Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Mim blowin’ it

90F
79F

MOSTLY SUNNY,

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LOW

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Volume: 105 No.165



The battle

for child
support
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SS

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

=a LST:

MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009







PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)



heroine grancma

Grandchildren saved but husband dies in horror blaze

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A HEARTBROKEN grand-
mother told last night how she
rescued her three grandchildren
from a burning house - but
failed to reach her 77-year-old
husband.

Fighting back the tears,
Emerald Cooper, 72, said the
fire started in a bedroom at
their home in Brice Lane, off
Mackey Street, before 6pm on
Saturday.

She was resting in the living
room when her six-year-old
grandson told her his mattress
was on fire, and she ordered
him to take his five-year-old
brother and seven-month-old
baby sister away from the
house.

Mrs Cooper then rushed to
the bedroom where her hus-
band Leon Cooper lay sleep-
ing.

Mr Cooper had been unable
to walk since he suffered a
stroke nine years ago, and Mrs
Cooper tried to drag him to
safety, but he resisted.

She said: “He was saying,
“Throw some water on it,’ and I
said, ‘I can’t, it’s a heavy fire’.

“But he said he ain’t going, so
I dragged him out the bed.
Then when we reached the door
of the room by the fire, he held
on.”

As the smoke became thick-

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EMERALD COOPER looks at
the only picture saved from
the house.

er, Mrs Cooper said she had to
get out of the building to save
her own life, although her hus-
band of 53 years would not let

SEE page two

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Ie i

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iu

-

-Felipé Major/Tribune

a

ils REMAINS Ovm Itt: eS Pets Reena by fire in Brice Lane, off Mackey Street.

Selection of PLP election
candidates raises concerns

m@ By PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net

CONCERNS have been
raised over the selection of
candidates to represent the
PLP in the next general elec-
tion after it was revealed that
people have already been
named and ratified as the
prospective representative for
certain key areas in New Prov-
idence ... without the candi-
date’s committee having met.

Neil Percentie, the former

branch chairman for the last
PLP representative for
Marathon Ron Pinder, said he
was shocked to see that Sena-
tor Jerome Fitzgerald was
already listed on the PLP’s
website as the “candidate” for
the Marathon constituency.
While outlining that he held
no brief with Senator Fitzger-
ald as he knows him to be a
good family man and a “bril-
liant business person”, Mr
Percentie said he is concerned
with the fact that the people in
the area have essentially been

SEE page eight



BAHAMAS WOMEN'S

VOLLEYBALL TEAM

ROBBED WHILE
PLAYING VITAL GAME

BAHAMIAN CITIZENS
NAMED IN QUEEN'S
BIRTHDAY HONOURS






ye eal et)

rire heartache of

Minister
can see no
resolution

between govt
and nurses

m@ By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff
Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of Health
Hubert Minnis can see no
resolution between the
Government and angry
nurses who have crippled
the public health system
on a week-long sick-out.

However Water and
Sewerage Corporation
(WSC) employees who
staged a sick-out late last
week have vowed to
return to work today.

The public health nurs-
es started industrial action
when around 50 per cent
of nursing staff across the
country called in sick last
Monday.

And although staff
returned to the Rand
Memorial Hospital in
Freeport, Grand Bahama,
on Wednesday, Dr Min-
nis said the sick-out con-
tinued at the busy Princess
Margaret Hospital in Nas-
sau over the weekend.

Bahamas Nurses Union
president Cleola Hamil-
ton said tempers flared

SEE page nine



es. finding missing

brothers alive

SEARCH parties are begin-
ning to lose hope of finding
alive brothers Deangelo Clarke,
nine, and five-year-old Marcelo
Clarke who went missing while
crabbing in South Andros last
week.

Family members of the boys
have flown down to the island
to assist in the desperate search
as fears continue to grow about
their safety.

Deangelo lives in Andros
with this grandparents, while
his brother Marcelo lives in
Nassau with his parents and was
visiting the island for only a few

ays.

On Tuesday night last week,
the two boys left the house to
hunt for crabs and have not
been seen since.

When night fell, worry began
to set in and the grandparents
and members of the community
began to search for them.

Officers from the Kemp’s
Bay police station were alerted
and joined the search the next
morning.

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

Fire heartache
of heroine
grandmother

FROM page one

her take him with her.

She said: “I had to drag him,
but he still wouldn’t come right
out, and I stumbled a few
times, and the smoke got to us.

“He had plenty of time to
come out there, but he would-
n’t come.

“He can’t walk but he
wouldn’t let me drag him out. I
tell you he was something
else.”

Mrs Cooper and her hus-
band had built the three bed-
room house soon after they
married. They raised their four
children there.

After the Bell *|:)

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ea LC

He had worked as a mechan-
ic at KC Auto Sales in Palm-
dale and Victoria Avenue, as
well as independently.

But life had been difficult
for the couple since his stroke,
as he was unable to walk, and
unable to work.

They lived with three of
their 13 grandchildren.

Firefighters found the house
engulfed in flames when they
arrived shortly after 6pm on
Saturday, and Mr Cooper’s
body was lying in the hallway.

Emergency medical services
pronounced him dead at the
scene.

Everything in the house was
reduced to ash or damaged by

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smoke and water.

Mrs Cooper said: “We had
all our things destroyed, every-
thing was destroyed, what we
had before it’s tough getting it
back now, but thank God we
are living.

“The children have nothing.
Everything hey had is gone.”

Neighbours and family
friends helped Mrs Cooper
clear the house of everything
that had been destroyed and
salvage what was left.

A photograph of Mrs Coop-
er’s daughter and grandchil-
dren is one of the few items
she has salvaged.

Mrs Cooper said she and her
grandchildren are virtually
unharmed by the blaze.

“Tm right here,” she said. “I
hurt my muscle when I was
pulling him out probably, it
hurts, but that’s all.

“Tt must be from when he
held on and I tried to pull him,
and the fire would have got
me, but I let him go.”

She and her grandchildren
are now looking for a new
home.

Police are investigating the
cause of the blaze.

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US)
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PHONE: 322-2157

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THE TRIBUNE





















Felipé Major/Tribune staff

THE REMAINS of the house after the blaze.















LEON COOPER’S walking cane lies in the remains of the house.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 3



Bahamas women’s volleyball team

robbed while playing vital game

0 In brief

Man arresied

after attempted

car break-in

A 19-YEAR-OLD man
has been arrested follow-
ing the attempted break-in
of a car in St Alban’s Dri-
ve, Nassau.

Police say a man was
seen attempting to opena
blue Honda Civic parked
in the area at around 2am
on Saturday.

Officers searched the
vehicle and found a num-
ber of electronic items and
other items they suspect
had been stolen.

Investigations continue.

NASA repairing
leak on space
shuttle fuel tank

m CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

NASA is repairing a leaky
hydrogen gas line on Endeav-
our’s fuel tank in hopes of pos-
sibly launching the space shut-
tle on Wednesday, according
to Associated Press.

The leak forced mission
managers to call off a launch
attempt Saturday.

The repair work began Sun-
day and should be completed
in time for Endeavour to lift
off Wednesday on the space
station construction mission.
But that’s the same day a pair
of science spacecraft are sched-
uled to blast off for the moon.

NASA’s top officials have
yet to decide which mission
takes priority.

The seven Endeavour astro-
nauts are sticking around
Florida’s Kennedy Space Cen-
ter, Just in case their flight gets
called up first. They will deliv-
er and install the final segment
of Japan’s space station lab.

Uighurs freed
from Guantanamo
savour weekend
of freedom

@ HAMILTON, Bermuda

THE four men in short-
sleeve shirts looked like ordi-
nary tourists, enjoying a Sun-
day lunch and butter pecan
ice cream afterward as they
observed the sparkling
waters surrounding this
Atlantic resort island,
according to Associated
Press.

But they are Uighurs,
Muslims from the vast
stretches of western China,
an arid and rugged land that
is a far cry from Bermuda's
sandy beaches and quaint
narrow streets lined with
pastel Victorian-era build-
ings.

They once were terrorism
suspects, but even after U.S.
authorities determined the
men weren't a threat to the
United States, they were
kept at the Guantanamo
prison for years because no
nation would take them —
until a few days ago, when
Bermuda agreed to let them
in as refugees.

The men have traded drab
prison jumpsuits for com-

m By RENALDO DORSETT/
BRENT STUBBS
Tribune Sports Reporters

SNEAK thieves robbed the
Bahamas Women’s National Vol-
leyball team of all their personal
effects and equipment while they
played a vital world championship
qualifier.

As the team were putting up a
brave battle against host country
Barbados on Friday at the
Garfield Sobers Sports Complex,
their lockers were being broken
into.

And women’s agony at a five
set loss turned into heartache
when they discovered their prop-
erty, including passports, had been
taken.

A report filed with the Barba-
dian Police estimates the value of
the stolen property at more than
$47,400, and now their scheduled
return home today is in jeopardy.

Among the missing items were
$8,500 from the team expense
fund, a few laptops and cellular
phones as well as several pass-
ports of team members and
coaches.

According to team member
Krystel Rolle, the night began
with an inauspicious start as the
team was initially delegated to a
locker room and was forced to



NATIONAL TEAM HEAD COACH
Joe Smith

change and perform pre game
stretches in an adjacent hallway.
“We felt like it was strange that
we did not have a locker allocated
to us at first. We were told the
team from Barbados was occupy-
ing the locker room next to where
we were stretching,” she said.
The team was forced to take
their belongings to the main court
and place them behind the bench-
es during the match, however a
tournament representative told

the team they had to relocate
equipment to a locker room in
the foreground of the stadium.

“When we got to the back, Bar-
bados had already left the locker
room and we were told it was safe
for us to put our stuff in there so
we did,” Rolle said, “Kelsie [John-
son], team captain, locked the
door and we went back out onto
the court to continue warming up
for the game.”

After the five set loss to Bar-
bados that dropped the Bahamas
to second place in the A group,
the team returned to the locker
room to find their personal effects
missing.

“The door to the locker room
was swung wide open and all of
our stuff was gone, everything.
No one was any help, no one saw
anything and we noticed later that
the lock on the door was broken,”
Rolle said.

“Tournament organizers didn’t
do anything, the local police did
not arrive until two hours later
and initially we thought that our
bags had been moved from one
room to the next and we were just
angry because they moved our
bags without our permission or
without supervision. After min-
utes rolled into hours it became
clear that our stuff had really been
stolen and the lady with the key to

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the door seemed clueless and
unconcerned.”

National Team Head Coach
Joe Smith said the team remained
in a state of disbelief at the lack of
an adequate resolution, but con-
tinued to focus on the ultimate
goal of advancing to the third
round of World Championship
qualification.

“They still expected us to play
and compete in the tournament.
But it was hard. After you lose a
hard fought game and then you
realize everything you had was
stolen right from under your nose,
it is hard to stay focused on vol-
leyball, but they tried,” he said.

Police

“We have contacted the police,
foreign affairs, but we are in a
dilemma down here. No money
and no passports, but we are try-
ing to at least finish the tourna-
ment so that way we can still qual-
ify. The girls are taking it hard.
Mentally it was a strain on them
because even though they were
trying it was still on their minds.”

Following the incident, the
team was scheduled to face
Jamaica yesterday, but lost in the
most lopsided outing of the tour-
nament, 25-23, 25-9, 25-13.

Mr Smith added: “We were
with the Police all day trying to
see if we can sort this issue out to
see if someone can provide some
direction as to where we would
go from here.

“But it is difficult because
absolutely everything out of the
locker rooms was taken and a lot
of the girls and people around the
team found it odd because over
the course of the tournament the
Bahamas was the only team to
have this happen to them.”

To have your say on this or any
other issue, email The Tribune
at: letters@tribunemedia.net
or deliver your letter to
The Tribune on Shirley Street,
P.O. Box N-3207











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fortable cotton pants and
knit shirts, and razor wire-
encircled jail compounds for
beach cottages.

They hope to quickly find
jobs in Bermuda — one of
the world's wealthiest places
because of its financial and
insurance sector — and
eventually start families.

The four Uighurs (pro-
nounced WEE'-gurs) also
have immediate priorities,
such as learning to drive, scu-
ba dive and bowl, said Glenn
Brangman, a former military
official who is helping rein-
troduce them to the world
outside prison.

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Prime Minister is not Moses

WHEN MOSES gathered the children of
Israel and led them from the bondage of
Egypt to the Promised Land, they had to
endure many years of hardship on a never
ending desert.

But these Israelites felt they were enti-
tled to more. They wanted food, they wanted
water, they wanted their comforts, but they
also wanted their freedom — by an easier
route. They knew they were in a desert where
nothing grew, and where there were no cool
streams to slake their thirst.

But they were a contentious lot, a bunch of
whiners. Moses had led them there and so it
was his duty to perform the impossible. It
was obvious they couldn’t make a desert yield
food and water, so they looked to Moses,
who was as empty-handed as they were.
Despite his condition of equal want they
demanded that he give them what he did not
have.

And so Moses knelt down and pounded
God’s door in prayer. God peaked out, saw
the condition of his stiff-necked people, and
took pity on Moses. He instructed Moses to
take the same stick with which he had divid-
ed the Nile, and strike a nearby rock out of
which water would flow for the people to
drink. Moses did as he was told and out came
the water.

Today the world’s leaders face a global
crises and although each one of them is stand-
ing before his people with a different stick to
try to stir life back into a collapsed global
economy — unlike the miracle of Moses —
nothing seems to work. There is no miracle
for our generation.

“This crisis,” Prime Minister Ingraham told
Bahamians from the floor of the House last
week, “is so great that the economic text-
books have no answers! The textbooks can
explain how an individual economy or even a
small related group of countries can solve an
economic crisis, but the textbooks have no
answers to a recession which is enormous
and global, and resistant to the textbook solu-
tions.”

And so, Mr Ingraham, like every world
leader today, is battening down the hatches,
caulking the leaks, provisioning the larders,
trimming the sails, and preparing the Ship
of State for a rough voyage. All he is asking
of Bahamians is that they work hard at the


















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“a

(1

Reflawitiy

oars, put all contentiousness behind them,
have patience and don’t rock the boat.

In the meantime he has prepared what he
described as “a realistic budget in extraordi-
nary times, whose principal objective is to
promote and protect the interests of the
Bahamian people.”

His aim is to sustain employment and liv-
ing standards as far as possible “while main-
taining as much fiscal flexibility as possible to
be able to deal with emerging developments.”

To do this he has had to cut back in every
department, ensuring that enough is provid-
ed for each to function adequately. Obvi-
ously this can be done if managers in these
various ministries make certain that waste is
cut back and whatever petty pilfering there
might be is cut out.

Today thousands of Bahamians are without
work, they have mortgages to pay, school
fees to meet and all the other expenses
required to keep a family together.

These Bahamians are desperate and don’t
know where to turn.

It is, therefore, shocking that a large seg-
ment of this country’s nurses have gone on
strike — not because they don’t have a job,
but because they have been asked to wait
until the crisis has passed for their promised
health insurance.

Health Minister Dr Herbert Minnis met
with executives of the nurses union and told
them that although their services were appre-
ciated, because of the country’s financial
problems “it was unlikely that they would
receive their insurance ... and the four per
cent salary increase that they demanded.”
They were asked to defer their insurance for
the present.

Their answer? Government made a
promise that they want fulfilled now — not
later. They have shown no concern for other
Bahamians who might have to suffer even
more if government has to meet their
demands.

And so, while the rest of us tighten our
belts and prepare for the worst to help save
our country from disaster, a large body of
nurses has walked out on their duties.

Is this what one calls patriotism?

Remember Prime Minister Ingraham is
not Moses. He cannot strike the Treasury
vaults and make non-existent money flow.



PLP show again
why they can’t
be trusted

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Listening to the response of
the leader of the opposition and
operatives of the Progressive
Liberal Party to the 2009/2010
budget, I was again reminded
as to just why the majority of
Bahamians didn’t trust them
and voted them out of office in
May of 2007.

Plain and simple in my opin-
1on the response was dishonest!
I was very offended by what the
leader of the opposition had to
say because it conveyed a mes-
sage to me that he thought that
I was stupid or ignorant as a
Bahamian citizen. Now it could
very well be that Mr Christie
and other PLP operatives
believe the nonsense that they
are spewing out, but God help
the PLP if that’s the case.

I hold no brief for the Free
National Movement (FNM)
Government or for the Prime
Minister, as I consider myself
an independent, having voted
for both parties in the past. I
am extremely disappointed, but
not surprised at the responses
given by members of the oppo-
sition to the 2009/20010 budget.
The response of the leader of
the opposition is riddled with
misrepresentations of the facts,
taking credit for successes, but
casting blame for failures just
as they did while in office. In
my estimation it was a failed
attempt to mislead the Bahami-
an people and any logical, right

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



thinking person will see it for
what it is. The thing that also
bothers me about this opposi-
tion party is that they criticise
without offering alternatives,
anybody can criticise but not
anybody can offer sensible,
workable solutions to problems.
I challenge the PLP to offer an
alternative budget and let’s
weigh one against the other!

Mr Christie and other opera-
tives continue to blame the state
of the Bahamian economy on
Mr Hubert Ingraham and the
FNM government, citing a
report from Standard and Poors
with regard to the FNM gov-
ernment stopping and review-
ing contracts as their evidence;
but nothing could be further
from the truth. Let’s take a look
at the projects that moved
ahead, those that were stopped
and reviewed or cancelled. Just
about every single one of those
projects have now stopped
because of the downturn in the
world economy and _ has
absolutely nothing to do with
the FNM government. The
Ginn project in West End, the
Ritz Carlton Project, the
Mayaguana project and the list
goes on.

I thought the Prime Minis-
ter’s remarks with respect to the

budget was sobering and hon-
est, which is one of the reasons
he was elected; “He can be
trusted to tell you the truth!”
He sent what I thought was a
clear message to Bahamians
that we cannot continue to
operate like we have been oper-
ating, we have to be more finan-
cially responsible and we cannot
continue to squander money
and resources like we’ve done
in the past. Can you imagine
Mr Christie being in office
telling us that all was well while
all hell is breaking loose around
us as far as the economy is con-
cerned? I want somebody who
will tell me the truth and also
tell me the extent to which the
government can help and the
part that I must play as a
Bahamian to make sure that we
make it through this.

I can go into detail with
regard to some of the things
that I mentioned in this letter
but I choose not to at this time.
What I will say is that I don’t
always agree with Mr Ingraham
and the way in which he does
and says some things, but when
I look at the lot of them, [ll
take him hands down any day.
He’s honest, he has courage and
he’s no-nonsense. Regardless
of what you think of the man
he’s what we need right now!

FELIX MUNNINGS

Nassau,
June, 2009.

Crime in the Bahamas seems to pay

EDITOR, The Tribune.

There simply should be a public outcry over the
information your reporter Paul Turnquest has
reported as to the number of persons accused of
serious violent crimes, murder, armed robbery,

etc, who are out on bail.

It seems crime in our Bahamas pays. Just how

can we continue to accept this?

The PLP talked about new conditions for bail
and there were promises we heard from the FNM
in 2008 in the opening of Parliament speech from
The Throne that some sort of tracking devices
were being looked at for persons on bail.

Since the New Year 2009 we have heard more
serious crime being reported almost daily to a

iting because they hear of murder after murder
and because they have no idea the locations of the

murders conclude they should not travel to the
Bahamas as it is unsafe.

The budget is coming next week and we all
know it is going to be the worst one for years as

revenues have decreased immensely, but the pub-

lic must be afforded the rightful safety day or

night wherever we live or on whatever island.

dered.

level that is very much unacceptable to the

Bahamian public.

Our newspapers are on the internet; persons
who might want to visit might be swayed from vis-

We do not only have a voice once every five
years — call your MP now and insist government
does something before more people are mur-

Yes, our police are doing their best, but we
have too many criminals on bail, which is their
right but we have to know where these people are.

ABRAHAM MOSS

Nassau,

May 19, 2009.

What kind of example does this set our youth?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

When we were kids there
seemed to be a game of some
sort on most days — marbles,
spin the top, "rounders", rug-

by, etc. In most of these games
there was usually someone who

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decided that the rules that had
been agreed the day before did
not suit him on that particular
day, usually because he was not
winning by the established rules
so he wanted to change them.

I was reminded of those days
when I read The Tribune
Thursday morning and was
shocked, but not surprised, to
learn that MP Glenys Hanna-
Martin created an uproar in
Parliament because she want-
ed to "raise an issue of public
importance.” She was denied
this opportunity because the
rules state that she was required
to have previously served notice
in Parliament that she intended
to bring up the matter.

She was asked to take her
seat and she refused to do so.

That too is not surprising. The
real shock followed when the
Speaker asked the Sergeant-at-
Arms to remove her from the
House and the other members
on her side of the House sur-
rounded her to prevent the
police from doing their duty.

Can we really be surprised
when so many young Bahami-
ans believe that the rules apply
to everyone else except them?

Most of us can recall a simi-
lar "incident of shame" in 1965,
which again proves the old
adage that "the fruit does not
fall far from the tree."

SIDNEY SWEETING, DDS
Nassau,
June 11, 2009

The Nassau Institute

PROTECTING YOUR
FAMILY IN HARD TIMES
What to expect?
What you can do?

Economist Dr. Robert Murphy
answers your questions

The Yacht Club on June 17th
from 6.30

Information: 328-6529
Admission Free



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Bahamian citizens named in
ueen’s Birthday Honours

GOVERNMENT House
has released the full list of
Bahamian citizens named in
the Queen’s Birthday Honours
for 2009.

Among those named are the
owner of John Bull, Frederick
Hazelwood, and Special
Olympics organiser Basil
Christie.

The full list is:

COMPANION OF THE
MOST DISTINGUISHED
ORDER OF SAINT
MICHAEL AND SAINT
GEORGE (CMG)

Bishop Elgarnet Brendan
Rahming: For untiring efforts
and invaluable contributions to
the growth and development
of the country in the field of
religion.

Frederick A Hazelwood Jr:
For outstanding service to the
business community in the
Bahamas.

Anita Doreen Bernard: For
outstanding and exemplary ser-
vice as a career public officer.

THE MOST
EXCELLENT ORDER OF
THE BRITISH EMPIRE
OFFICER (OBE)

George Cox: For long and
dedicated service in the field
of civil and structural engi-
neering in the Bahamas.

Lowell Mortimer: For out-
standing service to the public
service, church and community.

Dr Robert O Antoni: In
recognition of service to the
community and health.

Harcourt Lowell Turnquest:
For outstanding and exemplary
service as a career public offi-
cer.

THE MOST
EXCELLENT ORDER OF
THE BRITISH EMPIRE
MEMBER (MBE)

Sandra Moore: For out-
standing contribution to the
church and community.

Colors:

Gold

Red Pat

Black Pat

Multi Beige Snake

i

Canon Fitz Goodridge: In
recognition of services to reli-
gion.

Edna Mae Russell: For long
and loyal service in the field of
education.

Basil Christie: For outstand-
ing contribution to the devel-
opment of the Bahamas in the
areas of community service,
education, religion and Special
Olympics.

Frederick Solomon Ramsey:
For contribution to politics and
the growth and development
of the insurance industry in the
Bahamas.

John L Rolle Sr: For out-
standing contribution to the
business community.

Cecil Bernard Longley: For
outstanding and distinguished
career in the field of education.

THE BRITISH EMPIRE
MEDAL (BEM)
(CIVIL DIVISION)

Dennis Lloyd Turnquest: For
long and dedicated service to
the community, politics, busi-
ness and insurance manage-
ment.

Arthur M Sherman Jr: In
recognition of service to civics
and religion.

Wendell Carver Grant Sr: In
recognition of service to civics
and religion.

Doddridge MacLagan Hunt:
For outstanding service to the
public service, church and the
community.

Oswald Cory Munnings: For
service to the financial services
industry and to the church.

Reverend Wilbur St Clair
Outten: In recognition of ser-
vices to the community and
religion.

INNOVATORS
SUMMER PROGRAM
Ages 5-16 years old

Ta



Sheila McDonald: For long
dedicated service in the public
service and the community.

Maria Forbes: For long, ded-
icated and faithful service in
the field of education.

THE QUEEN’S POLICE
MEDAL (QPM)



Assistant Commissioner
Shannondor Harold Evans
(above): For outstanding and
meritorious service to the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force.

Chief Superintendent
Sylvester Augustus George
(Retired): For outstanding
career as an accomplished
musician, arranger, conductor
and administrator to the Royal
Bahamas Police Force.

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The marijuana plants, some up to 3ft high,
were seized along with a small quantity of

end. marijuana when police searched a home in
Officers found the packets, more tha $400
and an assortment of jewellery when they
executed a search warrant at a home in Balls
Alley, off Shirley Street.
A 46-year-old woman and 16-year-old boy

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The officers were assisted by the K-9 unit
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PAGE 6, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Gavin McKinney to receive BIFF's first Bahamian Tribute Award

THE 2009 Bahamas International Film Festival has
announced that esteemed director of photography
Gavin Mckinney will be honoured with the first
Bahamian Tribute Award at this year’s festival, which
will take place December 10 to 17 in Nassau.

Mr McKinney will be present for the tribute and
presentation on Tuesday, December 15.

BIFF Founder and executive director Leslie Van-
derpool said: “We are so honoured to recognise one
of our very own Bahamian filmmakers; Gavin con-
tinues to make strides around the globe within the
film world.”

Mr McKinney has been involved in underwater
film making since 1973 when he worked as a diver on
the feature film Day of the Dolphin and has spent
more than 20,000 hours underwater making films.

He has worked on more than 50 feature films and
television shows, including five James Bond films: The
Spy Who Loved Me, For Your Eyes Only, Moon-
raker, Never Say Never Again and The World is Not
Enough.

In addition to working behind the scenes with
logistics and planning, he was the Bond underwater
double in For Your Eyes Only.

While filming The Spy Who Loved Me, Mr McK-
inney thinks he became the only person in the history
of film to have been run over by a car underwater.

He also spent four months working on The Abyss
in 1988.

Since 2001, he has co-produced and filmed three
highly successful three dimensional underwater films
for the Imax theatres: Ocean Wonderland 3D, Sharks



Esteemed director of
photography to be honoured

3D and Dolphins and Wales 3D.

Mr McKinney has more than 35 years experience }
filming underwater and has provided full produc- i
tion services for underwater shoots, including per- }
sonnel, logistics, locations and marine services, though
now his energies are directed towards conservation ;

and education about the oceans of the world.

His current project is Ocean World 3D, a full- }
length 3D documentary due for a summer 09 release, }
which premiered at the 2009 Cannes Film Festival in }
May. It is a fictitious story of a turtle’s voyage around :

the world.

Entering its sixth year, the Bahamas Internation- }
al Film Festival (BIFF) has established itself as a i
marquee international festival in the Caribbean i
region, discovering and promoting independent voic- i
es and talent from around the world and showcasing }

a diverse array of international films.

BIFF is a non-profit organisation committed to
providing the local community and international fes- :
tival goers with a diverse presentation of films from }

the Bahamas and around the world.

In addition to showcasing films that might not }
otherwise be released theatrically, BIFF provides }
unique cultural experiences, educational programmes, i
and forums for exploring the past, present and future ;

of cinema.

























COMMONWEALTH BANK

2009 SCHOLARSHIP

Commonwealth Bank is offering Scholarship Awards to Bahamian
students to attend The College of The Bahamas.

Applications are available at any Commonwealth Bank Branch or at
The College of The Bahamas, Financial Aid & Housing Department,
2nd Floor, Portia Smith Building.

APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED TO:



OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR
FINANCIAL AID & HOUSING
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

P. 0. BOX N-4912

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

(Students from the Family Islands are invited to apply).

Ck

COMMONWEALTH BANK

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a an |

HAPRPY.FATHER’S DAY -

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DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS IS JULY 17, 2009

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Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

A CANDLELIGHT vigil and
rally will be held in Freeport
and Nassau to highlight the
issue of child abuse.

Freeport activist Troy Gar-
vey announced the events are
planned by the TOUCH (Trust-
ing Uniting Children’s Hearts)
organisation on Grand Bahama,
and Bahamas Against Crime in
New Providence.

He said the rally is set for
today in Nassau at Rawson
Square, and on Thursday in
Freeport at the Garnet Levari-
ty Justice Center.

Mr Garvey is urging the pub-
lic and various groups and
organisations throughout the
country to support the event.
Invitations will also be extend-
ed to MPs.

“We all need to join hands
and save our children in order
to save our country and bring
awareness to the child abuse
and molestation that his hap-
pening in the Bahamas.

“For too long we have been
closing our eyes and turning
heads to what is happening in
the schools and churches. By
doing this we have cost our
country a great loss of future
leaders and we want to say
enough is enough,” he said.

Mr Garvey said every child
has the right to be free of
exploitation, violence, rejection
and extreme poverty.

He said three parades will be
held in Nassau today, starting
from the eastern Parade of Nas-
sau at the foot of the bridge,

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TROY GARVEY announces plans for candlelight vigil and rally in
Freeport and Nassau. Also seen is Bee Butler, president and founder of
No More Victims Outreach Association.

from Windsor Park on Wulff
Road and East Road, and from
Christie Park and Nassau Street
near the College of the
Bahamas.

He said the parade in Nassau
will start at 6.30pm and con-
verge at Rawson Square where
rally will begin at 8pm.

In Freeport, the parade will
start at 7pm from downtown
and head north on West Mall
Drive to the Justice Center
compound, where a rally will
be held at 8pm.

Bee Butler, of No More Vic-
tims Association, said: “We
have been dealing with a lot of
victims and we want to call on
ministers to pray for children
to so that they can become the
men and women God have

them to be.

“We stand behind Mr Gar-
vey and his organisation and
ask persons to support this most
important event,” she said.

Mr Garvey thanked Senior
Assistant Commissioner Mar-
vin Dames for permission to use
the justice center compound in
Freeport for the rally.

To have your say on this or any
other issue, email The Tribune
at: letters@tribunemedia.net
or deliver your letter to
The Tribune on Shirley Street,
P.O. Box N-3207



Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

at

symposium



What Does the Rest of 2009 Hold in Store for You?

Thursday, June 18
6pm—8pm

COB Performing
Arts Centre

This Event is Free
to the Public.
Refreshments provided.

Onsite childcare available
for children ages 3 to 11.

The financial crisis of the past 18 months has us all
wondering, what's next? To answer this question and
help you develop your personal economic recovery
strategy, RBC is sponsoring a free educational sym-
posium for the community.

Please join us as a distinguished panel of speakers
explores the performance of the current economy,
future prospects for The Bahamas and strategies you
can employ as you cope with the changes and stress
of the economic slowdown.

Experienced professionals will be on hand to provide
financial advice at the end of the presentation and
question and answer session.

Panelists include:
> Mr. Nathaniel Beneby, Jr::
Vice President and Country Head, RBC

> Mrs, Wendy Craigg:
Governor of The Central Bank

> The Hon. Loretta Butler-Turner:
Minister of State, Ministry of Labour and Social Development

>? Dr. Timothy Barrett:
noted Bahamian Psychiatrist

RBC HELPING YOU SUCCEED

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 7

OO
Making Caricom less ‘at risk’

insight |

WORLD VIEW

m@ By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a consultant and
former Caribbean diplomat)

AMAICA’S Prime Min-

ister Bruce Golding says
that the Caribbean Communi-
ty and Common Market (Cari-
com) is “at risk”. He is right
and regional leaders should
shoulder the blame for this sad
development in an area of
small countries that need to
hold together as the only
means of retaining their iden-
tity, their culture and some
semblance of autonomy.

Mr Golding is also right
when he says of himself and
his fellow leaders: “I do not
believe that any of us can
believe that we are going to be
better off trying to swim in this
Caribbean sea on our own, but
it is time for us to stop playing
games, for us to stop mouthing
integration and professing our
commitment to this process
when the pragmatic demon-
stration of that commitment is
so often not being brought to
the fore.”

It would be very helpful
indeed if the Heads of Gov-
ernment were to sweep away
their usually long agenda for
the next Summit meeting in
Guyana in July in order to
spend a day talking about
nothing else except: “Do we
want Caricom? And, if so, how
do we make it work for the
benefit of the people of Cari-
com?”

If they — or any of them -
feel that the 41-year-old
regional project (the Caribbean
Free Trade Agreement started
in 1968) is of little or no use to
them and they can do better
on their own or in alliances
with other countries, they
should end the relationship
now. For, the Caricom under-
taking will continue to be frus-
trated by reluctant participants,
and reluctant participants will
themselves be frustrated by
their nagging belief that they
would be better-off elsewhere.

The “elsewhere” should be
carefully considered. Caricom
is unique because it is largely
made up of countries whose
people’s culture, history, polit-
ical development and identity
were brewed in the same pot.
At the bottom line, while trade
within the region is important
and must be developed, it is
not the most important ele-
ment in the integration pro-
ject. More vitally important
are: the retention of Caribbean
autonomy over the region’s
economies; maintaining
Caribbean dignity and pride in
ownership, management and
production; drawing on the
qualified strength of the entire
region to bargain for countries
individually and collectively in
ahighly competitive world; and
keeping the identity that
brands us as a people.

These things are not only
endangered, they are more
likely to disappear if countries
“go it alone” or seek alliances
with nations that have
resources greater than theirs.

In today’s globalised world —
and with the ambition of Euro-
pean, North American and
Asian firms to have a global
reach — it is not beyond pos-
sibility that Caribbean indige-
nous companies, including
media, could be swallowed-up.
It does not require large Cor-
porations to show an interest.
Any medium sized European,
North American or Asian
Company is larger and better
resourced than the largest
firms in the region.

The situation might have
been better if Caricom had
implemented the allocation of
industry scheme to which it
was committed in its early
years, and if it had backed such
a scheme by a deliberate poli-
cy of integrating production.
In other words, using the capi-
tal and skilled labour of some
countries to develop the nat-
ural resources — or competi-
tive advantage — of others for
the benefit of all. The compa-
nies that emerged from sucha
process would have had a bet-
ter chance to survive.

If per chance, regional lead-
ers continue to feel that Cari-
com — and the development
of a Single Market and Econ-
omy — has merit, it will not be
sufficient for them to issue yet
another Communiqué or Dec-
laration espousing the impor-
tance of integration.

People all over the region
have become unconvinced by
Communiqués and Declara-

tions. This is why many of the
Caribbean press buried in their
inside pages the statements
coming from the last Caricom
Summit in Trinidad in May.
Few made the Summit state-
ments a front-page story.

As Mr Golding said, they
will have to “stop mouthing
integration” and bring to the
fore “the pragmatic demon-
stration of that commitment.”

How could they do so?

At the level of people, one
very important way would be
for all immigration and cus-
toms officers at border entry
points to be instructed to treat
Caricom nationals with the
same high regard they accord
to European and North Amer-
ican tourists. This is not to say
that they should not be watch-
ful for violators, but the
assumption should not be that
the majority are.

Another way would be to
cease the use of Police for the
expulsion of Caricom nationals
who may be suspected of over-
staying. This should become
the responsibility of the immi-
gration department and, when
such people are discovered,
they should be subject to due
process under the law.

Residence and nationality
qualifications should also be
applied in a non-discriminato-
ry manner and consistent with
the law. They ought not to be
denied at the discretion of one
or two persons.

At the level of trade, non-

tariff barriers should end once
and for all subject only to gen-
uine health and safety require-
ments. Caricom is either a
common market moving to a
single market or it is not. No
Caricom producer should still
have to think twice about send-
ing goods to other Caricom
countries.

And, where a dispute aris-
es, machinery should be in
place for swift resolution with-
out the need for Ministerial
intervention and media
involvement.

The critical problem of
transportation of goods within
Caricom should also be
addressed in a practical man-
ner. For instance, Jamaica
might improve its level of
exports to other Caricom coun-
tries if better transportation
existed. Governments might
usefully address the incentives
that could be given to encour-
age private entrepreneurs to
establish such transportation
by sea and air.

On production integration,
governments might also con-
sider establishing a Caribbean
team to help the private sec-
tor to access funds from the
multilateral financial institu-
tions to develop Caricom wide
businesses on a limited alloca-
tion of industries scheme to
start with.

And, on governance, a
Caribbean Commission, along
the lines of the European
Commission manned by per-

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Caricom might be less “at
risk” for actions of this kind.

Responses to:
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PAGE 8, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009

CONFIDENCE
INSURANCE BROKERS
& AGENTS LTD.

Will be closed

on Friday, June 19, 2009

for our staff
ANNUAL FUN DAY

—- [2nd floor The Standard House)
one: 323-6920 Fax: 325-2485

LOCAL NEWS

Selection of PLP election
candidates raises concerns

FROM page one

denied an opportunity to
speak.

“The PLP lays claim to
being of the people and for
the people, however if this
website is correct, the people
once again have no say in ‘my
PLP’,” h said.

“As a card-carrying mem-
ber of the PLP and former
chairman of the Marathon
branch, I am able to say that
‘we the people’ were not
informed of any decision to
name a candidate to the con-
stituency of Marathon but to
have Sen. Fitzgerald posted
on the website as ‘the’ candi-
date is an insult to the people
of Marathon.

“In fact, knowing that the
candidate’s committee has not
met to determine who is to be
the candidate, suggests that
some scheme is amidst in my
beloved PLP,” he said.

Mr Percentie also took
exception with what he felt
was Mr Fitzgerald’s attempt
to lay claim to events that
took place in the constituency
of which he claims Mr Fitzger-
ald “has no knowledge of”.

Pt a

I]-GUCCI COLLECTION

stainless steel-black with rubber strap

a

eye 01

emerald bay exuma

marsh harbour abaco

gucci bay street & bank lane
gucci crystal court at atlantis

“As the former chairman
the membership and I didn’t
see or hear from him during
any of these events. I note
with great concern that the
voice of Marathon is not being
heard.

“The good people want not
only a son of the soil - but a
son of Marathon to represent
them.

“The people of Marathon
wish no longer to have visi-
tors representing them, they
want one who really lives the
same life that they do and
therefore feel their pains, hear
their cries and knows their
burdens.

“Tam such an individual
and I am preparing myself to
stand up for ‘Our Marathon’.
Yes Marathon the time has
come for you to make a
choice that will provide you
with a leader who is from
amongst you. You know
where I live, you don’t need to
RSVP to see me or place your
name on list at a gate in order
to gain access to this union vil-
lage boy. As I indicated earli-
er Senator Fitzgerald is a fine
son of the soil and I would
certainly wish to have him
along in the house as my com-

284 bay street nassau bahamas 242.302.2800
mall at marathon harbour bay palmdale

rade as the representative for
Seabreeze, Elizabeth or
Ocean Estates but he can
not speak for Marathon,” he
said.

Mr Percentie added a note
to the “powers that be” with-
in the PLP, pleading for them

THE TRIBUNE

to truly allow democracy to
reign and allow the people of
Marathon to chose who they
wish to represent them.

Attempts to reach Senator
Fitzgerald for comment were
unsuccessful up until press
time last night.

EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY

Confidence Insurance Brokers
& Agents Ltd. is seeking to fill the
following position:

JUNIOR CLERK/
MESSENGER

Energetic Male
18-23 years old
Computer knowledge in
Microsoft Excel/ Word
Communicative & Writing skills
is an asset.
Ability to work with cash
Driver’s License required.

Please submit a resume by
hand or mail to:

Confidence Insurance Brokers
& Agents Ltd.
Shirley Street
P.O. box SS-6253
Nassau, Bahamas

‘RY Py
~ 4eUce * Solutions Derm?

NOTICE

Mohs Surgery in Nassau

DR. JOHN STRASSWIMMER, MOHS SURGEON
will be visiting The Skin Centre on Friday
June 19, 2009. Dr Strasswimmer trained at
Harvard and Yale and is Board Certified and a
Fellow of the Mohs College.

Mohs Micrographic Surgery is an advanced
treatment process for skin cancer which is
now offered at The Skin Centre. It offers the
highest possible cure rate for many skin
cancers and simultaneously minimizes the
sacrifice of normal tissue. This cutting-edge
treatment requires highly specialized
physicians that serve as surgeon, pathologist
and reconstructive surgeon.

Our visiting Mohs Surgeon has extensive
experience in the Mohs Micrographic
Procedure. The technique is used to remove
the two most common forms of skin cancer:
basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell
carcinoma.

For more information, please contact:
The Skin Centre, Harbour Bay Plaza,
East Bay Street Tel. 393-7546.





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 9



HOSPITAL AUTHORITY BLOOD DRIVE

b I

uJ

the Mall Of Marathon.

THE HOSPITAL AUTHORITY along with BTC accepted blood from members of the public on Saturday at



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Minister can see no resolution hetween govt and nurses

FROM page one

when nurses learned they would not receive their
four per cent pay increase this year and the health
insurance they expected last year has been post-
poned to a projected date of 2012.

Dr Minnis said he cannot say what resolution
government will come to with the public nursing
staff.

PMH has suspended non-emergency surgeries,
excluding those for visitors from the Family
Islands, and closed almost all specialty clinics
since the action began.

Only the oncology clinic, dialysis clinic, mater-
nity high risk clinic, comprehensive clinic and
general practice clinic remained open, as well as
the Accident and Emergency department and
Intensive Care Unit.

Dr Minnis said: “I think they are coping. They
are getting tired working these exhaustive shifts,
but I think they are doing their best in trying to
ensure the Bahamian public get the best care
during this time.”

WSC staff took industrial action over pay on
Thursday, and Bahamas Utility and Service Allied
Workers Union (BUSAWU) president Carmen
Kemp said she wants government to ‘come to
the table’ to negotiate members’ concerns and
the industrial agreement which expired two years
ago.

A statement from BUSAWU maintains WSC
managers and staff have been pitted against each
other in an ‘explosive’ state of affairs as a result of
government’s delay.

BUSAWU states: “We have extended every
courtesy and attempted to negotiate in absolute
good faith with the government and executive



management of the corporation but to no avail.”

And the union maintains members pay is not
the only concern.

BUSAWU states: “We are also concerned with
the fact that a number of opportunities to grow
our business are on the table and that these
opportunities may be negotiated or given away,
without giving WSC and by extension our coun-
try an opportunity to benefit from them.

“What we cannot delay or defer is our demand
that the woes of the corporation be addressed
and that the Bahamian people are given the ser-
vice they deserve.”

WSC services are expected to return to normal
tomorrow.

However, the disruption in public health care is
expected to continue.

Patients are advised to only attend PMH or
local health clinics in medical emergencies.

If you are not sure if you have a medical emer-
gency call 326-7014, 502-7812, or 919.

Patients scheduled to receive surgical proce-
dures should call their physician or call 322-2861
extension 3149 to reschedule.

For all general inquiries call 322-2861 extension
3149 or 502-7890/1.

‘YOUR VIEW’

To have your say on this or any other
issue, email The Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your
letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street,
PO. Box N-3207

Fantastic
Father's Day
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this Father's Day and
with any purchase of
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for the special man in your life!

Promotion begins
Monday 15th June,
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PAGE 10, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE


























Deryuse 25
FUNERAL DIRECTORS

“Rendering the finest in caring and compassionae service
regardless af financial condition.”
Tih Terrace, Collins Avenue * (242) T56-2 087 *
PG) Bor G2a79 ® Wansee, Hahannars

Ms. DELORES
FERGUSON,
98

of Fox Hill Road South,
will be held on
Wednesday, June 17th,
2009 at 11:00 a.m. at St.
Anselm's Roman
Catholic Church, Bernard
Road, Fox Hill. Officiating will ba Fr. Noal Clarke,
assisted by Deacon Raymond Forbes. Interment will
be made in the Church's Cemetery, Bernard Road,

Her memories will be treasured by her nieces, Shirley
Fox, Betty Robinson, Patricia Bell, Maude Demeritte,
Barbara Rahming and Nancy Wilmott. Hear nephews,
Earl Wilmott, John Rahming and Edward Robinson
Jr; grand nieces and nephews, Phiora Clarke, Andrea
Bastian, Elizabeth Fox, Joanne Fox, Shirley Gray,
Melvern Fox, Jackie Rolle, Kayla, Anita and Schrelle
Wilmott, Parnela Miller, Renee Wilmott, Vernita
sawyer, Dorette Ferguson, Emericka and Stephanie
Robinson, Sharon, Anne and Monique, Angella
Sweeting, Bernadette, Christopher Rahming, Eric
dr. Barry, Larry, Edwin, Jerry, Richard, Brian, Mario,
Kevin Wilmott, Alphonso Woodside, Trevor and Brian
Young, Mark, Marcellus and Trevor Miller, Eric and
Michael Fox. Other relatives and friends including,
special fnend and care-taker, Ms. Miriam Roker and
family, Mrs Maria Knowles and family, Mrs. Ella
Thompson, Ms. Nadine Novella, Ms. Marina Smith,
Mr. Chris Carroll and family, Msgr. Preston Moss,
Father Clarke, The Eucharistic Ministers at St.
Anselm's Church, the staff of the Geriatric Ward and
a host of other friends too numerous to mention,

The body will repose in the Blessed Redeemer
Chapel at Ferguson's Funeral Directors, 7th Terrace
Collins Avenue on Tuesday from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00
p.m. and at the church on Wednesday from 10:00
a.m. until service time.

>>BUYERS

To buikl sakes theoweh purchasce that preeele uniemiied options to

nec nsamer eink The cancidase aust have a firm anckrsanel-
ng of marker trends, with a chear andersanding of logistics alome wial
ihe ability io establish
Mininquns of 2 years agperience, pen

Eecellent Chral aml Wiretnem skilb

aod mainiain effective verslor relatior ships:
Wicient io Word & Excel sutiies
ig a ust. Marketing experience will

be consicered a pauls.

>>ASSIS TANT MANAGERS

BOC as kocy support directing Use caaly aperanoie of a ccnepetitive

retail eviromment. The candidape must have o proven 2 jility oo ger Tey

siles, implement marketing and merchanclising siraiecies whik

tears & ALE Pathe. p CHL ii 6 ini pale rs. L iveceel SLATE M ISA La SS

both oral and writien

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Growth & Advancement within the organization
‘A alaey thar will eneecinemrate with ¢ x PCR nor

Croup Medical & Penson Plans

EVALUATING AN APPRAISAL

Bahamas real
estate today

Carmen Massoni



All of us often turn to pro-
fessionals when we need
critical services performed
or important guidance
offered. Of course, the buy-
ing and selling of property
is one such example, and the
selection of a representative
should be pursued careful-
ly with interviews and
research.

The same applies when
choosing another profes-
sional who is crucial to the
real estate transaction — the
appraiser. But who orders
the appraisal?

Most often, it is the
lender, who uses the report
to confirm a property’s val-
ue before approving financ-
ing.

Sandals



Sometimes, either the
buyer or the seller will order
an appraisal in order to
secure an independent opin-
ion of the value.

If you hire an appraiser,
be sure he or she is licensed
by BREA.

All lenders will provide a
list of qualified appraisers.
Lenders will finance sales
based on the lower of the
sales price or the appraised
value.

Royal Bahamian Resort & Offshore Island

Invites application for the following position:

GROUNDS MANAGER

The successful candidate should have the

following qualifications

* Supervise the day to day maintenance of the

grounds

* Work directly with landscape contractor

* Report to General Manager & Hotel Manager

* Knowledge of plants, insects, disease,
Irrigation pesticides, fertilizers

* Minimum 3 years experience

Applications should be email to:
mreampbell(@grp.sandals.com

2>MEAT SU de RVISOR

lo manage the day to day operation

Wo Meat purchasang areal Stamkord Operating Pooedares

akalle desirals

me PERSEDRSULLSSTE E

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packaging al

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NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE CONTACT BY EMAIL HR@ABACOMARKETS.COM

Youngsters enjoy
the slates Almada Comp eer tT



THESE YOUNGSTERS enjoy music at the Mall at Marathon on
: Saturday during the Hospital Authority and BTC’s blood drive.

IACK ISAAC sy
aoe a

Hae

TRIPLEX LOTS FOR SALE
Bem eee eT

eNO Ere Balen mero |
community in Coral Harbour
these 8,000 sq. ft. lots are being
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Office: 322-1069
Jack Isaacs: 359-2964
Samira Coleby: 436-5322

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Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

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THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS

In Argentina,
lissident
Cuban doctor
has no grudge

@ BUENOS AIRES,
Argentina

A DISSIDENT
Cuban surgeon said
Sunday that she har-
bors no grudge against
Fidel Castro upon
arriving in Argentina
for an emotional family
reunion after being
denied permission to
leave Cuba for more
than a decade, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

Desperate to see her
ailing, 90-year-old
mother, Dr. Hilda
Molina said she wrote
directly to Cuban lead-
ers seeking permission
to travel.

On Sunday, she was
able for the first time
to hug her Argentine-
born
grandchildren, ages 13
and 8, and see her
mother, who was
allowed to leave Cuba
months ago.

"TI have inside a
wound that will never
heal," Molina told
reporters after meeting
with her son for
the first time in 15
years.

"I say to Mr. Fidel
Castro, who has been
the scourge of my fami-
ly, may he have all the
peace in the world.
May he choose the path
that the country needs.
I don't need to forgive
him for anything."

Cubans like Molina
who dare to openly
criticize Cuba's system
are often denied per-
mission to leave the
country.

Cuba also restricts
individual foreign trav-
el by its physicians,
saying it spends too
much training them to
allow them to emigrate
for higher salaries else-
where.

Openness

The surprise travel
authorization, issued
Friday, was seen as a
gesture of openness in
the era after Fidel Cas-
tro ceded power to his
brother Raul in 2006
for health reasons.

It was also seen as a
nod to Argentine Presi-
dent Cristina Fernan-
dez, a Cuba ally who
along with her husband
and predecessor,
Nestor Kirchner, had
asked the Castros since
2003 to allow Molina to
leave.

But Molina said her
approval to travel in
itself did not indicate
broader changes by the
Cuban government.

"That will be
resolved when we
Cubans do not have to
ask permission to enter
and leave the country,"
she said.

"There are 11 million
Cubans whose rights
are being violated."

Molina, who once
posed for high-profile
photos with Fidel Cas-
tro, was a well-known
physician at a govern-
ment institution until
1994, when she
resigned after question-
ing the ethics of using
human stem cell tissue
in studies on treating
ailments like Parkin-
son's disease.

That same year her
son left Cuba with his
Argentine wife.

Molina's travel docu-
ments are good for sev-
eral months. She said
she intends to return to
Cuba, but not while her
mother is in precarious
health.

"I put it in the letter
to Raul Castro ... that
when I close the eyes of
my mother I will
return,” Molina said.

"I want her to recov-
er and to return togeth-
er.

“But as long as she is
in danger I am not
going to abandon her."

LU
ol
>
oP,
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a
Y)
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on
LU
Q.
Le,
an
QO.

MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 11

NASSAU LISTINGS

DEVELOPED RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

. BAY STREET

LOT NO. Parcel of Land
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Two-Storey Commercial Building
(Millie’s Place)

PROPERTY SIZE: 3,744 sq. ft.
LOCATION: On the southern side
of Bay Street between Deveaux
Street and Gomez Alley
APPRAISED VALUE: $993,000

. BEL-AIR ESTATES -

CARMIGHAEL ROAD

LOT NO. 259

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence,

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east on
Carmichael Road from Faith
Avenue take the fourth corner on
the right (Turtle Drive) property is
fourth house on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $186,000

. CARMICHAEL ROAD

LOT NO. Parcel of Land
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residence

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 12,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travelling east on
Carmichael Road from Bacardi
Road take the first asphalt paved
easement on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $401,882

. CHIPPINGHAM SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 96

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

3 beds /1 bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: From Nassau Street
onto Boyd Road, take the fifth
corner on the right - Dunmore
Street and then second corner
on the right Musgrove Street. The
property is the first house on the
corner left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $120,000

CORAL MEADOWS

SUBDIVISION —- WESTERN
DISTRICT

LOT NO. 4

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 7,500 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Western side of
Symonette Road and 150 feet
northward of Adelaide Road and
approximately a mile westward of
Coral Harbour Roundabout.
APPRAISED VALUE: $260,000

. DESTINY GARDEN

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 147

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

3 Beds /2Baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travelling west

on Carmichael Road from the
intersection of Gladstone Road

- about 2,000 feet - turn right at
the entrance of Destiny Garden
Subdivision; turn left at t-junction.
The property is the 19th house on
the right.

APPRAISED VALUE: $137,000

. ALLEN DRIVE CARMICHAEL

ROAD

LOT NO. 2

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Duplex Lot

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travelling west along
Carmichael Road turn through the
corner by Geneva Brass Seafood.
Take the third corner on the left
and travel to the end of the road.
The vacant lot is on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $65,000

. MALVARIC ESTATES

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 5

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Multi-Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 9,114 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travelling south along
High Vista Drive from East Bay
Street, take the 1st corner left

and then first right (Mango Drive).
Heading south take the 4th corner
right. At the t- junction, turn left
then take the first corner right.
The vacant lot is the third property
on the left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $109,000

. ELIZABETH ESTATES

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 178

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

5 beds / 1 bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Enter Elizabeth
Estates from Prince Charles, take
the first right and follow the curve.
The property is located on the
corner of St. Vincent Avenue and
Ghana Circle.

APPRAISED VALUE: $118,000

. ENGLERSTON SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 19 Block 22
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residence

2-beds / 1-bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: On the western side
of St. Charles Vincent Street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $64,000

. ENGLERSTON SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 4 Block 7
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Triplex Apartment building
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east on
Cordeaux Avenue from East
Street take the second right (Key
West Street). Heading south

on Key West Street the subject
property is the sixth building on
the left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $243,000

10. FAITH GARDENS SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 23 Block 4
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-family Residence

2 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: From Faith Avenue
enter Faith Gardens and travel
east along Cleveland Boulevard
then take the fourth corner

on the left. The property is

the 13th house on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $184,000

11. GOLDEN GATES TWO_

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 1010

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on
Carmichael Road, turn south onto
Jack Fish Drive; turn through the
fourth corner on the right. The
property is the third lot on the
right.

APPRAISED VALUE: $112,000

12. HAWKINS HILL

LOT NO. 52

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 6.175 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Southern side of
Windwhistle Street just east on
Hawkins Hill.

APPRAISED VALUE: $275,000

. OPULENT HEIGHTS
SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 28

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,597 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on
Carmichael Road, take the first
paved road after “Outdoor Patio”
on the left. Take the second
corner left, then the first corner
right. The vacant lot is second
to the last on the right before the
road ends.

APPRAISED VALUE: $75,000

. SOUTH OCEAN ESTATES

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 9 Block 4

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 11,566 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling south of
Lyford Cay, immediately pass
Mount Pleasant turn left on South
Ocean Boulevard to new South
Ocean Estates. The vacant lot is
number 9 in Block 4.
APPRAISED VALUE: $110,000

13. JUBILEE GARDENS

16. NASSAU EAST SUBDIVISION

17

18. PARADISE CONDOMINIUMS

. SOUTH SEAS SUBDIVISION

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 48

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

3 beds / 1 bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: From Fire Trail road
enter Jubilee Gardens and

take the first corner on the left
then the first right, the property is
the second house on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $128,000

14. MARSHALL ROAD

LOT NO. 17D

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Triplex Apartment

One 2-bedroom/ 2-bath & Two
2-bedroom /1-bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 10,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west along
Marshall Road from South Beach
Road, take the first corner on the
right (Tiao End Road). The subject
property is the fourth building on
the left painted green with white
trim.

APPRAISED VALUE: $288,000

15. MILLENNIUM GARDENS

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 85

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence,

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,952 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling north

on Bethel Avenue from Harold
Road take the third corner on
the right, Heading east pass the
third T-junction around the curve
to the junction of Sis. Theresa
Symonette Drive then turn left
onto Sis. Maria Rahming Drive.
The property is the 14th house on
the right.

APPRAISED VALUE: $182,000

LOT NO. 4 Block 8
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Apartment Building/Commercial
Complex

PROPERTY SIZE: 14,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Eastern district of
New Providence. The subject
property is on Yamacraw Hill
Road opposite Treasure Cove.
APPRAISED VALUE: $686,000

. NASSAU VILLAGE SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 10 & 11 Block 48
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

5 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 10,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travelling east along
Taylor street take a left

at the T-junction onto Alexandria
Boulevard, then take the third
right onto Matthews Street. The
property is located on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $257,000

LOT NO. 65

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Townhouse Unit 1 — Two-storey
apartment

PROPERTY SIZE: Floor area
1,215 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Eastern side of Faith
Avenue North - 100 feet south of
Hamster Road.

APPRAISED VALUE: $150,000

LOT NO. 199

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,983 sq. ft.
LOCATION: From Carmichael
Road turn onto Barcardi Road,
take the seventh corner on the left
then turn into the entrance gate.
The vacant lot is located on the
southern side of Channel Drive off
Eastward Drive.

APPRAISED VALUE: $90,000

. SOUTH SEAS SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 261

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,500 sq. ft.
LOCATION: From Carmichael
Road turn onto Barcardi Road,
take the seventh corner on left.
Turn into the entrance gate and
take the first right then second
left. The vacant lot is the twenty-
second property on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $90,000

21

19. PINEWOOD GARDENS

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 1438

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Two-
storey Residence 3 beds / 3 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: South on Wild Guava
Avenue

APPRAISED VALUE: $315,000

20. SANDILANDS VILLAGE

LOT NOS. 7 and 8

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence, with 3
apartments under construction
PROPERTY SIZE: Lot 7 - 7,970
sq. ft / Lot 8 - 8,419 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west along
Sandilands Village Road from Fox
Hill Road, take the ninth paved
road (Vanessa Close) on the left.
The properties are situated at the
northwestern side of the street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $277,000

. SOLDIER ROAD

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Two-storey Commercial Building
PROPERTY SIZE: 4,750 sq. ft.
LOCATION: On Soldier Road
1,000 feet east of Lady Slipper
Road

APPRAISED VALUE: $309,000

22.SOUTH BEACH ESTATES

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 1 Block 22

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Split
Level Residential Building with 3
Apartment Units.

PROPERTY SIZE:

Land 6,600 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Travel south along
East Street from Bamboo
Boulevard take the first corner on
right (Bougainvillea Boulevard).
Heading west on Bougainvillea
Boulevard, take the second
corner on the right, turn left at
the t-junction onto Oxford Drive.
The property is third house on
the right at the western corner of
Serville Drive and Oxford Avenue.
APPRAISED VALUE: $297,000

23. TWYNAM HEIGHTS

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 61

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Two-storey Residence, 2 beds / 1
bath/ with one apartment unit
PROPERTY SIZE: 9,100 sq. ft.
LOCATION: On the corner of
Victoria Street and Coronation
Road immediately east of
Wendy’s off Mackey Street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $203,000

24.YAMACRAW BEACH ESTATES

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 470

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Two-
storey Residence 3 beds / 3 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,200 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Southern side of
Mayaguana Avenue approximately
99 feet east of Yamacraw Beach
Drive.

APPRAISED VALUE: $402,000

VACANT LOTS

. VICTORIA GARDENS
SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 60

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travel south on
Gladstone Road from JFK Drive

take the first corner on the left,

entrance to Victoria Gardens.
Heading east, proceed to the
second T-junction, the property is
directly opposite.

APPRAISED VALUE: $66,000

. VICTORIA PARK SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 6

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Multi-family lot

PROPERTY SIZE: 6,707 sq. ft.
LOCATION: On the northern side
of Bunch Street about 60 feed
south of East Street and opposite
Calvary Deliverance Church
APPRAISED VALUE: $67,000

INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS INCLUSIVE OF TELEPHONE CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS
TO: CB DISTRESSED PROPERTIES, CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT, P.O BOX - SS-6263 NASSAU, BAHAMAS OR
EMAIL US AT: DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM * WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS.





PAGE 12, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009



SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



OTE T ATE

Truckers urged to regain F%

their hunger for success

m By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

IF the Commando Security
Truckers are going to be able to
defend their men’s title in the
New Providence Softball Associ-
ation, manager Perry Seymour
said they will definitely have to
play better than they did on Sat-
urday night.

Despite taking an early 10-2
lead, the Truckers had to dip
down deep to hold off the
Thompson Heavy Equipment
Outlaws 12-10 in the feature
game at the Banker’s Field at the
Baillou Hills Sporting Complex.

It came down to the top of the
seventh when first baseman
Stephen ‘Slugger’ Brown pro-
duced a two-run single to break
up a 10-10 tie for the secure the
win.

+ +

4



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

THOMPSON HEAVY EQUIPMENT OUTLAWS’ Roscoe Thompdon throws a pitch

against the Commando Security Truckers.

In the opener, it was also a
close affair as Robin Hood Hit-
man (formerly the New Breed),
survived with a 4-3 decision over

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the Young Breed, thanks to
Alcott Forbes’ RBI triple in the
seventh.

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Felipé Major/Tribune staff

MANAGER Perry Seymour tries to rally his Commando Security Truckersd in their game against the Thompdon Heavy Equip-

ment Outlaws.

Seymour said. “We have to real-
ize that when we have a team
down, we have to keep them
down. We can’t let them come
back like the Outlaws did or we
will get beat.”

The Truckers avoided their sec-
ond loss of the season to remain
in second place in the standings at
4-1 behind the undefeated Heavy
Lift Dorsey Park Boyz, who are
3-0.

With the loss, the Outlaws suf-
fered their second defeat in three
games and are now in fifth place.

“T think we came out flat,” said
third baseman Hosea Hilton
about Thompson Heavy Equip-
ment’s sluggish start. “We made
too many errors and we can’t win
like that.”

Consolation

The former track star from
Eleuthera, however, admitted
that if there’s any consolation for
his Outlaws, they don’t have that
many seasoned players in their
line-up.

“As the season goes on, we
should get better,” said Hilton,
who is making a return after
almost a 10-year hiatus rom the
sport when he would have played
in Eleuthera.

Also making a comeback was
Truckers’ pitcher Greg Mortimer,
who played in his first game for
the season.

Mortimer gave up seven hits
and six runs through the middle
of the fifth before he was relieved
by Anton ‘Bookie’ Gibson, an
off-season acquistion.

“T’m just still trying to get the
ball over the plate,” Miortimer
said. “But we have to play better
fundamental ball. As the season
goes on, we will get better.”

The Truckers had a pretty good
start as Martin Burrows Jr.,
another off-season acquistion,
came through with a two-run sin-
gle in a three-run first inning.

The Outlaws responded in the
bottom on Juliano Thompson’s
run-producing single.

Again, the Truckers put three
more runs on the scoreboard in
the second, highlighted by Marvin

CBRL Tr

New Providence Softball Association's 2009 league standings
L

Teams

Men's Division

Heavy Lift Dorsey Park Boyz 3
Commando Security Truckers 4
PriceWaterHouse Stingrays 3
Defense Force Commodores 2
Thompson Heavy

Equipment Outlaws

Robin Hood Hitmen

Mighty Mits

Young Breed

Morgan Buccaneers

Ladies' Division

Pineapple Air Wildcats

Sigma Brackettes

Proper Care Pool Lady Sharks
Bristol Mystical Gems
Bommer G Swingers

This week's schedule
Tonight

oOonMmwt o-eH Nt

Pet.

1,000
.800
.150
.666

.666
400
.290
.200
.000

1,000
1,000
.500
.000
.000

7 pm Commando Security vs Mighty Mits (M).
8:30 pm Heavy Lift Dorsey Park vs Morgans Buccaneers (M).

Thursday

7 pm Defense Force Commando vs Morgan Bucaneers (M).
8:30 pm Bommer G Swingers vs Pineapple Air Wildcats (L).

Friday

7 pm Young Breed vs PriceWaterHouse (M).
8:30 pm Thompson Heavy Lift vs Robin Hood Hitmen (M).

Saturday

7 pm Bommer G Swingers vs Untouchables (L).
8:30 pm Mighty Mits vs PriceWaterHouse (M).

A THOMPSON HEAVY EQUIPMENT OUTLAWS’ pitcher tried to avoid ais

é Major/Tribune staff



-Felip

tagged by Commando Security Truckers’ third baseman Jamal Johnson.

‘Tougie’ Wood’s two-run in-the-
park home run.
And the Outlaws plated anoth-

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Tenders ate te be addresced ta:
Mr. Kevin Basden

General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

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fo later than 4:00 p.m.

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er in the bottom as Quintin
Carey’s RBI double knocked in
Giovanni Saunders.

In the third, both teams struck
for three unearned runs.

In their half, Van ‘Lil Joe’
Johnson had a RBI single and he
and Marvin Wood both came
home on an error that put
Stephen ‘Slugger’ Brown on first.

In the bottom, Bruce Mackey
had a oner-out double and scored
on Clayton Bowles’ RBI single
before Hilton and Bowles both
scammered home on on consecu-
tive miscues.

Commando Security struck for
their 10th run in the fourth on
Tommy ‘Bucker T’ Fergusn’s
RBI single to plate Julian Taylor
in the fourth.

It wasn’t until the fifth when
Thompson’s Heavy Equipment
produced a pair of runs on a two-
run homer from Juliano Thomp-
son and Bowles doubled to send
Mortimer in the dug-out for Gib-
son.

The Outlaws didn’t get to Gib-
son until the sixth when Bowles
got a two-out two-run triple and
he scored on Carey’s RBI single
to actually pull even at 10-10.

But in the seventh, it was
Brown’s two-rn single, knocking
in Van Johnson and Marvin
Wood to seal the game for the
Truckers.

Like the feature contest, the
Hitman had to go to the seventh
before they held off the Young
Breed for their second win in five
games.

Alcott Forbes’ two-out RBI
triple plated William Delancy
before Forbes came home on an
error for the tying and winning
run.

“T haven’t been swining the bat
like I should. I just felt it was time
for me to come through,” Forbes
said. “But as a team, we’re flat.
We should not played these guys
this close.”

Forbes finished 2-for-4 with a
double and triple, two RBI anda
run scored, while Adrian Pinder
was 2-for-3 with a double and a
RBI.

Cardinal Gilbert got the win
on the mound over Eugene Pratt.

In a losing effort, Angelo But-
ler was 2-for-4 with two RBI; Ken
Wood 2-for-2 wirh a run and
Addie Finley 2-for-4 with a run.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



TRACK AND FIELD

Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium gets facelift



WITH the Bahamas Association of Athletic
Associations getting ready to host three major
competitions over the next two weeks, inclusive of
the Central American and Caribbean Age Group
Championships and the Junior Nationals both
this weekend and the Open Nationals, June 26th
and 27th, the Thomas A. Robinson Track and
Field Stadium is currently getting a facelift.

Workmen are busy resurfacing and repairing
the track surface with fresh coats of paint on the
lanes and lane numbers.

Work is also being done to the field and bleach-
ers in the spectators area.

The Local Organizing Committee for the CAC
Age Group, chaired by Dr Bernard Nottage, is
also busy preparing to receive the twenty counties




FROM page 15

Tonique Williams-Darling, how-
ever, emerged as the first
Bahamian to cash in on the pay-
check when she and Sweden’s
Christan Olssen split the $1 mil-
lion in 2004.

Brown, in thanking God for
keeping him healthy after the
race, said it was good to be back
in Europe after a nine-month
absence to pull off his first victo-

“At the start of the race, I felt
pretty good,” he said. “My legs
were a bit heavy, so I wasn’t able
to do what I wanted to do in the
race, but I still got the W under
my belt. So I will take it and not
worry about the time.

“T’m in grat shape, but I just
felt real flat for some reason.
Maybe it’s because I didn’t allow
myself sufficient time to get in
here and get adjusted to the time
difference. There was a lot of
things that factored into the race.”

Despite how he felt, Brown’s
time was good enough to place
him well ahead of the African
record holder Gary Kikaya, who
did 45.68 for second.

Grand Bahamian Michael Mat-
tieu was third in 45.92 and
Andretti Bain, who is slowly mak-
ing his return to the track after
being hampered by a slight ham-
string injury, was seventh in 46.82.

“It was a nice strong field. I
was racing guys who were top
notched, even though the guys
didn’t run as fast as they did last
year at this time,” Brown stressed.

“At the same time, these guys
could pull anything out of the bas-
ket. and it was nice to have
Andretti and Michael in the same
race. You don’t really get to see
three Bahamians in one race at
the same time.”

The reigning national champi-
on said the race was also a confi-
dent booster for him as he pre-
pare to come home to defend his
title for the Bahamas Association
of Athletic Associations’ Nation-
al Championships, June 26-27 at
the Thomas A. Robinson Track
and Field Stadium.

Brown, 30, won’t compete
again until the Nationals, which
will also serve as the final trials
for the IAAF World Champi-
onships in Athletics in Berlin in
August.

After the Nationals, Brown will
then return to Europe to run in
the next three legs of the Golden
League in Oslo (July 3), Rome
(July 10) and Paris (July 17)
before they head to the World’s
in Berlin.

Following the World’s, the final
two legs of the Golden League
will take place in Zurich (August
28) and Brussels (September 4).

Brown, incidentally, also leads
the IAAF’s 2009 World Athletics
Tour in the 400. After three races,
Brown has accumulated a total
of 31 points, tied with Kikaya,
who only did two races.

Mathieu is tied with two others
for seventh with 14.

There was also a showdown in
Berlin behind the top two female
sprinters with Chandra Sturrup
taking fourth in 11.18, followed
by Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie
in fifth in 11.19.

Jamaican Kerron Stewart
pulled off the victory in 11.00,
while American Stephanie Durst
broke up the Jamaican sweep in
second in 11.15. Sheri-Ann
Brooks, another Jamaica, got
third in 11.18.

Sturrup is now fifth in the
World Athletics standings with
27 points from four meets. Fer-
guson-McKenzie is 17th from two

BLAZING A
TRAIL: Chris
‘Fireman’ Brown
after his race in
the 2009 Golden
League in Europe.

meets with 15 points.

Also from Berlin, Sharma
Sands, the national 110 hurdles
record holder, had to settle for
fourth in the event in 13.56
behind an American sweep by
Dexter Faulk (13.18), Ryan Wil-
son (13.21) and David Payne
(13.22).

Sands occupies fifth place in
the World Athletics standings





with 33 points from five events.

Although they didn’t compete
yesterday, Olympic bronze
medalist Leevan ‘Superman’
Sands is tied with Cuban Arnie
David Girat for second in the
men’s triple jump with 20 points
from two meets and world cham-
pion Donald Thomas third in the
men’s high jump with 16.5 points
from three meets.

expected to be in Nassau this week. The first
team is expected to arrive today and the balance
on Tuesday and Wednesday.

In total there our some one hundred and six
athletes, forty five coaches and officials along
with Federation Representatives and CAC Exec-
utives. The BAAA is appealing all Bahamians to
come out and support all the upcoming meets

starting with the CAC Age Group Championships
on Thursday at 9 am. The Bahamas will be rep-
resented by Jeorjette Williams and Jeisha Taylor
in the girls 11-12; Danielle Gibson and Pedrya
Seymour in the girls 13-14; Julius Nottage and
Timothy Wilson in the boys 11-12 and Delano
Davis from Grand Bahama and Jerrio Rahming
in the boys 13-14.

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PAGE 14, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

SPORTS
LHiViehwr

memorable
Cae aN

FROM page 15

place finishers from the NORCE-
CA Pool C. It was the team’s first
win of the tournament in straight
sets and easily their most lopsided
margin of victory. Cheryse Rolle
led the scoring with 12 points, all
coming from attacks. Team cap-
tain Kelsie Johnson and
Tasamine Emmanuel-Poitier both
finished with 11 points apiece,
while Melinda Bastian chipped
in with 10. The Bahamas finished
the tournament at 2-2, with an
opening round win over Haiti, 25-
23 25-21 22-25 22-25 15-11, a sec-
ond round loss to Barbados 22-25
25-18 26-24 23-25 15-7, and the
loss to Jamaica in the semi-finals,
25-23 25-9 25-13.

Much of the focus for the
national team had been centred
on the theft of approximately
$47,000 worth of equipment and
personal effects from the team’s
locker room during their second
round match against Barbados.







US-BASED Tonya Joseph
is rejected at the net by
Melinda Bastian of the
Bahamas.

Team Head Coach Joe Smith
said his squad willingly stepped
up to the challenge when faced
with an unexpected adverse situ-
ation. “These girls had to go

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through a lot. Just to be able to
finish the tournament and finish it
successfully says a lot about them
and how much they wanted this,”
he said, “We had everything
stolen and they could have quit
but they bounced back the best
way they could.”

“Tt was hard for the team, men-
tally and physically to get back
into playing. We had to deal with
the situation with the police and
heading into the game against
Jamaica, we had to be at the
police station until 6pm and we
were scheduled to play at 7, so to
play well in that semi-final was
hard,” he said, “They had a
chance to regroup and still was
able to focus on doing what we
have to do, which is advance to
the next round.”

sports

TRACK
ARMRISTER/WHYTE AT NCAA

SPRINTERS Cache Armbris-
ter and Kristy Whyte finished
eighth and ninth respectively in
the wmoen’s 200 metres on the
final day of competition at the
NCAA Division One 2009 Out-
door Track and Field Champi-
onships.

On Saturday, Armbrister, a
sophomore at Auburn University,

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HIGH SCORER Melinda
Bastian scoring another kill
for the Bahamas over Tonya

was clocked in 23.80 seconds,
while Whyte, a junior at the Uni-
versity of Miami, got ninth in
23.91.

“T think what got me was my
start,” said Armbrister in an a
quote from Auburn’s website. “T
didn't fire out like I wanted to,
so I ended up running a little bit
out of my race on the curve, and
having to set it up all over again
coming home on the straight-
away.

“Being an All-American helps
me feel a little bit better, but I
hate to feel like I settled for
eighth, so it gives me something
to work for next year.”

Porscha Lucas, a junior at
Texas A&M, stopped the clock
in 22.81 for the victory.

The only other Bahamian to
make the final at the meet was
Southern Illinois’ senior Bianca
Stuart, who had to settle for the
14th and final spot in the womrn’s
long jump with a leap of 19-feet, 3
1/4-inches (5.87 metres).

Kimberly Williams, a sopho-
more at Florida State, won the
event with her leap of 21-5 1/2
(6.54 metres).

a



TENNIS
KNOWLES /BHUPATHI IN EAST-
BOURNE

After making an early exit at the
French Open at Roland Garros,
Mark Knowles and his Indian
partner Mahesh Bhupathi are
hoping to regain their form at the
Aegon International in East-
bourne, London, Great Britain.
Knowles and Bhupathi are the
number two seeds in the tourna-
ment that open today and run
through Sunday. The top seeds
are Lukas Dlouhy from the Czech
Republic and Leander Paes from
India, who are coming off their
French Open tournament victory
as the No.3 seeds.

When they start play, Knowles
and Bhuapthi will take on the
team of Stephen Huss from Aus-
tralia and Ross Hutchins from
Great Britain.

Going into the tournament,
Knowles and Bhupathi have
slipped to number four, trailing
Dlouhy and Paes, who moved up
to No.3. At the top of the ladder
is the American identical twin
brothers, Bob and Mike Bryan,

CO-PEBATUR
INSURANCE CAF

Kenmore Bynoe/Photos

who regained the lead from
Daniel Nestor and Nenad Zimon-
jic.
The Aegon International is a pre-
lude to Wimbledon that starts in
Great Britain on June 22. Wim-
bledon is the second Grand Slam
tournament for the year.
Knowles and Bhupathi were
finalist at the first Grand Slam at
the Australian Open in January.
At the second Grand Slam at
Roland Garros in May, Knowles
and Bhupathi were ousted in the
third round s the fourth seeds.

TRACK
FACEOFF CORRECTIONS

IN Saturday’s edition of the
BAAA’s Face Off for its athletes
heading into the National Open
Track and Field Stadium, it was
incorrectly stated that sprinter
Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie
attended RM Bailey High School.
She actually attended CC Sweet-
ing and then graduated from St.
Andrew’s.

The Tribune apologises for the
error.

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THE TRIBUNE PAGE 15

spor

MONDAY, JUNE 15,

ts

2009








CEC Adda Ud

Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net











































CHRIS ‘Fireman’ Brown,
still beaming from his two
recent Hall of Fame induc-
tions in the United States, has
gotten off to a sizzling start
on the 2009 Golden League
in Europe.

At the first of six meets on
the circuit for the whopping
$1 million jackpot on Sunday,
Brown won the men’s 400
metres at the DKB-ISTAF in
Berlin, Germany in 45.61 sec-
onds in a field that included
two other Bahamians.

Only the winners are eligi-
ble for the pot and Brown is
now in company with three
others on the men’s side and
five on the women’s side that
will not feature any Bahami-
ans.

Events on this year’s jack-
pot are the men’s 100, 400,
3,000/5,000, 110 hurdles and
javelin. The women’s are the
100, 400, 100 hurdles, high
jump and pole vault.

“T’m just waiting until
(Jeremy) Wariner and
(LaShawn) Merritt to come
on the scene,” said Brown of
the American dynamic duo
whom Brwn has had his share
of problems with at the major
international meets including
the Olympic Games and the
World Championships.

Neither Wariner or Mer-
ritt competed in the opener,
which makes them ineligible
for the hefty cash prize. To
be eligible, a competitor must
compete and win all six
meets.

Sprinter Chandra Sturrup
had a shot at the big cash
incentive in 2001, but she fal-
tered down the stretch.

SEE page 13
















AP Photo/Michael Sohn




CHRIS BROWN finishes first during the men's 400 metres race of the
ISTAF Golden League Athletics Meeting in Berlin Sunday, June 14, 2009.

©2009 Hilton Hospitality Inc.







WOMEN’S WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP VOLLEYBALL

Bahamas clinches
memorable victory

Team earns berth

to third round of
qualification for
championships

@ by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

Against a wall of adversity,
team Bahamas prevailed in one
of the most memorable national
team triumphs to date, while
simultaneously earning a berth to
the third round of qualification
for the 2010 FIVB World Cham-
pionships.

The Bahamas prevailed in the
bronze medal game against St.
Lucia in straight sets 26-24, 25-
14, 25-21 yesterday at NORCE-
CA Pool D during the second
round of the FIVB Women’s
World Championship at the
Garfield Sobers Sports Complex
in Bridgetown, Barbados.

With the win the Bahamas,
along with the loser of the gold
medal match between Barbados
and Jamaica, will be relegated to
NORCECA Pool I in Puerto
Rico along with the host country
and Canada

The winner of the tournament
will advance to the NORCECA
Pool G, July 6-8 in Orlando,
Florida to match up against the
USA, Costa Rica, and the second

SEE page 14

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THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY,

€
c ie
| ,

il

JUNE

ie



2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

J

Colinalmperial.

Confidence For Life







Government
draws down

$200m bridge
KAU LOTINY

* Government ‘not
optimistic about quick
economic turnaround’

* Sovereign bond to replace
bridge facility to be placed
internationally when market
conditions allow



Zhivargo Laing

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Government has begun
to draw down on the $200 mil-
lion bridging loan facility put
together by a Bahamas-based
commercial bank syndicate to
cover the anticipated $260 mil-
lion revenue shortfall for fiscal
2008-2009, with one minister
telling Tribune Business: “We
aren’t optimistic about a quick
[economic] turnaround.”

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, confirmed to
Tribune Business that it was
“correct” to say the Govern-
ment had “drawn on those
resources in the last couple of
weeks” as it moves to shore up
the deficit left by the recession’s
impact on its revenue intake.

SEE page 7B

The information contained is from a third |
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report, af





Freeport-Florida
ferry service plan

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A new ferry company is
pledging to start a daily round-
trip service between West
Palm Beach and Freeport this
year, Tribune Business can
reveal, with the possibility of
future expansion that includes
routes between Florida and
the Family Islands.

Ride Ocean Zoom, on its
website www.rideocean-
zoom.com, pledged that it
would “provide customers
with a comfortable and fast
way to get to the Bahamas
from West Palm Beach. Our
services also provide Bahami-
ans with a fast and cost-effi-
cient way to get to and from
the main land of the United
States”.

Ride Ocean Zoom execu-
tives did not respond to
detailed questions sent to
them by Tribune Business via
e-mail. A telephone call to the
number listed on the compa-
ny’s website was met with the
message: “Our services are

scheduled to begin this year,
2009.”

Still, the company seems
genuine, with its senior exec-
utives all listed on the website
and their background details
checking out via Internet-
related research conducted by
this newspaper.

Ride Ocean Zoom’s
founder and chief executive is
named as Rosalind Withers,
who is said to have some 25
years of experience in the
sales and marketing, and logis-
tics, industries after working
with companies such as East-
man Kodak, Ryder Truck
Rental, Raytheon Data Sys-
tem and all eight companies
that comprise Federal Express
(FedEx).

Other Board members
include Chris How-Davies,
founder and owner of 2mor-
row Group, a UK-based com-
pany with a more than $60
million turnover and 180 staff.
It is highly involved in travel
technology and ferry distribu-
tion organisation.

A Bahamian, Spencer Mal-

Ahaco Markets targets $100m
Sales after 10-fold profit hike

* Company ‘puts together five-year growth plan’
eyeing new Nassau store location

* QI profits increase to over $1m from $82,000
last year, with food division sales up $2.2m at 12%
* Retailer leases land, with option to buy, for
possible 15-20,000 sq ft Solomon's expansion

* Achieves $127,000 net cash position, with all
brands and stores ‘profitable for first time in a

long time’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Abaco Markets has “put
together a five-year growth strat-
egy” that may involve new store
locations, with its president pre-
dicting that sales will reach the
$100 million mark for this finan-
cial year, as the BISX-listed retail
group continues to defy the reces-
sion with a more than ten-fold
increase in first quarter net prof-
its.

Gavin Watchorn told Tribune
Business that if the $100 million
group top-line forecast holds true
for the year to January 31, 2010,
the Solomon’s SuperCentre and

SEE page 3B

lory, who worked on Ginn sur
met’s real estate sales is vice-
president of international sales
and marketing for Ride Ocean
Zoom, with Michael Calandra
named as vice-president of
development. Alfred DeMott,
the company’s chief financial
officer, was said to be vice-
president and treasurer of the
Bacarus Group, an entity cre-
ated to market travel and
logistics services in the
Bahamas.

It appears as if the concept
offered by Ride Ocean Zoom
will similar to that of Bahamas
Ferries, which services the
likes of Abaco, Eleuthera,
Harbour Island, Andros and
Exuma from Nassau. The type
of vessel displayed on the
company’s website is almost
a mirror image of the ones
employed by Bahamas Fer-
ries.

Ride Ocean Zoom’s emer-
gence, if it comes to fruition
and full operation, could also

SEE page 6B



GAVIN WATCHORN

Ross considers 3,000-
person medical school
expansion plan

* Port conducting studies on Freeport's
feasibility for medical tourism

* St George estate's attorney lobbying
government to deny Babak work permit

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Ross University is considering expanding its Freeport-based
medical school campus to 3,000 persons “within two to three
years”, senior Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA) offi-
cials have confirmed to Tribune Business, with the latter’s
group president calling for an end to “distractions” such as the
lobbying effort urging the Government to deny its chairman a
renewal of his work permit.

Tribune Business can reveal that Fred Smith, the Callen-
der’s & Co attorney and partner, who represents the late
Edward St George’s estate in its fight with Sir Jack Hayward’s
family trust over ownership of the GBPA and Port Group Ltd,
has written two separate letters to members of the Ingraham
Cabinet urging the Government not to renew the work permit
of Hannes Babak, the chairman of both companies.

Although this newspaper has not obtained copies of these let-
ters, Mr Babak, in a telephone interview with Tribune Business,
confirmed their existence and attacked them for spreading
“untruths” about himself and his initial 2006 application for a
work permit to be GBPA and Port Group Ltd chair.

“The letters were sent to the directors of the Port Authority
and Port Group Ltd, and were sent to the Prime Minister and
the Cabinet,” Mr Babak confirmed. “He [Mr Smith] was claim-

SEE page 10B

Amendment to deal with
‘challenges’ over audits

mg By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



The Government’s amendments to the Customs Management Act
are designed to clarify that powers reserved for the Minister of Finance
can be exercised by the Comptroller of Customs and his senior officials,
a government minister has said, overcoming the “challenges” posed by
Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA) licensees to Customs’ audit
powers.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, told Tribune Business:
“We are faced with a situation in which a number of people have
challenged the Customs Department’s ability to audit their affairs in
order to determine that the goods they import duty free, or condi-
tionally duty free, were actually used for the purpose they were sup-
posed to be used for in accordance with the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment and accompanying legislation.

“The courts indicated that that power is reserved for the Minister of
Finance, and what we are doing is amending the Customs Management

SEE page 8B

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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE
















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@ By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

Last week, investors traded in
four out of the 24 listed securi-
ties, of which three declined and

THE BAHAMIAN STOCK MARKET

FINDEX 779.87

one remained unchanged. aoe $1.39 $-0.01

EQUITY MARKET Ec : , Ge e

A total of 82,661 shares :
changed hands last week, repre- BPF $11.00 $-
senting an increase of 67,880 BSL $7.92 $-
shares compared to the previous BWL $3.15 $-
week's trading volume of 14,781 oa : a a a =
shares. . WU.

Abaco Markets (AML) was CHL = $ 2.83 $-
the volume leader with 70,000 CIB $10.38 $-0.02
shares trading hands, its stock CWCB $ 3.51 $0.06
price decreasing by $0.01 to end DHS = $ 1.50 $-
the week at $1.39. FAM $ 7.76 $-

Commonwealth Bank (CBL) FBB $ 2.37 $-
was the lead decliner, its share FC $ 0.30 $-
price falling by $0.50 to a new 52- FCL $ 5.09 $-
week low of $5.50 on a volume a

FCLB $ 1.00 $

of 6,650 shares. FIN $ 10.97 $-

FirstCaribbean International ICD $ 550 Gs
Bank (Bahamas) (CIB) traded , 7
5,540 shares, its stock droppin JSJ $ 10.50 $

; me PRE $10.00 $-

$0.02 to close at a new 52-week
low of $10.38.

BOND MARKET
No notes traded in the Bahami-
an market last week.

COMPANY NEWS:

Dividend & Annual General
Meeting (AGM) Notes:

Finance Corporation of the
Bahamas (FIN) has declared a
dividend of $0.13 per share,
payable on June 16, 2009, to all

(-6.58%) YTD

CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE CHANGE

70,000 -18.71%
4.55%
-9.16%
-6.78%

-22.28%

0.00%
-18.82%
-21.43%

0.00%
-0.67%
56.00%

0 -41.18%

0 -0.51%

471 0.00%

0 0.00%

0 -1.55%

0 0.00%

0 -1.58%
0
0

0

OO009000

-10.28%
5.41%
0.00%

BOND MARKET - TRADING STATISTICS

BISX SYMBOL

[RF_RFBGIF_Tribune.jpg]

Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
has declared a dividend of $0.05
per share, payable on June 30,
2009, to all shareholders of record

shareholders of record date June date June 15, 2009.

asm: Consolidated Water (CWCO)
has declared a dividend of $0.013

FOREX Rates
Currency Weekly % Change
CAD 0.8943 - 1.96
GBP 1.6445 + 1.57
EUR 1.4008 - 1.27
Commodities
Commodity Weekly % Change
Crude Oil 72.89 +6.10
Gold 939.80 -4.41
International Stock Market Indexes
Index Weekly % Change
DJIA 8,799.26 + 0.56
S & P 500 946.21 + 0.40
NASDAQ 1,858.80 + 0.47
Nikkei 10,135.82 +483

DESCRIPTION VOLUME PAR VALUE
FBB13 FBBL Series C Notes Due 2013 0
FBB15 FBBL Series D Notes Due 2015 0
FBB17 FBBL Series A Notes Due 2017 0
FBB22 FBBL Series B Notes Due 2022 0

$1,000
$1,000
$1,000
$1,000

per share, payable on August 10,
2009, to all shareholders of record
date July 1, 2009.

FamGuard Corporation
(FAM) announced it will be hold-
ing its Annual General Meeting
on Friday, June 19, 2009, at 4pm
at the British Colonial Hilton,
Victoria Room, Bay Street, Nas-
sau, Bahamas. Shareholders of
record as of May 21, 2009, will be
qualified to vote at the Meeting.

J.S. Johnson Company (JSJ)
announced it will be holding its
Annual General Meeting on
Monday, June 15, 2009, at 6pm
at the British Colonial Hilton,
Victoria Room, Bay Street, Nas-
sau, Bahamas.

Doctors Hospital Health Sys-
tems (DHS) announced it will be
holding its Annual General Meet-
ing on Thursday, June 18, 2009, at
5.30pm at Doctors Hospital,
Dowdeswell Street, Nassau,
Bahamas. Shareholders of record
as of May 27, 2009, will be quali-
fied to vote at the Annual Meet-
ing.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 3B



Abaco Markets targets $100m sales after 10-fold profit hike

FROM page 1B

Cost-Right owner will have gen-
erated $30 million in organic —
same-store — sales growth over
the past three financial years dat-
ing back to end-January 2007.

He acknowledged, though, that
such an organic growth rate — 42.9
per cent over a three-year period
- was difficult to maintain over
an extended period, hence the
look for growth and new store
opportunities.

“We've put together a five-year
growth strategy for the company
from 2009 to 2014,” Mr Watchorn
told Tribune Business. “Obvious-
ly, we’ve had great organic
growth over the last couple of
years from the same stores. They
did $70 million for the fiscal year
to January 2007, and we hope and
have good expectations that it will
be a $100 million company for
this year, which is a pretty pleas-
ing growth rate. We think we will
get over the $100 million mark
this year.

“That rate of organic growth
is not going to continue for ever,
and future growth will come from
new locations. We’re looking in
Nassau for an additional location,
but it’s too early to say where it
would be. We’ve got some plan-
ning going on. We’ve definitely
increased market share over the
last few years.”

Mr Watchorn added that he
was unable to say whether it was
the Solomon’s or Cost Right for-
mat that had been earmarked for
Nassau expansion, but Abaco
Markets’ outward looking plans
indicate the company is looking
forward with confidence despite
the recession, having returned to
consistent profitability after com-
pletion of its five-year turnaround
programme.

For the fiscal 2010 first quarter,
the BISX-listed retail group gen-
erated a $1.043 million net profit,
a more than ten-fold increase
upon the previous year’s $82,000
performance. The results for the
three months to April 30, 2009,
were driven by a $2.2 million sales
increase, which in turn was gen-
erated by a 12 per cent sales
increase at its Solomon’s and Cost
Right formats.

Mr Watchorn told Tribune
Business that customer counts
were up by 15-16 per cent over
prior year comparatives, although
the average transaction per per-
son was “down a little bit” in the
first quarter — largely due to the
recession and rein-in on consumer
spending.

“We feel confident in saying
that our prices are the best in
town, and the customer count
reflects that,’ Mr Watchorn told
Tribune Business.

While food purchases were
now accounting for a greater pro-
portion of customer purchases,
sales of higher margin general
merchandise, such as clothing,
while below 2008 levels were
“much better than budgeted for.
Our clothing sales are much bet-
ter than expected”.

“Every brand and location is
profitable, and it’s been a long
time since we could say that,” the
Abaco Markets president added.
“Everything moved in the right
direction for us [during the first
quarter], increased sales, reduced
expenses, reduced interest costs
and increased customer
accounts.”

Arguing that Abaco Markets
was “reaping the rewards” from
sticking to its core strategy and
values, Mr Watchorn said the
company had probably been bet-
ter prepared to handle the chal-
lenges from the recession than
many other Bahamas-based busi-
nesses by virtue of the turnaround
effort it had completed and the
initiatives executed. By cutting
costs and trimming the fat prior to
the downturn, Abaco Markets
was well-placed to cope with its
demands.

Of course, food retailers are
better placed than many retail
contemporaries to ride out reces-
sions simply because of the inelas-
tic consumer demand for their
products. Meanwhile, Mr
Watchorn attributed the 1 per
cent gross margin increase dur-
ing the 2010 first quarter to
increased sales, while gross mar-
gin dollars rose 14 per cent due to
better buying and logistics.

“We’ve been able to reduce
shrinkage as a percentage of sales,
which is helping, and we’ve
expanded our purchasing beyond
the south Florida base, and that is
paying dividends,” Mr Watchorn
explained.

“We've got a full-time person
whose job is to go out and get
deals. We’re looking further
afield and working hard to get
deals. It allows us to lower food
prices and get better margins at
the same time.

“Shrink as a percentage of sales
has dropped by 10 per cent.
That’s a combination of increased
sales and managing better. We’ve
not made the inroads we want-
ed, but it’s improved. Our level of
employee theft has leveled off
significantly. That’s due to
increased awareness and promo-
tion of the issue, as well as better
controls.”

The sales and margin improve-
ments coincided with a welcome
reduction in 2010 first quarter



“We’ve put
together a five-
year growth
strategy for the
company from
2009 to 2014.”



Gavin Watchorn

utility costs, with Mr Watchorn
estimating that Abaco Markets’
electricity bill fell between 10-20
per cent year-over-year. Other
expenses remained flat.

Elsewhere, Abaco Markets
reverses its net overdraft position
of recent years to end the 2010
first quarter with a $127,000 net
cash position. The overdraft facil-
ity reduction saw interest costs
drop by 25 per cent, while the
company paid down a further
$500,000 of the debt owed to
Royal Bank of Canada.

Some $400,000 of that debt
repayment came from the pro-
ceeds raised by selling the equip-
ment and inventory from the for-
mer Cost Right Abaco store, with
the actual property leased to Price
Right partners, Rupert Roberts
and Chad Sawyer.

Mr Watchorn told Tribune
Business that Abaco Markets
hoped to eventually realise $1.1
million from the sale of Cost
Right Abaco’s equipment and
inventory, with the monthly rental
payments from Price Right also
helping to pay-off Royal Bank.

A further $400,000 has been
paid to Royal Bank since April
2009, and Abaco Markets is hop-
ing to complete repayment of the
remaining debt — now less than
$900,000 — before the end of its
current financial year. Wiping out
the debt will free up an extra
$60,000 in cash flow per month.

Mr Watchorn added that exit-
ing Cost Right Abaco had creat-
eda “change around on liquidity
and the bottom line”, with man-
agement no longer distracted by a
loss-making entity that constant-
ly needed managers to be sent
out from Nassau.

As for the net cash position,
the Abaco Markets president
added: “It’s the first time, cer-
tainly as long as I’ve been with
the company, that we’ve achieved
that. It’s a good step. As a com-
pany in general, we’re achieving a
positive balance.”

The retail group had, over the
past year, been paying an aver-
age of $8,000-$10,000 per month
in overdraft interest, a figure that
was now “far less than that”.

Mr Watchorn told Tribune
Business that Abaco Markets had

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set aside some $750,000 as at the
first quarter’s end to repay the
principal owed to its preference
shareholders, a figure that was
“going to be close to $1 million”
at the second quarter end on July
31, 2009.

The first redemption is sched-
uled for March 2010, with a total
$1.2 million due to be returned
to the preference shareholders
next year. Mr Watchorn said that
would be fully funded, with some
$1.7-$1.8 million set aside for that
purpose.

And the BISX-listed group has
already moved to prepare for
expansion in Freeport, having
secured a three-year lease, with a
$450,000 option to purchase, on
2.65 acres of land adjacent to its
Solomon’s SuperCentre store.


















NASSAU'S

Premier

LUE

The land will initially be used
for store parking, with the com-
pany hoping to exercise the pur-
chase option in 2010. If the
timescale operates as planned,
the Abaco Markets president said
expansion work at Solomon’s
SuperCentre would likely start in
2011, with the store expanded by
15,000-20,000 square feet and its
layout reconfigured.

“That’s a piece of property
directly adjacent to the property
we have,” Mr Watchorn
explained, “and the business is
doing so well that parking is an
issue. We hope by the end of next
week to have addressed the park-
ing.

“Next year, when we have cap-
ital to purchase it, we will have
secured the land long-term and

RISTORAWNTE

COCKTAIL

can shift the layout of the store
around to facilitate expansion.
We think, if we purchase the land
next year, we will start on it in
early 2011.”

He added: “We feel that as
long as we control and manage
what we can control, we will con-
tinue to be profitable. The level of
profit depends on many factors,
competition and the economic
environment, but as long as we
manage what we can control we
will be OK.”

Abaco Markets said sales at its
Domino's Pizza franchise were
flat during the first quarter, hav-
ing lost the East Bay Street outlet,
but per capita transaction values
were higher as a result of
bundling different products with
its pizzas.

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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





UCHITRSI ETT NU RUC
Wear

“Hotty Fale Hay
“Free Health Chocks It”
Father's day week end

TT fae Fa, Sot J MoS

Family Medicine &
Sein Care Clinte
Ph# -326-1111

Mon-Fri: 9-6, Sak] 0-5
Shirley Sc
Opp Coctor's Hospital Parirag lor

Frees Blood pressure,

WAIT CMACKS,

Body Mass ndax (BMI) Calculations,
Blogd Sugar tet,

filand Cholesterol pest

NOTICE

REKTA LIMITED

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

REKTA LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the
41 June, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated
Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI

Dated this 15" day of June, A. D. 2009

Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator



Inventory shortages
hit Bahamian buyers

Qualified Bahamian real
estate buyers are being hin-
dered by inventory shortages,
a broker ha warned, after she
took one single home listing
and converted it into five suc-
cesses, including three sales
transactions.

Carla Sweeting, a broker
with ERA Dupuch Real
Estate in Nassau, explained:
“Here’s what happened. I got
a listing for a house in the
Eastern district, brought in a
buyer for that, subsequently
sold the seller a new house
further east, got the listing for
the buyer’s house, also in the
Eastern district and also sold
that.

“It all started with one
phone call.”

About eight months later,
Ms Sweeting’s version of
musical homes was done with
all transactions completed and
three clients in new resi-
dences.

She said the one drawback
in today’s real estate market
was not the economy, but a
shortage of inventory, partic-
ularly of available residential
lots for an eager and finan-
cially capable Bahamian buy-
ers.

“If we had multi-family lots
for less than $100,000 we
could sell six a day,” says the
broker, whose firm recently
walked away with regional top
performance honours, leading

CARLA SWEETING
ERA

fourth consecutive year.

St. Andrew’s School Foundation

affiliates in six
Caribbean countries for the

According to Ms Sweeting,



there’s also a shortage of
inventory in homes under
$500,000. “The foreign mar-
ket has definitely slowed, but



“Here’s what
happened. I got a
listing for a
house in the
Eastern district,
brought in a
buyer for that,
subsequently
sold the seller a
new house
further east, got
the listing for the
buyer’s house,
also in the
Eastern district
and also sold
that. It all started
with one phone
call.”



the Bahamian market is very
strong and eager to buy. The
banks are being a bit stricter,
requiring more for their com-
fort level, but money is avail-
able, interest rates are accept-
able and Bahamians are look-
ing for land and homes in the
moderate price range,” she
added.

Job Opportunity for an

ACCOUNTING CLERK

An established Bahamian Company is seeking an
Accounts Clerk
¢ Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent in Accounting
¢ Knowledge in Microsoft Word and Excel

Fantastic
Father's Day
Giveaway!

Shop at The Shoe Village
this Father's Day and
with any purchase of
$200 or more receive a

we Chawen Cae NEW YORK

belt or wallet.

Development Officer

The Foundation is committed to the Mission of St. Andrew's
School through its financial support of teachers, scholarship
students and building propects. The Foundation 1s presently

secking a person to lead its Office of Development. Interested persons should send resumes to:

P.O. Box CR-55056
Nassau, Bahamas

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The Development Officer, a full-time position, reports to
the St. Andrew's School Foundation and will:

be responsible for designing and overseeing fundraising
CHMIPALens in support of the Foundation’s str: abegie 2 snals:

develop marketing strategies and materials for public

Limited quantities, so shop early relations and advertising:

for the special man in your life!

pronbote relationships between the School and various
organizations, mcluding the St. Andrew's Alumni and
Friends Association:

Promotion begins
Monday 15th June,
and ends

Monday 22nd June . .
oversee The day today adiumsiralpon of mnleralicnal

charities

The successful candidate will possess kr ledge and
understanding of the School's history and culture: be a goal-
driven individual with strong organizational and social skill:
possess a Minimum of a Bi achelor” 5 Degree; and be
expericnoad in fundraising.

T G.R, Sweeting's

llige

Madeira Shopping Plaza - Tel: 328-0703
Marathon Mall - Tel: 393-6113
RND Plaza, Freeport : Tel: 351-3274

Interested candidates should send their CV and a letter of
Interest tc:

Development Officer Position
St. Andrew's School Foundation
FO. Box W-4695
Nassau, Bahanas

For more information or survey
Email: energysavingsconsultants @hotmail.com

Contact 326-6121 Montrose Avenue

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

Ze

clTev rca Me Ts Te.

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Morey 27 Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 11 JUNE 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,573.41 | CHG 0.24 | %CHG 0.02 | YTD -138.95 | YTD % -8.11
FINDEX: CLOSE 779.69 | YTD -6.61% | 2008 -12.31%

WWWwW._BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E

1.28 Abaco Markets 1.39 1.39 0.127 E 10.9

10.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.992

6.94 Bank of Bahamas 6.94 6.94 0.244
-0.877 4 N/M
0.078 4 40.4
0.055 - 43.1
1.406 . 8.1
0.249 s 11.4
0.419 sf 13.2
0.111 4 32.7
0.240 s 6.3
0.420 4 18.5
0.322 . 34.1
0.794 - 13.1

SWNT (OLLI
OF RASSAL, RAH ANLAS

SUMMER “LEARN TO SWIM”
CLASSES
June 29" to July 24", 2009

0.63 Benchmark 0.63 0.63
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15
2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37
10.18 Cable Bahamas 11.39 11.39
2.75 Colina Holdings 2.83 2.83
5.52 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 5.52 5.52
1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 3.40 3.63
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 1.50 1.50
7.50 Famguard 7.76 7.76
10.00 Finco 10.97 10.97
10.35 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.38 10.38
4.95 Focol (S) 5.09 5.09 0.332 = 15.3
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.000 4 N/M
0.30 Freeport Concrete 0.30 0.30 ig 0.035 x 8.6
5.50 ICD Utilities 5.50 5.50 e 0.407 13.5
10.50 J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 a 0.952 4 11.0
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.180 5 55.6
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade ona Percentage Pricing bases)
S2wk-Hi_ 52wk-Low Securi Symbol Last Sale
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Geries A) + FBB17 100.00 if T%
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity OQver-The-Counter Securities
Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92 8.42 14.60
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 4.00 6.25 6.00
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA _ Vv YTD% Last 12 Months

See Oe eee eee eee S
290990N00900900009
666566856565656506050

REGISTRATION AT
QUEEN’S COLLEGE POOL
SATURDAY JUNE 20', 2009

9:00 A.M. TO 12:00 NOON

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

EPS $ Div $ P/E

S52wk-Low Weekly Vol.

Fund Name

Colina Bond Fund

2.9230 Colina MSI Preferred Fund

1.3915 Colina Money Market Fund
3.1821 Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund
12.2702 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund

1.3124 1.3758 1.65 4.83
2.8962 -1.49 -3.35

1.4672 2.34 6.43

30-Apr-09
31-Mar-09
29-May-09
30-Apr-09
30-Apr-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
30-Apr-09
31-May-09
31-May-09
31-May-09

3.1821 6.01 -13.90
12.8618 1.93 5.80
100.5606 0.56 0.56
96.4070 -3.59 -3.59
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investrnent Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.2511 1.72 4.12
1.0578 2.13 5.78
1.0271 -0.57 2.71
1.0554 1.74 5.54
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

1.0000
1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany‘s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
('S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

Registration forms available on the website:
wy, barracudaswinuming org





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 5B



Sharing the route for best practices

@ By the Securities
Commission of
the Bahamas

E October 2002, TOSCO
adopted the MMOU as
the model for international co-
operation. The MMOU estab-
lishes standards to be applied
by IOSCO members when
making or responding to
requests for information. At the
April 2005 annual conference
of IOSCO, a timetable was
agreed for all member regula-
tors who were not already sig-
natories to the MMOU, to meet
the standards of the model by
January 1, 2010.

The draft securities legisla-
tion gives the Securities Com-
mission authority to share infor-
mation with both domestic and
foreign regulatory authorities,
consistent with international
best practices. The Commission
is authorised under the draft
legislation to exercise any of its

The Securities Commission of The Bahamas has became a Sig-
natory ‘B’ to the Multilateral Memorandum of Understanding
Concerning Consultation and Cooperation and Exchange of
Information (MMOU), established by the International Orga-
nization of Securities Commissions (IOSCO). By signing the
MMOU as a Signatory ‘B’, the Commission has undertaken to
make the necessary legislative changes to enable it to meet all of
the terms of the MMOU. The provisions of the draft Securities
Industry Act and Regulations, revealed below, reflect the pro-
visions necessary to enable the Commission to become a Signa-

tory ‘A’ to the MMOU.

powers, at the request of anoth-
er domestic regulatory authori-
ty (such as the Central Bank of
The Bahamas, the Office of the
Registrar of Insurance or the
Compliance Commission) and
may, on its own initiative, pro-
vide any such domestic regula-
tory authority with information
the Commission has obtained
in the course of carrying out its
activities. This assistance may
be provided to the domestic
regulatory authority to assist in
the performance of its function.

While the existing legislation

[BDO Mann Judd

enables information-sharing
amongst domestic regulatory
authorities, the draft legislation
broadens the Commission’s
authority to exercise any of its
powers available under the leg-
islation.

The scope of the Commis-
sion’s authority to share infor-
mation with foreign regulators
is limited to providing assistance
with the supervisory, investiga-
tive and enforcement functions
of the regulator, as they relate
to securities and capital market
matters. A comparative analysis

BDO is the fifth largest accountancy network in the world, a world wide network of
public accounting firms, called BOO Member Firms, serving international clients. BDO
Member Firms exist in 110 countries, and employ 44,000 people in 1,095 offices
worldwide, BDO Mann Judd is now seeking applications for assurance seniors/senior
accountants to work in the assurance depariment. The successful candidates will have a
bachelor’s degree in accounting and a CPA, ACCA, CA or any other qualification that is
recognized by the Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants,

The successful candidates will have 3 years experience in auditing, and be able to work in
a challenging team driven environment. Attention to detail is a must.

Individuals with the above-mentioned qualifications should fax or email their resume’s

to

info! bdomannjudd.com

Recruitment Manager
BDO Manna Judd
Nassau Bahamas

Fax: 242-325-6592

Absolutely no phone calls please.
Only the applicants with the above mentioned qualifications will be contacted.

ua

DOCTORS HOSPITAL

DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES

This Months Topic: Should we CUT IT OFF?

The Truths & Myths of Circumcision

SPEAKER:

Dr. Robin Roberts

UROLOGY

Purpose:

LECTURE DATE

Wednesday, June 17th 709 @ 6PM
Doctors Hospital Conference Room
RSVP ¢ Seating is Limited * 302-4603

Please join us as our guest every third
Thursday of the month for this scintillating
series of the most relevant health issues

affecting society today.

LECRUERE SERIES

To educate the public about
the important health issues,
presented by distinguished

physicians.

Screenings:

Get your Free Blood
Pressure,Cholesterol, and
Glucose testing between

Spm & 6pm.

The Truths & Myths of Circumcision

Dr. Robin Roberts

Womens Health
Dr. Madelene Sawyer

of the existing legislative pro-
visions on information sharing
shows that essentially the stan-
dards applied now are not that
different to those proposed in
the draft securities legislation.

Pursuant to the existing
Securities Industry Act 1999,
the Commission can provide
information to foreign regula-
tors. Certain factors, such as the
seriousness of the matter and
the existence of parallel
offences in the Bahamas, may
be taken into account when

determining whether informa-
tion should be shared with a
requesting authority. The fol-
lowing pre-conditions have to
be met; (a) an undertaking of
confidentiality is executed by
the foreign regulator before the
information is provided; or (b)
the Commission satisfies itself
that the laws of information
sharing in the requesting juris-
diction are comparable to those
in the Bahamas; and (c) the
Commission satisfies itself that
the request relates to the func-

tions of the overseas regulatory
authority.

The Commission may apply
to the Court for an Order
requiring that a registrant or
licensee disclose the informa-
tion requested by a foreign reg-
ulator, and the consent of the
Commission must be obtained
before the information can be
shared with a third party. It is
submitted that each of the

SEE page 6B














Visit our website at www.cob.edubs

STAFF VACANCY

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the following




position:

Writer, News & Publications, responsible for performing writing and relat-
ed duties as needed, for the development and production of all College of The
Bahamas publications of a news, general information and public awareness
nature. The incumbent will be expected to work within a demanding deadline
driven environment and to also perform assignments as related to media and

general public relations,

Specific duties and responsibilities include, but are not limited to, generating
content ideas for College publications; research and writing for College pub-
lications, press releases and related media and public relations assignments;
and staying abreast of College developments and maintaining a strong under-
standing of the national, regional and intemational context of these develop-

ments.

Applicants should possess a Bachelor’s degree or equivalent and at least four

(4) years post-qualification work experience at AS-1

level as a

writer/researcher in a magazine, supplement and/or newspaper environment.

For a detailed job description, visit www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply.

Interested candidates should submit a detailed resume and cover Ictter of
interest no later than Tuesday, June 16th, 2009,

Centeal Focus: All Presentations to boghleght and discuss receat developments in the local and global financial seruices: maddest;
which aot calyalfect our dey to diy besiness but also threaten the viability of the iadustry.

(a: E30

MAM

“Compliance”

The Lighthouse in the Perfect Storm

oAfeg

The Bahamas Association of Compliance Officers
MLRO Day 2009
Wednesday Jone 17° 20009

Brith Cokanl Hilton

(iors hop ehoiie for LA ACD CA ceeds]

Carat: 0 cover bers -

PEGGIER AT:

Registration end Introductions

INSIDE THE MINDS OF THE REGULATORS - Panel

4-40 cron mora bert

«New money laundering trends from the FIL's perspectives Forget what yoo thought vow knew

* Kev Aspects of the-new Central Bank Guidelines; Anticipating the Role of the Super Regulator, What dee is

on the Roreon?

Managing the Money Laundenag Rises Posed by Hedge Funds and Other evestrent Velocles
The Insurance Industry = What Have We Leamed, Ff Anything? New indestry Developments, How fer is far

enough!

The Specaal Focus: Responding so O20 Money Laundenag Challenges
Discussion & Followup pemod

[ee 1L15
1: 1200

12:00

5

hbamias

(ei)

-Laachesa-

Accounting for The Accountants: AML CFT issues re: She Accounting Profession
MASTER CLASS - Case study -Whea to Make that STR- Interactive sesnion

TIEA's DT As; OECD Tnitiatives-What peeparatioes should we male? What docs the tutore bold tor The Ba-

“The Rede of Goverament in shaping the fature of The Babamas* Financial Services Iedasiey & in secur

ina the best interests of Hs citizens The Hon. Mistister Phorvarps Lang

O20: M2

~Beeak-

RSVP:
To ensure available seating

Phone: 302-4603

Arthritis 012: 0806-00

Dr. Vincent Nwosa

THE CLOSED SESSP0%5-Members’ Onhy:

« Adopting Business Management Skilk to Optioize Your AMLICFT Program
« Focus on Traiming: Bett Practice for Building a Securities Indaviry AML Training Program
@# BAC as an SRO, The sew OCP CPD requirements; Preparing for the sect Level

Obesity in Children
Dr. Brian Humblestone

REGISTER AT: WWW BACOBAHAMAS COM) EMAIL: INPOEBIFSBARAMAS COM | 242-322-0871 of 2

4 uv. ge. 7 ft
Canumuited fb Canvas
: BC OE AG oo

"| DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life





PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SE Te
Sharing the route for best practices

Freeport-Florida
ferry service plan

FROM page 1B mechanical problems.

The company, which is
offering on-line booking, is
aiming to offer a round-trip

schedule between West Palm

mean competition for Discov-
ery Cruise Line, which has
recently been plagued by




























Legal Notice

NOTICE

GARTENPLATZ INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 15th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SPEEDWELL INVESTMENT INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SATINROSE PARK LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 18th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Beach and Freeport. Its vessel
will leave Florida at 8.30am in
the morning, arriving in
Freeport at 10.30sam. The
return journey will begin at
5.30pm, with arrival in Florida
at 7.30pm.

Preliminary ticket prices are
set at $170 per adult for a
round trip, and $85 each way.,
with children priced at $140
per round trip and $70 each
way. Cargo storage prices vary
from $75 to $135, with frozen
cargo priced between $50-$75.

Ride Ocean Zoom’s web-
site said: “Ocean Zoom is a
260 foot vessel providing
express commuter service to
and from West Palm Beach,
Florida, and Freeport,
Bahamas, a two-hour dock-
to-dock service. Ocean
Zoom’s future plans are to
expand to other locations,
including Fort Lauderdale,
Miami and select Family
Islands within the Bahamas.”

A West Palm Beach route
holds out the prospect of giv-
ing high net-worth Americans
another avenue by which they
can access Grand Bahama.

FROM page 5B

above requirements substan-
tively exists in the provisions of
the draft securities legislation.
However, the Commission
notes that the key differences
in the new legislation are as fol-
lows:

e Various issues relating to
the Commission’s inability to
access information from its reg-
istrants and licensees will have
been addressed

¢ Deficiencies in the record-
keeping requirements of
licensees and registrants of the
Commission will be clarified

eThe Commission’s authority
to assist a foreign regulator, who
is an MMOU signatory, with-
out the foreign regulator hav-
ing to execute an undertaking
concerning confidentiality and
onward disclosure before the
Commission acts on the request,
will be clarified

eRestrictions on the use of
information received from the
Commission imposed on for-
eign regulators in practice,
including various restrictions
applied to providing consent for
onward disclosure of informa-
tion for use in securities-related
criminal investigations and pro-
ceedings in the requesting state,
will no longer exist

eThe obligation of the Com-
mission to maintain the confi-
dentiality of requests for assis-
tance made to the Commission
by foreign authorities will be
statutorily established.

Many of the proposed

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SECOND GENESIS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ROCCOLEONE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

CULINARY & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE,
INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSES — FALL SEMESTER 2009 - 042009

COURSE

SEC. | CODE BEGINS | ENDS

DURATION

| TUITION & |
FEES —s| RM

OAS Tie

"No. of
_ Spaces



COOK
| Bahamian Culeine 1 | S06
COOK
Gourmet Cooking | 1 | #23
| COOK
Gourmet Cooking Il 24 Sop. 9
_————

Cake & Pastry COOK
Making | #13 Sepa. a
Cake & Pastry COOK
Making Il

Septi0 | Oct. 22

Sep. 7 | Get. 19

Get. 24

Now, 3

Sep. 10 | Mew, §

_ Bread Making | Now. 6

Cake Decorating | Sep. 7 How, 2

| ‘Cake Decorating il | Sap. 9 | Naw, 4

6 weeks
]

6 Banks

6 Weeks

8 weoks

8 weeks
j

| A weeks
7

G00
| 00pm

BLO -

HOO pe
| Boog) -

SoO0pm

Beta
ooem
B00
an0pm

| Thursday

| Mandy

Wednesday

Tinea

Thiwada

| Thursday

Bi -
S200 pm
B20 -

| AOpen

Mandar

| ike! naecadary

$475.00 MK
$360.00 | MK

S465.00 | ME

330000 | ae

3925.00 | Pe
LK

PK

Pe



ADl fees are included in the price queted above: mew students pay a one-time application fer of 4M, (WOW REFUNDABLE)

Application Deadline: August 28, 2009 at 4:00 p.m.

For further information or te pick up an application please contact the Industry Training Department of the Culinary & Hospitality

Management Institube, 323-5804, J29-hR1M or fax 323-1207,

The Coffee ofthe Bohs nenerees the rink fo cheape Titian, Pees, Course Canter, Course Schedule on! Course Adateriats



changes will require that par-
ticipants in the industry are
meeting international standards
for record keeping, and that the
Commission has access to that
information as presently exists
in other international financial
centres. Such changes are being
made primarily to ensure that
the Commission is properly
‘armed’ to carry out its statuto-
ry mandate. A secondary result
of these amendments, howev-
er, is that in doing so, we are
able to meet the fundamental
requirements of securities reg-
ulation, and thus the standards
of information sharing estab-

to information-sharing proce-
dures and will consist mainly of
clarifications to the process
presently applied by the Com-
mission. One change is that
MMODU signatories will not be
required to execute an under-
taking prior to the Commission
addressing each one of their
requests, as their status as sig-
natories addresses this issue.
This again is not a substantive
change, as the terms of the
existing undertaking are set out
in the MMOU and signatories
thereto are required to meet the
standards therein for each and
every request that they make.

lished by IOSCO.
Further, many of the changes
identified above relate directly

SEE page 9B

Legal Notice

NOTICE

MEGA LUCK MANAGEMENT LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

DRUMMONS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

Cammon Law and Equity Side

200 EQMQuill430

IM THE MATTER. of all that piece parcel or Int af
land situated on the Eastern side of Labour Street
appronimately |) feet South of Hay Street in the
Constituency of Grants Town bounded on the North
by an adjacent lot running thereon (105.00) fest on
the West by Labour Street and running thereon
(22200) feet on the South by an adjacent |ot running
thereon (72.00) feet. The property has an

aporosimare ance of (3,360) square feer,
ANT

is THE MATTER of the Quieting Tithes Act, 1959.
AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Wilfred James
Thompson

NOTICE

TAKE NOTICE that Wilfred James Thompson of Labour Street in
the Island of Mew Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas claims to be the owner of the
unencumbered fer simple estate of ALL THAT piece parcel or Jot
Of land situated on the Eastern side of Labour Street approximately
100 feet South of Hay Street in the Constituency of Grants Town
founded on te North by an adjacent bot running (105.0) feet on
the Weal by Labour Street and running thersan (32.080) feet on the
South by an adjacent bot running thereon (32.00) feet. The property
hae an approximabe ares of (3,350) sqisre feet.

Wilfred James Thompson clalene to be the owner in fies simple of
the said land free from encumbrances and has made an application
to ike Supreme Court in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under
Section 3 of che Quieting Tithes Act 1959 po have its tithe to the said
land investigated and the nature amd extend thereof determined and
declared ina Genificate of Tithe to be granted by the Court in
accordande with the provisions of the aaid Act

A plan ofthe said land many be inspected during normal office

hours if The Tolbewing places

a, The Registry of the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau.

b. The Chambers of Johngon-Hassan 4 Co., Sure No
Crasvendr Suites, Grosvenor Chase off Shirkey Street,
Nassau, M.P_ The Bahamas Attiomeys for the Pettioner.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower or right of
dower or an Adverse claim of claim not recognized im the Petition
shall on or before the 5t/ day of August, A.D, 2009 file in
the Supreme Court and seve on the Petter or the undersigned al
Statement of his claim in the prescribed form verified by an
Affidavit io be filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file
and serve a simtement of his claim on or before the said Sth day
of August, AD, 2009 will aperate a¢ a bar te such a claim.

JOHNSON-HASSAN & CO
Suite Nov? Grosvenor Close
Off Shirkey Sheer
Nassau, M.P., The Bohemas
Atomeys for the Petitiqner



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 7B



Government draws down

$200m bridge credit facility

FROM page 1B

Mr Laing was unable to say how much of the
$200 million bridging facility the Government
had drawn on, although it was possibly as much as
$100 million.

He confirmed that the credit facility was
designed to cover “what we recognised would be
a significant revenue shortfall experienced, and
this is intended to fund that in the current fiscal
year”.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham announced in
the 2009-2010 Budget communication that rev-
enues for the current fiscal year were likely to
come in some 17 per cent below projections, end-
ing at $1.31 billion instead of $1.57 billion.

The revenue shortfall came as little surprise
to most observers, given the Government’s heavy
reliance on trade-based taxation for some 60 per
cent of its revenues. This is an area that has borne
the brunt of the economic downturn, and is set to
leave the Ingraham administration facing a total
deficit of $422 million for the 2008-2009 Budget
year — a level the Prime Minister warned was
“unsustainable”.

Meanwhile, Mr Laing confirmed that the Goy-
ernment’s financial advisers were assessing when
market conditions would be conducive for the
launch of a $200 million sovereign government
bond to refinance the current bridging facility.

The International Monetary Fund’s (IMF) Arti-
cle IV consultation on the Bahamian economy
suggested that any bond issue would take place in
2010, something Mr Laing hinted at to Tribune
Business by implying that, given current market
conditions, any launch now could leave the Gov-
ernment paying a higher interest return to
investors than it wanted to.

“Financial advisers are looking at that to see
when market conditions are conducive, so that
costs would not be as much as current conditions
dictate,” Mr Laing added.

He told Tribune Business that any sovereign
bond issue would be targeted at international,
rather than domestic Bahamian, investors. “I
don’t think, in this environment, you are able to
place that locally. Certainly, not much,” the min-
ister said, adding that he expected the $200 million
bond to be placed internationally.

Mr Laing said the advantages from refinancing
the bridging loan would be to improve the Gov-
ernment’s cash flow by “terming out” the debt.
Bridging loans tend to be advanced for relative-
ly short periods, with borrowers paying higher
interest rates to lenders in comparison to bond
issue that have longer maturity dates.

“Tt would certainly be the ideal thing to do,” Mr
Laing added. “You're also likely, in the circum-
stances, to get loss costly terms on it, and also free
up the lending capacity of domestic institutions
who may have customers wanting to borrow.”

The IMF expressed no concern about the Gov-
ernment’s plans to finance the 2009-2010 fiscal
deficit through a combination of borrowing and
the proceeds from the Bahamas Telecommuni-
cations Company’s (BTC) privatization, finding
that “near term weak private sector credit
demand” meant risks from the ‘crowding out’

ve

effect were low. Only 10 per cent of the central
government’s direct debt is held by international
investors and institutions, according to the IMF,
giving the Bahamian government some room to
manoevere when it comes to launching a $200
million sovereign bond despite the expanding fis-
cal deficit and national debt.

However, Mr Laing rejected arguments that
the Government was pinning all its hopes on a
swift economic recovery, and the return of pre-
2008 economic activity levels, to pull itself from
the fiscal precipice.

“That’s not a fair assessment at all,” he told Tri-
bune Business. “What we are doing is maintain-
ing our options. Our policy decisions today are
putting us in a position where, if things get worse,
we have the ability to manoevere and respond. If
things stay the same, or a recovery takes longer
than anticipated, we have the ability to respond.

“We aren’t optimistic about a quick turn-
around. We aren’t planning on that basis. What
we are planning for is any number of possible”
scenarios given the uncertain and volatile global
economic environment.

Mr Laing added: “The Budget balances the
need to nurture this economy through the down-
turn with the management of fiscal affairs, so
that we do not create an unsustainable debt situ-
ation. We are giving ourselves options in the face
of any number of possible outcomes.”

The minister reiterated that the Government
was looking to cushion the recession’s impact
through a variety of capital works and infra-
structure projects, while at the same time con-
taining the recurrent deficit — the difference
between its total revenue income and its fixed
costs.

This strategy, Mr Laing added, was designed to
ensure that the Government “does not have to
borrow more than it has to borrow, and makes
commitments that hamper our ability to manoe-
vere if things turn down.”

The same was true if the economy recovered
more rapidly — and to a greater extent — than
forecast, as excessive borrowing and loading too
great a debt load on to the Government’s books
could hamper the Bahamas’ ability to exploit
opportunities that came its way.

This newspaper had previously reported that
The Government appears to be pinning its faith in
a relatively strong economic rebound from 2011
onwards, with gross domestic product (GDP) in
current prices rising by 0.9 per cent that year,
with a more sustained 2.5 per cent GDP expan-
sion in 2011-2012. It also seems to be hoping that
the level of economic growth will have returned
to normal, something that is also not a given, due
to the depth and severity of the current recession.

Tribune Business had previously revealed that
the combined fiscal deficits the Bahamas will
incur in the 2008-2009 Budget year and over the
next three fiscal years will total a staggering $1.411
billion if the Government’s forecasts hold true,
with the national debt breaking through the 50
per cent-of-GDP ratio in the 2010-2011 fiscal
period.



















“Dealing with the
stress of a medical
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access to care while
making the task of
paying for services
painless as possible.”

DOCTORS HOSPITAL

We Welcome You

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We are looking for an:



Insurance Services Coordinator




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Position Summary:
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- responsibilities include the management of various Insurance financial portfolios.

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Continuously participates in performance improvements to enhance services to our
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BAHAMTANS
THE TIME HAS COME TO
TAKE A STAND AGAINST

CRIME & VIOLENCE
IN THE BAHAMAS

wv ve

ve

Ww ve

ON MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009
JOIN A MARCH FROM ETTHER

EASTERN PARADE * WINDSOR PARK*CHRISTIE PARK

LEAVING AT 6:30 P. M.
TO ATTEND THE

CANDLE LIGHT VIGIL

RAWSON SQUARE
BEGINNING 8:00 P. M

OUR NATION IS IN CRISIS
IF YOU CARE-BE THERE












































Legal Notice

NOTICE

QUILL HILL LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PROMINENT MANAGEMENT
SERVICES LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Amendment to deal with
‘challenges' over audits

FROM page 1B

Act to make it abundantly clear
that the powers of the Minister
of Finance can be exercised via
the authority delegated in the
Customs Management Act to the
Comptroller of Customs.”

Mr Laing added that the Gov-
ernment was “also making pro-
visions for persons importing
goods duty-free to sign a declara-
tion that the goods will be used
for the purpose” intended,
enabling Customs to compare this
with their audit findings and
determine whether any fraud or
tax evasion has taken place.

The minister said the amend-
ments were intended “to protect
the revenue” of the Government
by clarifying Customs’ powers in
relation to the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement, and who could exer-
cise them.

“The point is being consistent
with what the needs of the juris-
diction are, and what we under-
stand the terms of the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement and the accom-
panying laws to be. We are doing
this amendment to give effect to
that,” Mr Laing added.



“We certainly
believe we’re doing
what is within the
ambit of the law and
what we’re
empowered to do...”



Zhivargo Laing

However, it seems likely that
the proposed amendment will be
challenged in the courts by
GBPA licensees. Gregory Moss,
the Grand Bahama Chamber of
Commerce’s president, said the
organisation “notes with concern”
the planned amendment, adding
that their main fear centred on
whether it was an attempt to
amend the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement by the back door.

‘The Grand Bahama Chamber
notes with concern the reference
by the Prime Minister in his
recent Budget communication to
an intention on the Governmen-
t’s part to amend the Customs
Management Act to “clarify and
bring certainty to the administra-

tion of the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement in the Port Area’,”
Mr Moss told Tribune Business.

He added that “if all the4 Gov-
ernment intends to do is repeat in
the Customs Management Act
the relationship with the Hawks-
bill Creek Agreement, we could
have no issue with that.

“If the Government intends to
abrogate any part of the Hawks-
bill Creek Agreement we would
have significant issue with that
and would have to respond to
that appropriately.”

Mr Moss pointed out that the
Government was unable to
amend the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement without the consent
of two-thirds of the GBPA
licensees. However, Mr Laing
told Tribune Business: “We cer-
tainly believe we’re doing what
is within the ambit of the law and
what we’re empowered to do, so
if the licensees challeng it in the
courts, that is their right.

“We believe there is a great
deal of reason being expressed
by the licensees that operate in
the Freeport area that there is a
law, an agreement that governs
the Freeport area, and that law
and agreement applies to every-
one. As long as it’s consistent with

the law, they will have no diffi-
culty in complying.”

The amendment, a copy of
which was obtained by Tribune
Business, said the reason for the
change was “to remove all doubts
that the Comptroller is the person
designated by the Minister to car-
ry out the powers in clause 2
(4)(f) of the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement”.

The actual amendment’s word-
ing states that the Customs comp-
troller, his deputy or the assistant
comptroller “be the person des-
ignated by the minister to carry
out any and all powers” contained
in that Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment clause.

The clause in question, as
analysed by Tribune Business,
gives a person designated by the
minister “free access at all rea-
sonable times” to any develop-
ment project, business, company
or commercial entity in the Port
area, and access to all parts of
their business, “for the purpose
of ascertaining whether the sev-
eral articles” admitted duty-free
under the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement are being used for
their stated purpose — meaning
in a licensee’s business, so that
no duty is payable on them.



Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

COMMONWEATH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008

IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/592

INTHE MATTER of the Quicting Titles Act, 1959
AND
IN THE MATTER of The Petition of Inez Taylor Martin
NOTICE OF PETITION

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Inez Taylor-Martin of Old Place
in the Western District of the Island of Exuma, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, is applying to the Supreme
Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas to have her title inves-
tigated determined and declared under the Quicting Titles Act, 1959
(Ch. 393) in respect of the land hereafter described, that is to say:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land situate approximately One
Thousand Five-Hundred and Thirty-five (1535) feet West of Queens
Highway on the Northern side of Gilbert Grant Road and bounded
EASTWARDLY by land now or formerly the property of Zelma
Nixon jointly by Crown Land occupied by Zelma Nixon and running
thereon a total distance of Two-Hundred and Seven and Sixty-Six
Hundredths (207.66) feet thence running NORTHWEST WARDLY
by land now or formerly the property of Emerald Bay Development
and running thereon a total distance of Six-Hundred and Fifty-Nine
and Forty-One Hundredths (659.41) feet WESTWARDLY by land
the other portion of the Gilbert Grant and running thereon Fight-
Hundred and Twenty-Nine and Fifteen Hundredths (829.15) feet
SOUTHWARDLY by a Public Road known as Gilbert Grant Road
and running thereon a distance of Four-Hundred and Thirty-Eight
and Twenty-Seven Hundredths (438.27) feet back to the point of
commencement which said piece parcel or tract of land described
above comprises an area of Four and Four Hundred and Seventy-
Nine Thousandths (4.479) Acres and has such position boundaries
shape marks and dimensions as are shown on the plan recorded in
the Department of Lands and Surveys as Plan No. 450 EXUMA.”

AND TAKE NOTICE that copies of the Petition and the Plan of the
said land may be inspected during normal office hours at the follow-
ing places:

i. Supreme Court Registry, Ansbacher House, East Street North,
New Providence, The Bahamas.

ii. Sharon Wilson & Co., Chambers, East Shirley Street, Highland
Terrace, New Providence, The Bahamas.

it. The Administrator’s Office, Georgetown, Exuma, The Bahamas
AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that any person having dower or
right to dower, an adverse claim or a claim not recognized in the
Petition shall on or before the 22nd JULY A.D., 2009 file in the Su-
preme Court and serve on the Petition or his attorney an Adverse
Claim in the prescribed form supported by Affidavit.

FAILURE OF ANY PERSON to file and serve an Adverse Claim on
or before 22nd JULY A.D., 2009 date will operate as a bar to such
claim.

Dated this 20th day of May A.D., 2009

Sharon Wilson & Co.
Chambers
Delvest House
East Shirley Street, Highland Terrace
Nassau, N.P, The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner

VACANCY
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Legal Notice

NOTICE
CHASCARILLO INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

STEZU INVESTMENTS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,
the Dissolution of STEZU INVESTMENTS LTD has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Registrar. The date of completion of the dissolution was the
29th day of May 2009.

ghee
Tid fy Bl. Poewr

Kor: Cuevtor end Lied aren. fine.

Lige Ret

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DAWN INT’L LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GALVESTON VALLEY LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEW ACCARDI INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

WANTED
ASSISTANT FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

A local company is seeking to hire a highly motivated
detailed oriented individual to fill the position of Assistant

Financial Conbreotler
REQUIREMENTS

* Ability to work with minimum supervision
Expenence in effective management of purchases,
inventory and Accounts Receivables
Supervise the accurate input and processing of
financial infomation
Timely preparation and issuance of financial reports
Must possess a high level of integrity & professionalism
Must be flexible and able to produce in a time-driven
environment

QUALIFICATIONS

* AUniversity Degree in Accounting or other related
dscipline

* Minimum of S years experience in accounting

* Working knowledge of Excel and Microsoft Word

Interested persons should apply on or before: July ist 2009
Attention: CONTROLLER
DA 61782
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N3207
Nassau, Bahamas

Salary is commensurate with experiance and qualification



THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 9B

NS TT
Sharing the route for best practices

FROM page 6B

Should they not do so then
there are various processes by
which the Commission can
assert its right to deal with that
member as a non-signatory.
Another substantive change
is the Commission’s obligation
to maintain the confidentiality
of the request made by an
MMOU signatory. This new
provision would mean that (a)
the Commission could not, as
it presently does, provide the
background information of a
request to the person from
whom the information is being
requested; (b) licensees, regis-
trants or any person requested
to provide information on
account holders would be
bound not to divulge the exis-
tence of the request with their
clients; and (c) any objections to
providing the information to the
Commission would have to be
made without the person from
whom the information is
requested being aware of the
background information related
to the request, or any input

from the person in respect of
the information is sought.

A first look at these informa-
tion-sharing provisions would
indicate that the changes made
are voluminous because of the
increased provisions. Consider-
ing the proposed provisions
from the perspective of sub-
stance and content, however, it
is clear that the amendments
proposed provide clarity to the
vague provisions that presently
exist in the Securities Industry
Act 1999. The proposed amend-
ments required to the securities
legislation as a result of the
Commission seeking to become
a Signatory ‘A’ of the MMOU
will therefore result in requests
for information-sharing being
addressed in a transparent envi-
ronment, in which licensees and
registrants of the Commission
will fully understand their rights
and obligations as well as those
of the Commission.

The Commission looks for-
ward to engaging its con-
stituents on their input and
comments in relation to these
provisions and any other matter
that might arise from the pro-

posed provisions in the draft
securities legislation. There is a
45-day consultation period with
respect to this document. with
the deadline for comments
being June 24, 2009. The Com-
mission welcomes comments on
the draft Securities Legislation
which may be posted directly
in the SIA/SIR Comment
Forum using:
http://stats.scb.gov.bs/sia2009/
or posted or emailed to the
Commission at Email:
sia2008@scb.gov.bs. The Com-
mission intends to issue further
articles during the next few
weeks in relation to other
aspects of the draft legislation.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



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The Bahamas

Development Bank

ABACOMARKETS

Chairman’s Report — Q1, 2009

It is with great pleasure that I report on our first quarter of 2009 as we post a net profit of $1.043m
for the quarter. Our locations continue to post strong sales gains - up $2.2m over the same period
the previous year - driven by a 12% increase in sales in the Food Distribution while Domino’s Pizza
sales remain flat with one store less than the previous year. Our gross margin has also improved by
1% driven by improved buying and logistics which has, in turn, allowed us to pass significant
savings on to our customers through our price cuts and club values which, combined, affect
thousands of products on a weekly basis.

The Group’s stringent cost controls, reductions in utility costs, a 25% decrease in interest rates and
the continued significant reduction in its bank debt have also positively impacted the Company’s
results. A total of $500k of our RBC loan was repaid in the first quarter with a further $400k in
repayments since April and we expect to repay this debt in full by the end of the 2009 fiscal year.

Our locations have delivered extremely solid performance in very challenging economic times and
our results clearly reflect the positive response to our strategic initiatives. We believe that by
focusing on our strengths - our brands and the synergies that we can achieve among our locations
- along with the current competitive conditions is giving us an opportunity to gain market share
and ensure that we are well positioned to both weather these economic conditions and prepare us
for further growth in the economic recovery.

These times are challenging us to be innovative, to carefully manage what is within our control, to
achieve the synergies in our buying and logistics to realise savings and efficiencies and to continue
to focus on the details that have delivered solid results in the past two years. We are confident in
these measures and in the performance of our locations - particularly at this time - and we are

relentlessly pursuing the operating results and shareholder value we know Abaco Markets can
produce.

R. Craig Symonette
June 11, 2009

ABACOMARKETS

INTERIM UNAUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
FOR THE QUARTER ENDED APRIL 30, 2009

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

April 30, January 31,
2009 2009

Assets 29,155 30,607

Liabilities (15,824) (18,319)



Equity 13,331 12,288



CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME

(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

Sales
Cost of sales

Quarter Ended
April 30, 2009

$ 22,667
(15,739)

Quarter Ended
April 30, 2008

20,446
(14,380)



Gross profit

Selling, general and administrative expenses

Other operating income

Net operating profit
Pre-opening costs

Interest expense

6,928

(5,849)
154

1,233

6,066

(5,884)
94

276
(24)

(43)

is recruiting a

Managing Director

The Bahamas Development Bank is undergoing a critical period of transformation and
renewal and is looking for a Managing Director (MD) to lead the Bank’s financial turnaround.

Dividends on preference shares (182)



Net profit on continuing operations 27

Net (loss)/profit on discontinued operations 55

Net profit 82

Profit per share
The MD is responsible for providing strategic leadership of the Bank by working with the
Board of Directors, management, and shareholders to establish, implement and oversee the
long-range goals, strategies, plans and policies of the Bank. The MD reports directly to the
Board and will enjoy substantial autonomy to shape overall operations in order to deliver
improved financial performance and customer service levels.



CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)
Duties and Responsibilities:
Quarter Ended
April 30, 2009

Quarter Ended

1. Leadership and Corporate Responsibility April 30, 2008

Lead the management team to be effective developers of solutions to business
challenges and establish credibility throughout the organization and with the
Board

Hold responsibility for driving the Bank to achieve and surpass profitability,
cash flow, and other business goals and objectives

Motivate and lead a results-oriented management team and staff; recruit members
to the executive team not currently in place and retain existing executive and
front-line talent

Represent the Bank and its renewed values with existing and prospective clients,
creditors, government, other stakeholders and the public in general

Net profit for period 1,043 82



Net cash provided by operating activities 1,153



Net cash used in investing activities (119)



Net cash used in financing activities (629)

Increase in cash 405
Business Management and Strategy
e Spearhead the development, communication and implementation of effective
growth strategies and processes
Collaborate with the Board to develop and implement plans for the operational
infrastructure of systems, processes and personnel, designed to accommodate
the Bank’s growth objectives
Assist, as required, in raising additional capital to enable the Bank to meet growth
and market share objectives
Direct the development and implementation of business strategies
Foster a success-oriented, performance-driven, and accountable environment
within the Bank
Lead the Bank’s cultural transformation

EXPLANATORY NOTES
TO INTERIM UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Quarter Ended April 30, 2009

ACCOUNTING POLICIES

These financial statements have been prepared in accordance with International Financial
Reporting Standards using the same accounting policies and methods of computation as
the Consolidated Financial Statements included in the 2008 Annual Report.

Corporate Governance and Disclosure

* Oversee the development, implementation, and compliance with key corporate
policies, including policies regarding corporate governance, risk management,
financial reporting as well as compliance with applicable legislative requirements

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Abaco Markets Limited.
(‘the Company”) and its significant wholly owned subsidiaries: Solomon’s Supercentre
(Nassau) Limited, Cost Right Nassau Limited, Solomon’s Club (Freeport) Limited,
Thompson Wholesale Limited and Caribbean Franchise Holdings Limited.

The ideal candidate will have strong leadership skills, a solid financial services background,
and broad knowledge of the Bahamian business environment. A demonstrated ability to
execute and deliver results is essential. Likewise, a proven track record in strategic plan
development with a clear ability to turn strategy into actions without over complication of
business process is critical.

DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS

On March 9, 2009, the Company ceased operations in Cost Right Abaco. Accordingly,
the assets and liabilities of Cost Right Abaco are treated as discontinued as of April 30,
2009.

The Company has signed a three year lease for the building used by the former store.

The successful candidate will Cn Oy an-atracnye, highly COMpEHLIVE, and performance- The lease includes an option to purchase the building at the end of the lease for $2.8m.

based compensation package.
The equipment of the former business was sold for $350,000, resulting in a gain of

$79,000. Balance of $250,000 on this transaction remains outstanding as of April 30,
2009.

Printed CVs are to be addressed in confidence to The Chairman, and delivered or mailed
to the
Bahamas Development Bank,
Cable Beach, West Bay,
P. O. Box N-3034,
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas

cy WPM ctl ae fail set ar fhe cited mance! steafements can fe obteiaced
ndgiee Gibson, ar Abaca Me (

Al Road Navan, The Balnauues, pet I

The deadline for applications is June 30, 2009.





PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



III =<). =~
Ross considers 3,000-person medical school expansion plan

FROM page 1B

ing that I got the work permit
under incorrect information two
years ago.

“There were untruths in the
letters. Our company lawyer
responded to it and set it right,
making the true information
available to all parties con-
cerned.”

Mr Babak pointed out that the
allegations in the letters had been
included in the ‘shareholder
oppression’ action the St George
estate had initiated against him-
self and Sir Jack, and which had
been thrown out by the Supreme
Court.

Although, as pointed out earli-
er, Tribune Business has not seen
the letter sent by Mr Smith, it is
likely to centre on previous alle-
gations made by the St George
estate, namely that the Immigra-

co TAL OCREOUF

i RRATIONAL

tion Department was in 2006 told
Mr Babak would not receive “any
salary, reward, gain or profit”
from the GBPA and Port Group
chairmanships.

This, the estate had previously
alleged, was at odds with claims
that the two companies’ immedi-
ate parent, Intercontinental
Diversified Corporation (IDC),
might owe a $65 million liability
to Mr Babak over his contract.
Observers close to the situation
have suggested to Tribune Busi-
ness that the Prime Minister and
his Cabinet, plus the Immigration
Department, are unlikely to be
swayed by Mr Smith’s lobbying
campaign over Mr Babak’s work
permit. For starters, they would
not want to be seen as taking
sides in the Port ownership dis-
pute, or lay themselves open to
any possibility of ‘victimisation’
accusations.

It is likely, though, that the let-

ters are the latest salvo in an
attempt by Mr Smith and his
clients to oust Mr Babak from the
GBPA and Port Group Ltd chair-
manship, and sever the links
between him and Sir Jack.

The directors appointed by the
St George estate, and their nom-
inees, voted against Mr Babak
regaining the chairmanship of
both entities, but were defeated
by the Hayward family trust’s
Board control.

Meanwhile, GBPA and Port
Group Ltd president, Ian Rolle,
told Tribune Business that he
wanted “distractions” such as the
furore over Mr Babak’s work per-
mit renewal to “go away”, as they
did not help to take either organ-
isation or Freeport forward.

“Mr Babak enjoys the full sup-
port of the management team and
the employees of the GBPA,” Mr
Rolle said. “They all feel a sense
of normalcy has come into this

place since he’s been around.

“We're focusing on moving
Grand Bahama and the Bahamas
forward. It would be sad to know
that Mr Babak will not be able
to enjoy the fruits of his labours.
He has been working feverishly to
better this island, and in effect
better the Bahamas through his
endeavours.

“T would like to focus on these
distractions going away. It’s not
doing Grand Bahama any good
by having these ongoing distrac-
tions.”

Mr Rolle praised Mr Babak for
attracting Ross University’s med-
ical school to Freeport, describing
it as an investment that was
“recession-proof”.

“There’s a next phase of Ross
University which could have a
tremendous impact for this econ-
omy. This type of business could
be recession-proof,” he added.
“Ross is thinking of expanding

its campus of students and staff to
3,000 persons within two to three
years. It is completely recession-
proof.” Mr Rolle said Ross’s
arrival on Grand Bahama had
been the major economic bright
spot for the island and Freeport
during some very dark economic
times, and the students and fac-
ulty brought with it had helped
to breathe life into the city’s retail
and restaurant industries.

In addition, the rental market
had also been revitalized, with
“apartments and houses not rent-
ed for years, rented now”. Such
developments would further
encourage landlords to invest in
the capital stock of their proper-
ties. Both Mr Rolle and Mr
Babak indicated that Ross Uni-
versity’s investment could spawn
greater things.

The medical school will pro-
duce a cadre of highly-trained
doctors, surgeons and medical

specialists who could form the
core of a medical tourism industry
for the Bahamas, with patients
travelling to Freeport from all
over the world for specialist care.

This, in turn, would create busi-
ness for the city’s hotel industry,
as well as additional demand for a
second home market that has
ample room on Grand Bahama
for expansion.

“We've made tremendous
progress,” Mr Rolle told Tribune
Business. “Hannes introduced a
study of medical tourism. We
have the first phase of a plan, and
it’s looking very favourable.”

Mr Babak added that the con-
sultant hired to conduct the study
had been involved in putting
together healthcare plans for
companies such as Microsoft, with
the focus on areas such as what
medical fields should Freeport
and Grand Bahama offer.

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MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009

be





i Ca Gd 1

The stories behind the news



The battle for chia
Support payments



m@ By RUPERT MISSICK
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

WE RECEIVED a call
from a politician last week
who had to console a dis-
traught single mother who had
come to him seeking assis-
tance. After a long battle, the
court had finally made the
father of her child pay some-
thing to assist her in raising
their child.

The exhilaration of this vic-
tory was short lived, howev-
er, when the court was only
able or willing to award her
$50 a week for the child's
upkeep.

"What can $50 a week do
for this woman? Why would
the court think that's fine? I
mean it's disgraceful,” the
politician said.

The truth is $50 a week isn’t
"fine" by any standards, but
many women don’t receive
much more for the mainte-
nance of their children. They
complain that men don’t
accept raising a child as a joint
effort.

I was severely chastised by
a woman (we'll call her
Simone) who resented the fact
that I had suggested, during
an admittedly clumsy turn of
phrase, that she had her child
for her ex-husband.

"Why do people say that?
‘T had a child for so and so’ or
"You had a child for so and
so’. You know I didn’t have a

INSI

FEEDBACK ON
‘THE GLOBAL

WATER CRISIS’
PAGE THREE



Qu y

child for any man. I had a
child with a man. When I hear
people, even women, say that
I get so mad. One time me
and my sister got into a big
fight over that. She told me
she was having a baby for her
husband.

"T told her straight, home-
girl you having a baby with
that man you're not
doing him any favours,
he isn’t paying you for a
service," she said.

The point was well
taken and I was slight-
ly (only slightly)
embarrassed that I
hadn’t picked up on
that nuance before.

When this partner-
ship that the phrase
"having a baby with"
another person sug-
gests, is broken, many
women find them-
selves in magistrate's
court attempting to
force the father of
their children to do the
right thing.

And then there is
Stephanie, a woman
in her forties, a bat-
tle-worn veteran of
family court, who
told Insight about her
experience. Her court order
for child support was issued
in 1998 when her daughter
was eight years old.

"He brought in all of his
bills and all of his things that
he had in arrears and pre-
sented them to the judge
and said he was unable to
pay child support for my
daughter but the judge still
made an order for him to
pay $80 a week for her
because the father owned a
business," Stephanie said.

This was only after the
judge had, and rightly so,
determined that a man who
owned his own business could
find a way to materialise $80
a week.

The daughter will be turn-
ing 19 this year and since this
order was made more than 10
years ago, her father has
made two $80 payments.

Like many women before
her, Stephanie has given up
on the system completely and
is not only unaware of how to
go about collecting back-child
support, but is no longer inter-
ested in pursuing this route.

"Every time I went to court
to pick up her cheque, they
said nothing was there and he
never paid anything else. He
never lived up to his word,"
Stephanie said.

Admitting that material

a a i

ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING













































support for
the child
they had
together came spo-
radically over the years in oth-
er forms, Stephanie highlight-
ed the need a single mother
has for certainty and the sta-
bility of "support that comes
on time every time."

Court orders for these
women become flaccid instru-
ments made more impotent
by a lack of enforcement.

These women feel not only
dishonoured by the men with
whom they had their children,
but degraded by a court sys-

Well-refined.

Newly designed.





tem that will also not live up
to its promises.

"They make an order and
they don’t have anybody who
follows up with a warrant of
arrest.

“T think if they start arrest-
ing them then I think they
would try to at least put
something there every week

even if they can't put every-
thing they're supposed to.
It's a hassle to keep going to
court. In order to get seen
you have to have an attorney
or else you'll be waiting out
there for hours and hours."

It is impossible to shake
Stephanie from the notion
that the father's lack of mate-
rial support has translated
into a lack of emotional sup-
port for a daughter who was
and still is desperate for a
close relationship with him.

"It's not much
but that was
money I
needed.
I'd
planned on making
that $80 a week stretch to help
pay school fees and buy
clothes and food," she said.

It is very hard to imagine,
even discounting nearly a
decade in an increase in the
cost of living, how this would
be possible but surprisingly
what amounted to $320 a
month is a kingly sum com-
pared to what some women
receive.

Take the more recent case
of Michelle, who is currently
in court attempting to have

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“These women feel not
only dishonoured
by the men with

whom they had their

children, but

degraded by a
court system

that will

also not
live up to
its promises.”

the father of her
children live up to
his obligations. Like
Stephanie before her, she is
frustrated with the system and
is about to "give up because
it's almost not worth it."

Michelle is the mother of
three boys — 17, 14 and 13.
The court ordered their father
to pay what essentially
amounts to $40 a week for
each child.

However, Michelle main-
tains that this isn’t nearly
enough to help raise her chil-
dren, especially as the 14-year-
old is a diabetic.

"I got so tired I actually







































stopped. I don't even
check it no more
because it's
never
there.
They had
a judg-
ment
warrant
out for
him
and it
looks
like
they
can't
catch
him. I
thought
they were
supposed
to lock you
up if you
defy a court
order, but
they can't
seem to find
him, he's not
paying and in
the meantime
the children
still have to
live," she said.

Michelle also
disagrees with
the way the
court decides
how much money
should be paid.

"It shouldn't
be based on
what the man
can pay. It
should be based
on what the
child needs. If I
could be out
there working
nights, working
two jobs to do
what I have to
do, why should-
n't he?" she
asked.

However, there
are times when
men do live up to
their obligations.
However, this
usually is no
thanks to the

courts, but solely to
the men who do what they are
supposed to do. Stephanie
said that while she may have
had a horrendous experience,
she has a friend, a divorcée
whose ex-husband's $100 a
week (about $33.33 for each
child) has been put to good
use.

With this $400 a month
Stephanie's friend is able to
pay her mortgage for her low
cost home.

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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

Battle for child support payments

FROM page one

"Tf I go to them and tell
them that I have responsibil-
ities for rent, light, water they
write it down and ask how
much and make their judg-
ment from what is left over.
Show up and lie. It's awkward
and silly because in the end a
woman would end up losing,
but sometimes court is the
only recourse a woman has,"

said Cleaver Duncombe,
advocate for children’s rights.
Mr Duncombe has a bit of
a conspiracy theory as to why
child support is so minimal.
"Many of the men who are
in positions of power, who

southern style

BISCUIT

ioe ele =



make and enforce the laws,
are serial sweethearters. The
last thing they want is to pay
a bunch of money to a bunch
of children. They want to
make it as minimal as possi-
ble," he said.

At the end of the day all
many women want is a civil
relationship with the father
so that they can adequately
take care of their child.

"IT know it’s not nice or
proper to say, and it may
change, but today I can hon-
estly say I hate my ex-hus-
band,” said Simone. “If I said
anything else I would be
lying. I'm praying about it
mind you, but I really hate
the man. But me and him
don’t speak about anything
else in the world other than
our child. That's it. What else
do we need to talk about? If
he calls there are four things
he says. ‘How you doing?
Can I speak to (Johnny)?
When can I pick (Johnny)
up? You got the money
right?’

"He don’t even really need
to ask how I doing and I don’t
care how he's doing. I don’t
care who he's seeing and he
sure aS hell don’t need to
waste no time about who I'm
seeing. The only point where
our lives intersect is from the
point where the top of our
boy’s head begins and it ends
at the tip of his toes. One
good thing I can say he loves
and takes care of his son."

Simone's earlier chastise-
ment of me is correct.
Women do have children with

“Many of the men who are in
positions of power, who make
and enforce the laws, are serial
sweethearters. The last thing
they want is to pay a bunch of
money to a bunch of children.
They want to make it as
minimal as possible.”



Cleaver Duncombe,
advocate for children’s rights

men. It's a partnership that
requires two mature adults
working in the best interest
of a child. Women do not
provide a service for men
when they bear their children.
Men cannot say, "Madame I
am unhappy with the results
of your work. Consequently I
have made the decision not
to pay for your inadequate
services." (If that were possi-
ble lord only knows what con-
versation my parents would
have had 27 years ago).

Certainly these amounts,
$33 a child a week, $40 a child
a week, $80 a child a week,
are simply tokens. It is at best
disheartening and at worst
insulting if they are seen as
anything more.

While the money is not
supposed to take care of the
mother and no reasonable

share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

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person believes that an indi-
vidual, pint sized or not, can
live on $33 a week, these
amounts seem to satisfy the
only obligation the state
requires of a man who does
not live with or is married to
the mother of his children —
maintenance.

Ideally a man should be
emotionally present for his
child, supportive in all ways
possible, nurturing and exam-
ple setting, but, as harsh as it
may sound, there is no oblig-
ation, other than a moral one,
for him to do any of this.
Shame only goes so far, and a
judicial system, even one that
is different and does what it is
supposed to do, cannot force
men to be better fathers. Her
Majesty's Prison is filled to
capacity with men who rather
brave its horrors than do
what is required of them.

Simone is a very good
friend of mine and we've had
many heated discussions over
the years and if God is kind
we Shall continue to have
them well into the future. I
suggested to her during our
conversation last week that if
I were to agree (and I do)
that women and men have
children with each another
then the failure of child sup-
port reaching those it is
intended to support, the chil-
dren, is a failure on the part



of two persons and not the
courts. "Lousy men and the
women who chose them,"
was the way I believe it was
put.

"Or lying men and the
women who believe them,"
she retorted. "Things would-
n’t be so bad if men didn’t
feel like their manhood was a
liquid that came out of their
(bodies)."

Touché!

Admittedly I had always
been confounded by men
who would boastfully tell me
that they had three, four, five
children with different
women. I used to wonder
how they took care of them.
Well the answer is that the
majority of them don't. If
there were some law that lim-
ited a man to the number of
children based on his ability
to take care of them, we
would lose a large segment
of our population.

We were damaged at some
point and made to believe, as
Simone said, that our man-
hood is connected to our viril-
ity. The question now is, are
we ready, court order or no
court order, to do what is
right by our women and our
children?





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 3C



INSIGHT



INSIGHT «=:

F E E D

Dear Mr. Nunez,

I read your article with
great interest.

About 10 years ago, Mr.
Moss (who was in charge of
Water & Sewerage at the
time) spoke at our Rotary
meeting about the positioning
of the Water & Sewerage to
meet future demands. Of the
plans presented none seem to
address growth and future
capacity of our water supply
system.

I raised a question to Mr.
Moss about building a reser-
voir to hold the millions of
gallons of water that is
shipped from Andros. My
question went into the depth
of dumping the water into
what I called a swamp, for
most of the shipment to min-
gle with the ground water and
eventually leached back into
the sea. Not realising that spe-
cial interests do not care if the
water is wasted, I pursued my
questions. I also went on to
include that a reservoir would
provide a catch basin for any
rainfall that would occur.

The ultimate answer to my
question was "that it doesn't
rain enough in Nassau, so
building a reservoir was not
cost effective." A man from
Australia replied to this that it
rains rarely in Australia, but
when it does they catch every
drop they can.

Because of time value of
money it would have been less
expensive to build 10
years ago than now. This to
me is like "Global Warming",
the longer we wait the greater
the problem and expense.

Just like our energy con-
servation problems, water
conservation is clouded with
special interests that is not in
the best interests of the
"Bahamian People."

— John Sandford

Mr. Nunez ,

I have read your report on
the “Global Water Crisis” in
today's newspaper (Tribune-
June 8). It is rather ironic that
you chose to write on this top-
ic because just recently a
report was submitted to the
Ministers of Environment
(April 2009) and the Prime
Minister (May 2009) concern-
ing the problems at the Water
and Sewerage Corporation
(WSC). I find it a difficult to
fathom that successive gov-
ernments have failed to
enforce the Water and Sew-
erage Act which gives the
WSC the right to exclusivity
as to the usage of our precious
ground water resources. Given
the 70 per cent of the popula-
tion of New Providence that is
using ground water, it is
inevitable of a crisis looming.

Neverthless, the “story
behind the story” is the fact
that the WSC as presently
constituted is unable to even
sustain its present customers.
This is because of two reasons:
1) lack of proper funding; 2)
poor management decisions.

The report identifies these
two reasons and takes an in
depth look at the latter. I trust
that you will write a follow-
up report to today's article
using the report provided.
This report has already been
submitted to the executives of
the organisation and govern-
ment, as previously men-
tioned, therein it is time the
general public knows exactly
what is going on at an organi-
sation being heavily subsidised
with their money.

— DF.

Good INSIGHT article;
and especially timely.

For your guidance I sent
the attached (admittedly
lengthy) letter to The
Guardian last month. It was
not published.

You cite "the first de-salin-
ization plant in 1969." Our
inept de-saliniztion planning
goes back further than that if I
recall correctly. About 1960
we were led to believe our
problems would be solved
when the Weir Company in
Scotland built a stainless steel
RO plant near Baillou Hills. I
suspect we knew little of stain-
less steels then because com-
mon so-called 304 stainless
cannot tolerate chlorides. The
austentitic (nickle bearing)
stainless steels can withstand
salt water. Anyhow our Weir
units within a couple years
apparently looked like fine

F EE OD BAC K



Irish lace; and were quietly
scrapped.

We never transported
Andros water efficiently, but
we could have. Instead I
believe we have prematurely
"Bet the farm" on the success
of reverse osmosis, and with
higher oil prices coming again
fast, and expected to continue
for a lengthy period we
may regret our haste.

— Bill Bardelmeier

The following is the letter
referred to by Mr
Bardelmeier:

Like much of the world's
population, we face a long
term struggle to supply water
at the places where people
need it. We are in this respect
perhaps no better nor worse
than some highly developed
economies such as that of Cal-
ifornia. We must accept how-
ever that it will require a con-
tinuous effort and careful
planning to stay on top of our
water supply problem.

Bahamas Water & Sewer
Corporation today produces
something close to 11 million
imperial gallons per day of
potable water. New Provi-
dence demand for water
would probably be closer to
13 million imp. gallons per day
if not constrained. With all
sectors (meaning Reverse
Osmosis and Tankering func-
tioning) Water & Sewer Corp.
seem to believe that supply
and demand are in reasonable
balance except during emer-
gency periods such as that
which is causing their public
newspaper notices this week
concerning the urgent need to
conserve water now.

We were advised long ago
that New Providence is not
capable of supplying more
ground water without serious
damage to our lens structures
and without grossly exceed-
ing world health standards for
chlorides.

Andros has a sizeable
quantity of water. For the past
couple decades we pumped
roughly five million gallons
per day from shallow well
fields at the northern end of
the island; shipping it in
tankers to Arawak Cay on
Nassau Harbour. This trans-
port system has been criticised
by some (in fact by many) as a
very wasteful, costly system.
Tankering water has been
abhorrent to some Bahamian
politicians and laymen, but it
has a potential that we should
appreciate.

Although the result was
wasteful and costly, the water
transport concept was never
well executed. Locally the
transport of Andros water to
New Providence was for many
years termed “barging” water.
In the very earliest days
Andros water was indeed
transported in barges towed
by small (often under-pow-
ered) tugs. A pair of (very)
used barges were purchased
on the U.S. Gulf coast and lat-
er a completely new simple
barge was constructed in Tam-
pa. (Lacking modern protec-
tive coatings it soon wasted
away).

However, Bahamas Water
& Sewerage Corp. at that time
had very little background
knowledge of the substantial
difference between using
towed barges versus use of self
propelled ships. Barges with
their shallower draft do tend
to be favoured where only
shallow ports are available. It
is quite commonplace for
towed barge systems to cease
achieving normal sea speed
whenever the wind reaches
about 20 knots velocity. In
those situations the tug and

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towed barge that are caught
at sea make headway only at
very slow (or even zero)
speed. Even more trouble-
some is the fact that once in
safe harbour with high winds
prevalent, the tug and barge
unit normally sits in port
awaiting weather abatement.
Water transport cost is almost
linear with speed, so the idle T
&B combination incurs unac-
ceptable costs.

The conventional ship-con-
figured tankship can continue
making fair forward progress
in rough seas up to the point
where it may no longer be
safely assured of entering a
narrow harbour channel
amidst breaking seas.

Water & Sewer executives
gained insight into this differ-
ence in operating efficiency
between tugs/barges on the
one hand and tankships on the
other and soon shifted their
procurement plans to encom-
pass the ship's advantages.

Unfortunately the graphic
representation of transport
cost by a range of ship sizes
has a very steep slope where
cost per ton carried decreases
rapidly as ship size increases.
(This being the heart of the
reason world crude oil trades
shifted from a maximum
70,000 ton ships to 326,000 ton
oil tankers in a brief span of
years in the 1960's/70's).

Whereas initial hopes of
accommodating large (by our
local standards) ships on the
Andros route, these hopes
were dashed when the dredg-
ing contractor engaged to
enlarge and deepen the for-
mer Owens Illinois pulpwood
loading berth/ channel at Mor-
gan's Bluff at the extreme
northern tip of Andros,
encountered much more diffi-
cult dredging of harder than
expected rock. My recollec-
tion is that there was extreme
delay getting a channel creat-
ed and with costs overrunning
substantially a smaller, shal-
lower water loading harbour
was agreed. A situation that
has cost a pretty penny for
many subsequent years up to
the present.

The approach channel,
turning basin and berthing
face at Morgan's Bluff are
defined in four areas describ-
ing a series of dredged depths
ranging from 25 feet in the
“A”, or deepest, zone down
to a bare 17 feet in the “D”
zone. By squeezing all the
inefficiency out of this lesser
harbour it became possible to
load water tankers to 19 feet
draft. However a very trou-
blesome further problem leapt
into the forefront. The turning
basin was so restricted in size
that an absolute maximum
ship length of about 410 feet
was mandated.

Now it is a fact that you
can't have a very large cargo
capacity in a ship only 410
feet long and loaded down to
only 19 feet draft. By charter-
ing an old North Slope heavi-
ly built 11,000 ton barge after
it had been fitted with a
vaguely ship-like blunt bow
and installing several very
costly, tempermental Swedish
engines W & S Corp. gained
the use of a 14,000 ton ship

SEE page 5C





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THE TRIBUNE

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

18TH JUNE, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00332

Whereas SOLOMON EZEKIEL NEWTON, of Pinewood Gardens in the Southern
District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
Letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate of MABLE NEWTON, late
of Yellow Elder Gardens in the Southern District of the Island of New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

18TH JUNE, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00333

Whereas SHAKIRA SANDS-BURROWS, of Millennium Gardens in the Western
District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate of JOHN SAMUEL SANDS
late of Malcolm Road in the Southern District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

18TH JUNE, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00334

Whereas ANDREW DWAYNE FORBES, of No. 19 High Vista Apartments in the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration
with the Will annexed of the Real and Personal Estate of DIANE M. MILLER late
of No. 580 S.E. 5th Street in the City of Pampano Beach in the State of Florida, one
of the States of the United States of America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

18TH JUNE, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00335

Whereas GRANVILLE CHRISTOPHER KNOWLES, of Miami Florida, U.S.A.,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration
with the Will annexed of the Real and Personal Estate of GRANVILLE JOSEPH
KNOWLES, late of 214 S.E. Lincoln Circle N., St. Petersburg, Pinellas, Florida,
US.A., deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

18TH JUNE, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00336

Whereas ARLINGTON WILLIAM DEAN, of Fox Hill, Eastern District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of CECIL A. HAMILTON, late of 11224 South Emerald
Street Chicago Illinois U.S.A., deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar



FROM page 3C

with a history of poor relia-
bility and frequent mainte-
nance. This vessel has served
many years but its speed is
about that of a barge because
of its broad beam (Normally
such width as one would
encounter in a 75,000 ton
tanker. Which would require
42 feet draft)

For about a decade W &S
Corp. concurrently chartered
a second small, elderly, Ex-
Canadian tankship of about
7000 tons capacity. It's mod-
est sea speed of near 12 knots
was about double that of the
larger converted broad beam
tankship. Thus the two vastly
differently configured ships
could haul about the same
quantity (tons) of water per
month on the short trip from
Andros to Arawak Cay.

With reverse osmosis sys-
tems of greater size and effi-
ciency appearing around the
world the executive decision
was apparently made to go
with the RO approach for the
future.

The water transport sys-
tem has been cut back to a
single ship and it was hoped
that even that could be aban-
doned soon. The question
today that one must ask is:
“Have we bet the farm too
early before proven success
of RO systems?” Bear in
mind that we have had fail-
ure of several earlier
attempts to use large scale
RO process to obtain potable
water.

———— , JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 5C
INSIGHT FEEDBACK

Now one suddenly is see-
ing adverts and hearing
rumours that indicate the
RO system may have cost
and reliability problems too.

Before the large world-
wide fuel price increases of
recent years the actual trans-
port cost by ship is estimated
to have been in the near
neighbourhood of $4.00 per
thousand Imperial gallons.
(An Imperial gallons is 20
per cent larger than a U.S.
gallon and 1000 I gallons is
equal to 4.47 long tons of
2240 pounds).

There have been further
verbal indications that the
shipment of Andros water
may have stressed some of
the Andros well fields. Only
the Water & Sewerage Corp
would have data on this.

Quite some years earlier
the World Bank examined
Bahamas wellfield potential
and indicated among other
findings that substantial sur-
face water was present fur-
ther south on Andros and
near a natural deeper water
harbour site near Big Wood
Cay. Such a site would add a
few hours to each round voy-
age to Nassau, but it would
remove the loading site from
the very serious funneling of
occasional destructive
Atlantic swells channeled
through Hole In The Wall
Passage and focusing on
Morgans Bluff. The phe-
nomenon in a matter of a

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few hours on a calm August
day destroyed the first $2
million dock that Owens IIli-
nois had built at Morgans
Bluff. The phenomena have
occurred at least twice again
since Owens Illinois gave up
the pulpwood business.
Despite the history of
destructive ocean swells W
& S Corp. have clung to
Morgan's Bluff for a loading
site.

Unless we are assured of
the reliability and the overall
costs of the newer RO sys-
tems

one is inclined to feel that
some very modern ship capa-
bility to move water must
remain available for at least
a few more years.

The dire message appear-
ing in local adverts the past
week indicate that the East-
ern District is going to have
some very serious water
problems for the near term
at least. Can we feel confi-
dent it won't also apply toa
longer term?

Unlike the 1970's we now
have a growing cadre of
skilled Bahamian shipboard
officers, thanks to the
Bahamas Maritime Authori-
tiy's scholarships and those
of our foreign Bahamian
Shipowners Association. In
addition small 15,000 to
20,000 ton tankers can now
be built with long life corro-
sion resistance and with a
need for greatly reduced
crew numbers. Local capital
has shown the financial
strength to easily fund a pair
of modern small tankers that
could substantially out-per-
form the old “crocks” we
have had to use in the past.
For many years all ships and
tugs used by Water & Sewer
Corp. consumed a very high
grade of marine fuel. This
morning's Houston price for
this quality of marine fuel is
$480 per ton. (Last summer
it reached $1600 per ton).
Modern small tankships typ-
ically are fitted to burn a
heavier, grade of marine fuel
(known as IFO 180) which
this morning costs $349.50
per ton. The reduction in
fuel cost per year could be
very substantial using new
efficient tankships.

Our situation deserves
close monitoring for the next
couple of years especially.
We cannot have a tourism
economy if we don't have
ample fresh water available.
We shouldn't “bet the farm”
on any one system in haste.

Wm E Bardelmeier,
Nassau,
May 10, 2009

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

Sidney Poitier International Conference

and Film Festival

Nassau, The Bahamas, February 23-27, 2010

CALL FOR PAPERS

Deadline for Submissions: July 31, 2009

The College of the Bahamas presents the Sidney Poitier International Conference and Film
Festival. We invite critics, historians, filmmakers, artists and cultural practitioners from around
the world to examine the artistic and social endeavours of acclaimed actor, director, author, and

diplomat Sir Sidney Poitier, who turns 83 on February 20, 2010.

We invite papers or panel presentations that explore the broad spectrum of critical issues sum-
moned up by Poitier’s work as actor, director, and author. Presentations should be 20 minutes
in length. Papers will be considered for publication in an upcoming scholarly text dedicated

to Poitier’s work.

Possible Panel and Paper Topics Include (but are not limited to):
Caribbean Sense and Sensibilities in American Cinema
Constructions of Blackness in Poitier’s Films
Representations of Women in Poitier’s Films

The Iconic Black Male in America

Black Skin, White Masks

Poitier and the White/Black Gaze
Poitier and the Global Politics of Race and Liberation
Poitier, Bahamian Politics and Identity

Sexing the Asexual

Black Christs and the White Conscience
Desire, Sexuality and Transgression

Poitier and Censorship
Poitier in the Classroom
The Actor as Activist
Poitier and Film Theory

Poitier and the Black Power Movement

Poitier and the Digital Age

Autobiography and Refashioning

Poitier as Director
Poitier as Writer

Please send abstracts via email to: istrachan@cob.edu.bs.
Abstracts should be submitted by July 31, 2009, and should be no longer than 250 words.

For more information on the conference please go to:http://poitierconference.synthasite.com/.

For any questions feel free to contact Ian Strachan at istrachan@cob.edu.bs, or Marjorie
Brooks-Jones at mjones@cob.edu.bs or call the School of English Studies at (242) 302-4381.





THE TRIBUNE





Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, SC
Chicago
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Honolulu
Houston










R : ORLANDO : Mostly sunny; Clear. Sunshine
/ High: 95° ae ¢ >a isolated t-shower. , ,
‘Low: 75°F/24°C ‘a
ea Ae High: 89°
* } ¢ allele 90° Low: 79° Low: 79°
TAMPA Egy: te f- Py, EN ae ay AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel
High: 92° F/33° C 5 > 111° F | 109°-86°F

Low: 77° F/25°C
@

de

High
F/C
88/31
68/20
90/32
75/23
17/25
64/17
74/23
91/32
78/25
77/25
97/36
77/25
79/26
87/30
96/35

KEY WEST
High: 88° F/31°C
Low: 79° F/26° C

Today

Low

F/C
61/16
53/11
71/21
58/14
59/15
53/11
56/13
74/23
55/12
56/13
76/24
52/11
57/13
75/23
77/25

Ww

+ SO Git ew eo
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Oo fe tee CS ee
o Be oO Oo

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115°-88° F

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and

Plenty of sunshine.





High:
Low:

90°
79°

= WEATHER REPORT &

5-Day FORECAST














i

Mostly sunny.



Mostly sunny, a
t-storm possible.







High: 88° High: 89°
Low: 78° Low: 79°
AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel
108°-85° F 104°-88° F

elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

1

a, @ WEST PALMBEACH
= High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 76° F/24° C
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT
High: 88°F/31°C High: 89° F/32° C
Low: 78° F/26° C ica Low: 76° F/24°C
| Sun
; MIAMI
a High: 89° F/32°C

Low: 77° F/25° C

x

@



ANDROS
High: 93° F/34° C
Low: 80° F/27°C



ABACO

High: 90° F/32° C

— Low: 79° F/26°C
“A

Cx

NASSAU

High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 79° F/26° C
@



Tuesday Today Tuesday
High Low W High Low W High Low W High
Fic FC Fic FC Fic FC F/C
91/382 638/17 s Indianapolis 80/26 62/16 pc 79/26 64/17 t Philadelphia 78/25
68/20 53/11 sh Jacksonville 93/33 73/22 t 96/35 73/22 pc Phoenix 97/36
87/30 72/22 pc Kansas City 80/26 68/20 t 85/29 69/20 t Pittsburgh 80/26
71/21 56/13 pe Las Vegas 93/33 69/20 s 94/34 74/23 pc Portland, OR 78/25
76/24 60/15 pc Little Rock 95/35 73/22 pe 97/86 73/22 s Raleigh-Durham 34/28
62/16 50/10 s Los Angeles 71/21 61/16 r 74/23 61/16 t St. Louis 81/27
76/24 60/15 pc Louisville 80/26 67/19 t 83/28 67/19 t Salt Lake City 75/23
87/30 67/19 t Memphis 95/35 75/23 t 94/34 75/23 s San Antonio 95/35
77/25 58/14 t Miami 89/31 77/25 t 89/31 78/25 t San Diego 71/21
79/26 61/16 pc Minneapolis 79/26 60/15 pce 74/23 60/15 t San Francisco 71/21
99/37 77/25 s Nashville 87/30 68/20 t 86/30 70/21 t Seattle 74/23
84/28 55/12 t New Orleans 95/35 77/25 $s 95/35 75/23 s Tallahassee 97/36
79/26 59/15 pc New York 75/23 58/14 t 69/20 58/14 pc Tampa 92/33
88/31 75/23 pc Oklahoma City 97/36 73/22 pce 99/87 72/22 pc Tucson 94/34
96/35 77/25 s Orlando 95/35 75/23 t 95/35 74/23 t Washington, DC 79/26

Today

Low

F/C
59/15
75/23
57/13
57/13
65/18
69/20
57/13
76/24
65/18
56/13
54/12
73/22
77/25
66/18
64/17

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GREAT EXUMA

ELEUTHERA



Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
Temperature

NGM es cca cicates Qaceeraueeataceraanet sateen 91° F/33° C
LOW sects 81° F/27° C
Normal high .... 87° F/31° C
Normal low 74° F/23° C
Last year's WIQh oo... cecesceteeeceeees 89° F/32° C

Last year's LOW oo. cccceseseeteseeeeeees 72° F/22° C
Precipitation

As of 2 p.m. yesterday .......ccccccccccenseeceneee 0.00"
Year to date 13.
Normal year to date 0... ccc ccseeceneeee 14.88"

AccuWeather.com

Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009



High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 77° F/25°C

—

High: 87° F/31°C
Low: 75° F/24° C

O ,
US rr ee

Tuesday

High

F/C
75/23
99/37
80/26
74/23
79/26
82/27
80/26
97/36
72/22
70/21
73/22
99/37
92/33
96/35
76/24

Low

F/C
59/15
77/25
60/15
57/13
64/17
71/21
58/14
75/23
65/18
56/13
56/13
74/23
77/25
68/20
60/15

Ww

pe
s
pe
pc
r
t
pe
s
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pe
pe
s
t
s

pe

AY ir Ny

3|4|5|6

MODERATE

o|1|2

LOW







HIGH | V.HIGH

7|8|9|10

Vv

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.

a Pos

High Ht.(ft.) Low
Toley (asp, 28 808 pm
Tuesday Soe 28 9.05em
Wednesiay eam 27 1006 pm
Thursday eae 29 1107 RM

Sunrise...... 6:20 a.m.
Sunset....... 8:01 p.m.
tat New



Jun. 15

Jun. 22

CATISLAND
High: 85° F/29° C
Low: 72° F/22°C
i SAN SALVADOR
High: 88° F/31° C
Low: 74° F/23°C
LONG ISLAND
High: 89° F/32° C
Low: 75° F/24°C ey MAYAGUANA
High: 86° F/30° C
— a Low: 74° F/23°C
CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
RAGGEDISLAND — Migh:90°F/32°c
High: 88° F/31° C Low: 76° F/24°C
Low: 72° F/22°C os
GREAT INAGUA

High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 77° F/25°C

ad

Moonrise. .. . 12:42 a.m.
Moonset... . 12:59 p.m.
First Full

Jun. 29

0.3
0.5

0.3
0.5

0.2
0.4

0.1
0.3



hil 7





Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
88/31
69/20
75/23
86/30
56/13
91/32
86/30
80/26
90/32
79/26
90/32
76/24
78/25
66/18
66/18
78/25
57/13
96/35
100/37
76/24
91/32
81/27
91/32
68/20
64/17
72/22
17/25
58/14
87/30
52/11
84/28
106/41
83/28
82/27
65/18
88/31
70/21
72/22
88/31
86/30
79/26
104/40
68/20
70/21
77/25
80/26
109/42
64/17
68/20
75/23
72/22
102/38
84/28
86/30
59/15
83/28
57/13
85/29
67/19
75/23
57/13
61/16
83/28
73/22
71/21
87/30
72/22
78/25
74/23
81/27

ealil

Today

Low
F/C
78/25
53/11
44/6
70/21
43/8
79/26
76/24
66/18
66/18
73/22
70/21
58/14
70/21
43/8
55/12
65/18
45/7
70/21
84/28
55/12
78/25
72/22
65/18
53/11
46/7
62/16
61/16
40/4
75/23
43/6
79/26
73/22
62/16
59/15
46/7
78/25
57/13
55/12
66/18
77/25
52/11
74/23
55/12
51/10
59/15
56/13
88/31
41/5
54/12
62/16
64/17
81/27
62/16
78/25
32/0
73/22
39/3
73/22
54/12
57/13
43/6
52/11
77/25
64/17
59/15
64/17
56/13
71/21
55/12
58/14









pe
pe
pc
fi
t
pe
pc
pe
C
pe
s

High
F/C
88/31
66/18
78/25
88/31
53/11
90/32
86/30
78/25
73/22
75/23
97/36
61/16
78/25
66/18
70/21
91/32
60/15
96/35
107/41
76/24
87/30
81/27
78/25
66/18
66/18
73/22
74/23
62/16
89/31
55/12
82/27
104/40
80/26
79/26
61/16
87/30
69/20
75/23
84/28
84/28
77/25
107/41
75/23
69/20
72/22
79/26
108/42
61/16
76/24
76/24
17/25
101/38
84/28
86/30
66/18
84/28
57/13
84/28
70/21
77/25
63/17
59/15
82/27
73/22
76/24
81/27
68/20
77/25
65/18
78/25

Tuesday

Low
F/C
78/25
51/10
51/10
73/22
46/7
78/25
77/25
65/18
63/17
70/21
67/19
48/8
70/21
47/8
51/10
58/14
45/7
70/21
84/28
51/10
76/24
72/22
67/19
51/10
50/10
55/12
59/15
44/6
71/21
45/7
79/26
73/22
65/18
59/15
46/7
78/25
ile
55/12
64/17
78/25
55/12
75/23
55/12
54/12
43/6
59/15
84/28
45/7
54/12
48/8
67/19
83/28
61/16
78/25
38/3
73/22
48/8
73/22
54/12
61/16
46/7
54/12
77/25
64/17
60/15
58/14
ale
53/11
49/9
57/13

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MariNE FORECAST

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Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace





MONDAY, JUNE 15th, 2009, PAGE 7C

WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
Tuesday: § at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
FREEPORT Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
Tuesday: § at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
ABACO Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
Tuesday: $ at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F



79/60
Washington
4

71/61

(BREEZY ) _

3 Houston

96/77, =
Showers
T-storms







eran ~ Rain Gaia Fronts
[*, * Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and “os

66) Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm intial
v7_7] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary .m@ a
10s | -ts [Os'| 10s 20s [305i] 40s [50s Gos 70s 80s [S0s\/i00sN/Ti05)



t ee

“You Can Be BI
Away By A Hurricane

ae you_can fee easy knowing

th oe yo have excellent insurance
erase no matter which
await he wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

ce | Abaco Eleuthera Exuma
ore] Tel: (242) 350-3500 f Tel: (242) 367-4204 f Tel: (242) 332-2862 ff Tel: (242) 336-2304

LH



Full Text

PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Fire heartache of heroine grandma C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.165MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER MOSTLYSUNNY, T-SHOWER HIGH 90F LOW 79F I N S I G H T SEEINSIGHTFRONT S P O R T S The battle for child support payments SEEPAGEFIFTEEN INSIDE Women’s volleyball n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A HEARTBROKEN grandmother told last night how she rescued her three grandchildren from a burning house but failed to reach her 77-year-old husband. Fighting back the tears, Emerald Cooper, 72, said the fire started in a bedroom at their home in Brice Lane, off Mackey Street, before 6pm on Saturday. She was resting in the living room when her six-year-old grandson told her his mattress was on fire, and she ordered him to take his five-year-old brother and seven-month-old baby sister away from the house. Mrs Cooper then rushed to the bedroom where her hus band Leon Cooper lay sleeping. Mr Cooper had been unable to walk since he suffered a stroke nine years ago, and Mrs Cooper tried to drag him to safety, but he resisted. She said: “He was saying, ‘Throw some water on it,’ and I said, ‘I can’t, it’s a heavy fire’. “But he said he ain’t going, so I dragged him out the bed. Then when we reached the door of the room by the fire, he held on.” As the smoke became thick er, Mrs Cooper said she had to get out of the building to save her own life, although her husband of 53 years would not let Grandchildren saved but husband dies in horror blaze The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com I N S I D E SECTIONINSIDE Real Estate EMERALD COOPER looks at the only picture saved from the house. SEE page two THE REMAINS of the house which was destroyed by fire in Brice Lane, off Mackey Street. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f Minister can see no resolution between govt and nurses n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@ tribunemedia.net MINISTER of Health Hubert Minnis can see no resolution between the Government and angry nurses who have crippled the public health system on a week-long sick-out. However Water and S ewerage Corporation ( WSC) employees who staged a sick-out late last week have vowed to return to work today. The public health nurs es started industrial action when around 50 per cento f nursing staff across the country called in sick last Monday. And although staff returned to the Rand Memorial Hospital in Freeport, Grand Bahama, on Wednesday, Dr Min nis said the sick-out continued at the busy Princess Margaret Hospital in Nas sau over the weekend. Bahamas Nurses Union president Cleola Hamil ton said tempers flared SEE page nine SEARCH parties are beginning to lose hope of finding alive brothers Deangelo Clarke, nine, and five-year-old Marcelo Clarke who went missing while crabbing in South Andros last week. Family members of the boys have flown down to the island to assist in the desperate search as fears continue to grow about their safety. Deangelo lives in Andros with this grandparents, while his brother Marcelo lives in Nassau with his parents and was visiting the island for only a few days. On Tuesday night last week, the two boys left the house to hunt for crabs and have not been seen since. When night fell, worry began to set in and the grandparents and members of the community began to search for them. Officers from the Kemp’s Bay police station were alerted and joined the search the next morning. Hopes fade of finding missing br others alive n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@ tribunemedia.net CONCERNS have been raised over the selection of candidates to represent the PLP in the next general election after it was revealed that people have already been named and ratified as the prospective representative for certain key areas in New Prov idence ... without the candi date’s committee having met. Neil Percentie, the former branch chairman for the last PLP representative for Marathon Ron Pinder, said he was shocked to see that Sena tor Jerome Fitzgerald was already listed on the PLP’s website as the “candidate” for the Marathon constituency. While outlining that he held no brief with Senator Fitzger ald as he knows him to be a good family man and a “bril liant business person”, Mr Percentie said he is concerned with the fact that the people in the area have essentially been Selection of PLP election candidates raises concerns SEE page eight INSIDE B AHAMAS WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL TEAM ROBBED WHILE PLAYING VITAL GAME PAGETHREE BAHAMIAN CITIZENS NAMED IN QUEEN’S BIR THD AY HONOURS PAGEFIVE

PAGE 2

her take him with her. She said: “I had to drag him, but he still wouldn’t come right out, and I stumbled a few times, and the smoke got to us. “He had plenty of time to come out there, but he wouldn’t come. “He can’t walk but he wouldn’t let me drag him out. I tell you he was something else.” Mrs Cooper and her husband had built the three bedroom house soon after they married. They raised their four children there. He had worked as a mechanic at KC Auto Sales in Palmdale and Victoria Avenue, as well as independently. But life had been difficult for the couple since his stroke, as he was unable to walk, and unable to work. They lived with three of their 13 grandchildren. Firefighters found the house engulfed in flames when they arrived shortly after 6pm on Saturday, and Mr Cooper’s body was lying in the hallway. Emergency medical services pronounced him dead at the scene. Everything in the house was reduced to ash or damaged by smoke and water. Mrs Cooper said: “We had all our things destroyed, everything was destroyed, what we had before it’s tough getting it back now, but thank God we are living. “The children have nothing. Everything hey had is gone.” Neighbours and family friends helped Mrs Cooper clear the house of everything that had been destroyed and salvage what was left. A photograph of Mrs Cooper’s daughter and grandchildren is one of the few items she has salvaged. Mrs Cooper said she and her grandchildren are virtually unharmed by the blaze. “I’m right here,” she said. “I hurt my muscle when I was pulling him out probably, it hurts, but that’s all. “It must be from when he held on and I tried to pull him, and the fire would have got me, but I let him go.” She and her grandchildren are now looking for a new home. Police are investigating the cause of the blaze. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE INDEX MAINSPORTS SECTION Local News .................. P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,11 Editorial/Letters..........................................P4 Sports........................................P12,13,14,15 Advt ......................................................... P16 BUSINESS SECTION Business........................P1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10 INSIGHT SECTION Insight ................................................ P1,2,3,5 Advt.........................................................P4,8 Comics ........................................................ P6 W eather ....................................................... P7 CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 P AGES REAL ESTATE GUIDE 24 PAGES USA TODA Y MAIN SECTION 12 P AGES Fire heartache of heroine grandmother F ROM page one THEREMAINS of the house after the blaze. LEON COOPER’S walking cane lies in the remains of the house. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

PAGE 3

n By RENALDO DORSETT/ BRENT STUBBS Tribune Sports Reporters SNEAK thieves robbed the B ahamas Women’s National Volleyball team of all their personal effects and equipment while they played a vital world championship qualifier. As the team were putting up a brave battle against host country Barbados on Friday at the Garfield Sobers Sports Complex, t heir lockers were being broken into. And women’s agony at a five set loss turned into heartache when they discovered their property, including passports, had been taken. A report filed with the Barbadian Police estimates the value of t he stolen property at more than $47,400, and now their scheduled return home today is in jeopardy. Among the missing items were $8,500 from the team expense fund, a few laptops and cellular phones as well as several passports of team members and coaches. According to team member K rystel Rolle, the night began with an inauspicious start as the team was initially delegated to a locker room and was forced to change and perform pre game stretches in an adjacent hallway. “We felt like it was strange that we did not have a locker allocated to us at first. We were told the team from Barbados was occupying the locker room next to where we were stretching,” she said. The team was forced to take their belongings to the main court and place them behind the benche s during the match, however a tournament representative told the team they had to relocate equipment to a locker room in the foreground of the stadium. “When we got to the back, Barbados had already left the locker room and we were told it was safe f or us to put our stuff in there so we did,” Rolle said, “Kelsie [Johnson], team captain, locked the door and we went back out onto the court to continue warming up for the game.” After the five set loss to Barbados that dropped the Bahamas to second place in the A group, t he team returned to the locker room to find their personal effects missing. “The door to the locker room was swung wide open and all of our stuff was gone, everything. No one was any help, no one saw anything and we noticed later that the lock on the door was broken,” R olle said. “Tournament organizers didn’t do anything, the local police did not arrive until two hours later and initially we thought that our bags had been moved from one room to the next and we were just angry because they moved our bags without our permission or without supervision. After minu tes rolled into hours it became clear that our stuff had really been s tolen and the lady with the key to the door seemed clueless and unconcerned.” National Team Head Coach Joe Smith said the team remained in a state of disbelief at the lack of an adequate resolution, but cont inued to focus on the ultimate goal of advancing to the third round of World Championship qualification. “They still expected us to play and compete in the tournament. But it was hard. After you lose a hard fought game and then you realize everything you had was s tolen right from under your nose, it is hard to stay focused on volleyball, but they tried,” he said. Police “We have contacted the police, foreign affairs, but we are in a dilemma down here. No money and no passports, but we are trying to at least finish the tournament so that way we can still qualify. The girls are taking it hard. Mentally it was a strain on them because even though they were trying it was still on their minds.” Following the incident, the team was scheduled to face Jamaica yesterday, but lost in the most lopsided outing of the tournament, 25-23, 25-9, 25-13. Mr Smith added: “We were with the Police all day trying to see if we can sort this issue out to see if someone can provide some direction as to where we would go from here. But it is difficult because absolutely everything out of the locker rooms was taken and a lot of the girls and people around the team found it odd because over the course of the tournament the Bahamas was the only team to have this happen to them.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 3 3 pc Queen Post Bed 3 pc Queen Post Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $3,950 $3,950 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $4,150 $4,150Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street M adeira Street ( 242)326 (242 2 335 2335F inancing Available Through Commonwealth Bank I I r r i i s s h h C C o o u u n n t t r r y y s s i i d d e e I I r r i i s s h h C C o o u u n n t t r r y y s s i i d d e e Bahamas women’s volleyball team robbed while playing vital game N ATIONAL TEAM HEAD COACH J oe Smith To have your say on this or any other issue, email The Tribune at:letters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207 A 19-YEAR-OLD man has been arrested following the attempted break-inof a car in St Alban’s Driv e, Nassau. P olice say a man was s een attempting to open a blue Honda Civic parked in the area at around 2am on Saturday. Officers searched the vehicle and found a number of electronic items and o ther items they suspect had been stolen. I nvestigations continue. Man arrested after attempted car break-in In brief n CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. NASA is repairing a leaky hydrogen gas line on Endeavour’s fuel tank in hopes of possibly launching the space shuttle on Wednesday, according to Associated Press. The leak forced mission managers to call off a launch attempt Saturday. The repair work began Sunday and should be completedin time for Endeavour to lift off Wednesday on the space station construction mission.But that’s the same day a pair of science spacecraft are sched uled to blast off for the moon. NASA’s top officials have yet to decide which mission takes priority. The seven Endeavour astronauts are sticking around Florida’s Kennedy Space Center, just in case their flight gets called up first. They will deliver and install the final segmentof Japan’s space station lab. NASA repairing leak on space shuttle fuel tank Uighurs fr eed from Guantanamo savour weekend of fr eedom n H AMILTON, Bermuda THE f our men in shortsleeve shirts looked like ordi-n ary tourists, enjoying a Sunday lunch and butter pecan ice cream afterward as they o bserved the sparkling waters surrounding this Atlantic resort island, according to Associated P ress. But they are Uighurs, Muslims from the vasts tretches of western China, an arid and rugged land that is a far cry from Bermuda's sandy beaches and quaint n arrow streets lined with pastel Victorian-era build-ings. They once were terrorism suspects, but even after U.S. authorities determined the men weren't a threat to the United States, they were kept at the Guantanamo prison for years because no nation would take them until a few days ago, when Bermuda agreed to let them in as refugees. The men have traded drab prison jumpsuits for comfortable cotton pants and knit shirts, and razor wireencircled jail compounds forbeach cottages. They hope to quickly find jobs in Bermuda one of the world's wealthiest places because of its financial and insurance sector and eventually start families. The four Uighurs (pro nounced WEE'-gurs) also have immediate priorities, such as learning to drive, scu ba dive and bowl, said Glenn Brangman, a former military official who is helping rein troduce them to the world outside prison.

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune. When we were kids there seemed to be a game of some sort on most days marbles, spin the top, "rounders", rugby, etc. In most of these games there was usually someone who decided that the rules that had been agreed the day before did not suit him on that particular day, usually because he was not winning by the established rules so he wanted to change them. I was reminded of those days when I read The Tribune Thursday morning and was shocked, but not surprised, to learn that MP Glenys HannaMartin created an uproar in Parliament because she want ed to "raise an issue of public importance." She was denied this opportunity because the rules state that she was required to have previously served notice in Parliament that she intended to bring up the matter. She was asked to take her seat and she refused to do so. That too is not surprising. The real shock followed when the Speaker asked the Sergeant-atArms to remove her from the House and the other members on her side of the House sur rounded her to prevent the police from doing their duty. Can we really be surprised when so many young Bahamians believe that the rules apply to everyone else except them? Most of us can recall a similar "incident of shame" in 1965, which again proves the old adage that "the fruit does not fall far from the tree." SIDNEY SWEETING, DDS Nassau, June 11, 2009 EDITOR, The Tribune. Listening to the response of the leader of the opposition and operatives of the Progressive Liberal Party to the 2009/2010 budget, I was again reminded as to just why the majority of Bahamians didn’t trust them and voted them out of office in May of 2007. Plain and simple in my opinion the response was dishonest! I was very offended by what the leader of the opposition had to say because it conveyed a message to me that he thought that I was stupid or ignorant as a Bahamian citizen. Now it could very well be that Mr Christie and other PLP operatives believe the nonsense that they are spewing out, but God help the PLP if that’s the case. I hold no brief for the Free National Movement (FNM Government or for the Prime Minister, as I consider myself an independent, having voted for both parties in the past. I am extremely disappointed, but not surprised at the responses given by members of the opposition to the 2009/20010 budget. The response of the leader of the opposition is riddled with misrepresentations of the facts, taking credit for successes, but casting blame for failures justa s they did while in office. In my estimation it was a failed attempt to mislead the Bahami an people and any logical, right thinking person will see it for what it is. The thing that also bothers me about this opposition party is that they criticise without offering alternatives, anybody can criticise but not anybody can offer sensible, workable solutions to problems. I challenge the PLP to offer an alternative budget and let’s weigh one against the other! Mr Christie and other operatives continue to blame the state of the Bahamian economy on Mr Hubert Ingraham and the FNM government, citing a report from Standard and Poors with regard to the FNM government stopping and reviewing contracts as their evidence; but nothing could be further from the truth. Let’s take a look at the projects that moved ahead, those that were stopped and reviewed or cancelled. Just about every single one of those projects have now stopped because of the downturn in the world economy and has absolutely nothing to do with the FNM government. The Ginn project in West End, the Ritz Carlton Project, the Mayaguana project and the list goes on. I thought the Prime Minister’s remarks with respect to the budget was sobering and honest, which is one of the reasons he was elected; “He can be trusted to tell you the truth!” He sent what I thought was a clear message to Bahamians that we cannot continue to operate like we have been operating, we have to be more financially responsible and we cannot continue to squander money and resources like we’ve done in the past. Can you imagine Mr Christie being in office telling us that all was well while all hell is breaking loose around us as far as the economy is concerned? I want somebody who will tell me the truth and also tell me the extent to which the government can help and the part that I must play as a Bahamian to make sure that we make it through this. I can go into detail with regard to some of the things that I mentioned in this letter but I choose not to at this time. What I will say is that I don’t always agree with Mr Ingraham and the way in which he does and says some things, but when I look at the lot of them, I’ll take him hands down any day. He’s honest, he has courage and he’s no-nonsense. Regardless of what you think of the man he’s what we need right now! F ELIX MUNNINGS Nassau, June, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited N ULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI B eing Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., ( Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt . P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 C ontributing Editor 1972-1991 E ILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972P ublished Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas I nsurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES S witchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 WEBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm WHEN MOSES gathered the children of Israel and led them from the bondage of Egypt to the Promised Land, they had to endure many years of hardship on a never ending desert. But these Israelites felt they were entitled to more. They wanted food, they wanted water, they wanted their comforts, but they also wanted their freedom by an easier route. They knew they were in a desert where nothing grew, and where there were no cool streams to slake their thirst. But they were a contentious lot, a bunch of whiners. Moses had led them there and so itwas his duty to perform the impossible. It was obvious they couldn’t make a desert yieldf ood and water, so they looked to Moses, who was as empty-handed as they were. Despite his condition of equal want they demanded that he give them what he did not have. And so Moses knelt down and pounded God’s door in prayer. God peaked out, sawt he condition of his stiff-necked people, and t ook pity on Moses. He instructed Moses to take the same stick with which he had divided the Nile, and strike a nearby rock out of which water would flow for the people to drink. Moses did as he was told and out came the water. Today the world’s leaders face a global crises and although each one of them is standing before his people with a different stick to try to stir life back into a collapsed global economy unlike the miracle of Moses nothing seems to work. There is no miracle for our generation. “This crisis,” Prime Minister Ingraham told Bahamians from the floor of the House last week, “is so great that the economic textbooks have no answers! The textbooks can explain how an individual economy or even a small related group of countries can solve an economic crisis, but the textbooks have no answers to a recession which is enormous and global, and resistant to the textbook solutions.” And so, Mr Ingraham, like every world leader today, is battening down the hatches, caulking the leaks, provisioning the larders, trimming the sails, and preparing the Ship of State for a rough voyage. All he is asking of Bahamians is that they work hard at the oars, put all contentiousness behind them, have patience and don’t rock the boat. In the meantime he has prepared what he described as “a realistic budget in extraordinary times, whose principal objective is to promote and protect the interests of the Bahamian people.” His aim is to sustain employment and living standards as far as possible “while maintaining as much fiscal flexibility as possible to be able to deal with emerging developments.” To do this he has had to cut back in every department, ensuring that enough is provided for each to function adequately. Obviously this can be done if managers in these various ministries make certain that waste isc ut back and whatever petty pilfering there might be is cut out. Today thousands of Bahamians are without work, they have mortgages to pay, school fees to meet and all the other expenses required to keep a family together. These Bahamians are desperate and don’t k now where to turn. I t is, therefore, shocking that a large seg ment of this country’s nurses have gone on strike not because they don’t have a job, but because they have been asked to wait until the crisis has passed for their promised health insurance. Health Minister Dr Herbert Minnis met with executives of the nurses union and told them that although their services were appre ciated, because of the country’s financial problems “it was unlikely that they would receive their insurance and the four per cent salary increase that they demanded.” They were asked to defer their insurance for the present. Their answer? Government made a promise that they want fulfilled now not later. They have shown no concern for other Bahamians who might have to suffer even more if government has to meet their demands. And so, while the rest of us tighten our belts and prepare for the worst to help save our country from disaster, a large body of nurses has walked out on their duties. Is this what one calls patriotism? Remember Prime Minister Ingraham is not Moses. He cannot strike the Treasury vaults and make non-existent money flow. PLP show again why they can’t be trusted LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Prime Minister is not Moses EDITOR, The Tribune. There simply should be a public outcry over the information your reporter Paul Turnquest has reported as to the number of persons accused of serious violent crimes, murder, armed robbery, etc, who are out on bail. It seems crime in our Bahamas pays. Just how can we continue to accept this? The PLP talked about new conditions for bail and there were promises we heard from the FNM in 2008 in the opening of Parliament speech from The Throne that some sort of tracking devices were being looked at for persons on bail. Since the New Year 2009 we have heard more serious crime being reported almost daily to a level that is very much unacceptable to the Bahamian public. Our newspapers are on the internet; persons who might want to visit might be swayed from visiting because they hear of murder after murder and because they have no idea the locations of the murders conclude they should not travel to the Bahamas as it is unsafe. The budget is coming next week and we all know it is going to be the worst one for years as revenues have decreased immensely, but the pub lic must be afforded the rightful safety day or night wherever we live or on whatever island. We do not only have a voice once every five years call your MP now and insist government does something before more people are murdered. Yes, our police are doing their best, but we have too many criminals on bail, which is their right but we have to know where these people are. ABRAHAM MOSS Nassau, May 19, 2009. Crime in the Bahamas seems to pay What kind of example does this set our youth?

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GOVERNMENT House h as released the full list of B ahamian citizens named in the Queen’s Birthday Honours f or 2009. A mong those named are the owner of John Bull, Frederick H azelwood, and Special Olympics organiser Basil Christie. T he full list is: COMPANION OF THE M OST DISTINGUISHED ORDER OF SAINT MICHAEL AND SAINT G EORGE (CMG B ishop Elgarnet Brendan Rahming: For untiring efforts and invaluable contributions to t he growth and development of the country in the field of religion. Frederick A Hazelwood Jr: For outstanding service to the business community in the B ahamas. A nita Doreen Bernard: F or o utstanding and exemplary service as a career public officer. THE MOST EXCELLENT ORDER OF T HE BRITISH EMPIRE OFFICER (OBE George Cox: For long and d edicated service in the field of civil and structural engineering in the Bahamas. L owell Mortimer: F or outstanding service to the public service, church and community. D r Robert O Antoni: I n recognition of service to the community and health. H arcourt Lowell Turnquest: For outstanding and exemplary s ervice as a career public offi cer. THE MOST EXCELLENT ORDER OF T HE BRITISH EMPIRE M EMBER (MBE Sandra Moore: For out s tanding contribution to the church and community. Canon Fitz Goodridge: In r ecognition of services to relig ion. E dna Mae Russell: F or long and loyal service in the field of education. Basil Christie: For outstandi ng contribution to the develo pment of the Bahamas in the areas of community service, e ducation, religion and Special O lympics. F rederick Solomon Ramsey: For contribution to politics and the growth and development o f the insurance industry in the Bahamas. J ohn L Rolle Sr: F or outstanding contribution to theb usiness community. C ecil Bernard Longley: F or outstanding and distinguishedc areer in the field of education. T HE BRITISH EMPIRE MEDAL (BEM (CIVIL DIVISION Dennis Lloyd Turnquest: For long and dedicated service to the community, politics, busin ess and insurance management. Arthur M Sherman Jr: In recognition of service to civics and religion. Wendell Carver Grant Sr: In recognition of service to civics and religion. D oddridge MacLagan Hunt: For outstanding service to the public service, church and thec ommunity. Oswald Cory Munnings: For service to the financial services industry and to the church. Reverend Wilbur St Clair O utten: I n recognition of services to the community and religion. Sheila McDonald: For long d edicated service in the public s ervice and the community. M aria Forbes: F or long, dedicated and faithful service in the field of education. THE QUEEN’S POLICE MEDAL (QPM A ssistant Commissioner S hannondor Harold Evans ( above): F or outstanding and m eritorious service to the Royal Bahamas Police Force. Chief Superintendent S ylvester Augustus George ( Retired): F or outstanding career as an accomplished m usician, arranger, conductor a nd administrator to the Royal B ahamas Police Force. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 5 RATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, F LIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS PHONE: 327-6464WE SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!STRUCKUM(DF55 Bahamian citizens named in Queen’s Birthday Honours POLICE found 16 marijuana plants and more than 21 packets of marijuana w hen searching two Nassau homes this weekend. Officers found the packets, more tha $400 and an assortment of jewellery when they executed a search warrant at a home in BallsA lley, off Shirley Street. A 46-year-old woman and 16-year-old boy were arrested in connection with the find. The marijuana plants, some up to 3ft high, w ere seized along with a small quantity of marijuana when police searched a home in Yellow Elder Gardens. The officers were assisted by the K-9 unit when they executed their search warrant ata round 5pm on Friday. A 26-year-old man was arrested. Marijuana found in search of two homes

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n B y DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net A CANDLELIGHT vigil and rally will be held in Freeport and Nassau to highlight the i ssue of child abuse. F reeport activist Troy Garvey announced the events are planned by the TOUCH (Trusting Uniting Children’s Hearts) o rganisation on Grand Bahama, and Bahamas Against Crime in New Providence. He said the rally is set for t oday in Nassau at Rawson S quare, and on Thursday in Freeport at the Garnet Levarity Justice Center. Mr Garvey is urging the publ ic and various groups and organisations throughout the country to support the event. Invitations will also be extende d to MPs. We all need to join hands and save our children in order to save our country and bring awareness to the child abuse and molestation that his happ ening in the Bahamas. “For too long we have been c losing our eyes and turning heads to what is happening in the schools and churches. By doing this we have cost our country a great loss of futurel eaders and we want to say enough is enough,” he said. M r Garvey said every child has the right to be free of e xploitation, violence, rejection and extreme poverty. He said three parades will be held in Nassau today, starting from the eastern Parade of Nas-s au at the foot of the bridge, from Windsor Park on Wulff Road and East Road, and from Christie Park and Nassau Street near the College of the B ahamas. He said the parade in Nassau w ill start at 6.30pm and converge at Rawson Square where rally will begin at 8pm. In Freeport, the parade will start at 7pm from downtowna nd head north on West Mall Drive to the Justice Centerc ompound, where a rally will be held at 8pm. B ee Butler, of No More Victims Association, said: “We have been dealing with a lot of victims and we want to call on ministers to pray for childrent o so that they can become the men and women God have them to be. “We stand behind Mr Garvey and his organisation and ask persons to support this most i mportant event,” she said. Mr Garvey thanked Senior A ssistant Commissioner Marvin Dames for permission to use the justice center compound in Freeport for the rally. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE A pplicationsareavailableatanyCommonwealthBankBranchorat T heCollegeofTheBahamas,FinancialAid&HousingDepartment, 2ndFloor,PortiaSmithBuilding. APPLICATIONSMUSTBESUBMITTEDTO: OFFICEOFTHEDIRECTOR FINANCIALAID&HOUSING THECOLLEGEOFTHEBAHAMAS P .O.BOXN-4912 NASSAU,BAHAMASDEADLINEFORAPPLICATIONSISJULY17,2009 LeaderinPersonalBankingServices”www.combankltd.com 2 0 0 9 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e t2 009SCHOLARSHIP AWARDPROGRAM Commonwealth Bank is offering Scholarship Awards to Bahamian s tudents to attend The College of The Bahamas.( StudentsfromtheFamilyIslandsareinvitedtoapply). Candlelight vigil and rally to highlight child abuse issue TROY GARVEY announces plans for candlelight vigil and rally in Freeport and Nassau. Also seen is Bee Butler, president and founder of No More Victims Outreach Association. To have your say on this or any o ther issue, email T he Tribune at: letters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207 T HE 2009 Bahamas International Film Festival has announced that esteemed director of photography Gavin Mckinney will be honoured with the first Bahamian Tribute Award at this year’s festival, which w ill take place December 10 to 17 in Nassau. M r McKinney will be present for the tribute and presentation on Tuesday, December 15. BIFF Founder and executive director Leslie Vanderpool said: “We are so honoured to recognise one o f our very own Bahamian filmmakers; Gavin continues to make strides around the globe within the film world.” Mr McKinney has been involved in underwater f ilm making since 1973 when he worked as a diver on t he feature film D ay of the Dolphin a nd has spent more than 20,000 hours underwater making films. He has worked on more than 50 feature films and television shows, including five James Bond films: The S py Who Loved Me, For Your Eyes Only, Moonraker, Never Say Never Again and The World is Not Enough. In addition to working behind the scenes with l ogistics and planning, he was the Bond underwater d ouble in F or Your Eyes Only. While filming The Spy Who Loved Me, Mr McKinney thinks he became the only person in the history of film to have been run over by a car underwater. H e also spent four months working on T he Abyss in 1988. Since 2001, he has co-produced and filmed three highly successful three dimensional underwater films f or the Imax theatres: O cean Wonderland 3D, Sharks 3D and Dolphins and Wales 3D . M r McKinney has more than 35 years experience filming underwater and has provided full production services for underwater shoots, including personnel, logistics, locations and marine services, though n ow his energies are directed towards conservation and education about the oceans of the world. His current project is Ocean World 3D, a fulllength 3D documentary due for a summer 09 release, which premiered at the 2009 Cannes Film Festival inM ay. It is a fictitious story of a turtle’s voyage around the world. Entering its sixth year, the Bahamas International Film Festival (BIFF m arquee international festival in the Caribbean region, discovering and promoting independent voices and talent from around the world and showcasing a diverse array of international films. BIFF is a non-profit organisation committed to p roviding the local community and international festival goers with a diverse presentation of films from the Bahamas and around the world. In addition to showcasing films that might not o therwise be released theatrically, BIFF provides unique cultural experiences, educational programmes, and forums for exploring the past, present and future of cinema. Gavin McKinney to receive BIFF’s first Bahamian Tribute Award Esteemed director of photography to be honoured Share your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who are m aking news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y .

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n By SIR RONALD SANDERS (The writer is a consultant and former Caribbean diplomat) J A MAICA’S Prime Minister Bruce Golding says that the Caribbean Community and Common Market (Caricom) is “at risk”. He is righta nd regional leaders should s houlder the blame for this sad development in an area of small countries that need to hold together as the only means of retaining their iden-t ity, their culture and some s emblance of autonomy. Mr Golding is also right w hen he says of himself and h is fellow leaders: “I do not believe that any of us can b elieve that we are going to be better off trying to swim in this Caribbean sea on our own, buti t is time for us to stop playing games, for us to stop mouthing i ntegration and professing our commitment to this process when the pragmatic demon-s tration of that commitment is so often not being brought to t he fore.” It would be very helpful indeed if the Heads of Gov-e rnment were to sweep away their usually long agenda for the next Summit meeting in Guyana in July in order to spend a day talking aboutn othing else except: “Do we want Caricom? And, if so, how do we make it work for theb enefit of the people of Caricom?” I f they – or any of them – feel that the 41-year-old regional project (the CaribbeanF ree Trade Agreement started in 1968) is of little or no use to t hem and they can do better on their own or in alliances with other countries, theys hould end the relationship now. For, the Caricom undertaking will continue to be frustrated by reluctant participants, and reluctant participants willt hemselves be frustrated by their nagging belief that they would be better-off elsewhere. The “elsewhere” should be carefully considered. Caricomi s unique because it is largely made up of countries whose people’s culture, history, polit-i cal development and identity were brewed in the same pot. A t the bottom line, while trade within the region is important and must be developed, it isn ot the most important ele ment in the integration project. More vitally important are: the retention of Caribbean autonomy over the region’se conomies; maintaining Caribbean dignity and pride in ownership, management and production; drawing on the qualified strength of the entire region to bargain for countries individually and collectively ina highly competitive world; and keeping the identity that brands us as a people. These things are not only endangered, they are more likely to disappear if countries “go it alone” or seek alliances with nations that have resources greater than theirs. In today’s globalised world – and with the ambition of European, North American and Asian firms to have a global reach it is not beyond possibility that Caribbean indige nous companies, including media, could be swallowed-up. It does not require large Cor porations to show an interest. Any medium sized European, North American or Asian Company is larger and better resourced than the largest firms in the region. The situation might have been better if Caricom had implemented the allocation of industry scheme to which it was committed in its early years, and if it had backed sucha scheme by a deliberate poli cy of integrating production. In other words, using the capi tal and skilled labour of some countries to develop the natural resources or competi tive advantage of others for the benefit of all. The companies that emerged from such a process would have had a bet ter chance to survive. If per chance, regional leaders continue to feel that Cari com and the development of a Single Market and Economy – has merit, it will not be sufficient for them to issue yet another Communiqu or Declaration espousing the impor tance of integration. People all over the region have become unconvinced by Communiqus and Declarations. This is why many of the Caribbean press buried in their inside pages the statements c oming from the last Caricom Summit in Trinidad in May. Few made the Summit statements a front-page story. As Mr Golding said, they w ill have to “stop mouthing i ntegration” and bring to the f ore “the pragmatic demonstration of that commitment.” H ow could they do so? At the level of people, one very important way would bef or all immigration and customs officers at border entry p oints to be instructed to treat Caricom nationals with the same high regard they accordt o European and North American tourists. This is not to say that they should not be watchful for violators, but the a ssumption should not be that the majority are. Another way would be to cease the use of Police for the expulsion of Caricom nationalsw ho may be suspected of overstaying. This should become the responsibility of the immi-g ration department and, when such people are discovered, t hey should be subject to due process under the law. Residence and nationality q ualifications should also be applied in a non-discriminator y manner and consistent with the law. They ought not to be denied at the discretion of one or two persons. At the level of trade, nontariff barriers should end once and for all subject only to genuine health and safety requirem ents. Caricom is either a common market moving to a single market or it is not. No Caricom producer should still have to think twice about send-i ng goods to other Caricom c ountries. A nd, where a dispute arises, machinery should be in p lace for swift resolution without the need for Ministerial intervention and mediai nvolvement. The critical problem of t ransportation of goods within Caricom should also be addressed in a practical man-n er. For instance, Jamaica might improve its level of exports to other Caricom countries if better transportation e xisted. Governments might usefully address the incentives that could be given to encourage private entrepreneurs to establish such transportationb y sea and air. On production integration, governments might also con-s ider establishing a Caribbean team to help the private sect or to access funds from the multilateral financial institutions to develop Caricom wideb usinesses on a limited allocation of industries scheme to s tart with. And, on governance, a Caribbean Commission, along the lines of the European Commission manned by per sons with political-savvy, cont inues to cry out for establishment, even as individual national sovereignty remainsi ntact. Caricom might be less “at r isk” for actions of this kind. Responses to: r onaldsanders29@hotmail.com C M Y K C M Y K THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 7 BED BATH & HOME TOOL BOXES $23.99 JUICE EXTRACTORS $63.99 PREMIUM BLENDERS $39.99 BATH SHEET TOWELS $23.00 PREMIUM IRON #PIV7147 $15.99 MIRRO 8 PC COOKWARE SET $79.99 WINDMERE COFFEE MAKER $23.99 SENTRY FLASHLIGHT RADIO $19.99 PREMIUM ELECTRIC SKILLET $39.99 LUMINARC DERBY 16PC GLASSWARE $31.99 CONAIR GOLD LINEZ HAIR CUTTER KIT $32.99A K16MONDAY JUNE15th SATURDAY JUNE 20thSALE STARTS Located: Harbour Bay Shopping Center Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448 Making Caricom less ‘at risk’ WORLDVIEW SIRRONALD SANDERS

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denied an opportunity to speak. “The PLP lays claim to being of the people and fort he people, however if this website is correct, the people once again have no say in ‘my PLP’,” h said. “As a card-carrying memb er of the PLP and former chairman of the Marathon branch, I am able to say that ‘we the people’ were noti nformed of any decision to name a candidate to the constituency of Marathon but toh ave Sen. Fitzgerald posted on the website as ‘the’ candid ate is an insult to the people of Marathon. “In fact, knowing that the c andidate’s committee has not met to determine who is to be t he candidate, suggests that some scheme is amidst in my beloved PLP,” he said. Mr Percentie also took e xception with what he felt was Mr Fitzgerald’s attempt to lay claim to events thatt ook place in the constituency of which he claims Mr Fitzgera ld “has no knowledge of”. “As the former chairman the membership and I didn’t see or hear from him duringa ny of these events. I note with great concern that the voice of Marathon is not being heard. “The good people want not o nly a son of the soil but a son of Marathon to represent them. “The people of Marathon wish no longer to have visi-t ors representing them, they w ant one who really lives the s ame life that they do and therefore feel their pains, hear t heir cries and knows their burdens. “I am such an individual a nd I am preparing myself to stand up for ‘Our Marathon’. Y es Marathon the time has come for you to make a choice that will provide youw ith a leader who is from amongst you. You know where I live, you don’t need toR SVP to see me or place your name on list at a gate in order t o gain access to this union village boy. As I indicated earlier Senator Fitzgerald is a fines on of the soil and I would certainly wish to have him a long in the house as my comrade as the representative for Seabreeze, Elizabeth or Ocean Estates but he can n ot speak for Marathon,” he said. Mr Percentie added a note to the “powers that be” within the PLP, pleading for them to truly allow democracy to reign and allow the people of Marathon to chose who theyw ish to represent them. Attempts to reach Senator Fitzgerald for comment were unsuccessful up until press time last night. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Selection of PLP election candidates raises concerns F ROM page one

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 9 Refrigerator FOR SALE PrTRUE ice:$4,950.00TRUE TG2R-2S R each-In Solid Door RefrigeratorPlease Contact:William Nottage Coffee Cay Limited 302.2895Price FEATURES 56.0 Cu.Ft., 2 Doors, 1/2 HP 3 00 Series Stainless Steel D oors Food safe refrigerators hold 3 3 F to 38 F A nodized quality aluminum s ides, bottom and back P ositive seal self-closing doors with 120 degree stay open feature 4” diameter swivel castors standard equipment, Doorl ocks standard, Exterior, digital temperature display Oversized and balance, environmentally friendly, refrigeration system Factory sealed and prel ubricated for long life when nurses learned they would not receive their four per cent pay increase this year and the health insurance they expected last year has been postponed to a projected date of 2012. Dr Minnis said he cannot say what resolution government will come to with the public nursing staff. PMH has suspended non-emergency surgeries, excluding those for visitors from the Family Islands, and closed almost all specialty clinics since the action began. Only the oncology clinic, dialysis clinic, maternity high risk clinic, comprehensive clinic and general practice clinic remained open, as well as the Accident and Emergency department and Intensive Care Unit. Dr Minnis said: “I think they are coping. They are getting tired working these exhaustive shifts, but I think they are doing their best in trying to ensure the Bahamian public get the best cared uring this time.” W SC staff took industrial action over pay on Thursday, and Bahamas Utility and Service Allied Workers Union (BUSAWU Kemp said she wants government to ‘come to the table’ to negotiate members’ concerns and the industrial agreement which expired two years ago. A statement from BUSAWU maintains WSC managers and staff have been pitted against each other in an ‘explosive’ state of affairs as a result of government’s delay. BUSAWU states: “We have extended every courtesy and attempted to negotiate in absolutegood faith with the government and executive management of the corporation but to no avail.” And the union maintains members pay is not the only concern. BUSAWU states: “We are also concerned with the fact that a number of opportunities to grow our business are on the table and that these opportunities may be negotiated or given away, without giving WSC and by extension our coun try an opportunity to benefit from them. “What we cannot delay or defer is our demand that the woes of the corporation be addressed and that the Bahamian people are given the service they deserve.” WSC services are expected to return to normal tomorrow. However, the disruption in public health care is expected to continue. Patients are advised to only attend PMH or local health clinics in medical emergencies. If you are not sure if you have a medical emergency call 326-7014, 502-7812, or 919. Patients scheduled to receive surgical procedures should call their physician or call 322-2861 extension 3149 to reschedule. For all general inquiries call 322-2861 extension 3149 or 502-7890/1. F ROM page one Minister can see no resolution between govt and nurses T o have your say on this or any other issue, email T he T ribune at: letter s@tribunemedia.net or deliver your letter to The T r i bune on Shirley Street, P .O. Box N-3207 THE HOSPITAL AUTHORITY along with BTC accepted blood from members of the public on Saturday at t he Mall Of Marathon. F elip Major / Tribune staff HOSPITALAUTHORITYBLOODDRIVE

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE A ll of us often turn to professionals when we need critical services performed or important guidance offered. Of course, the buy-i ng and selling of property is one such example, and the selection of a representative should be pursued carefully with interviews andr esearch. The same applies when choosing another professional who is crucial to ther eal estate transaction the appraiser. But who orders t he appraisal? Most often, it is the lender, who uses the reportt o confirm a property’s value before approving financi ng. S ometimes, either the buyer or the seller will order an appraisal in order to secure an independent opinion of the value. If you hire an appraiser, b e sure he or she is licensed by BREA. All lenders will provide a l ist of qualified appraisers. Lenders will finance sales b ased on the l ower o f the sales price or the appraised value. EVALUATING AN APPRAISAL Bahamas real estate today Carmen Massoni T HESEYOUNGSTERS e njoy music at the Mall at Marathon on Saturday during the Hospital Authority and BTC’s blood drive. Youngsters enjoy the music at the mall

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 11 NASSAU LISTINGS DEVELOPED RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL VACANT LOTS P R O P E R T I E S F O R S A L E 1.ALLEN DRIVE CARMICHAEL ROAD LOT NO. 2 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: DuplexLot PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000sq.ft. LOCATION: Travellingwestalong CarmichaelRoadturnthroughthe cornerbyGenevaBrassSeafood. Takethethirdcornerontheleft andtraveltotheendoftheroad. Thevacantlotisontheleft. APPRAISEDVALUE: $65,000 2.MALVARICESTATES SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 5 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Multi-FamilyResidentialLot PROPERTY SIZE: 9,114sq.ft. LOCATION: Travellingsouthalong HighVistaDrivefromEastBay Street,takethe1stcornerleft Headingsouthtakethe4thcorner right.Atthet-junction,turnleft Thevacantlotisthethirdproperty ontheleft. APPRAISEDVALUE: $109,000 3.OPULENTHEIGHTS SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 28 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: SingleFamilyResidentialLot PROPERTY SIZE: 7,597sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingweston pavedroadafter“OutdoorPatio” ontheleft.Takethesecond right.Thevacantlotissecond tothelastontherightbeforethe roadends. APPRAISEDVALUE: $75,000 4.SOUTH OCEANESTATES SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 9Block4 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: SingleFamilyResidentialLot PROPERTY SIZE: 11,566sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingsouthof LyfordCay,immediatelypass MountPleasantturnleftonSouth OceanBoulevardtonewSouth OceanEstates.Thevacantlotis number9inBlock4. APPRAISEDVALUE: $110,000 5.SOUTH SEAS SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 199 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: SingleFamilyResidentialLot PROPERTY SIZE: 6,983sq.ft. LOCATION: FromCarmichael RoadturnontoBarcardiRoad, taketheseventhcornerontheleft thenturnintotheentrancegate. Thevacantlotislocatedonthe southernsideofChannelDriveoff EastwardDrive. APPRAISEDVALUE: $90,000 6.SOUTH SEAS SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 261 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: SingleFamilyResidentialLot PROPERTY SIZE: 7,500sq.ft. LOCATION: FromCarmichael RoadturnontoBarcardiRoad, taketheseventhcorneronleft. Turnintotheentrancegateand left.Thevacantlotisthetwentysecondpropertyontheleft. APPRAISEDVALUE: $90,000 7.VICTORIA GARDENS SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 60 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: SingleFamilyResidentialLot PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelsouthon GladstoneRoadfromJFKDrive entrancetoVictoriaGardens. Headingeast,proceedtothe secondT-junction,thepropertyis directlyopposite. APPRAISEDVALUE: $66,000 8.VICTORIA PARK SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 6 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Multi-familylot PROPERTY SIZE: 6,707sq.ft. LOCATION: Onthenorthernside ofBunchStreetabout60feed southofEastStreetandopposite CalvaryDeliveranceChurch APPRAISEDVALUE: $67,000 1.BAY STREET LOT NO. ParcelofLand P ROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Two-StoreyCommercialBuilding PROPERTY SIZE: 3,744sq.ft. LOCATION: Onthesouthernside ofBayStreetbetweenDeveaux StreetandGomezAlley APPRAISEDVALUE: $993,000 2.BEL-AIRESTATES – CARMICHAEL ROAD LOT NO. 259 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence, 3beds/2baths PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingeaston CarmichaelRoadfromFaith Avenuetakethefourthcorneron fourthhouseontheright. A PPRAISEDVALUE: $186,000 3.CARMICHAEL ROAD LOT NO. ParcelofLand P ROPERTY DESCRIPTION: SingleFamilyResidence 3beds/2baths PROPERTY SIZE: 12,000sq.ft. L OCATION: Travellingeaston CarmichaelRoadfromBacardi easementontheright. APPRAISEDVALUE: $401,882 4.CHIPPINGHAMSUBDIVISION LOT NO. 96 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence 3beds/1bath PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000sq.ft. LOCATION: FromNassauStreet cornerontheright-Dunmore Streetandthensecondcorner ontherightMusgroveStreet.The cornerleft. APPRAISEDVALUE: $120,000 5CORAL MEADOWS SUBDIVISION – WESTERN DISTRICT LOT NO. 4 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence 3beds/2baths P ROPERTY SIZE: 7,500sq.ft. LOCATION: Westernsideof S ymonetteRoadand150feet northwardofAdelaideRoadand a pproximatelyamilewestwardof CoralHarbourRoundabout. APPRAISEDVALUE: $260,000 6.DESTINY GARDEN SUBDIVISION L OT NO. 147 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence 3Beds/2Baths PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000sq.ft. LOCATION: Travellingwest onCarmichaelRoadfromthe intersectionofGladstoneRoad -about2,000feet-turnrightat theentranceofDestinyGarden Subdivision;turnleftatt-junction. Thepropertyisthe19thhouseon theright. APPRAISEDVALUE: $137,000 7.ELIZABETH ESTATES SUBDIVISION L OT NO. 178 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence 5beds/1bath PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000sq.ft. LOCATION: EnterElizabeth EstatesfromPrinceCharles,take Thepropertyislocatedonthe cornerofSt.VincentAvenueand GhanaCircle. APPRAISEDVALUE: $118,000 8.ENGLERSTONSUBDIVISION LOT NO. 19Block22 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: SingleFamilyResidence 2-beds/1-bath PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000sq.ft. LOCATION: Onthewesternside ofSt.CharlesVincentStreet. A PPRAISEDVALUE: $64,000 9.ENGLERSTONSUBDIVISION LOT NO. 4Block7 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: TriplexApartmentbuilding PROPERTY SIZE: 7,000sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingeaston CordeauxAvenuefromEast onKeyWestStreetthesubject propertyisthesixthbuildingon theleft. APPRAISEDVALUE: $243,000 10.FAITH GARDENS SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 23Block4 P ROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-familyResidence 2beds/2baths PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000sq.ft. L OCATION: FromFaithAvenue enterFaithGardensandtravel e astalongClevelandBoulevard thentakethefourthcorner o ntheleft.Thepropertyis the13thhouseontheleft. A PPRAISEDVALUE: $184,000 1 1.GOLDEN GATES TWO SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 1010 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence 3beds/2baths PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingweston CarmichaelRoad,turnsouthonto JackFishDrive;turnthroughthe fourthcornerontheright.The propertyisthethirdlotonthe right. APPRAISEDVALUE: $112,000 12.HAWKINS HILL LOT NO. 52 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence 3 beds/2baths PROPERTY SIZE: 6.175sq.ft. L OCATION: Southernsideof WindwhistleStreetjusteaston HawkinsHill. APPRAISEDVALUE: $275,000 13.JUBILEE GARDENS SUBDIVISION L OT NO. 48 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence 3beds/1bath PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000sq.ft. LOCATION: FromFireTrailroad enterJubileeGardensand thesecondhouseontheright. APPRAISEDVALUE: $128,000 14.MARSHALL ROAD LOT NO. 17D PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: TriplexApartment One2-bedroom/2-bath&Two 2-bedroom/1-bath PROPERTY SIZE: 10,000sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingwestalong MarshallRoadfromSouthBeach propertyisthefourthbuildingon theleftpaintedgreenwithwhite trim. APPRAISEDVALUE: $288,000 15.MILLENNIUM GARDENS SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 85 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence, 3beds/2baths PROPERTY SIZE: 5,952sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingnorth onBethelAvenuefromHarold Roadtakethethirdcorneron theright,Headingeastpassthe thirdT-junctionaroundthecurve tothejunctionofSis.Theresa SymonetteDrivethenturnleft ontoSis.MariaRahmingDrive. Thepropertyisthe14thhouseon theright.A PPRAISEDVALUE: $182,000 1 6.NASSAUEASTSUBDIVISION LOT NO. 4Block8 P ROPERTY DESCRIPTION: ApartmentBuilding/Commercial C omplex PROPERTY SIZE: 14,000sq.ft. LOCATION: Easterndistrictof NewProvidence.Thesubject propertyisonYamacrawHill RoadoppositeTreasureCove. APPRAISEDVALUE: $686,000 17.NASSAUVILLAGE SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 10&11Block48 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence 5beds/2baths PROPERTY SIZE: 10,000sq.ft. LOCATION: Travellingeastalong Taylorstreettakealeft attheT-junctionontoAlexandria Boulevard,thentakethethird rightontoMatthewsStreet.Thep ropertyislocatedontheleft. APPRAISEDVALUE: $257,000 18.PARADISE CONDOMINIUMS LOT NO. 65 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: TownhouseUnit1Two-storey apartment PROPERTY SIZE: Floorarea 1,215sq.ft. LOCATION: EasternsideofFaith AvenueNorth-100feetsouthof HamsterRoad. APPRAISEDVALUE: $150,000 19.PINEWOOD GARDENS SUBDIVISION L OT NO. 1438 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: TwostoreyResidence3beds/3baths PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000sq.ft. LOCATION: SouthonWildGuava Avenue APPRAISEDVALUE: $315,000 20.SANDILANDS VILLAGE LOT NOS. 7and8 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence,with3 apartmentsunderconstruction PROPERTY SIZE: Lot77,970 sq.ft/Lot88,419sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingwestalong SandilandsVillageRoadfromFox HillRoad,taketheninthpaved Thepropertiesaresituatedatthe northwesternsideofthestreet. A PPRAISEDVALUE: $277,000 21.SOLDIER ROAD PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Two-storeyCommercialBuilding PROPERTY SIZE: 4,750sq.ft. LOCATION: OnSoldierRoad 1,000feeteastofLadySlipper Road APPRAISEDVALUE: $309,000 22.SOUTH BEACH ESTATES SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 1Block22 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Split LevelResidentialBuildingwith3 ApartmentUnits. PROPERTY SIZE: Land6,600sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelsouthalong EastStreetfromBamboo HeadingwestonBougainvilleaB oulevard,takethesecond cornerontheright,turnleftat t het-junctionontoOxfordDrive. Thepropertyisthirdhouseon t herightatthewesterncornerof ServilleDriveandOxfordAvenue. A PPRAISEDVALUE: $297,000 2 3.TWYNAMHEIGHTS SUBDIVISION L OT NO. 61 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Two-storeyResidence,2beds/1 bath/withoneapartmentunit PROPERTY SIZE: 9,100sq.ft. LOCATION: Onthecornerof VictoriaStreetandCoronation Roadimmediatelyeastof APPRAISEDVALUE: $203,000 24.YAMACRAW BEACH ESTATES SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 470 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: TwostoreyResidence3beds/3baths PROPERTY SIZE: 7,200sq.ft. LOCATION: Southernsideof MayaguanaAvenueapproximately9 9feeteastofYamacrawBeach Drive. A PPRAISEDVALUE: $402,000 INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS INCLUSIVEOF TELEPHONE CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS TO: CB DISTRESSEDPROPERTIES, CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT, P.OBOX SS-6263 NASSAU, BAHAMAS OR EMAIL USAT: DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM* WE RESERVE THE RIGHTTO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS. n BUENOS AIRES, Argentina A DISSIDENT Cuban surgeon said Sunday that she harbors no grudge againstF idel Castro upon arriving in Argentina for an emotional family reunion after being denied permission to leave Cuba for moret han a decade, a ccording to Associated Press. Desperate to see her a iling, 90-year-old mother, Dr. Hilda Molina said she wroted irectly to Cuban leaders seeking permission t o travel. On Sunday, she was able for the first timet o hug her Argentineb orn grandchildren, ages 13 a nd 8, and see her mother, who was allowed to leave Cubam onths ago. "I have inside a wound that will neverh eal," Molina told reporters after meeting w ith her son for the first time in 15 years. " I say to Mr. Fidel Castro, who has beent he scourge of my family, may he have all the p eace in the world. May he choose the path that the country needs.I don't need to forgive him for anything." C ubans like Molina who dare to openly criticize Cuba's systema re often denied per mission to leave the country. Cuba also restricts individual foreign trav-e l by its physicians, saying it spends too much training them to allow them to emigrate for higher salaries else w here. Openness The surprise travel authorization, issued Friday, was seen as ag esture of openness in the era after Fidel Castro ceded power to his brother Raul in 2006 for health reasons. It was also seen as a nod to Argentine President Cristina Fernandez, a Cuba ally who along with her husband and predecessor, Nestor Kirchner, had asked the Castros since 2003 to allow Molina to leave. But Molina said her approval to travel in itself did not indicate broader changes by the Cuban government. "That will be resolved when we Cubans do not have to ask permission to enter and leave the country," she said. "There are 11 million Cubans whose rights are being violated." Molina, who once posed for high-profile photos with Fidel Castro, was a well-known physician at a govern ment institution until 1994, when she resigned after question ing the ethics of using human stem cell tissue in studies on treating ailments like Parkinson's disease. That same year her son left Cuba with his Argentine wife. Molina's travel docu ments are good for several months. She said she intends to return to Cuba, but not while her mother is in precarious health. "I put it in the letter to Raul Castro ... that when I close the eyes of my mother I will return," Molina said. "I want her to recov er and to return together. “But as long as she is in danger I am not going to abandon her." In Argentina, dissident Cuban doctor has no grudge

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n B y BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net IF the Commando Security T ruckers are going to be able to defend their men’s title in the New Providence Softball Association, manager Perry Seymour s aid they will definitely have to p lay better than they did on Saturday night. Despite taking an early 10-2 lead, the Truckers had to dip d own deep to hold off the Thompson Heavy Equipment Outlaws 12-10 in the feature game at the Banker’s Field at the B aillou Hills Sporting Complex. I t came down to the top of the seventh when first baseman Stephen ‘Slugger’ Brown produced a two-run single to break u p a 10-10 tie for the secure the win. I n the opener, it was also a close affair as Robin Hood Hitman (formerly the New Breed survived with a 4-3 decision over t he Young Breed, thanks to Alcott Forbes’ RBI triple in the seventh. “We are just not that hungry,” Seymour said. “We have to realize that when we have a team d own, we have to keep them down. We can’t let them come back like the Outlaws did or we will get beat.” The Truckers avoided their sec ond loss of the season to remain in second place in the standings at 4-1 behind the undefeated HeavyL ift Dorsey Park Boyz, who are 3-0. W ith the loss, the Outlaws suffered their second defeat in three g ames and are now in fifth place. “I think we came out flat,” said third baseman Hosea Hilton about Thompson Heavy Equipment’s sluggish start. “We madet oo many errors and we can’t win like that.” Consolation T he former track star from Eleuthera, however, admitted t hat if there’s any consolation for his Outlaws, they don’t have that many seasoned players in their line-up. “As the season goes on, we s hould get better,” said Hilton, who is making a return aftera lmost a 10-year hiatus rom the sport when he would have played i n Eleuthera. Also making a comeback was Truckers’ pitcher Greg Mortimer, who played in his first game for the season. M ortimer gave up seven hits and six runs through the middleo f the fifth before he was relieved by Anton ‘Bookie’ Gibson, an o ff-season acquistion. “I’m just still trying to get the ball over the plate,” Miortimer said. “But we have to play better fundamental ball. As the season goes on, we will get better.” The Truckers had a pretty good s tart as Martin Burrows Jr., another off-season acquistion, c ame through with a two-run single in a three-run first inning. The Outlaws responded in the bottom on Juliano Thompson’s run-producing single. Again, the Truckers put three more runs on the scoreboard in the second, highlighted by Marvin ‘Tougie’ Wood’s two-run in-thepark home run. And the Outlaws plated anoth er in the bottom as Quintin Carey’s RBI double knocked in Giovanni Saunders. In the third, both teams struck for three unearned runs. In their half, Van ‘Lil Joe’ Johnson had a RBI single and he and Marvin Wood both came home on an error that put Stephen ‘Slugger’ Brown on first. In the bottom, Bruce Mackey had a oner-out double and scored on Clayton Bowles’ RBI single before Hilton and Bowles both scammered home on on consecutive miscues. Commando Security struck for their 10th run in the fourth on Tommy ‘Bucker T’ Fergusn’s RBI single to plate Julian Taylor in the fourth. It wasn’t until the fifth when Thompson’s Heavy Equipment produced a pair of runs on a tworun homer from Juliano Thomp son and Bowles doubled to send Mortimer in the dug-out for Gib son. The Outlaws didn’t get to Gibson until the sixth when Bowles got a two-out two-run triple and he scored on Carey’s RBI single to actually pull even at 10-10. But in the seventh, it was Brown’s two-rn single, knocking in Van Johnson and Marvin Wood to seal the game for the Truckers. Like the feature contest, the Hitman had to go to the seventh before they held off the Young Breed for their second win in five games. Alcott Forbes’ two-out RBI triple plated William Delancy before Forbes came home on an error for the tying and winning run. “I haven’t been swining the bat like I should. I just felt it was time for me to come through,” Forbes said. “But as a team, we’re flat. We should not played these guys this close.” Forbes finished 2-for-4 with a double and triple, two RBI and a run scored, while Adrian Pinder was 2-for-3 with a double and a RBI. Cardinal Gilbert got the win on the mound over Eugene Pratt. In a losing effort, Angelo Butler was 2-for-4 with two RBI; Ken Wood 2-for-2 wirh a run and Addie Finley 2-for-4 with a run. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS MANAGER Perry Seymour tries to rally his Commando Security Truckersd in their game against the Thompdon Heavy Equipment Outlaws. SOFTBALL Truckers urged to regain their hunger for success F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f LEAGUESTANDINGS New Providence Softball Association's 2009 league standings T eamsWLPct.GB M en's Division H eavy Lift Dorsey Park Boyz301,000C ommando Security Truckers41.8001 P riceWaterHouse Stingrays31.750_ Defense Force Commodores21.6661 T hompson Heavy Equipment Outlaws12.66611/2 R obin Hood Hitmen23.4002 Mighty Mits13.25021/2 Young Breed14.2003 M organ Buccaneers02.00021/2 L adies' Division P ineapple Air Wildcats401,000Sigma Brackettes301,000_ P roper Care Pool Lady Sharks22.5002 Bristol Mystical Gems02.0002 B ommer G Swingers04.0004 This week's schedule Tonight 7 pm Commando Security vs Mighty Mits (M 8:30 pm Heavy Lift Dorsey Park vs Morgans Buccaneers (M T hursday 7 pm Defense Force Commando vs Morgan Bucaneers (M 8 :30 pm Bommer G Swingers vs Pineapple Air Wildcats (L Friday 7 pm Young Breed vs PriceWaterHouse (M 8:30 pm Thompson Heavy Lift vs Robin Hood Hitmen (M Saturday 7 pm Bommer G Swingers vs Untouchables (L 8:30 pm Mighty Mits vs PriceWaterHouse (M THOMPSON HEAVY EQUIPMENT OUTLAWS’ Roscoe Thompdon throws a pitch against the Commando Security Truckers. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f A THOMPSON HEAVY EQUIPMENT OUTLAWS’ pitcher tried to avoid getting tagged by Commando Security Truckers’ third baseman Jamal Johnson. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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Tonique Williams-Darling, howe ver, emerged as the first Bahamian to cash in on the payc heck when she and Sweden’s Christan Olssen split the $1 mill ion in 2004. Brown, in thanking God for keeping him healthy after the race, said it was good to be backin Europe after a nine-month a bsence to pull off his first victory. At the start of the race, I felt pretty good,” he said. “My legs w ere a bit heavy, so I wasn’t able to do what I wanted to do in the race, but I still got the W under my belt. So I will take it and not worry about the time. “I’m in grat shape, but I just felt real flat for some reason.M aybe it’s because I didn’t allow myself sufficient time to get in h ere and get adjusted to the time difference. There was a lot of things that factored into the race.” Despite how he felt, Brown’s time was good enough to place him well ahead of the African record holder Gary Kikaya, who did 45.68 for second. Grand Bahamian Michael Matt ieu was third in 45.92 and Andretti Bain, who is slowly making his return to the track after being hampered by a slight hamstring injury, was seventh in 46.82. “It was a nice strong field. I was racing guys who were top notched, even though the guys didn’t run as fast as they did last year at this time,” Brown stressed. “At the same time, these guys could pull anything out of the basket. and it was nice to have Andretti and Michael in the same race. You don’t really get to see three Bahamians in one race at the same time.” The reigning national champion said the race was also a confident booster for him as he pre pare to come home to defend his title for the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations’ National Championships, June 26-27 at the Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium. Brown, 30, won’t compete again until the Nationals, which will also serve as the final trials for the IAAF World Championships in Athletics in Berlin in August. After the Nationals, Brown will then return to Europe to run in the next three legs of the Golden League in Oslo (July 3 (July 10July 17 before they head to the World’sin Berlin. Following the World’s, the final two legs of the Golden League will take place in Zurich (August 28) and Brussels (September 4). Brown, incidentally, also leads the IAAF’s 2009 World Athletics Tour in the 400. After three races, Brown has accumulated a totalof 31 points, tied with Kikaya, who only did two races. Mathieu is tied with two others for seventh with 14. There was also a showdown in Berlin behind the top two female sprinters with Chandra Sturrup taking fourth in 11.18, followed by Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie in fifth in 11.19. Jamaican Kerron Stewart pulled off the victory in 11.00, while American Stephanie Durst broke up the Jamaican sweep in second in 11.15. Sheri-Ann Brooks, another Jamaica, got third in 11.18. Sturrup is now fifth in the World Athletics standings with 27 points from four meets. Ferguson-McKenzie is 17th from two meets with 15 points. Also from Berlin, Sharma Sands, the national 110 hurdlesr ecord holder, had to settle for fourth in the event in 13.56 b ehind an American sweep by Dexter Faulk (13.18 s on (13.21 (13.22 Sands occupies fifth place in the World Athletics standings with 33 points from five events. Although they didn’t compete yesterday, Olympic bronzem edalist Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands is tied with Cuban Arnie D avid Girat for second in the men’s triple jump with 20 points f rom two meets and world champion Donald Thomas third in the men’s high jump with 16.5 points from three meets. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 13 (QW HU WR ZLQZL WK HDFK SXUFKD VHRYH 3URPRWLR QHQ GV-XQH W 6 HH VWRUHV IRUIXUWKHUGHW DLO WITH the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations getting ready to host three major competitions over the next two weeks, inclusive of the Central American and Caribbean Age Group Championships and the Junior Nationals both this weekend and the Open Nationals, June 26th and 27th, the Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium is currently getting a facelift. Workmen are busy resurfacing and repairing the track surface with fresh coats of paint on the lanes and lane numbers. Work is also being done to the field and bleachers in the spectators area. The Local Organizing Committee for the CAC Age Group, chaired by Dr Bernard Nottage, is also busy preparing to receive the twenty counties expected to be in Nassau this week. The first team is expected to arrive today and the balance on Tuesday and Wednesday. In total there our some one hundred and six athletes, forty five coaches and officials along with Federation Representatives and CAC Executives. The BAAA is appealing all Bahamians to come out and support all the upcoming meets starting with the CAC Age Group Championships on Thursday at 9 am. The Bahamas will be represented by Jeorjette Williams and Ieisha Taylor in the girls 11-12; Danielle Gibson and Pedrya Seymour in the girls 13-14; Julius Nottage and Timothy Wilson in the boys 11-12 and Delano Davis from Grand Bahama and Jerrio Rahming in the boys 13-14. T RACKANDFIELD Chris ‘Fireman’ Brown in sizzling form FROM page 15 BLAZINGA TRAIL: Chris ‘Fireman’ Brown after his race in the 2009 Golden League in Europe. Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium gets facelift

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place finishers from the NORCECA Pool C. It was the team’s first w in of the tournament in straight sets and easily their most lopsided margin of victory. Cheryse Rolle led the scoring with 12 points, all c oming from attacks. Team captain Kelsie Johnson and Tasamine Emmanuel-Poitier both finished with 11 points apiece, while Melinda Bastian chipped i n with 10. The Bahamas finished the tournament at 2-2, with an opening round win over Haiti, 25-23 25-21 22-25 22-25 15-11, a seco nd round loss to Barbados 22-25 25-18 26-24 23-25 15-7, and the loss to Jamaica in the semi-finals, 25-23 25-9 25-13. Much of the focus for the n ational team had been centred on the theft of approximately $47,000 worth of equipment and personal effects from the team’s l ocker room during their second round match against Barbados. Team Head Coach Joe Smith said his squad willingly stepped up to the challenge when faced with an unexpected adverse situation. “These girls had to go through a lot. Just to be able to finish the tournament and finish it successfully says a lot about them and how much they wanted this,” he said, “We had everything s tolen and they could have quit but they bounced back the best way they could.” “It was hard for the team, ment ally and physically to get back into playing. We had to deal witht he situation with the police and heading into the game against J amaica, we had to be at the police station until 6pm and we were scheduled to play at 7, so to play well in that semi-final wash ard,” he said, “They had a c hance to regroup and still was able to focus on doing what we have to do, which is advance to the next round.” TRACK ARMRISTER/WHYTE AT NCAA SPRINTERS Cache Armbris ter and Kristy Whyte finished eighth and ninth respectively in the wmoen’s 200 metres on the final day of competition at the NCAA Division One 2009 Out d oor Track and Field Championships. O n Saturday, Armbrister, a sophomore at Auburn University, w as clocked in 23.80 seconds, w hile Whyte, a junior at the University of Miami, got ninth in 23.91. “I think what got me was my start,” said Armbrister in an a quote from Auburn’s website. “I didn't fire out like I wanted to, s o I ended up running a little bit out of my race on the curve, and having to set it up all over again coming home on the straightaway. “Being an All-American helps me feel a little bit better, but I hate to feel like I settled for e ighth, so it gives me something to work for next year.” Porscha Lucas, a junior at T exas A&M, stopped the clock i n 22.81 for the victory. The only other Bahamian to make the final at the meet was Southern Illinois’ senior Bianca S tuart, who had to settle for the 14th and final spot in the womrn’s long jump with a leap of 19-feet, 3 1 /4-inches (5.87 metres Kimberly Williams, a sophomore at Florida State, won the event with her leap of 21-5 1/2 (6.54 metres TENNIS KNOWLES/BHUPATHI IN EAST BOURNE After making an early exit at the French Open at Roland Garros, M ark Knowles and his Indian partner Mahesh Bhupathi are h oping to regain their form at the Aegon International in Eastbourne, London, Great Britain. Knowles and Bhupathi are the number two seeds in the tournam ent that open today and run through Sunday. The top seeds are Lukas Dlouhy from the Czech Republic and Leander Paes from India, who are coming off theirF rench Open tournament victory as the No.3 seeds. W hen they start play, Knowles and Bhuapthi will take on the team of Stephen Huss from Aus t ralia and Ross Hutchins from Great Britain. Going into the tournament, K nowles and Bhupathi have slipped to number four, trailing D louhy and Paes, who moved up to No.3. At the top of the ladder is the American identical twin b rothers, Bob and Mike Bryan, w ho regained the lead from D aniel Nestor and Nenad Zimonjic. The Aegon International is a prel ude to Wimbledon that starts in G reat Britain on June 22. Wimb ledon is the second Grand Slam tournament for the year. Knowles and Bhupathi were finalist at the first Grand Slam att he Australian Open in January. At the second Grand Slam at Roland Garros in May, Knowlesa nd Bhupathi were ousted in the t hird round s the fourth seeds. TRACK F ACEOFF CORRECTIONS IN Saturday’s edition of the BAAA’s Face Off for its athletes heading into the National Open Track and Field Stadium, it was incorrectly stated that sprinter Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie attended RM Bailey High School. She actually attended CC Sweeting and then graduated from St. Andrew’s. The Tribune apologises for the e rror. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS K e n m o r e B y n o e / P h o t o s spor ts NOTES Bahamas in memorable victory F ROM page 15 HIGH SCORER Melinda Bastian scoring another kill for the Bahamas over Tonya Joseph. US-BASED Tonya Joseph is rejected at the net by Melinda Bastian of the Bahamas.

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C M Y K C M Y K MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 S EE PAGE12 Truckers dig deep for win 2 0 0 9 H i l t o n H o s p i t a l i t y I n c .Travel should take you placesForreservationscal l:322-3301 Fathers Dayis June 21st D AD Eats F ree!For parties of 8 adults or more one father eats ee.Call for group pricing.Treat your Dad to a delicious meal at Porto“ no Restaurant where you can choose om a scrumptious buet “t for a king.Restaurant hours: 12:00 noon to 3:00 pmStay the weekend!Three fathers will have an opportunity to win one of three great prizes:Weekend stay for two in a newly renovated room inclusive of full buet breakfastTwo month membership to the Hilton Fitness Centre$200 food and beverage credit for the new Bullion Bar (opening late summer 2009Ask about our special weekend Bahamian Resident Rates! CHRIS BROWN finishes first during the men's 400 metres race of the ISTAF Golden League Athletics Meeting in Berlin Sunday, June 14, 2009. CHRIS ‘FIREMAN’ BROWN SIZZLESINEUROPE A P P h o t o / M i c h a e l S o h n n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net CHRIS ‘Fireman’ Brown, s till beaming from his two recent Hall of Fame inductions in the United States, has gotten off to a sizzling start o n the 2009 Golden League i n Europe. At the first of six meets on the circuit for the whopping $1 million jackpot on Sunday, B rown won the men’s 400 metres at the DKB-ISTAF in Berlin, Germany in 45.61 seconds in a field that included t wo other Bahamians. Only the winners are eligible for the pot and Brown is now in company with threeo thers on the men’s side and five on the women’s side thatw ill not feature any Bahamians. E vents on this year’s jackpot are the men’s 100, 400, 3,000/5,000, 110 hurdles and javelin. The women’s are the 100, 400, 100 hurdles, highj ump and pole vault. “I’m just waiting until ( Jeremy) Wariner and (LaShawn o n the scene,” said Brown of the American dynamic duo w hom Brwn has had his share of problems with at the major international meets including the Olympic Games and the World Championships. N either Wariner or Mer ritt competed in the opener,w hich makes them ineligible for the hefty cash prize. To b e eligible, a competitor must compete and win all six m eets. Sprinter Chandra Sturrup had a shot at the big cash incentive in 2001, but she fal tered down the stretch. SEE page 13 n b y RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net A gainst a wall of adversity, t eam Bahamas prevailed in one of the most memorable national team triumphs to date, while simultaneously earning a berth to t he third round of qualification for the 2010 FIVB World Championships. The Bahamas prevailed in the b ronze medal game against St. L ucia in straight sets 26-24, 2514, 25-21 yesterday at NORCEC A Pool D during the second round of the FIVB Women’s W orld Championship at the Garfield Sobers Sports Complex i n Bridgetown, Barbados. With the win the Bahamas, a long with the loser of the gold medal match between Barbados and Jamaica, will be relegated to NORCECA Pool I in Puerto Rico along with the host country a nd Canada The winner of the tournament w ill advance to the NORCECA Pool G, July 6-8 in Orlando, F lorida to match up against the USA, Costa Rica, and the second Bahamas clinches memorable victory SEE page 14 WOMEN’SWORLDCHAMPIONSHIP VOLLEYBALL Team earns berth to third round of qualification for championships

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C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.97 $4.03 $4.04 b b t t f f b b !!! b nff n n b b t t ,/,)0$!-!&0',)*+ !*&.'$'&!$*+0$ '&$'+. ! ',)-!***+0$*'( !*+!+!'& + !*'%'%($+.!+ ',)+',&!&')*) $!-!!&!&)''%*.!+ '!&!&',)%+#!$%* *,!&*,!++ )''%.$#!&$'* $ !+'+ %!!*$'&.!+ !$0*!(''$+ + '-)$''#*+ /$,*!-$0(%'&+ !*+!& Ross considers 3,000person medical school expansion plan Government draws down $200m bridge credit facility n By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor R oss University is considering expanding its Freeport-based m edical school campus to 3,000 persons “within two to three y ears”, senior Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA c ials have confirmed to Tribune Business, with the latter’s group president calling for an end to “distractions” such as the l obbying effort urging the Government to deny its chairman a renewal of his work permit. T ribune Business c an reveal that Fred Smith, the Callender’s & Co attorney and partner, who represents the lateE dward St George’s estate in its fight with Sir Jack Hayward’s family trust over ownership of the GBPA and Port Group Ltd, h as written two separate letters to members of the Ingraham Cabinet urging the Government not to renew the work permit of Hannes Babak, the chairman of both companies. Although this newspaper has not obtained copies of these letters, Mr Babak, in a telephone interview with Tribune Business, c onfirmed their existence and attacked them for spreading “untruths” about himself and his initial 2006 application for a w ork permit to be GBPA and Port Group Ltd chair. “The letters were sent to the directors of the Port Authority and Port Group Ltd, and were sent to the Prime Minister and the Cabinet,” Mr Babak confirmed. “He [Mr Smith] was claim* Port conducting studies on Freeport's feasibility for medical tourism * St George estate's attorney lobbying government to deny Babak work permit SEE page 10B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Government has begun to draw down on the $200 million bridging loan facility put together by a Bahamas-based commercial bank syndicate to cover the anticipated $260 mil lion revenue shortfall for fiscal 2008-2009, with one minister telling Tribune Business : “We aren’t optimistic about a quick [economic] turnaround.” Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, confirmed to Tribune Business that it was “correct” to say the Govern ment had “drawn on those resources in the last couple of weeks” as it moves to shore up the deficit left by the recession’s impact on its revenue intake. * Government 'not optimistic about quick economic turnaround'* Sovereign bond to replace bridge facility to be placed internationally when market conditions allow Zhivargo Laing Abaco Markets targets $100m sales after 10-fold profit hike * Company 'puts together five-year growth plan' eyeing new Nassau store location* Q1 profits increase to over $1m from $82,000 last year , with food division sales up $2.2m at 12% * Retailer leases land, with option to buy, for possible 15-20,000 sq ft Solomon's expansion* Achieves $127,000 net cash position, with all brands and stores 'profitable for first time in a long time' n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Abaco Markets has “put together a five-year growth strategy” that may involve new store locations, with its president predicting that sales will reach the $100 million mark for this financial year, as the BISX-listed retail group continues to defy the recession with a more than ten-fold increase in first quarter net profits. Gavin Watchorn told Tribune Business that if the $100 million group top-line forecast holds true for the year to January 31, 2010, the Solomon’s SuperCentre and GAVIN WATCHORN SEE page 7B SEE page 3B n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A new ferry company is pledging to start a daily roundtrip service between West Palm Beach and Freeport this year, Tribune Business can r eveal, with the possibility of future expansion that includes routes between Florida andt he Family Islands. Ride Ocean Zoom, on its w ebsite www.rideocean zoom.com , pledged that it would “provide customersw ith a comfortable and fast way to get to the Bahamas f rom West Palm Beach. Our services also provide Bahamians with a fast and cost-effi-c ient way to get to and from the main land of the United States”. Ride Ocean Zoom execu tives did not respond to d etailed questions sent to them by Tribune Business via e-mail. A telephone call to the number listed on the compa ny’s website was met with the m essage: “Our services are scheduled to begin this year, 2009.” S till, the company seems genuine, with its senior execu tives all listed on the website and their background details checking out via Internet-r elated research conducted by this newspaper. R ide Ocean Zoom’s founder and chief executive is named as Rosalind Withers,w ho is said to have some 25 years of experience in the s ales and marketing, and logistics, industries after working with companies such as East-m an Kodak, Ryder Truck Rental, Raytheon Data System and all eight companiest hat comprise Federal Express (FedEx O ther Board members include Chris How-Davies, f ounder and owner of 2morrow Group, a UK-based company with a more than $60m illion turnover and 180 staff. It is highly involved in travel t echnology and ferry distribution organisation. A Bahamian, Spencer Mallory, who worked on Ginn sur mer’s real estate sales is vice-p resident of international sales and marketing for Ride Ocean Z oom, with Michael Calandra named as vice-president of development. Alfred DeMott,t he company’s chief financial officer, was said to be vicep resident and treasurer of the Bacarus Group, an entity created to market travel andl ogistics services in the Bahamas. I t appears as if the concept offered by Ride Ocean Zoom will similar to that of BahamasF erries, which services the likes of Abaco, Eleuthera, Harbour Island, Andros andE xuma from Nassau. The type of vessel displayed on the c ompany’s website is almost a mirror image of the ones e mployed by Bahamas Ferries. Ride Ocean Zoom’s emerg ence, if it comes to fruition and full operation, could also Freeport-Florida ferry service plan S EE page 6B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Government’s amendments to the Customs Management Act a re designed to clarify that powers reserved for the Minister of Finance can be exercised by the Comptroller of Customs and his senior officials,a government minister has said, overcoming the “challenges” posed by Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA p owers. Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, told Tribune Business : “We are faced with a situation in which a number of people have challenged the Customs Department’s ability to audit their affairs in order to determine that the goods they import duty free, or condi t ionally duty free, were actually used for the purpose they were sup posed to be used for in accordance with the Hawksbill Creek Agreem ent and accompanying legislation. “The courts indicated that that power is reserved for the Minister of Finance, and what we are doing is amending the Customs Management Amendment to deal with 'challenges' over audits SEE page 8B

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n By RoyalFidelity Capital Markets L ast week, investors traded in f our out of the 24 listed securities, of which three declined and one remained unchanged. E QUITY MARKET A total of 82,661 shares changed hands last week, representing an increase of 67,880 s hares compared to the previous w eek's trading volume of 14,781 shares. Abaco Markets (AML the volume leader with 70,000 s hares trading hands, its stock price decreasing by $0.01 to end the week at $1.39. Commonwealth Bank (CBL w as the lead decliner, its share p rice falling by $0.50 to a new 52week low of $5.50 on a volume of 6,650 shares. FirstCaribbean International B ank (BahamasCIB 5,540 shares, its stock dropping $0.02 to close at a new 52-week low of $10.38. B OND MARKET No notes traded in the Bahamian market last week. C OMPANY NEWS: Dividend & Annual General Meeting (AGM F inance Corporation of the Bahamas (FIN dividend of $0.13 per share,p ayable on June 16, 2009, to all shareholders of record date June9 , 2009. Commonwealth Bank (CBL has declared a dividend of $0.05 p er share, payable on June 30, 2 009, to all shareholders of record date June 15, 2009. Consolidated Water (CWCO h as declared a dividend of $0.013 per share, payable on August 10, 2009, to all shareholders of record d ate July 1, 2009. FamGuard Corporation (FAM ing its Annual General Meeting o n Friday, June 19, 2009, at 4pm at the British Colonial Hilton, Victoria Room, Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas. Shareholders ofr ecord as of May 21, 2009, will be q ualified to vote at the Meeting. J.S. Johnson Company (JSJ announced it will be holding its A nnual General Meeting on Monday, June 15, 2009, at 6pm at the British Colonial Hilton, Victoria Room, Bay Street, Nas-s au, Bahamas. Doctors Hospital Health Systems (DHS holding its Annual General Meeti ng on Thursday, June 18, 2009, at 5.30pm at Doctors Hospital,D owdeswell Street, Nassau, Bahamas. Shareholders of record a s of May 27, 2009, will be qualified to vote at the Annual Meeting. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE ROYAL FIDELITY MARKET WRAP INTERNATIONAL MARKETS F OREX Rates Currency Weekly% Change CAD 0.8943 1.96 GBP 1.6445 + 1.57 EUR 1.4008 1.27 C ommodities CommodityWeekly% Change Crude Oil 72.89 + 6.10 Gold 939.80 4.41 International Stock Market Indexes Index Weekly % Change DJIA 8,799.26 + 0.56 S & P 500 946.21 + 0.40 NASDAQ 1,858.80 + 0.47 Nikkei 10,135.82 + 4.83 THEBAHAMIANSTOCKMARKET F INDEX 779.87 (-6.58% BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE CHANGE AML $1.39 $-0.01 70,000 -18.71% BBL $ 0.63 $0 -4.55% BOB $ 6.94 $0 -9.16% BPF $ 11.00 $0 -6.78% BSL $ 7.92 $0 -22.28% BWL $ 3.15 $0 0.00% CAB $ 11.39 $0 -18.82% CBL $ 5.50 $-0.50 6,650 -21.43% CHL $ 2.83 $0 0.00% CIB $ 10.38 $-0.02 5,540 -0.67% CWCB $ 3.51 $0.06 0 56.00% DHS $ 1.50 $0 -41.18% FAM $ 7.76 $-0 -0.51% FBB $ 2.37 $471 0.00% FCC $ 0.30 $0 0.00% FCL $ 5.09 $0 -1.55% FCLB $ 1.00 $0 0.00% FIN$ 10.97 $0 -7.58% ICD $ 5.50 $0 -10.28% JSJ $ 10.50 $0 -5.41% PRE $ 10.00 $-0 0.00% BOND MARKET TRADING STATISTICS BISX SYMBOL DESCRIPTION VOLUME PAR VALUE FBB13 FBBL Series C Notes Due 2013 0 $1,000 FBB15 FBBL Series D Notes Due 2015 0 $1,000 FBB17 FBBL Series A Notes Due 2017 0 $1,000 FBB22 FBBL Series B Notes Due 2022 0 $1,000 [ RF_RFBGIF_Tribune.jpg]

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Cost-Right owner will have generated $30 million in organic – s ame-store – sales growth over the past three financial years dating back to end-January 2007. He acknowledged, though, that such an organic growth rate – 42.9 per cent over a three-year period was difficult to maintain over an extended period, hence the look for growth and new store o pportunities. “We’ve put together a five-year growth strategy for the company from 2009 to 2014,” Mr Watchorn told Tribune Business . “Obviously, we’ve had great organic growth over the last couple of years from the same stores. They did $70 million for the fiscal year t o January 2007, and we hope and have good expectations that it will be a $100 million company for this year, which is a pretty pleasing growth rate. We think we will get over the $100 million mark this year. “That rate of organic growth is not going to continue for ever, a nd future growth will come from new locations. We’re looking in Nassau for an additional location,b ut it’s too early to say where it w ould be. We’ve got some plann ing going on. We’ve definitely i ncreased market share over the last few years.” M r Watchorn added that he was unable to say whether it was t he Solomon’s or Cost Right format that had been earmarked forN assau expansion, but Abaco Markets’ outward looking plans i ndicate the company is looking forward with confidence despite the recession, having returned to c onsistent profitability after completion of its five-year turnaround p rogramme. For the fiscal 2010 first quarter, t he BISX-listed retail group gen erated a $1.043 million net profit,a more than ten-fold increase upon the previous year’s $82,000 performance. The results for the t hree months to April 30, 2009, were driven by a $2.2 million sales i ncrease, which in turn was gen erated by a 12 per cent sales i ncrease at its Solomon’s and Cost Right formats. M r Watchorn told Tribune Business that customer counts were up by 15-16 per cent over prior year comparatives, although the average transaction per pers on was “down a little bit” in the first quarter – largely due to ther ecession and rein-in on consumer spending. We feel confident in saying that our prices are the best in town, and the customer count reflects that,” Mr Watchorn told Tribune Business. W hile food purchases were now accounting for a greater pro-p ortion of customer purchases, sales of higher margin general m erchandise, such as clothing, while below 2008 levels were “much better than budgeted for. Our clothing sales are much bet ter than expected”. Every brand and location is profitable, and it’s been a long t ime since we could say that,” the Abaco Markets president added. Everything moved in the right direction for us [during the first q uarter], increased sales, reduced expenses, reduced interest costs and increased customer accounts.” Arguing that Abaco Markets was “reaping the rewards” from sticking to its core strategy and values, Mr Watchorn said the company had probably been better prepared to handle the challenges from the recession than many other Bahamas-based businesses by virtue of the turnaround effort it had completed and the initiatives executed. By cutting costs and trimming the fat prior to the downturn, Abaco Markets was well-placed to cope with its demands. Of course, food retailers are better placed than many retail contemporaries to ride out reces sions simply because of the inelastic consumer demand for their products. Meanwhile, Mr Watchorn attributed the 1 per cent gross margin increase during the 2010 first quarter to increased sales, while gross mar gin dollars rose 14 per cent due to better buying and logistics. “We’ve been able to reduce shrinkage as a percentage of sales, which is helping, and we’ve expanded our purchasing beyond the south Florida base, and that is paying dividends,” Mr Watchorn explained. “We’ve got a full-time person whose job is to go out and get deals. We’re looking further afield and working hard to get deals. It allows us to lower food prices and get better margins at the same time. “Shrink as a percentage of sales has dropped by 10 per cent. That’s a combination of increased sales and managing better. We’ve not made the inroads we wanted, but it’s improved. Our level of employee theft has leveled off significantly. That’s due to increased awareness and promotion of the issue, as well as better controls.” The sales and margin improvements coincided with a welcome reduction in 2010 first quarter utility costs, with Mr Watchorn e stimating that Abaco Markets’ e lectricity bill fell between 10-20 per cent year-over-year. Other expenses remained flat. Elsewhere, Abaco Markets r everses its net overdraft position of recent years to end the 2010 first quarter with a $127,000 net cash position. The overdraft facili ty reduction saw interest costs drop by 25 per cent, while the company paid down a further $500,000 of the debt owed to Royal Bank of Canada. S ome $400,000 of that debt repayment came from the proceeds raised by selling the equipment and inventory from the former Cost Right Abaco store, with the actual property leased to PriceR ight partners, Rupert Roberts and Chad Sawyer. Mr Watchorn told Tribune Business that Abaco Markets hoped to eventually realise $1.1m illion from the sale of Cost Right Abaco’s equipment and inventory, with the monthly rental payments from Price Right also h elping to pay-off Royal Bank. A further $400,000 has been paid to Royal Bank since April 2009, and Abaco Markets is hoping to complete repayment of ther emaining debt – now less than $900,000 – before the end of its current financial year. Wiping out the debt will free up an extra $ 60,000 in cash flow per month. Mr Watchorn added that exiting Cost Right Abaco had created a “change around on liquidity and the bottom line”, with man-a gement no longer distracted by a loss-making entity that constantly needed managers to be sent out from Nassau. A s for the net cash position, the Abaco Markets president added: “It’s the first time, certainly as long as I’ve been with the company, that we’ve achievedt hat. It’s a good step. As a company in general, we’re achieving a positive balance.” The retail group had, over the p ast year, been paying an avera ge of $8,000-$10,000 per month i n overdraft interest, a figure that w as now “far less than that”. M r Watchorn told Tribune Business that Abaco Markets had set aside some $750,000 as at the first quarter’s end to repay the principal owed to its preferences hareholders, a figure that was “going to be close to $1 million” at the second quarter end on July 31, 2009. T he first redemption is scheduled for March 2010, with a total $1.2 million due to be returned to the preference shareholders next year. Mr Watchorn said thatw ould be fully funded, with some $1.7-$1.8 million set aside for that purpose. And the BISX-listed group has a lready moved to prepare for expansion in Freeport, having secured a three-year lease, with a $450,000 option to purchase, on 2.65 acres of land adjacent to itsS olomon’s SuperCentre store. The land will initially be used for store parking, with the company hoping to exercise the pur-c hase option in 2010. If the timescale operates as planned, the Abaco Markets president said expansion work at Solomon’s S uperCentre would likely start in 2011, with the store expanded by 15,000-20,000 square feet and its layout reconfigured. “That’s a piece of property d irectly adjacent to the property we have,” Mr Watchorn explained, “and the business is doing so well that parking is an i ssue. We hope by the end of next week to have addressed the parking. “Next year, when we have capital to purchase it, we will haves ecured the land long-term and can shift the layout of the store around to facilitate expansion. We think, if we purchase the landn ext year, we will start on it in early 2011.” He added: “We feel that as long as we control and manage w hat we can control, we will continue to be profitable. The level of profit depends on many factors, competition and the economic environment, but as long as wem anage what we can control we will be OK.” Abaco Markets said sales at its Domino's Pizza franchise were f lat during the first quarter, having lost the East Bay Street outlet, but per capita transaction values were higher as a result of bundling different products withi ts pizzas. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 3B 48$/,7<:$7(5 Abaco Markets targets $100m sales after 10-fold profit hike FROM page 1B We’ve put together a fiveyear growth strategy for the company from 2 009 to 2014.” G avin Watchorn

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.841.28Abaco Markets1.391.390.000.1270.00010.90.00% 11.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.436.94Bank of Bahamas6.946.940.000.2440.26028.43.75% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.603.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.2010.18Cable Bahamas11.3911.390.001.4060.2508.12.19% 2.902.75Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.2490.04011.41.41% 7.505.52Commonwealth Bank (S15.525.520.000.4190.36013.26.52% 4.781.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.403.630.230.1110.05232.71.43% 2.951.32Doctor's Hospital1.501.500.000.2400.0806.35.33% 8.207.50Famguard7.767.760.000.4200.30018.53.87% 12.5010.00Finco10.9710.970.000.3220.67034.16.11% 11.7910.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.3810.380.000.7940.40013.13.85% 5.554.95Focol (S5.095.090.000.3320.15015.32.95% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9.025.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.0010.50J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.37581.3124Colina Bond Fund1.37581.654.83 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8962-1.49-3.35 1.46721.3915Colina Money Market Fund1.46722.345.43 3.60903.1821Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.18216.01-13.90 12.861812.2702Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.86181.935.80 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.56119.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.25111.724.12 1.05781.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.05782.135.78 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0271-0.572.71 1.05541.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.05541.745.54 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L L L L: : C C O O L L I I N N A A 2 24 4 2 2 5 5 0 0 2 27 70 0 1 10 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L L F F I I D D E E L L I I T T Y Y 2 2 4 42 2 -3 35 5 6 6 7 7 7 7 6 64 4 | | F F G G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K KE E T T S S 2 24 4 2 2-3 3 9 9 6 6 4 4 0 0 0 00 0 | | C C O OL L O O N N I I A A L L 2 2 4 42 2 -5 5 0 02 27 75 5 2 25 5FINDEX: CLOSE 779.69 | YTD -6.61% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSTHURSDAY, 11 JUNE 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,573.41 | CHG 0.24 | %CHG 0.02 | YTD -138.95 | YTD % -8.11BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 30-Apr-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 30-Apr-09 31-May-09 31-May-09 W W W WW W . . B B I I S S X X B B A A H H A A M M A A S S . .C C O O M M | | T T E E L L E E P P H HO ON N E E : : 2 2 4 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 -2 23 33 3 0 0 | | F F A A C C S S I I M M I I L L E E : : 2 2 4 42 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3-2 2 3 3 2 20 0NAV Date 31-Mar-09 29-May-09 30-Apr-09 30-Apr-09 31-Dec-08 31-May-09 Job Opportunity for an ACCOUNTING CLERKAn established Bahamian Company is seeking an Accounts Clerk Interested persons should send resumes to: P .O. Box CR-55056 Nassau, Bahamas Qualified Bahamian real estate buyers are being hin-d ered by inventory shortages, a broker ha warned, after she took one single home listing and converted it into five successes, including three salest ransactions. Carla Sweeting, a broker with ERA Dupuch Real E state in Nassau, explained: “Here’s what happened. I got a listing for a house in the Eastern district, brought in a buyer for that, subsequentlys old the seller a new house further east, got the listing for t he buyer’s house, also in the Eastern district and also sold that. “It all started with one p hone call.” About eight months later, Ms Sweeting’s version ofm usical homes was done with all transactions completed and t hree clients in new residences. She said the one drawback i n today’s real estate market was not the economy, but a shortage of inventory, particularly of available residential lots for an eager and finan-c ially capable Bahamian buyers. “If we had multi-family lots f or less than $100,000 we could sell six a day,” says the broker, whose firm recentlyw alked away with regional top performance honours, leading ERA affiliates in six Caribbean countries for thef ourth consecutive year. According to Ms Sweeting, there’s also a shortage of inventory in homes under$ 500,000. “The foreign market has definitely slowed, but the Bahamian market is very s trong and eager to buy. The banks are being a bit stricter, requiring more for their com-f ort level, but money is available, interest rates are acceptable and Bahamians are look-i ng for land and homes in the moderate price range,” she added. Inventory shortages hit Bahamian buyers CARLA SWEETING “Here’s what happened. I got a listing for a house in theE astern district, brought in a buyer for that, subsequently sold the seller a new house further east, got the listing for the buyer’s house, also in the Eastern district a nd also sold that. It all started with one phone call.”

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n By the Securities Commission of the Bahamas I n October 2002, IOSCO adopted the MMOU as the model for international cooperation. The MMOU establishes standards to be appliedby IOSCO members when making or responding to requests for information. At the April 2005 annual conference of IOSCO, a timetable was agreed for all member regulators who were not already signatories to the MMOU, to meet the standards of the model by January 1, 2010. The draft securities legislation gives the Securities Commission authority to share information with both domestic and foreign regulatory authorities, consistent with international best practices. The Commission is authorised under the draft legislation to exercise any of its powers, at the request of another domestic regulatory authority (such as the Central Bank of The Bahamas, the Office of the Registrar of Insurance or the Compliance Commission) and may, on its own initiative, provide any such domestic regulatory authority with information the Commission has obtained in the course of carrying out its a ctivities. This assistance may b e provided to the domestic r egulatory authority to assist in the performance of its function. While the existing legislation enables information-sharing amongst domestic regulatory authorities, the draft legislation broadens the Commission’s authority to exercise any of its powers available under the legislation. The scope of the Commission’s authority to share information with foreign regulators is limited to providing assistance w ith the supervisory, investigat ive and enforcement functions o f the regulator, as they relate to securities and capital market matters. A comparative analysis of the existing legislative provisions on information sharing shows that essentially the standards applied now are not that different to those proposed in the draft securities legislation. Pursuant to the existing Securities Industry Act 1999, the Commission can provide information to foreign regulators. Certain factors, such as the seriousness of the matter and the existence of parallel offences in the Bahamas, may be taken into account when determining whether information should be shared with a requesting authority. The following pre-conditions have to be met; (a confidentiality is executed by the foreign regulator before the information is provided; or (b the Commission satisfies itself that the laws of information sharing in the requesting jurisdiction are comparable to those in the Bahamas; and (c Commission satisfies itself that the request relates to the functions of the overseas regulatory authority. The Commission may apply to the Court for an Order requiring that a registrant or licensee disclose the information requested by a foreign regulator, and the consent of the Commission must be obtained before the information can be shared with a third party. It is submitted that each of the C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 5B Wednesday,June17th09@6PM DoctorsHospitalConferenceRoom RSVPSeatingisLimited302-4603 WEDNESDAY,June17 DOCTORSHOSPITALDISTINGUISHEDLECTURESERIESSCHEDULELECTURESERIES Pleasejoinusasourguesteverythird Thursday of the month for this scintillating seriesofthemostrelevanthealthissues affectingsocietytoday.Purpose:Toeducate thepublicabout the importanthealthissues, presented by distinguished physicians.Screenings:Get your Free Blood Pressure,Cholesterol, and Glucosetesting between 5pm&6pm.RSVP:To ensureavailable seatingPhone: 302-4603LEC This Months Topic: TURE DATE SPEAKER:Dr. Robin RobertsUROLOGY TheTruths&MythsofCircumcision Dr.RobinRobertsJuly 16 Womens Health Dr.MadeleneSawyerAugust 20 Arthritis Dr.Vincent NwosaSeptember 09Obesity in Children Dr.Brian HumblestoneShould we CUT IT OFF?TheTruths&MythsofCircumcision Sharing the route for best practices The Securities Commission of The Bahamas has became a Signatory ‘B’ to the Multilateral Memorandum of Understanding Concerning Consultation and Cooperation and Exchange of Information (MMOUn ization of Securities Commissions (IOSCO MMOU as a Signatory ‘B’, the Commission has undertaken to make the necessary legislative changes to enable it to meet all of the terms of the MMOU. The provisions of the draft Securities Industry Act and Regulations, revealed below,reflect the pro-v isions necessary to enable the Commission to become a Signatory ‘A’ to the MMOU. S EE page 6B

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above requirements substantively exists in the provisions of the draft securities legislation. However, the Commission notes that the key differences in the new legislation are as follows: Various issues relating to the Commission’s inability to access information from its registrants and licensees will have been addressed Deficiencies in the recordkeeping requirements of licensees and registrants of the Commission will be clarified The Commission’s authority to assist a foreign regulator, who is an MMOU signatory, without the foreign regulator having to execute an undertaking concerning confidentiality and onward disclosure before the Commission acts on the request, will be clarified Restrictions on the use of information received from the Commission imposed on foreign regulators in practice, including various restrictions applied to providing consent for onward disclosure of information for use in securities-related criminal investigations and proceedings in the requesting state, will no longer exist The obligation of the Com mission to maintain the confidentiality of requests for assistance made to the Commission by foreign authorities will be statutorily established. Many of the proposed changes will require that participants in the industry are meeting international standards for record keeping, and that the Commission has access to that information as presently exists i n other international financial c entres. Such changes are being m ade primarily to ensure that the Commission is properly ‘armed’ to carry out its statutory mandate. A secondary result of these amendments, however, is that in doing so, we are able to meet the fundamental requirements of securities regulation, and thus the standards of information sharing established by IOSCO. Further, many of the changes identified above relate directly to information-sharing procedures and will consist mainly of clarifications to the process presently applied by the Commission. One change is that MMOU signatories will not be r equired to execute an undert aking prior to the Commission a ddressing each one of their requests, as their status as signatories addresses this issue. This again is not a substantive change, as the terms of the existing undertaking are set out in the MMOU and signatories thereto are required to meet the standards therein for each and every request that they make. mean competition for Discovery Cruise Line, which hasr ecently been plagued by mechanical problems. The company, which is o ffering on-line booking, is a iming to offer a round-trip schedule between West Palm Beach and Freeport. Its vessel will leave Florida at 8.30am int he morning, arriving in F reeport at 10.30sam. The return journey will begin at 5.30pm, with arrival in Florida at 7.30pm. Preliminary ticket prices are s et at $170 per adult for a round trip, and $85 each way., with children priced at $140p er round trip and $70 each way. Cargo storage prices vary from $75 to $135, with frozenc argo priced between $50-$75. Ride Ocean Zoom’s website said: “Ocean Zoom is a2 60 foot vessel providing express commuter service to a nd from West Palm Beach, Florida, and Freeport, Bahamas, a two-hour dock-t o-dock service. Ocean Zoom’s future plans are to e xpand to other locations, including Fort Lauderdale, Miami and select FamilyI slands within the Bahamas.” A West Palm Beach route h olds out the prospect of giving high net-worth Americans another avenue by which theyc an access Grand Bahama. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bs /HJDORWLFH127,&('5800216,1& ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XQH7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH1 27,&(63((':(//,19(670(17,1&ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XQH7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH127,&(52&&2/(21(,1&ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0D\7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH1 27,&(*$57(13/$7=,1& ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$SULO7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH1 27,&(0 (*$/8&.$1$*(0(17/7'ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XQH7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH1 27,&(6(&21'*(1(6,6/7'ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XQH7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH127,&(6$7,1526($5./7' ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0D\7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV Aug ust , Aug ust , 5th 5th Freeport-Florida ferry service plan F ROM page 1B Sharing the route for best practices F ROM page 5B SEE page 9B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 7B to be a part of ourWOW service team. Please submit resumeto: Human ResourcesDepartment | Doctors Hospital P.O.Box N-3018 | Nassau,Bahamas | or call 302-4618 |Website: www.doctorshosp.com WeWelcomeYou DOCTORS HOSPITAL“Dealing with the stress of a medical emergency is hard enough. I facilitate access to care while making the task of paying for services painless as possible.”W earelookingforan:InsuranceServicesCoordinator B accalaureateDegreeinBusinessorrelatedstudies;3-5yearsexperienceata supervisorylevel;Excellentcomputerskills(Spreadsheetsdatabasemanagement); K nowledgeofICD-9&CPTcodes,CodingCertificationpreferred; E xcellentcomputerliteracy;Strongcommunication&interpersonalskillsessential. The successful Candidate will:B eresponsibleformanagingtheactivitiesoftheInsuranceServicesDepartment responsibilitiesincludethemanagementofvariousInsurancen ancialportfolios. Direct,administerandcoordinatetheactivitiesoftheInsuranceServicesDepartment tosupportthepolicies,goalsandobjectivesestablishedbytheinstitution. C ontinuouslyparticipatesinperformanceimprovementstoenhanceservicestoour c ustomersthroughouttheorganization.Developcollectionstrategiestoensure o ptimumcasho w. Developrelationshipswithkeypersonnelinlocalandforeign Insurancecompanies. | Salary commensurate with experience Mr Laing was unable to say how much of the $200 million bridging facility the Government had drawn on, although it was possibly as much as $100 million. He confirmed that the credit facility was designed to cover “what we recognised would bea significant revenue shortfall experienced, and this is intended to fund that in the current fiscal year”. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham announced in the 2009-2010 Budget communication that revenues for the current fiscal year were likely to come in some 17 per cent below projections, ending at $1.31 billion instead of $1.57 billion. The revenue shortfall came as little surprise to most observers, given the Government’s heavy reliance on trade-based taxation for some 60 per cent of its revenues. This is an area that has borne the brunt of the economic downturn, and is set to leave the Ingraham administration facing a total deficit of $422 million for the 2008-2009 Budget year – a level the Prime Minister warned was “unsustainable”. Meanwhile, Mr Laing confirmed that the Government’s financial advisers were assessing when market conditions would be conducive for the launch of a $200 million sovereign government bond to refinance the current bridging facility. The International Monetary Fund’s (IMF cle IV consultation on the Bahamian economy suggested that any bond issue would take place in 2010, something Mr Laing hinted at to Tribune Business by implying that, given current market conditions, any launch now could leave the Government paying a higher interest return to investors than it wanted to. “Financial advisers are looking at that to see when market conditions are conducive, so that costs would not be as much as current conditions dictate,” Mr Laing added. H e told Tribune Business that any sovereign bond issue would be targeted at international, rather than domestic Bahamian, investors. “I don’t think, in this environment, you are able to place that locally. Certainly, not much,” the minister said, adding that he expected the $200 million bond to be placed internationally. Mr Laing said the advantages from refinancing the bridging loan would be to improve the Government’s cash flow by “terming out” the debt. Bridging loans tend to be advanced for relative ly short periods, with borrowers paying higher interest rates to lenders in comparison to bond issue that have longer maturity dates. “It would certainly be the ideal thing to do,” Mr L aing added. “You’re also likely, in the circum stances, to get loss costly terms on it, and also free up the lending capacity of domestic institutions who may have customers wanting to borrow.” The IMF expressed no concern about the Government’s plans to finance the 2009-2010 fiscal deficit through a combination of borrowing and the proceeds from the Bahamas Telecommunications Company’s (BTC that “near term weak private sector credit demand” meant risks from the ‘crowding out’ effect were low. Only 10 per cent of the central government’s direct debt is held by international investors and institutions, according to the IMF, giving the Bahamian government some room to manoevere when it comes to launching a $200 million sovereign bond despite the expanding fiscal deficit and national debt. However, Mr Laing rejected arguments that the Government was pinning all its hopes on a swift economic recovery, and the return of pre2008 economic activity levels, to pull itself from the fiscal precipice. “That’s not a fair assessment at all,” he told Tribune Business. “What we are doing is maintaining our options. Our policy decisions today are putting us in a position where, if things get worse,we have the ability to manoevere and respond. If things stay the same, or a recovery takes longer than anticipated, we have the ability to respond. “We aren’t optimistic about a quick turnaround. We aren’t planning on that basis. What we are planning for is any number of possible” scenarios given the uncertain and volatile global economic environment. Mr Laing added: “The Budget balances the need to nurture this economy through the downt urn with the management of fiscal affairs, so that we do not create an unsustainable debt situation. We are giving ourselves options in the face of any number of possible outcomes.” T he minister reiterated that the Government was looking to cushion the recession’s impact through a variety of capital works and infrastructure projects, while at the same time containing the recurrent deficit – the difference between its total revenue income and its fixed costs. T his strategy, Mr Laing added, was designed to ensure that the Government “does not have to borrow more than it has to borrow, and makes commitments that hamper our ability to manoevere if things turn down.” The same was true if the economy recovered more rapidly – and to a greater extent – than f orecast, as excessive borrowing and loading too great a debt load on to the Government’s books could hamper the Bahamas’ ability to exploit opportunities that came its way. This newspaper had previously reported that The Government appears to be pinning its faith in a relatively strong economic rebound from 2011 onwards, with gross domestic product (GDP current prices rising by 0.9 per cent that year, with a more sustained 2.5 per cent GDP expansion in 2011-2012. It also seems to be hoping that the level of economic growth will have returned to normal, something that is also not a given, due to the depth and severity of the current recession. Tribune Business had previously revealed that the combined fiscal deficits the Bahamas will incur in the 2008-2009 Budget year and over the next three fiscal years will total a staggering $1.411 billion if the Government’s forecasts hold true, with the national debt breaking through the 50 per cent-of-GDP ratio in the 2010-2011 fiscal period. Government draws down $200m bridge credit facility F ROM page 1B

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Act to make it abundantly clear that the powers of the Minister of Finance can be exercised via t he authority delegated in the Customs Management Act to the Comptroller of Customs.” Mr Laing added that the Government was “also making pro-v isions for persons importing goods duty-free to sign a declaration that the goods will be used for the purpose” intended, e nabling Customs to compare this with their audit findings and determine whether any fraud or tax evasion has taken place. The minister said the amendm ents were intended “to protect the revenue” of the Government by clarifying Customs’ powers in relation to the Hawksbill Creek A greement, and who could exercise them. “The point is being consistent w ith what the needs of the jurisd iction are, and what we under stand the terms of the Hawksbill C reek Agreement and the accompanying laws to be. We are doing t his amendment to give effect to that,” Mr Laing added. However, it seems likely that the proposed amendment will be challenged in the courts by G BPA licensees. Gregory Moss, the Grand Bahama Chamber of Commerce’s president, said the organisation “notes with concern” the planned amendment, addingt hat their main fear centred on whether it was an attempt to amend the Hawksbill Creek Agreement by the back door. The Grand Bahama Chamber notes with concern the reference b y the Prime Minister in his recent Budget communication to an intention on the Government’s part to amend the Customs M anagement Act to “clarify and bring certainty to the administrat ion of the Hawksbill Creek Agreement in the Port Area’,” Mr Moss told Tribune Business . He added that “if all the4 Government intends to do is repeat int he Customs Management Act the relationship with the Hawksbill Creek Agreement, we could have no issue with that. If the Government intends to abrogate any part of the Hawksbill Creek Agreement we would have significant issue with that and would have to respond tot hat appropriately.” Mr Moss pointed out that the Government was unable to amend the Hawksbill Creek A greement without the consent of two-thirds of the GBPA licensees. However, Mr Laing told Tribune Business : “We certainly believe we’re doing whati s within the ambit of the law and what we’re empowered to do, so if the licensees challeng it in the courts, that is their right. “We believe there is a great d eal of reason being expressed b y the licensees that operate in t he Freeport area that there is a l aw, an agreement that governs the Freeport area, and that law a nd agreement applies to everyone. As long as it’s consistent with t he law, they will have no difficulty in complying.” The amendment, a copy of which was obtained by Tribune Business , said the reason for the c hange was “to remove all doubts that the Comptroller is the person designated by the Minister to carry out the powers in clause 2 ( 4)(f) of the Hawksbill Creek Agreement”. The actual amendment’s wording states that the Customs comptroller, his deputy or the assistantc omptroller “be the person designated by the minister to carry out any and all powers” contained in that Hawksbill Creek Agreem ent clause. The clause in question, as analysed by Tribune Business , gives a person designated by the minister “free access at all rea-s onable times” to any development project, business, company or commercial entity in the Port area, and access to all parts of their business, “for the purpose o f ascertaining whether the seve ral articles” admitted duty-free u nder the Hawksbill Creek A greement are being used for their stated purpose meaning i n a licensee’s business, so that no duty is payable on them. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE COMMONWEATH OF THE BAHAMAS2008 IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/592 IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 AND IN THE MATTER of The Petition of Inez Taylor Martin N OTICE OF PETITION N OTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that Inez Taylor-Martin of Old Place in the Western District of the Island of Exuma, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, is applying to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas to have her title investigated determined and declared under the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 (Ch. 393 “ALLTHATpiece parcel or tract of land situate approximately One Highway on the Northern side of Gilbert Grant Road and bounded EASTWARDLYby land now or formerly the property of Zelma Nixon jointly by Crown Land occupied by Zelma Nixon and running thereon a total distance of Two-Hundred and Seven and Sixty-Six Hundredths (207.66running NORTHWESTWARDLYby land now or formerly the property of Emerald Bay Development and running thereon a total distance of Six-Hundred and Fifty-Nine and Forty-One Hundredths (659.41WESTWARDLYby land the other portion of the Gilbert Grant and running thereon EightHundred and Twenty-Nine and Fifteen Hundredths (829.15 SOUTHWARDLYby a Public Road known as Gilbert Grant Road and running thereon a distance of Four-Hundred and Thirty-Eight and Twenty-Seven Hundredths (438.27 commencement which said piece parcel or tract of land described above comprises an area of Four and Four Hundred and SeventyNine Thousandths (4.479Acres and has such position boundaries shape marks and dimensions as are shown on the plan recorded in the Department of Lands and Surveys as Plan No. 450 EXUMA.” AND TAKE NOTICE that copies of the Petition and the Plan of the ing places: i. Supreme Court Registry, Ansbacher House, East Street North, New Providence, The Bahamas. ii. Sharon Wilson & Co., Chambers, East Shirley Street, Highland Terrace, New Providence, The Bahamas. AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that any person having dower or right to dower, an adverse claim or a claim not recognized in the preme Court and serve on the Petition or his attorney an Adverse or before 22nd JULYA.D., 2009 date will operate as a bar to such claim. Dated this 20th day of May A.D., 2009 Sharon Wilson & Co. Chambers Delvest House East Shirley Street, Highland Terrace Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas Attorneys for the Petitioner /HJDORWLFH127,&(3520,1(17$1$*(0(17 6(59,&(6/,0,7('ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XQH7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV &22.&+( /HJDORWLFH1 27,&(48,//+,//7'ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XQH7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH127,&(1(:$&&$5',,1&ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XQH7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH1 27,&(*$/9(6721$//(
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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 9B Chairman’s Report – Q1, 2009 It is with great pleasure that I reporton our first quarterof 2009 aswe post anet profit of $1.043m for the quarter.Our locations continue to post strong sales gains – up $2.2m over the same period the previous year driven by a 12% increase in sales in the Food Distribution while Domino’s Pizza sales remain flat with one storeless than the previousyear. Our gross margin has also improved by 1% driven by improved buying and logistics which has, in turn, allowed us to pass significant savings on to our customers through our price cuts and club values which, combined, affect thousands of products on a weekly basis. The Group’s stringent cost controls, reductionsin utility costs,a25%decreaseininterestrates and the continued significant reduction in its bank debt have also positively impacted the Company’s r esults. A total of $500k of our RBC loan was repaid in the first quarterwith afurther$400k in repayments since Apriland we expect to repay this debt in full by the end of the 2009 fiscal year. Our locations havedelivered extremely solid performance in very challenging economic times and o ur results clearly reflect the positive response toour strategic initiatives. We believe that by focusing on our strengths – our brands and the synergies that we can achieve among our locations along with the current competitive conditions isgivingus an opportunity togainmarketshare and ensure that we are well positioned to both weather these economic conditions and prepare us for further growth in the economic recovery. These times are challenging us to be innovative, tocarefully manage what is within our control,to achieve the synergies in our buying and logistics to realise savings and efficiencies and to continue to focus on the details that have delivered solid resultsinthepasttwoyears.Weareconfidentin these measures and in the performance of our locations particularly at this time and weare r elentlessly pursuing the operating results and shareholder value we know Abaco Markets can produce. R. Craig Symonette June 11, 2009 INTERIM UNAUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE QUARTER ENDED APRIL 30, 2009 CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET (Expressedin thousands ofBahamiandollars)April 30, January 31, 20092009 Assets $ 29,155 30,607 Liabilities(15,824)(18,319) Equity $13,331 12,288 CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME (Expressedin thousands ofBahamiandollars)Quarter EndedQuarter Ended April 30, 2009 April 30, 2008 Sales $22,667 20,446 Cost ofsales (15,739) (14,380) Gross profit6,9286,066 Selling, general and administrative expenses(5,849)(5,884) O ther operating income15494 Net operatingprofit1,233276 Pre-opening costs (24 I nterest expense (43)(43) Dividends onpreference shares (122)(182) Net profit oncontinuingoperations1,06827 N et (loss)/profit on discontinued operations(25)55 Net profit$1,04382 P rofit per share $0.067$0.005 CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS (Expressedin thousands ofBahamiandollars)Quarter Ended Quarter Ended A pril 30, 2009 April 30, 2008 Net profit for period $ 1,043 82 Net cashprovided byoperating activities 1,1531,279 Net cashused in investingactivities(119) (418) Net cashusedinfinancing activities(629) (582) Increase in cash $ 405 279 EXPLANATORY NOTES TO INTERIMUNAUDITEDCONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Quarter Ended April 30, 2009 1.ACCOUNTING POLICIES These financial statements have been prepared inaccordance withInternationalFinancial Reporting Standards using the same accounting policies andmethods of computationas the ConsolidatedFinancialStatementsincluded in the 2008Annual Report. The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Abaco Markets Limited (“the Compan) anditssignificant wholly owned subsidiaries:Solomos Supercentre (Nassau) Limited, Cost Right Nassau Limited, Solomons Club (Freeport) Limited, ThompsonWholesale Limited and Caribbean Franchise Holdings Limited. 2.DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS On March 9, 2009, the Company ceased operationsin Cost Right Abaco. Accordingly, the assets andliabilities of Cost RightAbacoare treatedas discontinued as of April 30, 2009. The Company has signed a three year lease for thebuildingused bytheformer store. The lease includes anoption to purchase thebuildingat theend ofthe lease for $2.8m. The equipment of the formerbusiness was soldfor $350,000,resultingin a gain of $79,000.Balance of$250,000onthis transaction remains outstanding as of April 30, 2009.C is recruiting aThe Bahamas Development Bank Managing Director S hould they not do so then t here are various processes by w hich the Commission can assert its right to deal with that member as a non-signatory. Another substantive change is the Commission’s obligation to maintain the confidentiality of the request made by an MMOU signatory. This new provision would mean that (a the Commission could not, as it presently does, provide the background information of a request to the person from whom the information is being requested; (b trants or any person requested to provide information on account holders would be bound not to divulge the existence of the request with their clients; and (c providing the information to the Commission would have to be made without the person fromwhom the information is requested being aware of the background information related to the request, or any input from the person in respect of the information is sought. A first look at these information-sharing provisions would indicate that the changes made are voluminous because of the increased provisions. Considering the proposed provisions from the perspective of substance and content, however, it is clear that the amendments proposed provide clarity to the vague provisions that presently exist in the Securities Industry Act 1999. The proposed amendments required to the securities legislation as a result of the Commission seeking to become a Signatory ‘A’ of the MMOU will therefore result in requests for information-sharing being addressed in a transparent environment, in which licensees and registrants of the Commission will fully understand their rights and obligations as well as those of the Commission. The Commission looks forward to engaging its constituents on their input and comments in relation to these provisions and any other matter that might arise from the proposed provisions in the draft securities legislation. There is a 4 5-day consultation period with respect to this document. with the deadline for comments being June 24, 2009.The Commission welcomes comments on the draft Securities Legislation which may be posted directly in the SIA/SIR Comment Forum using: http://stats.scb.gov.bs/sia2009/ or posted or emailed to the Commission at Email: sia2008@scb.gov.bs. The Commission intends to issue further articles during the next few weeks in relation to other aspects of the draft legislation. Sharing the route for best practices FROM page 6B I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE ing that I got the work permit under incorrect information two years ago. There were untruths in the letters. Our company lawyer responded to it and set it right, making the true information available to all parties concerned.” Mr Babak pointed out that the allegations in the letters had been included in the ‘shareholder o ppression’ action the St George estate had initiated against himself and Sir Jack, and which had been thrown out by the Supreme Court. Although, as pointed out earlier, Tribune Business has not seen the letter sent by Mr Smith, it is likely to centre on previous alleg ations made by the St George estate, namely that the Immigration Department was in 2006 told Mr Babak would not receive “any salary, reward, gain or profit”f rom the GBPA and Port Group chairmanships. This, the estate had previously alleged, was at odds with claims t hat the two companies’ immedia te parent, Intercontinental Diversified Corporation (IDC might owe a $65 million liability to Mr Babak over his contract.O bservers close to the situation have suggested to Tribune Business that the Prime Minister and his Cabinet, plus the Immigration D epartment, are unlikely to be s wayed by Mr Smith’s lobbying campaign over Mr Babak’s work permit. For starters, they would not want to be seen as taking s ides in the Port ownership dispute, or lay themselves open to any possibility of ‘victimisation’ accusations. I t is likely, though, that the letters are the latest salvo in an attempt by Mr Smith and his clients to oust Mr Babak from theG BPA and Port Group Ltd chairmanship, and sever the links between him and Sir Jack. The directors appointed by the S t George estate, and their nomi nees, voted against Mr Babak regaining the chairmanship of both entities, but were defeated by the Hayward family trust’sB oard control. Meanwhile, GBPA and Port Group Ltd president, Ian Rolle, told Tribune Business that he w anted “distractions” such as the f urore over Mr Babak’s work permit renewal to “go away”, as they did not help to take either organisation or Freeport forward. Mr Babak enjoys the full support of the management team and the employees of the GBPA,” Mr Rolle said. “They all feel a sense o f normalcy has come into this place since he’s been around. “We’re focusing on moving Grand Bahama and the Bahamasf orward. It would be sad to know that Mr Babak will not be able to enjoy the fruits of his labours. He has been working feverishly to b etter this island, and in effect b etter the Bahamas through his endeavours. “I would like to focus on these distractions going away. It’s notd oing Grand Bahama any good by having these ongoing distractions.” Mr Rolle praised Mr Babak for a ttracting Ross University’s medi cal school to Freeport, describing it as an investment that was “recession-proof”. “There’s a next phase of Ross U niversity which could have a tremendous impact for this economy. This type of business could be recession-proof,” he added. Ross is thinking of expanding its campus of students and staff to 3,000 persons within two to three years. It is completely recession-p roof.” Mr Rolle said Ross’s arrival on Grand Bahama had been the major economic bright spot for the island and Freeport d uring some very dark economic t imes, and the students and faculty brought with it had helped to breathe life into the city’s retail and restaurant industries. I n addition, the rental market had also been revitalized, with “apartments and houses not rented for years, rented now”. Such d evelopments would further e ncourage landlords to invest in the capital stock of their properties. Both Mr Rolle and Mr Babak indicated that Ross Univ ersity’s investment could spawn greater things. The medical school will produce a cadre of highly-trained d octors, surgeons and medical specialists who could form the core of a medical tourism industry for the Bahamas, with patientst ravelling to Freeport from all over the world for specialist care. This, in turn, would create business for the city’s hotel industry, a s well as additional demand for a s econd home market that has ample room on Grand Bahama for expansion. “We’ve made tremendous p rogress,” Mr Rolle told Tribune Business. “Hannes introduced a study of medical tourism. We have the first phase of a plan, and i t’s looking very favourable.” M r Babak added that the consultant hired to conduct the study had been involved in putting together healthcare plans for c ompanies such as Microsoft, with the focus on areas such as what medical fields should Freeport and Grand Bahama offer. Ross considers 3,000-person medical school expansion plan FROM page 1B

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INSIGHT C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune INSIGHT MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009 The stories behind the news n By RUPERT MISSICK C hief Reporter rmissick@tribunemedia.net WE RECEIVEDa call from a politician last week who had to console a dist raught single mother who had come to him seeking assis-t ance. After a long battle, the court had finally made the father of her child pay some thing to assist her in raising their child. T he exhilaration of this vic tory was short lived, howev er, when the court was only a ble or willing to award her $50 a week for the child's u pkeep. "What can $50 a week do for this woman? Why wouldt he court think that's fine? I mean it's disgraceful," the politician said. The truth is $50 a week isn’t "fine" by any standards, butm any women don’t receive much more for the mainte nance of their children. They complain that men don’t accept raising a child as a jointe ffort. I was severely chastised by a woman (we'll call her Simone) who resented the fact that I had suggested, duringa n admittedly clumsy turn of phrase, that she had her child f or her ex-husband. "Why do people say that? ‘I had a child for so and so' or 'You had a child for so and so'. You know I didn’t have a child for any man. I had a child with a man. When I hear people, even women, say thatI get so mad. One time me and my sister got into a big fight over that. She told mes he was having a baby for her husband. " I told her straight, homegirl you having a baby with t hat man you're not doing him any favours, he isn’t paying you for as ervice," she said. The point was well t aken and I was slight ly (only slightly embarrassed that Ih adn’t picked up on that nuance before. When this partnership that the phrase "having a baby with" a nother person suggests, is broken, many women find themselves in magistrate's court attempting tof orce the father of their children to do the right thing. A nd then there is Stephanie, a woman i n her forties, a bat tle-worn veteran of family court, whot old I nsight a bout her experience. Her court order for child support was issued i n 1998 when her daughter was eight years old. "He brought in all of his bills and all of his things that he had in arrears and pre sented them to the judge and said he was unable to pay child support for my daughter but the judge still made an order for him to pay $80 a week for her because the father owned a business," Stephanie said. This was only after the judge had, and rightly so, determined that a man who owned his own business could find a way to materialise $80 a week. The daughter will be turn ing 19 this year and since this order was made more than 10 years ago, her father has made two $80 payments. Like many women before her, Stephanie has given up on the system completely and is not only unaware of how to go about collecting back-child support, but is no longer interested in pursuing this route. "Every time I went to court to pick up her cheque, they said nothing was there and he never paid anything else. He never lived up to his word," Stephanie said. Admitting that material support for the child they had together came sporadically over the years in oth er forms, Stephanie highlighted the need a single mother has for certainty and the sta bility of "support that comes on time every time." Court orders for these women become flaccid instruments made more impotent by a lack of enforcement. These women feel not only dishonoured by the men with whom they had their children, but degraded by a court sys tem that will also not live up to its promises. " They make an order and they don’t have anybody who follows up with a warrant of arrest. “I think if they start arrest i ng them then I think they would try to at least put something there every week e ven if they can't put every thing they're supposed to. It's a hassle to keep going to court. In order to get seen you have to have an attorney or else you'll be waiting out there for hours and hours." It is impossible to shake Stephanie from the notion that the father's lack of material support has translated into a lack of emotional support for a daughter who was and still is desperate for a close relationship with him. "It's not much, but that was money I needed. I'd planned on making that $80 a week stretch to help pay school fees and buy clothes and food," she said. It is very hard to imagine, even discounting nearly a decade in an increase in the cost of living, how this would be possible but surprisingly what amounted to $320 a month is a kingly sum compared to what some women receive. Take the more recent case of Michelle, who is currently in court attempting to have the father of her children live up to his obligations. Like Stephanie before her, she is frustrated with the system and is about to "give up because it's almost not worth it." Michelle is the mother of three boys 17, 14 and 13. The court ordered their father to pay what essentially amounts to $40 a week for each child. However, Michelle main tains that this isn’t nearly enough to help raise her children, especially as the 14-yearold is a diabetic. "I got so tired I actually stopped. I don't even check it no more because it's n ever there. They had a judgment w arrant out for h im and it looks l ike they c an't catch him. I t hought they were supposed to lock you up if you d efy a court order, but they can't seem to find him, he's not p aying and in the meantime the children s till have to live," she said. M ichelle also disagrees with the way the c ourt decides how much money should be paid. " It shouldn't be based on what the man can pay. It should be based on what the child needs. If I could be out there working nights, working two jobs to do what I have to do, why shouldn't he?" she asked. However, there are times when men do live up to their obligations. However, this usually is no thanks to the courts, but solely to the men who do what they are supposed to do. Stephanie said that while she may have had a horrendous experience, she has a friend, a divorce whose ex-husband's $100 a week (about $33.33 for each child) has been put to good use. With this $400 a month Stephanie's friend is able to pay her mortgage for her low cost home. The battle for child support payments SEE page two INSIDE FEEDBACK ON THE GLOBAL WATER CRISIS’ PAGETHREE “These women feel not only dishonoured by the men with whom they had their children, but degraded by a court system that will also not live up to its promises. I N S I G H T C M Y K C M Y K T h e T r i b u n e I N S I G H T M O N D A Y , J U N E 8 , 2 0 0 9T h e s t o r i e s b e h i n d t h e n e w s nB y P A C O N U N E Z T r i b u n e N e w s E d i t o r EX P E R T S b e l i e v e w a t e r i s n o w t h e m o s t i m p o r t a n t r e s o u r c e o n e a r t h , s u r p a s s i n g e v e n o i l i n t e r m s o f g r o w i n g s c a r c i t y a n d a n t i c i p a t e d l a c k o f s u p p l y i n t h e n e a r f u t u r e . T h e a b i l i t y o f p o p u l a t i o n s t o g u a r a n t e e t h e s u p p l y o f p o t a b l e w a t e r n e c e s s a r y t o s u s t a i n a g r i c u l t u r e a n d i n d u s t r y n o t t o m e n t i o n d a y t o d a y s u r v i v a l i s b e c o m i n g i n c r e a s i n g l y u n c e r t a i n . O n e o u t o f s i x p e o p l e h a v e i n s u f f i c i e n t a c c e s s t o w a t e r a n d h a l f t h e p e o p l e o n e a r t h s u f f e r f r o m d i s e a s e s a s s o c i a t e d w i t h p o o r q u a l i t y d r i n k i n g w a t e r o r s u b s t a n d a r d s a n i t a t i o n . C l i m a t e c h a n g e , p o p u l a t i o n g r o w t h a n d r i s i n g l i v i n g s t a n d a r d s w i l l o n l y m a k e m a t t e r s w o r s e . C h i n a a n d I n d i a , b o t h h o m e t o r a p i d l y g r o w i n g p o p u l a t i o n s , a r e a l r e a d y f e e l i n g t h e e f f e c t s , a s w a t e r i s h a v i n g t o b e d i v e r t e d f r o m a g r i c u l t u r a l p r o j e c t s t o c i t i e s a n d s o i l i s b e c o m i n g m o r e s a l i n e , d a m a g i n g f a r m i n g y i e l d s . I n t h e M i d d l e E a s t , c o m p e t i t i o n f o r w a t e r i s c r e a t i n g p o l i t i c a l t e n s i o n s . T h i s h a s l e d s o m e e x p e r t s t o c l a i m t h a t w a t e r n o t o i l o r r e l i g i o u s f u n d a m e n t a l i s m w i l l b e t h e c a u s e o f t h e n e x t w o r l d w a r . S o , h o w d o e s t h e B a h a m a s r a t e i n t e r m s o f w a t e r s e c u r i t y ? D E P E N D E N C E O N G R O U N D W A T E R O n l y t h r e e p e r c e n t o f t h e w a t e r o n e a r t h i s f r e s h a n d a l m o s t a l l o f t h i s i s f r o z e n i n g l a c i e r s a n d p o l a r i c e c a p s . T h e v a s t m a j o r i t y o f w h a t r e m a i n s i s g r o u n d w a t e r , s t o r e d i n t h e p o r e s p a c e o f s o i l a n d r o c k s , o r i n a q u i f e r s b e l o w t h e w a t e r t a b l e . G r o u n d w a t e r i s t h e p r i m a r y s o u r c e o f p o t a b l e w a t e r a r o u n d t h e w o r l d . T h e p r o b l e m i s t h a t t h i s w a t e r i s r e p l e n i s h e d v e r y s l o w l y o n c e r e m o v e d , m e a n i n g t h a t s u p p l y i s e a s y t o e x h a u s t o r c o n t a m i n a t e w i t h s a l t w a t e r t h r o u g h o v e r p u m p i n g w h i c h i s e x a c t l y t h e d i l e m m a f a c i n g m a n y c o u n t r i e s , i n c l u d i n g t h e B a h a m a s . L e s t e r R B r o w n w r i t e s : " S c o r e s o f c o u n t r i e s a r e o v e r p u m p i n g a q u i f e r s a s t h e y s t r u g g l e t o s a t i s f y t h e i r g r o w i n g w a t e r n e e d s . T h e d r i l l i n g o f m i l l i o n s o f i r r i g a t i o n w e l l s h a s p u s h e d w a t e r w i t h d r a w a l s b e y o n d r e c h a r g e r a t e s , i n e f f e c t l e a d i n g t o g r o u n d w a t e r m i n i n g . T h e f a i l u r e o f g o v e r n m e n t s t o l i m i t p u m p i n g t o t h e s u s t a i n a b l e y i e l d o f a q u i f e r s m e a n s t h a t w a t e r t a b l e s a r e n o w f a l l i n g i n c o u n t r i e s t h a t c o n t a i n m o r e t h a n h a l f t h e w o r l d s p e o p l e , i n c l u d i n g t h e b i g t h r e e g r a i n p r o d u c e r s C h i n a , I n d i a , a n d t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s . " W h i l e t h e B a h a m a s h a s y e t t o s u f f e r a n y f a l l o u t f r o m o v e r p u m p i n g , t h e r e i s n o q u e s t i o n t h a t g r o u n d w a t e r f r o m A n d r o s , u p o n w h i c h N e w P r o v i d e n c e r e l i e s , w i l l o n e d a y b e c o m e c o n t a m i n a t e d w i t h s a l t w a t e r , o r s i m p l y r u n o u t . F o l l o w i n g a n i n e y e a r s t u d y b y W r i g h t S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y o n t h e w a t e r r e s o u r c e s i n A n d r o s , A n g e l a L A d a m s w r o t e i n 2 0 0 1 t h a t : " B e c a u s e o f o v e r p u m p i n g t h e t r e n c h w e l l s , t h e t h i c k n e s s o f t h e f r e s h w a t e r l e n s h a s t h i n n e d u n d e r t h e w e l l f i e l d s . " " T h e p r o d u c t i o n o f l a r g e q u a n t i t i e s o f w a t e r f o r e x p o r t r a i s e s c o n c e r n f o r t h e l o n g t e r m s u s t a i n a b i l i t y o f t h e r e s o u r c e , " s h e s a i d . J u s t t h i s y e a r , t h e I n t e r A m e r i c a n D e v e l o p m e n t B a n k n o t e d t h a t r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s f r o m a 2 0 0 3 s t u d y o n g r o u n d w a t e r m a n a g e m e n t a n d p o l l u t i o n c o n t r o l f o r t h e B a h a m a s h a v e n e v e r b e e n i m p l e m e n t e d , d e s p i t e t h e n a t i o n ' s s c a r c e w a t e r r e s o u r c e s f a c i n g " i n c r e a s i n g s t r e s s . " " T h e r e i s a p r e s s i n g n e e d f o r r e g u l a t i n g a n d p r o t e c t i n g t h e g r o u n d w a t e r r e s o u r c e s o f t h e B a h a m a s . I g n o r i n g o v e r e x p l o i t a t i o n a n d p r o t e c t i o n w i l l h a v e s e v e r e r e p e r c u s s i o n s , s u c h a s h e a l t h i s s u e s f r o m w a t e r b o r n e d i s e a s e s a n d m u c h g r e a t e r w a t e r c o s t s , " a n I D B r e p o r t s a i d . T H E E X I S T I N G S U P P L Y S Y S T E M A t t h e m o m e n t , N e w P r o v i d e n c e r e l i e s o n a c o m b i n a t i o n o f i n e f f i c i e n t d e s a l i n a t i o n m e t h o d s , e x p e n s i v e r e v e r s e o s m o s i s f a c i l i t i e s a n d a h i g h l y u n r e l i a b l e s y s t e m o f b a r g i n g w a t e r f r o m A n d r o s . D e s p i t e 4 0 y e a r s o f e f f o r t a n d a c o n s i d e r a b l e a m o u n t o f m o n e y , c o n s u m e r s o n t h e i s l a n d a r e n o c l o s e r t o a r e l i a b l e w a t e r s u p p l y t h a n t h e y w e r e b e f o r e i n d e p e n d e n c e . A s t h e p o p u l a t i o n h a s g r o w n , t h e p r o b l e m h a s o n l y b e c o m e w o r s e . S o m e F a m i l y I s l a n d s , f o r e x a m p l e A b a c o a n d E l e u t h e r a , r e l y o n s m a l l r e v e r s e o s m o s i s p l a n t s ; o t h e r s d r a w f r e s h w a t e r f r o m u n d e r g r o u n d r e s o u r c e s . B u t t h e s y s t e m i s s o h a p h a z a r d a n d p o o r l y m a i n t a i n e d t h a t l a s t w e e k , r e s i d e n t s o f M a s t i c P o i n t i n A n d r o s t h e v e r y i s l a n d t h a t N e w P r o v i d e n c e r e l i e s o n f o r i t s s u p p l y c o m p l a i n e d t h a t t h e y h a d b e e n w i t h o u t w a t e r f o r s i x t o s e v e n w e e k s . O n e l o c a l s a i d t h e p r o b l e m i s a f f e c t i n g t o u r i s m a s g u e s t h o u s e s h a v e h a d t o t u r n a w a y b o a r d e r s i n t h e l e a d u p t o t h e J u n e 1 1 C r a b F e s t . H e c l a i m e d t h e w a t e r s u p p l y w a s m u c h m o r e c o n s i s t e n t i n t h e 1 9 6 0 s w h e n t h e c o m m u n i t y w a s s u p p l i e d b y a l a r g e t a n k p u m p e d b y a w i n d m i l l . I n N e w P r o v i d e n c e , t h e i m m e d i a t e c a u s e o f w a t e r s h o r t a g e s i s t h e f a i l u r e o f t h e A n d r o s b a r g i n g s y s t e m . S o m e t i m e s , o n e o f t h e b a r g e s s i m p l y b r e a k s d o w n . M o r e w o r r y i n g , t h o u g h , i s t h e r e c e n t t r e n d o f s t o r m s a n d r o u g h s e a s p r e v e n t i n g t h e b a r g e s f r o m m a k i n g t h e t r i p p a r t i c u l a r l y a s s c i e n t i s t s s a y t h e v i o l e n t w e a t h e r o f t h e l a s t t w o y e a r s i s p a r t o f a l o n g t e r m t r e n d . I t i s e x p e c t e d t h a t c l i m a t e c h a n g e w i l l l e a d t o m a j o r s t o r m s b e c o m i n g l e s s f r e q u e n t , b u t m o r e i n t e n s e , a n d c a u s e u n p r e d i c t a b l e w e a t h e r i n g e n e r a l . S m a l l i s l a n d d e v e l o p i n g n a t i o n s h a v e t h e m o s t t o l o s e f r o m c l i m a t e c h a n g e , b u t t h e l e a s t s a y i n t h e m a t t e r . W i t h t h e U n i t e d N a t i o n s I n t e r g o v e r n m e n t a l P a n e l o n C l i m a t e C h a n g e e s t i m a t i n g t h a t t h e b e h a v i o u r o f i n d u s t r i a l n a t i o n s o v e r t h e n e x t f e w d e c a d e s w i l l b e c r u c i a l t o t h e s t a b i l i t y o f w e a t h e r c o n d i t i o n s , h o w s e c u r e w i l l o u r b a r g i n g s y s t e m b e i n s a y . . . 2 0 y e a r s ? H O W W E G O T H E R E O n a n y s m a l l , p o r o u s i s l a n d , s u p p l y i n g t h e p o p u l a t i o n w i t h w a t e r w i l l a l w a y s b e a c h a l l e n g e . S t i l l , h o w w e a r r i v e d a t o u r c u r r e n t p r e d i c a m e n t i s a n a s t o n i s h i n g s t o r y o f f a l s e s t a r t s a n d f a i l e d v e n t u r e s . B e f o r e t h e 1 9 7 0 s , w e l l f i e l d s i n w e s t e r n N e w P r o v i d e n c e s u p p l i e d t h e i s l a n d w i t h w a t e r , m u c h o f w h i c h w a s d i s t i l l e d a t a s m a l l , i n e f f i c i e n t p l a n t a t C l i f t o n P i e r . W h e n i n 1 9 6 9 i t w a s a n n o u n c e d t h a t t h e f i r s t l a r g e d e s a l i n a t i o n p l a n t w a s t o b e e s t a b l i s h e d , T h e T r i b u n e ' s h e a d l i n e r e a d : " $ 4 . 5 m p l a n t s h o u l d e n d o u r w a t e r p r o b l e m s . " T h e g o v e r n m e n t c o n t r a c t e d B r i t i s h f i r m A q u a C h e m L t d t o c o n s t r u c t a f a c i l i t y c a p a b l e o f p r o d u c i n g 2 . 5 m i l l i o n g a l l o n s a d a y , t o i n c r e a s e N a s s a u ' s w a t e r s u p p l y b y 4 5 p e r c e n t . T h e n e w B a i l l o u H i l l s p l a n t w a s t o b e g i n p u m p i n g w a t e r f r o m o n s i t e b o r e h o l e s i n 1 9 7 1 . T h e W a t e r W o r k s D e p a r t m e n t a l s o e x p a n d e d i t s p u m p i n g a n d s t o r a g e f a c i l i t i e s i n a n e f f o r t t o m e e t d a i l y g r o w i n g d e m a n d . A c t i n g d i r e c t o r C a l v i n C o o p e r s a i d : " W e h a v e a p r o b l e m w i t h l e a k s ( d u e t o s a l t c o r r o s i o n o f p i p e s ) , a n d t h e r e i s a h i g h p e r c e n t a g e o f l o s s t h a t w e c a n o n l y p u t d o w n t o l e a k s . T h e r e i s a s u r v e y b e i n g c o n d u c t e d n o w t o d e t e r m i n e e x a c t l y w h e r e t h e s e l e a k s e x i s t a n d h o w t h e y c a n b e c u t d o w n . " I r o n i c w o r d s , a s w e s h a l l s e e . D E S A L I N A T I O N B y F e b r u a r y 1 9 7 1 , N a s s a u c o m m u n i t i e s w e r e e x p e r i e n c i n g s e v e r e w a t e r c u t s u p t o 1 0 h o u r s l o n g . M i n i s t r y o f W o r k s p e r m a n e n t s e c r e t a r y A K W r i g h t s a i d t h a t t h e d e m a n d f o r w a t e r i n N a s s a u w a s i n c r e a s i n g b y 1 5 t o 2 0 p e r c e n t a y e a r , a n d t w o m o r e d e s a l i n a t i o n p l a n t s m i g h t h a v e t o b e c o m m i s s i o n e d i n 1 9 7 5 . B u t M i n i s t e r o f W o r k s L i v i n g s t o n C o a k l e y s a i d t h a t w h e n B a i l l o u H i l l s c a m e o n s t r e a m , " i t w i l l n o l o n g e r b e n e c e s s a r y t o T H E G L O B A L W A T E R C R I S I S T H E G L O B A L W A T E R C R I S I S T H E G L O B A L W A T E R C R I S I S T H E G L O B A L W A T E R C R I S I S T H E G L O B A L W A T E R C R I S I S T H E G L O B A L W A T E R C R I S I S T H E G L O B A L W A T E R C R I S I S T H E G L O B A L W A T E R C R I S I S T H E G L O B A L W A T E R C R I S I S T H E G L O B A L W A T E R C R I S I SH O W W I L L T H E B A H A M A S F A R E ? A c o m b i n a t i o n o f b o t c h e d v e n t u r e s a n d b a d l u c k o v e r t h e y e a r s h a s l e f t u s w i t h a n e r r a t i c a n d u n s u s t a i n a b l e w a t e r s u p p l y s y s t e m a t a t i m e w h e n c o u n t r i e s a r o u n d t h e w o r l d a r e f i g h t i n g f o r t h e i r s h a r e o f t h i s d w i n d l i n g r e s o u r c e . T H E r e c e n t b o t t l e d w a t e r c o n t a m i n a t i o n s c a r e h a s r e v e a l e d a c o n s p i c u o u s l a c k o f r e g u l a t i o n i n t h i s v i t a l i n d u s t r y . B o t t l e d w a t e r i s t h e o n l y s o u r c e o f d r i n k i n g w a t e r i n t h e B a h a m a s , a n d w h a t r e t a i l e r s h a v e t o s a y a b o u t t h e p o p u l a t i o n ' s r i s k o f e x p o s u r e t o d i s e a s e c a u s i n g a g e n t s i s a l a r m i n g . O n M a y 1 8 , T h e T r i b u n e r e p o r t e d t h a t s e v e r a l i m p o s t o r b o t t l e s b e a r i n g A q u a p u r e l a b e l s h a d b e e n c o n f i s c a t e d f r o m a n i n d e p e n d e n t d e p o t a n d f o u n d t o h a v e o f f t h e c h a r t l e v e l s o f d i s e a s e c a u s i n g a n d p o t e n t i a l l y d e a d l y b a c t e r i a . T h e c o m p a n y s a i d i t w a s t i p p e d o f f a b o u t t h e f a k e p r o d u c t s b e i n g p a s s e d o f f a s d e m i n e r a l i s e d w a t e r a f t e r s u s p i c i o u s l o o k i n g r e d c a p p e d b o t t l e s w e r e s p o t t e d b y a n A q u a p u r e e m p l o y e e a t a n i n d e p e n d e n t d e p o t i n c e n t r a l N e w P r o v i d e n c e . A q u a p u r e m a d e i t c l e a r t h a t t h e r e i s a b s o l u t e l y n o t h i n g w r o n g w i t h i t s b o t t l e s o f d e i o n i s e d d r i n k i n g w a t e r , w h i c h a l s o b e a r r e d c a p s . T h e f i v e f a k e b o t t l e s w e r e s e i z e d b y p o l i c e , t e s t e d b y c o m p a n y l a b t e c h n i c i a n s a n d f o u n d t o b e h e a v i l y c o n t a m i n a t e d w i t h c o l i f o r m b a c t e r i a , i n d i c a t o r s o f d i s e a s e c a u s i n g o r g a n i s m s , a n d f e c a l b a c t e r i a . A q u a p u r e s p r e s i d e n t A l e x K n o w l e s s a i d : T h e p r o b l e m w e h a v e i s t o p o l i c e t h i s . I t i s k i n d o f d i f f i c u l t . H e c a l l e d f o r e n v i r o n m e n t a l h e a l t h o f f i c i a l s t o v i g o r o u s l y m o n i t o r s m a l l d e p o t s a n d c r a c k d o w n o n t h e p r o b l e m . H e a l s o d e m a n d e d g o v e r n m e n t l e g i s l a t i o n t o a l l o w f o r t h e p r o s e c u t i o n o f p e r s o n s f o u n d b o t t l i n g o r s e l l i n g i m p o s t o r w a t e r . C h a r l e n e S m i t h , A q u a p u r e s q u a l i t y c o n t r o l m a n a g e r , s a i d t h a t t h e b a c t e r i a f o u n d i n t h e i m p o s t o r w a t e r c a n b e f a t a l t o e l d e r l y o r w e a k p e o p l e , i n f a n t s o r a n y o n e w i t h a c o m p r o m i s e d i m m u n e s y s t e m . I f i n g e s t e d , t h e b a c t e r i a c o u l d i n d u c e v o m i t i n g , h e p a t i t i s , d i a r r h o e a a n d i n t e s t i n a l i n f e c t i o n s . S o f a r , t h e r e h a v e b e e n n o r e p o r t s o f c o n s u m e r s i n g e s t i n g c o n t a m i n a t e d w a t e r . I n t h e w a k e o f t h e d i s c o v e r y , c a l l s h a v e b e e n r e n e w e d f o r a n i n d e p e n d e n t r e g u l a t o r y b o a r d t o p o l i c e l o c a l w a t e r c o m p a n i e s a n d c r a c k d o w n o n b o o t l e g g e r s . W h i l e s t r e s s i n g t h a t t h e r e i s n o n e e d f o r p a n i c , a s p o k e s p e r s o n f o r a n o t h e r l e a d i n g w a t e r c o m p a n y s a i d m o r e s t r i n g e n t r e g u l a t o r y c o n t r o l s a r e n e e d e d . F i r s t o f a l l , I t h i n k t h a t t h e w a t e r i n d u s t r y a s a w h o l e n e e d s t o b e m o r e r e g u l a t e d , n o d o u b t a b o u t i t . . . w e h a v e a l l t o u n d e r s t a n d t h a t w e a r e d e a l i n g w i t h a v e r y i m p o r t a n t p r o d u c t . T h e r e a r e n o s h o r t c u t s i n t h i s b u s i n e s s , s a i d T i n a K n o w l e s , o w n e r o f C h e l s e a s C h o i c e . S h e m a d e t h e s t a r t l i n g r e v e l a t i o n t h a t w a t e r w h i c h d o e s n t m e e t i n d u s t r y s t a n D R I N K I N GW A T E RS E E p a g e t h r e e S E E p a g e t w o

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"If I go to them and tell t hem that I have responsibilities for rent, light, water they write it down and ask how much and make their judgment from what is left over. Show up and lie. It's awkward a nd silly because in the end a w oman would end up losing, but sometimes court is the only recourse a woman has," s aid Cleaver Duncombe, advocate for children’s rights. Mr Duncombe has a bit of a conspiracy theory as to why child support is so minimal. " Many of the men who are i n positions of power, who m ake and enforce the laws, are serial sweethearters. The last thing they want is to paya bunch of money to a bunch of children. They want tom ake it as minimal as possib le," he said. At the end of the day all many women want is a civil relationship with the father so that they can adequatelyt ake care of their child. "I know it's not nice or proper to say, and it may change, but today I can honestly say I hate my ex-hus-b and,”said Simone. “If I said anything else I would be lying. I'm praying about it mind you, but I really hatet he man. But me and him don’t speak about anything e lse in the world other than our child. That's it. What else do we need to talk about? Ifh e calls there are four things he says. 'How you doing? C an I speak to (Johnny When can I pick (Johnny up? You got the moneyr ight?' "He don’t even really need t o ask how I doing and I don’t care how he's doing. I don’t care who he's seeing and hes ure as hell don’t need to waste no time about who I'm seeing. The only point where our lives intersect is from the point where the top of ourb oy’s head begins and it ends at the tip of his toes. One good thing I can say he lovesa nd takes care of his son." Simone's earlier chastisem ent of me is correct. Women do have children with men. It's a partnership that requires two mature adultsw orking in the best interest of a child. Women do not p rovide a service for men when they bear their children. Men cannot say, "Madame Ia m unhappy with the results of your work. Consequently I have made the decision nott o pay for your inadequate services." (If that were possib le lord only knows what conversation my parents would have had 27 years ago). C ertainly these amounts, $33 a child a week, $40 a child a week, $80 a child a week, are simply tokens. It is at best disheartening and at worsti nsulting if they are seen as anything more. W hile the money is not supposed to take care of the mother and no reasonable person believes that an individual, pint sized or not, canl ive on $33 a week, these amounts seem to satisfy the o nly obligation the state requires of a man who does not live with or is married tot he mother of his children maintenance. Ideally a man should be e motionally present for his child, supportive in all ways p ossible, nurturing and example setting, but, as harsh as it may sound, there is no oblig-a tion, other than a moral one, for him to do any of this. S hame only goes so far, and a judicial system, even one that is different and does what it iss upposed to do, cannot force men to be better fathers. Her M ajesty's Prison is filled to capacity with men who rather brave its horrors than dow hat is required of them. Simone is a very good friend of mine and we've had many heated discussions over the years and if God is kindw e shall continue to have them well into the future. I suggested to her during ourc onversation last week that if I were to agree (and I do t hat women and men have children with each another then the failure of child sup-p ort reaching those it is intended to support, the children, is a failure on the part of two persons and not the courts. "Lousy men and thew omen who chose them," was the way I believe it was p ut. "Or lying men and the women who believe them,"s he retorted. "Things wouldn’t be so bad if men didn’t f eel like their manhood was a liquid that came out of their (bodies T ouch! Admittedly I had always b een confounded by men who would boastfully tell me that they had three, four, fivec hildren with different women. I used to wonder how they took care of them. Well the answer is that the majority of them don't. Ift here were some law that limited a man to the number of children based on his abilityt o take care of them, we would lose a large segment o f our population. We were damaged at some point and made to believe, asS imone said, that our manhood is connected to our virility. The question now is, are we ready, court order or no court order, to do what isr ight by our women and our children? C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 2C, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE F ROM page one Battle for child support payments M M a a n n y y o o f f t t h h e e m m e e n n w w h h o o a a r r e e i i n n p p o o s s i i t t i i o o n n s s o o f f p p o o w w e e r r , , w w h h o o m m a a k k e e a a n n d d e e n n f f o o r r c c e e t t h h e e l l a a w w s s , , a a r r e e s s e e r r i i a a l l s s w w e e e e t t h h e e a a r r t t e e r r s s . . T T h h e e l l a a s s t t t t h h i i n n g g t t h h e e y y w w a a n n t t i i s s t t o o p p a a y y a a b b u u n n c c h h o o f f m m o o n n e e y y t t o o a a b b u u n n c c h h o o f f c c h h i i l l d d r r e e n n . . T T h h e e y y w w a a n n t t t t o o m m a a k k e e i i t t a a s s m m i i n n i i m m a a l l a a s s p p o o s s s s i i b b l l e e . . Cleaver Duncombe, advocate for children’s rights Shar e your news T he Tribune wants to hear from people who arem aking news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 a nd share your story.

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Dear Mr. Nunez, I read your article with great interest. About 10 years ago, Mr. M oss (who was in charge of Water & Sewerage at the time)spoke at our Rotary meeting about the positioningof the Water & Sewerage to m eet future demands.Of the plans presented none seem to address growth and future capacity of our water supply system. I raised a question to Mr. Moss about building a reser-v oir to hold the millions of gallons of water that is s hipped from Andros. My question went into the depth of dumping the water intow hat I called a swamp, for most of the shipment to ming le with the ground water and eventually leached back into the sea.Not realising that spe-c ial interests do not care if the water is wasted, I pursued my q uestions.I also went on to include that a reservoir would provide a catch basin for anyr ainfall that would occur. The ultimate answer to my question was "that it doesn't rain enough in Nassau, so building a reservoir was notc ost effective."A man from Australia replied to this that it rains rarely in Australia, butw hen it does they catch every drop they can. B ecause of time value of money it would have been less e xpensive to build 10 yearsago than now.This to me is like "Global Warming",t he longer we wait the greater the problem and expense. J ust like our energy conservation problems, water conservation is clouded withs pecial interests that is not in the best interests of the "Bahamian People." John Sandford M r. Nunez , I have read your report on the “Global Water Crisis” in t oday's newspaper (TribuneJune 8). It is rather ironic that you chose to write on this top i c because just recently a report was submitted to the M inisters of Environment (April 2009 Minister (May 2009 i ng the problems at the Water and Sewerage Corporation (WSC fathom that successive gov ernments have failed to e nforce the Water and Sewerage Act which gives the WSC the right to exclusivity as to the usage of our precious ground water resources. Given the 70 per cent of the population of New Providence that is using ground water, it is inevitable of a crisis looming. Neverthless, the “story behind the story” is the fact that the WSC as presently constituted is unable to even sustain its present customers. This is because of two reasons: 1) lack of proper funding; 2)poor management decisions. Thereport identifies these two reasons and takes an in depth look at the latter. I trust that you will write a followup report to today's article using the report provided. This report has already been submitted to the executives of the organisation and government, as previously mentioned, therein it is time the general public knows exactly what is going on at an organisation being heavily subsidisedwith their money. DF . GoodINSIGHT article; and especially timely. For your guidance I sent the attached (admittedly lengthy) letter to The Guardian last month. It was not published. You cite "the first de-salinization plant in 1969." Our ineptde-saliniztion planning goes back further than that if I recall correctly. About 1960 wewere led to believe our problems would be solved when the Weir Company in Scotland built a stainless steel RO plant near Baillou Hills. I suspect we knew little of stainless steels then because common so-called 304 stainless cannot tolerate chlorides. The austentitic (nickle bearing stainless steels can withstand salt water. Anyhow our Weir units within a couple years apparently looked like fine Irish lace; and were quietly scrapped. We never transported Andros water efficiently, butw e could have. Instead I believe we have prematurely "Bet the farm" on the success of reverse osmosis, andwith higher oil prices coming againf ast, and expected to continue for a lengthy period we mayregret our haste. Bill Bardelmeier The following is the letter referred to by MrB ardelmeier: L ike much of the world's population, we face a long term struggle to supply watera t the places where people need it. We are in this respect p erhaps no better nor worse than some highly developed economies such as that of Cal-i fornia. We must accept however that it will require a cont inuous effort and careful planning to stay on top of our water supply problem. B ahamas Water & Sewer Corporation today produces something close to 11 million imperial gallons per day of potable water. New Provi-d ence demand for water would probably be closer to 13 million imp. gallons per dayi f not constrained. With all sectors (meaning Reverse O smosis and Tankering functioning) Water & Sewer Corp. s eem to believe that supply and demand are in reasonable balance except during emer-g ency periods such as that which is causing their public n ewspaper notices this week concerning the urgent need to conserve water now. W e were advised long ago that New Providence is not capable of supplying more ground water without serious damage to our lens structuresa nd without grossly exceeding world health standards for chlorides. A ndros has a sizeable quantity of water. For the past couple decades we pumpedr oughly five million gallons per day from shallow well f ields at the northern end of the island; shipping it in tankers to Arawak Cay onN assau Harbour. This trans port system has been criticised by some (in fact by many very wasteful, costly system. Tankering water has beena bhorrent to some Bahamian politicians and laymen, but it has a potential that we should appreciate. Although the result was wasteful and costly, the water transport concept was never well executed. Locally the transport of Andros water to New Providence was for many years termed “barging” water. In the very earliest days Andros water was indeed transported in barges towed by small (often under-powered) tugs. A pair of (very) used barges were purchased on the U.S. Gulf coast and later a completely new simple barge was constructed in Tampa. (Lacking modern protective coatings it soon wasted away). However, Bahamas Water & Sewerage Corp. at that time had very little background knowledge of the substantial difference between using towed barges versus use of self propelled ships. Barges with their shallower draft do tend to be favoured where only shallow ports are available. It is quite commonplace for towed barge systems to cease achieving normal sea speed whenever the wind reaches about 20 knots velocity. In those situations the tug and towed barge that are caught a t sea make headway only at v ery slow (or even zero speed. Even more troubles ome is the fact that once in safe harbour with high winds prevalent, the tug and bargeu nit normally sits in port awaiting weather abatement. W ater transport cost is almost linear with speed, so the idle T &B combination incurs unac-c eptable costs. The conventional ship-conf igured tankship can continue making fair forward progress in rough seas up to the pointw here it may no longer be safely assured of entering a narrow harbour channel amidst breaking seas. Water & Sewer executives g ained insight into this difference in operating efficiency between tugs/barges on theo ne hand and tankships on the other and soon shifted their p rocurement plans to encompass the ship's advantages. Unfortunately the graphic r epresentation of transport cost by a range of ship sizes has a very steep slope wherec ost per ton carried decreases rapidly as ship size increases. (This being the heart of the reason world crude oil trades shifted from a maximum7 0,000 ton ships to 326,000 ton oil tankers in a brief span of years in the 1960's/70's). Whereas initial hopes of accommodating large (by ourl ocal standards) ships on the Andros route, these hopes were dashed when the dredg-i ng contractor engaged to enlarge and deepen the form er Owens Illinois pulpwood loading berth/ channel at Morgan's Bluff at the extremen orthern tip of Andros, encountered much more difficult dredging of harder than expected rock. My recollection is that there was extremed elay getting a channel creat ed and with costs overrunning substantially a smaller, shall ower water loading harbour was agreed. A situation that has cost a pretty penny for many subsequent years up to the present. The approach channel, turning basin and berthing face at Morgan's Bluff are defined in four areas describing a series of dredged depths ranging from 25 feet in the “A”, or deepest, zone down to a bare 17 feet in the “D” zone. By squeezing all the inefficiency out of this lesser harbour it became possible to load water tankers to 19 feet draft. However a very troublesome further problem leapt into the forefront. The turning basin was so restricted in size that an absolute maximum ship length of about 410 feet was mandated. Now it is a fact that you can't have a very large cargo capacity in a ship only 410 feet long and loaded down to only 19 feet draft. By chartering an old North Slope heavily built 11,000 ton barge after it had been fitted with a vaguely ship-like blunt bow and installing several very costly, tempermental Swedish engines W & S Corp. gained the use of a 14,000 ton ship C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 3C WIN A BARBECUEJust ll out an entry form when you come for your tote bag!Purchase either Heinz Ketchup or Heinz BBQ Saucewith any other Heinz product, get your tote bag and enter to win the Barbecue!Bahamas store receipt must be presented to claim tote bag and enter to win the Barbecue. Bring receipts to PRITCHARD’s on Robinson Rd. A D W O R K S 2 0 0 9 INSIGHT FEEDBACK INSIGHT C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune INSIGHT M ONDAY, JUNE 8, 2009The stories behind the news nB y PACO NUNEZ T ribune News Editor EXPERTS believe w ater is now the most i mportant resource on earth, s urpassing even oil in terms of growing scarcity and anticipated lack of supply in then ear future. T he ability of populations to g uarantee the supply of potable water necessary to sustain agriculture and industry –n ot to mention day-to-day surv ival – is becoming increasingl y uncertain. One out of six people have insufficient access to water andh alf the people on earth suffer f rom diseases associated with p oor quality drinking water or sub-standard sanitation. Climate change, population g rowth and rising living stand ards will only make matters w orse. China and India, both home to rapidly growing popula-t ions, are already feeling the e ffects, as water is having to b e diverted from agricultural projects to cities and soil is becoming more saline, dam-a ging farming yields. I n the Middle East, compet ition for water is creating political tensions. This has leds ome experts to claim that w ater – not oil or religious fund amentalism – will be the cause of the next world war. So, how does the Bahamas r ate in terms of water security? D EPENDENCE ON G ROUND WATER Only three per cent of the w ater on earth is fresh and a lmost all of this is frozen in g laciers and polar ice caps. The vast majority of what remains is groundwater, stored in thep ore space of soil and rocks, or i n aquifers below the water t able. Groundwater is the primary source of potable watera round the world. The probl em is that this water is repleni shed very slowly once removed, meaning that supply is easy to exhaust or contami-n ate with salt water through o verpumping – which is exactl y the dilemma facing many c ountries, including the Bahamas. Lester R Brown writes: " Scores of countries are overp umping aquifers as they s truggle to satisfy their growing water needs. The drilling of millions of irrigation wells hasp ushed water withdrawals b eyond recharge rates, in e ffect leading to groundwater mining. The failure of governments to limit pumping to thes ustainable yield of aquifers m eans that water tables are n ow falling in countries that contain more than half the world’s people, including theb ig three grain producers C hina, India, and the United S tates." While the Bahamas has yet to suffer any fallout from over-p umping, there is no question t hat groundwater from A ndros, upon which New Providence relies, will one day become contaminated with saltw ater, or simply run out. F ollowing a nine-year study b y Wright State University on the water resources in Andros, Angela L Adams wrote in2 001 that: "Because of over p umping the trench wells, the t hickness of the freshwater lens has thinned under the well fields." " The production of large quantities of water for export raises concern for the long-t erm sustainability of the r esource," she said. J ust this year, the InterA merican Development Bank noted that recommendations from a 2003 study on ground-w ater management and pollut ion control for the Bahamas h ave never been implemented, despite the nation's scarce water resources facing" increasing stress." " There is a pressing need for r egulating and protecting the ground water resources of the Bahamas. Ignoring over-e xploitation and protection w ill have severe repercussions, s uch as health issues from waterborne diseases and much greater water costs," an IDBr eport said. T HE EXISTING SUPPLY S YSTEM At the moment, New Provid ence relies on a combination of inefficient desalination methods, expensive reverseo smosis facilities and a highly u nreliable system of barging w ater from Andros. Despite 40 years of effort and a considerable amount ofm oney, consumers on the i sland are no closer to a relia ble water supply than they were before independence. As the population has grown, thep roblem has only become w orse. S ome Family Islands, for example Abaco and Eleuthera, rely on smallr everse osmosis plants; others d raw fresh water from underg round resources. But the system is so haphazard and poorly maintained that last week,r esidents of Mastic Point in A ndros – the very island that N ew Providence relies on for its supply – complained that they had been without waterf or six to seven weeks. O ne local said the problem i s affecting tourism as guest houses have had to turn away boarders in the lead up to theJ une 11 Crab Fest. H e claimed the water supp ly was much more consistent in the 1960s when the community was supplied by a larget ank pumped by a wind mill. I n New Providence, the i mmediate cause of water shortages is the failure of the A ndros barging system. S ometimes, one of the b arges simply breaks down. More worrying, though, is the recent trend of storms andr ough seas preventing the b arges from making the trip p articularly as scientists say the violent weather of the last two years is part of a long termt rend. I t is expected that climate c hange will lead to major storms becoming less frequent, but more intense, and causeu npredictable weather in gene ral. S mall island developing nations have the most to lose from climate change, but thel east say in the matter. With t he United Nations Intergove rnmental Panel on Climate Change estimating that the behaviour of industrial nationso ver the next few decades will b e crucial to the stability of w eather conditions, how secure will our barging system be in say... 20 years? HOW WE GOT HERE O n any small, porous island, s upplying the population with w ater will always be a chall enge. Still, how we arrived at o ur current predicament is an astonishing story of false starts and failed ventures. Before the 1970s, well fields i n western New Providence s upplied the island with water, much of which was distilled at a small, inefficient plant at Clifton Pier. W hen in 1969 it was a nnounced that the first large d esalination plant was to be e stablished, T he Tribune's headline read: "$4.5m plant should end our water prob-l ems." T he government contracted B ritish firm Aqua Chem Ltd to construct a facility capable of producing 2.5 million gal-l ons a day, to increase Nass au's water supply by 45 per c ent. The new Baillou Hills plant was to begin pumping water from on-site bore holesi n 1971. The Water Works Departm ent also expanded its pumpi ng and storage facilities in an e ffort to meet daily growing demand. Acting director C alvin Cooper said: "We have a problem with leaks (due to salt corrosion of pipes), and there is a high percentage ofl oss that we can only put down t o leaks. There is a survey b eing conducted now to determine exactly where these leaks exist and how they can be cut down." Ironic words, as wes hall see. D ESALINATION By February 1971, Nassau communities were experienc-i ng severe water cuts up to 10 h ours long. Ministry of Works p ermanent secretary A K Wright said that the demand for water in Nassau wasi ncreasing by 15 to 20 per cent a year, and two more desalin ation plants might have to be commissioned in 1975. But Minister of Works LivingstonC oakley said that when Baill ou Hills came on stream, "it w ill no longer be necessary to T HEGLOBAL W ATER CRISIS THEGLOBAL WATER CRISIS THEGLOBAL WATER CRISIS T HEGLOBAL W ATER CRISIS THEGLOBAL WATER CRISIS THEGLOBAL WATER CRISIS THEGLOBAL WATER CRISIS T HEGLOBAL W ATER CRISIS THEGLOBAL WATER CRISIS T HEGLOBAL W ATER CRISISHOW WILL THE BAHAMAS FARE? A combination of botched ventures and bad luck over the years has left us with an erratic and unsustainable water supply system – at a time when countries around the world are fighting for their share of this dwindling resource. THE recent bottled water contamination scare has revealed a conspicuous lacko f regulation in this vital i ndustry. Bottled water is the only source of drinking water in the Bahamas, and what retailers have to say about the population's risk of exposure to disease causing agents is alarming. O n May 18, The Tribune r eported that several impostor bottles bearing Aquapure labels had been confiscated from an independent depot and found to have off-the-chart levels of disease-causing and potentially deadly bacteria. T he company said it was t ipped off about the fake products – being passed off as demineralised water – after suspicious looking redcapped bottles were spotted by an Aquapure employee at an independent depot in central New Prov-i dence. A quapure made it clear that there is absolutely nothing wrong with its bottles of de-ionised drinking water, which also bear red caps. The five fake bottles were seized by police, tested byc ompany lab technicians a nd found to be “heavily contaminated” with coliform bacteria, indicators of disease-causing organisms, and fecal bacteria. Aquapure’s president Alex Knowles said: “The problem we have is to policet his. It is kind of difficult.” H e called for environmental health officials to vigorously monitor small depots and crack down on the problem. He also demanded government legislation to allow for the prosecution of persons found bottling or sellingi mpostor water. C harlene Smith, Aquapure’s quality control manager, said that the bacteria found in the impostor water can be fatal to elderly or weak people, infants or anyone with a compromised immune system. I f ingested, the bacteria could induce vomiting, hepatitis, diarrhoea and intestinal infections. So far, there have been no reports of consumers ingesting contaminated water. I n the wake of the disc overy, calls have been renewed for an independent regulatory board to policel ocal water companies and c rack down on bootleggers. While stressing that there is no need for panic, a spokesperson for anotherl eading water company said m ore stringent regulatory controls are needed. “First of all, I think that t he water industry as a w hole needs to be more regulated, no doubt about it . . . we have all to understand that we are dealing with av ery important product. T here are no short cuts in this business,” said Tina Knowles, owner ofC helsea’s Choice. S he made the startling revelation that water which doesn’t meet industry stanDRINKINGW ATER SEE page three SEE page two SEE page 5C

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with a history of poor reliab ility and frequent maintenance. This vessel has served many years but its speed is about that of a barge because of its broad beam (Normally such width as one would e ncounter in a 75,000 ton t anker. Which would require 42 feet draft) For about a decade W & S C orp. concurrently chartered a second small, elderly, ExCanadian tankship of about 7000 tons capacity. It's modest sea speed of near 12 knotsw as about double that of the l arger converted broad beam tankship. Thus the two vastly differently configured ships could haul about the same quantity (tons month on the short trip fromA ndros to Arawak Cay. With reverse osmosis syst ems of greater size and effic iency appearing around the world the executive decision w as apparently made to go with the RO approach for the future. T he water transport system has been cut back to a s ingle ship and it was hoped that even that could be abandoned soon. The question today that one must ask is: Have we bet the farm too early before proven success of RO systems?” Bear in mind that we have had failure of several earliera ttempts to use large scale RO process to obtain potable water. Now one suddenly is seeing adverts and hearing rumours that indicate the RO system may have costa nd reliability problems too. Before the large worldwide fuel price increases of recent years the actual transport cost by ship is estimatedt o have been in the near neighbourhood of $4.00 per thousand Imperial gallons. (An Imperial gallons is 20 per cent larger than a U.S.g allon and 1000 I gallons is equal to 4.47 long tons of 2240 pounds). There have been further verbal indications that thes hipment of Andros water m ay have stressed some of t he Andros well fields. Only the Water & Sewerage Corp w ould have data on this. Quite some years earlier the World Bank examinedB ahamas wellfield potential and indicated among other f indings that substantial surface water was present further south on Andros andn ear a natural deeper water harbour site near Big Wood Cay. Such a site would add af ew hours to each round voyage to Nassau, but it would r emove the loading site from the very serious funneling of occasional destructiveA tlantic swells channeled through Hole In The Wall P assage and focusing on Morgans Bluff. The phenomenon in a matter of a few hours on a calm August day destroyed the first $2 million dock that Owens Illinois had built at MorgansB luff. The phenomena have occurred at least twice again since Owens Illinois gave up the pulpwood business. Despite the history ofd estructive ocean swells W & S Corp. have clung to Morgan's Bluff for a loading site. Unless we are assured of t he reliability and the overall costs of the newer RO systems one is inclined to feel that some very modern ship capa-b ility to move water must r emain available for at least a few more years. The dire message appeari ng in local adverts the past week indicate that the Eastern District is going to haves ome very serious water problems for the near term a t least. Can we feel confident it won't also apply to a longer term? U nlike the 1970's we now have a growing cadre of skilled Bahamian shipboardo fficers, thanks to the Bahamas Maritime Authorit iy's scholarships and those of our foreign Bahamian Shipowners Association. Ina ddition small 15,000 to 20,000 ton tankers can now b e built with long life corrosion resistance and with a need for greatly reducedc rew numbers. Local capital has shown the financial strength to easily fund a pair of modern small tankers that could substantially out-perform the old “crocks” we have had to use in the past.F or many years all ships and tugs used by Water & Sewer Corp. consumed a very high grade of marine fuel. This morning's Houston price fort his quality of marine fuel is $480 per ton. (Last summer it reached $1600 per ton).M odern small tankships typically are fitted to burn a h eavier, grade of marine fuel (known as IFO 180 this morning costs $349.50p er ton. The reduction in fuel cost per year could be very substantial using new efficient tankships. Our situation deserves c lose monitoring for the next couple of years especially. We cannot have a tourism economy if we don't have ample fresh water available.W e shouldn't “bet the farm” on any one system in haste. Wm E Bardelmeier, Nassau, May 10, 2009 C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 5C Email: 2 0 0 9 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e t It’sElectric! THE COLLEGE OFTHE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bsSidney Poitier International Conference and Film Festival Nassau, The Bahamas, February 23-27, 2010CALL FOR PAPERS Deadline for Submissions: July 31, 2009The College of the Bahamas presents the Sidney Poitier International Conference and Film Festival. We invite critics, historians, filmmakers, artists and cultural practitioners from around theworld to examine the artistic and social endeavours of acclaimed actor, director, author, and diplomat Sir Sidney Poitier, who turns 83 on February 20, 2010. We invite papers or panel presentations that explore the broad spectrum of critical issues summoned up by Poitier’s work as actor, director, and author. Presentations should be 20 minutes in length. Papers will be considered for publication in an upcoming scholarly text dedicated toPoitier’s work. Possible Panel and Paper Topics Include (but are not limited to Caribbean Sense and Sensibilities in American Cinema Constructions of Blackness in Poitier’s Films Representations of Women in Poitier’s Films The Iconic Black Male in America Black Skin, White Masks Poitier and the White/Black Gaze Poitier and the Global Politics of Race and Liberation Poitier, Bahamian Politics and Identity Sexing the Asexual Black Christs and the White Conscience Desire, Sexuality and Transgression Poitier and Censorship Poitier in the Classroom The Actor as Activist Poitier and Film Theory Poitier and the Black Power Movement Poitier and the Digital Age Autobiography and Refashioning Poitier as Director Poitier as Writer Please send abstracts via email to: istrachan@cob.edu.bs. Abstracts should be submitted by July 31, 2009 ,and should be no longer than 250 words . For more information on the conference please go to:http://poitierconference.synthasite.com/ . For any questions feel free to contact Ian Strachan at istrachan@cob.edu.bs ,orMarjorie Brooks-Jones at mjones@cob.edu.bs or call the School of English Studies at (242 F ROM page 3C INSIGHTFEEDBACK

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 75F/24C Low: 77F/25C Low: 76F/24C Low: 78F/26C Low: 77 F/25 C Low: 79F/26C Low: 79 F/26 C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 95F/35C High: 92F/33C High: 90 F/32 C High: 88 F/31 C High: 89F/32C High: 88 F/31C High: 90F/32C Low: 79F/26C High: 90F/32C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 90F/32C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 72F/22C High: 88 F/31 C Low: 75F/24C High: 87 F/31 Low: 72F/22C High: 85F/29C Low: 74 F/23C High: 88F/31C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 90F/32C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 89F/32C Low: 74 F/23 C High: 86F/30C Low: 77F/25C High: 90 F/32 C Low: 80F/27C High: 93F/34C High: 89 F/32 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JUNE 15 TH , 2009, PAGE 7C THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Mostly sunny; isolated t-shower. Clear.Sunshine.Plenty of sunshine. Mostly sunny. High: 90 Low: 79 High: 89 High: 90 High: 88 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Mostly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 89 Low: 79 Low: 79 Low: 78 AccuWeather RealFeel 111F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 89F 109-86F 115-88F 108-85F 104-88F Low: 79 TODAYTONIGHTTUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................91F/33C Low ....................................................81F/27C Normal high ......................................87F/31C Normal low ........................................74F/23C Last year's high .................................. 89 F/32C Last year's low .................................. 72 F/22C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ................................................13.10" Normal year to date ....................................14.88" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Last New First Full Jun. 15 Jun. 22Jun. 29Jul. 7 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:20 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 8:01 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 12:42 a.m. Moonset . . . . 12:59 p.m. Today Tuesday Wednesday Thursday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 1:17 a.m.2.37:30 a.m.0.3 1:48 p.m.2.58:05 p.m.0.5 2:07 a.m.2.28:17 a.m.0.3 2:40 p.m.2.69:05 p.m.0.5 3:02 a.m.2.29:07 a.m.0.2 3:36 p.m.2.710:06 p.m.0.4 4:01 a.m.2.210:01 a.m.0.1 4:34 p.m.2.911:07 p.m.0.3 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco88/3178/25t88/3178/25pc Amsterdam69/2053/11c66/1851/10pc Ankara, Turkey75/2344/6s78/2551/10c Athens86/3070/21s88/3173/22s Auckland56/1348/8sh53/1146/7sh Bangkok91/3279/26t90/3278/25t Barbados86/3076/24sh86/3077/25sh Barcelona80/2666/18s78/2565/18pc Beijing90/3266/18pc73/2263/17t Beirut79/2673/22s75/2370/21s Belgrade90/3270/21pc97/3667/19s Berlin76/2458/14pc61/1648/8r Bermuda78/2570/21pc78/2570/21sh Bogota66/1848/8r66/1847/8t Brussels66/1855/12sh70/2151/10r Budapest78/2565/18c91/3258/14c Buenos Aires57/1345/7pc60/1545/7s Cairo96/3570/21s96/3570/21s Calcutta100/3784/28pc107/4184/28s Calgary76/2455/12t76/2451/10s Cancun91/3278/25t87/3076/24r Caracas81/2772/22pc81/2772/22pc Casablanca91/3265/18t78/2567/19pc Copenhagen68/2053/11s66/1851/10pc Dublin64/1746/7r66/1850/10pc Frankfurt72/2262/16r73/2255/12r Geneva 77/25 61/16 t 74/2359/15pc Halifax 58/14 40/4 c 62/16 44/6 s Havana 87/30 75/23 r 89/31 71/21 sh Helsinki 52/11 43/6sh55/1245/7pc Hong Kong 84/28 79/26 t 82/27 79/26t Islamabad 106/41 73/22 pc 104/40 73/22 t Istanbul83/2862/16s80/2665/18s Jerusalem 82/27 59/15s79/2659/15s Johannesburg 65/1846/7pc61/1646/7pc Kingston 88/3178/25sh87/3078/25sh Lima70/2157/13pc69/2057/13pc London72/2255/12r75/2355/12pc Madrid88/3166/18pc84/2864/17t Manila86/3077/25r84/2878/25t Mexico City79/2652/11pc77/2555/12t Monterrey104/4074/23s107/4175/23s Montreal68/2055/12t75/2355/12pc Moscow70/2151/10c69/2054/12s Munich77/2559/15sh72/2243/6pc Nairobi80/2656/13sh79/2659/15t New Delhi 109/4288/31pc108/4284/28s Oslo64/1741/5pc61/1645/7pc Paris68/2054/12r76/2454/12s Prague 75/23 62/16 r 76/24 48/8 sh Rio de Janeiro72/2264/17pc77/2567/19pc Riyadh102/3881/27s101/3883/28pc Rome 84/28 62/16 s 84/28 61/16 s St. Thomas86/3078/25sh86/3078/25sh San Juan59/1532/0pc66/1838/3pc San Salvador 83/28 73/22 t 84/28 73/22 t Santiago 57/1339/3r57/1348/8pc Santo Domingo85/2973/22sh84/2873/22t Sao Paulo 67/19 54/12 c 70/21 54/12r Seoul75/2357/13pc77/2561/16pc Stockholm 57/13 43/6 pc 63/17 46/7 pc Sydney 61/16 52/11 pc59/1554/12sh Taipei83/2877/25r82/2777/25r T okyo 73/22 64/17 t 73/22 64/17 pc T oronto 71/2159/15pc76/2460/15s Trinidad87/3064/17pc81/2758/14sh V ancouver 72/22 56/13 pc 68/2057/13pc Vienna 78/2571/21c77/2553/11sh W arsaw 74/23 55/12 pc 65/18 49/9 r Winnipeg 81/27 58/14 s 78/2557/13s H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayTuesday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles82F Tuesday:S at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles82F Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Tuesday:S at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Tuesday:S at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque88/3161/16s91/3263/17s Anchorage68/2053/11s68/2053/11sh Atlanta90/3271/21t87/3072/22pc Atlantic City75/2358/14t71/2156/13pc Baltimore77/2559/15c76/2460/15pc Boston64/1753/11c62/1650/10s Buffalo74/2356/13pc76/2460/15pc Charleston, SC91/3274/23t87/3067/19t Chicago78/2555/12pc77/2558/14t Cleveland77/2556/13pc79/2661/16pc Dallas97/3676/24s99/3777/25s Denver77/2552/11t84/2855/12t Detroit79/2657/13pc79/2659/15pc Honolulu87/3075/23pc88/3175/23pc Houston96/3577/25s96/3577/25s HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayTuesday TodayTuesdayTodayTuesday Indianapolis80/2662/16pc79/2664/17t Jacksonville93/3373/22t96/3573/22pc Kansas City80/2668/20t85/2969/20t Las Vegas93/3369/20s94/3474/23pc Little Rock95/3573/22pc97/3673/22s Los Angeles71/2161/16r74/2361/16t Louisville80/2667/19t83/2867/19t Memphis95/3575/23t94/3475/23s Miami89/3177/25t89/3178/25t Minneapolis79/2660/15pc74/2360/15t Nashville87/3068/20t86/3070/21t New Orleans95/3577/25s95/3575/23s New York75/2358/14t69/2058/14pc Oklahoma City97/3673/22pc99/3772/22pc Orlando95/3575/23t95/3574/23t Philadelphia78/2559/15t75/2359/15pc Phoenix 97/36 75/23 pc 99/3777/25s Pittsburgh80/2657/13pc80/2660/15pc Portland, OR 78/2557/13pc74/2357/13pc Raleigh-Durham 84/28 65/18 t 79/26 64/17 r St. Louis81/2769/20r82/2771/21t Salt Lake City 75/23 57/13 c 80/2658/14pc San Antonio 95/35 76/24 s 97/36 75/23 s San Diego71/2165/18r72/2265/18c San Francisco 71/21 56/13 c 70/2156/13pc Seattle74/2354/12pc73/2256/13pc T allahassee 97/3673/22t99/3774/23s T ampa 92/33 77/25 t 92/33 77/25t Tucson94/3466/18s96/3568/20s W ashington, DC 79/26 64/17c76/2460/15pc UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com


{T)

Mim blowin’ it

90F
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MOSTLY SUNNY,

HIGH
LOW

FSHOWER

Volume: 105 No.165



The battle

for child
support
ers M ai RS

SS

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

=a LST:

MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009







PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)



heroine grancma

Grandchildren saved but husband dies in horror blaze

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A HEARTBROKEN grand-
mother told last night how she
rescued her three grandchildren
from a burning house - but
failed to reach her 77-year-old
husband.

Fighting back the tears,
Emerald Cooper, 72, said the
fire started in a bedroom at
their home in Brice Lane, off
Mackey Street, before 6pm on
Saturday.

She was resting in the living
room when her six-year-old
grandson told her his mattress
was on fire, and she ordered
him to take his five-year-old
brother and seven-month-old
baby sister away from the
house.

Mrs Cooper then rushed to
the bedroom where her hus-
band Leon Cooper lay sleep-
ing.

Mr Cooper had been unable
to walk since he suffered a
stroke nine years ago, and Mrs
Cooper tried to drag him to
safety, but he resisted.

She said: “He was saying,
“Throw some water on it,’ and I
said, ‘I can’t, it’s a heavy fire’.

“But he said he ain’t going, so
I dragged him out the bed.
Then when we reached the door
of the room by the fire, he held
on.”

As the smoke became thick-

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EMERALD COOPER looks at
the only picture saved from
the house.

er, Mrs Cooper said she had to
get out of the building to save
her own life, although her hus-
band of 53 years would not let

SEE page two

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Ie i

F
iu

-

-Felipé Major/Tribune

a

ils REMAINS Ovm Itt: eS Pets Reena by fire in Brice Lane, off Mackey Street.

Selection of PLP election
candidates raises concerns

m@ By PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net

CONCERNS have been
raised over the selection of
candidates to represent the
PLP in the next general elec-
tion after it was revealed that
people have already been
named and ratified as the
prospective representative for
certain key areas in New Prov-
idence ... without the candi-
date’s committee having met.

Neil Percentie, the former

branch chairman for the last
PLP representative for
Marathon Ron Pinder, said he
was shocked to see that Sena-
tor Jerome Fitzgerald was
already listed on the PLP’s
website as the “candidate” for
the Marathon constituency.
While outlining that he held
no brief with Senator Fitzger-
ald as he knows him to be a
good family man and a “bril-
liant business person”, Mr
Percentie said he is concerned
with the fact that the people in
the area have essentially been

SEE page eight



BAHAMAS WOMEN'S

VOLLEYBALL TEAM

ROBBED WHILE
PLAYING VITAL GAME

BAHAMIAN CITIZENS
NAMED IN QUEEN'S
BIRTHDAY HONOURS






ye eal et)

rire heartache of

Minister
can see no
resolution

between govt
and nurses

m@ By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff
Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of Health
Hubert Minnis can see no
resolution between the
Government and angry
nurses who have crippled
the public health system
on a week-long sick-out.

However Water and
Sewerage Corporation
(WSC) employees who
staged a sick-out late last
week have vowed to
return to work today.

The public health nurs-
es started industrial action
when around 50 per cent
of nursing staff across the
country called in sick last
Monday.

And although staff
returned to the Rand
Memorial Hospital in
Freeport, Grand Bahama,
on Wednesday, Dr Min-
nis said the sick-out con-
tinued at the busy Princess
Margaret Hospital in Nas-
sau over the weekend.

Bahamas Nurses Union
president Cleola Hamil-
ton said tempers flared

SEE page nine



es. finding missing

brothers alive

SEARCH parties are begin-
ning to lose hope of finding
alive brothers Deangelo Clarke,
nine, and five-year-old Marcelo
Clarke who went missing while
crabbing in South Andros last
week.

Family members of the boys
have flown down to the island
to assist in the desperate search
as fears continue to grow about
their safety.

Deangelo lives in Andros
with this grandparents, while
his brother Marcelo lives in
Nassau with his parents and was
visiting the island for only a few

ays.

On Tuesday night last week,
the two boys left the house to
hunt for crabs and have not
been seen since.

When night fell, worry began
to set in and the grandparents
and members of the community
began to search for them.

Officers from the Kemp’s
Bay police station were alerted
and joined the search the next
morning.

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

Fire heartache
of heroine
grandmother

FROM page one

her take him with her.

She said: “I had to drag him,
but he still wouldn’t come right
out, and I stumbled a few
times, and the smoke got to us.

“He had plenty of time to
come out there, but he would-
n’t come.

“He can’t walk but he
wouldn’t let me drag him out. I
tell you he was something
else.”

Mrs Cooper and her hus-
band had built the three bed-
room house soon after they
married. They raised their four
children there.

After the Bell *|:)

AL SONNE

ea LC

He had worked as a mechan-
ic at KC Auto Sales in Palm-
dale and Victoria Avenue, as
well as independently.

But life had been difficult
for the couple since his stroke,
as he was unable to walk, and
unable to work.

They lived with three of
their 13 grandchildren.

Firefighters found the house
engulfed in flames when they
arrived shortly after 6pm on
Saturday, and Mr Cooper’s
body was lying in the hallway.

Emergency medical services
pronounced him dead at the
scene.

Everything in the house was
reduced to ash or damaged by

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smoke and water.

Mrs Cooper said: “We had
all our things destroyed, every-
thing was destroyed, what we
had before it’s tough getting it
back now, but thank God we
are living.

“The children have nothing.
Everything hey had is gone.”

Neighbours and family
friends helped Mrs Cooper
clear the house of everything
that had been destroyed and
salvage what was left.

A photograph of Mrs Coop-
er’s daughter and grandchil-
dren is one of the few items
she has salvaged.

Mrs Cooper said she and her
grandchildren are virtually
unharmed by the blaze.

“Tm right here,” she said. “I
hurt my muscle when I was
pulling him out probably, it
hurts, but that’s all.

“Tt must be from when he
held on and I tried to pull him,
and the fire would have got
me, but I let him go.”

She and her grandchildren
are now looking for a new
home.

Police are investigating the
cause of the blaze.

ie
US)
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PHONE: 322-2157

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8am - ipm (Sundays)
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THE TRIBUNE





















Felipé Major/Tribune staff

THE REMAINS of the house after the blaze.















LEON COOPER’S walking cane lies in the remains of the house.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 3



Bahamas women’s volleyball team

robbed while playing vital game

0 In brief

Man arresied

after attempted

car break-in

A 19-YEAR-OLD man
has been arrested follow-
ing the attempted break-in
of a car in St Alban’s Dri-
ve, Nassau.

Police say a man was
seen attempting to opena
blue Honda Civic parked
in the area at around 2am
on Saturday.

Officers searched the
vehicle and found a num-
ber of electronic items and
other items they suspect
had been stolen.

Investigations continue.

NASA repairing
leak on space
shuttle fuel tank

m CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

NASA is repairing a leaky
hydrogen gas line on Endeav-
our’s fuel tank in hopes of pos-
sibly launching the space shut-
tle on Wednesday, according
to Associated Press.

The leak forced mission
managers to call off a launch
attempt Saturday.

The repair work began Sun-
day and should be completed
in time for Endeavour to lift
off Wednesday on the space
station construction mission.
But that’s the same day a pair
of science spacecraft are sched-
uled to blast off for the moon.

NASA’s top officials have
yet to decide which mission
takes priority.

The seven Endeavour astro-
nauts are sticking around
Florida’s Kennedy Space Cen-
ter, Just in case their flight gets
called up first. They will deliv-
er and install the final segment
of Japan’s space station lab.

Uighurs freed
from Guantanamo
savour weekend
of freedom

@ HAMILTON, Bermuda

THE four men in short-
sleeve shirts looked like ordi-
nary tourists, enjoying a Sun-
day lunch and butter pecan
ice cream afterward as they
observed the sparkling
waters surrounding this
Atlantic resort island,
according to Associated
Press.

But they are Uighurs,
Muslims from the vast
stretches of western China,
an arid and rugged land that
is a far cry from Bermuda's
sandy beaches and quaint
narrow streets lined with
pastel Victorian-era build-
ings.

They once were terrorism
suspects, but even after U.S.
authorities determined the
men weren't a threat to the
United States, they were
kept at the Guantanamo
prison for years because no
nation would take them —
until a few days ago, when
Bermuda agreed to let them
in as refugees.

The men have traded drab
prison jumpsuits for com-

m By RENALDO DORSETT/
BRENT STUBBS
Tribune Sports Reporters

SNEAK thieves robbed the
Bahamas Women’s National Vol-
leyball team of all their personal
effects and equipment while they
played a vital world championship
qualifier.

As the team were putting up a
brave battle against host country
Barbados on Friday at the
Garfield Sobers Sports Complex,
their lockers were being broken
into.

And women’s agony at a five
set loss turned into heartache
when they discovered their prop-
erty, including passports, had been
taken.

A report filed with the Barba-
dian Police estimates the value of
the stolen property at more than
$47,400, and now their scheduled
return home today is in jeopardy.

Among the missing items were
$8,500 from the team expense
fund, a few laptops and cellular
phones as well as several pass-
ports of team members and
coaches.

According to team member
Krystel Rolle, the night began
with an inauspicious start as the
team was initially delegated to a
locker room and was forced to



NATIONAL TEAM HEAD COACH
Joe Smith

change and perform pre game
stretches in an adjacent hallway.
“We felt like it was strange that
we did not have a locker allocated
to us at first. We were told the
team from Barbados was occupy-
ing the locker room next to where
we were stretching,” she said.
The team was forced to take
their belongings to the main court
and place them behind the bench-
es during the match, however a
tournament representative told

the team they had to relocate
equipment to a locker room in
the foreground of the stadium.

“When we got to the back, Bar-
bados had already left the locker
room and we were told it was safe
for us to put our stuff in there so
we did,” Rolle said, “Kelsie [John-
son], team captain, locked the
door and we went back out onto
the court to continue warming up
for the game.”

After the five set loss to Bar-
bados that dropped the Bahamas
to second place in the A group,
the team returned to the locker
room to find their personal effects
missing.

“The door to the locker room
was swung wide open and all of
our stuff was gone, everything.
No one was any help, no one saw
anything and we noticed later that
the lock on the door was broken,”
Rolle said.

“Tournament organizers didn’t
do anything, the local police did
not arrive until two hours later
and initially we thought that our
bags had been moved from one
room to the next and we were just
angry because they moved our
bags without our permission or
without supervision. After min-
utes rolled into hours it became
clear that our stuff had really been
stolen and the lady with the key to

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the door seemed clueless and
unconcerned.”

National Team Head Coach
Joe Smith said the team remained
in a state of disbelief at the lack of
an adequate resolution, but con-
tinued to focus on the ultimate
goal of advancing to the third
round of World Championship
qualification.

“They still expected us to play
and compete in the tournament.
But it was hard. After you lose a
hard fought game and then you
realize everything you had was
stolen right from under your nose,
it is hard to stay focused on vol-
leyball, but they tried,” he said.

Police

“We have contacted the police,
foreign affairs, but we are in a
dilemma down here. No money
and no passports, but we are try-
ing to at least finish the tourna-
ment so that way we can still qual-
ify. The girls are taking it hard.
Mentally it was a strain on them
because even though they were
trying it was still on their minds.”

Following the incident, the
team was scheduled to face
Jamaica yesterday, but lost in the
most lopsided outing of the tour-
nament, 25-23, 25-9, 25-13.

Mr Smith added: “We were
with the Police all day trying to
see if we can sort this issue out to
see if someone can provide some
direction as to where we would
go from here.

“But it is difficult because
absolutely everything out of the
locker rooms was taken and a lot
of the girls and people around the
team found it odd because over
the course of the tournament the
Bahamas was the only team to
have this happen to them.”

To have your say on this or any
other issue, email The Tribune
at: letters@tribunemedia.net
or deliver your letter to
The Tribune on Shirley Street,
P.O. Box N-3207











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PAGE 4, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Prime Minister is not Moses

WHEN MOSES gathered the children of
Israel and led them from the bondage of
Egypt to the Promised Land, they had to
endure many years of hardship on a never
ending desert.

But these Israelites felt they were enti-
tled to more. They wanted food, they wanted
water, they wanted their comforts, but they
also wanted their freedom — by an easier
route. They knew they were in a desert where
nothing grew, and where there were no cool
streams to slake their thirst.

But they were a contentious lot, a bunch of
whiners. Moses had led them there and so it
was his duty to perform the impossible. It
was obvious they couldn’t make a desert yield
food and water, so they looked to Moses,
who was as empty-handed as they were.
Despite his condition of equal want they
demanded that he give them what he did not
have.

And so Moses knelt down and pounded
God’s door in prayer. God peaked out, saw
the condition of his stiff-necked people, and
took pity on Moses. He instructed Moses to
take the same stick with which he had divid-
ed the Nile, and strike a nearby rock out of
which water would flow for the people to
drink. Moses did as he was told and out came
the water.

Today the world’s leaders face a global
crises and although each one of them is stand-
ing before his people with a different stick to
try to stir life back into a collapsed global
economy — unlike the miracle of Moses —
nothing seems to work. There is no miracle
for our generation.

“This crisis,” Prime Minister Ingraham told
Bahamians from the floor of the House last
week, “is so great that the economic text-
books have no answers! The textbooks can
explain how an individual economy or even a
small related group of countries can solve an
economic crisis, but the textbooks have no
answers to a recession which is enormous
and global, and resistant to the textbook solu-
tions.”

And so, Mr Ingraham, like every world
leader today, is battening down the hatches,
caulking the leaks, provisioning the larders,
trimming the sails, and preparing the Ship
of State for a rough voyage. All he is asking
of Bahamians is that they work hard at the


















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oars, put all contentiousness behind them,
have patience and don’t rock the boat.

In the meantime he has prepared what he
described as “a realistic budget in extraordi-
nary times, whose principal objective is to
promote and protect the interests of the
Bahamian people.”

His aim is to sustain employment and liv-
ing standards as far as possible “while main-
taining as much fiscal flexibility as possible to
be able to deal with emerging developments.”

To do this he has had to cut back in every
department, ensuring that enough is provid-
ed for each to function adequately. Obvi-
ously this can be done if managers in these
various ministries make certain that waste is
cut back and whatever petty pilfering there
might be is cut out.

Today thousands of Bahamians are without
work, they have mortgages to pay, school
fees to meet and all the other expenses
required to keep a family together.

These Bahamians are desperate and don’t
know where to turn.

It is, therefore, shocking that a large seg-
ment of this country’s nurses have gone on
strike — not because they don’t have a job,
but because they have been asked to wait
until the crisis has passed for their promised
health insurance.

Health Minister Dr Herbert Minnis met
with executives of the nurses union and told
them that although their services were appre-
ciated, because of the country’s financial
problems “it was unlikely that they would
receive their insurance ... and the four per
cent salary increase that they demanded.”
They were asked to defer their insurance for
the present.

Their answer? Government made a
promise that they want fulfilled now — not
later. They have shown no concern for other
Bahamians who might have to suffer even
more if government has to meet their
demands.

And so, while the rest of us tighten our
belts and prepare for the worst to help save
our country from disaster, a large body of
nurses has walked out on their duties.

Is this what one calls patriotism?

Remember Prime Minister Ingraham is
not Moses. He cannot strike the Treasury
vaults and make non-existent money flow.



PLP show again
why they can’t
be trusted

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Listening to the response of
the leader of the opposition and
operatives of the Progressive
Liberal Party to the 2009/2010
budget, I was again reminded
as to just why the majority of
Bahamians didn’t trust them
and voted them out of office in
May of 2007.

Plain and simple in my opin-
1on the response was dishonest!
I was very offended by what the
leader of the opposition had to
say because it conveyed a mes-
sage to me that he thought that
I was stupid or ignorant as a
Bahamian citizen. Now it could
very well be that Mr Christie
and other PLP operatives
believe the nonsense that they
are spewing out, but God help
the PLP if that’s the case.

I hold no brief for the Free
National Movement (FNM)
Government or for the Prime
Minister, as I consider myself
an independent, having voted
for both parties in the past. I
am extremely disappointed, but
not surprised at the responses
given by members of the oppo-
sition to the 2009/20010 budget.
The response of the leader of
the opposition is riddled with
misrepresentations of the facts,
taking credit for successes, but
casting blame for failures just
as they did while in office. In
my estimation it was a failed
attempt to mislead the Bahami-
an people and any logical, right

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



thinking person will see it for
what it is. The thing that also
bothers me about this opposi-
tion party is that they criticise
without offering alternatives,
anybody can criticise but not
anybody can offer sensible,
workable solutions to problems.
I challenge the PLP to offer an
alternative budget and let’s
weigh one against the other!

Mr Christie and other opera-
tives continue to blame the state
of the Bahamian economy on
Mr Hubert Ingraham and the
FNM government, citing a
report from Standard and Poors
with regard to the FNM gov-
ernment stopping and review-
ing contracts as their evidence;
but nothing could be further
from the truth. Let’s take a look
at the projects that moved
ahead, those that were stopped
and reviewed or cancelled. Just
about every single one of those
projects have now stopped
because of the downturn in the
world economy and _ has
absolutely nothing to do with
the FNM government. The
Ginn project in West End, the
Ritz Carlton Project, the
Mayaguana project and the list
goes on.

I thought the Prime Minis-
ter’s remarks with respect to the

budget was sobering and hon-
est, which is one of the reasons
he was elected; “He can be
trusted to tell you the truth!”
He sent what I thought was a
clear message to Bahamians
that we cannot continue to
operate like we have been oper-
ating, we have to be more finan-
cially responsible and we cannot
continue to squander money
and resources like we’ve done
in the past. Can you imagine
Mr Christie being in office
telling us that all was well while
all hell is breaking loose around
us as far as the economy is con-
cerned? I want somebody who
will tell me the truth and also
tell me the extent to which the
government can help and the
part that I must play as a
Bahamian to make sure that we
make it through this.

I can go into detail with
regard to some of the things
that I mentioned in this letter
but I choose not to at this time.
What I will say is that I don’t
always agree with Mr Ingraham
and the way in which he does
and says some things, but when
I look at the lot of them, [ll
take him hands down any day.
He’s honest, he has courage and
he’s no-nonsense. Regardless
of what you think of the man
he’s what we need right now!

FELIX MUNNINGS

Nassau,
June, 2009.

Crime in the Bahamas seems to pay

EDITOR, The Tribune.

There simply should be a public outcry over the
information your reporter Paul Turnquest has
reported as to the number of persons accused of
serious violent crimes, murder, armed robbery,

etc, who are out on bail.

It seems crime in our Bahamas pays. Just how

can we continue to accept this?

The PLP talked about new conditions for bail
and there were promises we heard from the FNM
in 2008 in the opening of Parliament speech from
The Throne that some sort of tracking devices
were being looked at for persons on bail.

Since the New Year 2009 we have heard more
serious crime being reported almost daily to a

iting because they hear of murder after murder
and because they have no idea the locations of the

murders conclude they should not travel to the
Bahamas as it is unsafe.

The budget is coming next week and we all
know it is going to be the worst one for years as

revenues have decreased immensely, but the pub-

lic must be afforded the rightful safety day or

night wherever we live or on whatever island.

dered.

level that is very much unacceptable to the

Bahamian public.

Our newspapers are on the internet; persons
who might want to visit might be swayed from vis-

We do not only have a voice once every five
years — call your MP now and insist government
does something before more people are mur-

Yes, our police are doing their best, but we
have too many criminals on bail, which is their
right but we have to know where these people are.

ABRAHAM MOSS

Nassau,

May 19, 2009.

What kind of example does this set our youth?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

When we were kids there
seemed to be a game of some
sort on most days — marbles,
spin the top, "rounders", rug-

by, etc. In most of these games
there was usually someone who

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decided that the rules that had
been agreed the day before did
not suit him on that particular
day, usually because he was not
winning by the established rules
so he wanted to change them.

I was reminded of those days
when I read The Tribune
Thursday morning and was
shocked, but not surprised, to
learn that MP Glenys Hanna-
Martin created an uproar in
Parliament because she want-
ed to "raise an issue of public
importance.” She was denied
this opportunity because the
rules state that she was required
to have previously served notice
in Parliament that she intended
to bring up the matter.

She was asked to take her
seat and she refused to do so.

That too is not surprising. The
real shock followed when the
Speaker asked the Sergeant-at-
Arms to remove her from the
House and the other members
on her side of the House sur-
rounded her to prevent the
police from doing their duty.

Can we really be surprised
when so many young Bahami-
ans believe that the rules apply
to everyone else except them?

Most of us can recall a simi-
lar "incident of shame" in 1965,
which again proves the old
adage that "the fruit does not
fall far from the tree."

SIDNEY SWEETING, DDS
Nassau,
June 11, 2009

The Nassau Institute

PROTECTING YOUR
FAMILY IN HARD TIMES
What to expect?
What you can do?

Economist Dr. Robert Murphy
answers your questions

The Yacht Club on June 17th
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Information: 328-6529
Admission Free
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Bahamian citizens named in
ueen’s Birthday Honours

GOVERNMENT House
has released the full list of
Bahamian citizens named in
the Queen’s Birthday Honours
for 2009.

Among those named are the
owner of John Bull, Frederick
Hazelwood, and Special
Olympics organiser Basil
Christie.

The full list is:

COMPANION OF THE
MOST DISTINGUISHED
ORDER OF SAINT
MICHAEL AND SAINT
GEORGE (CMG)

Bishop Elgarnet Brendan
Rahming: For untiring efforts
and invaluable contributions to
the growth and development
of the country in the field of
religion.

Frederick A Hazelwood Jr:
For outstanding service to the
business community in the
Bahamas.

Anita Doreen Bernard: For
outstanding and exemplary ser-
vice as a career public officer.

THE MOST
EXCELLENT ORDER OF
THE BRITISH EMPIRE
OFFICER (OBE)

George Cox: For long and
dedicated service in the field
of civil and structural engi-
neering in the Bahamas.

Lowell Mortimer: For out-
standing service to the public
service, church and community.

Dr Robert O Antoni: In
recognition of service to the
community and health.

Harcourt Lowell Turnquest:
For outstanding and exemplary
service as a career public offi-
cer.

THE MOST
EXCELLENT ORDER OF
THE BRITISH EMPIRE
MEMBER (MBE)

Sandra Moore: For out-
standing contribution to the
church and community.

Colors:

Gold

Red Pat

Black Pat

Multi Beige Snake

i

Canon Fitz Goodridge: In
recognition of services to reli-
gion.

Edna Mae Russell: For long
and loyal service in the field of
education.

Basil Christie: For outstand-
ing contribution to the devel-
opment of the Bahamas in the
areas of community service,
education, religion and Special
Olympics.

Frederick Solomon Ramsey:
For contribution to politics and
the growth and development
of the insurance industry in the
Bahamas.

John L Rolle Sr: For out-
standing contribution to the
business community.

Cecil Bernard Longley: For
outstanding and distinguished
career in the field of education.

THE BRITISH EMPIRE
MEDAL (BEM)
(CIVIL DIVISION)

Dennis Lloyd Turnquest: For
long and dedicated service to
the community, politics, busi-
ness and insurance manage-
ment.

Arthur M Sherman Jr: In
recognition of service to civics
and religion.

Wendell Carver Grant Sr: In
recognition of service to civics
and religion.

Doddridge MacLagan Hunt:
For outstanding service to the
public service, church and the
community.

Oswald Cory Munnings: For
service to the financial services
industry and to the church.

Reverend Wilbur St Clair
Outten: In recognition of ser-
vices to the community and
religion.

INNOVATORS
SUMMER PROGRAM
Ages 5-16 years old

Ta



Sheila McDonald: For long
dedicated service in the public
service and the community.

Maria Forbes: For long, ded-
icated and faithful service in
the field of education.

THE QUEEN’S POLICE
MEDAL (QPM)



Assistant Commissioner
Shannondor Harold Evans
(above): For outstanding and
meritorious service to the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force.

Chief Superintendent
Sylvester Augustus George
(Retired): For outstanding
career as an accomplished
musician, arranger, conductor
and administrator to the Royal
Bahamas Police Force.

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Marijuana found in search of two homes

POLICE found 16 marijuana plants and
: more than 21 packets of marijuana
; when searching two Nassau homes this week-

were arrested in connection with the find.
The marijuana plants, some up to 3ft high,
were seized along with a small quantity of

end. marijuana when police searched a home in
Officers found the packets, more tha $400
and an assortment of jewellery when they
executed a search warrant at a home in Balls
Alley, off Shirley Street.
A 46-year-old woman and 16-year-old boy

Yellow Elder Gardens.

The officers were assisted by the K-9 unit
when they executed their search warrant at
around Spm on Friday. A 26-year-old man
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PAGE 6, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Gavin McKinney to receive BIFF's first Bahamian Tribute Award

THE 2009 Bahamas International Film Festival has
announced that esteemed director of photography
Gavin Mckinney will be honoured with the first
Bahamian Tribute Award at this year’s festival, which
will take place December 10 to 17 in Nassau.

Mr McKinney will be present for the tribute and
presentation on Tuesday, December 15.

BIFF Founder and executive director Leslie Van-
derpool said: “We are so honoured to recognise one
of our very own Bahamian filmmakers; Gavin con-
tinues to make strides around the globe within the
film world.”

Mr McKinney has been involved in underwater
film making since 1973 when he worked as a diver on
the feature film Day of the Dolphin and has spent
more than 20,000 hours underwater making films.

He has worked on more than 50 feature films and
television shows, including five James Bond films: The
Spy Who Loved Me, For Your Eyes Only, Moon-
raker, Never Say Never Again and The World is Not
Enough.

In addition to working behind the scenes with
logistics and planning, he was the Bond underwater
double in For Your Eyes Only.

While filming The Spy Who Loved Me, Mr McK-
inney thinks he became the only person in the history
of film to have been run over by a car underwater.

He also spent four months working on The Abyss
in 1988.

Since 2001, he has co-produced and filmed three
highly successful three dimensional underwater films
for the Imax theatres: Ocean Wonderland 3D, Sharks



Esteemed director of
photography to be honoured

3D and Dolphins and Wales 3D.

Mr McKinney has more than 35 years experience }
filming underwater and has provided full produc- i
tion services for underwater shoots, including per- }
sonnel, logistics, locations and marine services, though
now his energies are directed towards conservation ;

and education about the oceans of the world.

His current project is Ocean World 3D, a full- }
length 3D documentary due for a summer 09 release, }
which premiered at the 2009 Cannes Film Festival in }
May. It is a fictitious story of a turtle’s voyage around :

the world.

Entering its sixth year, the Bahamas Internation- }
al Film Festival (BIFF) has established itself as a i
marquee international festival in the Caribbean i
region, discovering and promoting independent voic- i
es and talent from around the world and showcasing }

a diverse array of international films.

BIFF is a non-profit organisation committed to
providing the local community and international fes- :
tival goers with a diverse presentation of films from }

the Bahamas and around the world.

In addition to showcasing films that might not }
otherwise be released theatrically, BIFF provides }
unique cultural experiences, educational programmes, i
and forums for exploring the past, present and future ;

of cinema.

























COMMONWEALTH BANK

2009 SCHOLARSHIP

Commonwealth Bank is offering Scholarship Awards to Bahamian
students to attend The College of The Bahamas.

Applications are available at any Commonwealth Bank Branch or at
The College of The Bahamas, Financial Aid & Housing Department,
2nd Floor, Portia Smith Building.

APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED TO:



OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR
FINANCIAL AID & HOUSING
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

P. 0. BOX N-4912

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

(Students from the Family Islands are invited to apply).

Ck

COMMONWEALTH BANK

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DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS IS JULY 17, 2009

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m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

A CANDLELIGHT vigil and
rally will be held in Freeport
and Nassau to highlight the
issue of child abuse.

Freeport activist Troy Gar-
vey announced the events are
planned by the TOUCH (Trust-
ing Uniting Children’s Hearts)
organisation on Grand Bahama,
and Bahamas Against Crime in
New Providence.

He said the rally is set for
today in Nassau at Rawson
Square, and on Thursday in
Freeport at the Garnet Levari-
ty Justice Center.

Mr Garvey is urging the pub-
lic and various groups and
organisations throughout the
country to support the event.
Invitations will also be extend-
ed to MPs.

“We all need to join hands
and save our children in order
to save our country and bring
awareness to the child abuse
and molestation that his hap-
pening in the Bahamas.

“For too long we have been
closing our eyes and turning
heads to what is happening in
the schools and churches. By
doing this we have cost our
country a great loss of future
leaders and we want to say
enough is enough,” he said.

Mr Garvey said every child
has the right to be free of
exploitation, violence, rejection
and extreme poverty.

He said three parades will be
held in Nassau today, starting
from the eastern Parade of Nas-
sau at the foot of the bridge,

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Candlelight vigil and rally to
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TROY GARVEY announces plans for candlelight vigil and rally in
Freeport and Nassau. Also seen is Bee Butler, president and founder of
No More Victims Outreach Association.

from Windsor Park on Wulff
Road and East Road, and from
Christie Park and Nassau Street
near the College of the
Bahamas.

He said the parade in Nassau
will start at 6.30pm and con-
verge at Rawson Square where
rally will begin at 8pm.

In Freeport, the parade will
start at 7pm from downtown
and head north on West Mall
Drive to the Justice Center
compound, where a rally will
be held at 8pm.

Bee Butler, of No More Vic-
tims Association, said: “We
have been dealing with a lot of
victims and we want to call on
ministers to pray for children
to so that they can become the
men and women God have

them to be.

“We stand behind Mr Gar-
vey and his organisation and
ask persons to support this most
important event,” she said.

Mr Garvey thanked Senior
Assistant Commissioner Mar-
vin Dames for permission to use
the justice center compound in
Freeport for the rally.

To have your say on this or any
other issue, email The Tribune
at: letters@tribunemedia.net
or deliver your letter to
The Tribune on Shirley Street,
P.O. Box N-3207



Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

at

symposium



What Does the Rest of 2009 Hold in Store for You?

Thursday, June 18
6pm—8pm

COB Performing
Arts Centre

This Event is Free
to the Public.
Refreshments provided.

Onsite childcare available
for children ages 3 to 11.

The financial crisis of the past 18 months has us all
wondering, what's next? To answer this question and
help you develop your personal economic recovery
strategy, RBC is sponsoring a free educational sym-
posium for the community.

Please join us as a distinguished panel of speakers
explores the performance of the current economy,
future prospects for The Bahamas and strategies you
can employ as you cope with the changes and stress
of the economic slowdown.

Experienced professionals will be on hand to provide
financial advice at the end of the presentation and
question and answer session.

Panelists include:
> Mr. Nathaniel Beneby, Jr::
Vice President and Country Head, RBC

> Mrs, Wendy Craigg:
Governor of The Central Bank

> The Hon. Loretta Butler-Turner:
Minister of State, Ministry of Labour and Social Development

>? Dr. Timothy Barrett:
noted Bahamian Psychiatrist

RBC HELPING YOU SUCCEED

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 7

OO
Making Caricom less ‘at risk’

insight |

WORLD VIEW

m@ By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a consultant and
former Caribbean diplomat)

AMAICA’S Prime Min-

ister Bruce Golding says
that the Caribbean Communi-
ty and Common Market (Cari-
com) is “at risk”. He is right
and regional leaders should
shoulder the blame for this sad
development in an area of
small countries that need to
hold together as the only
means of retaining their iden-
tity, their culture and some
semblance of autonomy.

Mr Golding is also right
when he says of himself and
his fellow leaders: “I do not
believe that any of us can
believe that we are going to be
better off trying to swim in this
Caribbean sea on our own, but
it is time for us to stop playing
games, for us to stop mouthing
integration and professing our
commitment to this process
when the pragmatic demon-
stration of that commitment is
so often not being brought to
the fore.”

It would be very helpful
indeed if the Heads of Gov-
ernment were to sweep away
their usually long agenda for
the next Summit meeting in
Guyana in July in order to
spend a day talking about
nothing else except: “Do we
want Caricom? And, if so, how
do we make it work for the
benefit of the people of Cari-
com?”

If they — or any of them -
feel that the 41-year-old
regional project (the Caribbean
Free Trade Agreement started
in 1968) is of little or no use to
them and they can do better
on their own or in alliances
with other countries, they
should end the relationship
now. For, the Caricom under-
taking will continue to be frus-
trated by reluctant participants,
and reluctant participants will
themselves be frustrated by
their nagging belief that they
would be better-off elsewhere.

The “elsewhere” should be
carefully considered. Caricom
is unique because it is largely
made up of countries whose
people’s culture, history, polit-
ical development and identity
were brewed in the same pot.
At the bottom line, while trade
within the region is important
and must be developed, it is
not the most important ele-
ment in the integration pro-
ject. More vitally important
are: the retention of Caribbean
autonomy over the region’s
economies; maintaining
Caribbean dignity and pride in
ownership, management and
production; drawing on the
qualified strength of the entire
region to bargain for countries
individually and collectively in
ahighly competitive world; and
keeping the identity that
brands us as a people.

These things are not only
endangered, they are more
likely to disappear if countries
“go it alone” or seek alliances
with nations that have
resources greater than theirs.

In today’s globalised world —
and with the ambition of Euro-
pean, North American and
Asian firms to have a global
reach — it is not beyond pos-
sibility that Caribbean indige-
nous companies, including
media, could be swallowed-up.
It does not require large Cor-
porations to show an interest.
Any medium sized European,
North American or Asian
Company is larger and better
resourced than the largest
firms in the region.

The situation might have
been better if Caricom had
implemented the allocation of
industry scheme to which it
was committed in its early
years, and if it had backed such
a scheme by a deliberate poli-
cy of integrating production.
In other words, using the capi-
tal and skilled labour of some
countries to develop the nat-
ural resources — or competi-
tive advantage — of others for
the benefit of all. The compa-
nies that emerged from sucha
process would have had a bet-
ter chance to survive.

If per chance, regional lead-
ers continue to feel that Cari-
com — and the development
of a Single Market and Econ-
omy — has merit, it will not be
sufficient for them to issue yet
another Communiqué or Dec-
laration espousing the impor-
tance of integration.

People all over the region
have become unconvinced by
Communiqués and Declara-

tions. This is why many of the
Caribbean press buried in their
inside pages the statements
coming from the last Caricom
Summit in Trinidad in May.
Few made the Summit state-
ments a front-page story.

As Mr Golding said, they
will have to “stop mouthing
integration” and bring to the
fore “the pragmatic demon-
stration of that commitment.”

How could they do so?

At the level of people, one
very important way would be
for all immigration and cus-
toms officers at border entry
points to be instructed to treat
Caricom nationals with the
same high regard they accord
to European and North Amer-
ican tourists. This is not to say
that they should not be watch-
ful for violators, but the
assumption should not be that
the majority are.

Another way would be to
cease the use of Police for the
expulsion of Caricom nationals
who may be suspected of over-
staying. This should become
the responsibility of the immi-
gration department and, when
such people are discovered,
they should be subject to due
process under the law.

Residence and nationality
qualifications should also be
applied in a non-discriminato-
ry manner and consistent with
the law. They ought not to be
denied at the discretion of one
or two persons.

At the level of trade, non-

tariff barriers should end once
and for all subject only to gen-
uine health and safety require-
ments. Caricom is either a
common market moving to a
single market or it is not. No
Caricom producer should still
have to think twice about send-
ing goods to other Caricom
countries.

And, where a dispute aris-
es, machinery should be in
place for swift resolution with-
out the need for Ministerial
intervention and media
involvement.

The critical problem of
transportation of goods within
Caricom should also be
addressed in a practical man-
ner. For instance, Jamaica
might improve its level of
exports to other Caricom coun-
tries if better transportation
existed. Governments might
usefully address the incentives
that could be given to encour-
age private entrepreneurs to
establish such transportation
by sea and air.

On production integration,
governments might also con-
sider establishing a Caribbean
team to help the private sec-
tor to access funds from the
multilateral financial institu-
tions to develop Caricom wide
businesses on a limited alloca-
tion of industries scheme to
start with.

And, on governance, a
Caribbean Commission, along
the lines of the European
Commission manned by per-

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PAGE 8, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009

CONFIDENCE
INSURANCE BROKERS
& AGENTS LTD.

Will be closed

on Friday, June 19, 2009

for our staff
ANNUAL FUN DAY

—- [2nd floor The Standard House)
one: 323-6920 Fax: 325-2485

LOCAL NEWS

Selection of PLP election
candidates raises concerns

FROM page one

denied an opportunity to
speak.

“The PLP lays claim to
being of the people and for
the people, however if this
website is correct, the people
once again have no say in ‘my
PLP’,” h said.

“As a card-carrying mem-
ber of the PLP and former
chairman of the Marathon
branch, I am able to say that
‘we the people’ were not
informed of any decision to
name a candidate to the con-
stituency of Marathon but to
have Sen. Fitzgerald posted
on the website as ‘the’ candi-
date is an insult to the people
of Marathon.

“In fact, knowing that the
candidate’s committee has not
met to determine who is to be
the candidate, suggests that
some scheme is amidst in my
beloved PLP,” he said.

Mr Percentie also took
exception with what he felt
was Mr Fitzgerald’s attempt
to lay claim to events that
took place in the constituency
of which he claims Mr Fitzger-
ald “has no knowledge of”.

Pt a

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“As the former chairman
the membership and I didn’t
see or hear from him during
any of these events. I note
with great concern that the
voice of Marathon is not being
heard.

“The good people want not
only a son of the soil - but a
son of Marathon to represent
them.

“The people of Marathon
wish no longer to have visi-
tors representing them, they
want one who really lives the
same life that they do and
therefore feel their pains, hear
their cries and knows their
burdens.

“Tam such an individual
and I am preparing myself to
stand up for ‘Our Marathon’.
Yes Marathon the time has
come for you to make a
choice that will provide you
with a leader who is from
amongst you. You know
where I live, you don’t need to
RSVP to see me or place your
name on list at a gate in order
to gain access to this union vil-
lage boy. As I indicated earli-
er Senator Fitzgerald is a fine
son of the soil and I would
certainly wish to have him
along in the house as my com-

284 bay street nassau bahamas 242.302.2800
mall at marathon harbour bay palmdale

rade as the representative for
Seabreeze, Elizabeth or
Ocean Estates but he can
not speak for Marathon,” he
said.

Mr Percentie added a note
to the “powers that be” with-
in the PLP, pleading for them

THE TRIBUNE

to truly allow democracy to
reign and allow the people of
Marathon to chose who they
wish to represent them.

Attempts to reach Senator
Fitzgerald for comment were
unsuccessful up until press
time last night.

EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY

Confidence Insurance Brokers
& Agents Ltd. is seeking to fill the
following position:

JUNIOR CLERK/
MESSENGER

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18-23 years old
Computer knowledge in
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Ability to work with cash
Driver’s License required.

Please submit a resume by
hand or mail to:

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& Agents Ltd.
Shirley Street
P.O. box SS-6253
Nassau, Bahamas

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~ 4eUce * Solutions Derm?

NOTICE

Mohs Surgery in Nassau

DR. JOHN STRASSWIMMER, MOHS SURGEON
will be visiting The Skin Centre on Friday
June 19, 2009. Dr Strasswimmer trained at
Harvard and Yale and is Board Certified and a
Fellow of the Mohs College.

Mohs Micrographic Surgery is an advanced
treatment process for skin cancer which is
now offered at The Skin Centre. It offers the
highest possible cure rate for many skin
cancers and simultaneously minimizes the
sacrifice of normal tissue. This cutting-edge
treatment requires highly specialized
physicians that serve as surgeon, pathologist
and reconstructive surgeon.

Our visiting Mohs Surgeon has extensive
experience in the Mohs Micrographic
Procedure. The technique is used to remove
the two most common forms of skin cancer:
basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell
carcinoma.

For more information, please contact:
The Skin Centre, Harbour Bay Plaza,
East Bay Street Tel. 393-7546.


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 9



HOSPITAL AUTHORITY BLOOD DRIVE

b I

uJ

the Mall Of Marathon.

THE HOSPITAL AUTHORITY along with BTC accepted blood from members of the public on Saturday at



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Minister can see no resolution hetween govt and nurses

FROM page one

when nurses learned they would not receive their
four per cent pay increase this year and the health
insurance they expected last year has been post-
poned to a projected date of 2012.

Dr Minnis said he cannot say what resolution
government will come to with the public nursing
staff.

PMH has suspended non-emergency surgeries,
excluding those for visitors from the Family
Islands, and closed almost all specialty clinics
since the action began.

Only the oncology clinic, dialysis clinic, mater-
nity high risk clinic, comprehensive clinic and
general practice clinic remained open, as well as
the Accident and Emergency department and
Intensive Care Unit.

Dr Minnis said: “I think they are coping. They
are getting tired working these exhaustive shifts,
but I think they are doing their best in trying to
ensure the Bahamian public get the best care
during this time.”

WSC staff took industrial action over pay on
Thursday, and Bahamas Utility and Service Allied
Workers Union (BUSAWU) president Carmen
Kemp said she wants government to ‘come to
the table’ to negotiate members’ concerns and
the industrial agreement which expired two years
ago.

A statement from BUSAWU maintains WSC
managers and staff have been pitted against each
other in an ‘explosive’ state of affairs as a result of
government’s delay.

BUSAWU states: “We have extended every
courtesy and attempted to negotiate in absolute
good faith with the government and executive



management of the corporation but to no avail.”

And the union maintains members pay is not
the only concern.

BUSAWU states: “We are also concerned with
the fact that a number of opportunities to grow
our business are on the table and that these
opportunities may be negotiated or given away,
without giving WSC and by extension our coun-
try an opportunity to benefit from them.

“What we cannot delay or defer is our demand
that the woes of the corporation be addressed
and that the Bahamian people are given the ser-
vice they deserve.”

WSC services are expected to return to normal
tomorrow.

However, the disruption in public health care is
expected to continue.

Patients are advised to only attend PMH or
local health clinics in medical emergencies.

If you are not sure if you have a medical emer-
gency call 326-7014, 502-7812, or 919.

Patients scheduled to receive surgical proce-
dures should call their physician or call 322-2861
extension 3149 to reschedule.

For all general inquiries call 322-2861 extension
3149 or 502-7890/1.

‘YOUR VIEW’

To have your say on this or any other
issue, email The Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your
letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street,
PO. Box N-3207

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PAGE 10, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE


























Deryuse 25
FUNERAL DIRECTORS

“Rendering the finest in caring and compassionae service
regardless af financial condition.”
Tih Terrace, Collins Avenue * (242) T56-2 087 *
PG) Bor G2a79 ® Wansee, Hahannars

Ms. DELORES
FERGUSON,
98

of Fox Hill Road South,
will be held on
Wednesday, June 17th,
2009 at 11:00 a.m. at St.
Anselm's Roman
Catholic Church, Bernard
Road, Fox Hill. Officiating will ba Fr. Noal Clarke,
assisted by Deacon Raymond Forbes. Interment will
be made in the Church's Cemetery, Bernard Road,

Her memories will be treasured by her nieces, Shirley
Fox, Betty Robinson, Patricia Bell, Maude Demeritte,
Barbara Rahming and Nancy Wilmott. Hear nephews,
Earl Wilmott, John Rahming and Edward Robinson
Jr; grand nieces and nephews, Phiora Clarke, Andrea
Bastian, Elizabeth Fox, Joanne Fox, Shirley Gray,
Melvern Fox, Jackie Rolle, Kayla, Anita and Schrelle
Wilmott, Parnela Miller, Renee Wilmott, Vernita
sawyer, Dorette Ferguson, Emericka and Stephanie
Robinson, Sharon, Anne and Monique, Angella
Sweeting, Bernadette, Christopher Rahming, Eric
dr. Barry, Larry, Edwin, Jerry, Richard, Brian, Mario,
Kevin Wilmott, Alphonso Woodside, Trevor and Brian
Young, Mark, Marcellus and Trevor Miller, Eric and
Michael Fox. Other relatives and friends including,
special fnend and care-taker, Ms. Miriam Roker and
family, Mrs Maria Knowles and family, Mrs. Ella
Thompson, Ms. Nadine Novella, Ms. Marina Smith,
Mr. Chris Carroll and family, Msgr. Preston Moss,
Father Clarke, The Eucharistic Ministers at St.
Anselm's Church, the staff of the Geriatric Ward and
a host of other friends too numerous to mention,

The body will repose in the Blessed Redeemer
Chapel at Ferguson's Funeral Directors, 7th Terrace
Collins Avenue on Tuesday from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00
p.m. and at the church on Wednesday from 10:00
a.m. until service time.

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All of us often turn to pro-
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ing and selling of property
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selection of a representative
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The same applies when
choosing another profes-
sional who is crucial to the
real estate transaction — the
appraiser. But who orders
the appraisal?

Most often, it is the
lender, who uses the report
to confirm a property’s val-
ue before approving financ-
ing.

Sandals



Sometimes, either the
buyer or the seller will order
an appraisal in order to
secure an independent opin-
ion of the value.

If you hire an appraiser,
be sure he or she is licensed
by BREA.

All lenders will provide a
list of qualified appraisers.
Lenders will finance sales
based on the lower of the
sales price or the appraised
value.

Royal Bahamian Resort & Offshore Island

Invites application for the following position:

GROUNDS MANAGER

The successful candidate should have the

following qualifications

* Supervise the day to day maintenance of the

grounds

* Work directly with landscape contractor

* Report to General Manager & Hotel Manager

* Knowledge of plants, insects, disease,
Irrigation pesticides, fertilizers

* Minimum 3 years experience

Applications should be email to:
mreampbell(@grp.sandals.com

2>MEAT SU de RVISOR

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THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS

In Argentina,
lissident
Cuban doctor
has no grudge

@ BUENOS AIRES,
Argentina

A DISSIDENT
Cuban surgeon said
Sunday that she har-
bors no grudge against
Fidel Castro upon
arriving in Argentina
for an emotional family
reunion after being
denied permission to
leave Cuba for more
than a decade, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

Desperate to see her
ailing, 90-year-old
mother, Dr. Hilda
Molina said she wrote
directly to Cuban lead-
ers seeking permission
to travel.

On Sunday, she was
able for the first time
to hug her Argentine-
born
grandchildren, ages 13
and 8, and see her
mother, who was
allowed to leave Cuba
months ago.

"TI have inside a
wound that will never
heal," Molina told
reporters after meeting
with her son for
the first time in 15
years.

"I say to Mr. Fidel
Castro, who has been
the scourge of my fami-
ly, may he have all the
peace in the world.
May he choose the path
that the country needs.
I don't need to forgive
him for anything."

Cubans like Molina
who dare to openly
criticize Cuba's system
are often denied per-
mission to leave the
country.

Cuba also restricts
individual foreign trav-
el by its physicians,
saying it spends too
much training them to
allow them to emigrate
for higher salaries else-
where.

Openness

The surprise travel
authorization, issued
Friday, was seen as a
gesture of openness in
the era after Fidel Cas-
tro ceded power to his
brother Raul in 2006
for health reasons.

It was also seen as a
nod to Argentine Presi-
dent Cristina Fernan-
dez, a Cuba ally who
along with her husband
and predecessor,
Nestor Kirchner, had
asked the Castros since
2003 to allow Molina to
leave.

But Molina said her
approval to travel in
itself did not indicate
broader changes by the
Cuban government.

"That will be
resolved when we
Cubans do not have to
ask permission to enter
and leave the country,"
she said.

"There are 11 million
Cubans whose rights
are being violated."

Molina, who once
posed for high-profile
photos with Fidel Cas-
tro, was a well-known
physician at a govern-
ment institution until
1994, when she
resigned after question-
ing the ethics of using
human stem cell tissue
in studies on treating
ailments like Parkin-
son's disease.

That same year her
son left Cuba with his
Argentine wife.

Molina's travel docu-
ments are good for sev-
eral months. She said
she intends to return to
Cuba, but not while her
mother is in precarious
health.

"I put it in the letter
to Raul Castro ... that
when I close the eyes of
my mother I will
return,” Molina said.

"I want her to recov-
er and to return togeth-
er.

“But as long as she is
in danger I am not
going to abandon her."

LU
ol
>
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ae
oe
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on
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Q.
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an
QO.

MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 11

NASSAU LISTINGS

DEVELOPED RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

. BAY STREET

LOT NO. Parcel of Land
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Two-Storey Commercial Building
(Millie’s Place)

PROPERTY SIZE: 3,744 sq. ft.
LOCATION: On the southern side
of Bay Street between Deveaux
Street and Gomez Alley
APPRAISED VALUE: $993,000

. BEL-AIR ESTATES -

CARMIGHAEL ROAD

LOT NO. 259

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence,

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east on
Carmichael Road from Faith
Avenue take the fourth corner on
the right (Turtle Drive) property is
fourth house on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $186,000

. CARMICHAEL ROAD

LOT NO. Parcel of Land
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residence

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 12,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travelling east on
Carmichael Road from Bacardi
Road take the first asphalt paved
easement on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $401,882

. CHIPPINGHAM SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 96

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

3 beds /1 bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: From Nassau Street
onto Boyd Road, take the fifth
corner on the right - Dunmore
Street and then second corner
on the right Musgrove Street. The
property is the first house on the
corner left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $120,000

CORAL MEADOWS

SUBDIVISION —- WESTERN
DISTRICT

LOT NO. 4

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 7,500 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Western side of
Symonette Road and 150 feet
northward of Adelaide Road and
approximately a mile westward of
Coral Harbour Roundabout.
APPRAISED VALUE: $260,000

. DESTINY GARDEN

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 147

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

3 Beds /2Baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travelling west

on Carmichael Road from the
intersection of Gladstone Road

- about 2,000 feet - turn right at
the entrance of Destiny Garden
Subdivision; turn left at t-junction.
The property is the 19th house on
the right.

APPRAISED VALUE: $137,000

. ALLEN DRIVE CARMICHAEL

ROAD

LOT NO. 2

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Duplex Lot

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travelling west along
Carmichael Road turn through the
corner by Geneva Brass Seafood.
Take the third corner on the left
and travel to the end of the road.
The vacant lot is on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $65,000

. MALVARIC ESTATES

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 5

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Multi-Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 9,114 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travelling south along
High Vista Drive from East Bay
Street, take the 1st corner left

and then first right (Mango Drive).
Heading south take the 4th corner
right. At the t- junction, turn left
then take the first corner right.
The vacant lot is the third property
on the left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $109,000

. ELIZABETH ESTATES

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 178

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

5 beds / 1 bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Enter Elizabeth
Estates from Prince Charles, take
the first right and follow the curve.
The property is located on the
corner of St. Vincent Avenue and
Ghana Circle.

APPRAISED VALUE: $118,000

. ENGLERSTON SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 19 Block 22
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residence

2-beds / 1-bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: On the western side
of St. Charles Vincent Street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $64,000

. ENGLERSTON SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 4 Block 7
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Triplex Apartment building
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east on
Cordeaux Avenue from East
Street take the second right (Key
West Street). Heading south

on Key West Street the subject
property is the sixth building on
the left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $243,000

10. FAITH GARDENS SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 23 Block 4
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-family Residence

2 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: From Faith Avenue
enter Faith Gardens and travel
east along Cleveland Boulevard
then take the fourth corner

on the left. The property is

the 13th house on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $184,000

11. GOLDEN GATES TWO_

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 1010

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on
Carmichael Road, turn south onto
Jack Fish Drive; turn through the
fourth corner on the right. The
property is the third lot on the
right.

APPRAISED VALUE: $112,000

12. HAWKINS HILL

LOT NO. 52

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 6.175 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Southern side of
Windwhistle Street just east on
Hawkins Hill.

APPRAISED VALUE: $275,000

. OPULENT HEIGHTS
SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 28

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,597 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on
Carmichael Road, take the first
paved road after “Outdoor Patio”
on the left. Take the second
corner left, then the first corner
right. The vacant lot is second
to the last on the right before the
road ends.

APPRAISED VALUE: $75,000

. SOUTH OCEAN ESTATES

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 9 Block 4

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 11,566 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling south of
Lyford Cay, immediately pass
Mount Pleasant turn left on South
Ocean Boulevard to new South
Ocean Estates. The vacant lot is
number 9 in Block 4.
APPRAISED VALUE: $110,000

13. JUBILEE GARDENS

16. NASSAU EAST SUBDIVISION

17

18. PARADISE CONDOMINIUMS

. SOUTH SEAS SUBDIVISION

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 48

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

3 beds / 1 bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: From Fire Trail road
enter Jubilee Gardens and

take the first corner on the left
then the first right, the property is
the second house on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $128,000

14. MARSHALL ROAD

LOT NO. 17D

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Triplex Apartment

One 2-bedroom/ 2-bath & Two
2-bedroom /1-bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 10,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west along
Marshall Road from South Beach
Road, take the first corner on the
right (Tiao End Road). The subject
property is the fourth building on
the left painted green with white
trim.

APPRAISED VALUE: $288,000

15. MILLENNIUM GARDENS

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 85

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence,

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,952 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling north

on Bethel Avenue from Harold
Road take the third corner on
the right, Heading east pass the
third T-junction around the curve
to the junction of Sis. Theresa
Symonette Drive then turn left
onto Sis. Maria Rahming Drive.
The property is the 14th house on
the right.

APPRAISED VALUE: $182,000

LOT NO. 4 Block 8
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Apartment Building/Commercial
Complex

PROPERTY SIZE: 14,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Eastern district of
New Providence. The subject
property is on Yamacraw Hill
Road opposite Treasure Cove.
APPRAISED VALUE: $686,000

. NASSAU VILLAGE SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 10 & 11 Block 48
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

5 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 10,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travelling east along
Taylor street take a left

at the T-junction onto Alexandria
Boulevard, then take the third
right onto Matthews Street. The
property is located on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $257,000

LOT NO. 65

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Townhouse Unit 1 — Two-storey
apartment

PROPERTY SIZE: Floor area
1,215 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Eastern side of Faith
Avenue North - 100 feet south of
Hamster Road.

APPRAISED VALUE: $150,000

LOT NO. 199

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,983 sq. ft.
LOCATION: From Carmichael
Road turn onto Barcardi Road,
take the seventh corner on the left
then turn into the entrance gate.
The vacant lot is located on the
southern side of Channel Drive off
Eastward Drive.

APPRAISED VALUE: $90,000

. SOUTH SEAS SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 261

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,500 sq. ft.
LOCATION: From Carmichael
Road turn onto Barcardi Road,
take the seventh corner on left.
Turn into the entrance gate and
take the first right then second
left. The vacant lot is the twenty-
second property on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $90,000

21

19. PINEWOOD GARDENS

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 1438

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Two-
storey Residence 3 beds / 3 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: South on Wild Guava
Avenue

APPRAISED VALUE: $315,000

20. SANDILANDS VILLAGE

LOT NOS. 7 and 8

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence, with 3
apartments under construction
PROPERTY SIZE: Lot 7 - 7,970
sq. ft / Lot 8 - 8,419 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west along
Sandilands Village Road from Fox
Hill Road, take the ninth paved
road (Vanessa Close) on the left.
The properties are situated at the
northwestern side of the street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $277,000

. SOLDIER ROAD

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Two-storey Commercial Building
PROPERTY SIZE: 4,750 sq. ft.
LOCATION: On Soldier Road
1,000 feet east of Lady Slipper
Road

APPRAISED VALUE: $309,000

22.SOUTH BEACH ESTATES

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 1 Block 22

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Split
Level Residential Building with 3
Apartment Units.

PROPERTY SIZE:

Land 6,600 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Travel south along
East Street from Bamboo
Boulevard take the first corner on
right (Bougainvillea Boulevard).
Heading west on Bougainvillea
Boulevard, take the second
corner on the right, turn left at
the t-junction onto Oxford Drive.
The property is third house on
the right at the western corner of
Serville Drive and Oxford Avenue.
APPRAISED VALUE: $297,000

23. TWYNAM HEIGHTS

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 61

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Two-storey Residence, 2 beds / 1
bath/ with one apartment unit
PROPERTY SIZE: 9,100 sq. ft.
LOCATION: On the corner of
Victoria Street and Coronation
Road immediately east of
Wendy’s off Mackey Street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $203,000

24.YAMACRAW BEACH ESTATES

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 470

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Two-
storey Residence 3 beds / 3 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,200 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Southern side of
Mayaguana Avenue approximately
99 feet east of Yamacraw Beach
Drive.

APPRAISED VALUE: $402,000

VACANT LOTS

. VICTORIA GARDENS
SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 60

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travel south on
Gladstone Road from JFK Drive

take the first corner on the left,

entrance to Victoria Gardens.
Heading east, proceed to the
second T-junction, the property is
directly opposite.

APPRAISED VALUE: $66,000

. VICTORIA PARK SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 6

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Multi-family lot

PROPERTY SIZE: 6,707 sq. ft.
LOCATION: On the northern side
of Bunch Street about 60 feed
south of East Street and opposite
Calvary Deliverance Church
APPRAISED VALUE: $67,000

INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS INCLUSIVE OF TELEPHONE CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS
TO: CB DISTRESSED PROPERTIES, CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT, P.O BOX - SS-6263 NASSAU, BAHAMAS OR
EMAIL US AT: DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM * WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS.


PAGE 12, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009



SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



OTE T ATE

Truckers urged to regain F%

their hunger for success

m By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

IF the Commando Security
Truckers are going to be able to
defend their men’s title in the
New Providence Softball Associ-
ation, manager Perry Seymour
said they will definitely have to
play better than they did on Sat-
urday night.

Despite taking an early 10-2
lead, the Truckers had to dip
down deep to hold off the
Thompson Heavy Equipment
Outlaws 12-10 in the feature
game at the Banker’s Field at the
Baillou Hills Sporting Complex.

It came down to the top of the
seventh when first baseman
Stephen ‘Slugger’ Brown pro-
duced a two-run single to break
up a 10-10 tie for the secure the
win.

+ +

4



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

THOMPSON HEAVY EQUIPMENT OUTLAWS’ Roscoe Thompdon throws a pitch

against the Commando Security Truckers.

In the opener, it was also a
close affair as Robin Hood Hit-
man (formerly the New Breed),
survived with a 4-3 decision over

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the Young Breed, thanks to
Alcott Forbes’ RBI triple in the
seventh.

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Felipé Major/Tribune staff

MANAGER Perry Seymour tries to rally his Commando Security Truckersd in their game against the Thompdon Heavy Equip-

ment Outlaws.

Seymour said. “We have to real-
ize that when we have a team
down, we have to keep them
down. We can’t let them come
back like the Outlaws did or we
will get beat.”

The Truckers avoided their sec-
ond loss of the season to remain
in second place in the standings at
4-1 behind the undefeated Heavy
Lift Dorsey Park Boyz, who are
3-0.

With the loss, the Outlaws suf-
fered their second defeat in three
games and are now in fifth place.

“T think we came out flat,” said
third baseman Hosea Hilton
about Thompson Heavy Equip-
ment’s sluggish start. “We made
too many errors and we can’t win
like that.”

Consolation

The former track star from
Eleuthera, however, admitted
that if there’s any consolation for
his Outlaws, they don’t have that
many seasoned players in their
line-up.

“As the season goes on, we
should get better,” said Hilton,
who is making a return after
almost a 10-year hiatus rom the
sport when he would have played
in Eleuthera.

Also making a comeback was
Truckers’ pitcher Greg Mortimer,
who played in his first game for
the season.

Mortimer gave up seven hits
and six runs through the middle
of the fifth before he was relieved
by Anton ‘Bookie’ Gibson, an
off-season acquistion.

“T’m just still trying to get the
ball over the plate,” Miortimer
said. “But we have to play better
fundamental ball. As the season
goes on, we will get better.”

The Truckers had a pretty good
start as Martin Burrows Jr.,
another off-season acquistion,
came through with a two-run sin-
gle in a three-run first inning.

The Outlaws responded in the
bottom on Juliano Thompson’s
run-producing single.

Again, the Truckers put three
more runs on the scoreboard in
the second, highlighted by Marvin

CBRL Tr

New Providence Softball Association's 2009 league standings
L

Teams

Men's Division

Heavy Lift Dorsey Park Boyz 3
Commando Security Truckers 4
PriceWaterHouse Stingrays 3
Defense Force Commodores 2
Thompson Heavy

Equipment Outlaws

Robin Hood Hitmen

Mighty Mits

Young Breed

Morgan Buccaneers

Ladies' Division

Pineapple Air Wildcats

Sigma Brackettes

Proper Care Pool Lady Sharks
Bristol Mystical Gems
Bommer G Swingers

This week's schedule
Tonight

oOonMmwt o-eH Nt

Pet.

1,000
.800
.150
.666

.666
400
.290
.200
.000

1,000
1,000
.500
.000
.000

7 pm Commando Security vs Mighty Mits (M).
8:30 pm Heavy Lift Dorsey Park vs Morgans Buccaneers (M).

Thursday

7 pm Defense Force Commando vs Morgan Bucaneers (M).
8:30 pm Bommer G Swingers vs Pineapple Air Wildcats (L).

Friday

7 pm Young Breed vs PriceWaterHouse (M).
8:30 pm Thompson Heavy Lift vs Robin Hood Hitmen (M).

Saturday

7 pm Bommer G Swingers vs Untouchables (L).
8:30 pm Mighty Mits vs PriceWaterHouse (M).

A THOMPSON HEAVY EQUIPMENT OUTLAWS’ pitcher tried to avoid ais

é Major/Tribune staff



-Felip

tagged by Commando Security Truckers’ third baseman Jamal Johnson.

‘Tougie’ Wood’s two-run in-the-
park home run.
And the Outlaws plated anoth-

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender
Consultancy Services

The Eshamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for the services described below:

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation's Administration Ofiee, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders ate te be addresced ta:
Mr. Kevin Basden

General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery ta BEC; an of before
July 3, 2009
fo later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:
Tender No. 704/09
CONSULTANCY SERVICES!
PROPOSAL TO INVESTIGATE CONCRETE
DELAMINATING AT STATION "A" BUILDING
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

The Corporation reserves the right to
accept of reject any oe all proposals.

Por all enquiries regarding the tenders and site visits, contact

Mr. Stefan Edgecombe at telephone 302-1505.

Site visit will take place on Friday, June 26, 2009 at 10:00 a.m-
at BEC, Cliftan Pier Power Station.



er in the bottom as Quintin
Carey’s RBI double knocked in
Giovanni Saunders.

In the third, both teams struck
for three unearned runs.

In their half, Van ‘Lil Joe’
Johnson had a RBI single and he
and Marvin Wood both came
home on an error that put
Stephen ‘Slugger’ Brown on first.

In the bottom, Bruce Mackey
had a oner-out double and scored
on Clayton Bowles’ RBI single
before Hilton and Bowles both
scammered home on on consecu-
tive miscues.

Commando Security struck for
their 10th run in the fourth on
Tommy ‘Bucker T’ Fergusn’s
RBI single to plate Julian Taylor
in the fourth.

It wasn’t until the fifth when
Thompson’s Heavy Equipment
produced a pair of runs on a two-
run homer from Juliano Thomp-
son and Bowles doubled to send
Mortimer in the dug-out for Gib-
son.

The Outlaws didn’t get to Gib-
son until the sixth when Bowles
got a two-out two-run triple and
he scored on Carey’s RBI single
to actually pull even at 10-10.

But in the seventh, it was
Brown’s two-rn single, knocking
in Van Johnson and Marvin
Wood to seal the game for the
Truckers.

Like the feature contest, the
Hitman had to go to the seventh
before they held off the Young
Breed for their second win in five
games.

Alcott Forbes’ two-out RBI
triple plated William Delancy
before Forbes came home on an
error for the tying and winning
run.

“T haven’t been swining the bat
like I should. I just felt it was time
for me to come through,” Forbes
said. “But as a team, we’re flat.
We should not played these guys
this close.”

Forbes finished 2-for-4 with a
double and triple, two RBI anda
run scored, while Adrian Pinder
was 2-for-3 with a double and a
RBI.

Cardinal Gilbert got the win
on the mound over Eugene Pratt.

In a losing effort, Angelo But-
ler was 2-for-4 with two RBI; Ken
Wood 2-for-2 wirh a run and
Addie Finley 2-for-4 with a run.
TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



TRACK AND FIELD

Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium gets facelift



WITH the Bahamas Association of Athletic
Associations getting ready to host three major
competitions over the next two weeks, inclusive of
the Central American and Caribbean Age Group
Championships and the Junior Nationals both
this weekend and the Open Nationals, June 26th
and 27th, the Thomas A. Robinson Track and
Field Stadium is currently getting a facelift.

Workmen are busy resurfacing and repairing
the track surface with fresh coats of paint on the
lanes and lane numbers.

Work is also being done to the field and bleach-
ers in the spectators area.

The Local Organizing Committee for the CAC
Age Group, chaired by Dr Bernard Nottage, is
also busy preparing to receive the twenty counties




FROM page 15

Tonique Williams-Darling, how-
ever, emerged as the first
Bahamian to cash in on the pay-
check when she and Sweden’s
Christan Olssen split the $1 mil-
lion in 2004.

Brown, in thanking God for
keeping him healthy after the
race, said it was good to be back
in Europe after a nine-month
absence to pull off his first victo-

“At the start of the race, I felt
pretty good,” he said. “My legs
were a bit heavy, so I wasn’t able
to do what I wanted to do in the
race, but I still got the W under
my belt. So I will take it and not
worry about the time.

“T’m in grat shape, but I just
felt real flat for some reason.
Maybe it’s because I didn’t allow
myself sufficient time to get in
here and get adjusted to the time
difference. There was a lot of
things that factored into the race.”

Despite how he felt, Brown’s
time was good enough to place
him well ahead of the African
record holder Gary Kikaya, who
did 45.68 for second.

Grand Bahamian Michael Mat-
tieu was third in 45.92 and
Andretti Bain, who is slowly mak-
ing his return to the track after
being hampered by a slight ham-
string injury, was seventh in 46.82.

“It was a nice strong field. I
was racing guys who were top
notched, even though the guys
didn’t run as fast as they did last
year at this time,” Brown stressed.

“At the same time, these guys
could pull anything out of the bas-
ket. and it was nice to have
Andretti and Michael in the same
race. You don’t really get to see
three Bahamians in one race at
the same time.”

The reigning national champi-
on said the race was also a confi-
dent booster for him as he pre-
pare to come home to defend his
title for the Bahamas Association
of Athletic Associations’ Nation-
al Championships, June 26-27 at
the Thomas A. Robinson Track
and Field Stadium.

Brown, 30, won’t compete
again until the Nationals, which
will also serve as the final trials
for the IAAF World Champi-
onships in Athletics in Berlin in
August.

After the Nationals, Brown will
then return to Europe to run in
the next three legs of the Golden
League in Oslo (July 3), Rome
(July 10) and Paris (July 17)
before they head to the World’s
in Berlin.

Following the World’s, the final
two legs of the Golden League
will take place in Zurich (August
28) and Brussels (September 4).

Brown, incidentally, also leads
the IAAF’s 2009 World Athletics
Tour in the 400. After three races,
Brown has accumulated a total
of 31 points, tied with Kikaya,
who only did two races.

Mathieu is tied with two others
for seventh with 14.

There was also a showdown in
Berlin behind the top two female
sprinters with Chandra Sturrup
taking fourth in 11.18, followed
by Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie
in fifth in 11.19.

Jamaican Kerron Stewart
pulled off the victory in 11.00,
while American Stephanie Durst
broke up the Jamaican sweep in
second in 11.15. Sheri-Ann
Brooks, another Jamaica, got
third in 11.18.

Sturrup is now fifth in the
World Athletics standings with
27 points from four meets. Fer-
guson-McKenzie is 17th from two

BLAZING A
TRAIL: Chris
‘Fireman’ Brown
after his race in
the 2009 Golden
League in Europe.

meets with 15 points.

Also from Berlin, Sharma
Sands, the national 110 hurdles
record holder, had to settle for
fourth in the event in 13.56
behind an American sweep by
Dexter Faulk (13.18), Ryan Wil-
son (13.21) and David Payne
(13.22).

Sands occupies fifth place in
the World Athletics standings





with 33 points from five events.

Although they didn’t compete
yesterday, Olympic bronze
medalist Leevan ‘Superman’
Sands is tied with Cuban Arnie
David Girat for second in the
men’s triple jump with 20 points
from two meets and world cham-
pion Donald Thomas third in the
men’s high jump with 16.5 points
from three meets.

expected to be in Nassau this week. The first
team is expected to arrive today and the balance
on Tuesday and Wednesday.

In total there our some one hundred and six
athletes, forty five coaches and officials along
with Federation Representatives and CAC Exec-
utives. The BAAA is appealing all Bahamians to
come out and support all the upcoming meets

starting with the CAC Age Group Championships
on Thursday at 9 am. The Bahamas will be rep-
resented by Jeorjette Williams and Jeisha Taylor
in the girls 11-12; Danielle Gibson and Pedrya
Seymour in the girls 13-14; Julius Nottage and
Timothy Wilson in the boys 11-12 and Delano
Davis from Grand Bahama and Jerrio Rahming
in the boys 13-14.

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PAGE 14, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

SPORTS
LHiViehwr

memorable
Cae aN

FROM page 15

place finishers from the NORCE-
CA Pool C. It was the team’s first
win of the tournament in straight
sets and easily their most lopsided
margin of victory. Cheryse Rolle
led the scoring with 12 points, all
coming from attacks. Team cap-
tain Kelsie Johnson and
Tasamine Emmanuel-Poitier both
finished with 11 points apiece,
while Melinda Bastian chipped
in with 10. The Bahamas finished
the tournament at 2-2, with an
opening round win over Haiti, 25-
23 25-21 22-25 22-25 15-11, a sec-
ond round loss to Barbados 22-25
25-18 26-24 23-25 15-7, and the
loss to Jamaica in the semi-finals,
25-23 25-9 25-13.

Much of the focus for the
national team had been centred
on the theft of approximately
$47,000 worth of equipment and
personal effects from the team’s
locker room during their second
round match against Barbados.







US-BASED Tonya Joseph
is rejected at the net by
Melinda Bastian of the
Bahamas.

Team Head Coach Joe Smith
said his squad willingly stepped
up to the challenge when faced
with an unexpected adverse situ-
ation. “These girls had to go

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through a lot. Just to be able to
finish the tournament and finish it
successfully says a lot about them
and how much they wanted this,”
he said, “We had everything
stolen and they could have quit
but they bounced back the best
way they could.”

“Tt was hard for the team, men-
tally and physically to get back
into playing. We had to deal with
the situation with the police and
heading into the game against
Jamaica, we had to be at the
police station until 6pm and we
were scheduled to play at 7, so to
play well in that semi-final was
hard,” he said, “They had a
chance to regroup and still was
able to focus on doing what we
have to do, which is advance to
the next round.”

sports

TRACK
ARMRISTER/WHYTE AT NCAA

SPRINTERS Cache Armbris-
ter and Kristy Whyte finished
eighth and ninth respectively in
the wmoen’s 200 metres on the
final day of competition at the
NCAA Division One 2009 Out-
door Track and Field Champi-
onships.

On Saturday, Armbrister, a
sophomore at Auburn University,

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HIGH SCORER Melinda
Bastian scoring another kill
for the Bahamas over Tonya

was clocked in 23.80 seconds,
while Whyte, a junior at the Uni-
versity of Miami, got ninth in
23.91.

“T think what got me was my
start,” said Armbrister in an a
quote from Auburn’s website. “T
didn't fire out like I wanted to,
so I ended up running a little bit
out of my race on the curve, and
having to set it up all over again
coming home on the straight-
away.

“Being an All-American helps
me feel a little bit better, but I
hate to feel like I settled for
eighth, so it gives me something
to work for next year.”

Porscha Lucas, a junior at
Texas A&M, stopped the clock
in 22.81 for the victory.

The only other Bahamian to
make the final at the meet was
Southern Illinois’ senior Bianca
Stuart, who had to settle for the
14th and final spot in the womrn’s
long jump with a leap of 19-feet, 3
1/4-inches (5.87 metres).

Kimberly Williams, a sopho-
more at Florida State, won the
event with her leap of 21-5 1/2
(6.54 metres).

a



TENNIS
KNOWLES /BHUPATHI IN EAST-
BOURNE

After making an early exit at the
French Open at Roland Garros,
Mark Knowles and his Indian
partner Mahesh Bhupathi are
hoping to regain their form at the
Aegon International in East-
bourne, London, Great Britain.
Knowles and Bhupathi are the
number two seeds in the tourna-
ment that open today and run
through Sunday. The top seeds
are Lukas Dlouhy from the Czech
Republic and Leander Paes from
India, who are coming off their
French Open tournament victory
as the No.3 seeds.

When they start play, Knowles
and Bhuapthi will take on the
team of Stephen Huss from Aus-
tralia and Ross Hutchins from
Great Britain.

Going into the tournament,
Knowles and Bhupathi have
slipped to number four, trailing
Dlouhy and Paes, who moved up
to No.3. At the top of the ladder
is the American identical twin
brothers, Bob and Mike Bryan,

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INSURANCE CAF

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who regained the lead from
Daniel Nestor and Nenad Zimon-
jic.
The Aegon International is a pre-
lude to Wimbledon that starts in
Great Britain on June 22. Wim-
bledon is the second Grand Slam
tournament for the year.
Knowles and Bhupathi were
finalist at the first Grand Slam at
the Australian Open in January.
At the second Grand Slam at
Roland Garros in May, Knowles
and Bhupathi were ousted in the
third round s the fourth seeds.

TRACK
FACEOFF CORRECTIONS

IN Saturday’s edition of the
BAAA’s Face Off for its athletes
heading into the National Open
Track and Field Stadium, it was
incorrectly stated that sprinter
Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie
attended RM Bailey High School.
She actually attended CC Sweet-
ing and then graduated from St.
Andrew’s.

The Tribune apologises for the
error.

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THE TRIBUNE PAGE 15

spor

MONDAY, JUNE 15,

ts

2009








CEC Adda Ud

Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net











































CHRIS ‘Fireman’ Brown,
still beaming from his two
recent Hall of Fame induc-
tions in the United States, has
gotten off to a sizzling start
on the 2009 Golden League
in Europe.

At the first of six meets on
the circuit for the whopping
$1 million jackpot on Sunday,
Brown won the men’s 400
metres at the DKB-ISTAF in
Berlin, Germany in 45.61 sec-
onds in a field that included
two other Bahamians.

Only the winners are eligi-
ble for the pot and Brown is
now in company with three
others on the men’s side and
five on the women’s side that
will not feature any Bahami-
ans.

Events on this year’s jack-
pot are the men’s 100, 400,
3,000/5,000, 110 hurdles and
javelin. The women’s are the
100, 400, 100 hurdles, high
jump and pole vault.

“T’m just waiting until
(Jeremy) Wariner and
(LaShawn) Merritt to come
on the scene,” said Brown of
the American dynamic duo
whom Brwn has had his share
of problems with at the major
international meets including
the Olympic Games and the
World Championships.

Neither Wariner or Mer-
ritt competed in the opener,
which makes them ineligible
for the hefty cash prize. To
be eligible, a competitor must
compete and win all six
meets.

Sprinter Chandra Sturrup
had a shot at the big cash
incentive in 2001, but she fal-
tered down the stretch.

SEE page 13
















AP Photo/Michael Sohn




CHRIS BROWN finishes first during the men's 400 metres race of the
ISTAF Golden League Athletics Meeting in Berlin Sunday, June 14, 2009.

©2009 Hilton Hospitality Inc.







WOMEN’S WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP VOLLEYBALL

Bahamas clinches
memorable victory

Team earns berth

to third round of
qualification for
championships

@ by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

Against a wall of adversity,
team Bahamas prevailed in one
of the most memorable national
team triumphs to date, while
simultaneously earning a berth to
the third round of qualification
for the 2010 FIVB World Cham-
pionships.

The Bahamas prevailed in the
bronze medal game against St.
Lucia in straight sets 26-24, 25-
14, 25-21 yesterday at NORCE-
CA Pool D during the second
round of the FIVB Women’s
World Championship at the
Garfield Sobers Sports Complex
in Bridgetown, Barbados.

With the win the Bahamas,
along with the loser of the gold
medal match between Barbados
and Jamaica, will be relegated to
NORCECA Pool I in Puerto
Rico along with the host country
and Canada

The winner of the tournament
will advance to the NORCECA
Pool G, July 6-8 in Orlando,
Florida to match up against the
USA, Costa Rica, and the second

SEE page 14

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THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY,

€
c ie
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il

JUNE

ie



2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

J

Colinalmperial.

Confidence For Life







Government
draws down

$200m bridge
KAU LOTINY

* Government ‘not
optimistic about quick
economic turnaround’

* Sovereign bond to replace
bridge facility to be placed
internationally when market
conditions allow



Zhivargo Laing

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Government has begun
to draw down on the $200 mil-
lion bridging loan facility put
together by a Bahamas-based
commercial bank syndicate to
cover the anticipated $260 mil-
lion revenue shortfall for fiscal
2008-2009, with one minister
telling Tribune Business: “We
aren’t optimistic about a quick
[economic] turnaround.”

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, confirmed to
Tribune Business that it was
“correct” to say the Govern-
ment had “drawn on those
resources in the last couple of
weeks” as it moves to shore up
the deficit left by the recession’s
impact on its revenue intake.

SEE page 7B

The information contained is from a third |
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report, af





Freeport-Florida
ferry service plan

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A new ferry company is
pledging to start a daily round-
trip service between West
Palm Beach and Freeport this
year, Tribune Business can
reveal, with the possibility of
future expansion that includes
routes between Florida and
the Family Islands.

Ride Ocean Zoom, on its
website www.rideocean-
zoom.com, pledged that it
would “provide customers
with a comfortable and fast
way to get to the Bahamas
from West Palm Beach. Our
services also provide Bahami-
ans with a fast and cost-effi-
cient way to get to and from
the main land of the United
States”.

Ride Ocean Zoom execu-
tives did not respond to
detailed questions sent to
them by Tribune Business via
e-mail. A telephone call to the
number listed on the compa-
ny’s website was met with the
message: “Our services are

scheduled to begin this year,
2009.”

Still, the company seems
genuine, with its senior exec-
utives all listed on the website
and their background details
checking out via Internet-
related research conducted by
this newspaper.

Ride Ocean Zoom’s
founder and chief executive is
named as Rosalind Withers,
who is said to have some 25
years of experience in the
sales and marketing, and logis-
tics, industries after working
with companies such as East-
man Kodak, Ryder Truck
Rental, Raytheon Data Sys-
tem and all eight companies
that comprise Federal Express
(FedEx).

Other Board members
include Chris How-Davies,
founder and owner of 2mor-
row Group, a UK-based com-
pany with a more than $60
million turnover and 180 staff.
It is highly involved in travel
technology and ferry distribu-
tion organisation.

A Bahamian, Spencer Mal-

Ahaco Markets targets $100m
Sales after 10-fold profit hike

* Company ‘puts together five-year growth plan’
eyeing new Nassau store location

* QI profits increase to over $1m from $82,000
last year, with food division sales up $2.2m at 12%
* Retailer leases land, with option to buy, for
possible 15-20,000 sq ft Solomon's expansion

* Achieves $127,000 net cash position, with all
brands and stores ‘profitable for first time in a

long time’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Abaco Markets has “put
together a five-year growth strat-
egy” that may involve new store
locations, with its president pre-
dicting that sales will reach the
$100 million mark for this finan-
cial year, as the BISX-listed retail
group continues to defy the reces-
sion with a more than ten-fold
increase in first quarter net prof-
its.

Gavin Watchorn told Tribune
Business that if the $100 million
group top-line forecast holds true
for the year to January 31, 2010,
the Solomon’s SuperCentre and

SEE page 3B

lory, who worked on Ginn sur
met’s real estate sales is vice-
president of international sales
and marketing for Ride Ocean
Zoom, with Michael Calandra
named as vice-president of
development. Alfred DeMott,
the company’s chief financial
officer, was said to be vice-
president and treasurer of the
Bacarus Group, an entity cre-
ated to market travel and
logistics services in the
Bahamas.

It appears as if the concept
offered by Ride Ocean Zoom
will similar to that of Bahamas
Ferries, which services the
likes of Abaco, Eleuthera,
Harbour Island, Andros and
Exuma from Nassau. The type
of vessel displayed on the
company’s website is almost
a mirror image of the ones
employed by Bahamas Fer-
ries.

Ride Ocean Zoom’s emer-
gence, if it comes to fruition
and full operation, could also

SEE page 6B



GAVIN WATCHORN

Ross considers 3,000-
person medical school
expansion plan

* Port conducting studies on Freeport's
feasibility for medical tourism

* St George estate's attorney lobbying
government to deny Babak work permit

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Ross University is considering expanding its Freeport-based
medical school campus to 3,000 persons “within two to three
years”, senior Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA) offi-
cials have confirmed to Tribune Business, with the latter’s
group president calling for an end to “distractions” such as the
lobbying effort urging the Government to deny its chairman a
renewal of his work permit.

Tribune Business can reveal that Fred Smith, the Callen-
der’s & Co attorney and partner, who represents the late
Edward St George’s estate in its fight with Sir Jack Hayward’s
family trust over ownership of the GBPA and Port Group Ltd,
has written two separate letters to members of the Ingraham
Cabinet urging the Government not to renew the work permit
of Hannes Babak, the chairman of both companies.

Although this newspaper has not obtained copies of these let-
ters, Mr Babak, in a telephone interview with Tribune Business,
confirmed their existence and attacked them for spreading
“untruths” about himself and his initial 2006 application for a
work permit to be GBPA and Port Group Ltd chair.

“The letters were sent to the directors of the Port Authority
and Port Group Ltd, and were sent to the Prime Minister and
the Cabinet,” Mr Babak confirmed. “He [Mr Smith] was claim-

SEE page 10B

Amendment to deal with
‘challenges’ over audits

mg By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



The Government’s amendments to the Customs Management Act
are designed to clarify that powers reserved for the Minister of Finance
can be exercised by the Comptroller of Customs and his senior officials,
a government minister has said, overcoming the “challenges” posed by
Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA) licensees to Customs’ audit
powers.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, told Tribune Business:
“We are faced with a situation in which a number of people have
challenged the Customs Department’s ability to audit their affairs in
order to determine that the goods they import duty free, or condi-
tionally duty free, were actually used for the purpose they were sup-
posed to be used for in accordance with the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment and accompanying legislation.

“The courts indicated that that power is reserved for the Minister of
Finance, and what we are doing is amending the Customs Management

SEE page 8B

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THE TRIBUNE
















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between June 13 and June 19, 2009

Drawing Saturday June 20th, 2009

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Markets

Last week, investors traded in
four out of the 24 listed securi-
ties, of which three declined and

THE BAHAMIAN STOCK MARKET

FINDEX 779.87

one remained unchanged. aoe $1.39 $-0.01

EQUITY MARKET Ec : , Ge e

A total of 82,661 shares :
changed hands last week, repre- BPF $11.00 $-
senting an increase of 67,880 BSL $7.92 $-
shares compared to the previous BWL $3.15 $-
week's trading volume of 14,781 oa : a a a =
shares. . WU.

Abaco Markets (AML) was CHL = $ 2.83 $-
the volume leader with 70,000 CIB $10.38 $-0.02
shares trading hands, its stock CWCB $ 3.51 $0.06
price decreasing by $0.01 to end DHS = $ 1.50 $-
the week at $1.39. FAM $ 7.76 $-

Commonwealth Bank (CBL) FBB $ 2.37 $-
was the lead decliner, its share FC $ 0.30 $-
price falling by $0.50 to a new 52- FCL $ 5.09 $-
week low of $5.50 on a volume a

FCLB $ 1.00 $

of 6,650 shares. FIN $ 10.97 $-

FirstCaribbean International ICD $ 550 Gs
Bank (Bahamas) (CIB) traded , 7
5,540 shares, its stock droppin JSJ $ 10.50 $

; me PRE $10.00 $-

$0.02 to close at a new 52-week
low of $10.38.

BOND MARKET
No notes traded in the Bahami-
an market last week.

COMPANY NEWS:

Dividend & Annual General
Meeting (AGM) Notes:

Finance Corporation of the
Bahamas (FIN) has declared a
dividend of $0.13 per share,
payable on June 16, 2009, to all

(-6.58%) YTD

CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE CHANGE

70,000 -18.71%
4.55%
-9.16%
-6.78%

-22.28%

0.00%
-18.82%
-21.43%

0.00%
-0.67%
56.00%

0 -41.18%

0 -0.51%

471 0.00%

0 0.00%

0 -1.55%

0 0.00%

0 -1.58%
0
0

0

OO009000

-10.28%
5.41%
0.00%

BOND MARKET - TRADING STATISTICS

BISX SYMBOL

[RF_RFBGIF_Tribune.jpg]

Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
has declared a dividend of $0.05
per share, payable on June 30,
2009, to all shareholders of record

shareholders of record date June date June 15, 2009.

asm: Consolidated Water (CWCO)
has declared a dividend of $0.013

FOREX Rates
Currency Weekly % Change
CAD 0.8943 - 1.96
GBP 1.6445 + 1.57
EUR 1.4008 - 1.27
Commodities
Commodity Weekly % Change
Crude Oil 72.89 +6.10
Gold 939.80 -4.41
International Stock Market Indexes
Index Weekly % Change
DJIA 8,799.26 + 0.56
S & P 500 946.21 + 0.40
NASDAQ 1,858.80 + 0.47
Nikkei 10,135.82 +483

DESCRIPTION VOLUME PAR VALUE
FBB13 FBBL Series C Notes Due 2013 0
FBB15 FBBL Series D Notes Due 2015 0
FBB17 FBBL Series A Notes Due 2017 0
FBB22 FBBL Series B Notes Due 2022 0

$1,000
$1,000
$1,000
$1,000

per share, payable on August 10,
2009, to all shareholders of record
date July 1, 2009.

FamGuard Corporation
(FAM) announced it will be hold-
ing its Annual General Meeting
on Friday, June 19, 2009, at 4pm
at the British Colonial Hilton,
Victoria Room, Bay Street, Nas-
sau, Bahamas. Shareholders of
record as of May 21, 2009, will be
qualified to vote at the Meeting.

J.S. Johnson Company (JSJ)
announced it will be holding its
Annual General Meeting on
Monday, June 15, 2009, at 6pm
at the British Colonial Hilton,
Victoria Room, Bay Street, Nas-
sau, Bahamas.

Doctors Hospital Health Sys-
tems (DHS) announced it will be
holding its Annual General Meet-
ing on Thursday, June 18, 2009, at
5.30pm at Doctors Hospital,
Dowdeswell Street, Nassau,
Bahamas. Shareholders of record
as of May 27, 2009, will be quali-
fied to vote at the Annual Meet-
ing.

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E: EstatesOfSeaview.com
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 3B



Abaco Markets targets $100m sales after 10-fold profit hike

FROM page 1B

Cost-Right owner will have gen-
erated $30 million in organic —
same-store — sales growth over
the past three financial years dat-
ing back to end-January 2007.

He acknowledged, though, that
such an organic growth rate — 42.9
per cent over a three-year period
- was difficult to maintain over
an extended period, hence the
look for growth and new store
opportunities.

“We've put together a five-year
growth strategy for the company
from 2009 to 2014,” Mr Watchorn
told Tribune Business. “Obvious-
ly, we’ve had great organic
growth over the last couple of
years from the same stores. They
did $70 million for the fiscal year
to January 2007, and we hope and
have good expectations that it will
be a $100 million company for
this year, which is a pretty pleas-
ing growth rate. We think we will
get over the $100 million mark
this year.

“That rate of organic growth
is not going to continue for ever,
and future growth will come from
new locations. We’re looking in
Nassau for an additional location,
but it’s too early to say where it
would be. We’ve got some plan-
ning going on. We’ve definitely
increased market share over the
last few years.”

Mr Watchorn added that he
was unable to say whether it was
the Solomon’s or Cost Right for-
mat that had been earmarked for
Nassau expansion, but Abaco
Markets’ outward looking plans
indicate the company is looking
forward with confidence despite
the recession, having returned to
consistent profitability after com-
pletion of its five-year turnaround
programme.

For the fiscal 2010 first quarter,
the BISX-listed retail group gen-
erated a $1.043 million net profit,
a more than ten-fold increase
upon the previous year’s $82,000
performance. The results for the
three months to April 30, 2009,
were driven by a $2.2 million sales
increase, which in turn was gen-
erated by a 12 per cent sales
increase at its Solomon’s and Cost
Right formats.

Mr Watchorn told Tribune
Business that customer counts
were up by 15-16 per cent over
prior year comparatives, although
the average transaction per per-
son was “down a little bit” in the
first quarter — largely due to the
recession and rein-in on consumer
spending.

“We feel confident in saying
that our prices are the best in
town, and the customer count
reflects that,’ Mr Watchorn told
Tribune Business.

While food purchases were
now accounting for a greater pro-
portion of customer purchases,
sales of higher margin general
merchandise, such as clothing,
while below 2008 levels were
“much better than budgeted for.
Our clothing sales are much bet-
ter than expected”.

“Every brand and location is
profitable, and it’s been a long
time since we could say that,” the
Abaco Markets president added.
“Everything moved in the right
direction for us [during the first
quarter], increased sales, reduced
expenses, reduced interest costs
and increased customer
accounts.”

Arguing that Abaco Markets
was “reaping the rewards” from
sticking to its core strategy and
values, Mr Watchorn said the
company had probably been bet-
ter prepared to handle the chal-
lenges from the recession than
many other Bahamas-based busi-
nesses by virtue of the turnaround
effort it had completed and the
initiatives executed. By cutting
costs and trimming the fat prior to
the downturn, Abaco Markets
was well-placed to cope with its
demands.

Of course, food retailers are
better placed than many retail
contemporaries to ride out reces-
sions simply because of the inelas-
tic consumer demand for their
products. Meanwhile, Mr
Watchorn attributed the 1 per
cent gross margin increase dur-
ing the 2010 first quarter to
increased sales, while gross mar-
gin dollars rose 14 per cent due to
better buying and logistics.

“We’ve been able to reduce
shrinkage as a percentage of sales,
which is helping, and we’ve
expanded our purchasing beyond
the south Florida base, and that is
paying dividends,” Mr Watchorn
explained.

“We've got a full-time person
whose job is to go out and get
deals. We’re looking further
afield and working hard to get
deals. It allows us to lower food
prices and get better margins at
the same time.

“Shrink as a percentage of sales
has dropped by 10 per cent.
That’s a combination of increased
sales and managing better. We’ve
not made the inroads we want-
ed, but it’s improved. Our level of
employee theft has leveled off
significantly. That’s due to
increased awareness and promo-
tion of the issue, as well as better
controls.”

The sales and margin improve-
ments coincided with a welcome
reduction in 2010 first quarter



“We’ve put
together a five-
year growth
strategy for the
company from
2009 to 2014.”



Gavin Watchorn

utility costs, with Mr Watchorn
estimating that Abaco Markets’
electricity bill fell between 10-20
per cent year-over-year. Other
expenses remained flat.

Elsewhere, Abaco Markets
reverses its net overdraft position
of recent years to end the 2010
first quarter with a $127,000 net
cash position. The overdraft facil-
ity reduction saw interest costs
drop by 25 per cent, while the
company paid down a further
$500,000 of the debt owed to
Royal Bank of Canada.

Some $400,000 of that debt
repayment came from the pro-
ceeds raised by selling the equip-
ment and inventory from the for-
mer Cost Right Abaco store, with
the actual property leased to Price
Right partners, Rupert Roberts
and Chad Sawyer.

Mr Watchorn told Tribune
Business that Abaco Markets
hoped to eventually realise $1.1
million from the sale of Cost
Right Abaco’s equipment and
inventory, with the monthly rental
payments from Price Right also
helping to pay-off Royal Bank.

A further $400,000 has been
paid to Royal Bank since April
2009, and Abaco Markets is hop-
ing to complete repayment of the
remaining debt — now less than
$900,000 — before the end of its
current financial year. Wiping out
the debt will free up an extra
$60,000 in cash flow per month.

Mr Watchorn added that exit-
ing Cost Right Abaco had creat-
eda “change around on liquidity
and the bottom line”, with man-
agement no longer distracted by a
loss-making entity that constant-
ly needed managers to be sent
out from Nassau.

As for the net cash position,
the Abaco Markets president
added: “It’s the first time, cer-
tainly as long as I’ve been with
the company, that we’ve achieved
that. It’s a good step. As a com-
pany in general, we’re achieving a
positive balance.”

The retail group had, over the
past year, been paying an aver-
age of $8,000-$10,000 per month
in overdraft interest, a figure that
was now “far less than that”.

Mr Watchorn told Tribune
Business that Abaco Markets had

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set aside some $750,000 as at the
first quarter’s end to repay the
principal owed to its preference
shareholders, a figure that was
“going to be close to $1 million”
at the second quarter end on July
31, 2009.

The first redemption is sched-
uled for March 2010, with a total
$1.2 million due to be returned
to the preference shareholders
next year. Mr Watchorn said that
would be fully funded, with some
$1.7-$1.8 million set aside for that
purpose.

And the BISX-listed group has
already moved to prepare for
expansion in Freeport, having
secured a three-year lease, with a
$450,000 option to purchase, on
2.65 acres of land adjacent to its
Solomon’s SuperCentre store.


















NASSAU'S

Premier

LUE

The land will initially be used
for store parking, with the com-
pany hoping to exercise the pur-
chase option in 2010. If the
timescale operates as planned,
the Abaco Markets president said
expansion work at Solomon’s
SuperCentre would likely start in
2011, with the store expanded by
15,000-20,000 square feet and its
layout reconfigured.

“That’s a piece of property
directly adjacent to the property
we have,” Mr Watchorn
explained, “and the business is
doing so well that parking is an
issue. We hope by the end of next
week to have addressed the park-
ing.

“Next year, when we have cap-
ital to purchase it, we will have
secured the land long-term and

RISTORAWNTE

COCKTAIL

can shift the layout of the store
around to facilitate expansion.
We think, if we purchase the land
next year, we will start on it in
early 2011.”

He added: “We feel that as
long as we control and manage
what we can control, we will con-
tinue to be profitable. The level of
profit depends on many factors,
competition and the economic
environment, but as long as we
manage what we can control we
will be OK.”

Abaco Markets said sales at its
Domino's Pizza franchise were
flat during the first quarter, hav-
ing lost the East Bay Street outlet,
but per capita transaction values
were higher as a result of
bundling different products with
its pizzas.

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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





UCHITRSI ETT NU RUC
Wear

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“Free Health Chocks It”
Father's day week end

TT fae Fa, Sot J MoS

Family Medicine &
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NOTICE

REKTA LIMITED

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

REKTA LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the
41 June, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated
Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI

Dated this 15" day of June, A. D. 2009

Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator



Inventory shortages
hit Bahamian buyers

Qualified Bahamian real
estate buyers are being hin-
dered by inventory shortages,
a broker ha warned, after she
took one single home listing
and converted it into five suc-
cesses, including three sales
transactions.

Carla Sweeting, a broker
with ERA Dupuch Real
Estate in Nassau, explained:
“Here’s what happened. I got
a listing for a house in the
Eastern district, brought in a
buyer for that, subsequently
sold the seller a new house
further east, got the listing for
the buyer’s house, also in the
Eastern district and also sold
that.

“It all started with one
phone call.”

About eight months later,
Ms Sweeting’s version of
musical homes was done with
all transactions completed and
three clients in new resi-
dences.

She said the one drawback
in today’s real estate market
was not the economy, but a
shortage of inventory, partic-
ularly of available residential
lots for an eager and finan-
cially capable Bahamian buy-
ers.

“If we had multi-family lots
for less than $100,000 we
could sell six a day,” says the
broker, whose firm recently
walked away with regional top
performance honours, leading

CARLA SWEETING
ERA

fourth consecutive year.

St. Andrew’s School Foundation

affiliates in six
Caribbean countries for the

According to Ms Sweeting,



there’s also a shortage of
inventory in homes under
$500,000. “The foreign mar-
ket has definitely slowed, but



“Here’s what
happened. I got a
listing for a
house in the
Eastern district,
brought in a
buyer for that,
subsequently
sold the seller a
new house
further east, got
the listing for the
buyer’s house,
also in the
Eastern district
and also sold
that. It all started
with one phone
call.”



the Bahamian market is very
strong and eager to buy. The
banks are being a bit stricter,
requiring more for their com-
fort level, but money is avail-
able, interest rates are accept-
able and Bahamians are look-
ing for land and homes in the
moderate price range,” she
added.

Job Opportunity for an

ACCOUNTING CLERK

An established Bahamian Company is seeking an
Accounts Clerk
¢ Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent in Accounting
¢ Knowledge in Microsoft Word and Excel

Fantastic
Father's Day
Giveaway!

Shop at The Shoe Village
this Father's Day and
with any purchase of
$200 or more receive a

we Chawen Cae NEW YORK

belt or wallet.

Development Officer

The Foundation is committed to the Mission of St. Andrew's
School through its financial support of teachers, scholarship
students and building propects. The Foundation 1s presently

secking a person to lead its Office of Development. Interested persons should send resumes to:

P.O. Box CR-55056
Nassau, Bahamas

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pronbote relationships between the School and various
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Promotion begins
Monday 15th June,
and ends

Monday 22nd June . .
oversee The day today adiumsiralpon of mnleralicnal

charities

The successful candidate will possess kr ledge and
understanding of the School's history and culture: be a goal-
driven individual with strong organizational and social skill:
possess a Minimum of a Bi achelor” 5 Degree; and be
expericnoad in fundraising.

T G.R, Sweeting's

llige

Madeira Shopping Plaza - Tel: 328-0703
Marathon Mall - Tel: 393-6113
RND Plaza, Freeport : Tel: 351-3274

Interested candidates should send their CV and a letter of
Interest tc:

Development Officer Position
St. Andrew's School Foundation
FO. Box W-4695
Nassau, Bahanas

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Email: energysavingsconsultants @hotmail.com

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FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

Ze

clTev rca Me Ts Te.

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Morey 27 Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 11 JUNE 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,573.41 | CHG 0.24 | %CHG 0.02 | YTD -138.95 | YTD % -8.11
FINDEX: CLOSE 779.69 | YTD -6.61% | 2008 -12.31%

WWWwW._BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E

1.28 Abaco Markets 1.39 1.39 0.127 E 10.9

10.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.992

6.94 Bank of Bahamas 6.94 6.94 0.244
-0.877 4 N/M
0.078 4 40.4
0.055 - 43.1
1.406 . 8.1
0.249 s 11.4
0.419 sf 13.2
0.111 4 32.7
0.240 s 6.3
0.420 4 18.5
0.322 . 34.1
0.794 - 13.1

SWNT (OLLI
OF RASSAL, RAH ANLAS

SUMMER “LEARN TO SWIM”
CLASSES
June 29" to July 24", 2009

0.63 Benchmark 0.63 0.63
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15
2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37
10.18 Cable Bahamas 11.39 11.39
2.75 Colina Holdings 2.83 2.83
5.52 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 5.52 5.52
1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 3.40 3.63
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 1.50 1.50
7.50 Famguard 7.76 7.76
10.00 Finco 10.97 10.97
10.35 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.38 10.38
4.95 Focol (S) 5.09 5.09 0.332 = 15.3
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.000 4 N/M
0.30 Freeport Concrete 0.30 0.30 ig 0.035 x 8.6
5.50 ICD Utilities 5.50 5.50 e 0.407 13.5
10.50 J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 a 0.952 4 11.0
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.180 5 55.6
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade ona Percentage Pricing bases)
S2wk-Hi_ 52wk-Low Securi Symbol Last Sale
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Geries A) + FBB17 100.00 if T%
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity OQver-The-Counter Securities
Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92 8.42 14.60
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 4.00 6.25 6.00
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA _ Vv YTD% Last 12 Months

See Oe eee eee eee S
290990N00900900009
666566856565656506050

REGISTRATION AT
QUEEN’S COLLEGE POOL
SATURDAY JUNE 20', 2009

9:00 A.M. TO 12:00 NOON

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

EPS $ Div $ P/E

S52wk-Low Weekly Vol.

Fund Name

Colina Bond Fund

2.9230 Colina MSI Preferred Fund

1.3915 Colina Money Market Fund
3.1821 Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund
12.2702 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund

1.3124 1.3758 1.65 4.83
2.8962 -1.49 -3.35

1.4672 2.34 6.43

30-Apr-09
31-Mar-09
29-May-09
30-Apr-09
30-Apr-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
30-Apr-09
31-May-09
31-May-09
31-May-09

3.1821 6.01 -13.90
12.8618 1.93 5.80
100.5606 0.56 0.56
96.4070 -3.59 -3.59
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investrnent Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.2511 1.72 4.12
1.0578 2.13 5.78
1.0271 -0.57 2.71
1.0554 1.74 5.54
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

1.0000
1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany‘s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
('S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

Registration forms available on the website:
wy, barracudaswinuming org


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 5B



Sharing the route for best practices

@ By the Securities
Commission of
the Bahamas

E October 2002, TOSCO
adopted the MMOU as
the model for international co-
operation. The MMOU estab-
lishes standards to be applied
by IOSCO members when
making or responding to
requests for information. At the
April 2005 annual conference
of IOSCO, a timetable was
agreed for all member regula-
tors who were not already sig-
natories to the MMOU, to meet
the standards of the model by
January 1, 2010.

The draft securities legisla-
tion gives the Securities Com-
mission authority to share infor-
mation with both domestic and
foreign regulatory authorities,
consistent with international
best practices. The Commission
is authorised under the draft
legislation to exercise any of its

The Securities Commission of The Bahamas has became a Sig-
natory ‘B’ to the Multilateral Memorandum of Understanding
Concerning Consultation and Cooperation and Exchange of
Information (MMOU), established by the International Orga-
nization of Securities Commissions (IOSCO). By signing the
MMOU as a Signatory ‘B’, the Commission has undertaken to
make the necessary legislative changes to enable it to meet all of
the terms of the MMOU. The provisions of the draft Securities
Industry Act and Regulations, revealed below, reflect the pro-
visions necessary to enable the Commission to become a Signa-

tory ‘A’ to the MMOU.

powers, at the request of anoth-
er domestic regulatory authori-
ty (such as the Central Bank of
The Bahamas, the Office of the
Registrar of Insurance or the
Compliance Commission) and
may, on its own initiative, pro-
vide any such domestic regula-
tory authority with information
the Commission has obtained
in the course of carrying out its
activities. This assistance may
be provided to the domestic
regulatory authority to assist in
the performance of its function.

While the existing legislation

[BDO Mann Judd

enables information-sharing
amongst domestic regulatory
authorities, the draft legislation
broadens the Commission’s
authority to exercise any of its
powers available under the leg-
islation.

The scope of the Commis-
sion’s authority to share infor-
mation with foreign regulators
is limited to providing assistance
with the supervisory, investiga-
tive and enforcement functions
of the regulator, as they relate
to securities and capital market
matters. A comparative analysis

BDO is the fifth largest accountancy network in the world, a world wide network of
public accounting firms, called BOO Member Firms, serving international clients. BDO
Member Firms exist in 110 countries, and employ 44,000 people in 1,095 offices
worldwide, BDO Mann Judd is now seeking applications for assurance seniors/senior
accountants to work in the assurance depariment. The successful candidates will have a
bachelor’s degree in accounting and a CPA, ACCA, CA or any other qualification that is
recognized by the Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants,

The successful candidates will have 3 years experience in auditing, and be able to work in
a challenging team driven environment. Attention to detail is a must.

Individuals with the above-mentioned qualifications should fax or email their resume’s

to

info! bdomannjudd.com

Recruitment Manager
BDO Manna Judd
Nassau Bahamas

Fax: 242-325-6592

Absolutely no phone calls please.
Only the applicants with the above mentioned qualifications will be contacted.

ua

DOCTORS HOSPITAL

DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES

This Months Topic: Should we CUT IT OFF?

The Truths & Myths of Circumcision

SPEAKER:

Dr. Robin Roberts

UROLOGY

Purpose:

LECTURE DATE

Wednesday, June 17th 709 @ 6PM
Doctors Hospital Conference Room
RSVP ¢ Seating is Limited * 302-4603

Please join us as our guest every third
Thursday of the month for this scintillating
series of the most relevant health issues

affecting society today.

LECRUERE SERIES

To educate the public about
the important health issues,
presented by distinguished

physicians.

Screenings:

Get your Free Blood
Pressure,Cholesterol, and
Glucose testing between

Spm & 6pm.

The Truths & Myths of Circumcision

Dr. Robin Roberts

Womens Health
Dr. Madelene Sawyer

of the existing legislative pro-
visions on information sharing
shows that essentially the stan-
dards applied now are not that
different to those proposed in
the draft securities legislation.

Pursuant to the existing
Securities Industry Act 1999,
the Commission can provide
information to foreign regula-
tors. Certain factors, such as the
seriousness of the matter and
the existence of parallel
offences in the Bahamas, may
be taken into account when

determining whether informa-
tion should be shared with a
requesting authority. The fol-
lowing pre-conditions have to
be met; (a) an undertaking of
confidentiality is executed by
the foreign regulator before the
information is provided; or (b)
the Commission satisfies itself
that the laws of information
sharing in the requesting juris-
diction are comparable to those
in the Bahamas; and (c) the
Commission satisfies itself that
the request relates to the func-

tions of the overseas regulatory
authority.

The Commission may apply
to the Court for an Order
requiring that a registrant or
licensee disclose the informa-
tion requested by a foreign reg-
ulator, and the consent of the
Commission must be obtained
before the information can be
shared with a third party. It is
submitted that each of the

SEE page 6B














Visit our website at www.cob.edubs

STAFF VACANCY

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the following




position:

Writer, News & Publications, responsible for performing writing and relat-
ed duties as needed, for the development and production of all College of The
Bahamas publications of a news, general information and public awareness
nature. The incumbent will be expected to work within a demanding deadline
driven environment and to also perform assignments as related to media and

general public relations,

Specific duties and responsibilities include, but are not limited to, generating
content ideas for College publications; research and writing for College pub-
lications, press releases and related media and public relations assignments;
and staying abreast of College developments and maintaining a strong under-
standing of the national, regional and intemational context of these develop-

ments.

Applicants should possess a Bachelor’s degree or equivalent and at least four

(4) years post-qualification work experience at AS-1

level as a

writer/researcher in a magazine, supplement and/or newspaper environment.

For a detailed job description, visit www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply.

Interested candidates should submit a detailed resume and cover Ictter of
interest no later than Tuesday, June 16th, 2009,

Centeal Focus: All Presentations to boghleght and discuss receat developments in the local and global financial seruices: maddest;
which aot calyalfect our dey to diy besiness but also threaten the viability of the iadustry.

(a: E30

MAM

“Compliance”

The Lighthouse in the Perfect Storm

oAfeg

The Bahamas Association of Compliance Officers
MLRO Day 2009
Wednesday Jone 17° 20009

Brith Cokanl Hilton

(iors hop ehoiie for LA ACD CA ceeds]

Carat: 0 cover bers -

PEGGIER AT:

Registration end Introductions

INSIDE THE MINDS OF THE REGULATORS - Panel

4-40 cron mora bert

«New money laundering trends from the FIL's perspectives Forget what yoo thought vow knew

* Kev Aspects of the-new Central Bank Guidelines; Anticipating the Role of the Super Regulator, What dee is

on the Roreon?

Managing the Money Laundenag Rises Posed by Hedge Funds and Other evestrent Velocles
The Insurance Industry = What Have We Leamed, Ff Anything? New indestry Developments, How fer is far

enough!

The Specaal Focus: Responding so O20 Money Laundenag Challenges
Discussion & Followup pemod

[ee 1L15
1: 1200

12:00

5

hbamias

(ei)

-Laachesa-

Accounting for The Accountants: AML CFT issues re: She Accounting Profession
MASTER CLASS - Case study -Whea to Make that STR- Interactive sesnion

TIEA's DT As; OECD Tnitiatives-What peeparatioes should we male? What docs the tutore bold tor The Ba-

“The Rede of Goverament in shaping the fature of The Babamas* Financial Services Iedasiey & in secur

ina the best interests of Hs citizens The Hon. Mistister Phorvarps Lang

O20: M2

~Beeak-

RSVP:
To ensure available seating

Phone: 302-4603

Arthritis 012: 0806-00

Dr. Vincent Nwosa

THE CLOSED SESSP0%5-Members’ Onhy:

« Adopting Business Management Skilk to Optioize Your AMLICFT Program
« Focus on Traiming: Bett Practice for Building a Securities Indaviry AML Training Program
@# BAC as an SRO, The sew OCP CPD requirements; Preparing for the sect Level

Obesity in Children
Dr. Brian Humblestone

REGISTER AT: WWW BACOBAHAMAS COM) EMAIL: INPOEBIFSBARAMAS COM | 242-322-0871 of 2

4 uv. ge. 7 ft
Canumuited fb Canvas
: BC OE AG oo

"| DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SE Te
Sharing the route for best practices

Freeport-Florida
ferry service plan

FROM page 1B mechanical problems.

The company, which is
offering on-line booking, is
aiming to offer a round-trip

schedule between West Palm

mean competition for Discov-
ery Cruise Line, which has
recently been plagued by




























Legal Notice

NOTICE

GARTENPLATZ INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 15th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SPEEDWELL INVESTMENT INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SATINROSE PARK LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 18th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Beach and Freeport. Its vessel
will leave Florida at 8.30am in
the morning, arriving in
Freeport at 10.30sam. The
return journey will begin at
5.30pm, with arrival in Florida
at 7.30pm.

Preliminary ticket prices are
set at $170 per adult for a
round trip, and $85 each way.,
with children priced at $140
per round trip and $70 each
way. Cargo storage prices vary
from $75 to $135, with frozen
cargo priced between $50-$75.

Ride Ocean Zoom’s web-
site said: “Ocean Zoom is a
260 foot vessel providing
express commuter service to
and from West Palm Beach,
Florida, and Freeport,
Bahamas, a two-hour dock-
to-dock service. Ocean
Zoom’s future plans are to
expand to other locations,
including Fort Lauderdale,
Miami and select Family
Islands within the Bahamas.”

A West Palm Beach route
holds out the prospect of giv-
ing high net-worth Americans
another avenue by which they
can access Grand Bahama.

FROM page 5B

above requirements substan-
tively exists in the provisions of
the draft securities legislation.
However, the Commission
notes that the key differences
in the new legislation are as fol-
lows:

e Various issues relating to
the Commission’s inability to
access information from its reg-
istrants and licensees will have
been addressed

¢ Deficiencies in the record-
keeping requirements of
licensees and registrants of the
Commission will be clarified

eThe Commission’s authority
to assist a foreign regulator, who
is an MMOU signatory, with-
out the foreign regulator hav-
ing to execute an undertaking
concerning confidentiality and
onward disclosure before the
Commission acts on the request,
will be clarified

eRestrictions on the use of
information received from the
Commission imposed on for-
eign regulators in practice,
including various restrictions
applied to providing consent for
onward disclosure of informa-
tion for use in securities-related
criminal investigations and pro-
ceedings in the requesting state,
will no longer exist

eThe obligation of the Com-
mission to maintain the confi-
dentiality of requests for assis-
tance made to the Commission
by foreign authorities will be
statutorily established.

Many of the proposed

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SECOND GENESIS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ROCCOLEONE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

CULINARY & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE,
INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSES — FALL SEMESTER 2009 - 042009

COURSE

SEC. | CODE BEGINS | ENDS

DURATION

| TUITION & |
FEES —s| RM

OAS Tie

"No. of
_ Spaces



COOK
| Bahamian Culeine 1 | S06
COOK
Gourmet Cooking | 1 | #23
| COOK
Gourmet Cooking Il 24 Sop. 9
_————

Cake & Pastry COOK
Making | #13 Sepa. a
Cake & Pastry COOK
Making Il

Septi0 | Oct. 22

Sep. 7 | Get. 19

Get. 24

Now, 3

Sep. 10 | Mew, §

_ Bread Making | Now. 6

Cake Decorating | Sep. 7 How, 2

| ‘Cake Decorating il | Sap. 9 | Naw, 4

6 weeks
]

6 Banks

6 Weeks

8 weoks

8 weeks
j

| A weeks
7

G00
| 00pm

BLO -

HOO pe
| Boog) -

SoO0pm

Beta
ooem
B00
an0pm

| Thursday

| Mandy

Wednesday

Tinea

Thiwada

| Thursday

Bi -
S200 pm
B20 -

| AOpen

Mandar

| ike! naecadary

$475.00 MK
$360.00 | MK

S465.00 | ME

330000 | ae

3925.00 | Pe
LK

PK

Pe



ADl fees are included in the price queted above: mew students pay a one-time application fer of 4M, (WOW REFUNDABLE)

Application Deadline: August 28, 2009 at 4:00 p.m.

For further information or te pick up an application please contact the Industry Training Department of the Culinary & Hospitality

Management Institube, 323-5804, J29-hR1M or fax 323-1207,

The Coffee ofthe Bohs nenerees the rink fo cheape Titian, Pees, Course Canter, Course Schedule on! Course Adateriats



changes will require that par-
ticipants in the industry are
meeting international standards
for record keeping, and that the
Commission has access to that
information as presently exists
in other international financial
centres. Such changes are being
made primarily to ensure that
the Commission is properly
‘armed’ to carry out its statuto-
ry mandate. A secondary result
of these amendments, howev-
er, is that in doing so, we are
able to meet the fundamental
requirements of securities reg-
ulation, and thus the standards
of information sharing estab-

to information-sharing proce-
dures and will consist mainly of
clarifications to the process
presently applied by the Com-
mission. One change is that
MMODU signatories will not be
required to execute an under-
taking prior to the Commission
addressing each one of their
requests, as their status as sig-
natories addresses this issue.
This again is not a substantive
change, as the terms of the
existing undertaking are set out
in the MMOU and signatories
thereto are required to meet the
standards therein for each and
every request that they make.

lished by IOSCO.
Further, many of the changes
identified above relate directly

SEE page 9B

Legal Notice

NOTICE

MEGA LUCK MANAGEMENT LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

DRUMMONS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

Cammon Law and Equity Side

200 EQMQuill430

IM THE MATTER. of all that piece parcel or Int af
land situated on the Eastern side of Labour Street
appronimately |) feet South of Hay Street in the
Constituency of Grants Town bounded on the North
by an adjacent lot running thereon (105.00) fest on
the West by Labour Street and running thereon
(22200) feet on the South by an adjacent |ot running
thereon (72.00) feet. The property has an

aporosimare ance of (3,360) square feer,
ANT

is THE MATTER of the Quieting Tithes Act, 1959.
AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Wilfred James
Thompson

NOTICE

TAKE NOTICE that Wilfred James Thompson of Labour Street in
the Island of Mew Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas claims to be the owner of the
unencumbered fer simple estate of ALL THAT piece parcel or Jot
Of land situated on the Eastern side of Labour Street approximately
100 feet South of Hay Street in the Constituency of Grants Town
founded on te North by an adjacent bot running (105.0) feet on
the Weal by Labour Street and running thersan (32.080) feet on the
South by an adjacent bot running thereon (32.00) feet. The property
hae an approximabe ares of (3,350) sqisre feet.

Wilfred James Thompson clalene to be the owner in fies simple of
the said land free from encumbrances and has made an application
to ike Supreme Court in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under
Section 3 of che Quieting Tithes Act 1959 po have its tithe to the said
land investigated and the nature amd extend thereof determined and
declared ina Genificate of Tithe to be granted by the Court in
accordande with the provisions of the aaid Act

A plan ofthe said land many be inspected during normal office

hours if The Tolbewing places

a, The Registry of the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau.

b. The Chambers of Johngon-Hassan 4 Co., Sure No
Crasvendr Suites, Grosvenor Chase off Shirkey Street,
Nassau, M.P_ The Bahamas Attiomeys for the Pettioner.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower or right of
dower or an Adverse claim of claim not recognized im the Petition
shall on or before the 5t/ day of August, A.D, 2009 file in
the Supreme Court and seve on the Petter or the undersigned al
Statement of his claim in the prescribed form verified by an
Affidavit io be filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file
and serve a simtement of his claim on or before the said Sth day
of August, AD, 2009 will aperate a¢ a bar te such a claim.

JOHNSON-HASSAN & CO
Suite Nov? Grosvenor Close
Off Shirkey Sheer
Nassau, M.P., The Bohemas
Atomeys for the Petitiqner
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 7B



Government draws down

$200m bridge credit facility

FROM page 1B

Mr Laing was unable to say how much of the
$200 million bridging facility the Government
had drawn on, although it was possibly as much as
$100 million.

He confirmed that the credit facility was
designed to cover “what we recognised would be
a significant revenue shortfall experienced, and
this is intended to fund that in the current fiscal
year”.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham announced in
the 2009-2010 Budget communication that rev-
enues for the current fiscal year were likely to
come in some 17 per cent below projections, end-
ing at $1.31 billion instead of $1.57 billion.

The revenue shortfall came as little surprise
to most observers, given the Government’s heavy
reliance on trade-based taxation for some 60 per
cent of its revenues. This is an area that has borne
the brunt of the economic downturn, and is set to
leave the Ingraham administration facing a total
deficit of $422 million for the 2008-2009 Budget
year — a level the Prime Minister warned was
“unsustainable”.

Meanwhile, Mr Laing confirmed that the Goy-
ernment’s financial advisers were assessing when
market conditions would be conducive for the
launch of a $200 million sovereign government
bond to refinance the current bridging facility.

The International Monetary Fund’s (IMF) Arti-
cle IV consultation on the Bahamian economy
suggested that any bond issue would take place in
2010, something Mr Laing hinted at to Tribune
Business by implying that, given current market
conditions, any launch now could leave the Gov-
ernment paying a higher interest return to
investors than it wanted to.

“Financial advisers are looking at that to see
when market conditions are conducive, so that
costs would not be as much as current conditions
dictate,” Mr Laing added.

He told Tribune Business that any sovereign
bond issue would be targeted at international,
rather than domestic Bahamian, investors. “I
don’t think, in this environment, you are able to
place that locally. Certainly, not much,” the min-
ister said, adding that he expected the $200 million
bond to be placed internationally.

Mr Laing said the advantages from refinancing
the bridging loan would be to improve the Gov-
ernment’s cash flow by “terming out” the debt.
Bridging loans tend to be advanced for relative-
ly short periods, with borrowers paying higher
interest rates to lenders in comparison to bond
issue that have longer maturity dates.

“Tt would certainly be the ideal thing to do,” Mr
Laing added. “You're also likely, in the circum-
stances, to get loss costly terms on it, and also free
up the lending capacity of domestic institutions
who may have customers wanting to borrow.”

The IMF expressed no concern about the Gov-
ernment’s plans to finance the 2009-2010 fiscal
deficit through a combination of borrowing and
the proceeds from the Bahamas Telecommuni-
cations Company’s (BTC) privatization, finding
that “near term weak private sector credit
demand” meant risks from the ‘crowding out’

ve

effect were low. Only 10 per cent of the central
government’s direct debt is held by international
investors and institutions, according to the IMF,
giving the Bahamian government some room to
manoevere when it comes to launching a $200
million sovereign bond despite the expanding fis-
cal deficit and national debt.

However, Mr Laing rejected arguments that
the Government was pinning all its hopes on a
swift economic recovery, and the return of pre-
2008 economic activity levels, to pull itself from
the fiscal precipice.

“That’s not a fair assessment at all,” he told Tri-
bune Business. “What we are doing is maintain-
ing our options. Our policy decisions today are
putting us in a position where, if things get worse,
we have the ability to manoevere and respond. If
things stay the same, or a recovery takes longer
than anticipated, we have the ability to respond.

“We aren’t optimistic about a quick turn-
around. We aren’t planning on that basis. What
we are planning for is any number of possible”
scenarios given the uncertain and volatile global
economic environment.

Mr Laing added: “The Budget balances the
need to nurture this economy through the down-
turn with the management of fiscal affairs, so
that we do not create an unsustainable debt situ-
ation. We are giving ourselves options in the face
of any number of possible outcomes.”

The minister reiterated that the Government
was looking to cushion the recession’s impact
through a variety of capital works and infra-
structure projects, while at the same time con-
taining the recurrent deficit — the difference
between its total revenue income and its fixed
costs.

This strategy, Mr Laing added, was designed to
ensure that the Government “does not have to
borrow more than it has to borrow, and makes
commitments that hamper our ability to manoe-
vere if things turn down.”

The same was true if the economy recovered
more rapidly — and to a greater extent — than
forecast, as excessive borrowing and loading too
great a debt load on to the Government’s books
could hamper the Bahamas’ ability to exploit
opportunities that came its way.

This newspaper had previously reported that
The Government appears to be pinning its faith in
a relatively strong economic rebound from 2011
onwards, with gross domestic product (GDP) in
current prices rising by 0.9 per cent that year,
with a more sustained 2.5 per cent GDP expan-
sion in 2011-2012. It also seems to be hoping that
the level of economic growth will have returned
to normal, something that is also not a given, due
to the depth and severity of the current recession.

Tribune Business had previously revealed that
the combined fiscal deficits the Bahamas will
incur in the 2008-2009 Budget year and over the
next three fiscal years will total a staggering $1.411
billion if the Government’s forecasts hold true,
with the national debt breaking through the 50
per cent-of-GDP ratio in the 2010-2011 fiscal
period.



















“Dealing with the
stress of a medical
emergency is hard
enough. I facilitate
access to care while
making the task of
paying for services
painless as possible.”

DOCTORS HOSPITAL

We Welcome You

to be a part of our WOW service team.

We are looking for an:



Insurance Services Coordinator




Qualifications:
Baccalaureate Degree in Business or related studies; 3 - 5 years experience at a
supervisory level; Excellent computer skills (Spreadsheets database management);
Knowledge of ICD-9 & CPT codes, Coding Certification preferred;

Excellent computer literacy; Strong communication & interpersonal skills essential.



Position Summary:
The successful Candidate will:



Be responsible for managing the activities of the Insurance Services Department
- responsibilities include the management of various Insurance financial portfolios.

Direct, administer and coordinate the activities of the Insurance Services Department
to support the policies, goals and objectives established by the institution.




Continuously participates in performance improvements to enhance services to our
customers throughout the organization. Develop collection strategies to ensure
optimum cash flow.








Develop relationships with key personnel in local and foreign
Insurance companies.

Excellent benefits | Salary commensurate with experience





a8] DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life




Please submit resume to: Human Resources Department | Doctors Hospital
P.O. Box N-3018 | Nassau, Bahamas | or call 302-4618 | Website: www.doctorshosp.com

BAHAMTANS
THE TIME HAS COME TO
TAKE A STAND AGAINST

CRIME & VIOLENCE
IN THE BAHAMAS

wv ve

ve

Ww ve

ON MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009
JOIN A MARCH FROM ETTHER

EASTERN PARADE * WINDSOR PARK*CHRISTIE PARK

LEAVING AT 6:30 P. M.
TO ATTEND THE

CANDLE LIGHT VIGIL

RAWSON SQUARE
BEGINNING 8:00 P. M

OUR NATION IS IN CRISIS
IF YOU CARE-BE THERE









































Legal Notice

NOTICE

QUILL HILL LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PROMINENT MANAGEMENT
SERVICES LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Amendment to deal with
‘challenges' over audits

FROM page 1B

Act to make it abundantly clear
that the powers of the Minister
of Finance can be exercised via
the authority delegated in the
Customs Management Act to the
Comptroller of Customs.”

Mr Laing added that the Gov-
ernment was “also making pro-
visions for persons importing
goods duty-free to sign a declara-
tion that the goods will be used
for the purpose” intended,
enabling Customs to compare this
with their audit findings and
determine whether any fraud or
tax evasion has taken place.

The minister said the amend-
ments were intended “to protect
the revenue” of the Government
by clarifying Customs’ powers in
relation to the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement, and who could exer-
cise them.

“The point is being consistent
with what the needs of the juris-
diction are, and what we under-
stand the terms of the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement and the accom-
panying laws to be. We are doing
this amendment to give effect to
that,” Mr Laing added.



“We certainly
believe we’re doing
what is within the
ambit of the law and
what we’re
empowered to do...”



Zhivargo Laing

However, it seems likely that
the proposed amendment will be
challenged in the courts by
GBPA licensees. Gregory Moss,
the Grand Bahama Chamber of
Commerce’s president, said the
organisation “notes with concern”
the planned amendment, adding
that their main fear centred on
whether it was an attempt to
amend the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement by the back door.

‘The Grand Bahama Chamber
notes with concern the reference
by the Prime Minister in his
recent Budget communication to
an intention on the Governmen-
t’s part to amend the Customs
Management Act to “clarify and
bring certainty to the administra-

tion of the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement in the Port Area’,”
Mr Moss told Tribune Business.

He added that “if all the4 Gov-
ernment intends to do is repeat in
the Customs Management Act
the relationship with the Hawks-
bill Creek Agreement, we could
have no issue with that.

“If the Government intends to
abrogate any part of the Hawks-
bill Creek Agreement we would
have significant issue with that
and would have to respond to
that appropriately.”

Mr Moss pointed out that the
Government was unable to
amend the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement without the consent
of two-thirds of the GBPA
licensees. However, Mr Laing
told Tribune Business: “We cer-
tainly believe we’re doing what
is within the ambit of the law and
what we’re empowered to do, so
if the licensees challeng it in the
courts, that is their right.

“We believe there is a great
deal of reason being expressed
by the licensees that operate in
the Freeport area that there is a
law, an agreement that governs
the Freeport area, and that law
and agreement applies to every-
one. As long as it’s consistent with

the law, they will have no diffi-
culty in complying.”

The amendment, a copy of
which was obtained by Tribune
Business, said the reason for the
change was “to remove all doubts
that the Comptroller is the person
designated by the Minister to car-
ry out the powers in clause 2
(4)(f) of the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement”.

The actual amendment’s word-
ing states that the Customs comp-
troller, his deputy or the assistant
comptroller “be the person des-
ignated by the minister to carry
out any and all powers” contained
in that Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment clause.

The clause in question, as
analysed by Tribune Business,
gives a person designated by the
minister “free access at all rea-
sonable times” to any develop-
ment project, business, company
or commercial entity in the Port
area, and access to all parts of
their business, “for the purpose
of ascertaining whether the sev-
eral articles” admitted duty-free
under the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement are being used for
their stated purpose — meaning
in a licensee’s business, so that
no duty is payable on them.



Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

COMMONWEATH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008

IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/592

INTHE MATTER of the Quicting Titles Act, 1959
AND
IN THE MATTER of The Petition of Inez Taylor Martin
NOTICE OF PETITION

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Inez Taylor-Martin of Old Place
in the Western District of the Island of Exuma, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, is applying to the Supreme
Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas to have her title inves-
tigated determined and declared under the Quicting Titles Act, 1959
(Ch. 393) in respect of the land hereafter described, that is to say:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land situate approximately One
Thousand Five-Hundred and Thirty-five (1535) feet West of Queens
Highway on the Northern side of Gilbert Grant Road and bounded
EASTWARDLY by land now or formerly the property of Zelma
Nixon jointly by Crown Land occupied by Zelma Nixon and running
thereon a total distance of Two-Hundred and Seven and Sixty-Six
Hundredths (207.66) feet thence running NORTHWEST WARDLY
by land now or formerly the property of Emerald Bay Development
and running thereon a total distance of Six-Hundred and Fifty-Nine
and Forty-One Hundredths (659.41) feet WESTWARDLY by land
the other portion of the Gilbert Grant and running thereon Fight-
Hundred and Twenty-Nine and Fifteen Hundredths (829.15) feet
SOUTHWARDLY by a Public Road known as Gilbert Grant Road
and running thereon a distance of Four-Hundred and Thirty-Eight
and Twenty-Seven Hundredths (438.27) feet back to the point of
commencement which said piece parcel or tract of land described
above comprises an area of Four and Four Hundred and Seventy-
Nine Thousandths (4.479) Acres and has such position boundaries
shape marks and dimensions as are shown on the plan recorded in
the Department of Lands and Surveys as Plan No. 450 EXUMA.”

AND TAKE NOTICE that copies of the Petition and the Plan of the
said land may be inspected during normal office hours at the follow-
ing places:

i. Supreme Court Registry, Ansbacher House, East Street North,
New Providence, The Bahamas.

ii. Sharon Wilson & Co., Chambers, East Shirley Street, Highland
Terrace, New Providence, The Bahamas.

it. The Administrator’s Office, Georgetown, Exuma, The Bahamas
AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that any person having dower or
right to dower, an adverse claim or a claim not recognized in the
Petition shall on or before the 22nd JULY A.D., 2009 file in the Su-
preme Court and serve on the Petition or his attorney an Adverse
Claim in the prescribed form supported by Affidavit.

FAILURE OF ANY PERSON to file and serve an Adverse Claim on
or before 22nd JULY A.D., 2009 date will operate as a bar to such
claim.

Dated this 20th day of May A.D., 2009

Sharon Wilson & Co.
Chambers
Delvest House
East Shirley Street, Highland Terrace
Nassau, N.P, The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner

VACANCY
Ken

COOK/CHEF

Downtown restaurant seeks talented and
experienced cook to prepare native and
contemporary dishes and manage all kitchen
operations. Please email resume to:

Jobvacancytkm@ yahoo.com

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CHASCARILLO INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

STEZU INVESTMENTS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,
the Dissolution of STEZU INVESTMENTS LTD has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Registrar. The date of completion of the dissolution was the
29th day of May 2009.

ghee
Tid fy Bl. Poewr

Kor: Cuevtor end Lied aren. fine.

Lige Ret

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DAWN INT’L LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GALVESTON VALLEY LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEW ACCARDI INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of June 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

WANTED
ASSISTANT FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

A local company is seeking to hire a highly motivated
detailed oriented individual to fill the position of Assistant

Financial Conbreotler
REQUIREMENTS

* Ability to work with minimum supervision
Expenence in effective management of purchases,
inventory and Accounts Receivables
Supervise the accurate input and processing of
financial infomation
Timely preparation and issuance of financial reports
Must possess a high level of integrity & professionalism
Must be flexible and able to produce in a time-driven
environment

QUALIFICATIONS

* AUniversity Degree in Accounting or other related
dscipline

* Minimum of S years experience in accounting

* Working knowledge of Excel and Microsoft Word

Interested persons should apply on or before: July ist 2009
Attention: CONTROLLER
DA 61782
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N3207
Nassau, Bahamas

Salary is commensurate with experiance and qualification
THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 9B

NS TT
Sharing the route for best practices

FROM page 6B

Should they not do so then
there are various processes by
which the Commission can
assert its right to deal with that
member as a non-signatory.
Another substantive change
is the Commission’s obligation
to maintain the confidentiality
of the request made by an
MMOU signatory. This new
provision would mean that (a)
the Commission could not, as
it presently does, provide the
background information of a
request to the person from
whom the information is being
requested; (b) licensees, regis-
trants or any person requested
to provide information on
account holders would be
bound not to divulge the exis-
tence of the request with their
clients; and (c) any objections to
providing the information to the
Commission would have to be
made without the person from
whom the information is
requested being aware of the
background information related
to the request, or any input

from the person in respect of
the information is sought.

A first look at these informa-
tion-sharing provisions would
indicate that the changes made
are voluminous because of the
increased provisions. Consider-
ing the proposed provisions
from the perspective of sub-
stance and content, however, it
is clear that the amendments
proposed provide clarity to the
vague provisions that presently
exist in the Securities Industry
Act 1999. The proposed amend-
ments required to the securities
legislation as a result of the
Commission seeking to become
a Signatory ‘A’ of the MMOU
will therefore result in requests
for information-sharing being
addressed in a transparent envi-
ronment, in which licensees and
registrants of the Commission
will fully understand their rights
and obligations as well as those
of the Commission.

The Commission looks for-
ward to engaging its con-
stituents on their input and
comments in relation to these
provisions and any other matter
that might arise from the pro-

posed provisions in the draft
securities legislation. There is a
45-day consultation period with
respect to this document. with
the deadline for comments
being June 24, 2009. The Com-
mission welcomes comments on
the draft Securities Legislation
which may be posted directly
in the SIA/SIR Comment
Forum using:
http://stats.scb.gov.bs/sia2009/
or posted or emailed to the
Commission at Email:
sia2008@scb.gov.bs. The Com-
mission intends to issue further
articles during the next few
weeks in relation to other
aspects of the draft legislation.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



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The Bahamas

Development Bank

ABACOMARKETS

Chairman’s Report — Q1, 2009

It is with great pleasure that I report on our first quarter of 2009 as we post a net profit of $1.043m
for the quarter. Our locations continue to post strong sales gains - up $2.2m over the same period
the previous year - driven by a 12% increase in sales in the Food Distribution while Domino’s Pizza
sales remain flat with one store less than the previous year. Our gross margin has also improved by
1% driven by improved buying and logistics which has, in turn, allowed us to pass significant
savings on to our customers through our price cuts and club values which, combined, affect
thousands of products on a weekly basis.

The Group’s stringent cost controls, reductions in utility costs, a 25% decrease in interest rates and
the continued significant reduction in its bank debt have also positively impacted the Company’s
results. A total of $500k of our RBC loan was repaid in the first quarter with a further $400k in
repayments since April and we expect to repay this debt in full by the end of the 2009 fiscal year.

Our locations have delivered extremely solid performance in very challenging economic times and
our results clearly reflect the positive response to our strategic initiatives. We believe that by
focusing on our strengths - our brands and the synergies that we can achieve among our locations
- along with the current competitive conditions is giving us an opportunity to gain market share
and ensure that we are well positioned to both weather these economic conditions and prepare us
for further growth in the economic recovery.

These times are challenging us to be innovative, to carefully manage what is within our control, to
achieve the synergies in our buying and logistics to realise savings and efficiencies and to continue
to focus on the details that have delivered solid results in the past two years. We are confident in
these measures and in the performance of our locations - particularly at this time - and we are

relentlessly pursuing the operating results and shareholder value we know Abaco Markets can
produce.

R. Craig Symonette
June 11, 2009

ABACOMARKETS

INTERIM UNAUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
FOR THE QUARTER ENDED APRIL 30, 2009

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

April 30, January 31,
2009 2009

Assets 29,155 30,607

Liabilities (15,824) (18,319)



Equity 13,331 12,288



CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME

(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

Sales
Cost of sales

Quarter Ended
April 30, 2009

$ 22,667
(15,739)

Quarter Ended
April 30, 2008

20,446
(14,380)



Gross profit

Selling, general and administrative expenses

Other operating income

Net operating profit
Pre-opening costs

Interest expense

6,928

(5,849)
154

1,233

6,066

(5,884)
94

276
(24)

(43)

is recruiting a

Managing Director

The Bahamas Development Bank is undergoing a critical period of transformation and
renewal and is looking for a Managing Director (MD) to lead the Bank’s financial turnaround.

Dividends on preference shares (182)



Net profit on continuing operations 27

Net (loss)/profit on discontinued operations 55

Net profit 82

Profit per share
The MD is responsible for providing strategic leadership of the Bank by working with the
Board of Directors, management, and shareholders to establish, implement and oversee the
long-range goals, strategies, plans and policies of the Bank. The MD reports directly to the
Board and will enjoy substantial autonomy to shape overall operations in order to deliver
improved financial performance and customer service levels.



CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)
Duties and Responsibilities:
Quarter Ended
April 30, 2009

Quarter Ended

1. Leadership and Corporate Responsibility April 30, 2008

Lead the management team to be effective developers of solutions to business
challenges and establish credibility throughout the organization and with the
Board

Hold responsibility for driving the Bank to achieve and surpass profitability,
cash flow, and other business goals and objectives

Motivate and lead a results-oriented management team and staff; recruit members
to the executive team not currently in place and retain existing executive and
front-line talent

Represent the Bank and its renewed values with existing and prospective clients,
creditors, government, other stakeholders and the public in general

Net profit for period 1,043 82



Net cash provided by operating activities 1,153



Net cash used in investing activities (119)



Net cash used in financing activities (629)

Increase in cash 405
Business Management and Strategy
e Spearhead the development, communication and implementation of effective
growth strategies and processes
Collaborate with the Board to develop and implement plans for the operational
infrastructure of systems, processes and personnel, designed to accommodate
the Bank’s growth objectives
Assist, as required, in raising additional capital to enable the Bank to meet growth
and market share objectives
Direct the development and implementation of business strategies
Foster a success-oriented, performance-driven, and accountable environment
within the Bank
Lead the Bank’s cultural transformation

EXPLANATORY NOTES
TO INTERIM UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Quarter Ended April 30, 2009

ACCOUNTING POLICIES

These financial statements have been prepared in accordance with International Financial
Reporting Standards using the same accounting policies and methods of computation as
the Consolidated Financial Statements included in the 2008 Annual Report.

Corporate Governance and Disclosure

* Oversee the development, implementation, and compliance with key corporate
policies, including policies regarding corporate governance, risk management,
financial reporting as well as compliance with applicable legislative requirements

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Abaco Markets Limited.
(‘the Company”) and its significant wholly owned subsidiaries: Solomon’s Supercentre
(Nassau) Limited, Cost Right Nassau Limited, Solomon’s Club (Freeport) Limited,
Thompson Wholesale Limited and Caribbean Franchise Holdings Limited.

The ideal candidate will have strong leadership skills, a solid financial services background,
and broad knowledge of the Bahamian business environment. A demonstrated ability to
execute and deliver results is essential. Likewise, a proven track record in strategic plan
development with a clear ability to turn strategy into actions without over complication of
business process is critical.

DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS

On March 9, 2009, the Company ceased operations in Cost Right Abaco. Accordingly,
the assets and liabilities of Cost Right Abaco are treated as discontinued as of April 30,
2009.

The Company has signed a three year lease for the building used by the former store.

The successful candidate will Cn Oy an-atracnye, highly COMpEHLIVE, and performance- The lease includes an option to purchase the building at the end of the lease for $2.8m.

based compensation package.
The equipment of the former business was sold for $350,000, resulting in a gain of

$79,000. Balance of $250,000 on this transaction remains outstanding as of April 30,
2009.

Printed CVs are to be addressed in confidence to The Chairman, and delivered or mailed
to the
Bahamas Development Bank,
Cable Beach, West Bay,
P. O. Box N-3034,
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas

cy WPM ctl ae fail set ar fhe cited mance! steafements can fe obteiaced
ndgiee Gibson, ar Abaca Me (

Al Road Navan, The Balnauues, pet I

The deadline for applications is June 30, 2009.


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



III =<). =~
Ross considers 3,000-person medical school expansion plan

FROM page 1B

ing that I got the work permit
under incorrect information two
years ago.

“There were untruths in the
letters. Our company lawyer
responded to it and set it right,
making the true information
available to all parties con-
cerned.”

Mr Babak pointed out that the
allegations in the letters had been
included in the ‘shareholder
oppression’ action the St George
estate had initiated against him-
self and Sir Jack, and which had
been thrown out by the Supreme
Court.

Although, as pointed out earli-
er, Tribune Business has not seen
the letter sent by Mr Smith, it is
likely to centre on previous alle-
gations made by the St George
estate, namely that the Immigra-

co TAL OCREOUF

i RRATIONAL

tion Department was in 2006 told
Mr Babak would not receive “any
salary, reward, gain or profit”
from the GBPA and Port Group
chairmanships.

This, the estate had previously
alleged, was at odds with claims
that the two companies’ immedi-
ate parent, Intercontinental
Diversified Corporation (IDC),
might owe a $65 million liability
to Mr Babak over his contract.
Observers close to the situation
have suggested to Tribune Busi-
ness that the Prime Minister and
his Cabinet, plus the Immigration
Department, are unlikely to be
swayed by Mr Smith’s lobbying
campaign over Mr Babak’s work
permit. For starters, they would
not want to be seen as taking
sides in the Port ownership dis-
pute, or lay themselves open to
any possibility of ‘victimisation’
accusations.

It is likely, though, that the let-

ters are the latest salvo in an
attempt by Mr Smith and his
clients to oust Mr Babak from the
GBPA and Port Group Ltd chair-
manship, and sever the links
between him and Sir Jack.

The directors appointed by the
St George estate, and their nom-
inees, voted against Mr Babak
regaining the chairmanship of
both entities, but were defeated
by the Hayward family trust’s
Board control.

Meanwhile, GBPA and Port
Group Ltd president, Ian Rolle,
told Tribune Business that he
wanted “distractions” such as the
furore over Mr Babak’s work per-
mit renewal to “go away”, as they
did not help to take either organ-
isation or Freeport forward.

“Mr Babak enjoys the full sup-
port of the management team and
the employees of the GBPA,” Mr
Rolle said. “They all feel a sense
of normalcy has come into this

place since he’s been around.

“We're focusing on moving
Grand Bahama and the Bahamas
forward. It would be sad to know
that Mr Babak will not be able
to enjoy the fruits of his labours.
He has been working feverishly to
better this island, and in effect
better the Bahamas through his
endeavours.

“T would like to focus on these
distractions going away. It’s not
doing Grand Bahama any good
by having these ongoing distrac-
tions.”

Mr Rolle praised Mr Babak for
attracting Ross University’s med-
ical school to Freeport, describing
it as an investment that was
“recession-proof”.

“There’s a next phase of Ross
University which could have a
tremendous impact for this econ-
omy. This type of business could
be recession-proof,” he added.
“Ross is thinking of expanding

its campus of students and staff to
3,000 persons within two to three
years. It is completely recession-
proof.” Mr Rolle said Ross’s
arrival on Grand Bahama had
been the major economic bright
spot for the island and Freeport
during some very dark economic
times, and the students and fac-
ulty brought with it had helped
to breathe life into the city’s retail
and restaurant industries.

In addition, the rental market
had also been revitalized, with
“apartments and houses not rent-
ed for years, rented now”. Such
developments would further
encourage landlords to invest in
the capital stock of their proper-
ties. Both Mr Rolle and Mr
Babak indicated that Ross Uni-
versity’s investment could spawn
greater things.

The medical school will pro-
duce a cadre of highly-trained
doctors, surgeons and medical

specialists who could form the
core of a medical tourism industry
for the Bahamas, with patients
travelling to Freeport from all
over the world for specialist care.

This, in turn, would create busi-
ness for the city’s hotel industry,
as well as additional demand for a
second home market that has
ample room on Grand Bahama
for expansion.

“We've made tremendous
progress,” Mr Rolle told Tribune
Business. “Hannes introduced a
study of medical tourism. We
have the first phase of a plan, and
it’s looking very favourable.”

Mr Babak added that the con-
sultant hired to conduct the study
had been involved in putting
together healthcare plans for
companies such as Microsoft, with
the focus on areas such as what
medical fields should Freeport
and Grand Bahama offer.

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MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009

be





i Ca Gd 1

The stories behind the news



The battle for chia
Support payments



m@ By RUPERT MISSICK
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

WE RECEIVED a call
from a politician last week
who had to console a dis-
traught single mother who had
come to him seeking assis-
tance. After a long battle, the
court had finally made the
father of her child pay some-
thing to assist her in raising
their child.

The exhilaration of this vic-
tory was short lived, howev-
er, when the court was only
able or willing to award her
$50 a week for the child's
upkeep.

"What can $50 a week do
for this woman? Why would
the court think that's fine? I
mean it's disgraceful,” the
politician said.

The truth is $50 a week isn’t
"fine" by any standards, but
many women don’t receive
much more for the mainte-
nance of their children. They
complain that men don’t
accept raising a child as a joint
effort.

I was severely chastised by
a woman (we'll call her
Simone) who resented the fact
that I had suggested, during
an admittedly clumsy turn of
phrase, that she had her child
for her ex-husband.

"Why do people say that?
‘T had a child for so and so’ or
"You had a child for so and
so’. You know I didn’t have a

INSI

FEEDBACK ON
‘THE GLOBAL

WATER CRISIS’
PAGE THREE



Qu y

child for any man. I had a
child with a man. When I hear
people, even women, say that
I get so mad. One time me
and my sister got into a big
fight over that. She told me
she was having a baby for her
husband.

"T told her straight, home-
girl you having a baby with
that man you're not
doing him any favours,
he isn’t paying you for a
service," she said.

The point was well
taken and I was slight-
ly (only slightly)
embarrassed that I
hadn’t picked up on
that nuance before.

When this partner-
ship that the phrase
"having a baby with"
another person sug-
gests, is broken, many
women find them-
selves in magistrate's
court attempting to
force the father of
their children to do the
right thing.

And then there is
Stephanie, a woman
in her forties, a bat-
tle-worn veteran of
family court, who
told Insight about her
experience. Her court order
for child support was issued
in 1998 when her daughter
was eight years old.

"He brought in all of his
bills and all of his things that
he had in arrears and pre-
sented them to the judge
and said he was unable to
pay child support for my
daughter but the judge still
made an order for him to
pay $80 a week for her
because the father owned a
business," Stephanie said.

This was only after the
judge had, and rightly so,
determined that a man who
owned his own business could
find a way to materialise $80
a week.

The daughter will be turn-
ing 19 this year and since this
order was made more than 10
years ago, her father has
made two $80 payments.

Like many women before
her, Stephanie has given up
on the system completely and
is not only unaware of how to
go about collecting back-child
support, but is no longer inter-
ested in pursuing this route.

"Every time I went to court
to pick up her cheque, they
said nothing was there and he
never paid anything else. He
never lived up to his word,"
Stephanie said.

Admitting that material

a a i

ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING













































support for
the child
they had
together came spo-
radically over the years in oth-
er forms, Stephanie highlight-
ed the need a single mother
has for certainty and the sta-
bility of "support that comes
on time every time."

Court orders for these
women become flaccid instru-
ments made more impotent
by a lack of enforcement.

These women feel not only
dishonoured by the men with
whom they had their children,
but degraded by a court sys-

Well-refined.

Newly designed.





tem that will also not live up
to its promises.

"They make an order and
they don’t have anybody who
follows up with a warrant of
arrest.

“T think if they start arrest-
ing them then I think they
would try to at least put
something there every week

even if they can't put every-
thing they're supposed to.
It's a hassle to keep going to
court. In order to get seen
you have to have an attorney
or else you'll be waiting out
there for hours and hours."

It is impossible to shake
Stephanie from the notion
that the father's lack of mate-
rial support has translated
into a lack of emotional sup-
port for a daughter who was
and still is desperate for a
close relationship with him.

"It's not much
but that was
money I
needed.
I'd
planned on making
that $80 a week stretch to help
pay school fees and buy
clothes and food," she said.

It is very hard to imagine,
even discounting nearly a
decade in an increase in the
cost of living, how this would
be possible but surprisingly
what amounted to $320 a
month is a kingly sum com-
pared to what some women
receive.

Take the more recent case
of Michelle, who is currently
in court attempting to have

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“These women feel not
only dishonoured
by the men with

whom they had their

children, but

degraded by a
court system

that will

also not
live up to
its promises.”

the father of her
children live up to
his obligations. Like
Stephanie before her, she is
frustrated with the system and
is about to "give up because
it's almost not worth it."

Michelle is the mother of
three boys — 17, 14 and 13.
The court ordered their father
to pay what essentially
amounts to $40 a week for
each child.

However, Michelle main-
tains that this isn’t nearly
enough to help raise her chil-
dren, especially as the 14-year-
old is a diabetic.

"I got so tired I actually







































stopped. I don't even
check it no more
because it's
never
there.
They had
a judg-
ment
warrant
out for
him
and it
looks
like
they
can't
catch
him. I
thought
they were
supposed
to lock you
up if you
defy a court
order, but
they can't
seem to find
him, he's not
paying and in
the meantime
the children
still have to
live," she said.

Michelle also
disagrees with
the way the
court decides
how much money
should be paid.

"It shouldn't
be based on
what the man
can pay. It
should be based
on what the
child needs. If I
could be out
there working
nights, working
two jobs to do
what I have to
do, why should-
n't he?" she
asked.

However, there
are times when
men do live up to
their obligations.
However, this
usually is no
thanks to the

courts, but solely to
the men who do what they are
supposed to do. Stephanie
said that while she may have
had a horrendous experience,
she has a friend, a divorcée
whose ex-husband's $100 a
week (about $33.33 for each
child) has been put to good
use.

With this $400 a month
Stephanie's friend is able to
pay her mortgage for her low
cost home.

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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

Battle for child support payments

FROM page one

"Tf I go to them and tell
them that I have responsibil-
ities for rent, light, water they
write it down and ask how
much and make their judg-
ment from what is left over.
Show up and lie. It's awkward
and silly because in the end a
woman would end up losing,
but sometimes court is the
only recourse a woman has,"

said Cleaver Duncombe,
advocate for children’s rights.
Mr Duncombe has a bit of
a conspiracy theory as to why
child support is so minimal.
"Many of the men who are
in positions of power, who

southern style

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ioe ele =



make and enforce the laws,
are serial sweethearters. The
last thing they want is to pay
a bunch of money to a bunch
of children. They want to
make it as minimal as possi-
ble," he said.

At the end of the day all
many women want is a civil
relationship with the father
so that they can adequately
take care of their child.

"IT know it’s not nice or
proper to say, and it may
change, but today I can hon-
estly say I hate my ex-hus-
band,” said Simone. “If I said
anything else I would be
lying. I'm praying about it
mind you, but I really hate
the man. But me and him
don’t speak about anything
else in the world other than
our child. That's it. What else
do we need to talk about? If
he calls there are four things
he says. ‘How you doing?
Can I speak to (Johnny)?
When can I pick (Johnny)
up? You got the money
right?’

"He don’t even really need
to ask how I doing and I don’t
care how he's doing. I don’t
care who he's seeing and he
sure aS hell don’t need to
waste no time about who I'm
seeing. The only point where
our lives intersect is from the
point where the top of our
boy’s head begins and it ends
at the tip of his toes. One
good thing I can say he loves
and takes care of his son."

Simone's earlier chastise-
ment of me is correct.
Women do have children with

“Many of the men who are in
positions of power, who make
and enforce the laws, are serial
sweethearters. The last thing
they want is to pay a bunch of
money to a bunch of children.
They want to make it as
minimal as possible.”



Cleaver Duncombe,
advocate for children’s rights

men. It's a partnership that
requires two mature adults
working in the best interest
of a child. Women do not
provide a service for men
when they bear their children.
Men cannot say, "Madame I
am unhappy with the results
of your work. Consequently I
have made the decision not
to pay for your inadequate
services." (If that were possi-
ble lord only knows what con-
versation my parents would
have had 27 years ago).

Certainly these amounts,
$33 a child a week, $40 a child
a week, $80 a child a week,
are simply tokens. It is at best
disheartening and at worst
insulting if they are seen as
anything more.

While the money is not
supposed to take care of the
mother and no reasonable

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person believes that an indi-
vidual, pint sized or not, can
live on $33 a week, these
amounts seem to satisfy the
only obligation the state
requires of a man who does
not live with or is married to
the mother of his children —
maintenance.

Ideally a man should be
emotionally present for his
child, supportive in all ways
possible, nurturing and exam-
ple setting, but, as harsh as it
may sound, there is no oblig-
ation, other than a moral one,
for him to do any of this.
Shame only goes so far, and a
judicial system, even one that
is different and does what it is
supposed to do, cannot force
men to be better fathers. Her
Majesty's Prison is filled to
capacity with men who rather
brave its horrors than do
what is required of them.

Simone is a very good
friend of mine and we've had
many heated discussions over
the years and if God is kind
we Shall continue to have
them well into the future. I
suggested to her during our
conversation last week that if
I were to agree (and I do)
that women and men have
children with each another
then the failure of child sup-
port reaching those it is
intended to support, the chil-
dren, is a failure on the part



of two persons and not the
courts. "Lousy men and the
women who chose them,"
was the way I believe it was
put.

"Or lying men and the
women who believe them,"
she retorted. "Things would-
n’t be so bad if men didn’t
feel like their manhood was a
liquid that came out of their
(bodies)."

Touché!

Admittedly I had always
been confounded by men
who would boastfully tell me
that they had three, four, five
children with different
women. I used to wonder
how they took care of them.
Well the answer is that the
majority of them don't. If
there were some law that lim-
ited a man to the number of
children based on his ability
to take care of them, we
would lose a large segment
of our population.

We were damaged at some
point and made to believe, as
Simone said, that our man-
hood is connected to our viril-
ity. The question now is, are
we ready, court order or no
court order, to do what is
right by our women and our
children?


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 3C



INSIGHT



INSIGHT «=:

F E E D

Dear Mr. Nunez,

I read your article with
great interest.

About 10 years ago, Mr.
Moss (who was in charge of
Water & Sewerage at the
time) spoke at our Rotary
meeting about the positioning
of the Water & Sewerage to
meet future demands. Of the
plans presented none seem to
address growth and future
capacity of our water supply
system.

I raised a question to Mr.
Moss about building a reser-
voir to hold the millions of
gallons of water that is
shipped from Andros. My
question went into the depth
of dumping the water into
what I called a swamp, for
most of the shipment to min-
gle with the ground water and
eventually leached back into
the sea. Not realising that spe-
cial interests do not care if the
water is wasted, I pursued my
questions. I also went on to
include that a reservoir would
provide a catch basin for any
rainfall that would occur.

The ultimate answer to my
question was "that it doesn't
rain enough in Nassau, so
building a reservoir was not
cost effective." A man from
Australia replied to this that it
rains rarely in Australia, but
when it does they catch every
drop they can.

Because of time value of
money it would have been less
expensive to build 10
years ago than now. This to
me is like "Global Warming",
the longer we wait the greater
the problem and expense.

Just like our energy con-
servation problems, water
conservation is clouded with
special interests that is not in
the best interests of the
"Bahamian People."

— John Sandford

Mr. Nunez ,

I have read your report on
the “Global Water Crisis” in
today's newspaper (Tribune-
June 8). It is rather ironic that
you chose to write on this top-
ic because just recently a
report was submitted to the
Ministers of Environment
(April 2009) and the Prime
Minister (May 2009) concern-
ing the problems at the Water
and Sewerage Corporation
(WSC). I find it a difficult to
fathom that successive gov-
ernments have failed to
enforce the Water and Sew-
erage Act which gives the
WSC the right to exclusivity
as to the usage of our precious
ground water resources. Given
the 70 per cent of the popula-
tion of New Providence that is
using ground water, it is
inevitable of a crisis looming.

Neverthless, the “story
behind the story” is the fact
that the WSC as presently
constituted is unable to even
sustain its present customers.
This is because of two reasons:
1) lack of proper funding; 2)
poor management decisions.

The report identifies these
two reasons and takes an in
depth look at the latter. I trust
that you will write a follow-
up report to today's article
using the report provided.
This report has already been
submitted to the executives of
the organisation and govern-
ment, as previously men-
tioned, therein it is time the
general public knows exactly
what is going on at an organi-
sation being heavily subsidised
with their money.

— DF.

Good INSIGHT article;
and especially timely.

For your guidance I sent
the attached (admittedly
lengthy) letter to The
Guardian last month. It was
not published.

You cite "the first de-salin-
ization plant in 1969." Our
inept de-saliniztion planning
goes back further than that if I
recall correctly. About 1960
we were led to believe our
problems would be solved
when the Weir Company in
Scotland built a stainless steel
RO plant near Baillou Hills. I
suspect we knew little of stain-
less steels then because com-
mon so-called 304 stainless
cannot tolerate chlorides. The
austentitic (nickle bearing)
stainless steels can withstand
salt water. Anyhow our Weir
units within a couple years
apparently looked like fine

F EE OD BAC K



Irish lace; and were quietly
scrapped.

We never transported
Andros water efficiently, but
we could have. Instead I
believe we have prematurely
"Bet the farm" on the success
of reverse osmosis, and with
higher oil prices coming again
fast, and expected to continue
for a lengthy period we
may regret our haste.

— Bill Bardelmeier

The following is the letter
referred to by Mr
Bardelmeier:

Like much of the world's
population, we face a long
term struggle to supply water
at the places where people
need it. We are in this respect
perhaps no better nor worse
than some highly developed
economies such as that of Cal-
ifornia. We must accept how-
ever that it will require a con-
tinuous effort and careful
planning to stay on top of our
water supply problem.

Bahamas Water & Sewer
Corporation today produces
something close to 11 million
imperial gallons per day of
potable water. New Provi-
dence demand for water
would probably be closer to
13 million imp. gallons per day
if not constrained. With all
sectors (meaning Reverse
Osmosis and Tankering func-
tioning) Water & Sewer Corp.
seem to believe that supply
and demand are in reasonable
balance except during emer-
gency periods such as that
which is causing their public
newspaper notices this week
concerning the urgent need to
conserve water now.

We were advised long ago
that New Providence is not
capable of supplying more
ground water without serious
damage to our lens structures
and without grossly exceed-
ing world health standards for
chlorides.

Andros has a sizeable
quantity of water. For the past
couple decades we pumped
roughly five million gallons
per day from shallow well
fields at the northern end of
the island; shipping it in
tankers to Arawak Cay on
Nassau Harbour. This trans-
port system has been criticised
by some (in fact by many) as a
very wasteful, costly system.
Tankering water has been
abhorrent to some Bahamian
politicians and laymen, but it
has a potential that we should
appreciate.

Although the result was
wasteful and costly, the water
transport concept was never
well executed. Locally the
transport of Andros water to
New Providence was for many
years termed “barging” water.
In the very earliest days
Andros water was indeed
transported in barges towed
by small (often under-pow-
ered) tugs. A pair of (very)
used barges were purchased
on the U.S. Gulf coast and lat-
er a completely new simple
barge was constructed in Tam-
pa. (Lacking modern protec-
tive coatings it soon wasted
away).

However, Bahamas Water
& Sewerage Corp. at that time
had very little background
knowledge of the substantial
difference between using
towed barges versus use of self
propelled ships. Barges with
their shallower draft do tend
to be favoured where only
shallow ports are available. It
is quite commonplace for
towed barge systems to cease
achieving normal sea speed
whenever the wind reaches
about 20 knots velocity. In
those situations the tug and

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BOR CRT a Eas

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The stories behind the news.

THE GLOBAL =
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BAHAMAS,

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towed barge that are caught
at sea make headway only at
very slow (or even zero)
speed. Even more trouble-
some is the fact that once in
safe harbour with high winds
prevalent, the tug and barge
unit normally sits in port
awaiting weather abatement.
Water transport cost is almost
linear with speed, so the idle T
&B combination incurs unac-
ceptable costs.

The conventional ship-con-
figured tankship can continue
making fair forward progress
in rough seas up to the point
where it may no longer be
safely assured of entering a
narrow harbour channel
amidst breaking seas.

Water & Sewer executives
gained insight into this differ-
ence in operating efficiency
between tugs/barges on the
one hand and tankships on the
other and soon shifted their
procurement plans to encom-
pass the ship's advantages.

Unfortunately the graphic
representation of transport
cost by a range of ship sizes
has a very steep slope where
cost per ton carried decreases
rapidly as ship size increases.
(This being the heart of the
reason world crude oil trades
shifted from a maximum
70,000 ton ships to 326,000 ton
oil tankers in a brief span of
years in the 1960's/70's).

Whereas initial hopes of
accommodating large (by our
local standards) ships on the
Andros route, these hopes
were dashed when the dredg-
ing contractor engaged to
enlarge and deepen the for-
mer Owens Illinois pulpwood
loading berth/ channel at Mor-
gan's Bluff at the extreme
northern tip of Andros,
encountered much more diffi-
cult dredging of harder than
expected rock. My recollec-
tion is that there was extreme
delay getting a channel creat-
ed and with costs overrunning
substantially a smaller, shal-
lower water loading harbour
was agreed. A situation that
has cost a pretty penny for
many subsequent years up to
the present.

The approach channel,
turning basin and berthing
face at Morgan's Bluff are
defined in four areas describ-
ing a series of dredged depths
ranging from 25 feet in the
“A”, or deepest, zone down
to a bare 17 feet in the “D”
zone. By squeezing all the
inefficiency out of this lesser
harbour it became possible to
load water tankers to 19 feet
draft. However a very trou-
blesome further problem leapt
into the forefront. The turning
basin was so restricted in size
that an absolute maximum
ship length of about 410 feet
was mandated.

Now it is a fact that you
can't have a very large cargo
capacity in a ship only 410
feet long and loaded down to
only 19 feet draft. By charter-
ing an old North Slope heavi-
ly built 11,000 ton barge after
it had been fitted with a
vaguely ship-like blunt bow
and installing several very
costly, tempermental Swedish
engines W & S Corp. gained
the use of a 14,000 ton ship

SEE page 5C





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THE TRIBUNE

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

18TH JUNE, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00332

Whereas SOLOMON EZEKIEL NEWTON, of Pinewood Gardens in the Southern
District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
Letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate of MABLE NEWTON, late
of Yellow Elder Gardens in the Southern District of the Island of New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

18TH JUNE, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00333

Whereas SHAKIRA SANDS-BURROWS, of Millennium Gardens in the Western
District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate of JOHN SAMUEL SANDS
late of Malcolm Road in the Southern District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

18TH JUNE, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00334

Whereas ANDREW DWAYNE FORBES, of No. 19 High Vista Apartments in the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration
with the Will annexed of the Real and Personal Estate of DIANE M. MILLER late
of No. 580 S.E. 5th Street in the City of Pampano Beach in the State of Florida, one
of the States of the United States of America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

18TH JUNE, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00335

Whereas GRANVILLE CHRISTOPHER KNOWLES, of Miami Florida, U.S.A.,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration
with the Will annexed of the Real and Personal Estate of GRANVILLE JOSEPH
KNOWLES, late of 214 S.E. Lincoln Circle N., St. Petersburg, Pinellas, Florida,
US.A., deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

18TH JUNE, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00336

Whereas ARLINGTON WILLIAM DEAN, of Fox Hill, Eastern District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of CECIL A. HAMILTON, late of 11224 South Emerald
Street Chicago Illinois U.S.A., deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar



FROM page 3C

with a history of poor relia-
bility and frequent mainte-
nance. This vessel has served
many years but its speed is
about that of a barge because
of its broad beam (Normally
such width as one would
encounter in a 75,000 ton
tanker. Which would require
42 feet draft)

For about a decade W &S
Corp. concurrently chartered
a second small, elderly, Ex-
Canadian tankship of about
7000 tons capacity. It's mod-
est sea speed of near 12 knots
was about double that of the
larger converted broad beam
tankship. Thus the two vastly
differently configured ships
could haul about the same
quantity (tons) of water per
month on the short trip from
Andros to Arawak Cay.

With reverse osmosis sys-
tems of greater size and effi-
ciency appearing around the
world the executive decision
was apparently made to go
with the RO approach for the
future.

The water transport sys-
tem has been cut back to a
single ship and it was hoped
that even that could be aban-
doned soon. The question
today that one must ask is:
“Have we bet the farm too
early before proven success
of RO systems?” Bear in
mind that we have had fail-
ure of several earlier
attempts to use large scale
RO process to obtain potable
water.

———— , JUNE 15, 2009, PAGE 5C
INSIGHT FEEDBACK

Now one suddenly is see-
ing adverts and hearing
rumours that indicate the
RO system may have cost
and reliability problems too.

Before the large world-
wide fuel price increases of
recent years the actual trans-
port cost by ship is estimated
to have been in the near
neighbourhood of $4.00 per
thousand Imperial gallons.
(An Imperial gallons is 20
per cent larger than a U.S.
gallon and 1000 I gallons is
equal to 4.47 long tons of
2240 pounds).

There have been further
verbal indications that the
shipment of Andros water
may have stressed some of
the Andros well fields. Only
the Water & Sewerage Corp
would have data on this.

Quite some years earlier
the World Bank examined
Bahamas wellfield potential
and indicated among other
findings that substantial sur-
face water was present fur-
ther south on Andros and
near a natural deeper water
harbour site near Big Wood
Cay. Such a site would add a
few hours to each round voy-
age to Nassau, but it would
remove the loading site from
the very serious funneling of
occasional destructive
Atlantic swells channeled
through Hole In The Wall
Passage and focusing on
Morgans Bluff. The phe-
nomenon in a matter of a

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Tel: 322-2188/9

Email: Geofflones@comcast.net



few hours on a calm August
day destroyed the first $2
million dock that Owens IIli-
nois had built at Morgans
Bluff. The phenomena have
occurred at least twice again
since Owens Illinois gave up
the pulpwood business.
Despite the history of
destructive ocean swells W
& S Corp. have clung to
Morgan's Bluff for a loading
site.

Unless we are assured of
the reliability and the overall
costs of the newer RO sys-
tems

one is inclined to feel that
some very modern ship capa-
bility to move water must
remain available for at least
a few more years.

The dire message appear-
ing in local adverts the past
week indicate that the East-
ern District is going to have
some very serious water
problems for the near term
at least. Can we feel confi-
dent it won't also apply toa
longer term?

Unlike the 1970's we now
have a growing cadre of
skilled Bahamian shipboard
officers, thanks to the
Bahamas Maritime Authori-
tiy's scholarships and those
of our foreign Bahamian
Shipowners Association. In
addition small 15,000 to
20,000 ton tankers can now
be built with long life corro-
sion resistance and with a
need for greatly reduced
crew numbers. Local capital
has shown the financial
strength to easily fund a pair
of modern small tankers that
could substantially out-per-
form the old “crocks” we
have had to use in the past.
For many years all ships and
tugs used by Water & Sewer
Corp. consumed a very high
grade of marine fuel. This
morning's Houston price for
this quality of marine fuel is
$480 per ton. (Last summer
it reached $1600 per ton).
Modern small tankships typ-
ically are fitted to burn a
heavier, grade of marine fuel
(known as IFO 180) which
this morning costs $349.50
per ton. The reduction in
fuel cost per year could be
very substantial using new
efficient tankships.

Our situation deserves
close monitoring for the next
couple of years especially.
We cannot have a tourism
economy if we don't have
ample fresh water available.
We shouldn't “bet the farm”
on any one system in haste.

Wm E Bardelmeier,
Nassau,
May 10, 2009

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

Sidney Poitier International Conference

and Film Festival

Nassau, The Bahamas, February 23-27, 2010

CALL FOR PAPERS

Deadline for Submissions: July 31, 2009

The College of the Bahamas presents the Sidney Poitier International Conference and Film
Festival. We invite critics, historians, filmmakers, artists and cultural practitioners from around
the world to examine the artistic and social endeavours of acclaimed actor, director, author, and

diplomat Sir Sidney Poitier, who turns 83 on February 20, 2010.

We invite papers or panel presentations that explore the broad spectrum of critical issues sum-
moned up by Poitier’s work as actor, director, and author. Presentations should be 20 minutes
in length. Papers will be considered for publication in an upcoming scholarly text dedicated

to Poitier’s work.

Possible Panel and Paper Topics Include (but are not limited to):
Caribbean Sense and Sensibilities in American Cinema
Constructions of Blackness in Poitier’s Films
Representations of Women in Poitier’s Films

The Iconic Black Male in America

Black Skin, White Masks

Poitier and the White/Black Gaze
Poitier and the Global Politics of Race and Liberation
Poitier, Bahamian Politics and Identity

Sexing the Asexual

Black Christs and the White Conscience
Desire, Sexuality and Transgression

Poitier and Censorship
Poitier in the Classroom
The Actor as Activist
Poitier and Film Theory

Poitier and the Black Power Movement

Poitier and the Digital Age

Autobiography and Refashioning

Poitier as Director
Poitier as Writer

Please send abstracts via email to: istrachan@cob.edu.bs.
Abstracts should be submitted by July 31, 2009, and should be no longer than 250 words.

For more information on the conference please go to:http://poitierconference.synthasite.com/.

For any questions feel free to contact Ian Strachan at istrachan@cob.edu.bs, or Marjorie
Brooks-Jones at mjones@cob.edu.bs or call the School of English Studies at (242) 302-4381.


THE TRIBUNE





Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, SC
Chicago
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Honolulu
Houston










R : ORLANDO : Mostly sunny; Clear. Sunshine
/ High: 95° ae ¢ >a isolated t-shower. , ,
‘Low: 75°F/24°C ‘a
ea Ae High: 89°
* } ¢ allele 90° Low: 79° Low: 79°
TAMPA Egy: te f- Py, EN ae ay AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel
High: 92° F/33° C 5 > 111° F | 109°-86°F

Low: 77° F/25°C
@

de

High
F/C
88/31
68/20
90/32
75/23
17/25
64/17
74/23
91/32
78/25
77/25
97/36
77/25
79/26
87/30
96/35

KEY WEST
High: 88° F/31°C
Low: 79° F/26° C

Today

Low

F/C
61/16
53/11
71/21
58/14
59/15
53/11
56/13
74/23
55/12
56/13
76/24
52/11
57/13
75/23
77/25

Ww

+ SO Git ew eo
oO

Oo fe tee CS ee
o Be oO Oo

La

115°-88° F

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and

Plenty of sunshine.





High:
Low:

90°
79°

= WEATHER REPORT &

5-Day FORECAST














i

Mostly sunny.



Mostly sunny, a
t-storm possible.







High: 88° High: 89°
Low: 78° Low: 79°
AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel
108°-85° F 104°-88° F

elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

1

a, @ WEST PALMBEACH
= High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 76° F/24° C
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT
High: 88°F/31°C High: 89° F/32° C
Low: 78° F/26° C ica Low: 76° F/24°C
| Sun
; MIAMI
a High: 89° F/32°C

Low: 77° F/25° C

x

@



ANDROS
High: 93° F/34° C
Low: 80° F/27°C



ABACO

High: 90° F/32° C

— Low: 79° F/26°C
“A

Cx

NASSAU

High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 79° F/26° C
@



Tuesday Today Tuesday
High Low W High Low W High Low W High
Fic FC Fic FC Fic FC F/C
91/382 638/17 s Indianapolis 80/26 62/16 pc 79/26 64/17 t Philadelphia 78/25
68/20 53/11 sh Jacksonville 93/33 73/22 t 96/35 73/22 pc Phoenix 97/36
87/30 72/22 pc Kansas City 80/26 68/20 t 85/29 69/20 t Pittsburgh 80/26
71/21 56/13 pe Las Vegas 93/33 69/20 s 94/34 74/23 pc Portland, OR 78/25
76/24 60/15 pc Little Rock 95/35 73/22 pe 97/86 73/22 s Raleigh-Durham 34/28
62/16 50/10 s Los Angeles 71/21 61/16 r 74/23 61/16 t St. Louis 81/27
76/24 60/15 pc Louisville 80/26 67/19 t 83/28 67/19 t Salt Lake City 75/23
87/30 67/19 t Memphis 95/35 75/23 t 94/34 75/23 s San Antonio 95/35
77/25 58/14 t Miami 89/31 77/25 t 89/31 78/25 t San Diego 71/21
79/26 61/16 pc Minneapolis 79/26 60/15 pce 74/23 60/15 t San Francisco 71/21
99/37 77/25 s Nashville 87/30 68/20 t 86/30 70/21 t Seattle 74/23
84/28 55/12 t New Orleans 95/35 77/25 $s 95/35 75/23 s Tallahassee 97/36
79/26 59/15 pc New York 75/23 58/14 t 69/20 58/14 pc Tampa 92/33
88/31 75/23 pc Oklahoma City 97/36 73/22 pce 99/87 72/22 pc Tucson 94/34
96/35 77/25 s Orlando 95/35 75/23 t 95/35 74/23 t Washington, DC 79/26

Today

Low

F/C
59/15
75/23
57/13
57/13
65/18
69/20
57/13
76/24
65/18
56/13
54/12
73/22
77/25
66/18
64/17

Ww

t
pc
ie
le
t

oO ” Bea eo fe ea
oO

GREAT EXUMA

ELEUTHERA



Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
Temperature

NGM es cca cicates Qaceeraueeataceraanet sateen 91° F/33° C
LOW sects 81° F/27° C
Normal high .... 87° F/31° C
Normal low 74° F/23° C
Last year's WIQh oo... cecesceteeeceeees 89° F/32° C

Last year's LOW oo. cccceseseeteseeeeeees 72° F/22° C
Precipitation

As of 2 p.m. yesterday .......ccccccccccenseeceneee 0.00"
Year to date 13.
Normal year to date 0... ccc ccseeceneeee 14.88"

AccuWeather.com

Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009



High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 77° F/25°C

—

High: 87° F/31°C
Low: 75° F/24° C

O ,
US rr ee

Tuesday

High

F/C
75/23
99/37
80/26
74/23
79/26
82/27
80/26
97/36
72/22
70/21
73/22
99/37
92/33
96/35
76/24

Low

F/C
59/15
77/25
60/15
57/13
64/17
71/21
58/14
75/23
65/18
56/13
56/13
74/23
77/25
68/20
60/15

Ww

pe
s
pe
pc
r
t
pe
s
E
pe
pe
s
t
s

pe

AY ir Ny

3|4|5|6

MODERATE

o|1|2

LOW







HIGH | V.HIGH

7|8|9|10

Vv

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.

a Pos

High Ht.(ft.) Low
Toley (asp, 28 808 pm
Tuesday Soe 28 9.05em
Wednesiay eam 27 1006 pm
Thursday eae 29 1107 RM

Sunrise...... 6:20 a.m.
Sunset....... 8:01 p.m.
tat New



Jun. 15

Jun. 22

CATISLAND
High: 85° F/29° C
Low: 72° F/22°C
i SAN SALVADOR
High: 88° F/31° C
Low: 74° F/23°C
LONG ISLAND
High: 89° F/32° C
Low: 75° F/24°C ey MAYAGUANA
High: 86° F/30° C
— a Low: 74° F/23°C
CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
RAGGEDISLAND — Migh:90°F/32°c
High: 88° F/31° C Low: 76° F/24°C
Low: 72° F/22°C os
GREAT INAGUA

High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 77° F/25°C

ad

Moonrise. .. . 12:42 a.m.
Moonset... . 12:59 p.m.
First Full

Jun. 29

0.3
0.5

0.3
0.5

0.2
0.4

0.1
0.3



hil 7





Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
88/31
69/20
75/23
86/30
56/13
91/32
86/30
80/26
90/32
79/26
90/32
76/24
78/25
66/18
66/18
78/25
57/13
96/35
100/37
76/24
91/32
81/27
91/32
68/20
64/17
72/22
17/25
58/14
87/30
52/11
84/28
106/41
83/28
82/27
65/18
88/31
70/21
72/22
88/31
86/30
79/26
104/40
68/20
70/21
77/25
80/26
109/42
64/17
68/20
75/23
72/22
102/38
84/28
86/30
59/15
83/28
57/13
85/29
67/19
75/23
57/13
61/16
83/28
73/22
71/21
87/30
72/22
78/25
74/23
81/27

ealil

Today

Low
F/C
78/25
53/11
44/6
70/21
43/8
79/26
76/24
66/18
66/18
73/22
70/21
58/14
70/21
43/8
55/12
65/18
45/7
70/21
84/28
55/12
78/25
72/22
65/18
53/11
46/7
62/16
61/16
40/4
75/23
43/6
79/26
73/22
62/16
59/15
46/7
78/25
57/13
55/12
66/18
77/25
52/11
74/23
55/12
51/10
59/15
56/13
88/31
41/5
54/12
62/16
64/17
81/27
62/16
78/25
32/0
73/22
39/3
73/22
54/12
57/13
43/6
52/11
77/25
64/17
59/15
64/17
56/13
71/21
55/12
58/14









pe
pe
pc
fi
t
pe
pc
pe
C
pe
s

High
F/C
88/31
66/18
78/25
88/31
53/11
90/32
86/30
78/25
73/22
75/23
97/36
61/16
78/25
66/18
70/21
91/32
60/15
96/35
107/41
76/24
87/30
81/27
78/25
66/18
66/18
73/22
74/23
62/16
89/31
55/12
82/27
104/40
80/26
79/26
61/16
87/30
69/20
75/23
84/28
84/28
77/25
107/41
75/23
69/20
72/22
79/26
108/42
61/16
76/24
76/24
17/25
101/38
84/28
86/30
66/18
84/28
57/13
84/28
70/21
77/25
63/17
59/15
82/27
73/22
76/24
81/27
68/20
77/25
65/18
78/25

Tuesday

Low
F/C
78/25
51/10
51/10
73/22
46/7
78/25
77/25
65/18
63/17
70/21
67/19
48/8
70/21
47/8
51/10
58/14
45/7
70/21
84/28
51/10
76/24
72/22
67/19
51/10
50/10
55/12
59/15
44/6
71/21
45/7
79/26
73/22
65/18
59/15
46/7
78/25
ile
55/12
64/17
78/25
55/12
75/23
55/12
54/12
43/6
59/15
84/28
45/7
54/12
48/8
67/19
83/28
61/16
78/25
38/3
73/22
48/8
73/22
54/12
61/16
46/7
54/12
77/25
64/17
60/15
58/14
ale
53/11
49/9
57/13

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MariNE FORECAST

WwW

pc
pc
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S$
sh
t
sh
pc
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pc
S$
pc
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S$
sh
pc
pc
S$
sh
pc
t
pc
t
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pc
pc
sh
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sh
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Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace





MONDAY, JUNE 15th, 2009, PAGE 7C

WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
Tuesday: § at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
FREEPORT Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
Tuesday: § at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
ABACO Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
Tuesday: $ at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F



79/60
Washington
4

71/61

(BREEZY ) _

3 Houston

96/77, =
Showers
T-storms







eran ~ Rain Gaia Fronts
[*, * Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and “os

66) Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm intial
v7_7] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary .m@ a
10s | -ts [Os'| 10s 20s [305i] 40s [50s Gos 70s 80s [S0s\/i00sN/Ti05)



t ee

“You Can Be BI
Away By A Hurricane

ae you_can fee easy knowing

th oe yo have excellent insurance
erase no matter which
await he wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

ce | Abaco Eleuthera Exuma
ore] Tel: (242) 350-3500 f Tel: (242) 367-4204 f Tel: (242) 332-2862 ff Tel: (242) 336-2304

LH





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