Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Mim blowin’ it
87F
76F

MOSTLY CLOUDY, A
FSTORM POSSIBLE

HIGH
LOW

Volume: 105 No.155



> EAU
TORS

SEE FRONT OF SPORTS SECTION

The Tribune

SA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, MAY 30, 2009





Mother heaten 0
Dy police hoyiriend

Inquiry launched as woman demands justice



PHOTOS:
Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A MOTHER is demanding justice after
claiming she was brutally beaten, strangled
and threatened with death by her police
officer boyfriend.

The Police Complaints Unit has launched
an investigation into the allegations.

But the victim, who wishes to remain
anonymous, and her family fear police are
not taking the matter seriously.

They say their suspicions were confirmed
after her attacker came to her house the
day after the incident. He was with a group
of other officers to collect a number of per-
sonal items, including his police uniform.

Roy Colebrooke replaced by
union’s first woman president

VOTES tallied in the

Abraham Smith drew 293 votes,

“He said he’d been (free) since the morn-
ing,” the woman claimed. “I don’t think
it’s fair. I am really hurt.”

The alleged incident began when the
boyfriend — a man who she claims to have
been in an abusive relationship with for
several years — came to her home on
Wednesday evening.

The pair got in an argument because she
had called him earlier that evening asking
him not to stay in her house during a week
she planned to be away in Florida.

After a brief verbal spat, the officer, who
is attached to the Traffic Division, began
punching and strangling her, shouting that
he would “kill her”, alleged the woman,
who has a son aged eight.

“Me and my (son) were in my bed sleep-

BRUISED AND BATTERED: A mother shows the injuries she claims she suffered at the hands of her police
officer boyfriend.

ing when he opened the door and said
“What do you think you’re talking about
on the phone?’”

The victim said that as a result of the
attack that followed she began “vomiting
blood.”

“T couldn’t breathe,” she said yesterday,
surrounded by family and friends.

After suffering blows for what she said
felt like 20 minutes, the victim said she
finally found herself free after she bit down
on her attacker’s hand, which was partially
covering her mouth.

“T tried to bite my way out because I
thought ‘I can’t just die’,” she said.

“T could’ve been just another statistic

SEE page 14

up all night!

MeDonald'’s downtown

drive-thru is now open

24 hours

Fridays & Saturdays



PRICE — ama: (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Doctored’ photo
of pageant queen
sparks probe

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

THE Miss Bahamas Universe
organisation is investigating the
release of what they claim is a
"doctored" photo of new queen
Kiara Sherman.

The image, first appearing on
local website
bahamasweekly.com and widely
circulated through emails, reveals
Ms Sherman with an apparent
wardrobe malfunction.

Amid the controversy, an
emotional Ms Sherman yester-
day said she will not let the
furore put a blight on a “once in
a lifetime” opportunity.

At a press conference held at
accounting firm Deloitte and Touche where officials sought
to validate the scores of the ballots cast, pageant represen-
tatives said the photo was digitally altered.

They plan to press charges against the person who released
the image.

"We are concerned about the increase in cyber crime of
which Ms Sherman is targeted through character assassina-
tion and graphic enhancement of sexual nature. This will not
be tolerated, we have begun an investigation regarding the
same and intend to press charges against the culprit to the
fullest extent of the law,” said president of the Miss Bahamas
Universe organisation Gaynelle Rolle, flanked by Ms Sher-
man, Miss Earth Bahamas Ife Bethel Sears, Miss Interna-
tional Bahamas Amanda Appleyard, several judges and
pageant officials.

"Tt not only affects Ms Sherman, but what does it say to the
world about Bahamians," she added.

SEE page 14

CROWNED: Kiara Sherman,
Miss Bahamas Universe 2009.



Fireworks at pageant press conference

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

SEVERAL heated arguments erupted during a tumultuous
press conference held by Miss Bahamas Universe officials yester-
day to validate the scores of the ballots cast in the recent pageant.

But despite some objections raised, 25-year-old singer Kiara
Sherman remains the current Miss Bahamas Universe.

A police officer was present through most of the proceedings as
relatives of the contestants, the top three finalists, several judges and
the media crowded into the conference room of accounting firm
Deloitte and Touche.

SEE page 14



Bahamas Hotel and Catering
Allied Workers Union revealed
yesterday that leader Roy Cole-
brooke has been replaced by
the organisation’s first woman
president.

Nicole Martin, a single moth-
er-of-three, led the “A Team”
to a landslide victory in the
polls, conducted Thursday.

Ms Martin received 1,358
votes while her nearest com-
petitor, Tyrone Butler of the
“M Team” attracted 416 votes.

THE Tribune will not be

published on Monday, which
is a public holiday. The next
edition will be on Tuesday.



while Mr Colebrooke ranked
last, with only 270 votes.

Her win followed months of
in-fighting in the union, which
represents around 6,000 hotel
workers, at a time when the
tourism industry faces unprece-
dented challenges.

Speaking late Thursday
evening, Ms Martin partly
attributed her win to her team’s
decision to “fight a clean fight”
in the run-up to the election.

She said they had faced
“many obstacles” in reaching
their goal of replacing Mr Cole-
brooke’s team, but their victory
proved that “when the people
are ready for change, change
will happen”.

“Our union is in trouble. Our

SEE page 14

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A MAN accused of murdering a young
woman and then dumping her body in a
local cemetery appeared in court yester-
day.

Police have charged 24-year-old Angelo
Poitier, alias Angelo Morley, with the mur-
der of 19-year-old Shanise Adderley.

Poitier, who was arraigned before Chief
Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court One,
Bank Lane, was not represented by an attor-
ney. He was not required to enter a plea to
the murder charge.

The case was adjourned to June 3 and
transferred to Court 10 Nassau Street for
fixture.

Ms Adderley, a resident of Chippingham,
was found dead at the Bahamas Veteran
Cemetery on Infant View Road shortly
before 4 am Wednesday.

CHARGED: Angelo Poitier at court yesterday.



NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

COB OPENS
PERFORMING ARTS
CENTRE

FNM AND PLP BLASTED
ON THE ECONOMY

MORE THAN $60,000
RAISED TO FIGHT HUNGER



PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MAY 30, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamas Democratic Movement leader

lays into FNM and PLP over the economy

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
turnquest@tribunemedia.net



BREAKING his silence after nearly a
year, leader of the Bahamas Democrat-
ic Movement Cassius Stuart has come
out swinging — criticising both the FNM
and PLP for the state for the economy.

Characterising the former PLP gov-
ernment led by Perry Christie as more
occupied with managing the “chaos and
crisis” it got itself into than creating new
initiatives, Mr Stuart said the present
FNM administration led by Hubert
Ingraham has been a “dismal failure”.

He said: “From his budget communi-
cations, it appears that the Ingraham
administration is confused and out of
touch with what is really happening in
the world. Neither the prime minister
nor any of his cabinet colleagues seem to
have any clue as to how to pull the
Bahamian economy out of the slump
that we are in.

Mi Cassius Stuart breaks silence after nearly a year

“Hubert Ingraham’s actions or inac-
tion is evidence that the prime minister
does not know what to do in the midst of
this crisis. For the first quarter of 2009,
the Bahamas government had a revenue
shortfall of about $100 million. For the
second quarter, we have experienced an
additional $100 million shortfall. In the
2009/2010 budget, it is projected that the
Bahamian economy will suffer even
more shortfall in the third and fourth
quarters, which will amount to about
$260 million.”

With this in mind, Mr Stuart ques-
tioned why the prime minister would see
fit to sell the Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Corporation — “the only corpora-
tion that is generating revenue for the
country at this time”.

“Why is the prime minister shutting
off the only valve that is bringing in
financial resources? This makes absolute-

ly no sense. BTC should not be sold until
our economy rebounds and the Ameri-
can economy stabilises. To sell BTC at
this time for a quick shot in the arm will
only do more harm than good. The reoc-
curring revenues generated from BTC’s
profits are vital for the survival of our
country in these critical economic times.

“Adding to his blunders, the prime
minister has been on a borrowing spree
that will have negative repercussions for
future generations of Bahamians. This
year alone, the prime minister has bor-
rowed more than $250 million. In this
budget alone, the government is pro-
jected to borrow a staggering $374 mil-
lion. To shed light on the magnitude of
our economic problems, government
debt at the end of June 2010 will rise to
43.2 per cent of GDP. This is a serious
problem and is cause for alarm for every
tax paying Bahamian.”

In the midst of this economic crisis,
Mr Stuart said, the government should
be wise in its borrowing and spending.

He said that while he agrees with Mr
Ingraham on the need for borrowing to
dredge the harbour, “certainly, borrow-
ing to fix a road in the midst of an eco-
nomic crisis is ludicrous and economi-
cally stupid. What is the return on invest-
ment for paving the road? How much
return would we see as a nation from
that $150 million road project?

“In less than five weeks, more than
5,000 students would be leaving school
looking for new opportunities. What
opportunities will be made available to
these students? Does the prime minister
have any plans for these additional 5,000
individuals? It is clear that Hubert Ingra-
ham is in deep water and does not have
a clue how to bring the ship to shore,” he
said.

Contract signed to complete North Eleuthera roads



PUBLIC WORKS and Transport Minister Neko Grant (right) is pictured
speaking to North Eleuthera residents during the contract signing for

refurbishing main roads.

Letisha Henderson/BIS Photo

NEKO GRANT, Minister for Public Works and Transport congratulates the owners of Nu View Construction Lim-

ited recipients of the $3.6 million contract to resurface and reconstruct roads in North Eleuthera. Pictured from
left, front row, are Thomas Johnson, Ministry of Works area representative; Colin Higgs, Permanent Secretary;
Peter Kemp, president of Nu View; Minister Grant; Quinten Kemp, vice president; Alvin Smith, Member Parlia-
ment for North Eleuthera and Speaker of the House of Assembly, Franklyn Johnson, Derek Elden of the Ministry

of Finance, Local Government representatives and other officials from the Ministry are also shown.

m BY KATHRYN CAMPBELL

UPPER BOGUE, Eleuthera
— The government has signed a
$3.6 million contract with Nu
View Construction Ltd for the
resurfacing and reconstruction
of roads in North Eleuthera.

mi oy- TMA =,

a wal

hc

The contract covers the entire
road network in North
Eleuthera, including Queen’s
Highway between the Glass
Window Bridge, and Upper and
Lower Bogue to the North
Eleuthera Airport. It is expect-
ed that 15-20 persons will be

1 ele motte)"

COOL

employed on the project. Dur-
ing the signing ceremony at the
Administrator's Office here,
Public Works and Transport
Minister Neko Grant said the
roadwork will complete previ-
ously contracted works for the
reconstruction and repair of

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roads throughout Eleuthera.

Minister Grant noted that the
projects would contribute to the
enhancement of road safety and
the further development of the
island. “The recession will not
last forever,” he said, “so it is
important to have our country
and our infrastructure in a state
of readiness for when the econ-
omy rebounds.”

Mr Grant insisted that Gov-
ernment expects “quality” work
and “on-time” completion of
the project.Member of Parlia-
ment for North Eleuthera and
Speaker of the House of
Assembly, Alvin Smith, said the
occasion marked a “historic
rehabilitation” of the roads.

“This ranks very high in the
memorable occasions since [|
have been an MP for this area
because I don’t speak from a
distance,” he said. “I speak from
experience.

“T have driven over these
roads so I know the deplorable
state they have deteriorated
into. For many years I have
been trying to get these roads
repaired.”

He expressed appreciation
for the roads on behalf of the
residents of Eleuthera. “We will
express our gratitude each time
we drive over the new roads,”
said Mr Smith

Mr Grant thanked the team
from the Ministry of Works,
including Permanent Secretary
Colin Higgs, Deputy Director
of Works (Civil Department)
George Hutcheson, and Project
Manager Dion Munroe.

Also at the signing were
North Eleuthera Administrator
Brenda Colebrooke and local
government representatives,
including Marcus Collins, Theo
Neely, Rosetta Hudson, and
Neko McDonald.

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© In brief

Man, 20, dies
after crashing
into tree

A MAN died early yester-
day morning after crashing
into a tree on J.F.K Drive,
police confirmed.

Dominique Miller, 20, of
Coral Harbour, is believed
to have lost control of the
2004 Chevy Trailblazer he
was driving when the colli-
sion occurred at around 2am.

Medics pronouned Mr
Miller dead at the scene.
Traffic police are investigat-
ing.

Blood appeal
by friends and
colleagues of
shooting victim

A DESPERATE plea for
blood has been issued by the
friends and colleagues of Jer-
ry Hutchinson, who is listed
in serious condition in the
intensive care unit at Doc-
tor’s Hospital.

Earlier this week, Mr
Hutchinson, a former rugby
player and general manager
of security at the Airport
Authority, was shot in the
front of Asa H Pritchard
some time around 6.30am.

Leaving the establishment
with funds to make a
deposit, Mr Hutchinson was
approached by a gunman
who demanded that he hand
over the cash.

Struggle

According to Assistant
Supt Leon Bethel, there was
a struggle between the two
men and Mr Hutchinson was
shot in the abdomen.

Since then, an e-mail has
been making rounds
amongst his colleagues and
friends asking them to visit
the hospital and donate
blood.

The gunman, who is still
actively being sought,
escaped the scene with the
deposit in a white car.

A Honda with the registra-
tion number 111982 is being
sought in connection with
the incident.

Anyone who has informa-
tion that may assist the
investigation is asked to call
Crime Stoppers on 328-TIPS
(8477). All calls are toll-free
and answered in the United
States to ensure total
anonymity.

Man in custody
over seizure of
gun, drugs and
ammunition

A 22 year-old man is in
custody in connection with
the seizure of a gun, ammu-
nition and drugs from a Nas-
sau Village home, according
to police.

The items, which included
a .223 rifle, nine live rounds
of ammunition for the
weapon and 21 foil packages
containing marijuana, were
discovered when Drug
Enforcement Unit officers
executed a search warrant on
the home at around 4am on
Friday.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MAY 30, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief



Worker kidnapped
after gunmen
Stage robbery

TWO terrified workers were
robbed by gunmen who kid-
napped one of them on Thurs-
day, police reported. The ordeal
began as a Jet Wash employee
was securing the building at
Bernard Road at around 11pm
when he was accosted by a gun-
man in a green Toyota Avalon.

After being forced into the
car, the employee was then dri-
ven to Prince Charles Drive
where three more men jumped
in. “They then drove to the resi-
dence of another employee who
resides in the eastern district of
New Providence where the
occupants of the home were
robbed of cash and other assort-
ed items,” said a police
spokesman. “The robbers then
fled the area in an unknown
direction, leaving the car.”

Police later found a shotgun
with four shells, a ski mask, a
quantity of cash, a laptop com-
puter, and a television set in the
vicinity.

Man on manslaughter
charge denied bail

m@ By NATARIO McKENZIE

Tribune Staff Reporter

THE man accused of killing a
father-of-one with a rock was
denied bail yesterday.

Jeffrey Moncur, 42, of Soldier
Road, has been charged with
the manslaughter of 45-year-old
Terry Fox. Mr Fox had report-
edly been watching television at
his home on Pork Fish Drive
when an acquaintance called
him outside. It is claamed Mr
Fox, a self-employed handyman,
was arguing with the visitor in
the back yard before he ran out
into the street and collapsed.
Police believed he died as a
result of a blow to the head with
a rock. His death was the 30th
homicide for the year.

Moncur, who was arraigned
on the manslaughter charge on
Thursday, was back before
Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez
yesterday for a bail hearing.

Denying bail, Chief Magis-
trate Gomez said he would rec-
ommend that Moncur be given
an early trial date in light of the
fact he is on remand. The case
has been adjourned to June 8
and transferred to Court 5,
Bank Lane.

College of Bahamas opens
Performing Arts Centre

AFTER undergoing major ren-
ovation, the Performing Arts
Centre of the College of the
Bahamas was officially opened
during the 20th annual ‘Colour
of Harmony’ exposition on May
26 which featured the artistic tal-
ents of students.

Governor General, His Excel-
lency Arthur D Hanna, said the
College has “far exceeded the
expectations” of those who con-
ceived the idea forty years ago.

“If those who had conceived
the idea of this College back in
1967, such as people like Rodney
Bain, could see its transformation
today, they would be amazed.

“Today it’s an institution that
awards a cross-section of degrees
and it is certainly an institution
of which we all can be proud.
Indeed, we never expected the
College could progress so quick-
ly,” said Mr Hanna.

According to College Presi-
dent, Janyne Hodder, the opening
of the Centre, situated on the
Oakes Field campus, was “a
dream that has finally become a
reality.”

“Tt is fitting that ‘Colour of
Harmony’ should mark the open-
ing of this facility,” she said. “It is
an amalgamation of art and music
- an ideal vehicle to highlight the
versatility of the Centre.

Colour of Harmony is one of
the College’s oldest and longest



THE PERFORMING ARTS CENTRE at the College of the Bahama



s (pictured)

was officially opened on May 26 during the 20th annual ‘Colour of Harmony’
- an exposition highlighting the artistic talents of students.

running annual events. Renova-
tion of the Centre has been one of
the College's major projects.

“All have been designed to
improve our facilities to make the
student and the faculty have a
more enjoyable, enriching expe-
rience and to assist us in our mis-
sion to support and drive nation-
al development through educa-
tion, research, innovation and ser-
vice,” said Ms Hodder.

The Performing Arts Centre is
a modern, fully equipped centre
with a 400-seat capacity. It is
capable of supporting live stage
productions, lectures, sympo-
siums, exhibitions, movies and
concerts. Through the Centre, the
College seeks to encourage cre-

ative potential and enrich the
intellectual and cultural life expe-
riences of students, host perfor-
mances by local and internation-
al companies and artists, and cre-
ate an environment were artists
and students of the arts can devel-
op and learn.

The Centre features computer
controlled theatrical lighting and
sound systems, dressing rooms
with private bathrooms, public
restrooms, a fully equipped con-
cession counter, and a concession
support area with fountain drinks,
ice, heaters and coolers.

It also has a director/manager’s
office, box office, and a computer-
based ticketing and reservations
system is to be installed. The Cen-

Former Defence Force officer granted leave to
apply for judicial review in unfair dismissal case

A FORMER US Marine and
Defence Force officer who claims
he was unfairly dismissed from
the force last year has been grant-
ed leave for apply for judicial
review, The Tribune has learned.

Lieutenant Zennerman Sher-
man, who was summarily dis-
missed from the Defence Force
last June for alleged misconduct,
was granted leave yesterday by
Supreme Court Justice Stephen
Isaacs to have his case heard. The
court will now review the force’s
decision to dismiss Lieut Sher-
man.

Lt Sherman, who joined the
Defence Force in 1996 after leav-
ing the US Marine Corps with an
honourable discharge in 1992,

FAMGUARD

CORPORATION LIMITED

Incorporated under the laws of the Commonweatth of The Bahamas

INTERIM REPORT — THREE MONTHS ENDING 31 MARCH, 2009
MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIRMAN

Dear Shareholder:

The strong growth in premium income experienced in 2008 continued in 2009 and
we recorded at the end of the first quarter an increase in premium income of $2.7
million or 15.7% over prior year-to-date.

Our Group Life and Health Division recorded the strongest gains in premium
income as a result of the sustained growth in new business. At the end of March
2009, new sales outstripped the prior year-to-date by 82%.

Our decision to change our accounting method for equities during 2008 from
fair value through profit and loss (FVTPL) to available for sale (AFS) assisted in
minimizing fluctuations in investment income caused by changes in the price
of shares held in our equities portfolio. We recorded investment income of $2.4
million for the first quarter of 2009 compared to $1.9 million for the same period
last year. Prior year was impacted significantly by unrealized losses on equities of

$441 thousand.

During the quarter policyholder benefits trended higher than prior year-to-date by
30% reflecting an increase in health claims. This increase in policyholder benefits
negatively impacted net income, which ended the quarter at $1.6 million.

The Board of Directors declared a dividend of 6 cents per share, which was paid to
shareholders on May 18 2009 based on the performance of the company for the three
months to March 31 2009.

Sincerely, f ;
hedge ache

Norbeit E. Boissiere
Chairman

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET (UNAUDITED)
AS AT 31 MARCH 2009

(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars) 44 Teeenber

2009 2008
$ $

1,954,114
339,737
13,789,621

ASSETS
Cash and bank balances
Short term bank deposits
Other bank term deposits
Financial Investment Assets
Held-to-maturity
Available for sale

Loans

1,833,305
340,635
4,233,591

56,390,833
6,787,851
69,567,290
139,153,505

2,208,520
3,086,519
34,442,304

178,890,848

44,255,404
7,243,165
69,292,456
136,874,497

2,784,130
2,749,750
34,062,774

176,471,151

Total investment assets

Receivables and other assets
Premiums receivable
Property, plant and equipment, net

TOTAL

LIABILITIES & EQUITY
LIABILITIES
Reserves for future policyholders’ benefits
Other policyholders’ funds
Policy liabilities
ayables and accruals

Total liabilities

104,806,556
9,898,793
114,705,349
4,851,759
119,557,108

102,902,989
7,756,601
110,659,590
6,993,345
117,652,935
EQUITY
reference shares
Ordinary shares
Share premium
Revaluation surplus
Retained earnings
Total equity
TOTAL

10,000,000
2,000,000
10,801,080
9,922,302
26,610,358
59,333,740

178,890,848

10,000,000

2,000,000
10,801,080
10,377,616
25,639,520
58,818,216

176,471,151





contends that National Security
Minister Tommy Turnquest —
who followed the recommenda-
tion of Commodore Clifford
Scavella — did not have the pow-
er to dismiss a commissioned offi-
cer according to the Defence Act.

Despite acclaimed service in
several areas of the force, includ-
ing education of young marines,
Lt Sherman contends he was sys-
tematically overlooked for pro-
motion and deliberately margin-
alised and ostracised.

Lt Sherman claims he has not
been given any reason for his dis-
missal and that his termination
was in breach of Section (14)1 of
the Defence Act.

The Minister of National

Security, the Commander of the
Royal Bahamas Defence Force
and the Attorney General are list-
ed as respondents in the court
action.

Lt Sherman is seeking to have
the decision to dismiss him
quashed, be reinstated to the
force and be compensated among
other eight other grounds of
relief.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

RR UE
PHONE: 322-2157



CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS (UNAUDITED)
FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED 31 MARCH 2009

(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)

Cash flows from operating activities
et income

Adjustments for:

Depreciation

Change in mortgage provision
Reserve for policyholder benefits
nterest income

Dividend income

(Increase) decrease in operating assets
Receivables and other assets

remium in arrears
(Decrease) increase in operating liabilities
ayables and accruals
Other policyholder funds
Net cash from operating activities
Cash flows from investing activities
olicy loans
urchase of fixed assets
Construction in progress
Other loans repaid

let mortgage loans issued

urchase of Government bonds
nterest received
Dividends received

Net cash from investing activities
Cash flows from financing activities
Dividends paid

Net cash used in financing activities



let increase in cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of the period
Cash and cash equivalents at end of the period

Cash and cash equivalents is comprised of:

Cash and bank balances
Short-term deposits
Other bank term deposits

Change in appreciation on investments in equities -

Operating profit before working capital changes

3 months to 3 months to
31 March 2009 31 March 2008
$ $

1,570,838 2,747,405

323,841 215,445
441,118
(292,226)
1,921,295 1,963,015
(2,303,409) (2,292,048)

112,932 $3,450
1,392,991 2,699,259

(6,642)

575,610
(336,769)

(2,059,784)
488,924

(2,141,586) (172,457)

2,142,192 148,617
1,632,438 807,325

44,996 (318,573)
(618,423) (1,103,542)
84,948 z
96,451 60,410
(367,843) (597,078)
(11,250,000) ¢
1,188,560 2,496,682
112,932 83,450
(10,708,379) 621,349

(600,000) (600,000)
(600,000) (600,000)

(9,675,941)
16,083,472
6,407,531

828,674
13,912,100
14,740,774

1,833,305

340,635
4,233,591
6,407,531

4,445,601
329,659
9,965,514
14,740,774

tre has a projection screen, a
video projector and a video con-
trol system for projector, screen,
DVD, VCR and other technical
equipment. With a high-tech
stage equipped with the highest
industry standards stage curtains;
a loading bay to the left of the
stage; a stage support/storage
room to the right (for items such
as the piano, podium and other
stage equipment associated with
productions). A baby grand piano
was purchased in April, 2008.

The evening was capped with
the presentation of the coveted
E Clement Bethel award to cele-
brated Bahamian Artist, Kendal
Hanna, one of the forerunners of
abstract painting in the Bahamas.

The award was presented by
Past President of the College, Dr
Keva Bethel, widow of E
Clement Bethel. She hailed Mr
Hanna as “someone who has
been a dear friend and colleague
in the arts.” “From 1962, Mr Han-
na participated in the Nassau Fes-
tival of Arts and Crafts and we
became very aware of the very
special talent that he brought to
our country,” said Dr Bethel. “It
is very pleasing for me to present
this award to him.”

Galleria

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AMCELS & DEM OMS

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[DANCE FLICK

Airlines put in place
box, hag embargo

American Airlines and its
regional affiliate American Eagle
Airlines are putting in place a box
and bag embargo on flights to
selected destinations including
the Bahamas between June 6 and
August 25. The embargo includes
people traveling to and from Nas-
sau, George Town, Exuma,
Marsh Harbour and Freeport

A year-round box embargo is
in place on flights from, or passing
through, New York's John F
Kennedy International Airport
to all Caribbean and Latin Amer-
ican destinations.

Under the embargo, oversize,
overweight and excess baggage
will not be accepted on flights to
the above destinations. Bags that
weigh between 51lbs and 70lbs
are subject to a fee of $50.

One carry-on bag will be
accepted with a maximum size of
45 inches and weight of 40lbs.
Sports equipment will be allowed
as part of the total checked bag-
gage allowance, but additional
charges may apply.

The embargo also affects cus-
tomers going to San Pedro Sula,
Tegucigalpa and San Salvador in
Central America; Maracaibo,
Cali, Medellin, La Paz, Santa
Cruz and Quito in South Ameri-
ca; Santo Domingo, Santiago,
Port-au-Prince, Grenada and
Kingston, Guadalajara, Aguas-
calientes, San Luis Potosi, Chi-
huahua and Leon in Mexico; and
all American Eagle flights to and
from San Juan.

it | a29



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DAO PLCS
ANGELS & DERM

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380-FLIX



CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME (UNAUDITED)

FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED 31 MARCH 2009

(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)

INCOME
Gross premium income
Premium ceded to reinsurers
Net premium income

Annuity deposits

Net premium income and annuity deposits

Interest income
Dividend income
Change in unrealized loss on investments
Realized gain from sale of assets
Other operating income
Total income

BENEFITS & EXPENSES

Restated

3 months to 3 months to
31 March 2009 31 March 2008
$ §

20,484,476 17,768,174
(2,283,130) (1,253,150)
18,201,346 16,515,024
1,604,804 1,154,892
19,806,150 17,669,916
2,303,409 2,292,048
112,932 83,450
4 (441,118)

100

156,348 153,661

22,378,939 19,757,957

BENEFITS
Policyholders’ benefits
Reinsurance recoveries
Net policyholders’ benefits
Increase in reserves for future policyholders’ benefits
Total benefits
EXPENSES
Commissions
Operating expenses
Premium tax
Depreciation and ammortization expense
Bad debt expense
Total expenses
Total benefits and expenses

NET INCOME

Earnings per share

11,997,201 9,229,155
624,133 846,444
11,373,068 8,382,711

1,921,295 1,963,014

13,294,363 10,345,725

2,908,194
3,670,388

2,648,135
3,555,827
617,957 537,621
323,841 215,445
6,642 292,201

7,513,738 6,664,827

20,808,101 17,010,552

1,570,838 2,747,405
0.16 0,27



NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED INTERIM FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
AS AT 31 MARCH 2009

1. ACCOUNTING POLICIES

hese interim consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with
International Accounting Standards 34: Interim Financial Reporting. The accounting policies
used in the preparation of the interim consolidated financial statements are consistent with those
used in the annual consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2008.







hese unaudited consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its
wholly owned subsidiaries, Family Guardian Insurance Company, FG General Insurance Agency
Limited, FG Financial Limited, FG Capital Markets Limited and BahamaHealth Insurance
Brokers and Benefits Consultants Limited.

2. EARNINGS PER SHARE

Earnings per share:



3 months to
31 March 2008

3 months to
31 March 2009

10,000,000
$ 1,570,838
0.16 $

10,000,000
$ 2,747 405
0.27

Weighted average number of shares outstanding
Consolidated net income
Earnings per share

3. COMMITMENTS

Outstanding commitments to extend credit under the mortgage loan agreements amounted to

approximately $3,675,003 as at 31 March 2009 (31 December 2008: $2,820,390)

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY (UNAUDITED)
FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED 31 MARCH 2009

(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)

Balance as of December 31, 2007

Transfer from revaluation surplus

Preference Ordinary

Share Revaluation Retained

Shares Shares Premium Reserve Earnings Total

$ $
$ 10,000,000 $ 20,000,000

Adjustment to fair value of investment in equities 7 :
Adjustment to appraised value of land and buildings : ‘

Net income for 2008
Dividends declared and paid -
preference shares
ordinary shares ($0.24 per share)
Balance as of December 31, 2008

$ $ $ $
$ 10,801,000 $7,361,959 $ 23,840,477 $ 54,003,516

- (496,893) -
- 3,512,550 3
4,899,043

(496,893)
3,512,550
4,899,043

(700,000) (700,000)

g 2,400,000 2,400,000

10,000,000 20,000,000

Adjustment to fair value of investment in equities 7 -
Adjustment to appraised value of land and buildings 2 zs

Net income for the period
Dividends declared and paid -
preference shares
ordinary shares ($0.06 per share)
Balance as of March 31, 2009

$ 10,000,000 $ 20,000,000

10,801,000 10,377,616 25,639,520
- (455,314) -

58,818,216
(455,314)
1,570,838 1,570,838

(600,000)
$ 59,333,740

(600,000)

$ 10,801,000 $ 9,922,302 $ 26,610,358









PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MAY 30, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Govt has no
legal authority



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972

Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Will Cuba return to OAS next week?

WASHINGTON — What would happen if
the Cuban government should send an envoy
next week to claim the country's long-vacant
seat at the Organisation of the American States
in Washington?

The 34 OAS foreign ministers, meeting in
Honduras, will vote Tuesday whether to reverse
the resolution that suspended Cuba's member-
ship in 1962 and denounced its Marxist-Lenin-
ist government as "incompatible" with the
organisation's founding principles of democra-
cy and human rights.

The 60-year-old OAS, heavily financed by
the United States, has been divided over
whether to give post-Fidel Castro Cuba a warm
welcome by overturning the resolution or expe-
rience the embarrassing scenario of a fight over
Cuba's seat.

So far, it appears to be most everybody else
vs. the United States.

The ministers gather for their annual assem-
bly starting Sunday in San Pedro Sula, Hon-
duras, despite cracks in buildings and damaged
streets left by a major earthquake early Thurs-
day.

The meeting's goal is to kill the 47-year-old
Cuban resolution and remove legal obstacles
for Cuba to regain its OAS membership.

"I believe the case is a lot more complex
than that," Jose Miguel Insulza, the OAS sec-
retary-general, said Wednesday during a meet-
ing in Washington that exposed deep divisions
among the members over the wording of the
text. “We have to see first if there is a will in the
Cuban government to start doing some practi-
cal things and accept principles of an organisa-
tion where it was absent for about 50 years,”
Insulza told reporters.

Since taking office in February, President
Barack Obama has signalled some willingness to
back away from a half-century of U.S. policy
toward the communist country. First, he ordered
the shutdown of the U.S. military prison in
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and later he lifted
restrictions on Cuban-American visiting rela-
tives in Cuba and sending them money.

As late as last week he made an overture to
Cuba, asking Raul Castro's government to
resume talks on legal immigration of Cubans to
the United States. That would reopen discus-
sions that had been closed off by President
George W. Bush in mid-2003.

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton
testified to a Senate panel last week that she
would not support any effort by her Western
Hemisphere peers to get Cuba back into the
organisation until that country changes its polit-
ical system, releases political prisoners and
respects human rights.

Yet the U.S. ambassador to OAS, Hector
Morales, presented a proposal Wednesday: a
US.-sponsored resolution asking to reverse the
1962 expulsion decision that Washington had
pressed the organisation to adopt during the
Cold War.

"There has been no change of policy," the
State Department said in a news release. "The
United States looks forward to the day when
Cuba can return to the Organisation of Amer-
ican States in a manner that is consistent with
the principles of the Inter-American Democra-
tic Charter." The charter makes democracy a

right of all people. Besides the U.S. proposal,
Nicaragua and Honduras are offering separate
ones, and the difficulty of satisfying everyone
has left a divided organisation going to the Hon-
duras meeting.

All OAS countries accept the first article of
the three resolutions to overturn the 1962 pol-
icy. The disagreements are about the follow-
ups about future relations between Cuba and
the OAS.

The Obama administration proposes to start
a dialogue with the current government that
could lead to a "possible reintegration" of the
country to the Inter-American system only if
Cuba meets the "compromises and values" of
the OAS charters.

Those opposing the U.S. version argue that
the OAS cannot dictate what Cuba has to do to
return. Cuban officials also have said they are
not interested in returning to the organisation
but they would like the OAS replaced by anoth-
er regional movement that would exclude the
United States.

The Nicaraguan proposal, sponsored by
Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez and coun-
tries close to the populist leader, is the most
radical. It asks the OAS to admit its 1962 deci-
sion was an “error and an act of injustice” that
caused extreme hardship to the Cuban people.
Besides Chavez's followers, the Nicaraguan
proposal is backed by some Caribbean countries
that benefit from the Venezuelan president's
use of oil to gain international friends.

The third proposal, sponsored by Honduras,
comprises article 1 and language that the future
relationship between Cuba and the OAS will
depend on decisions that both parties adopt.
Opponents argue about the usefulness of ruling
on an issue that Cuba would be unlikely to
accept. The ambassadors agreed to create a
task force that includes all OAS members to
write a text accepted by everyone in the next
couple of days so the ministers can pass it by
consensus. Lacking a consensus, the OAS has
another resource: the vote. The resolution
would require two-thirds of the members, or
23 countries, to pass, and enough votes already
exist for that, OAS sources said.

Some diplomats say the United States could
be the only government to vote against a draft
that did not dictate changes for Cuba to make.

By the time the OAS meets Tuesday, the
United States will be the only country in the
Americas that has not re-established diplomat-
ic ties with Cuba.

El Salvador, the only country besides the
United States without relations, plans to restore
ties the day before the Honduras meeting, when
its new president, Mauricio Funes, takes office.
He will be the first president of El Salvador
who is a member of the Farabundo Marti
National Liberation Front, or FMLN, the sec-
ond former Central American foe of the Unit-
ed States to take power democratically in Latin
America's lurch to the left.

In 2006, Nicaraguans elected Daniel Ortega
two decades after his Sandinista government
fought U.S.-backed Contra rebels, and his rela-
tions with Washington have remained tense
under Obama's administration.

(This article was written by Nestor Ikeda of
the Associated Press).



to interfere with
sports bodies

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

This Ministry would be grateful
for your kind assistance by publi-
cation of its response to a mis-
leading Editorial which appeared
in Thursday, May 14, 2009 edi-
tion of The Freeport News under
the headline “The Cop-out Must
Stop.”

The contents of the response
are self-explanatory and are in
the public interest, especially the
local sporting community.
Accordingly, your usual cooper-
ation and assistance would be
much appreciated.

Sincerely yours
Archie Nairn,
Permanent Secretary,
Nassau,

May 25, 2009

May 19th, 2009

Editor

The Freeport News

Mr Oswald Brown

Freeport, Grand Bahama

Dear Sir:

Thave been directed to respond
to your Thursday, May 14, 2009
Editorial appearing under the
headline, “The Cop-out Must
Stop.” Much of what is expressed
in the editorial finds unqualified
endorsement by this Ministry.
Exception is taken, however, with
your assertion that all Ministers
inclusive of the present one, have
copped out of resolving the 23-
year-old baseball issue, and that
none of them “considered the
matter serious enough to do what
is necessary to correct it.”

In the first instance, it is neces-
sary to address the widely held

letters@tribunemedia net



misconception that the Minister
of Sports possesses unfettered
powers to dictate to or interfere
with the affairs of local sporting
organisations.

Nowhere in The Sports Act are
such powers conferred on the
Minister.

In fact, even the government
has no legal authority to conduct
such interference, having regard
to the internationally accepted
protocol that governments are
obligated to accept and respect
the autonomy of sporting bodies
and by extension any legitimate
collection of those bodies such as
National Olympic Committees or
International Sports Federations.

Governments are made to pay
a price for violating such inter-
national protocols. For example
last year the Soccer Federation
and the Olympic Association of
Iraq entered a team to partici-
pate in the Beijing Olympics.

The Iraqi government did not
agree with the selections and
changed the team as well as those
who selected it.

When this was brought to the
attention of the IOC, the entire
Iraqi country was expelled from
participating in the Games,
demonstrating the international
community’s insistence on the
non-interference by governments
into the affairs of sporting bodies.

Having regard to such well
established internationally agreed

protocol then, it is misleading to
claim, as you did, that govern-
ments have unchecked power to
change or dismiss an internation-
ally recognised governing body,
with or without good cause.
Indeed, the most our government
can do in accordance with The
Sports Act, is to withdraw offi-
cial recognition of that govern-
ing body and to grant such recog-
nition to one more qualified body.
This latter action was formally
executed by the government in
2003 and from then to now, the
full weight of the government has
remained fixed behind the body
that meets the qualifications as
the parent body for the sport of
baseball in The Bahamas. No
doubt the level of support thusly
provided by the government has
been pivotal in the tremendous
growth of local baseball since
2003.

It should also be noted that in
spite of such decisive action taken
by this Ministry in 2003, the
Bahamas Olympic Association
has found it impossible to follow
suit, and therein resides real
impetus for the kind of resolu-
tion which your editorial begs.

I trust that this serves to pro-
vide you with a better insight of
the baseball issue and the vast
amount of resources the past 10
Ministers of Sports have devot-
ed to achieving relief for the local
baseball fraternity.

ARCHIE NAIRN
Permanent,
Secretary,

Nassau,

May 25, 2009.

Bahamians deserve probe
into pageant controversy

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The Miss Universe Pageant will be held here in
The Bahamas at the Atlantis Resort in August
this year. It will be The Bahamas’ time to shine;
however, there is much controversy surrounding
the coronation last night of Miss Bahamas Uni-

verse 2009.

The Bahamian people deserve a complete and
thorough investigation of the events leading up to
the crowning of the queen. The judges were vis-
ibly upset as the results were announced and the
queen was crowned. It is Deloitte & Touche and
the judges’ duty and responsibility to discuss and
determine that the scores were accurately and
fairly reported, and to rectify the results if they

were not.

It is upsetting that three of the awards: Best
Hair, Best Smile, and Best Evening Dress were
not announced, as the MC of the night said, “We
are waiting on the scores.” They have yet to be

the papers. Why would the judges and/or Deloitte
& Touche send the results without the names of

the winner of the awards? Two of the three unan-
nounced awards (hair and smile) are determined
beforehand during the preliminary events.

It is extremely odd that they were not on the
results cards handed to the MC. This begs the

question, were these awards factored into the

compiled scoring?

If the judges feel that the wrong queen was
named, they simply need to fix the problem.

It would be an injustice to the rightful queen,
the Miss Bahamas organisation, and to the
Bahamian people if the lady, in the eyes of the
judges, who best exemplifies the qualities of a
Miss Universe contestant, were not there to rep-

resent our country. The judges must do the right

announced. Furthermore, there was much chaos

when reading the cards that were provided to
the MC’s, with the Shenique Miller pointing at
names, while Clint Watson was constantly flipping

Nassau,
May, 2009.

thing to get it right, and if they sit back and allow
the show to continue, knowing full well that the
right girl was not crowned, they have failed in
their capacity as judges.

CECILE EDWARDS

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WUSVEL DOMINGUE
of #46 SOLDIER ROAD, P.O. BOX N-4218, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 30 day of May, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that PAUL ISAACS of CASSIA
CL, GLENISTON GARDENS, P.O. BOX SS-6345, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 23 day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that CHARLES CLARKE
of Freeport, Grand Bahama intend to change my name
to CHARLES FERGUSON. If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ROSNELL JOSEPH of MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, GENERAL DELIVERY is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 23rd day of MAY 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ELIE ETIENNE of
AUGUSTA STREET is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 23% day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



To advertise in

The Classified Section
Call 502-2351



Problems now? See what havoc
a major hurricane would wreak

EDITOR, The Tribune.

AlJl of us in The Bahamas are now talking about hard times.
Regardless of what anybody says, based on our geographical
location we should never have inflation problems and if we do
have inflation it is caused by poor management of the Gov-
ernment.

In 2007 before our General Election the United States went
into a recession, I did an article that appeared in the Punch, The
Tribune and The Nassau Guardian. The topic was “Tighten
your belt hard times ahead”.

At that time The Bahamas was doing very well. Of course, my
cry fell on deaf ears and some said it would never happen but my
experience came from 18-20 years as a Trade Union Leader that
certain things are not said or done. I stated then and am remind-
ing you now that when Minister Carl Bethell read those confi-
dential letters in the Halls of Parliament there were doom days
ahead because you don’t make mockery of people with money
they would never not accept that kind of treatment and lie
down and play dead. For almost 30 years my cry was move the
government institutions such as the hospital, Immigration, Cus-
toms (among others) to Andros or Eleuthera which would
reduce the population in New Providence.

T also spoke of the danger we would face if we did not do it.
Well you may say what is my point?

My point is we have been lucky so far that we have not had
a major hurricane in New Providence in a long time.

If we do have one this year or the next we would think God
really turned his back on us because we would see the worst
financial chaos that anyone alive today would have ever seen,
then we would understand why I said we need a major popula-
tion shift.

If you think we have problems now, wait and see what would
happen if we have a major hurricane.

AUDLEY D HANNA Sr
Nassau,
May 28, 2009.



THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

SATURDAY, MAY 30, 2009, PAGE 5



Pintard calls for sexual offenders list

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — Well-known
poet and radio host Michael
Pintard said a sexual offenders
list would help protect the
nation’s children from preda-
tors.

His comment came in
response to the child molesta-
tion scandal unfolding at the
Eight Mile Rock High School
on Grand Bahama.

In an exclusive interview with
The Tribune, Mr Pintard said
consideration ought to given to
such a list — especially now, after
it has been claimed that three
teachers at a single school might
have abused children.

Mr Pintard said that there are
many sexual offenders out on
the streets and people don’t
know who they are.

“T think that an offenders list
would be useful,” Mr Pintard
said. “I know persons have said
that would be a problem
because we are a small commu-

nity, however, unfortunately,
because so many children are
being violated now in the
Bahamas, I don’t think we have
much of a choice.

“T think we ought to have a
list available . . . so when per-
sons are released (from jail) and
move into neighbourhoods,
people can know who they are
living with.”

Following the Eight Mile
Rock abuse claims, the Ministry
of Education announced that
all new teachers will be vetted
by police and that safety com-
mittees made up of teachers,
students, administrators, and
parents will be introduced in all
public schools.

Complaints have been filed
against three teachers at Eight
Mile Rock High and police
investigations are continuing.

Mr Pintard said child
molestation in schools is not a
“new situation” in the Bahamas.

He claimed that for years, the
issue has been kept quiet while
disgraced teachers were either
transferred to other schools or



KEITH CAREY (above) was robbed and gunned-down in 2006 while
making a $40,000 deposit at Bank of The Bahamas on Tonique

Williams-Darling Highway.



@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net

"Tis vex to see them jitney
buses and cars join up with each
other gossiping, blocking traffic
from passing. An‘ them male dri-
vers seems to be looking in each
others eyes an’ don't look when
you is blowing your horn to sep-
arate them.

"The Department of Road
Traffic need to make sure they
has Christian ways before they
gets to drive.”

— VEX DRIVER, NASSAU

"T vex at the disrespectful level
of service I received at Princess
Margaret Hospital the other day.
I showed up there with my
appointment card to the recep-
tionist and she asked me rudely
where I get this from telling me I
must go back home because I did-
n't have an appointment. I don't
mind if they made a mistake with
my appointment date but I can't
take her attitude.

"T know she have kids and the
tone of the voice she spoke to me
in, she can't speak to her chirren
like that, much less to a customer.
The staff at PMH treats people
with no respect as if you begging
them for something. I paid my
contributions to NIB since it
came into effect until I retired,
so I'm not begging for anything.

“They should have somebody
check on these rude staff and how
they treat people. And then they
have the nerve to post a sign up in
PMH saying if you talk rude or be
rude to the staff they can have
you arrested — ain’ that some-
thing?"

— DUDLEY WILLIAMS, NASSAU

“T vex that the leaders of our
country can't get their acts
together, work together, and find
a sensible plan of action to lead
this country of the miserable eco-
nomic situation we are in right
now. Listening to the prime min-
ister's speech on the budget it
hit home that we are in for a
rough ride and I can only hope
that when those MPs meet in the
House of Assembly next week, I
hope more than hot air comes
out of their mouths.

"Our future depends on it.”

— POLITICAL OBSERVER, NASSAU

“T sick, tired and vex over
people who is be taking their
sweet time driving up and down
the streets. I mean I can under-
stand being cautious and not
wanting to go past the speed
limit but there is no reason on
this earth to drive at five, eight
or 10 miles per hour on the
public streets.

"Too many times traffic is
backed up during rush hour
because people who either
can't drive, don't have jobs or
just plain fool taking a turtle-
paced joy ride through the
streets. And no amount of horn
blowing or screaming is move
them out the way. That's just
like biggety Bahamians to act
like the road is theirs and to
have no respect for anyone
else."

— MAD MOTORIST, NASSAU

¢ Are you vex? Send your com-
plaints to whyyouvex@tribuneme-
dia.net or fax them to 328-2398.

taken out of classrooms and put
to work behind a desk in some
Ministry of Education office.

“When I was in school we all
knew the persons who were
problematic and successive gov-
ernments have had a problem
transferring culprits who never
get the treatment and help they
need so they just re-offend.

“Those persons ought to be
dealt with too. Why go after just
the present culprits when there
is irrefutable evidence about
somebody who might be sitting
in a ministry desk who has been
run out of multiple islands?”
Mr Pintard ask.

Mr Pintard said careful back-
ground screening is important,
but useless when employers fail
to alert other employers to
potential problems in an appli-
cant.

“Bear in mind, if an educa-
tor is Bahamian and they have
offended they are transferred
from one school to another.

“And to those, whether stu-
dents and educators, who are
aware that there are teachers



THE sentencing hearing of the
man convicted of the February
2006 murder of businessman
Keith Carey has been adjourned
to June 25.

The hearing was adjourned
after Deputy Director of Public
Prosecutions Cheryl Grant-
Bethel and attorney Craig But-
ler, who is representing convict
Jamal Glinton, said that they
needed more time to go over a
probation report.

Glinton was convicted on
April 10 of the murder of Keith
Carey, 43, who was gunned down
on the steps of the Bank of the
Bahamas on Tonique Williams-
Darling Highway before he was
able to deposit $40,000 that
belonged to the Esso Service Sta-
tion that he operated on Faith
Avenue and Carmichael Road.

Glinton, who stood trial with
Sean Brown and Dwight
Knowles, was also convicted of
armed robbery and conspiracy
to commit robbery.

“T think we
ought to have a
list available...
so when per-
sons are
released (from
jail) and move
into neighbour-
hoods, people
can know who
they are living
with.”



Michael Pintard

that are predators they have an
obligation to speak up,” he said.

Despite the recent allega-
tions, Mr Pintard noted that the
vast majority of educators are
living wholesome lives and con-
tinue to make personal sacri-
fices for their students.

All three men had initially
been charged with murder, con-
spiracy to commit armed rob-
bery and armed robbery, how-
ever nearing the end of their tri-
al, Justice Jon Isaacs directed
jurors not to consider the charge
of murder against Knowles and
Brown.

At the trial, the prosecution
submitted that Glinton, alias
“Bumper”, had shot Mr Carey
twice on the steps of the Bank of
the Bahamas in 2006 while
Knowles and Brown sat in the
getaway car.

Brown and Knowles were sen-
tenced to 10 years and 11 years
respectively on armed robbery
and conspiracy charges, which
will run concurrently.

The Crown is seeking to have
Glinton sentenced to death.



Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, MAY 31ST, 2009
7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Mathilda Woodside

11:00 a.m. Bro. Henry Knowles/Youth
7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Lay Preachers/ZNS Service



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Speaker Bro. Jim Gillett from Ireland Outreach Ministries

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. ¢ Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
¢ Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. ¢ Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
¢ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
¢ Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)

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Sunday School: 9:45am
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Telephone number: 324-2538
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INSIGHT



For the stories behind
the news, read Insight

on Mondays











THE TRIBUNE PAGE 11
~ —, Youngsters show
o .
‘x 4 Off their moves at
| | % ©, annual basketball
| SF tourney...
SATURDAY, MAY 30 2009 See page 12



SUT SS CLT
Smother Frenchmen
UR ERS aes

Andrew Brownbill/AP

Bg By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ahamian Mark Knowles

knew that he and his

Indian partner, Mahesh

Bhupathi, had to play
well in their first round match at the
Roland Garros Grand Slam Tour-
nament in Paris yesterday.

They didn’t leave anything for
chance as they smothered the French
team of Josselin Ouanna and Jo-Wil-
fried Tsonga in two straight sets.

The final score 6-3, 6-2.

“Tt was a very dangerous team,”
said Knowles of Ouanna and Tsonga,
who also made it to the third round
of the men’s singles. “It was a really
pro French crowd. It was almost like
playing Davis Cup against France.

“It was a really dangerous first
round match so we are really happy
to get the win and to get it in such a
convincing fashion.”

The number four seeded Knowles
and Bhupathi needed just 58 min-
utes (30 in the first set and 28 in the
second) to send the unseeded
Frenchmen packing.

They literally dominated the
match, posting 66 total points won
compared to 39 by the Frenchmen.
They produced a 66% (27-of-41) first
serve, 89% (24-of-27) winning on
first serve; 86% winning on second
set (12-of-14); 47% receiving points
won and 43% break point conver-
sions.

Knowles and Bhupathi will now
go on to play the team of Johan
Brunstrom of Sweden and Jean-
Julien Rojer of the Netherlands
Antilles in the second round today.

“They are two up and coming guys
who won their first round match,”
said Knowles of their next oppo-
nents. “They are a little unknown.
We don’t know these guys that well.

“So it is going to be more us
focussing on our game because any-
time you play in a Grand Slam, it’s
going to be tough. So we expect a
very tough match, but we expect to
pull through it.”

The draw for the tournament is an
interesting one.

Knowles’ former partner Daniel
Nestor and his new partner Nanad
Zimonjic are the top seeded team in
the tournament with American iden-
tical twin brothers Bob and Mike
Bryan at No.2.

The Bryans, however, are still sit-
ting on top of the ATP computer
rankings, while Nestor and Zimonjic
are at No.2. Knowles and Bhupathi
occupy the third spot.

“We haven’t really looked that far,
especially in a Grand Slam, you don’t
want to look too far ahead,” said
Knowles about the draw that could
see them collide with the Bryans in a
possible semifinal meeting next
week.

“We want to pretty much keep it
round by round. You just never
know what happens in a Grand Slam.
But we’re pretty focussed and we
are ready to play whoever it is we
meet. We have played in a lot of
matches, especially Grand Slams,
and so we both know that you really
don’t want to look too far ahead.”

Knowles said he and Bhupathi will
be contended if they can just get past
Brunstrom and Rojer in their sec-
ond round match whenever they

play.

match at the Roland Garros Grand Slam Tournament in Paris...

MARK KNOWLES & MAHESH BHUPATHI (shown in this photo at the ‘08 Australian Open) smothered the French team of Josselin Ouanna and Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in two straight sets, 6-3, 6-2 yesterday in their first round





—

Mark Knowles makes commitment to
play in second round of Davis Cup tie

Bm By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ALTHOUGH it’s more than a month away,
Mark Knowles is making a commitment to come
home and play in the second round of the Amer-
ican Zone II Davis Cup tie.

The Bahamas’ youthful team, led by Devin
Mullings and Timothy Neilly, lost 4-1 to
Paraguay when they went on the road to play the
first round in March.

Over the weekend of July 10-12, the Bahamas
is scheduled to host Guatemala in a must-win
match to avoid being relegated to Zone II next
year. A win will enable the Bahamas to remain
in Zone II.

“T am looking to be available for sure. Obvi-
ously it’s still a ways off, but it’s a big tie against

Guatemala,” he said. “But I think we have the
team that can get the job done. So I’m looking
forward to it.”

The elder statesman of the team, which is
loaded with bright young stars, said he’s delight-
ed to be able to make a contribution.

“T like being there for the team and helping the
team out,” he stressed. “Obviously, the team
needs to start winning these matches without
me.

“T think they’re getting close to that level.
They had a good match on the road in Paraguay
and I spoke with some of the guys and they feel
they are playing very well.”

With time and more exposure, Knowles feels
that the players will get better and eventually the
Bahamas will return to Zone One.

“T really think that as a nation we really
shouldn’t drop any lower than zone two,”

Knowles stated. “So I think with or without me,
those guys should be able to keep us in zone
two.

“With me on the team, I think we should be
able to challenge for zone one. That is my goal.
I think that is the same goal as the other players,
so I feel we should be able to achieve that very
soon.”

Having had the longest tenure of any local
player in Davis Cup history, registering a total of
14 years with a 41-32 total win-loss record, 23-25
in singles and 18-7 in doubles, Knowles said he
intends to continue playing as long as he’s
healthy.

“T am just taking it one year at a time,” he
said. “I have a wife and two great kids, so play-
ing tennis is very important to me. I’m still play-
ing well and having fun.

“So with all of these factors, I think I will con-

tinue to play and not put a deadline on how
long I will stick around. I will just play year for
year before I make a final decision on when I will
stop.”

As he prepares to come home for the tie,
Knowles will meet a new Bahamas Lawn Tennis
Association president in place.

Immediate past first vice president Stephen
Thompson has been elected as the new president,
replacing Wesley Rolle, who will still have the
responsibility of heading the organising com-
mittee for Davis Cup.

“T got an e-mail from the secretary saying that
there’s a new president. I don’t really know
much about what happened at the elections,”
Knowles said. “But obviously Stephen Turn-
quest is a very good guy and is capable of filling
the position. I thought that Wesley did a good
job, so I’m sorry to see him go.”



PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MAY 30, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS
SPORTS

Special Olympics: National games make a





splash, kick off with swimming and judo

AFTER training all year, ath-
letes from the islands of Abaco,
Grand Bahama, New Providence
and Long Island are competing at
this year’s National Special
Olympics Games.

More than 250 athletes are
expected to compete in various
sports in the capital, and organisers
are confident that the event will be
the best ever.

At 9am Friday, they took part in
swimming and judo at the Betty
Kelly Kenning swim complex.

And today at the Thomas A
Robinson Stadium, following the
opening ceremony at 9:30am, the
athletes are expected to show off
their skills in bocce and track and
field.

Roosevelt Thompson, national
director of Special Olympics
Bahamas, reports that athletes from
the sub-programmes in the islands
have trained all year for this event.





feee ne = eS
And they are anxious to com-
pete. As there are no international
games this year, this will be the
highlight of their training. fern weo aaecae- . ae
The increased number of coach- 5 ete’
es certified this year guarantees that
the quality of their performances
should surpass the high level
demonstrated in the past.

With the programme producing
more athletes, the competition
should be exciting, and the public is
invited to witness an inspiring dis-
play of courage and determination
by the participants.

Basil Christie, national chairman,
expressed his appreciation to the
many sponsors and supporters of
the national programme. He also :
encourages everybody to come out ¢ fe a 7 a
and cheer for the athletes.

The coaches and volunteers have
worked hard and he is confident
that spectators will be proud of the
results of their efforts. ATHLETES compete in swimming and judo at the Betty Kelly Kenning swim complex yesterday...



22 OP #4



ee
TUT UTS
Aree Gey)

gt

THE NEW PROVIDENCE Primary School Sports Association’s annual basketball tourney concluded Friday at the Kendal Isaacs Gmnasium. Here, some of the male youngsters are shown in action...





THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MAY 30TH, 2009, PAGE 13B

THE WEATHER RE eR S22 (9) INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

< mg _| (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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F/G FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC Fic FIC me Low: 76° F/24°C San Salvador 90/32 68/20 t 87/30 73/22 t a a c smart choice is
Albuquerque 82/27 58/14 t 86/30 59/15 pc Indianapolis 76/24 5613 t 80/26 63/17 s Philadelphia 79/26 58/14 s 77/25 56/13 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS Santiago 61/16 36/2 pe 64/17 43/6 s ’ Ll ce Management.
Anchorage 58/14 46/7 + 60/15 47/8 s Jacksonville 88/31 65/18 t 90/32 66/18 t Phoenix 100/37 73/22 s 100/37 73/22 s ee y Santo Domingo 88/31 73/22 pe 85/29 71/21 pe —_ ple vou can trust
Atlanta 85/29 61/16 s 86/30 66/18 s Kansas City 88/31 64/17 po 87/30 65/18 pc Pittsburgh 70/21 48/8 t 72/22 54/12 RAGGEDISLAND — Uigh:92°F/83°¢ oe errr oe ~~ es you :
Allantic City 78/25 53/11 s 79/26 5512 s Las Vegas 96/35 69/20 t 96/35 74/23 pc Portland, OR 85/29 56/13 s 83/28 55/12 s High: 90° F/32°C Low: 78° F/26°C aaa es ek mM pe re eae s be ae
Baltimore 78/25 52/11 s 80/26 56/13 s Little Rock 86/30 62/16 s 91/32 67/19 s Raleigh-Durham 85/29 59/15 s 88/31 63/17 s Low: 74° F/23°C “ae. i eae ae ei Be Be AG e —
Boston 74/23 52/11 t 75/23 54/12 pc LosAngeles 76/24 60/15 pc 76/24 60/15 pc _ St. Louis 82/27 65/18 t 88/31 69/20 s . om ae mane re SURGES 4 7 Wr
Buffalo 65/18 46/7 t 63/17 46/7 pc Louisville 78/25 62/16 t 84/28 67/19 s Salt Lake City 84/28 61/16 pc 83/28 57/413 t GREAT INAGUA = ttn Tala Fan BSAG ea : NSURANCE MANAGEMENT
Charleston,SC 88/31 65/18 s 88/31 66/18 s Memphis 88/31 68/20 s 90/32 70/21 s San Antonio 92/33 66/18 pce 89/31 67/19 pc High: 92°F/33°C aaa BAT AGI? t 66/18 50/0 pec ; 3) i tanen RRORPSS & AGENTS
Chicago 72/22 49/9 t 77/25 62/16 po Miami 87/30 74/23 t 87/30 73/22 t San Diego 72/22 63/17 po 69/20 62/16 pc Snes oe (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. - —
; Low: 76° F/24°C Trinidad 66/18 57/13 c 69/20 56/13 r =
Cleveland 66/18 52/11 t 70/21 58/14 s Minneapolis 72/22 53/11 pe 78/25 56/13 t San Francisco 69/20 54/12 pe 66/18 53/11 pc Vemeannai 89/20 50/10 s 69/20 53/11 pc t Flouth fy
Dallas 90/32 66/18 s 91/32 68/20 s Nashville 83/28 62/16 pc 88/31 66/18 s Seattle 75/23 52/11 s 77/25 5110 pe Vienna B13. 47/8 t 65/18 53/11 pc New Providence Grond Boho Abeco ert Wind
Denver 81/27 53/11 po 79/26 52/11 t New Orleans = 87/30 69/20 s 87/30 71/21 s Tallahassee 90/32 63/17 po 92/33 64/17 s Warsaw 66/18 50/10 sh 70/21 54/12 sh fl é
Detroit 70/21 50/10 t 70/21 57/13 s New York 76/24 57/13 s 75/23 60/15 pc ‘Tampa 85/29 70/21 t 89/31 71/21 s e~ Winnipeg 6015 40/4 pc Soe AAR t Ta SAAN Tel (0) 15-350) (HT) 740 Be (42) 350-2461 Ve (24 e104
Honolulu 87/30 74/23 s 87/30 74/23 s Oklahoma City 90/32 6246 s 89/31 64/17 pe — Tucson 98/36 66/18 pc 96/35 65/18 s -_ : : ; ; : ; eae
Houston 90/32 66/18 s 90/32 68/20 s Orlando 87/30 70/21 t 91/32 69/20 t Washington,DC 80/26 5713 s 83/28 64/17 s Te eh ee ee ce





PAGE 14, SATURDAY, MAY 30, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Paradise Plates serves up an unforgettable night

PARADISE Plates, Hands For
Hunger’s first annual fundraiser,
served-up an unforgettable evening to
the more than 400 hundred guests who
came out in a large show of support
and raised more than $60,000 to help
fight hunger.

Sponsored by the New Providence
Development Company Limited and
Old Fort Bay Club, the sold-out event
held last week at Atlantis featured a
lavish array of cuisine, fine wine, and
spectacular live entertainment with all
proceeds benefitting Hands For
Hunger — the non-profit, humanitarian
organisation committed to the elimi-
nation of hunger and the reduction of
food waste in the Bahamas.

“We are incredibly pleased and
grateful for the extraordinary success of
Paradise Plates,” said Georgina Web-
ster, director of fundraising for Hands
For Hunger. “The biggest kudos for
the evening goes to the chefs, vintners
and beverage participants who were
so accommodating and gracious and
served exceptional cuisine, fine wines
and drinks. Everyone in attendance
was treated to a remarkable evening
that went beyond expectations and we
thank each and every person that sup-
ported Paradise Plates.”

Showcasing new creations or their
well-known signature fare were the
chefs from Mesa Grill; Nobu; Dune;
British Colonial Hilton; Old Fort Bay
Club; Luciano’s of Chicago; The Patis-
serie; Van Breugels; Balduccinos;
Compass Point; Goodfellow Farms;
Food Art by Cacique; and Le Petit
Gourmet. Also showcased were fine
wines by Mendoza Wine Imports,
Sands Beer by Sands Brewery; Guava,
Passion Fruit and Pina Colada Frozen
Daiquiris provided by SHG Manage-
ment and Bacardi; and water by Nau-
tilus.

Other sponsors of Paradise Plate

FROM PAGE ONE

Mother heaten up 0

More than $60,000 raised to
help fight hunger in the Bahamas

included: Atlantis, Pearle Vision, Prime
Advisory Group, The d’Albenas
Agency Ltd, Royal Star Assurance,
Sun Tee Embroid Me, Mendoza Wine
Imports Sands Brewery and Creative
Relations.

Guests dined on creations such as
roasted pumpkin soup with coconut
compote by Balduccino’s; lobster and
mango salad, and wonton stuffed with
curried chicken by Old Fort Bay Club;
and ribbons of tuna, avocado, radish
and ginger by Dune.

Nobu served black cod on butter let-
tuce; Van Breugels served tuna tartare
with wasabi sauce and Goodfellow
Farms offered guests golden gazpacho,
balsamic beef tenderloin bites and gua-
va toast.

Deserts included a flourless choco-
late cake with raspberry sauce and
compote of fruit by The Patisserie, an
island snow fantasy by the British
Colonial Hilton, and guava duff with
rum butter sauce by Compass Point.
The wines served were Noble
Aconcagua Chardonnay 2007 and
Noble Aconcagua Malbec 2007 donat-
ed by Mendoza wine Imports.

Musical entertainment was provided
by Adrian D’ Aguilar, Ben Pinder, Trio
Bonjour, Christina Cartwright, Carib-
ah and Anthony Mullings who played
a mixture of jazz, string trio, Caribbean
jazz, calypso and classical music. A raf-
fle and silent auction held during the
event also helped to raise funds.

“After such an extraordinary
evening it will be hard to create an
even bigger and equally successful
evening next year — but that is exactly

what we propose to do,” added Mrs
Webster. “We look forward to working
together with our existing partners and
hope to forge new relationships to con-
tinue to raise funds for such an impor-
tant cause. We sincerely thank every-
one involved for their commitment and
support.”

“The success of Paradise Plates is
really a testament to the strength of
our community’s shared vision to fight
and end hunger in our country,” said
Alanna Rodgers, founder and pro-
gramme co-ordinator of Hands For
Hunger. “The fact is that there are
thousands of Bahamians facing food
insecurity, unable to access the foods
that are needed to allow for healthy
and fully functioning lives. There is
more than enough food on this island
to amply feed every single woman, man
and child. Hands For Hunger functions
to connect the excess supply of food
with the unmet, ever growing need
through the more equitable and effi-
cient distribution of resources. The
funds raised through Paradise Plates
will go directly to impacting the lives of
those in need.”

Each day, Hands For Hunger picks-
up fresh, high quality food that would
otherwise go to waste and delivers it to
community centres, shelters, churches
and soup kitchens throughout New
Providence.

“With our two new refrigerated
trucks on the road, we have already
distributed upwards of 75,000 pounds
of food thus far and are on target to
provide 450,000 meals by the end of
our first year,” added Ms Rodgers.

policeman hoyirien

3 S



THE CHEFS of Old Fort Bay Club served guests lobster and mango salad, and wonton

stuffed with curried chicken.

“This is a promising start to fulfilling
our mission to eliminate hunger while
significantly reducing food waste. All of
this is being done through the creation
of meaningful partnerships amongst
members of our community. We can-
not thank everyone involved in Par-
adise Plates enough for their time, tal-
ents and invaluable support and for
most importantly saying ‘yes’ to mak-
ing a difference and taking a stand for
transformation in our community.”

Hands For Hunger was started by a
group of Bahamian student leaders in
early 2008, who were and still are com-
mitted to making a difference in the
world. The organisation is a registered,
not-for-profit charity (#57211 C) that
relies on donations from community
groups, foundations, corporations and
the general public. They are led by a
volunteer board of directors and sup-
ported by hundreds of dedicated vol-
unteers.

Doctored’ photo

WECM Lae
SION KI Ie



FROM page one

that night if I hadn’t fought for my life.”

The officer ended his assault and she
“stumbled outside” where she found her
son crying. After witnessing the violent
assault, the boy had made a phone call to his
father asking him to come and collect him,
she said.

Shortly afterwards the woman went to
the Carmichael Road police station to
report the incident. Officers took state-
ments, photos and brought in the officer in
question, and indicated that the matter
would be dealt with, the family claimed.

The following day, the victim alleged,
her boyfriend’s brother — also a police offi-
cer — called her to demand that she drop the
charges against his brother.

“The next thing I knew, he (her
boyfriend) was out,” said the woman.

She and her family are concerned that
the officer’s alleged relations to a former
senior police officer might impede a prop-



“I tried to bite my
way out because I
thought ‘I can’t just
die’. I could’ve been
just another statistic
that night if I hadn’t
fought for my life.”



er investigation.

Yesterday Commissioner of Police Regi-
nald Ferguson, who met with the woman
after she left The Tribune, said her injuries
were appalling and that he directed the
family to lodge a formal complaint with the
organisation’s Complaint Unit.

Questioned as to whether such incidents
are cause for concern about the adequacy of
the RBPF’s vetting procedure, the com-
missioner defended the process, stating that

he believes it is “reasonably good.”
He added that while the RBPF would wish
to “bring in the best applicants,” it must
be appreciated that “along the lines you’re
going to have cracks and some persons are
likely to get through there who might not be
the desired kind of character.”

The commissioner described the force as
a “reflection” of the society it serves, as
officers are drawn from local communities.

Meanwhile, he said, it is not abnormal
for an officer under investigation to be back
on duty as quickly as the man in question.

“Tt depends on the officer who’s investi-
gating. When it becomes necessary to take
him off disciplinary leave that would be
done, it’s not threatening the investigation
in any way,” he said.

Mr Ferguson said the criminal complaint
and the disciplinary investigation will be
conducted and “the course of action we
will take will be determined.”

He said the disciplinary investigation
should take several days to conduct.

Hreworks at pageant press conference

FROM page one

Questions were raised over
pageant officials’ practice of
adding cumulative preliminary
numbers to the final scores, con-
cerns over possible ballot tam-
pering of the preliminary scores
and apparent impropriety of
having pageant official Monalisa
Thompson sit as head judge of
the competition.

Miss Bahamas Universe pres-
ident Gaynell Rolle-Stubbs
admitted that pageant officials
held the preliminary scores
before they were turned over
to the accounting firm, but
insisted there was no ballot tam-
pering.

"We held the scores prior to

the accounting firm receiving
them — the score sheets are a
true reflection of what we
received from the judges —
there were no alterations," she
said.

She maintained that the scor-
ing process was not flawed,
insisting the whole process was
"impartial" and "transparent"
while pageant media director
Clint Watson said it was not
uncommon in the pageant
world for members of a pageant
committee to sit on the judging
panel.

The meeting was briefly halt-
ed by verbal wrangling between
an aunt of top three finalist
Amanda Appleyard and
pageant officials who asked her
to leave the room after several

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emotional outbursts.

Judges Mark Humes and
Cypriana McWeeny were also
silenced by officials as they tried
to air their concerns of the scor-
ing process, with Ms Stubbs
telling the two they were not
invited.

Deloitte and Touche manag-
ing partner Raymond Winder
said the firm received the
judges’ scores from the pageant
committee on Saturday after-
noon. They ensured that all
score cards were signed by the
judges.

"These were double checked,
the tallies, in order to present
the top 12 contestants," said Mr
Winder.

The results of preliminary
scores were cumulative and
therefore carried over to the
events on Sunday — a practice
one judge told The Tribune did
not provide a level playing field
for the top 12 semi-finalists.

Mr Winder said on Sunday
night, Deloitte officials made
sure that judges submitted their
signed scorecards for tallying.
These cards were passed to his
firm "with no interference," he
said.

These were re-checked again
after the pageant and were con-
sistent with the results on Sun-
day night, he said.

Pageant officials held the pre-

liminary scores before they
were turned over to the
accounting firm, a practice that
raised eyebrows at yesterday's
conference.

The 17 contestants were pre-
judged in three separate events
leading up to the pageant.

"All scores were cumulative
and helped in the selection of
our top 12," said Ms Rolle,
adding that all judges were
made aware of this scoring sys-
tem before the pageant.

She said Ms Sherman held a
sizable gap over the other con-
testants in the preliminary
events.

"The winner at this stage was
indisputable and it would (have
taken) a miraculous miracle to
unseat Ms Sherman as she was
well on her way to victory hav-
ing led by a huge margin in two
of the preliminary categories
and placing in the top three in
the final preliminary event,” she
said.

Indira Wood, aunt of Amanda
Appleyard, said she was not sat-
isfied with yesterday's explana-
tion, alleging that there are calls
for Ms Rolle-Stubbs to be
stripped of her franchise licence.



FROM page one

"It's not an actual picture, it was photoshopped," said the pagean-
t's media director Clint Watson.

Overcome with tears, Ms Sherman said despite the negative
outcry following last Sunday's pageant she remains grateful for her
win.

"Tam so grateful for this opportunity, this is surely a once in a life-
time opportunity that I will embrace. I'm asking for the Bahamian
people to show their love and support — I am here to serve — and
despite all of the controversy it doesn't matter. J am here to serve
and that's what I’m going to do," she said.

"And these aren't tears of being afraid — I'm a very emotional
person — these are more tears of joy for those who have support-
ed me. And for the struggles that I have endured, because no one
has lived my life. So I know what I went through and like I said I'm
here to serve my country, I'm here to serve my Bahamian people,”
she said.

Ms Sherman, a 25-year-old singer and student whose platform is
child abuse awareness, has been at the centre of a firestorm fol-
lowing her crowning.

Earlier in the week judges of the Miss Bahamas Universe 2009
pageant invited Ms Stubbs to review and confirm the votes cast in
the contest with some sources close to the pageant claiming many
people were "surprised" that Ms Sherman walked away with the top
prize.

Scorching commentary also erupted on Internet message boards
with detractors taking colourful jabs at Ms Sherman and the
pageant’s director.

Contestant Enna Thomas told The Tribune she was unsettled by
allegations made on the Internet that she may have not placed in the
top 12 because of a money dispute between her sponsor — FML
Group of Companies President Craig Flowers — and Ms Stubbs.

These claims were denied by Ms Stubbs.

In spite of the questions raised, yesterday officials upheld Sun-
day's results and said the process was a “fair” and "impartial"
one.

Roy Colebrooke replaced by
union’s first woman president

; ra ———
CROWDS gather at St Matthew’s Anglican Church for the election.

FROM page one

union needs restoration. The Lord has seen our hearts, he had
heard our cries, and he has given the union back to its people,” said
Ms Martin.

She said her first priority will be meeting with Mr Colebrooke to
discuss the union’s next steps.

“Our union cannot keep going if we continuing to treat our out-
goings (presidents) as if they mean nothing,” she said.



Full Text



PAGE 1

VOTES tallied in the Bahamas Hotel and Catering Allied Workers Union revealed yesterday that leader Roy Colebrooke has been replaced by the organisation’s first woman president. Nicole Martin, a single moth er-of-three, led the “A Team” to a landslide victory in the polls, conducted Thursday. Ms Martin received 1,358 votes while her nearest competitor, Tyrone Butler of the “M Team” attracted 416 votes. Abraham Smith drew 293 votes, while Mr Colebrooke ranked last, with only 270 votes. Her win followed months of in-fighting in the union, which represents around 6,000 hotel workers, at a time when the tourism industry faces unprece dented challenges. Speaking late Thursday evening, Ms Martin partly attributed her win to her team’s decision to “fight a clean fight” in the run-up to the election. She said they had faced “many obstacles” in reaching their goal of replacing Mr Cole brooke’s team, but their victory proved that “when the people are ready for change, change will happen”. “Our union is in trouble. Our N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Mother ‘beaten up’ by police boyfriend C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.155SATURDAY, MAY 30, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER MOSTLYCLOUDY, A T-STORM POSSIBLE HIGH 87F LOW 76F S P O R T S SEEFRONTOFSPORTSSECTION Knowles, Bhupathi The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com ‘Doctored’ photo of pageant queen sparks probe INSIDE COB OPENS PERF ORMING AR T S CENTRE PAGE THREE FNMAND PLP BLASTED ONTHEECONOMY PAGE TWO MORE THAN $60,000 RAISED TO FIGHT HUNGER PAGE FOURTEEN I N S I D E CLASSIFIEDS TRA DER CARS! CARS! CARS! CLASSIFIEDSTRADER JOBSAND HELPWANTED L L O O A A D D S S O O F F FRENCH OPEN win in two sets REMINDER THE Tribune will not be published on Monday, which is a public holiday. The next edition will be on Tuesday. n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A MOTHER is demanding justice after claiming she was brutally beaten, strangled and threatened with death by her police officer boyfriend. The Police Complaints Unit has launched an investigation into the allegations. But the victim, who wishes to remain anonymous, and her family fear police are not taking the matter seriously. They say their suspicions were confirmed after her attacker came to her house the day after the incident. He was with a group of other officers to collect a number of per sonal items, including his police uniform. “He said he’d been (free ing,” the woman claimed. “I don’t think it’s fair. I am really hurt.” The alleged incident began when the boyfriend – a man who she claims to have been in an abusive relationship with for several years – came to her home on Wednesday evening. The pair got in an argument because she had called him earlier that evening asking him not to stay in her house during a week she planned to be away in Florida. After a brief verbal spat, the officer, who is attached to the Traffic Division, began punching and strangling her, shouting that he would “kill her”, alleged the woman, who has a son aged eight. “Me and my (son ing when he opened the door and said ‘What do you think you’re talking about on the phone?’” The victim said that as a result of the attack that followed she began “vomiting blood.” “I couldn’t breathe,” she said yesterday, surrounded by family and friends. After suffering blows for what she said felt like 20 minutes, the victim said she finally found herself free after she bit down on her attacker’s hand, which was partially covering her mouth. “I tried to bite my way out because I thought ‘I can’t just die’,” she said. “I could’ve been just another statistic Inquiry launched as woman demands justice n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net THE Miss Bahamas Universe organisation is investigating the release of what they claim is a "doctored" photo of new queen Kiara Sherman. The image, first appearing on local website bahamasweekly.com and widely circulated through emails, reveals Ms Sherman with an apparent wardrobe malfunction. Amid the controversy, an emotional Ms Sherman yesterday said she will not let the furore put a blight on a "once in a lifetime" opportunity. At a press conference held at accounting firm Deloitte and Touche where officials sought to validate the scores of the ballots cast, pageant representatives said the photo was digitally altered. They plan to press charges against the person who released the image. "We are concerned about the increase in cyber crime of which Ms Sherman is targeted through character assassination and graphic enhancement of sexual nature. This will not be tolerated, we have begun an investigation regarding the same and intend to press charges against the culprit to the fullest extent of the law," said president of the Miss Bahamas Universe organisation Gaynelle Rolle, flanked by Ms Sherman, Miss Earth Bahamas Ife Bethel Sears, Miss Interna tional Bahamas Amanda Appleyard, several judges and pageant officials. "It not only affects Ms Sherman, but what does it say to the world about Bahamians," she added. SEE page 14 CROWNED: Kiara Sherman, Miss Bahamas Universe 2009. BRUISEDANDBATTERED: A mother shows the injuries she claims she suffered at the hands of her police officer boyfriend. PHOTOS: Tim Clarke /Tribune staff SEE page 14 T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net SEVERAL heated arguments erupted during a tumultuous press conference held by Miss Bahamas Universe officials yester day to validate the scores of the ballots cast in the recent pageant. But despite some objections raised, 25-year-old singer Kiara Sherman remains the current Miss Bahamas Universe. A police officer was present through most of the proceedings as relatives of the contestants, the top three finalists, several judges and the media crowded into the conference room of accounting firm Deloitte and Touche. MAN IN C OUR T A CCUSED OF MURDERING WOMAN n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter A MAN accused of murdering a young woman and then dumping her body in a local cemetery appeared in court yesterday. Police have charged 24-year-old Angelo Poitier, alias Angelo Morley, with the murder of 19-year-old Shanise Adderley. Poitier, who was arraigned before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court One, Bank Lane, was not represented by an attorney. He was not required to enter a plea to the murder charge. The case was adjourned to June 3 and transferred to Court 10 Nassau Street for fixture. Ms Adderley, a resident of Chippingham, was found dead at the Bahamas Veteran Cemetery on Infant View Road shortly before 4 am Wednesday. CHARGED : Angelo Poitier at court yesterday. Fireworks at pageant press conference SEE page 14 SEE page 14 Roy Colebrooke replaced by union’ s first woman president

PAGE 2

n BY KATHRYN CAMPBELL UPPER BOGUE, Eleuthera The government has signed a $3.6 million contract with Nu View Construction Ltd for the resurfacing and reconstruction of roads in North Eleuthera. The contract covers the entire road network in North Eleuthera, including Queen’s Highway between the Glass Window Bridge, and Upper and Lower Bogue to the North Eleuthera Airport. It is expect ed that 15-20 persons will be employed on the project. During the signing ceremony at the Administrator's Office here, Public Works and TransportM inister Neko Grant said the roadwork will complete previ ously contracted works for the reconstruction and repair of roads throughout Eleuthera. Minister Grant noted that the projects would contribute to the enhancement of road safety andt he further development of the island. “The recession will not last forever,” he said, “so it is important to have our country and our infrastructure in a state of readiness for when the economy rebounds.” M r Grant insisted that Government expects “quality” work and “on-time” completion of the project.Member of Parliament for North Eleuthera and Speaker of the House of Assembly, Alvin Smith, said theo ccasion marked a “historic rehabilitation” of the roads. “This ranks very high in the memorable occasions since I have been an MP for this area because I don’t speak from a distance,” he said. “I speak from experience. “I have driven over these roads so I know the deplorable state they have deteriorated into. For many years I haveb een trying to get these roads repaired.” He expressed appreciation for the roads on behalf of the residents of Eleuthera. “We will express our gratitude each time we drive over the new roads,”s aid Mr Smith Mr Grant thanked the team from the Ministry of Works, including Permanent Secretary Colin Higgs, Deputy Director of Works (Civil Department George Hutcheson, and ProjectM anager Dion Munroe. Also at the signing were North Eleuthera Administrator Brenda Colebrooke and local government representatives, including Marcus Collins, Theo Neely, Rosetta Hudson, and Neko McDonald. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MAY 30, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net BREAKING his silence after nearly a year, leader of the Bahamas Democratic Movement Cassius Stuart has come out swinging – criticising both the FNM and PLP for the state for the economy. Characterising the former PLP government led by Perry Christie as more occupied with managing the “chaos and crisis” it got itself into than creating newi nitiatives, Mr Stuart said the present FNM administration led by Hubert Ingraham has been a “dismal failure”. He said: “From his budget communications, it appears that the Ingraham administration is confused and out of touch with what is really happening in the world. Neither the prime minister nor any of his cabinet colleagues seem to have any clue as to how to pull the Bahamian economy out of the slump that we are in. “Hubert Ingraham’s actions or inaction is evidence that the prime minister does not know what to do in the midst of this crisis. For the first quarter of 2009, the Bahamas government had a revenue s hortfall of about $100 million. For the s econd quarter, we have experienced an additional $100 million shortfall. In the 2009/2010 budget, it is projected that the Bahamian economy will suffer even more shortfall in the third and fourth quarters, which will amount to about $260 million.” With this in mind, Mr Stuart questioned why the prime minister would see fit to sell the Bahamas Telecommunications Corporation – “the only corporation that is generating revenue for the country at this time”. “Why is the prime minister shutting off the only valve that is bringing in financial resources? This makes absolutely no sense. BTC should not be sold until our economy rebounds and the American economy stabilises. To sell BTC at this time for a quick shot in the arm will only do more harm than good. The reocc urring revenues generated from BTC’s p rofits are vital for the survival of our country in these critical economic times. “Adding to his blunders, the prime minister has been on a borrowing spree that will have negative repercussions for future generations of Bahamians. This year alone, the prime minister has borrowed more than $250 million. In this budget alone, the government is projected to borrow a staggering $374 million. To shed light on the magnitude of our economic problems, government debt at the end of June 2010 will rise to 43.2 per cent of GDP. This is a serious problem and is cause for alarm for every tax paying Bahamian.” In the midst of this economic crisis, Mr Stuart said, the government should be wise in its borrowing and spending. He said that while he agrees with Mr Ingraham on the need for borrowing to d redge the harbour, “certainly, borrowi ng to fix a road in the midst of an economic crisis is ludicrous and economically stupid. What is the return on investment for paving the road? How much return would we see as a nation from that $150 million road project? “In less than five weeks, more than 5,000 students would be leaving school looking for new opportunities. What opportunities will be made available to these students? Does the prime minister have any plans for these additional 5,000 individuals? It is clear that Hubert Ingraham is in deep water and does not have a clue how to bring the ship to shore,” he said. A DESPERATE plea for blood has been issued by the f riends and colleagues of Jerry Hutchinson, who is listed in serious condition in thei ntensive care unit at Doctor’s Hospital. E arlier this week, Mr Hutchinson, a former rugby player and general managero f security at the Airport Authority, was shot in the front of Asa H Pritchard some time around 6.30am. Leaving the establishment w ith funds to make a d eposit, Mr Hutchinson was approached by a gunman w ho demanded that he hand over the cash. Str uggle According to Assistant S upt Leon Bethel, there was a struggle between the two men and Mr Hutchinson was shot in the abdomen. Since then, an e-mail has b een making rounds amongst his colleagues and friends asking them to visit the hospital and donate blood. T he gunman, who is still actively being sought, escaped the scene with the deposit in a white car. A Honda with the registrat ion number 111982 is being sought in connection with the incident. A nyone who has informa tion that may assist the investigation is asked to call Crime Stoppers on 328-TIPS (8477a nd answered in the United States to ensure total anonymity. A 22 year-old man is in custody in connection with the seizure of a gun, ammu nition and drugs from a Nassau Village home, according to police. The items, which included a .223 rifle, nine live rounds of ammunition for the weapon and 21 foil packages containing marijuana, were discovered when Drug Enforcement Unit officers executed a search warrant on the home at around 4am on Friday. A MAN died early yesterday morning after crashing into a tree on J.F.K Drive,p olice confirmed. Dominique Miller, 20, of Coral Harbour, is believed to have lost control of the 2004 Chevy Trailblazer hew as driving when the collision occurred at around 2am. Medics pronouned Mr Miller dead at the scene.T raffic police are investigating. Man, 20, dies after crashingi nto tree Blood appeal by friends and colleagues of shooting victim Man in custody over seizure of gun, drugs and ammunition In brief Bahamas Democratic Movement leader lays into FNM and PLP over the economy Cassius Stuart breaks silence after nearly a year Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y . Contract signed to complete North Eleuthera roads NEKO GRANT , Minister for Public Works and Transport congratulates the owners of Nu View Construction Lim ited recipients of the $3.6 million contract to resurface and reconstruct roads in North Eleuthera. Pictured from left, front row, are Thomas Johnson, Ministry of Works area representative; Colin Higgs, Permanent Secretary; Peter Kemp, president of Nu View; Minister Grant; Quinten Kemp, vice president; Alvin Smith, Member Parlia ment for North Eleuthera and Speaker of the House of Assembly, Franklyn Johnson, Derek Elden of the Ministry of Finance, Local Government representatives and other officials from the Ministry are also shown. L e t i s h a H e n d e r s o n / B I S P h o t o PUBLIC WORKS and Transport Minister Neko Grant (right speaking to North Eleuthera residents during the contract signing for refurbishing main roads.

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A FORMER US Marine and Defence Force officer who claims he was unfairly dismissed from t he force last year has been granted leave for apply for judicial r eview, T he Tribune h as learned. Lieutenant Zennerman Sherm an, who was summarily dis missed from the Defence Force last June for alleged misconduct, was granted leave yesterday by Supreme Court Justice Stephen I saacs to have his case heard. The court will now review the force’s d ecision to dismiss Lieut Sher man. L t Sherman, who joined the Defence Force in 1996 after leav ing the US Marine Corps with an honourable discharge in 1992, contends that National Security Minister Tommy Turnquest – who followed the recommendat ion of Commodore Clifford Scavella did not have the powe r to dismiss a commissioned offi cer according to the Defence Act. D espite acclaimed service in several areas of the force, includ ing education of young marines, Lt Sherman contends he was systematically overlooked for prom otion and deliberately marginalised and ostracised. L t Sherman claims he has not been given any reason for his dism issal and that his termination was in breach of Section (14 the Defence Act. The Minister of National Security, the Commander of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force and the Attorney General are liste d as respondents in the court action. L t Sherman is seeking to have the decision to dismiss him q uashed, be reinstated to the force and be compensated among other eight other grounds of relief. A FTER undergoing major reno vation, the Performing Arts Centre of the College of the Bahamas was officially opened during the 20th annual ‘Colouro f Harmony’ exposition on May 26 which featured the artistic talents of students. Governor General, His Excell ency Arthur D Hanna, said the C ollege has “far exceeded the expectations” of those who conceived the idea forty years ago. “If those who had conceived t he idea of this College back in l967, such as people like Rodney Bain, could see its transformation today, they would be amazed. Today it’s an institution that awards a cross-section of degrees and it is certainly an institution of which we all can be proud. Indeed, we never expected theC ollege could progress so quickly,” said Mr Hanna. According to College President, Janyne Hodder, the opening o f the Centre, situated on the O akes Field campus, was “a d ream that has finally become a reality.” “It is fitting that ‘Colour of Harmony’ should mark the openi ng of this facility,” she said. “It is an amalgamation of art and music an ideal vehicle to highlight the versatility of the Centre. C olour of Harmony is one of t he College’s oldest and longest running annual events. Renovat ion of the Centre has been one of the College's major projects. “All have been designed to improve our facilities to make the s tudent and the faculty have a more enjoyable, enriching experience and to assist us in our mission to support and drive national development through education, research, innovation and service,” said Ms Hodder. The Performing Arts Centre is a modern, fully equipped centre w ith a 400-seat capacity. It is capable of supporting live stagep roductions, lectures, symposiums, exhibitions, movies and c oncerts. Through the Centre, the College seeks to encourage creative potential and enrich the i ntellectual and cultural life experiences of students, host performances by local and international companies and artists, and crea te an environment were artists and students of the arts can develop and learn. The Centre features computer controlled theatrical lighting and sound systems, dressing rooms with private bathrooms, public restrooms, a fully equipped concession counter, and a concessions upport area with fountain drinks, ice, heaters and coolers. I t also has a director/manager’s office, box office, and a computerb ased ticketing and reservations system is to be installed. The Cent re has a projection screen, a v ideo projector and a video control system for projector, screen, DVD, VCR and other technical equipment. With a high-techs tage equipped with the highest industry standards stage curtains;a loading bay to the left of the stage; a stage support/storage r oom to the right (for items such a s the piano, podium and other stage equipment associated with productions). A baby grand piano was purchased in April, 2008. T he evening was capped with the presentation of the covetedE Clement Bethel award to celebrated Bahamian Artist, Kendal H anna, one of the forerunners of abstract painting in the Bahamas. The award was presented by Past President of the College, Dr Keva Bethel, widow of EC lement Bethel. She hailed Mr Hanna as “someone who has been a dear friend and colleague in the arts.” “From l962, Mr Hann a participated in the Nassau Fest ival of Arts and Crafts and we b ecame very aware of the very special talent that he brought to our country,” said Dr Bethel. “It is very pleasing for me to present t his award to him.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MAY 30, 2009, PAGE 3 Incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of e BahamasINTERIM REPORT – THREE MONTHS ENDING 31 MARCH, 2009MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIRMANDear Shareholder: strong growth in premium income experienced in 2008 continued in 2009 and we recorded at the end of the rst quarter an increase in premium income of $2.7 million or 15.7% over prior year-to-date. O ur Group Life and Health Division recorded the strongest gains in premium income as a result of the sustained growth in new business. At the end of March 2009, new sales outstripped the prior year-to-date by 82%. Ourdecisiontochangeouraccountingmethodforequitiesduring2008from fairvaluethroughprotandloss(FVTPLtoavailableforsale(AFSassistedin minimizinguctuationsininvestmentincomecausedbychangesintheprice ofsharesheldinourequitiesportfolio.Werecordedinvestmentincomeof$2.4 million for the rst quarter of 2009 compared to $1.9 million for the same period lastyear.Prioryearwasimpactedsignicantlybyunrealizedlossesonequitiesof $441 thousand. During the quarter policyholder benets trended higher than prior year-to-date by 30% reecting an increase in health claims. is increase in policyholder benets negatively impacted net income, which ended the quarter at $1.6 million. Board of Directors declared a dividend of 6 cents per share, which was paid to shareholders on May 18 2009 based on the performance of the company for the three months to March 31 2009. Sincerely, Norbert F. Boissiere Chairman CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET (UNAUDITEDas at 31 march 2009 (Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)ASSETS Cash and bank balances Short term bank deposits Other bank term deposits Financial Investment Assets Held-to-maturity Available for sale Loans Total investment assets Receivables and other assets Premiums receivable Property, plant and equipment, netTOTALLIABILITIES & EQUITYLIABILITIESReserves for future policyholders’ benets Other policyholders’ funds Policy liabilities Payables and accruals Total liabilitiesEQUITYPreference shares Ordinary shares Share premium Revaluation surplus Retained earnings Total equityTOTAL CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY (UNAUDITEDfor the three months ended 31 march 2009(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)Balance as of December 31, 2007 Transfer from revaluation surplus Adjustment to fair value of investment in equities Adjustment to appraised value of land and buildings Net income for 2008 Dividends declared and paid preference shares ordinary shares ($0.24 per share) Balance as of December 31, 2008 Adjustment to fair value of investment in equities Adjustment to appraised value of land and buildings Net income for the period Dividends declared and paid preference shares ordinary shares ($0.06 per share) Balance as of March 31, 2009Ordinary Shares $ $ 20,000,000 ---20,000,000 --$ 20,000,000 Revaluation Reserve $ $ 7,361,959 (496,893 3,512,550 10,377,616 (455,314 -$ 9,922,302 Total $ $ 54,003,516 (496,893 3,512,550 4,899,043 (700,000 (2,400,000 58,818,216 (455,314 1,570,838 (600,000 $ 59,333,740 Preference Shares $ $ 10,000,000 ---10,000,000 --$ 10,000,000 Share Premium $ $ 10,801,000 ---10,801,000 --$ 10,801,000 Retained Earnings $ $ 23,840,477 --4,899,043 (700,000 (2,400,000 25,639,520 -1,570,838 (600,000 $ 26,610,3582009 $1,833,305 340,635 4,233,591 56,390,833 6,787,851 69,567,290 139,153,505 2,208,520 3,086,519 34,442,304 178,890,848 104,806,556 9,898,793 114,705,349 4,851,759 119,557,108 10,000,000 2,000,000 10,801,080 9,922,302 26,610,358 59,333,740 178,890,84831 December 2008 $1,954,114 339,737 13,789,621 44,255,404 7,243,165 69,292,456 136,874,497 2,784,130 2,749,750 34,062,774 176,471,151 102,902,989 7,756,601 110,659,590 6,993,345 117,652,935 10,000,000 2,000,000 10,801,080 10,377,616 25,639,520 58,818,216 176,471,151NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED INTERIM FINANCIAL STATEMENTSas at 31 march 20091. ACCOUNTING POLICIESese interim consolidated nancial statements have been prepared in accordance with International Accounting Standards 34: Interim Financial Reporting. e accounting policies used in the preparation of the interim consolidated nancial statements are consistent with those used in the annual consolidated nancial statements for the year ended 31 December 2008. ese unaudited consolidated nancial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly owned subsidiaries, Family Guardian Insurance Company, FG General Insurance Agency Limited, FG Financial Limited, FG Capital Markets Limited and BahamaHealth Insurance Brokers and Benets Consultants Limited.2. EARNINGS PER SHAREEarnings per share: Weighted average number of shares outstanding Consolidated net income Earnings per share3. COMMITMENTSOutstanding commitments to extend credit under the mortgage loan agreements amounted to approximately $3,675,003 as at 31 March 2009 (31 December 2008: $2,820,390)3 months to 31 March 200810,000,000 $ 2,747,405 $0.273 months to 31 March 200910,000,000 $ 1,570,838 $0.16 CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS (UNAUDITEDfor the three months ended 31 march 2009(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)Cash ows from operating activities Net incomeA djustments for: Depreciation Change in appreciation on investments in equitiesC hange in mortgage provision Reserve for policyholder benets Interest incomeD ividend income Operating prot before working capital changes (Increase) decrease in operating assets Receivables and other assets Premium in arrears (Decrease) increase in operating liabilities Payables and accruals Other policyholder funds Net cash from operating activities Cash ows from investing activities Policy loans Purchase of xed assets Construction in progress Other loans repaid Net mortgage loans issued Purchase of Government bonds Interest received Dividends received Net cash from investing activities Cash ows from nancing activities Dividends paid Net cash used in nancing activities Net increase in cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of the period Cash and cash equivalents at end of the period Cash and cash equivalents is comprised of: Cash and bank balances Short-term deposits Other bank term deposits3 months to 31 March 2008 $2,747,405 215,445 4 41,118 (292,226 1,963,015 (2,292,048 (83,450 2,699,259 ( 2,059,784) 488,924 (172,457 (148,617 807,325 (318,573 (1,103,542 60,410 (597,078 2,496,682 83,450 621,349 (600,000 (600,000 828,674 13,912,100 14,740,774 4,445,601 329,659 9,965,514 14,740,7743 months to 31 March 2009 $1,570,838 323,841 (6,642 1,921,295 (2,303,409 (112,932 1,392,991 5 75,610 (336,769 (2,141,586 2,142,192 1,632,438 44,996 (618,423 84,948 96,451 (367,843 (11,250,000 1,188,560 112,932 (10,708,379 (600,000 (600,000 (9,675,941 16,083,472 6,407,531 1,833,305 340,635 4,233,591 6,407,531 CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME (UNAUDITEDfor the three months ended 31 march 2009(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)INCOME Gross premium incomeP remium ceded to reinsurers Net premium income Annuity deposits N et premium income and annuity deposits Interest income Dividend incomeC hange in unrealized loss on investments Realized gain from sale of assets Other operating income T otal income BENEFITS & EXPENSES BENEFITS P olicyholders’ benets Reinsurance recoveries Net policyholders’ benets I ncrease in reserves for future policyholders’ benets Total benets EXPENSES C ommissions Operating expenses Premium tax Depreciation and ammortization expense Bad debt expense Total expenses Total benets and expenses NET INCOME Earnings per shareRestated 3 months to 31 March 2008 $1 7,768,174 (1,253,150 16,515,024 1,154,892 1 7,669,916 2,292,048 83,450 (441,118 153,661 19,757,957 9,229,155 (846,444 8,382,711 1 ,963,014 10,345,725 2 ,648,135 3,555,827 537,621 215,445 ( 292,201) 6,664,827 17,010,552 2,747,405 0.273 months to 31 March 2009 $2 0,484,476 (2,283,130 18,201,346 1,604,804 1 9,806,150 2,303,409 112,932 100 156,348 22,378,939 11,997,201 (624,133 11,373,068 1 ,921,295 13,294,363 2 ,908,194 3,670,388 617,957 323,841 ( 6,642) 7,513,738 20,808,101 1,570,838 0.16 College of Bahamas opens Performing Arts Centre TWO terrified workers were robbed by gunmen who kidnapped one of them on Thursd ay, police reported. The ordeal began as a Jet Wash employee was securing the building at Bernard Road at around 11pm w hen he was accosted by a gunm an in a green Toyota Avalon. After being forced into the car, the employee was then driven to Prince Charles Drive w here three more men jumped in. “They then drove to the residence of another employee who resides in the eastern district of N ew Providence where the o ccupants of the home were robbed of cash and other assorted items,” said a police spokesman. “The robbers then f led the area in an unknown direction, leaving the car.” Police later found a shotgun with four shells, a ski mask, a q uantity of cash, a laptop comp uter, and a television set in the vicinity. n B y NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter THE man accused of killing a f ather-of-one with a rock was denied bail yesterday. J effrey Moncur, 42, of Soldier Road, has been charged with t he manslaughter of 45-year-old Terry Fox. Mr Fox had reportedly been watching television at his home on Pork Fish Drive when an acquaintance calledh im outside. It is claimed Mr Fox, a self-employed handyman,w as arguing with the visitor in the back yard before he ran out i nto the street and collapsed. Police believed he died as a result of a blow to the head with a rock. His death was the 30th homicide for the year. M oncur, who was arraigned on the manslaughter charge onT hursday, was back before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez y esterday for a bail hearing. Denying bail, Chief Magistrate Gomez said he would recommend that Moncur be given an early trial date in light of the f act he is on remand. The case has been adjourned to June 8 a nd transferred to Court 5, Bank Lane. A merican Airlines and its r egional affiliate American Eagle Airlines are putting in place a box and bag embargo on flights to selected destinations including t he Bahamas between June 6 and August 25. The embargo includes people traveling to and from Nassau, George Town, Exuma, M arsh Harbour and Freeport A year-round box embargo is in place on flights from, or passing through, New York's John F Kennedy International Airport t o all Caribbean and Latin American destinations. Under the embargo, oversize, overweight and excess baggage w ill not be accepted on flights to t he above destinations. Bags that weigh between 51lbs and 70lbs are subject to a fee of $50. One carry-on bag will be a ccepted with a maximum size of 45 inches and weight of 40lbs. Sports equipment will be allowed as part of the total checked bagg age allowance, but additional c harges may apply. The embargo also affects customers going to San Pedro Sula, Tegucigalpa and San Salvador in C entral America; Maracaibo, Cali, Medellin, La Paz, Santa Cruz and Quito in South America; Santo Domingo, Santiago, P ort-au-Prince, Grenada and Kingston, Guadalajara, Aguascalientes, San Luis Potosi, Chihuahua and Leon in Mexico; anda ll American Eagle flights to and from San Juan. Worker kidnapped after gunmen stage robbery Airlines put in place b ox, bag embargo M an on manslaughter charge denied bail In brief T HE PERFORMING ARTS CENTRE a t the College of the Bahamas (pictured w as officially opened on May 26 during the 20th annual 'Colour of Harmony' an exposition highlighting the artistic talents of students. Former Defence Force officer granted leave to apply for judicial review in unfair dismissal case

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EDITOR, The Tribune. This Ministry would be grateful for your kind assistance by public ation of its response to a misleading Editorial which appeared in Thursday, May 14, 2009 edition of The Freeport News under the headline “The Cop-out Must S top.” The contents of the response are self-explanatory and are in the public interest, especially the local sporting community. Accordingly, your usual coopera tion and assistance would be m uch appreciated. S incerely yours Archie Nairn, Permanent Secretary, N assau, May 25, 2009 May 19th, 2009 Editor The Freeport News M r Oswald Brown Freeport, Grand Bahama Dear Sir: I have been directed to respond to your Thursday, May 14, 2009 E ditorial appearing under the headline, “The Cop-out Must Stop.” Much of what is expressed in the editorial finds unqualified endorsement by this Ministry. E xception is taken, however, with y our assertion that all Ministers inclusive of the present one, have copped out of resolving the 23year-old baseball issue, and that n one of them “considered the m atter serious enough to do what is necessary to correct it.” In the first instance, it is necessary to address the widely held misconception that the Minister o f Sports possesses unfettered powers to dictate to or interfere with the affairs of local sporting organisations. Nowhere in The Sports Act are such powers conferred on the Minister. In fact, even the government has no legal authority to conduct such interference, having regard t o the internationally accepted protocol that governments are obligated to accept and respect the autonomy of sporting bodies and by extension any legitimatec ollection of those bodies such as N ational Olympic Committees or International Sports Federations. Governments are made to pay a price for violating such international protocols. For example last year the Soccer Federationa nd the Olympic Association of I raq entered a team to participate in the Beijing Olympics. The Iraqi government did not agree with the selections and changed the team as well as those who selected it. W hen this was brought to the a ttention of the IOC, the entire Iraqi country was expelled from participating in the Games, demonstrating the internationalc ommunity’s insistence on the n on-interference by governments into the affairs of sporting bodies. Having regard to such well established internationally agreed protocol then, it is misleading to c laim, as you did, that governments have unchecked power to c hange or dismiss an internationally recognised governing body,w ith or without good cause. Indeed, the most our government c an do in accordance with The Sports Act, is to withdraw offi-c ial recognition of that governing body and to grant such recogn ition to one more qualified body. This latter action was formally executed by the government in 2003 and from then to now, the f ull weight of the government has remained fixed behind the body that meets the qualifications as the parent body for the sport ofb aseball in The Bahamas. No d oubt the level of support thusly provided by the government has b een pivotal in the tremendous growth of local baseball since 2003. It should also be noted that in s pite of such decisive action taken by this Ministry in 2003, the B ahamas Olympic Association h as found it impossible to follow suit, and therein resides real i mpetus for the kind of resolu tion which your editorial begs. I trust that this serves to provide you with a better insight of the baseball issue and the vast amount of resources the past 10 Ministers of Sports have devoted to achieving relief for the local baseball fraternity. ARCHIE NAIRN Permanent, S ecretary, Nassau, May 25, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MAY 30, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm WASHINGTON What would happen if t he Cuban government should send an envoy next week to claim the country's long-vacant seat at the Organisation of the American States in Washington? T he 34 OAS foreign ministers, meeting in Honduras, will vote Tuesday whether to reverse t he resolution that suspended Cuba's membership in 1962 and denounced its Marxist-Lenini st government as "incompatible" with the organisation's founding principles of democra-c y and human rights. T he 60-year-old OAS, heavily financed by t he United States, has been divided over w hether to give post-Fidel Castro Cuba a warm welcome by overturning the resolution or exper ience the embarrassing scenario of a fight over Cuba's seat. S o far, it appears to be most everybody else vs. the United States. T he ministers gather for their annual assembly starting Sunday in San Pedro Sula, Hond uras, despite cracks in buildings and damaged streets left by a major earthquake early Thursday. The meeting's goal is to kill the 47-year-old Cuban resolution and remove legal obstacles f or Cuba to regain its OAS membership. "I believe the case is a lot more complex t han that," Jose Miguel Insulza, the OAS sec retary-general, said Wednesday during a meeti ng in Washington that exposed deep divisions among the members over the wording of the text. “We have to see first if there is a will in the Cuban government to start doing some practical things and accept principles of an organisa t ion where it was absent for about 50 years," Insulza told reporters. S ince taking office in February, President Barack Obama has signalled some willingness to b ack away from a half-century of U.S. policy toward the communist country. First, he ordered the shutdown of the U.S. military prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and later he lifted restrictions on Cuban-American visiting rela t ives in Cuba and sending them money. As late as last week he made an overture to C uba, asking Raul Castro's government to resume talks on legal immigration of Cubans to t he United States. That would reopen discus sions that had been closed off by President George W. Bush in mid-2003. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton testified to a Senate panel last week that she w ould not support any effort by her Western Hemisphere peers to get Cuba back into theo rganisation until that country changes its political system, releases political prisoners and r espects human rights. Yet the U.S. ambassador to OAS, Hector Morales, presented a proposal Wednesday: a U.S.-sponsored resolution asking to reverse the 1962 expulsion decision that Washington hadp ressed the organisation to adopt during the Cold War. "There has been no change of policy," the State Department said in a news release. "The United States looks forward to the day when Cuba can return to the Organisation of Amer ican States in a manner that is consistent with the principles of the Inter-American Democra tic Charter." The charter makes democracy a right of all people. Besides the U.S. proposal, N icaragua and Honduras are offering separate ones, and the difficulty of satisfying everyone has left a divided organisation going to the Honduras meeting. A ll OAS countries accept the first article of the three resolutions to overturn the 1962 poli cy. The disagreements are about the followups about future relations between Cuba and t he OAS. The Obama administration proposes to start a dialogue with the current government that c ould lead to a "possible reintegration" of the c ountry to the Inter-American system only if C uba meets the "compromises and values" of the OAS charters. T hose opposing the U.S. version argue that the OAS cannot dictate what Cuba has to do to r eturn. Cuban officials also have said they are not interested in returning to the organisationb ut they would like the OAS replaced by another regional movement that would exclude the U nited States. The Nicaraguan proposal, sponsored by Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez and coun tries close to the populist leader, is the most radical. It asks the OAS to admit its 1962 deci s ion was an "error and an act of injustice" that caused extreme hardship to the Cuban people. B esides Chavez's followers, the Nicaraguan proposal is backed by some Caribbean countries t hat benefit from the Venezuelan president's use of oil to gain international friends. The third proposal, sponsored by Honduras, comprises article 1 and language that the future relationship between Cuba and the OAS will d epend on decisions that both parties adopt. Opponents argue about the usefulness of ruling o n an issue that Cuba would be unlikely to accept. The ambassadors agreed to create a t ask force that includes all OAS members to write a text accepted by everyone in the next couple of days so the ministers can pass it by consensus. Lacking a consensus, the OAS has another resource: the vote. The resolution w ould require two-thirds of the members, or 23 countries, to pass, and enough votes already e xist for that, OAS sources said. Some diplomats say the United States could b e the only government to vote against a draft that did not dictate changes for Cuba to make. By the time the OAS meets Tuesday, the United States will be the only country in the Americas that has not re-established diplomat i c ties with Cuba. El Salvador, the only country besides the U nited States without relations, plans to restore ties the day before the Honduras meeting, when i ts new president, Mauricio Funes, takes office. He will be the first president of El Salvador who is a member of the Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front, or FMLN, the sec ond former Central American foe of the Unite d States to take power democratically in Latin America's lurch to the left. In 2006, Nicaraguans elected Daniel Ortega two decades after his Sandinista government fought U.S.-backed Contra rebels, and his relations with Washington have remained tense under Obama's administration. (This article was written by Nestor Ikeda of the Associated Press). Govt has no legal authority to interfere with sports bodies LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Will Cuba return toOAS next week? NOTICE is hereby given that PAULISAACS of CASSIA CL, GLENISTON GARDENS, P.O. BOX SS-6345, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 23rd day of May, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas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o advertise in The Classified Section Call 502-2351 EDITOR, The Tribune. The Miss Universe Pageant will be held here in The Bahamas at the Atlantis Resort in August this year. It will be The Bahamas’ time to shine; however, there is much controversy surrounding the coronation last night of Miss Bahamas Uni verse 2009. The Bahamian people deserve a complete and thorough investigation of the events leading up to the crowning of the queen. The judges were visibly upset as the results were announced and the queen was crowned. It is Deloitte & Touche and the judges’ duty and responsibility to discuss and determine that the scores were accurately and fairly reported, and to rectify the results if they were not. It is upsetting that three of the awards: Best Hair, Best Smile, and Best Evening Dress were not announced, as the MC of the night said, “We are waiting on the scores.” They have yet to be announced. Furthermore, there was much chaos when reading the cards that were provided to the MC’s, with the Shenique Miller pointing at names, while Clint Watson was constantly flipping the papers. Why would the judges and/or Deloitte & Touche send the results without the names of the winner of the awards? Two of the three unan nounced awards (hair and smile beforehand during the preliminary events. It is extremely odd that they were not on the results cards handed to the MC. This begs the question, were these awards factored into the compiled scoring? If the judges feel that the wrong queen was named, they simply need to fix the problem. It would be an injustice to the rightful queen, the Miss Bahamas organisation, and to the Bahamian people if the lady, in the eyes of the judges, who best exemplifies the qualities of a Miss Universe contestant, were not there to represent our country. The judges must do the right thing to get it right, and if they sit back and allow the show to continue, knowing full well that the right girl was not crowned, they have failed in their capacity as judges. CECILE EDWARDS Nassau, May, 2009. Bahamians deserve probe into pageant controversy EDITOR, The Tribune. All of us in The Bahamas are now talking about hard times. Regardless of what anybody says, based on our geographical location we should never have inflation problems and if we do have inflation it is caused by poor management of the Government. In 2007 before our General Election the United States went into a recession, I did an article that appeared in the Punch, The Tribune and The Nassau Guardian. The topic was “Tighten your belt hard times ahead”. At that time The Bahamas was doing very well. Of course, my cry fell on deaf ears and some said it would never happen but my experience came from 18 years as a Trade Union Leader that certain things are not said or done. I stated then and am reminding you now that when Minister Carl Bethell read those confidential letters in the Halls of Parliament there were doom days ahead because you don’t make mockery of people with money they would never not accept that kind of treatment and lie down and play dead. For almost 30 years my cry was move the government institutions such as the hospital, Immigration, Customs (among others reduce the population in New Providence. I also spoke of the danger we would face if we did not do it. Well you may say what is my point? My point is we have been lucky so far that we have not had a major hurricane in New Providence in a long time. If we do have one this year or the next we would think God really turned his back on us because we would see the worst financial chaos that anyone alive today would have ever seen, then we would understand why I said we need a major population shift. If you think we have problems now, wait and see what would happen if we have a major hurricane. AUDLEY D HANNA Sr Nassau, May 28, 2009. Pr ob lems no w? See what havoc a major hurricane would wreak

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THE sentencing hearing of the man convicted of the February 2006 murder of businessman Keith Carey has been adjourned to June 25. The hearing was adjourned after Deputy Director of Public Prosecutions Cheryl GrantBethel and attorney Craig But ler, who is representing convict Jamal Glinton, said that theyn eeded more time to go over a p robation report. Glinton was convicted on April 10 of the murder of Keith Carey, 43, who was gunned downo n the steps of the Bank of the Bahamas on Tonique WilliamsDarling Highway before he was able to deposit $40,000 that belonged to the Esso Service Sta tion that he operated on Faith Avenue and Carmichael Road. Glinton, who stood trial with Sean Brown and Dwight Knowles, was also convicted of armed robbery and conspiracy t o commit robbery. All three men had initially been charged with murder, conspiracy to commit armed robbery and armed robbery, however nearing the end of their trial, Justice Jon Isaacs directed jurors not to consider the charge of murder against Knowles and Brown. At the trial, the prosecution submitted that Glinton, alias Bumper”, had shot Mr Carey t wice on the steps of the Bank of the Bahamas in 2006 while Knowles and Brown sat in the getaway car. B rown and Knowles were sen tenced to 10 years and 11 years respectively on armed robbery and conspiracy charges, which will run concurrently. The Crown is seeking to have Glinton sentenced to death. n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Well-known poet and radio host Michael Pintard said a sexual offenders list would help protect the nation’s children from predators. H is comment came in response to the child molestation scandal unfolding at the Eight Mile Rock High School on Grand Bahama. In an exclusive interview with T he Tribune, M r Pintard said c onsideration ought to given to s uch a list – especially now, after it has been claimed that three teachers at a single school mighthave abused children. Mr Pintard said that there are m any sexual offenders out on t he streets and people don’t know who they are. I think that an offenders list would be useful,” Mr Pintard said. “I know persons have saidt hat would be a problem because we are a small community, however, unfortunately, because so many children areb eing violated now in the B ahamas, I don’t think we have m uch of a choice. “I think we ought to have a list available . . . so when persons are released (from jail move into neighbourhoods,p eople can know who they are l iving with.” Following the Eight Mile Rock abuse claims, the Ministry of Education announced that all new teachers will be vetted by police and that safety com-m ittees made up of teachers, students, administrators, and parents will be introduced in all public schools. Complaints have been filed against three teachers at Eight Mile Rock High and policei nvestigations are continuing. M r Pintard said child molestation in schools is not a “new situation” in the Bahamas. He claimed that for years, the issue has been kept quiet while disgraced teachers were either transferred to other schools or taken out of classrooms and put to work behind a desk in someM inistry of Education office. When I was in school we all k new the persons who were problematic and successive governments have had a problem transferring culprits who never get the treatment and help theyn eed so they just re-offend. Those persons ought to be dealt with too. Why go after just the present culprits when there is irrefutable evidence about somebody who might be sitting in a ministry desk who has beenr un out of multiple islands?” Mr Pintard ask. Mr Pintard said careful background screening is important, but useless when employers fail to alert other employers to potential problems in an appli-c ant. Bear in mind, if an educator is Bahamian and they have offended they are transferred from one school to another. “And to those, whether students and educators, who are aware that there are teachers that are predators they have an obligation to speak up,” he said. Despite the recent allegations, Mr Pintard noted that thev ast majority of educators are living wholesome lives and continue to make personal sacrif ices for their students. n B y TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net "I is vex to see them jitney buses and cars join up with each other gossiping, blocking traffic from passing. An' them male dri vers seems to be looking in each others eyes an' don't look when you is blowing your horn to separate them. "The Department of Road Traffic need to make sure they has Christian ways before they gets to drive." VEX DRIVER, NASSAU "I vex at the disrespectful level of service I received at Princess Margaret Hospital the other day.I showed up there with my appointment card to the receptionist and she asked me rudely where I get this from telling me I must go back home because I didn't have an appointment. I don't mind if they made a mistake with my appointment date but I can't take her attitude. "I know she have kids and the tone of the voice she spoke to me in, she can't speak to her chirren like that, much less to a customer. The staff at PMH treats people with no respect as if you begging them for something. I paid my contributions to NIB since it came into effect until I retired,so I'm not begging for anything. "They should have somebody check on these rude staff and how they treat people. And then they have the nerve to post a sign up in PMH saying if you talk rude or be rude to the staff they can have you arrested – ain' that something?" DUDLEY WILLIAMS, NASSAU “I vex that the leaders of our country can't get their acts together, work together, and find a sensible plan of action to lead this country of the miserable eco nomic situation we are in right now. Listening to the prime min ister's speech on the budget it hit home that we are in for a rough ride and I can only hope that when those MPs meet in the House of Assembly next week, I hope more than hot air comes out of their mouths. "Our future depends on it.” POLITICAL OBSERVER, NASSAU “I sick, tired and vex over people who is be taking theirs weet time driving up and down the streets. I mean I can understand being cautious and not wanting to go past the speed limit but there is no reason on this earth to drive at five, eight or 10 miles per hour on the public streets. "Too many times traffic is backed up during rush hour because people who either can't drive, don't have jobs or just plain fool taking a turtlepaced joy ride through the streets. And no amount of horn blowing or screaming is move them out the way. That's just like biggety Bahamians to act like the road is theirs and to have no respect for anyone else." MAD MOTORIST, NASSAU Are you vex? Send your complaints to whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net or fax them to 328-2398. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MAY 30, 2009, PAGE 5 Sentencing hearing for murder accused adjourned to June WHY YOU VEX? P P i i n n t t a a r r d d c c a a l l l l s s f f o o r r s s e e x x u u a a l l o o f f f f e e n n d d e e r r s s l l i i s s t t INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays “I think we o ught to have a list available . . . so when per-s ons are released (from jail) and movei nto neighbourhoods, people can know whot hey are living with.” Michael Pintard K EITH CAREY ( above) was robbed and gunned-down in 2006 while m aking a $40,000 deposit at Bank of The Bahamas on Tonique Williams-Darling Highway.

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C M Y K C M Y K SATURDAY, MAY 30 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 P AGE 12 National S pecial Olympics s tart with swimming, judo... Knowles, Bhupathi smother Frenchmen in two straight sets n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net B ahamian Mark Knowles knew that he and his Indian partner, Mahesh Bhupathi, had to play well in their first round match at the Roland Garros Grand Slam Tour nament in Paris yesterday. They didn’t leave anything for chance as they smothered the French team of Josselin Ouanna and Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in two straight sets. The final score 6-3, 6-2. “It was a very dangerous team,” said Knowles of Ouanna and Tsonga, who also made it to the third round of the men’s singles. “It was a really pro French crowd. It was almost like playing Davis Cup against France. “It was a really dangerous first round match so we are really happy to get the win and to get it in such a convincing fashion.” The number four seeded Knowles and Bhupathi needed just 58 min utes (30 in the first set and 28 in the second) to send the unseeded Frenchmen packing. They literally dominated the match, posting 66 total points won compared to 39 by the Frenchmen. They produced a 66% (27-of-41 serve, 89% (24-of-27 first serve; 86% winning on second set (12-of-14 won and 43% break point conversions. Knowles and Bhupathi will now go on to play the team of Johan Brunstrom of Sweden and JeanJulien Rojer of the Netherlands Antilles in the second round today. “They are two up and coming guys who won their first round match,” said Knowles of their next opponents. “They are a little unknown. We don’t know these guys that well. “So it is going to be more us focussing on our game because any t ime you play in a Grand Slam, it’s going to be tough. So we expect a very tough match, but we expect to pull through it.” The draw for the tournament is an interesting one. Knowles’ former partner Daniel N estor and his new partner Nanad Z imonjic are the top seeded team in the tournament with American iden tical twin brothers Bob and Mike Bryan at No.2. The Bryans, however, are still sit ting on top of the ATP computer rankings, while Nestor and Zimonjic are at No.2. Knowles and Bhupathi occupy the third spot. “We haven’t really looked that far, especially in a Grand Slam, you don’t want to look too far ahead,” said Knowles about the draw that could see them collide with the Bryans in a possible semifinal meeting next week. “We want to pretty much keep it round by round. You just never know what happens in a Grand Slam. But we’re pretty focussed and we are ready to play whoever it is we meet. We have played in a lot of matches, especially Grand Slams, and so we both know that you really don’t want to look too far ahead.” Knowles said he and Bhupathi will be contended if they can just get past Brunstrom and Rojer in their sec ond round match whenever they play. MARK KNOWLES & MAHESH BHUPATHI (shown in this photo at the Australian Open smothered the French team of Josselin Ouanna and Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in two straight sets, 6-3, 6-2 yesterday in their first round match at the Roland Garros Grand Slam Tournament in Paris... A n d r e w B r o w n b i l l / A P n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net ALTHOUGH it’s more than a month away, Mark Knowles is making a commitment to come home and play in the second round of the Amer ican Zone II Davis Cup tie. The Bahamas’ youthful team, led by Devin Mullings and Timothy Neilly, lost 4-1 to Paraguay when they went on the road to play the first round in March. Over the weekend of July 10-12, the Bahamas is scheduled to host Guatemala in a must-win match to avoid being relegated to Zone III next year. A win will enable the Bahamas to remain in Zone II. “I am looking to be available for sure. Obvi ously it’s still a ways off, but it’s a big tie against Guatemala,” he said. “But I think we have the team that can get the job done. So I’m looking forward to it.” The elder statesman of the team, which is loaded with bright young stars, said he’s delight ed to be able to make a contribution. “I like being there for the team and helping the team out,” he stressed. “Obviously, the team needs to start winning these matches without me. “I think they’re getting close to that level. They had a good match on the road in Paraguay and I spoke with some of the guys and they feel they are playing very well.” With time and more exposure, Knowles feels that the players will get better and eventually the Bahamas will return to Zone One. “I really think that as a nation we really shouldn’t drop any lower than zone two,” Knowles stated. “So I think with or without me, those guys should be able to keep us in zone two. “With me on the team, I think we should be able to challenge for zone one. That is my goal. I think that is the same goal as the other players, so I feel we should be able to achieve that very soon.” Having had the longest tenure of any local player in Davis Cup history, registering a total of 14 years with a 41-32 total win-loss record, 23-25 in singles and 18-7 in doubles, Knowles said he intends to continue playing as long as he’s healthy. “I am just taking it one year at a time,” he said. “I have a wife and two great kids, so playing tennis is very important to me. I’m still playing well and having fun. “So with all of these factors, I think I will continue to play and not put a deadline on how long I will stick around. I will just play year for year before I make a final decision on when I will stop.” As he prepares to come home for the tie, Knowles will meet a new Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association president in place. Immediate past first vice president Stephen Thompson has been elected as the new president, replacing Wesley Rolle, who will still have the responsibility of heading the organising com mittee for Davis Cup. “I got an e-mail from the secretary saying that there’s a new president. I don’t really know much about what happened at the elections,” Knowles said. “But obviously Stephen Turnquest is a very good guy and is capable of filling the position. I thought that Wesley did a good job, so I’m sorry to see him go.” Mark Knowles makes commitment to play in second r ound of Davis Cup tie Youngsters show off their moves at annual basketball tourney... See page 12

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AFTER training all year, athletes from the islands of Abaco, Grand Bahama, New Providence and Long Island are competing at this year’s National Special Olympics Games. More than 250 athletes are expected to compete in various sports in the capital, and organisers are confident that the event will be the best ever. At 9am Friday, they took part in swimming and judo at the Betty Kelly Kenning swim complex. And today at the Thomas A Robinson Stadium, following the opening ceremony at 9:30am, the athletes are expected to show off their skills in bocce and track and field. Roosevelt Thompson, national director of Special Olympics Bahamas, reports that athletes from the sub-programmes in the islands have trained all year for this event. And they are anxious to com pete. As there are no internationalg ames this year, this will be the highlight of their training. The increased number of coaches certified this year guarantees that the quality of their performances should surpass the high level demonstrated in the past. With the programme producing more athletes, the competition should be exciting, and the public is invited to witness an inspiring dis play of courage and determination by the participants. Basil Christie, national chairman, expressed his appreciation to the many sponsors and supporters of the national programme. He also encourages everybody to come out and cheer for the athletes. The coaches and volunteers have worked hard and he is confident that spectators will be proud of the results of their efforts. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MAY 30, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS Special Olympics: National games make a splash, kick off with swimming and judo ATHLETES compete in swimming and judo at the Betty Kelly Kenning swim complex yesterday... THE NEW PROVIDENCE Primary School Sports Association’s annual basketball tourney concluded Friday at the Kendal Isaacs Gmnasium. Here, some of the male youngsters are shown in action... Youngsters show off their moves at annual basketball tour ney

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 70F/21C Low: 70F/21C Low: 71F/22C Low: 73F/23C Low: 74 F/23 C Low: 77F/25C Low: 76 F/24 C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 87F/31C High: 85F/29C High: 85 F/29 C High: 84 F/29 C High: 87F/31C High: 85 F/29C High: 83F/28C Low: 78F/26C High: 86F/30C Low: 80 F/27 C High: 87F/31C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 74F/23C High: 90 F/32 C Low: 80F/27C High: 93 F/34 Low: 75F/24C High: 84F/29C Low: 77 F/25C High: 88F/31C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 92F/33C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 89F/32C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 90F/32C Low: 76F/24C High: 92 F/33 C Low: 80F/27C High: 90F/32C High: 85 F/29 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MAY 30 TH , 2009, PAGE 13B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Cloudy with thunderstorms. Partly cloudy.Partly sunny with a thunderstorm. Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. Partly sunny. High: 83 Low: 76 High: 85 High: 83 High: 83 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Chance for a couple of showers. High: 83 Low: 75 Low: 74 Low: 75 AccuWeather RealFeel 93F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 81F 99-79F 96-79F 96-76F 91-75F Low: 74 TODAYTONIGHTSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAYWEDNESDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................88F/31C Low ....................................................79F/26C Normal high ......................................85F/30C Normal low ........................................72F/22C Last year's high .................................. 89 F/32C Last year's low .................................. 77 F/25C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ..................................................6.93" Normal year to date ....................................11.52" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU First Full Last New May 30 Jun. 7Jun. 15Jun. 22 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:20 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:55 p.m. Moonrise . . . 12:42 p.m. Moonset . . . . 12:52 a.m. Today Sunday Monday Tuesday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 1:14 a.m.2.87:31 a.m.0.0 1:50 p.m.2.77:57 p.m.0.1 2:14 a.m.2.68:25 a.m.0.0 2:51 p.m.2.89:03 p.m.0.2 3:14 a.m.2.59:20 a.m.0.1 3:50 p.m.2.810:06 p.m.0.2 4:14 a.m.2.410:13 a.m.0.1 4:47 p.m.2.911:06 p.m.0.2 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco91/3277/25s91/3276/24pc Amsterdam67/1950/10s70/2156/13s Ankara, Turkey79/2652/11s81/2750/10c Athens78/2565/18pc81/2768/20s Auckland61/1647/8r49/942/5pc Bangkok89/3178/25t90/3279/26t Barbados86/3076/24c86/3077/25pc Barcelona72/2261/16pc70/2162/16c Beijing86/3064/17s90/3265/18s Beirut77/2571/21s75/2371/21s Belgrade62/1650/10sh78/2557/13pc Berlin66/1852/11sh70/2155/12sh Bermuda80/2674/23pc79/2671/21sh Bogota66/1848/8r65/1848/8c Brussels68/2052/11s73/2254/12pc Budapest61/1646/7t70/2146/7c Buenos Aires52/1141/5r59/1543/6pc Cairo93/3365/18s93/3367/19s Calcutta94/3481/27t96/3582/27t Calgary69/2044/6pc64/1740/4pc Cancun90/3275/23pc91/3271/21pc Caracas79/2671/21s81/2772/22c Casablanca81/2765/18pc82/2765/18s Copenhagen66/1854/12s72/2255/12s Dublin68/2050/10pc66/1850/10s Frankfurt68/2052/11pc73/2250/10pc Geneva 74/23 46/7 pc 75/2348/8s Halifax 55/12 51/10 c 59/15 43/6 c Havana 86/30 72/22 t 86/30 71/21 r Helsinki 70/21 54/12s77/2554/12s Hong Kong 79/26 75/23 pc 82/27 75/23c Islamabad 111/43 76/24 s 114/45 78/25 s Istanbul74/2364/17pc73/2260/15pc Jerusalem 80/26 55/12s77/2555/12s Johannesburg 63/1739/3s60/1537/2s Kingston 88/3177/25s88/3177/25sh Lima73/2257/13pc74/2359/15pc London72/2252/11s75/2352/11pc Madrid86/3059/15pc86/3057/13pc Manila82/2776/24t82/2777/25r Mexico City81/2757/13t74/2355/12t Monterrey84/2868/20t94/3471/21s Montreal61/1652/11pc57/1343/6sh Moscow72/2246/7pc75/2345/7pc Munich57/1340/4pc58/1442/5pc Nairobi80/2663/17t79/2661/16t New Delhi 102/3881/27pc104/4085/29pc Oslo69/2055/12s72/2254/12s Paris73/2252/11s77/2552/11pc Prague 58/14 47/8 sh 66/18 50/10 sh Rio de Janeiro78/2571/21c85/2967/19c Riyadh105/4075/23s107/4176/24s Rome 71/21 55/12 c 74/23 57/13 sh St. Thomas86/3077/25s87/3078/25s San Juan63/1737/2pc69/2037/2s San Salvador 90/32 68/20 t 87/30 73/22 t Santiago 61/1636/2pc64/1743/6s Santo Domingo88/3173/22pc85/2971/21pc Sao Paulo 74/23 61/16 t 71/21 53/11sh Seoul78/2552/11pc76/2452/11s Stockholm 68/20 46/7 pc 72/22 50/10 s Sydney 61/16 50/10 r61/1651/10sh Taipei84/2872/22s84/2873/22pc T okyo 68/20 66/18 r 75/23 64/17 c T oronto 64/1746/7t66/1850/10pc Trinidad66/1857/13c69/2056/13r V ancouver 69/20 50/10 s 69/2053/11pc Vienna 56/1347/8r65/1853/11pc W arsaw 66/18 50/10 sh 70/21 54/12 sh Winnipeg 60/15 40/4 pc 59/1544/6r H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySunday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SW at 7-14 Knots2-3 Feet5-10 Miles81F Sunday:SW at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-10 Miles81F Today:SW at 7-14 Knots2-3 Feet5-10 Miles80F Sunday:SW at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-10 Miles80F Today:SW at 7-14 Knots2-3 Feet5-10 Miles81F Sunday:SW at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-10 Miles81F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque82/2758/14t86/3059/15pc Anchorage58/1446/7r60/1547/8s Atlanta85/2961/16s86/3066/18s Atlantic City78/2553/11s79/2655/12s Baltimore78/2552/11s80/2656/13s Boston74/2352/11t75/2354/12pc Buffalo65/1846/7t63/1746/7pc Charleston, SC88/3165/18s88/3166/18s Chicago72/2249/9t77/2562/16pc Cleveland66/1852/11t70/2158/14s Dallas90/3266/18s91/3268/20s Denver81/2753/11pc79/2652/11t Detroit70/2150/10t70/2157/13s Honolulu87/3074/23s87/3074/23s Houston90/3266/18s90/3268/20s HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySunday TodaySundayTodaySunday Indianapolis76/2456/13t80/2663/17s Jacksonville88/3165/18t90/3266/18t Kansas City88/3164/17pc87/3065/18pc Las Vegas96/3569/20t96/3574/23pc Little Rock86/3062/16s91/3267/19s Los Angeles76/2460/15pc76/2460/15pc Louisville78/2562/16t84/2867/19s Memphis88/3168/20s90/3270/21s Miami87/3074/23t87/3073/22t Minneapolis72/2253/11pc78/2556/13t Nashville83/2862/16pc88/3166/18s New Orleans87/3069/20s87/3071/21s New York76/2457/13s75/2360/15pc Oklahoma City90/3262/16s89/3164/17pc Orlando87/3070/21t91/3269/20t Philadelphia79/2658/14s77/2556/13s Phoenix 100/37 73/22 s 100/3773/22s Pittsburgh70/2148/8t72/2254/12s Portland, OR 85/2956/13s83/2855/12s Raleigh-Durham 85/29 59/15 s 88/31 63/17 s St. Louis82/2765/18t88/3169/20s Salt Lake City 84/28 61/16 pc 83/2857/13t San Antonio 92/33 66/18 pc 89/31 67/19 pc San Diego72/2263/17pc69/2062/16pc San Francisco 69/20 54/12 pc 66/1853/11pc Seattle75/2352/11s77/2551/10pc T allahassee 90/3263/17pc92/3364/17s T ampa 85/29 70/21 t 89/31 71/21s Tucson98/3666/18pc96/3565/18s W ashington, DC 80/26 57/13s83/2864/17s UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T -storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

PAGE 9

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 14, SATURDAY, MAY 30, 2009 THE TRIBUNE PARADISE Plates, Hands For Hunger’s first annual fundraiser, served-up an unforgettable evening to the more than 400 hundred guests who came out in a large show of support and raised more than $60,000 to help fight hunger. Sponsored by the New Providence Development Company Limited and Old Fort Bay Club, the sold-out event held last week at Atlantis featured a lavish array of cuisine, fine wine, and spectacular live entertainment with all p roceeds benefitting Hands For H unger – the non-profit, humanitarian organisation committed to the elimination of hunger and the reduction of food waste in the Bahamas. “We are incredibly pleased and grateful for the extraordinary success of Paradise Plates,” said Georgina Webster, director of fundraising for Hands For Hunger. “The biggest kudos for the evening goes to the chefs, vintners and beverage participants who were so accommodating and gracious and served exceptional cuisine, fine wines and drinks. Everyone in attendance was treated to a remarkable evening that went beyond expectations and we thank each and every person that supported Paradise Plates.” Showcasing new creations or their well-known signature fare were the chefs from Mesa Grill; Nobu; Dune; British Colonial Hilton; Old Fort Bay Club; Luciano’s of Chicago; The Patisserie; Van Breugels; Balduccinos; Compass Point; Goodfellow Farms; Food Art by Cacique; and Le Petit Gourmet. Also showcased were fine wines by Mendoza Wine Imports, Sands Beer by Sands Brewery; Guava, Passion Fruit and Pina Colada Frozen Daiquiris provided by SHG Management and Bacardi; and water by Nautilus. O ther sponsors of Paradise Plate included: Atlantis, Pearle Vision, Prime Advisory Group, The d’Albenas Agency Ltd, Royal Star Assurance, Sun Tee Embroid Me, Mendoza Wine Imports Sands Brewery and Creative Relations. Guests dined on creations such as roasted pumpkin soup with coconut compote by Balduccino’s; lobster and mango salad, and wonton stuffed with curried chicken by Old Fort Bay Club; and ribbons of tuna, avocado, radish and ginger by Dune. Nobu served black cod on butter lettuce; Van Breugels served tuna tartare with wasabi sauce and Goodfellow Farms offered guests golden gazpacho, balsamic beef tenderloin bites and guava toast. Deserts included a flourless chocolate cake with raspberry sauce and compote of fruit by The Patisserie, an island snow fantasy by the British Colonial Hilton, and guava duff with rum butter sauce by Compass Point. The wines served were Noble Aconcagua Chardonnay 2007 andN oble Aconcagua Malbec 2007 donated by Mendoza wine Imports. Musical entertainment was provided by Adrian D’Aguilar, Ben Pinder, Trio Bonjour, Christina Cartwright, Caribah and Anthony Mullings who playeda mixture of jazz, string trio, Caribbean jazz, calypso and classical music. A raffle and silent auction held during the event also helped to raise funds. “After such an extraordinary evening it will be hard to create an even bigger and equally successful e vening next year – but that is exactly what we propose to do,” added Mrs Webster. “We look forward to working together with our existing partners and hope to forge new relationships to continue to raise funds for such an important cause. We sincerely thank everyone involved for their commitment and support.” “The success of Paradise Plates is really a testament to the strength of our community’s shared vision to fight and end hunger in our country,” said Alanna Rodgers, founder and programme co-ordinator of Hands For Hunger. “The fact is that there are thousands of Bahamians facing food insecurity, unable to access the foods that are needed to allow for healthy and fully functioning lives. There is more than enough food on this island to amply feed every single woman, man and child. Hands For Hunger functions to connect the excess supply of food with the unmet, ever growing need through the more equitable and efficient distribution of resources. The funds raised through Paradise Platesw ill go directly to impacting the lives of those in need.” Each day, Hands For Hunger picksup fresh, high quality food that would otherwise go to waste and delivers it to community centres, shelters, churches and soup kitchens throughout New Providence. “With our two new refrigerated trucks on the road, we have already distributed upwards of 75,000 pounds of food thus far and are on target to provide 450,000 meals by the end of o ur first year,” added Ms Rodgers. “This is a promising start to fulfilling our mission to eliminate hunger while significantly reducing food waste. All of this is being done through the creation of meaningful partnerships amongst m embers of our community. We cannot thank everyone involved in Paradise Plates enough for their time, talents and invaluable support and for most importantly saying ‘yes’ to making a difference and taking a stand for transformation in our community.” Hands For Hunger was started by a group of Bahamian student leaders in early 2008, who were and still are committed to making a difference in the world. The organisation is a registered, n ot-for-profit charity (# 57211 C relies on donations from community groups, foundations, corporations and the general public. They are led by a volunteer board of directors and supported by hundreds of dedicated volunteers. Paradise Plates serves up an unforgettable night M ore than $60,000 raised to help fight hunger in the Bahamas THE CHEFS of Old Fort Bay Club served guests lobster and mango salad, and wonton stuffed with curried chicken. FROMPAGEONE that night if I hadn’t fought for my life.” The officer ended his assault and she “stumbled outside” where she found her son crying. After witnessing the violent assault, the boy had made a phone call to his father asking him to come and collect him, she said. Shortly afterwards the woman went to the Carmichael Road police station to report the incident. Officers took statements, photos and brought in the officer in question, and indicated that the matter would be dealt with, the family claimed. The following day, the victim alleged, her boyfriend’s brother – also a police offi cer – called her to demand that she drop the charges against his brother. “The next thing I knew, he (her boyfriend) was out,” said the woman. She and her family are concerned that the officer’s alleged relations to a former senior police officer might impede a proper investigation. Yesterday Commissioner of Police Regi nald Ferguson, who met with the woman after she left The Tribune , said her injuries were appalling and that he directed the family to lodge a formal complaint with the organisation’s Complaint Unit. Questioned as to whether such incidents are cause for concern about the adequacy of the RBPF’s vetting procedure, the commissioner defended the process, stating that he believes it is “reasonably good.” He added that while the RBPF would wish to “bring in the best applicants,” it must be appreciated that “along the lines you’re going to have cracks and some persons are likely to get through there who might not be the desired kind of character.” The commissioner described the force as a “reflection” of the society it serves, as officers are drawn from local communities. Meanwhile, he said, it is not abnormal for an officer under investigation to be back on duty as quickly as the man in question. “It depends on the officer who’s investi gating. When it becomes necessary to take him off disciplinary leave that would be done, it’s not threatening the investigation in any way,” he said. Mr Ferguson said the criminal complaint and the disciplinary investigation will be conducted and “the course of action we will take will be determined.” He said the disciplinary investigation should take several days to conduct. Mother ‘beaten up’ by policeman boyfriend FROM page one "It's not an actual picture, it was photoshopped," said the pageant's media director Clint Watson. Overcome with tears, Ms Sherman said despite the negative outcry following last Sunday's pageant she remains grateful for her win. "I am so grateful for this opportunity, this is surely a once in a life time opportunity that I will embrace. I'm asking for the Bahamian people to show their love and support I am here to serve and despite all of the controversy it doesn't matter. I am here to serve and that's what I'm going to do," she said. "And these aren't tears of being afraid I'm a very emotional person these are more tears of joy for those who have supported me. And for the struggles that I have endured, because no one has lived my life. So I know what I went through and like I said I'm here to serve my country, I'm here to serve my Bahamian people," she said. Ms Sherman, a 25-year-old singer and student whose platform is child abuse awareness, has been at the centre of a firestorm following her crowning. Earlier in the week judges of the Miss Bahamas Universe 2009 pageant invited Ms Stubbs to review and confirm the votes cast in the contest with some sources close to the pageant claiming many people were "surprised" that Ms Sherman walked away with the top prize. Scorching commentary also erupted on Internet message boards with detractors taking colourful jabs at Ms Sherman and the pageant’s director. Contestant Enna Thomas told The Tribune she was unsettled by allegations made on the Internet that she may have not placed in the top 12 because of a money dispute between her sponsor FML Group of Companies President Craig Flowers and Ms Stubbs. These claims were denied by Ms Stubbs. In spite of the questions raised, yesterday officials upheld Sunday's results and said the process was a "fair" and "impartial" one. ‘Doctored’ photo of pageant queen sparks probe FROM page one Questions were raised over pageant officials' practice of adding cumulative preliminary numbers to the final scores, concerns over possible ballot tampering of the preliminary scores and apparent impropriety of having pageant official Monalisa Thompson sit as head judge of the competition. Miss Bahamas Universe president Gaynell Rolle-Stubbs admitted that pageant officials held the preliminary scores before they were turned over to the accounting firm, but insisted there was no ballot tampering. "We held the scores prior to the accounting firm receiving them the score sheets are a true reflection of what we received from the judges there were no alterations," she said. She maintained that the scor ing process was not flawed, insisting the whole process was "impartial" and "transparent" while pageant media director Clint Watson said it was not uncommon in the pageant world for members of a pageant committee to sit on the judging panel. The meeting was briefly halted by verbal wrangling between an aunt of top three finalist Amanda Appleyard and pageant officials who asked her to leave the room after several emotional outbursts. Judges Mark Humes and Cypriana McWeeny were also silenced by officials as they tried to air their concerns of the scoring process, with Ms Stubbs telling the two they were not invited. Deloitte and Touche manag ing partner Raymond Winder said the firm received the judges' scores from the pageant committee on Saturday afternoon. They ensured that all score cards were signed by the judges. "These were double checked, the tallies, in order to present the top 12 contestants," said Mr Winder. The results of preliminary scores were cumulative and therefore carried over to the events on Sunday a practice one judge told The Tribune did not provide a level playing field for the top 12 semi-finalists. Mr Winder said on Sunday night, Deloitte officials made sure that judges submitted their signed scorecards for tallying. These cards were passed to his firm "with no interference," he said. These were re-checked again after the pageant and were consistent with the results on Sun day night, he said. Pageant officials held the preliminary scores before they were turned over to the accounting firm, a practice that raised eyebrows at yesterday's conference. The 17 contestants were prejudged in three separate events leading up to the pageant. "All scores were cumulative and helped in the selection of our top 12," said Ms Rolle, adding that all judges were made aware of this scoring sys tem before the pageant. She said Ms Sherman held a sizable gap over the other contestants in the preliminary events. "The winner at this stage was indisputable and it would (have taken) a miraculous miracle to unseat Ms Sherman as she was well on her way to victory hav ing led by a huge margin in two of the preliminary categories and placing in the top three in the final preliminary event," she said. Indira Wood, aunt of Amanda Appleyard, said she was not satisfied with yesterday's explanation, alleging that there are calls for Ms Rolle-Stubbs to be stripped of her franchise licence. Fireworks at pageant press conference FROM page one union needs restoration. The Lord has seen our hearts, he had heard our cries, and he has given the union back to its people,” said Ms Martin. She said her first priority will be meeting with Mr Colebrooke to discuss the union’s next steps. “Our union cannot keep going if we continuing to treat our outgoings (presidents Roy Colebrooke replaced by union’s first woman president FROM page one CROWDS gather at St Matthew’s Anglican Church for the election. Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y . “I tried to bite my way out because I thought ‘I can’t just die’. I could’ve been just another statistic that night if I hadn’t fought for my life.”


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Volume: 105 No.155



> EAU
TORS

SEE FRONT OF SPORTS SECTION

The Tribune

SA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, MAY 30, 2009





Mother heaten 0
Dy police hoyiriend

Inquiry launched as woman demands justice



PHOTOS:
Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A MOTHER is demanding justice after
claiming she was brutally beaten, strangled
and threatened with death by her police
officer boyfriend.

The Police Complaints Unit has launched
an investigation into the allegations.

But the victim, who wishes to remain
anonymous, and her family fear police are
not taking the matter seriously.

They say their suspicions were confirmed
after her attacker came to her house the
day after the incident. He was with a group
of other officers to collect a number of per-
sonal items, including his police uniform.

Roy Colebrooke replaced by
union’s first woman president

VOTES tallied in the

Abraham Smith drew 293 votes,

“He said he’d been (free) since the morn-
ing,” the woman claimed. “I don’t think
it’s fair. I am really hurt.”

The alleged incident began when the
boyfriend — a man who she claims to have
been in an abusive relationship with for
several years — came to her home on
Wednesday evening.

The pair got in an argument because she
had called him earlier that evening asking
him not to stay in her house during a week
she planned to be away in Florida.

After a brief verbal spat, the officer, who
is attached to the Traffic Division, began
punching and strangling her, shouting that
he would “kill her”, alleged the woman,
who has a son aged eight.

“Me and my (son) were in my bed sleep-

BRUISED AND BATTERED: A mother shows the injuries she claims she suffered at the hands of her police
officer boyfriend.

ing when he opened the door and said
“What do you think you’re talking about
on the phone?’”

The victim said that as a result of the
attack that followed she began “vomiting
blood.”

“T couldn’t breathe,” she said yesterday,
surrounded by family and friends.

After suffering blows for what she said
felt like 20 minutes, the victim said she
finally found herself free after she bit down
on her attacker’s hand, which was partially
covering her mouth.

“T tried to bite my way out because I
thought ‘I can’t just die’,” she said.

“T could’ve been just another statistic

SEE page 14

up all night!

MeDonald'’s downtown

drive-thru is now open

24 hours

Fridays & Saturdays



PRICE — ama: (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Doctored’ photo
of pageant queen
sparks probe

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

THE Miss Bahamas Universe
organisation is investigating the
release of what they claim is a
"doctored" photo of new queen
Kiara Sherman.

The image, first appearing on
local website
bahamasweekly.com and widely
circulated through emails, reveals
Ms Sherman with an apparent
wardrobe malfunction.

Amid the controversy, an
emotional Ms Sherman yester-
day said she will not let the
furore put a blight on a “once in
a lifetime” opportunity.

At a press conference held at
accounting firm Deloitte and Touche where officials sought
to validate the scores of the ballots cast, pageant represen-
tatives said the photo was digitally altered.

They plan to press charges against the person who released
the image.

"We are concerned about the increase in cyber crime of
which Ms Sherman is targeted through character assassina-
tion and graphic enhancement of sexual nature. This will not
be tolerated, we have begun an investigation regarding the
same and intend to press charges against the culprit to the
fullest extent of the law,” said president of the Miss Bahamas
Universe organisation Gaynelle Rolle, flanked by Ms Sher-
man, Miss Earth Bahamas Ife Bethel Sears, Miss Interna-
tional Bahamas Amanda Appleyard, several judges and
pageant officials.

"Tt not only affects Ms Sherman, but what does it say to the
world about Bahamians," she added.

SEE page 14

CROWNED: Kiara Sherman,
Miss Bahamas Universe 2009.



Fireworks at pageant press conference

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

SEVERAL heated arguments erupted during a tumultuous
press conference held by Miss Bahamas Universe officials yester-
day to validate the scores of the ballots cast in the recent pageant.

But despite some objections raised, 25-year-old singer Kiara
Sherman remains the current Miss Bahamas Universe.

A police officer was present through most of the proceedings as
relatives of the contestants, the top three finalists, several judges and
the media crowded into the conference room of accounting firm
Deloitte and Touche.

SEE page 14



Bahamas Hotel and Catering
Allied Workers Union revealed
yesterday that leader Roy Cole-
brooke has been replaced by
the organisation’s first woman
president.

Nicole Martin, a single moth-
er-of-three, led the “A Team”
to a landslide victory in the
polls, conducted Thursday.

Ms Martin received 1,358
votes while her nearest com-
petitor, Tyrone Butler of the
“M Team” attracted 416 votes.

THE Tribune will not be

published on Monday, which
is a public holiday. The next
edition will be on Tuesday.



while Mr Colebrooke ranked
last, with only 270 votes.

Her win followed months of
in-fighting in the union, which
represents around 6,000 hotel
workers, at a time when the
tourism industry faces unprece-
dented challenges.

Speaking late Thursday
evening, Ms Martin partly
attributed her win to her team’s
decision to “fight a clean fight”
in the run-up to the election.

She said they had faced
“many obstacles” in reaching
their goal of replacing Mr Cole-
brooke’s team, but their victory
proved that “when the people
are ready for change, change
will happen”.

“Our union is in trouble. Our

SEE page 14

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A MAN accused of murdering a young
woman and then dumping her body in a
local cemetery appeared in court yester-
day.

Police have charged 24-year-old Angelo
Poitier, alias Angelo Morley, with the mur-
der of 19-year-old Shanise Adderley.

Poitier, who was arraigned before Chief
Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court One,
Bank Lane, was not represented by an attor-
ney. He was not required to enter a plea to
the murder charge.

The case was adjourned to June 3 and
transferred to Court 10 Nassau Street for
fixture.

Ms Adderley, a resident of Chippingham,
was found dead at the Bahamas Veteran
Cemetery on Infant View Road shortly
before 4 am Wednesday.

CHARGED: Angelo Poitier at court yesterday.



NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

COB OPENS
PERFORMING ARTS
CENTRE

FNM AND PLP BLASTED
ON THE ECONOMY

MORE THAN $60,000
RAISED TO FIGHT HUNGER
PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MAY 30, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamas Democratic Movement leader

lays into FNM and PLP over the economy

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
turnquest@tribunemedia.net



BREAKING his silence after nearly a
year, leader of the Bahamas Democrat-
ic Movement Cassius Stuart has come
out swinging — criticising both the FNM
and PLP for the state for the economy.

Characterising the former PLP gov-
ernment led by Perry Christie as more
occupied with managing the “chaos and
crisis” it got itself into than creating new
initiatives, Mr Stuart said the present
FNM administration led by Hubert
Ingraham has been a “dismal failure”.

He said: “From his budget communi-
cations, it appears that the Ingraham
administration is confused and out of
touch with what is really happening in
the world. Neither the prime minister
nor any of his cabinet colleagues seem to
have any clue as to how to pull the
Bahamian economy out of the slump
that we are in.

Mi Cassius Stuart breaks silence after nearly a year

“Hubert Ingraham’s actions or inac-
tion is evidence that the prime minister
does not know what to do in the midst of
this crisis. For the first quarter of 2009,
the Bahamas government had a revenue
shortfall of about $100 million. For the
second quarter, we have experienced an
additional $100 million shortfall. In the
2009/2010 budget, it is projected that the
Bahamian economy will suffer even
more shortfall in the third and fourth
quarters, which will amount to about
$260 million.”

With this in mind, Mr Stuart ques-
tioned why the prime minister would see
fit to sell the Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Corporation — “the only corpora-
tion that is generating revenue for the
country at this time”.

“Why is the prime minister shutting
off the only valve that is bringing in
financial resources? This makes absolute-

ly no sense. BTC should not be sold until
our economy rebounds and the Ameri-
can economy stabilises. To sell BTC at
this time for a quick shot in the arm will
only do more harm than good. The reoc-
curring revenues generated from BTC’s
profits are vital for the survival of our
country in these critical economic times.

“Adding to his blunders, the prime
minister has been on a borrowing spree
that will have negative repercussions for
future generations of Bahamians. This
year alone, the prime minister has bor-
rowed more than $250 million. In this
budget alone, the government is pro-
jected to borrow a staggering $374 mil-
lion. To shed light on the magnitude of
our economic problems, government
debt at the end of June 2010 will rise to
43.2 per cent of GDP. This is a serious
problem and is cause for alarm for every
tax paying Bahamian.”

In the midst of this economic crisis,
Mr Stuart said, the government should
be wise in its borrowing and spending.

He said that while he agrees with Mr
Ingraham on the need for borrowing to
dredge the harbour, “certainly, borrow-
ing to fix a road in the midst of an eco-
nomic crisis is ludicrous and economi-
cally stupid. What is the return on invest-
ment for paving the road? How much
return would we see as a nation from
that $150 million road project?

“In less than five weeks, more than
5,000 students would be leaving school
looking for new opportunities. What
opportunities will be made available to
these students? Does the prime minister
have any plans for these additional 5,000
individuals? It is clear that Hubert Ingra-
ham is in deep water and does not have
a clue how to bring the ship to shore,” he
said.

Contract signed to complete North Eleuthera roads



PUBLIC WORKS and Transport Minister Neko Grant (right) is pictured
speaking to North Eleuthera residents during the contract signing for

refurbishing main roads.

Letisha Henderson/BIS Photo

NEKO GRANT, Minister for Public Works and Transport congratulates the owners of Nu View Construction Lim-

ited recipients of the $3.6 million contract to resurface and reconstruct roads in North Eleuthera. Pictured from
left, front row, are Thomas Johnson, Ministry of Works area representative; Colin Higgs, Permanent Secretary;
Peter Kemp, president of Nu View; Minister Grant; Quinten Kemp, vice president; Alvin Smith, Member Parlia-
ment for North Eleuthera and Speaker of the House of Assembly, Franklyn Johnson, Derek Elden of the Ministry

of Finance, Local Government representatives and other officials from the Ministry are also shown.

m BY KATHRYN CAMPBELL

UPPER BOGUE, Eleuthera
— The government has signed a
$3.6 million contract with Nu
View Construction Ltd for the
resurfacing and reconstruction
of roads in North Eleuthera.

mi oy- TMA =,

a wal

hc

The contract covers the entire
road network in North
Eleuthera, including Queen’s
Highway between the Glass
Window Bridge, and Upper and
Lower Bogue to the North
Eleuthera Airport. It is expect-
ed that 15-20 persons will be

1 ele motte)"

COOL

employed on the project. Dur-
ing the signing ceremony at the
Administrator's Office here,
Public Works and Transport
Minister Neko Grant said the
roadwork will complete previ-
ously contracted works for the
reconstruction and repair of

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roads throughout Eleuthera.

Minister Grant noted that the
projects would contribute to the
enhancement of road safety and
the further development of the
island. “The recession will not
last forever,” he said, “so it is
important to have our country
and our infrastructure in a state
of readiness for when the econ-
omy rebounds.”

Mr Grant insisted that Gov-
ernment expects “quality” work
and “on-time” completion of
the project.Member of Parlia-
ment for North Eleuthera and
Speaker of the House of
Assembly, Alvin Smith, said the
occasion marked a “historic
rehabilitation” of the roads.

“This ranks very high in the
memorable occasions since [|
have been an MP for this area
because I don’t speak from a
distance,” he said. “I speak from
experience.

“T have driven over these
roads so I know the deplorable
state they have deteriorated
into. For many years I have
been trying to get these roads
repaired.”

He expressed appreciation
for the roads on behalf of the
residents of Eleuthera. “We will
express our gratitude each time
we drive over the new roads,”
said Mr Smith

Mr Grant thanked the team
from the Ministry of Works,
including Permanent Secretary
Colin Higgs, Deputy Director
of Works (Civil Department)
George Hutcheson, and Project
Manager Dion Munroe.

Also at the signing were
North Eleuthera Administrator
Brenda Colebrooke and local
government representatives,
including Marcus Collins, Theo
Neely, Rosetta Hudson, and
Neko McDonald.

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Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

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© In brief

Man, 20, dies
after crashing
into tree

A MAN died early yester-
day morning after crashing
into a tree on J.F.K Drive,
police confirmed.

Dominique Miller, 20, of
Coral Harbour, is believed
to have lost control of the
2004 Chevy Trailblazer he
was driving when the colli-
sion occurred at around 2am.

Medics pronouned Mr
Miller dead at the scene.
Traffic police are investigat-
ing.

Blood appeal
by friends and
colleagues of
shooting victim

A DESPERATE plea for
blood has been issued by the
friends and colleagues of Jer-
ry Hutchinson, who is listed
in serious condition in the
intensive care unit at Doc-
tor’s Hospital.

Earlier this week, Mr
Hutchinson, a former rugby
player and general manager
of security at the Airport
Authority, was shot in the
front of Asa H Pritchard
some time around 6.30am.

Leaving the establishment
with funds to make a
deposit, Mr Hutchinson was
approached by a gunman
who demanded that he hand
over the cash.

Struggle

According to Assistant
Supt Leon Bethel, there was
a struggle between the two
men and Mr Hutchinson was
shot in the abdomen.

Since then, an e-mail has
been making rounds
amongst his colleagues and
friends asking them to visit
the hospital and donate
blood.

The gunman, who is still
actively being sought,
escaped the scene with the
deposit in a white car.

A Honda with the registra-
tion number 111982 is being
sought in connection with
the incident.

Anyone who has informa-
tion that may assist the
investigation is asked to call
Crime Stoppers on 328-TIPS
(8477). All calls are toll-free
and answered in the United
States to ensure total
anonymity.

Man in custody
over seizure of
gun, drugs and
ammunition

A 22 year-old man is in
custody in connection with
the seizure of a gun, ammu-
nition and drugs from a Nas-
sau Village home, according
to police.

The items, which included
a .223 rifle, nine live rounds
of ammunition for the
weapon and 21 foil packages
containing marijuana, were
discovered when Drug
Enforcement Unit officers
executed a search warrant on
the home at around 4am on
Friday.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MAY 30, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief



Worker kidnapped
after gunmen
Stage robbery

TWO terrified workers were
robbed by gunmen who kid-
napped one of them on Thurs-
day, police reported. The ordeal
began as a Jet Wash employee
was securing the building at
Bernard Road at around 11pm
when he was accosted by a gun-
man in a green Toyota Avalon.

After being forced into the
car, the employee was then dri-
ven to Prince Charles Drive
where three more men jumped
in. “They then drove to the resi-
dence of another employee who
resides in the eastern district of
New Providence where the
occupants of the home were
robbed of cash and other assort-
ed items,” said a police
spokesman. “The robbers then
fled the area in an unknown
direction, leaving the car.”

Police later found a shotgun
with four shells, a ski mask, a
quantity of cash, a laptop com-
puter, and a television set in the
vicinity.

Man on manslaughter
charge denied bail

m@ By NATARIO McKENZIE

Tribune Staff Reporter

THE man accused of killing a
father-of-one with a rock was
denied bail yesterday.

Jeffrey Moncur, 42, of Soldier
Road, has been charged with
the manslaughter of 45-year-old
Terry Fox. Mr Fox had report-
edly been watching television at
his home on Pork Fish Drive
when an acquaintance called
him outside. It is claamed Mr
Fox, a self-employed handyman,
was arguing with the visitor in
the back yard before he ran out
into the street and collapsed.
Police believed he died as a
result of a blow to the head with
a rock. His death was the 30th
homicide for the year.

Moncur, who was arraigned
on the manslaughter charge on
Thursday, was back before
Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez
yesterday for a bail hearing.

Denying bail, Chief Magis-
trate Gomez said he would rec-
ommend that Moncur be given
an early trial date in light of the
fact he is on remand. The case
has been adjourned to June 8
and transferred to Court 5,
Bank Lane.

College of Bahamas opens
Performing Arts Centre

AFTER undergoing major ren-
ovation, the Performing Arts
Centre of the College of the
Bahamas was officially opened
during the 20th annual ‘Colour
of Harmony’ exposition on May
26 which featured the artistic tal-
ents of students.

Governor General, His Excel-
lency Arthur D Hanna, said the
College has “far exceeded the
expectations” of those who con-
ceived the idea forty years ago.

“If those who had conceived
the idea of this College back in
1967, such as people like Rodney
Bain, could see its transformation
today, they would be amazed.

“Today it’s an institution that
awards a cross-section of degrees
and it is certainly an institution
of which we all can be proud.
Indeed, we never expected the
College could progress so quick-
ly,” said Mr Hanna.

According to College Presi-
dent, Janyne Hodder, the opening
of the Centre, situated on the
Oakes Field campus, was “a
dream that has finally become a
reality.”

“Tt is fitting that ‘Colour of
Harmony’ should mark the open-
ing of this facility,” she said. “It is
an amalgamation of art and music
- an ideal vehicle to highlight the
versatility of the Centre.

Colour of Harmony is one of
the College’s oldest and longest



THE PERFORMING ARTS CENTRE at the College of the Bahama



s (pictured)

was officially opened on May 26 during the 20th annual ‘Colour of Harmony’
- an exposition highlighting the artistic talents of students.

running annual events. Renova-
tion of the Centre has been one of
the College's major projects.

“All have been designed to
improve our facilities to make the
student and the faculty have a
more enjoyable, enriching expe-
rience and to assist us in our mis-
sion to support and drive nation-
al development through educa-
tion, research, innovation and ser-
vice,” said Ms Hodder.

The Performing Arts Centre is
a modern, fully equipped centre
with a 400-seat capacity. It is
capable of supporting live stage
productions, lectures, sympo-
siums, exhibitions, movies and
concerts. Through the Centre, the
College seeks to encourage cre-

ative potential and enrich the
intellectual and cultural life expe-
riences of students, host perfor-
mances by local and internation-
al companies and artists, and cre-
ate an environment were artists
and students of the arts can devel-
op and learn.

The Centre features computer
controlled theatrical lighting and
sound systems, dressing rooms
with private bathrooms, public
restrooms, a fully equipped con-
cession counter, and a concession
support area with fountain drinks,
ice, heaters and coolers.

It also has a director/manager’s
office, box office, and a computer-
based ticketing and reservations
system is to be installed. The Cen-

Former Defence Force officer granted leave to
apply for judicial review in unfair dismissal case

A FORMER US Marine and
Defence Force officer who claims
he was unfairly dismissed from
the force last year has been grant-
ed leave for apply for judicial
review, The Tribune has learned.

Lieutenant Zennerman Sher-
man, who was summarily dis-
missed from the Defence Force
last June for alleged misconduct,
was granted leave yesterday by
Supreme Court Justice Stephen
Isaacs to have his case heard. The
court will now review the force’s
decision to dismiss Lieut Sher-
man.

Lt Sherman, who joined the
Defence Force in 1996 after leav-
ing the US Marine Corps with an
honourable discharge in 1992,

FAMGUARD

CORPORATION LIMITED

Incorporated under the laws of the Commonweatth of The Bahamas

INTERIM REPORT — THREE MONTHS ENDING 31 MARCH, 2009
MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIRMAN

Dear Shareholder:

The strong growth in premium income experienced in 2008 continued in 2009 and
we recorded at the end of the first quarter an increase in premium income of $2.7
million or 15.7% over prior year-to-date.

Our Group Life and Health Division recorded the strongest gains in premium
income as a result of the sustained growth in new business. At the end of March
2009, new sales outstripped the prior year-to-date by 82%.

Our decision to change our accounting method for equities during 2008 from
fair value through profit and loss (FVTPL) to available for sale (AFS) assisted in
minimizing fluctuations in investment income caused by changes in the price
of shares held in our equities portfolio. We recorded investment income of $2.4
million for the first quarter of 2009 compared to $1.9 million for the same period
last year. Prior year was impacted significantly by unrealized losses on equities of

$441 thousand.

During the quarter policyholder benefits trended higher than prior year-to-date by
30% reflecting an increase in health claims. This increase in policyholder benefits
negatively impacted net income, which ended the quarter at $1.6 million.

The Board of Directors declared a dividend of 6 cents per share, which was paid to
shareholders on May 18 2009 based on the performance of the company for the three
months to March 31 2009.

Sincerely, f ;
hedge ache

Norbeit E. Boissiere
Chairman

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET (UNAUDITED)
AS AT 31 MARCH 2009

(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars) 44 Teeenber

2009 2008
$ $

1,954,114
339,737
13,789,621

ASSETS
Cash and bank balances
Short term bank deposits
Other bank term deposits
Financial Investment Assets
Held-to-maturity
Available for sale

Loans

1,833,305
340,635
4,233,591

56,390,833
6,787,851
69,567,290
139,153,505

2,208,520
3,086,519
34,442,304

178,890,848

44,255,404
7,243,165
69,292,456
136,874,497

2,784,130
2,749,750
34,062,774

176,471,151

Total investment assets

Receivables and other assets
Premiums receivable
Property, plant and equipment, net

TOTAL

LIABILITIES & EQUITY
LIABILITIES
Reserves for future policyholders’ benefits
Other policyholders’ funds
Policy liabilities
ayables and accruals

Total liabilities

104,806,556
9,898,793
114,705,349
4,851,759
119,557,108

102,902,989
7,756,601
110,659,590
6,993,345
117,652,935
EQUITY
reference shares
Ordinary shares
Share premium
Revaluation surplus
Retained earnings
Total equity
TOTAL

10,000,000
2,000,000
10,801,080
9,922,302
26,610,358
59,333,740

178,890,848

10,000,000

2,000,000
10,801,080
10,377,616
25,639,520
58,818,216

176,471,151





contends that National Security
Minister Tommy Turnquest —
who followed the recommenda-
tion of Commodore Clifford
Scavella — did not have the pow-
er to dismiss a commissioned offi-
cer according to the Defence Act.

Despite acclaimed service in
several areas of the force, includ-
ing education of young marines,
Lt Sherman contends he was sys-
tematically overlooked for pro-
motion and deliberately margin-
alised and ostracised.

Lt Sherman claims he has not
been given any reason for his dis-
missal and that his termination
was in breach of Section (14)1 of
the Defence Act.

The Minister of National

Security, the Commander of the
Royal Bahamas Defence Force
and the Attorney General are list-
ed as respondents in the court
action.

Lt Sherman is seeking to have
the decision to dismiss him
quashed, be reinstated to the
force and be compensated among
other eight other grounds of
relief.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

RR UE
PHONE: 322-2157



CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS (UNAUDITED)
FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED 31 MARCH 2009

(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)

Cash flows from operating activities
et income

Adjustments for:

Depreciation

Change in mortgage provision
Reserve for policyholder benefits
nterest income

Dividend income

(Increase) decrease in operating assets
Receivables and other assets

remium in arrears
(Decrease) increase in operating liabilities
ayables and accruals
Other policyholder funds
Net cash from operating activities
Cash flows from investing activities
olicy loans
urchase of fixed assets
Construction in progress
Other loans repaid

let mortgage loans issued

urchase of Government bonds
nterest received
Dividends received

Net cash from investing activities
Cash flows from financing activities
Dividends paid

Net cash used in financing activities



let increase in cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of the period
Cash and cash equivalents at end of the period

Cash and cash equivalents is comprised of:

Cash and bank balances
Short-term deposits
Other bank term deposits

Change in appreciation on investments in equities -

Operating profit before working capital changes

3 months to 3 months to
31 March 2009 31 March 2008
$ $

1,570,838 2,747,405

323,841 215,445
441,118
(292,226)
1,921,295 1,963,015
(2,303,409) (2,292,048)

112,932 $3,450
1,392,991 2,699,259

(6,642)

575,610
(336,769)

(2,059,784)
488,924

(2,141,586) (172,457)

2,142,192 148,617
1,632,438 807,325

44,996 (318,573)
(618,423) (1,103,542)
84,948 z
96,451 60,410
(367,843) (597,078)
(11,250,000) ¢
1,188,560 2,496,682
112,932 83,450
(10,708,379) 621,349

(600,000) (600,000)
(600,000) (600,000)

(9,675,941)
16,083,472
6,407,531

828,674
13,912,100
14,740,774

1,833,305

340,635
4,233,591
6,407,531

4,445,601
329,659
9,965,514
14,740,774

tre has a projection screen, a
video projector and a video con-
trol system for projector, screen,
DVD, VCR and other technical
equipment. With a high-tech
stage equipped with the highest
industry standards stage curtains;
a loading bay to the left of the
stage; a stage support/storage
room to the right (for items such
as the piano, podium and other
stage equipment associated with
productions). A baby grand piano
was purchased in April, 2008.

The evening was capped with
the presentation of the coveted
E Clement Bethel award to cele-
brated Bahamian Artist, Kendal
Hanna, one of the forerunners of
abstract painting in the Bahamas.

The award was presented by
Past President of the College, Dr
Keva Bethel, widow of E
Clement Bethel. She hailed Mr
Hanna as “someone who has
been a dear friend and colleague
in the arts.” “From 1962, Mr Han-
na participated in the Nassau Fes-
tival of Arts and Crafts and we
became very aware of the very
special talent that he brought to
our country,” said Dr Bethel. “It
is very pleasing for me to present
this award to him.”

Galleria

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DANCE FLICK

AMCELS & DEM OMS

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Airlines put in place
box, hag embargo

American Airlines and its
regional affiliate American Eagle
Airlines are putting in place a box
and bag embargo on flights to
selected destinations including
the Bahamas between June 6 and
August 25. The embargo includes
people traveling to and from Nas-
sau, George Town, Exuma,
Marsh Harbour and Freeport

A year-round box embargo is
in place on flights from, or passing
through, New York's John F
Kennedy International Airport
to all Caribbean and Latin Amer-
ican destinations.

Under the embargo, oversize,
overweight and excess baggage
will not be accepted on flights to
the above destinations. Bags that
weigh between 51lbs and 70lbs
are subject to a fee of $50.

One carry-on bag will be
accepted with a maximum size of
45 inches and weight of 40lbs.
Sports equipment will be allowed
as part of the total checked bag-
gage allowance, but additional
charges may apply.

The embargo also affects cus-
tomers going to San Pedro Sula,
Tegucigalpa and San Salvador in
Central America; Maracaibo,
Cali, Medellin, La Paz, Santa
Cruz and Quito in South Ameri-
ca; Santo Domingo, Santiago,
Port-au-Prince, Grenada and
Kingston, Guadalajara, Aguas-
calientes, San Luis Potosi, Chi-
huahua and Leon in Mexico; and
all American Eagle flights to and
from San Juan.

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380-FLIX



CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME (UNAUDITED)

FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED 31 MARCH 2009

(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)

INCOME
Gross premium income
Premium ceded to reinsurers
Net premium income

Annuity deposits

Net premium income and annuity deposits

Interest income
Dividend income
Change in unrealized loss on investments
Realized gain from sale of assets
Other operating income
Total income

BENEFITS & EXPENSES

Restated

3 months to 3 months to
31 March 2009 31 March 2008
$ §

20,484,476 17,768,174
(2,283,130) (1,253,150)
18,201,346 16,515,024
1,604,804 1,154,892
19,806,150 17,669,916
2,303,409 2,292,048
112,932 83,450
4 (441,118)

100

156,348 153,661

22,378,939 19,757,957

BENEFITS
Policyholders’ benefits
Reinsurance recoveries
Net policyholders’ benefits
Increase in reserves for future policyholders’ benefits
Total benefits
EXPENSES
Commissions
Operating expenses
Premium tax
Depreciation and ammortization expense
Bad debt expense
Total expenses
Total benefits and expenses

NET INCOME

Earnings per share

11,997,201 9,229,155
624,133 846,444
11,373,068 8,382,711

1,921,295 1,963,014

13,294,363 10,345,725

2,908,194
3,670,388

2,648,135
3,555,827
617,957 537,621
323,841 215,445
6,642 292,201

7,513,738 6,664,827

20,808,101 17,010,552

1,570,838 2,747,405
0.16 0,27



NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED INTERIM FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
AS AT 31 MARCH 2009

1. ACCOUNTING POLICIES

hese interim consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with
International Accounting Standards 34: Interim Financial Reporting. The accounting policies
used in the preparation of the interim consolidated financial statements are consistent with those
used in the annual consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2008.







hese unaudited consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its
wholly owned subsidiaries, Family Guardian Insurance Company, FG General Insurance Agency
Limited, FG Financial Limited, FG Capital Markets Limited and BahamaHealth Insurance
Brokers and Benefits Consultants Limited.

2. EARNINGS PER SHARE

Earnings per share:



3 months to
31 March 2008

3 months to
31 March 2009

10,000,000
$ 1,570,838
0.16 $

10,000,000
$ 2,747 405
0.27

Weighted average number of shares outstanding
Consolidated net income
Earnings per share

3. COMMITMENTS

Outstanding commitments to extend credit under the mortgage loan agreements amounted to

approximately $3,675,003 as at 31 March 2009 (31 December 2008: $2,820,390)

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY (UNAUDITED)
FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED 31 MARCH 2009

(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)

Balance as of December 31, 2007

Transfer from revaluation surplus

Preference Ordinary

Share Revaluation Retained

Shares Shares Premium Reserve Earnings Total

$ $
$ 10,000,000 $ 20,000,000

Adjustment to fair value of investment in equities 7 :
Adjustment to appraised value of land and buildings : ‘

Net income for 2008
Dividends declared and paid -
preference shares
ordinary shares ($0.24 per share)
Balance as of December 31, 2008

$ $ $ $
$ 10,801,000 $7,361,959 $ 23,840,477 $ 54,003,516

- (496,893) -
- 3,512,550 3
4,899,043

(496,893)
3,512,550
4,899,043

(700,000) (700,000)

g 2,400,000 2,400,000

10,000,000 20,000,000

Adjustment to fair value of investment in equities 7 -
Adjustment to appraised value of land and buildings 2 zs

Net income for the period
Dividends declared and paid -
preference shares
ordinary shares ($0.06 per share)
Balance as of March 31, 2009

$ 10,000,000 $ 20,000,000

10,801,000 10,377,616 25,639,520
- (455,314) -

58,818,216
(455,314)
1,570,838 1,570,838

(600,000)
$ 59,333,740

(600,000)

$ 10,801,000 $ 9,922,302 $ 26,610,358






PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MAY 30, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Govt has no
legal authority



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972

Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Will Cuba return to OAS next week?

WASHINGTON — What would happen if
the Cuban government should send an envoy
next week to claim the country's long-vacant
seat at the Organisation of the American States
in Washington?

The 34 OAS foreign ministers, meeting in
Honduras, will vote Tuesday whether to reverse
the resolution that suspended Cuba's member-
ship in 1962 and denounced its Marxist-Lenin-
ist government as "incompatible" with the
organisation's founding principles of democra-
cy and human rights.

The 60-year-old OAS, heavily financed by
the United States, has been divided over
whether to give post-Fidel Castro Cuba a warm
welcome by overturning the resolution or expe-
rience the embarrassing scenario of a fight over
Cuba's seat.

So far, it appears to be most everybody else
vs. the United States.

The ministers gather for their annual assem-
bly starting Sunday in San Pedro Sula, Hon-
duras, despite cracks in buildings and damaged
streets left by a major earthquake early Thurs-
day.

The meeting's goal is to kill the 47-year-old
Cuban resolution and remove legal obstacles
for Cuba to regain its OAS membership.

"I believe the case is a lot more complex
than that," Jose Miguel Insulza, the OAS sec-
retary-general, said Wednesday during a meet-
ing in Washington that exposed deep divisions
among the members over the wording of the
text. “We have to see first if there is a will in the
Cuban government to start doing some practi-
cal things and accept principles of an organisa-
tion where it was absent for about 50 years,”
Insulza told reporters.

Since taking office in February, President
Barack Obama has signalled some willingness to
back away from a half-century of U.S. policy
toward the communist country. First, he ordered
the shutdown of the U.S. military prison in
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and later he lifted
restrictions on Cuban-American visiting rela-
tives in Cuba and sending them money.

As late as last week he made an overture to
Cuba, asking Raul Castro's government to
resume talks on legal immigration of Cubans to
the United States. That would reopen discus-
sions that had been closed off by President
George W. Bush in mid-2003.

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton
testified to a Senate panel last week that she
would not support any effort by her Western
Hemisphere peers to get Cuba back into the
organisation until that country changes its polit-
ical system, releases political prisoners and
respects human rights.

Yet the U.S. ambassador to OAS, Hector
Morales, presented a proposal Wednesday: a
US.-sponsored resolution asking to reverse the
1962 expulsion decision that Washington had
pressed the organisation to adopt during the
Cold War.

"There has been no change of policy," the
State Department said in a news release. "The
United States looks forward to the day when
Cuba can return to the Organisation of Amer-
ican States in a manner that is consistent with
the principles of the Inter-American Democra-
tic Charter." The charter makes democracy a

right of all people. Besides the U.S. proposal,
Nicaragua and Honduras are offering separate
ones, and the difficulty of satisfying everyone
has left a divided organisation going to the Hon-
duras meeting.

All OAS countries accept the first article of
the three resolutions to overturn the 1962 pol-
icy. The disagreements are about the follow-
ups about future relations between Cuba and
the OAS.

The Obama administration proposes to start
a dialogue with the current government that
could lead to a "possible reintegration" of the
country to the Inter-American system only if
Cuba meets the "compromises and values" of
the OAS charters.

Those opposing the U.S. version argue that
the OAS cannot dictate what Cuba has to do to
return. Cuban officials also have said they are
not interested in returning to the organisation
but they would like the OAS replaced by anoth-
er regional movement that would exclude the
United States.

The Nicaraguan proposal, sponsored by
Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez and coun-
tries close to the populist leader, is the most
radical. It asks the OAS to admit its 1962 deci-
sion was an “error and an act of injustice” that
caused extreme hardship to the Cuban people.
Besides Chavez's followers, the Nicaraguan
proposal is backed by some Caribbean countries
that benefit from the Venezuelan president's
use of oil to gain international friends.

The third proposal, sponsored by Honduras,
comprises article 1 and language that the future
relationship between Cuba and the OAS will
depend on decisions that both parties adopt.
Opponents argue about the usefulness of ruling
on an issue that Cuba would be unlikely to
accept. The ambassadors agreed to create a
task force that includes all OAS members to
write a text accepted by everyone in the next
couple of days so the ministers can pass it by
consensus. Lacking a consensus, the OAS has
another resource: the vote. The resolution
would require two-thirds of the members, or
23 countries, to pass, and enough votes already
exist for that, OAS sources said.

Some diplomats say the United States could
be the only government to vote against a draft
that did not dictate changes for Cuba to make.

By the time the OAS meets Tuesday, the
United States will be the only country in the
Americas that has not re-established diplomat-
ic ties with Cuba.

El Salvador, the only country besides the
United States without relations, plans to restore
ties the day before the Honduras meeting, when
its new president, Mauricio Funes, takes office.
He will be the first president of El Salvador
who is a member of the Farabundo Marti
National Liberation Front, or FMLN, the sec-
ond former Central American foe of the Unit-
ed States to take power democratically in Latin
America's lurch to the left.

In 2006, Nicaraguans elected Daniel Ortega
two decades after his Sandinista government
fought U.S.-backed Contra rebels, and his rela-
tions with Washington have remained tense
under Obama's administration.

(This article was written by Nestor Ikeda of
the Associated Press).



to interfere with
sports bodies

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

This Ministry would be grateful
for your kind assistance by publi-
cation of its response to a mis-
leading Editorial which appeared
in Thursday, May 14, 2009 edi-
tion of The Freeport News under
the headline “The Cop-out Must
Stop.”

The contents of the response
are self-explanatory and are in
the public interest, especially the
local sporting community.
Accordingly, your usual cooper-
ation and assistance would be
much appreciated.

Sincerely yours
Archie Nairn,
Permanent Secretary,
Nassau,

May 25, 2009

May 19th, 2009

Editor

The Freeport News

Mr Oswald Brown

Freeport, Grand Bahama

Dear Sir:

Thave been directed to respond
to your Thursday, May 14, 2009
Editorial appearing under the
headline, “The Cop-out Must
Stop.” Much of what is expressed
in the editorial finds unqualified
endorsement by this Ministry.
Exception is taken, however, with
your assertion that all Ministers
inclusive of the present one, have
copped out of resolving the 23-
year-old baseball issue, and that
none of them “considered the
matter serious enough to do what
is necessary to correct it.”

In the first instance, it is neces-
sary to address the widely held

letters@tribunemedia net



misconception that the Minister
of Sports possesses unfettered
powers to dictate to or interfere
with the affairs of local sporting
organisations.

Nowhere in The Sports Act are
such powers conferred on the
Minister.

In fact, even the government
has no legal authority to conduct
such interference, having regard
to the internationally accepted
protocol that governments are
obligated to accept and respect
the autonomy of sporting bodies
and by extension any legitimate
collection of those bodies such as
National Olympic Committees or
International Sports Federations.

Governments are made to pay
a price for violating such inter-
national protocols. For example
last year the Soccer Federation
and the Olympic Association of
Iraq entered a team to partici-
pate in the Beijing Olympics.

The Iraqi government did not
agree with the selections and
changed the team as well as those
who selected it.

When this was brought to the
attention of the IOC, the entire
Iraqi country was expelled from
participating in the Games,
demonstrating the international
community’s insistence on the
non-interference by governments
into the affairs of sporting bodies.

Having regard to such well
established internationally agreed

protocol then, it is misleading to
claim, as you did, that govern-
ments have unchecked power to
change or dismiss an internation-
ally recognised governing body,
with or without good cause.
Indeed, the most our government
can do in accordance with The
Sports Act, is to withdraw offi-
cial recognition of that govern-
ing body and to grant such recog-
nition to one more qualified body.
This latter action was formally
executed by the government in
2003 and from then to now, the
full weight of the government has
remained fixed behind the body
that meets the qualifications as
the parent body for the sport of
baseball in The Bahamas. No
doubt the level of support thusly
provided by the government has
been pivotal in the tremendous
growth of local baseball since
2003.

It should also be noted that in
spite of such decisive action taken
by this Ministry in 2003, the
Bahamas Olympic Association
has found it impossible to follow
suit, and therein resides real
impetus for the kind of resolu-
tion which your editorial begs.

I trust that this serves to pro-
vide you with a better insight of
the baseball issue and the vast
amount of resources the past 10
Ministers of Sports have devot-
ed to achieving relief for the local
baseball fraternity.

ARCHIE NAIRN
Permanent,
Secretary,

Nassau,

May 25, 2009.

Bahamians deserve probe
into pageant controversy

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The Miss Universe Pageant will be held here in
The Bahamas at the Atlantis Resort in August
this year. It will be The Bahamas’ time to shine;
however, there is much controversy surrounding
the coronation last night of Miss Bahamas Uni-

verse 2009.

The Bahamian people deserve a complete and
thorough investigation of the events leading up to
the crowning of the queen. The judges were vis-
ibly upset as the results were announced and the
queen was crowned. It is Deloitte & Touche and
the judges’ duty and responsibility to discuss and
determine that the scores were accurately and
fairly reported, and to rectify the results if they

were not.

It is upsetting that three of the awards: Best
Hair, Best Smile, and Best Evening Dress were
not announced, as the MC of the night said, “We
are waiting on the scores.” They have yet to be

the papers. Why would the judges and/or Deloitte
& Touche send the results without the names of

the winner of the awards? Two of the three unan-
nounced awards (hair and smile) are determined
beforehand during the preliminary events.

It is extremely odd that they were not on the
results cards handed to the MC. This begs the

question, were these awards factored into the

compiled scoring?

If the judges feel that the wrong queen was
named, they simply need to fix the problem.

It would be an injustice to the rightful queen,
the Miss Bahamas organisation, and to the
Bahamian people if the lady, in the eyes of the
judges, who best exemplifies the qualities of a
Miss Universe contestant, were not there to rep-

resent our country. The judges must do the right

announced. Furthermore, there was much chaos

when reading the cards that were provided to
the MC’s, with the Shenique Miller pointing at
names, while Clint Watson was constantly flipping

Nassau,
May, 2009.

thing to get it right, and if they sit back and allow
the show to continue, knowing full well that the
right girl was not crowned, they have failed in
their capacity as judges.

CECILE EDWARDS

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WUSVEL DOMINGUE
of #46 SOLDIER ROAD, P.O. BOX N-4218, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 30 day of May, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that PAUL ISAACS of CASSIA
CL, GLENISTON GARDENS, P.O. BOX SS-6345, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 23 day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that CHARLES CLARKE
of Freeport, Grand Bahama intend to change my name
to CHARLES FERGUSON. If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ROSNELL JOSEPH of MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, GENERAL DELIVERY is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 23rd day of MAY 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ELIE ETIENNE of
AUGUSTA STREET is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 23% day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



To advertise in

The Classified Section
Call 502-2351



Problems now? See what havoc
a major hurricane would wreak

EDITOR, The Tribune.

AlJl of us in The Bahamas are now talking about hard times.
Regardless of what anybody says, based on our geographical
location we should never have inflation problems and if we do
have inflation it is caused by poor management of the Gov-
ernment.

In 2007 before our General Election the United States went
into a recession, I did an article that appeared in the Punch, The
Tribune and The Nassau Guardian. The topic was “Tighten
your belt hard times ahead”.

At that time The Bahamas was doing very well. Of course, my
cry fell on deaf ears and some said it would never happen but my
experience came from 18-20 years as a Trade Union Leader that
certain things are not said or done. I stated then and am remind-
ing you now that when Minister Carl Bethell read those confi-
dential letters in the Halls of Parliament there were doom days
ahead because you don’t make mockery of people with money
they would never not accept that kind of treatment and lie
down and play dead. For almost 30 years my cry was move the
government institutions such as the hospital, Immigration, Cus-
toms (among others) to Andros or Eleuthera which would
reduce the population in New Providence.

T also spoke of the danger we would face if we did not do it.
Well you may say what is my point?

My point is we have been lucky so far that we have not had
a major hurricane in New Providence in a long time.

If we do have one this year or the next we would think God
really turned his back on us because we would see the worst
financial chaos that anyone alive today would have ever seen,
then we would understand why I said we need a major popula-
tion shift.

If you think we have problems now, wait and see what would
happen if we have a major hurricane.

AUDLEY D HANNA Sr
Nassau,
May 28, 2009.
THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

SATURDAY, MAY 30, 2009, PAGE 5



Pintard calls for sexual offenders list

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — Well-known
poet and radio host Michael
Pintard said a sexual offenders
list would help protect the
nation’s children from preda-
tors.

His comment came in
response to the child molesta-
tion scandal unfolding at the
Eight Mile Rock High School
on Grand Bahama.

In an exclusive interview with
The Tribune, Mr Pintard said
consideration ought to given to
such a list — especially now, after
it has been claimed that three
teachers at a single school might
have abused children.

Mr Pintard said that there are
many sexual offenders out on
the streets and people don’t
know who they are.

“T think that an offenders list
would be useful,” Mr Pintard
said. “I know persons have said
that would be a problem
because we are a small commu-

nity, however, unfortunately,
because so many children are
being violated now in the
Bahamas, I don’t think we have
much of a choice.

“T think we ought to have a
list available . . . so when per-
sons are released (from jail) and
move into neighbourhoods,
people can know who they are
living with.”

Following the Eight Mile
Rock abuse claims, the Ministry
of Education announced that
all new teachers will be vetted
by police and that safety com-
mittees made up of teachers,
students, administrators, and
parents will be introduced in all
public schools.

Complaints have been filed
against three teachers at Eight
Mile Rock High and police
investigations are continuing.

Mr Pintard said child
molestation in schools is not a
“new situation” in the Bahamas.

He claimed that for years, the
issue has been kept quiet while
disgraced teachers were either
transferred to other schools or



KEITH CAREY (above) was robbed and gunned-down in 2006 while
making a $40,000 deposit at Bank of The Bahamas on Tonique

Williams-Darling Highway.



@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net

"Tis vex to see them jitney
buses and cars join up with each
other gossiping, blocking traffic
from passing. An‘ them male dri-
vers seems to be looking in each
others eyes an’ don't look when
you is blowing your horn to sep-
arate them.

"The Department of Road
Traffic need to make sure they
has Christian ways before they
gets to drive.”

— VEX DRIVER, NASSAU

"T vex at the disrespectful level
of service I received at Princess
Margaret Hospital the other day.
I showed up there with my
appointment card to the recep-
tionist and she asked me rudely
where I get this from telling me I
must go back home because I did-
n't have an appointment. I don't
mind if they made a mistake with
my appointment date but I can't
take her attitude.

"T know she have kids and the
tone of the voice she spoke to me
in, she can't speak to her chirren
like that, much less to a customer.
The staff at PMH treats people
with no respect as if you begging
them for something. I paid my
contributions to NIB since it
came into effect until I retired,
so I'm not begging for anything.

“They should have somebody
check on these rude staff and how
they treat people. And then they
have the nerve to post a sign up in
PMH saying if you talk rude or be
rude to the staff they can have
you arrested — ain’ that some-
thing?"

— DUDLEY WILLIAMS, NASSAU

“T vex that the leaders of our
country can't get their acts
together, work together, and find
a sensible plan of action to lead
this country of the miserable eco-
nomic situation we are in right
now. Listening to the prime min-
ister's speech on the budget it
hit home that we are in for a
rough ride and I can only hope
that when those MPs meet in the
House of Assembly next week, I
hope more than hot air comes
out of their mouths.

"Our future depends on it.”

— POLITICAL OBSERVER, NASSAU

“T sick, tired and vex over
people who is be taking their
sweet time driving up and down
the streets. I mean I can under-
stand being cautious and not
wanting to go past the speed
limit but there is no reason on
this earth to drive at five, eight
or 10 miles per hour on the
public streets.

"Too many times traffic is
backed up during rush hour
because people who either
can't drive, don't have jobs or
just plain fool taking a turtle-
paced joy ride through the
streets. And no amount of horn
blowing or screaming is move
them out the way. That's just
like biggety Bahamians to act
like the road is theirs and to
have no respect for anyone
else."

— MAD MOTORIST, NASSAU

¢ Are you vex? Send your com-
plaints to whyyouvex@tribuneme-
dia.net or fax them to 328-2398.

taken out of classrooms and put
to work behind a desk in some
Ministry of Education office.

“When I was in school we all
knew the persons who were
problematic and successive gov-
ernments have had a problem
transferring culprits who never
get the treatment and help they
need so they just re-offend.

“Those persons ought to be
dealt with too. Why go after just
the present culprits when there
is irrefutable evidence about
somebody who might be sitting
in a ministry desk who has been
run out of multiple islands?”
Mr Pintard ask.

Mr Pintard said careful back-
ground screening is important,
but useless when employers fail
to alert other employers to
potential problems in an appli-
cant.

“Bear in mind, if an educa-
tor is Bahamian and they have
offended they are transferred
from one school to another.

“And to those, whether stu-
dents and educators, who are
aware that there are teachers



THE sentencing hearing of the
man convicted of the February
2006 murder of businessman
Keith Carey has been adjourned
to June 25.

The hearing was adjourned
after Deputy Director of Public
Prosecutions Cheryl Grant-
Bethel and attorney Craig But-
ler, who is representing convict
Jamal Glinton, said that they
needed more time to go over a
probation report.

Glinton was convicted on
April 10 of the murder of Keith
Carey, 43, who was gunned down
on the steps of the Bank of the
Bahamas on Tonique Williams-
Darling Highway before he was
able to deposit $40,000 that
belonged to the Esso Service Sta-
tion that he operated on Faith
Avenue and Carmichael Road.

Glinton, who stood trial with
Sean Brown and Dwight
Knowles, was also convicted of
armed robbery and conspiracy
to commit robbery.

“T think we
ought to have a
list available...
so when per-
sons are
released (from
jail) and move
into neighbour-
hoods, people
can know who
they are living
with.”



Michael Pintard

that are predators they have an
obligation to speak up,” he said.

Despite the recent allega-
tions, Mr Pintard noted that the
vast majority of educators are
living wholesome lives and con-
tinue to make personal sacri-
fices for their students.

All three men had initially
been charged with murder, con-
spiracy to commit armed rob-
bery and armed robbery, how-
ever nearing the end of their tri-
al, Justice Jon Isaacs directed
jurors not to consider the charge
of murder against Knowles and
Brown.

At the trial, the prosecution
submitted that Glinton, alias
“Bumper”, had shot Mr Carey
twice on the steps of the Bank of
the Bahamas in 2006 while
Knowles and Brown sat in the
getaway car.

Brown and Knowles were sen-
tenced to 10 years and 11 years
respectively on armed robbery
and conspiracy charges, which
will run concurrently.

The Crown is seeking to have
Glinton sentenced to death.



Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, MAY 31ST, 2009
7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Mathilda Woodside

11:00 a.m. Bro. Henry Knowles/Youth
7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Lay Preachers/ZNS Service



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11:30 A.M. Speaker Dr. David Allen
7:00 P.M. U.MLD. Rally
Speaker Bro. Jim Gillett from Ireland Outreach Ministries

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. ¢ Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
¢ Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. ¢ Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
¢ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
¢ Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)

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Worship time: Llam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
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WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.

Selective Bible Teaching
Royal Rangers (Boys Club) 4-16 yrs.
Missionettes (Girls Club) 4-16 yrs.

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Youth Ministry Meeting

RADIO MINISTRY
Sundays at 8:30 a.m. - ZNS 1 - TEMPLE TIME

Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God

OTP NI UM Cie em ecu
Tel: 322-8304, Fax: 322-4793. P.O. Box: N-1566
EMC OME OU aim RAE slau me



Grace and Peace Wesleyan Church
PRESS A Me ii eegs
North America

WHERE GOD IS ADORED AND EVERYONE IS AFFIRMED
7 Worship Time: Ila.m.

Church School during Worship Service

Prayer Time: 10:15a.m.

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry
P.O. Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE

INSIGHT



For the stories behind
the news, read Insight

on Mondays








THE TRIBUNE PAGE 11
~ —, Youngsters show
o .
‘x 4 Off their moves at
| | % ©, annual basketball
| SF tourney...
SATURDAY, MAY 30 2009 See page 12



SUT SS CLT
Smother Frenchmen
UR ERS aes

Andrew Brownbill/AP

Bg By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ahamian Mark Knowles

knew that he and his

Indian partner, Mahesh

Bhupathi, had to play
well in their first round match at the
Roland Garros Grand Slam Tour-
nament in Paris yesterday.

They didn’t leave anything for
chance as they smothered the French
team of Josselin Ouanna and Jo-Wil-
fried Tsonga in two straight sets.

The final score 6-3, 6-2.

“Tt was a very dangerous team,”
said Knowles of Ouanna and Tsonga,
who also made it to the third round
of the men’s singles. “It was a really
pro French crowd. It was almost like
playing Davis Cup against France.

“It was a really dangerous first
round match so we are really happy
to get the win and to get it in such a
convincing fashion.”

The number four seeded Knowles
and Bhupathi needed just 58 min-
utes (30 in the first set and 28 in the
second) to send the unseeded
Frenchmen packing.

They literally dominated the
match, posting 66 total points won
compared to 39 by the Frenchmen.
They produced a 66% (27-of-41) first
serve, 89% (24-of-27) winning on
first serve; 86% winning on second
set (12-of-14); 47% receiving points
won and 43% break point conver-
sions.

Knowles and Bhupathi will now
go on to play the team of Johan
Brunstrom of Sweden and Jean-
Julien Rojer of the Netherlands
Antilles in the second round today.

“They are two up and coming guys
who won their first round match,”
said Knowles of their next oppo-
nents. “They are a little unknown.
We don’t know these guys that well.

“So it is going to be more us
focussing on our game because any-
time you play in a Grand Slam, it’s
going to be tough. So we expect a
very tough match, but we expect to
pull through it.”

The draw for the tournament is an
interesting one.

Knowles’ former partner Daniel
Nestor and his new partner Nanad
Zimonjic are the top seeded team in
the tournament with American iden-
tical twin brothers Bob and Mike
Bryan at No.2.

The Bryans, however, are still sit-
ting on top of the ATP computer
rankings, while Nestor and Zimonjic
are at No.2. Knowles and Bhupathi
occupy the third spot.

“We haven’t really looked that far,
especially in a Grand Slam, you don’t
want to look too far ahead,” said
Knowles about the draw that could
see them collide with the Bryans in a
possible semifinal meeting next
week.

“We want to pretty much keep it
round by round. You just never
know what happens in a Grand Slam.
But we’re pretty focussed and we
are ready to play whoever it is we
meet. We have played in a lot of
matches, especially Grand Slams,
and so we both know that you really
don’t want to look too far ahead.”

Knowles said he and Bhupathi will
be contended if they can just get past
Brunstrom and Rojer in their sec-
ond round match whenever they

play.

match at the Roland Garros Grand Slam Tournament in Paris...

MARK KNOWLES & MAHESH BHUPATHI (shown in this photo at the ‘08 Australian Open) smothered the French team of Josselin Ouanna and Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in two straight sets, 6-3, 6-2 yesterday in their first round





—

Mark Knowles makes commitment to
play in second round of Davis Cup tie

Bm By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ALTHOUGH it’s more than a month away,
Mark Knowles is making a commitment to come
home and play in the second round of the Amer-
ican Zone II Davis Cup tie.

The Bahamas’ youthful team, led by Devin
Mullings and Timothy Neilly, lost 4-1 to
Paraguay when they went on the road to play the
first round in March.

Over the weekend of July 10-12, the Bahamas
is scheduled to host Guatemala in a must-win
match to avoid being relegated to Zone II next
year. A win will enable the Bahamas to remain
in Zone II.

“T am looking to be available for sure. Obvi-
ously it’s still a ways off, but it’s a big tie against

Guatemala,” he said. “But I think we have the
team that can get the job done. So I’m looking
forward to it.”

The elder statesman of the team, which is
loaded with bright young stars, said he’s delight-
ed to be able to make a contribution.

“T like being there for the team and helping the
team out,” he stressed. “Obviously, the team
needs to start winning these matches without
me.

“T think they’re getting close to that level.
They had a good match on the road in Paraguay
and I spoke with some of the guys and they feel
they are playing very well.”

With time and more exposure, Knowles feels
that the players will get better and eventually the
Bahamas will return to Zone One.

“T really think that as a nation we really
shouldn’t drop any lower than zone two,”

Knowles stated. “So I think with or without me,
those guys should be able to keep us in zone
two.

“With me on the team, I think we should be
able to challenge for zone one. That is my goal.
I think that is the same goal as the other players,
so I feel we should be able to achieve that very
soon.”

Having had the longest tenure of any local
player in Davis Cup history, registering a total of
14 years with a 41-32 total win-loss record, 23-25
in singles and 18-7 in doubles, Knowles said he
intends to continue playing as long as he’s
healthy.

“T am just taking it one year at a time,” he
said. “I have a wife and two great kids, so play-
ing tennis is very important to me. I’m still play-
ing well and having fun.

“So with all of these factors, I think I will con-

tinue to play and not put a deadline on how
long I will stick around. I will just play year for
year before I make a final decision on when I will
stop.”

As he prepares to come home for the tie,
Knowles will meet a new Bahamas Lawn Tennis
Association president in place.

Immediate past first vice president Stephen
Thompson has been elected as the new president,
replacing Wesley Rolle, who will still have the
responsibility of heading the organising com-
mittee for Davis Cup.

“T got an e-mail from the secretary saying that
there’s a new president. I don’t really know
much about what happened at the elections,”
Knowles said. “But obviously Stephen Turn-
quest is a very good guy and is capable of filling
the position. I thought that Wesley did a good
job, so I’m sorry to see him go.”
PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MAY 30, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS
SPORTS

Special Olympics: National games make a





splash, kick off with swimming and judo

AFTER training all year, ath-
letes from the islands of Abaco,
Grand Bahama, New Providence
and Long Island are competing at
this year’s National Special
Olympics Games.

More than 250 athletes are
expected to compete in various
sports in the capital, and organisers
are confident that the event will be
the best ever.

At 9am Friday, they took part in
swimming and judo at the Betty
Kelly Kenning swim complex.

And today at the Thomas A
Robinson Stadium, following the
opening ceremony at 9:30am, the
athletes are expected to show off
their skills in bocce and track and
field.

Roosevelt Thompson, national
director of Special Olympics
Bahamas, reports that athletes from
the sub-programmes in the islands
have trained all year for this event.





feee ne = eS
And they are anxious to com-
pete. As there are no international
games this year, this will be the
highlight of their training. fern weo aaecae- . ae
The increased number of coach- 5 ete’
es certified this year guarantees that
the quality of their performances
should surpass the high level
demonstrated in the past.

With the programme producing
more athletes, the competition
should be exciting, and the public is
invited to witness an inspiring dis-
play of courage and determination
by the participants.

Basil Christie, national chairman,
expressed his appreciation to the
many sponsors and supporters of
the national programme. He also :
encourages everybody to come out ¢ fe a 7 a
and cheer for the athletes.

The coaches and volunteers have
worked hard and he is confident
that spectators will be proud of the
results of their efforts. ATHLETES compete in swimming and judo at the Betty Kelly Kenning swim complex yesterday...



22 OP #4



ee
TUT UTS
Aree Gey)

gt

THE NEW PROVIDENCE Primary School Sports Association’s annual basketball tourney concluded Friday at the Kendal Isaacs Gmnasium. Here, some of the male youngsters are shown in action...


THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MAY 30TH, 2009, PAGE 13B

THE WEATHER RE eR S22 (9) INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

< mg _| (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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PAGE 14, SATURDAY, MAY 30, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Paradise Plates serves up an unforgettable night

PARADISE Plates, Hands For
Hunger’s first annual fundraiser,
served-up an unforgettable evening to
the more than 400 hundred guests who
came out in a large show of support
and raised more than $60,000 to help
fight hunger.

Sponsored by the New Providence
Development Company Limited and
Old Fort Bay Club, the sold-out event
held last week at Atlantis featured a
lavish array of cuisine, fine wine, and
spectacular live entertainment with all
proceeds benefitting Hands For
Hunger — the non-profit, humanitarian
organisation committed to the elimi-
nation of hunger and the reduction of
food waste in the Bahamas.

“We are incredibly pleased and
grateful for the extraordinary success of
Paradise Plates,” said Georgina Web-
ster, director of fundraising for Hands
For Hunger. “The biggest kudos for
the evening goes to the chefs, vintners
and beverage participants who were
so accommodating and gracious and
served exceptional cuisine, fine wines
and drinks. Everyone in attendance
was treated to a remarkable evening
that went beyond expectations and we
thank each and every person that sup-
ported Paradise Plates.”

Showcasing new creations or their
well-known signature fare were the
chefs from Mesa Grill; Nobu; Dune;
British Colonial Hilton; Old Fort Bay
Club; Luciano’s of Chicago; The Patis-
serie; Van Breugels; Balduccinos;
Compass Point; Goodfellow Farms;
Food Art by Cacique; and Le Petit
Gourmet. Also showcased were fine
wines by Mendoza Wine Imports,
Sands Beer by Sands Brewery; Guava,
Passion Fruit and Pina Colada Frozen
Daiquiris provided by SHG Manage-
ment and Bacardi; and water by Nau-
tilus.

Other sponsors of Paradise Plate

FROM PAGE ONE

Mother heaten up 0

More than $60,000 raised to
help fight hunger in the Bahamas

included: Atlantis, Pearle Vision, Prime
Advisory Group, The d’Albenas
Agency Ltd, Royal Star Assurance,
Sun Tee Embroid Me, Mendoza Wine
Imports Sands Brewery and Creative
Relations.

Guests dined on creations such as
roasted pumpkin soup with coconut
compote by Balduccino’s; lobster and
mango salad, and wonton stuffed with
curried chicken by Old Fort Bay Club;
and ribbons of tuna, avocado, radish
and ginger by Dune.

Nobu served black cod on butter let-
tuce; Van Breugels served tuna tartare
with wasabi sauce and Goodfellow
Farms offered guests golden gazpacho,
balsamic beef tenderloin bites and gua-
va toast.

Deserts included a flourless choco-
late cake with raspberry sauce and
compote of fruit by The Patisserie, an
island snow fantasy by the British
Colonial Hilton, and guava duff with
rum butter sauce by Compass Point.
The wines served were Noble
Aconcagua Chardonnay 2007 and
Noble Aconcagua Malbec 2007 donat-
ed by Mendoza wine Imports.

Musical entertainment was provided
by Adrian D’ Aguilar, Ben Pinder, Trio
Bonjour, Christina Cartwright, Carib-
ah and Anthony Mullings who played
a mixture of jazz, string trio, Caribbean
jazz, calypso and classical music. A raf-
fle and silent auction held during the
event also helped to raise funds.

“After such an extraordinary
evening it will be hard to create an
even bigger and equally successful
evening next year — but that is exactly

what we propose to do,” added Mrs
Webster. “We look forward to working
together with our existing partners and
hope to forge new relationships to con-
tinue to raise funds for such an impor-
tant cause. We sincerely thank every-
one involved for their commitment and
support.”

“The success of Paradise Plates is
really a testament to the strength of
our community’s shared vision to fight
and end hunger in our country,” said
Alanna Rodgers, founder and pro-
gramme co-ordinator of Hands For
Hunger. “The fact is that there are
thousands of Bahamians facing food
insecurity, unable to access the foods
that are needed to allow for healthy
and fully functioning lives. There is
more than enough food on this island
to amply feed every single woman, man
and child. Hands For Hunger functions
to connect the excess supply of food
with the unmet, ever growing need
through the more equitable and effi-
cient distribution of resources. The
funds raised through Paradise Plates
will go directly to impacting the lives of
those in need.”

Each day, Hands For Hunger picks-
up fresh, high quality food that would
otherwise go to waste and delivers it to
community centres, shelters, churches
and soup kitchens throughout New
Providence.

“With our two new refrigerated
trucks on the road, we have already
distributed upwards of 75,000 pounds
of food thus far and are on target to
provide 450,000 meals by the end of
our first year,” added Ms Rodgers.

policeman hoyirien

3 S



THE CHEFS of Old Fort Bay Club served guests lobster and mango salad, and wonton

stuffed with curried chicken.

“This is a promising start to fulfilling
our mission to eliminate hunger while
significantly reducing food waste. All of
this is being done through the creation
of meaningful partnerships amongst
members of our community. We can-
not thank everyone involved in Par-
adise Plates enough for their time, tal-
ents and invaluable support and for
most importantly saying ‘yes’ to mak-
ing a difference and taking a stand for
transformation in our community.”

Hands For Hunger was started by a
group of Bahamian student leaders in
early 2008, who were and still are com-
mitted to making a difference in the
world. The organisation is a registered,
not-for-profit charity (#57211 C) that
relies on donations from community
groups, foundations, corporations and
the general public. They are led by a
volunteer board of directors and sup-
ported by hundreds of dedicated vol-
unteers.

Doctored’ photo

WECM Lae
SION KI Ie



FROM page one

that night if I hadn’t fought for my life.”

The officer ended his assault and she
“stumbled outside” where she found her
son crying. After witnessing the violent
assault, the boy had made a phone call to his
father asking him to come and collect him,
she said.

Shortly afterwards the woman went to
the Carmichael Road police station to
report the incident. Officers took state-
ments, photos and brought in the officer in
question, and indicated that the matter
would be dealt with, the family claimed.

The following day, the victim alleged,
her boyfriend’s brother — also a police offi-
cer — called her to demand that she drop the
charges against his brother.

“The next thing I knew, he (her
boyfriend) was out,” said the woman.

She and her family are concerned that
the officer’s alleged relations to a former
senior police officer might impede a prop-



“I tried to bite my
way out because I
thought ‘I can’t just
die’. I could’ve been
just another statistic
that night if I hadn’t
fought for my life.”



er investigation.

Yesterday Commissioner of Police Regi-
nald Ferguson, who met with the woman
after she left The Tribune, said her injuries
were appalling and that he directed the
family to lodge a formal complaint with the
organisation’s Complaint Unit.

Questioned as to whether such incidents
are cause for concern about the adequacy of
the RBPF’s vetting procedure, the com-
missioner defended the process, stating that

he believes it is “reasonably good.”
He added that while the RBPF would wish
to “bring in the best applicants,” it must
be appreciated that “along the lines you’re
going to have cracks and some persons are
likely to get through there who might not be
the desired kind of character.”

The commissioner described the force as
a “reflection” of the society it serves, as
officers are drawn from local communities.

Meanwhile, he said, it is not abnormal
for an officer under investigation to be back
on duty as quickly as the man in question.

“Tt depends on the officer who’s investi-
gating. When it becomes necessary to take
him off disciplinary leave that would be
done, it’s not threatening the investigation
in any way,” he said.

Mr Ferguson said the criminal complaint
and the disciplinary investigation will be
conducted and “the course of action we
will take will be determined.”

He said the disciplinary investigation
should take several days to conduct.

Hreworks at pageant press conference

FROM page one

Questions were raised over
pageant officials’ practice of
adding cumulative preliminary
numbers to the final scores, con-
cerns over possible ballot tam-
pering of the preliminary scores
and apparent impropriety of
having pageant official Monalisa
Thompson sit as head judge of
the competition.

Miss Bahamas Universe pres-
ident Gaynell Rolle-Stubbs
admitted that pageant officials
held the preliminary scores
before they were turned over
to the accounting firm, but
insisted there was no ballot tam-
pering.

"We held the scores prior to

the accounting firm receiving
them — the score sheets are a
true reflection of what we
received from the judges —
there were no alterations," she
said.

She maintained that the scor-
ing process was not flawed,
insisting the whole process was
"impartial" and "transparent"
while pageant media director
Clint Watson said it was not
uncommon in the pageant
world for members of a pageant
committee to sit on the judging
panel.

The meeting was briefly halt-
ed by verbal wrangling between
an aunt of top three finalist
Amanda Appleyard and
pageant officials who asked her
to leave the room after several

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emotional outbursts.

Judges Mark Humes and
Cypriana McWeeny were also
silenced by officials as they tried
to air their concerns of the scor-
ing process, with Ms Stubbs
telling the two they were not
invited.

Deloitte and Touche manag-
ing partner Raymond Winder
said the firm received the
judges’ scores from the pageant
committee on Saturday after-
noon. They ensured that all
score cards were signed by the
judges.

"These were double checked,
the tallies, in order to present
the top 12 contestants," said Mr
Winder.

The results of preliminary
scores were cumulative and
therefore carried over to the
events on Sunday — a practice
one judge told The Tribune did
not provide a level playing field
for the top 12 semi-finalists.

Mr Winder said on Sunday
night, Deloitte officials made
sure that judges submitted their
signed scorecards for tallying.
These cards were passed to his
firm "with no interference," he
said.

These were re-checked again
after the pageant and were con-
sistent with the results on Sun-
day night, he said.

Pageant officials held the pre-

liminary scores before they
were turned over to the
accounting firm, a practice that
raised eyebrows at yesterday's
conference.

The 17 contestants were pre-
judged in three separate events
leading up to the pageant.

"All scores were cumulative
and helped in the selection of
our top 12," said Ms Rolle,
adding that all judges were
made aware of this scoring sys-
tem before the pageant.

She said Ms Sherman held a
sizable gap over the other con-
testants in the preliminary
events.

"The winner at this stage was
indisputable and it would (have
taken) a miraculous miracle to
unseat Ms Sherman as she was
well on her way to victory hav-
ing led by a huge margin in two
of the preliminary categories
and placing in the top three in
the final preliminary event,” she
said.

Indira Wood, aunt of Amanda
Appleyard, said she was not sat-
isfied with yesterday's explana-
tion, alleging that there are calls
for Ms Rolle-Stubbs to be
stripped of her franchise licence.



FROM page one

"It's not an actual picture, it was photoshopped," said the pagean-
t's media director Clint Watson.

Overcome with tears, Ms Sherman said despite the negative
outcry following last Sunday's pageant she remains grateful for her
win.

"Tam so grateful for this opportunity, this is surely a once in a life-
time opportunity that I will embrace. I'm asking for the Bahamian
people to show their love and support — I am here to serve — and
despite all of the controversy it doesn't matter. J am here to serve
and that's what I’m going to do," she said.

"And these aren't tears of being afraid — I'm a very emotional
person — these are more tears of joy for those who have support-
ed me. And for the struggles that I have endured, because no one
has lived my life. So I know what I went through and like I said I'm
here to serve my country, I'm here to serve my Bahamian people,”
she said.

Ms Sherman, a 25-year-old singer and student whose platform is
child abuse awareness, has been at the centre of a firestorm fol-
lowing her crowning.

Earlier in the week judges of the Miss Bahamas Universe 2009
pageant invited Ms Stubbs to review and confirm the votes cast in
the contest with some sources close to the pageant claiming many
people were "surprised" that Ms Sherman walked away with the top
prize.

Scorching commentary also erupted on Internet message boards
with detractors taking colourful jabs at Ms Sherman and the
pageant’s director.

Contestant Enna Thomas told The Tribune she was unsettled by
allegations made on the Internet that she may have not placed in the
top 12 because of a money dispute between her sponsor — FML
Group of Companies President Craig Flowers — and Ms Stubbs.

These claims were denied by Ms Stubbs.

In spite of the questions raised, yesterday officials upheld Sun-
day's results and said the process was a “fair” and "impartial"
one.

Roy Colebrooke replaced by
union’s first woman president

; ra ———
CROWDS gather at St Matthew’s Anglican Church for the election.

FROM page one

union needs restoration. The Lord has seen our hearts, he had
heard our cries, and he has given the union back to its people,” said
Ms Martin.

She said her first priority will be meeting with Mr Colebrooke to
discuss the union’s next steps.

“Our union cannot keep going if we continuing to treat our out-
goings (presidents) as if they mean nothing,” she said.