Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009

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TURNING



Nurses stay defiant

Union members
claim they are
‘still sick’ despite
an injunction
demanding they
return to work

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

NURSES have been ordered to
put an end to eight days of indus-
trial action and return to work by
a Supreme Court injunction
passed yesterday.

But when the message was
delivered to around 200 public
health nurses at a meeting held by
the Bahamas Nurses Union
(BNU) last night, the nurses insist-
ed they are still sick.

Those who have been off work
sick since Monday last week said
they will continue to take their
sick days and risk being held in
contempt of court for disobeying
the order.

Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall
granted the injunction to the Min-
ister of Health and Public Hospi-
tals Authority as the Bahamas
Nurses Union filed a dispute with
the Ministry of Labour seeking
permission to conduct a strike-
vote after their week-long sick-
out failed to produce results from
their employer.

BNU president Cleola Hamil-
ton said the Ministry of Health,
as employer of the Department of
Public Health, and the Public Hos-
pitals Authority have been
ordered to meet with the union

The Taste

Tuesdays!!



urt order

‘

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

BNU PRESIDENT Cleola Hamilton speaks to union members last night.

on Wednesday “to discuss what is
right for the nurses” as a result of
the application.

Around 50 per cent of nurses
employed at Princess Margaret
Hospital, Rand Memorial Hospi-
tal, Sandilands Rehabilitation Cen-
tre, and public health clinics across
the country joined the sick-out in
protest of the Ministry of Health’s
decision to postpone their health
insurance plan until 2012.

Ms Hamilton criticised Minis-

SEE page eight

Concerns raised over excavation and
landfill initiated off Carmichael Road

Lo} 9)



WORK TNT place on land behind Millars Heights.

m By MEGAN REYNOLDS ed on land behind Millars Heights
Tribune Staff Reporter off Carmichael Road.

The Tribune

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mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

ENTREPRENEURS are
allegedly excavating farmland to
sell quarry to developers and fill-
ing the cavity with waste, pollut-
ing the water table and putting
families at risk.

After years of exposure in The
Tribune, the practice of excava-
tion and landfill has been initiat-

Hundreds of residents near the
site fear the practice will pollute
the water table they depend on as
they do not have access to city
water from the Water and Sew-
erage Corporation.

They are also forced to endure
the constant disruption of noise
and dust from the site where two
diggers are said to be operating

SEE page eight

SEE PAGE ELEVEN



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)








Claims that baby
was treated for a
sexually transmitted
disease are refuted

Top police officer denies hospital
staff knew of treatment for an STD

m@ By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

CLAIMS five-month-old
Lynera Saunders had been
treated for a Sexually Trans-
mitted Disease (STD) short-
ly before her death have
been refuted by a top police
officer.

Superintendent Elsworth
Moss in charge of the Crim-
inal Detective Unit denied
that staff at Princess Mar-
garet Hospital (PMH) and
the Crisis Centre knew of
the baby’s treatment for an
STD as reported in The
Punch yesterday.

PMH has not released
any details of the young
patient’s illness and treat-
ment as the public hospital
maintains all patient care is
confidential.

But staff within the hos-
pital suspected the infant
had been molested when
she was admitted to hospital
on Friday June 5, and died
two hours later.

The medical staff in the
paediatric and emergency
room alerted police and sev-
eral individuals were inter-



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viewed in a police investi-
gation.

But the suspects were
released when the infant’s
death certificate showed she
had died as a result of
breathing difficulties.

Lynera Saunders’ moth-
er Indera Minns, 20, her
grandmother and great-
grandmother spoke out
about their devastation over
the baby’s death and humil-
iation over the claims last
week.

Family attorney Paul
Moss said the baby was tak-
ing antibiotics which led to
diarrhoea, and irritation
caused by the illness may
have been misinterpreted as
a sign of molestation.

However, health bosses
at PMH have so far failed
to explain what led medical
staff to raise concerns.

Supt Moss said: “The
child was never molested.
We had a copy of the death
certificate and the child died
of respiratory failure.

“The child was sick a
week prior (to her death)
and suffered from diar-
rhoea. There is no evidence
the child had an STD.”

SEE page eight

Proposed night court
changes could hit
Jews, Seventh-Day
Adventists, Rastafarians

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

JEWS, Seventh-Day Adven-
tists and Rastafarians may be neg-
atively affected by proposed new
changes to the night court sys-
tem, said president of the Bar
Association Wayne Munroe.

The fate of these proposed
changes — the possibility of elim-
inating the current night court
system and hearing those cases
on Saturday and the introduction
of lay magistrates — will be
announced "in due course",
Attorney General Michael Bar-
nett said yesterday during a brief
interview.

Mr Munroe said for years there
has been discussion within the
judiciary to move night courts to
the weekend but this never mate-

SEE page eight





PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



A distraught family
is offering a reward
for the safe return of
their lost pet.

Anyone who may
have seen the small
dog, a female Shitzu,

in the area of East-
ern Road or Sans
Souci is being asked
to call 324-1127.
The dog’s collar
bears a name tag
which reads: Maggie
Raine.
THE MISSING dog is a Shitzu, the same breed as pictured here.

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Man killed, his brother seriously injured

Police seek gunman
behind fatal aes

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



POLICE are trying to find the
gunman who shot two brothers out-
side a bar, killing one and leaving
the other in serious condition.

Both Matthew Armbrister, 23,
and his brother Marvin Armbrister,
24, of Farrington Road, were shot
once in the stomach when an alter-
cation erupted between two groups
of men outside Dominique’s Restau-
rant and Bar in Boyd Road, Nas-
sau.

Matthew, a former employee at
The Tribune who worked in the
press room, died at the scene.

His brother Marvin was rushed

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT will
“relaunch” the National Youth
Programme in the fall — moving it
from Andros to New Providence
and reforming it into a pro-

National Stadium

eI ITO CM em neh

by Independence
Day 2011’

CHINESE government
officials have indicated to their
Bahamian counterparts that
the new National Stadium
should be completed by Inde-
pendence Day 2011.

Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture Desmond Ban-
nister revealed this informa-
tion during his Budget contri-
bution in parliament yester-
day morning. Construction on
the stadium began, after much
delay, earlier this year.

Located adjacent to the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Cen-
tre, it is being funded by the
Chinese government, as a
“gift” to the Bahamian peo-
ple.

asenmireatments

deep penetrating
caning m Oisturizet

to Princess Margaret Hospital where
he is in serious condition. Police
have identified a man they believe is
in some way connected with the
shooting and plan to release a photo
today.

Superintendent Elsworth Moss,
in charge of the Criminal Detective
Unit said: “We are going to send
something out as soon as we identi-
fy a photograph of a male we are
looking for in respect to the shoot-
ing.”

The Armbrister brothers’ family
could not be contacted yesterday.
Matthew Armbrister’s death pushed
the murder count for this year to 33.
Police failed to release details of the
shooting death in the weekend crime

report.

gramme that does not solely focus
on dealing with young men who
have “already become menaces
to society,” said the Minister of
Youth.

Carmichael MP Desmond Ban-
nister suggested that while the
initiative “currently dubbed” the
National Youth Programme is
merely a “restorative” one for
those who have already gone off
the rails, government intends that
it should work with children who
“can be helped before they get
into trouble.”

“We envision a programme
which encompasses all aspects of
youth development,” said Mr
Bannister. Government believes
the national interest will best be
served by relocating the NYP to
New Providence and a location
“where the greatest need exists”
for the resources it offers.

“We will save taxpayer money
on travel costs, transportation
costs, food costs and other expen-
diture,” said Mr Bannister, adding
that staff will no longer have to
travel to Andros, leaving their
families. “In New Providence
trained teachers for the pro-
gramme will be in abundance...
this is a win-win situation for all,”
said the minister.

This year, funding for the pro-
gramme has been reduced to
$345,000.

This after Mr Bannister noted

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Govt will ‘relaunch’ National Youth Programme in autumn





“We envision a
programme which
encompasses all
aspects of youth
development.”



Desmond Bannister

that money allocated towards the
NYP rose from $17,861 in the
2003/2004 budget to $900,000 in
2008/2009.

Responding to Mr Bannister’s
statement, MP for North Andros
Vincent Peet accused government
of being “hell-bent on disman-
tling the one working project that
is helping to reduce crime.”

“What are they doing?” he
asked. He pointed to the reduc-
tion in funding for the pro-
gramme as evidence of his claim.

However, Mr Bannister vehe-
mently denied the MP’s charge,
saying government wanted to
transform the programme into
what it was originally intended to
be — one that reduced the likeli-
hood of young people turning to
crime to begin with.

“The government has absolute-
ly no intention of abolishing this
programme,” said Mr Bannister,
adding that Mr Peet was “wrong”
for “playing politics” with the
issue.

foie stl baet aie et hee) ee) oe

[bt i 1 8]





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009, PAGE 3



0 In brief

RBDF murder
trial: jury is
selected

A JURY has been selected in
the case of a woman charged
with the murder of a Royal
Bahamas Defence Force officer
last year. The eight-man, four-
woman jury was appointed yes-
terday to hear evidence on the
death of Defence Force Petty
Officer Gary Leon Carey, 54.

The trial is expected to start
tomorrow before Senior Justice
Anita Allen.

Shimeakima Delores Pratt,
31, of Minns Subdivision, is
accused of Mr Carey’s murder.

The officer was found dead
on Sunday, August 17, 2008.
Pratt was arraigned a week lat-
er. Pratt, a mother of three, is
represented by attorney
Romona Farquharson. Attor-
neys Stephanie Pintard and Ter-
ry Archer of the Attorney Gen-
eral’s Office are prosecuting the
case. Around 20 witnesses are
expected to be called to give
evidence.

Senator's name
removed from
candidate list

SENATOR Jerome Fitzger-
ald’s name and photo have been
removed from the candidate’s
section of the official PLP website
— where on Sunday, he had been
listed as the future candidate for
Marathon.

This comes after a front page
story in yesterday’s Tribune out-
lined concerns over the selection
of candidates to represent the
PLP in the next general election.

It was claimed that individuals
have already been named and rat-
ified as prospective representa-
tives for certain key constituen-
cies in New Providence, seem-
ingly without the candidate com-
mittee having met. On Sunday
night, Mr Fitzgerald’s name and
photo could still be found on
myplp.com in the space marked
“The Constituency of Marathon.”
That space now reads: “Your MP:
to be announced.”

Neil Percentie, branch chair-
man for the last PLP representa-
tive for Marathon, Ron Pinder,
told The Tribune on the week-
end that he had been shocked to
find that Senator Fitzgerald had
already been named as a candi-
date. “The PLP lays claim to
being of the people and for the
people, however if this website is
correct, the people once again
have no say in ‘my PLP’,” he said.

“As a card-carrying member of
the PLP and former chairman of
the Marathon branch, I am able
to say that ‘we the people’ were
not informed of any decision to
name a candidate to the con-
stituency of Marathon but to have
Senator Fitzgerald posted on the
website as ‘the’ candidate is an
insult to the people of Marathon.”

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@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE PLP was yesterday
accused by a Cabinet minister of
using propaganda techniques out-
lined by Nazi leader Adolf Hitler
in his book “Mein Kampf” to get
the public to accept the Opposi-
tion’s criticisms of the current
government.

Minister of Youth, Sports and
Culture Desmond Bannister
claimed that the repetition of the
PLP’s complaint that the FNM
engaged in a counter-productive
“stop, review and cancel” process
when it came to power follows
the Nazi leader’s advice that if
you tell a “big lie frequently
enough” people are likely to
believe it.

“Members opposite have
developed the refrain ‘stop,
review and cancel’ almost to a
science, and I just want members
opposite to know that whenever
they utter that phrase they are

REPORTS FROM THE HOUSE

PLP accused of Hitler-style propaganda

DESMOND BANNISTER

following the political theory of
one of history’s most vicious
tyrants, who pursued a totalitari-
an, authoritative, single party,
socialist agenda and his ‘big lie’
theory is well known,” said Mr
Bannister.

The minister quoted from the
informational website Wikipedia,
saying that Hitler’s primary rules
were “never allow the public to
cool off; never admit a fault or
wrong; never concede that there
may be some good in your ene-
my; never leave room for alter-



natives; never accept blame; con-
centrate on one enemy at a time
and blame him for everything that
goes wrong; people will believe
a big lie sooner than a little one
and if you repeat it frequently
enough people will sooner or lat-
er believe it.”

“So the (prime minister) will
now appreciate why members
focus on criticising him so often,”
Mr Bannister said. “It’s there in
black and white.”

Contracts

Throughout the budget debate,
various PLP MPs raised the issue
of the Ingraham administration’s
decision to, upon winning the
May 2007 election, review certain
contracts for projects signed
under the PLP government short-
ly before it left office.

Following Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham’s assessment of
the state of the economy and the
outlook for the future in the short

Minister outlines moves to
improve quality of homes

Ministry ‘road map’ unveiled

mw By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT wants to
ensure that no purchaser of a low-
cost home built by the Ministry of
Housing has to do any “major
repairs” within the first 10 years
of moving in.

Contributing to the 2009/2010
budget debate, Housing Minister
Kenneth Russell outlined numer-
ous steps his ministry has taken to
improve the quality of homes.

This comes as the ministry has
spent in the region of $3 million
on repairs to 303 homes built pri-
or to the May 2007 election.
Despite this effort, there are still
200 outstanding complaints to
deal with, he told parliament.

Mr Russell said the ministry
has “re-established the govern-
ment regulatory agencies as the
primary approval and inspection
bodies for all the work we do in
housing.

“T believe that this will result in
the quality of work we are aiming
for so that low income citizens
may rely on having little or no
major repairs within the first 10
years of ownership.”

Meanwhile, he added that
Housing has also contracted two
individuals to provide further
training to building inspectors and
to teach its planning team more
about all government procedures
relating to procuring, tendering,
development, planning and exe-
cution of projects.

“We have also re-instituted our
relationship with the tenders
board, taking all projects over
$50,000 for approval,” said the
minister.

He warned that “builders tak-
ing short cuts and unscrupulous in
their dealings will have their con-
tracts terminated, and likewise
tardy or wicked building inspec-
tors and compliance officers will
be dealt with accordingly.”

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m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

REACTING to an audit
that revealed deficiencies
in its operational proce-
dures, the Ministry of
Housing has developed a
“new strategic plan”,
Housing Minister Kenneth
Russell said yesterday.

This plan will be a f
“guide post and a road
map for the ministry’s
work today and in the
future,” he said.

Mr Russell said that the
strategy came about after

KENNETH RUSSELL

an as yet unpublished Auditor General’s report on the ministry crit-
icised its “general operational procedures and pointed to many

weaknesses.”

To enhance “openness and transparency” in the ministry, Mr Rus-
sell said, a “project accounting office” has been established to
keep “accurate records of all expenditure and contracted arrange-

ments for our housing projects.”

“A small team of three staff work closely together and liaise
daily with the Bahamas Mortgage Corporation to ensure that pay-
ments to contractors and purveyors are timely, accurate and trans-

parent,” added the minister.

Mr Russell told parliament that more would be said about the
report when it is tabled in the House of Assembly.

Noting the ministry’s progress
in providing low-cost homes to
the public, the minister said that
in 2007 the government met 92
houses in an incomplete state.

He said the government has
now caused 217 houses through-
out Abaco, Grand Bahama and
New Providence to be completed,
while 175 remain under con-
struction.

Meanwhile, more than 150 lots
have been readied and offered
for sale, with more being pre-
pared, he added.

“Lowest Prices On The Island”



Mr Russell said improving the
“housing stocks and to increas-
ing Bahamian home ownership”
is his “number one priority” and
warned the public to treat their
mortgages as their “top priority”.

If payment of this responsibili-
ty becomes “unbearable”, Mr
Russell advised that those
financed by the Bahamas Mort-
gage Corporation should speak
with staff there, who can offer
free advice and “possible
options.”

to medium term, PLP MPs sug-
gested that the economic situa-
tion the country now finds itself
in, including the high unemploy-
ment levels, could have been
buffered had the government not
scrapped or delayed certain pro-
posed developments or public
works projects.

They embraced as a validation
of their analysis a statement from

the international credit rating
agency Standard and Poot’s.

In its report late last year, S&P
said that the government’s deci-
sion to review certain contracts
entered into by the previous
administration took the growth
momentum out of the economy.

That claim has since been out-
right rejected by Prime Minister
Ingraham.

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Nurses need to reconsider

A band
of clowns
and jokers

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please indulge me for a brief
moment by granting just a small
portion in your valuable column
to express my indignation of the
spectacle displayed in the
House of Assembly. First of all
I fully support your editorial of
Thursday, June 4, 2009. It
expressed what I conveyed to
a colleague the day before as
to why we have such a lawless
and undisciplined society.

Being true to their nature, the
circus of the PLP put their band
of clowns and jokers on display
in showing the entire nation,
and the world how such a shaky
and lawless foundation was laid
for the society and nation that
we are now living in. In essence,
what they suggested was, what-

letters@triounemedia net



others, and not for them,
because they are above the law.

The arrogance of these peo-
ple is a turn off, and an insult to
the decent people of this nation.
I know that Perry Christie is in
a lot of trouble, and is fighting
for his political life and future in
the PLP.

He, being the selfish egocen-
tric individual that I believe he
is, is stalling for time, and is
planning, and probably wel-
coming any distractions to fur-
ther his cause.

It is obvious that these jok-
ers are not serious in their

charges of the Speaker being
unfair and undemocratic. They
wrote the rule book. I noticed
some smirk on some of their
faces. These guys are not seri-
ous, they are clowning, wasting
precious time. One of their
strategies is to block and hin-
der the programme of the gov-
ernment.

These clowns are still bitter
over their rejection at the polls
in 2007 after one term as gov-
ernment. Get on with the busi-
ness of the nation, or else do
the honourable thing and ten-
der your resignation. Right now,
I think you are an awful exam-
ple to the youth of this nation.
You make me sick!

VC
Nassau,

WE THINK if the nurses, who have crippled
the public health service for the past week with
their so-called “sick out”, are looking for public
sympathy they have over played their hand.

It seems they — or at least 50 per cent of
them — are the only ones who don’t under-
stand what the word “bare” means when told
that the financial cupboard is bare.

If they would rid themselves of their political
advisers they might see the world and the seri-
ous state of their country with more objectivity
and understanding — also with more patrio-
tism.

During the budget debate in the House,
Health Minister Dr Herbert Minnis said he had
met again on May 25 with nursing personnel and
explained the financial problems government
faced — at the time it was more than $200 mil-
lion behind projected revenue. As a result, he
told them, it was unlikely that government could
meet their four per cent salary increase. Nor
at that time could government afford their esti-
mated $10.5 million health insurance plan. The
insurance would come after the economic crisis
had eased.

That same day Dr Minnis met with the doc-
tors and explained the situation. “The doctors
said they understood the financial problems
and they accepted not receiving their 1.5 per
cent increase and their insurance,” said Dr Min-
nis. The doctors understood, the nurses did not.
As a result, at least 50 per cent of them claimed
to have taken to their beds in “sickness.”

Nurses union president Cleola Hamilton crit-
icised government for having a “dismissive atti-
tude toward the nurses union.” She claimed
to have had no communication with govern-
ment, remarking that “the impression that we
are getting is that we are being ignored, which
speaks very much to how much the govern-
ment regards the health of the people of this
country, because if you are ignoring the people
who are delivering the health care then, of
course, you have no regard for the health of
the nation.”

The nurses aren’t being ignored. They have
been told — like the rest of us — the reality of
the times. We know that we have to tighten
our belts. At least the nurses have a commit-
ment that the rest of us do not have. They have
been told that they will get their group health
plan in the 2010/11 fiscal year — even sooner —
if the economy improves.

However, yesterday Bahamians saw who
really cared for their welfare when the Supreme
Court ordered them back to the bedsides of
their sick patients. Prime Minister Ingraham,

concerned for the health of the nation, had
asked the court to break what most people see
as a “strike”, but which the nurses have classi-
fied as a “sick out.”

Yesterday the Bahamas Nurses Union
(BNU) filed two trade disputes — one with the
Ministry of Health, the second with the Public
Health Authority, claiming breach of sections 24
and 28 of their industrial agreement — these
sections deal with salary increases — 4 per cent
— and group insurance.

The procedure now is that the Labour
Department will hold conciliatory meetings
with BNU representatives. If there is no reso-
lution, either side — or even the Minister if he
considers it in the public interest — can refer the
dispute to the Industrial Tribunal.

After two conciliatory meetings the union
can apply for a strike vote, which will be super-
vised by the Department of Labour. If the
majority in the bargaining unit vote to strike, the
Minister of Labour has to certify that vote
before a strike can be called. Traditionally this
does not happen immediately as there has to be
a “cooling off” period during which time the
Minister tries to resolve the matter. However, if
the dispute is sent to the Industrial Tribunal
there can be neither strike, nor sick-out, so the
nurses might as well go back to work now. As
we wrote this column at 9 o’clock last night,
nurses were still discussing whether they should
defy the court order or return to work.

After this display of defiance, and the sug-
gestion that some nurses would even think of
ignoring a court order, government should seri-
ously consider classifying medical services as
an essential service. This would put medical
staff in the same category as the police, defence
force and prison officers, who cannot have
unions because they are essential services and,
therefore, cannot strike. This does not mean
that their grievances will not be heard. All it
means is that their disputes will be settled peace-
fully without jeopardising either the health or
security of the public.

We hope that the defiance of House rules
and the disrespect shown for Speaker Alvin
Smith a little over a week ago is not a pattern
being set — especially if nurses thumb their
noses at the courts — for the future of this
country.

We hope that nurses, who are flirting with
the idea of continuing their “sickness”, espe-
cially after displaying such lusty lungs at last
night’s meeting, fully understand that contempt
of a court order could mean cooling their heels
in a prison cell.



ever laws they implement, is for

June 5, 2009.

PLP leaders show again inability
to keep members disciplined

EDITOR, The Tribune

By condoning and even attempting to cele-
brate the disorderly behaviour by one of its mem-
bers of parliament, the PLP leaders have demon-
strated once again that they are incapable of
bringing discipline to bear on their members.

In fact, the leadership has shown that they are
just as much infected with that old familiar atti-
tude of entitlement as the rest of them. They
miss every opportunity to demonstrate other-
wise.

After Mrs. Glenys Hanna Martin's disorderly
behaviour in the House, they should have
rebuked her, or at least privately urged her to
desist and apologise to the Speaker.

Instead, both Perry Christie and Bernard Not-
tage aided and abetted her in deliberately and
persistently breaking the rules of the House.

In attempting to justify Mrs. Martin's behav-
iour, Mr. Christie passionately reminded Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham how he (Mr. Ingra-
ham) had only a week ago asked for permission to
go back on the agenda.

But Mr. Christie was making the point without
getting the point. Mr. Ingraham asked! He asked
for the consent of members. He did not demand.
He did not say he was going back with or without
permission. He asked, Mr. Christie!

notice. Then she demanded to be heard out of
order. Then she refused to sit down when the
Speaker asked her to. Then she refused to leave
the chamber when asked to. Then the next day
she tried to gain entrance to the House when she
knew she was suspended.

Dr. Nottage did his own political credibility a
disservice in preventing the carrying out of a law-
ful order by a lawful authority when he obstruct-
ed the Police in the House in full view of the
television cameras.

Then he returned to the House and launched
an attack on the Speaker during his budget con-
tribution. Dr. Nottage knows or should know
that you don't do that. The Speaker should only
be criticised on a substantive motion.

The PLP seem to think that because Speaker
Alvin Smith is a soft-spoken mild-mannered man
that they can intimidate him and run over him.
That's a bad miscalculation.

Speaker Smith has obviously familiarized him-
self with the rules.

He is an excellent Speaker, one who is dignified
but strong. He deserves the support and gratitude
of the Bahamian people.

THANKFUL
Nassau,

Mrs. Martin didn't do that. She failed to give

June 11, 2009

A waste of $2.3 resurfacing West Bay to Paradise Island

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The resurfacing of the
majority of West Bay contin-
uing onto Paradise Island
bridge prior to FIFA’s Con-
vention and Miss Universe
raises in these harsh econom-
ic times — is the spending of
$2.3 million really necessary?















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Okay the FIFA people will
ride once going and once leav-
ing — the Miss Universe con-
testants could ride in a cou-
ple of times and a couple may
be twice going out as they will
go I presume to photo-shoots
in the islands so for a max, of
say 15 rides from Lynden Pin-
dling International to Paradise
Island we are going to spend
$2.3 million?

The nine roundabouts
which are supposed to be
landscaped at a cost of
$346,000 or, yes, an individ-
ual cost of $38,444.44 this is
incredible if you take as an
example the completed Gua-
nahani roundabout in Cable
Beach....a lot of grass and a
few plants to accompany the
palms already there for

$38,444.44 — something gotta
be wrong with that tender?
$4,000 yes and that’s high!

Drive behind DEU/CID the
police garage and see how
many police vehicles are all
broken up...... some stations
don’t even have a car when
you call them. Back where we
were at election 2008!

See that long list of persons
out on bail in April? Some 28
pages times five photographs
per page and we worry about
a soft ride for the FIFA peo-
ple and Miss Universe contes-
tants?

We are lost — priorities
totally out of whack.

JENNIFER SMITH
Nassau,
May 20, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Aviation partnership
to help private pilots

AN AVIATION partnership
between the Bahamas and Florida
will make it easier for private pilots
to get procedural information for
flying to and from the islands.

The Bahamas Aviation Depart-
ment has been working with Florida
Fixed Base Operators (FBO) for
many years and has launched the

Minister claims the PLP
shot down airspace idea

eral operators strategically located
throughout South Florida, accord- :

ing to the Aero-News network.

The four operators selected as Fe ae rae a
Bahamas Gateway FBOs are Opa j Pa eens iia eae

Locka Airport in Miami, Fort Laud- “urgently” pursue in order to cre-
Stuart/Palm Beach Ai Gales i ate a new and much needed
Hse cinpusneme soi ae annem ? source of revenue for government

Lucie International Airport in Fort i was proposed and then dismissed

i by his party’s own leader six years

The Bahamas Tourist Office staff : ago, a Cabinet minister said.

have trained personnel in each air- ;
port on all aspects of United States | ent on Wednes day, Mr Davis
and Bahamian requirements for air- suggested that a cash-strapped
craft departing or arriving the US : government could reap $40 to $50

erdale Executive

Pierce.

mainland.

fee ines eral ee aa : “high quality job opportunities”
also able to provide Customs and? were it to assume control of
Immigration information as well as } Bahamian airspace from the

up-to-the minute information about United States government.

the Bahamas.

Ministry of Tourism and Aviation Sports and Culture Desmond
chief aviation specialist Greg Rolle i Bannister yesterday quoted for-
said the FBOs a pean ? mer PLP Prime Minister Perry
inkeTest. Uy working with the: “Christie telling parliament that
Bahamas and because of their inter- ? pe “could not proceed” with his
est, the Bahamas Aviation Depart- : own stated intention to do this in
ment conducted training of staffand } 5094 hecause of “homeland secu-
has included them in marketing } rity concerns” on the part of the
activities such as trade shows and } [j¢ government

Bahamas Gateway FBOs with sev- aS ee

Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE very idea that PLP MP

should

During his speech to parlia-

? million in fees and create 120

In response, Minister of Youth,

“Tt’s right here (in the)
2004/2005 budget com-
munication,” noted Mr
Bannister, as he con-
tributed to this year’s
budget debate.

This came after Mr
Davis claimed the budget
was evidence that the cur-
rent government, which
has reduced funding to
most ministries, depart-
ments and agencies in the
face of a major revenue
shortfall and continuing
decline in economic activ-
ity, has “no real plan” for
how it can bring in more money
in hard times.

But Mr Bannister suggested
that the governing FNM has been
unfairly “blamed” during the bud-
get debate for not adopting mea-
sures that have already been
shown to be unfeasible.

He noted that Mr Christie, hav-
ing suggested in 2003 that his gov-
ernment could introduce a flight
information region (FIR) and air
traffic control system for the
Bahamas as a new revenue
stream, added that should it not

Desmond Pere



do so, it would have to
find other new sources
of funding in the “very
near future” or “run
the risks” associated
with a high level of
government debt.

A failure on the part
of former Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie to
take his own advice in
2003/2004 contributed
| to the unsustainable
level of debt the gov-
ernment now finds
itself burdened with,
Mr Bannister said.

“We all know that the oppor-
tunity was not taken by the for-
mer administration and the for-
mer prime minister predicted
quite accurately six years ago
even without this unforeseeable
global financial crisis being on the
horizon that there would be prob-
lems with the accumulation of
GFS deficit and a high level of
government debt,” said Mr Ban-
nister.

The prime minister has told
parliament that the country is fac-
ing a level of debt this year that

will be “unsustainable” going for-
ward. He said government is act-
ing to ensure that it brings the
level back down over the next
several years.

“(Perry Christie) accurately
predicted in 2003 when he did not
initiate the flight information
region for the Bahamas that there
would be problems with the accu-
mulated GFS deficit and
increased government debt.

“He also accurately predicted
in 2006 that our economy
remained vulnerable to global
economic shocks such as a rise in
oil prices, and oil prices rose to

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the highest levels in history last
summer.

“But we are now being blamed.
The truth is here in the written
words of the leader of the oppo-
sition, some written as long as six
years ago; and we should tell the
Bahamian people the truth and
stop playing politics with this very
important debate,” said Mr Ban-
nister.

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Water and Sewerage union memberts return to work

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

OPERATIONS at the Water and
Sewage Corporation are said to be
“relatively normal” once again after
union members who staged a sick-out
in protest of delayed contract negoti-
ations and “unfavourable” remarks
by the prime minister, returned to
work. F

While police were on the scene at
the corporation's head office on
Thompson Boulevard yesterday morning in case
things "escalated", sources at WSC said the
employees returned to work "peacefully."

Meanwhile, Environment Minister Earl
Deveaux, who has ministerial responsibility for
WSC, warned that any workers who were found
to be illegally off the job during the "sick-out" will
face salary cuts.

"Anyone who has been illegally absent from
work will have their pay reduced. If they were
legally sick then no problem but there is a process
for calling industrial action but a mass sick-out is
not it,” said Mr Deveaux, adding that he did not
know how many union members called in sick.

Despite the quiet return to work, head of the

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Bahamas Utility Service and Allied
Workers Union (BUSAWU) Carmen
Kemp, who represents the line staff,
said the stand-off between union mem-
bers and government will continue until
the "stalled" negotiations resume.

"The government seems to be holding
its position and we're going to hold ours
because they are not supposed to dictate
when the contract is going to be com-
pleted," said Ms Kemp.

Yesterday, Minister Deveaux said
executives at the corporation plan to
meet with union representatives later
this week to hammer out contract details.

"(Management) advised me this morning that
they would resume a meeting with the union
this week and go through the contracts this week
to see where they would come to a consensus,” he
told The Tribune.

Tensions have been high for months between
the two unions representing workers at WSC —
BUSAWU and the Water and Sewerage Man-
agement Union (WSMU) - and government
over the stalled contract negotiations and gov-
ernment's decision not to give WSC employees
across the board salary increases.

Their expired contract has been up for renew-
al since June 2007.

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In March, the unions said they felt “exploited”
by government after negotiations to
renew expired industrial agreements were sus-
pended.

They called for a general salary increase in
line with the rising cost of living adding that the
workers have not had a general salary increase in
six years.

Weeks later, around 200 members of both
unions gathered outside the WSC headquarters
in Thompson Boulevard as union executives
claimed that WSC bosses withheld keys to
employees’ vehicles preventing them from work-
ing —a claim chairman Anton Saunders later
denied.

Government has always maintained that it
never left the negotiating table and has said while
it cannot offer across the board salary increases,
it is willing to continue contract discussions.

Last week's sick-out was sparked by what
union members called "unfavourable" remarks
by Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham in the House
of Assembly during the budget debate.

Mr Ingraham said he was astounded to hear
WSC workers calling for salary increases con-
sidering the financial straits facing the corpora-
tion.

He said the only way to raise salaries at WSC
was to reduce costs.

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THE TRIBUNE





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Committee is appointed for
National Training Programme

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

AS PROMISED by Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham during his Budget com-
munication, Senator Dion Foulkes over
the weekend announced the official for-
mation and appointment of an implemen-
tation advisory committee for the Nation-
al Training Programme.

This body, with its goal of training and
retraining 1,000 unemployed Bahamians,
will be headed by the newly-elected pres-
ident of the Chamber of Commerce
Khaalis Rolle. It will have amongst its
members Rev Patrick Paul, president of
the Bahamas Christian Council; John Pin-
der, president of the National Congress

LOCAL NEWS

of Trade Unions of the Bahamas
(NCTUB) and the Bahamas Public Service
Union (BPSU); Thomas Bastian, repre-
sentative of the Trade Union Congress
(TUC); Dr Pandora Johnson, vice-presi-
dent of College of the Bahamas; Dr Iva
Dahl, director of BT VI; Dorethea Godet,
deputy director of Labour, and Alpheus
Forbes, deputy permanent secretary at the
Ministry of Labour and Social Develop-
ment.

Senator Foulkes said that this committee
is mandated to propose a framework for
the National Training Programme and to
advise the government of its findings with-
in three weeks.

“This process of consultation started in
October of last year under the joint chair-
manship of the Minister of Education Carl

Bethel and myself along with Ministers
Desmond Bannister, Zhivargo Laing and
Loretta Turner,” Mr Foulkes said.

Prime Minister Ingraham said during
the Budget debate that after extensive
consultation with the trade union leaders,
employers’ representatives and the
Bahamas Christian Council, government
has decided to begin a national training
and retraining programme for recently
laid off workers.

“The programme will be geared towards
training workers in areas where there is a
strong demand from the business sector,”
Mr Ingraham said. “These areas will
include, but not limited to the following:
Masonry; carpentry; welding; tile laying;
electrical; landscaping; data processing;
computer skills; customer service; day care

assistant; housekeep-
ing and language skills.

“Courses will be for
a period of 10 to 15
weeks and are being offered by Bahamas
Technical and Vocational Institute (BT VI)
and the College of the Bahamas (COB)
and will be made available to 1,000 unem-
ployed Bahamians who will be selected
from those persons who have already reg-
istered for the National Insurance Unem-
ployment Benefit.”

Minister Foulkes thanked the social
partners for the work they have done up
until this point and he expressed his min-
istry’s appreciation for those who are now
serving on the implementation advisory
committee for the National Training Pro-
gramme.



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Minister pledges to abandon ‘narrow UR aes) to crime fighting

THE continuing spike in crime
means the Bahamas must aban-
don “narrow approaches” to
policing and national security,
Minister of National Security
Tommy Turnquest said.

He also affirmed his govern-
ment’s support for the “effective
policing strategies” and policies
that he said are being employed
by the Royal Bahamas Police
Force.












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Mr Turnquest said the govern-
ment is committed to ensuring
that funding is available to
acquire state-of-the-art equip-
ment and technology needed to
police today’s Bahamas.

He was speaking at a medal
presentation ceremony for mem-
bers of the Royal Bahamas Police
Force at Government House.

One hundred and seventy-five
officers, ranging in rank from

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missioner, were presented with
medals for gallantry, meritorious
service, long service, good con-
duct and faithful service. Reserve
officers were presented with
medals for faithful service for the
first time. Sir Arthur Foulkes,
Deputy to the Governor Gener-
al, made the presentations.

Mr Turnquest recalled times
when crime and criminality in the
Bahamas did not present the
challenges they do today.

“Many look back at those days
with nostalgia when Bahamian
police officers did not even have
to carry guns.

“Now, policing can leave offi-
cers open to danger and risk.

“Our police officers have
proven themselves willing to take
the risk and to face danger in
order to protect us,” Mr Turn-
quest said.

Resources will also be provid-
ed for the “appropriate” train-
ing of the men and women of the
Force, he said.

“This will open opportunities
for them over the wide range of
disciplines required by the Force.

“T am a strong advocate for a
dynamic and effective police
force and place special value on
the work the Force does in main-
taining law and order in our
country.”

The National Security minis-
ter lauded the awardees for
“exemplifying the loyalty, integri-
ty and courage” for which the
Royal Bahamas Police Force
stands.

ABOVE: Royal Bahamas Police Force
officers who were awarded medals
for outstanding service are pictured
on the steps of Government House
with Deputy to the Governor General
Sir Arthur Foulkes.

RIGHT: Minister of National
Security Tommy Turnquest.

“What you have done,
awardees, was to make a funda-
mental choice, a major decision,
to give good and faithful service
to the government and people of
the Bahamas,” Mr Turnquest
said.

“You have committed your-
selves to upholding law and order
in the Bahamas so as to make
our country more safe and
secure.

“Continue to give good and
dedicated service to the Force
and to influence others to do like-
wise.”







Patrick Hanna/BIS

PUBLIC NOTICE

Public Consultation on Retail
Pricing for the Electronic
Communications Sector

The Committee for the Privatisation of BTC is pleased
to invite comments from members of the public and
interested parties on its consultation document for a

proposed

new Retail

Electronic Communications Sector.

Retail

pricing

regulation enables

Pricing Structure

the

for the

regulator to

impose specific obligations on price levels and price
changes for operators deemed to have significant

market

power

in certain

consultation document addresses
proposed approaches to retail price regulation in The

Bahamas.

product
the current and

markets. The

The Retail Pricing consultation will run for approximately five weeks fram
June 16, 2009 to July 17, 2009. Caples of the consultation document are
being distributed to the Administrators’ offices In the Family islands and can
be obtained from the Public Litliities Commission and the offices of KPMG In
New Providence and Grand Bahama. Copies can also be downloaded fram
the Government's website at www. bahamas.gov.bs or the privatisation
website at www. bteprivatisation.com and comments amailed to
info@btcprivatisation.com.





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



School safety committees are

PUBLIC schools in Grand
Bahama have now instituted
school safety committees to
provide an established mecha-
nism for the sharing of infor-
mation to ensure to the physi-
cal, mental and sexual safety
the Grand Bahama District
inclusive of Bimini, Sweetings
Cay and Grand Cay.

The purpose of the safety
committee is to provide an
outlet for students to confi-
dentially report abuse and oth-
er concerns. The establishment
of these committees is part of
the six-point initiative that
Minister of Education Carl
Bethel announced in April at a
press conference to address
the problem of inappropriate

established on Grand Bahama

behaviours and sexual
molestation in public schools.

The committees are com-
prised of a principal, a teacher,
a guidance counsellor, a parent
and two students.

Administrators

According to Hezekiah
Dean, District Superintendent
for high schools, all-age and
special schools, the schools’
administrators are working
closely with psychologist Dr
Pamula Mills in this effort.

Mr Dean also noted that the
special schools in the district
will fall under the jurisdiction
of a joint committee that

includes the principals of those
institutions along with com-
munity leaders and represen-
tatives from the police depart-
ment, school boards, the Chris-
tian Council, Social Services
and the Ministry of Youth.

The purpose of the safety
committee is to provide an
outlet for students to confi-
dentially report abuse and oth-
er concerns.

The establishment of these
committees is part of the six-
point initiative that Minister
of Education Carl Bethel
announced in April to address
the problem of inappropriate
behaviours and sexual
molestation in public schools.

Once an incident of abuse

is reported to the committee, it
must then be reported to the
police and senior management
at headquarters in Nassau.

Other aspects of the six-
point initiative that the Min-
istry of Education is working
to have in place when school
reopens in September 2009
include the vetting of new
teachers within the first year
of their employment; more
training of school guidance
counsellors to address stu-
dents’ psycho-social needs;
updating of the School Safety
Manual and a card featuring
contacts for all of the child
protection agencies and the
police department on each
island.

Dynamic week for Bahamas
Sea Turtle Conservation Group

THE Bahamas Sea Turtle Con-
servation Group had a very dynam-
ic week with various events
designed to educate the general
public.

This organisation is co-chaired
by three Bahamians — Mrs. Kim
Aranha, also President of the
Bahamas Humane Society, Mrs.
Debbie Krukowski, also Vice-Pres-
ident of Animals Require Kind-
ness, and Mrs. Jane Mather, also
President of Advocates for Ani-
mal Rights.

The membership of this organ-
isation is comprised of all the large
animal and conservation groups in
the country, including The
Bahamas National Trust, Proud
Paws, ReEarth, the Grand Bahama
Humane Society, BREEF, The
Nature Conservancy, The Bahamas
Humane Society, Animals Require
Kindness, Advocates for Animal
Rights, and smaller animal
groups established around the
country.

The candlelight vigil held in
Rawson Square attracted interest-
ed citizens and tourists alike. The
highlight of the vigil was a skit put
on by two children, both students at
the Meridian School run by Mrs.
Lisa McCartney.

Anna Nixon, who is nine years
old, and the daughter of Joanna
and Ricky Nixon, was joined on a
small stage by Brent Whittingham,
who is seven years old, and the son
of Carla and Robert Whittingham.
They put on a great performance,
and received a resounding applause
from the onlookers gathered in the
Square. These two young children
were clearly spoken, unwavering
and composed. They stood before
the crowd and spoke their lines like
the real pros that they are. Their
message was easy to read and
spoke volumes for the cause that
they were representing. Mrs Aran-
ha, co-chairman of The Bahamas
Sea Turtle Conservation Group,
said it was “truly exciting to see
two such young citizens of the
Bahamas supporting their right to
a healthy and rich environment.”

“We at The Bahamas Sea Tur-
tle Conservation Group encourage
parents to bring up their children in
a manner so that they are conscious
of the environment and the perils
that lie in the future,” she said. “We
are very grateful to Mr. and Mrs.
Nixon, and Mr. and Mrs. Whit-
tingham, for allowing their children
to perform in this public forum.”

The Bahamas Sea Turtle Con-
servation Group flew in Dr. Alan
Bolten from the University of
Florida to speak at a town meeting
that was held at the College of the
Bahamas. Dr. Bolten talked of the
importance of protecting the sea
turtles immediately. He pointed
out that the Green Turtle is down
by 95 per cent in population. Dr.
Bolten also reminded the listeners
that the sea turtle has an impor-
tant function in keeping the sea
grass beds groomed for juvenile
conchs and groupers to breed. He
also explained how the Hawksbill
Turtle removes the undesirable
sponges from the reefs to allow
corals to grow.

“These are not the sponges that
we pick to sell,” co-chairman of
The Bahamas Sea Turtle Conser-
vation Group, Mrs. Debbie
Krukowski, explained.

Dr. Bolten also pointed out that
some people claim that there are
more turtles now than before,
when presented with this argument
Dr. Bolten used a very simple way
to explain this erroneous percep-
tion that there are more turtles
today. He said that if you have a
hundred turtles and a hundred
good, rich, feeding areas for them
to go, then you might only see one
turtle. If you have a hundred turtles
with only 10 places to go you may
see 10 turtles, but that does not
mean that there are more turtles. It
means that there are fewer places
for them to feed.

Seventy-eight per cent of all
Caribbean nations have passed tur-
tle protection acts, however for
many of them it has been too late



TRS mer highlight of the candlelight vigil.

to repair the damage done by
“progress” to the feeding grounds,
often torn apart by shrimping nets,
so the poor trusting sea turtle
comes to our pristine islands, still
rich with food. Jane Mather, the
co-chairman of the Bahamas Sea
Turtle Conservation group pointed
out that “as and when they get
here...we kill them!”

“Tt is time for the Bahamas to
join those enlightened countries
that protect turtles and then turn to
the other nations who are not doing
so and urge them to follow suit.”

Dr. Bolten explained and illus-
trated very clearly how the issue
goes far beyond the eating of turtle
meat, these creatures are the cus-
todians of the underwater gardens
where conch, juvenile grouper and
other precious marine resources
lurk and grow into larger and more
viable animals. If we upset the bal-

ance of nature, as it has been for
millions of years, we cause irrevo-
cable damage. The sea turtle has
been swimming on our planet for
more than 60 million years. At this
point in time all sea turtles are fac-
ing the very real possibility of
extinction.

Mrs Aranha pointed out that
all sea turtles love to eat jellyfish; it
is a delicacy for them.

“T don’t know about you,” Mrs.
Aranha said, “but when I was
young I never had to worry about
getting stung in the summer when
we went swimming, now it is a reg-
ular occurrence. It kind of makes
you wonder if the turtles, when
more plentiful, helped to keep the
jellyfish away from the beaches by
eating them.”

Mrs. Aranha said the group was
disappointed that none of the fish-
ermen or people who write in the

lard of Thanks

—— ~

The Family of the late

Leon B. Wells

would like to thank his many friends,
colleagues and past students for the
numerous acts of kindness and support
shown to them during their recent bereave-
ment. Your words of condolence were a
source of strength and comfort and were

greatly appreciated.



The Family

papers against passing the Turtle
Protection Act turned up at the
Town meeting at COB.

“It was a perfect opportunity
and forum for questions to be
answered, and for us to have had a
peaceful and intelligent discussion,”
she said.

“We hope that this series of
meetings and the wonderful inter-
view by Etoile Pinder on Jones
Communications has helped to
educate people who were unde-
cided about this issue and that it is
now perfectly clear to everybody
how fragile nature is when you
upset the balance of it.

“With this in mind we, The
Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation
group, urge our government to
make the right decision and protect
these marine creatures as quickly as
possible,” said a statement from
the organisation.

“Interested persons,” said the
group, “can contact us by e-mailing
bahamasturtles@gmail.com

“We urge you to write to Minis-
ter Cartwright and send a copy to
our group. All people in support
are asked to make their voices
heard.”

I

Man appears in court on
armed robbery charge

A35-YEAR-OLD man was arraigned in a Magistrates Court yes-
terday on an armed robbery charge.

Charles Pandy, of Malcolm Allotment, was also arraigned on
the charge of receiving before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in
Court One, Bank Lane.

It is alleged that on Thursday, April 9, 2009, Pandy along with oth-
ers used a handgun to rob Makeda Brown of a HP laptop, a digital
camera and a MP3 player with a total value of $870. It is also
alleged that Pandy received the items.

Pandy was not required to enter a plea to the charges at his
arraignment.

He was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. The case has been
adjourned to June 30. Pandy is charged along with two 16-year-old
boys who were arraigned in Juvenile Court. They are also expected
back in court on June 30.

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>The °
imaneial

VOICE

What are the highlights and shortcomings of the
2009/2010 Budget Communication?

How will it impact our economy, our education,
health and security?
What does it mean to YOU?
What can we expect over the next six months?

Don't miss

THE FINANCIAL VOICE

TOWN MEETING

On the 2009/2010 Budget Communication
Wednesday, June 17 at 8 p.m.

at Choices Restaurant,
COB School of Hospitality, Thompson Blvd.

Host: Jeff Lloyd

Panellists

Wendy Warren, CEO & Executive Director, BFSB
Anthony Ferguson, President, CFAL
Dr Duane Sands, President, Bahamas Medical Council
Capt. Randy Butler. President & CEO, Sky Bahames
Frank Comite, Executive Director, Bahamas Hotel Association

Belinda Wilson, President, Bahamas Union of Teachers

Peter Blair, Ph.D. candidate, Harvard University
Vaughn Delaney, Deputy Managing Director, Bank of The Bahamas

Presented by The Counsellors Ltd.





PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

ter of Health Dr Hubert Minnis
for failing to represent the nurses
and for not attempting to engage
in a discussion with the union
throughout the eight day sick-out
until yesterday morning.

She called for him to stand
down, provoking cheers and
applause from the angry nurses.

Ms Hamilton said: “It’s degrad-
ing, it’s disrespectful and we are
calling for this minister to leave...
When we are pushed to the limit
that our employers are pushing us
to, we have no other alternative
than to push back, and we are at
the point where we have been
pushed too far and for too long.

“We want to say to Dr Minnis
tonight; we are sick and tired, and
if you are not able to do the job
then step aside.”

She praised union members for
their commitment but assured
nurses she must advise them to
return to work.

However, Ms Hamilton said she
cannot advise the nurses of their

Nurses stay defiant

The BNU president said: “T fig-
ure you should go to the doctor
and ask if you should return to
work.”

BNU legal adviser Obie Fergu-
son informed nurses they may be
held in contempt of court and be
committed, fined or have their
assets seized if they fail to com-
ply with the order.

But a riotous atmosphere pre-
vailed in the meeting at the
Bahamas College of Nursing in
Grosvenor Close, off Shirley
Street, and rebellious nurses
argued they would present their
doctor’s notes to their employers,
as they insisted they are “sick”
and “not involved in industrial
action.”

One nurse said: “We are not
only physically sick. Emotional
sickness can bring on symptoms
and we are here because we want-
ed to hear what is happening.

“We came to get some clarifi-
cation and that does not mean I
am not sick.

said I am sick, and I came here
and now I feel worse!”

The president of the Nurses
Association pledged her support
to the nurses, as did former Attor-
ney General Alfred Sears MP who
said he was calling on government
to show respect to nurses.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham maintains the government
has agreed to provide the health
insurance benefit but has decided
to delay its implementation
because of unexpected pressures
on the national budget owing to
the global economic downturn.

Government was granted the
injunction after Ministry of Health
director of health Pearl MacMillan
and Public Hospitals managing
director Herbert Brown filed affi-

davits at the Supreme Court yes-
terday.

The injunction ordered the
BNU to instruct its members to
return to their specified areas of
employment when scheduled and
not take part in, or continue to
take part in, any form of industri-
al action.

Prime Minister Ingraham said:
“The government, acting through
the Public Hospitals Authority and
the Minister of Health, sought the
intervention of the Supreme Court
to put an end to the industrial
action being undertaken by some
members of the Bahamas Nurses
Union with the apparent encour-
agement of union officers.

“Today, the Supreme Court
ruled in the matter and ordered

Concerns raised over excavation

FROM page one

from sunrise to sunset on a daily basis.
And a new dirt track cleared through the area to Cowpen Road
means trucks rattle through the once peaceful neighbourhood at all

hours.

that the union and its members be
restrained from calling, organiz-
ing or procuring members to
strike, or to refuse to work, or to
refuse to work when scheduled to
do so, or leave their employment
or otherwise participate in any
form of industrial action.

“My government now fully
expects that all concerned will
abide by the ruling of the court.

“Whatever our grievances or
circumstances, we are all as citi-
zens bound to abide by the rule
of law which has ensured the sta-
bility of the Bahamas and enabled
the orderly delivery of essential
services to the public.

“My government has always
been committed to the welfare of

all those who serve the Bahamian
people in the public service,
including and especially our nurs-
es.

“We will continue, as resources
allow, to work towards improving
conditions and benefits for
Bahamian nurses.

“We are, and have always been,
open to continued dialogue on
these matters with mutual respect
for each other.

“But the government cannot
and will not at any time — and
especially during these trying times
— abdicate its responsibility to pro-
tect the overall interests of the
nation within the framework
of good order and the rule of
law.”

| Claims that baby was treated for a
_ sexually transmitted disease are refuted

FROM page one

i However, Police Commissioner Reginald Fer-
? guson has not ruled out claims the child was

i? sexually abused.

illness.
“T went to the doctors and he

ESSAY COMPETITION

TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK

The Department of Public Service will host an Essay
Competition as one of the activities for the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week. The Competition is open to Junior

and Senior Students in New Providence.

Additionally, this year, a speech competition will be

for schools

in the Northern & Southern Bahamas,

respectively. Students interested in participating in the
Essay Competition should write a 250 - 300 words (Junior
High), and 450 - 500 words (Senior High), essay on the
topic: “ The Public Service-Striving for Excellence in

Customer Service.”

The deadlines for entries, which should be referred
to the attention of Mrs. Antoinette Thompson, Deputy
Permanent Secretary, Department of Public Service, is

Friday 24th July, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 Computer System will be awarded to
the winner each category. The first runners-up for both the
Essay and Speech Competition in the Junior & Senior High
School category, will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.

The winners will be announced during the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week Awards Ceremony scheduled for

Saturday 10th October 2009.

Students interested in the Speech Competition for the
Northern and Southern Bahamas should contact their

Language Arts Teacher.



A mother of two whose Oxford Street home backs onto the site said
the tenant began bulldozing the site in October 2007, claiming he was
preparing the area for farming.

But at the end of last year it became clear he was excavating quar-
ry to sell, and when digging reached the water table, the empty craters
started to be filled with everything from mattresses to toilets.

The pile of garbage reached 20ft or so before it was compressed into
the ground, the 45-year-old mother said.

She claimed the excavation and landfill has dropped the level of the
land around 6ft, but her main concern is the risk it poses for the whole
community as everyone depends on the water table which is now like-
ly to be contaminated.

She said: “My main concern is that he’s digging below the water table
and dumping garbage in there, so he’s polluting our water and we
don’t have any other means of getting water, so I don’t know what the
long term health effects are going to be.”

The 45-year-old woman who has lived in Millars Heights for 27
years also suffers from allergies to dust and her 12-year-old son has asth-
ma attacks provoked by the dust.

Members of the community wrote to MP Charles Maynard, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham and Minister of Environment Earl Deveaux,
asking for authorities to put a stop to the activity in April, but have had
no reply.

The mother claimed: “He’s in contravention of his license and he’s
threatening the health of everybody in the area.

“We have had about enough. You can’t even enjoy being in your
house because we have that noise all day, we have dust, and we can
smell the diesel coming from the machine.

“What’s worse is I don’t know how much longer this is going to go
on, or what the end result is going to be. And he doesn’t even have the
authority to do it.”

Environment Minister Earl Deveaux said he had heard of similar
reports and the Minister of Agriculture and Marine Resources issued
a warning to all agricultural tenants on Thursday.

He asked Bahamas Environment, Science and Technology (BEST)
commission, Bahamas National Geographical Information Systems
(BNGIS) and the Department of Physical Planning to catalogue the
sites on Geographic Information Systems (GIS) so police action can be
taken on all illegal activity.

Mr Deveaux urged residents to take pictures to the police, and pro-
vide permanent secretary Ronald Thompson at the Ministry of the
Environment with as much information as possible.

The minister added: “We have had a number of sites identified by
GIS. We have compared those sites with approved sites and will cata-
logue the others for onward transmission to the police.

“Tam not familiar with all of the infractions. The more information
we have, with persons willing to assist, the more effective we can be in
addressing the illegal mining and consequent health risks, not to men-
tion the environmental damage.”

Mr Deveaux said he intends to bring all illegal mining to an imme-
diate halt and provide a reasonable alternative source for licensed
operators.

Dredging the harbour will generate two million cubic yards of fill, Mr
Deveaux said, and he hopes this can be sold to licensed operators
until a more sustainable long-term alternative to hill excavation has
been determined.

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Mr Ferguson told The Tribune last week that
: police followed the appropriate protocol and
: police are still awaiting a full medical report
: before taking further action.
i The Commissioner said: “I don’t have any-
: thing else to say about this baby. The police are J.
: awaiting the pathologist report. That isthe only — preinalp
; update at this time.” FERGUSON
? Chief hospital administrator at PMH Coralie
? Adderley said the child was cared for by a team of senior officers
? and consultants from the paediatric and emergency room, and the
? medical team followed established clinical protocol with respect
? to treatment and contacting police.
i The autopsy report, when completed, will be forwarded to the
? police and the appropriate agencies.



FROM page one

Night court

rialised.



"For some time there was
talk about scrapping it, but it
had never come to pass.
Whether it comes to pass now
I'm not sure. (But) I can see
some classes of persons who will
immediately be upset — if they
do move to the weekend on Sat-
urday that might be something
that might well adversely affect
Seventh-Day Adventists, Jews
and Rastafarians.

"And it also may be looked
at as cutting into the time that
families traditionally spend
together," said Mr Munroe,
who is also a partner in the law
firm Lockhart and Munroe.

In the Jewish faith, the Sab-
bath is a weekly day of rest,
beginning from sundown on Fri-
day until the appearance of
three stars in the sky on Satur-
day night. For practising Sev-
enth-Day Adventists, the Sab-
bath is observed from sunset on
Friday to sunset on Saturday.
Rastafarians also observe a Sab-
bath on Saturday.

The night court system is an
extension of the Magistrate's
Court, created for the conve-
nience of the working public
who need traffic and civil mat-
ters heard in the more conve-
nient evening hours, said Mr
Munroe.

Currently night court magis-
trates sit for about 20 hours a
week, between six to nine pm
Monday through Friday, he
said. According to Mr Munroe
the effectiveness of a weekend
court system would depend on



how many magistrates are
employed during the weekend.

But bringing in untrained
persons to act as magistrates —
which was done in the early
1990's — may create its fair
share of problems, he said.

"The experience of lay mag-
istrates in the past was not a
good one and you can't expect
somebody — the usual attor-
ney to be a magistrate you had
to have gone through school
and been a lawyer for five years
— who has no formal legal
training to be fully competent.

"They talked about opening
courts with lay magistrates —
that was done the first time the
FNM was in power. They were
paid $1,000 per month to sit one
week out of the month, which
totalled up to more weekly than
one magistrate was being paid.
And there was a problem with
the sustaining of convictions
that they came up with," Mr
Munroe continued.

"The problem is, see in Eng-
land you have lay magistrates
but each bench of lay magis-
trates has a legally trained Clerk
to advise them on the law and
procedure. That wasn't a fea-
ture when we introduced it.

"And if you were to say lay
magistrates would have a legal-
ly trained Clerk then why don't
you just have that person be
qualified instead of the magis-
trate. So there are issues, I
haven't seen a comprehensive
position paper behind it to see
why this was suggested.”

DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Annual General Meeting

A reminder to all of our Doctors

Hospital Health System shareholders

that your attendance at the 2009 Annual

General Meeting is very important to

us, The meeting will be held at the

Doctors Hospital Conference Room,

located on Dowdeswell Street behind

the Business Office. We look forward to

seeing our shareholders there,

Location:

Doctors Hospital Conference

Room, Dowdswell Street

Date:

Time:

5:30pm

Thursday, June 18, 20109

* DOCTORS HOSPITAL



Health Far £ ile



TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009, PAGE 9



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Jackson, Bryant put
Lakers back on top

= By TOM WITHERS
AP Sports Writer

ORLANDO, Florida (AP)
— The coach stood to the side
and watched as his team exe-
cuted its final play of the NBA
season to perfection. It's the
one that had worked nine pre-
vious times. This wasn't his
famed triangle offense, this was
the celebration circle.

Phil Jackson, the architect,
smiled as his Los Angeles Lak-
ers, each of them armed witha
champagne bottle, popped
corks and doused each other
with bubbly late Sunday night
after winning their 15th title —
and first since 2002 — with a
99-86 win over the Orlando
Magic in Game 5.

United all year, the Lakers
screamed as one.

Kobe Bryant then dragged
Jackson into the frothy fray.

"It's been a long time since
he had a champagne bath," said
the brilliant Bryant, who
enriched his legacy as one of
the game's all-time greats with
a fourth title and finals MVP
award. "I knew that so I made
sure he became part of our cir-
cle and we got him pretty
good."

The Zen Master had his 10th
title, one more than Red Auer-
bach.

Call him The Ten Master.

The Lakers, who drifted
between disinterested and
divine during stretches this sea-
son, put it all together in their
final game, a no-doubt-about-it
rout that was sealed with a 16-0
spurt in the second quarter that
showcased the club's depth,
versatility and Bryant's sheer
will.

Jackson, who has been vague
about his plans beyond this sea-
son, delighted in his teams'
development. Borrowing one
of the mantras of his medita-
tive training, he preached to
them about staying in the
moment. Don't look back.
Don't look too far ahead. Don't
waste opportunity. Enjoy the



PHIL JACKSON reacts to a play
in second quarter of Game 4 of
the finals against the Magic...

| da ERA)

journey.

The Lakers listened and
learned.

"They came together this
year and were self-motivated,
and for a coach that's a posi-
tive sign," said Jackson, who
won six titles in Chicago before
taking over the Lakers in 1999.
"When a team is ready, they're
aggressive, their learning curve
is high and they wanted to win."

Though he may not have
shown it outwardly, Jackson
wanted it too.

"You can see it in his eyes,"
Bryant said.

Jackson sidestepped ques-
tions about his place in history
and comparisons to Auerbach
throughout the finals. The 64-
year-old, has had both hips sur-
gically replaced and struggles
getting around, is at a time in
his life when basketball, though

still a passion, doesn't burn as it
once did.

The drive is still there, but
it's in a lower gear. With this
Lakers squad, he would instruct
and observe. Those days of get-
ting out on the floor for demon-
strations are few. He deferred
to his assistants and to Bryant,
his coach on the court.

"I've always felt as a coach
you have to push your team,"
Jackson said, “and I told them
they had to push themselves. I
wasn't at the stage of my life
where I could get out and do
things that I had done 10 or 15
years ago to push a team. They
pushed themselves and I feel
really strongly that this is about
them."

During the postgame cele-
bration, Jackson wore a gold
Lakers cap — a gift from his
children — with the Roman

ANDY MURRAY of Britain plays a return to James Blake of the US during Queen’s Club grass court championships
final in London on Sunday. Murray won by 7-5, 6-4.

(AP Photo: Sang Tan)

Murray beats Blake to
win Queen’s Club final

LONDON (AP) — Andy
Murray defeated James Blake
7-5, 6-4 Sunday to win the
Aegon Championships at
Queen’s Club for his first grass-
court title.

The top-seeded Murray
became the first British player
to win the tournament since
Bunny Austin in 1938, who then
went on to become the last
Briton to reach the Wimbledon
final.

"I was quite nervous,” Mur-
ray said. "People were telling
me that no (Briton) had won
here for 70-odd years so that
got the nerves going, especially
when I was serving for the
match."

Murray took an early lead
with a break in the third game,
but Blake immediately evened
it with a forehand winner down
the line. Both players then eas-

ily held serve until 5-5, when
Blake missed a forehand on
break point.

The second set was equally
competitive until Murray broke
for a decisive 4-3 lead when a
fierce return forced Blake to
net a backhand volley.

"T didn't quite know what to
expect, but this is some of the
best tennis I've played in my
life," said Murray, who did not
drop a set all week. "I'm a long
way from winning Wimbledon,
but I feel confident. I'll try and
not get too far ahead of myself
and focus on my first match
there, but if I play my best like
I did this week, I've got a
chance."

Blake said he was beaten by a
better player, but that he was
pleased with preparation for
Wimbledon, which starts June
22.

"Thad a good week,” Blake
said. "Playing on the grass, I
always have a lot of fun playing
here. I feel great. I've been
working with my coach and
trainer, and I know I'm doing
the best preparation possible
for Wimbledon. I'll be ready to
play and feel great about my
chances."

It was Murray's fourth title
of the year, following victories
in Doha, Rotterdam and Miami.

The sixth-seeded Blake was
playing his third grass-court
final, after finishing runner-up
here in 2006 to Lleyton Hewitt
and losing the Newport final in
2002 to Taylor Dent. He was
seeking his first title since
August 2007.

Defending champion Rafael
Nadal pulled out of the tourna-
ment to rest his knees ahead of
Wimbledon.



numeral "X"' on the front to
signify his double-digit titles.

"Almost incomprehensible,"
Orlando coach Stan Van
Gundy said of Jackson's per-
fect 10.

Bryant can't imagine playing
for anyone but Jackson, his
coach for nine seasons in L.A.
Following Game 5, guard
Derek Fisher, who won his
fourth ring, couldn't picture the
Lakers’ luxury liner without
Jackson as its captain.

"T know it's part of the busi-
ness and it can happen, but to
take away the chef who stirs
the pot — it'll be a different
batch of stew, I'll tell you that
much," Fisher said. "I have no
idea what his plans are, and
how tonight makes him feel, or
where he feels he wants to go
from here. I know for a fact that
I want to play for him, next sea-

KOBE BRYANT kisses the championship trophy after the Lakers won

Game 5 of the finals against the Orlando Magic in Orlando, Florida,
on Sunday night. Los Angeles defeated Orlando 99-86 for the NBA

championship.

son and for as long as I'm capa-
ble of playing.

"That's who I want to play
for."

As for Bryant, he may be just
hitting his stride.

Now that he silenced all
those who said he couldn't win
it all without former teammate
Shaquille O'Neal, Bryant can
take aim at loftier goals.

He has become a true leader,
hardly the "uncoachable" play-
er as he was once labeled in a
book by Jackson when their
relationship was on the rocks.
Bryant is driven to win cham-
pionships, and just this side of
his 31st birthday, he is just two
away from matching Jordan.

Could Bryant eclipse Jordan
as the modern game's greatest
player?

Such talk once seemed
unfathomable. Not anymore.
Bryant is beginning to make his
case.

As long as they can sign free
agents Lamar Odom and
Trevor Ariza, the Lakers have

NISSAN PICKUP

Tough Body
Trouble-free
Easy to Maintain

(AP Photo: Stephen M Dowell)



enough talent to string together
several championships over the
next few years. If Bryant stays
healthy and hungry, the Larry
O'Brien Trophy could be set-
tling out West for a while.

Bryant has two years remain-
ing on a $136 million contract
he can option out of beginning
next month. He's not going
anywhere and said as much
when his contract situation was
raised a few days ago.

The Lakers are the only team
he has known, and Los Ange-
les, which has waited seven
years to celebrate another
hoops title, is his town. Again.

The City of Angels can be
unforgiving, even for the
blessed.

"They won't see us as losers,"
Bryant said. "L.A. is brutal,
man. Now when I go to Dis-
neyland, I can enjoy the
moment. I don't have to answer
questions about, 'What the hell
happened to you guys.’ From
that standpoint, the summer is
much more enjoyable."

One look at its super-solid, workhorse body tells you that the

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

Stewart makes

BUDGET DEBATE

Minister outlines programmes
to receive monetary increases

@ by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

A successful 2008-09 for the Depart-
ment of Sports will set the stage for an
improved fiscal year in 2009-10, high-
lighted by several increases to key initia-
tives set forth by the Ministry to assist in
the development of sports.

In his contribution to the Governmen-
t’s 2009-10 budget tabled in the House
of Assembly, Minister of Youth Sports
and Culture, the Hon. Desmond Bannis-
ter, outlined his ministry’s impact on the
current budget.

In 2009-10, programs receiving mone-
tary increases will include Student Athlete
Aid, Annual Summer Sports Program
and Elite Athlete Subvention.

Bannister congratulated the success of
the National teams, both at the junior
and senior levels over the course of the
year including the Beijing Olympics,
Carifta swimming and athletics, and
recently both men and women volleyball
teams at regional World Cup Qualifiers.

The Minister pledged for the Subven-
tion program to increase to its highest
level in Bahamian history.

“We in the Ministry, are appreciative of
the success of these teams, and we pledge
to continue to provide support for our
athletes.

“In this regard, I note that the item for
subventions to elite athletes has been
increased by $270,815 to $1,170,815,000,
which is the highest that it has been in his-
tory,” he said, “And even in these hard
times, the National Endowment Fund for
sports is $1.5 million, which is higher than
it has ever been prior to July 2007.”

In a timely fashion with school clos-
ings on the horizon for the impending
summer months, Bannister gave a syn-
opsis of the Ministry’s Summer Youth
Program which will seek additional
improvement with a budget increase of $1
million dollars.

“One Thousand One hundred and
ninety-three (1,193) boys and one thou-
sand and ninety-four (1,094) girls partic-
ipated in this six weeks programme dur-
ing the summer of 2008.





















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assistant, 3 years rust protections warranty
and licensed and inspected up to birthday.

2008 FORD RANGER
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LOADED
was $32,848.00
NOW $28,700.00



SSS

“The age of campers ranged from five
(5) to eighteen (18) years and the daily
rate of participation was ninety-cight per-
cent (98%).

“The programme employed three hun-
dred and twenty-six summer students and
trained coaches at a weekly average
stipend of $180 per week.

Subsidise

“A new component of the programme
was to subsidize eighteen non-profit sum-
mer camps organized by private non-gov-
ernment agencies here in New Provi-
dence, in Grand Bahama and in
Eleuthera,” he said, “Colleagues would
note that despite the global economic
downturn, the budget for this programme
has been increased by $54,000.00 to $1
million dollars. I thank the Right Hon-
ourable Prime Minister for this wise
investment in our youth.”

Working closely in conjunction with
the College of the Bahamas, the Ministry
will seek to grant student athletes with

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2.5 Turbo Diesel Automatic, Leather,
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greater incentives to hone their craft and
educate themselves at home by increasing
the aid available to students to $120,000.

“Mr. Speaker, my Ministry successful-
ly implemented a project to assist the
growth and development of the Athletic
Department at the College of the
Bahamas. In partnership with the Col-
lege, some twenty-nine student-athletes
were selected for financial assistance on
the basis of need and qualifications. An
allocation of $45,000 was made available
from my Ministry’s budget to fund the
programme, which was designed to make
the college equally as attractive to the
better student-athletes seeking tertiary
education. The initiative was also under-
taken to commence the process of devel-
oping a programme which allows
Bahamian athletes to train and develop
on their home soil,” he said, “I am
pleased to say, Mr. Speaker, that the gov-
ernment recognizes that no nation should
totally outsource the responsibility for
the development of its citizens.

“The immediate success of this pro-
gramme is that student-athletes receiv-
ing aid at C.O.B. are pursuing degrees
as varied as business, engineering, medi-
cine and education.

“Accordingly, we have been pleased
to increase the money available under
this item from $60,000.00 to $120,000.00
this year.”

Other programs addressed by the Min-
ister in his contribution included the
revival of National Hall of Fame, Pilot
Learn to Swim Program, Establishment
of Sports Medicine Commission, Fiscal
Responsibilities of National Federations
and Associations, Sports Tourism and
Capital Project completed by the Min-
istry.

“My ministry continues to be a world
pacesetter for developing successful and
innovative sporting programs and pro-
jects; as is shown by our experience dur-
ing that past fiscal year,” Bannister said,
“All of these programs were designed to
promote diversified opportunities for
Bahamians to practice the universal right
of all mankind to participate in peaceful,
well organized sort and recreational activ-
ities.”

FROM page 11

ment.

The Bahama Snow Kids
Camp was started by Korath
Wright as a way to introduce
Bahamian teens to the same
camp that sparked his passion
for snowboarding.

The programme teaches
young Bahamians how to snow-
board while they make new
friends and see a new part of
the world.

The camp is set for July 6-25
at Mount Hood, Oregon.

“This beautiful mountain is
one of just three places north
of the equator where you can

Jamaicans proud

JAMAICAN Kerron Stewart finishes first in the women’s 100m
final at the ISTAF Golden League Athletics Meeting in Berlin Sunday.
Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie of the Bahamas can be seen on the right.

She placed fifth in 11:19.

ski and snowboard all summer
long. This was the starting point
for Korath's snowboarding
career. He attended High Cas-
cade Snowboard Camp at Mt
Hood as a camper at age 11,
going on to work his way
through the ranks to become a
counselor and then coach. It's
the ideal place for the Bahamas
Snow Kids Camp to begin train-
ing the next generation of
Bahamian snowboarders.”

Interested teens can also e-
mail Korath at SnowKids@The-
BahamasWeekly.com and tell
him why you think you should
be selected.

The camp will include other

tee

Ministry of Finance
Treasury Department

Announcement
To All Merchant and Vendors

The Treasure wishes to advise that for goods and
services supplied or rendered to Government
Ministries and Departments during the 2008/2009
fiscal year, you are hereby requested to submit:

1. The original of all outstanding invoices to
the Accounts Section of the relevant Ministry or

Department

2. A copy of those invoices to:
The Public Treasury Department

First Floor

British American House
(George Street & Navy Lion Road)

NO LATER THAN THURSDAY 24th, JUNE 2009

Please note that the PURCHASE ORDER NO.
Must be indicated on all invoices.

Signed

The Treasurer





(AP Photo: Michael Sohn)



Want to be a Bahama Snow Kid?

activities over the week and per-
sons may find more informa-
tion at Wwww.BahamaS-
now Kids.com
nowkids.com or www.highcas-
cade.com and click 'summer
camps’.

Fun off-hill activities are also
on the agenda during the nine-
day stay. Camp One runs from
July 6-14 and Camp Two from
July 17-25.

Eligible teens must be
Bahamian residents and be
ready to travel and have up-to-
date travel and legal documents.

“Teens can also buy in to the
camp if they do not wish to try
out for the scholarships. As long
as they are ready to try snow-
boarding, anyone from the age
of 13 to 17 years can be regis-
tered in the camp.

“I'm excited about the
Bahama Snow Kids Camp
because it’s an opportunity for
teens from the Bahamas to see
snow for the first time...and then
rip that snow apart on a snow-
board!

“It's also a chance for me to
communicate to kids that as
long as they know what they
want, are clear on their values
and are ready to work for it,
every decision they make will
move them towards their goals.

“Competing for the Bahamas
as the first winter Olympian,
I'm proof that anything is pos-
sible, and this camp will encour-
age teens to follow their
dreams, no matter how big
those dreams may be,” said
Korath.

Korath would like to thank
The Bahamas Weekly, Pelican
Bay Hotel, Freeport Advertis-
ing and Printing, the Grand
Bahama YMCA and the New
Providence Community Centre
for helping make this project
possible.

Persons can learn more about
Korath at www.korathsnow-
boarding.com and stay tuned to
TheBahamasWeekly.com for
updates on his progress.

For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight
on Mondays



THE TRIBUNE

sp

=
s

PAGE 11

r



t



TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009



Jackson,
Bryant put
Lakers back

on top soe
See page 9

Women's national volleyiall

leam awaiting po

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

he women’s

national volleyball

team, having qual-

ified for the third

round of the
NORCECA 2010 World Cham-
pionships, will have to spend an
extra day in Barbados before
they can return home to cele-
brate.

Having lost all of their per-
sonal belongings in a robbery
at the Garfield Sobers Sports
Complex as they were playing
against host Barbados in pool
play, head coach Joseph ‘Joe
Moe’ Smith said the players are
still upbeat, but eagerly awaiting
the completion of the police
report.

“We have had to relocate
from the games village to a
hotel because the Barbados
Volleyball Association won’t
accommodate us,” Smith said
yesterday as they prepare to
travel on Wednesday.

“We are fending for our-
selves. We are still trying to
complete the police report.
Once we do that, then we can
leave. It looks as if we may have
to file a lawsuit because they
are not doing anything for us.”

An estimated $47,000 in per-
sonal and team monies, jew-
ellery, laptop computers, ipods
and cellular phones, as well as
the passports of Smith and play-
er Anishka Rolle were stolen
from the team’s locker room on
Friday night as they played Bar-
bados in a bid to get into the
playoffs.

The Bahamas eventually lost
that game in five gruelling sets,
but still advanced to play
Jamaica in an effort to get into
the gold medal game.

However, with emotions run-
ning high following the robbery,
the team got swept in three
straight sets on Saturday, forc-
ing them to play in the bronze
medal game.

On Sunday, after getting a

Want to be
a Bahama
Snow Kid?

CHILDREN of all ages are
invited to come out and meet
the first athlete to represent the
Bahamas in the winter
Olympics in February 2010 in
Vancouver, Canada.

Korath Wright is scheduled
to visit the Bahamas to select
10 lucky teens between the ages
of 13 and 17 to become the
Bahama Snow Kids and attend
the High Cascade Snowboard
Camp in Oregon, USA this
July.

Freeport - YMCA - Saturday,
June 20 - 3pm

Nassau - New Providence
Community Church - Monday,
June 22 - 6pm

Korath will be selecting five
teens from Grand Bahama and
five from New Providence.

“Kids, bring your cameras
and skateboards, whether you
want to try out or just meet
Korath Wright for a photo
opportunity. Tryouts will consist
of three preliminary activities
which are relative skills to snow-
boarding, but any teen who is
athletic could be a worthy can-
didate if they are interested in
trying snowboarding.

“The tryouts will involve
sprinting, an obstacle course
using quick side-to-side move-
ment, and skateboarding,”
according to a written state-

SEE page 10








STANDING TALL FOR BRONZE — Shown (I-r) are some members
of the women’s national volleyball team, Melinda Bastian and
sisters Cherise and Krystel Rolle, as they receive their bronze
medals from an unidentified official at the NORCECA 2010 World
Championships in Barbados on Sunday.

Uli

from

Fine Threads

Bernard Rd - Mackey St - Thompson Blvd
LJress Pants trom





(Photo by Kenmore Bynoe)

lice report

Will have to spend extra
day in Barbados before
they can return home to
celebrate qualifying for
third round of NORCECA
World Championships...

glimmer of hope when they
were told that a small portion of
the items were found by the
police, the team took their frus-
trations out on Suriname with a
hard fought three-set sweep to
earn the right to advance to the
third round of the World Cham-
pionships qualifications in Puer-
to Rico in July.

“We just decided to keep our
heads above water, but we are
trying our best to get out here as
soon as possible,” Smith said.
“We really want to come home.

“We are working with Amer-
ican Airlines to re-book the
seats for us so that we can come
back the same way that we had
intended to do so today.”

Had they not gotten into this
dilemma, Smith said the team
was originally scheduled to
depart Barbados at 7 am and
arrive in Miami, Florida, at
about 11 am. They would
depart Miami after 1 pm and
arrive shortly after 2 pm.

“It’s going to cost us a few
more dollars,” Smith said. “But
we have been in contact with
our family members and friends
in Nassau trying to get them to
help us out.”

Smith said that through all
the “madness” that they

encountered, there was some
light at the end of the tunnel as
the team qualified to go to the
next round in Puerto Rico.

“That just goes to show you
how good this team is,” Smith
said. “We have to do what we
have to do because the Barba-
dos association ain’t checking
for us. We had a meeting for
about two hours with them and
we told them that if they were
in Nassau and this had hap-
pened to them, there is no way
that we would have treated
them the way they treated us.”

Smith said there are a few
people, including the host at the
Golden Sands Hotel where they
are staying until they depart,
who are assisting.

He also noted that the gov-
ernment representative in Bar-
bados has also been very help-
ful, assisting them with the nec-
essary paperwork to ensure that
both he and Rolle are able to
travel with the rest of the team,
if their passports are not located
in time.

Smith said he has sent a
report to NORCECA, which
gives a complete outline of the
problems they encountered
while in Barbados and they are
also waiting on a response.

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Stephen Wrinkle

New starts
critical to
construction
sector health

* Sector’s business levels
down by one-third, but BCA
president and others say
inquiry flow started again
in past two weeks, led
by Bahamian projects

* ‘Buyer’s market’ makes it
ideal time to do business
with Bahamian contractors
at reduced rates

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE construction industry’s
immediate health depends on the
number of new construction starts
that take place before year-end,
the Bahamian Contractors Asso-
ciation’s (BCA) president said
yesterday, with the sector on
average having experienced a
“one-third” fall-off in business
levels.

Stephen Wrinkle, who heads
Wrinkle Development Company,
told Tribune Business that the
business decline experienced by
the Bahamian construction indus-
try would likely increase if con-
tractors were unable to find new
work once their existing projects
were completed.

“It’s difficult to generalise, but
I'd say probably by one-third,”
Mr Wrinkle said, when asked by
Tribune Business how much busi-
ness levels were down in the con-
struction industry.

“That figure will increase as
projects are finishing. People who
started a job last fall and are fin-
ishing this summer will need new
projects to work on, or otherwise
that 30 per cent might go to 50
per cent at year-end.

“Tt depends on how many new
construction starts there are. The
potential for new starts will be
critical.”

The BCA president, though,
said he and other contractors had
detected positive signs in the last
two weeks, having received
inquiries and requests to bid on
tenders from potential develop-
ers.

The majority of these requests,

SEE page 6B

WINTON #4276 Nestled on a large 18,000 sq. ft. lot with lush

landscaping and numerous fruit trees, this rare jewel features unique

THE TRIBUNE

uSiIness

2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net



T U8: S.D AY .

JUNE E16.

Retailer awaits
customer count rise Peton

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

large Bahamian

retailer yesterday

said it was defy-

ing the recession

with customer
headcount for June likely to be up
50 per cent compared to early
2009, and expansion plans in the
shape of new liquor and women’s
fashion concepts - plus 90,000
extra square feet of grocery space
- in the works.

Sandy Schaefer, Robin Hood’s
president, told Tribune Business
that the Tonique Williams-Dar-
ling Highway-based retailer was
also looking for “another loca-
tion somewhere on the eastern
side of the island”, but only once
its existing store had fully bed-
ded down.

“We have some prospects.
We've already identified a few,”
Mtr Schaefer said of potential real
estate sites for a second Robin
Hood outlet. “But, certainly,
nothing will be finalised this year.

“We’re looking at solidifying
ourselves here, and expanding
this next year with much more
grocery space, probably another
90,000 square feet. We’re look-
ing at developing all of it.

Conveyancing attorney

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FINCO’s proposal to require
title insurance for all mortgages it
issues could cause “a contraction”
in the number of attorneys willing
to provide conveyancing services,
the Bahamas Bar Association’s
president said yesterday, arguing
that the plan was asking the pro-
fessional carrying the greatest
potential liability to accept a cut
in his fees.

Wayne Munroe, who is also an
attorney and partner in the Lock-
hart & Munroe law firm, told Tri-
bune Business that under FIN-
CO’s proposal Bahamian attor-
neys would still be required to do
the same amount of work as they
do presently.

He pointed out that attorneys
would still have to provide First
Bahamas Title Insurance Agency,
the agency through which title
insurance will be provided to all
FINCO clients, with all the title
documents relative to a specific
mortgage, analyse them and
determine whether the real estate
buyer had ‘good title’ to what was
being purchased.

“Our concern is for the public
interest and how the whole pro-
posal would look,” Mr Munroe
said of FINCO’s plans, which
were disclosed earlier this month
by Tribune Business.

He added that Royal Bank of
Canada’ s mortgage lending arm
was not providing title insurance
itself, but instead looking to use
First Bahamas, whose under-
writer is US-based Lawyers Title
Insurance Corporation, to pro-

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* Robin Hood planning imminent liquor store and LA-style women’s
clothing/fashion boutique openings, plus 90,000 sq ft expansion next year

* Assessing locations for possible second store in eastern
New Providence, although no immediate move likely

* Customer count likely to break 60,000 for June, up from 56,000 in May

* Hard goods sales down 30-35%, with retailer eyeing solar power plans for whole store

“We’re profitable and continue
to be, and expect to grow that
profitability. We’re looking to the
future and expanding.”

Mr Schaefer said Robin Hood
had enjoyed “our best May ever”,
with customer traffic up some 15-
20 per cent over April 2009 fig-
ures.

“Year-ovet-year, it’s probably
up 80 per cent,” he added, though
pointing out that comparatives
will not become relevant until
August 2009, as that was the
month in which Robin Hood’s
expanded 104,000 square foot ful-
ly opened last year.

Mr Schaefer said the retailer
was likely to benefit further from
the closure of City Markets’ Inde-
pendence Drive outlet, adding:
“We should be close to 60,000
customers this month, and had
56,000 last month. January, Feb-
ruary, March were in the low

40,000s, and we’ve picked up 50
per cent since then.”

An in-store liquor outlet was
due to open at Robin Hood with-
in the next two-and-a-half to
three weeks, Mr Schaefer added,
with a Los Angeles-style wom-
en’s fashion and clothing bou-
tique also set to make its pres-
ence felt imminently.

“We’re doing an LA Boutique
for women’s fashion and cloth-
ing,” Mr Schaefer confirmed.
Product, he added, would be
sourced direct from Los Angeles,
one of his buyers having been dis-
patched there last week.

The store, he added, would
offer fashion and clothing prod-
ucts similar to those sold by Bay
Street retailers, with a former
executive from a Bay Street store
having been brought into run it.
The women’s clothing/fashion
store is set to open in the next

week to week-and-half.
Elsewhere, Mr Schaefer said
sales of hard goods, such as fur-
niture, appliances and televisions,
had dropped by 30-35 per cent,
those high-end, high-margin prod-
ucts having been hit hard by the
economic downturn and the rein-
ing in of consumer spending.
Yet on the positive side, Mr
Schaefer said Robin Hood had
been helped “quite a bit” by the
reduction in the Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation’s (BEC) fuel
surcharge. The retailer was now
looking to take the reduction in
electricity costs one step further,
and was examining “going solar
for the entire store”, which will
likely make for interesting times
when it goes head-to-head with
the law that requires BEC power
to be used in all areas where it is

SEE page 6B

‘contraction’ concerns

* Bar chief criticises FINCO title insurance proposal, saying it will not be cheaper and quicker for clients
* Areues that attorneys, who carry greatest professional liability, being asked to accept fee reduction

vide security for its mortgage
portfolio.

“The say this will be quicker
and cheaper for the public, but it
won’t be,” Mr Munroe said.
“They’re asking lawyers to reduce
their fees but do everything they
do now.”

In addition, Bahamian attor-
neys would still be liable - as they
are now - if a title opinion was
subsequently proven to be incor-
rect. This required attorneys to
maintain professional indemnity
insurance, something that was
extremely costly.

“We know that in a commer-
cial world, risk determines price.
If cutting out risk, then you can

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reduce your price, but under this
arrangement attorneys will still
be liable to them [FINCO], and
liable to the title insurance com-
pany,” Mr Munroe said.

“T’m still going to have to pay
for professional indemnity insur-
ance, but I’m going to have a
reduced fee,” he added of FIN-
CO’s proposal. ‘The only person
being asked to reduce their fee is
the person who has the liability,
because the bank and the realtor
don’t have liability.

“A lot of lawyers don’t do con-
veyancing because it’s a headache
with unlimited liability. You could
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quicker, cheaper or a better ser-
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FINCO’s interest was to secure
its mortgage loan, while the inter-
est of attorneys was whether the
purchaser had clean title or not,
Mr Munroe added.

He said that when the Bar
Council met with FINCO, the
mortgage lender expressed con-
cern that if an attorney did not
have professional indemnity
insurance, and a title opinion was
defective, then it would be
exposed.

In response, Mr Munroe said

SEE page 6B



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010

Ex-minister:
Budget

may be ‘too
optimistic’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A FORMER finance minister
has questioned the Government’s
projected 6 per cent revenue
increase for the 2009-2010 Bud-
get, given that Bahamian gross
domestic product (GDP) is pro-
jected to decline by 1 per cent in
current prices, warning that the
forecasts may be too optimistic
and that this nation may have to
become used to “large budget
deficits and a rapidly growing
national debt”.

James Smith, minister of state
for finance in the former Christie
administration, told the Rotary
Club of west Nassau: “As regards
the assumptions in the Budget,
one has to question how it is pos-
sible for the GDP to decline by 1
per cent in the 2009-2010 fiscal
period and, at the same time, rev-
enue is expected to increase by
6.5 per cent with no tax increases,
given that revenue actually fell
by 16 per cent in the second half

SEE page 5B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009






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Cable Bahamas in 5.6% Internet client increase

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Cable Bahamas saw subscribers
to its Coralwave Internet service
increase by more than 2,300 or
5.6 per cent year-over-year for
the 2009 first quarter, generating
an 8.6 per cent or $500,000
increase in revenues generated
from this business segment.

In his latest quarterly report to

Cable Bahamas shareholders,
chairman Brendan Paddick said
the BISX-listed utility’s Internet
subscriber numbers had hit 42,058
at the 2009 first quarter-end, hav-
ing grown by 2,300 compared to
the year-before period.

As a result, Cable Bahamas’
Internet revenues increased by
5.6 per cent during the 2009 first
quarter, rising from $6 million to
$6.5 million year-over-year.

al

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Mr Paddick said: “These results
have been very encouraging, and
have confirmed the positive effect
of the company’s continued
efforts in upgrading its processes
and core broadband network
infrastructure, thus improving ser-
vice performance and reliability.”

Elsewhere, Caribbean Cross-
ings and Maxil Communications,
the 100 per cent wholly-owned
subsidiaries that comprise Cable
Bahamas’ data business, saw com-
bined 2009 first quarter revenues
hit $3.3 million, compared to $2.9
million the year-before - a 15.8
per cent increase.

“On a standalone basis, the
operating margins for the data
business segment remained
impressive, and collectively
exceeded 80 per cent for the quar-
ter,’ Mr Paddick said.

Revenues from Cable
Bahamas’ core television busi-
ness, a more mature market,
increased slightly by 1 per cent
during the 2009 first quarter,
increasing from $11.1 million to
$11.2 million.

Mr Paddick said the company’s
decision to make set-top boxes
available to Bahamian consumers
on a rental basis had paid divi-
dends. Quarterly revenues from
this segment stood at $145,000,
representing “just over $500,000
on an annualised basis”.

Cable Bahamas invested some
$4.5 million in capital expendi-
ture during the 2009 first quar-
ter, and Mr Paddick added: “The
focus of the company’s capital
expenditure programme was on
improving the stability and per-
formance of the network, increas-
ing both subscriber growth and
monthly recurring revenue, and
enhancing overall customer ser-
vice delivery.

“Some of the major projects
include the continuation of the
construction of the Freeport
office complex, the deployment
of enhanced optical nodes to facil-
itate increased bandwidth capac-
ity to our HFC broadband net-
work, and the upgrading of our ad
insertion system to provide a full
digital platform, thus increasing
product capacity for our media
channel offerings.

“The company has also begun
to transition the extended com-
munities of Spring City area of
Great Abaco, from an analog to a
fully digital service which on com-
pletion will yield some 300 new
potential subscribers.”

Cable Bahamas’ Board of
Directors approved a 16.7 per
cent increase in annualised share
dividends from $0.24 per share to
$0.28 per share.





THE TRIBUNE

Bahamas moves
to grow private
aircraft market

TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009, PAGE 3B

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARCKENDY
ALCE of TREASURE CAY, ABACO, BAHAMAS,
P.O Box SS 1956 is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/





naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 16 day of June, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

VACANCY

m@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunebusiness.net

THE BAHAMAS Ministry of
Tourism has undertaken a new
marketing strategy that aims to
open up this nation to more pri-
vate aircraft owners and expand
the Family Islands product, its
chief aviation specialist said yes-
terday.

Greg Rolle told Tribune Busi-
ness that the Ministry of Tourism
and Aviation was focused on
making the arrival process for pri-

vate air travellers as seamless as
possible through holding semi-
nars and workshop to familiarise
pilots, who would use designat-
ed Fixed Based Operations
(FBOs), with Bahamian arrival
procedures.

The Ministry recently desig-
nated four Florida airports as
Bahamas Gateways for private
fliers. They are Opa Locka Air-
port’s Miami Executive Aviation,
Fort Lauderdale Executive Air-
port’s Banyan Air Service, Stu-
art/Palm Beach Airport’s Galaxy
Aviation of Palm Beach, and St.
Lucie International Airport’s Air

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“A select four has been identi-
fied as Bahamas Gateway FBOs
at this time, who have been
trained by the Bahamas Tourist
Office staff on all facets of US
and Bahamas requirements of air-
crafts leaving/arriving the US
mainland. It is hoped, however,
that the number will grow,” said
the Ministry.

According to statistics provided
by the Ministry of Tourism, a
major amount of private air traf-
fic left the US bound for the
Bahamas in the past three years.
Canada received 35 per cent of
the General Aviation Aircraft
(GAA) traffic over that time,
while the Bahamas received 35
per cent, with Alaska and other
Caribbean countries at 26 and 12
per cent respectively.

These statistics, gathered by
the Aircraft Owners and Pilots
Association, show the size of the
market the Ministry of Tourism
hopes to capture and increase. It
includes a vast number of high
net worth individuals.

It is hoped that an increase in
this sort of aviation arrivals will
translate into an increase in room
night for small and large Family
Island hotels.

According to the data, Abaco
itself accrued more than 120,000
visitor nights of this type in 2007,
which was almost 76,000 more
visitor nights than the nearest sin-
gle island.

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“Dealing with the

For a market that has been
plagued by high costs in com-
mercial airlift, this move by the
Ministry could mean substantial
gains for Family island tourism if
the product can a be expanded.

As it stands, Florida, the closest
US state to the Bahamas, has the
highest number of active licensed
pilots of any other state in the
southeastern US, and is the prime
market for these islands.

Mr Rolle said the Bahamas’
relationship with FBOs will also
serve to cut costs on trade show
and promotional ventures by
splitting the cost of such events
between the Ministry and the
GAA agencies.

"The FBOs, like Banyan, have
shown much interest in working
with the islands of the Bahamas,"
said Mr Rolle.

“Because of this expressed
interest, over the years, the
Bahamas Aviation Department
has conducted training of the staff
as well as included FBOs in their
marketing activities, such as trade
shows and promotional ven-
tures.”

Pilots choosing the Bahamas
as their final destination will be
able to use the FBO of their
choice, according to the Ministry.
However, the designated gate-
ways will offer information and
guidance not found at any other
FBO.

“The selected FBOs have been
classed as Bahamas Gateways
and are equipped to provide Cus-
toms and Immigration informa-
tion, as well as supplies and even
up-to-the minute information on
the Bahamas,” said the Ministry
of Tourism release.

“The small airports serve as a
one-stop shop for private pilots,
as well as general aviation traf-
fic, both private and charter.”

The Ministry used figures
gleaned from immigration cards
to identify which gateways those
private fliers were utilizing.

“Twenty per cent were coming
out of Miami and Fort Laud-
erdale,” said Mr Rolle.



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    THE TRIBUNE

    COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
    THE SUPREME COURT

    PROBATE DIVISION

    18TH JUNE, 2009

    No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00332

    Whereas SOLOMON EZEKIEL NEWTON, of Pinewood Gardens in the Southern
    District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
    of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
    Letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate of MABLE NEWTON, late
    of Yellow Elder Gardens in the Southern District of the Island of New Providence,
    one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

    Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
    expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

    NICOYA NEILLY
    (for) Registrar

    COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
    THE SUPREME COURT

    PROBATE DIVISION

    18TH JUNE, 2009

    No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00333

    Whereas SHAKIRA SANDS-BURROWS, of Millennium Gardens in the Western
    District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
    of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
    letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate of JOHN SAMUEL SANDS
    late of Malcolm Road in the Southern District of the Island of New Providence, one
    of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

    Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
    expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

    NICOYA NEILLY
    (for) Registrar

    COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
    THE SUPREME COURT

    PROBATE DIVISION

    18TH JUNE, 2009

    No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00334

    Whereas ANDREW DWAYNE FORBES, of No. 19 High Vista Apartments in the
    Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
    has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration
    with the Will annexed of the Real and Personal Estate of DIANE M. MILLER late
    of No. 580 S.E. 5th Street in the City of Pampano Beach in the State of Florida, one
    of the States of the United States of America, deceased.

    Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
    expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

    NICOYA NEILLY
    (for) Registrar

    COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
    THE SUPREME COURT

    PROBATE DIVISION

    18TH JUNE, 2009

    No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00335

    Whereas GRANVILLE CHRISTOPHER KNOWLES, of Miami Florida, U.S.A.,
    has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration
    with the Will annexed of the Real and Personal Estate of GRANVILLE JOSEPH
    KNOWLES, late of 214 S.E. Lincoln Circle N., St. Petersburg, Pinellas, Florida,
    USS.A., deceased.

    Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
    expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

    DESIREE ROBINSON
    (for) Registrar

    COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
    THE SUPREME COURT

    PROBATE DIVISION

    18TH JUNE, 2009

    No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00336

    Whereas ARLINGTON WILLIAM DEAN, of Fox Hill, Eastern District, New
    Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made
    application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the
    Real and Personal Estate of CECIL A. HAMILTON, late of 11224 South Emerald
    Street Chicago Illinois U.S.A., deceased.

    Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
    expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

    DESIREE ROBINSON
    (for) Registrar



    TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009, PAGE 5B



    Ex-miunister:
    Budget
    projections
    may be ‘too
    optimistic’

    FROM page 1B

    of 2008 and continues on a down-
    ward trend.

    “This merely indicates that the
    projections on the deficit, and
    therefore the national debt over
    the next few years, may be some-
    what understated. That is partic-
    ularly worrisome when one fac-
    tors in other possible adverse
    effects on the economy, such as
    increased oil prices and/or the
    unwelcome visit of a few hurri-
    canes.

    “Tt is difficult not to conclude
    that large budget deficits and a
    rapidly growing national debt are
    likely to be fixtures of the
    Bahamian economy in the years
    ahead.”

    Projections

    Mr Smith said the Govern-
    ment’s Budget projections could
    be “the most optimistic out-
    come”, not taking into account
    the possibility of further shocks to
    the international and Bahamian

    economies that could result in
    increased fiscal deficits and a larg-
    er national debt.

    He pointed out that the Gov-
    ernment’s projected GFS fiscal
    deficits for the periods from 2008-
    2009 to 2011-2012, which strip out
    debt redemption costs, could add
    $1.07 billion to the national debt,
    taking it beyond $4 billion and
    up toa 55 per cent debt-to-GDP
    ratio.

    Mr Smith said this percentage
    might be described as a ‘danger
    zone’ for small island economies
    such as the Bahamas, and the pro-
    jected large deficits were set to
    “substantially increase the nation-
    al debt, unless there is a dramat-
    ic turn around in the global econ-
    omy in general, and in the US
    economy in particular”.

    “Our principal concern in the
    Bahamas over the next few years
    should be the size of the planned
    deficit budgets and the resultant
    impact on the national debt,” Mr
    Smith said.

    “More importantly, whether
    the assumptions that have been

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    of government revenue and
    expenditure and resurgence of
    tourism expenditure and foreign
    direct investment flows over the
    next few years are correct and
    therefore justify the level of pub-
    lic sector borrowing that is envis-
    aged over the relevant period.

    Accurate

    “Tf the assumptions are rea-
    sonably accurate then there is a
    good chance the country will
    weather this economic storm and
    be restored to the path of growth
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    rating’ in the international credit
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    “On the other hand, if the
    experts are correct, we could be in
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    prudence by reducing the debt-
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    public accounting firms, called BOO Member Firms, serving international clients. BDO
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    BDO Mann Judd
    Nassau Bahamas

    Fan: 242-325-6592

    Absolutely no phone calls please
    Only the applicants with the above mentioned qualifications will be contacted

    REEFA_C#H

    Ministry of Education & REACH

    present

    SUMMER PROGRAMME 2009

    for students with autism & related Challenges

    JULY 6™ TO JULY 31°"

    GARVIN TYNES PRIMARY SCHOOL
    Hours: 9 - I Ages: 4-21

    Activities include:

    * Academics ™“ Life Skills“ Computer * Craft
    * Music ™ Physical Fitness “Field Trips

    * Swimming

    For further information and registration please contact:

    Mrs. C. Mitchell 361-8585
    Ms. T. Vassell 341-7996
    DeCosta Bethe! 557-2554

    The programme will be FREE of charge.





    PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009

    THE TRIBUNE





    Conveyancing attorney
    ‘contraction’ concerns

    FROM page 1B

    FINCO could stipulate that it
    only does business with attorneys
    who have adequate professional
    indemnity insurance.

    He then explained that attor-
    neys could “enter into an agree-
    ment where, if they work for FIN-
    CO, give power of attorney to
    FINCO to make a claim on your
    behalf on your indemnity insur-
    ance”.

    Mr Munroe said the Bar had
    attempted to obtain details on
    First Bahamas’ and Lawyers Title
    Insurance’s respective capital
    standings and financial perfor-
    mances, but without success.

    The Bar Council’s concerns
    were sparked by an April 1, 2009,
    letter sent to its Bahamian attor-
    ney members by Patrice Ritchie,
    FINCO’s senior manager for
    mortgages, in which she con-
    firmed the lending institution’s
    plans to require title insurance
    for all mortgages it issued.

    Mts Ritchie’s letter stated that
    attorneys “will not have to pre-
    pare an opinion on title on behalf
    of RBC FINCO”, and all this
    implies.

    FINCO, in urging Bahamian
    attorneys to consider “a flat fee”
    with respect to the preparation
    of mortgage documents, including
    their execution, stamping and
    recording, is essentially implying
    that the introduction of title insur-
    ance into this nation’s mort-
    gage/home buying market will
    eliminate the need for lawyers to
    do the current volume of work
    they handle, especially title
    searches.

    Less work means that Bahami-
    an attorneys are unlikely to be
    able to charge the current fees -
    usually pegged at 2.5 per cent of
    the real estate transaction’s worth
    - for conveyancing work, thus
    reducing income for a consider-
    able number of the profession.

    This would happen at a time
    when the Bahamian legal services
    profession is already under
    intense pressure from the global
    economic downturn, real estate

    and transactional work having
    dropped on average by 40 per
    cent, so any further cuts in - or
    loss- of income will be particu-
    larly unappreciated.

    Mrs Ritchie’s letter, a copy of
    which has been obtained by Tri-
    bune Business, said: “In an effort
    to improve the whole mortgage
    experience for our clients, by
    speeding up the legal process and
    reducing their out-of-pocket costs,
    RBC FINCO will be requiring
    title insurance on all mortgages
    granted after April 30, 2009.

    “We anticipate that in the eco-
    nomic environment, title insur-
    ance will result in a most wel-
    comed cost-saving for the client.
    Hence, we are writing to request
    your consideration of a flat fee
    with respect to mortgage prepa-
    ration, inclusive of execution,
    stamping and recording of the
    same, plus any disbursements
    made to pay the title insurance
    premium.”

    Mts Ritchie said FINCO would
    advise its mortgage clients of the
    fees charged for this service, and
    added: “In the circumstances, you
    will not have to prepare an opin-
    ion of title on behalf of RBC FIN-
    co.”

    First Bahamas Title Insurance
    Agency, which acts as the
    Bahamian agent for Lawyers
    Title Insurance Corporation, is
    an affiliate of Higgs & Johnson.

    Higgs & Johnson are the attor-
    neys for Royal Bank of Canada,
    and the firm’s managing partner,
    John Delaney, sits on FINCO’s
    Board of Directors.

    Mr Munroe yesterday alluded
    to these connections, arguing that
    FINCO’s proposal appeared to
    be an attempt to keep more of
    the income from mortgage-relat-
    ed transactions for itself.

    In a thinly-veiled critique of
    Higgs & Johnson, he added: “It
    just speaks to a certain part of
    the Bar breaking ranks.” Mr
    Munroe said some members of
    the profession were attempting
    to “undercut” their colleagues on
    price, something he described as
    “very unfortunate”.

    New starts critical to
    construction sector health

    FROM page 1B

    Mr Wrinkle said, were coming
    from Bahamian clients, as
    opposed to international devel-
    opers, something he said gave
    him a stronger “sense of securi-
    ty”.

    yn the construction industry
    in the last two weeks, we’ve seen
    some inquiries coming in, mainly
    from Bahamians. There’s been
    some activity, some inquiries and
    requests for pricing,” Mr Wrin-
    kle told Tribune Business.

    “That’s the first work we’ve
    had come in for the year, and oth-
    er major contractors I’ve talked to
    are in a similar position. Most
    have had very little new work
    come in since Christmas.”

    Mr Wrinkle said it was too ear-
    ly to determine whether the
    uptick in inquiries would develop
    into a trend, with the remainder
    of this year likely to be tough for
    the majority of contractors, their

    tradesmen and the wider labour
    pool.

    For if the current inquiries
    translate into real business, the
    projects will only likely start -
    from a bricks and mortar per-
    spective - during the 2009 fourth
    quarter, the BCA president
    explained.

    “Bahamian developers that
    have the proper collateral are get-
    ting good financing, so those pro-
    jects are moving forward, and
    that’s what starting to happen
    now,” he added.

    “TI do feel a sense of security
    with the Bahamian projects mov-
    ing forward. It’s a sign we’re cut-
    ting our dependence, rather than
    waiting for major international
    developers to come in.

    “It’s a good time for Bahamian
    investors to move ahead. There’s
    a lot of liquidity in the banking
    system, good contractor avail-
    ability at a reasonable rate, a
    good labour pool. It’s a good time

    Retailer awaits 50%

    FROM page 1B

    available.

    “We've got guys competing on
    bids for solar, and if that happens
    you will see prices drop 3, 4, 5
    per cent,” Mr Schaefer said. He
    added that he was hoping some-
    thing concrete on solar power
    would develop within the next 90
    days, because electricity was
    “such a cost of doing business”.

    “Tf we can reduce it to a point
    where it becomes reasonable, we
    can pass the savings on to the

    consumer. It’s real money,” he
    said.

    Mr Schaefer conceded that
    Robin Hood’s move into the gro-
    cery business had helped to shield
    it from the worst effects of the
    economic downturn, with its abil-
    ity to bring in fresh meat, such as
    beef or pork, helping to give it a
    competitive advantage.

    This, he explained, had helped
    Robin Hood to get increased
    business and orders from
    Bahamian restaurants, who were
    buying “wholesale at retail
    prices”.

    to do business. It’s a buyer’s mar-
    ket in the construction industry
    right now.”

    Mr Wrinkle said that despite
    having strong liquidity - the
    amount of surplus assets avail-
    able for onward lending purposes
    - the Bahamian commercial banks
    were being extremely cautious
    about lending, due to the weak
    economic environment and ris-
    ing unemployment. Increased col-
    lateral was being demanded from
    those borrowers who were suc-
    cessful in accessing credit.

    “We have heard that some of
    the major developers are trying to
    refinance and regroup,” Mr Wrin-
    kle said. “The Rose Island Ritz-
    Carlton and Royal Island are the
    two I hear that are trying to get
    back to the table, and in terms of
    projects on the board those are
    two of the better ones, so we
    would welcome that.”

    Describing the Bahamian con-
    struction industry as being “in a

    lull”, Mr Wrinkle added: “It does
    give us a chance to get our house
    in order and work on the Con-
    tractors Bill.”

    The BCA was working with the
    Ministry of Works to finalise “a
    few items and details” in the draft
    Bill, in an effort to finalise it
    before it went back to the Attor-
    ney General’s Office.

    The organisation was also due
    to restart its seminar series for
    contractors, to prepare the 2,000-
    3,000 Bahamian construction
    companies for the Bill’s pre-qual-
    ification requirements and grand-
    fathering them into the various
    categories.

    Mr Wrinkle added that the
    BCA was “99 per cent there” on
    completing work to initiate the
    Inter-American Development
    Bank (IDB) financed initiative to
    strengthen the Bahamian indus-
    try, and prepare it for the rigours
    of international competition in a
    free trade environment.

    customer count rise

    Robin Hood now employed a
    175-strong workforce, Mr Schae-
    fer said, making the company
    “one of the few places on the
    island looking to employ more
    people”. The retailer was contin-
    uing to look for extra staff, having
    just hired an additional two
    employees in its produce depart-
    ment, which was expanding at a
    rate where it was likely to soon
    need a further two staff.

    “Where else can you go and
    get it all done under one roof?”

    Mr Schaefer asked. “We’re going
    to become another shopping des-
    tination.”

    He added that Robin Hood
    was looking at extending its open-
    ing hours on days when it was
    especially busy, such as Saturday.
    The August opening of former
    PLP minister, Leslie Miller’s,
    bowling alley next to the Robin
    Hood outlet in the Summerwinds
    Plaza, was also likely to produce
    an increase in business and
    extended opening hours.

    NOTICE

    International Business Companies Act
    (No. 46 of 2000)

    GLP HOLDINGS LTD.

    Registration Number 154.085 B
    in Voluntary Liquidation)

    Notice 1s hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of
    the International Business Companies Act (No. 46 of 2000) GLP
    HOLDINGS LTD. 1s in Dissolution.

    Any person having any clam against GLP HOLDINGS LTD. 1

    Legal Notice

    NOTICE

    NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

    (a) QUASI HOLDINGS LIMITED 1s in dissolution under the provi-
    sions of the International Business Companies Act 2000

    (b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on June 15, 2009
    when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by
    the Registrar General.

    (c) The Liquidator of the said company 1s Shakira Burrows of 2nd
    Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

    (d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
    required on or before the July 28, 2009 to send their names and ad-
    dresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the
    company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit
    of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

    Job Opportunity for an

    ACCOUNTING CLERK

    An established Bahamian Company is seeking an
    Accounts Clerk
    ¢ Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent in Accounting
    ¢ Knowledge in Microsoft Word and Excel

    Interested persons should send resumes to:
    P.O. Box CR-55056
    Nassau, Bahamas

    PUBLIC NOTICE

    INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

    The Public is hereby advised that |, ELENCHA VICTORIA
    SMITH of PO. Box N-4637, Nassau, The Bahamas,
    intend to change my name to ELENCHA VICTORIA
    BARTLETT. If there are any objections to this change

    of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to
    the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau,
    Bahamas, no later than thirty (80) days after the date of
    publication of this notice.

    NOTICE

    CHELSEA PROPERTIES HOLDINGS LIMITED

    required on or before the 12th day of July, 2009 to send their name,
    address and particulars of the debt or claim to the Liquidator of the
    company, or in default thereof they may have excluded from the ben-
    efit of any distribution made before such claim 1s approved.

    June 16, 2009
    SHAKIRA BURROWS
    LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

    GSO Corporate Services Ltd., of 303 Shirley Street, Nassau, The Ba-
    hamas is the Liquidator of GLP HOLDINGS LTD.

    Please be advised that
    the following offices

    WILL BE

    In Voluntary Liquidation

    2 EP Wa ie ees ee

    GSO Corporate Services Ltd,

    Manidator Pursuant to Section 137 (8) of the International Business

    Companies Act, Notice is hereby given that, with effect from
    the 29th day of May, 2009 the above-named Company has
    been dissolved and has been struck off the Register.

    St. Andrew’s School Foundation

    CLOSED

    Development Officer
    sd a sd Dated this 16th day of June, 2009
    The Foundation is committed to the Mission of St. Ancdirew's
    School through its financial support of teachers, scholarship
    students and building projects. The Foundation is presently
    secking a person to bead its Office of Development.

    on Friday, June 19, 2009
    and will re-open on
    Monday, June 22, 2009

    at the usual business hours.

    Kyrene Kelty

    Liquidator

    The Development Officer, a full-time position, reports te
    the St. Andrew's School Foundation and will:

    be responsible for designing and overseeing fundraising

    : : [os “ae ; Legal Notice
    cHMpalens in support of the Foundation’s strategic goals:

    NOTICE
    CAERLEON VENTURES LTD.

    (In Voluntary Liquidation)

    develop marketing strategies and materials for public
    relations and advertising:

    BAHAMAS FIRST

    GENERAL INSURANCE COMPANY

    NASSAU UNDERWRITERS
    INSURANCE AGENCY LTD.

    Collins Avenue and Harbour Bay Locations

    pronente relationships between the School and various
    organizations, mcluding the St. Aumdrew's Alum and
    Friends Association:
    Notice is hereby given that the above-named
    Company is in dissolution, which commenced
    on the 15th day of June 2009. The Liquidator

    is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

    oversee the day today adtoinstnatpon of inbermational
    charities

    The successful candidate will possess knowledge and
    understanding of the School's history and culture; be a goal-
    dnoven individual with strong organizational and social skill:
    possess a minimum of a Bachelor's Degree; and be
    experienced in fundraising.

    Bahamas.

    We regret any
    inconveniences caused.

    Interested candidates should send their CÂ¥ and a letter of
    Interest tc:

    Development Officer Position
    St. Andrew's School Foundation
    FO. Box W-4695
    Nassau, Bahainas

    ARGOSA CORP. INC.

    Signed: Management (Liquidator)





    PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009

    THE TRIBUNE



    HEALTH



    The Tribune



    ©

    tee N D







    SEXe EMOTIONS

    @ By LLOYD ALLEN
    Tribune Features Reporter
    lallen@tribunemedia.net

    WHEN many of us think
    of the elements that make
    up a healthy and mature
    relationship, there are the
    usual thoughts of fidelity,
    monogamy, security, and

    love.

    However, some would say that
    the most common and significant
    sign of a strong relationship
    remains the sexual bond which
    should act as not only the glue
    that keeps that couple together,
    but also the reward that culmi-
    nates that connection.

    Dr Wayne Thompson from the
    Centre for Renewing Relation-
    ships recently told Tribune Health
    that many relationships today
    exist on the basis of sexual attrac-

    interpreted for genuine feelings,
    and often leads to one or both
    partners feeling misunderstood
    or in some way neglected,

    Dr Thompson who is trained
    in both psychosomatic and psy-
    chological therapy, said a com-
    mon problem in many relation-
    ships is sex is used and some-
    times abused to fill the void of
    something that’s lacking.

    He explained: “Sex is an impor-
    tant part of a relationship, but
    the vital thing to understand is
    what a relationship is.

    “We acknowledge the fact that
    both men and women are sexual
    beings, what is important is for
    us to understand how our sexual-
    ity is designed to bring fulfill-
    ment. Unfortunately for many
    people, whether in a relationship
    or not, there is the lack of emo-
    tional health, therefore the val-
    ue and importance of sex is
    skewed, ending in a lot of stress
    in their relationship.”

    Dr Thompson added, that as
    each partner is responsible for
    preparing themselves in various
    aspects of the relationship, failing
    to do so can and in most cases
    does affect its dynamics.

    He said what sometimes hap-
    pens with individuals who have
    a weak sense of self, is that sex
    may be transformed into a band-
    aid that temporarily conceals the
    real issue. For that person, he
    explained the thought rarely aris-
    es as to what problems or cir-
    cumstances may be affecting their
    partner, their modus-operandi is
    to fulfill their need to feel valued
    through sex.

    Dr Thompson said: “In the con-
    text of the true relationship, sex is
    the pinnacle of the relationship
    pyramid, and if we think of the
    pyramid we actually have four
    levels.”

    At the base of the pyramid, Dr
    Thompson said there exist emo-
    tional health, which is the foun-



    dation to experiencing
    the essence of what sex
    was designed for.

    At the next level, a
    person’s communica-
    tion skills are an
    important element
    to balancing a
    healthy relationship. He | |
    said knowing how to effec-
    tively communicate and |Â¥
    relate to others is a true Me 4%
    characteristic of an emo-

    tionally healthy person. 7 %

    Thirdly, he noted that the — h

    ability to resolve conflict was |, 4,

    also an important element to 7 yy
    a healthy relationship.

    “Once those three tiers are
    aligned, then sexual intimacy can
    be experience in a relationship.”
    Unfortunately, Dr Thompson
    said many relationships miss out |
    on true fulfillment because “
    either one or more of these ele-
    ments are absent.

    tion, which can commonly be mis-



    MAYBE you notice recently that your
    dog sleeps more than he used to, or does-
    n't show the same enthusiasm about his
    daily walks. His appetite is not as good as
    it used to be; and when he does eat, the
    food doesn't always agree with him. He's
    a little grumpy when you ask him to
    make some room on the couch or the
    bed, unless you catch him on one of his
    many trips to go to the bathroom. Sound
    like your grandparents? If you live in an
    extended family it might be, but other-
    wise you're probably describing the
    habits of the aging family cat or dog.

    Animals, like people, age over time.
    We've all heard of the comparison of
    one human year to seven "dog years."
    It's actually not that simple. Depending
    on the age of dog it's better to use a slid-
    ing scale where one human year equals
    five to 12 "dog years." The one to 12
    year comparison would apply to pup-
    pies, while the one to five year compar-
    ison is more appropriate for older dogs.
    Hence the average one to seven years for
    all dogs.

    There's little doubt that certain health
    concerns become more of an issue, as
    the body grows older. Those health prob-
    lems should be addressed directly and
    not clumped into the non-diagnosis of
    "Old Age." One of my hopes in writing
    about this subject is to diffuse the notion
    that if an older pet is sick, there's little
    hope of helping him because-well, he’s
    old. I often will be asked, when faced
    with an older, ailing patient "Isn't he
    just old Doc?" I diplomatically try to
    suggest that if we just conclude the pet is
    dying of "old age” we may be missing an
    opportunity to help him.

    Granted, there may be some older
    patients we can't help, but we don't



    know until we
    try.

    With that said let's talk about some
    of the common problems we can see in
    our older dogs and cats.

    We can all picture the image of the
    older dog or cat slowly standing up,
    stiffly walking across the room, only to
    lie down for another nap. Sore, stiff joints
    are common in older pets. Varying
    degrees of arthritis seems to be an almost
    inevitable problem for our aging ani-
    mals. Good weight control, regular mod-
    erate exercise, and newer medications
    are helping many of these patients cope
    with the problem, and in some cases
    regain mobility and enjoyment.

    Sometimes the joints become arthritic
    because of the gradually increasing load
    they're ask to carry. Pets tend to gain
    weight as they age for the same reasons
    people do. This additional weight undu-
    ly stresses the major weight bearing
    joints (hips, knees, shoulders, and
    elbows). Many times these joints were
    not designed to carry that added weight
    and problems develop. Couple this with
    a more sedentary lifestyle and reduced
    overall muscle tone, and you have a
    recipe for arthritis.

    Needless to say, a trim body weight
    benefits our pets in many ways just like
    it does for us adults.

    Our older pet's internal organs and
    structures can face problems as well.
    Kidney failure is a frequent diagnosis in
    older pets, especially older cats. It seems,
    at times, that the feline kidney system
    "wears out" before the other organ sys-
    tems do. Most cats over seven years
    should have a kidney profile done to
    rule out kidney disease annually.

    Pets with kidney malfunction will ini-
    tially exhibit increased thirst and urina-
    tion and weight loss. Later, as the kidney
    function worsens, symptoms of vomit-
    ing, diarrhea, poor appetite, dehydra-
    tion, and depression will develop.
    There's no question that the veterinari-
    an has a better chance of helping the
    kidney failure patient if the diagnosis is
    made sooner rather than later. I encour-
    age families to have their pets routinely
    screened with blood tests that identify
    kidney problems, before visible symp-
    toms develop. This may allow some ear-
    ly intervention that can help in the long
    run.

    After kidney problems, the next most
    common internal problem of older pets
    involves the cardiovascular system.
    While dogs and cats rarely, if ever, have
    coronary heart disease or "heart attacks”
    their hearts are quite prone to other
    kinds of problems.

    Valvular heart disease is all too com-
    mon in older dogs. Valves inside the
    heart keep blood flowing in the correct
    direction. With age these valves can
    develop irregularities that cause them
    to leak. This malfunctioning valve may
    be mild and insignificant in many
    patients, but severe and life threatening
    in others. Pets with heart problems may
    exhibit coughing, listlessness, and poor
    appetite. Using a stethoscope your vet-

    SEE page nine

    THERE’S little
    doubt that certain
    health concerns
    become more of an
    issue, as the body
    grows older. Those
    health problems
    should be
    addressed directly
    and not clumped
    into the non-diag-
    nosis of “Old Age.”

    erinarian can often hear an extra heart
    sound call a "murmur" that will tip
    him/her off that a heart problem may
    need to be looked into. Fortunately
    many pets with heart problems, if cor-
    rectly diagnosed, can be helped with
    medications.

    Possibly the most common health
    problem we see with older pets is dental
    disease. A pet doesn't need to necessar-
    ily be old to have problems with her
    teeth. The vast majority of dogs over 5
    years of age have moderate to severe
    dental problems. Without routine dental
    care, an eight-10 year old dog or cat can
    have dental problems so severe that their
    general health can be affected. Tooth
    loss, tooth root infections, and consider-
    able oral discomfort-enough to cause
    hesitation to eat-are common oral cavi-
    ty problems caused by bad teeth.

    We also know that long-standing den-
    tal disease can initiate severe, system-
    wide problems that can spell serious
    trouble for the already somewhat sus-
    ceptible older pet. Keeping the teeth
    clean is your best defense for these prob-
    lems. This may mean a complete dental
    cleaning under anesthesia if the prob-
    lem is advanced, and/or regular home
    cleaning or brushing to prevent the prob-
    lem in the first place.

    Obviously this short discussion only
    touches on a few common health issues
    for geriatric pets. In the final assessment
    there are many health problems associ-
    ated with aging-some treatable, some
    not so treatable. Certainly our venerable
    animal senior citizens deserve the bene-
    fit of the doubt. It may not come as a sur-
    prise to you, but some time ago-I think
    sometime around my fortieth birthday-I
    stopped calling older age a “disease.”



    A brighter
    future
    for skin

    APPEARING on her
    vacation yacht in the 1920s
    looking bronzed and no
    doubt fashionable, Coco
    Chanel set forth a move-
    ment that made the dark-
    ening - or tanning - of skin
    a sign of health and afflu-
    ence. From that moment
    on, women of the 20s had
    to add tanning to their
    demanding “beautifica-
    tion” regimens that
    already included the bob-
    bing of hair, binding of
    breasts and slimming of
    the waistline.

    Thanks in part to aware-
    ness that UV light leads to
    advanced aging and skin
    cancer, tanning is falling
    out of favor as a sign of
    health. Consumers world-
    wide are more and more
    interested in obtaining
    lighter, brighter skin. The
    main reason may stem
    from market research stud-
    ies which indicate that an
    uneven skin tone is per-
    ceived as aging while a
    more even skin coloration
    is judged to be healthier
    and younger-looking.

    As populations mature
    globally, pigmentation
    issues become more preva-
    lent, and the demand for
    skin brightening products
    has surged. Unfortunate-
    ly, those looking to bright-
    en skin often run into two
    different and disappoint-
    ing scenarios: the products
    don't deliver results as
    promised or even worse,
    skin health suffers at the
    hand of brightening ingre-
    dients. Treating hyperpig-
    mentation without regard
    for skin health can lead to
    sensitivity, irritation, pho-
    todamage, exposure to
    potentially dangerous
    agents and premature
    aging.

    This leads our research
    and development team at
    The International Dermal
    Institute to develop an
    ingredient complex that
    could both balance the
    skin's tone and maintain
    its utmost health. The
    result is ChromaWhite
    TRx, anew era in bright-
    ening. See your Derma-
    logica professional skin
    therapist for your Face
    Mapping® skin analysis
    and customized product
    prescription.



    THE TRIBUNE

    TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009, PAGE 9B



    a eV



    Dating in midlife

    DATING in midlife is
    undoubtedly a whole differ-
    ent ball game from the rose
    colored vision of love and
    life in our teens and twen-
    ties. In the beginning it was
    exhilarating and life seemed
    mysterious and full of won-
    der. Everyone and every-
    thing seemed exciting and
    anything seemed possible.
    ‘Chemistry' was all that was
    important and differences in
    personalities seemed unim-
    portant. ‘First Loves' have a
    special place in our hearts
    as the first major loss is trau-
    matic and leaves an indeli-

    ble impression in our minds.
    Now several decades of dating and
    relationships later it is completely



    understandable that we are not the
    same people and our requirements
    from a relationship are very different.
    We have gained experience; know our-
    selves a whole lot better than when we
    first entered adulthood. We may be a
    little jaded or weather beaten from
    failed relationships or perhaps life just
    did not give us what we had expected
    or planned. Our advancing years reveal
    that even when we try to plan and
    make the right choices life has a way of
    just making new paths for us. At a cer-
    tain point we come to realise that living
    our life with bitterness and regret is
    pointless and not helping our current
    situation or happiness.

    By this stage many have already

    decided to go it alone and fill their
    lives with satisfying activities and
    careers. Their lives are rich and they
    have found ways to meet all their emo-
    tional, physical, spiritual and intellec-
    tual needs. They are empowered from
    their own achievements and do not
    feel the need to be in a couple to feel
    complete. The natural desire to be
    loved and be touched is met by hugs
    and kisses from close friends, family
    and even pets. Dating at this point in
    their lives holds little importance and
    often there is little room for a new per-
    son to enter such a full lifestyle.

    But for the other people who are
    single in midlife and who want and
    crave a close loving intimate relation-
    ship there is a sense of urgency and
    impatience with the dating scene. They
    feel strongly about ‘wasting time’ on
    relationships that may not lead any-
    where. Their biological clock may be
    ticking or just life's clock. They may be
    acutely aware of their own mortality as
    they may have encountered serious ill-
    ness or even death of someone close to
    them. It becomes even more impor-

    tant to love and express our love to
    those who play a vital role in our lives.
    The words ‘life is too short and pre-
    cious’ becomes even more relevant.

    So is it possible to ‘fast track’ this
    dating thing? Is it possible to skip to
    the nitty -gritty areas of a relationship
    without putting in the time? Is it only
    possible to really get to know some-
    one by living with them?

    Yes, it is possible but it requires a
    great deal of honesty and willingness
    from both parties. It also requires you
    to know yourself well and to able to
    take criticism. All these prerequisites
    may narrow the candidates as they may
    run in fear when you first discuss this.
    But if this is important to you and they
    are willing- go for it! First write down
    all your fears and the buttons that peo-
    ple push which make you act defen-
    sively. Relate them to situations that
    have happened in this relationship
    which provoked such a reaction. In
    doing this you both quickly learn vast
    vulnerable areas which help to explain
    your behaviour. Then do a quick run
    down of things you would change in

    that person. It is hard to listen to but
    you may be surprised they are usually
    areas that are easy to correct.

    All in all learning about bad habits
    and fears takes you deeper into a rela-
    tionship. Just the mere fact of a person
    being willing to open up and be honest
    adds to their ability to be a serious
    partner in your life. If on the other
    hand the exercise opens up huge
    wounds and the decision is to end the
    relationship then tell yourself it is bet-
    ter to find out now than months or
    years down the line. Trust yourself and
    embrace the idea that there is someone
    for you out there.

    ¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual and
    Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a
    Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical
    Sex Therapist.

    Call for an appointment- Relate Bahamas
    at 364- 7230, or email
    relatebahamas@yahoo.com
    orwww.relatebahamas.blogspot.com.
    She is also available for speaking
    engagements.

    GREEN SCENE

    @x



    The popularity
    of papayas

    PAPAYAS may be the
    most popular back yard fruit
    grown in The Bahamas. You
    can see them everywhere. A
    recent photograph in The Tri-
    bune showed a Haitian shack
    in very poor circumstances,
    but right outside the front
    door was a papaya.

    Papayas are often called
    ‘paw-paws’ and the plants are
    herbs rather than trees. Typi-
    cal growth is a single hollow
    stem with a crown of lattice-
    work leaves produced at the
    end of long hollow stems.
    Fruits are produced from the
    stems, usually high up in a
    cluster.

    The plants need full sun and
    will grow long and spindly in
    an attempt to reach sunlight if
    grown in the shade. Papaya
    plants grown in the sun are
    strong enough to survive
    winds less than hurricane
    strength but elongated and
    weakened papaya trees can
    be blown over.

    The fruits can be long and
    thin, pear shaped, or almost
    perfectly round. The flesh
    when ripe can be light yellow
    to deep gold or reddish. Many
    people profess not to like the
    taste of papaya but this is
    often because they have not
    experienced the full palette
    of papayas that range from
    earthy to extremely sweet.

    Cut in half lengthwise the
    fruit will reveal a mass of dark
    seeds that can be easily
    removed with a spoon. The
    surrounding pulp also can be
    removed with a spoon or
    peeled and cut into cubes or
    balled with a melon baller. If
    the taste is not to your satis-
    faction you can always add a
    little sugar. Papaya also
    makes a healthy and tasty
    smoothie.

    Papaya fruits that are full
    but still green can be peeled,
    deseeded and then cut into
    chunks and boiled in salted
    water. Once drained and
    mashed the taste is almost
    identical to squash.

    Papaya (Carica papaya) is
    native to South America and
    has been naturalised in The
    Bahamas and the Caribbean
    for centuries. The native
    Bahamian papaya comes as
    male and female (boar and
    sow) and both sexes must be
    present to produce fruit.
    Female trees produce single
    bell-shaped flowers while the
    male produce panicles of slim,
    elongated flowers. One male
    tree will fertilise up to ten

    female trees.

    Most modern varieties of
    papaya have perfect flowers
    that contain both male and
    female parts. Food stores
    often sell cut papayas from
    Nicaragua and other Central
    American countries and these
    can provide the seeds you
    need to raise your own
    papayas.

    Once you have removed the
    seeds from the fruit you
    should rub them singly with
    your fingers to break the skin
    of the aril that surrounds the
    seeds. It is best that the seeds
    be planted where you want
    them to grow as they are often
    awkward to transplant suc-
    cessfully.

    The seeds should be planted
    a quarter of an inch deep in
    fertile soil and kept well
    watered until established. It
    takes about a year from seed
    to ripe fruit but in the mean-
    time your papaya grove will
    add a touch of the tropics to
    your garden. A papaya tree
    will produce for 4 to 7 years
    but is often replaced much
    earlier.

    The leftover seeds with their
    arils intact can be allowed to
    dry and then used as a condi-
    ment by filling a pepper
    grinder. The taste is pleasant-
    ly peppery. All parts of
    papaya contain papain, an
    enzyme that aids digestion. It
    is a good idea to start or end a
    meal with a slice of papaya.

    Sometimes papaya trees
    grow too tall for us to reach
    the fruits easily. This incon-
    venience can be avoided by
    cutting the tree a few feet
    from the ground just after a
    period of bearing. Three or
    four branches will form and
    each one of these branches
    will bear as heavily as the orig-
    inal main stem. Of course, the
    tree will lose its original grace-
    ful appeal and become quite
    ugly — but productive.

    Young papaya fruits are
    attacked by the papaya fruit
    fly that resembles a wasp with
    a very long protrusion at the
    rear that is actually a oviposi-
    tor used to place eggs into the
    fruit. The only effective way to
    prevent this is to cover small
    fruits with paper bags as soon
    as the flower drops. By the
    time the paper bag disinte-
    grates the fruit will have a
    thick enough skin to repel the
    papaya fruit fly.

    ¢ j.hardy@coralwave.com

    BY GARDENER JACK







    Sex & emotions

    FROM page eight

    He said a clear sign of a
    person who is not emotion-
    ally healthy is when their
    thinking is not appropriate
    toward life, relationships, and
    people, which can cause them
    to treat their partner “like a
    piece of meat,” or as if
    they’re inadequate.

    He said while these short-
    falls in a person’s ability to
    understand a healthy rela-
    tionship may seem miniscule,

    at the end of the day it plays
    a significant role in their
    overall health.

    “It’s the most critical part,
    what is unique about human
    beings is that they are lastly
    physical beings. At the core
    you are a mental, emotional,
    Spiritual being, and all of that
    is housed in a physiological
    body. If you don’t have the
    core lined-up correctly, then
    the physiological body is
    going to experience problems
    and = challenges,” he

    explained.

    He said from the psycho-
    somatic perspective, when the
    human = spirit/emotional
    health is broken, some prob-
    lems which can arise include
    depression, headaches, palpi-
    tations, back-pains, and oth-
    ers.

    With these problems hav-
    ing the potential to develop
    into even more serious phys-
    ical conditions, Dr Thomp-
    son said it is up to the indi-
    vidual to reduce or eliminate
    them.

    He suggest developing self
    esteem, focusing on building
    self worth and self respect.

    “Persons must be willing
    to have their emotional
    check-up from the neck-up!
    We service our vehicles, we
    wash our dishes, so we should
    also service our minds which
    house the key components to
    life. If you don’t cleanse your-
    self mentally, emotionally,
    and in your spirit, you will
    eventually pick-up viruses
    which are in the environment.

    “These are your everyday
    stresses, when you are not
    emotionally healthy, your abil-
    ity to cope with them does not
    exist, so the way you view
    them is incorrect. This distorts
    the way you see yourself, they

    way you look at yourself, and
    the way you look at others.”

    He said if you realise that
    you are the kind of person who
    has difficulty trusting, who is
    insecure, suspicious, irritation-
    prone, or overly stressed, seek-
    ing professional help should be
    your next move.

    However on the practical
    end, he said exercise can help
    to cleanse your body and then
    mind.

    Dr Thompson said although
    sexual intercourse may be an
    easy element to any relation-
    ship, finding sexual bliss can
    only manifest from a com-
    pletely healthy relationship.



    Porn industry
    _ promotes
    -Pecord in

    _ fighting HIV

    : MLOS ANGELES

    WHEN Tricia Devereaux

    i broke into the adult film
    ? business 15 years ago, test-
    ? ing for sexually transmitted
    ? diseases wasn't much more
    ? than an afterthought, so
    ? much so that by the end of
    ? the decade the star of such
    ? films as "Coed Carwash" and

    "Convention Cuties" had

    } tested positive for HIV,
    : according to the Associated
    i Press.

    But these days, says Dev-

    i ereaux, who has worked
    i behind the cameras since
    ? testing positive in 1998, her
    : industry has become so
    i aggressive at policing itself
    ? that she believes a porn star
    ? has less risk of acquiring the
    ? AIDS virus than a member
    ? of the general public.

    "T think because of what

    ? happened in 1998 the indus-
    i try immediately looked at
    ? itself and found ways to real-
    ? ly, really minimize the risk
    i factors by switching to more
    ? foolproof tests and doing it
    ? more often,” she said.

    Adult filmmakers in the

    U.S. now require that actors
    : prove they have tested nega-
    ? tive for HIV and other sexu-
    i ally transmitted diseases
    ? within 30 days of going to
    ? work ona film.

    Still, the tests aren't fool-

    : proof, as was revealed this
    ? week when an actress who
    i? had passed an HIV test
    ? before making a film tested
    ? positive immediately after-
    i ward.

    That positive result was

    i reported by the Adult Indus-
    i try Medical Healthcare
    ? Foundation. Known in the
    ? industry as AIM, the organi-
    ? zation tests hundreds of
    ? actors each month in the San
    i Fernando Valley, where the
    ? U.S. porn industry is head-
    ? quartered. It grants those
    ? who pass certificates allow-
    ? ing them to work.

    Although the woman's co-

    ; stars have tested negative,
    ? they have been quarantined
    i from acting for the time
    ? being and advised to be
    i retested
    i because medical experts say
    ? it takes almost that long for a
    ? person to show signs of infec-
    ? tion.

    in two weeks

    That means the woman's

    ? case should be a wake-up call
    ? to the adult film industry that
    ? it isn't doing enough to pro-
    ? tect its performers, said Dr.
    ? Jonathan Fielding, director
    ? of the Los Angeles County
    ? Department of Health.

    He said the state Division

    i} of Occupational Safety and
    ? Health requires that safe sex
    i be practiced on all adult
    ? movie sets.

    "But we have persistent

    i reports that that is not the
    ? case," he said, adding his
    ? department receives an aver-
    ? age of 15 reports a week from
    ? the Adult Industry Medical
    ? Healthcare Foundation of
    ? actors testing positive for oth-
    ? er sexually transmitted dis-
    ? eases such as gonorrhea and
    ? chlamydia.

    "That's obviously very dis-

    : turbing,” Fielding said. "I
    ? don't know of any other
    ? industry where people are
    ? subjected to that kind of risk."

    He called for the use of

    ? condoms on all adult films as
    ? one means of providing nec-
    ? essary worker safety.



    PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009

    THE TRIBUNE





    AFTER a long courtship
    over the telephone, Asma
    Ahmed, a painter in Karachi,
    Pakistan, married her fiance,
    Rafi-uddin Shikoh, a business
    consultant in New York, in a
    bicontinental wedding by
    Webcam. When the new
    bride then moved to Queens
    in 2002, she tried to make
    herself at home by staking

    her claim through art.

    In Pakistan, Ahmed Shikoh's work had
    been sociopolitical, addressing what she
    saw as the country's colonization by
    American fast-food chains, for instance,
    with paintings like "The Invasion,” in
    which swarms of Ronald McDonalds,
    wearing screaming-red clown wigs, sur-
    round a central monument in Karachi.

    Here, however, her art turned deeply
    personal as she grappled with her new
    identity as an immigrant and, having rarely
    set foot in a mosque back home, as a grad-
    ually more observant Muslim. In her first
    American paintings, Ahmed Shikoh
    reimagined the Statue of Liberty in her
    own image: in a Pakistani wedding dress,
    as a pregnant immigrant and as a regal

    BOOKREVIEW

    Life changing

    a,
    iy » |
    } |

    mother, baby on hip. Next she trans-
    formed the subway map with paint and
    calligraphic script into an Urdu manu-
    script that made the city feel more like
    hers.

    Finally, in 2006, after she made the dif-
    ficult decision to cover her hair, inspired
    by Muslim-American women who man-
    aged to combine faith and a career,
    Ahmed Shikoh began using the head scarf
    as a recurring image.

    On the surface, Ahmed Shikoh, 31, has
    little in common with Negar Ahkami, 38,
    a sleek, raven-haired Iranian-American
    artist, beyond the wall space that they
    share in a new exhibition, "The Seen and
    the Hidden: ((Dis))Covering the Veil,"
    at the Austrian Cultural Forum in Man-
    hattan. Ahkami grew up in suburban New
    Jersey, considers herself only "technically
    Muslim" and toys with stereotypical
    images of exotic Middle Eastern women in
    her art.

    Yet the two are both in their 30s, moth-
    ers of small children and emerging artists
    in the New York area. They are both
    exploring their identities as refracted
    through their backgrounds in the wake
    of 9/11. And they are both working to
    create a new kind of Islamic art that is
    modern, Westernized and female-centric.
    "As women artists of Muslim descent,
    Asma and Negar are both trying to dis-

    cover who they are, to look at themselves
    and their heritage and to get beyond
    stereotypes,” said David Harper, a curator
    of the Austrian exhibition. "What's so
    interesting is that they present two such
    very different ways to examine the subject
    from American soil.”

    "The Hidden and the Seen,” which runs
    through Aug. 29, features 15 artists, 13 of
    them women, of whom Ahmed Shikoh
    and Ahkami are the only full-time U.S.
    residents. The exhibition is a partner event
    of the Muslim Voices Festival organized
    by the Brooklyn Academy of Music, Asia
    Society and New York University's Cen-
    ter for Dialogues.

    In this exhibition Ahmed Shikoh and
    Ahkami seek to humanize the individuals
    beneath the veil. Ahmed Shikoh's
    approach is deeply earnest. Her installa-
    tion, "Beehive," is a cardboard honey-
    comb whose cells are stuffed with the col-
    orful scarves that she collected from scores
    of Muslim-American women who also
    sent messages — "I ran the 10k Bolder
    Boulder and wore this scarf" — that anno-
    tate this intentionally rough-hewn work.

    In contrast, Ahkami's piece is playful,
    acerbic and polished. It consists of eight
    nesting dolls sumptuously repainted as
    "Persian Dolls," in brilliant colors with
    gold faces. The outer doll is stern, with a
    thick unibrow, in full black chador. The
    ever smaller dolls within wear Chanel
    head scarves or cocktail dresses or, as with
    the tiniest, nothing at all but curves.

    "T have always struggled with the
    images of humorless, somber Iranian
    women in full-on black chador," Ahkami
    said. "For me these images do not reflect
    the real Iranian women any more than
    the images of the harem girls of the 19th
    century did."

    Ahkami felt angst here too. The child of
    Iranians who emigrated in the 1960s, she
    grew up in Clifton, N.J., spending what
    she remembers as magical summers in
    Tran until the Islamic revolution of 1979.

    pe

    Commencement

    J. COURTNEY Sullivan's
    "Commencement" is one of this
    year's most inviting summer
    novels. It tells of four Smith
    College dorm mates who
    reunite for a wedding four years
    after graduation, and it man-
    ages to be so entertaining that
    this setup never feels schematic.
    In a novel that’s what Curtis
    Sittenfeld's "Prep" aspired to
    be (Le., a smart, discerning book
    about school years) Sullivan
    introduces strong, warmly
    believable three-dimensional
    characters who have fun, have
    fights and fall into intense love
    affairs, sometimes with one
    another. Smith's feathers may
    be ruffled by the candor with
    which Sullivan describes cam-
    pus life.

    The "Commencement" char-
    acters are savvy about, among
    other things, feminism and pub-
    lishing. "When a woman writes
    a book that has anything to do
    with feelings or relationships,
    it's either called chick lit or
    women's fiction, right?" one of
    them asks. "But look at Updike,
    or Irving. Imagine if they'd been
    women. Just imagine. Someone
    would have slapped a pink cov-
    er onto ‘Rabbit at Rest,’ and
    poof, there goes the ... Pulitzer.”

    They're right of course. But
    this is the season when prettily
    designed books flood the mar-
    ket and compete for female
    readers. It's a time when literary
    and lightweight books aimed at
    women become hard to tell
    apart. Their covers use standard
    imagery: sand, flowers, cake,
    feet, houses, pastel colors, the
    occasional Adirondack chair.

    Their titles ("Summer House,"
    "Dune Road," "The Wedding
    Girl," ''Trouble") skew generic.
    And they tend to be blurbed
    exclusively by women. Gloria
    Steinem likes "Commence-
    ment.” She ought to; the
    women of "Commencement"
    are big fans of hers.

    Amid such confusion, here's a
    crib sheet for this season's crop
    of novels and memoirs. It does
    mix seriously ambitious books
    ("Shanghai Girls") with ami-
    ably schlocky ones ("Queen
    Takes King") and includes one
    off-the-charts oddity ("My Judy
    Garland Life"). It's even got a
    nascent Julia Roberts movie.
    But the common denominator
    is beach appeal, female variety.
    Each of these books takes a
    supportive, girlfriendly
    approach to weathering crises,
    be they global (World War IT)
    or domestic (dead husband on
    the kitchen floor), great or
    small.

    Julie Metz's "Perfection" is a
    visual standout for good rea-
    son: Metz designs book jackets.
    And she has given her all to the
    vibrant tulip on her memoir's
    cover. She also gave her all to
    what she thought was a solid
    marriage. Then her husband
    died suddenly, in 2003, and left
    behind a secret history of phi-
    landering, complete with e-mail
    trail. He left one particularly
    devious lover in the same small
    town where Metz found herself
    trapped as a new widow. How
    would she rear her daughter
    there when the daughter's best
    friend's mother (chick-book afi-
    cionados can follow this, no

    problem) was her husband's
    married girlfriend?

    Metz provides a blow-by-
    blow account of how she
    processed these revelations. Lit-
    tle did she know that the man
    who wrote her a florid poem
    for Valentine's Day was also
    sending pornographic holiday
    e-mail messages to at least two
    women with whom he was hav-
    ing affairs. ("I had to smile at
    the efficiency of it all,” Metz
    writes about this cut-and-paste
    job.) Little did she realize how
    truly distant her husband was.
    And little did she imagine that
    she would ever be living one of
    the most basic dreams of chick
    lit: going back to dating after
    years of marriage. Metz changes
    the names of the men in this
    book, but she brings refreshing
    candor to a startling, painful
    tale.

    Kate Christensen's "Trouble"
    is also about a woman who's
    married with a child until she
    suddenly finds herself unat-
    tached. But she, Josie, is an
    insufferably smug New York
    psychotherapist who high-hand-
    edly dissolves her marriage. "I
    think it's lame for people to stay
    together just for the kids,”
    Josie's adolescent daughter says
    helpfully, after Josie decides to
    ditch Daddy and have an
    adventurous Christmas in Mex-
    ico City. Yet Josie is so bitter
    that she resents her husband
    even for letting her go. "It
    enraged me that Anthony had
    allowed our marriage to end
    like this,” Josie says. "It made
    me want to punch him in the
    head."



    “| have always
    struggled with the
    images of humorless,
    somber Iranian
    women in full-on black
    chador. For me these
    images do not reflect
    the real Iranian
    women any more
    than the images of the
    harem girls of the

    19th century did.”

    NEGAR AHKAMI

    With the hostage crisis, her world split in
    two, making her feel like the child of a
    messy, public divorce.

    "At a time when I was trying to assim-
    ilate, it was very confusing to me," she
    said. "I was born here, and suddenly the
    girl across the street was saying: "You nev-
    er told me you were Iranian. You said
    you were Persian.’ And I never saw her
    again."

    A hypersensitive young artist, Ahkami
    was not stung just by the classmate who
    mouthed “ayatollah” at her. She hated
    being made to explain her family in the
    context of television images that made all
    Iranians seem like "Death to America"-
    chanting fundamentalists. She hated the
    way that the culture she loved was
    "degraded, demonized and reduced toa
    cartoon" both here and in Iran.

    MME NK, EWE
    - fl -& Ty

    TL iy
    ThE Stikip
    Phy

    E hit 30.

    thirty.

    Successful,
    Single, ant
    dreading

    turning 30

    FROM page 12

    I would hopefully be secure

    in a job for at least four years,

    and I would like to have
    already started on my first

    ? home.

    “T think many people have

    ? the fear of turning thirty
    ? because there is a greater fear
    ? of turning old, and thirty
    ? seems to be that initial age
    ? where youth has expired and
    ? the good years are behind
    you.”

    However women too are

    bombarded with images and
    } stories of what they should

    accomplish by the time they

    In a special turning 30

    ? episode on TV series Friends,
    ? Jennifer Aniston’s character

    Rachel Greene was extreme-

    ly distraught when a thirtieth
    birthday party was thrown in
    ? her honor.

    In an attempt to make up

    for her ‘over the hill birthday,’
    ; she was seen dating a man
    ; much younger than she was.

    Rachel said: “Come on

    guys, is it just me or am I
    ; Overreacting...Look I know
    ? my life’s going pretty well, but

    I look around and I see so

    many people who’ve accom-
    ; plished so many other goals
    i by the time they are 30.”

    Thirty-year-old Heike Wol-

    lenweber, explained that

    although she was like many

    ? women who had the usual
    ? fears of turning thirty, she
    ? now realises that turning thir-
    : tyis not the end of the world.

    “Before I turned thirty last

    ? year, the thought of turning
    ? thirty put a lot of things in
    ? perspective, it got difficult
    ? when | thought of all the
    i things I wanted to accomplish
    i by that time,” she said.

    She now understands that

    there is still a great deal to

    appreciate about life after

    Although she does not yet

    ? have children, Heike said she
    i isnot overly concerned, espe-
    i cially because she is still wait-
    } ing on Mr Right. She also has

    a number of things she would

    i still like to do and is excited
    ? that she is able to look for-
    ? ward to them at this stage in
    i herlite.

    As an entrepreneur who is
    always busy working on sev-

    eral projects, being thirty she
    ? said is nowdays one of the last
    i things on her mind.

    She said although she may

    not fit the bill when it comes
    ; to common expectations of a
    : women thirty and up, “really

    and truly thirty is not that old,
    and my best years are still
    ahead of me.”

    By The Associated Press



    Sullivan introduces strong, warmly believable three-

    dimensional characters who have fun, have fights and fall
    into intense love affairs, sometimes with one another.





    tls

    THE WEATHER REPO

    5-Day FORECAST

    TAMPA

    High: 92° F/33° C
    Low: 77° F/25°C

    @ ¢
    KEY WEST

    High: 88° F/31°C
    Low: 80° F/27°C
    @

    ORLANDO |
    High:93°F/34°C
    Low:74°F/23°C
    @

    cw,

    Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
    highs and tonights's lows.

    Albuquerque
    Anchorage
    Atlanta
    Atlantic City
    Baltimore
    Boston
    Buffalo
    Charleston, SC
    Chicago
    Cleveland
    Dallas
    Denver
    Detroit
    Honolulu
    Houston

    High
    F/C
    91/32
    68/20
    91/32
    74/23
    76/24
    64/17
    79/26
    91/32
    77/25
    79/26
    99/37
    84/28
    78/25
    88/31
    96/35

    Today

    Low

    F/C
    63/17
    53/11
    72/22
    56/13
    57/13
    50/10
    60/15
    71/21
    60/15
    61/16
    77/25
    55/12
    59/15
    75/23
    75/23

    Ww

    rey

    YD TDD
    oO pao

    AnD tH HM eS

    Wednesday

    High
    F/C
    88/31
    68/20
    90/32
    70/21
    73/22
    69/20
    78/25
    85/29
    78/25
    79/26
    97/36
    85/29
    76/24
    88/31
    96/35

    Low

    F/C
    62/16
    53/11
    73/22
    60/15
    60/15
    54/12
    59/15
    73/22
    61/16
    61/16
    77/25
    56/13
    60/15
    76/24
    522

    Ww

    non onnrerennnwveoS

    oO

    oO

    o

    Indianapolis
    Jacksonville
    Kansas City
    Las Vegas
    Little Rock
    Los Angeles
    Louisville
    Memphis
    Miami
    Minneapolis
    Nashville
    New Orleans
    New York
    Oklahoma City
    Orlando

    Plenty of sunshine.

    H ig h: 89°
    ICRU Calcd

    101° F



    Partly cloudy, a A few patchy clouds. Partly sunny.
    shower; warm.
    High: 88° High: 88°
    Low: 79° Low: 79° Low: 78°
    98°-86° F 98°-89° F

    @ WEST PALM BEACH
    High: 91° F/33°C
    Low: 76° F/24° C

    FT. LAUDERDALE
    High: 90° F/32° C @
    Low: 76° F/24°C

    = AMI

    High: 91° F/33°C
    Low: 78° F/26° C

    <



    High
    F/C
    77/25
    93/33
    85/29
    85/29
    97/36
    74/23
    85/29
    94/34
    91/32
    74/23
    88/31
    95/35
    70/21
    99/37
    93/33

    WS rn

    Today

    Low

    F/C
    66/18
    73/22
    69/20
    65/18
    73/22
    62/16
    72/22
    75/23
    78/25
    63/17
    70/21
    75/23
    58/14
    72/22
    74/23

    Ww

    F+THODH FH H SHH OCD S

    oO

    oO

    Wednesday

    High
    F/C
    85/29
    97/36
    95/35
    93/33
    97/36
    76/24
    90/32
    96/35
    89/31
    83/28
    91/32
    95/35
    73/22
    99/37
    95/35

    Low

    F/C
    67/19
    75/23
    75/23
    76/24
    74/23
    62/16
    71/21
    76/24
    76/24
    69/20
    71/21
    76/24
    61/16
    74/23
    74/23

    ABACO
    High: 90° F/32° C

    FREEPORT
    High: 89° F/32° C
    Low: 76° F/24°C

    Low: 78° F/26°C

    NASSAU

    High: 89° F/32° C
    Low: 79° F/26° C
    @

    i.

    ANDROS

    High: 93° F/34° C
    Low: 79° F/26° C

    Ww

    oO

    oO

    +FnNO NM FtOFTH FTO HH DOS
    }

    Philadelphia
    Phoenix
    Pittsburgh
    Portland, OR
    Raleigh-Durham
    St. Louis

    Salt Lake City
    San Antonio
    San Diego

    San Francisco
    Seattle
    Tallahassee
    Tampa

    Tucson
    Washington, DC

    High
    F/C
    75/23
    97/36
    80/26
    78/25
    76/24
    82/27
    74/23
    98/36
    72/22
    70/21
    73/22
    98/36
    92/33
    96/35
    78/25

    Today

    Low

    F/C
    59/15
    73/22
    60/15
    57/13
    64/17
    73/22
    54/12
    75/23
    65/18
    56/13
    56/13
    74/23
    77/25
    68/20
    64/17

    Ww

    pe
    pe
    s

    pe

    =

    narnoop tN On
    ie

    pe

    GREAT EXUMA

    ELEUTHERA
    High: 90° F/32° C
    Low: 77° F/25° C

    ——

    >

    ae

    —







    Clouds and sun, a
    t-storm possible.
    High: 89°
    Low: 79°
    110°-88° F

    The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
    elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

    Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday

    Temperature

    i 88° F/31° C
    77° F/25° C
    87° F/31° C
    74° F/23° C
    88° F/31° C
    76° F/25° C

    Normal high ....
    Normal low
    Last year's high
    Last year's low

    Brilliant sunshine.





    et
    ae | .

    a

    A na Ny

    o|1

    LOW

    High: 90°
    Low: 78°

    AccuWeather RealFeel

    116°-88° F

    Today

    Thursday

    Friday

    CATISLAND

    High: 85° F/29° C

    Low: 73° F/23°C
    a

    —— i.

    High: 86° F/30° C
    Low: 76° F/24° C

    a

    Wednesday

    High Low W

    F/C F/C

    —*

    LONG ISLAND

    High: 88° F/31

    Low: 75° F/24°C

    °C

    SAN SALVADOR

    High: 88° F/31°C
    Low: 76° F/24° C

    QO

    75/23
    99/37
    75/23
    72/22
    76/24
    94/34
    75/23
    98/36
    73/22
    70/21
    68/20
    101/38
    92/33
    95/35
    70/21

    59/15
    77/25
    57/13
    58/14
    63/17
    75/23
    57/13
    77/25
    64/17
    56/13
    56/13
    74/23
    77/25
    69/20
    63/17

    pe
    pe
    r
    pe
    r

    +

    oO

    “=D ho” ke” mo
    oO

    CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
    High: 91° F/33° C

    High: 87° F/31°C
    Low: 72° F/22° C

    GREAT INAGUA

    High: 91° F/33°C
    Low: 75° F/24°C

    a

    >)

    |2



    MODERATE

    High
    2:07 a.m.
    2:40 p.m.

    Wednesday 3:9° a.m.

    3:36 p.m.
    4:01 a.m.
    4:34 p.m.

    5:02 a.m.
    5:33 p.m.




    MAYAGUANA
    High: 88° F/31°C

    Low: 73° F/23° C

    * x

    3|4[5|

    HIGH |





    2.2
    2.6

    2.2
    27

    2.2
    29

    2.2
    3.0




    WW
    Jlshop
    EXT.

    The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
    greater the need for eye and skin protection.

    ea Posy

    Ht. (ft.



    \. HIGH

    Low
    8:17 a.m.
    9:05 p.m.

    9:07 a.m.

    10:06 p.m.

    10:01 a.m.
    11:07 p.m.

    10:58 a.m.

    Ht. (ft.

    0.3
    0.5

    0.2
    0.4

    0.1
    0.3

    0.0

    Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:20 a.m. Moonrise..... 1:13 a.m.

    As of 2 p.m. yesterday .....ccccccscsssssscsssesseeen 0.00" Sunset....... 8:01 p.m. Moonset..... 1:53 p.m.

    Year to date 13. ;

    Normal year to date 0... ccc cece ceneee 15.10" a = Full /-

    A a Zo
    AccuWeather.com 5 Wea
    Forecasts and graphics provided by : a ‘ay
    AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jun. 22 = Jun. 29 Jul. 7 Jul. 15

    Acapulco
    Amsterdam
    Ankara, Turkey
    Athens
    Auckland
    Bangkok
    Barbados
    Barcelona
    Beijing
    Beirut
    Belgrade
    Berlin
    Bermuda
    Bogota
    Brussels
    Budapest
    Buenos Aires
    Cairo
    Calcutta
    Calgary
    Cancun
    Caracas
    Casablanca
    Copenhagen
    Dublin
    Frankfurt
    Geneva
    Halifax
    Havana
    Helsinki
    Hong Kong
    Islamabad
    Istanbul
    Jerusalem
    Johannesburg
    Kingston
    Lima
    London
    Madrid
    Manila
    Mexico City
    Monterrey
    Montreal
    Moscow
    Munich
    Nairobi
    New Delhi
    Oslo

    Paris
    Prague

    Rio de Janeiro
    Riyadh
    Rome

    St. Thomas
    San Juan
    San Salvador
    Santiago
    Santo Domingo
    Sao Paulo
    Seoul
    Stockholm
    Sydney
    Taipei

    Tokyo
    Toronto
    Trinidad
    Vancouver
    Vienna
    Warsaw
    Winnipeg

    He bash Fh

    9%

    Tent TTS

    High
    F/C
    91/32
    64/17
    17/25
    88/31
    53/11
    90/32
    86/30
    81/27
    75/23
    75/23
    94/34
    68/20
    80/26
    66/18
    68/20
    77/25
    57/13
    96/35
    107/41
    76/24
    88/31
    81/27
    84/28
    66/18
    68/20
    72/22
    78/25
    58/14
    90/32
    55/12
    84/28
    101/38
    82/27
    79/26
    61/16
    87/30
    71/21
    73/22
    88/31
    84/28
    79/26
    100/37
    75/23
    72/22
    72/22
    80/26
    104/40
    57/13
    73/22
    71/21
    79/26
    103/39
    82/27
    86/30
    68/20
    84/28
    59/15
    84/28
    70/21
    80/26
    61/16
    59/15
    88/31
    76/24
    13/22
    79/26
    68/20
    78/25
    68/20
    78/25

    il

    Today

    Low
    F/C
    79/26
    52/11
    43/6
    73/22
    37/2
    78/25
    77/25
    65/18
    68/20
    70/21
    61/16
    50/10
    72/22
    47/8
    43/8
    54/12
    43/6
    70/21
    84/28
    51/10
    73/22
    72/22
    73/22
    53/11
    50/10
    50/10
    55/12
    44/6
    72/22
    45/7
    79/26
    72/22
    67/19
    59/15
    44/6
    78/25
    58/14
    52/11
    59/15
    78/25
    55/12
    73/22
    57/13
    54/12
    47/8
    56/13
    82/27
    45/7
    54/12
    49/9
    67/19
    83/28
    61/16
    78/25
    33/3
    70/21
    45/7
    73/22
    49/9
    62/16
    45/7
    50/10
    77/25
    64/17
    60/15
    63/17
    57/13
    57/13
    45/7
    59/15





    no
    =

    nntrorra nn

    nw
    — —

    +o TT YTDTTDTTSO TIO MD O RS
    oO Ba ee > ee oO oO =a

    pe

    Wednesday

    High
    F/C
    93/33
    68/20
    81/27
    91/32
    53/11
    90/32
    86/30
    78/25
    95/35
    74/23
    81/27
    72/22
    79/26
    64/17
    73/22
    79/26
    63/17
    95/35
    106/41
    70/21
    90/32
    80/26
    88/31
    67/19
    64/17
    79/26
    80/26
    65/18
    88/31
    59/15
    86/30
    109/42
    83/28
    76/24
    64/17
    87/30
    71/21
    70/21
    95/35
    84/28
    76/24
    97/36
    79/26
    68/20
    78/25
    78/25
    108/42
    61/16
    77/25
    75/23
    74/23
    103/39
    85/29
    87/30
    74/23
    85/29
    55/12
    85/29
    65/18
    75/23
    64/17
    57/13
    88/31
    74/23
    72/22
    84/28
    68/20
    78/25
    66/18
    77/25

    Low
    F/C
    79/26
    57/13
    50/10
    76/24
    43/6
    78/25
    76/24
    67/19
    73/22
    70/21
    56/13
    55/12
    72/22
    47/8
    55/12
    52/11
    48/8
    72/22
    81/27
    49/9
    73/22
    71/21
    73/22
    55/12
    48/8
    55/12
    56/13
    48/8
    72/22
    43/6
    81/27
    75/23
    65/18
    60/15
    46/7
    79/26
    58/14
    54/12
    64/17
    78/25
    55/12
    75/23
    61/16
    45/7
    51/10
    57/13
    82/27
    49/9
    55/12
    53/11
    62/16
    82/27
    67/19
    79/26
    39/3
    73/22
    45/7
    74/23
    50/10
    61/16
    50/10
    52/11
    77/25
    66/18
    58/14
    63/17
    55/12
    61/16
    45/7
    63/17

    INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

    (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

    WwW

    pe
    pe
    pc
    $

    pc
    sh
    pc
    sh
    r

    pc
    C

    pc
    sh
    pc

    Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
    storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace



    USS Se ee

    MARINE FORECAST

    WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
    NASSAU Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
    Wednesday: S at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
    FREEPORT Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
    Wednesday: S at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
    ABACO Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
    Wednesday: S$ at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F



    a Billings
    82/57,

    Li

    Denver, |/Kansas|
    84/55 85/69

    Miami
    91/78

    Showers
    [&&}j T-storms
    Rain

    [ * _%| Flurries
    pk] Snow
    [v_z] Ice

    -10s

    Fronts
    Cold =

    Warm Mintel

    Stationary Meugaafi

    is | 05 | 10s 20s [305 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 80s) /A00st/Ai0)

    Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
    precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
    Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.









    = hal age

    You Can BS Blown
    way By A Hurricane
    _ Or you_can rest easy knowing

    hat you, have excellent insurance

    coverage no matter which
    way the wind blows.

    Nobody does it better.

    INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

    (BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

    Ce



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=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009

ATR
EAN
Me Sto

PPO Tee te











TURNING



Nurses stay defiant

Union members
claim they are
‘still sick’ despite
an injunction
demanding they
return to work

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

NURSES have been ordered to
put an end to eight days of indus-
trial action and return to work by
a Supreme Court injunction
passed yesterday.

But when the message was
delivered to around 200 public
health nurses at a meeting held by
the Bahamas Nurses Union
(BNU) last night, the nurses insist-
ed they are still sick.

Those who have been off work
sick since Monday last week said
they will continue to take their
sick days and risk being held in
contempt of court for disobeying
the order.

Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall
granted the injunction to the Min-
ister of Health and Public Hospi-
tals Authority as the Bahamas
Nurses Union filed a dispute with
the Ministry of Labour seeking
permission to conduct a strike-
vote after their week-long sick-
out failed to produce results from
their employer.

BNU president Cleola Hamil-
ton said the Ministry of Health,
as employer of the Department of
Public Health, and the Public Hos-
pitals Authority have been
ordered to meet with the union

The Taste

Tuesdays!!



urt order

‘

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

BNU PRESIDENT Cleola Hamilton speaks to union members last night.

on Wednesday “to discuss what is
right for the nurses” as a result of
the application.

Around 50 per cent of nurses
employed at Princess Margaret
Hospital, Rand Memorial Hospi-
tal, Sandilands Rehabilitation Cen-
tre, and public health clinics across
the country joined the sick-out in
protest of the Ministry of Health’s
decision to postpone their health
insurance plan until 2012.

Ms Hamilton criticised Minis-

SEE page eight

Concerns raised over excavation and
landfill initiated off Carmichael Road

Lo} 9)



WORK TNT place on land behind Millars Heights.

m By MEGAN REYNOLDS ed on land behind Millars Heights
Tribune Staff Reporter off Carmichael Road.

The Tribune

niZ7a) wiih Be

ete ch

gel (] So

i Nora alkeas) G19



mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

ENTREPRENEURS are
allegedly excavating farmland to
sell quarry to developers and fill-
ing the cavity with waste, pollut-
ing the water table and putting
families at risk.

After years of exposure in The
Tribune, the practice of excava-
tion and landfill has been initiat-

Hundreds of residents near the
site fear the practice will pollute
the water table they depend on as
they do not have access to city
water from the Water and Sew-
erage Corporation.

They are also forced to endure
the constant disruption of noise
and dust from the site where two
diggers are said to be operating

SEE page eight

SEE PAGE ELEVEN



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)








Claims that baby
was treated for a
sexually transmitted
disease are refuted

Top police officer denies hospital
staff knew of treatment for an STD

m@ By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

CLAIMS five-month-old
Lynera Saunders had been
treated for a Sexually Trans-
mitted Disease (STD) short-
ly before her death have
been refuted by a top police
officer.

Superintendent Elsworth
Moss in charge of the Crim-
inal Detective Unit denied
that staff at Princess Mar-
garet Hospital (PMH) and
the Crisis Centre knew of
the baby’s treatment for an
STD as reported in The
Punch yesterday.

PMH has not released
any details of the young
patient’s illness and treat-
ment as the public hospital
maintains all patient care is
confidential.

But staff within the hos-
pital suspected the infant
had been molested when
she was admitted to hospital
on Friday June 5, and died
two hours later.

The medical staff in the
paediatric and emergency
room alerted police and sev-
eral individuals were inter-



POLICE SEEK GUNMAN
BEHIND FATAL
SHOOTING

PLP ACCUSED OF
HITLER-STYLE
PROPAGANDA

MINISTER CLAIMS THE
PLP SHOT DOWN
AIRSPACE IDEA

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NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



viewed in a police investi-
gation.

But the suspects were
released when the infant’s
death certificate showed she
had died as a result of
breathing difficulties.

Lynera Saunders’ moth-
er Indera Minns, 20, her
grandmother and great-
grandmother spoke out
about their devastation over
the baby’s death and humil-
iation over the claims last
week.

Family attorney Paul
Moss said the baby was tak-
ing antibiotics which led to
diarrhoea, and irritation
caused by the illness may
have been misinterpreted as
a sign of molestation.

However, health bosses
at PMH have so far failed
to explain what led medical
staff to raise concerns.

Supt Moss said: “The
child was never molested.
We had a copy of the death
certificate and the child died
of respiratory failure.

“The child was sick a
week prior (to her death)
and suffered from diar-
rhoea. There is no evidence
the child had an STD.”

SEE page eight

Proposed night court
changes could hit
Jews, Seventh-Day
Adventists, Rastafarians

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

JEWS, Seventh-Day Adven-
tists and Rastafarians may be neg-
atively affected by proposed new
changes to the night court sys-
tem, said president of the Bar
Association Wayne Munroe.

The fate of these proposed
changes — the possibility of elim-
inating the current night court
system and hearing those cases
on Saturday and the introduction
of lay magistrates — will be
announced "in due course",
Attorney General Michael Bar-
nett said yesterday during a brief
interview.

Mr Munroe said for years there
has been discussion within the
judiciary to move night courts to
the weekend but this never mate-

SEE page eight


PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



A distraught family
is offering a reward
for the safe return of
their lost pet.

Anyone who may
have seen the small
dog, a female Shitzu,

in the area of East-
ern Road or Sans
Souci is being asked
to call 324-1127.
The dog’s collar
bears a name tag
which reads: Maggie
Raine.
THE MISSING dog is a Shitzu, the same breed as pictured here.

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Man killed, his brother seriously injured

Police seek gunman
behind fatal aes

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



POLICE are trying to find the
gunman who shot two brothers out-
side a bar, killing one and leaving
the other in serious condition.

Both Matthew Armbrister, 23,
and his brother Marvin Armbrister,
24, of Farrington Road, were shot
once in the stomach when an alter-
cation erupted between two groups
of men outside Dominique’s Restau-
rant and Bar in Boyd Road, Nas-
sau.

Matthew, a former employee at
The Tribune who worked in the
press room, died at the scene.

His brother Marvin was rushed

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT will
“relaunch” the National Youth
Programme in the fall — moving it
from Andros to New Providence
and reforming it into a pro-

National Stadium

eI ITO CM em neh

by Independence
Day 2011’

CHINESE government
officials have indicated to their
Bahamian counterparts that
the new National Stadium
should be completed by Inde-
pendence Day 2011.

Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture Desmond Ban-
nister revealed this informa-
tion during his Budget contri-
bution in parliament yester-
day morning. Construction on
the stadium began, after much
delay, earlier this year.

Located adjacent to the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Cen-
tre, it is being funded by the
Chinese government, as a
“gift” to the Bahamian peo-
ple.

asenmireatments

deep penetrating
caning m Oisturizet

to Princess Margaret Hospital where
he is in serious condition. Police
have identified a man they believe is
in some way connected with the
shooting and plan to release a photo
today.

Superintendent Elsworth Moss,
in charge of the Criminal Detective
Unit said: “We are going to send
something out as soon as we identi-
fy a photograph of a male we are
looking for in respect to the shoot-
ing.”

The Armbrister brothers’ family
could not be contacted yesterday.
Matthew Armbrister’s death pushed
the murder count for this year to 33.
Police failed to release details of the
shooting death in the weekend crime

report.

gramme that does not solely focus
on dealing with young men who
have “already become menaces
to society,” said the Minister of
Youth.

Carmichael MP Desmond Ban-
nister suggested that while the
initiative “currently dubbed” the
National Youth Programme is
merely a “restorative” one for
those who have already gone off
the rails, government intends that
it should work with children who
“can be helped before they get
into trouble.”

“We envision a programme
which encompasses all aspects of
youth development,” said Mr
Bannister. Government believes
the national interest will best be
served by relocating the NYP to
New Providence and a location
“where the greatest need exists”
for the resources it offers.

“We will save taxpayer money
on travel costs, transportation
costs, food costs and other expen-
diture,” said Mr Bannister, adding
that staff will no longer have to
travel to Andros, leaving their
families. “In New Providence
trained teachers for the pro-
gramme will be in abundance...
this is a win-win situation for all,”
said the minister.

This year, funding for the pro-
gramme has been reduced to
$345,000.

This after Mr Bannister noted

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Govt will ‘relaunch’ National Youth Programme in autumn





“We envision a
programme which
encompasses all
aspects of youth
development.”



Desmond Bannister

that money allocated towards the
NYP rose from $17,861 in the
2003/2004 budget to $900,000 in
2008/2009.

Responding to Mr Bannister’s
statement, MP for North Andros
Vincent Peet accused government
of being “hell-bent on disman-
tling the one working project that
is helping to reduce crime.”

“What are they doing?” he
asked. He pointed to the reduc-
tion in funding for the pro-
gramme as evidence of his claim.

However, Mr Bannister vehe-
mently denied the MP’s charge,
saying government wanted to
transform the programme into
what it was originally intended to
be — one that reduced the likeli-
hood of young people turning to
crime to begin with.

“The government has absolute-
ly no intention of abolishing this
programme,” said Mr Bannister,
adding that Mr Peet was “wrong”
for “playing politics” with the
issue.

foie stl baet aie et hee) ee) oe

[bt i 1 8]


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009, PAGE 3



0 In brief

RBDF murder
trial: jury is
selected

A JURY has been selected in
the case of a woman charged
with the murder of a Royal
Bahamas Defence Force officer
last year. The eight-man, four-
woman jury was appointed yes-
terday to hear evidence on the
death of Defence Force Petty
Officer Gary Leon Carey, 54.

The trial is expected to start
tomorrow before Senior Justice
Anita Allen.

Shimeakima Delores Pratt,
31, of Minns Subdivision, is
accused of Mr Carey’s murder.

The officer was found dead
on Sunday, August 17, 2008.
Pratt was arraigned a week lat-
er. Pratt, a mother of three, is
represented by attorney
Romona Farquharson. Attor-
neys Stephanie Pintard and Ter-
ry Archer of the Attorney Gen-
eral’s Office are prosecuting the
case. Around 20 witnesses are
expected to be called to give
evidence.

Senator's name
removed from
candidate list

SENATOR Jerome Fitzger-
ald’s name and photo have been
removed from the candidate’s
section of the official PLP website
— where on Sunday, he had been
listed as the future candidate for
Marathon.

This comes after a front page
story in yesterday’s Tribune out-
lined concerns over the selection
of candidates to represent the
PLP in the next general election.

It was claimed that individuals
have already been named and rat-
ified as prospective representa-
tives for certain key constituen-
cies in New Providence, seem-
ingly without the candidate com-
mittee having met. On Sunday
night, Mr Fitzgerald’s name and
photo could still be found on
myplp.com in the space marked
“The Constituency of Marathon.”
That space now reads: “Your MP:
to be announced.”

Neil Percentie, branch chair-
man for the last PLP representa-
tive for Marathon, Ron Pinder,
told The Tribune on the week-
end that he had been shocked to
find that Senator Fitzgerald had
already been named as a candi-
date. “The PLP lays claim to
being of the people and for the
people, however if this website is
correct, the people once again
have no say in ‘my PLP’,” he said.

“As a card-carrying member of
the PLP and former chairman of
the Marathon branch, I am able
to say that ‘we the people’ were
not informed of any decision to
name a candidate to the con-
stituency of Marathon but to have
Senator Fitzgerald posted on the
website as ‘the’ candidate is an
insult to the people of Marathon.”

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@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE PLP was yesterday
accused by a Cabinet minister of
using propaganda techniques out-
lined by Nazi leader Adolf Hitler
in his book “Mein Kampf” to get
the public to accept the Opposi-
tion’s criticisms of the current
government.

Minister of Youth, Sports and
Culture Desmond Bannister
claimed that the repetition of the
PLP’s complaint that the FNM
engaged in a counter-productive
“stop, review and cancel” process
when it came to power follows
the Nazi leader’s advice that if
you tell a “big lie frequently
enough” people are likely to
believe it.

“Members opposite have
developed the refrain ‘stop,
review and cancel’ almost to a
science, and I just want members
opposite to know that whenever
they utter that phrase they are

REPORTS FROM THE HOUSE

PLP accused of Hitler-style propaganda

DESMOND BANNISTER

following the political theory of
one of history’s most vicious
tyrants, who pursued a totalitari-
an, authoritative, single party,
socialist agenda and his ‘big lie’
theory is well known,” said Mr
Bannister.

The minister quoted from the
informational website Wikipedia,
saying that Hitler’s primary rules
were “never allow the public to
cool off; never admit a fault or
wrong; never concede that there
may be some good in your ene-
my; never leave room for alter-



natives; never accept blame; con-
centrate on one enemy at a time
and blame him for everything that
goes wrong; people will believe
a big lie sooner than a little one
and if you repeat it frequently
enough people will sooner or lat-
er believe it.”

“So the (prime minister) will
now appreciate why members
focus on criticising him so often,”
Mr Bannister said. “It’s there in
black and white.”

Contracts

Throughout the budget debate,
various PLP MPs raised the issue
of the Ingraham administration’s
decision to, upon winning the
May 2007 election, review certain
contracts for projects signed
under the PLP government short-
ly before it left office.

Following Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham’s assessment of
the state of the economy and the
outlook for the future in the short

Minister outlines moves to
improve quality of homes

Ministry ‘road map’ unveiled

mw By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT wants to
ensure that no purchaser of a low-
cost home built by the Ministry of
Housing has to do any “major
repairs” within the first 10 years
of moving in.

Contributing to the 2009/2010
budget debate, Housing Minister
Kenneth Russell outlined numer-
ous steps his ministry has taken to
improve the quality of homes.

This comes as the ministry has
spent in the region of $3 million
on repairs to 303 homes built pri-
or to the May 2007 election.
Despite this effort, there are still
200 outstanding complaints to
deal with, he told parliament.

Mr Russell said the ministry
has “re-established the govern-
ment regulatory agencies as the
primary approval and inspection
bodies for all the work we do in
housing.

“T believe that this will result in
the quality of work we are aiming
for so that low income citizens
may rely on having little or no
major repairs within the first 10
years of ownership.”

Meanwhile, he added that
Housing has also contracted two
individuals to provide further
training to building inspectors and
to teach its planning team more
about all government procedures
relating to procuring, tendering,
development, planning and exe-
cution of projects.

“We have also re-instituted our
relationship with the tenders
board, taking all projects over
$50,000 for approval,” said the
minister.

He warned that “builders tak-
ing short cuts and unscrupulous in
their dealings will have their con-
tracts terminated, and likewise
tardy or wicked building inspec-
tors and compliance officers will
be dealt with accordingly.”

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REACTING to an audit
that revealed deficiencies
in its operational proce-
dures, the Ministry of
Housing has developed a
“new strategic plan”,
Housing Minister Kenneth
Russell said yesterday.

This plan will be a f
“guide post and a road
map for the ministry’s
work today and in the
future,” he said.

Mr Russell said that the
strategy came about after

KENNETH RUSSELL

an as yet unpublished Auditor General’s report on the ministry crit-
icised its “general operational procedures and pointed to many

weaknesses.”

To enhance “openness and transparency” in the ministry, Mr Rus-
sell said, a “project accounting office” has been established to
keep “accurate records of all expenditure and contracted arrange-

ments for our housing projects.”

“A small team of three staff work closely together and liaise
daily with the Bahamas Mortgage Corporation to ensure that pay-
ments to contractors and purveyors are timely, accurate and trans-

parent,” added the minister.

Mr Russell told parliament that more would be said about the
report when it is tabled in the House of Assembly.

Noting the ministry’s progress
in providing low-cost homes to
the public, the minister said that
in 2007 the government met 92
houses in an incomplete state.

He said the government has
now caused 217 houses through-
out Abaco, Grand Bahama and
New Providence to be completed,
while 175 remain under con-
struction.

Meanwhile, more than 150 lots
have been readied and offered
for sale, with more being pre-
pared, he added.

“Lowest Prices On The Island”



Mr Russell said improving the
“housing stocks and to increas-
ing Bahamian home ownership”
is his “number one priority” and
warned the public to treat their
mortgages as their “top priority”.

If payment of this responsibili-
ty becomes “unbearable”, Mr
Russell advised that those
financed by the Bahamas Mort-
gage Corporation should speak
with staff there, who can offer
free advice and “possible
options.”

to medium term, PLP MPs sug-
gested that the economic situa-
tion the country now finds itself
in, including the high unemploy-
ment levels, could have been
buffered had the government not
scrapped or delayed certain pro-
posed developments or public
works projects.

They embraced as a validation
of their analysis a statement from

the international credit rating
agency Standard and Poot’s.

In its report late last year, S&P
said that the government’s deci-
sion to review certain contracts
entered into by the previous
administration took the growth
momentum out of the economy.

That claim has since been out-
right rejected by Prime Minister
Ingraham.

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Nurses need to reconsider

A band
of clowns
and jokers

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please indulge me for a brief
moment by granting just a small
portion in your valuable column
to express my indignation of the
spectacle displayed in the
House of Assembly. First of all
I fully support your editorial of
Thursday, June 4, 2009. It
expressed what I conveyed to
a colleague the day before as
to why we have such a lawless
and undisciplined society.

Being true to their nature, the
circus of the PLP put their band
of clowns and jokers on display
in showing the entire nation,
and the world how such a shaky
and lawless foundation was laid
for the society and nation that
we are now living in. In essence,
what they suggested was, what-

letters@triounemedia net



others, and not for them,
because they are above the law.

The arrogance of these peo-
ple is a turn off, and an insult to
the decent people of this nation.
I know that Perry Christie is in
a lot of trouble, and is fighting
for his political life and future in
the PLP.

He, being the selfish egocen-
tric individual that I believe he
is, is stalling for time, and is
planning, and probably wel-
coming any distractions to fur-
ther his cause.

It is obvious that these jok-
ers are not serious in their

charges of the Speaker being
unfair and undemocratic. They
wrote the rule book. I noticed
some smirk on some of their
faces. These guys are not seri-
ous, they are clowning, wasting
precious time. One of their
strategies is to block and hin-
der the programme of the gov-
ernment.

These clowns are still bitter
over their rejection at the polls
in 2007 after one term as gov-
ernment. Get on with the busi-
ness of the nation, or else do
the honourable thing and ten-
der your resignation. Right now,
I think you are an awful exam-
ple to the youth of this nation.
You make me sick!

VC
Nassau,

WE THINK if the nurses, who have crippled
the public health service for the past week with
their so-called “sick out”, are looking for public
sympathy they have over played their hand.

It seems they — or at least 50 per cent of
them — are the only ones who don’t under-
stand what the word “bare” means when told
that the financial cupboard is bare.

If they would rid themselves of their political
advisers they might see the world and the seri-
ous state of their country with more objectivity
and understanding — also with more patrio-
tism.

During the budget debate in the House,
Health Minister Dr Herbert Minnis said he had
met again on May 25 with nursing personnel and
explained the financial problems government
faced — at the time it was more than $200 mil-
lion behind projected revenue. As a result, he
told them, it was unlikely that government could
meet their four per cent salary increase. Nor
at that time could government afford their esti-
mated $10.5 million health insurance plan. The
insurance would come after the economic crisis
had eased.

That same day Dr Minnis met with the doc-
tors and explained the situation. “The doctors
said they understood the financial problems
and they accepted not receiving their 1.5 per
cent increase and their insurance,” said Dr Min-
nis. The doctors understood, the nurses did not.
As a result, at least 50 per cent of them claimed
to have taken to their beds in “sickness.”

Nurses union president Cleola Hamilton crit-
icised government for having a “dismissive atti-
tude toward the nurses union.” She claimed
to have had no communication with govern-
ment, remarking that “the impression that we
are getting is that we are being ignored, which
speaks very much to how much the govern-
ment regards the health of the people of this
country, because if you are ignoring the people
who are delivering the health care then, of
course, you have no regard for the health of
the nation.”

The nurses aren’t being ignored. They have
been told — like the rest of us — the reality of
the times. We know that we have to tighten
our belts. At least the nurses have a commit-
ment that the rest of us do not have. They have
been told that they will get their group health
plan in the 2010/11 fiscal year — even sooner —
if the economy improves.

However, yesterday Bahamians saw who
really cared for their welfare when the Supreme
Court ordered them back to the bedsides of
their sick patients. Prime Minister Ingraham,

concerned for the health of the nation, had
asked the court to break what most people see
as a “strike”, but which the nurses have classi-
fied as a “sick out.”

Yesterday the Bahamas Nurses Union
(BNU) filed two trade disputes — one with the
Ministry of Health, the second with the Public
Health Authority, claiming breach of sections 24
and 28 of their industrial agreement — these
sections deal with salary increases — 4 per cent
— and group insurance.

The procedure now is that the Labour
Department will hold conciliatory meetings
with BNU representatives. If there is no reso-
lution, either side — or even the Minister if he
considers it in the public interest — can refer the
dispute to the Industrial Tribunal.

After two conciliatory meetings the union
can apply for a strike vote, which will be super-
vised by the Department of Labour. If the
majority in the bargaining unit vote to strike, the
Minister of Labour has to certify that vote
before a strike can be called. Traditionally this
does not happen immediately as there has to be
a “cooling off” period during which time the
Minister tries to resolve the matter. However, if
the dispute is sent to the Industrial Tribunal
there can be neither strike, nor sick-out, so the
nurses might as well go back to work now. As
we wrote this column at 9 o’clock last night,
nurses were still discussing whether they should
defy the court order or return to work.

After this display of defiance, and the sug-
gestion that some nurses would even think of
ignoring a court order, government should seri-
ously consider classifying medical services as
an essential service. This would put medical
staff in the same category as the police, defence
force and prison officers, who cannot have
unions because they are essential services and,
therefore, cannot strike. This does not mean
that their grievances will not be heard. All it
means is that their disputes will be settled peace-
fully without jeopardising either the health or
security of the public.

We hope that the defiance of House rules
and the disrespect shown for Speaker Alvin
Smith a little over a week ago is not a pattern
being set — especially if nurses thumb their
noses at the courts — for the future of this
country.

We hope that nurses, who are flirting with
the idea of continuing their “sickness”, espe-
cially after displaying such lusty lungs at last
night’s meeting, fully understand that contempt
of a court order could mean cooling their heels
in a prison cell.



ever laws they implement, is for

June 5, 2009.

PLP leaders show again inability
to keep members disciplined

EDITOR, The Tribune

By condoning and even attempting to cele-
brate the disorderly behaviour by one of its mem-
bers of parliament, the PLP leaders have demon-
strated once again that they are incapable of
bringing discipline to bear on their members.

In fact, the leadership has shown that they are
just as much infected with that old familiar atti-
tude of entitlement as the rest of them. They
miss every opportunity to demonstrate other-
wise.

After Mrs. Glenys Hanna Martin's disorderly
behaviour in the House, they should have
rebuked her, or at least privately urged her to
desist and apologise to the Speaker.

Instead, both Perry Christie and Bernard Not-
tage aided and abetted her in deliberately and
persistently breaking the rules of the House.

In attempting to justify Mrs. Martin's behav-
iour, Mr. Christie passionately reminded Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham how he (Mr. Ingra-
ham) had only a week ago asked for permission to
go back on the agenda.

But Mr. Christie was making the point without
getting the point. Mr. Ingraham asked! He asked
for the consent of members. He did not demand.
He did not say he was going back with or without
permission. He asked, Mr. Christie!

notice. Then she demanded to be heard out of
order. Then she refused to sit down when the
Speaker asked her to. Then she refused to leave
the chamber when asked to. Then the next day
she tried to gain entrance to the House when she
knew she was suspended.

Dr. Nottage did his own political credibility a
disservice in preventing the carrying out of a law-
ful order by a lawful authority when he obstruct-
ed the Police in the House in full view of the
television cameras.

Then he returned to the House and launched
an attack on the Speaker during his budget con-
tribution. Dr. Nottage knows or should know
that you don't do that. The Speaker should only
be criticised on a substantive motion.

The PLP seem to think that because Speaker
Alvin Smith is a soft-spoken mild-mannered man
that they can intimidate him and run over him.
That's a bad miscalculation.

Speaker Smith has obviously familiarized him-
self with the rules.

He is an excellent Speaker, one who is dignified
but strong. He deserves the support and gratitude
of the Bahamian people.

THANKFUL
Nassau,

Mrs. Martin didn't do that. She failed to give

June 11, 2009

A waste of $2.3 resurfacing West Bay to Paradise Island

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The resurfacing of the
majority of West Bay contin-
uing onto Paradise Island
bridge prior to FIFA’s Con-
vention and Miss Universe
raises in these harsh econom-
ic times — is the spending of
$2.3 million really necessary?















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Okay the FIFA people will
ride once going and once leav-
ing — the Miss Universe con-
testants could ride in a cou-
ple of times and a couple may
be twice going out as they will
go I presume to photo-shoots
in the islands so for a max, of
say 15 rides from Lynden Pin-
dling International to Paradise
Island we are going to spend
$2.3 million?

The nine roundabouts
which are supposed to be
landscaped at a cost of
$346,000 or, yes, an individ-
ual cost of $38,444.44 this is
incredible if you take as an
example the completed Gua-
nahani roundabout in Cable
Beach....a lot of grass and a
few plants to accompany the
palms already there for

$38,444.44 — something gotta
be wrong with that tender?
$4,000 yes and that’s high!

Drive behind DEU/CID the
police garage and see how
many police vehicles are all
broken up...... some stations
don’t even have a car when
you call them. Back where we
were at election 2008!

See that long list of persons
out on bail in April? Some 28
pages times five photographs
per page and we worry about
a soft ride for the FIFA peo-
ple and Miss Universe contes-
tants?

We are lost — priorities
totally out of whack.

JENNIFER SMITH
Nassau,
May 20, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Aviation partnership
to help private pilots

AN AVIATION partnership
between the Bahamas and Florida
will make it easier for private pilots
to get procedural information for
flying to and from the islands.

The Bahamas Aviation Depart-
ment has been working with Florida
Fixed Base Operators (FBO) for
many years and has launched the

Minister claims the PLP
shot down airspace idea

eral operators strategically located
throughout South Florida, accord- :

ing to the Aero-News network.

The four operators selected as Fe ae rae a
Bahamas Gateway FBOs are Opa j Pa eens iia eae

Locka Airport in Miami, Fort Laud- “urgently” pursue in order to cre-
Stuart/Palm Beach Ai Gales i ate a new and much needed
Hse cinpusneme soi ae annem ? source of revenue for government

Lucie International Airport in Fort i was proposed and then dismissed

i by his party’s own leader six years

The Bahamas Tourist Office staff : ago, a Cabinet minister said.

have trained personnel in each air- ;
port on all aspects of United States | ent on Wednes day, Mr Davis
and Bahamian requirements for air- suggested that a cash-strapped
craft departing or arriving the US : government could reap $40 to $50

erdale Executive

Pierce.

mainland.

fee ines eral ee aa : “high quality job opportunities”
also able to provide Customs and? were it to assume control of
Immigration information as well as } Bahamian airspace from the

up-to-the minute information about United States government.

the Bahamas.

Ministry of Tourism and Aviation Sports and Culture Desmond
chief aviation specialist Greg Rolle i Bannister yesterday quoted for-
said the FBOs a pean ? mer PLP Prime Minister Perry
inkeTest. Uy working with the: “Christie telling parliament that
Bahamas and because of their inter- ? pe “could not proceed” with his
est, the Bahamas Aviation Depart- : own stated intention to do this in
ment conducted training of staffand } 5094 hecause of “homeland secu-
has included them in marketing } rity concerns” on the part of the
activities such as trade shows and } [j¢ government

Bahamas Gateway FBOs with sev- aS ee

Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE very idea that PLP MP

should

During his speech to parlia-

? million in fees and create 120

In response, Minister of Youth,

“Tt’s right here (in the)
2004/2005 budget com-
munication,” noted Mr
Bannister, as he con-
tributed to this year’s
budget debate.

This came after Mr
Davis claimed the budget
was evidence that the cur-
rent government, which
has reduced funding to
most ministries, depart-
ments and agencies in the
face of a major revenue
shortfall and continuing
decline in economic activ-
ity, has “no real plan” for
how it can bring in more money
in hard times.

But Mr Bannister suggested
that the governing FNM has been
unfairly “blamed” during the bud-
get debate for not adopting mea-
sures that have already been
shown to be unfeasible.

He noted that Mr Christie, hav-
ing suggested in 2003 that his gov-
ernment could introduce a flight
information region (FIR) and air
traffic control system for the
Bahamas as a new revenue
stream, added that should it not

Desmond Pere



do so, it would have to
find other new sources
of funding in the “very
near future” or “run
the risks” associated
with a high level of
government debt.

A failure on the part
of former Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie to
take his own advice in
2003/2004 contributed
| to the unsustainable
level of debt the gov-
ernment now finds
itself burdened with,
Mr Bannister said.

“We all know that the oppor-
tunity was not taken by the for-
mer administration and the for-
mer prime minister predicted
quite accurately six years ago
even without this unforeseeable
global financial crisis being on the
horizon that there would be prob-
lems with the accumulation of
GFS deficit and a high level of
government debt,” said Mr Ban-
nister.

The prime minister has told
parliament that the country is fac-
ing a level of debt this year that

will be “unsustainable” going for-
ward. He said government is act-
ing to ensure that it brings the
level back down over the next
several years.

“(Perry Christie) accurately
predicted in 2003 when he did not
initiate the flight information
region for the Bahamas that there
would be problems with the accu-
mulated GFS deficit and
increased government debt.

“He also accurately predicted
in 2006 that our economy
remained vulnerable to global
economic shocks such as a rise in
oil prices, and oil prices rose to

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summer.

“But we are now being blamed.
The truth is here in the written
words of the leader of the oppo-
sition, some written as long as six
years ago; and we should tell the
Bahamian people the truth and
stop playing politics with this very
important debate,” said Mr Ban-
nister.

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Water and Sewerage union memberts return to work

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

OPERATIONS at the Water and
Sewage Corporation are said to be
“relatively normal” once again after
union members who staged a sick-out
in protest of delayed contract negoti-
ations and “unfavourable” remarks
by the prime minister, returned to
work. F

While police were on the scene at
the corporation's head office on
Thompson Boulevard yesterday morning in case
things "escalated", sources at WSC said the
employees returned to work "peacefully."

Meanwhile, Environment Minister Earl
Deveaux, who has ministerial responsibility for
WSC, warned that any workers who were found
to be illegally off the job during the "sick-out" will
face salary cuts.

"Anyone who has been illegally absent from
work will have their pay reduced. If they were
legally sick then no problem but there is a process
for calling industrial action but a mass sick-out is
not it,” said Mr Deveaux, adding that he did not
know how many union members called in sick.

Despite the quiet return to work, head of the

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Bahamas Utility Service and Allied
Workers Union (BUSAWU) Carmen
Kemp, who represents the line staff,
said the stand-off between union mem-
bers and government will continue until
the "stalled" negotiations resume.

"The government seems to be holding
its position and we're going to hold ours
because they are not supposed to dictate
when the contract is going to be com-
pleted," said Ms Kemp.

Yesterday, Minister Deveaux said
executives at the corporation plan to
meet with union representatives later
this week to hammer out contract details.

"(Management) advised me this morning that
they would resume a meeting with the union
this week and go through the contracts this week
to see where they would come to a consensus,” he
told The Tribune.

Tensions have been high for months between
the two unions representing workers at WSC —
BUSAWU and the Water and Sewerage Man-
agement Union (WSMU) - and government
over the stalled contract negotiations and gov-
ernment's decision not to give WSC employees
across the board salary increases.

Their expired contract has been up for renew-
al since June 2007.

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In March, the unions said they felt “exploited”
by government after negotiations to
renew expired industrial agreements were sus-
pended.

They called for a general salary increase in
line with the rising cost of living adding that the
workers have not had a general salary increase in
six years.

Weeks later, around 200 members of both
unions gathered outside the WSC headquarters
in Thompson Boulevard as union executives
claimed that WSC bosses withheld keys to
employees’ vehicles preventing them from work-
ing —a claim chairman Anton Saunders later
denied.

Government has always maintained that it
never left the negotiating table and has said while
it cannot offer across the board salary increases,
it is willing to continue contract discussions.

Last week's sick-out was sparked by what
union members called "unfavourable" remarks
by Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham in the House
of Assembly during the budget debate.

Mr Ingraham said he was astounded to hear
WSC workers calling for salary increases con-
sidering the financial straits facing the corpora-
tion.

He said the only way to raise salaries at WSC
was to reduce costs.

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THE TRIBUNE





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Committee is appointed for
National Training Programme

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

AS PROMISED by Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham during his Budget com-
munication, Senator Dion Foulkes over
the weekend announced the official for-
mation and appointment of an implemen-
tation advisory committee for the Nation-
al Training Programme.

This body, with its goal of training and
retraining 1,000 unemployed Bahamians,
will be headed by the newly-elected pres-
ident of the Chamber of Commerce
Khaalis Rolle. It will have amongst its
members Rev Patrick Paul, president of
the Bahamas Christian Council; John Pin-
der, president of the National Congress

LOCAL NEWS

of Trade Unions of the Bahamas
(NCTUB) and the Bahamas Public Service
Union (BPSU); Thomas Bastian, repre-
sentative of the Trade Union Congress
(TUC); Dr Pandora Johnson, vice-presi-
dent of College of the Bahamas; Dr Iva
Dahl, director of BT VI; Dorethea Godet,
deputy director of Labour, and Alpheus
Forbes, deputy permanent secretary at the
Ministry of Labour and Social Develop-
ment.

Senator Foulkes said that this committee
is mandated to propose a framework for
the National Training Programme and to
advise the government of its findings with-
in three weeks.

“This process of consultation started in
October of last year under the joint chair-
manship of the Minister of Education Carl

Bethel and myself along with Ministers
Desmond Bannister, Zhivargo Laing and
Loretta Turner,” Mr Foulkes said.

Prime Minister Ingraham said during
the Budget debate that after extensive
consultation with the trade union leaders,
employers’ representatives and the
Bahamas Christian Council, government
has decided to begin a national training
and retraining programme for recently
laid off workers.

“The programme will be geared towards
training workers in areas where there is a
strong demand from the business sector,”
Mr Ingraham said. “These areas will
include, but not limited to the following:
Masonry; carpentry; welding; tile laying;
electrical; landscaping; data processing;
computer skills; customer service; day care

assistant; housekeep-
ing and language skills.

“Courses will be for
a period of 10 to 15
weeks and are being offered by Bahamas
Technical and Vocational Institute (BT VI)
and the College of the Bahamas (COB)
and will be made available to 1,000 unem-
ployed Bahamians who will be selected
from those persons who have already reg-
istered for the National Insurance Unem-
ployment Benefit.”

Minister Foulkes thanked the social
partners for the work they have done up
until this point and he expressed his min-
istry’s appreciation for those who are now
serving on the implementation advisory
committee for the National Training Pro-
gramme.



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Minister pledges to abandon ‘narrow UR aes) to crime fighting

THE continuing spike in crime
means the Bahamas must aban-
don “narrow approaches” to
policing and national security,
Minister of National Security
Tommy Turnquest said.

He also affirmed his govern-
ment’s support for the “effective
policing strategies” and policies
that he said are being employed
by the Royal Bahamas Police
Force.












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Mr Turnquest said the govern-
ment is committed to ensuring
that funding is available to
acquire state-of-the-art equip-
ment and technology needed to
police today’s Bahamas.

He was speaking at a medal
presentation ceremony for mem-
bers of the Royal Bahamas Police
Force at Government House.

One hundred and seventy-five
officers, ranging in rank from

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constable to senior assistant com-
missioner, were presented with
medals for gallantry, meritorious
service, long service, good con-
duct and faithful service. Reserve
officers were presented with
medals for faithful service for the
first time. Sir Arthur Foulkes,
Deputy to the Governor Gener-
al, made the presentations.

Mr Turnquest recalled times
when crime and criminality in the
Bahamas did not present the
challenges they do today.

“Many look back at those days
with nostalgia when Bahamian
police officers did not even have
to carry guns.

“Now, policing can leave offi-
cers open to danger and risk.

“Our police officers have
proven themselves willing to take
the risk and to face danger in
order to protect us,” Mr Turn-
quest said.

Resources will also be provid-
ed for the “appropriate” train-
ing of the men and women of the
Force, he said.

“This will open opportunities
for them over the wide range of
disciplines required by the Force.

“T am a strong advocate for a
dynamic and effective police
force and place special value on
the work the Force does in main-
taining law and order in our
country.”

The National Security minis-
ter lauded the awardees for
“exemplifying the loyalty, integri-
ty and courage” for which the
Royal Bahamas Police Force
stands.

ABOVE: Royal Bahamas Police Force
officers who were awarded medals
for outstanding service are pictured
on the steps of Government House
with Deputy to the Governor General
Sir Arthur Foulkes.

RIGHT: Minister of National
Security Tommy Turnquest.

“What you have done,
awardees, was to make a funda-
mental choice, a major decision,
to give good and faithful service
to the government and people of
the Bahamas,” Mr Turnquest
said.

“You have committed your-
selves to upholding law and order
in the Bahamas so as to make
our country more safe and
secure.

“Continue to give good and
dedicated service to the Force
and to influence others to do like-
wise.”







Patrick Hanna/BIS

PUBLIC NOTICE

Public Consultation on Retail
Pricing for the Electronic
Communications Sector

The Committee for the Privatisation of BTC is pleased
to invite comments from members of the public and
interested parties on its consultation document for a

proposed

new Retail

Electronic Communications Sector.

Retail

pricing

regulation enables

Pricing Structure

the

for the

regulator to

impose specific obligations on price levels and price
changes for operators deemed to have significant

market

power

in certain

consultation document addresses
proposed approaches to retail price regulation in The

Bahamas.

product
the current and

markets. The

The Retail Pricing consultation will run for approximately five weeks fram
June 16, 2009 to July 17, 2009. Caples of the consultation document are
being distributed to the Administrators’ offices In the Family islands and can
be obtained from the Public Litliities Commission and the offices of KPMG In
New Providence and Grand Bahama. Copies can also be downloaded fram
the Government's website at www. bahamas.gov.bs or the privatisation
website at www. bteprivatisation.com and comments amailed to
info@btcprivatisation.com.


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



School safety committees are

PUBLIC schools in Grand
Bahama have now instituted
school safety committees to
provide an established mecha-
nism for the sharing of infor-
mation to ensure to the physi-
cal, mental and sexual safety
the Grand Bahama District
inclusive of Bimini, Sweetings
Cay and Grand Cay.

The purpose of the safety
committee is to provide an
outlet for students to confi-
dentially report abuse and oth-
er concerns. The establishment
of these committees is part of
the six-point initiative that
Minister of Education Carl
Bethel announced in April at a
press conference to address
the problem of inappropriate

established on Grand Bahama

behaviours and sexual
molestation in public schools.

The committees are com-
prised of a principal, a teacher,
a guidance counsellor, a parent
and two students.

Administrators

According to Hezekiah
Dean, District Superintendent
for high schools, all-age and
special schools, the schools’
administrators are working
closely with psychologist Dr
Pamula Mills in this effort.

Mr Dean also noted that the
special schools in the district
will fall under the jurisdiction
of a joint committee that

includes the principals of those
institutions along with com-
munity leaders and represen-
tatives from the police depart-
ment, school boards, the Chris-
tian Council, Social Services
and the Ministry of Youth.

The purpose of the safety
committee is to provide an
outlet for students to confi-
dentially report abuse and oth-
er concerns.

The establishment of these
committees is part of the six-
point initiative that Minister
of Education Carl Bethel
announced in April to address
the problem of inappropriate
behaviours and sexual
molestation in public schools.

Once an incident of abuse

is reported to the committee, it
must then be reported to the
police and senior management
at headquarters in Nassau.

Other aspects of the six-
point initiative that the Min-
istry of Education is working
to have in place when school
reopens in September 2009
include the vetting of new
teachers within the first year
of their employment; more
training of school guidance
counsellors to address stu-
dents’ psycho-social needs;
updating of the School Safety
Manual and a card featuring
contacts for all of the child
protection agencies and the
police department on each
island.

Dynamic week for Bahamas
Sea Turtle Conservation Group

THE Bahamas Sea Turtle Con-
servation Group had a very dynam-
ic week with various events
designed to educate the general
public.

This organisation is co-chaired
by three Bahamians — Mrs. Kim
Aranha, also President of the
Bahamas Humane Society, Mrs.
Debbie Krukowski, also Vice-Pres-
ident of Animals Require Kind-
ness, and Mrs. Jane Mather, also
President of Advocates for Ani-
mal Rights.

The membership of this organ-
isation is comprised of all the large
animal and conservation groups in
the country, including The
Bahamas National Trust, Proud
Paws, ReEarth, the Grand Bahama
Humane Society, BREEF, The
Nature Conservancy, The Bahamas
Humane Society, Animals Require
Kindness, Advocates for Animal
Rights, and smaller animal
groups established around the
country.

The candlelight vigil held in
Rawson Square attracted interest-
ed citizens and tourists alike. The
highlight of the vigil was a skit put
on by two children, both students at
the Meridian School run by Mrs.
Lisa McCartney.

Anna Nixon, who is nine years
old, and the daughter of Joanna
and Ricky Nixon, was joined on a
small stage by Brent Whittingham,
who is seven years old, and the son
of Carla and Robert Whittingham.
They put on a great performance,
and received a resounding applause
from the onlookers gathered in the
Square. These two young children
were clearly spoken, unwavering
and composed. They stood before
the crowd and spoke their lines like
the real pros that they are. Their
message was easy to read and
spoke volumes for the cause that
they were representing. Mrs Aran-
ha, co-chairman of The Bahamas
Sea Turtle Conservation Group,
said it was “truly exciting to see
two such young citizens of the
Bahamas supporting their right to
a healthy and rich environment.”

“We at The Bahamas Sea Tur-
tle Conservation Group encourage
parents to bring up their children in
a manner so that they are conscious
of the environment and the perils
that lie in the future,” she said. “We
are very grateful to Mr. and Mrs.
Nixon, and Mr. and Mrs. Whit-
tingham, for allowing their children
to perform in this public forum.”

The Bahamas Sea Turtle Con-
servation Group flew in Dr. Alan
Bolten from the University of
Florida to speak at a town meeting
that was held at the College of the
Bahamas. Dr. Bolten talked of the
importance of protecting the sea
turtles immediately. He pointed
out that the Green Turtle is down
by 95 per cent in population. Dr.
Bolten also reminded the listeners
that the sea turtle has an impor-
tant function in keeping the sea
grass beds groomed for juvenile
conchs and groupers to breed. He
also explained how the Hawksbill
Turtle removes the undesirable
sponges from the reefs to allow
corals to grow.

“These are not the sponges that
we pick to sell,” co-chairman of
The Bahamas Sea Turtle Conser-
vation Group, Mrs. Debbie
Krukowski, explained.

Dr. Bolten also pointed out that
some people claim that there are
more turtles now than before,
when presented with this argument
Dr. Bolten used a very simple way
to explain this erroneous percep-
tion that there are more turtles
today. He said that if you have a
hundred turtles and a hundred
good, rich, feeding areas for them
to go, then you might only see one
turtle. If you have a hundred turtles
with only 10 places to go you may
see 10 turtles, but that does not
mean that there are more turtles. It
means that there are fewer places
for them to feed.

Seventy-eight per cent of all
Caribbean nations have passed tur-
tle protection acts, however for
many of them it has been too late



TRS mer highlight of the candlelight vigil.

to repair the damage done by
“progress” to the feeding grounds,
often torn apart by shrimping nets,
so the poor trusting sea turtle
comes to our pristine islands, still
rich with food. Jane Mather, the
co-chairman of the Bahamas Sea
Turtle Conservation group pointed
out that “as and when they get
here...we kill them!”

“Tt is time for the Bahamas to
join those enlightened countries
that protect turtles and then turn to
the other nations who are not doing
so and urge them to follow suit.”

Dr. Bolten explained and illus-
trated very clearly how the issue
goes far beyond the eating of turtle
meat, these creatures are the cus-
todians of the underwater gardens
where conch, juvenile grouper and
other precious marine resources
lurk and grow into larger and more
viable animals. If we upset the bal-

ance of nature, as it has been for
millions of years, we cause irrevo-
cable damage. The sea turtle has
been swimming on our planet for
more than 60 million years. At this
point in time all sea turtles are fac-
ing the very real possibility of
extinction.

Mrs Aranha pointed out that
all sea turtles love to eat jellyfish; it
is a delicacy for them.

“T don’t know about you,” Mrs.
Aranha said, “but when I was
young I never had to worry about
getting stung in the summer when
we went swimming, now it is a reg-
ular occurrence. It kind of makes
you wonder if the turtles, when
more plentiful, helped to keep the
jellyfish away from the beaches by
eating them.”

Mrs. Aranha said the group was
disappointed that none of the fish-
ermen or people who write in the

lard of Thanks

—— ~

The Family of the late

Leon B. Wells

would like to thank his many friends,
colleagues and past students for the
numerous acts of kindness and support
shown to them during their recent bereave-
ment. Your words of condolence were a
source of strength and comfort and were

greatly appreciated.



The Family

papers against passing the Turtle
Protection Act turned up at the
Town meeting at COB.

“It was a perfect opportunity
and forum for questions to be
answered, and for us to have had a
peaceful and intelligent discussion,”
she said.

“We hope that this series of
meetings and the wonderful inter-
view by Etoile Pinder on Jones
Communications has helped to
educate people who were unde-
cided about this issue and that it is
now perfectly clear to everybody
how fragile nature is when you
upset the balance of it.

“With this in mind we, The
Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation
group, urge our government to
make the right decision and protect
these marine creatures as quickly as
possible,” said a statement from
the organisation.

“Interested persons,” said the
group, “can contact us by e-mailing
bahamasturtles@gmail.com

“We urge you to write to Minis-
ter Cartwright and send a copy to
our group. All people in support
are asked to make their voices
heard.”

I

Man appears in court on
armed robbery charge

A35-YEAR-OLD man was arraigned in a Magistrates Court yes-
terday on an armed robbery charge.

Charles Pandy, of Malcolm Allotment, was also arraigned on
the charge of receiving before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in
Court One, Bank Lane.

It is alleged that on Thursday, April 9, 2009, Pandy along with oth-
ers used a handgun to rob Makeda Brown of a HP laptop, a digital
camera and a MP3 player with a total value of $870. It is also
alleged that Pandy received the items.

Pandy was not required to enter a plea to the charges at his
arraignment.

He was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. The case has been
adjourned to June 30. Pandy is charged along with two 16-year-old
boys who were arraigned in Juvenile Court. They are also expected
back in court on June 30.

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>The °
imaneial

VOICE

What are the highlights and shortcomings of the
2009/2010 Budget Communication?

How will it impact our economy, our education,
health and security?
What does it mean to YOU?
What can we expect over the next six months?

Don't miss

THE FINANCIAL VOICE

TOWN MEETING

On the 2009/2010 Budget Communication
Wednesday, June 17 at 8 p.m.

at Choices Restaurant,
COB School of Hospitality, Thompson Blvd.

Host: Jeff Lloyd

Panellists

Wendy Warren, CEO & Executive Director, BFSB
Anthony Ferguson, President, CFAL
Dr Duane Sands, President, Bahamas Medical Council
Capt. Randy Butler. President & CEO, Sky Bahames
Frank Comite, Executive Director, Bahamas Hotel Association

Belinda Wilson, President, Bahamas Union of Teachers

Peter Blair, Ph.D. candidate, Harvard University
Vaughn Delaney, Deputy Managing Director, Bank of The Bahamas

Presented by The Counsellors Ltd.


PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

ter of Health Dr Hubert Minnis
for failing to represent the nurses
and for not attempting to engage
in a discussion with the union
throughout the eight day sick-out
until yesterday morning.

She called for him to stand
down, provoking cheers and
applause from the angry nurses.

Ms Hamilton said: “It’s degrad-
ing, it’s disrespectful and we are
calling for this minister to leave...
When we are pushed to the limit
that our employers are pushing us
to, we have no other alternative
than to push back, and we are at
the point where we have been
pushed too far and for too long.

“We want to say to Dr Minnis
tonight; we are sick and tired, and
if you are not able to do the job
then step aside.”

She praised union members for
their commitment but assured
nurses she must advise them to
return to work.

However, Ms Hamilton said she
cannot advise the nurses of their

Nurses stay defiant

The BNU president said: “T fig-
ure you should go to the doctor
and ask if you should return to
work.”

BNU legal adviser Obie Fergu-
son informed nurses they may be
held in contempt of court and be
committed, fined or have their
assets seized if they fail to com-
ply with the order.

But a riotous atmosphere pre-
vailed in the meeting at the
Bahamas College of Nursing in
Grosvenor Close, off Shirley
Street, and rebellious nurses
argued they would present their
doctor’s notes to their employers,
as they insisted they are “sick”
and “not involved in industrial
action.”

One nurse said: “We are not
only physically sick. Emotional
sickness can bring on symptoms
and we are here because we want-
ed to hear what is happening.

“We came to get some clarifi-
cation and that does not mean I
am not sick.

said I am sick, and I came here
and now I feel worse!”

The president of the Nurses
Association pledged her support
to the nurses, as did former Attor-
ney General Alfred Sears MP who
said he was calling on government
to show respect to nurses.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham maintains the government
has agreed to provide the health
insurance benefit but has decided
to delay its implementation
because of unexpected pressures
on the national budget owing to
the global economic downturn.

Government was granted the
injunction after Ministry of Health
director of health Pearl MacMillan
and Public Hospitals managing
director Herbert Brown filed affi-

davits at the Supreme Court yes-
terday.

The injunction ordered the
BNU to instruct its members to
return to their specified areas of
employment when scheduled and
not take part in, or continue to
take part in, any form of industri-
al action.

Prime Minister Ingraham said:
“The government, acting through
the Public Hospitals Authority and
the Minister of Health, sought the
intervention of the Supreme Court
to put an end to the industrial
action being undertaken by some
members of the Bahamas Nurses
Union with the apparent encour-
agement of union officers.

“Today, the Supreme Court
ruled in the matter and ordered

Concerns raised over excavation

FROM page one

from sunrise to sunset on a daily basis.
And a new dirt track cleared through the area to Cowpen Road
means trucks rattle through the once peaceful neighbourhood at all

hours.

that the union and its members be
restrained from calling, organiz-
ing or procuring members to
strike, or to refuse to work, or to
refuse to work when scheduled to
do so, or leave their employment
or otherwise participate in any
form of industrial action.

“My government now fully
expects that all concerned will
abide by the ruling of the court.

“Whatever our grievances or
circumstances, we are all as citi-
zens bound to abide by the rule
of law which has ensured the sta-
bility of the Bahamas and enabled
the orderly delivery of essential
services to the public.

“My government has always
been committed to the welfare of

all those who serve the Bahamian
people in the public service,
including and especially our nurs-
es.

“We will continue, as resources
allow, to work towards improving
conditions and benefits for
Bahamian nurses.

“We are, and have always been,
open to continued dialogue on
these matters with mutual respect
for each other.

“But the government cannot
and will not at any time — and
especially during these trying times
— abdicate its responsibility to pro-
tect the overall interests of the
nation within the framework
of good order and the rule of
law.”

| Claims that baby was treated for a
_ sexually transmitted disease are refuted

FROM page one

i However, Police Commissioner Reginald Fer-
? guson has not ruled out claims the child was

i? sexually abused.

illness.
“T went to the doctors and he

ESSAY COMPETITION

TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK

The Department of Public Service will host an Essay
Competition as one of the activities for the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week. The Competition is open to Junior

and Senior Students in New Providence.

Additionally, this year, a speech competition will be

for schools

in the Northern & Southern Bahamas,

respectively. Students interested in participating in the
Essay Competition should write a 250 - 300 words (Junior
High), and 450 - 500 words (Senior High), essay on the
topic: “ The Public Service-Striving for Excellence in

Customer Service.”

The deadlines for entries, which should be referred
to the attention of Mrs. Antoinette Thompson, Deputy
Permanent Secretary, Department of Public Service, is

Friday 24th July, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 Computer System will be awarded to
the winner each category. The first runners-up for both the
Essay and Speech Competition in the Junior & Senior High
School category, will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.

The winners will be announced during the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week Awards Ceremony scheduled for

Saturday 10th October 2009.

Students interested in the Speech Competition for the
Northern and Southern Bahamas should contact their

Language Arts Teacher.



A mother of two whose Oxford Street home backs onto the site said
the tenant began bulldozing the site in October 2007, claiming he was
preparing the area for farming.

But at the end of last year it became clear he was excavating quar-
ry to sell, and when digging reached the water table, the empty craters
started to be filled with everything from mattresses to toilets.

The pile of garbage reached 20ft or so before it was compressed into
the ground, the 45-year-old mother said.

She claimed the excavation and landfill has dropped the level of the
land around 6ft, but her main concern is the risk it poses for the whole
community as everyone depends on the water table which is now like-
ly to be contaminated.

She said: “My main concern is that he’s digging below the water table
and dumping garbage in there, so he’s polluting our water and we
don’t have any other means of getting water, so I don’t know what the
long term health effects are going to be.”

The 45-year-old woman who has lived in Millars Heights for 27
years also suffers from allergies to dust and her 12-year-old son has asth-
ma attacks provoked by the dust.

Members of the community wrote to MP Charles Maynard, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham and Minister of Environment Earl Deveaux,
asking for authorities to put a stop to the activity in April, but have had
no reply.

The mother claimed: “He’s in contravention of his license and he’s
threatening the health of everybody in the area.

“We have had about enough. You can’t even enjoy being in your
house because we have that noise all day, we have dust, and we can
smell the diesel coming from the machine.

“What’s worse is I don’t know how much longer this is going to go
on, or what the end result is going to be. And he doesn’t even have the
authority to do it.”

Environment Minister Earl Deveaux said he had heard of similar
reports and the Minister of Agriculture and Marine Resources issued
a warning to all agricultural tenants on Thursday.

He asked Bahamas Environment, Science and Technology (BEST)
commission, Bahamas National Geographical Information Systems
(BNGIS) and the Department of Physical Planning to catalogue the
sites on Geographic Information Systems (GIS) so police action can be
taken on all illegal activity.

Mr Deveaux urged residents to take pictures to the police, and pro-
vide permanent secretary Ronald Thompson at the Ministry of the
Environment with as much information as possible.

The minister added: “We have had a number of sites identified by
GIS. We have compared those sites with approved sites and will cata-
logue the others for onward transmission to the police.

“Tam not familiar with all of the infractions. The more information
we have, with persons willing to assist, the more effective we can be in
addressing the illegal mining and consequent health risks, not to men-
tion the environmental damage.”

Mr Deveaux said he intends to bring all illegal mining to an imme-
diate halt and provide a reasonable alternative source for licensed
operators.

Dredging the harbour will generate two million cubic yards of fill, Mr
Deveaux said, and he hopes this can be sold to licensed operators
until a more sustainable long-term alternative to hill excavation has
been determined.

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Mr Ferguson told The Tribune last week that
: police followed the appropriate protocol and
: police are still awaiting a full medical report
: before taking further action.
i The Commissioner said: “I don’t have any-
: thing else to say about this baby. The police are J.
: awaiting the pathologist report. That isthe only — preinalp
; update at this time.” FERGUSON
? Chief hospital administrator at PMH Coralie
? Adderley said the child was cared for by a team of senior officers
? and consultants from the paediatric and emergency room, and the
? medical team followed established clinical protocol with respect
? to treatment and contacting police.
i The autopsy report, when completed, will be forwarded to the
? police and the appropriate agencies.



FROM page one

Night court

rialised.



"For some time there was
talk about scrapping it, but it
had never come to pass.
Whether it comes to pass now
I'm not sure. (But) I can see
some classes of persons who will
immediately be upset — if they
do move to the weekend on Sat-
urday that might be something
that might well adversely affect
Seventh-Day Adventists, Jews
and Rastafarians.

"And it also may be looked
at as cutting into the time that
families traditionally spend
together," said Mr Munroe,
who is also a partner in the law
firm Lockhart and Munroe.

In the Jewish faith, the Sab-
bath is a weekly day of rest,
beginning from sundown on Fri-
day until the appearance of
three stars in the sky on Satur-
day night. For practising Sev-
enth-Day Adventists, the Sab-
bath is observed from sunset on
Friday to sunset on Saturday.
Rastafarians also observe a Sab-
bath on Saturday.

The night court system is an
extension of the Magistrate's
Court, created for the conve-
nience of the working public
who need traffic and civil mat-
ters heard in the more conve-
nient evening hours, said Mr
Munroe.

Currently night court magis-
trates sit for about 20 hours a
week, between six to nine pm
Monday through Friday, he
said. According to Mr Munroe
the effectiveness of a weekend
court system would depend on



how many magistrates are
employed during the weekend.

But bringing in untrained
persons to act as magistrates —
which was done in the early
1990's — may create its fair
share of problems, he said.

"The experience of lay mag-
istrates in the past was not a
good one and you can't expect
somebody — the usual attor-
ney to be a magistrate you had
to have gone through school
and been a lawyer for five years
— who has no formal legal
training to be fully competent.

"They talked about opening
courts with lay magistrates —
that was done the first time the
FNM was in power. They were
paid $1,000 per month to sit one
week out of the month, which
totalled up to more weekly than
one magistrate was being paid.
And there was a problem with
the sustaining of convictions
that they came up with," Mr
Munroe continued.

"The problem is, see in Eng-
land you have lay magistrates
but each bench of lay magis-
trates has a legally trained Clerk
to advise them on the law and
procedure. That wasn't a fea-
ture when we introduced it.

"And if you were to say lay
magistrates would have a legal-
ly trained Clerk then why don't
you just have that person be
qualified instead of the magis-
trate. So there are issues, I
haven't seen a comprehensive
position paper behind it to see
why this was suggested.”

DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Annual General Meeting

A reminder to all of our Doctors

Hospital Health System shareholders

that your attendance at the 2009 Annual

General Meeting is very important to

us, The meeting will be held at the

Doctors Hospital Conference Room,

located on Dowdeswell Street behind

the Business Office. We look forward to

seeing our shareholders there,

Location:

Doctors Hospital Conference

Room, Dowdswell Street

Date:

Time:

5:30pm

Thursday, June 18, 20109

* DOCTORS HOSPITAL



Health Far £ ile
TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009, PAGE 9



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Jackson, Bryant put
Lakers back on top

= By TOM WITHERS
AP Sports Writer

ORLANDO, Florida (AP)
— The coach stood to the side
and watched as his team exe-
cuted its final play of the NBA
season to perfection. It's the
one that had worked nine pre-
vious times. This wasn't his
famed triangle offense, this was
the celebration circle.

Phil Jackson, the architect,
smiled as his Los Angeles Lak-
ers, each of them armed witha
champagne bottle, popped
corks and doused each other
with bubbly late Sunday night
after winning their 15th title —
and first since 2002 — with a
99-86 win over the Orlando
Magic in Game 5.

United all year, the Lakers
screamed as one.

Kobe Bryant then dragged
Jackson into the frothy fray.

"It's been a long time since
he had a champagne bath," said
the brilliant Bryant, who
enriched his legacy as one of
the game's all-time greats with
a fourth title and finals MVP
award. "I knew that so I made
sure he became part of our cir-
cle and we got him pretty
good."

The Zen Master had his 10th
title, one more than Red Auer-
bach.

Call him The Ten Master.

The Lakers, who drifted
between disinterested and
divine during stretches this sea-
son, put it all together in their
final game, a no-doubt-about-it
rout that was sealed with a 16-0
spurt in the second quarter that
showcased the club's depth,
versatility and Bryant's sheer
will.

Jackson, who has been vague
about his plans beyond this sea-
son, delighted in his teams'
development. Borrowing one
of the mantras of his medita-
tive training, he preached to
them about staying in the
moment. Don't look back.
Don't look too far ahead. Don't
waste opportunity. Enjoy the



PHIL JACKSON reacts to a play
in second quarter of Game 4 of
the finals against the Magic...

| da ERA)

journey.

The Lakers listened and
learned.

"They came together this
year and were self-motivated,
and for a coach that's a posi-
tive sign," said Jackson, who
won six titles in Chicago before
taking over the Lakers in 1999.
"When a team is ready, they're
aggressive, their learning curve
is high and they wanted to win."

Though he may not have
shown it outwardly, Jackson
wanted it too.

"You can see it in his eyes,"
Bryant said.

Jackson sidestepped ques-
tions about his place in history
and comparisons to Auerbach
throughout the finals. The 64-
year-old, has had both hips sur-
gically replaced and struggles
getting around, is at a time in
his life when basketball, though

still a passion, doesn't burn as it
once did.

The drive is still there, but
it's in a lower gear. With this
Lakers squad, he would instruct
and observe. Those days of get-
ting out on the floor for demon-
strations are few. He deferred
to his assistants and to Bryant,
his coach on the court.

"I've always felt as a coach
you have to push your team,"
Jackson said, “and I told them
they had to push themselves. I
wasn't at the stage of my life
where I could get out and do
things that I had done 10 or 15
years ago to push a team. They
pushed themselves and I feel
really strongly that this is about
them."

During the postgame cele-
bration, Jackson wore a gold
Lakers cap — a gift from his
children — with the Roman

ANDY MURRAY of Britain plays a return to James Blake of the US during Queen’s Club grass court championships
final in London on Sunday. Murray won by 7-5, 6-4.

(AP Photo: Sang Tan)

Murray beats Blake to
win Queen’s Club final

LONDON (AP) — Andy
Murray defeated James Blake
7-5, 6-4 Sunday to win the
Aegon Championships at
Queen’s Club for his first grass-
court title.

The top-seeded Murray
became the first British player
to win the tournament since
Bunny Austin in 1938, who then
went on to become the last
Briton to reach the Wimbledon
final.

"I was quite nervous,” Mur-
ray said. "People were telling
me that no (Briton) had won
here for 70-odd years so that
got the nerves going, especially
when I was serving for the
match."

Murray took an early lead
with a break in the third game,
but Blake immediately evened
it with a forehand winner down
the line. Both players then eas-

ily held serve until 5-5, when
Blake missed a forehand on
break point.

The second set was equally
competitive until Murray broke
for a decisive 4-3 lead when a
fierce return forced Blake to
net a backhand volley.

"T didn't quite know what to
expect, but this is some of the
best tennis I've played in my
life," said Murray, who did not
drop a set all week. "I'm a long
way from winning Wimbledon,
but I feel confident. I'll try and
not get too far ahead of myself
and focus on my first match
there, but if I play my best like
I did this week, I've got a
chance."

Blake said he was beaten by a
better player, but that he was
pleased with preparation for
Wimbledon, which starts June
22.

"Thad a good week,” Blake
said. "Playing on the grass, I
always have a lot of fun playing
here. I feel great. I've been
working with my coach and
trainer, and I know I'm doing
the best preparation possible
for Wimbledon. I'll be ready to
play and feel great about my
chances."

It was Murray's fourth title
of the year, following victories
in Doha, Rotterdam and Miami.

The sixth-seeded Blake was
playing his third grass-court
final, after finishing runner-up
here in 2006 to Lleyton Hewitt
and losing the Newport final in
2002 to Taylor Dent. He was
seeking his first title since
August 2007.

Defending champion Rafael
Nadal pulled out of the tourna-
ment to rest his knees ahead of
Wimbledon.



numeral "X"' on the front to
signify his double-digit titles.

"Almost incomprehensible,"
Orlando coach Stan Van
Gundy said of Jackson's per-
fect 10.

Bryant can't imagine playing
for anyone but Jackson, his
coach for nine seasons in L.A.
Following Game 5, guard
Derek Fisher, who won his
fourth ring, couldn't picture the
Lakers’ luxury liner without
Jackson as its captain.

"T know it's part of the busi-
ness and it can happen, but to
take away the chef who stirs
the pot — it'll be a different
batch of stew, I'll tell you that
much," Fisher said. "I have no
idea what his plans are, and
how tonight makes him feel, or
where he feels he wants to go
from here. I know for a fact that
I want to play for him, next sea-

KOBE BRYANT kisses the championship trophy after the Lakers won

Game 5 of the finals against the Orlando Magic in Orlando, Florida,
on Sunday night. Los Angeles defeated Orlando 99-86 for the NBA

championship.

son and for as long as I'm capa-
ble of playing.

"That's who I want to play
for."

As for Bryant, he may be just
hitting his stride.

Now that he silenced all
those who said he couldn't win
it all without former teammate
Shaquille O'Neal, Bryant can
take aim at loftier goals.

He has become a true leader,
hardly the "uncoachable" play-
er as he was once labeled in a
book by Jackson when their
relationship was on the rocks.
Bryant is driven to win cham-
pionships, and just this side of
his 31st birthday, he is just two
away from matching Jordan.

Could Bryant eclipse Jordan
as the modern game's greatest
player?

Such talk once seemed
unfathomable. Not anymore.
Bryant is beginning to make his
case.

As long as they can sign free
agents Lamar Odom and
Trevor Ariza, the Lakers have

NISSAN PICKUP

Tough Body
Trouble-free
Easy to Maintain

(AP Photo: Stephen M Dowell)



enough talent to string together
several championships over the
next few years. If Bryant stays
healthy and hungry, the Larry
O'Brien Trophy could be set-
tling out West for a while.

Bryant has two years remain-
ing on a $136 million contract
he can option out of beginning
next month. He's not going
anywhere and said as much
when his contract situation was
raised a few days ago.

The Lakers are the only team
he has known, and Los Ange-
les, which has waited seven
years to celebrate another
hoops title, is his town. Again.

The City of Angels can be
unforgiving, even for the
blessed.

"They won't see us as losers,"
Bryant said. "L.A. is brutal,
man. Now when I go to Dis-
neyland, I can enjoy the
moment. I don't have to answer
questions about, 'What the hell
happened to you guys.’ From
that standpoint, the summer is
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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

Stewart makes

BUDGET DEBATE

Minister outlines programmes
to receive monetary increases

@ by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

A successful 2008-09 for the Depart-
ment of Sports will set the stage for an
improved fiscal year in 2009-10, high-
lighted by several increases to key initia-
tives set forth by the Ministry to assist in
the development of sports.

In his contribution to the Governmen-
t’s 2009-10 budget tabled in the House
of Assembly, Minister of Youth Sports
and Culture, the Hon. Desmond Bannis-
ter, outlined his ministry’s impact on the
current budget.

In 2009-10, programs receiving mone-
tary increases will include Student Athlete
Aid, Annual Summer Sports Program
and Elite Athlete Subvention.

Bannister congratulated the success of
the National teams, both at the junior
and senior levels over the course of the
year including the Beijing Olympics,
Carifta swimming and athletics, and
recently both men and women volleyball
teams at regional World Cup Qualifiers.

The Minister pledged for the Subven-
tion program to increase to its highest
level in Bahamian history.

“We in the Ministry, are appreciative of
the success of these teams, and we pledge
to continue to provide support for our
athletes.

“In this regard, I note that the item for
subventions to elite athletes has been
increased by $270,815 to $1,170,815,000,
which is the highest that it has been in his-
tory,” he said, “And even in these hard
times, the National Endowment Fund for
sports is $1.5 million, which is higher than
it has ever been prior to July 2007.”

In a timely fashion with school clos-
ings on the horizon for the impending
summer months, Bannister gave a syn-
opsis of the Ministry’s Summer Youth
Program which will seek additional
improvement with a budget increase of $1
million dollars.

“One Thousand One hundred and
ninety-three (1,193) boys and one thou-
sand and ninety-four (1,094) girls partic-
ipated in this six weeks programme dur-
ing the summer of 2008.





















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“The age of campers ranged from five
(5) to eighteen (18) years and the daily
rate of participation was ninety-cight per-
cent (98%).

“The programme employed three hun-
dred and twenty-six summer students and
trained coaches at a weekly average
stipend of $180 per week.

Subsidise

“A new component of the programme
was to subsidize eighteen non-profit sum-
mer camps organized by private non-gov-
ernment agencies here in New Provi-
dence, in Grand Bahama and in
Eleuthera,” he said, “Colleagues would
note that despite the global economic
downturn, the budget for this programme
has been increased by $54,000.00 to $1
million dollars. I thank the Right Hon-
ourable Prime Minister for this wise
investment in our youth.”

Working closely in conjunction with
the College of the Bahamas, the Ministry
will seek to grant student athletes with

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greater incentives to hone their craft and
educate themselves at home by increasing
the aid available to students to $120,000.

“Mr. Speaker, my Ministry successful-
ly implemented a project to assist the
growth and development of the Athletic
Department at the College of the
Bahamas. In partnership with the Col-
lege, some twenty-nine student-athletes
were selected for financial assistance on
the basis of need and qualifications. An
allocation of $45,000 was made available
from my Ministry’s budget to fund the
programme, which was designed to make
the college equally as attractive to the
better student-athletes seeking tertiary
education. The initiative was also under-
taken to commence the process of devel-
oping a programme which allows
Bahamian athletes to train and develop
on their home soil,” he said, “I am
pleased to say, Mr. Speaker, that the gov-
ernment recognizes that no nation should
totally outsource the responsibility for
the development of its citizens.

“The immediate success of this pro-
gramme is that student-athletes receiv-
ing aid at C.O.B. are pursuing degrees
as varied as business, engineering, medi-
cine and education.

“Accordingly, we have been pleased
to increase the money available under
this item from $60,000.00 to $120,000.00
this year.”

Other programs addressed by the Min-
ister in his contribution included the
revival of National Hall of Fame, Pilot
Learn to Swim Program, Establishment
of Sports Medicine Commission, Fiscal
Responsibilities of National Federations
and Associations, Sports Tourism and
Capital Project completed by the Min-
istry.

“My ministry continues to be a world
pacesetter for developing successful and
innovative sporting programs and pro-
jects; as is shown by our experience dur-
ing that past fiscal year,” Bannister said,
“All of these programs were designed to
promote diversified opportunities for
Bahamians to practice the universal right
of all mankind to participate in peaceful,
well organized sort and recreational activ-
ities.”

FROM page 11

ment.

The Bahama Snow Kids
Camp was started by Korath
Wright as a way to introduce
Bahamian teens to the same
camp that sparked his passion
for snowboarding.

The programme teaches
young Bahamians how to snow-
board while they make new
friends and see a new part of
the world.

The camp is set for July 6-25
at Mount Hood, Oregon.

“This beautiful mountain is
one of just three places north
of the equator where you can

Jamaicans proud

JAMAICAN Kerron Stewart finishes first in the women’s 100m
final at the ISTAF Golden League Athletics Meeting in Berlin Sunday.
Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie of the Bahamas can be seen on the right.

She placed fifth in 11:19.

ski and snowboard all summer
long. This was the starting point
for Korath's snowboarding
career. He attended High Cas-
cade Snowboard Camp at Mt
Hood as a camper at age 11,
going on to work his way
through the ranks to become a
counselor and then coach. It's
the ideal place for the Bahamas
Snow Kids Camp to begin train-
ing the next generation of
Bahamian snowboarders.”

Interested teens can also e-
mail Korath at SnowKids@The-
BahamasWeekly.com and tell
him why you think you should
be selected.

The camp will include other

tee

Ministry of Finance
Treasury Department

Announcement
To All Merchant and Vendors

The Treasure wishes to advise that for goods and
services supplied or rendered to Government
Ministries and Departments during the 2008/2009
fiscal year, you are hereby requested to submit:

1. The original of all outstanding invoices to
the Accounts Section of the relevant Ministry or

Department

2. A copy of those invoices to:
The Public Treasury Department

First Floor

British American House
(George Street & Navy Lion Road)

NO LATER THAN THURSDAY 24th, JUNE 2009

Please note that the PURCHASE ORDER NO.
Must be indicated on all invoices.

Signed

The Treasurer





(AP Photo: Michael Sohn)



Want to be a Bahama Snow Kid?

activities over the week and per-
sons may find more informa-
tion at Wwww.BahamaS-
now Kids.com
nowkids.com or www.highcas-
cade.com and click 'summer
camps’.

Fun off-hill activities are also
on the agenda during the nine-
day stay. Camp One runs from
July 6-14 and Camp Two from
July 17-25.

Eligible teens must be
Bahamian residents and be
ready to travel and have up-to-
date travel and legal documents.

“Teens can also buy in to the
camp if they do not wish to try
out for the scholarships. As long
as they are ready to try snow-
boarding, anyone from the age
of 13 to 17 years can be regis-
tered in the camp.

“I'm excited about the
Bahama Snow Kids Camp
because it’s an opportunity for
teens from the Bahamas to see
snow for the first time...and then
rip that snow apart on a snow-
board!

“It's also a chance for me to
communicate to kids that as
long as they know what they
want, are clear on their values
and are ready to work for it,
every decision they make will
move them towards their goals.

“Competing for the Bahamas
as the first winter Olympian,
I'm proof that anything is pos-
sible, and this camp will encour-
age teens to follow their
dreams, no matter how big
those dreams may be,” said
Korath.

Korath would like to thank
The Bahamas Weekly, Pelican
Bay Hotel, Freeport Advertis-
ing and Printing, the Grand
Bahama YMCA and the New
Providence Community Centre
for helping make this project
possible.

Persons can learn more about
Korath at www.korathsnow-
boarding.com and stay tuned to
TheBahamasWeekly.com for
updates on his progress.

For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight
on Mondays
THE TRIBUNE

sp

=
s

PAGE 11

r



t



TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009



Jackson,
Bryant put
Lakers back

on top soe
See page 9

Women's national volleyiall

leam awaiting po

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

he women’s

national volleyball

team, having qual-

ified for the third

round of the
NORCECA 2010 World Cham-
pionships, will have to spend an
extra day in Barbados before
they can return home to cele-
brate.

Having lost all of their per-
sonal belongings in a robbery
at the Garfield Sobers Sports
Complex as they were playing
against host Barbados in pool
play, head coach Joseph ‘Joe
Moe’ Smith said the players are
still upbeat, but eagerly awaiting
the completion of the police
report.

“We have had to relocate
from the games village to a
hotel because the Barbados
Volleyball Association won’t
accommodate us,” Smith said
yesterday as they prepare to
travel on Wednesday.

“We are fending for our-
selves. We are still trying to
complete the police report.
Once we do that, then we can
leave. It looks as if we may have
to file a lawsuit because they
are not doing anything for us.”

An estimated $47,000 in per-
sonal and team monies, jew-
ellery, laptop computers, ipods
and cellular phones, as well as
the passports of Smith and play-
er Anishka Rolle were stolen
from the team’s locker room on
Friday night as they played Bar-
bados in a bid to get into the
playoffs.

The Bahamas eventually lost
that game in five gruelling sets,
but still advanced to play
Jamaica in an effort to get into
the gold medal game.

However, with emotions run-
ning high following the robbery,
the team got swept in three
straight sets on Saturday, forc-
ing them to play in the bronze
medal game.

On Sunday, after getting a

Want to be
a Bahama
Snow Kid?

CHILDREN of all ages are
invited to come out and meet
the first athlete to represent the
Bahamas in the winter
Olympics in February 2010 in
Vancouver, Canada.

Korath Wright is scheduled
to visit the Bahamas to select
10 lucky teens between the ages
of 13 and 17 to become the
Bahama Snow Kids and attend
the High Cascade Snowboard
Camp in Oregon, USA this
July.

Freeport - YMCA - Saturday,
June 20 - 3pm

Nassau - New Providence
Community Church - Monday,
June 22 - 6pm

Korath will be selecting five
teens from Grand Bahama and
five from New Providence.

“Kids, bring your cameras
and skateboards, whether you
want to try out or just meet
Korath Wright for a photo
opportunity. Tryouts will consist
of three preliminary activities
which are relative skills to snow-
boarding, but any teen who is
athletic could be a worthy can-
didate if they are interested in
trying snowboarding.

“The tryouts will involve
sprinting, an obstacle course
using quick side-to-side move-
ment, and skateboarding,”
according to a written state-

SEE page 10








STANDING TALL FOR BRONZE — Shown (I-r) are some members
of the women’s national volleyball team, Melinda Bastian and
sisters Cherise and Krystel Rolle, as they receive their bronze
medals from an unidentified official at the NORCECA 2010 World
Championships in Barbados on Sunday.

Uli

from

Fine Threads

Bernard Rd - Mackey St - Thompson Blvd
LJress Pants trom





(Photo by Kenmore Bynoe)

lice report

Will have to spend extra
day in Barbados before
they can return home to
celebrate qualifying for
third round of NORCECA
World Championships...

glimmer of hope when they
were told that a small portion of
the items were found by the
police, the team took their frus-
trations out on Suriname with a
hard fought three-set sweep to
earn the right to advance to the
third round of the World Cham-
pionships qualifications in Puer-
to Rico in July.

“We just decided to keep our
heads above water, but we are
trying our best to get out here as
soon as possible,” Smith said.
“We really want to come home.

“We are working with Amer-
ican Airlines to re-book the
seats for us so that we can come
back the same way that we had
intended to do so today.”

Had they not gotten into this
dilemma, Smith said the team
was originally scheduled to
depart Barbados at 7 am and
arrive in Miami, Florida, at
about 11 am. They would
depart Miami after 1 pm and
arrive shortly after 2 pm.

“It’s going to cost us a few
more dollars,” Smith said. “But
we have been in contact with
our family members and friends
in Nassau trying to get them to
help us out.”

Smith said that through all
the “madness” that they

encountered, there was some
light at the end of the tunnel as
the team qualified to go to the
next round in Puerto Rico.

“That just goes to show you
how good this team is,” Smith
said. “We have to do what we
have to do because the Barba-
dos association ain’t checking
for us. We had a meeting for
about two hours with them and
we told them that if they were
in Nassau and this had hap-
pened to them, there is no way
that we would have treated
them the way they treated us.”

Smith said there are a few
people, including the host at the
Golden Sands Hotel where they
are staying until they depart,
who are assisting.

He also noted that the gov-
ernment representative in Bar-
bados has also been very help-
ful, assisting them with the nec-
essary paperwork to ensure that
both he and Rolle are able to
travel with the rest of the team,
if their passports are not located
in time.

Smith said he has sent a
report to NORCECA, which
gives a complete outline of the
problems they encountered
while in Barbados and they are
also waiting on a response.

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Stephen Wrinkle

New starts
critical to
construction
sector health

* Sector’s business levels
down by one-third, but BCA
president and others say
inquiry flow started again
in past two weeks, led
by Bahamian projects

* ‘Buyer’s market’ makes it
ideal time to do business
with Bahamian contractors
at reduced rates

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE construction industry’s
immediate health depends on the
number of new construction starts
that take place before year-end,
the Bahamian Contractors Asso-
ciation’s (BCA) president said
yesterday, with the sector on
average having experienced a
“one-third” fall-off in business
levels.

Stephen Wrinkle, who heads
Wrinkle Development Company,
told Tribune Business that the
business decline experienced by
the Bahamian construction indus-
try would likely increase if con-
tractors were unable to find new
work once their existing projects
were completed.

“It’s difficult to generalise, but
I'd say probably by one-third,”
Mr Wrinkle said, when asked by
Tribune Business how much busi-
ness levels were down in the con-
struction industry.

“That figure will increase as
projects are finishing. People who
started a job last fall and are fin-
ishing this summer will need new
projects to work on, or otherwise
that 30 per cent might go to 50
per cent at year-end.

“Tt depends on how many new
construction starts there are. The
potential for new starts will be
critical.”

The BCA president, though,
said he and other contractors had
detected positive signs in the last
two weeks, having received
inquiries and requests to bid on
tenders from potential develop-
ers.

The majority of these requests,

SEE page 6B

WINTON #4276 Nestled on a large 18,000 sq. ft. lot with lush

landscaping and numerous fruit trees, this rare jewel features unique

THE TRIBUNE

uSiIness

2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net



T U8: S.D AY .

JUNE E16.

Retailer awaits
customer count rise Peton

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

large Bahamian

retailer yesterday

said it was defy-

ing the recession

with customer
headcount for June likely to be up
50 per cent compared to early
2009, and expansion plans in the
shape of new liquor and women’s
fashion concepts - plus 90,000
extra square feet of grocery space
- in the works.

Sandy Schaefer, Robin Hood’s
president, told Tribune Business
that the Tonique Williams-Dar-
ling Highway-based retailer was
also looking for “another loca-
tion somewhere on the eastern
side of the island”, but only once
its existing store had fully bed-
ded down.

“We have some prospects.
We've already identified a few,”
Mtr Schaefer said of potential real
estate sites for a second Robin
Hood outlet. “But, certainly,
nothing will be finalised this year.

“We’re looking at solidifying
ourselves here, and expanding
this next year with much more
grocery space, probably another
90,000 square feet. We’re look-
ing at developing all of it.

Conveyancing attorney

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FINCO’s proposal to require
title insurance for all mortgages it
issues could cause “a contraction”
in the number of attorneys willing
to provide conveyancing services,
the Bahamas Bar Association’s
president said yesterday, arguing
that the plan was asking the pro-
fessional carrying the greatest
potential liability to accept a cut
in his fees.

Wayne Munroe, who is also an
attorney and partner in the Lock-
hart & Munroe law firm, told Tri-
bune Business that under FIN-
CO’s proposal Bahamian attor-
neys would still be required to do
the same amount of work as they
do presently.

He pointed out that attorneys
would still have to provide First
Bahamas Title Insurance Agency,
the agency through which title
insurance will be provided to all
FINCO clients, with all the title
documents relative to a specific
mortgage, analyse them and
determine whether the real estate
buyer had ‘good title’ to what was
being purchased.

“Our concern is for the public
interest and how the whole pro-
posal would look,” Mr Munroe
said of FINCO’s plans, which
were disclosed earlier this month
by Tribune Business.

He added that Royal Bank of
Canada’ s mortgage lending arm
was not providing title insurance
itself, but instead looking to use
First Bahamas, whose under-
writer is US-based Lawyers Title
Insurance Corporation, to pro-

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* Robin Hood planning imminent liquor store and LA-style women’s
clothing/fashion boutique openings, plus 90,000 sq ft expansion next year

* Assessing locations for possible second store in eastern
New Providence, although no immediate move likely

* Customer count likely to break 60,000 for June, up from 56,000 in May

* Hard goods sales down 30-35%, with retailer eyeing solar power plans for whole store

“We’re profitable and continue
to be, and expect to grow that
profitability. We’re looking to the
future and expanding.”

Mr Schaefer said Robin Hood
had enjoyed “our best May ever”,
with customer traffic up some 15-
20 per cent over April 2009 fig-
ures.

“Year-ovet-year, it’s probably
up 80 per cent,” he added, though
pointing out that comparatives
will not become relevant until
August 2009, as that was the
month in which Robin Hood’s
expanded 104,000 square foot ful-
ly opened last year.

Mr Schaefer said the retailer
was likely to benefit further from
the closure of City Markets’ Inde-
pendence Drive outlet, adding:
“We should be close to 60,000
customers this month, and had
56,000 last month. January, Feb-
ruary, March were in the low

40,000s, and we’ve picked up 50
per cent since then.”

An in-store liquor outlet was
due to open at Robin Hood with-
in the next two-and-a-half to
three weeks, Mr Schaefer added,
with a Los Angeles-style wom-
en’s fashion and clothing bou-
tique also set to make its pres-
ence felt imminently.

“We’re doing an LA Boutique
for women’s fashion and cloth-
ing,” Mr Schaefer confirmed.
Product, he added, would be
sourced direct from Los Angeles,
one of his buyers having been dis-
patched there last week.

The store, he added, would
offer fashion and clothing prod-
ucts similar to those sold by Bay
Street retailers, with a former
executive from a Bay Street store
having been brought into run it.
The women’s clothing/fashion
store is set to open in the next

week to week-and-half.
Elsewhere, Mr Schaefer said
sales of hard goods, such as fur-
niture, appliances and televisions,
had dropped by 30-35 per cent,
those high-end, high-margin prod-
ucts having been hit hard by the
economic downturn and the rein-
ing in of consumer spending.
Yet on the positive side, Mr
Schaefer said Robin Hood had
been helped “quite a bit” by the
reduction in the Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation’s (BEC) fuel
surcharge. The retailer was now
looking to take the reduction in
electricity costs one step further,
and was examining “going solar
for the entire store”, which will
likely make for interesting times
when it goes head-to-head with
the law that requires BEC power
to be used in all areas where it is

SEE page 6B

‘contraction’ concerns

* Bar chief criticises FINCO title insurance proposal, saying it will not be cheaper and quicker for clients
* Areues that attorneys, who carry greatest professional liability, being asked to accept fee reduction

vide security for its mortgage
portfolio.

“The say this will be quicker
and cheaper for the public, but it
won’t be,” Mr Munroe said.
“They’re asking lawyers to reduce
their fees but do everything they
do now.”

In addition, Bahamian attor-
neys would still be liable - as they
are now - if a title opinion was
subsequently proven to be incor-
rect. This required attorneys to
maintain professional indemnity
insurance, something that was
extremely costly.

“We know that in a commer-
cial world, risk determines price.
If cutting out risk, then you can

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reduce your price, but under this
arrangement attorneys will still
be liable to them [FINCO], and
liable to the title insurance com-
pany,” Mr Munroe said.

“T’m still going to have to pay
for professional indemnity insur-
ance, but I’m going to have a
reduced fee,” he added of FIN-
CO’s proposal. ‘The only person
being asked to reduce their fee is
the person who has the liability,
because the bank and the realtor
don’t have liability.

“A lot of lawyers don’t do con-
veyancing because it’s a headache
with unlimited liability. You could
have a contraction of conveyanc-
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public interest. It’s not going to be
quicker, cheaper or a better ser-
vice.”

FINCO’s interest was to secure
its mortgage loan, while the inter-
est of attorneys was whether the
purchaser had clean title or not,
Mr Munroe added.

He said that when the Bar
Council met with FINCO, the
mortgage lender expressed con-
cern that if an attorney did not
have professional indemnity
insurance, and a title opinion was
defective, then it would be
exposed.

In response, Mr Munroe said

SEE page 6B



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010

Ex-minister:
Budget

may be ‘too
optimistic’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A FORMER finance minister
has questioned the Government’s
projected 6 per cent revenue
increase for the 2009-2010 Bud-
get, given that Bahamian gross
domestic product (GDP) is pro-
jected to decline by 1 per cent in
current prices, warning that the
forecasts may be too optimistic
and that this nation may have to
become used to “large budget
deficits and a rapidly growing
national debt”.

James Smith, minister of state
for finance in the former Christie
administration, told the Rotary
Club of west Nassau: “As regards
the assumptions in the Budget,
one has to question how it is pos-
sible for the GDP to decline by 1
per cent in the 2009-2010 fiscal
period and, at the same time, rev-
enue is expected to increase by
6.5 per cent with no tax increases,
given that revenue actually fell
by 16 per cent in the second half

SEE page 5B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



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ee =~ <>
Cable Bahamas in 5.6% Internet client increase

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Cable Bahamas saw subscribers
to its Coralwave Internet service
increase by more than 2,300 or
5.6 per cent year-over-year for
the 2009 first quarter, generating
an 8.6 per cent or $500,000
increase in revenues generated
from this business segment.

In his latest quarterly report to

Cable Bahamas shareholders,
chairman Brendan Paddick said
the BISX-listed utility’s Internet
subscriber numbers had hit 42,058
at the 2009 first quarter-end, hav-
ing grown by 2,300 compared to
the year-before period.

As a result, Cable Bahamas’
Internet revenues increased by
5.6 per cent during the 2009 first
quarter, rising from $6 million to
$6.5 million year-over-year.

al

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eee



Mr Paddick said: “These results
have been very encouraging, and
have confirmed the positive effect
of the company’s continued
efforts in upgrading its processes
and core broadband network
infrastructure, thus improving ser-
vice performance and reliability.”

Elsewhere, Caribbean Cross-
ings and Maxil Communications,
the 100 per cent wholly-owned
subsidiaries that comprise Cable
Bahamas’ data business, saw com-
bined 2009 first quarter revenues
hit $3.3 million, compared to $2.9
million the year-before - a 15.8
per cent increase.

“On a standalone basis, the
operating margins for the data
business segment remained
impressive, and collectively
exceeded 80 per cent for the quar-
ter,’ Mr Paddick said.

Revenues from Cable
Bahamas’ core television busi-
ness, a more mature market,
increased slightly by 1 per cent
during the 2009 first quarter,
increasing from $11.1 million to
$11.2 million.

Mr Paddick said the company’s
decision to make set-top boxes
available to Bahamian consumers
on a rental basis had paid divi-
dends. Quarterly revenues from
this segment stood at $145,000,
representing “just over $500,000
on an annualised basis”.

Cable Bahamas invested some
$4.5 million in capital expendi-
ture during the 2009 first quar-
ter, and Mr Paddick added: “The
focus of the company’s capital
expenditure programme was on
improving the stability and per-
formance of the network, increas-
ing both subscriber growth and
monthly recurring revenue, and
enhancing overall customer ser-
vice delivery.

“Some of the major projects
include the continuation of the
construction of the Freeport
office complex, the deployment
of enhanced optical nodes to facil-
itate increased bandwidth capac-
ity to our HFC broadband net-
work, and the upgrading of our ad
insertion system to provide a full
digital platform, thus increasing
product capacity for our media
channel offerings.

“The company has also begun
to transition the extended com-
munities of Spring City area of
Great Abaco, from an analog to a
fully digital service which on com-
pletion will yield some 300 new
potential subscribers.”

Cable Bahamas’ Board of
Directors approved a 16.7 per
cent increase in annualised share
dividends from $0.24 per share to
$0.28 per share.


THE TRIBUNE

Bahamas moves
to grow private
aircraft market

TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009, PAGE 3B

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARCKENDY
ALCE of TREASURE CAY, ABACO, BAHAMAS,
P.O Box SS 1956 is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/





naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 16 day of June, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

VACANCY

m@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunebusiness.net

THE BAHAMAS Ministry of
Tourism has undertaken a new
marketing strategy that aims to
open up this nation to more pri-
vate aircraft owners and expand
the Family Islands product, its
chief aviation specialist said yes-
terday.

Greg Rolle told Tribune Busi-
ness that the Ministry of Tourism
and Aviation was focused on
making the arrival process for pri-

vate air travellers as seamless as
possible through holding semi-
nars and workshop to familiarise
pilots, who would use designat-
ed Fixed Based Operations
(FBOs), with Bahamian arrival
procedures.

The Ministry recently desig-
nated four Florida airports as
Bahamas Gateways for private
fliers. They are Opa Locka Air-
port’s Miami Executive Aviation,
Fort Lauderdale Executive Air-
port’s Banyan Air Service, Stu-
art/Palm Beach Airport’s Galaxy
Aviation of Palm Beach, and St.
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“A select four has been identi-
fied as Bahamas Gateway FBOs
at this time, who have been
trained by the Bahamas Tourist
Office staff on all facets of US
and Bahamas requirements of air-
crafts leaving/arriving the US
mainland. It is hoped, however,
that the number will grow,” said
the Ministry.

According to statistics provided
by the Ministry of Tourism, a
major amount of private air traf-
fic left the US bound for the
Bahamas in the past three years.
Canada received 35 per cent of
the General Aviation Aircraft
(GAA) traffic over that time,
while the Bahamas received 35
per cent, with Alaska and other
Caribbean countries at 26 and 12
per cent respectively.

These statistics, gathered by
the Aircraft Owners and Pilots
Association, show the size of the
market the Ministry of Tourism
hopes to capture and increase. It
includes a vast number of high
net worth individuals.

It is hoped that an increase in
this sort of aviation arrivals will
translate into an increase in room
night for small and large Family
Island hotels.

According to the data, Abaco
itself accrued more than 120,000
visitor nights of this type in 2007,
which was almost 76,000 more
visitor nights than the nearest sin-
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“Dealing with the

For a market that has been
plagued by high costs in com-
mercial airlift, this move by the
Ministry could mean substantial
gains for Family island tourism if
the product can a be expanded.

As it stands, Florida, the closest
US state to the Bahamas, has the
highest number of active licensed
pilots of any other state in the
southeastern US, and is the prime
market for these islands.

Mr Rolle said the Bahamas’
relationship with FBOs will also
serve to cut costs on trade show
and promotional ventures by
splitting the cost of such events
between the Ministry and the
GAA agencies.

"The FBOs, like Banyan, have
shown much interest in working
with the islands of the Bahamas,"
said Mr Rolle.

“Because of this expressed
interest, over the years, the
Bahamas Aviation Department
has conducted training of the staff
as well as included FBOs in their
marketing activities, such as trade
shows and promotional ven-
tures.”

Pilots choosing the Bahamas
as their final destination will be
able to use the FBO of their
choice, according to the Ministry.
However, the designated gate-
ways will offer information and
guidance not found at any other
FBO.

“The selected FBOs have been
classed as Bahamas Gateways
and are equipped to provide Cus-
toms and Immigration informa-
tion, as well as supplies and even
up-to-the minute information on
the Bahamas,” said the Ministry
of Tourism release.

“The small airports serve as a
one-stop shop for private pilots,
as well as general aviation traf-
fic, both private and charter.”

The Ministry used figures
gleaned from immigration cards
to identify which gateways those
private fliers were utilizing.

“Twenty per cent were coming
out of Miami and Fort Laud-
erdale,” said Mr Rolle.



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    THE TRIBUNE

    COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
    THE SUPREME COURT

    PROBATE DIVISION

    18TH JUNE, 2009

    No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00332

    Whereas SOLOMON EZEKIEL NEWTON, of Pinewood Gardens in the Southern
    District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
    of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
    Letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate of MABLE NEWTON, late
    of Yellow Elder Gardens in the Southern District of the Island of New Providence,
    one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

    Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
    expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

    NICOYA NEILLY
    (for) Registrar

    COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
    THE SUPREME COURT

    PROBATE DIVISION

    18TH JUNE, 2009

    No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00333

    Whereas SHAKIRA SANDS-BURROWS, of Millennium Gardens in the Western
    District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
    of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
    letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate of JOHN SAMUEL SANDS
    late of Malcolm Road in the Southern District of the Island of New Providence, one
    of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

    Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
    expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

    NICOYA NEILLY
    (for) Registrar

    COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
    THE SUPREME COURT

    PROBATE DIVISION

    18TH JUNE, 2009

    No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00334

    Whereas ANDREW DWAYNE FORBES, of No. 19 High Vista Apartments in the
    Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
    has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration
    with the Will annexed of the Real and Personal Estate of DIANE M. MILLER late
    of No. 580 S.E. 5th Street in the City of Pampano Beach in the State of Florida, one
    of the States of the United States of America, deceased.

    Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
    expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

    NICOYA NEILLY
    (for) Registrar

    COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
    THE SUPREME COURT

    PROBATE DIVISION

    18TH JUNE, 2009

    No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00335

    Whereas GRANVILLE CHRISTOPHER KNOWLES, of Miami Florida, U.S.A.,
    has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration
    with the Will annexed of the Real and Personal Estate of GRANVILLE JOSEPH
    KNOWLES, late of 214 S.E. Lincoln Circle N., St. Petersburg, Pinellas, Florida,
    USS.A., deceased.

    Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
    expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

    DESIREE ROBINSON
    (for) Registrar

    COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
    THE SUPREME COURT

    PROBATE DIVISION

    18TH JUNE, 2009

    No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00336

    Whereas ARLINGTON WILLIAM DEAN, of Fox Hill, Eastern District, New
    Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made
    application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the
    Real and Personal Estate of CECIL A. HAMILTON, late of 11224 South Emerald
    Street Chicago Illinois U.S.A., deceased.

    Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
    expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

    DESIREE ROBINSON
    (for) Registrar



    TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009, PAGE 5B



    Ex-miunister:
    Budget
    projections
    may be ‘too
    optimistic’

    FROM page 1B

    of 2008 and continues on a down-
    ward trend.

    “This merely indicates that the
    projections on the deficit, and
    therefore the national debt over
    the next few years, may be some-
    what understated. That is partic-
    ularly worrisome when one fac-
    tors in other possible adverse
    effects on the economy, such as
    increased oil prices and/or the
    unwelcome visit of a few hurri-
    canes.

    “Tt is difficult not to conclude
    that large budget deficits and a
    rapidly growing national debt are
    likely to be fixtures of the
    Bahamian economy in the years
    ahead.”

    Projections

    Mr Smith said the Govern-
    ment’s Budget projections could
    be “the most optimistic out-
    come”, not taking into account
    the possibility of further shocks to
    the international and Bahamian

    economies that could result in
    increased fiscal deficits and a larg-
    er national debt.

    He pointed out that the Gov-
    ernment’s projected GFS fiscal
    deficits for the periods from 2008-
    2009 to 2011-2012, which strip out
    debt redemption costs, could add
    $1.07 billion to the national debt,
    taking it beyond $4 billion and
    up toa 55 per cent debt-to-GDP
    ratio.

    Mr Smith said this percentage
    might be described as a ‘danger
    zone’ for small island economies
    such as the Bahamas, and the pro-
    jected large deficits were set to
    “substantially increase the nation-
    al debt, unless there is a dramat-
    ic turn around in the global econ-
    omy in general, and in the US
    economy in particular”.

    “Our principal concern in the
    Bahamas over the next few years
    should be the size of the planned
    deficit budgets and the resultant
    impact on the national debt,” Mr
    Smith said.

    “More importantly, whether
    the assumptions that have been

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    expenditure and resurgence of
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    therefore justify the level of pub-
    lic sector borrowing that is envis-
    aged over the relevant period.

    Accurate

    “Tf the assumptions are rea-
    sonably accurate then there is a
    good chance the country will
    weather this economic storm and
    be restored to the path of growth
    and stability and maintain it’s ‘A-
    rating’ in the international credit
    markets.

    “On the other hand, if the
    experts are correct, we could be in
    for a rough ride over the next few
    years and at least two of the bud-
    getary objectives, maintaining fis-
    cal flexibility and a return to fiscal
    prudence by reducing the debt-
    to-GDP ratio, are unlikely to be
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    PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009

    THE TRIBUNE





    Conveyancing attorney
    ‘contraction’ concerns

    FROM page 1B

    FINCO could stipulate that it
    only does business with attorneys
    who have adequate professional
    indemnity insurance.

    He then explained that attor-
    neys could “enter into an agree-
    ment where, if they work for FIN-
    CO, give power of attorney to
    FINCO to make a claim on your
    behalf on your indemnity insur-
    ance”.

    Mr Munroe said the Bar had
    attempted to obtain details on
    First Bahamas’ and Lawyers Title
    Insurance’s respective capital
    standings and financial perfor-
    mances, but without success.

    The Bar Council’s concerns
    were sparked by an April 1, 2009,
    letter sent to its Bahamian attor-
    ney members by Patrice Ritchie,
    FINCO’s senior manager for
    mortgages, in which she con-
    firmed the lending institution’s
    plans to require title insurance
    for all mortgages it issued.

    Mts Ritchie’s letter stated that
    attorneys “will not have to pre-
    pare an opinion on title on behalf
    of RBC FINCO”, and all this
    implies.

    FINCO, in urging Bahamian
    attorneys to consider “a flat fee”
    with respect to the preparation
    of mortgage documents, including
    their execution, stamping and
    recording, is essentially implying
    that the introduction of title insur-
    ance into this nation’s mort-
    gage/home buying market will
    eliminate the need for lawyers to
    do the current volume of work
    they handle, especially title
    searches.

    Less work means that Bahami-
    an attorneys are unlikely to be
    able to charge the current fees -
    usually pegged at 2.5 per cent of
    the real estate transaction’s worth
    - for conveyancing work, thus
    reducing income for a consider-
    able number of the profession.

    This would happen at a time
    when the Bahamian legal services
    profession is already under
    intense pressure from the global
    economic downturn, real estate

    and transactional work having
    dropped on average by 40 per
    cent, so any further cuts in - or
    loss- of income will be particu-
    larly unappreciated.

    Mrs Ritchie’s letter, a copy of
    which has been obtained by Tri-
    bune Business, said: “In an effort
    to improve the whole mortgage
    experience for our clients, by
    speeding up the legal process and
    reducing their out-of-pocket costs,
    RBC FINCO will be requiring
    title insurance on all mortgages
    granted after April 30, 2009.

    “We anticipate that in the eco-
    nomic environment, title insur-
    ance will result in a most wel-
    comed cost-saving for the client.
    Hence, we are writing to request
    your consideration of a flat fee
    with respect to mortgage prepa-
    ration, inclusive of execution,
    stamping and recording of the
    same, plus any disbursements
    made to pay the title insurance
    premium.”

    Mts Ritchie said FINCO would
    advise its mortgage clients of the
    fees charged for this service, and
    added: “In the circumstances, you
    will not have to prepare an opin-
    ion of title on behalf of RBC FIN-
    co.”

    First Bahamas Title Insurance
    Agency, which acts as the
    Bahamian agent for Lawyers
    Title Insurance Corporation, is
    an affiliate of Higgs & Johnson.

    Higgs & Johnson are the attor-
    neys for Royal Bank of Canada,
    and the firm’s managing partner,
    John Delaney, sits on FINCO’s
    Board of Directors.

    Mr Munroe yesterday alluded
    to these connections, arguing that
    FINCO’s proposal appeared to
    be an attempt to keep more of
    the income from mortgage-relat-
    ed transactions for itself.

    In a thinly-veiled critique of
    Higgs & Johnson, he added: “It
    just speaks to a certain part of
    the Bar breaking ranks.” Mr
    Munroe said some members of
    the profession were attempting
    to “undercut” their colleagues on
    price, something he described as
    “very unfortunate”.

    New starts critical to
    construction sector health

    FROM page 1B

    Mr Wrinkle said, were coming
    from Bahamian clients, as
    opposed to international devel-
    opers, something he said gave
    him a stronger “sense of securi-
    ty”.

    yn the construction industry
    in the last two weeks, we’ve seen
    some inquiries coming in, mainly
    from Bahamians. There’s been
    some activity, some inquiries and
    requests for pricing,” Mr Wrin-
    kle told Tribune Business.

    “That’s the first work we’ve
    had come in for the year, and oth-
    er major contractors I’ve talked to
    are in a similar position. Most
    have had very little new work
    come in since Christmas.”

    Mr Wrinkle said it was too ear-
    ly to determine whether the
    uptick in inquiries would develop
    into a trend, with the remainder
    of this year likely to be tough for
    the majority of contractors, their

    tradesmen and the wider labour
    pool.

    For if the current inquiries
    translate into real business, the
    projects will only likely start -
    from a bricks and mortar per-
    spective - during the 2009 fourth
    quarter, the BCA president
    explained.

    “Bahamian developers that
    have the proper collateral are get-
    ting good financing, so those pro-
    jects are moving forward, and
    that’s what starting to happen
    now,” he added.

    “TI do feel a sense of security
    with the Bahamian projects mov-
    ing forward. It’s a sign we’re cut-
    ting our dependence, rather than
    waiting for major international
    developers to come in.

    “It’s a good time for Bahamian
    investors to move ahead. There’s
    a lot of liquidity in the banking
    system, good contractor avail-
    ability at a reasonable rate, a
    good labour pool. It’s a good time

    Retailer awaits 50%

    FROM page 1B

    available.

    “We've got guys competing on
    bids for solar, and if that happens
    you will see prices drop 3, 4, 5
    per cent,” Mr Schaefer said. He
    added that he was hoping some-
    thing concrete on solar power
    would develop within the next 90
    days, because electricity was
    “such a cost of doing business”.

    “Tf we can reduce it to a point
    where it becomes reasonable, we
    can pass the savings on to the

    consumer. It’s real money,” he
    said.

    Mr Schaefer conceded that
    Robin Hood’s move into the gro-
    cery business had helped to shield
    it from the worst effects of the
    economic downturn, with its abil-
    ity to bring in fresh meat, such as
    beef or pork, helping to give it a
    competitive advantage.

    This, he explained, had helped
    Robin Hood to get increased
    business and orders from
    Bahamian restaurants, who were
    buying “wholesale at retail
    prices”.

    to do business. It’s a buyer’s mar-
    ket in the construction industry
    right now.”

    Mr Wrinkle said that despite
    having strong liquidity - the
    amount of surplus assets avail-
    able for onward lending purposes
    - the Bahamian commercial banks
    were being extremely cautious
    about lending, due to the weak
    economic environment and ris-
    ing unemployment. Increased col-
    lateral was being demanded from
    those borrowers who were suc-
    cessful in accessing credit.

    “We have heard that some of
    the major developers are trying to
    refinance and regroup,” Mr Wrin-
    kle said. “The Rose Island Ritz-
    Carlton and Royal Island are the
    two I hear that are trying to get
    back to the table, and in terms of
    projects on the board those are
    two of the better ones, so we
    would welcome that.”

    Describing the Bahamian con-
    struction industry as being “in a

    lull”, Mr Wrinkle added: “It does
    give us a chance to get our house
    in order and work on the Con-
    tractors Bill.”

    The BCA was working with the
    Ministry of Works to finalise “a
    few items and details” in the draft
    Bill, in an effort to finalise it
    before it went back to the Attor-
    ney General’s Office.

    The organisation was also due
    to restart its seminar series for
    contractors, to prepare the 2,000-
    3,000 Bahamian construction
    companies for the Bill’s pre-qual-
    ification requirements and grand-
    fathering them into the various
    categories.

    Mr Wrinkle added that the
    BCA was “99 per cent there” on
    completing work to initiate the
    Inter-American Development
    Bank (IDB) financed initiative to
    strengthen the Bahamian indus-
    try, and prepare it for the rigours
    of international competition in a
    free trade environment.

    customer count rise

    Robin Hood now employed a
    175-strong workforce, Mr Schae-
    fer said, making the company
    “one of the few places on the
    island looking to employ more
    people”. The retailer was contin-
    uing to look for extra staff, having
    just hired an additional two
    employees in its produce depart-
    ment, which was expanding at a
    rate where it was likely to soon
    need a further two staff.

    “Where else can you go and
    get it all done under one roof?”

    Mr Schaefer asked. “We’re going
    to become another shopping des-
    tination.”

    He added that Robin Hood
    was looking at extending its open-
    ing hours on days when it was
    especially busy, such as Saturday.
    The August opening of former
    PLP minister, Leslie Miller’s,
    bowling alley next to the Robin
    Hood outlet in the Summerwinds
    Plaza, was also likely to produce
    an increase in business and
    extended opening hours.

    NOTICE

    International Business Companies Act
    (No. 46 of 2000)

    GLP HOLDINGS LTD.

    Registration Number 154.085 B
    in Voluntary Liquidation)

    Notice 1s hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of
    the International Business Companies Act (No. 46 of 2000) GLP
    HOLDINGS LTD. 1s in Dissolution.

    Any person having any clam against GLP HOLDINGS LTD. 1

    Legal Notice

    NOTICE

    NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

    (a) QUASI HOLDINGS LIMITED 1s in dissolution under the provi-
    sions of the International Business Companies Act 2000

    (b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on June 15, 2009
    when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by
    the Registrar General.

    (c) The Liquidator of the said company 1s Shakira Burrows of 2nd
    Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

    (d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
    required on or before the July 28, 2009 to send their names and ad-
    dresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the
    company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit
    of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

    Job Opportunity for an

    ACCOUNTING CLERK

    An established Bahamian Company is seeking an
    Accounts Clerk
    ¢ Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent in Accounting
    ¢ Knowledge in Microsoft Word and Excel

    Interested persons should send resumes to:
    P.O. Box CR-55056
    Nassau, Bahamas

    PUBLIC NOTICE

    INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

    The Public is hereby advised that |, ELENCHA VICTORIA
    SMITH of PO. Box N-4637, Nassau, The Bahamas,
    intend to change my name to ELENCHA VICTORIA
    BARTLETT. If there are any objections to this change

    of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to
    the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau,
    Bahamas, no later than thirty (80) days after the date of
    publication of this notice.

    NOTICE

    CHELSEA PROPERTIES HOLDINGS LIMITED

    required on or before the 12th day of July, 2009 to send their name,
    address and particulars of the debt or claim to the Liquidator of the
    company, or in default thereof they may have excluded from the ben-
    efit of any distribution made before such claim 1s approved.

    June 16, 2009
    SHAKIRA BURROWS
    LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

    GSO Corporate Services Ltd., of 303 Shirley Street, Nassau, The Ba-
    hamas is the Liquidator of GLP HOLDINGS LTD.

    Please be advised that
    the following offices

    WILL BE

    In Voluntary Liquidation

    2 EP Wa ie ees ee

    GSO Corporate Services Ltd,

    Manidator Pursuant to Section 137 (8) of the International Business

    Companies Act, Notice is hereby given that, with effect from
    the 29th day of May, 2009 the above-named Company has
    been dissolved and has been struck off the Register.

    St. Andrew’s School Foundation

    CLOSED

    Development Officer
    sd a sd Dated this 16th day of June, 2009
    The Foundation is committed to the Mission of St. Ancdirew's
    School through its financial support of teachers, scholarship
    students and building projects. The Foundation is presently
    secking a person to bead its Office of Development.

    on Friday, June 19, 2009
    and will re-open on
    Monday, June 22, 2009

    at the usual business hours.

    Kyrene Kelty

    Liquidator

    The Development Officer, a full-time position, reports te
    the St. Andrew's School Foundation and will:

    be responsible for designing and overseeing fundraising

    : : [os “ae ; Legal Notice
    cHMpalens in support of the Foundation’s strategic goals:

    NOTICE
    CAERLEON VENTURES LTD.

    (In Voluntary Liquidation)

    develop marketing strategies and materials for public
    relations and advertising:

    BAHAMAS FIRST

    GENERAL INSURANCE COMPANY

    NASSAU UNDERWRITERS
    INSURANCE AGENCY LTD.

    Collins Avenue and Harbour Bay Locations

    pronente relationships between the School and various
    organizations, mcluding the St. Aumdrew's Alum and
    Friends Association:
    Notice is hereby given that the above-named
    Company is in dissolution, which commenced
    on the 15th day of June 2009. The Liquidator

    is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

    oversee the day today adtoinstnatpon of inbermational
    charities

    The successful candidate will possess knowledge and
    understanding of the School's history and culture; be a goal-
    dnoven individual with strong organizational and social skill:
    possess a minimum of a Bachelor's Degree; and be
    experienced in fundraising.

    Bahamas.

    We regret any
    inconveniences caused.

    Interested candidates should send their CÂ¥ and a letter of
    Interest tc:

    Development Officer Position
    St. Andrew's School Foundation
    FO. Box W-4695
    Nassau, Bahainas

    ARGOSA CORP. INC.

    Signed: Management (Liquidator)


    PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009

    THE TRIBUNE



    HEALTH



    The Tribune



    ©

    tee N D







    SEXe EMOTIONS

    @ By LLOYD ALLEN
    Tribune Features Reporter
    lallen@tribunemedia.net

    WHEN many of us think
    of the elements that make
    up a healthy and mature
    relationship, there are the
    usual thoughts of fidelity,
    monogamy, security, and

    love.

    However, some would say that
    the most common and significant
    sign of a strong relationship
    remains the sexual bond which
    should act as not only the glue
    that keeps that couple together,
    but also the reward that culmi-
    nates that connection.

    Dr Wayne Thompson from the
    Centre for Renewing Relation-
    ships recently told Tribune Health
    that many relationships today
    exist on the basis of sexual attrac-

    interpreted for genuine feelings,
    and often leads to one or both
    partners feeling misunderstood
    or in some way neglected,

    Dr Thompson who is trained
    in both psychosomatic and psy-
    chological therapy, said a com-
    mon problem in many relation-
    ships is sex is used and some-
    times abused to fill the void of
    something that’s lacking.

    He explained: “Sex is an impor-
    tant part of a relationship, but
    the vital thing to understand is
    what a relationship is.

    “We acknowledge the fact that
    both men and women are sexual
    beings, what is important is for
    us to understand how our sexual-
    ity is designed to bring fulfill-
    ment. Unfortunately for many
    people, whether in a relationship
    or not, there is the lack of emo-
    tional health, therefore the val-
    ue and importance of sex is
    skewed, ending in a lot of stress
    in their relationship.”

    Dr Thompson added, that as
    each partner is responsible for
    preparing themselves in various
    aspects of the relationship, failing
    to do so can and in most cases
    does affect its dynamics.

    He said what sometimes hap-
    pens with individuals who have
    a weak sense of self, is that sex
    may be transformed into a band-
    aid that temporarily conceals the
    real issue. For that person, he
    explained the thought rarely aris-
    es as to what problems or cir-
    cumstances may be affecting their
    partner, their modus-operandi is
    to fulfill their need to feel valued
    through sex.

    Dr Thompson said: “In the con-
    text of the true relationship, sex is
    the pinnacle of the relationship
    pyramid, and if we think of the
    pyramid we actually have four
    levels.”

    At the base of the pyramid, Dr
    Thompson said there exist emo-
    tional health, which is the foun-



    dation to experiencing
    the essence of what sex
    was designed for.

    At the next level, a
    person’s communica-
    tion skills are an
    important element
    to balancing a
    healthy relationship. He | |
    said knowing how to effec-
    tively communicate and |Â¥
    relate to others is a true Me 4%
    characteristic of an emo-

    tionally healthy person. 7 %

    Thirdly, he noted that the — h

    ability to resolve conflict was |, 4,

    also an important element to 7 yy
    a healthy relationship.

    “Once those three tiers are
    aligned, then sexual intimacy can
    be experience in a relationship.”
    Unfortunately, Dr Thompson
    said many relationships miss out |
    on true fulfillment because “
    either one or more of these ele-
    ments are absent.

    tion, which can commonly be mis-



    MAYBE you notice recently that your
    dog sleeps more than he used to, or does-
    n't show the same enthusiasm about his
    daily walks. His appetite is not as good as
    it used to be; and when he does eat, the
    food doesn't always agree with him. He's
    a little grumpy when you ask him to
    make some room on the couch or the
    bed, unless you catch him on one of his
    many trips to go to the bathroom. Sound
    like your grandparents? If you live in an
    extended family it might be, but other-
    wise you're probably describing the
    habits of the aging family cat or dog.

    Animals, like people, age over time.
    We've all heard of the comparison of
    one human year to seven "dog years."
    It's actually not that simple. Depending
    on the age of dog it's better to use a slid-
    ing scale where one human year equals
    five to 12 "dog years." The one to 12
    year comparison would apply to pup-
    pies, while the one to five year compar-
    ison is more appropriate for older dogs.
    Hence the average one to seven years for
    all dogs.

    There's little doubt that certain health
    concerns become more of an issue, as
    the body grows older. Those health prob-
    lems should be addressed directly and
    not clumped into the non-diagnosis of
    "Old Age." One of my hopes in writing
    about this subject is to diffuse the notion
    that if an older pet is sick, there's little
    hope of helping him because-well, he’s
    old. I often will be asked, when faced
    with an older, ailing patient "Isn't he
    just old Doc?" I diplomatically try to
    suggest that if we just conclude the pet is
    dying of "old age” we may be missing an
    opportunity to help him.

    Granted, there may be some older
    patients we can't help, but we don't



    know until we
    try.

    With that said let's talk about some
    of the common problems we can see in
    our older dogs and cats.

    We can all picture the image of the
    older dog or cat slowly standing up,
    stiffly walking across the room, only to
    lie down for another nap. Sore, stiff joints
    are common in older pets. Varying
    degrees of arthritis seems to be an almost
    inevitable problem for our aging ani-
    mals. Good weight control, regular mod-
    erate exercise, and newer medications
    are helping many of these patients cope
    with the problem, and in some cases
    regain mobility and enjoyment.

    Sometimes the joints become arthritic
    because of the gradually increasing load
    they're ask to carry. Pets tend to gain
    weight as they age for the same reasons
    people do. This additional weight undu-
    ly stresses the major weight bearing
    joints (hips, knees, shoulders, and
    elbows). Many times these joints were
    not designed to carry that added weight
    and problems develop. Couple this with
    a more sedentary lifestyle and reduced
    overall muscle tone, and you have a
    recipe for arthritis.

    Needless to say, a trim body weight
    benefits our pets in many ways just like
    it does for us adults.

    Our older pet's internal organs and
    structures can face problems as well.
    Kidney failure is a frequent diagnosis in
    older pets, especially older cats. It seems,
    at times, that the feline kidney system
    "wears out" before the other organ sys-
    tems do. Most cats over seven years
    should have a kidney profile done to
    rule out kidney disease annually.

    Pets with kidney malfunction will ini-
    tially exhibit increased thirst and urina-
    tion and weight loss. Later, as the kidney
    function worsens, symptoms of vomit-
    ing, diarrhea, poor appetite, dehydra-
    tion, and depression will develop.
    There's no question that the veterinari-
    an has a better chance of helping the
    kidney failure patient if the diagnosis is
    made sooner rather than later. I encour-
    age families to have their pets routinely
    screened with blood tests that identify
    kidney problems, before visible symp-
    toms develop. This may allow some ear-
    ly intervention that can help in the long
    run.

    After kidney problems, the next most
    common internal problem of older pets
    involves the cardiovascular system.
    While dogs and cats rarely, if ever, have
    coronary heart disease or "heart attacks”
    their hearts are quite prone to other
    kinds of problems.

    Valvular heart disease is all too com-
    mon in older dogs. Valves inside the
    heart keep blood flowing in the correct
    direction. With age these valves can
    develop irregularities that cause them
    to leak. This malfunctioning valve may
    be mild and insignificant in many
    patients, but severe and life threatening
    in others. Pets with heart problems may
    exhibit coughing, listlessness, and poor
    appetite. Using a stethoscope your vet-

    SEE page nine

    THERE’S little
    doubt that certain
    health concerns
    become more of an
    issue, as the body
    grows older. Those
    health problems
    should be
    addressed directly
    and not clumped
    into the non-diag-
    nosis of “Old Age.”

    erinarian can often hear an extra heart
    sound call a "murmur" that will tip
    him/her off that a heart problem may
    need to be looked into. Fortunately
    many pets with heart problems, if cor-
    rectly diagnosed, can be helped with
    medications.

    Possibly the most common health
    problem we see with older pets is dental
    disease. A pet doesn't need to necessar-
    ily be old to have problems with her
    teeth. The vast majority of dogs over 5
    years of age have moderate to severe
    dental problems. Without routine dental
    care, an eight-10 year old dog or cat can
    have dental problems so severe that their
    general health can be affected. Tooth
    loss, tooth root infections, and consider-
    able oral discomfort-enough to cause
    hesitation to eat-are common oral cavi-
    ty problems caused by bad teeth.

    We also know that long-standing den-
    tal disease can initiate severe, system-
    wide problems that can spell serious
    trouble for the already somewhat sus-
    ceptible older pet. Keeping the teeth
    clean is your best defense for these prob-
    lems. This may mean a complete dental
    cleaning under anesthesia if the prob-
    lem is advanced, and/or regular home
    cleaning or brushing to prevent the prob-
    lem in the first place.

    Obviously this short discussion only
    touches on a few common health issues
    for geriatric pets. In the final assessment
    there are many health problems associ-
    ated with aging-some treatable, some
    not so treatable. Certainly our venerable
    animal senior citizens deserve the bene-
    fit of the doubt. It may not come as a sur-
    prise to you, but some time ago-I think
    sometime around my fortieth birthday-I
    stopped calling older age a “disease.”



    A brighter
    future
    for skin

    APPEARING on her
    vacation yacht in the 1920s
    looking bronzed and no
    doubt fashionable, Coco
    Chanel set forth a move-
    ment that made the dark-
    ening - or tanning - of skin
    a sign of health and afflu-
    ence. From that moment
    on, women of the 20s had
    to add tanning to their
    demanding “beautifica-
    tion” regimens that
    already included the bob-
    bing of hair, binding of
    breasts and slimming of
    the waistline.

    Thanks in part to aware-
    ness that UV light leads to
    advanced aging and skin
    cancer, tanning is falling
    out of favor as a sign of
    health. Consumers world-
    wide are more and more
    interested in obtaining
    lighter, brighter skin. The
    main reason may stem
    from market research stud-
    ies which indicate that an
    uneven skin tone is per-
    ceived as aging while a
    more even skin coloration
    is judged to be healthier
    and younger-looking.

    As populations mature
    globally, pigmentation
    issues become more preva-
    lent, and the demand for
    skin brightening products
    has surged. Unfortunate-
    ly, those looking to bright-
    en skin often run into two
    different and disappoint-
    ing scenarios: the products
    don't deliver results as
    promised or even worse,
    skin health suffers at the
    hand of brightening ingre-
    dients. Treating hyperpig-
    mentation without regard
    for skin health can lead to
    sensitivity, irritation, pho-
    todamage, exposure to
    potentially dangerous
    agents and premature
    aging.

    This leads our research
    and development team at
    The International Dermal
    Institute to develop an
    ingredient complex that
    could both balance the
    skin's tone and maintain
    its utmost health. The
    result is ChromaWhite
    TRx, anew era in bright-
    ening. See your Derma-
    logica professional skin
    therapist for your Face
    Mapping® skin analysis
    and customized product
    prescription.
    THE TRIBUNE

    TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009, PAGE 9B



    a eV



    Dating in midlife

    DATING in midlife is
    undoubtedly a whole differ-
    ent ball game from the rose
    colored vision of love and
    life in our teens and twen-
    ties. In the beginning it was
    exhilarating and life seemed
    mysterious and full of won-
    der. Everyone and every-
    thing seemed exciting and
    anything seemed possible.
    ‘Chemistry' was all that was
    important and differences in
    personalities seemed unim-
    portant. ‘First Loves' have a
    special place in our hearts
    as the first major loss is trau-
    matic and leaves an indeli-

    ble impression in our minds.
    Now several decades of dating and
    relationships later it is completely



    understandable that we are not the
    same people and our requirements
    from a relationship are very different.
    We have gained experience; know our-
    selves a whole lot better than when we
    first entered adulthood. We may be a
    little jaded or weather beaten from
    failed relationships or perhaps life just
    did not give us what we had expected
    or planned. Our advancing years reveal
    that even when we try to plan and
    make the right choices life has a way of
    just making new paths for us. At a cer-
    tain point we come to realise that living
    our life with bitterness and regret is
    pointless and not helping our current
    situation or happiness.

    By this stage many have already

    decided to go it alone and fill their
    lives with satisfying activities and
    careers. Their lives are rich and they
    have found ways to meet all their emo-
    tional, physical, spiritual and intellec-
    tual needs. They are empowered from
    their own achievements and do not
    feel the need to be in a couple to feel
    complete. The natural desire to be
    loved and be touched is met by hugs
    and kisses from close friends, family
    and even pets. Dating at this point in
    their lives holds little importance and
    often there is little room for a new per-
    son to enter such a full lifestyle.

    But for the other people who are
    single in midlife and who want and
    crave a close loving intimate relation-
    ship there is a sense of urgency and
    impatience with the dating scene. They
    feel strongly about ‘wasting time’ on
    relationships that may not lead any-
    where. Their biological clock may be
    ticking or just life's clock. They may be
    acutely aware of their own mortality as
    they may have encountered serious ill-
    ness or even death of someone close to
    them. It becomes even more impor-

    tant to love and express our love to
    those who play a vital role in our lives.
    The words ‘life is too short and pre-
    cious’ becomes even more relevant.

    So is it possible to ‘fast track’ this
    dating thing? Is it possible to skip to
    the nitty -gritty areas of a relationship
    without putting in the time? Is it only
    possible to really get to know some-
    one by living with them?

    Yes, it is possible but it requires a
    great deal of honesty and willingness
    from both parties. It also requires you
    to know yourself well and to able to
    take criticism. All these prerequisites
    may narrow the candidates as they may
    run in fear when you first discuss this.
    But if this is important to you and they
    are willing- go for it! First write down
    all your fears and the buttons that peo-
    ple push which make you act defen-
    sively. Relate them to situations that
    have happened in this relationship
    which provoked such a reaction. In
    doing this you both quickly learn vast
    vulnerable areas which help to explain
    your behaviour. Then do a quick run
    down of things you would change in

    that person. It is hard to listen to but
    you may be surprised they are usually
    areas that are easy to correct.

    All in all learning about bad habits
    and fears takes you deeper into a rela-
    tionship. Just the mere fact of a person
    being willing to open up and be honest
    adds to their ability to be a serious
    partner in your life. If on the other
    hand the exercise opens up huge
    wounds and the decision is to end the
    relationship then tell yourself it is bet-
    ter to find out now than months or
    years down the line. Trust yourself and
    embrace the idea that there is someone
    for you out there.

    ¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual and
    Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a
    Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical
    Sex Therapist.

    Call for an appointment- Relate Bahamas
    at 364- 7230, or email
    relatebahamas@yahoo.com
    orwww.relatebahamas.blogspot.com.
    She is also available for speaking
    engagements.

    GREEN SCENE

    @x



    The popularity
    of papayas

    PAPAYAS may be the
    most popular back yard fruit
    grown in The Bahamas. You
    can see them everywhere. A
    recent photograph in The Tri-
    bune showed a Haitian shack
    in very poor circumstances,
    but right outside the front
    door was a papaya.

    Papayas are often called
    ‘paw-paws’ and the plants are
    herbs rather than trees. Typi-
    cal growth is a single hollow
    stem with a crown of lattice-
    work leaves produced at the
    end of long hollow stems.
    Fruits are produced from the
    stems, usually high up in a
    cluster.

    The plants need full sun and
    will grow long and spindly in
    an attempt to reach sunlight if
    grown in the shade. Papaya
    plants grown in the sun are
    strong enough to survive
    winds less than hurricane
    strength but elongated and
    weakened papaya trees can
    be blown over.

    The fruits can be long and
    thin, pear shaped, or almost
    perfectly round. The flesh
    when ripe can be light yellow
    to deep gold or reddish. Many
    people profess not to like the
    taste of papaya but this is
    often because they have not
    experienced the full palette
    of papayas that range from
    earthy to extremely sweet.

    Cut in half lengthwise the
    fruit will reveal a mass of dark
    seeds that can be easily
    removed with a spoon. The
    surrounding pulp also can be
    removed with a spoon or
    peeled and cut into cubes or
    balled with a melon baller. If
    the taste is not to your satis-
    faction you can always add a
    little sugar. Papaya also
    makes a healthy and tasty
    smoothie.

    Papaya fruits that are full
    but still green can be peeled,
    deseeded and then cut into
    chunks and boiled in salted
    water. Once drained and
    mashed the taste is almost
    identical to squash.

    Papaya (Carica papaya) is
    native to South America and
    has been naturalised in The
    Bahamas and the Caribbean
    for centuries. The native
    Bahamian papaya comes as
    male and female (boar and
    sow) and both sexes must be
    present to produce fruit.
    Female trees produce single
    bell-shaped flowers while the
    male produce panicles of slim,
    elongated flowers. One male
    tree will fertilise up to ten

    female trees.

    Most modern varieties of
    papaya have perfect flowers
    that contain both male and
    female parts. Food stores
    often sell cut papayas from
    Nicaragua and other Central
    American countries and these
    can provide the seeds you
    need to raise your own
    papayas.

    Once you have removed the
    seeds from the fruit you
    should rub them singly with
    your fingers to break the skin
    of the aril that surrounds the
    seeds. It is best that the seeds
    be planted where you want
    them to grow as they are often
    awkward to transplant suc-
    cessfully.

    The seeds should be planted
    a quarter of an inch deep in
    fertile soil and kept well
    watered until established. It
    takes about a year from seed
    to ripe fruit but in the mean-
    time your papaya grove will
    add a touch of the tropics to
    your garden. A papaya tree
    will produce for 4 to 7 years
    but is often replaced much
    earlier.

    The leftover seeds with their
    arils intact can be allowed to
    dry and then used as a condi-
    ment by filling a pepper
    grinder. The taste is pleasant-
    ly peppery. All parts of
    papaya contain papain, an
    enzyme that aids digestion. It
    is a good idea to start or end a
    meal with a slice of papaya.

    Sometimes papaya trees
    grow too tall for us to reach
    the fruits easily. This incon-
    venience can be avoided by
    cutting the tree a few feet
    from the ground just after a
    period of bearing. Three or
    four branches will form and
    each one of these branches
    will bear as heavily as the orig-
    inal main stem. Of course, the
    tree will lose its original grace-
    ful appeal and become quite
    ugly — but productive.

    Young papaya fruits are
    attacked by the papaya fruit
    fly that resembles a wasp with
    a very long protrusion at the
    rear that is actually a oviposi-
    tor used to place eggs into the
    fruit. The only effective way to
    prevent this is to cover small
    fruits with paper bags as soon
    as the flower drops. By the
    time the paper bag disinte-
    grates the fruit will have a
    thick enough skin to repel the
    papaya fruit fly.

    ¢ j.hardy@coralwave.com

    BY GARDENER JACK







    Sex & emotions

    FROM page eight

    He said a clear sign of a
    person who is not emotion-
    ally healthy is when their
    thinking is not appropriate
    toward life, relationships, and
    people, which can cause them
    to treat their partner “like a
    piece of meat,” or as if
    they’re inadequate.

    He said while these short-
    falls in a person’s ability to
    understand a healthy rela-
    tionship may seem miniscule,

    at the end of the day it plays
    a significant role in their
    overall health.

    “It’s the most critical part,
    what is unique about human
    beings is that they are lastly
    physical beings. At the core
    you are a mental, emotional,
    Spiritual being, and all of that
    is housed in a physiological
    body. If you don’t have the
    core lined-up correctly, then
    the physiological body is
    going to experience problems
    and = challenges,” he

    explained.

    He said from the psycho-
    somatic perspective, when the
    human = spirit/emotional
    health is broken, some prob-
    lems which can arise include
    depression, headaches, palpi-
    tations, back-pains, and oth-
    ers.

    With these problems hav-
    ing the potential to develop
    into even more serious phys-
    ical conditions, Dr Thomp-
    son said it is up to the indi-
    vidual to reduce or eliminate
    them.

    He suggest developing self
    esteem, focusing on building
    self worth and self respect.

    “Persons must be willing
    to have their emotional
    check-up from the neck-up!
    We service our vehicles, we
    wash our dishes, so we should
    also service our minds which
    house the key components to
    life. If you don’t cleanse your-
    self mentally, emotionally,
    and in your spirit, you will
    eventually pick-up viruses
    which are in the environment.

    “These are your everyday
    stresses, when you are not
    emotionally healthy, your abil-
    ity to cope with them does not
    exist, so the way you view
    them is incorrect. This distorts
    the way you see yourself, they

    way you look at yourself, and
    the way you look at others.”

    He said if you realise that
    you are the kind of person who
    has difficulty trusting, who is
    insecure, suspicious, irritation-
    prone, or overly stressed, seek-
    ing professional help should be
    your next move.

    However on the practical
    end, he said exercise can help
    to cleanse your body and then
    mind.

    Dr Thompson said although
    sexual intercourse may be an
    easy element to any relation-
    ship, finding sexual bliss can
    only manifest from a com-
    pletely healthy relationship.



    Porn industry
    _ promotes
    -Pecord in

    _ fighting HIV

    : MLOS ANGELES

    WHEN Tricia Devereaux

    i broke into the adult film
    ? business 15 years ago, test-
    ? ing for sexually transmitted
    ? diseases wasn't much more
    ? than an afterthought, so
    ? much so that by the end of
    ? the decade the star of such
    ? films as "Coed Carwash" and

    "Convention Cuties" had

    } tested positive for HIV,
    : according to the Associated
    i Press.

    But these days, says Dev-

    i ereaux, who has worked
    i behind the cameras since
    ? testing positive in 1998, her
    : industry has become so
    i aggressive at policing itself
    ? that she believes a porn star
    ? has less risk of acquiring the
    ? AIDS virus than a member
    ? of the general public.

    "T think because of what

    ? happened in 1998 the indus-
    i try immediately looked at
    ? itself and found ways to real-
    ? ly, really minimize the risk
    i factors by switching to more
    ? foolproof tests and doing it
    ? more often,” she said.

    Adult filmmakers in the

    U.S. now require that actors
    : prove they have tested nega-
    ? tive for HIV and other sexu-
    i ally transmitted diseases
    ? within 30 days of going to
    ? work ona film.

    Still, the tests aren't fool-

    : proof, as was revealed this
    ? week when an actress who
    i? had passed an HIV test
    ? before making a film tested
    ? positive immediately after-
    i ward.

    That positive result was

    i reported by the Adult Indus-
    i try Medical Healthcare
    ? Foundation. Known in the
    ? industry as AIM, the organi-
    ? zation tests hundreds of
    ? actors each month in the San
    i Fernando Valley, where the
    ? U.S. porn industry is head-
    ? quartered. It grants those
    ? who pass certificates allow-
    ? ing them to work.

    Although the woman's co-

    ; stars have tested negative,
    ? they have been quarantined
    i from acting for the time
    ? being and advised to be
    i retested
    i because medical experts say
    ? it takes almost that long for a
    ? person to show signs of infec-
    ? tion.

    in two weeks

    That means the woman's

    ? case should be a wake-up call
    ? to the adult film industry that
    ? it isn't doing enough to pro-
    ? tect its performers, said Dr.
    ? Jonathan Fielding, director
    ? of the Los Angeles County
    ? Department of Health.

    He said the state Division

    i} of Occupational Safety and
    ? Health requires that safe sex
    i be practiced on all adult
    ? movie sets.

    "But we have persistent

    i reports that that is not the
    ? case," he said, adding his
    ? department receives an aver-
    ? age of 15 reports a week from
    ? the Adult Industry Medical
    ? Healthcare Foundation of
    ? actors testing positive for oth-
    ? er sexually transmitted dis-
    ? eases such as gonorrhea and
    ? chlamydia.

    "That's obviously very dis-

    : turbing,” Fielding said. "I
    ? don't know of any other
    ? industry where people are
    ? subjected to that kind of risk."

    He called for the use of

    ? condoms on all adult films as
    ? one means of providing nec-
    ? essary worker safety.
    PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009

    THE TRIBUNE





    AFTER a long courtship
    over the telephone, Asma
    Ahmed, a painter in Karachi,
    Pakistan, married her fiance,
    Rafi-uddin Shikoh, a business
    consultant in New York, in a
    bicontinental wedding by
    Webcam. When the new
    bride then moved to Queens
    in 2002, she tried to make
    herself at home by staking

    her claim through art.

    In Pakistan, Ahmed Shikoh's work had
    been sociopolitical, addressing what she
    saw as the country's colonization by
    American fast-food chains, for instance,
    with paintings like "The Invasion,” in
    which swarms of Ronald McDonalds,
    wearing screaming-red clown wigs, sur-
    round a central monument in Karachi.

    Here, however, her art turned deeply
    personal as she grappled with her new
    identity as an immigrant and, having rarely
    set foot in a mosque back home, as a grad-
    ually more observant Muslim. In her first
    American paintings, Ahmed Shikoh
    reimagined the Statue of Liberty in her
    own image: in a Pakistani wedding dress,
    as a pregnant immigrant and as a regal

    BOOKREVIEW

    Life changing

    a,
    iy » |
    } |

    mother, baby on hip. Next she trans-
    formed the subway map with paint and
    calligraphic script into an Urdu manu-
    script that made the city feel more like
    hers.

    Finally, in 2006, after she made the dif-
    ficult decision to cover her hair, inspired
    by Muslim-American women who man-
    aged to combine faith and a career,
    Ahmed Shikoh began using the head scarf
    as a recurring image.

    On the surface, Ahmed Shikoh, 31, has
    little in common with Negar Ahkami, 38,
    a sleek, raven-haired Iranian-American
    artist, beyond the wall space that they
    share in a new exhibition, "The Seen and
    the Hidden: ((Dis))Covering the Veil,"
    at the Austrian Cultural Forum in Man-
    hattan. Ahkami grew up in suburban New
    Jersey, considers herself only "technically
    Muslim" and toys with stereotypical
    images of exotic Middle Eastern women in
    her art.

    Yet the two are both in their 30s, moth-
    ers of small children and emerging artists
    in the New York area. They are both
    exploring their identities as refracted
    through their backgrounds in the wake
    of 9/11. And they are both working to
    create a new kind of Islamic art that is
    modern, Westernized and female-centric.
    "As women artists of Muslim descent,
    Asma and Negar are both trying to dis-

    cover who they are, to look at themselves
    and their heritage and to get beyond
    stereotypes,” said David Harper, a curator
    of the Austrian exhibition. "What's so
    interesting is that they present two such
    very different ways to examine the subject
    from American soil.”

    "The Hidden and the Seen,” which runs
    through Aug. 29, features 15 artists, 13 of
    them women, of whom Ahmed Shikoh
    and Ahkami are the only full-time U.S.
    residents. The exhibition is a partner event
    of the Muslim Voices Festival organized
    by the Brooklyn Academy of Music, Asia
    Society and New York University's Cen-
    ter for Dialogues.

    In this exhibition Ahmed Shikoh and
    Ahkami seek to humanize the individuals
    beneath the veil. Ahmed Shikoh's
    approach is deeply earnest. Her installa-
    tion, "Beehive," is a cardboard honey-
    comb whose cells are stuffed with the col-
    orful scarves that she collected from scores
    of Muslim-American women who also
    sent messages — "I ran the 10k Bolder
    Boulder and wore this scarf" — that anno-
    tate this intentionally rough-hewn work.

    In contrast, Ahkami's piece is playful,
    acerbic and polished. It consists of eight
    nesting dolls sumptuously repainted as
    "Persian Dolls," in brilliant colors with
    gold faces. The outer doll is stern, with a
    thick unibrow, in full black chador. The
    ever smaller dolls within wear Chanel
    head scarves or cocktail dresses or, as with
    the tiniest, nothing at all but curves.

    "T have always struggled with the
    images of humorless, somber Iranian
    women in full-on black chador," Ahkami
    said. "For me these images do not reflect
    the real Iranian women any more than
    the images of the harem girls of the 19th
    century did."

    Ahkami felt angst here too. The child of
    Iranians who emigrated in the 1960s, she
    grew up in Clifton, N.J., spending what
    she remembers as magical summers in
    Tran until the Islamic revolution of 1979.

    pe

    Commencement

    J. COURTNEY Sullivan's
    "Commencement" is one of this
    year's most inviting summer
    novels. It tells of four Smith
    College dorm mates who
    reunite for a wedding four years
    after graduation, and it man-
    ages to be so entertaining that
    this setup never feels schematic.
    In a novel that’s what Curtis
    Sittenfeld's "Prep" aspired to
    be (Le., a smart, discerning book
    about school years) Sullivan
    introduces strong, warmly
    believable three-dimensional
    characters who have fun, have
    fights and fall into intense love
    affairs, sometimes with one
    another. Smith's feathers may
    be ruffled by the candor with
    which Sullivan describes cam-
    pus life.

    The "Commencement" char-
    acters are savvy about, among
    other things, feminism and pub-
    lishing. "When a woman writes
    a book that has anything to do
    with feelings or relationships,
    it's either called chick lit or
    women's fiction, right?" one of
    them asks. "But look at Updike,
    or Irving. Imagine if they'd been
    women. Just imagine. Someone
    would have slapped a pink cov-
    er onto ‘Rabbit at Rest,’ and
    poof, there goes the ... Pulitzer.”

    They're right of course. But
    this is the season when prettily
    designed books flood the mar-
    ket and compete for female
    readers. It's a time when literary
    and lightweight books aimed at
    women become hard to tell
    apart. Their covers use standard
    imagery: sand, flowers, cake,
    feet, houses, pastel colors, the
    occasional Adirondack chair.

    Their titles ("Summer House,"
    "Dune Road," "The Wedding
    Girl," ''Trouble") skew generic.
    And they tend to be blurbed
    exclusively by women. Gloria
    Steinem likes "Commence-
    ment.” She ought to; the
    women of "Commencement"
    are big fans of hers.

    Amid such confusion, here's a
    crib sheet for this season's crop
    of novels and memoirs. It does
    mix seriously ambitious books
    ("Shanghai Girls") with ami-
    ably schlocky ones ("Queen
    Takes King") and includes one
    off-the-charts oddity ("My Judy
    Garland Life"). It's even got a
    nascent Julia Roberts movie.
    But the common denominator
    is beach appeal, female variety.
    Each of these books takes a
    supportive, girlfriendly
    approach to weathering crises,
    be they global (World War IT)
    or domestic (dead husband on
    the kitchen floor), great or
    small.

    Julie Metz's "Perfection" is a
    visual standout for good rea-
    son: Metz designs book jackets.
    And she has given her all to the
    vibrant tulip on her memoir's
    cover. She also gave her all to
    what she thought was a solid
    marriage. Then her husband
    died suddenly, in 2003, and left
    behind a secret history of phi-
    landering, complete with e-mail
    trail. He left one particularly
    devious lover in the same small
    town where Metz found herself
    trapped as a new widow. How
    would she rear her daughter
    there when the daughter's best
    friend's mother (chick-book afi-
    cionados can follow this, no

    problem) was her husband's
    married girlfriend?

    Metz provides a blow-by-
    blow account of how she
    processed these revelations. Lit-
    tle did she know that the man
    who wrote her a florid poem
    for Valentine's Day was also
    sending pornographic holiday
    e-mail messages to at least two
    women with whom he was hav-
    ing affairs. ("I had to smile at
    the efficiency of it all,” Metz
    writes about this cut-and-paste
    job.) Little did she realize how
    truly distant her husband was.
    And little did she imagine that
    she would ever be living one of
    the most basic dreams of chick
    lit: going back to dating after
    years of marriage. Metz changes
    the names of the men in this
    book, but she brings refreshing
    candor to a startling, painful
    tale.

    Kate Christensen's "Trouble"
    is also about a woman who's
    married with a child until she
    suddenly finds herself unat-
    tached. But she, Josie, is an
    insufferably smug New York
    psychotherapist who high-hand-
    edly dissolves her marriage. "I
    think it's lame for people to stay
    together just for the kids,”
    Josie's adolescent daughter says
    helpfully, after Josie decides to
    ditch Daddy and have an
    adventurous Christmas in Mex-
    ico City. Yet Josie is so bitter
    that she resents her husband
    even for letting her go. "It
    enraged me that Anthony had
    allowed our marriage to end
    like this,” Josie says. "It made
    me want to punch him in the
    head."



    “| have always
    struggled with the
    images of humorless,
    somber Iranian
    women in full-on black
    chador. For me these
    images do not reflect
    the real Iranian
    women any more
    than the images of the
    harem girls of the

    19th century did.”

    NEGAR AHKAMI

    With the hostage crisis, her world split in
    two, making her feel like the child of a
    messy, public divorce.

    "At a time when I was trying to assim-
    ilate, it was very confusing to me," she
    said. "I was born here, and suddenly the
    girl across the street was saying: "You nev-
    er told me you were Iranian. You said
    you were Persian.’ And I never saw her
    again."

    A hypersensitive young artist, Ahkami
    was not stung just by the classmate who
    mouthed “ayatollah” at her. She hated
    being made to explain her family in the
    context of television images that made all
    Iranians seem like "Death to America"-
    chanting fundamentalists. She hated the
    way that the culture she loved was
    "degraded, demonized and reduced toa
    cartoon" both here and in Iran.

    MME NK, EWE
    - fl -& Ty

    TL iy
    ThE Stikip
    Phy

    E hit 30.

    thirty.

    Successful,
    Single, ant
    dreading

    turning 30

    FROM page 12

    I would hopefully be secure

    in a job for at least four years,

    and I would like to have
    already started on my first

    ? home.

    “T think many people have

    ? the fear of turning thirty
    ? because there is a greater fear
    ? of turning old, and thirty
    ? seems to be that initial age
    ? where youth has expired and
    ? the good years are behind
    you.”

    However women too are

    bombarded with images and
    } stories of what they should

    accomplish by the time they

    In a special turning 30

    ? episode on TV series Friends,
    ? Jennifer Aniston’s character

    Rachel Greene was extreme-

    ly distraught when a thirtieth
    birthday party was thrown in
    ? her honor.

    In an attempt to make up

    for her ‘over the hill birthday,’
    ; she was seen dating a man
    ; much younger than she was.

    Rachel said: “Come on

    guys, is it just me or am I
    ; Overreacting...Look I know
    ? my life’s going pretty well, but

    I look around and I see so

    many people who’ve accom-
    ; plished so many other goals
    i by the time they are 30.”

    Thirty-year-old Heike Wol-

    lenweber, explained that

    although she was like many

    ? women who had the usual
    ? fears of turning thirty, she
    ? now realises that turning thir-
    : tyis not the end of the world.

    “Before I turned thirty last

    ? year, the thought of turning
    ? thirty put a lot of things in
    ? perspective, it got difficult
    ? when | thought of all the
    i things I wanted to accomplish
    i by that time,” she said.

    She now understands that

    there is still a great deal to

    appreciate about life after

    Although she does not yet

    ? have children, Heike said she
    i isnot overly concerned, espe-
    i cially because she is still wait-
    } ing on Mr Right. She also has

    a number of things she would

    i still like to do and is excited
    ? that she is able to look for-
    ? ward to them at this stage in
    i herlite.

    As an entrepreneur who is
    always busy working on sev-

    eral projects, being thirty she
    ? said is nowdays one of the last
    i things on her mind.

    She said although she may

    not fit the bill when it comes
    ; to common expectations of a
    : women thirty and up, “really

    and truly thirty is not that old,
    and my best years are still
    ahead of me.”

    By The Associated Press



    Sullivan introduces strong, warmly believable three-

    dimensional characters who have fun, have fights and fall
    into intense love affairs, sometimes with one another.


    tls

    THE WEATHER REPO

    5-Day FORECAST

    TAMPA

    High: 92° F/33° C
    Low: 77° F/25°C

    @ ¢
    KEY WEST

    High: 88° F/31°C
    Low: 80° F/27°C
    @

    ORLANDO |
    High:93°F/34°C
    Low:74°F/23°C
    @

    cw,

    Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
    highs and tonights's lows.

    Albuquerque
    Anchorage
    Atlanta
    Atlantic City
    Baltimore
    Boston
    Buffalo
    Charleston, SC
    Chicago
    Cleveland
    Dallas
    Denver
    Detroit
    Honolulu
    Houston

    High
    F/C
    91/32
    68/20
    91/32
    74/23
    76/24
    64/17
    79/26
    91/32
    77/25
    79/26
    99/37
    84/28
    78/25
    88/31
    96/35

    Today

    Low

    F/C
    63/17
    53/11
    72/22
    56/13
    57/13
    50/10
    60/15
    71/21
    60/15
    61/16
    77/25
    55/12
    59/15
    75/23
    75/23

    Ww

    rey

    YD TDD
    oO pao

    AnD tH HM eS

    Wednesday

    High
    F/C
    88/31
    68/20
    90/32
    70/21
    73/22
    69/20
    78/25
    85/29
    78/25
    79/26
    97/36
    85/29
    76/24
    88/31
    96/35

    Low

    F/C
    62/16
    53/11
    73/22
    60/15
    60/15
    54/12
    59/15
    73/22
    61/16
    61/16
    77/25
    56/13
    60/15
    76/24
    522

    Ww

    non onnrerennnwveoS

    oO

    oO

    o

    Indianapolis
    Jacksonville
    Kansas City
    Las Vegas
    Little Rock
    Los Angeles
    Louisville
    Memphis
    Miami
    Minneapolis
    Nashville
    New Orleans
    New York
    Oklahoma City
    Orlando

    Plenty of sunshine.

    H ig h: 89°
    ICRU Calcd

    101° F



    Partly cloudy, a A few patchy clouds. Partly sunny.
    shower; warm.
    High: 88° High: 88°
    Low: 79° Low: 79° Low: 78°
    98°-86° F 98°-89° F

    @ WEST PALM BEACH
    High: 91° F/33°C
    Low: 76° F/24° C

    FT. LAUDERDALE
    High: 90° F/32° C @
    Low: 76° F/24°C

    = AMI

    High: 91° F/33°C
    Low: 78° F/26° C

    <



    High
    F/C
    77/25
    93/33
    85/29
    85/29
    97/36
    74/23
    85/29
    94/34
    91/32
    74/23
    88/31
    95/35
    70/21
    99/37
    93/33

    WS rn

    Today

    Low

    F/C
    66/18
    73/22
    69/20
    65/18
    73/22
    62/16
    72/22
    75/23
    78/25
    63/17
    70/21
    75/23
    58/14
    72/22
    74/23

    Ww

    F+THODH FH H SHH OCD S

    oO

    oO

    Wednesday

    High
    F/C
    85/29
    97/36
    95/35
    93/33
    97/36
    76/24
    90/32
    96/35
    89/31
    83/28
    91/32
    95/35
    73/22
    99/37
    95/35

    Low

    F/C
    67/19
    75/23
    75/23
    76/24
    74/23
    62/16
    71/21
    76/24
    76/24
    69/20
    71/21
    76/24
    61/16
    74/23
    74/23

    ABACO
    High: 90° F/32° C

    FREEPORT
    High: 89° F/32° C
    Low: 76° F/24°C

    Low: 78° F/26°C

    NASSAU

    High: 89° F/32° C
    Low: 79° F/26° C
    @

    i.

    ANDROS

    High: 93° F/34° C
    Low: 79° F/26° C

    Ww

    oO

    oO

    +FnNO NM FtOFTH FTO HH DOS
    }

    Philadelphia
    Phoenix
    Pittsburgh
    Portland, OR
    Raleigh-Durham
    St. Louis

    Salt Lake City
    San Antonio
    San Diego

    San Francisco
    Seattle
    Tallahassee
    Tampa

    Tucson
    Washington, DC

    High
    F/C
    75/23
    97/36
    80/26
    78/25
    76/24
    82/27
    74/23
    98/36
    72/22
    70/21
    73/22
    98/36
    92/33
    96/35
    78/25

    Today

    Low

    F/C
    59/15
    73/22
    60/15
    57/13
    64/17
    73/22
    54/12
    75/23
    65/18
    56/13
    56/13
    74/23
    77/25
    68/20
    64/17

    Ww

    pe
    pe
    s

    pe

    =

    narnoop tN On
    ie

    pe

    GREAT EXUMA

    ELEUTHERA
    High: 90° F/32° C
    Low: 77° F/25° C

    ——

    >

    ae

    —







    Clouds and sun, a
    t-storm possible.
    High: 89°
    Low: 79°
    110°-88° F

    The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
    elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

    Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday

    Temperature

    i 88° F/31° C
    77° F/25° C
    87° F/31° C
    74° F/23° C
    88° F/31° C
    76° F/25° C

    Normal high ....
    Normal low
    Last year's high
    Last year's low

    Brilliant sunshine.





    et
    ae | .

    a

    A na Ny

    o|1

    LOW

    High: 90°
    Low: 78°

    AccuWeather RealFeel

    116°-88° F

    Today

    Thursday

    Friday

    CATISLAND

    High: 85° F/29° C

    Low: 73° F/23°C
    a

    —— i.

    High: 86° F/30° C
    Low: 76° F/24° C

    a

    Wednesday

    High Low W

    F/C F/C

    —*

    LONG ISLAND

    High: 88° F/31

    Low: 75° F/24°C

    °C

    SAN SALVADOR

    High: 88° F/31°C
    Low: 76° F/24° C

    QO

    75/23
    99/37
    75/23
    72/22
    76/24
    94/34
    75/23
    98/36
    73/22
    70/21
    68/20
    101/38
    92/33
    95/35
    70/21

    59/15
    77/25
    57/13
    58/14
    63/17
    75/23
    57/13
    77/25
    64/17
    56/13
    56/13
    74/23
    77/25
    69/20
    63/17

    pe
    pe
    r
    pe
    r

    +

    oO

    “=D ho” ke” mo
    oO

    CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
    High: 91° F/33° C

    High: 87° F/31°C
    Low: 72° F/22° C

    GREAT INAGUA

    High: 91° F/33°C
    Low: 75° F/24°C

    a

    >)

    |2



    MODERATE

    High
    2:07 a.m.
    2:40 p.m.

    Wednesday 3:9° a.m.

    3:36 p.m.
    4:01 a.m.
    4:34 p.m.

    5:02 a.m.
    5:33 p.m.




    MAYAGUANA
    High: 88° F/31°C

    Low: 73° F/23° C

    * x

    3|4[5|

    HIGH |





    2.2
    2.6

    2.2
    27

    2.2
    29

    2.2
    3.0




    WW
    Jlshop
    EXT.

    The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
    greater the need for eye and skin protection.

    ea Posy

    Ht. (ft.



    \. HIGH

    Low
    8:17 a.m.
    9:05 p.m.

    9:07 a.m.

    10:06 p.m.

    10:01 a.m.
    11:07 p.m.

    10:58 a.m.

    Ht. (ft.

    0.3
    0.5

    0.2
    0.4

    0.1
    0.3

    0.0

    Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:20 a.m. Moonrise..... 1:13 a.m.

    As of 2 p.m. yesterday .....ccccccscsssssscsssesseeen 0.00" Sunset....... 8:01 p.m. Moonset..... 1:53 p.m.

    Year to date 13. ;

    Normal year to date 0... ccc cece ceneee 15.10" a = Full /-

    A a Zo
    AccuWeather.com 5 Wea
    Forecasts and graphics provided by : a ‘ay
    AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jun. 22 = Jun. 29 Jul. 7 Jul. 15

    Acapulco
    Amsterdam
    Ankara, Turkey
    Athens
    Auckland
    Bangkok
    Barbados
    Barcelona
    Beijing
    Beirut
    Belgrade
    Berlin
    Bermuda
    Bogota
    Brussels
    Budapest
    Buenos Aires
    Cairo
    Calcutta
    Calgary
    Cancun
    Caracas
    Casablanca
    Copenhagen
    Dublin
    Frankfurt
    Geneva
    Halifax
    Havana
    Helsinki
    Hong Kong
    Islamabad
    Istanbul
    Jerusalem
    Johannesburg
    Kingston
    Lima
    London
    Madrid
    Manila
    Mexico City
    Monterrey
    Montreal
    Moscow
    Munich
    Nairobi
    New Delhi
    Oslo

    Paris
    Prague

    Rio de Janeiro
    Riyadh
    Rome

    St. Thomas
    San Juan
    San Salvador
    Santiago
    Santo Domingo
    Sao Paulo
    Seoul
    Stockholm
    Sydney
    Taipei

    Tokyo
    Toronto
    Trinidad
    Vancouver
    Vienna
    Warsaw
    Winnipeg

    He bash Fh

    9%

    Tent TTS

    High
    F/C
    91/32
    64/17
    17/25
    88/31
    53/11
    90/32
    86/30
    81/27
    75/23
    75/23
    94/34
    68/20
    80/26
    66/18
    68/20
    77/25
    57/13
    96/35
    107/41
    76/24
    88/31
    81/27
    84/28
    66/18
    68/20
    72/22
    78/25
    58/14
    90/32
    55/12
    84/28
    101/38
    82/27
    79/26
    61/16
    87/30
    71/21
    73/22
    88/31
    84/28
    79/26
    100/37
    75/23
    72/22
    72/22
    80/26
    104/40
    57/13
    73/22
    71/21
    79/26
    103/39
    82/27
    86/30
    68/20
    84/28
    59/15
    84/28
    70/21
    80/26
    61/16
    59/15
    88/31
    76/24
    13/22
    79/26
    68/20
    78/25
    68/20
    78/25

    il

    Today

    Low
    F/C
    79/26
    52/11
    43/6
    73/22
    37/2
    78/25
    77/25
    65/18
    68/20
    70/21
    61/16
    50/10
    72/22
    47/8
    43/8
    54/12
    43/6
    70/21
    84/28
    51/10
    73/22
    72/22
    73/22
    53/11
    50/10
    50/10
    55/12
    44/6
    72/22
    45/7
    79/26
    72/22
    67/19
    59/15
    44/6
    78/25
    58/14
    52/11
    59/15
    78/25
    55/12
    73/22
    57/13
    54/12
    47/8
    56/13
    82/27
    45/7
    54/12
    49/9
    67/19
    83/28
    61/16
    78/25
    33/3
    70/21
    45/7
    73/22
    49/9
    62/16
    45/7
    50/10
    77/25
    64/17
    60/15
    63/17
    57/13
    57/13
    45/7
    59/15





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    nw
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    +o TT YTDTTDTTSO TIO MD O RS
    oO Ba ee > ee oO oO =a

    pe

    Wednesday

    High
    F/C
    93/33
    68/20
    81/27
    91/32
    53/11
    90/32
    86/30
    78/25
    95/35
    74/23
    81/27
    72/22
    79/26
    64/17
    73/22
    79/26
    63/17
    95/35
    106/41
    70/21
    90/32
    80/26
    88/31
    67/19
    64/17
    79/26
    80/26
    65/18
    88/31
    59/15
    86/30
    109/42
    83/28
    76/24
    64/17
    87/30
    71/21
    70/21
    95/35
    84/28
    76/24
    97/36
    79/26
    68/20
    78/25
    78/25
    108/42
    61/16
    77/25
    75/23
    74/23
    103/39
    85/29
    87/30
    74/23
    85/29
    55/12
    85/29
    65/18
    75/23
    64/17
    57/13
    88/31
    74/23
    72/22
    84/28
    68/20
    78/25
    66/18
    77/25

    Low
    F/C
    79/26
    57/13
    50/10
    76/24
    43/6
    78/25
    76/24
    67/19
    73/22
    70/21
    56/13
    55/12
    72/22
    47/8
    55/12
    52/11
    48/8
    72/22
    81/27
    49/9
    73/22
    71/21
    73/22
    55/12
    48/8
    55/12
    56/13
    48/8
    72/22
    43/6
    81/27
    75/23
    65/18
    60/15
    46/7
    79/26
    58/14
    54/12
    64/17
    78/25
    55/12
    75/23
    61/16
    45/7
    51/10
    57/13
    82/27
    49/9
    55/12
    53/11
    62/16
    82/27
    67/19
    79/26
    39/3
    73/22
    45/7
    74/23
    50/10
    61/16
    50/10
    52/11
    77/25
    66/18
    58/14
    63/17
    55/12
    61/16
    45/7
    63/17

    INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

    (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

    WwW

    pe
    pe
    pc
    $

    pc
    sh
    pc
    sh
    r

    pc
    C

    pc
    sh
    pc

    Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
    storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace



    USS Se ee

    MARINE FORECAST

    WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
    NASSAU Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
    Wednesday: S at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
    FREEPORT Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
    Wednesday: S at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
    ABACO Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
    Wednesday: S$ at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F



    a Billings
    82/57,

    Li

    Denver, |/Kansas|
    84/55 85/69

    Miami
    91/78

    Showers
    [&&}j T-storms
    Rain

    [ * _%| Flurries
    pk] Snow
    [v_z] Ice

    -10s

    Fronts
    Cold =

    Warm Mintel

    Stationary Meugaafi

    is | 05 | 10s 20s [305 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 80s) /A00st/Ai0)

    Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
    precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
    Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.









    = hal age

    You Can BS Blown
    way By A Hurricane
    _ Or you_can rest easy knowing

    hat you, have excellent insurance

    coverage no matter which
    way the wind blows.

    Nobody does it better.

    INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

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    Ce






    PAGE 1

    N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Nurses stay defiant despite court order C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.166TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNSHINE HIGH 89F LOW 79F F E A T U R E S S P O R T S SEEPAGEELEVEN Volleyball latest n By MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net NURSES have been ordered to put an end to eight days of industrial action and return to work by a Supreme Court injunction p assed yesterday. But when the message was d elivered to around 200 public health nurses at a meeting held by t he Bahamas Nurses Union (BNU ed they are still sick. Those who have been off work sick since Monday last week saidt hey will continue to take their sick days and risk being held in contempt of court for disobeying the order. Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall granted the injunction to the Minister of Health and Public Hospitals Authority as the Bahamas Nurses Union filed a dispute with the Ministry of Labour seeking permission to conduct a strikevote after their week-long sickout failed to produce results from their employer. BNU president Cleola Hamilton said the Ministry of Health, as employer of the Department of Public Health, and the Public Hospitals Authority have been ordered to meet with the union on Wednesday “to discuss what is right for the nurses” as a result of the application. Around 50 per cent of nurses employed at Princess Margaret Hospital, Rand Memorial Hospital, Sandilands Rehabilitation Cen tre, and public health clinics across the country joined the sick-out in protest of the Ministry of Health’s decision to postpone their health insurance plan until 2012. Ms Hamilton criticised MinisUnion members claim they are ‘still sick’ despite an injunction demanding they return to work The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com Switch to Fidelity products they have built-in savings plans:It’s not too late to build yours...Weather the storm with Fidelity. /77 57:616/ )Va WVM' SUCCESSFUL, SINGLE AND DREADING TURNING BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE 30 SEEWOMANSECTION I N S I D E Claims that baby was treated for a sexually transmitted disease are refuted n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@ tribunemedia.net CLAIMS five-month-old L ynera Saunders had been t reated for a Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD ly before her death have been refuted by a top police officer. Superintendent Elsworth Moss in charge of the Crim-i nal Detective Unit denied that staff at Princess Mar garet Hospital (PMH the Crisis Centre knew of the baby’s treatment for an STD as reported in The Punch yesterday. PMH has not released any details of the young patient’s illness and treatment as the public hospital maintains all patient care is confidential. But staff within the hos pital suspected the infant had been molested when she was admitted to hospital on Friday June 5, and died two hours later. The medical staff in the paediatric and emergency room alerted police and several individuals were inter viewed in a police investigation. But the suspects were released when the infant’s death certificate showed she had died as a result of breathing difficulties. Lynera Saunders’ moth er Indera Minns, 20, her grandmother and greatgrandmother spoke out about their devastation over the baby’s death and humiliation over the claims last week. Family attorney Paul Moss said the baby was tak ing antibiotics which led to diarrhoea, and irritation caused by the illness may have been misinterpreted as a sign of molestation. However, health bosses at PMH have so far failed to explain what led medical staff to raise concerns. Supt Moss said: “The child was never molested. We had a copy of the death certificate and the child died of respiratory failure. “The child was sick a week prior (to her death and suffered from diarrhoea. There is no evidence the child had an STD.” Top police officer denies hospital staff knew of treatment for an STD SEE page eight n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net JEWS, Seventh-Day Adventists and Rastafarians may be neg atively affected by proposed new changes to the night court sys tem, said president of the Bar Association Wayne Munroe. The fate of these proposed changes the possibility of eliminating the current night court system and hearing those cases on Saturday and the introduction of lay magistrates will be announced "in due course", Attorney General Michael Barnett said yesterday during a brief interview. Mr Munroe said for years there has been discussion within the judiciary to move night courts to the weekend but this never mate Proposed night court changes could hit Jews, Seventh-Day Adventists, Rastafarians SEE page eight INSIDE POLICE SEEK GUNMAN BEHIND F A T AL SHOO TING P A GETWO PLP A CCUSED OF HITLER-S T YLE PR OP AGANDA P A GE THREE MINIS TER CL AIMS THE PLP SHO T DOWN AIRSP A CE IDEA P A GE FIVE n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net ENTREPRENEURSare allegedly excavating farmland to sell quarry to developers and filling the cavity with waste, polluting the water table and putting families at risk. After years of exposure in The Tribune , the practice of excavation and landfill has been initiated on land behind Millars Heights off Carmichael Road. Hundreds of residents near the site fear the practice will pollute the water table they depend on as they do not have access to city water from the Water and Sew erage Corporation. They are also forced to endure the constant disruption of noise and dust from the site where two diggers are said to be operating Concerns raised over excavation and landfill initiated off Carmichael Road SEE page eight WORK TAKING place on land behind Millars Heights. BNU PRESIDENT Cleola Hamilton speaks to union members last night. SEE page eight T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

    PAGE 2

    n By ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net GOVERNMENT will relaunch” the National Youth Programme in the fall – moving it f rom Andros to New Providence and reforming it into a prog ramme that does not solely focus on dealing with young men who have “already become menaces to society,” said the Minister of Youth. C armichael MP Desmond Bannister suggested that while the initiative “currently dubbed” the National Youth Programme ism erely a “restorative” one for t hose who have already gone off the rails, government intends that it should work with children who “can be helped before they get i nto trouble.” “We envision a programme which encompasses all aspects of youth development,” said MrB annister. Government believes t he national interest will best be served by relocating the NYP to N ew Providence and a location “where the greatest need exists” f or the resources it offers. “We will save taxpayer money o n travel costs, transportation costs, food costs and other expend iture,” said Mr Bannister, adding that staff will no longer have to travel to Andros, leaving their families. “In New Providence trained teachers for the pro g ramme will be in abundance . . . this is a win-win situation for all,” s aid the minister. This year, funding for the prog ramme has been reduced to $345,000. This after Mr Bannister noted that money allocated towards the NYP rose from $17,861 in the 2003/2004 budget to $900,000 in2 008/2009. R esponding to Mr Bannister’s statement, MP for North Andros Vincent Peet accused government of being “hell-bent on dismant ling the one working project that is helping to reduce crime.” What are they doing?” he asked. He pointed to the reduct ion in funding for the programme as evidence of his claim. However, Mr Bannister vehemently denied the MP’s charge, saying government wanted to t ransform the programme into what it was originally intended tob e one that reduced the likeli hood of young people turning toc rime to begin with. “The government has absolutely no intention of abolishing this programme,” said Mr Bannister, adding that Mr Peet was “wrong” f or “playing politics” with the issue. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net POLICE are trying to find the gunman who shot two brothers outs ide a bar, killing one and leaving the other in serious condition. Both Matthew Armbrister, 23, and his brother Marvin Armbrister, 2 4, of Farrington Road, were shot o nce in the stomach when an altercation erupted between two groups of men outside Dominique’s Restaurant and Bar in Boyd Road, Nass au. Matthew, a former employee at The Tribune who worked in the press room, died at the scene. H is brother Marvin was rushed to Princess Margaret Hospital where he is in serious condition. Police h ave identified a man they believe is in some way connected with the shooting and plan to release a photo today. S uperintendent Elsworth Moss, i n charge of the Criminal Detective Unit said: “We are going to send something out as soon as we identify a photograph of a male we are l ooking for in respect to the shooting.” The Armbrister brothers’ family could not be contacted yesterday.M atthew Armbrister’s death pushed the murder count for this year to 33. Police failed to release details of the shooting death in the weekend crime r eport. C HINESE government officials have indicated to their B ahamian counterparts that the new National Stadium should be completed by Independence Day 2011. Minister of Youth, Sports a nd Culture Desmond Ban nister revealed this informa-t ion during his Budget contribution in parliament yesterd ay morning. Construction on the stadium began, after much delay, earlier this year. Located adjacent to the Queen Elizabeth Sports Cent re, it is being funded by the Chinese government, as a gift” to the Bahamian peo ple. REWARD OFFERED FOR SAFE RETURN OF MISSING DOG THE MISSING dog is a Shitzu, the same breed as pictured here. A distraught family i s offering a reward f or the safe return of their lost pet. Anyone who may have seen the small dog, a female Shitzu,i n the area of Eastern Road or Sans Souci is being asked to call 324-1127. The dog’s collar b ears a name tag which reads: Maggie Raine. Police seek gunman behind fatal shooting National Stadium ‘should be ready by Independence Day 2011’ Govt will ‘relaunch’ National Youth Programme in autumn M an killed, his brother seriously injured M ATTHEW ARMBRISTER We envision a p rogramme which encompasses all aspects of youth d evelopment.” Desmond Bannister

    PAGE 3

    n B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net G OVERNMENT wants to ensure that no purchaser of a lowcost home built by the Ministry of Housing has to do any “major repairs” within the first 10 yearso f moving in. Contributing to the 2009/2010 b udget debate, Housing Minister Kenneth Russell outlined numero us steps his ministry has taken to improve the quality of homes. T his comes as the ministry has spent in the region of $3 million on repairs to 303 homes built prior to the May 2007 election. Despite this effort, there are still 2 00 outstanding complaints to deal with, he told parliament. M r Russell said the ministry has “re-established the govern-m ent regulatory agencies as the primary approval and inspection b odies for all the work we do in housing. “I believe that this will result in the quality of work we are aiming for so that low income citizens m ay rely on having little or no major repairs within the first 10y ears of ownership.” Meanwhile, he added that H ousing has also contracted two individuals to provide further training to building inspectors and to teach its planning team more about all government procedures r elating to procuring, tendering, development, planning and exe-c ution of projects. “We have also re-instituted our relationship with the tenders board, taking all projects over $50,000 for approval,” said them inister. He warned that “builders taki ng short cuts and unscrupulous in their dealings will have their cont racts terminated, and likewise tardy or wicked building inspectors and compliance officers will be dealt with accordingly.” N oting the ministry’s progress in providing low-cost homes to the public, the minister said that in 2007 the government met 92 houses in an incomplete state. He said the government has now caused 217 houses through out Abaco, Grand Bahama and New Providence to be completed, while 175 remain under construction. Meanwhile, more than 150 lots have been readied and offered for sale, with more being prepared, he added. M r Russell said improving the “housing stocks and to increasing Bahamian home ownership” is his “number one priority” and warned the public to treat their mortgages as their “top priority”. If payment of this responsibili ty becomes “unbearable”, Mr Russell advised that those financed by the Bahamas Mortgage Corporation should speak with staff there, who can offer free advice and “possible options.” n By ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net T HE PLP was yesterday accused by a Cabinet minister of using propaganda techniques outlined by Nazi leader Adolf Hitler i n his book “Mein Kampf” to get the public to accept the Opposition’s criticisms of the current government. M inister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister claimed that the repetition of the PLP’s complaint that the FNMe ngaged in a counter-productive “stop, review and cancel” process when it came to power follows t he Nazi leader’s advice that if you tell a “big lie frequently enough” people are likely to believe it. Members opposite have developed the refrain ‘stop, review and cancel’ almost to a science, and I just want members opposite to know that whenever they utter that phrase they are following the political theory of o ne of history’s most vicious t yrants, who pursued a totalitarian, authoritative, single party, socialist agenda and his ‘big lie’ theory is well known,” said Mr B annister. T he minister quoted from the informational website Wikipedia, saying that Hitler’s primary rules were “never allow the public to cool off; never admit a fault orw rong; never concede that there may be some good in your enemy; never leave room for alternatives; never accept blame; concentrate on one enemy at a time and blame him for everything that goes wrong; people will believea big lie sooner than a little one and if you repeat it frequently enough people will sooner or later believe it.” “So the (prime minister now appreciate why members focus on criticising him so often,” Mr Bannister said. “It’s there in black and white.” Contracts Throughout the budget debate, various PLP MPs raised the issue of the Ingraham administration’s decision to, upon winning the May 2007 election, review certain contracts for projects signed under the PLP government shortly before it left office. Following Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham’s assessment of the state of the economy and the outlook for the future in the short to medium term, PLP MPs sugg ested that the economic situation the country now finds itself in, including the high unemployment levels, could have been b uffered had the government not scrapped or delayed certain proposed developments or public works projects. T hey embraced as a validation of their analysis a statement from the international credit rating agency Standard and Poor’s. In its report late last year, S&P s aid that the government’s decision to review certain contracts entered into by the previous administration took the growth momentum out of the economy. T hat claim has since been outright rejected by Prime Minister Ingraham. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009, PAGE 3 7 SHQIURPXHVGD\WRDWXUGD\ RBDF murder trial: jury is selected Senator s name removed from candidate list In brief A JURY has been selected in the case of a woman charged with the murder of a Royal Bahamas Defence Force officer last year. The eight-man, fourwoman jury was appointed yesterday to hear evidence on the d eath of Defence Force Petty Officer Gary Leon Carey, 54. The trial is expected to start tomorrow before Senior Justice Anita Allen. Shimeakima Delores Pratt, 31, of Minns Subdivision, is accused of Mr Carey’s murder. The officer was found dead o n Sunday, August 17, 2008. Pratt was arraigned a week later. Pratt, a mother of three, is represented by attorney Romona Farquharson. Attorneys Stephanie Pintard and Terry Archer of the Attorney General’s Office are prosecuting the case. Around 20 witnesses are e xpected to be called to give evidence. n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net REACTING to an audit that revealed deficiencies in its operational procedures, the Ministry of H ousing has developed a “new strategic plan”, H ousing Minister Kenneth Russell said yesterday. T his plan will be a “guide post and a road map for the ministry’s work today and in the future,” he said. M r Russell said that the strategy came about after a n as yet unpublished Auditor General’s report on the ministry crit icised its “general operational procedures and pointed to many w eaknesses.” To enhance “openness and transparency” in the ministry, Mr Russell said, a “project accounting office” has been established to keep “accurate records of all expenditure and contracted arrangements for our housing projects.” “A small team of three staff work closely together and liaise daily with the Bahamas Mortgage Corporation to ensure that payments to contractors and purveyors are timely, accurate and trans parent,” added the minister. M r Russell told parliament that more would be said about the report when it is tabled in the House of Assembly. PLP accused of Hitler-style propaganda REPORTSFROMTHEHOUSE Minister outlines moves to improve quality of homes Ministry ‘road map’ unveiled KENNETH RUSSELL SENATOR Jerome Fitzgera ld’s name and photo have been removed from the candidate’s section of the official PLP website – where on Sunday, he had been listed as the future candidate forM arathon. This comes after a front page s tory in yesterday’s T ribune o ut lined concerns over the selection o f candidates to represent the PLP in the next general election. It was claimed that individuals have already been named and ratified as prospective representa t ives for certain key constituencies in New Providence, seem i ngly without the candidate com mittee having met. On Sunday n ight, Mr Fitzgerald’s name and photo could still be found on myplp.com in the space marked “The Constituency of Marathon.” That space now reads: “Your MP: t o be announced.” Neil Percentie, branch chair m an for the last PLP representative for Marathon, Ron Pinder, t old T he Tribune o n the weekend that he had been shocked to find that Senator Fitzgerald had already been named as a candidate. “The PLP lays claim to being of the people and for the people, however if this website is correct, the people once again have no say in ‘my PLP’,” he said. As a card-carrying member of the PLP and former chairman of the Marathon branch, I am able to say that ‘we the people’ were not informed of any decision to name a candidate to the constituency of Marathon but to have Senator Fitzgerald posted on the website as ‘the’ candidate is an insult to the people of Marathon.” DESMOND BANNISTER

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    EDITOR, The Tribune. The resurfacing of the majority of West Bay continuing onto Paradise Island bridge prior to FIFA’s Convention and Miss Universe raises in these harsh economic times is the spending of $2.3 million really necessary? Okay the FIFA people will ride once going and once leaving the Miss Universe contestants could ride in a couple of times and a couple may be twice going out as they will go I presume to photo-shoots in the islands so for a max, of say 15 rides from Lynden Pindling International to Paradise Island we are going to spend $2.3 million? The nine roundabouts which are supposed to be landscaped at a cost of $346,000 or, yes, an individual cost of $38,444.44 this is incredible if you take as an example the completed Guanahani roundabout in Cable Beach....a lot of grass and a few plants to accompany the palms already there for $38,444.44 something gotta be wrong with that tender? $4,000 yes and that’s high! Drive behind DEU/CID the police garage and see how many police vehicles are all broken up...... some stations don’t even have a car when you call them. Back where we were at election 2008! See that long list of persons out on bail in April? Some 28 pages times five photographs per page and we worry abouta soft ride for the FIFA people and Miss Universe contestants? We are lost priorities totally out of whack. JENNIFER SMITH Nassau, May 20, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. Please indulge me for a brief moment by granting just a small portion in your valuable column to express my indignation of the spectacle displayed in the House of Assembly. First of all I fully support your editorial of Thursday, June 4, 2009. It expressed what I conveyed to a colleague the day before as to why we have such a lawless and undisciplined society. B eing true to their nature, the circus of the PLP put their band of clowns and jokers on display in showing the entire nation, and the world how such a shaky and lawless foundation was laid for the society and nation that we are now living in. In essence, what they suggested was, whatever laws they implement, is for others, and not for them, because they are above the law. T he arrogance of these peop le is a turn off, and an insult to the decent people of this nation. I know that Perry Christie is in a lot of trouble, and is fighting for his political life and future in the PLP. He, being the selfish egocen tric individual that I believe he is, is stalling for time, and is planning, and probably welcoming any distractions to further his cause. It is obvious that these jok ers are not serious in their charges of the Speaker being unfair and undemocratic. They wrote the rule book. I noticed some smirk on some of their faces. These guys are not serious, they are clowning, wasting precious time. One of their strategies is to block and hinder the programme of the government. These clowns are still bitter over their rejection at the polls in 2007 after one term as government. Get on with the busi-n ess of the nation, or else do the honourable thing and tender your resignation. Right now,I think you are an awful example to the youth of this nation. You make me sick! VC Nassau, June 5, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm W E THINK if the nurses, who have crippled the public health service for the past week with t heir so-called “sick out”, are looking for public sympathy they have over played their hand. I t seems they or at least 50 per cent of them are the only ones who don’t unders tand what the word “bare” means when told that the financial cupboard is bare. If they would rid themselves of their political advisers they might see the world and the serious state of their country with more objectivity a nd understanding also with more patriotism. D uring the budget debate in the House, Health Minister Dr Herbert Minnis said he had met again on May 25 with nursing personnel and explained the financial problems government faced at the time it was more than $200 mill ion behind projected revenue. As a result, he told them, it was unlikely that government couldm eet their four per cent salary increase. Nor at that time could government afford their esti m ated $10.5 million health insurance plan. The insurance would come after the economic crisis had eased. That same day Dr Minnis met with the doctors and explained the situation. “The doctors s aid they understood the financial problems and they accepted not receiving their 1.5 per c ent increase and their insurance,” said Dr Min nis. The doctors understood, the nurses did not. A s a result, at least 50 per cent of them claimed to have taken to their beds in “sickness.” Nurses union president Cleola Hamilton criticised government for having a “dismissive attitude toward the nurses union.” She claimed t o have had no communication with government, remarking that “the impression that we a re getting is that we are being ignored, which speaks very much to how much the govern m ent regards the health of the people of this country, because if you are ignoring the people who are delivering the health care then, of course, you have no regard for the health of the nation.” The nurses aren’t being ignored. They have been told like the rest of us the reality oft he times. We know that we have to tighten our belts. At least the nurses have a commitment that the rest of us do not have. They have been told that they will get their group healthp lan in the 2010/11 fiscal year even sooner if the economy improves. H owever, yesterday Bahamians saw who really cared for their welfare when the Supreme Court ordered them back to the bedsides of their sick patients. Prime Minister Ingraham, c oncerned for the health of the nation, had asked the court to break what most people see a s a “strike”, but which the nurses have classified as a “sick out.” Y esterday the Bahamas Nurses Union (BNU M inistry of Health, the second with the Public Health Authority, claiming breach of sections 24 and 28 of their industrial agreement these sections deal with salary increases – 4 per cent and group insurance. T he procedure now is that the Labour Department will hold conciliatory meetings w ith BNU representatives. If there is no reso lution, either side or even the Minister if he considers it in the public interest can refer the dispute to the Industrial Tribunal. After two conciliatory meetings the union c an apply for a strike vote, which will be supervised by the Department of Labour. If them ajority in the bargaining unit vote to strike, the Minister of Labour has to certify that vote b efore a strike can be called. Traditionally this does not happen immediately as there has to be a “cooling off” period during which time the Minister tries to resolve the matter. However, if the dispute is sent to the Industrial Tribunal t here can be neither strike, nor sick-out, so the nurses might as well go back to work now. As w e wrote this column at 9 o’clock last night, nurses were still discussing whether they should d efy the court order or return to work. After this display of defiance, and the sug gestion that some nurses would even think of ignoring a court order, government should seriously consider classifying medical services as a n essential service. This would put medical staff in the same category as the police, defence f orce and prison officers, who cannot have unions because they are essential services and, t herefore, cannot strike. This does not mean that their grievances will not be heard. All it means is that their disputes will be settled peace fully without jeopardising either the health or security of the public. We hope that the defiance of House rules and the disrespect shown for Speaker AlvinS mith a little over a week ago is not a pattern being set especially if nurses thumb their noses at the courts for the future of this country. W e hope that nurses, who are flirting with the idea of continuing their “sickness”, espec ially after displaying such lusty lungs at last night’s meeting, fully understand that contempt of a court order could mean cooling their heels in a prison cell. A band of clowns and jokers LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Nurses need to reconsider EDITOR, The Tribune By condoning and even attempting to celebrate the disorderly behaviour by one of its mem bers of parliament, the PLP leaders have demon strated once again that they are incapable of bringing discipline to bear on their members. In fact, the leadership has shown that they are just as much infected with that old familiar attitude of entitlement as the rest of them. They miss every opportunity to demonstrate other wise. A fter Mrs. Glenys Hanna Martin's disorderly behaviour in the House, they should have rebuked her, or at least privately urged her to desist and apologise to the Speaker. Instead, both Perry Christie and Bernard Nottage aided and abetted her in deliberately and persistently breaking the rules of the House. In attempting to justify Mrs. Martin's behaviour, Mr. Christie passionately reminded Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham how he (Mr. Ingra ham) had only a week ago asked for permission to go back on the agenda. But Mr. Christie was making the point without getting the point. Mr. Ingraham asked! He asked for the consent of members. He did not demand. He did not say he was going back with or without permission. He asked, Mr. Christie! Mrs. Martin didn't do that. She failed to give notice. Then she demanded to be heard out of order. Then she refused to sit down when the Speaker asked her to. Then she refused to leave the chamber when asked to. Then the next day she tried to gain entrance to the House when she knew she was suspended. Dr. Nottage did his own political credibility a disservice in preventing the carrying out of a law ful order by a lawful authority when he obstructed the Police in the House in full view of the television cameras. Then he returned to the House and launched a n attack on the Speaker during his budget contribution. Dr. Nottage knows or should know that you don't do that. The Speaker should only be criticised on a substantive motion. The PLP seem to think that because Speaker Alvin Smith is a soft-spoken mild-mannered man that they can intimidate him and run over him. That's a bad miscalculation. Speaker Smith has obviously familiarized him self with the rules. He is an excellent Speaker, one who is dignified but strong. He deserves the support and gratitude of the Bahamian people. THANKFUL Nassau, June 11, 2009 PLP leaders show again inability to keep members disciplined A waste of $2.3m r esur facing W est Bay to Paradise Island

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    n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE very idea that PLP MP Philip Davis said the “visionless” FNM government should “urgently” pursue in order to create a new and much needed source of revenue for government was proposed and then dismissed by his party’s own leader six years a go, a Cabinet minister said. During his speech to parliament on Wednesday, Mr Davis suggested that a cash-strapped government could reap $40 to $50 million in fees and create 120 “high quality job opportunities” were it to assume control of Bahamian airspace from the U nited States government. In response, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister yesterday quoted former PLP Prime Minister Perry Christie telling parliament that he “could not proceed” with his own stated intention to do this in 2004 because of “homeland security concerns” on the part of theU S government. “It’s right here (in the 2 004/2005 budget communication,” noted Mr Bannister, as he contributed to this year’s b udget debate. T his came after Mr Davis claimed the budget was evidence that the current government, which h as reduced funding to most ministries, departments and agencies in the face of a major revenue s hortfall and continuing decline in economic activity, has “no real plan” for how it can bring in more money in hard times. But Mr Bannister suggested that the governing FNM has been unfairly “blamed” during the budget debate for not adopting meas ures that have already been shown to be unfeasible. He noted that Mr Christie, having suggested in 2003 that his government could introduce a flight information region (FIR t raffic control system for the Bahamas as a new revenue s tream, added that should it not do so, it would have to f ind other new sources of funding in the “very near future” or “run the risks” associated w ith a high level of g overnment debt. A failure on the part of former Prime Minister Perry Christie to t ake his own advice in 2003/2004 contributed to the unsustainable level of debt the gove rnment now finds itself burdened with, Mr Bannister said. “We all know that the opportunity was not taken by the former administration and the former prime minister predicted quite accurately six years ago even without this unforeseeable g lobal financial crisis being on the horizon that there would be problems with the accumulation of GFS deficit and a high level of government debt,” said Mr Bannister. T he prime minister has told parliament that the country is faci ng a level of debt this year that will be “unsustainable” going forw ard. He said government is acting to ensure that it brings the level back down over the next several years. (Perry Christie p redicted in 2003 when he did not initiate the flight information region for the Bahamas that there would be problems with the accum ulated GFS deficit and increased government debt. “He also accurately predicted in 2006 that our economy r emained vulnerable to global economic shocks such as a rise in oil prices, and oil prices rose to the highest levels in history last s ummer. “But we are now being blamed. The truth is here in the written words of the leader of the oppos ition, some written as long as six y ears ago; and we should tell the Bahamian people the truth and stop playing politics with this very important debate,” said Mr Bann ister. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009, PAGE 5 Minister claims the PLP shot down airspace idea AN AVIATION partnership between the Bahamas and Floridaw ill make it easier for private pilots to get procedural information for flying to and from the islands. The Bahamas Aviation Departm ent has been working with Florida F ixed Base Operators (FBO many years and has launched the Bahamas Gateway FBOs with several operators strategically locatedt hroughout South Florida, according to the Aero-News network. The four operators selected as Bahamas Gateway FBOs are Opa L ocka Airport in Miami, Fort Laude rdale Executive Airport, Stuart/Palm Beach Airport and St Lucie International Airport in Fort Pierce. T he Bahamas Tourist Office staff have trained personnel in each airport on all aspects of United States and Bahamian requirements for airc raft departing or arriving the US m ainland. The Bahamas Gateway FBOs are also able to provide Customs and Immigration information as well asu p-to-the minute information about the Bahamas. Ministry of Tourism and Aviation chief aviation specialist Greg Rolle s aid the FBOs have shown much interest in working with the Bahamas and because of their interest, the Bahamas Aviation Departm ent conducted training of staff and has included them in marketing a ctivities such as trade shows and promotional ventures. Aviation partnership to help private pilots Desmond Bannister n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net OPERATIONS at the Water and S ewage Corporation are said to be “relatively normal” once again after u nion members who staged a sick-out in protest of delayed contract negotiations and “unfavourable” remarks by the prime minister, returned to work. W hile police were on the scene at the corporation's head office on T hompson Boulevard yesterday morning in case things "escalated", sources at WSC said the e mployees returned to work "peacefully." Meanwhile, Environment Minister Earl Deveaux, who has ministerial responsibility for WSC, warned that any workers who were found to be illegally off the job during the "sick-out" will face salary cuts. "Anyone who has been illegally absent from work will have their pay reduced. If they were legally sick then no problem but there is a process f or calling industrial action but a mass sick-out is not it," said Mr Deveaux, adding that he did not know how many union members called in sick. Despite the quiet return to work, head of the Bahamas Utility Service and Allied Workers Union (BUSAWUK emp, who represents the line staff, s aid the stand-off between union members and government will continue until the "stalled" negotiations resume. "The government seems to be holding i ts position and we're going to hold ours because they are not supposed to dictate w hen the contract is going to be completed," said Ms Kemp. Y esterday, Minister Deveaux said executives at the corporation plan to meet with union representatives later this week to hammer out contract details. "(Management t hey would resume a meeting with the union this week and go through the contracts this weekt o see where they would come to a consensus," he told The Tribune. T ensions have been high for months between the two unions representing workers at WSC – BUSAWU and the Water and Sewerage Man agement Union (WSMUand government over the stalled contract negotiations and government's decision not to give WSC employees across the board salary increases. T heir expired contract has been up for renewal since June 2007. In March, the unions said they felt “exploited” by government after negotiations to r enew expired industrial agreements were susp ended. They called for a general salary increase in line with the rising cost of living adding that the workers have not had a general salary increase in s ix years. Weeks later, around 200 members of both u nions gathered outside the WSC headquarters in Thompson Boulevard as union executives c laimed that WSC bosses withheld keys to employees’ vehicles preventing them from working – a claim chairman Anton Saunders later denied. Government has always maintained that it n ever left the negotiating table and has said while it cannot offer across the board salary increases,i t is willing to continue contract discussions. Last week's sick-out was sparked by what u nion members called "unfavourable" remarks by Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham in the House of Assembly during the budget debate. Mr Ingraham said he was astounded to hear WSC workers calling for salary increases considering the financial straits facing the corporation. H e said the only way to raise salaries at WSC was to reduce costs. Water and Sewerage union members return to work Earl Deveaux

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    n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net A S PROMISEDby Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham during his Budget communication, Senator Dion Foulkes over the weekend announced the official form ation and appointment of an implementation advisory committee for the National Training Programme. This body, with its goal of training and r etraining 1,000 unemployed Bahamians, w ill be headed by the newly-elected president of the Chamber of Commerce Khaalis Rolle. It will have amongst its members Rev Patrick Paul, president of t he Bahamas Christian Council; John Pinder, president of the National Congress of Trade Unions of the Bahamas ( NCTUB) and the Bahamas Public Service Union (BPSU sentative of the Trade Union Congress (TUC dent of College of the Bahamas; Dr IvaD ahl, director of BTVI; Dorethea Godet, deputy director of Labour, and Alpheus Forbes, deputy permanent secretary at the Ministry of Labour and Social Developm ent. Senator Foulkes said that this committee is mandated to propose a framework for the National Training Programme and to advise the government of its findings with-i n three weeks. “This process of consultation started in October of last year under the joint chairmanship of the Minister of Education Carl Bethel and myself along with Ministers D esmond Bannister, Zhivargo Laing and Loretta Turner,” Mr Foulkes said. Prime Minister Ingraham said during the Budget debate that after extensive consultation with the trade union leaders,e mployers’ representatives and the Bahamas Christian Council, government has decided to begin a national training and retraining programme for recently l aid off workers. “The programme will be geared towards training workers in areas where there is a strong demand from the business sector,” Mr Ingraham said. “These areas willi nclude, but not limited to the following: Masonry; carpentry; welding; tile laying; electrical; landscaping; data processing; computer skills; customer service; day care assistant; housekeepi ng and language skills. “Courses will be for a period of 10 to 15 weeks and are being offered by Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVIa nd the College of the Bahamas (COB and will be made available to 1,000 unemployed Bahamians who will be selected from those persons who have already regi stered for the National Insurance Unemployment Benefit.” Minister Foulkes thanked the social partners for the work they have done up until this point and he expressed his min-i stry’s appreciation for those who are now serving on the implementation advisory committee for the National Training Programme. THE continuing spike in crime means the Bahamas must aban-d on “narrow approaches” to policing and national security, Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest said. H e also affirmed his governm ent’s support for the “effective p olicing strategies” and policies t hat he said are being employed b y the Royal Bahamas Police Force. Mr Turnquest said the government is committed to ensuringt hat funding is available to acquire state-of-the-art equipment and technology needed to police today’s Bahamas. H e was speaking at a medal p resentation ceremony for memb ers of the Royal Bahamas Police F orce at Government House. O ne hundred and seventy-five officers, ranging in rank from constable to senior assistant commissioner, were presented withm edals for gallantry, meritorious service, long service, good conduct and faithful service. Reserve officers were presented with m edals for faithful service for the f irst time. Sir Arthur Foulkes, D eputy to the Governor Genera l, made the presentations. M r Turnquest recalled times when crime and criminality in the B ahamas did not present the challenges they do today. Many look back at those days with nostalgia when Bahamianp olice officers did not even have t o carry guns. Now, policing can leave offic ers open to danger and risk. “Our police officers have p roven themselves willing to take the risk and to face danger in o rder to protect us,” Mr Turnquest said. R esources will also be provided for the “appropriate” traini ng of the men and women of the Force, he said. “This will open opportunities for them over the wide range of disciplines required by the Force. I am a strong advocate for a dynamic and effective police f orce and place special value on the work the Force does in maint aining law and order in our country.” The National Security minister lauded the awardees for “exemplifying the loyalty, integri t y and courage” for which the Royal Bahamas Police Force s tands. What you have done, awardees, was to make a funda m ental choice, a major decision, to give good and faithful service to the government and people of the Bahamas,” Mr Turnquest said. You have committed yourselves to upholding law and orderi n the Bahamas so as to make our country more safe and s ecure. “Continue to give good and dedicated service to the Force and to influence others to do likewise.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 'VO 4VNNFS $BNQ7LUHGRIWKHDPH 2OG%RULQJXPPHU 6FKRRO" 7U\RPHWKLQJ 1HZt&UHDWLY$FWLYLWLHV,QFOXGH $ UWVt&UDIWV'UDZLQJtDLQWLQJ0 XVLFt'UDPD / HVVRQV 6 ZLPPLQJDQG 6 SRUWV &$//:$1' 5(6(59(<285 %()25(,7/$7( RU(PDLOZHVWPRRU#KRWPDLOFRP Committee is appointed for National Training Programme Minister pledges to abandon ‘narrow approaches’ to crime fighting ABOVE: Royal Bahamas Police Force o fficers who were awarded medals f or outstanding service are pictured on the steps of Government House with Deputy to the Governor General Sir Arthur Foulkes. RIGHT: Minister of National S ecurity Tommy Turnquest. P atrick Hanna / BIS Dion Foulkes

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    PUBLIC schools in Grand Bahama have now instituteds chool safety committees to provide an established mechanism for the sharing of information to ensure to the physical, mental and sexual safetyt he Grand Bahama District i nclusive of Bimini, Sweetings Cay and Grand Cay. The purpose of the safety committee is to provide an outlet for students to confi-d entially report abuse and other concerns. The establishment of these committees is part oft he six-point initiative that Minister of Education Carl Bethel announced in April at ap ress conference to address the problem of inappropriate behaviours and sexual molestation in public schools. T he committees are comprised of a principal, a teacher, a guidance counsellor, a parent and two students. Administrators According to Hezekiah Dean, District Superintendentf or high schools, all-age and s pecial schools, the schools’ administrators are working c losely with psychologist Dr Pamula Mills in this effort. M r Dean also noted that the special schools in the district will fall under the jurisdictiono f a joint committee that includes the principals of those institutions along with com-m unity leaders and representatives from the police department, school boards, the Christian Council, Social Services and the Ministry of Youth. T he purpose of the safety c ommittee is to provide an outlet for students to confidentially report abuse and other concerns. The establishment of these c ommittees is part of the sixpoint initiative that Minister of Education Carl Bethela nnounced in April to address the problem of inappropriate behaviours and sexualm olestation in public schools. Once an incident of abuse is reported to the committee, it must then be reported to thep olice and senior management at headquarters in Nassau. Other aspects of the sixpoint initiative that the Ministry of Education is workingt o have in place when school r eopens in September 2009 include the vetting of new teachers within the first year of their employment; more training of school guidancec ounsellors to address students’ psycho-social needs; updating of the School SafetyM anual and a card featuring contacts for all of the child protection agencies and thep olice department on each island. THE Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation Group had a very dynam-i c week with various events d esigned to educate the general public. This organisation is co-chaired by three Bahamians Mrs. Kim A ranha, also President of the Bahamas Humane Society, Mrs. Debbie Krukowski, also Vice-President of Animals Require Kind-n ess, and Mrs. Jane Mather, also P resident of Advocates for Animal Rights. T he membership of this organ isation is comprised of all the large a nimal and conservation groups in the country, including The Bahamas National Trust, Proud Paws, ReEarth, the Grand Bahama Humane Society, BREEF, The N ature Conservancy, The Bahamas Humane Society, Animals Require K indness, Advocates for Animal Rights, and smaller animal g roups established around the country. The candlelight vigil held in Rawson Square attracted interested citizens and tourists alike. The h ighlight of the vigil was a skit put on by two children, both students at t he Meridian School run by Mrs. Lisa McCartney. A nna Nixon, who is nine years old, and the daughter of Joanna a nd Ricky Nixon, was joined on a small stage by Brent Whittingham, who is seven years old, and the son of Carla and Robert Whittingham. They put on a great performance, a nd received a resounding applause from the onlookers gathered in theS quare. These two young children were clearly spoken, unwavering a nd composed. They stood before the crowd and spoke their lines like the real pros that they are. Their message was easy to read and spoke volumes for the cause thatt hey were representing. Mrs Aranha, co-chairman of The Bahamas S ea Turtle Conservation Group, said it was “truly exciting to see t wo such young citizens of the Bahamas supporting their right to a healthy and rich environment.” “We at The Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation Group encourage parents to bring up their children in a manner so that they are conscious of the environment and the perils that lie in the future,” she said. “We are very grateful to Mr. and Mrs. Nixon, and Mr. and Mrs. Whittingham, for allowing their children to perform in this public forum.” The Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation Group flew in Dr. Alan Bolten from the University of Florida to speak at a town meeting that was held at the College of the Bahamas. Dr. Bolten talked of the importance of protecting the sea turtles immediately. He pointed out that the Green Turtle is down by 95 per cent in population. Dr. Bolten also reminded the listeners that the sea turtle has an important function in keeping the sea grass beds groomed for juvenile conchs and groupers to breed. He also explained how the Hawksbill Turtle removes the undesirable sponges from the reefs to allow corals to grow. “These are not the sponges that we pick to sell,” co-chairman of The Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation Group, Mrs. Debbie Krukowski, explained. Dr. Bolten also pointed out that some people claim that there are more turtles now than before, when presented with this argument Dr. Bolten used a very simple way to explain this erroneous perception that there are more turtles today. He said that if you have a hundred turtles and a hundred good, rich, feeding areas for them to go, then you might only see one turtle. If you have a hundred turtles with only 10 places to go you may see 10 turtles, but that does not mean that there are more turtles. It means that there are fewer places for them to feed. Seventy-eight per cent of all Caribbean nations have passed turtle protection acts, however for many of them it has been too late to repair the damage done by progress” to the feeding grounds, often torn apart by shrimping nets, s o the poor trusting sea turtle comes to our pristine islands, still rich with food. Jane Mather, the co-chairman of the Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation group pointed out that “as and when they get herewe kill them!” It is time for the Bahamas to join those enlightened countries t hat protect turtles and then turn to the other nations who are not doing so and urge them to follow suit.” Dr. Bolten explained and illustrated very clearly how the issue goes far beyond the eating of turtle meat, these creatures are the cust odians of the underwater gardens where conch, juvenile grouper and o ther precious marine resources lurk and grow into larger and more v iable animals. If we upset the balance of nature, as it has been for m illions of years, we cause irrevocable damage. The sea turtle has b een swimming on our planet for more than 60 million years. At this point in time all sea turtles are facing the very real possibility of extinction. Mrs Aranha pointed out that all sea turtles love to eat jellyfish; it i s a delicacy for them. “I don’t know about you,” Mrs. A ranha said, “but when I was young I never had to worry about getting stung in the summer when we went swimming, now it is a regular occurrence. It kind of makes you wonder if the turtles, when more plentiful, helped to keep the j ellyfish away from the beaches by eating them.” M rs. Aranha said the group was disappointed that none of the fishe rmen or people who write in the papers against passing the Turtle Protection Act turned up at theT own meeting at COB. It was a perfect opportunity and forum for questions to be answered, and for us to have had a peaceful and intelligent discussion,” s he said. “We hope that this series of meetings and the wonderful interview by Etoile Pinder on JonesC ommunications has helped to e ducate people who were undecided about this issue and that it is n ow perfectly clear to everybody how fragile nature is when you u pset the balance of it. “With this in mind we, The Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation group, urge our government to make the right decision and protect t hese marine creatures as quickly as possible,” said a statement from t he organisation. “Interested persons,” said the g roup, “can contact us by e-mailing bahamasturtles@gmail.com “We urge you to write to Minister Cartwright and send a copy to our group. All people in support a re asked to make their voices heard.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009, PAGE 7 Dynamic week for Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation Group School safety committees are established on Grand Bahama THISSKIT was a highlight of the candlelight vigil. A 35-YEAR-OLDman was arraigned in a Magistrates Court yesterday on an armed robbery charge. C harles Pandy, of Malcolm Allotment, was also arraigned on the charge of receiving before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court One, Bank Lane. It is alleged that on Thursday, April 9, 2009, Pandy along with others used a handgun to rob Makeda Brown of a HP laptop, a digitalc amera and a MP3 player with a total value of $870. It is also alleged that Pandy received the items. Pandy was not required to enter a plea to the charges at his arraignment. H e was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. The case has been adjourned to June 30. Pandy is charged along with two 16-year-old boys who were arraigned in Juvenile Court. They are also expected back in court on June 30. Man appears in court on armed robbery charge

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    C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8,TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Harbour Bay S S i i z z e es s X X S S t t o o 3 3 X X L L Sale on Selected items Up to 50.% Off ALL CLOTHING VISIT US ON THE WEB aebahamas.comFor Fashion news & specials ter of Health Dr Hubert Minnis for failing to represent the nurses and for not attempting to engagein a discussion with the union throughout the eight day sick-out u ntil yesterday morning. She called for him to stand down, provoking cheers and applause from the angry nurses. Ms Hamilton said: “It’s degrading, it’s disrespectful and we are calling for this minister to leave... When we are pushed to the limit that our employers are pushing us t o, we have no other alternative than to push back, and we are at the point where we have been pushed too far and for too long. “We want to say to Dr Minnis tonight; we are sick and tired, and if you are not able to do the job then step aside.” She praised union members for t heir commitment but assured nurses she must advise them to return to work. However, Ms Hamilton said she cannot advise the nurses of their illness. T he BNU president said: “I figu re you should go to the doctor and ask if you should return to work.” BNU legal adviser Obie Fergus on informed nurses they may be held in contempt of court and be committed, fined or have their assets seized if they fail to comp ly with the order. B ut a riotous atmosphere prevailed in the meeting at the Bahamas College of Nursing in Grosvenor Close, off Shirley S treet, and rebellious nurses argued they would present their doctor’s notes to their employers, as they insisted they are “sick” a nd “not involved in industrial a ction.” One nurse said: “We are not only physically sick. Emotional sickness can bring on symptoms a nd we are here because we wanted to hear what is happening. “We came to get some clarification and that does not mean I a m not sick. I went to the doctors and he said I am sick, and I came here a nd now I feel worse!” The president of the Nurses Association pledged her support to the nurses, as did former Attorney General Alfred Sears MP whos aid he was calling on government to show respect to nurses. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham maintains the government h as agreed to provide the health insurance benefit but has decided to delay its implementation because of unexpected pressures on the national budget owing tot he global economic downturn. Government was granted the injunction after Ministry of Health director of health Pearl MacMillan a nd Public Hospitals managing director Herbert Brown filed affidavits at the Supreme Court yest erday. The injunction ordered the BNU to instruct its members to return to their specified areas of employment when scheduled andn ot take part in, or continue to take part in, any form of industrial action. Prime Minister Ingraham said: The government, acting through the Public Hospitals Authority and the Minister of Health, sought the intervention of the Supreme Court to put an end to the industriala ction being undertaken by some members of the Bahamas Nurses Union with the apparent encouragement of union officers. Today, the Supreme Court ruled in the matter and ordered that the union and its members be r estrained from calling, organizing or procuring members to strike, or to refuse to work, or to refuse to work when scheduled to do so, or leave their employmento r otherwise participate in any form of industrial action. “My government now fully expects that all concerned will a bide by the ruling of the court. “Whatever our grievances or circumstances, we are all as citizens bound to abide by the rule of law which has ensured the sta-b ility of the Bahamas and enabled the orderly delivery of essential services to the public. “My government has always b een committed to the welfare of all those who serve the Bahamian p eople in the public service, including and especially our nurses. “We will continue, as resources allow, to work towards improvingc onditions and benefits for Bahamian nurses. “We are, and have always been, open to continued dialogue on t hese matters with mutual respect for each other. “But the government cannot and will not at any time and especially during these trying times abdicate its responsibility to protect the overall interests of the nation within the framework of good order and the rule of l aw.” from sunrise to sunset on a daily basis. And a new dirt track cleared through the area to Cowpen Road means trucks rattle through the once peaceful neighbourhood at all hours. A mother of two whose Oxford Street home backs onto the site said the tenant began bulldozing the site in October 2007, claiming he was preparing the area for farming. But at the end of last year it became clear he was excavating quarry to sell, and when digging reached the water table, the empty craters started to be filled with everything from mattresses to toilets. The pile of garbage reached 20ft or so before it was compressed into the ground, the 45-year-old mother said. She claimed the excavation and landfill has dropped the level of the l and around 6ft, but her main concern is the risk it poses for the whole c ommunity as everyone depends on the water table which is now likely to be contaminated. S he said: “My main concern is that he’s digging below the water table and dumping garbage in there, so he’s polluting our water and we d on’t have any other means of getting water, so I don’t know what the long term health effects are going to be.” The 45-year-old woman who has lived in Millars Heights for 27 years also suffers from allergies to dust and her 12-year-old son has asthma attacks provoked by the dust. M embers of the community wrote to MP Charles Maynard, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and Minister of Environment Earl Deveaux,a sking for authorities to put a stop to the activity in April, but have had no reply. T he mother claimed: “He’s in contravention of his license and he’s threatening the health of everybody in the area. “We have had about enough. You can’t even enjoy being in your house because we have that noise all day, we have dust, and we can smell the diesel coming from the machine. What’s worse is I don’t know how much longer this is going to go on, or what the end result is going to be. And he doesn’t even have the a uthority to do it.” Environment Minister Earl Deveaux said he had heard of similar reports and the Minister of Agriculture and Marine Resources issueda warning to all agricultural tenants on Thursday. He asked Bahamas Environment, Science and Technology (BEST c ommission, Bahamas National Geographical Information Systems (BNGISs ites on Geographic Information Systems (GIS taken on all illegal activity. M r Deveaux urged residents to take pictures to the police, and pro vide permanent secretary Ronald Thompson at the Ministry of the Environment with as much information as possible. The minister added: “We have had a number of sites identified by GIS. We have compared those sites with approved sites and will catal ogue the others for onward transmission to the police. “I am not familiar with all of the infractions. The more information w e have, with persons willing to assist, the more effective we can be in addressing the illegal mining and consequent health risks, not to ment ion the environmental damage.” Mr Deveaux said he intends to bring all illegal mining to an immediate halt and provide a reasonable alternative source for licensed operators. Dredging the harbour will generate two million cubic yards of fill, Mr D eveaux said, and he hopes this can be sold to licensed operators until a more sustainable long-term alternative to hill excavation hasb een determined. r ialised. " For some time there was talk about scrapping it, but it had never come to pass. Whether it comes to pass now I 'm not sure. (But some classes of persons who will immediately be upset if they do move to the weekend on Sat-u rday that might be something that might well adversely affect Seventh-Day Adventists, Jews and Rastafarians. "And it also may be looked a t as cutting into the time that families traditionally spend t ogether," said Mr Munroe, who is also a partner in the law f irm Lockhart and Munroe. In the Jewish faith, the Sab bath is a weekly day of rest, beginning from sundown on Fri day until the appearance oft hree stars in the sky on Saturday night. For practising Seve nth-Day Adventists, the Sab bath is observed from sunset on F riday to sunset on Saturday. Rastafarians also observe a Sab bath on Saturday. The night court system is an extension of the Magistrate's C ourt, created for the convenience of the working public w ho need traffic and civil mat ters heard in the more conven ient evening hours, said Mr Munroe. Currently night court magistrates sit for about 20 hours a week, between six to nine pm M onday through Friday, he said. According to Mr Munroe t he effectiveness of a weekend court system would depend on how many magistrates are employed during the weekend. But bringing in untrained persons to act as magistrates w hich was done in the early 1990's may create its fairs hare of problems, he said. "The experience of lay magi strates in the past was not a good one and you can't expect s omebody the usual attor ney to be a magistrate you had to have gone through school and been a lawyer for five years who has no formal legal t raining to be fully competent. "They talked about opening c ourts with lay magistrates that was done the first time the F NM was in power. They were paid $1,000 per month to sit one week out of the month, which totalled up to more weekly than one magistrate was being paid. A nd there was a problem with the sustaining of convictions t hat they came up with," Mr Munroe continued. " The problem is, see in England you have lay magistrates b ut each bench of lay magis trates has a legally trained Clerk to advise them on the law and procedure. That wasn't a fea ture when we introduced it. " And if you were to say lay magistrates would have a legal l y trained Clerk then why don't you just have that person be qualified instead of the magistrate. So there are issues, I haven't seen a comprehensive position paper behind it to see why this was suggested." F ROM page one Nurses stay defiant F ROM page one Night court However, Police Commissioner Reginald Ferguson has not ruled out claims the child was sexually abused. Mr Ferguson told The Tribune last week that police followed the appropriate protocol and police are still awaiting a full medical report before taking further action. The Commissioner said: “I don’t have anything else to say about this baby. The police are awaiting the pathologist report. That is the only update at this time.” Chief hospital administrator at PMH Coralie Adderley said the child was cared for by a team of senior officers and consultants from the paediatric and emergency room, and the medical team followed established clinical protocol with respect to treatment and contacting police. The autopsy report, when completed, will be forwarded to the police and the appropriate agencies. FROM page one Claims that baby was treated for a sexually transmitted disease are refuted REGINALD FERGUSON FROM page one Concerns raised over excavation

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    n By TOM WITHERS AP Sports Writer O RLANDO, Florida (AP The coach stood to the side and watched as his team executed its final play of the NBA season to perfection. It's the one that had worked nine previous times. This wasn't hisf amed triangle offense, this was the celebration circle. Phil Jackson, the architect, smiled as his Los Angeles Lakers, each of them armed with a champagne bottle, popped corks and doused each other with bubbly late Sunday night a fter winning their 15th title a nd first since 2002 with a 99-86 win over the Orlando Magic in Game 5. U nited all year, the Lakers s creamed as one. Kobe Bryant then dragged Jackson into the frothy fray. " It's been a long time since he had a champagne bath," said the brilliant Bryant, who e nriched his legacy as one of t he game's all-time greats with a fourth title and finals MVP award. "I knew that so I mades ure he became part of our circle and we got him pretty good." The Zen Master had his 10th title, one more than Red Auerbach. Call him The Ten Master. The Lakers, who drifted between disinterested and divine during stretches this sea-s on, put it all together in their final game, a no-doubt-about-it rout that was sealed with a 16-0s purt in the second quarter that showcased the club's depth, versatility and Bryant's sheer will. Jackson, who has been vague about his plans beyond this sea-son, delighted in his teams' d evelopment. Borrowing one of the mantras of his meditative training, he preached tot hem about staying in the moment. Don't look back. Don't look too far ahead. Don't waste opportunity. Enjoy the journey. The Lakers listened and learned. "They came together this y ear and were self-motivated, and for a coach that's a positive sign," said Jackson, who won six titles in Chicago beforet aking over the Lakers in 1999. "When a team is ready, they're aggressive, their learning curvei s high and they wanted to win." Though he may not have shown it outwardly, Jackson wanted it too. " You can see it in his eyes," Bryant said. Jackson sidestepped quest ions about his place in history and comparisons to Auerbach throughout the finals. The 64year-old, has had both hips sur gically replaced and struggles getting around, is at a time in his life when basketball, though still a passion, doesn't burn as it once did. The drive is still there, but it's in a lower gear. With this L akers squad, he would instruct and observe. Those days of getting out on the floor for demonstrations are few. He deferredt o his assistants and to Bryant, his coach on the court. "I've always felt as a coach y ou have to push your team," Jackson said, "and I told them they had to push themselves. I wasn't at the stage of my lifew here I could get out and do things that I had done 10 or 15 years ago to push a team. Theyp ushed themselves and I feel really strongly that this is about them." During the postgame cele bration, Jackson wore a gold Lakers cap a gift from his children with the Roman numeral "X'' on the front to signify his double-digit titles. "Almost incomprehensible," Orlando coach Stan Van G undy said of Jackson's perfect 10. Bryant can't imagine playing for anyone but Jackson, hisc oach for nine seasons in L.A. Following Game 5, guard Derek Fisher, who won hisf ourth ring, couldn't picture the Lakers' luxury liner without Jackson as its captain. "I know it's part of the busin ess and it can happen, but to take away the chef who stirs the pot it'll be a differentb atch of stew, I'll tell you that much," Fisher said. "I have no idea what his plans are, and how tonight makes him feel, or where he feels he wants to go from here. I know for a fact thatI want to play for him, next seas on and for as long as I'm capable of playing. "That's who I want to play for." A s for Bryant, he may be just hitting his stride. Now that he silenced all t hose who said he couldn't win i t all without former teammate Shaquille O'Neal, Bryant can take aim at loftier goals. H e has become a true leader, hardly the "uncoachable" play er as he was once labeled in a book by Jackson when their relationship was on the rocks. Bryant is driven to win championships, and just this side of his 31st birthday, he is just two away from matching Jordan. Could Bryant eclipse Jordan a s the modern game's greatest player? Such talk once seemed u nfathomable. Not anymore. Bryant is beginning to make his case. As long as they can sign free agents Lamar Odom and Trevor Ariza, the Lakers have e nough talent to string together several championships over the next few years. If Bryant stays healthy and hungry, the Larry O 'Brien Trophy could be settling out West for a while. Bryant has two years remaini ng on a $136 million contract h e can option out of beginning next month. He's not going anywhere and said as muchw hen his contract situation was raised a few days ago. The Lakers are the only team he has known, and Los Angeles, which has waited seven years to celebrate another hoops title, is his town. Again. The City of Angels can be unforgiving, even for the blessed. " They won't see us as losers," Bryant said. "L.A. is brutal, man. Now when I go to Dis-n eyland, I can enjoy the moment. I don't have to answer questions about, 'What the hell happened to you guys.' From that standpoint, the summer is much more enjoyable." C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009, PAGE 9 Jackson, Bryant put Lakers back on top Kiss of a champion! KOBE BRYANT kisses the championship trophy after the Lakers won Game 5 of the finals against the Orlando Magic in Orlando, Florida, on Sunday night. Los Angeles defeated Orlando 99-86 for the NBA championship. (AP Photo: Stephen M Dowell PHIL JACKSON reacts to a play in second quarter of Game 4 oft he finals against the Magic... (AP Photo: David J Phillip LONDON (AP Murray defeated James Blake 7-5, 6-4 Sunday to win the Aegon Championships at Queen’s Club for his first grasscourt title. The top-seeded Murray became the first British player to win the tournament since Bunny Austin in 1938, who then went on to become the last Briton to reach the Wimbledon final. "I was quite nervous," Murray said. "People were telling me that no (Briton here for 70-odd years so that got the nerves going, especially when I was serving for the match." Murray took an early lead with a break in the third game, but Blake immediately evened it with a forehand winner down the line. Both players then eas ily held serve until 5-5, when Blake missed a forehand on break point. The second set was equally competitive until Murray broke for a decisive 4-3 lead when a fierce return forced Blake to net a backhand volley. "I didn't quite know what to expect, but this is some of the best tennis I've played in my life," said Murray, who did not drop a set all week. "I'm a long way from winning Wimbledon, but I feel confident. I'll try and not get too far ahead of myself and focus on my first match there, but if I play my best like I did this week, I've got a chance." Blake said he was beaten by a better player, but that he was pleased with preparation for Wimbledon, which starts June22. "I had a good week," Blake said. "Playing on the grass, I always have a lot of fun playing here. I feel great. I've been working with my coach and trainer, and I know I'm doing the best preparation possible for Wimbledon. I'll be ready to play and feel great about my chances." It was Murray's fourth title of the year, following victories in Doha, Rotterdam and Miami. The sixth-seeded Blake was playing his third grass-court final, after finishing runner-up here in 2006 to Lleyton Hewitt and losing the Newport final in 2002 to Taylor Dent. He was seeking his first title since August 2007. Defending champion Rafael Nadal pulled out of the tournament to rest his knees ahead of Wimbledon. Mur ray beats Blake to win Queen’s Club final ANDY MURRAY of Britain plays a return to James Blake of the US during Queen’s Club grass court championships final in London on Sunday. Murray won by 7-5, 6-4. (AP Photo: Sang Tan

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    ment. The Bahama Snow Kids Camp was started by Korath Wright as a way to introduce Bahamian teens to the same camp that sparked his passion for snowboarding. The programme teaches young Bahamians how to snowboard while they make new friends and see a new part of the world. The camp is set for July 6-25 at Mount Hood, Oregon. “This beautiful mountain is one of just three places north of the equator where you can ski and snowboard all summer l ong. This was the starting point f or Korath's snowboarding career. He attended High Cas cade Snowboard Camp at Mt Hood as a camper at age 11, going on to work his way through the ranks to become a counselor and then coach. It's the ideal place for the Bahamas Snow Kids Camp to begin training the next generation of Bahamian snowboarders.” Interested teens can also email Korath at SnowKids@TheBahamasWeekly.com and tell him why you think you should be selected. The camp will include other activities over the week and pers ons may find more informat ion at www.BahamaSnowKids.com
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    n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net T he women’s national volleyball team, having qualified for the third round of the NORCECA 2010 World Championships, will have to spend an extra day in Barbados before they can return home to celebrate. Having lost all of their personal belongings in a robbery at the Garfield Sobers Sports Complex as they were playing against host Barbados in pool play, head coach Joseph ‘Joe Moe’ Smith said the players are still upbeat, but eagerly awaitingt he completion of the police report. “We have had to relocate from the games village to a hotel because the Barbados Volleyball Association won’t accommodate us,” Smith saidy esterday as they prepare to t ravel on Wednesday. “We are fending for our selves. We are still trying to complete the police report. Once we do that, then we can leave. It looks as if we may have to file a lawsuit because they are not doing anything for us.” An estimated $47,000 in personal and team monies, jew ellery, laptop computers, ipods and cellular phones, as well as the passports of Smith and play er Anishka Rolle were stolen from the team’s locker room on Friday night as they played Bar bados in a bid to get into the playoffs. The Bahamas eventually lost that game in five gruelling sets, but still advanced to play Jamaica in an effort to get into the gold medal game. However, with emotions running high following the robbery, the team got swept in three straight sets on Saturday, forcing them to play in the bronze medal game. On Sunday, after getting a glimmer of hope when they were told that a small portion of the items were found by the police, the team took their frus trations out on Suriname with a hard fought three-set sweep to earn the right to advance to the third round of the World Championships qualifications in Puerto Rico in July. “We just decided to keep our heads above water, but we are trying our best to get out here as soon as possible,” Smith said. “We really want to come home. “We are working with American Airlines to re-book the seats for us so that we can come back the same way that we had intended to do so today.” Had they not gotten into this dilemma, Smith said the team was originally scheduled to depart Barbados at 7 am and arrive in Miami, Florida, at about 11 am. They would depart Miami after 1 pm and arrive shortly after 2 pm. “It’s going to cost us a few more dollars,” Smith said. “But we have been in contact with our family members and friends in Nassau trying to get them to help us out.” Smith said that through all the “madness” that they encountered, there was some light at the end of the tunnel as the team qualified to go to the next round in Puerto Rico. “That just goes to show you how good this team is,” Smith said. “We have to do what we have to do because the Barbados association ain’t checking for us. We had a meeting for about two hours with them and we told them that if they were in Nassau and this had happened to them, there is no way that we would have treated them the way they treated us.” Smith said there are a few people, including the host at the Golden Sands Hotel where they are staying until they depart, who are assisting. He also noted that the government representative in Barbados has also been very helpful, assisting them with the necessary paperwork to ensure that both he and Rolle are able to travel with the rest of the team, if their passports are not located in time. Smith said he has sent a report to NORCECA, which gives a complete outline of the problems they encountered while in Barbados and they are also waiting on a response. C M Y K C M Y K TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 P AGE 9 International sports news Jackson, Bryant put Lakers back on top... See page 9 Women’s national volleyball team awaiting police report STANDING TALL FOR BRONZE Shown (l-r of the women’s national volleyball team, Melinda Bastian and sisters Cherise and Krystel Rolle, as they receive their bronze medals from an unidentified official at the NORCECA 2010 World Championships in Barbados on Sunday. (Photo by Kenmore Bynoe Will have to spend extra day in Barbados before they can return home to celebrate qualifying for third round of NORCECA World Championships... CHILDREN of all ages are invited to come out and meet the first athlete to represent the Bahamas in the winter Olympics in February 2010 in Vancouver, Canada. Korath Wright is scheduled to visit the Bahamas to select 10 lucky teens between the ages of 13 and 17 to become the Bahama Snow Kids and attend the High Cascade Snowboard Camp in Oregon, USA this July. F F r r e e e e p p o o r r t t Y Y M M C C A A S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y , , J J u u n n e e 2 2 0 0 3 3 p p m m N N a a s s s s a a u u N N e e w w P P r r o o v v i i d d e e n n c c e e C C o o m m m m u u n n i i t t y y C C h h u u r r c c h h M M o o n n d d a a y y , , J J u u n n e e 2 2 2 2 6 6 p p m m Korath will be selecting five teens from Grand Bahama and five from New Providence. “Kids, bring your cameras and skateboards, whether you want to try out or just meet Korath Wright for a photo opportunity. Tryouts will consist of three preliminary activities which are relative skills to snowboarding, but any teen who is athletic could be a worthy candidate if they are interested in trying snowboarding. “The tryouts will involve sprinting, an obstacle course using quick side-to-side movement, and skateboarding,” according to a written stateWant to be a Bahama Sno w Kid? S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0

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    n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor FINCO’s proposal to require t itle insurance for all mortgages it issues could cause “a contraction” in the number of attorneys willing to provide conveyancing services, the Bahamas Bar Association’s p resident said yesterday, arguing that the plan was asking the prof essional carrying the greatest potential liability to accept a cut i n his fees. Wayne Munroe, who is also an attorney and partner in the Lockhart & Munroe law firm, told Tribune Business that under FIN C O’s proposal Bahamian attorneys would still be required to do t he same amount of work as they do presently. He pointed out that attorneys would still have to provide FirstB ahamas Title Insurance Agency, the agency through which title insurance will be provided to all FINCO clients, with all the title documents relative to a specific mortgage, analyse them and determine whether the real estate buyer had ‘good title’ to what was being purchased. “Our concern is for the public interest and how the whole pro posal would look,” Mr Munroe said of FINCO’s plans, which were disclosed earlier this month by Tribune Business. He added that Royal Bank of Canada’ s mortgage lending arm was not providing title insurance itself, but instead looking to use First Bahamas, whose under writer is US-based Lawyers Title Insurance Corporation, to prov ide security for its mortgage portfolio. The say this will be quicker and cheaper for the public, but it w on’t be,” Mr Munroe said. “They’re asking lawyers to reduce their fees but do everything they do now.” In addition, Bahamian attor n eys would still be liable as they are now if a title opinion was s ubsequently proven to be incor rect. This required attorneys to m aintain professional indemnity insurance, something that was extremely costly. “We know that in a commercial world, risk determines price. If cutting out risk, then you can r educe your price, but under this arrangement attorneys will still b e liable to them [FINCO], and liable to the title insurance comp any,” Mr Munroe said. “I’m still going to have to pay for professional indemnity insurance, but I’m going to have a reduced fee,” he added of FIN C O’s proposal. ‘The only person being asked to reduce their fee is t he person who has the liability, because the bank and the realtor d on’t have liability. “A lot of lawyers don’t do conveyancing because it’s a headache with unlimited liability. You could have a contraction of conveyancing lawyers, which can’t be in the p ublic interest. It’s not going to be quicker, cheaper or a better serv ice.” FINCO’s interest was to secure i ts mortgage loan, while the inter est of attorneys was whether the purchaser had clean title or not, Mr Munroe added. He said that when the Bar C ouncil met with FINCO, the mortgage lender expressed con c ern that if an attorney did not have professional indemnity i nsurance, and a title opinion was defective, then it would be exposed. In response, Mr Munroe said Retailer awaits 50% customer count rise C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from a t hird party and The Tribune can not be held responsible fore rrors and/or o mission from the daily report. $3.97 $4.03 $4.04 ! $ b r n By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor A large Bahamian retailer yesterday said it was defy-i ng the recession with customer headcount for June likely to be up 50 per cent compared to early 2 009, and expansion plans in the shape of new liquor and women’s f ashion concepts plus 90,000 extra square feet of grocery spacein the works. Sandy Schaefer, Robin Hood’s p resident, told Tribune Business that the Tonique Williams-Darling Highway-based retailer was also looking for “another location somewhere on the easterns ide of the island”, but only once its existing store had fully bed-d ed down. “We have some prospects. W e’ve already identified a few,” Mr Schaefer said of potential real estate sites for a second Robin Hood outlet. “But, certainly, nothing will be finalised this year. “We’re looking at solidifying ourselves here, and expanding t his next year with much more grocery space, probably another9 0,000 square feet. We’re looking at developing all of it. “We’re profitable and continue to be, and expect to grow that profitability. We’re looking to thef uture and expanding.” Mr Schaefer said Robin Hood h ad enjoyed “our best May ever”, with customer traffic up some 152 0 per cent over April 2009 figures. “Year-over-year, it’s probably up 80 per cent,” he added, though pointing out that comparativesw ill not become relevant until August 2009, as that was them onth in which Robin Hood’s expanded 104,000 square foot full y opened last year. Mr Schaefer said the retailer w as likely to benefit further from the closure of City Markets’ Independence Drive outlet, adding: “We should be close to 60,000 customers this month, and had 5 6,000 last month. January, Feb ruary, March were in the low 40,000s, and we’ve picked up 50 per cent since then.” An in-store liquor outlet was d ue to open at Robin Hood within the next two-and-a-half tot hree weeks, Mr Schaefer added, with a Los Angeles-style wome n’s fashion and clothing boutique also set to make its presence felt imminently. “We’re doing an LA Boutique for women’s fashion and cloth-i ng,” Mr Schaefer confirmed. Product, he added, would bes ourced direct from Los Angeles, one of his buyers having been disp atched there last week. The store, he added, would o ffer fashion and clothing prod ucts similar to those sold by Bay Street retailers, with a former executive from a Bay Street store having been brought into run it. T he women’s clothing/fashion store is set to open in the next week to week-and-half. Elsewhere, Mr Schaefer said sales of hard goods, such as fur-n iture, appliances and televisions, had dropped by 30-35 per cent,t hose high-end, high-margin prod ucts having been hit hard by the e conomic downturn and the reining in of consumer spending. Yet on the positive side, Mr Schaefer said Robin Hood had been helped “quite a bit” by ther eduction in the Bahamas Electricity Corporation’s (BECs urcharge. The retailer was now looking to take the reduction in e lectricity costs one step further, and was examining “going solar f or the entire store”, which will likely make for interesting times when it goes head-to-head with the law that requires BEC power to be used in all areas where it is * Sector’s business levels d own by one-third, but BCA president and others say inquiry flow started again in past two weeks, led by Bahamian projects * ‘Buyer’s market’ makes it ideal time to do business with Bahamian contractors at reduced rates n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE construction industry’s i mmediate health depends on the number of new construction starts that take place before year-end, the Bahamian Contractors Asso ciation’s (BCAy esterday, with the sector on average having experienced a one-third” fall-off in business levels. S tephen Wrinkle, who heads Wrinkle Development Company, told Tribune Business that the business decline experienced by the Bahamian construction indus t ry would likely increase if con tractors were unable to find new w ork once their existing projects were completed. “It’s difficult to generalise, but I’d say probably by one-third,” Mr Wrinkle said, when asked by Tribune Business how much business levels were down in the construction industry. “That figure will increase as p rojects are finishing. People who started a job last fall and are fini shing this summer will need new projects to work on, or otherwise that 30 per cent might go to 50 per cent at year-end. “It depends on how many new construction starts there are. The potential for new starts will be critical.” The BCA president, though, said he and other contractors had detected positive signs in the last two weeks, having received inquiries and requests to bid on tenders from potential developers. The majority of these requests, New starts critical to constr uction sector health Con v e y ancing attor ney ‘contraction’ concerns * Robin Hood planning imminent liquor store and LA-style women’s clothing/fashion boutique openings, plus 90,000 sq ft expansion next year * Assessing locations for possible second store in eastern New Providence, although no immediate move likely * Customer count likely to break 60,000 for June, up from 56,000 in May * Hard goods sales down 30-35%, with retailer eyeing solar power plans for whole store Stephen Wrinkle S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor A FORMER finance minister has questioned the Government’s projected 6 per cent revenue increase for the 2009-2010 Budg et, given that Bahamian gross domestic product (GDP jected to decline by 1 per cent in current prices, warning that the forecasts may be too optimistica nd that this nation may have to become used to “large budgetd eficits and a rapidly growing national debt”. J ames Smith, minister of state for finance in the former Christie administration, told the Rotary Club of west Nassau: “As regards the assumptions in the Budget,o ne has to question how it is possible for the GDP to decline by 1p er cent in the 2009-2010 fiscal period and, at the same time, reve nue is expected to increase by 6.5 per cent with no tax increases, g iven that revenue actually fell by 16 per cent in the second half Ex-minister: Budget projections may be ‘too optimistic’ S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B * Bar chief criticises FINCO title insurance proposal, saying it will not be cheaper and quicker for clients * Argues that attorneys, who carry greatest professional liability , being asked to accept fee reduction

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    n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Cable Bahamas saw subscribers to its Coralwave Internet service increase by more than 2,300 or 5.6 per cent year-over-year for the 2009 first quarter, generating an 8.6 per cent or $500,000 increase in revenues generated from this business segment. In his latest quarterly report to Cable Bahamas shareholders, chairman Brendan Paddick said the BISX-listed utility’s Internet subscriber numbers had hit 42,058 at the 2009 first quarter-end, having grown by 2,300 compared to the year-before period. As a result, Cable Bahamas’ Internet revenues increased by 5.6 per cent during the 2009 first quarter, rising from $6 million to $6.5 million year-over-year. Mr Paddick said: “These results have been very encouraging, and have confirmed the positive effect of the company’s continued efforts in upgrading its processes and core broadband network infrastructure, thus improving service performance and reliability.” Elsewhere, Caribbean Crossings and Maxil Communications, the 100 per cent wholly-owned subsidiaries that comprise Cable Bahamas’ data business, saw combined 2009 first quarter revenues hit $3.3 million, compared to $2.9 million the year-before a 15.8 per cent increase. “On a standalone basis, the operating margins for the data business segment remained impressive, and collectively exceeded 80 per cent for the quarter,” Mr Paddick said. Revenues from Cable Bahamas’ core television business, a more mature market, increased slightly by 1 per cent during the 2009 first quarter, increasing from $11.1 million to $11.2 million. Mr Paddick said the company’s decision to make set-top boxes available to Bahamian consumers on a rental basis had paid dividends. Quarterly revenues from this segment stood at $145,000, representing “just over $500,000 on an annualised basis”. Cable Bahamas invested some $4.5 million in capital expenditure during the 2009 first quarter, and Mr Paddick added: “The focus of the company’s capital expenditure programme was on improving the stability and per formance of the network, increasing both subscriber growth and monthly recurring revenue, and enhancing overall customer service delivery. “Some of the major projects include the continuation of the construction of the Freeport office complex, the deployment of enhanced optical nodes to facilitate increased bandwidth capacity to our HFC broadband network, and the upgrading of our ad insertion system to provide a full digital platform, thus increasing product capacity for our media channel offerings. “The company has also begun to transition the extended communities of Spring City area of Great Abaco, from an analog to a fully digital service which on completion will yield some 300 new potential subscribers.” Cable Bahamas’ Board of Directors approved a 16.7 per cent increase in annualised share dividends from $0.24 per share to $0.28 per share. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Cable Bahamas in 5.6% Internet client increase

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    n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter c robards@tribunebusiness.net THE BAHAMAS Ministry of Tourism has undertaken a new marketing strategy that aims too pen up this nation to more private aircraft owners and expand the Family Islands product, its chief aviation specialist said yest erday. G reg Rolle told Tribune Business that the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation was focused on making the arrival process for private air travellers as seamless as p ossible through holding seminars and workshop to familiarise pilots, who would use designated Fixed Based Operations (FBOsp rocedures. The Ministry recently designated four Florida airports as Bahamas Gateways for private f liers. They are Opa Locka Airport’s Miami Executive Aviation, Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport’s Banyan Air Service, Stuart/Palm Beach Airport’s GalaxyA viation of Palm Beach, and St. Lucie International Airport’s Air Center/Fort Pierce. A select four has been identified as Bahamas Gateway FBOs at this time, who have been trained by the Bahamas Tourist Office staff on all facets of USa nd Bahamas requirements of aircrafts leaving/arriving the US mainland. It is hoped, however, that the number will grow,” said t he Ministry. According to statistics provided by the Ministry of Tourism, a major amount of private air traffic left the US bound for theB ahamas in the past three years. Canada received 35 per cent of the General Aviation Aircraft (GAA w hile the Bahamas received 35 per cent, with Alaska and other C aribbean countries at 26 and 12 p er cent respectively. T hese statistics, gathered by the Aircraft Owners and Pilots A ssociation, show the size of the market the Ministry of Tourism h opes to capture and increase. It includes a vast number of highn et worth individuals. It is hoped that an increase in t his sort of aviation arrivals will translate into an increase in room night for small and large Family Island hotels. According to the data, Abaco i tself accrued more than 120,000 visitor nights of this type in 2007,w hich was almost 76,000 more visitor nights than the nearest single island. For a market that has been p lagued by high costs in commercial airlift, this move by the Ministry could mean substantial gains for Family island tourism if the product can a be expanded. A s it stands, Florida, the closest US state to the Bahamas, has the highest number of active licensed pilots of any other state in the s outheastern US, and is the prime market for these islands. Mr Rolle said the Bahamas’ relationship with FBOs will also serve to cut costs on trade showa nd promotional ventures by splitting the cost of such events between the Ministry and the GAA agencies. " The FBOs, like Banyan, have shown much interest in working w ith the islands of the Bahamas," s aid Mr Rolle. Because of this expressed interest, over the years, the B ahamas Aviation Department has conducted training of the staff a s well as included FBOs in their marketing activities, such as trades hows and promotional ven tures.” P ilots choosing the Bahamas as their final destination will be able to use the FBO of their choice, according to the Ministry. However, the designated gate w ays will offer information and guidance not found at any otherF BO. “The selected FBOs have been classed as Bahamas Gateways and are equipped to provide Customs and Immigration informat ion, as well as supplies and even up-to-the minute information ont he Bahamas,” said the Ministry of Tourism release. The small airports serve as a one-stop shop for private pilots, as well as general aviation traffic, both private and charter.” The Ministry used figures g leaned from immigration cards to identify which gateways thosep rivate fliers were utilizing. “Twenty per cent were coming o ut of Miami and Fort Lauderdale,” said Mr Rolle. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009, PAGE 3B to be a part of ourWOW service team. Please submit resumeto: Human ResourcesDepartment | Doctors Hospital P.O.Box N-3018 | Nassau,Bahamas | or call 302-4618 |Website: www.doctorshosp.com WeWelcomeYou DOCTORS HOSPITAL“Dealing with the stress of a medical emergency is hard enough. I facilitate access to care while making the task of paying for services painless as possible.”Wearelookingforan:InsuranceServicesCoordinatorBaccalaureateDegreeinBusinessorrelatedstudies;3-5yearsexperienceata supervisorylevel;Excellentcomputerskills(Spreadsheetsdatabasemanagement); KnowledgeofICD-9&CPTcodes,CodingCertificationpreferred; Excellentcomputerliteracy;Strongcommunication&interpersonalskillsessential. The successful Candidate will:BeresponsibleformanagingtheactivitiesoftheInsuranceServicesDepartment -responsibilitiesincludethemanagementofvariousInsurancenancialportfolios. Direct,administerandcoordinatetheactivitiesoftheInsuranceServicesDepartment tosupportthepolicies,goalsandobjectivesestablishedbytheinstitution. Continuouslyparticipatesinperformanceimprovementstoenhanceservicestoour customersthroughouttheorganization.Developcollectionstrategiestoensure optimumcashow. Developrelationshipswithkeypersonnelinlocalandforeign Insurancecompanies. | Salary commensurate with experience Annual General Meeting of the Shareholders of FAMGUARD CORPORATION LIMITED will be held in the Victoria Room of the British Colonial Hilton No. 1 Bay Street at 4:00 p.m. on Friday, June 19, 2009 &22.&+( 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW 0$5&.(1'< $/&(RI75($685(&$<$%$&2%$+$0$6 3 %R[66 L V DSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOH IRU1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQ QDWXUDOL]DWLRQDVFLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDW D SHUVRQZKRNQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQ QDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOGVHQG ZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQWZHQW\ H LJKWGD\VIURPWKH W K G D\ R I W R WKH0LQLVWHU UHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3%R[ Bahamas moves to grow private aircraft market

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    C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009, PAGE 5B Ex-minister: Budget projections may be ‘too optimistic’ of 2008 and continues on a downward trend. “This merely indicates that the projections on the deficit, and therefore the national debt over the next few years, may be some-w hat understated. That is particularly worrisome when one fac-t ors in other possible adverse effects on the economy, such as i ncreased oil prices and/or the unwelcome visit of a few hurricanes. “It is difficult not to conclude that large budget deficits and ar apidly growing national debt are likely to be fixtures of theB ahamian economy in the years ahead.” Projections Mr Smith said the Govern ment’s Budget projections could b e “the most optimistic outcome”, not taking into accountt he possibility of further shocks to the international and Bahamian economies that could result in increased fiscal deficits and a larger national debt. H e pointed out that the Government’s projected GFS fiscal deficits for the periods from 20082009 to 2011-2012, which strip out d ebt redemption costs, could add $1.07 billion to the national debt, t aking it beyond $4 billion and up to a 55 per cent debt-to-GDP r atio. Mr Smith said this percentage m ight be described as a ‘danger zone’ for small island economies s uch as the Bahamas, and the projected large deficits were set to “substantially increase the nationa l debt, unless there is a dramatic turn around in the global econ o my in general, and in the US economy in particular”. Our principal concern in the Bahamas over the next few years s hould be the size of the planned deficit budgets and the resultant impact on the national debt,” Mr S mith said. “More importantly, whether t he assumptions that have been made regarding the growth rate of the economy, the performance of government revenue and e xpenditure and resurgence of tourism expenditure and foreign direct investment flows over the next few years are correct and t herefore justify the level of public sector borrowing that is envisa ged over the relevant period. Accurate If the assumptions are rea sonably accurate then there is a g ood chance the country will weather this economic storm and be restored to the path of growth a nd stability and maintain it’s ‘Arating’ in the international credit m arkets. “On the other hand, if the e xperts are correct, we could be in for a rough ride over the next few y ears and at least two of the budgetary objectives, maintaining fiscal flexibility and a return to fiscal p rudence by reducing the debtto-GDP ratio, are unlikely to bea chieved over the medium term.” F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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    available. We’ve got guys competing on bids for solar, and if that happensy ou will see prices drop 3, 4, 5 per cent,” Mr Schaefer said. He a dded that he was hoping something concrete on solar power would develop within the next 90 d ays, because electricity was “such a cost of doing business”. If we can reduce it to a point where it becomes reasonable, we c an pass the savings on to the c onsumer. It’s real money,” he said. Mr Schaefer conceded that R obin Hood’s move into the grocery business had helped to shield i t from the worst effects of the economic downturn, with its abil-i ty to bring in fresh meat, such as beef or pork, helping to give it a c ompetitive advantage. This, he explained, had helped Robin Hood to get increased b usiness and orders from Bahamian restaurants, who wereb uying “wholesale at retail prices”. R obin Hood now employed a 175-strong workforce, Mr Schaefer said, making the company one of the few places on the island looking to employ more p eople”. The retailer was continuing to look for extra staff, havingj ust hired an additional two employees in its produce departm ent, which was expanding at a rate where it was likely to soon need a further two staff. Where else can you go and get it all done under one roof?” M r Schaefer asked. “We’re going to become another shopping destination.” H e added that Robin Hood was looking at extending its open i ng hours on days when it was especially busy, such as Saturday.T he August opening of former PLP minister, Leslie Miller’s, b owling alley next to the Robin Hood outlet in the Summerwinds Plaza, was also likely to produce a n increase in business and extended opening hours. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Job Opportunity for an ACCOUNTING CLERKAn established Bahamian Company is seeking an Accounts Clerk Interested persons should send resumes to: P .O. Box CR-55056 Nassau, Bahamas /HJDORWLFH 127,&( &$(5/(21(1785(6/7' ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XQH 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV NOTICECHELSEA PROPERTIES HOLDINGS LIMITEDIn Voluntary Liquidation Pursuant to Section 137 (8 Companies Act, Notice is hereby given that, with effect from the 29th day of May, 2009 the above-named Company has been dissolved and has been struck off the Register. Dated this 16th day of June, 2009Kyrene Kelty Liquidator M r Wrinkle said, were coming from Bahamian clients, as opposed to international developers, something he said gave him a stronger “sense of securi-t y”. “In the construction industry in the last two weeks, we’ve seen some inquiries coming in, mainly f rom Bahamians. There’s been some activity, some inquiries and requests for pricing,” Mr Wrinkle told Tribune Business. “That’s the first work we’ve h ad come in for the year, and other major contractors I’ve talked to are in a similar position. Most have had very little new work c ome in since Christmas.” Mr Wrinkle said it was too early to determine whether the uptick in inquiries would develop i nto a trend, with the remainder of this year likely to be tough for t he majority of contractors, their tradesmen and the wider labour pool. For if the current inquiries t ranslate into real business, the projects will only likely start from a bricks and mortar perspective during the 2009 fourth quarter, the BCA presidente xplained. “Bahamian developers that have the proper collateral are getting good financing, so those proj ects are moving forward, and that’s what starting to happen now,” he added. “I do feel a sense of security with the Bahamian projects mov-i ng forward. It’s a sign we’re cutting our dependence, rather than waiting for major international developers to come in. It’s a good time for Bahamian investors to move ahead. There’s a lot of liquidity in the banking system, good contractor availa bility at a reasonable rate, a good labour pool. It’s a good time to do business. It’s a buyer’s market in the construction industry right now.” M r Wrinkle said that despite having strong liquidity the amount of surplus assets available for onward lending purposes the Bahamian commercial banks w ere being extremely cautious about lending, due to the weak economic environment and rising unemployment. Increased coll ateral was being demanded from those borrowers who were successful in accessing credit. “We have heard that some of the major developers are trying tor efinance and regroup,” Mr Wrinkle said. “The Rose Island RitzCarlton and Royal Island are the two I hear that are trying to get b ack to the table, and in terms of projects on the board those are two of the better ones, so we would welcome that.” D escribing the Bahamian construction industry as being “in a lull”, Mr Wrinkle added: “It does give us a chance to get our house in order and work on the Cont ractors Bill.” The BCA was working with the Ministry of Works to finalise “a few items and details” in the draft Bill, in an effort to finalise itb efore it went back to the Attorney General’s Office. The organisation was also due to restart its seminar series for c ontractors, to prepare the 2,0003,000 Bahamian construction companies for the Bill’s pre-qualification requirements and grandfathering them into the variousc ategories. Mr Wrinkle added that the BCA was per cent there” on completing work to initiate the I nter-American Development Bank (IDB strengthen the Bahamian industry, and prepare it for the rigours o f international competition in a free trade environment. New starts critical to construction sector health Retailer awaits 50% customer count rise C onveyancing attorney ‘contraction’ concerns FINCO could stipulate that it only does business with attorneysw ho have adequate professional indemnity insurance. He then explained that attorneys could “enter into an agreem ent where, if they work for FINCO, give power of attorney to FINCO to make a claim on your behalf on your indemnity insurance”. M r Munroe said the Bar had attempted to obtain details on First Bahamas’ and Lawyers Title Insurance’s respective capital s tandings and financial performances, but without success. The Bar Council’s concerns were sparked by an April 1, 2009, letter sent to its Bahamian attor-n ey members by Patrice Ritchie, FINCO’s senior manager for mortgages, in which she confirmed the lending institution’s p lans to require title insurance for all mortgages it issued. Mrs Ritchie’s letter stated that attorneys “will not have to prepare an opinion on title on behalfo f RBC FINCO”, and all this implies. FINCO, in urging Bahamian attorneys to consider “a flat fee” with respect to the preparation o f mortgage documents, including t heir execution, stamping and r ecording, is essentially implying t hat the introduction of title insurance into this nation’s mortg age/home buying market will eliminate the need for lawyers to d o the current volume of work they handle, especially titles earches. L ess work means that Bahamia n attorneys are unlikely to be a ble to charge the current fees usually pegged at 2.5 per cent of t he real estate transaction’s worth for conveyancing work, thus r educing income for a considerable number of the profession. T his would happen at a time when the Bahamian legal services p rofession is already under intense pressure from the global economic downturn, real estate and transactional work having d ropped on average by 40 per cent, so any further cuts in or lossof income will be particularly unappreciated. M rs Ritchie’s letter, a copy of which has been obtained by Tribune Business, said: “In an effort to improve the whole mortgage experience for our clients, bys peeding up the legal process and reducing their out-of-pocket costs, RBC FINCO will be requiring title insurance on all mortgages g ranted after April 30, 2009. “We anticipate that in the economic environment, title insurance will result in a most welcomed cost-saving for the client.H ence, we are writing to request your consideration of a flat fee with respect to mortgage preparation, inclusive of execution, s tamping and recording of the same, plus any disbursements made to pay the title insurance premium.” Mrs Ritchie said FINCO would a dvise its mortgage clients of the fees charged for this service, and added: “In the circumstances, you will not have to prepare an opini on of title on behalf of RBC FINCO.” First Bahamas Title Insurance Agency, which acts as the B ahamian agent for Lawyers Title Insurance Corporation, is a n affiliate of Higgs & Johnson. Higgs & Johnson are the attor n eys for Royal Bank of Canada, and the firm’s managing partner,J ohn Delaney, sits on FINCO’s Board of Directors. M r Munroe yesterday alluded to these connections, arguing that FINCO’s proposal appeared to be an attempt to keep more of the income from mortgage-relat e d transactions for itself. In a thinly-veiled critique of H iggs & Johnson, he added: “It just speaks to a certain part of the Bar breaking ranks.” Mr Munroe said some members of the profession were attempting t o “undercut” their colleagues on price, something he described as very unfortunate”. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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    C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE BODYANDMIND T h e T r i b u n e APPEARING on her vacation yacht in the 1920s looking bronzed and no doubt fashionable, Coco Chanel set forth a movement that made the darkening or tanning of skina sign of health and afflu ence. From that moment on, women of the 20s had to add tanning to their demanding “beautification” regimens that already included the bobbing of hair, binding of breasts and slimming of the waistline. Thanks in part to awareness that UV light leads to advanced aging and skin cancer, tanning is fallingout of favor as a sign of health. Consumers worldwide are more and more interested in obtaining lighter, brighter skin. The main reason may stem from market research studies which indicate that an uneven skin tone is perceived as aging while a more even skin coloration is judged to be healthier and younger-looking. As populations mature globally, pigmentation issues become more preva lent, and the demand for skin brightening products has surged. Unfortunate ly, those looking to brighten skin often run into two different and disappointing scenarios: the products don't deliver results as promised or even worse, skin health suffers at the hand of brightening ingredients. Treating hyperpig mentation without regard for skin health can lead to sensitivity, irritation, photodamage, exposure to potentially dangerous agents and premature aging. This leads our research and development team at The International Dermal Institute to develop an ingredient complex that could both balance the skin's tone and maintain its utmost health. The result is ChromaWhite TRx, a new era in brightening. See your Derma logica professional skin therapist for your Face Mapping skin analysis and customized product prescription. A brighter futur e for skin BY SARAH BEEK MAYBEyou notice recently that your dog sleeps more than he used to, or doesn't show the same enthusiasm about his daily walks. His appetite is not as good as it used to be; and when he does eat, the food doesn't always agree with him. He's a little grumpy when you ask him to make some room on the couch or the bed, unless you catch him on one of his many trips to go to the bathroom. Sound like your grandparents? If you live in an extended family it might be, but otherwise you're probably describing the habits of the aging family cat or dog. Animals, like people, age over time. We've all heard of the comparison of one human year to seven "dog years." It's actually not that simple. Depending on the age of dog it's better to use a sliding scale where one human year equals five to 12 "dog years." The one to 12 year comparison would apply to puppies, while the one to five year comparison is more appropriate for older dogs. Hence the average one to seven years for all dogs. There's little doubt that certain health concerns become more of an issue, as the body grows older. Those health problems should be addressed directly and not clumped into the non-diagnosis of "Old Age." One of my hopes in writing about this subject is to diffuse the notion that if an older pet is sick, there's little hope of helping him because-well, he's old. I often will be asked, when faced with an older, ailing patient "Isn't he just old Doc?" I diplomatically try to suggest that if we just conclude the pet is dying of "old age" we may be missing an opportunity to help him. Granted, there may be some older patients we can't help, but we don't know until we try. With that said let's talk about some of the common problems we can see in our older dogs and cats. We can all picture the image of the older dog or cat slowly standing up, stiffly walking across the room, only to lie down for another nap. Sore, stiff joints are common in older pets. Varying degrees of arthritis seems to be an almost inevitable problem for our aging ani mals. Good weight control, regular mod erate exercise, and newer medications are helping many of these patients cope with the problem, and in some cases regain mobility and enjoyment. Sometimes the joints become arthritic because of the gradually increasing load they're ask to carry. Pets tend to gain weight as they age for the same reasons people do. This additional weight undu ly stresses the major weight bearing joints (hips, knees, shoulders, and elbows). Many times these joints were not designed to carry that added weight and problems develop. Couple this witha more sedentary lifestyle and reduced overall muscle tone, and you have a recipe for arthritis. Needless to say, a trim body weight benefits our pets in many ways just like it does for us adults. Our older pet's internal organs and structures can face problems as well. Kidney failure is a frequent diagnosis in older pets, especially older cats. It seems, at times, that the feline kidney system "wears out" before the other organ sys tems do. Most cats over seven years should have a kidney profile done to rule out kidney disease annually. Pets with kidney malfunction will initially exhibit increased thirst and urination and weight loss. Later, as the kidney function worsens, symptoms of vomiting, diarrhea, poor appetite, dehydration, and depression will develop. There's no question that the veterinarian has a better chance of helping the kidney failure patient if the diagnosis is made sooner rather than later. I encourage families to have their pets routinely screened with blood tests that identify kidney problems, before visible symptoms develop. This may allow some early intervention that can help in the long run. After kidney problems, the next most common internal problem of older pets involves the cardiovascular system. While dogs and cats rarely, if ever, have coronary heart disease or "heart attacks" their hearts are quite prone to other kinds of problems. Valvular heart disease is all too com mon in older dogs. Valves inside the heart keep blood flowing in the correct direction. With age these valves can develop irregularities that cause them to leak. This malfunctioning valve may be mild and insignificant in many patients, but severe and life threatening in others. Pets with heart problems may exhibit coughing, listlessness, and poor appetite. Using a stethoscope your veterinarian can often hear an extra heart sound call a "murmur" that will tip him/her off that a heart problem may need to be looked into. Fortunately many pets with heart problems, if correctly diagnosed, can be helped with medications. Possibly the most common health problem we see with older pets is dental disease. A pet doesn't need to necessarily be old to have problems with her teeth. The vast majority of dogs over 5 years of age have moderate to severe dental problems. Without routine dental care, an eight-10 year old dog or cat can have dental problems so severe that their general health can be affected. Tooth loss, tooth root infections, and consider able oral discomfort-enough to cause hesitation to eat-are common oral cavity problems caused by bad teeth. We also know that long-standing dental disease can initiate severe, systemwide problems that can spell serious trouble for the already somewhat susceptible older pet. Keeping the teeth clean is your best defense for these prob lems. This may mean a complete dental cleaning under anesthesia if the problem is advanced, and/or regular home cleaning or brushing to prevent the problem in the first place. Obviously this short discussion only touches on a few common health issues for geriatric pets. In the final assessment there are many health problems associated with aging-some treatable, some not so treatable. Certainly our venerable animal senior citizens deserve the benefit of the doubt. It may not come as a surprise to you, but some time ago-I think sometime around my fortieth birthday-I stopped calling older age a "disease.” Old age is not a disease BY DR BASIL SANDS n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net WHEN many of us think of the elements that make up a healthy and mature relationship, there are the usual thoughts of fidelity, m onogamy, security, and lo ve. H owever, some would say that the most common and significant sign of a strong relationship r emains the sexual bond which s hould act as not only the glue that keeps that couple together, b ut also the reward that culminates that connection. Dr Wayne Thompson from the C entre for Renewing Relationships recently told Tribune Health t hat many relationships today exist on the basis of sexual attrac tion, which can commonly be misinterpreted for genuine feelings, a nd often leads to one or both partners feeling misunderstood or in some way neglected, D r Thompson who is trained in both psychosomatic and psychological therapy, said a com-m on problem in many relationships is sex is used and somet imes abused to fill the void of something that’s lacking. He explained: “Sex is an import ant part of a relationship, but the vital thing to understand is w hat a relationship is. We acknowledge the fact that b oth men and women are sexual b eings, what is important is for u s to understand how our sexuality is designed to bring fulfillm ent. Unfortunately for many p eople, whether in a relationship o r not, there is the lack of emo tional health, therefore the value and importance of sex iss kewed, ending in a lot of stress in their relationship.” Dr Thompson added, that as e ach partner is responsible for preparing themselves in various aspects of the relationship, failingt o do so can and in most cases does affect its dynamics. He said what sometimes happ ens with individuals who have a weak sense of self, is that sex m ay be transformed into a bandaid that temporarily conceals the real issue. For that person, he e xplained the thought rarely arises as to what problems or circ umstances may be affecting their p artner, their modus-operandi is t o fulfill their need to feel valued t hrough sex. D r Thompson said: “In the context of the true relationship, sex is t he pinnacle of the relationship p yramid, and if we think of the p yramid we actually have four levels.” At the base of the pyramid, Dr T hompson said there exist emotional health, which is the foundation to experiencing t he essence of what sex was designed for. At the next level, a p erson’s communication skills are an important elementt o balancing a healthy relationship. He s aid knowing how to effectively communicate and relate to others is a true c haracteristic of an emotionally healthy person. T hirdly, he noted that the a bility to resolve conflict was a lso an important element to a healthy relationship. Once those three tiers are aligned, then sexual intimacy can b e experience in a relationship.” U nfortunately, Dr Thompson s aid many relationships miss out on true fulfillment because either one or more of these ele-m ents are absent. S EX & E MOTIONS S EE page nine health THERE’S little doubt that certain health concerns become more of an issue, as the body grows older. Those health problems should be addressed directly and not clumped into the non-diagnosis of “Old Age.”

    PAGE 18

    C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE BODYANDMIND T h e T r i b u n e APPEARING on her vacation yacht in the 1920s looking bronzed and no doubt fashionable, Coco Chanel set forth a movement that made the darkening or tanning of skina sign of health and afflu ence. From that moment on, women of the 20s had to add tanning to their demanding “beautification” regimens that already included the bobbing of hair, binding of breasts and slimming of the waistline. Thanks in part to awareness that UV light leads to advanced aging and skin cancer, tanning is fallingout of favor as a sign of health. Consumers worldwide are more and more interested in obtaining lighter, brighter skin. The main reason may stem from market research studies which indicate that an uneven skin tone is perceived as aging while a more even skin coloration is judged to be healthier and younger-looking. As populations mature globally, pigmentation issues become more preva lent, and the demand for skin brightening products has surged. Unfortunate ly, those looking to brighten skin often run into two different and disappointing scenarios: the products don't deliver results as promised or even worse, skin health suffers at the hand of brightening ingredients. Treating hyperpig mentation without regard for skin health can lead to sensitivity, irritation, photodamage, exposure to potentially dangerous agents and premature aging. This leads our research and development team at The International Dermal Institute to develop an ingredient complex that could both balance the skin's tone and maintain its utmost health. The result is ChromaWhite TRx, a new era in brightening. See your Derma logica professional skin therapist for your Face Mapping skin analysis and customized product prescription. A brighter futur e for skin BY SARAH BEEK MAYBEyou notice recently that your dog sleeps more than he used to, or doesn't show the same enthusiasm about his daily walks. His appetite is not as good as it used to be; and when he does eat, the food doesn't always agree with him. He's a little grumpy when you ask him to make some room on the couch or the bed, unless you catch him on one of his many trips to go to the bathroom. Sound like your grandparents? If you live in an extended family it might be, but otherwise you're probably describing the habits of the aging family cat or dog. Animals, like people, age over time. We've all heard of the comparison of one human year to seven "dog years." It's actually not that simple. Depending on the age of dog it's better to use a sliding scale where one human year equals five to 12 "dog years." The one to 12 year comparison would apply to puppies, while the one to five year comparison is more appropriate for older dogs. Hence the average one to seven years for all dogs. There's little doubt that certain health concerns become more of an issue, as the body grows older. Those health problems should be addressed directly and not clumped into the non-diagnosis of "Old Age." One of my hopes in writing about this subject is to diffuse the notion that if an older pet is sick, there's little hope of helping him because-well, he's old. I often will be asked, when faced with an older, ailing patient "Isn't he just old Doc?" I diplomatically try to suggest that if we just conclude the pet is dying of "old age" we may be missing an opportunity to help him. Granted, there may be some older patients we can't help, but we don't know until we try. With that said let's talk about some of the common problems we can see in our older dogs and cats. We can all picture the image of the older dog or cat slowly standing up, stiffly walking across the room, only to lie down for another nap. Sore, stiff joints are common in older pets. Varying degrees of arthritis seems to be an almost inevitable problem for our aging ani mals. Good weight control, regular mod erate exercise, and newer medications are helping many of these patients cope with the problem, and in some cases regain mobility and enjoyment. Sometimes the joints become arthritic because of the gradually increasing load they're ask to carry. Pets tend to gain weight as they age for the same reasons people do. This additional weight undu ly stresses the major weight bearing joints (hips, knees, shoulders, and elbows). Many times these joints were not designed to carry that added weight and problems develop. Couple this witha more sedentary lifestyle and reduced overall muscle tone, and you have a recipe for arthritis. Needless to say, a trim body weight benefits our pets in many ways just like it does for us adults. Our older pet's internal organs and structures can face problems as well. Kidney failure is a frequent diagnosis in older pets, especially older cats. It seems, at times, that the feline kidney system "wears out" before the other organ sys tems do. Most cats over seven years should have a kidney profile done to rule out kidney disease annually. Pets with kidney malfunction will initially exhibit increased thirst and urination and weight loss. Later, as the kidney function worsens, symptoms of vomiting, diarrhea, poor appetite, dehydration, and depression will develop. There's no question that the veterinarian has a better chance of helping the kidney failure patient if the diagnosis is made sooner rather than later. I encourage families to have their pets routinely screened with blood tests that identify kidney problems, before visible symptoms develop. This may allow some early intervention that can help in the long run. After kidney problems, the next most common internal problem of older pets involves the cardiovascular system. While dogs and cats rarely, if ever, have coronary heart disease or "heart attacks" their hearts are quite prone to other kinds of problems. Valvular heart disease is all too com mon in older dogs. Valves inside the heart keep blood flowing in the correct direction. With age these valves can develop irregularities that cause them to leak. This malfunctioning valve may be mild and insignificant in many patients, but severe and life threatening in others. Pets with heart problems may exhibit coughing, listlessness, and poor appetite. Using a stethoscope your veterinarian can often hear an extra heart sound call a "murmur" that will tip him/her off that a heart problem may need to be looked into. Fortunately many pets with heart problems, if correctly diagnosed, can be helped with medications. Possibly the most common health problem we see with older pets is dental disease. A pet doesn't need to necessarily be old to have problems with her teeth. The vast majority of dogs over 5 years of age have moderate to severe dental problems. Without routine dental care, an eight-10 year old dog or cat can have dental problems so severe that their general health can be affected. Tooth loss, tooth root infections, and consider able oral discomfort-enough to cause hesitation to eat-are common oral cavity problems caused by bad teeth. We also know that long-standing dental disease can initiate severe, systemwide problems that can spell serious trouble for the already somewhat susceptible older pet. Keeping the teeth clean is your best defense for these prob lems. This may mean a complete dental cleaning under anesthesia if the problem is advanced, and/or regular home cleaning or brushing to prevent the problem in the first place. Obviously this short discussion only touches on a few common health issues for geriatric pets. In the final assessment there are many health problems associated with aging-some treatable, some not so treatable. Certainly our venerable animal senior citizens deserve the benefit of the doubt. It may not come as a surprise to you, but some time ago-I think sometime around my fortieth birthday-I stopped calling older age a "disease.” Old age is not a disease BY DR BASIL SANDS n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net WHEN many of us think of the elements that make up a healthy and mature relationship, there are the usual thoughts of fidelity, m onogamy, security, and lo ve. H owever, some would say that the most common and significant sign of a strong relationship r emains the sexual bond which s hould act as not only the glue that keeps that couple together, b ut also the reward that culminates that connection. Dr Wayne Thompson from the C entre for Renewing Relationships recently told Tribune Health t hat many relationships today exist on the basis of sexual attrac tion, which can commonly be misinterpreted for genuine feelings, a nd often leads to one or both partners feeling misunderstood or in some way neglected, D r Thompson who is trained in both psychosomatic and psychological therapy, said a com-m on problem in many relationships is sex is used and somet imes abused to fill the void of something that’s lacking. He explained: “Sex is an import ant part of a relationship, but the vital thing to understand is w hat a relationship is. We acknowledge the fact that b oth men and women are sexual b eings, what is important is for u s to understand how our sexuality is designed to bring fulfillm ent. Unfortunately for many p eople, whether in a relationship o r not, there is the lack of emo tional health, therefore the value and importance of sex iss kewed, ending in a lot of stress in their relationship.” Dr Thompson added, that as e ach partner is responsible for preparing themselves in various aspects of the relationship, failingt o do so can and in most cases does affect its dynamics. He said what sometimes happ ens with individuals who have a weak sense of self, is that sex m ay be transformed into a bandaid that temporarily conceals the real issue. For that person, he e xplained the thought rarely arises as to what problems or circ umstances may be affecting their p artner, their modus-operandi is t o fulfill their need to feel valued t hrough sex. D r Thompson said: “In the context of the true relationship, sex is t he pinnacle of the relationship p yramid, and if we think of the p yramid we actually have four levels.” At the base of the pyramid, Dr T hompson said there exist emotional health, which is the foundation to experiencing t he essence of what sex was designed for. At the next level, a p erson’s communication skills are an important elementt o balancing a healthy relationship. He s aid knowing how to effectively communicate and relate to others is a true c haracteristic of an emotionally healthy person. T hirdly, he noted that the a bility to resolve conflict was a lso an important element to a healthy relationship. Once those three tiers are aligned, then sexual intimacy can b e experience in a relationship.” U nfortunately, Dr Thompson s aid many relationships miss out on true fulfillment because either one or more of these ele-m ents are absent. S EX & E MOTIONS S EE page nine health THERE’S little doubt that certain health concerns become more of an issue, as the body grows older. Those health problems should be addressed directly and not clumped into the non-diagnosis of “Old Age.”

    PAGE 19

    GREEN SCENE BY GARDENER JACK C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009, PAGE 9B D ATINGin midlife is undoubtedly a whole different ball game from the rose c olored vision of love and life in our teens and twenties. In the beginning it wase xhilarating and life seemed mysterious and full of wonder. Everyone and everyt hing seemed exciting and anything seemed possible. 'Chemistry' was all that was important and differences in personalities seemed unimportant. 'First Loves' have as pecial place in our hearts as the first major loss is traumatic and leaves an indelib le impression in our minds. Now several decades of dating and relationships later it is completely understandable that we are not the same people and our requirements from a relationship are very different. We have gained experience; know ourselves a whole lot better than when we first entered adulthood. We may be a little jaded or weather beaten from failed relationships or perhaps life just did not give us what we had expected or planned. Our advancing years reveal that even when we try to plan and make the right choices life has a way of just making new paths for us. At a certain point we come to realise that living our life with bitterness and regret is pointless and not helping our current situation or happiness. By this stage many have already decided to go it alone and fill their lives with satisfying activities and careers. Their lives are rich and they have found ways to meet all their emotional, physical, spiritual and intellectual needs. They are empowered from their own achievements and do not feel the need to be in a couple to feel complete. The natural desire to be loved and be touched is met by hugs and kisses from close friends, family and even pets. Dating at this point in their lives holds little importance and often there is little room for a new person to enter such a full lifestyle. But for the other people who are single in midlife and who want and crave a close loving intimate relationship there is a sense of urgency and impatience with the dating scene. They feel strongly about 'wasting time' on relationships that may not lead anywhere. Their biological clock may be ticking or just life's clock. They may be acutely aware of their own mortality as they may have encountered serious illness or even death of someone close to them. It becomes even more important to love and express our love to those who play a vital role in our lives. The words 'life is too short and precious' becomes even more relevant. So is it possible to 'fast track' this dating thing? Is it possible to skip to the nitty -gritty areas of a relationship without putting in the time? Is it only possible to really get to know someone by living with them? Yes, it is possible but it requires a great deal of honesty and willingness from both parties. It also requires you to know yourself well and to able to take criticism. All these prerequisites may narrow the candidates as they may run in fear when you first discuss this. But if this is important to you and they are willinggo for it! First write down all your fears and the buttons that people push which make you act defensively. Relate them to situations that have happened in this relationship which provoked such a reaction. In doing this you both quickly learn vast vulnerable areas which help to explain your behaviour. Then do a quick run down of things you would change in that person. It is hard to listen to but you may be surprised they are usually areas that are easy to correct. All in all learning about bad habits and fears takes you deeper into a relationship. Just the mere fact of a person being willing to open up and be honest adds to their ability to be a serious partner in your life. If on the other hand the exercise opens up huge wounds and the decision is to end the relationship then tell yourself it is better to find out now than months or years down the line. Trust yourself and embrace the idea that there is someone for you out there. Margaret Bain is an Individual and Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical Sex Therapist. Call for an appointmentRelate Bahamas at 3647230, oremail relatebahamas@yahoo.com orwww.relatebahamas.blogspot.com. She is also available for speaking engagements. Dating in midlife B Y MAGGIE BAIN PAPAYASmay be the most popular back yard fruitg rown in The Bahamas. You can see them everywhere. A recent photograph in The Tribune showed a Haitian shack in very poor circumstances,b ut right outside the front door was a papaya. P apayas are often called ‘paw-paws’ and the plants are herbs rather than trees. Typi-c al growth is a single hollow stem with a crown of latticew ork leaves produced at the end of long hollow stems. Fruits are produced from thes tems, usually high up in a cluster. The plants need full sun and will grow long and spindly in an attempt to reach sunlight ifg rown in the shade. Papaya plants grown in the sun are strong enough to survive winds less than hurricane strength but elongated andw eakened papaya trees can be blown over. The fruits can be long and t hin, pear shaped, or almost perfectly round. The flesh w hen ripe can be light yellow to deep gold or reddish. Many people profess not to like the taste of papaya but this is often because they have not experienced the full palette of papayas that range from earthy to extremely sweet. Cut in half lengthwise the fruit will reveal a mass of dark seeds that can be easily removed with a spoon. The surrounding pulp also can be removed with a spoon or peeled and cut into cubes or balled with a melon baller. If the taste is not to your satisfaction you can always add a little sugar. Papaya also makes a healthy and tasty smoothie. Papaya fruits that are full but still green can be peeled, deseeded and then cut into chunks and boiled in salted water. Once drained and mashed the taste is almost identical to squash. Papaya (Carica papaya native to South America and has been naturalised in The Bahamas and the Caribbean for centuries. The native Bahamian papaya comes as male and female (boar and sow) and both sexes must be present to produce fruit. Female trees produce single bell-shaped flowers while the male produce panicles of slim, elongated flowers. One male tree will fertilise up to ten female trees. Most modern varieties of p apaya have perfect flowers that contain both male and female parts. Food stores often sell cut papayas from Nicaragua and other CentralA merican countries and these can provide the seeds you n eed to raise your own papayas. Once you have removed the s eeds from the fruit you should rub them singly with y our fingers to break the skin of the aril that surrounds the seeds. It is best that the seedsb e planted where you want them to grow as they are often awkward to transplant successfully. The seeds should be planted a quarter of an inch deep in fertile soil and kept well watered until established. It takes about a year from seed to ripe fruit but in the mean-t ime your papaya grove will add a touch of the tropics to your garden. A papaya treew ill produce for 4 to 7 years but is often replaced much e arlier. The leftover seeds with their arils intact can be allowed to dry and then used as a condi ment by filling a pepper grinder. The taste is pleasantly peppery. All parts of papaya contain papain, an enzyme that aids digestion. It is a good idea to start or end a meal with a slice of papaya. Sometimes papaya trees grow too tall for us to reach the fruits easily. This inconvenience can be avoided by cutting the tree a few feet from the ground just after a period of bearing. Three or four branches will form and each one of these branches will bear as heavily as the original main stem. Of course, the tree will lose its original graceful appeal and become quite ugly – but productive. Young papaya fruits are attacked by the papaya fruit fly that resembles a wasp with a very long protrusion at the rear that is actually a ovipositor used to place eggs into the fruit. The only effective way to prevent this is to cover small fruits with paper bags as soon as the flower drops. By the time the paper bag disintegrates the fruit will have a thick enough skin to repel the papaya fruit fly. j.hardy@coralwave.com The popularity of papayas n LOS ANGELES WHENTricia Devereaux broke into the adult film business 15 years ago, testing for sexually transmitted diseases wasn't much more than an afterthought, so much so that by the end of the decade the star of such films as "Coed Carwash" and "Convention Cuties" had tested positive for HIV, according to the Associated Press . But these days, says Devereaux, who has worked behind the cameras since testing positive in 1998, her industry has become so aggressive at policing itself that she believes a porn star has less risk of acquiring the AIDS virus than a member of the general public. " I think because of what happened in 1998 the industry immediately looked at itself and found ways to really, really minimize the risk factors by switching to more foolproof tests and doing itm ore often," she said. A dult filmmakers in the U.S. now require that actors prove they have tested negative for HIV and other sexu ally transmitted diseases within 30 days of going to work on a film. Still, the tests aren't fool proof, as was revealed this week when an actress who had passed an HIV test before making a film tested positive immediately afterward. That positive result was reported by the Adult Indus try Medical Healthcare Foundation. Known in the industry as AIM, the organization tests hundreds of actors each month in the San Fernando Valley, where the U.S. porn industry is head quartered. It grants those who pass certificates allow ing them to work. Although the woman's costars have tested negative, they have been quarantined from acting for the time being and advised to be retested in two weeks because medical experts say it takes almost that long for a person to show signs of infection. That means the woman's case should be a wake-up call to the adult film industry that it isn't doing enough to pro tect its performers, said Dr. Jonathan Fielding, director of the Los Angeles County Department of Health. He said the state Division of Occupational Safety and Health requires that safe sex be practiced on all adult movie sets. "But we have persistent reports that that is not the case," he said, adding his department receives an average of 15 reports a week from the Adult Industry Medical Healthcare Foundation of actors testing positive for oth er sexually transmitted dis eases such as gonorrhea and chlamydia. "That's obviously very dis turbing," Fielding said. "I don't know of any other industry where people are subjected to that kind of risk." He called for the use of condoms on all adult films as one means of providing necessary worker safety. Porn industry promotes record in fighting HIV He said a clear sign of a person who is not emotion ally healthy is when their thinking is not appropriate toward life, relationships, and people, which can cause them to treat their partner “like a piece of meat,” or as if they’re inadequate. He said while these short falls in a person’s ability to understand a healthy rela tionship may seem miniscule, at the end of the day it plays a significant role in their overall health. “It’s the most critical part, what is unique about human beings is that they are lastly physical beings. At the core you are a mental, emotional, spiritual being, and all of that is housed in a physiological body. If you don’t have the core lined-up correctly, then the physiological body is going to experience problems and challenges,” he explained. He said from the psychosomatic perspective, when the human spirit/emotional health is broken, some problems which can arise include depression, headaches, palpi tations, back-pains, and others. With these problems hav ing the potential to develop into even more serious phys ical conditions, Dr Thompson said it is up to the indi vidual to reduce or eliminate them. He suggest developing self esteem, focusing on building self worth and self respect. “Persons must be willing to have their emotional check-up from the neck-up! We service our vehicles, we wash our dishes, so we should also service our minds which house the key components to life. If you don’t cleanse yourself mentally, emotionally, and in your spirit, you will eventually pick-up viruses which are in the environment. “These are your everyday stresses, when you are not emotionally healthy, your abil ity to cope with them does not exist, so the way you view them is incorrect. This distorts the way you see yourself, they way you look at yourself, and the way you look at others.” He said if you realise that you are the kind of person who has difficulty trusting, who is insecure, suspicious, irritationprone, or overly stressed, seek ing professional help should be your next move. However on the practical end, he said exercise can help to cleanse your body and then mind. Dr Thompson said although sexual intercourse may be an easy element to any relation ship, finding sexual bliss can only manifest from a completely healthy relationship. FROM page eight Sex & emotions

    PAGE 20

    C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE AFTERa long courtship o ver the telephone, Asma A hmed, a painter in Karachi, P akist an, mar r ied her f i ance, R a f i-uddin Shik oh, a business consult ant in New York, in a bicontinent al w edding by Webcam. When the newb ride then moved to Queens in 2002, she tried to make herself at home b y st a king h er claim through art. In Pakistan, Ahmed Shikoh's work had been sociopolitical, addressing what shesaw as the country's colonization by American fast-food chains, for instance,with paintings like "The Invasion," in which swarms of Ronald McDonalds, wearing screaming-red clown wigs, surround a central monument in Karachi. H ere, however, her art turned deeply p ersonal as she grappled with her new i dentity as an immigrant and, having rarely set foot in a mosque back home, as a grad ually more observant Muslim. In her first American paintings, Ahmed Shikoh reimagined the Statue of Liberty in her own image: in a Pakistani wedding dress,as a pregnant immigrant and as a regal mother, baby on hip. Next she trans formed the subway map with paint and calligraphic script into an Urdu manuscript that made the city feel more like hers. Finally, in 2006, after she made the difficult decision to cover her hair, inspired by Muslim-American women who managed to combine faith and a career, Ahmed Shikoh began using the head scarf as a recurring image. On the surface, Ahmed Shikoh, 31, has little in common with Negar Ahkami, 38,a sleek, raven-haired Iranian-American artist, beyond the wall space that they share in a new exhibition, "The Seen and the Hidden: ((Dis at the Austrian Cultural Forum in Manhattan. Ahkami grew up in suburban New Jersey, considers herself only "technically Muslim" and toys with stereotypical images of exotic Middle Eastern women in her art. Yet the two are both in their 30s, mothers of small children and emerging artists in the New York area. They are both exploring their identities as refracted through their backgrounds in the wake of 9/11. And they are both working to create a new kind of Islamic art that is modern, Westernized and female-centric. "As women artists of Muslim descent, Asma and Negar are both trying to discover who they are, to look at themselves and their heritage and to get beyond stereotypes," said David Harper, a curator of the Austrian exhibition. "What's so interesting is that they present two such very different ways to examine the subject from American soil." ''The Hidden and the Seen," which runs through Aug. 29, features 15 artists, 13 of them women, of whom Ahmed Shikoh and Ahkami are the only full-time U.S. residents. The exhibition is a partner event of the Muslim Voices Festival organized by the Brooklyn Academy of Music, Asia Society and New York University's Center for Dialogues. In this exhibition Ahmed Shikoh and Ahkami seek to humanize the individuals beneath the veil. Ahmed Shikoh's approach is deeply earnest. Her installation, "Beehive," is a cardboard honeycomb whose cells are stuffed with the colorful scarves that she collected from scores of Muslim-American women who also sent messages "I ran the 10k Bolder Boulder and wore this scarf" that anno tate this intentionally rough-hewn work. I n contrast, Ahkami's piece is playful, a cerbic and polished. It consists of eight nesting dolls sumptuously repainted as "Persian Dolls," in brilliant colors with gold faces. The outer doll is stern, with a thick unibrow, in full black chador. The ever smaller dolls within wear Chanel head scarves or cocktail dresses or, as witht he tiniest, nothing at all but curves. ''I have always struggled with the images of humorless, somber Iranian women in full-on black chador," Ahkami said. "For me these images do not reflect the real Iranian women any more than the images of the harem girls of the 19th century did." Ahkami felt angst here too. The child of Iranians who emigrated in the 1960s, she grew up in Clifton, N.J., spending what she remembers as magical summers in Iran until the Islamic revolution of 1979. With the hostage crisis, her world split in two, making her feel like the child of a messy, public divorce. ''At a time when I was trying to assim ilate, it was very confusing to me," she said. "I was born here, and suddenly the girl across the street was saying: 'You never told me you were Iranian. You said you were Persian.' And I never saw her again." A hypersensitive young artist, Ahkami was not stung just by the classmate who mouthed "ayatollah" at her. She hated being made to explain her family in the context of television images that made all Iranians seem like "Death to America"chanting fundamentalists. She hated the way that the culture she loved was "degraded, demonized and reduced to a cartoon" both here and in Iran. Life changing decision I would hopefully be secure in a job for at least four years, and I would like to have already started on my first home. “I think many people have the fear of turning thirty because there is a greater fear of turning old, and thirty seems to be that initial age w here youth has expired and the good years are behind you.” However women too are bombarded with images and stories of what they should accomplish by the time they hit 30. In a special turning 30 episode on TV series Friends , Jennifer Aniston’s character Rachel Greene was extremely distraught when a thirtieth birthday party was thrown in her honor. In an attempt to make up for her ‘over the hill birthday,’ she was seen dating a man m uch younger than she was. R achel said: “Come on g uys, is it just me or am I overreactingLook I know my life’s going pretty well, but I look around and I see so many people who’ve accomplished so many other goals by the time they are 30.” Thirty-year-old Heike Wollenweber, explained that although she was like many women who had the usual fears of turning thirty, she now realises that turning thirty is not the end of the world. “Before I turned thirty last year, the thought of turning thirty put a lot of things in perspective,it got difficult when I thought of all the things I wanted to accomplish by that time,” she said. She now understands that there is still a great deal to appreciate about life after thirty. Although she does not yet have children, Heike said she is not overly concerned, espe cially because she is still wait ing on Mr Right. She also has a number of things she would still like to do and is excited that she is able to look forward to them at this stage in her life. As an entrepreneur who is always busy working on sev eral projects, being thirty she said is nowdays one of the last things on her mind. She said although she may not fit the bill when it comes to common expectations of a women thirty and up, “really and truly thirty is not that old, and my best years are still ahead of me.” I have always struggled with the images of humorless, somber Iranian women in full-on black chador . For me these images do not reflect the real Iranian women any more than the images of the harem girls of the 19th century did. NEGAR AHKAMI Successful, single, and dreading turning 30 F ROM page 12 BOOK REVIEW By The Associated Press Sullivan introduces strong, warmly believable threedimensional characters who have fun, have fights and fall into intense love affairs, sometimes with one another . J. COURTNEY Sullivan's "Commencement" is one of this year's most inviting summer novels. It tells of four Smith College dorm mates who reunite for a wedding four years after graduation, and it manages to be so entertaining that this setup never feels schematic. In a novel that's what Curtis Sittenfeld's "Prep" aspired to be (i.e., a smart, discerning book about school years) Sullivan introduces strong, warmly believable three-dimensional characters who have fun, have fights and fall into intense love affairs, sometimes with one another. Smith's feathers may be ruffled by the candor with which Sullivan describes campus life. The "Commencement" characters are savvy about, among other things, feminism and publishing. "When a woman writes a book that has anything to do with feelings or relationships, it's either called chick lit or women's fiction, right?" one of them asks. "But look at Updike, or Irving. Imagine if they'd been women. Just imagine. Someone would have slapped a pink cover onto 'Rabbit at Rest,' and poof, there goes the ... Pulitzer." They're right of course. But this is the season when prettily designed books flood the mar ket and compete for female readers. It's a time when literary and lightweight books aimed at women become hard to tell apart. Their covers use standard imagery: sand, flowers, cake, feet, houses, pastel colors, the occasional Adirondack chair. Their titles ("Summer House," ''Dune Road," ''The Wedding Girl," ''Trouble") skew generic. And they tend to be blurbed exclusively by women. Gloria Steinem likes "Commence ment." She ought to; the women of "Commencement" are big fans of hers. Amid such confusion, here's a crib sheet for this season's crop of novels and memoirs. It does mix seriously ambitious books ("Shanghai Girls" ably schlocky ones ("Queen Takes King") and includes one off-the-charts oddity ("My Judy Garland Life"). It's even got a nascent Julia Roberts movie. But the common denominator is beach appeal, female variety. Each of these books takes a supportive, girlfriendly approach to weathering crises, be they global (World War II or domestic (dead husband on the kitchen floor), great or small. Julie Metz's "Perfection" is a visual standout for good rea son: Metz designs book jackets. And she has given her all to the vibrant tulip on her memoir's cover. She also gave her all to what she thought was a solid marriage. Then her husband died suddenly, in 2003, and left behind a secret history of phi landering, complete with e-mail trail. He left one particularly devious lover in the same small town where Metz found herself trapped as a new widow. How would she rear her daughter there when the daughter's best friend's mother (chick-book aficionados can follow this, no problem) was her husband's married girlfriend? Metz provides a blow-byblow account of how she processed these revelations. Lit tle did she know that the man who wrote her a florid poem for Valentine's Day was also sending pornographic holiday e-mail messages to at least two women with whom he was hav ing affairs. ("I had to smile at the efficiency of it all," Metz writes about this cut-and-paste job.) Little did she realize how truly distant her husband was. And little did she imagine that she would ever be living one of the most basic dreams of chick lit: going back to dating after years of marriage. Metz changes the names of the men in this book, but she brings refreshing candor to a startling, painful tale. Kate Christensen's "Trouble" is also about a woman who's married with a child until she suddenly finds herself unat tached. But she, Josie, is an insufferably smug New York psychotherapist who high-handedly dissolves her marriage. "I think it's lame for people to stay together just for the kids," Josie's adolescent daughter says helpfully, after Josie decides to ditch Daddy and have an adventurous Christmas in Mex ico City. Yet Josie is so bitter that she resents her husband even for letting her go. "It enraged me that Anthony had allowed our marriage to end like this," Josie says. "It made me want to punch him in the head." Commencement

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    ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 74F/23C Low: 77F/25C Low: 76F/24C Low: 76F/24C Low: 78 F/26 C Low: 80F/27C Low: 79 F/26 C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 93F/34C High: 92F/33C High: 91 F/33 C High: 90 F/32 C High: 91F/33C High: 88 F/31C High: 89F/32C Low: 78F/26C High: 90F/32C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 90F/32C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 72F/22C High: 87 F/31 C Low: 76F/24C High: 86 F/30 Low: 73F/23C High: 85F/29C Low: 76 F/24C High: 88F/31C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 91F/33C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 88F/31C Low: 73 F/23 C High: 88F/31C Low: 75F/24C High: 91 F/33 C Low: 79F/26C High: 93F/34C High: 89 F/32 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JUNE 16th, 2009, PAGE 11B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Plenty of sunshine. Partly cloudy, a shower; warm. A few patchy clouds.Partly sunny. Clouds and sun, a t-storm possible. High: 89 Low: 79 High: 88 High: 88 High: 89 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Brilliant sunshine. High: 90 Low: 79 Low: 78 Low: 79 AccuWeather RealFeel 101F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 87F 98-86F 98-89F 110-88F 116-88F Low: 78 TODAYTONIGHTWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................88F/31C Low ....................................................77F/25C Normal high ......................................87F/31C Normal low ........................................74F/23C Last year's high .................................. 88 F/31C Last year's low .................................. 76 F/25C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ................................................13.10" Normal year to date ....................................15.10" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU New First Full Last Jun. 22 Jun. 29Jul. 7Jul. 15 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:20 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 8:01 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 1:13 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 1:53 p.m. Today Wednesday Thursday Friday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 2:07 a.m.2.28:17 a.m.0.3 2:40 p.m.2.69:05 p.m.0.5 3:02 a.m.2.29:07 a.m.0.2 3:36 p.m.2.710:06 p.m.0.4 4:01 a.m.2.210:01 a.m.0.1 4:34 p.m.2.911:07 p.m.0.3 5:02 a.m.2.210:58 a.m.0.0 5:33 p.m.3.0----W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco91/3279/26t93/3379/26pc Amsterdam64/1752/11sh68/2057/13pc Ankara, Turkey77/2543/6s81/2750/10pc Athens88/3173/22s91/3276/24s Auckland53/1137/2r53/1143/6pc Bangkok90/3278/25t90/3278/25t Barbados86/3077/25t86/3076/24pc Barcelona81/2765/18c78/2567/19pc Beijing75/2368/20t95/3573/22s Beirut75/2370/21s74/2370/21s Belgrade94/3461/16s81/2756/13c Berlin68/2050/10sh72/2255/12s Bermuda80/2672/22sh79/2672/22r Bogota66/1847/8t64/1747/8sh Brussels68/2048/8sh73/2255/12pc Budapest77/2554/12c79/2652/11pc Buenos Aires57/1343/6pc63/1748/8pc Cairo96/3570/21s95/3572/22s Calcutta107/4184/28c106/4181/27pc Calgary76/2451/10pc70/2149/9t Cancun88/3173/22t90/3273/22t Caracas81/2772/22pc80/2671/21pc Casablanca84/2873/22pc88/3173/22pc Copenhagen66/1853/11pc67/1955/12s Dublin68/2050/10pc64/1748/8r Frankfurt72/2250/10sh79/2655/12s Geneva 78/25 55/12 pc 80/2656/13pc Halifax 58/14 44/6 pc 65/18 48/8 s Havana 90/32 72/22 t 88/31 72/22 sh Helsinki 55/12 45/7pc59/1543/6pc Hong Kong 84/28 79/26 t 86/30 81/27sh Islamabad 101/38 72/22 pc 109/42 75/23 s Istanbul82/2767/19pc83/2865/18s Jerusalem 79/26 59/15s76/2460/15s Johannesburg 61/1644/6pc64/1746/7c Kingston 87/3078/25sh87/3079/26r Lima71/2158/14pc71/2158/14s London73/2252/11pc70/2154/12r Madrid88/3159/15r95/3564/17pc Manila84/2878/25t84/2878/25r Mexico City79/2655/12t76/2455/12t Monterrey100/3773/22s97/3675/23s Montreal75/2357/13s79/2661/16s Moscow72/2254/12sh68/2045/7r Munich72/2247/8sh78/2551/10pc Nairobi80/2656/13r78/2557/13r New Delhi 104/4082/27s108/4282/27s Oslo57/1345/7pc61/1649/9pc Paris73/2254/12pc77/2555/12s Prague 71/21 49/9 sh 75/23 53/11 s Rio de Janeiro79/2667/19pc74/2362/16s Riyadh103/3983/28pc103/3982/27pc Rome 82/27 61/16 s 85/29 67/19 pc St. Thomas86/3078/25t87/3079/26sh San Juan68/2038/3s74/2339/3pc San Salvador 84/28 70/21 t 85/29 73/22 t Santiago 59/1545/7c55/1245/7c Santo Domingo84/2873/22t85/2974/23sh Sao Paulo 70/21 49/9 r 65/18 50/10pc Seoul80/2662/16pc75/2361/16r Stockholm 61/16 45/7 pc 64/17 50/10 pc Sydney 59/15 50/10 sh57/1352/11sh Taipei88/3177/25c88/3177/25pc T okyo 76/24 64/17 sh 74/23 66/18 sh T oronto 73/2260/15s72/2258/14r Trinidad79/2663/17sh84/2863/17pc V ancouver 68/20 57/13 pc 68/2055/12c Vienna 78/2557/13c78/2561/16pc W arsaw 68/20 45/7 sh 66/18 45/7 sh Winnipeg 78/25 59/15 pc 77/2563/17pc H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayWednesday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles82F Wednesday:S at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles82F Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Wednesday:S at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Wednesday:S at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque91/3263/17s88/3162/16t Anchorage68/2053/11t68/2053/11pc Atlanta91/3272/22t90/3273/22t Atlantic City74/2356/13pc70/2160/15pc Baltimore76/2457/13pc73/2260/15r Boston64/1750/10pc69/2054/12s Buffalo79/2660/15s78/2559/15r Charleston, SC91/3271/21t85/2973/22t Chicago77/2560/15t78/2561/16t Cleveland79/2661/16s79/2661/16r Dallas99/3777/25s97/3677/25s Denver84/2855/12t85/2956/13c Detroit78/2559/15pc76/2460/15r Honolulu88/3175/23s88/3176/24pc Houston96/3575/23s96/3575/23s HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayWednesday TodayWednesdayTodayWednesday Indianapolis77/2566/18t85/2967/19t Jacksonville93/3373/22pc97/3675/23t Kansas City85/2969/20t95/3575/23pc Las Vegas85/2965/18c93/3376/24s Little Rock97/3673/22s97/3674/23s Los Angeles74/2362/16t76/2462/16pc Louisville85/2972/22t90/3271/21t Memphis94/3475/23s96/3576/24s Miami91/3278/25t89/3176/24t Minneapolis74/2363/17t83/2869/20c Nashville88/3170/21t91/3271/21t New Orleans95/3575/23s95/3576/24s New York70/2158/14pc73/2261/16pc Oklahoma City99/3772/22s99/3774/23s Orlando93/3374/23t95/3574/23t Philadelphia75/2359/15pc75/2359/15pc Phoenix 97/36 73/22 pc 99/3777/25pc Pittsburgh80/2660/15s75/2357/13r Portland, OR 78/2557/13pc72/2258/14pc Raleigh-Durham 76/24 64/17 r 76/24 63/17 r St. Louis82/2773/22r94/3475/23t Salt Lake City 74/23 54/12 c 75/2357/13c San Antonio 98/36 75/23 s 98/36 77/25 s San Diego72/2265/18t73/2264/17pc San Francisco 70/21 56/13 pc 70/2156/13s Seattle73/2256/13pc68/2056/13c T allahassee 98/3674/23s101/3874/23s T ampa 92/33 77/25 t 92/33 77/25t Tucson96/3568/20s95/3569/20pc W ashington, DC 78/25 64/17pc70/2163/17r UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com