Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
{T)\

Mim blowin’ it

84F
74F

SUNNY WITH
eT STORM

Volume: 105 No.156

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009

LOW Get Your Cold

Coffee Fix





etm Cem] 8
$2.3m in stamp
tax revenue
in last year



SSSR





CAH

BOY, tu, found



Mother fears ‘police
brutality’ may have
contributed to son’s death

m@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A DISTRAUGHT single
mother of five fears police bru-
tality may have contributed to
the death of her teenage son.

Michael Knowles, 15, was
found dead in his police cell at
around 8.21pm on Sunday.

Officers found him hanging
from an upper bar with what is
believed to be a drawstring
from his shorts around his neck.

The youngster, who had been
arrested on Thursday on suspi-
cion of housebreaking, was pro-
nounced dead at the scene.

While police have ruled
Michael’s death a “suicide”, his
family do not believe the boy
would have taken his own life.

His mother, 33-year-old Don-
na Wilson, claims the police
reports do not add up and says
she is seeking “the truth”
regarding the tragedy.

She told The Tribune: “I only
want to know the truth because
this story does not sound right.

“It sounds as if someone is
trying to cover up something.”

Ms Wilson claims that sepa-
rate witnesses who were at the
station with her son have told
her that Michael, who celebrat-



33-YEAR-OLD Donna Wilson,

mother of the 15-year-old, claims

the police reports do not add up.
Felipé Major/Tribune staff

ed his 15th birthday two weeks
ago, was beaten by police.
While police reported that
the 15-year-old had been found
with a draw string around his
neck, Ms Wilson said she found
that unlikely as her son had

SEE page 10

The Taste

on

Tuesdays!!

ey wilt

rmore.

Baise oh aimedium,

DSO



PLP MP’s
salary cut
claim is
criticised

m By ALISON LOWE

Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Chairman of the FNM
yesterday criticised PLP MP Philip
Davis’ claim that he is willing to
forego 20 per cent of his parlia-
mentary salary to save public mon-
ey as a political move intended to
further an ambition to be leader
of the PLP.

Johnley Ferguson said if Mr
Davis was “serious” he would have

SEE page 15



CLAIM THAT RESIDENTS
“FACE A SEVEN MILE DRIVE’
TO GET WATER

WOMAN PASSENGER IS
KILLED IN TRAFFIC ACCIDENT

CLERGYMEN VOICE CONCERN
OVER GOVT'S HANDLING OF
CRIME





SEE PAGE ELEVEN

First case
of Swine
Flu in the
Bahamas

Adult visitor

tested positive

JOANNA BROWN was
wned Miss Bahamas World
the Wyndham Nassau
esort on Sunday night.

a3 aH tia

YLT M LiCl PMMA CLUS) cU ie



Family flee
as fire sweeps
through their

apartment

POLICE fire officials are try-
ing to determine the cause of a
blaze which destroyed an apart-
ment unit and left the parents of
an infant girl nursing minor
burns.

According to reports, a 31-
year-old man and his wife were
wakened by a fire in their Misty
Gardens home off Marshall
Road early yesterday morning.

They forced their way out of
the apartment with their infant
daughter. As a result the man

SEE page 10

It wasn't raining when Noah built the Ark...

It’s not too late to build yours...

Weather the storm with Fidelity.

Fidelity Built-In Savings Plans

Switch to Fidelity products - they have built-in savings plans:
MoneyBack Mortgage @e Debt$AVER e Asue Visa Card

Nassau: 356.7764 Freeport: 352.6676/7 Marsh Harbour: 367.3135

D

FIDELITY
30* ANNIVERSARY



NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Ministry of Health
has confirmed that The
Bahamas has recorded its
first case of Swine Flu.

Revealing how a young
adult visitor to the country
from New York tested
positive for the potentially
deadly A (H1N1) virus, a
Government spokesman
said “all necessary pre-
cautions” were taken at
the facilities where the vis-
itor stayed while other
sites where they may have
come into contact with
people are under “ongo-
ing surveillance.”

However, neither
Health Minister Dr
Hubert Minnis or
Bahamas Hotel Associa-

SEE page 10

Man and
woman shot
several times

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT —- A man and
woman are being treated at
Rand Memorial Hospital after
they were shot at several times
in the Xanadu Beach area on
Sunday evening.

Asst Supt Emrick Seymour
said the couple sustained non-
life threatening injuries and
were able to escape their
assailant and drive to the hos-
pital, where they are under
police protection.

At this time, police
are unable to determine
whether the shooting was an
apparent armed robbery
attempt or caused by a jealous
lover.

“We do not know for sure
what the motive was in this case
and we cannot speculate, but
we are investigating the mat-
ter,” said Mr Seymour.

He reported that police are

SEE page 10





PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009






















UE Ue (elem Vln
SEATON, UM aad Ue ee TLC

Financial Str

__ A- Excellent

FAMGUARD

CORPORATION LIMITED

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Claim that residents
‘face a seven mile
drive’ to get water

RESIDENTS of a North
Andros community are hav-
ing to drive as far as seven
miles to get water for basic
needs after a major shortage
struck the settlement, a local
resident claims.

And to add to their trou-
bles, telephone service and
electricity were off for several
days.

Speaking to The Tribune
using his “Vibe” longdistance
telephone service - the only
phone service available on Fri-
day - a Mastic Point resident,
who wished to remain anony-
mous, called on Government
to address the needs of the
community.

He said: “Fortunately

TROPICAL
Sars el
RR UE
PHONE: 322-2157

enough rain came and we had
a very heavy downpour, but
people have been having to
drive to other neighbouring
settlements, to relatives or
friends, to get water.”

The man claimed the water
shortage has affected Mastic
Point for “six to seven weeks”
with many driving to neigh-
bouring San Andros to get
supplies.

However, he noted that the
community has been blighted
by an unreliable water supply
for decades, with each repre-
sentative - PLP or FNM -
“promising” to do something
about it but failing to, he
claims.

“It’s just a total disaster,”
he said. “It seems as though
we don’t have a representa-
tive (MP).”

The latest drought is affect-
ing the livelihoods of those
who own guesthouses in the
community, as they are unable
to provide guests with basic
amenities.

The resident said the situa-
tion is particularly unfortunate
given the fact that popular
Andros event Crabfest is due
to take place on June 11.

“You cannot entertain per-
sons who want to come to this
part of the island in your guest
houses because there is no
water, no telephone and the
light’s not really dependable,”
he said.

A MASTIC POINT resident

claimed the water shortage
has affected the community
for ‘six to seven weeks’.



Tourists passing through the
community have to be turned
away if they ask to use bath-
rooms, or are looking for a
cold drink when the electrici-
ty is out.

The long-time resident of
the area claimed the water
supply was much more con-
sistent in the 1960s when the
community was supplied by a
large tank pumped by a wind-
mill.

“We’re longing to hear a
voice from the government to
hear what’s going on,” he
added, noting that although
Mastic Point has always been
a “faithful polling division”
for the FNM, overall condi-
tions have not improved
under the current government.

The Tribune was unable to
reach Vincent Peet, the PLP
MP for the constituency, for
comment yesterday.

Meanwhile calls to local
branches the utilities corpo-
rations - BEC, Water and
Sewerage and Batelco - were
unsuccessful because of the
phone service failures.

‘YOUR VIEW”

To have your say on this or any
other issue, email The Tribune
at: letters@tribunemedia.net
or deliver your letter to
The Tribune on Shirley Street,
P.O. Box N-3207



Minister congratulates
developers of The Balmoral

DEVELOPERS of upscale residential development The Balmoral
were congratulated by Labour Minister Dion Foulkes for their efforts
that will shortly see more than 150 Bahamians on their payroll.

Mr Foulkes, Minister of Labour and Social Development, made
his comments as he officially opened The Balmoral, located in western
New Providence, on Friday, May 29.

Commencement of the construction of 75 condominiums and resi-
dential homes will give employment to more than 100 Bahamian
workers, he was told, while the development’s club house employs 50
Bahamians.

Minister Foulkes said: “This development is indicative of the confi-
dence that the investment community has in the Bahamas. In spite of
the global economic downturn, the owners of the Balmoral Club con-
tinue to aggressively pursue the completion of this project.”

He praised the developers for engaging construction firms that are
100 per cent Bahamian owned.

The Balmoral Club is jointly owned by Bahamians and foreign
investors, including Bahamians Mr. Wesley Bastian and Mr. Jason
Kinsale, President of The Balmoral.

¢ SEE BUSINESS SECTION

PARADISE ISLAND

Fully tummehed
A bed, 2 bath condos with
[= tol harbor access
Ke Weber erie parent.
In pristine condition

PEPe Tired CORT) Wile Sea LT
eda oe ite
Loonbact
Mir, Wells & Tropical Realty
for immediate viewing
Srranpements.
Phone: 327-1102

oe





THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

Woman passenger is _—_ Steppin on Da Shores
event is postponed

killed in traffic accident

ABACO recorded its first traffic fatal-
ity for year on Sunday when a 29-year-old
woman died after the truck she was a
passenger in ran off the road and crashed

into bushes.

According to reports, sometime after
6pm the driver of a blue 2001 Nissan

en to the local clinic for treatment.
But Ms Sands was pronounced dead
shortly after arrival.
The driver of the truck is reportedly
sul receiving medical attention.
Traffic police are continuing their inves-
tigations.

Frontier truck along with a passenger
identified as Melissa Sands, were heading
south along Ernestine Highway located in
South Abaco when the truck ran off the
road into bushes.

Ms Sands and the 30-year-old driver
from Man-O-War Cay, Abaco, were tak-

Sel aa Tae Glia

A YOUNG man was lucky
to escape alive from this Glad-
stone Road crash on Sunday
that resulted in power cables
being damaged, eyewitnesses
said.

According to someone on
the scene, the man, between
20 and 25 years old, was head-
ing north at around 10pm
when his car hit the utility
pole.

Escaping with no visible
injuries, the unidentified man
was seen refusing requests

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Ia AA es
Tropical Exterminators
322-2157

share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



“Lowest Prices On The Island”



from paramedics, who were
at the scene, to take him to

of OFF ALL
PROM
\ 0 O FaBRics

/ (a of a kind Special Occasion Fabric
\ Iridescent Taffeta
Two Tone Shantung
Beaded & Sequin Fabric
Lamour, Chiffon

By ee i
OACCESSORIES

an purchased same dayas fabric
Evening Bags
“Gloves

me

—





7












ee — ae - Le Te SD

Cae La

Madeira St. [242] 325-8233 * Robinson Rd.[242] 322-3080

FOR ALL YOUR DECORATING nS | ig

goltt

STORE HOURS:
Monday - Saturday
8:30am - 5:30pm

BILLY’S DREAM
STILL ALIVE

FREE DELIVERY ANY WHERE IN NASSAU AND TO THE MAIL BOAT

¢ E-Z CREDIT TERMS AVAILABLE

Donald’s Furniture

And Appliance Centre

SIXTH TERRACE CENTREVILLE TEL: 322-1731 OR 322-3875

DUE to a decline in local
economic activity, a num-
ber of the major partners
have had to scale back on
their contributions to the
Steppin on Da Shores
event.

The event has now been

postponed for 2009.

The organisers apologise
for the inconvenience
caused, but they are in talks
with another entity in hopes
to bring a collaborative pre-
mium event before the end
of Summer 2009.



Bere eg mma eee UL

MORLEY
FoR â„¢
MEN

Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6654/6
Baypar! Building, Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-8240 ¢ Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com










Bi = {_Beoins
| i’

TERMINATOR

el ed rT

i A nil i ea Vat sel

a
tii

feet So houee




ool. "I



bax MEPOMELL mew | 0 [295 [WA cio [8 [Ht
remanorcnsatomion | 80, [50 WY oe [a0 18

cat arg scum | ts | 00 | WIA sto | a [408

ounce ruck [nts | nas [WA | rns [as [et |

awcersanewons ic] 100 |ik | 00 {roo | wa_| ee |

SmaTIEKK) | 60 | an | NA | eo | a | 10 |

ex onc 2 | 0s | Wik i | a | 1 |

NEN ORIGIN WOUERNE | +00 | nan [NA | eo | 25 | 145 |
T

















rewmaronsanaron + [1s [0 [ WA | 10 | 20 | so
pace sree [vt 3 [Wa | 0 | eae | a

wcenis [vat [aw [wa | 62 wat 5
prcsanens © [it [WA | ao] HWA |
PC

380-FLIX





PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Strong, decisive leadership needed

AS THIS year opened Opposition Leader
Perry Christie warned his parliamentarians that
the FNM government would try to destroy the
PLP by using any and all of the “agencies of the
state” against it.

As the year progressed it seemed that Mr
Christie had targeted the wrong enemy. Faced
with a world in recession, Prime Minister Ingra-
ham was too involved in the monumental task of
crafting reforms to “keep this country above
water” to be concerned about Mr Christie and
his squabbling party.

A growing faction of the PLP do not believe
their party has a chance of victory in another
election with Mr Christie as its leader. How-
ever, there is also a hard core of party stalwarts
who still hold Mr Christie’s arm high in the ring
as reigning champion. They see no one to
replace him.

As for Mr Christie — he assures Bahamians
that he, PLP Deputy Leader Cynthia Pratt and
party chairman Glenys Hanna Martin, are “all,
as of today, secure in their positions.” His crit-
ics say he is in denial.

In an attempt to force reality on him, some-
one within the party has released the entire
Greenberg, Quinlan and Rosner report. These
US consultants were commissioned by the PLP
after the 2007 election to analyse the reason
for the party’s election loss. The report was
blunt in its findings — a nice, but weak leader,
with a public perception of a corrupt and scan-
dal-ridden party. The consultants gave advice as
to how to reverse the poor image. But party
critics claim that they have seen no signs of Mr
Christie taking any steps to wipe the slate clean
and starting anew.

However, Mr Christie assured them that he
has not been asleep. Since the consultants’
report, he told his supporters, who seem lost in
the same Land of Nod with him, the party has
done a self-examination and “will have strength-
ened itself” in time for the 2012 election.

Apparently, he doesn’t see much need for
change within the party. He is relying on the
country being in such a depressed condition
that, in disgust, a people of short memory will
turn to him as their saviour.

He might be right, but just as those of the old
PLP relied on racist propaganda, symbolised
by grocer JP Sands, to win a generation of vot-
ers who had no idea who JP Sands was, the
days when Mr Christie could don a fringed Val-
ley Boys junkanoo costume and with a ker-lick
of a cow bell get a nation to follow him, are
also over. Today, Bahamians are better edu-
cated, have more intelligence and can reason for
themselves.

Bahamians understand that Mr Ingraham,
like other world leaders, is grappling with an
economic situation that not one of them knows
how to solve. There are many projects that Mr
Ingraham could have launched had he had the
five good years that Mr Christie squandered.
But Bahamians understand that if Barack Oba-
ma of the US, Gordon Brown of the UK,
Angela Merkel of Germany, Nicolas Sarkozy of
France and other world leaders are feeling their
way in a darkened world, how do they expect
Mr Ingraham, leading a group of islands that
barely show on the map, to have the answers? In
addition, this is an archipelago that depends on
the economic health of the world’s industri-
alised nations for its own financial well being. So
if they fail, we also fail, and there is no one —
not even Mr Christie — who can change the
inevitable.

The only blessing in all of this confusion is
that the Bahamas has Mr Ingraham at the helm,
instead of Mr Christie, who would probably
still be taking his time selecting a committee
of advisers.

According to Mr Christie, if a people don’t
like what a government in power is doing, in
their disaffection they will turn to the Opposi-
tion, regardless of how it is organised. On this
we disagree.

They will care how it is organised. The years
2002-2007 are not so long past that Bahamians
will forget a man who promised them that at his
government’s first cabinet meeting, his ministers
would “formally adopt the strictest code of
ethics in the political life of the country,” but
instead gave them five years of ministers out of
control, allegations of corruption, and scandal
followed by scandal.

Mr Christie might be right that his position as
leader is secure within his own party— the
researchers did find that he was personally pop-
ular — only because the party has no one else in
its ranks who can hold it together. However, the
people will not forget his leadership style, which
they equate with weakness.

In these troubled times, this country needs a
strong, decisive leader, one who will say: Look
the country does not have enough funds to give
each individual what he or she might want, or
even deserve, but I, as your prime minister,
have to think of the good of the whole. I shall
have to lock the Treasury vaults to make certain
that the Bahamas can stay afloat if the present
depression worsens. This is now time for all of
us to tighten our belts.

No, Mr Christie, you are not the man of the
hour. Nor is your party — its reputation is in
desperate need of cleansing.



Wn Being Left in the Dark?

ie
nee eee eel)

We Can Help You
Tem ew meee

SDMO Generators

,
tr

WANTED
A FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

Sad to see
the chaos

in the PLP

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I would be eternally grate-
ful if you would print this letter.
I am tired of pretending and
must call a spade a spade. The
Bahamas would be better if
more of us be honest and think
of the betterment of this coun-
try instead of party first.

First of all lam a PLP who is
totally disgruntled with my own
party. I have never seen any
organisation that is so disor-
ganised and in utter chaos as
the PLP is today. The deterio-
ration is rapid. What in the
world is going on? Where is
the party that I grew up almost
worshipping? Where are the
men with the backbone? This
is very sad to witness.

The last election displayed
to all Bahamians and indeed the
world that the PLP was simply
not tuned into what the
Bahamian people were saying.
They screamed many times that
we had a weak and indecisive
leader. Yet we ignored the peo-
ple. The people told us that if
we sent the PLP back with Mr.
Chrisite as leader they would
refuse the party as the govern-
ment. We did not listen. The
result is history.

We hired a group to deter-
mine what went wrong. Even
though we knew all along, the
group said in clear unambigu-
ous language that the leader
was weak and indecisive. The
leader saw the report and all of
the top brass was privy. They
hid the report from us and now
it is out in the public domain

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



that the people were right all
along. This is highly embarrass-
ing. Yet the leadership has no
shame.

Many of the potential can-
didates vying for deputy lead-
ership are so afraid of their own
shadow that they refuse to use
this information to pressure Mr.
Perry Gladstone Chrisite to
pack his Georgie bundle and
leave town before sundown.
They, instead, “kiss up” and
appease Mr. Chrisite hoping
that their journey to their
desired position gets his bless-
ing. They do not have the guts
to openly challenge him. The
fact of the matter is that all of
them are just like him, weak.
Some may even be weaker than
Mr. Christie, because he plays
all kind of games with them and
they retreat. The next thing they
need to do is surrender.

In my opinion, Mr. Chrisite is
simply looking out for his own
hide. In fact Mr. Ingraham is
also looking out for Mr.
Chrisite. The first thing he did
was secured a pay raise for the
leader of the opposition and his
pension. These guys are look-
ing out for each other.

This is a game that they are
playing that only benefits them.
Don’t be fooled. There is a plan
to make sure that Mr. Philip
"Brave" Davis receives the
baton next so that the whole

circle would be completed. We
must not let that happen.

That is why the only PLP
today that has displayed any
strength or to put it bluntly, tes-
ticular fortitude is attorney and
activist Paul Moss. Mr. Moss
has consistently displayed the
kind of guts that is sorely lack-
ing in all of the present mem-
bers of parliament especially
the ones who aspire to lead.

He does not appear to be the
kind that would put his own
interest above the country. So
far Mr. Moss has for many years
been an advocate for the down-
trodden and Mr. Chrisite does
not. Mr. Moss spends his time
mixing with his people, listening
to them, Mr. Christie does not.
Mr. Moss is respected by many,
especially nowadays; more stal-
warts are gravitating to his
strong personality and his deter-
mination to get things done. Mr.
Christie, on the other hand, is
turning people off by his inabil-
ity to display strong leadership.

If we are to rebound from
the sorry state and from this
bottomless pit we seem to be
sinking in, we must give serious
consideration to a man who
continues to prove that he is
fearless and would rise to
address any and all challenges.

These times are different. It
is not business as usual. The
PLP need action and we need it
desperately. We cannot wait.

A DEPRESSED
PLP SUPPORTER
Nassau,

May 31, 2009

Corruption needs to be investigated

EDITOR, The Tribune.

A reputable, mid-sized
company is seeking a

FINANCIAL
CONTROLLER

It has come to my attention (although I have
always suspected) that corruption permeates
the governmental hierarchical structure, from
top to bottom, within governments around the
world. The Bahamas is no exception.

I am told that bribes, kickbacks and influ-
ence peddling runs rampant throughout the
civil service in the Bahamas government; and
has been so for years.

This unfortunate development in governance,
in my humble opinion, calls for a precipitation
of measures by the government; chief of which
is the creation (if it does not already exist) or
enhancement of an arm of The Police Force
that would be exclusively dedicated to investi-
gating the activities of the civil service. If a
department like that already exists, I am
unaware of its activities, and thus the mem-
bers of this department are failing miserably.

[have been inundated with testimony from a
variety of individuals who have knowledge of
persons in government (civil service) whose
lifestyles are much more lavish than their

salaries or other alternative income would per-
mit. In my humble opinion, people of that ilk
should be investigated by this department, and
let the consequences prevail.

A legitimate concern with creating or
enhancing this department would be the avail-
ability of resources of the government.

I am well aware (and I am sure others are
too) that the civil service in The Bahamas is
bloated. Ministers of the government inces-
santly admit this freely. And so, those civil ser-
vants who are assigned (and do) little to no
work for the Bahamian taxpayer, would be
able to devote this unproductive time to some
meaningful productivity. Of course, these peo-
ple with their reassignments would have to be
trained and retrained to fulfil the responsibili-
ties of this new vocation. And, if implemented,
The Bahamas government would have
improved the level of productivity associated
with governance of this country.

MARVIN G LIGHTBOURN
Nassau,
May, 2009.

Quality Auto Sales

PRE-OWNED CARS & TRUCKS

For the best deal in town on

pre-cunned cars, with warranty!
Trade-ins on new car sales

NOW
IN STOCK!

‘01 TOYOTA CAMRY

gk a

‘05 TOYOTA CAMRY = suse
‘07 TOYOTA YARIS
‘06 HYUNDAI TERRACAN
‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE
‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
‘06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
‘06 HYUNDAI SONATA
‘01 HYUNDAI HD-65 TRUCK
‘94 MITSUBISHI DIAMANTE
‘94 TOYOTA CAMRY

ADA sales @

Mite

The successful candidate must have

e A minimum of five (5) years experience
with expertise in Cost Accounting.

¢ Competitive Salary & Benefits
Package Available.

Send resumes to:
bahamasfinancialcontroller @ gmail.com

or
Fax: 242-328-7996

DEADLINE: June 19th, 2009
EAST SHIRLEY STREET - * 322-3775 « 325-3079

Fined gy sprees of og bp Pel doe gee ee
me dhoee Ao is feet Reet ey va a

We provide afer sale parte and service ae well we warranly supper.
eer Rae ee mee eli por em ec oeleleit
we well as service contracts as mecded.

x

obcat GP
ahamas

Ketlaiiity

Pema © Prodacniery 7

‘raion’ Sa. Cis Fichd

Tali FER-S171 Fax; 322-0009





THE TRIBUNE

Clergymen voice
concern over govt's

TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 5



Reyer. aS
_ Aircraft laden with cocaine crashes in Honduras

m TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras



consumed by flames.

Police say at least 10 planes carrying drugs have
crashed in Honduras so far this year. Drug traf-
fickers have increasingly been operating in Central
America after coming under pressure in Mexico,
where President Felipe Calderon launched a crack-
down on organized crime in 2006.

Honduran officials say at least 100 tons of U.S.-
bound cocaine from Colombia pass through each

POLICE say a small aircraft carrying bundles

? of cocaine burst into flames as it attempted to land

? north of Tegucigalpa, killing two people on board,
: Co to Associated Press.

National police chief, Gen. Julian Gonzalez says

E police found about 2.2 pounds (1 kilo) of cocaine

? and a Colombian passport inside the craft and that

handling of crime

TWO LEADING local cler-
gymen have expressed their
concern about the Govern-
ment’s efforts in addressing
crime in the country.

Bishop Simeon Hall, senior
pastor of New Covenant Bap-
tist Church, claims Govern-
ment’s cut in funds for crime
fighting agencies, while under-
standable, does not bode well
for the peace and stability of
our nation.

Bishop Hall stated: “I am
amazed that we can burrow for
everything else besides those
agencies that keep us from
total social disintegration.

“Tn light of the budget cuts,
many of the recommendations
made in the last Crime Report
will die a silent death. I can
only urge all well thinking per-
sons to work with our police
so that the criminal element
will not overwhelm us any fur-
ther.”

Rev CB Moss who spear-
heads the ‘Bahamas Against
Crime’ says the Government
of the Bahamas must get a
handle on crime or “face the
wrath of the people which will
surely come.”

Reflecting on the recent
murder of 19-year-old Shanice
Adderley, Reverend Moss in
a press release said: “This

Bishop Simeon Hall

scene is repeated far too long
and far too often. Too many
families, relatives, neighbours
and friends are left to mourn
the tragic loss of loved ones.”
He stated: “The Bahamian
landscape is becoming increas-
ingly stained with the blood of
our people violently spilled.
“The burning question is
how many more people; espe-
cially our youth are going to
be slaughtered while our lead-
ers appear to be asleep. How
many more shootings, rob-

Rev CB Moss



beries, rapes, burglaries,
assaults on our children and
other serious crimes must we
endure before government
realizes that it cannot fix the
problem by passing pieces of
peripheral legislation, then sit-
ting back and expecting posi-
tive results.”

Rev Moss said Government
must lead other stakeholders
in preparing a comprehensive
plan of action then swiftly
apply it before the country is
engulfed in a sea of violence.

: i authorities suspect most of the drug shipment was

Come see our

New Arrivals

year.

of Hondas, Toyotas and Nissan

many to choose from.

Straw Market condition

is condemned by attorney



ATTORNEY Paul Moss has
condemned the condition of the
Straw Market stating that succes-
sive governments have merely
given “lip service” to its con-
struction.

Vendors at the Straw Market
claim many of their goods were
damaged as a result of torrential
rain and strong winds this past
weekend.

“Almost eight years have
passed since the market burned
and successive governments have
given lip service to its construc-
tion without seeing the first block
laid. In all truthfulness they do
not care about these people and
what is troubling is that so many
parliamentarians have their own
roots and connections to that
Straw Market. It is scandalous
and shameful,” Mr Moss stated
in a recent press release.

“The government as landlord
has the duty to ensure a safe
building for its tenants to sell their
wares. In breach of that duty they
have allowed these hardworking
people to sit permanently under a
temporary tent that could not
withstand the high winds and
heavy rain we have experienced

SURO

PRR RR Tata os

FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS

PHONE: 327-6464
Te

in the past two weeks,” Mr Moss
stated.

Mr Moss said he has asked all
vendors at the Straw Market to
provide proof of their loss and
will approach the relevant author-
ities to have them compensated
for their loss.

“How can we say we love our
people and tourists when we con-
tinue to put them in harm’s way
under a tent that threatened to
collapse on them last week which
would have been a public rela-
tions disaster. We must do the
best for our people because they
are our most important resource,”
Mr Moss stated.






Attorney Paul Moss

Oe eb Ga eden

where life is still simple and people stil care
Murphyville, 2nd Right from Sears Road.
Telephone 322-8493









ENJOY AN EVENING of CLASSIC MUSIC
from ODESSA GARDENI!!

MANTOVAN|- ROMANTIC CLASSICS - THEME FROM





“A Summer Place,”

some Enchanted

Evening, Unchained Melody, Arrivederci Roma,
THEME FROM "Gone With The Wind",

The Very Best of ANDRES SEGOVIA - GUITAR GENIUS
VOL. 1 -BACH RECITAL, VOL.2-ROBERT DE VISEE,
ALSO VOLS. JAND 4.

BEETHOVEN, The Nine Symphonies.

Josef Krips Conducting the LONDON SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA.

4 CD's.

1 pe 5 Drawer Chest

“IN-HOUSE FINANCING AVAILABLE”

PR Gece

Government
Workers

(242) 341-2249 - FAX: (242) 361-1136

Visit our Website: www.autohl.com








Colors:
Gold
Silver
Bronze
Brown
Denim



SNedKer DOK

Rosetta St. Ph: 325-3336

Queen 8 Pc Set

Financing Available Through
King 8 Pc Set

Commonwealth Bank

Solid Wood







PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Public input invited on new Town Planning Act _

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE public has been invited
to offer its input and recom-




mendations on a new Town
Planning Act.

The Act will address impor-
tant planning issues such as the
development of new subdivi-
sions, construction on and near

Local Company
seeking applicants





wetlands or along the coastline
and setbacks from the high
water mark or sand dunes.

Speaking to the Bahamas
Real Estate Association at its
50th anniversary banquet on
Friday Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham suggested realtors
“discuss the draft legislation
amongst yourselves and with
your clients.”

“All comments received prior

to mid-September will be con-
sidered,” he said.

“As we do our part to sup-
port your industry and to devel-
op and to implement new effi-
cient processes, I call upon your
industry to play its part,” he
added.

The new Town Planning Act
is expected to be accessible on
the Ministry of the Environ-
ment’s website this month.





for the position of
Accountant

Excellent opportunity for an experienced and
highly motivated full-charge Accountant. This
position requires an individual that can multi-
task & has excellent verbal and organizational
skills. This position is responsible to assist in
the overseeing of the accounting and adminis-
trative duties of the company.

This position requires the knowledge of all
accounting procedures through financial
statements. Must be able to work indepen-
dently, as well as work with all departments.
Experience with Human Resources would be
an asset. Must be dynamic and disciplined.

Requirements include:

Thorough knowledge of Microsoft Software
Systems including: Word, Access and Excel,
Advanced Computer Accounting.

Degree in Finance/ Accounting or other related
field.

Interested persons should apply
in writing, with resume, to:

Accountant Position

P.O. Box 55-5698
Nassau, Bahamas

or via Email to:
applications.dropbox?gqmail.com

>The °
Financial

VOICE

HOW WILL REGULATORY REFORM OF
ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATIONS IMPACT

Telecommunications, Cable TV,
Broadcasting, The Internet, Businesses,

YOU?

Plan to attend

THE FINANCIAL VOICE

Town Meeting

Tuesday, June 2nd at 8 p.m.
at Choices Restaurant, COB Schoo! of
Hospitality, Thompson Blvd.

Host: Jeff Lloyd
Panellists

Julian Francis, Deputy Chairman, Committee for the Privatisation of BTC
Simon Wilson, Member, Committee for the Privatisation of BTC
Felix Stubbs, Member, Committee for the Privatisation of BTC
Michael Symonette, Executive Director, PUC
Usman Saadat, Director of Policy and Regulation, for the soon to be
established Utlities Regulation and Competition Authority (URCA)

DON'T MISS IT!

A funeral service for the late HERMAN McDONALD BURROWS, age 91, of Neppers
Hill, Lower Deadiman'’s Cay. Long Island, The Bahamas, will be held at St. John’s
Anglican Church, Buckley's, Lang Island, on Wednesday, 3rd

June, 2009 at 11 am. Reverend Father Ernest Pratt and

Reverend Paulette Cartwright will officiate and interment will

follow in Deadman's Cay Public Cemetery, Deadman's

Cay, Long Island,

Henman is survived by his loving and devoted wife of 55

years: Viola Burrows; 3 daughters: Miriam Procter,

Gwendotyn Edilall and Marjorie Archer, 2 sons-in-law:

Kemraj Edilall and Robert Archer; 7 grandchildren:

Keisha and her husband Kenneth McPhee Ill, Keiran

Edilall and hrs wita Junise, Davanand Edilall (deceased),

Anya and ber husband Hicardo Gomez Sr, Kristen 'y

Edilall and his wife Shericka, Melanie and her husband Y

Stephen Johnsen and Priadashni “Pria” Edilall; 7 great-

grandchildren: Kenisha McPhee, Ricardo Gomez Jr,

Kemren and Kaylen Edilall, Kenneth McPhee Iv, Jaylin

Johneon and Kemraj Edilall; 1 sister: Ethhyn Burrows; 1 brother:

Virginus Burrows; 3 sisters-in-law: Lucresha Burrows, Dora Turnquest and Shirley
Knowles; nephews: Glenroy, Philip, Alistair and Henry Burrows, Prince, Morgan, Peter,
Neel and Kendal Turnquest, Mack McHardy and Jahn Smith; nieces: Iva McHardy,
Madiyn Cartwright, Elva and Gloria Turmquest, Ruth Wong, Alice Missick, Della Mack,
Nellena Burrows and Caral Shearer; numerous cousins, grandnieces and grandnephews.
and a host of other relatives and friends including Pearlean Burrows, Vincent and
Learene Burrows and family. LaGloria Burrows, Clarence and Gwen Carroll and family,
Walking and Predensa Burrows and family, Donald and Judy Burrowes and family,
Patranella Sawyer and family, Barbara Dorsett and family, Patrica Seymour and family,
Cynthia Burrows and family, Marsha Stuart and family, Nolvin Turnquest and family,
Roosevelt and Maria Burrows and family, Anthony and Madhyn Farrington and family,
Beatrice Burrows and family, Ethel Cartwright and family, Richard and Thelma McHardy
and family, Basil Burrows and family, Janet Minnis and family, Mack Burrows and family,
Mazie and Marge family, Trixie Hanna and family, Iris Farquharson and farnily, Joseph
and Virgie Carrell and family, Byllis Storr and family, Carnetta Burrows and family, Hinton
Burrows and family, Richard Cartwright and farnily, John and Tee Burrows and family,
Can and Effie Cartwright and family, Mavis Carrall and family, Ruth Burrows and family,
Mary Burrows and family, Patricia Archer and the entire Archer family, Or, Earle and Mrs.
Melanie Farrington, Kemranie, Rajesh, Patrina, Brandon and Ashley Edilall, Praim,
Nadira, Arianna and Ryan Jafar, the Knowles family, Rev. Fr. Emest Pratt and family, Rev.
Paulette Cartwright, Fr. and Mrs. Atma Budha, the entire staff of Deadiman's Cay Health
Gentre, the Anglican Church Men (A-C.M.) and the Anglican Church Women (4.0.1),
St, Athanasius and St. John’s Anglican Parish Family, and the entire Lower Deadman’s
Gay family.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at St. John’s Anglican Church, Buckley's,
Long Island on Tuesday from 6 p.m. to service time on Wednesday.

‘Farthquake
Strikes north of
Virgin Islands

: SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico

Olin brief

Chamber of
Commerce
Annual Business
Awards 2009

OUTSTANDING busi-

i ness people and companies
? will be recognised today as
i the Bahamas Chamber of

? Commerce announces the
i finalists in its 2009 Annual
} Business Awards.

Categories in the awards

: include: Outstanding Busi-
i ness Person of the Year,

? Developing Entrepeneur of
: the Year and Company of

? the Year.

The Company of the

? Year award is offered in

: two categories - businesses
? with over 50 employees and
; those with less.

The Chamber will also

: announce events scheduled
? to take place in Chamber
; Week 2009.

¢ SEE BUSINESS
SECTION

SEISMOLOGISTS say an

: earthquake has struck north
? of the Virgin Islands but no
? injuries or damage have

? been reported, according to
i Associated Press.

The U.S. Geological Sur-

: vey says the early Monday

? quake had a preliminary

? magnitude of 4.6 and the

? epicenter was located about
? 80 miles (130 kilometers)

? northeast of Tortola, the

? capital of the British Virgin
i? Islands.

The earthquake also was

i felt in the U.S. Virgin

? Islands and parts of north-
? ern Puerto Rico before

? dawn.

LONG ISLAND

REGATTA
EXCURSION

Onboard: M/V Legend

Sails: June 3rd, 2009
Returns: June 7th, 2009

Tickets $99/Cars $399.00

Telephone:
356-6672/3



Music, Food, Drinks, Fun!!!





© fe Porickle Patel

Caeeerun le Plaza, I larold Rd

Phi: 356-7502 Fax: 996-7572

MIDNIGHT
MENS SS



ME EARLY BIRD

SALE

Entire Stock MUST Go

12th - 43th








THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 7



Africa is right to hold

out for a better deal
insight

m@ By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a consultant
and former Caribbean
Diplomat)

W ITH the intention
of getting a more

favourable arrangement, sever-
al African countries are hold-
ing out on signing an Economic
Partnership Agreement (EPA)
with the European Union (EU).
Both the members of the South-
ern Africa Development Com-
munity (SADC) and the Eco-
nomic Community of West
African States (ECOWAS) are
continuing to negotiate with the
EU.

SADC was scheduled to sign
the EPA on May 7th, but the
ceremony was cancelled at the
last minute, and ECOWAS
declared that signing an EPA
before a June 20 deadline was
“no longer realistic.”

One of the issues identified is
the ‘“‘most favoured nation”
clause under which all trade
benefits agreed with third par-
ties are automatically extended
to the EU. The fear is that the
EU will access market openings
that African countries give to
other developing countries in
the context of South-South
trade. This would give devel-
oped EU countries an unfair
advantage.

The identical argument was
raised in criticism of the EPA
signed between the EU and
Caribbean countries.

Another objection that has
surfaced in the Africa-EU nego-
tiations is the limited capacity of
African developing countries to
take future trade disputes to
arbitration. This was also a con-
cern of critics of the Caribbean
EPA with the EU.

In the case of the Caribbean,
while the Cariforum countries —
the members of the Caribbean
Community and Common Mar-
ket (Caricom) plus the Domini-
can Republic — negotiated the
EPA jointly through the
Regional Negotiating Machin-
ery (RNM), each Caribbean
country is a separate signatory
to the agreement with the 27-
nation EU collectively. In the
event of a dispute going to arbi-
tration, the affected Caribbean
country would have to bear the
cost alone while the EU as a
whole will meet its expenses.
The cost of such arbitration
would be beyond the reach of
most developing nations.

As they did with the
Caribbean, the EU has threat-
ened African countries with the
deprivation of market access for
existing export products if they
do not sign the EPA. In the
Caribbean’s case, the threat was
the imposition of a Generalised
System of Preferences (GSP)
regime on Caribbean exports
to the EU market.

All fourteen Caribbean
countries signed up to a full
EPA to avoid being penalised.
Although, available figures
show that GSP treatment on
exports to the EU would have
affected only 1 per cent or less
of the total exports of goods
and services of eight Caribbean
countries. The eight countries
are: Antigua and Barbuda (0.0
per cent), Bahamas (0.0 per
cent), St Kitts-Nevis (0.0 per
cent), St Vincent and the
Grenadines (0.2 per cent),
Trinidad and Tobago (0.3 per
cent), Grenada (0.4 per cent),
Barbados (0.5 per cent) and St
Lucia (1.0 per cent), But, as
Professor Norman Girvan has
pointed out, though the per-
centages are small for countries
such as St Vincent and St Lucia,
the sectors concerned, such as
bananas, were politically vul-
nerable because of the numbers
of people employed. The EU
knew that and played on it mer-
cilessly.

The countries that would
have been worst affected by the
GSP tariffs on their goods and
services are: Guyana (21.8 per
cent), Belize (8.5 per cent) and
Jamaica (4.3 per cent). Yet, it
was the Guyana government
that most strongly held out
against signing a full EPA with
the EU, and which did so only
after succeeding in getting the
EU to agree to a review of the
EPA within five years of its
coming into force.

Had the Caribbean stood
together, they could have
refused to surrender to the EU
threat of GSP treatment for
Caribbean exports.

It was a similar threat that

WORLD VIEW

led to the initialling of the inter-
im EPA by all southern African
states except South Africa.
However, unlike the Caribbean,
the SADC countries have now
committed themselves to stick-
ing together.

Caribbean countries had the
option of initialling only an
Interim Agreement preserving
market access to the EU, and
continuing to negotiate into
2008 and even after — as the
African countries are doing, but
chose not to. A renowned trade
lawyer, Dr Lorand Bartels of
Cambridge University in Eng-
land, had identified three legal
ways in which the negotiations
could have continued into 2008
without having to apply GSP.

he Africans are rightly

resisting another red
herring that the EU used in
their negotiations with the
Caribbean. The red herring is
the claim that they (the EU)
are under pressure to make
preferential tariff provisions
with African, Caribbean and
Pacific regions compliant with
WTO regulations or face a chal-
lenge from other WTO mem-
bers.

But, of course the text that
the EU presented to the Cari-
forum governments included a
range of matters that had noth-
ing to do with WTO compati-
bility. Among these matters are
the so-called ‘Singapore Issues’:
trade in services, public pro-
curement, investment, customs
issues and competition policies.
All that was required for WTO
compatibility was an agreement
on trade in goods.

The Africans are rightly
making the point that “the EU’s
push to include services and
other “‘new issues” has nothing
to do with WTO compliance
and is an attempt to sneak pro-
posals through at bilateral level
that were defeated at the
WTO”.

In the aftermath of signing
the EPA, some Caribbean gov-
ernments made much of the
access to the 400 million-strong
market of the 27-nations EU
for “services”. This, they said,
included the right to set up
financial services and to send
musicians and chefs to work in
the EU. But the devil was in
detail as critics pointed out at
the time. For while the EU
Commission negotiated and
signed the EPA, they made it
clear that access to the EU mar-
kets depended entirely on the
rules applied by individual EU
member countries.

That reality came home to
roost when it was discovered
that “rigid visa regimes” con-
stituted barriers to getting goods
and services in to the EU. The
Jamaican Minister of Informa-
tion, Culture, Youth and Sports,
Olivia Grange, lamented that:
"The idea of being able to
showcase your products to the
500 million-strong European
market is among the most



appealing elements of the EPA.
However, this seems like an
empty promise if people are
unable to enter the region,
because they either don't qual-
ify, or can't afford a visa.”

As with the EPA signed with
the Caribbean, the EU shows
no inclination to include in the
EPAs with African countries an
unequivocal commitment to
funding a development pro-
gramme to ameliorate the
effects of an EPA. An ECOW-
AS Ministerial Monitoring
Committee has recommended
that contributions to the EPA
Development Programme
should be "adequate and acces-
sible" and beyond the commit-
ment already made in the Euro-
pean Development Fund.

In the Cariforum-EU agree-
ment, the Caribbean did not get
such a commitment.

By not capitulating to the
EU, the African groups may
end up getting a better deal
than the Caribbean.

rae

Sir Ronald Sanders



Meanwhile, Haiti is also to
be admired for refusing to sign
the EPA between Cariforum
and the EU despite reported
pressure from the EU and Cari-
com to do so. There is nothing
in the EPA that benefits Haiti
which, as a less developed coun-
try, should theoretically be able
to export ‘everything but arms’
to the EU. It would be a fur-
ther grave injustice to the Hait-
ian people for the EU to com-
pel it to sign by withholding
much needed assistance.

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

> EXTRA, EXTRA,

Y/ COME CHECK

US OUT

want" Shipments Arrived

Hurry, Hurry, Hurry and
Get Your First Choice
For Easy Financing

Bank And Insurance

On Premises
Check Our Prices
Before buying

Hy



Oless a Garden

witere life ts stall simple and people still care
Murphyville, 2nd Right from Sears Road.
Telephone 322-8493

ENJOY AN EVENING of CLASSIC MUSIC
from ODESSA GARDENI!!

THREE GOLDEN GREATS - THE SONGS OF GERSHWIN,
PORTER, BERLIN, - Dinah Shore The Man | Love,
Nancy Wilson - Someone to watch over me,
Shirley Bassey - Ev'ry Time We Say Goodbye,
Edmund Hockridge - | Love Paris, Joe Loss - I've Got My
Love to Keep Me Warm, Matt Monro - Cheek To Cheek,
Billy May - Top Hat, White Tie and Tails.

THE PIPES AND DRUMS AND MILITARY BAND OF THE
ROYAL SCOTS DRAGOON GUARDS, Amazing Grace,
Scotland the Brave, Scottish Waltz,

The Day Is Ended, Reveille.

HIHGS WaT

KINGSWAY ACADEMY
TEACHER VACANCIES

For September 2009

Kingsway Academy High School is seeking
applicants for teaching positions in the following
areas:

® Information Technology

® Mathematics/Physics up to the Advanced
Placement Level

0 Spanish up to the Advanced Placement Level

Track and Field Coach

® Woodwork/Technical Drawing

All applicants should have the following:

0 Be a born again Christian

® An Academic degree in the area of specialization
0 A Teaching Certificate

& Excellent Communication Skills

® A love for children and learning

High standards of morality

Letters of application together with a recent
color photograph and detailed Curriculum Vita
(including the names and addresses of at least
three references, one being the name of one’s
church minister). These should be forwarded to:

The Academy Affairs Manager
Kingsway Academy Business Office
Bernard Road
Nassau

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATION IS FRIDAY
JUNE 12, 2009.





BACK To SCHool *

LA



AWA





NO interest « NO fees + just 3 easy payments

layaway plan

we've got it

Custom
COMPUTERS LIMITED

4 Stores at Cable Beach & East Bay St.»

t 242.396.1/01 @ 242.396.1100

www.customcomputers.bs





PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

Bahamas

HIGHLIGHTS FROM SUNDAY’S EVENT HELD
AT THE RAINFOREST THEATRE, WYNDHAM
NASSAU RESORT AT CABLE BEACH











MISS Bahamas World
Joanna Brown

NEW CONDOS

OR SALE

~-Resario West
St. Albans Dr. New 3 Bedroom, 2 1/2 Bath,
3 Storey Townhouses. Gated Property.
Modern Kitchens & Well Appointed Interiors
$239,000 with only 5% deposit required.
Bank Financing Available
325-1325 454-2098 or 422-4489

Phase IT commences July 2009



Theordore
Ellyett
Productions

* Tiaras * Gloves
* Rhinestone jewelry
* Roseties tor Hair
* Evening Bags

CAREY'S
Faskic & DEPARTMENT STO

Mackey Street | 399-0758

MISS Sposabelle Bridal Formal and Evening
wear Devera Pinder



SOLUTIONS FOR A RAPIDLY CHANGING WORLD

Join the team!
About Providence Technology Group

Providence Technology Group is one of the leading providers of business critical IT solutions in
The Bahamas. Through our seamless mix of Networking, Productivity and Consulting solutions,
we have the privilege of guiding a growing base of clients in the financial and professional

services sectors along unique paths to achieving their business goals.

We Exist so that our
Clients may Succeed

Senior Technical Analyst

Asa Senior Technical Analystinthe Networking
Solutions practice, you will play a leading
role in the architecture & design, staging
& deployment, and ongoing optimization &
support of small, medium and large client
networks. As such, you will be required
to work closely with the Vice President,
Networking Solutions in order to gain a full
understanding of client requirements, to
rapidly design and accurately cost client
solutions, and to assist in presenting solutions
to clients in clear business terms. Once a
solution has been approved, you will also be
responsible for leading the deployment of the
solution to ensure that it is delivered “error-
free” and in accordance with industry best
practices, Additionally, you will be responsible
for ensuring that all “managed” client network
environments are regularly optimized and kept
in excellent working condition. You will also
be required to provide hands-on technical
support and advanced troubleshooting to
bring prompt resolution to technical problems
as they arise.

Microsoft

GULD CERTIFIED

Requirements:

Education & Experience
a Minimum of a Bachelors Degree
a Minimum 10 years hands-on
experience designing, deploying and
supporting business critical networks.
= Demonstrated technical leadership
experience

Core Certifications
= Microsoft: MCSE W2K3, MCITP
W2K8 EA, Exchange 2K3/2K7, ISA
2K4/2K6 | Hyper-V Virtualization
= Cisco: CCDP (Design), CCNP (Routing
& Switching), CCSP (Security), CCVP
(Voice), CCNA (Wireless)

Additional Certifications/Competencies
(are an advantage)
= Citrix (Administrator | Engineer)
VMWare Virtualization
Storage Area Networking (SAN)
Unified Messaging, Voice over IP
(VOIP), Telephony

How To Apply
Please email resumes to
jobs@providencetg.com

by 12 June 2009

#2 Nassau Court | Level Two | P.O. Box N-1081 | Nassau, The Bahamas
T 242.326.0382 F 242.326.0389 | info@providenceTG.com | www.providenceTG.com

NETWORKING SOLUTIONS | PRODUCTIVITY SOLUTIONS | CONSULTING SOLUTIONS

Liceicioe > Feaeee- Feels #8 f 8
2 Pd feree & es Ee seers
BP stt etahhae Falsaeeak

| THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

The Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute's (CHMI's)
Lil’ Chefs Summer Training Programme

Trained chef instructors mentor kids ages 10-15 and teach them how to
prepare:-

Hot meals

Assorted Sandwiches
Pastries

Fruit Platters and much more!

Where: CHMI, Bahamas Tourism Training Centre,
Thompson Boulevard
When: July 13-31, 2009,
Mondays 9a.m.-4p.m.; Tuesday-Friday, 9a.m.-3p.m.
Cost: 1 week, 5275: 2? weeks $500; 3 weeks, $675

Call: 323-5804, 677-3220 or 677-3202 for more information and
applications.

Also available in Exuma and Grand Bahama

Application deadline June 15, 2009





THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 9
LOCAL NEWS



MISS
Habour
Island
Swanique
Sawyer

MISS
Red Hot

er leatalils








w= ae! .



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

MISS Galleria Cinemas . wae y Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs
Emily Darville a



Want to Enhance Your Creative Edge?

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

Offers a Course
in
Window

Treatment

This course is designed to provide participants with instructions
and formulas that will enable them to create and design drapery,
roman shades and valances.

Tuition: $250.00

Mondays & Wednesdays,
Staring 15 June, 2009
6:00p.m. to7:30p.m.

— EM

ABOVE: Miss D.S Lifestyles Inc daurmrigohedinhs. Fees nay be paid por semester by Cash, Credit Cand or Bank Centilied Cheque
VAIL ta. Payable in:

Kendra Wilkinson The College of The Babams Business Office.

LEFT: Miss Bella Donna Michaela CEES Reserves The Right Ta Charge Tuetion, Fees, Comme Comaent, Course Schecdole And Cniree Materials

Ferguson

istic New Solution for

~ BUSINESS STORAGE

e A state of the art Hurricane Proof storage facility offers
the first 12 individual units, each one witha surface of
1,200sq ft. Ceiling from 24 to 28 ft high. 1,200 cubic yards

of usable space per unit.

ULRIES: Comaact the Co-ondinasor at Veli 232)925.57 14/52 8099928 1956 or e-mail
I

e Container ramp and truck ramp elevated from road
level.

© Ideal also for Disaster Recovery Facility to
store files in a perfectly safe location.

www.bahamaslogistic.com
email: info@ bahamaslogistic.com

Phone: 327-8681 ¢ Fax: 327-8214





PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Family flee
as fire sweeps
through their

apartment

FROM page one

received minor burns to his
right arm and left leg, and
his wife received minor fire
burns to the right arm.

The couple were taken to
hospital and are being treat-
ed for injuries.

The infant was
unharmed.

Fire officials responded
to the emergency call at
around 2.23 am Monday.

Firefighters were able to
successfully extinguish the
blaze, which destroyed the
apartment.

The incident is being
investigated.

CONVENIENT TRAVEL AGE\@y

Prince Charles Drive

Our Bi-Weekly Travel update
NOW SELLING

a) Western Air

b) Southern Air

c) Jet Blue (credit card only)

d) Spirit Airlines (credit card only)



















POPULAR DESTINATIONS

VA 6 sis csasiseserrscasscnisescamencinseeeo ls LO
Trinidad.........cccccccccsecsccscssceneeeee 402,10
Barbad S..........cccccscsssecee seaxnareens

Puerto Ric. ccesecssssssscssessseeseesseeses8359. 00
Hath, .cccsescncnsssecsssccssensssssessssccssnesetit oO

Ue ALR e

FROM page one

tion President Robert Sands
were prepared yesterday to
disclose which island the per-
son visited or where they
stayed.

Dr Minnis said a press con-
ference will be held tomorrow
in which further information
regarding the case will be
made public.

Mr Sands, also Vice Presi-
dent of External Affairs for
Baha Mar, said he was not pre-
pared to add anything to the
Ministry’s statement.

The announcement comes as
global media hype surround-
ing the A (H1N1) virus,
believed to have originated in
Mexico, has died down. This
even as the number of cases
and related deaths rises.

New York state currently
has 42 confirmed cases of
swine flu, which has now been
recorded in all 50 American
states, as well as in an increas-
ing number of countries glob-
ally.

The Ministry of Health said
the visitor came to the
Bahamas from New York on
May 25 and returned to Amer-
ica the following day “to recov-
er at home.”

“Due to heightened surveil-
lance activities by the Depart-
ment of Public Health neces-
sary tests were done that same
day.

“The results were received
on the evening of 29 May,” it
stated.

The positive test would have
come back two days prior to
Jamaica announcing its first
two cases of Swine Flu. Both

Jamaicans had _ recently
returned from visits to New
York.

Other Caribbean countries
to have confirmed cases are
the Dominican Republic, Cuba
and Puerto Rico.

“As this widespread global
occurrence of Influenza A
(H1N1) continues to evolve,
The Bahamas maintains the
monitoring of influenza trends,
which at present do not indi-
cate any increase in cases at

PRIME OFFICE SPACE

Approximately 2,200 square feet of second floor
space available in newly constructed building
at the corner of Marlborough and Cumberland
Streets. Two (2) on-site car spaces included.

Ideal location for offshore bank, law firm, or other

professions.

Contact Owner at:

362-6006

7) THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION
AND EXTENSION SERVICES

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT - ———— SEMESTER 022009

COURSE

SECT | COURSE

NO. DESCRIPTION
"BUSINESS

cusTso0
COMPUTERS
COMP930 WEBS PAGE DESIGN WS |

COMP9341

01___| suERIOR cuSTOMER SER, Wis _|4:309m
0 SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SER. WIS 430prn

Thurs | 19-Jun lnm |

ENQUIRIES: racist the cponibialr at Tel: (242) 925-5714 I (242) 328-0093 /
328-1936 / 302-4300 ext. 5202 or email prevsdev@cob.edu.bs

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time).
CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and

Course Materiafs.



For the price of a coffee, you can take

care of something priceless.
$300,000 life cover for the price of a coffee per day!

*

a COLONIAL GROUP
hj INTERNATIONAL

iN

ATLANTIC
MEDICAL

ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE CO. LTD.
Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue, PO. Box SS-5915, Nassau Tel. 356-5433

this time,”
Health.

“Enhanced surveillance
activities for the Influenza A
(H1N1) virus have been ongo-
ing across all sectors since the
first case of the virus was
reported in March 2009.”

The Ministry of Health
warned that influenza
preventative measures should
be continue to be followed
to ensure protection of indi-
viduals, families and commu-
nities.

said the Ministry of

First case of Swine
Flu in the Bahamas

“These precautionary mea-
sures include covering your
nose and mouth with a tissue
when you cough or sneeze, dis-
posing of the tissue in the trash
after use, along with frequent
hand washing with soap and
water.

“Additionally, if you are
experiencing flu like symp-
toms, avoid contact with oth-
ers, and stay away from group
settings, to decrease the poten-
tial spread,” said the state-
ment.

To have your say on this or any other issue,
email The Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your letter to
The Tribune on Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207



Boy, 15, found
hanged in cell

FROM page one

been taken into custody on Thursday wearing black jeans, a white
T-shirt, black socks and a pair of black slippers.
Ms Wilson recalled that she had tried to visit her son at the
East Street South Police Station on two occasions, but was denied.
She said police had told her that she could bring Michael a
change of clothes early Tuesday because he was going to Juvenile

Court.

Ms Wilson also questioned why police had allegedly kept her son
in custody so long without allowing her to take him food and

water.

She admitted her son had been fighting with “issues,”

“God-fearing child.”

> but was a

“My children are grounded in God. My children go to church on
Sunday. My son participated in youth meetings. My son read the
scriptures, my son was active in church,” Ms Wilson added.

“Tam not saying my son was all that and glory because you can-
not swear for your children behind your back because you don’t
know what they do behind your back.”

Distraught, Ms Wilson says she now intends to seek an inde-
pendent autopsy on her son’s body.

Police Commissioner Reginald Ferguson told The Tribune yes-
terday: “We are investigating an apparent suicide and that’s it.”

Man and woman
shot several times

FROM page one

looking for a dark green-
coloured truck, which was seen
in the area at the time of the
shooting.

According to police reports,
the couple was sitting in their
vehicle which was parked on
Xanadu Beach around 9.30pm
when they were accosted by a
young dark man armed with a
gun.

The gunman knocked on the
driver’s door, however, when
the male occupant realised what
was happening he started the

vehicle, and then suddenly
heard a gunshot.

As he was reversing to get
away, the gunman fired several
more shots at the vehicle, hitting
the driver and his woman pas-
senger.

On their way to the hospi-
tal, the driver called the police
to report what had happened.

Mr Seymour said the driver
was shot twice, in the upper left
side of the body and in his leg,
and his passenger was shot once
in the hip.

He said the couple recalled
seeing a dark green Ford F-150
truck in the area.

LifeChoices

If you could secure $300,000 family protection for the

price of a daily coffee, with no medical required, would

you do it? Would you invest in $300,000 family financial

security, if it included a free and confidential financial

review with a professional adviser? We're hoping the

answer Is yes, because you could have this cover, for a

little less caffeine, from just $9 per week*. You'll certainly

A member of Colonial Group International: Insurance, Health, Pensions, Life

sleep a little easier!

*rates vary, applies to male age 30

CALL 356-LIFE

or visit www.cgigroup.bm

Colonial Group International is
rated A- (Excellent) by AM Best.





THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 11

ts





Sports

Knowles and
Bhupathi lose
at French Open

MARK Knowles and his
Indian partner Mahesh Bhu-
pathi suffered another set-
back on Sunday when they
got ousted from Roland Gar-
ros in Paris, France.

Competing in the third
round of the men's doubles,
the number seeded team
team of Knowles and Bhu-
pathi fell victim to Jose Aca-
suso of Argentina and Fer-
nando Gonzalez of China in
set sets of 7-5, 4-6, 6-4.

Knowles and Bhupathi
won their first round match
6-3, 6-2 over Frenchmen Jos-
selin Ouanna and Jo-Wil-
fried Tsonga before they
beat Johan Brumstrom of
Sweden and Jean-Julien
Rojer of the Netherlands
Antilles 7-5, 6-7, 7-6 in the
second round.

Yesterday, Knowles and
his mixed doubles partner
Anna-Lena Groenefeld from
Germany are still alive. They
won their second round
match 3-6, 7-5, 10-6 to
advance to the quarter-final
where they will face Anasta-
sia Rodionova of Australian
and Rik De Voest from the
Repulibe of South Africa.

Swimming
educational
incentive

The Bahamas Swimming
Federation recognizes the
importance of education and
maintaining academic excel-
lence as well as excellence in
the pool for our swimmers.

The federation will initia-
tive a new plan that aims to
supports the BSF student
athletes in their pursuit of
excellence in the classroom
and in the pool at the 2009
RBC National Swimming
Championships.

BSF Clubs, Coaches and
other BSF Members will
nominate Student-Athletes
with a GPA of 3.5 or higher
who have represented the
Bahamas on a national team
or qualified to

compete at the 2009
national swimming champi-
onships.

Attached forms for those
swimmers who have
achieved a 3.5 GPA or above
during the past academic
school year and have quali-
fied for the RBC National
Swimming Championships
are available on line at
bsf_news@yahoo.com and
returned no later than the
end of May 2009.

BSF student-athletes will
be recognized at the champi-
onships and in this years
nationals programme book-
let.

Track BAAA's
CAC youth trials

THE Bahamas Associa-
tion of Athletic Associations
will hold its final trials for
the Central American and
Caribbean Age Group
Championships this weekend
at the Thomas A. Robinson
Track and Field Stadium.
The trials will get started on
Friday at 4 pm and continue
on Saturday at 6 pm. The
Bahamas will play host to
the CAC Age Group Cham-
pionships from June 18-19 at
the Thomas A. Robinson
Track and Field Stadium.
The championships was orig-
inally scheduled for Grand
Bahama, but the refurbish-
ing of the track at the Grand
Bahama Sports Complex
won't be completed in time.



# Retains title
alter shaking
off ring rust

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemeda.net

OT having

fought since he

claimed the

British Com-
monwealth title last July, Jer-
maine ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey
didn’t take long Saturday night
to shake off the ring rust against
Emiliano Cayetano.

In the main event of First
Class Promotions’ show
dubbed: “The Boys are Back,”
Mackey retain the World Box-
ing Council’s Caribbean Box-
ing Federation (CABOFE)
super middleweight title he won
against Kirk ‘the Technician’
Sinnette on June 22, 2007.

SEE page 12

JERMAINE ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey
goes after Emiliano Cayetano in
their main event bout on Satur-
day night.

PHOTOS:

Felipé Major/Tribune staff



JERMAINE ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey stands tall over Emiliano Cayetano in the
event that he gets back up to fight in their First Class Promotions’ main
event on Saturday night.

FIFA plans for quota rule
could face tough road

@ By TIM REYNOLDS
Nassau, Bahamas

European soccer officials will abstain if a vote is taken by the
sport's worldwide body this week to restrict teams to a maximum of
five foreign players in starting lineups, according to Associated
Press.

FIFA president Sepp Blatter backs the plan, which is supported
by many of his organization's members and could drastically change
the makeup of many of the world's best-known clubs, such as ones
in the English Premier League.

The European Union, however, insists such a rule discriminates
on the grounds of nationality. And that disagreement could easily
put members of Europe's soccer federation in a delicate spot if a
vote is called during FIFA's annual meeting Wednesday.

"Tam in the middle,” said UEFA president Michel Platini, a
former star midfielder for France's national team and the Italian club
Juventus. "I always play in the middle."

UEFA members support certain parts of the so-called 6+5 plan,
but decided Monday at its own meeting that its members shouldn't
vote on the matter until the legal questions are answered. That's a
process with no end in sight.

"We can only do it when it's legal,” Belgian federation president
Francois De Keersmaecker said.

The EU favors UEFA's "homegrown" proposal that would
require clubs to carry a quota of players on their roster who were
trained in that country, regardless of nationality.

International volleyball officials recently considered a similar
plan, only to eventually decide that such a rule could be challenged
by lawmakers as an illegal restriction of workers’ rights.

"We agreed with the objectives last year of the 6+5, but ... we have
to know if it's legal or illegal," Platini said.

The player quota issue is one of many FIFA will discuss Wednes-
day, along with changing the maximum age of Olympic soccer
players from 23 to 21, stadium security and anti-doping initiatives.

FIFA's annual meeting has a ceremonial opening Tuesday
evening.

FIRST CLASS PROMOTIONS: THE BOYS ARE BACK

Choo’ Mackey
with a bang!



after he stopped Emiliano Cayetano in the third round
to retain his WBC’s CABOFE super middleweight title.










2008 FORD EVEREST

2.5 Turbo Diesel Automatic, Leather,
LOADED - 7 Passanger

was $38,114.00
\ ita NOW $32,400.00

3 years or 65K warranty, 3 years roadside
assistant, 3 years rust protections warranty
and licensed and inspected up to birthday.

2008 FORD RANGER
2.5 Turbo Diesel/Standard Shift

LOADED
was $32,848.00
NOW $28,700.00

3 years or 36,000 miles warranty, 3 years roadside
assistant, 3 years rust protections warranty and
licensed and inspected up to birthday.

NOM THAT'S REALLY AT 23 ](@Deal
FRIENDLY MOTORS CO. LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 * FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com * WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com



PAGE 12, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



=
‘Big Daddy’
powers his

way to first
round KO



m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

JERRY ‘Big Daddy’ Butler
wanted to make a statement to
former Bahamas heavyweight
champion Renaldo ‘the Termi-
nator’ Minus Saturday night at
the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

Against the taller Sandy Anto-
nio Soto, Butler did more than
that when he stopped the
Dominican Republican one
minute and five seconds in the
first round of their scheduled
eight round co-main event.

It was the fifth time in his
career that Butler won by a first
round knockout as he improved
his record to 8-5-1. Soto, coming
off his second straight loss,
dropped to 1-2.

“Every time, I get somebody
that was bigger or taller than me,”
he said. “This time, it looked even
so I said will just go out there
and do what I have to do. “If the
knockout come along I will take
it.”

Butler, 28, slowly worked his
way inside Soto and once he got a
few shots to the body, he was able
to tag him up on the ropes, forc-
ing his opponent to take an eight
count. Realizing that Butler was
just a little too overpowering for
him, Soto refused to get back
after he got an eight count from
the referee.

“He came out and he looked
like he could handle himself after
I threw two punches,” Butler
pointed out. “He started to work
his jab and looked like he came to
fight.

“But after it looked like he was
going to make me chase him, I






1 |
DOMINICAN Republican Sandy Antonio
Soto knelt on one knee as he was giv-
en a mandatory eight count.

said enough of this, so I decided
to cut the ring off and go to the
body.”

After he was awarded the vic-
tory, Butler got on the micro-
phone and he issued a challenge
to Minus, who was working on
his corner. Minus, who according
to Bahamas Boxing Commis-
sion’s chairman Pat ‘the Center-
ville Assassin’ Strachan, was
stripped of his title, gladly accept-
ed. Also on the undercard of First
Class Promotion’s first profes-
sional fight for the year dubbed:
“The Boys are Back,” Hensley
‘the Bruiser’ Strachan won an
unanimous four round decision
over Derrick ‘Castro’ Sawyer.

Strachan, who controlled the
tempo of the fight from the first
round when he had Sawyer on
the ropes with a series of body
punches, said he was pleased to
have come out on top.

“T was a little disappointed
(that I didn’t put him away ear-
ly),” Strachan said. “I was in tip

BOXING: THE BOYS ARE BACK




JERRY ‘BIG DADDY’ BUTLER and Sandy Antonio Soto sizes each other up before throwing a blow in their heavyweight bout on Saturday night at the Kendal

Isaacs Gymnasium.

top shape, but I liked what hap-
pened.”

Strachan, 25, said he anticipat-
ed a much better showing from
Sawyer, but he’s on a mission and
he doesn’t intend to let any of the
local boxers stop him right now.

“T want to get the Bahamas
junior welterweight belt,” said
Strachan, whose record climbed
to 5-3 with a draw. “I just have to
go back into the gym and train a
little harder and I know I can get
it (title shot).”

Not to be out-done, in another
four-rounder on the underdard,
Anthony ‘Psycho’ Woods forced
John ‘Old Time School’ Wesley
into submission 55 seconds into
the third. As Woods continued
to throw a series of combinations,
Wesley just refused to continue
fighting and the fight was called.
Woods, 24, improved his record
to 6-11 with his sixth knockout.
Wesley fell to 0-11.

“T had to come out strong
because I knew if I didn’t come
out strong he was going to try and
take it away from me,” Woods
said. “I want to stop whoever
come my way and get the title.

“T didn’t want this one to over
too quick, but he came out there
pushing, so I had to go for the
knockout.”

Drive it!, Drag It,
Pull it!, Push It!

EVEN IF IT DOESN’T MOVE
WE WILL TRADE IT IN.

BEST PRICES
EVER SALE!

ELITE MOTORS LTD. SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED
Thompson Blvd. « Oakes Field

#209 WuP Rood

OM THE SPOT FIMAMCING WITH
COMMONWEALTH BANE

INSURANCE AVAILABLE WITH



HENSLEY ‘the Bruiser’ Strachan connects to the head of Derrick ‘Castro’ Sawyer in his four round decision on Saturday night

at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.



FROM page 11

Like a hawk watching his prey, Mackey need-
ed just one minute and 32 seconds into the third
round to force Cayetano into submission after
he received his second mandatory eight count
from referee Matthew Rolle.

“T knew he was going to come hard. Hey, ’'m
the Commonwealth champion, I’m the Bahami-
an champion, I’m the WBC champion so he was
coming to make a statement, but I’ve been out of
the ring for 11 months and I was a little nervous,
but I said ‘hey, all of the hard work, all the train-
ing will pay off,’” said Mackey, who thanked his
sponsors, V-8 Splash, Nautilus Water, Prime
Bahamas and the Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture for keeping him going.

When nobody else stuck with him, Mackey
said First Class Promotions was there and he was
delighted to display his skills on their first pro card
for the year. He also thanked the Bahamas Box-
ing Commission, who had suspended the promo-
tional group headed by Ray and Michelle Minus
last year.

Pounded

In their scheduled 12 round bout, Cayetano,
who had predicted at the weigh-in that he will
stop Mackey in the third, had to eat his words and
brush of his ego after he got pounded in the fatal
third round.

“T was looking for an early knockout, but it
came hard because he caught me with a few clear
shots that told me that “Hey, you still have the ring
rust, so just be patient,’” Mackey reflected.

Mackey, who dominated the first round before
he looked a little weary in the second, stepped it
up a notch as he rocked Cayetano with a left
blow to the body. Following with a combo to the
body and the head, Mackey watched as Cayetano
fell through the ring ropes and was caught by
members of the Bahamas Boxing Commission.

Once he got back into the ring, he as adminis-

| HENSLEY ‘the
Bruiser’ Stra-
chan and Derrick
‘Castro’ Sawyer
both closes their
eyes as they
throw punches.



JERMAINE ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey connects with a right
to the head of Sandy Antonio Soto in their WBC’s
CABOFE super middleweight bout on Saturday night.

tered the eight count from Rolle as he knelt on
one knee. Once he got up, Rolle asked Cayetano
if he was okay and he said yes.

Mackey, waiting with anticipation in the neutral
corner, came right back at Cayetano once Rolle
gave the order to fight again. Again, Mackey
went back to the body and the head with anoth-
er combo that floored Cayetano.

This time, as Mackey stood in the neutral cor-
ner launching for another shot at his wounded vic-
tim, Cayetano refused to get up after the eight
count. Realizing that it was over, Mackey leaped
into the air as he started to celebrate as he
improved his record to 18-3 with 14 knockouts.
The gym went even wilder as the fans continued
to cheer him on. “He made it seemed as if he
was exhausted, but every time I tried to go in, he
caught me with some solid punches,” said Mack-
ey, who noted that once he got the body shots, he
made Cayetano pay for it.

Mackey, 29, is now preparing to defend his
British Commonwealth title on the next First
Class Promotions’ show in August at the Kendal
Issacs Gymnasium.

Cayetano, 36, dropped to 18-3.

t. 242.326.6377 f. 242.326.6315
®. sanping@coralwave.com

PO, Boose Mel Ad
tb [2d2] Idaddd? f(2d2) 399-8238

ADVANTAGE PSURANCE
BROKERS & AGENTS LID.



PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff



TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



ECGS Tay)

m@ By BRENT STUBBS

erasing the meet record of 22.31 set by American

Chris ‘Fireman’ Brown sends message to rivals

Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

NATIONAL quarter-mile champion Chris ‘Fire-
man’ Brown sent a clear message to his rivals that
he's still going to be the man to beat when everybody
line up at the Bahamas Association of Athletic
Associations’ National Open Track and Field Cham-
pionships.

The championships is scheduled for the week-
end of June 26-27 and Brown got his first real test
when he matched up against Grand Bahamian
Andrae Williams, one of the toughest rivals to his
throne, in the men's 400 metres.

Competing at the Reebok Grand Prix in the first
head-to-head showdown between any of the
Bahamian quarter-milers so far this year, Brown
posted a third place finish in 45.04 seconds. Williams,
25, had to settle for fifth place in 45.31.

“Tt was a great field and a very strong one. It was
also my second race of the season. I was a little dis-
appointed with being in lane 2, but still thankful
that I had one,” said Brown, who also thanked God
for allowing him to stay healthy at this point in the
season.

“Tt was also great to run against Andrae, we were
both happy and excited to be on the scene and on
the track at the same time. It shows the world that
the Bahamas is a power house because we were the
only country other than USA to have two individu-
als in that event.”

Winning the event on Saturday was American
Olympic champion LaShawn Merritt in 44.75, just
shy of the meet record of 44.70 by Xavier Carter of
the United States last year. Trinidad & Tobago's

Cache Armbrister clocks season’s best time



m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

SPRINTER CACHE Arm-
brister and long jumper Bian-
ca Stuart led a field of four
Bahamians who have advanced
to the NCAA Track and Field
Championships.

Competing at the Midwest

AT THE DOUBLE:
Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie (far right).

Rennie Quow was second in 44.89.

Brown, 30, was just off his seasons best of 45.03
that he opened up with on May 16 in Carson, Cali-
fornia. Williams still holds the second fastest time by
a Bahamian this year of 44.98 that he ran on May 7
in Lubbock, Texas.

Newcomer Latroy Williams, however, has record-
ed the best mark of 44.73, but he didn't compete
since he did the stunning time on May 23 in Hutchin-
son, Kansas State.

But Brown warned all his rivals that he’s looking
forward to “bringing the fire” at the nationals as
he get set for the World Championships in Berlin,
Germany in August.

“T’m always looking foward to a match up with
whomever whenever. We have about eight guys
now who can run 45 sec so trials should be fun,”
Brown stressed.

White, who tried out for the
Bahamian Olympic team last
year, also ran on the lead off
leg for UM's 4 x 400 relay team
that got disqualified.

At the West Regional at the
Hayward Field at the Univer-
sity of Oregon in Eugene, Ore-
gon, Karlton Rolle, a freshman
at the University of California
at Los Angeles (UCLA), was

Regional Championships in
Louisville, Kentucky on Satur-
day, Armbrister a sophmore at
Auburn University, clocked a
season's best time of 23.22 sec-
onds to secure her second con-
secutive berth into the NCAA
Championships.

Last year, the 19-year-old St.
Augustine's College graduate
majoring in marketing advanced
to the semifinal at the NCAA's,
finishing 22th in 23.42.

Samantha Henry, a junior at
Louisiana State University
(LSU) won the race in 22.80.
Armbrister, however, had the
fastest qualifying time of 23.57,
compared to Henry's 23.73 for
fourth place.

Armbrister will also have
double duties at the champi-
onships after she helped
Auburn women's 4 x 400 relay
team clinch a spot.

NG ls eM al a

In the 4 x 100, Armbrister ran
the lead off leg for Auburn, but
they got disqualified.

Stuart, the two-time All-
American senior at Southern
Illinois, took first place in flight
three with a leap of 21-feet, 5
1/2-inches, which enabled her
to secure the victory.

The Queen's College gradu-
ate who turned 21 on May 17
was a seventh place finisher at
last year's Nationals. When she
leaves Southern [linois, her
name will be on both the Saluk-
i's indoor and outdoor long
jump records.

At the East Regional, Kristy
White, competing for the Uni-
versity of Miami, clocked 23.53
for second place in the wom-
en's 200. The race was won by
UM's senior Murielle Ahoure
in 23.09.



fifth in the final of the men's
200 in 21.34.

Rolle, who also had the fifth
fastest qualifying time of 21.16,
advanced to the NCAA's after
he came in behind Justin
Woods, a senior at WSU, who
won the final in 20.90.

Rolle, a 18-year-old graduate
of Nassau Christian Academy,
also ran the second leg on
UCLA's 4x 100 relay team that
finished ninth in 41.44, but they
didn't advance to the final.

And Portland State's senior
Jernice Saunders was fifth in
the women's 200 final in 23.77
to earn her berth at NAAA's.
Charonda Williams, a senior at
Arizona State, won the race in
23.02. Saunders, 23, is a gradu-
ate of CI Gibson, who trans-
ferred from Minnesota State to
Portland State where she inked
her name in two of the four

SPT eM eRe CUS
Chippingham





“I’m happy to see that we are taking the 400m to
another level in the Bahamas. I want to say thanks
to all my family, friends and fans for tuning in and
supporting me on my journey to Berlin.”

This weekend, Brown will be heading back to his
alma mater for an induction into the Norfolk State
University Athletis Foundation Hall of Fame. Just
two months ago, he was inducted into the Mid-East-
ern Athletic Conference (MEAC) Hall of Fame.

Also at the meet, 33-year-old Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie had more of a challenge as she did the
sprint double against some of the top competitors
she will have to contain with in Berlin.

Ferguson-McKenzie's best performance came in
the 200 where she placed third in 22.56 for the fourth
fastest time in the world this year.

The race was won by her training partner Lauryn
William from the United States, who just missed

school records at the Regional.
In becoming the first Vikings’
sprinter to qualify for the
NCAA, Saunders lowered her
own record in the 200 and she
also shattered the previous
mark of 11.74 by Finishing sixth
in her heat and 11th overall in
the century, Saunders was shy
of another NCAA qualifying
spoy, but she now holds Port-
land State's indoor 60 and 200
as well as the 100 and 200
marks. And at the Midwest
Regional in Norman, Okla-
homa, Lamar Delaney, a fresh-
man at Houston, was 11th in
the men's triple jump with a
best leap of 50-feet, 8 1/4-inches
(15.45 metres) on his first
attempt. Will Claye, a freshman
at Oklahoma, won the event
with a leap of 55-2 (16.81 m) on
his sixth and final attempt.
Delaney, however, didn't
advance to the NCAA's.

RUNNING FOR GLORY: Cache Armbrister.

Rachelle Smith in 2007 for the world's leading time.
Coming in second in an American sweep was
Shalonda Solomon in 22.43 for the second fastest
time.

A week before, LaVerne Jones-Ferrette of the
Virgin Islands turned in the third fastest time when
she ran 22.49 in Belém.

In the 100, Ferguson-McKenzie dropped all the
way to eighth place. Her time was 11.11, which
matched her season's best on May 10 in Orlando,
Florida. Only seven other athletes have ran faster
than Ferguson-McKenzie this year. Leading the way
is Jamaican Kerron Stewart with 10.92 in Kingston,
Jamaica on May 2.

Saturday, however, Carmelita Jeter won the race
in 10.85 to lead another American 1-2 sweep that
would have smashed the meet record of 10.91 that
was posted Jamaican Vernica Campbell last year
in 10.91. But it was wind-aided. Jeter now has the
second fastest time in the world.

Second place went to Muna Lee in 10.88. Inci-
dentally, Campbell came in third in 10.91, the same
time as Kelly-Ann Baptiste from Trinidad & Toba-
go. Williams also ran under 11 seconds in 10.94 for
fifth.

And 25-year-old Derrick Atkins, the World
Championships’ 100 runner-up, finished third in the
men's B century race in 10.23. The race was won by
Jamaican Yohan Blake in 10.20 with Alnso Edward
of Panama second in 10.22.

Atkins’ time placed him 12th overall in the two
races combined. The A race was won by American
Mike Rodgers in 9.93. Three Jamaicans rounded
out the 7-9th spots with former world record holder
Asafa Powell clocking 10.10 for seventh.



GREAT WALL MOTORS

SAILOR LHD

sturdy and Efficient
4 Cyl. Diesel Engine
Well Appointed
Unbeatable Value

Diesel Double Cab
Deer: $21,570.00

Diesel Club Cab
Deer $19,900.00

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co. Ltd

Montrose Ave.
Phone: 322-1722/Fax:326-7452





PAGE 14, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Cartie Co. and Chamcem Boats of Long Island
held their 5th Annual All Tackle Fishing Tourna-
ment this week-end at the Flying Fish Marina in
Clarence Town, Long Island. Fishing 19 boats, with
78 anglers this year, the three-day tournament was
the biggest yet, with boats entered from Nassau,
Exuma, and Long Island. From a 17’ local fishing
boat, built by the host Chamcem Boats, to a 45’
Hatteras, the wide variety of boat sizes and lengths
had the crowd wondering from day one which team
was going home with the cash and prizes of
$27,000.00!

With calm seas over the three days weather was
not an issue, but the intense heat taxed the fisherman
who were working 12 ? hour days, competing to
win the Greatest Combined Weight over the three-
day period, and or the Single Longest Fish. Boats
left out each morning at 6:30 am to work the sea,
returning back to the marina by 7:00pm. Day one set
the mark high for weight when the “Lady Friendly”
owned by Anthony Cartwright of Long Island
brought in 18 Mahi Mahi weighing 205lbs, however
the “King Fish” of Nassau raised it even higher
when they brought 8 fish weighing 277 lbs.

Captain Paul King, Ian Radermaker of Harbour-
side Marine, Kristian Kwienski and Greg Cottis put
in a long trip past the Diana Banks all the way to the
Columbus Bank of Ragged Island in search of the
big ones. Day two was slow for the fisherman, with
many returning to dock with little or no catch, until
the “Bush” captained by Barry Knowles, and team-
mates Sylvester Burrows, David Hocher and Roy
Rolle hit the dock with 212 lbs of Mahi Mahi, Mack-
erel, and Tuna, putting them in lead for weight.
The “King Fish” too had a slow day bringing in
only two fish, however their only Wahoo of the day
entered a length of 63” basically securing their posi-
tion for the win.

Breeze

With a light breeze dancing on the water, the
fisherman had a break from the flat seas, and excite-
ment was growing as they left with high hopes to be
the winning team. Most boats stayed out until the
last possible moment, however three boats weighed
in before 4:00pm with only a minimal catch. The
crowd continued to gather in abundance to bear
witness to the champions as the boats lined up to
weigh in. With only four boats entering weight over
100lbs, it was anyone’s game until the crew of the
“King Fish” unloaded. As the huge Yellowfin tuna
began lining up on the dock, anglers, observers and
organizers mouths dropped in awe of the size and
amount of this amazing catch, but the team had
another shock for crowd. In an unprecedented act
of generosity the “King Fish” donated all their fish
to Social Services, all 619lbs! It was all over, “King
Fish” had won the tournament, but still more sur-
prises were in store....

As anglers dined on a buffet dinner and grilled fish
provided by the Committee, and “Sky Juice” pro-
moted by Gilbey’s the Tournament’s main spon-
sor, the buzz continued on the huge tuna catch.
With the first place gone, there were still more win-
ners to be announced. Trophies gleamed on the
table, cash was counted and prizes ready to go, and
so the Award Ceremonies began with opening
prayers by Father Pratt, and remarks by MP and







































2008 FORD EXPLORER XLT

7 Passanger XLT, Leather Interior

was $42,073.00
NOW $33,800.00

2008 FORD SPORT TRAC
LIMITED - Leather Interior

was $46,186.00
NOW $37,300.00 yo

—_—— -——

oa

SPORTS

TS
Long Island three-day fishing

tournament the biggest yet

Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries, the Honor-
able Lawrence “Larry” Cartwright. Mr. Cartwright
commended the Committee on their organization of
the event and for staying within Ministry regula-
tions for a Sportsfishing Tournament, giving the
Committee his Ministry’s seal of approval for the
continuation of the event. Mr. Cartwright further
remarked on the benefits to the local community
from the Tournament, and congratulated lead orga-
nizers and business owners Cathy Darville, Francis
Darville and Amanda Cartwright on a successful
Tournament.

In Third Place for the Greatest Weight, the team
of “Bush” with 495lbs of fish won 2 cases of oil
donated by Baystreet Garage, a rod and reel combo
donated by Marine & Land, and $700.00 cash.
“Scorpio”, the defending champion from last year -
Ben Knowles, “Dutch Boy” Knowles, Jason Edler
and Brookes Miller, walked away with $3000.00
cash for their 624lb catch. Taking the First Place
$10,000 prize money sponsored in part by Gilbey’s,
with a grand total of 960lbs, was the “King Fish” of
Nassau setting a new tournament record for weight!

In the Length category, taking Third place was the
“Bush” team with 53 ?”, winning a chest freezer
from Master Technicians, 2 cases of oil from
Baystreet Garage, and $700.00 cash, followed by
the “Still Slunkin” team of Andrew Knowles, Alex
Cartwright, Duncan Love and Matthew Wells with
56”, winning them a Yamaha “Crypton” Scooter
sponsored by Harbourside Marine, and $1000.00
cash. In First Place, winning $10,000 cash sponsored
in part by the Ministry of Tourism was the “King
Fish” with their 63” Wahoo caught on the second
day. Proudly sporting their junior angler Jalen
Knowles on his shoulder and naming him the “lucky
charm”, captain Paul King took the crowds breath
away when he announced he was donating the entire
cash prize to the Mac Knowles Junior Sailing Club!
With young Jalen as a sailing club member, Mr.
King and his team wanted to do something posi-
tive for both the Island and Jalen, and with his dona-
tion, the Sailing Club will be able to afford new
sailing boats, and riggings for the existing ones.

There’s never a dull moment in this Tournament,
from start to finish. Nightly “sponsor trivia” keeps
the crowd (and sponsors) happy with its free give-
aways, Gilbey’s drink specials for three day and DJ
music throughout — it’s a winning combination that
can’t be beat!

Complete List of Sponsors: Gilbey’s, Ministry of
Tourism, Sun Oil Ltd, Harbourside Marine, Con-
stantakis Sea Enterprise, Athena’s Café, Ultimate
Door & Window, Scotiabank, Seafarer Marine,
Baystreet Garage, Master Technicians, Outer Edge
Grill, Henry S Storr Electric, Sunshine Real Estate,
Palmdale Service Station, Discount Tyre & Bat-
tery, Caribbean Bottling Company, Panama Jack,
Boss Up Entertainment, Bling Bling Car Rental &
Wash, Professional Insurance Consultants, Utlimate
Glass, M & S Crane Rental, Glacier Ice, National
Plumbing, Damien Treco Building & Renovations,
Land ‘N’ Sea, Treco’s Service Station, Sunquest
Services, JWK Construction, Marine & Land, Fox
Locksmithing, Archipelago Painters & Developers
Ltd., Cartwright’s Construction, Yuma Crystal
Springs, Grog Pond Hardware, Bahamas Food Ser-
vices, Long Island Tile Supply, Carroll Shipping
Company Ltd., Darville Packaging, Island Cellu-
lar, A.I.D and Under The Sun.

Save BIG Right Now!

was $41,670.00
NOW $35,400.00

3 years or 36,000 miles warranty, 3 years roadside
assistant, 3 years rust protections warranty and

A chance to join
the High Cascade
nowboard Camp!

Winter Olympic athlete Korath Wright sends
invitation to ten lucky Bahamas teenagers



Photo by Alex Neun
KORATH WRIGHT on a visit to The
Bahamas in May 2009.

The first winter Olympic ath-
lete for The Bahamas, Korath
Wright is inviting 10 lucky teens
from The Bahamas ages 13 —
17 years to participate in the
High Cascade Snowboard
Camp in Oregon, USA for two
9-day camps this July.

Camp 1 runs from July 6th to
14th and Camp 2 from July 17th
to 25th.

The Bahamas Snow Kids
Camp was started by Korath
Wright as a way to introduce
Bahamian teens to the same
camp that sparked his passion
for snowboarding. The program
teaches young Bahamians how
to snowboard while they make
new friends and see a new part
of the world.

Beautiful

The Camp is from July 6th to
25th at Mount Hood, Oregon.
This beautiful mountain is one
of just three places north of the
equator where you can ski and
snowboard all summer long.
This was the starting point for
Korath's snowboarding career.
He attended High Cascade
Snowboard Camp at Mt. Hood
as acamper at age 11, going on
to work his way through the
ranks to become a counselor
and then coach. It's the ideal
place for the Bahamas Snow
Kids Camp to begin training the
next generation of Bahamian
snowboarders.

Interested teens should email
Korath as soon as possible at

SnowKids@TheBa-
hamasWeekly.com and tell him
why you think you should be
selected. The camp will include
other activities over the week
and persons may find more
information at www.BahamaS-
nowKids.com masnowkids.com/> or
www.highcascade.com and
click ‘summer camps’. Fun off-
hill activities are also on the
agenda during the 9-day stay.

Tryouts will take place in
New Providence, and Grand
Bahama Island between the
18th and 22nd of June.* The
exact venue, time and date will
be announced closer to that
time.

Five teens from each island
will fly to Oregon to participate
in the camp for free! Eligible
teens must be Bahamian resi-

2014 WORLD CUP: HOST CITIES NAMED



SNOWBOARDING at High Cascade, Mount Hood, Oregon.

dents and be ready to travel and
have up to date travel and legal
documents.

Korath has come up with
three preliminary activities
which are relative skills to snow-
boarding, but any teen who is
athletic could be a worthy can-
didate if they are interested in
trying snowboarding. The try-
outs will involve sprinting, an
obstacle course using quick
side-to-side movement, and
skateboarding.

Teens can also buy in to the
camp if they do not wish to try
out for the scholarships. As long
as they are ready to try snow-
boarding, anyone from the age
of 13 to 17 years can be regis-
tered in the camp. Camp fees
per child are $2500 US and
include everything from flights,
accommodation, food, lift tick-
ets, chaperone, and coaching.

“I'm excited about the

Bahamas Snow Kids Camp
because it’s an opportunity for
teens from The Bahamas to see
snow for the first time... and
then rip that snow apart on a
snowboard!

It's also a chance for me to
communicate to kids that as
long as they know what they
want, are clear on their values
and are ready to work for it,
every decision they make will
move them towards their goals.

Competing for The Bahamas
as the first winter Olympian,
I'm proof that anything is pos-
sible , and this camp will
encourage teens to follow their
dreams, no matter how big
those dreams may be,” said
Korath.

Persons can learn more about
Korath at www.korathsnow-
boarding.com and stay tuned to
TheBahamasWeekly.com for
updates on Korath’s visit.

== licensed and inspected up to birthday.

NOW THAT'S REALLY A

| |(SDeal
FRIENDLY MOTORS CO, LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 * FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com ¢ WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com

was $42,116.00
NOW $35,800.00



PHOTO: Patrice Ann Johnson

NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS — President the Federation of International Football Association (FIFA) Joseph Blatter
speaks, on May 31, 2009, during the 2014 World Cup Brazil Announcement of Host Cities Names, at the Atlantis
Resort, Paradise Island, The Bahamas. Among the cities named for the games include Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo
and Recife.



THE TRIBUNE



PLP MP’s salary cut claim is criticised

FROM page one

simply gone ahead with taking
the pay cut instead of announc-
ing he would be “willing to do
so.”

He said he “waits with baited
breath” to see if Mr Davis goes
ahead with the move and if his
parliamentary colleagues in the
Opposition will follow suit as Mr
Davis suggested all MPs should.

Meanwhile, Mr Ferguson
described as “almost irresponsi-
ble” the MP’s suggestion that
Ministers of State are an unnec-
essary burden on the treasury.

“I don’t think he knows or he
even understands what these
ministers of state are doing. So
for him to say that is out of his
league — it’s not his business,”
said the FNM chairman.

On Thursday Mr Davis, MP
for Cat Island, Rum Cay and
San Salvador, issued a statement
in which he announced that he
would be willing to take the 20
per cent cut in his parliamentary
salary of $28,000 and called on
his parliamentary colleagues to
do the same.

The MP - who earlier this year
said he would be interested in
seeking either the leadership or
deputy leadership of his party,
depending on which became
available first - called on the
Prime Minister to remove
“unnecessary burdens” on tax-
payers during a deep recession
by “eliminating duplicate junior
ministers in his cabinet.”

Byron Woodside, Zhivargo
Laing, Branville McCartney,
Brensil Rolle, Phenton Ney-
mour, Loretta Butler-Turner
and Charles Maynard should all
go, said Mr Davis, as “full min-
isters are responsible for each
of these areas.”

This came after Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham told par-
liament that major expenditure
cutbacks across almost all gov-
ernment ministries, departments
and agencies were required in
view of the economic climate.

Mr Ingraham said Govern-
ment could not afford to pay for
a new health insurance benefit
for nurses, worth $10.5 million,
at present, and teachers and doc-
tors would not be getting pay
increase this year.

Yesterday Mr Ferguson said
the “time is coming for political
pandering and (Mr Davis) is free
to do what he wants along those
lines.”

Stating that Mr Davis’s state-
ment “sounds good”, the Chair-
man accused him of merely

Philip ‘Brave’ Davis



seeking to “set the stage for him
to become leader of the PLP.”

Mr Ferguson suggested that if
Mr Davis’ proposal was some-
thing the PLP party as a whole
supported the statement
“would’ve come from the leader
(Perry Christie) rather than
him.”

As for FNM MPs taking pay
cuts, Mr Ferguson said he ‘“‘does-
n’t see any reason for it right
now.”

Phenton Neymour, one of the
Ministers of State targeted by
Mr Davis, told The Tribune that
he thinks Mr Davis is “behind
the ball” and “should’ve read
the budget” before making his
statement.

Pointing to the decision on the
part of the government to leave
out of the budget the $100,000
allowance each MP was previ-
ously getting to put towards pro-
jects in their constituency, the
Minister of State for the Envi-
ronment said this will have
a much greater cost-saving
impact.

Also accusing Mr Davis of try-
ing to “score political brownie
points” rather than being gen-
uinely concerned about saving
public money, Mr Neymour
defended the need for his posi-
tion telling The Tribune that the
“increased” attention that a
number of issues which fall in
his portfolio have required -
such as BEC and the Water and
Sewerage corporation - justify
the need for his appointment.

Zhivargo Laing, Minister of
State for Finance, told this news-
paper that he would have a
“good response” to Mr Davis’
statement in parliament.

Who understands the

power of a promise?

We do.

We wouldn't be around for more than a century if we didn't.
Every day more than 100,000 people trust Colinalmperal to be
there with them fo meet fife's unexpected challenges

The question then isn't “What will tomorow bring?”

The question is “Wil your insurance company be reac?"

ae

Colinalmperial.

Stay confident. Stay connected.

Nossa: PA 2000 346.6000 Freeport: 342.2223
www oootinoimeerial.cam







































































© FUSION GRAPHICS 09

TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 15

BREAK FREE

at the Hilton

FREE Breakfast,
FREE Internet,
FREE Rooms!

$64.50"
For Groups of 10 rooms or more.

Great for Church Retreats, Family Reunions,
Weddings and Weekend Corporate Groups.

*Price per person based on double occupancy. Full buffet breakfast in Portofino Restaurant. Free in-room internet access.

One comp per 10 rooms confirmed and actualized (based on minimum of 10 rooms per night).
Valid Friday/Saturday/Sunday nights only. June — September 2009.
Blackout dates apply. Additional taxes apply. Bahamian residents only.

British Colonial Hilton

Nassau

Travel should take you places

Tee yi aes eee iste
TO A LARGE TODAY

WIN Instant FOOD Prizes
TCR YC ANNU UT HSL

Ute me em Mm OC am LEN
FCM eee) mel doe

PLUS with your Upgrade, enter to WIN
Weekly Cash Prizes of $1,000.00 & our Whopping $10,000.00 Jackpot!!!

a ee
ee eh ee

PROMOTION ON AT ALL WENDY'S LOCATIONS. SEE STORE FOR RULES AND REGULATIONS.

©2009 Hilton Hospitality Inc.



THE TRIBUNE



ee

TUESDAY,

©
c a

—

| a :

TUNE-2.



2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net





ROYAL BFIDELITY

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010

Government gives up $2.3m in
stamp tax revenue in last year

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

he Government has giv-

en up $2.3 million in

stamp tax revenue in the

last year due to the

recently amended real
property tax act which exempts first
time home owners from the payment of
stamp tax on the acquisition of a resi-
dence with a combined value of up to
$500,000.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
spoke to members of the Bahamas Real
Estate Association during a banquet
to celebrate the organisation’s 50th
anniversary on Friday evening.

He told the realtors: “Since last July,
641 first time- homeowners have
enjoyed this saving in connection with
the acquisition of residents with a total
value of $57 million.

“The government gave up some $2.3
million in stamp tax revenues on those
transactions. Additionally, some
$814,000 was waived by the Govern-
ment on mortgages totaling $86 mil-
lion in connection with the purchase
of first homes.”

Mr Ingraham explained that the
amendedment also exempts first time
homeowners from the payment of real
property tax for the first five years of
home-ownership.

Rolle elected president of
Chamber of Commerce

KHAALITS Rolle, chief mar-
keting officer at Bahamas Fer-
ries, was elected president of
The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce during its recent
2009 Annual General Meeting
(AGM) held at the British Colo-
nial Hilton.

Chamber members also elect-
ed a new slate of officers and
directors for the Chamber’s
2009-2010 Administrative Year.

Rolle is the principal of Nas-
sau Water Ferries and a part
time lecturer at the College of
the Bahamas. Having served on
the Chamber’s board since 2004,
he is no stranger to the business

“We are taking additional action this
year to further reduce the cost of home-
ownership, reduce real property tax
and extend the $250,000 owner — occu-
pied exemption across the board to all
home-owners, Bahamian and foreign
regardless of the period of occupancy in
the residence by the owner.”

The Prime Minister added that the
Government would like to have a low
residential real property tax regime
something he said is possible if people
declared the real value of their homes
and paid the taxes due on them.

He added that the Government is
aware of the association’s concern
about the government’s removal of the
four year concession which capped real
property tax payable on residential real
property at $35,000 per annum.

Mr Ingraham said it is no secret that
many people are paying taxes based
on less than the real value of their
home paying instead on the value
established at the time of original pur-
chase or construction or in some cases
are only paying on the value of the
vacant land on which they built.

“T have found the noise in the market
surrounding the imposition and
removal of the residential real proper-
ty tax cap interesting. Prior to 2003 and
the introduction of the cap, 17 owner
—occupied properties paid annual real
property taxes in excess of $35,000 in



PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham (second from left) with BREA board members —
(shown I-r): Lana Munnings-Basalyga; PM Ingraham; William Wong, BREA president, and
Larry Roberts, immediate past president — during a banquet at Atlantis resort to mark the

organisation’s 50th anniversary.

the amount of $1.1 million.

“During the four-year period 2003-
2007 when the cap was in place, 57 such
properties paid taxes of $35,000 per
annum in the amount of $ 4.1 million.

“Can it be that we should design a
special tax rate to 57 or 68 home-own-
ers amoung the thousands of home-
owners in the country and to accodo-
mate only the wealthiest home-own-
ers?” the prime minister asked.

Mr Ingraham said the Government
believed that as opposed to the caps at

Photo hy Keith Parker, PS News/Features

the upper end of the real estate tax
bracket and or revaluation by the Chef
Valuation Officer it would be infinite-
ly fairer to zone The Bahamas for real
property tax purposes determining
property value purposes on the basis of
the square footage of improvements
plus the value of the land.

“Then we would not have to rely on
sale prices to determine the value of
real estate for real property tax pur-
pose,” the prime minister said.

Mr Ingraham pointed out that a 3,000

Pre-sold homes at $100m Balmoral
development 99% Bahamian owned

square foot residence in Cooper’s town
Abaco can not have the same value as
a residence of the same size in Lyford
Cay. “We might also consider that the
real property tax value will be calcu-
lated on say 75 per cent of a residence‘s
sale price. Either or all of these sug-
gestions could provide certainty and
stability as to tax liabilities for pur-
chases of real property in our country.
And we may also set the circumstances
or conditions which will trigger or result
in an increase in the value of properties
in an orderly fashion so that tax increas-
es are not expected or dramatic in
nature.

Another suggestion would be to
agree that foreign second home owners
might be permitted to retain a residen-
tial designation for real property tax
property purposes even when their res-
idences are not occupied by the owner
for a minimum of nine months of the
year.

Despite a turbulent economy which
has affected their businesses, BREA
president William Wong said that the
industry will rebound as the economy
of both the US and the Bahamas
improves. The gala banquet, which also
awarded long-standing BREA mem-
bers, was held at the Atlantis Resort
and featured entertainment by the
Extra Band, Ronnie Butler and Count
Bernardino.

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE BALMORAL develop-
ment, earmarked at $100 mil-
lion, broke ground last Friday,
with the pre-sold homes now 99
per cent Bahamian owned,
according to the property’s prin-
cipal.

Jason Kinsale, who purchased
the vintage property only 18
months ago, said foundations
have already been laid and more
land is still being cleared for
the start of phase one of the pro-
ject.

“It’s hard to believe that we
started this journey only 18
months ago it’s been very
encouraging to see that we’ve
been able to move forward in
light of the times that we’re see-
ing today and bring this project
to fruition,” he said.

“Tm really excited about the
fact that we’ve been able to cre-
ate opportunities for Bahamian
contractors and really see that
we’re able to contribute to the
economy even though it is a
very difficult time right now.”

According to Mr Kinsale, the
government has made the
approval process for his devel-

opment a smooth process.

“They understand that
investors inject a significant
amount of capital, not only into
my project alone, but into any
development and it is necessary
that we get these approvals in
time which they do truly under-
stand,” he said.

Minister of Labour Dion
Foulkes assisted in the ground-
breaking ceremony along with
Lester Cox, David Johnstone
and Mr Kinsale.

Mr Foulkes said the jobs that
will be created through the Bal-

SEE page 3B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



of the Chamber and expressed
his enthusiasm about continu-
ing to represent the interests of
the private sector.

Thanking members for their
support, Rolle said: “I am grate-
ful for the opportunity to serve
you as president and look for-
ward to lobbying the govern-
ment on issues and policies that
affect that way we do business in
the Bahamas.”

Anxious to tackle the objec-
tives of his new office, Rolle
explained that it would be one
of his main priorities to ensure
that the small and medium sized
enterprise (SME) unit of the
Chamber becomes fully func-
tional.

“The SME Unit will provide
the technical support needed by

YOLANDA PENTHOUSE, PARADISE ISLAND #2712
Dazzling harbourfront penthouse encompasses 3 floors and 5,000 sq. ft. of
living space. The main level features marble flooring, a great room with
custom furnishings, an oversized kitchen and 2 bedrooms with ensuite
baths. On the 2nd level is the master bedroom, an adjoining lounge, guest
bedroom and laundry. A full size private gym is on the 3rd level.

Nick. Damianos@SothebysRealty.com 242.376.1841

Damianos

Member of
SIRbahamas.com | t 242.322.2305 | #242.322.2033 | The Bhamas MLS





Khaalis Rolle

the greater percentage our
membership to enhance their
competitiveness and more
immediately, to survive the cur-
rent business crisis,” he said.

“Tm looking forward to meet-
ing with and developing rela-
tionships with the membership
to further appreciate the needs
of the business community and
reassure them of the Chamber’s
relevance to the continued suc-
cess of their businesses. My term
will be membership-focused and
our objectives will be to deliver
tangible, measurable and recog-
nisable support.”

SEE page 4B

Sothebys

INTERNATIONAL REALTY

Make it a reality.

Personal Pension Plan

e Strong investment performance

e Flexible Structure

PA

Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

FUP le leh

St. Michael: 246.435.1955

royalfidelity.com

e Competitive fees

e Efficient administration

We can get you there!

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

An RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company





PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009

4
dal daa.

MOSELEY « BURNSIDE

CARIB INSURANCE

BROKERS & AGENTS 0D

€e> N-U-A
NOW WE ARE ONE.

A message to our Valued Customers:

We are pleased to announce that Can insurance Brokers & Agents Lid. and Moselay
Burnside Insurance Agency Lid. are now part of NUA Insurance Agents & Brokers
Lid. For our customers, this means:

LOCATIONS

- The Moseley Burnside location at the Harbour Bay Shopping Centre becomes
NUA's second Service Centre in New Providence, complementing its existing
Service Centre and Head Office on Collins Avenue

* The Carib office on Charlotte Street in downtown Nassau will close effective
April 24, 2008. Customers will have the convenience of being served at either the
Collinge Avenue or Harbour Bay Shopping Canirea locations.

CUSTOMER BENEFITS

+ Greater convenience for all of your general insurance needs, including policy
renewals
The benefit of our combined experience, expertise and areas of specialization.
Your insurance coverage remains unchanged. Nothing changes with your
current policies.

* Gontinued excellent service that you have come to expect.

As part of the Bahamas First Group of Companies, we have the security of the
largest and most trusted general insurer in The Bahamas. Bahamas First General
Insurance Gompany Lid. has an A.M. Best Rating of A- (Exeellent) which reflects the
company's excellent capital and liquidity position as well as its superior operational
results.

Now we ara one, committed to helping individuals and businesses with all of their
general insurance needs. It you have any questions please call or viait us al one of
our Service Centres.

The A.H. Bobby Symonette Building
ard Terrace & Golling Avenue

P.O. Bow N-dB70, Nassau

The Bahamas

Harbour Bay Shopping Centre
P.0.Box N-4870, Nassau
Tre Bahamas

Tel: S02-8100, 328 Soo49 ‘Tel:
Or 356-800)
Fax: 328 $974 of 326-3701 Fax

302-9100, 304-8506
or a22-8210
d2e-5277 of 34-8909

me Hands On

Insurance

Avene }



@eo)liareliaalercurel
congratulates its
outstanding
employees

Mena Bethel
Cae eke g a =p be =a)

Colinalmperial.

S56.8300996.2000 Freeport: 352.3223

WAAR Ca InaimMperial Cham

THE TRIBUNE





@ ROYAL FIDELITY MARKET WRAP

@ By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

IT was a busy trading week in
the Bahamian market with
investors trading in 12 out of
the 24 listed securities, of which
three advanced, five declined
and four remained unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 646,818 shares
changed hands, representing a
significant increase of 610,364
shares, compared to last week's
trading volume of 36,454 shares.

Abaco Markets (AML) was
the volume leader with 217,565
shares trading hands, its stock
rising by $0.07 to end the week
at $1.40.

Consolidated Water Compa-
ny (CWCB) was the lead
advancer with 40,000 shares
trading, its stock gaining $0.34
to end the week up at $3.12.
Doctors Hospital Health Sys-
tems (DHS) traded 70,696
shares, its share price climbing
by $0.02 to end the week at
$1.40.

Cable Bahamas (CAB) was
the lead decliner, its stock
falling by $0.36 to $11.39 on a
volume of 63,894 shares. Com-
monwealth Bank (CBL) trad-
ed 59,447 shares, its share price
decreasing by $0.13 to a new

The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 790.41

BISX
SYMBOL PRICE

AML $1.40 $0.07
BBL $0.63 $-
BOB $6.94
BPF $11.00
BSL $7.92
BWL $3.15
CAB $11.39
CBL $6.00
CHL $2.83
CIB $10.40
CWCB — $3.12
DHS $1.40
FAM $7.76
FBB $2.37
FCC $0.30
FCL $5.09
FCLB $1.00
FIN $10.97
ICD $5.50
JSJ $10.50
PRE $10.00

52-week low of $6.

Focol Holdings (FCL) trad-
ed 7,794 shares, its share price
dropping by $0.05 to end the
week at $5.09. Finance Corpo-
ration of the Bahamas (FIN)

International Markets

FOREX Rates

CAD$
GBP
EUR

Commodities

Crude Oil
Gold





International Stock Market Indexes:

DITA

S & P500
NASDAQ
Nikkei

eee ac

rae

Weekly % Change
1.0906 -2.49
1.6194 +177
1.4146 +1.01
Weekly % Change
$66.45 +7.96
$980.50 +2.42
Weekly % Change
8,500.33 +2.69
919.14 +3.62
1,774.33 +4.87
9,522.50 +322



ae el saat ees

(-5.32%) YTD
CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE

CHANGE

-18.13%
-4.55%
-9.16%
-6.78%

0 -22.28%

0 0.00%

63,894 -18.82%

59,447 -14.29%

104 0.00%

80,244 -0.48%

40,000 38.67%

70,696 -45.10%

0 -0.51%

0 0.00%

0 0.00%

7,794 -1.55%

0 0.00%

49,364 -7.58%

217,565
0
43,165
0



traded 49,364 shares, falling by
$0.03 to a new 52-week low of
$10.97.

Bank of Bahamas (BOB)
share price lost $0.01, also clos-
ing at a new 52-week low of
$6.94 on a volume of 43,165
shares.

BOND MARKET

Investors traded $101,000
(par value) of Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) Series D Notes
(FBB15) Due 2015.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:

Benchmark (Bahamas)
(BBL) released its audited
financial results for the year
ended December 31, 2008.

BBL reported a net loss of
$1.9 million, a decrease of $1.4
million or 42 per cent versus a
net loss of $3.2 million in 2007.

Net investment income
declined by $419,000 or 22 per
cent to $1.5 million, compared
to $1.9 million in the previous
year.

BBL's net operating loss
decreased significantly to
$426,000 or 91 per cent, com-

SEE page 4B

vs

ly

ws
\

| q

ov

feam players





THE TRIBUNE



JASON KINSALE (right), principal and president of The Balmoral, speaks with Minister Dion Foulkes at a
reception following the official opening ceremony...

BALMORAL, from 1B

moral development will take a
great amount of pressure off of
the central government and oth-
er government agencies.

He said he is pleased that
around 150 jobs will be created
at the height of the develop-
ment stage of the project, with
that labour coming from
Bahamian construction firms.

“This is a model of how for-
eign investors and Bahamian
investors can pool their
resources and come together to
really do something different
and something that is badly
needed in New Providence and
the Bahamas,” he said.

Guests at the groundbreak-
ing ceremony were treated to
exquisite hors d’oeuvres from
the Balmoral’s head Chef John
Knowles, which will be an inte-
gral part of the development’s
clubhouse experience.

According Mr Kinsale, sky-
rocketing property values in
New Providence and diminish-
ing land availability prompted
him to construct the affordable
gated community.

Two bedroom, 1400 sq ft
town homes in the development
begin at $359,000 while four
bedroom, 2000 sq ft homes sell
for about $559,000.

The more conservative
spender can acquire a 1200 sq ft
condo for $300,000.

“Our buyers have seen a lot
of value in the price point,” said
Mr Kinsale.

“We’ve been able to appeal
to different market segments
and what I consider to be
affordable for the young pro-

fessional market.”

The 43 acre property
belonged to Lord Oliver Sim-
monds in the 1940s and was
purchased by the Tomlinson
family in the 60s.

When Mr Kinsale, a native
of Grand Bahama, bought the
property, the house which has
been redesigned to be the Bal-
moral’s clubhouse, underwent
a five month, one million dollar
renovation. The 17,000 sq ft
clubhouse was redesigned
around its historical trimmings
and original spiral staircase.

“The Tomlinson family did a
tremendous job of maintaining
the history,” said Mr Kinsale.

The contract to construct the
70 phase one homes has been
awarded to Bahama Wall Sys-
tems Ltd.

When construction com-
mences and infrastructure is put
in place Mr Kinsale said he
expects interest to peak.

“We anticipate much stronger
demand once the project
starts,” he said.

The construction side of the

development is expected to cre-
ate around 100 jobs, with 50
more employed at Balmoral’s
clubhouse as gardeners, wait
staff, culinary staff and admin-
istration.

“We have been able to create
a significant number of jobs and
hiring process for local Bahami-
an contractors,” said Mr Kin-
sale.

He said because of the cur-
rent state of the market Bal-
moral’s sales and marketing
team have been working over-
time to push presales in order to
get give the project legs.

He also said Royal Bank of
Canada, which holds the lien
on the development, have been
very helpful in making the pro-
ject a reality.

The project has placed a huge
emphasis on making the Bal-
moral a family oriented com-
munity, with pools and a Mark
Knowles tennis centre to com-
plement the clubhouse amenity
available to all home owners.

“There is a lot of focus on the
amenities,” said Mr Kinsale.

PRODUCERS / FISHERMEN






This Evenme June 2, 62000) pm-20) pm
Law aon: Holy Crees Acre tenn Church Hall
HELP CRAFT
SAVLALL BIOS TASS ACCT OFF DHE BAH ASLAS

Log em In fOern ar bole mg ieshoonaa) Sing cen

ALL ABOVE HOU SIMESS (OY NERS SHOULD ATES

SMALL BUSINESS FOOSOMIEC: SUMMIT



Contact: MARK 4. TURNQUEST
(242) 326-6748 I! (242) 427-3640





THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY

NOTICE

TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF COURIER SERVICES,
PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY

TENDERS ARE INVITED FROM QUALIFIED CONTRACTORS TO
PROVIDE COURIER SERVICES FOR THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS

AUTHORITY, FOR A PERIOD OF ONE (1) YEAR.

TENDER DOCUMENTS,

WHICH

INCLUDE

INSTRUCTIONS

TO TENDERERS, SPECIFICATIONS AND OTHER RELEVANT
INFORMATION CAN BE COLLECTED 9 AM - 5:00 PM MONDAY TO
FRIDAY AT THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY, CORPORATE
CENTRE, BUILDING “B’, THIRD AND WEST TERRACES, COLLINS

AVENUE.

A TENDER MUST BE SUBMITTED IN DUPLICATE IN A SEALED
ENVELOPE OR PACKAGE IDENTIFIED AS “TENDER FOR THE
PROVISION OF COURIER SERVICES, PUBLIC HOSPITALS
AUTHORITY” ADDRESSED TO:

THE CHAIRMAN,
TENDERS COMMITTEE
THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
CORPORATE CENTRE BUILDING “B”
THIRD & WEST TERRACES, COLLINS AVENUE
P.O. BOX N-8200
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

TENDERS ARE TO ARRIVE AT THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
NO LATER THAN 5:00 P.M. Friday 19" June, 2009. LATE

TENDER(S) WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.

A copy of a valid business license and a certificate verifying up
to date National Insurance Contributions should accompany all

proposals.

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to accept or reject any

or all Tender(s).



TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 3B

ALITTLE EXTRA
HELP
CAN MAKE.A
BIG DIFFERENCE

BLAIRWOOD ACADEMY

Alternative school dedicated to the education of students
with learning disabilities,

SUMMER SCHOOL

July 06th to July 31st
Monday- Friday
9:30 a.m, - 12:30 p.m.
* Reading

Encoding! Decoding
> Comprehension
Math
* Writing

© Touch Math and Other Proerams

Concentration and study skills

Ages 4 to 18

Individualized Classes
Proven Special Education Methods
Fee: $ 500.00

Register Now!

3 to make an appointment for a free consult
Deadline for payment in full is 12th June.
VILLAGE ROAD SOUTH OF QUEEN'S COLLEGE

it ane. in
Call 393-131

Consolidated Water (Bahamas) Ltd.

Invites submissions for the sale of:

ONE 1250 kW Diesel Generator Set with 3512 DITA Caterpillar Engine Fully
Enclosed

Bee a Oe ALR

Contingous duty rating 1010 KW. Factory designed amd
delivered in a package that is ready to he commected bo
Power Lines, 4-Stroke-Cyele, Water-cooled Diesel Engine,
DES KW (1562 kVA) SRO V3 hose, 60H 2) 1A or
1250 kVA 400Â¥, 3-Phase, 0H fa) 100rpm, 18 model
year, 6029 hours on unit's hours meter,
Specifications follow:

Cat 3512 TA Diesel Engine
Cat SR Generator incL Tropicalization and 134%

Dy erspeed Canactty
CAT EMCP [I Digital Comal Panel
Anrio Start Stop Function
Safety Shutdawins
NFPA 110 Alarm Module
Circunt Breaker
Woodward 7301 Electronic Grovernot
"4 Electric Starter
Bator: Changer
33.Amp Altemator
Lube Oil Cooler
Lube Ohl and Filters
Recor Fuel Filters
Ar Cleaners
Pladiator
Dual Jacket Water Heaters
Rail/Skid-meaunted in ENCLOSURE
Muffler
S000 Gallen (10,300 Liter) UL. Listed Double Wall Fuel
Tank Base
Heavy Duty Enclosure
Warranty Note
PACKAGING: Prepared for Flat Bed Transpart

SUA Re ee Ce ee:
eR eT De
Deca e one este Um Ee et tires

Peete ioe

eee ETO M a eam
the following adress on or before June 24, 2089

The General Manager
Consolidated Water |Hahaneas) Ltd.
cae ee 10
RE CCH LEE EES





PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SS cea reg ee ee ee ee ee ee a a ae
Rolle elected president of Chamber of Commerce

FROM page 1B

The Chamber of Commerce
currently has a membership of
approximately 500.

Effective from yesterday, the
incoming president will head a
new board of officers comprised
of Ist Vice President, Gershan
Major (Mail Boxes Etc.); 2nd
Vice President, Chester Cooper
(British American Financial);
Honorary Treasurer, Darron
Cash (First Caribbean Bank);
and Honorary Secretary, Yvette
Sands (Sands & Associates).

Saluting the Chamber’s new
board, the new president not-
ed, “I will have the pleasure of
working with a very diverse and
energetic board, representative
of the entire business commu-
nity. The diversity of the board
brings added value to our mem-
bership as we represent the
issues and policies affecting the
private sector and the way we
do business.

We will work to maintain an
open line of communication
with the government to ensure

MARKET, from 2B

pared to a $4.6 million loss in
fiscal 2007, due primarily to low-
er provisions for doubtful debts
in the year of $473,000 ($5.6
million in 2007).

The unrealised loss on BBL's
portfolio of $1.6 million
accounted for the balance of the
company's net losses in fiscal
2008.

Total assets and liabilities

private sector representation on
the relevant policy making and
decisions.”

Giving the President’s
Report, outgoing president,
Dionisio D’Aguilar, conveyed
highlights of his term over the
last two years. “It gave me great
pride to take this office that my
father held. I was particularly
happy to serve when my father
was alive.”

Vincent D’Aguilar served as
Chamber President from 1977-
79 and in 1987. Mr. D’ Aguilar
reflected that it made his father
proud to see his son rise to the
top of an organisation to which
he contributed much of his time
and which was near and dear
to him.

Known for being a strong
voice for the business commu-
nity, D’Aguilar noted, “I par-
ticularly enjoyed being presi-
dent because it has allowed me
to get off my chest some of my
concerns about the way busi-
ness is done in this country. I
lobbied hard during my term in
office for the large anchor pro-
jects because I felt they would

million respectively, compared
to $22.3 million and $19.9 mil-
lion at year-end 2007, with net
assets of $495,000 - declining
from $2.3 million reported at
year-end 2007.

Doctors Hospital Health Sys-
tems (DHS) - During the week,
DHS released its financial
results for the three months
ended April 30, 2009.

Net income for the quarter
was $2.3 million ($0.23 per

stood at $30.3 million and $29.8 share), compared to $981,000

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law and Equity Division

2008
CLE/QUI/OO 1134

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land containing Three thousand and Fifty-six
(3,056) square feet situate in the Settlement of Great
Guana Cay one of the Abaco chain of cays in the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas bounded on the
North by land now or formerly the property of Lewis
Roberts and running thereon Sixty (60) feet on the
East by land the property of Alrob (Thomas Roberts)
but now the property of William Doyle Watson and
Frederik F. Gottlieb running thereon Fifty-five and
Ninety-three hundredths (55.93) feet on the South by
the Main Public Road (known as “Front Street”) and
running thereon Seventy (70) feet or less and on the
West by a Three (3) feet wide public reservation and
running thereon Sixty (60) feet

cushion us during the impend-
ing economic downtown.”

He expressed happiness
about the progress being made
by Albany and looked to the
AGM’s guest speaker, Sarkis
Izmirlian, to give an update on
the Baha Mar project.

Banking

In his usual frank nature,
D’ Aguilar expressed disap-
pointment that the banking
community has been unable to
establish the automated clearing
house (A.C.H.), “They’ve
promised that will it happen this
year but needless to say after
two years of promises I’m not
holding my breath.”

Speaking to the current eco-
nomic recession, he lamented,
“Sales are down, expenses are
up, especially energy costs, and
this has placed has an enormous
downward pressure on compa-
nies’ profits. The government
needs to be constantly remind-
ed that ensuring a healthy viable
private sector is key to a suc-
cessful economy.”

($0.10 per share) in the 2009
first quarter, an increase of 135
per cent.

Total revenues of $12.8 mil-
lion increased by $1.9 million
or 17 per cent in comparison to
$10.9 million the previous year,
while total expenses of $10.4
million increased by $611,000
or 6 per cent.

Management attributed the
positive results to a growth in
patient services, with revenues
from patient services of $12.4
million increasing by $1.8 mil-
lion or 18 per cent year-over-
year.

The increase in expenses was
said to be a direct result of rev-
enue growth, with medical sup-
plies and services costs of $3.1
million increasing by $412,000
or 15 per cent, while salaries
and benefits increased by
$236,000 or 6 per cent to $4.3
million compared to the 2009
first quarter.

Total DHS assets at April 30,
2009, were $31.3 million, a
decrease of $475,000 compared
to $31.8 million at year-end
2009. Total liabilities declined
by $2.2 million or 25 per cent
to $6.4 million, due primarily to

Having become a regular
with the local media, D’ Aguilar
thanked the press for their sup-
port, “I think the journalists of
this country enjoyed my can-
didness and my willingness to
‘tell it like it is’ in my usual
undiplomatic style.”

The Chairman and Chief
Executive Officer of the Baha
Mar Resorts Ltd., Mr. Sarkis
Izmirlian, delivered the AGM’s
keynote address on the topic
“Are We Ready For The
Recovery?”

“Yes, our community is feel-
ing the adverse affects of the
recession but at the same time
our community has the oppor-
tunity to implement strategic
initiatives so that we can be
well positioned to take advan-
tage of the economic recovery,”
he said.

Izmirlian highlighted the need
for major reform to various
areas including education, gam-
ing regulations, the port and
downtown, the airport and the
country’s investment process.

Conveying well wishes to the
outgoing President: “He has

repayment of a bank loan on
the company’s investment prop-
erty.

Annual General Meeting

(AGM) Notes:

Famguard Corporation
(FAM) announced that it will
hold its Annual General Meet-
ing on Friday, June 19, 2009, at
4pm at the British Colonial
Hilton, Victoria Room, Bay
Street, Nassau, Bahamas. Share-
holders of record as of May 21,
2009, will be qualified to vote
at the Annual Meeting.

J.S. Johnson Company (JSJ)
announced it will be holding its
Annual General Meeting on
Monday, June 15, 2009, at 6pm
at the British Colonial Hilton,
Victoria Room, Bay Street,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Doctors Hospital Health Sys-
tems (DHS) announced that it
will be holding its Annual Gen-
eral Meeting on Thursday, June
18, 2009, at 5.30pm at Doctors
Hospital, Dowdeswell Street,
Nassau, Bahamas. Sharehold-
ers of record as of May 27, 2009,
will be qualified to vote at the
Annual Meeting.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that
BUNMORE STREET, HARBOUR

KERVIN JONASSAINT of
ISLAND, ELEUTHERA,

always taken a vocal position
to protect and enhance the busi-
ness environment of the
Bahamas. His straight talk and
frank approach has been a
refreshing change. Even with
all the bad news in the papers
over the past months, I always
looked forward to reading the
papers and learning of his latest
crusade. I know the newspapers
will miss him as much as all of
us will.”

The Chamber’s 2009-10
board of directors was elected
during the AGM and consists
of the President, Khaalis Rolle;
1st Vice President, Gershan




Major; 2nd Vice President,
Chester Cooper; Honorary
Treasurer, Darron Cash; Hon-
orary Secretary, Yvette Sands;
Rick Hazelwood, John Bull
Group of Companies; Dr.
Jonathan Rodgers, Pearle
Vision; Robert Myers,
Caribbean Landscape Ltd.;
Diane Morley, Coles of Nassau;
Odley Aritis, TOP Builders;
Aaron Brice, Epic Battery Ltd.;
Pedro Roberts, Commonwealth
Drug & Medical Supplies Com-
pany Limited; Merrit Storr,
Chancellors Chambers;

Creswell Gardiner; Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) Limited.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL






The Public is hereby advised that

ALIA TAMAR

AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT,
1959, CHAPTER 393 OF THE STATUTE LAWS OF
THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

AND

BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 26TH day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF WILLIAM
DOYLE WATSON and FREDERIK F. GOTTLIEB
NOTICE OF PETITION

WILLIAM DOYLE WATSON of St. Simon’s Island in
the State of Georgia one of the states of the United
States of America and FREDERIK F. GOTTLIEB of
the Town of Marsh Harbour in the Island of Abaco
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas claim to be the owners in fee simple in
possession of all that piece parcel or lot of land
hereinbefore described free from encumbrances.
AND the Petitioners have made application to
the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act,
1959 Chapter 393 of the Statute Laws of the said
Commonwealth, in the above action, to have their
title to the said land investigated and the nature
and extent thereof determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted in accordance with
the provisions of the said Act.

Notice is hereby given to any person having
a dower or right of dower or an adverse claim or
a claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or
before the expiration of thirty (30) days after the final
publication of these presents filed in the Registry
of the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
or the undersigned a statement of his claim in the
prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure of any such person to file and serve
a statement on or before the expiration of thirty (30)
days after the final publication of these presents shall
operate as a bar to such claims.

Copies of the said plan may be inspected
during normal hours at the Registry of the
Supreme Court, East Street North, City of Nassau,
New Providence, The Bahamas and the Office
of the Administrator in the Township of Marsh
Harbour, Abaco, The Bahamas.

Dated this 2nd day of December, A.D., 2008

SYDBRI LEGAL SERVICES
Chambers
Naomi House
No.19, Ninth Terrace & West Court
Centreville
New Providence, The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioners



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DARREL SIMILIAN of HARBOUR
WEST, EIGHT MILE ROCK, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 25TH day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

WANTED
POSSE VA CLL

A local company is seeking to hire a highly motivated
detailed oriented individual to fill the position of Assistant

Financial Controller

REQUIREMENTS

Ability to work with minimum supervision
Experience in effective management of purchases,
inventory and Accounts Receivables

Supervise the accurate input and processing of

financial information

Timely preparation and issuance of financial reports
Must possess a high level of integrity & professionalism
Must be flexible and able to produce in a time-driven

environment

QUALIFICATIONS

* A University Degree in Accounting or other related
discipline

* Minimum of 5 years experience in accounting

* Working knowledge of Excel and Microsoft Word

Interested persons should apply on or before: July 1st 2009

Attention: CONTROLLER
DA 61782
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N3207
Nassau, Bahamas

Salary is commensurate with experience and qualification

SAUNDERS of Nassau, Bahamas intend to change
my name to ALIA TAMAR SAUNDERS KNOWLES. If
there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Deputy Chief
Passport Officer, PO.Box N-792, Nassau, Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of
this notice.










































NOTICE
NAPLES LIMITED

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) NAPLES LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 29nd May, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro
Associated Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI

Dated this 2nd day of June, A. D. 2009



Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CORPORACION TONAR S.A.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ESSAY COMPETITION

TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK

The Department of Public Service will host an Essay
Competition as one of the activities for the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week. The Competition is open to Junior
and Senior Students in New Providence.

Additionally, this year, a speech competition will be
for schools in the Northern & Southern Bahamas,
respectively. Students interested in participating in the
Essay Competition should write a 250 - 300 words (Junior
High), and 450 - 500 words (Senior High), essay on the
topic: “ The Public Service-Striving for Excellence in
Customer Service.”

The deadlines for entries, which should be referred
to the attention of Mrs. Antoinette Thompson, Deputy
Permanent Secretary, Department of Public Service, is
Friday 24th July, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 Computer System will be awarded to
the winner each category. The first runners-up for both the
Essay and Speech Competition in the Junior & Senior High
School category, will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.

The winners will be announced during the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week Awards Ceremony scheduled for
Saturday 10th October 2009.

Students interested in the Speech Competition for the
Northern and Southern Bahamas should contact their
Language Arts Teacher.



THE TRIBUNE

PBUSINESS
Oil prices
push to
new highs
for ‘09

@ By MARK WILLIAMS
AP Energy Writer



COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP)
— Oil prices pushed to new
highs for the year Monday on
a weak dollar and new data
suggesting manufacturing in
China has strengthened. Both
of those factors helped send
energy prices to record highs
last summer.

Benchmark crude for July
delivery rose $2.27 to settle at
$68.58 a barrel on the New
York Mercantile Exchange,
the highest close since early
November. Natural gas
futures soared 10 per cent.

The data out of China
shows how much economic
news from across the globe
can effect pocketbooks in the
US.

Brokerage CLSA Asia-
Pacific Markets said its pur-
chasing managers index rose
to 51.2 from April's 50.1 on a
100-point scale, indicating that
the world's third-largest econ-
omy might be recovering from
a slump. Numbers above 50
show an expansion. The state-
sanctioned China Federation
of Logistics and Purchasing
reported that its index had
eased, but that manufacturing
was still expanding somewhat.

When crude prices were
heading toward $150 per bar-
rel last year, many energy ana-
lysts believed the booming
economies of China and India
would support energy prices
globally even as Western
nations slipped into recession.

That did not turn out to be
the case and there is little tan-
gible evidence to suggest that
the rapid rise in energy prices
can be sustained for long this
summer.

That would be good news
for some consumers as far as
energy prices go. Utility bills
and gasoline prices are far
below last year's levels,
though the plunge has come at
the cost of millions of jobs.

Yet the pace at which ener-
gy prices rose in May has also
raised questions about what
is causing the surge. That is
especially true of spiking nat-
ural gas prices Monday.

Natural gas has been one
commodity in the energy com-
plex that has lagged this year
compared with crude and
gasoline, and may finally have
attracted a large number of
investors who saw a bargain.

Speculative bets on crude
were on the rise already. The
net increase in bets that
benchmark crude prices will
increase rose by more than 14
per cent last week, according
to a report from the Com-
modity Futures Trading Com-
mission.

A lot of that money is being
driven by inflation fears as the
dollar falls against other major
currencies.

Stil, there are continuing
hints of an economy that may
be on the mend.

The Tempe, Arizona-based
Institute for Supply Manage-
ment reported the first month
of growth in the new-orders
index since November 2007,
though the sector continues
to contract overall.

Natural gas prices have
slumped to five-year lows with
some of the biggest users, like

RBC

Royal Bank
Rx, of Canada

PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each property.
HOUSES/APARTMENTS/COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

(401) Lots #17 & #18 Crown Allot-
ments, Love Hill Settlement, An-
dros. Containing a two-storey res.
Appraised value: $100,000

(806) Lots #1 & #2, Block 3 with
a parcel situated between Lot #1,
Block 3, containing a 4 bedroom
condominium — Sunset View Villas,
West Bay Street. Appraised value:
$750,000

(433) Lot #27 of Village Allotment
#14 in the Eastern District, contain-
ing residence situated on Denver
Street off Parkgate Road in the Ann’s
Town Constituency, New Providence.
Property size 2,500 sqft Building size
990 sqft. Appraised value: $50,000

(400) Property situated in Calabash
Bay on the Island of Andros. 75’ x
150’ and containing thereon a small
grocery store 480 sqft. and an in-
complete 3 bed 2 bath house 900
sqft. Appraised value: $65,000

(301) Lot #2 in block #8, Steward
Road, Coral Heights East Subdivi-
sion situated in Western District of
New Providence, approx. size 8,800
sq. ft. with a split level containing
two bed, two bath, living, dining
& family rooms, kitchen and util-
ity room - approx. size of building
2,658 sqft Appraised value: $322,752

(702) Lot #20 with residential prop-
erty located Skyline Heights.
Appraised value $280,000

(902) Lot ofland94x94x 150x150
on Queens Highway just south of
Palmetto Point with a two storey
stone building containing two apart-
ments. Each unit has 3 bed/2 1/2
bath, kitchen, living room and 3 linen
closets. Appraised value: $287,209

(400) Lot #14 situated in the settle-
ment of Love Hill on the Island of
Andros totalling 20,000 sqft Property
contains a two storey 5 bedroom,
3 bathroom residence. Appraised
value: $185,000

(105) Lot containing 2 storey bldg.
with three bed, two and a half bath
residence, and 30’ x 86’ situated Bai-
ley Town, North Bimini.
Appraised value: $235,000

(801) Lot #18 in Sandilands Allot-

(702) Undeveloped lots# 4A, 16, 17,
18 and 19 located Chapman Estates,
West Bay. Appraised value: $348,000

(701) Undeveloped lot #149. Sea-
fan Lane, Lucayan Beach Subdivi-
sion. Grand Bahama, 18750 sqft.
Appraised value: TBA

(565) Vacantlot#5 located Eleuthera
Island Shores, Seaside Drive Section
B, Block #15, Eleuthera, Bahamas.
9,691 sqft, Appraised value: $27,620

(402) Lot89, Block 7 Aberdeen Drive,
Bahamia West Replat Subdivision,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, consist-
ing of 12,100 sqft.

Appraised value: $51,000

(800) Vacant property located Baha-
mia South. Block 16 lot 9A, Freep-
ort, Grand Bahama consisting of
24,829.20 sqft. Appraised value:
$52,000

(565) Vacant Lot #9 (11,406.65 sqft)
situated in Mango Lane Section “B”
Block #15, Eleuthera Island Shores,
Eleuthera.

Appraised value: $50,189

(909) Vacant residential Lot# 63
(7800 sqft) Crown Allotments located
Murphy Town, Abaco.

Appraised value: $18,000

ment on the western side of Cross-
wind Road between Seabreeze Lane
and Pineyard Road in the Eastern
Distract of The Island of New Prov-
idence-The Bahamas.,containing
single storey private residence com-
prising the following: covered entry
porch, living room, dining room,
kitchen, laundry room, familyroom,
sitting area, 4 bedrooms, 2 bathroom
and patio. The total area ofland is
approximately 7,641 square feet.
Appraised value: $289,426

(801) Two parcels of land containing
21,120 sq.ft. situated on the south-
ern side of East Shirley Street and
100 feet west of its junction with
“Shirlea” in the Eastern District, New
Providence. Situated thereon isa
Gas Station and Auto Repair Shop.
Appraised value: $799,497

(601) Lot #17 located Village Allot-
ment with fourplex,
Appraised value: $500,000

(701) Lotofland having the number
16 in Block number 16 in Section
Three of the Subdivision called
and known as Sea Breeze Estates
situated in the Eastern District of
New Providence. Property contains
a three bed, two bath residence.
Appraised value: $277,000

(701) Lot ofland being lot number
11 in Block number 10 ona plan of
allotments laid out by Village Estates
Limited and filed in the dept of Land
& Surveys as number 142 N.P and
situated in the Eastern District of
New Providence. Property contains
three bed, two bath residence.
Appraised value: $165,000

(565) Lot # 1018 in Golden Gates
Estates #2 Subdivision situate in
the South Western District of the
island of New Providence Containing
a single storey private residence 3
bedroom 2 bath. Property approx.
size 6,000 sqft Building approx size
2,400 sqft Appraised value: $173,176

(205) Lot B - 50 ft x 115.73 ft situ-
ated on the north side of Shell Fish
Road, being the third lot west of Fire
Trail Road and east of Hamster Road
with a one half duplex residential
premises. Appraised value: TBA

(808) Lot #3 Block 24 in the Cen-

(108) Vacant Single Family Lot #5
Block #5 Unit #1 Devonshire
Appraised value $30,000

(802) Vacant Commercial Lot No:
3A, Block 60 Bahamia Subdivision
VI containing 3 acres located Free-
port, Grand Bahama.

Appraised value: $750,000

(108) Vacant Single Family Lot #5
Block F Bahamia South Subdivi-
sion. Appraised value $35,700

(569) Vacant property located in
Subdivision called “Culmerville”
being a portion of Lot #47 and a
portion of Lot #57. Appraised value:
$24,000

(569) All that piece parcel or lot
of land situate in the settlement
of James Cistern on the Island of
Eleuthera one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of the Baha-
mas measuring approx 10,000 sq. ft.
Appraised value TBA

(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land being Lot No. 102 in the Sub-
division known as “EXUMA HAR-
BOUR’ in the Island of Great Exuma
measuring 10,000 sq.ft. Appraised
value $20,000.00.

(202) Vacant lot of land contain-

treville Subdivision . Building #109/
Eastern side of Collins Ave .Com-
prising commercial 2,800 sq ft com-
mercial building.

Appraised value: $582,000

(901) Lot #32 containing 4 bedroom
2bath concrete structure located
Triana Shores Harbour Island, Eleu-
thera. Property size 80’ x 120’ x 80’
120 feet Appraised value: $332,735

(902) Property contains 23,125 sq ft
lot #30 Lover’s Hill Subdivision with
two storey structure approximately
15 years old. House contains Three
bedrooms, Two baths, living room,
dining room, t.v. room, kitchen, attic
space and Double car garage with a
gross floor area of 3,378 sq. ft. Lover's
Hill is a residential development.
Appraised value $254,154.00

(902) Property contains approx.
5,800 sq. ft. situated in North Pal-
metto Point with a single storey con-
crete structure approx. 18 years old.
House contains three bedrooms,
two baths, living room, dining room
and kitchen with a gross floor area
of 1,444.26 sq. ft. Palmetto Pointis
a residential developed area. Ap-
praised value $128,766.00

(101-N) Single Family Resi-
dence-810 sqft, 2 bed,1 bath Lot
#3 Block #1 Eastville Subdivision
Eastern District, New Providence.
Appraised value: $65,000

(910) Lot #12 Maderia Park, a small
subdivision on the outskirts of Treas-
ure Cay, Abaco having an area of
9,444 square feet residence contain-
ing a concrete block structure with
asphalt shingle roof comprises of
three bedrooms, two bathrooms,
family room, living room, dining
room, and kitchen. Appraised value:
$147,000

(569) Property situated on Wil-
liams Lane off Kemp Road, New
Providence, Bahamas containing
a two-storey house and an apart-
ment building consisting of 1800
sqft. Appraised value $100,000

(501) Allthat piece of land being Par-
cel #3 and Parcel #4 situated on the
South side of Prince Charles Drive,
New Providence, Bahamas contain-
ing a commercial building housing

VACANT PROPERTIES

ing 41,164 sqft, Lot#8, Love Estate,
Phase 1, 2,300 ft. south of West Bay
Street, Western District, New Provi-
dence. Appraised value $165,000

(202) Vacantlot ofland containing
1.786 acre, situated east of Know-
les Drive, approximately 1,420 ft.
southward of Harold Road in the
western district of New Providence,
Bahamas. Appraised value: $ 170,000

(503) Vacant property consisting
of Lot #894 situated in the Freep-
ort Ridge Subdivision, Section #1,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.
Appraised value: TBA

(505) Ten (10) acres of land situ-
ated on Woods Cay, known as Lit-
tle Abaco, between Cooper’s Town
and Cedar Harbourin Abaco, Baha-
mas. The property is undeveloped
with a view of the sea from both the
North and South side. Appraised
value: $1,078,750

(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land Lot #977, Pinewood Gardens
Subdivision, Southern District, New
Providence. Appraised value: TBA.

(008) All that piece parcel oflot and
land on the Island of Great Exuma sit-
uated about 10 1/2 miles Northwest-
wardly of George Town which said

OFFICERS

TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 5B

two shop space on the ground floor
and three shop space on the second
floor with a large storage area in the
rear. Total area 8400 sq ft.
Appraised value: $366,650

(569) All that piece, parcel or land
having an approximate area of 2100
sqft situated on the Western side of
Blue Hill Road about 70 ft North of
Peter Street and about 115 ft south
of Laird Street in the Southern Dis-
trict of New Providence, Bahamas
containing a commercial building
housing a two bed/one bath unit
on the top floor and a store on the
first floor. Appraised value: $154,000

(569) All that piece, parcel or lot
of land situated on Cowpen Road
(1000 ft east of the Faith Avenue Junc-
tion) in the Southern District of New
Providence, Bahamas containing
a duplex apartment comprising of
two - 2-bedroom/1-bathroom apart-
ments. Appraised value: $150,000

(800) All that parcel or lot of land
being Lots #10 and 11 in Block 29
of Coconut Grove Subdivision, con-
taining a shopping plaza. The lotis
trapezium in shape, 8,383 square
feet. Appraised value $500,000

(560) Lot of land #2 Sea View Sub-
division, Russell Island, Spanish
Wells. Property size 11,323 sqft,
building size 2236 sq ft containing
3 bedrooms, 2 bath, living room, an
eat-in kitchen, dining room, laun-
dry room, covered porch, a one car
garage, and a covered water tank.
Appraised value: $299,000

(901) Lot#57 block# Trianna Shores
containing 3 bed 2 bath front room,
dining room, & kitchen. Concrete
structure, 1926.40 sq ft wooden
deck 321.60 sq ft. property 9600 sqft.
Appraised value: $448,645

(901) Lot “K” Barrack Street, Harbour
Island containing a2 storey concrete
building with 4 bed 4 bath, dining
room & kitchen -Building 2934.56
sqft property 6563 sqft.
Appraised value: $479,228

(811) Property containing Condo
“Millennium II’, Unit A-101, building
57, Phase 1C, 2 bedrooms, 3 bath-
rooms, living room, dining room,
utility closet & patio. Situated in

piece parcel or lotofland is #10750
Bahama Sound O.A.E. 10,900 sqft.
Appraised value: $65,000

(008) All that piece parcel orlot of
land designated as Lot Number 563
onaplan ofa Subdivision called or
known as Bahama Highlands #4.
11,223.41 sqft. Appraised value:
$87,000

(201) Single family residential Lot
No. 11703 Bahama Sound Subd.
Number 11 West, Great Exuma.
Size: approx. 10,000 sq ft
Appraised value $15,000

(201) Multifamily LotNo. 10-South-
east Corner of Mandarin Drive, Sugar
Apple Road, Sans Souci Sudv. Size:
14,368 sq ft

Appraised value $165,000.00.

(201) Single family residential Lot
No. 11698 Bahama Sound Subd.
Number 11 West, Great Exuma.
Size: approx. 10,426 sq ft Appraised
value: $15,000

(569) All that piece parcel orlot of
land being Lot #1 located in Block 3
in the Subdivision known as East-
ern Estates situate in the Eastern
District of the island of New Prov-
idence. Property approx. 6950 sq.
ft, Appraised value TBA

908

the area known as Bimini Bay Re-
sort, Bimini, Bahamas.
Appraised value - $485,000

(008) Single Story tri-plex building,
one 2 bedrooms and two 1 bed-
room located on a multi-family Lot
No.4, block 3, Shirley Lane, section
1, Bahama Reef Yacht & Country
Club Subdivision, Freeport Grand
Bahama. Property size is approx.
16,621 sq. ft.

Appraised value $348,000

(908 Lot# 52 Crown Allotments
located Murphy Town, Abaco with
size being 10,200 sq ft. Containing
a one storey house with 4 bed/2
bath - Concrete Block Structure —
Appraised value. $200,000

(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land being Lot #39 in the residen-
tially zoned area of Highbury Park
Subdivision in the Eastern District
of New Providence, Bahamas. Ap-
prox. land size 6,000 sq ft. Property
contains a 3-bedroom/2-bathroom
house, size being 1,563 sq. ft.

Appraised Value $131,000.00.

(908) Lot# 23 located in the Sub-
division of Spring City, Abaco with
size being 8,925 sq ft. Containing a
one storey wooden structure house
with 3 bed/1 bath of 7985 sq ft
Appraised value. $60,000

(304) Single storey triplex, situated
on Lot 615, Mermaid Boulevard,
Golden Gates #2 in the Western
District, New Providence. Two - two
bedrooms, one bathroom units and
one - one bedroom, one bathroom
unit. The property is zoned as Multi
Family Residential, measuring 9,092
sq.feet with the living area meas-
uring 2,792 sq ft.

Appraised value $374,192

(201) Duplex Lot #25 situated on
Faith Ave. North (Claridge Estates)
- size being 7,354 sq. feet. with du-
plex thereon.

Appraised value - TBA

(201) Lot of land situated on Fire
Trail Road being a partition of Glad-
ston Allot #41 New Providence, Ba-
hamas containing townhouse apart-
ment unit and two proposed units
(completed as is).

Appraised value $237,714

(569) All that piece parcel or lot
of land located on Marigold Road
in the Subdivision known as Kool
Acres. Lot is approx.9455 sq. ft.
Appraised value $93,000.

(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land being Lot #152 located in the
Subdivision known as West Ridge-
land Park situated in the Southern
District of the island of New Provi-
dence. Property approx. 4000 sq. ft.
Appraised value $55,000.

(008) An undeveloped waterfront
lot land being Lot Number 12032
with a size of 10,600 sq.ft. in the
Bahama Sound of Exuma Subdi-
vision Number 11] West situated in
the Island of Great Exuma one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas.

Appraised value $224,000

(008) Partially developed parcel
ofland being 10,000 sq.ft. situate
about the eastern portion of The
Forest Estate in the vicinity of the
settlements of Southside and The
Forest being Lot Number 4803 in
Bahama Sound of Exuma6, Exuma
The Bahamas.

Appraised value $25,000

COMMERCIAL BANKING CENTRE
Tel: 242-356-8568

800) Mrs. Monique Crawford
801) Mr. Jerome Pinder

802) Mr. Brian Knowles

803) Mr. Vandyke Pratt

805) Mrs. Tiffany Simms O’brien
806) Mrs. Lois Hollis

807) Mr. Lester Cox

808) Mrs. DaShann Clare-Paul
810) Miss LaPaige Gardiner

811) Ms. Lydia Gardiner
PALMDALE SHOPPING CENTRE
Tel: 242-322-4426/9 or
242-302-3800

(201) Ms. Nicola Walker

(202) Mr. Robert Pantry

(205) Mrs. Anya Major

NASSAU MAIN BRANCH

Tel: 242-322-8700

701) Mr. James Strachan

702) Mr. Antonio Eyma

301) Ms. Thyra Johnson

304) Mrs. Alicia Thompson
MACKEY STREET BRANCH

Tel: 242-393-3097

601) Ms. Cherelle Martinborough
JOHN E. KENNEDY DRIVE BRANCH
Tel: 242-325-4711

401) Mrs. Renea Walkine

402) Mrs. Chandra Gilbert
PRINCE CHARLES SHOPPING CENTRE
Tel: 242-393-7505/8

503) Mr. Dwight King

505) Ms. Patricia Russell

CABLE BEACH BRANCH

Tel: 242-327-6077

466) Mrs. Winnifred Roberts
LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE
Tel: 242-502-5170/502-5180

716) Mrs. Ingrid Simon

717) Mrs. Nancy Swaby
723) Ms. Deidre King

) Mrs. Joyce Riviere
}
724) Mrs. Faye Higgs
}
}

909) Mrs. Sylvia Poitier

910) Miss Cyprianna Williams
BIMINI BRANCH
Tel:242-347-3031

105) Miss. Ganiatu Tinubu
GRAY’S, LONG ISLAND

Tel: 242-337-0101

100) Mrs. Lucy Wells
EXUMA BRANCH

Tel: 242-336-3251

008) Ms. Jocyelyn Mackey
FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH
Tel: 242-352-6631/2

101-F) Ms. Garnell Frith
102) Ms. Elaine Collie

103) Mrs. Damita Newbold-Cartwright
108) Ms. Sylvie Carey
SPANISH WELLS

Tel: 242-333-4131 or
242-333-4145

(560) Mr. Walter Carey

manufacturers, hammered by
the recession.

The lack of broader, funda-
mental support hasn't stopped
momentum from building in
energy markets.

"T don't believe in it ... but
I'm not dumb enough to stand
in front of it," oil trader and
analyst Stephen Schork said
of the rally.

In other Nymex trading,
gasoline for June delivery rose
two cents to $1.915 a gallon
and heating oil rose 9.89 cents
to settle at $1.7765 a gallon.
Natural gas for June delivery
jumped 41.4 cents to settle at
$4.249 per 1,000 cubic feet.

In London, Brent prices
rose $2.45 to settle at $67.97 a
barrel on the ICE Futures
exchange.

¢ Associate Press writers Joe
McDonald in Beijing, Carlo
Piovano in London and Alex
Kennedy in Singapore con-
tributed to this report

725) Ms. Marguerite Johnson
565) Mrs. Catherine Davis

569) Mrs. Vanessa Scott

NASSAU INT’L AIRPORT

Tel: 242-377-7179

433) Mrs. Suzette Hall-Moss
LYFORD CAY BRANCH

Tel: 242-362-4540 or 242-362-4037
101-N) Mrs. Lindsey Peterson
GOVERNOR’S HARBOUR, ELEUTHERA
Tel: 242-332-2856/8

902) Ms. Nicole Evans
HARBOUR ISLAND BRANCH
Tel:242-333-2230

901) Ms. Velderine Laroda
ANDROS TOWN BRANCH

Tel: 242-368-2071

400) Mrs. Rose Bethel

MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO

Tel: 242-367-2420



(
(
(
(
(
(
(
(
(
(









For the stories

L RBC Royal
behind the news,

RBC > HELPING YOU SUCCEED SETA melee]

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean /bahamas

™ Trademark of Royal Bank of Canada. ® The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are registered trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada.

read Insight
on Mondays





PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Dow Jones swaps

Travelers for Citigroup

@ By IEVA M AUGSTUMS
AP Business Writer

CHARLOTTE, North Car-
olina (AP) — Seven years after
being spun off by Citigroup Inc.,
Travelers Cos. is supplanting its
former parent as a member of
the Dow Jones industrial aver-
age.

Travelers’ selection helps
maintain the representation of
financial companies in the Dow.
The property and casualty
insurer has suffered less than
many other financial firms dur-
ing the credit crisis and reces-
sion.

New York-based Citigroup is
the second financial company
to be dropped from the Dow
after suffering huge losses dur-
ing the credit crisis and reces-
sion. Dow removed American
International Group Inc. in Sep-
tember after the insurer

received a multibillion dollar
bailout that gave the govern-
ment an 80 per cent stake in the
company.

Citigroup was expected to be
removed from the index as its
share price tumbled nearly 87
per cent since the beginning of
2008. Shares of St. Paul, Min-
nesota-based Travelers, on the
other hand, are only down near-
ly 22 per cent.

As of Friday, Citigroup
accounted for less than one per
cent of the value of the index,
which includes 30 stocks that
make up the best-known
barometer of Wall Street. As a
higher-priced stock, Travelers
will have more weight, and
therefore will account for a larg-
er portion of the Dow.

Shares of Travelers gained
$1.43, or 3.5 per cent, to $42.09
in afternoon trading Monday,
while Citigroup lost three cents

to $3.69.

Dow Jones & Co. also said
Monday it would add computer
networking gear maker Cisco
Systems Inc. to the industrials,
replacing General Motors
Corp., as GM entered bank-
ruptcy protection. The changes
take effect June 8.

Citigroup's removal ends 12
years in the index for the New
York-based bank, known as
Citicorp when it joined in
March 1997. Citigroup was cre-
ated in 1998 when Sanford
Weill merged his Travelers
Group with Citicorp, creating
a financial supermarket provid-
ing everything from checking
accounts to hurricane insurance.
Travelers was then spun off as a
separate company in 2002.

"It's always sort of interest-
ing, and ironic, when a former
subsidiary of a company that
got spun off eclipses the par-

THE FOLLOWING ARE EXCERPTS FROM THE COMPARY'S AUDITED FISANCLAL
STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 2008. A COMPLETE SET OF

CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL
OONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL
AUBTORS” RERORT CAN BE VIEY

STATEMERTS,
STATEMENTS

INCLUDING
AND THE

4 Ti y

THE NOTES TO THE

RELATED [NOEPESDENT
VEO ONLINE ON THE COMPANYS WEBSITE AT

ent,” said Paul Newsome, an
analyst with Sandler, O'Neill &
Partners.

Wall Street Journal Manag-
ing Editor Robert Thomson
expressed reluctance in a state-
ment Monday to remove Citi-
group, although "it is clear that
the bank is in the midst of a
substantial restructuring which
will see the government with a
large and ongoing stake."

The government's stress tests
of the 19 biggest US banks ear-

lier this month showed 10 of
them had to raise a total of $75
billion in new capital to with-
stand possible future losses. Of
those, Citigroup needed $5.5
billion.

Thomson added said that
after the removal of AIG last
year and the addition of Kraft
Foods, the financial industry
was underrepresented on the
Dow. The selection of Travelers
corrects that deficiency, he said.

John A. Prestbo, editor and

executive director of Dow Jones
Indexes, said the company,
when looking for Citigroup's
replacement, turned to an insur-
er because “we wanted to get
that element back into the mix."

Like Travelers, AIG sold
property and casualty insurance.

"T think it's certainly appro-
priate to add Travelers," New-
some said. "They are a big com-
pany and well capitalized ... the
things you would want in a blue
chip kind of name."

> MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT WC

NOTICE

CORRIDOR 11

BLUE HILL ROAD
ROADWAY CONSTRUCTION

In an effort to relieve current traffic congestion problems JOSE
CARTELLONE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES S.A_ has
been contracted for the Completion of the New Providence Road
Improvement Project — International Package. Road construction

nineteen will be commencing onCorridor 11A (Blue Hill Road),which may

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET require diversions from:

AS OF DECEMBER 31, 20068
(Expressed it Bahamian dovlars)

Duke Street & Robinson Road

ASSETS -, . . .
Local diversions will be sign posted in due course and further

Ce information will be provided in the local media

Cash 5
Accounts receivable, net

624 774
VOUT, 575
6333
3,792,139
GML419

4,817,180
1647,078
g19.24
LBL367T8
4a )4k

Prone exporses and diopasins

Tel: 242-322-8341 /242-322-2610 Email: jcccbahamas @cartellone.com.ar

Inventory
Current porlean of long-lerm neacwvabkes

Total current pases [BARS [th 1S,840315

NON-CURKENT ASSETS

Investment 444913

3,307,95|
1565760083

4741 4dk

168,371,305

4243913
550935
16,641 52

a 752 7

Long-term receivables
Property, plant and equipment
Intangible assets

Pal
NAD

Nassau Airport

Oevelopment Company

General Information

Total monscusrent assets 154,439 087

POTAL 187,008), 564 174,279.402

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

Session
Restaurant & Retail Opportunities

CURRENT LIABILITIES:

Accounts payable and accrued lishilities Ia, 77RRSR §
| TSM
8,567 051
§ 000MM)

2H BL4 418

11,771 474
Deter’ ihc oie U35, 807
S38

SMH) 000

Current portion of longterm debt
Curent portion af redeemable prelenred shares

Total curred leatulinies 26,6135, 704

The Nassau Airport Development Company invites
all interested persons to attend a general information
session to discuss the food & beverage and retail
opportunities available in the new airport terminals at
the Lynden Pindling International Airport.

NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES:
Subscriber deposits 5371
24,1485)

20, ODM

5,284 082
MGT AH
TS AMH)000

Long-term deta
Kedicmabls preferred shares

40,520,276 G37] 203

Total nn-current Liabilities

Total liabilities 7H.I34 04 498d O17
FCMUITY:
Onderary share capetal |. 6550074

4S. 7h

19,712,899 When: Monday June 15, 2009

Retained eames 65581 SRG

Total equity 108 6 870 #5 20d dS

Where: Wyndham Nassau Resort, Salon 4

TOT Al $ BSS 8 TS ATP

CABLE BAHAMAS LTD. Time: 9:30 a.m. - Noon

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008

{Expressed in Bahamian dotlars)

Learn about:

> Nassau Ainport Development Company
2008 2007 -
The LPIA Expansion Project
REVENUE 5

SLAG1 055 § 75,3,085

OPERATING EXPENSES (38,676,303) (37,829,563)

The New U.S. Departures Terminal

42,784,752

(12 50H) 198)

35, 135,44

Depreciation and amortization 1137010)

Food & Beverage and Retail Opportunities
OPERATING INCUME

Interest EXpetise

Ab T4534
(2,348,677)

(2,040, 0001)

24,763,340)
(2,095,031)
(2,454,001)

The NAD Request For Proposal Process

Dividends paid on redeemable preferred shares

NET INCOME The NAD Commercial Lease Content

21,617,709

BASIC AND DILUTED EARNINGS PER SHARE 4 1.10

The Tenant Design Criteria Manual

MOTE; A COMPLETE SET OF CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, INCLUDING
THE NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND THE RELATED
INDEPENDENT AUDITORS REPORT CAN BE VIEWED ONLINE ON THE COMPANY'S
WEESITE AT intteo4www coiblebolray, com corpora inners sarcilders.





PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a | > =; ;
Stocks rally after positive economic data

lm By MADLEN READ
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall
Street is starting June with a big
gain, boosted by reports that
paint a more upbeat picture of
the global economy.

Investors looked past Gener-
al Motors Corp.'s bankruptcy
filing and instead focused on
better-than-expected readings
on US manufacturing, con-
sumer spending and construc-
tion spending. Stocks got off to
a strong start Monday follow-
ing upswings in Europe and
Asia, where markets surged on
surveys showing improvements
in manufacturing in those
regions.

By late afternoon trading, the
Dow Jones industrial average

TST

GA ty

aU ae
ar
ths



and other major indexes were
up more than two per cent. The
Standard & Poor's 500 index
and the Nasdaq composite
index hit their highest levels so
far this year.

It wasn't just fundamental
economic data that encouraged
buying on Monday, however.
Some technical factors were at
play, too. The first trading day
of the month often brings with it
a surge of new money from
mutual funds. Also, the S&P
broke through its 200-day mov-
ing average, a key development
that hasn't occurred in over a
year.

Kim Caughey, equity
research analyst at Fort Pitt
Capital Group, said she was
skeptical about the strength of
the market's move Monday.
The economic data were "better
than expected, but I wouldn't
say they were great."

Even if the economy is stabi-
lizing, there is little to drive
demand once it bottoms,
Caughey said. "I can't really
buy into today's super-happy
stock market."

Standard & Poor's chief
economist David Wyss said
Monday he expects the US
economy to bottom out late this
summer or early in the fall, but
then experience a "rather slug-
gish" recovery.

"It's not a pleasant outlook,"
Wyss said. He predicted US

A World of
Choices

gross domestic product —
which measures the value of all
goods and services produced in
the country — to drop 3.1 per
cent this year, with even sharp-
er declines in European
economies and Japan.

In late afternoon trading, the
Dow rose 217.60, or 2.6 per
cent, to 8,717.93. The Standard
& Poor's 500 index rose 23.21,
or 2.5 per cent, to 942.35. The
Nasdaq composite index rose
48.97, or 2.8 per cent, to
1,823.30.

Because GM's bankruptcy fil-
ing was so well telegraphed in
advance, the move did not faze
investors.

"It's remarkable the degree
of resilience that the equity
markets have shown," said Jack
A. Ablin, chief investment offi-
cer at Harris Private Bank,
referring to the market's ability
to look past GM and other dis-
ruptions. "We've had plant clos-
ings, we've had dealer shut-
downs. I think the reverbera-
tions have already been felt.”

The government will get a 60
per cent stake in GM, and is
expected to provide the
automaker with an additional
$30 billion on top of the $20 bil-
lion it has already received to
help it restructure. Meanwhile
Chrysler LLC, which filed for
Chapter 11 protection in April,
is expected to emerge from
bankruptcy protection this

week.

The Dow Jones industrial
average announced Monday it
is dropping GM as a compo-
nent after the automaker filed
for bankruptcy, as well as Citi-
group Inc., in which the gov-
ernment now owns a significant
stake. GM and Citi will be
replaced with Travelers Cos.
and Cisco Systems Inc. next
week.

Filing

Positive economic data
helped overshadow GM's bank-
ruptcy filing.

Consumers trimmed spend-
ing by 0.1 per cent, the Com-
merce Department reported,
less than the 0.2 per cent reduc-
tion forecast by economists.
Personal income was also better
than anticipated, coming in flat
instead of negative.

The Commerce Department
also reported that construction
spending rose for the second
straight month in April by 0.8
per cent, far better than the 1.2
per cent decline economists had
expected.

US manufacturing activity
also shrank at a slower pace in
May, according to the Institute
for Supply Management. The
ISM index came in at 42.8 —
its highest since September and
up from 40.1 in March. A read-
ing above 50 indicates growth,

FirstCaribbean

Savings

At FirstCaribbean, you have the

freedom to choose
an account that fits your lifestyle.

FirstCaribbean Savings

Achieve your financial goals with a
FirstCaribbean Savings Account and
have the security of knowing your nest
egg is always growing.

FirstCaribbean Savings Plus
Fast track your savings by having your
interest calculated daily with a FirstCaribbean
Savings Plus Account.

Visit www.firstcaribbeanbank.com or your nearest FirstCaribbean
Branch to find out more about our wide range of product choices.

FirstCaribbean International Bank is a member of the CIBC Group.

Savings Plus

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.

and a reading below 50 indi-
cates contraction.

Advancing stocks outnum-
bered decliners by five to one
on the New York Stock
Exchange, where volume came
to 968 million shares, relatively
low but up from 814 million
around the same time on Fri-
day.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies rose 16.44,
or 3.3 per cent, to 518.02.

Overseas, Japan's Nikkei
stock average jumped 1.6 per
cent, while Hong Kong's Hang
Seng index soared 4.0 per cent.
In Europe, Britain's FTSE 100
rose two per cent, Germany's
DAX index rose 4.1 per cent
and France's CAC-40 gained
3.1 per cent.

The market's three-month
surge has brought the S&P 500
about 39 per cent above the 12-
year lows it reached in early
March. It's the fastest rise the
market has seen since the 1930s.

But new worries have begun
to seep into the market, includ-
ing a sinking dollar and climbing
interest rates, which some
investors fear could threaten an
economic recovery. A tempo-
rary spike in long-term bond
yields to six-month highs last
week brought a sharp decline
in stock prices.

Government bonds fell again
Monday, driving yields back

near last week's highs. The yield
on the 10-year Treasury note,
which is used as a benchmark
for home mortgages and other
consumer loans, rose to 3.70 per
cent from 3.46 per cent late Fri-
day.

The dollar weakened further
Monday against the euro and
the British pound. Gold slipped,
but oil jumped.

Another hurdle that's
approaching later this summer:
Second-quarter corporate earn-
ings results. If those come in
worse than investors anticipat-
ed, Caughey said, "we'll have a
reason to hate the market

again."
While Monday's move was
strong, many long-view

investors were unconvinced
about its staying power. Ablin
noted that returns are much
better when the S&P 500 is
trading above its 200-day mov-
ing average, but that the statis-
tic itself can send "a number of
false signals.”

Also, trading on the first day
of the month is generally much
stronger than normal. The S&P
500 index was down about 34
per cent in the 10 years leading
up to May 1. But according to
S&P data, if someone invested
in the index only on the first
day of the month over that time
frame, he would have seen a
gain of 21 per cent.

ACCOUNTING & SMALL BUSINESS
CONSULTING SERVICES

(over 25 years experience)

* Accounting records in bad shape?

* Need financial statements for the bank? (2-4 weeks)

* Need a business plan and financing proposal prepared?
* Need business licence prepared/certified? (1-2 weeks)

CALL US WE CAN HELP

* Business Start-Up Assistance/Consultations

« Business Success Pack....($5) off

* Construction & Contract Accounting

* Quickbooks Accounting - Problem Solving - Setup

* Business Survival Pack....($5) off

* Controllership Services - Per Diem - Low Rates

« Small Business Accounting Services/System/Journals
* Handbook - Inventory Control....($5) off

NEW BUSINESS START-UP KIT

($5) off

A guide to starting and managing a small business
(Business Start-Ups Checklist...$6)

BUSINESS SEMINARS - REGISTRATION - $25
(Materials + Refreshments + Special Discounts)

* Inventory Control Techniques June 27 @ 10am

Business Licence Special
Preparation + Certification
TEL: 325-7313 or 322-6000 * FAX: 323-3700

F. A. HEPBURN & CO.
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS

Small Business Consultants

Wal

southern style

2

BISCUIT

r
I

try it for bree

|







THE TRIBUNE

‘man TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009



The live,
free dream
wedding

lm By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

IT’S summer again, and for many
engaged couples waiting to say I do,
this season has practically all the right
ingredients for the perfect backdrop
to their special occasion.

Embracing these elements, the pro-
ducers of the Bahamas At Sunrise
show have teamed-up with the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel to offer one
special couple the chance of a life-
time to not only have their special
day aired live on national television,
but to also have the entire experience
straight through to the honeymoon
provided free of charge.

While all of this may sound too
good to be true, it really is, but there
is one catch, all of the arrangements
for the wedding including the dress,
location, floral arrangements, and
rings will be decided by the viewing
audience.

Latoya Hanna-Moxey who is sales
manager and project representative
from the British Colonial Hilton, and
Sharell Ferguson of the Bahamas at
Sunrise Dream Wedding Committee
recently made the announcement on
the show.

Mrs Hanna-Moxey explained: “We
are very excited to take part in this
first and once in a lifetime opportunity
with Bahamas At Sunrise. We are one
of the major sponsors of the event
and we will be providing the reception
location as well as the ceremony loca-
tion.

“We at the British Colonial Hilton
will be creating that ‘wow’ experience
for the lucky couple on the actual
wedding day. We will be providing
the sleeping rooms, the food, and the
drinks, so it will be a great day for
the lucky couple.”

According to the producers of the
show, the wedding project promises to
be an exciting moment in local broad-
casting as it will give Bahamians a
chance to create the perfect wedding
experience for a lucky couple on live
television for the first time.

Several community partners will
take part in this ground breaking wed-
ding.

Apryl Jasmine designs will be cre-
ating the wedding gown that’s cho-
sen, while Vows will provide the
dresses for the bridesmaids. The
groom and groomsmen will be
dressed by Modern Men, make-up
will be provided by Renee Brown,
and hair will be done by Gigi Turn-
quest.

All in all, the Bahamas at Sunrise
and Hilton team have arranged a top-
notch selection of companies and peo-
ple to make this day a success for the
couple ensuring that they only have to
show up on their wedding day.

Any engaged couple who are citi-
zens or permanent residents of the
Bahamas can apply.

Application forms are available at
the Counsellors, First Terrace, Collins
Avenue, at the British Colonial Hilton
on West Bay Street, or from
www.bahamasatsunrise.com.

After an initial elimination process
done by the organisers, three lucky
couples will go head-to-head live on
television where the audience will be
given a chance to vote for their
favourite couple online.

On the website, there will also be
profiles, pictures, and a message board
for viewers to talk about the couple
who they think should win, as well as
discussions on the progress of the
wedding.

The deadline to enter the event is
June 10, and voting will begin on June
22, 2009.



In dating world, is
timing everything?

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

n the world of dating, a lot of single peo-

ple feel timing is everything when it

comes to making certain moves. Some

feel they have to wait at least six to eight

months before they have sex with their
partner, or at least a month before they have
their first kiss. However, have you ever thought
that maybe if you waited too long to make a
move it may ruin the relationship? Or have you
ever thought that even finding the right person
was all about the right timing?

Barrington Brennen, a marriage and family
therapist and counseling psychologist, says time
is your best friend.

However, he said “You must not take too
much time. Too long is unhealthy and too short
is unhealthy. Too long meaning when a rela-
tionship drags on for 3 to 4 years. Ideally, a seri-
ous intended romantic relationship, not just
friendship, should last a minimum of one year
and ideally you should repeat that year. You
should go through the calendar year, the sea-
sons, family rituals, birthdays, holidays and such.
Tf your birthday is in November and you meet the
man in January get married in April and when
your birthday comes around in November, he
does something that shocks you and then you
didn’t want a man to do that- you should have
waited,” Dr Brennen said.

For those interested in wedding bells, Dr Bren-
nen said you should wait at least 18 to 24 months
before you get married.

“Now two to three years is not too bad but
after four years is risky business. If you never
broke up before you would be breaking up at
least once. You should not make a total com-
mitment before you have passed that first year.
Now that will help you to make the right choice.
The fundamental principal of choosing the right
person is being the right person. You can not
find the right person if you are hungry, desperate,
you don’t know yourself, you don’t like your-
self, you need a man badly, that sort of thing,” Dr
Brennen said.



MANY SINGLE PEOPLE feel timing is everything when
it comes to making certain moves. Some feel they
have to wait at least six to eight months before they
have sex with their partner, or at least a month before
they have their first kiss...

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway ¢ 394-1759



Sheena Pinder, director of the Women’s Min-
istry at Bahamas Faith Ministries, agrees that a
lot of young people do not take marriage and
being in a relationship as serious as they should.

“They just see it as a fairytale thing thinking
they are in love and want to have sex- that is
pretty much it. The Bible says sex outside of
marriage is wrong. They feel that because they
are in love and want to have sex, the legal way to
do it is to get married and two months down the
road, they realise they might have been ready for
sex but not marriage-there is a difference,” Mrs
Pinder said.

Mrs Pinder said in finding the right mate, a
lot of young people think that because they wait-
ed so long to find someone, they should hurry
and get married.

“As an independent woman, when you get
married you are giving up your independence.
Once you get married you will have to answer to
your husband. Your money is not your money
and your life is not your life anymore. You have
decided to join your life to someone else’s and
until you are ready to do that then you need to
stay single because that man does not deserve for
you as a woman to make his life miserable. Don’t
think your time is running out just because you
are getting older,” Mrs Pinder said.

Now the timing in terms of the steps in build-
ing the relationship, Dr Brennen suggests you
need to take your time to the climb.

“When you see somebody, you should be phys-
ically attracted to that person. I think the major-
ity of relationships start with infatuation and
that is healthy for starters. However, you should
not let infatuation govern whether this person is
the one you should be with. From a Christian per-
spective you should not date unless you are ready
to get married. Dating is a relationship with an
end in mind. If your end is sex, then that is the
end you will get. Dating means that you have
an intimate personal encounter with someone
of the complimentary sex. Take your time. I
don’t care how much you think this man is a
God-sent, you can actually mess up what God
gave you by going too fast. The first foundation
is friendship, and friends don’t make love,” Dr
Brennen said.

cS eo



PAGE 2C, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE






































































Pea ea die anneeneeeee

Includes: Roundtrip Airfare, 2 Nights Accomodations and 2 Days Car Aantal with LDW
Insurance. Rate based on 2-persons traveling together. Excludes taxes, surcharges and any
additianal fees. Subject to availability. Olhar restrictions may apply.

See a participating
Travel Agency for more

Teenie
Hotel, Car, and Air Packages

Zulia

Nossau mw

Aarow Travel 393-1981 |
Coribo Trovel ct eee he

Gem Travel 3461-3434

ML Travel 305-848-9849

geet | ee a

Treasure Travel 356-0544

United Travel CPA er

Vocation Venue ee ee)

Freeport

Gateway Travel 351-9451
dand Fun and Sun 351-4000 =

FLORIDA
‘HOTEL

\ SONFEPERCE
cCEATER

eek a

ee

wQUINTA

(ANS o SUITES

*otadlony Sie.
EXPRESS

SOE, fi SLE

Abaco - Marsh Harbour

Outward Bound Trovel Service ee
347-4709 —

NASSAU

Oakesfield
322-6673

Palmdale
322-4785

Treasures of the Caribbean International

FREEPORT
Culmersville Plaza

352-8346

General Reservations
377-5505

bahamas

Wve deri put By ree, We es ae
a
7%
o

GARDENING
The garden in June

YESTERDAY was the offi-
cial beginning of the 2009 hur-
ricane season, though hurri-
canes in the area are not likely
for another couple of months.
Later in the month we will have
the official beginning of sum-
mer, confirming what we have
suspected for quite a while now.
June is also royal poinciana
month, especially in Nassau
where the show can be stun-
ning.

Citrus and fruit trees should
be fertilised in spring, summer
and autumn. Apply a drench of
chelated iron around the trunk
of each tree, a teaspoonful of
iron for each 5 gallons, and then
apply a granular fertiliser
around the drip lines.

All good quality fertilisers
contain the minor elements
needed but if you have any
doubts about the fertiliser you
are using you can spray the
foliage of the tree with a minor
nutrient spray, using a stick-
er/spreader to make it more
effective.

The vegetable garden is at the
somnolent stage when most of
the popular vegetables of winter
and spring cannot cope with the
heat and humidity. Exceptions
are collards, cow peas, corn,
okra and snake beans.

Thank goodness for cherry
tomatoes. These little balls of
joy take the heat well and pro-
vide for us when the larger-
fruiting tomatoes fail to pro-
duce. Italian style plum toma-



CHERRY TOMATOES — a wonderful
standby when the larger varieties
are unavailable...



NEW GUINEA IMPATIENS — a long-lasting perennial that grows well in
summer if shaded...

toes such as Roma also last
longer into summer than most
tomatoes.

The sweet bell peppers plant-
ed at the beginning of the veg-
etable season last year may very
well be still performing, but
probably with fruits so small
they may embarrass you.
Cubanelle peppers take the
summer heat better and are a
wonderful addition to the sum-
mer

vegetable garden. It is best
they be grown in a degree of
shade as the fruits are still sus-
ceptible to sunscald. I have
mine in the shade of papaya
trees.

While the vegetable garden
is at a low productivity stage
you may consider covering
areas with clear plastic sheet-
ing. Make sure the ground is
wet before you do this and
anchor the sheeting with
cement blocks or such. The
plastic sheeting will prevent
weeds from growing

— indeed, it will bake the
weed seeds — and sterilise the
soil for a new start in August
or September.

In the flowerbeds it is time
for those stalwarts of summer:
cosmos, zinnias, vincas, portu-
lacas, Mexican sunflowers and
marigolds. New Guinea impa-
tiens can be grown in shaded
areas, as can caladiums.

Callas also take the summer

heat, especially if they are estab-
lished plants.

The fruit of the month is scar-
let plum. This close relative of
the hog plum is a favourite of
Bahamian children who also
like mangoes. Early mangoes
start their season in June and
this season’s crop looks like
being a bumper one.

The rainy season has started
so it is a good idea to fertilise
your flowering shrubs as soon as
possible. This is a time of rapid
growth and the shrubs will ben-
efit from available sustenance.
Flowering shrubs like chelated
iron too as it assists them in the
absorption of elements from
fertiliser. Always apply fertilis-
er when the ground is wet. If
you treat dry soil the next show-
er could wash your fertiliser
through the oil at too fast a rate
for it to be optimally effective.

The royal poinciana is the
true Bahamian harbinger of
summer. The trees are bare and
unsightly through most of fall,
winter and spring but suddenly
leap into life and become
smothered with blossoms. The
flowers will gradually give way
to foliage and by early fall the
seed pods will begin to develop.
The show is then over. But at
the moment we can enjoy the
flamboyance, the almost exces-
sive showiness, of the royal
poinciana flowering season.

j-hardy@coralwave.com



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 3C





At the office, some things
unsaid.

are better left

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

FOR those of us who work
in a close-knit office environ-
ment it can certainly feel like
your co-workers become a sec-
ond family making it natural to
gossip all day with office mates.
However, there are some topics
that are better left unsaid and
should remain out of the “work
family” discussions.

Sheena Gordan, a 30- year -
old professional, said on her
first job she got carried away
and gossiped about everything
from finding a new job to every
time she caught a cold.

“T used to talk about every-
thing. I learned that no matter
how much you might dislike
your current job, you don't want
to be sent packing before you
are ready. I was telling some
girls at my last office how much
I hated my job and I thought
they were sympathising with
me. They threw me under the
bus when the boss wanted
someone to fire,” Mrs Gordan
said.

She said she would advise
young persons that if they have
a job and are secretly looking
for another job, or even just
entertaining the idea of leaving,
it is best to keep this informa-
tion to themselves. “Word got
around about I wanted to leave
and I found myself being treat-
ed as if I was already gone,”
Mrs Gordan said.

If you hang out with co-
workers outside of the office, it
is most likely that they are going
to know about your health
issues and love life. However,
as far as making a declaration
around the office about one’s
personal life, keep the discus-
sion to a minimum.

Grace Plank, psychotherapist
and trauma specialist at the
Renascence Clinic, said certain
things should not be discussed
or even talk about in the office,
especially when it comes to dat-
ing other office mates.

“It’s not a question about
whether it is appropriate; it is
whether or not it is healthy for
that work environment. The
reality is it is not always healthy
because if you had an argument
that morning, chances are you
both are going to come to work
with that,” Mrs Plank said.





New Providence:
Available spaces:

Grand Bahama:

Available spaces:

Mrs Plank said many times
because of these inter-office
relationships, other persons in
the work place start to feel
uncomfortable, affecting their
ability to do their job.

“Unfortunately, here in the
Bahamas, a lot of people will
say things in the workplace that
would be considered unaccept-
able in North America, and
could be perceived as sexual
harassment and contributing to

a hostile work environment. If
you feel you can’t tolerate the
talk that is coming about
because of these relationships,
then you have the right to com-
plain to human resources or
your manager,” Mrs Plank said.
Mrs Plank said many times it
is hard for persons to speak up
but they do not want to subject
themselves to the possibility of
it becoming anything more.
“Some times you can just use

Bahamas National Trust’s

Sunner Safart

Have your children do hands-on
activities, visit National Parks, and

participate in adventurous
expeditions and field studies.
Lunch, oll] materials and gear included.

Ages:
Daily Hours:

Venue:

Venue:

8 - 14 years
Sam - 3pm

June 22nd - 27th
Retreat Gardens, Village Rd
35 (first come, first served basis)

June 22nd - 27th
The Rand Nature Center

East Settler's Way

Cost:

35 (first come, first served basis)

$150.00 (non-BNT members)

$100.00 (BNT members)

For more information call:

393-1317 (Nassau)

352-5438 (Grand Bahama)

emaik bnt@bnt.bs



make the choice to leave,” Mrs
Plank said.

your headphones and listen to
music while you work if it is

allowed. If not you can find a
way to cope with it or you can

New Stock
In-Store
Right Now.

All-New 2009
VIERA® HDTV’s

Enhance your passion with the VIERA® HDTV Series
from Panasonic. Perfect for gamers, sports nuts,
movie buffs and music lovers. Let us recommend
aM le P UR eee miele

sae le
Modi ee Meat Cer com cel mee Cee]
photos with triends and family.

s VUES
aa s

VIERA Linkâ„¢

tReet Cesc ecm Lis Cee: lace

Put CteMs Ute Mur BMT le | Mette alae)
On-screen Menus.

RT
miu

OLS Ue mess Le
RCL O Teer 8) 6

Te Ste tT Ted
URS See ee oe LS
Pe OMT EE| Iie HN age Tec Roe

tahoe athe

ae

a mera rs

VIESA

Panasonic





PAGE 4C, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



HEALTH



Dating with a fear of intimacy

@ By MAGGIE BAIN

DAYDREAMING can be a
relaxing pass time and allows
us to delve into the depth of
our imagination. It can help us
relieve anxiety, work out our
problems and plan and visu-
alise our lives. During these
moments of relaxation we
often reflect on prior love
relationships and spend hours
dissecting them- what worked
and what did not. Who did
what and who reacted to what.
For those of us who have
explored our deep inner self
we are able to recognise our
own traits recurring in each
relationship. Through our own
self discovery we are able to
see that we were made to feel
that these were our weakness-
es when in fact they were
transferred from our partner.

The majority of us hide our
fears behind masks. The pub-
lic persona versus our true,
private inner self. We often
create these masks early on in
childhood to protect our egos
from pain. Repeated harsh
words or treatment from par-
ents, teachers, family mem-
bers and friends can cause us
to use a protective shell as
defense. We love these masks
and perfect them as we age.
All too often we see people
who are almost unrecognis-
able from the person at home
and at work. This can be very
difficult for the people close to
them as they have to second
guess and anticipate if the
mask is on or off. But to wear
a mask is not all bad. Whether
it is a workaholic, attention
seeking or a sex mask to name
a few, it can allow us to be fun,
productive, resourceful and
resilient people. The down
side is when we have difficulty
recognising our true self and
in turn allowing our intimate
partner to see us. That is not
truly living but existing on the
peripheries of life.

Dating allows us to find
someone with equal intimacy
needs. Glaring problems that
show up during this period of
exploration gives us the
opportunity to pull out prior
to committing for the long
haul. Incompatibilities in inti-



DAYDREAMING can be a relaxing pass time and allows us to delve into the depth of our imagination. It can help us relieve anxiety, work out our problems and plan and visualise our lives.
During these moments of relaxation we often reflect on prior love relationships and spend hours dissecting them- what worked and what did not.

macy cause great concern and
anxiety within a long term
relationship or marriage. Lov-

ing relationships work best
when there is a sense of bal-
ance and there is a deep, hon-

Shaving Dos and Don’ts



FOR a great shave and
healthier skin, you have to go
beyond gliding a razor over
skin. Combine these tips with
the right pre-shave, shave, and
post-shave regimen for the ulti-
mate shave.

e Shave after showering to
pre-soften the skin.

e Pay attention to hair growth
direction: The best time to
determine the pattern of your
beard is to run your hand along
beard growth approximately
one to three days after shaving.

e Avoid alkaline-based prod-
ucts and soap, which can dry



skin.

¢ Avoid after-shave lotions
containing alcohol - they not
only cause pain, but contribute
to irritation and fail to replace
the skin's natural protective bar-
rier.

e Shave with the right pres-
sure: pressing hard won't deliv-
er a closer shave, just more irri-

tation.

e Use a steady, constant
motion when shaving, making
each stroke around 1 to 2 inch-
es long.

e Rinse the blade clean
before each stroke.

e Use a sharp, clean razor and
shave with the grain.*

* Tf you have a heavy, coarse
beard, shave against the grain
only after first shaving with the
grain (when the hair is shorter
and less likely to curl back in
on itself). Re-apply all neces-
sary shaving mediums before
shaving against the grain.

(<)) THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

STAFF VACANCY

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the following

position:

Writer, News & Publications, responsible for performing writing and relat-
ed duties as needed, for the development and production of all College of The
Bahamas publications of a news, general information and public awareness
nature. The incumbent will be expected to work within a demanding deadline
driven environment and to also perform assignments as related to media and

general public relations,

Specific duties and responsibilities include, but are not limited to, generating
content ideas for College publications; research and writing for College pub-
lications, press releases and related media and public relations assignments;
and staying abreast of College developments and maintaining a strong under-
standing of the national, regional and international context of these develop-

ments.

Applicants should possess a Bachelor's degree or equivalent and at least four

(4) years post-qualification work experience at AS-1

level as a

writer/researcher in a magazine, supplement and/or newspaper environment.

For a detailed job description, visit w

way.cob.edu.bs/hrap

Interested candidates should submit a detailed resume and cover letter of
interest no later than Tuesday, June 16th, 2009,

est connection. Consider if
you have ever experienced or
indeed are experiencing a situ-
ation where you have to be
the one to say 'I love you' first
or when you are getting close
and intense your partner cre-
ates a distraction and the
moment is lost. You may have
a sense that they are just not
completely present in the
moment or may appear
unavailable emotionally due
to fear, social conditioning or
low self esteem. It is very frus-
trating loving someone who
appears unable to love you in
return. Certainly if you are in
the early stages of a new love
relationship then let it go and
move on and find someone
who is more compatible.

If on reading this you recog-
nise yourself and know that
you have trouble getting really
close to people and opening
up then read on.

Just the very idea of some-

one seeing past the mask is
probably terrifying for you.
You worry about being trans-
parent and imagine that now
the person can toy with your
feelings. In the past someone
has probably hurt you and this
has only reinforced your need
to keep up the defenses. But
by letting your fears take con-
trol of your life you only allow
them to get stronger and give
them more credibility. The
most effective way to over-
come your fears is to stay a
few minutes with the fear.
Feel it, feel the pain and anxi-
ety. Make a note of how your
body is responding. Are you
having butterflies or are you
sweating? Yes, it is the same
response as being excited.
Many re-train themselves by
saying ‘I am excited’ at that
moment and go with the feel-
ings. Let your partner know
your fears and the obstacles
you put in the way. As with

everything in life it all gets
easier with practice.

Many times we imagine our
problems to be worse or more
insurmountable than they
really are. We teach our chil-
dren to face their fears such as
the dentist or needles. We
have to face our own fears
throughout our lives so that
we can savor every day fully.
Once you can achieve true
intimacy then you will also
achieve self acceptance and
self love. There is no better
way to live life.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Indi-
vidual and Couples Relation-
ship Therapist. She is a Regis-
tered Nurse and a Certified
Clinical Sex Therapist. For
appointments call 535-7456 or
e-mail her at
relatebahamas@yahoo.com or
www.relatebahamas.blogspot.c
om. She is also available for
speaking engagements.





THE TRIBUNE

a Ne

TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 5C





The Tribune



e





ith



‘Healing ands of physiotherapy





@ By ALEX MISSICK
Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

f you have ever been

involved in a road

traffic accident, suf-

fered from a sports

injury or work relat-
ed injury, or if you have ever
had surgery you know how
painful it is to get back to
being your physical best. A
doctor may recommend the
expertise of another medical
professional to help you fully
recover... namely a physio-
therapist.

Providence Rehabilitation
Centre, located in Suite 57,
Grosvenor Close West off
Shirley Street, specialises in
the assessment and treatment
of adults and children requir-
ing post operative care or suf-
fering from various injuries
and illnesses including chron-
ic pain, back and neck pain,
foot pain, stroke, and post
lymphedema mastectomy just
to name a few.

Christina G Messarra,
Facility Director at Provi-
dence Rehabilitation Centre
and Physiotherapist, told Tri-
bune Health: “It is very
important to participate in
physiotherapy treatment after
an accident or when living
with an illness.

“The human body is amaz-
ing. I am in this profession
because I love and admire the
human body. I think that the
body’s capacity to heal and
our capacity to compensate
for injury is limitless. How-
ever, without physiotherapy
helping you in that recovery it
can take longer to recover
and sometimes your recovery
is less than optimal. The
body’s compensatory mech-
anisms are not necessarily
ideal- in other words you may
be walking with a limp when
you may not need to limp at
all,” Mrs Messarra said.

Mrs Messarra said the
American Physiotherapy
Association’s catch phrase
really sums up what Physio-
therapy is all about.

“Tt’s the science of healing
and the art of caring. Physio-
therapy follows the principles
of western medicine. Physio-
therapists are trained diag-
nosticians who deal with neu-
rological and musculoskele-
tal disorders of the body. A
lot of our training is done in
conjunction with medical stu-
dents. For example, while I
was at McGill University in
my first year of physiotherapy
training, we did our anatomy,
physiology, and biochemistry
courses with the medical stu-
dents. After that first year of
health sciences, the doctors
went off and became doctors
and we went off and became
physiotherapists,” Mrs Mes-
sarra said.

Mrs Messarra said that one
of the ways physiotherapists
differ from physicians is that
physiotherapists tend to
spend a lot more time with
their patients, typically treat-
ing a patient for an hour three
times per week.

“We use our hands to facil-
itate the body’s own healing
processes. Physiotherapists
use manual techniques such
as massage therapy, joint
mobilisation and biofeedback,
modalities that use light, elec-
trical and sound energy to
help heal tissues. Physio-
therapists also mentor, moti-
vate, and educate patients in
health, wellness, self help and
exercise. Physiotherapists are
most easily compared to
teachers because they teach
patients how to help them-
selves recover and that is
where the art of caring comes
in. You come to us and you
are in pain from some sort of
trauma, and a physiotherapist
helps you help yourself get
better. We will get you back
walking when you are not
walking and help you opti-
mise your recovery,” Mrs
Messarra said.

Mrs Messarra saw a need
for a mobile physiotherapy
service that brings physio-
therapy services to your home
when you are not well enough
to get to the clinic.

“T felt there was an oppor-
tunity to formalise Home
Care Physiotherapy Services
in New Providence and to
improve the nature of this ser-
vice. A van was bought that is
fully equipped to be a
portable physiotherapy cen-
tre with portable beds, exer-
cise equipment and all the
necessary modalities (ultra-
sound, Tens, laser). I felt that
by investing in that, we would
be able to provide a top notch
quality service for Bahami-
ans,” Mrs Messarra said.

Home Care physiotherapy
services provided by Yasmin
Sweeting, a Bahamian phys-
iotherapist with over nine
tears of clinical experience at
PMH are now available six
days a week. Yasmin works
with your doctors, nursing
staff, and family to make sure
that you achieve your best
possible recovery.

Whether you need the
Home Care service long term
to manage after a stroke or
catastrophic spinal cord injury
or you simply need a few ses-
sions to get you well enough
to get to the clinic for ongoing
care, Yasmin is available to
assist in your care.

Mrs Messarra said that
physiotherapists often make
living with very serious ill-
nesses and injuries more com-
fortable for the patient and
with that comes peace of
mind for the patient’s loved
ones.



Last Name:
Company:
Telephone # Home:

Fax #:
Exact Street Address:

House #:
House Colour:

Requested Start Date:

Sess
al




\ Ms “We use
our hands

the body’s
~ own

healing

7

First Name:
Title:

Work:
P.O.Box:

House Name:
Type of Fence/Wall:

eerie ela schedule is
let us be the first on your list.

Vee

PWR
LAL

3 MONTHS | & MONTHS | 1 YEAR

j \ | to facilitate

processes.’

— Christina G
Messarra

’







Full Text



PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Boy, 15, found hanged in cell C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.156TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNYWITH T-STORM HIGH 84F LOW 74F B U S I N E S S S EEFRONTOFBUSINESSSECTION S P O R T S Govt gives up $2.3m in stamp tax revenue in last year SEEPAGEELEVEN ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey back with a bang! n B y NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter A DISTRAUGHT single mother of five fears police brutality may have contributed to the death of her teenage son. Michael Knowles, 15, was f ound dead in his police cell at around 8.21pm on Sunday. Officers found him hanging from an upper bar with what is believed to be a drawstring from his shorts around his neck. The youngster, who had been arrested on Thursday on suspicion of housebreaking, was pro nounced dead at the scene. While police have ruled Michael’s death a “suicide”, his family do not believe the boy would have taken his own life. His mother, 33-year-old Don na Wilson, claims the police reports do not add up and says she is seeking “the truth” regarding the tragedy. She told The Tribune : “I only want to know the truth because this story does not sound right. “It sounds as if someone is trying to cover up something.” Ms Wilson claims that separate witnesses who were at the station with her son have told her that Michael, who celebrat ed his 15th birthday two weeks ago, was beaten by police. While police reported that the 15-year-old had been found with a draw string around his neck, Ms Wilson said she found that unlikely as her son had Mother fears ‘police brutality’ may have contributed to son’ s death The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com Switch to Fidelity products they have built-in savings plans:It’s not too late to build yours...Weather the storm with Fidelity. I N S I D E SECTIONINSIDE Real Estate First case of Swine Flu in the Bahamas MISSBAHAMASWORLD JOANNA B ROWN was crowned Miss Bahamas World 2 009 at the Wyndham Nassau Resort on Sunday night. SEEPAGESEIGHT AND N INEFOR HIGHLIGHTSFROM THE EVENTF e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f n By ALISON LOWE Tribune StaffR eporter alowe@tribunemedia.net T HE Ministry of Health has confirmed that The Bahamas has recorded its first case of Swine Flu. R evealing how a young adult visitor to the country from New York tested positive for the potentially deadly A (H1N1 Government spokesmans aid “all necessary precautions” were taken at the facilities where the vis itor stayed while other s ites where they may have come into contact with people are under “ongoing surveillance.” However, neither Health Minister DrH ubert Minnis or Bahamas Hotel AssociaAdult visitor tested positive 33-YEAR-OLD Donna Wilson, mother of the 15-year-old, claims the police reports do not add up. Felip Major /Tribune staff SEE page 10 n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – A man and woman are being treated at Rand Memorial Hospital after they were shot at several times in the Xanadu Beach area on Sunday evening. Asst Supt Emrick Seymour said the couple sustained nonlife threatening injuries and were able to escape their assailant and drive to the hospital, where they are under police protection. At this time, police are unable to determine whether the shooting was an apparent armed robbery attempt or caused by a jealous lover. “We do not know for sure what the motive was in this case and we cannot speculate, but we are investigating the mat ter,” said Mr Seymour. He reported that police are Man and woman shot several times SEE page 10 n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE Chairman of the FNM yesterday criticised PLP MP Philip Davis’ claim that he is willing to forego 20 per cent of his parliamentary salary to save public mon ey as a political move intended to further an ambition to be leader of the PLP. Johnley Ferguson said if Mr Davis was “serious” he would have PLPMP’s salary cut claim is criticised SEE page 15 POLICE fire officials are trying to determine the cause of a blaze which destroyed an apartment unit and left the parents of an infant girl nursing minor burns. According to reports, a 31year-old man and his wife were wakened by a fire in their Misty Gardens home off Marshall Road early yesterday morning. They forced their way out of the apartment with their infant daughter. As a result the man Family flee as fire sweeps through their apartment SEE page 10 INSIDE CLAIM THAT RESIDENTS ACE A SEVEN MILE DRIVE’ TO GET WATER P A GE TWO WOMAN PASSENGER IS KILLED IN TRAFFIC ACCIDENT P A GE THREE CLER GYMEN VOICE CONCERN OVER GOVT’S HANDLING OF CRIME P A GEFIVE SEE page 10

PAGE 2

RESIDENTS of a North A ndros community are havi ng to drive as far as seven m iles to get water for basic needs after a major shortage struck the settlement, a localr esident claims. A nd to add to their troub les, telephone service and e lectricity were off for several days. Speaking to The Tribune u sing his “Vibe” longdistance telephone service the only phone service available on Friday a Mastic Point resident, w ho wished to remain anonymous, called on Government to address the needs of the c ommunity. H e said: “Fortunately enough rain came and we had a very heavy downpour, but p eople have been having to d rive to other neighbouring s ettlements, to relatives or f riends, to get water.” T he man claimed the water shortage has affected Mastic Point for “six to seven weeks” with many driving to neighbouring San Andros to get supplies. However, he noted that the c ommunity has been blighted by an unreliable water supply for decades, with each repre-s entative PLP or FNM - “promising” to do something a bout it but failing to, he claims. “It’s just a total disaster,” h e said. “It seems as though we don’t have a representa tive (MP The latest drought is affecti ng the livelihoods of those w ho own guesthouses in the community, as they are unable to provide guests with basic amenities. The resident said the situa tion is particularly unfortunate given the fact that popularA ndros event Crabfest is due to take place on June 11. “You cannot entertain per sons who want to come to this part of the island in your guest houses because there is no water, no telephone and the light’s not really dependable,” he said. Tourists passing through the c ommunity have to be turned a way if they ask to use bathr ooms, or are looking for a c old drink when the electricit y is out. T he long-time resident of the area claimed the water supply was much more consistent in the 1960s when the community was supplied by a large tank pumped by a windmill. We’re longing to hear a voice from the government to hear what’s going on,” hea dded, noting that although Mastic Point has always been a “faithful polling division” for the FNM, overall condi tions have not improvedu nder the current government. The Tribune was unable to reach Vincent Peet, the PLP MP for the constituency, forc omment yesterday. M eanwhile calls to local branches the utilities corpo rations BEC, Water and Sewerage and Batelco were unsuccessful because of the phone service failures. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE your safe harbourfor Life & Health Insurance, Pension Management, and Brokerage & Advisory ServicesFAMILY GUARDIAN 396-1355 I BAHAMAHEALTH 396-1300 I FG CAPITAL MARKETS 396-4076 I FG FINANCIAL 396-4080SALES OFFICES: NASSAU I FREEPORT I ABACO I ELEUTHERA I EXUMA I CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET I www.famguardbahamas.com A MBESTA-ExcellentFinancialStrengthRating To have your say on this or any other issue, email The Tribune at:letters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207 Claim that residents ‘face a seven mile drive’ to get water A MASTICPOINT r esident c laimed the water shortage has affected the community for ‘six to seven weeks’. DEVELOPERS of upscale residential development The Balmoral were congratulated by Labour Minister Dion Foulkes for their efforts that will shortly see more than 150 Bahamians on their payroll. Mr Foulkes, Minister of Labour and Social Development, made his comments as he officially opened The Balmoral, located in western New Providence, on Friday, May 29. Commencement of the construction of 75 condominiums and residential homes will give employment to more than 100 Bahamian workers, he was told, while the development’s club house employs 50 Bahamians. Minister Foulkes said: “This development is indicative of the confidence that the investment community has in the Bahamas. In spite of the global economic downturn, the owners of the Balmoral Club continue to aggressively pursue the completion of this project.” He praised the developers for engaging construction firms that are 100 per cent Bahamian owned. The Balmoral Club is jointly owned by Bahamians and foreign investors, including Bahamians Mr. Wesley Bastian and Mr. Jason Kinsale, President of The Balmoral. SEEBUSINESSSECTION Minister congratulates developers of The Balmoral

PAGE 3

A YOUNG man was lucky t o escape alive from this Glads tone Road crash on Sunday that resulted in power cables b eing damaged, eyewitnesses s aid. A ccording to someone on the scene, the man, between20 and 25 years old, was head ing north at around 10pm w hen his car hit the utility pole. E scaping with no visible i njuries, the unidentified man was seen refusing requests from paramedics, who were a t the scene, to take him to h ospital. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 3 DUEto a decline in local economic activity, a numb er of the major partners h ave had to scale back on their contributions to the Steppin on Da Shores event. The event has now been postponed for 2009. The organisers apologise f or the inconvenience c aused, but they are in talks with another entity in hopes to bring a collaborative premium event before the end of Summer 2009. ABACO recorded its first traffic fatality for year on Sunday when a 29-year-old w oman died after the truck she was a p assenger in ran off the road and crashed into bushes. According to reports, sometime after 6pm the driver of a blue 2001 Nissan Frontier truck along with a passenger identified as Melissa Sands, were heading s outh along Ernestine Highway located in S outh Abaco when the truck ran off the road into bushes. Ms Sands and the 30-year-old driver from Man-O-War Cay, Abaco, were taken to the local clinic for treatment. But Ms Sands was pronounced dead s hortly after arrival. T he driver of the truck is reportedly still receiving medical attention. Traffic police are continuing their investigations. Woman passenger is killed in traffic accident Steppin on Da Shores event is postponed CARHITSAND DAMAGESPOWERCABLES Share your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune . I would be eternally grateful if you would print this letter. I am tired of pretending and must call a spade a spade. The Bahamas would be better if more of us be honest and think of the betterment of this country instead of party first. First of all I am a PLP who is totally disgruntled with my own party. I have never seen any organisation that is so disorganised and in utter chaos as the PLP is today. The deterioration is rapid. What in the world is going on? Where is the party that I grew up almost worshipping? Where are the men with the backbone? This is very sad to witness. The last election displayed to all Bahamians and indeed the world that the PLP was simply not tuned into what the Bahamian people were saying. They screamed many times that we had a weak and indecisive leader. Yet we ignored the people. The people told us that if we sent the PLP back with Mr. Chrisite as leader they would refuse the party as the government. We did not listen. The result is history. We hired a group to determine what went wrong. Even though we knew all along, the group said in clear unambigu ous language that the leader was weak and indecisive. The leader saw the report and all of the top brass was privy. They hid the report from us and now it is out in the public domain that the people were right all along. This is highly embarrassing. Yet the leadership has no shame. Many of the potential candidates vying for deputy leadership are so afraid of their own shadow that they refuse to use this information to pressure Mr. Perry Gladstone Chrisite to pack his Georgie bundle and leave town before sundown. They, instead, “kiss up” and appease Mr. Chrisite hoping that their journey to their desired position gets his blessing. They do not have the guts to openly challenge him. The fact of the matter is that all of them are just like him, weak. Some may even be weaker than Mr. Christie, because he plays all kind of games with them and they retreat. The next thing theyn eed to do is surrender. In my opinion, Mr. Chrisite is simply looking out for his own hide. In fact Mr. Ingraham is also looking out for Mr. Chrisite. The first thing he didw as secured a pay raise for the l eader of the opposition and his pension. These guys are looking out for each other. This is a game that they are playing that only benefits them. Don’t be fooled. There is a plan to make sure that Mr. Philip" Brave" Davis receives the baton next so that the whole circle would be completed. We must not let that happen. That is why the only PLP today that has displayed any strength or to put it bluntly, testicular fortitude is attorney and activist Paul Moss. Mr. Moss has consistently displayed the kind of guts that is sorely lacking in all of the present members of parliament especially the ones who aspire to lead. He does not appear to be the kind that would put his own interest above the country. So far Mr. Moss has for many years been an advocate for the downtrodden and Mr. Chrisite does not. Mr. Moss spends his time mixing with his people, listening to them, Mr. Christie does not. Mr. Moss is respected by many, especially nowadays; more stalwarts are gravitating to his strong personality and his determination to get things done. Mr. Christie, on the other hand, is turning people off by his inability to display strong leadership. If we are to rebound from the sorry state and from this bottomless pit we seem to be sinking in, we must give serious consideration to a man who continues to prove that he is fearless and would rise to address any and all challenges. These times are different. It is not business as usual. The PLP need action and we need it desperately. We cannot wait. A DEPRESSED PLP SUPPORTER Nassau, May 31, 2009 C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm AS THIS year opened Opposition Leader Perry Christie warned his parliamentarians that the FNM government would try to destroy the PLP by using any and all of the “agencies of thes tate” against it. A s the year progressed it seemed that Mr C hristie had targeted the wrong enemy. Faced w ith a world in recession, Prime Minister Ingrah am was too involved in the monumental task of c rafting reforms to “keep this country above w ater” to be concerned about Mr Christie and h is squabbling party. A growing faction of the PLP do not believe t heir party has a chance of victory in another e lection with Mr Christie as its leader. How ever, there is also a hard core of party stalwarts w ho still hold Mr Christie’s arm high in the ring as reigning champion. They see no one to replace him. As for Mr Christie he assures Bahamians that he, PLP Deputy Leader Cynthia Pratt and party chairman Glenys Hanna Martin, are “all, as of today, secure in their positions.” His crit ics say he is in denial. In an attempt to force reality on him, some one within the party has released the entire Greenberg, Quinlan and Rosner report. These US consultants were commissioned by the PLP after the 2007 election to analyse the reason for the party’s election loss. The report was blunt in its findings a nice, but weak leader, with a public perception of a corrupt and scandal-ridden party. The consultants gave advice as to how to reverse the poor image. But party critics claim that they have seen no signs of Mr Christie taking any steps to wipe the slate clean and starting anew. However, Mr Christie assured them that he has not been asleep. Since the consultants’ report, he told his supporters, who seem lost in t he same Land of Nod with him, the party has done a self-examination and “will have strength-e ned itself” in time for the 2012 election. Apparently, he doesn’t see much need for c hange within the party. He is relying on the country being in such a depressed condition that, in disgust, a people of short memory will turn to him as their saviour. He might be right, but just as those of the old P LP relied on racist propaganda, symbolised b y grocer JP Sands, to win a generation of vote rs who had no idea who JP Sands was, the d ays when Mr Christie could don a fringed Valley Boys junkanoo costume and with a ker-lickof a cow bell get a nation to follow him, are also over. Today, Bahamians are better educated, have more intelligence and can reason for themselves. Bahamians understand that Mr Ingraham, like other world leaders, is grappling with an economic situation that not one of them knows how to solve. There are many projects that MrI ngraham could have launched had he had the f ive good years that Mr Christie squandered. B ut Bahamians understand that if Barack Obam a of the US, Gordon Brown of the UK, A ngela Merkel of Germany, Nicolas Sarkozy of F rance and other world leaders are feeling their w ay in a darkened world, how do they expect M r Ingraham, leading a group of islands that b arely show on the map, to have the answers? In a ddition, this is an archipelago that depends on t he economic health of the world’s industri alised nations for its own financial well being. So i f they fail, we also fail, and there is no one not even Mr Christie who can change the inevitable. The only blessing in all of this confusion is that the Bahamas has Mr Ingraham at the helm, instead of Mr Christie, who would probably still be taking his time selecting a committee of advisers. According to Mr Christie, if a people don’t like what a government in power is doing, in their disaffection they will turn to the Opposi tion, regardless of how it is organised. On this we disagree. They will care how it is organised. The years 2002-2007 are not so long past that Bahamians will forget a man who promised them that at his government’s first cabinet meeting, his ministers would “formally adopt the strictest code of ethics in the political life of the country,” but instead gave them five years of ministers out of control, allegations of corruption, and scandal followed by scandal. Mr Christie might be right that his position as leader is secure within his own party the r esearchers did find that he was personally popular only because the party has no one else ini ts ranks who can hold it together. However, the people will not forget his leadership style, which t hey equate with weakness. In these troubled times, this country needs a strong, decisive leader, one who will say: Look the country does not have enough funds to give each individual what he or she might want, or e ven deserve, but I, as your prime minister, h ave to think of the good of the whole. I shall h ave to lock the Treasury vaults to make certain t hat the Bahamas can stay afloat if the present depression worsens. This is now time for all of us to tighten our belts. No, Mr Christie, you are not the man of the hour. Nor is your party its reputation is in desperate need of cleansing. Sad to see the chaos in the PLP LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Strong, decisive leadership needed EDITOR, The Tribune. I t has come to my attention (although I have always suspected) that corruption permeates the governmental hierarchical structure, from top to bottom, within governments around the world. The Bahamas is no exception. I am told that bribes, kickbacks and influ ence peddling runs rampant throughout the civil service in the Bahamas government; and has been so for years. This unfortunate development in governance, i n my humble opinion, calls for a precipitation of measures by the government; chief of which is the creation (if it does not already existe nhancement of an arm of The Police Force that would be exclusively dedicated to investigating the activities of the civil service. If a department like that already exists, I am unaware of its activities, and thus the members of this department are failing miserably. I have been inundated with testimony from a variety of individuals who have knowledge of persons in government (civil service lifestyles are much more lavish than their salaries or other alternative income would permit. In my humble opinion, people of that ilks hould be investigated by this department, and let the consequences prevail. A legitimate concern with creating or enhancing this department would be the avail ability of resources of the government. I am well aware (and I am sure others are too) that the civil service in The Bahamas is bloated. Ministers of the government inces santly admit this freely. And so, those civil servants who are assigned (and dow ork for the Bahamian taxpayer, would be able to devote this unproductive time to some meaningful productivity. Of course, these peo-p le with their reassignments would have to be trained and retrained to fulfil the responsibilities of this new vocation. And, if implemented, The Bahamas government would have improved the level of productivity associated with governance of this country. MARVIN G LIGHTBOURN Nassau, May, 2009. Cor r uption needs to be investigated

PAGE 5

ATTORNEY Paul Moss has condemned the condition of the Straw Market stating that successive governments have merely given “lip service” to its con struction. Vendors at the Straw Market claim many of their goods were damaged as a result of torrential rain and strong winds this past weekend. “Almost eight years have passed since the market burned and successive governments have given lip service to its construc-tion without seeing the first block laid. In all truthfulness they do not care about these people and what is troubling is that so many parliamentarians have their own roots and connections to that Straw Market. It is scandalous and shameful,” Mr Moss stated in a recent press release. “The government as landlord has the duty to ensure a safe building for its tenants to sell their wares. In breach of that duty they have allowed these hardworking people to sit permanently under a temporary tent that could not withstand the high winds and heavy rain we have experienced in the past two weeks,” Mr Moss stated. Mr Moss said he has asked all vendors at the Straw Market to provide proof of their loss and will approach the relevant author ities to have them compensated for their loss. “How can we say we love our people and tourists when we con tinue to put them in harm’s way under a tent that threatened to collapse on them last week which would have been a public rela tions disaster. We must do the best for our people because they are our most important resource,” Mr Moss stated. TWO LEADING local clergymen have expressed their concern about the Government’s efforts in addressing crime in the country. Bishop Simeon Hall, senior pastor of New Covenant Baptist Church, claims Government’s cut in funds for crime fighting agencies, while under-s tandable, does not bode well for the peace and stability of our nation. Bishop Hall stated: “I am a mazed that we can burrow for everything else besides those agencies that keep us from t otal social disintegration. “In light of the budget cuts, m any of the recommendations made in the last Crime Report will die a silent death. I can o nly urge all well thinking pers ons to work with our police s o that the criminal element will not overwhelm us any further.” R ev CB Moss who spearheads the ‘Bahamas Against Crime’ says the Governmentof the Bahamas must get a handle on crime or “face the wrath of the people which will surely come.” R eflecting on the recent m urder of 19-year-old Shanice A dderley, Reverend Moss in a press release said: “This s cene is repeated far too long and far too often. Too many families, relatives, neighbours and friends are left to mourn the tragic loss of loved ones.” He stated: “The Bahamian landscape is becoming increasi ngly stained with the blood of o ur people violently spilled. The burning question is how many more people; espe-c ially our youth are going to b e slaughtered while our leaders appear to be asleep. How many more shootings, robb eries, rapes, burglaries, assaults on our children and other serious crimes must we endure before government realizes that it cannot fix the problem by passing pieces of peripheral legislation, then sitt ing back and expecting posit ive results.” R ev Moss said Government must lead other stakeholdersi n preparing a comprehensive p lan of action then swiftly apply it before the country is engulfed in a sea of violence. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 5 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $3,440 $3,440 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $3,600 $3,600Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank P P i i n n e e C C o o t t t t a a g g e e P P i i n n e e C C o o t t t t a a g g e e RATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS PHONE: 327-6464WE SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!STRUCKUM(DF55 Clergymen voice concern over govt’s handling of crime n TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras POLICEsay a small aircraft carrying bundles of cocaine burst into flames as it attempted to land north of Tegucigalpa, killing two people on board, according to Associated Press. National police chief, Gen. Julian Gonzalez says police found about 2.2 pounds (1 kilo and a Colombian passport inside the craft and that authorities suspect most of the drug shipment was consumed by flames. P olice say at least 10 planes carrying drugs have crashed in Honduras so far this year. Drug traffickers have increasingly been operating in Central America after coming under pressure in Mexico, where President Felipe Calderon launched a crackdown on organized crime in 2006. Honduran officials say at least 100 tons of U.S.bound cocaine from Colombia pass through each year. Aircraft laden with cocaine crashes in Honduras Bishop Simeon Hall Rev CB Moss Straw Market condition is condemned by attorney A ttorney Paul Moss

PAGE 6

n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net THE public has been invited to offer its input and recommendations on a new Town Planning Act. The Act will address import ant planning issues such as the development of new subdivisions, construction on and near wetlands or along the coastline and setbacks from the high water mark or sand dunes. S peaking to the Bahamas Real Estate Association at its 50th anniversary banquet on Friday Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham suggested realtors “discuss the draft legislation amongst yourselves and withy our clients.” “All comments received prior to mid-September will be considered,” he said. “As we do our part to supp ort your industry and to develop and to implement new efficient processes, I call upon your industry to play its part,” he added. The new Town Planning Act is expected to be accessible ont he Ministry of the Environment’s website this month. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OUTSTANDING business people and companies will be recognised today as the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce announces the finalists in its 2009 Annual Business Awards. C ategories in the awards i nclude: Outstanding Busin ess Person of the Year, D eveloping Entrepeneur of the Year and Company of the Year. T he Company of the Y ear award is offered in t wo categories businesses with over 50 employees andt hose with less. T he Chamber will also announce events scheduled to take place in Chamber Week 2009. SEEBUSINESS SECTION Public input invited on new Town Planning Act Hubert Ingraham Chamber of Commerce Annual Business Awards 2009 In brief n SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico SEISMOLOGISTSsay an earthquake has struck north o f the Virgin Islands but no i njuries or damage have been reported, according to Associated Press. T he U.S. Geological Sur vey says the early Monday quake had a preliminary magnitude of 4.6 and the e picenter was located about 80 miles (130 kilometers northeast of Tortola, the c apital of the British Virgin Islands. The earthquake also was f elt in the U.S. Virgin I slands and parts of north ern Puerto Rico before dawn. Earthquake strikes north of Virgin Islands

PAGE 7

n BySIR RONALD SANDERS (The writer is a consultant a nd former Caribbean D iplomat) W ITH the intention of getting a more favourable arrangement, sever-a l African countries are holdi ng out on signing an Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA with the European Union (EU Both the members of the Southern Africa Development Community (SADC n omic Community of West African States (ECOWAS c ontinuing to negotiate with the EU. SADC was scheduled to sign t he EPA on May 7th, but the ceremony was cancelled at thel ast minute, and ECOWAS d eclared that signing an EPA b efore a June 20 deadline was ‘‘no longer realistic.’’ One of the issues identified is t he ‘‘most favoured nation’’ clause under which all trade benefits agreed with third par-t ies are automatically extended t o the EU. The fear is that the EU will access market openings that African countries give to o ther developing countries in the context of South-South trade. This would give devel o ped EU countries an unfair advantage. The identical argument was raised in criticism of the EPA signed between the EU and Caribbean countries. Another objection that has s urfaced in the Africa-EU nego tiations is the limited capacity of African developing countries to take future trade disputes to a rbitration. This was also a con cern of critics of the Caribbean EPA with the EU. I n the case of the Caribbean, while the Cariforum countries – the members of the CaribbeanC ommunity and Common Market (Caricom can Republic – negotiated the EPA jointly through theR egional Negotiating Machin ery (RNM country is a separate signatory to the agreement with the 27nation EU collectively. In the event of a dispute going to arbi t ration, the affected Caribbean country would have to bear the cost alone while the EU as a whole will meet its expenses. The cost of such arbitration would be beyond the reach of most developing nations. As they did with the Caribbean, the EU has threat ened African countries with the deprivation of market access for existing export products if they do not sign the EPA. In the Caribbean’s case, the threat was the imposition of a Generalised System of Preferences (GSP regime on Caribbean exports to the EU market. All fourteen Caribbean countries signed up to a full EPA to avoid being penalised. Although, available figures show that GSP treatment on exports to the EU would have affected only 1 per cent or less of the total exports of goodsand services of eight Caribbean countries. The eight countries are: Antigua and Barbuda (0.0per cent), Bahamas (0.0 per cent), St Kitts-Nevis (0.0 percent), St Vincent and the Grenadines (0.2 per cent Trinidad and Tobago (0.3 per cent), Grenada (0.4 per cent), Barbados (0.5 per cent Lucia (1.0 per cent Professor Norman Girvan has pointed out, though the per centages are small for countries such as St Vincent and St Lucia, the sectors concerned, such as bananas, were politically vulnerable because of the numbers of people employed. The EU knew that and played on it mer cilessly. The countries that would have been worst affected by the GSP tariffs on their goods and services are: Guyana (21.8 per cent), Belize (8.5 per cent) and Jamaica (4.3 per cent was the Guyana governmentthat most strongly held out against signing a full EPA with the EU, and which did so only after succeeding in getting the EU to agree to a review of the EPA within five years of its coming into force. Had the Caribbean stood together, they could have refused to surrender to the EU threat of GSP treatment for Caribbean exports. It was a similar threat that l ed to the initialling of the interim EPA by all southern African states except South Africa. However, unlike the Caribbean, the SADC countries have now committed themselves to sticking together. Caribbean countries had the o ption of initialling only an I nterim Agreement preserving market access to the EU, and continuing to negotiate into 2008 and even after as the A frican countries are doing, but chose not to. A renowned trade l awyer, Dr Lorand Bartels of C ambridge University in Eng land, had identified three legal w ays in which the negotiations c ould have continued into 2008 without having to apply GSP. T he Africans are rightly resisting another red h erring that the EU used in t heir negotiations with the Caribbean. The red herring is t he claim that they (the EU are under pressure to make preferential tariff provisions with African, Caribbean and Pacific regions compliant with W TO regulations or face a challenge from other WTO mem bers. B ut, of course the text that the EU presented to the Cariforum governments included a r ange of matters that had noth ing to do with WTO compatibility. Among these matters aret he so-called ‘Singapore Issues’: t rade in services, public pro curement, investment, customs issues and competition policies.A ll that was required for WTO compatibility was an agreement on trade in goods. T he Africans are rightly making the point that “the EU’s push to include services and other ‘‘new issues’’ has nothing t o do with WTO compliance and is an attempt to sneak proposals through at bilateral level that were defeated at the WTO”. In the aftermath of signing the EPA, some Caribbean gov e rnments made much of the access to the 400 million-strong market of the 27-nations EUf or “services”. This, they said, included the right to set up financial services and to send musicians and chefs to work in t he EU. But the devil was in detail as critics pointed out at the time. For while the EU Commission negotiated and signed the EPA, they made it clear that access to the EU mar kets depended entirely on the rules applied by individual EU member countries. That reality came home to roost when it was discovered that “rigid visa regimes” constituted barriers to getting goods and services in to the EU. The Jamaican Minister of Information, Culture, Youth and Sports, Olivia Grange, lamented that: "The idea of being able to showcase your products to the 500 million-strong European market is among the most a ppealing elements of the EPA. However, this seems like an empty promise if people are unable to enter the region, because they either don't qualify, or can't afford a visa.” As with the EPA signed with the Caribbean, the EU showsn o inclination to include in the E PAs with African countries an unequivocal commitment to funding a development programme to ameliorate the e ffects of an EPA. An ECOWAS Ministerial Monitoring C ommittee has recommended t hat contributions to the EPA Development Programme s hould be "adequate and access ible" and beyond the commitment already made in the Europ ean Development Fund. In the Cariforum-EU agreement, the Caribbean did not get such a commitment. B y not capitulating to the E U, the African groups may end up getting a better deal t han the Caribbean. Meanwhile, Haiti is also to be admired for refusing to sign the EPA between Cariforuma nd the EU despite reported p ressure from the EU and Caric om to do so. There is nothing in the EPA that benefits Haiti which, as a less developed country, should theoretically be able to export ‘everything but arms’t o the EU. It would be a further grave injustice to the Haitian people for the EU to compel it to sign by withholding much needed assistance. R esponses to: r onaldsanders29@hotmail.com C M Y K C M Y K THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 7 .,1*6:$<$&$'(0< 7($&+(5$&$1&,(6 .LQJVZD\$FDGHP\+LJK6FKRROLVVHHNLQJ DSSOLFDQWVIRUWHDFKLQJSRVLWLRQVLQWKHIROORZLQJD UHDV ,QIRUPDWLRQ7HFKQRORJ\ 0DWKHPDWLFV“K\VLFVXSWRWKH$GYDQFHG 3ODFHPHQW/HYHO 6SDQLVKXSWRWKH$GYDQFHGODFHPHQW/HYHO 7UDFNDQG)LHOG&RDFK :RRGZRUN—HFKQLFD,'UDZLQJ $OODSSOLFDQWVVKRXOGKDYHWKHIROORZLQJ %HDERUQDJDLQ&KULVWLDQ $Q$FDGHPLFGHJUHHLQWKHDUHDRIVSHFLDOL]DWLRQ $7HDFKLQJ&HUWLFDWH ([FHOOHQW&RPPXQLFDWLRQNLOOV $ ORYHIRUFKLOGUHQDQGOHDUQLQJ +LJKVWDQGDUGVRIPRUDOLW\ /HWWHUVRIDSSOLFDWLRQWRJHWKHUZLWKUHFHQW FRORUSKRWRJUDSKDQGGHWDLOHG&XUULFXOXP9LWD LQFOXGLQJWKHQDPHVDQGDGGUHVVHVRIDWOHDVW WKUHHUHIHUHQFHVRQHEHLQJWKHQDPHRIRQH FKXUFKPLQLVWHUf7KHVHVKRXOGEHIRUZDUGHG 7KH$FDGHP\$IIDLUVDQDJHU .LQJVZD\$FDGHP\%XVLQHVVIFH %HUQDUGRDG 1DVVDX '($'/,1()25$33/,&$7,21,6)5,'$< Africa is right to hold out for a better deal WORLDVIEW SirRonald Sanders

PAGE 8

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Bahamas miss world 2009 H IGHLIGHTS FROM SUNDAY’S EVENT HELD AT THE RAINFOREST THEATRE, WYNDHAM NASSAU RESORT AT CABLE BEACH MISS Bahamas World Joanna Brown MISS Sposabelle Bridal Formal and Evening w ear Devera Pinder M ISS E xuma D anielle Morley MISS T heordore Ellyett Productions MISS Bahamas E xperience Llatera Laing

PAGE 9

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 9 ABOVE: Miss D.S Lifestyles Inc K endra Wilkinson LEFT: Miss Bella Donna Michaela Ferguson MISS Galleria Cinemas E mily Darville MISS R ed Hot Gabrielle Major MISS Habour I sland S wanique Sawyer THECONTESTANTS of Miss Bahamas World 2009

PAGE 10

tion President Robert Sands were prepared yesterday to disclose which island the person visited or where they stayed. D r Minnis said a press conference will be held tomorrow in which further information regarding the case will be made public. Mr Sands, also Vice President of External Affairs forB aha Mar, said he was not prepared to add anything to the Ministry’s statement. The announcement comes as g lobal media hype surrounding the A (H1N1 believed to have originated in Mexico, has died down. This e ven as the number of cases a nd related deaths rises. New York state currently h as 42 confirmed cases of s wine flu, which has now been recorded in all 50 American s tates, as well as in an increasing number of countries glob-a lly. T he Ministry of Health said the visitor came to the Bahamas from New York on May 25 and returned to America the following day “to recover at home.” Due to heightened surveill ance activities by the Department of Public Health necessary tests were done that same day. “The results were received on the evening of 29 May,” it s tated. T he positive test would have come back two days prior to Jamaica announcing its first two cases of Swine Flu. BothJ amaicans had recently returned from visits to New York. Other Caribbean countries to have confirmed cases are the Dominican Republic, Cuba and Puerto Rico. As this widespread global occurrence of Influenza A (H1N1T he Bahamas maintains the monitoring of influenza trends, which at present do not indi-c ate any increase in cases at t his time,” said the Ministry of Health. “Enhanced surveillance activities for the Influenza A (H1N1 ing across all sectors since the f irst case of the virus was r eported in March 2009.” The Ministry of Health warned that influenza preventative measures should be continue to be followed to ensure protection of indiv iduals, families and commun ities. These precautionary measures include covering your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, disposing of the tissue in the trash after use, along with frequent h and washing with soap and w ater. “Additionally, if you are experiencing flu like symptoms, avoid contact with others, and stay away from group settings, to decrease the potent ial spread,” said the statem ent. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE LifeChoicesATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE CO.LTD. Atlantic House,2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue,P.O.Box SS-5915,Nassau Tel.356-5433A member of Colonial Group International:Insurance,Health,Pensions,LifeIf you could secure $300,000 family protection for the price of a daily coffee,with no medical required,would you do it? Would you invest in $300,000 family financial security,if it included a free and confidential financial review with a professional adviser? Were hoping the answer is yes,because you could have this cover,for a little less caffeine,from just $9 per week*.You’ll certainly sleep a little easier! *rates vary,applies to male age 30CALL 356-LIFEor visit www.cgigroup.bmFor the price of a coffee,you can take care of something priceless.$300,000 life cover for the price of a coffee per day! Colonial Group International is rated A-(Excellentby AM Best. been taken into custody on Thursday wearing black jeans, a white T-shirt, black socks and a pair of black slippers. M s Wilson recalled that she had tried to visit her son at the East Street South Police Station on two occasions, but was denied. She said police had told her that she could bring Michael a change of clothes early Tuesday because he was going to Juvenile Court. Ms Wilson also questioned why police had allegedly kept her son i n custody so long without allowing her to take him food and w ater. She admitted her son had been fighting with “issues,” but was a “God-fearing child.” My children are grounded in God. My children go to church on S unday. My son participated in youth meetings. My son read the scriptures, my son was active in church,” Ms Wilson added. “I am not saying my son was all that and glory because you cann ot swear for your children behind your back because you don’t know what they do behind your back.” Distraught, Ms Wilson says she now intends to seek an indep endent autopsy on her son’s body. Police Commissioner Reginald Ferguson told The Tribune yes terday: “We are investigating an apparent suicide and that’s it.” r eceived minor burns to his right arm and left leg, and his wife received minor fire burns to the right arm. The couple were taken to h ospital and are being treated for injuries. T heinfantwas unharmed. Fire officials responded to the emergency call at around 2.23 am Monday. F irefighters were able to successfully extinguish the b laze, which destroyed the apartment. The incident is being investigated. l ooking for a dark greencoloured truck, which was seen in the area at the time of the shooting. According to police reports, the couple was sitting in their vehicle which was parked on Xanadu Beach around 9.30pm when they were accosted by a young dark man armed with a gun. The gunman knocked on the driver’s door, however, when the male occupant realised what was happening he started the vehicle, and then suddenly h eard a gunshot. As he was reversing to get away, the gunman fired severalm ore shots at the vehicle, hitting the driver and his woman pas senger. On their way to the hospital, the driver called the police to report what had happened. Mr Seymour said the driver was shot twice, in the upper left side of the body and in his leg, and his passenger was shot once in the hip. He said the couple recalled seeing a dark green Ford F-150 truck in the area. Family flee as fire sweeps through their apartment FROM page one First case of Swine Flu in the Bahamas T o have your say on this or any other issue, email The Tribune at: letters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207 FROM page one Boy, 15, found hanged in cell FROM page one Man and woman shot several times FROM page one Dr Hubert Minnis

PAGE 11

C M Y K C M Y K TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 I NSIDE Chance to join High Cascade Snowboard Camp n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemeda.net N OT having fought since he claimed theB ritish Com monwealth title last July, Jermaine ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey didn’t take long Saturday night to shake off the ring rust against Emiliano Cayetano. In the main event of First Class Promotions’ show dubbed: “The Boys are Back,” Mackey retain the World Box ing Council’s Caribbean Box ing Federation (CABOFE super middleweight title he won against Kirk ‘the Technician’ Sinnette on June 22, 2007. MARK Knowles and his Indian partner Mahesh Bhu-p athi suffered another setback on Sunday when they g ot ousted from Roland Garros in Paris, France. Competing in the third r ound of the men's doubles, the number seeded team t eam of Knowles and Bhupathi fell victim to Jose Acasuso of Argentina and Fer-n ando Gonzalez of China in set sets of 7-5, 4-6, 6-4. K nowles and Bhupathi won their first round match 6-3, 6-2 over Frenchmen Jos-s elin Ouanna and Jo-Wilfried Tsonga before they beat Johan Brumstrom ofS weden and Jean-Julien Rojer of the Netherlands A ntilles 7-5, 6-7, 7-6 in the second round. Yesterday, Knowles and h is mixed doubles partner Anna-Lena Groenefeld from G ermany are still alive. They won their second round match 3-6, 7-5, 10-6 toa dvance to the quarter-final where they will face Anastasia Rodionova of Australian and Rik De Voest from the Repulibc of South Africa. The Bahamas Swimming Federation recognizes thei mportance of education and maintaining academic excel lence as well as excellence in the pool for our swimmers. The federation will initia t ive a new plan that aims to supports the BSF student a thletes in their pursuit of excellence in the classroom and in the pool at the 2009 RBC National Swimming Championships. BSF Clubs, Coaches and other BSF Members will nominate Student-Athletes with a GPA of 3.5 or higher who have represented the Bahamas on a national team or qualified to compete at the 2009 national swimming championships. Attached forms for those swimmers who have achieved a 3.5 GPA or above during the past academic school year and have qualified for the RBC National Swimming Championships are available on line at bsf_news@yahoo.com and returned no later than the end of May 2009. BSF student-athletes will be recognized at the champi onships and in this years nationals programme booklet. THE Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations will hold its final trials for the Central American and Caribbean Age Group Championships this weekend at the Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium. The trials will get started on Friday at 4 pm and continue on Saturday at 6 pm. The Bahamas will play host to the CAC Age Group Championships from June 18-19 at the Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium. The championships was originally scheduled for Grand Bahama, but the refurbishing of the track at the Grand Bahama Sports Complex won't be completed in time. n By TIM REYNOLDS Nassau, Bahamas European soccer officials will abstain if a vote is taken by the sport's worldwide body this week to restrict teams to a maximum of five foreign players in starting lineups, according to Associated Press . FIFA president Sepp Blatter backs the plan, which is supported by many of his organization's members and could drastically change the makeup of many of the world's best-known clubs, such as ones in the English Premier League. The European Union, however, insists such a rule discriminates on the grounds of nationality. And that disagreement could easily put members of Europe's soccer federation in a delicate spot if a vote is called during FIFA's annual meeting Wednesday. "I am in the middle," said UEFA president Michel Platini, a former star midfielder for France's national team and the Italian club Juventus. "I always play in the middle." UEFA members support certain parts of the so-called 6+5 plan, but decided Monday at its own meeting that its members shouldn't vote on the matter until the legal questions are answered. That's a process with no end in sight. "We can only do it when it's legal," Belgian federation president Francois De Keersmaecker said. The EU favors UEFA's "homegrown" proposal that would require clubs to carry a quota of players on their roster who were trained in that country, regardless of nationality. International volleyball officials recently considered a similar plan, only to eventually decide that such a rule could be challenged by lawmakers as an illegal restriction of workers' rights. "We agreed with the objectives last year of the 6+5, but ... we have to know if it's legal or illegal," Platini said. The player quota issue is one of many FIFA will discuss Wednes day, along with changing the maximum age of Olympic soccer players from 23 to 21, stadium security and anti-doping initiatives. FIFA's annual meeting has a ceremonial opening Tuesday evening. JERMAINE ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey goes after Emiliano Cayetano in their main event bout on Satur day night. sports NOTES Knowles and Bhupathi lose at French Open Swimming educational incentive Track BAAAs CAC youth trials ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey back with a bang! JERMAINE ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey talks to the press after he stopped Emiliano Cayetano in the third round to retain his WBC’s CABOFE super middleweight title. FIRSTCLASS PROMOTIONS: THEBOYSAREBACK FIFA plans for quota rule could face tough road JERMAINE ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey stands tall over Emiliano Cayetano in the event that he gets back up to fight in their First Class Promotions’ main event on Saturday night. PHOTOS: F elip Major / Tribune staff SEE page 12 Retains title after shaking off ring rust

PAGE 12

C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net J ERRY ‘Big Daddy’ Butler wanted to make a statement to former Bahamas heavyweight champion Renaldo ‘the Termin ator’ Minus Saturday night at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. Against the taller Sandy Antonio Soto, Butler did more than t hat when he stopped the Dominican Republican one m inute and five seconds in the first round of their scheduled eight round co-main event. It was the fifth time in his career that Butler won by a firstr ound knockout as he improved his record to 8-5-1. Soto, comingo ff his second straight loss, dropped to 1-2. Every time, I get somebody that was bigger or taller than me,” he said. “This time, it looked even so I said will just go out there and do what I have to do. “If thek nockout come along I will take it.” B utler, 28, slowly worked his way inside Soto and once he got a f ew shots to the body, he was able to tag him up on the ropes, forc ing his opponent to take an eight count. Realizing that Butler was just a little too overpowering for h im, Soto refused to get back after he got an eight count from t he referee. “He came out and he looked l ike he could handle himself after I threw two punches,” Butler pointed out. “He started to work his jab and looked like he came to fight. But after it looked like he was going to make me chase him, I s aid enough of this, so I decided to cut the ring off and go to the body.” After he was awarded the victory, Butler got on the micro p hone and he issued a challenge to Minus, who was working onh is corner. Minus, who according to Bahamas Boxing Commission’s chairman Pat ‘the Centerville Assassin’ Strachan, was stripped of his title, gladly accepte d. Also on the undercard of First Class Promotion’s first profes s ional fight for the year dubbed: “The Boys are Back,” Hensley the Bruiser’ Strachan won an unanimous four round decision over Derrick ‘Castro’ Sawyer. Strachan, who controlled the tempo of the fight from the first r ound when he had Sawyer on the ropes with a series of bodyp unches, said he was pleased to have come out on top. I was a little disappointed (that I didn’t put him away early),” Strachan said. “I was in tip t op shape, but I liked what happ ened.” Strachan, 25, said he anticipate d a much better showing from Sawyer, but he’s on a mission and h e doesn’t intend to let any of the local boxers stop him right now. “I want to get the Bahamas j unior welterweight belt,” said S trachan, whose record climbed t o 5-3 with a draw. “I just have to go back into the gym and train a l ittle harder and I know I can get it (title shot N ot to be out-done, in another four-rounder on the underdard, Anthony ‘Psycho’ Woods forced John ‘Old Time School’ Wesley into submission 55 seconds into t he third. As Woods continued to throw a series of combinations, W esley just refused to continue fighting and the fight was called. W oods, 24, improved his record to 6-11 with his sixth knockout. Wesley fell to 0-11. “I had to come out strong because I knew if I didn’t come out strong he was going to try and take it away from me,” Woods s aid. “I want to stop whoever come my way and get the title. I didn’t want this one to over too quick, but he came out there p ushing, so I had to go for the knockout.” HENSLEY ‘the Bruiser’ Strachan connects to the head of Derrick ‘Castro’ Sawyer in his four round decision on Saturday night at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. BOXING: THEBOYSAREBACK Like a hawk watching his prey, Mackey need ed just one minute and 32 seconds into the third round to force Cayetano into submission after he received his second mandatory eight count from referee Matthew Rolle. “I knew he was going to come hard. Hey, I’m the Commonwealth champion, I’m the Bahamian champion, I’m the WBC champion so he was coming to make a statement, but I’ve been out of the ring for 11 months and I was a little nervous, but I said ‘hey, all of the hard work, all the training will pay off,’” said Mackey, who thanked his sponsors, V-8 Splash, Nautilus Water, Prime Bahamas and the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture for keeping him going. When nobody else stuck with him, Mackey said First Class Promotions was there and he was delighted to display his skills on their first pro card for the year. He also thanked the Bahamas Box ing Commission, who had suspended the promo tional group headed by Ray and Michelle Minus last year. Pounded In their scheduled 12 round bout, Cayetano, who had predicted at the weigh-in that he will stop Mackey in the third, had to eat his words and brush of his ego after he got pounded in the fatal third round. “I was looking for an early knockout, but it came hard because he caught me with a few clear shots that told me that ‘Hey, you still have the ring rust, so just be patient,’” Mackey reflected. Mackey, who dominated the first round before he looked a little weary in the second, stepped it up a notch as he rocked Cayetano with a left blow to the body. Following with a combo to the body and the head, Mackey watched as Cayetano fell through the ring ropes and was caught by members of the Bahamas Boxing Commission. Once he got back into the ring, he as administered the eight count from Rolle as he knelt on one knee. Once he got up, Rolle asked Cayetano if he was okay and he said yes. Mackey, waiting with anticipation in the neutral corner, came right back at Cayetano once Rolle gave the order to fight again. Again, Mackey went back to the body and the head with another combo that floored Cayetano. This time, as Mackey stood in the neutral cor ner launching for another shot at his wounded victim, Cayetano refused to get up after the eight count. Realizing that it was over, Mackey leaped into the air as he started to celebrate as he improved his record to 18-3 with 14 knockouts. The gym went even wilder as the fans continued to cheer him on. “He made it seemed as if he was exhausted, but every time I tried to go in, he caught me with some solid punches,” said Mack ey, who noted that once he got the body shots, he made Cayetano pay for it. Mackey, 29, is now preparing to defend his British Commonwealth title on the next First Class Promotions’ show in August at the Kendal Issacs Gymnasium. Cayetano, 36, dropped to 18-3. ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey shakes off ring rust to retain title FROM page 11 ‘Big Daddy’ powers his way to first round KO JERRY ‘BIG DADDY’ BUTLER and Sandy Antonio Soto sizes each other up before throwing a blow in their heavyweight bout on Saturday night at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. PHOTOS: Felip Major /Tribune staff HENSLEY ‘the Bruiser’ Stra chan and Derrick ‘Castro’ Sawyerb oth closes their eyes as they throw punches. JERMAINE ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey connects with a right to the head of Sandy Antonio Soto in their WBC’s CABOFE super middleweight bout on Saturday night. DOMINICAN Republican Sandy Antonio Soto knelt on one knee as he was given a mandatory eight count.

PAGE 13

n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net SPRINTER CACHE Armbrister and long jumper Bianca Stuart led a field of four Bahamians who have advanced to the NCAA Track and Field Championships. Competing at the Midwest Regional Championships in Louisville, Kentucky on Satur-day, Armbrister a sophmore at Auburn University, clocked a season's best time of 23.22 seconds to secure her second consecutive berth into the NCAA Championships. Last year, the 19-year-old St. Augustine's College graduate majoring in marketing advanced to the semifinal at the NCAA's, finishing 22th in 23.42. Samantha Henry, a junior at Louisiana State University (LSU Armbrister, however, had the fastest qualifying time of 23.57, compared to Henry's 23.73 for fourth place. Armbrister will also have d ouble duties at the championships after she helped Auburn women's 4 x 400 relay team clinch a spot. In the 4 x 100, Armbrister ran the lead off leg for Auburn, but they got disqualified. Stuart, the two-time AllAmerican senior at Southern Illinois, took first place in flight three with a leap of 21-feet, 5 1/2-inches, which enabled her to secure the victory. The Queen's College gradu ate who turned 21 on May 17 was a seventh place finisher at last year's Nationals. When she leaves Southern Illinois, her name will be on both the Saluk i's indoor and outdoor long jump records. At the East Regional, Kristy White, competing for the Uni versity of Miami, clocked 23.53 for second place in the women's 200. The race was won by UM's senior Murielle Ahoure in 23.09. White, who tried out for the Bahamian Olympic team last year, also ran on the lead off leg for UM's 4 x 400 relay team that got disqualified. At the West Regional at the Hayward Field at the University of Oregon in Eugene, Ore gon, Karlton Rolle, a freshman at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLAf ifth in the final of the men's 200 in 21.34. Rolle, who also had the fifth fastest qualifying time of 21.16, advanced to the NCAA's after he came in behind Justin Woods, a senior at WSU, whow on the final in 20.90. R olle, a 18-year-old graduate of Nassau Christian Academy, also ran the second leg on UCLA's 4 x 100 relay team that finished ninth in 41.44, but they didn't advance to the final. And Portland State's senior Jernice Saunders was fifth in the women's 200 final in 23.77 to earn her berth at NAAA's. Charonda Williams, a senior at Arizona State, won the race in 23.02. Saunders, 23, is a gradu ate of CI Gibson, who transferred from Minnesota State to Portland State where she inked her name in two of the four school records at the Regional. In becoming the first Vikings' sprinter to qualify for the NCAA, Saunders lowered her own record in the 200 and she also shattered the previous mark of 11.74 by Finishing sixth in her heat and 11th overall in the century, Saunders was shy of another NCAA qualifying spoy, but she now holds Port-l and State's indoor 60 and 200 as well as the 100 and 200 marks. And at the Midwest Regional in Norman, Oklahoma, Lamar Delaney, a freshman at Houston, was 11th in the men's triple jump with ab est leap of 50-feet, 8 1/4-inches ( 15.45 metres) on his first attempt. Will Claye, a freshman at Oklahoma, won the event with a leap of 55-2 (16.81 m his sixth and final attempt. Delaney, however, didn't advance to the NCAA's. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 13 n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net NATIONAL quarter-mile champion Chris ‘Fireman’ Brown sent a clear message to his rivals that he's still going to be the man to beat when everybody line up at the Bahamas Association of Athletic A ssociations' National Open Track and Field Championships. T he championships is scheduled for the weekend of June 26-27 and Brown got his first real test w hen he matched up against Grand Bahamian Andrae Williams, one of the toughest rivals to his t hrone, in the men's 400 metres. Competing at the Reebok Grand Prix in the first head-to-head showdown between any of the Bahamian quarter-milers so far this year, Brown posted a third place finish in 45.04 seconds. Williams, 25, had to settle for fifth place in 45.31. “It was a great field and a very strong one. It was also my second race of the season. I was a little disappointed with being in lane 2, but still thankful that I had one,” said Brown, who also thanked God for allowing him to stay healthy at this point in the season. “It was also great to run against Andrae, we were both happy and excited to be on the scene and on the track at the same time. It shows the world that the Bahamas is a power house because we were the only country other than USA to have two individua ls in that event.” W inning the event on Saturday was American Olympic champion LaShawn Merritt in 44.75, just s hy of the meet record of 44.70 by Xavier Carter of t he United States last year. Trinidad & Tobago's Rennie Quow was second in 44.89. Brown, 30, was just off his seasons best of 45.03 t hat he opened up with on May 16 in Carson, Calif ornia. Williams still holds the second fastest time by a Bahamian this year of 44.98 that he ran on May 7 in Lubbock, Texas. Newcomer Latroy Williams, however, has recorded the best mark of 44.73, but he didn't compete since he did the stunning time on May 23 in Hutchins on, Kansas State. B ut Brown warned all his rivals that he’s looking forward to “bringing the fire” at the nationals as he get set for the World Championships in Berlin, G ermany in August. “I’m always looking foward to a match up with w homever whenever. We have about eight guys now who can run 45 sec so trials should be fun,”B rown stressed. “I’m happy to see that we are taking the 400m to another level in the Bahamas. I want to say thankst o all my family, friends and fans for tuning in and s upporting me on my journey to Berlin.” This weekend, Brown will be heading back to his alma mater for an induction into the Norfolk State University Athletis Foundation Hall of Fame. Just two months ago, he was inducted into the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC A lso at the meet, 33-year-old Debbie FergusonM cKenzie had more of a challenge as she did the sprint double against some of the top competitors she will have to contain with in Berlin. F erguson-McKenzie's best performance came in the 200 where she placed third in 22.56 for the fourth f astest time in the world this year. The race was won by her training partner Lauryn W illiam from the United States, who just missed erasing the meet record of 22.31 set by American R achelle Smith in 2007 for the world's leading time. Coming in second in an American sweep was Shalonda Solomon in 22.43 for the second fastest time. A week before, LaVerne Jones-Ferrette of the V irgin Islands turned in the third fastest time when she ran 22.49 in Belm. I n the 100, Ferguson-McKenzie dropped all the way to eighth place. Her time was 11.11, whichm atched her season's best on May 10 in Orlando, Florida. Only seven other athletes have ran faster than Ferguson-McKenzie this year. Leading the way is Jamaican Kerron Stewart with 10.92 in Kingston, Jamaica on May 2. S aturday, however, Carmelita Jeter won the race in 10.85 to lead another American 1-2 sweep thatw ould have smashed the meet record of 10.91 that was posted Jamaican Vernica Campbell last year in 10.91. But it was wind-aided. Jeter now has the second fastest time in the world. Second place went to Muna Lee in 10.88. Incid entally, Campbell came in third in 10.91, the same time as Kelly-Ann Baptiste from Trinidad & Toba-g o. Williams also ran under 11 seconds in 10.94 for fifth. And 25-year-old Derrick Atkins, the World Championships' 100 runner-up, finished third in the men's B century race in 10.23. The race was won by Jamaican Yohan Blake in 10.20 with Alnso Edward of Panama second in 10.22. A tkins' time placed him 12th overall in the two races combined. The A race was won by American Mike Rodgers in 9.93. Three Jamaicans rounded o ut the 7-9th spots with former world record holder A safa Powell clocking 10.10 for seventh. TRACKANDFIELD Chris ‘Fireman’ Brown sends message to rivals Cache Armbrister clocks season’s best time RUNNINGFORGLORY: Cache Armbrister. CACHE ARMBRISTER ATTHEDOUBLE: Debbie FergusonMcKenzie (far right

PAGE 14

C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS The first winter Olympic athlete for The Bahamas, Korath Wright is inviting 10 lucky teens from The Bahamas ages 13 – 17 years to participate in the High Cascade Snowboard Camp in Oregon, USA for two 9-day camps this July. Camp 1 runs from July 6th to 14th and Camp 2 from July 17th to 25th. The Bahamas Snow Kids Camp was started by Korath Wright as a way to introduce Bahamian teens to the same camp that sparked his passion for snowboarding. The program teaches young Bahamians how to snowboard while they make new friends and see a new part of the world. Beautiful The Camp is from July 6th to 25th at Mount Hood, Oregon. This beautiful mountain is one of just three places north of the equator where you can ski and snowboard all summer long. This was the starting point for Korath's snowboarding career. He attended High Cascade Snowboard Camp at Mt. Hood as a camper at age 11, going on to work his way through ther anks to become a counselor a nd then coach. It's the ideal place for the Bahamas Snow Kids Camp to begin training the next generation of Bahamian snowboarders. Interested teens should email Korath as soon as possible at SnowKids@TheBa hamasWeekly.com and tell him why you think you should be selected. The camp will include other activities over the week and persons may find more information at www.BahamaSnowKids.com or www.highcascade.com and click 'summer camps'. Fun offhill activities are also on the agenda during the 9-day stay. Tryouts will take place in New Providence, and Grand Bahama Island between the 18th and 22nd of June.* The exact venue, time and date will be announced closer to that time. Five teens from each island will fly to Oregon to participate in the camp for free! Eligible teens must be Bahamian resid ents and be ready to travel and h ave up to date travel and legal documents. Korath has come up with three preliminary activities which are relative skills to snow boarding, but any teen who is athletic could be a worthy candidate if they are interested in trying snowboarding. The tryouts will involve sprinting, an obstacle course using quick side-to-side movement, and skateboarding. Teens can also buy in to the camp if they do not wish to try out for the scholarships. As long as they are ready to try snowboarding, anyone from the age of 13 to 17 years can be registered in the camp. Camp fees per child are $2500 US and include everything from flights, accommodation, food, lift tick ets, chaperone, and coaching. “I'm excited about the B ahamas Snow Kids Camp b ecause it's an opportunity for teens from The Bahamas to see snow for the first time... and then rip that snow apart on a snowboard! It's also a chance for me to communicate to kids that as long as they know what they want, are clear on their values and are ready to work for it, every decision they make will move them towards their goals. Competing for The Bahamas as the first winter Olympian, I'm proof that anything is possible , and this camp will encourage teens to follow their dreams, no matter how big those dreams may be,” said Korath. Persons can learn more about Korath at www.korathsnowboarding.com and stay tuned to TheBahamasWeekly.com for updates on Korath’s visit. Cartie Co. and Chamcem Boats of Long Island held their 5th Annual All Tackle Fishing Tournament this week-end at the Flying Fish Marina in Clarence Town, Long Island. Fishing 19 boats, with78 anglers this year, the three-day tournament was t he biggest yet, with boats entered from Nassau, Exuma, and Long Island. From a 17’ local fishingb oat, built by the host Chamcem Boats, to a 45’ Hatteras, the wide variety of boat sizes and lengthsh ad the crowd wondering from day one which team was going home with the cash and prizes of $ 27,000.00! With calm seas over the three days weather was not an issue, but the intense heat taxed the fisherman who were working 12 ? hour days, competing to win the Greatest Combined Weight over the threeday period, and or the Single Longest Fish. Boats l eft out each morning at 6:30 am to work the sea, returning back to the marina by 7:00pm. Day one set the mark high for weight when the “Lady Friendly” o wned by Anthony Cartwright of Long Island brought in 18 Mahi Mahi weighing 205lbs, however the “King Fish” of Nassau raised it even higher when they brought 8 fish weighing 277 lbs. Captain Paul King, Ian Radermaker of Harbourside Marine, Kristian Kwienski and Greg Cottis put in a long trip past the Diana Banks all the way to the Columbus Bank of Ragged Island in search of the b ig ones. Day two was slow for the fisherman, with many returning to dock with little or no catch, until the “Bush” captained by Barry Knowles, and teammates Sylvester Burrows, David Hocher and Roy Rolle hit the dock with 212 lbs of Mahi Mahi, Mackerel, and Tuna, putting them in lead for weight. The “King Fish” too had a slow day bringing in only two fish, however their only Wahoo of the daye ntered a length of 63” basically securing their posit ion for the win. Breeze W ith a light breeze dancing on the water, the f isherman had a break from the flat seas, and excitement was growing as they left with high hopes to be t he winning team. Most boats stayed out until the last possible moment, however three boats weighed in before 4:00pm with only a minimal catch. The c rowd continued to gather in abundance to bear witness to the champions as the boats lined up to w eigh in. With only four boats entering weight over 1 00lbs, it was anyone’s game until the crew of the King Fish” unloaded. As the huge Yellowfin tuna began lining up on the dock, anglers, observers and organizers mouths dropped in awe of the size and a mount of this amazing catch, but the team had another shock for crowd. In an unprecedented act of generosity the “King Fish” donated all their fish to Social Services, all 619lbs! It was all over, “King Fish” had won the tournament, but still more surprises were in store. As anglers dined on a buffet dinner and grilled fish provided by the Committee, and “Sky Juice” pro moted by Gilbey’s the Tournament’s main sponsor, the buzz continued on the huge tuna catch. With the first place gone, there were still more win ners to be announced. Trophies gleamed on the table, cash was counted and prizes ready to go, and s o the Award Ceremonies began with opening p rayers by Father Pratt, and remarks by MP and Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries, the Honorable Lawrence “Larry” Cartwright. Mr. Cartwright commended the Committee on their organization of t he event and for staying within Ministry regulations for a Sportsfishing Tournament, giving the C ommittee his Ministry’s seal of approval for the continuation of the event. Mr. Cartwright further r emarked on the benefits to the local community from the Tournament, and congratulated lead organizers and business owners Cathy Darville, Francis Darville and Amanda Cartwright on a successful Tournament. In Third Place for the Greatest Weight, the team of “Bush” with 495lbs of fish won 2 cases of oil d onated by Baystreet Garage, a rod and reel combo donated by Marine & Land, and $700.00 cash. Scorpio”, the defending champion from last year Ben Knowles, “Dutch Boy” Knowles, Jason Edler a nd Brookes Miller, walked away with $3000.00 cash for their 624lb catch. Taking the First Place $ 10,000 prize money sponsored in part by Gilbey’s, with a grand total of 960lbs, was the “King Fish” of Nassau setting a new tournament record for weight! In the Length category, taking Third place was the “Bush” team with 53 ?”, winning a chest freezerf rom Master Technicians, 2 cases of oil from Baystreet Garage, and $700.00 cash, followed by t he “Still Slunkin” team of Andrew Knowles, Alex Cartwright, Duncan Love and Matthew Wells with 5 6”, winning them a Yamaha “Crypton” Scooter sponsored by Harbourside Marine, and $1000.00 c ash. In First Place, winning $10,000 cash sponsored in part by the Ministry of Tourism was the “King F ish” with their 63” Wahoo caught on the second day. Proudly sporting their junior angler Jalen K nowles on his shoulder and naming him the “lucky charm”, captain Paul King took the crowds breath a way when he announced he was donating the entire c ash prize to the Mac Knowles Junior Sailing Club! W ith young Jalen as a sailing club member, Mr. K ing and his team wanted to do something positive for both the Island and Jalen, and with his donation, the Sailing Club will be able to afford new sailing boats, and riggings for the existing ones. There’s never a dull moment in this Tournament, from start to finish. Nightly “sponsor trivia” keeps t he crowd (and sponsors a ways, Gilbey’s drink specials for three day and DJ music throughout – it’s a winning combination that can’t be beat! Complete List of Sponsors: Gilbey’s, Ministry of Tourism, Sun Oil Ltd, Harbourside Marine, Constantakis Sea Enterprise, Athena’s Caf, Ultimate Door & Window, Scotiabank, Seafarer Marine, Baystreet Garage, Master Technicians, Outer Edge Grill, Henry S Storr Electric, Sunshine Real Estate, Palmdale Service Station, Discount Tyre & Bat t ery, Caribbean Bottling Company, Panama Jack, B oss Up Entertainment, Bling Bling Car Rental & W ash, Professional Insurance Consultants, Utlimate G lass, M & S Crane Rental, Glacier Ice, National Plumbing, Damien Treco Building & Renovations, Land ‘N’ Sea, Treco’s Service Station, Sunquest Services, JWK Construction, Marine & Land, Fox Locksmithing, Archipelago Painters & Developers Ltd., Cartwright’s Construction, Yuma Crystal Springs, Grog Pond Hardware, Bahamas Food Ser vices, Long Island Tile Supply, Carroll Shipping Company Ltd., Darville Packaging, Island Cellu-l ar, A.I.D and Under The Sun. SNOWBOARDING A chance to join the High Cascade Snowboard Camp! 20 1 4 WORLDCUP: HOSTCITIESNAMED NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS – President the Federation of International Football Association (FIFA speaks, on May 31, 2009, during the 2014 World Cup Brazil Announcement of Host Cities Names, at the Atlantis Resort, Paradise Island, The Bahamas. Among the cities named for the games include Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo and Recife. P H O T O : P a t r i c e A n n J o h n s o n Winter Olympic athlete Korath Wright sends invitation to ten lucky Bahamas teenagers KORATHWRIGHT on the shores of Nassau in 2008. T i m A y l e n SNOWBOARDING at High Cascade, Mount Hood, Oregon. Photo by Alex Neun KORATH WRIGHT on a visit to The Bahamas in May 2009. Long Island three-day fishing tournament the biggest yet

PAGE 15

simply gone ahead with taking the pay cut instead of announcing he would be “willing to do so.” He said he “waits with baited breath” to see if Mr Davis goes ahead with the move and if his parliamentary colleagues in the Opposition will follow suit as Mr Davis suggested all MPs should. Meanwhile, Mr Ferguson described as “almost irresponsible” the MP’s suggestion that Ministers of State are an unnecessary burden on the treasury. “I don’t think he knows or he even understands what these ministers of state are doing. So for him to say that is out of his league it’s not his business,” said the FNM chairman. On Thursday Mr Davis, MP for Cat Island, Rum Cay and San Salvador, issued a statement in which he announced that he would be willing to take the 20 per cent cut in his parliamentary salary of $28,000 and called on his parliamentary colleagues to do the same. The MP who earlier this year said he would be interested in seeking either the leadership or deputy leadership of his party, depending on which became available first called on the Prime Minister to remove “unnecessary burdens” on tax payers during a deep recession by “eliminating duplicate junior ministers in his cabinet.” Byron Woodside, Zhivargo Laing, Branville McCartney, Brensil Rolle, Phenton Neymour, Loretta Butler-Turnerand Charles Maynard should all go, said Mr Davis, as “full ministers are responsible for each of these areas.” This came after Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham told parliament that major expenditure cutbacks across almost all government ministries, departments and agencies were required in view of the economic climate. Mr Ingraham said Government could not afford to pay fora new health insurance benefit for nurses, worth $10.5 million, at present, and teachers and doc tors would not be getting pay increase this year. Y esterday Mr Ferguson said the “time is coming for political pandering and (Mr Davis to do what he wants along those lines.” Stating that Mr Davis’s state ment “sounds good”, the Chairman accused him of merely seeking to “set the stage for him to become leader of the PLP.” Mr Ferguson suggested that if Mr Davis’ proposal was something the PLP party as a whole supported the statement “would’ve come from the leader (Perry Christie him.” As for FNM MPs taking pay cuts, Mr Ferguson said he “doesn’t see any reason for it right now.” Phenton Neymour, one of the Ministers of State targeted by Mr Davis, told The Tribune that he thinks Mr Davis is “behind the ball” and “should’ve read the budget” before making his statement. Pointing to the decision on the part of the government to leave out of the budget the $100,000 allowance each MP was previously getting to put towards projects in their constituency, the Minister of State for the Environment said this will have a much greater cost-saving impact. Also accusing Mr Davis of trying to “score political brownie points” rather than being genuinely concerned about saving public money, Mr Neymour defended the need for his position telling The Tribune that the “increased” attention that a number of issues which fall in his portfolio have required such as BEC and the Water and Sewerage corporation justify the need for his appointment. Zhivargo Laing, Minister of State for Finance, told this newspaper that he would have a “good response” to Mr Davis’ statement in parliament. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 15 *Price per person based on double occupancy. Full buet breakfast in Portno Restaurant. Free in-room internet access. One comp per 10 rooms con“rmed and actualized (based on minimum of 10 rooms per night). Valid Friday/Saturday/Sunday nights only. June September 2009. Blackout dates apply. Additional taxes apply. Bahamian residents only. 2 0 0 9 H i l t o n H o s p i t a l i t y I n c .Travel should take you placesForreservationscall:3029080or3029032ore-mail :sales.nassau@hilton.comBREAK FREEat the Hilton F R E E B r e a k f a s t , FREE Breakfast, F R E E I n t e r n e t , FREE Internet,F R E E R o o m s ! FREE Rooms!For Groups of 10 rooms or more. Great for Church Retreats, Family Reunions, Weddings and Weekend Corporate Groups.$64.50* PLPMP’s salary cut claim is criticised F ROM page one Philip ‘Brave’ Davis

PAGE 16

n By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL T ribune Features Editor T h e Government has given up $2.3 million in stamp tax revenue in the last year due to the recently amended real property tax act which exempts first time home owners from the payment of stamp tax on the acquisition of a residence with a combined value of up to $500,000. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham spoke to members of the Bahamas Real Estate Association during a banquet to celebrate the organisation’s 50th anniversary on Friday evening. He told the realtors: “Since last July, 641 first timehomeowners have enjoyed this saving in connection with the acquisition of residents with a total value of $57 million. “The government gave up some $2.3 million in stamp tax revenues on those transactions. Additionally, some $814,000 was waived by the Government on mortgages totaling $86 million in connection with the purchase of first homes.” Mr Ingraham explained that the amendedment also exempts first time homeowners from the payment of real property tax for the first five years of home-ownership. “We are taking additional action this year to further reduce the cost of homeownership, reduce real property tax and extend the $250,000 owner – occupied exemption across the board to all home-owners, Bahamian and foreign regardless of the period of occupancy in the residence by the owner.” The Prime Minister added that the G overnment would like to have a low r esidential real property tax regime s omething he said is possible if people declared the real value of their homes and paid the taxes due on them. He added that the Government is aware of the association’s concern about the government’s removal of the four year concession which capped real property tax payable on residential real property at $35,000 per annum. Mr Ingraham said it is no secret that many people are paying taxes based on less than the real value of their home paying instead on the value established at the time of original purchase or construction or in some cases are only paying on the value of the vacant land on which they built. “I have found the noise in the market surrounding the imposition and removal of the residential real proper ty tax cap interesting. Prior to 2003 and the introduction of the cap, 17 owner –occupied properties paid annual real property taxes in excess of $35,000 in the amount of $1.1 million. “During the four-year period 20032007 when the cap was in place, 57 such properties paid taxes of $35,000 per annum in the amount of $ 4.1 million. “Can it be that we should design a special tax rate to 57 or 68 home-owners amoung the thousands of home owners in the country and to accodo mate only the wealthiest home-owners?” the prime minister asked. Mr Ingraham said the Government believed that as opposed to the caps at the upper end of the real estate tax bracket and or revaluation by the Chef Valuation Officer it would be infinitely fairer to zone The Bahamas for real property tax purposes determining property value purposes on the basis of the square footage of improvements plus the value of the land. “Then we would not have to rely on sale prices to determine the value of real estate for real property tax purpose,” the prime minister said. Mr Ingraham pointed out that a 3,000 square foot residence in Cooper’s town Abaco can not have the same value as a residence of the same size in Lyford Cay. “We might also consider that the real property tax value will be calculated on say 75 per cent of a residence‘s sale price. Either or all of these suggestions could provide certainty and stability as to tax liabilities for purc hases of real property in our country. A nd we may also set the circumstances o r conditions which will trigger or result in an increase in the value of properties in an orderly fashion so that tax increases are not expected or dramatic in nature. Another suggestion would be to agree that foreign second home owners might be permitted to retain a residential designation for real property tax property purposes even when their residences are not occupied by the owner for a minimum of nine months of the year. Despite a turbulent economy which has affected their businesses, BREA president William Wong said that the industry will rebound as the economy of both the US and the Bahamas improves. The gala banquet, which also awarded long-standing BREA mem bers, was held at the Atlantis Resort and featured entertainment by the Extra Band, Ronnie Butler and Count Bernardino. C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission f rom the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29T he information contained is from a third party and The T ribune can not be held responsible for e rrors and/or o mission from the d aily report. $3.73 $3.62 $3.82 # brnb""" %$!!&# $"#$!"%"!&## f#%"##!# !!'t"%#"#%frbt Government gives up $2.3m in stamp tax revenue in last year n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE BALMORAL development, earmarked at $100 million, broke ground last Friday, with the pre-sold homes now 99 per cent Bahamian owned, according to the property’s principal. Jason Kinsale, who purchased the vintage property only 18 months ago, said foundations have already been laid and more land is still being cleared for the start of phase one of the pro ject. “It’s hard to believe that we started this journey only 18 months ago it’s been very encouraging to see that we’ve been able to move forward in light of the times that we’re seeing today and bring this project to fruition,” he said. “I’m really excited about the fact that we’ve been able to cre ate opportunities for Bahamian contractors and really see that we’re able to contribute to the economy even though it is a very difficult time right now.” According to Mr Kinsale, the government has made the approval process for his development a smooth process. “They understand that investors inject a significant amount of capital, not only into my project alone, but into any development and it is necessary that we get these approvals in time which they do truly understand,” he said. Minister of Labour Dion Foulkes assisted in the groundbreaking ceremony along with Lester Cox, David Johnstone and Mr Kinsale. Mr Foulkes said the jobs that will be created through the BalPre-sold homes at $100m Balmoral development 99% Bahamian owned KHAALIS Rolle, chief mar keting officer at Bahamas Ferries, was elected president of The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce during its recent 2009 Annual General Meeting (AGM nial Hilton. Chamber members also elect ed a new slate of officers and directors for the Chamber’s 2009-2010 Administrative Year. Rolle is the principal of Nassau Water Ferries and a part time lecturer at the College of the Bahamas. Having served on the Chamber’s board since 2004, he is no stranger to the business of the Chamber and expressed his enthusiasm about continuing to represent the interests of the private sector. Thanking members for their support, Rolle said: “I am grate ful for the opportunity to serve you as president and look forward to lobbying the government on issues and policies that affect that way we do business in the Bahamas.” Anxious to tackle the objec tives of his new office, Rolle explained that it would be one of his main priorities to ensure that the small and medium sized enterprise (SME Chamber becomes fully functional. “The SME Unit will provide the technical support needed by the greater percentage our membership to enhance their competitiveness and more immediately, to survive the cur rent business crisis,” he said. “I’m looking forward to meeting with and developing relationships with the membership to further appreciate the needs of the business community and reassure them of the Chamber’s relevance to the continued suc cess of their businesses. My term will be membership-focused and our objectives will be to deliver tangible, measurable and recognisable support.” Rolle elected president of Chamber of Commerce S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B Khaalis Rolle P RIME MINISTER H ubert Ingraham (second from left (shown l-r Larry Roberts, immediate past president – during a banquet at Atlantis resort to mark the organisation’s 50th anniversary. Photo by Keith Parker, PS News/Features

PAGE 17

C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By RoyalFidelity Capital Markets IT was a busy trading week in the Bahamian market with investors trading in 12 out of the 24 listed securities, of which three advanced, five declined and four remained unchanged. E E Q Q U U I I T T Y Y M M A A R R K K E E T T A total of 646,818 shares changed hands, representing a significant increase of 610,364 shares, compared to last week's trading volume of 36,454 shares. Abaco Markets (AML the volume leader with 217,565 shares trading hands, its stock rising by $0.07 to end the week at $1.40. Consolidated Water Company (CWCB advancer with 40,000 shares trading, its stock gaining $0.34 to end the week up at $3.12. Doctors Hospital Health Systems (DHS shares, its share price climbing by $0.02 to end the week at $1.40. Cable Bahamas (CAB the lead decliner, its stock falling by $0.36 to $11.39 on a volume of 63,894 shares. Commonwealth Bank (CBL ed 59,447 shares, its share price decreasing by $0.13 to a new 52-week low of $6. Focol Holdings (FCL ed 7,794 shares, its share priced ropping by $0.05 to end the week at $5.09. Finance Corporation of the Bahamas (FIN traded 49,364 shares, falling by $0.03 to a new 52-week low of $10.97. B ank of Bahamas (BOB share price lost $0.01, also closing at a new 52-week low of $6.94 on a volume of 43,165 shares. B B O O N N D D M M A A R R K K E E T T Investors traded $101,000 (par value (Bahamas (FBB15 C C O O M M P P A A N N Y Y N N E E W W S S E E a a r r n n i i n n g g s s R R e e l l e e a a s s e e s s : : B enchmark (Bahamas (BBL financial results for the year ended December 31, 2008. BBL reported a net loss of $1.9 million, a decrease of $1.4 million or 42 per cent versus a net loss of $3.2 million in 2007. Net investment income declined by $419,000 or 22 per cent to $1.5 million, compared to $1.9 million in the previous year. BBL's net operating loss decreased significantly to $426,000 or 91 per cent, com ROYAL FIDELITY MARKETWRAP The Bahamian Stock Market F F I I N N D D E E X X 7 7 9 9 0 0 . . 4 4 1 1 ( ( 5 5 . . 3 3 2 2 % % ) ) Y Y T T D D B B I I S S X X C C L L O O S S I I N N G G C C H H A A N N G G E E V V O O L L U U M M E E Y Y T T D D P P R R I I C C E E S S Y Y M M B B O O L L P P R R I I C C E E C C H H A A N N G G E E AML$1.40 $0.07217,565-18.13% BBL$0.63 $-0-4.55% BOB$6.94 $-0.0143,165-9.16% BPF$11.00 $-0-6.78% BSL$7.92 $-0-22.28% BWL$3.15 $-00.00% CAB$11.39$-0.3663,894-18.82% CBL$6.00 $-0.13 59,447-14.29% CHL$2.83 $-1040.00% CIB$10.40 $-80,244-0.48% CWCB$3.12 $0.3440,00038.67% DHS$1.40 $0.0270,696-45.10% FAM$7.76 $-0-0.51% FBB$2.37 $-00.00% FCC$0.30 $-00.00% FCL$5.09 $-0.057,794-1.55% FCLB$1.00 $-00.00% FIN$10.97$-0.0349,364-7.58%I CD$5.50 $-14,545-10.28% JSJ$10.50 $-0-5.41% PRE$10.00 $-00.00% International Markets F F O O R R E E X X R R a a t t e e s s W W e e e e k k l l y y % % C C h h a a n n g g e e C C A A D D $ $ 1 .0906-2.49 G G B B P P 1.6194+1.77 E E U U R R 1.4146+1.01 C C o o m m m m o o d d i i t t i i e e s s W W e e e e k k l l y y % % C C h h a a n n g g e e C C r r u u d d e e O O i i l l $ 66.45+7.96 G G o o l l d d $980.50+2.42 I I n n t t e e r r n n a a t t i i o o n n a a l l S S t t o o c c k k M M a a r r k k e e t t I I n n d d e e x x e e s s : : W W e e e e k k l l y y % % C C h h a a n n g g e e D D J J I I A A 8 ,500.33+2.69 S S & & P P 5 5 0 0 0 0 919.14 +3.62 N N A A S S D D A A Q Q 1 ,774.33+4.87 N N i i k k k k e e i i 9,522.50+3.22 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B

PAGE 18

moral development will take a great amount of pressure off of the central government and other government agencies. He said he is pleased that around 150 jobs will be created at the height of the development stage of the project, with that labour coming from Bahamian construction firms. “This is a model of how foreign investors and Bahamian investors can pool their resources and come together to really do something different and something that is badly needed in New Providence and t he Bahamas,” he said. Guests at the groundbreaking ceremony were treated to exquisite hors d’oeuvres from the Balmoral’s head Chef John Knowles, which will be an integral part of the development’s clubhouse experience. According Mr Kinsale, skyrocketing property values in New Providence and diminishing land availability prompted him to construct the affordable gated community. Two bedroom, 1400 sq ft town homes in the development begin at $359,000 while four bedroom, 2000 sq ft homes sell for about $559,000. The more conservative spender can acquire a 1200 sq ft condo for $300,000. “Our buyers have seen a lot of value in the price point,” said Mr Kinsale. “We’ve been able to appeal to different market segments and what I consider to be affordable for the young professional market.” The 43 acre property belonged to Lord Oliver Simmonds in the 1940s and was purchased by the Tomlinson family in the 60s. When Mr Kinsale, a native of Grand Bahama, bought the property, the house which has been redesigned to be the Balmoral’s clubhouse, underwent a five month, one million dollar renovation. The 17,000 sq ft clubhouse was redesigned around its historical trimmings and original spiral staircase. “The Tomlinson family did a tremendous job of maintaining the history,” said Mr Kinsale. The contract to construct the 70 phase one homes has been awarded to Bahama Wall Systems Ltd. When construction commences and infrastructure is put in place Mr Kinsale said he expects interest to peak. “We anticipate much stronger demand once the project starts,” he said. The construction side of the development is expected to create around 100 jobs, with 50 more employed at Balmoral’s clubhouse as gardeners, wait staff, culinary staff and administration. “We have been able to create a significant number of jobs and hiring process for local Bahamian contractors,” said Mr Kinsale. He said because of the current state of the market Balmoral’s sales and marketing team have been working overtime to push presales in order to get give the project legs. He also said Royal Bank of Canada, which holds the lien on the development, have been very helpful in making the project a reality. The project has placed a huge emphasis on making the Balmoral a family oriented community, with pools and a Mark Knowles tennis centre to complement the clubhouse amenity available to all home owners. “There is a lot of focus on the amenities,” said Mr Kinsale. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 3B 7+(%/,&+263,7$/6$87+25,7<127,&(7(1'(5)25+(,6,21)&285,(5(59,&(6 38%/,&+263,7$/6$87+25,7<7(1'(56$5(,19,7(')52048$/,),('&2175$&72567 3529,'(&285,(56(59,&(6)257+(38%/,&+263,7$/6 $87+25,7<$<($5 7(1'(5'2&80(176:+,&+,1&/8'(,16758&7,216 77(1'(5(5663(&,7,216$1'27+(55(/(9$17 ,1)250$7,21&$1&2//(&7('$030021'$<7 )5,'$<$77+(38%/,&+263,7$/6$87+25,7<&25325$ &(175(%8,/',1*7+,5'$1':(677(55$&(6&2//,16 $9(18( $7(1'(5086768%0,77(',1'83/,&$,1$6($/(' (19(/23(253$&.$*(,'(17,),('$67(1'(5)257+( 3529,6,21&285,(56(59,&(638%/,&+263,7$/6 $87+25,7<$''5(66('7 7+(&+$,50$1 7(1'(56&200,77(( 7+(%/,&+263,7$/6$87+25,7< &25325$7(&(175(%8,/',1*% 7+,5't:(67(55$&(6&2//,16$9(18( 3 1$66$8%$+$0$67(1'(56$5(7$55,9($77+(%/,&+263,7$/6$87+25,7< 12/$7(57+$1WK/$ 7(1'(5f:,//$&&(37(' $FRS\RIYDOLGEXVLQHVVOLFHQVHDQGFHUWLFDWHYHULI\LQJXS WRGDWH1DWLRQDO,QVXUDQFH&RQWULEXWLRQVVKRXOGDFFRPSDQ\DOO SURSRVDOV7KHXEOLF+RVSLWDOV$XWKRULW\UHVHUYHVWKHULJKWWRDFFHSWRUUHMHFWDQ\ RUDOOHQGHUVf JASON KINSALE (right reception following the official opening ceremony... B B A A L L M M O O R R A A L L , , f f r r o o m m 1 1 B B

PAGE 19

The Chamber of Commerce currently has a membership of approximately 500. Effective from yesterday, the incoming president will head a new board of officers comprisedof 1st Vice President, Gershan Major (Mail Boxes Etc. Vice President, Chester Cooper (British American Financial Honorary Treasurer, Darron Cash (First Caribbean Bank and Honorary Secretary, Yvette Sands (Sands & Associates Saluting the Chamber’s new board, the new president noted, “I will have the pleasure of working with a very diverse and energetic board, representativeof the entire business community. The diversity of the board brings added value to our membership as we represent the issues and policies affecting the private sector and the way wedo business. We will work to maintain an open line of communicationwith the government to ensure private sector representation on the relevant policy making and d ecisions.” G iving the President’s R eport, outgoing president, Dionisio D’Aguilar, conveyed highlights of his term over the last two years. “It gave me great pride to take this office that my father held. I was particularly happy to serve when my father was alive.” Vincent D’Aguilar served as Chamber President from 197779 and in 1987. Mr. D’Aguilar reflected that it made his father proud to see his son rise to the top of an organisation to which he contributed much of his time and which was near and dear to him. Known for being a strong voice for the business community, D’Aguilar noted, “I particularly enjoyed being president because it has allowed me to get off my chest some of my concerns about the way business is done in this country. I lobbied hard during my term in office for the large anchor projects because I felt they would cushion us during the impending economic downtown.” H e expressed happiness a bout the progress being made b y Albany and looked to the AGM’s guest speaker, Sarkis Izmirlian, to give an update on the Baha Mar project. Banking In his usual frank nature, D’Aguilar expressed disappointment that the banking community has been unable to establish the automated clearing house (A.C.H. promised that will it happen this year but needless to say after two years of promises I’m not holding my breath.” Speaking to the current economic recession, he lamented, “Sales are down, expenses are up, especially energy costs, and this has placed has an enormous downward pressure on companies’ profits. The government needs to be constantly reminded that ensuring a healthy viable private sector is key to a successful economy.” Having become a regular with the local media, D’Aguilar t hanked the press for their supp ort, “I think the journalists of t his country enjoyed my candidness and my willingness to ‘tell it like it is’ in my usual undiplomatic style.” The Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the Baha Mar Resorts Ltd., Mr. Sarkis Izmirlian, delivered the AGM’s keynote address on the topic “Are We Ready For The Recovery?” “Yes, our community is feeling the adverse affects of the recession but at the same time our community has the opportunity to implement strategic initiatives so that we can be well positioned to take advantage of the economic recovery,” he said. Izmirlian highlighted the need for major reform to various areas including education, gaming regulations, the port and downtown, the airport and the country’s investment process. Conveying well wishes to the outgoing President: “He has always taken a vocal position to protect and enhance the busin ess environment of the B ahamas. His straight talk and f rank approach has been a refreshing change. Even with all the bad news in the papers over the past months, I always looked forward to reading the papers and learning of his latest crusade. I know the newspapers will miss him as much as all of us will.” The Chamber’s 2009-10 board of directors was elected during the AGM and consists of the President, Khaalis Rolle; 1st Vice President, Gershan Major; 2nd Vice President, Chester Cooper; Honorary T reasurer, Darron Cash; Hono rary Secretary, Yvette Sands; R ick Hazelwood, John Bull Group of Companies; Dr. Jonathan Rodgers, Pearle Vision; Robert Myers, Caribbean Landscape Ltd.; Diane Morley, Coles of Nassau; Odley Aritis, TOP Builders; Aaron Brice, Epic Battery Ltd.; Pedro Roberts, Commonwealth Drug & Medical Supplies Company Limited; Merrit Storr, Chancellors Chambers; Creswell Gardiner; Fidelity Bank (Bahamas pared to a $4.6 million loss in fiscal 2007, due primarily to low-er provisions for doubtful debts in the year of $473,000 ($5.6 m illion in 2007). T he unrealised loss on BBL's portfolio of $1.6 million accounted for the balance of the company's net losses in fiscal 2008. Total assets and liabilities stood at $30.3 million and $29.8 million respectively, compared to $22.3 million and $19.9 million at year-end 2007, with net assets of $495,000 declining from $2.3 million reported at year-end 2007. Doctors Hospital Health Systems (DHS DHS released its financial results for the three months ended April 30, 2009. Net income for the quarter was $2.3 million ($0.23 per share), compared to $981,000 ($0.10 per share first quarter, an increase of 135 per cent. Total revenues of $12.8 million increased by $1.9 million or 17 per cent in comparison to $10.9 million the previous year, while total expenses of $10.4 million increased by $611,000 or 6 per cent. Management attributed the positive results to a growth in patient services, with revenues from patient services of $12.4 million increasing by $1.8 million or 18 per cent year-overyear. The increase in expenses was said to be a direct result of revenue growth, with medical sup plies and services costs of $3.1 million increasing by $412,000 or 15 per cent, while salaries and benefits increased by $236,000 or 6 per cent to $4.3 million compared to the 2009 first quarter. Total DHS assets at April 30, 2009, were $31.3 million, a decrease of $475,000 compared to $31.8 million at year-end 2009. Total liabilities declined by $2.2 million or 25 per centt o $6.4 million, due primarily to repayment of a bank loan on the company’s investment property. A A n n n n u u a a l l G G e e n n e e r r a a l l M M e e e e t t i i n n g g ( ( A A G G M M ) ) N N o o t t e e s s : : Famguard Corporation (FAM hold its Annual General Meeting on Friday, June 19, 2009, at 4pm at the British Colonial Hilton, Victoria Room, Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas. Shareholders of record as of May 21, 2009, will be qualified to vote at the Annual Meeting. J.S. Johnson Company (JSJ announced it will be holding its Annual General Meeting on Monday, June 15, 2009, at 6pm at the British Colonial Hilton, Victoria Room, Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas. Doctors Hospital Health Systems (DHS will be holding its Annual General Meeting on Thursday, June 18, 2009, at 5.30pm at Doctors Hospital, Dowdeswell Street, Nassau, Bahamas. Shareholders of record as of May 27, 2009, will be qualified to vote at theA nnual Meeting. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE &20021:($/ , 7+((0(&2857& RPPRQ/DZDQG(TXLW\'LYLVLRQ , 7+(0$77(5$//7+$7 SLHFHSDUFHORU ORWRIODQGFRQWDLQLQJ7KUHHWKRXVDQGDQG)LIW\VL[ VTXDUHIHHWVLWXDWHLQWKH6HWWOHPHQWRI*UHDW * XDQD&D\RQHRIWKH$EDFRFKDLQRIFD\VLQWKH &RPPRQZHDOWKRI7KH%DKDPDVERXQGHGRQWKH 1 RUWKODQGQRZRUIRUPHUO\WKHSURSHUW\RI/HZLV 5 REHUWVDQGUXQQLQJWKHUHRQ6L[W\IHHWRQWKH (DVWODQGWKHSURSHUW\RI$OUREKRPDV5REHUWVf E XWQRZWKHSURSHUW\RI:LOOLDP'R\OH:DWVRQDQG ) UHGHULN)*RWWOLHEUXQQLQJWKHUHRQDQG 1LQHW\WKUHHKXQGUHGWKVIHHWRQWKH6RXWK WKH0DLQ3XEOLF5RDGNQRZQDV)URQW6WUHHWfDQGU XQQLQJWKHUHRQ6HYHQW\IHHWRUOHVVDQGRQWKH :HVW7KUHHIHHWZLGHSXEOLFUHVHUYDWLRQDQG UXQQLQJWKHUHRQL[W\fIHHW $1' ,1+($77(5)+(,(7,1*,7/(6$&7 $787(/$ 7+(&20021:($/7+)+(%$+$0$6 $1' ,1+($77(5)+((7,7,21):,//,$0 '2
PAGE 20

C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 5B HOUSES/APARTMENTS/COMMERCIAL BUILDINGSVACANT PROPERTIES(401rown Allotments, Love Hill Settlement, Andros. Containing a two-storey res. Appraised value: $100,000 (806Lots #1 & #2, Block 3 with a parcel situated between Lot #1, Block 3, containing a 4 bedroom condominium – Sunset View Villas, West Bay Street. Appraised value: $750,000 (433Lot #27 of Village Allotment #14 in the Eastern District, contain-ing residence situated on Denver Street off Parkgate Road in the AnnsTown Constituency, New Providence. Property size 2,500 sqft Building size 990 sqft. Appraised value: $50,000(400) Property situated in Calabash Bay on the Island of Andros. 75’ x 150’ and containing thereon a small grocery store 480 sqft. and an incomplete 3 bed 2 bath house 900 sqft. Appraised value: $65,000 (301Lot #2 in block #8, Steward Road, Coral Heights East Subdivi-sion situated in Western District of New Providence, approx. size 8,800 sq. ft. with a split level containing two bed, two bath, living, dining & family rooms, kitchen and util-ity room – approx. size of building 2,658 sqft Appraised value: $322,752(702)Lot #20 with residential prop-erty located Skyline Heights. Appraised value $280,000 (902)Lot of land 94 x 94 x 150 x 150 on Queens Highway just south of Palmetto Point with a two storey stone building containing two apart-ments. Each unit has 3 bed/2 1/2 bath, kitchen, living room and 3 linen closets. Appraised value: $287,209(400)Lot #14 situated in the settle-ment of Love Hill on the Island of Andros totalling 20,000 sqft Property contains a two storey 5 bedroom, 3 bathroom residence. Appraised value: $185,000(105) Lot containing 2 storey bldg. with three bed, two and a half bath residence, and 30’ x 86’ situated Bai-ley Town, North Bimini. Appraised value: $235,000(801 Lot #18 in Sandilands Allot-ment on the western side of Cross-wind Road between Seabreeze Lane and Pineyard Road in the Eastern Distract of The Island of New Prov-idence-The Bahamas.,containing single storey private residence com-prising the following: covered entry porch, living room, dining room, kitchen, laundry room, family room, sitting area, 4 bedrooms, 2 bathroom and patio. The total area of land is approximately 7,641 square feet. Appraised value: $289,426(801) Twoparcels of land containing 21,120 sq.ft. situated on the south-ern side of East Shirley Street and 100 feet west of its junction with Shirlea” in the Eastern District, New Providence. Situated thereon is a Gas Station and Auto Repair Shop. Appraised value: $799,497(601Village Allot-ment with fourplex, Appraised value: $500,000(701)Lot of land having the number 16 in Block number 16 in Section Three of the Subdivision called and known as Sea Breeze Estates situated in the Eastern District of New Providence. Property contains a three bed, two bath residence. Appraised value: $277,000(701)Lot of land being lot number 11 in Block number 10 on a plan of allotments laid out byVillage Estates Limited and led in the dept of Land & Surveys as number 142 N.P. and situated in the Eastern District of New Providence. Property contains three bed, two bath residence. Appraised value: $165,000 (565Lot # 1018 in Golden Gates Estates #2 Subdivision situate in the South Western District of the island of New Providence Containing a single storey private residence 3 bedroom 2 bath. Property approx. size 6,000 sqft Building approx size 2,400 sqft Appraised value: $173,176(205Lot B 50 ft x 115.73 ft situ-ated on the north side of Shell Fish Road, being the third lot west of FireTrail Road and east of Hamster Road with a one half duplex residential premises. Appraised value: TBA (808Lot # 3 Block 24 in the Cen-treville Subdivision . Building #109/Eastern side of Collins Ave . Com-prising commercial 2,800 sq ft com-mercial building. Appraised value: $582,000(901)Lot #32 containing 4 bedroom 2bath concrete structure located Triana Shores Harbour Island, Eleu-thera. Property size 80’ x 120’ x 80’ 120 feet Appraised value: $332,735 (902) Property contains 23,125 sq ft lot #30 Lovers Hill Subdivision with two storey structure approximately 15 years old. House contains Three bedrooms, Two baths, living room, dining room, t.v. room, kitchen, attic space and Double car garage with a gross oor area of 3,378 sq. ft. Lovers Hill is a residential development. Appraised value $254,154.00 (902Property contains approx. 5,800 sq. ft. situated in North Pal-metto Point with a single storey con-crete structure approx. 18 years old. House contains three bedrooms, two baths, living room, dining room and kitchen with a gross oor area of 1,444.26 sq. ft. Palmetto Point is a residential developed area. Appraised value $128,766.00 (101-N S ingle Family Residence-810 sqft, 2 bed,1 bath Lot # 3 Block #1 Eastville Subdivision Eastern District, New Providence. Appraised value: $65,000(910)Lot #12 Maderia Park, a small subdivision on the outskirts of Treas-ure Cay, Abaco having an area of 9,444 square feet residence contain-ing a concrete block structure with asphalt shingle roof comprises of three bedrooms, two bathrooms, family room, living room, dining room, and kitchen. Appraised value: $147,000 (569Property situated on Williams Lane off Kemp Road, New Providence, Bahamas containing a two-storey house and an apartment building consisting of 1800 sqft. Appraised value $100,000(501)All that piece of land being Par-cel #3 and Parcel #4 situated on the South side of Prince Charles Drive,New Providence, Bahamas contain-ing a commercial building housing two shop space on the ground oor and three shop space on the second oor with a large storage area in the rear. Total area 8400 sq ft. Appraised value: $366,650(569All that piece, parcel or land having an approximate area of 2100 sqft situated on the Western side of Blue Hill Road about 70 ft North of Peter Street and about 115 ft south of Laird Street in the Southern Dis-trict of New Providence, Bahamas containing a commercial building housing a two bed/one bath unit on the top oor and a store on the rst oor. Appraised value: $154,000(569All that piece, parcel or lot of land situated on Cowpen Road (1000 ft east of the Faith Avenue Junc-tion) in the Southern District of New Providence, Bahamas containing a duplex apartment comprising of two 2-bedroom/1-bathroom apart-ments. Appraised value: $150,000 (800All that parcel or lot of land being Lots #10 and 11 in Block 29 of Coconut Grove Subdivision, con-taining a shopping plaza. The lot is trapezium in shape, 8,383 square feet. Appraised value $500,000(560Lot of land #2 Sea View Sub-division, Russell Island, Spanish Wells. Property size 11,323 sqft, building size 2236 sq ft containing 3 bedrooms, 2 bath, living room, an eat-in kitchen, dining room, laun-dry room, covered porch, a one car garage, and a covered water tank. Appraised value: $299,000(901Trianna Shores containing 3 bed 2 bath front room, dining room, & kitchen. Concrete structure, 1926.40 sq ft wooden deck 321.60 sq ft. property 9600 sqft. Appraised value: $448,645(901K” Barrack Street, Harbour Island containing a 2 storey concrete building with 4 bed 4 bath, dining room & kitchen -Building 2934.56 sqft property 6563 sqft. Appraised value: $479,228 (811Property containing Condo Millennium II”, Unit A-101, building 57, Phase 1C, 2 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, living room, dining room, utility closet & patio. Situated in the area known asBimini Bay Resort, Bimini, Bahamas. Appraised value $485,000 (008) Single Story tri-plex building, one 2 bedrooms and two 1 bed-room located on a multi-family Lot No.4, block 3, Shirley Lane, section 1, Bahama Reef Yacht & Country Club Subdivision, Freeport Grand Bahama. Property size is approx. 16,621 sq. ft. Appraised value $348,000 (908 Lot# 52 Crown Allotments located Murphy Town, Abaco with size being 10,200 sq ft. Containing a one storey house with 4 bed/2 bath – Concrete Block Structure – Appraised value. $200,000(569All that piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #39 in the residen-tially zoned area of Highbury ParkSubdivision in the Eastern District of New Providence, Bahamas. Ap-prox. land size 6,000 sq ft. Property contains a 3-bedroom/2-bathroom house, size being 1,563 sq. ft.. Appraised Value $131,000.00. (908Lot# 23 located in the Sub-division of Spring City, Abaco with size being 8,925 sq ft. Containing a one storey wooden structure house with 3 bed/1 bath of 7985 sq ft Appraised value. $60,000 (304)Single storey triplex, situated on Lot 615, Mermaid Boulevard, Golden Gates #2 in the Western District, New Providence. Two two bedrooms, one bathroom units and one one bedroom, one bathroom unit. The property is zoned as Multi Family Residential, measuring 9,092 sq. feet with the living area meas-uring 2,792 sq ft. Appraised value $374,192 (201Duplex Lot #25 situated on Faith Ave. North (Claridge Estates) size being 7,354 sq. feet. with du-plex thereon. Appraised value TBA (201Lot of land situated on FireTrail Road being a partition of Glad-ston Allot #41 New Providence, Ba-hamas containing townhouse apart-ment unit and two proposed units (completed as is Appraised value $237,714OFFICERSPROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALEContact Account Ofcer listed below by using number code for each property.(702) Undeveloped lots # 4A, 16, 17, 18 and 19 located Chapman Estates, West Bay. Appraised value: $348,000(701Undeveloped lot #149. Seafan Lane, Lucayan Beach Subdivision. Grand Bahama, 18750 sqft. Appraised value: TBA(565) Vacant lot #5 located Eleuthera Island Shores, Seaside Drive Section B, Block #15, Eleuthera, Bahamas. 9,691 sqft, Appraised value: $27,620(402)Lot 89, Block 7 Aberdeen Drive,Bahamia West Replat Subdivision, Freeport, Grand Bahama, consist-ing of 12,100 sqft. Appraised value: $51,000(800)Vacant property located Baha-mia South. Block 16 lot 9A, Freeport, Grand Bahama consisting of 24,829.20 sqft. Appraised value: $52,000(565) Vacant Lot #9 (11,406.65 sqftsituated in Mango Lane Section BBlock #15, Eleuthera Island Shores, Eleuthera. Appraised value: $50,189 (909Vacant residential Lot# 63 (7800 sqftrown Allotments located Murphy Town, Abaco. Appraised value: $18,000 (108Vacant Single Family Lot #5 Block #5 Unit #1 Devonshire Appraised value $30,000 (802Vacant Commercial Lot No: 3A, Block 60 Bahamia Subdivision VI containing 3 acres located Free-port, Grand Bahama. Appraised value: $750,000 (108Vacant Single Family Lot #5 Block F Bahamia South Subdivision. Appraised value $35,700 (569Vacant property located in Subdivision called Culmerville being aportion of Lot #47 and aportion of Lot #57. Appraised value:$24,000 (569cel or lot of land situate in the settlement of James Cistern on the Island of Eleuthera one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the Baha-mas measuring approx 10,000 sq.ft. Appraised value TBA (569All that piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 102 in the Subdivision known as EXUMA HAR-BOUR” in the Island of Great Exuma measuring 10,000 sq.ft. Appraised value $20,000.00. (202Vacant lot of land contain-ing 41,164 sqft, Lot #8, Love Estate, Phase 1, 2,300 ft. south of West Bay Street, Western District, New Provi-dence. Appraised value $165,000(202)Vacant lot of land containing 1.786 acre, situated east of Knowles Drive, approximately 1,420 ft. southward of Harold Road in the western district of New Providence, Bahamas. Appraised value: $ 170,000(503Vacant property consisting of Lot #894 situated in the Freeport Ridge Subdivision, Section #1, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas. Appraised value: TBA (505Ten (10es of land situated on Woods Cay, known as Lit-tle Abaco, between CoopersTown and Cedar Harbour in Abaco, Baha-mas. The property is undeveloped with a view of the sea from both the North and South side. Appraised value: $1,078,750(569All that piece parcel or lot of land Lot # 977, Pinewood Gardens Subdivision, Southern District, New Providence. Appraised value: TBA. (008cel of lot and land on the Island of Great Exuma sit-uated about 10 1/2 miles Northwest-wardly of George Town which said piece parcel or lot of land is #10750 Bahama Sound O.A.E. 10,900 sqft. Appraised value: $65,000(008All that piece parcel or lot of land designated as Lot Number 563 on a plan of a Subdivision called or known as Bahama Highlands #4. 11,223.41 sqft. Appraised value: $87,000(201Single family residential Lot No. 11703 Bahama Sound Subd. Number 11 West, Great Exuma. Size: approx. 10,000 sq ft Appraised value $15,000 (201) Multi family Lot No. 10 South-east Corner of Mandarin Drive, Sugar Apple Road, Sans Souci Sudv. Size: 14,368 sq ft Appraised value $165,000.00. (201Single family residential Lot No. 11698 Bahama Sound Subd. Number 11 West, Great Exuma. Size: approx. 10,426 sq ft Appraised value: $15,000 (569All that piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #1 located in Block 3 in the Subdivision known as Eastern Estates situate in the Eastern District of the island of New Providence. Property approx. 6950 sq. ft. Appraised value TBA (569All that piece parcel or lot of land located on Marigold Road in the Subdivision known as Kool Acres. Lot is approx.9455 sq. ft. Appraised value $93,000. (569All that piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #152 located in the Subdivision known as West Ridge-land Park situated in the Southern District of the island of New Provi-dence. Property approx. 4000 sq. ft. Appraised value $55,000.(008An undeveloped waterfront lot land being Lot Number 12032 with a size of 10,600 sq.ft. in the Bahama Sound of Exuma Subdi-vision Number 11 West situated in the Island of Great Exuma one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. Appraised value $224,000 (008Partially developed parcel of land being 10,000 sq.ft. situate about the eastern portion of The Forest Estate in the vicinity of the settlements of Southside and The Forest being Lot Number 4803 in Bahama Sound of Exuma 6, Exuma The Bahamas. Appraised value $25,000COMMERCIAL BANKING CENTRE Tel: 242-356-8568 (800. Monique Crawford (801. Jerome Pinder (802. Brian Knowles (803. Vandyke Pratt (805. Tiffany Simms O’brien (806. Lois Hollis (807. Lester Cox (808. DaShann Clare-Paul (810iss LaPaige Gardiner (811. Lydia Gardiner PALMDALE SHOPPING CENTRE Tel: 242-322-4426/9 or 242-302-3800 (201. Nicola Walker (202. Robert Pantry (205. Anya Major NASSAU MAIN BRANCH Tel: 242-322-8700 (701. James Strachan (702. Antonio Eyma (301. Thyra Johnson (304. Alicia Thompson MACKEY STREETBRANCH Tel: 242-393-3097 (601. Cherelle Martinborough JOHN F. KENNEDY DRIVE BRANCH Tel: 242-325-4711 (401. Renea Walkine (402. Chandra Gilbert PRINCE CHARLES SHOPPING CENTRE Tel: 242-393-7505/8 (503. Dwight King (505. Patricia Russell CABLE BEACH BRANCH Tel: 242-327-6077 (466. Winnifred Roberts LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE Tel: 242-502-5170/502-5180 (716. Ingrid Simon (717. Nancy Swaby (723. Deidre King (724. Faye Higgs (725. Marguerite Johnson (565. Catherine Davis (569. Vanessa Scott NASSAU INT’L AIRPORT Tel: 242-377-7179 (433. Suzette Hall-Moss LYFORD CAYBRANCH Tel: 242-362-4540 or 242-362-4037 (101-N. Lindsey Peterson GOVERNOR’S HARBOUR, ELEUTHERA Tel: 242-332-2856/8 (902. Nicole Evans HARBOUR ISLAND BRANCH Tel:242-333-2230 (901. Velderine Laroda ANDROS TOWN BRANCH Tel: 242-368-2071 (400. Rose Bethel MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO Tel: 242-367-2420 (908. Joyce Riviere (909. Sylvia Poitier (910iss Cyprianna Williams BIMINI BRANCH Tel:242-347-3031 (105iss. Ganiatu Tinubu GRAY’S, LONG ISLAND Tel: 242-337-0101 (100. Lucy Wells EXUMA BRANCH Tel: 242-336-3251 (008. Jocyelyn Mackey FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH Tel: 242-352-6631/2 (101-F. Garnell Frith (102. Elaine Collie (103. Damita Newbold-Cartwright (108. Sylvie Carey SPANISH WELLS Tel: 242-333-4131 or 242-333-4145 (560. Walter Carey n B y MARK WILLIAMS AP Energy Writer COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP Oil prices pushed to new highs for the year Monday on a weak dollar and new datas uggesting manufacturing in China has strengthened. Both of those factors helped send energy prices to record highs last summer. Benchmark crude for July delivery rose $2.27 to settle at$ 68.58 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange, t he highest close since early November. Natural gas f utures soared 10 per cent. The data out of China shows how much economic news from across the globe c an effect pocketbooks in the U S. Brokerage CLSA AsiaPacific Markets said its pur-c hasing managers index rose to 51.2 from April's 50.1 on a 100-point scale, indicating that t he world's third-largest econo my might be recovering from a slump. Numbers above 50 show an expansion. The states anctioned China Federation of Logistics and Purchasing reported that its index hade ased, but that manufacturing w as still expanding somewhat. W hen crude prices were heading toward $150 per barrel last year, many energy analysts believed the booming economies of China and Indiaw ould support energy prices globally even as Western nations slipped into recession. T hat did not turn out to be the case and there is little tan gible evidence to suggest that t he rapid rise in energy prices c an be sustained for long this summer. That would be good news f or some consumers as far as energy prices go. Utility bills and gasoline prices are farb elow last year's levels, though the plunge has come at the cost of millions of jobs. Yet the pace at which ener g y prices rose in May has also raised questions about what is causing the surge. That is especially true of spiking nat ural gas prices Monday. Natural gas has been one commodity in the energy com-p lex that has lagged this year compared with crude and gasoline, and may finally havea ttracted a large number of investors who saw a bargain. Speculative bets on crude w ere on the rise already. The n et increase in bets that benchmark crude prices will increase rose by more than 14 per cent last week, according to a report from the Com modity Futures Trading Commission. A lot of that money is being driven by inflation fears as the dollar falls against other major currencies. Still, there are continuing hints of an economy that may be on the mend. The Tempe, Arizona-based Institute for Supply Manage ment reported the first month of growth in the new-orders index since November 2007, though the sector continues to contract overall. Natural gas prices have slumped to five-year lows with some of the biggest users, like manufacturers, hammered by the recession. The lack of broader, fundamental support hasn't stopped momentum from building in energy markets. "I don't believe in it ... but I'm not dumb enough to stand in front of it," oil trader and analyst Stephen Schork said of the rally. In other Nymex trading, gasoline for June delivery rose two cents to $1.915 a gallon and heating oil rose 9.89 cents to settle at $1.7765 a gallon. Natural gas for June delivery jumped 41.4 cents to settle at $4.249 per 1,000 cubic feet. In London, Brent prices rose $2.45 to settle at $67.97 a barrel on the ICE Futures exchange. Associate Press writers Joe McDonald in Beijing, Carlo Piovano in London and Alex Kennedy in Singapore con tributed to this report Oil prices push to new highs for F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

PAGE 21

n B y IEVA M AUGSTUMS AP Business Writer CHARLOTTE, North Carolina (AP being spun off by Citigroup Inc., Travelers Cos. is supplanting its former parent as a member of the Dow Jones industrial average. Travelers' selection helps maintain the representation of financial companies in the Dow. The property and casualty insurer has suffered less than many other financial firms during the credit crisis and recession. N ew York-based Citigroup is t he second financial company t o be dropped from the Dow after suffering huge losses during the credit crisis and recession. Dow removed American International Group Inc. in September after the insurer received a multibillion dollar bailout that gave the government an 80 per cent stake in the company. Citigroup was expected to be removed from the index as its share price tumbled nearly 87 per cent since the beginning of 2008. Shares of St. Paul, Minnesota-based Travelers, on the other hand, are only down nearly 22 per cent. As of Friday, Citigroup accounted for less than one per cent of the value of the index, which includes 30 stocks that make up the best-known barometer of Wall Street. As a higher-priced stock, Travelers will have more weight, and therefore will account for a larger portion of the Dow. Shares of Travelers gained $1.43, or 3.5 per cent, to $42.09 in afternoon trading Monday, while Citigroup lost three cents to $3.69. Dow Jones & Co. also said Monday it would add computer networking gear maker Cisco Systems Inc. to the industrials, replacing General Motors Corp., as GM entered bankruptcy protection. The changes take effect June 8. Citigroup's removal ends 12 years in the index for the New York-based bank, known as Citicorp when it joined in March 1997. Citigroup was created in 1998 when Sanford Weill merged his Travelers Group with Citicorp, creating a financial supermarket providing everything from checking accounts to hurricane insurance. Travelers was then spun off as a separate company in 2002. "It's always sort of interesting, and ironic, when a former subsidiary of a company that got spun off eclipses the parent," said Paul Newsome, an analyst with Sandler, O'Neill & Partners. Wall Street Journal Managing Editor Robert Thomson expressed reluctance in a statement Monday to remove Citigroup, although "it is clear that the bank is in the midst of a substantial restructuring which will see the government with a large and ongoing stake." The government's stress tests of the 19 biggest US banks earlier this month showed 10 of them had to raise a total of $75 billion in new capital to withstand possible future losses. Of those, Citigroup needed $5.5 billion. Thomson added said that after the removal of AIG last year and the addition of Kraft Foods, the financial industry was underrepresented on the Dow. The selection of Travelers corrects that deficiency, he said. John A. Prestbo, editor and executive director of Dow Jones Indexes, said the company, when looking for Citigroup's replacement, turned to an insurer because "we wanted to get that element back into the mix." Like Travelers, AIG sold property and casualty insurance. "I think it's certainly appropriate to add Travelers," Newsome said. "They are a big company and well capitalized ... the things you would want in a blue chip kind of name." C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 0,1,675<:25.6t75$163257 %/8(+,//$' 52$':$<&216758&7,21 ,QDQHIIRUWWRUHOLHYHFXUUHQWWUDIFFRQJHVWLRQSUREOHPV -26( &$57(//21(&216758&&,21(6&,9,/(66$ KDV E HHQFRQWUDFWHGIRUWKH&RPSOHWLRQRIWKH1HZ3URYLGHQFH5RDG ,PSURYHPHQW3URMHFW,QWHUQDWLRQDO3DFNDJH5RDGFRQVWUXFWLRQ ZLOOEHFRPPHQFLQJRQ&RUULGRU%OXH+LOO5RDGfZKLFKPD\ UHTXLUHGLYHUVLRQVIURP 'XNHWUHHWtRELQVRQRDG /RFDOGLYHUVLRQVZLOOEHVLJQSRVWHGLQGXHFRXUVHDQGIXUWKHU LQIRUPDWLRQZLOOEHSURYLGHGLQWKHORFDOPHGLD Dow Jones swaps Travelers for Citigroup

PAGE 22

n B y MADLEN READ AP Business Writer NEW YORK (AP Street is starting June with a big gain, boosted by reports that paint a more upbeat picture of the global economy. Investors looked past General Motors Corp.'s bankruptcy filing and instead focused on better-than-expected readings on US manufacturing, consumer spending and construct ion spending. Stocks got off to a strong start Monday followi ng upswings in Europe and Asia, where markets surged on surveys showing improvements in manufacturing in those regions. By late afternoon trading, the Dow Jones industrial average and other major indexes were up more than two per cent. The Standard & Poor's 500 index and the Nasdaq composite index hit their highest levels so far this year. It wasn't just fundamental economic data that encouraged buying on Monday, however. Some technical factors were at play, too. The first trading day of the month often brings with ita surge of new money from mutual funds. Also, the S&P broke through its 200-day moving average, a key development that hasn't occurred in over a year. Kim Caughey, equity research analyst at Fort Pitt Capital Group, said she was skeptical about the strength of the market's move Monday. The economic data were "better than expected, but I wouldn't say they were great." Even if the economy is stabilizing, there is little to drive demand once it bottoms, Caughey said. "I can't really buy into today's super-happy stock market." Standard & Poor's chief economist David Wyss said Monday he expects the US economy to bottom out late this summer or early in the fall, but then experience a "rather sluggish" recovery. "It's not a pleasant outlook," Wyss said. He predicted US gross domestic product which measures the value of all goods and services produced in the country to drop 3.1 per cent this year, with even sharper declines in European economies and Japan. In late afternoon trading, the Dow rose 217.60, or 2.6 per cent, to 8,717.93. The Standard & Poor's 500 index rose 23.21, or 2.5 per cent, to 942.35. The Nasdaq composite index rose 48.97, or 2.8 per cent, to 1,823.30. Because GM's bankruptcy filing was so well telegraphed in advance, the move did not faze investors. "It's remarkable the degree of resilience that the equity markets have shown," said Jack A. Ablin, chief investment officer at Harris Private Bank, referring to the market's ability to look past GM and other disruptions. "We've had plant closings, we've had dealer shutdowns. I think the reverberations have already been felt." The government will get a 60 per cent stake in GM, and is expected to provide the automaker with an additional $30 billion on top of the $20 billion it has already received to help it restructure. Meanwhile Chrysler LLC, which filed for Chapter 11 protection in April, is expected to emerge from bankruptcy protection this week. The Dow Jones industrial average announced Monday it is dropping GM as a component after the automaker filed for bankruptcy, as well as Citigroup Inc., in which the government now owns a significant stake. GM and Citi will be replaced with Travelers Cos. and Cisco Systems Inc. next week. Filing Positive economic data helped overshadow GM's bankruptcy filing. Consumers trimmed spending by 0.1 per cent, the Commerce Department reported, less than the 0.2 per cent reduction forecast by economists. Personal income was also better than anticipated, coming in flat instead of negative. The Commerce Department also reported that construction spending rose for the second straight month in April by 0.8 per cent, far better than the 1.2 per cent decline economists had expected. US manufacturing activity also shrank at a slower pace in May, according to the Institute for Supply Management. The ISM index came in at 42.8 its highest since September and up from 40.1 in March. A reading above 50 indicates growth, and a reading below 50 indicates contraction. Advancing stocks outnumbered decliners by five to one on the New York Stock Exchange, where volume came to 968 million shares, relatively low but up from 814 million around the same time on Friday. The Russell 2000 index of smaller companies rose 16.44, or 3.3 per cent, to 518.02. Overseas, Japan's Nikkei stock average jumped 1.6 per cent, while Hong Kong's Hang Seng index soared 4.0 per cent. In Europe, Britain's FTSE 100 rose two per cent, Germany's DAX index rose 4.1 per cent and France's CAC-40 gained 3.1 per cent. The market's three-month surge has brought the S&P 500 about 39 per cent above the 12year lows it reached in early March. It's the fastest rise the market has seen since the 1930s. But new worries have begun to seep into the market, including a sinking dollar and climbing interest rates, which some investors fear could threaten an economic recovery. A temporary spike in long-term bond yields to six-month highs last week brought a sharp decline in stock prices. Government bonds fell again Monday, driving yields back near last week's highs. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note, which is used as a benchmark for home mortgages and other consumer loans, rose to 3.70 per cent from 3.46 per cent late Friday. The dollar weakened further Monday against the euro and the British pound. Gold slipped, but oil jumped. Another hurdle that's approaching later this summer: Second-quarter corporate earnings results. If those come in worse than investors anticipated, Caughey said, "we'll have a reason to hate the market again." While Monday's move was strong, many long-view investors were unconvinced about its staying power. Ablin noted that returns are much better when the S&P 500 is trading above its 200-day moving average, but that the statistic itself can send "a number of false signals." Also, trading on the first day of the month is generally much stronger than normal. The S&P 500 index was down about 34 per cent in the 10 years leading up to May 1. But according to S&P data, if someone invested in the index only on the first day of the month over that time frame, he would have seen a gain of 21 per cent. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Stocks rally after positive economic data INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays

PAGE 23

C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE SECTIONC HEALTH: Body and mind T UESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net IT’S summer again, and for many e ngaged couples waiting to say I do, this season has practically all the right i ngredients for the perfect backdrop to their special occasion. Embracing these elements, the producers of the Bahamas At Sunrise show have teamed-up with the British Colonial Hilton Hotel to offer one special couple the chance of a lifetime to not only have their special day aired live on national television, but to also have the entire experience straight through to the honeymoonp rovided free of charge. While all of this may sound too g ood to be true, it really is, but there is one catch, all of the arrangements for the wedding including the dress, location, floral arrangements, and rings will be decided by the viewing audience. Latoya Hanna-Moxey who is sales manager and project representative from the British Colonial Hilton, and Sharell Ferguson of the Bahamas at Sunrise Dream Wedding Committee recently made the announcement on the show. Mrs Hanna-Moxey explained: “We are very excited to take part in this first and once in a lifetime opportunity with Bahamas At Sunrise. We are one of the major sponsors of the event and we will be providing the reception location as well as the ceremony location. “We at the British Colonial Hilton will be creating that ‘wow’ experience for the lucky couple on the actual wedding day. We will be providing the sleeping rooms, the food, and the drinks, so it will be a great day for the lucky couple.” According to the producers of the show, the wedding project promises to be an exciting moment in local broad casting as it will give Bahamians a chance to create the perfect wedding experience for a lucky couple on live television for the first time. Several community partners will take part in this ground breaking wedding. Apryl Jasmine designs will be creating the wedding gown that’s chosen, while Vows will provide the dresses for the bridesmaids. The groom and groomsmen will be dressed by Modern Men, make-up will be provided by Renee Brown, and hair will be done by Gigi Turnquest. All in all, the Bahamas at Sunrise and Hilton team have arranged a topnotch selection of companies and peo ple to make this day a success for the couple ensuring that they only have to show up on their wedding day. Any engaged couple who are citi zens or permanent residents of the Bahamas can apply. Application forms are available at the Counsellors, First Terrace, Collins Avenue, at the British Colonial Hilton on West Bay Street, or from www.bahamasatsunrise.com. After an initial elimination process done by the organisers, three lucky couples will go head-to-head live on television where the audience will begiven a chance to vote for their favourite couple online. On the website, there will also be profiles, pictures, and a message board for viewers to talk about the couple who they think should win, as well as discussions on the progress of the wedding. The deadline to enter the event is June 10, and voting will begin on June 22, 2009. The live, free dream wedding n B y ALEX MISSICK Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net I n the world of dating, a lot of single people feel timing is everything when itc omes to making certain moves. Some feel they have to wait at least six to eight m onths before they have sex with their partner, or at least a month before they have t heir first kiss. However, have you ever thought that maybe if you waited too long to make a move it may ruin the relationship? Or have you ever thought that even finding the right person was all about the right timing? Barrington Brennen, a marriage and family therapist and counseling psychologist, says time is your best friend. However, he said “You must not take too much time. Too long is unhealthy and too short is unhealthy. Too long meaning when a relationship drags on for 3 to 4 years. Ideally, a serious intended romantic relationship, not just friendship, should last a minimum of one year and ideally you should repeat that year. You should go through the calendar year, the sea sons, family rituals, birthdays, holidays and such. If your birthday is in November and you meet the man in January get married in April and when your birthday comes around in November, he does something that shocks you and then you didn’t want a man to do thatyou should have waited,” Dr Brennen said. For those interested in wedding bells, Dr Brennen said you should wait at least 18 to 24 months before you get married. “Now two to three years is not too bad but after four years is risky business. If you never broke up before you would be breaking up at least once. You should not make a total commitment before you have passed that first year. Now that will help you to make the right choice. The fundamental principal of choosing the right person is being the right person. You can not find the right person if you are hungry, desperate, you don’t know yourself, you don’t like yourself, you need a man badly, that sort of thing,” Dr Brennen said. S heena Pinder, director of the Women’s Min istry at Bahamas Faith Ministries, agrees that a lot of young people do not take marriage and being in a relationship as serious as they should. They just see it as a fairytale thing thinking they are in love and want to have sexthat is pretty much it. The Bible says sex outside of marriage is wrong. They feel that because they are in love and want to have sex, the legal way to do it is to get married and two months down the road, they realise they might have been ready for sex but not marriage-there is a difference,” Mrs Pinder said. Mrs Pinder said in finding the right mate, a lot of young people think that because they waited so long to find someone, they should hurry and get married. “As an independent woman, when you get married you are giving up your independence. Once you get married you will have to answer to your husband. Your money is not your money and your life is not your life anymore. You have decided to join your life to someone else’s and until you are ready to do that then you need to stay single because that man does not deserve for you as a woman to make his life miserable. Don’t think your time is running out just because you are getting older,” Mrs Pinder said. Now the timing in terms of the steps in build ing the relationship, Dr Brennen suggests you need to take your time to the climb. “When you see somebody, you should be physically attracted to that person. I think the majority of relationships start with infatuation and that is healthy for starters. However, you should not let infatuation govern whether this person is the one you should be with. From a Christian perspective you should not date unless you are ready to get married. Dating is a relationship with an end in mind. If your end is sex, then that is the end you will get. Dating means that you have an intimate personal encounter with someone of the complimentary sex. Take your time. I don’t care how much you think this man is a God-sent, you can actually mess up what God gave you by going too fast. The first foundation is friendship, and friends don’t make love,” Dr Brennen said. In dating world, is timing everything? MANY SINGLE PEOPLE feel timing is everything when it comes to making certain moves. Some feel they have to wait at least six to eight months before they have sex with their partner, or at least a month before they have their first kiss...

PAGE 24

C M Y K C M Y K GARDENING PAGE 2C, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE YESTERDAY was the official beginning of the 2009 hurricane season, though hurricanes in the area are not likely f or another couple of months. L ater in the month we will have t he official beginning of summer, confirming what we have suspected for quite a while now. June is also royal poinciana month, especially in Nassau where the show can be stunning. Citrus and fruit trees should be fertilised in spring, summer and autumn. Apply a drench of chelated iron around the trunk of each tree, a teaspoonful of iron for each 5 gallons, and then apply a granular fertiliser around the drip lines. All good quality fertilisers contain the minor elements needed but if you have any doubts about the fertiliser you are using you can spray the foliage of the tree with a minor nutrient spray, using a sticker/spreader to make it more effective. The vegetable garden is at the somnolent stage when most of the popular vegetables of winter and spring cannot cope with the heat and humidity. Exceptions are collards, cow peas, corn, okra and snake beans. T hank goodness for cherry t omatoes. These little balls of j oy take the heat well and provide for us when the largerfruiting tomatoes fail to produce. Italian style plum tomatoes such as Roma also last longer into summer than most tomatoes. The sweet bell peppers planted at the beginning of the vegetable season last year may very well be still performing, but p robably with fruits so small t hey may embarrass you. C ubanelle peppers take the summer heat better and are a wonderful addition to the summer vegetable garden. It is best they be grown in a degree of shade as the fruits are still susceptible to sunscald. I have mine in the shade of papaya trees. While the vegetable garden is at a low productivity stage you may consider covering areas with clear plastic sheeting. Make sure the ground is wet before you do this and anchor the sheeting with cement blocks or such. The plastic sheeting will prevent weeds from growing indeed, it will bake the weed seeds – and sterilise the soil for a new start in August or September. In the flowerbeds it is time for those stalwarts of summer: cosmos, zinnias, vincas, portu lacas, Mexican sunflowers and marigolds. New Guinea impatiens can be grown in shaded areas, as can caladiums. Callas also take the summer heat, especially if they are established plants. The fruit of the month is scarlet plum. This close relative of the hog plum is a favourite of Bahamian children who also like mangoes. Early mangoes s tart their season in June and t his season’s crop looks like b eing a bumper one. The rainy season has started so it is a good idea to fertilise your flowering shrubs as soon as possible. This is a time of rapid growth and the shrubs will benefit from available sustenance. Flowering shrubs like chelated iron too as it assists them in the absorption of elements from fertiliser. Always apply fertiliser when the ground is wet. If you treat dry soil the next shower could wash your fertiliser through the oil at too fast a rate for it to be optimally effective. The royal poinciana is the true Bahamian harbinger of summer. The trees are bare and unsightly through most of fall, winter and spring but suddenly leap into life and become smothered with blossoms. The flowers will gradually give way to foliage and by early fall the seed pods will begin to develop. The show is then over. But at the moment we can enjoy the flamboyance, the almost excessive showiness, of the royal poinciana flowering season. j.hardy@coralwave.com The garden in June by GARDENER JACK NEW GUINEA IMPATIENS – a long-lasting perennial that grows well in summer if shaded... CHERRY TOMATOES – a wonderful standby when the larger varieties are unavailable...

PAGE 25

n By ALEX MISSICK Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net FOR those of us who work in a close-knit office environment it can certainly feel like your co-workers become a second family making it natural to gossip all day with office mates. However, there are some topics that are better left unsaid and should remain out of the “work family” discussions. Sheena Gordan, a 30year old professional, said on her first job she got carried away and gossiped about everything from finding a new job to every time she caught a cold. “I used to talk about everything. I learned that no matter how much you might dislike your current job, you don't wantto be sent packing before you are ready. I was telling some girls at my last office how muchI hated my job and I thought they were sympathising with me. They threw me under the bus when the boss wanted someone to fire,” Mrs Gordan said. She said she would advise young persons that if they have a job and are secretly looking for another job, or even just entertaining the idea of leaving, it is best to keep this informa-t ion to themselves. “Word got around about I wanted to leave and I found myself being treat ed as if I was already gone,” Mrs Gordan said. If you hang out with cow orkers outside of the office, it i s most likely that they are going to know about your health issues and love life. However, as far as making a declaration around the office about one’s personal life, keep the discussion to a minimum. G race Plank, psychotherapist and trauma specialist at the Renascence Clinic, said certain things should not be discussed or even talk about in the office, especially when it comes to dat ing other office mates. “It’s not a question about whether it is appropriate; it is whether or not it is healthy for that work environment. The reality is it is not always healthy because if you had an argument that morning, chances are you both are going to come to work with that,” Mrs Plank said. Mrs Plank said many times because of these inter-office relationships, other persons in the work place start to feel uncomfortable, affecting their ability to do their job. “Unfortunately, here in the Bahamas, a lot of people will say things in the workplace that would be considered unaccept able in North America, and could be perceived as sexual harassment and contributing to a hostile work environment. If you feel you can’t tolerate the talk that is coming about because of these relationships, then you have the right to com plain to human resources or your manager,” Mrs Plank said. Mrs Plank said many times it is hard for persons to speak up but they do not want to subject themselves to the possibility of it becoming anything more. “Some times you can just use your headphones and listen to music while you work if it is allowed. If not you can find a way to cope with it or you can make the choice to leave,” Mrs Plank said. C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 3C At the office, some things are better left unsaid

PAGE 26

C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH PAGE 4C, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By MAGGIE BAIN DAYDREAMING can be a relaxing pass time and allows us to delve into the depth of our imagination. It can help us relieve anxiety, work out our problems and plan and visualise our lives. During these moments of relaxation we often reflect on prior love relationships and spend hours dissecting themwhat worked and what did not. Who did what and who reacted to what. For those of us who have explored our deep inner self we are able to recognise our own traits recurring in each relationship. Through our own self discovery we are able to see that we were made to feel that these were our weaknesses when in fact they were transferred from our partner. The majority of us hide our fears behind masks. The publ ic persona versus our true, private inner self. We often create these masks early on in childhood to protect our egos from pain. Repeated harsh words or treatment from parents, teachers, family members and friends can cause us to use a protective shell as defense. We love these masks and perfect them as we age. All too often we see people who are almost unrecognisable from the person at home and at work. This can be very difficult for the people close to them as they have to second guess and anticipate if the mask is on or off. But to wear a mask is not all bad. Whether it is a workaholic, attention seeking or a sex mask to namea few, it can allow us to be fun, productive, resourceful and resilient people. The down side is when we have difficulty recognising our true self and in turn allowing our intimate partner to see us. That is not truly living but existing on the peripheries of life. Dating allows us to find someone with equal intimacy needs. Glaring problems that show up during this period of exploration gives us the opportunity to pull out priorto committing for the long haul. Incompatibilities in intimacy cause great concern and anxiety within a long term relationship or marriage. Lov ing relationships work best when there is a sense of bal ance and there is a deep, hon est connection. Consider if you have ever experienced or indeed are experiencing a situ a tion where you have to be t he one to say 'I love you' first or when you are getting close and intense your partner creates a distraction and the moment is lost. You may havea sense that they are just not completely present in the moment or may appear unavailable emotionally due to fear, social conditioning or low self esteem. It is very frus trating loving someone who appears unable to love you in return. Certainly if you are in the early stages of a new love relationship then let it go and move on and find someone who is more compatible. If on reading this you recognise yourself and know that you have trouble getting really close to people and opening up then read on. Just the very idea of some one seeing past the mask is probably terrifying for you. You worry about being trans p arent and imagine that now t he person can toy with your feelings. In the past someone has probably hurt you and this has only reinforced your need to keep up the defenses. But by letting your fears take control of your life you only allow them to get stronger and give them more credibility. The most effective way to over come your fears is to stay a few minutes with the fear. Feel it, feel the pain and anxiety. Make a note of how your body is responding. Are you having butterflies or are you sweating? Yes, it is the same response as being excited. Many re-train themselves by saying 'I am excited' at that moment and go with the feelings. Let your partner know your fears and the obstacles you put in the way. As with everything in life it all gets easier with practice. Many times we imagine our p roblems to be worse or more i nsurmountable than they really are. We teach our children to face their fears such as the dentist or needles. We have to face our own fears throughout our lives so that we can savor every day fully. Once you can achieve true intimacy then you will also achieve self acceptance and self love. There is no better way to live life. Margaret Bain is an Individual and Couples Relation ship Therapist. She is a Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical Sex Therapist. For appointments call 535-7456 or e-mail her at relatebahamas@yahoo.com or www.relatebahamas.blogspot.c om. She is also available for speaking engagements. Dating with a fear of intimacy FOR a great shave and h ealthier skin, you have to go beyond gliding a razor over skin. Combine these tips with the right pre-shave, shave, and post-shave regimen for the ultimate shave. Shave after showering to pre-soften the skin. Pay attention to hair growth direction: The best time to determine the pattern of your beard is to run your hand along beard growth approximately one to three days after shaving. Avoid alkaline-based prod ucts and soap, which can dry skin. Avoid after-shave lotions containing alcohol they not only cause pain, but contribute to irritation and fail to replace the skin's natural protective barrier. Shave with the right pressure: pressing hard won't deliv er a closer shave, just more irri tation. Use a steady, constant motion when shaving, making each stroke around 1 to 2 inch es long. Rinse the blade clean before each stroke. Use a sharp, clean razor and shave with the grain.* * If you have a heavy, coarse beard, shave against the grain only after first shaving with the grain (when the hair is shorter and less likely to curl back in on itself). Re-apply all necessary shaving mediums before shaving against the grain. Shaving Dos and Don’ ts by SARAH BEEK D AYDREAMING c an be a relaxing pass time and allows us to delve into the depth of our imagination. It can help us relieve anxiety, work out our problems and plan and visualise our lives. During these moments of relaxation we often reflect on prior love relationships and spend hours dissecting themwhat worked and what did not.

PAGE 27

C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 5C health B ODYANDMIND T T h h e e T T r r i i b b u u n n e e n By ALEX MISSICK Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net I f you have ever been involved in a road traffic accident, suffered from a sports injury or work related injury, or if you have ever had surgery you know how painful it is to get back to being your physical best. A doctor may recommend the expertise of another medical professional to help you fully recover namely a physiotherapist. Providence Rehabilitation Centre, located in Suite 57, Grosvenor Close West off Shirley Street, specialises in the assessment and treatmento f adults and children requiring post operative care or suffering from various injuries and illnesses including chronic pain, back and neck pain, foot pain, stroke, and post lymphedema mastectomy just to name a few. Christina G Messarra, Facility Director at Providence Rehabilitation Centre and Physiotherapist, told Tri bune Health: “It is very important to participate in physiotherapy treatment after an accident or when living with an illness. “The human body is amazing. I am in this profession because I love and admire the human body. I think that the body’s capacity to heal and our capacity to compensate for injury is limitless. How ever, without physiotherapy helping you in that recovery it can take longer to recover and sometimes your recovery is less than optimal. The body’s compensatory mech anisms are not necessarily idealin other words you may be walking with a limp when you may not need to limp at all,” Mrs Messarra said. Mrs Messarra said the American Physiotherapy Association’s catch phrase really sums up what Physio therapy is all about. “It’s the science of healing and the art of caring. Physio therapy follows the principles of western medicine. Physiotherapists are trained diagnosticians who deal with neurological and musculoskeletal disorders of the body. A lot of our training is done in conjunction with medical stu dents. For example, while I was at McGill University in my first year of physiotherapy training, we did our anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry courses with the medical students. After that first year of health sciences, the doctors went off and became doctors and we went off and became physiotherapists,” Mrs Messarra said. Mrs Messarra said that one of the ways physiotherapists differ from physicians is that physiotherapists tend to spend a lot more time with their patients, typically treating a patient for an hour three times per week. “We use our hands to facilitate the body’s own healing processes. Physiotherapists use manual techniques such as massage therapy, joint mobilisation and biofeedback, modalities that use light, electrical and sound energy to help heal tissues. Physiotherapists also mentor, motivate, and educate patients in health, wellness, self help and exercise. Physiotherapists are most easily compared to teachers because they teach patients how to help them selves recover and that is where the art of caring comes in. You come to us and you are in pain from some sort of trauma, and a physiotherapist helps you help yourself get better. We will get you back walking when you are not walking and help you opti mise your recovery,” Mrs Messarra said. Mrs Messarra saw a need for a mobile physiotherapy service that brings physiotherapy services to your home when you are not well enough to get to the clinic. “I felt there was an oppor tunity to formalise Home Care Physiotherapy Services in New Providence and to improve the nature of this service. A van was bought that is fully equipped to be a portable physiotherapy centre with portable beds, exercise equipment and all the necessary modalities (ultrasound, Tens, laser). I felt that by investing in that, we would be able to provide a top notch quality service for Bahamians,” Mrs Messarra said. Home Care physiotherapy services provided by Yasmin Sweeting, a Bahamian phys iotherapist with over nine tears of clinical experience at PMH are now available six days a week. Yasmin works with your doctors, nursing staff, and family to make sure that you achieve your best possible recovery. Whether you need the Home Care service long term to manage after a stroke or catastrophic spinal cord injury or you simply need a few sessions to get you well enough to get to the clinic for ongoing care, Yasmin is available to assist in your care. Mrs Messarra said that physiotherapists often make living with very serious illnesses and injuries more comfortable for the patient and with that comes peace of mind for the patient’s loved ones. ‘Healing hands’ of physiotherapy e use our hands to facilitate the body’s own healing processes.” Christina G Messarra


{T)\

Mim blowin’ it

84F
74F

SUNNY WITH
eT STORM

Volume: 105 No.156

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009

LOW Get Your Cold

Coffee Fix





etm Cem] 8
$2.3m in stamp
tax revenue
in last year



SSSR





CAH

BOY, tu, found



Mother fears ‘police
brutality’ may have
contributed to son’s death

m@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A DISTRAUGHT single
mother of five fears police bru-
tality may have contributed to
the death of her teenage son.

Michael Knowles, 15, was
found dead in his police cell at
around 8.21pm on Sunday.

Officers found him hanging
from an upper bar with what is
believed to be a drawstring
from his shorts around his neck.

The youngster, who had been
arrested on Thursday on suspi-
cion of housebreaking, was pro-
nounced dead at the scene.

While police have ruled
Michael’s death a “suicide”, his
family do not believe the boy
would have taken his own life.

His mother, 33-year-old Don-
na Wilson, claims the police
reports do not add up and says
she is seeking “the truth”
regarding the tragedy.

She told The Tribune: “I only
want to know the truth because
this story does not sound right.

“It sounds as if someone is
trying to cover up something.”

Ms Wilson claims that sepa-
rate witnesses who were at the
station with her son have told
her that Michael, who celebrat-



33-YEAR-OLD Donna Wilson,

mother of the 15-year-old, claims

the police reports do not add up.
Felipé Major/Tribune staff

ed his 15th birthday two weeks
ago, was beaten by police.
While police reported that
the 15-year-old had been found
with a draw string around his
neck, Ms Wilson said she found
that unlikely as her son had

SEE page 10

The Taste

on

Tuesdays!!

ey wilt

rmore.

Baise oh aimedium,

DSO



PLP MP’s
salary cut
claim is
criticised

m By ALISON LOWE

Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Chairman of the FNM
yesterday criticised PLP MP Philip
Davis’ claim that he is willing to
forego 20 per cent of his parlia-
mentary salary to save public mon-
ey as a political move intended to
further an ambition to be leader
of the PLP.

Johnley Ferguson said if Mr
Davis was “serious” he would have

SEE page 15



CLAIM THAT RESIDENTS
“FACE A SEVEN MILE DRIVE’
TO GET WATER

WOMAN PASSENGER IS
KILLED IN TRAFFIC ACCIDENT

CLERGYMEN VOICE CONCERN
OVER GOVT'S HANDLING OF
CRIME





SEE PAGE ELEVEN

First case
of Swine
Flu in the
Bahamas

Adult visitor

tested positive

JOANNA BROWN was
wned Miss Bahamas World
the Wyndham Nassau
esort on Sunday night.

a3 aH tia

YLT M LiCl PMMA CLUS) cU ie



Family flee
as fire sweeps
through their

apartment

POLICE fire officials are try-
ing to determine the cause of a
blaze which destroyed an apart-
ment unit and left the parents of
an infant girl nursing minor
burns.

According to reports, a 31-
year-old man and his wife were
wakened by a fire in their Misty
Gardens home off Marshall
Road early yesterday morning.

They forced their way out of
the apartment with their infant
daughter. As a result the man

SEE page 10

It wasn't raining when Noah built the Ark...

It’s not too late to build yours...

Weather the storm with Fidelity.

Fidelity Built-In Savings Plans

Switch to Fidelity products - they have built-in savings plans:
MoneyBack Mortgage @e Debt$AVER e Asue Visa Card

Nassau: 356.7764 Freeport: 352.6676/7 Marsh Harbour: 367.3135

D

FIDELITY
30* ANNIVERSARY



NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Ministry of Health
has confirmed that The
Bahamas has recorded its
first case of Swine Flu.

Revealing how a young
adult visitor to the country
from New York tested
positive for the potentially
deadly A (H1N1) virus, a
Government spokesman
said “all necessary pre-
cautions” were taken at
the facilities where the vis-
itor stayed while other
sites where they may have
come into contact with
people are under “ongo-
ing surveillance.”

However, neither
Health Minister Dr
Hubert Minnis or
Bahamas Hotel Associa-

SEE page 10

Man and
woman shot
several times

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT —- A man and
woman are being treated at
Rand Memorial Hospital after
they were shot at several times
in the Xanadu Beach area on
Sunday evening.

Asst Supt Emrick Seymour
said the couple sustained non-
life threatening injuries and
were able to escape their
assailant and drive to the hos-
pital, where they are under
police protection.

At this time, police
are unable to determine
whether the shooting was an
apparent armed robbery
attempt or caused by a jealous
lover.

“We do not know for sure
what the motive was in this case
and we cannot speculate, but
we are investigating the mat-
ter,” said Mr Seymour.

He reported that police are

SEE page 10


PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009






















UE Ue (elem Vln
SEATON, UM aad Ue ee TLC

Financial Str

__ A- Excellent

FAMGUARD

CORPORATION LIMITED

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Claim that residents
‘face a seven mile
drive’ to get water

RESIDENTS of a North
Andros community are hav-
ing to drive as far as seven
miles to get water for basic
needs after a major shortage
struck the settlement, a local
resident claims.

And to add to their trou-
bles, telephone service and
electricity were off for several
days.

Speaking to The Tribune
using his “Vibe” longdistance
telephone service - the only
phone service available on Fri-
day - a Mastic Point resident,
who wished to remain anony-
mous, called on Government
to address the needs of the
community.

He said: “Fortunately

TROPICAL
Sars el
RR UE
PHONE: 322-2157

enough rain came and we had
a very heavy downpour, but
people have been having to
drive to other neighbouring
settlements, to relatives or
friends, to get water.”

The man claimed the water
shortage has affected Mastic
Point for “six to seven weeks”
with many driving to neigh-
bouring San Andros to get
supplies.

However, he noted that the
community has been blighted
by an unreliable water supply
for decades, with each repre-
sentative - PLP or FNM -
“promising” to do something
about it but failing to, he
claims.

“It’s just a total disaster,”
he said. “It seems as though
we don’t have a representa-
tive (MP).”

The latest drought is affect-
ing the livelihoods of those
who own guesthouses in the
community, as they are unable
to provide guests with basic
amenities.

The resident said the situa-
tion is particularly unfortunate
given the fact that popular
Andros event Crabfest is due
to take place on June 11.

“You cannot entertain per-
sons who want to come to this
part of the island in your guest
houses because there is no
water, no telephone and the
light’s not really dependable,”
he said.

A MASTIC POINT resident

claimed the water shortage
has affected the community
for ‘six to seven weeks’.



Tourists passing through the
community have to be turned
away if they ask to use bath-
rooms, or are looking for a
cold drink when the electrici-
ty is out.

The long-time resident of
the area claimed the water
supply was much more con-
sistent in the 1960s when the
community was supplied by a
large tank pumped by a wind-
mill.

“We’re longing to hear a
voice from the government to
hear what’s going on,” he
added, noting that although
Mastic Point has always been
a “faithful polling division”
for the FNM, overall condi-
tions have not improved
under the current government.

The Tribune was unable to
reach Vincent Peet, the PLP
MP for the constituency, for
comment yesterday.

Meanwhile calls to local
branches the utilities corpo-
rations - BEC, Water and
Sewerage and Batelco - were
unsuccessful because of the
phone service failures.

‘YOUR VIEW”

To have your say on this or any
other issue, email The Tribune
at: letters@tribunemedia.net
or deliver your letter to
The Tribune on Shirley Street,
P.O. Box N-3207



Minister congratulates
developers of The Balmoral

DEVELOPERS of upscale residential development The Balmoral
were congratulated by Labour Minister Dion Foulkes for their efforts
that will shortly see more than 150 Bahamians on their payroll.

Mr Foulkes, Minister of Labour and Social Development, made
his comments as he officially opened The Balmoral, located in western
New Providence, on Friday, May 29.

Commencement of the construction of 75 condominiums and resi-
dential homes will give employment to more than 100 Bahamian
workers, he was told, while the development’s club house employs 50
Bahamians.

Minister Foulkes said: “This development is indicative of the confi-
dence that the investment community has in the Bahamas. In spite of
the global economic downturn, the owners of the Balmoral Club con-
tinue to aggressively pursue the completion of this project.”

He praised the developers for engaging construction firms that are
100 per cent Bahamian owned.

The Balmoral Club is jointly owned by Bahamians and foreign
investors, including Bahamians Mr. Wesley Bastian and Mr. Jason
Kinsale, President of The Balmoral.

¢ SEE BUSINESS SECTION

PARADISE ISLAND

Fully tummehed
A bed, 2 bath condos with
[= tol harbor access
Ke Weber erie parent.
In pristine condition

PEPe Tired CORT) Wile Sea LT
eda oe ite
Loonbact
Mir, Wells & Tropical Realty
for immediate viewing
Srranpements.
Phone: 327-1102

oe


THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

Woman passenger is _—_ Steppin on Da Shores
event is postponed

killed in traffic accident

ABACO recorded its first traffic fatal-
ity for year on Sunday when a 29-year-old
woman died after the truck she was a
passenger in ran off the road and crashed

into bushes.

According to reports, sometime after
6pm the driver of a blue 2001 Nissan

en to the local clinic for treatment.
But Ms Sands was pronounced dead
shortly after arrival.
The driver of the truck is reportedly
sul receiving medical attention.
Traffic police are continuing their inves-
tigations.

Frontier truck along with a passenger
identified as Melissa Sands, were heading
south along Ernestine Highway located in
South Abaco when the truck ran off the
road into bushes.

Ms Sands and the 30-year-old driver
from Man-O-War Cay, Abaco, were tak-

Sel aa Tae Glia

A YOUNG man was lucky
to escape alive from this Glad-
stone Road crash on Sunday
that resulted in power cables
being damaged, eyewitnesses
said.

According to someone on
the scene, the man, between
20 and 25 years old, was head-
ing north at around 10pm
when his car hit the utility
pole.

Escaping with no visible
injuries, the unidentified man
was seen refusing requests

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Ia AA es
Tropical Exterminators
322-2157

share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



“Lowest Prices On The Island”



from paramedics, who were
at the scene, to take him to

of OFF ALL
PROM
\ 0 O FaBRics

/ (a of a kind Special Occasion Fabric
\ Iridescent Taffeta
Two Tone Shantung
Beaded & Sequin Fabric
Lamour, Chiffon

By ee i
OACCESSORIES

an purchased same dayas fabric
Evening Bags
“Gloves

me

—





7












ee — ae - Le Te SD

Cae La

Madeira St. [242] 325-8233 * Robinson Rd.[242] 322-3080

FOR ALL YOUR DECORATING nS | ig

goltt

STORE HOURS:
Monday - Saturday
8:30am - 5:30pm

BILLY’S DREAM
STILL ALIVE

FREE DELIVERY ANY WHERE IN NASSAU AND TO THE MAIL BOAT

¢ E-Z CREDIT TERMS AVAILABLE

Donald’s Furniture

And Appliance Centre

SIXTH TERRACE CENTREVILLE TEL: 322-1731 OR 322-3875

DUE to a decline in local
economic activity, a num-
ber of the major partners
have had to scale back on
their contributions to the
Steppin on Da Shores
event.

The event has now been

postponed for 2009.

The organisers apologise
for the inconvenience
caused, but they are in talks
with another entity in hopes
to bring a collaborative pre-
mium event before the end
of Summer 2009.



Bere eg mma eee UL

MORLEY
FoR â„¢
MEN

Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6654/6
Baypar! Building, Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-8240 ¢ Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com










Bi = {_Beoins
| i’

TERMINATOR

el ed rT

i A nil i ea Vat sel

a
tii

feet So houee




ool. "I



bax MEPOMELL mew | 0 [295 [WA cio [8 [Ht
remanorcnsatomion | 80, [50 WY oe [a0 18

cat arg scum | ts | 00 | WIA sto | a [408

ounce ruck [nts | nas [WA | rns [as [et |

awcersanewons ic] 100 |ik | 00 {roo | wa_| ee |

SmaTIEKK) | 60 | an | NA | eo | a | 10 |

ex onc 2 | 0s | Wik i | a | 1 |

NEN ORIGIN WOUERNE | +00 | nan [NA | eo | 25 | 145 |
T

















rewmaronsanaron + [1s [0 [ WA | 10 | 20 | so
pace sree [vt 3 [Wa | 0 | eae | a

wcenis [vat [aw [wa | 62 wat 5
prcsanens © [it [WA | ao] HWA |
PC

380-FLIX


PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Strong, decisive leadership needed

AS THIS year opened Opposition Leader
Perry Christie warned his parliamentarians that
the FNM government would try to destroy the
PLP by using any and all of the “agencies of the
state” against it.

As the year progressed it seemed that Mr
Christie had targeted the wrong enemy. Faced
with a world in recession, Prime Minister Ingra-
ham was too involved in the monumental task of
crafting reforms to “keep this country above
water” to be concerned about Mr Christie and
his squabbling party.

A growing faction of the PLP do not believe
their party has a chance of victory in another
election with Mr Christie as its leader. How-
ever, there is also a hard core of party stalwarts
who still hold Mr Christie’s arm high in the ring
as reigning champion. They see no one to
replace him.

As for Mr Christie — he assures Bahamians
that he, PLP Deputy Leader Cynthia Pratt and
party chairman Glenys Hanna Martin, are “all,
as of today, secure in their positions.” His crit-
ics say he is in denial.

In an attempt to force reality on him, some-
one within the party has released the entire
Greenberg, Quinlan and Rosner report. These
US consultants were commissioned by the PLP
after the 2007 election to analyse the reason
for the party’s election loss. The report was
blunt in its findings — a nice, but weak leader,
with a public perception of a corrupt and scan-
dal-ridden party. The consultants gave advice as
to how to reverse the poor image. But party
critics claim that they have seen no signs of Mr
Christie taking any steps to wipe the slate clean
and starting anew.

However, Mr Christie assured them that he
has not been asleep. Since the consultants’
report, he told his supporters, who seem lost in
the same Land of Nod with him, the party has
done a self-examination and “will have strength-
ened itself” in time for the 2012 election.

Apparently, he doesn’t see much need for
change within the party. He is relying on the
country being in such a depressed condition
that, in disgust, a people of short memory will
turn to him as their saviour.

He might be right, but just as those of the old
PLP relied on racist propaganda, symbolised
by grocer JP Sands, to win a generation of vot-
ers who had no idea who JP Sands was, the
days when Mr Christie could don a fringed Val-
ley Boys junkanoo costume and with a ker-lick
of a cow bell get a nation to follow him, are
also over. Today, Bahamians are better edu-
cated, have more intelligence and can reason for
themselves.

Bahamians understand that Mr Ingraham,
like other world leaders, is grappling with an
economic situation that not one of them knows
how to solve. There are many projects that Mr
Ingraham could have launched had he had the
five good years that Mr Christie squandered.
But Bahamians understand that if Barack Oba-
ma of the US, Gordon Brown of the UK,
Angela Merkel of Germany, Nicolas Sarkozy of
France and other world leaders are feeling their
way in a darkened world, how do they expect
Mr Ingraham, leading a group of islands that
barely show on the map, to have the answers? In
addition, this is an archipelago that depends on
the economic health of the world’s industri-
alised nations for its own financial well being. So
if they fail, we also fail, and there is no one —
not even Mr Christie — who can change the
inevitable.

The only blessing in all of this confusion is
that the Bahamas has Mr Ingraham at the helm,
instead of Mr Christie, who would probably
still be taking his time selecting a committee
of advisers.

According to Mr Christie, if a people don’t
like what a government in power is doing, in
their disaffection they will turn to the Opposi-
tion, regardless of how it is organised. On this
we disagree.

They will care how it is organised. The years
2002-2007 are not so long past that Bahamians
will forget a man who promised them that at his
government’s first cabinet meeting, his ministers
would “formally adopt the strictest code of
ethics in the political life of the country,” but
instead gave them five years of ministers out of
control, allegations of corruption, and scandal
followed by scandal.

Mr Christie might be right that his position as
leader is secure within his own party— the
researchers did find that he was personally pop-
ular — only because the party has no one else in
its ranks who can hold it together. However, the
people will not forget his leadership style, which
they equate with weakness.

In these troubled times, this country needs a
strong, decisive leader, one who will say: Look
the country does not have enough funds to give
each individual what he or she might want, or
even deserve, but I, as your prime minister,
have to think of the good of the whole. I shall
have to lock the Treasury vaults to make certain
that the Bahamas can stay afloat if the present
depression worsens. This is now time for all of
us to tighten our belts.

No, Mr Christie, you are not the man of the
hour. Nor is your party — its reputation is in
desperate need of cleansing.



Wn Being Left in the Dark?

ie
nee eee eel)

We Can Help You
Tem ew meee

SDMO Generators

,
tr

WANTED
A FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

Sad to see
the chaos

in the PLP

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I would be eternally grate-
ful if you would print this letter.
I am tired of pretending and
must call a spade a spade. The
Bahamas would be better if
more of us be honest and think
of the betterment of this coun-
try instead of party first.

First of all lam a PLP who is
totally disgruntled with my own
party. I have never seen any
organisation that is so disor-
ganised and in utter chaos as
the PLP is today. The deterio-
ration is rapid. What in the
world is going on? Where is
the party that I grew up almost
worshipping? Where are the
men with the backbone? This
is very sad to witness.

The last election displayed
to all Bahamians and indeed the
world that the PLP was simply
not tuned into what the
Bahamian people were saying.
They screamed many times that
we had a weak and indecisive
leader. Yet we ignored the peo-
ple. The people told us that if
we sent the PLP back with Mr.
Chrisite as leader they would
refuse the party as the govern-
ment. We did not listen. The
result is history.

We hired a group to deter-
mine what went wrong. Even
though we knew all along, the
group said in clear unambigu-
ous language that the leader
was weak and indecisive. The
leader saw the report and all of
the top brass was privy. They
hid the report from us and now
it is out in the public domain

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



that the people were right all
along. This is highly embarrass-
ing. Yet the leadership has no
shame.

Many of the potential can-
didates vying for deputy lead-
ership are so afraid of their own
shadow that they refuse to use
this information to pressure Mr.
Perry Gladstone Chrisite to
pack his Georgie bundle and
leave town before sundown.
They, instead, “kiss up” and
appease Mr. Chrisite hoping
that their journey to their
desired position gets his bless-
ing. They do not have the guts
to openly challenge him. The
fact of the matter is that all of
them are just like him, weak.
Some may even be weaker than
Mr. Christie, because he plays
all kind of games with them and
they retreat. The next thing they
need to do is surrender.

In my opinion, Mr. Chrisite is
simply looking out for his own
hide. In fact Mr. Ingraham is
also looking out for Mr.
Chrisite. The first thing he did
was secured a pay raise for the
leader of the opposition and his
pension. These guys are look-
ing out for each other.

This is a game that they are
playing that only benefits them.
Don’t be fooled. There is a plan
to make sure that Mr. Philip
"Brave" Davis receives the
baton next so that the whole

circle would be completed. We
must not let that happen.

That is why the only PLP
today that has displayed any
strength or to put it bluntly, tes-
ticular fortitude is attorney and
activist Paul Moss. Mr. Moss
has consistently displayed the
kind of guts that is sorely lack-
ing in all of the present mem-
bers of parliament especially
the ones who aspire to lead.

He does not appear to be the
kind that would put his own
interest above the country. So
far Mr. Moss has for many years
been an advocate for the down-
trodden and Mr. Chrisite does
not. Mr. Moss spends his time
mixing with his people, listening
to them, Mr. Christie does not.
Mr. Moss is respected by many,
especially nowadays; more stal-
warts are gravitating to his
strong personality and his deter-
mination to get things done. Mr.
Christie, on the other hand, is
turning people off by his inabil-
ity to display strong leadership.

If we are to rebound from
the sorry state and from this
bottomless pit we seem to be
sinking in, we must give serious
consideration to a man who
continues to prove that he is
fearless and would rise to
address any and all challenges.

These times are different. It
is not business as usual. The
PLP need action and we need it
desperately. We cannot wait.

A DEPRESSED
PLP SUPPORTER
Nassau,

May 31, 2009

Corruption needs to be investigated

EDITOR, The Tribune.

A reputable, mid-sized
company is seeking a

FINANCIAL
CONTROLLER

It has come to my attention (although I have
always suspected) that corruption permeates
the governmental hierarchical structure, from
top to bottom, within governments around the
world. The Bahamas is no exception.

I am told that bribes, kickbacks and influ-
ence peddling runs rampant throughout the
civil service in the Bahamas government; and
has been so for years.

This unfortunate development in governance,
in my humble opinion, calls for a precipitation
of measures by the government; chief of which
is the creation (if it does not already exist) or
enhancement of an arm of The Police Force
that would be exclusively dedicated to investi-
gating the activities of the civil service. If a
department like that already exists, I am
unaware of its activities, and thus the mem-
bers of this department are failing miserably.

[have been inundated with testimony from a
variety of individuals who have knowledge of
persons in government (civil service) whose
lifestyles are much more lavish than their

salaries or other alternative income would per-
mit. In my humble opinion, people of that ilk
should be investigated by this department, and
let the consequences prevail.

A legitimate concern with creating or
enhancing this department would be the avail-
ability of resources of the government.

I am well aware (and I am sure others are
too) that the civil service in The Bahamas is
bloated. Ministers of the government inces-
santly admit this freely. And so, those civil ser-
vants who are assigned (and do) little to no
work for the Bahamian taxpayer, would be
able to devote this unproductive time to some
meaningful productivity. Of course, these peo-
ple with their reassignments would have to be
trained and retrained to fulfil the responsibili-
ties of this new vocation. And, if implemented,
The Bahamas government would have
improved the level of productivity associated
with governance of this country.

MARVIN G LIGHTBOURN
Nassau,
May, 2009.

Quality Auto Sales

PRE-OWNED CARS & TRUCKS

For the best deal in town on

pre-cunned cars, with warranty!
Trade-ins on new car sales

NOW
IN STOCK!

‘01 TOYOTA CAMRY

gk a

‘05 TOYOTA CAMRY = suse
‘07 TOYOTA YARIS
‘06 HYUNDAI TERRACAN
‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE
‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
‘06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
‘06 HYUNDAI SONATA
‘01 HYUNDAI HD-65 TRUCK
‘94 MITSUBISHI DIAMANTE
‘94 TOYOTA CAMRY

ADA sales @

Mite

The successful candidate must have

e A minimum of five (5) years experience
with expertise in Cost Accounting.

¢ Competitive Salary & Benefits
Package Available.

Send resumes to:
bahamasfinancialcontroller @ gmail.com

or
Fax: 242-328-7996

DEADLINE: June 19th, 2009
EAST SHIRLEY STREET - * 322-3775 « 325-3079

Fined gy sprees of og bp Pel doe gee ee
me dhoee Ao is feet Reet ey va a

We provide afer sale parte and service ae well we warranly supper.
eer Rae ee mee eli por em ec oeleleit
we well as service contracts as mecded.

x

obcat GP
ahamas

Ketlaiiity

Pema © Prodacniery 7

‘raion’ Sa. Cis Fichd

Tali FER-S171 Fax; 322-0009


THE TRIBUNE

Clergymen voice
concern over govt's

TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 5



Reyer. aS
_ Aircraft laden with cocaine crashes in Honduras

m TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras



consumed by flames.

Police say at least 10 planes carrying drugs have
crashed in Honduras so far this year. Drug traf-
fickers have increasingly been operating in Central
America after coming under pressure in Mexico,
where President Felipe Calderon launched a crack-
down on organized crime in 2006.

Honduran officials say at least 100 tons of U.S.-
bound cocaine from Colombia pass through each

POLICE say a small aircraft carrying bundles

? of cocaine burst into flames as it attempted to land

? north of Tegucigalpa, killing two people on board,
: Co to Associated Press.

National police chief, Gen. Julian Gonzalez says

E police found about 2.2 pounds (1 kilo) of cocaine

? and a Colombian passport inside the craft and that

handling of crime

TWO LEADING local cler-
gymen have expressed their
concern about the Govern-
ment’s efforts in addressing
crime in the country.

Bishop Simeon Hall, senior
pastor of New Covenant Bap-
tist Church, claims Govern-
ment’s cut in funds for crime
fighting agencies, while under-
standable, does not bode well
for the peace and stability of
our nation.

Bishop Hall stated: “I am
amazed that we can burrow for
everything else besides those
agencies that keep us from
total social disintegration.

“Tn light of the budget cuts,
many of the recommendations
made in the last Crime Report
will die a silent death. I can
only urge all well thinking per-
sons to work with our police
so that the criminal element
will not overwhelm us any fur-
ther.”

Rev CB Moss who spear-
heads the ‘Bahamas Against
Crime’ says the Government
of the Bahamas must get a
handle on crime or “face the
wrath of the people which will
surely come.”

Reflecting on the recent
murder of 19-year-old Shanice
Adderley, Reverend Moss in
a press release said: “This

Bishop Simeon Hall

scene is repeated far too long
and far too often. Too many
families, relatives, neighbours
and friends are left to mourn
the tragic loss of loved ones.”
He stated: “The Bahamian
landscape is becoming increas-
ingly stained with the blood of
our people violently spilled.
“The burning question is
how many more people; espe-
cially our youth are going to
be slaughtered while our lead-
ers appear to be asleep. How
many more shootings, rob-

Rev CB Moss



beries, rapes, burglaries,
assaults on our children and
other serious crimes must we
endure before government
realizes that it cannot fix the
problem by passing pieces of
peripheral legislation, then sit-
ting back and expecting posi-
tive results.”

Rev Moss said Government
must lead other stakeholders
in preparing a comprehensive
plan of action then swiftly
apply it before the country is
engulfed in a sea of violence.

: i authorities suspect most of the drug shipment was

Come see our

New Arrivals

year.

of Hondas, Toyotas and Nissan

many to choose from.

Straw Market condition

is condemned by attorney



ATTORNEY Paul Moss has
condemned the condition of the
Straw Market stating that succes-
sive governments have merely
given “lip service” to its con-
struction.

Vendors at the Straw Market
claim many of their goods were
damaged as a result of torrential
rain and strong winds this past
weekend.

“Almost eight years have
passed since the market burned
and successive governments have
given lip service to its construc-
tion without seeing the first block
laid. In all truthfulness they do
not care about these people and
what is troubling is that so many
parliamentarians have their own
roots and connections to that
Straw Market. It is scandalous
and shameful,” Mr Moss stated
in a recent press release.

“The government as landlord
has the duty to ensure a safe
building for its tenants to sell their
wares. In breach of that duty they
have allowed these hardworking
people to sit permanently under a
temporary tent that could not
withstand the high winds and
heavy rain we have experienced

SURO

PRR RR Tata os

FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS

PHONE: 327-6464
Te

in the past two weeks,” Mr Moss
stated.

Mr Moss said he has asked all
vendors at the Straw Market to
provide proof of their loss and
will approach the relevant author-
ities to have them compensated
for their loss.

“How can we say we love our
people and tourists when we con-
tinue to put them in harm’s way
under a tent that threatened to
collapse on them last week which
would have been a public rela-
tions disaster. We must do the
best for our people because they
are our most important resource,”
Mr Moss stated.






Attorney Paul Moss

Oe eb Ga eden

where life is still simple and people stil care
Murphyville, 2nd Right from Sears Road.
Telephone 322-8493









ENJOY AN EVENING of CLASSIC MUSIC
from ODESSA GARDENI!!

MANTOVAN|- ROMANTIC CLASSICS - THEME FROM





“A Summer Place,”

some Enchanted

Evening, Unchained Melody, Arrivederci Roma,
THEME FROM "Gone With The Wind",

The Very Best of ANDRES SEGOVIA - GUITAR GENIUS
VOL. 1 -BACH RECITAL, VOL.2-ROBERT DE VISEE,
ALSO VOLS. JAND 4.

BEETHOVEN, The Nine Symphonies.

Josef Krips Conducting the LONDON SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA.

4 CD's.

1 pe 5 Drawer Chest

“IN-HOUSE FINANCING AVAILABLE”

PR Gece

Government
Workers

(242) 341-2249 - FAX: (242) 361-1136

Visit our Website: www.autohl.com








Colors:
Gold
Silver
Bronze
Brown
Denim



SNedKer DOK

Rosetta St. Ph: 325-3336

Queen 8 Pc Set

Financing Available Through
King 8 Pc Set

Commonwealth Bank

Solid Wood




PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Public input invited on new Town Planning Act _

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE public has been invited
to offer its input and recom-




mendations on a new Town
Planning Act.

The Act will address impor-
tant planning issues such as the
development of new subdivi-
sions, construction on and near

Local Company
seeking applicants





wetlands or along the coastline
and setbacks from the high
water mark or sand dunes.

Speaking to the Bahamas
Real Estate Association at its
50th anniversary banquet on
Friday Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham suggested realtors
“discuss the draft legislation
amongst yourselves and with
your clients.”

“All comments received prior

to mid-September will be con-
sidered,” he said.

“As we do our part to sup-
port your industry and to devel-
op and to implement new effi-
cient processes, I call upon your
industry to play its part,” he
added.

The new Town Planning Act
is expected to be accessible on
the Ministry of the Environ-
ment’s website this month.





for the position of
Accountant

Excellent opportunity for an experienced and
highly motivated full-charge Accountant. This
position requires an individual that can multi-
task & has excellent verbal and organizational
skills. This position is responsible to assist in
the overseeing of the accounting and adminis-
trative duties of the company.

This position requires the knowledge of all
accounting procedures through financial
statements. Must be able to work indepen-
dently, as well as work with all departments.
Experience with Human Resources would be
an asset. Must be dynamic and disciplined.

Requirements include:

Thorough knowledge of Microsoft Software
Systems including: Word, Access and Excel,
Advanced Computer Accounting.

Degree in Finance/ Accounting or other related
field.

Interested persons should apply
in writing, with resume, to:

Accountant Position

P.O. Box 55-5698
Nassau, Bahamas

or via Email to:
applications.dropbox?gqmail.com

>The °
Financial

VOICE

HOW WILL REGULATORY REFORM OF
ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATIONS IMPACT

Telecommunications, Cable TV,
Broadcasting, The Internet, Businesses,

YOU?

Plan to attend

THE FINANCIAL VOICE

Town Meeting

Tuesday, June 2nd at 8 p.m.
at Choices Restaurant, COB Schoo! of
Hospitality, Thompson Blvd.

Host: Jeff Lloyd
Panellists

Julian Francis, Deputy Chairman, Committee for the Privatisation of BTC
Simon Wilson, Member, Committee for the Privatisation of BTC
Felix Stubbs, Member, Committee for the Privatisation of BTC
Michael Symonette, Executive Director, PUC
Usman Saadat, Director of Policy and Regulation, for the soon to be
established Utlities Regulation and Competition Authority (URCA)

DON'T MISS IT!

A funeral service for the late HERMAN McDONALD BURROWS, age 91, of Neppers
Hill, Lower Deadiman'’s Cay. Long Island, The Bahamas, will be held at St. John’s
Anglican Church, Buckley's, Lang Island, on Wednesday, 3rd

June, 2009 at 11 am. Reverend Father Ernest Pratt and

Reverend Paulette Cartwright will officiate and interment will

follow in Deadman's Cay Public Cemetery, Deadman's

Cay, Long Island,

Henman is survived by his loving and devoted wife of 55

years: Viola Burrows; 3 daughters: Miriam Procter,

Gwendotyn Edilall and Marjorie Archer, 2 sons-in-law:

Kemraj Edilall and Robert Archer; 7 grandchildren:

Keisha and her husband Kenneth McPhee Ill, Keiran

Edilall and hrs wita Junise, Davanand Edilall (deceased),

Anya and ber husband Hicardo Gomez Sr, Kristen 'y

Edilall and his wife Shericka, Melanie and her husband Y

Stephen Johnsen and Priadashni “Pria” Edilall; 7 great-

grandchildren: Kenisha McPhee, Ricardo Gomez Jr,

Kemren and Kaylen Edilall, Kenneth McPhee Iv, Jaylin

Johneon and Kemraj Edilall; 1 sister: Ethhyn Burrows; 1 brother:

Virginus Burrows; 3 sisters-in-law: Lucresha Burrows, Dora Turnquest and Shirley
Knowles; nephews: Glenroy, Philip, Alistair and Henry Burrows, Prince, Morgan, Peter,
Neel and Kendal Turnquest, Mack McHardy and Jahn Smith; nieces: Iva McHardy,
Madiyn Cartwright, Elva and Gloria Turmquest, Ruth Wong, Alice Missick, Della Mack,
Nellena Burrows and Caral Shearer; numerous cousins, grandnieces and grandnephews.
and a host of other relatives and friends including Pearlean Burrows, Vincent and
Learene Burrows and family. LaGloria Burrows, Clarence and Gwen Carroll and family,
Walking and Predensa Burrows and family, Donald and Judy Burrowes and family,
Patranella Sawyer and family, Barbara Dorsett and family, Patrica Seymour and family,
Cynthia Burrows and family, Marsha Stuart and family, Nolvin Turnquest and family,
Roosevelt and Maria Burrows and family, Anthony and Madhyn Farrington and family,
Beatrice Burrows and family, Ethel Cartwright and family, Richard and Thelma McHardy
and family, Basil Burrows and family, Janet Minnis and family, Mack Burrows and family,
Mazie and Marge family, Trixie Hanna and family, Iris Farquharson and farnily, Joseph
and Virgie Carrell and family, Byllis Storr and family, Carnetta Burrows and family, Hinton
Burrows and family, Richard Cartwright and farnily, John and Tee Burrows and family,
Can and Effie Cartwright and family, Mavis Carrall and family, Ruth Burrows and family,
Mary Burrows and family, Patricia Archer and the entire Archer family, Or, Earle and Mrs.
Melanie Farrington, Kemranie, Rajesh, Patrina, Brandon and Ashley Edilall, Praim,
Nadira, Arianna and Ryan Jafar, the Knowles family, Rev. Fr. Emest Pratt and family, Rev.
Paulette Cartwright, Fr. and Mrs. Atma Budha, the entire staff of Deadiman's Cay Health
Gentre, the Anglican Church Men (A-C.M.) and the Anglican Church Women (4.0.1),
St, Athanasius and St. John’s Anglican Parish Family, and the entire Lower Deadman’s
Gay family.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at St. John’s Anglican Church, Buckley's,
Long Island on Tuesday from 6 p.m. to service time on Wednesday.

‘Farthquake
Strikes north of
Virgin Islands

: SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico

Olin brief

Chamber of
Commerce
Annual Business
Awards 2009

OUTSTANDING busi-

i ness people and companies
? will be recognised today as
i the Bahamas Chamber of

? Commerce announces the
i finalists in its 2009 Annual
} Business Awards.

Categories in the awards

: include: Outstanding Busi-
i ness Person of the Year,

? Developing Entrepeneur of
: the Year and Company of

? the Year.

The Company of the

? Year award is offered in

: two categories - businesses
? with over 50 employees and
; those with less.

The Chamber will also

: announce events scheduled
? to take place in Chamber
; Week 2009.

¢ SEE BUSINESS
SECTION

SEISMOLOGISTS say an

: earthquake has struck north
? of the Virgin Islands but no
? injuries or damage have

? been reported, according to
i Associated Press.

The U.S. Geological Sur-

: vey says the early Monday

? quake had a preliminary

? magnitude of 4.6 and the

? epicenter was located about
? 80 miles (130 kilometers)

? northeast of Tortola, the

? capital of the British Virgin
i? Islands.

The earthquake also was

i felt in the U.S. Virgin

? Islands and parts of north-
? ern Puerto Rico before

? dawn.

LONG ISLAND

REGATTA
EXCURSION

Onboard: M/V Legend

Sails: June 3rd, 2009
Returns: June 7th, 2009

Tickets $99/Cars $399.00

Telephone:
356-6672/3



Music, Food, Drinks, Fun!!!





© fe Porickle Patel

Caeeerun le Plaza, I larold Rd

Phi: 356-7502 Fax: 996-7572

MIDNIGHT
MENS SS



ME EARLY BIRD

SALE

Entire Stock MUST Go

12th - 43th





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 7



Africa is right to hold

out for a better deal
insight

m@ By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a consultant
and former Caribbean
Diplomat)

W ITH the intention
of getting a more

favourable arrangement, sever-
al African countries are hold-
ing out on signing an Economic
Partnership Agreement (EPA)
with the European Union (EU).
Both the members of the South-
ern Africa Development Com-
munity (SADC) and the Eco-
nomic Community of West
African States (ECOWAS) are
continuing to negotiate with the
EU.

SADC was scheduled to sign
the EPA on May 7th, but the
ceremony was cancelled at the
last minute, and ECOWAS
declared that signing an EPA
before a June 20 deadline was
“no longer realistic.”

One of the issues identified is
the ‘“‘most favoured nation”
clause under which all trade
benefits agreed with third par-
ties are automatically extended
to the EU. The fear is that the
EU will access market openings
that African countries give to
other developing countries in
the context of South-South
trade. This would give devel-
oped EU countries an unfair
advantage.

The identical argument was
raised in criticism of the EPA
signed between the EU and
Caribbean countries.

Another objection that has
surfaced in the Africa-EU nego-
tiations is the limited capacity of
African developing countries to
take future trade disputes to
arbitration. This was also a con-
cern of critics of the Caribbean
EPA with the EU.

In the case of the Caribbean,
while the Cariforum countries —
the members of the Caribbean
Community and Common Mar-
ket (Caricom) plus the Domini-
can Republic — negotiated the
EPA jointly through the
Regional Negotiating Machin-
ery (RNM), each Caribbean
country is a separate signatory
to the agreement with the 27-
nation EU collectively. In the
event of a dispute going to arbi-
tration, the affected Caribbean
country would have to bear the
cost alone while the EU as a
whole will meet its expenses.
The cost of such arbitration
would be beyond the reach of
most developing nations.

As they did with the
Caribbean, the EU has threat-
ened African countries with the
deprivation of market access for
existing export products if they
do not sign the EPA. In the
Caribbean’s case, the threat was
the imposition of a Generalised
System of Preferences (GSP)
regime on Caribbean exports
to the EU market.

All fourteen Caribbean
countries signed up to a full
EPA to avoid being penalised.
Although, available figures
show that GSP treatment on
exports to the EU would have
affected only 1 per cent or less
of the total exports of goods
and services of eight Caribbean
countries. The eight countries
are: Antigua and Barbuda (0.0
per cent), Bahamas (0.0 per
cent), St Kitts-Nevis (0.0 per
cent), St Vincent and the
Grenadines (0.2 per cent),
Trinidad and Tobago (0.3 per
cent), Grenada (0.4 per cent),
Barbados (0.5 per cent) and St
Lucia (1.0 per cent), But, as
Professor Norman Girvan has
pointed out, though the per-
centages are small for countries
such as St Vincent and St Lucia,
the sectors concerned, such as
bananas, were politically vul-
nerable because of the numbers
of people employed. The EU
knew that and played on it mer-
cilessly.

The countries that would
have been worst affected by the
GSP tariffs on their goods and
services are: Guyana (21.8 per
cent), Belize (8.5 per cent) and
Jamaica (4.3 per cent). Yet, it
was the Guyana government
that most strongly held out
against signing a full EPA with
the EU, and which did so only
after succeeding in getting the
EU to agree to a review of the
EPA within five years of its
coming into force.

Had the Caribbean stood
together, they could have
refused to surrender to the EU
threat of GSP treatment for
Caribbean exports.

It was a similar threat that

WORLD VIEW

led to the initialling of the inter-
im EPA by all southern African
states except South Africa.
However, unlike the Caribbean,
the SADC countries have now
committed themselves to stick-
ing together.

Caribbean countries had the
option of initialling only an
Interim Agreement preserving
market access to the EU, and
continuing to negotiate into
2008 and even after — as the
African countries are doing, but
chose not to. A renowned trade
lawyer, Dr Lorand Bartels of
Cambridge University in Eng-
land, had identified three legal
ways in which the negotiations
could have continued into 2008
without having to apply GSP.

he Africans are rightly

resisting another red
herring that the EU used in
their negotiations with the
Caribbean. The red herring is
the claim that they (the EU)
are under pressure to make
preferential tariff provisions
with African, Caribbean and
Pacific regions compliant with
WTO regulations or face a chal-
lenge from other WTO mem-
bers.

But, of course the text that
the EU presented to the Cari-
forum governments included a
range of matters that had noth-
ing to do with WTO compati-
bility. Among these matters are
the so-called ‘Singapore Issues’:
trade in services, public pro-
curement, investment, customs
issues and competition policies.
All that was required for WTO
compatibility was an agreement
on trade in goods.

The Africans are rightly
making the point that “the EU’s
push to include services and
other “‘new issues” has nothing
to do with WTO compliance
and is an attempt to sneak pro-
posals through at bilateral level
that were defeated at the
WTO”.

In the aftermath of signing
the EPA, some Caribbean gov-
ernments made much of the
access to the 400 million-strong
market of the 27-nations EU
for “services”. This, they said,
included the right to set up
financial services and to send
musicians and chefs to work in
the EU. But the devil was in
detail as critics pointed out at
the time. For while the EU
Commission negotiated and
signed the EPA, they made it
clear that access to the EU mar-
kets depended entirely on the
rules applied by individual EU
member countries.

That reality came home to
roost when it was discovered
that “rigid visa regimes” con-
stituted barriers to getting goods
and services in to the EU. The
Jamaican Minister of Informa-
tion, Culture, Youth and Sports,
Olivia Grange, lamented that:
"The idea of being able to
showcase your products to the
500 million-strong European
market is among the most



appealing elements of the EPA.
However, this seems like an
empty promise if people are
unable to enter the region,
because they either don't qual-
ify, or can't afford a visa.”

As with the EPA signed with
the Caribbean, the EU shows
no inclination to include in the
EPAs with African countries an
unequivocal commitment to
funding a development pro-
gramme to ameliorate the
effects of an EPA. An ECOW-
AS Ministerial Monitoring
Committee has recommended
that contributions to the EPA
Development Programme
should be "adequate and acces-
sible" and beyond the commit-
ment already made in the Euro-
pean Development Fund.

In the Cariforum-EU agree-
ment, the Caribbean did not get
such a commitment.

By not capitulating to the
EU, the African groups may
end up getting a better deal
than the Caribbean.

rae

Sir Ronald Sanders



Meanwhile, Haiti is also to
be admired for refusing to sign
the EPA between Cariforum
and the EU despite reported
pressure from the EU and Cari-
com to do so. There is nothing
in the EPA that benefits Haiti
which, as a less developed coun-
try, should theoretically be able
to export ‘everything but arms’
to the EU. It would be a fur-
ther grave injustice to the Hait-
ian people for the EU to com-
pel it to sign by withholding
much needed assistance.

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

> EXTRA, EXTRA,

Y/ COME CHECK

US OUT

want" Shipments Arrived

Hurry, Hurry, Hurry and
Get Your First Choice
For Easy Financing

Bank And Insurance

On Premises
Check Our Prices
Before buying

Hy



Oless a Garden

witere life ts stall simple and people still care
Murphyville, 2nd Right from Sears Road.
Telephone 322-8493

ENJOY AN EVENING of CLASSIC MUSIC
from ODESSA GARDENI!!

THREE GOLDEN GREATS - THE SONGS OF GERSHWIN,
PORTER, BERLIN, - Dinah Shore The Man | Love,
Nancy Wilson - Someone to watch over me,
Shirley Bassey - Ev'ry Time We Say Goodbye,
Edmund Hockridge - | Love Paris, Joe Loss - I've Got My
Love to Keep Me Warm, Matt Monro - Cheek To Cheek,
Billy May - Top Hat, White Tie and Tails.

THE PIPES AND DRUMS AND MILITARY BAND OF THE
ROYAL SCOTS DRAGOON GUARDS, Amazing Grace,
Scotland the Brave, Scottish Waltz,

The Day Is Ended, Reveille.

HIHGS WaT

KINGSWAY ACADEMY
TEACHER VACANCIES

For September 2009

Kingsway Academy High School is seeking
applicants for teaching positions in the following
areas:

® Information Technology

® Mathematics/Physics up to the Advanced
Placement Level

0 Spanish up to the Advanced Placement Level

Track and Field Coach

® Woodwork/Technical Drawing

All applicants should have the following:

0 Be a born again Christian

® An Academic degree in the area of specialization
0 A Teaching Certificate

& Excellent Communication Skills

® A love for children and learning

High standards of morality

Letters of application together with a recent
color photograph and detailed Curriculum Vita
(including the names and addresses of at least
three references, one being the name of one’s
church minister). These should be forwarded to:

The Academy Affairs Manager
Kingsway Academy Business Office
Bernard Road
Nassau

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATION IS FRIDAY
JUNE 12, 2009.





BACK To SCHool *

LA



AWA





NO interest « NO fees + just 3 easy payments

layaway plan

we've got it

Custom
COMPUTERS LIMITED

4 Stores at Cable Beach & East Bay St.»

t 242.396.1/01 @ 242.396.1100

www.customcomputers.bs


PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

Bahamas

HIGHLIGHTS FROM SUNDAY’S EVENT HELD
AT THE RAINFOREST THEATRE, WYNDHAM
NASSAU RESORT AT CABLE BEACH











MISS Bahamas World
Joanna Brown

NEW CONDOS

OR SALE

~-Resario West
St. Albans Dr. New 3 Bedroom, 2 1/2 Bath,
3 Storey Townhouses. Gated Property.
Modern Kitchens & Well Appointed Interiors
$239,000 with only 5% deposit required.
Bank Financing Available
325-1325 454-2098 or 422-4489

Phase IT commences July 2009



Theordore
Ellyett
Productions

* Tiaras * Gloves
* Rhinestone jewelry
* Roseties tor Hair
* Evening Bags

CAREY'S
Faskic & DEPARTMENT STO

Mackey Street | 399-0758

MISS Sposabelle Bridal Formal and Evening
wear Devera Pinder



SOLUTIONS FOR A RAPIDLY CHANGING WORLD

Join the team!
About Providence Technology Group

Providence Technology Group is one of the leading providers of business critical IT solutions in
The Bahamas. Through our seamless mix of Networking, Productivity and Consulting solutions,
we have the privilege of guiding a growing base of clients in the financial and professional

services sectors along unique paths to achieving their business goals.

We Exist so that our
Clients may Succeed

Senior Technical Analyst

Asa Senior Technical Analystinthe Networking
Solutions practice, you will play a leading
role in the architecture & design, staging
& deployment, and ongoing optimization &
support of small, medium and large client
networks. As such, you will be required
to work closely with the Vice President,
Networking Solutions in order to gain a full
understanding of client requirements, to
rapidly design and accurately cost client
solutions, and to assist in presenting solutions
to clients in clear business terms. Once a
solution has been approved, you will also be
responsible for leading the deployment of the
solution to ensure that it is delivered “error-
free” and in accordance with industry best
practices, Additionally, you will be responsible
for ensuring that all “managed” client network
environments are regularly optimized and kept
in excellent working condition. You will also
be required to provide hands-on technical
support and advanced troubleshooting to
bring prompt resolution to technical problems
as they arise.

Microsoft

GULD CERTIFIED

Requirements:

Education & Experience
a Minimum of a Bachelors Degree
a Minimum 10 years hands-on
experience designing, deploying and
supporting business critical networks.
= Demonstrated technical leadership
experience

Core Certifications
= Microsoft: MCSE W2K3, MCITP
W2K8 EA, Exchange 2K3/2K7, ISA
2K4/2K6 | Hyper-V Virtualization
= Cisco: CCDP (Design), CCNP (Routing
& Switching), CCSP (Security), CCVP
(Voice), CCNA (Wireless)

Additional Certifications/Competencies
(are an advantage)
= Citrix (Administrator | Engineer)
VMWare Virtualization
Storage Area Networking (SAN)
Unified Messaging, Voice over IP
(VOIP), Telephony

How To Apply
Please email resumes to
jobs@providencetg.com

by 12 June 2009

#2 Nassau Court | Level Two | P.O. Box N-1081 | Nassau, The Bahamas
T 242.326.0382 F 242.326.0389 | info@providenceTG.com | www.providenceTG.com

NETWORKING SOLUTIONS | PRODUCTIVITY SOLUTIONS | CONSULTING SOLUTIONS

Liceicioe > Feaeee- Feels #8 f 8
2 Pd feree & es Ee seers
BP stt etahhae Falsaeeak

| THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

The Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute's (CHMI's)
Lil’ Chefs Summer Training Programme

Trained chef instructors mentor kids ages 10-15 and teach them how to
prepare:-

Hot meals

Assorted Sandwiches
Pastries

Fruit Platters and much more!

Where: CHMI, Bahamas Tourism Training Centre,
Thompson Boulevard
When: July 13-31, 2009,
Mondays 9a.m.-4p.m.; Tuesday-Friday, 9a.m.-3p.m.
Cost: 1 week, 5275: 2? weeks $500; 3 weeks, $675

Call: 323-5804, 677-3220 or 677-3202 for more information and
applications.

Also available in Exuma and Grand Bahama

Application deadline June 15, 2009


THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 9
LOCAL NEWS



MISS
Habour
Island
Swanique
Sawyer

MISS
Red Hot

er leatalils








w= ae! .



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

MISS Galleria Cinemas . wae y Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs
Emily Darville a



Want to Enhance Your Creative Edge?

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

Offers a Course
in
Window

Treatment

This course is designed to provide participants with instructions
and formulas that will enable them to create and design drapery,
roman shades and valances.

Tuition: $250.00

Mondays & Wednesdays,
Staring 15 June, 2009
6:00p.m. to7:30p.m.

— EM

ABOVE: Miss D.S Lifestyles Inc daurmrigohedinhs. Fees nay be paid por semester by Cash, Credit Cand or Bank Centilied Cheque
VAIL ta. Payable in:

Kendra Wilkinson The College of The Babams Business Office.

LEFT: Miss Bella Donna Michaela CEES Reserves The Right Ta Charge Tuetion, Fees, Comme Comaent, Course Schecdole And Cniree Materials

Ferguson

istic New Solution for

~ BUSINESS STORAGE

e A state of the art Hurricane Proof storage facility offers
the first 12 individual units, each one witha surface of
1,200sq ft. Ceiling from 24 to 28 ft high. 1,200 cubic yards

of usable space per unit.

ULRIES: Comaact the Co-ondinasor at Veli 232)925.57 14/52 8099928 1956 or e-mail
I

e Container ramp and truck ramp elevated from road
level.

© Ideal also for Disaster Recovery Facility to
store files in a perfectly safe location.

www.bahamaslogistic.com
email: info@ bahamaslogistic.com

Phone: 327-8681 ¢ Fax: 327-8214


PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Family flee
as fire sweeps
through their

apartment

FROM page one

received minor burns to his
right arm and left leg, and
his wife received minor fire
burns to the right arm.

The couple were taken to
hospital and are being treat-
ed for injuries.

The infant was
unharmed.

Fire officials responded
to the emergency call at
around 2.23 am Monday.

Firefighters were able to
successfully extinguish the
blaze, which destroyed the
apartment.

The incident is being
investigated.

CONVENIENT TRAVEL AGE\@y

Prince Charles Drive

Our Bi-Weekly Travel update
NOW SELLING

a) Western Air

b) Southern Air

c) Jet Blue (credit card only)

d) Spirit Airlines (credit card only)



















POPULAR DESTINATIONS

VA 6 sis csasiseserrscasscnisescamencinseeeo ls LO
Trinidad.........cccccccccsecsccscssceneeeee 402,10
Barbad S..........cccccscsssecee seaxnareens

Puerto Ric. ccesecssssssscssessseeseesseeses8359. 00
Hath, .cccsescncnsssecsssccssensssssessssccssnesetit oO

Ue ALR e

FROM page one

tion President Robert Sands
were prepared yesterday to
disclose which island the per-
son visited or where they
stayed.

Dr Minnis said a press con-
ference will be held tomorrow
in which further information
regarding the case will be
made public.

Mr Sands, also Vice Presi-
dent of External Affairs for
Baha Mar, said he was not pre-
pared to add anything to the
Ministry’s statement.

The announcement comes as
global media hype surround-
ing the A (H1N1) virus,
believed to have originated in
Mexico, has died down. This
even as the number of cases
and related deaths rises.

New York state currently
has 42 confirmed cases of
swine flu, which has now been
recorded in all 50 American
states, as well as in an increas-
ing number of countries glob-
ally.

The Ministry of Health said
the visitor came to the
Bahamas from New York on
May 25 and returned to Amer-
ica the following day “to recov-
er at home.”

“Due to heightened surveil-
lance activities by the Depart-
ment of Public Health neces-
sary tests were done that same
day.

“The results were received
on the evening of 29 May,” it
stated.

The positive test would have
come back two days prior to
Jamaica announcing its first
two cases of Swine Flu. Both

Jamaicans had _ recently
returned from visits to New
York.

Other Caribbean countries
to have confirmed cases are
the Dominican Republic, Cuba
and Puerto Rico.

“As this widespread global
occurrence of Influenza A
(H1N1) continues to evolve,
The Bahamas maintains the
monitoring of influenza trends,
which at present do not indi-
cate any increase in cases at

PRIME OFFICE SPACE

Approximately 2,200 square feet of second floor
space available in newly constructed building
at the corner of Marlborough and Cumberland
Streets. Two (2) on-site car spaces included.

Ideal location for offshore bank, law firm, or other

professions.

Contact Owner at:

362-6006

7) THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION
AND EXTENSION SERVICES

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT - ———— SEMESTER 022009

COURSE

SECT | COURSE

NO. DESCRIPTION
"BUSINESS

cusTso0
COMPUTERS
COMP930 WEBS PAGE DESIGN WS |

COMP9341

01___| suERIOR cuSTOMER SER, Wis _|4:309m
0 SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SER. WIS 430prn

Thurs | 19-Jun lnm |

ENQUIRIES: racist the cponibialr at Tel: (242) 925-5714 I (242) 328-0093 /
328-1936 / 302-4300 ext. 5202 or email prevsdev@cob.edu.bs

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time).
CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and

Course Materiafs.



For the price of a coffee, you can take

care of something priceless.
$300,000 life cover for the price of a coffee per day!

*

a COLONIAL GROUP
hj INTERNATIONAL

iN

ATLANTIC
MEDICAL

ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE CO. LTD.
Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue, PO. Box SS-5915, Nassau Tel. 356-5433

this time,”
Health.

“Enhanced surveillance
activities for the Influenza A
(H1N1) virus have been ongo-
ing across all sectors since the
first case of the virus was
reported in March 2009.”

The Ministry of Health
warned that influenza
preventative measures should
be continue to be followed
to ensure protection of indi-
viduals, families and commu-
nities.

said the Ministry of

First case of Swine
Flu in the Bahamas

“These precautionary mea-
sures include covering your
nose and mouth with a tissue
when you cough or sneeze, dis-
posing of the tissue in the trash
after use, along with frequent
hand washing with soap and
water.

“Additionally, if you are
experiencing flu like symp-
toms, avoid contact with oth-
ers, and stay away from group
settings, to decrease the poten-
tial spread,” said the state-
ment.

To have your say on this or any other issue,
email The Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your letter to
The Tribune on Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207



Boy, 15, found
hanged in cell

FROM page one

been taken into custody on Thursday wearing black jeans, a white
T-shirt, black socks and a pair of black slippers.
Ms Wilson recalled that she had tried to visit her son at the
East Street South Police Station on two occasions, but was denied.
She said police had told her that she could bring Michael a
change of clothes early Tuesday because he was going to Juvenile

Court.

Ms Wilson also questioned why police had allegedly kept her son
in custody so long without allowing her to take him food and

water.

She admitted her son had been fighting with “issues,”

“God-fearing child.”

> but was a

“My children are grounded in God. My children go to church on
Sunday. My son participated in youth meetings. My son read the
scriptures, my son was active in church,” Ms Wilson added.

“Tam not saying my son was all that and glory because you can-
not swear for your children behind your back because you don’t
know what they do behind your back.”

Distraught, Ms Wilson says she now intends to seek an inde-
pendent autopsy on her son’s body.

Police Commissioner Reginald Ferguson told The Tribune yes-
terday: “We are investigating an apparent suicide and that’s it.”

Man and woman
shot several times

FROM page one

looking for a dark green-
coloured truck, which was seen
in the area at the time of the
shooting.

According to police reports,
the couple was sitting in their
vehicle which was parked on
Xanadu Beach around 9.30pm
when they were accosted by a
young dark man armed with a
gun.

The gunman knocked on the
driver’s door, however, when
the male occupant realised what
was happening he started the

vehicle, and then suddenly
heard a gunshot.

As he was reversing to get
away, the gunman fired several
more shots at the vehicle, hitting
the driver and his woman pas-
senger.

On their way to the hospi-
tal, the driver called the police
to report what had happened.

Mr Seymour said the driver
was shot twice, in the upper left
side of the body and in his leg,
and his passenger was shot once
in the hip.

He said the couple recalled
seeing a dark green Ford F-150
truck in the area.

LifeChoices

If you could secure $300,000 family protection for the

price of a daily coffee, with no medical required, would

you do it? Would you invest in $300,000 family financial

security, if it included a free and confidential financial

review with a professional adviser? We're hoping the

answer Is yes, because you could have this cover, for a

little less caffeine, from just $9 per week*. You'll certainly

A member of Colonial Group International: Insurance, Health, Pensions, Life

sleep a little easier!

*rates vary, applies to male age 30

CALL 356-LIFE

or visit www.cgigroup.bm

Colonial Group International is
rated A- (Excellent) by AM Best.


THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 11

ts





Sports

Knowles and
Bhupathi lose
at French Open

MARK Knowles and his
Indian partner Mahesh Bhu-
pathi suffered another set-
back on Sunday when they
got ousted from Roland Gar-
ros in Paris, France.

Competing in the third
round of the men's doubles,
the number seeded team
team of Knowles and Bhu-
pathi fell victim to Jose Aca-
suso of Argentina and Fer-
nando Gonzalez of China in
set sets of 7-5, 4-6, 6-4.

Knowles and Bhupathi
won their first round match
6-3, 6-2 over Frenchmen Jos-
selin Ouanna and Jo-Wil-
fried Tsonga before they
beat Johan Brumstrom of
Sweden and Jean-Julien
Rojer of the Netherlands
Antilles 7-5, 6-7, 7-6 in the
second round.

Yesterday, Knowles and
his mixed doubles partner
Anna-Lena Groenefeld from
Germany are still alive. They
won their second round
match 3-6, 7-5, 10-6 to
advance to the quarter-final
where they will face Anasta-
sia Rodionova of Australian
and Rik De Voest from the
Repulibe of South Africa.

Swimming
educational
incentive

The Bahamas Swimming
Federation recognizes the
importance of education and
maintaining academic excel-
lence as well as excellence in
the pool for our swimmers.

The federation will initia-
tive a new plan that aims to
supports the BSF student
athletes in their pursuit of
excellence in the classroom
and in the pool at the 2009
RBC National Swimming
Championships.

BSF Clubs, Coaches and
other BSF Members will
nominate Student-Athletes
with a GPA of 3.5 or higher
who have represented the
Bahamas on a national team
or qualified to

compete at the 2009
national swimming champi-
onships.

Attached forms for those
swimmers who have
achieved a 3.5 GPA or above
during the past academic
school year and have quali-
fied for the RBC National
Swimming Championships
are available on line at
bsf_news@yahoo.com and
returned no later than the
end of May 2009.

BSF student-athletes will
be recognized at the champi-
onships and in this years
nationals programme book-
let.

Track BAAA's
CAC youth trials

THE Bahamas Associa-
tion of Athletic Associations
will hold its final trials for
the Central American and
Caribbean Age Group
Championships this weekend
at the Thomas A. Robinson
Track and Field Stadium.
The trials will get started on
Friday at 4 pm and continue
on Saturday at 6 pm. The
Bahamas will play host to
the CAC Age Group Cham-
pionships from June 18-19 at
the Thomas A. Robinson
Track and Field Stadium.
The championships was orig-
inally scheduled for Grand
Bahama, but the refurbish-
ing of the track at the Grand
Bahama Sports Complex
won't be completed in time.



# Retains title
alter shaking
off ring rust

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemeda.net

OT having

fought since he

claimed the

British Com-
monwealth title last July, Jer-
maine ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey
didn’t take long Saturday night
to shake off the ring rust against
Emiliano Cayetano.

In the main event of First
Class Promotions’ show
dubbed: “The Boys are Back,”
Mackey retain the World Box-
ing Council’s Caribbean Box-
ing Federation (CABOFE)
super middleweight title he won
against Kirk ‘the Technician’
Sinnette on June 22, 2007.

SEE page 12

JERMAINE ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey
goes after Emiliano Cayetano in
their main event bout on Satur-
day night.

PHOTOS:

Felipé Major/Tribune staff



JERMAINE ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey stands tall over Emiliano Cayetano in the
event that he gets back up to fight in their First Class Promotions’ main
event on Saturday night.

FIFA plans for quota rule
could face tough road

@ By TIM REYNOLDS
Nassau, Bahamas

European soccer officials will abstain if a vote is taken by the
sport's worldwide body this week to restrict teams to a maximum of
five foreign players in starting lineups, according to Associated
Press.

FIFA president Sepp Blatter backs the plan, which is supported
by many of his organization's members and could drastically change
the makeup of many of the world's best-known clubs, such as ones
in the English Premier League.

The European Union, however, insists such a rule discriminates
on the grounds of nationality. And that disagreement could easily
put members of Europe's soccer federation in a delicate spot if a
vote is called during FIFA's annual meeting Wednesday.

"Tam in the middle,” said UEFA president Michel Platini, a
former star midfielder for France's national team and the Italian club
Juventus. "I always play in the middle."

UEFA members support certain parts of the so-called 6+5 plan,
but decided Monday at its own meeting that its members shouldn't
vote on the matter until the legal questions are answered. That's a
process with no end in sight.

"We can only do it when it's legal,” Belgian federation president
Francois De Keersmaecker said.

The EU favors UEFA's "homegrown" proposal that would
require clubs to carry a quota of players on their roster who were
trained in that country, regardless of nationality.

International volleyball officials recently considered a similar
plan, only to eventually decide that such a rule could be challenged
by lawmakers as an illegal restriction of workers’ rights.

"We agreed with the objectives last year of the 6+5, but ... we have
to know if it's legal or illegal," Platini said.

The player quota issue is one of many FIFA will discuss Wednes-
day, along with changing the maximum age of Olympic soccer
players from 23 to 21, stadium security and anti-doping initiatives.

FIFA's annual meeting has a ceremonial opening Tuesday
evening.

FIRST CLASS PROMOTIONS: THE BOYS ARE BACK

Choo’ Mackey
with a bang!



after he stopped Emiliano Cayetano in the third round
to retain his WBC’s CABOFE super middleweight title.










2008 FORD EVEREST

2.5 Turbo Diesel Automatic, Leather,
LOADED - 7 Passanger

was $38,114.00
\ ita NOW $32,400.00

3 years or 65K warranty, 3 years roadside
assistant, 3 years rust protections warranty
and licensed and inspected up to birthday.

2008 FORD RANGER
2.5 Turbo Diesel/Standard Shift

LOADED
was $32,848.00
NOW $28,700.00

3 years or 36,000 miles warranty, 3 years roadside
assistant, 3 years rust protections warranty and
licensed and inspected up to birthday.

NOM THAT'S REALLY AT 23 ](@Deal
FRIENDLY MOTORS CO. LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 * FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com * WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com
PAGE 12, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



=
‘Big Daddy’
powers his

way to first
round KO



m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

JERRY ‘Big Daddy’ Butler
wanted to make a statement to
former Bahamas heavyweight
champion Renaldo ‘the Termi-
nator’ Minus Saturday night at
the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

Against the taller Sandy Anto-
nio Soto, Butler did more than
that when he stopped the
Dominican Republican one
minute and five seconds in the
first round of their scheduled
eight round co-main event.

It was the fifth time in his
career that Butler won by a first
round knockout as he improved
his record to 8-5-1. Soto, coming
off his second straight loss,
dropped to 1-2.

“Every time, I get somebody
that was bigger or taller than me,”
he said. “This time, it looked even
so I said will just go out there
and do what I have to do. “If the
knockout come along I will take
it.”

Butler, 28, slowly worked his
way inside Soto and once he got a
few shots to the body, he was able
to tag him up on the ropes, forc-
ing his opponent to take an eight
count. Realizing that Butler was
just a little too overpowering for
him, Soto refused to get back
after he got an eight count from
the referee.

“He came out and he looked
like he could handle himself after
I threw two punches,” Butler
pointed out. “He started to work
his jab and looked like he came to
fight.

“But after it looked like he was
going to make me chase him, I






1 |
DOMINICAN Republican Sandy Antonio
Soto knelt on one knee as he was giv-
en a mandatory eight count.

said enough of this, so I decided
to cut the ring off and go to the
body.”

After he was awarded the vic-
tory, Butler got on the micro-
phone and he issued a challenge
to Minus, who was working on
his corner. Minus, who according
to Bahamas Boxing Commis-
sion’s chairman Pat ‘the Center-
ville Assassin’ Strachan, was
stripped of his title, gladly accept-
ed. Also on the undercard of First
Class Promotion’s first profes-
sional fight for the year dubbed:
“The Boys are Back,” Hensley
‘the Bruiser’ Strachan won an
unanimous four round decision
over Derrick ‘Castro’ Sawyer.

Strachan, who controlled the
tempo of the fight from the first
round when he had Sawyer on
the ropes with a series of body
punches, said he was pleased to
have come out on top.

“T was a little disappointed
(that I didn’t put him away ear-
ly),” Strachan said. “I was in tip

BOXING: THE BOYS ARE BACK




JERRY ‘BIG DADDY’ BUTLER and Sandy Antonio Soto sizes each other up before throwing a blow in their heavyweight bout on Saturday night at the Kendal

Isaacs Gymnasium.

top shape, but I liked what hap-
pened.”

Strachan, 25, said he anticipat-
ed a much better showing from
Sawyer, but he’s on a mission and
he doesn’t intend to let any of the
local boxers stop him right now.

“T want to get the Bahamas
junior welterweight belt,” said
Strachan, whose record climbed
to 5-3 with a draw. “I just have to
go back into the gym and train a
little harder and I know I can get
it (title shot).”

Not to be out-done, in another
four-rounder on the underdard,
Anthony ‘Psycho’ Woods forced
John ‘Old Time School’ Wesley
into submission 55 seconds into
the third. As Woods continued
to throw a series of combinations,
Wesley just refused to continue
fighting and the fight was called.
Woods, 24, improved his record
to 6-11 with his sixth knockout.
Wesley fell to 0-11.

“T had to come out strong
because I knew if I didn’t come
out strong he was going to try and
take it away from me,” Woods
said. “I want to stop whoever
come my way and get the title.

“T didn’t want this one to over
too quick, but he came out there
pushing, so I had to go for the
knockout.”

Drive it!, Drag It,
Pull it!, Push It!

EVEN IF IT DOESN’T MOVE
WE WILL TRADE IT IN.

BEST PRICES
EVER SALE!

ELITE MOTORS LTD. SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED
Thompson Blvd. « Oakes Field

#209 WuP Rood

OM THE SPOT FIMAMCING WITH
COMMONWEALTH BANE

INSURANCE AVAILABLE WITH



HENSLEY ‘the Bruiser’ Strachan connects to the head of Derrick ‘Castro’ Sawyer in his four round decision on Saturday night

at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.



FROM page 11

Like a hawk watching his prey, Mackey need-
ed just one minute and 32 seconds into the third
round to force Cayetano into submission after
he received his second mandatory eight count
from referee Matthew Rolle.

“T knew he was going to come hard. Hey, ’'m
the Commonwealth champion, I’m the Bahami-
an champion, I’m the WBC champion so he was
coming to make a statement, but I’ve been out of
the ring for 11 months and I was a little nervous,
but I said ‘hey, all of the hard work, all the train-
ing will pay off,’” said Mackey, who thanked his
sponsors, V-8 Splash, Nautilus Water, Prime
Bahamas and the Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture for keeping him going.

When nobody else stuck with him, Mackey
said First Class Promotions was there and he was
delighted to display his skills on their first pro card
for the year. He also thanked the Bahamas Box-
ing Commission, who had suspended the promo-
tional group headed by Ray and Michelle Minus
last year.

Pounded

In their scheduled 12 round bout, Cayetano,
who had predicted at the weigh-in that he will
stop Mackey in the third, had to eat his words and
brush of his ego after he got pounded in the fatal
third round.

“T was looking for an early knockout, but it
came hard because he caught me with a few clear
shots that told me that “Hey, you still have the ring
rust, so just be patient,’” Mackey reflected.

Mackey, who dominated the first round before
he looked a little weary in the second, stepped it
up a notch as he rocked Cayetano with a left
blow to the body. Following with a combo to the
body and the head, Mackey watched as Cayetano
fell through the ring ropes and was caught by
members of the Bahamas Boxing Commission.

Once he got back into the ring, he as adminis-

| HENSLEY ‘the
Bruiser’ Stra-
chan and Derrick
‘Castro’ Sawyer
both closes their
eyes as they
throw punches.



JERMAINE ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey connects with a right
to the head of Sandy Antonio Soto in their WBC’s
CABOFE super middleweight bout on Saturday night.

tered the eight count from Rolle as he knelt on
one knee. Once he got up, Rolle asked Cayetano
if he was okay and he said yes.

Mackey, waiting with anticipation in the neutral
corner, came right back at Cayetano once Rolle
gave the order to fight again. Again, Mackey
went back to the body and the head with anoth-
er combo that floored Cayetano.

This time, as Mackey stood in the neutral cor-
ner launching for another shot at his wounded vic-
tim, Cayetano refused to get up after the eight
count. Realizing that it was over, Mackey leaped
into the air as he started to celebrate as he
improved his record to 18-3 with 14 knockouts.
The gym went even wilder as the fans continued
to cheer him on. “He made it seemed as if he
was exhausted, but every time I tried to go in, he
caught me with some solid punches,” said Mack-
ey, who noted that once he got the body shots, he
made Cayetano pay for it.

Mackey, 29, is now preparing to defend his
British Commonwealth title on the next First
Class Promotions’ show in August at the Kendal
Issacs Gymnasium.

Cayetano, 36, dropped to 18-3.

t. 242.326.6377 f. 242.326.6315
®. sanping@coralwave.com

PO, Boose Mel Ad
tb [2d2] Idaddd? f(2d2) 399-8238

ADVANTAGE PSURANCE
BROKERS & AGENTS LID.



PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff
TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



ECGS Tay)

m@ By BRENT STUBBS

erasing the meet record of 22.31 set by American

Chris ‘Fireman’ Brown sends message to rivals

Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

NATIONAL quarter-mile champion Chris ‘Fire-
man’ Brown sent a clear message to his rivals that
he's still going to be the man to beat when everybody
line up at the Bahamas Association of Athletic
Associations’ National Open Track and Field Cham-
pionships.

The championships is scheduled for the week-
end of June 26-27 and Brown got his first real test
when he matched up against Grand Bahamian
Andrae Williams, one of the toughest rivals to his
throne, in the men's 400 metres.

Competing at the Reebok Grand Prix in the first
head-to-head showdown between any of the
Bahamian quarter-milers so far this year, Brown
posted a third place finish in 45.04 seconds. Williams,
25, had to settle for fifth place in 45.31.

“Tt was a great field and a very strong one. It was
also my second race of the season. I was a little dis-
appointed with being in lane 2, but still thankful
that I had one,” said Brown, who also thanked God
for allowing him to stay healthy at this point in the
season.

“Tt was also great to run against Andrae, we were
both happy and excited to be on the scene and on
the track at the same time. It shows the world that
the Bahamas is a power house because we were the
only country other than USA to have two individu-
als in that event.”

Winning the event on Saturday was American
Olympic champion LaShawn Merritt in 44.75, just
shy of the meet record of 44.70 by Xavier Carter of
the United States last year. Trinidad & Tobago's

Cache Armbrister clocks season’s best time



m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

SPRINTER CACHE Arm-
brister and long jumper Bian-
ca Stuart led a field of four
Bahamians who have advanced
to the NCAA Track and Field
Championships.

Competing at the Midwest

AT THE DOUBLE:
Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie (far right).

Rennie Quow was second in 44.89.

Brown, 30, was just off his seasons best of 45.03
that he opened up with on May 16 in Carson, Cali-
fornia. Williams still holds the second fastest time by
a Bahamian this year of 44.98 that he ran on May 7
in Lubbock, Texas.

Newcomer Latroy Williams, however, has record-
ed the best mark of 44.73, but he didn't compete
since he did the stunning time on May 23 in Hutchin-
son, Kansas State.

But Brown warned all his rivals that he’s looking
forward to “bringing the fire” at the nationals as
he get set for the World Championships in Berlin,
Germany in August.

“T’m always looking foward to a match up with
whomever whenever. We have about eight guys
now who can run 45 sec so trials should be fun,”
Brown stressed.

White, who tried out for the
Bahamian Olympic team last
year, also ran on the lead off
leg for UM's 4 x 400 relay team
that got disqualified.

At the West Regional at the
Hayward Field at the Univer-
sity of Oregon in Eugene, Ore-
gon, Karlton Rolle, a freshman
at the University of California
at Los Angeles (UCLA), was

Regional Championships in
Louisville, Kentucky on Satur-
day, Armbrister a sophmore at
Auburn University, clocked a
season's best time of 23.22 sec-
onds to secure her second con-
secutive berth into the NCAA
Championships.

Last year, the 19-year-old St.
Augustine's College graduate
majoring in marketing advanced
to the semifinal at the NCAA's,
finishing 22th in 23.42.

Samantha Henry, a junior at
Louisiana State University
(LSU) won the race in 22.80.
Armbrister, however, had the
fastest qualifying time of 23.57,
compared to Henry's 23.73 for
fourth place.

Armbrister will also have
double duties at the champi-
onships after she helped
Auburn women's 4 x 400 relay
team clinch a spot.

NG ls eM al a

In the 4 x 100, Armbrister ran
the lead off leg for Auburn, but
they got disqualified.

Stuart, the two-time All-
American senior at Southern
Illinois, took first place in flight
three with a leap of 21-feet, 5
1/2-inches, which enabled her
to secure the victory.

The Queen's College gradu-
ate who turned 21 on May 17
was a seventh place finisher at
last year's Nationals. When she
leaves Southern [linois, her
name will be on both the Saluk-
i's indoor and outdoor long
jump records.

At the East Regional, Kristy
White, competing for the Uni-
versity of Miami, clocked 23.53
for second place in the wom-
en's 200. The race was won by
UM's senior Murielle Ahoure
in 23.09.



fifth in the final of the men's
200 in 21.34.

Rolle, who also had the fifth
fastest qualifying time of 21.16,
advanced to the NCAA's after
he came in behind Justin
Woods, a senior at WSU, who
won the final in 20.90.

Rolle, a 18-year-old graduate
of Nassau Christian Academy,
also ran the second leg on
UCLA's 4x 100 relay team that
finished ninth in 41.44, but they
didn't advance to the final.

And Portland State's senior
Jernice Saunders was fifth in
the women's 200 final in 23.77
to earn her berth at NAAA's.
Charonda Williams, a senior at
Arizona State, won the race in
23.02. Saunders, 23, is a gradu-
ate of CI Gibson, who trans-
ferred from Minnesota State to
Portland State where she inked
her name in two of the four

SPT eM eRe CUS
Chippingham





“I’m happy to see that we are taking the 400m to
another level in the Bahamas. I want to say thanks
to all my family, friends and fans for tuning in and
supporting me on my journey to Berlin.”

This weekend, Brown will be heading back to his
alma mater for an induction into the Norfolk State
University Athletis Foundation Hall of Fame. Just
two months ago, he was inducted into the Mid-East-
ern Athletic Conference (MEAC) Hall of Fame.

Also at the meet, 33-year-old Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie had more of a challenge as she did the
sprint double against some of the top competitors
she will have to contain with in Berlin.

Ferguson-McKenzie's best performance came in
the 200 where she placed third in 22.56 for the fourth
fastest time in the world this year.

The race was won by her training partner Lauryn
William from the United States, who just missed

school records at the Regional.
In becoming the first Vikings’
sprinter to qualify for the
NCAA, Saunders lowered her
own record in the 200 and she
also shattered the previous
mark of 11.74 by Finishing sixth
in her heat and 11th overall in
the century, Saunders was shy
of another NCAA qualifying
spoy, but she now holds Port-
land State's indoor 60 and 200
as well as the 100 and 200
marks. And at the Midwest
Regional in Norman, Okla-
homa, Lamar Delaney, a fresh-
man at Houston, was 11th in
the men's triple jump with a
best leap of 50-feet, 8 1/4-inches
(15.45 metres) on his first
attempt. Will Claye, a freshman
at Oklahoma, won the event
with a leap of 55-2 (16.81 m) on
his sixth and final attempt.
Delaney, however, didn't
advance to the NCAA's.

RUNNING FOR GLORY: Cache Armbrister.

Rachelle Smith in 2007 for the world's leading time.
Coming in second in an American sweep was
Shalonda Solomon in 22.43 for the second fastest
time.

A week before, LaVerne Jones-Ferrette of the
Virgin Islands turned in the third fastest time when
she ran 22.49 in Belém.

In the 100, Ferguson-McKenzie dropped all the
way to eighth place. Her time was 11.11, which
matched her season's best on May 10 in Orlando,
Florida. Only seven other athletes have ran faster
than Ferguson-McKenzie this year. Leading the way
is Jamaican Kerron Stewart with 10.92 in Kingston,
Jamaica on May 2.

Saturday, however, Carmelita Jeter won the race
in 10.85 to lead another American 1-2 sweep that
would have smashed the meet record of 10.91 that
was posted Jamaican Vernica Campbell last year
in 10.91. But it was wind-aided. Jeter now has the
second fastest time in the world.

Second place went to Muna Lee in 10.88. Inci-
dentally, Campbell came in third in 10.91, the same
time as Kelly-Ann Baptiste from Trinidad & Toba-
go. Williams also ran under 11 seconds in 10.94 for
fifth.

And 25-year-old Derrick Atkins, the World
Championships’ 100 runner-up, finished third in the
men's B century race in 10.23. The race was won by
Jamaican Yohan Blake in 10.20 with Alnso Edward
of Panama second in 10.22.

Atkins’ time placed him 12th overall in the two
races combined. The A race was won by American
Mike Rodgers in 9.93. Three Jamaicans rounded
out the 7-9th spots with former world record holder
Asafa Powell clocking 10.10 for seventh.



GREAT WALL MOTORS

SAILOR LHD

sturdy and Efficient
4 Cyl. Diesel Engine
Well Appointed
Unbeatable Value

Diesel Double Cab
Deer: $21,570.00

Diesel Club Cab
Deer $19,900.00

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co. Ltd

Montrose Ave.
Phone: 322-1722/Fax:326-7452


PAGE 14, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Cartie Co. and Chamcem Boats of Long Island
held their 5th Annual All Tackle Fishing Tourna-
ment this week-end at the Flying Fish Marina in
Clarence Town, Long Island. Fishing 19 boats, with
78 anglers this year, the three-day tournament was
the biggest yet, with boats entered from Nassau,
Exuma, and Long Island. From a 17’ local fishing
boat, built by the host Chamcem Boats, to a 45’
Hatteras, the wide variety of boat sizes and lengths
had the crowd wondering from day one which team
was going home with the cash and prizes of
$27,000.00!

With calm seas over the three days weather was
not an issue, but the intense heat taxed the fisherman
who were working 12 ? hour days, competing to
win the Greatest Combined Weight over the three-
day period, and or the Single Longest Fish. Boats
left out each morning at 6:30 am to work the sea,
returning back to the marina by 7:00pm. Day one set
the mark high for weight when the “Lady Friendly”
owned by Anthony Cartwright of Long Island
brought in 18 Mahi Mahi weighing 205lbs, however
the “King Fish” of Nassau raised it even higher
when they brought 8 fish weighing 277 lbs.

Captain Paul King, Ian Radermaker of Harbour-
side Marine, Kristian Kwienski and Greg Cottis put
in a long trip past the Diana Banks all the way to the
Columbus Bank of Ragged Island in search of the
big ones. Day two was slow for the fisherman, with
many returning to dock with little or no catch, until
the “Bush” captained by Barry Knowles, and team-
mates Sylvester Burrows, David Hocher and Roy
Rolle hit the dock with 212 lbs of Mahi Mahi, Mack-
erel, and Tuna, putting them in lead for weight.
The “King Fish” too had a slow day bringing in
only two fish, however their only Wahoo of the day
entered a length of 63” basically securing their posi-
tion for the win.

Breeze

With a light breeze dancing on the water, the
fisherman had a break from the flat seas, and excite-
ment was growing as they left with high hopes to be
the winning team. Most boats stayed out until the
last possible moment, however three boats weighed
in before 4:00pm with only a minimal catch. The
crowd continued to gather in abundance to bear
witness to the champions as the boats lined up to
weigh in. With only four boats entering weight over
100lbs, it was anyone’s game until the crew of the
“King Fish” unloaded. As the huge Yellowfin tuna
began lining up on the dock, anglers, observers and
organizers mouths dropped in awe of the size and
amount of this amazing catch, but the team had
another shock for crowd. In an unprecedented act
of generosity the “King Fish” donated all their fish
to Social Services, all 619lbs! It was all over, “King
Fish” had won the tournament, but still more sur-
prises were in store....

As anglers dined on a buffet dinner and grilled fish
provided by the Committee, and “Sky Juice” pro-
moted by Gilbey’s the Tournament’s main spon-
sor, the buzz continued on the huge tuna catch.
With the first place gone, there were still more win-
ners to be announced. Trophies gleamed on the
table, cash was counted and prizes ready to go, and
so the Award Ceremonies began with opening
prayers by Father Pratt, and remarks by MP and







































2008 FORD EXPLORER XLT

7 Passanger XLT, Leather Interior

was $42,073.00
NOW $33,800.00

2008 FORD SPORT TRAC
LIMITED - Leather Interior

was $46,186.00
NOW $37,300.00 yo

—_—— -——

oa

SPORTS

TS
Long Island three-day fishing

tournament the biggest yet

Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries, the Honor-
able Lawrence “Larry” Cartwright. Mr. Cartwright
commended the Committee on their organization of
the event and for staying within Ministry regula-
tions for a Sportsfishing Tournament, giving the
Committee his Ministry’s seal of approval for the
continuation of the event. Mr. Cartwright further
remarked on the benefits to the local community
from the Tournament, and congratulated lead orga-
nizers and business owners Cathy Darville, Francis
Darville and Amanda Cartwright on a successful
Tournament.

In Third Place for the Greatest Weight, the team
of “Bush” with 495lbs of fish won 2 cases of oil
donated by Baystreet Garage, a rod and reel combo
donated by Marine & Land, and $700.00 cash.
“Scorpio”, the defending champion from last year -
Ben Knowles, “Dutch Boy” Knowles, Jason Edler
and Brookes Miller, walked away with $3000.00
cash for their 624lb catch. Taking the First Place
$10,000 prize money sponsored in part by Gilbey’s,
with a grand total of 960lbs, was the “King Fish” of
Nassau setting a new tournament record for weight!

In the Length category, taking Third place was the
“Bush” team with 53 ?”, winning a chest freezer
from Master Technicians, 2 cases of oil from
Baystreet Garage, and $700.00 cash, followed by
the “Still Slunkin” team of Andrew Knowles, Alex
Cartwright, Duncan Love and Matthew Wells with
56”, winning them a Yamaha “Crypton” Scooter
sponsored by Harbourside Marine, and $1000.00
cash. In First Place, winning $10,000 cash sponsored
in part by the Ministry of Tourism was the “King
Fish” with their 63” Wahoo caught on the second
day. Proudly sporting their junior angler Jalen
Knowles on his shoulder and naming him the “lucky
charm”, captain Paul King took the crowds breath
away when he announced he was donating the entire
cash prize to the Mac Knowles Junior Sailing Club!
With young Jalen as a sailing club member, Mr.
King and his team wanted to do something posi-
tive for both the Island and Jalen, and with his dona-
tion, the Sailing Club will be able to afford new
sailing boats, and riggings for the existing ones.

There’s never a dull moment in this Tournament,
from start to finish. Nightly “sponsor trivia” keeps
the crowd (and sponsors) happy with its free give-
aways, Gilbey’s drink specials for three day and DJ
music throughout — it’s a winning combination that
can’t be beat!

Complete List of Sponsors: Gilbey’s, Ministry of
Tourism, Sun Oil Ltd, Harbourside Marine, Con-
stantakis Sea Enterprise, Athena’s Café, Ultimate
Door & Window, Scotiabank, Seafarer Marine,
Baystreet Garage, Master Technicians, Outer Edge
Grill, Henry S Storr Electric, Sunshine Real Estate,
Palmdale Service Station, Discount Tyre & Bat-
tery, Caribbean Bottling Company, Panama Jack,
Boss Up Entertainment, Bling Bling Car Rental &
Wash, Professional Insurance Consultants, Utlimate
Glass, M & S Crane Rental, Glacier Ice, National
Plumbing, Damien Treco Building & Renovations,
Land ‘N’ Sea, Treco’s Service Station, Sunquest
Services, JWK Construction, Marine & Land, Fox
Locksmithing, Archipelago Painters & Developers
Ltd., Cartwright’s Construction, Yuma Crystal
Springs, Grog Pond Hardware, Bahamas Food Ser-
vices, Long Island Tile Supply, Carroll Shipping
Company Ltd., Darville Packaging, Island Cellu-
lar, A.I.D and Under The Sun.

Save BIG Right Now!

was $41,670.00
NOW $35,400.00

3 years or 36,000 miles warranty, 3 years roadside
assistant, 3 years rust protections warranty and

A chance to join
the High Cascade
nowboard Camp!

Winter Olympic athlete Korath Wright sends
invitation to ten lucky Bahamas teenagers



Photo by Alex Neun
KORATH WRIGHT on a visit to The
Bahamas in May 2009.

The first winter Olympic ath-
lete for The Bahamas, Korath
Wright is inviting 10 lucky teens
from The Bahamas ages 13 —
17 years to participate in the
High Cascade Snowboard
Camp in Oregon, USA for two
9-day camps this July.

Camp 1 runs from July 6th to
14th and Camp 2 from July 17th
to 25th.

The Bahamas Snow Kids
Camp was started by Korath
Wright as a way to introduce
Bahamian teens to the same
camp that sparked his passion
for snowboarding. The program
teaches young Bahamians how
to snowboard while they make
new friends and see a new part
of the world.

Beautiful

The Camp is from July 6th to
25th at Mount Hood, Oregon.
This beautiful mountain is one
of just three places north of the
equator where you can ski and
snowboard all summer long.
This was the starting point for
Korath's snowboarding career.
He attended High Cascade
Snowboard Camp at Mt. Hood
as acamper at age 11, going on
to work his way through the
ranks to become a counselor
and then coach. It's the ideal
place for the Bahamas Snow
Kids Camp to begin training the
next generation of Bahamian
snowboarders.

Interested teens should email
Korath as soon as possible at

SnowKids@TheBa-
hamasWeekly.com and tell him
why you think you should be
selected. The camp will include
other activities over the week
and persons may find more
information at www.BahamaS-
nowKids.com masnowkids.com/> or
www.highcascade.com and
click ‘summer camps’. Fun off-
hill activities are also on the
agenda during the 9-day stay.

Tryouts will take place in
New Providence, and Grand
Bahama Island between the
18th and 22nd of June.* The
exact venue, time and date will
be announced closer to that
time.

Five teens from each island
will fly to Oregon to participate
in the camp for free! Eligible
teens must be Bahamian resi-

2014 WORLD CUP: HOST CITIES NAMED



SNOWBOARDING at High Cascade, Mount Hood, Oregon.

dents and be ready to travel and
have up to date travel and legal
documents.

Korath has come up with
three preliminary activities
which are relative skills to snow-
boarding, but any teen who is
athletic could be a worthy can-
didate if they are interested in
trying snowboarding. The try-
outs will involve sprinting, an
obstacle course using quick
side-to-side movement, and
skateboarding.

Teens can also buy in to the
camp if they do not wish to try
out for the scholarships. As long
as they are ready to try snow-
boarding, anyone from the age
of 13 to 17 years can be regis-
tered in the camp. Camp fees
per child are $2500 US and
include everything from flights,
accommodation, food, lift tick-
ets, chaperone, and coaching.

“I'm excited about the

Bahamas Snow Kids Camp
because it’s an opportunity for
teens from The Bahamas to see
snow for the first time... and
then rip that snow apart on a
snowboard!

It's also a chance for me to
communicate to kids that as
long as they know what they
want, are clear on their values
and are ready to work for it,
every decision they make will
move them towards their goals.

Competing for The Bahamas
as the first winter Olympian,
I'm proof that anything is pos-
sible , and this camp will
encourage teens to follow their
dreams, no matter how big
those dreams may be,” said
Korath.

Persons can learn more about
Korath at www.korathsnow-
boarding.com and stay tuned to
TheBahamasWeekly.com for
updates on Korath’s visit.

== licensed and inspected up to birthday.

NOW THAT'S REALLY A

| |(SDeal
FRIENDLY MOTORS CO, LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 * FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com ¢ WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com

was $42,116.00
NOW $35,800.00



PHOTO: Patrice Ann Johnson

NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS — President the Federation of International Football Association (FIFA) Joseph Blatter
speaks, on May 31, 2009, during the 2014 World Cup Brazil Announcement of Host Cities Names, at the Atlantis
Resort, Paradise Island, The Bahamas. Among the cities named for the games include Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo
and Recife.
THE TRIBUNE



PLP MP’s salary cut claim is criticised

FROM page one

simply gone ahead with taking
the pay cut instead of announc-
ing he would be “willing to do
so.”

He said he “waits with baited
breath” to see if Mr Davis goes
ahead with the move and if his
parliamentary colleagues in the
Opposition will follow suit as Mr
Davis suggested all MPs should.

Meanwhile, Mr Ferguson
described as “almost irresponsi-
ble” the MP’s suggestion that
Ministers of State are an unnec-
essary burden on the treasury.

“I don’t think he knows or he
even understands what these
ministers of state are doing. So
for him to say that is out of his
league — it’s not his business,”
said the FNM chairman.

On Thursday Mr Davis, MP
for Cat Island, Rum Cay and
San Salvador, issued a statement
in which he announced that he
would be willing to take the 20
per cent cut in his parliamentary
salary of $28,000 and called on
his parliamentary colleagues to
do the same.

The MP - who earlier this year
said he would be interested in
seeking either the leadership or
deputy leadership of his party,
depending on which became
available first - called on the
Prime Minister to remove
“unnecessary burdens” on tax-
payers during a deep recession
by “eliminating duplicate junior
ministers in his cabinet.”

Byron Woodside, Zhivargo
Laing, Branville McCartney,
Brensil Rolle, Phenton Ney-
mour, Loretta Butler-Turner
and Charles Maynard should all
go, said Mr Davis, as “full min-
isters are responsible for each
of these areas.”

This came after Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham told par-
liament that major expenditure
cutbacks across almost all gov-
ernment ministries, departments
and agencies were required in
view of the economic climate.

Mr Ingraham said Govern-
ment could not afford to pay for
a new health insurance benefit
for nurses, worth $10.5 million,
at present, and teachers and doc-
tors would not be getting pay
increase this year.

Yesterday Mr Ferguson said
the “time is coming for political
pandering and (Mr Davis) is free
to do what he wants along those
lines.”

Stating that Mr Davis’s state-
ment “sounds good”, the Chair-
man accused him of merely

Philip ‘Brave’ Davis



seeking to “set the stage for him
to become leader of the PLP.”

Mr Ferguson suggested that if
Mr Davis’ proposal was some-
thing the PLP party as a whole
supported the statement
“would’ve come from the leader
(Perry Christie) rather than
him.”

As for FNM MPs taking pay
cuts, Mr Ferguson said he ‘“‘does-
n’t see any reason for it right
now.”

Phenton Neymour, one of the
Ministers of State targeted by
Mr Davis, told The Tribune that
he thinks Mr Davis is “behind
the ball” and “should’ve read
the budget” before making his
statement.

Pointing to the decision on the
part of the government to leave
out of the budget the $100,000
allowance each MP was previ-
ously getting to put towards pro-
jects in their constituency, the
Minister of State for the Envi-
ronment said this will have
a much greater cost-saving
impact.

Also accusing Mr Davis of try-
ing to “score political brownie
points” rather than being gen-
uinely concerned about saving
public money, Mr Neymour
defended the need for his posi-
tion telling The Tribune that the
“increased” attention that a
number of issues which fall in
his portfolio have required -
such as BEC and the Water and
Sewerage corporation - justify
the need for his appointment.

Zhivargo Laing, Minister of
State for Finance, told this news-
paper that he would have a
“good response” to Mr Davis’
statement in parliament.

Who understands the

power of a promise?

We do.

We wouldn't be around for more than a century if we didn't.
Every day more than 100,000 people trust Colinalmperal to be
there with them fo meet fife's unexpected challenges

The question then isn't “What will tomorow bring?”

The question is “Wil your insurance company be reac?"

ae

Colinalmperial.

Stay confident. Stay connected.

Nossa: PA 2000 346.6000 Freeport: 342.2223
www oootinoimeerial.cam







































































© FUSION GRAPHICS 09

TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 15

BREAK FREE

at the Hilton

FREE Breakfast,
FREE Internet,
FREE Rooms!

$64.50"
For Groups of 10 rooms or more.

Great for Church Retreats, Family Reunions,
Weddings and Weekend Corporate Groups.

*Price per person based on double occupancy. Full buffet breakfast in Portofino Restaurant. Free in-room internet access.

One comp per 10 rooms confirmed and actualized (based on minimum of 10 rooms per night).
Valid Friday/Saturday/Sunday nights only. June — September 2009.
Blackout dates apply. Additional taxes apply. Bahamian residents only.

British Colonial Hilton

Nassau

Travel should take you places

Tee yi aes eee iste
TO A LARGE TODAY

WIN Instant FOOD Prizes
TCR YC ANNU UT HSL

Ute me em Mm OC am LEN
FCM eee) mel doe

PLUS with your Upgrade, enter to WIN
Weekly Cash Prizes of $1,000.00 & our Whopping $10,000.00 Jackpot!!!

a ee
ee eh ee

PROMOTION ON AT ALL WENDY'S LOCATIONS. SEE STORE FOR RULES AND REGULATIONS.

©2009 Hilton Hospitality Inc.
THE TRIBUNE



ee

TUESDAY,

©
c a

—

| a :

TUNE-2.



2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net





ROYAL BFIDELITY

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010

Government gives up $2.3m in
stamp tax revenue in last year

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

he Government has giv-

en up $2.3 million in

stamp tax revenue in the

last year due to the

recently amended real
property tax act which exempts first
time home owners from the payment of
stamp tax on the acquisition of a resi-
dence with a combined value of up to
$500,000.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
spoke to members of the Bahamas Real
Estate Association during a banquet
to celebrate the organisation’s 50th
anniversary on Friday evening.

He told the realtors: “Since last July,
641 first time- homeowners have
enjoyed this saving in connection with
the acquisition of residents with a total
value of $57 million.

“The government gave up some $2.3
million in stamp tax revenues on those
transactions. Additionally, some
$814,000 was waived by the Govern-
ment on mortgages totaling $86 mil-
lion in connection with the purchase
of first homes.”

Mr Ingraham explained that the
amendedment also exempts first time
homeowners from the payment of real
property tax for the first five years of
home-ownership.

Rolle elected president of
Chamber of Commerce

KHAALITS Rolle, chief mar-
keting officer at Bahamas Fer-
ries, was elected president of
The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce during its recent
2009 Annual General Meeting
(AGM) held at the British Colo-
nial Hilton.

Chamber members also elect-
ed a new slate of officers and
directors for the Chamber’s
2009-2010 Administrative Year.

Rolle is the principal of Nas-
sau Water Ferries and a part
time lecturer at the College of
the Bahamas. Having served on
the Chamber’s board since 2004,
he is no stranger to the business

“We are taking additional action this
year to further reduce the cost of home-
ownership, reduce real property tax
and extend the $250,000 owner — occu-
pied exemption across the board to all
home-owners, Bahamian and foreign
regardless of the period of occupancy in
the residence by the owner.”

The Prime Minister added that the
Government would like to have a low
residential real property tax regime
something he said is possible if people
declared the real value of their homes
and paid the taxes due on them.

He added that the Government is
aware of the association’s concern
about the government’s removal of the
four year concession which capped real
property tax payable on residential real
property at $35,000 per annum.

Mr Ingraham said it is no secret that
many people are paying taxes based
on less than the real value of their
home paying instead on the value
established at the time of original pur-
chase or construction or in some cases
are only paying on the value of the
vacant land on which they built.

“T have found the noise in the market
surrounding the imposition and
removal of the residential real proper-
ty tax cap interesting. Prior to 2003 and
the introduction of the cap, 17 owner
—occupied properties paid annual real
property taxes in excess of $35,000 in



PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham (second from left) with BREA board members —
(shown I-r): Lana Munnings-Basalyga; PM Ingraham; William Wong, BREA president, and
Larry Roberts, immediate past president — during a banquet at Atlantis resort to mark the

organisation’s 50th anniversary.

the amount of $1.1 million.

“During the four-year period 2003-
2007 when the cap was in place, 57 such
properties paid taxes of $35,000 per
annum in the amount of $ 4.1 million.

“Can it be that we should design a
special tax rate to 57 or 68 home-own-
ers amoung the thousands of home-
owners in the country and to accodo-
mate only the wealthiest home-own-
ers?” the prime minister asked.

Mr Ingraham said the Government
believed that as opposed to the caps at

Photo hy Keith Parker, PS News/Features

the upper end of the real estate tax
bracket and or revaluation by the Chef
Valuation Officer it would be infinite-
ly fairer to zone The Bahamas for real
property tax purposes determining
property value purposes on the basis of
the square footage of improvements
plus the value of the land.

“Then we would not have to rely on
sale prices to determine the value of
real estate for real property tax pur-
pose,” the prime minister said.

Mr Ingraham pointed out that a 3,000

Pre-sold homes at $100m Balmoral
development 99% Bahamian owned

square foot residence in Cooper’s town
Abaco can not have the same value as
a residence of the same size in Lyford
Cay. “We might also consider that the
real property tax value will be calcu-
lated on say 75 per cent of a residence‘s
sale price. Either or all of these sug-
gestions could provide certainty and
stability as to tax liabilities for pur-
chases of real property in our country.
And we may also set the circumstances
or conditions which will trigger or result
in an increase in the value of properties
in an orderly fashion so that tax increas-
es are not expected or dramatic in
nature.

Another suggestion would be to
agree that foreign second home owners
might be permitted to retain a residen-
tial designation for real property tax
property purposes even when their res-
idences are not occupied by the owner
for a minimum of nine months of the
year.

Despite a turbulent economy which
has affected their businesses, BREA
president William Wong said that the
industry will rebound as the economy
of both the US and the Bahamas
improves. The gala banquet, which also
awarded long-standing BREA mem-
bers, was held at the Atlantis Resort
and featured entertainment by the
Extra Band, Ronnie Butler and Count
Bernardino.

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE BALMORAL develop-
ment, earmarked at $100 mil-
lion, broke ground last Friday,
with the pre-sold homes now 99
per cent Bahamian owned,
according to the property’s prin-
cipal.

Jason Kinsale, who purchased
the vintage property only 18
months ago, said foundations
have already been laid and more
land is still being cleared for
the start of phase one of the pro-
ject.

“It’s hard to believe that we
started this journey only 18
months ago it’s been very
encouraging to see that we’ve
been able to move forward in
light of the times that we’re see-
ing today and bring this project
to fruition,” he said.

“Tm really excited about the
fact that we’ve been able to cre-
ate opportunities for Bahamian
contractors and really see that
we’re able to contribute to the
economy even though it is a
very difficult time right now.”

According to Mr Kinsale, the
government has made the
approval process for his devel-

opment a smooth process.

“They understand that
investors inject a significant
amount of capital, not only into
my project alone, but into any
development and it is necessary
that we get these approvals in
time which they do truly under-
stand,” he said.

Minister of Labour Dion
Foulkes assisted in the ground-
breaking ceremony along with
Lester Cox, David Johnstone
and Mr Kinsale.

Mr Foulkes said the jobs that
will be created through the Bal-

SEE page 3B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



of the Chamber and expressed
his enthusiasm about continu-
ing to represent the interests of
the private sector.

Thanking members for their
support, Rolle said: “I am grate-
ful for the opportunity to serve
you as president and look for-
ward to lobbying the govern-
ment on issues and policies that
affect that way we do business in
the Bahamas.”

Anxious to tackle the objec-
tives of his new office, Rolle
explained that it would be one
of his main priorities to ensure
that the small and medium sized
enterprise (SME) unit of the
Chamber becomes fully func-
tional.

“The SME Unit will provide
the technical support needed by

YOLANDA PENTHOUSE, PARADISE ISLAND #2712
Dazzling harbourfront penthouse encompasses 3 floors and 5,000 sq. ft. of
living space. The main level features marble flooring, a great room with
custom furnishings, an oversized kitchen and 2 bedrooms with ensuite
baths. On the 2nd level is the master bedroom, an adjoining lounge, guest
bedroom and laundry. A full size private gym is on the 3rd level.

Nick. Damianos@SothebysRealty.com 242.376.1841

Damianos

Member of
SIRbahamas.com | t 242.322.2305 | #242.322.2033 | The Bhamas MLS





Khaalis Rolle

the greater percentage our
membership to enhance their
competitiveness and more
immediately, to survive the cur-
rent business crisis,” he said.

“Tm looking forward to meet-
ing with and developing rela-
tionships with the membership
to further appreciate the needs
of the business community and
reassure them of the Chamber’s
relevance to the continued suc-
cess of their businesses. My term
will be membership-focused and
our objectives will be to deliver
tangible, measurable and recog-
nisable support.”

SEE page 4B

Sothebys

INTERNATIONAL REALTY

Make it a reality.

Personal Pension Plan

e Strong investment performance

e Flexible Structure

PA

Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

FUP le leh

St. Michael: 246.435.1955

royalfidelity.com

e Competitive fees

e Efficient administration

We can get you there!

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

An RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company


PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009

4
dal daa.

MOSELEY « BURNSIDE

CARIB INSURANCE

BROKERS & AGENTS 0D

€e> N-U-A
NOW WE ARE ONE.

A message to our Valued Customers:

We are pleased to announce that Can insurance Brokers & Agents Lid. and Moselay
Burnside Insurance Agency Lid. are now part of NUA Insurance Agents & Brokers
Lid. For our customers, this means:

LOCATIONS

- The Moseley Burnside location at the Harbour Bay Shopping Centre becomes
NUA's second Service Centre in New Providence, complementing its existing
Service Centre and Head Office on Collins Avenue

* The Carib office on Charlotte Street in downtown Nassau will close effective
April 24, 2008. Customers will have the convenience of being served at either the
Collinge Avenue or Harbour Bay Shopping Canirea locations.

CUSTOMER BENEFITS

+ Greater convenience for all of your general insurance needs, including policy
renewals
The benefit of our combined experience, expertise and areas of specialization.
Your insurance coverage remains unchanged. Nothing changes with your
current policies.

* Gontinued excellent service that you have come to expect.

As part of the Bahamas First Group of Companies, we have the security of the
largest and most trusted general insurer in The Bahamas. Bahamas First General
Insurance Gompany Lid. has an A.M. Best Rating of A- (Exeellent) which reflects the
company's excellent capital and liquidity position as well as its superior operational
results.

Now we ara one, committed to helping individuals and businesses with all of their
general insurance needs. It you have any questions please call or viait us al one of
our Service Centres.

The A.H. Bobby Symonette Building
ard Terrace & Golling Avenue

P.O. Bow N-dB70, Nassau

The Bahamas

Harbour Bay Shopping Centre
P.0.Box N-4870, Nassau
Tre Bahamas

Tel: S02-8100, 328 Soo49 ‘Tel:
Or 356-800)
Fax: 328 $974 of 326-3701 Fax

302-9100, 304-8506
or a22-8210
d2e-5277 of 34-8909

me Hands On

Insurance

Avene }



@eo)liareliaalercurel
congratulates its
outstanding
employees

Mena Bethel
Cae eke g a =p be =a)

Colinalmperial.

S56.8300996.2000 Freeport: 352.3223

WAAR Ca InaimMperial Cham

THE TRIBUNE





@ ROYAL FIDELITY MARKET WRAP

@ By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

IT was a busy trading week in
the Bahamian market with
investors trading in 12 out of
the 24 listed securities, of which
three advanced, five declined
and four remained unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 646,818 shares
changed hands, representing a
significant increase of 610,364
shares, compared to last week's
trading volume of 36,454 shares.

Abaco Markets (AML) was
the volume leader with 217,565
shares trading hands, its stock
rising by $0.07 to end the week
at $1.40.

Consolidated Water Compa-
ny (CWCB) was the lead
advancer with 40,000 shares
trading, its stock gaining $0.34
to end the week up at $3.12.
Doctors Hospital Health Sys-
tems (DHS) traded 70,696
shares, its share price climbing
by $0.02 to end the week at
$1.40.

Cable Bahamas (CAB) was
the lead decliner, its stock
falling by $0.36 to $11.39 on a
volume of 63,894 shares. Com-
monwealth Bank (CBL) trad-
ed 59,447 shares, its share price
decreasing by $0.13 to a new

The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 790.41

BISX
SYMBOL PRICE

AML $1.40 $0.07
BBL $0.63 $-
BOB $6.94
BPF $11.00
BSL $7.92
BWL $3.15
CAB $11.39
CBL $6.00
CHL $2.83
CIB $10.40
CWCB — $3.12
DHS $1.40
FAM $7.76
FBB $2.37
FCC $0.30
FCL $5.09
FCLB $1.00
FIN $10.97
ICD $5.50
JSJ $10.50
PRE $10.00

52-week low of $6.

Focol Holdings (FCL) trad-
ed 7,794 shares, its share price
dropping by $0.05 to end the
week at $5.09. Finance Corpo-
ration of the Bahamas (FIN)

International Markets

FOREX Rates

CAD$
GBP
EUR

Commodities

Crude Oil
Gold





International Stock Market Indexes:

DITA

S & P500
NASDAQ
Nikkei

eee ac

rae

Weekly % Change
1.0906 -2.49
1.6194 +177
1.4146 +1.01
Weekly % Change
$66.45 +7.96
$980.50 +2.42
Weekly % Change
8,500.33 +2.69
919.14 +3.62
1,774.33 +4.87
9,522.50 +322



ae el saat ees

(-5.32%) YTD
CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE

CHANGE

-18.13%
-4.55%
-9.16%
-6.78%

0 -22.28%

0 0.00%

63,894 -18.82%

59,447 -14.29%

104 0.00%

80,244 -0.48%

40,000 38.67%

70,696 -45.10%

0 -0.51%

0 0.00%

0 0.00%

7,794 -1.55%

0 0.00%

49,364 -7.58%

217,565
0
43,165
0



traded 49,364 shares, falling by
$0.03 to a new 52-week low of
$10.97.

Bank of Bahamas (BOB)
share price lost $0.01, also clos-
ing at a new 52-week low of
$6.94 on a volume of 43,165
shares.

BOND MARKET

Investors traded $101,000
(par value) of Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) Series D Notes
(FBB15) Due 2015.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:

Benchmark (Bahamas)
(BBL) released its audited
financial results for the year
ended December 31, 2008.

BBL reported a net loss of
$1.9 million, a decrease of $1.4
million or 42 per cent versus a
net loss of $3.2 million in 2007.

Net investment income
declined by $419,000 or 22 per
cent to $1.5 million, compared
to $1.9 million in the previous
year.

BBL's net operating loss
decreased significantly to
$426,000 or 91 per cent, com-

SEE page 4B

vs

ly

ws
\

| q

ov

feam players


THE TRIBUNE



JASON KINSALE (right), principal and president of The Balmoral, speaks with Minister Dion Foulkes at a
reception following the official opening ceremony...

BALMORAL, from 1B

moral development will take a
great amount of pressure off of
the central government and oth-
er government agencies.

He said he is pleased that
around 150 jobs will be created
at the height of the develop-
ment stage of the project, with
that labour coming from
Bahamian construction firms.

“This is a model of how for-
eign investors and Bahamian
investors can pool their
resources and come together to
really do something different
and something that is badly
needed in New Providence and
the Bahamas,” he said.

Guests at the groundbreak-
ing ceremony were treated to
exquisite hors d’oeuvres from
the Balmoral’s head Chef John
Knowles, which will be an inte-
gral part of the development’s
clubhouse experience.

According Mr Kinsale, sky-
rocketing property values in
New Providence and diminish-
ing land availability prompted
him to construct the affordable
gated community.

Two bedroom, 1400 sq ft
town homes in the development
begin at $359,000 while four
bedroom, 2000 sq ft homes sell
for about $559,000.

The more conservative
spender can acquire a 1200 sq ft
condo for $300,000.

“Our buyers have seen a lot
of value in the price point,” said
Mr Kinsale.

“We’ve been able to appeal
to different market segments
and what I consider to be
affordable for the young pro-

fessional market.”

The 43 acre property
belonged to Lord Oliver Sim-
monds in the 1940s and was
purchased by the Tomlinson
family in the 60s.

When Mr Kinsale, a native
of Grand Bahama, bought the
property, the house which has
been redesigned to be the Bal-
moral’s clubhouse, underwent
a five month, one million dollar
renovation. The 17,000 sq ft
clubhouse was redesigned
around its historical trimmings
and original spiral staircase.

“The Tomlinson family did a
tremendous job of maintaining
the history,” said Mr Kinsale.

The contract to construct the
70 phase one homes has been
awarded to Bahama Wall Sys-
tems Ltd.

When construction com-
mences and infrastructure is put
in place Mr Kinsale said he
expects interest to peak.

“We anticipate much stronger
demand once the project
starts,” he said.

The construction side of the

development is expected to cre-
ate around 100 jobs, with 50
more employed at Balmoral’s
clubhouse as gardeners, wait
staff, culinary staff and admin-
istration.

“We have been able to create
a significant number of jobs and
hiring process for local Bahami-
an contractors,” said Mr Kin-
sale.

He said because of the cur-
rent state of the market Bal-
moral’s sales and marketing
team have been working over-
time to push presales in order to
get give the project legs.

He also said Royal Bank of
Canada, which holds the lien
on the development, have been
very helpful in making the pro-
ject a reality.

The project has placed a huge
emphasis on making the Bal-
moral a family oriented com-
munity, with pools and a Mark
Knowles tennis centre to com-
plement the clubhouse amenity
available to all home owners.

“There is a lot of focus on the
amenities,” said Mr Kinsale.

PRODUCERS / FISHERMEN






This Evenme June 2, 62000) pm-20) pm
Law aon: Holy Crees Acre tenn Church Hall
HELP CRAFT
SAVLALL BIOS TASS ACCT OFF DHE BAH ASLAS

Log em In fOern ar bole mg ieshoonaa) Sing cen

ALL ABOVE HOU SIMESS (OY NERS SHOULD ATES

SMALL BUSINESS FOOSOMIEC: SUMMIT



Contact: MARK 4. TURNQUEST
(242) 326-6748 I! (242) 427-3640





THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY

NOTICE

TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF COURIER SERVICES,
PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY

TENDERS ARE INVITED FROM QUALIFIED CONTRACTORS TO
PROVIDE COURIER SERVICES FOR THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS

AUTHORITY, FOR A PERIOD OF ONE (1) YEAR.

TENDER DOCUMENTS,

WHICH

INCLUDE

INSTRUCTIONS

TO TENDERERS, SPECIFICATIONS AND OTHER RELEVANT
INFORMATION CAN BE COLLECTED 9 AM - 5:00 PM MONDAY TO
FRIDAY AT THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY, CORPORATE
CENTRE, BUILDING “B’, THIRD AND WEST TERRACES, COLLINS

AVENUE.

A TENDER MUST BE SUBMITTED IN DUPLICATE IN A SEALED
ENVELOPE OR PACKAGE IDENTIFIED AS “TENDER FOR THE
PROVISION OF COURIER SERVICES, PUBLIC HOSPITALS
AUTHORITY” ADDRESSED TO:

THE CHAIRMAN,
TENDERS COMMITTEE
THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
CORPORATE CENTRE BUILDING “B”
THIRD & WEST TERRACES, COLLINS AVENUE
P.O. BOX N-8200
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

TENDERS ARE TO ARRIVE AT THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
NO LATER THAN 5:00 P.M. Friday 19" June, 2009. LATE

TENDER(S) WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.

A copy of a valid business license and a certificate verifying up
to date National Insurance Contributions should accompany all

proposals.

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to accept or reject any

or all Tender(s).



TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 3B

ALITTLE EXTRA
HELP
CAN MAKE.A
BIG DIFFERENCE

BLAIRWOOD ACADEMY

Alternative school dedicated to the education of students
with learning disabilities,

SUMMER SCHOOL

July 06th to July 31st
Monday- Friday
9:30 a.m, - 12:30 p.m.
* Reading

Encoding! Decoding
> Comprehension
Math
* Writing

© Touch Math and Other Proerams

Concentration and study skills

Ages 4 to 18

Individualized Classes
Proven Special Education Methods
Fee: $ 500.00

Register Now!

3 to make an appointment for a free consult
Deadline for payment in full is 12th June.
VILLAGE ROAD SOUTH OF QUEEN'S COLLEGE

it ane. in
Call 393-131

Consolidated Water (Bahamas) Ltd.

Invites submissions for the sale of:

ONE 1250 kW Diesel Generator Set with 3512 DITA Caterpillar Engine Fully
Enclosed

Bee a Oe ALR

Contingous duty rating 1010 KW. Factory designed amd
delivered in a package that is ready to he commected bo
Power Lines, 4-Stroke-Cyele, Water-cooled Diesel Engine,
DES KW (1562 kVA) SRO V3 hose, 60H 2) 1A or
1250 kVA 400Â¥, 3-Phase, 0H fa) 100rpm, 18 model
year, 6029 hours on unit's hours meter,
Specifications follow:

Cat 3512 TA Diesel Engine
Cat SR Generator incL Tropicalization and 134%

Dy erspeed Canactty
CAT EMCP [I Digital Comal Panel
Anrio Start Stop Function
Safety Shutdawins
NFPA 110 Alarm Module
Circunt Breaker
Woodward 7301 Electronic Grovernot
"4 Electric Starter
Bator: Changer
33.Amp Altemator
Lube Oil Cooler
Lube Ohl and Filters
Recor Fuel Filters
Ar Cleaners
Pladiator
Dual Jacket Water Heaters
Rail/Skid-meaunted in ENCLOSURE
Muffler
S000 Gallen (10,300 Liter) UL. Listed Double Wall Fuel
Tank Base
Heavy Duty Enclosure
Warranty Note
PACKAGING: Prepared for Flat Bed Transpart

SUA Re ee Ce ee:
eR eT De
Deca e one este Um Ee et tires

Peete ioe

eee ETO M a eam
the following adress on or before June 24, 2089

The General Manager
Consolidated Water |Hahaneas) Ltd.
cae ee 10
RE CCH LEE EES


PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SS cea reg ee ee ee ee ee ee a a ae
Rolle elected president of Chamber of Commerce

FROM page 1B

The Chamber of Commerce
currently has a membership of
approximately 500.

Effective from yesterday, the
incoming president will head a
new board of officers comprised
of Ist Vice President, Gershan
Major (Mail Boxes Etc.); 2nd
Vice President, Chester Cooper
(British American Financial);
Honorary Treasurer, Darron
Cash (First Caribbean Bank);
and Honorary Secretary, Yvette
Sands (Sands & Associates).

Saluting the Chamber’s new
board, the new president not-
ed, “I will have the pleasure of
working with a very diverse and
energetic board, representative
of the entire business commu-
nity. The diversity of the board
brings added value to our mem-
bership as we represent the
issues and policies affecting the
private sector and the way we
do business.

We will work to maintain an
open line of communication
with the government to ensure

MARKET, from 2B

pared to a $4.6 million loss in
fiscal 2007, due primarily to low-
er provisions for doubtful debts
in the year of $473,000 ($5.6
million in 2007).

The unrealised loss on BBL's
portfolio of $1.6 million
accounted for the balance of the
company's net losses in fiscal
2008.

Total assets and liabilities

private sector representation on
the relevant policy making and
decisions.”

Giving the President’s
Report, outgoing president,
Dionisio D’Aguilar, conveyed
highlights of his term over the
last two years. “It gave me great
pride to take this office that my
father held. I was particularly
happy to serve when my father
was alive.”

Vincent D’Aguilar served as
Chamber President from 1977-
79 and in 1987. Mr. D’ Aguilar
reflected that it made his father
proud to see his son rise to the
top of an organisation to which
he contributed much of his time
and which was near and dear
to him.

Known for being a strong
voice for the business commu-
nity, D’Aguilar noted, “I par-
ticularly enjoyed being presi-
dent because it has allowed me
to get off my chest some of my
concerns about the way busi-
ness is done in this country. I
lobbied hard during my term in
office for the large anchor pro-
jects because I felt they would

million respectively, compared
to $22.3 million and $19.9 mil-
lion at year-end 2007, with net
assets of $495,000 - declining
from $2.3 million reported at
year-end 2007.

Doctors Hospital Health Sys-
tems (DHS) - During the week,
DHS released its financial
results for the three months
ended April 30, 2009.

Net income for the quarter
was $2.3 million ($0.23 per

stood at $30.3 million and $29.8 share), compared to $981,000

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law and Equity Division

2008
CLE/QUI/OO 1134

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land containing Three thousand and Fifty-six
(3,056) square feet situate in the Settlement of Great
Guana Cay one of the Abaco chain of cays in the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas bounded on the
North by land now or formerly the property of Lewis
Roberts and running thereon Sixty (60) feet on the
East by land the property of Alrob (Thomas Roberts)
but now the property of William Doyle Watson and
Frederik F. Gottlieb running thereon Fifty-five and
Ninety-three hundredths (55.93) feet on the South by
the Main Public Road (known as “Front Street”) and
running thereon Seventy (70) feet or less and on the
West by a Three (3) feet wide public reservation and
running thereon Sixty (60) feet

cushion us during the impend-
ing economic downtown.”

He expressed happiness
about the progress being made
by Albany and looked to the
AGM’s guest speaker, Sarkis
Izmirlian, to give an update on
the Baha Mar project.

Banking

In his usual frank nature,
D’ Aguilar expressed disap-
pointment that the banking
community has been unable to
establish the automated clearing
house (A.C.H.), “They’ve
promised that will it happen this
year but needless to say after
two years of promises I’m not
holding my breath.”

Speaking to the current eco-
nomic recession, he lamented,
“Sales are down, expenses are
up, especially energy costs, and
this has placed has an enormous
downward pressure on compa-
nies’ profits. The government
needs to be constantly remind-
ed that ensuring a healthy viable
private sector is key to a suc-
cessful economy.”

($0.10 per share) in the 2009
first quarter, an increase of 135
per cent.

Total revenues of $12.8 mil-
lion increased by $1.9 million
or 17 per cent in comparison to
$10.9 million the previous year,
while total expenses of $10.4
million increased by $611,000
or 6 per cent.

Management attributed the
positive results to a growth in
patient services, with revenues
from patient services of $12.4
million increasing by $1.8 mil-
lion or 18 per cent year-over-
year.

The increase in expenses was
said to be a direct result of rev-
enue growth, with medical sup-
plies and services costs of $3.1
million increasing by $412,000
or 15 per cent, while salaries
and benefits increased by
$236,000 or 6 per cent to $4.3
million compared to the 2009
first quarter.

Total DHS assets at April 30,
2009, were $31.3 million, a
decrease of $475,000 compared
to $31.8 million at year-end
2009. Total liabilities declined
by $2.2 million or 25 per cent
to $6.4 million, due primarily to

Having become a regular
with the local media, D’ Aguilar
thanked the press for their sup-
port, “I think the journalists of
this country enjoyed my can-
didness and my willingness to
‘tell it like it is’ in my usual
undiplomatic style.”

The Chairman and Chief
Executive Officer of the Baha
Mar Resorts Ltd., Mr. Sarkis
Izmirlian, delivered the AGM’s
keynote address on the topic
“Are We Ready For The
Recovery?”

“Yes, our community is feel-
ing the adverse affects of the
recession but at the same time
our community has the oppor-
tunity to implement strategic
initiatives so that we can be
well positioned to take advan-
tage of the economic recovery,”
he said.

Izmirlian highlighted the need
for major reform to various
areas including education, gam-
ing regulations, the port and
downtown, the airport and the
country’s investment process.

Conveying well wishes to the
outgoing President: “He has

repayment of a bank loan on
the company’s investment prop-
erty.

Annual General Meeting

(AGM) Notes:

Famguard Corporation
(FAM) announced that it will
hold its Annual General Meet-
ing on Friday, June 19, 2009, at
4pm at the British Colonial
Hilton, Victoria Room, Bay
Street, Nassau, Bahamas. Share-
holders of record as of May 21,
2009, will be qualified to vote
at the Annual Meeting.

J.S. Johnson Company (JSJ)
announced it will be holding its
Annual General Meeting on
Monday, June 15, 2009, at 6pm
at the British Colonial Hilton,
Victoria Room, Bay Street,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Doctors Hospital Health Sys-
tems (DHS) announced that it
will be holding its Annual Gen-
eral Meeting on Thursday, June
18, 2009, at 5.30pm at Doctors
Hospital, Dowdeswell Street,
Nassau, Bahamas. Sharehold-
ers of record as of May 27, 2009,
will be qualified to vote at the
Annual Meeting.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that
BUNMORE STREET, HARBOUR

KERVIN JONASSAINT of
ISLAND, ELEUTHERA,

always taken a vocal position
to protect and enhance the busi-
ness environment of the
Bahamas. His straight talk and
frank approach has been a
refreshing change. Even with
all the bad news in the papers
over the past months, I always
looked forward to reading the
papers and learning of his latest
crusade. I know the newspapers
will miss him as much as all of
us will.”

The Chamber’s 2009-10
board of directors was elected
during the AGM and consists
of the President, Khaalis Rolle;
1st Vice President, Gershan




Major; 2nd Vice President,
Chester Cooper; Honorary
Treasurer, Darron Cash; Hon-
orary Secretary, Yvette Sands;
Rick Hazelwood, John Bull
Group of Companies; Dr.
Jonathan Rodgers, Pearle
Vision; Robert Myers,
Caribbean Landscape Ltd.;
Diane Morley, Coles of Nassau;
Odley Aritis, TOP Builders;
Aaron Brice, Epic Battery Ltd.;
Pedro Roberts, Commonwealth
Drug & Medical Supplies Com-
pany Limited; Merrit Storr,
Chancellors Chambers;

Creswell Gardiner; Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) Limited.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL






The Public is hereby advised that

ALIA TAMAR

AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT,
1959, CHAPTER 393 OF THE STATUTE LAWS OF
THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

AND

BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 26TH day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF WILLIAM
DOYLE WATSON and FREDERIK F. GOTTLIEB
NOTICE OF PETITION

WILLIAM DOYLE WATSON of St. Simon’s Island in
the State of Georgia one of the states of the United
States of America and FREDERIK F. GOTTLIEB of
the Town of Marsh Harbour in the Island of Abaco
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas claim to be the owners in fee simple in
possession of all that piece parcel or lot of land
hereinbefore described free from encumbrances.
AND the Petitioners have made application to
the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act,
1959 Chapter 393 of the Statute Laws of the said
Commonwealth, in the above action, to have their
title to the said land investigated and the nature
and extent thereof determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted in accordance with
the provisions of the said Act.

Notice is hereby given to any person having
a dower or right of dower or an adverse claim or
a claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or
before the expiration of thirty (30) days after the final
publication of these presents filed in the Registry
of the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
or the undersigned a statement of his claim in the
prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure of any such person to file and serve
a statement on or before the expiration of thirty (30)
days after the final publication of these presents shall
operate as a bar to such claims.

Copies of the said plan may be inspected
during normal hours at the Registry of the
Supreme Court, East Street North, City of Nassau,
New Providence, The Bahamas and the Office
of the Administrator in the Township of Marsh
Harbour, Abaco, The Bahamas.

Dated this 2nd day of December, A.D., 2008

SYDBRI LEGAL SERVICES
Chambers
Naomi House
No.19, Ninth Terrace & West Court
Centreville
New Providence, The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioners



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DARREL SIMILIAN of HARBOUR
WEST, EIGHT MILE ROCK, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 25TH day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

WANTED
POSSE VA CLL

A local company is seeking to hire a highly motivated
detailed oriented individual to fill the position of Assistant

Financial Controller

REQUIREMENTS

Ability to work with minimum supervision
Experience in effective management of purchases,
inventory and Accounts Receivables

Supervise the accurate input and processing of

financial information

Timely preparation and issuance of financial reports
Must possess a high level of integrity & professionalism
Must be flexible and able to produce in a time-driven

environment

QUALIFICATIONS

* A University Degree in Accounting or other related
discipline

* Minimum of 5 years experience in accounting

* Working knowledge of Excel and Microsoft Word

Interested persons should apply on or before: July 1st 2009

Attention: CONTROLLER
DA 61782
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N3207
Nassau, Bahamas

Salary is commensurate with experience and qualification

SAUNDERS of Nassau, Bahamas intend to change
my name to ALIA TAMAR SAUNDERS KNOWLES. If
there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Deputy Chief
Passport Officer, PO.Box N-792, Nassau, Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of
this notice.










































NOTICE
NAPLES LIMITED

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) NAPLES LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 29nd May, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro
Associated Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI

Dated this 2nd day of June, A. D. 2009



Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CORPORACION TONAR S.A.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ESSAY COMPETITION

TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK

The Department of Public Service will host an Essay
Competition as one of the activities for the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week. The Competition is open to Junior
and Senior Students in New Providence.

Additionally, this year, a speech competition will be
for schools in the Northern & Southern Bahamas,
respectively. Students interested in participating in the
Essay Competition should write a 250 - 300 words (Junior
High), and 450 - 500 words (Senior High), essay on the
topic: “ The Public Service-Striving for Excellence in
Customer Service.”

The deadlines for entries, which should be referred
to the attention of Mrs. Antoinette Thompson, Deputy
Permanent Secretary, Department of Public Service, is
Friday 24th July, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 Computer System will be awarded to
the winner each category. The first runners-up for both the
Essay and Speech Competition in the Junior & Senior High
School category, will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.

The winners will be announced during the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week Awards Ceremony scheduled for
Saturday 10th October 2009.

Students interested in the Speech Competition for the
Northern and Southern Bahamas should contact their
Language Arts Teacher.
THE TRIBUNE

PBUSINESS
Oil prices
push to
new highs
for ‘09

@ By MARK WILLIAMS
AP Energy Writer



COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP)
— Oil prices pushed to new
highs for the year Monday on
a weak dollar and new data
suggesting manufacturing in
China has strengthened. Both
of those factors helped send
energy prices to record highs
last summer.

Benchmark crude for July
delivery rose $2.27 to settle at
$68.58 a barrel on the New
York Mercantile Exchange,
the highest close since early
November. Natural gas
futures soared 10 per cent.

The data out of China
shows how much economic
news from across the globe
can effect pocketbooks in the
US.

Brokerage CLSA Asia-
Pacific Markets said its pur-
chasing managers index rose
to 51.2 from April's 50.1 on a
100-point scale, indicating that
the world's third-largest econ-
omy might be recovering from
a slump. Numbers above 50
show an expansion. The state-
sanctioned China Federation
of Logistics and Purchasing
reported that its index had
eased, but that manufacturing
was still expanding somewhat.

When crude prices were
heading toward $150 per bar-
rel last year, many energy ana-
lysts believed the booming
economies of China and India
would support energy prices
globally even as Western
nations slipped into recession.

That did not turn out to be
the case and there is little tan-
gible evidence to suggest that
the rapid rise in energy prices
can be sustained for long this
summer.

That would be good news
for some consumers as far as
energy prices go. Utility bills
and gasoline prices are far
below last year's levels,
though the plunge has come at
the cost of millions of jobs.

Yet the pace at which ener-
gy prices rose in May has also
raised questions about what
is causing the surge. That is
especially true of spiking nat-
ural gas prices Monday.

Natural gas has been one
commodity in the energy com-
plex that has lagged this year
compared with crude and
gasoline, and may finally have
attracted a large number of
investors who saw a bargain.

Speculative bets on crude
were on the rise already. The
net increase in bets that
benchmark crude prices will
increase rose by more than 14
per cent last week, according
to a report from the Com-
modity Futures Trading Com-
mission.

A lot of that money is being
driven by inflation fears as the
dollar falls against other major
currencies.

Stil, there are continuing
hints of an economy that may
be on the mend.

The Tempe, Arizona-based
Institute for Supply Manage-
ment reported the first month
of growth in the new-orders
index since November 2007,
though the sector continues
to contract overall.

Natural gas prices have
slumped to five-year lows with
some of the biggest users, like

RBC

Royal Bank
Rx, of Canada

PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each property.
HOUSES/APARTMENTS/COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

(401) Lots #17 & #18 Crown Allot-
ments, Love Hill Settlement, An-
dros. Containing a two-storey res.
Appraised value: $100,000

(806) Lots #1 & #2, Block 3 with
a parcel situated between Lot #1,
Block 3, containing a 4 bedroom
condominium — Sunset View Villas,
West Bay Street. Appraised value:
$750,000

(433) Lot #27 of Village Allotment
#14 in the Eastern District, contain-
ing residence situated on Denver
Street off Parkgate Road in the Ann’s
Town Constituency, New Providence.
Property size 2,500 sqft Building size
990 sqft. Appraised value: $50,000

(400) Property situated in Calabash
Bay on the Island of Andros. 75’ x
150’ and containing thereon a small
grocery store 480 sqft. and an in-
complete 3 bed 2 bath house 900
sqft. Appraised value: $65,000

(301) Lot #2 in block #8, Steward
Road, Coral Heights East Subdivi-
sion situated in Western District of
New Providence, approx. size 8,800
sq. ft. with a split level containing
two bed, two bath, living, dining
& family rooms, kitchen and util-
ity room - approx. size of building
2,658 sqft Appraised value: $322,752

(702) Lot #20 with residential prop-
erty located Skyline Heights.
Appraised value $280,000

(902) Lot ofland94x94x 150x150
on Queens Highway just south of
Palmetto Point with a two storey
stone building containing two apart-
ments. Each unit has 3 bed/2 1/2
bath, kitchen, living room and 3 linen
closets. Appraised value: $287,209

(400) Lot #14 situated in the settle-
ment of Love Hill on the Island of
Andros totalling 20,000 sqft Property
contains a two storey 5 bedroom,
3 bathroom residence. Appraised
value: $185,000

(105) Lot containing 2 storey bldg.
with three bed, two and a half bath
residence, and 30’ x 86’ situated Bai-
ley Town, North Bimini.
Appraised value: $235,000

(801) Lot #18 in Sandilands Allot-

(702) Undeveloped lots# 4A, 16, 17,
18 and 19 located Chapman Estates,
West Bay. Appraised value: $348,000

(701) Undeveloped lot #149. Sea-
fan Lane, Lucayan Beach Subdivi-
sion. Grand Bahama, 18750 sqft.
Appraised value: TBA

(565) Vacantlot#5 located Eleuthera
Island Shores, Seaside Drive Section
B, Block #15, Eleuthera, Bahamas.
9,691 sqft, Appraised value: $27,620

(402) Lot89, Block 7 Aberdeen Drive,
Bahamia West Replat Subdivision,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, consist-
ing of 12,100 sqft.

Appraised value: $51,000

(800) Vacant property located Baha-
mia South. Block 16 lot 9A, Freep-
ort, Grand Bahama consisting of
24,829.20 sqft. Appraised value:
$52,000

(565) Vacant Lot #9 (11,406.65 sqft)
situated in Mango Lane Section “B”
Block #15, Eleuthera Island Shores,
Eleuthera.

Appraised value: $50,189

(909) Vacant residential Lot# 63
(7800 sqft) Crown Allotments located
Murphy Town, Abaco.

Appraised value: $18,000

ment on the western side of Cross-
wind Road between Seabreeze Lane
and Pineyard Road in the Eastern
Distract of The Island of New Prov-
idence-The Bahamas.,containing
single storey private residence com-
prising the following: covered entry
porch, living room, dining room,
kitchen, laundry room, familyroom,
sitting area, 4 bedrooms, 2 bathroom
and patio. The total area ofland is
approximately 7,641 square feet.
Appraised value: $289,426

(801) Two parcels of land containing
21,120 sq.ft. situated on the south-
ern side of East Shirley Street and
100 feet west of its junction with
“Shirlea” in the Eastern District, New
Providence. Situated thereon isa
Gas Station and Auto Repair Shop.
Appraised value: $799,497

(601) Lot #17 located Village Allot-
ment with fourplex,
Appraised value: $500,000

(701) Lotofland having the number
16 in Block number 16 in Section
Three of the Subdivision called
and known as Sea Breeze Estates
situated in the Eastern District of
New Providence. Property contains
a three bed, two bath residence.
Appraised value: $277,000

(701) Lot ofland being lot number
11 in Block number 10 ona plan of
allotments laid out by Village Estates
Limited and filed in the dept of Land
& Surveys as number 142 N.P and
situated in the Eastern District of
New Providence. Property contains
three bed, two bath residence.
Appraised value: $165,000

(565) Lot # 1018 in Golden Gates
Estates #2 Subdivision situate in
the South Western District of the
island of New Providence Containing
a single storey private residence 3
bedroom 2 bath. Property approx.
size 6,000 sqft Building approx size
2,400 sqft Appraised value: $173,176

(205) Lot B - 50 ft x 115.73 ft situ-
ated on the north side of Shell Fish
Road, being the third lot west of Fire
Trail Road and east of Hamster Road
with a one half duplex residential
premises. Appraised value: TBA

(808) Lot #3 Block 24 in the Cen-

(108) Vacant Single Family Lot #5
Block #5 Unit #1 Devonshire
Appraised value $30,000

(802) Vacant Commercial Lot No:
3A, Block 60 Bahamia Subdivision
VI containing 3 acres located Free-
port, Grand Bahama.

Appraised value: $750,000

(108) Vacant Single Family Lot #5
Block F Bahamia South Subdivi-
sion. Appraised value $35,700

(569) Vacant property located in
Subdivision called “Culmerville”
being a portion of Lot #47 and a
portion of Lot #57. Appraised value:
$24,000

(569) All that piece parcel or lot
of land situate in the settlement
of James Cistern on the Island of
Eleuthera one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of the Baha-
mas measuring approx 10,000 sq. ft.
Appraised value TBA

(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land being Lot No. 102 in the Sub-
division known as “EXUMA HAR-
BOUR’ in the Island of Great Exuma
measuring 10,000 sq.ft. Appraised
value $20,000.00.

(202) Vacant lot of land contain-

treville Subdivision . Building #109/
Eastern side of Collins Ave .Com-
prising commercial 2,800 sq ft com-
mercial building.

Appraised value: $582,000

(901) Lot #32 containing 4 bedroom
2bath concrete structure located
Triana Shores Harbour Island, Eleu-
thera. Property size 80’ x 120’ x 80’
120 feet Appraised value: $332,735

(902) Property contains 23,125 sq ft
lot #30 Lover’s Hill Subdivision with
two storey structure approximately
15 years old. House contains Three
bedrooms, Two baths, living room,
dining room, t.v. room, kitchen, attic
space and Double car garage with a
gross floor area of 3,378 sq. ft. Lover's
Hill is a residential development.
Appraised value $254,154.00

(902) Property contains approx.
5,800 sq. ft. situated in North Pal-
metto Point with a single storey con-
crete structure approx. 18 years old.
House contains three bedrooms,
two baths, living room, dining room
and kitchen with a gross floor area
of 1,444.26 sq. ft. Palmetto Pointis
a residential developed area. Ap-
praised value $128,766.00

(101-N) Single Family Resi-
dence-810 sqft, 2 bed,1 bath Lot
#3 Block #1 Eastville Subdivision
Eastern District, New Providence.
Appraised value: $65,000

(910) Lot #12 Maderia Park, a small
subdivision on the outskirts of Treas-
ure Cay, Abaco having an area of
9,444 square feet residence contain-
ing a concrete block structure with
asphalt shingle roof comprises of
three bedrooms, two bathrooms,
family room, living room, dining
room, and kitchen. Appraised value:
$147,000

(569) Property situated on Wil-
liams Lane off Kemp Road, New
Providence, Bahamas containing
a two-storey house and an apart-
ment building consisting of 1800
sqft. Appraised value $100,000

(501) Allthat piece of land being Par-
cel #3 and Parcel #4 situated on the
South side of Prince Charles Drive,
New Providence, Bahamas contain-
ing a commercial building housing

VACANT PROPERTIES

ing 41,164 sqft, Lot#8, Love Estate,
Phase 1, 2,300 ft. south of West Bay
Street, Western District, New Provi-
dence. Appraised value $165,000

(202) Vacantlot ofland containing
1.786 acre, situated east of Know-
les Drive, approximately 1,420 ft.
southward of Harold Road in the
western district of New Providence,
Bahamas. Appraised value: $ 170,000

(503) Vacant property consisting
of Lot #894 situated in the Freep-
ort Ridge Subdivision, Section #1,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.
Appraised value: TBA

(505) Ten (10) acres of land situ-
ated on Woods Cay, known as Lit-
tle Abaco, between Cooper’s Town
and Cedar Harbourin Abaco, Baha-
mas. The property is undeveloped
with a view of the sea from both the
North and South side. Appraised
value: $1,078,750

(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land Lot #977, Pinewood Gardens
Subdivision, Southern District, New
Providence. Appraised value: TBA.

(008) All that piece parcel oflot and
land on the Island of Great Exuma sit-
uated about 10 1/2 miles Northwest-
wardly of George Town which said

OFFICERS

TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 5B

two shop space on the ground floor
and three shop space on the second
floor with a large storage area in the
rear. Total area 8400 sq ft.
Appraised value: $366,650

(569) All that piece, parcel or land
having an approximate area of 2100
sqft situated on the Western side of
Blue Hill Road about 70 ft North of
Peter Street and about 115 ft south
of Laird Street in the Southern Dis-
trict of New Providence, Bahamas
containing a commercial building
housing a two bed/one bath unit
on the top floor and a store on the
first floor. Appraised value: $154,000

(569) All that piece, parcel or lot
of land situated on Cowpen Road
(1000 ft east of the Faith Avenue Junc-
tion) in the Southern District of New
Providence, Bahamas containing
a duplex apartment comprising of
two - 2-bedroom/1-bathroom apart-
ments. Appraised value: $150,000

(800) All that parcel or lot of land
being Lots #10 and 11 in Block 29
of Coconut Grove Subdivision, con-
taining a shopping plaza. The lotis
trapezium in shape, 8,383 square
feet. Appraised value $500,000

(560) Lot of land #2 Sea View Sub-
division, Russell Island, Spanish
Wells. Property size 11,323 sqft,
building size 2236 sq ft containing
3 bedrooms, 2 bath, living room, an
eat-in kitchen, dining room, laun-
dry room, covered porch, a one car
garage, and a covered water tank.
Appraised value: $299,000

(901) Lot#57 block# Trianna Shores
containing 3 bed 2 bath front room,
dining room, & kitchen. Concrete
structure, 1926.40 sq ft wooden
deck 321.60 sq ft. property 9600 sqft.
Appraised value: $448,645

(901) Lot “K” Barrack Street, Harbour
Island containing a2 storey concrete
building with 4 bed 4 bath, dining
room & kitchen -Building 2934.56
sqft property 6563 sqft.
Appraised value: $479,228

(811) Property containing Condo
“Millennium II’, Unit A-101, building
57, Phase 1C, 2 bedrooms, 3 bath-
rooms, living room, dining room,
utility closet & patio. Situated in

piece parcel or lotofland is #10750
Bahama Sound O.A.E. 10,900 sqft.
Appraised value: $65,000

(008) All that piece parcel orlot of
land designated as Lot Number 563
onaplan ofa Subdivision called or
known as Bahama Highlands #4.
11,223.41 sqft. Appraised value:
$87,000

(201) Single family residential Lot
No. 11703 Bahama Sound Subd.
Number 11 West, Great Exuma.
Size: approx. 10,000 sq ft
Appraised value $15,000

(201) Multifamily LotNo. 10-South-
east Corner of Mandarin Drive, Sugar
Apple Road, Sans Souci Sudv. Size:
14,368 sq ft

Appraised value $165,000.00.

(201) Single family residential Lot
No. 11698 Bahama Sound Subd.
Number 11 West, Great Exuma.
Size: approx. 10,426 sq ft Appraised
value: $15,000

(569) All that piece parcel orlot of
land being Lot #1 located in Block 3
in the Subdivision known as East-
ern Estates situate in the Eastern
District of the island of New Prov-
idence. Property approx. 6950 sq.
ft, Appraised value TBA

908

the area known as Bimini Bay Re-
sort, Bimini, Bahamas.
Appraised value - $485,000

(008) Single Story tri-plex building,
one 2 bedrooms and two 1 bed-
room located on a multi-family Lot
No.4, block 3, Shirley Lane, section
1, Bahama Reef Yacht & Country
Club Subdivision, Freeport Grand
Bahama. Property size is approx.
16,621 sq. ft.

Appraised value $348,000

(908 Lot# 52 Crown Allotments
located Murphy Town, Abaco with
size being 10,200 sq ft. Containing
a one storey house with 4 bed/2
bath - Concrete Block Structure —
Appraised value. $200,000

(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land being Lot #39 in the residen-
tially zoned area of Highbury Park
Subdivision in the Eastern District
of New Providence, Bahamas. Ap-
prox. land size 6,000 sq ft. Property
contains a 3-bedroom/2-bathroom
house, size being 1,563 sq. ft.

Appraised Value $131,000.00.

(908) Lot# 23 located in the Sub-
division of Spring City, Abaco with
size being 8,925 sq ft. Containing a
one storey wooden structure house
with 3 bed/1 bath of 7985 sq ft
Appraised value. $60,000

(304) Single storey triplex, situated
on Lot 615, Mermaid Boulevard,
Golden Gates #2 in the Western
District, New Providence. Two - two
bedrooms, one bathroom units and
one - one bedroom, one bathroom
unit. The property is zoned as Multi
Family Residential, measuring 9,092
sq.feet with the living area meas-
uring 2,792 sq ft.

Appraised value $374,192

(201) Duplex Lot #25 situated on
Faith Ave. North (Claridge Estates)
- size being 7,354 sq. feet. with du-
plex thereon.

Appraised value - TBA

(201) Lot of land situated on Fire
Trail Road being a partition of Glad-
ston Allot #41 New Providence, Ba-
hamas containing townhouse apart-
ment unit and two proposed units
(completed as is).

Appraised value $237,714

(569) All that piece parcel or lot
of land located on Marigold Road
in the Subdivision known as Kool
Acres. Lot is approx.9455 sq. ft.
Appraised value $93,000.

(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land being Lot #152 located in the
Subdivision known as West Ridge-
land Park situated in the Southern
District of the island of New Provi-
dence. Property approx. 4000 sq. ft.
Appraised value $55,000.

(008) An undeveloped waterfront
lot land being Lot Number 12032
with a size of 10,600 sq.ft. in the
Bahama Sound of Exuma Subdi-
vision Number 11] West situated in
the Island of Great Exuma one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas.

Appraised value $224,000

(008) Partially developed parcel
ofland being 10,000 sq.ft. situate
about the eastern portion of The
Forest Estate in the vicinity of the
settlements of Southside and The
Forest being Lot Number 4803 in
Bahama Sound of Exuma6, Exuma
The Bahamas.

Appraised value $25,000

COMMERCIAL BANKING CENTRE
Tel: 242-356-8568

800) Mrs. Monique Crawford
801) Mr. Jerome Pinder

802) Mr. Brian Knowles

803) Mr. Vandyke Pratt

805) Mrs. Tiffany Simms O’brien
806) Mrs. Lois Hollis

807) Mr. Lester Cox

808) Mrs. DaShann Clare-Paul
810) Miss LaPaige Gardiner

811) Ms. Lydia Gardiner
PALMDALE SHOPPING CENTRE
Tel: 242-322-4426/9 or
242-302-3800

(201) Ms. Nicola Walker

(202) Mr. Robert Pantry

(205) Mrs. Anya Major

NASSAU MAIN BRANCH

Tel: 242-322-8700

701) Mr. James Strachan

702) Mr. Antonio Eyma

301) Ms. Thyra Johnson

304) Mrs. Alicia Thompson
MACKEY STREET BRANCH

Tel: 242-393-3097

601) Ms. Cherelle Martinborough
JOHN E. KENNEDY DRIVE BRANCH
Tel: 242-325-4711

401) Mrs. Renea Walkine

402) Mrs. Chandra Gilbert
PRINCE CHARLES SHOPPING CENTRE
Tel: 242-393-7505/8

503) Mr. Dwight King

505) Ms. Patricia Russell

CABLE BEACH BRANCH

Tel: 242-327-6077

466) Mrs. Winnifred Roberts
LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE
Tel: 242-502-5170/502-5180

716) Mrs. Ingrid Simon

717) Mrs. Nancy Swaby
723) Ms. Deidre King

) Mrs. Joyce Riviere
}
724) Mrs. Faye Higgs
}
}

909) Mrs. Sylvia Poitier

910) Miss Cyprianna Williams
BIMINI BRANCH
Tel:242-347-3031

105) Miss. Ganiatu Tinubu
GRAY’S, LONG ISLAND

Tel: 242-337-0101

100) Mrs. Lucy Wells
EXUMA BRANCH

Tel: 242-336-3251

008) Ms. Jocyelyn Mackey
FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH
Tel: 242-352-6631/2

101-F) Ms. Garnell Frith
102) Ms. Elaine Collie

103) Mrs. Damita Newbold-Cartwright
108) Ms. Sylvie Carey
SPANISH WELLS

Tel: 242-333-4131 or
242-333-4145

(560) Mr. Walter Carey

manufacturers, hammered by
the recession.

The lack of broader, funda-
mental support hasn't stopped
momentum from building in
energy markets.

"T don't believe in it ... but
I'm not dumb enough to stand
in front of it," oil trader and
analyst Stephen Schork said
of the rally.

In other Nymex trading,
gasoline for June delivery rose
two cents to $1.915 a gallon
and heating oil rose 9.89 cents
to settle at $1.7765 a gallon.
Natural gas for June delivery
jumped 41.4 cents to settle at
$4.249 per 1,000 cubic feet.

In London, Brent prices
rose $2.45 to settle at $67.97 a
barrel on the ICE Futures
exchange.

¢ Associate Press writers Joe
McDonald in Beijing, Carlo
Piovano in London and Alex
Kennedy in Singapore con-
tributed to this report

725) Ms. Marguerite Johnson
565) Mrs. Catherine Davis

569) Mrs. Vanessa Scott

NASSAU INT’L AIRPORT

Tel: 242-377-7179

433) Mrs. Suzette Hall-Moss
LYFORD CAY BRANCH

Tel: 242-362-4540 or 242-362-4037
101-N) Mrs. Lindsey Peterson
GOVERNOR’S HARBOUR, ELEUTHERA
Tel: 242-332-2856/8

902) Ms. Nicole Evans
HARBOUR ISLAND BRANCH
Tel:242-333-2230

901) Ms. Velderine Laroda
ANDROS TOWN BRANCH

Tel: 242-368-2071

400) Mrs. Rose Bethel

MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO

Tel: 242-367-2420



(
(
(
(
(
(
(
(
(
(









For the stories

L RBC Royal
behind the news,

RBC > HELPING YOU SUCCEED SETA melee]

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean /bahamas

™ Trademark of Royal Bank of Canada. ® The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are registered trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada.

read Insight
on Mondays


PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Dow Jones swaps

Travelers for Citigroup

@ By IEVA M AUGSTUMS
AP Business Writer

CHARLOTTE, North Car-
olina (AP) — Seven years after
being spun off by Citigroup Inc.,
Travelers Cos. is supplanting its
former parent as a member of
the Dow Jones industrial aver-
age.

Travelers’ selection helps
maintain the representation of
financial companies in the Dow.
The property and casualty
insurer has suffered less than
many other financial firms dur-
ing the credit crisis and reces-
sion.

New York-based Citigroup is
the second financial company
to be dropped from the Dow
after suffering huge losses dur-
ing the credit crisis and reces-
sion. Dow removed American
International Group Inc. in Sep-
tember after the insurer

received a multibillion dollar
bailout that gave the govern-
ment an 80 per cent stake in the
company.

Citigroup was expected to be
removed from the index as its
share price tumbled nearly 87
per cent since the beginning of
2008. Shares of St. Paul, Min-
nesota-based Travelers, on the
other hand, are only down near-
ly 22 per cent.

As of Friday, Citigroup
accounted for less than one per
cent of the value of the index,
which includes 30 stocks that
make up the best-known
barometer of Wall Street. As a
higher-priced stock, Travelers
will have more weight, and
therefore will account for a larg-
er portion of the Dow.

Shares of Travelers gained
$1.43, or 3.5 per cent, to $42.09
in afternoon trading Monday,
while Citigroup lost three cents

to $3.69.

Dow Jones & Co. also said
Monday it would add computer
networking gear maker Cisco
Systems Inc. to the industrials,
replacing General Motors
Corp., as GM entered bank-
ruptcy protection. The changes
take effect June 8.

Citigroup's removal ends 12
years in the index for the New
York-based bank, known as
Citicorp when it joined in
March 1997. Citigroup was cre-
ated in 1998 when Sanford
Weill merged his Travelers
Group with Citicorp, creating
a financial supermarket provid-
ing everything from checking
accounts to hurricane insurance.
Travelers was then spun off as a
separate company in 2002.

"It's always sort of interest-
ing, and ironic, when a former
subsidiary of a company that
got spun off eclipses the par-

THE FOLLOWING ARE EXCERPTS FROM THE COMPARY'S AUDITED FISANCLAL
STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 2008. A COMPLETE SET OF

CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL
OONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL
AUBTORS” RERORT CAN BE VIEY

STATEMERTS,
STATEMENTS

INCLUDING
AND THE

4 Ti y

THE NOTES TO THE

RELATED [NOEPESDENT
VEO ONLINE ON THE COMPANYS WEBSITE AT

ent,” said Paul Newsome, an
analyst with Sandler, O'Neill &
Partners.

Wall Street Journal Manag-
ing Editor Robert Thomson
expressed reluctance in a state-
ment Monday to remove Citi-
group, although "it is clear that
the bank is in the midst of a
substantial restructuring which
will see the government with a
large and ongoing stake."

The government's stress tests
of the 19 biggest US banks ear-

lier this month showed 10 of
them had to raise a total of $75
billion in new capital to with-
stand possible future losses. Of
those, Citigroup needed $5.5
billion.

Thomson added said that
after the removal of AIG last
year and the addition of Kraft
Foods, the financial industry
was underrepresented on the
Dow. The selection of Travelers
corrects that deficiency, he said.

John A. Prestbo, editor and

executive director of Dow Jones
Indexes, said the company,
when looking for Citigroup's
replacement, turned to an insur-
er because “we wanted to get
that element back into the mix."

Like Travelers, AIG sold
property and casualty insurance.

"T think it's certainly appro-
priate to add Travelers," New-
some said. "They are a big com-
pany and well capitalized ... the
things you would want in a blue
chip kind of name."

> MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT WC

NOTICE

CORRIDOR 11

BLUE HILL ROAD
ROADWAY CONSTRUCTION

In an effort to relieve current traffic congestion problems JOSE
CARTELLONE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES S.A_ has
been contracted for the Completion of the New Providence Road
Improvement Project — International Package. Road construction

nineteen will be commencing onCorridor 11A (Blue Hill Road),which may

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET require diversions from:

AS OF DECEMBER 31, 20068
(Expressed it Bahamian dovlars)

Duke Street & Robinson Road

ASSETS -, . . .
Local diversions will be sign posted in due course and further

Ce information will be provided in the local media

Cash 5
Accounts receivable, net

624 774
VOUT, 575
6333
3,792,139
GML419

4,817,180
1647,078
g19.24
LBL367T8
4a )4k

Prone exporses and diopasins

Tel: 242-322-8341 /242-322-2610 Email: jcccbahamas @cartellone.com.ar

Inventory
Current porlean of long-lerm neacwvabkes

Total current pases [BARS [th 1S,840315

NON-CURKENT ASSETS

Investment 444913

3,307,95|
1565760083

4741 4dk

168,371,305

4243913
550935
16,641 52

a 752 7

Long-term receivables
Property, plant and equipment
Intangible assets

Pal
NAD

Nassau Airport

Oevelopment Company

General Information

Total monscusrent assets 154,439 087

POTAL 187,008), 564 174,279.402

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

Session
Restaurant & Retail Opportunities

CURRENT LIABILITIES:

Accounts payable and accrued lishilities Ia, 77RRSR §
| TSM
8,567 051
§ 000MM)

2H BL4 418

11,771 474
Deter’ ihc oie U35, 807
S38

SMH) 000

Current portion of longterm debt
Curent portion af redeemable prelenred shares

Total curred leatulinies 26,6135, 704

The Nassau Airport Development Company invites
all interested persons to attend a general information
session to discuss the food & beverage and retail
opportunities available in the new airport terminals at
the Lynden Pindling International Airport.

NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES:
Subscriber deposits 5371
24,1485)

20, ODM

5,284 082
MGT AH
TS AMH)000

Long-term deta
Kedicmabls preferred shares

40,520,276 G37] 203

Total nn-current Liabilities

Total liabilities 7H.I34 04 498d O17
FCMUITY:
Onderary share capetal |. 6550074

4S. 7h

19,712,899 When: Monday June 15, 2009

Retained eames 65581 SRG

Total equity 108 6 870 #5 20d dS

Where: Wyndham Nassau Resort, Salon 4

TOT Al $ BSS 8 TS ATP

CABLE BAHAMAS LTD. Time: 9:30 a.m. - Noon

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008

{Expressed in Bahamian dotlars)

Learn about:

> Nassau Ainport Development Company
2008 2007 -
The LPIA Expansion Project
REVENUE 5

SLAG1 055 § 75,3,085

OPERATING EXPENSES (38,676,303) (37,829,563)

The New U.S. Departures Terminal

42,784,752

(12 50H) 198)

35, 135,44

Depreciation and amortization 1137010)

Food & Beverage and Retail Opportunities
OPERATING INCUME

Interest EXpetise

Ab T4534
(2,348,677)

(2,040, 0001)

24,763,340)
(2,095,031)
(2,454,001)

The NAD Request For Proposal Process

Dividends paid on redeemable preferred shares

NET INCOME The NAD Commercial Lease Content

21,617,709

BASIC AND DILUTED EARNINGS PER SHARE 4 1.10

The Tenant Design Criteria Manual

MOTE; A COMPLETE SET OF CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, INCLUDING
THE NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND THE RELATED
INDEPENDENT AUDITORS REPORT CAN BE VIEWED ONLINE ON THE COMPANY'S
WEESITE AT intteo4www coiblebolray, com corpora inners sarcilders.


PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a | > =; ;
Stocks rally after positive economic data

lm By MADLEN READ
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall
Street is starting June with a big
gain, boosted by reports that
paint a more upbeat picture of
the global economy.

Investors looked past Gener-
al Motors Corp.'s bankruptcy
filing and instead focused on
better-than-expected readings
on US manufacturing, con-
sumer spending and construc-
tion spending. Stocks got off to
a strong start Monday follow-
ing upswings in Europe and
Asia, where markets surged on
surveys showing improvements
in manufacturing in those
regions.

By late afternoon trading, the
Dow Jones industrial average

TST

GA ty

aU ae
ar
ths



and other major indexes were
up more than two per cent. The
Standard & Poor's 500 index
and the Nasdaq composite
index hit their highest levels so
far this year.

It wasn't just fundamental
economic data that encouraged
buying on Monday, however.
Some technical factors were at
play, too. The first trading day
of the month often brings with it
a surge of new money from
mutual funds. Also, the S&P
broke through its 200-day mov-
ing average, a key development
that hasn't occurred in over a
year.

Kim Caughey, equity
research analyst at Fort Pitt
Capital Group, said she was
skeptical about the strength of
the market's move Monday.
The economic data were "better
than expected, but I wouldn't
say they were great."

Even if the economy is stabi-
lizing, there is little to drive
demand once it bottoms,
Caughey said. "I can't really
buy into today's super-happy
stock market."

Standard & Poor's chief
economist David Wyss said
Monday he expects the US
economy to bottom out late this
summer or early in the fall, but
then experience a "rather slug-
gish" recovery.

"It's not a pleasant outlook,"
Wyss said. He predicted US

A World of
Choices

gross domestic product —
which measures the value of all
goods and services produced in
the country — to drop 3.1 per
cent this year, with even sharp-
er declines in European
economies and Japan.

In late afternoon trading, the
Dow rose 217.60, or 2.6 per
cent, to 8,717.93. The Standard
& Poor's 500 index rose 23.21,
or 2.5 per cent, to 942.35. The
Nasdaq composite index rose
48.97, or 2.8 per cent, to
1,823.30.

Because GM's bankruptcy fil-
ing was so well telegraphed in
advance, the move did not faze
investors.

"It's remarkable the degree
of resilience that the equity
markets have shown," said Jack
A. Ablin, chief investment offi-
cer at Harris Private Bank,
referring to the market's ability
to look past GM and other dis-
ruptions. "We've had plant clos-
ings, we've had dealer shut-
downs. I think the reverbera-
tions have already been felt.”

The government will get a 60
per cent stake in GM, and is
expected to provide the
automaker with an additional
$30 billion on top of the $20 bil-
lion it has already received to
help it restructure. Meanwhile
Chrysler LLC, which filed for
Chapter 11 protection in April,
is expected to emerge from
bankruptcy protection this

week.

The Dow Jones industrial
average announced Monday it
is dropping GM as a compo-
nent after the automaker filed
for bankruptcy, as well as Citi-
group Inc., in which the gov-
ernment now owns a significant
stake. GM and Citi will be
replaced with Travelers Cos.
and Cisco Systems Inc. next
week.

Filing

Positive economic data
helped overshadow GM's bank-
ruptcy filing.

Consumers trimmed spend-
ing by 0.1 per cent, the Com-
merce Department reported,
less than the 0.2 per cent reduc-
tion forecast by economists.
Personal income was also better
than anticipated, coming in flat
instead of negative.

The Commerce Department
also reported that construction
spending rose for the second
straight month in April by 0.8
per cent, far better than the 1.2
per cent decline economists had
expected.

US manufacturing activity
also shrank at a slower pace in
May, according to the Institute
for Supply Management. The
ISM index came in at 42.8 —
its highest since September and
up from 40.1 in March. A read-
ing above 50 indicates growth,

FirstCaribbean

Savings

At FirstCaribbean, you have the

freedom to choose
an account that fits your lifestyle.

FirstCaribbean Savings

Achieve your financial goals with a
FirstCaribbean Savings Account and
have the security of knowing your nest
egg is always growing.

FirstCaribbean Savings Plus
Fast track your savings by having your
interest calculated daily with a FirstCaribbean
Savings Plus Account.

Visit www.firstcaribbeanbank.com or your nearest FirstCaribbean
Branch to find out more about our wide range of product choices.

FirstCaribbean International Bank is a member of the CIBC Group.

Savings Plus

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.

and a reading below 50 indi-
cates contraction.

Advancing stocks outnum-
bered decliners by five to one
on the New York Stock
Exchange, where volume came
to 968 million shares, relatively
low but up from 814 million
around the same time on Fri-
day.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies rose 16.44,
or 3.3 per cent, to 518.02.

Overseas, Japan's Nikkei
stock average jumped 1.6 per
cent, while Hong Kong's Hang
Seng index soared 4.0 per cent.
In Europe, Britain's FTSE 100
rose two per cent, Germany's
DAX index rose 4.1 per cent
and France's CAC-40 gained
3.1 per cent.

The market's three-month
surge has brought the S&P 500
about 39 per cent above the 12-
year lows it reached in early
March. It's the fastest rise the
market has seen since the 1930s.

But new worries have begun
to seep into the market, includ-
ing a sinking dollar and climbing
interest rates, which some
investors fear could threaten an
economic recovery. A tempo-
rary spike in long-term bond
yields to six-month highs last
week brought a sharp decline
in stock prices.

Government bonds fell again
Monday, driving yields back

near last week's highs. The yield
on the 10-year Treasury note,
which is used as a benchmark
for home mortgages and other
consumer loans, rose to 3.70 per
cent from 3.46 per cent late Fri-
day.

The dollar weakened further
Monday against the euro and
the British pound. Gold slipped,
but oil jumped.

Another hurdle that's
approaching later this summer:
Second-quarter corporate earn-
ings results. If those come in
worse than investors anticipat-
ed, Caughey said, "we'll have a
reason to hate the market

again."
While Monday's move was
strong, many long-view

investors were unconvinced
about its staying power. Ablin
noted that returns are much
better when the S&P 500 is
trading above its 200-day mov-
ing average, but that the statis-
tic itself can send "a number of
false signals.”

Also, trading on the first day
of the month is generally much
stronger than normal. The S&P
500 index was down about 34
per cent in the 10 years leading
up to May 1. But according to
S&P data, if someone invested
in the index only on the first
day of the month over that time
frame, he would have seen a
gain of 21 per cent.

ACCOUNTING & SMALL BUSINESS
CONSULTING SERVICES

(over 25 years experience)

* Accounting records in bad shape?

* Need financial statements for the bank? (2-4 weeks)

* Need a business plan and financing proposal prepared?
* Need business licence prepared/certified? (1-2 weeks)

CALL US WE CAN HELP

* Business Start-Up Assistance/Consultations

« Business Success Pack....($5) off

* Construction & Contract Accounting

* Quickbooks Accounting - Problem Solving - Setup

* Business Survival Pack....($5) off

* Controllership Services - Per Diem - Low Rates

« Small Business Accounting Services/System/Journals
* Handbook - Inventory Control....($5) off

NEW BUSINESS START-UP KIT

($5) off

A guide to starting and managing a small business
(Business Start-Ups Checklist...$6)

BUSINESS SEMINARS - REGISTRATION - $25
(Materials + Refreshments + Special Discounts)

* Inventory Control Techniques June 27 @ 10am

Business Licence Special
Preparation + Certification
TEL: 325-7313 or 322-6000 * FAX: 323-3700

F. A. HEPBURN & CO.
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS

Small Business Consultants

Wal

southern style

2

BISCUIT

r
I

try it for bree

|




THE TRIBUNE

‘man TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009



The live,
free dream
wedding

lm By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

IT’S summer again, and for many
engaged couples waiting to say I do,
this season has practically all the right
ingredients for the perfect backdrop
to their special occasion.

Embracing these elements, the pro-
ducers of the Bahamas At Sunrise
show have teamed-up with the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel to offer one
special couple the chance of a life-
time to not only have their special
day aired live on national television,
but to also have the entire experience
straight through to the honeymoon
provided free of charge.

While all of this may sound too
good to be true, it really is, but there
is one catch, all of the arrangements
for the wedding including the dress,
location, floral arrangements, and
rings will be decided by the viewing
audience.

Latoya Hanna-Moxey who is sales
manager and project representative
from the British Colonial Hilton, and
Sharell Ferguson of the Bahamas at
Sunrise Dream Wedding Committee
recently made the announcement on
the show.

Mrs Hanna-Moxey explained: “We
are very excited to take part in this
first and once in a lifetime opportunity
with Bahamas At Sunrise. We are one
of the major sponsors of the event
and we will be providing the reception
location as well as the ceremony loca-
tion.

“We at the British Colonial Hilton
will be creating that ‘wow’ experience
for the lucky couple on the actual
wedding day. We will be providing
the sleeping rooms, the food, and the
drinks, so it will be a great day for
the lucky couple.”

According to the producers of the
show, the wedding project promises to
be an exciting moment in local broad-
casting as it will give Bahamians a
chance to create the perfect wedding
experience for a lucky couple on live
television for the first time.

Several community partners will
take part in this ground breaking wed-
ding.

Apryl Jasmine designs will be cre-
ating the wedding gown that’s cho-
sen, while Vows will provide the
dresses for the bridesmaids. The
groom and groomsmen will be
dressed by Modern Men, make-up
will be provided by Renee Brown,
and hair will be done by Gigi Turn-
quest.

All in all, the Bahamas at Sunrise
and Hilton team have arranged a top-
notch selection of companies and peo-
ple to make this day a success for the
couple ensuring that they only have to
show up on their wedding day.

Any engaged couple who are citi-
zens or permanent residents of the
Bahamas can apply.

Application forms are available at
the Counsellors, First Terrace, Collins
Avenue, at the British Colonial Hilton
on West Bay Street, or from
www.bahamasatsunrise.com.

After an initial elimination process
done by the organisers, three lucky
couples will go head-to-head live on
television where the audience will be
given a chance to vote for their
favourite couple online.

On the website, there will also be
profiles, pictures, and a message board
for viewers to talk about the couple
who they think should win, as well as
discussions on the progress of the
wedding.

The deadline to enter the event is
June 10, and voting will begin on June
22, 2009.



In dating world, is
timing everything?

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

n the world of dating, a lot of single peo-

ple feel timing is everything when it

comes to making certain moves. Some

feel they have to wait at least six to eight

months before they have sex with their
partner, or at least a month before they have
their first kiss. However, have you ever thought
that maybe if you waited too long to make a
move it may ruin the relationship? Or have you
ever thought that even finding the right person
was all about the right timing?

Barrington Brennen, a marriage and family
therapist and counseling psychologist, says time
is your best friend.

However, he said “You must not take too
much time. Too long is unhealthy and too short
is unhealthy. Too long meaning when a rela-
tionship drags on for 3 to 4 years. Ideally, a seri-
ous intended romantic relationship, not just
friendship, should last a minimum of one year
and ideally you should repeat that year. You
should go through the calendar year, the sea-
sons, family rituals, birthdays, holidays and such.
Tf your birthday is in November and you meet the
man in January get married in April and when
your birthday comes around in November, he
does something that shocks you and then you
didn’t want a man to do that- you should have
waited,” Dr Brennen said.

For those interested in wedding bells, Dr Bren-
nen said you should wait at least 18 to 24 months
before you get married.

“Now two to three years is not too bad but
after four years is risky business. If you never
broke up before you would be breaking up at
least once. You should not make a total com-
mitment before you have passed that first year.
Now that will help you to make the right choice.
The fundamental principal of choosing the right
person is being the right person. You can not
find the right person if you are hungry, desperate,
you don’t know yourself, you don’t like your-
self, you need a man badly, that sort of thing,” Dr
Brennen said.



MANY SINGLE PEOPLE feel timing is everything when
it comes to making certain moves. Some feel they
have to wait at least six to eight months before they
have sex with their partner, or at least a month before
they have their first kiss...

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway ¢ 394-1759



Sheena Pinder, director of the Women’s Min-
istry at Bahamas Faith Ministries, agrees that a
lot of young people do not take marriage and
being in a relationship as serious as they should.

“They just see it as a fairytale thing thinking
they are in love and want to have sex- that is
pretty much it. The Bible says sex outside of
marriage is wrong. They feel that because they
are in love and want to have sex, the legal way to
do it is to get married and two months down the
road, they realise they might have been ready for
sex but not marriage-there is a difference,” Mrs
Pinder said.

Mrs Pinder said in finding the right mate, a
lot of young people think that because they wait-
ed so long to find someone, they should hurry
and get married.

“As an independent woman, when you get
married you are giving up your independence.
Once you get married you will have to answer to
your husband. Your money is not your money
and your life is not your life anymore. You have
decided to join your life to someone else’s and
until you are ready to do that then you need to
stay single because that man does not deserve for
you as a woman to make his life miserable. Don’t
think your time is running out just because you
are getting older,” Mrs Pinder said.

Now the timing in terms of the steps in build-
ing the relationship, Dr Brennen suggests you
need to take your time to the climb.

“When you see somebody, you should be phys-
ically attracted to that person. I think the major-
ity of relationships start with infatuation and
that is healthy for starters. However, you should
not let infatuation govern whether this person is
the one you should be with. From a Christian per-
spective you should not date unless you are ready
to get married. Dating is a relationship with an
end in mind. If your end is sex, then that is the
end you will get. Dating means that you have
an intimate personal encounter with someone
of the complimentary sex. Take your time. I
don’t care how much you think this man is a
God-sent, you can actually mess up what God
gave you by going too fast. The first foundation
is friendship, and friends don’t make love,” Dr
Brennen said.

cS eo
PAGE 2C, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE






































































Pea ea die anneeneeeee

Includes: Roundtrip Airfare, 2 Nights Accomodations and 2 Days Car Aantal with LDW
Insurance. Rate based on 2-persons traveling together. Excludes taxes, surcharges and any
additianal fees. Subject to availability. Olhar restrictions may apply.

See a participating
Travel Agency for more

Teenie
Hotel, Car, and Air Packages

Zulia

Nossau mw

Aarow Travel 393-1981 |
Coribo Trovel ct eee he

Gem Travel 3461-3434

ML Travel 305-848-9849

geet | ee a

Treasure Travel 356-0544

United Travel CPA er

Vocation Venue ee ee)

Freeport

Gateway Travel 351-9451
dand Fun and Sun 351-4000 =

FLORIDA
‘HOTEL

\ SONFEPERCE
cCEATER

eek a

ee

wQUINTA

(ANS o SUITES

*otadlony Sie.
EXPRESS

SOE, fi SLE

Abaco - Marsh Harbour

Outward Bound Trovel Service ee
347-4709 —

NASSAU

Oakesfield
322-6673

Palmdale
322-4785

Treasures of the Caribbean International

FREEPORT
Culmersville Plaza

352-8346

General Reservations
377-5505

bahamas

Wve deri put By ree, We es ae
a
7%
o

GARDENING
The garden in June

YESTERDAY was the offi-
cial beginning of the 2009 hur-
ricane season, though hurri-
canes in the area are not likely
for another couple of months.
Later in the month we will have
the official beginning of sum-
mer, confirming what we have
suspected for quite a while now.
June is also royal poinciana
month, especially in Nassau
where the show can be stun-
ning.

Citrus and fruit trees should
be fertilised in spring, summer
and autumn. Apply a drench of
chelated iron around the trunk
of each tree, a teaspoonful of
iron for each 5 gallons, and then
apply a granular fertiliser
around the drip lines.

All good quality fertilisers
contain the minor elements
needed but if you have any
doubts about the fertiliser you
are using you can spray the
foliage of the tree with a minor
nutrient spray, using a stick-
er/spreader to make it more
effective.

The vegetable garden is at the
somnolent stage when most of
the popular vegetables of winter
and spring cannot cope with the
heat and humidity. Exceptions
are collards, cow peas, corn,
okra and snake beans.

Thank goodness for cherry
tomatoes. These little balls of
joy take the heat well and pro-
vide for us when the larger-
fruiting tomatoes fail to pro-
duce. Italian style plum toma-



CHERRY TOMATOES — a wonderful
standby when the larger varieties
are unavailable...



NEW GUINEA IMPATIENS — a long-lasting perennial that grows well in
summer if shaded...

toes such as Roma also last
longer into summer than most
tomatoes.

The sweet bell peppers plant-
ed at the beginning of the veg-
etable season last year may very
well be still performing, but
probably with fruits so small
they may embarrass you.
Cubanelle peppers take the
summer heat better and are a
wonderful addition to the sum-
mer

vegetable garden. It is best
they be grown in a degree of
shade as the fruits are still sus-
ceptible to sunscald. I have
mine in the shade of papaya
trees.

While the vegetable garden
is at a low productivity stage
you may consider covering
areas with clear plastic sheet-
ing. Make sure the ground is
wet before you do this and
anchor the sheeting with
cement blocks or such. The
plastic sheeting will prevent
weeds from growing

— indeed, it will bake the
weed seeds — and sterilise the
soil for a new start in August
or September.

In the flowerbeds it is time
for those stalwarts of summer:
cosmos, zinnias, vincas, portu-
lacas, Mexican sunflowers and
marigolds. New Guinea impa-
tiens can be grown in shaded
areas, as can caladiums.

Callas also take the summer

heat, especially if they are estab-
lished plants.

The fruit of the month is scar-
let plum. This close relative of
the hog plum is a favourite of
Bahamian children who also
like mangoes. Early mangoes
start their season in June and
this season’s crop looks like
being a bumper one.

The rainy season has started
so it is a good idea to fertilise
your flowering shrubs as soon as
possible. This is a time of rapid
growth and the shrubs will ben-
efit from available sustenance.
Flowering shrubs like chelated
iron too as it assists them in the
absorption of elements from
fertiliser. Always apply fertilis-
er when the ground is wet. If
you treat dry soil the next show-
er could wash your fertiliser
through the oil at too fast a rate
for it to be optimally effective.

The royal poinciana is the
true Bahamian harbinger of
summer. The trees are bare and
unsightly through most of fall,
winter and spring but suddenly
leap into life and become
smothered with blossoms. The
flowers will gradually give way
to foliage and by early fall the
seed pods will begin to develop.
The show is then over. But at
the moment we can enjoy the
flamboyance, the almost exces-
sive showiness, of the royal
poinciana flowering season.

j-hardy@coralwave.com
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 3C





At the office, some things
unsaid.

are better left

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

FOR those of us who work
in a close-knit office environ-
ment it can certainly feel like
your co-workers become a sec-
ond family making it natural to
gossip all day with office mates.
However, there are some topics
that are better left unsaid and
should remain out of the “work
family” discussions.

Sheena Gordan, a 30- year -
old professional, said on her
first job she got carried away
and gossiped about everything
from finding a new job to every
time she caught a cold.

“T used to talk about every-
thing. I learned that no matter
how much you might dislike
your current job, you don't want
to be sent packing before you
are ready. I was telling some
girls at my last office how much
I hated my job and I thought
they were sympathising with
me. They threw me under the
bus when the boss wanted
someone to fire,” Mrs Gordan
said.

She said she would advise
young persons that if they have
a job and are secretly looking
for another job, or even just
entertaining the idea of leaving,
it is best to keep this informa-
tion to themselves. “Word got
around about I wanted to leave
and I found myself being treat-
ed as if I was already gone,”
Mrs Gordan said.

If you hang out with co-
workers outside of the office, it
is most likely that they are going
to know about your health
issues and love life. However,
as far as making a declaration
around the office about one’s
personal life, keep the discus-
sion to a minimum.

Grace Plank, psychotherapist
and trauma specialist at the
Renascence Clinic, said certain
things should not be discussed
or even talk about in the office,
especially when it comes to dat-
ing other office mates.

“It’s not a question about
whether it is appropriate; it is
whether or not it is healthy for
that work environment. The
reality is it is not always healthy
because if you had an argument
that morning, chances are you
both are going to come to work
with that,” Mrs Plank said.





New Providence:
Available spaces:

Grand Bahama:

Available spaces:

Mrs Plank said many times
because of these inter-office
relationships, other persons in
the work place start to feel
uncomfortable, affecting their
ability to do their job.

“Unfortunately, here in the
Bahamas, a lot of people will
say things in the workplace that
would be considered unaccept-
able in North America, and
could be perceived as sexual
harassment and contributing to

a hostile work environment. If
you feel you can’t tolerate the
talk that is coming about
because of these relationships,
then you have the right to com-
plain to human resources or
your manager,” Mrs Plank said.
Mrs Plank said many times it
is hard for persons to speak up
but they do not want to subject
themselves to the possibility of
it becoming anything more.
“Some times you can just use

Bahamas National Trust’s

Sunner Safart

Have your children do hands-on
activities, visit National Parks, and

participate in adventurous
expeditions and field studies.
Lunch, oll] materials and gear included.

Ages:
Daily Hours:

Venue:

Venue:

8 - 14 years
Sam - 3pm

June 22nd - 27th
Retreat Gardens, Village Rd
35 (first come, first served basis)

June 22nd - 27th
The Rand Nature Center

East Settler's Way

Cost:

35 (first come, first served basis)

$150.00 (non-BNT members)

$100.00 (BNT members)

For more information call:

393-1317 (Nassau)

352-5438 (Grand Bahama)

emaik bnt@bnt.bs



make the choice to leave,” Mrs
Plank said.

your headphones and listen to
music while you work if it is

allowed. If not you can find a
way to cope with it or you can

New Stock
In-Store
Right Now.

All-New 2009
VIERA® HDTV’s

Enhance your passion with the VIERA® HDTV Series
from Panasonic. Perfect for gamers, sports nuts,
movie buffs and music lovers. Let us recommend
aM le P UR eee miele

sae le
Modi ee Meat Cer com cel mee Cee]
photos with triends and family.

s VUES
aa s

VIERA Linkâ„¢

tReet Cesc ecm Lis Cee: lace

Put CteMs Ute Mur BMT le | Mette alae)
On-screen Menus.

RT
miu

OLS Ue mess Le
RCL O Teer 8) 6

Te Ste tT Ted
URS See ee oe LS
Pe OMT EE| Iie HN age Tec Roe

tahoe athe

ae

a mera rs

VIESA

Panasonic


PAGE 4C, TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



HEALTH



Dating with a fear of intimacy

@ By MAGGIE BAIN

DAYDREAMING can be a
relaxing pass time and allows
us to delve into the depth of
our imagination. It can help us
relieve anxiety, work out our
problems and plan and visu-
alise our lives. During these
moments of relaxation we
often reflect on prior love
relationships and spend hours
dissecting them- what worked
and what did not. Who did
what and who reacted to what.
For those of us who have
explored our deep inner self
we are able to recognise our
own traits recurring in each
relationship. Through our own
self discovery we are able to
see that we were made to feel
that these were our weakness-
es when in fact they were
transferred from our partner.

The majority of us hide our
fears behind masks. The pub-
lic persona versus our true,
private inner self. We often
create these masks early on in
childhood to protect our egos
from pain. Repeated harsh
words or treatment from par-
ents, teachers, family mem-
bers and friends can cause us
to use a protective shell as
defense. We love these masks
and perfect them as we age.
All too often we see people
who are almost unrecognis-
able from the person at home
and at work. This can be very
difficult for the people close to
them as they have to second
guess and anticipate if the
mask is on or off. But to wear
a mask is not all bad. Whether
it is a workaholic, attention
seeking or a sex mask to name
a few, it can allow us to be fun,
productive, resourceful and
resilient people. The down
side is when we have difficulty
recognising our true self and
in turn allowing our intimate
partner to see us. That is not
truly living but existing on the
peripheries of life.

Dating allows us to find
someone with equal intimacy
needs. Glaring problems that
show up during this period of
exploration gives us the
opportunity to pull out prior
to committing for the long
haul. Incompatibilities in inti-



DAYDREAMING can be a relaxing pass time and allows us to delve into the depth of our imagination. It can help us relieve anxiety, work out our problems and plan and visualise our lives.
During these moments of relaxation we often reflect on prior love relationships and spend hours dissecting them- what worked and what did not.

macy cause great concern and
anxiety within a long term
relationship or marriage. Lov-

ing relationships work best
when there is a sense of bal-
ance and there is a deep, hon-

Shaving Dos and Don’ts



FOR a great shave and
healthier skin, you have to go
beyond gliding a razor over
skin. Combine these tips with
the right pre-shave, shave, and
post-shave regimen for the ulti-
mate shave.

e Shave after showering to
pre-soften the skin.

e Pay attention to hair growth
direction: The best time to
determine the pattern of your
beard is to run your hand along
beard growth approximately
one to three days after shaving.

e Avoid alkaline-based prod-
ucts and soap, which can dry



skin.

¢ Avoid after-shave lotions
containing alcohol - they not
only cause pain, but contribute
to irritation and fail to replace
the skin's natural protective bar-
rier.

e Shave with the right pres-
sure: pressing hard won't deliv-
er a closer shave, just more irri-

tation.

e Use a steady, constant
motion when shaving, making
each stroke around 1 to 2 inch-
es long.

e Rinse the blade clean
before each stroke.

e Use a sharp, clean razor and
shave with the grain.*

* Tf you have a heavy, coarse
beard, shave against the grain
only after first shaving with the
grain (when the hair is shorter
and less likely to curl back in
on itself). Re-apply all neces-
sary shaving mediums before
shaving against the grain.

(<)) THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

STAFF VACANCY

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the following

position:

Writer, News & Publications, responsible for performing writing and relat-
ed duties as needed, for the development and production of all College of The
Bahamas publications of a news, general information and public awareness
nature. The incumbent will be expected to work within a demanding deadline
driven environment and to also perform assignments as related to media and

general public relations,

Specific duties and responsibilities include, but are not limited to, generating
content ideas for College publications; research and writing for College pub-
lications, press releases and related media and public relations assignments;
and staying abreast of College developments and maintaining a strong under-
standing of the national, regional and international context of these develop-

ments.

Applicants should possess a Bachelor's degree or equivalent and at least four

(4) years post-qualification work experience at AS-1

level as a

writer/researcher in a magazine, supplement and/or newspaper environment.

For a detailed job description, visit w

way.cob.edu.bs/hrap

Interested candidates should submit a detailed resume and cover letter of
interest no later than Tuesday, June 16th, 2009,

est connection. Consider if
you have ever experienced or
indeed are experiencing a situ-
ation where you have to be
the one to say 'I love you' first
or when you are getting close
and intense your partner cre-
ates a distraction and the
moment is lost. You may have
a sense that they are just not
completely present in the
moment or may appear
unavailable emotionally due
to fear, social conditioning or
low self esteem. It is very frus-
trating loving someone who
appears unable to love you in
return. Certainly if you are in
the early stages of a new love
relationship then let it go and
move on and find someone
who is more compatible.

If on reading this you recog-
nise yourself and know that
you have trouble getting really
close to people and opening
up then read on.

Just the very idea of some-

one seeing past the mask is
probably terrifying for you.
You worry about being trans-
parent and imagine that now
the person can toy with your
feelings. In the past someone
has probably hurt you and this
has only reinforced your need
to keep up the defenses. But
by letting your fears take con-
trol of your life you only allow
them to get stronger and give
them more credibility. The
most effective way to over-
come your fears is to stay a
few minutes with the fear.
Feel it, feel the pain and anxi-
ety. Make a note of how your
body is responding. Are you
having butterflies or are you
sweating? Yes, it is the same
response as being excited.
Many re-train themselves by
saying ‘I am excited’ at that
moment and go with the feel-
ings. Let your partner know
your fears and the obstacles
you put in the way. As with

everything in life it all gets
easier with practice.

Many times we imagine our
problems to be worse or more
insurmountable than they
really are. We teach our chil-
dren to face their fears such as
the dentist or needles. We
have to face our own fears
throughout our lives so that
we can savor every day fully.
Once you can achieve true
intimacy then you will also
achieve self acceptance and
self love. There is no better
way to live life.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Indi-
vidual and Couples Relation-
ship Therapist. She is a Regis-
tered Nurse and a Certified
Clinical Sex Therapist. For
appointments call 535-7456 or
e-mail her at
relatebahamas@yahoo.com or
www.relatebahamas.blogspot.c
om. She is also available for
speaking engagements.


THE TRIBUNE

a Ne

TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009, PAGE 5C





The Tribune



e





ith



‘Healing ands of physiotherapy





@ By ALEX MISSICK
Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

f you have ever been

involved in a road

traffic accident, suf-

fered from a sports

injury or work relat-
ed injury, or if you have ever
had surgery you know how
painful it is to get back to
being your physical best. A
doctor may recommend the
expertise of another medical
professional to help you fully
recover... namely a physio-
therapist.

Providence Rehabilitation
Centre, located in Suite 57,
Grosvenor Close West off
Shirley Street, specialises in
the assessment and treatment
of adults and children requir-
ing post operative care or suf-
fering from various injuries
and illnesses including chron-
ic pain, back and neck pain,
foot pain, stroke, and post
lymphedema mastectomy just
to name a few.

Christina G Messarra,
Facility Director at Provi-
dence Rehabilitation Centre
and Physiotherapist, told Tri-
bune Health: “It is very
important to participate in
physiotherapy treatment after
an accident or when living
with an illness.

“The human body is amaz-
ing. I am in this profession
because I love and admire the
human body. I think that the
body’s capacity to heal and
our capacity to compensate
for injury is limitless. How-
ever, without physiotherapy
helping you in that recovery it
can take longer to recover
and sometimes your recovery
is less than optimal. The
body’s compensatory mech-
anisms are not necessarily
ideal- in other words you may
be walking with a limp when
you may not need to limp at
all,” Mrs Messarra said.

Mrs Messarra said the
American Physiotherapy
Association’s catch phrase
really sums up what Physio-
therapy is all about.

“Tt’s the science of healing
and the art of caring. Physio-
therapy follows the principles
of western medicine. Physio-
therapists are trained diag-
nosticians who deal with neu-
rological and musculoskele-
tal disorders of the body. A
lot of our training is done in
conjunction with medical stu-
dents. For example, while I
was at McGill University in
my first year of physiotherapy
training, we did our anatomy,
physiology, and biochemistry
courses with the medical stu-
dents. After that first year of
health sciences, the doctors
went off and became doctors
and we went off and became
physiotherapists,” Mrs Mes-
sarra said.

Mrs Messarra said that one
of the ways physiotherapists
differ from physicians is that
physiotherapists tend to
spend a lot more time with
their patients, typically treat-
ing a patient for an hour three
times per week.

“We use our hands to facil-
itate the body’s own healing
processes. Physiotherapists
use manual techniques such
as massage therapy, joint
mobilisation and biofeedback,
modalities that use light, elec-
trical and sound energy to
help heal tissues. Physio-
therapists also mentor, moti-
vate, and educate patients in
health, wellness, self help and
exercise. Physiotherapists are
most easily compared to
teachers because they teach
patients how to help them-
selves recover and that is
where the art of caring comes
in. You come to us and you
are in pain from some sort of
trauma, and a physiotherapist
helps you help yourself get
better. We will get you back
walking when you are not
walking and help you opti-
mise your recovery,” Mrs
Messarra said.

Mrs Messarra saw a need
for a mobile physiotherapy
service that brings physio-
therapy services to your home
when you are not well enough
to get to the clinic.

“T felt there was an oppor-
tunity to formalise Home
Care Physiotherapy Services
in New Providence and to
improve the nature of this ser-
vice. A van was bought that is
fully equipped to be a
portable physiotherapy cen-
tre with portable beds, exer-
cise equipment and all the
necessary modalities (ultra-
sound, Tens, laser). I felt that
by investing in that, we would
be able to provide a top notch
quality service for Bahami-
ans,” Mrs Messarra said.

Home Care physiotherapy
services provided by Yasmin
Sweeting, a Bahamian phys-
iotherapist with over nine
tears of clinical experience at
PMH are now available six
days a week. Yasmin works
with your doctors, nursing
staff, and family to make sure
that you achieve your best
possible recovery.

Whether you need the
Home Care service long term
to manage after a stroke or
catastrophic spinal cord injury
or you simply need a few ses-
sions to get you well enough
to get to the clinic for ongoing
care, Yasmin is available to
assist in your care.

Mrs Messarra said that
physiotherapists often make
living with very serious ill-
nesses and injuries more com-
fortable for the patient and
with that comes peace of
mind for the patient’s loved
ones.



Last Name:
Company:
Telephone # Home:

Fax #:
Exact Street Address:

House #:
House Colour:

Requested Start Date:

Sess
al




\ Ms “We use
our hands

the body’s
~ own

healing

7

First Name:
Title:

Work:
P.O.Box:

House Name:
Type of Fence/Wall:

eerie ela schedule is
let us be the first on your list.

Vee

PWR
LAL

3 MONTHS | & MONTHS | 1 YEAR

j \ | to facilitate

processes.’

— Christina G
Messarra

’







xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EW2CS4PJL_CTWKVO INGEST_TIME 2011-10-19T18:45:23Z PACKAGE UF00084249_01327
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES