINS unclear whether
an autopsy has been carried out on

? the body of 15-year-old Michael
? Knowles, with police claiming
? ignorance and an attorney for his
? family declining to comment.

This, as Minister of National
Security Tommy Turnquest was

? criticised by PLP chairman Glenys
? Hanna Martin for his comments to
? parliament on Monday about
? Knowles’ death which she claimed

“raised more questions than
answers.”
She said that Mr Turnquest’s

i comments about the boy’s alleged
? criminal background are, “even if
? true, irrelevant to the issue of his
? safe custody in the hands of the
? police - which is the issue at hand
: — (as well as) highly
i prejudicial.”

“This strengthens

being

Contributing to





cation was made to the courts to
detain Mr Knowles for a further
48 hours,” said the minister.

Referring to the political furore
that stemmed from Mr Knowles’
death, Mr Turnquest said it
became the subject of “blatant
manipulation.” Mrs Hanna Martin
was suspended from the House of
Assembly after she sought to raise
the matter of the cell death at a
time that House Speaker Alvin
Smith deemed inappropriate and
for which she had failed to give
the required one hour advance
notice to the Speaker to get per-
mission to speak on the agenda at
that time. Because she was not
allowed to break into the agenda
the Opposition claimed that gov-
ernment did not want to address
the issue.

“In death, this young man is
defended by persons, who by their
very actions give the
distinct impression that
they want to cast the
law aside, and plant
doubts as to the com-
petency of our legal
procedures,” claimed
Mr Turnguest.

Mrs Hanna Martin
and her parliamentary
colleagues maintain
that the Speaker should
have allowed her to
raise the issue when she
attempted to as a “mat-

debate on Monday

? evening, Mr Turn-

quest told parliament

? that Knowles’ death
: represents an “awful
i human tragedy”,
? however, proposed
? that “all he has seen”
? indicates that police

“followed proper

GLENYS HANNA-
MARTIN said it is
‘very regrettable that
political propaganda
over the last several
days has served to
overshadow the issue
of how Knowles met
his death in the cus-
tody of the state.

ter of public impor-
tance.” She said she
only wished to obtain
an assurance from Mr
Turnquest that the mat-
ter would be indepen-
dently investigated.
However, numerous
government MPs made
disparaging comments
during the budget

: procedure with the

arrest of a minor.”
The 15-year-old was found

: hanging in a police cell on June

Mr Turnquest claimed it is “also
a tragedy that many of our young

? people, especially young males,
: find themselves on the wrong side
? of the law. Regrettably, young
? Knowles was suspected of break-
: ing the law in the matter of house-
? breaking.

“As a suspect, Knowles was
detained in custody. There is noth-

; ing unusual about that. The fact
? that he was a minor was taken into

account.
“Tt is the fact that according to

: law, he could only be detained for
? 48 hours, and he was. As the inves-
i? tigation was still pending, appli-

debate about her
refusal to obey the Speaker.

Yesterday Mrs Hanna-Martin
said it is “very regrettable that
political propaganda over the last
several days has served to over-
shadow” the issue of how Knowles
met his death in the custody of
the state.

Speaking on Monday, Mr Turn-
quest stated that there will be a
“full investigation into the mat-
ter” but stopped short of indicat-
ing that it would be carried out by
a body independent of the police,
as Mrs Hanna-Martin has called
for.

Mr Turnquest said the govern-
ment “will not, and must not, be
swayed by public displays and mis-
chief making.





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009, PAGE 3



Boat thefts hike blamed on ‘organised criminals’

INS accounts:

‘In disarray’

THE accounts of the Broad- :
casting Corporation of the }
Bahamas (ZNS) are in such dis-
array that even conducting an }
audit would pose a serious chal- }
lenge, the minister responsible :

said.

Minister of National Security }
Tommy Turnquest told parlia- ;
ment this week that govern- }
ment is seeking to address the }
confused state of affairs of the }

Corporation’s accounts.

“In fact, matters are so con- :
fused as to call into question }
the possibility of conducting an }
effective audit of accounts for }
the years 2003-2007. The gov-
ernment is addressing these
matters with a view to deter- }
mining the way forward, andI
should be able to say more on }
this in due course,” said Mr }

Turnquest.

He added that ZNS has been :
allocated $8 million in this :
year’s budget and is expected }
o “operate within this para- i

meter.”

Meanwhile, Mr Turnquest :
said that there “remains an }
enormous amount of work that }
must be done to make the Cor- }
poration viable, effective and :
the pivotal national institution it }

ought to be.”

“During the debate on the :
Communications Bills, [spoke }
of the government’s plans to }
move the Corporation to a pub- }
lic service broadcasting facili- :
ty. This remains our objective :
and serious discussions will }
commence shortly in this }

regard,” he said.

of indecently
assallting
young girls

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A39-YEAR-OLD Eleuthera :
man accused of indecently }
assaulting seven young girls on }
that island between September }
2008 and May of this year was }
arraigned in Magistrate’s Court }

yesterday.

Adrian Albert White of Air- }
port Road, Eleuthera appeared }
before Chief Magistrate Roger }
Gomez in Court One, Bank :
Lane yesterday on eight counts }

of indecent assault.

It is alleged that White inde- :
cently assaulted a 16-year-old }
girl during the month of Sep-
tember 2008, another in Febru- }
ary of this year and another 16- }
year-old girl on two occasions — }
in January and April of this

year.

14-year-old girl in May.

White, a security guard who }
is represented by lawyer Antho-
ny Newbold, indicated to the }
court that he understood the }
charges and pleaded not guilty i

to all.

able.

White was remanded to Her }
Majesty’s Prison in Nassau yes- :
terday. He is expected to appear
in Court 5, Bank Lane, on June
22, when a bail hearing is }

expected to take place.

More than 100
persons living in
Bahamas illegally
are repatriated

THE Immigration Depart-
ment said that after a series of
investigations and apprehen-
sion exercises, it has repatriat-
ed more than 100 persons
found to be living in the
Bahamas illegally.

On Tuesday, 109 Haitians
were repatriated after the
Enforcement Unit found a
number of persons working
without valid work permits.

Of those flown back to
Haiti, 80 were men, 15 were
women, and 14 were children.

This follows the repatria-
tion of 86 persons in the first
two weeks of June. These
included: 64 Haitians, one
Zambian, two Venezuelans,
two Filipinos, four Domini-
cans, one Isreali and 12
Jamaicans.

The department said it
“remains committed toward
ensuring that the immigration
laws of the Bahamas are
adhered to. Further, the
department will continue to
aggressively pursue those
found in violation of Bahami-
an laws and Bahamians who
violate the laws will be prose-
cuted.”

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AUTHORITIES and boaters
have raised the alarm over what
they believe is a small, but “highly
organised” group of criminals
responsible for a “massive” hike
in boat thefts that are costing own-
ers and insurance companies mil-
lions of dollars.

The Royal Bahamas Defence
Force said it has fortified its patrols
in Nassau harbour area, particu-
larly at night when most incidents
occur, in response to the increase
over the last year in particular.

Meanwhile, some insurers are
raising their premiums and
demanding that owners take addi-
tional security measures like pay-
ing to dock their vessels at certain
marinas considered to be safer
than private docks.

Concerned boaters fear that not
enough is being done by authori-
ties to counter the trend, which
they say has the potential, not only
of hitting residents, but also
adversely affecting marine tourism
to the Bahamas and the second
home market.

One Paradise Island resident,
who wished to remain anonymous,
told of how his family was struck
by three boat thefts in the space of
eight months, with thieves taking
his father-in-law’s brand new
$250,000 boat, his nephew’s 35-
foot speedboat, and his own 36
footer.

The $250,000 boat was recov-
ered in Jamaica, having been used
for a drug run, but has since been
impounded by the government
there.

His nephew’s boat turned up in
Florida, where police reported it
had been used for human smug-
gling, and his own vessel was found
stripped of $40,000 of equipment in
a Seabreeze canal.

This after he had secured it with
six of “the best locks money can
buy” in view of the theft of his
father-in-law’s boat, which was
docked in the same location inside
Nassau Harbour.

“My father-in-law’s boat was a
total write-off and so was mine,”
said the boater, adding that his
insurance has gone up and his
insurers have requested that he
move his vessel to another marina
in the harbour.

He is upset that authorities are

AUTHORITIES say it is vessels such as
speedboats with high-powered 250 or 300
horsepower engines — that are being targeted.

| i Ia
= “Ml tei mae ~" "

by

5 ae

not reporting the incidents to the
media so that the wider public can
be warned about and respond to
the situation.

Commanding officer of the
RBDF’s Harbour Patrol Unit
Ralph McKinney and Bahamas
Air Sea Rescue Association oper-
ations director Chris Lloyd say that
a highly organised, well equipped
and apparently industrious group
of criminals is to blame.

“T’ve been here 15 years. It used
to be a handful of boats stolen each
year. I’ve never seen it on such an
organised scale as we’re seeing
now — it’s insane,” said Mr Lloyd,
describing the rise in thefts in the
Abacos in particular as “‘astro-
nomical.”

Engines

Suspicion about the sophisticat-
ed nature of the operation is raised
by the speed with which boats are
being stolen and stripped — and
the ability of those involved to
move “huge” engines weighing
hundreds of pounds onto land.

“The joke on the street is that if
you need a boat part you can just
order it from these guys and they'll
steal it. It’s become like a moral
victory for visitors to come and
cruise the Bahamas and not have
their boat stolen,” Mr Lloyd
claimed.

He said that in May — the month
that The Tribune’s source had his
boat stolen — he was made aware
of seven boats disappearing in a
period of around 10 to 12 days
alone.

wey Vielsire

fe



Petty Officer McKinney said
that the RBDF has yet to catch
anyone responsible but as part of
its efforts to do so, regularly boards
vessels seen moving in and out of
Nassau harbour at night.

In order to assist the RBDF in
its work, Mr McKinney called on
all boaters to have proof of own-
ership and boat registration on
them at all times.

But, despite his comments, some
boaters still believe it is all too easy
for criminals to remove vessels
from the harbour at night time.

“From a national security per-
spective, how can they be disap-
pearing at night and no one knows
the situation?” asked one.

Mr Lloyd added: “TI just don’t
know how they’re stealing them
and getting them out of harbour
quite so easily.”

Some boaters formed a local e-
mail list to which alerts are now
being sent on a regular basis warn-
ing mariners to be on the look out
for missing vessels.

The latest e-mail tells of the theft
of a 29-foot Sea Hunt stolen from
the Abaco Beach Resort/Boat
Harbour Marina at around 3am
last Sunday. The “Sea Dancer”
had twin 250-hp Yamaha engines
and is cream coloured.








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Authorities say it is this kind of
vessel — a speedboat with high-
powered 250 or 300 horsepower
engines — that is being targeted.

Mr McKinney said that thefts
are being reported from “the tip of
Lyford Cay all the way around the
island.”

The boats commonly turn up on

the south side of the island, or in a
Seabreeze canal, if not abroad.

Attempts to obtain boat theft
report statistics from the police
yesterday were unsuccessful.

Police press liaison officer Wal-
ter Evans said he was not aware of
a rise in the incidence of such
crimes.

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White is also accused of inde- :
cently assaulting two 14-year- }
old girls, as well as a 17-year- }
old girl in January and another }

Mr Newbold noted that
despite the multiplicity of the }
charges, the offences were bail-

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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

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WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

‘Sick-out’ becomes contagious

LAST WEEK the same strange “sickness”
that removed 50 per cent of the Hospital
Authority’s nursing staff from their stations,
sent Water and Sewerage Corporation employ-
ees seeking bed rest.

Both groups described their malaise
as a “sick-out”, but as Hospital Authority man-
aging director Herbert Brown told Chief Justice
Sir Burton Hall, he knows of “no outbreak of
any epidemic or other contagious illness at any
of the public hospital facilities that would
explain the widespread illness among the nurs-
es employed at the various facilities.”

“The low levels of attendance have no prece-
dence during the period for which I have held
the position of managing director of the Author-
ity,” he said.

Mr Brown made this statement in an affidavit
in support of an Originating Summons and
Interlocutory Injunction filed in the Supreme
Court to order the nurses back to work or face
contempt charges. If they defy the court order
they could be committed to prison and union
funds could be “subject to sequestration”
simply put, the court could separate the union
from its bank account. The same can happen to
any person, or persons who encourage the nurs-
es to continue in their “sickness.” Such persons
can also be imprisoned, fined or have their
assets seized.

This court order was not necessary in the
case of Water and Sewerage (WSC) employees,
who probably saw the handwriting on the wall
for them if they put any further financial strain
on an already crippled corporation.

However, last week WSC employees claimed
to have caught the “sickness” bug because of a
delay in contract negotiations. They also took to
their beds because they were upset by what
they called Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham’s
“unfavourable remarks” about them in the
House of Assembly.

The Prime Minister had announced that
there would be no civil service salary increases
this year because of the precarious position of
the country’s economy. He had to hold the line
wherever he could so as not to collapse the
nation.

In the House, Prime Minister Ingraham said
he was astounded to hear that WSC workers
would be asking for salary increases considering
the financial straits facing their corporation.

He said the only way to raise salaries at WSC
was to reduce costs. This ominous statement
should have been enough to send any thinking
person to their bed, especially those at WSC

who know the corporation’s over staffing prob-
lems.

WSC has many problems — among them
about 5 million imperial gallons of water lost
daily through leaks, theft or meter inaccura-
cies; water quality difficulties; the expense and
unreliability of barging water from Andros;
reduced revenue and heavy staffing. To cut cost
in any one of these areas means a tremendous
outlay of funds — the quickest and cheapest
route to take would be staff layoffs.

In the House on Monday State Minister for
the Environment Phenton Neymour painted a
very grim picture of the staffing position at the
corporation.

Mr Neymour said that like other govern-
ment corporations it is well known that WSC is
over staffed, and has “highly competitive remu-
neration and compensation packages.” He said
that corporate business plans prepared within
the last 10 years had recommended that staff be
reduced by more than 25 per cent. He said that
to date these “recommended reductions have
not been made.”

Despite this he encouraged management
and staff to concentrate on becoming more effi-
cient and productive. The emphasis, he said,
must now be on reduced expenses, increased
revenues, and the creation of an environment
“where customers are satisfied, and all can enjoy
a decent quality of life.”

“It remains government’s position,” he said,
“to undertake compensation considerations
when the economy and budget can better afford
such increases. In the face of all of the chronic
deficiencies of the corporation, staff employ-
ment has been safeguarded.”

It would seem that government has been
most generous in safeguarding the jobs of more
than 25 per cent excess staff. However, if this
staff do not try to assist the corporation to get
costs down by other means, then they had bet-
ter sit down and cast lots as to who among them
will have to walk the redundancy plank.

“T implore staff to impose a level of relativ-
ity, realism, rational and unselfish thought in
their dealings with the corporation and the Gov-
ernment, with respect to compensation mat-
ters,” said Mr Neymour. And if those who
walked off the job with that silly sick excuse
have any sense they will heed Mr Neymout’s
warning. If they don’t make themselves essential
workers they will soon be seeing those pink
slips — and they will only have themselves to
blame. It is then that they will really under-
stand the consequences of a sick-out.



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A message to
nurses from

a nurse!

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

As a Registered nurse, I just
couldn’t keep quiet any longer
on this issue of health insurance
for nurses. It is crystal clear to
me that Cleona Hamilton has a
political agenda, and the other
nurses are following behind her
like lambs to the slaughter!

What world are you living in?
Do you know that last month
alone, more than 300,000 people
lost jobs in America? Have you
seen the drop in tourism and
the loss of jobs right here in The
Bahamas? Anyone with a brain,
can see the economic situation
that the entire world is in! What
a time to make a demand for
something that may be extreme-
ly important to everyone, but
least of all to us nurses?

What nurse can stand up and
tell me that you are in dire
straits for medical insurance?
We are in a better position than
most! If you walked into PMH
now, I can guarantee you that
you will get preferential treat-
ment because you’ve known
and worked with the staff for
many years.

As a registered nurse, you
have physician acquaintances
who would be more than happy
to see and treat you and your
family for little or no charge.
Dr Minnis himself treated me
and other nurses throughout the
course of our pregnancies and
never charged us a single dime!
I have never stood in a line or
waited hours to see a doctor,
and very few if any nurses do.

letters@triounemedia.net



Dr Minnis has taken money
out of his pocket time and time
again to fund educational sem-
inars for us nurses, Christmas
parties and other events that
were related to nurses. In fact
he has offered us the assurance
that beds have been put aside
and that we will receive quality
private care if and when need-
ed, until the government can
afford to provide health insur-
ance. He has always been there
for nurses, and I challenge any
nurse at PMH to prove other-
wise.

Cleola Hamilton and the
nurses who blindly follow her,
should be ashamed of them-
selves, at a time when thousands
of people are without jobs!
They should be thanking God
for theirs!

The people who stand behind
them and insist that the gov-
ernment fork up the $10,000,000
now, are the same people who
would complain about the lack
of something else because the
money was used for that pur-
pose.

Theard one man on the radio
this morning say that if the gov-
ernment can spend over
$100,000,000 on roads, they can
take $10,000,000 to give the
nurses insurance. He would
probably be the same man
bitching and moaning and

cussing Neko Grant if his car
fell in a ditch tomorrow!

I say to the Honourable
Prime Minister and Dr Hubert
Minnis, you are doing a great
job! Keep up the good work!

To the teachers, I say thank
you for having a brain!

I say to my collagues, the
nurses, stop the politics and the
consultations with the opposi-
tion and practice your profes-
sion faithfully. Abstain from
whatever is deleterious and mis-
chievous, maintain and elevate
the standard of your profession,
and devote yourself to the wel-
fare of those committed to your
care! Shut up, get back to work!
And thank God for a job!

NO NAME

Nassau,

June 12, 2009.

(What the caller to the radio
station failed to realise is that
the roadworks now underway
have been started by govern-
ment to provide work for those
without jobs. One would have
to be brainless not to under-
stand that it is far more impor-
tant to create work for the
unemployed than to provide
health insurance for nurses, who
are fully employed, and work
in health facilities that will take
care of their every need.

(As a matter of fact the atti-
tude of some of these nurses
shows a lack of true concern for
others — an attribute we
thought essential for a true
nurse. — Ed).

Competent people needed to chart rough waters ahead

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Remember Bahamas Remem-
ber, whom the gods would
destroy, they first make mad.
Change is inevitable, but it may
not be the change we think we
want.

Adverse situations on a per-
sonal, tribal and national level
force change, but up until recent-
ly these changes have been subtle,
and have all been occurring in
relatively good times.

Now more than ever our coun-
try needs competent people to
contribute intellectually in chart-
ing the rough waters ahead and I
for one firmly believe the rough-
est is yet to come.

Especially if our current crop
of politicians and civil servants
keep acting as if everything is
under control and will improve
in spite of their efforts.

A pessimist? Me? No way, I
am an optimist and a realist, but I
am getting hemmed in by some
pretty mediocre resources, which
is making it difficult to stay opti-

www.btcbahamas.com



mistic. I will always deal with real-
ity head on, as dismal as it may
get.

Take interpersonal communi-
cations for instance:

I have yet to have a conversa-
tion of any length with a politician
that is, for lack of better words,
coherent in thought and progres-
sion.

In fact, I am beginning to think
that they think in 30 second com-
mercial type sound bites.

There is no development of
the idea, real or abstract, and no
discussions have ever ended very
well.

Any authority they have, who-
ever they may be, usually ends
up being wielded as power, as an
effort to subjugate me.

As those who know me will
attest, this has never gone over
very well.

Most often I start to feel as if I
am re-living the tower of Babel
Biblical story, in which the tribes
are scattered to the winds through
their sudden lack of ability to
speak to each other.

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Thank you for your continued support.

At this point I should probably
take my leave, and go back to my
quiet corner, survive as best as is
possible, and stay out of the way.
Who am I to tell anyone what to
do or how to do it?

But, at the same time, this is
my country as much as anyone
else’s, and I choose to try my
damnedest to contribute come
hell or high water. And I proba-
bly will for life.

One last thought for now:

A lot of Bahamians in high and
mighty places better learn to
laugh at themselves every so
often instead of laughing at other
Bahamians, the ones they try to
keep under foot.

This applies to the two politi-
cal leadership groups, the com-
plete farces that they are.

Remember, whom the gods
would destroy, they first make
mad. (Euripides - Greek tragic
dramatist 484 BC - 406 BC).

There is ample madness in the
Bahamas to give that thought
credibility.

CHRISTOPHER D. LOWE
Nassau,
June 15, 2009

Opposition displayed
complete contempt
for the police

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The Opposition displayed
complete contempt for the police
when they prevented an officer
from carrying out his duty in the
House last Wednesday.

Not only did they defy the
Speaker, but they rendered the
policeman impotent in a very
public and humiliating way, and
put themselves above the law.

What’s even more shocking is
the former national security min-
ister took part in the debacle.

If the Opposition wanted to
talk about the very sad death of a
15 year old in prison, they should
have called a press conference
after it became clear both sides
wouldn’t give consent to sideline
the Budget exercise. They did not
need the protection of Parlia-
mentary privilege to say what
they had to say.

If they’re clever, they can raise
the matter when they speak in
the Budget debate. Or, they can
put it on the agenda to deal with
at a later date.

The whole episode was ridicu-
lous and there are better ways to
score political brownie points.

If the opposition can do their
own thing and thumb their nose
at authority, why shouldn’t the
public? Their behaviour typifies
the tragedy of the Bahamas.

No wonder we live in a lawless
society.

ATHENA DAMIANOS
Nassau,
June 8, 2009



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Nurses ‘accepted’ deferment
of pay rise, health insurance

PLP ate nlll
hopeful defends
Senator's bid

for Marathon

m By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net_

A PLP chairmanship hopeful :

has come out to defend Senator }
Jerome Fitzgerald in his bidto rep-

resent the people of Marathon,
The Tribune can reveal.

PLP activist Ricardo Smith, a }
former party council member for }
Marathon, said he considers the :
comments made by former }
Marathon chairman Neil Percentie }
to be an underhanded attack }
against all PLP members of par- }
liament who do not live in the con-
stituency which they were elected }

to represent.

“This was an attack on every ;
MP, our leader Perry Christie, the }
chairman Glenys Hanna-Martin, }
Obie Wilchcombe etc, because I }
would wager that 90 per cent of }
the members of parliament donot }
live in their various constituen- }

cles.”

to meet.

However, The Tribune under- }
stands that Mr Fitzgerald’s photo }
was accidentally placed on :
myplp.com in the space marked }

“The Constituency of Marathon.”

Mr Fitzgerald’s name was report- ;
edly mistakenly linked to that part :
of the website from his contribu- }
tions to the Senate which are i
archived on myplp.com for easy }

public access.

Despite this error, however, Mr }
Smith said the point still remains — }
that there are persons vying for }
positions and seats in the party, :
some of which are currently filled
by sitting members of parliament. }

“But what he (Mr Percentie) is ;

doing is nitpicking.

“Tt is my hope that we will allow :
all persons who want to vie for }
whatever position to have their }
fair chance, but our focus must }
remain on defeating the current }
representative for Marathon, Earl }
Deveaux. That’s what this is all ;

about,” he said.

Mr Smith refused to address }
reports that he will be challenging }
Mts Hanna-Martin at the upcom- }
ing National Convention for the :
post of National Chairman of the :

PLP.

On Sunday evening, Mr Per- i
centie issued a statement exclu- }
sively to The Tribune questioning }
how Mr Fitzgerald could already ;
be listed on the PLP’s website as }
the candidate for the Marathon }
constituency despite the fact that }
the candidate’s committee has yet i

@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

NURSES accepted the
deferment of their pay rise
and health insurance plan
before taking industrial
action, according to an affi-
davit supplied to the
Supreme Court.

Public Hospitals Authority
(PHA) managing director
Herbert Brown submitted
records to the courts showing
how the Bahamas Nurses
Union (BNU) were warned
in January about how the
drastic downturn in the econ-
omy could affect the terms
of their 2006 industrial agree-
ment.

The nurses were then
asked by Minister of Health
Dr Hubert Minnis in April
to consider alternative
options for healthcare such
as care from government
consultants without addi-
tional costs and access to
separate facilities for treat-
ment in privacy.

When Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham made his
budget communication on
May 27 and explained that
the country’s revenue short-
fall was in excess of $260 mil-
lion, the BNU is reported to
have agreed to delay the new
health insurance plan and
four per cent salary increase.

According to the affidavit,
BNU president Cleola
Hamilton told the press: “If
you look around you have to
be reasonable. You don’t
want to take the country
places that you know the
country can’t go right now.
So you have to be reason-
able in your thinking.”

But the following day ata
meeting with the Minister of
Health and public health
nurses, the union threatened

Affidavit says the union was
warned before taking action

to take industrial action if
nurses’ needs were not
met.

Nurses demanded the pay-
ment of the group health
insurance plan or the pay
rise, and explained the extent
of their hardships: a lack of
respect from government,
the need to work several jobs
to make ends meet and the
risks they face in the health-
care system.

When their demands were
not met around 50 per cent
of public health nurses across
the country took action.

More than half of staff
scheduled to work at
Princess Margaret Hospital
called in sick last Monday,
as well as a significant num-
ber of nurses at the Rand
Memorial Hospital in
Freeport, the Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre and
various public health clinics.

And several nurses contin-
ued the sick-out for the ninth
day yesterday, as around 200
New Providence nurses
attending a BNU meeting on
Monday told the union pres-
ident they are still ‘sick’
despite the government’s
injunction demanding they
return to work.

But not all nurses are sup-
portive of the industrial
action.

A nurse who does not
want to be named told The
Tribune: “It is crystal clear
to me that (there is) a politi-
cal agenda, and the other
nurses are following behind
like lambs to the slaughter!

“Anyone with a brain can
see the economic situation
that the entire world is in!

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What a time to make a
demand for something that
may be extremely important
to everyone, but least of all
to us nurses?”

The nurse argued that
healthcare professionals are
in a better position than most
to receive treatment as doc-
tors will not keep them wait-
ing or charge them for ser-
vices, and she said they
should be grateful to still be
employed in such dire eco-
nomic times.

Ms Hamilton was unavail-
able for comment yesterday,
but president of the Nurses
Association Rosemarie Josey
pledged her support for the
‘sick’ nurses and the die-hard
attitude they displayed on
Monday night.

She said: “It was awesome.
The nurses are really hurt-
ing and I with the public
could realise why it’s so
important for us to get the
insurance.

“I think people are under
the mistaken impression that
they don’t understand the

To have your say on this or any
other issue, email The Tribune
at: letters@tribunemedia.net
or deliver your letter to
The Tribune on Shirley Street,
P.O. Box N-3207

ig He
UUs)
a et
a er a bY |

economic problems.

“They understand it very
well, but they are irate,
because of the way they were
disrespected and dismissed
as if they are of no impor-
tance.

“They found money for
everyone else except the
nurses.

“And it’s sad to even see
the nurses are threatened
with an injunction when they
are just fighting for a basic
right.”



DR HUBERT MINNIS ‘asked the
nurses to consider alternative options’.

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ea eee rr i ee
Another new dawn for the revitalisation of Nassau

C) N THE banks of the St
Lawrence River, at the
very spot where the city of Mon-
treal was founded over three
centuries ago, stands a remark-
able structure built in 1992 atop
the remains of a Victorian office
building.

The Museum of Archaeolo-
gy and History entombs the city's
origins on the site of an earlier
Iroquois settlement known as
Hochelaga. This archeological
crypt preserves the remains of
Montreal's history from every
settlement period — in situ. And
more than 350,000 people visit
this amazing time capsule every
year.

Pointe a Calliere is the heart
of the architectural and cultural
heritage that is Old Montreal, a
district energized by fine restau-
rants, outdoor cafes and people-

DOCTORS HOSPITAL

filled plazas. And this restored
historic zone lies at the centre of
a booming, cosmopolitan city
ranked as one of the world's best
places to live or visit.

Noted American architect
Hugh Newell Johnson once said
that “When you look at a city,
it's like reading the hopes, aspi-
rations and pride of everyone
who built it.” Put another way
by Bahamian architect Pat Rah-
ming, every city requires a dream
recorded in a vision.

"For the city to belong to the
community, the vision must have



been their inspiration as they
worked to create it," Rahming
wrote in a recent article.
"Unfortunately, there appears
not to have emerged a dream of
a post-independent Bahamas.
Rather, for 30-odd years, plans
have been proposed based upon
visions by foreign consultants."

The city of Nassau stretches
from Bay Street to Wulff Road
and from the Eastern Parade to
the long-vanished Western
Parade, where the British Colo-
nial Hilton now stands. It's
descent into an ugly, traffic-

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Arthritis
Dr. Vincent Nwosa

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Dr. Madelene Sawyer

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Dr. Brian Humblestone

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Health For Life



choked ruin has been variously
attributed to the removal of the
public market, the development
of large beachfront hotels, and
the construction of outlying
shopping malls.

Cynics have also laid much of
the blame on the long-running
political vendetta between a pre-
dominantly black government
and the mostly white merchant
princes who once held sway over
Bay Street. But this is a gross
simplification of the current real-
ity, which is perhaps best char-
acterised by the Finlayson fami-
ly's ownership of Solomon's
Mines.

Early efforts to arrest the cap-
ital's decline were led by the late
Norman Solomon, who invited
the respected, Maryland-based
Rouse Corporation to propose
ideas in the 1980s. But Solomon
and his associates did not have
enough political clout at the time
to get beyond first base. So they
resorted to lobbying for tax
exemptions on high-end goods
to help spur downtown spend-
ing and investment.

Once duty-free legislation had
been passed, the business com-
munity and the Ministry of
Tourism set up the Nassau
Tourism Development Board in
1995. At about the same time,
the government was mulling a
land use plan for New Provi-
dence, and Canadian consultants
produced a report on infrastruc-
tural needs and costs. But like
so much else, that project was
shelved, postponing all the hard
choices.

During the late 90s, the
NTDB enjoyed some success.
Workshops were held, sidewalks
rebuilt, street lights installed, a
welcome centre was added to the
cruise port, and many downtown
properties were upgraded. Per-
haps the most significant event
was the $90 million restoration of
the British Colonial Hotel.
Opened in 1923 as the city’s toni-
est resort, this massive structure
on the most historic site in town
had been reduced to a few rooms
operating as a downmarket inn
until new owners acquired it in
1997.

But some leaders saw that
marketing was not the only —
or even the major — issue. Real
change required the input of all
public and private stakeholders
to redefine a vision for the city of
Nassau, as well as to recreate the
physical product. It was also
realised that the regular pro-
cessing of huge numbers of dis-
gusted cruise visitors was bound
to affect the performance of our
number one industry.

In fact, studies confirmed that
almost half of all hotel visitors
never went downtown, while
cruise visitors spent only a frac-
tion of their time and money in
Nassau — an appalling rate of
return from the country's chief
economic activity.

So the NTDB sought to focus
government attention on this
alarming state of affairs. It's mis-
sion was to tip-toe through polit-
ical minefields to promote a
tourism product that was "clean,
safe, uniquely Bahamian and
provided value for money", as
NTDB spokesman Frank Comi-
to put it. From all accounts, it
was as difficult a task as steer-
ing the Titanic away from an ice-
berg collision.

Nassau as we know it today
was largely built during the
Great Depression, with revenues
earned from bootlegging. And a
major overhaul of the town’s
decrepit infrastructure along with
restoration of its historic districts
are long overdue. But experts
have complained for years that
little can be done until the con-
tainer port is relocated. Well,

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“The Arawak Cay
Port Development
Company —

a coalition of
shipping interests
— will also build a
bridge from the
western extension
of Arawak Cay to
connect with the
Bethel Avenue
road extension.”



that is about to happen.
Dredging of the harbour to
expand the cruise port will begin
within weeks and some of the
spoil will be used to add 40 acres
to Arawak Cay's existing 70
acres. Created when the harbour
was dredged back in the 1960s,
this artificial island is already
occupied by a container termi-
nal. It also handles dry bulk car-
goes like sand, cement, steel and
aggregates, as well as potable
water shipped from Andros.
When the current dredging
finishes in the fall, construction
of the new port will begin on
land leased from the govern-
ment. In addition to expanded
container and dry bulk terminals,
the cay will feature a 5.5-acre
ferry terminal for tour boats, the
Fiesta Mail and Bahamas Fer-
ries, while most inter-island ves-
sels will stay at Potters Cay.

‘i Arawak Cay Port
Development Company
—a coalition of shipping inter-
ests — will also build a bridge
from the western extension of
Arawak Cay to connect with the
Bethel Avenue road extension.
Containers will be trucked along
this route to a new 15-acre ware-
house depot at Gladstone Road.

A public offering is planned
for the new port (together with a
$15 million preference share
issue), and the government will
acquire a 20 per cent stake in the
company. Individual sharehold-
ings will be restricted to an upper
limit of 15 per cent, according to
a memorandum of understanding
between the developers and the
government.

Total costs are put at under
$60 million with a rate of return
of more than 12 per cent, and if
all goes as scheduled, the port
will be out of the downtown area
some time next year, presenting
an unprecedented opportunity
to launch the revitalisation
process in earnest. As you might
expect, a lot of ducks are being
moved into place now to achieve
this.

A key player is the newly-cre-
ated Downtown Nassau Part-
nership. This is the public-pri-
vate group that took over from
the Downtown Revitalisation
Committee, which was preced-
ed by the Nassau Economic
Development Commission, that
was gestated by the NTDB,
which developed from an initia-
tive spearheaded by the Duty-
Free Promotion Board. The
DNP itself will eventually be
supplanted by a new city author-
ity created by legislation.

Co-chaired by Tourism Direc-
tor-General Vernice Walkine
and NTDB chief Charles
Klonaris, the Partnership is man-
aged by Bahamian Vaughan
Roberts, a former finance direc-
tor at Baha Mar who has spent
most of his career in the United
States. Dave Feehan, of the

International Downtown Asso-
ciation, and Brad Segal, of the
US-based Progressive Urban
Management Associates, have
been hired as consultants.

Meanwhile, veteran Bahami-
an architect Jackson Burnside
has been commissioned to pre-
pare a master plan for the initial
phase of the improvements. This
will feature an expansion of
Woods Rogers’ Wharf, which
will be turned into a waterfront
pedestrian promenade; con-
struction of the new straw mar-
ket; and — hopefully — lots of
cultural activities.

But there are other — less
official — efforts underway that
look promising. One of these is
called Take Initiative Nassau
(http://www.tin242.com) organ-
ised by an enthusiastic grad stu-
dent named Alastair Knowles.
Tough Call attended the inau-
gural meeting last week at the
Bahamas National Trust head-
quarters on Village Road.

Knowles simply decided he
had a responsibility as a citizen
to help with the Nassau redevel-
opment: "I determined that it
was critical to educate Bahami-
ans on the need for people to
work together with the DNP to
help better the chances of Nas-
sau reaching its full potential.
Vaughn Roberts has a truly
daunting task before him and
he’ll need all the help he can
get."

At last week's meeting,
Roberts made the point that
revitalisation can't be achieved
unless ordinary Bahamians take
ownership of the process. He
invited artists to consider occu-
pying vacant spaces and to dec-
orate derelict buildings. He
urged retailers to work at creat-
ing a better business mix, and
said taxi drivers shouldn't be
parking all day on Bay Street,
while straw vendors would have
to come to terms with the prod-
uct they were offering.

"The average citizen should
take advantage of the opportu-
nities that will be generated by a
new wave of ideas, and our
politicians should focus on the
greater good and make this a
national priority. There are
tremendous economic benefits
not only for downtown property
owners but for over the hill too.
This recession will help bring
about change and we will have
an opportunity to write history
and create new legacies."

IE Pat Rahming's words,
"The city is a complex
thing. It is a place where people
meet, live, shop, and find recre-
ation, entertainment and cultur-
al fulfillment...It is more than the
commerce of the time, more than
the cleanness of the streets or
the number of parking spaces. It
is where the community meets
to celebrate special occasions."

Ever since the 1960s, we have
spent millions of dollars on study
after study by both local and for-
eign experts advising us to clean
up our act, preserve what's left of
our history, protect our environ-
ment and salvage our cultural
heritage. And every year we
ignore this costly advice.

So what, in the end, will our
grandchildren inherit from us?
Will we ever be able to put our
history on show as the city of
Montreal and countless others
have done so successfully? The
past is a precious resource that
we discard at our peril. The
future is in our hands today.

What do you think? Send comments
to larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

LifeChoices

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price of a daily coffee, with no medical required, would

you do it? Would you invest in $300,000 family financial

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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009, PAGE 7



Unqualified persons allowed
to become prison officers

Minister says promotions also offered to people who did not meet criteria

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

TO “BRING CLOSURE?” to a
problem dating back to the May
2007 election, the government has
permitted 25 unqualified persons
to become prison officers and
agreed to offer promotions to peo-
ple who did not meet the neces-
sary criteria, the Minister of
National Security stated.

Tommy Turnquest claimed this
“decisive action” had to be taken
after the former PLP government
took steps to recruit unqualified
candidates to the prison service in
2005 and 2006 when it was “well
known that they did not have the
required post qualifications to be
recruited”.

He said the former government
advised another group that they
were to be promoted though they
lacked the relevant qualifications
and despite the fact that the Public
Service Commission (PSC) had not
ratified the move.

Contributing to the 2009/2010
budget debate, Tommy Turnquest
said that his ministry had been pre-

occupied by “serious
and vexing human
resources problems” in
recent years, including
the “long standing prob-
lem at Her Majesty’s
Prisons resulting from
appointments and pro-
motions well outside of
the rules and regula-
tions of the Public Ser-
vice.”

“We understood that
the position in which |
these unfortunate per-
sons at the prison found
themselves was not of
their making, but was a result of
what appeared to be an effort to
circumvent the rules and regula-
tions of the public service.

“Many questions have been
asked by many persons, including
in this House, as to when these
matters would be brought to clo-
sure. I am now happy to report that
this government has taken the deci-
sive action required to bring these
matters to closure,” said Mr Turn-
quest.

“Of the persons in the 2005 and
2006 squads of Her Majesty’s Pris-

Tommy Turnquest



ons, 41 prison recruits
did not meet the requi-
site qualifications. Of
this number, 25 have
been issued letters of
appointment to prison
officers, and should be
paid by the end of this
month. Of the remain-
ing number, two have
been interdicted, three
| are suspected of tam-
pering with their certifi-
cates, and two have yet
to produce their birth
certificates.

“The remaining nine
persons are still with the Public
Service Commission and should be
concluded by July 1, 2009,” he said.

The minister said that where it is
required, those confirmed “will be
encouraged” to obtain the neces-
sary qualifications to permit them
to be further promoted in the sys-
tem.

Meanwhile, the ministry has tak-
en steps to ensure that “for the
future, everyone recruited to prison
service has the required qualifica-
tions.”

Mr Turnquest said a “grandfa-

New Court of Appeal
justices are appointed

thering policy” has been imple-
mented towards those people with-
out the requisite qualifications who
were advised they were to be pro-
moted, “to permit them to be pro-
moted on the basis of good and
effective service to the prison over
the years.”

He said these people were
informed they would be promot-
ed “on the eve of the 2007 general
election.”

“The PSC has agreed in princi-
ple that the grandfathering policy
will be accepted and implemented
in this case, but it is not to establish
a precedent. Once financial clear-
ance is in place, all officers will be
officially notified of their promo-
tion,” he added.

Attempts to reach Fred Mitchell,
former minister with responsibility
for the public service, for comment
yesterday were unsuccessful as he
was Said to be off the island.

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FINANCE CORPORATION OF
BAHAMAS LIMITED

TWO new Court of Appeal justices will take their
places at the bench in the coming weeks, the Attorney
General's Office announced.

Under Article 99 of the Constitution, Sir George
Newman has been appointed a non-resident Justice of
the Court of Appeal and Justice Stanley John has been
appointed a resident Justice of Appeal.

Sir George's appointment comes into effect on June,
15 while Justice John's takes effect on July 1, a state-
ment by the AG's office said.

Sir George was appointed a judge of the High Court
of England and Wales in May, 1995. He retired from
that court on October 1, 2007 after serving more than 12
years.

Before becoming a judge of the High Court, Sir
George practiced as a barrister.

He was called to the bar in 1965 and was appointed
Queen’s Counsel in 1981. His practice as a barrister
included many appearances before the Privy Council in
a wide variety of cases.

Sir George was among the judges nominated to sit on

the Administrative Court and the Special Immigration
Appeals Commission (SIAC) and is presently the trea-
surer of the Honourable Society of the Middle Temple.

He was appointed chair of the Security Vetting
Appeals Panel of the United Kingdom in February
2009.

Justice John is a citizen of Trinidad and Tobago and
served as a justice of the Court of Appeal in that coun-
try from July, 2002 until June, 2009.

The Trinidadian press reported that he resigned
from this post after making several stinging criticisms of
Trinidad's judicial system.

Justice John was called to the Bar of England and
Wales as a member of the Honourable Society of Lin-
coln’s Inn in July, 1972. He served in private practice in
Trinidad from 1972 to 1994.

In 1994, Justice John was appointed a Puisne Judge
of the High Court of Justice of Trinidad and Tobago.

It has also been announced that current Court of
Appeal judge, Justice Emanuel Osadebay, will demit
office as a Justice of Appeal at the end of this month.



NOTICE

We are pleased to advise the public of the appointment of Mr. Larry
Wilson, Chief Financial Officer, Royal Bank of Canada as a director
of the company effective goth Mav 2009,

D. BURROWS-HAINES (Mrs.)
Corporate Secretary

ongratulations ¢,
Elder Joshua and Effie San ds

me) 8 ety ee 5



Public Consultation on Retail
Pricing for the Electronic
Communications Sector

The Committee for the Privatisation of BTC is pleased

to invite comments from members of the public and

interested parties on its consultation document for a

proposed new Retail Pricing Structure for the
{ Electronic Communications Sector.

t



Oy th

Retail the

pricing
impose specific obligations on price levels and price
changes for operators deemed to have significant

regulation enables regulator to

17th June 1951-2009

Jesliua Lockpwood Soods Sr. of Palmetto Polat Clewtiera and Effie Jeredene Sands nee Welland of
Sern Sooed Elewtiers mere foined in holy matrimony on Yume fei, 19ST
by Eeageliss WOM, Sarringten, ‘Te ‘Aride wes given io merriage by Ber brodher Mr, Cyril feliord,
The atedding party wis ae fotlows:

Porcats of the Bride: Mr, ee es. Cotker Bullard, Parents of the grooms Or, & Mes. Willi Sands,
Maid ef ‘Noner : Ms, Esther Does, Bridesmaids: Mes. Beryl [Sethel) Tiller, Mrs Sheila War,
and ds, Fasepicipe Avin ry. Hest Mun: fr, erulad Bethel, Grermasmen: Wr. Willian Berkel,

Mr. Glusfard Thompicn, and Mir. Audie Carey, Fiearer girls: Mrs. Bewerty (lotr! Fain, Wes. Bade
(Wethell Sites, Mrs. Malena (toeyer! Wilkon, Mrs. Welande [Archer! Harrington
Payetog: Mr. Cerfeton ‘Blair, ‘Towst to ‘Brides parents: Mr. ‘Timotty Gibson, ‘Toust to Groom's parents:
Mr. Jack Ford, ‘Wedding Caordingter: Bra, Rath (Fethel! ladars
Ovganiets Mew. Pisele Sink, Maser of Ceremonies Mr. Marcus Benkel, Trecamaker: Mrs. Taberia Gadat
Thotographer: Mr. George Lune

market power in certain product markets. The
consultation document addresses the current and
proposed approaches to retail price regulation in The
Bahamas.

The Retail Pricing consultation will run for approximately five weeks from
June T?, 2009 to July 17, 2009. Coples of the consultation document are
being distributed to the Administrators’ offices In the Family islands and can
be obtained from the Public Ltiities Commission and the offices of KPMG In
New Providence and Grand Bahama. Copies can also be downloaded from
the Government's website at www. bahamas.gov.bs or the privatisation
website at www. bteprivatisation.com and comments amailed to
info@btcprivatisation.com.

‘Tite Terciene Sond hate deen oo ee ber af Timmins! (poapel chanel for over 60 weirs. See is the founder af
Tenaifer Camas Fabrics ond has worked as do dressmaker for weary 60 years and ib Knows tiroagioul thie
Sahomes for fer eqreflent oork, Iu addition she is Epon for fer eqceifent cooking aod sie fos dewoted fer

/ fife to retiring Ber family, _ 7
Hider Jasiud Coeksedd Fords ir, kos beed & meee of Eeimdnwe Gaigpel for over el yedry dad fas
sereed in worious capacities tireag hou ifs ti. Ae iso memeber of the United Willons Deporimens of
the Aaveciotion of Dretires in tie Bafemos, Ne bos served as chairman of tie United Eiders Council, He
tat Dustice of the Pearce aed mii ridge officer end holds the Queens Hadye af Hamer.

WW foe cal Mp PEE Bou atid eee crus for gour foie fulness.

rom
suit af your children: Sharlene and Jaime! Ligkthooree, Seerg! Sagas, ‘Pastor Toseud Sunde Tr. Freetun
— and Tenfamin Gmith, Jennifer and Kendle Meckjaney 7
Grandrfilaren: Jamaal, Sormine, Jayson and Jomeile Cightbeurns. Kechel, Syptirgn ana Mery! Sands, Kyle
and Ageivon Smith, Amari ans a4 Mc Ainreey
Al af your entnded fariiy dnd friends





PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





St. Andrew’s School Foundation

Development Officer

The Foundation ts committed to the Mlisston of St. Andrew's
School through its financial support of teachers, scholarship
students and building projects. The Foundation is presently
seeking a person to lead its Office of Development.

The Development Officer, a full-time position, reports to
the St. Andrew's School Foundation and will:

- be responsible for designing and overseeing fundraising
campaigns in support of the Foundation’s strategic goals;

develop marketing strategies and materials for public
relations and advertising;

- promote relationships between the School and various
organizations, including the St. Andrew's Alumni and
Priends Association:

oversee the day to day administration of international
charities,

The successful candidate will possess knowledge and
understanding of the School's history and culture; be a goal-
driven individual with strong organizational and social skill;
possess a minimum of a Bachelor's Degree; and be
experienced in fundraising.

Interested candidates should send their CV and a letter of

Interest to:

Development Officer Position
SL Andrew's School Foundation
EO. Box N-4695
Nassau, Bahamas



St Andrew’s 2009 class has
‘best ever’ BGCSE results

88 per cent
of students
achieve
A-C passes

HISTORY was made at St
Andrew’s School this year,
with the graduating class of
2009 obtaining the best aca-
demic results ever at the
school since the introduction
of the BGCSE exams 16
years ago.

Of 68 students, 88 per cent
achieved A-C passes, 15
received five or more As.
The class also boasted the
top student in the Bahamas -
Brolin Xavier, who achieved
10 ‘A’ passes.

Speaking at last week’s
graduation ceremony, St
Andrew’s secondary school
principal Frank Coyle said
that this class “is an excellent

Mizuho Corporate Bank (USA)

Consolidated Balance Sheets
(in Thousands, Except Share Amounts)

Assets
Cash and due from banks (Note 3)
Interest-bearing deposits with banks (Note 3)

Securities (Note 4)
Available-for-sale
Held-to-maturity

Loans and leases (Notes 5 and 21)
Allowance for credit losses (Note 6)
Net loans and leases

Accrued interest receivable and other assets
Total assets

Liabilities ,
Noninterest-bearing deposits
Interest-bearing deposits (Note 9)
Total deposits

Federal funds purchased

Other borrowings (Note /0)

Accrued taxes, interest payable and other liabilities
Total liabilities

Stockholder’s equity (Note 13)

Common stock—$100 par value; (authorized, issued and outstanding
984,742 shares in 2008 and 2007)

Capital surplus

Accumulated deficit

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

Total stockholder’s equity

Total liabilities and stockholder’s equity

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

El] ERNST & YOUNG

Report of Independent Auditors

Board of Directors
Mizuho Corporate Bank (USA)
New York, New York

December 31
2008 2007

$ 598,058 $ 28,882
1,042 -

88,021
33,015

2,506,694

270,260
34,017

2,502,271

(18,116) (10,289)
2,488,578 2,491,982

61,950
$3,270,664

69,544
$2,894,685

$ 163,947
1,912,901
2,076,848

$ 101,608
1,348,312
1,449,920

- 270,000
63,509 66,129
102,674 89,027

2,243,031 1,875,076

98,474
1,222,036 1,222,036
(285,141) (276,240).

(7,736) (24,661)
1,027,633 1,019,609

98,474

$3,270,664 $2,894,685

Ernst & Young LLP
5 Times Square
New York , New York 10036-6530

Tel: +1 212 773 3000
www.ey.com

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Mizuho Corporate Bank
(USA) (the “Bank”) as of December 31, 2008 and 2007, and the related consolidated statements
of operations, stockholder’s equity and cash flows for the years then ended. These financial
statements are the responsibility of the Bank’s management. Our responsibility is to express an

opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United
States. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable
assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement.
An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and
disclosures in the consolidated financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and
significant estimates made by management, and evaluating the overall consolidated financial
statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all
material respects, the consolidated financial position of Mizuho Corporate Bank (USA) at
December 31, 2008 and 2007, and the consolidated results of its operations and its cash flows for
the years then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United

States.

March 26, 2009

Barnet ¥ rer

Interested persons may obtain a complete copy of the Audited Accounts
from SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas)Limited, P.O. Box N-7788,

West Bay Street, Nassau Bahamas. :



ST ANDREW’S SCHOOL’S graduating class of 2009.

example of how we at St
Andrew’s continue to try to
raise the educational bar here
in the Bahamas.”

Success

He credited the solid foun-
dation the students obtained
during the primary years pro-
gramme and the school’s
“vastly improved” middle
school programme with the
success of this year’s gradu-
ating class.

“When we read in the
national press about the ‘D+’
national average, this class
thought we single-handedly
brought it up from a ‘D’ - no,
but we must remember that
in the ‘not so good old days’
only a select few took the
GCE, over 90 per cent of the
students here in the Bahamas
did not get the opportunity
to sit any GCE , zero passes,
therefore if you had worked
out the national average in
those ‘not so good old days’

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the national average would
have been close to ‘U’,
unclassified,” he said.

“Tf we entered only 15, the
average pass for St Andrew’s
would have been ‘A’, if we
had entered only 45 we
would have had 100 per cent
A-C, but no, we enter every
student, all 68.”

Mr Coyle said the school’s
head boy and head girl were
recognised at Government
House for having GPAs of
4.0.

While the class of 2009
were breaking academic
records they were also break-
ing sporting records in soft-
ball, soccer, volleyball and
swimming, he said.

The students were also
very actively involved in
school productions, music
and theatre, putting on
“Alice in Wonderland”,
“Mid-Summers Night
Dream” and “Animal Farm”
to name a few.

Mr Coyle expressed his
feeling of honour and pride
to be presiding over the grad-
uation ceremony and advised
the students to always keep
their “eyes on the prize” in
life.



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Bs 0708



THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009, PAGE 9



Andros satellite farms revitalised

m@ By GLADSTONE THURSTON

THE Bahamas Agricultural and Indus-
trial Corporation has commenced revi-
talisation of its 1,500-acre satellite farms
in North Andros with the initial focus
on livestock.

This will be extended to incorporate
fruit trees while expanding private fruit
tree nurseries, BAIC executive chairman
Edison Key told members of the House
of Assembly last week.

He was speaking during the debate on
the government’s $1.7 billion budget for
fiscal year 2009/2010 which begins July 1.

BAIC is mandated to stimulate, facili-
tate and encourage agriculture develop-
ment in the Bahamas, and expand and
create opportunities for Bahamians to
participate in the economic development
of the country.

“Especially during this eco-
nomic downturn,” said Mr Key,
“BAIC’s mandate has become
more vital to stimulate employ-
ment and the economy.

“To this end BAIC has

embarked on a number of ini- |j

tiatives focusing on the expan-
sion of agriculture production,
greater utilisation of BAIC’s

land portfolio, business adviso- [7
ry services, and the expansion

of craft centres and craft train-
ing.”

Already BAIC has launched
the North Andros Agricultural
Initiatives Project, a major com-
ponent of which is the utilisa-

tion of land that has already been cleared

and not in full production.

This includes the acquisition of 561



acres in the vicinity of the San
Andros airport from Kerzner
International.

“Funding for this is in place and
it is anticipated that this matter
will be resolved in short order,”
said Mr Key. “Applications for
this prime agriculture land were
over subscribed and the survey-
ing and issuing of leases are a mat-
ter of priority for BAIC.”

Another project that forms a
part of this initiative is the 800-
acre former Morgan Farms in
which BAIC has a 40 per cent
lease interest.

It is BAIC’s intention to estab-
lish a nursery and other related
activities on a portion of this and lease
300 acres to vegetable producers Lucayan
Tropical.

BAIC EXECUTIVE
chairman Edison Key

“Ttis BAIC’s view that the presence of
Lucayan Tropical in North Andros as a
domestic investor will auger very well
for the further development of agricul-
ture,” he said.

It will create jobs, enhance marketing
of agriculture products from North
Andros, add value to agriculture prod-
ucts, enhance technical skills, improve
methods of farming, and save on foreign
exchange, he said.

Applications are still being received
from Bahamians interested in leasing
land in the proposed Andros agro-indus-
trial park.

“Therefore, we will continue to nurture
this desire to establish operations in
Andros through our promotional activi-
ties, with emphasis on agro processing
and the production of ornamental
plants.”

Jerome Thompson to make landmark voyage for the disabled

A NEW horizon will be met as
Adventures Unlimited Bahamas and
Jerome Thompson attempt to cir-
cumnavigate New Providence and
Paradise Island on Saturday, July
11.

If successful, Mr Thompson will
be the first visually disabled person
to be recorded accomplishing this
feat in the Bahamas.

The venture is scheduled to begin
at 10am at Hurricane Hole Marina,
located on Paradise Island, with a
brief pass-by at noon of the
Junkanoo Summer Festival on
Woodes Rodgers Wharf. It will end
at Hurricane Hole Marina at approx-
imately 3pm, followed immediately
by an official ceremony.

Mr Thompson and his team have
invited the public to witness the his-



JEROME THOMPSON is sre nilsting’s a vessel during a training session

with Captain Glen Bain.

toric moment. This event will also
be the launch of Adventures Unlim-
ited Bahamas, a non-profit organi-
sation licensed on January 8, 2009.

This non-profit entity has as its
goal to promote, encourage and sup-
port persons with disabilities in pur-
suits of various endeavors that might

seem to be impossible.

July’s venture is a solo boat trip
which is being undertaken by Mr
Thompson, the organisation’s presi-
dent and founder. As a blind per-
son, Mr Thompson is endeavoring to
showcase that persons with disabili-
ties in the Bahamas, no matter what
their limitations, can rise to and con-
quer any challenge once determined
and committed.

Mr Thompson said he was
inspired by persons worldwide who
have different types of disabilities
and who have accomplished great
endeavors in spite of their various
limitations.

Persons of any category of dis-
ability in the Bahamas will be assist-
ed by the organisation in respect to
accomplishing various projects.

Mr Thompson’s history-making
venture is supported by the Bahamas
Ministry of Tourism and Aviation,
the Bahamas National Council for
Disability, Sir Durward Knowles and
the Independence Celebration Com-
mittee. Mr Thompson acknowledges
his attempt would not be possible
without the assistance given to him
by his trainer, Captain Glen Bain,
Harbour Bay Marina dock master
Lundy Robinson, meteorologist
Greg Thompson and businessman
Peter Roker. Additionally, the ven-
ture received sponsorship from Hur-
ricane Hole Marina, the Bank of the
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THE TRIBUNE

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

18TH JUNE, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00332

Whereas SOLOMON EZEKIEL NEWTON, of Pinewood Gardens in the Southern
District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
Letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate of MABLE NEWTON, late
of Yellow Elder Gardens in the Southern District of the Island of New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

18TH JUNE, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00333

Whereas SHAKIRA SANDS-BURROWS, of Millennium Gardens in the Western
District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate of JOHN SAMUEL SANDS
late of Malcolm Road in the Southern District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

18TH JUNE, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00334

Whereas ANDREW DWAYNE FORBES, of No. 19 High Vista Apartments in the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration
with the Will annexed of the Real and Personal Estate of DIANE M. MILLER late
of No. 580 S.E. 5th Street in the City of Pampano Beach in the State of Florida, one
of the States of the United States of America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

18TH JUNE, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00335

Whereas GRANVILLE CHRISTOPHER KNOWLES, of Miami Florida, U.S.A.,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration
with the Will annexed of the Real and Personal Estate of GRANVILLE JOSEPH
KNOWLES, late of 214 S.E. Lincoln Circle N., St. Petersburg, Pinellas, Florida,
US.A., deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

18TH JUNE, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00336

Whereas ARLINGTON WILLIAM DEAN, of Fox Hill, Eastern District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of CECIL A. HAMILTON, late of 11224 South Emerald
Street Chicago Illinois U.S.A., deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar



FROM page one

public.”

The week-long sick out
meant hospitals had a severely
reduced capacity to provide
emergency services in the Acci-
dent and Emergency depart-
ment, including significant
delays in patients receiving
medical attention, Mr Brown
said.

And as the Princess Margaret
Hospital operated on a skeleton
staff the hospital was forced to
close surgical, paediatric and
medical clinics on Monday and
Tuesday last week.

All surgeries, except emer-
gency surgical procedures, were
cancelled and there was a
reduction of dialysis treatment
for patients with kidney failure
to half their normal levels
throughout the week.

However nurses insist they
are still “sick” as they refuse to
accept any alteration to the
industrial agreement’s promise
of a group medical insurance
plan despite the economic
downturn.

Minister of Health Dr
Hubert Minnis explained the
budget would not allow for
nurses four per cent pay rise or
health insurance scheme this
fiscal year and that implement-
ing the insurance would require
nurses to take a pay cut of
$41.69.

But a nurse at the South
Beach Health Centre said she
would gladly make the sacrifice

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009, PAGE 11

LOCAL NEWS

Nurses call in sick
for a ninth day

' Teich es 1g
Peau Merc Yai es

ys

eee eee



PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL operated on a skeleton staff.

rather than continue to pay
$500 per month for medical
insurance.

She said: “I’d be happy to
take the cut, that’s nothing
compared to what I pay.
Because I am a woman our
insurance is high, and I am a
nurse so our insurance is more
than the general population.”

Nurses Association president
Rosemarie Josey said all nurses
face high medical insurance
fees because they are at high
risk, and several nurses who
had invested in failed compa-
ny Clico (Bahamas) Ltd are
now even more vulnerable.

Mrs Josey said: “Nurses are
injured on the job and verbally
and physically abused, and
nurses feel hurt because they
were under the impression Dr
Minnis really cared, and they
were very disappointed because
his message is that they don’t
understand what’s going on,
when all they wanted was some

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



reassurance; a date when they
will get the insurance.

“Tf we fall sick now we are
treated just like a public
patient. The only benefit we get
is what they would give to any
government worker.

“There is no special room in
the hospital, we just lay on the
same bed next to the other
patients.

“If the government could
find money for the police, and
to improve their insurance, why
do the nurses still not have any
insurance at all?”

Sandilands Rehabilitation
Centre nurse Lakerah Rolle
said: “The nature of our job
means we are exposed to chem-
icals, carcinogens and radioac-
tivity, back strains from lifting,
and for the H1N1 virus scare
and SARS, nurses are at the
entry point for these diseases,
we are the first to see any
patient.

“We understand that it is the
nature of the job, but we feel as
though we shouldn’t have to
worry about paying for this
medical expense.”

The South Beach Health
Centre nurse added: “What we
have to go through now for this
health insurance is ridiculous.

“T have been a nurse for sev-
en years and I cannot see
myself working for the govern-
ment much longer because it is
so discouraging.

“T wouldn’t encourage an
animal on the road to do nurs-
ing.”

(FOR MORE ON THIS
STORY, SEE PAGE 5).

(=) THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

ORIENTATION AND ADVISEMENT FOR
FALL SEMESTER 2009

ORIENTATION AND ADVISEMENT WILL TAKE PLACE FRIDAY, JUNE 19,
2009 FROM 9 AM TO 1 PM IN ROOMS B-5 AND B-6 FOR THE FOLLOWING
STUDENTS ACCEPTED IN THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS (BBA) PRO-

GRAMMES:

1 STUDENTS WITH EARLY ACCEPTANCE
2 STUDENTS WHO HAVE COMPLETED COLLEGE PREP
3. STUDENTS WHO HAVE COMPLETED THE UPGRADING PROGRAM

(CEES)

ALL STUDENTS SHOULD BRING COPIES OF ACCEPTANCE LETTERS, COM-
PLETION LETTERS AND RELEVANT EXAM RESULTS SUCH AS THE BGCSE.

NOTICE

Please be advised that the following offices will be closed on

Friday, June 19, 2009 and will re-open on Monday, June 22,

2009 at the usual business hours.

BAHAMAS FIRST GENERAL
INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

NASSAU UNDERWRITERS
INSURANCE AGENCY LTD. - COLLINS AVENUE AND
HARBOUR BAY LOCATIONS

We regret any inconveniences caused.

Signed: Management





PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamas fails to fully comply with minimum

standards to eliminate human trafficking

Police probe child sex film

Patterson said, victims have to }
wait four, five, even six years i
before their case reaches the }

FROM page one

protecting is of great concern
to all.

“The prime minister is very
right when he says that many
people in our nation have been
closing their eyes, refusing to
accept that this can happen in
their homes, in schools, in the
community, to their children.
Our prime minister is very
right when he speaks of the
impact (of) the horrendous
delay that victims have to
endure in order to get justice,”
she said.

On an average, Dr Dean-

Supreme Court.

“(There was a) recent inci- }
dent where a 10 year old had }
to wait for her case to reach }
court until she was 16 years old
and then the perpetrator }
walked. We can all imagine
what she feels about a system
that allows this. It is unaccept- }
able that children and victims }
of sexual assault have to con- }
tinue to undergo this long }
drawn-out re-victimisation by a }
system that appears not to }
care about their violation,” she }

said.

Ministry of Finance
Treasury Department

FROM page one

strongly promoted official
awareness of, and coordina-
tion on, trafficking issues
within the country through
mechanisms such as the multi-
agency Trafficking in Persons
Working Group, but made
“no visible effort to reduce
the demand for commercial
sex acts, and it did not engage
in any other awareness-rais-
ing efforts directed at
Bahamian citizens,” the
report said.

The US State Department
also found the Bahamas
“Jacked a comprehensive anti-
trafficking law for most of the
reporting period, faced rele-
vant resource and capacity
constraints, and confronted
multiple competing law
enforcement priorities.”

The report pointed out that

despite the fact that the
Bahamas prohibited all forms
of trafficking through its Traf-
ficking in Persons Prevention
and Suppression Act of 2008
and previously enacted laws
prohibit trafficking-related
offences, the government did
not arrest or prosecute any
trafficking offenders during
the reporting period.

The report found that in
some situations employers
coerce migrant or temporary
workers — legal and illegal
— to work longer hours, at
lower pay, and in conditions
not permitted under local
labour law by changing the
terms of contracts, withhold-
ing travel documents, refus-
ing transportation back home,
threatening to withdraw the
employer-specific and
employer-held permits, or to
turn the employee over to
immigration.

According to the new rating
system introduced in this
year’s report, the Bahamas
ranks as a “Tier 2” country.
This means that while it is not
fully compliant with interna-
tional standards of fighting
the trafficking of persons, it
is taking significant steps to
remedy this.

For the past three years the
Bahamas was included in the
report as a ‘Special Case’ due
to limited data.

During the reporting peri-
od for the new report, the
State Department said, the
Bahamian government
“enacted comprehensive anti-
trafficking legislation, added
skilled personnel to anti-traf-
ficking agencies and offices,
consulted with other govern-
ments about trafficking issues
and assistance, and continued
to train government personnel
on trafficking issues.”

However, the report points
out that the government
failed to make noticeable
efforts to proactively identi-
fy victims among vulnerable
populations, such as foreign
women and girls engaged in
illegal prostitution or women
and girls intercepted at its
borders who may be attempt-
ing to enter the country to
engage in illegal prostitution.

The US State Department
recommends that the govern-
ment take steps to identify
“trafficking victims among
migrants attempting to enter
the Bahamas illegally; inves-
tigate, prosecute, and punish
suspected human trafficking
offenders; create and imple-
ment a national trafficking
public awareness and preven-
tion programme; and allocate
resources for the victim assis-
tance measures mandated by
the new anti-trafficking law.”

Announcement
To All Merchant and Vendors

Mother’s fears for missing boys | Murder victim ‘targeted’
FROM page one FROM page one

but were chased by the group. The pursuers then opened
fire on Mr Johnson, shooting him a number times in his
body.

The victim collapsed in the grounds of the Tom "The
Bird" Grant Sports and Recreational Complex in the Yel-
low Elder area and was pronounced dead by EMS officers.

The victim's brother was able to escape the area
unharmed, police said.

According to the head of the Central Detective Unit,
Superintendent Elsworth Moss, the victim was on bail for
a murder charge dating back to a case in 2006.

Up to press time police had not uncovered a motive
for the killing but suspect Mr Johnson was targeted by his
killers.

"We believe they were pretty much targeting him,” said
Mr Moss, who added that police were still trying to ascer-
tain if the murder was possibly drug or gang related.

He could not say if the victim knew his attackers.

Police are asking for anyone with information on the
murder to contact the police at 919, 502-9991, or 328-TIPS.

The killing has pushed the country's murder count to
an unofficial 34 and comes just days after brothers Matthew
and Marvin Armbrister were shot at a nightspot early Sat-
urday morning. Matthew, 23, a former Tribune employee on
the pressroom staff, was killed in Dominique's Restaurant
on Boyd Road.

His 24-year-old brother was left fighting for his life in the
Intensive Care Unit at Princess Margaret Hospital.

The shootings reportedly came after an altercation
between the brothers and another man at the restaurant.

The Treasure wishes to advise that for goods and
services supplied or rendered to Government
Ministries and Departments during the 2008/2009
fiscal year, you are hereby requested to submit:

the police, the Defence Force and the South Andros community failed
to turn up any sign of her sons.

“T feel like if they were somewhere in the bushes something would
have been found. The helicopters and the dogs would have found
something, but there was nothing, that’s why I think they were kid-
napped,” she told The Tribune.

Ms Clarke said she has told her suspicions to the police and was told
they would investigate.

Although the official police search has been suspended, relatives and
members of the community have vowed to keep looking for the boys
for at least another couple of days, Ms Clarke said.

She said that while her mother and her husband are struggling to
cope with the devastating situation, she is attempting to hold up and put
on a brave face.

Ms Clarke said she still hopes that her two boys will be safely
returned to her.

Brothers Deangelo and Marcelo disappeared while crabbing in
South Andros last Tuesday evening.

The alarm was raised when the boys did not return to their grand-
parents’ house after nightfall.

Officers from the Kemp’s Bay police station were alerted and joined
relatives in their search on Wednesday morning.

Local residents and Defence Force officers joined the search, and
canine units were flown in from Nassau.

Deangelo lives in Andros with his grandparents. Marcelo, who lives
in Nassau with his parents, was visiting when the children went miss-

Signed a ‘ : - : aces
nyone who may have any information about the missing
The Treasurer brothers should call Crime Stoppers immediately on
328-TIPS (8477).

. The original of all outstanding invoices to
the Accounts Section of the relevant Ministry or
Department

2. A copy of those invoices to:
The Public Treasury Department
First Floor
British American House
(George Street & Navy Lion Road)

NO LATER THAN THURSDAY 24th, JUNE 2009

Please note that the PURCHASE ORDER NO.
Must be indicated on all invoices.



Bereaved family of five-month-old
girl plans to sue over allegations

charged in connection with the baby’s death.

No one was charged, and the police later said three
persons were questioned but were later released.

On June 10, the infant's family rejected the alle-
gations of molestation. Mr Moss explained that the
child had been prescribed anti-biotics which led to
diarrhoea.

This condition caused diaper rash and chafing
which hospital staff could have confused for signs of
molestation, he said.

According to Mr Moss and Police Commissioner
Reginald Ferguson, a death certificate lists the cause
of death as respiratory failure.

A complete pathologist report is expected within six
weeks, police said.

FROM page two


















orate the family’s claims.

"We have to see what the damages are and hope-
fully these people will understand the error of their
ways and come to the table instead of thrashing this
out in the courts," he said.

Lynera Saunders died on June 5, two hours after
she was taken to hospital for treatment.

Police said in their initial report that the child "may
have been molested" and that they were questioning
several persons in connection with the matter.

The news sparked national outrage and calls for a
massive march to parliament to push for reform of
child protection laws.

Last week, an angry mob gathered in Bank Lane
after rumours circulated that a suspect was to be

Save BIG Right Now!
GOVERNMENT NOTICE

MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS & TRANSPORT TENDER FOR CONSTRUCTION OF
CUSTOMS SCANNER MACHINE BUILDING THOMPSON BOULEVARD,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

2.0L Automatic - LOADED

was $26,866.00
NOW $22,800.00

Interested Contractors are invited to tender for the construction of a building at the Customs Department
Compound on Thompson Boulevard, Nassau to house their container scanning machine.

SCHEDULE FOR TENDER OPENING

Companies interested in tendering may attend a pre-tender meeting at the Ministry of Public Works and
Transport, Conference Room, 3rd Door of the Ministry's building on .J.F.K. Drive at 10:00 a.m. on 22nd
June, 2009 which will be followed by a site visit.

1

All tender bids must include the following:

2008 FORD TAURUS SEL
3.5L Automatic
Leather Interior - LOADED
was $41,304.00
— NOW $35,200.00

* Complete tender document
+ Copy of current Business Licence
* National Insurance Board letter of good standing

Sealed Tender submissions are to be deposited in the Tender Box located at:

Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance
3rd Floor
Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
West Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas

3 years or 36,000 miles warranty, 3 years roadside assistant, 3 years rust protections
warranty and licensed and inspected up to birthday.

NOW THAT'S REALLY A 23[ ](@Deal
FRIENDLY MOTORS CO. LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 * FAX: 328-6094

Tender submissions must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Tuesday, 11. July, 2009. Tenderers are
invited to attend the opening at 10:00 a.m., Tuesday, 7” July, 2009 at the Tenders Board.

The Ministry of Public Works and Transport reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.

Signed:
Nicole Campbell Actg.
Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Public Works & Transport

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com ¢ WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS

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—
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—



WORLD CHAMPION Donald Thomas (shown below and far right at the ‘08 Beijing Olympic Games) and reigning national champion Ramon Higgs
are expected to compete against each other in the men’s high jump at the National Open Track and Field Championships at Thomas A Robinson Track

and Field Stadium June 26-27...

IN the continuation of some
of the match-ups expected at
the National Open Track and
Field Championships, set for
June 26-27 at the Thomas A
Robinson Track and Field Sta-
dium, the Bahamas Association
of Athletic Associations is
focusing on the men’s high
jump.

Two of the athletes featured
are world champion Donald
Thomas and reigning national
champion Ramon Higgs, who
pulled off the upset during the
2008 nationals.

DONALD THOMAS

Event: High Jump

Personal Best: 2.35m/7' 7”

Season Best: 2.30m/7' 6 1/2”

Height: 6' 3” (75kg)

Weight: 165lbs (1.9m)

D.O.B. July Ist 1984

Age: 25

Hometown: Freeport Grand
Bahama

Name of College: Auburn
University

Name of High School: Bishop
Michael Eldon



Ramon Higgs

College Coach: Henry Rolle,
Jerry Clayton

Thomas took up the sport in
early 2006, having previously
played basketball. He cleared
2.22 metres in his first meet, and
just months later he finished
fourth at the 2006 Common-
wealth Games with a 2.23m
jump.

In the 2007 indoor season he
cleared 2.30m for the first time,

and eventually jumped 2.33m
in March in Fayetteville,
Arkansas. In July 2007, he
cleared 2.35m on the world
record track in Salamanca,
Spain.

The result was a new person-
al best and the world season’s
best at the time. He then won
the World Championships in
Osaka, again with a 2.35m
jump. He also won gold at the
2007 IAAF World Athletics
Final. However, the Olympic
competition in 2008 turned out
to be a major disappointment
for Thomas, who only made
2.20m in the qualifying round
and finished 21st overall.

RAMON HIGGS

Event: High Jump

Personal Best: 2.21m/7' 2”

Season Best: 2.21m/7' 2”

Height: 6'0” (1.71m)

Weight: 150lbs (80kg)

D.O.B. January 24th 1991

Age: 18

Hometown: Freeport Grand
Bahama

Raymond Higgs kept the
under-17 triple jump title in the

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Bahamas, taking over from
2006 champion Gerard Brown.

Higgs third-round 14.76m
effort into a -2.0 metres per sec-
ond headwind, his first of three
attempts over 14.5m, gave him

TENNIS
KNOWLES/BHUPATHI
WIN OPENER

BAHAMIAN Mark
Knowles and Mahesh Bhu-
pathi of India won their first
round doubles match at the
Aegon International in East-
bourne, Great Britain.

The duo, seeded number
two, pulled off a 4-6, 7-6 (4),
10-3 decision over Stephen
Huss of Australia and Ross
Hutchinson of Great Britain.

Knowles and Bhupathi will
now go on to play the team
of Travis Parrott of the US
and Filip Polasek of Slovakia
in the quarter-final of the
small field of 16 teams.

The top seeded team is
Lukas Dlouhy of the Czech
Republic and Leander Paes
of India. They are coming off
their triumph as champions of
the French Open Grand Slam
at Roland Garros.

Dlouhy and Paes have
moved into third place on the
ATP computer rankings with
3,740 points, dropping
Knowles and Bhupathi to
fourth with 2,535.

The American identical
twin brothers of Bob and
Mike Bryan are back on top
with 5,665, while Daniel
Nestor and Nenad Zimonjic,
who at one time stood out
front, are in second with 5,110.

TRACK
CAC AGE GROUP

THE US Virgin Islands

his second gold medal in Provo,
after setting a new high jump
record on day one.

With long jump on day three,
he could be on course for a rare
sweep. Last year, the three-time

arrived yesterday as the first
of the 20 countries expected
to compete in the Central
American and Caribbean Age
Group Championships that is
slated to get underway Thurs-
day at Thomas A Robinson
Track and Field Stadium. All
of the other countries are
expected to arrive today.

Additionally, Neville ‘Ted-
dy’ McCook, the IAAF coun-
cil member and area repre-
sentative and Victor Lopez
were due to arrive yesterday.

Accreditation for the cham-
pionships have already gotten
underway at the Games Vil-
lage at the Nassau Palm
Resort and Conference Cen-
ter.

The morning sessions for
the multi-event championships
are scheduled to get under-
way at 8:30am with the after-
noon sessions starting at
1:30pm. Friday’s morning ses-
sion starts at 8:30am with the
afternoon one at 2pm.

TRACK
JUNIOR NATIONALS

THE Bahamas Association
of Athletic Associations is
scheduled to host the Nation-
al Junior Championships at
Thomas A Robinson Track
and Field Stadium this week-
end. The trials are set to begin
at 6pm Friday and continue
lpm Saturday. They will serve
as the final trials for team
selection for the [IAAF World
Youth and Jr Pan American
Championships.



high jump champ of Freeport,
Grand Bahama was third in the
long jump.

In 2009, he set a new Carifta
record in the high jump of
2.21m (7'-2”) for men under 20.

YOUR CONNECTION-TO THE WORLO

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER — GENERAL INSURANCE

2009 - 2010

The Bahamas Telecommunicaiions Company Lid.
(BTC) is pleased to invite qualified Companies/Firms
to submit a proposal to provide the Company with
General Insurance coverage. These policies include
Employers Liability, Money, Group Personal Acci-
dent, Open Marine Cargo, Fidelity Guarantee and
Public/Products Liability.

Interested companies/firms may collect a Tender
Specification from the Security's Desk located in the
Administrative building on John F. Kennedy Drive, be-
tween the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday

through Friday.

The deadline for submission of tenders is Monday
lenders should be sealed and

July 6th, 2009.
marked “TENDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE’

and

should be delivered to the attention of the ‘Mr. |. Kirk
Griffin Acting President and CEO.’

BIC RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY,

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PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Police recover more

than 60 per cent of
team’s belongings

Bg By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WITH more than 60 per cent
of their belongings recovered,
members of our women’s
national volleyball team
breathed a sigh of relief, but
they will have to wait a little
longer before they return home
from Bridgetown, Barbados.

Yesterday, head coach
Joseph “Joe Moe” Smith said
they spent a lot of time at one of
the police stations identifying
items from nine bags that were
eventually recovered.

“Four bags are still missing,
so things are looking good,”
Smith said. “But in those nine
bags that we discovered, none
of the expensive items were
found. We’re also still missing

me and Anishka Rolle’s pass-
port.”

Since the robbery of the
team’s locker on Friday night
at the Garfield Sober National
Gymnasium when the Bahamas
was playing host Barbados in
the second round of the
NORCECA 2010 World Cham-
pionships qualifying round, the
Bahamas was set to leave today.

But Smith said they won’t
leave Barbados until 2pm
Thursday.

Team manager Lloyd “Rat-
ty” Davis said they are still wait-
ing for the Bahamas Volleyball
Federation and some of the
players to show some support.

“We know they know we are
still on the island,” said Davis,
who indicated that they haven’t
seen anybody since the tourna-
ment ended Sunday night.

“It’s very embarrassing, but
we have to give the police force
(in Barbados) a lot of credit
because they are doing an excel-
lent job in recovering the bags.”

Davis noted that the police
are questioning a number of
persons, but they haven’t
charged anybody as yet.

In the meantime, Davis said
the players are still in high spir-
its.

“Everybody is joking around
and laughing and having a good
time,” he said. “The only thing
left for us to do now is wait until
we leave. But we can’t afford
to let this keep us down.”

Davis said the team was able
to accomplish their ultimate
goal, which was to qualify for
the third round of the 2010
World Championships after
beating St Lucia in the playoffs.

‘Top swimmers’ day at Custom Aquatics

EVE McLeod and Lia Mon-
cur celebrated their ‘top swim-
mers’ day at Custom Aquatics
Limited.

Four of the swim school’s stu-
dents, Kehli and Kristin Lewis
Johnson (not shown) have
reached their ‘fish’ level and all
four are just five years old.

‘Fish’ can swim a correct
freestyle with side breathing,
do racing dives, deep dive to
six feet, swim overarm back-
stroke and even snorkel with
mast fins and snorkel breath-
ing.
Top all round swimmer is
Kyla Basden who, at age ten,
is already a medley swimmer
and recently won three firsts at
her Xavier’s swim meet.

Most improved went to her
sister Khara Basden and five-
year-old Cainan Tucker.

Finishing the awards list was
‘instant swimmer’ Vance
Wheaton who, at three years
old, learned to swim indepen-



a

Jack McLeod

Eve McLeod

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

WITH a series of cancella-
tions on the schedule of the
International Softball Federa-
tion, the Bahamas will have an
opportunity to host a regional
tournament featuring the best
teams in the English speaking
Caribbean.





LIA Moncur (left) and Eve McLeod get in swimming motion...

dently in less than 10 days.
Custom Aquatics (in its 15th
year) and Fran Young Doyle

offers private, semi-private and
custom group lessons in most
watersports.



LIA Moncur and Eve McLeod make a splash...

Bahamas to host softball tourney in October

The Bahamas Softball Feder-
ation (BSF) is scheduled to host
the English Speaking Caribbean
Countries Softball Association
Tournament before the year’s
end with a tentative date set for
October.

With a the men’s Central and
American and Caribbean
Games qualifier cancelled and
in search of a venue and the
women’s tournament also in
jeopardy, the ISF was forced to
readjust its schedule.

The 7th Pan American
Games, set for July 31 in Mara-
cay, Venezuela, will also serve as
a women’s qualifier for the
CAC Games, scheduled for
December 12 in San Pedro Sula,
Honduras.

The men’s team remains with-
out a qualifier at this time,
therefore their national team
plans remain on hold for the
moment.

Burket Dorsett, president of
the Bahamas Softball Federa-
tion, said the tournament was
created to fill a void for many
countries seeking qualification.

He said the Bahamas will put
its best foot forward to ensure
that its past performances at the
ESCCSA tournament will be
met and perhaps exceeded.

The BSF has been asked to
revisit and host the ESCCSA
tournament. The organising
committee of the latter has
asked the tournament to have
it sanctioned and placed on the
calendar, hopefully to serve as a
qualifier for either the Pan Am
or CAC Games.

“We have sent out corre-
spondence to many of the teams
in the region and already we
have been receiving responses

on a very positive note,” he said.

“Already we have commit-
ments from Turks Island,
Jamaica, Netherlands Antilles,
and the Cayman Islands but we
are still waiting on commitments
from a few others to see if they
will take place in the revitaliza-
tion of this tournament. The last
time this tournament was held
was in the 1970s and the
Bahamas looks to continue this
legacy of success.”

Dorsett said with a number
of countries backing out of
regional qualifiers it increases
the Bahamas’ chances of making
the cut in the case of the women
and with the men, a long road of
qualification lies ahead.

“The BSF has been advised
by CONCASA that the host
country for both men and
women qualifiers have been
advised that they can no longer
host these qualifying rounds.
What they did in the case of the
ladies is combine the CAC qual-
ifier with the Pan Am Games.

“Because of economic condi-
tions, things have been extreme-
ly tough for many South Amer-
ican countries and throughout
the region so some countries
have opted not to attend these
games,” he said.

“In that qualifying round, the
first five teams will qualify for
the World Championship, then
the top eight teams will qualify
for the CAC Games. With many
countries not attending I think it
forces the organising commit-
tee of both to restrategise and
find another format for teams
to find a means to the CAC
games and it puts our men in
jeopardy with less options
before them."



THE TRIBUNE

S
i

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17,



PAGE

15

ts

2009





Thomas,
Higgs in
face off
spotlight...

See page 15

Fireman burns up standings

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

hristening the new

track at the Olympic

Stadium in Berlin,

Germany, Sunday,
Chris “Fireman” Brown surged
to the top of the men’s 400m
standings for the [IAAF World
Athletics Tour.

The tour features a maximum
of 25 IAAF Permit Meetings
divided into the 1) Golden
League Meetings and Super
Grand Prix Meetings, and 2)
Grand Prix Meetings.

Smacked around the 12th
IAAF World Championships in
Berlin August 15-23, the event
is set to culminate with the
IAAF/VTB Bank World Ath-
letics Final in Thessaloniki,
Greece, slated for September
12-13.

Only a limited amount of ath-
letes will be allowed to compete
based on their overall positions
in their respective events in the
series of meets in Europe.

Prize money for the World
Athletics Final will range from
$30,000 for first place to $2,000
for eighth place.

In those events where the
field will be extended to 12,
those finishing 9th to 12th will
each collect $1,000.

Brown, the 30-year-old
Eleuthera native, is one of five
male contenders, along with the
five females, who are in the run-
ning for the Golden League
Jackpot of $1 million in the six
meets after his victory in Berlin.

Competing in his third meet

SS ee

Sa



i ) lll ut

CHRIS BROWN, of the Bahamas, after he won 400m at ISTAF Golden
League Athletics Meeting in Berlin on Sunday...
(AP Photo/Michael Sohn)

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Thirty-year-old Eleuthera
native is in the running for
$1m Golden League Jackpot

for the year, Brown also surged
to the top of the men’s 400m
standings for the World Athlet-
ics Tour in a two-way tie with
Gary Kikaya of the Democrat-
ic Republic of Congo. Both
have accumulated a total of 31
points.

Grand Bahamian Michael
Mathieu, coming off his third
place finish at the meet in
Berlin, is tied with Aussie’s
Johan Wissman and India’s Bib-
in Matthew for seventh place
with 14 points apiece.

None of the other quarter-
milers are in the top 15, but
Andrae Williams, another
Grand Bahamian, is tied for
18th with Young Talkmore
Nyongani of Zimbabwe with
nine points each.

Also on the track, national
record holder Shamar Sands is
sitting in fifth place in the men’s
110m hurdles with 33 points
over five meets.

But on the field, Olympic
bronze medallist Leevan
“Superman” Sands and reign-
ing world high jump record
holder Donald Thomas are in
second and third place respec-
tively.

Sands has competed in three

CEU elms Ulaatle)



meets in the men’s triple jump
and is currently tied for second
place with Arnie David Girat
of Cuba with 20 points.

Thomas, on the other hand,
has amassed a total of 20 points
over three meets for third place.

On the ladies’ side, veteran
sprinter Chandra Sturrup is
pegged at number five in the
100m with 27 points over four
meets.

Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie
is all the way in 17th place with
15 points over two meets. How-
ever, she is in sixth place in the
200m with 13 points over two

Enter to Win

meets.

The only other female who
has gotten a listing is Christine
Amertil, who is tied with Ndeye
Soumah of Senegal, Asami Tan-
no of Japan and American
Dominique Darden with seven
points.

Only Amertil and Darden
have raced in two meets while
the others have only competed
in one.

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Data
protection
‘not being

taken

seriously
enough’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN private and pub-
lic sector agencies are not taking
the need to have a Data Protec-
tion Plan in place by 2012 “as seri-
ously as they should”, Tribune
Business was told yesterday, with
this nation still to satisfy the
European Union’s (EU) ‘ade-
quacy test’ for transborder data
flows.

George E. Rodgers, the
Bahamas Data Protection Com-
missioner, told Tribune Business
that meeting the EU’s require-
ments in that area were “a major
problem for two reasons”.

He explained: “One, you have
to have a certain number of [data
protection-related] complaints
under your belt so they can see
how you handle them. They are
very few and far between. Peo-
ple seem more interested in Free-
dom of Information than data
protection.

“The other stumbling block is
we need to be an office ourselves.
Although in law we’re indepen-
dent, I’m still in the Ministry of
Finance. Those are the two criti-
cal areas, so I don’t know how
it’s going to work out.”

Meeting the EU adequacy test
would likely increase the
Bahamas’ attractiveness for inter-
national technology and data-
related firms, enticing them to set
up operations here safe in the
knowledge that their data flows
would be secured and protected
within a statutory framework.

On the complaints side, Mr
Rodgers said his office had only
received three to date, along with
20 queries. He acknowledged that
Bahamians tended to “lag
behind” when it came to new ini-
tiatives, especially when there was
no urgency involved.

Still, Mr Rodgers said that the
Bahamas had all the legislation
it needed on the books, in the
form of the Data Protection Act,
Computer Misuse Act and Elec-
tronic Transactions Act. What
was missing was enforcement and
implementation.

Mr Rodgers said the Data Pro-
tection Act gave a “five-year
grace period” until 2012 for all
Bahamas-based private and pub-
lic sector organisations to imple-
ment a data security protection
plan, but “everyone is lagging
behind and saying they’ve got
plenty of time. That’s not how it
works.....

“Tf I were to be honest, people
are not taking it as seriously as
they should.”

He added that he was working
with the Clearing Banks Associ-
ation and the Central Bank of the
Bahamas to introduce language
stipulating the need for data pro-
tection into the former’s Code of
Conduct.


























The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
tesponsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

Sale Ends
June 21st
{Except on Net Items)

THE TRIBUNE

sine

WEDNESDAY,

JUNE

ies



2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Courier ‘lay-off fears
from Customs reform

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ourier companies yes-
terday said Customs
reforms to the process
of clearing goods at
Bahamian airports “aren’t going
to work” and could result in lay-
offs in an industry employing
1,000 people alone in Nassau,
while their Freeport counterparts
are now in “a state of shock” fol-
lowing the announcement of
plans to introduce the same
changes there.
But Glen Gomez, comptroller

$20m loss leaves
BEC in ‘position
of key concern’

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Electricity Cor-
poration (BEC) is in a “position
of critical concern”, having
incurred an estimated $20 million
in losses at the end of its fiscal
year 2008 and having had to can-
cel or defer some capital projects
valued at more than $450 million

Phenton Neymour, whose cab-
inet position is minister of state
for the environment, alluded to
BEC being unable to currently
“stand on its own”, as its $134
million accounts payable for the
month of April 2009 greatly out-
weighed its receivables of $99 mil-
lion in May 2009.

Mr Neymour, addressing the
House of Assembly, said “the
global situation has worsened and
BEC’s financial position has done
the same, as there are encum-
brances with collections in all
areas”.

He said that because of the
BEC’s present commitments, the
large capital projects underway
and the present revenue situa-
tion, it was not able to meet its
financial obligations.

Mr Neymour placed some of
the blame on the former PLP
administration’s handling of the
corporation during its term. He
quoted observations made by the
International Monetary Fund
(IMF), which noted operational
loses during the PLP’s term of $3
million in 2007 and $11 million
in 2007.

These losses, according to the
IMF report, were the result of
imposed rate reductions and cus-
tomer relief programmes.

“So it is not just me saying this,
it is also the IMF,” said Mr Ney-
mour. “For the last two years,
whenever I speak on this matter
there is almost an immediate
response denying the effects of
this PLP-led poor decision.”

The minister said that in order
for BEC to recover its losses in
the short to medium-term, it
would seek a government-guar-
anteed loan. He added that the
Government has provided the
corporation with a two-year relief
on Customs Duty and stamp tax.

These measures, along with
increased awareness on energy
consumption “on a major level”,
are expected to mitigate the bur-
den on the Government-owned
entity.

Mr Neymour said a tariff
adjustment is also fundamental
to the sustainability of BEC.
According to him, its implemen-
tation will allow the Corporation
to return to a position where it
can “stand alone” without a gov-
ernment guarantee.

“Presently, Family Island tariffs
are the same as that for New
Providence, even though the cost
for providing services for Family
Islands is significantly higher,”
said Mr Neymour.

SEE page 6B

ROYAL @FIDELITY

* Industry believes ‘short form’ use end ‘isn’t going to work’
and could effectively end overnight delivery services

* Comptroller defends policy, saying changes have increased
revenues collected at airport and enhanced statistical data

* Freeport firms ‘in state of shock’ after Customs announces

plan to implement policy there on July 1

of Customs, yesterday defended
the reforms, telling Tribune Busi-
ness he had been told that rev-
enue collected at Lynden Pindling
International Airport (LPIA) and

Odyssey Aviation had
“increased” as a result of the deci-
sion to stop courier companies
and brokers using the C18 ‘unac-
companied baggage declaration’

form to declare imported goods.
Mr Gomez added that while
people often reacted negatively

SEE page 4B

Revenues cover just 62% of Water Corp costs

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration’s revenues are only able
to cover 62 per cent of its opera-
tional costs, while non-revenue
water continues to rob it of $3
million annually, a government
minister has warned. Meanwhile,
the cost of reverse osmosis water
has more than tripled from $6 to
$20 million annually.

Phenton Neymour, minister of
state for the environment, making
his contribution to the 2009-2010
Budget debate in parliament, said
that repairing the outdated and
deteriorating infrastructure was
beyond many world governmen-
t’s fiscal capacity, and could
require some private sector assis-
tance.

Mr Neymour said the problems
with Water and Sewerage’s infra-
structure, and resulting water
leaks, could be as much as 30

Principal Protected
Series 2

Phenton Neymour



times international standards. The
World Bank had recommended
that developing countries keep
non-revenue water below 23 per
cent of total production, but the
Bahamas was at 50 per cent.
The minister said the Govern-

ment had drafted a plan to
decrease the five million imperial
gallons per day (MIGD) non-rev-
enue water loss by a minimum
2.5 MIGD over a 4-year period,
and to maintain that reduction.

“Non-revenue water is water
that has been produced and is
‘lost’ before it reaches the cus-
tomer or is billed to customers,”
he said.

“These losses can be ‘real’
through leaks or apparent losses
through theft or metering inac-
curacies.”

Mr Neymour said recapturing
just one MIGD of water and sell-
ing it would be more than $5 mil-
lion in additional revenue for the
Corporation annually.

“Therefore, our very best
efforts should be made to reduce
our levels of non-revenue water,”
said Mr Neymour. “At the Water
and Sewerage, the problem of
non-revenue water is mainly due

SEE page 6B



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010

Insurers brace
for 5% motor
premium drop

“Industry hit by ‘epidemic’
of marine thefts

* ICB suffers two-thirds
profit drop in 2008 as
result of $1.46m swing
on unrealised investment
gains, plus $500,000
Hurricane Ike net loss

* Company’s property
aggregate sum insured
still at $1.9bn

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN general insurers
are bracing for “a drop of 5 per
cent or more” in gross written
premiums from their most prof-
itable motor business line during
2009, Insurance Company of the
Bahamas (ICB) general manager
said yesterday, with the industry’s
profitability also being endan-
gered by the current “epidemic”
of boat thefts.

Tom Duff said the general
insurer was now starting, along
with its competitors, “to see pres-
sure on premium” income across
all business classes as a result of
the recession, with clients either
not renewing policies, renewing
for smaller amounts or paying
late.

On motor insurance, which is
usually among the most profitable
business lines for Bahamian gen-
eral insurers, Mr Duff said ICB
was following market trends, with
increasing numbers of policy-
holders switching from compre-
hensive to cheaper third party
coverage.

In addition, Bahamians were
conserving cash by not upgrad-
ing their vehicles - purchasing
new or used ones - as frequently,

SEE page 6B

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





A confident personality
turns into positive sales

Most customers have a wide
range of options to choose from
for products they are looking
for. So why should they choose
you?

Price should not be the only

AN
~
NAD

Nassau Airport
Devolopmont Company

factor or benefit. Anyone can
sell if the price is cheap. If you
sell on price only, eventually
you will end up losing in the
long run. Most companies are
selling pretty much the same

Tender

C118 Medium Voltage Seitch House and Duct Bank

Massau Apo Developme Company (44D) 2 pled sed Lo
announce the minase of Tender C118 Medium Voltage Swatch
House and Duc Bank for Stage 1 of the Lyeden Findling
nkematonal Apart Expansion

The scope of work includes:

« Constucton of a new modem voltage [Tk] eviich house tor
HEC end MAL aanich gear: Building 6 apprecamelely yl SF,
& inch block walls, alernum handrails, anda standing seam

metal roa

«Goal orks including approomately 1500 LF of excastion
being. duct etalaton, supply and aslallabon of manhoies
backfill, compaction, cutting and patching for a new medium

Ved aye duct bank,

Purchase and installation of MAD Switchgear

nkerested Bidders mus! be ligensed and aperoved by fhe Bahamas
Biecine Gomoration tn pelo medium vollage (1 1k] work

The 118 Tender Documents wil be available for pick up after
12900 pm, Tiesday June 16th, 2009. Abakders meine wll
be held at 10200 am, Thursday June 28th, 2008 Piease
Conleel Traci Breshy to regieter at the MAD Project office

Contact: TRAC! BRISEY
Contacts and Procurement Manager

LPIA Eenamgeon Progen

Ph: (242) MOD-0086 | Fue: (282) ST7-PHT
PO Bon AP Si229, Massey, Bahamas

Email traci brehyiitrers bs



products and/or services.

Accounting firms, lawyers,
doctors, IT companies etc.
Some do specialise in certain
areas and may differentiate
themselves, but in today’s mar-
ket a lot of companies are spe-
cialised in the same field or
area.

So why should they choose
you? How do you stand out
from the crowd? Well, thanks to
our higher power, we are all
created differently. Imagine if
everyone was the same. Hmm-
mmimm, what a bore that would
be!

As I mentioned previously,
one of the biggest assets you
have is your time and, next to
that, your next greatest asset is
yourself. You are the difference
between everyone else and
every other product. A power-
ful sales tool/asset that many of
us overlook is ourselves, our
own personality.







Promotional
Marketing

ANee LMS TIEN KOT

yy (F
—

Case in point. How many
doctors are general praction-
ers? A lot! They have all stud-
ied pretty much the same med-
icine and have been trained sim-
ilarly. So why do some people
prefer one doctor over another?
PERSONALITY. Why do
some people prefer one
mechanic, accountant, veteri-
narian, IT specialist etc? PER-
SONALITY. I always hear peo-
ple say: “I like so and so
because he or she is nice,
patient, explains everything and
so forth.”

However, please note that in
order to successfully use your
personality on a sales call, or in

NOTICE

“K” LINE LNG TRANSPORT CO., LTD.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance
with Section 138(4) of the International Business
Companies Act. 2000, “K” LINE LNG TRANSPORT
CO., LTD. is in dissolution as of June 12, 2009.

Akira Misaki of Minato-Ku, Tokyo, Japan is the

Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR



any situation, you have to be
confident and positive, not arro-
gant. Confident in how you can
help your customers. Too many
salespeople are simply confi-
dent in what they’re selling, not
in their ability. There’s a big dif-
ference. When you’re confident
in what you’re selling, it means
youre putting more emphasis
on yourself and products or ser-
vices. Your focus should be on
your clients. Most confident
individuals are calm and
relaxed. They do not force or
push themselves on potential
clients.

This misunderstanding elimi-
nates a large number of sales-
people from being able to use
their personality to positively
influence their ability to close.
Confidence should not come
across as better than. I’m sure
we all know salespeople with
strong personalities that use
them to bulldoze their way
through with customers. On the
outside, they appear to be suc-
cessful, at least for the short
term. However, those who have
a manipulative personality will
lull themselves into a false sense
of security when, in reality,
they’re destroying their long-
term sales potential.

A confident salesperson is
honest, upfront and takes the

TST

For the stories

WPT Ta
TE
on Mondays



time to find out what the real
needs of their customers are.
Remember why our higher
power gave us two ears and one
mouth? Don’t jump at the per-
son’s first comment and try to
close the deal. Confident and
honest salespeople believe so
strongly in themselves and their
ability to help that they’re not
concerned with making a quick
sale. Rather, they genuinely
want to help the client, which
usually results in a much larger
and more profitable sale than
a quick one.

Finally, to successfully use
your personality, you must be
upbeat, genuine, honest and
dedicated. These are great tools.
To determine your level of con-
fidence, ask yourself the fol-
lowing two questions.

* Do customers call you for
information?

* Do customers refer you
often?

So ask yourself this question:
Why should potential clients
buy from you?

All of these marketing strate-
gies are certain to keep your
business on top during these
challenging economic times.
Have a productive and prof-
itable week! Remember:
“THOSE WHO MARKET
WILL MAKE IT.”

NB: Scott Farrington is pres-
ident of SunTee EmbroidMe, a
promotional and marketing
company specialising in pro-
motional products. Established
over 27 years ago, SunTee
EmbroidMe has assisted
Bahamian businesses from var-
ious industries, ranging from
tourism, banking and telecom-
munications in marketing them-
selves. Readers can contact Mr
Farrington at SunTee
EmbroidMe on East Shirley
Street, by e-mail at scott@sun-
tee.com or by telephone at 242-
393-3104.





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009, PAGE 3B



aaa S25
Broker develops payments solution for insuring public

A BAHAMIAN insurance broker
yesterday announced it had launched a
payments solution to allow those hard-
est hit by the recession to keep cover-
age intact through extending payments
— interest-free 0 until the economy
rebounds.

The programme, called S.LP.P. -
Simple Insurance Payment Plan — was
introduced by Nassau-based Lampkin
& Company Insurance Brokers and
Benefits Consultants.

“When the economic picture appears
gloomy, among the first thing people
look at cutting is insurance because it is
not something they can put on the
table or hold in their hands,” said Jea-
nine Lampkin, founder and president
of Lampkin & Co.

“But coverage is not dispensable. It
can save lives and protect persons or
businesses that would otherwise leave
themselves exposed to what could be
tantamount to financial disaster, due to

a catastrophic illness, a hurricane, acci-
dent or other unforeseeable event.”

The announcement followed months
of the insurance broker working with
its carrier partners to develop a solu-
tion that would make remaining
insured, even in tough times, palat-
able.

Announce

“With our partners’ cooperation, we
are pleased to announce that policy-
holders will be able to pay their pre-
miums over an extended period of
time, up to 10 months beyond the orig-
inal statement date, without incurring
any interest charges so long as a mini-
mum payment is made by salary deduc-
tion,” said Ms Lampkin.

Participating companies include
RoyalStar Assurance, Security & Gen-
eral, Bahamas First (through Colina
General), ICWI, BahamaHealth, Col-



inalmperial and Family Guardian.

According to Lampkin & Co’s mar-
keting and customer service manager,
Jennifer Bain, clients pay a single down
payment, and minimal salary deduc-
tions will pay the premium.

“S.LP.P. will also entitle you to free
counselling,” said Ms Bain. “An insur-
ance expert will sit with a client to
review all policies with a view towards
getting you the best coverage for the
least cost, which may mean brokering
through a different underwriter or rec-
ommending a change in coverage or
insured amounts.

“Individuals often forget that what
worked before may not necessarily be
the best solution for now. It’s impor-
tant to remember that needs change
and coverage should be compatible
with those needs.”

Lampkin & Company’s approach
reflects many international companies’

Ascmuin Leth efforts to combat the rising problem

of the perfect storm hitting the insur-
ance industry - a poor economy leading
to an increase in policy cancellations,
job losses translating into lower enrol-
ments in group policies and widespread
corporate cutbacks resulting in shrink-
ing coverage.

Company profit margins are also
declining as insurance underwriters
face poorer performance results from
stock market investments.

“We want to get the message out
that whether you insure through Lamp-
kin & Company or another broker,”
said Ms Bain, “please do not cut your
insurance coverage. A single illness
could wipe out a family’s income for
years to come. Insurance is not a luxu-
ry. It is as essential as the food on the
table. It preserves your way of life and
could save your life. We hope the
S.LP.P. solution will allow everyone
to remain covered without feeling bur-
dened.”

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BIRKA INT’L COMPANY LIMITED

——_ > —___

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BIRKA INT’L COMPANY LIMITED has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LESOTHO INVESTMENTS LIMITED

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of LESOTHO INVESTMENTS LIMITED
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
XETTERIDGE
INVESTMENT LTD.

—_

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of XETTERIDGE INVESTMENT LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ENKLE INVESTMENT LTD.

—

é

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ENKLE INVESTMENT LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PREMIER STAR INVESTMENTS LTD.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PREMIER STAR INVESTMENTS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BEGONIA FLOWERS INC.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of BEGONIA FLOWERS INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PAVIOUR VENTURES LTD.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PAVIOUR VENTURES LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

GAMTONFIELD INVESTMENTS LTD

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GAMTONFIELD INVESTMENTS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
POULTER VENTURES LTD.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of POULTER VENTURES LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ORLANDI VALUTA INC.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ORLANDI VALUTA INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BONFIRE SPARKS INC.

——_ of)

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BONFIRE SPARKS INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ZAKARIAH HOLDINGS LIMITED

— -,——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ZAKARIAH HOLDINGS LIMITED has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



aaa S25
Courier ‘lay-off fears from Customs reform

FROM page 1B

to changes, any problem with a
new system would usually “sort

itself out”.
Tribune Business, though, was

NOTICE

GALACTIC SAND INC.

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 138 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has

been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 6th day of May, 2009.

Lynden D. Maycock
Liquidator

of

GALACTIC SAND INC.






told that Freeport-based courier
companies, importers, brokers
and freight forwarders reacted
negatively when plans to intro-
duce the same policy were
unveiled during a Monday meet-
ing with Customs’ deputy comp-
troller for the island, Lincoln
Strachan.

Private sector representatives
who attended the meeting were
tight-lipped when contacted by
Tribune Business yesterday,
declining to comment on the
record.

One source, who requested
anonymity, said Freeport-based
courier companies and brokers
were now seeking a meeting with
the minister of state for finance,
Zhivargo Laing, on the issue,
adding that the details of Cus-
toms’ proposals were “sketchy”
and that they wanted to see some-
thing in writing. It is understood
that Customs wants to introduce
the system, now operating in Nas-
sau, to Freeport on July 1, then
roll it out to all the Family
Islands.

Another Freeport business
source, speaking to Tribune Busi-
ness on condition of anonymity,
said courier companies, importers

SU Sr eS
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based on 5% down, interest rate of 8.5% and loan term of 15 years. Actual monthly payment may vary.

VACANCY

FOR A GENERAL MANAGER

WATER ANO SEWERAGE CORPORATION

Under the direction of the Board of Directors, this position is charged with the general
tranagemen! and coordination of all aspects of the Water and Sewerage Corporation's
administrative and technical affairs: ensures that the business of the Corporation ts
conducted on a sound, realistic, profitable basis in accordance with kgislation,

regulations and policies.

PCT |

Care respondibilities include

Planning and directing the mamicnance and development of both business and
operational activities in order to maximize profitability and growth in lime with
cverall business stralegies
Taking action to procure, maintain and improve pliysical assets of the Corporation
Inching premises, and equipment bo standards appropriate tor the business

dndenaken.

Developing and maiaining effective operating systems and techniquea required
1 wn mast wihzalion for eompuler lechnobeyry
Serving extemal customers, focusing ettorts on decovering wml meeting their

needs.

Contribution to the development of sound business strategies which creates value

for the basiness

The job requires wide experience im administration, financial accounting and project
management. Must seck opportunities to help staff develop their skills whilst improving
ferlormance in current role, lacing Career progression of full realisation af potential,

The job holder must be a strategic leader capable of orchestrating and leading major
cultural change efforts aimed al substantially improving the use and productivily of

human assets

Must bea strong mdvecate of the participative management philosophy

and be capable of providing strategic leadership in the corporate-wide transition from

“op-down" management to “employee empowered” processes.

Educational Requirements and Experience

We seck a seasoned Business Executive with a minimum of b years senior management
expenence wilh a degree in Business or Engineering; bowether with an MBA, MPA or
Professponal COMMUNE qualiticatwon

We offer a highly competitive bawe salary along with attractive fringe benefits package.

Candidates with productive management expenence and a proven ability be set and meet
compte objectives should send resume and salary requirements to:

On or before 26" June, 2008

Chairman

Water & Sewerage Corporation

P.O. Box N-3905
Nassau, Bahamas

and brokers would have to
increase their bonds and hire
extra persons to fill out and check
Customs entries, as a result of dis-
continuing the ‘unaccompanied
baggage declaration form’ in
favour of a return to the C13
‘long form’.

The source added that the pro-
posed changes might actually cost
the Government and Customs
revenue. He pointed out that, in
the past, to clear goods and doc-
uments quickly, courier compa-
nies had often paid duty on behalf
of their clients up-front.

However, since the advantage
of doing this for overnight deliv-
ery would be ended by Customs’
reforms, the source said it was
likely that these goods would now
be brought in ‘bonded’ under the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement’s
provisions - thus reducing the
Government’s revenue intake.

Meanwhile, Walt Saunders,
president of the newly-formed
Bahamas Transhipment and
Logistics Association, which rep-
resents the courier companies,
told Tribune Business that despite
the comptroller’s best intentions
and efforts, the changes he had
instituted were “not going to
work”.

Mr Saunders, who is president
and owner of GWS Worldwide
Express, said the reforms had
effectively made Bahamas-based
courier companies, who provide
overnight express delivery to their
clients, brokers.

The reforms had also increased
costs to clients who were “already
paying top dollar to have it
overnight”, Mr Saunders explain-
ing that the courier firms were
now having to charge a minimum
$10 fee per customer to claim
goods, plus a further $35 service
fee if the item in question attract-
ed duty. In cases where items
were dutiable, there was a mini-
mum $45 extra cost to the cus-
tomer.

Mr Saunders told Tribune
Business he had last met with the
Customs comptroller a fortnight
ago, when Mr Gomez said he
wanted “his concept implemented
in the system, and to give it a shot
to see if it can work”.

The Association head said the
industry and Customs were now
“in a test and trial” phase, where
if problems arose the private sec-
tor was to communicate them to
Mr Gomez and he and his offi-
cers would address the issue.

“It’s not going to work,” said
Mr Saunders, striking a pes-
simistic note. He explained that
through its reforms, Customs was
treating overnight express deliv-
eries, which largely consisted of
documents, the same as cargo
brought in at sea ports and docks.

Questioning what would hap-
pen if important court documents
or business contracts could not
be delivered on time as a result of
the reforms, Mr Saunders said:
“Tt can only serve to frustrate this
system.”

LEGA. KTH

NOTICE

Grand Apollos Corporation

Pursuant to the Provision of Section 138 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice is
hereby given that the above-named Company has been
dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant to a
Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General

on the 6th day of Miary, 2000.

Lynden D. Mayeock
Liquidator

Grand Apollos Corporation

He added that Customs had
reinstituted the system last used
14 years ago, which would result
in delays clearing goods at the
airport, defeating the whole idea
of overnight delivery.

Mr Saunders warned that Cus-
toms policy could “see people ter-
minating employees on the job
site” within the next few months.
He estimated that the 20 courier
companies in Nassau employed
more than 1,000 persons between
them, and said he hoped it would
not come to that.

“Not only is service delayed,
but there is a cost,” Mr Saunders
added of the decision to end the
‘short form’ declaration for couri-
er companies, and replace it with
the long form, which requires all
imports to be broken down into
individual items.

Customs and Mr Gomez had
instituted the changes to improve
the Department’s collection of
statistical data, and to protect rev-
enues by ensuring the appropriate
duty rates are applied to all items.

“It’s not going to work in our
interests. Globally, we are anti-
quated. There is no way we are
matching global practices,” Mr
Saunders said. He added, though,
that he had been able to negotiate
one concession with Customs,
where courier companies paid up-
front on behalf of their clients,
rather than increasing the size of
their bond security lodged with
the Department.

Mr Gomez yesterday con-
firmed to Tribune Business that
the Customs Department planned
to roll the new policy out to the
Family Islands and Freeport,
ensuring that all were using the
same forms and complying with
the rules and regulations.

He described the previous use
of the C18 form by courier com-
panies as “wrong”. “They should-
n’t be using that,” Mr Gomez
said. “Why should someone use
the form for cargo that I use for
personal travel. It’s getting them
to use the right form, and for us to
capture statistical data not cap-
tured before, and capture rev-
enue not collected before.”

As a result, the Comptroller
added: “I’ve been told there has
been an increase in revenue col-
lected at the airport because of
the new process, although I have
not seen any figures.

“Obviously, people were bring-
ing in items before that were
wrongly declared or not declared
at all. We’re making sure we have
the right rates. It’s a win-win sit-
uation. We’re assessing the cor-
rect duties on these items.”

VACANCY NOTICE #5
Analyst/Programmer II] “2

Applications are invited from surtably qqucali te d persons for the above position in the

Landi IMO Technol a Department of thie Nartir tal Insurance Beard.

PURPOSE OF JOB

To develop computer sofbware systems as per user requirements and provide user support.

OVERALL RESPONSIBILITIES WILL INCLUDE:

\nalyze, design, develop, implement and maintam computer software systems

Provide status reports on progress of projects to the Analyst, Programmer

Advise users of avadability of systems for testing

Ensure proper recording of system change requests

Marntain the System Development Database
Ensute proper sequencing of programming activities

Communicate required sottware changes,/enhancements to the Analyst,

Programmer

Prowide systems documentation for all systems developed

Perform structured walkthroughs of svSTems under devel PUTLETIL

Provide user support (including training, as is necessary)

lest and evaluate external (prepackaged) software and recommend as 1s necessary

Advise Commuttees, Departments regarding software

Report all uncommon occurrences to the Analyst’ Programmer of Sensor Analyst,

Pee Mere

Other duties and prosects as asserted by the Analyst’ Programmer or Sersor
i | :

Analyst, Programmer

QUALIFICATIONS AND REQUIREMENTS

Applicants shi ub have ia Bacheli t's Desree fram atl accredited college of university, in

Computer Seence, Information Systems or a related field. Ar least five (5) years expenence

working in a AS400/Tseres and networking environments & preferred, but a shorter length

of expenence will be considered. Applicants must have the abelity to wnte programs in REG
ILE & CL on the IBM iSeries, Experience in using RAD of CASE tools on PC-based

systems is desired,

de sited

APPLICATION

4, working knowledge of DB/2 and WS SC database By STeMs 15

ntetested persons may apely by submittiae a completed application form, alone with the
I ip pply by sul z pleted appl fi a with tl
necessary proof of qualifications on ot before Tuesday, June 30, S009, tes:

The Senior M ANAEL

Human Resources Administration

THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD

Clifford Darking ( zomuplex, Baillew Hill Road



BO Bos N-7508
Nassau, Bahamas





THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009, PAGE 5B

Bank donates $25k to
Nassau revitalisation | “—.-"~



Legal Notice

NOTICE

COMMONWEALTH Bank
has donated $25,000 to the
Downtown Nassau Partnership
to support efforts to transform
the 260-year-old city into a thriv-
ing mecca for shopping, dining,
entertainment and living.

“Contributions of corporate
citizens like Commonwealth
Bank are making it possible to
make the Nassau dream a reali-
ty,” said Charles Klonaris, the
DNP’s co-chairman.

“We are extremely grateful to
Commonwealth Bank, which has
once again demonstrated its
belief in the value of historic Nas-
sau, which we believe will soon
meet its rightful role as the
dynamic heartbeat of the nation.”

“We in the Ministry of Tourism
appreciate the strong support
shown by the banking communi-
ty in the important undertaking of
rediscovering and reinventing the
historic city of Nassau,” said Ver-
nice Walkine, the Ministry of
Tourism’s director-general and
DNP co-chairman.

“We envision a city that is alive
at night with locals and visitors
enjoying restaurants, cafes, book
stores, galleries and other shop-
ping and entertainment. We envi-
sion a city where people want to
live, not just work. We’ve seen
what a strong downtown can add
to tourism offerings and to the
quality of life in other places, and

no city that I have ever personal-
ly visited anywhere in the world
had the untapped potential of the
city of Nassau. We are really
excited about this project and
grateful for the support it has
been getting.”

The redevelopment exercise is
estimated to cost in the millions,
with funds raised through a vari-
ety of ways, including a partially
self-funding Business Improve-
ment District (BID) initiative.

Among the most immediate
improvements projected to have
a major impact is the relocation
of commercial shipping that has
long clogged the eastern end of
Bay Street. That project is under-
way and has already spurred

interest in properties that had
been vacated as shipping and con-
tainers dominated more of the
waterfront and the southern side
of Bay Street.

In addition to relocating ship-
ping and the incentives created
under the 2008 City of Nassau
Revitalisation Act, other impor-
tant steps include creating a mas-
ter plan, extending the water’s
edge, beautifying the city, miti-
gating flooding potential, enhanc-
ing public spaces and working
with private owners to redevel-
op their properties. The process is
guided by the DNP with an 11-
member board of directors and
Vaughn Roberts, managing direc-
tor.

NOTICE

OF

INNOVATIVE
INSIGHT LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 15th day of June, 2009.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Finacial Cen-
tre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, The Bahamas
has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE

OF

JUSTIN & WILLIAMSON
LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 15th day of June, 2009.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Finacial Cen-
tre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, The Bahamas
has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PETTIINGER HOLDINGS LTD.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PETTIINGER HOLDINGS LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MEADOWBROOK LANE INC.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MEADOWBROOK LANE INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
YENLEY VIEW
INVESTMENTS LTD.

— -,——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of YENLEY VIEW INVESTMENTS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TRINITY PROVISIONS LIMITED

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of TRINITY PROVISIONS LIMITED has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PEORIA INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.

—_

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of PEORIA INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NOME BRACH LTD.

—— -—__

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of NOME BRACH LTD. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of RICHLAND CORP. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
WILFLOW
INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of WILFLOW INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SAVIESE MEADOWS INC.

——__ ff)

i

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of SAVIESE MEADOWS INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BALEEN ARCH HOLDINGS INC.

—_— ¢) —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BALEEN ARCH HOLDINGS INC. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DE AVARUA S.A.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of DE AVARUA S.A. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Insurers brace for 5%
motor premium drop

FROM page 1B

instead choosing to make their
existing model run for longer.

As aresult, Mr Duff said: “The
value of the vehicle drops, and
the value of the premium drops
with it. Then you get to the stage
where they switch from compre-
hensive to third party, fire and
theft.

“T think the whole market will
see a drop of 5 per cent or more
in motor income by the end of
the year at the gross level. We all
have to mark down motor
income.”

On the property and casualty
side, Mr Duff said ICB was start-
ing to experience problems from
“people delaying premium pay-
ments, coming in late with
cheques, or not increasing the
sums insured as people would in a
boom market. When people pay
late it has an impact for your run-
ning costs”.

Falling premium income was
happening against the backdrop
of another slight increase in prop-
erty and casualty reinsurance
costs, Mr Duff explained, “mak-
ing it more difficult to squeeze
profitability out of the property
class” of business.

Overall, the ICB general man-
ager said it was “not unreason-
able” to predict that all Bahamian
general insurance carriers would
experience an average 5 per cent
drop in gross written premium
for all business classes in 2009,
although 10 per cent “might be
at the high end of the scale”.

“We all expect that this has to
be a year when we trim costs,
focus on customer service and
hope for better times in 2010 and

2011,” Mr Duff added.

“So far, though, it’s not been
that bad in terms of claims.
Claims have been within the
boundaries expected.”

He said that ICB’s total aggre-
gate sums insured were in line
with 2008 comparatives, adding
that the company had about $1.9
billion worth of total property
risks on its books.

Meanwhile, ICB was assessing
its marine underwriting policies
“very closely” as a result of the
recent spike in boat and vessel
thefts, which had reached “epi-
demic” proportions.

Abaco, in particular, seemed
to be “the hot spot” for boat
thefts, Mr Duff said, the favourite
target for thieves being craft that
were 30 feet in length and had
two outboard motors.

“We’re very mindful of that
and looking very closely at under-
writing,” the ICB general man-
ager said. “We’re in the midst of
forming a plan going forward,
looking at where vessels are
berthed, the size of the craft.

“There is definitely an epi-
demic of small craft thefts at the
moment, no doubt about it. All
these insurance companies are
being impacted by it.

“We’re not making a loss on
marine, but are not making as
much profit as we should be. The
returns on the marine hull class
are much less than others. It’s an
area of concern for the industry,
and impacts the overall prof-
itability for the business.”

Mr Duff added: “We’re very
mindful of the trend in marine
hull losses, and are working on a
plan to minimise them.

“With quite a lot of the berths,

especially on Abaco, I imagine
security is not as tight as in other
areas. One boat was recently
stolen in Abaco at 3am in the
morning; it’s very easy to do.
Sometimes you get it back, and
sometimes you don’t.”

For its 2008 financial year, ICB
saw its net income drop by almost
two-thirds or 66.4 per cent to
$1.39 million, compared to $4.127
million the year before, largely
due to hurricane-related claims
and a $1.46 million reversal in
unrealised gains on its investment
securities.

Suffered

ICB suffered a $500,000 net
loss due to Hurricane Ike-related
claims in the Turks & Caicos
Islands, plus incurred a $401,609
loss in unrealised movements in
the value of its equity investments
portfolio, compared to a $1.059
million gain the year before.
Together, these accounted for
$1.96 million of the $2.737 mil-
lion decline in the carrier’s net
income.

Mr Duff said unrealised invest-
ment portfolio gains moved “sig-
nificantly in our favour” in the 12
months to December 31, 2007,
largely due to appreciation in
Commonwealth Bank’s stock.

This position, though, reversed
itself in 2008 with the slide in
equities values on the Bahamas
International Securities Exchange
(BISX). In addition, Mr Duff said
many of ICB’s competitors did
not incur Hurricane Ike-related
claims because they had no risks
insured in the Turks & Caicos.

Acknowledging that ICB’s bot-
tom line result “was somewhat

less than expected” for 2008, Mr
Duff said net income projections
had been set at levels “a little bit
more than we produced, although
we were not too far out.

“Overall, it was not a bad result
for us. We’re reasonably happy
with it, but it’s not an outstanding
result.”

He added: “On a general
claims level, 2007 was particular-
ly favourable in terms of motor
claims, whereas 2008 was still
good but not as good as the prior
year.”

Mr Duff said ICB still recorded
underwriting profits in all its
major business lines, with motor
and property/casualty producing
“superior returns”. Operating
expenses, too, came in 5 per cent
below budgeted levels.

For the 12 months to Decem-
ber 31, 2008, gross written pre-
miums were flat, standing at
$51.734 million compared to the
previous year’s $51.793 million.

Due to a reduction in the
amount ceded to reinsurers, net
retained premiums increased
slightly to $9.345 million, com-
pared to $9.342 million the year
before. Net earned premiums
increased by almost 2 per cent to
$9.36 million, compared to $9.179
million the year before.

Net claims incurred, though,
rose to $2.863 million compared
to $1.835 million in 2007, an
increase of 56 per cent.

This was largely responsible for
the 20.9 per cent hike in total
expenses to $7.768 million, com-
pared to $6.424 million in 2007.

As a result underwriting profits
fell 42.2 per cent to $1.591 mil-
lion, compared to $2.755 million
in 2007.

Revenues cover just 62% of Water Corp costs

to inferior infrastructure result-
ing in breaks or leaks.”

He suggested that a reputable
international firm would have to
come in to Water and Sewerage’s
to evaluate the extent of damage
to its infrastructure. Mr Neymour
said many areas throughout New
Providence had problems with
rusty water.

“This is caused by old infra-
structure such as cast iron and
galvanised iron water mains that
have become blocked by the pre-
vious dependency on hard,
groundwater supplies,” he said.

“Now that we have moved to a
softer, desalinated water supply,
these deposits are resulting in
rusty water. Ultimately, the prob-
lem requires massive replacement
of infrastructure. In that regard,
several infrastructure improve-
ments are planned to address this
and other issues.”

Mr Neymour said a part of the
Water and Sewerage infrastruc-
tural improvements will be car-
ried out with the New Providence
road Improvement Project. “The
New Providence Road Improve-
ment Project, has approximately
$10 million worth of infrastruc-
tural improvements for Water
and Sewerage’s, including
upgrades to improve capacity,
and new lines to improve service
quality and reliability,” he said.

One of the biggest expenses of
Water and Sewerage is the pro-
cessing of water by reverse osmo-

BEC, from page 1B

Late last year, the Government
implemented a social assistance
program borne out of a high num-
ber of disconnections carried out
by BEC. Now, according to Mr
Neymour, many of the customers
who took advantage of the pay-
ment programme offered by the
Government last year have found
themselves in the same situation
again.

He said: “Of the 5,000 cus-
tomers that were disconnected
(last year), some 4,000 plus cus-
tomers were reconnected. A
number of accounts were not

sis, but according to Mr Neymour,
the process is much more reliable
than barging water from North
Andros. He said water shipments
were originally a temporary solu-
tion, but were now a 25-year-old
process.

“Facilities for RO water pro-
duction are typically constructed
to meet 150 mph hurricane con-
ditions, and major facilities have
100 per cent back-up power capa-
bility, sufficient to cover up to
five days of operations,” said Mr
Neymour. “Secondly, the RO
facility capacity is also specified to
allow for regular maintenance
without loss of contracted pro-
duction capacity, and has addi-
tional capacity to offset demand
fluctuations. “Thirdly, RO plants
produce a consistently high qual-
ity standard water product, which
meets or in many cases exceed
WHO (World Health Organiza-
tion) guidelines for potable
water.”

Mr Neymour suggested that
reverse osmosis plants must
decrease their energy consump-
tion in order to cut the cost of
production, and thus the cost of
the water. “The levels of invest-
ment required cannot be provid-
ed by the Government indefi-
nitely,” he said. “The circum-
stances are further exacerbated
given that only 30 per cent of the
population is served thus increas-
ing the cost per customer signifi-
cantly.”

reconnected for varying reasons
(i.e. safety, vacant, no access,
landlord wanted the supply off,
etc).”

“As of October 31, 2008, 1,847
customers had made arrange-
ments to pay off their arrears with
25 per cent payment and the bal-
ance over 24 months.

“As of February 2009, under
the more lenient current policy,
some 2,754 customers made
arrangements to pay off their
arrears with 50 per cent payment
and the balance over three to six
months. Therefore, some 5,161
customers were in a state of dis-
connection as of March 2009.”

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

PROVENCE INTERNATIONAL INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,
the Dissolution of PROVENCE INTERNATIONAL INC.

has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-

sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Regis-
ter. The date of completion of the dissolution was the 29th day
of May 2009.

Tak: Saeed uu! Liquolatees, nz
beqeme te

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

CANALEJAS S.A.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,
the Dissolution of CANALEJAS S.A. has been completed, a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register. The date of completion
of the dissolution was the 8th day of June, 2009.

Lagan

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HUNTERWAY SHORES INC.

— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HUNTERWAY SHORES INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

VICTORY INTERNATIONAL LTD.
a
Fd

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of VICTORY INTERNATIONAL LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

LONGOLD ENTERPRISES LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,
the Dissolution of LONGOLD ENTERPRISES LIMITED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Regis-
ter. The date of completion of the dissolution was the 4th day
of June, 2009.

Totalserve Management Limited
TOTALSERVE MANAGEMENT LIMITED

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MATHA INTERNATIONAL
INVESTMENT LTD.

—*,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of MATHA INTERNTIONAL INVEST-
MENT LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolu-
tion has been issued and the Company has therefore been

struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PHD HOLDINGS LIMITED

—=

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of PHD HOLDINGS LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CL LIMITED

— f*), —_—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CL LIMITED has been completed; a Certifi-
cate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has

therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

VINOPOLIS HOLDINGS LTD.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of VINOPOLIS HOLDINGS LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



eS



The Tribune



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Address:

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@ By ALEX MISSICK

Tribune Features Reporter

amissick@tribunemedia.net

SUMMER brings out the easy and quick when
it comes to grabbing a bite to eat and hot dogs
are one of the most popular summer foods in the
world. Donna Miller, owner of Donna’s Delec-
table Dogs, located on Rosetta Street next to
RBC Finco, knows exactly how to please the pal-
lets of her customers who prefer to have this sum-

mer favorite year round.

Ms Miller has been a full
time hot dog vendor for the
past three years and said she
has always been excited about
the business.

“My friend had a hot dog
cart and I saw how successful
she was. This is not a hobby-
it’s a job. It’s my profession
and my lively hood even
though I worked for many
places before this. I just decid-
ed to do my own thing,” Ms
Miller said.

Donna’s Delectable Dogs
are priced at $2 for small hot-
dogs and the larger size at $3
along with a variety of top-
pings to sastify whatever your

CHEESE topped hot dog.
es

taste buds crave. With every-
thing made fresh daily, it is no
wonder Ms Miller is always
swamped with hungry cus-
tomers.

“Trun through about 200
dogs a day. We have chili,
cheese, onions, jalapefios,
tomatoes, green peppers and
even sauerkraut. People are
really catching on to the
sauerkraut. My most popular
combination is relish, chili and
cheese. The second would be
the jalapefios and onions,” Ms
Miller said.

Donna’s Delectable Dogs
are strictly beef due to the fact
that they are a hot seller in the



county.

Faithful customer, Devenor
Wilkinson, said although he
recently started having hot
dogs, he finds Donna’s Delec-
table Dogs to be spectacular.

“Those hot dogs are so
good. I eat, sleep and dream
Donna’s Delectable Dogs. I
love onions and she has nice,
fresh, crushed onions. I love
the cheese and the chili as well
because the chili really brings
out the hot dog. Even the
bread-the bread is sweet. She
is very clean and tidy. I think
this is one of the cleanest
stands in Nassau,” Mr Wilkin-
son said.

Ms Miller said she would
encourage young persons who
want to start their own busi-
ness that location and many
other attributes are important
for success.

“T think in any successful
business all you need is the
right attitude. Even if your
product is not superior, people
come back because you are
pleasant, you know how to
treat people and you know
how to talk to people,” Ms
Miller said.





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009, PAGE 9B







The Tribune




















m@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

THIS week in our lineup,
we've given you the option of
cool movies, a celebration of
the arts, or some easy listening
music. Hopefully, the recent
summer showers won't put a
damper on the weekend’s plans.

«The Jazz Summer Festival

is going into high gear this
week, with several planned per-
formances at some of the jazzi-
est venues on the island. Friday
is the official night of Jazz
music Bahamian style, with
RnB sensation Frydeh - a for-
mer member of Baha-men -
along with the G-Note All-stars
who will be performing at the
Humidor Churrascaria on West
Street. On Saturday, Arturo
Sandoval and Paul Hanna will
perform at the National Centre
for The Performing Arts on
Shirley Street at 8pm. Tickets
for the events are priced
between $45 and $75. For more
details, email jazz@ivoryglobal-
promotions.com.

©). Virtue Dance Academy

sapresents Diary of a Bitter
Mother In-Law, a play featuring
Tia Johnson and students of
the academy. A dance and dra-
ma production, this show is the
fifth edition to Dance Of The
Scrolls series by Professor
Marilyn T Deveaux. It is about
the Bible character Naomi- the
mother-in-law of Ruth. Perfor-
mances will take place this Sat-
urday at the Holy Trinity Activi-
ty Centre in Stapledon Gardens
at 3pm and 8pm. Tickets are
$15 and are available at the
door, from parents of the stu-
dents, Logos bookstore, the
Christian bookstore, Faith Life
Bookstore, the Bible Centre,
and the Juke Box. There is also
a pre-booking group discount
of $10 per child to all groups
with 5 persons or more. Food
and drinks will also be on sale.

3. The Bahamas Internation-
al Film Festival will present
Sita Sings the Blues at Galleria
Cinema JFK Drive on tonight as
part of its month long movie
series. This 82 minute Ameri-
can film is about a goddess
named Sita who is separated
from her beloved lord and hus-
band Rama. The director Nina
Paley is an animator whose
husband moves back to India
and dumps her via email. Three
hilarious shadow puppets nar-
rate both ancient tragedy and
modern comedy in this beauti-
fully animated interpretation of
the Indian epic Ramayana. Set
to the 1920's jazz vocals of
Annette Hanshaw, Sita Sings
the Blues earns its spot as ‘the
Greatest Break-Up Story Ever
Told.’

/ On Thursday, the National
Art Gallery of the Bahamas
presents the film Common
Ground as a part of its Love
Film series. In this 112 minute
flick made in 2002, a respected
Argentinean university profes-
sor is forced into early retire-
ment, and faces an uncertain
future as an unemployed hus-
band. As the film progresses,
he and his wife move to the
countryside and open a new
chapter of their lives. Directed
by Adolfo Aristarain, the film
has English subtitles but is
heard in Spanish. Showtime is
at 8 pm at the gallery on West
and Well Hill Street. For more
information, email
info@nagb.org.bs or visit
www.nagb.org.bs.

. Tired of being labeled a

couch potato, sign up for
the rotary club’s walk-a-thon
this weekend and start the jour-
ney to a healthier you. Planned
for Saturday June 20 at Arawak
Cay, the walk is from Arawak
Cay to Goodman’s Bay and
back. It begins at 7.30am.
Categories include the under 20
division, 21 to 35, 36 to 50, and
51 and up. Prizes will be
awarded to the top finishers.
Registration is $10, and the
event is in aid of local charities
to be announced. Forms can be
obtained from all Subway loca-
tions, Michael Hepburn and
Associates, and Pat Strachan
Realty.

Singer,

OP poOser,

ivacidies Frode

Island MG

Hitting the

SWEETNOTE |

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

MOVING to the
Bahamas more than
a decade ago, life-
long musician Luicito
“Toto” Bazard is still
in love with these
islands, and is once
again producing
music fo tell his story.

In his latest CD titled Island
Musical Pot Pourri, he created
nearly a dozen songs all cele-
brating Bahamian and
Caribbean sounds, an effort
which he said proves that we
are all one despite our differ-
ences.

Telling the story of his pro-
gression as a musician, Mr
Bazard explained that at the
age of four, he was given a
banjo from a relative which
was his first introduction to the
world of music.

“T don’t remember playing
anything that made sense with
the banjo, but since then I
began to acquire a love for
music, especially after my
father threw it away insisting
that he didn’t want me to play
it.

“At the age of 15, I took up
solfege, piano and guitar
lessons. After about a year, I
joined a cultural and artistic
club, where I composed two of
the songs from my latest
album.”

He moved to the Bahamas
in 1966 and worked by day as
an interpreter for the Ministry
of Finance and nights and
weekends slowly building his
music repertoire.

A former member of the
groups Blue Dreamers and
Kool Vibrations, he became
familiar with the music of the
Bahamas and Caribbean in
places like the South Beach
Cabana, Club Med, and the
Pink Pussycat nightclub.

“During the seventies I was
also exposed to quite a range

of musical sounds including
Reggae, Calypso, and Kompa
(a Creole rhythm), and of
course you know that kind of
music stayed in my blood.

“We played ballads, rake-n-
scrape, a little bit of reggae,
we played it all. Especially
when I worked at Club Med,
we played several songs from
the Latin American countries
and the Bahamas, but what
made that experience more
memorable was the fact that
we performed most of those
songs in foreign languages
because of the diverse cultures
that frequented Club Med.”

He said it was these experi-
ences that helped to perpetu-
ate his love for Bahamian cul-
ture.

In his latest track titled
Come Enjoy the Bahamas, Mr
Bazard speaks of some of the
elements that define the
Bahamas from other places in
the region and throughout the
world.

“In your life, there are things
you'll never enjoy, until you
come to the place where you
jump for joy. Here in Nassau
and the Family Islands also,
you will find the treasures of
pleasure. Throughout the
Bahamas, where the elite and
the masses, all enjoy great fun
under the ever shining sun.
Refreshed by cool breeze, you
can do your own thing at ease.
Spring, Summer, Winter, it
doesn’t matter, come to the
Bahamas, enjoy the Bahamas.”

These lyrics are simpler than
the sophisticated lyrics of most
songs of today, and are aptly
complemented with a tune that
is without question reminiscent
of Goombay music.

Mr Bazard said although
most local artists nowadays
produce music that is often
mistaken for American or
Jamaican music, he wants to
produce music that sounds
Bahamian.

He also wants to continue
developing his talent provid-
ing listeners with authentic
Bahamian music and a greater
sense of identity.

To learn more about Mr
Bazard and Komopa, visit
www.shopbvm.com.

ee
“cr

IN HIS latest CD /sland entertainment

Pot Pourri, lifelong

musician Luicito
Bazard sings of many

of the elements that
& helped to define the
> moiscos; _ Attorney seeks
culture and rhythm. : = .
, — delay in Chris
Brown case

m LOS ANGELES

CHRIS Brown’s lawyer has
asked the California Supreme
Court to delay a key hearing in
the singer’s assault case, accord-
ing to the Associated Press.

Court records show Mark
Geragos wants the state’s high
court to put off a preliminary
hearing scheduled for Monday.
No decision has been made.

It’s the second attempt Gera-
gos has made to delay Brown’s
preliminary hearing. An appeals
court rejected a motion to delay
the case last week.

Brown’s alleged victim,
Rihanna, has received a sub-
poena to testify and is expected
to appear.

Geragos is seeking access to
police personnel and investiga-
tive records. The 19-year-old
R&B singer faces
felony assault and
criminal threats
charges. A
judge _-will
decide after
Monday’s | —
hearing
whether there —_
is enough evi- i
dence for the
case to pro-
ceed.






ot-Pourri

242} 393-1033



ra

participating products
and you could WIN
1 of 8 $1,000

Bank of the Bahamas
Visa itt i tea



$1,000 gift sand Give-away

Name:
Address: Tel:

For long lasting hand towel and bathroom tissue trust S _ ott & Co _ ton _ lle



PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ARTS



W one of Stuart Cove’s fastest growing book-
ings, the shark dive gives spectators that up

‘close and personal encounter. But be warned,
Â¥ experience is not for the faint hearted.

#

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

Summertime is that special time of year

when people look to take a much needed

break from the hustle and bustle of life,

although finding that perfectly affordable
and fun vacation spot can be challenging.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that we, DWYANE HUMPHREY WALLACE
AND DANNESTINE SHERICK TAYLOR of the Island of New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, intend to change
our son’s name from TENAJ VALENTIO HUYLER to TENAJ VALENTIO
WALLACE. If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication
of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that HERMANE EXAMENTE
of GOVERNOR’S HARBOUR, ELEUTHERA, P.O Box
EL - 25048 is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 10° day of June, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

However, there are many
experiences right here at home
that can be fabulous without
costing ‘an arm and a leg,’ some-
thing important considering the
current state of the economy.

At Stuart Cove’s Aqua
Adventure company, there are
several breathtaking experiences
waiting to be discovered by per-
sons of all ages from 10- year-
olds to seniors.

Dive instructor Viviana Toro
explained that for first time
divers, the company offers a cer-
tification course where students
learn about the equipment need-
ed for the underwater adven-
tures, how to properly commu-
nicate while submerged, and the
safety tips needed when inter-
acting with sea creatures.

Once those basics are out of
the way, the real fun begins.
Activities include scuba tours of
some of the islands most amazing
coral reefs, mini-submarine tours
where you can explore a new
world of fish and other sea life,
or if you’re brave enough you
can even have the experience of

ON Stuart Cove's mini-scuba
experience, you have the
chance to see several fish sea
creatures including sergeant
majors, snappers, sea turtles,
sea urchins, or even a lion fish.

swimming with the sharks.

Now one of Stuart Cove’s
fastest growing bookings, the
shark dive gives spectators that
up close and personal encounter.
But be warned, this experience is
not for the faint hearted.

Viviana explained: “This
extreme shark adventure at Stu-
art Cove’s is basically an oppor-
tunity for people to have a
chance to dive with a good num-
ber of sharks.

“Most people go to different
locations throughout the world
taking these kinds of dives where
they may see one or two sharks,
but here they get to see some-
times up to 30 sharks all swim-
ming around them. The type of
sharks we frequently see on these
dives are reef and nurse sharks.”

The tour which is set up in two

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JAMAAL McCLEARY of # 6
QUEENS PARK off FARRINGTON Rd is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 10 day of June, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that ROSEMARY DIANA
GILBERT of Richville Drive, Nassau, Bahamas intend
to change my name to DIANA ROSEMARY GILBERT. If
there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Deputy Chief
Passport Officer, PO.Box N-792, Nassau, Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of
this notice.



. t
AT Stuart Cove’s
Aqua Adventure
company, there
~ exist several
breathtaking
experiences
waiting to be
discovered by
you.

parts first allows divers to per-
form a sea wall dive, which is
done in the area the sharks live.

She said this is a more relaxed
non-feeding environment, and
although there are some sharks
normally spotted, their presence
gives divers a chance to figure
out just how prepared they are
for part two.

“The second dive is the actual
feed, and things are treated
slightly different. We introduce
food in the water which creates a
little bit more excitement, and
the method that we use is called
polite feeding.

“During this dive we remind
divers that hand movements are
restricted, we also try to over-
weight divers usually by an extra
two to four pounds so that when
they breathe or when a shark
may pass them and create a light
current, the extra weight stops
them from floating up or losing
their balance.

“We tell them to deflate their
jackets and to place everything
they need near their folded arms.
We tell our divers not to touch
the sharks, and should they have
to communicate with another
diver we show them how to sig-
nal nice and close to their bod-
ies.”

Lasting for about 20 to 25 min-
utes, the feeding can seem long,
but is truly an experience of a
lifetime.

After a long debate, Tribune
Features recently took the plunge
and swam with more than a
dozen sharks in the Stuart Cove
extreme shark dive.

“Tt was always something that
I said I never wanted to experi-
ence, but while in the moment
of having a 13 foot predator inch-
es away from me, I gained a new
respect for these creatures.

“T still believe that they feed
off our fears, but I actually lost
every bit of that once I saw how
relaxed they were next to me, it
was like swimming in a public
pool to say the least.”

Viviana said the fear most
people have toward sharks is
fueled from the negative por-
trayal of sharks in most Holly-
wood blockbusters but often
once they get up close and see
how calm and easy going the ani-
mals are, their views are
changed.

Of course after experiencing
an extreme shark dive, you’re
going to want to tell everyone
about your wild experience. Stu-
art Cove’s Fin Photo depart-
ment, is a wonderful crew of aux-
iliary divers who can either take
a few pictures for you or record a
half hour long video of your
underwater adventure.











_ Captivating
cards by
_ Angie

FROM page 12

: Ms Sawyer actually began
? creating hand-made, unique-
i ly beautiful greeting cards at
? the young age of seven.

? = =©6“T draw my inspiration for
? my card creations from any
? beautiful place, thing or emo-
? tion that I experience. Inspi-
? ration for my themed card
? collections can be drawn from
? the tranquil turquoise sea, the
? beauty of a vibrant hued
i flower, the energetic beauty
? of Junkanoo, the universal
? feeling of affection during a
i holiday/ celebration or the
? love of a family member or
? friend,” Ms Sawyer said.

? Ms Sawyer said her card
? creations began by the sup-
? port from her family, espe-
? cially her parents, Dudley and
i Marva Sawyer and has now
? grown into a creative obses-
? sion.

? “This obsession has
? spawned opportunities for me
? to present my Bahamian art
? form to Ms Universe 2006,
? Nathalie Glebova, members
? of parliament, influential
? members of the community,
? gifts to loved ones and the
? loved ones of my customers. I
? will continue in this vein by
? making these creations for
? personal and commercial pur-
? poses and plan to take my
? unique talent to a level of
? international success,” Ms

“I draw my
inspiration for

my card creations
trom any beautitul
place, thing or
emotion that

| experience.”

— ANGELIQUE SAWYER

Sawyer said.
: Ms Sawyer said although
? the card making process can
i be rather simple, the detailed
: design process that she uses in
? creating cards began in the
? year of 2000.
i “The time process that it
: takes to create a card varies
i greatly and depends on the
i size, the theme and design of
: acard. However, it typically
i varies from a small and sim-
i ply designed card at 1 hour
: to a large and ornately
? designed card for up to 6
i hours. The general process in
? creating a card begins with a
? sketch or ‘blue print’, if you
i will, of the design elements
? of the card that is composed
? of the lay out and elements
; being used on the card to
i ensure harmony of the
i? design. Thereafter, all of the
? materials are readied via var-
? ious means such as painting,
i measuring, cutting and
i preparing for placement on
? the card. The final stage is
? where the ‘blue print’ of the
? card becomes a 3D creation
? by all of the design elements
? being combined into a one-
? of-a-kind, custom created
: card,” Ms Sawyer said.
? Ms Sawyer said she would
: love the ability to create cards
? as requested. The cost of the
? card is dependent on the size,
? design details and hours of
? labor used in the cards cre-
? ation. The cost of a card nor-
? mally begins at $20.
? ~~ In offering words of advice
? for young persons who would
: like to express their creativity,
? Ms Sawyer said she encour-
? ages them to truly trust in
? their creative talents, no mat-
? ter what the naysayers say.
? = “Creativity comes from the
? creator and everything from
? Him is magnificent and awe-
? some.”
i Persons who are interest-
? ed in sending or owning one
? of these unique, custom
? designed creations can con-
? tact Ms Sawyer at angelique-
? sawyer@gmail.com or at the
i telephone number: 544-0018.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that JAMES JERMINE
NONOME of Excellence Estates No.2, Nassau,

Bahamas intend to change my name to JAMES
JERMINE NONOME-DERISMA. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Deputy Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box N-792, Nassau, Bahamas no later than
thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.












Discovering Get a taste of
the blue Donna Miller's

See page 10 delectable hot dogs)
see page eight



4

1S

The Tribune SECTION B ¢



WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009











a x
Be lites tas =

fivating
cards by « J ‘a



Wap








a‘
My
@ By ALEX MISSIC

Tribune Features/Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net



HEN it is hard to express
ones feelings in words, many
persons turn to greeting
cards to say exactly how they feel.
However, something that is handmade
takes a lot more time and effort to put
together to express ones love for anoth- |
er person. It is this love for self expres-
sion that prompted law student
Angelique Sawyer to place a little bit of
her self into her hand made cards.

SEE page 10

__— di



j pee. L i

"a





Full Text
WEATHER

TRY OUR
SOUTHERN
CHICKEN BISCUIT" ‘°v"" it

S8F
79F

valle re

Great for GRITS
Madan) ae

The Tribune

ANY TIME..-ANY PLACE, WE’RE #71

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009

eS
a
AND REAL Alias



HIGH
LOW



Volume: 105 No.167 PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Brown storms
standings

Cla a
arr Para £ ie



Uru
Sen

aU a



SS i a

Police
Chi SEX TIM

U-TURN ON EXCAVATION?



Fury over video
of molested
three-year-old

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

POLICE have pledged to
investigate a pornographic
video that is circulating through-
out Nassau by e-mail with what
is reported to be a Bahamian
man engaging in sexual rela-
tions with a three-year-old girl.

The disturbing footage has
been forwarded to local police
and the Federal Bureau of
Investigation to ascertain the
nationality of the man and pos-
sibly lead to his capture and
imprisonment.

Yesterday countless recipi-
ents of the e-mail responded to
the initial message calling for
the man in the video to be jailed
or even tortured to death for
defiling the young girl.

“It is with great pain and
mixed emotions that Iam send-
ing you this e-mail. It is my
belief that people, like the per-
son(s) involved in this or similar
clips, should not be shot, hung
or whatever instant death penal-
ty there exists.

“No, instead they should be
put to death in a slow, long and
painful manner. Pain that can
go on for years, where they wish
every single day they were dead.
In a way of speaking they would
be welcoming death every day.
This way it would be a constant
reminder to them and many
others out there of the debauch-
ery they do to other innocent
human beings,” the blogger
wrote.

“Take care of your kids!”
wrote another recipient, while
others simply called for the man
to be “shot”.

In view of a similar case, the
Crisis Centre has recently called
on Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham to establish a special
court focused primarily on child
sexual abuse matters.

Director of the Crisis Centre
Dr Sandra Dean-Patterson said
that to hear that 15 teachers are
currently being investigated for
sexual impropriety with stu-
dents they are supposed to be

SEE page 12

HURRICANE INSURANCE

TUS jes Sy

ibe

SEE

Nt



Nurses call
in sick for
a ninth day

‘Only one or

two’ return
to hospitals
and clinics

AFTER THE TRIBUNE reported yesterday that entrepreneurs are allegedly excavating farmland to sell quarry
to developers and filling the cavity with waste, tractors were seen pushing dirt back into the holes on land
behind Millars Heights off Carmichael Road.

Mother fears
missing boys
may have been
kidnapped

THE distraught mother of
the two boys missing on South
Andros now fears the young-
sters may have been kidnapped.

Police yesterday called off the
search for Deangelo Clarke,

PUES ELSE RTT UT TT
SCT CTS CTT ECE TG CCT

WHILE the
Bahamas is making
efforts to combat
human trafficking,
the country contin-
ues to fail to fully
comply with the min-
imum standards set
for its elimination.

ily for the purpose of
forced labour, and
women from
Jamaica and other
countries for the
purpose of commer-
cial sexual exploita-
tion.

The report found



mg By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia. net

PATIENTS lives contin-
ued to be put at risk yester-
day as public health nurses
called in sick for the ninth
day despite an injunction
prohibiting industrial action.

Although the Public
Health Authority (PHA)
did not disclose how many
nurses failed to show up for
work, a senior medic told
The Tribune only ‘one or
two’ returned to public hos-
pitals and clinics.

She said nurses would not
be intimidated by the court
ruling as they have, “lost all
respect for the justice sys-
tem, the Prime Minister and
Dr Minnis.”

And because the nurses
have doctor’s notes they do
not fear being jailed.

The Government has
sought to end the sick-out
with a court injunction.

According to an affidavit
submitted to the Supreme
Court by PHA managing
director Herbert Brown on
Monday, the actions of the
union and the nurses “seri-
ously undermined and
impaired the ability of the
Public Health Authority to
provide required medical
and health services to the

SEE page 11



Police believe
murder victim
was targeted
deliberately

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

POLICE believe the killers
of a 20-year-old man from Blue
Hill Heights deliberately tar-
geted their victim.

Jeffrey Johnson, also known
as Jeffrey Rolle, and his broth-
er were walking in the Derby
Road area around 10pm on

These are the find-
ings of the 2009 Traf-
ficking in Persons Tyr pepgRT
(TIP) report released was released by
yesterday by eg Hillary Clinton (AP)
States Secretary o
State Hillary Chto. in 2008.

the Bahamas made
j only “minimal
efforts” to protect
victims of the crime
and to prosecute
trafficking offenders

nine, and his five-year-old
brother Marcelo after a week
of unsuccessfully scouring a
large area of the island.

But their heartbroken moth-
er Vera Clarke, 32, said that
although she has no evidence

You

an Be Blown

Away

y A Hurricane

Or you can rest easy knowing
that you have excellent insurance
coverage no matter which

to go on, her “feeling” tells her
the boys were kidnapped.

Ms Clarke said she came to
this conclusion after a week of
intensive searching by relatives,

SEE page 12

In it, the US State Depart-
ment describes the Bahamas
as a destination country for
men and women trafficked
from Haiti and other
Caribbean countries primar-

The Bahamian govern-
ment demonstrated “limited
efforts” to prevent trafficking
over the reporting period. It

SEE page 12

Monday when they saw a group
of men approach, according to
police reports.

The brothers turned to flee,

SEE page 12



ray ‘the wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(RABAMAS) UMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

ce hbaco i Ema
Te OE) AGI) Te 267-0 Te ef Tet oS





NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS” LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



girl plans to sue over allegations

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE bereaved family of five-
month-old Lynera Saunders still
plans to issue law suits over the
dissemination of allegations that
the child —- who died of respiratory
failure last week — may have been
molested.

Legal action has not yet been

pwwuwTw

initiated, but family lawyer Paul
Moss said this is because the griev-
ing family has been focused on
making funeral arrangements.
“They are still planning to sue —
certainly after the family has had a
time to conclude the funeral
(arrangements) they are going to
get up to deal with these matters.
Someone has to be held responsi-
ble for what has happened to the
family so that is what they intend

to pursue with vigour,” Mr Moss
told The Tribune yesterday.

He said “every agency
involved" in the airing of the
molestation allegations — includ-
ing the Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal, the Royal Bahamas Police
Force and various electronic and
print media outlets — is a potential
target of legal action.

While he did not specify how
much compensation the family will

seek, he said he is hopeful the mat-
ter can be settled out of court.
"Some (parties) have been very
reckless as we've seen with the
story in (a local tabloid) yester-
day and some stories carried (on
the internet) and also on some
radio stations," he said, adding
that he is still in the process of
compiling information to corrob-

SEE page 12

For safe return or information leading to recovery of:

Female SHIT-ZU Dog lost in San Souci a nd Eastern Road Area
Thursday 11th June 2009.

t ~ -
a

Ez

ils

P x

Dog answers to name Maggie and is 11 years old and spayed.
She is on a special diet and will die without medication.

Please Call 457 3462

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i the call for an inde-
? pendent inquiry as
i? what is
: released from the
: police and the minis-
ter suggests conclu-
? sions even before an
? investigation has
: been completed,”
: she said.

the 2009/2010 budget

; By ALISON LOWE

Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

IT REMAINS unclear whether
an autopsy has been carried out on

? the body of 15-year-old Michael
? Knowles, with police claiming
? ignorance and an attorney for his
? family declining to comment.

This, as Minister of National
Security Tommy Turnquest was

? criticised by PLP chairman Glenys
? Hanna Martin for his comments to
? parliament on Monday about
? Knowles’ death which she claimed

“raised more questions than
answers.”
She said that Mr Turnquest’s

i comments about the boy’s alleged
? criminal background are, “even if
? true, irrelevant to the issue of his
? safe custody in the hands of the
? police - which is the issue at hand
: — (as well as) highly
i prejudicial.”

“This strengthens

being

Contributing to





cation was made to the courts to
detain Mr Knowles for a further
48 hours,” said the minister.

Referring to the political furore
that stemmed from Mr Knowles’
death, Mr Turnquest said it
became the subject of “blatant
manipulation.” Mrs Hanna Martin
was suspended from the House of
Assembly after she sought to raise
the matter of the cell death at a
time that House Speaker Alvin
Smith deemed inappropriate and
for which she had failed to give
the required one hour advance
notice to the Speaker to get per-
mission to speak on the agenda at
that time. Because she was not
allowed to break into the agenda
the Opposition claimed that gov-
ernment did not want to address
the issue.

“In death, this young man is
defended by persons, who by their
very actions give the
distinct impression that
they want to cast the
law aside, and plant
doubts as to the com-
petency of our legal
procedures,” claimed
Mr Turnguest.

Mrs Hanna Martin
and her parliamentary
colleagues maintain
that the Speaker should
have allowed her to
raise the issue when she
attempted to as a “mat-

debate on Monday

? evening, Mr Turn-

quest told parliament

? that Knowles’ death
: represents an “awful
i human tragedy”,
? however, proposed
? that “all he has seen”
? indicates that police

“followed proper

GLENYS HANNA-
MARTIN said it is
‘very regrettable that
political propaganda
over the last several
days has served to
overshadow the issue
of how Knowles met
his death in the cus-
tody of the state.

ter of public impor-
tance.” She said she
only wished to obtain
an assurance from Mr
Turnquest that the mat-
ter would be indepen-
dently investigated.
However, numerous
government MPs made
disparaging comments
during the budget

: procedure with the

arrest of a minor.”
The 15-year-old was found

: hanging in a police cell on June

Mr Turnquest claimed it is “also
a tragedy that many of our young

? people, especially young males,
: find themselves on the wrong side
? of the law. Regrettably, young
? Knowles was suspected of break-
: ing the law in the matter of house-
? breaking.

“As a suspect, Knowles was
detained in custody. There is noth-

; ing unusual about that. The fact
? that he was a minor was taken into

account.
“Tt is the fact that according to

: law, he could only be detained for
? 48 hours, and he was. As the inves-
i? tigation was still pending, appli-

debate about her
refusal to obey the Speaker.

Yesterday Mrs Hanna-Martin
said it is “very regrettable that
political propaganda over the last
several days has served to over-
shadow” the issue of how Knowles
met his death in the custody of
the state.

Speaking on Monday, Mr Turn-
quest stated that there will be a
“full investigation into the mat-
ter” but stopped short of indicat-
ing that it would be carried out by
a body independent of the police,
as Mrs Hanna-Martin has called
for.

Mr Turnquest said the govern-
ment “will not, and must not, be
swayed by public displays and mis-
chief making.


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009, PAGE 3



Boat thefts hike blamed on ‘organised criminals’

INS accounts:

‘In disarray’

THE accounts of the Broad- :
casting Corporation of the }
Bahamas (ZNS) are in such dis-
array that even conducting an }
audit would pose a serious chal- }
lenge, the minister responsible :

said.

Minister of National Security }
Tommy Turnquest told parlia- ;
ment this week that govern- }
ment is seeking to address the }
confused state of affairs of the }

Corporation’s accounts.

“In fact, matters are so con- :
fused as to call into question }
the possibility of conducting an }
effective audit of accounts for }
the years 2003-2007. The gov-
ernment is addressing these
matters with a view to deter- }
mining the way forward, andI
should be able to say more on }
this in due course,” said Mr }

Turnquest.

He added that ZNS has been :
allocated $8 million in this :
year’s budget and is expected }
o “operate within this para- i

meter.”

Meanwhile, Mr Turnquest :
said that there “remains an }
enormous amount of work that }
must be done to make the Cor- }
poration viable, effective and :
the pivotal national institution it }

ought to be.”

“During the debate on the :
Communications Bills, [spoke }
of the government’s plans to }
move the Corporation to a pub- }
lic service broadcasting facili- :
ty. This remains our objective :
and serious discussions will }
commence shortly in this }

regard,” he said.

of indecently
assallting
young girls

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A39-YEAR-OLD Eleuthera :
man accused of indecently }
assaulting seven young girls on }
that island between September }
2008 and May of this year was }
arraigned in Magistrate’s Court }

yesterday.

Adrian Albert White of Air- }
port Road, Eleuthera appeared }
before Chief Magistrate Roger }
Gomez in Court One, Bank :
Lane yesterday on eight counts }

of indecent assault.

It is alleged that White inde- :
cently assaulted a 16-year-old }
girl during the month of Sep-
tember 2008, another in Febru- }
ary of this year and another 16- }
year-old girl on two occasions — }
in January and April of this

year.

14-year-old girl in May.

White, a security guard who }
is represented by lawyer Antho-
ny Newbold, indicated to the }
court that he understood the }
charges and pleaded not guilty i

to all.

able.

White was remanded to Her }
Majesty’s Prison in Nassau yes- :
terday. He is expected to appear
in Court 5, Bank Lane, on June
22, when a bail hearing is }

expected to take place.

More than 100
persons living in
Bahamas illegally
are repatriated

THE Immigration Depart-
ment said that after a series of
investigations and apprehen-
sion exercises, it has repatriat-
ed more than 100 persons
found to be living in the
Bahamas illegally.

On Tuesday, 109 Haitians
were repatriated after the
Enforcement Unit found a
number of persons working
without valid work permits.

Of those flown back to
Haiti, 80 were men, 15 were
women, and 14 were children.

This follows the repatria-
tion of 86 persons in the first
two weeks of June. These
included: 64 Haitians, one
Zambian, two Venezuelans,
two Filipinos, four Domini-
cans, one Isreali and 12
Jamaicans.

The department said it
“remains committed toward
ensuring that the immigration
laws of the Bahamas are
adhered to. Further, the
department will continue to
aggressively pursue those
found in violation of Bahami-
an laws and Bahamians who
violate the laws will be prose-
cuted.”

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AUTHORITIES and boaters
have raised the alarm over what
they believe is a small, but “highly
organised” group of criminals
responsible for a “massive” hike
in boat thefts that are costing own-
ers and insurance companies mil-
lions of dollars.

The Royal Bahamas Defence
Force said it has fortified its patrols
in Nassau harbour area, particu-
larly at night when most incidents
occur, in response to the increase
over the last year in particular.

Meanwhile, some insurers are
raising their premiums and
demanding that owners take addi-
tional security measures like pay-
ing to dock their vessels at certain
marinas considered to be safer
than private docks.

Concerned boaters fear that not
enough is being done by authori-
ties to counter the trend, which
they say has the potential, not only
of hitting residents, but also
adversely affecting marine tourism
to the Bahamas and the second
home market.

One Paradise Island resident,
who wished to remain anonymous,
told of how his family was struck
by three boat thefts in the space of
eight months, with thieves taking
his father-in-law’s brand new
$250,000 boat, his nephew’s 35-
foot speedboat, and his own 36
footer.

The $250,000 boat was recov-
ered in Jamaica, having been used
for a drug run, but has since been
impounded by the government
there.

His nephew’s boat turned up in
Florida, where police reported it
had been used for human smug-
gling, and his own vessel was found
stripped of $40,000 of equipment in
a Seabreeze canal.

This after he had secured it with
six of “the best locks money can
buy” in view of the theft of his
father-in-law’s boat, which was
docked in the same location inside
Nassau Harbour.

“My father-in-law’s boat was a
total write-off and so was mine,”
said the boater, adding that his
insurance has gone up and his
insurers have requested that he
move his vessel to another marina
in the harbour.

He is upset that authorities are

AUTHORITIES say it is vessels such as
speedboats with high-powered 250 or 300
horsepower engines — that are being targeted.

| i Ia
= “Ml tei mae ~" "

by

5 ae

not reporting the incidents to the
media so that the wider public can
be warned about and respond to
the situation.

Commanding officer of the
RBDF’s Harbour Patrol Unit
Ralph McKinney and Bahamas
Air Sea Rescue Association oper-
ations director Chris Lloyd say that
a highly organised, well equipped
and apparently industrious group
of criminals is to blame.

“T’ve been here 15 years. It used
to be a handful of boats stolen each
year. I’ve never seen it on such an
organised scale as we’re seeing
now — it’s insane,” said Mr Lloyd,
describing the rise in thefts in the
Abacos in particular as “‘astro-
nomical.”

Engines

Suspicion about the sophisticat-
ed nature of the operation is raised
by the speed with which boats are
being stolen and stripped — and
the ability of those involved to
move “huge” engines weighing
hundreds of pounds onto land.

“The joke on the street is that if
you need a boat part you can just
order it from these guys and they'll
steal it. It’s become like a moral
victory for visitors to come and
cruise the Bahamas and not have
their boat stolen,” Mr Lloyd
claimed.

He said that in May — the month
that The Tribune’s source had his
boat stolen — he was made aware
of seven boats disappearing in a
period of around 10 to 12 days
alone.

wey Vielsire

fe



Petty Officer McKinney said
that the RBDF has yet to catch
anyone responsible but as part of
its efforts to do so, regularly boards
vessels seen moving in and out of
Nassau harbour at night.

In order to assist the RBDF in
its work, Mr McKinney called on
all boaters to have proof of own-
ership and boat registration on
them at all times.

But, despite his comments, some
boaters still believe it is all too easy
for criminals to remove vessels
from the harbour at night time.

“From a national security per-
spective, how can they be disap-
pearing at night and no one knows
the situation?” asked one.

Mr Lloyd added: “TI just don’t
know how they’re stealing them
and getting them out of harbour
quite so easily.”

Some boaters formed a local e-
mail list to which alerts are now
being sent on a regular basis warn-
ing mariners to be on the look out
for missing vessels.

The latest e-mail tells of the theft
of a 29-foot Sea Hunt stolen from
the Abaco Beach Resort/Boat
Harbour Marina at around 3am
last Sunday. The “Sea Dancer”
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Authorities say it is this kind of
vessel — a speedboat with high-
powered 250 or 300 horsepower
engines — that is being targeted.

Mr McKinney said that thefts
are being reported from “the tip of
Lyford Cay all the way around the
island.”

The boats commonly turn up on

the south side of the island, or in a
Seabreeze canal, if not abroad.

Attempts to obtain boat theft
report statistics from the police
yesterday were unsuccessful.

Police press liaison officer Wal-
ter Evans said he was not aware of
a rise in the incidence of such
crimes.

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White is also accused of inde- :
cently assaulting two 14-year- }
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Mr Newbold noted that
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charges, the offences were bail-

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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

‘Sick-out’ becomes contagious

LAST WEEK the same strange “sickness”
that removed 50 per cent of the Hospital
Authority’s nursing staff from their stations,
sent Water and Sewerage Corporation employ-
ees seeking bed rest.

Both groups described their malaise
as a “sick-out”, but as Hospital Authority man-
aging director Herbert Brown told Chief Justice
Sir Burton Hall, he knows of “no outbreak of
any epidemic or other contagious illness at any
of the public hospital facilities that would
explain the widespread illness among the nurs-
es employed at the various facilities.”

“The low levels of attendance have no prece-
dence during the period for which I have held
the position of managing director of the Author-
ity,” he said.

Mr Brown made this statement in an affidavit
in support of an Originating Summons and
Interlocutory Injunction filed in the Supreme
Court to order the nurses back to work or face
contempt charges. If they defy the court order
they could be committed to prison and union
funds could be “subject to sequestration”
simply put, the court could separate the union
from its bank account. The same can happen to
any person, or persons who encourage the nurs-
es to continue in their “sickness.” Such persons
can also be imprisoned, fined or have their
assets seized.

This court order was not necessary in the
case of Water and Sewerage (WSC) employees,
who probably saw the handwriting on the wall
for them if they put any further financial strain
on an already crippled corporation.

However, last week WSC employees claimed
to have caught the “sickness” bug because of a
delay in contract negotiations. They also took to
their beds because they were upset by what
they called Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham’s
“unfavourable remarks” about them in the
House of Assembly.

The Prime Minister had announced that
there would be no civil service salary increases
this year because of the precarious position of
the country’s economy. He had to hold the line
wherever he could so as not to collapse the
nation.

In the House, Prime Minister Ingraham said
he was astounded to hear that WSC workers
would be asking for salary increases considering
the financial straits facing their corporation.

He said the only way to raise salaries at WSC
was to reduce costs. This ominous statement
should have been enough to send any thinking
person to their bed, especially those at WSC

who know the corporation’s over staffing prob-
lems.

WSC has many problems — among them
about 5 million imperial gallons of water lost
daily through leaks, theft or meter inaccura-
cies; water quality difficulties; the expense and
unreliability of barging water from Andros;
reduced revenue and heavy staffing. To cut cost
in any one of these areas means a tremendous
outlay of funds — the quickest and cheapest
route to take would be staff layoffs.

In the House on Monday State Minister for
the Environment Phenton Neymour painted a
very grim picture of the staffing position at the
corporation.

Mr Neymour said that like other govern-
ment corporations it is well known that WSC is
over staffed, and has “highly competitive remu-
neration and compensation packages.” He said
that corporate business plans prepared within
the last 10 years had recommended that staff be
reduced by more than 25 per cent. He said that
to date these “recommended reductions have
not been made.”

Despite this he encouraged management
and staff to concentrate on becoming more effi-
cient and productive. The emphasis, he said,
must now be on reduced expenses, increased
revenues, and the creation of an environment
“where customers are satisfied, and all can enjoy
a decent quality of life.”

“It remains government’s position,” he said,
“to undertake compensation considerations
when the economy and budget can better afford
such increases. In the face of all of the chronic
deficiencies of the corporation, staff employ-
ment has been safeguarded.”

It would seem that government has been
most generous in safeguarding the jobs of more
than 25 per cent excess staff. However, if this
staff do not try to assist the corporation to get
costs down by other means, then they had bet-
ter sit down and cast lots as to who among them
will have to walk the redundancy plank.

“T implore staff to impose a level of relativ-
ity, realism, rational and unselfish thought in
their dealings with the corporation and the Gov-
ernment, with respect to compensation mat-
ters,” said Mr Neymour. And if those who
walked off the job with that silly sick excuse
have any sense they will heed Mr Neymout’s
warning. If they don’t make themselves essential
workers they will soon be seeing those pink
slips — and they will only have themselves to
blame. It is then that they will really under-
stand the consequences of a sick-out.



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A message to
nurses from

a nurse!

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

As a Registered nurse, I just
couldn’t keep quiet any longer
on this issue of health insurance
for nurses. It is crystal clear to
me that Cleona Hamilton has a
political agenda, and the other
nurses are following behind her
like lambs to the slaughter!

What world are you living in?
Do you know that last month
alone, more than 300,000 people
lost jobs in America? Have you
seen the drop in tourism and
the loss of jobs right here in The
Bahamas? Anyone with a brain,
can see the economic situation
that the entire world is in! What
a time to make a demand for
something that may be extreme-
ly important to everyone, but
least of all to us nurses?

What nurse can stand up and
tell me that you are in dire
straits for medical insurance?
We are in a better position than
most! If you walked into PMH
now, I can guarantee you that
you will get preferential treat-
ment because you’ve known
and worked with the staff for
many years.

As a registered nurse, you
have physician acquaintances
who would be more than happy
to see and treat you and your
family for little or no charge.
Dr Minnis himself treated me
and other nurses throughout the
course of our pregnancies and
never charged us a single dime!
I have never stood in a line or
waited hours to see a doctor,
and very few if any nurses do.

letters@triounemedia.net



Dr Minnis has taken money
out of his pocket time and time
again to fund educational sem-
inars for us nurses, Christmas
parties and other events that
were related to nurses. In fact
he has offered us the assurance
that beds have been put aside
and that we will receive quality
private care if and when need-
ed, until the government can
afford to provide health insur-
ance. He has always been there
for nurses, and I challenge any
nurse at PMH to prove other-
wise.

Cleola Hamilton and the
nurses who blindly follow her,
should be ashamed of them-
selves, at a time when thousands
of people are without jobs!
They should be thanking God
for theirs!

The people who stand behind
them and insist that the gov-
ernment fork up the $10,000,000
now, are the same people who
would complain about the lack
of something else because the
money was used for that pur-
pose.

Theard one man on the radio
this morning say that if the gov-
ernment can spend over
$100,000,000 on roads, they can
take $10,000,000 to give the
nurses insurance. He would
probably be the same man
bitching and moaning and

cussing Neko Grant if his car
fell in a ditch tomorrow!

I say to the Honourable
Prime Minister and Dr Hubert
Minnis, you are doing a great
job! Keep up the good work!

To the teachers, I say thank
you for having a brain!

I say to my collagues, the
nurses, stop the politics and the
consultations with the opposi-
tion and practice your profes-
sion faithfully. Abstain from
whatever is deleterious and mis-
chievous, maintain and elevate
the standard of your profession,
and devote yourself to the wel-
fare of those committed to your
care! Shut up, get back to work!
And thank God for a job!

NO NAME

Nassau,

June 12, 2009.

(What the caller to the radio
station failed to realise is that
the roadworks now underway
have been started by govern-
ment to provide work for those
without jobs. One would have
to be brainless not to under-
stand that it is far more impor-
tant to create work for the
unemployed than to provide
health insurance for nurses, who
are fully employed, and work
in health facilities that will take
care of their every need.

(As a matter of fact the atti-
tude of some of these nurses
shows a lack of true concern for
others — an attribute we
thought essential for a true
nurse. — Ed).

Competent people needed to chart rough waters ahead

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Remember Bahamas Remem-
ber, whom the gods would
destroy, they first make mad.
Change is inevitable, but it may
not be the change we think we
want.

Adverse situations on a per-
sonal, tribal and national level
force change, but up until recent-
ly these changes have been subtle,
and have all been occurring in
relatively good times.

Now more than ever our coun-
try needs competent people to
contribute intellectually in chart-
ing the rough waters ahead and I
for one firmly believe the rough-
est is yet to come.

Especially if our current crop
of politicians and civil servants
keep acting as if everything is
under control and will improve
in spite of their efforts.

A pessimist? Me? No way, I
am an optimist and a realist, but I
am getting hemmed in by some
pretty mediocre resources, which
is making it difficult to stay opti-

www.btcbahamas.com



mistic. I will always deal with real-
ity head on, as dismal as it may
get.

Take interpersonal communi-
cations for instance:

I have yet to have a conversa-
tion of any length with a politician
that is, for lack of better words,
coherent in thought and progres-
sion.

In fact, I am beginning to think
that they think in 30 second com-
mercial type sound bites.

There is no development of
the idea, real or abstract, and no
discussions have ever ended very
well.

Any authority they have, who-
ever they may be, usually ends
up being wielded as power, as an
effort to subjugate me.

As those who know me will
attest, this has never gone over
very well.

Most often I start to feel as if I
am re-living the tower of Babel
Biblical story, in which the tribes
are scattered to the winds through
their sudden lack of ability to
speak to each other.

FOUR CONNECTION@TO THE WORLD

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location which was formally at the Mall at Marathon
is now closed. Customers wishing to subscribe to
BTC's l-Connect and VIBE Unite service can visit our
Customer Service offices at JFK, The Mall at Mara-
thon and Shirley Street.

Thank you for your continued support.

At this point I should probably
take my leave, and go back to my
quiet corner, survive as best as is
possible, and stay out of the way.
Who am I to tell anyone what to
do or how to do it?

But, at the same time, this is
my country as much as anyone
else’s, and I choose to try my
damnedest to contribute come
hell or high water. And I proba-
bly will for life.

One last thought for now:

A lot of Bahamians in high and
mighty places better learn to
laugh at themselves every so
often instead of laughing at other
Bahamians, the ones they try to
keep under foot.

This applies to the two politi-
cal leadership groups, the com-
plete farces that they are.

Remember, whom the gods
would destroy, they first make
mad. (Euripides - Greek tragic
dramatist 484 BC - 406 BC).

There is ample madness in the
Bahamas to give that thought
credibility.

CHRISTOPHER D. LOWE
Nassau,
June 15, 2009

Opposition displayed
complete contempt
for the police

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The Opposition displayed
complete contempt for the police
when they prevented an officer
from carrying out his duty in the
House last Wednesday.

Not only did they defy the
Speaker, but they rendered the
policeman impotent in a very
public and humiliating way, and
put themselves above the law.

What’s even more shocking is
the former national security min-
ister took part in the debacle.

If the Opposition wanted to
talk about the very sad death of a
15 year old in prison, they should
have called a press conference
after it became clear both sides
wouldn’t give consent to sideline
the Budget exercise. They did not
need the protection of Parlia-
mentary privilege to say what
they had to say.

If they’re clever, they can raise
the matter when they speak in
the Budget debate. Or, they can
put it on the agenda to deal with
at a later date.

The whole episode was ridicu-
lous and there are better ways to
score political brownie points.

If the opposition can do their
own thing and thumb their nose
at authority, why shouldn’t the
public? Their behaviour typifies
the tragedy of the Bahamas.

No wonder we live in a lawless
society.

ATHENA DAMIANOS
Nassau,
June 8, 2009
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Nurses ‘accepted’ deferment
of pay rise, health insurance

PLP ate nlll
hopeful defends
Senator's bid

for Marathon

m By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net_

A PLP chairmanship hopeful :

has come out to defend Senator }
Jerome Fitzgerald in his bidto rep-

resent the people of Marathon,
The Tribune can reveal.

PLP activist Ricardo Smith, a }
former party council member for }
Marathon, said he considers the :
comments made by former }
Marathon chairman Neil Percentie }
to be an underhanded attack }
against all PLP members of par- }
liament who do not live in the con-
stituency which they were elected }

to represent.

“This was an attack on every ;
MP, our leader Perry Christie, the }
chairman Glenys Hanna-Martin, }
Obie Wilchcombe etc, because I }
would wager that 90 per cent of }
the members of parliament donot }
live in their various constituen- }

cles.”

to meet.

However, The Tribune under- }
stands that Mr Fitzgerald’s photo }
was accidentally placed on :
myplp.com in the space marked }

“The Constituency of Marathon.”

Mr Fitzgerald’s name was report- ;
edly mistakenly linked to that part :
of the website from his contribu- }
tions to the Senate which are i
archived on myplp.com for easy }

public access.

Despite this error, however, Mr }
Smith said the point still remains — }
that there are persons vying for }
positions and seats in the party, :
some of which are currently filled
by sitting members of parliament. }

“But what he (Mr Percentie) is ;

doing is nitpicking.

“Tt is my hope that we will allow :
all persons who want to vie for }
whatever position to have their }
fair chance, but our focus must }
remain on defeating the current }
representative for Marathon, Earl }
Deveaux. That’s what this is all ;

about,” he said.

Mr Smith refused to address }
reports that he will be challenging }
Mts Hanna-Martin at the upcom- }
ing National Convention for the :
post of National Chairman of the :

PLP.

On Sunday evening, Mr Per- i
centie issued a statement exclu- }
sively to The Tribune questioning }
how Mr Fitzgerald could already ;
be listed on the PLP’s website as }
the candidate for the Marathon }
constituency despite the fact that }
the candidate’s committee has yet i

@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

NURSES accepted the
deferment of their pay rise
and health insurance plan
before taking industrial
action, according to an affi-
davit supplied to the
Supreme Court.

Public Hospitals Authority
(PHA) managing director
Herbert Brown submitted
records to the courts showing
how the Bahamas Nurses
Union (BNU) were warned
in January about how the
drastic downturn in the econ-
omy could affect the terms
of their 2006 industrial agree-
ment.

The nurses were then
asked by Minister of Health
Dr Hubert Minnis in April
to consider alternative
options for healthcare such
as care from government
consultants without addi-
tional costs and access to
separate facilities for treat-
ment in privacy.

When Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham made his
budget communication on
May 27 and explained that
the country’s revenue short-
fall was in excess of $260 mil-
lion, the BNU is reported to
have agreed to delay the new
health insurance plan and
four per cent salary increase.

According to the affidavit,
BNU president Cleola
Hamilton told the press: “If
you look around you have to
be reasonable. You don’t
want to take the country
places that you know the
country can’t go right now.
So you have to be reason-
able in your thinking.”

But the following day ata
meeting with the Minister of
Health and public health
nurses, the union threatened

Affidavit says the union was
warned before taking action

to take industrial action if
nurses’ needs were not
met.

Nurses demanded the pay-
ment of the group health
insurance plan or the pay
rise, and explained the extent
of their hardships: a lack of
respect from government,
the need to work several jobs
to make ends meet and the
risks they face in the health-
care system.

When their demands were
not met around 50 per cent
of public health nurses across
the country took action.

More than half of staff
scheduled to work at
Princess Margaret Hospital
called in sick last Monday,
as well as a significant num-
ber of nurses at the Rand
Memorial Hospital in
Freeport, the Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre and
various public health clinics.

And several nurses contin-
ued the sick-out for the ninth
day yesterday, as around 200
New Providence nurses
attending a BNU meeting on
Monday told the union pres-
ident they are still ‘sick’
despite the government’s
injunction demanding they
return to work.

But not all nurses are sup-
portive of the industrial
action.

A nurse who does not
want to be named told The
Tribune: “It is crystal clear
to me that (there is) a politi-
cal agenda, and the other
nurses are following behind
like lambs to the slaughter!

“Anyone with a brain can
see the economic situation
that the entire world is in!

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What a time to make a
demand for something that
may be extremely important
to everyone, but least of all
to us nurses?”

The nurse argued that
healthcare professionals are
in a better position than most
to receive treatment as doc-
tors will not keep them wait-
ing or charge them for ser-
vices, and she said they
should be grateful to still be
employed in such dire eco-
nomic times.

Ms Hamilton was unavail-
able for comment yesterday,
but president of the Nurses
Association Rosemarie Josey
pledged her support for the
‘sick’ nurses and the die-hard
attitude they displayed on
Monday night.

She said: “It was awesome.
The nurses are really hurt-
ing and I with the public
could realise why it’s so
important for us to get the
insurance.

“I think people are under
the mistaken impression that
they don’t understand the

To have your say on this or any
other issue, email The Tribune
at: letters@tribunemedia.net
or deliver your letter to
The Tribune on Shirley Street,
P.O. Box N-3207

ig He
UUs)
a et
a er a bY |

economic problems.

“They understand it very
well, but they are irate,
because of the way they were
disrespected and dismissed
as if they are of no impor-
tance.

“They found money for
everyone else except the
nurses.

“And it’s sad to even see
the nurses are threatened
with an injunction when they
are just fighting for a basic
right.”



DR HUBERT MINNIS ‘asked the
nurses to consider alternative options’.

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ea eee rr i ee
Another new dawn for the revitalisation of Nassau

C) N THE banks of the St
Lawrence River, at the
very spot where the city of Mon-
treal was founded over three
centuries ago, stands a remark-
able structure built in 1992 atop
the remains of a Victorian office
building.

The Museum of Archaeolo-
gy and History entombs the city's
origins on the site of an earlier
Iroquois settlement known as
Hochelaga. This archeological
crypt preserves the remains of
Montreal's history from every
settlement period — in situ. And
more than 350,000 people visit
this amazing time capsule every
year.

Pointe a Calliere is the heart
of the architectural and cultural
heritage that is Old Montreal, a
district energized by fine restau-
rants, outdoor cafes and people-

DOCTORS HOSPITAL

filled plazas. And this restored
historic zone lies at the centre of
a booming, cosmopolitan city
ranked as one of the world's best
places to live or visit.

Noted American architect
Hugh Newell Johnson once said
that “When you look at a city,
it's like reading the hopes, aspi-
rations and pride of everyone
who built it.” Put another way
by Bahamian architect Pat Rah-
ming, every city requires a dream
recorded in a vision.

"For the city to belong to the
community, the vision must have



been their inspiration as they
worked to create it," Rahming
wrote in a recent article.
"Unfortunately, there appears
not to have emerged a dream of
a post-independent Bahamas.
Rather, for 30-odd years, plans
have been proposed based upon
visions by foreign consultants."

The city of Nassau stretches
from Bay Street to Wulff Road
and from the Eastern Parade to
the long-vanished Western
Parade, where the British Colo-
nial Hilton now stands. It's
descent into an ugly, traffic-

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Health For Life



choked ruin has been variously
attributed to the removal of the
public market, the development
of large beachfront hotels, and
the construction of outlying
shopping malls.

Cynics have also laid much of
the blame on the long-running
political vendetta between a pre-
dominantly black government
and the mostly white merchant
princes who once held sway over
Bay Street. But this is a gross
simplification of the current real-
ity, which is perhaps best char-
acterised by the Finlayson fami-
ly's ownership of Solomon's
Mines.

Early efforts to arrest the cap-
ital's decline were led by the late
Norman Solomon, who invited
the respected, Maryland-based
Rouse Corporation to propose
ideas in the 1980s. But Solomon
and his associates did not have
enough political clout at the time
to get beyond first base. So they
resorted to lobbying for tax
exemptions on high-end goods
to help spur downtown spend-
ing and investment.

Once duty-free legislation had
been passed, the business com-
munity and the Ministry of
Tourism set up the Nassau
Tourism Development Board in
1995. At about the same time,
the government was mulling a
land use plan for New Provi-
dence, and Canadian consultants
produced a report on infrastruc-
tural needs and costs. But like
so much else, that project was
shelved, postponing all the hard
choices.

During the late 90s, the
NTDB enjoyed some success.
Workshops were held, sidewalks
rebuilt, street lights installed, a
welcome centre was added to the
cruise port, and many downtown
properties were upgraded. Per-
haps the most significant event
was the $90 million restoration of
the British Colonial Hotel.
Opened in 1923 as the city’s toni-
est resort, this massive structure
on the most historic site in town
had been reduced to a few rooms
operating as a downmarket inn
until new owners acquired it in
1997.

But some leaders saw that
marketing was not the only —
or even the major — issue. Real
change required the input of all
public and private stakeholders
to redefine a vision for the city of
Nassau, as well as to recreate the
physical product. It was also
realised that the regular pro-
cessing of huge numbers of dis-
gusted cruise visitors was bound
to affect the performance of our
number one industry.

In fact, studies confirmed that
almost half of all hotel visitors
never went downtown, while
cruise visitors spent only a frac-
tion of their time and money in
Nassau — an appalling rate of
return from the country's chief
economic activity.

So the NTDB sought to focus
government attention on this
alarming state of affairs. It's mis-
sion was to tip-toe through polit-
ical minefields to promote a
tourism product that was "clean,
safe, uniquely Bahamian and
provided value for money", as
NTDB spokesman Frank Comi-
to put it. From all accounts, it
was as difficult a task as steer-
ing the Titanic away from an ice-
berg collision.

Nassau as we know it today
was largely built during the
Great Depression, with revenues
earned from bootlegging. And a
major overhaul of the town’s
decrepit infrastructure along with
restoration of its historic districts
are long overdue. But experts
have complained for years that
little can be done until the con-
tainer port is relocated. Well,

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“The Arawak Cay
Port Development
Company —

a coalition of
shipping interests
— will also build a
bridge from the
western extension
of Arawak Cay to
connect with the
Bethel Avenue
road extension.”



that is about to happen.
Dredging of the harbour to
expand the cruise port will begin
within weeks and some of the
spoil will be used to add 40 acres
to Arawak Cay's existing 70
acres. Created when the harbour
was dredged back in the 1960s,
this artificial island is already
occupied by a container termi-
nal. It also handles dry bulk car-
goes like sand, cement, steel and
aggregates, as well as potable
water shipped from Andros.
When the current dredging
finishes in the fall, construction
of the new port will begin on
land leased from the govern-
ment. In addition to expanded
container and dry bulk terminals,
the cay will feature a 5.5-acre
ferry terminal for tour boats, the
Fiesta Mail and Bahamas Fer-
ries, while most inter-island ves-
sels will stay at Potters Cay.

‘i Arawak Cay Port
Development Company
—a coalition of shipping inter-
ests — will also build a bridge
from the western extension of
Arawak Cay to connect with the
Bethel Avenue road extension.
Containers will be trucked along
this route to a new 15-acre ware-
house depot at Gladstone Road.

A public offering is planned
for the new port (together with a
$15 million preference share
issue), and the government will
acquire a 20 per cent stake in the
company. Individual sharehold-
ings will be restricted to an upper
limit of 15 per cent, according to
a memorandum of understanding
between the developers and the
government.

Total costs are put at under
$60 million with a rate of return
of more than 12 per cent, and if
all goes as scheduled, the port
will be out of the downtown area
some time next year, presenting
an unprecedented opportunity
to launch the revitalisation
process in earnest. As you might
expect, a lot of ducks are being
moved into place now to achieve
this.

A key player is the newly-cre-
ated Downtown Nassau Part-
nership. This is the public-pri-
vate group that took over from
the Downtown Revitalisation
Committee, which was preced-
ed by the Nassau Economic
Development Commission, that
was gestated by the NTDB,
which developed from an initia-
tive spearheaded by the Duty-
Free Promotion Board. The
DNP itself will eventually be
supplanted by a new city author-
ity created by legislation.

Co-chaired by Tourism Direc-
tor-General Vernice Walkine
and NTDB chief Charles
Klonaris, the Partnership is man-
aged by Bahamian Vaughan
Roberts, a former finance direc-
tor at Baha Mar who has spent
most of his career in the United
States. Dave Feehan, of the

International Downtown Asso-
ciation, and Brad Segal, of the
US-based Progressive Urban
Management Associates, have
been hired as consultants.

Meanwhile, veteran Bahami-
an architect Jackson Burnside
has been commissioned to pre-
pare a master plan for the initial
phase of the improvements. This
will feature an expansion of
Woods Rogers’ Wharf, which
will be turned into a waterfront
pedestrian promenade; con-
struction of the new straw mar-
ket; and — hopefully — lots of
cultural activities.

But there are other — less
official — efforts underway that
look promising. One of these is
called Take Initiative Nassau
(http://www.tin242.com) organ-
ised by an enthusiastic grad stu-
dent named Alastair Knowles.
Tough Call attended the inau-
gural meeting last week at the
Bahamas National Trust head-
quarters on Village Road.

Knowles simply decided he
had a responsibility as a citizen
to help with the Nassau redevel-
opment: "I determined that it
was critical to educate Bahami-
ans on the need for people to
work together with the DNP to
help better the chances of Nas-
sau reaching its full potential.
Vaughn Roberts has a truly
daunting task before him and
he’ll need all the help he can
get."

At last week's meeting,
Roberts made the point that
revitalisation can't be achieved
unless ordinary Bahamians take
ownership of the process. He
invited artists to consider occu-
pying vacant spaces and to dec-
orate derelict buildings. He
urged retailers to work at creat-
ing a better business mix, and
said taxi drivers shouldn't be
parking all day on Bay Street,
while straw vendors would have
to come to terms with the prod-
uct they were offering.

"The average citizen should
take advantage of the opportu-
nities that will be generated by a
new wave of ideas, and our
politicians should focus on the
greater good and make this a
national priority. There are
tremendous economic benefits
not only for downtown property
owners but for over the hill too.
This recession will help bring
about change and we will have
an opportunity to write history
and create new legacies."

IE Pat Rahming's words,
"The city is a complex
thing. It is a place where people
meet, live, shop, and find recre-
ation, entertainment and cultur-
al fulfillment...It is more than the
commerce of the time, more than
the cleanness of the streets or
the number of parking spaces. It
is where the community meets
to celebrate special occasions."

Ever since the 1960s, we have
spent millions of dollars on study
after study by both local and for-
eign experts advising us to clean
up our act, preserve what's left of
our history, protect our environ-
ment and salvage our cultural
heritage. And every year we
ignore this costly advice.

So what, in the end, will our
grandchildren inherit from us?
Will we ever be able to put our
history on show as the city of
Montreal and countless others
have done so successfully? The
past is a precious resource that
we discard at our peril. The
future is in our hands today.

What do you think? Send comments
to larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009, PAGE 7



Unqualified persons allowed
to become prison officers

Minister says promotions also offered to people who did not meet criteria

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

TO “BRING CLOSURE?” to a
problem dating back to the May
2007 election, the government has
permitted 25 unqualified persons
to become prison officers and
agreed to offer promotions to peo-
ple who did not meet the neces-
sary criteria, the Minister of
National Security stated.

Tommy Turnquest claimed this
“decisive action” had to be taken
after the former PLP government
took steps to recruit unqualified
candidates to the prison service in
2005 and 2006 when it was “well
known that they did not have the
required post qualifications to be
recruited”.

He said the former government
advised another group that they
were to be promoted though they
lacked the relevant qualifications
and despite the fact that the Public
Service Commission (PSC) had not
ratified the move.

Contributing to the 2009/2010
budget debate, Tommy Turnquest
said that his ministry had been pre-

occupied by “serious
and vexing human
resources problems” in
recent years, including
the “long standing prob-
lem at Her Majesty’s
Prisons resulting from
appointments and pro-
motions well outside of
the rules and regula-
tions of the Public Ser-
vice.”

“We understood that
the position in which |
these unfortunate per-
sons at the prison found
themselves was not of
their making, but was a result of
what appeared to be an effort to
circumvent the rules and regula-
tions of the public service.

“Many questions have been
asked by many persons, including
in this House, as to when these
matters would be brought to clo-
sure. I am now happy to report that
this government has taken the deci-
sive action required to bring these
matters to closure,” said Mr Turn-
quest.

“Of the persons in the 2005 and
2006 squads of Her Majesty’s Pris-

Tommy Turnquest



ons, 41 prison recruits
did not meet the requi-
site qualifications. Of
this number, 25 have
been issued letters of
appointment to prison
officers, and should be
paid by the end of this
month. Of the remain-
ing number, two have
been interdicted, three
| are suspected of tam-
pering with their certifi-
cates, and two have yet
to produce their birth
certificates.

“The remaining nine
persons are still with the Public
Service Commission and should be
concluded by July 1, 2009,” he said.

The minister said that where it is
required, those confirmed “will be
encouraged” to obtain the neces-
sary qualifications to permit them
to be further promoted in the sys-
tem.

Meanwhile, the ministry has tak-
en steps to ensure that “for the
future, everyone recruited to prison
service has the required qualifica-
tions.”

Mr Turnquest said a “grandfa-

New Court of Appeal
justices are appointed

thering policy” has been imple-
mented towards those people with-
out the requisite qualifications who
were advised they were to be pro-
moted, “to permit them to be pro-
moted on the basis of good and
effective service to the prison over
the years.”

He said these people were
informed they would be promot-
ed “on the eve of the 2007 general
election.”

“The PSC has agreed in princi-
ple that the grandfathering policy
will be accepted and implemented
in this case, but it is not to establish
a precedent. Once financial clear-
ance is in place, all officers will be
officially notified of their promo-
tion,” he added.

Attempts to reach Fred Mitchell,
former minister with responsibility
for the public service, for comment
yesterday were unsuccessful as he
was Said to be off the island.

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TWO new Court of Appeal justices will take their
places at the bench in the coming weeks, the Attorney
General's Office announced.

Under Article 99 of the Constitution, Sir George
Newman has been appointed a non-resident Justice of
the Court of Appeal and Justice Stanley John has been
appointed a resident Justice of Appeal.

Sir George's appointment comes into effect on June,
15 while Justice John's takes effect on July 1, a state-
ment by the AG's office said.

Sir George was appointed a judge of the High Court
of England and Wales in May, 1995. He retired from
that court on October 1, 2007 after serving more than 12
years.

Before becoming a judge of the High Court, Sir
George practiced as a barrister.

He was called to the bar in 1965 and was appointed
Queen’s Counsel in 1981. His practice as a barrister
included many appearances before the Privy Council in
a wide variety of cases.

Sir George was among the judges nominated to sit on

the Administrative Court and the Special Immigration
Appeals Commission (SIAC) and is presently the trea-
surer of the Honourable Society of the Middle Temple.

He was appointed chair of the Security Vetting
Appeals Panel of the United Kingdom in February
2009.

Justice John is a citizen of Trinidad and Tobago and
served as a justice of the Court of Appeal in that coun-
try from July, 2002 until June, 2009.

The Trinidadian press reported that he resigned
from this post after making several stinging criticisms of
Trinidad's judicial system.

Justice John was called to the Bar of England and
Wales as a member of the Honourable Society of Lin-
coln’s Inn in July, 1972. He served in private practice in
Trinidad from 1972 to 1994.

In 1994, Justice John was appointed a Puisne Judge
of the High Court of Justice of Trinidad and Tobago.

It has also been announced that current Court of
Appeal judge, Justice Emanuel Osadebay, will demit
office as a Justice of Appeal at the end of this month.



NOTICE

We are pleased to advise the public of the appointment of Mr. Larry
Wilson, Chief Financial Officer, Royal Bank of Canada as a director
of the company effective goth Mav 2009,

D. BURROWS-HAINES (Mrs.)
Corporate Secretary

ongratulations ¢,
Elder Joshua and Effie San ds

me) 8 ety ee 5



Public Consultation on Retail
Pricing for the Electronic
Communications Sector

The Committee for the Privatisation of BTC is pleased

to invite comments from members of the public and

interested parties on its consultation document for a

proposed new Retail Pricing Structure for the
{ Electronic Communications Sector.

t



Oy th

Retail the

pricing
impose specific obligations on price levels and price
changes for operators deemed to have significant

regulation enables regulator to

17th June 1951-2009

Jesliua Lockpwood Soods Sr. of Palmetto Polat Clewtiera and Effie Jeredene Sands nee Welland of
Sern Sooed Elewtiers mere foined in holy matrimony on Yume fei, 19ST
by Eeageliss WOM, Sarringten, ‘Te ‘Aride wes given io merriage by Ber brodher Mr, Cyril feliord,
The atedding party wis ae fotlows:

Porcats of the Bride: Mr, ee es. Cotker Bullard, Parents of the grooms Or, & Mes. Willi Sands,
Maid ef ‘Noner : Ms, Esther Does, Bridesmaids: Mes. Beryl [Sethel) Tiller, Mrs Sheila War,
and ds, Fasepicipe Avin ry. Hest Mun: fr, erulad Bethel, Grermasmen: Wr. Willian Berkel,

Mr. Glusfard Thompicn, and Mir. Audie Carey, Fiearer girls: Mrs. Bewerty (lotr! Fain, Wes. Bade
(Wethell Sites, Mrs. Malena (toeyer! Wilkon, Mrs. Welande [Archer! Harrington
Payetog: Mr. Cerfeton ‘Blair, ‘Towst to ‘Brides parents: Mr. ‘Timotty Gibson, ‘Toust to Groom's parents:
Mr. Jack Ford, ‘Wedding Caordingter: Bra, Rath (Fethel! ladars
Ovganiets Mew. Pisele Sink, Maser of Ceremonies Mr. Marcus Benkel, Trecamaker: Mrs. Taberia Gadat
Thotographer: Mr. George Lune

market power in certain product markets. The
consultation document addresses the current and
proposed approaches to retail price regulation in The
Bahamas.

The Retail Pricing consultation will run for approximately five weeks from
June T?, 2009 to July 17, 2009. Coples of the consultation document are
being distributed to the Administrators’ offices In the Family islands and can
be obtained from the Public Ltiities Commission and the offices of KPMG In
New Providence and Grand Bahama. Copies can also be downloaded from
the Government's website at www. bahamas.gov.bs or the privatisation
website at www. bteprivatisation.com and comments amailed to
info@btcprivatisation.com.

‘Tite Terciene Sond hate deen oo ee ber af Timmins! (poapel chanel for over 60 weirs. See is the founder af
Tenaifer Camas Fabrics ond has worked as do dressmaker for weary 60 years and ib Knows tiroagioul thie
Sahomes for fer eqreflent oork, Iu addition she is Epon for fer eqceifent cooking aod sie fos dewoted fer

/ fife to retiring Ber family, _ 7
Hider Jasiud Coeksedd Fords ir, kos beed & meee of Eeimdnwe Gaigpel for over el yedry dad fas
sereed in worious capacities tireag hou ifs ti. Ae iso memeber of the United Willons Deporimens of
the Aaveciotion of Dretires in tie Bafemos, Ne bos served as chairman of tie United Eiders Council, He
tat Dustice of the Pearce aed mii ridge officer end holds the Queens Hadye af Hamer.

WW foe cal Mp PEE Bou atid eee crus for gour foie fulness.

rom
suit af your children: Sharlene and Jaime! Ligkthooree, Seerg! Sagas, ‘Pastor Toseud Sunde Tr. Freetun
— and Tenfamin Gmith, Jennifer and Kendle Meckjaney 7
Grandrfilaren: Jamaal, Sormine, Jayson and Jomeile Cightbeurns. Kechel, Syptirgn ana Mery! Sands, Kyle
and Ageivon Smith, Amari ans a4 Mc Ainreey
Al af your entnded fariiy dnd friends


PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





St. Andrew’s School Foundation

Development Officer

The Foundation ts committed to the Mlisston of St. Andrew's
School through its financial support of teachers, scholarship
students and building projects. The Foundation is presently
seeking a person to lead its Office of Development.

The Development Officer, a full-time position, reports to
the St. Andrew's School Foundation and will:

- be responsible for designing and overseeing fundraising
campaigns in support of the Foundation’s strategic goals;

develop marketing strategies and materials for public
relations and advertising;

- promote relationships between the School and various
organizations, including the St. Andrew's Alumni and
Priends Association:

oversee the day to day administration of international
charities,

The successful candidate will possess knowledge and
understanding of the School's history and culture; be a goal-
driven individual with strong organizational and social skill;
possess a minimum of a Bachelor's Degree; and be
experienced in fundraising.

Interested candidates should send their CV and a letter of

Interest to:

Development Officer Position
SL Andrew's School Foundation
EO. Box N-4695
Nassau, Bahamas



St Andrew’s 2009 class has
‘best ever’ BGCSE results

88 per cent
of students
achieve
A-C passes

HISTORY was made at St
Andrew’s School this year,
with the graduating class of
2009 obtaining the best aca-
demic results ever at the
school since the introduction
of the BGCSE exams 16
years ago.

Of 68 students, 88 per cent
achieved A-C passes, 15
received five or more As.
The class also boasted the
top student in the Bahamas -
Brolin Xavier, who achieved
10 ‘A’ passes.

Speaking at last week’s
graduation ceremony, St
Andrew’s secondary school
principal Frank Coyle said
that this class “is an excellent

Mizuho Corporate Bank (USA)

Consolidated Balance Sheets
(in Thousands, Except Share Amounts)

Assets
Cash and due from banks (Note 3)
Interest-bearing deposits with banks (Note 3)

Securities (Note 4)
Available-for-sale
Held-to-maturity

Loans and leases (Notes 5 and 21)
Allowance for credit losses (Note 6)
Net loans and leases

Accrued interest receivable and other assets
Total assets

Liabilities ,
Noninterest-bearing deposits
Interest-bearing deposits (Note 9)
Total deposits

Federal funds purchased

Other borrowings (Note /0)

Accrued taxes, interest payable and other liabilities
Total liabilities

Stockholder’s equity (Note 13)

Common stock—$100 par value; (authorized, issued and outstanding
984,742 shares in 2008 and 2007)

Capital surplus

Accumulated deficit

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

Total stockholder’s equity

Total liabilities and stockholder’s equity

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

El] ERNST & YOUNG

Report of Independent Auditors

Board of Directors
Mizuho Corporate Bank (USA)
New York, New York

December 31
2008 2007

$ 598,058 $ 28,882
1,042 -

88,021
33,015

2,506,694

270,260
34,017

2,502,271

(18,116) (10,289)
2,488,578 2,491,982

61,950
$3,270,664

69,544
$2,894,685

$ 163,947
1,912,901
2,076,848

$ 101,608
1,348,312
1,449,920

- 270,000
63,509 66,129
102,674 89,027

2,243,031 1,875,076

98,474
1,222,036 1,222,036
(285,141) (276,240).

(7,736) (24,661)
1,027,633 1,019,609

98,474

$3,270,664 $2,894,685

Ernst & Young LLP
5 Times Square
New York , New York 10036-6530

Tel: +1 212 773 3000
www.ey.com

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Mizuho Corporate Bank
(USA) (the “Bank”) as of December 31, 2008 and 2007, and the related consolidated statements
of operations, stockholder’s equity and cash flows for the years then ended. These financial
statements are the responsibility of the Bank’s management. Our responsibility is to express an

opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United
States. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable
assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement.
An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and
disclosures in the consolidated financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and
significant estimates made by management, and evaluating the overall consolidated financial
statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all
material respects, the consolidated financial position of Mizuho Corporate Bank (USA) at
December 31, 2008 and 2007, and the consolidated results of its operations and its cash flows for
the years then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United

States.

March 26, 2009

Barnet ¥ rer

Interested persons may obtain a complete copy of the Audited Accounts
from SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas)Limited, P.O. Box N-7788,

West Bay Street, Nassau Bahamas. :



ST ANDREW’S SCHOOL’S graduating class of 2009.

example of how we at St
Andrew’s continue to try to
raise the educational bar here
in the Bahamas.”

Success

He credited the solid foun-
dation the students obtained
during the primary years pro-
gramme and the school’s
“vastly improved” middle
school programme with the
success of this year’s gradu-
ating class.

“When we read in the
national press about the ‘D+’
national average, this class
thought we single-handedly
brought it up from a ‘D’ - no,
but we must remember that
in the ‘not so good old days’
only a select few took the
GCE, over 90 per cent of the
students here in the Bahamas
did not get the opportunity
to sit any GCE , zero passes,
therefore if you had worked
out the national average in
those ‘not so good old days’

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the national average would
have been close to ‘U’,
unclassified,” he said.

“Tf we entered only 15, the
average pass for St Andrew’s
would have been ‘A’, if we
had entered only 45 we
would have had 100 per cent
A-C, but no, we enter every
student, all 68.”

Mr Coyle said the school’s
head boy and head girl were
recognised at Government
House for having GPAs of
4.0.

While the class of 2009
were breaking academic
records they were also break-
ing sporting records in soft-
ball, soccer, volleyball and
swimming, he said.

The students were also
very actively involved in
school productions, music
and theatre, putting on
“Alice in Wonderland”,
“Mid-Summers Night
Dream” and “Animal Farm”
to name a few.

Mr Coyle expressed his
feeling of honour and pride
to be presiding over the grad-
uation ceremony and advised
the students to always keep
their “eyes on the prize” in
life.



§ Scotiabank’

+ Conditions apy * Tsdererk of The Bank of Nowe Scot, used under cance
Bs 0708
THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009, PAGE 9



Andros satellite farms revitalised

m@ By GLADSTONE THURSTON

THE Bahamas Agricultural and Indus-
trial Corporation has commenced revi-
talisation of its 1,500-acre satellite farms
in North Andros with the initial focus
on livestock.

This will be extended to incorporate
fruit trees while expanding private fruit
tree nurseries, BAIC executive chairman
Edison Key told members of the House
of Assembly last week.

He was speaking during the debate on
the government’s $1.7 billion budget for
fiscal year 2009/2010 which begins July 1.

BAIC is mandated to stimulate, facili-
tate and encourage agriculture develop-
ment in the Bahamas, and expand and
create opportunities for Bahamians to
participate in the economic development
of the country.

“Especially during this eco-
nomic downturn,” said Mr Key,
“BAIC’s mandate has become
more vital to stimulate employ-
ment and the economy.

“To this end BAIC has

embarked on a number of ini- |j

tiatives focusing on the expan-
sion of agriculture production,
greater utilisation of BAIC’s

land portfolio, business adviso- [7
ry services, and the expansion

of craft centres and craft train-
ing.”

Already BAIC has launched
the North Andros Agricultural
Initiatives Project, a major com-
ponent of which is the utilisa-

tion of land that has already been cleared

and not in full production.

This includes the acquisition of 561



acres in the vicinity of the San
Andros airport from Kerzner
International.

“Funding for this is in place and
it is anticipated that this matter
will be resolved in short order,”
said Mr Key. “Applications for
this prime agriculture land were
over subscribed and the survey-
ing and issuing of leases are a mat-
ter of priority for BAIC.”

Another project that forms a
part of this initiative is the 800-
acre former Morgan Farms in
which BAIC has a 40 per cent
lease interest.

It is BAIC’s intention to estab-
lish a nursery and other related
activities on a portion of this and lease
300 acres to vegetable producers Lucayan
Tropical.

BAIC EXECUTIVE
chairman Edison Key

“Ttis BAIC’s view that the presence of
Lucayan Tropical in North Andros as a
domestic investor will auger very well
for the further development of agricul-
ture,” he said.

It will create jobs, enhance marketing
of agriculture products from North
Andros, add value to agriculture prod-
ucts, enhance technical skills, improve
methods of farming, and save on foreign
exchange, he said.

Applications are still being received
from Bahamians interested in leasing
land in the proposed Andros agro-indus-
trial park.

“Therefore, we will continue to nurture
this desire to establish operations in
Andros through our promotional activi-
ties, with emphasis on agro processing
and the production of ornamental
plants.”

Jerome Thompson to make landmark voyage for the disabled

A NEW horizon will be met as
Adventures Unlimited Bahamas and
Jerome Thompson attempt to cir-
cumnavigate New Providence and
Paradise Island on Saturday, July
11.

If successful, Mr Thompson will
be the first visually disabled person
to be recorded accomplishing this
feat in the Bahamas.

The venture is scheduled to begin
at 10am at Hurricane Hole Marina,
located on Paradise Island, with a
brief pass-by at noon of the
Junkanoo Summer Festival on
Woodes Rodgers Wharf. It will end
at Hurricane Hole Marina at approx-
imately 3pm, followed immediately
by an official ceremony.

Mr Thompson and his team have
invited the public to witness the his-



JEROME THOMPSON is sre nilsting’s a vessel during a training session

with Captain Glen Bain.

toric moment. This event will also
be the launch of Adventures Unlim-
ited Bahamas, a non-profit organi-
sation licensed on January 8, 2009.

This non-profit entity has as its
goal to promote, encourage and sup-
port persons with disabilities in pur-
suits of various endeavors that might

seem to be impossible.

July’s venture is a solo boat trip
which is being undertaken by Mr
Thompson, the organisation’s presi-
dent and founder. As a blind per-
son, Mr Thompson is endeavoring to
showcase that persons with disabili-
ties in the Bahamas, no matter what
their limitations, can rise to and con-
quer any challenge once determined
and committed.

Mr Thompson said he was
inspired by persons worldwide who
have different types of disabilities
and who have accomplished great
endeavors in spite of their various
limitations.

Persons of any category of dis-
ability in the Bahamas will be assist-
ed by the organisation in respect to
accomplishing various projects.

Mr Thompson’s history-making
venture is supported by the Bahamas
Ministry of Tourism and Aviation,
the Bahamas National Council for
Disability, Sir Durward Knowles and
the Independence Celebration Com-
mittee. Mr Thompson acknowledges
his attempt would not be possible
without the assistance given to him
by his trainer, Captain Glen Bain,
Harbour Bay Marina dock master
Lundy Robinson, meteorologist
Greg Thompson and businessman
Peter Roker. Additionally, the ven-
ture received sponsorship from Hur-
ricane Hole Marina, the Bank of the
Bahamas, Scotiabank (Bahamas)
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THE TRIBUNE

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

18TH JUNE, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00332

Whereas SOLOMON EZEKIEL NEWTON, of Pinewood Gardens in the Southern
District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
Letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate of MABLE NEWTON, late
of Yellow Elder Gardens in the Southern District of the Island of New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

18TH JUNE, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00333

Whereas SHAKIRA SANDS-BURROWS, of Millennium Gardens in the Western
District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate of JOHN SAMUEL SANDS
late of Malcolm Road in the Southern District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

18TH JUNE, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00334

Whereas ANDREW DWAYNE FORBES, of No. 19 High Vista Apartments in the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration
with the Will annexed of the Real and Personal Estate of DIANE M. MILLER late
of No. 580 S.E. 5th Street in the City of Pampano Beach in the State of Florida, one
of the States of the United States of America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

18TH JUNE, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00335

Whereas GRANVILLE CHRISTOPHER KNOWLES, of Miami Florida, U.S.A.,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration
with the Will annexed of the Real and Personal Estate of GRANVILLE JOSEPH
KNOWLES, late of 214 S.E. Lincoln Circle N., St. Petersburg, Pinellas, Florida,
US.A., deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

18TH JUNE, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00336

Whereas ARLINGTON WILLIAM DEAN, of Fox Hill, Eastern District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of CECIL A. HAMILTON, late of 11224 South Emerald
Street Chicago Illinois U.S.A., deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar



FROM page one

public.”

The week-long sick out
meant hospitals had a severely
reduced capacity to provide
emergency services in the Acci-
dent and Emergency depart-
ment, including significant
delays in patients receiving
medical attention, Mr Brown
said.

And as the Princess Margaret
Hospital operated on a skeleton
staff the hospital was forced to
close surgical, paediatric and
medical clinics on Monday and
Tuesday last week.

All surgeries, except emer-
gency surgical procedures, were
cancelled and there was a
reduction of dialysis treatment
for patients with kidney failure
to half their normal levels
throughout the week.

However nurses insist they
are still “sick” as they refuse to
accept any alteration to the
industrial agreement’s promise
of a group medical insurance
plan despite the economic
downturn.

Minister of Health Dr
Hubert Minnis explained the
budget would not allow for
nurses four per cent pay rise or
health insurance scheme this
fiscal year and that implement-
ing the insurance would require
nurses to take a pay cut of
$41.69.

But a nurse at the South
Beach Health Centre said she
would gladly make the sacrifice

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009, PAGE 11

LOCAL NEWS

Nurses call in sick
for a ninth day

' Teich es 1g
Peau Merc Yai es

ys

eee eee



PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL operated on a skeleton staff.

rather than continue to pay
$500 per month for medical
insurance.

She said: “I’d be happy to
take the cut, that’s nothing
compared to what I pay.
Because I am a woman our
insurance is high, and I am a
nurse so our insurance is more
than the general population.”

Nurses Association president
Rosemarie Josey said all nurses
face high medical insurance
fees because they are at high
risk, and several nurses who
had invested in failed compa-
ny Clico (Bahamas) Ltd are
now even more vulnerable.

Mrs Josey said: “Nurses are
injured on the job and verbally
and physically abused, and
nurses feel hurt because they
were under the impression Dr
Minnis really cared, and they
were very disappointed because
his message is that they don’t
understand what’s going on,
when all they wanted was some

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
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area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



reassurance; a date when they
will get the insurance.

“Tf we fall sick now we are
treated just like a public
patient. The only benefit we get
is what they would give to any
government worker.

“There is no special room in
the hospital, we just lay on the
same bed next to the other
patients.

“If the government could
find money for the police, and
to improve their insurance, why
do the nurses still not have any
insurance at all?”

Sandilands Rehabilitation
Centre nurse Lakerah Rolle
said: “The nature of our job
means we are exposed to chem-
icals, carcinogens and radioac-
tivity, back strains from lifting,
and for the H1N1 virus scare
and SARS, nurses are at the
entry point for these diseases,
we are the first to see any
patient.

“We understand that it is the
nature of the job, but we feel as
though we shouldn’t have to
worry about paying for this
medical expense.”

The South Beach Health
Centre nurse added: “What we
have to go through now for this
health insurance is ridiculous.

“T have been a nurse for sev-
en years and I cannot see
myself working for the govern-
ment much longer because it is
so discouraging.

“T wouldn’t encourage an
animal on the road to do nurs-
ing.”

(FOR MORE ON THIS
STORY, SEE PAGE 5).

(=) THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

ORIENTATION AND ADVISEMENT FOR
FALL SEMESTER 2009

ORIENTATION AND ADVISEMENT WILL TAKE PLACE FRIDAY, JUNE 19,
2009 FROM 9 AM TO 1 PM IN ROOMS B-5 AND B-6 FOR THE FOLLOWING
STUDENTS ACCEPTED IN THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS (BBA) PRO-

GRAMMES:

1 STUDENTS WITH EARLY ACCEPTANCE
2 STUDENTS WHO HAVE COMPLETED COLLEGE PREP
3. STUDENTS WHO HAVE COMPLETED THE UPGRADING PROGRAM

(CEES)

ALL STUDENTS SHOULD BRING COPIES OF ACCEPTANCE LETTERS, COM-
PLETION LETTERS AND RELEVANT EXAM RESULTS SUCH AS THE BGCSE.

NOTICE

Please be advised that the following offices will be closed on

Friday, June 19, 2009 and will re-open on Monday, June 22,

2009 at the usual business hours.

BAHAMAS FIRST GENERAL
INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

NASSAU UNDERWRITERS
INSURANCE AGENCY LTD. - COLLINS AVENUE AND
HARBOUR BAY LOCATIONS

We regret any inconveniences caused.

Signed: Management


PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamas fails to fully comply with minimum

standards to eliminate human trafficking

Police probe child sex film

Patterson said, victims have to }
wait four, five, even six years i
before their case reaches the }

FROM page one

protecting is of great concern
to all.

“The prime minister is very
right when he says that many
people in our nation have been
closing their eyes, refusing to
accept that this can happen in
their homes, in schools, in the
community, to their children.
Our prime minister is very
right when he speaks of the
impact (of) the horrendous
delay that victims have to
endure in order to get justice,”
she said.

On an average, Dr Dean-

Supreme Court.

“(There was a) recent inci- }
dent where a 10 year old had }
to wait for her case to reach }
court until she was 16 years old
and then the perpetrator }
walked. We can all imagine
what she feels about a system
that allows this. It is unaccept- }
able that children and victims }
of sexual assault have to con- }
tinue to undergo this long }
drawn-out re-victimisation by a }
system that appears not to }
care about their violation,” she }

said.

Ministry of Finance
Treasury Department

FROM page one

strongly promoted official
awareness of, and coordina-
tion on, trafficking issues
within the country through
mechanisms such as the multi-
agency Trafficking in Persons
Working Group, but made
“no visible effort to reduce
the demand for commercial
sex acts, and it did not engage
in any other awareness-rais-
ing efforts directed at
Bahamian citizens,” the
report said.

The US State Department
also found the Bahamas
“Jacked a comprehensive anti-
trafficking law for most of the
reporting period, faced rele-
vant resource and capacity
constraints, and confronted
multiple competing law
enforcement priorities.”

The report pointed out that

despite the fact that the
Bahamas prohibited all forms
of trafficking through its Traf-
ficking in Persons Prevention
and Suppression Act of 2008
and previously enacted laws
prohibit trafficking-related
offences, the government did
not arrest or prosecute any
trafficking offenders during
the reporting period.

The report found that in
some situations employers
coerce migrant or temporary
workers — legal and illegal
— to work longer hours, at
lower pay, and in conditions
not permitted under local
labour law by changing the
terms of contracts, withhold-
ing travel documents, refus-
ing transportation back home,
threatening to withdraw the
employer-specific and
employer-held permits, or to
turn the employee over to
immigration.

According to the new rating
system introduced in this
year’s report, the Bahamas
ranks as a “Tier 2” country.
This means that while it is not
fully compliant with interna-
tional standards of fighting
the trafficking of persons, it
is taking significant steps to
remedy this.

For the past three years the
Bahamas was included in the
report as a ‘Special Case’ due
to limited data.

During the reporting peri-
od for the new report, the
State Department said, the
Bahamian government
“enacted comprehensive anti-
trafficking legislation, added
skilled personnel to anti-traf-
ficking agencies and offices,
consulted with other govern-
ments about trafficking issues
and assistance, and continued
to train government personnel
on trafficking issues.”

However, the report points
out that the government
failed to make noticeable
efforts to proactively identi-
fy victims among vulnerable
populations, such as foreign
women and girls engaged in
illegal prostitution or women
and girls intercepted at its
borders who may be attempt-
ing to enter the country to
engage in illegal prostitution.

The US State Department
recommends that the govern-
ment take steps to identify
“trafficking victims among
migrants attempting to enter
the Bahamas illegally; inves-
tigate, prosecute, and punish
suspected human trafficking
offenders; create and imple-
ment a national trafficking
public awareness and preven-
tion programme; and allocate
resources for the victim assis-
tance measures mandated by
the new anti-trafficking law.”

Announcement
To All Merchant and Vendors

Mother’s fears for missing boys | Murder victim ‘targeted’
FROM page one FROM page one

but were chased by the group. The pursuers then opened
fire on Mr Johnson, shooting him a number times in his
body.

The victim collapsed in the grounds of the Tom "The
Bird" Grant Sports and Recreational Complex in the Yel-
low Elder area and was pronounced dead by EMS officers.

The victim's brother was able to escape the area
unharmed, police said.

According to the head of the Central Detective Unit,
Superintendent Elsworth Moss, the victim was on bail for
a murder charge dating back to a case in 2006.

Up to press time police had not uncovered a motive
for the killing but suspect Mr Johnson was targeted by his
killers.

"We believe they were pretty much targeting him,” said
Mr Moss, who added that police were still trying to ascer-
tain if the murder was possibly drug or gang related.

He could not say if the victim knew his attackers.

Police are asking for anyone with information on the
murder to contact the police at 919, 502-9991, or 328-TIPS.

The killing has pushed the country's murder count to
an unofficial 34 and comes just days after brothers Matthew
and Marvin Armbrister were shot at a nightspot early Sat-
urday morning. Matthew, 23, a former Tribune employee on
the pressroom staff, was killed in Dominique's Restaurant
on Boyd Road.

His 24-year-old brother was left fighting for his life in the
Intensive Care Unit at Princess Margaret Hospital.

The shootings reportedly came after an altercation
between the brothers and another man at the restaurant.

The Treasure wishes to advise that for goods and
services supplied or rendered to Government
Ministries and Departments during the 2008/2009
fiscal year, you are hereby requested to submit:

the police, the Defence Force and the South Andros community failed
to turn up any sign of her sons.

“T feel like if they were somewhere in the bushes something would
have been found. The helicopters and the dogs would have found
something, but there was nothing, that’s why I think they were kid-
napped,” she told The Tribune.

Ms Clarke said she has told her suspicions to the police and was told
they would investigate.

Although the official police search has been suspended, relatives and
members of the community have vowed to keep looking for the boys
for at least another couple of days, Ms Clarke said.

She said that while her mother and her husband are struggling to
cope with the devastating situation, she is attempting to hold up and put
on a brave face.

Ms Clarke said she still hopes that her two boys will be safely
returned to her.

Brothers Deangelo and Marcelo disappeared while crabbing in
South Andros last Tuesday evening.

The alarm was raised when the boys did not return to their grand-
parents’ house after nightfall.

Officers from the Kemp’s Bay police station were alerted and joined
relatives in their search on Wednesday morning.

Local residents and Defence Force officers joined the search, and
canine units were flown in from Nassau.

Deangelo lives in Andros with his grandparents. Marcelo, who lives
in Nassau with his parents, was visiting when the children went miss-

Signed a ‘ : - : aces
nyone who may have any information about the missing
The Treasurer brothers should call Crime Stoppers immediately on
328-TIPS (8477).

. The original of all outstanding invoices to
the Accounts Section of the relevant Ministry or
Department

2. A copy of those invoices to:
The Public Treasury Department
First Floor
British American House
(George Street & Navy Lion Road)

NO LATER THAN THURSDAY 24th, JUNE 2009

Please note that the PURCHASE ORDER NO.
Must be indicated on all invoices.



Bereaved family of five-month-old
girl plans to sue over allegations

charged in connection with the baby’s death.

No one was charged, and the police later said three
persons were questioned but were later released.

On June 10, the infant's family rejected the alle-
gations of molestation. Mr Moss explained that the
child had been prescribed anti-biotics which led to
diarrhoea.

This condition caused diaper rash and chafing
which hospital staff could have confused for signs of
molestation, he said.

According to Mr Moss and Police Commissioner
Reginald Ferguson, a death certificate lists the cause
of death as respiratory failure.

A complete pathologist report is expected within six
weeks, police said.

FROM page two


















orate the family’s claims.

"We have to see what the damages are and hope-
fully these people will understand the error of their
ways and come to the table instead of thrashing this
out in the courts," he said.

Lynera Saunders died on June 5, two hours after
she was taken to hospital for treatment.

Police said in their initial report that the child "may
have been molested" and that they were questioning
several persons in connection with the matter.

The news sparked national outrage and calls for a
massive march to parliament to push for reform of
child protection laws.

Last week, an angry mob gathered in Bank Lane
after rumours circulated that a suspect was to be

Save BIG Right Now!
GOVERNMENT NOTICE

MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS & TRANSPORT TENDER FOR CONSTRUCTION OF
CUSTOMS SCANNER MACHINE BUILDING THOMPSON BOULEVARD,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

2.0L Automatic - LOADED

was $26,866.00
NOW $22,800.00

Interested Contractors are invited to tender for the construction of a building at the Customs Department
Compound on Thompson Boulevard, Nassau to house their container scanning machine.

SCHEDULE FOR TENDER OPENING

Companies interested in tendering may attend a pre-tender meeting at the Ministry of Public Works and
Transport, Conference Room, 3rd Door of the Ministry's building on .J.F.K. Drive at 10:00 a.m. on 22nd
June, 2009 which will be followed by a site visit.

1

All tender bids must include the following:

2008 FORD TAURUS SEL
3.5L Automatic
Leather Interior - LOADED
was $41,304.00
— NOW $35,200.00

* Complete tender document
+ Copy of current Business Licence
* National Insurance Board letter of good standing

Sealed Tender submissions are to be deposited in the Tender Box located at:

Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance
3rd Floor
Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
West Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas

3 years or 36,000 miles warranty, 3 years roadside assistant, 3 years rust protections
warranty and licensed and inspected up to birthday.

NOW THAT'S REALLY A 23[ ](@Deal
FRIENDLY MOTORS CO. LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 * FAX: 328-6094

Tender submissions must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Tuesday, 11. July, 2009. Tenderers are
invited to attend the opening at 10:00 a.m., Tuesday, 7” July, 2009 at the Tenders Board.

The Ministry of Public Works and Transport reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.

Signed:
Nicole Campbell Actg.
Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Public Works & Transport

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com ¢ WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS

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WORLD CHAMPION Donald Thomas (shown below and far right at the ‘08 Beijing Olympic Games) and reigning national champion Ramon Higgs
are expected to compete against each other in the men’s high jump at the National Open Track and Field Championships at Thomas A Robinson Track

and Field Stadium June 26-27...

IN the continuation of some
of the match-ups expected at
the National Open Track and
Field Championships, set for
June 26-27 at the Thomas A
Robinson Track and Field Sta-
dium, the Bahamas Association
of Athletic Associations is
focusing on the men’s high
jump.

Two of the athletes featured
are world champion Donald
Thomas and reigning national
champion Ramon Higgs, who
pulled off the upset during the
2008 nationals.

DONALD THOMAS

Event: High Jump

Personal Best: 2.35m/7' 7”

Season Best: 2.30m/7' 6 1/2”

Height: 6' 3” (75kg)

Weight: 165lbs (1.9m)

D.O.B. July Ist 1984

Age: 25

Hometown: Freeport Grand
Bahama

Name of College: Auburn
University

Name of High School: Bishop
Michael Eldon



Ramon Higgs

College Coach: Henry Rolle,
Jerry Clayton

Thomas took up the sport in
early 2006, having previously
played basketball. He cleared
2.22 metres in his first meet, and
just months later he finished
fourth at the 2006 Common-
wealth Games with a 2.23m
jump.

In the 2007 indoor season he
cleared 2.30m for the first time,

and eventually jumped 2.33m
in March in Fayetteville,
Arkansas. In July 2007, he
cleared 2.35m on the world
record track in Salamanca,
Spain.

The result was a new person-
al best and the world season’s
best at the time. He then won
the World Championships in
Osaka, again with a 2.35m
jump. He also won gold at the
2007 IAAF World Athletics
Final. However, the Olympic
competition in 2008 turned out
to be a major disappointment
for Thomas, who only made
2.20m in the qualifying round
and finished 21st overall.

RAMON HIGGS

Event: High Jump

Personal Best: 2.21m/7' 2”

Season Best: 2.21m/7' 2”

Height: 6'0” (1.71m)

Weight: 150lbs (80kg)

D.O.B. January 24th 1991

Age: 18

Hometown: Freeport Grand
Bahama

Raymond Higgs kept the
under-17 triple jump title in the

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Bahamas, taking over from
2006 champion Gerard Brown.

Higgs third-round 14.76m
effort into a -2.0 metres per sec-
ond headwind, his first of three
attempts over 14.5m, gave him

TENNIS
KNOWLES/BHUPATHI
WIN OPENER

BAHAMIAN Mark
Knowles and Mahesh Bhu-
pathi of India won their first
round doubles match at the
Aegon International in East-
bourne, Great Britain.

The duo, seeded number
two, pulled off a 4-6, 7-6 (4),
10-3 decision over Stephen
Huss of Australia and Ross
Hutchinson of Great Britain.

Knowles and Bhupathi will
now go on to play the team
of Travis Parrott of the US
and Filip Polasek of Slovakia
in the quarter-final of the
small field of 16 teams.

The top seeded team is
Lukas Dlouhy of the Czech
Republic and Leander Paes
of India. They are coming off
their triumph as champions of
the French Open Grand Slam
at Roland Garros.

Dlouhy and Paes have
moved into third place on the
ATP computer rankings with
3,740 points, dropping
Knowles and Bhupathi to
fourth with 2,535.

The American identical
twin brothers of Bob and
Mike Bryan are back on top
with 5,665, while Daniel
Nestor and Nenad Zimonjic,
who at one time stood out
front, are in second with 5,110.

TRACK
CAC AGE GROUP

THE US Virgin Islands

his second gold medal in Provo,
after setting a new high jump
record on day one.

With long jump on day three,
he could be on course for a rare
sweep. Last year, the three-time

arrived yesterday as the first
of the 20 countries expected
to compete in the Central
American and Caribbean Age
Group Championships that is
slated to get underway Thurs-
day at Thomas A Robinson
Track and Field Stadium. All
of the other countries are
expected to arrive today.

Additionally, Neville ‘Ted-
dy’ McCook, the IAAF coun-
cil member and area repre-
sentative and Victor Lopez
were due to arrive yesterday.

Accreditation for the cham-
pionships have already gotten
underway at the Games Vil-
lage at the Nassau Palm
Resort and Conference Cen-
ter.

The morning sessions for
the multi-event championships
are scheduled to get under-
way at 8:30am with the after-
noon sessions starting at
1:30pm. Friday’s morning ses-
sion starts at 8:30am with the
afternoon one at 2pm.

TRACK
JUNIOR NATIONALS

THE Bahamas Association
of Athletic Associations is
scheduled to host the Nation-
al Junior Championships at
Thomas A Robinson Track
and Field Stadium this week-
end. The trials are set to begin
at 6pm Friday and continue
lpm Saturday. They will serve
as the final trials for team
selection for the [IAAF World
Youth and Jr Pan American
Championships.



high jump champ of Freeport,
Grand Bahama was third in the
long jump.

In 2009, he set a new Carifta
record in the high jump of
2.21m (7'-2”) for men under 20.

YOUR CONNECTION-TO THE WORLO

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER — GENERAL INSURANCE

2009 - 2010

The Bahamas Telecommunicaiions Company Lid.
(BTC) is pleased to invite qualified Companies/Firms
to submit a proposal to provide the Company with
General Insurance coverage. These policies include
Employers Liability, Money, Group Personal Acci-
dent, Open Marine Cargo, Fidelity Guarantee and
Public/Products Liability.

Interested companies/firms may collect a Tender
Specification from the Security's Desk located in the
Administrative building on John F. Kennedy Drive, be-
tween the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday

through Friday.

The deadline for submission of tenders is Monday
lenders should be sealed and

July 6th, 2009.
marked “TENDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE’

and

should be delivered to the attention of the ‘Mr. |. Kirk
Griffin Acting President and CEO.’

BIC RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY,

OR ALL TENDERS.

www.btcbahamas.corm


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the store!

¢ Diving & Camping
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June 18"



PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Police recover more

than 60 per cent of
team’s belongings

Bg By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WITH more than 60 per cent
of their belongings recovered,
members of our women’s
national volleyball team
breathed a sigh of relief, but
they will have to wait a little
longer before they return home
from Bridgetown, Barbados.

Yesterday, head coach
Joseph “Joe Moe” Smith said
they spent a lot of time at one of
the police stations identifying
items from nine bags that were
eventually recovered.

“Four bags are still missing,
so things are looking good,”
Smith said. “But in those nine
bags that we discovered, none
of the expensive items were
found. We’re also still missing

me and Anishka Rolle’s pass-
port.”

Since the robbery of the
team’s locker on Friday night
at the Garfield Sober National
Gymnasium when the Bahamas
was playing host Barbados in
the second round of the
NORCECA 2010 World Cham-
pionships qualifying round, the
Bahamas was set to leave today.

But Smith said they won’t
leave Barbados until 2pm
Thursday.

Team manager Lloyd “Rat-
ty” Davis said they are still wait-
ing for the Bahamas Volleyball
Federation and some of the
players to show some support.

“We know they know we are
still on the island,” said Davis,
who indicated that they haven’t
seen anybody since the tourna-
ment ended Sunday night.

“It’s very embarrassing, but
we have to give the police force
(in Barbados) a lot of credit
because they are doing an excel-
lent job in recovering the bags.”

Davis noted that the police
are questioning a number of
persons, but they haven’t
charged anybody as yet.

In the meantime, Davis said
the players are still in high spir-
its.

“Everybody is joking around
and laughing and having a good
time,” he said. “The only thing
left for us to do now is wait until
we leave. But we can’t afford
to let this keep us down.”

Davis said the team was able
to accomplish their ultimate
goal, which was to qualify for
the third round of the 2010
World Championships after
beating St Lucia in the playoffs.

‘Top swimmers’ day at Custom Aquatics

EVE McLeod and Lia Mon-
cur celebrated their ‘top swim-
mers’ day at Custom Aquatics
Limited.

Four of the swim school’s stu-
dents, Kehli and Kristin Lewis
Johnson (not shown) have
reached their ‘fish’ level and all
four are just five years old.

‘Fish’ can swim a correct
freestyle with side breathing,
do racing dives, deep dive to
six feet, swim overarm back-
stroke and even snorkel with
mast fins and snorkel breath-
ing.
Top all round swimmer is
Kyla Basden who, at age ten,
is already a medley swimmer
and recently won three firsts at
her Xavier’s swim meet.

Most improved went to her
sister Khara Basden and five-
year-old Cainan Tucker.

Finishing the awards list was
‘instant swimmer’ Vance
Wheaton who, at three years
old, learned to swim indepen-



a

Jack McLeod

Eve McLeod

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

WITH a series of cancella-
tions on the schedule of the
International Softball Federa-
tion, the Bahamas will have an
opportunity to host a regional
tournament featuring the best
teams in the English speaking
Caribbean.





LIA Moncur (left) and Eve McLeod get in swimming motion...

dently in less than 10 days.
Custom Aquatics (in its 15th
year) and Fran Young Doyle

offers private, semi-private and
custom group lessons in most
watersports.



LIA Moncur and Eve McLeod make a splash...

Bahamas to host softball tourney in October

The Bahamas Softball Feder-
ation (BSF) is scheduled to host
the English Speaking Caribbean
Countries Softball Association
Tournament before the year’s
end with a tentative date set for
October.

With a the men’s Central and
American and Caribbean
Games qualifier cancelled and
in search of a venue and the
women’s tournament also in
jeopardy, the ISF was forced to
readjust its schedule.

The 7th Pan American
Games, set for July 31 in Mara-
cay, Venezuela, will also serve as
a women’s qualifier for the
CAC Games, scheduled for
December 12 in San Pedro Sula,
Honduras.

The men’s team remains with-
out a qualifier at this time,
therefore their national team
plans remain on hold for the
moment.

Burket Dorsett, president of
the Bahamas Softball Federa-
tion, said the tournament was
created to fill a void for many
countries seeking qualification.

He said the Bahamas will put
its best foot forward to ensure
that its past performances at the
ESCCSA tournament will be
met and perhaps exceeded.

The BSF has been asked to
revisit and host the ESCCSA
tournament. The organising
committee of the latter has
asked the tournament to have
it sanctioned and placed on the
calendar, hopefully to serve as a
qualifier for either the Pan Am
or CAC Games.

“We have sent out corre-
spondence to many of the teams
in the region and already we
have been receiving responses

on a very positive note,” he said.

“Already we have commit-
ments from Turks Island,
Jamaica, Netherlands Antilles,
and the Cayman Islands but we
are still waiting on commitments
from a few others to see if they
will take place in the revitaliza-
tion of this tournament. The last
time this tournament was held
was in the 1970s and the
Bahamas looks to continue this
legacy of success.”

Dorsett said with a number
of countries backing out of
regional qualifiers it increases
the Bahamas’ chances of making
the cut in the case of the women
and with the men, a long road of
qualification lies ahead.

“The BSF has been advised
by CONCASA that the host
country for both men and
women qualifiers have been
advised that they can no longer
host these qualifying rounds.
What they did in the case of the
ladies is combine the CAC qual-
ifier with the Pan Am Games.

“Because of economic condi-
tions, things have been extreme-
ly tough for many South Amer-
ican countries and throughout
the region so some countries
have opted not to attend these
games,” he said.

“In that qualifying round, the
first five teams will qualify for
the World Championship, then
the top eight teams will qualify
for the CAC Games. With many
countries not attending I think it
forces the organising commit-
tee of both to restrategise and
find another format for teams
to find a means to the CAC
games and it puts our men in
jeopardy with less options
before them."
THE TRIBUNE

S
i

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17,



PAGE

15

ts

2009





Thomas,
Higgs in
face off
spotlight...

See page 15

Fireman burns up standings

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

hristening the new

track at the Olympic

Stadium in Berlin,

Germany, Sunday,
Chris “Fireman” Brown surged
to the top of the men’s 400m
standings for the [IAAF World
Athletics Tour.

The tour features a maximum
of 25 IAAF Permit Meetings
divided into the 1) Golden
League Meetings and Super
Grand Prix Meetings, and 2)
Grand Prix Meetings.

Smacked around the 12th
IAAF World Championships in
Berlin August 15-23, the event
is set to culminate with the
IAAF/VTB Bank World Ath-
letics Final in Thessaloniki,
Greece, slated for September
12-13.

Only a limited amount of ath-
letes will be allowed to compete
based on their overall positions
in their respective events in the
series of meets in Europe.

Prize money for the World
Athletics Final will range from
$30,000 for first place to $2,000
for eighth place.

In those events where the
field will be extended to 12,
those finishing 9th to 12th will
each collect $1,000.

Brown, the 30-year-old
Eleuthera native, is one of five
male contenders, along with the
five females, who are in the run-
ning for the Golden League
Jackpot of $1 million in the six
meets after his victory in Berlin.

Competing in his third meet

SS ee

Sa



i ) lll ut

CHRIS BROWN, of the Bahamas, after he won 400m at ISTAF Golden
League Athletics Meeting in Berlin on Sunday...
(AP Photo/Michael Sohn)

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Thirty-year-old Eleuthera
native is in the running for
$1m Golden League Jackpot

for the year, Brown also surged
to the top of the men’s 400m
standings for the World Athlet-
ics Tour in a two-way tie with
Gary Kikaya of the Democrat-
ic Republic of Congo. Both
have accumulated a total of 31
points.

Grand Bahamian Michael
Mathieu, coming off his third
place finish at the meet in
Berlin, is tied with Aussie’s
Johan Wissman and India’s Bib-
in Matthew for seventh place
with 14 points apiece.

None of the other quarter-
milers are in the top 15, but
Andrae Williams, another
Grand Bahamian, is tied for
18th with Young Talkmore
Nyongani of Zimbabwe with
nine points each.

Also on the track, national
record holder Shamar Sands is
sitting in fifth place in the men’s
110m hurdles with 33 points
over five meets.

But on the field, Olympic
bronze medallist Leevan
“Superman” Sands and reign-
ing world high jump record
holder Donald Thomas are in
second and third place respec-
tively.

Sands has competed in three

CEU elms Ulaatle)



meets in the men’s triple jump
and is currently tied for second
place with Arnie David Girat
of Cuba with 20 points.

Thomas, on the other hand,
has amassed a total of 20 points
over three meets for third place.

On the ladies’ side, veteran
sprinter Chandra Sturrup is
pegged at number five in the
100m with 27 points over four
meets.

Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie
is all the way in 17th place with
15 points over two meets. How-
ever, she is in sixth place in the
200m with 13 points over two

Enter to Win

meets.

The only other female who
has gotten a listing is Christine
Amertil, who is tied with Ndeye
Soumah of Senegal, Asami Tan-
no of Japan and American
Dominique Darden with seven
points.

Only Amertil and Darden
have raced in two meets while
the others have only competed
in one.

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Data
protection
‘not being

taken

seriously
enough’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN private and pub-
lic sector agencies are not taking
the need to have a Data Protec-
tion Plan in place by 2012 “as seri-
ously as they should”, Tribune
Business was told yesterday, with
this nation still to satisfy the
European Union’s (EU) ‘ade-
quacy test’ for transborder data
flows.

George E. Rodgers, the
Bahamas Data Protection Com-
missioner, told Tribune Business
that meeting the EU’s require-
ments in that area were “a major
problem for two reasons”.

He explained: “One, you have
to have a certain number of [data
protection-related] complaints
under your belt so they can see
how you handle them. They are
very few and far between. Peo-
ple seem more interested in Free-
dom of Information than data
protection.

“The other stumbling block is
we need to be an office ourselves.
Although in law we’re indepen-
dent, I’m still in the Ministry of
Finance. Those are the two criti-
cal areas, so I don’t know how
it’s going to work out.”

Meeting the EU adequacy test
would likely increase the
Bahamas’ attractiveness for inter-
national technology and data-
related firms, enticing them to set
up operations here safe in the
knowledge that their data flows
would be secured and protected
within a statutory framework.

On the complaints side, Mr
Rodgers said his office had only
received three to date, along with
20 queries. He acknowledged that
Bahamians tended to “lag
behind” when it came to new ini-
tiatives, especially when there was
no urgency involved.

Still, Mr Rodgers said that the
Bahamas had all the legislation
it needed on the books, in the
form of the Data Protection Act,
Computer Misuse Act and Elec-
tronic Transactions Act. What
was missing was enforcement and
implementation.

Mr Rodgers said the Data Pro-
tection Act gave a “five-year
grace period” until 2012 for all
Bahamas-based private and pub-
lic sector organisations to imple-
ment a data security protection
plan, but “everyone is lagging
behind and saying they’ve got
plenty of time. That’s not how it
works.....

“Tf I were to be honest, people
are not taking it as seriously as
they should.”

He added that he was working
with the Clearing Banks Associ-
ation and the Central Bank of the
Bahamas to introduce language
stipulating the need for data pro-
tection into the former’s Code of
Conduct.


























The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
tesponsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

Sale Ends
June 21st
{Except on Net Items)

THE TRIBUNE

sine

WEDNESDAY,

JUNE

ies



2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Courier ‘lay-off fears
from Customs reform

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ourier companies yes-
terday said Customs
reforms to the process
of clearing goods at
Bahamian airports “aren’t going
to work” and could result in lay-
offs in an industry employing
1,000 people alone in Nassau,
while their Freeport counterparts
are now in “a state of shock” fol-
lowing the announcement of
plans to introduce the same
changes there.
But Glen Gomez, comptroller

$20m loss leaves
BEC in ‘position
of key concern’

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Electricity Cor-
poration (BEC) is in a “position
of critical concern”, having
incurred an estimated $20 million
in losses at the end of its fiscal
year 2008 and having had to can-
cel or defer some capital projects
valued at more than $450 million

Phenton Neymour, whose cab-
inet position is minister of state
for the environment, alluded to
BEC being unable to currently
“stand on its own”, as its $134
million accounts payable for the
month of April 2009 greatly out-
weighed its receivables of $99 mil-
lion in May 2009.

Mr Neymour, addressing the
House of Assembly, said “the
global situation has worsened and
BEC’s financial position has done
the same, as there are encum-
brances with collections in all
areas”.

He said that because of the
BEC’s present commitments, the
large capital projects underway
and the present revenue situa-
tion, it was not able to meet its
financial obligations.

Mr Neymour placed some of
the blame on the former PLP
administration’s handling of the
corporation during its term. He
quoted observations made by the
International Monetary Fund
(IMF), which noted operational
loses during the PLP’s term of $3
million in 2007 and $11 million
in 2007.

These losses, according to the
IMF report, were the result of
imposed rate reductions and cus-
tomer relief programmes.

“So it is not just me saying this,
it is also the IMF,” said Mr Ney-
mour. “For the last two years,
whenever I speak on this matter
there is almost an immediate
response denying the effects of
this PLP-led poor decision.”

The minister said that in order
for BEC to recover its losses in
the short to medium-term, it
would seek a government-guar-
anteed loan. He added that the
Government has provided the
corporation with a two-year relief
on Customs Duty and stamp tax.

These measures, along with
increased awareness on energy
consumption “on a major level”,
are expected to mitigate the bur-
den on the Government-owned
entity.

Mr Neymour said a tariff
adjustment is also fundamental
to the sustainability of BEC.
According to him, its implemen-
tation will allow the Corporation
to return to a position where it
can “stand alone” without a gov-
ernment guarantee.

“Presently, Family Island tariffs
are the same as that for New
Providence, even though the cost
for providing services for Family
Islands is significantly higher,”
said Mr Neymour.

SEE page 6B

ROYAL @FIDELITY

* Industry believes ‘short form’ use end ‘isn’t going to work’
and could effectively end overnight delivery services

* Comptroller defends policy, saying changes have increased
revenues collected at airport and enhanced statistical data

* Freeport firms ‘in state of shock’ after Customs announces

plan to implement policy there on July 1

of Customs, yesterday defended
the reforms, telling Tribune Busi-
ness he had been told that rev-
enue collected at Lynden Pindling
International Airport (LPIA) and

Odyssey Aviation had
“increased” as a result of the deci-
sion to stop courier companies
and brokers using the C18 ‘unac-
companied baggage declaration’

form to declare imported goods.
Mr Gomez added that while
people often reacted negatively

SEE page 4B

Revenues cover just 62% of Water Corp costs

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration’s revenues are only able
to cover 62 per cent of its opera-
tional costs, while non-revenue
water continues to rob it of $3
million annually, a government
minister has warned. Meanwhile,
the cost of reverse osmosis water
has more than tripled from $6 to
$20 million annually.

Phenton Neymour, minister of
state for the environment, making
his contribution to the 2009-2010
Budget debate in parliament, said
that repairing the outdated and
deteriorating infrastructure was
beyond many world governmen-
t’s fiscal capacity, and could
require some private sector assis-
tance.

Mr Neymour said the problems
with Water and Sewerage’s infra-
structure, and resulting water
leaks, could be as much as 30

Principal Protected
Series 2

Phenton Neymour



times international standards. The
World Bank had recommended
that developing countries keep
non-revenue water below 23 per
cent of total production, but the
Bahamas was at 50 per cent.
The minister said the Govern-

ment had drafted a plan to
decrease the five million imperial
gallons per day (MIGD) non-rev-
enue water loss by a minimum
2.5 MIGD over a 4-year period,
and to maintain that reduction.

“Non-revenue water is water
that has been produced and is
‘lost’ before it reaches the cus-
tomer or is billed to customers,”
he said.

“These losses can be ‘real’
through leaks or apparent losses
through theft or metering inac-
curacies.”

Mr Neymour said recapturing
just one MIGD of water and sell-
ing it would be more than $5 mil-
lion in additional revenue for the
Corporation annually.

“Therefore, our very best
efforts should be made to reduce
our levels of non-revenue water,”
said Mr Neymour. “At the Water
and Sewerage, the problem of
non-revenue water is mainly due

SEE page 6B



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010

Insurers brace
for 5% motor
premium drop

“Industry hit by ‘epidemic’
of marine thefts

* ICB suffers two-thirds
profit drop in 2008 as
result of $1.46m swing
on unrealised investment
gains, plus $500,000
Hurricane Ike net loss

* Company’s property
aggregate sum insured
still at $1.9bn

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN general insurers
are bracing for “a drop of 5 per
cent or more” in gross written
premiums from their most prof-
itable motor business line during
2009, Insurance Company of the
Bahamas (ICB) general manager
said yesterday, with the industry’s
profitability also being endan-
gered by the current “epidemic”
of boat thefts.

Tom Duff said the general
insurer was now starting, along
with its competitors, “to see pres-
sure on premium” income across
all business classes as a result of
the recession, with clients either
not renewing policies, renewing
for smaller amounts or paying
late.

On motor insurance, which is
usually among the most profitable
business lines for Bahamian gen-
eral insurers, Mr Duff said ICB
was following market trends, with
increasing numbers of policy-
holders switching from compre-
hensive to cheaper third party
coverage.

In addition, Bahamians were
conserving cash by not upgrad-
ing their vehicles - purchasing
new or used ones - as frequently,

SEE page 6B

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





A confident personality
turns into positive sales

Most customers have a wide
range of options to choose from
for products they are looking
for. So why should they choose
you?

Price should not be the only

AN
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NAD

Nassau Airport
Devolopmont Company

factor or benefit. Anyone can
sell if the price is cheap. If you
sell on price only, eventually
you will end up losing in the
long run. Most companies are
selling pretty much the same

Tender

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The scope of work includes:

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& inch block walls, alernum handrails, anda standing seam

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being. duct etalaton, supply and aslallabon of manhoies
backfill, compaction, cutting and patching for a new medium

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products and/or services.

Accounting firms, lawyers,
doctors, IT companies etc.
Some do specialise in certain
areas and may differentiate
themselves, but in today’s mar-
ket a lot of companies are spe-
cialised in the same field or
area.

So why should they choose
you? How do you stand out
from the crowd? Well, thanks to
our higher power, we are all
created differently. Imagine if
everyone was the same. Hmm-
mmimm, what a bore that would
be!

As I mentioned previously,
one of the biggest assets you
have is your time and, next to
that, your next greatest asset is
yourself. You are the difference
between everyone else and
every other product. A power-
ful sales tool/asset that many of
us overlook is ourselves, our
own personality.







Promotional
Marketing

ANee LMS TIEN KOT

yy (F
—

Case in point. How many
doctors are general praction-
ers? A lot! They have all stud-
ied pretty much the same med-
icine and have been trained sim-
ilarly. So why do some people
prefer one doctor over another?
PERSONALITY. Why do
some people prefer one
mechanic, accountant, veteri-
narian, IT specialist etc? PER-
SONALITY. I always hear peo-
ple say: “I like so and so
because he or she is nice,
patient, explains everything and
so forth.”

However, please note that in
order to successfully use your
personality on a sales call, or in

NOTICE

“K” LINE LNG TRANSPORT CO., LTD.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance
with Section 138(4) of the International Business
Companies Act. 2000, “K” LINE LNG TRANSPORT
CO., LTD. is in dissolution as of June 12, 2009.

Akira Misaki of Minato-Ku, Tokyo, Japan is the

Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR



any situation, you have to be
confident and positive, not arro-
gant. Confident in how you can
help your customers. Too many
salespeople are simply confi-
dent in what they’re selling, not
in their ability. There’s a big dif-
ference. When you’re confident
in what you’re selling, it means
youre putting more emphasis
on yourself and products or ser-
vices. Your focus should be on
your clients. Most confident
individuals are calm and
relaxed. They do not force or
push themselves on potential
clients.

This misunderstanding elimi-
nates a large number of sales-
people from being able to use
their personality to positively
influence their ability to close.
Confidence should not come
across as better than. I’m sure
we all know salespeople with
strong personalities that use
them to bulldoze their way
through with customers. On the
outside, they appear to be suc-
cessful, at least for the short
term. However, those who have
a manipulative personality will
lull themselves into a false sense
of security when, in reality,
they’re destroying their long-
term sales potential.

A confident salesperson is
honest, upfront and takes the

TST

For the stories

WPT Ta
TE
on Mondays



time to find out what the real
needs of their customers are.
Remember why our higher
power gave us two ears and one
mouth? Don’t jump at the per-
son’s first comment and try to
close the deal. Confident and
honest salespeople believe so
strongly in themselves and their
ability to help that they’re not
concerned with making a quick
sale. Rather, they genuinely
want to help the client, which
usually results in a much larger
and more profitable sale than
a quick one.

Finally, to successfully use
your personality, you must be
upbeat, genuine, honest and
dedicated. These are great tools.
To determine your level of con-
fidence, ask yourself the fol-
lowing two questions.

* Do customers call you for
information?

* Do customers refer you
often?

So ask yourself this question:
Why should potential clients
buy from you?

All of these marketing strate-
gies are certain to keep your
business on top during these
challenging economic times.
Have a productive and prof-
itable week! Remember:
“THOSE WHO MARKET
WILL MAKE IT.”

NB: Scott Farrington is pres-
ident of SunTee EmbroidMe, a
promotional and marketing
company specialising in pro-
motional products. Established
over 27 years ago, SunTee
EmbroidMe has assisted
Bahamian businesses from var-
ious industries, ranging from
tourism, banking and telecom-
munications in marketing them-
selves. Readers can contact Mr
Farrington at SunTee
EmbroidMe on East Shirley
Street, by e-mail at scott@sun-
tee.com or by telephone at 242-
393-3104.


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009, PAGE 3B



aaa S25
Broker develops payments solution for insuring public

A BAHAMIAN insurance broker
yesterday announced it had launched a
payments solution to allow those hard-
est hit by the recession to keep cover-
age intact through extending payments
— interest-free 0 until the economy
rebounds.

The programme, called S.LP.P. -
Simple Insurance Payment Plan — was
introduced by Nassau-based Lampkin
& Company Insurance Brokers and
Benefits Consultants.

“When the economic picture appears
gloomy, among the first thing people
look at cutting is insurance because it is
not something they can put on the
table or hold in their hands,” said Jea-
nine Lampkin, founder and president
of Lampkin & Co.

“But coverage is not dispensable. It
can save lives and protect persons or
businesses that would otherwise leave
themselves exposed to what could be
tantamount to financial disaster, due to

a catastrophic illness, a hurricane, acci-
dent or other unforeseeable event.”

The announcement followed months
of the insurance broker working with
its carrier partners to develop a solu-
tion that would make remaining
insured, even in tough times, palat-
able.

Announce

“With our partners’ cooperation, we
are pleased to announce that policy-
holders will be able to pay their pre-
miums over an extended period of
time, up to 10 months beyond the orig-
inal statement date, without incurring
any interest charges so long as a mini-
mum payment is made by salary deduc-
tion,” said Ms Lampkin.

Participating companies include
RoyalStar Assurance, Security & Gen-
eral, Bahamas First (through Colina
General), ICWI, BahamaHealth, Col-



inalmperial and Family Guardian.

According to Lampkin & Co’s mar-
keting and customer service manager,
Jennifer Bain, clients pay a single down
payment, and minimal salary deduc-
tions will pay the premium.

“S.LP.P. will also entitle you to free
counselling,” said Ms Bain. “An insur-
ance expert will sit with a client to
review all policies with a view towards
getting you the best coverage for the
least cost, which may mean brokering
through a different underwriter or rec-
ommending a change in coverage or
insured amounts.

“Individuals often forget that what
worked before may not necessarily be
the best solution for now. It’s impor-
tant to remember that needs change
and coverage should be compatible
with those needs.”

Lampkin & Company’s approach
reflects many international companies’

Ascmuin Leth efforts to combat the rising problem

of the perfect storm hitting the insur-
ance industry - a poor economy leading
to an increase in policy cancellations,
job losses translating into lower enrol-
ments in group policies and widespread
corporate cutbacks resulting in shrink-
ing coverage.

Company profit margins are also
declining as insurance underwriters
face poorer performance results from
stock market investments.

“We want to get the message out
that whether you insure through Lamp-
kin & Company or another broker,”
said Ms Bain, “please do not cut your
insurance coverage. A single illness
could wipe out a family’s income for
years to come. Insurance is not a luxu-
ry. It is as essential as the food on the
table. It preserves your way of life and
could save your life. We hope the
S.LP.P. solution will allow everyone
to remain covered without feeling bur-
dened.”

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BIRKA INT’L COMPANY LIMITED

——_ > —___

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BIRKA INT’L COMPANY LIMITED has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LESOTHO INVESTMENTS LIMITED

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of LESOTHO INVESTMENTS LIMITED
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
XETTERIDGE
INVESTMENT LTD.

—_

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of XETTERIDGE INVESTMENT LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ENKLE INVESTMENT LTD.

—

é

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ENKLE INVESTMENT LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PREMIER STAR INVESTMENTS LTD.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PREMIER STAR INVESTMENTS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BEGONIA FLOWERS INC.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of BEGONIA FLOWERS INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PAVIOUR VENTURES LTD.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PAVIOUR VENTURES LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

GAMTONFIELD INVESTMENTS LTD

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GAMTONFIELD INVESTMENTS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
POULTER VENTURES LTD.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of POULTER VENTURES LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ORLANDI VALUTA INC.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ORLANDI VALUTA INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BONFIRE SPARKS INC.

——_ of)

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BONFIRE SPARKS INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ZAKARIAH HOLDINGS LIMITED

— -,——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ZAKARIAH HOLDINGS LIMITED has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)
PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



aaa S25
Courier ‘lay-off fears from Customs reform

FROM page 1B

to changes, any problem with a
new system would usually “sort

itself out”.
Tribune Business, though, was

NOTICE

GALACTIC SAND INC.

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 138 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has

been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 6th day of May, 2009.

Lynden D. Maycock
Liquidator

of

GALACTIC SAND INC.






told that Freeport-based courier
companies, importers, brokers
and freight forwarders reacted
negatively when plans to intro-
duce the same policy were
unveiled during a Monday meet-
ing with Customs’ deputy comp-
troller for the island, Lincoln
Strachan.

Private sector representatives
who attended the meeting were
tight-lipped when contacted by
Tribune Business yesterday,
declining to comment on the
record.

One source, who requested
anonymity, said Freeport-based
courier companies and brokers
were now seeking a meeting with
the minister of state for finance,
Zhivargo Laing, on the issue,
adding that the details of Cus-
toms’ proposals were “sketchy”
and that they wanted to see some-
thing in writing. It is understood
that Customs wants to introduce
the system, now operating in Nas-
sau, to Freeport on July 1, then
roll it out to all the Family
Islands.

Another Freeport business
source, speaking to Tribune Busi-
ness on condition of anonymity,
said courier companies, importers

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VACANCY

FOR A GENERAL MANAGER

WATER ANO SEWERAGE CORPORATION

Under the direction of the Board of Directors, this position is charged with the general
tranagemen! and coordination of all aspects of the Water and Sewerage Corporation's
administrative and technical affairs: ensures that the business of the Corporation ts
conducted on a sound, realistic, profitable basis in accordance with kgislation,

regulations and policies.

PCT |

Care respondibilities include

Planning and directing the mamicnance and development of both business and
operational activities in order to maximize profitability and growth in lime with
cverall business stralegies
Taking action to procure, maintain and improve pliysical assets of the Corporation
Inching premises, and equipment bo standards appropriate tor the business

dndenaken.

Developing and maiaining effective operating systems and techniquea required
1 wn mast wihzalion for eompuler lechnobeyry
Serving extemal customers, focusing ettorts on decovering wml meeting their

needs.

Contribution to the development of sound business strategies which creates value

for the basiness

The job requires wide experience im administration, financial accounting and project
management. Must seck opportunities to help staff develop their skills whilst improving
ferlormance in current role, lacing Career progression of full realisation af potential,

The job holder must be a strategic leader capable of orchestrating and leading major
cultural change efforts aimed al substantially improving the use and productivily of

human assets

Must bea strong mdvecate of the participative management philosophy

and be capable of providing strategic leadership in the corporate-wide transition from

“op-down" management to “employee empowered” processes.

Educational Requirements and Experience

We seck a seasoned Business Executive with a minimum of b years senior management
expenence wilh a degree in Business or Engineering; bowether with an MBA, MPA or
Professponal COMMUNE qualiticatwon

We offer a highly competitive bawe salary along with attractive fringe benefits package.

Candidates with productive management expenence and a proven ability be set and meet
compte objectives should send resume and salary requirements to:

On or before 26" June, 2008

Chairman

Water & Sewerage Corporation

P.O. Box N-3905
Nassau, Bahamas

and brokers would have to
increase their bonds and hire
extra persons to fill out and check
Customs entries, as a result of dis-
continuing the ‘unaccompanied
baggage declaration form’ in
favour of a return to the C13
‘long form’.

The source added that the pro-
posed changes might actually cost
the Government and Customs
revenue. He pointed out that, in
the past, to clear goods and doc-
uments quickly, courier compa-
nies had often paid duty on behalf
of their clients up-front.

However, since the advantage
of doing this for overnight deliv-
ery would be ended by Customs’
reforms, the source said it was
likely that these goods would now
be brought in ‘bonded’ under the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement’s
provisions - thus reducing the
Government’s revenue intake.

Meanwhile, Walt Saunders,
president of the newly-formed
Bahamas Transhipment and
Logistics Association, which rep-
resents the courier companies,
told Tribune Business that despite
the comptroller’s best intentions
and efforts, the changes he had
instituted were “not going to
work”.

Mr Saunders, who is president
and owner of GWS Worldwide
Express, said the reforms had
effectively made Bahamas-based
courier companies, who provide
overnight express delivery to their
clients, brokers.

The reforms had also increased
costs to clients who were “already
paying top dollar to have it
overnight”, Mr Saunders explain-
ing that the courier firms were
now having to charge a minimum
$10 fee per customer to claim
goods, plus a further $35 service
fee if the item in question attract-
ed duty. In cases where items
were dutiable, there was a mini-
mum $45 extra cost to the cus-
tomer.

Mr Saunders told Tribune
Business he had last met with the
Customs comptroller a fortnight
ago, when Mr Gomez said he
wanted “his concept implemented
in the system, and to give it a shot
to see if it can work”.

The Association head said the
industry and Customs were now
“in a test and trial” phase, where
if problems arose the private sec-
tor was to communicate them to
Mr Gomez and he and his offi-
cers would address the issue.

“It’s not going to work,” said
Mr Saunders, striking a pes-
simistic note. He explained that
through its reforms, Customs was
treating overnight express deliv-
eries, which largely consisted of
documents, the same as cargo
brought in at sea ports and docks.

Questioning what would hap-
pen if important court documents
or business contracts could not
be delivered on time as a result of
the reforms, Mr Saunders said:
“Tt can only serve to frustrate this
system.”

LEGA. KTH

NOTICE

Grand Apollos Corporation

Pursuant to the Provision of Section 138 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice is
hereby given that the above-named Company has been
dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant to a
Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General

on the 6th day of Miary, 2000.

Lynden D. Mayeock
Liquidator

Grand Apollos Corporation

He added that Customs had
reinstituted the system last used
14 years ago, which would result
in delays clearing goods at the
airport, defeating the whole idea
of overnight delivery.

Mr Saunders warned that Cus-
toms policy could “see people ter-
minating employees on the job
site” within the next few months.
He estimated that the 20 courier
companies in Nassau employed
more than 1,000 persons between
them, and said he hoped it would
not come to that.

“Not only is service delayed,
but there is a cost,” Mr Saunders
added of the decision to end the
‘short form’ declaration for couri-
er companies, and replace it with
the long form, which requires all
imports to be broken down into
individual items.

Customs and Mr Gomez had
instituted the changes to improve
the Department’s collection of
statistical data, and to protect rev-
enues by ensuring the appropriate
duty rates are applied to all items.

“It’s not going to work in our
interests. Globally, we are anti-
quated. There is no way we are
matching global practices,” Mr
Saunders said. He added, though,
that he had been able to negotiate
one concession with Customs,
where courier companies paid up-
front on behalf of their clients,
rather than increasing the size of
their bond security lodged with
the Department.

Mr Gomez yesterday con-
firmed to Tribune Business that
the Customs Department planned
to roll the new policy out to the
Family Islands and Freeport,
ensuring that all were using the
same forms and complying with
the rules and regulations.

He described the previous use
of the C18 form by courier com-
panies as “wrong”. “They should-
n’t be using that,” Mr Gomez
said. “Why should someone use
the form for cargo that I use for
personal travel. It’s getting them
to use the right form, and for us to
capture statistical data not cap-
tured before, and capture rev-
enue not collected before.”

As a result, the Comptroller
added: “I’ve been told there has
been an increase in revenue col-
lected at the airport because of
the new process, although I have
not seen any figures.

“Obviously, people were bring-
ing in items before that were
wrongly declared or not declared
at all. We’re making sure we have
the right rates. It’s a win-win sit-
uation. We’re assessing the cor-
rect duties on these items.”

VACANCY NOTICE #5
Analyst/Programmer II] “2

Applications are invited from surtably qqucali te d persons for the above position in the

Landi IMO Technol a Department of thie Nartir tal Insurance Beard.

PURPOSE OF JOB

To develop computer sofbware systems as per user requirements and provide user support.

OVERALL RESPONSIBILITIES WILL INCLUDE:

\nalyze, design, develop, implement and maintam computer software systems

Provide status reports on progress of projects to the Analyst, Programmer

Advise users of avadability of systems for testing

Ensure proper recording of system change requests

Marntain the System Development Database
Ensute proper sequencing of programming activities

Communicate required sottware changes,/enhancements to the Analyst,

Programmer

Prowide systems documentation for all systems developed

Perform structured walkthroughs of svSTems under devel PUTLETIL

Provide user support (including training, as is necessary)

lest and evaluate external (prepackaged) software and recommend as 1s necessary

Advise Commuttees, Departments regarding software

Report all uncommon occurrences to the Analyst’ Programmer of Sensor Analyst,

Pee Mere

Other duties and prosects as asserted by the Analyst’ Programmer or Sersor
i | :

Analyst, Programmer

QUALIFICATIONS AND REQUIREMENTS

Applicants shi ub have ia Bacheli t's Desree fram atl accredited college of university, in

Computer Seence, Information Systems or a related field. Ar least five (5) years expenence

working in a AS400/Tseres and networking environments & preferred, but a shorter length

of expenence will be considered. Applicants must have the abelity to wnte programs in REG
ILE & CL on the IBM iSeries, Experience in using RAD of CASE tools on PC-based

systems is desired,

de sited

APPLICATION

4, working knowledge of DB/2 and WS SC database By STeMs 15

ntetested persons may apely by submittiae a completed application form, alone with the
I ip pply by sul z pleted appl fi a with tl
necessary proof of qualifications on ot before Tuesday, June 30, S009, tes:

The Senior M ANAEL

Human Resources Administration

THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD

Clifford Darking ( zomuplex, Baillew Hill Road



BO Bos N-7508
Nassau, Bahamas


THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009, PAGE 5B

Bank donates $25k to
Nassau revitalisation | “—.-"~



Legal Notice

NOTICE

COMMONWEALTH Bank
has donated $25,000 to the
Downtown Nassau Partnership
to support efforts to transform
the 260-year-old city into a thriv-
ing mecca for shopping, dining,
entertainment and living.

“Contributions of corporate
citizens like Commonwealth
Bank are making it possible to
make the Nassau dream a reali-
ty,” said Charles Klonaris, the
DNP’s co-chairman.

“We are extremely grateful to
Commonwealth Bank, which has
once again demonstrated its
belief in the value of historic Nas-
sau, which we believe will soon
meet its rightful role as the
dynamic heartbeat of the nation.”

“We in the Ministry of Tourism
appreciate the strong support
shown by the banking communi-
ty in the important undertaking of
rediscovering and reinventing the
historic city of Nassau,” said Ver-
nice Walkine, the Ministry of
Tourism’s director-general and
DNP co-chairman.

“We envision a city that is alive
at night with locals and visitors
enjoying restaurants, cafes, book
stores, galleries and other shop-
ping and entertainment. We envi-
sion a city where people want to
live, not just work. We’ve seen
what a strong downtown can add
to tourism offerings and to the
quality of life in other places, and

no city that I have ever personal-
ly visited anywhere in the world
had the untapped potential of the
city of Nassau. We are really
excited about this project and
grateful for the support it has
been getting.”

The redevelopment exercise is
estimated to cost in the millions,
with funds raised through a vari-
ety of ways, including a partially
self-funding Business Improve-
ment District (BID) initiative.

Among the most immediate
improvements projected to have
a major impact is the relocation
of commercial shipping that has
long clogged the eastern end of
Bay Street. That project is under-
way and has already spurred

interest in properties that had
been vacated as shipping and con-
tainers dominated more of the
waterfront and the southern side
of Bay Street.

In addition to relocating ship-
ping and the incentives created
under the 2008 City of Nassau
Revitalisation Act, other impor-
tant steps include creating a mas-
ter plan, extending the water’s
edge, beautifying the city, miti-
gating flooding potential, enhanc-
ing public spaces and working
with private owners to redevel-
op their properties. The process is
guided by the DNP with an 11-
member board of directors and
Vaughn Roberts, managing direc-
tor.

NOTICE

OF

INNOVATIVE
INSIGHT LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 15th day of June, 2009.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Finacial Cen-
tre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, The Bahamas
has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE

OF

JUSTIN & WILLIAMSON
LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 15th day of June, 2009.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Finacial Cen-
tre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, The Bahamas
has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PETTIINGER HOLDINGS LTD.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PETTIINGER HOLDINGS LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MEADOWBROOK LANE INC.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MEADOWBROOK LANE INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
YENLEY VIEW
INVESTMENTS LTD.

— -,——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of YENLEY VIEW INVESTMENTS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TRINITY PROVISIONS LIMITED

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of TRINITY PROVISIONS LIMITED has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PEORIA INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.

—_

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of PEORIA INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NOME BRACH LTD.

—— -—__

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of NOME BRACH LTD. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of RICHLAND CORP. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
WILFLOW
INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of WILFLOW INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SAVIESE MEADOWS INC.

——__ ff)

i

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of SAVIESE MEADOWS INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BALEEN ARCH HOLDINGS INC.

—_— ¢) —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BALEEN ARCH HOLDINGS INC. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DE AVARUA S.A.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of DE AVARUA S.A. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Insurers brace for 5%
motor premium drop

FROM page 1B

instead choosing to make their
existing model run for longer.

As aresult, Mr Duff said: “The
value of the vehicle drops, and
the value of the premium drops
with it. Then you get to the stage
where they switch from compre-
hensive to third party, fire and
theft.

“T think the whole market will
see a drop of 5 per cent or more
in motor income by the end of
the year at the gross level. We all
have to mark down motor
income.”

On the property and casualty
side, Mr Duff said ICB was start-
ing to experience problems from
“people delaying premium pay-
ments, coming in late with
cheques, or not increasing the
sums insured as people would in a
boom market. When people pay
late it has an impact for your run-
ning costs”.

Falling premium income was
happening against the backdrop
of another slight increase in prop-
erty and casualty reinsurance
costs, Mr Duff explained, “mak-
ing it more difficult to squeeze
profitability out of the property
class” of business.

Overall, the ICB general man-
ager said it was “not unreason-
able” to predict that all Bahamian
general insurance carriers would
experience an average 5 per cent
drop in gross written premium
for all business classes in 2009,
although 10 per cent “might be
at the high end of the scale”.

“We all expect that this has to
be a year when we trim costs,
focus on customer service and
hope for better times in 2010 and

2011,” Mr Duff added.

“So far, though, it’s not been
that bad in terms of claims.
Claims have been within the
boundaries expected.”

He said that ICB’s total aggre-
gate sums insured were in line
with 2008 comparatives, adding
that the company had about $1.9
billion worth of total property
risks on its books.

Meanwhile, ICB was assessing
its marine underwriting policies
“very closely” as a result of the
recent spike in boat and vessel
thefts, which had reached “epi-
demic” proportions.

Abaco, in particular, seemed
to be “the hot spot” for boat
thefts, Mr Duff said, the favourite
target for thieves being craft that
were 30 feet in length and had
two outboard motors.

“We’re very mindful of that
and looking very closely at under-
writing,” the ICB general man-
ager said. “We’re in the midst of
forming a plan going forward,
looking at where vessels are
berthed, the size of the craft.

“There is definitely an epi-
demic of small craft thefts at the
moment, no doubt about it. All
these insurance companies are
being impacted by it.

“We’re not making a loss on
marine, but are not making as
much profit as we should be. The
returns on the marine hull class
are much less than others. It’s an
area of concern for the industry,
and impacts the overall prof-
itability for the business.”

Mr Duff added: “We’re very
mindful of the trend in marine
hull losses, and are working on a
plan to minimise them.

“With quite a lot of the berths,

especially on Abaco, I imagine
security is not as tight as in other
areas. One boat was recently
stolen in Abaco at 3am in the
morning; it’s very easy to do.
Sometimes you get it back, and
sometimes you don’t.”

For its 2008 financial year, ICB
saw its net income drop by almost
two-thirds or 66.4 per cent to
$1.39 million, compared to $4.127
million the year before, largely
due to hurricane-related claims
and a $1.46 million reversal in
unrealised gains on its investment
securities.

Suffered

ICB suffered a $500,000 net
loss due to Hurricane Ike-related
claims in the Turks & Caicos
Islands, plus incurred a $401,609
loss in unrealised movements in
the value of its equity investments
portfolio, compared to a $1.059
million gain the year before.
Together, these accounted for
$1.96 million of the $2.737 mil-
lion decline in the carrier’s net
income.

Mr Duff said unrealised invest-
ment portfolio gains moved “sig-
nificantly in our favour” in the 12
months to December 31, 2007,
largely due to appreciation in
Commonwealth Bank’s stock.

This position, though, reversed
itself in 2008 with the slide in
equities values on the Bahamas
International Securities Exchange
(BISX). In addition, Mr Duff said
many of ICB’s competitors did
not incur Hurricane Ike-related
claims because they had no risks
insured in the Turks & Caicos.

Acknowledging that ICB’s bot-
tom line result “was somewhat

less than expected” for 2008, Mr
Duff said net income projections
had been set at levels “a little bit
more than we produced, although
we were not too far out.

“Overall, it was not a bad result
for us. We’re reasonably happy
with it, but it’s not an outstanding
result.”

He added: “On a general
claims level, 2007 was particular-
ly favourable in terms of motor
claims, whereas 2008 was still
good but not as good as the prior
year.”

Mr Duff said ICB still recorded
underwriting profits in all its
major business lines, with motor
and property/casualty producing
“superior returns”. Operating
expenses, too, came in 5 per cent
below budgeted levels.

For the 12 months to Decem-
ber 31, 2008, gross written pre-
miums were flat, standing at
$51.734 million compared to the
previous year’s $51.793 million.

Due to a reduction in the
amount ceded to reinsurers, net
retained premiums increased
slightly to $9.345 million, com-
pared to $9.342 million the year
before. Net earned premiums
increased by almost 2 per cent to
$9.36 million, compared to $9.179
million the year before.

Net claims incurred, though,
rose to $2.863 million compared
to $1.835 million in 2007, an
increase of 56 per cent.

This was largely responsible for
the 20.9 per cent hike in total
expenses to $7.768 million, com-
pared to $6.424 million in 2007.

As a result underwriting profits
fell 42.2 per cent to $1.591 mil-
lion, compared to $2.755 million
in 2007.

Revenues cover just 62% of Water Corp costs

to inferior infrastructure result-
ing in breaks or leaks.”

He suggested that a reputable
international firm would have to
come in to Water and Sewerage’s
to evaluate the extent of damage
to its infrastructure. Mr Neymour
said many areas throughout New
Providence had problems with
rusty water.

“This is caused by old infra-
structure such as cast iron and
galvanised iron water mains that
have become blocked by the pre-
vious dependency on hard,
groundwater supplies,” he said.

“Now that we have moved to a
softer, desalinated water supply,
these deposits are resulting in
rusty water. Ultimately, the prob-
lem requires massive replacement
of infrastructure. In that regard,
several infrastructure improve-
ments are planned to address this
and other issues.”

Mr Neymour said a part of the
Water and Sewerage infrastruc-
tural improvements will be car-
ried out with the New Providence
road Improvement Project. “The
New Providence Road Improve-
ment Project, has approximately
$10 million worth of infrastruc-
tural improvements for Water
and Sewerage’s, including
upgrades to improve capacity,
and new lines to improve service
quality and reliability,” he said.

One of the biggest expenses of
Water and Sewerage is the pro-
cessing of water by reverse osmo-

BEC, from page 1B

Late last year, the Government
implemented a social assistance
program borne out of a high num-
ber of disconnections carried out
by BEC. Now, according to Mr
Neymour, many of the customers
who took advantage of the pay-
ment programme offered by the
Government last year have found
themselves in the same situation
again.

He said: “Of the 5,000 cus-
tomers that were disconnected
(last year), some 4,000 plus cus-
tomers were reconnected. A
number of accounts were not

sis, but according to Mr Neymour,
the process is much more reliable
than barging water from North
Andros. He said water shipments
were originally a temporary solu-
tion, but were now a 25-year-old
process.

“Facilities for RO water pro-
duction are typically constructed
to meet 150 mph hurricane con-
ditions, and major facilities have
100 per cent back-up power capa-
bility, sufficient to cover up to
five days of operations,” said Mr
Neymour. “Secondly, the RO
facility capacity is also specified to
allow for regular maintenance
without loss of contracted pro-
duction capacity, and has addi-
tional capacity to offset demand
fluctuations. “Thirdly, RO plants
produce a consistently high qual-
ity standard water product, which
meets or in many cases exceed
WHO (World Health Organiza-
tion) guidelines for potable
water.”

Mr Neymour suggested that
reverse osmosis plants must
decrease their energy consump-
tion in order to cut the cost of
production, and thus the cost of
the water. “The levels of invest-
ment required cannot be provid-
ed by the Government indefi-
nitely,” he said. “The circum-
stances are further exacerbated
given that only 30 per cent of the
population is served thus increas-
ing the cost per customer signifi-
cantly.”

reconnected for varying reasons
(i.e. safety, vacant, no access,
landlord wanted the supply off,
etc).”

“As of October 31, 2008, 1,847
customers had made arrange-
ments to pay off their arrears with
25 per cent payment and the bal-
ance over 24 months.

“As of February 2009, under
the more lenient current policy,
some 2,754 customers made
arrangements to pay off their
arrears with 50 per cent payment
and the balance over three to six
months. Therefore, some 5,161
customers were in a state of dis-
connection as of March 2009.”

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

PROVENCE INTERNATIONAL INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,
the Dissolution of PROVENCE INTERNATIONAL INC.

has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-

sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Regis-
ter. The date of completion of the dissolution was the 29th day
of May 2009.

Tak: Saeed uu! Liquolatees, nz
beqeme te

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

CANALEJAS S.A.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,
the Dissolution of CANALEJAS S.A. has been completed, a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register. The date of completion
of the dissolution was the 8th day of June, 2009.

Lagan

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HUNTERWAY SHORES INC.

— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HUNTERWAY SHORES INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

VICTORY INTERNATIONAL LTD.
a
Fd

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of VICTORY INTERNATIONAL LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

LONGOLD ENTERPRISES LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,
the Dissolution of LONGOLD ENTERPRISES LIMITED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Regis-
ter. The date of completion of the dissolution was the 4th day
of June, 2009.

Totalserve Management Limited
TOTALSERVE MANAGEMENT LIMITED

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MATHA INTERNATIONAL
INVESTMENT LTD.

—*,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of MATHA INTERNTIONAL INVEST-
MENT LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolu-
tion has been issued and the Company has therefore been

struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PHD HOLDINGS LIMITED

—=

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of PHD HOLDINGS LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CL LIMITED

— f*), —_—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CL LIMITED has been completed; a Certifi-
cate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has

therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

VINOPOLIS HOLDINGS LTD.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of VINOPOLIS HOLDINGS LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



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The Tribune



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@ By ALEX MISSICK

Tribune Features Reporter

amissick@tribunemedia.net

SUMMER brings out the easy and quick when
it comes to grabbing a bite to eat and hot dogs
are one of the most popular summer foods in the
world. Donna Miller, owner of Donna’s Delec-
table Dogs, located on Rosetta Street next to
RBC Finco, knows exactly how to please the pal-
lets of her customers who prefer to have this sum-

mer favorite year round.

Ms Miller has been a full
time hot dog vendor for the
past three years and said she
has always been excited about
the business.

“My friend had a hot dog
cart and I saw how successful
she was. This is not a hobby-
it’s a job. It’s my profession
and my lively hood even
though I worked for many
places before this. I just decid-
ed to do my own thing,” Ms
Miller said.

Donna’s Delectable Dogs
are priced at $2 for small hot-
dogs and the larger size at $3
along with a variety of top-
pings to sastify whatever your

CHEESE topped hot dog.
es

taste buds crave. With every-
thing made fresh daily, it is no
wonder Ms Miller is always
swamped with hungry cus-
tomers.

“Trun through about 200
dogs a day. We have chili,
cheese, onions, jalapefios,
tomatoes, green peppers and
even sauerkraut. People are
really catching on to the
sauerkraut. My most popular
combination is relish, chili and
cheese. The second would be
the jalapefios and onions,” Ms
Miller said.

Donna’s Delectable Dogs
are strictly beef due to the fact
that they are a hot seller in the



county.

Faithful customer, Devenor
Wilkinson, said although he
recently started having hot
dogs, he finds Donna’s Delec-
table Dogs to be spectacular.

“Those hot dogs are so
good. I eat, sleep and dream
Donna’s Delectable Dogs. I
love onions and she has nice,
fresh, crushed onions. I love
the cheese and the chili as well
because the chili really brings
out the hot dog. Even the
bread-the bread is sweet. She
is very clean and tidy. I think
this is one of the cleanest
stands in Nassau,” Mr Wilkin-
son said.

Ms Miller said she would
encourage young persons who
want to start their own busi-
ness that location and many
other attributes are important
for success.

“T think in any successful
business all you need is the
right attitude. Even if your
product is not superior, people
come back because you are
pleasant, you know how to
treat people and you know
how to talk to people,” Ms
Miller said.


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009, PAGE 9B







The Tribune




















m@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

THIS week in our lineup,
we've given you the option of
cool movies, a celebration of
the arts, or some easy listening
music. Hopefully, the recent
summer showers won't put a
damper on the weekend’s plans.

«The Jazz Summer Festival

is going into high gear this
week, with several planned per-
formances at some of the jazzi-
est venues on the island. Friday
is the official night of Jazz
music Bahamian style, with
RnB sensation Frydeh - a for-
mer member of Baha-men -
along with the G-Note All-stars
who will be performing at the
Humidor Churrascaria on West
Street. On Saturday, Arturo
Sandoval and Paul Hanna will
perform at the National Centre
for The Performing Arts on
Shirley Street at 8pm. Tickets
for the events are priced
between $45 and $75. For more
details, email jazz@ivoryglobal-
promotions.com.

©). Virtue Dance Academy

sapresents Diary of a Bitter
Mother In-Law, a play featuring
Tia Johnson and students of
the academy. A dance and dra-
ma production, this show is the
fifth edition to Dance Of The
Scrolls series by Professor
Marilyn T Deveaux. It is about
the Bible character Naomi- the
mother-in-law of Ruth. Perfor-
mances will take place this Sat-
urday at the Holy Trinity Activi-
ty Centre in Stapledon Gardens
at 3pm and 8pm. Tickets are
$15 and are available at the
door, from parents of the stu-
dents, Logos bookstore, the
Christian bookstore, Faith Life
Bookstore, the Bible Centre,
and the Juke Box. There is also
a pre-booking group discount
of $10 per child to all groups
with 5 persons or more. Food
and drinks will also be on sale.

3. The Bahamas Internation-
al Film Festival will present
Sita Sings the Blues at Galleria
Cinema JFK Drive on tonight as
part of its month long movie
series. This 82 minute Ameri-
can film is about a goddess
named Sita who is separated
from her beloved lord and hus-
band Rama. The director Nina
Paley is an animator whose
husband moves back to India
and dumps her via email. Three
hilarious shadow puppets nar-
rate both ancient tragedy and
modern comedy in this beauti-
fully animated interpretation of
the Indian epic Ramayana. Set
to the 1920's jazz vocals of
Annette Hanshaw, Sita Sings
the Blues earns its spot as ‘the
Greatest Break-Up Story Ever
Told.’

/ On Thursday, the National
Art Gallery of the Bahamas
presents the film Common
Ground as a part of its Love
Film series. In this 112 minute
flick made in 2002, a respected
Argentinean university profes-
sor is forced into early retire-
ment, and faces an uncertain
future as an unemployed hus-
band. As the film progresses,
he and his wife move to the
countryside and open a new
chapter of their lives. Directed
by Adolfo Aristarain, the film
has English subtitles but is
heard in Spanish. Showtime is
at 8 pm at the gallery on West
and Well Hill Street. For more
information, email
info@nagb.org.bs or visit
www.nagb.org.bs.

. Tired of being labeled a

couch potato, sign up for
the rotary club’s walk-a-thon
this weekend and start the jour-
ney to a healthier you. Planned
for Saturday June 20 at Arawak
Cay, the walk is from Arawak
Cay to Goodman’s Bay and
back. It begins at 7.30am.
Categories include the under 20
division, 21 to 35, 36 to 50, and
51 and up. Prizes will be
awarded to the top finishers.
Registration is $10, and the
event is in aid of local charities
to be announced. Forms can be
obtained from all Subway loca-
tions, Michael Hepburn and
Associates, and Pat Strachan
Realty.

Singer,

OP poOser,

ivacidies Frode

Island MG

Hitting the

SWEETNOTE |

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

MOVING to the
Bahamas more than
a decade ago, life-
long musician Luicito
“Toto” Bazard is still
in love with these
islands, and is once
again producing
music fo tell his story.

In his latest CD titled Island
Musical Pot Pourri, he created
nearly a dozen songs all cele-
brating Bahamian and
Caribbean sounds, an effort
which he said proves that we
are all one despite our differ-
ences.

Telling the story of his pro-
gression as a musician, Mr
Bazard explained that at the
age of four, he was given a
banjo from a relative which
was his first introduction to the
world of music.

“T don’t remember playing
anything that made sense with
the banjo, but since then I
began to acquire a love for
music, especially after my
father threw it away insisting
that he didn’t want me to play
it.

“At the age of 15, I took up
solfege, piano and guitar
lessons. After about a year, I
joined a cultural and artistic
club, where I composed two of
the songs from my latest
album.”

He moved to the Bahamas
in 1966 and worked by day as
an interpreter for the Ministry
of Finance and nights and
weekends slowly building his
music repertoire.

A former member of the
groups Blue Dreamers and
Kool Vibrations, he became
familiar with the music of the
Bahamas and Caribbean in
places like the South Beach
Cabana, Club Med, and the
Pink Pussycat nightclub.

“During the seventies I was
also exposed to quite a range

of musical sounds including
Reggae, Calypso, and Kompa
(a Creole rhythm), and of
course you know that kind of
music stayed in my blood.

“We played ballads, rake-n-
scrape, a little bit of reggae,
we played it all. Especially
when I worked at Club Med,
we played several songs from
the Latin American countries
and the Bahamas, but what
made that experience more
memorable was the fact that
we performed most of those
songs in foreign languages
because of the diverse cultures
that frequented Club Med.”

He said it was these experi-
ences that helped to perpetu-
ate his love for Bahamian cul-
ture.

In his latest track titled
Come Enjoy the Bahamas, Mr
Bazard speaks of some of the
elements that define the
Bahamas from other places in
the region and throughout the
world.

“In your life, there are things
you'll never enjoy, until you
come to the place where you
jump for joy. Here in Nassau
and the Family Islands also,
you will find the treasures of
pleasure. Throughout the
Bahamas, where the elite and
the masses, all enjoy great fun
under the ever shining sun.
Refreshed by cool breeze, you
can do your own thing at ease.
Spring, Summer, Winter, it
doesn’t matter, come to the
Bahamas, enjoy the Bahamas.”

These lyrics are simpler than
the sophisticated lyrics of most
songs of today, and are aptly
complemented with a tune that
is without question reminiscent
of Goombay music.

Mr Bazard said although
most local artists nowadays
produce music that is often
mistaken for American or
Jamaican music, he wants to
produce music that sounds
Bahamian.

He also wants to continue
developing his talent provid-
ing listeners with authentic
Bahamian music and a greater
sense of identity.

To learn more about Mr
Bazard and Komopa, visit
www.shopbvm.com.

ee
“cr

IN HIS latest CD /sland entertainment

Pot Pourri, lifelong

musician Luicito
Bazard sings of many

of the elements that
& helped to define the
> moiscos; _ Attorney seeks
culture and rhythm. : = .
, — delay in Chris
Brown case

m LOS ANGELES

CHRIS Brown’s lawyer has
asked the California Supreme
Court to delay a key hearing in
the singer’s assault case, accord-
ing to the Associated Press.

Court records show Mark
Geragos wants the state’s high
court to put off a preliminary
hearing scheduled for Monday.
No decision has been made.

It’s the second attempt Gera-
gos has made to delay Brown’s
preliminary hearing. An appeals
court rejected a motion to delay
the case last week.

Brown’s alleged victim,
Rihanna, has received a sub-
poena to testify and is expected
to appear.

Geragos is seeking access to
police personnel and investiga-
tive records. The 19-year-old
R&B singer faces
felony assault and
criminal threats
charges. A
judge _-will
decide after
Monday’s | —
hearing
whether there —_
is enough evi- i
dence for the
case to pro-
ceed.






ot-Pourri

242} 393-1033



ra

participating products
and you could WIN
1 of 8 $1,000

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Visa itt i tea



$1,000 gift sand Give-away

Name:
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For long lasting hand towel and bathroom tissue trust S _ ott & Co _ ton _ lle
PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ARTS



W one of Stuart Cove’s fastest growing book-
ings, the shark dive gives spectators that up

‘close and personal encounter. But be warned,
Â¥ experience is not for the faint hearted.

#

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

Summertime is that special time of year

when people look to take a much needed

break from the hustle and bustle of life,

although finding that perfectly affordable
and fun vacation spot can be challenging.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that we, DWYANE HUMPHREY WALLACE
AND DANNESTINE SHERICK TAYLOR of the Island of New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, intend to change
our son’s name from TENAJ VALENTIO HUYLER to TENAJ VALENTIO
WALLACE. If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication
of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that HERMANE EXAMENTE
of GOVERNOR’S HARBOUR, ELEUTHERA, P.O Box
EL - 25048 is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 10° day of June, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

However, there are many
experiences right here at home
that can be fabulous without
costing ‘an arm and a leg,’ some-
thing important considering the
current state of the economy.

At Stuart Cove’s Aqua
Adventure company, there are
several breathtaking experiences
waiting to be discovered by per-
sons of all ages from 10- year-
olds to seniors.

Dive instructor Viviana Toro
explained that for first time
divers, the company offers a cer-
tification course where students
learn about the equipment need-
ed for the underwater adven-
tures, how to properly commu-
nicate while submerged, and the
safety tips needed when inter-
acting with sea creatures.

Once those basics are out of
the way, the real fun begins.
Activities include scuba tours of
some of the islands most amazing
coral reefs, mini-submarine tours
where you can explore a new
world of fish and other sea life,
or if you’re brave enough you
can even have the experience of

ON Stuart Cove's mini-scuba
experience, you have the
chance to see several fish sea
creatures including sergeant
majors, snappers, sea turtles,
sea urchins, or even a lion fish.

swimming with the sharks.

Now one of Stuart Cove’s
fastest growing bookings, the
shark dive gives spectators that
up close and personal encounter.
But be warned, this experience is
not for the faint hearted.

Viviana explained: “This
extreme shark adventure at Stu-
art Cove’s is basically an oppor-
tunity for people to have a
chance to dive with a good num-
ber of sharks.

“Most people go to different
locations throughout the world
taking these kinds of dives where
they may see one or two sharks,
but here they get to see some-
times up to 30 sharks all swim-
ming around them. The type of
sharks we frequently see on these
dives are reef and nurse sharks.”

The tour which is set up in two

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JAMAAL McCLEARY of # 6
QUEENS PARK off FARRINGTON Rd is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 10 day of June, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that ROSEMARY DIANA
GILBERT of Richville Drive, Nassau, Bahamas intend
to change my name to DIANA ROSEMARY GILBERT. If
there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Deputy Chief
Passport Officer, PO.Box N-792, Nassau, Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of
this notice.



. t
AT Stuart Cove’s
Aqua Adventure
company, there
~ exist several
breathtaking
experiences
waiting to be
discovered by
you.

parts first allows divers to per-
form a sea wall dive, which is
done in the area the sharks live.

She said this is a more relaxed
non-feeding environment, and
although there are some sharks
normally spotted, their presence
gives divers a chance to figure
out just how prepared they are
for part two.

“The second dive is the actual
feed, and things are treated
slightly different. We introduce
food in the water which creates a
little bit more excitement, and
the method that we use is called
polite feeding.

“During this dive we remind
divers that hand movements are
restricted, we also try to over-
weight divers usually by an extra
two to four pounds so that when
they breathe or when a shark
may pass them and create a light
current, the extra weight stops
them from floating up or losing
their balance.

“We tell them to deflate their
jackets and to place everything
they need near their folded arms.
We tell our divers not to touch
the sharks, and should they have
to communicate with another
diver we show them how to sig-
nal nice and close to their bod-
ies.”

Lasting for about 20 to 25 min-
utes, the feeding can seem long,
but is truly an experience of a
lifetime.

After a long debate, Tribune
Features recently took the plunge
and swam with more than a
dozen sharks in the Stuart Cove
extreme shark dive.

“Tt was always something that
I said I never wanted to experi-
ence, but while in the moment
of having a 13 foot predator inch-
es away from me, I gained a new
respect for these creatures.

“T still believe that they feed
off our fears, but I actually lost
every bit of that once I saw how
relaxed they were next to me, it
was like swimming in a public
pool to say the least.”

Viviana said the fear most
people have toward sharks is
fueled from the negative por-
trayal of sharks in most Holly-
wood blockbusters but often
once they get up close and see
how calm and easy going the ani-
mals are, their views are
changed.

Of course after experiencing
an extreme shark dive, you’re
going to want to tell everyone
about your wild experience. Stu-
art Cove’s Fin Photo depart-
ment, is a wonderful crew of aux-
iliary divers who can either take
a few pictures for you or record a
half hour long video of your
underwater adventure.











_ Captivating
cards by
_ Angie

FROM page 12

: Ms Sawyer actually began
? creating hand-made, unique-
i ly beautiful greeting cards at
? the young age of seven.

? = =©6“T draw my inspiration for
? my card creations from any
? beautiful place, thing or emo-
? tion that I experience. Inspi-
? ration for my themed card
? collections can be drawn from
? the tranquil turquoise sea, the
? beauty of a vibrant hued
i flower, the energetic beauty
? of Junkanoo, the universal
? feeling of affection during a
i holiday/ celebration or the
? love of a family member or
? friend,” Ms Sawyer said.

? Ms Sawyer said her card
? creations began by the sup-
? port from her family, espe-
? cially her parents, Dudley and
i Marva Sawyer and has now
? grown into a creative obses-
? sion.

? “This obsession has
? spawned opportunities for me
? to present my Bahamian art
? form to Ms Universe 2006,
? Nathalie Glebova, members
? of parliament, influential
? members of the community,
? gifts to loved ones and the
? loved ones of my customers. I
? will continue in this vein by
? making these creations for
? personal and commercial pur-
? poses and plan to take my
? unique talent to a level of
? international success,” Ms

“I draw my
inspiration for

my card creations
trom any beautitul
place, thing or
emotion that

| experience.”

— ANGELIQUE SAWYER

Sawyer said.
: Ms Sawyer said although
? the card making process can
i be rather simple, the detailed
: design process that she uses in
? creating cards began in the
? year of 2000.
i “The time process that it
: takes to create a card varies
i greatly and depends on the
i size, the theme and design of
: acard. However, it typically
i varies from a small and sim-
i ply designed card at 1 hour
: to a large and ornately
? designed card for up to 6
i hours. The general process in
? creating a card begins with a
? sketch or ‘blue print’, if you
i will, of the design elements
? of the card that is composed
? of the lay out and elements
; being used on the card to
i ensure harmony of the
i? design. Thereafter, all of the
? materials are readied via var-
? ious means such as painting,
i measuring, cutting and
i preparing for placement on
? the card. The final stage is
? where the ‘blue print’ of the
? card becomes a 3D creation
? by all of the design elements
? being combined into a one-
? of-a-kind, custom created
: card,” Ms Sawyer said.
? Ms Sawyer said she would
: love the ability to create cards
? as requested. The cost of the
? card is dependent on the size,
? design details and hours of
? labor used in the cards cre-
? ation. The cost of a card nor-
? mally begins at $20.
? ~~ In offering words of advice
? for young persons who would
: like to express their creativity,
? Ms Sawyer said she encour-
? ages them to truly trust in
? their creative talents, no mat-
? ter what the naysayers say.
? = “Creativity comes from the
? creator and everything from
? Him is magnificent and awe-
? some.”
i Persons who are interest-
? ed in sending or owning one
? of these unique, custom
? designed creations can con-
? tact Ms Sawyer at angelique-
? sawyer@gmail.com or at the
i telephone number: 544-0018.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that JAMES JERMINE
NONOME of Excellence Estates No.2, Nassau,

Bahamas intend to change my name to JAMES
JERMINE NONOME-DERISMA. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Deputy Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box N-792, Nassau, Bahamas no later than
thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.









Discovering Get a taste of
the blue Donna Miller's

See page 10 delectable hot dogs)
see page eight



4

1S

The Tribune SECTION B ¢



WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009











a x
Be lites tas =

fivating
cards by « J ‘a



Wap








a‘
My
@ By ALEX MISSIC

Tribune Features/Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net



HEN it is hard to express
ones feelings in words, many
persons turn to greeting
cards to say exactly how they feel.
However, something that is handmade
takes a lot more time and effort to put
together to express ones love for anoth- |
er person. It is this love for self expres-
sion that prompted law student
Angelique Sawyer to place a little bit of
her self into her hand made cards.

SEE page 10

__— di



j pee. L i

"a






PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Police pr obe child sex film C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.167WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY HIGH 88F LOW 79F F E A T U R E S SEEINSIDE‘THEARTS’ S P O R T S Captivating Cards by Angie SEEPAGEFIFTEEN Brown storms standings n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net POLICE have pledged to investigate a pornographic video that is circulating throughout Nassau by e-mail with what is reported to be a Bahamian man engaging in sexual relations with a three-year-old girl. The disturbing footage has been forwarded to local police and the Federal Bureau of Investigation to ascertain the nationality of the man and possibly lead to his capture and imprisonment. Yesterday countless recipients of the e-mail responded to the initial message calling for the man in the video to be jailed or even tortured to death for defiling the young girl. “It is with great pain and mixed emotions that I am sending you this e-mail. It is my belief that people, like the per son(s clips, should not be shot, hung or whatever instant death penal ty there exists. “No, instead they should be put to death in a slow, long and painful manner. Pain that can go on for years, where they wish every single day they were dead. In a way of speaking they would be welcoming death every day. This way it would be a constant reminder to them and many others out there of the debauchery they do to other innocent human beings,” the blogger wrote. “Take care of your kids!” wrote another recipient, while others simply called for the man to be “shot”. In view of a similar case, the Crisis Centre has recently called on Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham to establish a special court focused primarily on child sexual abuse matters. Director of the Crisis Centre Dr Sandra Dean-Patterson said that to hear that 15 teachers are currently being investigated for sexual impropriety with stu dents they are supposed to be Fury over video of molested thr ee-year-old The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E SEE page 12 U-TURN ON EXCAVATION? n By MEGAN R EYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@ tribunemedia.net PATIENTS lives continued to be put at risk yesterd ay as public health nurses called in sick for the ninthd ay despite an injunction prohibiting industrial action. A lthough the Public Health Authority (PHA did not disclose how many nurses failed to show up for work, a senior medic told The Tribune only ‘one or two’ returned to public hos p itals and clinics. She said nurses would not b e intimidated by the court ruling as they have, “lost all respect for the justice system, the Prime Minister and Dr Minnis.” And because the nurses have doctor’s notes they do n ot fear being jailed. The Government has s ought to end the sick-out with a court injunction. According to an affidavit submitted to the Supreme Court by PHA managing director Herbert Brown on Monday, the actions of the union and the nurses “seriously undermined and impaired the ability of the Public Health Authority to provide required medical and health services to the Nurses call in sick for a ninth day ‘Only one or two’ return to hospitals and clinics AFTER THE TRIBUNE reported yesterday that entrepreneurs are allegedly excavating farmland to sell quarry to developers and filling the cavity with waste, tractors were seen pushing dirt back into the holes on land behind Millars Heights off Carmichael Road. WHILEthe Bahamas is making efforts to combat human trafficking, the country continues to fail to fully comply with the minimum standards set for its elimination. These are the findings of the 2009 Trafficking in Persons (TIP yesterday by United States Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. In it, the US State Department describes the Bahamas as a destination country for men and women trafficked from Haiti and other Caribbean countries primarily for the purpose of forced labour, and women from Jamaica and other countries for the purpose of commer cial sexual exploitation. The report found the Bahamas made only “minimal efforts” to protect victims of the crime and to prosecute trafficking offenders in 2008. The Bahamian government demonstrated “limited efforts” to prevent trafficking over the reporting period. It Bahamas fails to fully comply with minimum standar ds to eliminate human traf ficking THE REPORT was released by Hillary Clinton (AP SEE page 12 THE distraught mother of the two boys missing on South Andros now fears the youngsters may have been kidnapped. Police yesterday called off the search for Deangelo Clarke, nine, and his five-year-old brother Marcelo after a week of unsuccessfully scouring a large area of the island. But their heartbroken moth er Vera Clarke, 32, said that although she has no evidence to go on, her “feeling” tells her the boys were kidnapped. Ms Clarke said she came to this conclusion after a week of intensive searching by relatives, Mother fears missing boys may have been kidnapped SEE page 12 SEE page 11 n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net POLICE believe the killers of a 20-year-old man from Blue Hill Heights deliberately targeted their victim. Jeffrey Johnson, also known as Jeffrey Rolle, and his broth er were walking in the Derby Road area around 10pm on Monday when they saw a group of men approach, according to police reports. The brothers turned to flee, Police believe murder victim was targeted deliberately SEE page 12

PAGE 2

n B y TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net T HE bereaved family of fivemonth-old Lynera Saunders still plans to issue law suits over the dissemination of allegations that the child – who died of respiratoryf ailure last week – may have been molested. Legal action has not yet been initiated, but family lawyer Paul Moss said this is because the griev-i ng family has been focused on making funeral arrangements. “They are still planning to sue – certainly after the family has had a t ime to conclude the funeral ( arrangements) they are going to get up to deal with these matters. Someone has to be held responsible for what has happened to thef amily so that is what they intend to pursue with vigour,” Mr Moss told The Tribune yesterday. H e said "every agency involved" in the airing of the molestation allegations – including the Princess Margaret Hospit al, the Royal Bahamas Police F orce and various electronic and print media outlets – is a potential target of legal action. While he did not specify how m uch compensation the family will seek, he said he is hopeful the matter can be settled out of court. " Some (parties reckless as we've seen with the story in (a local tabloid day and some stories carried (on t he internet) and also on some r adio stations," he said, adding that he is still in the process of compiling information to corrobC M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net ITREMAINSunclear whether an autopsy has been carried out on the body of 15-year-oldMichaelK nowles, with police claiming ignorance and an attorney for his family declining to comment. This, as Minister of National S ecurity Tommy Turnquest was criticised by PLP chairman Glenys Hanna Martin for his comments to parliament on Monday about Knowles’ death which she claimed raised more questions than answers.” She said that Mr Turnquest’s comments about the boy’s alleged c riminal background are, “even if true, irrelevant to the issue of his safe custody in the hands of the police – which is the issue at hand (as well as p rejudicial.” “This strengthens the call for an independent inquiry as w hat is being released from the police and the minister suggests conclusions even before an investigation has b een completed,” she said. C ontributing to the 2009/2010 budgetd ebate on Monday evening, Mr Turnq uest told parliament that Knowles’ death represents an “awful h uman tragedy”, however, proposed t hat “all he has seen” indicates that police followed proper procedure with the a rrest of a minor.” The 15-year-old was found hanging in a police cell on June 1 , 2009. Mr Turnquest claimed it is “also a tragedy that many of our young people, especially young males, f ind themselves on the wrong side of the law. Regrettably, young Knowles was suspected of breaking the law in the matter of house breaking. As a suspect, Knowles was detained in custody. There is noth-i ng unusual about that. The fact that he was a minor was taken into a ccount. “It is the fact that according to law, he could only be detained for 48 hours, and he was. As the inves tigation was still pending, appli c ation was made to the courts to detain Mr Knowles for a further 48 hours,” said the minister. Referring to the political furore t hat stemmed from Mr Knowles’ death, Mr Turnquest said it became the subject of “blatant manipulation.” Mrs Hanna Martin w as suspended from the House of A ssembly after she sought to raise the matter of the cell death at a time that House Speaker Alvin Smith deemed inappropriate andf or which she had failed to give the required one hour advance notice to the Speaker to get permission to speak on the agenda at t hat time. Because she was not a llowed to break into the agenda the Opposition claimed that government did not want to address the issue. In death, this young man is defended by persons, who by their very actions give the distinct impression that t hey want to cast the l aw aside, and plant doubts as to the competency of our legal procedures,” claimedM r Turnquest. Mrs Hanna Martin and her parliamentary colleagues maintain that the Speaker shouldh ave allowed her to r aise the issue when she attempted to as a “matter of public importance.” She said she o nly wished to obtain an assurance from Mr Turnquest that the matter would be indepen-d ently investigated. H owever, numerous government MPs made disparaging comments during the budget d ebate about her refusal to obey the Speaker. Y esterday Mrs Hanna-Martin said it is “very regrettable that p olitical propaganda over the last several days has served to over shadow” the issue of how Knowles met his death in the custody of the state. S peaking on Monday, Mr Turn quest stated that there will be a full investigation into the mat ter” but stopped short of indicati ng that it would be carried out by a body independent of the police, as Mrs Hanna-Martin has called for. Mr Turnquest said the govern m ent “will not, and must not, be swayed by public displays and misc hief making. Bereaved family of five-month-old girl plans to sue over allegations SEE page 12 No answer over whether autopsy has been carried out on Michael Knowles G LENYSHANNAMARTIN said it is very regrettable that political propaganda o ver the last several days has served to overshadow’ the issue of how Knowles met his death in the cus-t ody of the state.

PAGE 3

n B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net AUTHORITIESand boaters have raised the alarm over what they believe is a small, but “highly organised” group of criminals responsible for a “massive” hike i n boat thefts that are costing owners and insurance companies millions of dollars. The Royal Bahamas Defence Force said it has fortified its patrols in Nassau harbour area, particularly at night when most incidents occur, in response to the increase over the last year in particular. M eanwhile, some insurers are raising their premiums and demanding that owners take additional security measures like paying to dock their vessels at certain marinas considered to be safer than private docks. Concerned boaters fear that not enough is being done by authorit ies to counter the trend, which they say has the potential, not only of hitting residents, but also adversely affecting marine tourism to the Bahamas and the second home market. One Paradise Island resident, who wished to remain anonymous, told of how his family was struck by three boat thefts in the space ofe ight months, with thieves taking his father-in-law’s brand new$ 250,000 boat, his nephew’s 35foot speedboat, and his own 36 f ooter. The $250,000 boat was recovered in Jamaica, having been used for a drug run, but has since been impounded by the governmentt here. His nephew’s boat turned up in F lorida, where police reported it had been used for human smugg ling, and his own vessel was found stripped of $40,000 of equipment in a Seabreeze canal. This after he had secured it with six of “the best locks money can b uy” in view of the theft of his father-in-law’s boat, which wasd ocked in the same location inside Nassau Harbour. My father-in-law’s boat was a total write-off and so was mine,” said the boater, adding that his insurance has gone up and his insurers have requested that he m ove his vessel to another marina in the harbour. H e is upset that authorities are not reporting the incidents to the media so that the wider public can be warned about and respond to the situation. Commanding officer of the R BDF’s Harbour Patrol Unit Ralph McKinney and Bahamas Air Sea Rescue Association operations director Chris Lloyd say thata highly organised, well equipped and apparently industrious group of criminals is to blame. “I’ve been here 15 years. It used t o be a handful of boats stolen each year. I’ve never seen it on such an o rganised scale as we’re seeing now – it’s insane,” said Mr Lloyd,d escribing the rise in thefts in the Abacos in particular as “astron omical.” Engines S uspicion about the sophisticated nature of the operation is raised by the speed with which boats are being stolen and stripped – andt he ability of those involved to m ove “huge” engines weighing hundreds of pounds onto land. “The joke on the street is that if you need a boat part you can just o rder it from these guys and they’ll steal it. It’s become like a moralv ictory for visitors to come and cruise the Bahamas and not have t heir boat stolen,” Mr Lloyd claimed. He said that in May – the month that The Tribune’s source had his boat stolen – he was made aware o f seven boats disappearing in a period of around 10 to 12 daysa lone. Petty Officer McKinney said that the RBDF has yet to catch anyone responsible but as part of its efforts to do so, regularly boards vessels seen moving in and out of N assau harbour at night. In order to assist the RBDF in its work, Mr McKinney called on all boaters to have proof of ownership and boat registration on them at all times. But, despite his comments, some boaters still believe it is all too easy f or criminals to remove vessels from the harbour at night time. From a national security perspective, how can they be disap-p earing at night and no one knows the situation?” asked one. M r Lloyd added: “I just don’t know how they’re stealing them and getting them out of harbour quite so easily.” Some boaters formed a local em ail list to which alerts are now being sent on a regular basis warn-i ng mariners to be on the look out for missing vessels. T he latest e-mail tells of the theft of a 29-foot Sea Hunt stolen from the Abaco Beach Resort/Boat Harbour Marina at around 3am last Sunday. The “Sea Dancer” h ad twin 250-hp Yamaha engines and is cream coloured. Authorities say it is this kind of vessel – a speedboat with highp owered 250 or 300 horsepower engines – that is being targeted. Mr McKinney said that thefts are being reported from “the tip of L yford Cay all the way around the i sland.” The boats commonly turn up on the south side of the island, or in a Seabreeze canal, if not abroad. A ttempts to obtain boat theft report statistics from the police yesterday were unsuccessful. Police press liaison officer Walt er Evans said he was not aware of a rise in the incidence of such crimes. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009, PAGE 3 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $4,210 $4,210 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $4,410 $4,410Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank M M e e d d i i t t e e r r r r a a n n e e a a n n M M e e d d i i t t e e r r r r a a n n e e a a n n THIS FATHERSDAY GIVEHIMA Luke&LauraCo DowdeswellStreet 322-1103 15%OFFSALE STOREWIDE S a l e E n d s 6 / 2 0 / 0 9 THE accounts of the Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas (ZNS a rray that even conducting an audit would pose a serious challenge, the minister responsible said. Minister of National Security T ommy Turnquest told parliament this week that government is seeking to address the confused state of affairs of the Corporation’s accounts. “In fact, matters are so confused as to call into question the possibility of conducting an effective audit of accounts for t he years 2003-2007. The government is addressing these matters with a view to determining the way forward, and I should be able to say more on this in due course,” said Mr Turnquest. He added that ZNS has been allocated $8 million in this y ear’s budget and is expected to “operate within this parameter.” Meanwhile, Mr Turnquest s aid that there “remains an enormous amount of work that must be done to make the Corporation viable, effective and the pivotal national institution ito ught to be.” “During the debate on the Communications Bills, I spoke of the government’s plans to move the Corporation to a publ ic service broadcasting facility. This remains our objectivea nd serious discussions will commence shortly in this r egard,” he said. Boat thefts hike blamed on ‘organised criminals’ n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net A 39-YEAR-OLDEleuthera man accused of indecently a ssaulting seven young girls on that island between September 2 008 and May of this year was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Adrian Albert White of Airport Road, Eleuthera appeared before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court One, Bank Lane yesterday on eight counts of indecent assault. I t is alleged that White inde cently assaulted a 16-year-old girl during the month of September 2008, another in February of this year and another 16year-old girl on two occasions – in January and April of this year. White is also accused of inde c ently assaulting two 14-yearold girls, as well as a 17-yearo ld girl in January and another 14-year-old girl in May. White, a security guard who is represented by lawyer Antho ny Newbold, indicated to the c ourt that he understood the charges and pleaded not guilty t o all. Mr Newbold noted that despite the multiplicity of the charges, the offences were bailable. White was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison in Nassau yesterday. He is expected to appear in Court 5, Bank Lane, on June 22, when a bail hearing is expected to take place. THE Immigration Depart ment said that after a series of investigations and apprehension exercises, it has repatriated more than 100 persons found to be living in the Bahamas illegally. On Tuesday, 109 Haitians were repatriated after the Enforcement Unit found a number of persons working without valid work permits. Of those flown back to Haiti, 80 were men, 15 were women, and 14 were children. This follows the repatriation of 86 persons in the first two weeks of June. These included: 64 Haitians, one Zambian, two Venezuelans, two Filipinos, four Dominicans, one Isreali and 12 Jamaicans. The department said it “remains committed toward ensuring that the immigration laws of the Bahamas are adhered to. Further, the department will continue to aggressively pursue those found in violation of Bahami an laws and Bahamians who violate the laws will be prose cuted.” ZNS accounts ‘in disarray’ Man accused of indecently assaulting young girls More than 100 persons living in Bahamas illegally ar e repatriated AUTHORITIES say it is vessels such as speedboats with high-powered 250 or 300 horsepower engines – that are being targeted.

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune. Remember Bahamas Remember, whom the gods would d estroy, they first make mad. Change is inevitable, but it may n ot be the change we think we want. A dverse situations on a personal, tribal and national level f orce change, but up until recent ly these changes have been subtle, and have all been occurring in relatively good times. Now more than ever our count ry needs competent people to contribute intellectually in charti ng the rough waters ahead and I for one firmly believe the roughest is yet to come. Especially if our current crop of politicians and civil servants keep acting as if everything is under control and will improve in spite of their efforts. A pessimist? Me? No way, I am an optimist and a realist, but I am getting hemmed in by some pretty mediocre resources, which is making it difficult to stay opti mistic. I will always deal with real ity head on, as dismal as it may get. Take interpersonal communi c ations for instance: I have yet to have a conversat ion of any length with a politician that is, for lack of better words, c oherent in thought and progression. I n fact, I am beginning to think that they think in 30 second com mercial type sound bites. There is no development of the idea, real or abstract, and no d iscussions have ever ended very well. A ny authority they have, whoever they may be, usually ends up being wielded as power, as an effort to subjugate me. As those who know me will attest, this has never gone over very well. Most often I start to feel as if I am re-living the tower of Babel Biblical story, in which the tribes are scattered to the winds through their sudden lack of ability to speak to each other. At this point I should probably take my leave, and go back to my quiet corner, survive as best as is possible, and stay out of the way. W ho am I to tell anyone what to do or how to do it? B ut, at the same time, this is my country as much as anyone e lse’s, and I choose to try my damnedest to contribute come h ell or high water. And I proba bly will for life. One last thought for now: A lot of Bahamians in high and mighty places better learn to l augh at themselves every so often instead of laughing at other B ahamians, the ones they try to keep under foot. This applies to the two politi cal leadership groups, the com plete farces that they are. Remember, whom the gods would destroy, they first make mad. (Euripides Greek tragic dramatist 484 BC 406 BC). There is ample madness in the Bahamas to give that thought credibility. CHRISTOPHER D. LOWE Nassau, June 15, 2009 EDITOR, The Tribune. As a Registered nurse, I just couldn’t keep quiet any longer on this issue of health insurance for nurses. It is crystal clear to me that Cleona Hamilton has a political agenda, and the other nurses are following behind her like lambs to the slaughter! What world are you living in? Do you know that last month a lone, more than 300,000 people lost jobs in America? Have you seen the drop in tourism and the loss of jobs right here in The Bahamas? Anyone with a brain, can see the economic situation that the entire world is in! What a time to make a demand for something that may be extremely important to everyone, but least of all to us nurses? What nurse can stand up and t ell me that you are in dire straits for medical insurance? We are in a better position than most! If you walked into PMH now, I can guarantee you that you will get preferential treatment because you’ve known and worked with the staff for many years. As a registered nurse, you have physician acquaintances who would be more than happy to see and treat you and your family for little or no charge. Dr Minnis himself treated me and other nurses throughout the course of our pregnancies and never charged us a single dime! I have never stood in a line or waited hours to see a doctor, and very few if any nurses do. Dr Minnis has taken money out of his pocket time and time again to fund educational seminars for us nurses, Christmas parties and other events that were related to nurses. In fact he has offered us the assurance that beds have been put aside and that we will receive quality private care if and when needed, until the government can afford to provide health insurance. He has always been there for nurses, and I challenge any nurse at PMH to prove otherwise. Cleola Hamilton and the nurses who blindly follow her, should be ashamed of them-s elves, at a time when thousands of people are without jobs! They should be thanking God for theirs! The people who stand behind t hem and insist that the government fork up the $10,000,000 now, are the same people who would complain about the lack of something else because the money was used for that purpose. I heard one man on the radio this morning say that if the government can spend over $100,000,000 on roads, they can take $10,000,000 to give the nurses insurance. He would probably be the same man bitching and moaning and cussing Neko Grant if his car fell in a ditch tomorrow! I say to the Honourable P rime Minister and Dr Hubert Minnis, you are doing a great job! Keep up the good work! To the teachers, I say thank you for having a brain! I say to my collagues, the nurses, stop the politics and the consultations with the opposition and practice your profession faithfully. Abstain from whatever is deleterious and mischievous, maintain and elevate the standard of your profession, and devote yourself to the wel-f are of those committed to your care! Shut up, get back to work! And thank God for a job! NO NAME Nassau, June 12, 2009. (What the caller to the radio station failed to realise is that the roadworks now underway have been started by govern ment to provide work for those without jobs. One would have to be brainless not to understand that it is far more important to create work for the unemployed than to provide health insurance for nurses, who are fully employed, and work in health facilities that will take care of their every need. (As a matter of fact the atti tude of some of these nurses shows a lack of true concern for others an attribute we thought essential for a true nurse. Ed). C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm LAST WEEK the same strange “sickness” t hat removed 50 per cent of the Hospital Authority’s nursing staff from their stations,s ent Water and Sewerage Corporation employ ees seeking bed rest. B oth groups described their malaise as a “sick-out”, but as Hospital Authority managing director Herbert Brown told Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall, he knows of “no outbreak of any epidemic or other contagious illness at anyo f the public hospital facilities that would explain the widespread illness among the nurs e s employed at the various facilities.” “The low levels of attendance have no precedence during the period for which I have held the position of managing director of the Authority,” he said. M r Brown made this statement in an affidavit in support of an Originating Summons andI nterlocutory Injunction filed in the Supreme Court to order the nurses back to work or face c ontempt charges. If they defy the court order they could be committed to prison and union funds could be “subject to sequestration” simply put, the court could separate the union from its bank account. The same can happen to a ny person, or persons who encourage the nurses to continue in their “sickness.” Such persons c an also be imprisoned, fined or have their assets seized. T his court order was not necessary in the case of Water and Sewerage (WSC who probably saw the handwriting on the wall for them if they put any further financial strainon an already crippled corporation. H owever, last week WSC employees claimed to have caught the “sickness” bug because of a d elay in contract negotiations. They also took to their beds because they were upset by what t hey called Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham’s “unfavourable remarks” about them in the House of Assembly. The Prime Minister had announced that there would be no civil service salary increases this year because of the precarious position of the country’s economy. He had to hold the linew herever he could so as not to collapse the nation. In the House, Prime Minister Ingraham said he was astounded to hear that WSC workersw ould be asking for salary increases considering the financial straits facing their corporation. H e said the only way to raise salaries at WSC was to reduce costs. This ominous statement should have been enough to send any thinking person to their bed, especially those at WSC who know the corporation’s over staffing prob l ems. WSC has many problems among them a bout 5 million imperial gallons of water lost daily through leaks, theft or meter inaccurac ies; water quality difficulties; the expense and unreliability of barging water from Andros; reduced revenue and heavy staffing. To cut cost in any one of these areas means a tremendous outlay of funds the quickest and cheapestr oute to take would be staff layoffs. In the House on Monday State Minister for t he Environment Phenton Neymour painted a very grim picture of the staffing position at the corporation. Mr Neymour said that like other government corporations it is well known that WSC is o ver staffed, and has “highly competitive remuneration and compensation packages.” He saidt hat corporate business plans prepared within the last 10 years had recommended that staff be r educed by more than 25 per cent. He said that to date these “recommended reductions have not been made.” Despite this he encouraged management and staff to concentrate on becoming more effic ient and productive. The emphasis, he said, must now be on reduced expenses, increased r evenues, and the creation of an environment “where customers are satisfied, and all can enjoy a decent quality of life.” “It remains government’s position,” he said, “to undertake compensation considerations when the economy and budget can better afford such increases. In the face of all of the chronic d eficiencies of the corporation, staff employment has been safeguarded.” I t would seem that government has been most generous in safeguarding the jobs of more t han 25 per cent excess staff. However, if this staff do not try to assist the corporation to get costs down by other means, then they had better sit down and cast lots as to who among them will have to walk the redundancy plank. “I implore staff to impose a level of relativity, realism, rational and unselfish thought int heir dealings with the corporation and the Gov ernment, with respect to compensation matters,” said Mr Neymour. And if those who walked off the job with that silly sick excuseh ave any sense they will heed Mr Neymour’s warning. If they don’t make themselves essential w orkers they will soon be seeing those pink slips and they will only have themselves to blame. It is then that they will really understand the consequences of a sick-out. A message to nurses from a nurse! LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net ‘Sick-out’ becomes contagious Competent people needed to chart rough waters ahead EDITOR, The Tribune. The Opposition displayed complete contempt for the police when they prevented an officer from carrying out his duty in the House last Wednesday. Not only did they defy the Speaker, but they rendered the policeman impotent in a very public and humiliating way, and put themselves above the law. What’s even more shocking is the former national security minister took part in the debacle. If the Opposition wanted to talk about the very sad death of a 15 year old in prison, they should have called a press conference after it became clear both sides wouldn’t give consent to sideline the Budget exercise. They did not need the protection of Parliamentary privilege to say what they had to say. If they’re clever, they can raise the matter when they speak in the Budget debate. Or, they can put it on the agenda to deal with at a later date. The whole episode was ridicu lous and there are better ways to score political brownie points. If the opposition can do their own thing and thumb their nose at authority, why shouldn’t the public? Their behaviour typifies the tragedy of the Bahamas. No wonder we live in a lawless society. ATHENA DAMIANOS Nassau, June 8, 2009 Opposition displayed complete contempt for the police

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n B y MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@ tribunemedia.net N URSES accepted the d eferment of their pay rise and health insurance plan before taking industrial action, according to an affidavit supplied to the Supreme Court. P ublic Hospitals Authority (PHA Herbert Brown submittedr ecords to the courts showing how the Bahamas Nurses U nion (BNU in January about how the drastic downturn in the econ-o my could affect the terms of their 2006 industrial agreem ent. The nurses were then asked by Minister of HealthD r Hubert Minnis in April to consider alternative o ptions for healthcare such as care from government consultants without addi-t ional costs and access to separate facilities for treatment in privacy. When Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham made hisb udget communication on May 27 and explained that the country’s revenue short-f all was in excess of $260 million, the BNU is reported to h ave agreed to delay the new health insurance plan and four per cent salary increase. A ccording to the affidavit, BNU president Cleola H amilton told the press: “If you look around you have to be reasonable. You don’tw ant to take the country places that you know the country can’t go right now. So you have to be reason able in your thinking.” B ut the following day at a meeting with the Minister of Health and public health nurses, the union threatened to take industrial action if nurses’ needs were not met. Nurses demanded the paym ent of the group health insurance plan or the pay r ise, and explained the extent of their hardships: a lack of r espect from government, the need to work several jobs to make ends meet and ther isks they face in the healthcare system. When their demands were n ot met around 50 per cent of public health nurses across t he country took action. More than half of staff scheduled to work atP rincess Margaret Hospital called in sick last Monday, a s well as a significant number of nurses at the Rand Memorial Hospital inF reeport, the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre and v arious public health clinics. And several nurses continued the sick-out for the ninthd ay yesterday, as around 200 New Providence nurses attending a BNU meeting on Monday told the union president they are still ‘sick’ despite the government’s injunction demanding theyr eturn to work. But not all nurses are supportive of the industrial action. A nurse who does not w ant to be named told T he Tribune : “It is crystal clear to me that (there isc al agenda, and the other nurses are following behind l ike lambs to the slaughter! “Anyone with a brain can see the economic situationt hat the entire world is in! What a time to make a demand for something that may be extremely important to everyone, but least of allt o us nurses?” The nurse argued that h ealthcare professionals are in a better position than most t o receive treatment as doctors will not keep them waiting or charge them for ser-v ices, and she said they should be grateful to still be employed in such dire eco-n omic times. Ms Hamilton was unavaila ble for comment yesterday, but president of the Nurses Association Rosemarie Joseyp ledged her support for the ‘sick’ nurses and the die-hard a ttitude they displayed on Monday night. She said: “It was awesome. T he nurses are really hurting and I with the public c ould realise why it’s so important for us to get the insurance. I think people are under the mistaken impression that they don’t understand the economic problems. “They understand it very well, but they are irate,b ecause of the way they were disrespected and dismissed as if they are of no importance. “They found money for e veryone else except the nurses. “And it’s sad to even see the nurses are threatenedw ith an injunction when they are just fighting for a basic right.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009, PAGE 5 Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort @ Offshore Island. Invites applications for the positions of: T RAINEE ENGINEER E LECTRICIANS PLUMBERS CAPENTERS MASONS TILE LAYERS PAINTERS BOAT CAPTAINS DIVE MASTERSApplicants should satisfy the Company with proof of n B y PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net A PLP chairmanship hopeful h as come out to defend Senator Jerome Fitzgerald in his bid to represent the people of Marathon, The Tribune can reveal. P LP activist Ricardo Smith, a former party council member for Marathon, said he considers the comments made by former M arathon chairman Neil Percentie to be an underhanded attack against all PLP members of parliament who do not live in the constituency which they were electedt o represent. “This was an attack on every MP, our leader Perry Christie, the chairman Glenys Hanna-Martin, O bie Wilchcombe etc, because I would wager that 90 per cent of the members of parliament do not live in their various constituencies.” O n Sunday evening, Mr Percentie issued a statement exclusively to The Tribune questioning how Mr Fitzgerald could already b e listed on the PLP’s website as the candidate for the Marathon c onstituency despite the fact that the candidate’s committee has yett o meet. However, The Tribune unders tands that Mr Fitzgerald’s photo was accidentally placed on myplp.com in the space marked “The Constituency of Marathon.” Mr Fitzgerald’s name was reporte dly mistakenly linked to that part of the website from his contribu-t ions to the Senate which are archived on myplp.com for easy p ublic access. Despite this error, however, Mr Smith said the point still remains – that there are persons vying for positions and seats in the party, some of which are currently filled by sitting members of parliament. But what he (Mr Percentie doing is nitpicking. It is my hope that we will allow all persons who want to vie for w hatever position to have their fair chance, but our focus must remain on defeating the current representative for Marathon, Earl Deveaux. That’s what this is all a bout,” he said. Mr Smith refused to address r eports that he will be challenging Mrs Hanna-Martin at the upcomi ng National Convention for the post of National Chairman of the PLP. PLP chairmanship hopeful defendsS enator’s bid for Marathon Nurses ‘accepted’ deferment of pay rise, health insurance Affidavit says the union was warned before taking action To have your say on this or any o ther issue, email T he Tribune at:letters@tribunemedia.net o r deliver your letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street, P .O. Box N-3207 DR HUBERT MINNIS ‘ asked the n urses to consider alternative options’.

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O N THEbanks of the St Lawrence River, at the very spot where the city of Montreal was founded over threec enturies ago, stands a remarkable structure built in 1992 atop the remains of a Victorian office building. T he Museum of Archaeolog y and History entombs the city's origins on the site of an earlier Iroquois settlement known as Hochelaga. This archeologicalc rypt preserves the remains of Montreal's history from every settlement period in situ. And more than 350,000 people visit t his amazing time capsule every y ear. Pointe a Calliere is the heart of the architectural and cultural heritage that is Old Montreal, ad istrict energized by fine restaurants, outdoor cafes and peoplef illed plazas. And this restored historic zone lies at the centre of a booming, cosmopolitan city ranked as one of the world's best places to live or visit. N oted American architect Hugh Newell Johnson once said that “When you look at a city, it's like reading the hopes, aspir ations and pride of everyone who built it.” Put another way by Bahamian architect Pat Rahming, every city requires a dream recorded in a vision. " For the city to belong to the community, the vision must have b een their inspiration as they worked to create it," Rahming wrote in a recent article. "Unfortunately, there appears not to have emerged a dream ofa post-independent Bahamas. Rather, for 30-odd years, plans have been proposed based upon visions by foreign consultants." T he city of Nassau stretches from Bay Street to Wulff Road and from the Eastern Parade to the long-vanished Western Parade, where the British Colo-n ial Hilton now stands. It's descent into an ugly, trafficchoked ruin has been variously a ttributed to the removal of the public market, the development of large beachfront hotels, and the construction of outlying s hopping malls. C ynics have also laid much of the blame on the long-running political vendetta between a predominantly black government a nd the mostly white merchant princes who once held sway over Bay Street. But this is a gross simplification of the current reali ty, which is perhaps best chara cterised by the Finlayson family's ownership of Solomon's Mines. Early efforts to arrest the capi tal's decline were led by the late Norman Solomon, who invited the respected, Maryland-based Rouse Corporation to propose i deas in the 1980s. But Solomon and his associates did not have enough political clout at the time to get beyond first base. So they resorted to lobbying for tax exemptions on high-end goods to help spur downtown spending and investment. Once duty-free legislation had b een passed, the business community and the Ministry of Tourism set up the Nassau Tourism Development Board in1 995. At about the same time, the government was mulling al and use plan for New Providence, and Canadian consultants p roduced a report on infrastructural needs and costs. But like so much else, that project was shelved, postponing all the hard choices. D uring the late 90s, the NTDB enjoyed some success.W orkshops were held, sidewalks rebuilt, street lights installed, a w elcome centre was added to the cruise port, and many downtown properties were upgraded. Perhaps the most significant event was the $90 million restoration of the British Colonial Hotel. Opened in 1923 as the city's toni e st resort, this massive structure on the most historic site in town h ad been reduced to a few rooms operating as a downmarket inn u ntil new owners acquired it in 1997. But some leaders saw that marketing was not the only or even the major issue. Real c hange required the input of all public and private stakeholders t o redefine a vision for the city of Nassau, as well as to recreate the p hysical product. It was also realised that the regular pro cessing of huge numbers of disgusted cruise visitors was bound to affect the performance of our number one industry. In fact, studies confirmed that almost half of all hotel visitors never went downtown, while c ruise visitors spent only a fraction of their time and money in Nassau an appalling rate of return from the country's chief economic activity. So the NTDB sought to focus government attention on this alarming state of affairs. It's mission was to tip-toe through polit ical minefields to promote a tourism product that was "clean, safe, uniquely Bahamian and provided value for money", as NTDB spokesman Frank Comi to put it. From all accounts, it was as difficult a task as steer ing the Titanic away from an iceberg collision. Nassau as we know it today was largely built during the Great Depression, with revenues earned from bootlegging. And a major overhaul of the town’s decrepit infrastructure along with restoration of its historic districts are long overdue. But experts have complained for years that little can be done until the con tainer port is relocated. Well, that is about to happen. Dredging of the harbour to e xpand the cruise port will begin within weeks and some of the spoil will be used to add 40 acres to Arawak Cay's existing 70 acres. Created when the harbour was dredged back in the 1960s, this artificial island is already occupied by a container terminal. It also handles dry bulk carg oes like sand, cement, steel and aggregates, as well as potable water shipped from Andros. W hen the current dredging finishes in the fall, construction o f the new port will begin on land leased from the government. In addition to expanded c ontainer and dry bulk terminals, the cay will feature a 5.5-acre f erry terminal for tour boats, the Fiesta Mail and Bahamas Fer-r ies, while most inter-island vessels will stay at Potters Cay. T he Arawak Cay Port Development Company a coalition of shipping inter-e sts will also build a bridge from the western extension ofA rawak Cay to connect with the Bethel Avenue road extension. C ontainers will be trucked along this route to a new 15-acre warehouse depot at Gladstone Road. A public offering is planned for the new port (together with a $ 15 million preference share issue), and the government willa cquire a 20 per cent stake in the company. Individual shareholdi ngs will be restricted to an upper limit of 15 per cent, according to a memorandum of understanding between the developers and the government. T otal costs are put at under $60 million with a rate of return o f more than 12 per cent, and if all goes as scheduled, the port w ill be out of the downtown area some time next year, presenting an unprecedented opportunity to launch the revitalisation process in earnest. As you might e xpect, a lot of ducks are being moved into place now to achieve t his. A key player is the newly-cre a ted Downtown Nassau Partnership. This is the public-pri vate group that took over from the Downtown Revitalisation Committee, which was preceded by the Nassau Economic Development Commission, that was gestated by the NTDB, which developed from an initiative spearheaded by the DutyFree Promotion Board. TheD NP itself will eventually be supplanted by a new city author ity created by legislation. Co-chaired by Tourism Director-General Vernice Walkine and NTDB chief Charles Klonaris, the Partnership is managed by Bahamian Vaughan Roberts, a former finance direc tor at Baha Mar who has spent most of his career in the United States. Dave Feehan, of the International Downtown Assoc iation, and Brad Segal, of the US-based Progressive Urban Management Associates, have been hired as consultants. M eanwhile, veteran Bahamia n architect Jackson Burnside has been commissioned to prepare a master plan for the initial phase of the improvements. This w ill feature an expansion of Woods Rogers’ Wharf, which will be turned into a waterfront pedestrian promenade; cons truction of the new straw mark et; and hopefully lots of cultural activities. But there are other less official efforts underway that l ook promising. One of these is called Take Initiative Nassau (http://www.tin242.com ised by an enthusiastic grad stud ent named Alastair Knowles. Tough Call attended the inaugural meeting last week at the Bahamas National Trust headquarters on Village Road. Knowles simply decided he had a responsibility as a citizen to help with the Nassau redevelopment: "I determined that it w as critical to educate Bahamians on the need for people to work together with the DNP to help better the chances of Nas-s au reaching its full potential. Vaughn Roberts has a trulyd aunting task before him and he’ll need all the help he can g et." At last week's meeting, Roberts made the point that revitalisation can't be achieved unless ordinary Bahamians takeo wnership of the process. He invited artists to consider occu-p ying vacant spaces and to decorate derelict buildings. He u rged retailers to work at creating a better business mix, and said taxi drivers shouldn't be parking all day on Bay Street, while straw vendors would have to come to terms with the prod uct they were offering. " The average citizen should take advantage of the opportun ities that will be generated by a new wave of ideas, and our p oliticians should focus on the greater good and make this a national priority. There are tremendous economic benefits not only for downtown property o wners but for over the hill too. This recession will help bring a bout change and we will have an opportunity to write history a nd create new legacies." I n Pat Rahming's words, "The city is a complex thing. It is a place where people meet, live, shop, and find recreation, entertainment and cultur al fulfillment...It is more than the c ommerce of the time, more than the cleanness of the streets or the number of parking spaces. It is where the community meets to celebrate special occasions." Ever since the 1960s, we have spent millions of dollars on study after study by both local and foreign experts advising us to clean up our act, preserve what's left of our history, protect our environment and salvage our cultural heritage. And every year we ignore this costly advice. So what, in the end, will our grandchildren inherit from us? Will we ever be able to put our history on show as the city of Montreal and countless others have done so successfully? The past is a precious resource that we discard at our peril. The future is in our hands today. What do you think? Send comments to larry@tribunemedia.net Or visit www.bahamapundit.com C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE LifeChoicesATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE CO.LTD. 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Robin RobertsU ROLOGY TheTruths&MythsofCircumcision Dr.RobinRobertsJuly 16 Womens Health Dr.MadeleneSawyerAugust 20 Arthritis Dr.Vincent NwosaSeptember 09Obesity in Children Dr.Brian HumblestoneShould we CUT IT OFF?TheTruths&MythsofCircumcision Another new dawn for the revitalisation of Nassau T T h h e e A A r r a a w w a a k k C C a a y y P P o o r r t t D D e e v v e e l l o o p p m m e e n n t t C C o o m m p p a a n n y y a a c c o o a a l l i i t t i i o o n n o o f f s s h h i i p p p p i i n n g g i i n n t t e e r r e e s s t t s s w w i i l l l l a a l l s s o o b b u u i i l l d d a a b b r r i i d d g g e e f f r r o o m m t t h h e e w w e e s s t t e e r r n n e e x x t t e e n n s s i i o o n n o o f f A A r r a a w w a a k k C C a a y y t t o o c c o o n n n n e e c c t t w w i i t t h h t t h h e e B B e e t t h h e e l l A A v v e e n n u u e e r r o o a a d d e e x x t t e e n n s s i i o o n n . .

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n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net TO “BRING CLOSURE”to a p roblem dating back to the May 2007 election, the government has permitted 25 unqualified persons to become prison officers and agreed to offer promotions to people who did not meet the necessary criteria, the Minister of National Security stated. Tommy Turnquest claimed this decisive action” had to be taken after the former PLP government took steps to recruit unqualified candidates to the prison service in 2005 and 2006 when it was “well known that they did not have the required post qualifications to be recruited”. He said the former government a dvised another group that they were to be promoted though they lacked the relevant qualifications and despite the fact that the Public Service Commission (PSC ratified the move. Contributing to the 2009/2010 b udget debate, Tommy Turnquest s aid that his ministry had been preoccupied by “serious and vexinghuman r esources problems” in r ecent years, including the “long standing problem at Her Majesty’s Prisons resulting from a ppointments and promotions well outside of the rules and regulations of the Public Serv ice.” “We understood that the position in which these unfortunate pers ons at the prison found t hemselves was not of their making, but was a result of what appeared to be an effort to circumvent the rules and regula-t ions of the public service. “Many questions have been asked by many persons, including in this House, as to when these m atters would be brought to clos ure. I am now happy to report that this government has taken the decisive action required to bring these m atters to closure,” said Mr Turn quest. Of the persons in the 2005 and 2006 squads of Her Majesty’s Prisons, 41 prison recruits did not meet the requis ite qualifications. Of t his number, 25 have been issued letters of appointment to prison officers, and should be p aid by the end of this month. Of the remaining number, two have been interdicted, three a re suspected of tampering with their certificates, and two have yet to produce their birth c ertificates. The remaining nine persons are still with the Public Service Commission and should be concluded by July 1, 2009,” he said. T he minister said that where it is required, those confirmed “will be encouraged” to obtain the necessary qualifications to permit them t o be further promoted in the syst em. Meanwhile, the ministry has taken steps to ensure that “for the f uture, everyone recruited to prison service has the required qualificat ions.” Mr Turnquest said a “grandfathering policy” has been implemented towards those people witho ut the requisite qualifications who w ere advised they were to be promoted, “to permit them to be promoted on the basis of good and effective service to the prison over t he years.” He said these people were informed they would be promoted “on the eve of the 2007 general e lection.” “The PSC has agreed in principle that the grandfathering policy will be accepted and implemented i n this case, but it is not to establish a precedent. Once financial clearance is in place, all officers will be officially notified of their promotion,” he added. A ttempts to reach Fred Mitchell, former minister with responsibility for the public service, for comment yesterday were unsuccessful as he w as said to be off the island. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009, PAGE 7 Unqualified persons allowed to become prison officers TWO new Court of Appeal justices will take their places at the bench in the coming weeks, the Attorney General's Office announced. Under Article 99 of the Constitution, Sir George N ewman has been appointed a non-resident Justice of the Court of Appeal and Justice Stanley John has been a ppointed a resident Justice of Appeal. Sir George's appointment comes into effect on June, 1 5 while Justice John's takes effect on July 1, a statement by the AG's office said. Sir George was appointed a judge of the High Court of England and Wales in May, 1995. He retired from that court on October 1, 2007 after serving more than 12 years. Before becoming a judge of the High Court, Sir G eorge practiced as a barrister. He was called to the bar in 1965 and was appointed Q ueen’s Counsel in 1981. His practice as a barrister included many appearances before the Privy Council in a wide variety of cases. Sir George was among the judges nominated to sit on the Administrative Court and the Special Immigration Appeals Commission (SIAC surer of the Honourable Society of the Middle Temple. He was appointed chair of the Security Vetting A ppeals Panel of the United Kingdom in February 2009. J ustice John is a citizen of Trinidad and Tobago and served as a justice of the Court of Appeal in that count ry from July, 2002 until June, 2009. The Trinidadian press reported that he resigned from this post after making several stinging criticisms of Trinidad's judicial system. Justice John was called to the Bar of England and Wales as a member of the Honourable Society of Lin coln’s Inn in July, 1972. He served in private practice in T rinidad from 1972 to 1994. In 1994, Justice John was appointed a Puisne Judge o f the High Court of Justice of Trinidad and Tobago. It has also been announced that current Court of A ppeal judge, Justice Emanuel Osadebay, will demit office as a Justice of Appeal at the end of this month. New Court of Appeal justices are appointed Minister says promotions also offered to people who did not meet criteria Tommy Turnquest

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HISTORY was made at St A ndrew’s School this year, w ith the graduating class of 2009 obtaining the best acad emic results ever at the school since the introduction of the BGCSE exams 16y ears ago. Of 68 students, 88 per cent a chieved A-C passes, 15 received five or more As. The class also boasted thet op student in the Bahamas Brolin Xavier, who achieved 1 0 ‘A’ passes. Speaking at last week’s graduation ceremony, StA ndrew’s secondary school principal Frank Coyle said that this class “is an excellent e xample of how we at St Andrew’s continue to try to r aise the educational bar here in the Bahamas.” Success H e credited the solid foundation the students obtained during the primary years pro-g ramme and the school’s “vastly improved” middle s chool programme with the success of this year’s graduating class. When we read in the national press about the ‘D+’ n ational average, this class thought we single-handedly brought it up from a ‘D’ no,b ut we must remember that in the ‘not so good old days’ o nly a select few took the GCE, over 90 per cent of the students here in the Bahamasd id not get the opportunity to sit any GCE , zero passes, therefore if you had worked out the national average in those ‘not so good old days’ t he national average would have been close to ‘U’, u nclassified,” he said. “If we entered only 15, the average pass for St Andrew’sw ould have been ‘A’, if we had entered only 45 we w ould have had 100 per cent A-C, but no, we enter every student, all 68.” M r Coyle said the school’s head boy and head girl were recognised at Government House for having GPAs of 4.0. W hile the class of 2009 were breaking academic records they were also break-i ng sporting records in softball, soccer, volleyball and swimming, he said. T he students were also very actively involved in s chool productions, music and theatre, putting on “Alice in Wonderland”, Mid-Summers Night Dream” and “Animal Farm” to name a few. Mr Coyle expressed his feeling of honour and pridet o be presiding over the grad uation ceremony and advised the students to always keep their “eyes on the prize” in life. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE St Andrew’s 2009 class has ‘best ever’ BGCSE results ST ANDREW’S SCHOOL’S graduating class of 2009. 88 per cent of students achieve A-Cpasses

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009, PAGE 9 'VO 4VNNFS $BNQ7LUHGRIWKHDPH 2OG%RULQJXPPHU 6FKRRO" 7 U\RPHWKLQJ 1 HZt&UHDWLY$ FWLYLWLHV,QFOXGH $UWVt&UDIWV'UDZLQJtDLQWLQJ0 XVLFt'UDPD /HVVRQV 6 ZLPPLQJDQG 6SRUWV &$//:$1' 5(6(59(<285 %()25(,7/$7( RU(PDLOZHVWPRRU#KRWPDLOFRP A NEW horizon will be met as Adventures Unlimited Bahamas and J erome Thompson attempt to circumnavigate New Providence and Paradise Island on Saturday, July 11. I f successful, Mr Thompson will be the first visually disabled person to be recorded accomplishing this feat in the Bahamas. T he venture is scheduled to begin at 10am at Hurricane Hole Marina,l ocated on Paradise Island, with a brief pass-by at noon of the J unkanoo Summer Festival on Woodes Rodgers Wharf. It will end at Hurricane Hole Marina at approximately 3pm, followed immediately by an official ceremony. M r Thompson and his team have invited the public to witness the historic moment. This event will also b e the launch of Adventures Unlimited Bahamas, a non-profit organisation licensed on January 8, 2009. This non-profit entity has as its g oal to promote, encourage and support persons with disabilities in pursuits of various endeavors that might seem to be impossible. July’s venture is a solo boat trip w hich is being undertaken by Mr Thompson, the organisation’s president and founder. As a blind person, Mr Thompson is endeavoring to s howcase that persons with disabilities in the Bahamas, no matter what their limitations, can rise to and conquer any challenge once determineda nd committed. Mr Thompson said he was i nspired by persons worldwide who have different types of disabilities a nd who have accomplished great endeavors in spite of their various limitations. Persons of any category of disability in the Bahamas will be assist-e d by the organisation in respect to accomplishing various projects. Mr Thompson’s history-making venture is supported by the Bahamas M inistry of Tourism and Aviation, the Bahamas National Council for Disability, Sir Durward Knowles and the Independence Celebration Comm ittee. Mr Thompson acknowledges his attempt would not be possible without the assistance given to him by his trainer, Captain Glen Bain,H arbour Bay Marina dock master Lundy Robinson, meteorologistG reg Thompson and businessman Peter Roker. Additionally, the vent ure received sponsorship from Hurricane Hole Marina, the Bank of the Bahamas, Scotiabank (Bahamas Ltd, Robin Hood Enterprises Ltd, Lil Giant Discount Lumber andB uilding Supplies and Esso Bargain City Service Station. JEROME THOMPSON is pictured piloting a vessel during a training session w ith Captain Glen Bain. Jerome Thompson to make landmark voyage for the disabled n By GLADSTONE THURSTON THE Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation has commenced revitalisation of its 1,500-acre satellite farms in North Andros with the initial focus on livestock. This will be extended to incorporate fruit trees while expanding private fruit tree nurseries, BAIC executive chairman Edison Key told members of the House of Assembly last week. He was speaking during the debate on the government’s $1.7 billion budget for fiscal year 2009/2010 which begins July 1. BAIC is mandated to stimulate, facilitate and encourage agriculture development in the Bahamas, and expand and c reate opportunities for Bahamians to p articipate in the economic development o f the country. “Especially during this economic downturn,” said Mr Key, “BAIC’s mandate has become more vital to stimulate employment and the economy. “To this end BAIC has embarked on a number of initiatives focusing on the expansion of agriculture production, greater utilisation of BAIC’s land portfolio, business advisory services, and the expansion of craft centres and craft training.” Already BAIC has launched the North Andros Agricultural Initiatives Project, a major component of which is the utilisation of land that has already been cleared and not in full production. This includes the acquisition of 561 acres in the vicinity of the San Andros airport from Kerzner International. “Funding for this is in place and it is anticipated that this matter will be resolved in short order,” said Mr Key. “Applications for this prime agriculture land were over subscribed and the surveying and issuing of leases are a matter of priority for BAIC.” Another project that forms a part of this initiative is the 800acre former Morgan Farms in which BAIC has a 40 per cent lease interest. It is BAIC’s intention to establish a nursery and other related activities on a portion of this and lease 300 acres to vegetable producers Lucayan Tropical. “It is BAIC’s view that the presence of Lucayan Tropical in North Andros as a domestic investor will auger very well for the further development of agriculture,” he said. It will create jobs, enhance marketing of agriculture products from North Andros, add value to agriculture products, enhance technical skills, improve methods of farming, and save on foreign exchange, he said. Applications are still being received from Bahamians interested in leasing land in the proposed Andros agro-industrial park. “Therefore, we will continue to nurture this desire to establish operations in Andros through our promotional activities, with emphasis on agro processing and the production of ornamental plants.” BAIC EXECUTIVE c hairman Edison Key Andros satellite farms revitalised

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009, PAGE 11 THE COLLEGE OFTHE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bsSCHOOL OF BUSINESSORIENTATION AND ADVISEMENT FOR FALL SEMESTER 2009ORIENTATION AND ADVISEMENT WILL TAKE PLACE FRIDAY, JUNE 19, 2009 FROM 9 AM TO 1 PM IN ROOMS B-5 AND B-6 FOR THE FOLLOWING STUDENTS ACCEPTED IN THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS (BBA GRAMMES: 1STUDENTS WITH EARLY ACCEPTANCE 2STUDENTS WHO HAVE COMPLETED COLLEGE PREP 3STUDENTS WHO HAVE COMPLETED THE UPGRADING PROGRAM (CEES ALL STUDENTS SHOULD BRING COPIES OF ACCEPTANCE LETTERS, COMPLETION LETTERS AND RELEVANT EXAM RESULTS SUCH AS THE BGCSE. public.” T he week-long sick out meant hospitals had a severely reduced capacity to provide emergency services in the Accid ent and Emergency department, including significant delays in patients receiving medical attention, Mr Brown said. A nd as the Princess Margaret Hospital operated on a skeleton staff the hospital was forced to close surgical, paediatric and m edical clinics on Monday and Tuesday last week. All surgeries, except emergency surgical procedures, were cancelled and there was ar eduction of dialysis treatment for patients with kidney failure to half their normal levels throughout the week. H owever nurses insist they are still “sick” as they refuse to a ccept any alteration to the i ndustrial agreement’s promise o f a group medical insurance plan despite the economic d ownturn. Minister of Health Dr H ubert Minnis explained the budget would not allow forn urses four per cent pay rise or h ealth insurance scheme this f iscal year and that implementi ng the insurance would require nurses to take a pay cut of $ 41.69. But a nurse at the South B each Health Centre said she would gladly make the sacrifice rather than continue to pay $500 per month for medicali nsurance. She said: “I’d be happy to take the cut, that’s nothing compared to what I pay. B ecause I am a woman our insurance is high, and I am a nurse so our insurance is more than the general population.” Nurses Association president Rosemarie Josey said all nurses f ace high medical insurance fees because they are at high risk, and several nurses who had invested in failed company Clico (Bahamasn ow even more vulnerable. Mrs Josey said: “Nurses are i njured on the job and verbally and physically abused, and n urses feel hurt because they were under the impression Dr Minnis really cared, and they were very disappointed because his message is that they don’tu nderstand what’s going on, when all they wanted was some reassurance; a date when they will get the insurance. If we fall sick now we are treated just like a public patient. The only benefit we get is what they would give to any g overnment worker. “There is no special room in the hospital, we just lay on the same bed next to the other patients. “If the government could f ind money for the police, and to improve their insurance, why do the nurses still not have any insurance at all?” Sandilands Rehabilitation C entre nurse Lakerah Rolle said: “The nature of our jobm eans we are exposed to chem icals, carcinogens and radioact ivity, back strains from lifting, and for the H1N1 virus scare and SARS, nurses are at the entry point for these diseases, we are the first to see anyp atient. “We understand that it is the n ature of the job, but we feel as though we shouldn’t have to w orry about paying for this medical expense.” The South Beach Health Centre nurse added: “What we have to go through now for this h ealth insurance is ridiculous. “I have been a nurse for sev e n years and I cannot see myself working for the governm ent much longer because it is so discouraging. “I wouldn’t encourage an animal on the road to do nursing.” (FOR MORE ON THIS S TORY, SEE PAGE 5). Nurses call in sick for a ninth day F ROM page one Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who arem aking news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an a war d. I f so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. P RINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL o perated on a skeleton staff.

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCALNEWS PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE *29(510(17,&( orate the family’s claims. " We have to see what the damages are and hope fully these people will understand the error of their ways and come to the table instead of thrashing this out in the courts," he said. Lynera Saunders died on June 5, two hours after she was taken to hospital for treatment. Police said in their initial report that the child "may have been molested" and that they were questioning several persons in connection with the matter. The news sparked national outrage and calls for a massive march to parliament to push for reform of child protection laws. Last week, an angry mob gathered in Bank Lane after rumours circulated that a suspect was to be charged in connection with the baby’s death. No one was charged, and the police later said three persons were questioned but were later released. O n June 10, the infant's family rejected the alle gations of molestation. Mr Moss explained that the child had been prescribed anti-biotics which led to diarrhoea. This condition caused diaper rash and chafing which hospital staff could have confused for signs of molestation, he said. A ccording to Mr Moss and Police Commissioner Reginald Ferguson, a death certificate lists the cause o f death as respiratory failure. A complete pathologist report is expected within six w eeks, police said. protecting is of great concern to all. “The prime minister is very right when he says that many people in our nation have been closing their eyes, refusing to accept that this can happen in their homes, in schools, in the community, to their children. Our prime minister is very right when he speaks of the impact (of delay that victims have to endure in order to get justice,” she said. On an average, Dr DeanPatterson said, victims have to wait four, five, even six years before their case reaches the Supreme Court. “(There was a dent where a 10 year old had to wait for her case to reach court until she was 16 years old and then the perpetrator walked. We can all imagine what she feels about a system that allows this. It is unacceptable that children and victims of sexual assault have to continue to undergo this long drawn-out re-victimisation by a system that appears not to care about their violation,” she said. the police, the Defence Force and the South Andros community failed to turn up any sign of her sons. “I feel like if they were somewhere in the bushes something would have been found. The helicopters and the dogs would have found something, but there was nothing, that’s why I think they were kidnapped,” she told The Tribune . Ms Clarke said she has told her suspicions to the police and was told they would investigate. Although the official police search has been suspended, relatives and members of the community have vowed to keep looking for the boys for at least another couple of days, Ms Clarke said. She said that while her mother and her husband are struggling to cope with the devastating situation, she is attempting to hold up and put on a brave face. Ms Clarke said she still hopes that her two boys will be safely returned to her. Brothers Deangelo and Marcelo disappeared while crabbing in S outh Andros last Tuesday evening. The alarm was raised when the boys did not return to their grandparents’ house after nightfall. Officers from the Kemp’s Bay police station were alerted and joined relatives in their search on Wednesday morning. Local residents and Defence Force officers joined the search, and canine units were flown in from Nassau. D eangelo lives in Andros with his grandparents. Marcelo, who lives in Nassau with his parents, was visiting when the children went miss ing. Anyone who may have any information about the missing brothers should call Crime Stoppers immediately on 328-TIPS (8477 strongly promoted official a wareness of, and coordinat ion on, trafficking issues within the country through mechanisms such as the multiagency Trafficking in PersonsW orking Group, but made “no visible effort to reduce the demand for commercial sex acts, and it did not engage in any other awareness-rais-i ng efforts directed at Bahamian citizens,” the report said. The US State Department a lso found the Bahamas “lacked a comprehensive antit rafficking law for most of the reporting period, faced relevant resource and capacityc onstraints, and confronted multiple competing law e nforcement priorities.” The report pointed out that despite the fact that the Bahamas prohibited all forms of trafficking through its Trafficking in Persons Preventiona nd Suppression Act of 2008 a nd previously enacted laws prohibit trafficking-related offences, the government did not arrest or prosecute any trafficking offenders duringt he reporting period. The report found that in some situations employers coerce migrant or temporary workers legal and illegal to work longer hours, at lower pay, and in conditions not permitted under local labour law by changing thet erms of contracts, withholding travel documents, refusi ng transportation back home, threatening to withdraw the employer-specific ande mployer-held permits, or to turn the employee over to i mmigration. According to the new rating system introduced in this year’s report, the Bahamas ranks as a “Tier 2” country.T his means that while it is not f ully compliant with international standards of fighting the trafficking of persons, it is taking significant steps to remedy this. F or the past three years the Bahamas was included in the report as a ‘Special Case’ due to limited data. During the reporting perio d for the new report, the State Department said, the Bahamian government “enacted comprehensive anti-t rafficking legislation, added skilled personnel to anti-traff icking agencies and offices, consulted with other governments about trafficking issuesa nd assistance, and continued to train government personnel o n trafficking issues.” However, the report points out that the government failed to make noticeable efforts to proactively identi-f y victims among vulnerable p opulations, such as foreign women and girls engaged in illegal prostitution or women and girls intercepted at its borders who may be attempt-i ng to enter the country to engage in illegal prostitution. The US State Department recommends that the government take steps to identify trafficking victims among migrants attempting to enter the Bahamas illegally; investigate, prosecute, and punishs uspected human trafficking offenders; create and implem ent a national trafficking public awareness and prevention programme; and allocater esources for the victim assistance measures mandated by t he new anti-trafficking law.” but were chased by the group. The pursuers then opened fire on Mr Johnson, shooting him a number times in his body. The victim collapsed in the grounds of the Tom "The Bird" Grant Sports and Recreational Complex in the Yellow Elder area and was pronounced dead by EMS officers. The victim's brother was able to escape the area unharmed, police said. According to the head of the Central Detective Unit, Superintendent Elsworth Moss, the victim was on bail fora murder charge dating back to a case in 2006. Up to press time police had not uncovered a motive for the killing but suspect Mr Johnson was targeted by his killers. "We believe they were pretty much targeting him," said Mr Moss, who added that police were still trying to ascertain if the murder was possibly drug or gang related. He could not say if the victim knew his attackers. Police are asking for anyone with information on the murder to contact the police at 919 , 502-9991 , or 328-TIPS . The killing has pushed the country's murder count to an unofficial 34 and comes just days after brothers Matthew and Marvin Armbrister were shot at a nightspot early Saturday morning. Matthew, 23, a former Tribune employee on the pressroom staff, was killed in Dominique's Restaurant on Boyd Road. His 24-year-old brother was left fighting for his life in the Intensive Care Unit at Princess Margaret Hospital. The shootings reportedly came after an altercation b etween the brothers and another man at the restaurant. FROM page two Ber eaved family of five-month-old girl plans to sue over allegations Police probe child sex film F ROM page one F ROM page one F ROM page one Mother’s fears for missing boys Murder victim ‘targeted’ Bahamas fails to fully comply with minimum standards to eliminate human trafficking FROM page one

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I N the continuation of some o f the match-ups expected at the National Open Track and Field Championships, set for June 26-27 at the Thomas A Robinson Track and Field Stadium, the Bahamas Associationof Athletic Associations is focusing on the men’s high jump. Two of the athletes featured are world champion Donald Thomas and reigning national champion Ramon Higgs, who pulled off the upset during the 2008 nationals. D D O O N N A A L L D D T T H H O O M M A A S S Event: High Jump Personal Best: 2.35m/ 7' 7” Season Best: 2.30m/ 7' 6 1/2” Height: 6' 3” (75kg Weight: 165lbs (1.9m D.O.B. July 1st 1984 Age: 25 Hometown: Freeport Grand Bahama Name of College: Auburn University Name of High School: Bishop Michael Eldon College Coach: Henry Rolle, Jerry Clayton Thomas took up the sport in early 2006, having previously played basketball. He cleared 2.22 metres in his first meet, and just months later he finished fourth at the 2006 Commonwealth Games with a 2.23m jump. In the 2007 indoor season he cleared 2.30m for the first time, a nd eventually jumped 2.33m i n March in Fayetteville, Arkansas. In July 2007, he cleared 2.35m on the world record track in Salamanca, Spain. The result was a new personal best and the world season’s best at the time. He then won the World Championships in Osaka, again with a 2.35m jump. He also won gold at the 2007 IAAF World Athletics Final. However, the Olympic competition in 2008 turned out to be a major disappointment for Thomas, who only made 2.20m in the qualifying round and finished 21st overall. R R A A M M O O N N H H I I G G G G S S Event: High Jump Personal Best: 2.21m/ 7' 2” Season Best: 2.21m/ 7' 2” Height: 6'0” (1.71m Weight: 150lbs (80kg D.O.B. January 24th 1991 Age: 18 Hometown: Freeport Grand Bahama Raymond Higgs kept the under-17 triple jump title in the B ahamas, taking over from 2 006 champion Gerard Brown. Higgs third-round 14.76m effort into a -2.0 metres per second headwind, his first of three attempts over 14.5m, gave him h is second gold medal in Provo, a fter setting a new high jump record on day one. With long jump on day three, he could be on course for a rare sweep. Last year, the three-time h igh jump champ of Freeport, G rand Bahama was third in the long jump. In 2009, he set a new Carifta record in the high jump of 2.21m (7'-2” C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009, PAGE 13 Spotlight on Thomas, Higgs face off Ramon Higgs WORLD CHAMPION Donald Thomas (shown below and far right at the Beijing Olympic Games and reigning national champion Ramon Higgs are expected to compete against each other in the men’s high jump at the National Open Track and Field Championships at Thomas A Robinson Track and Field Stadium June 26-27... T T E E N N N N I I S S K K N N O O W W L L E E S S / / B B H H U U P P A A T T H H I I W W I I N N O O P P E E N N E E R R BAHAMIAN Mark Knowles and Mahesh Bhupathi of India won their first round doubles match at the Aegon International in Eastbourne, Great Britain. The duo, seeded number two, pulled off a 4-6, 7-6 (4 10-3 decision over Stephen Huss of Australia and Ross Hutchinson of Great Britain. Knowles and Bhupathi will now go on to play the team of Travis Parrott of the US and Filip Polasek of Slovakia in the quarter-final of the small field of 16 teams. The top seeded team is Lukas Dlouhy of the Czech Republic and Leander Paes of India. They are coming off their triumph as champions of the French Open Grand Slam at Roland Garros. Dlouhy and Paes have moved into third place on the ATP computer rankings with 3,740 points, dropping K nowles and Bhupathi to fourth with 2,535. T he American identical twin brothers of Bob and Mike Bryan are back on top with 5,665, while Daniel Nestor and Nenad Zimonjic, who at one time stood out front, are in second with 5,110. T T R R A A C C K K C C A A C C A A G G E E G G R R O O U U P P T HE US Virgin Islands arrived yesterday as the first of the 20 countries expected to compete in the Central American and Caribbean Age Group Championships that is slated to get underway Thursday at Thomas A Robinson Track and Field Stadium. All of the other countries are expected to arrive today. Additionally, Neville ‘Teddy’ McCook, the IAAF council member and area representative and Victor Lopez were due to arrive yesterday. Accreditation for the championships have already gotten underway at the Games Village at the Nassau Palm Resort and Conference Center. The morning sessions for the multi-event championships are scheduled to get underway at 8:30am with the afternoon sessions starting at 1:30pm. Friday’s morning session starts at 8:30am with the afternoon one at 2pm. T T R R A A C C K K J J U U N N I I O O R R N N A A T T I I O O N N A A L L S S THE Bahamas Association o f Athletic Associations is scheduled to host the National Junior Championships at Thomas A Robinson Track and Field Stadium this weekend. The trials are set to begin at 6pm Friday and continue 1pm Saturday. They will serve as the final trials for team selection for the IAAF World Youth and Jr Pan AmericanC hampionships. SPORTS IN BRIEF T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net WITH a series of cancellations on the schedule of the International Softball Federa tion, the Bahamas will have an opportunity to host a regional tournament featuring the best teams in the English speaking Caribbean. The Bahamas Softball Federation (BSF the English Speaking Caribbean Countries Softball Association Tournament before the year’s end with a tentative date set for October. With a the men’s Central and American and Caribbean Games qualifier cancelled and in search of a venue and the women’s tournament also in jeopardy, the ISF was forced to readjust its schedule. The 7th Pan American Games, set for July 31 in Mara cay, Venezuela, will also serve asa women’s qualifier for the CAC Games, scheduled for December 12 in San Pedro Sula, Honduras. The men’s team remains without a qualifier at this time, therefore their national team plans remain on hold for the moment. Burket Dorsett, president of the Bahamas Softball Federation, said the tournament was created to fill a void for many countries seeking qualification. He said the Bahamas will put its best foot forward to ensure that its past performances at the ESCCSA tournament will be met and perhaps exceeded. The BSF has been asked to revisit and host the ESCCSA tournament. The organising committee of the latter has asked the tournament to have it sanctioned and placed on the calendar, hopefully to serve as a qualifier for either the Pan Am or CAC Games. “We have sent out correspondence to many of the teams in the region and already we have been receiving responses on a very positive note,” he said. “Already we have commitments from Turks Island, Jamaica, Netherlands Antilles, and the Cayman Islands but we are still waiting on commitments from a few others to see if they will take place in the revitalization of this tournament. The last time this tournament was held was in the 1970s and the Bahamas looks to continue this legacy of success.” Dorsett said with a number of countries backing out of regional qualifiers it increases the Bahamas’ chances of making the cut in the case of the women and with the men, a long road of qualification lies ahead. “The BSF has been advised by CONCASA that the host country for both men and women qualifiers have been advised that they can no longer host these qualifying rounds. What they did in the case of the ladies is combine the CAC qualifier with the Pan Am Games. “Because of economic conditions, things have been extremely tough for many South Amer ican countries and throughout the region so some countries have opted not to attend these games,” he said. “In that qualifying round, the first five teams will qualify for the World Championship, then the top eight teams will qualify for the CAC Games. With many countries not attending I think it forces the organising committee of both to restrategise and find another format for teams to find a means to the CAC games and it puts our men in jeopardy with less options before them." n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net WITH more than 60 per cent of their belongings recovered, members of our women’s national volleyball team breathed a sigh of relief, but they will have to wait a little longer before they return home from Bridgetown, Barbados. Yesterday, head coach Joseph “Joe Moe” Smith said they spent a lot of time at one of the police stations identifying i tems from nine bags that were e ventually recovered. Four bags are still missing, so things are looking good,” Smith said. “But in those nine bags that we discovered, none of the expensive items were found. We’re also still missing me and Anishka Rolle’s passport.” Since the robbery of the team’s locker on Friday night at the Garfield Sober National Gymnasium when the Bahamas was playing host Barbados in the second round of the NORCECA 2010 World Championships qualifying round, the Bahamas was set to leave today. But Smith said they won’t leave Barbados until 2pm Thursday. Team manager Lloyd “Ratty” Davis said they are still waiting for the Bahamas Volleyball Federation and some of the players to show some support. “We know they know we are still on the island,” said Davis, who indicated that they haven’t seen anybody since the tournament ended Sunday night. “It’s very embarrassing, but we have to give the police force (in Barbados because they are doing an excellent job in recovering the bags.” Davis noted that the police are questioning a number of persons, but they haven’t charged anybody as yet. In the meantime, Davis said the players are still in high spirits. “Everybody is joking around and laughing and having a good time,” he said. “The only thing left for us to do now is wait until we leave. But we can’t afford to let this keep us down.” Davis said the team was able to accomplish their ultimate goal, which was to qualify for the third round of the 2010 World Championships after beating St Lucia in the playoffs. EVE McLeod and Lia Monc ur celebrated their ‘top swimmers’ day at Custom Aquatics Limited. F our of the swim school’s students, Kehli and Kristin Lewis Johnson (not shown reached their ‘fish’ level and all four are just five years old. ‘Fish’ can swim a correct freestyle with side breathing, do racing dives, deep dive to six feet, swim overarm backstroke and even snorkel with mast fins and snorkel breathing. Top all round swimmer is K yla Basden who, at age ten, is already a medley swimmer and recently won three firsts at h er Xavier’s swim meet. Most improved went to her sister Khara Basden and fiveyear-old Cainan Tucker. Finishing the awards list was ‘instant swimmer’ Vance Wheaton who, at three years old, learned to swim independently in less than 10 days. Custom Aquatics (in its 15th year) and Fran Young Doyle offers private, semi-private and custom group lessons in most watersports. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE op swimmers’ day at Custom Aquatics LIA Moncur (left Jack McLeod Eve McLeod LIA Moncur and Eve McLeod make a splash... Bahamas to host softball tourney in October Police recover more than 60 per cent of team’s belongings

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n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net C hristening the new track at the Olympic Stadium in Berlin, Germany, Sunday, Chris “Fireman” Brown surged to the top of the men’s 400m standings for the IAAF World Athletics Tour. The tour features a maximum of 25 IAAF Permit Meetings divided into the 1) Golden League Meetings and Super Grand Prix Meetings, and 2) G rand Prix Meetings. S macked around the 12th I AAF World Championships in Berlin August 15-23, the event is set to culminate with the IAAF/VTB Bank World Athletics Final in Thessaloniki, Greece, slated for September 12-13. Only a limited amount of athletes will be allowed to compete based on their overall positions in their respective events in the series of meets in Europe. Prize money for the World Athletics Final will range from $30,000 for first place to $2,000 for eighth place. In those events where the field will be extended to 12, those finishing 9th to 12th will each collect $1,000. Brown, the 30-year-old Eleuthera native, is one of five male contenders, along with the five females, who are in the run ning for the Golden League Jackpot of $1 million in the six meets after his victory in Berlin. Competing in his third meet for the year, Brown also surged to the top of the men’s 400m standings for the World Athletics Tour in a two-way tie with Gary Kikaya of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Both have accumulated a total of 31 points. Grand Bahamian Michael Mathieu, coming off his third place finish at the meet in Berlin, is tied with Aussie’s Johan Wissman and India’s Bibin Matthew for seventh place with 14 points apiece. None of the other quartermilers are in the top 15, but Andrae Williams, another Grand Bahamian, is tied for 18th with Young Talkmore Nyongani of Zimbabwe with nine points each. Also on the track, national record holder Shamar Sands is sitting in fifth place in the men’s 110m hurdles with 33 points over five meets. But on the field, Olympic bronze medallist Leevan “Superman” Sands and reigning world high jump record holder Donald Thomas are in second and third place respectively. Sands has competed in three meets in the men’s triple jump a nd is currently tied for second p lace with Arnie David Girat of Cuba with 20 points. Thomas, on the other hand, has amassed a total of 20 points over three meets for third place. On the ladies’ side, veteran sprinter Chandra Sturrup is pegged at number five in the 100m with 27 points over four meets. Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie is all the way in 17th place with 15 points over two meets. However, she is in sixth place in the 200m with 13 points over two meets. The only other female who has gotten a listing is Christine Amertil, who is tied with Ndeye Soumah of Senegal, Asami Tanno of Japan and American Dominique Darden with seven points. Only Amertil and Darden have raced in two meets while the others have only competed in one. C M Y K C M Y K WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 P AGE 14 op swimmers’ day at Custom Aquatics... T homas, H iggs in face off spotlight... See page 13 ‘Fireman’ burns up standings Thirty-year-old Eleuthera native is in the running for $1m Golden League Jackpot Chandra Sturrup CHRIS BROWN , of the Bahamas, after he won 400m at ISTAF Golden League Athletics Meeting in Berlin on Sunday... (AP Photo/Michael Sohn

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C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.97 $4.03 $4.04 100% Principal Protection 5 Year Term 100% Participation OFFERINGCLOSESJUNE22,2009 * Industry hit by ‘epidemic’ of marine thefts * ICB suffers two-thirds profit drop in 2008 as r esult of $1.46m swing on unrealised investment gains, plus $500,000 Hurricane Ike net loss * Company’s property a ggregate sum insured still at $1.9bn n B y NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor BAHAMIAN general insurers a re bracing for “a drop of 5 per cent or more” in gross written p remiums from their most profitable motor business line during2 009, Insurance Company of the B ahamas (ICB s aid yesterday, with the industry’s p rofitability also being endangered by the current “epidemic” o f boat thefts. Tom Duff said the general i nsurer was now starting, along with its competitors, “to see pres-s ure on premium” income across all business classes as a result of t he recession, with clients either not renewing policies, renewing for smaller amounts or paying late. On motor insurance, which is u sually among the most profitable business lines for Bahamian gen e ral insurers, Mr Duff said ICB was following market trends, with i ncreasing numbers of policyholders switching from compre hensive to cheaper third party coverage. In addition, Bahamians were c onserving cash by not upgrad ing their vehicles purchasing n ew or used ones as frequently, Insurers brace for 5% motor premium drop n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor C o urier companies yest erday said Customs reforms to the process of clearing goods at Bahamian airports “aren’t goingt o work” and could result in layoffs in an industry employing 1,000 people alone in Nassau, while their Freeport counterparts are now in “a state of shock” following the announcement ofp lans to introduce the same changes there. B ut Glen Gomez, comptroller o f Customs, yesterday defended t he reforms, telling Tribune Busin ess he had been told that revenue collected at Lynden Pindling I nternational Airport (LPIA O dyssey Aviation had increased” as a result of the decis ion to stop courier companies and brokers using the C18 ‘unacc ompanied baggage declaration’ f orm to declare imported goods. M r Gomez added that while p eople often reacted negatively Courier ‘lay-off’ fears from Customs reform n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor B AHAMIAN private and public sector agencies are not taking the need to have a Data Protection Plan in place by 2012 “as seriously as they should”, Tribune Business was told yesterday, witht his nation still to satisfy the European Union’s (EUq uacy test’ for transborder data flows. G eorge E. Rodgers, the Bahamas Data Protection Commissioner, told Tribune Business that meeting the EU’s requirements in that area were “a majorp roblem for two reasons”. He explained: “One, you have t o have a certain number of [data protection-related] complaints u nder your belt so they can see how you handle them. They are very few and far between. People seem more interested in Freedom of Information than data protection. “The other stumbling block is w e need to be an office ourselves. Although in law we’re indepen-d ent, I’m still in the Ministry of Finance. Those are the two critic al areas, so I don’t know how it’s going to work out.” Meeting the EU adequacy test would likely increase the Bahamas’ attractiveness for intern ational technology and datarelated firms, enticing them to setu p operations here safe in the knowledge that their data flows w ould be secured and protected within a statutory framework. On the complaints side, Mr Rodgers said his office had only received three to date, along with 2 0 queries. He acknowledged that Bahamians tended to “lag b ehind” when it came to new ini tiatives, especially when there was n o urgency involved. Still, Mr Rodgers said that the Bahamas had all the legislation it needed on the books, in the form of the Data Protection Act, C omputer Misuse Act and Electronic Transactions Act. What w as missing was enforcement and implementation. Mr Rodgers said the Data Protection Act gave a “five-yearg race period” until 2012 for all Bahamas-based private and pub lic sector organisations to implement a data security protection plan, but “everyone is lagging behind and saying they’ve got plenty of time. That’s not how it works..... “If I were to be honest, people are not taking it as seriously as they should.” He added that he was working with the Clearing Banks Association and the Central Bank of the Bahamas to introduce language stipulating the need for data pro tection into the former’s Code of Conduct. Data protection ‘not being taken seriously enough’ * Industry believes ‘short form’ use end ‘isn’t going to work’ and could effectively end overnight delivery services * Comptroller defends policy, saying changes have increased revenues collected at airport and enhanced statistical data * Freeport firms ‘in state of shock’ after Customs announces p lan to implement policy there on July 1 n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE Water & Sewerage Corp oration’s revenues are only able to cover 62 per cent of its operat ional costs, whilenon-revenue water continues to rob it of $3 m illion annually, a government minister has warned. Meanwhile, the cost of reverse osmosis water has more than tripled from $6 to $20 million annually. P henton Neymour, minister of state for the environment, makingh is contribution to the 2009-2010 Budget debate in parliament, said t hat repairing the outdated and deteriorating infrastructure was beyond many world governmen t’s fiscal capacity, and could require some private sector assist ance. Mr Neymour said the problems w ith Water and Sewerage’s infra structure, and resulting water l eaks, could be as much as 30 times international standards. The World Bank had recommended t hat developing countries keep non-revenue water below 23 per c ent of total production, but the Bahamas was at 50 per cent. T he minister said the Govern m ent had drafted a plan to decrease the five million imperial g allons per day (MIGD enue water loss by a minimum 2.5 MIGD over a 4-year period, and to maintain that reduction. “Non-revenue water is water t hat has been produced and is ‘lost’ before it reaches the cus t omer or is billed to customers,” he said. “These losses can be ‘real’ through leaks or apparent losses through theft or metering inacc uracies.” Mr Neymour said recapturing j ust one MIGD of water and selling it would be more than $5 mil l ion in additional revenue for the Corporation annually. “Therefore, our very best efforts should be made to reduce our levels of non-revenue water,” s aid Mr Neymour. “At the Water and Sewerage, the problem of n on-revenue water is mainly due Revenues cover just 62% of Water Corp costs S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas Electricity Corp oration (BEC of critical concern”, havingi ncurred an estimated $20 million in losses at the end of its fiscal y ear 2008 and having had to can cel or defer some capital projects valued at more than $450 million Phenton Neymour, whose cab inet position is minister of state f or the environment, alluded to BEC being unable to currently stand on its own”, as its $134 million accounts payable for the m onth of April 2009 greatly out weighed its receivables of $99 mil lion in May 2009. Mr Neymour, addressing the House of Assembly, said “the g lobal situation has worsened and BEC’s financial position has done t he same, as there are encum brances with collections in all a reas”. He said that because of the BEC’s present commitments, the large capital projects underway and the present revenue situa t ion, it was not able to meet its financial obligations. M r Neymour placed some of the blame on the former PLP administration’s handling of the corporation during its term. He quoted observations made by the International Monetary Fund (IMF loses during the PLP’s term of $3 million in 2007 and $11 millioni n 2007. These losses, according to the IMF report, were the result of imposed rate reductions and customer relief programmes. “So it is not just me saying this, it is also the IMF,” said Mr Neymour. “For the last two years, whenever I speak on this matter there is almost an immediate response denying the effects of this PLP-led poor decision.” The minister said that in order for BEC to recover its losses in the short to medium-term, it would seek a government-guaranteed loan. He added that the Government has provided the corporation with a two-year relief on Customs Duty and stamp tax. These measures, along with increased awareness on energy consumption “on a major level”, are expected to mitigate the bur den on the Government-owned entity. Mr Neymour said a tariff adjustment is also fundamental to the sustainability of BEC. According to him, its implementation will allow the Corporation to return to a position where it can “stand alone” without a government guarantee. “Presently, Family Island tariffs are the same as that for New Providence, even though the cost for providing services for Family Islands is significantly higher,” said Mr Neymour. $20m loss leaves BEC in ‘position of key concern’ P henton Neymour S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B

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Most customers have a wide r ange of options to choose from for products they are looking for. So why should they choose you? Price should not be the only factor or benefit. Anyone can s ell if the price is cheap. If you sell on price only, eventually you will end up losing in the long run. Most companies are selling pretty much the same products and/or services. A ccounting firms, lawyers, doctors, IT companies etc. Some do specialise in certain areas and may differentiate themselves, but in today’s market a lot of companies are specialised in the same field ora rea. So why should they choose you? How do you stand out from the crowd? Well, thanks to our higher power, we are all created differently. Imagine if everyone was the same. Hmm-m mmm, what a bore that would be! As I mentioned previously, one of the biggest assets you have is your time and, next to t hat, your next greatest asset is yourself. You are the difference between everyone else and every other product. A powerful sales tool/asset that many of us overlook is ourselves, our own personality. Case in point. How many doctors are general practioners? A lot! They have all studied pretty much the same medicine and have been trained similarly. So why do some peoplep refer one doctor over another? PERSONALITY. Why do some people prefer one mechanic, accountant, veterinarian, IT specialist etc? PERS ONALITY. I always hear people say: “I like so and so because he or she is nice, patient, explains everything and so forth.” However, please note that in order to successfully use yourp ersonality on a sales call, or in any situation, you have to be c onfident and positive, not arrogant. Confident in how you can help your customers.Too many salespeople are simply confident in what they’re selling, not in their ability. There’s a big difference. When you’re confidenti n what you’re selling, it means you’re putting more emphasis on yourself and products or services. Your focus should be on your clients. Most confident individuals are calm and relaxed. They do not force orp ush themselves on potential clients. This misunderstanding eliminates a large number of salespeople from being able to use t heir personality to positively influence their ability to close. Confidence should not come across as better than. I’m sure we all know salespeople with strong personalities that use them to bulldoze their wayt hrough with customers. On the outside, they appear to be successful, at least for the short term. However, those who have a manipulative personality will lull themselves into a false sense of security when, in reality, t hey’re destroying their longterm sales potential. A confident salesperson is h onest, upfront and takes the time to find out what the real n eeds of their customers are. Remember why our higher power gave us two ears and one mouth? Don’t jump at the person’s first comment and try to close the deal. Confident and honest salespeople believe sos trongly in themselves and their ability to help that they’re not concerned with making a quick sale. Rather, they genuinely want to help the client, which usually results in a much larger and more profitable sale thana quick one. Finally, to successfully use your personality, you must be upbeat, genuine, honest and dedicated. These are great tools. T o determine your level of con fidence, ask yourself the following two questions. * Do customers call you for information? * Do customers refer you often? S o ask yourself this question: Why should potential clients buy from you? All of these marketing strate gies are certain to keep your business on top during these c hallenging economic times. Have a productive and profitable week! Remember: THOSE WHO MARKET WILL MAKE IT.” N N B B : : S S c c o o t t t t F F a a r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n i i s s p p r r e e s s i i d d e e n n t t o o f f S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e , , a a p p r r o o m m o o t t i i o o n n a a l l a a n n d d m m a a r r k k e e t t i i n n g g c c o o m m p p a a n n y y s s p p e e c c i i a a l l i i s s i i n n g g i i n n p p r r o o m m o o t t i i o o n n a a l l p p r r o o d d u u c c t t s s . . E E s s t t a a b b l l i i s s h h e e d d o o v v e e r r 2 2 7 7 y y e e a a r r s s a a g g o o , , S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e h h a a s s a a s s s s i i s s t t e e d d B B a a h h a a m m i i a a n n b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s e e s s f f r r o o m m v v a a r r i i o o u u s s i i n n d d u u s s t t r r i i e e s s , , r r a a n n g g i i n n g g f f r r o o m m t t o o u u r r i i s s m m , , b b a a n n k k i i n n g g a a n n d d t t e e l l e e c c o o m m m m u u n n i i c c a a t t i i o o n n s s i i n n m m a a r r k k e e t t i i n n g g t t h h e e m m s s e e l l v v e e s s . . R R e e a a d d e e r r s s c c a a n n c c o o n n t t a a c c t t M M r r F F a a r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n a a t t S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e o o n n E E a a s s t t S S h h i i r r l l e e y y S S t t r r e e e e t t , , b b y y e e m m a a i i l l a a t t s s c c o o t t t t @ @ s s u u n n t t e e e e . . c c o o m m o o r r b b y y t t e e l l e e p p h h o o n n e e a a t t 2 2 4 4 2 2 3 3 9 9 3 3 3 3 1 1 0 0 4 4 . . C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE NOTICE K” LINE LNG TRANSPORT CO., LTD. In Voluntary Liquidation Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138(4Business Companies Act. 2000, “K” LINE LNG TRANSPORT CO., LTD. is in dissolution as of June 12, 2009. Akira Misaki of Minato-Ku, Tokyo, Japan is the Liquidator. LIQUIDATOR _____________________ A confident personality turns into positive sales Promotional Marketing by Scott Farrington INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, r ead Insight on Mondays

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009, PAGE 3B A BAHAMIAN insurance broker yesterday announced it had launched a payments solution to allow those hardest hit by the recession to keep coverage intact through extending payments – interest-free 0 until the economy rebounds. The programme, called S.I.P.P. – Simple Insurance Payment Plan – was introduced by Nassau-based Lampkin & Company Insurance Brokers and Benefits Consultants. “When the economic picture appears gloomy, among the first thing people look at cutting is insurance because it is not something they can put on the table or hold in their hands,” said Jeanine Lampkin, founder and president of Lampkin & Co. “But coverage is not dispensable. It can save lives and protect persons or businesses that would otherwise leave themselves exposed to what could be tantamount to financial disaster, due to a catastrophic illness, a hurricane, accident or other unforeseeable event.” The announcement followed months of the insurance broker working with its carrier partners to develop a solution that would make remaining insured, even in tough times, palatable. A nnounce With our partners’ cooperation, we a re pleased to announce that policyholders will be able to pay their premiums over an extended period of time, up to 10 months beyond the original statement date, without incurring any interest charges so long as a minimum payment is made by salary deduction,” said Ms Lampkin. Participating companies include RoyalStar Assurance, Security & General, Bahamas First (through Colina General), ICWI, BahamaHealth, ColinaImperial and Family Guardian. According to Lampkin & Co’s marketing and customer service manager, Jennifer Bain, clients pay a single down payment, and minimal salary deductions will pay the premium. “S.I.P.P. will also entitle you to free counselling,” said Ms Bain. “An insurance expert will sit with a client to review all policies with a view towards getting you the best coverage for the least cost, which may mean brokering through a different underwriter or recommending a change in coverage or insured amounts. “Individuals often forget that what worked before may not necessarily be the best solution for now. It’s important to remember that needs change and coverage should be compatible with those needs.” Lampkin & Company’s approach reflects many international companies’ efforts to combat the rising problem of the perfect storm hitting the insurance industry a poor economy leading to an increase in policy cancellations, job losses translating into lower enrolments in group policies and widespread corporate cutbacks resulting in shrinking coverage. Company profit margins are also declining as insurance underwriters face poorer performance results from stock market investments. “We want to get the message out that whether you insure through Lampkin & Company or another broker,” said Ms Bain, “please do not cut your insurance coverage. A single illness could wipe out a family’s income for years to come. Insurance is not a luxury. It is as essential as the food on the table. It preserves your way of life and could save your life. We hope the S.I.P.P. solution will allow everyone to remain covered without feeling burdened.” Broker develops payments solution for insuring public Jeanine Lampkin

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to changes, any problem with a new system would usually “sort itself out”. Tribune Business, though, was told that Freeport-based courier companies, importers, brokers and freight forwarders reacted n egatively when plans to introduce the same policy were unveiled during a Monday meeting with Customs’ deputy comptroller for the island, LincolnS trachan. Private sector representatives who attended the meeting were tight-lipped when contacted by T ribune Business yesterday, declining to comment on the record. One source, who requested anonymity, said Freeport-basedc ourier companies and brokers were now seeking a meeting with the minister of state for finance, Zhivargo Laing, on the issue, a dding that the details of Customs’ proposals were “sketchy” and that they wanted to see something in writing. It is understood that Customs wants to introducet he system, now operating in Nassau, to Freeport on July 1, then roll it out to all the Family Islands. A nother Freeport business source, speaking to Tribune Business on condition of anonymity, said courier companies, importers and brokers would have to increase their bonds and hire extra persons to fill out and check C ustoms entries, as a result of discontinuing the ‘unaccompanied baggage declaration form’ in favour of a return to the C13 ‘long form’. T he source added that the proposed changes might actually cost the Government and Customs revenue. He pointed out that, in t he past, to clear goods and documents quickly, courier companies had often paid duty on behalf of their clients up-front. However, since the advantage o f doing this for overnight delivery would be ended by Customs’ reforms, the source said it was likely that these goods would now b e brought in ‘bonded’ under the Hawksbill Creek Agreement’s provisions thus reducing the Government’s revenue intake. Meanwhile, Walt Saunders, p resident of the newly-formed Bahamas Transhipment and Logistics Association, which represents the courier companies, t old Tribune Business that despite the comptroller’s best intentions and efforts, the changes he had instituted were “not going to work”. M r Saunders, who is president and owner of GWS Worldwide Express, said the reforms hade ffectively made Bahamas-based courier companies, who provideo vernight express delivery to their clients, brokers. The reforms had also increased costs to clients who were “already paying top dollar to have it o vernight”, Mr Saunders explaining that the courier firms were now having to charge a minimum $10 fee per customer to claim goods, plus a further $35 servicef ee if the item in question attracted duty. In cases where items were dutiable, there was a minimum $45 extra cost to the cust omer. Mr Saunders told Tribune Business he had last met with the Customs comptroller a fortnight ago, when Mr Gomez said hew anted “his concept implemented in the system, and to give it a shot to see if it can work”. The Association head said the i ndustry and Customs were now “in a test and trial” phase, where if problems arose the private sector was to communicate them to Mr Gomez and he and his offi-c ers would address the issue. “It’s not going to work,” said Mr Saunders, striking a pessimistic note. He explained that t hrough its reforms, Customs was treating overnight express deliveries, which largely consisted of documents, the same as cargo brought in at sea ports and docks. Q uestioning what would happen if important court documents or business contracts could notb e delivered on time as a result of the reforms, Mr Saunders said: It can only serve to frustrate this system.” He added that Customs had reinstituted the system last used 14 years ago, which would result i n delays clearing goods at the airport, defeating the whole idea of overnight delivery. Mr Saunders warned that Customs policy could “see people ter-m inating employees on the job site” within the next few months. He estimated that the 20 courier companies in Nassau employed m ore than 1,000 persons between them, and said he hoped it would not come to that. “Not only is service delayed, but there is a cost,” Mr Saundersa dded of the decision to end the ‘short form’ declaration for courier companies, and replace it with the long form, which requires all i mports to be broken down into individual items. Customs and Mr Gomez had instituted the changes to improve the Department’s collection ofs tatistical data, and to protect revenues by ensuring the appropriate duty rates are applied to all items. “It’s not going to work in our i nterests. Globally, we are antiquated. There is no way we are matching global practices,” Mr Saunders said. He added, though, that he had been able to negotiateo ne concession with Customs, where courier companies paid upfront on behalf of their clients,r ather than increasing the size of their bond security lodged witht he Department. Mr Gomez yesterday conf irmed to Tribune Business that t he Customs Department planned to roll the new policy out to the F amily Islands and Freeport, ensuring that all were using the s ame forms and complying with the rules and regulations. H e described the previous use of the C18 form by courier comp anies as “wrong”. “They shouldn’t be using that,” Mr Gomez said. “Why should someone use the form for cargo that I use for personal travel. It’s getting themt o use the right form, and for us to capture statistical data not cap t ured before, and capture rev enue not collected before.” As a result, the Comptroller added: “I’ve been told there has been an increase in revenue coll ected at the airport because of the new process, although I haven ot seen any figures. “Obviously, people were bring i ng in items before that were wrongly declared or not declared at all. We’re making sure we have the right rates. It’s a win-win situation. We’re assessing the cor r ect duties on these items.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Courier ‘lay-off’ fears from Customs reform F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009, PAGE 5B COMMONWEALTH Bank h as donated $25,000 to the Downtown Nassau Partnershipt o support efforts to transform the 260-year-old city into a thriving mecca for shopping, dining, entertainment and living. “Contributions of corporate citizens like Commonwealth Bank are making it possible to make the Nassau dream a reali-t y,” said Charles Klonaris, the DNP’s co-chairman. “We are extremely grateful to Commonwealth Bank, which has once again demonstrated its b elief in the value of historic Nassau, which we believe will soonm eet its rightful role as the dynamic heartbeat of the nation.” We in the Ministry of Tourism appreciate the strong supports hown by the banking community in the important undertaking of rediscovering and reinventing the historic city of Nassau,” said Vernice Walkine, the Ministry of Tourism’s director-general and DNP co-chairman. “We envision a city that is alive a t night with locals and visitors enjoying restaurants, cafes, book stores, galleries and other shopping and entertainment. We envision a city where people want to l ive, not just work. We’ve seen what a strong downtown can addt o tourism offerings and to the quality of life in other places, and no city that I have ever personall y visited anywhere in the world had the untapped potential of thec ity of Nassau. We are really excited about this project and grateful for the support it has been getting.” The redevelopment exercise is estimated to cost in the millions, with funds raised through a variety of ways, including a partiallys elf-funding Business Improvement District (BID Among the most immediate improvements projected to have a major impact is the relocation o f commercial shipping that has long clogged the eastern end ofB ay Street. That project is underway and has already spurred interest in properties that had b een vacated as shipping and containers dominated more of thew aterfront and the southern side of Bay Street. In addition to relocating shipping and the incentives created under the 2008 City of Nassau Revitalisation Act, other important steps include creating a master plan, extending the water’se dge, beautifying the city, mitigating flooding potential, enhancing public spaces and working with private owners to redevelop their properties. The process is g uided by the DNP with an 11member board of directors andV aughn Roberts, managing director. Bank donates $25k to Nassau revitalisation

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instead choosing to make their existing model run for longer. As a result, Mr Duff said: “The value of the vehicle drops, and t he value of the premium drops with it. Then you get to the stage where they switch from comprehensive to third party, fire and theft. “I think the whole market will see a drop of 5 per cent or more in motor income by the end of the year at the gross level. We all h ave to mark down motor income.” On the property and casualty side, Mr Duff said ICB was starting to experience problems from “people delaying premium payments, coming in late with cheques, or not increasing the sums insured as people would in a b oom market. When people pay late it has an impact for your running costs”. F alling premium income was happening against the backdrop o f another slight increase in property and casualty reinsurance costs, Mr Duff explained, “maki ng it more difficult to squeeze profitability out of the property c lass” of business. Overall, the ICB general mana ger said it was “not unreasonable” to predict that all Bahamian g eneral insurance carriers would experience an average 5 per cent drop in gross written premium for all business classes in 2009, although 10 per cent “might bea t the high end of the scale”. “We all expect that this has to b e a year when we trim costs, focus on customer service and h ope for better times in 2010 and 2011,” Mr Duff added. “So far, though, it’s not been that bad in terms of claims. C laims have been within the boundaries expected.” He said that ICB’s total aggregate sums insured were in line with 2008 comparatives, addingt hat the company had about $1.9 billion worth of total property risks on its books. Meanwhile, ICB was assessing i ts marine underwriting policies “very closely” as a result of the recent spike in boat and vessel thefts, which had reached “epidemic” proportions. A baco, in particular, seemed to be “the hot spot” for boat thefts, Mr Duff said, the favourite target for thieves being craft that w ere 30 feet in length and had two outboard motors. “We’re very mindful of that and looking very closely at underwriting,” the ICB general manager said. “We’re in the midst of f orming a plan going forward, looking at where vessels are b erthed, the size of the craft. “There is definitely an epid emic of small craft thefts at the moment, no doubt about it. All t hese insurance companies are being impacted by it. “We’re not making a loss on m arine, but are not making as much profit as we should be. The r eturns on the marine hull class are much less than others. It’s ana rea of concern for the industry, and impacts the overall profi tability for the business.” Mr Duff added: “We’re very mindful of the trend in marine h ull losses, and are working on a plan to minimise them. With quite a lot of the berths, especially on Abaco, I imagine security is not as tight as in other areas. One boat was recently s tolen in Abaco at 3am in the morning; it’s very easy to do. Sometimes you get it back, and sometimes you don’t.” For its 2008 financial year, ICB s aw its net income drop by almost two-thirds or 66.4 per cent to $1.39 million, compared to $4.127 million the year before, largely d ue to hurricane-related claims and a $1.46 million reversal in unrealised gains on its investment securities. S uffered ICB suffered a $500,000 net loss due to Hurricane Ike-related c laims in the Turks & Caicos Islands, plus incurred a $401,609 loss in unrealised movements in the value of its equity investments portfolio, compared to a $1.059 million gain the year before. T ogether, these accounted for $1.96 million of the $2.737 mil l ion decline in the carrier’s net income. M r Duff said unrealised invest ment portfolio gains moved “sign ificantly in our favour” in the 12 months to December 31, 20o7, largely due to appreciation in C ommonwealth Bank’s stock. This position, though, reversed i tself in 2008 with the slide in equities values on the BahamasI nternational Securities Exchange (BISX m any of ICB’s competitors did not incur Hurricane Ike-related claims because they had no risks i nsured in the Turks & Caicos. Acknowledging that ICB’s bot t om line result “was somewhat less than expected” for 2008, Mr Duff said net income projections had been set at levels “a little bit m ore than we produced, although we were not too far out. “Overall, it was not a bad result for us. We’re reasonably happy with it, but it’s not an outstandingr esult.” He added: “On a general claims level, 2007 was particularly favourable in terms of motor c laims, whereas 2008 was still good but not as good as the prior year.” Mr Duff said ICB still recorded underwriting profits in all itsm ajor business lines, with motor and property/casualty producing “superior returns”. Operating expenses, too, came in 5 per cent b elow budgeted levels. For the 12 months to December 31, 2008, gross written premiums were flat, standing at $51.734 million compared to the previous year’s $51.793 million. D ue to a reduction in the amount ceded to reinsurers, net r etained premiums increased slightly to $9.345 million, com-p ared to $9.342 million the year before. Net earned premiums i ncreased by almost 2 per cent to $9.36 million, compared to $9.179 million the year before. N et claims incurred, though, rose to $2.863 million compared t o $1.835 million in 2007, an increase of 56 per cent. T his was largely responsible for the 20.9 per cent hike in total e xpenses to $7.768 million, compared to $6.424 million in 2007. As a result underwriting profits f ell 42.2 per cent to $1.591 million, compared to $2.755 millioni n 2007. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Insurers brace for 5% motor premium drop Revenues cover just 62% of Water Corp costs to inferior infrastructure resulting in breaks or leaks.” He suggested that a reputable international firm would have toc ome in to Water and Sewerage’s to evaluate the extent of damage to its infrastructure. Mr Neymour said many areas throughout New P rovidence had problems with rusty water. “This is caused by old infrastructure such as cast iron and galvanised iron water mains thath ave become blocked by the previous dependency on hard, groundwater supplies,” he said. “Now that we have moved to a s ofter, desalinated water supply, these deposits are resulting in rusty water. Ultimately, the problem requires massive replacement of infrastructure.In that regard,s everal infrastructure improvements are planned to address this and other issues.” Mr Neymour said a part of the W ater and Sewerage infrastructural improvements will be carried out with the New Providence road Improvement Project. “The New Providence Road Improve-m ent Project, has approximately $10 million worth of infrastructural improvements for Water and Sewerage’s, including u pgrades to improve capacity, and new lines to improve service quality and reliability,” he said. O ne of the biggest expenses of W ater and Sewerage is the processing of water by reverse osmosis, but according to Mr Neymour, the process is much more reliable than barging water from North Andros.He said water shipmentsw ere originally a temporary solution, but were now a 25-year-old process. “Facilities for RO water prod uction are typically constructed to meet 150 mph hurricane conditions, and major facilities have 100 per cent back-up power capability, sufficient to cover up tof ive days of operations,” said Mr Neymour.“Secondly, the RO facility capacity is also specified to allow for regular maintenance w ithout loss of contracted production capacity, and has additional capacity to offset demand fluctuations. “Thirdly, RO plants produce a consistently high qual-i ty standard water product, which meets or in many cases exceed WHO (World Health Organization) guidelines for potable w ater.” Mr Neymour suggested that reverse osmosis plants must decrease their energy consumption in order to cut the cost ofp roduction, and thus the cost of the water. “The levels of investment required cannot be provided by the Government indefin itely,” he said.“The circumstances are further exacerbated given that only 30 per cent of the p opulation is served thus increasi ng the cost per customer significantly.” L ate last year, the Government implemented a social assistance p rogram borne out of a high number of disconnections carried outb y BEC. Now, according to Mr N eymour, many of the customers w ho took advantage of the paym ent programme offered by the Government last year have found t hemselves in the same situation again. H e said: “Of the 5,000 customers that were disconnected( last year), some 4,000 plus customers were reconnected.A n umber of accounts were not reconnected for varying reasons ( i.e. safety, vacant, no access, landlord wanted the supply off, e tc).” “As of October 31, 2008, 1,847 customers had made arrangem ents to pay off their arrears with 25 per cent payment and the bal a nce over 24 months. “As of February 2009, under t he more lenient current policy, some 2,754 customers made a rrangements to pay off their arrears with 50 per cent payment and the balance over three to six m onths. Therefore, some 5,161 customers were in a state of dis c onnection as of March 2009.” F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B B B E E C C , , f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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Ms Miller has been a full time hot dog vendor for the past three years and said she has always been excited about the business. “My friend had a hot dog cart and I saw how successful she was. This is not a hobbyit’s a job. It’s my profession and my lively hood even though I worked for many places before this. I just decided to do my own thing,” Ms Miller said. Donna’s Delectable Dogs are priced at $2 for small hot dogs and the larger size at $3 along with a variety of top pings to sastify whatever your taste buds crave. With everything made fresh daily, it is no wonder Ms Miller is always swamped with hungry cus tomers. “I run through about 200 dogs a day. We have chili, cheese, onions, jalape–os, tomatoes, green peppers and even sauerkraut. People are really catching on to the sauerkraut. My most popular combination is relish, chili and cheese. The second would be the jalape–os and onions,” Ms Miller said. Donna’s Delectable Dogs are strictly beef due to the fact that they are a hot seller in the county. Faithful customer, Devenor Wilkinson, said although he recently started having hot dogs, he finds Donna’s Delectable Dogs to be spectacular. “Those hot dogs are so good. I eat, sleep and dream Donna’s Delectable Dogs. I love onions and she has nice, fresh, crushed onions. I love the cheese and the chili as well because the chili really brings out the hot dog. Even the bread-the bread is sweet. She is very clean and tidy. I think this is one of the cleanest stands in Nassau,” Mr Wilkinson said. Ms Miller said she would encourage young persons who want to start their own busi ness that location and many other attributes are important for success. “I think in any successful business all you need is the right attitude. Even if your product is not superior, people come back because you are pleasant, you know how to treat people and you know how to talk to people,” Ms Miller said. C M Y K C M Y K TASTE PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE T h e T r i b u n e n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net SUMMER brings out the easy and quick when it comes t o gr abbing a bit e t o eat and ho t dogs ar e one of the most popular summer foods in the world. Donna Miller, owner of Donna’s Delectable Dogs, located on Rosetta Street next to RBC Finco, knows exactly how to please the pallets of her customers who prefer to have this summer f a v orite year round. delectable H O d g O S t M S M iller creating a delectable dog. CHEESE topped hot dog. THE makings of a hot dog. TASTY chili dog. RELISH combination hot dog.

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C M Y K C M Y K TASTE THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009, PAGE 9B T h e T r i b u n e n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net THIS week in our lineup, we’ve given you the option of cool movies, a celebration of the arts, or some easy listening music. Hopefully, the recent summer showers won’t put a damper on the weekend’s plans. 1 . The Jazz Summer Festival i s going into high gear this week, with several planned performances at some of the jazzie st venues on the island. Friday i s the official night of Jazz music Bahamian style, with RnB sensation Frydeh a former member of Baha-men -a long with the G-Note All-stars w ho will be performing at the Humidor Churrascaria on West Street. On Saturday, Arturo Sandoval and Paul Hanna will perform at the National Centre for The Performing Arts on Shirley Street at 8pm. Tickets for the events are priced between $45 and $75. For more details, email jazz@ivoryglobalp romotions.com. 2 . Virtue Dance Academy presents Diary of a Bitter Mother In-Law , a play featuring T ia Johnson and students of the academy. A dance and dra ma production, this show is the f ifth edition to Dance Of The Scrolls series by Professor Marilyn T Deveaux. It is about the Bible character Naomithe mother-in-law of Ruth. Performances will take place this Saturday at the Holy Trinity Activit y Centre in Stapledon Gardens at 3pm and 8pm. Tickets are $15 and are available at the door, from parents of the stu dents, Logos bookstore, the Christian bookstore, Faith Life Bookstore, the Bible Centre, and the Juke Box. There is also a pre-booking group discount of $10 per child to all groups with 5 persons or more. Food and drinks will also be on sale. 3 . The Bahamas Internation al Film Festival will present Sita Sings the Blues at Galleria Cinema JFK Drive on tonight as part of its month long movie series. This 82 minute Ameri-c an film is about a goddess n amed Sita who is separated from her beloved lord and husband Rama. The director Nina Paley is an animator whose husband moves back to Indiaand dumps her via email. Three hilarious shadow puppets nar rate both ancient tragedy and modern comedy in this beautifully animated interpretation of the Indian epic Ramayana. Set to the 1920's jazz vocals of Annette Hanshaw, Sita Sings the Blues earns its spot as ‘the Greatest Break-Up Story Ever Told.’ 4 . On Thursday, the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas presents the film Common Ground as a part of its Love Film series. In this 112 minute flick made in 2002, a respected Argentinean university professor is forced into early retirement, and faces an uncertain future as an unemployed hus band. As the film progresses, he and his wife move to the countryside and open a new chapter of their lives. Directed by Adolfo Aristarain, the film has English subtitles but is heard in Spanish. Showtime is at 8 pm at the gallery on West and Well Hill Street. For more information, email info@nagb.org.bs or visit www.nagb.org.bs. 5 . Tired of being labeled a couch potato, sign up for the rotary club’s walk-a-thon this weekend and start the journey to a healthier you. Planned for Saturday June 20 at Arawak Cay, the walk is from Arawak Cay to Goodman’s Bay and back. It begins at 7.30am. Categories include the under 20 division, 21 to 35, 36 to 50, and51 and up. Prizes will be awarded to the top finishers. Registration is $10, and the event is in aid of local charities to be announced. Forms can be obtained from all Subway loca tions, Michael Hepburn and Associates, and Pat Strachan Realty. things 2 DO n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features R eporter l allen@tribunemedia.net MOVING to the Bahamas more than a decade ago, lif e long musician L uicit o Toto” Bazard is still in lo ve with these islands, and is once again producing music t o t ell his st or y . In his latest CD titled Island Musical Pot Pourri , he created nearly a dozen songs all cele brating Bahamian and Caribbean sounds, an effort which he said proves that we are all one despite our differences. Telling the story of his pro gression as a musician, Mr Bazard explained that at the age of four, he was given a banjo from a relative which was his first introduction to the world of music. “I don’t remember playing anything that made sense with the banjo, but since then I began to acquire a love for music, especially after my father threw it away insisting that he didn’t want me to play it. “At the age of 15, I took up solfege, piano and guitar lessons. After about a year, I joined a cultural and artistic club, where I composed two of the songs from my latest album.” He moved to the Bahamas in 1966 and worked by day as an interpreter for the Ministry of Finance and nights and weekends slowly building his music repertoire. A former member of the groups Blue Dreamers and Kool Vibrations, he became familiar with the music of the Bahamas and Caribbean in places like the South Beach Cabana, Club Med, and the Pink Pussycat nightclub. “During the seventies I was also exposed to quite a range of musical sounds including Reggae, Calypso, and Kompa (a Creole rhythm course you know that kind of music stayed in my blood. We played ballads, rake-nscrape, a little bit of reggae, we played it all. Especially when I worked at Club Med, we played several songs from the Latin American countries and the Bahamas, but what made that experience more memorable was the fact that we performed most of those songs in foreign languages because of the diverse cultures that frequented Club Med.” He said it was these experiences that helped to perpetuate his love for Bahamian culture. In his latest track titled Come Enjoy the Bahamas, Mr Bazard speaks of some of the elements that define the Bahamas from other places in the region and throughout the world. “In your life, there are things you’ll never enjoy, until you come to the place where you jump for joy. Here in Nassau and the Family Islands also, you will find the treasures of pleasure. Throughout the Bahamas, where the elite and the masses, all enjoy great fun under the ever shining sun. Refreshed by cool breeze, you can do your own thing at ease. Spring, Summer, Winter, it doesn’t matter, come to the Bahamas, enjoy the Bahamas.” These lyrics are simpler than the sophisticated lyrics of most songs of today, and are aptly complemented with a tune that is without question reminiscent of Goombay music. Mr Bazard said although most local artists nowadays produce music that is often mistaken for American or Jamaican music, he wants to produce music that sounds Bahamian. He also wants to continue developing his talent provid ing listeners with authentic Bahamian music and a greater sense of identity. To learn more about Mr Bazard and Komopa, visit www.shopbvm.com. Hitting the SWEET NOTE IN HIS latest CD Island Pot Pourri, lifelong musician Luicito Bazard sings of many of the elements that helped to define the Bahamas for him as a place of never-ending culture and rhythm. entertainment BRIEF n LOS ANGELES CHRIS Brown’s lawyer has asked the California Supreme Court to delay a key hearing in the singer’s assault case, according to the Associated Press . Court records show Mark Geragos wants the state’s high court to put off a preliminary hearing scheduled for Monday. No decision has been made. It’s the second attempt Geragos has made to delay Brown’s preliminary hearing. An appeals court rejected a motion to delay the case last week. Brown’s alleged victim, Rihanna, has received a subpoena to testify and is expected to appear. Geragos is seeking access to police personnel and investiga tive records. The 19-year-old R&B singer faces felony assault and criminal threats charges. A judge will decide after Monday’s hearing whether there is enough evidence for the case to proceed. Attorney seeks delay in Chris Brown case Chris Brown

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However, there are many experiences right here at home that can be fabulous without costing ‘an arm and a leg,’ something important considering the current state of the economy. At Stuart Cove’s Aqua Adventure company, there are several breathtaking experiences waiting to be discovered by persons of all ages from 10yearolds to seniors. Dive instructor Viviana Toro explained that for first time divers, the company offers a certification course where students learn about the equipment need ed for the underwater adventures, how to properly commu nicate while submerged, and the safety tips needed when inter acting with sea creatures. Once those basics are out of the way, the real fun begins. Activities include scuba tours of some of the islands most amazing coral reefs, mini-submarine tours where you can explore a new world of fish and other sea life, or if you’re brave enough you can even have the experience of swimming with the sharks. Now one of Stuart Cove’s fastest growing bookings, the shark dive gives spectators that up close and personal encounter. But be warned, this experience is not for the faint hearted. Viviana explained: “This extreme shark adventure at Stuart Cove’s is basically an oppor tunity for people to have a chance to dive with a good num ber of sharks. “Most people go to different locations throughout the world taking these kinds of dives where they may see one or two sharks, but here they get to see sometimes up to 30 sharks all swimming around them. The type of sharks we frequently see on these dives are reef and nurse sharks.” The tour which is set up in two parts first allows divers to perform a sea wall dive, which is done in the area the sharks live. S he said this is a more relaxed non-feeding environment, and although there are some sharks normally spotted, their presenceg ives divers a chance to figure out just how prepared they are for part two. “The second dive is the actual f eed, and things are treated slightly different. We introduce food in the water which creates a little bit more excitement, andt he method that we use is called polite feeding. “During this dive we remind divers that hand movements are restricted, we also try to over weight divers usually by an extra two to four pounds so that when they breathe or when a shark may pass them and create a light current, the extra weight stops them from floating up or losing their balance. “We tell them to deflate their jackets and to place everything they need near their folded arms. We tell our divers not to touch the sharks, and should they have to communicate with another diver we show them how to sig nal nice and close to their bodies.” Lasting for about 20 to 25 minutes, the feeding can seem long, but is truly an experience of a lifetime. After a long debate, Tribune Features recently took the plunge and swam with more than a dozen sharks in the Stuart Cove extreme shark dive. “It was always something that I said I never wanted to experience, but while in the moment of having a 13 foot predator inches away from me, I gained a new respect for these creatures. “I still believe that they feed off our fears, but I actually lost every bit of that once I saw how relaxed they were next to me, it was like swimming in a public pool to say the least.” Viviana said the fear most people have toward sharks is fueled from the negative portrayal of sharks in most Hollywood blockbusters but often once they get up close and see how calm and easy going the animals are, their views are changed. Of course after experiencing an extreme shark dive, you’re going to want to tell everyone about your wild experience. Stu art Cove’s Fin Photo depart ment, is a wonderful crew of auxiliary divers who can either take a few pictures for you or record a half hour long video of your underwater adventure. n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net Summer time is t hat special time of y ear when people look to take a much needed break from the hustle and bustle of life, alt hough finding that perfectly affordable and fun vacation spot can be challenging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C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune SECTIONB I N S I D E Discovering the blue See page 10 WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2009 Get a taste of Donna Miller’s delectable hot dogs S ee page eight Captivating cards by Angie n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net W HEN it is hard to express ones feelings in words, many persons tur n t o gr ee ting cards to say exactly how they feel. However, something that is handmade t ak es a lo t more time and effort to put together to express ones love for another person. It is this love for self expression t hat prompted law student Angelique Sawyer to place a little bit of her self into her hand made cards. SEE page 10 EVENING BUTTERFLY CARD. SEA SHELL LOVER BIRTHDAY CARD. CLASSY YET SIMPLE FLOWER CARD.


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