Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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‘Jah Doctrine’ claims
attempts to report
abduction of wife and
child fell on deaf ears

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A LOCAL reggae star has
criticised police for not believ-
ing him when his wife and
child were kidnapped.

Devlyn Stubbs, also known
as Jah Doctrine, had left his
car parked outside a down-
town bank when a thief
jumped in and drove off with
his wife, Sarah, and their nine-
month-old baby inside.

But the 28-year-old claims
his fears turned to frustration
when the emergency 919 num-
ber was “repeatedly busy” and
his attempts to report the
crime to officers nearby fell
on deaf ears.

According to Mr Stubbs,
four different police officers
on Bay Street refused to
believe his car had been
stolen. Instead they suggest-
ed it had merely been towed.

In the meantime, his car,
which traffic had slowed down
enough to enable Sarah and
their baby to escape

unharmed, had apparently left



DEVLYN STUBBS with his wife
and child.

the area. He said when his
wife jumped out of the car,
she ran back to the bank with
the baby and told him how
their car had been stolen. She
told him how she had shouted
to the man to stop, but it was
only when traffic stopped him
that she and the baby were
able to escape.

“All I wanted was help ina

SEE page eight



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to his injuries

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

THE HEAVY RAIN that drenched the Bahamas recently has taken its toll on roads around New
Providence. The sun may have been out yesterday, but these pot holes would have wiped the smiles

from the faces of motorists.

New Crown
land grants
allegations

IT IS claimed that two sec-
retaries and another senior
government official are among
those in the Department of
Lands and Surveys who are
alleged to have used their
positions to get Crown land
grants in Abaco, Exuma, and
Cat Island.

Since April 19, The Tribune
has published a series of arti-
cles in which sources have
accused the department of
corruption and nepotism.

More and more information
is coming out from sources
within the ministry who are

SEE page eight

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THE ROYAL Bahamas Police Force Band plays at the opening of the
59th FIFA congress at Atlantis last night. The two-day soccer event
has never before been held in the Caribbean.

e SEE PAGE FIVE



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

mpd ty or
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Customs
security
cuard dies
of ‘Knife’

wounds

Man succumbs J my tanexa



THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter

tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

POLICE have
launched an investigation
into the case of a man
who died in hospital
hours after he was admit-

ted with multiple wounds
from what appeared to be
a knife.

Collier Shermark
Knowles, a 33-year-old
Customs security guard

SEE page eight

PLP calls for
inquiry into
boy’s death in
police custody

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE PLP is calling for an
immediate inquiry by an
impartial body into the death
of 15-year-old Michael
Knowles in police custody on
Sunday night.

In a statement released yes-
terday afternoon the party
said it is “deeply concerned”
about the incident and assert-
ed that it “would not be rea-
sonable nor acceptable that

SEE page six

INSIDE

SHOPPER OUTRAGE AFTER
SOLOMON’S BOMB HOAX
PAGE THREE
CALL FOR ENHANCED MEDICAL
TREATMENT ON STANIEL CAY
PAGE FIVE

We Apologize For Any
Inconvenience Caused

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISTANDS, LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009



LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





for the second straight year

ATLANTIS on Paradise
Island continues to maintain
its stronghold as the top
resort in the Caribbean.

In its summer 2009 issue,
Celebrated Living, American
Airline’s magazine for first
and business class passengers,
revealed its ‘Reader’s Choice
Platinum List’, naming
Atlantis the top resort in the
Caribbean for a 2nd straight
year.

Atlantis, Paradise Island,
ranks high on the list high-
lighting American Airline’s
passenger’s top choices in
cruises, spas, golf courrses
and hotels.

The article’s writer Elaine
Glusac descibes the list as the
ranking of, "Great hotels
[that] are more than the sum
of their amenities. Those that
make lasting memories also
rely on the personal touch --
your favorite fruit in the
room, your preferred news-
paper with your morning cof-
fee, and an of-course attitude
on the part of the concierge.”

Continuing to outrank its

competitors, in the Caribbean
hotel category, Atlantis
scored high marks over other
properties such as The Ritz
Carlton in The U.S. Virgin
Islands and The Four Seasons
in Nevis.

According to Celebrated
Living this is why Atlantis
was chosen number one:-

“Who can compete with 35
restaurants and bars plus 20
million gallons of pool?
Atlantis rules the sea, say CL
readers.

“Get behind the scenes
among the resort’s 50,000
marine animals with its new
“Sea Keeper” program, or
train dolphins for a day.”

One&Only Ocean Club
was also in the ranking, gar-
nering a respectable 10th
place spot. The article cited
the propry’s sporting ameni-
ties as the reason it enjoys a
place on the list.

“One&Only aims to keep
you bikini-fit with a new
Technogym virtual training
system including equipment
and nutritional advice.”

Atlantis named topihotelinithe

Resort tops ‘Platinum List’

wr a of the oval eS ota & ial Atlantis Resort on Paradise en

Once again (also for a 2nd
straight year), the American
Airlines quarterly luxury
magazine also ranked

Man in court on armed robbery,
weapons and kidnapping charges

A 39-YEAR-OLD man was
arraigned in Magistrates Court
yesterday on armed robbery,
weapons and kidnapping
charges.

Shawn Miller of Fox Hill
was arraigned in Court Five,
Bank Lane on one count of
kidnapping, five counts of
armed robbery, five counts
of receiving as well as









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weapon and ammunitions
charges.

According to court dockets,
it is alleged that on May 28,
2009 while armed with a hand-
gun, Miller robbed Hamilton
Dean of a brown 1995 Toyota
Corolla valued at $3,500, and
Andrew Dean of three cellular
phones together valued at
$1,290,

On the same day, it is
alleged, he robbed Alissa Dean
of $360, Audley Dean of $1,116
and Zelma Dean of a gray
Toshiba laptop valued at
$1,200.

Miller, who was arraigned
in Court One, Bank Lane was

|
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not required to enter a plea to
the armed robbery charges.

He pleaded not guilty to kid-
napping Hamilton Dean. This
offense allegedly took place on
May 28.

Miller also pleaded not
guilty to possession of a 12
gauge Maverick shotgun, pos-
session of a smooth bore shot-
gun, and possession of seven
live rounds of 12 gauge shot-
gun ammunition.

He also entered not guilty
pleas to the receiving charges.

Miller was remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison. The case has
been transferred to Court Five
and adjourned to June 10.

ica

Um Pai F han



Atlantis second in its list of
Top 10 Family Resorts, with Spa in Lake Buena Vista,
the only property getting Florida.
higher marks-

Disney’s

AV ITN er Tua een
ILO UT WL en ORL) ONS

m@ By GLADSTONE THURSTON

THE government is considering creating
an integrated credit union supervision sys-
tem by establishing a single regulator for the
sector, Agriculture and Marine Resources
Minister Larry Cartwright confirmed.

“Tt is envisaged at this time that the Central
Bank of the Bahamas will assume the regula-
tion and supervision of credit unions,” he told
the Bahamas Co-operative League Limited
30th annual general meeting on May 29.

“The government is cognisant that credit
unions are different from banks and the pecu-
liarities or the uniqueness of credit unions
must be taken into account.

“However, there is an overarching obliga-
tion to protect not only the stability and
integrity of credit unions but the larger finan-
cial system as well,” said Mr Cartwright,
whose ministerial responsibility includes co-
operative development.

Credit unions have not been exempted from
the global financial crisis which has had “far
reaching effects on our local economy” in the
form of reduced tourist arrivals, and by exten-
sion lower employment and reduced income.

The 2005 Co-operative Societies Act and
the pending 2009 Co-operative Regulations
Act both include mechanisms to bring credit
union operations in line with other financial
institutions and international best practices,
said Mr Cartwright.

This includes establishing annual continu-

Grand Floridian Resort and

“New dining plans at this



water-park-mega-resort allow
kids under 7 to eat free. Kids
applaud: The Jonas Brothers
perform here often.”

Derek Smith/BIS

MINISTER of Agriculture and Marine Resources
Larry Cartwright.

ance of registration, improving efficiencies
by imposing penalties for non-compliance
with the Act, and upgrading the supervising
standards of credit unions in order to comply
with international best practices, said Mr
Cartwright.

“Regulatory reform is a challenge that is
not insurmountable,” said Mr Cartwright,”
and your board of directors, managers and
executives must demonstrate the commitment
and prudence necessary to bring these organ-
isations into compliance.

“This could only be a good thing for your
members, your credit unions and by exten-
sion the financial system of the Bahamas.”



Political tribalism ‘eating away
at chances of social progress’

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Well-known
Bahamian poet and radio host
Michael Pintard warned that
political tribalism is one of the
most dangerous “diseases” eat-
ing away at the country’s
chances at social progress.

He noted that too often, ideas
put forward by talented
Bahamians are not taken in the
right context — simply because
they don’t wear the right colour.

“Tt is expected that we see
ourselves as one important enti-
ty and unfortunately one of the

greatest diseases that the
Bahamas has is political tribal-
ism; that persons who wear red
or yellow often do not see the
merit of the issue or the value of
somebody’s ideas except
through political spectacles,”
said Mr Pintard.

He stressed that Bahamians
must bring an end to both polit-
ical and religious tribalism if
they want the country to
progress.

“One of the greatest tragedies
we face in this country is when
persons who are talented and
gifted and have great ideas
somehow intellectually surren-
der unto politicians, and in
some cases to ministers in the

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

Pike 50,156

Paeceae Serene ete caters P4

Poe tOrd

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES



church,” he said.

Mr Pintard noted that com-
merce is also being stifled as a
result of political influence.

He said that in Grand
Bahama, New Providence and
Abaco, prominent persons seek
to block others from compet-
ing in the business sector.

“You have a network of per-
sons at the top who have pre-
determined that only a certain
few are going to get in. And
persons through political con-
nections often set up scenarios
where they can prevent others
from righteously competing
with them.

“One of the greatest dilem-
mas we have in this country is
that even in corporate govern-
ment structures ... while per-
sons might not do things that
are illegal they often do things
that are unethical in the execu-
tion of business, and many per-
sons are aware of the fact but
say nothing,” he said.

Mr Pintard said quality of life
must be improved for all
Bahamians, especially for those
who are marginalised and dis-
enfranchised.

He urged those who have the
means to reach out to the less
fortunate.

“Too often we have a great
imbalance, and many Bahami-
ans and friends of the Bahamas
who reside here and are doing
exceptionally well do not have a
heart for service or a willing-
ness to reach out and truly help
people.

“Tf we are not helping to feed
the marginalised and the disen-
franchised, they will seek to run
up on you with a 9mm or Knife
and they will affect the quality
of life that you and I enjoy,” he
warned.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 38, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Handgun
seized after
police chase;
suspect on
the loose

A police chase in southern
New Providence led to the
confiscation of a .45 hand-
gun, but a male suspect
remains on the loose.

Assistant Superintendent
Walter Evans said officers
from the Southern Police
Station were about to exe-
cute a search warrant at a
home on Dunmore Avenue
at around 7am on Monday,
when a man inside the house
saw the police and fled.

Officers gave chase but the
man escaped. During the
chase, the suspect threw
away an object that was
recovered and found to be a
A5 handgun, Mr Evans said.

No arrest has been made
but investigations continue.

Two detained
after drugs
discovered

TWO residents of Wulff
Road are in police custody in
connection with the discov-
ery of more than 60 packets
of marijuana.

Officers from the Wulff
Road police station made
the find after they executed
a search warrant at a house
in the Murphyville area.

According to press liaison
officer Walter Evans, the
officers reported finding a
paint can near a gas tank
outside the house which con-
tained 63 packets of marijua-
na, as well as a plastic bag
containing a small amount of
the drug.

A 33-year-old man and a
28-year-old woman are being
questioned.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays























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Shopper outrage after
Solomon’s bomb hoax

nBy ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A popular retail store was closed
down yesterday afternoon after an
anonymous female caller claimed there
were four bombs inside the building.

Management at Solomon’s Super-
centre on Old Trail Road yesterday
said it had no idea who would want
to make such a threat —- which was
called in at around 12.30pm — or why.

However, manager Dino Duncombe
told The Tribune the store did not take
the claim “lightly” and staff and cus-
tomers were immediately evacuated
from the premises.

An annoyed shopper, who wished
to remain anonymous, said her entire
day was ruined by the closure of the



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

EVACUATED staff gather outside Solomon’s Supercentre after a woman called in a bomb threat

yesterday afternoon.

store. “I don’t know why anyone
would be so stupid,” she said. “What-

ever your problem is, there is no rea-
son to act like a child, calling in a bomb

scare. Anyway, whatever their issue
is, I have nothing to do with it, and
they have no right to ruin my day like
that.”

Police and fire services arrived on
the scene and searched the area for
any evidence that the threat was any-
thing more than that, however they
“found absolutely nothing inside the
store,” said Mr Duncombe.

When The Tribune got to the store
at around 1.45pm, there were about
30 staff members gathered in the park-
ing lot waiting for law enforcement
officers to complete their sweep.

The store was closed for about three
and a half hours as a result of the
prank call.

Mr Duncombe said it took some
time for the bomb squad to arrive as
they are based at the Lynden Pindling
International Airport.

Boaters rescue three Dominican migrants

n By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

BOATERS rescued three
Dominican migrants who were
swimming in waters off south-
west New Providence near
Shipwreck Cay, the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force said.

Another migrant found on
the cay — which is about two
miles off Saunders Beach —
was picked up by Defence
Force officials during a search

of the area. Officials said it is
possible that the men were
part of a human smuggling
operation.

According to RBDF press
officer Senior Lieutenant
Sonia Miller, civilian boaters
were in the area of Shipwreck
Cay, otherwise known as Long
Cay, on Monday morning
when they stumbled upon the
three men swimming towards
New Providence.

“The boaters picked up the
swimmers, who were without

life jackets, just before 9am,”
Ms Miller said. "The men were
picked up by local mariners
(Monday) morning before
noon; we found the other man
later Monday evening on the
cay.”

Health

The men, who were report-
ed to be in good health, were
turned over to immigration
officials for processing.

Up to press time, no more

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Boy, 14, charged with housebreaking, stealing

A 14-year-old Mackey Street boy was arraigned
in Juvenile Court yesterday on housebreaking
and stealing charges.

The accused, who was detained by police with
the teenager who was discovered dead in a cell at
the East Street South Police Station Sunday night,
appeared in Juvenile Court 2, Victoria Gardens.

He was arraigned on three counts of house-
breaking and one count of stealing.

According to court dockets, it is alleged that on
May 22, the 14-year-old broke into the home of
Eloise Rolle on Chrysanthemum Avenue with
intent to commit a felony.

It is further alleged that on May 25, the accused
broke into the home of Agnes Smith on Collins
Avenue.

There, it is alleged, he stole an assortment of
personal items together valued at $2,875.

It is also alleged that on the same day, the
accused broke into the home of Jamal McKenzie
on Gilbert Street.

The juvenile pleaded not guilty to the charges
and was granted bail in the sum of $5,000. The
case has been adjourned to November 4.

It had been expected that the young man would
be charged with Michael Knowles, 15, who was
discovered dead on Sunday night with a nylon
cord around his neck.

It is believed that the cord was fashioned from
the draw-string of his trousers. Knowles was found
hanging from a bar near the ceiling of his cell.

While police have ruled the boy’s death a sui-
cide, his mother Donna Wilson believes that there
may be more to the story, as witnesses have told
her that her son was beaten while in police cus-
tody.

i Convicted killer seeks more time to appeal sentence

er charge.

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THE man convicted of the 2007 stabbing death of the daughtet of
veteran broadcaster Steve McKinney is appealing for more time to file
an appeal against his life sentence.

Michael Byron Simmons, 24, also known as “Kaz”, was convicted of
manslaughter in May 2008 after he decided to plead guilty to the less-

He was sentenced to life in prison in July 2008 by then Acting Jus-
tice Isaacs in connection with the stabbing death of Trevonne McK-

Simmons was represented by lawyer Dawn Hanna at his trial.

McKinney died in hospital after being stabbed multiple times in Wil-
son Tract on Sunday, March 4, 2007.

Simmons appeared in the Court of Appeal yesterday on an appli-
cation for an extension of time.

The matter, however, was adjourned to September 7 as Simmons did
not have an attorney present. The court will assign an attorney to

The Court of Appeal will first have to decide on whether or not to
grant Simmons an extension of time to file his appeal.

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migrants had been found and
the Defence Force had no evi-
dence that a vessel might have
been shipwrecked in the area.

Ms Miller added that RBDF
officers were conducting

another search of the area yes-
terday, but there were no new
developments up to press time.
It remains unclear how the
men got to the cay or how long
they were stranded there.

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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Perry Christie’s chance to shine

GOVERNMENT has set aside five days to
debate the Budget, which Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham presented to the House last
week.

The debate, which opens at 10 o’clock this
morning, will continue tomorrow, resuming
next week, Monday, Wednesday and Thurs-
day, and continuing that night until each mem-
ber has had his or her say.

Already Opposition Leader Perry Christie
has condemned the Ingraham Budget as offer-
ing “no blueprint for the way forward.” As Mr
Christie must obviously have such a blueprint,
these next two debating days will be a golden
opportunity for him to shine. In fact, if he has a
solution to the country’s dilemma it is his duty
as the leader of Her Majesty’s Loyal Opposition
to share his knowledge.

He criticised Mr Ingraham’s government for
its sober and “depressing” view of the economy.
The truth is there is nothing joyful, or hopeful
about the economy. We are certain that the
Bahamian people would prefer to know the
truth, no matter how painful, so that they can
tighten their belts, plant their little vegetable
gardens, and hope for the best. Did Mr Christie
expect the Prime Minister to pretend that he
saw a beautiful rainbow in the near future, when
there is none to be seen? However, if Mr
Christie does see something to which the rest of
us are blind, then again it’s his duty to share his
discovery. At least it will give relief to our gloom
and doom. Mr Christie said that instead of Mr
Ingraham hoisting the white flag of surrender,
he should present a plan for developing agri-
culture and fisheries, improving the financial
services sector and meeting the challenge facing
the tourism industry.

We now see far more activity on the agri-
cultural front than we saw during the Christie
administration. While The Tribune has pub-
lished photographs of BAIC chairman Edison
Key showing off the magnificent produce of
farmers, all the news that BAIC made during
the Christie years were allegations of misuse
of funds, political victimisation in dealing with
staff, and the disgraceful Korean fishing boat
scandal.

In those years Mr Christie was so pre-occu-
pied with keeping his minister and BAIC chair-
man from each others throats that he had no
time to use his creativity to inspire the farmers.

As for the financial sector, it seems govern-
ment is struggling with a difficult situation to
prevent these islands being completely shut off
to investors. As for tourism, there is not much
that one can do when potential visitors haven’t
money to travel. Tourist officials are using their
budget to tap as many markets as they can. We
are now fortunate to be hosting the 59th FIFA
conference at Atlantis. And later this year this
country will host the Miss World Beauty

pageant. But, it is true, while all of those asso-
ciated with tourism are out there fighting for
every tourism dollar they can get, Bahamians
will not see a steady flow of tourists until the
global economic crisis eases. No matter how
much Mr Christie tries to inspire Bahamians
to use their “ingenuity and creativity” to jump
start tourism, this is one problem he cannot
solve.

No one is happy that workers’ terms and
conditions of service have to be changed and
that nurses, doctors and teachers cannot get
their promised health insurance at the present
time. However, there is nothing that one can do
if the money is not there.

Would Mr Christie recommend that Mr
Ingraham maintain the status quo and drain
the Treasury, or put the brakes on now to at
least try to keep the nation afloat should the
present hard times become even harder. Mr
Ingraham has been very frank with the people.
A slowdown in business, a slowdown in tourist
arrivals and investments, translates into no mon-
ey to meet obligations. It is as simple as that.

If Mr Christie can solve the dilemma, then he
will have plenty of time to explain himself to the
nation in the next five days.

We know we shall hear all about the invest-
ment contracts that were held up by the Ingra-
ham administration when it became the gov-
ernment in 2007. Mr Ingraham wanted to scru-
tinise all the contracts, because it was felt that in
some of them too much of the people’s land
was being given away. Mr Christie has blamed
the Bahamas’ economic slowdown on this
holdup. However, these were investors
approved by the Christie government. If these
investments were so important why didn’t the
Christie government finalise them during its
administration and at least get them started —
some of them could have been completed
before the 2007 election. Maybe, Mr Christie
will tell us why his government did not complete
these agreements before the 2007 election. Were
they held up because Mr Christie did not want
them to become an election issue if Bahamians
were to question the generous concessions?
Obviously, the PLP was confident it would be
returned to power, and the agreements could be
signed after the election without the people
having a voice in their own affairs.

But the PLP lost the government. The Ingra-
ham government went over the agreements and
made changes. The global crisis descended
before they were finalised.

Mr Christie did not give the green light for
them to go ahead, nor did Mr Ingraham. Now
Mr Ingraham is being blamed for scuttling the
economy. Maybe within the next five days, Mr
Christie, if he had such confidence in these pro-
jects, will explain why he did not complete the
paperwork for them before 2007?

Crown
land for

everyone

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The Bahamas belongs to all
Bahamians. No Bahamian
deserves to have access to land
in the Bahamas more than any
other Bahamian, period. Who
died and left them in charge of
our birthright?

There is no Bahamian who is
more important than any other.
Regardless of how much educa-
tion we have or how much money
we have, we are all equal. It does
not matter if you come from
Bahamian royalty or come from
the ghetto, we all are equal. There
is no difference if you go to a
cathedral or a small church over
the hill through a dead end street,
you are as equal to the big timers
who go to churches downtown.

The whole acquisition of land
that is owned by the Bahamian
people must be revisited. The pre-
sumptuousness of anyone, regard-
less of who he or she might be, to
give away that which does not
belong to them in the first place
should be investigated, period. I
am flabbergasted how this prac-
tice was allowed to continue for
so long. The suggestions that a
foreigner may be in a position to
distribute or influence the distri-
bution of Bahamian land just goes
to prove how stupid Bahamians
really are to even consider even
imagining it. Only in the Bahamas
can a non-Bahamian sit in such a
delicate position. We must be the
laughing stock of the whole
world. It is almost embarrassing
to be a Bahamian.

This particular position has
always seemed to be held by for-
eigners and it is alleged that
almost all of Gladstone is now
owned by foreigners. What kind
of foolishness is this? Also rela-
tives of persons who are high up
politically allegedly have been
give large plots of land.

The recent revelation of the
land that was acquired and resold
was just a tip of the iceberg, espe-
cially since this practice has been
in full effect since time immemo-
rial. I personally know of many
persons who brag after they were
given large plots of Crown land.
The question I asked was, “what
did they do to deserve such great
fortune?” Their answer was:
“You got to be connected in high
places to be able to swing that!”

I am one who became very
angry when I heard of the sweet
land deals that were offered to
foreigners for no reason. I won-
dered how and why would any-
one “rape this country” giving
away the birthright of Bahami-
ans yet unborn. Why would we
bend over backwards that far just
to get a foreign investor, who
comes with empty hands and give
them thousands of acres, then
allow them to use the land to
acquire the financing to get their
project off the ground?

letters@tribunemedia net



Why has the idea of creating
jobs be the rational way we would
do what we do? It is foolish and
no one can convince me that it is
a wise business arrangement. But
we do it and we lose almost all
of the time. When are going to
cease and desist this unfair poli-
cy? When are we going to dis-
continue playing on an uneven
playing field? Bahamians are get-
ting weary of the disrespect. How
could a political party give away
Crown Land just before election
in lieu of favours given during the
election? Politics make strange
bedfellows is an understatement.

Now I am forced to make a
suggestion that I am sure would
be acceptable by the majority of
right thinking Bahamians. Since
the land is owned by the Bahami-
an people, then why not take a
complete inventory of how much
land is left and distribute it even-
ly to all “raw born” Bahamians.
Furthermore put a stipulation in
that the land cannot be sold but
can only be willed to a Bahamian.
Too many foreigners have bene-
fitted from the use of our
“birthright” and we get the
crumbs. How come large plots of
land are approved without the
input by the Bahamian people
through a referendum?

Tam still sick to my stomach
about the Mayaguana project. A
few guys sitting in a room can
conclude that Mr Foreigner can
get 10,000 acres and we must just
keep quiet. This could have been
shared between 10,000 Bahami-
ans at an acre per person.

This would eliminate the temp-
tation by greedy civil servants and
people in authority to deal with
our land. The Bahamas must be
the slackest place in the world.
There is no end to corruption.
Where and when will it end?
Very few are off limits. These
cliques that exist in the public ser-
vice show that things are probably
being shared between “members
only”.

It would also prevent a pastor
from acquiring a large plot of land
on Gladstone Road in the name
of his church and benefit from
the subdivision. Furthermore why
would a pastor stoop so low to
beg for land for himself under the
disguise of the church? This
would only compromises the
word of God, because the public
would probably think that the
transaction went down and they
would probably question the

integrity of the pastor. If so it
would suggest that the pastor had
abandoned his mission and had
now embarked on a mission to
see what he could get for himself.

Now, all of the land that was
recently acquired under false pre-
tenses should be retrieve and put
back in the inventory. People who
have got large plots should be left
with the amount that they would
get if the suggestion of sharing
equally is done.

It is amazing how land could
be taken and given in the
Bahamas and nothing happens.
It’s amazing, and in my opinion
further solidifies our reputation
as a corrupt country. It is high
time for us to throw caution to
the wind and “let the chips fall
where they may” and clean up
this mess, that stinks to high heav-
en. Those who want all should
get none. We must move with
haste to kill the “all for me baby”
spirit. Otherwise it would devour
us all. Stop the “ripping off “of
land that belongs to future gen-
erations. Stop giving away Crown
land; it does not belong to any
individual regardless of his posi-
tion or disposition. It is unfair
that an individual could give his
friend or family our land without
our permission.

I am willing to work together
with anyone who strongly
believes that we as Bahamians
are being exploited by the well
connected. This must stop, and it
must stop now. I expect the cow-
ards to hide. I also expect the
people who condone corruption
to become agitated and I expect
the people in authority who are
hooked on power to retaliate, but
if God be for you no man can be
against you.

I am strengthened by the fact
that good will win over evil. It
must.

IVOINE INGRAHAM
Nassau,
May, 2009.

(Throughout his letter Mr
Ingraham has given the impres-
sion that all Crown land transac-
tions have been a free gift to
friends and family. This is not
true. In all of the transactions
being questioned, the land was
bought at a low price, and in a
few cases was resold at a good
profit.

(The objection is that some
Bahamians with good connec-
tions can buy Crown land more
easily than can Bahamians with-
out the right connections. The
other resentment is that land
ostensibly bought cheaply for per-
sonal use was, in some instances,
turned into financial profit. —Ed)

Enlightened leadership needed

EDITOR, The Tribune.



In response to numerous letters and articles by Mr Rick Lowe and
The Nassau Institute I have felt compelled to write this letter.

Over and again Mr Lowe praises the supposed benefits of unfettered
capitalism and seems to echo the neocon position which, distilled to its
essence, favours the wealthy and generally scorns the less fortunate
members of society.

Has Mr. Lowe read the book “The Shock Doctrine” by Naomi
Klein? Mr Lowe and The Nassau Institute should inform the Bahami-
an public about the financial model upon which our economy is based.
Tell the people about the ideas of the late Sir Stafford Sands and of our
continuing dependence upon tourism and banking in a rapidly chang-
ing world. Make sure that readers understand that our financial system
is designed to protect wealthy depositors from many countries. Don't
forget to mention that the continuing dependence of government
upon a regressive tax like customs duty is intended to delay the intro-
duction of an income tax which the wealthy seek to avoid at any cost.

Please note that politicians no longer address the real issues such as
rapid population growth, severe traffic congestion, importation of
cheap labour, under funded public health and overloaded public edu-
cation systems, etc.

Point out that as long as the Public Treasury depends upon customs
duties levied upon imports there can be no serious effort to limit the
importation of automobiles and no effective way to reduce congestion
on the roads even when certain quiet residential streets are converted
into highways. The idea of unemployment insurance seems to terrify Mr
Lowe. However, if he found himself suddenly unemployed perhaps he
would not be so critical of a system that is widely used in many coun-
tries. Of course there exists the risk of abuse of the system but that risk
already exists with customs and National Insurance as well.

Full blown socialism is on display in Cuba, a country I have visited
on several occasions. Since I speak Spanish fluently and have read
Cuban history in both English and Spanish (the official and the unof-
ficial versions) and have been to places off the path of the average
tourist, [have to admit that I cannot see myself living under such a sys-
tem. However, The Nassau Institute and Mr Lowe should be honest
enough to point out that democratic socialism exists in Europe, espe-
cially in the Scandinavian countries where the electorate decided after
World War II that a system of high taxation by which a wide range of
social programmes would be funded was necessary in order to estab-
lish a society in which it is very difficult to become rich and even
more difficult to end up bankrupt and living on the street as a result of
being unable to pay medical bills.

Perhaps Mr Lowe has seen the film “Sicko” by Michael Moore and
any number of documentaries on the topic presented by PBS and
cable TV. Let us recall that the world economy is in considerable dif-
ficulty at present as a result of unfettered and largely unregulated
capitalism which feeds off human greed and selfishness.

Obviously it is necessary to find a middle ground between two
extremes and that is where we require enlightened leadership with ideas
that transcend petty personal and party interests.

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THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 38, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Call for enhanced medical
treatment on Staniel Cay

IN THE wake of a series of med-
ical emergencies on and around Staniel
Cay, a concerned citizen has called for

0 In brief

Bahamian
made video at
FIFA opening —

THE delegates of the ;
Federation of International :
Football Associations were
treated to a thrilling video
shot in the Bahamas when



.. We have a Sandals resort about one
mile away and some huge building pro-
jects on the neighbouring cays as well

about the medical resources
on the island have been
brought to his attention up

and a heart attack suffered by
a local man.
“These are just a few of the

the 59th FIFA congress the government to enhance the level of — until now. many accidents that occur as here on the island. There is also the
opened yesterday after- medical treatment available on the Messages left for the local here and as you can see they Staniel Cay Yacht Club, Sampson Cay
noon. : island. administrator and Health Min- are very serious,” said the let- Club and Marina and Compass Cay

Swiss Production Compa- } In a letter to The Tribune, a resi- ister Hubert Minnis were not ter. Marina that accommodate thousands
ny VisualPark hired ? dent of the island said numerous emer- _ returned up to press time. While medical emergencies of tourists yearly and yet we have

Bahamian production man- :
ager Heather Carey to put
together a local crew and
talent to star in the video.

Locations featured inthe
film included Festival Place,
Parliament Square, the ;
steps of Frederick Street, }
Arawak Cay, the Pirates of }
Nassau Museum andthe
National Art Gallery of the :
Bahamas. ;

The local crew included
assistant director Charles;
Smith, who is well known to :
Bahamians as the host of
the show Electric Air and
the director of Baha-Men
videos.

Julian Lord worked as :
key grip with Antionne and }
Vaughn Rolle serving as i

gencies — some of which resulted in
death - and the fact that several
tourism developments are located in
the area, make it vital that healthcare
is improved.

“We really need this matter investi-
gated and resolved immediately
because the summer is approaching,”
he added.

However, MP for the area Anthony
Moss told The Tribune no complaints

According to the resident,
recent medical emergencies
on the island included: a
yachting accident which left a
tourist with a broken back; a
stabbing accident on Farmers
Cay which resulted in a death; a bro-
ken leg suffered by a seven year-old
boy who fell from a dock; a fall from a
bicycle which left a five-year-old with
a face wound which needed stitches;

FIFA Congress to bring
‘a great deal of money’

THE 2009 FIFA congress

on Staniel Cay are supposed
to be attended to by a local
nurse, the resident claimed
that she has left the island for
six weeks and no replacement
has been arranged.

Even when the nurse is in place, he
said, one person is not enough to deal
with all medical emergencies.

“Staniel Cay is a very busy little
island where lots of tourists travel to .

absolutely no emergency services on
the island,” he said.

It was further claimed that two peo-
ple living on the island who have med-
ical qualifications have offered to help
treating injuries, but are now being
“turned away by the government.”

“It is embarrassing ... we have a
wonderful professional couple here
who are willing to help,” said the resi-
dent.

Yam alloyed ame UTA TAT ASS






Patrice Ann Johnson



the place for sports around the world as

grip assists and Apryl : willinject “a great dealofmon- tourism. ‘the World’s Sport’.”

Weech worked asa stylist ; ey” into the Bahamas econo- “We have delegates In preparation for
and hair and makeup co- ? my, Minister of Youth, Sports coming from more the congress, 10 tons
ordinator. and Culture Desmond Bannis- than 100 countries — of material were trans-

ter said.

The two-day event, which
has never before been held in
the Caribbean, began yester-
day at the Atlantis Resort on
Paradise Island. Prime Minister lionaires and others |
Hubert Ingraham delivered the are very wealthy peo-
opening address. ple.

“We are extremely pleased "They are going to
that FIFA chose the Bahamas be here for about a
as the site for its congress, and week and they are going to be
for the announcement of the spending a lot of money in our
site of the next World Cup, the country and you are going to
world's largest sporting event,” see that reflected.”

Minister Bannister said. Mr Bannister hailed FIFA as

“The benefits of the hun- "the most powerful and presti-
dreds of FIFA delegates visit- gious sporting organisation in
ing our country and occupying — the world." The last World Cup
hundreds of hotel rooms will attracted an audience of more
certainly make a difference for than 600 million.
many Bahamian families this “That is much more than any
summer and will place us Super Bowl,” he said. “Foot-
squarely in the world's eye as_ ball (soccer) is regarded

and these are not just
coaches and ath-
letes,” Mr Bannister
said. “Several of
them are multi-mil-

ported from FIFA
headquarters. More
than 5,000 hotel nights
have been reserved
and about 100 journal-
) ists accredited for an
| event.
ie Mr Bannister

Meenemeeuiiciae referred to FIFA pres-
ident Joseph Blatter,
whom he met at Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport on
May 26, as “the most powerful
man in sports in the world”.

“We are pleased to have him
in the Bahamas," said Mr Ban-
nister. "We are going to do
everything we can to ensure
that they have a good time, that
they enjoy their stay to the
fullest, and that they want to
come back.

“Tt is very critical that we let

The stars of the show
were 15 children between
the ages of 5 and 12, who
represented the Bahamas
and other countries.

Military: Gitmo
letainee dies of |
apparent suicide

NSAN JUAN, Puerto Rico

PRESIDENT THE FEDERATION OF INTERNATIONAL FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION
(FIFA) Joseph Blatter during the 2014 World Cup Brazil Announcement of Host
Cities Names, at Atlantis. Pictured, from left, are President of the Brazil Fed-
eration Ricardo Terra Teixeira, FIFA President Blatter and FIFA Secretary
General Jerome Valcke. Among the cities named for the games include Rio de
Janeiro, Sao Paulo and Brasilia.



everybody know what a won-
derful country we have, what
friendly people we have, and
that this is a place where they
are welcome.”

Odes behCl Ga rden

where life ts still simple and people stil care

Murphyville, tnd Right from Sears Road.
Telephone 322-8493

Delegates will receive “red-
carpet” treatment and some of
them will arrive in celebrity
style, said Mr Bannister.

A YEMENI detainee at e SEE STORY TOP LEFT

Guantanamo Bay has died of
an "apparent suicide," U.S. mil- }
itary officials announced Tues- }
day, according to Associated }
Press. :
The Joint Task Force that :
runs the U.S. prison in Cuba }
said guards found 31-year-old }
Muhammad Ahmad Abdallah
Salih unresponsive and not
breathing in his cell Monday
night. :

In a statement issued from
Miami, the U.S. military said :

CREDIT SUISSE
Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch

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from ODESSA GARDEN!!!

the detainee was pronounced }
dead by a doctor after "exten-
sive lifesaving measures had }

been exhausted."

The Yemeni prisoner, known }
as Al-Hanashi, has been held
without charge at Guantanamo
since February 2002. Military :
records show he was about 31.
His is the fourth apparent sui-

cide at Guantanamo.

The U.S. military says the
remains will be autopsied by a :
pathologist from the Armed

Forces Institute of Pathology.

The prisoner appears to have }
joined the long-running hunger
strike at Guantanamo, accord-
ing to medical records previ- }
ously released by the military :
in response to a Freedom of }
Information Act lawsuit filed }

by The Associated Press.

His weight was down to i

about 86 pounds (39 kilograms)

in December 2005. He weighed }
124 pounds (56 kilograms)
when he was first taken to ?
Guantanamo in February 2002. }

A prison spokesman, Navy }
Lt. Cmdr. Brook DeWalt, con- }
firmed the incident but declined :
to discuss further details on how i
the Yemeni man committed }
suicide and whether any family
members have been contacted.

DeWalt declined to say }
whether procedures have }
changed at the prison as aresult

of the apparent suicide.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Private Banking

is presently considering applications for

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT OFFICER
CANADIAN & BRAZILIAN DESKS

The Private Banking Business Area is accepting applications for a Business
Development Officer, covering Canada and Brazil Markets:

Duties will include:

Acquisition and development of new offshore Canadian and Brazilian

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Marketing of estate planning, private banking and portfolio management
services to prospective clients along with additional services, such as,
the set-up of companies and trusts together with administrative procedures
Advising clients of clients origin on products, services and investment

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Applicants should possess a University Degree (or equivalent) in Banking

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At least seven (7) years banking experience including relationship
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Marketing experience throughout Canada and Brazil

Must have established international client base with assets under
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Applications should be submitted to:
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Nassau, Bahamas
or via fax 356-8148

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS: JUNE 18, 2009



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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

PLP calls for inquiry into
boy's death in police custody
i



Debris confirms crash :
of Air France Flight M7

m FERNANDO DE

NORONHA, Brazil

AN AIRPLANE seat, a
fuel slick and pieces of white
debris scattered over three
miles of open ocean marked
the site in the mid-Atlantic on
Tuesday where Air France
Flight 447 plunged to its
doom, Brazil’s defense minis-

ter said, according to Associat- 3

ed Press.

Brazilian military pilots
spotted the wreckage, sad
reminders bobbing on waves,
in the ocean 400 miles (640
kilometers) northeast of these
islands off Brazil’s coast. The

plane carrying 228 people van-
ished Sunday about four hours }

into its flight from Rio de
Janeiro to Paris.

“T can confirm that the five
kilometers of debris are those
of the Air France plane,”
Defense Minister Nelson
Jobim told reporters at a
hushed news conference in
Rio. He said no bodies had
been found and there was no
sign of life.

The effort to recover the
debris and locate the all-
important black box
recorders, which emit signals

for only 30 days, is expected to

be exceedingly challenging.

FROM page one

the police should investigate itself.”

Michael Knowles, 15, was found
dead in his police cell at around 8.21
pm Sunday. Officers at the East Street
South Police Station reportedly found
the teenager hanging from an upper
bar with what is believed to be a draw-
string from his shorts around his neck.

While police have ruled his death a
suicide, Knowles’ mother Donna Wil-
son, 33, claims that police reports do
not add up. According to Knowles,
two witnesses who were at the station
claimed that her son had been brutal-
ly beaten by police.

Mrs Hanna Martin said: “The public
statements of his mother raise serious
questions which are at odds with the
official statements emanating from
police.

“The law provides for the manner in
which a minor is to be arrested
detained and interrogated by police

and while in police custody. Given
these facts and because it is funda-
mentally important that there is public
confidence in the exercise of police
powers, an immediate inquiry by an
impartial body must be established by
the Government to investigate the
cause of death of this minor.”

The party chairman and MP for
Englerston said she will be asking
questions of the Minister of National
Security relative to the terrible tragedy
in parliament tomorrow.

The party’s statement comes as Ms
Wilson says she is anxiously awaiting
the results of an autopsy on her son’s
body.

The single mother of five said that
based on those results, she could take
legal action against the police force
but added that her family would “cross
that bridge when we get there.”

The Tribune office was inundated
with callers expressing their
concern over the allegations of police
brutality.



THE TRIBUNE

MICHAEL
KNOWLES’
MOTHER
Donna Wilson,
33, claims that
police reports
do not add up.

Dear Shareholders, _
—— ee Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Consolidated Statement of Operations

As many of you are aware, Grand Bahama continues to struggle Three months ended February 28, 2009 with comparative information for 2008

economically as does the rest of the world as we all go through the present
global recession. These challenges are in every industry here on the island
whether you are in tourism, banking, retail or any other business.

Outstanding shares = 4,708,334
Expressed in Bahamian dollars

Th f th i er ih wilted { 3 months ended 3 months ended
e outcome of these tough economic times has resulted 1n many companies 28-Feb-09 29-Feb-08

having to severely trim their expenses and staff to stay afloat under the

present circumstances. Sales 2,638,548 3,492,105
Cost of sales 1,956,915 2,557,881

It is true that at FCC, we too have been severely impacted by the present Pier cue aon

economic conditions. However, there is a ray of hope for us in that some of
our challenges are a bit different in that we are still experiencing additional
customer demand which we need to fill with our products and services.

Payroll costs 509,404 496 815
Redundancy costs 195,000 0
Other operating costs 200,983 218,702
Rent expense 105,600 115,518
Advertising expense 10,247 19,313

Unfortunately we are reporting a loss in the os quarter of $521k. Both the Utilities expense 85,871 92,179
Home Centre and the concrete division lost money in the 2â„¢ quarter due to a 1,107,105 942,527

reduction in sales of 20% at the Home Centre and 37% at the concrete

division over the same period last year. nee pete er

depreciation and amortisation (425,472) (8,303)

Therefore, based on the declining sales and the resultant losses, we took the Depn. and amort. expense (55,580) (67,127)
very difficult but necessary step in March of laying off 22 people in the
company. The redundancies and one early retirement costs totaled $195k
and we have recorded this as a one time expense in our 2â„¢ quarter

financials.

Net financing income/(expense 40,522 33,557

Net income/(loss) (521,574) (108,987)

The resultant savings in payroll costs for the company will be about $130k a
quarter and we will see these savings reflected in our 3" quarter financials as
a result of us recording the redundancy costs of $195k in our an quarter

pa Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Consolidated Statement of Operations

Six months ended February 28, 2009 with comparative information for 2008
The drop in concrete sales is a result of a number of factors, which not only
include the present economic conditions but also the addition of more
competitors in the marketplace and our limited product offerings to our
customers.

Outstanding shares = 4,708,334
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

6 months ended 6 months ended
28-Feb-09 29-Feb-08

Therefore, we have now taken proactive steps to improve our concrete sales
and gain additional market share. Recently, we were able to purchase a
Columbia Model 22 block plant from Florida Block in Miami and we are
forecasting that this plant will be operational by the end of this month so that
we can start selling concrete blocks in early June 2009.

Sales 6,063,578 7,238,994
Cost of sales 4,603,725 5,280,061
Gross profit 1,459,853 1,958,933

Payroll costs 1,008,933 1,019,028
Redundancy costs 195,000 0
Other operating costs 380,857 430,636
Rent expense 209,400 254 469
Advertising expense 17,640 44,580

Utilities expense 181,214 183,375

We are confident that once we start producing quality blocks, this will
enhance our customer offerings and we will see our revenues at the concrete
plant increase as we will now be able to offer, not only concrete, but also
concrete blocks to the contractors on Grand Bahama.

Income/(loss) before interest, taxes
Further, we believe this strong competitive move, will increase our sales depreciation and amortisation (533,191) 26,845
revenues at the Home Centre, as we will now be able to offer special pricing
to our contractors that are prepared to purchase concrete, concrete blocks
and building supplies from us. In essence, we will position the company as

the one stop shop for construction supplies in Grand Bahama.

Depn. and amort. expense (126,587) (139,780)
Net financing income/(expense 81,820 69,716

Net income/(loss) (741 598) (182,651)
In addition, the recent hiring of Martin Foody as our concrete plant manager,
who is also overseeing the assembly of the block plant, is impacting
positively on improving the quality of our concrete and regaining concrete
business lost in the past to our competitors.

Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Consolidated Balance Sheet
As at February 28, 2009

Based on the above, we expect that despite there being a lack of very large
construction projects in Freeport we will still be able to report a profit in the
last four months of this fiscal in the concrete division.
28-Feb-09 August 31,2008
(Unaudited) (audited)

Assets

As mentioned earlier our sales revenues at the Home Centre in the 2nd
quarter of this fiscal are down 20% over the same period last year, however

our general and administration expenses have been managed very carefully
and allowing for the redundancy costs we have again been able to further
reduce them by 13% over the same 2nd quarter period last year.

Even though we have continued to manage our expenses, our inventory
levels have dropped and it is now seriously affecting our sales revenues at
the Home Centre.

As mentioned the significant reduction in payroll costs will improve the
bottom line, free some cash constraints in the future and help to assist in
obtaining inventory which is the critical fuel to produce revenues. We will
need though to strive diligently to maintain the necessary levels of inventory
that are required to drive sales and grow our business.

However, on a positive note, we continue to see over and over again, that the
demand for our products and services from our many loyal customers
continues to remain strong and if we can maintain the monthly sales revenue
targets at the Home Centre we should report profitability based on the
current payroll and operating expenses.

We are expecting that the significant cost saving steps that have already
been implemented, coupled with the production of concrete blocks, giving
us anew source of revenue, will assist us in surviving through these tough
economic times.

Ray Simpson
Chief Executive Officer
May 19", 2009

Cash

Accounts receivable, net

Inventories

Inventories of spare parts and supplies
Deposits and prepaid expenses

Total current assets
Fixed assets

Total assets

Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity

Bank overdraft

Accounts payable and accrued expenses
Warranty Provision

Current portion of long term debt

Total current liabilities
Long term debt

Shareholders’ equity:
Share Capital
Contributed surplus
Appraisal excess
Retained earnings
Current earnings

19,035
720,149
1,283,181
96,178
69,773

2,188,316
4,162,840

6,351,156

1,972,479
3,513,413
5,000
134,604

5,625,496

47,083
5,774,868
1,433,867

(5,788,559)

(741,598)

48,530
607,011
1,672,262
82,970
67,142

2,477,915
4,115,724

6,593,639

1,841,481
3,039,007
5,000
183,857

5,069,345
57,036
47,083

5,774,868

1,433,867
(5,788,559)

Total equity 725,661 1,467,259

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity $ 6,351,157 6,593,640





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009, PAGE 7





Maurice Glinton and the
accountability of judges

Preeerorr lawyer Mau-
rice Glinton told mem-
bers of The Nassau Institute last
week that freedom in the
Bahamas was threatened by
judges who are politically compli-
ant, unaccountable to the public,
and acquiescent in their own
abuse.

Glinton has degrees in law,
economics and international rela-
tions, and has written extensively
on constitutional law and law
reform. He is best known for
suing the government In 2003
(with fellow lawyer Leandra
Esfakis) over measures that par-
liament enacted eight years ago
affecting the confidentiality of
lawyer-client relations. That
action was subsequently taken
over by the Bar Council and
remains in limbo.

According to Glinton, the judi-
clary is as important to good gov-
ernance as are the legislative and
executive branches, and freedom
is seriously diminished by the lack
of respect for judges: "If our judi-
cial system cannot carry out its
role that is reason for concern that
the government is not perform-
ing with the public interest in
mind, which puts liberty and com-
merce at risk."

But this failure may also reflect
the "misplaced loyalties" of judges
themselves, he said. As the wield-
ers of power judges must be fully
accountable. And he dismissed
claims that judges are not politi-
cally influenced as "weak protes-
tations in the face of the obvious."
In his view, one of the chief rea-
sons for the lack of judicial inde-
pendence in the Bahamas is the
process by which judges are
recruited.

"I know more about judges in
the US than I do about those in
the Bahamas, who are faceless,"
he said. "We need a process that
forces judges to be accountable,
and I am not talking about simply
making a report to parliament. It
is the inner strength of judges that
alone can save the judiciary. We
need a mandated procedure for
judicial appointments."

Such a process would seek to
take politicos out of the equation.
Currently, the chief justice and
the appeal court justices are cho-
sen by the prime minister, after
consultation with the leader of the
opposition. Other judges — there
can be as many as 12 on the
Supreme Court — are selected by
the Judicial and Legal Service
Commission.

The commission is chaired by
the chief justice and includes
another judge of his choosing, as
well as the chairman of the Public
Service Commission and two
members picked by the prime
minister after consultation with
the leader of the opposition. This
archaic arrangement gives far too
much power to the executive and
stands in stark contrast to the cur-
rent state of affairs in the United
Kingdom.

The British chief justice is now
appointed by a panel convened
by the Judicial Appointments
Commission, a genuinely inde-
pendent body that selects judges
on merit from the widest range
of eligible candidates. The 15
commissioners are drawn from
the judiciary, the legal profession
and the lay public, and their pro-
cedures for selecting judges are
public and transparent. Politicians
are excluded from the process.

But Glinton says Bahamians
are "uneasy" about taking respon-
sibility for our own affairs: "We
have 1,000 lawyers yet we are still
beating about the Eastern
Caribbean for judges. We should
not leave our most cherished pos-
sessions in the hands of people
who are here today and gone
tomorrow. And if we remain
silent on this there will be no
change and the country will con-
tinue to deteriorate."

He added that "Judicial inde-
pendence depends ultimately on
how judges repel any attempts
against this independence. The
truth of the matter is that judges in
the Bahamas are too often per-
ceived as compliant and acquies-
cent in their own abuse, even to

—

TOUGH GALL CALL

Mes

the point of tolerating in their
midst some who are legally and
morally unsuitable for the third
branch of government."

Such matters are critical to the
rule of law, he said. Political
thinkers have long argued that
checks and balances between sep-
arate branches of government are
vital to prevent abuse of power, a
view shared by John Marshall —
the great 19th century jurist who
defined the American legal sys-
tem. It was Marshall who declared
that "the only security against the
abuse of power is found in the
structure of government itself.”

According to Glinton, a truly
independent judiciary can only be
achieved through accountability,
and judges should be subject to
public scrutiny in the Bahamas as
they are in the United States. And
it is important to recruit Bahami-
an judges in order to prevent the
judiciary from becoming a non-
Bahamian "ward" of the other
branches of government.

"Accountability requires open-
ness of process, beginning with a
mandated procedure for carrying
out selections," he said. "We have
judges but no judicial system.
There is a lack of leadership - the
chief justice should be out on a
limb making the case. There are
few Bahamian judges today
because we don't respect our
judges.”

Although couched in academ-
ic language, there is much wisdom
in what Glinton had to say. And
we ignore these issues at our per-
il. I can think of three possible
reasons for the mind-numbing
inertia of the political class in this
context. One, they don't under-
stand. Two, they understand but
want to keep things as they are
because it suits them. Three, they
understand and want to make
changes but lack the political cov-
er or will to do so.

Perhaps one lesson from his-
tory will suffice to encourage
Bahamian judges and lawyers to
step up to the plate. In 1832 Chief
Justice Marshall ruled in favour
of sovereignty for the Cherokee
Indians, but President Andrew
Jackson simply ignored the deci-
sion and proceeded to ethnically
cleanse Indians from the Ameri-
can states.

Yet despite this massive - and
tragic - system failure in a new
nation, Marshall was able to
establish the Supreme Court’s
powers of judicial review as the
final arbiter of the constitution.
And today he is credited with
cementing the judiciary as an
influential branch of government.

The onus is on Bahamian
lawyers to take up the challenge
here and ensure an independent
and accountable judiciary. Are
they up to the task?

Cable Bahamas and
Compulsory Licensing

\ \ | hen we told critics of
Cable Bahamas to put

up or shut up last week, some
readers pointed to the company's
supposed theft of programming
from American providers. But this
is really a bilateral trade dispute.
It all dates back to 1995 when
CBL began servicing households
on New Providence. Cable
Bahamas is on one side of the
copyright issue and the US-based
Television Association of Pro-
grammers — an industry group
representing more than 30 US pay
television channels in the region
— is on the other. But the real
argument is between the Bahami-
an and American governments.
The dispute arose because
CBL couldn't get the commercial
rights to some 60 per cent of its
US-originated programming.
Those rights were simply not
available to a tiny English-speak-
ing territory in this largely Span-



ish-speaking region because the
copyright owners couldn't be
bothered to negotiate them. But
over the years the programming
that is still in dispute has dwin-
dled to about 7 per cent of the
total — mostly HBO movies.

This circumstance must be
viewed in the context of the mar-
ket that existed during the mid-
1990s, when practically every
Bahamian household had a satel-
lite dish that was already pirating
American signals. This was also
the case in other countries that
could receive US satellite signals.

In an effort to regularise the
market, the Bahamas passed a
copyright law in 1998 which pro-
vided for compulsory licensing of
TV signals under international
convention. This meant that the
content could be re-transmitted
by an operator licensed within the
Bahamas without the consent of
the foreign-based copyright own-
er. However, the content provider
retained the right to be paid for
that use.

The 1998 law created a copy-
right royalty tribunal (currently
composed of lawyer Kirk Sey-
mour, artist Stan Burnside and
accountant James Gomez) to deal
with the compulsory licensing
issue. This tribunal collects roy-
alties in order to make appropri-
ate payments to copyright own-
ers when there are claims. And
over the years, CBL says it has
contributed some $70 million to
this fund.

The dispute came to a head in
2000 when the Bahamas reached
an agreement with the US to cor-
rect "deficiencies" in the copy-
right law. Of particular concern
to the programmers were provi-
sions for the compulsory licens-
ing of premium, encrypted cable
television programming in the
Bahamas. They also complained
about inadequate compensation
rates for re-transmissions to hotels
and other commercial enterprises.

Under this bilateral agreement,
our government committed to
make the cable compulsory
license more palatable to the pro-
grammers. It took four years to
enact these changes, which led to
the Bahamas being removed from
a US watch list. But the amend-
ments were never actually imple-
mented and the programmers
continue to urge the US govern-
ment to support their cause.

"Restrictive legislation by the
Bahamian government, coupled
with a possible domino effect that
could occur in other Caribbean
countries, could result in a loss of
approximately $250-$270 million
in annual programming revenue
for US pay television companies,"
the programmers argued earlier
this year.

"We strongly believe the
Bahamas merits (a) high level of
engagement due to its egregious
lack of protection of US intellec-
tual property, and specifically for
its actions to institutionalize the
theft of US films and pay televi-
sion programming through its
compulsory license.”

If the amendments to the copy-
right act were to be implemented,
they would limit the scope of the
compulsory license to the “unal-
tered re-transmission of free, over-
the-air broadcast signals and
would not permit re-transmission
of encrypted signals or extend to
re-transmission over the Inter-
net."

Both the Christie and Ingra-
ham administrations have refused
to implement the 2004 amend-
ments until the commercial needs
of Cable Bahamas for English-
speaking content are met. As part
of the 2000 agreement, the US
promised to “encourage” Ameri-
can rightholders to negotiate these
licenses, and the US has so far not
acceded to the programmers’ lob-
bying to put the Bahamas back
on the watch list.

TIME FOR A HOUSE CALL

A REAL estate professional in the US recently
coined the term “Price Denial Syndrome,” a trou-
blesome condition that afflicts sellers having a hard
time facing the realities of today’s markets. Of course
it’s difficult to make a pricing concession, but an
overpriced home simply will not sell.

Perhaps the sellers argue that they really need
the money, but then they have to ask themselves
what they’ll do for money if the home doesn’t sell.
Maybe they figure that they can shoot for the moon
now and reduce the price later if they must. How-
ever, the longer a property remains unsold, the
more likely it is that even more price reductions
will follow. Then it’s taken even longer to get a sale

at a lower price.

Some sellers might suggest trying a higher price
just for the first two weeks, but that’s when the
interest of serious buyers is always greatest. Those

ty.

Bahamas real
estate today

Carmen Massoni



buyers usually look within a certain range, and won’t
even make an offer at all on an overpriced proper-

Most importantly, if the sellers need to buy anoth-
er home, time is of the essence. If the sale takes
too long, theyll be buying at a time when prices
and interest rates may begin climbing again.

If you’re suffering from PDS, pay attention to
the news, review your home’s Competitive Market
Analysis, and call me in the morning!

According to a CBL
spokesman, "we will buy the
commercial rights if the pro-
grammers will sell, but
Caribbean demographics are
mostly Spanish so rights are
often only available for Span-
ish programming. To operate
successfully we need English
language programming, and we
were the first in the region to
seek those rights. Over time we
have obtained most of them.”

The plain fact is that com-
pulsory licensing is 100 per cent
legal in the Bahamas, and it is a
practice that is internationally
accepted. Cable Bahamas
attempts to deal with this issue

every year in Washington, but
as the spokesman put it: "We
are just a pimple on the back-
side of the industry."

It is also worth noting that
CBLs main competitor —
Direct TV satellite television —
is in the same position locally
and has thousands of Bahamian
subscribers. Cable's pricing for
subscriber services matches that
of Direct TV.

For the record, we were mis-
taken in saying that CBL
planned to buy out Phil Keep-
ing's controlling stake in the
company. Keeping (the Canadi-
an who launched Cable

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited

(Incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas)

Consolidated Balance Sheet (Unaudited)

As of 31 March 2009

(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)

ASSETS

Cash on hand and at banks

Investment securities

Mortgages, consumer and other loans
Property, plant and equipment
Prepayments and other assets

TOTAL ASSETS

LIABILITIES
Customer deposits
Debt securities

Accrued expenses and other liabilities

TOTAL LIABILITIES

EQUITY

Share capital
Revaluation surplus
Retained earnings

TOTAL EQUITY

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

31 March

17,758,628
33,408,237
204,337,640
12,133,988
5,002,082

Bahamas in 1994) sold out to
another Canadian-led group in
2004. It is this group that Cable
plans to buy out now. But the
key point remains — the buy out
will make CBL 100 per cent
Bahamian owned and con-
trolled. It is now mostly owned
by Bahamian shareholders, but
boardroom control rests with the
Canadian group (Columbus
Communications).

What do you think?
Send comments to

larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

31 December
2009 2008
$ $

18,646,538
36,615,975
198,861,978
12,286,606
6,079,617



272,640,575

211,931,070
25,564,027
1,810,718

272,490,714

209,931,152
28,107,262
1,483,632



239,305,815

20,000,001
2,504,341
10,830,418

239,522,046

20,000,001
2,526,329
10,442,338



33,334,760

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Consolidated Income Statement (Unaudited)
For the Three Months Ended 31 March 2009
(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)

INCOME

Interest income
Interest expense

Net interest income
Non-interest income

Total income

EXPENSES
Salaries and staff benefits

General and administrative

31 March

4,927,602
2,720,230

272,640,575

32,968,668

272,490,714

3 Months Ended

31 March

2009 2008
$ $

4,002,644
2,170,498



2,207,372

1,397,914

1,832,146

1,418,985



3,605,286

1,392,604
1,268,625

Provision for loan losses (Note 5)
Depreciation and amortisation (Note 6)

Total expenses

NET INCOME

259,841
318,124

3,251,131

1,305,298
1,172,385
111,490
271,049



3,239,194

366,092

2,860,222

390,909



Weighted average number of ordinary

shares outstanding

Earnings per share

28,666,670

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Consolidated Statement of Changes in Equity (Unaudited)
For the Three Months Ended 31 March 2009
(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)

As of 1 January 2008
Depreciation transfer
Net income

Dividends on ordinary
shares

As of 31 December 2008

As of 1 January 2009
Depreciation transfer
Net income

Dividends on ordinary
shares

As of 31 March 2009

Ordinary _ Revaluation
Shares Surplus

$ $
20,000,001 2,572,037

(45,708)

28,666,670

$0.013 $0.014

Retained
Earnings Total

$ $
10,230,691 32,802,729
45,708

1,312,606 1,312,606

(1,146,667) _ (1,146,667)



20,000,001 2,526,329

10,442,338 32,968,668





20,000,001 2,526,329

(21,988)

10,442,338 32,968,668
21,988

366,092 366,092



20,000,001 2,504,341

10,830,418

33,334,760







PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Customs security
ouard dies of
‘knife’ wounds

FROM page one

stationed at Kelly's Dock, was driven to hospital by private
vehicle around 8pm Monday with "lacerations about the
body," said Press Liaison Officer Assistant Superintendent
Walter Evans.

About eight hours later, around 4 am yesterday,
Knowles died as a result of his injuries, Mr Evans
added.

Police believe Knowles received his fatal injuries dur-
ing an altercation with a man he knew in the area of
Willow Tree Avenue and Saffron Street.

ASP Evans said police are "following several leads
into the man who may have been responsible for this
act."

Yesterday police were still trying to discover the iden-
tity of the person who drove Knowles to the hospital.

Reports reaching The Tribune yesterday indicated
that Knowles, a resident of Rosewood Street in
Pinewood Gardens, was "chapped" with a cutlass.
Police, however, did not confirm this.

"He had some cuts about the body and head, we're
not sure what they were inflicted by, maybe some sharp
instrument," head of the Central Detective Unit Super-
intendent Elsworth Moss told The Tribune. "We're not
certain as yet (how he received his injuries), all we know
is he showed up to hospital yesterday (Monday) after-
noon with some injuries about the body. We couldn't
speak to him because he was not conscious."

Knowles’ former co-workers at the department's main
office on Thompson Boulevard were shocked and "sad-
dened" over the news of his death.

"We're in mourning and stunned. He was just down
here Friday, he was in a good mood," said one co-work-
er, who asked to remain anonymous.

"Most of the staff feel for him because he was popular
—a lot of people seem to like him, as far as the staff
concerned he was co-operative and helpful," said the
Customs officer who described Knowles as a reserved,
laid-back person who didn't appear to be a trouble mak-
er.

When contacted for comment, Comptroller of Cus-
toms Glen Gomez extended condolences to Knowles’
family on behalf of the department.

"We are of course saddened by the way he died and
his life being shortened, we extend our sympathy to his
family," said Mr Gomez.

Yesterday head of the Central Detective Unit Super-
intendent Elsworth Moss said police did not have a
motive for the killing or any suspects in custody. How-
ever, he said, police "were following some leads” and
were looking to make an arrest "in the very near
future."

Knowles’ death marked the country's thirty-second
homicide for the year, police said. He had worked with
the Department of Customs as a guard for more than
seven years.

Reggae star slams

Olice after kidnap

FROM page one

time of crisis, but instead (police)
approached me as if I’m automatically
the problem,” said Mr Stubbs.

“Their attitude should be ‘Sure I'll help
you,’ not ‘You’re lying to me’,” added
the father, noting that he lodged a formal
complaint in the wake of the incident.

According to the singer, the first officer
he encountered caught up with him as
he ran up and down near the area where
he had parked his car, trying to “find any-
one who might have seen anything.”

“He rode towards me (on a bike) ina
sort of aggressive way and was like, “What
are you doing?’ He came on like he was
just accosting me rather than trying to
see what’s up,” said the father.

With this officer then failing to believe
that the 28-year-old’s car had been stolen,
Mr Stubbs said he continued on in the
hope of finding an officer who would take
a different approach.

However, he claimed a second pair of
officers and a third lone officer respond-
ed in the same way, despite his explana-

tion of how the thief had sped away with
his wife and child inside the car.

“Twas hoping that they could put out a
notice about the car, so that people could
start looking for it. But all they said was
‘Your car ain’t get robbed, your car
impounded, man’.”

“It’s like [have to convince them that a
crime has been committed against me.
The police were around, but when there
is a crisis I don’t know what it takes for
them to take you seriously.

“Rather than being professional they
were just dismissive and inconsiderate.
They assumed the situation before they
took time to figure out what had really
happened.”

Giving up, Mr Stubbs said he began to
walk to the nearby East Street police sta-
tion in the hope of reporting the robbery
and attempted kidnapping there.

But along the way another officer
stopped and offered to help the family
when Mr Stubbs flagged him down .

“He kind of assumed the same thing
(that the car was towed), but I guess he
thought I must be talking some sense if
I'd bothered to flag him down,” said Mr

Stubbs.

However, once in the car, the musician
said one of the officers he had first
approached came up to the window and
began to “jeer at” and “antagonise” him
and his wife.

“He said ‘The shoe’s on the other foot
now, isn’t it?’” claimed Stubbs, adding
that he was not exactly sure what the offi-
cer meant by this. Meanwhile the man
went on to tell him that he “could’ve got
his car long time ago.”

“I didn’t respond to him at any time. I
realised he was just being petty,” said the
singer.

Mr Stubb’s wife, Sarah, said the expe-
rience made her “disappointed in the
Bahamas.”

The Ohio, USA native said she had
feared for her baby when the man drove
off with them inside the car, but she was
particularly angry by the police’s dismis-
sive response to her and her husband’s
reports. It just meant, she said, they had
missed an opportunity to catch up with
the vehicle while it was still nearby.

The car was eventually recovered in
The Grove that evening.

New Crown land grants allegations

FROM page one

providing documentation to
support their claims that some
employees have been aggran-
dizing themselves “for
decades.”

Yesterday, a woman from
Long Island told The Tribune
how she had given $100 to an
employee at the department
who promised that for this
generosity her application for
a piece of agricultural land on
Cowpen Road would be
“pushed to the top of the
pile.”

Going a little further, the
woman said, the employee
also advised her that she had
to have the property surveyed
and suggested the name of an

UALITY DIESEL

HE

JACâ„¢4

VY DUTY TRUCKS

TON®IONG FLAT BED

922,995.00

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co. Ltd.

Montrose Ave.

Phone: 322-1722/Fax: 326-7452



individual with whom the
department reportedly
worked.

Thinking that something
was suspicious, the woman
said she called around and got
other offers for the surveying
of the property. She discov-
ered that the price quoted to
her by the recommended sur-
veyor was exaggerated by at
least $500.

She said she thinks “it’s dis-
graceful what they are doing.”

“But what are we left to do?
You have to work with them,
because there is no recourse. I
know the Prime Minister is

busy dealing with Customs
and all of that, but he needs to
do something about this min-
istry because I shouldn’t have
to bribe these people to do
their jobs. They are already
getting paid a salary. Just do
your job,” she said.

Earlier this month, the for-
mer director of Lands and
Surveys Tex Turnquest
resigned from his post when
it was claimed that his moth-
er-in-law and other relatives
on the island of Exuma were
granted Crown land during his
tenure.

Since then, it was reported

that Undersecretary Audley
Greaves and Chief Housing
officer Christopher Russell’s
wives had also received
Crown land grants in
Abaco.

It is unclear at this point
what position the government
will take in dealing with this
matter, but it has been con-
firmed that the Minister of
State for Lands and Local
Government, Byran Wood-
side has taken up a constant
posting at the department to
provide a more “hands on”
approach to dealing with the
allegations.

North Korea prepares missiles

m PANMUNJOM, Korea

NORTH KOREA is believed to have begun
assembling a long-range missile capable of reaching
Alaska, a news report said Wednesday, as the com-
munist regime prepared to test-fire a barrage of mis-
siles from both coasts, according to Associated Press.

The moves further heightened soaring tensions in
the region following North Korea’s underground
nuclear test last week, and came as speculation grows
that leader Kim Jong II has selected his third son to
succeed him as ruler of the secretive communist coun-
try.

At the border village of Panmunjom inside the
Demilitarized Zone separating the two Koreas, the sit-
uation seemed calm on the surface, but a military
guide warned tensions are running deep.

“The possibility of armed provocation is higher
than ever in the Joint Security Area,” said the South
Korean military guide taking journalists on a tour
of the border area. He did not provide his full name
saying he did not have permission to do so.

The guide also cautioned journalists not to “point
at the North Koreans or make any gestures.” On the
North Korean side of the area, a lone guard could be
seen standing with his arms to his side, just watching
the journalist group.

The mass-market JoongAng Ilbo newspaper said
Wednesday that a long-range missile — transported
by train to the Dongchang-ni launch site near the
North’s northwest coast near China — is believed
to have entered an assembly building. The paper cit-
ed an unnamed South Korean official.

An American military official confirmed that an

BUR INS

Harsour Bay Suoppinc PLaza
322.3170

Case Cottace, Cas_e Beacu
327.7072

FLATTENS
YOUR TUMMY
& SLIMS
YOUR SHAPE.




===

SOUTH KOREAN and U.S. soldiers watch an armored
vehicle pass through decontamination process during a
joint military exercise against chemical warfare by the
U.S. and South Korea army at U.S. military base in Dong-
duchon, north of Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, June 2,
2009. (AP Photo)

intercontinental ballistic missile capable of striking the
USS. was being readied at a base on the North’s west
coast. The official said it could be more than a week
before Pyongyang was ready to launch. He spoke
on condition of anonymity because it was an intelli-
gence-related issue.

Separately, North Korea may soon launch three or
four mid-range missiles, believed to be modified ver-
sions of its Rodong series, from its east coast, South
Korea’s Yonhap news agency reported.








Z2a=~sse=ron


THE TRIBUNE



a ’
i
ORLANDO B




























% Partly sunny. Partly cloudy and Sunshine; breezy in Periods of sun, a Times of clouds and Times of clouds and The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
v4 High: 92° ae ¢ very warm. the afternoon. t-storm possible. sun. sun. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
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77° ‘ Low: 77° F/25°C ) 4 ‘2 The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel ao is an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 5:33 a.m 21 11:25am. 0.2
a @ 0 ~~ elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 6:06pm. 28 ----
> } ; ie
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2 AN Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Saillay 710am. 02 (13am. 03
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% Pod | ah. OG° 0 VOM. stunecateaven Dass tyersutecedtasniueccaiaeoss ° ° 753 am. 73 (55am. 02
a »” & A. High: 89° F/32°C LOW oeeeeeeeeeeeee 81° F/27° C Monday aap 28 (ean 02
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, wy Normal low 75° F/24° C
a pe _ @ WEST PALMBEACH Peis Last year's High... ssnsestenenenssen 86° F/30° SUN Ay Ty iyi
. a High: 92° F/33° C Last year's lOW oo... eeseseeeeeeeeeeeees 72° F/22° C oa sy a re
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. ° i *. As of 2 p.m. yesterday .....ccccccscssssssscsssssseeen 0.00" ‘Sunset....... 8:04 p.m. Moonset ..... 3:07 a.m.
all. FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT i Year to date AT, Full Last New First
High: 90° F/32° C @ High: 88° F/31°C Normal year to date .......c.ccsecscssssseecseeeeeee 18.81" oi a
Low: 77° F/25°C ~—— Low: 79° F/26° C 5
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MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jul. 7 «Jule15 = Jul.21 Jul. 28
— er tore NASSAU High: 92° F/33°C
2 Low: 80° F/27°C
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KEY WEST - — CATISLAND
High: 88° F/31° C High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 81°F/27°C — Low: 72° F/22°C
@ Ya a
= GREAT EXUMA OO SAN SALVADOR
’ High: 89° F/32° C
| ANDROS = Low: 78° F/26° C one
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's : OL
highs and tonights's lows. eae a i
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LONGISLAND
Low: 75° F/24°C
Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 90° F/32° C
FIC F/C FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FC FC Fic FC me Low: 74° F/23° C
Albuquerque 86/30 67/19 t 91/32 68/20 pc Indianapolis 84/28 6317 s 78/25 60/15 t Philadelphia 82/27 63/17 t 83/28 66/18 s
Anchorage 70/21 54/12 c 70/21 56/13 pc Jacksonville 94/34 71/21 t 97/36 73/22 t Phoenix 104/40 85/29 t 106/41 87/30 CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 90/32 68/20 pc 89/31 71/21 pc Kansas City 84/28 67/19 t 83/28 69/20 t _——Pittsburgh 74/23 56/13 t «78/25 56/13 pc RAGGEDISLAND — Uigh:93°F/s4°c
Atlantic City 80/26 62/16 t 85/29 60/15 s Las Vegas 102/38 79/26 pce 105/40 83/28 s Portland, OR 92/33 59/15 s 91/32 58/14 s High: 90° F/32°C Low: 75° F/24°C
Baltimore 82/27 62/16 t 84/28 62/16 s Little Rock 94/34 75/23 po 95/35 75/23 t Raleigh-Durham 89/31 65/18 s 90/32 65/18 s Low: 72°F/22°C < %
Boston 76/24 62/16 t 79/26 61/16 t Los Angeles 82/27 66/18 pc 84/28 64/17 pc St. Louis 88/31 69/20 s 79/26 67/19 t .
Buffalo 66/18 58/14 t 68/20 56/13 pc Louisville 85/29 67/19 s 79/26 63/17 t Salt Lake City 90/32 66/18 t 87/30 64/17 pc GREATINAGUA Xa
Charleston, SC 94/34 71/21 pce 93/83 73/22 pc Memphis 95/35 75/23 pe 94/34 74/23 t San Antonio 99/37 77/25 s 100/87 78/25 s High: 93° F/34° C
Chicago 82/27 60/15 s 77/25 53/1 pe Miami 90/32 77/25 t 90/32 78/25 t San Diego 76/24 68/20 pe 75/23 67/19 pc Low. 76°F/24°C
Cleveland 74/23 58/14 pe 74/23 53/11 pe Minneapolis 79/26 61/16 $s 81/27 62/16 pc San Francisco 75/23 57/13 pe 75/23 55/12 pe i
Dallas 100/37 79/26 pc 101/38 79/26 s Nashville 88/31 65/18 pce 82/27 67/19 t Seattle 85/29 56/13 s 83/28 56/13 s
Denver 88/31 59/15 t 86/30 57/13 t New Orleans 96/35 79/26 s 97/36 78/25 t Tallahassee 96/35 70/21 t 99/37 74/23 t
Detroit 79/26 56/13 pe 77/25 54/12 s New York 80/26 65/18 t 81/27 66/18 s Tampa 89/31 77/25 t 89/31 77/25 t
Honolulu 88/31 75/23 s 88/31 75/23 s Oklahoma City 100/37 75/23 pe 99/37 74/23 s Tucson 95/35 79/26 t 98/36 78/25 pc
Houston 99/37 78/25 pc 98/36 79/26 pc Orlando 92/33 76/24 t 94/34 75/23 t Washington, DC 84/28 66/18 t 86/30 65/18 s

o|1|2

LOW



3|4|5|6

MODERATE







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HIGH |



\. HIGH

AY INDEX NY



















Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
88/31
81/27
79/26
90/32
60/15
91/32
86/30
80/26
99/37
76/24
87/30
86/30
82/27
65/18
82/27
91/32
63/17
98/36
92/33
70/21
91/32
82/27
82/27
81/27
70/21
90/32
81/27
64/17
90/32
68/20
88/31
102/38
89/31
80/26
57/13
89/31
71/21
79/26
93/33
87/30
73/22
102/38
70/21
64/17
76/24
79/26
95/35
83/28
82/27
82/27
74/23
105/40
84/28
90/32
67/19
87/30
57/13
86/30
67/19
81/27
78/25
62/16
90/32
79/26
74/23
84/28
76/24
87/30
82/27
72/22

ealil

Today

Low
F/C
79/26
65/18
58/14
73/22
51/10
77/25
77/25
71/21
72/22
76/24
69/20
65/18
72/22
45/7
61/16
64/17
53/11
75/23
83/28
46/7
74/23
71/21
70/21
62/16
55/12
63/17
61/16
55/12
73/22
52/11
79/26
77/25
71/21
60/15
37/2
78/25
57/13
57/13
66/18
78/25
52/11
76/24
63/17
43/8
59/15
52/11
75/23
62/16
61/16
59/15
68/20
82/27
70/21
80/26
35/1
74/23
43/6
73/22
56/13
64/17
55/12
45/7
79/26
70/21
56/13
62/16
59/15
70/21
58/14
50/10





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High
F/C
88/31
78/25
85/29
90/32
59/15
89/31
86/30
82/27
94/34
78/25
87/30
87/30
79/26
64/17
81/27
92/33
61/16
98/36
95/35
70/21
91/32
81/27
83/28
83/28
66/18
84/28
80/26
66/18
91/32
70/21
86/30
100/37
89/31
79/26
57/13
89/31
71/21
77/25
95/35
87/30
73/22
104/40
70/21
63/17
78/25
80/26
95/35
71/21
84/28
86/30
76/24
105/40
86/30
90/32
69/20
89/31
56/13
86/30
70/21
81/27
68/20
63/17
89/31
77/25
13/22
85/29
74/23
86/30
81/27
71/21

Saturday

Low
F/C
78/25
61/16
56/13
74/23
48/8
79/26
77/25
70/21
74/23
76/24
66/18
67/19
71/21
46/7
60/15
62/16
53/11
75/23
85/29
50/10
74/23
71/21
69/20
66/18
54/12
64/17
61/16
53/11
74/23
54/12
81/27
77/25
72/22
61/16
40/4
78/25
58/14
57/13
64/17
77/25
54/12
76/24
57/13
41/5
61/16
53/11
75/23
61/16
63/17
63/17
68/20
80/26
68/20
81/27
35/1
74/23
42/5
73/22
58/14
63/17
ale
46/7
77/25
70/21
57/13
65/18
58/14
69/20
57/13
55/12

WwW

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YNTT MH MT MH ATM HW
o0o => oO =— —

pe

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace

MARINE FORECAST



a ae Me LS

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

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WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SE at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-15 Miles 82° F
Saturday: SE at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-15 Miles 82° F
FREEPORT Today: SE at 10-15 Knots 2-3 Feet 5-15 Miles 81°F
Saturday: SE at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
ABACO Today: SE at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
Saturday: _ SE at 7-14 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F



Showers
Lx] T-storms

Rain

Flurries

Snow
Ice









~ wag,

Awa ay

=
8/605 (BREEZY) 79/61

Minneapolis

79/61 =

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

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Gang Bs

Miami
90/77

Fronts
Cod =="

Warm fianiMianfiMn
Stationary MMmgynllite

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



‘The Boys are Back’ boxing show was spectacular

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

DUBBED “The Boys are Back,” First
Class Promotions put on a spectacular
show on Saturday night to bring profes-
sional boxing back to the local scene.

Promoter Michelle Minus said she was
just glad that they were able to enter-
tain so many people who showed up at
the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium to view
the competition that was highlighted
between the Bahamas and the Domini-
can Republic.

“We did a couple of extra things to
really make it exciting,” said Minus, who
thanked the Bahamian public for coming
out, the sponsors for sticking with them
through their most difficult moments and
Pastor Ivan Butler of Kemp Road Min-
istries, who prayed continuously for their
return.

“The boys are back and First Class
Promotions has a whole slate of fights
set up for the Bahamian people and they
are all going to be exciting,” she said.
“We're looking forward to doing a title
fight for Jerry ‘Big Daddy’ Butler,

FIFA holds draw
for World Cup
preliminaries



NASSAU, Bahamas (AP) —
CONCACAF's fourth-place
team in World Cup qualifying
will host South America's fifth-
place team in a home-and-away
series starting on November 14.

The series will conclude in
South America on November
18, with the winner qualifying
for the 32-nation World Cup
finals in South Africa next year.
The matchups won't be known
until group qualifying ends.

Other World Cup prelimi-
nary matchups drawn on Tues-
day will have the third-place
team from Asia's Group A
hosting the third-place club
from Asia's Group B on Sep-
tember 5, with the series switch-
ing venues on September 9.

The eventual winner of that
series will advance to a playoff
against New Zealand, with Asia
hosting the first game on Octo-
ber 10 and going on the road
on November 14.

The finals draw takes place
on December 4.

a al
an

L..

Alpachino Allen and a whole lot of oth-
er fighters.”

Of course, Minus said they are now
working feverishly on Jermaine ‘Choo
Choo’ Mackey’s defense of the British
Commonwealth super middleweight title
against an African opponent in August at
the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

Last year after Mackey won the British
Commonwealth title, First Class Promo-
tions was suspended for one year by the
Bahamas Boxing Commission. At the
beginning of the year, the suspension
was lifted.

Now the commission’s chairman Pat
“The Centreville Assassin’ Strachan says
there’s no need for First Class or the
public to be concerned about any fur-
ther interruption of the sport.

“As long as First Class Promotions do
what they are mandated to do, we
shouldn’t have any problems,” Strachan
said.

“A good indication of that was what
they did for this show. We didn’t have
any problems at all.”

Strachan, the former cruiserweight
champion of the Bahamas, said Mackey
gave a good impression of his future.

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“TI was very impressed with Choo
Choo. I thought he handled himself very
well,” Strachan said.

“He looked pretty good. I can only
predict good things for him. He stands a
good chance of getting a world title shot
soon. I just think it’s only a matter of
time, once he finds himself in the right
place at the right time.”

Also particularly impressed with what
he saw from Mackey was Phil Smith, the
marketing manager at D’Albenas
Agency Limited, one of the major spon-
sors of the show.

“He’s a little rusty, but he still got the
skills,” Smith said. “He just needs some
fights and you know the story, he should
definitely be ready for his British Com-
monwealth title defense in August.”

Smith said he was so pleased to see
pro boxing back and he and his company
will continue to make their contribution
to its further growth and success in the
future.

The show attracted a number of per-
sons, including Olympic and World
Championships women’s 400 metre
champion Tonique Williams-Darling,
who has a lot of time on her hands since

Nassau conference is held to announce Brazil’s
host cities for 2014 World Cup soccer tourney

officially retiring last year.

Making her first appearance at a show,
Williams-Darling said she was quite
relieved to be a part of the audience and
she certainly enjoyed every moment of it.

“T want to commend Ray Minus (Jr),
who is my cousin, and his wife, Michelle.
They have been trying to get me out for
a long time,” she said. “I think they are
doing a wonderful job.

“T was particularly pleased with the
women’s fight. We know that this is a
sport for men, but it’s good that they
both went out there and they handled
themselves very well. I was really proud
of them.”

As for Mackey, Williams-Darling said
she heard so much about him and she
was honoured to have been afforded the
opportunity to see a rising star before
he really makes it big on the interna-
tional scene as she did.

Now that she has retired from track
and field, Williams-Darling said she’s
looking at the possibility of doing one
or two things that will make an impact on
the sport. But for now, she said every-
thing will remain a secret until she’s
ready to reveal it.



































Tim Aylen/AP

RICARDO TERRA TEIXEIRA (far left), president of Brazil’s
soccer confederation, FIFA President Joseph S Blatter (sec-
ond left) and FIFA Secretary General Jerome Valcke pose for
a photograph as they hold a map of Brazil at a press con-
ference in Nassau, Bahamas, on Sunday. The conference
was held to announce Brazil’s host cities for the 2014
World Cup soccer tournament. The cities are Rio de Janeiro,
Curitiba, Porto Alegre, Sao Paulo, Cuiaba, Manaus, Fortaleza,
Natal, Recife, Brasilia, Salvador and Belo Horizonte.

USA Track and
Field partners
with National
Center for Drug
Free Sport

@ By EDDIE PELLS
AP National Writer

USA Track and Field entered
a partnership Tuesday with a
company that helps athletes find
out if supplements they're
thinking about taking are free of
banned substances.

USATE chief executive Doug
Logan announced the deal with
the National Center for Drug
Free Sport, saying it was a way
for athletes "to navigate the
confounding labyrinth that is
the multi-zillion dollar industry
of ‘legal’ supplements."

Earlier this year, Logan deliv-
ered a rebuke of supplement
makers, saying they've been
complicit in helping ruin a sport
filled with doping scandals over
the years.

He backed it up by announc-
ing the deal with a company
that also has agreements with
the NCAA, Major League
Baseball, the NFL, and the
PGA Tour.

A common excuse when an
athlete tests positive for perfor-
mance-enhancing drugs is to say
they used a supplement that
must have been tainted. The
supplement industry has largely
steered clear of federal regula-
tions, and Logan, in his speech
in January, said it was all
because of a long-term, calcu-
lated lobbying effort in Wash-
ington.

In his blog Tuesday, Logan
said the only way an athlete can
really know if he's clean is by
competing supplement-free.

"But if an athlete does use
supplements, or is considering
using them, this new resource
will help them make a more
informed decision about the
benefits and pitfalls of a given
product," he wrote.

USATF members can log on
to the Web site's Resource
Exchange Center and get infor-
mation about supplements
they're thinking about taking.

Logan said the U.S. Anti-
Doping Agency already has a
hotline for athletes in its test-
ing pool to ask about banned
substances. So while the agree-
ment may not be a huge added
benefit for Olympic-caliber ath-
letes, the new programme will
enable any USATF member —
juniors, seniors, recreational
athletes — to use the Drug Free
Sport service.

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THE TRIBUNE

S
b

WEDNESDAY,



PAGE 11



JUNE 3,

ts

2009






Ke

Soderling beats
Davydenko to
advance to his

first major semi...
See page 9

PM opens 89th FIFA Congress

rime Minister Hubert
Ingraham delivered
the keynote address
at the world famous
Atlantis resort on Paradise
Island yesterday to officially
open the 59th FIFA Congress
after months of preparation.

He praised the FIFA execu-
tives for taking the initiative to
come to a small nation such as
the Bahamas to host such a
prestigious meeting to discuss
the most widely played sport in
the world.

“The 58th FIFA Congress
last year was held in Sidney,
Australia — a country with a
somewhat larger football tradi-
tion than our own. So one can
only imagine the delight when it
was announced that the 59th
Congress would be held in The
Bahamas,” he said.

“You will have discovered
that, though small, The
Bahamas has a great tradition
of sporting excellence and high-
ly qualified and dedicated pro-
fessionals. As well, you will
have learned that we have cre-
ated a particularly successful
industry out of welcoming visi-
tors to our shores. These two
make us ideally suited to host-
ing the 59th FIFA Congress.”

PM Ingraham said it is his
hope that the visiting delegates’
experience here in the wonder-
land of Atlantis will help bol-
ster the Bahamas’ reputation as
a modern, efficient and conve-
nient location for both business
and pleasure and certainly for
the business of discussing
leisure.

The delegation is headed by
Sepp Blatter, who was re-elect-
ed as president, while Jack
Warner is the vice president.
More than 100 delegates from
just about every nation affiliat-
ed with FIFA is represented at
the congress.

“Sport is important for so
many reasons, whether in teach-
ing discipline, promoting
healthy lifestyles or developing
social skills. And so it is quite
natural that governments are
enthusiastic supporters and pro-
moters of sporting activities,”



Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff

FIFA president Sepp Blatter speaks during the spectacular opening ceremony at Atlantis resort Tuesday evening...

he said.

While Mr Ingraham noted
that there are many issues that
will be discussed over the next
two days in the congress, he said
it is the hope of the Bahamas
government that their delegates’
presence here will result in the
further development of the
game and its wider appeal to all
Bahamians, but very specifical-
ly to children who would bene-
fit from the exposure to the
game and its wide international
appeal.

“The Government and peo-
ple of The Bahamas regard this
Congress as being a globally sig-

nificant meeting of sports
administrators comprising over
200 countries,” Ingraham said.

“Your decisions will shape
the organisation of Member
Associations world wide, the
most significant being the
announcement of the upcom-
ing 2014 World Cup host coun-
try.

“This event has been a sig-
nificant undertaking for The
Bahamas requiring a multi-
agency cooperative approach
undergirded by unprecedented
strategy.”

Mr Ingraham not only
acknowledged and thanked

‘The Terminator’ has fists set on ‘Big Daddy’

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

FOR quite some time, there
has been a lot of talk about a
match-up between Sherman
“The Tank’ Williams and Renal-
do ‘The Terminator’ Minus for
the Bahamas heavyweight title.

For quite some time, that was
all it was - talk. Neither fighter
could come to a compromise
where they both signed on the
dotted line to square off in the
ring.

And for quite some time,
Minus didn’t have a legitimate
contender to defend his title.
So much so that the Bahamas
Boxing Commission has decid-
ed to strip Minus of the crown.

Now there’s talk of a possible
showdown between Minus and
Jerry ‘Big Daddy’ Butler.

Saturday night, moments
after he won his eight round co-
main event bout over Domini-
can Republic’s Sandy Antonio
Soto on the First Class Promo-
tions’ first professional card for
the year dubbed, “The Boys are
back,” Butler turned to Minus
and issued a challenge.

Minus, who worked in But-
ler’s corner during the fight,
gladly accepted.

But Bahamas Boxing Com-
mission’s chairman Pat “The
Centreville Assassin’ Strachan
put the possible match-up in
prospective.

“Just for the record, Renaldo
has been stripped of his title, so
the heavyweight title is vacant,”
Strachan said. “At our next
meeting, I will put it out on our
agenda and we will determine
who will fight for it.”

Strachan, a former cruiser-
weight champion of the
Bahamas, said there’s a strong
possibility that the commission
would recommend that the two
most active heavyweights fight
in an elimination bout and then
there will be a title bout.



JERRY ‘Big Daddy’ Butler

As for who those two most
active heavyweights are -
Williams and Butler.

“Renaldo, I certainly believe
will be in the hunt, but the com-
mission will make a decision on
that,” Strachan said. “Sherman
could be in the hunt also. But
there could be an elimination
before a title fight is deter-
mined.”

And just like he did when he
was challenged by and he in
term challenged Williams,
Minus said he’s looking forward
to the possibility of facing But-
ler.

“It’s expected, it’s expected,”
Minus quipped. “He came a
long way. We spent a lot of time
preparing him from scratch and
he has developed into a fine
young man, a fine boxer. He
feels it’s his time.

“I feel he has matured
enough to get a title shot and I
think he deserves a chance. But
training him is one thing. Fight-
ing and training is two differ-
ent things. So I would like to
see him inside the ring.”

Thirty eight-year-old Minus,
who last fought on April 8,
2006, when he was stopped in
the fourth round by Elieser
Castillo in Tampa, Florida, last
fought at home on June 12,
2004, when he won a 10-round
decision over Miguel Otero at

the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

However, the last Bahamian
he fought was James ‘Killer’
Coakley on October 2, 1999, to
successfully defend his Bahamas
heavyweight title with a first
round knockout. He initially
won the vacant title over Coak-
ley on June 15, 1996, with
another first round knockout
over Coakley.

His record stands at 18-14
with 15 knockouts.

As for Butler, 28, he
improved his record to 8-5 with
his first round decision over
Soto. In his last fight on Novem-
ber 11, 2008, Butler drew a six
round decision against Wilner
Vazquez in Hollywood, Flori-
da.

Butler’s last fight against a
Bahamian was on June 30, 2007,
when he stopped Bernard Rolle
in the first round at the C I Gib-
son Gymnasium.

Williams, a native of Grand
Bahama fighting out of Vero
Beach, Florida, is 34-10 with
two draws.

His last fight was on Decem-
ber 12, 2008, when he won by
an unanimous decision over
Andrew Greeley in Jack-
sonville, Florida. The 36-year-
old last fought at home on April
18, 2007 when he stopped
American Wade Lewis in the
first round at Clifford Park.

But Williams has yet to face a
Bahamian opponent in his pro
career that got started in 1997.

While Minus said he will wait
for the possible showdown with
Butler, once he can get about
4-5 months to get in shape, he’s
ruling out any chance of him
and Williams ever squaring off.

“We offered Tank numerous
offers to fight, but he has
refused to sign, so I guess he
doesn’t want to fight me,”
Minus said. “Right now, Big
Daddy Jerry Butler is in front of
me, he has issued this challenge
and that is who I have my sights
set on right now.”

Chuck Blazer, a friend and
long-time resident of the
Bahamas and a member of the
Executive Committee of FIFA

Football governing
body to talk
about change

NASSAU, Bahamas (AP) — Restrictions on foreign players in
club football, changes to the age limit for Olympic football and

preparations for the 2010 World Cup in South Africa are on the
agenda for FIFA's annual congress.

FIFA president Sepp Blatter will lead discussions Wednes-
day at a meeting attended by representatives of 208 nations.

"I think at the end of the Congress Wednesday, everybody will
see what we're doing in FIFA, (that) we're doing what we can do
and we can all be happy,” Blatter said.

Glitz has been apparent, whether it was the stir created by Foot-
ball Federation Australia chairman Frank Lowy bringing his
240-foot (73 m) yacht into Bahamian waters to reportedly lobby
for a future World Cup, or the steady stream of people at a din-
ner Monday waiting to greet 2012 London Olympics organizing

committee head Sebastian Coe.

for the crucial role he played in
bringing the congress to Par-
adise Island, but he also recog-
nised the hard work of host
Bahamas Football Association
(BFA) president Anton Sealy
and his executive secretary
Lionel Haven.

He also congratulated Min-
ister of Youth, Sport and Cul-
ture Desmond Bannister and
the ardent effort of the official
secretariat and other national
stakeholders in collaborating
with the Bahamas Football
Association in this initiative.

“Going forward, we hope to
strengthen and solidify our
strong sporting tradition with
the completion of a national sta-
dium currently under construc-



tion. It’s anticipated completion
in 2011 will strengthen our abil-
ity to host international match-
es and sporting events and we
look forward to such opportu-
nities in the years ahead,” he
said.

“We particularly look for-
ward to the boost the new foot-
ball pitch will provide to the
further development of football
in The Bahamas, particularly to
our junior footballers.”

In closing, Mr Ingraham said
the Bahamas has a slogan that
says “once is not enough” and
he welcomed the delegates to
come back and when they do, to
ensure that they visit some of
the Family Islands that make
up the Bahamas archipelago.

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THE TRIBUNE
A ul



AF Holding
acquires
Anshacher
(Bahamas)

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

AF HOLDING Limited, a
Bahamian company with more
than $4.73 billion in assets
under administration and man-
agement and $535 million in
assets, confirmed yesterday in
a release that it has acquired
Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited
“with full Bahamas Govern-
ment regulatory approval.” The
release verified what Tribune
Business has reported for sev-
eral months.

According to the release,
Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited
was sold by the Ansbacher
Group as a part of its strategy to
focus on its European markets
and the Middle East markets of
its parent, the Qatar National
Bank.

Sources previously told this
paper that the Ansbacher man-
agement team led by managing
director Michael Mayhew-
Arnold, had previously been
exploring a management-led
buyout of the bank from cur-
rent owner Qatar and had also
seeked to remain in place to
obtain a sizable equity stake,
around 30 per cent, from any
new owner in the aftermath of a
takeover.

However, it was claimed that
the Ansbacher management
could not obtain a large enough
backer to underwrite the buy-
out.

The AF Holdings release
said, however, that Mr May-
hew-Arnold will remain the
company’s managing director
and the company, when merged
with AF’s subsidiary, Sentinel
Bank and Trust Company Lim-
ited, will retain the name Ans-
bacher (Bahamas) limited.

“We are truly delighted to
conclude the purchase of Ans-
bacher (Bahamas) Limited, a
matter that has been on our
agenda for some while,” said
Director of AF Holdings Lim-
ited Anthony Ferguson.

“We believe this acquisition is
an excellent strategic fit that
will significantly expand our
product offerings and capabili-
ties in some important lines of
business, resulting in economies
of scale that will bring consid-
erable value to our clients and
make our collective operations
that much stronger.

“The merger will create a
major new player in the off-

SEE page 2B



























The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

Sale Ends



in

WEDNESDAY,

JUNE 3,



2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Pricing row pushes Chelsea’s threat
to pull product from Super Value

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

row over pricing has

pushed a leading water

supplier to threaten

pulling its product

from the shelves of a
major supermarket chain, The Tribune
can reveal.

In a letter said to be sent from the
Super Value chain of stores to an
employee of Chelsea's Choice last
week, the food-store chain accused the
water company of selling five gallon
bottles directly to customers at its East
West Highway plant at a cheaper price
than offered to retailers.

The letter asked Chelsea's Choice
to curtail this "direct competition” say-
ing that it is not supported by Super
Value.

A response from Chelsea's Choice
lashed out at the grocer's position and
denied that they were competing with
their retailers. The letter indicated that

More expansions
could be on the

after a 20-year relationship, the brand
would no longer be available in Super
Value stores.

Copies of both letters were obtained
by The Tribune.

"It has come to our attention that
retailing by wholesalers had intensi-
fied with the downturn of the economy.
We understand that you are retailing
five gallon Chelsea's Choice water to
the public for $2.50 and wholesaling it
to your retailers at $3.50. We cannot
support wholesalers that are in direct
competition with their retailers,” said
the first letter, dated May 29, bearing
the signature of Super Value president
Rupert Roberts.

"This leaves us with no choice but
to inform you that you no longer have
the support of retailers as long as you
persist in retailing to the public less
than wholesale prices. We trust that
you will refrain from your retailing
activity,” the letter continued.

Attempts to reach Mr Roberts for
comment were unsuccessful yesterday
as he was said to be out of office.

A letter sent by Chelsea's Choice in
response, dated June 2, lashed out at
the grocery store's position and denied
that they were competing with their
retailers.

Ms Knowles maintained - according
to the letter - that Chelsea's Choice
acts as wholesaler, not a retailer, by
selling items by the case and by vol-
ume in five gallon bottles.

"The fact that we wholesale from
our plant has not caused you to sell
any less in your stores based on the
frequency of deliveries to you. As far as
we are aware our brand sells out very
quickly," said the letter signed by com-
pany president Tina Knowles.

The letter said that low inventory
orders by Super Value forced cus-
tomers "to come to our plant to pur-
chase what could have been sold at
your stores".

The letter added that the option for
Super Value always existed to collect
water from the East West Highway
plant at a price of $2.50 adding that it
appears the supermarket "is not inter-

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ested in having a relationship with this
company”.

As of December 1, 2008 distribution
of Chelsea’s Choice water was handled
by a fleet of independent drivers,
according to the letter.

"We feel we should pass the savings
to the consumer particularly during
these difficult times. A price increase at
this time is not bearable. . .We hope
this decision does not cause our
employees and their extended families
to shop elsewhere as the potential is
there to create another unfortunate cir-
cumstance.

"We will advise our customers that
our products will no longer be found at
your stores,” said the letter.

When contacted for comment yes-
terday Ms Knowles declined to com-
ment. However Super Value Opera-
tions Manager Kendrick Moss said he
was unaware of any change regarding a
business relationship between the two
companies. "To my knowledge nothing
has changed... I haven't been given
that decision," said Mr Moss.

City Markets expects equity capital injection to flow by mid June

way for Mall at
Marathon

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

MALL at Marathon’s Gen-
eral manager said yesterday that
more expansions could be on
the way for the property, but
lamented that consumer traffic
through the mall has been down
year on year.

Bob Stevenson told Tribune
Business that the mall’s mer-
chant space has seen a series of
losses and gains his year, but
has not seen diminished interest
in those spaces which have
become vacant.

According to him, the mall
has undertaken an aggressive
leasing programme in order to
fill their vacant commercial
space.

He revealed that Mr Pretzels,
an entertainment centre and
eatery, is expected to expand
into available spaces and Dairy
Queen is expected to construct
a drive through on the property.

“It’s super fantastic,” said Mr
Stevenson. “The last two stores
rented in the last two days.”

According to him, with the
onset of the economic down-
turn, the mall committed to
assisting its merchants through
increased advertising, increased
security and one on one con-
sultation.

“The mall has indeed helped
its merchants - we do it individ-
ually and as a group,” he said.

“We bolster our marketing
and promotional efforts more
so than normal and we main-
tain a strong security pro-
gramme, we maintain it and
commit to it.”

Some merchants told this
paper recently that the mall had
not been accommodating with
merchants who made late rental
payments and said the increased
security did nothing to help
struggling vendors with the
tough economic environment.

Mr Stevenson asserted, how-
ever, that rent is a “figment of
the imagination” and said it
accounted for only ten per cent
of the businesses’ retail opera-
tions.

He said if they could not
meet that ten per cent then
“they have a problem with their

SEE page 2B

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

CITY MARKETS expects an
injection of equity capital by its
majority shareholder to flow
into the 12-store Bahamian
supermarket chain by mid June,
Tribune Business was told yes-
terday, with receipt of that fund-
ing getting the firm back to its
direct purchasing programme.

Sunil Chatrani, chief execu-
tive of City Markets’ immedi-

ate holdings company, Bahamas
Supermarkets, said he could not
say how much was being invest-
ed to aid in the company’s
relaunch, but Tribune Business
sources claimed it to be in the
range of $10 million.

“There is a figure, but I prefer
not to say it until investors have
all committed to the exact
amount, then we’ll know that
final figure,” he said.

Mr Chitrani told this paper
recently that investors in
Bahamas Supermarket’s 78 per

cent majority shareholder, BSL
Holdings, were now discussing
with Royal Bank of Canada the
terms and arrangements for the
new capital injection.

According to him, City Mar-
kets’ floundering business has
already begun to “turn the cor-
ner” and stabilise.

He said the company has had
to reduce costs substantially by
cutting expenses and had in the
past month been forced to
deeply discount products, selling
them at a loss.

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He said the company had
been out of line in terms of the
market prices and have had to
recently realign them.

“We have had to fix shop
and we have done that now, so
we’re just waiting for the injec-
tion of funds to go into the pro-
gramme,” said Mr Chatrani.

“T think we have turned the
corner and the worst is all
behind us and at this point
things are pretty stable and

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



= 00 )~ = >\—
Chamber announces finalists for ‘09 Annual Business Awards

THE Chamber of Commerce
announced the finalists for the
2009 annual Business Awards
yesterday, as they released plans
for this year’s Chamber Week,
when the winners will be
announced.

Bahamian businesspersons
will vie for the distinguished
titles of Outstanding Busi-
nessperson of The Year and
Developing Entrepreneur of the
Year.

Two preeminent Bahamian
businesses will be designated
Outstanding Business of the
Year, which is awarded in two
categories, businesses with over
fifty employees and those with
less.

The Chamber’s annual presti-
gious Lifetime Achievement
Award will go to George Myers,
chairman of the Myers Group
of Companies. Mr Myers will be
saluted for his overwhelming
contributions to Bahamian
enterprise and the community



SOME of the 2009 award finalists are pictured (L-R) Farrell Goff, Bahamas

Woodworking Studio; Robin Strachan, Caribbean Civil Group Limited; Dr.
Wendy Stuart, Botani Bath; Dr. Sophia Rolle, Chairperson, Chamber Week
2009; Dr. Barry Russell, Bahamas Orthodontic Center; Claire Sands, The Plait
Lady; Dr. Charles Diggiss, The MEDNET Group of Companies; Philip Simon,
Executive Director, Bahamas Chamber of Commerce; Robert Stevenson, Mall
at Marathon; Lavette McFall, Bahamas Orthodontic Center; Gershan Major,
1st Vice President, Bahamas Chamber of Commerce; Deran Thompson,

Bahamas Woodworking Studio.

through his accomplishments in
the hospitality sector through his
restaurant and entertainment
holdings. Nominations for the
Annual Business Awards have

City Markets expects equity capital
injection by its majority shareholder

FROM page 1B

we’re just waiting for funding
so we can get back into our
direct purchasing programme
(imports).”

In the meantime City Mar-
kets continues to do price sur-
veys of the market in order to
stay competitive, which Mr
Chatrani said that has already
begun to happen.

“As we start back our over-
seas programme we will have
more flexibility of prices,” he
said.

The City Markets chief exec-
utive told this paper recently
that the company’s sales were
likely to decline to between
$120-$125 million for the 2009
fiscal year to end June 2009, due
to a combination of the eco-
nomic recession and the com-



pany’s own internal issues.

While this represented a
decline of between 13.2-17 per
cent compared to the top-of the
top-line figure for 2008, Mr
Chatrani said that Bahamas
Supermarkets had largely
bought the increased business
that year through deep dis-
counts, which left the company
selling products at a loss.

As a result, gross profit mar-
gins for that year fell to 17.8 per
cent. Mr Chatrani said these
had recovered to 25.4 per cent
within the past quarter, and the
company was looking to get
back to historical margins of 28
per cent plus as soon as possi-
ble.

According to Mr Chatrani,
there will not likely be any kind
of expansion for the supermar-
ket chain in the medium term.



been sent to Chamber officials
over the last several weeks and
after careful deliberation, the
finalists in each category were
announced.

In the category of Outstanding
Business Person of the Year, the
finalists are Dr. Charles Diggiss,
The MEDNET Group of Com-
panies; Gus Cartwright, Check-
er Café; and Chris Mortimer,
Galleria Cinemas and Benni-
gan’s Grill & Tavern.

The 2009 Developing Entre-

preneur of the Year Award will
go to a business pioneer who has
successfully established a busi-
ness in the private sector within
the past five years. This year’s
award will go to one of the fol-
lowing finalists: Dr. Wendy Stu-
art, Botani Bath; Kenwood Kerr,
Providence Advisers; Deran
Thompson/ Farrell Goff,
Bahamas Woodworking Studio.
The designation of Outstand-
ing Business of the Year with
over 50 employees will be go to
either Mall at Marathon, Furni-
ture Plus or Bahamas Waste.
The award for that thriving
Bahamian business with less
than 50 employees will go to one
of these finalists: Caribbean Civ-
il] Group Limited, Bahamas
Orthodontic Centre or The Plait
Lady. The Annual Business
Awards will culminate Chamber
Week, which begins on June 22.
The week’s events also include
a courtesy call on Prime Minister
Ingraham, the highly anticipated
Mix N Mingle business-net-
working event on Tuesday, June
23, and the Meet the Ministers
forum on Thursday, June 25.
Twelve Cabinet Ministers will
participate in the Forum, which
1s open to Chamber members.
All events will take place at San-
dals Royal Bahamian.

More expansions could be on



the way for Mall at Marathon

FROM page 1B

business.”

“This is truly a difficult time
and people are experiencing
sales declines, so we work with
them as best we can,” he con-
tinued.

Mr Stevenson said manage-
ment collected whatever data it
could in order to assess how the
mall’s businesses were holding
up to the ensuing recession.

“We measure what we can,
we collect sales data from sev-
eral of our stores, we sell gift
certificates and we measure the
traffic in the mall and clearly it
is down,” he said.

According to Mr Stevenson,
over the past five to ten years,
many retailers have prospered
greatly at the mall and the cur-
rent 110 shops are preparing to
celebrate its 20 years in busi-
ness this Fall.

AF Holding acquires
Ansbacher (Bahamas)

FROM page 1B

shore international banking
industry that is wholly owned
by Bahamians and governed by
a Bahamas regulatory regime.”

Ansbacher (Bahamas) has
some obvious attractions for
Sentinel Bank and Trust and its
parent, AF Holdings (the for-
mer Colina Financial Group),
whose primary principals are
Mr Ferguson and Anthony
Alexiou.

As reported by this paper
earlier, Ansbacher (Bahamas)
has a significant Bahamian dol-
lar portfolio, being involved in
domestic pension fund man-
agement and administration,
and one possibility would be for
that business to be merged with
CFAL, the brokerage/corporate
advisory entity had by Mr Fer-
guson. The international busi-
ness could then be absorbed by
Sentinel Bank and Trust.

It was said in the earlier
stages of the proposed acquisi-
tion that Sentinel’s chances of
obtaining Ansbacher
(Bahamas) Limited were great-
ly increased when a rival bid-
der was knocked out because
of regulatory concerns
expressed by the Central Bank.

That rival was claimed to be
Belize Bank, the largest such
institution in that Central
American country, which is
owned by a holding company
controlled by controversial UK
peer Lord Ashcroft.

The British Noble, once the
treasurer for UK opposition

party, the Conservatives, is now
their deputy chairman, and both
he and his Belizean business
interests have long been targets
for reports by the UK media.

None of the allegations have
yet been proven, and some
reports have even resulted in
Lord Ashcroft taking legal
action for libel, cases which
have usually been settled out of
court. Yet it is likely that the
swirl of controversy may have
alarmed the Bahamian Central
Bank.

“AF Holdings Limited
(AFH), formerly Colina Finan-
cial Group (CFG), is a finan-
cial consortium of leading com-
prehensive financial services
with insurance, banking, health-
care and media companies and
real estate holdings in The
Bahamas, offering integrated
solutions to meet the diverse
needs of international and local
clients,” said the company’s
release.

It said AF Holdings acquisi-
tion, Ansbacher (Bahamas)
Limited, is one of oldest off-
shore bank and trust companies
in The Bahamas.

“Formerly known as
Bahamas International Trust
Company Limited, ("BITCO"),
it was previously owned by a
consortium of banks with Bar-
clays Bank as the majority
shareholder. BITCO was sold
to the Ansbacher Group of
Companies in 1989, changing
its name to Ansbacher
(Bahamas) Limited in 1994,”
the release continued.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ALCHEMIST DREAMS INC.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PINK SHELLS
HOLDINGS LTD.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PINK SHELLS HOLDINGS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

GROLEY RIVERS INC.

——

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GROLEY RIVERS INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PHILIPPA VALLEY INC.

ee

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PHILIPPA VALLEY INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PIRQUE FIRST
INVESTMENT INC.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PIRQUE FIRST INVESTMENT INC.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TSK HOLDINGS
LIMITED

— f*) ——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of TSK HOLDINGS LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

MIN MIN &
MIKE CO. LTD.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MIN MIN & MIKE CO. LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

——_

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ALCHEMIST DREAMS INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

OAXACA S.A.

—— _—
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of OAXACA S.A. has been completed; a Cer-
tificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company

has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

genet i |
—_ Col ae

NOTICE

The Management and Board of Directors of Colina
Holdings Bahamas Limited (CHBL) wish to
announce that the Consolidated Interim
(Unaudited) Financial Statements for CHBL for the
three months ended March 31, 2009 have been
authorized for release on June 3, 2009.

A complete copy of these financial statements is
available on the Company’s’ website
www.colinaimperial.com or by contacting the
corporate headquarters of Colinalmperial by
phone at (242) 396-2102 or by email at
Financials@Colinalmperial.com





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2009, PAGE 3B



=
AP source: GM to sell Hummer to Chinese manufacturer

m@ By BREE FOWLER
AP Auto Writers

DETROIT (AP) — General
Motors Corp. took a key step
toward its downsizing on Tues-
day, striking a tentative deal to
sell its Hummer brand to a Chi-
nese manufacturer, while also
revealing that it has potential
buyers for its Saturn and Saab
brands.

GM has an agreement to sell
its Hummer brand to Sichuan
Tengzhong Heavy Industrial
Machinery Co. of China, said a
person briefed on the deal.

The Detroit automaker
announced Tuesday morning
that it had a memorandum of
understanding to sell the brand
of rugged SUVs, but it didn't
identify the buyer. A formal
announcement of the buyer was
to be made Tuesday afternoon,
said the person briefed on the
deal. The person spoke on con-
dition of anonymity because the
details have not been made
public.

Sichuan Tengzhong deals in
road construction, plastics,
resins and other industrial prod-
ucts, but Hummer would be its
first step into the automotive
business.

GM said the sale will likely
save more than 3,000 US jobs in
manufacturing, engineering and
at various Hummer dealerships.

As part of the proposed
transaction, Hummer will con-
tinue to contract vehicle manu-
facturing and business services
from GM during a transitional
period. For example, GM's
Shreveport, La., assembly plant
would continue to contract to
assemble the H3 and H3T
through at least 2010, GM said.

The automaker also said
Tuesday that it has 16 buyers
interested in purchasing its Sat-
urn brand, while three parties
are interested in the Swedish
Saab brand.

Chief Financial Officer Ray
Young told reporters and indus-
try analysts on a conference call
that GM is continuing to pursue
manufacturing agreements with
anew Saturn buyer.

GM would like to sell the
money-losing Saturn brand's
dealership network, contracting
with the new buyer to make
some of its cars while the buyer
gets other vehicles from differ-
ent manufacturers.

At the same time, bridge loan
discussions with the Swedish
government are progressing,
Young said.

GM, which filed for Chapter
11 bankruptcy protection in
New York on Monday, is racing
to remake itself as a smaller,
leaner automaker. In addition
to its plan to sell the Hummer,
Saab and Saturn brands, GM
will also phase out its Pontiac
brand, concentrating on its
Chevrolet, Cadillac, Buick and
GMC nameplates.

The company hopes to fol-
low the lead of fellow US
automaker Chrysler LLC by
transforming its most profitable
assets into a new company in
just 30 days and emerging from
bankruptcy protection soon
after.

But GM is much larger and
complex than its Auburn Hills-
based rival and isn't up against
Chrysler's tight June 15 dead-
line to close its deal with Fiat
Group SpA.

Sharon Lindstrom, managing
director at business consulting
firm Protiviti, said the compa-
nies pose different challenges.
But as with Chrysler, she notes
that the Treasury Department
made sure many of GM's mov-
ing parts were in order ahead
of time so a quick bankruptcy
reorganization might be possi-
ble.

"They had a lot of their ducks
in a row because the terms of
the government financing
forced them to get all the par-
ties to the table in a very, very
short period of time,” Lind-
strom said.

Separately, the German gov-
ernment said Tuesday it paid
out the first 300 million ($425
million) in bridge loans to GM's
Adam Opel GmbH division.
The loans are part of a deal to
shrink GM's stake in Opel and
shield it from GM's bankruptcy
protection filing in the U.S.

Canadian auto supplier
Magna International Inc. and
Russian-owned Sberbank will
acquire 55 per cent of Opel.

A sale of the Hummer brand
had been expected. Chief Exec-
utive Fritz Henderson had said
in April that the automaker was
expecting final bids from three
potential buyers within the
month.

Eric Lane, vice president of
Baton Rouge, La.-based Gerry
Lane Enterprises, which has
four dealerships — including
one offering Hummers — wel-
comed the sale.

"Even though they've put out
a fantastic product, they haven't
come out with enough new



A HUMMER H2 vehicle is seen for sale on Tuesday at a GM Superstore in

Dublin, California...

models to keep up,” said Lane.
"We'd like a new owner to
come in and inject some new
products.”

Lane said the lack of new
products and the recession fig-
ured into the Hummer equa-
tion much more than last year’s
runup in gasoline prices. "I
haven't had a single owner com-
plain about mileage. Nobody
buys a Hummer because of the
gas. You don't buy a vehicle for
$60,000 and worry about the
price of gas."

Critics had seized on the
rugged but fuel-inefficient
Hummer as a symbol of excess
as GM's financial troubles grew
and gas prices rose. Sales at
Hummer, which is known for
models with military-vehicle
roots, have been in a steep slide
since gasoline prices rose to
record heights last summer. For
the first four months of this
year, Hummer sales are down
67 per cent.

GM nailed down deals with
its union and a majority of its
bondholders and arranged the
Opel deal in order to appear in

BSi

(AP Photo:Ben Margot)

court Monday with a near-com-
plete plan to quickly emerge
with a chance to become prof-
itable.

The government has said it
expects GM to come out of
bankruptcy protection within
60 to 90 days. By comparison,

the judge overseeing Chrysler's
case approved the sale of its
assets to a group led by Italy's
Fiat in just over a month. Some
industry observers think
Chrysler could emerge as early
as this week.

During Monday's hearing,
GM attorney Harvey Miller
stressed the magnitude of the
case and the importance of
moving GM through court over-
sight as fast as possible. He not-
ed that the automaker only has
about $2 billion in cash left.

"If there's going to be a
recovery of value, it's absolute-
ly crucial that a sale take place
as soon as possible,” Miller said
in his opening statement.

The automaker wants to sell
the bulk of its assets to a new
company in which the US gov-
ernment will take a 60 per cent
ownership stake. The Canadi-
an government would take 12.5
per cent of the "New GM,” with
the United Auto Workers
union getting 17.5 per cent and
unsecured bondholders receiv-
ing 10 per cent. Existing share-
holders are expected to be
wiped out.

US Judge Robert Gerber
moved swiftly through more
than 25 mostly procedural
motions during the automak-
er's first-day Chapter 11 hear-
ing.
Gerber set GM's sale hear-
ing for June 30, putting it on a
path similar to that of Chrysler.
Objections are due on June 19,
with any competing bids
required to be submitted by

PRIME OFFICE SPACE

Approximately 2,200 square feet of second floor
space available in newly constructed building
at the corner of Marlborough and Cumberland
Streets. Two (2) on-site car spaces included.

Ideal location for offshore bank, law firm, or other

professions.

Contact Owner at:

362-6006



BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BS! Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established
international private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is
presently accepting applications for

PRIVATE BANKING RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

Applicants for the position of PB Relationship Manager must have a banking
or financial degree and 10-15 years experience in the offshore banking sector,
have knowledge of intemational investment instruments & money market,
ability to partner with team members, must be confident regarding customer
relations, investments & portfolio management and have thorough knowledge
of local legislation, regulatory & statutory matters as well as international
banking practices. Fluency in Italian & French is absolutely required.

Personal qualities :-

Excellent communication skils
Goal-onented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
Commitment to quality and service axceallance
Able to work with minimal supervision

Strong Team attitude

Excellent Acquisition Skills

Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary
Must be able fo work under pressure
Available to travel on a frequently basis

Responsibilities :-

Acquire new clients in target markeis
Service & advise existing customers
Maintain & follow up account relationships
Liaise directly with customers or their invesiment advisors

Foster and maintain communication with intemallextemal banking

professionals

Meet deadlines on timely basis
Meet target in terms of Profitability and Acquisition of Met Mew Money

Interested persons

with

such qualifications

resume/curriculum vitae to:-

Human Resources Manager
BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre

P.O. Box M-7130
Nassau, Bahamas

should

submit their

Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kern@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted



June 22.

Gerber also gave GM imme-
diate access to $15 billion in
government financing to get it
through the next few weeks,
and interim approval for use of
a total $33.3 billion in financ-
ing, with final approval slated
to be ruled on June 25. The
funds are contingent on GM's
sale being approved by July 10.
Gerber also approved motions
allowing the company to pay
certain prebankruptcy wages,
along with supplier and ship-
ping costs.

The sheer size of GM makes
it amore complicated case than
Chrysler.

GM made twice as many
vehicles as Chrysler's 1.5 mil-
lion last year and employs
235,000 people compared with
Chrysler's 54,000. GM also has
plants and operations in many
more countries, meaning it will
likely have to strike separate
deals to navigate the bankrupt-

cy laws of those places.

Henderson said GM has
learned a few things by watch-
ing Chrysler's case.

"Certainly the court showed
that it can address 363 (sale)
transactions in an expeditious
fashion," Henderson said at a
news conference Monday. "Par-
ticularly in our case with what
will be a very large 363 transac-
tion."

GM's filing for Chapter 11
bankruptcy protection is the
largest ever for an industrial
company. GM, which said it has
$172.81 billion in debt and
$82.29 billion in assets, had
received about $20 billion in
low-interest loans before enter-
ing bankruptcy protection.

¢ Fowler reported from New
York. AP Auto Writer Dan
Strumpf in New York, Associ-
ated Press Writer Alan Sayre in
New Orleans and Associated
Press Writer Joe McDonald in
Bewing contributed to this report

TOURISM /HOSPITALITY SECTOR

ALL ABOVE BUSINESS OWNERS SHOULD ATTEND
SMALL BUSINESS FOOSO411C SUMMIT
This Evening: June 3, 6:00 pm-9:00) pm
Location: Hely Cross Anglican Church Hall
HELF CRAFT

SALALIL BUSINESS ACT OF THE BAHAMAS
Log ft bo Boma “if Leica bing

ere eM e lt) aa
(242) 326-6748 | (242) 427-3640

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
SUPREME COURT

2009
CLE/Qui/ 00243

IN THE MATTER ALL THAT parcel or tract
of land containing 464.664 acres situated in
Alexander’s Settlement on the Island of Exuma,
Bahamas and IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT
parcel or tract of land containing 73.957 acres also
situated in Alexander’s Settlement on the Island of
Exuma, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FLORENCE SMITH
of Alexander’s Settlement in the Island of Exuma
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas is applying to the Supreme Court to have
its Title to the following land investigated under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act, and the nature
and extent thereof determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted by the said Court
in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

“ALL THAT parcel or tract of land containing
Four hundred and Sixty-four and Six hundred
and Sixty-four thousandths (464.664) acres being
a portion of Crown Grant C-24 granted to William
Alexander and situated in Alexander’s Settlement
on the Island of Exuma, Bahamas which said
parcel or tract of land has such position boundaries
shape marks and dimensions as are shown on the
diagram or plan filed in the Department of Lands
and Surveys situated in the City of Nassau in the
Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas as Plan Number
343A EX and IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT
parcel or tract of land containing Seventy-three
and Nine hundred and Fifty-Seven thousandths
(73.957) acres also being a portion of Crown Grant
C-24 granted to William Alexander and situated
in Alexander's Settlement on the Island of Exuma,
Bahamas which said parcel or tract of land has such
position boundaries shape marks and dimensions
as are shown on the diagram or plan filed in the
Department of Lands and Surveys situated in the
City of Nassau in the Island of New Providence
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas as Plan Number 343 EX and which said
parcels or tracts of land are filed herein and edged
in “PINK”.

Copies of the Plan may be inspected during normal
office hours at the following places:-

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher
Building, East Street, in the City of Nassau;

2. The Local Administrator’s Office situated in the
Settlement of George Town, Exuma;

3. The Local Constable’s Office situated in the
Settlement of George Town, Exuma; or

4, The Chambers of Colin M. Thompson Terrace
House, First Terrace and Collins Avenue
Nassau, Bahamas.

Any person who objects to the granting of the said
Certificate of Title is required to file in the Supreme
Court and serve on the Petitioner or its Attorney a
Statement of its, his or her Claim in the prescribed
forms, verified by an Affidavit and other related
requirements to be filed therewith by the 15th day
of July A.D., 2009. Failure of any such person to
file and serve a Statement of its, his or her Claim
together with the other related requirement by the
15th day of July A.D., 2009, will operate as a bar to
such claim.



COLIN M. THOMPSON
ATTORNEY FOR THE PETITIONER





PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Pending home sales rise
6.7 per cent in April

@ By ALAN ZIBEL
AP Real Estate Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
The number of US homebuy-
ers who agreed to purchase a
previously occupied home in
April posted the largest month-
ly jump in nearly eight years, a
sign that sales are finally coming
to life after a long and painful
slump.

The National Association of
Realtors said Tuesday its sea-

sonally adjusted index of sales
contracts signed in April surged
6.7 per cent to 90.3, far exceed-
ing analysts’ forecasts. It was
the biggest monthly jump since
October 2001, when pending
sales rose 9.2 per cent.

Economists were encouraged
by the report, and stock indexes
advanced modestly.

“This is yet another positive
indication that the bottoming
process is forming,” Jennifer
Lee, an economist at BMO

Legal Notice

NOTICE

QUASETTE INC.

— 4H} —

Capital Markets, wrote in a note
to clients. “Now if only prices
would stabilize.”

Economists surveyed by
Thomson Reuters expected the
index would edge up to 85 from
a reading of 84.6 in March. Typ-
ically there is a one- to two-
month lag between a contract
and a done deal, so the index
is a barometer for future exist-
ing home sales.

In early trading, the Dow
Jones industrial average added

about 20 points to 8,741, and at
times traded above 8,776.39, its
finish for 2008.

Still, some economists won-
der whether rising mortgage
rates will dampen home sales.
Nationwide average rates for
30-year-fixed rate mortgages are
around 5.3 per cent this week
compared with about five per
cent a week earlier, according to
Bankrate.com.

And analysts cautioned prices
will take longer to stabilize,

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CHAPLAIN
INVESTMENTS LIMITED

— 4} —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of QUASETTE INC. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SILVER PINE CORPORATION
—-_—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SILVER PINE CORPORATION has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ALLVEST WEALTH
MANAGEMENT CORP.

—_

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ALLVEST WEALTH MANAGEMENT
CORP. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck

off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

DICKSONIA LTD.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of DICKSONIA LTD. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CHAPLAIN INVESTMENTS LIMITED
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEW CAPSTONES INC.

—— > —__

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of NEW CAPSTONES INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

VUADENS INC.

— -,——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of VWUADENS INC. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TULIP GROUP
HOLDINGS LTD.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of TULIP GROUP HOLDINGS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



because of the glut of unsold
properties on the market.

“Even if sales volumes
rebound, home prices will keep
falling under the weight of the
massive inventory overhang,”
wrote Ian Shepherdson, chief
US economist at High Fre-
quency Economics.

The Realtors’ index was 3.2
per cent above last year’s levels
and has risen for three straight
months after hitting a record
low in January. A nearly 33 per
cent sales increase in the North-
east and a 9.8 per cent jump in
the Midwest led the overall
surge. Sales contracts rose 1.8
per cent in April from a month
earlier in the West, but fell 0.2
per cent in the South.

The big boost likely reflects
the impact of a new $8,000 tax
credit for first-time homebuy-
ers that was included in the eco-
nomic stimulus bill signed by
President Barack Obama in
February. Since buyers need to
finish their purchases by
November 30 to claim the cred-
it, “we expect greater activity
in the months ahead,”
Lawrence Yun, the Realtors’
chief economist, said in a state-
ment.

Still, Yun cautioned that the
pending sales data is more
volatile than in the past because
many sellers need banks to
agree to take less than the orig-
inal mortgage — a so-called
“short sale.” That process is
often difficult, time-consuming
and can wind up falling apart

before the deal closes.

The Federal Housing Admin-
istration last week released
details of a plan in which bor-
rowers who use FHA loans can
get advances from lenders that
let them effectively receive the
credit in advance, so they don’t
have to wait to get the money
from the Internal Revenue Ser-
vice.

Completed home sales rose
2.9 per cent to an annual rate of
4.68 million in April from a
downwardly revised pace of
4.55 million in March, the Real-
tors’ group said last week.

Sales of inexpensive foreclo-
sures and other distressed low-
end properties have even
sparked bidding wars in places
like Las Vegas, Phoenix and
Miami. But the market for high-
end properties remains at a vir-
tual standstill.

The national median sales
price in April plunged more
than 15 per cent to $170,200,
from $201,300 in the same
month last year. That was the
second largest yearly price drop
on record, according to the
Realtors’ group.

For the stories
behind the news,

ele Mat [e Td
on Mondays



Legal Notice

NOTICE

ORANGE VALLEY INC.

— -* ——
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ORANGE VALLEY INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TEKE S.A.

— )——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of TEKE S.A. has been completed; a Certifi-
cate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has

therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GENTLE INTERNATIONAL
HOLDINGS INC.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GENTLE INTERNATIONAL HOLD-
INGS INC. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolu-
tion has been issued and the Company has therefore been

struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





A look at economic developments,
stock activity around the world

@ By The Associated Press

A look at economic develop-
ments and stock market activity
around the world Tuesday:

BEIJING — US Treasury
Secretary Timothy Geithner
concluded his reassurance tour
of China, telling leaders of the
country that holds the largest
share of America's debt that
US President Barack Obama
was committed to tackling the
soaring budget deficits.

Meanwhile, General Motors
Corp. officials said the

automaker's Asian operations
will be unaffected by its bank-

ruptcy and it plans to open new
factories in China, Thailand and
India even as it closes US facil-
ities.

HONG KONG — Goldman
Sachs raised more than $1.9 bil-
lion after selling part of its stake
in Industrial & Commercial
Bank of China as the US invest-
ment firm seeks to repay gov-
ernment bailout funds. Gold-
man unloaded more than 3.3
billion Hong Kong shares in
ICBC, China's biggest lender.

LONDON — A major Mid-
dle Eastern shareholder in Bar-
clays bank said it intends to sell

part of its stake — at least 1.3
billion shares — potentially tak-
ing a big profit on its seven-
month investment and sending
Barclays shares down more
than 13 per cent.

The FTSE 100 index of lead-
ing British shares underper-
formed its European counter-
parts, ending down 29.17 points,
or 0.7 per cent, at 4,477.02 as it
was dragged down by banking
stocks after a major Middle
Eastern shareholder in Barclays
PLC said it intends to sell part
of its stake, potentially taking
a big profit on its seven-month
investment. Elsewhere in Euro-
pean markets, Germany's DAX

closed essentially unchanged at
5,144.60, up an infinitesimal 1.5
point, while France's CAC-40
index was only 1.45 point lower
at 3,378.04.

Separately, activity in the UK
construction industry retreated
for the 15th straight month in
May, but the number of home
mortgages approved has risen
for the third month.

BRUSSELS — The jobless
rate in the 16 nations that use
the euro surged to 9.2 per cent
in April, the highest level in
almost a decade, the EU statis-
tics office said. The euro-zone
jobless rate has reached its high-














NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ORINDA TAMARA KATHLEEN
WILTSHIRE of #2 BACHELOR’S HOUSE, HUDSON AVENUE,
FREEPORT, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 27 day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

KEYCOVE
MANAGEMENT LTD.

——_

Fs

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of KEYCOVE MANAGEMENT LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been 1s-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GOLDEN DEWDROP LIMITED

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of GOLDEN DEWDROP LIMITED has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been 1s-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, KIRCH LEWITT
FERGUSON of Eastwood Estates, Nassau, Bahamas,

intend to my name to KIRSCH LEWITT FERGUSON.
If there are any objections to this change of name by
Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of

this notice.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

est level since September 1999,
with Spain standing out with a
18.1 per cent rate. Unemploy-
ment across all 27 EU countries
rose to 8.6 per cent in April
from 8.4 per cent in March.
Some 20.8 million people are
now seeking work in the EU.

TOKYO — Japan's bench-
mark Nikkei 225 stock average
added 26.56 points, or 0.3 per
cent, to 9,704.31, setting a fresh
eight-month high. Australia's
index added 1.6 per cent and
Shanghai's benchmark was up
0.1 per cent.

But Hong Kong's Hang Seng
lost 2.7 per cent to 18,389.08
after jumping four per cent to
an eight-month high the previ-
ous session. South Korea's
Kospi gave up early gains to
trade down 0.2 per cent amid
more concerns North Korea is
preparing to launch three or
four medium-range missiles.

CAIRO — A Saudi con-
glomerate whose billionaire
chairman is under the spotlight
by the kingdom's banking

authorities had its credit rating
knocked down several notches
to junk status by Moody's
Investors Service. The
announcement came as Saad
Group, headed by major HSBC
stakeholder Maan al-Sanea, said
it was planning an "orderly
restructuring” of some of its
companies’ debt, citing liquidi-
ty issues linked to the global
economic meltdown. The two
statements came days after Sau-
di Arabia's central bank
ordered local financial institu-
tions to freeze al-Sanea's
accounts and those of five of his
relatives, including wife and
children. Al-Sanea is listed by
Forbes as the world's 62nd rich-
est man.

ST. PETERSBURG, Russia
— Prime Minister Vladimir
Putin and Nissan Motor Corp.
president Carlos Ghosn
presided over the opening of
the Japanese car maker's first
plant in Russia, banking on the
revival of the country's car
industry despite the global
financial crisis.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

BEVELED LEDGE LTD.
—_— ¢) —_—
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BEVELED LEDGE LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

The Public is hereby advised that we, SHERRECK LAVERN
FORBES AND PIERRE RENE MONDELS of St. Charles
Vincent Street intend to change our child’s name from RAINIQUE

AAILYAH_ MCPHEE to RAINIQUE AAILYAH MONDELUS. If

there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

CORDAY LIMITED

——

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CORDAY LIMITED has been completed;

a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

NOTICE

VENUS INT’L
HOLDINGS LTD.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of VENUS INT’L HOLDINGS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

GY

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 2 JUNE 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,598.25 | CHG 0.33 | %CHG 0.02 | YTD -114.11 | YTD % -6.66
FINDEX: CLOSE 790.41 | YTD -5.32% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

Securit
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Premier Real Estate

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +

1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Previous Close _ Today's Close

100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

Change Daily Vol. Div $

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

1%
Prime + 1.75%

Prime + 1.75%

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

S2wk-Low Symbol Bid $
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 4.00
0.20 RND Holdings 0.3.

5 0.40
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

30.13
0.45

Ask $

8.42
6.25

0.55

Last Price

0.35

29.00
0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

S2wk-Low
1.3124
2.9230
1.3875
3.1821

12.2702
100.0000
96.4070

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000 1.0523

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
i

Last 12 Months Yield %

5.23

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
i

Weekly Vol. - Trading vol

EPS $-Acom

oF th
reported earings per share for the last 12 mths.

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

g price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
('S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

ALPHA MAIMA GROUP LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 of the International Business Companies Act No.
45 of 2000, ALPHA MAIMA GROUP LTD. has been
Dissolved and struck off the Register according to
the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 21st day of May, 2009.

Ziedonis Udis
Law Office Skudra & Udris
13/3 Marijas iela, Riga
Latvia
Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE

BAKER UNITED LTD.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BAKER UNITED LTD. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009

The Tribune

burger

yang!

m@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

he , it’s lunch time and

you’re in the mood to eat

A « burger- instead of chowing

r san on your typical fast food

~* “ hamburger visit the Burger

URS Laurel Soleo MeLie
get a burger with a bang.



eS

Owner Marva Thompson
serves up the traditional lunch time favourite with a
dynamic twist that leaves her customers begging for
more.

Mrs Thompson explained that she was the quality
control inspector for a major fast food chain for many
years and felt that she had gone as far as she could in the
company.

Wanting to further her love of cooking, she branched
out and Burger Barn came along late last year.

“This is a family affair, my husband, Tommy and my
two daughters Teniel and Kenea all work with me.

“T wanted to do something different, and I love to
cook and I like to experiment. I did not want to do the
traditional chicken and conch snacks so I came up with
the idea of hamburgers, but with unique toppings that
had an edge and would make people want to drive out
here for more.

“The hamburgers you get at Burger Barn are not
your regular hamburgers, the size is larger, we do not use
frozen patties, we make our own buns and the toppings
you can not get anywhere else.”

These toppings include: grilled onions, pineapples,
bacon, fried eggs, jalapenos, mushrooms, Teriyaki sauce
or conch chilli just to name a few delicious options.

Customers can choose from an eclectic list of Burger
Barn suggestions. The Sunshine Burger, one of the
most popular, is an all beef patty topped with a fried
egg, melted American cheese, bacon and lettuce and
tomatoes. Want something hotter? Try the TNT burg-
er- a beef patty topped with roasted bell peppers,
jalapenos,onions and garlic Swiss cheese and lettuce
and tomatoes Or try the Avalanche burger - spicy pork
topped with grilled pineapple, lettuce and tomatoes.

None of those strike your fancy? Then create your
own signature burger.

If yowre not in the mood for a hamburger, try the jerk
chicken or pork, escoveitch fish or Mrs Thompson’s
original conch chilli. She also offers cracked chicken or



you can create your own hamburger masterpeice.




BURGER BARN offers an ecletic array of burgers on its menu
such as the Sunshine, TNT, Bonanza or Avalanche burgers or

THE TRIBUNE















roe a

conch.
Pair any one of these entrees with French fries onion
rings, sweet potato, chili, or garlic fries or a garden sal-
ad.

And she’s not yet done searching for new items to add
to the menu.

“T will try anything on a burger, I have trusted staff
and family members who I try things out on. They are
my guinea pigs and
then we decide if we
should do it. You
won't know until you
try, | remember when
we first introduced the
pineapple, people
were reluctant, but
now they love it. I
really have not gotten
any negative feed-
back. Now that we
have so many mangos
in season, I would love
to do maybe a turkey
burger with a mango
topping on a whole-
wheat bun or maybe
something with nuts.”

The location of her
restaurant- on
Carmichael Road west of Gladstone Road has not
detracted from her business either.

“IT have customers who drive out here from
Yamacraw, they come from as far east as you can think
or as far west. Ninety per cent of my business comes
from repeat customers or word of mouth- people who
hear about Burger Barn from friends and come to try it

out.

“The hamburgers

you get at Burger
Barn are not your
regular hamburgers,
the size is larger, we
do not use frozen pat
ties, we make our
own buns and the
toppings you can not
get anywhere else.”

_—_—_—_—s=









THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2009, PAGE 9B







The Tribune

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

Over the last few weeks the }
rain has managed to place a }
damper on several outdoor }
events, and has forced many }
to opt for a weekend at home }
rather than go out and about.
However this weekend’s }
event forecast is predicting }
numerous scattered events, }
with lots of food and culture. }
So grab your dancing shoes i
and your raincoat, because }
this weekend’s entertainment
rundown is offering every- }

thing but the sun.

41. Salt Pond Long Island is

expected to be booming this
weekend when hundreds of
spectators attend the island’s
annual regatta. Over the
course of the three day cul-
tural extravaganza which
starts Thursday there will be
a plethora of activities includ-
ing the traditional boat racing,
various fairs, lots of food
stalls, parties, and much
more. To book your seat,
contact Bahamasair, the
Island Link or the Legacy
motor vessels.

2. This weekend its all
about family fun, at least

according to the organisers of

the Eleuthera Pineapple Festi-

val. The event which is spread

over a five day weekend start-
ing from today, has sched-
uled a long list of activities
including tours of some of
the island’s pineapple farms,
craft exhibits, a Junkanoo
rush out, live music, and
pineapple cooking and eating
contest. Event organisers
have also planned a ‘Pine-
athlon’ which will include a
half mile swim, a three mile
run, then a four and a half
mile bike ride. The festival
includes the island’s annual
Little Miss Pineapple pageant,
where one lucky girl will be
crowned with the esteemed
title and reign as the festival
princess. Set to take centre
stage in Governor’s Harbour
Eleuthera, this event is a sure
bet for those looking for that
drama free weekend getaway.

3. Starting today at the
Galleria Cinema JFK location,
the Bahamas International
Film Festival will launch its
month long local film series
starting with the film /Am
Not A Dummy by local film

maker Kareem Mortimer. Oth-

er movies slated for the mini-
series include Artists of The
Bahamas, Sita Sings The
Blues, and Three Seasons.
Priced at a mere $5 per per-
son, this event is expected to

draw a hefty crowd to witness

the Bahamian film making
industry at its finest. Show-
time begins promptly at
7.30pm.

4, Visit the Hub Art Centre
this Friday evening at 7pm to
learn film making techniques
form international producer
Paul H-O and Tom Donhue
from New York. The duo who
also produced the film Guest
of Cindy Sherman which was
recently premiered at the
Popop Studio, will offer view-
ers a unique look into their
early careers while revealing
some of their best kept
secrets as film makers. This
informal art/documentary film
making workshop at the Hub
on Friday, June 5 at 7 pmisa
must do for all those interest-
ed in developing as actors,
producers, and directors.

5. Thursday, stop over at
the Hard Rock Café to catch
an exciting session of the
weekly Express Yourself open
mic night. The event which
has brought in exciting per-
formers like Broken Micz,
Davineir Clarke, Baygon, and

many other artists on the rise,

is guaranteed to entertain
viewers in every way imagin-
able. Entrance is free, and
drinks are affordably priced.

=
j %

m — -
=

y

@ By LLOYDALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

SEEN as a newcomer to the
local music scene, Bahamian reg-
gae artist Jalam is making waves
as a force to be reckoned with as
he takes on the Bahamas and the

world through his conscious lyrics.

Born and raised in the tiny settlement of
New Bight, Cat Island, Jalam aka Jamal
Moncur began molding himself as a musician
from early on, and quickly gained local
attention for his performances in various tal-
ent competitions and school productions.

Jalam told Tribune Entertainment, that
because of his well received lyrics on the
island, it was easy to get the support of his
teachers, peers, and family for what was to
come next in his career.

After graduating high school in 1996,
Jalam moved to Nassau which for him was
the place to be for any performing artist who
wanted to make it big.

He quickly linked with local entertainers
Michael Hoyte and Ian Williams, who were
instrumental in improving his sound, image,
and his overall understanding of the local
music industry.

Explaining the platform for most of his
work, Jalam said: “Most of my lyrics are
more about social issues which are generally

things I see on the streets, crime, but are
mostly positive vibes.

“So when people hear from Jalam, they
know it’s pure niceness, crafty lyrics, so I feel
like most people that listen to me listen not
for the beat, but for what I have to say.”

Although described as a reggae artist,
Jalam said he views himself as a world beat
artist touching several genres including
dancehall, culture, rap, and even RnB.

After first hitting the industry more than
13 years ago with his singles No Mama Man,
Jah Guides, and Sufferation, Jalam has con-
tinued to give music lovers smooth rhythms
and conscious lyrics.

Staying true to his passion of producing
music with a message, Jalam has also pro-
duced a track titled HIV, which he hopes will
better educate young people on the dangers
of unprotected sex.

“It’s hurtful to see a lot of young people
catching diseases at a rapid pace, and right
now it’s intensifying. A lot of people aren’t
getting educated for what’s going on, and on
top of that I don’t see other artist really talk-
ing about it, but this is really an important
issue and I think there needs to be more
artists who are not afraid to advocate for this
cause,” he said.

With a selection of songs now on the air-
waves including World Gone Crazy and
Most High - which was produced and shoot
by F.DOT - Jalam is once again asserting
himself as a top performing Bahamian artist,
where he plans to take no prisoners on his
way to the top.

BTVI hosts Spice 2009

m@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Technical and Voca-
tional Institute’s (BTVI) Fashion and
Cosmetology Department is getting
ready to host it’s first ever Hair Show
on June 14 at the Wyndam Nassau
Resort and Crystal Palace Ballroom to
showcase its brightest student’s hair,
beauty and fashion creations.

Under the theme “SPICE- Student’s
Practical Interpretation of Cosmetic
Expression,” students will be allowed to
show off their best skills in the area of
fashion design and hair styling. There

will be eight students from the fashion
design department and 10 students
from the cosmetology department.

Assistant Coordinator for Cosmetol-
ogy at BTVI, Andrea Taylor, said
BTVI decided to have the show to
make the country aware of what stu-
dents had to offer.

“We really wanted them to show off
their creativity in their work. They will
be styling hair onstage. The first cate-
gory will be an everyday look and the
second category is an evening comb
out. This is to help them to do plat-
form work. There are a lot of areas in
cosmetology that you can go into and
one of those areas is becoming a hair

artist or hair cosmologist representa-
tive for various companies. With this
type of experience, they will get to
know how to create with what they
have,” Mrs Taylor said.

Shirley Pearson, Coordinator for
Fashion Design Production, said for
the fashion design segment, students
will be required to create high fashion
and casual wear.

“They got excited when Islands of
the World fashion week was held last
November. Since then, they have been
hyped and ready to display their work.
Most of the students are hiding their
themes but one student is doing a salt
and pepper collection in relation to the





















spices,” Mrs Pearson said.

Mrs Taylor said this show is a great
opportunity for the public to know
about the upcoming talent at BTVI.

“These students are going to be grad-
uating soon and we want to expose
their work. We really want to let the
public know that we are here in the
cosmetology and fashion department
and we are running 100 per cent,” Mrs
Taylor said.

Showtime for SPICE 2009 is 8pm.
Tickets for the event can be purchased
for $20 from BTVI, 100% Per Cent
Bible Bookstore, and Security Plus on
Village Road. Tickets will be $25 at the
door.



PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2009



ARTS

THE TRIBUNE





“Da most hansome hustla”
ee

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

SPRING 2009 brought with
it new life and new begin-
nings especially for the music
industry in the Bahamas.
Young talented Bahamians
have been producing cultur-
ally expressive music to satis-
fy a new generation of listen-

ers.

However, other young Bahamians
who left home in search of making a
name for themselves abroad musically
are beginning to return home and give
back to the industry in the Bahamas
with SINDAKID trailblazing the way
for these returning sons of the soil.

Born Dwight George Porter in
Freeport, Grand Bahama, SINDAKID
has placed himself outside of the box
immersing himself in everything from
being a rapper, writer, producer, and
actor.

“IT moved to New York when I was
17. When it comes to rapping, it was a

God given talent. I wasn’t trained or
learned how to do it-I was born with
the ability to rap. When it comes to
people I look up to in the music busi-
ness, the only person is Tupac because
I like his music-it’s real and down to
earth. I am real, I express myself 100
per cent and I don’t try to be nobody
else but who I am,” SINDAKID said.

The name SINDAKID apparently is
a spin off of the first gang in the
Bahamas dating back to the early
1980’s called SINDAKIDS.

“T basically wanted to turn a nega-
tive into a positive. It was a gang and
the majority of time gangs are always
negative. I took off the ‘S’ where it
would be SINDAKID. A gang is
organised crime or a group of people.
When I took off the ‘S’ it became one
person or basically a one man army.
When you hear the name SINDAKID,
for kids in this generation, they would
know that name for something posi-
tive. I also wanted to have a name that
no one had in New York. I wanted
something that was home based and
that no one could even think about in
America and SINDAKID was the per-
fect name,” he said.

While most young people prefer to

leave the country and never return,
SINDAKID said he had to come back,
even if he had left for over 30 years.

“This is the place where I was born
and raised, this is the place that I love
and hate. There are pros and cons-but
why not come home and let people see
my talent. In New York, I represent
the Bahamas hard and I really want to
get reacquainted with my home base
because if you forget where you come
from you can’t get where you are
going. At the end of the day, the
Bahamas hasn’t changed-it’s still the
same Bahamas basically. I am making
rounds in foreign, but the people in the
Bahamas have to know who I am too.
My new single says it all for my love of
this country called ‘I love Nassau,’
which incorporates all the islands,”
SINDAKID said.

SINDAKID has sold thousands of
copies of his latest mixtape, “The
Appetizer” world wide and has a new
mixtape called “From Bahamas to
New York,” showcasing his Bahamian
upbringing and love for his country.
With his hard core tracks and mind
altering lyrics, SINDAKID is deter-
mined to emphasise real life in his
music.

ere eee ee SSL LESS

“[’m not a gospel rapper or a person
that is going to always preach to the
people- my message is about me as a
person and people getting to hear how
Tam living, my lifestyle, what I went
through growing up and what I am
going through now. My message over-
all is to keep striving to follow your
dreams,” SINDAKID said.

Although SINDAKID resides in
New York, he said he represents the
Bahamas in everything he does and
while he is back home, he wants to get
involved in everything this country has
to offer.

“T really want to get in tune with
everything that is going on dealing
with music and the community. I
would definitely like to get involved in
anything that is like community ser-
vice, some organisations, and just give
back to the community. Even with my
music I don’t sell it the people here I
give them to the people. I want them
to embrace my music so I give it out
here for them to get to know me and
my music.”

To hear more music from SIN-
DAKID, check out facebook page at
sindakid porter or on myspace at
redragzent.

“! really want fo
get in tune with
everything that is
going on dealing
with music and the
community. |
would definitely
like to get involved
in anything that is
like community
service, some
organisations,

and just give back
to the community.”



The Bahamas Real Estate Associ-
ation (BREA) celebrated its 50th
anniversary last week May 24 -
Friday May 29. BREA was formed
in 1959 by HG Christie, Edgar
Bain, Frank Christie, D Lester
Brown, Jack Hughes and Bert L
Roberts. The objectives of the
association, as established by its
founding members were to unite
and regulate the industry, main-
tain a code of ethics by persons
in the industry and to prevent
infringements by foreign brokers
or other unauthorised persons in
the sale of real estate in the coun-
try.

On Friday evening, the associa-
tion hosted a gala black tie ban-
quet in the Crown Ballroom of the
Atlantis Resort. Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham delivered the
key note address, and Governor-
General Arthur Hanna presented
awards to long serving and dedi-
cated members of the associa-
tion. Also in attendance was Tim-
othy Kinzler, BREA’s president
liaison for the National Associa-
tion of Realtors.

Attendees danced the night away
to the music of musical legends
Count Bernadino and Ronnie But-
ler accompanied by the Extra

Band. past president Larry Roberts.



AMONG the Bahamas Real Estate Association's Past Presidents attending the Association's 50 Anniversary
Celebration Friday, May 29 at Atlantis were: (From left to right ) Garth Buckner 2003-2004 , Patrick Stra-
chan 1999-1001, Barbara Brooks 1993-1998, Geoffrey Brown Sr.; Mike Lightbourn, far right, has served
on the BREA Board almost continuously.

Keith Parker/P. S. News photos



BREA Board members with Prime Minister Ingraham at BREA 50th, May 29, 2009 at Atlantis: (from left) Lana Munnings-Basalyga; The PM: president William Wong, and immediate



BREA Administrator June Fife (centre) received a plaque from BREA at the Association's 50th Anniversary
Celebration. Governor General Arthur Hanna and Lana Munnings-Basalyga BREA’s vice president presented
the plaque.






WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009

The new
buzz

| See page nine



Try a burger

with a bang!
See page eight





@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

OUR hair is one of the first

things people notice. The

right hair accessories can do
wonders by making your hair style
all your own. Most people buy
generic accessories from the gro-
cery store and by the end of the
day someone else has the exact
_ same hair accessory, making your
x look less unique. However,
_ Cherie McCartney-
_ Gilbert has decided
to take hair acces-
sories to another
level by making
them as extraor-
dinary as her

clients.

































“| am surrounded
by a number

ot ware that
share the same
passion and have
encouraged me
to create such
hair accessories.”

“h-
=. + ,

ma



Photos taken by Vaughn Scriven



#|

Born and raised in New Providence, and a
mother of two, Mrs Gilbert has a Bachelors
Degree in International Business & Finance
and has worked in the financial services
industry for the last 13 years.

Despite this, Mrs Gilbert said she always
enjoyed being creative and working with her
hands.

“Prior to shell craft, I have done pottery
and in the last month and a half I have pur-
sued glass blowing and straw work craft. In
February of this year, I did a shell craft class
with BAIC that was taught by Mrs April
Martin-Fox,” Mrs Gilbert said.

Travelling

Due to her love for traveling, Mrs Gilbert
collects interesting and unique hand made
pieces. When it comes to her creations, Mrs
Gilbert makes it her goal to make pieces that
can be used by the individuals purchasing
them for a very long time.

“T have a passion for hair accessories
which include hair clips and I am surrounded
by a number of women that share the same
passion and have encouraged me to create
such hair accessories. Therefore, I ensure
that my creations are functional pieces that
showcase the beauty of our Bahama
Islands,” Mrs Gilbert said.

Mrs Gilbert’s hair clips can range in price
from $7 and $20. The process of making a
hair accessory is rather rigorous as Mrs

_ Gilbert explains her technique.

“First is the selection of the right
shells to express/compliment
the idea that I like or wish

- tocreate and the proper
_ cleaning of the shells to
— ensure that the beauty
_ of the shells are max-
imised. Decoration
of the hair clips is
done with the use
of a glue gun. This
process involves
making flow-
ers Or
oth-

Cherie McCartney-Gilbert

creates gorgeous hair accessories
from beautiful seashells









er shapes with the shells
while keeping in mind if this
clip will be worn by a young girl
or an adult female. In addition, I
need to keep in mind whether the
piece can be used for a casual or
dressy occasion. After I have complet-
ed the decoration process and am satis-
fied with my creation, Envirotex is used
to preserve the shells so that they are :
strong and durable and to give it a gloss
finish. Once the piece is dried, if required,
a Dremel is used to clean up any excess
Envirotex that may have hardened during
the drying process,” Mrs Gilbert said.
Most of Mrs Gilbert’s preferred shells
of choice are those shells that can be
found on the lovely beaches of the
Bahamas. These include: Keyhole
Limpet, Bleeding Tooth (Nerita
peloronta), Flamingo Tooth (Cyphoma
gibbosum), Dove Shell (Columbella mer-
catoria), small white clam shell, pink &
white clam shell, Sunrise Tellin, Tellina
radiate, zebra stripped tiger, Tessellate
nerite and whelk shells all of which can
be found in Long Island.

Inspiration

Mrs Gilbert said she also used shells
from Cat Island such as Tiger Lucina,
Donax denticulata, Faust Tellin and
Gaudy Asaphis and shells from Andros,
Bimini and New Providence.

As for inspiration, Mrs Gilbert
attributes it to God as she seeks
Him first for guidance and cre-
ativity so that she can express
herself through her shell
crafts.

“T am also inspired by the |
beautiful shells that can be ;
found throughout our beau-
tiful islands and want to

display their beauty on
creative pieces,” Mrs
Gilbert said.

Mrs Gilbert said she would
advise other young artist to
follow their hearts.

“Tf this is something that
you have a passion for then
pursue it.”



Full Text


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CHICKEN BISCUIT. ™ tevin’ fr
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‘Jah Doctrine’ claims
attempts to report
abduction of wife and
child fell on deaf ears

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A LOCAL reggae star has
criticised police for not believ-
ing him when his wife and
child were kidnapped.

Devlyn Stubbs, also known
as Jah Doctrine, had left his
car parked outside a down-
town bank when a thief
jumped in and drove off with
his wife, Sarah, and their nine-
month-old baby inside.

But the 28-year-old claims
his fears turned to frustration
when the emergency 919 num-
ber was “repeatedly busy” and
his attempts to report the
crime to officers nearby fell
on deaf ears.

According to Mr Stubbs,
four different police officers
on Bay Street refused to
believe his car had been
stolen. Instead they suggest-
ed it had merely been towed.

In the meantime, his car,
which traffic had slowed down
enough to enable Sarah and
their baby to escape

unharmed, had apparently left



DEVLYN STUBBS with his wife
and child.

the area. He said when his
wife jumped out of the car,
she ran back to the bank with
the baby and told him how
their car had been stolen. She
told him how she had shouted
to the man to stop, but it was
only when traffic stopped him
that she and the baby were
able to escape.

“All I wanted was help ina

SEE page eight



INSURANCE MANAGEMENT




Our Nassau Office




Will Be Closed On



Thursday June 4th,




2009 For Our Annual




TALE








FUN DAY



ZOOQ9D

We Will Re-Open For
Business As Usual On
Monday June 8th, 2009.

The Tribune

TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2009

CARS FOR SALE,
a
aa Aide

BAHAMAS BIGGEST ;







all MS ROADS



to his injuries

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

THE HEAVY RAIN that drenched the Bahamas recently has taken its toll on roads around New
Providence. The sun may have been out yesterday, but these pot holes would have wiped the smiles

from the faces of motorists.

New Crown
land grants
allegations

IT IS claimed that two sec-
retaries and another senior
government official are among
those in the Department of
Lands and Surveys who are
alleged to have used their
positions to get Crown land
grants in Abaco, Exuma, and
Cat Island.

Since April 19, The Tribune
has published a series of arti-
cles in which sources have
accused the department of
corruption and nepotism.

More and more information
is coming out from sources
within the ministry who are

SEE page eight

BMG CaN CG ARCA IIS

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THE ROYAL Bahamas Police Force Band plays at the opening of the
59th FIFA congress at Atlantis last night. The two-day soccer event
has never before been held in the Caribbean.

e SEE PAGE FIVE



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

mpd ty or
Ware ss

SS a AS




Customs
security
cuard dies
of ‘Knife’

wounds

Man succumbs J my tanexa



THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter

tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

POLICE have
launched an investigation
into the case of a man
who died in hospital
hours after he was admit-

ted with multiple wounds
from what appeared to be
a knife.

Collier Shermark
Knowles, a 33-year-old
Customs security guard

SEE page eight

PLP calls for
inquiry into
boy’s death in
police custody

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE PLP is calling for an
immediate inquiry by an
impartial body into the death
of 15-year-old Michael
Knowles in police custody on
Sunday night.

In a statement released yes-
terday afternoon the party
said it is “deeply concerned”
about the incident and assert-
ed that it “would not be rea-
sonable nor acceptable that

SEE page six

INSIDE

SHOPPER OUTRAGE AFTER
SOLOMON’S BOMB HOAX
PAGE THREE
CALL FOR ENHANCED MEDICAL
TREATMENT ON STANIEL CAY
PAGE FIVE

We Apologize For Any
Inconvenience Caused

lil

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

o Se

ITALIAN CLUB STEAK & CHEESE
TURKEY & SWISS CHICKEN CAESAR
HAM & CHEDDAR CHICKEN & CHEDDAR

MAKE IT A COMBO 16 OZ FOUNTAIN SODA & FRIES FOR $2.00 MORE

Quiznos SuB







NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISTANDS, LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009



LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





for the second straight year

ATLANTIS on Paradise
Island continues to maintain
its stronghold as the top
resort in the Caribbean.

In its summer 2009 issue,
Celebrated Living, American
Airline’s magazine for first
and business class passengers,
revealed its ‘Reader’s Choice
Platinum List’, naming
Atlantis the top resort in the
Caribbean for a 2nd straight
year.

Atlantis, Paradise Island,
ranks high on the list high-
lighting American Airline’s
passenger’s top choices in
cruises, spas, golf courrses
and hotels.

The article’s writer Elaine
Glusac descibes the list as the
ranking of, "Great hotels
[that] are more than the sum
of their amenities. Those that
make lasting memories also
rely on the personal touch --
your favorite fruit in the
room, your preferred news-
paper with your morning cof-
fee, and an of-course attitude
on the part of the concierge.”

Continuing to outrank its

competitors, in the Caribbean
hotel category, Atlantis
scored high marks over other
properties such as The Ritz
Carlton in The U.S. Virgin
Islands and The Four Seasons
in Nevis.

According to Celebrated
Living this is why Atlantis
was chosen number one:-

“Who can compete with 35
restaurants and bars plus 20
million gallons of pool?
Atlantis rules the sea, say CL
readers.

“Get behind the scenes
among the resort’s 50,000
marine animals with its new
“Sea Keeper” program, or
train dolphins for a day.”

One&Only Ocean Club
was also in the ranking, gar-
nering a respectable 10th
place spot. The article cited
the propry’s sporting ameni-
ties as the reason it enjoys a
place on the list.

“One&Only aims to keep
you bikini-fit with a new
Technogym virtual training
system including equipment
and nutritional advice.”

Atlantis named topihotelinithe

Resort tops ‘Platinum List’

wr a of the oval eS ota & ial Atlantis Resort on Paradise en

Once again (also for a 2nd
straight year), the American
Airlines quarterly luxury
magazine also ranked

Man in court on armed robbery,
weapons and kidnapping charges

A 39-YEAR-OLD man was
arraigned in Magistrates Court
yesterday on armed robbery,
weapons and kidnapping
charges.

Shawn Miller of Fox Hill
was arraigned in Court Five,
Bank Lane on one count of
kidnapping, five counts of
armed robbery, five counts
of receiving as well as









TROPICAL
US)
ate ta
PHONE: 322-2157

weapon and ammunitions
charges.

According to court dockets,
it is alleged that on May 28,
2009 while armed with a hand-
gun, Miller robbed Hamilton
Dean of a brown 1995 Toyota
Corolla valued at $3,500, and
Andrew Dean of three cellular
phones together valued at
$1,290,

On the same day, it is
alleged, he robbed Alissa Dean
of $360, Audley Dean of $1,116
and Zelma Dean of a gray
Toshiba laptop valued at
$1,200.

Miller, who was arraigned
in Court One, Bank Lane was

|
pba) wes T eee | es]

not required to enter a plea to
the armed robbery charges.

He pleaded not guilty to kid-
napping Hamilton Dean. This
offense allegedly took place on
May 28.

Miller also pleaded not
guilty to possession of a 12
gauge Maverick shotgun, pos-
session of a smooth bore shot-
gun, and possession of seven
live rounds of 12 gauge shot-
gun ammunition.

He also entered not guilty
pleas to the receiving charges.

Miller was remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison. The case has
been transferred to Court Five
and adjourned to June 10.

ica

Um Pai F han



Atlantis second in its list of
Top 10 Family Resorts, with Spa in Lake Buena Vista,
the only property getting Florida.
higher marks-

Disney’s

AV ITN er Tua een
ILO UT WL en ORL) ONS

m@ By GLADSTONE THURSTON

THE government is considering creating
an integrated credit union supervision sys-
tem by establishing a single regulator for the
sector, Agriculture and Marine Resources
Minister Larry Cartwright confirmed.

“Tt is envisaged at this time that the Central
Bank of the Bahamas will assume the regula-
tion and supervision of credit unions,” he told
the Bahamas Co-operative League Limited
30th annual general meeting on May 29.

“The government is cognisant that credit
unions are different from banks and the pecu-
liarities or the uniqueness of credit unions
must be taken into account.

“However, there is an overarching obliga-
tion to protect not only the stability and
integrity of credit unions but the larger finan-
cial system as well,” said Mr Cartwright,
whose ministerial responsibility includes co-
operative development.

Credit unions have not been exempted from
the global financial crisis which has had “far
reaching effects on our local economy” in the
form of reduced tourist arrivals, and by exten-
sion lower employment and reduced income.

The 2005 Co-operative Societies Act and
the pending 2009 Co-operative Regulations
Act both include mechanisms to bring credit
union operations in line with other financial
institutions and international best practices,
said Mr Cartwright.

This includes establishing annual continu-

Grand Floridian Resort and

“New dining plans at this



water-park-mega-resort allow
kids under 7 to eat free. Kids
applaud: The Jonas Brothers
perform here often.”

Derek Smith/BIS

MINISTER of Agriculture and Marine Resources
Larry Cartwright.

ance of registration, improving efficiencies
by imposing penalties for non-compliance
with the Act, and upgrading the supervising
standards of credit unions in order to comply
with international best practices, said Mr
Cartwright.

“Regulatory reform is a challenge that is
not insurmountable,” said Mr Cartwright,”
and your board of directors, managers and
executives must demonstrate the commitment
and prudence necessary to bring these organ-
isations into compliance.

“This could only be a good thing for your
members, your credit unions and by exten-
sion the financial system of the Bahamas.”



Political tribalism ‘eating away
at chances of social progress’

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Well-known
Bahamian poet and radio host
Michael Pintard warned that
political tribalism is one of the
most dangerous “diseases” eat-
ing away at the country’s
chances at social progress.

He noted that too often, ideas
put forward by talented
Bahamians are not taken in the
right context — simply because
they don’t wear the right colour.

“Tt is expected that we see
ourselves as one important enti-
ty and unfortunately one of the

greatest diseases that the
Bahamas has is political tribal-
ism; that persons who wear red
or yellow often do not see the
merit of the issue or the value of
somebody’s ideas except
through political spectacles,”
said Mr Pintard.

He stressed that Bahamians
must bring an end to both polit-
ical and religious tribalism if
they want the country to
progress.

“One of the greatest tragedies
we face in this country is when
persons who are talented and
gifted and have great ideas
somehow intellectually surren-
der unto politicians, and in
some cases to ministers in the

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

Pike 50,156

Paeceae Serene ete caters P4

Poe tOrd

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES



church,” he said.

Mr Pintard noted that com-
merce is also being stifled as a
result of political influence.

He said that in Grand
Bahama, New Providence and
Abaco, prominent persons seek
to block others from compet-
ing in the business sector.

“You have a network of per-
sons at the top who have pre-
determined that only a certain
few are going to get in. And
persons through political con-
nections often set up scenarios
where they can prevent others
from righteously competing
with them.

“One of the greatest dilem-
mas we have in this country is
that even in corporate govern-
ment structures ... while per-
sons might not do things that
are illegal they often do things
that are unethical in the execu-
tion of business, and many per-
sons are aware of the fact but
say nothing,” he said.

Mr Pintard said quality of life
must be improved for all
Bahamians, especially for those
who are marginalised and dis-
enfranchised.

He urged those who have the
means to reach out to the less
fortunate.

“Too often we have a great
imbalance, and many Bahami-
ans and friends of the Bahamas
who reside here and are doing
exceptionally well do not have a
heart for service or a willing-
ness to reach out and truly help
people.

“Tf we are not helping to feed
the marginalised and the disen-
franchised, they will seek to run
up on you with a 9mm or Knife
and they will affect the quality
of life that you and I enjoy,” he
warned.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 38, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Handgun
seized after
police chase;
suspect on
the loose

A police chase in southern
New Providence led to the
confiscation of a .45 hand-
gun, but a male suspect
remains on the loose.

Assistant Superintendent
Walter Evans said officers
from the Southern Police
Station were about to exe-
cute a search warrant at a
home on Dunmore Avenue
at around 7am on Monday,
when a man inside the house
saw the police and fled.

Officers gave chase but the
man escaped. During the
chase, the suspect threw
away an object that was
recovered and found to be a
A5 handgun, Mr Evans said.

No arrest has been made
but investigations continue.

Two detained
after drugs
discovered

TWO residents of Wulff
Road are in police custody in
connection with the discov-
ery of more than 60 packets
of marijuana.

Officers from the Wulff
Road police station made
the find after they executed
a search warrant at a house
in the Murphyville area.

According to press liaison
officer Walter Evans, the
officers reported finding a
paint can near a gas tank
outside the house which con-
tained 63 packets of marijua-
na, as well as a plastic bag
containing a small amount of
the drug.

A 33-year-old man and a
28-year-old woman are being
questioned.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays























C Ide abe

ENJOY AN EVENING of CLASSIC MUSIC
from ODESSA GARDENI!!

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VOL. 1

Shopper outrage after
Solomon’s bomb hoax

nBy ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A popular retail store was closed
down yesterday afternoon after an
anonymous female caller claimed there
were four bombs inside the building.

Management at Solomon’s Super-
centre on Old Trail Road yesterday
said it had no idea who would want
to make such a threat —- which was
called in at around 12.30pm — or why.

However, manager Dino Duncombe
told The Tribune the store did not take
the claim “lightly” and staff and cus-
tomers were immediately evacuated
from the premises.

An annoyed shopper, who wished
to remain anonymous, said her entire
day was ruined by the closure of the



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

EVACUATED staff gather outside Solomon’s Supercentre after a woman called in a bomb threat

yesterday afternoon.

store. “I don’t know why anyone
would be so stupid,” she said. “What-

ever your problem is, there is no rea-
son to act like a child, calling in a bomb

scare. Anyway, whatever their issue
is, I have nothing to do with it, and
they have no right to ruin my day like
that.”

Police and fire services arrived on
the scene and searched the area for
any evidence that the threat was any-
thing more than that, however they
“found absolutely nothing inside the
store,” said Mr Duncombe.

When The Tribune got to the store
at around 1.45pm, there were about
30 staff members gathered in the park-
ing lot waiting for law enforcement
officers to complete their sweep.

The store was closed for about three
and a half hours as a result of the
prank call.

Mr Duncombe said it took some
time for the bomb squad to arrive as
they are based at the Lynden Pindling
International Airport.

Boaters rescue three Dominican migrants

n By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

BOATERS rescued three
Dominican migrants who were
swimming in waters off south-
west New Providence near
Shipwreck Cay, the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force said.

Another migrant found on
the cay — which is about two
miles off Saunders Beach —
was picked up by Defence
Force officials during a search

of the area. Officials said it is
possible that the men were
part of a human smuggling
operation.

According to RBDF press
officer Senior Lieutenant
Sonia Miller, civilian boaters
were in the area of Shipwreck
Cay, otherwise known as Long
Cay, on Monday morning
when they stumbled upon the
three men swimming towards
New Providence.

“The boaters picked up the
swimmers, who were without

life jackets, just before 9am,”
Ms Miller said. "The men were
picked up by local mariners
(Monday) morning before
noon; we found the other man
later Monday evening on the
cay.”

Health

The men, who were report-
ed to be in good health, were
turned over to immigration
officials for processing.

Up to press time, no more

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Boy, 14, charged with housebreaking, stealing

A 14-year-old Mackey Street boy was arraigned
in Juvenile Court yesterday on housebreaking
and stealing charges.

The accused, who was detained by police with
the teenager who was discovered dead in a cell at
the East Street South Police Station Sunday night,
appeared in Juvenile Court 2, Victoria Gardens.

He was arraigned on three counts of house-
breaking and one count of stealing.

According to court dockets, it is alleged that on
May 22, the 14-year-old broke into the home of
Eloise Rolle on Chrysanthemum Avenue with
intent to commit a felony.

It is further alleged that on May 25, the accused
broke into the home of Agnes Smith on Collins
Avenue.

There, it is alleged, he stole an assortment of
personal items together valued at $2,875.

It is also alleged that on the same day, the
accused broke into the home of Jamal McKenzie
on Gilbert Street.

The juvenile pleaded not guilty to the charges
and was granted bail in the sum of $5,000. The
case has been adjourned to November 4.

It had been expected that the young man would
be charged with Michael Knowles, 15, who was
discovered dead on Sunday night with a nylon
cord around his neck.

It is believed that the cord was fashioned from
the draw-string of his trousers. Knowles was found
hanging from a bar near the ceiling of his cell.

While police have ruled the boy’s death a sui-
cide, his mother Donna Wilson believes that there
may be more to the story, as witnesses have told
her that her son was beaten while in police cus-
tody.

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THE man convicted of the 2007 stabbing death of the daughtet of
veteran broadcaster Steve McKinney is appealing for more time to file
an appeal against his life sentence.

Michael Byron Simmons, 24, also known as “Kaz”, was convicted of
manslaughter in May 2008 after he decided to plead guilty to the less-

He was sentenced to life in prison in July 2008 by then Acting Jus-
tice Isaacs in connection with the stabbing death of Trevonne McK-

Simmons was represented by lawyer Dawn Hanna at his trial.

McKinney died in hospital after being stabbed multiple times in Wil-
son Tract on Sunday, March 4, 2007.

Simmons appeared in the Court of Appeal yesterday on an appli-
cation for an extension of time.

The matter, however, was adjourned to September 7 as Simmons did
not have an attorney present. The court will assign an attorney to

The Court of Appeal will first have to decide on whether or not to
grant Simmons an extension of time to file his appeal.

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migrants had been found and
the Defence Force had no evi-
dence that a vessel might have
been shipwrecked in the area.

Ms Miller added that RBDF
officers were conducting

another search of the area yes-
terday, but there were no new
developments up to press time.
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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Perry Christie’s chance to shine

GOVERNMENT has set aside five days to
debate the Budget, which Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham presented to the House last
week.

The debate, which opens at 10 o’clock this
morning, will continue tomorrow, resuming
next week, Monday, Wednesday and Thurs-
day, and continuing that night until each mem-
ber has had his or her say.

Already Opposition Leader Perry Christie
has condemned the Ingraham Budget as offer-
ing “no blueprint for the way forward.” As Mr
Christie must obviously have such a blueprint,
these next two debating days will be a golden
opportunity for him to shine. In fact, if he has a
solution to the country’s dilemma it is his duty
as the leader of Her Majesty’s Loyal Opposition
to share his knowledge.

He criticised Mr Ingraham’s government for
its sober and “depressing” view of the economy.
The truth is there is nothing joyful, or hopeful
about the economy. We are certain that the
Bahamian people would prefer to know the
truth, no matter how painful, so that they can
tighten their belts, plant their little vegetable
gardens, and hope for the best. Did Mr Christie
expect the Prime Minister to pretend that he
saw a beautiful rainbow in the near future, when
there is none to be seen? However, if Mr
Christie does see something to which the rest of
us are blind, then again it’s his duty to share his
discovery. At least it will give relief to our gloom
and doom. Mr Christie said that instead of Mr
Ingraham hoisting the white flag of surrender,
he should present a plan for developing agri-
culture and fisheries, improving the financial
services sector and meeting the challenge facing
the tourism industry.

We now see far more activity on the agri-
cultural front than we saw during the Christie
administration. While The Tribune has pub-
lished photographs of BAIC chairman Edison
Key showing off the magnificent produce of
farmers, all the news that BAIC made during
the Christie years were allegations of misuse
of funds, political victimisation in dealing with
staff, and the disgraceful Korean fishing boat
scandal.

In those years Mr Christie was so pre-occu-
pied with keeping his minister and BAIC chair-
man from each others throats that he had no
time to use his creativity to inspire the farmers.

As for the financial sector, it seems govern-
ment is struggling with a difficult situation to
prevent these islands being completely shut off
to investors. As for tourism, there is not much
that one can do when potential visitors haven’t
money to travel. Tourist officials are using their
budget to tap as many markets as they can. We
are now fortunate to be hosting the 59th FIFA
conference at Atlantis. And later this year this
country will host the Miss World Beauty

pageant. But, it is true, while all of those asso-
ciated with tourism are out there fighting for
every tourism dollar they can get, Bahamians
will not see a steady flow of tourists until the
global economic crisis eases. No matter how
much Mr Christie tries to inspire Bahamians
to use their “ingenuity and creativity” to jump
start tourism, this is one problem he cannot
solve.

No one is happy that workers’ terms and
conditions of service have to be changed and
that nurses, doctors and teachers cannot get
their promised health insurance at the present
time. However, there is nothing that one can do
if the money is not there.

Would Mr Christie recommend that Mr
Ingraham maintain the status quo and drain
the Treasury, or put the brakes on now to at
least try to keep the nation afloat should the
present hard times become even harder. Mr
Ingraham has been very frank with the people.
A slowdown in business, a slowdown in tourist
arrivals and investments, translates into no mon-
ey to meet obligations. It is as simple as that.

If Mr Christie can solve the dilemma, then he
will have plenty of time to explain himself to the
nation in the next five days.

We know we shall hear all about the invest-
ment contracts that were held up by the Ingra-
ham administration when it became the gov-
ernment in 2007. Mr Ingraham wanted to scru-
tinise all the contracts, because it was felt that in
some of them too much of the people’s land
was being given away. Mr Christie has blamed
the Bahamas’ economic slowdown on this
holdup. However, these were investors
approved by the Christie government. If these
investments were so important why didn’t the
Christie government finalise them during its
administration and at least get them started —
some of them could have been completed
before the 2007 election. Maybe, Mr Christie
will tell us why his government did not complete
these agreements before the 2007 election. Were
they held up because Mr Christie did not want
them to become an election issue if Bahamians
were to question the generous concessions?
Obviously, the PLP was confident it would be
returned to power, and the agreements could be
signed after the election without the people
having a voice in their own affairs.

But the PLP lost the government. The Ingra-
ham government went over the agreements and
made changes. The global crisis descended
before they were finalised.

Mr Christie did not give the green light for
them to go ahead, nor did Mr Ingraham. Now
Mr Ingraham is being blamed for scuttling the
economy. Maybe within the next five days, Mr
Christie, if he had such confidence in these pro-
jects, will explain why he did not complete the
paperwork for them before 2007?

Crown
land for

everyone

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The Bahamas belongs to all
Bahamians. No Bahamian
deserves to have access to land
in the Bahamas more than any
other Bahamian, period. Who
died and left them in charge of
our birthright?

There is no Bahamian who is
more important than any other.
Regardless of how much educa-
tion we have or how much money
we have, we are all equal. It does
not matter if you come from
Bahamian royalty or come from
the ghetto, we all are equal. There
is no difference if you go to a
cathedral or a small church over
the hill through a dead end street,
you are as equal to the big timers
who go to churches downtown.

The whole acquisition of land
that is owned by the Bahamian
people must be revisited. The pre-
sumptuousness of anyone, regard-
less of who he or she might be, to
give away that which does not
belong to them in the first place
should be investigated, period. I
am flabbergasted how this prac-
tice was allowed to continue for
so long. The suggestions that a
foreigner may be in a position to
distribute or influence the distri-
bution of Bahamian land just goes
to prove how stupid Bahamians
really are to even consider even
imagining it. Only in the Bahamas
can a non-Bahamian sit in such a
delicate position. We must be the
laughing stock of the whole
world. It is almost embarrassing
to be a Bahamian.

This particular position has
always seemed to be held by for-
eigners and it is alleged that
almost all of Gladstone is now
owned by foreigners. What kind
of foolishness is this? Also rela-
tives of persons who are high up
politically allegedly have been
give large plots of land.

The recent revelation of the
land that was acquired and resold
was just a tip of the iceberg, espe-
cially since this practice has been
in full effect since time immemo-
rial. I personally know of many
persons who brag after they were
given large plots of Crown land.
The question I asked was, “what
did they do to deserve such great
fortune?” Their answer was:
“You got to be connected in high
places to be able to swing that!”

I am one who became very
angry when I heard of the sweet
land deals that were offered to
foreigners for no reason. I won-
dered how and why would any-
one “rape this country” giving
away the birthright of Bahami-
ans yet unborn. Why would we
bend over backwards that far just
to get a foreign investor, who
comes with empty hands and give
them thousands of acres, then
allow them to use the land to
acquire the financing to get their
project off the ground?

letters@tribunemedia net



Why has the idea of creating
jobs be the rational way we would
do what we do? It is foolish and
no one can convince me that it is
a wise business arrangement. But
we do it and we lose almost all
of the time. When are going to
cease and desist this unfair poli-
cy? When are we going to dis-
continue playing on an uneven
playing field? Bahamians are get-
ting weary of the disrespect. How
could a political party give away
Crown Land just before election
in lieu of favours given during the
election? Politics make strange
bedfellows is an understatement.

Now I am forced to make a
suggestion that I am sure would
be acceptable by the majority of
right thinking Bahamians. Since
the land is owned by the Bahami-
an people, then why not take a
complete inventory of how much
land is left and distribute it even-
ly to all “raw born” Bahamians.
Furthermore put a stipulation in
that the land cannot be sold but
can only be willed to a Bahamian.
Too many foreigners have bene-
fitted from the use of our
“birthright” and we get the
crumbs. How come large plots of
land are approved without the
input by the Bahamian people
through a referendum?

Tam still sick to my stomach
about the Mayaguana project. A
few guys sitting in a room can
conclude that Mr Foreigner can
get 10,000 acres and we must just
keep quiet. This could have been
shared between 10,000 Bahami-
ans at an acre per person.

This would eliminate the temp-
tation by greedy civil servants and
people in authority to deal with
our land. The Bahamas must be
the slackest place in the world.
There is no end to corruption.
Where and when will it end?
Very few are off limits. These
cliques that exist in the public ser-
vice show that things are probably
being shared between “members
only”.

It would also prevent a pastor
from acquiring a large plot of land
on Gladstone Road in the name
of his church and benefit from
the subdivision. Furthermore why
would a pastor stoop so low to
beg for land for himself under the
disguise of the church? This
would only compromises the
word of God, because the public
would probably think that the
transaction went down and they
would probably question the

integrity of the pastor. If so it
would suggest that the pastor had
abandoned his mission and had
now embarked on a mission to
see what he could get for himself.

Now, all of the land that was
recently acquired under false pre-
tenses should be retrieve and put
back in the inventory. People who
have got large plots should be left
with the amount that they would
get if the suggestion of sharing
equally is done.

It is amazing how land could
be taken and given in the
Bahamas and nothing happens.
It’s amazing, and in my opinion
further solidifies our reputation
as a corrupt country. It is high
time for us to throw caution to
the wind and “let the chips fall
where they may” and clean up
this mess, that stinks to high heav-
en. Those who want all should
get none. We must move with
haste to kill the “all for me baby”
spirit. Otherwise it would devour
us all. Stop the “ripping off “of
land that belongs to future gen-
erations. Stop giving away Crown
land; it does not belong to any
individual regardless of his posi-
tion or disposition. It is unfair
that an individual could give his
friend or family our land without
our permission.

I am willing to work together
with anyone who strongly
believes that we as Bahamians
are being exploited by the well
connected. This must stop, and it
must stop now. I expect the cow-
ards to hide. I also expect the
people who condone corruption
to become agitated and I expect
the people in authority who are
hooked on power to retaliate, but
if God be for you no man can be
against you.

I am strengthened by the fact
that good will win over evil. It
must.

IVOINE INGRAHAM
Nassau,
May, 2009.

(Throughout his letter Mr
Ingraham has given the impres-
sion that all Crown land transac-
tions have been a free gift to
friends and family. This is not
true. In all of the transactions
being questioned, the land was
bought at a low price, and in a
few cases was resold at a good
profit.

(The objection is that some
Bahamians with good connec-
tions can buy Crown land more
easily than can Bahamians with-
out the right connections. The
other resentment is that land
ostensibly bought cheaply for per-
sonal use was, in some instances,
turned into financial profit. —Ed)

Enlightened leadership needed

EDITOR, The Tribune.



In response to numerous letters and articles by Mr Rick Lowe and
The Nassau Institute I have felt compelled to write this letter.

Over and again Mr Lowe praises the supposed benefits of unfettered
capitalism and seems to echo the neocon position which, distilled to its
essence, favours the wealthy and generally scorns the less fortunate
members of society.

Has Mr. Lowe read the book “The Shock Doctrine” by Naomi
Klein? Mr Lowe and The Nassau Institute should inform the Bahami-
an public about the financial model upon which our economy is based.
Tell the people about the ideas of the late Sir Stafford Sands and of our
continuing dependence upon tourism and banking in a rapidly chang-
ing world. Make sure that readers understand that our financial system
is designed to protect wealthy depositors from many countries. Don't
forget to mention that the continuing dependence of government
upon a regressive tax like customs duty is intended to delay the intro-
duction of an income tax which the wealthy seek to avoid at any cost.

Please note that politicians no longer address the real issues such as
rapid population growth, severe traffic congestion, importation of
cheap labour, under funded public health and overloaded public edu-
cation systems, etc.

Point out that as long as the Public Treasury depends upon customs
duties levied upon imports there can be no serious effort to limit the
importation of automobiles and no effective way to reduce congestion
on the roads even when certain quiet residential streets are converted
into highways. The idea of unemployment insurance seems to terrify Mr
Lowe. However, if he found himself suddenly unemployed perhaps he
would not be so critical of a system that is widely used in many coun-
tries. Of course there exists the risk of abuse of the system but that risk
already exists with customs and National Insurance as well.

Full blown socialism is on display in Cuba, a country I have visited
on several occasions. Since I speak Spanish fluently and have read
Cuban history in both English and Spanish (the official and the unof-
ficial versions) and have been to places off the path of the average
tourist, [have to admit that I cannot see myself living under such a sys-
tem. However, The Nassau Institute and Mr Lowe should be honest
enough to point out that democratic socialism exists in Europe, espe-
cially in the Scandinavian countries where the electorate decided after
World War II that a system of high taxation by which a wide range of
social programmes would be funded was necessary in order to estab-
lish a society in which it is very difficult to become rich and even
more difficult to end up bankrupt and living on the street as a result of
being unable to pay medical bills.

Perhaps Mr Lowe has seen the film “Sicko” by Michael Moore and
any number of documentaries on the topic presented by PBS and
cable TV. Let us recall that the world economy is in considerable dif-
ficulty at present as a result of unfettered and largely unregulated
capitalism which feeds off human greed and selfishness.

Obviously it is necessary to find a middle ground between two
extremes and that is where we require enlightened leadership with ideas
that transcend petty personal and party interests.

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THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 38, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Call for enhanced medical
treatment on Staniel Cay

IN THE wake of a series of med-
ical emergencies on and around Staniel
Cay, a concerned citizen has called for

0 In brief

Bahamian
made video at
FIFA opening —

THE delegates of the ;
Federation of International :
Football Associations were
treated to a thrilling video
shot in the Bahamas when



.. We have a Sandals resort about one
mile away and some huge building pro-
jects on the neighbouring cays as well

about the medical resources
on the island have been
brought to his attention up

and a heart attack suffered by
a local man.
“These are just a few of the

the 59th FIFA congress the government to enhance the level of — until now. many accidents that occur as here on the island. There is also the
opened yesterday after- medical treatment available on the Messages left for the local here and as you can see they Staniel Cay Yacht Club, Sampson Cay
noon. : island. administrator and Health Min- are very serious,” said the let- Club and Marina and Compass Cay

Swiss Production Compa- } In a letter to The Tribune, a resi- ister Hubert Minnis were not ter. Marina that accommodate thousands
ny VisualPark hired ? dent of the island said numerous emer- _ returned up to press time. While medical emergencies of tourists yearly and yet we have

Bahamian production man- :
ager Heather Carey to put
together a local crew and
talent to star in the video.

Locations featured inthe
film included Festival Place,
Parliament Square, the ;
steps of Frederick Street, }
Arawak Cay, the Pirates of }
Nassau Museum andthe
National Art Gallery of the :
Bahamas. ;

The local crew included
assistant director Charles;
Smith, who is well known to :
Bahamians as the host of
the show Electric Air and
the director of Baha-Men
videos.

Julian Lord worked as :
key grip with Antionne and }
Vaughn Rolle serving as i

gencies — some of which resulted in
death - and the fact that several
tourism developments are located in
the area, make it vital that healthcare
is improved.

“We really need this matter investi-
gated and resolved immediately
because the summer is approaching,”
he added.

However, MP for the area Anthony
Moss told The Tribune no complaints

According to the resident,
recent medical emergencies
on the island included: a
yachting accident which left a
tourist with a broken back; a
stabbing accident on Farmers
Cay which resulted in a death; a bro-
ken leg suffered by a seven year-old
boy who fell from a dock; a fall from a
bicycle which left a five-year-old with
a face wound which needed stitches;

FIFA Congress to bring
‘a great deal of money’

THE 2009 FIFA congress

on Staniel Cay are supposed
to be attended to by a local
nurse, the resident claimed
that she has left the island for
six weeks and no replacement
has been arranged.

Even when the nurse is in place, he
said, one person is not enough to deal
with all medical emergencies.

“Staniel Cay is a very busy little
island where lots of tourists travel to .

absolutely no emergency services on
the island,” he said.

It was further claimed that two peo-
ple living on the island who have med-
ical qualifications have offered to help
treating injuries, but are now being
“turned away by the government.”

“It is embarrassing ... we have a
wonderful professional couple here
who are willing to help,” said the resi-
dent.

Yam alloyed ame UTA TAT ASS






Patrice Ann Johnson



the place for sports around the world as

grip assists and Apryl : willinject “a great dealofmon- tourism. ‘the World’s Sport’.”

Weech worked asa stylist ; ey” into the Bahamas econo- “We have delegates In preparation for
and hair and makeup co- ? my, Minister of Youth, Sports coming from more the congress, 10 tons
ordinator. and Culture Desmond Bannis- than 100 countries — of material were trans-

ter said.

The two-day event, which
has never before been held in
the Caribbean, began yester-
day at the Atlantis Resort on
Paradise Island. Prime Minister lionaires and others |
Hubert Ingraham delivered the are very wealthy peo-
opening address. ple.

“We are extremely pleased "They are going to
that FIFA chose the Bahamas be here for about a
as the site for its congress, and week and they are going to be
for the announcement of the spending a lot of money in our
site of the next World Cup, the country and you are going to
world's largest sporting event,” see that reflected.”

Minister Bannister said. Mr Bannister hailed FIFA as

“The benefits of the hun- "the most powerful and presti-
dreds of FIFA delegates visit- gious sporting organisation in
ing our country and occupying — the world." The last World Cup
hundreds of hotel rooms will attracted an audience of more
certainly make a difference for than 600 million.
many Bahamian families this “That is much more than any
summer and will place us Super Bowl,” he said. “Foot-
squarely in the world's eye as_ ball (soccer) is regarded

and these are not just
coaches and ath-
letes,” Mr Bannister
said. “Several of
them are multi-mil-

ported from FIFA
headquarters. More
than 5,000 hotel nights
have been reserved
and about 100 journal-
) ists accredited for an
| event.
ie Mr Bannister

Meenemeeuiiciae referred to FIFA pres-
ident Joseph Blatter,
whom he met at Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport on
May 26, as “the most powerful
man in sports in the world”.

“We are pleased to have him
in the Bahamas," said Mr Ban-
nister. "We are going to do
everything we can to ensure
that they have a good time, that
they enjoy their stay to the
fullest, and that they want to
come back.

“Tt is very critical that we let

The stars of the show
were 15 children between
the ages of 5 and 12, who
represented the Bahamas
and other countries.

Military: Gitmo
letainee dies of |
apparent suicide

NSAN JUAN, Puerto Rico

PRESIDENT THE FEDERATION OF INTERNATIONAL FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION
(FIFA) Joseph Blatter during the 2014 World Cup Brazil Announcement of Host
Cities Names, at Atlantis. Pictured, from left, are President of the Brazil Fed-
eration Ricardo Terra Teixeira, FIFA President Blatter and FIFA Secretary
General Jerome Valcke. Among the cities named for the games include Rio de
Janeiro, Sao Paulo and Brasilia.



everybody know what a won-
derful country we have, what
friendly people we have, and
that this is a place where they
are welcome.”

Odes behCl Ga rden

where life ts still simple and people stil care

Murphyville, tnd Right from Sears Road.
Telephone 322-8493

Delegates will receive “red-
carpet” treatment and some of
them will arrive in celebrity
style, said Mr Bannister.

A YEMENI detainee at e SEE STORY TOP LEFT

Guantanamo Bay has died of
an "apparent suicide," U.S. mil- }
itary officials announced Tues- }
day, according to Associated }
Press. :
The Joint Task Force that :
runs the U.S. prison in Cuba }
said guards found 31-year-old }
Muhammad Ahmad Abdallah
Salih unresponsive and not
breathing in his cell Monday
night. :

In a statement issued from
Miami, the U.S. military said :

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the detainee was pronounced }
dead by a doctor after "exten-
sive lifesaving measures had }

been exhausted."

The Yemeni prisoner, known }
as Al-Hanashi, has been held
without charge at Guantanamo
since February 2002. Military :
records show he was about 31.
His is the fourth apparent sui-

cide at Guantanamo.

The U.S. military says the
remains will be autopsied by a :
pathologist from the Armed

Forces Institute of Pathology.

The prisoner appears to have }
joined the long-running hunger
strike at Guantanamo, accord-
ing to medical records previ- }
ously released by the military :
in response to a Freedom of }
Information Act lawsuit filed }

by The Associated Press.

His weight was down to i

about 86 pounds (39 kilograms)

in December 2005. He weighed }
124 pounds (56 kilograms)
when he was first taken to ?
Guantanamo in February 2002. }

A prison spokesman, Navy }
Lt. Cmdr. Brook DeWalt, con- }
firmed the incident but declined :
to discuss further details on how i
the Yemeni man committed }
suicide and whether any family
members have been contacted.

DeWalt declined to say }
whether procedures have }
changed at the prison as aresult

of the apparent suicide.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Private Banking

is presently considering applications for

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT OFFICER
CANADIAN & BRAZILIAN DESKS

The Private Banking Business Area is accepting applications for a Business
Development Officer, covering Canada and Brazil Markets:

Duties will include:

Acquisition and development of new offshore Canadian and Brazilian

based clients

Marketing of estate planning, private banking and portfolio management
services to prospective clients along with additional services, such as,
the set-up of companies and trusts together with administrative procedures
Advising clients of clients origin on products, services and investment

opportunities

Management of accounts/relationships with clients originating from

Canada and Brazil

Requirements:

Applicants should possess a University Degree (or equivalent) in Banking

& Finance

At least seven (7) years banking experience including relationship
management, trading, trade reconciliation, custody business and securities

markets

Marketing experience throughout Canada and Brazil

Must have established international client base with assets under
management in excess of US$100 Mio and a well developed network
within the market regions
Strong communication skills in English, French and Portuguese is a
requirement to facilitate marketing and relationship management with
clients and prospects
Good computer skills (Word, Excel, Power Point, Outlook & Bloomberg)
Willing to travel extensively throughout Canada and Brazil and utilize

a network of existing contacts and associates

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. Persons not meeting the
minimum requirements need not apply. Telephone calls will not be accepted.

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department

P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas
or via fax 356-8148

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS: JUNE 18, 2009



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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

PLP calls for inquiry into
boy's death in police custody
i



Debris confirms crash :
of Air France Flight M7

m FERNANDO DE

NORONHA, Brazil

AN AIRPLANE seat, a
fuel slick and pieces of white
debris scattered over three
miles of open ocean marked
the site in the mid-Atlantic on
Tuesday where Air France
Flight 447 plunged to its
doom, Brazil’s defense minis-

ter said, according to Associat- 3

ed Press.

Brazilian military pilots
spotted the wreckage, sad
reminders bobbing on waves,
in the ocean 400 miles (640
kilometers) northeast of these
islands off Brazil’s coast. The

plane carrying 228 people van-
ished Sunday about four hours }

into its flight from Rio de
Janeiro to Paris.

“T can confirm that the five
kilometers of debris are those
of the Air France plane,”
Defense Minister Nelson
Jobim told reporters at a
hushed news conference in
Rio. He said no bodies had
been found and there was no
sign of life.

The effort to recover the
debris and locate the all-
important black box
recorders, which emit signals

for only 30 days, is expected to

be exceedingly challenging.

FROM page one

the police should investigate itself.”

Michael Knowles, 15, was found
dead in his police cell at around 8.21
pm Sunday. Officers at the East Street
South Police Station reportedly found
the teenager hanging from an upper
bar with what is believed to be a draw-
string from his shorts around his neck.

While police have ruled his death a
suicide, Knowles’ mother Donna Wil-
son, 33, claims that police reports do
not add up. According to Knowles,
two witnesses who were at the station
claimed that her son had been brutal-
ly beaten by police.

Mrs Hanna Martin said: “The public
statements of his mother raise serious
questions which are at odds with the
official statements emanating from
police.

“The law provides for the manner in
which a minor is to be arrested
detained and interrogated by police

and while in police custody. Given
these facts and because it is funda-
mentally important that there is public
confidence in the exercise of police
powers, an immediate inquiry by an
impartial body must be established by
the Government to investigate the
cause of death of this minor.”

The party chairman and MP for
Englerston said she will be asking
questions of the Minister of National
Security relative to the terrible tragedy
in parliament tomorrow.

The party’s statement comes as Ms
Wilson says she is anxiously awaiting
the results of an autopsy on her son’s
body.

The single mother of five said that
based on those results, she could take
legal action against the police force
but added that her family would “cross
that bridge when we get there.”

The Tribune office was inundated
with callers expressing their
concern over the allegations of police
brutality.



THE TRIBUNE

MICHAEL
KNOWLES’
MOTHER
Donna Wilson,
33, claims that
police reports
do not add up.

Dear Shareholders, _
—— ee Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Consolidated Statement of Operations

As many of you are aware, Grand Bahama continues to struggle Three months ended February 28, 2009 with comparative information for 2008

economically as does the rest of the world as we all go through the present
global recession. These challenges are in every industry here on the island
whether you are in tourism, banking, retail or any other business.

Outstanding shares = 4,708,334
Expressed in Bahamian dollars

Th f th i er ih wilted { 3 months ended 3 months ended
e outcome of these tough economic times has resulted 1n many companies 28-Feb-09 29-Feb-08

having to severely trim their expenses and staff to stay afloat under the

present circumstances. Sales 2,638,548 3,492,105
Cost of sales 1,956,915 2,557,881

It is true that at FCC, we too have been severely impacted by the present Pier cue aon

economic conditions. However, there is a ray of hope for us in that some of
our challenges are a bit different in that we are still experiencing additional
customer demand which we need to fill with our products and services.

Payroll costs 509,404 496 815
Redundancy costs 195,000 0
Other operating costs 200,983 218,702
Rent expense 105,600 115,518
Advertising expense 10,247 19,313

Unfortunately we are reporting a loss in the os quarter of $521k. Both the Utilities expense 85,871 92,179
Home Centre and the concrete division lost money in the 2â„¢ quarter due to a 1,107,105 942,527

reduction in sales of 20% at the Home Centre and 37% at the concrete

division over the same period last year. nee pete er

depreciation and amortisation (425,472) (8,303)

Therefore, based on the declining sales and the resultant losses, we took the Depn. and amort. expense (55,580) (67,127)
very difficult but necessary step in March of laying off 22 people in the
company. The redundancies and one early retirement costs totaled $195k
and we have recorded this as a one time expense in our 2â„¢ quarter

financials.

Net financing income/(expense 40,522 33,557

Net income/(loss) (521,574) (108,987)

The resultant savings in payroll costs for the company will be about $130k a
quarter and we will see these savings reflected in our 3" quarter financials as
a result of us recording the redundancy costs of $195k in our an quarter

pa Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Consolidated Statement of Operations

Six months ended February 28, 2009 with comparative information for 2008
The drop in concrete sales is a result of a number of factors, which not only
include the present economic conditions but also the addition of more
competitors in the marketplace and our limited product offerings to our
customers.

Outstanding shares = 4,708,334
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

6 months ended 6 months ended
28-Feb-09 29-Feb-08

Therefore, we have now taken proactive steps to improve our concrete sales
and gain additional market share. Recently, we were able to purchase a
Columbia Model 22 block plant from Florida Block in Miami and we are
forecasting that this plant will be operational by the end of this month so that
we can start selling concrete blocks in early June 2009.

Sales 6,063,578 7,238,994
Cost of sales 4,603,725 5,280,061
Gross profit 1,459,853 1,958,933

Payroll costs 1,008,933 1,019,028
Redundancy costs 195,000 0
Other operating costs 380,857 430,636
Rent expense 209,400 254 469
Advertising expense 17,640 44,580

Utilities expense 181,214 183,375

We are confident that once we start producing quality blocks, this will
enhance our customer offerings and we will see our revenues at the concrete
plant increase as we will now be able to offer, not only concrete, but also
concrete blocks to the contractors on Grand Bahama.

Income/(loss) before interest, taxes
Further, we believe this strong competitive move, will increase our sales depreciation and amortisation (533,191) 26,845
revenues at the Home Centre, as we will now be able to offer special pricing
to our contractors that are prepared to purchase concrete, concrete blocks
and building supplies from us. In essence, we will position the company as

the one stop shop for construction supplies in Grand Bahama.

Depn. and amort. expense (126,587) (139,780)
Net financing income/(expense 81,820 69,716

Net income/(loss) (741 598) (182,651)
In addition, the recent hiring of Martin Foody as our concrete plant manager,
who is also overseeing the assembly of the block plant, is impacting
positively on improving the quality of our concrete and regaining concrete
business lost in the past to our competitors.

Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Consolidated Balance Sheet
As at February 28, 2009

Based on the above, we expect that despite there being a lack of very large
construction projects in Freeport we will still be able to report a profit in the
last four months of this fiscal in the concrete division.
28-Feb-09 August 31,2008
(Unaudited) (audited)

Assets

As mentioned earlier our sales revenues at the Home Centre in the 2nd
quarter of this fiscal are down 20% over the same period last year, however

our general and administration expenses have been managed very carefully
and allowing for the redundancy costs we have again been able to further
reduce them by 13% over the same 2nd quarter period last year.

Even though we have continued to manage our expenses, our inventory
levels have dropped and it is now seriously affecting our sales revenues at
the Home Centre.

As mentioned the significant reduction in payroll costs will improve the
bottom line, free some cash constraints in the future and help to assist in
obtaining inventory which is the critical fuel to produce revenues. We will
need though to strive diligently to maintain the necessary levels of inventory
that are required to drive sales and grow our business.

However, on a positive note, we continue to see over and over again, that the
demand for our products and services from our many loyal customers
continues to remain strong and if we can maintain the monthly sales revenue
targets at the Home Centre we should report profitability based on the
current payroll and operating expenses.

We are expecting that the significant cost saving steps that have already
been implemented, coupled with the production of concrete blocks, giving
us anew source of revenue, will assist us in surviving through these tough
economic times.

Ray Simpson
Chief Executive Officer
May 19", 2009

Cash

Accounts receivable, net

Inventories

Inventories of spare parts and supplies
Deposits and prepaid expenses

Total current assets
Fixed assets

Total assets

Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity

Bank overdraft

Accounts payable and accrued expenses
Warranty Provision

Current portion of long term debt

Total current liabilities
Long term debt

Shareholders’ equity:
Share Capital
Contributed surplus
Appraisal excess
Retained earnings
Current earnings

19,035
720,149
1,283,181
96,178
69,773

2,188,316
4,162,840

6,351,156

1,972,479
3,513,413
5,000
134,604

5,625,496

47,083
5,774,868
1,433,867

(5,788,559)

(741,598)

48,530
607,011
1,672,262
82,970
67,142

2,477,915
4,115,724

6,593,639

1,841,481
3,039,007
5,000
183,857

5,069,345
57,036
47,083

5,774,868

1,433,867
(5,788,559)

Total equity 725,661 1,467,259

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity $ 6,351,157 6,593,640


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009, PAGE 7





Maurice Glinton and the
accountability of judges

Preeerorr lawyer Mau-
rice Glinton told mem-
bers of The Nassau Institute last
week that freedom in the
Bahamas was threatened by
judges who are politically compli-
ant, unaccountable to the public,
and acquiescent in their own
abuse.

Glinton has degrees in law,
economics and international rela-
tions, and has written extensively
on constitutional law and law
reform. He is best known for
suing the government In 2003
(with fellow lawyer Leandra
Esfakis) over measures that par-
liament enacted eight years ago
affecting the confidentiality of
lawyer-client relations. That
action was subsequently taken
over by the Bar Council and
remains in limbo.

According to Glinton, the judi-
clary is as important to good gov-
ernance as are the legislative and
executive branches, and freedom
is seriously diminished by the lack
of respect for judges: "If our judi-
cial system cannot carry out its
role that is reason for concern that
the government is not perform-
ing with the public interest in
mind, which puts liberty and com-
merce at risk."

But this failure may also reflect
the "misplaced loyalties" of judges
themselves, he said. As the wield-
ers of power judges must be fully
accountable. And he dismissed
claims that judges are not politi-
cally influenced as "weak protes-
tations in the face of the obvious."
In his view, one of the chief rea-
sons for the lack of judicial inde-
pendence in the Bahamas is the
process by which judges are
recruited.

"I know more about judges in
the US than I do about those in
the Bahamas, who are faceless,"
he said. "We need a process that
forces judges to be accountable,
and I am not talking about simply
making a report to parliament. It
is the inner strength of judges that
alone can save the judiciary. We
need a mandated procedure for
judicial appointments."

Such a process would seek to
take politicos out of the equation.
Currently, the chief justice and
the appeal court justices are cho-
sen by the prime minister, after
consultation with the leader of the
opposition. Other judges — there
can be as many as 12 on the
Supreme Court — are selected by
the Judicial and Legal Service
Commission.

The commission is chaired by
the chief justice and includes
another judge of his choosing, as
well as the chairman of the Public
Service Commission and two
members picked by the prime
minister after consultation with
the leader of the opposition. This
archaic arrangement gives far too
much power to the executive and
stands in stark contrast to the cur-
rent state of affairs in the United
Kingdom.

The British chief justice is now
appointed by a panel convened
by the Judicial Appointments
Commission, a genuinely inde-
pendent body that selects judges
on merit from the widest range
of eligible candidates. The 15
commissioners are drawn from
the judiciary, the legal profession
and the lay public, and their pro-
cedures for selecting judges are
public and transparent. Politicians
are excluded from the process.

But Glinton says Bahamians
are "uneasy" about taking respon-
sibility for our own affairs: "We
have 1,000 lawyers yet we are still
beating about the Eastern
Caribbean for judges. We should
not leave our most cherished pos-
sessions in the hands of people
who are here today and gone
tomorrow. And if we remain
silent on this there will be no
change and the country will con-
tinue to deteriorate."

He added that "Judicial inde-
pendence depends ultimately on
how judges repel any attempts
against this independence. The
truth of the matter is that judges in
the Bahamas are too often per-
ceived as compliant and acquies-
cent in their own abuse, even to

—

TOUGH GALL CALL

Mes

the point of tolerating in their
midst some who are legally and
morally unsuitable for the third
branch of government."

Such matters are critical to the
rule of law, he said. Political
thinkers have long argued that
checks and balances between sep-
arate branches of government are
vital to prevent abuse of power, a
view shared by John Marshall —
the great 19th century jurist who
defined the American legal sys-
tem. It was Marshall who declared
that "the only security against the
abuse of power is found in the
structure of government itself.”

According to Glinton, a truly
independent judiciary can only be
achieved through accountability,
and judges should be subject to
public scrutiny in the Bahamas as
they are in the United States. And
it is important to recruit Bahami-
an judges in order to prevent the
judiciary from becoming a non-
Bahamian "ward" of the other
branches of government.

"Accountability requires open-
ness of process, beginning with a
mandated procedure for carrying
out selections," he said. "We have
judges but no judicial system.
There is a lack of leadership - the
chief justice should be out on a
limb making the case. There are
few Bahamian judges today
because we don't respect our
judges.”

Although couched in academ-
ic language, there is much wisdom
in what Glinton had to say. And
we ignore these issues at our per-
il. I can think of three possible
reasons for the mind-numbing
inertia of the political class in this
context. One, they don't under-
stand. Two, they understand but
want to keep things as they are
because it suits them. Three, they
understand and want to make
changes but lack the political cov-
er or will to do so.

Perhaps one lesson from his-
tory will suffice to encourage
Bahamian judges and lawyers to
step up to the plate. In 1832 Chief
Justice Marshall ruled in favour
of sovereignty for the Cherokee
Indians, but President Andrew
Jackson simply ignored the deci-
sion and proceeded to ethnically
cleanse Indians from the Ameri-
can states.

Yet despite this massive - and
tragic - system failure in a new
nation, Marshall was able to
establish the Supreme Court’s
powers of judicial review as the
final arbiter of the constitution.
And today he is credited with
cementing the judiciary as an
influential branch of government.

The onus is on Bahamian
lawyers to take up the challenge
here and ensure an independent
and accountable judiciary. Are
they up to the task?

Cable Bahamas and
Compulsory Licensing

\ \ | hen we told critics of
Cable Bahamas to put

up or shut up last week, some
readers pointed to the company's
supposed theft of programming
from American providers. But this
is really a bilateral trade dispute.
It all dates back to 1995 when
CBL began servicing households
on New Providence. Cable
Bahamas is on one side of the
copyright issue and the US-based
Television Association of Pro-
grammers — an industry group
representing more than 30 US pay
television channels in the region
— is on the other. But the real
argument is between the Bahami-
an and American governments.
The dispute arose because
CBL couldn't get the commercial
rights to some 60 per cent of its
US-originated programming.
Those rights were simply not
available to a tiny English-speak-
ing territory in this largely Span-



ish-speaking region because the
copyright owners couldn't be
bothered to negotiate them. But
over the years the programming
that is still in dispute has dwin-
dled to about 7 per cent of the
total — mostly HBO movies.

This circumstance must be
viewed in the context of the mar-
ket that existed during the mid-
1990s, when practically every
Bahamian household had a satel-
lite dish that was already pirating
American signals. This was also
the case in other countries that
could receive US satellite signals.

In an effort to regularise the
market, the Bahamas passed a
copyright law in 1998 which pro-
vided for compulsory licensing of
TV signals under international
convention. This meant that the
content could be re-transmitted
by an operator licensed within the
Bahamas without the consent of
the foreign-based copyright own-
er. However, the content provider
retained the right to be paid for
that use.

The 1998 law created a copy-
right royalty tribunal (currently
composed of lawyer Kirk Sey-
mour, artist Stan Burnside and
accountant James Gomez) to deal
with the compulsory licensing
issue. This tribunal collects roy-
alties in order to make appropri-
ate payments to copyright own-
ers when there are claims. And
over the years, CBL says it has
contributed some $70 million to
this fund.

The dispute came to a head in
2000 when the Bahamas reached
an agreement with the US to cor-
rect "deficiencies" in the copy-
right law. Of particular concern
to the programmers were provi-
sions for the compulsory licens-
ing of premium, encrypted cable
television programming in the
Bahamas. They also complained
about inadequate compensation
rates for re-transmissions to hotels
and other commercial enterprises.

Under this bilateral agreement,
our government committed to
make the cable compulsory
license more palatable to the pro-
grammers. It took four years to
enact these changes, which led to
the Bahamas being removed from
a US watch list. But the amend-
ments were never actually imple-
mented and the programmers
continue to urge the US govern-
ment to support their cause.

"Restrictive legislation by the
Bahamian government, coupled
with a possible domino effect that
could occur in other Caribbean
countries, could result in a loss of
approximately $250-$270 million
in annual programming revenue
for US pay television companies,"
the programmers argued earlier
this year.

"We strongly believe the
Bahamas merits (a) high level of
engagement due to its egregious
lack of protection of US intellec-
tual property, and specifically for
its actions to institutionalize the
theft of US films and pay televi-
sion programming through its
compulsory license.”

If the amendments to the copy-
right act were to be implemented,
they would limit the scope of the
compulsory license to the “unal-
tered re-transmission of free, over-
the-air broadcast signals and
would not permit re-transmission
of encrypted signals or extend to
re-transmission over the Inter-
net."

Both the Christie and Ingra-
ham administrations have refused
to implement the 2004 amend-
ments until the commercial needs
of Cable Bahamas for English-
speaking content are met. As part
of the 2000 agreement, the US
promised to “encourage” Ameri-
can rightholders to negotiate these
licenses, and the US has so far not
acceded to the programmers’ lob-
bying to put the Bahamas back
on the watch list.

TIME FOR A HOUSE CALL

A REAL estate professional in the US recently
coined the term “Price Denial Syndrome,” a trou-
blesome condition that afflicts sellers having a hard
time facing the realities of today’s markets. Of course
it’s difficult to make a pricing concession, but an
overpriced home simply will not sell.

Perhaps the sellers argue that they really need
the money, but then they have to ask themselves
what they’ll do for money if the home doesn’t sell.
Maybe they figure that they can shoot for the moon
now and reduce the price later if they must. How-
ever, the longer a property remains unsold, the
more likely it is that even more price reductions
will follow. Then it’s taken even longer to get a sale

at a lower price.

Some sellers might suggest trying a higher price
just for the first two weeks, but that’s when the
interest of serious buyers is always greatest. Those

ty.

Bahamas real
estate today

Carmen Massoni



buyers usually look within a certain range, and won’t
even make an offer at all on an overpriced proper-

Most importantly, if the sellers need to buy anoth-
er home, time is of the essence. If the sale takes
too long, theyll be buying at a time when prices
and interest rates may begin climbing again.

If you’re suffering from PDS, pay attention to
the news, review your home’s Competitive Market
Analysis, and call me in the morning!

According to a CBL
spokesman, "we will buy the
commercial rights if the pro-
grammers will sell, but
Caribbean demographics are
mostly Spanish so rights are
often only available for Span-
ish programming. To operate
successfully we need English
language programming, and we
were the first in the region to
seek those rights. Over time we
have obtained most of them.”

The plain fact is that com-
pulsory licensing is 100 per cent
legal in the Bahamas, and it is a
practice that is internationally
accepted. Cable Bahamas
attempts to deal with this issue

every year in Washington, but
as the spokesman put it: "We
are just a pimple on the back-
side of the industry."

It is also worth noting that
CBLs main competitor —
Direct TV satellite television —
is in the same position locally
and has thousands of Bahamian
subscribers. Cable's pricing for
subscriber services matches that
of Direct TV.

For the record, we were mis-
taken in saying that CBL
planned to buy out Phil Keep-
ing's controlling stake in the
company. Keeping (the Canadi-
an who launched Cable

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited

(Incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas)

Consolidated Balance Sheet (Unaudited)

As of 31 March 2009

(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)

ASSETS

Cash on hand and at banks

Investment securities

Mortgages, consumer and other loans
Property, plant and equipment
Prepayments and other assets

TOTAL ASSETS

LIABILITIES
Customer deposits
Debt securities

Accrued expenses and other liabilities

TOTAL LIABILITIES

EQUITY

Share capital
Revaluation surplus
Retained earnings

TOTAL EQUITY

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

31 March

17,758,628
33,408,237
204,337,640
12,133,988
5,002,082

Bahamas in 1994) sold out to
another Canadian-led group in
2004. It is this group that Cable
plans to buy out now. But the
key point remains — the buy out
will make CBL 100 per cent
Bahamian owned and con-
trolled. It is now mostly owned
by Bahamian shareholders, but
boardroom control rests with the
Canadian group (Columbus
Communications).

What do you think?
Send comments to

larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

31 December
2009 2008
$ $

18,646,538
36,615,975
198,861,978
12,286,606
6,079,617



272,640,575

211,931,070
25,564,027
1,810,718

272,490,714

209,931,152
28,107,262
1,483,632



239,305,815

20,000,001
2,504,341
10,830,418

239,522,046

20,000,001
2,526,329
10,442,338



33,334,760

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Consolidated Income Statement (Unaudited)
For the Three Months Ended 31 March 2009
(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)

INCOME

Interest income
Interest expense

Net interest income
Non-interest income

Total income

EXPENSES
Salaries and staff benefits

General and administrative

31 March

4,927,602
2,720,230

272,640,575

32,968,668

272,490,714

3 Months Ended

31 March

2009 2008
$ $

4,002,644
2,170,498



2,207,372

1,397,914

1,832,146

1,418,985



3,605,286

1,392,604
1,268,625

Provision for loan losses (Note 5)
Depreciation and amortisation (Note 6)

Total expenses

NET INCOME

259,841
318,124

3,251,131

1,305,298
1,172,385
111,490
271,049



3,239,194

366,092

2,860,222

390,909



Weighted average number of ordinary

shares outstanding

Earnings per share

28,666,670

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Consolidated Statement of Changes in Equity (Unaudited)
For the Three Months Ended 31 March 2009
(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)

As of 1 January 2008
Depreciation transfer
Net income

Dividends on ordinary
shares

As of 31 December 2008

As of 1 January 2009
Depreciation transfer
Net income

Dividends on ordinary
shares

As of 31 March 2009

Ordinary _ Revaluation
Shares Surplus

$ $
20,000,001 2,572,037

(45,708)

28,666,670

$0.013 $0.014

Retained
Earnings Total

$ $
10,230,691 32,802,729
45,708

1,312,606 1,312,606

(1,146,667) _ (1,146,667)



20,000,001 2,526,329

10,442,338 32,968,668





20,000,001 2,526,329

(21,988)

10,442,338 32,968,668
21,988

366,092 366,092



20,000,001 2,504,341

10,830,418

33,334,760




PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Customs security
ouard dies of
‘knife’ wounds

FROM page one

stationed at Kelly's Dock, was driven to hospital by private
vehicle around 8pm Monday with "lacerations about the
body," said Press Liaison Officer Assistant Superintendent
Walter Evans.

About eight hours later, around 4 am yesterday,
Knowles died as a result of his injuries, Mr Evans
added.

Police believe Knowles received his fatal injuries dur-
ing an altercation with a man he knew in the area of
Willow Tree Avenue and Saffron Street.

ASP Evans said police are "following several leads
into the man who may have been responsible for this
act."

Yesterday police were still trying to discover the iden-
tity of the person who drove Knowles to the hospital.

Reports reaching The Tribune yesterday indicated
that Knowles, a resident of Rosewood Street in
Pinewood Gardens, was "chapped" with a cutlass.
Police, however, did not confirm this.

"He had some cuts about the body and head, we're
not sure what they were inflicted by, maybe some sharp
instrument," head of the Central Detective Unit Super-
intendent Elsworth Moss told The Tribune. "We're not
certain as yet (how he received his injuries), all we know
is he showed up to hospital yesterday (Monday) after-
noon with some injuries about the body. We couldn't
speak to him because he was not conscious."

Knowles’ former co-workers at the department's main
office on Thompson Boulevard were shocked and "sad-
dened" over the news of his death.

"We're in mourning and stunned. He was just down
here Friday, he was in a good mood," said one co-work-
er, who asked to remain anonymous.

"Most of the staff feel for him because he was popular
—a lot of people seem to like him, as far as the staff
concerned he was co-operative and helpful," said the
Customs officer who described Knowles as a reserved,
laid-back person who didn't appear to be a trouble mak-
er.

When contacted for comment, Comptroller of Cus-
toms Glen Gomez extended condolences to Knowles’
family on behalf of the department.

"We are of course saddened by the way he died and
his life being shortened, we extend our sympathy to his
family," said Mr Gomez.

Yesterday head of the Central Detective Unit Super-
intendent Elsworth Moss said police did not have a
motive for the killing or any suspects in custody. How-
ever, he said, police "were following some leads” and
were looking to make an arrest "in the very near
future."

Knowles’ death marked the country's thirty-second
homicide for the year, police said. He had worked with
the Department of Customs as a guard for more than
seven years.

Reggae star slams

Olice after kidnap

FROM page one

time of crisis, but instead (police)
approached me as if I’m automatically
the problem,” said Mr Stubbs.

“Their attitude should be ‘Sure I'll help
you,’ not ‘You’re lying to me’,” added
the father, noting that he lodged a formal
complaint in the wake of the incident.

According to the singer, the first officer
he encountered caught up with him as
he ran up and down near the area where
he had parked his car, trying to “find any-
one who might have seen anything.”

“He rode towards me (on a bike) ina
sort of aggressive way and was like, “What
are you doing?’ He came on like he was
just accosting me rather than trying to
see what’s up,” said the father.

With this officer then failing to believe
that the 28-year-old’s car had been stolen,
Mr Stubbs said he continued on in the
hope of finding an officer who would take
a different approach.

However, he claimed a second pair of
officers and a third lone officer respond-
ed in the same way, despite his explana-

tion of how the thief had sped away with
his wife and child inside the car.

“Twas hoping that they could put out a
notice about the car, so that people could
start looking for it. But all they said was
‘Your car ain’t get robbed, your car
impounded, man’.”

“It’s like [have to convince them that a
crime has been committed against me.
The police were around, but when there
is a crisis I don’t know what it takes for
them to take you seriously.

“Rather than being professional they
were just dismissive and inconsiderate.
They assumed the situation before they
took time to figure out what had really
happened.”

Giving up, Mr Stubbs said he began to
walk to the nearby East Street police sta-
tion in the hope of reporting the robbery
and attempted kidnapping there.

But along the way another officer
stopped and offered to help the family
when Mr Stubbs flagged him down .

“He kind of assumed the same thing
(that the car was towed), but I guess he
thought I must be talking some sense if
I'd bothered to flag him down,” said Mr

Stubbs.

However, once in the car, the musician
said one of the officers he had first
approached came up to the window and
began to “jeer at” and “antagonise” him
and his wife.

“He said ‘The shoe’s on the other foot
now, isn’t it?’” claimed Stubbs, adding
that he was not exactly sure what the offi-
cer meant by this. Meanwhile the man
went on to tell him that he “could’ve got
his car long time ago.”

“I didn’t respond to him at any time. I
realised he was just being petty,” said the
singer.

Mr Stubb’s wife, Sarah, said the expe-
rience made her “disappointed in the
Bahamas.”

The Ohio, USA native said she had
feared for her baby when the man drove
off with them inside the car, but she was
particularly angry by the police’s dismis-
sive response to her and her husband’s
reports. It just meant, she said, they had
missed an opportunity to catch up with
the vehicle while it was still nearby.

The car was eventually recovered in
The Grove that evening.

New Crown land grants allegations

FROM page one

providing documentation to
support their claims that some
employees have been aggran-
dizing themselves “for
decades.”

Yesterday, a woman from
Long Island told The Tribune
how she had given $100 to an
employee at the department
who promised that for this
generosity her application for
a piece of agricultural land on
Cowpen Road would be
“pushed to the top of the
pile.”

Going a little further, the
woman said, the employee
also advised her that she had
to have the property surveyed
and suggested the name of an

UALITY DIESEL

HE

JACâ„¢4

VY DUTY TRUCKS

TON®IONG FLAT BED

922,995.00

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co. Ltd.

Montrose Ave.

Phone: 322-1722/Fax: 326-7452



individual with whom the
department reportedly
worked.

Thinking that something
was suspicious, the woman
said she called around and got
other offers for the surveying
of the property. She discov-
ered that the price quoted to
her by the recommended sur-
veyor was exaggerated by at
least $500.

She said she thinks “it’s dis-
graceful what they are doing.”

“But what are we left to do?
You have to work with them,
because there is no recourse. I
know the Prime Minister is

busy dealing with Customs
and all of that, but he needs to
do something about this min-
istry because I shouldn’t have
to bribe these people to do
their jobs. They are already
getting paid a salary. Just do
your job,” she said.

Earlier this month, the for-
mer director of Lands and
Surveys Tex Turnquest
resigned from his post when
it was claimed that his moth-
er-in-law and other relatives
on the island of Exuma were
granted Crown land during his
tenure.

Since then, it was reported

that Undersecretary Audley
Greaves and Chief Housing
officer Christopher Russell’s
wives had also received
Crown land grants in
Abaco.

It is unclear at this point
what position the government
will take in dealing with this
matter, but it has been con-
firmed that the Minister of
State for Lands and Local
Government, Byran Wood-
side has taken up a constant
posting at the department to
provide a more “hands on”
approach to dealing with the
allegations.

North Korea prepares missiles

m PANMUNJOM, Korea

NORTH KOREA is believed to have begun
assembling a long-range missile capable of reaching
Alaska, a news report said Wednesday, as the com-
munist regime prepared to test-fire a barrage of mis-
siles from both coasts, according to Associated Press.

The moves further heightened soaring tensions in
the region following North Korea’s underground
nuclear test last week, and came as speculation grows
that leader Kim Jong II has selected his third son to
succeed him as ruler of the secretive communist coun-
try.

At the border village of Panmunjom inside the
Demilitarized Zone separating the two Koreas, the sit-
uation seemed calm on the surface, but a military
guide warned tensions are running deep.

“The possibility of armed provocation is higher
than ever in the Joint Security Area,” said the South
Korean military guide taking journalists on a tour
of the border area. He did not provide his full name
saying he did not have permission to do so.

The guide also cautioned journalists not to “point
at the North Koreans or make any gestures.” On the
North Korean side of the area, a lone guard could be
seen standing with his arms to his side, just watching
the journalist group.

The mass-market JoongAng Ilbo newspaper said
Wednesday that a long-range missile — transported
by train to the Dongchang-ni launch site near the
North’s northwest coast near China — is believed
to have entered an assembly building. The paper cit-
ed an unnamed South Korean official.

An American military official confirmed that an

BUR INS

Harsour Bay Suoppinc PLaza
322.3170

Case Cottace, Cas_e Beacu
327.7072

FLATTENS
YOUR TUMMY
& SLIMS
YOUR SHAPE.




===

SOUTH KOREAN and U.S. soldiers watch an armored
vehicle pass through decontamination process during a
joint military exercise against chemical warfare by the
U.S. and South Korea army at U.S. military base in Dong-
duchon, north of Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, June 2,
2009. (AP Photo)

intercontinental ballistic missile capable of striking the
USS. was being readied at a base on the North’s west
coast. The official said it could be more than a week
before Pyongyang was ready to launch. He spoke
on condition of anonymity because it was an intelli-
gence-related issue.

Separately, North Korea may soon launch three or
four mid-range missiles, believed to be modified ver-
sions of its Rodong series, from its east coast, South
Korea’s Yonhap news agency reported.








Z2a=~sse=ron THE TRIBUNE



a ’
i
ORLANDO B




























% Partly sunny. Partly cloudy and Sunshine; breezy in Periods of sun, a Times of clouds and Times of clouds and The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
v4 High: 92° ae ¢ very warm. the afternoon. t-storm possible. sun. sun. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
peli a High: 89° High: 91° High: 92° High: 91°
\. @ if |
TAMPA | ae High: 90° Low: 80° Low: 79° Low: 80° Low: 81° Low: 81° sede EOD
ei: we CHAU E Cd er ted Er) a Lr aet) ccu weather i Pi CHUM E mer ted HUME mesg LAURE ers ed
i. y Ea DUET CURE (EES) EES SU eee
High: 89° F/32° C Ls AY 2 [| _100°-90°F 100°-87° F 100°-100° F High Ht.(ft.) — Low
77° ‘ Low: 77° F/25°C ) 4 ‘2 The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel ao is an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 5:33 a.m 21 11:25am. 0.2
a @ 0 ~~ elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 6:06pm. 28 ----
> } ; ie
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2 AN Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Saillay 710am. 02 (13am. 03
4 == ABACO Temperate EG 7:38pm. 28 1:01pm. 0.2
% Pod | ah. OG° 0 VOM. stunecateaven Dass tyersutecedtasniueccaiaeoss ° ° 753 am. 73 (55am. 02
a »” & A. High: 89° F/32°C LOW oeeeeeeeeeeeee 81° F/27° C Monday aap 28 (ean 02
——— Low: 82° F/28°C Normal high sersi¢¢ =P
, wy Normal low 75° F/24° C
a pe _ @ WEST PALMBEACH Peis Last year's High... ssnsestenenenssen 86° F/30° SUN Ay Ty iyi
. a High: 92° F/33° C Last year's lOW oo... eeseseeeeeeeeeeeees 72° F/22° C oa sy a re
. Low: 76° F/24°C Precipitation unrise...... "24 a.m. oonrise .... 9:10 p.m.
. ° i *. As of 2 p.m. yesterday .....ccccccscssssssscsssssseeen 0.00" ‘Sunset....... 8:04 p.m. Moonset ..... 3:07 a.m.
all. FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT i Year to date AT, Full Last New First
High: 90° F/32° C @ High: 88° F/31°C Normal year to date .......c.ccsecscssssseecseeeeeee 18.81" oi a
Low: 77° F/25°C ~—— Low: 79° F/26° C 5
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MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jul. 7 «Jule15 = Jul.21 Jul. 28
— er tore NASSAU High: 92° F/33°C
2 Low: 80° F/27°C
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KEY WEST - — CATISLAND
High: 88° F/31° C High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 81°F/27°C — Low: 72° F/22°C
@ Ya a
= GREAT EXUMA OO SAN SALVADOR
’ High: 89° F/32° C
| ANDROS = Low: 78° F/26° C one
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's : OL
highs and tonights's lows. eae a i
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LONGISLAND
Low: 75° F/24°C
Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 90° F/32° C
FIC F/C FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FC FC Fic FC me Low: 74° F/23° C
Albuquerque 86/30 67/19 t 91/32 68/20 pc Indianapolis 84/28 6317 s 78/25 60/15 t Philadelphia 82/27 63/17 t 83/28 66/18 s
Anchorage 70/21 54/12 c 70/21 56/13 pc Jacksonville 94/34 71/21 t 97/36 73/22 t Phoenix 104/40 85/29 t 106/41 87/30 CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 90/32 68/20 pc 89/31 71/21 pc Kansas City 84/28 67/19 t 83/28 69/20 t _——Pittsburgh 74/23 56/13 t «78/25 56/13 pc RAGGEDISLAND — Uigh:93°F/s4°c
Atlantic City 80/26 62/16 t 85/29 60/15 s Las Vegas 102/38 79/26 pce 105/40 83/28 s Portland, OR 92/33 59/15 s 91/32 58/14 s High: 90° F/32°C Low: 75° F/24°C
Baltimore 82/27 62/16 t 84/28 62/16 s Little Rock 94/34 75/23 po 95/35 75/23 t Raleigh-Durham 89/31 65/18 s 90/32 65/18 s Low: 72°F/22°C < %
Boston 76/24 62/16 t 79/26 61/16 t Los Angeles 82/27 66/18 pc 84/28 64/17 pc St. Louis 88/31 69/20 s 79/26 67/19 t .
Buffalo 66/18 58/14 t 68/20 56/13 pc Louisville 85/29 67/19 s 79/26 63/17 t Salt Lake City 90/32 66/18 t 87/30 64/17 pc GREATINAGUA Xa
Charleston, SC 94/34 71/21 pce 93/83 73/22 pc Memphis 95/35 75/23 pe 94/34 74/23 t San Antonio 99/37 77/25 s 100/87 78/25 s High: 93° F/34° C
Chicago 82/27 60/15 s 77/25 53/1 pe Miami 90/32 77/25 t 90/32 78/25 t San Diego 76/24 68/20 pe 75/23 67/19 pc Low. 76°F/24°C
Cleveland 74/23 58/14 pe 74/23 53/11 pe Minneapolis 79/26 61/16 $s 81/27 62/16 pc San Francisco 75/23 57/13 pe 75/23 55/12 pe i
Dallas 100/37 79/26 pc 101/38 79/26 s Nashville 88/31 65/18 pce 82/27 67/19 t Seattle 85/29 56/13 s 83/28 56/13 s
Denver 88/31 59/15 t 86/30 57/13 t New Orleans 96/35 79/26 s 97/36 78/25 t Tallahassee 96/35 70/21 t 99/37 74/23 t
Detroit 79/26 56/13 pe 77/25 54/12 s New York 80/26 65/18 t 81/27 66/18 s Tampa 89/31 77/25 t 89/31 77/25 t
Honolulu 88/31 75/23 s 88/31 75/23 s Oklahoma City 100/37 75/23 pe 99/37 74/23 s Tucson 95/35 79/26 t 98/36 78/25 pc
Houston 99/37 78/25 pc 98/36 79/26 pc Orlando 92/33 76/24 t 94/34 75/23 t Washington, DC 84/28 66/18 t 86/30 65/18 s

o|1|2

LOW



3|4|5|6

MODERATE







'7|8|9l10

HIGH |



\. HIGH

AY INDEX NY



















Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
88/31
81/27
79/26
90/32
60/15
91/32
86/30
80/26
99/37
76/24
87/30
86/30
82/27
65/18
82/27
91/32
63/17
98/36
92/33
70/21
91/32
82/27
82/27
81/27
70/21
90/32
81/27
64/17
90/32
68/20
88/31
102/38
89/31
80/26
57/13
89/31
71/21
79/26
93/33
87/30
73/22
102/38
70/21
64/17
76/24
79/26
95/35
83/28
82/27
82/27
74/23
105/40
84/28
90/32
67/19
87/30
57/13
86/30
67/19
81/27
78/25
62/16
90/32
79/26
74/23
84/28
76/24
87/30
82/27
72/22

ealil

Today

Low
F/C
79/26
65/18
58/14
73/22
51/10
77/25
77/25
71/21
72/22
76/24
69/20
65/18
72/22
45/7
61/16
64/17
53/11
75/23
83/28
46/7
74/23
71/21
70/21
62/16
55/12
63/17
61/16
55/12
73/22
52/11
79/26
77/25
71/21
60/15
37/2
78/25
57/13
57/13
66/18
78/25
52/11
76/24
63/17
43/8
59/15
52/11
75/23
62/16
61/16
59/15
68/20
82/27
70/21
80/26
35/1
74/23
43/6
73/22
56/13
64/17
55/12
45/7
79/26
70/21
56/13
62/16
59/15
70/21
58/14
50/10





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High
F/C
88/31
78/25
85/29
90/32
59/15
89/31
86/30
82/27
94/34
78/25
87/30
87/30
79/26
64/17
81/27
92/33
61/16
98/36
95/35
70/21
91/32
81/27
83/28
83/28
66/18
84/28
80/26
66/18
91/32
70/21
86/30
100/37
89/31
79/26
57/13
89/31
71/21
77/25
95/35
87/30
73/22
104/40
70/21
63/17
78/25
80/26
95/35
71/21
84/28
86/30
76/24
105/40
86/30
90/32
69/20
89/31
56/13
86/30
70/21
81/27
68/20
63/17
89/31
77/25
13/22
85/29
74/23
86/30
81/27
71/21

Saturday

Low
F/C
78/25
61/16
56/13
74/23
48/8
79/26
77/25
70/21
74/23
76/24
66/18
67/19
71/21
46/7
60/15
62/16
53/11
75/23
85/29
50/10
74/23
71/21
69/20
66/18
54/12
64/17
61/16
53/11
74/23
54/12
81/27
77/25
72/22
61/16
40/4
78/25
58/14
57/13
64/17
77/25
54/12
76/24
57/13
41/5
61/16
53/11
75/23
61/16
63/17
63/17
68/20
80/26
68/20
81/27
35/1
74/23
42/5
73/22
58/14
63/17
ale
46/7
77/25
70/21
57/13
65/18
58/14
69/20
57/13
55/12

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



‘The Boys are Back’ boxing show was spectacular

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

DUBBED “The Boys are Back,” First
Class Promotions put on a spectacular
show on Saturday night to bring profes-
sional boxing back to the local scene.

Promoter Michelle Minus said she was
just glad that they were able to enter-
tain so many people who showed up at
the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium to view
the competition that was highlighted
between the Bahamas and the Domini-
can Republic.

“We did a couple of extra things to
really make it exciting,” said Minus, who
thanked the Bahamian public for coming
out, the sponsors for sticking with them
through their most difficult moments and
Pastor Ivan Butler of Kemp Road Min-
istries, who prayed continuously for their
return.

“The boys are back and First Class
Promotions has a whole slate of fights
set up for the Bahamian people and they
are all going to be exciting,” she said.
“We're looking forward to doing a title
fight for Jerry ‘Big Daddy’ Butler,

FIFA holds draw
for World Cup
preliminaries



NASSAU, Bahamas (AP) —
CONCACAF's fourth-place
team in World Cup qualifying
will host South America's fifth-
place team in a home-and-away
series starting on November 14.

The series will conclude in
South America on November
18, with the winner qualifying
for the 32-nation World Cup
finals in South Africa next year.
The matchups won't be known
until group qualifying ends.

Other World Cup prelimi-
nary matchups drawn on Tues-
day will have the third-place
team from Asia's Group A
hosting the third-place club
from Asia's Group B on Sep-
tember 5, with the series switch-
ing venues on September 9.

The eventual winner of that
series will advance to a playoff
against New Zealand, with Asia
hosting the first game on Octo-
ber 10 and going on the road
on November 14.

The finals draw takes place
on December 4.

a al
an

L..

Alpachino Allen and a whole lot of oth-
er fighters.”

Of course, Minus said they are now
working feverishly on Jermaine ‘Choo
Choo’ Mackey’s defense of the British
Commonwealth super middleweight title
against an African opponent in August at
the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

Last year after Mackey won the British
Commonwealth title, First Class Promo-
tions was suspended for one year by the
Bahamas Boxing Commission. At the
beginning of the year, the suspension
was lifted.

Now the commission’s chairman Pat
“The Centreville Assassin’ Strachan says
there’s no need for First Class or the
public to be concerned about any fur-
ther interruption of the sport.

“As long as First Class Promotions do
what they are mandated to do, we
shouldn’t have any problems,” Strachan
said.

“A good indication of that was what
they did for this show. We didn’t have
any problems at all.”

Strachan, the former cruiserweight
champion of the Bahamas, said Mackey
gave a good impression of his future.

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“TI was very impressed with Choo
Choo. I thought he handled himself very
well,” Strachan said.

“He looked pretty good. I can only
predict good things for him. He stands a
good chance of getting a world title shot
soon. I just think it’s only a matter of
time, once he finds himself in the right
place at the right time.”

Also particularly impressed with what
he saw from Mackey was Phil Smith, the
marketing manager at D’Albenas
Agency Limited, one of the major spon-
sors of the show.

“He’s a little rusty, but he still got the
skills,” Smith said. “He just needs some
fights and you know the story, he should
definitely be ready for his British Com-
monwealth title defense in August.”

Smith said he was so pleased to see
pro boxing back and he and his company
will continue to make their contribution
to its further growth and success in the
future.

The show attracted a number of per-
sons, including Olympic and World
Championships women’s 400 metre
champion Tonique Williams-Darling,
who has a lot of time on her hands since

Nassau conference is held to announce Brazil’s
host cities for 2014 World Cup soccer tourney

officially retiring last year.

Making her first appearance at a show,
Williams-Darling said she was quite
relieved to be a part of the audience and
she certainly enjoyed every moment of it.

“T want to commend Ray Minus (Jr),
who is my cousin, and his wife, Michelle.
They have been trying to get me out for
a long time,” she said. “I think they are
doing a wonderful job.

“T was particularly pleased with the
women’s fight. We know that this is a
sport for men, but it’s good that they
both went out there and they handled
themselves very well. I was really proud
of them.”

As for Mackey, Williams-Darling said
she heard so much about him and she
was honoured to have been afforded the
opportunity to see a rising star before
he really makes it big on the interna-
tional scene as she did.

Now that she has retired from track
and field, Williams-Darling said she’s
looking at the possibility of doing one
or two things that will make an impact on
the sport. But for now, she said every-
thing will remain a secret until she’s
ready to reveal it.



































Tim Aylen/AP

RICARDO TERRA TEIXEIRA (far left), president of Brazil’s
soccer confederation, FIFA President Joseph S Blatter (sec-
ond left) and FIFA Secretary General Jerome Valcke pose for
a photograph as they hold a map of Brazil at a press con-
ference in Nassau, Bahamas, on Sunday. The conference
was held to announce Brazil’s host cities for the 2014
World Cup soccer tournament. The cities are Rio de Janeiro,
Curitiba, Porto Alegre, Sao Paulo, Cuiaba, Manaus, Fortaleza,
Natal, Recife, Brasilia, Salvador and Belo Horizonte.

USA Track and
Field partners
with National
Center for Drug
Free Sport

@ By EDDIE PELLS
AP National Writer

USA Track and Field entered
a partnership Tuesday with a
company that helps athletes find
out if supplements they're
thinking about taking are free of
banned substances.

USATE chief executive Doug
Logan announced the deal with
the National Center for Drug
Free Sport, saying it was a way
for athletes "to navigate the
confounding labyrinth that is
the multi-zillion dollar industry
of ‘legal’ supplements."

Earlier this year, Logan deliv-
ered a rebuke of supplement
makers, saying they've been
complicit in helping ruin a sport
filled with doping scandals over
the years.

He backed it up by announc-
ing the deal with a company
that also has agreements with
the NCAA, Major League
Baseball, the NFL, and the
PGA Tour.

A common excuse when an
athlete tests positive for perfor-
mance-enhancing drugs is to say
they used a supplement that
must have been tainted. The
supplement industry has largely
steered clear of federal regula-
tions, and Logan, in his speech
in January, said it was all
because of a long-term, calcu-
lated lobbying effort in Wash-
ington.

In his blog Tuesday, Logan
said the only way an athlete can
really know if he's clean is by
competing supplement-free.

"But if an athlete does use
supplements, or is considering
using them, this new resource
will help them make a more
informed decision about the
benefits and pitfalls of a given
product," he wrote.

USATF members can log on
to the Web site's Resource
Exchange Center and get infor-
mation about supplements
they're thinking about taking.

Logan said the U.S. Anti-
Doping Agency already has a
hotline for athletes in its test-
ing pool to ask about banned
substances. So while the agree-
ment may not be a huge added
benefit for Olympic-caliber ath-
letes, the new programme will
enable any USATF member —
juniors, seniors, recreational
athletes — to use the Drug Free
Sport service.

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THE TRIBUNE

S
b

WEDNESDAY,



PAGE 11



JUNE 3,

ts

2009






Ke

Soderling beats
Davydenko to
advance to his

first major semi...
See page 9

PM opens 89th FIFA Congress

rime Minister Hubert
Ingraham delivered
the keynote address
at the world famous
Atlantis resort on Paradise
Island yesterday to officially
open the 59th FIFA Congress
after months of preparation.

He praised the FIFA execu-
tives for taking the initiative to
come to a small nation such as
the Bahamas to host such a
prestigious meeting to discuss
the most widely played sport in
the world.

“The 58th FIFA Congress
last year was held in Sidney,
Australia — a country with a
somewhat larger football tradi-
tion than our own. So one can
only imagine the delight when it
was announced that the 59th
Congress would be held in The
Bahamas,” he said.

“You will have discovered
that, though small, The
Bahamas has a great tradition
of sporting excellence and high-
ly qualified and dedicated pro-
fessionals. As well, you will
have learned that we have cre-
ated a particularly successful
industry out of welcoming visi-
tors to our shores. These two
make us ideally suited to host-
ing the 59th FIFA Congress.”

PM Ingraham said it is his
hope that the visiting delegates’
experience here in the wonder-
land of Atlantis will help bol-
ster the Bahamas’ reputation as
a modern, efficient and conve-
nient location for both business
and pleasure and certainly for
the business of discussing
leisure.

The delegation is headed by
Sepp Blatter, who was re-elect-
ed as president, while Jack
Warner is the vice president.
More than 100 delegates from
just about every nation affiliat-
ed with FIFA is represented at
the congress.

“Sport is important for so
many reasons, whether in teach-
ing discipline, promoting
healthy lifestyles or developing
social skills. And so it is quite
natural that governments are
enthusiastic supporters and pro-
moters of sporting activities,”



Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff

FIFA president Sepp Blatter speaks during the spectacular opening ceremony at Atlantis resort Tuesday evening...

he said.

While Mr Ingraham noted
that there are many issues that
will be discussed over the next
two days in the congress, he said
it is the hope of the Bahamas
government that their delegates’
presence here will result in the
further development of the
game and its wider appeal to all
Bahamians, but very specifical-
ly to children who would bene-
fit from the exposure to the
game and its wide international
appeal.

“The Government and peo-
ple of The Bahamas regard this
Congress as being a globally sig-

nificant meeting of sports
administrators comprising over
200 countries,” Ingraham said.

“Your decisions will shape
the organisation of Member
Associations world wide, the
most significant being the
announcement of the upcom-
ing 2014 World Cup host coun-
try.

“This event has been a sig-
nificant undertaking for The
Bahamas requiring a multi-
agency cooperative approach
undergirded by unprecedented
strategy.”

Mr Ingraham not only
acknowledged and thanked

‘The Terminator’ has fists set on ‘Big Daddy’

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

FOR quite some time, there
has been a lot of talk about a
match-up between Sherman
“The Tank’ Williams and Renal-
do ‘The Terminator’ Minus for
the Bahamas heavyweight title.

For quite some time, that was
all it was - talk. Neither fighter
could come to a compromise
where they both signed on the
dotted line to square off in the
ring.

And for quite some time,
Minus didn’t have a legitimate
contender to defend his title.
So much so that the Bahamas
Boxing Commission has decid-
ed to strip Minus of the crown.

Now there’s talk of a possible
showdown between Minus and
Jerry ‘Big Daddy’ Butler.

Saturday night, moments
after he won his eight round co-
main event bout over Domini-
can Republic’s Sandy Antonio
Soto on the First Class Promo-
tions’ first professional card for
the year dubbed, “The Boys are
back,” Butler turned to Minus
and issued a challenge.

Minus, who worked in But-
ler’s corner during the fight,
gladly accepted.

But Bahamas Boxing Com-
mission’s chairman Pat “The
Centreville Assassin’ Strachan
put the possible match-up in
prospective.

“Just for the record, Renaldo
has been stripped of his title, so
the heavyweight title is vacant,”
Strachan said. “At our next
meeting, I will put it out on our
agenda and we will determine
who will fight for it.”

Strachan, a former cruiser-
weight champion of the
Bahamas, said there’s a strong
possibility that the commission
would recommend that the two
most active heavyweights fight
in an elimination bout and then
there will be a title bout.



JERRY ‘Big Daddy’ Butler

As for who those two most
active heavyweights are -
Williams and Butler.

“Renaldo, I certainly believe
will be in the hunt, but the com-
mission will make a decision on
that,” Strachan said. “Sherman
could be in the hunt also. But
there could be an elimination
before a title fight is deter-
mined.”

And just like he did when he
was challenged by and he in
term challenged Williams,
Minus said he’s looking forward
to the possibility of facing But-
ler.

“It’s expected, it’s expected,”
Minus quipped. “He came a
long way. We spent a lot of time
preparing him from scratch and
he has developed into a fine
young man, a fine boxer. He
feels it’s his time.

“I feel he has matured
enough to get a title shot and I
think he deserves a chance. But
training him is one thing. Fight-
ing and training is two differ-
ent things. So I would like to
see him inside the ring.”

Thirty eight-year-old Minus,
who last fought on April 8,
2006, when he was stopped in
the fourth round by Elieser
Castillo in Tampa, Florida, last
fought at home on June 12,
2004, when he won a 10-round
decision over Miguel Otero at

the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

However, the last Bahamian
he fought was James ‘Killer’
Coakley on October 2, 1999, to
successfully defend his Bahamas
heavyweight title with a first
round knockout. He initially
won the vacant title over Coak-
ley on June 15, 1996, with
another first round knockout
over Coakley.

His record stands at 18-14
with 15 knockouts.

As for Butler, 28, he
improved his record to 8-5 with
his first round decision over
Soto. In his last fight on Novem-
ber 11, 2008, Butler drew a six
round decision against Wilner
Vazquez in Hollywood, Flori-
da.

Butler’s last fight against a
Bahamian was on June 30, 2007,
when he stopped Bernard Rolle
in the first round at the C I Gib-
son Gymnasium.

Williams, a native of Grand
Bahama fighting out of Vero
Beach, Florida, is 34-10 with
two draws.

His last fight was on Decem-
ber 12, 2008, when he won by
an unanimous decision over
Andrew Greeley in Jack-
sonville, Florida. The 36-year-
old last fought at home on April
18, 2007 when he stopped
American Wade Lewis in the
first round at Clifford Park.

But Williams has yet to face a
Bahamian opponent in his pro
career that got started in 1997.

While Minus said he will wait
for the possible showdown with
Butler, once he can get about
4-5 months to get in shape, he’s
ruling out any chance of him
and Williams ever squaring off.

“We offered Tank numerous
offers to fight, but he has
refused to sign, so I guess he
doesn’t want to fight me,”
Minus said. “Right now, Big
Daddy Jerry Butler is in front of
me, he has issued this challenge
and that is who I have my sights
set on right now.”

Chuck Blazer, a friend and
long-time resident of the
Bahamas and a member of the
Executive Committee of FIFA

Football governing
body to talk
about change

NASSAU, Bahamas (AP) — Restrictions on foreign players in
club football, changes to the age limit for Olympic football and

preparations for the 2010 World Cup in South Africa are on the
agenda for FIFA's annual congress.

FIFA president Sepp Blatter will lead discussions Wednes-
day at a meeting attended by representatives of 208 nations.

"I think at the end of the Congress Wednesday, everybody will
see what we're doing in FIFA, (that) we're doing what we can do
and we can all be happy,” Blatter said.

Glitz has been apparent, whether it was the stir created by Foot-
ball Federation Australia chairman Frank Lowy bringing his
240-foot (73 m) yacht into Bahamian waters to reportedly lobby
for a future World Cup, or the steady stream of people at a din-
ner Monday waiting to greet 2012 London Olympics organizing

committee head Sebastian Coe.

for the crucial role he played in
bringing the congress to Par-
adise Island, but he also recog-
nised the hard work of host
Bahamas Football Association
(BFA) president Anton Sealy
and his executive secretary
Lionel Haven.

He also congratulated Min-
ister of Youth, Sport and Cul-
ture Desmond Bannister and
the ardent effort of the official
secretariat and other national
stakeholders in collaborating
with the Bahamas Football
Association in this initiative.

“Going forward, we hope to
strengthen and solidify our
strong sporting tradition with
the completion of a national sta-
dium currently under construc-



tion. It’s anticipated completion
in 2011 will strengthen our abil-
ity to host international match-
es and sporting events and we
look forward to such opportu-
nities in the years ahead,” he
said.

“We particularly look for-
ward to the boost the new foot-
ball pitch will provide to the
further development of football
in The Bahamas, particularly to
our junior footballers.”

In closing, Mr Ingraham said
the Bahamas has a slogan that
says “once is not enough” and
he welcomed the delegates to
come back and when they do, to
ensure that they visit some of
the Family Islands that make
up the Bahamas archipelago.

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THE TRIBUNE
A ul



AF Holding
acquires
Anshacher
(Bahamas)

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

AF HOLDING Limited, a
Bahamian company with more
than $4.73 billion in assets
under administration and man-
agement and $535 million in
assets, confirmed yesterday in
a release that it has acquired
Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited
“with full Bahamas Govern-
ment regulatory approval.” The
release verified what Tribune
Business has reported for sev-
eral months.

According to the release,
Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited
was sold by the Ansbacher
Group as a part of its strategy to
focus on its European markets
and the Middle East markets of
its parent, the Qatar National
Bank.

Sources previously told this
paper that the Ansbacher man-
agement team led by managing
director Michael Mayhew-
Arnold, had previously been
exploring a management-led
buyout of the bank from cur-
rent owner Qatar and had also
seeked to remain in place to
obtain a sizable equity stake,
around 30 per cent, from any
new owner in the aftermath of a
takeover.

However, it was claimed that
the Ansbacher management
could not obtain a large enough
backer to underwrite the buy-
out.

The AF Holdings release
said, however, that Mr May-
hew-Arnold will remain the
company’s managing director
and the company, when merged
with AF’s subsidiary, Sentinel
Bank and Trust Company Lim-
ited, will retain the name Ans-
bacher (Bahamas) limited.

“We are truly delighted to
conclude the purchase of Ans-
bacher (Bahamas) Limited, a
matter that has been on our
agenda for some while,” said
Director of AF Holdings Lim-
ited Anthony Ferguson.

“We believe this acquisition is
an excellent strategic fit that
will significantly expand our
product offerings and capabili-
ties in some important lines of
business, resulting in economies
of scale that will bring consid-
erable value to our clients and
make our collective operations
that much stronger.

“The merger will create a
major new player in the off-

SEE page 2B



























The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

Sale Ends



in

WEDNESDAY,

JUNE 3,



2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Pricing row pushes Chelsea’s threat
to pull product from Super Value

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

row over pricing has

pushed a leading water

supplier to threaten

pulling its product

from the shelves of a
major supermarket chain, The Tribune
can reveal.

In a letter said to be sent from the
Super Value chain of stores to an
employee of Chelsea's Choice last
week, the food-store chain accused the
water company of selling five gallon
bottles directly to customers at its East
West Highway plant at a cheaper price
than offered to retailers.

The letter asked Chelsea's Choice
to curtail this "direct competition” say-
ing that it is not supported by Super
Value.

A response from Chelsea's Choice
lashed out at the grocer's position and
denied that they were competing with
their retailers. The letter indicated that

More expansions
could be on the

after a 20-year relationship, the brand
would no longer be available in Super
Value stores.

Copies of both letters were obtained
by The Tribune.

"It has come to our attention that
retailing by wholesalers had intensi-
fied with the downturn of the economy.
We understand that you are retailing
five gallon Chelsea's Choice water to
the public for $2.50 and wholesaling it
to your retailers at $3.50. We cannot
support wholesalers that are in direct
competition with their retailers,” said
the first letter, dated May 29, bearing
the signature of Super Value president
Rupert Roberts.

"This leaves us with no choice but
to inform you that you no longer have
the support of retailers as long as you
persist in retailing to the public less
than wholesale prices. We trust that
you will refrain from your retailing
activity,” the letter continued.

Attempts to reach Mr Roberts for
comment were unsuccessful yesterday
as he was said to be out of office.

A letter sent by Chelsea's Choice in
response, dated June 2, lashed out at
the grocery store's position and denied
that they were competing with their
retailers.

Ms Knowles maintained - according
to the letter - that Chelsea's Choice
acts as wholesaler, not a retailer, by
selling items by the case and by vol-
ume in five gallon bottles.

"The fact that we wholesale from
our plant has not caused you to sell
any less in your stores based on the
frequency of deliveries to you. As far as
we are aware our brand sells out very
quickly," said the letter signed by com-
pany president Tina Knowles.

The letter said that low inventory
orders by Super Value forced cus-
tomers "to come to our plant to pur-
chase what could have been sold at
your stores".

The letter added that the option for
Super Value always existed to collect
water from the East West Highway
plant at a price of $2.50 adding that it
appears the supermarket "is not inter-

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ested in having a relationship with this
company”.

As of December 1, 2008 distribution
of Chelsea’s Choice water was handled
by a fleet of independent drivers,
according to the letter.

"We feel we should pass the savings
to the consumer particularly during
these difficult times. A price increase at
this time is not bearable. . .We hope
this decision does not cause our
employees and their extended families
to shop elsewhere as the potential is
there to create another unfortunate cir-
cumstance.

"We will advise our customers that
our products will no longer be found at
your stores,” said the letter.

When contacted for comment yes-
terday Ms Knowles declined to com-
ment. However Super Value Opera-
tions Manager Kendrick Moss said he
was unaware of any change regarding a
business relationship between the two
companies. "To my knowledge nothing
has changed... I haven't been given
that decision," said Mr Moss.

City Markets expects equity capital injection to flow by mid June

way for Mall at
Marathon

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

MALL at Marathon’s Gen-
eral manager said yesterday that
more expansions could be on
the way for the property, but
lamented that consumer traffic
through the mall has been down
year on year.

Bob Stevenson told Tribune
Business that the mall’s mer-
chant space has seen a series of
losses and gains his year, but
has not seen diminished interest
in those spaces which have
become vacant.

According to him, the mall
has undertaken an aggressive
leasing programme in order to
fill their vacant commercial
space.

He revealed that Mr Pretzels,
an entertainment centre and
eatery, is expected to expand
into available spaces and Dairy
Queen is expected to construct
a drive through on the property.

“It’s super fantastic,” said Mr
Stevenson. “The last two stores
rented in the last two days.”

According to him, with the
onset of the economic down-
turn, the mall committed to
assisting its merchants through
increased advertising, increased
security and one on one con-
sultation.

“The mall has indeed helped
its merchants - we do it individ-
ually and as a group,” he said.

“We bolster our marketing
and promotional efforts more
so than normal and we main-
tain a strong security pro-
gramme, we maintain it and
commit to it.”

Some merchants told this
paper recently that the mall had
not been accommodating with
merchants who made late rental
payments and said the increased
security did nothing to help
struggling vendors with the
tough economic environment.

Mr Stevenson asserted, how-
ever, that rent is a “figment of
the imagination” and said it
accounted for only ten per cent
of the businesses’ retail opera-
tions.

He said if they could not
meet that ten per cent then
“they have a problem with their

SEE page 2B

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

CITY MARKETS expects an
injection of equity capital by its
majority shareholder to flow
into the 12-store Bahamian
supermarket chain by mid June,
Tribune Business was told yes-
terday, with receipt of that fund-
ing getting the firm back to its
direct purchasing programme.

Sunil Chatrani, chief execu-
tive of City Markets’ immedi-

ate holdings company, Bahamas
Supermarkets, said he could not
say how much was being invest-
ed to aid in the company’s
relaunch, but Tribune Business
sources claimed it to be in the
range of $10 million.

“There is a figure, but I prefer
not to say it until investors have
all committed to the exact
amount, then we’ll know that
final figure,” he said.

Mr Chitrani told this paper
recently that investors in
Bahamas Supermarket’s 78 per

cent majority shareholder, BSL
Holdings, were now discussing
with Royal Bank of Canada the
terms and arrangements for the
new capital injection.

According to him, City Mar-
kets’ floundering business has
already begun to “turn the cor-
ner” and stabilise.

He said the company has had
to reduce costs substantially by
cutting expenses and had in the
past month been forced to
deeply discount products, selling
them at a loss.

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He said the company had
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market prices and have had to
recently realign them.

“We have had to fix shop
and we have done that now, so
we’re just waiting for the injec-
tion of funds to go into the pro-
gramme,” said Mr Chatrani.

“T think we have turned the
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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



= 00 )~ = >\—
Chamber announces finalists for ‘09 Annual Business Awards

THE Chamber of Commerce
announced the finalists for the
2009 annual Business Awards
yesterday, as they released plans
for this year’s Chamber Week,
when the winners will be
announced.

Bahamian businesspersons
will vie for the distinguished
titles of Outstanding Busi-
nessperson of The Year and
Developing Entrepreneur of the
Year.

Two preeminent Bahamian
businesses will be designated
Outstanding Business of the
Year, which is awarded in two
categories, businesses with over
fifty employees and those with
less.

The Chamber’s annual presti-
gious Lifetime Achievement
Award will go to George Myers,
chairman of the Myers Group
of Companies. Mr Myers will be
saluted for his overwhelming
contributions to Bahamian
enterprise and the community



SOME of the 2009 award finalists are pictured (L-R) Farrell Goff, Bahamas

Woodworking Studio; Robin Strachan, Caribbean Civil Group Limited; Dr.
Wendy Stuart, Botani Bath; Dr. Sophia Rolle, Chairperson, Chamber Week
2009; Dr. Barry Russell, Bahamas Orthodontic Center; Claire Sands, The Plait
Lady; Dr. Charles Diggiss, The MEDNET Group of Companies; Philip Simon,
Executive Director, Bahamas Chamber of Commerce; Robert Stevenson, Mall
at Marathon; Lavette McFall, Bahamas Orthodontic Center; Gershan Major,
1st Vice President, Bahamas Chamber of Commerce; Deran Thompson,

Bahamas Woodworking Studio.

through his accomplishments in
the hospitality sector through his
restaurant and entertainment
holdings. Nominations for the
Annual Business Awards have

City Markets expects equity capital
injection by its majority shareholder

FROM page 1B

we’re just waiting for funding
so we can get back into our
direct purchasing programme
(imports).”

In the meantime City Mar-
kets continues to do price sur-
veys of the market in order to
stay competitive, which Mr
Chatrani said that has already
begun to happen.

“As we start back our over-
seas programme we will have
more flexibility of prices,” he
said.

The City Markets chief exec-
utive told this paper recently
that the company’s sales were
likely to decline to between
$120-$125 million for the 2009
fiscal year to end June 2009, due
to a combination of the eco-
nomic recession and the com-



pany’s own internal issues.

While this represented a
decline of between 13.2-17 per
cent compared to the top-of the
top-line figure for 2008, Mr
Chatrani said that Bahamas
Supermarkets had largely
bought the increased business
that year through deep dis-
counts, which left the company
selling products at a loss.

As a result, gross profit mar-
gins for that year fell to 17.8 per
cent. Mr Chatrani said these
had recovered to 25.4 per cent
within the past quarter, and the
company was looking to get
back to historical margins of 28
per cent plus as soon as possi-
ble.

According to Mr Chatrani,
there will not likely be any kind
of expansion for the supermar-
ket chain in the medium term.



been sent to Chamber officials
over the last several weeks and
after careful deliberation, the
finalists in each category were
announced.

In the category of Outstanding
Business Person of the Year, the
finalists are Dr. Charles Diggiss,
The MEDNET Group of Com-
panies; Gus Cartwright, Check-
er Café; and Chris Mortimer,
Galleria Cinemas and Benni-
gan’s Grill & Tavern.

The 2009 Developing Entre-

preneur of the Year Award will
go to a business pioneer who has
successfully established a busi-
ness in the private sector within
the past five years. This year’s
award will go to one of the fol-
lowing finalists: Dr. Wendy Stu-
art, Botani Bath; Kenwood Kerr,
Providence Advisers; Deran
Thompson/ Farrell Goff,
Bahamas Woodworking Studio.
The designation of Outstand-
ing Business of the Year with
over 50 employees will be go to
either Mall at Marathon, Furni-
ture Plus or Bahamas Waste.
The award for that thriving
Bahamian business with less
than 50 employees will go to one
of these finalists: Caribbean Civ-
il] Group Limited, Bahamas
Orthodontic Centre or The Plait
Lady. The Annual Business
Awards will culminate Chamber
Week, which begins on June 22.
The week’s events also include
a courtesy call on Prime Minister
Ingraham, the highly anticipated
Mix N Mingle business-net-
working event on Tuesday, June
23, and the Meet the Ministers
forum on Thursday, June 25.
Twelve Cabinet Ministers will
participate in the Forum, which
1s open to Chamber members.
All events will take place at San-
dals Royal Bahamian.

More expansions could be on



the way for Mall at Marathon

FROM page 1B

business.”

“This is truly a difficult time
and people are experiencing
sales declines, so we work with
them as best we can,” he con-
tinued.

Mr Stevenson said manage-
ment collected whatever data it
could in order to assess how the
mall’s businesses were holding
up to the ensuing recession.

“We measure what we can,
we collect sales data from sev-
eral of our stores, we sell gift
certificates and we measure the
traffic in the mall and clearly it
is down,” he said.

According to Mr Stevenson,
over the past five to ten years,
many retailers have prospered
greatly at the mall and the cur-
rent 110 shops are preparing to
celebrate its 20 years in busi-
ness this Fall.

AF Holding acquires
Ansbacher (Bahamas)

FROM page 1B

shore international banking
industry that is wholly owned
by Bahamians and governed by
a Bahamas regulatory regime.”

Ansbacher (Bahamas) has
some obvious attractions for
Sentinel Bank and Trust and its
parent, AF Holdings (the for-
mer Colina Financial Group),
whose primary principals are
Mr Ferguson and Anthony
Alexiou.

As reported by this paper
earlier, Ansbacher (Bahamas)
has a significant Bahamian dol-
lar portfolio, being involved in
domestic pension fund man-
agement and administration,
and one possibility would be for
that business to be merged with
CFAL, the brokerage/corporate
advisory entity had by Mr Fer-
guson. The international busi-
ness could then be absorbed by
Sentinel Bank and Trust.

It was said in the earlier
stages of the proposed acquisi-
tion that Sentinel’s chances of
obtaining Ansbacher
(Bahamas) Limited were great-
ly increased when a rival bid-
der was knocked out because
of regulatory concerns
expressed by the Central Bank.

That rival was claimed to be
Belize Bank, the largest such
institution in that Central
American country, which is
owned by a holding company
controlled by controversial UK
peer Lord Ashcroft.

The British Noble, once the
treasurer for UK opposition

party, the Conservatives, is now
their deputy chairman, and both
he and his Belizean business
interests have long been targets
for reports by the UK media.

None of the allegations have
yet been proven, and some
reports have even resulted in
Lord Ashcroft taking legal
action for libel, cases which
have usually been settled out of
court. Yet it is likely that the
swirl of controversy may have
alarmed the Bahamian Central
Bank.

“AF Holdings Limited
(AFH), formerly Colina Finan-
cial Group (CFG), is a finan-
cial consortium of leading com-
prehensive financial services
with insurance, banking, health-
care and media companies and
real estate holdings in The
Bahamas, offering integrated
solutions to meet the diverse
needs of international and local
clients,” said the company’s
release.

It said AF Holdings acquisi-
tion, Ansbacher (Bahamas)
Limited, is one of oldest off-
shore bank and trust companies
in The Bahamas.

“Formerly known as
Bahamas International Trust
Company Limited, ("BITCO"),
it was previously owned by a
consortium of banks with Bar-
clays Bank as the majority
shareholder. BITCO was sold
to the Ansbacher Group of
Companies in 1989, changing
its name to Ansbacher
(Bahamas) Limited in 1994,”
the release continued.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ALCHEMIST DREAMS INC.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PINK SHELLS
HOLDINGS LTD.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PINK SHELLS HOLDINGS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

GROLEY RIVERS INC.

——

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GROLEY RIVERS INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PHILIPPA VALLEY INC.

ee

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PHILIPPA VALLEY INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PIRQUE FIRST
INVESTMENT INC.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PIRQUE FIRST INVESTMENT INC.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TSK HOLDINGS
LIMITED

— f*) ——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of TSK HOLDINGS LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

MIN MIN &
MIKE CO. LTD.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MIN MIN & MIKE CO. LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

——_

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ALCHEMIST DREAMS INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

OAXACA S.A.

—— _—
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of OAXACA S.A. has been completed; a Cer-
tificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company

has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

genet i |
—_ Col ae

NOTICE

The Management and Board of Directors of Colina
Holdings Bahamas Limited (CHBL) wish to
announce that the Consolidated Interim
(Unaudited) Financial Statements for CHBL for the
three months ended March 31, 2009 have been
authorized for release on June 3, 2009.

A complete copy of these financial statements is
available on the Company’s’ website
www.colinaimperial.com or by contacting the
corporate headquarters of Colinalmperial by
phone at (242) 396-2102 or by email at
Financials@Colinalmperial.com


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2009, PAGE 3B



=
AP source: GM to sell Hummer to Chinese manufacturer

m@ By BREE FOWLER
AP Auto Writers

DETROIT (AP) — General
Motors Corp. took a key step
toward its downsizing on Tues-
day, striking a tentative deal to
sell its Hummer brand to a Chi-
nese manufacturer, while also
revealing that it has potential
buyers for its Saturn and Saab
brands.

GM has an agreement to sell
its Hummer brand to Sichuan
Tengzhong Heavy Industrial
Machinery Co. of China, said a
person briefed on the deal.

The Detroit automaker
announced Tuesday morning
that it had a memorandum of
understanding to sell the brand
of rugged SUVs, but it didn't
identify the buyer. A formal
announcement of the buyer was
to be made Tuesday afternoon,
said the person briefed on the
deal. The person spoke on con-
dition of anonymity because the
details have not been made
public.

Sichuan Tengzhong deals in
road construction, plastics,
resins and other industrial prod-
ucts, but Hummer would be its
first step into the automotive
business.

GM said the sale will likely
save more than 3,000 US jobs in
manufacturing, engineering and
at various Hummer dealerships.

As part of the proposed
transaction, Hummer will con-
tinue to contract vehicle manu-
facturing and business services
from GM during a transitional
period. For example, GM's
Shreveport, La., assembly plant
would continue to contract to
assemble the H3 and H3T
through at least 2010, GM said.

The automaker also said
Tuesday that it has 16 buyers
interested in purchasing its Sat-
urn brand, while three parties
are interested in the Swedish
Saab brand.

Chief Financial Officer Ray
Young told reporters and indus-
try analysts on a conference call
that GM is continuing to pursue
manufacturing agreements with
anew Saturn buyer.

GM would like to sell the
money-losing Saturn brand's
dealership network, contracting
with the new buyer to make
some of its cars while the buyer
gets other vehicles from differ-
ent manufacturers.

At the same time, bridge loan
discussions with the Swedish
government are progressing,
Young said.

GM, which filed for Chapter
11 bankruptcy protection in
New York on Monday, is racing
to remake itself as a smaller,
leaner automaker. In addition
to its plan to sell the Hummer,
Saab and Saturn brands, GM
will also phase out its Pontiac
brand, concentrating on its
Chevrolet, Cadillac, Buick and
GMC nameplates.

The company hopes to fol-
low the lead of fellow US
automaker Chrysler LLC by
transforming its most profitable
assets into a new company in
just 30 days and emerging from
bankruptcy protection soon
after.

But GM is much larger and
complex than its Auburn Hills-
based rival and isn't up against
Chrysler's tight June 15 dead-
line to close its deal with Fiat
Group SpA.

Sharon Lindstrom, managing
director at business consulting
firm Protiviti, said the compa-
nies pose different challenges.
But as with Chrysler, she notes
that the Treasury Department
made sure many of GM's mov-
ing parts were in order ahead
of time so a quick bankruptcy
reorganization might be possi-
ble.

"They had a lot of their ducks
in a row because the terms of
the government financing
forced them to get all the par-
ties to the table in a very, very
short period of time,” Lind-
strom said.

Separately, the German gov-
ernment said Tuesday it paid
out the first 300 million ($425
million) in bridge loans to GM's
Adam Opel GmbH division.
The loans are part of a deal to
shrink GM's stake in Opel and
shield it from GM's bankruptcy
protection filing in the U.S.

Canadian auto supplier
Magna International Inc. and
Russian-owned Sberbank will
acquire 55 per cent of Opel.

A sale of the Hummer brand
had been expected. Chief Exec-
utive Fritz Henderson had said
in April that the automaker was
expecting final bids from three
potential buyers within the
month.

Eric Lane, vice president of
Baton Rouge, La.-based Gerry
Lane Enterprises, which has
four dealerships — including
one offering Hummers — wel-
comed the sale.

"Even though they've put out
a fantastic product, they haven't
come out with enough new



A HUMMER H2 vehicle is seen for sale on Tuesday at a GM Superstore in

Dublin, California...

models to keep up,” said Lane.
"We'd like a new owner to
come in and inject some new
products.”

Lane said the lack of new
products and the recession fig-
ured into the Hummer equa-
tion much more than last year’s
runup in gasoline prices. "I
haven't had a single owner com-
plain about mileage. Nobody
buys a Hummer because of the
gas. You don't buy a vehicle for
$60,000 and worry about the
price of gas."

Critics had seized on the
rugged but fuel-inefficient
Hummer as a symbol of excess
as GM's financial troubles grew
and gas prices rose. Sales at
Hummer, which is known for
models with military-vehicle
roots, have been in a steep slide
since gasoline prices rose to
record heights last summer. For
the first four months of this
year, Hummer sales are down
67 per cent.

GM nailed down deals with
its union and a majority of its
bondholders and arranged the
Opel deal in order to appear in

BSi

(AP Photo:Ben Margot)

court Monday with a near-com-
plete plan to quickly emerge
with a chance to become prof-
itable.

The government has said it
expects GM to come out of
bankruptcy protection within
60 to 90 days. By comparison,

the judge overseeing Chrysler's
case approved the sale of its
assets to a group led by Italy's
Fiat in just over a month. Some
industry observers think
Chrysler could emerge as early
as this week.

During Monday's hearing,
GM attorney Harvey Miller
stressed the magnitude of the
case and the importance of
moving GM through court over-
sight as fast as possible. He not-
ed that the automaker only has
about $2 billion in cash left.

"If there's going to be a
recovery of value, it's absolute-
ly crucial that a sale take place
as soon as possible,” Miller said
in his opening statement.

The automaker wants to sell
the bulk of its assets to a new
company in which the US gov-
ernment will take a 60 per cent
ownership stake. The Canadi-
an government would take 12.5
per cent of the "New GM,” with
the United Auto Workers
union getting 17.5 per cent and
unsecured bondholders receiv-
ing 10 per cent. Existing share-
holders are expected to be
wiped out.

US Judge Robert Gerber
moved swiftly through more
than 25 mostly procedural
motions during the automak-
er's first-day Chapter 11 hear-
ing.
Gerber set GM's sale hear-
ing for June 30, putting it on a
path similar to that of Chrysler.
Objections are due on June 19,
with any competing bids
required to be submitted by

PRIME OFFICE SPACE

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Streets. Two (2) on-site car spaces included.

Ideal location for offshore bank, law firm, or other

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Contact Owner at:

362-6006



BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BS! Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established
international private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is
presently accepting applications for

PRIVATE BANKING RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

Applicants for the position of PB Relationship Manager must have a banking
or financial degree and 10-15 years experience in the offshore banking sector,
have knowledge of intemational investment instruments & money market,
ability to partner with team members, must be confident regarding customer
relations, investments & portfolio management and have thorough knowledge
of local legislation, regulatory & statutory matters as well as international
banking practices. Fluency in Italian & French is absolutely required.

Personal qualities :-

Excellent communication skils
Goal-onented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
Commitment to quality and service axceallance
Able to work with minimal supervision

Strong Team attitude

Excellent Acquisition Skills

Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary
Must be able fo work under pressure
Available to travel on a frequently basis

Responsibilities :-

Acquire new clients in target markeis
Service & advise existing customers
Maintain & follow up account relationships
Liaise directly with customers or their invesiment advisors

Foster and maintain communication with intemallextemal banking

professionals

Meet deadlines on timely basis
Meet target in terms of Profitability and Acquisition of Met Mew Money

Interested persons

with

such qualifications

resume/curriculum vitae to:-

Human Resources Manager
BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre

P.O. Box M-7130
Nassau, Bahamas

should

submit their

Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kern@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted



June 22.

Gerber also gave GM imme-
diate access to $15 billion in
government financing to get it
through the next few weeks,
and interim approval for use of
a total $33.3 billion in financ-
ing, with final approval slated
to be ruled on June 25. The
funds are contingent on GM's
sale being approved by July 10.
Gerber also approved motions
allowing the company to pay
certain prebankruptcy wages,
along with supplier and ship-
ping costs.

The sheer size of GM makes
it amore complicated case than
Chrysler.

GM made twice as many
vehicles as Chrysler's 1.5 mil-
lion last year and employs
235,000 people compared with
Chrysler's 54,000. GM also has
plants and operations in many
more countries, meaning it will
likely have to strike separate
deals to navigate the bankrupt-

cy laws of those places.

Henderson said GM has
learned a few things by watch-
ing Chrysler's case.

"Certainly the court showed
that it can address 363 (sale)
transactions in an expeditious
fashion," Henderson said at a
news conference Monday. "Par-
ticularly in our case with what
will be a very large 363 transac-
tion."

GM's filing for Chapter 11
bankruptcy protection is the
largest ever for an industrial
company. GM, which said it has
$172.81 billion in debt and
$82.29 billion in assets, had
received about $20 billion in
low-interest loans before enter-
ing bankruptcy protection.

¢ Fowler reported from New
York. AP Auto Writer Dan
Strumpf in New York, Associ-
ated Press Writer Alan Sayre in
New Orleans and Associated
Press Writer Joe McDonald in
Bewing contributed to this report

TOURISM /HOSPITALITY SECTOR

ALL ABOVE BUSINESS OWNERS SHOULD ATTEND
SMALL BUSINESS FOOSO411C SUMMIT
This Evening: June 3, 6:00 pm-9:00) pm
Location: Hely Cross Anglican Church Hall
HELF CRAFT

SALALIL BUSINESS ACT OF THE BAHAMAS
Log ft bo Boma “if Leica bing

ere eM e lt) aa
(242) 326-6748 | (242) 427-3640

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
SUPREME COURT

2009
CLE/Qui/ 00243

IN THE MATTER ALL THAT parcel or tract
of land containing 464.664 acres situated in
Alexander’s Settlement on the Island of Exuma,
Bahamas and IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT
parcel or tract of land containing 73.957 acres also
situated in Alexander’s Settlement on the Island of
Exuma, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FLORENCE SMITH
of Alexander’s Settlement in the Island of Exuma
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas is applying to the Supreme Court to have
its Title to the following land investigated under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act, and the nature
and extent thereof determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted by the said Court
in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

“ALL THAT parcel or tract of land containing
Four hundred and Sixty-four and Six hundred
and Sixty-four thousandths (464.664) acres being
a portion of Crown Grant C-24 granted to William
Alexander and situated in Alexander’s Settlement
on the Island of Exuma, Bahamas which said
parcel or tract of land has such position boundaries
shape marks and dimensions as are shown on the
diagram or plan filed in the Department of Lands
and Surveys situated in the City of Nassau in the
Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas as Plan Number
343A EX and IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT
parcel or tract of land containing Seventy-three
and Nine hundred and Fifty-Seven thousandths
(73.957) acres also being a portion of Crown Grant
C-24 granted to William Alexander and situated
in Alexander's Settlement on the Island of Exuma,
Bahamas which said parcel or tract of land has such
position boundaries shape marks and dimensions
as are shown on the diagram or plan filed in the
Department of Lands and Surveys situated in the
City of Nassau in the Island of New Providence
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas as Plan Number 343 EX and which said
parcels or tracts of land are filed herein and edged
in “PINK”.

Copies of the Plan may be inspected during normal
office hours at the following places:-

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher
Building, East Street, in the City of Nassau;

2. The Local Administrator’s Office situated in the
Settlement of George Town, Exuma;

3. The Local Constable’s Office situated in the
Settlement of George Town, Exuma; or

4, The Chambers of Colin M. Thompson Terrace
House, First Terrace and Collins Avenue
Nassau, Bahamas.

Any person who objects to the granting of the said
Certificate of Title is required to file in the Supreme
Court and serve on the Petitioner or its Attorney a
Statement of its, his or her Claim in the prescribed
forms, verified by an Affidavit and other related
requirements to be filed therewith by the 15th day
of July A.D., 2009. Failure of any such person to
file and serve a Statement of its, his or her Claim
together with the other related requirement by the
15th day of July A.D., 2009, will operate as a bar to
such claim.



COLIN M. THOMPSON
ATTORNEY FOR THE PETITIONER


PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Pending home sales rise
6.7 per cent in April

@ By ALAN ZIBEL
AP Real Estate Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
The number of US homebuy-
ers who agreed to purchase a
previously occupied home in
April posted the largest month-
ly jump in nearly eight years, a
sign that sales are finally coming
to life after a long and painful
slump.

The National Association of
Realtors said Tuesday its sea-

sonally adjusted index of sales
contracts signed in April surged
6.7 per cent to 90.3, far exceed-
ing analysts’ forecasts. It was
the biggest monthly jump since
October 2001, when pending
sales rose 9.2 per cent.

Economists were encouraged
by the report, and stock indexes
advanced modestly.

“This is yet another positive
indication that the bottoming
process is forming,” Jennifer
Lee, an economist at BMO

Legal Notice

NOTICE

QUASETTE INC.

— 4H} —

Capital Markets, wrote in a note
to clients. “Now if only prices
would stabilize.”

Economists surveyed by
Thomson Reuters expected the
index would edge up to 85 from
a reading of 84.6 in March. Typ-
ically there is a one- to two-
month lag between a contract
and a done deal, so the index
is a barometer for future exist-
ing home sales.

In early trading, the Dow
Jones industrial average added

about 20 points to 8,741, and at
times traded above 8,776.39, its
finish for 2008.

Still, some economists won-
der whether rising mortgage
rates will dampen home sales.
Nationwide average rates for
30-year-fixed rate mortgages are
around 5.3 per cent this week
compared with about five per
cent a week earlier, according to
Bankrate.com.

And analysts cautioned prices
will take longer to stabilize,

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CHAPLAIN
INVESTMENTS LIMITED

— 4} —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of QUASETTE INC. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SILVER PINE CORPORATION
—-_—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SILVER PINE CORPORATION has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ALLVEST WEALTH
MANAGEMENT CORP.

—_

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ALLVEST WEALTH MANAGEMENT
CORP. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck

off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

DICKSONIA LTD.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of DICKSONIA LTD. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CHAPLAIN INVESTMENTS LIMITED
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEW CAPSTONES INC.

—— > —__

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of NEW CAPSTONES INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

VUADENS INC.

— -,——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of VWUADENS INC. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TULIP GROUP
HOLDINGS LTD.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of TULIP GROUP HOLDINGS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



because of the glut of unsold
properties on the market.

“Even if sales volumes
rebound, home prices will keep
falling under the weight of the
massive inventory overhang,”
wrote Ian Shepherdson, chief
US economist at High Fre-
quency Economics.

The Realtors’ index was 3.2
per cent above last year’s levels
and has risen for three straight
months after hitting a record
low in January. A nearly 33 per
cent sales increase in the North-
east and a 9.8 per cent jump in
the Midwest led the overall
surge. Sales contracts rose 1.8
per cent in April from a month
earlier in the West, but fell 0.2
per cent in the South.

The big boost likely reflects
the impact of a new $8,000 tax
credit for first-time homebuy-
ers that was included in the eco-
nomic stimulus bill signed by
President Barack Obama in
February. Since buyers need to
finish their purchases by
November 30 to claim the cred-
it, “we expect greater activity
in the months ahead,”
Lawrence Yun, the Realtors’
chief economist, said in a state-
ment.

Still, Yun cautioned that the
pending sales data is more
volatile than in the past because
many sellers need banks to
agree to take less than the orig-
inal mortgage — a so-called
“short sale.” That process is
often difficult, time-consuming
and can wind up falling apart

before the deal closes.

The Federal Housing Admin-
istration last week released
details of a plan in which bor-
rowers who use FHA loans can
get advances from lenders that
let them effectively receive the
credit in advance, so they don’t
have to wait to get the money
from the Internal Revenue Ser-
vice.

Completed home sales rose
2.9 per cent to an annual rate of
4.68 million in April from a
downwardly revised pace of
4.55 million in March, the Real-
tors’ group said last week.

Sales of inexpensive foreclo-
sures and other distressed low-
end properties have even
sparked bidding wars in places
like Las Vegas, Phoenix and
Miami. But the market for high-
end properties remains at a vir-
tual standstill.

The national median sales
price in April plunged more
than 15 per cent to $170,200,
from $201,300 in the same
month last year. That was the
second largest yearly price drop
on record, according to the
Realtors’ group.

For the stories
behind the news,

ele Mat [e Td
on Mondays



Legal Notice

NOTICE

ORANGE VALLEY INC.

— -* ——
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ORANGE VALLEY INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TEKE S.A.

— )——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of TEKE S.A. has been completed; a Certifi-
cate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has

therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GENTLE INTERNATIONAL
HOLDINGS INC.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GENTLE INTERNATIONAL HOLD-
INGS INC. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolu-
tion has been issued and the Company has therefore been

struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)
PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





A look at economic developments,
stock activity around the world

@ By The Associated Press

A look at economic develop-
ments and stock market activity
around the world Tuesday:

BEIJING — US Treasury
Secretary Timothy Geithner
concluded his reassurance tour
of China, telling leaders of the
country that holds the largest
share of America's debt that
US President Barack Obama
was committed to tackling the
soaring budget deficits.

Meanwhile, General Motors
Corp. officials said the

automaker's Asian operations
will be unaffected by its bank-

ruptcy and it plans to open new
factories in China, Thailand and
India even as it closes US facil-
ities.

HONG KONG — Goldman
Sachs raised more than $1.9 bil-
lion after selling part of its stake
in Industrial & Commercial
Bank of China as the US invest-
ment firm seeks to repay gov-
ernment bailout funds. Gold-
man unloaded more than 3.3
billion Hong Kong shares in
ICBC, China's biggest lender.

LONDON — A major Mid-
dle Eastern shareholder in Bar-
clays bank said it intends to sell

part of its stake — at least 1.3
billion shares — potentially tak-
ing a big profit on its seven-
month investment and sending
Barclays shares down more
than 13 per cent.

The FTSE 100 index of lead-
ing British shares underper-
formed its European counter-
parts, ending down 29.17 points,
or 0.7 per cent, at 4,477.02 as it
was dragged down by banking
stocks after a major Middle
Eastern shareholder in Barclays
PLC said it intends to sell part
of its stake, potentially taking
a big profit on its seven-month
investment. Elsewhere in Euro-
pean markets, Germany's DAX

closed essentially unchanged at
5,144.60, up an infinitesimal 1.5
point, while France's CAC-40
index was only 1.45 point lower
at 3,378.04.

Separately, activity in the UK
construction industry retreated
for the 15th straight month in
May, but the number of home
mortgages approved has risen
for the third month.

BRUSSELS — The jobless
rate in the 16 nations that use
the euro surged to 9.2 per cent
in April, the highest level in
almost a decade, the EU statis-
tics office said. The euro-zone
jobless rate has reached its high-














NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ORINDA TAMARA KATHLEEN
WILTSHIRE of #2 BACHELOR’S HOUSE, HUDSON AVENUE,
FREEPORT, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 27 day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

KEYCOVE
MANAGEMENT LTD.

——_

Fs

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of KEYCOVE MANAGEMENT LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been 1s-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GOLDEN DEWDROP LIMITED

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of GOLDEN DEWDROP LIMITED has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been 1s-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, KIRCH LEWITT
FERGUSON of Eastwood Estates, Nassau, Bahamas,

intend to my name to KIRSCH LEWITT FERGUSON.
If there are any objections to this change of name by
Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of

this notice.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

est level since September 1999,
with Spain standing out with a
18.1 per cent rate. Unemploy-
ment across all 27 EU countries
rose to 8.6 per cent in April
from 8.4 per cent in March.
Some 20.8 million people are
now seeking work in the EU.

TOKYO — Japan's bench-
mark Nikkei 225 stock average
added 26.56 points, or 0.3 per
cent, to 9,704.31, setting a fresh
eight-month high. Australia's
index added 1.6 per cent and
Shanghai's benchmark was up
0.1 per cent.

But Hong Kong's Hang Seng
lost 2.7 per cent to 18,389.08
after jumping four per cent to
an eight-month high the previ-
ous session. South Korea's
Kospi gave up early gains to
trade down 0.2 per cent amid
more concerns North Korea is
preparing to launch three or
four medium-range missiles.

CAIRO — A Saudi con-
glomerate whose billionaire
chairman is under the spotlight
by the kingdom's banking

authorities had its credit rating
knocked down several notches
to junk status by Moody's
Investors Service. The
announcement came as Saad
Group, headed by major HSBC
stakeholder Maan al-Sanea, said
it was planning an "orderly
restructuring” of some of its
companies’ debt, citing liquidi-
ty issues linked to the global
economic meltdown. The two
statements came days after Sau-
di Arabia's central bank
ordered local financial institu-
tions to freeze al-Sanea's
accounts and those of five of his
relatives, including wife and
children. Al-Sanea is listed by
Forbes as the world's 62nd rich-
est man.

ST. PETERSBURG, Russia
— Prime Minister Vladimir
Putin and Nissan Motor Corp.
president Carlos Ghosn
presided over the opening of
the Japanese car maker's first
plant in Russia, banking on the
revival of the country's car
industry despite the global
financial crisis.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

BEVELED LEDGE LTD.
—_— ¢) —_—
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BEVELED LEDGE LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

The Public is hereby advised that we, SHERRECK LAVERN
FORBES AND PIERRE RENE MONDELS of St. Charles
Vincent Street intend to change our child’s name from RAINIQUE

AAILYAH_ MCPHEE to RAINIQUE AAILYAH MONDELUS. If

there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

CORDAY LIMITED

——

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CORDAY LIMITED has been completed;

a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

NOTICE

VENUS INT’L
HOLDINGS LTD.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of VENUS INT’L HOLDINGS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

GY

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 2 JUNE 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,598.25 | CHG 0.33 | %CHG 0.02 | YTD -114.11 | YTD % -6.66
FINDEX: CLOSE 790.41 | YTD -5.32% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

Securit
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Premier Real Estate

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +

1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Previous Close _ Today's Close

100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

Change Daily Vol. Div $

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

1%
Prime + 1.75%

Prime + 1.75%

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

S2wk-Low Symbol Bid $
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 4.00
0.20 RND Holdings 0.3.

5 0.40
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

30.13
0.45

Ask $

8.42
6.25

0.55

Last Price

0.35

29.00
0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

S2wk-Low
1.3124
2.9230
1.3875
3.1821

12.2702
100.0000
96.4070

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000 1.0523

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
i

Last 12 Months Yield %

5.23

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
i

Weekly Vol. - Trading vol

EPS $-Acom

oF th
reported earings per share for the last 12 mths.

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

g price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
('S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

ALPHA MAIMA GROUP LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 of the International Business Companies Act No.
45 of 2000, ALPHA MAIMA GROUP LTD. has been
Dissolved and struck off the Register according to
the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 21st day of May, 2009.

Ziedonis Udis
Law Office Skudra & Udris
13/3 Marijas iela, Riga
Latvia
Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE

BAKER UNITED LTD.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BAKER UNITED LTD. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009

The Tribune

burger

yang!

m@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

he , it’s lunch time and

you’re in the mood to eat

A « burger- instead of chowing

r san on your typical fast food

~* “ hamburger visit the Burger

URS Laurel Soleo MeLie
get a burger with a bang.



eS

Owner Marva Thompson
serves up the traditional lunch time favourite with a
dynamic twist that leaves her customers begging for
more.

Mrs Thompson explained that she was the quality
control inspector for a major fast food chain for many
years and felt that she had gone as far as she could in the
company.

Wanting to further her love of cooking, she branched
out and Burger Barn came along late last year.

“This is a family affair, my husband, Tommy and my
two daughters Teniel and Kenea all work with me.

“T wanted to do something different, and I love to
cook and I like to experiment. I did not want to do the
traditional chicken and conch snacks so I came up with
the idea of hamburgers, but with unique toppings that
had an edge and would make people want to drive out
here for more.

“The hamburgers you get at Burger Barn are not
your regular hamburgers, the size is larger, we do not use
frozen patties, we make our own buns and the toppings
you can not get anywhere else.”

These toppings include: grilled onions, pineapples,
bacon, fried eggs, jalapenos, mushrooms, Teriyaki sauce
or conch chilli just to name a few delicious options.

Customers can choose from an eclectic list of Burger
Barn suggestions. The Sunshine Burger, one of the
most popular, is an all beef patty topped with a fried
egg, melted American cheese, bacon and lettuce and
tomatoes. Want something hotter? Try the TNT burg-
er- a beef patty topped with roasted bell peppers,
jalapenos,onions and garlic Swiss cheese and lettuce
and tomatoes Or try the Avalanche burger - spicy pork
topped with grilled pineapple, lettuce and tomatoes.

None of those strike your fancy? Then create your
own signature burger.

If yowre not in the mood for a hamburger, try the jerk
chicken or pork, escoveitch fish or Mrs Thompson’s
original conch chilli. She also offers cracked chicken or



you can create your own hamburger masterpeice.




BURGER BARN offers an ecletic array of burgers on its menu
such as the Sunshine, TNT, Bonanza or Avalanche burgers or

THE TRIBUNE















roe a

conch.
Pair any one of these entrees with French fries onion
rings, sweet potato, chili, or garlic fries or a garden sal-
ad.

And she’s not yet done searching for new items to add
to the menu.

“T will try anything on a burger, I have trusted staff
and family members who I try things out on. They are
my guinea pigs and
then we decide if we
should do it. You
won't know until you
try, | remember when
we first introduced the
pineapple, people
were reluctant, but
now they love it. I
really have not gotten
any negative feed-
back. Now that we
have so many mangos
in season, I would love
to do maybe a turkey
burger with a mango
topping on a whole-
wheat bun or maybe
something with nuts.”

The location of her
restaurant- on
Carmichael Road west of Gladstone Road has not
detracted from her business either.

“IT have customers who drive out here from
Yamacraw, they come from as far east as you can think
or as far west. Ninety per cent of my business comes
from repeat customers or word of mouth- people who
hear about Burger Barn from friends and come to try it

out.

“The hamburgers

you get at Burger
Barn are not your
regular hamburgers,
the size is larger, we
do not use frozen pat
ties, we make our
own buns and the
toppings you can not
get anywhere else.”

_—_—_—_—s=






THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2009, PAGE 9B







The Tribune

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

Over the last few weeks the }
rain has managed to place a }
damper on several outdoor }
events, and has forced many }
to opt for a weekend at home }
rather than go out and about.
However this weekend’s }
event forecast is predicting }
numerous scattered events, }
with lots of food and culture. }
So grab your dancing shoes i
and your raincoat, because }
this weekend’s entertainment
rundown is offering every- }

thing but the sun.

41. Salt Pond Long Island is

expected to be booming this
weekend when hundreds of
spectators attend the island’s
annual regatta. Over the
course of the three day cul-
tural extravaganza which
starts Thursday there will be
a plethora of activities includ-
ing the traditional boat racing,
various fairs, lots of food
stalls, parties, and much
more. To book your seat,
contact Bahamasair, the
Island Link or the Legacy
motor vessels.

2. This weekend its all
about family fun, at least

according to the organisers of

the Eleuthera Pineapple Festi-

val. The event which is spread

over a five day weekend start-
ing from today, has sched-
uled a long list of activities
including tours of some of
the island’s pineapple farms,
craft exhibits, a Junkanoo
rush out, live music, and
pineapple cooking and eating
contest. Event organisers
have also planned a ‘Pine-
athlon’ which will include a
half mile swim, a three mile
run, then a four and a half
mile bike ride. The festival
includes the island’s annual
Little Miss Pineapple pageant,
where one lucky girl will be
crowned with the esteemed
title and reign as the festival
princess. Set to take centre
stage in Governor’s Harbour
Eleuthera, this event is a sure
bet for those looking for that
drama free weekend getaway.

3. Starting today at the
Galleria Cinema JFK location,
the Bahamas International
Film Festival will launch its
month long local film series
starting with the film /Am
Not A Dummy by local film

maker Kareem Mortimer. Oth-

er movies slated for the mini-
series include Artists of The
Bahamas, Sita Sings The
Blues, and Three Seasons.
Priced at a mere $5 per per-
son, this event is expected to

draw a hefty crowd to witness

the Bahamian film making
industry at its finest. Show-
time begins promptly at
7.30pm.

4, Visit the Hub Art Centre
this Friday evening at 7pm to
learn film making techniques
form international producer
Paul H-O and Tom Donhue
from New York. The duo who
also produced the film Guest
of Cindy Sherman which was
recently premiered at the
Popop Studio, will offer view-
ers a unique look into their
early careers while revealing
some of their best kept
secrets as film makers. This
informal art/documentary film
making workshop at the Hub
on Friday, June 5 at 7 pmisa
must do for all those interest-
ed in developing as actors,
producers, and directors.

5. Thursday, stop over at
the Hard Rock Café to catch
an exciting session of the
weekly Express Yourself open
mic night. The event which
has brought in exciting per-
formers like Broken Micz,
Davineir Clarke, Baygon, and

many other artists on the rise,

is guaranteed to entertain
viewers in every way imagin-
able. Entrance is free, and
drinks are affordably priced.

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y

@ By LLOYDALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

SEEN as a newcomer to the
local music scene, Bahamian reg-
gae artist Jalam is making waves
as a force to be reckoned with as
he takes on the Bahamas and the

world through his conscious lyrics.

Born and raised in the tiny settlement of
New Bight, Cat Island, Jalam aka Jamal
Moncur began molding himself as a musician
from early on, and quickly gained local
attention for his performances in various tal-
ent competitions and school productions.

Jalam told Tribune Entertainment, that
because of his well received lyrics on the
island, it was easy to get the support of his
teachers, peers, and family for what was to
come next in his career.

After graduating high school in 1996,
Jalam moved to Nassau which for him was
the place to be for any performing artist who
wanted to make it big.

He quickly linked with local entertainers
Michael Hoyte and Ian Williams, who were
instrumental in improving his sound, image,
and his overall understanding of the local
music industry.

Explaining the platform for most of his
work, Jalam said: “Most of my lyrics are
more about social issues which are generally

things I see on the streets, crime, but are
mostly positive vibes.

“So when people hear from Jalam, they
know it’s pure niceness, crafty lyrics, so I feel
like most people that listen to me listen not
for the beat, but for what I have to say.”

Although described as a reggae artist,
Jalam said he views himself as a world beat
artist touching several genres including
dancehall, culture, rap, and even RnB.

After first hitting the industry more than
13 years ago with his singles No Mama Man,
Jah Guides, and Sufferation, Jalam has con-
tinued to give music lovers smooth rhythms
and conscious lyrics.

Staying true to his passion of producing
music with a message, Jalam has also pro-
duced a track titled HIV, which he hopes will
better educate young people on the dangers
of unprotected sex.

“It’s hurtful to see a lot of young people
catching diseases at a rapid pace, and right
now it’s intensifying. A lot of people aren’t
getting educated for what’s going on, and on
top of that I don’t see other artist really talk-
ing about it, but this is really an important
issue and I think there needs to be more
artists who are not afraid to advocate for this
cause,” he said.

With a selection of songs now on the air-
waves including World Gone Crazy and
Most High - which was produced and shoot
by F.DOT - Jalam is once again asserting
himself as a top performing Bahamian artist,
where he plans to take no prisoners on his
way to the top.

BTVI hosts Spice 2009

m@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Technical and Voca-
tional Institute’s (BTVI) Fashion and
Cosmetology Department is getting
ready to host it’s first ever Hair Show
on June 14 at the Wyndam Nassau
Resort and Crystal Palace Ballroom to
showcase its brightest student’s hair,
beauty and fashion creations.

Under the theme “SPICE- Student’s
Practical Interpretation of Cosmetic
Expression,” students will be allowed to
show off their best skills in the area of
fashion design and hair styling. There

will be eight students from the fashion
design department and 10 students
from the cosmetology department.

Assistant Coordinator for Cosmetol-
ogy at BTVI, Andrea Taylor, said
BTVI decided to have the show to
make the country aware of what stu-
dents had to offer.

“We really wanted them to show off
their creativity in their work. They will
be styling hair onstage. The first cate-
gory will be an everyday look and the
second category is an evening comb
out. This is to help them to do plat-
form work. There are a lot of areas in
cosmetology that you can go into and
one of those areas is becoming a hair

artist or hair cosmologist representa-
tive for various companies. With this
type of experience, they will get to
know how to create with what they
have,” Mrs Taylor said.

Shirley Pearson, Coordinator for
Fashion Design Production, said for
the fashion design segment, students
will be required to create high fashion
and casual wear.

“They got excited when Islands of
the World fashion week was held last
November. Since then, they have been
hyped and ready to display their work.
Most of the students are hiding their
themes but one student is doing a salt
and pepper collection in relation to the





















spices,” Mrs Pearson said.

Mrs Taylor said this show is a great
opportunity for the public to know
about the upcoming talent at BTVI.

“These students are going to be grad-
uating soon and we want to expose
their work. We really want to let the
public know that we are here in the
cosmetology and fashion department
and we are running 100 per cent,” Mrs
Taylor said.

Showtime for SPICE 2009 is 8pm.
Tickets for the event can be purchased
for $20 from BTVI, 100% Per Cent
Bible Bookstore, and Security Plus on
Village Road. Tickets will be $25 at the
door.
PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2009



ARTS

THE TRIBUNE





“Da most hansome hustla”
ee

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

SPRING 2009 brought with
it new life and new begin-
nings especially for the music
industry in the Bahamas.
Young talented Bahamians
have been producing cultur-
ally expressive music to satis-
fy a new generation of listen-

ers.

However, other young Bahamians
who left home in search of making a
name for themselves abroad musically
are beginning to return home and give
back to the industry in the Bahamas
with SINDAKID trailblazing the way
for these returning sons of the soil.

Born Dwight George Porter in
Freeport, Grand Bahama, SINDAKID
has placed himself outside of the box
immersing himself in everything from
being a rapper, writer, producer, and
actor.

“IT moved to New York when I was
17. When it comes to rapping, it was a

God given talent. I wasn’t trained or
learned how to do it-I was born with
the ability to rap. When it comes to
people I look up to in the music busi-
ness, the only person is Tupac because
I like his music-it’s real and down to
earth. I am real, I express myself 100
per cent and I don’t try to be nobody
else but who I am,” SINDAKID said.

The name SINDAKID apparently is
a spin off of the first gang in the
Bahamas dating back to the early
1980’s called SINDAKIDS.

“T basically wanted to turn a nega-
tive into a positive. It was a gang and
the majority of time gangs are always
negative. I took off the ‘S’ where it
would be SINDAKID. A gang is
organised crime or a group of people.
When I took off the ‘S’ it became one
person or basically a one man army.
When you hear the name SINDAKID,
for kids in this generation, they would
know that name for something posi-
tive. I also wanted to have a name that
no one had in New York. I wanted
something that was home based and
that no one could even think about in
America and SINDAKID was the per-
fect name,” he said.

While most young people prefer to

leave the country and never return,
SINDAKID said he had to come back,
even if he had left for over 30 years.

“This is the place where I was born
and raised, this is the place that I love
and hate. There are pros and cons-but
why not come home and let people see
my talent. In New York, I represent
the Bahamas hard and I really want to
get reacquainted with my home base
because if you forget where you come
from you can’t get where you are
going. At the end of the day, the
Bahamas hasn’t changed-it’s still the
same Bahamas basically. I am making
rounds in foreign, but the people in the
Bahamas have to know who I am too.
My new single says it all for my love of
this country called ‘I love Nassau,’
which incorporates all the islands,”
SINDAKID said.

SINDAKID has sold thousands of
copies of his latest mixtape, “The
Appetizer” world wide and has a new
mixtape called “From Bahamas to
New York,” showcasing his Bahamian
upbringing and love for his country.
With his hard core tracks and mind
altering lyrics, SINDAKID is deter-
mined to emphasise real life in his
music.

ere eee ee SSL LESS

“[’m not a gospel rapper or a person
that is going to always preach to the
people- my message is about me as a
person and people getting to hear how
Tam living, my lifestyle, what I went
through growing up and what I am
going through now. My message over-
all is to keep striving to follow your
dreams,” SINDAKID said.

Although SINDAKID resides in
New York, he said he represents the
Bahamas in everything he does and
while he is back home, he wants to get
involved in everything this country has
to offer.

“T really want to get in tune with
everything that is going on dealing
with music and the community. I
would definitely like to get involved in
anything that is like community ser-
vice, some organisations, and just give
back to the community. Even with my
music I don’t sell it the people here I
give them to the people. I want them
to embrace my music so I give it out
here for them to get to know me and
my music.”

To hear more music from SIN-
DAKID, check out facebook page at
sindakid porter or on myspace at
redragzent.

“! really want fo
get in tune with
everything that is
going on dealing
with music and the
community. |
would definitely
like to get involved
in anything that is
like community
service, some
organisations,

and just give back
to the community.”



The Bahamas Real Estate Associ-
ation (BREA) celebrated its 50th
anniversary last week May 24 -
Friday May 29. BREA was formed
in 1959 by HG Christie, Edgar
Bain, Frank Christie, D Lester
Brown, Jack Hughes and Bert L
Roberts. The objectives of the
association, as established by its
founding members were to unite
and regulate the industry, main-
tain a code of ethics by persons
in the industry and to prevent
infringements by foreign brokers
or other unauthorised persons in
the sale of real estate in the coun-
try.

On Friday evening, the associa-
tion hosted a gala black tie ban-
quet in the Crown Ballroom of the
Atlantis Resort. Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham delivered the
key note address, and Governor-
General Arthur Hanna presented
awards to long serving and dedi-
cated members of the associa-
tion. Also in attendance was Tim-
othy Kinzler, BREA’s president
liaison for the National Associa-
tion of Realtors.

Attendees danced the night away
to the music of musical legends
Count Bernadino and Ronnie But-
ler accompanied by the Extra

Band. past president Larry Roberts.



AMONG the Bahamas Real Estate Association's Past Presidents attending the Association's 50 Anniversary
Celebration Friday, May 29 at Atlantis were: (From left to right ) Garth Buckner 2003-2004 , Patrick Stra-
chan 1999-1001, Barbara Brooks 1993-1998, Geoffrey Brown Sr.; Mike Lightbourn, far right, has served
on the BREA Board almost continuously.

Keith Parker/P. S. News photos



BREA Board members with Prime Minister Ingraham at BREA 50th, May 29, 2009 at Atlantis: (from left) Lana Munnings-Basalyga; The PM: president William Wong, and immediate



BREA Administrator June Fife (centre) received a plaque from BREA at the Association's 50th Anniversary
Celebration. Governor General Arthur Hanna and Lana Munnings-Basalyga BREA’s vice president presented
the plaque.



WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009

The new
buzz

| See page nine



Try a burger

with a bang!
See page eight





@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

OUR hair is one of the first

things people notice. The

right hair accessories can do
wonders by making your hair style
all your own. Most people buy
generic accessories from the gro-
cery store and by the end of the
day someone else has the exact
_ same hair accessory, making your
x look less unique. However,
_ Cherie McCartney-
_ Gilbert has decided
to take hair acces-
sories to another
level by making
them as extraor-
dinary as her

clients.

































“| am surrounded
by a number

ot ware that
share the same
passion and have
encouraged me
to create such
hair accessories.”

“h-
=. + ,

ma



Photos taken by Vaughn Scriven



#|

Born and raised in New Providence, and a
mother of two, Mrs Gilbert has a Bachelors
Degree in International Business & Finance
and has worked in the financial services
industry for the last 13 years.

Despite this, Mrs Gilbert said she always
enjoyed being creative and working with her
hands.

“Prior to shell craft, I have done pottery
and in the last month and a half I have pur-
sued glass blowing and straw work craft. In
February of this year, I did a shell craft class
with BAIC that was taught by Mrs April
Martin-Fox,” Mrs Gilbert said.

Travelling

Due to her love for traveling, Mrs Gilbert
collects interesting and unique hand made
pieces. When it comes to her creations, Mrs
Gilbert makes it her goal to make pieces that
can be used by the individuals purchasing
them for a very long time.

“T have a passion for hair accessories
which include hair clips and I am surrounded
by a number of women that share the same
passion and have encouraged me to create
such hair accessories. Therefore, I ensure
that my creations are functional pieces that
showcase the beauty of our Bahama
Islands,” Mrs Gilbert said.

Mrs Gilbert’s hair clips can range in price
from $7 and $20. The process of making a
hair accessory is rather rigorous as Mrs

_ Gilbert explains her technique.

“First is the selection of the right
shells to express/compliment
the idea that I like or wish

- tocreate and the proper
_ cleaning of the shells to
— ensure that the beauty
_ of the shells are max-
imised. Decoration
of the hair clips is
done with the use
of a glue gun. This
process involves
making flow-
ers Or
oth-

Cherie McCartney-Gilbert

creates gorgeous hair accessories
from beautiful seashells









er shapes with the shells
while keeping in mind if this
clip will be worn by a young girl
or an adult female. In addition, I
need to keep in mind whether the
piece can be used for a casual or
dressy occasion. After I have complet-
ed the decoration process and am satis-
fied with my creation, Envirotex is used
to preserve the shells so that they are :
strong and durable and to give it a gloss
finish. Once the piece is dried, if required,
a Dremel is used to clean up any excess
Envirotex that may have hardened during
the drying process,” Mrs Gilbert said.
Most of Mrs Gilbert’s preferred shells
of choice are those shells that can be
found on the lovely beaches of the
Bahamas. These include: Keyhole
Limpet, Bleeding Tooth (Nerita
peloronta), Flamingo Tooth (Cyphoma
gibbosum), Dove Shell (Columbella mer-
catoria), small white clam shell, pink &
white clam shell, Sunrise Tellin, Tellina
radiate, zebra stripped tiger, Tessellate
nerite and whelk shells all of which can
be found in Long Island.

Inspiration

Mrs Gilbert said she also used shells
from Cat Island such as Tiger Lucina,
Donax denticulata, Faust Tellin and
Gaudy Asaphis and shells from Andros,
Bimini and New Providence.

As for inspiration, Mrs Gilbert
attributes it to God as she seeks
Him first for guidance and cre-
ativity so that she can express
herself through her shell
crafts.

“T am also inspired by the |
beautiful shells that can be ;
found throughout our beau-
tiful islands and want to

display their beauty on
creative pieces,” Mrs
Gilbert said.

Mrs Gilbert said she would
advise other young artist to
follow their hearts.

“Tf this is something that
you have a passion for then
pursue it.”



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PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Reggae star slams police after kidnap C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.157WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY WITH SHOWERS HIGH 85F LOW 77F SEEBUSINESSFRONT S P O R T S Pricing row pushes Chelsea’s threat to pull product from Super Value SEEPAGEELEVEN 59th FIFA Congress n B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A LOCAL reggae star has criticised police for not believ i ng him when his wife and child were kidnapped. Devlyn Stubbs, also known as Jah Doctrine, had left his car parked outside a down t own bank when a thief jumped in and drove off with h is wife, Sarah, and their ninemonth-old baby inside. But the 28-year-old claims his fears turned to frustration when the emergency 919 number was “repeatedly busy” and his attempts to report the crime to officers nearby fell on deaf ears. According to Mr Stubbs, four different police officers on Bay Street refused to believe his car had been stolen. Instead they suggested it had merely been towed. In the meantime, his car, which traffic had slowed down enough to enable Sarah and their baby to escape unharmed, had apparently left the area. He said when his wife jumped out of the car, she ran back to the bank with the baby and told him how their car had been stolen. She told him how she had shouted to the man to stop, but it was only when traffic stopped him that she and the baby were able to escape. “All I wanted was help in a ah Doctrine’ claims attempts to report abduction of wife and child fell on deaf ears The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com Our Nassau Office Will Be Closed On Thursday June 4th, 2009 For Our AnnualWe Will Re-Open For Business As Usual On Monday June 8th, 2009.We Apologize For Any Inconvenience Caused 2009 n B y C H E S T E R R O B A R D S B u s i n e s s R e p o r t e r c r o b a r d s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t C I T Y M A R K E T S e x p e c t s a n i n j e c t i o n o f e q u i t y c a p i t a l b y i t s m a j o r i t y s h a r e h o l d e r t o f l o w i n t o t h e 1 2 s t o r e B a h a m i a n s u p e r m a r k e t c h a i n b y m i d J u n e , T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s w a s t o l d y e s t e r d a y , w i t h r e c e i p t o f t h a t f u n d i n g g e t t i n g t h e f i r m b a c k t o i t s d i r e c t p u r c h a s i n g p r o g r a m m e . S u n i l C h a t r a n i , c h i e f e x e c u t i v e o f C i t y M a r k e t s i m m e d i a t e h o l d i n g s c o m p a n y , B a h a m a s S u p e r m a r k e t s , s a i d h e c o u l d n o t s a y h o w m u c h w a s b e i n g i n v e s t e d t o a i d i n t h e c o m p a n y s r e l a u n c h , b u t T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s s o u r c e s c l a i m e d i t t o b e i n t h e r a n g e o f $ 1 0 m i l l i o n . T h e r e i s a f i g u r e , b u t I p r e f e r n o t t o s a y i t u n t i l i n v e s t o r s h a v e a l l c o m m i t t e d t o t h e e x a c t a m o u n t , t h e n w e l l k n o w t h a t f i n a l f i g u r e , h e s a i d . M r C h i t r a n i t o l d t h i s p a p e r r e c e n t l y t h a t i n v e s t o r s i n B a h a m a s S u p e r m a r k e t s 7 8 p e r c e n t m a j o r i t y s h a r e h o l d e r , B S L H o l d i n g s , w e r e n o w d i s c u s s i n g w i t h R o y a l B a n k o f C a n a d a t h e t e r m s a n d a r r a n g e m e n t s f o r t h e n e w c a p i t a l i n j e c t i o n . A c c o r d i n g t o h i m , C i t y M a r k e t s f l o u n d e r i n g b u s i n e s s h a s a l r e a d y b e g u n t o t u r n t h e c o r n e r a n d s t a b i l i s e . H e s a i d t h e c o m p a n y h a s h a d t o r e d u c e c o s t s s u b s t a n t i a l l y b y c u t t i n g e x p e n s e s a n d h a d i n t h e p a s t m o n t h b e e n f o r c e d t o d e e p l y d i s c o u n t p r o d u c t s , s e l l i n g t h e m a t a l o s s . H e s a i d t h e c o m p a n y h a d b e e n o u t o f l i n e i n t e r m s o f t h e m a r k e t p r i c e s a n d h a v e h a d t o r e c e n t l y r e a l i g n t h e m . W e h a v e h a d t o f i x s h o p a n d w e h a v e d o n e t h a t n o w , s o w e r e j u s t w a i t i n g f o r t h e i n j e c t i o n o f f u n d s t o g o i n t o t h e p r o g r a m m e , s a i d M r C h a t r a n i . I t h i n k w e h a v e t u r n e d t h e c o r n e r a n d t h e w o r s t i s a l l b e h i n d u s a n d a t t h i s p o i n t t h i n g s a r e p r e t t y s t a b l e a n d P r i c i n g r o w p u s h e s C h e l s e a s t h r e a t t o p u l l p r o d u c t f r o m S u p e r V a l u e C M Y K C M Y K S E C T I O N B b u s i n e s s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t W E D N E S D A Y , J U N E 3 , 2 0 0 9 T H E T R I B U N E $ 3 . 7 3 $ 3 . 6 2 $ 3 . 8 2 n B y T A N E K A T H O M P S O N T r i b u n e S t a f f R e p o r t e r t t h o m p s o n @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e tAr o w o v e r p r i c i n g h a s p u s h e d a l e a d i n g w a t e r s u p p l i e r t o t h r e a t e n p u l l i n g i t s p r o d u c t f r o m t h e s h e l v e s o f a m a j o r s u p e r m a r k e t c h a i n , T h e T r i b u n ec a n r e v e a l . I n a l e t t e r s a i d t o b e s e n t f r o m t h e S u p e r V a l u e c h a i n o f s t o r e s t o a n e m p l o y e e o f C h e l s e a ' s C h o i c e l a s t w e e k , t h e f o o d s t o r e c h a i n a c c u s e d t h e w a t e r c o m p a n y o f s e l l i n g f i v e g a l l o n b o t t l e s d i r e c t l y t o c u s t o m e r s a t i t s E a s t W e s t H i g h w a y p l a n t a t a c h e a p e r p r i c e t h a n o f f e r e d t o r e t a i l e r s . T h e l e t t e r a s k e d C h e l s e a ' s C h o i c e t o c u r t a i l t h i s " d i r e c t c o m p e t i t i o n " s a y i n g t h a t i t i s n o t s u p p o r t e d b y S u p e r V a l u e . A r e s p o n s e f r o m C h e l s e a ' s C h o i c e l a s h e d o u t a t t h e g r o c e r ' s p o s i t i o n a n d d e n i e d t h a t t h e y w e r e c o m p e t i n g w i t h t h e i r r e t a i l e r s . T h e l e t t e r i n d i c a t e d t h a t a f t e r a 2 0 y e a r r e l a t i o n s h i p , t h e b r a n d w o u l d n o l o n g e r b e a v a i l a b l e i n S u p e r V a l u e s t o r e s . C o p i e s o f b o t h l e t t e r s w e r e o b t a i n e d b y T h e T r i b u n e. " I t h a s c o m e t o o u r a t t e n t i o n t h a t r e t a i l i n g b y w h o l e s a l e r s h a d i n t e n s i f i e d w i t h t h e d o w n t u r n o f t h e e c o n o m y . W e u n d e r s t a n d t h a t y o u a r e r e t a i l i n g f i v e g a l l o n C h e l s e a ' s C h o i c e w a t e r t o t h e p u b l i c f o r $ 2 . 5 0 a n d w h o l e s a l i n g i t t o y o u r r e t a i l e r s a t $ 3 . 5 0 . W e c a n n o t s u p p o r t w h o l e s a l e r s t h a t a r e i n d i r e c t c o m p e t i t i o n w i t h t h e i r r e t a i l e r s , " s a i d t h e f i r s t l e t t e r , d a t e d M a y 2 9 , b e a r i n g t h e s i g n a t u r e o f S u p e r V a l u e p r e s i d e n t R u p e r t R o b e r t s . " T h i s l e a v e s u s w i t h n o c h o i c e b u t t o i n f o r m y o u t h a t y o u n o l o n g e r h a v e t h e s u p p o r t o f r e t a i l e r s a s l o n g a s y o u p e r s i s t i n r e t a i l i n g t o t h e p u b l i c l e s s t h a n w h o l e s a l e p r i c e s . W e t r u s t t h a t y o u w i l l r e f r a i n f r o m y o u r r e t a i l i n g a c t i v i t y , " t h e l e t t e r c o n t i n u e d . A t t e m p t s t o r e a c h M r R o b e r t s f o r c o m m e n t w e r e u n s u c c e s s f u l y e s t e r d a y a s h e w a s s a i d t o b e o u t o f o f f i c e . A l e t t e r s e n t b y C h e l s e a ' s C h o i c e i n r e s p o n s e , d a t e d J u n e 2 , l a s h e d o u t a t t h e g r o c e r y s t o r e ' s p o s i t i o n a n d d e n i e d t h a t t h e y w e r e c o m p e t i n g w i t h t h e i r r e t a i l e r s . M s K n o w l e s m a i n t a i n e d a c c o r d i n g t o t h e l e t t e r t h a t C h e l s e a ' s C h o i c e a c t s a s w h o l e s a l e r , n o t a r e t a i l e r , b y s e l l i n g i t e m s b y t h e c a s e a n d b y v o l u m e i n f i v e g a l l o n b o t t l e s . " T h e f a c t t h a t w e w h o l e s a l e f r o m o u r p l a n t h a s n o t c a u s e d y o u t o s e l l a n y l e s s i n y o u r s t o r e s b a s e d o n t h e f r e q u e n c y o f d e l i v e r i e s t o y o u . A s f a r a s w e a r e a w a r e o u r b r a n d s e l l s o u t v e r y q u i c k l y , " s a i d t h e l e t t e r s i g n e d b y c o m p a n y p r e s i d e n t T i n a K n o w l e s . T h e l e t t e r s a i d t h a t l o w i n v e n t o r y o r d e r s b y S u p e r V a l u e f o r c e d c u s t o m e r s " t o c o m e t o o u r p l a n t t o p u r c h a s e w h a t c o u l d h a v e b e e n s o l d a t y o u r s t o r e s " . T h e l e t t e r a d d e d t h a t t h e o p t i o n f o r S u p e r V a l u e a l w a y s e x i s t e d t o c o l l e c t w a t e r f r o m t h e E a s t W e s t H i g h w a y p l a n t a t a p r i c e o f $ 2 . 5 0 a d d i n g t h a t i t a p p e a r s t h e s u p e r m a r k e t " i s n o t i n t e r e s t e d i n h a v i n g a r e l a t i o n s h i p w i t h t h i s c o m p a n y " . A s o f D e c e m b e r 1 , 2 0 0 8 d i s t r i b u t i o n o f C h e l s e a s C h o i c e w a t e r w a s h a n d l e d b y a f l e e t o f i n d e p e n d e n t d r i v e r s , a c c o r d i n g t o t h e l e t t e r . " W e f e e l w e s h o u l d p a s s t h e s a v i n g s t o t h e c o n s u m e r p a r t i c u l a r l y d u r i n g t h e s e d i f f i c u l t t i m e s . A p r i c e i n c r e a s e a t t h i s t i m e i s n o t b e a r a b l e . . . W e h o p e t h i s d e c i s i o n d o e s n o t c a u s e o u r e m p l o y e e s a n d t h e i r e x t e n d e d f a m i l i e s t o s h o p e l s e w h e r e a s t h e p o t e n t i a l i s t h e r e t o c r e a t e a n o t h e r u n f o r t u n a t e c i r c u m s t a n c e . " W e w i l l a d v i s e o u r c u s t o m e r s t h a t o u r p r o d u c t s w i l l n o l o n g e r b e f o u n d a t y o u r s t o r e s , " s a i d t h e l e t t e r . W h e n c o n t a c t e d f o r c o m m e n t y e s t e r d a y M s K n o w l e s d e c l i n e d t o c o m m e n t . H o w e v e r S u p e r V a l u e O p e r a t i o n s M a n a g e r K e n d r i c k M o s s s a i d h e w a s u n a w a r e o f a n y c h a n g e r e g a r d i n g a b u s i n e s s r e l a t i o n s h i p b e t w e e n t h e t w o c o m p a n i e s . " T o m y k n o w l e d g e n o t h i n g h a s c h a n g e d . . . I h a v e n ' t b e e n g i v e n t h a t d e c i s i o n , " s a i d M r M o s s . n B y C H E S T E R R O B A R D S B u s i n e s s R e p o r t e r c r o b a r d s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t A F H O L D I N G L i m i t e d , a B a h a m i a n c o m p a n y w i t h m o r e t h a n $ 4 . 7 3 b i l l i o n i n a s s e t s u n d e r a d m i n i s t r a t i o n a n d m a n a g e m e n t a n d $ 5 3 5 m i l l i o n i n a s s e t s , c o n f i r m e d y e s t e r d a y i n a r e l e a s e t h a t i t h a s a c q u i r e d A n s b a c h e r ( B a h a m a s ) L i m i t e d w i t h f u l l B a h a m a s G o v e r n m e n t r e g u l a t o r y a p p r o v a l . T h e r e l e a s e v e r i f i e d w h a t T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s h a s r e p o r t e d f o r s e v e r a l m o n t h s . A c c o r d i n g t o t h e r e l e a s e , A n s b a c h e r ( B a h a m a s ) L i m i t e d w a s s o l d b y t h e A n s b a c h e r G r o u p a s a p a r t o f i t s s t r a t e g y t o f o c u s o n i t s E u r o p e a n m a r k e t s a n d t h e M i d d l e E a s t m a r k e t s o f i t s p a r e n t , t h e Q a t a r N a t i o n a l B a n k . S o u r c e s p r e v i o u s l y t o l d t h i s p a p e r t h a t t h e A n s b a c h e r m a n a g e m e n t t e a m l e d b y m a n a g i n g d i r e c t o r M i c h a e l M a y h e w A r n o l d , h a d p r e v i o u s l y b e e n e x p l o r i n g a m a n a g e m e n t l e d b u y o u t o f t h e b a n k f r o m c u r r e n t o w n e r Q a t a r a n d h a d a l s o s e e k e d t o r e m a i n i n p l a c e t o o b t a i n a s i z a b l e e q u i t y s t a k e , a r o u n d 3 0 p e r c e n t , f r o m a n y n e w o w n e r i n t h e a f t e r m a t h o f a t a k e o v e r . H o w e v e r , i t w a s c l a i m e d t h a t t h e A n s b a c h e r m a n a g e m e n t c o u l d n o t o b t a i n a l a r g e e n o u g h b a c k e r t o u n d e r w r i t e t h e b u y o u t . T h e A F H o l d i n g s r e l e a s e s a i d , h o w e v e r , t h a t M r M a y h e w A r n o l d w i l l r e m a i n t h e c o m p a n y s m a n a g i n g d i r e c t o r a n d t h e c o m p a n y , w h e n m e r g e d w i t h A F s s u b s i d i a r y , S e n t i n e l B a n k a n d T r u s t C o m p a n y L i m i t e d , w i l l r e t a i n t h e n a m e A n s b a c h e r ( B a h a m a s ) l i m i t e d . W e a r e t r u l y d e l i g h t e d t o c o n c l u d e t h e p u r c h a s e o f A n s b a c h e r ( B a h a m a s ) L i m i t e d , a m a t t e r t h a t h a s b e e n o n o u r a g e n d a f o r s o m e w h i l e , s a i d D i r e c t o r o f A F H o l d i n g s L i m i t e d A n t h o n y F e r g u s o n . W e b e l i e v e t h i s a c q u i s i t i o n i s a n e x c e l l e n t s t r a t e g i c f i t t h a t w i l l s i g n i f i c a n t l y e x p a n d o u r p r o d u c t o f f e r i n g s a n d c a p a b i l i t i e s i n s o m e i m p o r t a n t l i n e s o f b u s i n e s s , r e s u l t i n g i n e c o n o m i e s o f s c a l e t h a t w i l l b r i n g c o n s i d e r a b l e v a l u e t o o u r c l i e n t s a n d m a k e o u r c o l l e c t i v e o p e r a t i o n s t h a t m u c h s t r o n g e r . T h e m e r g e r w i l l c r e a t e a m a j o r n e w p l a y e r i n t h e o f f A F H o l d i n g a c q u i r e s A n s b a c h e r ( B a h a m a s ) S E E p a g e 2 B n B y C H E S T E R R O B A R D S B u s i n e s s R e p o r t e r c r o b a r d s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t M A L L a t M a r a t h o n s G e n e r a l m a n a g e r s a i d y e s t e r d a y t h a t m o r e e x p a n s i o n s c o u l d b e o n t h e w a y f o r t h e p r o p e r t y , b u t l a m e n t e d t h a t c o n s u m e r t r a f f i c t h r o u g h t h e m a l l h a s b e e n d o w n y e a r o n y e a r . B o b S t e v e n s o n t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s t h a t t h e m a l l s m e r c h a n t s p a c e h a s s e e n a s e r i e s o f l o s s e s a n d g a i n s h i s y e a r , b u t h a s n o t s e e n d i m i n i s h e d i n t e r e s t i n t h o s e s p a c e s w h i c h h a v e b e c o m e v a c a n t . A c c o r d i n g t o h i m , t h e m a l l h a s u n d e r t a k e n a n a g g r e s s i v e l e a s i n g p r o g r a m m e i n o r d e r t o f i l l t h e i r v a c a n t c o m m e r c i a l s p a c e . H e r e v e a l e d t h a t M r P r e t z e l s , a n e n t e r t a i n m e n t c e n t r e a n d e a t e r y , i s e x p e c t e d t o e x p a n d i n t o a v a i l a b l e s p a c e s a n d D a i r y Q u e e n i s e x p e c t e d t o c o n s t r u c t a d r i v e t h r o u g h o n t h e p r o p e r t y . I t s s u p e r f a n t a s t i c , s a i d M r S t e v e n s o n . T h e l a s t t w o s t o r e s r e n t e d i n t h e l a s t t w o d a y s . A c c o r d i n g t o h i m , w i t h t h e o n s e t o f t h e e c o n o m i c d o w n t u r n , t h e m a l l c o m m i t t e d t o a s s i s t i n g i t s m e r c h a n t s t h r o u g h i n c r e a s e d a d v e r t i s i n g , i n c r e a s e d s e c u r i t y a n d o n e o n o n e c o n s u l t a t i o n . T h e m a l l h a s i n d e e d h e l p e d i t s m e r c h a n t s w e d o i t i n d i v i d u a l l y a n d a s a g r o u p , h e s a i d . W e b o l s t e r o u r m a r k e t i n g a n d p r o m o t i o n a l e f f o r t s m o r e s o t h a n n o r m a l a n d w e m a i n t a i n a s t r o n g s e c u r i t y p r o g r a m m e , w e m a i n t a i n i t a n d c o m m i t t o i t . S o m e m e r c h a n t s t o l d t h i s p a p e r r e c e n t l y t h a t t h e m a l l h a d n o t b e e n a c c o m m o d a t i n g w i t h m e r c h a n t s w h o m a d e l a t e r e n t a l p a y m e n t s a n d s a i d t h e i n c r e a s e d s e c u r i t y d i d n o t h i n g t o h e l p s t r u g g l i n g v e n d o r s w i t h t h e t o u g h e c o n o m i c e n v i r o n m e n t . M r S t e v e n s o n a s s e r t e d , h o w e v e r , t h a t r e n t i s a f i g m e n t o f t h e i m a g i n a t i o n a n d s a i d i t a c c o u n t e d f o r o n l y t e n p e r c e n t o f t h e b u s i n e s s e s r e t a i l o p e r a t i o n s . H e s a i d i f t h e y c o u l d n o t m e e t t h a t t e n p e r c e n t t h e n t h e y h a v e a p r o b l e m w i t h t h e i r M o r e e x p a n s i o n s c o u l d b e o n t h e w a y f o r M a l l a t M a r a t h o nS E E p a g e 2 B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B C i t y M a r k e t s e x p e c t s e q u i t y c a p i t a l i n j e c t i o n t o f l o w b y m i d J u n e B U S I N E S S BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune StaffR eporter tthompson@ tribunemedia.net POLICEhave l aunched an investigation into the case of a man who died in hospital hours after he was admit ted with multiple wounds f rom what appeared to be a knife. CollierShermark K nowles, a 33-year-old Customs security guard Man succumbs to his injuries Customs security guard dies of ‘knife’ wounds SEE page eight DEVLYN STUBBS with his wife and child. SEE page eight THEHEAVYRAIN that drenched the Bahamas recently has taken its toll on roads around New Providence. The sun may have been out yesterday, but these pot holes would have wiped the smiles from the faces of motorists. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f RAINDAMAGESROADS n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE PLP is calling for an immediate inquiry by an impartial body into the death of 15-year-old Michael Knowles in police custody on Sunday night. In a statement released yesterday afternoon the party said it is “deeply concerned” about the incident and asserted that it “would not be rea sonable nor acceptable that PLP calls for inquiry into boy’s death in police custody SEE page six IT IS claimed that two secretaries and another senior government official are among those in the Department of Lands and Surveys who are alleged to have used their positions to get Crown land grants in Abaco, Exuma, and Cat Island. Since April 19, The Tribune has published a series of articles in which sources have accused the department of corruption and nepotism. More and more information is coming out from sources within the ministry who are New Crown land grants allegations SEE page eight THE ROYAL Bahamas Police Force Band plays at the opening of the 59th FIFA congress at Atlantis last night. The two-day soccer event has never before been held in the Caribbean. SEEPAGEFIVE FIF A C ONGRESS KICK S OFFATATLANTIS F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f INSIDE SHOPPER OUTRA GE AFTER SOLOMON’S BOMB HOAX P AGETHREE CALL FOR ENHANCED MEDICAL TREATMENT ON STANIEL CAY P A GEFIVE

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n By GLADSTONE THURSTON T HE government is considering creating a n integrated credit union supervision sys tem by establishing a single regulator for the sector, Agriculture and Marine Resources Minister Larry Cartwright confirmed. “It is envisaged at this time that the Central Bank of the Bahamas will assume the regula tion and supervision of credit unions,” he toldt he Bahamas Co-operative League Limited 30th annual general meeting on May 29. “The government is cognisant that credit unions are different from banks and the peculiarities or the uniqueness of credit unions must be taken into account. “However, there is an overarching obliga tion to protect not only the stability and integrity of credit unions but the larger finan cial system as well,” said Mr Cartwright, whose ministerial responsibility includes cooperative development. Credit unions have not been exempted from the global financial crisis which has had “far reaching effects on our local economy” in the form of reduced tourist arrivals, and by exten sion lower employment and reduced income. The 2005 Co-operative Societies Act and the pending 2009 Co-operative Regulations Act both include mechanisms to bring credit union operations in line with other financial institutions and international best practices, said Mr Cartwright. This includes establishing annual continu ance of registration, improving efficiencies by imposing penalties for non-compliance with the Act, and upgrading the supervising standards of credit unions in order to comply with international best practices, said Mr Cartwright. “Regulatory reform is a challenge that is not insurmountable,” said Mr Cartwright,” and your board of directors, managers and executives must demonstrate the commitment and prudence necessary to bring these organ isations into compliance. “This could only be a good thing for your members, your credit unions and by extension the financial system of the Bahamas.” n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Well-known Bahamian poet and radio host Michael Pintard warned that political tribalism is one of the most dangerous “diseases” eating away at the country’s chances at social progress. He noted that too often, ideas put forward by talented Bahamians are not taken in the right context – simply because they don’t wear the right colour. “It is expected that we see ourselves as one important entity and unfortunately one of the greatest diseases that the Bahamas has is political tribal ism; that persons who wear red or yellow often do not see the merit of the issue or the value of somebody’s ideas except through political spectacles,” said Mr Pintard. He stressed that Bahamians must bring an end to both political and religious tribalism if they want the country to progress. “One of the greatest tragedies we face in this country is when persons who are talented and gifted and have great ideas somehow intellectually surrender unto politicians, and in some cases to ministers in the church,” he said. Mr Pintard noted that com merce is also being stifled as a result of political influence. He said that in Grand Bahama, New Providence and Abaco, prominent persons seek to block others from competing in the business sector. “You have a network of persons at the top who have predetermined that only a certain few are going to get in. And persons through political connections often set up scenarios where they can prevent others from righteously competing with them. “One of the greatest dilemmas we have in this country is that even in corporate government structures . . . while per sons might not do things that are illegal they often do things that are unethical in the execution of business, and many persons are aware of the fact but say nothing,” he said. Mr Pintard said quality of life must be improved for all Bahamians, especially for those who are marginalised and disenfranchised. He urged those who have the means to reach out to the less fortunate. “Too often we have a great imbalance, and many Bahami ans and friends of the Bahamas who reside here and are doing exceptionally well do not have a heart for service or a willing ness to reach out and truly help people. “If we are not helping to feed the marginalised and the disenfranchised, they will seek to run up on you with a 9mm or knife and they will affect the quality of life that you and I enjoy,” he warned. A 39-YEAR-OLDman was arraigned in Magistrates Courty esterday on armed robbery, weapons and kidnapping charges. Shawn Miller of Fox Hill was arraigned in Court Five, Bank Lane on one count of kidnapping, five counts of armed robbery, five counts of receiving as well as weapon and ammunitions charges. A ccording to court dockets, it is alleged that on May 28, 2009 while armed with a hand gun, Miller robbed Hamilton Dean of a brown 1995 Toyota Corolla valued at $3,500, and Andrew Dean of three cellular phones together valued at $1,290, On the same day, it is alleged, he robbed Alissa Dean of $360, Audley Dean of $1,116 and Zelma Dean of a gray Toshiba laptop valued at $1,200. Miller, who was arraigned in Court One, Bank Lane was not required to enter a plea to the armed robbery charges. H e pleaded not guilty to kidnapping Hamilton Dean. This offense allegedly took place on May 28. Miller also pleaded not guilty to possession of a 12 gauge Maverick shotgun, pos session of a smooth bore shotgun, and possession of seven live rounds of 12 gauge shotgun ammunition. He also entered not guilty pleas to the receiving charges. Miller was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. The case has been transferred to Court Five and adjourned to June 10. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE INDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News ...............................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8 Editorial/Letters..........................................P4 Sports...............................................P9,10,11 Advt .........................................................P12 BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION Business.........................................P1,2,3,4,6 Advt............................................................P5 Comics........................................................P7 Taste........................................................P8,9 Arts......................................................P10,12 Weather.....................................................P11 CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES ATLANTIS on Paradise Island continues to maintaini ts stronghold as the top resort in the Caribbean. In its summer 2009 issue, Celebrated Living, American Airline’s magazine for firsta nd business class passengers, revealed its ‘Reader’s Choice Platinum List’, naming Atlantis the top resort in the Caribbean for a 2nd straight year. Atlantis, Paradise Island, r anks high on the list highlighting American Airline’s p assenger’s top choices in cruises, spas, golf courrses and hotels. T he article’s writer Elaine Glusac descibes the list as the r anking of, ”Great hotels [that] are more than the sum of their amenities. Those that m ake lasting memories also rely on the personal touch -your favorite fruit in ther oom, your preferred newspaper with your morning cof f ee, and an of-course attitude on the part of the concierge.” Continuing to outrank its competitors, in the Caribbean hotel category, Atlantiss cored high marks over other properties such as The Ritz Carlton in The U.S. Virgin Islands and The Four Seasons in Nevis. A ccording to Celebrated Living this is why Atlantis was chosen number one:- “Who can compete with 35 restaurants and bars plus 20 million gallons of pool? Atlantis rules the sea, say CLr eaders. “Get behind the scenes a mong the resort’s 50,000 marine animals with its new “Sea Keeper” program, ort rain dolphins for a day.” One&Only Ocean Club w as also in the ranking, garnering a respectable 10th place spot. The article citedt he propry’s sporting amenities as the reason it enjoys a place on the list. One&Only aims to keep you bikini-fit with a new T echnogym virtual training system including equipment and nutritional advice.” Once again (also for a 2nd s traight year), the American Airlines quarterly luxury magazine also ranked Atlantis second in its list of T op 10 Family Resorts, with the only property getting higher marksDisney’s Grand Floridian Resort and S pa in Lake Buena Vista, Florida. “New dining plans at this water-park-mega-resort allow k ids under 7 to eat free. Kids applaud: The Jonas Brothers perform here often.” Atlantis named top hotel in the Caribbean Atlantis named top hotel in the Caribbean Atlantis named top hotel in the Caribbean Atlantis named top hotel in the Caribbean Atlantis named top hotel in the Caribbean Atlantis named top hotel in the Caribbean Atlantis named top hotel in the Caribbean Atlantis named top hotel in the Caribbean Atlantis named top hotel in the Caribbean Atlantis named top hotel in the Caribbean Resort tops ‘Platinum List’ for the second straight year AVIEW of the Royal Towers, part of the Atlantis Resort on Paradise Island. Man in court on armed robbery, weapons and kidnapping charges MINISTER of Agriculture and Marine Resources Larry Cartwright. D e r e k S m i t h / B I S Minister Cartwright encourages co-ops Political tribalism ‘eating away at chances of social progress’

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n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net B OATERS rescued three D ominican migrants who were swimming in waters off southwest New Providence near Shipwreck Cay, the Royal Bahamas Defence Force said. A nother migrant found on t he cay – which is about two miles off Saunders Beach – was picked up by Defence F orce officials during a search of the area. Officials said it is possible that the men were part of a human smuggling operation. According to RBDF press o fficer Senior Lieutenant Sonia Miller, civilian boaters were in the area of Shipwreck Cay, otherwise known as Long Cay, on Monday morning when they stumbled upon the three men swimming towards New Providence. “The boaters picked up the swimmers, who were without life jackets, just before 9am,” M s Miller said. "The men were picked up by local mariners ( Monday) morning before noon; we found the other man later Monday evening on thec ay.” Health The men, who were reported to be in good health, were t urned over to immigration officials for processing. U p to press time, no more migrants had been found and the Defence Force had no evi-d ence that a vessel might have been shipwrecked in the area. Ms Miller added that RBDF officers were conducting another search of the area yesterday, but there were no new d evelopments up to press time. It remains unclear how the men got to the cay or how long they were stranded there. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009, PAGE 3 T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong Plaza • Madeira St. Wong’s Plaza • Madeira St. Tel: (242 Tel: (242 2335 2335 Soft and durable Diversatex Soft and durable DiversatexTM TMcushion is fade and mildew cushion is fade and mildew resistant and is available in resistant and is available in blue, green or terracotta blue, green or terracotta x xChairs Chairsx xTables Tablesx xBenches Benchesx xUmbrellas Umbrellasx xLoungers Loungersx xDrinks Trolleys Drinks Trolleysx xCoffee Tables Coffee Tablesx xEnd Tables End Tablesx xCushions CushionsOutdoor Elegance Outdoor Elegance n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A popular retail store was closed d own yesterday afternoon after an anonymous female caller claimed there were four bombs inside the building. Management at Solomon’s Supercentre on Old Trail Road yesterday said it had no idea who would wantt o make such a threat – which was called in at around 12.30pm – or why. H owever, manager Dino Duncombe t old T he Tribune t he store did not take the claim “lightly” and staff and cust omers were immediately evacuated from the premises. An annoyed shopper, who wished t o remain anonymous, said her entire day was ruined by the closure of the s tore. “I don’t know why anyone would be so stupid,” she said. “Whate ver your problem is, there is no reason to act like a child, calling in a bomb scare. Anyway, whatever their issue is, I have nothing to do with it, andt hey have no right to ruin my day like t hat.” Police and fire services arrived on the scene and searched the area for any evidence that the threat was anything more than that, however they found absolutely nothing inside the s tore,” said Mr Duncombe. When The Tribune got to the store at around 1.45pm, there were about3 0 staff members gathered in the parking lot waiting for law enforcement o fficers to complete their sweep. The store was closed for about three and a half hours as a result of thep rank call. Mr Duncombe said it took some t ime for the bomb squad to arrive as they are based at the Lynden Pindling International Airport. Shopper outrage after Solomon’s bomb hoax Handgun seized after police chase; suspect on the loose In brief A police chase in southern New Providence led to the confiscation of a .45 hand-g un, but a male suspect r emains on the loose. Assistant Superintendent Walter Evans said officers from the Southern PoliceS tation were about to execute a search warrant at a home on Dunmore Avenuea t around 7am on Monday, when a man inside the house s aw the police and fled. Officers gave chase but the man escaped. During thec hase, the suspect threw away an object that was r ecovered and found to be a .45 handgun, Mr Evans said. No arrest has been made b ut investigations continue. TWO residents of Wulff R oad are in police custody in connection with the discovery of more than 60 packetso f marijuana. Officers from the Wulff R oad police station made the find after they executed a search warrant at a house in the Murphyville area. According to press liaison officer Walter Evans, theo fficers reported finding a paint can near a gas tank outside the house which con t ained 63 packets of marijua na, as well as a plastic bag c ontaining a small amount of the drug. A 33-year-old man and a 2 8-year-old woman are being questioned. Two detained after dr ugs discovered T HE man convicted of the 2007 stabbing death of the daughtet of veteran broadcaster Steve McKinney is appealing for more time to file a n appeal against his life sentence. Michael Byron Simmons, 24, also known as “Kaz”, was convicted of manslaughter in May 2008 after he decided to plead guilty to the lesser charge. He was sentenced to life in prison in July 2008 by then Acting Jus t ice Isaacs in connection with the stabbing death of Trevonne McKinney, 22. S immons was represented by lawyer Dawn Hanna at his trial. McKinney died in hospital after being stabbed multiple times in Wilson Tract on Sunday, March 4, 2007. Simmons appeared in the Court of Appeal yesterday on an application for an extension of time. The matter, however, was adjourned to September 7 as Simmons did not have an attorney present. The court will assign an attorney to him. The Court of Appeal will first have to decide on whether or not to grant Simmons an extension of time to file his appeal. Convicted killer seeks more time to appeal sentence EVACUATED staff gather outside Solomon’s Supercentre after a woman called in a bomb threat yesterday afternoon. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f Boaters rescue three Dominican migrants A 14-year-old Mackey Street boy was arraigned in Juvenile Court yesterday on housebreaking and stealing charges. The accused, who was detained by police with the teenager who was discovered dead in a cell at the East Street South Police Station Sunday night, appeared in Juvenile Court 2, Victoria Gardens. He was arraigned on three counts of housebreaking and one count of stealing. According to court dockets, it is alleged that on May 22, the 14-year-old broke into the home of Eloise Rolle on Chrysanthemum Avenue with intent to commit a felony. It is further alleged that on May 25, the accused broke into the home of Agnes Smith on Collins Avenue. There, it is alleged, he stole an assortment of personal items together valued at $2,875. It is also alleged that on the same day, the accused broke into the home of Jamal McKenzie on Gilbert Street. The juvenile pleaded not guilty to the charges and was granted bail in the sum of $5,000. The case has been adjourned to November 4. It had been expected that the young man would be charged with Michael Knowles, 15, who was discovered dead on Sunday night with a nylon cord around his neck. It is believed that the cord was fashioned from the draw-string of his trousers. Knowles was found hanging from a bar near the ceiling of his cell. While police have ruled the boy’s death a suicide, his mother Donna Wilson believes that there may be more to the story, as witnesses have told her that her son was beaten while in police cus tody. Boy, 14, charged with housebreaking, stealing INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays

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EDITOR, The Tribune. T he Bahamas belongs to all Bahamians. No Bahamian deserves to have access to land in the Bahamas more than any other Bahamian, period. Who died and left them in charge of our birthright? There is no Bahamian who is more important than any other. R egardless of how much education we have or how much money we have, we are all equal. It does not matter if you come from Bahamian royalty or come from the ghetto, we all are equal. There is no difference if you go to a cathedral or a small church over the hill through a dead end street,y ou are as equal to the big timers w ho go to churches downtown. The whole acquisition of land t hat is owned by the Bahamian people must be revisited. The pres umptuousness of anyone, regardless of who he or she might be, to give away that which does not belong to them in the first places hould be investigated, period. I a m flabbergasted how this practice was allowed to continue for so long. The suggestions that a foreigner may be in a position to d istribute or influence the distribution of Bahamian land just goes to prove how stupid Bahamians really are to even consider even imagining it. Only in the Bahamas c an a non-Bahamian sit in such a delicate position. We must be the l aughing stock of the whole world. It is almost embarrassing t o be a Bahamian. This particular position has always seemed to be held by foreigners and it is alleged that almost all of Gladstone is now o wned by foreigners. What kind of foolishness is this? Also relat ives of persons who are high up politically allegedly have been g ive large plots of land. The recent revelation of the land that was acquired and resold was just a tip of the iceberg, especially since this practice has been i n full effect since time immemorial. I personally know of many p ersons who brag after they were given large plots of Crown land.T he question I asked was, “what did they do to deserve such great f ortune?” Their answer was: “You got to be connected in high places to be able to swing that!” I am one who became very angry when I heard of the sweetl and deals that were offered to foreigners for no reason. I wond ered how and why would anyone “rape this country” giving a way the birthright of Bahami ans yet unborn. Why would we bend over backwards that far just to get a foreign investor, who comes with empty hands and givet hem thousands of acres, then allow them to use the land to acquire the financing to get their project off the ground? W hy has the idea of creating jobs be the rational way we would do what we do? It is foolish and no one can convince me that it is a wise business arrangement. But we do it and we lose almost all of the time. When are going to cease and desist this unfair polic y? When are we going to disc ontinue playing on an uneven playing field? Bahamians are getting weary of the disrespect. Howc ould a political party give away Crown Land just before electioni n lieu of favours given during the election? Politics make strange b edfellows is an understatement. Now I am forced to make a suggestion that I am sure would be acceptable by the majority of right thinking Bahamians. Sincet he land is owned by the Bahamian people, then why not take ac omplete inventory of how much land is left and distribute it evenl y to all “raw born” Bahamians. Furthermore put a stipulation in that the land cannot be sold but can only be willed to a Bahamian. Too many foreigners have benef itted from the use of our “birthright” and we get the c rumbs. How come large plots of land are approved without the i nput by the Bahamian people through a referendum? I am still sick to my stomach about the Mayaguana project. A few guys sitting in a room can conclude that Mr Foreigner can get 10,000 acres and we must just k eep quiet. This could have been shared between 10,000 Bahami a ns at an acre per person. This would eliminate the tempt ation by greedy civil servants and people in authority to deal with our land. The Bahamas must be the slackest place in the world. There is no end to corruption. W here and when will it end? Very few are off limits. These c liques that exist in the public service show that things are probably b eing shared between “members only”. It would also prevent a pastor from acquiring a large plot of land on Gladstone Road in the name o f his church and benefit from the subdivision. Furthermore why w ould a pastor stoop so low to beg for land for himself under the d isguise of the church? This would only compromises the word of God, because the publicw ould probably think that the transaction went down and they w ould probably question the integrity of the pastor. If so it would suggest that the pastor had a bandoned his mission and had now embarked on a mission to see what he could get for himself. Now, all of the land that was recently acquired under false pretenses should be retrieve and put back in the inventory. People who have got large plots should be left with the amount that they would g et if the suggestion of sharing equally is done. It is amazing how land could be taken and given in the Bahamas and nothing happens. It’s amazing, and in my opinion further solidifies our reputation as a corrupt country. It is high time for us to throw caution tot he wind and “let the chips fall w here they may” and clean up this mess, that stinks to high heave n. Those who want all should get none. We must move with h aste to kill the “all for me baby” spirit. Otherwise it would devour us all. Stop the “ripping off “of land that belongs to future gen-e rations. Stop giving away Crown l and; it does not belong to any individual regardless of his position or disposition. It is unfair that an individual could give his f riend or family our land without our permission. I am willing to work together with anyone who strongly believes that we as Bahamians a re being exploited by the well connected. This must stop, and it m ust stop now. I expect the cow ards to hide. I also expect the p eople who condone corruption to become agitated and I expect the people in authority who are hooked on power to retaliate, but if God be for you no man can be a gainst you. I am strengthened by the fact t hat good will win over evil. It must. IVOINE INGRAHAM Nassau, May, 2009. (Throughout his letter Mr I ngraham has given the impression that all Crown land transact ions have been a free gift to friends and family. This is nott rue. In all of the transactions being questioned, the land was b ought at a low price, and in a few cases was resold at a good profit. (The objection is that some Bahamians with good connec t ions can buy Crown land more easily than can Bahamians witho ut the right connections. The other resentment is that land o stensibly bought cheaply for per sonal use was, in some instances, turned into financial profit. Ed) C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm G OVERNMENT has set aside five days to debate the Budget, which Prime Minister H ubert Ingraham presented to the House last week. T he debate, which opens at 10 o’clock this morning, will continue tomorrow, resuming n ext week, Monday, Wednesday and Thursday, and continuing that night until each member has had his or her say. A lready Opposition Leader Perry Christie has condemned the Ingraham Budget as offer i ng “no blueprint for the way forward.” As Mr Christie must obviously have such a blueprint,t hese next two debating days will be a golden opportunity for him to shine. In fact, if he has a s olution to the country’s dilemma it is his duty as the leader of Her Majesty’s Loyal Opposition to share his knowledge. H e criticised Mr Ingraham’s government for its sober and “depressing” view of the economy.T he truth is there is nothing joyful, or hopeful about the economy. We are certain that the B ahamian people would prefer to know the truth, no matter how painful, so that they can tighten their belts, plant their little vegetable gardens, and hope for the best. Did Mr Christie expect the Prime Minister to pretend that he s aw a beautiful rainbow in the near future, when there is none to be seen? However, if MrC hristie does see something to which the rest of us are blind, then again it’s his duty to share his d iscovery. At least it will give relief to our gloom and doom. Mr Christie said that instead of Mr Ingraham hoisting the white flag of surrender, he should present a plan for developing agriculture and fisheries, improving the financial s ervices sector and meeting the challenge facing the tourism industry. W e now see far more activity on the agri cultural front than we saw during the Christie a dministration. While The Tribune has published photographs of BAIC chairman Edison Key showing off the magnificent produce of farmers, all the news that BAIC made during the Christie years were allegations of misuse o f funds, political victimisation in dealing with staff, and the disgraceful Korean fishing boat s candal. In those years Mr Christie was so pre-occup ied with keeping his minister and BAIC chairman from each others throats that he had no t ime to use his creativity to inspire the farmers. As for the financial sector, it seems government is struggling with a difficult situation to prevent these islands being completely shut offt o investors. As for tourism, there is not much that one can do when potential visitors haven’t money to travel. Tourist officials are using their budget to tap as many markets as they can. We are now fortunate to be hosting the 59th FIFA conference at Atlantis. And later this year this country will host the Miss World Beauty p ageant. But, it is true, while all of those associated with tourism are out there fighting for e very tourism dollar they can get, Bahamians will not see a steady flow of tourists until theg lobal economic crisis eases. No matter how much Mr Christie tries to inspire Bahamians t o use their “ingenuity and creativity” to jump start tourism, this is one problem he cannot solve. N o one is happy that workers’ terms and conditions of service have to be changed and t hat nurses, doctors and teachers cannot get their promised health insurance at the presentt ime. However, there is nothing that one can do if the money is not there. W ould Mr Christie recommend that Mr Ingraham maintain the status quo and drain the Treasury, or put the brakes on now to at l east try to keep the nation afloat should the present hard times become even harder. MrI ngraham has been very frank with the people. A slowdown in business, a slowdown in tourist a rrivals and investments, translates into no mon ey to meet obligations. It is as simple as that. If Mr Christie can solve the dilemma, then he will have plenty of time to explain himself to the nation in the next five days. W e know we shall hear all about the investment contracts that were held up by the Ingra h am administration when it became the government in 2007. Mr Ingraham wanted to scru t inise all the contracts, because it was felt that in some of them too much of the people’s land was being given away. Mr Christie has blamed the Bahamas’ economic slowdown on this holdup. However, these were investors a pproved by the Christie government. If these investments were so important why didn’t the C hristie government finalise them during its administration and at least get them started s ome of them could have been completed before the 2007 election. Maybe, Mr Christie will tell us why his government did not complete these agreements before the 2007 election. Were they held up because Mr Christie did not want t hem to become an election issue if Bahamians were to question the generous concessions? O bviously, the PLP was confident it would be returned to power, and the agreements could be s igned after the election without the people having a voice in their own affairs. B ut the PLP lost the government. The Ingra ham government went over the agreements and made changes. The global crisis descended before they were finalised. M r Christie did not give the green light for them to go ahead, nor did Mr Ingraham. Now Mr Ingraham is being blamed for scuttling the economy. Maybe within the next five days, Mr Christie, if he had such confidence in these projects, will explain why he did not complete the paperwork for them before 2007? Crown land for everyone LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Perry Christie’s chance to shine EDITOR, The Tribune. In response to numerous letters and articles by Mr Rick Lowe and The Nassau Institute I have felt compelled to write this letter. Over and again Mr Lowe praises the supposed benefits of unfettered capitalism and seems to echo the neocon position which, distilled to its essence, favours the wealthy and generally scorns the less fortunate members of society. Has Mr. Lowe read the book “The Shock Doctrine” by Naomi Klein? Mr Lowe and The Nassau Institute should inform the Bahamian public about the financial model upon which our economy is based. Tell the people about the ideas of the late Sir Stafford Sands and of our continuing dependence upon tourism and banking in a rapidly chang ing world. Make sure that readers understand that our financial system is designed to protect wealthy depositors from many countries. Don't forget to mention that the continuing dependence of government upon a regressive tax like customs duty is intended to delay the introduction of an income tax which the wealthy seek to avoid at any cost. Please note that politicians no longer address the real issues such as rapid population growth, severe traffic congestion, importation of cheap labour, under funded public health and overloaded public education systems, etc. Point out that as long as the Public Treasury depends upon customs duties levied upon imports there can be no serious effort to limit the importation of automobiles and no effective way to reduce congestion on the roads even when certain quiet residential streets are converted into highways. The idea of unemployment insurance seems to terrify Mr Lowe. However, if he found himself suddenly unemployed perhaps he would not be so critical of a system that is widely used in many coun tries. Of course there exists the risk of abuse of the system but that risk already exists with customs and National Insurance as well. Full blown socialism is on display in Cuba, a country I have visited on several occasions. Since I speak Spanish fluently and have read Cuban history in both English and Spanish (the official and the unof ficial versions) and have been to places off the path of the average tourist, I have to admit that I cannot see myself living under such a system. However, The Nassau Institute and Mr Lowe should be honest enough to point out that democratic socialism exists in Europe, espe cially in the Scandinavian countries where the electorate decided after World War II that a system of high taxation by which a wide range of social programmes would be funded was necessary in order to establish a society in which it is very difficult to become rich and even more difficult to end up bankrupt and living on the street as a result of being unable to pay medical bills. Perhaps Mr Lowe has seen the film “Sicko” by Michael Moore and any number of documentaries on the topic presented by PBS and cable TV. Let us recall that the world economy is in considerable dif ficulty at present as a result of unfettered and largely unregulated capitalism which feeds off human greed and selfishness. Obviously it is necessary to find a middle ground between two extremes and that is where we require enlightened leadership with ideas that transcend petty personal and party interests. AVID READER Nassau, May 26, 2009. Enlightened leadership needed

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THE 2009 FIFA congress will inject “a great deal of money” into the Bahamas economy, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister said. The two-day event, which has never before been held in the Caribbean, began yesterday at the Atlantis Resort on Paradise Island. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham delivered the opening address. “We are extremely pleased that FIFA chose the Bahamas as the site for its congress, and for the announcement of the site of the next World Cup, the world's largest sporting event,” Minister Bannister said. “The benefits of the hun dreds of FIFA delegates visiting our country and occupying hundreds of hotel rooms will certainly make a difference for many Bahamian families this summer and will place us squarely in the world's eye as the place for sports tourism. “We have delegates coming from more than 100 countries – and these are not just coaches and ath letes,” Mr Bannister said. “Several of them are multi-millionaires and others are very wealthy peo ple. "They are going to be here for about a week and they are going to be spending a lot of money in our country and you are going to see that reflected.” Mr Bannister hailed FIFA as "the most powerful and presti gious sporting organisation in the world." The last World Cup attracted an audience of more than 600 million. “That is much more than any Super Bowl,” he said. “Foot ball (soccer around the world as 'the World’s Sport’.” In preparation for the congress, 10 tons of material were transported from FIFA headquarters. More than 5,000 hotel nights have been reserved and about 100 journalists accredited for an event. Mr Bannister referred to FIFA president Joseph Blatter, whom he met at Lynden Pin dling International Airport on May 26, as “the most powerful man in sports in the world”. “We are pleased to have him in the Bahamas," said Mr Ban nister. "We are going to do everything we can to ensure that they have a good time, that they enjoy their stay to the fullest, and that they want to come back. “It is very critical that we let everybody know what a wonderful country we have, what friendly people we have, and that this is a place where they are welcome.” Delegates will receive “redcarpet” treatment and some of them will arrive in celebrity style, said Mr Bannister. SEE STORYTOPLEFT C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009, PAGE 5 I N THE wake of a series of medical emergencies on and around Staniel Cay, a concerned citizen has called for the government to enhance the level of medical treatment available on thei sland. In a letter to The Tribune , a resident of the island said numerous emergencies – some of which resulted in death – and the fact that several tourism developments are located int he area, make it vital that healthcare is improved. “We really need this matter investig ated and resolved immediately because the summer is approaching,” h e added. However, MP for the area Anthony Moss told The Tribune no complaints a bout the medical resources on the island have been brought to his attention up until now. Messages left for the local a dministrator and Health Minister Hubert Minnis were not returned up to press time. According to the resident, recent medical emergencies on the island included: ay achting accident which left a tourist with a broken back; a stabbing accident on FarmersC ay which resulted in a death; a broken leg suffered by a seven year-old b oy who fell from a dock; a fall from a bicycle which left a five-year-old with a face wound which needed stitches; a nd a heart attack suffered by a local man. “These are just a few of the many accidents that occur here and as you can see theya re very serious,” said the letter. While medical emergencies on Staniel Cay are supposed to be attended to by a local nurse, the resident claimedt hat she has left the island for six weeks and no replacement has been arranged. E ven when the nurse is in place, he said, one person is not enough to deal w ith all medical emergencies. “Staniel Cay is a very busy little island where lots of tourists travel to . . . We have a Sandals resort about one mile away and some huge building projects on the neighbouring cays as well as here on the island. There is also the Staniel Cay Yacht Club, Sampson CayC lub and Marina and Compass Cay Marina that accommodate thousands of tourists yearly and yet we have absolutely no emergency services on the island,” he said. It was further claimed that two peop le living on the island who have medical qualifications have offered to help treating injuries, but are now being turned away by the government.” “It is embarrassing . . . we have a w onderful professional couple here who are willing to help,” said the resident. Call for enhanced medical treatment on Staniel Cay P RESIDENT THE FEDERATION OF INTERNATIONAL FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION (FIFA C ities Names, at Atlantis. Pictured, from left, are President of the Brazil Fed eration Ricardo Terra Teixeira, FIFA President Blatter and FIFA Secretary General Jerome Valcke. Among the cities named for the games include Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo and Brasilia. FIFA Congress to bring ‘a great deal of money’ Patrice Ann Johnson Desmond Bannister Dr Hubert Minnis Bahamian made video at FIFA opening In brief THE delegates of the Federation of International Football Associations weret reated to a thrilling video s hot in the Bahamas when the 59th FIFA congress opened yesterday afternoon. Swiss Production Compan y VisualPark hired Bahamian production manager Heather Carey to putt ogether a local crew and talent to star in the video. Locations featured in the f ilm included Festival Place, Parliament Square, the steps of Frederick Street,A rawak Cay, the Pirates of Nassau Museum and the N ational Art Gallery of the Bahamas. The local crew included a ssistant director Charles Smith, who is well known to B ahamians as the host of the show Electric Air and the director of Baha-Menv ideos. Julian Lord worked as k ey grip with Antionne and Vaughn Rolle serving as grip assists and AprylW eech worked as a stylist and hair and makeup coordinator. The stars of the show were 15 children betweent he ages of 5 and 12, who represented the Bahamas and other countries. n SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico A YEMENI detainee at G uantanamo Bay has died of an "apparent suicide," U.S. military officials announced Tuesday, according to Associated Press. The Joint Task Force that runs the U.S. prison in Cuba s aid guards found 31-year-old Muhammad Ahmad Abdallah S alih unresponsive and not breathing in his cell Monday night. In a statement issued from Miami, the U.S. military said the detainee was pronounced dead by a doctor after "exten s ive lifesaving measures had been exhausted." T he Yemeni prisoner, known as Al-Hanashi, has been held w ithout charge at Guantanamo since February 2002. Military records show he was about 31. His is the fourth apparent suicide at Guantanamo. The U.S. military says the remains will be autopsied by ap athologist from the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology. The prisoner appears to have joined the long-running hunger strike at Guantanamo, accord ing to medical records previously released by the military in response to a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit filed by The Associated Press. His weight was down to about 86 pounds (39 kilograms in December 2005. He weighed 124 pounds (56 kilograms when he was first taken to Guantanamo in February 2002. A prison spokesman, Navy Lt. Cmdr. Brook DeWalt, con firmed the incident but declined to discuss further details on how the Yemeni man committed suicide and whether any family members have been contacted. DeWalt declined to say whether procedures have changed at the prison as a result of the apparent suicide. Militar y: Gitmo detainee dies of apparent suicide Share your news The T ribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Dear Shareholders, As many ofyou are aware, Grand Bahama continues to struggle economically as does the rest ofthe world as we all go through the present global recession. These challenges are in every industry here on the island whether you are in tourism, banking, retail or any other business. The outcome ofthese tough economic times has resulted in many companies having to severely trim their expenses and staffto stay afloat under the present circumstances. Itis true that at FCC, we too have been severely impacted by the present economic conditions. However, there is a ray ofhope for us in that some of our challenges are a bit different in that we are still experiencingadditional customer demand which we need to fill with our products and services. Unfortunately we are reporting a loss in the 2ndquarter of$521k. Both the Home Centre and the concrete division lost money in the 2ndquarter due to a reduction in sales of20%at the Home Centre and 37%at the concrete division over the same period last year. Therefore, based on the declining sales and the resultant losses, we took the very difficult butnecessary step in March oflaying off22people in the company.The redundanciesand one early retirement costs totaled $195k and we have recorded this as a one time expense in our 2ndquarter financials. The resultant savings in payroll costs for the company will be about $130k a quarter and we will see these savings reflected in our 3rdquarter financials as a result ofus recording the redundancy costs of$195k in our 2ndquarter financials. The drop in concrete sales is a result ofa number offactors,which not only include the present economic conditionsbut also the additionofmore competitors in the marketplace and our limited productofferingsto our customers. Therefore, we havenowtakenproactive steps to improve our concrete sales and gain additional market share. Recently, we were able to purchase a Columbia Model 22 block plant from Florida Block in Miami and we are forecasting that this plant will be operational by the end ofthis month so that we can start selling concrete blocks in early June 2009. We are confident that once we start producing quality blocks, this will enhance our customer offerings and we will see our revenues at the concrete plant increase as we will nowbe able to offer, not only concrete, but also concrete blocks to the contractors on Grand Bahama. Further, we believe this strong competitive move, will increaseour sales revenues at the Home Centre,as we will nowbe able to offer special pricing to our contractors that are prepared to purchase concrete, concrete blocks and building supplies from us. In essence, we will position the company as the one stop shop for construction supplies in Grand Bahama. In addition, the recent hiring ofMartin Foody as our concreteplant manager, who is also overseeing the assembly ofthe block plant,is impacting positively on improving the quality ofour concrete and regaining concrete business lost in the past to our competitors. Based on the above, we expect that despite there being a lack ofvery large construction projects in Freeport we will still be able to report a profit in the last four months of this fiscal in the concrete division. As mentioned earlier our sales revenues at the Home Centre in the 2nd quarter ofthis fiscal are down20%over the same period last year, however our general and administration expenses have been managed very carefully and allowing for the redundancy costs we have again been able to further reduce themby13% over the same 2nd quarter period last year. Even though we have continued to manage our expenses, our inventory levels have dropped and it is nowseriously affecting our sales revenues at the Home Centre. As mentioned the significant reduction in payroll costs will improve the bottom line, free some cash constraints in the future and help to assist in obtaining inventory which is the critical fuel to produce revenues. We will need though to strive diligently to maintain the necessary levels of inventory that are required to drive sales and grow our business. However, on a positive note, we continue to see over and over again, that the demand for our products and services from our many loyal customers continues to remain strong and if we can maintain the monthly sales revenue targets at the Home Centre we should report profitability based on the current payroll and operating expenses. We are expecting that the significant cost saving steps that have already been implemented, coupled with the production of concrete blocks, giving us a new source of revenue, will assist us in surviving through these tough economic times. Ray Simpson Chief Executive Officer May 19th, 2009 F F r r e e e e p p o o r r t t C C o on n c c r r e e t t e e C C o o m m p p a a n n y y L L i i m m i i t t e e d d Consolidated Statement of Operations Three months ended February 28, 2009 with comparative information for 2008 Outstanding shares = 4,708,334 ( Expressed in Bahamian dollars) 3 months ended 3 months ended 2 8-Feb-09 2 9-Feb-08 Sales 2,638,548 3,492,105 Cost of sales 1,956,915 2,557,881 G ross profit 6 81,633 9 34,224 Payroll costs 509,404 496,815 Redundancy costs 195,000 0 O ther operating costs 2 00,983 2 18,702 Rent expense 105,600 115,518 Advertising expense 10,247 19,313 U tilities expense 8 5,871 9 2,179 1,107,105 942,527 Income/(loss d epreciation and amortisation ( 425,472) ( 8,303) Depn. and amort. expense (55,580 (67,127 N et financing income/(expense ( 40,522) ( 33,557) Net income/(loss (521,574 (108,987 F F r r e e e e p p o o r r t t C C o o n n c c r r e e t t e e C C o om m p p a a n n y y L L i i m m i i t t e e d d C onsolidated Statement of Operations Six months ended February 28, 2009 with comparative information for 2008 Outstanding shares = 4,708,334 ( Expressed in Bahamian dollars) 6 months ended 6 months ended 28-Feb-09 29-Feb-08 Sales 6,063,578 7,238,994 Cost of sales 4,603,725 5,280,061 Gross profit 1,459,853 1,958,933 P ayroll costs 1 ,008,933 1 ,019,028 Redundancy costs 195,000 0 Other operating costs 380,857 430,636 Rent expense 209,400 254,469 A dvertising expense 1 7,640 4 4,580 Utilities expense 181,214 183,375 I ncome/(loss depreciation and amortisation (533,191 26,845 Depn. and amort. expense (126,587 (139,780 Net financing income/(expense (81,820 (69,716 Net income/(loss (741,598 (182,651 F F r r e e e e p p o o r r t t C C o o n n c c r r e e t t e e C C o o m m p p a a n n y y L L i i m m i i t t e e d d Consolidated Balance Sheet As at February 28, 2009 28-Feb-09 August 31,2008 (Unaudited (audited Assets Cash 19,035 48,530 Accounts receivable, net 720,149 607,011 Inventories 1,283,181 1,672,262 Inventories of spare parts and supplies 96,178 82,970 Deposits and prepaid expenses 69,773 67,142 Total current assets 2,188,316 2,477,915 Fixed assets 4,162,840 4,115,724 Total assets 6,351,156 6,593,639 Liabilities and Shareholders' Equity Bank overdraft 1,972,479 1,841,481 Accounts payable and accrued expenses 3,513,413 3,039,007 Warranty Provision 5,000 5,000 Current portion of long term debt 134,604 183,857 Total current liabilities 5,625,496 5,069,345 Long term debt 57,036 Shareholders' equity: Share Capital 47,083 47,083 Contributed surplus 5,774,868 5,774,868 Appraisal excess 1,433,867 1,433,867 Retained earnings (5,788,559 (5,788,559 Current earnings (741,598 Total equity 725,661 1,467,259 Total liabilities and shareholders' equity 6,351,157 $ 6,593,640 the police should investigate itself.” Michael Knowles, 15, was found dead in his police cell at around 8.21p m Sunday. Officers at the East Street S outh Police Station reportedly found the teenager hanging from an upper bar with what is believed to be a drawstring from his shorts around his neck. While police have ruled his death a suicide, Knowles’ mother Donna Wil-s on, 33, claims that police reports do not add up. According to Knowles, two witnesses who were at the stationc laimed that her son had been brutally beaten by police. M rs Hanna Martin said: “The public statements of his mother raise serious questions which are at odds with theo fficial statements emanating from police. The law provides for the manner in which a minor is to be arrested detained and interrogated by police and while in police custody. Given these facts and because it is funda-m entally important that there is public confidence in the exercise of police powers, an immediate inquiry by an impartial body must be established by the Government to investigate thec ause of death of this minor.” The party chairman and MP for Englerston said she will be asking questions of the Minister of National Security relative to the terrible tragedy in parliament tomorrow. T he party’s statement comes as Ms Wilson says she is anxiously awaiting the results of an autopsy on her son’sb ody. The single mother of five said that b ased on those results, she could take legal action against the police force but added that her family would “crosst hat bridge when we get there.” The Tribune office was inundated w ith callers expressing their concern over the allegations of police brutality. PLP calls for inquiry into boy’s death in police custody MICHAEL KNOWLES’M OTHER Donna Wilson, 33, claims that p olice reports do not add up. F ROM page one n FERNANDO DE NORONHA, Brazil AN AIRPLANEseat, a fuel slick and pieces of white debris scattered over three m iles of open ocean marked the site in the mid-Atlantic on Tuesday where Air France Flight 447 plunged to its doom, Brazil’s defense minis-t er said, a ccording to Associated Press. Brazilian military pilots spotted the wreckage, sad r eminders bobbing on waves, in the ocean 400 miles (640 kilometers) northeast of these islands off Brazil’s coast. The plane carrying 228 people van-i shed Sunday about four hours into its flight from Rio de Janeiro to Paris. “I can confirm that the five k ilometers of debris are those of the Air France plane,” Defense Minister Nelson Jobim told reporters at a hushed news conference inR io. He said no bodies had been found and there was no sign of life. The effort to recover the d ebris and locate the allimportant black box recorders, which emit signals f or only 30 days, is expected to be exceedingly challenging. Debris confirms crash of Air France Flight 447

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F REEPORT lawyer Maur ice Glinton told members of The Nassau Institute last week that freedom in the Bahamas was threatened by judges who are politically compliant, unaccountable to the public, and acquiescent in their own abuse. Glinton has degrees in law, e conomics and international relations, and has written extensively on constitutional law and law reform. He is best known for suing the government In 2003 (with fellow lawyer Leandra Esfakis) over measures that parliament enacted eight years ago affecting the confidentiality of l awyer-client relations. That action was subsequently taken over by the Bar Council and remains in limbo. A ccording to Glinton, the judiciary is as important to good gov-e rnance as are the legislative and executive branches, and freedom i s seriously diminished by the lack of respect for judges: "If our judi c ial system cannot carry out its role that is reason for concern thatt he government is not perform i ng with the public interest in mind, which puts liberty and com-m erce at risk." But this failure may also reflect t he "misplaced loyalties" of judges themselves, he said. As the wield e rs of power judges must be fully accountable. And he dismissedc laims that judges are not politi cally influenced as "weak protestations in the face of the obvious." In his view, one of the chief reasons for the lack of judicial inde p endence in the Bahamas is the process by which judges are r ecruited. "I know more about judges in t he US than I do about those in the Bahamas, who are faceless," he said. "We need a process that forces judges to be accountable, and I am not talking about simply m aking a report to parliament. It is the inner strength of judges that a lone can save the judiciary. We need a mandated procedure for j udicial appointments." Such a process would seek to take politicos out of the equation. Currently, the chief justice and the appeal court justices are cho s en by the prime minister, after consultation with the leader of the o pposition. Other judges there can be as many as 12 on the S upreme Court are selected by the Judicial and Legal Service Commission. The commission is chaired by the chief justice and includes a nother judge of his choosing, as well as the chairman of the PublicS ervice Commission and two members picked by the prime m inister after consultation with the leader of the opposition. This archaic arrangement gives far too much power to the executive and stands in stark contrast to the cur rent state of affairs in the United Kingdom. The British chief justice is now appointed by a panel convened by the Judicial Appointments Commission, a genuinely independent body that selects judges on merit from the widest range of eligible candidates. The 15 commissioners are drawn from the judiciary, the legal profession and the lay public, and their procedures for selecting judges are public and transparent. Politicians are excluded from the process. But Glinton says Bahamians are "uneasy" about taking responsibility for our own affairs: "We have 1,000 lawyers yet we are still beating about the Eastern Caribbean for judges. We should not leave our most cherished possessions in the hands of people who are here today and gone tomorrow. And if we remain silent on this there will be no change and the country will con tinue to deteriorate." He added that "Judicial inde pendence depends ultimately on how judges repel any attempts against this independence. The truth of the matter is that judges in the Bahamas are too often perceived as compliant and acquiescent in their own abuse, even to the point of tolerating in their m idst some who are legally and morally unsuitable for the third branch of government." Such matters are critical to the r ule of law, he said. Political thinkers have long argued that checks and balances between separate branches of government are vital to prevent abuse of power, av iew shared by John Marshall the great 19th century jurist who defined the American legal system. It was Marshall who declared t hat "the only security against the a buse of power is found in the s tructure of government itself." A ccording to Glinton, a truly i ndependent judiciary can only be achieved through accountability, a nd judges should be subject to public scrutiny in the Bahamas as t hey are in the United States. And it is important to recruit Bahami-a n judges in order to prevent the j udiciary from becoming a nonB ahamian "ward" of the other b ranches of government. "Accountability requires openn ess of process, beginning with a mandated procedure for carrying o ut selections," he said. "We have judges but no judicial system.T here is a lack of leadership the chief justice should be out on a l imb making the case. There are few Bahamian judges today because we don't respect our judges." Although couched in academ i c language, there is much wisdom in what Glinton had to say. And w e ignore these issues at our per il. I can think of three possible r easons for the mind-numbing inertia of the political class in this context. One, they don't understand. Two, they understand but want to keep things as they are b ecause it suits them. Three, they understand and want to make c hanges but lack the political cov er or will to do so. P erhaps one lesson from his tory will suffice to encourage Bahamian judges and lawyers to step up to the plate. In 1832 Chief Justice Marshall ruled in favour o f sovereignty for the Cherokee Indians, but President Andrew J ackson simply ignored the deci sion and proceeded to ethnically c leanse Indians from the American states. Yet despite this massive and tragic system failure in a new nation, Marshall was able to establish the Supreme Court’s powers of judicial review as thef inal arbiter of the constitution. And today he is credited with c ementing the judiciary as an influential branch of government. The onus is on Bahamian lawyers to take up the challenge here and ensure an independent and accountable judiciary. Are they up to the task? Cable Bahamas and Compulsory Licensing W hen we told critics of Cable Bahamas to put up or shut up last week, some readers pointed to the company's supposed theft of programming from American providers. But this is really a bilateral trade dispute. It all dates back to 1995 when CBL began servicing households on New Providence. Cable Bahamas is on one side of the copyright issue and the US-based Television Association of Pro grammers an industry group representing more than 30 US pay television channels in the region is on the other. But the real argument is between the Bahamian and American governments. The dispute arose because CBL couldn't get the commercial rights to some 60 per cent of its US-originated programming. Those rights were simply not available to a tiny English-speak ing territory in this largely Span ish-speaking region because the c opyright owners couldn't be bothered to negotiate them. But over the years the programming that is still in dispute has dwind led to about 7 per cent of the total mostly HBO movies. This circumstance must be viewed in the context of the market that existed during the mid-1 990s, when practically every Bahamian household had a satellite dish that was already pirating American signals. This was also t he case in other countries that c ould receive US satellite signals. I n an effort to regularise the m arket, the Bahamas passed a c opyright law in 1998 which provided for compulsory licensing of T V signals under international convention. This meant that the c ontent could be re-transmitted by an operator licensed within theB ahamas without the consent of t he foreign-based copyright owne r. However, the content provider r etained the right to be paid for that use. T he 1998 law created a copyright royalty tribunal (currently c omposed of lawyer Kirk Seymour, artist Stan Burnside anda ccountant James Gomez) to deal with the compulsory licensing i ssue. This tribunal collects roy alties in order to make appropri ate payments to copyright own ers when there are claims. And over the years, CBL says it has c ontributed some $70 million to this fund. T he dispute came to a head in 2000 when the Bahamas reached a n agreement with the US to cor rect "deficiencies" in the copy right law. Of particular concern to the programmers were provisions for the compulsory licens i ng of premium, encrypted cable television programming in the B ahamas. They also complained about inadequate compensation r ates for re-transmissions to hotels and other commercial enterprises. Under this bilateral agreement, our government committed to make the cable compulsory l icense more palatable to the programmers. It took four years to e nact these changes, which led to the Bahamas being removed from a US watch list. But the amendments were never actually implemented and the programmers continue to urge the US government to support their cause. "Restrictive legislation by the Bahamian government, coupledw ith a possible domino effect that could occur in other Caribbean c ountries, could result in a loss of approximately $250-$270 million in annual programming revenue for US pay television companies," the programmers argued earlier this year. "We strongly believe the Bahamas merits (a engagement due to its egregious lack of protection of US intellec tual property, and specifically for its actions to institutionalize the theft of US films and pay televi sion programming through its compulsory license." If the amendments to the copy right act were to be implemented, they would limit the scope of the compulsory license to the "unal tered re-transmission of free, overthe-air broadcast signals and would not permit re-transmission of encrypted signals or extend to re-transmission over the Internet." Both the Christie and Ingraham administrations have refused to implement the 2004 amend ments until the commercial needs of Cable Bahamas for Englishspeaking content are met. As part of the 2000 agreement, the US promised to “encourage” American rightholders to negotiate these licenses, and the US has so far not acceded to the programmers' lobbying to put the Bahamas back on the watch list. According to a CBL spokesman, "we will buy the commercial rights if the pro-g rammers will sell, but Caribbean demographics are mostly Spanish so rights are often only available for Spani sh programming. To operate successfully we need English language programming, and we were the first in the region to seek those rights. Over time weh ave obtained most of them." The plain fact is that compulsory licensing is 100 per cent legal in the Bahamas, and it is a p ractice that is internationally accepted. Cable Bahamas attempts to deal with this issue every year in Washington, but as the spokesman put it: "We are just a pimple on the back-s ide of the industry." It is also worth noting that CBLs main competitor Direct TV satellite television i s in the same position locally and has thousands of Bahamian subscribers. Cable's pricing for subscriber services matches that of Direct TV. For the record, we were mistaken in saying that CBL planned to buy out Phil Keepi ng's controlling stake in the company. Keeping (the Canadian who launched Cable Bahamas in 1994) sold out to another Canadian-led group in 2004. It is this group that Cablep lans to buy out now. But the key point remains the buy out will make CBL 100 per cent Bahamian owned and cont rolled. It is now mostly owned by Bahamian shareholders, but boardroom control rests with the Canadian group (Columbus Communications). What do you think? S end comments to larry@tribunemedia.net Or visit www.bahamapundit.com C M Y K C M Y K THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009, PAGE 7 Maurice Glinton and the accountability of judges A REAL estate professional in the US recently coined the term “Price Denial Syndrome,” a troublesome condition that afflicts sellers having a hard time facing the realities of today’s markets. Of course it’s difficult to make a pricing concession, but an overpriced home simply will not sell. Perhaps the sellers argue that they really need the money, but then they have to ask themselves what they’ll do for money if the home doesn’t sell. Maybe they figure that they can shoot for the moon now and reduce the price later if they must. However, the longer a property remains unsold, the more likely it is that even more price reductions will follow. Then it’s taken even longer to get a sale at a lower price. Some sellers might suggest trying a higher price just for the first two weeks, but that’s when the interest of serious buyers is always greatest. Those buyers usually look within a certain range, and won’t even make an offer at all on an overpriced proper ty. Most importantly, if the sellers need to buy another home, time is of the essence. If the sale takes too long, they’ll be buying at a time when prices and interest rates may begin climbing again. If you’re suffering from PDS, pay attention to the news, review your home’s Competitive Market Analysis, and call me in the morning! TIME FOR A HOUSE CALL Bahamas r eal estate today Carmen Massoni

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE time of crisis, but instead (police a pproached me as if I’m automatically the problem,” said Mr Stubbs. “Their attitude should be ‘Sure I’ll help you,’ not ‘You’re lying to me’,” added the father, noting that he lodged a formalc omplaint in the wake of the incident. According to the singer, the first officer h e encountered caught up with him as he ran up and down near the area where h e had parked his car, trying to “find anyone who might have seen anything.” “He rode towards me (on a bike s ort of aggressive way and was like, ‘What are you doing?’ He came on like he was j ust accosting me rather than trying to see what’s up,” said the father. With this officer then failing to believe t hat the 28-year-old’s car had been stolen, Mr Stubbs said he continued on in the h ope of finding an officer who would take a different approach. However, he claimed a second pair of o fficers and a third lone officer responded in the same way, despite his explanation of how the thief had sped away with his wife and child inside the car. “I was hoping that they could put out a n otice about the car, so that people could start looking for it. But all they said was ‘Your car ain’t get robbed, your car impounded, man’.” “It’s like I have to convince them that a c rime has been committed against me. The police were around, but when there is a crisis I don’t know what it takes for them to take you seriously. Rather than being professional they were just dismissive and inconsiderate. T hey assumed the situation before they took time to figure out what had really happened.” G iving up, Mr Stubbs said he began to walk to the nearby East Street police stat ion in the hope of reporting the robbery and attempted kidnapping there. But along the way another officer s topped and offered to help the family when Mr Stubbs flagged him down . “He kind of assumed the same thing (that the car was towed thought I must be talking some sense ifI ’d bothered to flag him down,” said Mr Stubbs. However, once in the car, the musician said one of the officers he had firsta pproached came up to the window and began to “jeer at” and “antagonise” him and his wife. “He said ‘The shoe’s on the other foot now, isn’t it?’” claimed Stubbs, addingt hat he was not exactly sure what the officer meant by this. Meanwhile the man went on to tell him that he “could’ve got his car long time ago.” I didn’t respond to him at any time. I realised he was just being petty,” said the s inger. Mr Stubb’s wife, Sarah, said the experience made her “disappointed in theB ahamas.” The Ohio, USA native said she had f eared for her baby when the man drove off with them inside the car, but she was particularly angry by the police’s dismis-s ive response to her and her husband’s reports. It just meant, she said, they had missed an opportunity to catch up with the vehicle while it was still nearby. The car was eventually recovered in T he Grove that evening. p roviding documentation to support their claims that some employees have been aggrand izing themselves “for decades.” Yesterday, a woman from L ong Island told T he Tribune how she had given $100 to an e mployee at the department who promised that for this generosity her application fora piece of agricultural land on Cowpen Road would be “pushed to the top of the pile.” Going a little further, the w oman said, the employee also advised her that she had to have the property surveyed a nd suggested the name of an i ndividual with whom the department reportedly w orked. Thinking that something was suspicious, the womans aid she called around and got other offers for the surveying o f the property. She discovered that the price quoted to her by the recommended sur-v eyor was exaggerated by at least $500. She said she thinks “it’s disgraceful what they are doing.” “But what are we left to do? Y ou have to work with them, because there is no recourse. I know the Prime Minister is b usy dealing with Customs and all of that, but he needs to d o something about this ministry because I shouldn’t have to bribe these people to dot heir jobs. They are already getting paid a salary. Just do y our job,” she said. Earlier this month, the former director of Lands andS urveys Tex Turnquest resigned from his post when it was claimed that his mother-in-law and other relatives on the island of Exuma wereg ranted Crown land during his tenure. Since then, it was reported t hat Undersecretary Audley Greaves and Chief Housing o fficer Christopher Russell’s wives had also received Crown land grants in A baco. It is unclear at this point w hat position the government will take in dealing with this matter, but it has been con-f irmed that the Minister of State for Lands and Local Government, Byran Woodside has taken up a constant posting at the department top rovide a more “hands on” approach to dealing with the allegations. stationed at Kelly's Dock, was driven to hospital by private vehicle around 8pm Monday with "lacerations about the body," said Press Liaison Officer Assistant Superintendent Walter Evans. A bout eight hours later, around 4 am yesterday, Knowles died as a result of his injuries, Mr Evans added. Police believe Knowles received his fatal injuries during an altercation with a man he knew in the area of Willow Tree Avenue and Saffron Street. ASP Evans said police are "following several leads i nto the man who may have been responsible for this act." Y esterday police were still trying to discover the identity of the person who drove Knowles to the hospital. Reports reaching The Tribune yesterday indicated t hat Knowles, a resident of Rosewood Street in Pinewood Gardens, was "chapped" with a cutlass. P olice, however, did not confirm this. "He had some cuts about the body and head, we're not sure what they were inflicted by, maybe some sharpi nstrument," head of the Central Detective Unit Superintendent Elsworth Moss told The Tribune. "We're not c ertain as yet (how he received his injuries is he showed up to hospital yesterday (Monday noon with some injuries about the body. We couldn'ts peak to him because he was not conscious." Knowles' former co-workers at the department's main office on Thompson Boulevard were shocked and "sad-d ened" over the news of his death. "We're in mourning and stunned. He was just down h ere Friday, he was in a good mood," said one co-worker, who asked to remain anonymous. "Most of the staff feel for him because he was popular a lot of people seem to like him, as far as the staff concerned he was co-operative and helpful," said the C ustoms officer who described Knowles as a reserved, laid-back person who didn't appear to be a trouble maker. W hen contacted for comment, Comptroller of Customs Glen Gomez extended condolences to Knowles' family on behalf of the department. " We are of course saddened by the way he died and his life being shortened, we extend our sympathy to his family," said Mr Gomez. Yesterday head of the Central Detective Unit Super intendent Elsworth Moss said police did not have a m otive for the killing or any suspects in custody. How ever, he said, police "were following some leads" and were looking to make an arrest "in the very nearf uture." Knowles' death marked the country's thirty-second h omicide for the year, police said. He had worked with the Department of Customs as a guard for more than seven years. Reggae star slams police after kidnap F ROM page one Customs security guard dies of ‘knife’ wounds F ROM page one New Crown land grants allegations F ROM page one n PANMUNJOM, Korea NORTH KOREAis believed to have begun assembling a long-range missile capable of reaching Alaska, a news report said Wednesday, as the communist regime prepared to test-fire a barrage of missiles from both coasts, according to Associated Press. The moves further heightened soaring tensions in t he region following North Korea’s underground nuclear test last week, and came as speculation grows that leader Kim Jong Il has selected his third son to succeed him as ruler of the secretive communist coun try. At the border village of Panmunjom inside the Demilitarized Zone separating the two Koreas, the sit uation seemed calm on the surface, but a military guide warned tensions are running deep. “The possibility of armed provocation is higher than ever in the Joint Security Area,” said the South Korean military guide taking journalists on a tour of the border area. He did not provide his full name saying he did not have permission to do so. The guide also cautioned journalists not to “point at the North Koreans or make any gestures.” On the North Korean side of the area, a lone guard could be seen standing with his arms to his side, just watching the journalist group. The mass-market JoongAng Ilbo newspaper said Wednesday that a long-range missile transported by train to the Dongchang-ni launch site near the North’s northwest coast near China is believed to have entered an assembly building. The paper cited an unnamed South Korean official. An American military official confirmed that an intercontinental ballistic missile capable of striking the U.S. was being readied at a base on the North’s west coast. The official said it could be more than a week before Pyongyang was ready to launch. He spoke on condition of anonymity because it was an intelligence-related issue. Separately, North Korea may soon launch three or four mid-range missiles, believed to be modified versions of its Rodong series, from its east coast, South Korea’s Yonhap news agency reported. North Korea prepares missiles SOUTH KOREAN and U.S. soldiers watch an armored v ehicle pass through decontamination process during a joint military exercise against chemical warfare by the U .S. and South Korea army at U.S. military base in Dongduchon, north of Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, June 2, 2 009. (AP Photo

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 76F/24C Low: 77F/25C Low: 76F/24C Low: 77F/25C Low: 77 F/25 C Low: 81F/27C Low: 80 F/27 C Low: 79 F/26 C High: 92F/33C High: 89F/32C High: 92 F/33 C High: 90 F/32 C High: 90F/32C High: 88 F/31C High: 90F/32C Low: 82F/28C High: 89F/32C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 92F/33C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 72F/22C High: 90 F/32 C Low: 78F/26C High: 89 F/32 Low: 72F/22C High: 86F/30C Low: 74 F/23C High: 89F/32C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 93F/34C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 91F/33C Low: 74 F/23 C High: 90F/32C Low: 76F/24C High: 93 F/34 C Low: 80F/27C High: 95F/35C High: 88 F/31 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JULY 3 TH , 2009, PAGE 11B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Partly sunny. Partly cloudy and very warm. Sunshine; breezy in the afternoon. Periods of sun, a t-storm possible. Times of clouds and sun. High: 90 Low: 80 High: 89 High: 91 High: 92 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Times of clouds and sun. High: 91 Low: 79 Low: 80 Low: 81 AccuWeather RealFeel 98F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 87F 95-87F 100-90F 100-87F 100-100F Low: 81 TODAYTONIGHTSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................91F/33C Low ....................................................81F/27C Normal high ......................................88F/31C Normal low ........................................75F/24C Last year's high .................................. 86 F/30C Last year's low .................................. 72 F/22C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ................................................17.70" Normal year to date ....................................18.81" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Full Last New First Jul. 7 Jul. 15Jul. 21Jul. 28 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:24 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 8:04 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 5:16 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 3:07 a.m. Today Saturday Sunday Monday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 5:33 a.m.2.111:25 a.m.0.2 6:06 p.m.2.8----6:23 a.m.2.212:27 a.m.0.3 6:54 p.m.2.812:14 p.m.0.2 7:10 a.m.2.21:13 a.m.0.3 7:38 p.m.2.81:01 p.m.0.2 7:53 a.m.2.31:55 a.m.0.2 8:19 p.m.2.81:46 p.m.0.2 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco88/3179/26pc88/3178/25pc Amsterdam81/2765/18sh78/2561/16s Ankara, Turkey79/2658/14pc85/2956/13s Athens90/3273/22s90/3274/23s Auckland60/1551/10s59/1548/8r Bangkok91/3277/25pc89/3179/26sh Barbados86/3077/25sh86/3077/25sh Barcelona80/2671/21s82/2770/21s Beijing99/3772/22s94/3474/23pc Beirut76/2476/24s78/2576/24pc Belgrade87/3069/20t87/3066/18t Berlin86/3065/18s87/3067/19pc Bermuda82/2772/22r79/2671/21sh Bogota65/1845/7t64/1746/7t Brussels82/2761/16r81/2760/15s Budapest91/3264/17c92/3362/16s Buenos Aires63/1753/11s61/1653/11s Cairo98/3675/23s98/3675/23s Calcutta92/3383/28sh95/3585/29t Calgary70/2146/7pc70/2150/10pc Cancun91/3274/23sh91/3274/23sh Caracas82/2771/21t81/2771/21t Casablanca82/2770/21s83/2869/20pc Copenhagen81/2762/16s83/2866/18s Dublin70/2155/12sh66/1854/12r Frankfurt90/3263/17t84/2864/17r Geneva 81/27 61/16 t 80/2661/16s Halifax 64/17 55/12 sh 66/18 53/11 c Havana 90/32 73/22 pc 91/32 74/23 sh Helsinki 68/20 52/11pc70/2154/12s Hong Kong 88/31 79/26 sh 86/30 81/27r Islamabad 102/38 77/25 pc 100/37 77/25 sh Istanbul89/3171/21s89/3172/22s Jerusalem 80/26 60/15s79/2661/16pc Johannesburg 57/1337/2s57/1340/4s Kingston 89/3178/25s89/3178/25sh Lima71/2157/13s71/2158/14pc London79/2657/13t77/2557/13pc Madrid93/3366/18s95/3564/17s Manila87/3078/25r87/3077/25r Mexico City73/2252/11t73/2254/12t Monterrey102/3876/24s104/4076/24s Montreal70/2163/17t70/2157/13t Moscow64/1748/8c63/1741/5pc Munich76/2459/15t78/2561/16t Nairobi79/2652/11pc80/2653/11pc New Delhi 95/3575/23t95/3575/23t Oslo83/2862/16pc71/2161/16sh Paris82/2761/16sh84/2863/17sh Prague 82/27 59/15 r 86/30 63/17 s Rio de Janeiro74/2368/20t76/2468/20pc Riyadh105/4082/27s105/4080/26s Rome 84/28 70/21 s 86/30 68/20 s St. Thomas90/3280/26sh90/3281/27sh San Juan67/1935/1pc69/2035/1pc San Salvador 87/30 74/23 t 89/31 74/23 pc Santiago 57/1343/6c56/1342/5r Santo Domingo86/3073/22sh86/3073/22sh Sao Paulo 67/19 56/13 r 70/21 58/14t Seoul81/2764/17t81/2763/17t Stockholm 78/25 55/12 r 68/20 57/13 pc Sydney 62/16 45/7 pc63/1746/7pc Taipei90/3279/26t89/3177/25t T okyo 79/26 70/21 sh 77/25 70/21 r T oronto 74/2356/13t73/2257/13pc Trinidad84/2862/16sh85/2965/18c V ancouver 76/24 59/15 s 74/2358/14pc Vienna 87/3070/21t86/3069/20s W arsaw 82/27 58/14 s 81/27 57/13 sh Winnipeg 72/22 50/10 s 71/2155/12pc H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySaturday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SE at 10-15 Knots2-4 Feet5-15 Miles82F Saturday:SE at 10-15 Knots2-4 Feet5-15 Miles82F Today:SE at 10-15 Knots2-3 Feet5-15 Miles81F Saturday:SE at 8-16 Knots2-4 Feet5-10 Miles81F Today:SE at 10-15 Knots2-4 Feet5-10 Miles81F Saturday:SE at 7-14 Knots2-4 Feet5-10 Miles81F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque86/3067/19t91/3268/20pc Anchorage70/2154/12c70/2156/13pc Atlanta90/3268/20pc89/3171/21pc Atlantic City80/2662/16t85/2960/15s Baltimore82/2762/16t84/2862/16s Boston76/2462/16t79/2661/16t Buffalo66/1858/14t68/2056/13pc Charleston, SC94/3471/21pc93/3373/22pc Chicago82/2760/15s77/2553/11pc Cleveland74/2358/14pc74/2353/11pc Dallas100/3779/26pc101/3879/26s Denver88/3159/15t86/3057/13t Detroit79/2656/13pc77/2554/12s Honolulu88/3175/23s88/3175/23s Houston99/3778/25pc98/3679/26pc HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySaturday TodaySaturdayTodaySaturday Indianapolis84/2863/17s78/2560/15t Jacksonville94/3471/21t97/3673/22t Kansas City84/2867/19t83/2869/20t Las Vegas102/3879/26pc105/4083/28s Little Rock94/3475/23pc95/3575/23t Los Angeles82/2766/18pc84/2864/17pc Louisville85/2967/19s79/2663/17t Memphis95/3575/23pc94/3474/23t Miami90/3277/25t90/3278/25t Minneapolis79/2661/16s81/2762/16pc Nashville88/3165/18pc82/2767/19t New Orleans96/3579/26s97/3678/25t New York80/2665/18t81/2766/18s Oklahoma City100/3775/23pc99/3774/23s Orlando92/3376/24t94/3475/23t Philadelphia82/2763/17t83/2866/18s Phoenix 104/40 85/29 t 106/4187/30s Pittsburgh74/2356/13t78/2556/13pc Portland, OR 92/3359/15s91/3258/14s Raleigh-Durham 89/31 65/18 s 90/32 65/18 s St. Louis88/3169/20s79/2667/19t Salt Lake City 90/32 66/18 t 87/3064/17pc San Antonio 99/37 77/25 s 100/37 78/25 s San Diego76/2468/20pc75/2367/19pc San Francisco 75/23 57/13 pc 75/2355/12pc Seattle85/2956/13s83/2856/13s T allahassee 96/3570/21t99/3774/23t T ampa 89/31 77/25 t 89/31 77/25t Tucson95/3579/26t98/3678/25pc W ashington, DC 84/28 66/18t86/3065/18s UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. T emperature bands are highs for the day . Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net DUBBED “The Boys are Back,” First Class Promotions put on a spectacular show on Saturday night to bring professional boxing back to the local scene. Promoter Michelle Minus said she was just glad that they were able to entertain so many people who showed up at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium to view the competition that was highlighted between the Bahamas and the Dominican Republic. “We did a couple of extra things to really make it exciting,” said Minus, who thanked the Bahamian public for coming out, the sponsors for sticking with them through their most difficult moments and Pastor Ivan Butler of Kemp Road Ministries, who prayed continuously for their r eturn. “The boys are back and First Class P romotions has a whole slate of fights set up for the Bahamian people and they a re all going to be exciting,” she said. “We’re looking forward to doing a title fight for Jerry ‘Big Daddy’ Butler, Alpachino Allen and a whole lot of othe r fighters.” Of course, Minus said they are now w orking feverishly on Jermaine ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey’s defense of the British Commonwealth super middleweight title against an African opponent in August at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. Last year after Mackey won the British Commonwealth title, First Class Promotions was suspended for one year by the Bahamas Boxing Commission. At the beginning of the year, the suspension was lifted. Now the commission’s chairman Pat ‘The Centreville Assassin’ Strachan says there’s no need for First Class or the public to be concerned about any further interruption of the sport. “As long as First Class Promotions do what they are mandated to do, we shouldn’t have any problems,” Strachan said. “A good indication of that was what they did for this show. We didn’t havea ny problems at all.” Strachan, the former cruiserweight c hampion of the Bahamas, said Mackey gave a good impression of his future. “I was very impressed with Choo C hoo. I thought he handled himself very well,” Strachan said. He looked pretty good. I can only predict good things for him. He stands a good chance of getting a world title shot soon. I just think it’s only a matter of time, once he finds himself in the right place at the right time.” Also particularly impressed with what he saw from Mackey was Phil Smith, the marketing manager at D’Albenas Agency Limited, one of the major sponsors of the show. “He’s a little rusty, but he still got the skills,” Smith said. “He just needs some fights and you know the story, he should definitely be ready for his British Commonwealth title defense in August.” Smith said he was so pleased to see pro boxing back and he and his company will continue to make their contribution to its further growth and success in the future. The show attracted a number of pers ons, including Olympic and World Championships women’s 400 metre c hampion Tonique Williams-Darling, who has a lot of time on her hands since officially retiring last year. M aking her first appearance at a show, Williams-Darling said she was quite r elieved to be a part of the audience and she certainly enjoyed every moment of it. “I want to commend Ray Minus (Jr who is my cousin, and his wife, Michelle. They have been trying to get me out fora long time,” she said. “I think they are doing a wonderful job. “I was particularly pleased with the women’s fight. We know that this is a sport for men, but it’s good that they both went out there and they handled themselves very well. I was really proud of them.” As for Mackey, Williams-Darling said she heard so much about him and she was honoured to have been afforded the opportunity to see a rising star before he really makes it big on the international scene as she did. Now that she has retired from track and field, Williams-Darling said she’s looking at the possibility of doing oneo r two things that will make an impact on the sport. But for now, she said everyt hing will remain a secret until she’s ready to reveal it. Nassau conference is held to announce Brazil’s host cities for 2014 World Cup soccer tourney C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS n By EDDIE PELLS AP National Writer USA Track and Field entered a partnership Tuesday with a company that helps athletes find o ut if supplements they're t hinking about taking are free of b anned substances. USATF chief executive Doug Logan announced the deal with the National Center for Drug Free Sport, saying it was a way for athletes "to navigate the confounding labyrinth that is the multi-zillion dollar industry of 'legal' supplements." Earlier this year, Logan delivered a rebuke of supplement makers, saying they've been complicit in helping ruin a sport filled with doping scandals over the years. He backed it up by announcing the deal with a company that also has agreements witht he NCAA, Major League Baseball, the NFL, and the PGA Tour. A common excuse when an athlete tests positive for performance-enhancing drugs is to say they used a supplement that must have been tainted. The supplement industry has largely steered clear of federal regulations, and Logan, in his speech in January, said it was all because of a long-term, calcul ated lobbying effort in Washi ngton. In his blog Tuesday, Logan said the only way an athlete can really know if he's clean is by competing supplement-free. "But if an athlete does use supplements, or is considering using them, this new resource will help them make a more informed decision about the benefits and pitfalls of a given product," he wrote. USATF members can log on to the Web site's Resource Exchange Center and get infor mation about supplements they're thinking about taking. Logan said the U.S. AntiDoping Agency already has a hotline for athletes in its testing pool to ask about banned substances. So while the agree ment may not be a huge added benefit for Olympic-caliber ath letes, the new programme will enable any USATF member juniors, seniors, recreational athletes to use the Drug Free Sport service. USA Track and Field partners with National Center for Drug Free Sport RICARDO TERRA TEIXEIRA (far left soccer confederation, FIFA President Joseph S Blatter (second left) and FIFA Secretary General Jerome Valcke pose for a photograph as they hold a map of Brazil at a press con ference in Nassau, Bahamas, on Sunday. The conference was held to announce Brazil’s host cities for the 2014 World Cup soccer tournament. The cities are Rio de Janeiro, Curitiba, Porto Alegre, Sao Paulo, Cuiaba, Manaus, Fortaleza, Natal, Recife, Brasilia, Salvador and Belo Horizonte. NASSAU, Bahamas (AP CONCACAF's fourth-place t eam in World Cup qualifying w ill host South America's fifthp lace team in a home-and-away series starting on November 14. The series will conclude in South America on November 18, with the winner qualifying for the 32-nation World Cup finals in South Africa next year. The matchups won't be known until group qualifying ends. Other World Cup prelimi nary matchups drawn on Tues day will have the third-place team from Asia's Group A hosting the third-place club from Asia's Group B on September 5, with the series switch ing venues on September 9. The eventual winner of that series will advance to a playoff against New Zealand, with Asia hosting the first game on October 10 and going on the roadon November 14. The finals draw takes place on December 4. FIFA holds draw for World Cup preliminaries T i m A y l e n / A P ‘The Boys are Back’ boxing show was spectacular

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P rime Minister Hubert Ingraham delivered the keynote address at the world famous Atlantis resort on Paradise Island yesterday to officially open the 59th FIFA Congress after months of preparation. He praised the FIFA executives for taking the initiative to come to a small nation such as the Bahamas to host such a prestigious meeting to discuss the most widely played sport in the world. “The 58th FIFA Congress last year was held in Sidney, Australia – a country with a somewhat larger football tradition than our own. So one can only imagine the delight when it was announced that the 59th Congress would be held in The Bahamas,” he said. “You will have discovered that, though small, The Bahamas has a great tradition of sporting excellence and highly qualified and dedicated pro fessionals. As well, you will have learned that we have created a particularly successful industry out of welcoming visi tors to our shores. These two make us ideally suited to hosting the 59th FIFA Congress.” PM Ingraham said it is his hope that the visiting delegates’ experience here in the wonderland of Atlantis will help bolster the Bahamas’ reputation as a modern, efficient and conve nient location for both business and pleasure and certainly for the business of discussing leisure. The delegation is headed by Sepp Blatter, who was re-elected as president, while Jack Warner is the vice president. More than 100 delegates from just about every nation affiliated with FIFA is represented at the congress. “Sport is important for so many reasons, whether in teaching discipline, promoting healthy lifestyles or developings ocial skills. And so it is quite natural that governments are enthusiastic supporters and promoters of sporting activities,” he said. While Mr Ingraham noted that there are many issues that will be discussed over the nextt wo days in the congress, he said i t is the hope of the Bahamas government that their delegates’ presence here will result in the further development of the game and its wider appeal to all Bahamians, but very specifically to children who would bene f it from the exposure to the game and its wide international appeal. “The Government and peo ple of The Bahamas regard this Congress as being a globally significant meeting of sports administrators comprising over 200 countries,” Ingraham said. “Your decisions will shape t he organisation of Member A ssociations world wide, the most significant being the announcement of the upcom ing 2014 World Cup host country. “This event has been a significant undertaking for TheB ahamas requiring a multiagency cooperative approach undergirded by unprecedented strategy.” Mr Ingraham not only acknowledged and thanked Chuck Blazer, a friend and long-time resident of the Bahamas and a member of the Executive Committee of FIFA for the crucial role he played in bringing the congress to Paradise Island, but he also recog nised the hard work of host Bahamas Football Association (BFA and his executive secretary Lionel Haven. He also congratulated Minister of Youth, Sport and Cul ture Desmond Bannister and the ardent effort of the official secretariat and other national stakeholders in collaborating with the Bahamas Football Association in this initiative. “Going forward, we hope to strengthen and solidify our strong sporting tradition with the completion of a national stadium currently under construc tion. It’s anticipated completion in 2011 will strengthen our ability to host international match es and sporting events and we look forward to such opportunities in the years ahead,” he said. “We particularly look forward to the boost the new football pitch will provide to the further development of football in The Bahamas, particularly to our junior footballers.” In closing, Mr Ingraham said the Bahamas has a slogan that says “once is not enough” and he welcomed the delegates to come back and when they do, to ensure that they visit some of the Family Islands that make up the Bahamas archipelago. Football governing body to talk about change C M Y K C M Y K WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 P AGE 9 Changing ‘the face of Bahamian basketball forever’ ... Soderling beats Davydenko to advance to his first major semi... See page 9 n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net FOR quite some time, there has been a lot of talk about a match-up between Sherman ‘The Tank’ Williams and Renaldo ‘The Terminator’ Minus for the Bahamas heavyweight title. For quite some time, that was all it was talk. Neither fighter could come to a compromise where they both signed on the dotted line to square off in the ring. And for quite some time, Minus didn’t have a legitimate contender to defend his title. So much so that the Bahamas Boxing Commission has decided to strip Minus of the crown. Now there’s talk of a possible showdown between Minus and Jerry ‘Big Daddy’ Butler. Saturday night, moments after he won his eight round comain event bout over Dominican Republic’s Sandy Antonio Soto on the First Class Promotions’ first professional card for the year dubbed, “The Boys are back,” Butler turned to Minus and issued a challenge. Minus, who worked in But ler’s corner during the fight, gladly accepted. But Bahamas Boxing Com mission’s chairman Pat ‘The Centreville Assassin’ Strachan put the possible match-up in prospective. “Just for the record, Renaldo has been stripped of his title, so the heavyweight title is vacant,” Strachan said. “At our next meeting, I will put it out on our agenda and we will determine who will fight for it.” Strachan, a former cruiserweight champion of the Bahamas, said there’s a strong possibility that the commission would recommend that the two most active heavyweights fight in an elimination bout and then there will be a title bout. As for who those two most active heavyweights are Williams and Butler. “Renaldo, I certainly believe will be in the hunt, but the commission will make a decision on that,” Strachan said. “Sherman could be in the hunt also. But there could be an elimination before a title fight is deter mined.” And just like he did when he was challenged by and he in term challenged Williams, Minus said he’s looking forward to the possibility of facing But ler. “It’s expected, it’s expected,” Minus quipped. “He came a long way. We spent a lot of time preparing him from scratch and he has developed into a fine young man, a fine boxer. He feels it’s his time. “I feel he has matured enough to get a title shot and I think he deserves a chance. But training him is one thing. Fighting and training is two differ ent things. So I would like to see him inside the ring.” Thirty eight-year-old Minus, who last fought on April 8, 2006, when he was stopped in the fourth round by Elieser Castillo in Tampa, Florida, last fought at home on June 12, 2004, when he won a 10-round decision over Miguel Otero at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. However, the last Bahamian he fought was James ‘Killer’ Coakley on October 2, 1999, to successfully defend his Bahamas heavyweight title with a first round knockout. He initially won the vacant title over Coakley on June 15, 1996, with another first round knockout over Coakley. His record stands at 18-14 with 15 knockouts. As for Butler, 28, he improved his record to 8-5 with his first round decision over Soto. In his last fight on November 11, 2008, Butler drew a six round decision against Wilner Vazquez in Hollywood, Florida. Butler’s last fight against a Bahamian was on June 30, 2007, when he stopped Bernard Rolle in the first round at the C I Gib son Gymnasium. Williams, a native of Grand Bahama fighting out of Vero Beach, Florida, is 34-10 with two draws. His last fight was on Decem ber 12, 2008, when he won by an unanimous decision over Andrew Greeley in Jack sonville, Florida. The 36-yearold last fought at home on April 18, 2007 when he stopped American Wade Lewis in the first round at Clifford Park. But Williams has yet to face a Bahamian opponent in his pro career that got started in 1997. While Minus said he will wait for the possible showdown with Butler, once he can get about 4-5 months to get in shape, he’s ruling out any chance of him and Williams ever squaring off. “We offered Tank numerous offers to fight, but he has refused to sign, so I guess he doesn’t want to fight me,” Minus said. “Right now, Big Daddy Jerry Butler is in front of me, he has issued this challenge and that is who I have my sights set on right now.” ‘The Terminator’ has fists set on ‘Big Daddy’ JERRY ‘Big Daddy’ Butler PM opens 59th FIFA Congress P h o t o s : F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f FIFA president Sepp Blatter speaks during the spectacular opening ceremony at Atlantis resort Tuesday evening... N ASSAU, Bahamas (AP c lub football, changes to the age limit for Olympic football and p reparations for the 2010 World Cup in South Africa are on the agenda for FIFA's annual congress. FIFA president Sepp Blatter will lead discussions Wednesday at a meeting attended by representatives of 208 nations. " I think at the end of the Congress Wednesday, everybody will see what we're doing in FIFA, (that a nd we can all be happy," Blatter said. Glitz has been apparent, whether it was the stir created by Football Federation Australia chairman Frank Lowy bringing his 240-foot (73 m f or a future World Cup, or the steady stream of people at a dinn er Monday waiting to greet 2012 London Olympics organizing c ommittee head Sebastian Coe.

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n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net CITY MARKETS expects an injection of equity capital by its majority shareholder to flow into the 12-store Bahamian supermarket chain by mid June, Tribune Business was told yesterday, with receipt of that funding getting the firm back to its direct purchasing programme. Sunil Chatrani, chief executive of City Markets’ immedi ate holdings company, Bahamas Supermarkets, said he could not say how much was being invested to aid in the company’s relaunch, but Tribune Business sources claimed it to be in the range of $10 million. “There is a figure, but I prefer not to say it until investors have all committed to the exact amount, then we’ll know that final figure,” he said. Mr Chitrani told this paper recently that investors in Bahamas Supermarket’s 78 per cent majority shareholder, BSL Holdings, were now discussing with Royal Bank of Canada the terms and arrangements for the new capital injection. According to him, City Markets’ floundering business has already begun to “turn the cor ner” and stabilise. He said the company has had to reduce costs substantially by cutting expenses and had in the past month been forced to deeply discount products, selling them at a loss. He said the company had been out of line in terms of the market prices and have had to recently realign them. “We have had to fix shop and we have done that now, so we’re just waiting for the injec tion of funds to go into the pro gramme,” said Mr Chatrani. “I think we have turned the corner and the worst is all behind us and at this point things are pretty stable and Pricing row pushes Chelsea’s threat to pull product from Super Value C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report. $3.73 $3.62 $3.82 Superior investment performance • Professional management Flexible investment options 24/7 Online access Convenient Salary Deductions Administration and start-up fees waived for rst year • Preferential rates and discounts on many banking products and services from the Royal Bank of Canada and Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Ltd.Benets:As a part of our commitment to our valued members,The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce is partnering with Royal Fidelity to provide Chamber members with a superior Group and Individual Pension Plan with more benets,xible investment options and online access. THE BAHAMAS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE PENSION PLANFor more information contact: The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce T: 322-2145 www.thebahamaschamber.com Royal Fidelity T: 356-9801 www.royaldelity.com n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net A row over pricing has pushed a leading water supplier to threaten p ulling its product f rom the shelves of a m ajor supermarket chain, T he Tribune can reveal. In a letter said to be sent from the Super Value chain of stores to an employee of Chelsea's Choice last week, the food-store chain accused the water company of selling five gallon bottles directly to customers at its East West Highway plant at a cheaper price than offered to retailers. The letter asked Chelsea's Choice to curtail this "direct competition" saying that it is not supported by Super Value. A response from Chelsea's Choice lashed out at the grocer's position and denied that they were competing with their retailers. The letter indicated that after a 20-year relationship, the brand would no longer be available in Super Value stores. Copies of both letters were obtained by The Tribune . "It has come to our attention that retailing by wholesalers had intensified with the downturn of the economy. We understand that you are retailing five gallon Chelsea's Choice water to the public for $2.50 and wholesaling it to your retailers at $3.50. We cannot support wholesalers that are in direct competition with their retailers," said the first letter, dated May 29, bearing the signature of Super Value president Rupert Roberts. "This leaves us with no choice but to inform you that you no longer have the support of retailers as long as you persist in retailing to the public less than wholesale prices. We trust that you will refrain from your retailing activity," the letter continued. Attempts to reach Mr Roberts for comment were unsuccessful yesterday as he was said to be out of office. A letter sent by Chelsea's Choice in response, dated June 2, lashed out at the grocery store's position and denied that they were competing with their retailers. Ms Knowles maintained according to the letter that Chelsea's Choice acts as wholesaler, not a retailer, by selling items by the case and by volume in five gallon bottles. "The fact that we wholesale from our plant has not caused you to sell any less in your stores based on the frequency of deliveries to you. As far as we are aware our brand sells out very quickly," said the letter signed by company president Tina Knowles. The letter said that low inventory orders by Super Value forced customers "to come to our plant to purchase what could have been sold at your stores". The letter added that the option for Super Value always existed to collect water from the East West Highway plant at a price of $2.50 adding that it appears the supermarket "is not interested in having a relationship with this company". As of December 1, 2008 distribution of Chelsea’s Choice water was handled by a fleet of independent drivers, according to the letter. "We feel we should pass the savings to the consumer particularly during these difficult times. A price increase at this time is not bearable. . .We hope this decision does not cause our employees and their extended families to shop elsewhere as the potential is there to create another unfortunate circumstance. "We will advise our customers that our products will no longer be found at your stores," said the letter. When contacted for comment yesterday Ms Knowles declined to comment. However Super Value Operations Manager Kendrick Moss said he was unaware of any change regarding a business relationship between the two companies. "To my knowledge nothing has changed . . . I haven't been given that decision," said Mr Moss. n By CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net AF HOLDING Limited, a Bahamian company with more than $4.73 billion in assets under administration and management and $535 million in assets, confirmed yesterday in a release that it has acquired Ansbacher (Bahamas “with full Bahamas Government regulatory approval.” The release verified what Tribune Business has reported for several months. According to the release, Ansbacher (Bahamas was sold by the Ansbacher Group as a part of its strategy to focus on its European markets and the Middle East markets of its parent, the Qatar National Bank. Sources previously told this paper that the Ansbacher management team led by managing director Michael MayhewArnold, had previously been exploring a management-led buyout of the bank from cur rent owner Qatar and had also seeked to remain in place to obtain a sizable equity stake, around 30 per cent, from any new owner in the aftermath of a takeover. However, it was claimed that the Ansbacher management could not obtain a large enough backer to underwrite the buy out. The AF Holdings release said, however, that Mr May hew-Arnold will remain the company’s managing director and the company, when merged with AF’s subsidiary, Sentinel Bank and Trust Company Lim ited, will retain the name Ansbacher (Bahamas “We are truly delighted to conclude the purchase of Ans-b acher (Bahamas matter that has been on our agenda for some while,” said Director of AF Holdings Limited Anthony Ferguson. “We believe this acquisition is an excellent strategic fit that will significantly expand our product offerings and capabilities in some important lines of business, resulting in economies of scale that will bring consid erable value to our clients and make our collective operations that much stronger. “The merger will create a major new player in the offAF Holding acquires Ansbacher (Bahamas S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net MALL at Marathon’s General manager said yesterday that more expansions could be on the way for the property, but lamented that consumer traffic through the mall has been down year on year. Bob Stevenson told Tribune Business that the mall’s merchant space has seen a series of losses and gains his year, but has not seen diminished interest in those spaces which have become vacant. According to him, the mall has undertaken an aggressive leasing programme in order to fill their vacant commercial space. He revealed that Mr Pretzels, an entertainment centre and eatery, is expected to expand into available spaces and Dairy Queen is expected to construct a drive through on the property. “It’s super fantastic,” said Mr Stevenson. “The last two stores rented in the last two days.” According to him, with the onset of the economic down turn, the mall committed to assisting its merchants through increased advertising, increased security and one on one consultation. “The mall has indeed helped its merchants we do it individually and as a group,” he said. “We bolster our marketing and promotional efforts more so than normal and we maintain a strong security programme, we maintain it and commit to it.” Some merchants told this paper recently that the mall had not been accommodating with merchants who made late rental payments and said the increased security did nothing to help struggling vendors with the tough economic environment. Mr Stevenson asserted, however, that rent is a “figment of the imagination” and said it accounted for only ten per cent of the businesses’ retail opera tions. He said if they could not meet that ten per cent then “they have a problem with their More expansions could be on the way for Mall at Marathon S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B City Markets expects equity capital injection to flow by mid June

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THE Chamber of Commerce announced the finalists for the 2009 annual Business Awards yesterday, as they released plans for this year’s Chamber Week, when the winners will be announced. Bahamian businesspersons will vie for the distinguished titles of Outstanding Businessperson of The Year and Developing Entrepreneur of the Year. Two preeminent Bahamian businesses will be designated Outstanding Business of the Year, which is awarded in two categories, businesses with over fifty employees and those with less. The Chamber’s annual prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award will go to George Myers, chairman of the Myers Groupof Companies. Mr Myers will be saluted for his overwhelming contributions to Bahamian enterprise and the community through his accomplishments in the hospitality sector through his restaurant and entertainment holdings. Nominations for the Annual Business Awards have been sent to Chamber officials over the last several weeks and after careful deliberation, the finalists in each category were announced. In the category of Outstanding Business Person of the Year, the finalists are Dr. Charles Diggiss, The MEDNET Group of Companies; Gus Cartwright, Checker Caf; and Chris Mortimer, G alleria Cinemas and Bennigan’s Grill & Tavern. The 2009 Developing Entrepreneur of the Year Award will go to a business pioneer who has successfully established a business in the private sector within the past five years. This year’s award will go to one of the following finalists: Dr. Wendy Stuart, Botani Bath; Kenwood Kerr, Providence Advisers; Deran Thompson/ Farrell Goff, Bahamas Woodworking Studio. The designation of Outstanding Business of the Year with over 50 employees will be go to either Mall at Marathon, Furniture Plus or Bahamas Waste. The award for that thriving Bahamian business with less than 50 employees will go to one of these finalists: Caribbean Civil Group Limited, Bahamas Orthodontic Centre or The Plait Lady. The Annual Business Awards will culminate Chamber Week, which begins on June 22. The week’s events also include a courtesy call on Prime Minister Ingraham, the highly anticipated Mix N Mingle business-netw orking event on Tuesday, June 23, and the Meet the Ministers forum on Thursday, June 25. Twelve Cabinet Ministers will participate in the Forum, which is open to Chamber members. All events will take place at Sandals Royal Bahamian. business.” “This is truly a difficult time and people are experiencing sales declines, so we work with them as best we can,” he continued. Mr Stevenson said management collected whatever data it could in order to assess how the mall’s businesses were holding up to the ensuing recession. “We measure what we can, we collect sales data from several of our stores, we sell gift certificates and we measure the traffic in the mall and clearly it is down,” he said. According to Mr Stevenson, over the past five to ten years, many retailers have prospered greatly at the mall and the current 110 shops are preparing to celebrate its 20 years in business this Fall. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE NOTICE The Management and Board of Directors of Colina Holdings Bahamas Limited (CHBL)wish to announce that the Consolidated Interim (UnauditedFinancial Statements for CHBL for the three months ended March 31, 2009 have been authorized for release on June 3, 2009. A complete copy of these financial statements is available on the Company’s website www.colinaimperial.com or by contacting the corporate headquarters of ColinaImperial by phone at (242) 396-2102 or by email a t Financials@ColinaImperial.com shore international banking industry that is wholly owned by Bahamians and governed by a Bahamas regulatory regime.” Ansbacher (Bahamas some obvious attractions for Sentinel Bank and Trust and its parent, AF Holdings (the former Colina Financial Group), whose primary principals are Mr Ferguson and Anthony Alexiou. As reported by this paper earlier, Ansbacher (Bahamas has a significant Bahamian dollar portfolio, being involved in domestic pension fund management and administration, and one possibility would be for that business to be merged with CFAL, the brokerage/corporate advisory entity had by Mr Ferguson. The international business could then be absorbed by Sentinel Bank and Trust. It was said in the earlier stages of the proposed acquisition that Sentinel’s chances of obtaining Ansbacher (Bahamas ly increased when a rival bidder was knocked out because of regulatory concerns expressed by the Central Bank. That rival was claimed to be Belize Bank, the largest such institution in that Central American country, which is owned by a holding company controlled by controversial UK peer Lord Ashcroft. The British Noble, once the treasurer for UK opposition party, the Conservatives, is now their deputy chairman, and both he and his Belizean business interests have long been targets for reports by the UK media. None of the allegations have yet been proven, and some reports have even resulted in Lord Ashcroft taking legal action for libel, cases which have usually been settled out of court. Yet it is likely that the swirl of controversy may have alarmed the Bahamian Central Bank. “AF Holdings Limited (AFH cial Group (CFG cial consortium of leading comprehensive financial services with insurance, banking, healthcare and media companies and real estate holdings in The Bahamas, offering integrated solutions to meet the diverse needs of international and local clients,” said the company’s release. It said AF Holdings acquisition, Ansbacher (Bahamas Limited, is one of oldest offshore bank and trust companies in The Bahamas. “Formerly known as Bahamas International Trust Company Limited, ("BITCO" it was previously owned by a consortium of banks with Barclays Bank as the majority shareholder. BITCO was sold to the Ansbacher Group of Companies in 1989, changing its name to Ansbacher (Bahamas the release continued. AF Holding acquires Ansbacher (Bahamas F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B More expansions could be on the way for Mall at Marathon F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Chamber announces finalists for Annual Business Awards we’re just waiting for funding so we can get back into our direct purchasing programme (imports In the meantime City Markets continues to do price surveys of the market in order to stay competitive, which Mr Chatrani said that has already begun to happen. “As we start back our overs eas programme we will have m ore flexibility of prices,” he said. The City Markets chief executive told this paper recently that the company’s sales were likely to decline to between $120-$125 million for the 2009f iscal year to end June 2009, due to a combination of the economic recession and the com pany’s own internal issues. While this represented a decline of between 13.2-17 per cent compared to the top-of the top-line figure for 2008, Mr Chatrani said that Bahamas Supermarkets had largely bought the increased business that year through deep discounts, which left the company selling products at a loss. As a result, gross profit margins for that year fell to 17.8 per c ent. Mr Chatrani said these h ad recovered to 25.4 per cent within the past quarter, and the company was looking to get back to historical margins of 28 per cent plus as soon as possible. According to Mr Chatrani, t here will not likely be any kind of expansion for the supermarket chain in the medium term. City Markets expects equity capital injection by its majority shareholder F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B SOME of the 2009 award finalists are pictured (L-R Woodworking Studio; Robin Strachan, Caribbean Civil Group Limited; Dr. Wendy Stuart, Botani Bath; Dr. Sophia Rolle, Chairperson, Chamber Week 2009; Dr. Barry Russell, Bahamas Orthodontic Center; Claire Sands, The Plait Lady; Dr. Charles Diggiss, The MEDNET Group of Companies; Philip Simon, Executive Director, Bahamas Chamber of Commerce; Robert Stevenson, Mall at Marathon; Lavette McFall, Bahamas Orthodontic Center; Gershan Major, 1st Vice President, Bahamas Chamber of Commerce; Deran Thompson, Bahamas Woodworking Studio.

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n By BREE FOWLER AP Auto Writers DETROIT (AP Motors Corp. took a key step toward its downsizing on Tues-day, striking a tentative deal to sell its Hummer brand to a Chinese manufacturer, while also revealing that it has potential buyers for its Saturn and Saab brands. GM has an agreement to sell its Hummer brand to Sichuan Tengzhong Heavy Industrial Machinery Co. of China, said a person briefed on the deal. The Detroit automaker announced Tuesday morning that it had a memorandum of understanding to sell the brand of rugged SUVs, but it didn't identify the buyer. A formal announcement of the buyer was to be made Tuesday afternoon, said the person briefed on the deal. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the details have not been made public. Sichuan Tengzhong deals in road construction, plastics, resins and other industrial products, but Hummer would be its f irst step into the automotive b usiness. G M said the sale will likely save more than 3,000 US jobs in manufacturing, engineering and at various Hummer dealerships. As part of the proposed transaction, Hummer will continue to contract vehicle manufacturing and business services from GM during a transitional period. For example, GM's Shreveport, La., assembly plant would continue to contract to assemble the H3 and H3T t hrough at least 2010, GM said. The automaker also said Tuesday that it has 16 buyers interested in purchasing its Sat urn brand, while three parties are interested in the Swedish Saab brand. Chief Financial Officer Ray Young told reporters and industry analysts on a conference call that GM is continuing to pursue manufacturing agreements witha new Saturn buyer. GM would like to sell the money-losing Saturn brand's dealership network, contracting with the new buyer to make some of its cars while the buyer gets other vehicles from differ ent manufacturers. At the same time, bridge loan discussions with the Swedish government are progressing, Young said. GM, which filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in New York on Monday, is racing to remake itself as a smaller, leaner automaker. In addition to its plan to sell the Hummer, Saab and Saturn brands, GM will also phase out its Pontiac brand, concentrating on its Chevrolet, Cadillac, Buick and GMC nameplates. The company hopes to follow the lead of fellow US automaker Chrysler LLC by transforming its most profitable assets into a new company in just 30 days and emerging from bankruptcy protection soon after. But GM is much larger and complex than its Auburn Hillsbased rival and isn't up against Chrysler's tight June 15 deadline to close its deal with Fiat Group SpA. Sharon Lindstrom, managing director at business consulting firm Protiviti, said the companies pose different challenges. But as with Chrysler, she notes that the Treasury Department made sure many of GM's moving parts were in order ahead of time so a quick bankruptcy reorganization might be possible. "They had a lot of their ducks in a row because the terms of the government financing forced them to get all the parties to the table in a very, very short period of time," Lind strom said. Separately, the German government said Tuesday it paid out the first million ($425 million) in bridge loans to GM's Adam Opel GmbH division. The loans are part of a deal to shrink GM's stake in Opel and shield it from GM's bankruptcy protection filing in the U.S. Canadian auto supplier Magna International Inc. and Russian-owned Sberbank will acquire 55 per cent of Opel. A sale of the Hummer brand had been expected. Chief Exec utive Fritz Henderson had said in April that the automaker was expecting final bids from three potential buyers within the month. Eric Lane, vice president of Baton Rouge, La.-based Gerry Lane Enterprises, which has four dealerships including one offering Hummers wel comed the sale. "Even though they've put out a fantastic product, they haven't come out with enough new models to keep up," said Lane. "We'd like a new owner to come in and inject some new products." Lane said the lack of new products and the recession figured into the Hummer equa tion much more than last year's runup in gasoline prices. "I haven't had a single owner complain about mileage. Nobody buys a Hummer because of the gas. You don't buy a vehicle for $60,000 and worry about the price of gas." Critics had seized on the rugged but fuel-inefficient Hummer as a symbol of excess as GM's financial troubles grew and gas prices rose. Sales at Hummer, which is known for models with military-vehicle roots, have been in a steep slide since gasoline prices rose to record heights last summer. For the first four months of this year, Hummer sales are down 67 per cent. GM nailed down deals with its union and a majority of its bondholders and arranged the Opel deal in order to appear in court Monday with a near-complete plan to quickly emerge with a chance to become profitable. The government has said it expects GM to come out of bankruptcy protection within 60 to 90 days. By comparison, the judge overseeing Chrysler's case approved the sale of its assets to a group led by Italy's Fiat in just over a month. Some industry observers think Chrysler could emerge as early as this week. During Monday's hearing, GM attorney Harvey Miller stressed the magnitude of the case and the importance of moving GM through court oversight as fast as possible. He noted that the automaker only has about $2 billion in cash left. "If there's going to be a r ecovery of value, it's absolutel y crucial that a sale take place a s soon as possible," Miller said in his opening statement. The automaker wants to sell the bulk of its assets to a new company in which the US government will take a 60 per cent ownership stake. The Canadian government would take 12.5 per cent of the "New GM," with the United Auto Workers union getting 17.5 per cent and unsecured bondholders receiving 10 per cent. Existing shareholders are expected to be wiped out. US Judge Robert Gerber moved swiftly through more than 25 mostly procedural motions during the automaker's first-day Chapter 11 hearing. Gerber set GM's sale hearing for June 30, putting it on a path similar to that of Chrysler. Objections are due on June 19, with any competing bids required to be submitted by June 22. Gerber also gave GM immediate access to $15 billion in government financing to get it through the next few weeks, and interim approval for use of a total $33.3 billion in financing, with final approval slated to be ruled on June 25. The funds are contingent on GM's sale being approved by July 10. Gerber also approved motions allowing the company to pay certain prebankruptcy wages, along with supplier and shipping costs. T he sheer size of GM makes i t a more complicated case than C hrysler. GM made twice as many vehicles as Chrysler's 1.5 million last year and employs 235,000 people compared with Chrysler's 54,000. GM also has plants and operations in many more countries, meaning it will likely have to strike separate deals to navigate the bankruptcy laws of those places. Henderson said GM has learned a few things by watching Chrysler's case. "Certainly the court showed that it can address 363 (sale transactions in an expeditious fashion," Henderson said at a news conference Monday. "Particularly in our case with what will be a very large 363 transaction." GM's filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection is the largest ever for an industrial company. GM, which said it has $ 172.81 billion in debt and $ 82.29 billion in assets, had r eceived about $20 billion in low-interest loans before entering bankruptcy protection. Fowler reported from New York. AP Auto Writer Dan Strumpf in New York, Associated Press Writer Alan Sayre in New Orleans and Associated Press Writer Joe McDonald in Beijing contributed to this report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source: GM to sell Hummer to Chinese manufacturer A HUMMER H2 vehicle is seen for sale on Tuesday at a GM Superstore in Dublin, California... (AP Photo:Ben Margot

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n By ALAN ZIBEL AP Real Estate Writer W ASHINGTON (AP T he number of US homebuyers who agreed to purchase a previously occupied home in April posted the largest monthly jump in nearly eight years, a sign that sales are finally coming to life after a long and painful slump. The National Association of Realtors said Tuesday its seasonally adjusted index of sales contracts signed in April surged 6.7 per cent to 90.3, far exceeding analysts’ forecasts. It was the biggest monthly jump since October 2001, when pending sales rose 9.2 per cent. Economists were encouraged by the report, and stock indexes advanced modestly. “This is yet another positive indication that the bottoming process is forming,” Jennifer Lee, an economist at BMO Capital Markets, wrote in a note to clients. “Now if only prices would stabilize.” Economists surveyed by Thomson Reuters expected the index would edge up to 85 froma reading of 84.6 in March. Typically there is a oneto twomonth lag between a contract and a done deal, so the index is a barometer for future existing home sales. In early trading, the Dow Jones industrial average added about 20 points to 8,741, and at times traded above 8,776.39, its finish for 2008. Still, some economists wonder whether rising mortgage rates will dampen home sales. Nationwide average rates for 30-year-fixed rate mortgages are around 5.3 per cent this week compared with about five per cent a week earlier, according to Bankrate.com. And analysts cautioned prices will take longer to stabilize, because of the glut of unsold properties on the market. “Even if sales volumes rebound, home prices will keep falling under the weight of the massive inventory overhang,” wrote Ian Shepherdson, chief US economist at High Frequency Economics. The Realtors’ index was 3.2 per cent above last year’s levels and has risen for three straight months after hitting a record low in January. A nearly 33 per cent sales increase in the Northeast and a 9.8 per cent jump in the Midwest led the overall surge. Sales contracts rose 1.8 per cent in April from a month earlier in the West, but fell 0.2 per cent in the South. The big boost likely reflects the impact of a new $8,000 tax credit for first-time homebuyers that was included in the economic stimulus bill signed by President Barack Obama in February. Since buyers need to finish their purchases by November 30 to claim the credit, “we expect greater activity in the months ahead,” Lawrence Yun, the Realtors’ chief economist, said in a statement. Still, Yun cautioned that the pending sales data is more volatile than in the past because many sellers need banks to agree to take less than the original mortgage a so-called “short sale.” That process is often difficult, time-consuming and can wind up falling apart before the deal closes. The Federal Housing Administration last week released details of a plan in which borrowers who use FHA loans can get advances from lenders that let them effectively receive the credit in advance, so they don’t have to wait to get the money from the Internal Revenue Service. Completed home sales rose 2.9 per cent to an annual rate of 4.68 million in April from a downwardly revised pace of 4.55 million in March, the Realtors’ group said last week. Sales of inexpensive foreclosures and other distressed lowend properties have even sparked bidding wars in places like Las Vegas, Phoenix and Miami. But the market for highend properties remains at a virtual standstill. The national median sales price in April plunged more than 15 per cent to $170,200, from $201,300 in the same month last year. That was the second largest yearly price drop on record, according to the Realtors’ group. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Pending home sales rise 6.7 per cent in April F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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n By The Associated Press A look at economic developments and stock market activity around the world Tuesday: ___ BEIJING US Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner concluded his reassurance tour of China, telling leaders of the country that holds the largest share of America's debt that US President Barack Obama was committed to tackling the soaring budget deficits. Meanwhile, General Motors Corp. officials said the automaker's Asian operations will be unaffected by its bankruptcy and it plans to open new factories in China, Thailand and India even as it closes US facilities. ___ HONG KONG Goldman Sachs raised more than $1.9 billion after selling part of its stake in Industrial & Commercial Bank of China as the US investment firm seeks to repay government bailout funds. Goldman unloaded more than 3.3 billion Hong Kong shares in ICBC, China's biggest lender. ___ LONDON A major Middle Eastern shareholder in Barclays bank said it intends to sell part of its stake at least 1.3 billion shares potentially taking a big profit on its sevenmonth investment and sending Barclays shares down more than 13 per cent. The FTSE 100 index of leading British shares underperformed its European counterparts, ending down 29.17 points, or 0.7 per cent, at 4,477.02 as it was dragged down by banking stocks after a major Middle Eastern shareholder in Barclays PLC said it intends to sell part of its stake, potentially taking a big profit on its seven-month investment. Elsewhere in European markets, Germany's DAX closed essentially unchanged at 5,144.60, up an infinitesimal 1.5 point, while France's CAC-40 index was only 1.45 point lower at 3,378.04. Separately, activity in the UK construction industry retreated for the 15th straight month in May, but the number of home mortgages approved has risen for the third month. ___ BRUSSELS The jobless rate in the 16 nations that use the euro surged to 9.2 per cent in April, the highest level in almost a decade, the EU statistics office said. The euro-zone jobless rate has reached its highest level since September 1999, with Spain standing out with a 18.1 per cent rate. Unemployment across all 27 EU countries rose to 8.6 per cent in April from 8.4 per cent in March. Some 20.8 million people are now seeking work in the EU. ___ TOKYO Japan's benchmark Nikkei 225 stock average added 26.56 points, or 0.3 per cent, to 9,704.31, setting a fresh eight-month high. Australia's index added 1.6 per cent and Shanghai's benchmark was up 0.1 per cent. But Hong Kong's Hang Seng lost 2.7 per cent to 18,389.08 after jumping four per cent to an eight-month high the previo us session. South Korea's K ospi gave up early gains to t rade down 0.2 per cent amid more concerns North Korea is preparing to launch three or four medium-range missiles. ___ CAIRO A Saudi conglomerate whose billionaire chairman is under the spotlight by the kingdom's banking authorities had its credit rating knocked down several notches to junk status by Moody's Investors Service. The announcement came as Saad Group, headed by major HSBC stakeholder Maan al-Sanea, said it was planning an "orderly restructuring" of some of its companies' debt, citing liquidity issues linked to the global economic meltdown. The two statements came days after Saudi Arabia's central bank ordered local financial institutions to freeze al-Sanea's accounts and those of five of his relatives, including wife and children. Al-Sanea is listed by Forbes as the world's 62nd richest man. _ __ S T. PETERSBURG, Russia Prime Minister Vladimir Putin and Nissan Motor Corp. president Carlos Ghosn presided over the opening of the Japanese car maker's first plant in Russia, banking on the revival of the country's car industry despite the global financial crisis. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 5 2wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y P revious CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.841.28Abaco Markets1.401.400.000.1270.00011.00.00% 11.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.436.94Bank of Bahamas6.946.940.000.2440.26028.43.75% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.603.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.2010.18Cable Bahamas11.3911.390.001.4060.2508.12.19% 2.902.75Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.2490.04011.41.41% 7.506.00Commonwealth Bank (S16.006.000.000.4190.36014.36.00% 4.781.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.123.190.070.1110.05228.71.63% 2.951.32Doctor's Hospital1.401.450.052,0000.2400.0806.05.52% 8.207.50Famguard7.767.760.000.4200.30018.53.87% 12.5010.00Finco10.9710.970.000.3220.67034.16.11% 11.7910.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.4010.400.000.7940.40013.13.85% 5.554.95Focol (S5.095.090.000.3320.15015.32.95%1 .001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9 .025.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.0010.50J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.001 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.37581.3124Colina Bond Fund1.37581.654.83 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8962-1.49-3.35 1.39011.3875Colina Money Market Fund1.46302.055.25 3.60903.1821Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.18216.01-13.90 12.861812.2702Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.86181.935.80 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.56119.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.21061.27-6.81 1.05261.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.05261.635.26 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0322-0.083.22 1.05231.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.05231.455.23 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L L L L : : C C O O L LI I N N A A 2 24 4 2 2 5 5 0 0 2 2 7 70 0 1 10 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L L F F I I D D E E L LI I T T Y Y 2 2 4 42 2 -3 35 5 6 67 7 7 7 6 64 4 | | F FG G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K K E E T T S S 2 24 4 2 2 3 3 9 9 6 6 -4 40 0 0 00 0 | | C C O O L L O O N N I I A A L L 2 2 4 4 2 2 5 50 0 2 2 -7 75 5 2 2 5 5FINDEX: CLOSE 790.41 | YTD -5.32% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSTUESDAY, 2 JUNE 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,598.25 | CHG 0.33 | %CHG 0.02 | YTD -114.11 | YTD % -6.66BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 30-Apr-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 30-Apr-09 30-Apr-09 30-Apr-09 W W W WW W . .B B I I S S X X B B A A H H A A M M A A S S . .C C O O M M | | T T E E L L E E P P H HO ON N E E : :2 24 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 -2 23 3 3 3 0 0 | | F F A A C C S S I I M M I I L L E E : : 2 2 4 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 -2 23 3 2 2 0 0NAV Date 31-Mar-09 15-May-09 30-Apr-09 30-Apr-09 31-Dec-08 30-Apr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tGULV /DWYLD /LTXLGDWRU A look at economic developments, stock activity around the world

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Owner Marva Thompson serves up the traditional lunch time favourite with a dynamic twist that leaves her customers begging for more. Mrs Thompson explained that she was the quality c ontrol inspector for a major fast food chain for many years and felt that she had gone as far as she could in the company. Wanting to further her love of cooking, she branched out and Burger Barn came along late last year. “This is a family affair, my husband, Tommy and my two daughters Teniel and Kenea all work with me. I wanted to do something different, and I love to c ook and I like to experiment. I did not want to do the traditional chicken and conch snacks so I came up with the idea of hamburgers, but with unique toppings that had an edge and would make people want to drive out here for more. “The hamburgers you get at Burger Barn are not your regular hamburgers, the size is larger, we do not use frozen patties, we make our own buns and the toppings you can not get anywhere else.” These toppings include: grilled onions, pineapples, bacon, fried eggs, jalapenos, mushrooms, Teriyaki sauce or conch chilli just to name a few delicious options. Customers can choose from an eclectic list of Burger Barn suggestions. The Sunshine Burger, one of the most popular, is an all beef patty topped with a fried egg, melted American cheese, bacon and lettuce and tomatoes. Want something hotter? Try the TNT burg era beef patty topped with roasted bell peppers, jalapenos,onions and garlic Swiss cheese and lettuce and tomatoes Or try the Avalanche burger spicy pork topped with grilled pineapple, lettuce and tomatoes. None of those strike your fancy? Then create your own signature burger. If you’re not in the mood for a hamburger, try the jerk chicken or pork, escoveitch fish or Mrs Thompson’s original conch chilli. She also offers cracked chicken or conch. Pair any one of these entrees with French fries onion rings, sweet potato, chili, or garlic fries or a garden sal ad. And she’s not yet done searching for new items to add to the menu. I will try anything on a burger, I have trusted staff and family members who I try things out on. They are my guinea pigs and then we decide if we should do it. You won’t know until you try, I remember when we first introduced the pineapple, people were reluctant, but now they love it. I really have not gotten any negative feed back. Now that we have so many mangos in season, I would love to do maybe a turkey burger with a mango topping on a whole wheat bun or maybe something with nuts.” The location of her restauranton Carmichael Road west of Gladstone Road has not detracted from her business either. “I have customers who drive out here from Yamacraw, they come from as far east as you can think or as far west. Ninety per cent of my business comes from repeat customers or word of mouthpeople who hear about Burger Barn from friends and come to try it out. C M Y K C M Y K TASTE PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE T h e T r i b u n e n By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL Tribune Features Editor S o, it’s lunc h time and you’re in the mood to eat a burgerinstead of chowing down on your typical fast food hamburger visit t he Burger Barn on Carmichael Road and get a burger with a bang . Try a bang! burger with a The hamburgers you get at Burger Bar n are not your regular hamburgers, the size is larger, we do not use frozen pat ties, we make our own buns and the toppings you can not get anywhere else. MARVA THOMPSON BURGER BARN offers an ecletic array of burgers on its menu such as the Sunshine, TNT, Bonanza or Avalanche burgers or you can create your own hamburger masterpeice.

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B UZZ C M Y K C M Y K TASTE THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009, PAGE 9B T h e T r i b u n e n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas Technical and Voca tional Institute’s (BTVI Cosmetology Department is getting ready to host it’s first ever Hair Show on June 14 at the Wyndam Nassau Resort and Crystal Palace Ballroom to showcase its brightest student’s hair, beauty and fashion creations. Under the theme “SPICEStudent’s Practical Interpretation of Cosmetic Expression,” students will be allowed to show off their best skills in the area of fashion design and hair styling. There will be eight students from the fashion design department and 10 students from the cosmetology department. Assistant Coordinator for Cosmetology at BTVI, Andrea Taylor, said BTVI decided to have the show to make the country aware of what students had to offer. “We really wanted them to show off their creativity in their work. They will be styling hair onstage. The first category will be an everyday look and the second category is an evening comb out. This is to help them to do platform work. There are a lot of areas in cosmetology that you can go into and one of those areas is becoming a hair artist or hair cosmologist representative for various companies. With this type of experience, they will get to know how to create with what they have,” Mrs Taylor said. Shirley Pearson, Coordinator for Fashion Design Production, said for the fashion design segment, students will be required to create high fashion and casual wear. “They got excited when Islands of the World fashion week was held last November. Since then, they have been hyped and ready to display their work. Most of the students are hiding their themes but one student is doing a salt and pepper collection in relation to the spices,” Mrs Pearson said. Mrs Taylor said this show is a great opportunity for the public to know about the upcoming talent at BTVI. “These students are going to be graduating soon and we want to expose their work. We really want to let the public know that we are here in the cosmetology and fashion department and we are running 100 per cent,” Mrs Taylor said. Showtime for SPICE 2009 is 8pm. Tickets for the event can be purchased for $20 from BTVI, 100% Per Cent Bible Bookstore, and Security Plus on Village Road. Tickets will be $25 at the door. BTVI hosts Spice 2009 n By LLOYD ALLEN T ribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net Over the last few weeks the rain has managed to place a damper on several outdoor events, and has forced many to opt for a weekend at home rather than go out and about. However this weekend’s event forecast is predicting numerous scattered events, with lots of food and culture. So grab your dancing shoes and your raincoat, because this weekend’s entertainment rundown is offering everything but the sun. 1. Salt Pond Long Island is expected to be booming this weekend when hundreds of spectators attend the island’s a nnual regatta. Over the course of the three day cultural extravaganza which s tarts Thursday there will be a plethora of activities including the traditional boat racing, various fairs, lots of food stalls, parties, and much more. To book your seat, contact Bahamasair, the Island Link or the Legacy motor vessels. 2. This weekend its all about family fun, at least according to the organisers of the Eleuthera Pineapple Festi val. The event which is spread over a five day weekend start ing from today, has scheduled a long list of activities including tours of some of the island’s pineapple farms, craft exhibits, a Junkanoo r ush out, live music, and pineapple cooking and eating contest. Event organisers have also planned a ‘Pineathlon’ which will include a h alf mile swim, a three mile run, then a four and a half mile bike ride. The festival includes the island’s annual Little Miss Pineapple pageant, where one lucky girl will be crowned with the esteemed title and reign as the festival princess. Set to take centre stage in Governor’s Harbour Eleuthera, this event is a sure bet for those looking for that drama free weekend getaway. 3. Starting today at the Galleria Cinema JFK location, the Bahamas International Film Festival will launch its month long local film series starting with the film I Am Not A Dummy by local film maker Kareem Mortimer. Other movies slated for the miniseries include Artists of The Bahamas , Sita Sings The Blues , and Three Seasons . Priced at a mere $5 per person, this event is expected to draw a hefty crowd to witness the Bahamian film making industry at its finest. Showtime begins promptly at 7.30pm. 4. Visit the Hub Art Centre this Friday evening at 7pm to learn film making techniques form international producer Paul H-O and Tom Donhue from New York. The duo who also produced the film Guest of Cindy Sherman which was recently premiered at the Popop Studio, will offer view ers a unique look into their early careers while revealing some of their best kept secrets as film makers. This informal art/documentary film making workshop at the Hub on Friday, June 5 at 7 pm is a must do for all those interest ed in developing as actors, producers, and directors. 5. Thursday, stop over at the Hard Rock Caf to catch an exciting session of the weekly Express Yourself open mic night. The event which has brought in exciting performers like Broken Micz, Davineir Clarke, Baygon, and many other artists on the rise, is guaranteed to entertain viewers in every way imagin able. Entrance is free, and drinks are affordably priced. things 2 DO n By LLOYDALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net SEEN as a newcomer to the local music scene, Bahamian reggae ar tist Jalam is making w a v es as a force to be reckoned with as he takes on the Bahamas and the w or ld t hr ough his conscious l yr ics. Born and raised in the tiny settlement of New Bight, Cat Island, Jalam aka Jamal Moncur began molding himself as a musician from early on, and quickly gained local attention for his performances in various tal ent competitions and school productions. Jalam told Tribune Entertainment , that because of his well received lyrics on the island, it was easy to get the support of his teachers, peers, and family for what was to come next in his career. After graduating high school in 1996, Jalam moved to Nassau which for him was the place to be for any performing artist who wanted to make it big. He quickly linked with local entertainers Michael Hoyte and Ian Williams, who were instrumental in improving his sound, image, and his overall understanding of the local music industry. Explaining the platform for most of his work, Jalam said: “Most of my lyrics are more about social issues which are generally things I see on the streets, crime, but are mostly positive vibes. “So when people hear from Jalam, they know it’s pure niceness, crafty lyrics, so I feel like most people that listen to me listen not for the beat, but for what I have to say.” Although described as a reggae artist, Jalam said he views himself as a world beat artist touching several genres including dancehall, culture, rap, and even RnB. After first hitting the industry more than 13 years ago with his singles No Mama Man, Jah Guides , and Sufferation, Jalam has continued to give music lovers smooth rhythms and conscious lyrics. Staying true to his passion of producing music with a message, Jalam has also pro duced a track titled HIV, which he hopes will better educate young people on the dangers of unprotected sex. “It’s hurtful to see a lot of young people catching diseases at a rapid pace, and right now it’s intensifying. A lot of people aren’t getting educated for what’s going on, and on top of that I don’t see other artist really talking about it, but this is really an important issue and I think there needs to be more artists who are not afraid to advocate for this cause,” he said. With a selection of songs now on the air waves including World Gone Crazy and Most High which was produced and shoot by F.DOT Jalam is once again asserting himself as a top performing Bahamian artist, where he plans to take no prisoners on his way to the top. The new

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C M Y K C M Y K ARTS PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n B y ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net S PRING 2009 brought with it new life and new beginn ings especially for the music industry in the Bahamas. Young talented Bahamians have been producing culturally expressive music to satisfy a ne w gener ation of listeners. However, other young Bahamians who left home in search of making a name for themselves abroad musically are beginning to return home and give back to the industry in the Bahamas with SINDAKID trailblazing the way for these returning sons of the soil. Born Dwight George Porter in Freeport, Grand Bahama, SINDAKID has placed himself outside of the box immersing himself in everything from being a rapper, writer, producer, and actor. “I moved to New York when I was 17. When it comes to rapping, it was a God given talent. I wasn’t trained or learned how to do it-I was born with the ability to rap. When it comes to people I look up to in the music business, the only person is Tupac becauseI like his music-it’s real and down to earth. I am real, I express myself 100 per cent and I don’t try to be nobody else but who I am,” SINDAKID said. The name SINDAKID apparently is a spin off of the first gang in the Bahamas dating back to the early 1980’s called SINDAKIDS. “I basically wanted to turn a negative into a positive. It was a gang and the majority of time gangs are always negative. I took off the ‘S’ where it would be SINDAKID. A gang is organised crime or a group of people. When I took off the ‘S’ it became one person or basically a one man army. When you hear the name SINDAKID, for kids in this generation, they would know that name for something positive. I also wanted to have a name that no one had in New York. I wanted something that was home based and that no one could even think about in America and SINDAKID was the perfect name,” he said. While most young people prefer to leave the country and never return, SINDAKID said he had to come back, even if he had left for over 30 years. “This is the place where I was born and raised, this is the place that I love and hate. There are pros and cons-but why not come home and let people see my talent. In New York, I represent the Bahamas hard and I really want to get reacquainted with my home base because if you forget where you come from you can’t get where you are going. At the end of the day, the Bahamas hasn’t changed-it’s still the same Bahamas basically. I am making rounds in foreign, but the people in the Bahamas have to know who I am too. My new single says it all for my love of this country called ‘I love Nassau,’ which incorporates all the islands,” SINDAKID said. SINDAKID has sold thousands of copies of his latest mixtape, “The Appetizer” world wide and has a new mixtape called “From Bahamas to New York,” showcasing his Bahamian upbringing and love for his country. With his hard core tracks and mind altering lyrics, SINDAKID is determined to emphasise real life in his music. “I’m not a gospel rapper or a person that is going to always preach to the peoplemy message is about me as a person and people getting to hear howI am living, my lifestyle, what I went through growing up and what I am going through now. My message overall is to keep striving to follow your dreams,” SINDAKID said. Although SINDAKID resides in New York, he said he represents the Bahamas in everything he does and while he is back home, he wants to get involved in everything this country has to offer. “I really want to get in tune with everything that is going on dealing with music and the community. I would definitely like to get involved in anything that is like community service, some organisations, and just give back to the community. Even with my music I don’t sell it the people here I give them to the people. I want them to embrace my music so I give it out here for them to get to know me and my music.” To hear more music from SIN DAKID, check out facebook page at sindakid porter or on myspace at redragzent. “Da most hansome hustla” SINDAKID I really want to get in tune with everything that is going on dealing with music and the community . I would definitely like to get involved in anything that is like community service, some organisations, and just give back to the community. The Bahamas Real Estate Association (BREA anniversary last week May 24 Friday May 29. BREA was formed in 1959 by HG Christie, Edgar Bain, Frank Christie, D Lester Brown, Jack Hughes and Bert L Roberts. The objectives of the association, as established by its founding members were to unite and regulate the industry, maintain a code of ethics by persons in the industry and to prevent infringements by foreign brokers or other unauthorised persons in the sale of real estate in the country. On Friday evening, the association hosted a gala black tie banquet in the Crown Ballroom of the Atlantis Resort. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham delivered the key note address, and GovernorGeneral Arthur Hanna presented awards to long serving and dedicated members of the association. Also in attendance was Timothy Kinzler, BREA’s president liaison for the National Association of Realtors. Attendees danced the night away to the music of musical legends Count Bernadino and Ronnie But ler accompanied by the Extra Band. THE B AHAMAS REAL ES TATE ASSOCIATION CELEBRATES 50 YEARS BREA Board members with Prime Minister Ingraham at BREA 50th, May 29, 2009 at Atlantis: (from left past president Larry Roberts. AMONG the Bahamas Real Estate Association's Past Presidents attending the Association's 50 Anniversary Celebration Friday, May 29 at Atlantis were: (From left to right chan 1999-1001, Barbara Brooks 1993-1998, Geoffrey Brown Sr.; Mike Lightbourn, far right, has served on the BREA Board almost continuously. BREA Administrator June Fife (centre Celebration. Governor General Arthur Hanna and Lana Munnings-Basalyga BREA’s vice president presented the plaque. Keith Parker/ P. S. News photos

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C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune SECTIONB I N S I D E The new buzz See page nine WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2009 Try a burger with a bang! See page eight n B y ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter a missick@tribunemedia.net Y OUR hair is one of the first things people notice. The right hair accessories can do wonders by making your hair style all y our own. Most people buy gener ic accessories from the grocer y st ore and by the end of the da y someone else has t he exact same hair accessory, making your look less unique. However, Cherie McCartneyGilbert has decided to take hair accessories to another level by making them as extraordinary as her clients. Born and raised in New Providence, and a mother of two, Mrs Gilbert has a Bachelors Degree in International Business & Finance and has worked in the financial services industry for the last 13 years. Despite this, Mrs Gilbert said she always enjoyed being creative and working with her hands. “Prior to shell craft, I have done pottery and in the last month and a half I have pursued glass blowing and straw work craft. In February of this year, I did a shell craft class with BAIC that was taught by Mrs April Martin-Fox,” Mrs Gilbert said. Travelling Due to her love for traveling, Mrs Gilbert collects interesting and unique hand made pieces. When it comes to her creations, Mrs Gilbert makes it her goal to make pieces that can be used by the individuals purchasing them for a very long time. “I have a passion for hair accessories which include hair clips and I am surrounded by a number of women that share the same passion and have encouraged me to create such hair accessories. Therefore, I ensure that my creations are functional pieces that showcase the beauty of our Bahama Islands,” Mrs Gilbert said. Mrs Gilbert’s hair clips can range in price from $7 and $20. The process of making a hair accessory is rather rigorous as Mrs Gilbert explains her technique. “First is the selection of the right shells to express/compliment the idea that I like or wish to create and the proper cleaning of the shells to ensure that the beauty of the shells are max imised. Decoration of the hair clips is done with the use of a glue gun. This process involves making flowers or other shapes with the shells while keeping in mind if this clip will be worn by a young girl or an adult female. In addition, I need to keep in mind whether the piece can be used for a casual or dressy occasion. After I have completed the decoration process and am satis fied with my creation, Envirotex is used to preserve the shells so that they are strong and durable and to give it a gloss finish. Once the piece is dried, if required, a Dremel is used to clean up any excess Envirotex that may have hardened during the drying process,” Mrs Gilbert said. Most of Mrs Gilbert’s preferred shells of choice are those shells that can be found on the lovely beaches of the Bahamas. These include: Keyhole Limpet, Bleeding Tooth (Nerita peloronta), Flamingo Tooth (Cyphoma gibbosum), Dove Shell (Columbella mer catoria), small white clam shell, pink & white clam shell, Sunrise Tellin, Tellina radiate, zebra stripped tiger, Tessellate nerite and whelk shells all of which can be found in Long Island. Inspiration Mrs Gilbert said she also used shells from Cat Island such as Tiger Lucina, Donax denticulata, Faust Tellin and Gaudy Asaphis and shells from Andros, Bimini and New Providence. As for inspiration, Mrs Gilbert attributes it to God as she seeks Him first for guidance and creativity so that she can express herself through her shell crafts. “I am also inspired by the beautiful shells that can be found throughout our beau tiful islands and want to display their beauty on creative pieces,” Mrs Gilbert said. Mrs Gilbert said she would advise other young artist to follow their hearts. “If this is something that you have a passion for then pursue it.” Cherie McCartney-Gilbert creates gorgeous hair accessories from beautiful seashells I am surrounded by a number of women that share the same passion and have encouraged me to create such hair accessories. CHERIE MCCARTNEY-GILBERT CHERIE GILBERT poses with one of her lovely hair accessory creations. HAIR CLIP created with small white clam shells. Photos taken by Vaughn Scriven