Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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This item has the following downloads:


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Downturn
‘endangering
their welfare’

= By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE economic downturn is
putting the lives and welfare of
the nation’s children in mortal
danger, new statistics have
revealed.

Authorities have revealed a
major hike in the number of
attempted suicides as well as
incidences of physical and sex-
ual abuse among school-age
youngsters this year.

Of particular concern is a rise
in the number of primary school
children who attempted suicide
in April, with teachers flagging
up 10 cases.

Assistant director of the
Department of Social Service’s
School Welfare Division, Lor-

Search for
brothers

continues

= By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff
Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE search for two miss-
ing Andros boys continued
yesterday without revealing
any obvious leads to their
whereabouts.

Police Superintendent in
charge of the Family
Islands, Hulan Hanna, said
the search would continue
but there was nothing of sig-
nificance to report, as the
status of the investigation
remains the same.

Brothers Deangelo
Clarke, nine, and Marcelo
Clarke, five, disappeared
while crabbing in South
Andros on Tuesday
evening.

Worry set in when they
did not return to their
grandparents’ house after
nightfall.

Police officers from the
Kemp’s Bay police station
were alerted and joined rel-
atives in their search on
Wednesday morning.

Local residents and

SEE page 6



raine Duvalier, claimed a rise
in the number of struggling and
frustrated parents physically
abusing their children may have
contributed to the increase in
suicidal thoughts.

Mrs Duvalier said: “Kids are
also being affected by the down-
turn. Parents are lashing out at
them. Fathers or other figures
are abusing sons, and some of
them feel like they just can’t
take it anymore.”

Physical abuse is defined by
Social Services as any abuse that
leaves “visible” or physical
injuries on the child’s body —
including fractures, bruises,
scratches or other wounds.

A total of 16 attempted sui-
cide cases were brought to the
attention of her department by
teachers in New Providence
schools within the first four
months of 2009, with April see-
ing more cases than the first
three months combined.

Cases were spread through-
out the school system, not
focused at anyone or few insti-
tutions, and involved both girls
and boys.

While the April leap may
have led officials to conclude
that matters were worsening,
officials note that May fortu-
nately saw a major decline —
with no attempted suicide cases
reported to the School Welfare
division.

This after the division
received no reports of suicidal
students in the whole of 2008.

Meanwhile, the number of
attempted suicide cases and sus-
pected abuse cases made known
to the division is just a fraction
of those recorded by the
Department of Social Services
as a whole, The Tribune was
informed.

However, an attempt to
ascertain the total number of
cases recorded throughout the
Department was unsuccessful
yesterday.

According to Mrs Duvalier,
signs of suicidal tendencies are
often recognised by vigilant
teachers who have years of
experience with what is “nor-
mal” and “unusual” student
behaviour.

Students have been known to
write notes implying their suici-
dal mental state, tell friends who
inform teachers, make their
intentions known to a school
guidance counsellor, exhibit
“self-destructive” behaviour or

SEE page 6



=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009



es.

MMU eae

ECONOMY Sparks
Child abuse hik



Employee
put on leave

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

MANDRELL Adderley, 28, was yesterday charged with the May 11 murder of 27 year-old Vernon
Rolle, who was found opposite the Blue Hill Road Community Clinic with a stab wound to the chest.
Adderley is due back in court on June 18.



‘Quite a few’ abuse claims
in two Freeport schools

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Staff Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A social worker claims that
while the nation was focused on the Eight Mile
Rock High School, where two teachers have been
accused of sexually abusing students, “quite a
few” reported cases of child molestation have
surfaced at two other government schools on
Grand Bahama.

According to an abuse counsellor, the alleged
incidents occurred at the Jack Hayward and St
Georges’ High Schools in Freeport.

Bee Butler, founder of No More Victims Out-
reach Association in Freeport, claims her organ-
isation has been seeing a number of sexual
molestation cases involving students.

“It is sad that there are so many molestation
incidents occurring in our society, especially now
in our schools,” Ms Butler said.

“We have been dealing with a lot of victims
who have been molested. Young boys are sexually

molesting young girls in the schools.

“There have been quite a few incidents and
the most recent occurred two days ago when a
young girl was molested in school by a male stu-
dent.”

Ms Butler said the girl’s mother has reported
the matter to the police.

According to reports, it is alleged that a 16-
year-old male student forcibly held the girl down
and assaulted her.

Ms Butler, who was also a victim of incest as a
child, said she formed the organisation because
she wanted to help other victims of abuse.

Grand Bahama police are still investigating
alleged molestation incidents at the Eight Mile
Rock High School.

Complaints have been filed against three teach-
ers at the school. All have been removed pending
the outcome of investigations.

Teacher Andre Birbal, who fled the country in
February, was arrested in New York, USA, ona

SEE page 6



NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



extrahours

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Bahamas struggles past Haiti

New school
abuse probe

@ ByTANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

AN employee of the North
Eluethera High School has
been placed on administrative
leave after allegations that he
made sexual advances to
female students.

While police and education
officials yesterday confirmed
there was an active investiga-
tion, they did not divulge
details surrounding the alleged
advances.

"There is an investigation
going on, we have been look-
ing into this matter. I believe a
person may have been taken
into custody but I am unable
to say anything further until
early next week," said head of
the Family Island District,
Assistant Commissioner
Hulan Hanna.

A parent of a student at the
school claimed the employee
allegedly showed several
female students — reported
to be at least three students
— pornographic material and
"touched them inappropriate-

ly."
SEE page 6

Bahamians
named in
Queen’s
Honours

JOHN Bull owner Frederick
Hazelwood, well known engi-
neer George Cox and long-time
Special Olympics organiser
Basil Christie were among those
named in the Queen’s Birthday
Honours List last night.

Mr Hazelwood will be made
a Companion of the Most Dis-
tinguished Order of Saint
Michael and Saint George
(CMG) for his “outstanding ser-
vice to the business community
in the Bahamas”.

Mr Cox will receive the Most
Excellent Order of the British
Empire (OBE) for his “long
and dedicated service in the
field of civil and structural engi-
neering in the Bahamas.

Mr Christie is awarded the
Most Excellent Order of the
British Empire (MBE) for his
“outstanding contribution to the
development of The Bahamas
in the areas of community ser-
vice, education, religion and
Special Olympics”.

Reports of
tourist rape

THE Tribune received
reports last night that a

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on Thursday.

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had received reports of a
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PAGE 2, SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS
Family and friends honour
NAslTA Dart! Tr
m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS oe

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
SUPREME COURT

2009
CLE/Qui/ 00243

IN THE MATTER ALL THAT parcel or tract
of land containing 464.664 acres situated in
Alexander’s Settlement on the Island of Exuma,
Bahamas and IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT
parcel or tract of land containing 73.957 acres also
situated in Alexander’s Settlement on the Island of
Exuma, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FLORENCE SMITH
of Alexander’s Settlement in the Island of Exuma
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas is applying to the Supreme Court to have
its Title to the following land investigated under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act, and the nature
and extent thereof determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted by the said Court
in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

“ALL THAT parcel or tract of land containing
Four hundred and Sixty-four and Six hundred
and Sixty-four thousandths (464.664) acres being
a portion of Crown Grant C-24 granted to William
Alexander and situated in Alexander's Settlement
on the Island of Exuma, Bahamas which said
parcel or tract of land has such position boundaries
shape marks and dimensions as are shown on the
diagram or plan filed in the Department of Lands
and Surveys situated in the City of Nassau in the
Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas as Plan Number
343A EX and IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT
parcel or tract of land containing Seventy-three
and Nine hundred and Fifty-Seven thousandths
(73.957) acres also being a portion of Crown Grant
C-24 granted to William Alexander and situated
in Alexander’s Settlement on the Island of Exuma,
Bahamas which said parcel or tract of land has such
position boundaries shape marks and dimensions
as are shown on the diagram or plan filed in the
Department of Lands and Surveys situated in the
City of Nassau in the Island of New Providence
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas as Plan Number 343 EX and which said
parcels or tracts of land are filed herein and edged
in “PINK”,

Copies of the Plan may be inspected during normal
office hours at the following places:-

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher
Building, East Street, in the City of Nassau;

2. The Local Administrator’s Office situated in the
Settlement of George Town, Exuma;

3. The Local Constable’s Office situated in the
Settlement of George Town, Exuma; or

4, The Chambers of Colin M. Thompson Terrace
House, First Terrace and Collins Avenue
Nassau, Bahamas.

Any person who objects to the granting of the said
Certificate of Title is required to file in the Supreme
Court and serve on the Petitioner or its Attorney a
Statement of its, his or her Claim in the prescribed
forms, verified by an Affidavit and other related
requirements to be filed therewith by the 15th day
of July A.D., 2009. Failure of any such person to
file and serve a Statement of its, his or her Claim
together with the other related requirement by the
15th day of July A.D., 2009, will operate as a bar to
such claim.



COLIN M. THOMPSON
ATTORNEY FOR THE PETITIONER



Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

RELATIVES and friends of
the late Milo Butler Jr are
mourning the loss of a dedicat-
ed father, friend and politician
following his unexpected death
on Wednesday at age 72.

The former Speaker of the
House, MP for Pinewood, and
son of the country’s first gov-
ernor general Sir Milo Butler,
had suffered an aneurysm and
two strokes in recent years and
family members say his health
had greatly deteriorated since
then.

Mr Butler followed in his
father’s footsteps to forge a
successful political career and
make a significant contribution
to the shaping of the country
throughout his adult life.

The sixth of Sir Milo’s 10
children served as chairman of
the PLP in 1968, going on to
take up a seat in the Senate the
following year, and then
becoming vice-president of the
Senate for five years.

He was then appointed the
first consul general for the
Bahamas in Florida in 1974,
before returning to Nassau to
run for parliament in 1977.

The ambitious politician was
promptly voted in as MP for
Pinewood and retained his seat
until 1992, becoming Deputy
Speaker of the House of
Assembly in 1987 and Speaker
of the House in 1991 during his
15-year term.

Mr Butler also served as
chairman of the Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation (BEC) and
the Gaming Board.

When he was unsuccessful in
the 1992 general election, Mr
Butler resumed work in the
family business Milo Butler
and Sons Ltd.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham expressed his sym-
pathy to Mr Butler’s family on
Wednesday, paying tribute to
his life of service.

Mr Ingraham said: “The pin-
nacle of his political career was
his service as Speaker of the
House of Assembly, a position
which he occupied with dignity
and grace.

“He maintained friendships
with, and earned the respect
of, persons across the political
spectrum. He was a great
Bahamian gentleman and a
nation-builder.

“My colleagues in the gov-
ernment join Delores and me





in extending heartfelt condo-

lences to the Butler family.”
Mr Butler’s niece Loretta

Butler-Turner, Minister of

_ SENATOR Milo Butler
Junior at the Mental

Health Week panel

Discussion in 1974.

0 Butler Or with
a young Hubert Ingra-
ham outside the House
of Assembly in 1986.

State for Social Development,
said her uncle helped inspire
her own political career.

She said: “He was one of the

aa









individuals in our family that I
would have followed in his
footsteps in terms of political
contribution. He was my uncle,
and we are avery close family
so this is a great loss to us.”

Mr Butler Jr is survived by
his wife Winifred Butler, 65,
five children, two daughters-
in-law and seven grandchildren.

His daughter Bernadette
Butler, 39, a lawyer in the
Attorney General’s office,
remembers her father as a pop-
ular man who lived life to the
full.

She said: “My father was full
of fun. He loved life, He did
everything he wanted to do,
and he had a very good sense
of humour.

“He was always holding din-
ners at the house, and was
entertaining friends.

“He was a very well-liked
person and he had a lot of
friends.”

Her father always strived to
do his best, Miss Butler said,
as his motto was: Good, bet-
ter, best — never let it rest until
the good is better, and the bet-
ter best.

“He lived by that,” she said.

“That was his thing, to
always be the best you can be.

“He was a good man, he was
a great Bahamian, and he
made a contribution to the
development of the Bahamas
as we know it.”

Mr Butler was also a devoted
member of the parish at St
Matthew’s Anglican Church on
Shirley Street. Funeral arrange-
ments have not yet been made.

Nurses continue with fifth day of sick-out

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,

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Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

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Bank Ano Insurance

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Hy



m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

ALL specialty clinics at the
Princess Margaret Hospital
remained closed yesterday on
the fifth day of industrial action
staged by public health nurses
across the country.

The nurses began their sick-
out on Monday morning over
government decisions to with-
hold their four per cent pay rise
this year and postpone a health
insurance plan until 2012.

Around 50 per cent of nurs-
ing staff at public clinics across
the Bahamas participated in
the sick-out on Monday and
Tuesday.

And although nearly all nurs-
ing staff returned to the Rand
Memorial Hospital in Freeport
on Wednesday, disruption con-

tele
Sasa ee

eRe tHE
PHONE: 322-2157



tinued at the busy Princess
Margaret Hospital for the fifth
day yesterday as public health
nurses pressed on with the sick-
out.

PMH announced yesterday
that all specialty clinics, includ-
ing the surgical, medical and
paediatric clinics remained
closed.

All non-emergency surgeries
continue to be postponed,
apart from those scheduled for
visitors from the Family
Islands.

However the hospital did
open the oncology clinic, dial-
ysis clinic, maternity high risk
clinic, comprehensive clinic and
general practice clinic yester-
day.

Patients are advised to only
attend the hospital in a med-
ical emergency. If you are not
sure whether you have a med-
ical emergency call 326-7014,
502-7812 or 919.

Patients scheduled for surgi-
cal procedures should call their
doctor or call 322-2861 exten-
sion 3149.

For all general inquiries call
the number above, or 502-
7890/1.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

Comics

alpen ONO nail

eee cee eee P4

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY WEEKENDER 8 PAGES





THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

$4m allocated
for work on
Straw Market

FOUR million dollars has
been allocated in this year’s
budget for the construction of
a new straw market, the esti-
mated total cost of which is
$10 million.

Bidding for the contract to
construct the market is
expected to be finished by
August 21, 2009 and con-
struction is scheduled to go
ahead at the end of Septem-
ber 2009 and last 16 to 18
months.

According to Works Min-
ister Neko Grant, project
architect Patrick Rahming was
awarded a contract to design
the market in December 2008.

Mr Rahming’s design plan
has not yet been completed,
however Mr Grant suggested
during his contribution to the
budget debate that they
should be ready within the
week.

Consequently, preparations
are being made to begin the
tendering process.

Funding boost
for Fish Frys

Government has increased
funding for the “further devel-
opment” of the Fish Fry areas
in both New Providence and
Eight Mile Rock, Grand
Bahama from $100,000 to
$500,000 in this year’s budget.

“We remain cognisant of
the important value of other
aspects of Bahamian culture
to our tourism product and
the need for regular mainte-
nance and upgrading of infra-
structure at these sites as
required,” Minister of Works
Neko Grant told parliament,
as he contributed to the
2009/2010 budget debate.

Assessment of
repair work to
PI Bridge

THIS budget year will see
the Paradise Bridge Authori-
ty undertake “preliminary
work” to determine the extent
of works required for the
repair of the Paradise Island
Bridge, according to the Min-
ister of Works.

Neko Grant said this work
will be comprised of “investi-
gations and repair design.”

Contributing to the
2009/2010 budget debate, Mr
Grant noted that the intro-
duction of a “token-less” sys-
tem at the Paradise Island
Bridge in the 2008/2009 bud-
get year is expected to reduce
the Bridge Authority’s
expenses by approximately
$122,000 a year.

“In this regard, savings
should be realised as a result
of cost reduction in machin-
ery maintenance,” he added.

Contracts to
aid flood fight

Seeking to mitigate Nas-
sau’s flooding issues, the gov-
ernment has issued contracts
worth $641,200 for the clean-
ing and maintenance of 834
wells and 664 associated catch
pits, the Minister of Works
said yesterday.

Meanwhile, a Drainage
Master Plan study is being
conducted by his ministry,
which is anticipated to pro-
vide a framework for how
maintenance of the drainage
system can be more effective-
ly monitored and managed,
he said.

“During the recent precipi-
tation, the wells in the heavily
trafficked areas and the areas
of high population density
were the ones that experi-
enced some blockage.

“Tt was discovered that litter
had blocked the inlet grates
and the screen baskets. To
mitigate any recurrence of
such events, we adopted a
proactive approach by
instructing the contractors to
clean the screen baskets and
the grates outside of their nor-
mal routine,” said Mr Grant.

“Two contracts totalling
$325,000 were awarded for the
re-drilling of 80 drainage wells
which were identified from
the past maintenance contract.

“This programme also
includes the installation of 15
new drainage wells in the spe-
cific areas which were
assessed and found to be in
need of drainage wells,” the
minister said.



Minister pledges Lands
and Surveys ‘clean-up’

= By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

Measures will be taken to
“clean up” and restore public
confidence in the Department
of Lands and Surveys, Minister
of State Byron Woodside told
parliament.

This comes after the depart-
ment was rocked by allegations
of corruption centering on the
granting of numerous plots of
Crown land to close relatives
and friends of then director of
the department, Tex Turnquest,
some of which were soon after
re-sold for hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars.

Mr Turnquest stepped down
following the publication of sev-
eral reports in The Tribune out-
lining the land controversy and
the allegations.

Contributing to the 2009/2010
budget debate on Thursday
evening, Mr Woodside gave
some mixed signals about exact-
ly how the department per-
ceives the allegations, stating
both that a “preliminary
review” indicated that “noth-
ing untoward” occurred, and
later that the corruption claims
led the department to take the
“painful decision” to “take the
necessary measures” to “clean

up” and restore public confi-
dence.

He said: “During the past
few weeks the Department of
Lands and Surveys has come
under much public scrutiny.
While no system is perfect and
persons may feel aggrieved by
decisions made within various
areas of the public service, I
must take this opportunity to
advise that all Bahamians have
the right to apply for Crown
land, including public officers
and their families.

“However there are guide-
lines that are to be followed in
the review of applications by
public officers, especially those
who are retiring or have
retired.”

Mr Woodside added that
“family members of public offi-
cers employed at the Depart-
ment of Lands and Surveys,
who wish to secure land for res-
idential and commercial use”
may also apply.

“There is no skullduggery.
However, the public’s percep-
tion has been that these people
may have been given preferen-
tial treatment,” he noted.

Mr Woodside stated that
“this entire issue is currently
under review”, declaring that
“preliminary reports do not
indicate that anything untoward



i SCM ESI:

occurred relative to the appli-
cation process.”

The issue of Crown land and
land policy, and the revelations
about the granting of land to
Mr Turnquest’s relatives, was
mentioned by several opposi-
tion members during the course
of the budget debate.

MP for West End and Bimini



Cuts will exacerbate
court ‘tsunami Crisis’

= By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

CUTS in funding for the
Attorney General’s Office will
only contribute to a backlog of
court cases that have already
reached “tsunami crisis” level,
according to Cat Island, Rum
Cay and San Salvador MP and
attorney Philip Davis.

Mr Davis made this allega-
tion in parliament as he criti-
cised the way in which govern-
ment has allocated funds to var-
ious ministries, departments and
agencies in the 2009/2010 bud-
get.

Noting decreases in the
tourism budget — down by $12
million — as well as cuts at crim-
inal justice agencies — including
the police, the Attorney Gen-
eral’s Office, and the judiciary —
Mr Davis charged that govern-
ment is “aimless.”

“Tt is clear, Mr Speaker, that
this is not the time to take
resources away from our crime
fighting agencies. With cuts to
these agencies, it seems as if the
government has abandoned its
fundamental duty to protect the
Bahamian people. Mr. Speak-
er, what results should Bahami-
ans expect from agencies with
fewer resources? Expect more
for less, when more has contin-
ually produced less?

“Certainly, Mr Speaker,
Bahamians will not get better
investigations from the police,
or more cases being brought
before the courts by the Attor-
ney General’s Office, with few-
er resources,” he said.

In his budget communication,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham cautioned that below
expected government revenue
last year — $260 million less than
projected — and increased
demand on government services
means the government must
exercise “expenditure restraint”
and maximise the collection of
monies due to it in this year’s
budget if the country is to come
through the crisis without hav-
ing to make sacrifices in terms
of living standards and the pro-
vision of essential services.

Mr Ingraham said govern-
ment made some “difficult deci-
sions” when preparing the bud-
get — including cuts to critical
areas and the delay of certain
outlays, for example the nurses’
health insurance benefit that
days later resulted in an ongoing
sick-out that is crippling the



PHILIP Davis

health care system.

Despite Hubert Ingraham’s
efforts to justify the decisions
taken, the budget debate saw
various opposition members,
including Mr Davis, suggest that
cuts to particular areas — includ-
ing education, tourism and
crime fighting agencies — sim-
ply cannot be countenanced.

Mr Davis, as an experienced
attorney, noted that the country
already suffers from a shortage
of judges, courts and judicial
support staff to “service a mod-
ern Bahamas.”

“Our police force still does
not have the modern forensics
lab it so desperately needs to
quickly examine evidence. And
the Attorney General’s Office is
inadequately organised to deal
with the volume of cases it has
to prosecute.

“Yet the government in its
wisdom decided that now is the
time to cut the budgets of these
agencies along with that of the
prison and the Defence Force,”
said Mr Davis.

This, as the government has
made “little to no impact” on
the crime problem since com-
ing to office in May 2007, he
claimed.

Meanwhile, the MP called for
government to release up-to-
date statistics on conviction
rates for violent crimes — fig-
ures which would show the
“success rate” of various law
enforcement agencies.

While crediting the Minister
of National Security for regu-
larly releasing crime statistics,
Mr Davis said such releases
should also involve conviction
data.

“We have no idea what the
current backlog is in the
Supreme Court. Throughout

the rest of the year, we do not
know how many criminal cases
the AG’s Office brings to court
on a monthly basis. We also do
not know how many criminal
cases come in for prosecution
at the Supreme Court level
every month.

“We can only infer and make
assumptions about the backlog
from the crime and detection
statistics,” he added.

Lh

NEW COROLLA,

ELECTRIC BRAKE CONTROL,

Obie Wilchcombe said during
his contribution that he is “par-
ticularly concerned” about the
land scandal that he “heard
about a few weeks ago.”

“Pm also concerned about
who owns all this land, and
whether the politicians have
Crown land as well. I know I
don’t. But I am trying to figure
it out — because I need to know
how that happened. I still don’t
understand that and somebody
has to explain that to us,” he
said.

PLP chairman Glenys Han-
na-Martin had previously stated
that the situation warranted the
formation of a new land policy,
while MP for Fox Hill Fred
Mitchell called for a select com-
mittee to examine how and to
whom Crown land has been

granted.

Mr Woodside noted that
there have been a number of
changes at the Department of
Lands and Surveys during the
past four months.

These include: Richard
Hardy being named as the act-
ing director of Lands and Sur-
veys; Brian Bynoe being recent-
ly employed as the acting sur-
veyor general; the identification
of five certified surveyors to
augment the land management
unit; a review of plans to make
the department more customer
service friendly; the placement
of restrictions on the unfettered
access of private persons to cer-
tain areas in the department;
and greater focus being placed
on human resources and admin-
istrative needs.

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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

















































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Obama is the opposite of Reagan

WASHINGTON — Federal Reserve
Chairman Ben Bernanke sounded like a fis-
cal Paul Revere last week, warning Congress
about the dangers of an advancing army of
debt.

Bernanke said policymakers need a bold
plan to correct the deficit or else face dire
consequences. Our “near-term challenges
must not be allowed to hinder timely con-
sideration of the steps needed to address fis-
cal imbalances. Unless we demonstrate a
strong commitment to fiscal sustainability in
the longer term, we will have neither financial
stability nor healthy economic growth.”

He’s not alone. The Congressional Bud-
get Office and private forecasters share these
worries. Concern about the president’s han-
dling of the deficit and debt are also spread-
ing to the general public. While 67 per cent
approve of Obama’s job performance overall,
only 45 per cent of Americans approve of
Obama’s handling of federal spending, and 46
per cent of his handling of the federal budget
deficit, according to a new Gallup poll.

The White House is a lot better at dealing
with public criticism than balancing the bud-
get. Earlier this week Obama called for
restoration of “pay as you go” (PAYGO)
rules to curb the mounting debt, which means
any new spending would be offset by other
cuts or tax increases. But it may be too little,
too late, according to Sen. Kent Conrad, D-
N.D., chairman of the Senate Budget Com-
mittee. He told ABC News, the plan “does
not address the deficits and debt projected
under existing policy.”

For now, the White House’s posture of
periodically genuflecting to the altar of
deficits while conducting a revival of new
spending at least makes political sense. The
new president campaigned on a platform of
change and activism. His instincts and ideol-
ogy lead him to larger government. Large
majorities in Congress further empower his
goals. His liberal backers waited at least eight
years for this moment. Truly promoting fiscal
austerity at this moment in time is like order-
ing rice cakes at a steakhouse. But Obama
may have a broader ambition. He wants to be
Ronald Reagan in reverse. Running up the
debt, creating a host of new budgetary com-
mitments and enlarging the government’s
role in the economy will take generations to
unwind. And the engines of bigger govern-
ment also require fuel in the form of taxes.

Reagan did the opposite. He cut taxes to
make government expansion harder. Oba-
ma is transposing Reagan. He is growing gov-
ernment to make future tax cuts more diffi-
cult.

True, Obama promised tax cuts to 95 per
cent of Americans. That leaves a small per-
centage of individuals and businesses to bear
the burden. Based on budget forecasts and
other White House policy proposals, his math

seems fuzzy.

Maybe most Americans won’t pay higher
federal income taxes for the time being, but
Obama’s plans to enlarge the federal gov-
ernment could mean higher out-of-pocket
costs for individuals and businesses due to
legislation ranging from climate change to
health care reform.

Further, Democrats in Congress are deter-
mined to outbid even Obama in federaliz-
ing more programmes. For example, buried in
the energy bill the House will consider in
upcoming weeks is a provision giving the fed-
eral government new powers over local build-
ing codes, according to a recent Washington
Post editorial. And based on the Democrat-
ic majority’s plans in a host of other areas,
there is a lot more to come.

But one thing is clear: tax cuts don’t fit
into the White House’s long-term fiscal pic-
ture. Liberal budget experts already argue
that, given the grim fiscal realities, cutting
taxes would be “irresponsible.” How can we
reduce revenues given all our obligations and
a sea of red ink?

Many still think Obama will pivot at some
point and get serious about the deficit. But
new federal programmes and regulations
develop stakeholders and interest group sup-
port. Like dandelions, they tend to multiply
rather than go away on their own. And the
president’s PAYGO gambit won’t make
much of a difference either.

Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, said the
plan is a “fig leaf to appease those who say
they support fiscal discipline but continue to
vote for more spending.”

Finding fuel for new economic growth is
Obama’s larger challenge. Reducing the tax
burden is more than just ideological symbol-
ism; it’s an important tool to propel economic
growth. With an enlarged public sector, and
tax cuts off the table, we run the risk of enter-
ing a fiscal death spiral: a sluggish economy
means shrinking tax revenues, producing
even larger deficits and debt.

Financing these growing obligations also
means higher interest rates, which hampers
economic growth even more. It’s hard to see
how the current path doesn’t lead to higher
taxes to close budgetary gaps, which again, is
a reverse Reagan outcome.

Reagan believed tax cuts served not only as
a stimulus for economic growth, but as a tool
to keep the size of the federal government in
check. Obama is trying the antithesis. By
growing the size and reach of Washington
he makes tax cuts seem like an impossible
dream —truly a nightmare for those who
agree with Ronald Reagan’s belief that a
bloated federal leviathan is inconsistent with
both fiscal stability and economic growth.

(This article was written by Gary Andres-
c. 2009 Hearst Newspapers).

PLP leaders
miss point
yet again

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune

By condoning and even
attempting to celebrate the dis-
orderly behaviour by one of its
members of parliament, the
PLP leaders have demonstrated
once again that they are inca-
pable of bringing discipline to
bear on their members.

In fact, the leadership has
shown that they are just as
much infected with that old
familiar attitude of entitlement
as the rest of them. They miss
every opportunity to demon-
strate otherwise.

After Mrs. Glenys Hanna
Martin's disorderly behaviour
in the House, they should have
rebuked her, or at least pri-
vately urged her to desist and
apologise to the Speaker.

Instead, both Perry Christie
and Bernard Nottage aided and
abetted her in deliberately and
persistently breaking the rules
of the House.

In attempting to justify Mrs.
Martin's behaviour, Mr. Christie
passionately reminded Prime

Breaking
the rules
to suit

EDITOR, The Tribune.

When we were kids there
seemed to be a game of some
sort on most days — marbles,
spin the top, "rounders", rug-
by, etc. In most of these games
there was usually someone who
decided that the rules that had
been agreed the day before did
not suit him on that particular
day, usually because he was not
winning by the established rules
so he wanted to change them.

I was reminded of those days
when I read The Tribune
Thursday morning and was
shocked, but not surprised, to
learn that MP Glenys Hanna-
Martin created an uproar in
Parliament because she want-
ed to "raise an issue of public
importance.” She was denied
this opportunity because the
rules state that she was required
to have previously served notice
in Parliament that she intended
to bring up the matter.

She was asked to take her
seat and she refused to do so.
That too is not surprising. The
real shock followed when the
Speaker asked the Sergeant-at-
Arms to remove her from the
House and the other members
on her side of the House sur-
rounded her to prevent the
police from doing their duty.

Can we really be surprised
when so many young Bahami-
ans believe that the rules apply
to everyone else except them?

Most of us can recall a simi-
lar "incident of shame" in 1965,
which again proves the old
adage that "the fruit does not
fall far from the tree."

SIDNEY SWEETING, DDS
Nassau,
June 11, 2009

letters@tribunemedia net



Minister Hubert Ingraham how
he (Mr. Ingraham) had only a
week ago asked for permission
to go back on the agenda.

But Mr. Christie was making
the point without getting the
point. Mr. Ingraham asked! He
asked for the consent of mem-
bers. He did not demand. He
did not say he was going back
with or without permission. He
asked, Mr. Christie!

Mrs. Martin didn't do that.
She failed to give notice. Then
she demanded to be heard out
of order. Then she refused to
sit down when the Speaker
asked her to. Then she refused
to leave the chamber when
asked to. Then the next day she
tried to gain entrance to the
House when she knew she was
suspended.

Dr. Nottage did his own polit-
ical credibility a disservice in

preventing the carrying out of a
lawful order by a lawful author-
ity when he obstructed the
Police in the House in full view
of the television cameras.

Then he returned to the
House and launched an attack
on the Speaker during his bud-
get contribution. Dr. Nottage
knows or should know that you
don't do that. The Speaker
should only be criticised on a
substantive motion.

The PLP seem to think that
because Speaker Alvin Smith
is a soft-spoken mild-mannered
man that they can intimidate
him and run over him. That's a
bad miscalculation.

Speaker Smith has obviously
familiarized himself with the
rules. He is an excellent Speak-
er, one who is dignified but
strong. He deserves the support
and gratitude of the Bahamian
people.

THANKFUL
Nassau,
June 11, 2009

House uproar
epitomises why
the Bahamas is
lawless society

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The Opposition displayed complete contempt for the police
when they prevented an officer from carrying out his duty in the

House last Wednesday.

Not only did they defy the Speaker, but they rendered the
policeman impotent in a very public and humiliating way, and

put themselves above the law.

What’s even more shocking is the former national security
minister took part in the debacle.

If the Opposition wanted to talk about the very sad death of
a 15 year old in prison, they should have called a press confer-
ence after it became clear both sides wouldn’t give consent to
sideline the Budget exercise. They did not need the protec-
tion of Parliamentary privilege to say what they had to say.

If they’re clever, they can raise the matter when they speak
in the Budget debate. Or, they can put it on the agenda to

deal with at a later date.

The whole episode was ridiculous and there are better ways
to score political brownie points.

If the opposition can do their own thing and thumb their nose
at authority, why shouldn’t the public?

Their behaviour typifies the tragedy of the Bahamas.

No wonder we live in a lawless society.

ATHENA DAMIANOS
Nassau,
June 8, 2009

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that 1, PANNY ANDRER
COOPER intend to change my name to PENNY
ANDRER COOPER If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.





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THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Wuy YOU VEX?




































































"I vex because of all these
mammoth sized craters — not
pot holes, craters — which
seem to be popping up all
over Nassau causing me to
almost bust my tyre one night!
I mean, I drive at the speed
limit but when it dark and you
can't see these canyons it's a
driving and safety hazard! I
scared my bumper ga fall off
or my tyre ga bust because of
the slackness going on in the
streets.

"Even the prime minister
said these ditches in the mid-
dle of the road got to go -
them people at Ministry of
Works need to get it together
before they cause serious
injury or damage to people
cars man."

—Concerned Driver

"IT vex at these health-care
professionals who have the
nerve to
have a
sick-out
when our
country is
in a finan-
cial crisis! I
understand
that you
want
health
insurance
and other
benefits
but there
are a lot of
people
who. ain’
got no
insurance,
or job, or
paycheck
to take
home at
night.

"T think
it is very selfish of these nurs-
es to put people's health at
risk — they could have had
demonstrations on their lunch
hour, or when they off-duty
and still go to work to serve
the public. I bet these same
people would be hot mad or
worse if when they need
surgery, the doctors tell them:
"No, we on strike’. I say bring
in more of them Filipinos let
them tend to our sick, cause
these people ain't serious."

— Sick and tired

"I am vex because of one
story in another paper where
persons are trying to eliminate
the constitutional budgetary
allocated educational grant of
some $500 per each Bahamian
private school student while
the government school stu-
dent is allotted some $3,000.
As a parent of a private school
student, I sacrifice to pay fees
to assist my child, country and
government in providing a
diverse, competitive, academ-

ic, religious, enriching envi-
ronment to bring forth future
Bahamian citizens and to
employ teachers and person-
nel in both private and gov-
ernment schools.

"My taxes go to pay for
teachers, personnel, equip-
ment and premises in both pri-
vate and $2,500 extra for gov-
ernment schools, and it is dis-
criminatory for government
in a constitutional budget allo-
cation to treat my private
school Bahamian student less
than that of a Bahamian gov-

ernment school student —

especially using my taxes!"
- Vex Voter.

"I vex because I received a
very disturbing e-mail at work
concerning Miss Bahamas

Universe. It was a picture of

Miss (Kiara) Sherman after
she was crowned with the run-
ners-up
behind her.
To my cha-
grin and
complete
disgust, the
photo had
been doc-
tored to
lengthen
the split in
her dress
upward.
"Tt takes
a hell of a

lot of

courage for
young
ladies to
participate
i n
pageants,
not to
mention
the time
spent
grooming of not just their out-

ward appearances but also of

their characters in preparation
for the pageant. These ladies
aspire to represent our coun-
try, the Bahamas, as best they
can. While Miss Sherman was
not my choice for Miss
Bahamas Universe, I com-
mend her and the other par-
ticipants nonetheless.

"Our fellow Bahamians
claim to have national pride
but that pride has been lost
each time a Bahamian brother

or sister sent that despicable e-
mail on to a few others! Miss
Sherman can now be consid-
ered a National Symbol, to
which a certain amount of

honour should be given.
Shame on you Bahamas!"

— Disappointed and Dis-

gusted!

Are you vex? Send your
complaints to whyyouvex @tri-
bunemedia.net or fax them to

328-2398.

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¢ Tool Sets

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Tel: (242) 393-4002
: } 393-4096

Website to launch
during September

THE Immigration Depart-
ment has completed a policy
paper on the transit of persons
across Bahamian borders, Min-
ister of State for Immigration
Branville McCartney told par-
liament.

The document also deals with
persons intending to work and
remain in the country, and
addresses the need for change
in the Department, Mr McCart-
ney said during debate on the
national budget.

“The paper, once approved
by Cabinet, will be easily read,”
he said. “It will bring clarity to
the many questionable concerns
and address all those areas often
deemed ambiguous and vague.”

The budget for the Immigra-
tion Department is $15,607,472
for fiscal year 2009-2010.

“Improved and outstanding
customer service is a priority of
the new mandate given to the
new directorate,” said Mr
McCartney. “In recent months,
the department has given much
attention to this area.”

He said plans are underway

DECLARING it one of the
most important causes on the
national agenda, Scotiabank
(Bahamas) Ltd pledged $25,000
for two years to support the
revitalisation of historic Nas-
sau.

The funds will support the
Downtown Nassau Partnership,
the public-private board
charged with overseeing a
major transformation and revi-
talisation of the Bay Street area.

“Scotiabank is proud to part-
ner with the Downtown Nassau
Partnership in the effort to pre-
serve and revitalise historic Nas-
sau, a matter we consider one of
the most significant on the
national agenda,” said Barry J
Malcolm, managing director.
“Scotiabank’s commitment to
downtown Nassau has been
part of our history since the first
Scotiabank branch at Bay and
Frederick Street opened a lit-
tle more than 50 years ago.

“Today, our Bahamas head-
quarters remain in the heart of
the city on Rawson Square and
we have another branch at
number one Bay Street. We
have watched this city with its

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Immigration policy
paper is completed

to devise a plan of action to
effectively address customer
service.

It will provide for the training
and retraining of staff, identifi-
cation of customer friendly
employees to deal with the pub-
lic, and reconfiguration of cus-
tomer service areas.

“It is imperative that the
department reconfigure its
offices so as to deal effectively
with customers’ needs,” said Mr
McCartney.

It is envisaged that during fis-
cal year beginning July 1, adjust-
ments will be made to the inte-
rior of the Hawkins Hill build-
ing to allow better customer ser-
vice, he said.

Plans are also underway for
major developments at the
Freeport, Grand Bahama office.

The department plans to
launch its website this Septem-
ber. The public will be able to
download application forms and
deal with other matters online.

“Education and public rela-
tions are the tools that will keep
the public informed,” Mr
McCartney said. “Therefore
brochures and pamphlets are
being designed for publication
which will keep readers and
applicants abreast and knowl-
edgeable about the depart-

ment.” Pye A) Mom LTO Lan





Scotiabank aids downtown revival

side to prepare a master plan
for phase one of the improve-
ments.

Plans are also underway to
move commercial shipping out
of the heart of the city and con-
duct a major harbour dredging
exercise.

unique architecture and natural
beauty flourish and we have
watched its decline, but we
know that this is a typical pat-
tern for downtown and we
believe that the many efforts
over recent years have paved
the way for what we believe will
be a true transformation. We
are excited about this effort and
proud to be part of it.”
Co-chair of the Nassau
Tourism Development Board
Charles Klonaris said: “The
revitalisation of downtown Nas-
sau would not be possible with-

out the support of private sector
stakeholders like Scotiabank.
With their continued support
and with government’s contin-
uing commitment, the city will
be revived, restored and
renewed for the betterment of
residents and visitors alike.”
Recent steps toward revitali-
sation include the enactment of
the City of Nassau Revitalisa-
tion Act, 2008; the creation of
the DNP and appointment of
its managing director Vaughn
Roberts; and the selection of
local architect Jackson Burn-

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Invites submissions for the sale of:

ONE 1250 kW Diesel Generator Set with 3512 DITA Caterpillar Engine Fully
Enclosed

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CAT EMCP II Digital Control Panel
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Safety Shutdowns
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35Amp Alternator
Lube Oil Cooler
Lube Oil and Filters
Racor Fuel Filters
Air Cleaners
Radiator
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TERMS OF SALE: As is, Where is
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TERMS OF PAYMENT: Wire Transfer

Interested persons can forward their submission to
the following address on or before June 24, 2009

WUTC EEE og
Consolidated Water (Bahamas) Ltd.
P.O. Box C.R. 54030
Nassau, Bahamas





PAGE 6, SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Ss ea

DR Leon Higgs of the Ministry of Education cuts the ribbon, watched by John Haughton, vice-chairman of Project Read, Arthurlue Rahming,
administrator, and Brian Moodie, chairman

Computer laboratory
to aid literacy initiative

As part of its efforts to
achieve complete literacy in the
Bahamas, Project Read
Bahamas has launched a com-
puter lab and related reading
programme.

Founded in 1991 by the
Rotary Club of East Nassau,
Project Read has helped more
than 1,000 Bahamians join the
world of the functionally liter-
ate, free of charge.

Donated by Sunshine Com-
pany Holdings Ltd, Project
Read Bahamas’ computer lab
boasts 10 computers in cubicles,
internet access and headphones

for privacy.

The project’s directors say the
computer lab is a particularly
important milestone, as it allows
them to offer the Computer
Aided Literacy (CALS) Pro-
gramme.

CALS not only addresses
reading issues but also provides
math tutoring as well, allowing
students the rare opportunity
to read, learn math skills and
become computer literate at the
same time.

Brian Moodie, Rotary Club
president and chairman of Pro-
ject Read Bahamas’ board of

Child abuse
cases Increase

FROM page one

even be caught physically harm-
ing themselves.

Once at-risk children are
identified, Social Services steps
in, calling on the children and
their parents to attend the
department’s Community
Counselling and Assessment
Centre.

“We don’t play when it
comes to these things. Any sign
is taken very seriously,” said
Mrs Duvalier.

The assistant director said
that once the situation is
revealed to children’s parents,
the majority are “very con-
cerned” although in many cases





CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ® Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, JUNE 14TH, 2009
11:30 A.M. Speaker:
Pastor Gil Maycock

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. ¢ Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
¢ Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. ¢ Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
¢ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
e Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)

still unwilling to make a link
between their own behaviour
and their child’s condition.

Once assessment has been
undertaken, the children —
with the permission of their par-
ents — are admitted to the
Sandilands Rehabilitation Cen-
tre to undergo further treat-
ment.

How long they remain in the
institution depends on the
severity of each individual case.
Once released, they continue to
be monitored in school.

Social Services officials also
work with parents to “help
them realise the part they play”
in their children’s trauma.

“So far we haven’t had repeat
cases,” said Mrs Duvalier.



directors, said he is extremely
grateful for Sunshine’s gener-
ous donation.

“Sunshine Holdings was
more than pleased to assist the
people of the Bahamas in their
quest for literacy and encour-
ages more corporate citizens to
donate to Project Read
Bahamas as it provides an
essential service to the coun-
try’s development,” he said.

He noted that with an esti-
mated one in four Bahamians
unable to read well enough to
function properly in society,
Project Read Bahamas per-



forms a “vital service” by pro-
viding a confidential environ-
ment where adults can learn to
read... “with the assistance of
volunteer tutors who share their
time and expertise at no cost to
the student.”

Project Read Bahamas, locat-
ed on Village Road south of
Queen’s College, welcomes all
adults in need of reading assis-
tance to join the programme at
no cost.

Anyone interested in helping
with the effort is also welcome
to volunteer as tutors are always
in demand.

Venezuela bans Coke product

By FABIOLA SANCHEZ
Associated Press Writer

CARACAS, Venezuela
(AP) — Venezuela’s Health

Ministry said Friday it banned
sales of Coca-Cola Zero
because the company failed
to declare that the no-calorie
soft drink uses an artificial
sweetener allegedly harmful
to health.

Health officials said tests
show the cola contains sodi-
um cyclamate. Coca-Cola Co.
disputes that, saying the prod-
uct sold in Venezuela uses dif-
ferent artificial sweeteners.

Cyclamate is not prohibited
in Venezuela. But the min-
istry said the company failed
to report sodium cyclamate
as an ingredient in Coca-Cola
Zero.



Alleged abuse at other
Grand Bahama schools

FROM page one

traffic violation in May.

He is wanted by police for questioning in connection with alleged
unnatural sexual intercourse with two former male students.

The Attorney General’s Office is working with US authorities to
have Birbal extradited to the Bahamas.

Grant’s Town Weslep Methodist Church

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, JUNE 14TH, 2009
7:00 a.m. Rev. Charles Sweeting | Bro. Andre Bethel
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer | Bro. Jamicko Forde
7:00 p.m. Bro. Franklyn Bethel | Rev. Carla Culmer (H.C)
Theme: “ But As For Me And My Household, We Will Serve the Lord”

Defence Force



joins missing

boys searches

FROM page one



Defence Frece officers joined
the search, and dog units were
flown in from Nassau.

But after three days of
searching, there has been no
sign of the missing youngsters.

Dangelo lives in Andros with
his grandparents, and his

younger brother Marcelo, who
lives in Nassau with his parents,
was visiting when the children
went missing.

Anyone who may have any
information about the missing
brothers should call Crime
Stoppers immediately on 328-
TIPS (8477).

All calls are free and confi-
dential.

Parent fury on
abuse claims

FROM page one

These claims were neither
confirmed nor denied by ACP
Hanna yesterday.

A police source on the island
said the suspect is not accused
of having sex with any of the
students.

"(The employee) was inter-
viewed in reference to making
sexual advances towards some
students," said the source.

According to reports from
the island, at least one of the
students involved in the case
reported the allegations to a
school official earlier this week
who informed Ministry of Edu-
cation officials in Nassau.

Education Director Lionel
Sands said he was apprised of
the police investigation on
Thursday and immediately
placed the suspect on leave,
pending the results of the police
probe.

"The Ministry is waiting for
the conclusion of the police
investigation but until then the
(suspect) has been placed on




administration leave," he told
The Tribune.

When asked to confirm the
details surrounding the alleged
incidents, Mr Sands said he
could not as he was "awaiting
full details from the district
superintendent.”

The concerned parent who
contacted The Tribune said
many parents in the Lower
Bogue area were fuming over
the allegations and were disap-
pointed that the matter had not
been reported to the press.

The parent claimed the
employee was suspended from
the school around two weeks
ago.

Police were said to have
interviewed more than a dozen
students at the high school over
the past few days.

It is unclear when, or if, the
suspect will be charged with an
offence.

School Principal Sheena Dun-
combe said she was not pre-
pared to make a statement on
the allegations but confirmed
the employee was not at the
school.

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL



Sunday School: 10am
Preaching 11am & 7:30pm
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

FUNDAMENTAL
EVANGELISTIC

Pastor:H. Mills

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills ¢ Phone: 393-0563 ¢ Box N-3622







Come, join usjas}we come togetherands a
worship, the)Uord in Spiritand inTruth) ~ Pon

J ASSEMBLIES OF G00]

OPPORTUNITIES FOR

WORSHIP AND MINISTRY

SUNDAY SERVICES

Morning Worship Service
Sunday School for all ages ...

Adult Education
Worship Service
Spanish Service

» LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

Grace and Peace Wesleyan Church
A Society of The Free Methodist Church of
North America

Evening Worship Service

ai, WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.

Selective Bible Teaching
Royal Rangers (Boys Club) 4-16 yrs.
Missionettes (Girls Club) 4-16 yrs.

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Youth Ministry Meeting

RADIO MINISTRY
Sundays at 8:30 a.m. - ZNS 1 - TEMPLE TIME

Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God

TANCE Um Cucle met
Tel: 322-8304, Fax: 322-4793. P.O. Box: N-1566
Email: evtemple@batelnet.bs Web: www.evangelistictemple.org

WHERE GOD IS ADORED AND EVERYONE IS AFFIRMED

' 7; Worship Time: Lla.m.

Church School during Worship Service

Worship time: Ilam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:

Prayer Time: 10:15a.m.

The Madeira
Shopping Center

Place: Twynam Heights

Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles off Prince Charles Drive

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O. Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE









THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Junior tourism minister
proves to be true beauty

THE Ministry of Tourism
and Aviation’s Grand Bahama
office is throwing even more
support behind Joanna Brown,
the island’s Junior Minister of
Tourism, now that she has won
the Miss Bahamas World Beau-
ty Pageant.

Through the Tourism Today
Travel Club, which the Ministry
of Tourism has established in
many schools throughout the
Bahamas, students learn the
workings of the tourism, travel

and hospitality sector.

As part of the programme, a
series of competitions deter-
mine the Junior Minister of
Tourism for major islands.

The junior minister then rep-
resents the island at various
important functions and nation-
al events.

Karenda Swain, co-ordinator
of the Tourism Today Travel
Club in Grand Bahama, said it
was clear from their first meet-
ing that Ms Brown had enough

confidence to be a good repre-
sentative of the island.

She said Ms Brown demon-
strated that she had the intelli-
gence and skills to accomplish
great things.

“Tt is evident that Joanna skil-
fully combined her experience
and intellect with charm and
beauty and became the coun-
try’s proud winner of the title
Miss Bahamas World,” Ms
Swain said.

“She is indeed an excellent

person, a practising Christian
and a tremendous role model
for other young ladies.

“Grand Bahama is very
proud of its Junior Minister of
Tourism, who is celebrated
nationally for her talent and
beauty.”

Ms Brown is a recent gradu-
ate of Bishop Michael Eldon
High School and has been
accepted into the Ministry of
Tourism’s new summer employ-
ment programme.

















FG CAPITAL MABREETS
AERA Be ALY RGEC S

ROYAL FIDELITY

‘hones at Work

BIS LETED & TRAD ED SECU AMES ASC Fr:
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a een

SkyClimbers Summer Camps will be held at
the SkyClimbers facility on Paradise Island

TO TENNIS
CENTER

SkyClimbers Will be Hosting Full Week all Day
Climbing Summer Camps 9am-5pm.

Activities Include:

¢ Climbing at SkyClimbers!

¢ Climbing at Climber’s Rush ATLANTIS!
¢ Tours of Dolphin Cay!

¢ Meet the Sea Lions!

¢ Feed the Sting Rays

¢ Tours of Aquaventure!

Cost For All this Fun $80/week
Spaces are Limited to
12 Students/Camp
minimum age is 9 years old.

The summer camps are week length camps
beginning on the 15th of this month.

The dates: June 15th- 19th - 22nd-25th

June 29th-July 3rd

July 6th-10th, 13th-17th,20th-24th

August 3rd-7th,10th-14th,24th-28th

(The Entire month of July and August in short)

Please call Wardell McClam

363-0626



THE TRIBUNE



Stingrays rout
Comodores 16-0

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

VETERAN Leroy
Thompson has won a New
Providence Softball Asso-
ciation men’s champi-
onship title with just about
every team that he pitched
on.
Switching from the
champions D’s Truckers to
the youthful PriceWater-
House Stingrays during the
off-season, Thompson
threw a neat two-hitter
with six strike outs in a 16-
0 whitewashing over the
Royal Bahamas Defense
Force Commodores.

It was the lone game
played Thursday night at
the Baillou Hills Sporting
Complex as the ladies’ fea-
ture game between the
Sigma Brackettes and the
Proper Care Pool Lady
Sharks was rained out
after the first inning.

While Thompson was on
his game on the mound,
second baseman James
Clarke almost had a per-
fect plate appearance in his
four at bats as he finished
3-for-4 with a run batted
in and three scored to lead
their offensive attack.

“Our game plan tonight
was to come out and make
a statement,” said Clarke,
who helped in their 12-hit
attack that forced the
Commodores to switch
starter Terrance Culmer
with center-fielder Ramon
Storr in the fifth.

“We just wanted the
league to know that we
could play head-to-head
with any team and with the
addition of Leroy on the
mound, we can be as com-
petitive as anybody else.”

The win improved the
Stingrays’ record to 3-1,
while the Commodores
dropped to 2-1.

After taking a 1-0 lead
in the second on Ghandi
Williams’ run-producing
single that plated Clarke,
PriceWaterHouse went on
an offensive tear in the
third.

They marched 11 batters
to the plate and came up
with six runs on as many
hits, highlighted by an RBI
single from Clarke, a two-
run double from both
Lavaughn Ferguson and
Godfrey Burnside Jr. as
well as an RBI single from
Greg Jones.

In the fourth, the
Stringrays struck for three
more, thanks to Luton
Delancy’s RBI ground out
and Burnside Jr’s second
two-run double, extending
their margin to 10-0.

And in the fifth, Price-
WaterHouse once again
batted around the clock
producing another six-run
assault, this time on
Jameiko Sands’ RBI triple
and Burnside Jr’s RBI sin-
gle.

The Commodores, who
only got three batters on
base, didn’t perform any-
where near their capabili-
ties, according to Storr.

“We didn’t have people
playing good defence and
we didn’t hit the ball and
that resulted in the loss,”
Storr pointed out.

Storr was the first
Defence Force player to
reach base on a one-out
single in the first. In the
second, Alex Hailey led off
with a single and stole sec-
ond. And in the third, Shi-
mon Bain touched first on
an error.

But in each instance,
neither batter was able to
get past second base as
Thompson totally shut
down their offence, includ-
ing retiring the side in
order in the fourth and the
fifth, the latter on three
strike outs.

Tonight's schedule: 7 pm
Robin Hood Hitmen vs
Young Breed. 8:30 pm
Commando Security
Truckers vs Thompson
Heavy Equipment.



PAGE 9

i



SATURDAY, JUNE 13,



t

2009





THE Bahamas’ Melinda Bastian and captain Kelsie Johnson forming a double block against Haiti's Sainvilia Aubert.

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

DESPITE struggling to win
their opener against Haiti,
women’s national volleyball
team captain Kelsie Johnson
likes the position the Bahamas
is in at the second round of
the 2010 FIVB World Cham-
pionships Qualifying Tourna-
ment.

Avenging their loss from the
2006 Caribbean Volleyball
Championships here at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium, the
Bahamas rallied for a 25-23,
25-21, 22-25, 22-25, 15-11 deci-
sion Thursday night at the

Stuggles to second
round of FIVB qualifiers

“It was a tough hard fought
match because it was our first
time playing together from
2008,” said Johnson of the last
CAV.

“T think the cobwebs are
gone and we will be a different
team tonight (when we play
Barbados) because Cherise
and IJ didn’t have a great match
like we expected us to have.
So the Bajan team didn’t see
us at full strength.”

While Johnson and the
Rolle sisters (Cherise and

Krystel) didn’t perform as well
as anticipated, Melinda Bast-
ian, one of the two collegiate
players on the team, stepped it
up and scored a game high 23
kills with three blocks and an
ace.
Last night, the Bahamas
played Barbados in Pool A
final match-up as the two
undefeated teams determined
who they will play when they
cross over in the playoffs that
get started today.

Based on what she’s seen

so far, Johnson said the
Bahamas not only has a good
chance of qualifying for the
next round of the World
Championships, but they are
in an unique position to win
this round.

“We're sitting in an excel-
lent position. The first goal was
to get the win because you
don’t want to go up against
Barbados in their home town
being down,” she pointed out.

“So getting the win was
more a morale booster for us,
knowing that they defeated us
in ‘06 to get the bronze. So get-
ting the win, it will relax us
even more.”

The women are hoping to
join the men, who two weeks

Kenmore Bynoe/Photo

ago advanced to the next
round when they finished sec-
ond in Kingston, Jamaica with
an upset win over Jamaica in
the playoffs.

The women, however, will
have to finish in the top three
and could either play Jamaica
or St. Lucia when they get to
the playoffs.

“We can cither see our-
selves winning or finishing sec-
ond,” Johnson projected.

Now that they have
achieved their initial goal,
Johnson said they know that
they have to step up their
game because they can’t afford
to get into the same situation
in the playoffs that they found
themselves in against Haiti.

Wildey Gym in Barbados.

Stuart makes final appearance

at NCAA Outdoor Championships

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IT wasn’t the way Bianca ‘BB’ Stuart
had intended to complete her collegiate
eligibility.

The Southern Illinois senior completed
her final appearance at the National Col-
legiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Out-
door Championships yesterday with a 14th
place finish in the women’s long jump.

She only soared 5.87 metres for the 14th
and final position in the final of the wom-
en’s long jump. The winning jump was
6.54 metres by Kimberly Williams, a
sophomore from Florida State.

In the preliminaries, Stuart had the 11th
best jump of 5.85 to qualify for the final.

Also on Thursday, Auburn University’s
sophomore sprinter Cache Armbrister and
University of Miami’s junior Kristy Whyte
both qualified for the final of the women’s 200 metres.

Bainca Stuart



Armbrister placed fourth in heat one of the semifinal in 23.22 for eighth place
overall, while Whyte came in fifth in the second heat in 23.27 for the ninth and final ;

spot.

In the preliminaries earlier in the day, Armbrister got third in the fourth of five
heats in 23.76 to qualify in the 11th spot. Whyte, competing in heat five, was
fourth in 23.76 for 17th overall.

Jernise Saunders, a senior at Portland State, also closed out her collegiate athletes went to Orlando recently to

: compete in the 11th annual Interna-

In the men’s 200 preliminaries, Karlton Rolle ran 21.95 for sixth place. But the a eh CMAG, Arts Cham-
freshman at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) ended up 25th ; P r :

career when she finished fifth in heat five in 24.15 for 22nd, but it wasn’t good
enough for her to advance to the semis.

overall and he too failed to advance.
Whyte and Rolle all competed on their relay teams, but neither advanced out of
the prelims.

UCLA men’s 4 x 1 team that placed fifth in heat two in 39.77 for 14th overall.

in heat three for 12th overall as they too failed to advance.

It’s now down to just Armbrister and Whyte in the 200 final that was held last
eo q cially the kids," French said. "They

i worked very hard."

night.
Meanwhile, overseas, a number of our elite athletes were in competition.
At the Meeting de Montreuil, Shamar Sands, the national 110 metres hurdles

American Jeff Porter in 13.54.

Sands was the lone Bahamian at the meet, but at the Festival of Excellence in } ; :
: won a giant title best performance

: by a foreign Kung Fu school, beating
: out Italy, Puerto Rico, France and
: Canada.

Toronto, Canada, two quarter-milers were in action.

Andrae Williams, who has ran the second fastest time for a Bahamian this
year, clocked 45.72 for third place in the men’s 400. American Olympic champi-
on LaShawn Merritt stopped the clock in 44.83.

And in the women’s 400 at the Varsity Stadium at the University of Toronto, }
Christine Amertil got third place as well in 52.29. The winning time was 51.44 by }
: national competition circuit. It host-

American Shana Cox.



Key and Ming Shu Santerrio Johnson.

Devron Pinder/Photo

! Thurston, Ming Shu Joshua Ferguson. Second row from left are 0 Gao Tao Lyn-
: den French (senior instructor), Gao Gough Ramond Miller, Gao Gough Jamal

STC

CMR MMOD TELA TAS FU

A SMALL team of eight Kung Fu

They were led by 4th degree black

belt Lynden French and 1st degree
i black belt Kent Bazard, and are stu-
? dents of the Bai Sung Institute 'Four

In the women’s 4 x 100, Whyte ran on the second leg of Miami’s team that got :

third in heat two in 44.44 for 10th overall. Rolle also ran the second leg for | Wings of Kung Fu,’ an internation-

i ally recognized system founded by
The women’s 4 x 4 team from Auburn, without Armbrister, ran 3:35.47 for fourth pees Grandmaster Kenneth P.
? Lewis.

"The group did very well, espe-

Each of the athletes placed in at

national record holder, picked off a victory in that event in 13.45, well ahead of } least one event and the team came

: home with three gold, two silver and

four bronze medals. The team also

The event was hosted by Master
Nick Scrima and is a part of an inter-



ed over 2,000 competitors, judges
and spectators at each event.

In December, the Bahamas will
host the first ICMAC event outside
of the United States at the Atlantis
Resort and will become host for the
yearly World Championships starting
in 2010.

"The Bahamas ICMAC will be a
world class Kung Fu competition and
the finale on the international cir-
cuit,” Bazard said. "The circuit will
include Washington, Las Vegas, San
Diego, Japan, Italy and Costa Rica.
All of the competitors will come to
our country for the grand champi-
onships."

The Four Winds System hopes to
win the support of local sponsors and
the Ministry of Sports.

"We need support to make an
international impression of the talent
we have here in the Bahamas,"
Bazard said. "This December,
though, will be another chance to
prove to the world that we are small,
but we are the best."



PAGE 10, SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



BAAA National Open Track and Field Championships

IN today's segment of Face Off by the Bahamas
Association of Athletic Association's Public Relations
officers Kermit Taylor and Troy McIntosh, we focus
our attention on the top two female sprinters as they

prepare to lead the charge in the 100 and 200 metres
at the National Open Track and Field Champi-
onships, June 26-27 at the Thomas A. Robinson

Track and Field Stadium.



Chandra Sturrup 99

EVENT: 100/200/LJ

PERSONAL BEST: 10.84/22.33/22
SEASON BEST: 11.18/23.33
HEIGHT: 5 4 (1.59m)

WEIGHT: 135 Ibs (52 kg)

D.0.B. September 12th 1971
AGE: 37

FAVOURITE MOVE: Oliver Twist and any movie with Sir Sean

Connery

FAVOURITE FOOD: Lobster Lobeste
MOM'S NAME: Deborah Dean (deceased)
DAD'S NAME: Charles Sturrup
HOMETOWN: Nassau, Bahamas

NAME OF COLLEGE: Norfolk University, Virginia

NAME OF HIGH SCHOOL: R.M. Bailey
HIGH SCHOOL COACH: Steven Murray
COLLEGE COACH: Laverne Sweat
FAVOURITE FOOTBALL TEAM: none
FAVOURITE BASKETBALL TEAM: none
FAVOURITE TV SHOW: Days of Our Lives
HARDEST WORKOUT: 300m

EASIEST WORKOUT: Blocks

The diminutive Chandra Sturrup launched her international

career in 1996 finishing fourth in the Olympic 100m final and win-
ning silver in the 4x100m relay at the Atlanta Games. Further suc-
cesses followed: 100m gold at the 1998 Commonwealth Games
and 60m gold at the 2001 World Indoor Championships. She also
landed successive 100m bronze medals at the 2001 and 2003
World Championships in Edmonton and Paris.

Chandra Sturrup is a Bahamian track and field sprint athlete.
She is a 100 m specialist and the Bahamian national record holder
for the women's 100 m dash with a personal best of 10.84 sec-
onds set in Lausanne, Switzerland on July 5, 2005.

Sturrup competed at the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing at
the 100 m sprint. In her first round heat she placed first in front of
Kelly-Ann Baptiste and Lina Grincikaite in a time of 11.30 to
advance to the second round. There she improved her time to
11.16 seconds and placed third behind Sherone Simpson and
Muna Lee. In her semi final Sturrup finished in fifth position with
11.22 seconds, causing elimination. However her fellow Bahamian
Debbie Ferguson did qualify for the final with the same time, but

she finished fourth in her semi final. This winter she has enjoyed a
real Indian summer, winning major international 60m races in
Lievin, Dusseldorf and Gent. Sturrup has an 18-year-old son.

Inducted in NCAA, Norfolk State University, and CIAA Hall of

Fame.

EVENT: 100/200

PERSONAL BEST: 10.91/22.31
SEASON BEST: 11.11/ 23.01
HEIGHT: 5 6 (1.69m)
WEIGHT: 139 Ibs (63 kg)
D.0.B: January 16th 1976
AGE: 30

HOMETOWN: Nassau, Bahamas

NAME OF HIGH SCHOOL: R.M. Bailey
HIGH SCHOOL COACH: Pancho Rahming

€<€ Debbie Ferguson/\cKenzie

NAME OF COLLEGE: University of Georgia, Atlanta



In 2002 she was appointed as an ambassador for the United
Nations Food and Agriculture Organization. At the 2002 Com-
monwealth Games, England, she set the championship record in
the 100 m and in the 40100 m relay with the Bahamian team,
recording a personal best of 10.91 seconds in the individual

event.

At the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing she competed at the
100 m sprint. In her first round heat she placed second behind
Oludamola Osayomi in a time of 11.17 to advance to the second
round. There she won her series to qualify for the semi finals in a
time of 11.21, this time finishing in front of Osayomi. Despite fel-

ai

INBRIEF

Phelps hack in
Competition in
Santa Clara

SWIMMING
SANTA CLARA, Calif.
Associated Press



MICHAEL Phelps has
easily qualified for the 200-
meter butterfly final at the
Santa Clara International
Grand Prix.

Phelps touched in 1
minute, 57.45 seconds, mak-
ing him the fastest qualifier
for Friday night’s final in the
outdoor pool. The 14-time
Olympic gold medalist owns
the world record of 1:52.03
that he set at the Beijing
Games.

He blew away his competi-
tion in the morning prelimi-
naries, swimming 0.44 sec-
onds faster than Samuel
McGraw, the second-leading
qualifier.

Phelps is competing in his
second meet since his three-
month suspension by USA
Swimming ended last month.
He was penalized after a pho-
to surfaced of him using a
marijuana pipe.

I =z)

COLLEGE COACH: Norbert Elliott low Bahamian Chandra Sturrup being unable to qualify for the

final with a time of 11.22 in the first semi final, Ferguson man-
aged to qualify with the same time as she finished fourth in her
race, while Sturrup finished fifth in hers. In the final Ferguson
came to 11.19 seconds, which was the 7th position.

She competed at the 2009 Manchester City Games, winning
the 150 m final in 16.54 seconds.

Falcons release
suspented OB

Ferguson graduated from University of Georgia from where
she launched her senior athletic career since which she has
gained medals at the Summer Olympics, IAAF World Champi-
onship in Athletics, Commonwealth Games and Pan American
Games..





BAAA plays host to 13th Central American
and Caribbean Age Group Championships

NEXT weekend at the Thomas A.
Robinson Track and Field Stadium, the
Bahamas Association of Athletic Asso-
ciations will play host to athletes, coach-
es and delegates from 20 countries in
the 13th Central American and
Caribbean Age Group Championships.

At a press conference on Friday,
BAAA's president Curt Hollingsworth
and committee chairman Dr. Bernard
Nottage revealed plans for the champi-
onships that will run from Thursday-Fri-
day, June 16-17.

More than 160 athletes, the largest
number to ever participate in the region-
al meet held every two years, are expect-
ed to display their skills in the multiple
event competition in two different age
groups for boys and girls.

This will be the 13th time the meet
has been held and it is expected to be an
exciting one.

The four divisions to be contested are
as follows: Girls - 11-12 years old, Boys -
11-12 years old, Girls - 13-14 years old
and Boys - 13-14 year old

Team size is restricted to 3 athletes
per division to give a maximum team of
12 athletes per country.

The Bahamas will be represented by
the following:

Girls 11-12 - Jeorjette Williams and
Teisha Taylor; girls 13-14 - Danielle Gib-
son and Pedrya Seymour; boys 11-12 -
Julis Nottage and Timothy Wilson and
boys 13-14 - Delano Davis from Grand
Bahama and Jerrio Rahming.

In the younger age group (11-12), ath-
letes will compete in 5 events:

Day One - 60 metres, high jump and
Ball Throw

Day Two - Long Jump, 800m (Females

fly



PICTURED are BAAA's president Curt Hollingsworth (left) and Dr. Bernard Nottage (right).

Only) and 1000m (Males only).

In the older age group (13-14), ath-
letes will compete in 7 events:

Day One - 80 metres, shot put, high
jump and long jump.

Day Two - 60 metre hurdles (Females
only), 80 metre hurdles (males only),
Ball Throw, 1000 metre (females only)
and 1200m (males only).

Each athlete competes for points in
each event in his/her division; points are
totaled to give an overall divisional win-
ner. The event stimulates great compe-
tition and enthusiasm, with athletes dis-











playing their talents in several different
disciplines.

The meet has been held twice before
in the Bahamas, in 1987 and 2001. It has
also marked the start of an athletic
career for many of the outstanding elite
athletes in the region today. The most
famous of those is our own "Golden
Girl" Debbie Ferguson McKenzie, who
competed twice in CAC Age Group
when she was a student at Oakesfield
Primary School, she did well

in 1987 and even better in 1989 when

The BAAA, along with the local orga-
nizing committee headed by Dr. Not-
tage, have gotten the financial backing
from the Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture are currently finalizing its plans
to ensure that the championships are
successful and memorable for all those
who participate.

The BAAA say they look forward to
the support of parents, family, friends,
coaches, local track and field fans, the
media and the public at large as they
come out to watch the meet and cheer on

she was the overall winner.

the young athletes.















RUSSIA'S
Maria Shara-
pova reaches
to return shot
during her
women's third-
round tennis
match against
Francesca
Schiavone of
Italy at the
Aegon Classic
in Birming-
ham, England,
Thursday,
June 11, 2009.

Simon Dawson/AP Photo

LT



TENNIS
BIRMINGHAM, England
Associated Press

MARIA Sharapova reached
her first semifinal in more than
a year by defeating Yanina
Wickmayer 6-1, 2-6, 6-3 Friday
at the Aegon Classic.

The former top-ranked play-
er struggled with her serve in
the second set, but regained
her stride in the third to break
her 19-year-old opponent twice
for a 5-1 lead.

Sharapova had 11 double-
faults with a remodeled serve
to protect her shoulder, which
required surgery last year and
sidelined her for 10 months.

“T kind of lost the momen-
tum and made more errors
than I would have preferred,
and she gained confidence
from that,” Sharapova said.
“When you give her time, she

Sharapova defeats Wickmayer to reach semifinals

plays very aggressively. And
once she had broken me, she
kept swinging away and came
up with some great shots.”

Sharapova next plays Li Na,
the former Wimbledon quar-
terfinalist from China who beat
Stefanie Voegele 6-3, 7-6 (3).

The other semifinal will pit
Magdalena Rybarikova against
Sania Mirza.

Mirza reached only her sec-
ond semifinal in two years with
a 6-1, 7-6 (4) win over Melinda
Czink, while Rybarikova
defeated Urszula Radwanska
6-3, 6-3.

Mirza recently recovered
from a wrist injury, and was
encouraged by her perfor-
mances in Birmingham.

“Tm happy to be competing
and winning some matches,”
Mirza said. “The wrist is
healed, which is the biggest
positive out of this.”

Michael Vick

@ FOOTBALL
ATLANTA
Associated Press

THE Falcons have
released suspended quarter-
back Michael Vick, opening
the door for him to sign with
any interested NFL team.

Vick is eligible to immedi-
ately sign with a team even
though he has not been rein-
stated by NFL commission-
er Roger Goodell.

Falcons general manager
Thomas Dimitroff said the
team relinquished its con-
tractual rights to Vick on Fri-
day.

“Michael remains sus-
pended by the NFL,” Dim-
itroff said. “However, in the
event NFL commissioner
Roger Goodell decides to
reinstate Michael, we feel his
best opportunity to re-engage
his football career would be
at another club.”

The move was no surprise.

“Everybody always knew
that Mike wouldn’t be play-
ing with the Falcons,” Vick’s
agent, Joel Segal, said. “He’s
really just taking it one day at
a time.”

The NFL had no comment
on Vick’s release.

Goodell has said he will sit
down with Vick after the
quarterback completes his 23-
month sentence on July 20
for running a dogfighting
ring.

“Michael’s going to have
to demonstrate to myself and
the general public and to a
lot of people, did he learn
anything from this experi-
ence? Does he regret what
happened?” Goodell said last
month at the NFL meetings
in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
“Does he feel that he can be
a positive influence going for-
ward? Those are questions
that I would like to see when
I sit with him.”

Vick’s currently making
$10 an hour as a construction
worker for W.M. Jordan Co.
while he serves the final two
months of his sentence on
home confinement in Hamp-
ton, Va. He was released
from federal prison in Kansas
on May 20.

Even while making it clear
Vick had no football future
with the Falcons, Falcons
owner Arthur Blank has said
he would be available to
assist Vick.

“Our entire organization
sincerely hopes that Michael
will continue to focus his
efforts on making positive
changes in his life, and we
wish him well in that regard,”
Dimitroff said Friday.

Vick was the Falcons No. 1
draft pick in 2001. He played
six seasons with the team, but
the Falcons moved on by
making quarterback Matt
Ryan their No. 1 pick last
year. Ryan started every
game as a rookie and led the
Falcons to the playoffs.





a 6/13/09, PAGE 11

THE WEATHER RE bP 2 | F/|INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

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PAGE 12, SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Workshop to give young
a head start in business

YOUNG entrepreneurs will get an
opportunity to expand their horizons
and develop new perspectives on
entrepreneurship at the upcoming
Business Builders Immersion work-
shop.

The goal of the three-day work-
shop — scheduled for June 15 to 17 at
the British Colonial Hilton — aims
to encourage young Bahamians to
seriously consider entrepreneurship
as a career option.

The guest speakers at the work-
shop, including Doongalik Studios
CEO Jackson Burnside, all have
practical experience operating a busi-

ness, said the organisers.

“My vision is to bring together
young Bahamian entrepreneurs and
business professionals to share their
experiences in the world of business,”
said co-ordinator Sharell Ferguson,
an MBA graduate of Howard Uni-
versity.

“My partners, all peers of mine,
specialise in a wide range of skills,
including, human resources, market-
ing, law, agriculture, the fashion
industry, accounting, finance, enter-
tainment, business consultation and
counselling. I desired to create an
opportunity where youth can learn

from those who are making strides
of success in their own industries
locally and abroad. I believe that we
need to help each other succeed.”

Farenno Ferguson, CEO of iKonz
Media Group, said attendees can
expect an informative session.

"T plan to share ways in which they
can find effective means of increasing
their marketability in any career field
and especially in the new media mar-
ket which is now booming.”

BBI will offer interactive sessions
for attendees, including developing
business plans, vision and mission
statements, branding personal and

corporate image, and networking
opportunities.

Speakers include Sharell Ferguson,
CEO Beyond The Veil Group of
Companies; Farenno Ferguson, CEO
iKonz Media Group; Tyrinna Neely
CEO, Primadona Sales; Shenique
Gray, CPA; Kenneth Moncur,
Kemis.Net; Franklyn Miller, the
Ghostbuster; Khrystle Rutherford,
LLB; Timothy Blair, agricultural spe-
cialist; Kendria Strachan, marketing
manager; Charmin Lotmore, MBA,
partner, PBC Group; Rekeno Car-
roll, CPA; Nekeino Brice, CPA, part-
ner, Island Purchasing Group.





RUSSIA'S national flag is unveiled atop the Ostankino TV tower marking the Day
of Russia in Moscow, Russia, yesterday. The nation’s first president, Boris
Yeltsin, established the June 12 holiday after the Soviet breakup to mark the 1990
declaration of sovereignty by Russia's Soviet-era parliament.



r PR 4

ae

L



me B on | i anal an
i) | y, ba

CHILDREN enjoy a holiday and the warm weather swimming in a Moskva river, in

Moscow, Russia.



Sergey Ponomarev/AP Photos

FIREWORKS explode over the Kremlin, with St. Basil's cathedral, center, marking the
Day of Russia in Moscow, Russia.



UN imposes tough new sanctions on N Korea

@ UNITED NATIONS

THE U.N. Security Council
imposed punishing new sanc-
tions on North Korea Friday,
toughening an arms embargo
and authorizing ship searches
on the high seas in an attempt
to thwart the reclusive nation’s
nuclear and ballistic missile
programs, according to the
Associated Press.

The unanimous support for
the resolution reflected inter-
national disapproval for recent
actions by North Korea, which
defied the council by conduct-
ing a second nuclear test on
May 25 and heightened global
tensions with recent missile

launches that raised the
specter of a renegade nuclear
state.

North Korea has repeatedly
warned that it would view new
sanctions as a declaration of
war, but it boycotted Friday’s
vote — in sharp contrast to the
October 2006 Security Council
meeting where sanctions were
imposed after the country’s
first nuclear test. Then, the
North Korean ambassador
immediately rejected the res-
olution, accused council mem-
bers of “gangster-like” action
and walked out of the council
chamber.

U.S. Ambassador Susan
Rice, who shepherded the res-

olution through two weeks of
complex and sometimes diffi-
cult negotiations, told
reporters in Washington that
the administration was “very
pleased” with the council’s
“unprecedented” and “innov-
ative” action.

She cautioned that North
Korea could react to the reso-
lution with “further provoca-
tion.”

“There’s reason to believe
they may respond in an irre-
sponsible fashion to this,” she
said.

North Korea said Monday
in its main newspaper that it
would respond to any new
sanctions with “corresponding

self-defense measures.” On
Tuesday, the North said it
would use nuclear weapons in
a “merciless offensive” if pro-
voked.

The resolution seeks to
deprive North Korea of
financing and material for its
weapons program and bans
the communist country’s lucra-
tive arms exports, especially
missiles. It does not ban nor-
mal trade, but does call on
international financial institu-
tions to halt grants, aid or
loans to the North except for
humanitarian, development
and denuclearization pro-
grams.

China and Russia, the

North’s closest allies, support-
ed the resolution, but stressed
that it did not authorize the
use of force against North
Korea, a key demand by both
countries. Diplomats said dur-
ing the negotiations both coun-
tries pushed to ensure that the
measures not hurt ordinary
people in North Korea who
face daily hardships.

Russia’s U.N. Ambassador
Vitaly Churkin called the
North’s repeat nuclear test “a
serious blow” to efforts to pre-
vent the proliferation of
nuclear weapons and said the
resolution was “an appropri-
ate response,” targeted at the
weapons programs.

0 In brief

Venezuela:
Coca-Cola Zero
has harmful

_ sweetener

: MCARACAS, Venezuela

VENEZUELA’S Health

; Ministry said Friday it

? banned sales of Coca-Cola

? Zero because the company

? failed to declare that the no-
? calorie soft drink uses an

i artificial sweetener allegedly
? harmful to health, according
i to the Associated Press.

Health officials said tests

} show the cola contains sodi-
? um cyclamate. Coca-Cola

? Co. disputes that, saying the
? product sold in Venezuela

? uses different artificial

? sweeteners, Acesulfame-K
? and Aspartame.

Cyclamate is not prohibit-

: ed in Venezuela. But the

? ministry said the company

? failed to report sodium

? cyclamate as an ingredient in
? Coca-Cola Zero when it

? received its initial health

? permit to begin selling the

? drink in April.

Coca-Cola is “failing to

: comply with sanitary

? norms,” the ministry said in

? astatement published in the
? newspaper Ultimas Noticias.
i The ministry urged

? Venezuelans to refrain from
? trying the drink, saying it is

? “considered harmful to the

? health.”

The U.S. prohibits the use

: of cyclamates in human food
? because of health safety con-
? cerns. Sales of Coca-Cola

? Zero elsewhere in Latin

? America have met with

? resistance over the use of

? cyclamate.

Rosy Alvarez, a spokes-

: woman for Coca-Cola Servi-
? cios de Venezuela, told The
? Associated Press on Thurs-

? day that “no ingredient of

? Coca-Cola Zero is harmful

? to peoples’ health.” But the

? company is complying with

? Venezuela’s ban and has

? begun halting production,

i? she said.

_ Mexico candidate:
- Drug gangs contact
“all hopefuls

â„¢ MEXICO CITY

A RULING party may-

? oral candidate in Mexico’s

? richest city told his support-
? ers that drug traffickers have
? contacted all leading politi-

? cal contenders in the country
? seeking their loyalty ahead

? of congressional and local

? elections next month,

? according to the Associated

i Press.

Mauricio Fernandez’s dis-

? cussion with a group of sup-
? porters in a suburb of Mon-
? terrey —a leaked recording
? of which was broadcast

? throughout Mexico on Fri-

? day — is a remarkably frank
? description of how the brutal
? gangs try to control political
? leaders, which is a key con-

? cern of President Felipe

? Calderon in his fight against
? drug cartels.

The candidate also

i acknowledged that the Bel-
? tran Levya cartel controls

? drug smuggling in his city of
? San Pedro Garza and sug-

? gested that as mayor he

? would avoid confronting the
i gang to maintain peace,

? comments that undermined
i Calderon’s drive to show

? that the government and his
? National Action Party, or

i PAN, are tough on orga-

? nized crime.

Fernandez’s campaign was

? thrown into turmoil by the
? recording, but he stood by

? the comments, saying he was
? merely telling the truth. He
? denied meeting with any

? traffickers during this cam-
? paign and said he rejected

i efforts by gangsters to buy
? his loyalty when he ran

? unsuccessfully for governor
? of Nuevo Leon state six

i years ago.

“Tam stating the reality

i that my city is living,” Fer-
? nandez told MVS Radio. “I
? don’t have any reason to

? hide it.”

PAN had no immediate

? comment on the recording,
? nor was it clear how the gov-
? ernment would react.

Calderon has acknowl-

: edged that corrupt police

? and elected officials are a

? major obstacle in his fight

? with organized crime. Feder-
? al forces last month arrested
? 10 mayors in the president’s

? home state of Michoacan for
? alleged drug gang ties.



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Volume: 105 No.164

SECT ATES

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Downturn
‘endangering
their welfare’

= By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE economic downturn is
putting the lives and welfare of
the nation’s children in mortal
danger, new statistics have
revealed.

Authorities have revealed a
major hike in the number of
attempted suicides as well as
incidences of physical and sex-
ual abuse among school-age
youngsters this year.

Of particular concern is a rise
in the number of primary school
children who attempted suicide
in April, with teachers flagging
up 10 cases.

Assistant director of the
Department of Social Service’s
School Welfare Division, Lor-

Search for
brothers

continues

= By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff
Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE search for two miss-
ing Andros boys continued
yesterday without revealing
any obvious leads to their
whereabouts.

Police Superintendent in
charge of the Family
Islands, Hulan Hanna, said
the search would continue
but there was nothing of sig-
nificance to report, as the
status of the investigation
remains the same.

Brothers Deangelo
Clarke, nine, and Marcelo
Clarke, five, disappeared
while crabbing in South
Andros on Tuesday
evening.

Worry set in when they
did not return to their
grandparents’ house after
nightfall.

Police officers from the
Kemp’s Bay police station
were alerted and joined rel-
atives in their search on
Wednesday morning.

Local residents and

SEE page 6



raine Duvalier, claimed a rise
in the number of struggling and
frustrated parents physically
abusing their children may have
contributed to the increase in
suicidal thoughts.

Mrs Duvalier said: “Kids are
also being affected by the down-
turn. Parents are lashing out at
them. Fathers or other figures
are abusing sons, and some of
them feel like they just can’t
take it anymore.”

Physical abuse is defined by
Social Services as any abuse that
leaves “visible” or physical
injuries on the child’s body —
including fractures, bruises,
scratches or other wounds.

A total of 16 attempted sui-
cide cases were brought to the
attention of her department by
teachers in New Providence
schools within the first four
months of 2009, with April see-
ing more cases than the first
three months combined.

Cases were spread through-
out the school system, not
focused at anyone or few insti-
tutions, and involved both girls
and boys.

While the April leap may
have led officials to conclude
that matters were worsening,
officials note that May fortu-
nately saw a major decline —
with no attempted suicide cases
reported to the School Welfare
division.

This after the division
received no reports of suicidal
students in the whole of 2008.

Meanwhile, the number of
attempted suicide cases and sus-
pected abuse cases made known
to the division is just a fraction
of those recorded by the
Department of Social Services
as a whole, The Tribune was
informed.

However, an attempt to
ascertain the total number of
cases recorded throughout the
Department was unsuccessful
yesterday.

According to Mrs Duvalier,
signs of suicidal tendencies are
often recognised by vigilant
teachers who have years of
experience with what is “nor-
mal” and “unusual” student
behaviour.

Students have been known to
write notes implying their suici-
dal mental state, tell friends who
inform teachers, make their
intentions known to a school
guidance counsellor, exhibit
“self-destructive” behaviour or

SEE page 6



=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009



es.

MMU eae

ECONOMY Sparks
Child abuse hik



Employee
put on leave

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

MANDRELL Adderley, 28, was yesterday charged with the May 11 murder of 27 year-old Vernon
Rolle, who was found opposite the Blue Hill Road Community Clinic with a stab wound to the chest.
Adderley is due back in court on June 18.



‘Quite a few’ abuse claims
in two Freeport schools

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Staff Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A social worker claims that
while the nation was focused on the Eight Mile
Rock High School, where two teachers have been
accused of sexually abusing students, “quite a
few” reported cases of child molestation have
surfaced at two other government schools on
Grand Bahama.

According to an abuse counsellor, the alleged
incidents occurred at the Jack Hayward and St
Georges’ High Schools in Freeport.

Bee Butler, founder of No More Victims Out-
reach Association in Freeport, claims her organ-
isation has been seeing a number of sexual
molestation cases involving students.

“It is sad that there are so many molestation
incidents occurring in our society, especially now
in our schools,” Ms Butler said.

“We have been dealing with a lot of victims
who have been molested. Young boys are sexually

molesting young girls in the schools.

“There have been quite a few incidents and
the most recent occurred two days ago when a
young girl was molested in school by a male stu-
dent.”

Ms Butler said the girl’s mother has reported
the matter to the police.

According to reports, it is alleged that a 16-
year-old male student forcibly held the girl down
and assaulted her.

Ms Butler, who was also a victim of incest as a
child, said she formed the organisation because
she wanted to help other victims of abuse.

Grand Bahama police are still investigating
alleged molestation incidents at the Eight Mile
Rock High School.

Complaints have been filed against three teach-
ers at the school. All have been removed pending
the outcome of investigations.

Teacher Andre Birbal, who fled the country in
February, was arrested in New York, USA, ona

SEE page 6



NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



extrahours

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Bahamas struggles past Haiti

New school
abuse probe

@ ByTANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

AN employee of the North
Eluethera High School has
been placed on administrative
leave after allegations that he
made sexual advances to
female students.

While police and education
officials yesterday confirmed
there was an active investiga-
tion, they did not divulge
details surrounding the alleged
advances.

"There is an investigation
going on, we have been look-
ing into this matter. I believe a
person may have been taken
into custody but I am unable
to say anything further until
early next week," said head of
the Family Island District,
Assistant Commissioner
Hulan Hanna.

A parent of a student at the
school claimed the employee
allegedly showed several
female students — reported
to be at least three students
— pornographic material and
"touched them inappropriate-

ly."
SEE page 6

Bahamians
named in
Queen’s
Honours

JOHN Bull owner Frederick
Hazelwood, well known engi-
neer George Cox and long-time
Special Olympics organiser
Basil Christie were among those
named in the Queen’s Birthday
Honours List last night.

Mr Hazelwood will be made
a Companion of the Most Dis-
tinguished Order of Saint
Michael and Saint George
(CMG) for his “outstanding ser-
vice to the business community
in the Bahamas”.

Mr Cox will receive the Most
Excellent Order of the British
Empire (OBE) for his “long
and dedicated service in the
field of civil and structural engi-
neering in the Bahamas.

Mr Christie is awarded the
Most Excellent Order of the
British Empire (MBE) for his
“outstanding contribution to the
development of The Bahamas
in the areas of community ser-
vice, education, religion and
Special Olympics”.

Reports of
tourist rape

THE Tribune received
reports last night that a

ON ee eo REET
on Thursday.

SUIT een M tm oN
had received reports of a
Cri eehTe LAMM COLL CU
CHICO MICU MCE LULL
Pte Lao






PAGE 2, SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS
Family and friends honour
NAslTA Dart! Tr
m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS oe

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
SUPREME COURT

2009
CLE/Qui/ 00243

IN THE MATTER ALL THAT parcel or tract
of land containing 464.664 acres situated in
Alexander’s Settlement on the Island of Exuma,
Bahamas and IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT
parcel or tract of land containing 73.957 acres also
situated in Alexander’s Settlement on the Island of
Exuma, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FLORENCE SMITH
of Alexander’s Settlement in the Island of Exuma
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas is applying to the Supreme Court to have
its Title to the following land investigated under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act, and the nature
and extent thereof determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted by the said Court
in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

“ALL THAT parcel or tract of land containing
Four hundred and Sixty-four and Six hundred
and Sixty-four thousandths (464.664) acres being
a portion of Crown Grant C-24 granted to William
Alexander and situated in Alexander's Settlement
on the Island of Exuma, Bahamas which said
parcel or tract of land has such position boundaries
shape marks and dimensions as are shown on the
diagram or plan filed in the Department of Lands
and Surveys situated in the City of Nassau in the
Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas as Plan Number
343A EX and IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT
parcel or tract of land containing Seventy-three
and Nine hundred and Fifty-Seven thousandths
(73.957) acres also being a portion of Crown Grant
C-24 granted to William Alexander and situated
in Alexander’s Settlement on the Island of Exuma,
Bahamas which said parcel or tract of land has such
position boundaries shape marks and dimensions
as are shown on the diagram or plan filed in the
Department of Lands and Surveys situated in the
City of Nassau in the Island of New Providence
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas as Plan Number 343 EX and which said
parcels or tracts of land are filed herein and edged
in “PINK”,

Copies of the Plan may be inspected during normal
office hours at the following places:-

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher
Building, East Street, in the City of Nassau;

2. The Local Administrator’s Office situated in the
Settlement of George Town, Exuma;

3. The Local Constable’s Office situated in the
Settlement of George Town, Exuma; or

4, The Chambers of Colin M. Thompson Terrace
House, First Terrace and Collins Avenue
Nassau, Bahamas.

Any person who objects to the granting of the said
Certificate of Title is required to file in the Supreme
Court and serve on the Petitioner or its Attorney a
Statement of its, his or her Claim in the prescribed
forms, verified by an Affidavit and other related
requirements to be filed therewith by the 15th day
of July A.D., 2009. Failure of any such person to
file and serve a Statement of its, his or her Claim
together with the other related requirement by the
15th day of July A.D., 2009, will operate as a bar to
such claim.



COLIN M. THOMPSON
ATTORNEY FOR THE PETITIONER



Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

RELATIVES and friends of
the late Milo Butler Jr are
mourning the loss of a dedicat-
ed father, friend and politician
following his unexpected death
on Wednesday at age 72.

The former Speaker of the
House, MP for Pinewood, and
son of the country’s first gov-
ernor general Sir Milo Butler,
had suffered an aneurysm and
two strokes in recent years and
family members say his health
had greatly deteriorated since
then.

Mr Butler followed in his
father’s footsteps to forge a
successful political career and
make a significant contribution
to the shaping of the country
throughout his adult life.

The sixth of Sir Milo’s 10
children served as chairman of
the PLP in 1968, going on to
take up a seat in the Senate the
following year, and then
becoming vice-president of the
Senate for five years.

He was then appointed the
first consul general for the
Bahamas in Florida in 1974,
before returning to Nassau to
run for parliament in 1977.

The ambitious politician was
promptly voted in as MP for
Pinewood and retained his seat
until 1992, becoming Deputy
Speaker of the House of
Assembly in 1987 and Speaker
of the House in 1991 during his
15-year term.

Mr Butler also served as
chairman of the Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation (BEC) and
the Gaming Board.

When he was unsuccessful in
the 1992 general election, Mr
Butler resumed work in the
family business Milo Butler
and Sons Ltd.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham expressed his sym-
pathy to Mr Butler’s family on
Wednesday, paying tribute to
his life of service.

Mr Ingraham said: “The pin-
nacle of his political career was
his service as Speaker of the
House of Assembly, a position
which he occupied with dignity
and grace.

“He maintained friendships
with, and earned the respect
of, persons across the political
spectrum. He was a great
Bahamian gentleman and a
nation-builder.

“My colleagues in the gov-
ernment join Delores and me





in extending heartfelt condo-

lences to the Butler family.”
Mr Butler’s niece Loretta

Butler-Turner, Minister of

_ SENATOR Milo Butler
Junior at the Mental

Health Week panel

Discussion in 1974.

0 Butler Or with
a young Hubert Ingra-
ham outside the House
of Assembly in 1986.

State for Social Development,
said her uncle helped inspire
her own political career.

She said: “He was one of the

aa









individuals in our family that I
would have followed in his
footsteps in terms of political
contribution. He was my uncle,
and we are avery close family
so this is a great loss to us.”

Mr Butler Jr is survived by
his wife Winifred Butler, 65,
five children, two daughters-
in-law and seven grandchildren.

His daughter Bernadette
Butler, 39, a lawyer in the
Attorney General’s office,
remembers her father as a pop-
ular man who lived life to the
full.

She said: “My father was full
of fun. He loved life, He did
everything he wanted to do,
and he had a very good sense
of humour.

“He was always holding din-
ners at the house, and was
entertaining friends.

“He was a very well-liked
person and he had a lot of
friends.”

Her father always strived to
do his best, Miss Butler said,
as his motto was: Good, bet-
ter, best — never let it rest until
the good is better, and the bet-
ter best.

“He lived by that,” she said.

“That was his thing, to
always be the best you can be.

“He was a good man, he was
a great Bahamian, and he
made a contribution to the
development of the Bahamas
as we know it.”

Mr Butler was also a devoted
member of the parish at St
Matthew’s Anglican Church on
Shirley Street. Funeral arrange-
ments have not yet been made.

Nurses continue with fifth day of sick-out

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,

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Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

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m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

ALL specialty clinics at the
Princess Margaret Hospital
remained closed yesterday on
the fifth day of industrial action
staged by public health nurses
across the country.

The nurses began their sick-
out on Monday morning over
government decisions to with-
hold their four per cent pay rise
this year and postpone a health
insurance plan until 2012.

Around 50 per cent of nurs-
ing staff at public clinics across
the Bahamas participated in
the sick-out on Monday and
Tuesday.

And although nearly all nurs-
ing staff returned to the Rand
Memorial Hospital in Freeport
on Wednesday, disruption con-

tele
Sasa ee

eRe tHE
PHONE: 322-2157



tinued at the busy Princess
Margaret Hospital for the fifth
day yesterday as public health
nurses pressed on with the sick-
out.

PMH announced yesterday
that all specialty clinics, includ-
ing the surgical, medical and
paediatric clinics remained
closed.

All non-emergency surgeries
continue to be postponed,
apart from those scheduled for
visitors from the Family
Islands.

However the hospital did
open the oncology clinic, dial-
ysis clinic, maternity high risk
clinic, comprehensive clinic and
general practice clinic yester-
day.

Patients are advised to only
attend the hospital in a med-
ical emergency. If you are not
sure whether you have a med-
ical emergency call 326-7014,
502-7812 or 919.

Patients scheduled for surgi-
cal procedures should call their
doctor or call 322-2861 exten-
sion 3149.

For all general inquiries call
the number above, or 502-
7890/1.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

Comics

alpen ONO nail

eee cee eee P4

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY WEEKENDER 8 PAGES


THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

$4m allocated
for work on
Straw Market

FOUR million dollars has
been allocated in this year’s
budget for the construction of
a new straw market, the esti-
mated total cost of which is
$10 million.

Bidding for the contract to
construct the market is
expected to be finished by
August 21, 2009 and con-
struction is scheduled to go
ahead at the end of Septem-
ber 2009 and last 16 to 18
months.

According to Works Min-
ister Neko Grant, project
architect Patrick Rahming was
awarded a contract to design
the market in December 2008.

Mr Rahming’s design plan
has not yet been completed,
however Mr Grant suggested
during his contribution to the
budget debate that they
should be ready within the
week.

Consequently, preparations
are being made to begin the
tendering process.

Funding boost
for Fish Frys

Government has increased
funding for the “further devel-
opment” of the Fish Fry areas
in both New Providence and
Eight Mile Rock, Grand
Bahama from $100,000 to
$500,000 in this year’s budget.

“We remain cognisant of
the important value of other
aspects of Bahamian culture
to our tourism product and
the need for regular mainte-
nance and upgrading of infra-
structure at these sites as
required,” Minister of Works
Neko Grant told parliament,
as he contributed to the
2009/2010 budget debate.

Assessment of
repair work to
PI Bridge

THIS budget year will see
the Paradise Bridge Authori-
ty undertake “preliminary
work” to determine the extent
of works required for the
repair of the Paradise Island
Bridge, according to the Min-
ister of Works.

Neko Grant said this work
will be comprised of “investi-
gations and repair design.”

Contributing to the
2009/2010 budget debate, Mr
Grant noted that the intro-
duction of a “token-less” sys-
tem at the Paradise Island
Bridge in the 2008/2009 bud-
get year is expected to reduce
the Bridge Authority’s
expenses by approximately
$122,000 a year.

“In this regard, savings
should be realised as a result
of cost reduction in machin-
ery maintenance,” he added.

Contracts to
aid flood fight

Seeking to mitigate Nas-
sau’s flooding issues, the gov-
ernment has issued contracts
worth $641,200 for the clean-
ing and maintenance of 834
wells and 664 associated catch
pits, the Minister of Works
said yesterday.

Meanwhile, a Drainage
Master Plan study is being
conducted by his ministry,
which is anticipated to pro-
vide a framework for how
maintenance of the drainage
system can be more effective-
ly monitored and managed,
he said.

“During the recent precipi-
tation, the wells in the heavily
trafficked areas and the areas
of high population density
were the ones that experi-
enced some blockage.

“Tt was discovered that litter
had blocked the inlet grates
and the screen baskets. To
mitigate any recurrence of
such events, we adopted a
proactive approach by
instructing the contractors to
clean the screen baskets and
the grates outside of their nor-
mal routine,” said Mr Grant.

“Two contracts totalling
$325,000 were awarded for the
re-drilling of 80 drainage wells
which were identified from
the past maintenance contract.

“This programme also
includes the installation of 15
new drainage wells in the spe-
cific areas which were
assessed and found to be in
need of drainage wells,” the
minister said.



Minister pledges Lands
and Surveys ‘clean-up’

= By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

Measures will be taken to
“clean up” and restore public
confidence in the Department
of Lands and Surveys, Minister
of State Byron Woodside told
parliament.

This comes after the depart-
ment was rocked by allegations
of corruption centering on the
granting of numerous plots of
Crown land to close relatives
and friends of then director of
the department, Tex Turnquest,
some of which were soon after
re-sold for hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars.

Mr Turnquest stepped down
following the publication of sev-
eral reports in The Tribune out-
lining the land controversy and
the allegations.

Contributing to the 2009/2010
budget debate on Thursday
evening, Mr Woodside gave
some mixed signals about exact-
ly how the department per-
ceives the allegations, stating
both that a “preliminary
review” indicated that “noth-
ing untoward” occurred, and
later that the corruption claims
led the department to take the
“painful decision” to “take the
necessary measures” to “clean

up” and restore public confi-
dence.

He said: “During the past
few weeks the Department of
Lands and Surveys has come
under much public scrutiny.
While no system is perfect and
persons may feel aggrieved by
decisions made within various
areas of the public service, I
must take this opportunity to
advise that all Bahamians have
the right to apply for Crown
land, including public officers
and their families.

“However there are guide-
lines that are to be followed in
the review of applications by
public officers, especially those
who are retiring or have
retired.”

Mr Woodside added that
“family members of public offi-
cers employed at the Depart-
ment of Lands and Surveys,
who wish to secure land for res-
idential and commercial use”
may also apply.

“There is no skullduggery.
However, the public’s percep-
tion has been that these people
may have been given preferen-
tial treatment,” he noted.

Mr Woodside stated that
“this entire issue is currently
under review”, declaring that
“preliminary reports do not
indicate that anything untoward



i SCM ESI:

occurred relative to the appli-
cation process.”

The issue of Crown land and
land policy, and the revelations
about the granting of land to
Mr Turnquest’s relatives, was
mentioned by several opposi-
tion members during the course
of the budget debate.

MP for West End and Bimini



Cuts will exacerbate
court ‘tsunami Crisis’

= By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

CUTS in funding for the
Attorney General’s Office will
only contribute to a backlog of
court cases that have already
reached “tsunami crisis” level,
according to Cat Island, Rum
Cay and San Salvador MP and
attorney Philip Davis.

Mr Davis made this allega-
tion in parliament as he criti-
cised the way in which govern-
ment has allocated funds to var-
ious ministries, departments and
agencies in the 2009/2010 bud-
get.

Noting decreases in the
tourism budget — down by $12
million — as well as cuts at crim-
inal justice agencies — including
the police, the Attorney Gen-
eral’s Office, and the judiciary —
Mr Davis charged that govern-
ment is “aimless.”

“Tt is clear, Mr Speaker, that
this is not the time to take
resources away from our crime
fighting agencies. With cuts to
these agencies, it seems as if the
government has abandoned its
fundamental duty to protect the
Bahamian people. Mr. Speak-
er, what results should Bahami-
ans expect from agencies with
fewer resources? Expect more
for less, when more has contin-
ually produced less?

“Certainly, Mr Speaker,
Bahamians will not get better
investigations from the police,
or more cases being brought
before the courts by the Attor-
ney General’s Office, with few-
er resources,” he said.

In his budget communication,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham cautioned that below
expected government revenue
last year — $260 million less than
projected — and increased
demand on government services
means the government must
exercise “expenditure restraint”
and maximise the collection of
monies due to it in this year’s
budget if the country is to come
through the crisis without hav-
ing to make sacrifices in terms
of living standards and the pro-
vision of essential services.

Mr Ingraham said govern-
ment made some “difficult deci-
sions” when preparing the bud-
get — including cuts to critical
areas and the delay of certain
outlays, for example the nurses’
health insurance benefit that
days later resulted in an ongoing
sick-out that is crippling the



PHILIP Davis

health care system.

Despite Hubert Ingraham’s
efforts to justify the decisions
taken, the budget debate saw
various opposition members,
including Mr Davis, suggest that
cuts to particular areas — includ-
ing education, tourism and
crime fighting agencies — sim-
ply cannot be countenanced.

Mr Davis, as an experienced
attorney, noted that the country
already suffers from a shortage
of judges, courts and judicial
support staff to “service a mod-
ern Bahamas.”

“Our police force still does
not have the modern forensics
lab it so desperately needs to
quickly examine evidence. And
the Attorney General’s Office is
inadequately organised to deal
with the volume of cases it has
to prosecute.

“Yet the government in its
wisdom decided that now is the
time to cut the budgets of these
agencies along with that of the
prison and the Defence Force,”
said Mr Davis.

This, as the government has
made “little to no impact” on
the crime problem since com-
ing to office in May 2007, he
claimed.

Meanwhile, the MP called for
government to release up-to-
date statistics on conviction
rates for violent crimes — fig-
ures which would show the
“success rate” of various law
enforcement agencies.

While crediting the Minister
of National Security for regu-
larly releasing crime statistics,
Mr Davis said such releases
should also involve conviction
data.

“We have no idea what the
current backlog is in the
Supreme Court. Throughout

the rest of the year, we do not
know how many criminal cases
the AG’s Office brings to court
on a monthly basis. We also do
not know how many criminal
cases come in for prosecution
at the Supreme Court level
every month.

“We can only infer and make
assumptions about the backlog
from the crime and detection
statistics,” he added.

Lh

NEW COROLLA,

ELECTRIC BRAKE CONTROL,

Obie Wilchcombe said during
his contribution that he is “par-
ticularly concerned” about the
land scandal that he “heard
about a few weeks ago.”

“Pm also concerned about
who owns all this land, and
whether the politicians have
Crown land as well. I know I
don’t. But I am trying to figure
it out — because I need to know
how that happened. I still don’t
understand that and somebody
has to explain that to us,” he
said.

PLP chairman Glenys Han-
na-Martin had previously stated
that the situation warranted the
formation of a new land policy,
while MP for Fox Hill Fred
Mitchell called for a select com-
mittee to examine how and to
whom Crown land has been

granted.

Mr Woodside noted that
there have been a number of
changes at the Department of
Lands and Surveys during the
past four months.

These include: Richard
Hardy being named as the act-
ing director of Lands and Sur-
veys; Brian Bynoe being recent-
ly employed as the acting sur-
veyor general; the identification
of five certified surveyors to
augment the land management
unit; a review of plans to make
the department more customer
service friendly; the placement
of restrictions on the unfettered
access of private persons to cer-
tain areas in the department;
and greater focus being placed
on human resources and admin-
istrative needs.

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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

















































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Obama is the opposite of Reagan

WASHINGTON — Federal Reserve
Chairman Ben Bernanke sounded like a fis-
cal Paul Revere last week, warning Congress
about the dangers of an advancing army of
debt.

Bernanke said policymakers need a bold
plan to correct the deficit or else face dire
consequences. Our “near-term challenges
must not be allowed to hinder timely con-
sideration of the steps needed to address fis-
cal imbalances. Unless we demonstrate a
strong commitment to fiscal sustainability in
the longer term, we will have neither financial
stability nor healthy economic growth.”

He’s not alone. The Congressional Bud-
get Office and private forecasters share these
worries. Concern about the president’s han-
dling of the deficit and debt are also spread-
ing to the general public. While 67 per cent
approve of Obama’s job performance overall,
only 45 per cent of Americans approve of
Obama’s handling of federal spending, and 46
per cent of his handling of the federal budget
deficit, according to a new Gallup poll.

The White House is a lot better at dealing
with public criticism than balancing the bud-
get. Earlier this week Obama called for
restoration of “pay as you go” (PAYGO)
rules to curb the mounting debt, which means
any new spending would be offset by other
cuts or tax increases. But it may be too little,
too late, according to Sen. Kent Conrad, D-
N.D., chairman of the Senate Budget Com-
mittee. He told ABC News, the plan “does
not address the deficits and debt projected
under existing policy.”

For now, the White House’s posture of
periodically genuflecting to the altar of
deficits while conducting a revival of new
spending at least makes political sense. The
new president campaigned on a platform of
change and activism. His instincts and ideol-
ogy lead him to larger government. Large
majorities in Congress further empower his
goals. His liberal backers waited at least eight
years for this moment. Truly promoting fiscal
austerity at this moment in time is like order-
ing rice cakes at a steakhouse. But Obama
may have a broader ambition. He wants to be
Ronald Reagan in reverse. Running up the
debt, creating a host of new budgetary com-
mitments and enlarging the government’s
role in the economy will take generations to
unwind. And the engines of bigger govern-
ment also require fuel in the form of taxes.

Reagan did the opposite. He cut taxes to
make government expansion harder. Oba-
ma is transposing Reagan. He is growing gov-
ernment to make future tax cuts more diffi-
cult.

True, Obama promised tax cuts to 95 per
cent of Americans. That leaves a small per-
centage of individuals and businesses to bear
the burden. Based on budget forecasts and
other White House policy proposals, his math

seems fuzzy.

Maybe most Americans won’t pay higher
federal income taxes for the time being, but
Obama’s plans to enlarge the federal gov-
ernment could mean higher out-of-pocket
costs for individuals and businesses due to
legislation ranging from climate change to
health care reform.

Further, Democrats in Congress are deter-
mined to outbid even Obama in federaliz-
ing more programmes. For example, buried in
the energy bill the House will consider in
upcoming weeks is a provision giving the fed-
eral government new powers over local build-
ing codes, according to a recent Washington
Post editorial. And based on the Democrat-
ic majority’s plans in a host of other areas,
there is a lot more to come.

But one thing is clear: tax cuts don’t fit
into the White House’s long-term fiscal pic-
ture. Liberal budget experts already argue
that, given the grim fiscal realities, cutting
taxes would be “irresponsible.” How can we
reduce revenues given all our obligations and
a sea of red ink?

Many still think Obama will pivot at some
point and get serious about the deficit. But
new federal programmes and regulations
develop stakeholders and interest group sup-
port. Like dandelions, they tend to multiply
rather than go away on their own. And the
president’s PAYGO gambit won’t make
much of a difference either.

Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, said the
plan is a “fig leaf to appease those who say
they support fiscal discipline but continue to
vote for more spending.”

Finding fuel for new economic growth is
Obama’s larger challenge. Reducing the tax
burden is more than just ideological symbol-
ism; it’s an important tool to propel economic
growth. With an enlarged public sector, and
tax cuts off the table, we run the risk of enter-
ing a fiscal death spiral: a sluggish economy
means shrinking tax revenues, producing
even larger deficits and debt.

Financing these growing obligations also
means higher interest rates, which hampers
economic growth even more. It’s hard to see
how the current path doesn’t lead to higher
taxes to close budgetary gaps, which again, is
a reverse Reagan outcome.

Reagan believed tax cuts served not only as
a stimulus for economic growth, but as a tool
to keep the size of the federal government in
check. Obama is trying the antithesis. By
growing the size and reach of Washington
he makes tax cuts seem like an impossible
dream —truly a nightmare for those who
agree with Ronald Reagan’s belief that a
bloated federal leviathan is inconsistent with
both fiscal stability and economic growth.

(This article was written by Gary Andres-
c. 2009 Hearst Newspapers).

PLP leaders
miss point
yet again

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune

By condoning and even
attempting to celebrate the dis-
orderly behaviour by one of its
members of parliament, the
PLP leaders have demonstrated
once again that they are inca-
pable of bringing discipline to
bear on their members.

In fact, the leadership has
shown that they are just as
much infected with that old
familiar attitude of entitlement
as the rest of them. They miss
every opportunity to demon-
strate otherwise.

After Mrs. Glenys Hanna
Martin's disorderly behaviour
in the House, they should have
rebuked her, or at least pri-
vately urged her to desist and
apologise to the Speaker.

Instead, both Perry Christie
and Bernard Nottage aided and
abetted her in deliberately and
persistently breaking the rules
of the House.

In attempting to justify Mrs.
Martin's behaviour, Mr. Christie
passionately reminded Prime

Breaking
the rules
to suit

EDITOR, The Tribune.

When we were kids there
seemed to be a game of some
sort on most days — marbles,
spin the top, "rounders", rug-
by, etc. In most of these games
there was usually someone who
decided that the rules that had
been agreed the day before did
not suit him on that particular
day, usually because he was not
winning by the established rules
so he wanted to change them.

I was reminded of those days
when I read The Tribune
Thursday morning and was
shocked, but not surprised, to
learn that MP Glenys Hanna-
Martin created an uproar in
Parliament because she want-
ed to "raise an issue of public
importance.” She was denied
this opportunity because the
rules state that she was required
to have previously served notice
in Parliament that she intended
to bring up the matter.

She was asked to take her
seat and she refused to do so.
That too is not surprising. The
real shock followed when the
Speaker asked the Sergeant-at-
Arms to remove her from the
House and the other members
on her side of the House sur-
rounded her to prevent the
police from doing their duty.

Can we really be surprised
when so many young Bahami-
ans believe that the rules apply
to everyone else except them?

Most of us can recall a simi-
lar "incident of shame" in 1965,
which again proves the old
adage that "the fruit does not
fall far from the tree."

SIDNEY SWEETING, DDS
Nassau,
June 11, 2009

letters@tribunemedia net



Minister Hubert Ingraham how
he (Mr. Ingraham) had only a
week ago asked for permission
to go back on the agenda.

But Mr. Christie was making
the point without getting the
point. Mr. Ingraham asked! He
asked for the consent of mem-
bers. He did not demand. He
did not say he was going back
with or without permission. He
asked, Mr. Christie!

Mrs. Martin didn't do that.
She failed to give notice. Then
she demanded to be heard out
of order. Then she refused to
sit down when the Speaker
asked her to. Then she refused
to leave the chamber when
asked to. Then the next day she
tried to gain entrance to the
House when she knew she was
suspended.

Dr. Nottage did his own polit-
ical credibility a disservice in

preventing the carrying out of a
lawful order by a lawful author-
ity when he obstructed the
Police in the House in full view
of the television cameras.

Then he returned to the
House and launched an attack
on the Speaker during his bud-
get contribution. Dr. Nottage
knows or should know that you
don't do that. The Speaker
should only be criticised on a
substantive motion.

The PLP seem to think that
because Speaker Alvin Smith
is a soft-spoken mild-mannered
man that they can intimidate
him and run over him. That's a
bad miscalculation.

Speaker Smith has obviously
familiarized himself with the
rules. He is an excellent Speak-
er, one who is dignified but
strong. He deserves the support
and gratitude of the Bahamian
people.

THANKFUL
Nassau,
June 11, 2009

House uproar
epitomises why
the Bahamas is
lawless society

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The Opposition displayed complete contempt for the police
when they prevented an officer from carrying out his duty in the

House last Wednesday.

Not only did they defy the Speaker, but they rendered the
policeman impotent in a very public and humiliating way, and

put themselves above the law.

What’s even more shocking is the former national security
minister took part in the debacle.

If the Opposition wanted to talk about the very sad death of
a 15 year old in prison, they should have called a press confer-
ence after it became clear both sides wouldn’t give consent to
sideline the Budget exercise. They did not need the protec-
tion of Parliamentary privilege to say what they had to say.

If they’re clever, they can raise the matter when they speak
in the Budget debate. Or, they can put it on the agenda to

deal with at a later date.

The whole episode was ridiculous and there are better ways
to score political brownie points.

If the opposition can do their own thing and thumb their nose
at authority, why shouldn’t the public?

Their behaviour typifies the tragedy of the Bahamas.

No wonder we live in a lawless society.

ATHENA DAMIANOS
Nassau,
June 8, 2009

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that 1, PANNY ANDRER
COOPER intend to change my name to PENNY
ANDRER COOPER If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.





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THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Wuy YOU VEX?




































































"I vex because of all these
mammoth sized craters — not
pot holes, craters — which
seem to be popping up all
over Nassau causing me to
almost bust my tyre one night!
I mean, I drive at the speed
limit but when it dark and you
can't see these canyons it's a
driving and safety hazard! I
scared my bumper ga fall off
or my tyre ga bust because of
the slackness going on in the
streets.

"Even the prime minister
said these ditches in the mid-
dle of the road got to go -
them people at Ministry of
Works need to get it together
before they cause serious
injury or damage to people
cars man."

—Concerned Driver

"IT vex at these health-care
professionals who have the
nerve to
have a
sick-out
when our
country is
in a finan-
cial crisis! I
understand
that you
want
health
insurance
and other
benefits
but there
are a lot of
people
who. ain’
got no
insurance,
or job, or
paycheck
to take
home at
night.

"T think
it is very selfish of these nurs-
es to put people's health at
risk — they could have had
demonstrations on their lunch
hour, or when they off-duty
and still go to work to serve
the public. I bet these same
people would be hot mad or
worse if when they need
surgery, the doctors tell them:
"No, we on strike’. I say bring
in more of them Filipinos let
them tend to our sick, cause
these people ain't serious."

— Sick and tired

"I am vex because of one
story in another paper where
persons are trying to eliminate
the constitutional budgetary
allocated educational grant of
some $500 per each Bahamian
private school student while
the government school stu-
dent is allotted some $3,000.
As a parent of a private school
student, I sacrifice to pay fees
to assist my child, country and
government in providing a
diverse, competitive, academ-

ic, religious, enriching envi-
ronment to bring forth future
Bahamian citizens and to
employ teachers and person-
nel in both private and gov-
ernment schools.

"My taxes go to pay for
teachers, personnel, equip-
ment and premises in both pri-
vate and $2,500 extra for gov-
ernment schools, and it is dis-
criminatory for government
in a constitutional budget allo-
cation to treat my private
school Bahamian student less
than that of a Bahamian gov-

ernment school student —

especially using my taxes!"
- Vex Voter.

"I vex because I received a
very disturbing e-mail at work
concerning Miss Bahamas

Universe. It was a picture of

Miss (Kiara) Sherman after
she was crowned with the run-
ners-up
behind her.
To my cha-
grin and
complete
disgust, the
photo had
been doc-
tored to
lengthen
the split in
her dress
upward.
"Tt takes
a hell of a

lot of

courage for
young
ladies to
participate
i n
pageants,
not to
mention
the time
spent
grooming of not just their out-

ward appearances but also of

their characters in preparation
for the pageant. These ladies
aspire to represent our coun-
try, the Bahamas, as best they
can. While Miss Sherman was
not my choice for Miss
Bahamas Universe, I com-
mend her and the other par-
ticipants nonetheless.

"Our fellow Bahamians
claim to have national pride
but that pride has been lost
each time a Bahamian brother

or sister sent that despicable e-
mail on to a few others! Miss
Sherman can now be consid-
ered a National Symbol, to
which a certain amount of

honour should be given.
Shame on you Bahamas!"

— Disappointed and Dis-

gusted!

Are you vex? Send your
complaints to whyyouvex @tri-
bunemedia.net or fax them to

328-2398.

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Website to launch
during September

THE Immigration Depart-
ment has completed a policy
paper on the transit of persons
across Bahamian borders, Min-
ister of State for Immigration
Branville McCartney told par-
liament.

The document also deals with
persons intending to work and
remain in the country, and
addresses the need for change
in the Department, Mr McCart-
ney said during debate on the
national budget.

“The paper, once approved
by Cabinet, will be easily read,”
he said. “It will bring clarity to
the many questionable concerns
and address all those areas often
deemed ambiguous and vague.”

The budget for the Immigra-
tion Department is $15,607,472
for fiscal year 2009-2010.

“Improved and outstanding
customer service is a priority of
the new mandate given to the
new directorate,” said Mr
McCartney. “In recent months,
the department has given much
attention to this area.”

He said plans are underway

DECLARING it one of the
most important causes on the
national agenda, Scotiabank
(Bahamas) Ltd pledged $25,000
for two years to support the
revitalisation of historic Nas-
sau.

The funds will support the
Downtown Nassau Partnership,
the public-private board
charged with overseeing a
major transformation and revi-
talisation of the Bay Street area.

“Scotiabank is proud to part-
ner with the Downtown Nassau
Partnership in the effort to pre-
serve and revitalise historic Nas-
sau, a matter we consider one of
the most significant on the
national agenda,” said Barry J
Malcolm, managing director.
“Scotiabank’s commitment to
downtown Nassau has been
part of our history since the first
Scotiabank branch at Bay and
Frederick Street opened a lit-
tle more than 50 years ago.

“Today, our Bahamas head-
quarters remain in the heart of
the city on Rawson Square and
we have another branch at
number one Bay Street. We
have watched this city with its

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* except on red
tagged and net items

Kelly's "+:

Fos age eso

I Cire eau peels e0) oa)
Satu B00 0.8 ol)
Sunday re

SANA esc Reet)



Immigration policy
paper is completed

to devise a plan of action to
effectively address customer
service.

It will provide for the training
and retraining of staff, identifi-
cation of customer friendly
employees to deal with the pub-
lic, and reconfiguration of cus-
tomer service areas.

“It is imperative that the
department reconfigure its
offices so as to deal effectively
with customers’ needs,” said Mr
McCartney.

It is envisaged that during fis-
cal year beginning July 1, adjust-
ments will be made to the inte-
rior of the Hawkins Hill build-
ing to allow better customer ser-
vice, he said.

Plans are also underway for
major developments at the
Freeport, Grand Bahama office.

The department plans to
launch its website this Septem-
ber. The public will be able to
download application forms and
deal with other matters online.

“Education and public rela-
tions are the tools that will keep
the public informed,” Mr
McCartney said. “Therefore
brochures and pamphlets are
being designed for publication
which will keep readers and
applicants abreast and knowl-
edgeable about the depart-

ment.” Pye A) Mom LTO Lan





Scotiabank aids downtown revival

side to prepare a master plan
for phase one of the improve-
ments.

Plans are also underway to
move commercial shipping out
of the heart of the city and con-
duct a major harbour dredging
exercise.

unique architecture and natural
beauty flourish and we have
watched its decline, but we
know that this is a typical pat-
tern for downtown and we
believe that the many efforts
over recent years have paved
the way for what we believe will
be a true transformation. We
are excited about this effort and
proud to be part of it.”
Co-chair of the Nassau
Tourism Development Board
Charles Klonaris said: “The
revitalisation of downtown Nas-
sau would not be possible with-

out the support of private sector
stakeholders like Scotiabank.
With their continued support
and with government’s contin-
uing commitment, the city will
be revived, restored and
renewed for the betterment of
residents and visitors alike.”
Recent steps toward revitali-
sation include the enactment of
the City of Nassau Revitalisa-
tion Act, 2008; the creation of
the DNP and appointment of
its managing director Vaughn
Roberts; and the selection of
local architect Jackson Burn-

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

PCr
322-2157



Consolidated Water (Bahamas) Ltd.

Invites submissions for the sale of:

ONE 1250 kW Diesel Generator Set with 3512 DITA Caterpillar Engine Fully
Enclosed

ASKING PRICE - $ 195,000.00

Continuous duty rating 1010 kW. Factory designed and
delivered in a package that is ready to be connected to
Power Lines, 4-Stroke-Cycle, Water-cooled Diesel Engine,
1250 kW (1563 kVA) 480 V, 3 Phase, 60Hz @ 1800rpm or
1250 kVA 400V, 3-Phase, 50Hz @ 1500rpm, 1998 model
year, 6039 hours on unit’s hours meter.
Specifications follow:

Cat 3512 TA Diesel Engine
Cat SR4 Generator incl. Tropicalization and 150%
Overspeed Capacity
CAT EMCP II Digital Control Panel
Auto Start/Stop Function
Safety Shutdowns
NFPA 110 Alarm Module
Circuit Breaker
Woodward 2301 Electronic Governor
24V Electric Starter
Battery Charger
35Amp Alternator
Lube Oil Cooler
Lube Oil and Filters
Racor Fuel Filters
Air Cleaners
Radiator
Dual Jacket Water Heaters
Rail/Skid-mounted in ENCLOSURE
Muffler
3000 Gallon (11,300 Liter) U.L. Listed Double Wall Fuel
Tank Base
Heavy Duty Enclosure
Warranty — None
PACKAGING: Prepared for Flat Bed Transport

TERMS OF SALE: As is, Where is
The unit can be viewed at Windsor Reverse Osmosis Plant, Windsor
Field Road, Nassau, Bahamas

TERMS OF PAYMENT: Wire Transfer

Interested persons can forward their submission to
the following address on or before June 24, 2009

WUTC EEE og
Consolidated Water (Bahamas) Ltd.
P.O. Box C.R. 54030
Nassau, Bahamas


PAGE 6, SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Ss ea

DR Leon Higgs of the Ministry of Education cuts the ribbon, watched by John Haughton, vice-chairman of Project Read, Arthurlue Rahming,
administrator, and Brian Moodie, chairman

Computer laboratory
to aid literacy initiative

As part of its efforts to
achieve complete literacy in the
Bahamas, Project Read
Bahamas has launched a com-
puter lab and related reading
programme.

Founded in 1991 by the
Rotary Club of East Nassau,
Project Read has helped more
than 1,000 Bahamians join the
world of the functionally liter-
ate, free of charge.

Donated by Sunshine Com-
pany Holdings Ltd, Project
Read Bahamas’ computer lab
boasts 10 computers in cubicles,
internet access and headphones

for privacy.

The project’s directors say the
computer lab is a particularly
important milestone, as it allows
them to offer the Computer
Aided Literacy (CALS) Pro-
gramme.

CALS not only addresses
reading issues but also provides
math tutoring as well, allowing
students the rare opportunity
to read, learn math skills and
become computer literate at the
same time.

Brian Moodie, Rotary Club
president and chairman of Pro-
ject Read Bahamas’ board of

Child abuse
cases Increase

FROM page one

even be caught physically harm-
ing themselves.

Once at-risk children are
identified, Social Services steps
in, calling on the children and
their parents to attend the
department’s Community
Counselling and Assessment
Centre.

“We don’t play when it
comes to these things. Any sign
is taken very seriously,” said
Mrs Duvalier.

The assistant director said
that once the situation is
revealed to children’s parents,
the majority are “very con-
cerned” although in many cases





CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ® Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, JUNE 14TH, 2009
11:30 A.M. Speaker:
Pastor Gil Maycock

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. ¢ Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
¢ Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. ¢ Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
¢ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
e Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)

still unwilling to make a link
between their own behaviour
and their child’s condition.

Once assessment has been
undertaken, the children —
with the permission of their par-
ents — are admitted to the
Sandilands Rehabilitation Cen-
tre to undergo further treat-
ment.

How long they remain in the
institution depends on the
severity of each individual case.
Once released, they continue to
be monitored in school.

Social Services officials also
work with parents to “help
them realise the part they play”
in their children’s trauma.

“So far we haven’t had repeat
cases,” said Mrs Duvalier.



directors, said he is extremely
grateful for Sunshine’s gener-
ous donation.

“Sunshine Holdings was
more than pleased to assist the
people of the Bahamas in their
quest for literacy and encour-
ages more corporate citizens to
donate to Project Read
Bahamas as it provides an
essential service to the coun-
try’s development,” he said.

He noted that with an esti-
mated one in four Bahamians
unable to read well enough to
function properly in society,
Project Read Bahamas per-



forms a “vital service” by pro-
viding a confidential environ-
ment where adults can learn to
read... “with the assistance of
volunteer tutors who share their
time and expertise at no cost to
the student.”

Project Read Bahamas, locat-
ed on Village Road south of
Queen’s College, welcomes all
adults in need of reading assis-
tance to join the programme at
no cost.

Anyone interested in helping
with the effort is also welcome
to volunteer as tutors are always
in demand.

Venezuela bans Coke product

By FABIOLA SANCHEZ
Associated Press Writer

CARACAS, Venezuela
(AP) — Venezuela’s Health

Ministry said Friday it banned
sales of Coca-Cola Zero
because the company failed
to declare that the no-calorie
soft drink uses an artificial
sweetener allegedly harmful
to health.

Health officials said tests
show the cola contains sodi-
um cyclamate. Coca-Cola Co.
disputes that, saying the prod-
uct sold in Venezuela uses dif-
ferent artificial sweeteners.

Cyclamate is not prohibited
in Venezuela. But the min-
istry said the company failed
to report sodium cyclamate
as an ingredient in Coca-Cola
Zero.



Alleged abuse at other
Grand Bahama schools

FROM page one

traffic violation in May.

He is wanted by police for questioning in connection with alleged
unnatural sexual intercourse with two former male students.

The Attorney General’s Office is working with US authorities to
have Birbal extradited to the Bahamas.

Grant’s Town Weslep Methodist Church

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, JUNE 14TH, 2009
7:00 a.m. Rev. Charles Sweeting | Bro. Andre Bethel
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer | Bro. Jamicko Forde
7:00 p.m. Bro. Franklyn Bethel | Rev. Carla Culmer (H.C)
Theme: “ But As For Me And My Household, We Will Serve the Lord”

Defence Force



joins missing

boys searches

FROM page one



Defence Frece officers joined
the search, and dog units were
flown in from Nassau.

But after three days of
searching, there has been no
sign of the missing youngsters.

Dangelo lives in Andros with
his grandparents, and his

younger brother Marcelo, who
lives in Nassau with his parents,
was visiting when the children
went missing.

Anyone who may have any
information about the missing
brothers should call Crime
Stoppers immediately on 328-
TIPS (8477).

All calls are free and confi-
dential.

Parent fury on
abuse claims

FROM page one

These claims were neither
confirmed nor denied by ACP
Hanna yesterday.

A police source on the island
said the suspect is not accused
of having sex with any of the
students.

"(The employee) was inter-
viewed in reference to making
sexual advances towards some
students," said the source.

According to reports from
the island, at least one of the
students involved in the case
reported the allegations to a
school official earlier this week
who informed Ministry of Edu-
cation officials in Nassau.

Education Director Lionel
Sands said he was apprised of
the police investigation on
Thursday and immediately
placed the suspect on leave,
pending the results of the police
probe.

"The Ministry is waiting for
the conclusion of the police
investigation but until then the
(suspect) has been placed on




administration leave," he told
The Tribune.

When asked to confirm the
details surrounding the alleged
incidents, Mr Sands said he
could not as he was "awaiting
full details from the district
superintendent.”

The concerned parent who
contacted The Tribune said
many parents in the Lower
Bogue area were fuming over
the allegations and were disap-
pointed that the matter had not
been reported to the press.

The parent claimed the
employee was suspended from
the school around two weeks
ago.

Police were said to have
interviewed more than a dozen
students at the high school over
the past few days.

It is unclear when, or if, the
suspect will be charged with an
offence.

School Principal Sheena Dun-
combe said she was not pre-
pared to make a statement on
the allegations but confirmed
the employee was not at the
school.

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL



Sunday School: 10am
Preaching 11am & 7:30pm
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

FUNDAMENTAL
EVANGELISTIC

Pastor:H. Mills

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills ¢ Phone: 393-0563 ¢ Box N-3622







Come, join usjas}we come togetherands a
worship, the)Uord in Spiritand inTruth) ~ Pon

J ASSEMBLIES OF G00]

OPPORTUNITIES FOR

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SUNDAY SERVICES

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Sunday School for all ages ...

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Worship Service
Spanish Service

» LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

Grace and Peace Wesleyan Church
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Evening Worship Service

ai, WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.

Selective Bible Teaching
Royal Rangers (Boys Club) 4-16 yrs.
Missionettes (Girls Club) 4-16 yrs.

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Youth Ministry Meeting

RADIO MINISTRY
Sundays at 8:30 a.m. - ZNS 1 - TEMPLE TIME

Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God

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Tel: 322-8304, Fax: 322-4793. P.O. Box: N-1566
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WHERE GOD IS ADORED AND EVERYONE IS AFFIRMED

' 7; Worship Time: Lla.m.

Church School during Worship Service

Worship time: Ilam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:

Prayer Time: 10:15a.m.

The Madeira
Shopping Center

Place: Twynam Heights

Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles off Prince Charles Drive

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O. Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE






THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Junior tourism minister
proves to be true beauty

THE Ministry of Tourism
and Aviation’s Grand Bahama
office is throwing even more
support behind Joanna Brown,
the island’s Junior Minister of
Tourism, now that she has won
the Miss Bahamas World Beau-
ty Pageant.

Through the Tourism Today
Travel Club, which the Ministry
of Tourism has established in
many schools throughout the
Bahamas, students learn the
workings of the tourism, travel

and hospitality sector.

As part of the programme, a
series of competitions deter-
mine the Junior Minister of
Tourism for major islands.

The junior minister then rep-
resents the island at various
important functions and nation-
al events.

Karenda Swain, co-ordinator
of the Tourism Today Travel
Club in Grand Bahama, said it
was clear from their first meet-
ing that Ms Brown had enough

confidence to be a good repre-
sentative of the island.

She said Ms Brown demon-
strated that she had the intelli-
gence and skills to accomplish
great things.

“Tt is evident that Joanna skil-
fully combined her experience
and intellect with charm and
beauty and became the coun-
try’s proud winner of the title
Miss Bahamas World,” Ms
Swain said.

“She is indeed an excellent

person, a practising Christian
and a tremendous role model
for other young ladies.

“Grand Bahama is very
proud of its Junior Minister of
Tourism, who is celebrated
nationally for her talent and
beauty.”

Ms Brown is a recent gradu-
ate of Bishop Michael Eldon
High School and has been
accepted into the Ministry of
Tourism’s new summer employ-
ment programme.

















FG CAPITAL MABREETS
AERA Be ALY RGEC S

ROYAL FIDELITY

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a een

SkyClimbers Summer Camps will be held at
the SkyClimbers facility on Paradise Island

TO TENNIS
CENTER

SkyClimbers Will be Hosting Full Week all Day
Climbing Summer Camps 9am-5pm.

Activities Include:

¢ Climbing at SkyClimbers!

¢ Climbing at Climber’s Rush ATLANTIS!
¢ Tours of Dolphin Cay!

¢ Meet the Sea Lions!

¢ Feed the Sting Rays

¢ Tours of Aquaventure!

Cost For All this Fun $80/week
Spaces are Limited to
12 Students/Camp
minimum age is 9 years old.

The summer camps are week length camps
beginning on the 15th of this month.

The dates: June 15th- 19th - 22nd-25th

June 29th-July 3rd

July 6th-10th, 13th-17th,20th-24th

August 3rd-7th,10th-14th,24th-28th

(The Entire month of July and August in short)

Please call Wardell McClam

363-0626
THE TRIBUNE



Stingrays rout
Comodores 16-0

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

VETERAN Leroy
Thompson has won a New
Providence Softball Asso-
ciation men’s champi-
onship title with just about
every team that he pitched
on.
Switching from the
champions D’s Truckers to
the youthful PriceWater-
House Stingrays during the
off-season, Thompson
threw a neat two-hitter
with six strike outs in a 16-
0 whitewashing over the
Royal Bahamas Defense
Force Commodores.

It was the lone game
played Thursday night at
the Baillou Hills Sporting
Complex as the ladies’ fea-
ture game between the
Sigma Brackettes and the
Proper Care Pool Lady
Sharks was rained out
after the first inning.

While Thompson was on
his game on the mound,
second baseman James
Clarke almost had a per-
fect plate appearance in his
four at bats as he finished
3-for-4 with a run batted
in and three scored to lead
their offensive attack.

“Our game plan tonight
was to come out and make
a statement,” said Clarke,
who helped in their 12-hit
attack that forced the
Commodores to switch
starter Terrance Culmer
with center-fielder Ramon
Storr in the fifth.

“We just wanted the
league to know that we
could play head-to-head
with any team and with the
addition of Leroy on the
mound, we can be as com-
petitive as anybody else.”

The win improved the
Stingrays’ record to 3-1,
while the Commodores
dropped to 2-1.

After taking a 1-0 lead
in the second on Ghandi
Williams’ run-producing
single that plated Clarke,
PriceWaterHouse went on
an offensive tear in the
third.

They marched 11 batters
to the plate and came up
with six runs on as many
hits, highlighted by an RBI
single from Clarke, a two-
run double from both
Lavaughn Ferguson and
Godfrey Burnside Jr. as
well as an RBI single from
Greg Jones.

In the fourth, the
Stringrays struck for three
more, thanks to Luton
Delancy’s RBI ground out
and Burnside Jr’s second
two-run double, extending
their margin to 10-0.

And in the fifth, Price-
WaterHouse once again
batted around the clock
producing another six-run
assault, this time on
Jameiko Sands’ RBI triple
and Burnside Jr’s RBI sin-
gle.

The Commodores, who
only got three batters on
base, didn’t perform any-
where near their capabili-
ties, according to Storr.

“We didn’t have people
playing good defence and
we didn’t hit the ball and
that resulted in the loss,”
Storr pointed out.

Storr was the first
Defence Force player to
reach base on a one-out
single in the first. In the
second, Alex Hailey led off
with a single and stole sec-
ond. And in the third, Shi-
mon Bain touched first on
an error.

But in each instance,
neither batter was able to
get past second base as
Thompson totally shut
down their offence, includ-
ing retiring the side in
order in the fourth and the
fifth, the latter on three
strike outs.

Tonight's schedule: 7 pm
Robin Hood Hitmen vs
Young Breed. 8:30 pm
Commando Security
Truckers vs Thompson
Heavy Equipment.



PAGE 9

i



SATURDAY, JUNE 13,



t

2009





THE Bahamas’ Melinda Bastian and captain Kelsie Johnson forming a double block against Haiti's Sainvilia Aubert.

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

DESPITE struggling to win
their opener against Haiti,
women’s national volleyball
team captain Kelsie Johnson
likes the position the Bahamas
is in at the second round of
the 2010 FIVB World Cham-
pionships Qualifying Tourna-
ment.

Avenging their loss from the
2006 Caribbean Volleyball
Championships here at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium, the
Bahamas rallied for a 25-23,
25-21, 22-25, 22-25, 15-11 deci-
sion Thursday night at the

Stuggles to second
round of FIVB qualifiers

“It was a tough hard fought
match because it was our first
time playing together from
2008,” said Johnson of the last
CAV.

“T think the cobwebs are
gone and we will be a different
team tonight (when we play
Barbados) because Cherise
and IJ didn’t have a great match
like we expected us to have.
So the Bajan team didn’t see
us at full strength.”

While Johnson and the
Rolle sisters (Cherise and

Krystel) didn’t perform as well
as anticipated, Melinda Bast-
ian, one of the two collegiate
players on the team, stepped it
up and scored a game high 23
kills with three blocks and an
ace.
Last night, the Bahamas
played Barbados in Pool A
final match-up as the two
undefeated teams determined
who they will play when they
cross over in the playoffs that
get started today.

Based on what she’s seen

so far, Johnson said the
Bahamas not only has a good
chance of qualifying for the
next round of the World
Championships, but they are
in an unique position to win
this round.

“We're sitting in an excel-
lent position. The first goal was
to get the win because you
don’t want to go up against
Barbados in their home town
being down,” she pointed out.

“So getting the win was
more a morale booster for us,
knowing that they defeated us
in ‘06 to get the bronze. So get-
ting the win, it will relax us
even more.”

The women are hoping to
join the men, who two weeks

Kenmore Bynoe/Photo

ago advanced to the next
round when they finished sec-
ond in Kingston, Jamaica with
an upset win over Jamaica in
the playoffs.

The women, however, will
have to finish in the top three
and could either play Jamaica
or St. Lucia when they get to
the playoffs.

“We can cither see our-
selves winning or finishing sec-
ond,” Johnson projected.

Now that they have
achieved their initial goal,
Johnson said they know that
they have to step up their
game because they can’t afford
to get into the same situation
in the playoffs that they found
themselves in against Haiti.

Wildey Gym in Barbados.

Stuart makes final appearance

at NCAA Outdoor Championships

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IT wasn’t the way Bianca ‘BB’ Stuart
had intended to complete her collegiate
eligibility.

The Southern Illinois senior completed
her final appearance at the National Col-
legiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Out-
door Championships yesterday with a 14th
place finish in the women’s long jump.

She only soared 5.87 metres for the 14th
and final position in the final of the wom-
en’s long jump. The winning jump was
6.54 metres by Kimberly Williams, a
sophomore from Florida State.

In the preliminaries, Stuart had the 11th
best jump of 5.85 to qualify for the final.

Also on Thursday, Auburn University’s
sophomore sprinter Cache Armbrister and
University of Miami’s junior Kristy Whyte
both qualified for the final of the women’s 200 metres.

Bainca Stuart



Armbrister placed fourth in heat one of the semifinal in 23.22 for eighth place
overall, while Whyte came in fifth in the second heat in 23.27 for the ninth and final ;

spot.

In the preliminaries earlier in the day, Armbrister got third in the fourth of five
heats in 23.76 to qualify in the 11th spot. Whyte, competing in heat five, was
fourth in 23.76 for 17th overall.

Jernise Saunders, a senior at Portland State, also closed out her collegiate athletes went to Orlando recently to

: compete in the 11th annual Interna-

In the men’s 200 preliminaries, Karlton Rolle ran 21.95 for sixth place. But the a eh CMAG, Arts Cham-
freshman at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) ended up 25th ; P r :

career when she finished fifth in heat five in 24.15 for 22nd, but it wasn’t good
enough for her to advance to the semis.

overall and he too failed to advance.
Whyte and Rolle all competed on their relay teams, but neither advanced out of
the prelims.

UCLA men’s 4 x 1 team that placed fifth in heat two in 39.77 for 14th overall.

in heat three for 12th overall as they too failed to advance.

It’s now down to just Armbrister and Whyte in the 200 final that was held last
eo q cially the kids," French said. "They

i worked very hard."

night.
Meanwhile, overseas, a number of our elite athletes were in competition.
At the Meeting de Montreuil, Shamar Sands, the national 110 metres hurdles

American Jeff Porter in 13.54.

Sands was the lone Bahamian at the meet, but at the Festival of Excellence in } ; :
: won a giant title best performance

: by a foreign Kung Fu school, beating
: out Italy, Puerto Rico, France and
: Canada.

Toronto, Canada, two quarter-milers were in action.

Andrae Williams, who has ran the second fastest time for a Bahamian this
year, clocked 45.72 for third place in the men’s 400. American Olympic champi-
on LaShawn Merritt stopped the clock in 44.83.

And in the women’s 400 at the Varsity Stadium at the University of Toronto, }
Christine Amertil got third place as well in 52.29. The winning time was 51.44 by }
: national competition circuit. It host-

American Shana Cox.



Key and Ming Shu Santerrio Johnson.

Devron Pinder/Photo

! Thurston, Ming Shu Joshua Ferguson. Second row from left are 0 Gao Tao Lyn-
: den French (senior instructor), Gao Gough Ramond Miller, Gao Gough Jamal

STC

CMR MMOD TELA TAS FU

A SMALL team of eight Kung Fu

They were led by 4th degree black

belt Lynden French and 1st degree
i black belt Kent Bazard, and are stu-
? dents of the Bai Sung Institute 'Four

In the women’s 4 x 100, Whyte ran on the second leg of Miami’s team that got :

third in heat two in 44.44 for 10th overall. Rolle also ran the second leg for | Wings of Kung Fu,’ an internation-

i ally recognized system founded by
The women’s 4 x 4 team from Auburn, without Armbrister, ran 3:35.47 for fourth pees Grandmaster Kenneth P.
? Lewis.

"The group did very well, espe-

Each of the athletes placed in at

national record holder, picked off a victory in that event in 13.45, well ahead of } least one event and the team came

: home with three gold, two silver and

four bronze medals. The team also

The event was hosted by Master
Nick Scrima and is a part of an inter-



ed over 2,000 competitors, judges
and spectators at each event.

In December, the Bahamas will
host the first ICMAC event outside
of the United States at the Atlantis
Resort and will become host for the
yearly World Championships starting
in 2010.

"The Bahamas ICMAC will be a
world class Kung Fu competition and
the finale on the international cir-
cuit,” Bazard said. "The circuit will
include Washington, Las Vegas, San
Diego, Japan, Italy and Costa Rica.
All of the competitors will come to
our country for the grand champi-
onships."

The Four Winds System hopes to
win the support of local sponsors and
the Ministry of Sports.

"We need support to make an
international impression of the talent
we have here in the Bahamas,"
Bazard said. "This December,
though, will be another chance to
prove to the world that we are small,
but we are the best."
PAGE 10, SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



BAAA National Open Track and Field Championships

IN today's segment of Face Off by the Bahamas
Association of Athletic Association's Public Relations
officers Kermit Taylor and Troy McIntosh, we focus
our attention on the top two female sprinters as they

prepare to lead the charge in the 100 and 200 metres
at the National Open Track and Field Champi-
onships, June 26-27 at the Thomas A. Robinson

Track and Field Stadium.



Chandra Sturrup 99

EVENT: 100/200/LJ

PERSONAL BEST: 10.84/22.33/22
SEASON BEST: 11.18/23.33
HEIGHT: 5 4 (1.59m)

WEIGHT: 135 Ibs (52 kg)

D.0.B. September 12th 1971
AGE: 37

FAVOURITE MOVE: Oliver Twist and any movie with Sir Sean

Connery

FAVOURITE FOOD: Lobster Lobeste
MOM'S NAME: Deborah Dean (deceased)
DAD'S NAME: Charles Sturrup
HOMETOWN: Nassau, Bahamas

NAME OF COLLEGE: Norfolk University, Virginia

NAME OF HIGH SCHOOL: R.M. Bailey
HIGH SCHOOL COACH: Steven Murray
COLLEGE COACH: Laverne Sweat
FAVOURITE FOOTBALL TEAM: none
FAVOURITE BASKETBALL TEAM: none
FAVOURITE TV SHOW: Days of Our Lives
HARDEST WORKOUT: 300m

EASIEST WORKOUT: Blocks

The diminutive Chandra Sturrup launched her international

career in 1996 finishing fourth in the Olympic 100m final and win-
ning silver in the 4x100m relay at the Atlanta Games. Further suc-
cesses followed: 100m gold at the 1998 Commonwealth Games
and 60m gold at the 2001 World Indoor Championships. She also
landed successive 100m bronze medals at the 2001 and 2003
World Championships in Edmonton and Paris.

Chandra Sturrup is a Bahamian track and field sprint athlete.
She is a 100 m specialist and the Bahamian national record holder
for the women's 100 m dash with a personal best of 10.84 sec-
onds set in Lausanne, Switzerland on July 5, 2005.

Sturrup competed at the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing at
the 100 m sprint. In her first round heat she placed first in front of
Kelly-Ann Baptiste and Lina Grincikaite in a time of 11.30 to
advance to the second round. There she improved her time to
11.16 seconds and placed third behind Sherone Simpson and
Muna Lee. In her semi final Sturrup finished in fifth position with
11.22 seconds, causing elimination. However her fellow Bahamian
Debbie Ferguson did qualify for the final with the same time, but

she finished fourth in her semi final. This winter she has enjoyed a
real Indian summer, winning major international 60m races in
Lievin, Dusseldorf and Gent. Sturrup has an 18-year-old son.

Inducted in NCAA, Norfolk State University, and CIAA Hall of

Fame.

EVENT: 100/200

PERSONAL BEST: 10.91/22.31
SEASON BEST: 11.11/ 23.01
HEIGHT: 5 6 (1.69m)
WEIGHT: 139 Ibs (63 kg)
D.0.B: January 16th 1976
AGE: 30

HOMETOWN: Nassau, Bahamas

NAME OF HIGH SCHOOL: R.M. Bailey
HIGH SCHOOL COACH: Pancho Rahming

€<€ Debbie Ferguson/\cKenzie

NAME OF COLLEGE: University of Georgia, Atlanta



In 2002 she was appointed as an ambassador for the United
Nations Food and Agriculture Organization. At the 2002 Com-
monwealth Games, England, she set the championship record in
the 100 m and in the 40100 m relay with the Bahamian team,
recording a personal best of 10.91 seconds in the individual

event.

At the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing she competed at the
100 m sprint. In her first round heat she placed second behind
Oludamola Osayomi in a time of 11.17 to advance to the second
round. There she won her series to qualify for the semi finals in a
time of 11.21, this time finishing in front of Osayomi. Despite fel-

ai

INBRIEF

Phelps hack in
Competition in
Santa Clara

SWIMMING
SANTA CLARA, Calif.
Associated Press



MICHAEL Phelps has
easily qualified for the 200-
meter butterfly final at the
Santa Clara International
Grand Prix.

Phelps touched in 1
minute, 57.45 seconds, mak-
ing him the fastest qualifier
for Friday night’s final in the
outdoor pool. The 14-time
Olympic gold medalist owns
the world record of 1:52.03
that he set at the Beijing
Games.

He blew away his competi-
tion in the morning prelimi-
naries, swimming 0.44 sec-
onds faster than Samuel
McGraw, the second-leading
qualifier.

Phelps is competing in his
second meet since his three-
month suspension by USA
Swimming ended last month.
He was penalized after a pho-
to surfaced of him using a
marijuana pipe.

I =z)

COLLEGE COACH: Norbert Elliott low Bahamian Chandra Sturrup being unable to qualify for the

final with a time of 11.22 in the first semi final, Ferguson man-
aged to qualify with the same time as she finished fourth in her
race, while Sturrup finished fifth in hers. In the final Ferguson
came to 11.19 seconds, which was the 7th position.

She competed at the 2009 Manchester City Games, winning
the 150 m final in 16.54 seconds.

Falcons release
suspented OB

Ferguson graduated from University of Georgia from where
she launched her senior athletic career since which she has
gained medals at the Summer Olympics, IAAF World Champi-
onship in Athletics, Commonwealth Games and Pan American
Games..





BAAA plays host to 13th Central American
and Caribbean Age Group Championships

NEXT weekend at the Thomas A.
Robinson Track and Field Stadium, the
Bahamas Association of Athletic Asso-
ciations will play host to athletes, coach-
es and delegates from 20 countries in
the 13th Central American and
Caribbean Age Group Championships.

At a press conference on Friday,
BAAA's president Curt Hollingsworth
and committee chairman Dr. Bernard
Nottage revealed plans for the champi-
onships that will run from Thursday-Fri-
day, June 16-17.

More than 160 athletes, the largest
number to ever participate in the region-
al meet held every two years, are expect-
ed to display their skills in the multiple
event competition in two different age
groups for boys and girls.

This will be the 13th time the meet
has been held and it is expected to be an
exciting one.

The four divisions to be contested are
as follows: Girls - 11-12 years old, Boys -
11-12 years old, Girls - 13-14 years old
and Boys - 13-14 year old

Team size is restricted to 3 athletes
per division to give a maximum team of
12 athletes per country.

The Bahamas will be represented by
the following:

Girls 11-12 - Jeorjette Williams and
Teisha Taylor; girls 13-14 - Danielle Gib-
son and Pedrya Seymour; boys 11-12 -
Julis Nottage and Timothy Wilson and
boys 13-14 - Delano Davis from Grand
Bahama and Jerrio Rahming.

In the younger age group (11-12), ath-
letes will compete in 5 events:

Day One - 60 metres, high jump and
Ball Throw

Day Two - Long Jump, 800m (Females

fly



PICTURED are BAAA's president Curt Hollingsworth (left) and Dr. Bernard Nottage (right).

Only) and 1000m (Males only).

In the older age group (13-14), ath-
letes will compete in 7 events:

Day One - 80 metres, shot put, high
jump and long jump.

Day Two - 60 metre hurdles (Females
only), 80 metre hurdles (males only),
Ball Throw, 1000 metre (females only)
and 1200m (males only).

Each athlete competes for points in
each event in his/her division; points are
totaled to give an overall divisional win-
ner. The event stimulates great compe-
tition and enthusiasm, with athletes dis-











playing their talents in several different
disciplines.

The meet has been held twice before
in the Bahamas, in 1987 and 2001. It has
also marked the start of an athletic
career for many of the outstanding elite
athletes in the region today. The most
famous of those is our own "Golden
Girl" Debbie Ferguson McKenzie, who
competed twice in CAC Age Group
when she was a student at Oakesfield
Primary School, she did well

in 1987 and even better in 1989 when

The BAAA, along with the local orga-
nizing committee headed by Dr. Not-
tage, have gotten the financial backing
from the Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture are currently finalizing its plans
to ensure that the championships are
successful and memorable for all those
who participate.

The BAAA say they look forward to
the support of parents, family, friends,
coaches, local track and field fans, the
media and the public at large as they
come out to watch the meet and cheer on

she was the overall winner.

the young athletes.















RUSSIA'S
Maria Shara-
pova reaches
to return shot
during her
women's third-
round tennis
match against
Francesca
Schiavone of
Italy at the
Aegon Classic
in Birming-
ham, England,
Thursday,
June 11, 2009.

Simon Dawson/AP Photo

LT



TENNIS
BIRMINGHAM, England
Associated Press

MARIA Sharapova reached
her first semifinal in more than
a year by defeating Yanina
Wickmayer 6-1, 2-6, 6-3 Friday
at the Aegon Classic.

The former top-ranked play-
er struggled with her serve in
the second set, but regained
her stride in the third to break
her 19-year-old opponent twice
for a 5-1 lead.

Sharapova had 11 double-
faults with a remodeled serve
to protect her shoulder, which
required surgery last year and
sidelined her for 10 months.

“T kind of lost the momen-
tum and made more errors
than I would have preferred,
and she gained confidence
from that,” Sharapova said.
“When you give her time, she

Sharapova defeats Wickmayer to reach semifinals

plays very aggressively. And
once she had broken me, she
kept swinging away and came
up with some great shots.”

Sharapova next plays Li Na,
the former Wimbledon quar-
terfinalist from China who beat
Stefanie Voegele 6-3, 7-6 (3).

The other semifinal will pit
Magdalena Rybarikova against
Sania Mirza.

Mirza reached only her sec-
ond semifinal in two years with
a 6-1, 7-6 (4) win over Melinda
Czink, while Rybarikova
defeated Urszula Radwanska
6-3, 6-3.

Mirza recently recovered
from a wrist injury, and was
encouraged by her perfor-
mances in Birmingham.

“Tm happy to be competing
and winning some matches,”
Mirza said. “The wrist is
healed, which is the biggest
positive out of this.”

Michael Vick

@ FOOTBALL
ATLANTA
Associated Press

THE Falcons have
released suspended quarter-
back Michael Vick, opening
the door for him to sign with
any interested NFL team.

Vick is eligible to immedi-
ately sign with a team even
though he has not been rein-
stated by NFL commission-
er Roger Goodell.

Falcons general manager
Thomas Dimitroff said the
team relinquished its con-
tractual rights to Vick on Fri-
day.

“Michael remains sus-
pended by the NFL,” Dim-
itroff said. “However, in the
event NFL commissioner
Roger Goodell decides to
reinstate Michael, we feel his
best opportunity to re-engage
his football career would be
at another club.”

The move was no surprise.

“Everybody always knew
that Mike wouldn’t be play-
ing with the Falcons,” Vick’s
agent, Joel Segal, said. “He’s
really just taking it one day at
a time.”

The NFL had no comment
on Vick’s release.

Goodell has said he will sit
down with Vick after the
quarterback completes his 23-
month sentence on July 20
for running a dogfighting
ring.

“Michael’s going to have
to demonstrate to myself and
the general public and to a
lot of people, did he learn
anything from this experi-
ence? Does he regret what
happened?” Goodell said last
month at the NFL meetings
in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
“Does he feel that he can be
a positive influence going for-
ward? Those are questions
that I would like to see when
I sit with him.”

Vick’s currently making
$10 an hour as a construction
worker for W.M. Jordan Co.
while he serves the final two
months of his sentence on
home confinement in Hamp-
ton, Va. He was released
from federal prison in Kansas
on May 20.

Even while making it clear
Vick had no football future
with the Falcons, Falcons
owner Arthur Blank has said
he would be available to
assist Vick.

“Our entire organization
sincerely hopes that Michael
will continue to focus his
efforts on making positive
changes in his life, and we
wish him well in that regard,”
Dimitroff said Friday.

Vick was the Falcons No. 1
draft pick in 2001. He played
six seasons with the team, but
the Falcons moved on by
making quarterback Matt
Ryan their No. 1 pick last
year. Ryan started every
game as a rookie and led the
Falcons to the playoffs.


a 6/13/09, PAGE 11

THE WEATHER RE bP 2 | F/|INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

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PAGE 12, SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Workshop to give young
a head start in business

YOUNG entrepreneurs will get an
opportunity to expand their horizons
and develop new perspectives on
entrepreneurship at the upcoming
Business Builders Immersion work-
shop.

The goal of the three-day work-
shop — scheduled for June 15 to 17 at
the British Colonial Hilton — aims
to encourage young Bahamians to
seriously consider entrepreneurship
as a career option.

The guest speakers at the work-
shop, including Doongalik Studios
CEO Jackson Burnside, all have
practical experience operating a busi-

ness, said the organisers.

“My vision is to bring together
young Bahamian entrepreneurs and
business professionals to share their
experiences in the world of business,”
said co-ordinator Sharell Ferguson,
an MBA graduate of Howard Uni-
versity.

“My partners, all peers of mine,
specialise in a wide range of skills,
including, human resources, market-
ing, law, agriculture, the fashion
industry, accounting, finance, enter-
tainment, business consultation and
counselling. I desired to create an
opportunity where youth can learn

from those who are making strides
of success in their own industries
locally and abroad. I believe that we
need to help each other succeed.”

Farenno Ferguson, CEO of iKonz
Media Group, said attendees can
expect an informative session.

"T plan to share ways in which they
can find effective means of increasing
their marketability in any career field
and especially in the new media mar-
ket which is now booming.”

BBI will offer interactive sessions
for attendees, including developing
business plans, vision and mission
statements, branding personal and

corporate image, and networking
opportunities.

Speakers include Sharell Ferguson,
CEO Beyond The Veil Group of
Companies; Farenno Ferguson, CEO
iKonz Media Group; Tyrinna Neely
CEO, Primadona Sales; Shenique
Gray, CPA; Kenneth Moncur,
Kemis.Net; Franklyn Miller, the
Ghostbuster; Khrystle Rutherford,
LLB; Timothy Blair, agricultural spe-
cialist; Kendria Strachan, marketing
manager; Charmin Lotmore, MBA,
partner, PBC Group; Rekeno Car-
roll, CPA; Nekeino Brice, CPA, part-
ner, Island Purchasing Group.





RUSSIA'S national flag is unveiled atop the Ostankino TV tower marking the Day
of Russia in Moscow, Russia, yesterday. The nation’s first president, Boris
Yeltsin, established the June 12 holiday after the Soviet breakup to mark the 1990
declaration of sovereignty by Russia's Soviet-era parliament.



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CHILDREN enjoy a holiday and the warm weather swimming in a Moskva river, in

Moscow, Russia.



Sergey Ponomarev/AP Photos

FIREWORKS explode over the Kremlin, with St. Basil's cathedral, center, marking the
Day of Russia in Moscow, Russia.



UN imposes tough new sanctions on N Korea

@ UNITED NATIONS

THE U.N. Security Council
imposed punishing new sanc-
tions on North Korea Friday,
toughening an arms embargo
and authorizing ship searches
on the high seas in an attempt
to thwart the reclusive nation’s
nuclear and ballistic missile
programs, according to the
Associated Press.

The unanimous support for
the resolution reflected inter-
national disapproval for recent
actions by North Korea, which
defied the council by conduct-
ing a second nuclear test on
May 25 and heightened global
tensions with recent missile

launches that raised the
specter of a renegade nuclear
state.

North Korea has repeatedly
warned that it would view new
sanctions as a declaration of
war, but it boycotted Friday’s
vote — in sharp contrast to the
October 2006 Security Council
meeting where sanctions were
imposed after the country’s
first nuclear test. Then, the
North Korean ambassador
immediately rejected the res-
olution, accused council mem-
bers of “gangster-like” action
and walked out of the council
chamber.

U.S. Ambassador Susan
Rice, who shepherded the res-

olution through two weeks of
complex and sometimes diffi-
cult negotiations, told
reporters in Washington that
the administration was “very
pleased” with the council’s
“unprecedented” and “innov-
ative” action.

She cautioned that North
Korea could react to the reso-
lution with “further provoca-
tion.”

“There’s reason to believe
they may respond in an irre-
sponsible fashion to this,” she
said.

North Korea said Monday
in its main newspaper that it
would respond to any new
sanctions with “corresponding

self-defense measures.” On
Tuesday, the North said it
would use nuclear weapons in
a “merciless offensive” if pro-
voked.

The resolution seeks to
deprive North Korea of
financing and material for its
weapons program and bans
the communist country’s lucra-
tive arms exports, especially
missiles. It does not ban nor-
mal trade, but does call on
international financial institu-
tions to halt grants, aid or
loans to the North except for
humanitarian, development
and denuclearization pro-
grams.

China and Russia, the

North’s closest allies, support-
ed the resolution, but stressed
that it did not authorize the
use of force against North
Korea, a key demand by both
countries. Diplomats said dur-
ing the negotiations both coun-
tries pushed to ensure that the
measures not hurt ordinary
people in North Korea who
face daily hardships.

Russia’s U.N. Ambassador
Vitaly Churkin called the
North’s repeat nuclear test “a
serious blow” to efforts to pre-
vent the proliferation of
nuclear weapons and said the
resolution was “an appropri-
ate response,” targeted at the
weapons programs.

0 In brief

Venezuela:
Coca-Cola Zero
has harmful

_ sweetener

: MCARACAS, Venezuela

VENEZUELA’S Health

; Ministry said Friday it

? banned sales of Coca-Cola

? Zero because the company

? failed to declare that the no-
? calorie soft drink uses an

i artificial sweetener allegedly
? harmful to health, according
i to the Associated Press.

Health officials said tests

} show the cola contains sodi-
? um cyclamate. Coca-Cola

? Co. disputes that, saying the
? product sold in Venezuela

? uses different artificial

? sweeteners, Acesulfame-K
? and Aspartame.

Cyclamate is not prohibit-

: ed in Venezuela. But the

? ministry said the company

? failed to report sodium

? cyclamate as an ingredient in
? Coca-Cola Zero when it

? received its initial health

? permit to begin selling the

? drink in April.

Coca-Cola is “failing to

: comply with sanitary

? norms,” the ministry said in

? astatement published in the
? newspaper Ultimas Noticias.
i The ministry urged

? Venezuelans to refrain from
? trying the drink, saying it is

? “considered harmful to the

? health.”

The U.S. prohibits the use

: of cyclamates in human food
? because of health safety con-
? cerns. Sales of Coca-Cola

? Zero elsewhere in Latin

? America have met with

? resistance over the use of

? cyclamate.

Rosy Alvarez, a spokes-

: woman for Coca-Cola Servi-
? cios de Venezuela, told The
? Associated Press on Thurs-

? day that “no ingredient of

? Coca-Cola Zero is harmful

? to peoples’ health.” But the

? company is complying with

? Venezuela’s ban and has

? begun halting production,

i? she said.

_ Mexico candidate:
- Drug gangs contact
“all hopefuls

â„¢ MEXICO CITY

A RULING party may-

? oral candidate in Mexico’s

? richest city told his support-
? ers that drug traffickers have
? contacted all leading politi-

? cal contenders in the country
? seeking their loyalty ahead

? of congressional and local

? elections next month,

? according to the Associated

i Press.

Mauricio Fernandez’s dis-

? cussion with a group of sup-
? porters in a suburb of Mon-
? terrey —a leaked recording
? of which was broadcast

? throughout Mexico on Fri-

? day — is a remarkably frank
? description of how the brutal
? gangs try to control political
? leaders, which is a key con-

? cern of President Felipe

? Calderon in his fight against
? drug cartels.

The candidate also

i acknowledged that the Bel-
? tran Levya cartel controls

? drug smuggling in his city of
? San Pedro Garza and sug-

? gested that as mayor he

? would avoid confronting the
i gang to maintain peace,

? comments that undermined
i Calderon’s drive to show

? that the government and his
? National Action Party, or

i PAN, are tough on orga-

? nized crime.

Fernandez’s campaign was

? thrown into turmoil by the
? recording, but he stood by

? the comments, saying he was
? merely telling the truth. He
? denied meeting with any

? traffickers during this cam-
? paign and said he rejected

i efforts by gangsters to buy
? his loyalty when he ran

? unsuccessfully for governor
? of Nuevo Leon state six

i years ago.

“Tam stating the reality

i that my city is living,” Fer-
? nandez told MVS Radio. “I
? don’t have any reason to

? hide it.”

PAN had no immediate

? comment on the recording,
? nor was it clear how the gov-
? ernment would react.

Calderon has acknowl-

: edged that corrupt police

? and elected officials are a

? major obstacle in his fight

? with organized crime. Feder-
? al forces last month arrested
? 10 mayors in the president’s

? home state of Michoacan for
? alleged drug gang ties.




PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Economy sparks child abuse hike C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.164SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY WITH S TORMS HIGH 88F LOW 79F N E W S M INISTER PLEDGES TO ADDRESS RECENT CONCERNS S P O R T S Lands and Surveys Bahamas struggles past Haiti Clean Up Tough PROGRESS N E W S Fears of further court backlog ‘TSUNAMI CRISIS’ T HE economic downturn is putting the lives and welfare of the nation’s children in mortal d anger, new statistics have revealed. Authorities have revealed a m ajor hike in the number of attempted suicides as well as incidences of physical and sex u al abuse among school-age youngsters this year. Of particular concern is a rise in the number of primary schoolc hildren who attempted suicide in April, with teachers flagging up 10 cases. Assistant director of the Department of Social Service’s School Welfare Division, Lorraine Duvalier, claimed a rise in the number of struggling and frustrated parents physically a busing their children may have contributed to the increase in suicidal thoughts. M rs Duvalier said: “Kids are a lso being affected by the downturn. Parents are lashing out at them. Fathers or other figures are abusing sons, and some of them feel like they just can’t take it anymore.” Physical abuse is defined by S ocial Services as any abuse that leaves “visible” or physical injuries on the child’s body i ncluding fractures, bruises, scratches or other wounds. A total of 16 attempted suicide cases were brought to the attention of her department by teachers in New Providence schools within the first four months of 2009, with April see ing more cases than the first three months combined. Cases were spread throughout the school system, not focused at anyone or few institutions, and involved both girls and boys. While the April leap may have led officials to conclude that matters were worsening, officials note that May fortunately saw a major decline with no attempted suicide cases reported to the School Welfare division. This after the division received no reports of suicidal students in the whole of 2008. Meanwhile, the number of attempted suicide cases and suspected abuse cases made known to the division is just a fraction of those recorded by the Department of Social Services as a whole, The Tribune was informed. However, an attempt to ascertain the total number of cases recorded throughout the Department was unsuccessful yesterday. According to Mrs Duvalier, signs of suicidal tendencies are often recognised by vigilant teachers who have years of experience with what is “nor mal” and “unusual” student behaviour. Students have been known to write notes implying their suicidal mental state, tell friends who inform teachers, make their intentions known to a school guidance counsellor, exhibit “self-destructive” behaviour or Do wntur n ‘endang ering their welfar The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com New school abuse probe n B y ALISONLOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net E E m m p p l l o o y y e e e e p p u u t t o o n n l l e e a a v v e e AN employee of the North Eluethera High School has been placed on administrative leave after allegations that hem ade sexual advances to female students. W hile police and education o fficials yesterday confirmed there was an active investiga tion, they did not divulge d etails surrounding the alleged advances. "There is an investigation going on, we have been look-i ng into this matter. I believe a person may have been taken into custody but I am unable t o say anything further until early next week," said head of the Family Island District, Assistant Commissioner H ulan Hanna. A parent of a student at the school claimed the employee allegedly showed several female students reported to be at least three students pornographic material and " touched them inappropriately." n ByTANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net Murder accused charged T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEE page 6 SEE page 6 THE search for two miss ing Andros boys continued yesterday without revealing any obvious leads to their whereabouts. Police Superintendent in charge of the Family Islands, Hulan Hanna, said the search would continue but there was nothing of sig nificance to report, as the status of the investigation remains the same. Brothers Deangelo Clarke, nine, and Marcelo Clarke, five, disappeared while crabbing in South Andros on Tuesday evening. Worry set in when they did not return to their grandparents’ house after nightfall. Police officers from the Kemp’s Bay police station were alerted and joined relatives in their search on Wednesday morning. Local residents and MANDRELL Adderley, 28, was yesterday charged with the May 11 murder of 27 year-old Vernon Rolle, who was found opposite the Blue Hill Road Community Clinic with a stab wound to the chest. Adderley is due back in court on June 18. FREEPORT – A social worker claims that while the nation was focused on the Eight Mile Rock High School, where two teachers have been accused of sexually abusing students, “quite a few” reported cases of child molestation have surfaced at two other government schools on Grand Bahama. According to an abuse counsellor, the alleged incidents occurred at the Jack Hayward and St Georges’ High Schools in Freeport. Bee Butler, founder of No More Victims Out reach Association in Freeport, claims her organ isation has been seeing a number of sexual molestation cases involving students. “It is sad that there are so many molestation incidents occurring in our society, especially now in our schools,” Ms Butler said. “We have been dealing with a lot of victims who have been molested. Young boys are sexually molesting young girls in the schools. “There have been quite a few incidents and the most recent occurred two days ago when a young girl was molested in school by a male student.” Ms Butler said the girl’s mother has reported the matter to the police. According to reports, it is alleged that a 16year-old male student forcibly held the girl down and assaulted her. Ms Butler, who was also a victim of incest as a child, said she formed the organisation because she wanted to help other victims of abuse. Grand Bahama police are still investigating alleged molestation incidents at the Eight Mile Rock High School. Complaints have been filed against three teach ers at the school. All have been removed pending the outcome of investigations. Teacher Andre Birbal, who fled the country in February, was arrested in New York, USA, on a Reports of tourist rape THE Tribune received reports last night that a tourist was raped in Nassau on Thursday. The police confirmed they had received reports of a sexual assault, but would offer no further details about the matter. n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Staff Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net Search for brothers continues n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net SEE page 6 ‘Quite a few’ abuse claims in two Fr eeport schools SEE page 6 JOHN Bull owner Frederick Hazelwood, well known engi neer George Cox and long-time Special Olympics organiser Basil Christie were among those named in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List last night. Mr Hazelwood will be made a Companion of the Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George (CMG vice to the business community in the Bahamas”. Mr Cox will receive the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (OBE and dedicated service in the field of civil and structural engineering in the Bahamas. Mr Christie is awarded the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (MBE “outstanding contribution to the development of The Bahamas in the areas of community service, education, religion and Special Olympics”. Bahamians named in Queen’ s Honours

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS PAGE 2, SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE INDEX MAIN/SPOR TS SECTION Local News ............................. P1,2,3,5,6,7,12 Editorial/Letters..........................................P4 Comics ........................................................ P8 Sports .................................................... P9,10 W eather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n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net R ELATIVES and friends of the late Milo Butler Jr are mourning the loss of a dedicated father, friend and politician f ollowing his unexpected death o n Wednesday at age 72. The former Speaker of the House, MP for Pinewood, and son of the country’s first governor general Sir Milo Butler, had suffered an aneurysm and t wo strokes in recent years and family members say his health had greatly deteriorated since then. M r Butler followed in his father’s footsteps to forge a successful political career andm ake a significant contribution t o the shaping of the country t hroughout his adult life. The sixth of Sir Milo’s 10 c hildren served as chairman of t he PLP in 1968, going on to take up a seat in the Senate the following year, and then b ecoming vice-president of the S enate for five years. H e was then appointed the first consul general for the B ahamas in Florida in 1974, b efore returning to Nassau to run for parliament in 1977. The ambitious politician was p romptly voted in as MP for Pinewood and retained his seat until 1992, becoming Deputy Speaker of the House ofA ssembly in 1987 and Speaker o f the House in 1991 during his 15-year term. Mr Butler also served as chairman of the Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BECt he Gaming Board. W hen he was unsuccessful in the 1992 general election, Mr Butler resumed work in the family business Milo Butler and Sons Ltd. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham expressed his sym p athy to Mr Butler’s family on W ednesday, paying tribute to his life of service. M r Ingraham said: “The pinnacle of his political career was his service as Speaker of the House of Assembly, a position which he occupied with dignitya nd grace. He maintained friendships with, and earned the respect o f, persons across the political spectrum. He was a great Bahamian gentleman and an ation-builder. “My colleagues in the gove rnment join Delores and me in extending heartfelt condolences to the Butler family.” Mr Butler’s niece Loretta B utler-Turner, Minister of State for Social Development, said her uncle helped inspire her own political career. She said: “He was one of the individuals in our family that I w ould have followed in his footsteps in terms of political c ontribution. He was my uncle, and we are a very close family so this is a great loss to us.” M r Butler Jr is survived by his wife Winifred Butler, 65, five children, two daughtersi n-law and seven grandchildren. H is daughter Bernadette Butler, 39, a lawyer in the Attorney General’s office, r emembers her father as a popular man who lived life to the full. S he said: “My father was full of fun. He loved life, He did everything he wanted to do, and he had a very good sense of humour. He was always holding dinners at the house, and was entertaining friends. “He was a very well-liked person and he had a lot of friends.” H er father always strived to do his best, Miss Butler said, as his motto was: Good, bet ter, best – never let it rest until the good is better, and the better best. “He lived by that,” she said. “That was his thing, to a lways be the best you can be. “He was a good man, he was a great Bahamian, and he made a contribution to the development of the Bahamas as we know it.” M r Butler was also a devoted m ember of the parish at St Matthew’s Anglican Church on Shirley Street. Funeral arrangements have not yet been made. Family and friends honour n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net ALL specialty clinics at the Pr incess Margaret Hospital remained closed yesterday on the fifth day of industrial action staged by public health nurses across the country. The nurses began their sickout on Monday morning over government decisions to with hold their four per cent pay rise this year and postpone a health insurance plan until 2012. Around 50 per cent of nursing staff at public clinics across the Bahamas participated in the sick-out on Monday and Tuesday. And although nearly all nurs ing staff returned to the Rand Memorial Hospital in Freeport on Wednesday, disruption continued at the busy Princess Margaret Hospital for the fifth day yesterday as public health nurses pressed on with the sickout. PMH announced yesterday that all specialty clinics, includ ing the surgical, medical and paediatric clinics remained closed. All non-emergency surgeries continue to be postponed, apart from those scheduled for visitors from the Family Islands. However the hospital did open the oncology clinic, dialysis clinic, maternity high risk clinic, comprehensive clinic and general practice clinic yester day. Patients are advised to only attend the hospital in a med ical emergency. If you are not sure whether you have a medical emergency call 326-7014, 502-7812 or 919. Patients scheduled for surgical procedures should call their doctor or call 322-2861 extension 3149. For all general inquiries call the number above, or 5027890/1. Nurses continue with fifth day of sick-out Milo Butler Jr. M ILO B utler Junior with a young Hubert Ingraham outside the Houseo f Assembly in 1986. SENATOR Milo Butler J unior at the Mental H ealth Week panel Discussion in 1974.

PAGE 3

CUTS in funding for the Attorney General’s Office will only contribute to a backlog of c ourt cases that have already reached “tsunami crisis” level, according to Cat Island, Rum C ay and San Salvador MP and attorney Philip Davis. Mr Davis made this allega t ion in parliament as he criti cised the way in which government has allocated funds to various ministries, departments anda gencies in the 2009/2010 bud get. Noting decreases in the t ourism budget – down by $12 million – as well as cuts at crim inal justice agencies – including t he police, the Attorney Gen eral’s Office, and the judiciary – Mr Davis charged that government is “aimless.” “It is clear, Mr Speaker, that this is not the time to take resources away from our crime fighting agencies. With cuts to these agencies, it seems as if the government has abandoned its fundamental duty to protect the Bahamian people. Mr. Speaker, what results should Bahami ans expect from agencies with fewer resources? Expect more for less, when more has continually produced less? “Certainly, Mr Speaker, Bahamians will not get better investigations from the police, or more cases being brought before the courts by the Attor ney General’s Office, with fewer resources,” he said. In his budget communication, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham cautioned that below expected government revenue last year – $260 million less than projected – and increased demand on government services means the government must exercise “expenditure restraint” and maximise the collection of monies due to it in this year’s budget if the country is to come through the crisis without having to make sacrifices in terms of living standards and the pro vision of essential services. Mr Ingraham said govern ment made some “difficult decisions” when preparing the bud get – including cuts to critical areas and the delay of certain outlays, for example the nurses’ health insurance benefit that days later resulted in an ongoing sick-out that is crippling the health care system. Despite Hubert Ingraham’s e fforts to justify the decisions taken, the budget debate saw various opposition members, including Mr Davis, suggest that cuts to particular areas – including education, tourism and crime fighting agencies – sim ply cannot be countenanced. Mr Davis, as an experienced attorney, noted that the country already suffers from a shortage of judges, courts and judicial support staff to “service a mod ern Bahamas.” “Our police force still does not have the modern forensics lab it so desperately needs to quickly examine evidence. And the Attorney General’s Office is inadequately organised to deal with the volume of cases it has to prosecute. “Yet the government in its wisdom decided that now is the time to cut the budgets of these agencies along with that of the prison and the Defence Force,” said Mr Davis. This, as the government has made “little to no impact” on the crime problem since coming to office in May 2007, he claimed. Meanwhile, the MP called for government to release up-todate statistics on conviction rates for violent crimes – figures which would show the “success rate” of various law enforcement agencies. While crediting the Minister of National Security for regularly releasing crime statistics, Mr Davis said such releases should also involve conviction data. “We have no idea what the current backlog is in the Supreme Court. Throughout the rest of the year, we do not know how many criminal cases t he AG’s Office brings to court on a monthly basis. We also do not know how many criminalc ases come in for prosecution a t the Supreme Court level every month. “We can only infer and make a ssumptions about the backlog from the crime and detection statistics,” he added. Measures will be taken to “clean up” and restore public c onfidence in the Department of Lands and Surveys, Minister of State Byron Woodside told parliament. This comes after the departm ent was rocked by allegations of corruption centering on theg ranting of numerous plots of Crown land to close relatives and friends of then director of the department, Tex Turnquest, some of which were soon after re-sold for hundreds of thousands of dollars. M r Turnquest stepped down following the publication of several reports in The Tribune outl ining the land controversy and t he allegations. C ontributing to the 2009/2010 budget debate on Thursday e vening, Mr Woodside gave some mixed signals about exactly how the department per-c eives the allegations, stating both that a “preliminary review” indicated that “nothing untoward” occurred, and later that the corruption claims led the department to take the “painful decision” to “take then ecessary measures” to “clean up” and restore public confid ence. H e said: “During the past few weeks the Department of Lands and Surveys has come under much public scrutiny. While no system is perfect and persons may feel aggrieved byd ecisions made within various areas of the public service, I must take this opportunity to advise that all Bahamians have the right to apply for Crown land, including public officers and their families. However there are guidel ines that are to be followed in the review of applications by public officers, especially those who are retiring or have retired.” Mr Woodside added that “family members of public officers employed at the Depart-m ent of Lands and Surveys, who wish to secure land for res idential and commercial use” m ay also apply. “There is no skullduggery. However, the public’s percep-t ion has been that these people m ay have been given preferent ial treatment,” he noted. Mr Woodside stated that this entire issue is currently under review”, declaring that “preliminary reports do noti ndicate that anything untoward occurred relative to the application process.” The issue of Crown land and l and policy, and the revelations about the granting of land to Mr Turnquest’s relatives, was mentioned by several opposition members during the course of the budget debate. M P for West End and Bimini Obie Wilchcombe said during h is contribution that he is “part icularly concerned” about the land scandal that he “heard about a few weeks ago.” “I’m also concerned about who owns all this land, and whether the politicians haveC rown land as well. I know I don’t. But I am trying to figure it out – because I need to know how that happened. I still don’t understand that and somebody has to explain that to us,” he said. P LP chairman Glenys Hann a-Martin had previously stated that the situation warranted the formation of a new land policy, while MP for Fox Hill Fred Mitchell called for a select committee to examine how and to whom Crown land has been granted. M r Woodside noted that t here have been a number of changes at the Department of Lands and Surveys during the past four months. These include: Richard Hardy being named as the act-i ng director of Lands and Surveys; Brian Bynoe being recently employed as the acting surveyor general; the identification of five certified surveyors to augment the land management unit; a review of plans to maket he department more customer s ervice friendly; the placement of restrictions on the unfettered access of private persons to certain areas in the department; and greater focus being placed on human resources and administrative needs. F OUR million dollars has b een allocated in this year’s budget for the construction of a new straw market, the estimated total cost of which is $10 million. Bidding for the contract to construct the market is e xpected to be finished by August 21, 2009 and construction is scheduled to go ahead at the end of September 2009 and last 16 to 18m onths. According to Works Mini ster Neko Grant, project architect Patrick Rahming was awarded a contract to design the market in December 2008. Mr Rahming’s design plan has not yet been completed, however Mr Grant suggestedd uring his contribution to the budget debate that they should be ready within the w eek. C onsequently, preparations a re being made to begin the tendering process. Government has increased funding for the “further development” of the Fish Fry areasi n both New Providence and Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama from $100,000 to $500,000 in this year’s budget. “We remain cognisant of the important value of other a spects of Bahamian culture t o our tourism product and the need for regular mainte nance and upgrading of infras tructure at these sites as required,” Minister of Works Neko Grant told parliament, a s he contributed to the 2009/2010 budget debate. THIS budget year will see the Paradise Bridge Authority undertake “preliminary work” to determine the extento f works required for the repair of the Paradise Island Bridge, according to the Min-i ster of Works. Neko Grant said this work will be comprised of “investi gations and repair design.” C ontributing to the 2009/2010 budget debate, Mr Grant noted that the intro-d uction of a “token-less” sys tem at the Paradise Island Bridge in the 2008/2009 bud-g et year is expected to reduce t he Bridge Authority’s expenses by approximately $122,000 a year. “In this regard, savings should be realised as a result of cost reduction in machinery maintenance,” he added. Seeking to mitigate Nassau’s flooding issues, the government has issued contracts worth $641,200 for the cleaning and maintenance of 834 wells and 664 associated catch pits, the Minister of Works said yesterday. Meanwhile, a Drainage Master Plan study is being conducted by his ministry, which is anticipated to provide a framework for how maintenance of the drainage system can be more effective ly monitored and managed, he said. “During the recent precipi tation, the wells in the heavily trafficked areas and the areasof high population density were the ones that experienced some blockage. “It was discovered that litter had blocked the inlet grates and the screen baskets. To mitigate any recurrence of such events, we adopted a proactive approach by instructing the contractors to clean the screen baskets and the grates outside of their nor mal routine,” said Mr Grant. “Two contracts totalling $325,000 were awarded for the re-drilling of 80 drainage wells which were identified from the past maintenance contract. “This programme also includes the installation of 15 new drainage wells in the spe cific areas which were assessed and found to be in need of drainage wells,” the minister said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009, PAGE 3 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW .(5/,1(-867,/,(1 RI0$&.(<675((71$66$8%$+$0$6 3%R[66 LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOH IRU1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQ QDWXUDOL]DWLRQDVFLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDW DQ\SHUVRQZKRNQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQ QDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOGVHQG ZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQWZHQW\ HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH WKGD\ RI -XQH WR WKH 0LQLVWHU UHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3%R[ $4m allocated for work on Straw Market Contracts to aid flood fight Assessment of repair work to PI Bridge Funding boost for Fish Frys In brief Minister pledges Lands and Surveys ‘clean-up’ n B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net n B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net Byron Woodside Cuts will exacerbate court ‘tsunami crisis’ PHILIPDavis

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EDITOR, The Tribune B y condoning and even attempting to celebrate the disorderly behaviour by one of its members of parliament, the PLP leaders have demonstrated o nce again that they are incapable of bringing discipline to bear on their members. I n fact, the leadership has s hown that they are just as much infected with that old familiar attitude of entitlement as the rest of them. They miss e very opportunity to demons trate otherwise. A fter Mrs. Glenys Hanna Martin's disorderly behaviour in the House, they should have r ebuked her, or at least priv ately urged her to desist and apologise to the Speaker. I nstead, both Perry Christie and Bernard Nottage aided and abetted her in deliberately and persistently breaking the rules of the House. I n attempting to justify Mrs. Martin's behaviour, Mr. Christie p assionately reminded Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham how he (Mr. Ingraham week ago asked for permission to go back on the agenda. B ut Mr. Christie was making the point without getting the p oint. Mr. Ingraham asked! He a sked for the consent of memb ers. He did not demand. He d id not say he was going back with or without permission. He asked, Mr. Christie! Mrs. Martin didn't do that. S he failed to give notice. Then s he demanded to be heard out of order. Then she refused to sit down when the Speakera sked her to. Then she refused to leave the chamber when asked to. Then the next day she t ried to gain entrance to the H ouse when she knew she was s uspended. Dr. Nottage did his own politi cal credibility a disservice in preventing the carrying out of a lawful order by a lawful author-i ty when he obstructed the Police in the House in full view of the television cameras. Then he returned to the House and launched an attack o n the Speaker during his budget contribution. Dr. Nottage knows or should know that youd on't do that. The Speaker s hould only be criticised on a substantive motion. The PLP seem to think that because Speaker Alvin Smith i s a soft-spoken mild-mannered m an that they can intimidate h im and run over him. That's a bad miscalculation. Speaker Smith has obviously f amiliarized himself with the r ules. He is an excellent Speaker, one who is dignified but s trong. He deserves the support and gratitude of the Bahamian people. T HANKFUL Nassau, J une 11, 2009 C M Y K C M Y K E DITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., ( Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt . P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising A dvertising Manager (242 Circulation Department (242 Nassau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 Freeport fax: (242 WEBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm WASHINGTON Federal Reserve C hairman Ben Bernanke sounded like a fiscal Paul Revere last week, warning Congress about the dangers of an advancing army of debt. B ernanke said policymakers need a bold plan to correct the deficit or else face dire consequences. Our “near-term challenges must not be allowed to hinder timely cons ideration of the steps needed to address fis cal imbalances. Unless we demonstrate a strong commitment to fiscal sustainability in the longer term, we will have neither financial s tability nor healthy economic growth.” H e’s not alone. The Congressional Budget Office and private forecasters share thesew orries. Concern about the president’s han d ling of the deficit and debt are also spreading to the general public. While 67 per cent approve of Obama’s job performance overall, only 45 per cent of Americans approve of O bama’s handling of federal spending, and 46 per cent of his handling of the federal budget deficit, according to a new Gallup poll. The White House is a lot better at dealing with public criticism than balancing the budget. Earlier this week Obama called for restoration of “pay as you go” (PAYGO rules to curb the mounting debt, which means any new spending would be offset by otherc uts or tax increases. But it may be too little, t oo late, according to Sen. Kent Conrad, DN.D., chairman of the Senate Budget Com mittee. He told ABC News, the plan “does not address the deficits and debt projected under existing policy.” For now, the White House’s posture of periodically genuflecting to the altar of d eficits while conducting a revival of new s pending at least makes political sense. The new president campaigned on a platform of change and activism. His instincts and ideology lead him to larger government. Large m ajorities in Congress further empower his goals. His liberal backers waited at least eight years for this moment. Truly promoting fiscal austerity at this moment in time is like ordering rice cakes at a steakhouse. But Obama may have a broader ambition. He wants to be Ronald Reagan in reverse. Running up the debt, creating a host of new budgetary com mitments and enlarging the government’s role in the economy will take generations to unwind. And the engines of bigger govern ment also require fuel in the form of taxes. Reagan did the opposite. He cut taxes to make government expansion harder. Obama is transposing Reagan. He is growing government to make future tax cuts more difficult. True, Obama promised tax cuts to 95 per cent of Americans. That leaves a small per centage of individuals and businesses to bear the burden. Based on budget forecasts and other White House policy proposals, his math seems fuzzy. M aybe most Americans won’t pay higher federal income taxes for the time being, but Obama’s plans to enlarge the federal government could mean higher out-of-pocket c osts for individuals and businesses due to legislation ranging from climate change to health care reform. Further, Democrats in Congress are determ ined to outbid even Obama in federaliz ing more programmes. For example, buried in the energy bill the House will consider in upcoming weeks is a provision giving the fede ral government new powers over local build i ng codes, according to a recent Washington Post editorial. And based on the Democrat-i c majority’s plans in a host of other areas, t here is a lot more to come. But one thing is clear: tax cuts don’t fit into the White House’s long-term fiscal picture. Liberal budget experts already argue t hat, given the grim fiscal realities, cutting taxes would be “irresponsible.” How can we reduce revenues given all our obligations anda sea of red ink? Many still think Obama will pivot at some point and get serious about the deficit. But new federal programmes and regulations develop stakeholders and interest group support. Like dandelions, they tend to multiplyr ather than go away on their own. And the p resident’s PAYGO gambit won’t make much of a difference either. Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, said the plan is a “fig leaf to appease those who say they support fiscal discipline but continue to vote for more spending.” Finding fuel for new economic growth is O bama’s larger challenge. Reducing the tax b urden is more than just ideological symbolism; it’s an important tool to propel economic growth. With an enlarged public sector, and tax cuts off the table, we run the risk of enteri ng a fiscal death spiral: a sluggish economy means shrinking tax revenues, producing even larger deficits and debt. Financing these growing obligations also means higher interest rates, which hampers economic growth even more. It’s hard to see how the current path doesn’t lead to higher taxes to close budgetary gaps, which again, isa reverse Reagan outcome. Reagan believed tax cuts served not only as a stimulus for economic growth, but as a tool to keep the size of the federal government in check. Obama is trying the antithesis. By growing the size and reach of Washington he makes tax cuts seem like an impossible dream truly a nightmare for those who agree with Ronald Reagan’s belief that a bloated federal leviathan is inconsistent with both fiscal stability and economic growth. (This article was written by Gary Andresc. 2009 Hearst Newspapers). PLPleaders miss point yet again LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Obama is the opposite of Reagan 7KH3XEOLFLVKHUHE\DGYLVHGWKDW 3$11<$1'5(5 &223(5 LQWHQGWRFKDQJHQDPHWR 3(11< $1'5(5&223(5 ,IWKHUHDUHDQ\REMHFWLRQVWRWKLV FKDQJHRIQDPH'HHG3ROO\RXPD\ZULWHVXFK REMHFWLRQVWRWKH&KLHI3DVVSRUW2IFHU3 1DVVDX%DKDPDVQRODWHUWKDQWKLUW\GD\VDIWHUWKH GDWHRISXEOLFDWLRQRIWKLVQRWLFH EDITOR, The Tribune. T he Opposition displayed complete contempt for the police when they prevented an officer from carrying out his duty in the House last Wednesday. N ot only did they defy the Speaker, but they rendered the p oliceman impotent in a very public and humiliating way, and put themselves above the law. What’s even more shocking is the former national security m inister took part in the debacle. If the Opposition wanted to talk about the very sad death of a 15 year old in prison, they should have called a press confer-e nce after it became clear both sides wouldn’t give consent to s ideline the Budget exercise. They did not need the protec tion of Parliamentary privilege to say what they had to say. If they’re clever, they can raise the matter when they speak i n the Budget debate. Or, they can put it on the agenda to deal with at a later date. The whole episode was ridiculous and there are better ways t o score political brownie points. If the opposition can do their own thing and thumb their nose at authority, why shouldn’t the public? Their behaviour typifies the tragedy of the Bahamas. No wonder we live in a lawless society. ATHENA DAMIANOS Nassau, June 8, 2009 House uproar epitomises why the Bahamas is lawless society EDITOR, The Tribune. W hen we were kids there seemed to be a game of some sort on most days marbles,s pin the top, "rounders", rug by, etc. In most of these games there was usually someone who decided that the rules that hadb een agreed the day before did not suit him on that particular day, usually because he was not w inning by the established rules so he wanted to change them. I was reminded of those days when I read The Tribune T hursday morning and was shocked, but not surprised, to learn that MP Glenys Hanna-M artin created an uproar in Parliament because she wanted to "raise an issue of public importance." She was denied t his opportunity because the rules state that she was required to have previously served noticei n Parliament that she intended to bring up the matter. She was asked to take her seat and she refused to do so. That too is not surprising. The real shock followed when the Speaker asked the Sergeant-atArms to remove her from the House and the other members on her side of the House surrounded her to prevent the police from doing their duty. Can we really be surprised when so many young Bahamians believe that the rules apply to everyone else except them? Most of us can recall a simi lar "incident of shame" in 1965, which again proves the old adage that "the fruit does not fall far from the tree." SIDNEY SWEETING, DDS Nassau, June 11, 2009 Breaking the rules to suit

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DECLARING it one of the most important causes on the national agenda, Scotiabank (Bahamasf or two years to support the revitalisation of historic Nassau. The funds will support the D owntown Nassau Partnership, the public-private board charged with overseeing am ajor transformation and revitalisation of the Bay Street area. “Scotiabank is proud to part n er with the Downtown Nassau Partnership in the effort to preserve and revitalise historic Nassau, a matter we consider one oft he most significant on the national agenda,” said Barry J Malcolm, managing director. “Scotiabank’s commitment to downtown Nassau has been part of our history since the firstS cotiabank branch at Bay and Frederick Street opened a little more than 50 years ago. “Today, our Bahamas head quarters remain in the heart of the city on Rawson Square and we have another branch at number one Bay Street. We have watched this city with its unique architecture and natural beauty flourish and we have watched its decline, but we know that this is a typical pat t ern for downtown and we believe that the many efforts over recent years have paved the way for what we believe will b e a true transformation. We are excited about this effort and proud to be part of it.” C o-chair of the Nassau Tourism Development Board Charles Klonaris said: “Ther evitalisation of downtown Nassau would not be possible without the support of private sector stakeholders like Scotiabank. With their continued support and with government’s contin u ing commitment, the city will be revived, restored and renewed for the betterment of residents and visitors alike.” R ecent steps toward revitali sation include the enactment of the City of Nassau Revitalisa-t ion Act, 2008; the creation of the DNP and appointment of its managing director VaughnR oberts; and the selection of local architect Jackson Burnside to prepare a master plan for phase one of the improvements. Plans are also underway to m ove commercial shipping out of the heart of the city and conduct a major harbour dredging exercise. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009, PAGE 5 " I vex because of all these mammoth sized craters – not pot holes, craters – which seem to be popping up all over Nassau causing me to almost bust my tyre one night!I mean, I drive at the speed l imit but when it dark and you can't see these canyons it's a driving and safety hazard! I scared my bumper ga fall off or my tyre ga bust because of the slackness going on in the s treets. " Even the prime minister said these ditches in the middle of the road got to go – them people at Ministry of Works need to get it together before they cause serious i njury or damage to people c ars man." –Concerned Driver "I vex at these health-care p rofessionals who have the nerve to have a sick-out when our country is in a finan-c ial crisis! I understand that youw ant health insurancea nd other b enefits but there are a lot of p eople who ain' got no i nsurance, o r job, or paycheck to take home at night. "I think i t is very selfish of these nurses to put people's health at risk – they could have had demonstrations on their lunch h our, or when they off-duty and still go to work to serve the public. I bet these samep eople would be hot mad or worse if when they need surgery, the doctors tell them:' No, we on strike'. I say bring in more of them Filipinos let them tend to our sick, cause these people ain't serious." Sick and tired "I am vex because of one s tory in another paper where persons are trying to eliminate the constitutional budgetarya llocated educational grant of s ome $500 per each Bahamian private school student while the government school stud ent is allotted some $3,000. As a parent of a private school student, I sacrifice to pay feest o assist my child, country and government in providing a diverse, competitive, academ i c, religious, enriching environment to bring forth future Bahamian citizens and to employ teachers and personnel in both private and government schools. " My taxes go to pay for t eachers, personnel, equipment and premises in both private and $2,500 extra for government schools, and it is discriminatory for government in a constitutional budget alloc ation to treat my private s chool Bahamian student less than that of a Bahamian government school student – especially using my taxes!" Vex Voter. " I vex because I received a v ery disturbing e-mail at work concerning Miss Bahamas Universe. It was a picture of Miss (Kiaras he was crowned with the runners-up behind her. To my chagrin and complete disgust, thep hoto had been doc tored to l engthen the split in her dressu pward. " It takes a hell of a lot of c ourage for young ladies top articipate i n pageants, not to mention the time spent g rooming of not just their outward appearances but also of their characters in preparation for the pageant. These ladies a spire to represent our country, the Bahamas, as best they can. While Miss Sherman wasn ot my choice for Miss Bahamas Universe, I com mend her and the other par t icipants nonetheless. "Our fellow Bahamians claim to have national pride but that pride has been loste ach time a Bahamian brother or sister sent that despicable email on to a few others! Miss S herman can now be considered a National Symbol, to which a certain amount ofh onour should be given. S hame on you Bahamas!" Disappointed and Disgusted! Are you vex? Send your c omplaints to whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net or fax them to 328-2398. Immigration policy paper is completed T HE Immigration Departm ent has completed a policy paper on the transit of persons across Bahamian borders, Minister of State for Immigration Branville McCartney told parliament. T he document also deals with p ersons intending to work and remain in the country, and addresses the need for change in the Department, Mr McCart-n ey said during debate on the national budget. “The paper, once approved by Cabinet, will be easily read,” he said. “It will bring clarity to the many questionable concerns and address all those areas oftend eemed ambiguous and vague.” The budget for the Immigra tion Department is $15,607,472 f or fiscal year 2009-2010. “Improved and outstanding customer service is a priority oft he new mandate given to the n ew directorate,” said Mr McCartney. “In recent months, the department has given much a ttention to this area.” He said plans are underway t o devise a plan of action to effectively address customer service. It will provide for the training and retraining of staff, identifi-c ation of customer friendly employees to deal with the public, and reconfiguration of customer service areas. “It is imperative that the department reconfigure its offices so as to deal effectivelyw ith customers’ needs,” said Mr M cCartney. It is envisaged that during fiscal year beginning July 1, adjustments will be made to the interior of the Hawkins Hill building to allow better customer ser v ice, he said. Plans are also underway for m ajor developments at the F reeport, Grand Bahama office. The department plans to launch its website this September. The public will be able to d ownload application forms and d eal with other matters online. Education and public relations are the tools that will keep the public informed,” MrM cCartney said. “Therefore brochures and pamphlets are being designed for publicationw hich will keep readers and a pplicants abreast and knowledgeable about the department.” Scotiabank aids downtown revival B RANVILLE MCCARTNEY Website to launch during September W HYYOU V EX ?

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE These claims were neither c onfirmed nor denied by ACP Hanna yesterday. A police source on the island s aid the suspect is not accused o f having sex with any of the s tudents. "(The employee v iewed in reference to making sexual advances towards some students," said the source. A ccording to reports from t he island, at least one of the students involved in the case reported the allegations to a school official earlier this week who informed Ministry of Education officials in Nassau. E ducation Director Lionel Sands said he was apprised of the police investigation on T hursday and immediately p laced the suspect on leave, pending the results of the police p robe. "The Ministry is waiting for the conclusion of the police investigation but until then the( suspect) has been placed on administration leave," he told The Tribune. W hen asked to confirm the details surrounding the allegedi ncidents, Mr Sands said he c ould not as he was "awaiting f ull details from the district s uperintendent." The concerned parent who c ontacted The Tribune said m any parents in the Lower B ogue area were fuming over t he allegations and were disappointed that the matter had not been reported to the press. The parent claimed the e mployee was suspended from t he school around two weeks ago. P olice were said to have interviewed more than a dozen students at the high school over the past few days. It is unclear when, or if, the suspect will be charged with an offence. School Principal Sheena Dun c ombe said she was not prepared to make a statement on the allegations but confirmed t he employee was not at the school. e ven be caught physically harming themselves. Once at-risk children are i dentified, Social Services steps in, calling on the children and their parents to attend the department’s Community Counselling and Assessment Centre. “We don’t play when it comes to these things. Any sign is taken very seriously,” said Mrs Duvalier. The assistant director said that once the situation is revealed to children’s parents, the majority are “very concerned” although in many cases still unwilling to make a link between their own behavioura nd their child’s condition. Once assessment has been undertaken, the children w ith the permission of their par e nts are admitted to the Sandilands Rehabilitation Cen tre to undergo further treatment. How long they remain in the institution depends on the severity of each individual case. Once released, they continue to be monitored in school. Social Services officials also work with parents to “help them realise the part they play” in their children’s trauma. “So far we haven’t had repeat cases,” said Mrs Duvalier. Defence Frece officers joined the search, and dog units weref lown in from Nassau. But after three days of searching, there has been no sign of the missing youngsters. Dangelo lives in Andros with h is grandparents, and his younger brother Marcelo, who lives in Nassau with his parents, was visiting when the children went missing. A nyone who may have any i nformation about the missing brothers should call Crime Stoppers immediately on 328TIPS (8477 All calls are free and confidential. traffic violation in May. He is wanted by police for questioning in connection with alleged unnatural sexual intercourse with two former male students. The Attorney General’s Office is working with US authorities to have Birbal extradited to the Bahamas. FROM page one Parent fury on abuse claims FROM page one Defence Force joins missing boys searches FROM page one FROM page one Child abuse cases incr ease Alleged abuse at other Grand Bahama schools As part of its efforts to achieve complete literacy in the Bahamas, Project Read Bahamas has launched a computer lab and related reading programme. F ounded in 1991 by the Rotary Club of East Nassau, Project Read has helped more than 1,000 Bahamians join the w orld of the functionally liter ate, free of charge. Donated by Sunshine Comp any Holdings Ltd, Project Read Bahamas’ computer lab boasts 10 computers in cubicles,i nternet access and headphones for privacy. The project’s directors say the computer lab is a particularly important milestone, as it allows them to offer the Computer Aided Literacy (CALSg ramme. CALS not only addresses reading issues but also provides math tutoring as well, allowing s tudents the rare opportunity to read, learn math skills and become computer literate at thes ame time. Brian Moodie, Rotary Club president and chairman of Pro j ect Read Bahamas’ board of directors, said he is extremely grateful for Sunshine’s generous donation. “Sunshine Holdings was more than pleased to assist the people of the Bahamas in theirq uest for literacy and encour ages more corporate citizens to donate to Project Read Bahamas as it provides an e ssential service to the coun try’s development,” he said. He noted that with an estim ated one in four Bahamians unable to read well enough to function properly in society,P roject Read Bahamas performs a “vital service” by providing a confidential environment where adults can learn to read . . . “with the assistance of volunteer tutors who share their time and expertise at no cost tot he student.” Project Read Bahamas, locat ed on Village Road south of Queen’s College, welcomes all a dults in need of reading assis tance to join the programme at no cost. A nyone interested in helping with the effort is also welcome to volunteer as tutors are alwaysi n demand. Computer laboratory to aid literacy initiative DR Leon Higgs of the Ministry of Education cuts the ribbon, watched by John Haughton, vice-chairman of Project Read, Arthurlue Rahming, a dministrator, and Brian Moodie, chairman By FABIOLA SANCHEZ Associated Press Writer C ARACAS, Venezuela (AP Ministry said Friday it banned s ales of Coca-Cola Zero because the company failed to declare that the no-calories oft drink uses an artificial sweetener allegedly harmful to health. Health officials said tests show the cola contains sodi-u m cyclamate. Coca-Cola Co. d isputes that, saying the prod uct sold in Venezuela uses different artificial sweeteners. C yclamate is not prohibited in Venezuela. But the ministry said the company failedt o report sodium cyclamate as an ingredient in Coca-Cola Zero. Venezuela bans Coke product

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009, PAGE 7 Junior tourism minister proves to be true beauty THE Ministry of Tourism and Aviation’s Grand Bahama o ffice is throwing even more s upport behind Joanna Brown, the island’s Junior Minister of Tourism, now that she has won the Miss Bahamas World Beauty Pageant. Through the Tourism Today T ravel Club, which the Ministry o f Tourism has established in many schools throughout the Bahamas, students learn the workings of the tourism, travel and hospitality sector. As part of the programme, a s eries of competitions determ ine the Junior Minister of Tourism for major islands. The junior minister then represents the island at various important functions and national events. K arenda Swain, co-ordinator o f the Tourism Today Travel Club in Grand Bahama, said it was clear from their first meeting that Ms Brown had enough confidence to be a good representative of the island. S he said Ms Brown demons trated that she had the intelligence and skills to accomplish great things. “It is evident that Joanna skilfully combined her experience and intellect with charm andb eauty and became the count ry’s proud winner of the title Miss Bahamas World,” Ms Swain said. “She is indeed an excellent person, a practising Christian and a tremendous role model f or other young ladies. Grand Bahama is very proud of its Junior Minister of Tourism, who is celebrated nationally for her talent and beauty.” Ms Brown is a recent gradua te of Bishop Michael Eldon H igh School and has been accepted into the Ministry of Tourism’s new summer employment programme. J OANNA BROWN

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C M Y K C M Y K SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 9 INSIDE International sports news n B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net D ESPITE struggling to win their opener against Haiti, women’s national volleyballt eam captain Kelsie Johnson l ikes the position the Bahamas is in at the second round of the 2010 FIVB World Championships Qualifying Tourna m ent. Avenging their loss from the 2006 Caribbean VolleyballC hampionships here at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium, the Bahamas rallied for a 25-23, 25-21, 22-25, 22-25, 15-11 deci s ion Thursday night at the Wildey Gym in Barbados. “It was a tough hard fought match because it was our firstt ime playing together from 2 008,” said Johnson of the last CAV. “I think the cobwebs are g one and we will be a different team tonight (when we play Barbados) because Cherise and I didn’t have a great matchl ike we expected us to have. So the Bajan team didn’t see us at full strength.” While Johnson and the R olle sisters (Cherise and Krystel) didn’t perform as well as anticipated, Melinda Bast i an, one of the two collegiate p layers on the team, stepped it up and scored a game high 23 kills with three blocks and ana ce. Last night, the Bahamas played Barbados in Pool A final match-up as the twou ndefeated teams determined who they will play when they cross over in the playoffs that get started today. B ased on what she’s seen so far, Johnson said the Bahamas not only has a good chance of qualifying for the next round of the WorldC hampionships, but they are i n an unique position to win this round. “We’re sitting in an excell ent position. The first goal was to get the win because you don’t want to go up against Barbados in their home townb eing down,” she pointed out. So getting the win was more a morale booster for us, knowing that they defeated us in to get the bronze. So getting the win, it will relax us even more.” The women are hoping to j oin the men, who two weeks ago advanced to the next round when they finished second in Kingston, Jamaica with an upset win over Jamaica int he playoffs. T he women, however, will have to finish in the top three and could either play Jamaicao r St. Lucia when they get to the playoffs. “We can either see ourselves winning or finishing sec-o nd,” Johnson projected. N ow that they have achieved their initial goal, Johnson said they know that they have to step up their game because they can’t afford to get into the same situation in the playoffs that they foundt hemselves in against Haiti. Johnson ‘likes’ team’s position n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net V ETERAN Leroy Thompson has won a New Providence Softball Association men’s champi-o nship title with just about e very team that he pitched o n. S witching from the champions D’s Truckers to the youthful PriceWater-H ouse Stingrays during the off-season, Thompson threw a neat two-hitterw ith six strike outs in a 160 whitewashing over the Royal Bahamas DefenseF orce Commodores. It was the lone game played Thursday night att he Baillou Hills Sporting C omplex as the ladies’ fea ture game between the S igma Brackettes and the Proper Care Pool Lady Sharks was rained out after the first inning. While Thompson was on his game on the mound,s econd baseman James Clarke almost had a perfect plate appearance in his f our at bats as he finished 3-for-4 with a run batted in and three scored to lead their offensive attack. Our game plan tonight was to come out and make a statement,” said Clarke, who helped in their 12-hita ttack that forced the Commodores to switch s tarter Terrance Culmer with center-fielder Ramon Storr in the fifth. “We just wanted the league to know that we c ould play head-to-head with any team and with the addition of Leroy on the mound, we can be as competitive as anybody else.” The win improved the Stingrays’ record to 3-1, while the Commodores dropped to 2-1. A fter taking a 1-0 lead in the second on Ghandi Williams’ run-producings ingle that plated Clarke, PriceWaterHouse went on an offensive tear in the third. They marched 11 batters to the plate and came up with six runs on as many hits, highlighted by an RBI single from Clarke, a tworun double from both Lavaughn Ferguson and Godfrey Burnside Jr. as well as an RBI single from Greg Jones. In the fourth, the Stringrays struck for three more, thanks to Luton Delancy’s RBI ground out and Burnside Jr’s second two-run double, extending their margin to 10-0. And in the fifth, PriceWaterHouse once again batted around the clock producing another six-run assault, this time on Jameiko Sands’ RBI triple and Burnside Jr’s RBI single. The Commodores, who only got three batters on base, didn’t perform any where near their capabili ties, according to Storr. “We didn’t have people playing good defence and we didn’t hit the ball and that resulted in the loss,” Storr pointed out. Storr was the first Defence Force player to reach base on a one-out single in the first. In the second, Alex Hailey led off with a single and stole sec ond. And in the third, Shimon Bain touched first on an error. But in each instance, neither batter was able to get past second base as Thompson totally shut down their offence, including retiring the side in order in the fourth and the fifth, the latter on three strike outs. Tonight's schedule: 7 pm Robin Hood Hitmen vs Young Breed. 8:30 pm Commando Security Truckers vs Thompson Heavy Equipment. Stingrays rout Comodores 16-0 Stuggles to second r ound of FIVB qualif ier s T HE B ahamas' Melinda Bastian and captain Kelsie Johnson forming a double block against Haiti's Sainvilia Aubert. K e n m o r e B y n o e / P h o t o D e v r o n P i n d e r / P h o t o n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net IT wasn’t the way Bianca ‘BB’ Stuart had intended to complete her collegiate eligibility. The Southern Illinois senior completed her final appearance at the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA door Championships yesterday with a 14th place finish in the women’s long jump. She only soared 5.87 metres for the 14th and final position in the final of the wom en’s long jump. The winning jump was 6.54 metres by Kimberly Williams, a sophomore from Florida State. In the preliminaries, Stuart had the 11th best jump of 5.85 to qualify for the final. Also on Thursday, Auburn University’s sophomore sprinter Cache Armbrister and University of Miami’s junior Kristy Whyte both qualified for the final of the women’s 200 metres. Armbrister placed fourth in heat one of the semifinal in 23.22 for eighth place overall, while Whyte came in fifth in the second heat in 23.27 for the ninth and final spot. In the preliminaries earlier in the day, Armbrister got third in the fourth of five heats in 23.76 to qualify in the 11th spot. Whyte, competing in heat five, was fourth in 23.76 for 17th overall. Jernise Saunders, a senior at Portland State, also closed out her collegiate career when she finished fifth in heat five in 24.15 for 22nd, but it wasn’t good enough for her to advance to the semis. In the men’s 200 preliminaries, Karlton Rolle ran 21.95 for sixth place. But the freshman at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA overall and he too failed to advance. Whyte and Rolle all competed on their relay teams, but neither advanced out of the prelims. In the women’s 4 x 100, Whyte ran on the second leg of Miami’s team that got third in heat two in 44.44 for 10th overall. Rolle also ran the second leg for UCLA men’s 4 x 1 team that placed fifth in heat two in 39.77 for 14th overall. The women’s 4 x 4 team from Auburn, without Armbrister, ran 3:35.47 for fourth in heat three for 12th overall as they too failed to advance. It’s now down to just Armbrister and Whyte in the 200 final that was held last night. Meanwhile, overseas, a number of our elite athletes were in competition. At the Meeting de Montreuil, Shamar Sands, the national 110 metres hurdles national record holder, picked off a victory in that event in 13.45, well ahead of American Jeff Porter in 13.54. Sands was the lone Bahamian at the meet, but at the Festival of Excellence in Toronto, Canada, two quarter-milers were in action. Andrae Williams, who has ran the second fastest time for a Bahamian this year, clocked 45.72 for third place in the men’s 400. American Olympic champion LaShawn Merritt stopped the clock in 44.83. And in the women’s 400 at the Varsity Stadium at the University of Toronto, Christine Amertil got third place as well in 52.29. The winning time was 51.44 by American Shana Cox. Stuart makes final appearance at NCAA Outdoor Championships A SMALL team of eight Kung Fu athletes went to Orlando recently to compete in the 11th annual Interna tional Chinese Martial Arts Cham pionships (ICMAC They were led by 4th degree black belt Lynden French and 1st degree black belt Kent Bazard, and are students of the Bai Sung Institute 'Four Wings of Kung Fu,' an internation ally recognized system founded by Bahamian Grandmaster Kenneth P. Lewis. "The group did very well, espe cially the kids," French said. "They worked very hard." Each of the athletes placed in at least one event and the team came home with three gold, two silver and four bronze medals. The team also won a giant title best performance by a foreign Kung Fu school, beating out Italy, Puerto Rico, France and Canada. The event was hosted by Master Nick Scrima and is a part of an inter national competition circuit. It hosted over 2,000 competitors, judges and spectators at each event. In December, the Bahamas will host the first ICMAC event outside of the United States at the Atlantis Resort and will become host for the yearly World Championships starting in 2010. "The Bahamas ICMAC will be a world class Kung Fu competition and the finale on the international circuit," Bazard said. "The circuit will include Washington, Las Vegas, San Diego, Japan, Italy and Costa Rica. All of the competitors will come to our country for the grand champi onships." The Four Winds System hopes to win the support of local sponsors and the Ministry of Sports. "We need support to make an international impression of the talent we have here in the Bahamas," Bazard said. "This December, though, will be another chance to prove to the world that we are small, but we are the best." Bainca Stuart Eight member Four Wings kung fu team back from 11th annual ICMAC PICTURED from left to right are Ku-Ya-Shu Kiara Johnson, Shu Shu Obryan Thurston, Ming Shu Joshua Ferguson. Second row from left are O Gao Tao Lynden French (senior instructor Key and Ming Shu Santerrio Johnson.

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C M Y K C M Y K S PORTS PAGE 10, SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS n S WIMMING SANTA CLARA, Calif. A ssociated Press M ICHAEL Phelps has easily qualified for the 200meter butterfly final at the Santa Clara International Grand Prix. P helps touched in 1 m inute, 57.45 seconds, making him the fastest qualifier for Friday night’s final in the outdoor pool. The 14-time O lympic gold medalist owns t he world record of 1:52.03 that he set at the Beijing Games. H e blew away his competi tion in the morning prelimin aries, swimming 0.44 seco nds faster than Samuel M cGraw, the second-leading qualifier. Phelps is competing in his s econd meet since his threemonth suspension by USA Swimming ended last month.H e was penalized after a phot o surfaced of him using a marijuana pipe. Phelps back in competition in Santa Clara Falcons release suspended QB Michael Vick n TENNIS BIRMINGHAM, England Associated Press MARIASharapova reached her first semifinal in more than a year by defeating Yanina Wickmayer 6-1, 2-6, 6-3 Friday at the Aegon Classic. The former top-ranked play er struggled with her serve in the second set, but regained her stride in the third to break her 19-year-old opponent twice for a 5-1 lead. Sharapova had 11 doublefaults with a remodeled serve to protect her shoulder, which required surgery last year and sidelined her for 10 months. “I kind of lost the momen tum and made more errors than I would have preferred, and she gained confidence from that,” Sharapova said. “When you give her time, she plays very aggressively. And once she had broken me, she kept swinging away and came up with some great shots.” Sharapova next plays Li Na, the former Wimbledon quar terfinalist from China who beat Stefanie Voegele 6-3, 7-6 (3 The other semifinal will pit Magdalena Rybarikova against Sania Mirza. Mirza reached only her second semifinal in two years witha 6-1, 7-6 (4 Czink, while Rybarikova defeated Urszula Radwanska 6-3, 6-3. Mirza recently recovered from a wrist injury, and was encouraged by her perfor mances in Birmingham. “I’m happy to be competing and winning some matches,” Mirza said. “The wrist is healed, which is the biggest positive out of this.” Sharapova defeats Wickmayer to reach semifinals SPORTS IN BRIEF RUSSIA'S Maria Sharapova reaches to return shot during her women's thirdround tennis match against Francesca Schiavone of Italy at the Aegon Classic in Birmingham, England, Thursday, June 11, 2009. S i m o n D a w s o n / A P P h o t o n FOOTBALL A TLANTA A ssociated Press THEFalcons have released suspended quarterback Michael Vick, opening t he door for him to sign with any interested NFL team. Vick is eligible to immedi a tely sign with a team even though he has not been rein stated by NFL commissione r Roger Goodell. Falcons general manager Thomas Dimitroff said the team relinquished its con-t ractual rights to Vick on Fri day. “Michael remains susp ended by the NFL,” Dim i troff said. “However, in the event NFL commissioner Roger Goodell decides tor einstate Michael, we feel his best opportunity to re-engage his football career would bea t another club.” The move was no surprise. “Everybody always knew t hat Mike wouldn’t be play ing with the Falcons,” Vick’s agent, Joel Segal, said. “He’s really just taking it one day at a time.” The NFL had no comment on Vick’s release. Goodell has said he will sit down with Vick after the quarterback completes his 23month sentence on July 20 for running a dogfighting ring. “Michael’s going to have to demonstrate to myself and the general public and to a lot of people, did he learn anything from this experience? Does he regret what happened?” Goodell said last month at the NFL meetings in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. “Does he feel that he can be a positive influence going for ward? Those are questions that I would like to see whenI sit with him.” Vick’s currently making $10 an hour as a construction worker for W.M. Jordan Co. while he serves the final two months of his sentence on home confinement in Hamp ton, Va. He was released from federal prison in Kansas on May 20. Even while making it clear Vick had no football future with the Falcons, Falcons owner Arthur Blank has said he would be available to assist Vick. “Our entire organization sincerely hopes that Michael will continue to focus his efforts on making positive changes in his life, and we wish him well in that regard,” Dimitroff said Friday. Vick was the Falcons No. 1 draft pick in 2001. He played six seasons with the team, but the Falcons moved on by making quarterback Matt Ryan their No. 1 pick last year. Ryan started every game as a rookie and led the Falcons to the playoffs. N EXT weekend at the Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium, the Bahamas Association of Athletic Asso c iations will play host to athletes, coaches and delegates from 20 countries in the 13th Central American and C aribbean Age Group Championships. At a press conference on Friday, BAAA's president Curt Hollingswortha nd committee chairman Dr. Bernard Nottage revealed plans for the championships that will run from Thursday-Fri day, June 16-17. M ore than 160 athletes, the largest number to ever participate in the regional meet held every two years, are expect-e d to display their skills in the multiple event competition in two different age groups for boys and girls. This will be the 13th time the meet has been held and it is expected to be an exciting one. The four divisions to be contested are as follows: Girls 11-12 years old, Boys 11-12 years old, Girls 13-14 years old and Boys 13-14 year old Team size is restricted to 3 athletes per division to give a maximum team of 12 athletes per country. The Bahamas will be represented by the following: Girls 11-12 Jeorjette Williams and Ieisha Taylor; girls 13-14 Danielle Gib son and Pedrya Seymour; boys 11-12 Julis Nottage and Timothy Wilson and boys 13-14 Delano Davis from Grand Bahama and Jerrio Rahming. In the younger age group (11-12 letes will compete in 5 events: Day One 60 metres, high jump and Ball Throw Day Two Long Jump, 800m (Females Only) and 1000m (Males only). In the older age group (13-14 letes will compete in 7 events: Day One 80 metres, shot put, high jump and long jump. Day Two 60 metre hurdles (Females only), 80 metre hurdles (males only), Ball Throw, 1000 metre (females only and 1200m (males only Each athlete competes for points in each event in his/her division; points are totaled to give an overall divisional winner. The event stimulates great compe tition and enthusiasm, with athletes dis playing their talents in several different disciplines. The meet has been held twice before in the Bahamas, in 1987 and 2001. It has also marked the start of an athletic career for many of the outstanding elite athletes in the region today. The most famous of those is our own "Golden Girl" Debbie Ferguson McKenzie, who competed twice in CAC Age Group when she was a student at Oakesfield Primary School, she did well in 1987 and even better in 1989 when she was the overall winner. The BAAA, along with the local orga nizing committee headed by Dr. Nottage, have gotten the financial backing from the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture are currently finalizing its plans to ensure that the championships are successful and memorable for all those who participate. The BAAA say they look forward to the support of parents, family, friends, coaches, local track and field fans, the media and the public at large as they come out to watch the meet and cheer on the young athletes. BAAA plays host to 13th Central American and Caribbean Age Group Championships FACE OFF BAAA National Open Track and Field Championships IN today's segment of Face Off by the Bahamas Association of Athletic Association's Public Relations officers Kermit Taylor and Troy McIntosh, we focus our attention on the top two female sprinters as they prepare to lead the charge in the 100 and 200 metres at the National Open Track and Field Championships, June 26-27 at the Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium. Chandra Sturrup PICTURED are BAAA's president Curt Hollingsworth (leftright E VENT: 1 00/200/LJ PERSONAL BEST: 10.84/22.33/22 SEASON BEST: 11.18/23.33 HEIGHT: 5 4 (1.59m WEIGHT: 135 lbs (52 kg D.O.B. September 12th 1971 AGE: 37 F AVOURITE MOVE: O liver Twist and any movie with Sir Sean Connery FAVOURITE FOOD: Lobster Lobeste MOM'S NAME: Deborah Dean (deceased DAD'S NAME: Charles Sturrup HOMETOWN: Nassau, Bahamas N AME OF COLLEGE: N orfolk University, Virginia N AME OF HIGH SCHOOL: R .M. Bailey HIGH SCHOOL COACH: Steven Murray COLLEGE COACH: Laverne Sweat FAVOURITE FOOTBALL TEAM: none FAVOURITE BASKETBALL TEAM: none FAVOURITE TV SHOW: Days of Our Lives HARDEST WORKOUT: 300m EASIEST WORKOUT: Blocks T he diminutive Chandra Sturrup launched her international c areer in 1996 finishing fourth in the Olympic 100m final and winning silver in the 4x100m relay at the Atlanta Games. Further successes followed: 100m gold at the 1998 Commonwealth Games and 60m gold at the 2001 World Indoor Championships. She also landed successive 100m bronze medals at the 2001 and 2003 World Championships in Edmonton and Paris. C handra Sturrup is a Bahamian track and field sprint athlete. She is a 100 m specialist and the Bahamian national record holder for the women's 100 m dash with a personal best of 10.84 seconds set in Lausanne, Switzerland on July 5, 2005. Sturrup competed at the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing at the 100 m sprint. In her first round heat she placed first in front of K elly-Ann Baptiste and Lina Grincikaite in a time of 11.30 to a dvance to the second round. There she improved her time to 11.16 seconds and placed third behind Sherone Simpson and Muna Lee. In her semi final Sturrup finished in fifth position with 11.22 seconds, causing elimination. However her fellow Bahamian Debbie Ferguson did qualify for the final with the same time, but she finished fourth in her semi final. This winter she has enjoyed a real Indian summer, winning major international 60m races in Lievin, Dusseldorf and Gent. Sturrup has an 18-year-old son. Inducted in NCAA, Norfolk State University, and CIAA Hall of F ame. Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie E VENT: 1 00/200 P ERSONAL BEST: 1 0.91/22.31 SEASON BEST: 11.11/ 23.01 H EIGHT: 5 6 (1.69m WEIGHT: 139 lbs (63 kg D.O.B: January 16th 1976 AGE: 30 HOMETOWN: Nassau, Bahamas N AME OF COLLEGE: U niversity of Georgia, Atlanta NAME OF HIGH SCHOOL: R.M. Bailey H IGH SCHOOL COACH: P ancho Rahming C OLLEGE COACH: N orbert Elliott F erguson graduated from University of Georgia from where s he launched her senior athletic career since which she has gained medals at the Summer Olympics, IAAF World Champio nship in Athletics, Commonwealth Games and Pan American Games.. I n 2002 she was appointed as an ambassador for the United N ations Food and Agriculture Organization. At the 2002 Commonwealth Games, England, she set the championship record in the 100 m and in the 4 100 m relay with the Bahamian team, recording a personal best of 10.91 seconds in the individual event. A t the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing she competed at the 1 00 m sprint. In her first round heat she placed second behind O ludamola Osayomi in a time of 11.17 to advance to the second round. There she won her series to qualify for the semi finals in at ime of 11.21, this time finishing in front of Osayomi. Despite fell ow Bahamian Chandra Sturrup being unable to qualify for the final with a time of 11.22 in the first semi final, Ferguson man-a ged to qualify with the same time as she finished fourth in her race, while Sturrup finished fifth in hers. In the final Ferguson c ame to 11.19 seconds, which was the 7th position. She competed at the 2009 Manchester City Games, winning the 150 m final in 16.54 seconds.

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 74F/23C Low: 76F/24C Low: 75F/24C Low: 78F/26C Low: 78 F/26 C Low: 78F/26C Low: 79 F/26 C Low: 74 F/23 C High: 94F/34C High: 92F/33C High: 89 F/32 C High: 87 F/31 C High: 89F/32C High: 87 F/31C High: 88F/31C Low: 77F/25C High: 88F/31C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 89F/32C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 76F/24C High: 83 F/28 C Low: 76F/24C High: 85 F/29 Low: 74F/23C High: 84F/29C Low: 76 F/24C High: 87F/31C Low: 79 F/26 C High: 88F/31C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 86F/30C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 86F/30C Low: 78F/26C High: 90 F/32 C Low: 81F/27C High: 90F/32C High: 87 F/31 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE 6/13/09, PAGE 11 THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Partly sunny, a t-storm; breezy. Cloudy, a couple of t-storms; warm. Partial sunshine.Clouds and sun, a t-storm possible. Mostly sunny with a shower possible. High: 88 Low: 79 High: 88 High: 90 High: 89 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Plenty of sunshine. High: 90 Low: 79 Low: 79 Low: 79 AccuWeather RealFeel 101F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 86F 111-89F 109-87F 112-89F 110-86F Low: 79 TODAYTONIGHTSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAYWEDNESDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................88F/31C Low ....................................................75F/24C Normal high ......................................87F/30C Normal low ........................................74F/23C Last year's high .................................. 90 F/32C Last year's low .................................. 79 F/26C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.57" Year to date ................................................13.10" Normal year to date ....................................14.44" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Last New First Full Jun. 15 Jun. 22Jun. 29Jul. 7 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:20 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 8:00 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . . . . none Moonset . . . . 11:15 a.m. Today Sunday Monday Tuesday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 12:14 p.m.2.36:09 a.m.0.3 -----6:19 p.m.0.5 12:32 a.m.2.46:48 a.m.0.3 12:59 p.m.2.47:10 p.m.0.5 1:17 a.m.2.37:30 a.m.0.3 1:48 p.m.2.58:05 p.m.0.5 2:07 a.m.2.28:17 a.m.0.3 2:40 p.m.2.69:05 p.m.0.5 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco93/3379/26pc92/3378/25pc Amsterdam65/1852/11pc68/2054/12r Ankara, Turkey81/2750/10s75/2345/7s Athens86/3068/20s85/2966/18s Auckland58/1453/11r59/1555/12c Bangkok90/3278/25sh91/3278/25pc Barbados86/3077/25sh86/3077/25r Barcelona80/2666/18s80/2666/18pc Beijing88/3163/17s91/3264/17s Beirut77/2572/22s79/2674/23s Belgrade78/2556/13pc85/2962/16s Berlin68/2048/8s75/2352/11pc Bermuda80/2673/22sh80/2673/22sh Bogota63/1746/7r64/1747/8sh Brussels72/2257/13pc73/2255/12sh Budapest75/2352/11s82/2763/17s Buenos Aires64/1748/8s64/1752/11s Cairo98/3675/23s98/3674/23s Calcutta106/4184/28pc108/4287/30pc Calgary77/2552/11t77/2553/11t Cancun91/3273/22pc92/3371/21t Caracas83/2871/21t82/2771/21t Casablanca91/3270/21pc85/2969/20c Copenhagen68/2047/8pc67/1946/7s Dublin64/1748/8r63/1746/7sh Frankfurt74/2352/11pc79/2659/15t Geneva 83/28 57/13 s 80/2662/16pc Halifax 66/18 46/7 pc 61/16 45/7 pc Havana 88/31 71/21 sh 89/31 71/21 r Helsinki 68/20 54/12sh59/1546/7r Hong Kong 84/28 79/26 t 86/30 79/26t Islamabad 111/43 76/24 pc 109/42 77/25 c Istanbul80/2663/17pc81/2761/16s Jerusalem 81/27 60/15s84/2862/16s Johannesburg 61/1644/6s60/1545/7t Kingston 86/3077/25t88/3178/25sh Lima73/2259/15pc72/2258/14pc London70/2152/11pc68/2054/12sh Madrid97/3664/17s86/3063/17sh Manila84/2878/25r86/3078/25r Mexico City84/2857/13t81/2755/12t Monterrey100/3773/22pc100/3775/23s Montreal73/2257/13pc72/2261/16c Moscow81/2754/12t73/2250/10pc Munich72/2249/9s82/2759/15s Nairobi80/2657/13r79/2659/15sh New Delhi 106/4186/30pc104/4084/28pc Oslo57/1345/7c55/1243/6s Paris79/2661/16pc81/2757/13t Prague 72/22 49/9 s 77/25 60/15 s Rio de Janeiro70/2162/16pc70/2162/16s Riyadh104/4082/27pc104/4082/27pc Rome 86/30 64/17 s 85/29 64/17 pc St. Thomas86/3079/26sh87/3079/26r San Juan72/2238/3s69/2036/2pc San Salvador 90/32 70/21 pc 85/29 73/22 t Santiago 66/1841/5pc54/1237/2r Santo Domingo85/2974/23sh85/2973/22sh Sao Paulo 60/15 50/10 c 62/16 54/12s Seoul75/2362/16sh76/2456/13sh Stockholm 61/16 48/8 r 65/18 46/7 pc Sydney 63/17 49/9 c65/1849/9s Taipei88/3177/25r84/2874/23r T okyo 77/25 66/18 pc 75/23 66/18 sh T oronto 69/2056/13t73/2258/14t Trinidad79/2657/13pc84/2861/16pc V ancouver 72/22 56/13 pc 71/2154/12pc Vienna 74/2356/13s80/2668/20s W arsaw 63/17 45/7 sh 68/20 50/10 s Winnipeg 72/22 47/8 s 78/2555/12s H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySunday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SE at 10-20 Knots2-3 Feet4-6 Miles82F Sunday:SE at 6-12 Knots1-2 Feet4-6 Miles82F Today:SE at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet4-6 Miles81F Sunday:SE at 6-12 Knots1-2 Feet4-6 Miles81F Today:SE at 8-16 Knots2-3 Feet4-6 Miles81F Sunday:SE at 6-12 Knots1-2 Feet4-6 Miles81F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque88/3161/16pc88/3160/15pc Anchorage65/1852/11pc67/1951/10pc Atlanta88/3169/20t90/3274/23t Atlantic City78/2559/15t76/2462/16pc Baltimore81/2762/16t80/2660/15pc Boston66/1856/13pc66/1856/13c Buffalo70/2151/10t75/2355/12pc Charleston, SC92/3373/22t93/3373/22t Chicago73/2252/11r73/2253/11pc Cleveland72/2249/9t74/2355/12pc Dallas97/3677/25t97/3676/24s Denver72/2250/10t76/2451/10t Detroit73/2255/12t75/2356/13pc Honolulu87/3074/23s87/3075/23s Houston96/3577/25s96/3577/25pc HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySunday TodaySundayTodaySunday Indianapolis80/2663/17t79/2658/14pc Jacksonville94/3472/22t93/3374/23pc Kansas City81/2766/18t79/2663/17t Las Vegas87/3066/18pc90/3269/20pc Little Rock92/3373/22t93/3374/23pc Los Angeles70/2158/14sh70/2158/14r Louisville84/2866/18t84/2866/18t Memphis89/3174/23t93/3374/23t Miami89/3178/25t88/3177/25t Minneapolis79/2659/15pc80/2660/15s Nashville85/2966/18t88/3171/21t New Orleans91/3274/23s93/3375/23pc New York78/2561/16t77/2561/16pc Oklahoma City92/3374/23t96/3570/21pc Orlando94/3474/23t93/3375/23t Philadelphia80/2662/16t78/2562/16pc Phoenix 94/34 74/23 s 97/3675/23s Pittsburgh76/2455/12t75/2355/12pc Portland, OR 77/2556/13c73/2256/13pc Raleigh-Durham 90/32 68/20 t 90/32 68/20 t St. Louis84/2869/20t85/2965/18t Salt Lake City 69/20 56/13 t 75/2355/12t San Antonio 97/36 76/24 s 98/36 76/24 s San Diego67/1962/16sh66/1863/17r San Francisco 68/20 56/13 pc 67/1954/12pc Seattle77/2555/12c71/2153/11pc T allahassee 95/3572/22pc95/3573/22pc T ampa 92/33 76/24 t 92/33 77/25t Tucson93/3367/19s95/3567/19s W ashington, DC 84/28 64/17t82/2765/18pc UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. T emperature bands are highs for the day . Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE YOUNG entrepreneurs will get an o pportunity to expand their horizons and develop new perspectives on entrepreneurship at the upcoming Business Builders Immersion workshop. The goal of the three-day works hop – scheduled for June 15 to 17 at t he British Colonial Hilton – aims t o encourage young Bahamians to seriously consider entrepreneurship as a career option. The guest speakers at the works hop, including Doongalik Studios C EO Jackson Burnside, all have p ractical experience operating a business, said the organisers. My vision is to bring together young Bahamian entrepreneurs and business professionals to share their experiences in the world of business,” said co-ordinator Sharell Ferguson, an MBA graduate of Howard Univ ersity. My partners, all peers of mine, s pecialise in a wide range of skills, including, human resources, marketing, law, agriculture, the fashion industry, accounting, finance, entert ainment, business consultation and c ounselling. I desired to create an o pportunity where youth can learn from those who are making strides o f success in their own industries locally and abroad. I believe that we need to help each other succeed.” Farenno Ferguson, CEO of iKonz Media Group, said attendees can expect an informative session. " I plan to share ways in which they c an find effective means of increasing t heir marketability in any career field and especially in the new media market which is now booming.” BBI will offer interactive sessions f or attendees, including developing b usiness plans, vision and mission s tatements, branding personal and corporate image, and networking o pportunities. Speakers include Sharell Ferguson, CEO Beyond The Veil Group of Companies; Farenno Ferguson, CEO iKonz Media Group; Tyrinna Neely CEO, Primadona Sales; Shenique G ray, CPA; Kenneth Moncur, K emis.Net; Franklyn Miller, the G hostbuster; Khrystle Rutherford, LLB; Timothy Blair, agricultural specialist; Kendria Strachan, marketing manager; Charmin Lotmore, MBA, p artner, PBC Group; Rekeno Carr oll, CPA; Nekeino Brice, CPA, partn er, Island Purchasing Group. Workshop to give young a head start in business Venezuela: C oca-Cola Zero has harmful sweetener In brief n CARACAS, Venezuela VENEZUELA’SHealth M inistry said Friday it b anned sales of Coca-Cola Zero because the company failed to declare that the nocalorie soft drink uses an artificial sweetener allegedly harmful to health, according to the Associated Press . H ealth officials said tests show the cola contains sodium cyclamate. Coca-Cola Co. disputes that, saying the product sold in Venezuela uses different artificial s weeteners, Acesulfame-K a nd Aspartame. C yclamate is not prohibite d in Venezuela. But the ministry said the company f ailed to report sodium cyclamate as an ingredient in Coca-Cola Zero when it received its initial health permit to begin selling the d rink in April. Coca-Cola is “failing to c omply with sanitary n orms,” the ministry said in a statement published in the newspaper Ultimas Noticias. The ministry urged V enezuelans to refrain from t rying the drink, saying it is considered harmful to the h ealth.” The U.S. prohibits the use o f cyclamates in human food because of health safety con-c erns. Sales of Coca-Cola Z ero elsewhere in Latin America have met with resistance over the use of cyclamate. Rosy Alvarez, a spokes w oman for Coca-Cola Servicios de Venezuela, told The A ssociated Press on Thursd ay that “no ingredient of Coca-Cola Zero is harmful to peoples’ health.” But thec ompany is complying with V enezuela’s ban and has begun halting production, she said. n MEXICO CITY A RULINGparty mayoral candidate in Mexico’s richest city told his supporters that drug traffickers havec ontacted all leading political contenders in the country seeking their loyalty aheado f congressional and local elections next month, according to the Associated P ress . M auricio Fernandez’s dis cussion with a group of supporters in a suburb of Mon terrey a leaked recording of which was broadcast throughout Mexico on Friday is a remarkably frank description of how the brutal gangs try to control political leaders, which is a key concern of President Felipe Calderon in his fight against drug cartels. The candidate also acknowledged that the Beltran Levya cartel controls drug smuggling in his city of San Pedro Garza and sug gested that as mayor he would avoid confronting the gang to maintain peace, comments that undermined Calderon’s drive to show that the government and his National Action Party, or PAN, are tough on organized crime. Fernandez’s campaign was thrown into turmoil by the recording, but he stood by the comments, saying he was merely telling the truth. He denied meeting with any traffickers during this campaign and said he rejected efforts by gangsters to buy his loyalty when he ran unsuccessfully for governor of Nuevo Leon state six years ago. “I am stating the reality that my city is living,” Fernandez told MVS Radio. “I don’t have any reason to hide it.” PAN had no immediate comment on the recording, nor was it clear how the gov ernment would react. Calderon has acknowledged that corrupt police and elected officials are a major obstacle in his fight with organized crime. Feder al forces last month arrested 10 mayors in the president’s home state of Michoacan for alleged drug gang ties. Mexico candidate: Drug gangs contact all hopefuls FIREWORKS MARK DAY OF RUSSIA RUSSIA'S national flag is unveiled atop the Ostankino TV tower marking the Day of Russia in Moscow, Russia, yesterday. The nation’s first president, Boris Yeltsin, established the June 12 holiday after the Soviet breakup to mark the 1990 declaration of sovereignty by Russia's Soviet-era parliament. FIREWORKS explode over the Kremlin, with St. Basil's cathedral, center, marking the Day of Russia in Moscow, Russia. CHILDREN enjoy a holiday and the warm weather swimming in a Moskva river, in Moscow, Russia. n UNITED NATIONS THE U.N. Security Council imposed punishing new sanctions on North Korea Friday, toughening an arms embargo and authorizing ship searches on the high seas in an attempt to thwart the reclusive nation’s nuclear and ballistic missile programs, according to the Associated Press . The unanimous support for the resolution reflected international disapproval for recent actions by North Korea, which defied the council by conduct ing a second nuclear test on May 25 and heightened global tensions with recent missile launches that raised the specter of a renegade nuclear state. North Korea has repeatedly warned that it would view new sanctions as a declaration of war, but it boycotted Friday’s vote in sharp contrast to the October 2006 Security Council meeting where sanctions were imposed after the country’s first nuclear test. Then, the North Korean ambassador immediately rejected the res olution, accused council members of “gangster-like” action and walked out of the council chamber. U.S. Ambassador Susan Rice, who shepherded the res olution through two weeks of complex and sometimes diffi cult negotiations, told reporters in Washington that the administration was “very pleased” with the council’s “unprecedented” and “innovative” action. She cautioned that North Korea could react to the resolution with “further provoca tion.” “There’s reason to believe they may respond in an irre sponsible fashion to this,” she said. North Korea said Monday in its main newspaper that it would respond to any new sanctions with “corresponding self-defense measures.” On Tuesday, the North said it would use nuclear weapons in a “merciless offensive” if provoked. The resolution seeks to deprive North Korea of financing and material for its weapons program and bans the communist country’s lucrative arms exports, especially missiles. It does not ban nor mal trade, but does call on international financial institu tions to halt grants, aid or loans to the North except for humanitarian, development and denuclearization programs. China and Russia, the North’s closest allies, supported the resolution, but stressed that it did not authorize the use of force against North Korea, a key demand by both countries. Diplomats said dur ing the negotiations both countries pushed to ensure that the measures not hurt ordinary people in North Korea who face daily hardships. Russia’s U.N. Ambassador Vitaly Churkin called the North’s repeat nuclear test “a serious blow” to efforts to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons and said the resolution was “an appropriate response,” targeted at the weapons programs. UN imposes tough new sanctions on N Korea Sergey Ponomarev /AP Photos