Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
m Lhe Tribune

=USA TODAY.

S6F
74F

BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com

SUNNY WITH
FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009

TSTORM
THREE PAGES OF

Law firm moves patna
UU ee ay

SEEN Te Sy

HIGH
LOW

Asani) Sieve Ens

; ah



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

on BVI expansion

SSSR]

Es



MP ‘will take

Street shootou

vil. tar
ine Wild Wesi

Have-a-go heroes
tackle gunman

A SHOOTOUT in broad
daylight erupted near the KFC
outlet on Prince Charles Drive
when bystanders tried to res-
cue an old woman who was
being held up for her purse.

What started out as an
attempt by good Samaritans to
catch a purse snatcher turned
dangerous when the perpetrator
pulled out a gun and starting
shooting randomly.

Witnesses say the situation
descended into complete chaos
when an unidentified man in a
car pulled out a shotgun and

FAMILY OF MURDER VICTIM
SAY REPORTS INACCURATE

THE family of murder vic-
tim Shenise Adderley say
news reports published yes-
terday contained inaccurate
information about her mur-
der.

Specifically, the family
denied suggestions that a
young man being questioned
in connection with the mur-
der was in a relationship with
the victim. They also said
Shenise did not live with the
young man.



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poyes i ys)
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began firing back at the gun-
wielding thief.

While those who initially con-
fronted the robber were praised
for their bravery, people on the
scene criticised the police for
not responding to calls quickly
enough and said they fear Nas-
sau is becoming a lawless town.

One said: “It felt like a movie.
Nassau has become like the
Wild Wild West, where some-
one can walk up to you in broad
daylight and kill you.”

The incident began at around
6pm on Wednesday when an
old woman was accosted by a
man as she walked down a side
street near the back of the KFC
building. An unidentified man
saw what was happening and
ran over to help. He was quick-
ly followed by several other
men.

By the time they got to the
victim, the robber had snatched
her purse and taken off running
down the side street. The men
eventually caught up and
attempted to tackle him to the
ground, probably hoping to
hold him there until the police
arrived, witnesses said.

However, the perpetrator was

SEE page 11

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Village Rd. Roundabout + Harold Rd. * Prince Charles » Frederick Street North * Cable Beach

CROWDS GATHER at
St Matthew’s Anglican
Church for the

BHCAWU’s election.

MOTORISTS were
hopping mad yesterday
after crowds of hotel
workers taking part in
their union elections
caused traffic on major
roadways to come to a
near standstill for much
of the day.

Results of executive
elections held by the
Bahamas Hotel Catering
and Allied Workers
Union yesterday were
not known up to press
time.

However, one thing
certainly was: Many Nas-
suvians did not appreci-
ate the decision to use St
Matthew’s Anglican
Church as one of two
polling stations for the
BHCAWU’s approxi-
mately 6,000 union mem-
bers.

The move meant that
crowds of hotel workers

SEE page 11





























Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Report alleges Bahamian

20% salary
cut’ to save

Philip ‘Brave’
Davis urges
colleagues to
do the same








officers unlawfully killed man

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

ALLEGATIONS of security
forces using excessive force and
Bahamian police officers unlaw-
fully killing one man have been
logged in Amnesty Internation-
al’s annual report released yes-
terday.

The international human
rights watchdog’s evaluation of
events throughout 2008 further
notes discrimination towards
Haitian migrants in the country
and mistreatment of
Cuban detainees in the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre.

It states Haitians living in the
Bahamas have appealed to the
Haitian government to help them
overcome the discrimination they
face, while Cuban detainees have
complained of ill-treatment and
breaches of immigration laws at

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the Detention Centre.

The annual report also states:
“Several allegations of use of
excessive force and one case of

SEE page 11

=

Y treasury cash

AN MP says he is will-
ing to take a 20 per cent
cut in his parliamentary
salary in an effort to save
the treasury some much
needed money.

Cat Island MP Philip
“Brave” Davis is also urg-
ing his parliamentary col-
leagues to do the same
and has called on Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
to eliminate the duplicate
ministers in his cabinet.

He branded Byron
Woodside, Zhivargo
Laing, Branville McCart-
ney, Brensil Rolle, Phen-
ton Neymour, Loretta
Butler-Turner and
Charles Maynard “unnec-
essary burdens on taxpay-
ers” during this deep
recession as “full minis-
ters” are responsible for
each of their respective
areas.

Mr Davis then criticised
Mr Ingraham for his
“shocking” decision to
deny nurses their health
insurance saying he
“opposed the decision in
the strongest terms.”

“These dedicated work-
ers are the backbone of
our entire health care sys-
tem. Nurses often go
beyond the call of duty to
care for the sick and dying
without any thanks. A car-
ing government, or a car-
ing prime minister, would
never deny nurses health
insurance,” he said.

During his budget com-
munication yesterday the
Prime Minster announced
that teachers, doctors and
nurses will be among
those on the public pay-

SEE page three



THE SUDDEN extreme weather that

swept Nassau yesterday managed to force
trailer on top of these cars at the British
Olonial Hilton — causing severe damage.





Financing For
Government Workers!



NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

@)ntague

Village Road Near Shirley Street

Tel: 394-0323/5 OR 394-1377





PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009



tsFinger

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Joseph “Brass” Roberts (Father)

: ——

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Eden Street Store Hours
Zam - 7pm (Mon. - Sat.)
fam - 3pm (Sundays)
fam - 12noon (Holidays)

Special #1($50.00):



Special #2($50.00):

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

NEW LOTTERY: Island Luck boasts ail new locations.

A NEW local lottery has
opened in Nassau, boasting four
new locations and attractive jack-
pots hinged on the United States
lotteries.

Island Luck — which has loca-
tions on East Bay, Collins
Avenue and Madeira Street,
Robinson Road and Six Street,
and the Dunkin Donuts Plaza on

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of O Positive, O Negative
and A negative blood.

People able to make a
donation are asked to do so
as soon as possible.



Me

Bernard Rd - Mackey St - Thompson Blvd

East Street South — offers patrons
the chance to wager $1 for the
chance to make $900 if their three
ball selection is drawn in either
the New York, Chicago, or Miami
lotteries.

Paying out $3,000 to the dollar
for the four ball selection, patrons
who play this game have a 1,032
to one chance of winning, while
those playing the three ball lot-
tery stand a much better chance
of hitting with only 56 to one
odds.

With security posted at its front
door, the establishment on East
Bay Street has counters at which
patrons can submit their “lucky
picks” for the day to the helpful
attendants who are secure behind
an inch and a half of bullet proof
glass.

Once you have submitted your
selections, you are punctually
issued a computerised receipt
complete with its own individual
receipt number and bar code.

Each number is printed in the
first column along with the US
lottery identification in the sec-
ond, followed by the amount

TROPICAL
is)

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157



l

Island Luck lottery

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

wagered. It is unknown how
much business this relatively new
enterprise — the self-styled place
where “winners live” — has been
able to attract away from estab-
lished lotteries such as FML, Red
Hot, Clesos, and NWS.

While it is technically illegal to
play the lottery in the Bahamas,
the number of Bahamians who
are involved in the numbers sys-
tem is so great that it is slowly
becoming an “un-policeable”
phenomenon, some claim.

Recently, two of the establish-
ments of FML CEO Craig Flow-
ers were raided by police.

This much publicised event
dominated national headlines as
police confiscated nearly $1 mil-
lion in cash from this single
branch.

Following this raid, Mr Flowers
spoke exclusively with The Tri-
bune on his views about the estab-
lishment of a national lottery and
his reaction to the raid.

Denying any anger over the
matter, Mr Flowers said that 90
per cent of the officers involved in
the raid were his friends, and
were simply doing their jobs.

“We don’t have any problems
with this sort of conduct because
of the fact that they are carrying
out their roles as mandated, and
certainly ours is of a different
agenda and we are just going to
have to find a way to work along
with the authorities,” he said.

Percival Roberts (Son /Proprietor

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5Lbs Snappers or Jacks

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Sam - 6pm (Mon. - Sat.)
8am - 1pm (Sundays)
Closed (Holidays)

Special #3:
Lobster Tails-$16.95/Lb
Jacks-$80.00/Kit

*** Conch Trimmings-$1.00/Lb***





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Philip ‘Brave’ Davis



MP ‘will take
20% salary
cut’ to save
treasury cash

FROM page one

roll who will be hit by cut-
backs in government's budget, :
having to forego salary :
increases — with the latter not :
receiving an anticipated $10.5 ;
million health insurance ben- }
efit — in this fiscal year. ;

The MP pointed out that :
while Mr Ingraham said there :
will be across the board }
expenditure cuts in the pub- i
lic service, he did not tell :
Bahamians what these cuts }
will mean to the thousands of }
civil servants across the coun- }
try. i
“As we look through the }
budget in the days to come I }
am certain that we will see !
more surprises like the mas- }
sive tax increases he hid from }
the country last year,” he said. }

Mr Davis said that the bud-
get statement sounded more ;
like a resignation speech than
a national address intended to
steer the country during a time }
of economic crisis. :

“The prime minister had no }
new ideas, no words of inspi- }
ration and appears resigned
to wait until world leaders fig-
ure out the problem before }
there is resolution for the }
Bahamas. He is a man past his :
prime and past his usefulness,”
the Cat Island MP said. i

He said he was “especially
concerned” about what the
prime minister did not say :
during his address. :

“With the country again on }
pace to set another homicide }
record, the Prime Minister }
said nothing about crime and }
his government’s plan to:
reduce the level of violence }
on our streets,” he said. i

Budget cuts ‘could hit level
of service given to public’

BUDGET) 009 / 10

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

BUDGET cuts at various govern-
ment ministries, departments and agen-
cies allowing them to operate with
financing to meet their "core" man-
dates could hurt the level of service
given to the public, President of the
Bahamas Public Service Union John
Pinder said.

His comments came in response to
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham's
2009/2010 budget communication in the
House of Assembly, during which Mr
Ingraham said significant revenue loss-
es lead to all government ministries,
departments, and agencies "being allo-
cated funding sufficient to meet their
core mandate to the public, albeit in
the context of the overriding need to
maintain a disciplined approach to pub-
lic expenditure."

"It doesn't enhance service, the gen-
eral public demands high quality ser-
vice from the civil servants but in most
cases we don't have the necessary tools
and equipment to compete with the

private sector. And also in
some cases persons need
more training — and it's a
cost in training people —
but if you don't invest in
human resources you're
not going to get the kind of
quality performance that
you're looking for," Mr
Pinder told The Tribune.

While stressing that he
understood the financial |
constraints facing govern- |
ment due to the global eco-
nomic downturn, Mr Pin- &
der said funding for train-
ing of human resources is
vital to the development of a well-per-
forming public sector.

But outgoing head of the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce Dionisio
D'Aguilar feels the budget cuts will not
hamper what he called an already
"inefficient" public service.

"I don't think it's going to cripple
the public service, I don't think it's
going to make quite a bit of difference
to the public service because it depends
how you are going to do more with less.
Are you going to have less people and
I think he said when people retire he's
not going to replace them, but I think
it's general knowledge that the public

John annie



service is overstaffed,
they're incredibly ineffi-
cient," said Mr D'Aguilar,
who is also the president of
the Superwash chain of
laundromats.

The prime minister stat-
§ ed that the positions of the
) 138 civil servants who will
reach the mandatory age of
retirement in the this fiscal
period, July 1 to June 30,
2010, will not be replaced
— at an expected annual
salary savings of $4.1 mil-
lion.

Nearly all government
ministries and departments will see
decreases in their allocations in
2009/2010 budget year over approved
estimates for the previous budget peri-
od, said the prime minister. However,
there were a few increases, including
$10.4 million to the Department of
Public Service; $7.3 million to the Pub-
lic Hospital's Authority; $2.9 million
to the Department of Environmental
Health Services; and $1.9 million to the
Department of Public Health.

Mr Pinder as also of the opinion that
an audit of the public sector's staff
capabilities is needed to ensure that
qualified persons are deployed to areas

left vacant by persons who've reached
the mandatory age of retirement.

"He's (the prime minister) been get-
ting rid of a number of persons and
they've not been replaced. So he's real-
ly put the public service is in a worse
position than before — I wish they
would have done an audit of the human
resources side of the public service so
we can better redeploy persons, based
on their skills and their job experience
and academics.

"Unless we are satisfied that we have
now done a proper audit of the human
resources (department) and that per-
sons can be redeployed to fill some of
those positions and allow persons who
are already in the service to be pro-
moted — rather than bringing in new
people— (that would) help to control
the expenditure on new salaries," said
Mr Pinder.

To have your say on this or any other
issue, email Tbe Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your
letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street,
P.O. Box N-3207



Social Services Dept ‘will focus on core mandate’

THE Department of Social

The Poverty Alleviation

some surprise at the reduction

Meanwhile, though

Services will focus this year on
its core mandate of ensuring
that every Bahamian has food
to eat, clothes to wear and a
roof over their head, rather
than attempting to develop
any new social projects, Min-
ister of State Loretta Butler
Turner said yesterday.

Mrs Butler Turner told The
Tribune yesterday that despite
cuts to some areas of the
department’s responsibility the
“important thing” about the
budget in relation to Social
Services was that it was able
to “hold the line” overall in
terms of funding — still receiv-
ing $39,167,977 in total.

This after it had already
received a massive increase in
its allocation in the previous
budgetary period, of around
$12 million.

She made her comments as
the 2009/2010 budget reveals
that funds for certain projects,

Me)anecMoleN vam MOANA

including the Department’s
Poverty Alleviation Pro-
gramme and the not yet oper-
ational Centre for Children
with Disabilities (Cheshire
Home), have been slashed.



Programme saw a reduction
of $594,000 in its allocation, to
$2.4 million, while the
Cheshire Home will now only
have $50,000 at its disposal
rather than $300,000 in the last
budgetary period.

Also reduced was the allo-
cation for “family island oper-
ations,” which fell from $4.547
million to $2.673m — a reduc-
tion of $1.873 million.

In the case of the Poverty
Alleviation Programme and
the Cheshire Home, Mrs But-
ler Turner suggested that both
were projects that had yet to
fully get off the ground and
whose full development is now
being postponed in view of the
need for government to exer-
cise spending restraints due
to difficult economic condi-
tions.

An official at the Disability
Affairs Division of the Depart-
ment yesterday expressed

in funding for the Cheshire
Home as he said government
did have plans to relaunch the
home as a centre for children
with disabilities.

“There were a lot of plans,”
he said, adding that he was
“still hopeful” that the Home
can be developed this year
despite the cutbacks.

Mrs Butler Turner said a
“consensus had never really
been reached” on “what to
do” with the Home, and in
view of a need for fiscal
restraint it was not going to be
treated as a priority.

“We are going to be very
focused on ensuring those
things that are priority are that
every Bahamian is taken care
of in terms of their basic
needs,” she said.

resources for Grand Bahama,
one of the Department’s
“biggest users of assistance
funds,” had previously come
out of the “Family Island
Operations” allocation, the
$1.9 million reduction in that
area is in part due to the fact
that social services funding for
Grand Bahama now
“goes through the public trea-
sury,” explained Mrs Butler
Turner.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

Ue Pee te
322-2157



Be ee ee —
—— hs

$12m cut to Ministry of Tourism
funds ‘won't severely impact ability’

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AFTER seeing the Ministry
of Tourism’s funds slashed by
$12 million in this year’s budget,
the Minister of Tourism
claimed the reduction will not
severely impact its ability to do
its job in a harsh tourism cli-
mate.

However, both the Minister
and Bahamas Hotel Associa- F
tion President Robert Sands
agreed yesterday that the cut-
back will require the Ministry to
ensure it focuses on utilising the
money it does have in the most effective
way possible.

Describing the move as “disappointing”
but to some extent understandable in view of
present conditions, Mr Sands said the cut
“will give cause for the Ministry of Tourism
to re-engineer itself and to ensure the monies
they have available become productive
sums.”

Meanwhile, Mr Vanderpool Wallace said
programmes that are going to “survive” in
the Ministry of Tourism are those that are
known to have a “direct impact on visitor
arrivals” while more “exploratory pro-
grammes are going to suffer.”

Vincent Netcast Wallace



In his Budget Communica-
tion to parliament on Wednes-
day Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham described how
“decidedly weak” tourism per-
formance in 2008 worsened
going into 2009.

He said Government is
“moving to address (the) chal-
lenges (faced by the industry)
and improve the attractiveness
| of our tourism product.”

Mr Vanderpool Wallace
told The Tribune the Ministry
already finds itself in a more
favourable position than it was
to respond under budgetary
constraints.

“Nobody likes to see a reduction in budget
but we have had the good fortune this year of
buying media, for example advertising, much
better than we ever did before. So the cost to
get same kind of exposure is lower this year
than last year and year before, so we’re going
to get good value for money,” he said.

“Secondly, certain commitments that were
contractual commitments in the budget last
year don’t exist this year, so in terms of the
real deduction, in terms of what has hap-
pened to our budget it’s nowhere near the
$12 million. It is lower — but it’s not as is
reflected (by the $12 million figure),” he
said.

On Wednesday the Prime Minister said
that through April total arrivals to The
Bahamas were down by 1.2 per cent from the
same period last year, at 1.68 million.

He added that although more people vis-
ited the country on cruise ships — arrivals by
sea were actually up by 5.5 per cent over
the first four months, air arrivals in New
Providence were down by 10.5 per cent in the
January to April 2009 period compared with
same period in 2008.

Meanwhile, in Grand Bahama and the oth-
er Family Islands, were down by a massive
28.9 per cent and 27.6 per cent respectively.

Noting that this impact on the Bahamian
tourism sector is not “unique” in the world,
but reflective of similar drop offs elsewhere,
he added that the “short term prospects”
for the country’s major industry “remain
challenging.”

In responding to these conditions, which
see consumers in The Bahamas’ primary
market, the U.S., far less prone to spend
their money on holiday’s abroad, Mr Ingra-
ham said the Ministry of Tourism “is
embarking on a plan to increase the number
of airlines serving our country with reduced
airfares for customers.”

“Further, the Ministry of Tourism will
undertake a broad spectrum of strategic mar-
keting initiatives in the U.S., Europe, Cana-
da and Latin America,” added the Prime
Minister.

Police Family Island operations ‘will not be cut’

POLICE Commissioner Regi-
nald Ferguson has pledged that
operations on the Family Islands
will not be cut despite more than
$2 million in budget cuts.

In the 2009/2010 budget, the
amount allocated to the Royal
Bahamian Police Force's Fami-
ly Island operations will be
reduced from $4 million to an
estimated $1,722,547 for the
coming budget year, represent- 1.
ing a shortfall of $2,277,454.

When asked during a brief Mr

He did not provide
a breakdown of which
specific areas the cuts
would affect.

On Wednesday,
Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham pre-
sented the 2009/2010
budget communica-
tion for the fiscal year,
which begins on July

During the address,
Ingraham



Seenele ey aeTUEYON

The Prime Minister
said the harsh global
downturn led to an
almost 17 per cent
decline in recurrent
revenue, estimated to
be $260 million lower
than projected in last
year's budget.

He also painted a
grim picture of the
country's ballooning
deficit for 2008/2009,
estimated at $352 mil-

upcoming fiscal year compared
to $121,931,871 in approved esti-
mates for the 2008/2009 budget
year, representing a change of
$3,005,812.

Other areas of note where
cuts were made to the RBPF in
the budget include an a $470,000
reduction in government spend-
ing on tuition, training, in-ser-
vice awards and subsistence; a
$700,000 decrease spent on
clothing and clothing supplies;
a $30,000 decrease on work-

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telephone interview how this
reduction would affect the force's
abilities in the Family Islands,
Mr Ferguson said: "Nothing that
we need to do is curtailed from
that point of view."

explained that due to
the severe downturn in the
economy, government is "pac-
ing" itself financially to prepare
for possible worsening of the
economy.

lion, more than
double the amount projected in
last year's budget communica-
tion.

The RBPF was allotted an
estimated $118,926,059 for the

shops, conferences, seminars,
meetings and exhibits; and a
$400,000 cut on electricity
expenditure, compared to
approved estimates for the pre-
vious budget year.

~ 380-FLIX





PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited | Why women
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master nee d to be prou d
of themselves



LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

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Bahamians need to be better trained

IN THIS column yesterday we discussed the
complaint of a letter writer who believed Prime
Minister Ingraham had insulted Bahamians by
announcing that a foreigner was to be brought
in to regulate government’s electronic commu-
nications network in preparation for the sale
of BTC. The writer took this as an inference by
the Prime Minister that Bahamians were not
smart enough to regulate their own communi-
cations business.

Mr Ingraham was insulting no one. He was
just being realistic that at present there is no
Bahamian with the experience required at this
time to meet global standards. We do not have
to go very far to find proof of this because if we
did have the local expertise our telecommuni-
cations would be far superior to what it is now.
However, this does not mean that Bahamians
will never be able to control their own system.
It just means that they do not have the experi-
ence to do it now. And since 1967 we have
much evidence of what happens when people
take on positions for which they are neither
formally trained, nor have practical experience.
For these examples, we can start with the politi-
cians.

Even before there was talk of globalisation,
Bahamians were urged to take their school
work and technical training seriously to pre-
pare themselves to compete on the world stage.

Now that that time is here, we have reports
from all sides that Bahamians, who expect to be
big players in the global market, are not pre-
pared.

The address to the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s annual general meeting Wednes-
day by Baha Mar’s Chief Executive Sarkis
Izmirlian should be a serious wake up call for
Bahamians.

“Just this month,” said Mr Izmirlian, “in the
middle of the great recession, the Government
of Qatar invested $75 million to build a luxury
250-room hotel in Cuba.

“We had contacted the Government of Qatar
some time back about an investment in the
Baha Mar (Cable Beach). They made it very
clear they had no interest in investing in the
Bahamas.”

Mr Izmirlian said his company first consid-
ered Qatar’s disinterest due to the economic
environment. But when Qatar made such a
heavy commitment in Cuba despite the eco-
nomic crisis, they felt they should have looked
“closer to home for the reason.”

He pointed to the closure of Four Seasons
Emerald Bay in Exuma as a sign of the times for
the Bahamas. It was the only hotel, he said, in
the globally branded chain to close. “That
should tell us something,” he said.

He recited air and cruise arrival figures to the

ground as a competitive destination in the
region. While tourist arrivals were down in the
Bahamas, they were up in such places as Can-
cun, Cuba, Jamaica and even Aruba, despite
the negative publicity generated against that
island by the disappearance of an American
medical student. And all this, he pointed out,
despite the Bahamas’ advantage at being so
near to the US mainland.

“Let me be blunt,” he said, “unless we
improve the education of all Bahamians:
Schools for younger Bahamian children and
trade schools, or continuing education for
mature Bahamians, we are doomed.”

Ralph Massey, who has done much research
into the Bahamian educational system, has been
warning for some time of the “devastating impli-
cations” for the economy because of the high
illiteracy levels among Bahamian high school
leavers. He predicted that the present situation
could make this nation “progressively less com-
petitive.”

We are now seeing evidence of this happen-
ing.

And recently, again in an address to the
Chamber of Commerce, a senior policy adviser
to the Caribbean Export Development Agency
(CEDA), said that Bahamian service profes-
sionals will not be able to supply the European
Union market under the Economic Partner-
ship Agreement (EPA) if their qualifications
are “not recognised” by countries in that trad-
ing bloc.

He said that access to this market is not
automatically open to Bahamians and other
Caribbean nations just because their countries
signed on to the EPA.

Bahamian services professionals, he said,
would have to sign Mutual Recognition Agree-
ments with their EU counterparts, which had to
be approved by the relevant EPA governing
body, to ensure that they can supply the EU
market.

“Tf qualifications are not recognised in the
EU market,” he told Bahamian businessmen,
“you can’t sell goods and services there.”

And although we are a seafaring nation, a
scholarship programme has been launched to
help Bahamians acquire specialised, skills-based
training to compete in the international mar-
itime industry. Without this training Bahamians
will not be able to take advantage of the many
opportunities now open in the international
deep sea fleet.

Gone are the days when an MP could burden
the civil service with their constituents, many of
whom had no qualifications for the positions
they were given in exchange for their vote.
Bahamians now face a future that will depend
upon what they know, not who they know to

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Firstly let me thank you for
allowing me space in your
esteemed daily to share yet
another concern of mine.

God made all women differ-
ent. Some are slim and shapely.
Some are chubby and round.
Some are dark in complexion.
Some have lighter skin tones.
Some have crinkly hair, while
the hair of others is straight.
Some are surly while others
enjoy more pleasant attitudes
towards life.

I say all this to illustrate that
each woman is different and
should be comfortable in being
who they are. Why then do we
have women bleaching their
skin, risking cancer, to be lighter
than the complexion God made
them? Why then do some
women lose the quality of their
hair by using chemicals that
deem themselves unsuitable in
short order.

Those are just two superficial

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



examples of being who you are
not as a woman, but it goes
much deeper than that.

To answer those questions,
many women in our society suf-
fer from very low self esteem
and feel that altering their
appearance will make them
more acceptable to others and
ultimately who they see in the
mirror. This is nonsense as
every woman is beautiful in her
own right.

Being confident is one of the
greatest gifts a woman can have.
The black woman should
embrace her “Africaness”
through locking her hair or
wearing it short and natural as
opposed to straightening it and
becoming someone you are not.

A woman who feels she is
overweight should simply take

on a lifetime change by way of a
new diet inclusive of fruits and
vegetables and lots of water.
Exercise is a must and she will
soon start to feel better about
herself inside and out.

Accepting oneself is a major
step in being comfortable in
one’s own skin. If your nose is
round and not straight, that is
how your maker intended it to
be. Accept it.

If your lips are fuller than
the woman next to you, that’s
how it was intended to be.
Accept it. It makes you who
YOU ARE.

We need to be proud of our-
selves as women.

We were, after all, chosen as
the vessel of humanity. That
alone should make us confi-
dent!

Be comfortable in your own
skin.

MAYA NEWBOLD
Nassau,
May 25, 2008

Pot holes and traffic lights still need fixing

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Recently I wrote a letter about pot holes and
traffic lights and I now discover that the Minister
of Works is also Minister of Traffic Lights as he
was quoted in the Guardian (May 19) under both
capacities. So this is a letter addressed to the
Minister to first of all thank him for fixing the
“New Breed” of pot hole on West Bay and Blake
Road, but to remind him that there are many
others that require his attention. Secondly I would
like to take exception to his comments on traffic

lights.

While commending him for issuing a contract to
fix the non-working lights, it was inexcusable to
refuse to explain why they have not been working

for a longtime.

“There are a number of circumstances that I
prefer not to go into at this time”, he said. I think
the minister and his colleagues should look at

Ss COvacnnl Leite
resist spending

COIR IO MN eTULOT LT
downtown Nassau?



EDITOR, The Tribune.

Re: Cruise Lines: We don’t
recognize tour body Tribune,
24 April, 2009

Amazing. You mean to tell
me cruise passengers prefer to
spend their money at Half
Moon Cay, Coco Cay and Cast-
away Cay rather than beautiful
downtown Nassau? Who would
a think!

KEN W
KNOWLES, MD

what is happening in the world and note that the
public no longer tolerate vague and unrespon-

sive answers from public servants anymore. An
apology is no longer acceptable, the question is
why were they not fixed months ago?

Even the speaker of the UK Parliament is no
exception. I think the public respect for public ser-
vants is at an all time low and if they, and I do not
single out the Minister of Works, are not pre-
pared to be upfront and honest with the public
they should leave the job.

It will be great when the traffic lights are fixed,

but, of course, the traffic light problem is only a

Nassau,

May 19, 2009.

symptom of what is happening in the world where
a second rate performance is considered good
when it comes to public servants.

PATRICK H THOMSON

Backward place, backward people

EDITOR, The Tribune.

How could our police and our
Government allow these fools to
go through our streets and
through our neighbourhoods,
with music booming, shaking
earth and sky, at any hour of
morning, night or day?

Are these people ungodly and
criminal, as well as are our police
and our Government? Only way
to cope is to withdraw and to
imagine that this is not my coun-

try, it cannot be. I pretend,
though I am stuck here, to be
elsewhere. I am not a part of this
madness. I just cannot be part of
such a backward place and such a
backward people.

Why does no one in authority
say something, do something?

This perplexes me. In whose
hands are we?

OBEDIAH SMITH
Nassau,
May 9, 2009.

One man's terrorist is another man’s doctor

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Isurmise that the controversy over the US State Department’s list-
ing of Cuba as a state sponsor of terrorism originates in a simple

choice of nomenclature.

Nassau,
April 26, 2009.

You see every year Cuba dispatches hundreds of white-suited,
masked agents, armed with chemical kits, to poor countries around the
world. That much is not in dispute.

But whereas in US State Department jargon, these functionaries are
called “terrorists”, everywhere else in the world (including the Oxford
English Dictionary) they are known as “doctors”.

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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009, PAGE 5



oln brief. MISS BAHAMAS PAGEANT FUROR

Man accused
of killing father
appears in court

THE man accused of killing a
father-of-one with a rock on
Sunday night appeared in Mag-
istrates Court yesterday on a
manslaughter charge.

Jeffrey Moncur, 42, of Sol-
dier Road, has been charged

Fox.

side.

Relatives claimed Mr Fox, a }
self-employed handyman, was :
arguing with the visitor in the i
back yard before he ran out into }
the street and collapsed. Police :
believed he died as a result of a :

blow to the head with a rock.

His death was the 30th homi-

cide for the year.

Moncur who appeared before }
Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez
and Magistrate Janet Bullardin }
Court One, Bank Lane, was not }

required to enter a plea.

He was remanded to Her :
Majesty’s Prison and is expect- }
ed back in court today for a bail :

hearing.

Officer charged
with killing in
the course of

dangerous driving

A POLICE officer charged
with killing in the course of dan- }
gerous driving was arraigned in }

Magistrates Court yesterday.

Police Constable Sean Ben-
jamin, 37, appeared before }
Chief magistrate Roger Gomez }
in Court One, Bank Lane yes- }

terday.

It is alleged that Benjamin, }
of Avocado Street, caused the }
death of Omar Anthony Stuart }
on July 14, 2007, while driving :
on the Tonique Williams Dar- :

ling Highway.

According to reports, the :
accident occurred shortly after }
6pm when the driver of a white
1996 Nissan Sentra traveling :
west on Tonique Williams Dar- }
ling Highway lost control of the ;
car which collided with a tree. }
The vehicle reportedly over- }
turned resulting in a passenger }
being ejected. The three occu- }
pants of the car, all males, were }
transported to hospital, howev- }
er, the passenger who was eject- }
ed eventually succumbed to :




injuries.

Benjamin was granted bail }
in the sum of $8,000 with one ;
surety. His case has been
adjourned to June 2 and trans- }
ferred to Court 6, Parliament }
Street. Benjamin was ordered :
to report to the East Street }
South Police Station every Sat- }

urday before 6 pm.

Man pleads
guilty to
ammunition
charges

A 27-YEAR-OLD man of
Kennedy Subdivision was
jailed for two years imprison-
ment after pleading guilty to
ammunition charges.

Philip Gray who appeared
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel in Court 8, Bank Lane,
on Wednesday admitted pos-
session of an unlicensed
firearm and possession of
ammunition.

According to court dock-
ets, Gray was found in posses-
sion of a black and chrome .38
revolver and six .38 rounds.

Magistrate Bethel sen-
tenced Gray to two years
imprisonment on both
charges. The sentences are to
run concurrently.

Mr Fox, 45, had reportedly }
been watching television at his :
home on Pork Fish Drive when }
an acquaintance called him out- }

THE FUROR surrounding the results of the
Miss Bahamas pageant continues with a judge
claiming that five out the nine officials had
voted in favor of another contestant.

Speaking with The Tribune on the condition
of anonymity, the judge yesterday claimed the
five voted overwhelmingly in support of Aman-
da Appleyard, and not Kiara Sherman, who
was crowned Miss Bahamas on Sunday night.

Reportedly, officials at the event claim that
Ms Sherman’s results were far higher than any
other - a claim some judges are finding hard to
believe.

Points

Allegedly in the lead up until the pageant, Ms
Sherman was reported to be 150 points ahead
of any other contestant following the prelimi-
nary rounds. While the judge questioned the
authenticity of this assessment, they also ques-
tioned how preliminary results, which they
claim should not have been included in the
totals on the pageant night could possibly have
been used.

“The Miss Universe pageant requires that
all preliminary scores are discarded once the

Judge claims five of
nine officials didn’t
vote for the winner

with killing 45-year-old Terry ;

finalist are chosen. However, there is now a
suggestion that all the scores were used cumu-
latively. If this is so, then why this change from
the Miss Universe rules?” they asked.

Additionally, the judge questioned who actu-
ally had carriage of the preliminary scores
which were collected from the judges before
they were handed into the accounting firm of
Deloitte and Touche.

“If these preliminary scores were not hand-
ed to them until the pageant that night, who
knows what could have happened to those
scores. Were all the judges including the pre-
liminary judges invited to view their final scores
after the pageant?

“Also, about three days before the final
pageant night, two prominent judges were
removed from the event, and replaced with
two judges who did not even interview the girls
on a one on one basis,” the judge said.

Since Miss Bahamas was crowned, she has
been the blunt of vicious attacks online through
networking websites and in emails.

The Miss Bahamas Committee is set to hold
a press conference today to answer these
attacks and other questions that have arisen fol-
lowing the pageant.

Staff collect final cheques
from Emerald Bay Resort

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

REDUNDANT staff col-
lected their final paychecks
from the Emerald Bay Resort
yesterday with the hope that
severance will last them until
the development re-opens.

The resort and marina, Four
Seasons Hotel and golf course
officially closed on Tuesday,
while receivers work to secure
a buyer for the property in
Farmers Hill, Exuma.

Although some staff are
expected to stay on at the
resort for a while longer to
close down operations, and
others were let go last week,
the majority of workers
picked up their final pay yes-
terday.

Many of the 500 employees
who flocked to Emerald Bay
from across the Bahamas to
take up positions at the resort,
will now return to their origi-
nal homes. Others will stay in
Exuma anticipating a quick
sale and re-opening of the
hotel.

Exuma MP Anthony Moss
said: “Some have left already
and some are in the process of
leaving. Certainly some of
them are looking for new jobs
because we are not certain
when it will re-open, but we
want to remain optimistic.”

Mr Moss said potential buy-
ers toured the property last
week and he is hopeful a deci-
sion will be made soon.

Receivers for Japanese cred-
itors Mitsui, Pricewaterhouse
Coopers, confirmed there are
over 20 interested buyers and
they expect to make an
announcement regarding the
sale within weeks.

When asked if the receivers
were any closer to securing a
buyer yesterday representative
Russell Downs said: “We are
closer, but we are not ata
stage where we are going to
announce what is happening
for another couple of weeks.

“As soon as there is news we
will say, but at the moment we
are running through the
process, and hopefully within a

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some news.”

Mr Moss said he hopes the
turnaround will be secured and
completed as quickly as possi-
ble.

He said: “We are hoping it
would be a matter of months,
because the programme the
government has in place right
now is for a couple of months.

“So while people may have a
small amount of money, it may
carry them for a couple of
months until we get them back
to work.”

Former food and beverage
department employee Kim-
berley Rolle, 22, left Emerald
Bay with a small number of
staff last Thursday.

She is hoping the hotel will
re-open within the couple of
months she expects her sever-
ance package will last.

Miss Rolle said: “I just have
to do something positive with
the money I have.

“Tam hoping the hotel will
get sold in the next couple of
months so I can get back to
work.”

Appreciation

Mr Moss said government
agencies organised an ecu-
menical church service at the
Ebenezer Union Baptist
Church in Farmer's Hill, near
the resort on Wednesday
evening to show appreciation
to the redundant staff.

The MP said it was impor-
tant to give those who have
worked at Emerald Bay over
the last four or five years
thanks and encouragement at
this difficult time.

Around 150 of those who
were in Emerald Bay on the
eve of the final payday attend-
ed the service along with gov-
ernment officials including
director of Labour Harcourt
Brown.

Mr Moss said: “We want to
give thanks to Reverend Dr
Irvin Clarke for opening the
doors of his church to assist
with his church services that
was organised by the local gov-
ernment and our administra-

tor and government agencies
all were present.”

Specialists from the Ministry
of Health, Department of
Social Services, and the
National Insurance Board have
been in Exuma this to provide
guidance and support to
redundant staff seeking assis-
tance.

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Gambling laws ‘a laughing stock’

THE Bahamas Gaming
Reform Committee has again
urged Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham to legalise gambling
across the Bahamas.

Declaring current gaming laws
discriminatory and “a laughing
stock”, the BGR asked why Mr
Ingraham is indifferent to the will
of the people on this matter.

Citing a recent on-line poll, the
BGR told the prime minister
Bahamians overwhelmingly sup-
port the legalisation of gambling.

In a letter to Mr Ingraham, the
BGR criticised the failure of gov-
ernment to engage citizens in an
open discussion on public poli-
cy.

“Again the integrity of basic
democratic principles is brought
into question,” the letter said.

Committee chairperson Sidney
Strachan added: “Public discus-
sion of the gaming issue could
not be more pronounced. The
airwaves are filled with discus-
sion of the issue. Talk shows are
inundated with calls and print
media are writing about the mat-
ter daily. The message being con-
veyed is consistently that gaming
must be legalised.

“The depth of interest across
the country is evident. Now the
issue has moved into the inter-
national arena on the web. A
recent on-line Twiigs Poll has 78

BGR says Bahamians
overwhelmingly
support legalisation

per cent of Bahamians supporting
the legalisation of gaming. It’s
just another of many strong indi-
cators. Bahamians are asking,
‘Where is the government on this
issue?’ Effectively it is in hiding
while the issue consumes the
nation. That’s irresponsible how-
ever you look at it.”

The letter said, in part: “We
again write out of frustration. For
weeks the Bahamas Gaming
Reform Committee has been
attempting to learn the formal
position of the government on
gaming law reform. Our efforts
have been to no avail despite
adherence to an orderly process.
In fact, we have not been accord-
ed the most fundamental of cour-
tesies from the government — the
acknowledgment of correspon-
dence.

“The Cayman Islands have
now made us the last standing
Caribbean democracy afraid to
challenge the constitutional and

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gaming status quo. Against strong
religious opposition, the people
voted in referendum by 63 per

COSCON

cent for change and it should be
noted that they changed the gov-
ernment in the process. Your
government must not be afraid
to act.”

The letter noted that Minister
of Tourism Vincent Vaderpool-
Wallace, in the May 22, 2009 edi-
tion of The Tribune, said the gov-
ernment is thinking about review-
ing the Gaming and Financial
Transaction Reporting Act to
permit “legal residents” to game.

“By all accounts, this will not

Fi “4 i 7 |
‘ - i

BLAIRWOOD ACADEMY pupils sing at the scholarship party.

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A SCHOLARSHIP party at
Blairwood Academy helped raise
funds to allow students with spe-
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school despite their parents’ eco-
nomic hardships.

The academy, behaviour and
family therapy centre in Village
Road, provides a multi-sensory
approach to learning to help
pupils with math and learning dis-
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employs world-class educational
methods including auditory, visu-
al and kinesthetic programmes,
Blairwood Academy owner and
director Kim Kooskalis said.

But the special attention pupils
receive means school fees are
often too high for many families,
despite the fact dedicated teach-
ers are grossly underpaid, the
director said.

She added: “There are a large
number of students sitting in pub-
lic schools who cannot read. The
national average is a D. Much of
the reason for this is due to the
fact that there are children who
are supposed to be in a school
like Blairwood but cannot afford
it and are failing out.”

Full-time scholarships are pro-
vided to two students aged 10 and
11 who have ADHD and dyslex-
ia but are unable to pay the fees,
and part-scholarships cover some
of the fees for around 15 other
students.

Often children are a grade or
two behind when they begin at
Blairwood, but within two years
they will be at the same level as
their mainstreamed peers, Ms
Kooskalis said.

And the scholarship party on
Thursday, May 21, moved par-
ents and visitors to tears as staff
and children conveyed the
school’s success story.

Ms Kooskalis said: “Many peo-

augur well with Bahamians if
they too are not afforded the
opportunity to gamble through
gaming reform. A comprehen-
sive review of the Gaming Act is
necessary if your government
intends to clearly demonstrate
that it is indeed respectful of the
will of the people. Anything short
of this, sir, will only serve to fur-
ther exasperate the feelings of
hypocrisy and discrimination
throughout the Bahamas,” the
BGR said.

= Dw,



ple believe our students at Blair-
wood are not capable of being
successful but that is not true.

“Our children are the future
basketball stars, artists, photog-
raphers, and some are even schol-
ars.

“Most of our population have
normal IQ levels but just learn
differently than the mainstreamed
kids.”

The school recently added a
basketball team which made
national history by making when
both the junior and senior teams
went to the finals, Ms Kooskalis
said.

She added: “Over and over
again parents are taking their
child from school to school until
they find out about Blairwood.

“Some are in denial regarding
the abilities or disabilities of their
child, but some are just unaware
of how successful we are with
children who do not fit ‘into the
mould’.

“So many of our parents are
grateful for the individualised
attention and concern we give
their children.”

The school is appealing for
donations for the scholarship fund
to keep needy children in educa-
tion.

To find out more about Blair-
wood Academy or to make a
donation contact the school on
393-1303 or 394-3329.

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Al



INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

Our Nassau Office

Will Be Closed On
Thursday June 4th,
2009 For Our Annual

START
EUN DAY

ZOOQ9

We Will Re-Open For
Business As Usual On
Monday June 8th, 2009.

We Apologize For Any
Inconvenience Caused

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Govt signs
‘Short Stay
Visa Waiver
Agreement’

THE government has
signed a ‘Short Stay Visa
Waiver Agreement’ which
allows Bahamians to travel
visa-free to Schengen
European countries for up
to three months, the Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs
announced.

The agreement was
signed yesterday during a
ceremony at the Council of
the European Union in
Brussels, Belgium by Paul
Farquharson, Ambassador
of the Bahamas to the
European Community. He
is also High Commissioner
to London.

The agreement, to take
effect immediately, applies
to the following Schengen
countries: Austria, Bel-
gium, Bulgaria, Cyprus,
Czech Republic, Denmark,
Estonia, Finland, France,
Germany, Greece, Hun-
gary, Italy, Latvia, Lithua-
nia, Luxembourg, Malta,
Netherlands, Poland, Por-
tugal, Romania, Slovakia,
Slovenia, Spain and Swe-
den.

The agreement does not
apply to Ireland or the
United Kingdom. Bahami-
an passport holders may
still travel to these coun-
tries without a visa for
stays of up to six months,
said Deputy Prime Minis-
ter and Minister of Foreign
Affairs Brent Symonette.

The agreement also does
not apply to the overseas
territories of France or the
Netherlands. A French visa
is required for French
Guiana, Guadeloupe, Mar-
tinique, Reunion, Tahiti
and St Martin. A visa is not
required for the Nether-
lands overseas territories
of Aruba, and Netherlands
Antilles including Bonaire,
Curacao, and St Maarten.

This agreement does not
yet apply to Iceland,
Liechtenstein and Norway.

Under the current Euro-
pean Union rules regard-
ing travel to the Schengen
area, a short stay is defined
as a time not exceeding
three months, within a six-
month period following the
first date of entry into the
Schengen area as a whole.

Stays are calculated on a
cumulative basis within
that six-month period,
including both the number
of days stayed, and the
number of Schengen coun-
tries visited.

This means that a visit to
any one of the 25 countries
is considered as a Visit to
all and will count towards
the maximum three
months stay within a six-
month period, according to
the agreement.

This does not prevent
persons from travelling to
several of the countries on
any one visit or from visit-
ing Europe more than once
in a six-month period.

“Bahamians who travel
frequently to Europe, and
whose visits may potential-
ly exceed three months
within any six month peri-
od, should contact the
nearest embassy or con-
sulate of the country to
which they intend to travel
in order to secure the nec-
essary visas or permits,”
Mr Symonette said.

“For the time being, vis-
its to Bulgaria, Cyprus and
Romania would be the
exception to this, as
Bahamian passport holders
could make three month
visits to each of these
countries without it count-
ing towards their overall
three month allowance.
This exception would
fall away once these coun-
tries fully implement the
Schengen Agreement,” he
said.

For the purpose of the
agreement, short stays are
considered as visits for
tourism, business, sports,
journalism, and intra-cor-
porate training.

“The agreement does
not cover students or per-
sons seeking employment,”
said Mr Symonette. “These
persons must continue to
secure the necessary visas
and permits for education-
al or employment purpos-
es.”

The agreement was also
signed between the
European Union and
Antigua and Barbuda, Bar-
bados, Mauritius, St Kitts
and Nevis and the Sey-
chelles.



PAGE 8, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





0 In brief

Season's

first tropical
fepression =
forms in Atlantic |

@ MIAMI

z

NATIONAL Hurricane }
Center forecasters in Miami }
say a tropical depression has }
formed off the mid-Atlantic }
coast, but it’s not expected to }
threaten land, according to }
Associated Press. :

The National Weather Ser- }
vice counts the depression as }
the first of the 2009 Atlantic }
hurricane season, which offi- }
cially begins June 1. :

The depression’s maximum
sustained winds are near 35 }
mph. Forecasters say it could }
strengthen to a tropical storm }
Thursday night or Friday but }
then is expected to weaken or }
dissipate by Saturday. ;

Forecasters expect the :
depression to stay over the }
Atlantic, where it’s moving }
toward the northeast near 16 }
mph. :
Around 5 p.m. EDT Thurs-
day, the depression was cen- }
tered about 305 miles south- }
southeast of Providence, R.L, }
and about 565 miles southwest i
of Halifax, Nova Scotia. i

Florida man
faces charges
over Séa
turtle eggs

m@ WEST PALM BEACH, Fla.

A WEST PALM BEACH
man is facing federal charges
after authorities allegedly
caught him in the middle of the
night with a bag full of 119 sea
turtle eggs, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Police stopped 52-year-old
Bruce Wayne Bivins on May 8
and asked to see the contents of
his bag. Bivins allegedly ran-
away, but later surrendered. He
appeared in federal court
Wednesday.

Roughly half of the eggs
were covered in sand, which
means they may have been col-
lected from a female sea turtle
while she was laying the eggs
and before they touched the
sand in her nest.

The sea turtle eggs are pro-
tected under federal law as a
threatened species. Officials
estimate the eggs were worth
more than $350 on the black
market.

Watching out for the watchdog

THE CORONER’S COURT -

m@ By BAHAMAS
PATIENT ADVOCACY

HE role of the Coroner

has adapted over the
eight centuries since the office
was formally established in Eng-
land in1194, from being a form
of medieval tax gatherer to an
independent judicial officer
charged with the investigation
of sudden, violent or unnatural
death.

And with the Coroner’s Act
of 1988, no criminal charges
could result as a consequence of
evidence produced at an inquest.
However, the notable case of
Dr Harold Shipman (who was
convicted of murdering 15
patients) resulted in three public
inquiries, and brought the Coro-
ner’s Act again under review.

But in the Bahamas there has
been no review, amendments,
regulations or rules made under
our Coroner’s Act of 1909, in
the last 100 years.

And how well does that one
century old Act enable our
Coroner to meet the changing
needs of a rapidly developing
society, and provide service to
the public in general, and the
bereaved in particular?

Well, the first issue, is that we
do not have a Coroner’s Court
as such. Each magistrate is by
virtue of his office a coroner but
there is no official coroner
equipped with his own office,
funding and staffing. Under our
law, the coroner is a magistrate
appointed on an ad hoc basis to
hear cases.

Responsibility for hearing
inquests has been a shifting brief,
although there was a period of
allocating all cases to one mag-
istrate who became the “de fac-
to” coroner. This arrangement
was discontinued a few years
ago.

The specialist coroner system
has a critical advantage, and it is
this: the specialist coroner is not
a magistrate who has to deal
with the pressure of other cases,
which are bound to be seen as
more urgent, because those oth-
er cases concern the living. The
demand for an inquest lacks that
vitality, in every sense of that
word.

However, under both systems,
a backlog of unheard cases accu-
mulated. Long delays represent
a failing to meet the needs of
those bereaved families. Given
the escalating rate of reported
unnatural deaths, the backlog
will likely increase.

Local Company
seeking applicants
for the position of

Accountant

Excellent opportunity for an experienced and
highly motivated full-charge Accountant. This
position requires an individual that can multi-
task & has excellent verbal and organizational
skills. This position is responsible to assist in
the overseeing of the accounting and adminis-
trative duties of the company.

This position requires the knowledge of all

accounting procedures
Must be able to work indepen-

Statements.

through financial

dently, as well as work with all departments.
Experience with Human Resources would be
an asset. Must be dynamic and disciplined.

Requirements include:

Thorough knowledge of Microsoft Software
Systems including: Word, Access and Excel,
Advanced Computer Accounting.

Degree in Finance/ Accounting or other related

field.

Interested persons should apply
in writing, with resume, to:

Accountant Position

P.O. Box 55-5698
Nassau, Bahamas

or via Email to:

applications.dropbox?gmail.com



YOUR SAY



It may be, that this small juris-
diction needs more than one
coroner, so that an alternate
coroner can hear matters from
which the first might recuse him-
self.

With more than 900 lawyers
admitted to the bar, and mre
than 900 doctors licensed to
practice, we should have suffi-
cient qualified personnel to con-
stitute dedicated coroner’s courts
to meet the current level of
need.

The years of delay experi-
enced by Bahamians in getting
inquests held by the Coroner’s
Court adds insult to injury. It
prolongs grieving, aggravates the
sense of grievance for the
deceased=s family, and impacts
the reputation of the judicial sys-
tem, which at this point, needs
refurbishing.

Local psychiatrists have writ-
ten widely and well on “anger
management issues” as a cause
of violence in our society. The
perceived lack of effective
recourse or accountability
through appropriate channels,
might also be a factor in stimu-
lating public anger.

And the fact remains that in
100 years, our Coroner’s Court
has not evolved to support or
re-inforce current provisions for
accountability, which do exist,
at least in law.

Take one case which illus-
trates both problems: A 42-year-
old patient dies unexpectedly in
hospital in 2002. It then takes
five years for that case to be
brought before the Coroner’s
Court, and another year for the
inquest to complete.

That inquest involved more
than 20 witnesses, and occupied
about 24 court days, over 15
months. The evidence emerging
from that case is voluminous.
Apart from clinical ‘neglect’,
according to one expert witness,
the hospital records showed a
complete ‘systems failure’.

The evidence in that case indi-
cates there are health care safe-
ty issues, which should be
addressed by two statutory
boards: the Hospitals Board, and
the Medical Council. These bod-
ies have the duty to investigate
and evaluate private hospitals
and medical professionals as an
adjunct of their powers to license
those hospitals and doctors, for
public safety.

However, Bahamian law does
not give a coroner the power to
refer matters to anywhere but
the Supreme Court for criminal
charges, once there is an appro-
priate verdict.




Even if our law did give the
coroner authority to refer a mat-
ter to a statutory authority for
remedial action, this assumes
that we have, for instance, a
Hospital Board able and willing
to act. It also assumes that a
Medical Council is not prevent-
ed by a judge’s order from car-
rying out an evaluation the pro-
fessionals it licenses. If these
assumptions are wrong, the
information coming out of an
Inquest, at public expense,
would not be used to the public
benefit.

The Inquest process can also
reveal deficiencies in prisons, the
police force, and other organi-
zations responsible for the cir-
cumstances of a death. This
information could put the agen-
cies responsible, in a better posi-
tion to respond more promptly,
to address deficiencies and pre-
vent other lives being avoidably
lost.

The Coroner’s Court, is — or
should be - the citizen’s watch-
dog when it comes to investi-
gating abuse of power . The cit-
izen has a right not to be unlaw-
fully deprived of his life by the
State. A verdict of manslaughter
against a police officer, or any
other person, needs to proceed
in the Supreme Court, and not
lie buried in the Attorney Gen-
eral’s office.

The coroner should be, and
has to be, a watchdog for society
- to establish the real cause of
death. We need an informed
citizenry and strong civic bodies
to push for an effective follow
up to a coroner’s verdict. And
to develop an informed citizenry,
we need the investigative jour-
nalism of a free press.

But in the Bahamas, some
suspicious deaths never make it
to coroner’s court. We are build-
ing up an inordinate backlog of
those cases which are referred.
Verdicts of manslaughter can
languish silently in the AG’s
office, regulatory bodies charged
with protecting the public, are
weak and /or hamstrung, the rule
of law lapses, and the press still
needs to push for answers and
reforms.

What kind of reforms? Ideal-
ly, we should have an official
Coroner of The Bahamas, and a
coroner’s office, as in England.
However, as a starting point, to
make the court more efficient
and prevent the build up of a
backlog, we could make the fol-
low reforms, without much cost,
and even some savings.

The coroner should have pow-
er to sit alone, without a jury, in

Wholesaler/Retailer located in Nassau seeks

aah Seely









The candidate will work alongside the senior management
team at our head office, assisting in a variety of areas such
as public and custamer relations, marketing, advertising,
HR, basic bookkeeping, and various administrative duties
such as filing and organization. Much of the above will be











office and computer-based.

The candidate should have the following skills:




General computer skills (Microsoft XP. internet, social
networking web sites,...)

Strang knowledge of Microsoft Office (Word, Excel,

Outlook)

Familiarity with basic bookkeeping concepts
(particularly Accounts Payable and Receivable}

Experience:

The candidate should have experience of office
administration. Specific retail, wholesale, HR or
bookkeeping not essential but beneficial. Additionally,
the candidate must be well-spoken, highly organised
and professional and have a current driver's license and

their own transportation,

Applications are to include: Recent police record,
passport photo, two references, resume, covering letter
Stating where/how specific experience was gained In

(i) Microsoft Office (Word, Excel) (ii) Any bookkeeping
concepts (iii) other software programs you are

experienced / familiar with.

Applications can be sent via email, fax or post to:
fe) sees Ulcer] Reel

f, 322-8430

P.O. Box 55-19021

certain cases not involving
agents of the state: police,
warders, immigration, and
defense force officers.

Fix the minimum and maxi-
mum number of jurors, so that
the absence of a juror does not
lead to an inevitable adjourn-
ment.

Raise the remuneration of the
jurors.

Provide coroner rules for this
jurisdiction.

The first two changes are crit-
ical to an increased disposal of
inquests and require small
changes in the Coroners Act.
Too much expense and delay is
entailed now, when one juror is
disabled or dies, and the inquest
has to be started all over again.

These changes could be
speedily put in place, and go a
long way to having an effective
and properly functioning coro-
ner’s court. In other jurisdictions,
the role and the importance of

A CENTURY LATER

the coroner’s courts are increas-
ing. Here it is diminishing. Why?

A Coroner’s Court should be
able to respond to the commu-
nity’s needs, in a timely fashion.
This requires review of the leg-
islation, and also review of the
funding, support facilities and
staff available to the Coroner.

“Governments do not rise and
fall on proposed amendments to
the Coroner’s Act,” according
to one pundit. But the circum-
stances of a death, may reveal
issues of wider importance to
the community which have to be
rectified.

So, either we continue to
watch the decline of this ancient
and vital Court, or we position
our Coroners Court to be the
Watchdog for citizens it is
intended to be.

What do you think?
www.bahamaspatientadvocacy.org

‘Mighty Sparrow’
to sing for former
police officers

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CALYPSO KING of the World ‘The Mighty Sparrow’.

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



A CONCERT is set to raise funds for former police officers
who retired up to 40 years ago and are struggling to stretch their

pensions in today’s economy.

Calypso King of the World ‘The Mighty Sparrow’ will fly in
with his band the Trinidad and Tobago Troubadours to play at the
Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort in Cable Beach in June.

The award-winning superstar who has been performing since the
1960s will play to help raise funds for the Royal Bahamas Police
Force Retired Police Officers Association to help former officers
who served the country for most of their lives and are now in need

of support.

Chairman of the organising committee Paul Thompson said: “It
is all in aid of retired officers who have fallen on hard times. A lot
of these officers retired in the 60s and 70s, and they’re getting on.

“Some of them can’t work, and the pension in those days based
on their salaries is a lot smaller than the salary we get today, so we

try to help them.”

Mr Thompson said the force helps former officers by providing
prescription medication at the police college, and operating a bus
service which transports former officers around New Providence

free of charge.

And funds raised at the event will help cover the cost of such ini-
tiatives as well as contribute to the cost of medical attention
requiered by some former officers.

The association’s executive committee head former assistant
commissioner Grafton Ifill, will oversee distribution of the funds.

Mr Thompson said George Myers of Restaurants Bahamas Ltd
has greatly supported the world-class event which will also include
entertainment from the police band, police entertainers and local
guest entertainers at the Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort.

The concert will be held at 8.30pm on Friday, June 19.

Tickets are $25 and available from the RBPF Retired Police
Officers Association office at Police Headquarters in East Street,
the Shell garage in Shirley Street, the Cricket Pavillion at Hayes
Oval, West Bay Street, and other locations.

For more information call the association on 302-8044.

To learn more about The Mighty Sparrow log on to

www.mightysparrow.com.

Open ‘Monday-Saturday 9am to bpm. Closed Thursdays

Ne. #9 Mowat Gopal Soe

a

Prone “Fay 24,





THE TRIBUNE

BANQUE SCS ALLIANCE (WASSAIN LTD,

Coren whed Melanics “Sheer

December 31, 20S, sith cemespending fleures for 2007
(bapréeecd in Swiss Francs)

FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009, PAGE 11



Govt ‘in no position’ to

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bid for Carifesta events

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Government yesterday
confirmed to the cultural com-
munity that it will no longer be
hosting Carifesta XI and is no
longer in a position to bid for the
right to stage either of the two
succeeding arts festivals.

This comes even as the
Caribbean Community (CARI-
COM) revealed it has decided to
delay Carifesta XT until 2011 in
view of the economic challenges
being faced by all of the region.

Having then scrapped all slated
hosts countries, CARICOM is to
start soliciting bids from all mem-
ber countries interested in staging
either Carifesta XI, XII (which
will take place in 2013) or XIII
(which will take place in 2015),
from next month until Septem-
ber, The Tribune has learned.

However, Culture Minister
Charles Maynard, reflecting state-
ments made by Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham in his budget
communication yesterday, said
the challenges facing the Bahami-
an economy mean it would be
“crazy for us to put a bid on any
of them right now.”

While The Bahamas might be
interested in hosting Carifesta XII
or XIII, the fact that CARICOM
has decided to open up bidding

Charles Maynard



for all three of the festivals now
rather than at a later date when
the Bahamian economy has had a
chance to start rebounding
excludes this country as a poten-
tial host for any of them, he said.
“It’s unfortunate they’ve cho-
sen to put three successive Car-
ifestas to bid at one time,” said
Mr Maynard, adding, however,
that he would suspect most
Caribbean countries would feel
the same way and may put up
some resistance to the decision.
These latest developments
come after The Tribune revealed
exclusively in April that Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham had
told his Caricom counterparts at a
meeting of Caribbean leaders in

Trinidad that month — appar-
ently before the grouping had
reached the decision to delay the
festival — that The Bahamas
could no longer host Carifesta
XI.

A meeting was called at the
Ministry of Culture last night to
formally explain the situation to
the cultural community and to
offer an opportunity to “chart the
way forward”, according to Mr
Maynard.

Speaking prior to that meet-
ing, the minister of state said that
despite Carifesta and the enor-
mous multi-disciplinary contin-
gents of artists from across the
region not coming to The
Bahamas any time soon, he has
heard a number of proposals
from within the Bahamian arts
community to stage alternative
“more focused” events.

These include a visual arts fes-
tival and an international drum-
ming festival, he said.

“There are any number of pro-
posals out there that we can par-
ticipate in,” added Mr Maynard.

He said that the $1 million the
Government has allocated
towards upgrading the National
Performing Arts Centre shows
that it is “still putting emphasis
into cultural infrastructure” which
will “help The Bahamas be ready
whenever the time comes to do
whatever it is we could do.”

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Union election

FROM page one

swarmed Shirley and Church Streets for hours,
taking away business from local operations by
parking their cars in nearby parking spaces and
touched off angry phone calls to The Tribune
newsroom from irate drivers.

One man, who wished to remain anonymous,
said it had taken him an hour and a half to get from
the Village Road and Shirley Street intersection to
Elizabeth Avenue downtown.

He hit out at the union for deciding to locate the
polling station at the church and for the police
for not making efforts to help motorists trapped by
the activities of the unionists.

“It caused traffic to be backed up all the way
down Eastern Road. They were drinking beer,
laughing and playing around like it was a street car-
nival in the middle of Shirley Street.

“T don’t understand how anyone in their right
mind could possibly pick that location on one of
the busiest streets in probably the whole country to
put a polling station for thousands and thousands
of people to vote in a union election.

“The worst part is the police who stood there in
the middle of Church Street looking very official
but doing absolutely nothing - surely it’s their
responsibility to make sure that cars can pass on
Shirley Street?”

A local business owner said that the flow of
customers into her shop was severely curtailed by
the fact that union members parked in all available
parking spots outside her Shirley Street shop.

St Matthew’s church was one of two polling sta-
tions available to members wishing to vote yes-
terday — at Worker’s House and St Matthews
church.

The process took placed between Sam and
around 7pm with the members of the country’s
second biggest union being offered a chance to
choose between five teams vying for leadership
positions.

Despite complaints from the public, the voting
appeared to have proceeded much more smooth-
ly than the nomination process, which saw sever-
al fights break out and a dispute over which was
the correct day for nominations to take place.

The election went ahead after a Supreme Court
judge lifted an injunction against it on Tuesday.

The injunction had been called for by the union’s
First Vice President Kirk Wilson, who, with other
members of the executive, has been at odds with
the union’s President Roy Colebrooke.

Mr Wilson had claimed that proper procedures
were not followed when the date for the election
was set.

Report allegations
FROM page one

unlawful killing by the police were reported.

“The lack of an independent body to investi-
gate allegations of ill-treatment involving police
officers undermined confidence in due process.”

Amnesty has recorded the killing of Patrick
Strachan, who was shot in the stomach by police
in Wilson Tract on February 27 last year, and lat-
er died in hospital.

Local residents maintain Mr Strachan was
not armed when he was shot, while police say
the victim had fired at officers before they shot
at him, the report states. However, the progress
of an investigation into the incident were not
known by Amnesty at the end of last year.

The organisation also notes details of the
alleged harassment and ill-treatment of envi-
ronmental organisation chairman Emmanuel
McKenzie, who it is clatmed was handcuffed,
dragged off to a clearing, and had a gun pointed
at his head when police/army officers raided a
fundraising event on April 19 last year.

Others attending the event were also beaten
and ill-treated, and although a formal complaint
was logged, no investigation had been initiated
by the end of the year, Amnesty records.

In other areas Amnesty has acknowledged
how the Domestic Violence Protection Order
Act came into force on December 1, more than
a year after it was passed by Parliament, while
amendments to the Sexual Offences and
Domestic Violence Act to increase the penalty
for serious sexual crimes to life imprisonment
were passed in November.

At least one person was sentenced to death
during the year, according to the press, although
no executions were carried out, the report states.

Amnesty records: “A number of prisoners
had their death sentences reviewed and com-
muted to life imprisonment; this followed a rul-
ing in 2006 by the UK-based Judicial Committee
of the Privy Council which abolished mandato-
ry death sentences for murder.

“The national public debate on executions
continued, with the Prime Minister, the Presi-
dent of the Bar Association and the Acting
Commissioner of Police voicing support for
resumption.”

The Bahamas voted against a United Nations
General Assembly resolution calling for a world-
wide moratorium on executions in December,
and ratified the International Covenant on Civ-
il and Political Rights and the International
Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural
Rights.

PLEASE CALL FOR RESERVATIONS & INFORMATION

cee ere eae ee



Street shootout
‘like Wild West’

FROM page one

able to pull free of the men
enough to draw a handgun and
begin to fire it randomly, caus-
ing bystanders to scatter.

At this point, another man —
who seemed to be a civilian but
could have been a plain clothes
officer — reportedly got out of
his car carrying a shotgun and
began firing at the perpetrator.

One witness said: “It was a
shoot out. People were running
everywhere. I ran too. I just
wanted to get out of there.”

It is unclear what happened
next as the witnesses who spoke
to The Tribune say they fled the
scene and did not look back.
Staff at KFC said no one on
duty at the time was there yes-
terday and senior police offi-
cials were not available for com-
ment last night.

Bystanders said they were
frustrated by the fact that a

number of calls were made to
the police while the incident was
unfolding, but there seemed to
be no response.

One said: “It took time for
all of that to happen, but the
police were nowhere to be seen.
It’s like there is no one there to
protect you — it’s just you. The
public is not allowed to carry
weapons, so we are defense-
less.”

Yesterday morning, police
issued the press with a list of
crimes committed the day
before, but did not mention the
incident.

This is the second time this
week The Tribune disclosed
details of crimes that the police
failed to make public.

On Wednesday, a front page
article revealed that a series of
nighttime muggings took place
throughout the capital over the
weekend.

Although the police think the

attacks were "isolated", a senior
officer warned the public to be
vigilant of their surroundings at
night to avoid falling victim to
an armed criminal.

Members of the public who
heard rumours of the muggings
expressed concern that the
police failed to report them.

A professional woman whose
job forces her to travel at night
said news of the attacks fright-
ened her.

“Obviously there is an
increase in crime, and the police
should be reporting it,” she said.

The woman, asked to remain
anonymous, said: “I think it has
to be Known if there is some-
thing going on out there.”

A caller who identified him-
self as Mr Dean, said: “This is
scary. People have to be made
aware if messed up things are
going on so they can be more
careful. You can’t keep them
dumb.”



PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

‘Choo Choo’ defends WBA FedCarihe title Saturday night

Fiscal budget
should not affect ©
sports ministry
FROM page 14

there will be no plans to }
replace them. i

“We have some people }
who are up for retirement }
this year, but as far as I }
know, most of them are in }
administrative positions and i
so it should not affect on the
ongoing operation of the }
sports department,” Bannis- }
ter said. i

“Persons who are in the
sports department who are }
eligible for retirement, will i
have the option to retire.” }

There was some rumors }
that both Director of Sports, }
Martin Lundy and Assistant }
Director of Sports, Frank
‘Pancho’ Rahming, may be
retiring.

But Bannister said: “I
don’t think it affects them.
I think both of time have
time where they can deter-
mine when and if it’s the
right time to retire. I don’t
think it affects either one of
them.”

As for facilities, Bannister
said the construction of the
new stadium is underway at
the Queen Elizabeth Sports
Center as well as the resur-
facing of the track at the
Grand Bahama Sports Com-
plex.

“We’re doing capital
works in a lot of the Family
Islands, we’re putting bas-
ketball courts down in Red
Bays, Lowe Sound and
Fresh Creek, Andros,” he
revealed.

“We’ve just shipped bas-
ketball backboards and
stands to Exuma and we are
constantly doing a whole lot
of stuff to keep sports going
throughout the country. A
lot of things we are going
people don’t know about.”

Bannister was referring to
the restoration of a number
of parks throughout New
Providence, which have been
upgraded to host a number
of recreational and compet-
itive events in the commu-
nities.

As he look forward to the
upcoming year, Bannister
said he’s particularly
impressed with what’s hap-
pened in volleyball with the
men’s national team advanc-
ing to the third round of the
FIVA NORCEA’s Qualify-
ing Round for the 2010
World Championships.

“Judging by the perfor-
mances of our athletes as
well over the last few weeks,
I think we will be gearing up
for an outstanding showing i
at the World Championships }
in Athletics,” he said. i

“And we haven’t even }
gotten to the NCAA Cham- }
pionships or the height of }
the season for the elite ath- {
letes. So it should be a good }
year ahead of us in sports.”

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays



m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

AFTER a brief hiatus, First
Class Promotions is back on the
local boxing scene with its first
show of the year featuring its
top fighters including a bout for
the WBA FedCaribe Super
Middleweight title.

Jermain "Choo Choo" Mack-
ey (17-3) will headline the card
when he defends his title
against Emiliano Cayetano (18-
2) of the Dominican Republic
tomorrow night at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium.

Featured on the undercard
will be Jerry "Big Daddy” But-
ler (7-5-1) in an eight round
bout against Dominican
Michael Santiago (0-0) and the
professional debut of female
fighter Kelly Finlayson.

Mackey, whose last fight
came 11 months ago, said he is
ready willing and able to set
foot in the ring again to suc-
cessfully defend the WBA title
at home for the third time.

"Tam 120 percent ready. I
am ready to carry the Bahami-
an flag into the ring and also
bring it back with my head held
high defending the WBC title.
He's a very good fighter. He's

Female fighter makes
pro debut on undercard

18-2 so he has a better record
than me by one fight. He is a
good quality fighter on my road
toward a world title fight,” he
said, "After I beat this oppo-
nent I defend the Common-
wealth title and from then I will
see where it goes. It is exciting
to get back into the ring. I am
just waiting on the hours to pass
right now to get back into the
ring where I feel at home."

Butler, who came off a draw
in his last fight in November of
2008, said he is ready to get
back into the ring and expects a
productive finish to the end of
the year.

"Right now I'm very focused,
trying to get in my last bit of
work. But the training has gone
as good as I would have hoped,
just getting in my last few
touches and final movements
but I'm ready for Saturday
night. I know nothing about my
opponent, just his record, his
name and where he is from,
that is all Ineed,” he said. "My
time will be soon, it is coming in
October. It is up to me to stay

in shape and stay on board
especially with all that was
going on. I just have to stay
ready and in shape and able to
fight."

Finlayson, who has the
potential to become the face of
female boxing in the Bahamas,
said irrespective of the fight's
outcome fans should expect her
top effort in her debut.

"It's going to be interesting
and exciting. Physically and
mentally I'll be prepared for it.
I know nothing about my oppo-
nent it just makes me want to
train a little more harder to get
up my confidence because I do
not know where she is coming
from, how she is trying, how
strong she is or her prepara-
tion,” he said, "One thing is
certain I will go out there, give
it my all.”

First Class Promotions Chief
Executive Officer, Michelle
Minus, said the fighters and the
general public highly anticipate
the return to the ring.

"We are expecting to have a
large crowd we have been get-

ting a lot of response from peo-
ple in the boxing community
and the Bahamas in general.
People are very excited we are
back, it looks as though as if
they are really going to support
us,” she said. "It feels great to
be back. First Class Promotions
our aim and objective is to
mold these young people now
so we will have successful citi-
zens of tomorrow. Our main
focus is for these young men to
utilize their talent and skills to
find something to do in a career
than can take them places."

With this event as their inau-
gural event of the year, Minus
said her organisation has an
exciting remainder of the year
planned for its fans and fighters.

"We are looking forward to
hosting a Commonwealth title
fight August 8th. We are look-
ing forward to great things from
Choo Choo and some of our
up and coming boxers like Big
Daddy Jerry Butler, we see him
getting in line to fight for a
WBA or WBC title hopefully
before the end of the year,” she
said. "We are also looking for
things from some of our other
fighters like Alpachino Allen,
and some of the other guys that
will be featured on the card Sat-
urday night.”





Christophe Ena/AP Photo

SWITZERLAND'S Roger Federer returns the ball to Argentina's Jose Acasuso during their second round match at the Roland Garros stadium in Paris, Thursday May 28,
2009.

Federer struggles in 2nd round at French Open

@ TENNIS
PARIS
Associated Press

CLOSE doesn't count. Roger Fed-
erer knows that as well as anyone.

Still, even Federer had to acknowl-
edge he found himself in a much tighter
and tougher match than he would have
expected — or is used to — in the
French Open's second round Thursday
before producing a 7-6 (8), 5-7, 7-6 (2),
6-2 victory over Jose Acasuso of
Argentina.

How near did the 45th-ranked Aca-
suso come to a startling upset — in
straight sets, no less? On four occa-
sions, the Argentine was a point from
taking the first set. After winning the
second, he held a set point in the third.

Federer, whose season hasn't been
up to his high standards, was up to the
task each time, though.

"Mentally, I've always been very
strong, but I'm not being put in a posi-
tion like this very often, you know,"
Federer said. Then, moments later, as if

to make sure everyone understood him,
Federer added: "Coming through such
a match is always a great feeling. Like I
said, I'm not part of such close match-
es that often."

Particularly at this stage of a Grand
Slam tournament. And particularly
against anyone other than Rafael
Nadal, who supplanted Federer at No.
1 in the rankings last year and edged
him in five-set Wimbledon and Aus-
tralian Open finals.

"T thought,” Acasuso said, "I could
have won this match."

But this has not been a French Open
for underdogs or upsets, and no seeded
men lost Thursday, when the winners
included No. 5 Juan Martin del Potro,
No. 6 Andy Roddick, No. 9 Jo-Wilfried
Tsonga, No. 10 Nikolay Davydenko,
No. 11 Gael Monfils and No. 16 Tom-
my Robredo.

Four seeded women went home,
though none higher than No. 13 Mari-
on Bartoli. Those moving into the third
round included both Williams sisters
— Venus needed three sets, Serena two

— No. 5 Jelena Jankovic, No. 7 Svet-
lana Kuznetsova and No. 4 Elena
Dementieva, who advanced when Jele-
na Dokic stopped playing because of
a bad back while leading 6-2, 3-4.

"T really don't deserve to win today
because of the way I was playing,”
Dementieva said.

The biggest surprise Thursday might
have been how well Roddick played,
given that he hadn't made the third
round at Roland Garros since his 2001
tournament debut.

"There's a lot of work to go,” said
Roddick, the only U.S. man remaining
of the nine who entered the tourna-
ment. "By no means have I accom-
plished anything yet.”

In his 6-2, 6-2, 7-6 (2) victory over
85th-ranked Ivo Minar of the Czech
Republic, Roddick hit 15 aces, saved
all four break points he faced and won
the point on 23 of 26 trips to the net.

"I'm not going to sit here and jump
up on a soap box like I'm really good
on this stuff now because I won two
matches. I think that's what you need to

guard against,” Roddick said. "Today I
felt pretty good, and I felt pretty in
control of what I was doing."

Federer, in contrast, offered this
assessment of his performance: "I was
not managing and controlling the match
the way I should have."

He has made the semifinals at a
record 19 consecutive majors and has-
n't lost before the third round at any
Grand Slam event since the 2003
French Open. But of Federer's 13
Grand Slam titles — one shy of Pete
Sampras’ career mark — zero have
come at Roland Garros.

Federer reached the past three finals
and the 2005 semifinals at the clay-
court major before losing to Nadal each
time.

No one over the last five years, apart
from Nadal, had really made Federer
seem ordinary at the French Open until
Acasuso did for stretches. That he
would give Federer a hard time is espe-
cially noteworthy: Acasuso advanced
past the second round only once in 28
career Grand Slam tournaments.

Women's National Volleyball Team gearing up for NORCEA qualifiers

FROM page 14

in town and we should have two weeks
to get them ready,” he said.

By today, Smith said they should be
able to trim the 15 players down to the
final 12 for the tournament.

The team, which will be managed by
Yvonne Rolle, should be led by Kelsie
Johnson once it is selected.

The major concern, according to Jer-
maine Adderley, who traveled as the
manager of the men’s team, is funding.

“The federation had the difficult task
of getting the men’s team off, but we

were able to advance, so that was a g00d
thing for us,” Adderley said.

“But however, the women have the
same difficulty as it relates to funding
because they are leaving on June 9 and
at this time, we are still looking for fund-
ing.”

Adderley said it is estimated that it
will cost the federation some $40,000
to make the trip to Barbados and right
on the heels of that, both the junior
boys and girls will be travelling in July
and they will need an additional $30,000.

“We are in such a hole right now as it
relates to funding,” Adderley said. “We
have great expectations for these teams

because of the talent available.

“At the same time, we are also look-
ing for funding for our men’s team to
travel to Santo Domingo over the holi-
day weekend in July to prepare for the
next round in Cuba.”

The FIVB will be assisting us with
our funding in Santo Domingo, which is
a great boost. But Adderley said the
federation will have to make their own
travel arrangement.

Then in August, Adderley said the
federation will have to fund the entire
trip to Cuba for the third round, which
will determine whether or not the
Bahamas will advance to the World

Championships next year in Tokyo,
Japan and eventually the Olympic
Games in 2012 in London.

“So we’re still looking for funding as
it relates to all of our national teams,”
Adderley pointed out. “So it’s looking
rocky right now for us.”

In all, Adderley said they have an
estimated budget of $130,000 for all of
the teams to be able to travel over the
next three months.

Persons interested in making a con-
tribution to the federation to assist the
national teams can contact Adderley at
535-6623, DeVince Smith at 357-7707
or Joe Smith at 457-1050.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS





THE FIFTH annual Bahamas National Drug Council's Five-on-Five Basketball tournament will be played over the May 30-31 weekend at the historic Archdeacon William Thompson Park (Government Ground). Organizers of

the tournament showcase some of the trophies that will be up for grabs.

BNOG basketball tourney set for end of month

SEVEN teams have regis-
tered to compete in the
Bahamas National Drug
Council’s (BNDC) Five-on-
Five Rehabilitation Basket-
ball Tournament scheduled
for May 30-31.

The double-climination tournament
will make its return to the historic
Archdeacon Wiliam Thompson Park
(Southern Recreation Grounds), and
will be played in honour of Mr.
Andrew “Rasta” Pratt who passed
away in 2009.

It will be played under the motto:
“Your Life, Your Community, No
Place for Drugs.”

Mr. Pratt was named Most Valu-
able Player of both the third and

fourth annual tournaments and was
a fierce, yet gracious, competitor,
whose intensity of the basketball court
was matched in the fight against drug
use and abuse.

“This fifth tournament has great sig-
nificance to the organising commit-
tee, the Bahamas National Drug
Council and the participating teams
because it allows us to salute the con-
tributions of two persons so dear to
our hearts,” said Tournament Chair-
man, Mr. Floyd McPhee.

“Firstly, it gives us the opportunity
to honour the memory one of our own
in the person of Mr. Andrew Pratt
who was not only a very active partic-
ipant in the tournament as witnessed
by his back-to-back MVP titles, but
was also a great colleague who played
a vital role in the work we do in the

fight against drug use and abuse.

“By hosting the tournament at the
Archdeacon William Thompson Park,
it gives us an opportunity to salute
the contributions Archdeacon Thomp-
son made to the surrounding commu-
nity and the Bahamas National Drug
Council, through its Rehabilitative
Committee.

“Archdeacon Thompson was a pil-
lar of strength who worked tirelessly
and unselfishly with regards to the
fight against drugs and the need for
the provision of rehabilitative services
for drug users and abusers in the coun-
try,” Mr. McPhee added.

Mr. McPhee said the Five-on-Five
tournament is one of the many
avenues the BNDC uses to promote
drug awareness in The Bahamas in its
ongoing fight against drug use and

Here are the facts

surrounding the Minus
and Pratt exhibitions



Dear Sir,

KINDLY allow me space in
your newspaper to respond to
the many lies, half truths and
foolishness that has surround-
ed the recently publicized exhi-
bitions by Ray Minus Jr. and
one Quincy Pratt.

For the sake of clarity let us
first concentrate on Pratt. A
long time ago when Lloyd
Turnquest was Chairman of the
Bahamas Boxing Commission
and Algernon Allen was Minis-
ter of Sports, Pratt’s license was
taken away from him because
as I understand it, he was legal-
ly blind.

The next boxing Chairman
was Dr. Norman Gay, whom I
had the pleasure of serving as
Vice Chairman. Again Pratt’s
license was rejected because the
Commission was satisfied that
he is legally blind.

In 2007, I was appointed
Chairman of the Commission.
Among the Commissioners
named was one Quincy Pratt.
Quincy again expressed a desire
to fight. He met with myself and
members of the Commission.

Quincy was advised that the
first thing he needed to do was
submit a letter of resignation
then he can re-apply for a
license. That has not happened
up to this day. So, as far as we
are concerned, Quincy Pratt is
still a member on the Commis-
sion.

Some years ago, Ray Minus
Jr. announced his retirement
from professional boxing. Ray is
fully aware that the Boxing
Commission is responsible for
regulating the sport of profes-
sional boxing in this country.

His wife is head of a promo-
tions company. He is a trainer
of many fighters. Yet he choos-
es to ignore the ‘process’ that
he is fully familiar with and
announce to the public a series
of exhibitions between himself
and Pratt.

I, in my capacity as Chair-
man, had no choice but to send



QUINCY PRATT (left) and Ray Minus Jr. (right) face off to pro-
mote their exhibition.

out the notice from the Com-
mission. Afterwards, Ray went
on one of the radio talk shows
and advised that these are not
Exhibitions; they are demon-
strations between him and
Quincy, trying to raise funds for
the amateurs.

Also Ray left a message at
my office, saying there was a
misunderstanding. We apolo-
gize. “It is not an exhibition, it is
a Sparring session.”

Mr. Editor, there is a bigger
picture here. And that is what is
disturbing to me the most. It
would seem to me that those
among us feel we are above the
rules and the rules do not apply
to us. And when the regulators
put their feet down, all sorts of
accusations are hurled at the
ones putting their feet down.

Even more disturbing is that
some members of the press
choose to print the foolishness
spewed out by some individuals
instead of doing some inves-
tigative reporting and finding
out the truth. But it is an even
deeper issue. And that is of
honesty. And that I believe is
notorius throughout our soci-
ety.

It is incredible that some of us
are so used to getting away with
foolishness we have a problem
adjusting when the rules are
enforced.

Mr. Editor, what is so amaz-
ing is that when Dr. Norman
Gay served as Chairman these
very same trouble makers nev-
er posed a problem to him. In
fact, they genuflect to him for
four consecutive years.

But as soon as my friend Pat
Strachan becomes Chairman,
all of a sudden the rules do not
apply to them. And I’m ona
campaign to stem the growth of
professional boxing and victim-
ize promoters.

How hypocritical!

Let me say for the record, the
Bahamas Boxing Commission
is committed to going the extra
mile and providing avenues for
our many fighters to embrace
the many opportunities that are
out there. At this time, we have
the most fighters rated in the
British Commonwealth ratings
because of the action of the
Commission.

The President of the Com-
monwealth Boxing Council is
Fred Sturrup. And I witnessed
first hand how he campaigned
to put Bahamian fighters in the
British Commonwealth ratings.
Fred is also the Secretary for
the Bahamas Boxing Commis-
sion.

PAT STRACHAN
Chairman of the Bahamas
Boxing Commission

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abuse and illicit drug trafficking.

He said the Five-on-Five tourna-
ment “emerged” from what was a
social gathering of recovering addicts,
along with others from the various
Support Services, who would gather
during the evenings for games of
“friendly, but competitive basketball
games” at the then Temple Christian
Academy Gymnasium.

“This gathering became more than
just an opportunity to compete in bas-
ketball games after awhile, as it also
gave brothers who did not play the
game an opportunity to come out and
enjoy the social atmosphere and bond
with others,” Mr. McPhee said.

“As the spirit of brotherhood and
competition grew, a committee was
formed for the purpose of organizing
a tournament for the rehabilitation

centres and support services.

“After extensive planning and col-
laboration with stakeholders and
sponsors, the tournament was estab-
lished with the Bahamas National
Drug Council serving as hosts,” Mr.
McPhee added.

The tournament begins on Satur-
day, May 30 at 9am. Play is expected
to end at 3pm. Day two will com-
mence at lpm on Sunday, May 31 with
presentation of awards scheduled to
take place at 6pm following athe
Championship game.

The team from the Dean Granger
Centre is the two-time champions,
winning consecutive titles in 2007 and
2008.

Past winners have included Great
Commission (2005) and Teen Chal-
lenge (2006).

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THE TRIBUNE







TENNIS
MATCH RAINED OUT

¢ MARK Knowles and
Mahesh Bhupathi’s first
round men’s doubles at the
French Open at Roland
Garros was rained out yes-
terday.

Knowles and Bhupathi,
seeded number four in the
second Grand Slam Tour-
nament for the year, were
scheduled to play the
unseeded team of Josselin
Quanna and Jo-Wilfried
Tsonga from France on
Thursday.

But their match was post-
poned until today.

Knowles and Bhupathi,
the No.3 team ranked team
in the ATP computer rank-
ings, are looking for their
first title victory for the
year.

They were runners-up to
the American identical twin
brothers combo of Bob and
Mike Bryan at the first
grand slam for the year at
the Australian Open in
Melbourne in January.

The Bryans, seeded at
No.2, won their opening
match yesterday. So did
Daniel Nestor and his part-
ner Nanad Zimonjic, the
top seeds in the tourna-

ment.

BODYBUILDING
NOVICE

CHAMPIONSHIP

e THE Bahamas Body-
building and Fitness Feder-
ation will hold its annual
Novice Bodybuilding
Championships tonight at
the National Center for
Performance Arts.

The championships is
expected to showcase a
number of first time com-
petitors and those who
competed before but never
won their divisional title.

Competitors from Grand
Bahama and Long Island
are expected to join a host
of competitors from New
Providence in the champi-
onship that will get started
at 8 pm.

Satelitte Bahamas Limit-
ed is the official sponsors
for the championships.

FRIDAY, MAY 29,

1 4

PAGE





Pictured are some of the Chinese workers contracted to work on the new National Sports Stadium.

2009







Fiscal budget should not
affect sports ministry

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WHILE there may have
been some concern about the
government’s 2009/2010 fiscal
budget that was presented in
the House of Assembly on
Wednesday, the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture
should not be affected at all.

Minister Desmond Bannis-
ter told The Tribune yesterday
that his ministry will maintain
a “fair and substantial” bud-
get for sports because they
have not spent all of the mon-
ey that was allocated from last
year.

“We had money in last
year’s budget, for example, to

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build a gym in Abaco and a
gym in Eleuthera and we did-
n’t build those gyms,” Bannis-
ter said.

“The year just beat us out
and we just didn’t get them
built, even though we have
designed them and the Min-
istry can now go ahead with
them. In that respect, we didn’t
build them. So if you take out
the money for those two gyms,
the money is still the same.”

In the budget, presented by
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham, the Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture will receive
an estimated $19,087,933, a
variance of $$1,110,127 from
the $17,087,933 from last year’s
budget.

Additionally, the subvention

Women’

to elite athletes have been
increased by $270,815 with an
estimated $1,170,815, up from
the $900,000 from last year.

Bannister said a full detail
of the allocation for his min-
istry will be outlined when he
makes his contribution in the
House.

But he noted that in this
year’s budget, there is a sub-
stantial amount of funding to
ensure that the work goes on
for the construction of the
national stadium that is being
headed by the People’s Repub-
lic of China.

“The stadium requires a
Bahamian component, so
there’s a half a million dollars
that is in there for work and
contracts for Bahamians,”

revealed Bannister, of the con-
struction that is currently
underway.

“There’s also the same allo-
cation for the subvention of
our elite athletes. That’s been
increased. So on the sports
side, there’s really no loss.”

To all sporting federations
and associations, Bannister
assured them all that the
endowment for sports has not
been affected at all.

“The government is com-
mitted to that endowment and
so federations need not be con-
cerned about that,” Bannister
charged. “I would say there are
two things that sports federa-
tions need to be concerned
about.

“They need to make sure



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff .

Desmond Bannister

that they are up to date with
their constitutions and they are
keeping us up to date with
their financial statements. Any
federation who is in compli-
ance, should get their money
as they did before.”

On the issue of those per-
sons who retire from the public
service this year, Bannister
said Ingraham mentioned that

SEE page 12

s national volleyball team

gearing up for NORCEA qualifiers

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

STILL basking in the historic
performance from the men’s
national team, the Bahamas
Volleyball Federation is gear-
ing up for an encore for the
women’s team.

Like the men, the women
will be travelling to Barbados
on June 9 to begin their
NORCEAY’S qualifying rounds
for the 2010 World Champi-
onships where they will have
to play both host Barbados and
Haiti in their pool.

Federation’s first vice presi-
dent Joseph ‘Joe Mo’ Smith,
who accompanied the men’s
team to Kingston, Jamaica
where they qualified to go to
the third round in Cuba in
August, know that the task will
be just as tough for the women.

“We have roughly two weeks
of preparation left,” said Smith,
who will travel as the head
coach for the women’s team.
“We know what we’re up
against.

“The difference is going to
be the new balls. I brought two
of them for us to get used to
playing with them. The ball
really threw the guys off in their
first game. It’s very light and it
travel quick. If we can get the



THE national men’s volleyball team pose after winning a her medal at the qualifiers for the FIVB Men’s Volleyball
World Championships.

girls to touch the ball before
they get to Barbados it will be
an incentive to them.”

While he preferred not to put
so much attention on the ball,
Smith admitted that the team
will have to play solid defense if
they are going to succeed.

“The plan is for us to readjust
our game off the net, instead

of playing tight on the net,” he
said. “So we will be doing some
things over the next two weeks
to get them ready.”

Although he missed about a
week working out with the
team as he traveled with the
men, Smith said the woman
were kept busy under the guid-
ance of assistant coach Jackie

Conyers.

He noted that they are look-
ing forward to taking a solid
team to the tournament, com-
prising of a mixture of locally-
based and collegiate players
returning home from school.

“The whole team should be

SEE page 12









Retailer
sees 30%

sales
Ue)

@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter

crobards @tribunemedia.net

COUPLED with the 25
per cent excise tax imposed
on perfumes and toilet
water, competition from
cruise ships’ onboard duty-
free stores and the Internet,
and the economic downturn,
one Bay Street retailer’s
sales have declined by 30 per
cent, Tribune Business was
told yesterday.

Tim Lightbourne, owner
of The Perfume Shop, said
that despite the duty-free
status placed on many items
sold on Bay Street, the Gov-
ernment having reduced the
excise tax on perfume and
toilet water from 25 per cent
to 10 per cent in Wednes-
day’s Budget, the “whop-
ping” Stamp duty imposed
on these items made the
Bahamas one of the most
heavily-taxed Caribbean des-
tinations.

Mr Lightbourne said that
even with the excise tax
decrease, retailers’ prices in
the Bahamas will still be
higher than competitors in
the region but “just as com-
petitive”.

“We lost over 7 per cent of
our profit margin as a result
of the tax increase [in the
2008-2009 Budget],” said Mr
Lightbourne.

“It’s been an extremely
hard year, but there is more
to it (the competition) than
just import duties. It’s the
Internet and major destina-
tions. The younger genera-
tion are buying on the Inter-
net and not from retail
shops.”

He suggested that for
downtown Bay Street to
become more competitive in
the region, it will need to
offer a diversity of stores.

Mr Lightbourne said
downtown merchants pri-
marily sell jewellery, make-
up, perfume and liquor.

“We have become a down-
town where if you go from
George Street to Market
Street, every shop is jew-
ellery,” he said.

“You need a greater vari-
ety of products to make the
whole of downtown come
back to life.”

President of the Nassau
Institute, Joan Thompson,
said the Government should
implement an across-the-
board flat rate of duty for
almost everything. She
argued that a 7 per cent sales
tax should be implemented
in the Bahamas.

“If we were to have a flat
sales tax on all goods and
services, that should provide
enough revenue for this
country,” said Mrs Thomp-
son.

“And government should
be downsized to live with the
revenue of the 7 per cent
tax.”

She said the reduction in
taxes for some sectors
seemed somewhat discrimi-
natory, and asserted that the
Government should not be
in the business of helping
some over others.

Mrs Thompson said most
retailers in the Bahamas are
facing the same challenges
and don’t see a turnaround
in the economy in the short
term.

“My gut says every retailer
is facing the same thing and
is worried about what sales
will be in the future,” said
Mrs Thompson.

“My gut sense says we
won't get out of this quickly.
People don’t change their
habits overnight.”

THE TRIBUNE

usine

FRIDAY,





MAY 2-9 -



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Law firm moves
on BVI expansion

Mj Lennox Paton to ‘officially open second international office in
next few months’ aiming to exploit ‘symmetry with Bahamas
MH Bahamas needs to do ‘a better job marketing’ its legal and

financial services

MH) Bahamian law firm ‘holding strong’ across all departments,

A >

Brian Simms

and contemplating no lay-offs

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

A Bahamian law firm yester-
day said it was forging ahead
with international expansion
plans despite the economic
slowdown, with its British Vir-
gin Islands (BVI) office set to
“officially open in the next few
months”, in a bid to exploit the
“symmetry” between the two
jurisdictions.

Brian Simms, the Lennox
Paton partner in charge of the
firm’s litigation/dispute resolu-
tion practice, said that while the
company had “seen a slight
slowdown” in legal work, unlike
other law practices it had not
reached “the point where we’re

Summit scales the peak
with 94% profit rise

* General insurance carrier enjoys
‘best year by a slim margin in
2008’ due to 110% improvement
in underwriting and net claims

reduction

* Anticipating tougher year in
2009, with gross written premium
likely to fall by 5-10% in line with
industry projections

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Summit Insurance Compa-
ny, the Bahamian general
insurance carrier through
which Insurance Management
places much of its business,
yesterday said fiscal 2008 was
its “best year yet by a slim
margin”, with improved
underwriting profits propelling
it to a 93.5 per cent net
income.

Timothy Ingraham, Sum-
mit’s general manager and
director, said “fair results on
the claims for most classes of
business” helped propel the
general insurance company to
$3.44 million in net income for
the 12 months to December
31, 2008, compared to $1.777
million the year before.

Underwriting profits more
than doubled to $3.543 mil-
lion, a 110.9 per cent increase
on the previous year’s $1.68
million, a performance aided
by an almost-21 per cent
reduction in net claims
incurred from $7.233 million
to $5.721 million.

“Last year was the best one
for us so far by a slim mar-
gin,” Mr Ingraham told Tri-
bune Business. “We had a fair
result on the claims for most
classes of business. It just sort
of worked out that way.

“We purchased a little more
reinsurance protection, so all
that helped to give us a posi-
tive result. Old claims also cost
slightly less than anticipated,
which helped to bring a posi-
tive result to the bottom line.

“We can say that we had a
reasonable year, and it’s posi-
tioned us well for this year.
Obviously we’re in a mode of

SEE page 6B

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

home owner shi

call our mortgage department today at
00 (Nassau) or 352-3670 (Freeport)



having to consider laying-off
staff and attorneys”.

He attributed this to Lennox
Paton’s diversified practice, and
its strength in financial services-
related fields such as trusts and
investment funds, coupled with
the fact that its real estate/con-
veyancing department had tar-
geted major resort develop-
ments for work rather than
focusing solely on private client
business.

Mr Simms also confirmed to
Tribune Business that Lennox
Paton was set to make BVI its
second operational base after
its London office, having whit-
tled down the number of candi-

SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
fesponsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



Deficits to
total $1.4bn

over 4 years

Central Bank pushes back Bahamian
economic recovery until 2011, with
national debt-to-GDP ratio breaking
50% ratio in 2010-2011

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The combined fiscal deficits the Bahamas will incur in
the 2008-2009 Budget year and over the next three fiscal
years will total a staggering $1.411 billion if the Gov-
ernment’s forecasts hold true, Tribune Business can
reveal, with the national debt breaking through the 50 per
cent-of-GDP ratio in the 2010-2011 fiscal period.

Using the Government’s figures from the 2009-2010
Budget communication, the total deficit (including debt
principal repayments) for the current and subsequent
three Budget years are projected as follows:

2008-2009: $422 million

2009-2010: $374 million

2010-2011: $340 million

2011-2012: $275 million

SEE page 5B



Chamber facing mid-June decision
on honded vehicle litigation action

If Government fails to reply in time

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Grand Bahama Chamber of Commerce will decide at its
next Board meeting in mid-June whether to issue a writ against
the Government over the use of bonded vehicles outside the
Port area if no “substantive response” is received by then from
the Attorney General’s Office, Tribune Business was told yes-
terday.

Gregory Moss, the Chamber’s president, said the Board had
already resolved to initiate legal action over the issue, but had
held off on filing a writ with the Supreme Court following pleas
from the Government via the Attorney General’s Office.

He explained that the only issue left to work out was the

SEE page 15B

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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are making
news in their neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising funds
for a good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.

OO

breakfast



Boaters welcome tax
exemption for spare parts

m@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

Bahamas-based boating
advocates and a South Florida
Boating association yesterday
lauded the Government’s
decision to provide exemp-
tions on repair parts for motor
vessels, their engines and
mechanical parts.

The Bahamas Hotel Asso-
ciation’s (BHA) vice-presi-
dent, Frank Comito, told Tri-
bune Business that the organ-
isation had been lobbying for
the Government to remove
the tax imposed last year on
boating vessel repair parts
coming into the Bahamas.

“We hope it will advocate
more and longer stays by
boats in the country,” said Mr
Comito.

He added that pleasure boat
arrivals to the Bahamas often
translate into room nights for

many resorts with marinas.

“This certainly has a broad-
er impact on the industry and
the country,” Mr Comito said.
“Policies like this send a mes-
sage to the international com-
munity that the Bahamas is a
place that they can rely on.”

Director of Association Ser-
vices for the 850-member
Marine Industries Association
of South Florida, Gordon
Connell, shared Mr Comito’s
sentiment on the policy
change.

"The Islands of the
Bahamas have always been a
popular destination, offer
some of the best fishing and
diving available and have
always been popular,” said
Mr Connell.

"Boaters still look to the
Bahamas as one of their top
destinations from Florida even
with the tough economic
times."

He added that the Bahamas
government clearly recognises,

with the implementation of a
tax exemption on service parts
for motor boats, that tariff
breaks are incentives that will
keep South Florida boaters
coming to these islands.

“Exemption on boat engine
repair parts are g00d because
they [boaters] want to go
where they are appreciated
and welcome,” said Mr Con-
nell.

It was recently revealed that
recreational yachts and boat
arrivals were down about 20
per cent this year.

Boating experts and enthu-
siasts also cited the high cost
of travel to the Bahamas,
including fuel and cruising
fees, as a reason for the
decline.

Mr Comito said islands such
as Abaco, Eleuthera and
Grand Bahama _ have
expressed frustrations over the
decline in private boat arrivals.
He argued that the industry
may have even seen a 50 per

cent decline.

The Government last July
implemented the 35 per cent
tax on repair parts for motor
vessels, which vexed many
South Florida boaters who fre-
quented the Bahamas year
round.

Publisher of Southern Boat-
ing Magazine, Skip Allen, told
Tribune Business that boaters
were opting to visit the Flori-
da Keys instead of making the
trip across the Gulfstream to
the waters of the Bahamas.

According to Mr Comito,
the Government is in need of
a long-term strategy for the
area of tourism that caters to
visiting pleasure craft.

“There needs to be a broad-
er approach to the industry,”
he said

Computer, printer prices may
decline on duty reduction

m@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE PROPOSED 45 to 10
per cent customs duty reduc-
tion for printer parts and
standalone computer moni-
tors could mean a drastic
reduction in their in-store
prices, a Custom Computers
manager said yesterday.

Tammy Thompson, who is
also the Hewlett Packard line

manager for the store, said
consumers could see a reduc-
tion on the price of certain
items as soon as today.

She said Custom Comput-
ers was awaiting a shipment
of products that may be sub-
ject to the decrease in import
duties. “Consumers will see
decreasing prices on the
shelf,” she said.

Ms Thompson said the store
has received numerous com-
plaints about the high price of
computer items, compared to
US prices.

She said many people opted
to defer repair of their com-
puters or forgo the item until
they could take a trip to the
US in order to purchase it.

“A lot of the parts they
could pick up in the States
they can purchase here,” said
Ms Thompson.

She suggested that now



“A lot of the
parts they
could pick up
in the States
they can pur-
chase here.”



Tammy Thompson

some of the duties have been
decreased there will be more
people shopping at home for
immediate replacement of
parts, instead of having to
travel abroad and buy in bulk.

“Let’s say they bought the
computer away. Now they

would purchase the replace-
ment parts here,” she said.

Custom Computers has not
suffered a decline in sales with
the failing economy, accord-
ing to Ms Thompson.

She said many people who
lost jobs because of the eco-
nomic downturn were encour-
aged to hone their computer
skills, and consequently
bought entry-level computers.

“A lot of people were buy-
ing entry level PCs from us,”
she said.

Custom Computers opened
their second location in the
old City Market Plaza on
Cable Beach in November last
year, and have been staying
competitive in the market by
offering classes related to the
much desired Apple comput-
ers.

Bahamas National Trust’s

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Have your children do hands-on
activities, visit National Parks, and
participate in adventurous
expeditions and field studies.

Lunch, all materials and gear included.

Ages: 8 = 14 years
Daily Hours: 9am - 3pm

New Providence: June 22nd - 27th
Venue: Retreat Gardens, Village Rd
Available spaces: 35 (first come, first served basis)

Grand Bahama: June 22nd - 27th
Venue: The Rand Nature Center
East Settler's Way
Available spaces: 35 (first come, first served basis)

Cost: $150.00 (non-BNT members)
$100.00 (BNT members)

For more information call:
393-1317 (Nassau)
352-5438 (Grand Bahama)
email: bnt@bnt.bs

Ze
Q





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009, PAGE 3B





Realtors: Government
just don’t get it on tax

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas Real Estate
Association’s (BREA) president
yesterday said “the Government
just don’t get it” when it came to
this nation’s competitiveness in
the foreign second home buyer
market, arguing that the Govern-
ment’s real property tax reforms
in the 2009-2010 Budget did not
go far enough.

William Wong told Tribune
Business that BREA, plus the
legal profession, had wanted the
Government to reinstate the
$35,000 cap on real property tax
paid on high-end homes, which
was removed in the 2008-2009
Budget. This, they argued, had
exposed wealthy foreign home
owners to higher levels of taxa-
tion, deterring interest from new
buyers and making the Bahamas
uncompetitive in the region in
this market. Most other nations,
BREA had argued, had no or
minimal property-based taxes.

“From what I see, this govern-
ment just doesn’t get it,” Mr
Wong told Tribune Business.
“We are not competitive in this
region, and the Government is
losing on both sides. People have
choices other than the Bahamas.

“It is not enough. This is not
the way to doit. We want people
to come here. They [the Govern-
ment] just don’t get it.”

While properties occupied by
their owners for nine months of
the year are exempt from real
property tax payments, Mr Wong
said it would be impossible to ask
wealthy foreign home owners to
stay for this duration, and to
police this.

He added that the Bahamas’
relatively high tax rates would not
only deter new buyers, thus cost-
ing the Government stamp tax
on the property purchase, but also
the per annum real property tax
rates. Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, in his 2009-2010 Bud-
get communication, announced
that while the $35,000 cap would
not be reinstated, the real prop-

BREA chief says ‘more relief was needed’ on real property tax cap issue

erty tax structure was being
reduced from three to two.

A 1 per cent rate would be
applied to properties valued at
up to $7.5 million, above the
$250,000 exemption level, and
properties valued in excess of $7.5
million would see a 0.25 per cent
rate applied on the value above
$7.5 million. Mike Lightbourn,

president of Coldwell Banker
Lightbourn Realty, yesterday
agreed with Mr Wong that the
Government’s amendments were
“not enough” and did not bring
the necessary real property tax
relief to wealthy Bahamian and
foreign home owners who occu-
pied their property for less than
nine months of the year.

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FAMGUARD

CORPORATION LIMITED

Incorporated under the laws of the Commonweatth of The Bahamas

INTERIM REPORT — THREE MONTHS ENDING 31 MARCH, 2008
MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIRMAN

Dear Shareholder:

The strong growth in premium income experienced in 2008 continued in 2009 and
we recorded at the end of the first quarter an increase in premium income of $2.7
million or 15.7% over prior year-to-date.

Our Group Life and Health Division recorded the strongest gains in premium
income as a result of the sustained growth in new business. At the end of March
2009, new sales outstripped the prior year-to-date by 82%.



CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS (UNAUDITED)
FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED 31 MARCH 2009

(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)

Cash flows from operating activities
et income

Adjustments for:

Depreciation

ment giving foreign purchasers
an incentive to build, rather than

“There’s some relief, but it’s
not enough. We needed more,”
Mr Lightbourn told Tribune Busi-
ness. Elsewhere, in a bid to
encourage real property tax
defaulters to pay, the Govern-
ment will write-off the surcharge
on owner-occupied dwellings.
The outstanding tax remains and
has to be paid within six months

of the amendments coming into
effect, after which a 5 per cent
per annum surcharge will be
levied on the outstanding bal-
ances. The tax-rate on foreign-
owned, vacant property valued at
up to $7,000 will be $100, with
properties worth more than
$7,000 paying a 1.5 per cent rate.
This is likely to be the Govern-

simply hold, then flip their real
estate for profit. The exemption
on owner-occupied property will
be applicable automatically
except for foreign home owners,
where the nine-month occupancy
period will continue to apply, and
a 0.5 per cent tax rate will be
applied to buildings on leased
Crown cays.



.
seal



BUR INS

Harsour Bay Suoppinc PLaza
322.3170

Case Cottace, Cas_e Beacu
327.7072





FLATTENS
YOUR TUMMY
& SLIMS
YOUR SHAPE.

ZeZeZzeron <~
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME (UNAUDITED)
FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED 31 MARCH 2009

(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars) besa

3 months to 3 months to
31 March 2009 31 March 2008
$ $

20,484,476 17,768,174
(2,283,130) (1,253,150)
18,201,346 16,515,024
1,604,804 1,154,892
19,806,150 17,669,916
2,303,409 2,292,048
112,932 83,450
(441,118)

INCOME
Gross premium income
Premium ceded to reinsurers
Net premium income
Annuity deposits
Net premium income and annuity deposits
Interest income
Dividend income
Change in unrealized loss on investments
Realized gain from sale of assets 100
Other operating income
Total income

BENEFITS & EXPENSES

3 months to 3 months to
31 March 2009 31 March 2008
$ $

1,570,838 2,747,405

156,348 153,661

22,378,939 19,757,957

323,841 215,445

Our decision to change our accounting method for equities during 2008 from
fair value through profit and loss (FVTPL) to available for sale (AFS) assisted in
minimizing fluctuations in investment income caused by changes in the price
of shares held in our equities portfolio. We recorded investment income of $2.4
million for the first quarter of 2009 compared to $1.9 million for the same period
last year. Prior year was impacted significantly by unrealized losses on equities of

$441 thousand.

During the quarter policyholder benefits trended higher than prior year-to-date by
30% reflecting an increase in health claims. This increase in policyholder benefits
negatively impacted net income, which ended the quarter at $1.6 million.

The Board of Directors declared a dividend of 6 cents per share, which was paid to
shareholders on May 18 2009 based on the performance of the company for the three
months to March 31 2009.

Sincerely, f ;

Norbeft E. Boissiere
Chairman

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET (UNAUDITED)
AS AT 31 MARCH 2009

(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars) ai Dieeanber

2009 2008
$ $

1,954,114
339,737
13,789,621

ASSETS
Cash and bank balances
Short term bank deposits
Other bank term deposits
Financial Investment Assets
Held-to-maturity
Available for sale

Loans

1,833,305
340,635
4,233,591

56,390,833
6,787,851
69,567,290
139,153,505
2,208,520
3,086,519 2,749,750
34,442,304 34,062,774

178,890,848 176,471,151

44,255 404
7,243,165
69,292,456
136,874,497

2,784,130

Total investment assets

Receivables and other assets
Premiums receivable
Property, plant and equipment, net

TOTAL

LIABILITIES & EQUITY
LIABILITIES
Reserves for future policyholders benefits
Other policyholders funds
Policy liabilities
ayables and accruals

Total liabilities

104,806,556
9,898,793
114,705,349
4,851,759
119,557,108

102,902,989
7,756,601
110,659,590
6,993,345
117,652,935
EQUITY
reference shares
Ordinary shares
Share premium
Revaluation surplus
Retained earnings
Total equity
TOTAL

10,000,000
2,000,000
10,801,080
9,922,302
26,610,358
59,333,740

178,890,848

10,000,000

2,000,000
10,801,080
10,377,616
25,639,520
58,818,216

176,471,151





441,118
(292,226)
1,921,295 1,963,015
(2,303,409) (2,292,048)

112,932 $3,450
1,392,991 2,699,259

Change in appreciation on investments in equities
Change in mortgage provision (6,642)
Reserve for policyholder benefits

nterest income
Dividend income

Operating profit before working capital changes
(Increase) decrease in operating assets
Receivables and other assets 575,610

(336,769)

(2,059,784)
remium in arrears 488,924
(Decrease) increase in operating liabilities
(2,141,586) (172,457)
2,142,192 148,617
1,632,438 807,325

ayables and accruals
Other policyholder funds
Net cash from operating activities
Cash flows from investing activities
44,996
(618,423)
84,948
96,451
(367,843)
(11,250,000)
1,188,560
112,932
(10,708,379)

(318,573)
(1,103,542)

olicy loans

urchase of fixed assets
Construction in progress
Other loans repaid

let mortgage loans issued

60,410
(597,078)
urchase of Government bonds
nterest received

2,496,682
83,450
621,349

Dividends received

Net cash from investing activities
Cash flows from financing activities
Dividends paid

Net cash used in financing activities

(600,000) (600,000)
(600,000) (600,000)



(9,675,941)
16,083,472
6,407,531

828,674
13,912,100
14,740,774

let increase in cash and cash equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of the period
Cash and cash equivalents at end of the period

Cash and cash equivalents is comprised of:
Cash and bank balances

Short-term deposits

Other bank term deposits

1,833,305

340,635
4,233,591
6,407,531

4,445,601
329,659
9,965,514
14,740,774

BENEFITS
Policyholders’ benefits
Reinsurance recoveries
Net policyholders’ benefits
Increase in reserves for future policyholders’ benefits
Total benefits
EXPENSES
Commissions
Operating expenses
Premium tax
Depreciation and ammortization expense
Bad debt expense
Total expenses
Total benefits and expenses

NET INCOME

Earnings per share

11,997,201 9,229,155
624,133 846.444
11,373,068 8,382,711

1,921,295 1,963,014

13,294,363 10,345,725

2,908,194
3,670,388

2,648,135
3,555,827
617,957 537,621
323,841 215,445
6,642 292,201

7,513,738 6,664,827

20,808,101 17,010,552

1,570,838 2,747,405
0.16 0,27



NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED INTERIM FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
AS AT 31 MARCH 2009

1. ACCOUNTING POLICIES

hese interim consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with
International Accounting Standards 34: Interim Financial Reporting, The accounting policies
used in the preparation of the interim consolidated financial statements are consistent with those
used in the annual consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2008.







hese unaudited consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its
wholly owned subsidiaries, Family Guardian Insurance Company, FG General Insurance Agency
Limited, FG Financial Limited, FG Capital Markets Limited and BahamaHealth Insurance
Brokers and Benefits Consultants Limited.

2. EARNINGS PER SHARE

Earnings per share:



3 months to
31 March 2008

3 months to
31 March 2009

10,000,000
$ 1,570,838
0.16 $

10,000,000
$ 2,747,405
0,27

Weighted average number of shares outstanding
Consolidated net income
Earnings per share

3. COMMITMENTS

Outstanding commitments to extend credit under the mortgage loan agreements amounted to

approximately $3,675,003 as at 31 March 2009 (31 December 2008: $2,820,390)

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY (UNAUDITED)

FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED 31 MARCH 2009

(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)

Preference Ordinary

Share Revaluation Retained

Shares Shares Premium Reserve Earnings Total

$ $

Balance as of December 31, 2007 $ 10,000,000 $ 20,000,000
Transfer from revaluation surplus - -
Adjustment to fair value of investment in equities
Adjustment to appraised value of land and buildings
Net income for 2008
Dividends declared and paid -

preference shares

ordinary shares ($0.24 per share)
Balance as of December 31, 2008
Adjustment to fair value of investment in equities
Adjustment to appraised value of land and buildings
Net income for the period
Dividends declared and paid -

preference shares

ordinary shares ($0.06 per share)
Balance as of March 31, 2009

10,000,000 20,000,000

$ 10,000,000 $ 20,000,000

$ $ $ $
$ 10,801,000 $ 7,361,959 $ 23,840,477 $ 54,003,516
(496,893)

3,512,550
4,899,043

(496,893)
3,512,550 -
. 4,899,043

(700,000) (700,000)

% 2,400,000 2,400,000

10,377,616
(455,314)

10,801,000 25,639,520 58,818,216
- (455,314)

1,570,838 1,570,838

(600,000)
$ 59,333,740

(600,000)

$ 10,801,000 $ 9,922,302 $ 26,610,358









PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Law firm moves on BVI expansion

FROM page 1B

dates to head the new office to
three.

“We’ve just finished renova-
tions to the office in BVI, which
has the capacity for six attor-
neys,” he said. “We expect to
have the office opening shortly
in the next few months.”

By then, Lennox Paton will



which Lennox Paton works.

“We chose BVI for a num-
ber of reasons,” he explained.
“BVI and the Bahamas are sim-
ilar in the products they offer,
and BVI, as an offshore corpo-
rate jurisdiction, has trust busi-
ness and mutual fund business,
which we deal with here.

“Our International Business
Companies (IBCs) Act was
developed from BVI legislation.

Mr Simms added that BVI
was the chosen domicile for 40
per cent of the world’s offshore
hedge funds, giving it a “very
strong presence” and the ability
to compete directly with the
Cayman Islands.

“BVI is fairly fertile ground
in that the large firms that are
there do not have a significant
presence, and we feel that given
our client base and the many

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FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED

NOTICE

Please be advised that the Head Office and
the Registered Office of the company will be

moved from the Bahamas Financial Centre,
Charlotte & Shirley Streets, 2nd Floor, Nassau,
Bahamas to Royal Bank House, East Hill Street,
Nassau, Bahamas effective 25th May, 2009.

D. BURROWS-HAINES (Mrs.)
Corporate Secretary

Dated this 22nd May 2009

Telephone Number - 356-8500
Telefax - 356-8660



there.” Lennox Paton already
had an associate on the ground
in BVI in the shape of Fiona
Forbes, and after appointing
someone to head the office, the
company will assess how quick-
ly it expands the operation
there.

When asked why Bahamian
law firms should look to expand
internationally, Mr Simms said
moving into different jurisdic-
tions created diversified rev-
enue streams, and helped to
guard against a downturn in
business in any one particular
country.

He told Tribune Business: “T
think it is a hedge against hav-
ing all your eggs in one basket.
If you spread yourself out, you
hedge against a slowdown of
business in any particular juris-
diction.”

Lennox Paton is not the only
Bahamian law firm to have
expanded overseas, Callender’s
& Co having also opened a
London office, and Higgs &
Johnson moved into the Cay-
man Islands through its acqui-
sition and merger with Truman,
Bodden & Company.

Mr Simms, though, said
Lennox Paton preferred to
grow “organically”, opening its
own offices and establishing its
own presence, rather than via
acquisition.

“We'll grow our own office
with our own people, and our

BKG/410.03

culture and our work ethic,” he
explained. “We’re quite happy
growing our firm and our peo-
ple.”.

The Lennox Paton litigation
partner told Tribune Business
that while he believed the
Bahamas was competitive in the
global legal services market, it
needed “to do a better market-
ing job” to ensure it matched
rival international financial cen-
tres.

“My personal view is we are
competitive,” Mr Simms said.
“My view is the other jurisdic-
tions do a better marketing gen-
erally, and talk about how good
their services are, when they’re
no better than ours. We have a
much larger court system - we
have approximately 10 judges
in the Court of First Instance
[Supreme Court] when others
have just one or two, and get
matters through the legal sys-
tem much faster.

“We don’t go out and mar-
ket our strengths. We are not
chained to Britain, or a sibling
of other Crown protectorates.
As firms in those countries
grow, they market their sister
jurisdictions and often criticise
the Bahamas, but only to ensure
they’re getting the business for
the jurisdictions they’re in.”

Mr Simms added: “As a juris-
diction we need to put more
effort into selling our services
and the fact we have the best

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT TREASURY BILLS

Sealed tenders for B$84,100,000.00 of 91-Day Treasury Bills
will be received by the Banking Manager, The Central Bank
of The Bahamas, Frederick Street, Nassau up to 3:00 p.m
on Friday, May 29, 2009. Successful tenderers, who will be
advised should take up their bills against payment on

Tuesday, June 2, 2009. These bills will be in minimum
multiples of B$100.00. Tenders are to be on special forms
obtainable from the Central Bank of The Bahamas or

Commercial Banks.

Tenders must state the net price percent (in multiples of one
cent) and should be marked “Tender”. The Central Bank of the
Bahamas reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.

Ce aan, €
eee steep eee



legislation in the world. The
Bahamas has the best trust leg-
islation that everyone wants to
emulate. The Bahamas has
been a leader in the trust field,
and need to make sure we hold
on to work we have in areas
that are slowing down.”

The Lennox Paton partner
said the Bahamas “will be one
of those” international finan-
cial centres to survive the Oba-
ma/G-20 onslaught, “providing
we continue to put in best
efforts, putting forwards good
products and good services”.

As for Lennox Paton’s cur-
rent status, Mr Simms said:
“Certainly, there is a general
slowdown in the world econo-
my, and that ultimately has an
effect on legal services. In our
particular case, we have seen a
slight slowdown, but not to the
point where we have to consid-
er laying-off staff and associ-
ates.

“We’re monitoring the situ-
ation, but are quite pleased with
the way the firm has been
doing, even in this slow time,
and are maintaining a certain
level of business.”

Mr Simms said Lennox
Paton’s conveyancing/real
estate department “remains
busy”. He added: “That is prob-
ably due to the fact that strate-
gically we have placed the firm
as a major legal advisor to
resort developments, as
opposed to focusing solely on
private client business.

“As such, these resort devel-
opments need constant legal
services, including refinancing
and restructuring, in this eco-
nomic market.”

All departments, including lit-
igation, were “holding steady”,
Mr Simms added, with Lennox
Paton not experiencing a slow-
down to “the extent of other
firms”.

“Firms very dependent on
conveyancing, particularly pri-
vate client conveyancing, are
suffering greatly at this time,”
he explained.

Mr Simms said it could be
dangerous for law firms to lay-
off attorneys during a recession,
as they might not be in a posi-
tion to be competitive when the
economy recovers.

Lennox Paton was not con-
templating lay-offs, but Mr
Simms added: “That’s not to
say we’re not watching things
and not being careful where we
expand and how we expand.

“At the end of the day, we’d
have to think long and hard
about letting anyone go.

“We have a good relationship
with all our employees, and it
would be hard to let any go.”

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THE TRIBUNE

FROM page 1B

Adding those four figures together
produces $1.411 billion as the com-
bined total deficit the Government
will incur over the next four years,
highlighting the full extent of the cri-
sis in the public finances, and the dif-
ficulty the Ingraham administration
will have in getting them back on
track.

The Government appears to be
pinning its faith in a relatively strong
economic rebound from 2011
onwards, with gross domestic product
(GDP) in current prices rising by 0.9
per cent that year, with a more sus-
tained 2.5 per cent GDP expansion in
2011-2012. It also seems to be hoping
that the level of economic growth
will have returned to normal, some-
thing that is also not a given, duc to
the depth and severity of the current
recession.

Even the Central Bank of the
Bahamas appears to have again post-
poned its forecast recovery for the
Bahamian economy, writing in the
economic background to the Prime
Minister’s Budget communication:
“The prospects for the Bahamian

“It is up to us as
people to realise
that continually
placing demands
on government to
do things is out of
the question.”



Rick Lowe

economy over the remainder of 2009
appear weak, with real GDP not
expected to return to a positive tra-
jectory before 2011.”

Stripping out debt principal
redemptions, and using the GFS
deficit, the Government’s predic-
tions, if they come true, will see the

ublic finances run a cumulative

1.073 billion in deficits between the
2008-2009 and 2011-2012 Budget
periods.

Those deficits, as forecast, are:

2008-2009: $352 million

2009-2010: $286 million
2010-2011: $250 million
2011-2012: $185 million

And the GFS deficits, as a per-
centage of GDP, for those periods
are:

2008-2009: 4.7 per cent

2009-2010: 3.9 per cent

2010-2011: 3.3 per cent

2011-2012: 2.4 per cent

All this goes to show that getting
the fiscal deficit and national debt
under control, and recreating what
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
referred to on Thursday as “fiscal
headroom”, will be no easy task. The
Government seems to be hoping that
a return to GDP growth in 2011 will
ultimately keep the rising debt-to-
GDP ratio in check, before it gets
out of control.

Not surprisingly, the continuous-
ly heavy fiscal deficits will impact the
Government’s debt. The direct debt
charge on government is expected
to increase as follows:

2008-2009: $2.912 billion

2009-2010: $3.198 billion

2010-2011: $3.448 billion

2011-2012: $3.633 million

GN-865

GOVERNMENT

THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT
(CHAPTER 326)

lt is hereby notified pursuant ta Section 7 of the Industries Encouragement
Act that the Minister is about to consider whether the following products
should be declared “APPROVED PRODUCTS” for the purpose of that
Act.

Biodiesel, Biomass, Ethanol

Any interested person having any objection to such a declaration should give
notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds thereof to the Office of the
Prime Minister, before the 8th day of June, 2009, by letter addressed to:-

NOTICE

NOTICE

RAW MATERIALS TO BE USED
IN MANUFACTURE

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER

Act.

Coconut, Jatropha Oil, Miscanthus,
Sugar Cane, Potassium Hydroxide,
Potassium Methoxide, Sodium
Hydroxide, Sodium Methoxide,

THE PERMANENT SECRETARY
OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER
P.O. Box CB-10980

NASSAU, N.P.,
THE BAHAMAS

DAVID R. DAVIS

Permanent Secretary

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER

THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT

NOTICE

(CHAPTER 326)

It is hereby notified pursuant to Section 5 of the Industries Encouragement
Act, Chapter 301, that the Minister is about to consider whether the
manufacturer specified in the first column of the table below should be
declared an “APPROVED MANUFACTURER?” in relation to the products
specified in the third column,

MANUFACTURER LOCATION OF PRODUCTS
FACTORY PREMISES

Biodiesel, Biomass,
Fihanel

Natural (ils
International

Any interested person having any objection to such a declaration should give
notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds thereof to the Office of the
Prime Minister, before the 8th day of June, 2009, by letter addressed to:-

Abaco, The Bahamas

THE PERMANENT SECRETARY
OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER
P.O. Box CB-10980

NASSAU, N.P.,
THE BAHAMAS

DAVID R. DAVIS

Permanent Secretary

Phosphoric Acid/HCL

FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009, PAGE 5B

Deficits to total $1.4bn over 4 years

And as a percentage of GDP, they
are:

2008-2009: 38.9 per cent

2009-2010: 43.2 per cent

2010-2011: 46.2 per cent

2011-2012: 47.4 per cent

Yet the latter set of figures do not
take into account the $439 million
worth of debt that the Government
has guaranteed, a figure that is like-
ly to have been increased further by
the $30 million guarantee the Ingra-
ham administration on Wednesday
gave to the CLICO (Bahamas) poli-
cyholders.

With government-guaranteed debt
already amounting to 6 per cent of
GDP, and the latter figure declin-
ing, this has to be added on to the
Government’s direct charge to obtain
a true picture of the national debt.

This means that the national debt
will increase to 49.2 per cent at the
2009-2010 budget year-end, with this
breaking the 50 per cent gap to 52.2
per cent in 2010-2011. And for 2011-
2012, the national debt-to-GDP will
be 53.4 per cent.

Sounding the alarm, Rick Lowe, a
Nassau Institute executive and noted
fiscal hawk, said of the Governmen-
ts Budget figures: “We’re over the

precipice. It’s the perfect storm.”

He added that, when the Govern-
ment’s fiscal woes were added to the
escalating problems with crime, edu-
cation, the courts and other areas:
“That compounds all the other prob-
lems we face in the country. It could
be the tipping point. It’s going to be
very hard to recover.

“It leaves me speechless. It’s obvi-
ous the Government’s going to have
avery difficult task ahead of them.
The responsibility rests in Parliament
and successive governments, and
wanton and profligate spending as if
future generations don’t matter.

“It’s up to us as people to realise
that continually placing demands on
government to do things is out of the
question.”

The Government is basing its fiscal
forecasts on the International Mon-
etary Fund’s (IMF) projections of
1.5 per cent real GDP growth for the
Bahamas in 2011, and 3 per cent in
2012.

It is also assuming that recurrent
revenues, as a percentage of GDP,
will increase from 17.5 per cent in
2008-2009 to 20.4 per cent in 2011-
2012. It has been forecast as remain-
ing flat at 20.7 per cent of GDP in
2011-2012.

GN-&64

GOVERNMENT
NOTICE

NOTICE

THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT

(CHAPTER 326)

li is hereby notified pursuant to Section 7 of the Industries Encouragement
Act that the Minister is about to consider whether the following products
should be declared “APPROVED PRODUCTS" for the purpose of that

RAW MATERIALS TO BE USED
IN MANUFACTURE

Unfinished cabinet doors, lumber,
plywood, formica, corian, nails,

(Cabinets

acrews, wood, hardware, contact

cement

Any interested person having any objection to such a declaration should give
notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds thereof to the Office of the
Prime Minister, before the 8th day of June, 2009, by letter addressed to:-

THE PERMANENT SECRETARY
OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER
P.O. Box CB-10980

NASSAU, N.P.,
THE BAHAMAS

DAVID R. DAVIS

Permanent Secretary

NOTICE

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER

THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT

(CHAPTER 326)

specified in the third column.

The Abaco Cabinet
Company

The Bahamas

It is hereby notified pursuant to Section 5 of the Industries Encouragement
Act, Chapter 301, that the Minister is about to consider whether the
manufacturer specified in the first column of the table below should be
declared an “APPROVED MANUFACTURER?” in relation to the products

MANUFACTURER LOCATION OF PRODUCTS
FACTORY PREMISES

Marsh Harbour, Abaco,

Cabinets

Any interested person having any objection to such a declaration should give
notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds thereof to the Office of the
Prime Minister, before the 8th day of June, 2009, by letter addressed to:-

THE PERMANENT SECRETARY
OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER
P.O. Box CB-10980

NASSAU, N.P.,
THE BAHAMAS

DAVID R. DAVIS

Permanent Secretary





PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





NOTICE

DYNOMAR DEVELOPMENT CORP.

In Voluntary Liquidation












































Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act. 2000,
DYNOMAR DEVELOPMENT CORP. is in dissolution as of
May 27, 2009.

Steffen H. Heitland situated at 3200 Tamiami Trail North,
Naples, Florida is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

CLEAR WATER FUND LIMITED

HOTICE = hereby green that the Cosifors of the abowesesdi Company we

7 ari “ewan & 7
feaguird on of baton June 90 2000 to card tain nares and addraasaa, with

Particulars of fiir Gebts or daims, and fie rames and addresses of ther

Attra [if ary), io Alien J Tres and Maria M4, Féréra, Joint Liquidalirs ol

Clear Water Fund Limited, cfo FT Consultants Lic. P.O. Bow N-4992, Nassau

Claris

Dated this 20° day of May, 2005

Adret Treea
Mara M. Finire
Joirt Liquidators

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

Pursuant to the peovisions of Section 137 (4) of The International
Business Companies Act, 2000, Motice is hereby given thatt:-

UNICOM LIMITED is in dissolution;
the dale of commencement of the dissolution is 28° day af May,

2008,

the name of the Liquidator i Alison J. Treco, FT Consultants Led.,
One Monlaguea Placa, East Bay Street, P.O. Bow Meds,
Nassau, Bahamas

FURTHER NOTICE is hereby given thal the Creditors of the above-
named Company are required, on or before the 30° cay of June, 2009 to
send their names and addresses, with particulars of their dable or claims,
and the namas end addresses of their Attorneys (if any), to the
Liquidator, Alson Treco, elo FT Consultants Ltd., P.O. Box M-3932,

Nassau, Bahamas.

Deted this 2° dey of May, A.D. 2008

Algom J. Treco
Liquidator

ROYAL = FIDELITY

eoney at Work

Summit scales the peak
with 94% profit rise

FROM page 1B

trying to hold on to the busi-
ness we have. Growth is not a
realistic target at this point,
and having had a good year
last year, hopefully it will soft-
en the impact this time. We’re
all in the same boat in that
regard.”

Mr Ingraham acknowl-
edged, though, that with the
economy mired in recession,
he expected that 2009 was
“going to be more of a chal-
lenge”, with Summit joining
the likes of RoyalStar Assur-
ance, J. S. Johnson and NUA
in projecting a 5-10 per cent

extent.”

ly to $42.0645 million, com-

drop in top-line gross written
premium.

Summit, though, actually
did more with less in 2008, so
to speak. For while gross writ-
ten premiums increased slight-

pared to $40.133 million in
2007, net written premiums
actually declined from $20.565
million to $19.84 million, due
to the more than $2 million
increase in reinsurance cover-

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, CRYSTAL LEWIS of #17
Windward Isle Way, intend to change my son’s name from

AVONTE JERVAR LEWIS to AVONT JERVAR SAUNDERS.
lf there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, KIRSCH LEWITT
FERGUSON of the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, intend to
my name to KIRCH LEWITT FERGUSON, If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write
such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date
of publication of this notice.

NOTICE
OF
CHERRY PIE
HOLDING LIMITED

Pursuant to Park [X, Section 137 (6) of the (Interna-
tional Business Companies Act, 2000), we hereby sub-
mit that winding-up and dissolution of the Company
has been completed on the 27th day of May, 2009.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

FG CAPITAL TS
BROKERAGE

EB & ADVISORY SERYVIC-ES

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:

THURSDAY,

28 MAY 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,602.47 | CHG 0.67 | %CHG 0.04 | YTD -109.89 | YTD % -6.42
FINDEX: CLOSE 792.33 | YTD -5.09% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

S2wk-Low
1.28
10.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
2.14
10.18
2.75
6.00
1.27
1.32
7.50
10.00
10.35
4.95

Securit
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnsen
Premier Real Estate

1.40
11.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.74
2.83
6.02
2.79
1.32
7.76
10.97
10.40
5.09
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol. EPS $
0.127
0.992
0.244

-0.877
0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

Div $ P/E
1.40
11.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.74
2.83
6.02
3.04
1.40
7.76
10.97
10.40
5.09
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

See eee eee eee ee
29299090N909000000
666656600606506060

11.0
55.6

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale

Change Daily Vol. Interest
0.00 T%

0.00 Prime + 1.75%
0.00 T%

0.00 Prime + 1.75%

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

S52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Bid $
7.92
4.00
0.35

Ask $

Last Price
14.60
6.00
0.35

Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
8.42
6.25

0.40



“Reinsurance costs have
increased marginally, and
that’s something we can’t pass
on. That’s going to impact the
bottom line to a certain



Timothy Ingraham

age that was purchased.

“So far to date it’s been fair-
ly reasonable,” Mr Ingraham
said.

“T think it’s going to come
through in the latter part of
the year.

“A lot of people will have
been laid-off, there savings
will have been exhausted, so
things will tighten up and peo-
ple will look to save money
on insurance.

“Hopefully, at the end of
this year, we’ll start to pull out
of this.”

When asked whether Sum-
mit was projecting similar
gross written premium
decreases to the likes of rival
RoyalStar, Mr Ingraham said:

“We can expect to see that.
We've started to see it already
in one or two lines.” It was
especially prevalent in motor
insurance, as Summit clients
switched from comprehensive
to third party coverage.

Given the Bahamian econ-
omy’s current condition, Mr
Ingraham said Summit was in
no position to pass on
increased reinsurance costs to
its clients, something that
would also impact its financial
performance in 2009.

“Reinsurance costs have
increased marginally, and
that’s something we can’t pass
on. That’s going to impact the
bottom line to a certain
extent,” the Summit general
manager explained.

During 2008, Summit’s per-
sonnel expenses rose from
$694,936 in the previous year
to $761,669, with general and
administrative expenses rising
from $482,006 to $532,179.

As a result, total operating
expenses rose from $1.211 mil-
lion in 2007 to $1.495 million
in 2008. Mr Ingraham said the
increases were caused by the
combination of a new com-
puter system’s installation, and
the full-year impact of addi-
tional staff, who had only been
appointed mid-way through
fiscal 2007.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, FABIAN MARSTULLAS
SAUNDERS of #6 Tranquil Gardens Subdivision, P.O. Box
N-10006, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to my name to FABIAN
MARSTULLAS ARANHA, If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections
to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau,
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of
publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANNA GRACE LECORGNE
of EASTERN ROAD, P.O. BOX N-3006, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 22"> day of May, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
AIRLEASE FIVE LIMITED is in dissolution. Mrs Alrena
Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at Winterbotham
Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names addresses and
particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before June 8th, 2009

Os 918d:

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA _ Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3758 1.65 4.83
2.8962 -1.49 -3.35
1.4630 2.05 5.25
3.1964 -5.59 -13.64
12.7397 0.96 5.79
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1599
1.0526
1.0322 -0.08
1.0523 1.45
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
LUNDBERG TRADING INC., is in dissolution. Continen-
tal Liquidators Inc. 1s the Liquidator and can be contacted
at 60 Market Square, P.O. Box 1906, Belize City, Belize.
All persons having claims against the above-named company
are required to send their names, addresses and particulars of
their debts or claims to the Liquidator before 27th day of June,
2009,

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
1.3875 Colina Money Market Fund
3.1964 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
12.1564 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Div $
1.3124
2.9230

30-Apr-09
31-Mar-09
15-May-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
30-Apr-09
30-Apr-09
30-Apr-09

0.56
-3.59
0.00
0.71
1.63

0.56
-3.59
0.00
-12.76
5.26
3.22
5.23

Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
ing price in last 52 weeks
last 52 weeks
Previous Close
Today's Close -
Change - Ch

hted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. - olume of the prior week

rom day to day EPS $ -A compa reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths.
es traded today NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

cy ai : 2s ena ge }
Tha h. ear

Kor Cowon es Lied ateen line.
Lige Kecy

ighted price for daily volume rice - F pri |

pri

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S11) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525





THE TRIBUNE



















































Finter Bank & Trust (Bahernes) Linsited

Notes io Mon-Consclicated Financial Staerscns (Continued)

I Bisk Management (Continued)

Currency risk (continaed)
The Fol loving if An anahysis of peeeis lubilities and chorchiolder'’ a aunty on Lkecerber 31,
CUPRENEY | if thoes of ciotlars)

ek by

21a

ELIRCE WTHERS TOTAL,
Asoois

40,i0 §
Lies aed ahveancos |e a

Lither aeaeis 14 - - 40

Lash and departs wee berks 4.959

Total aiseta
Liabilities and shareholder's
ceils
Dae bo Danks
Calenen' caren and dep
acts
Caheer liatilinies
Sharchobhier's qjuity
1.3tal liatalees and shorcholkder's
6914 §

equity 11 Bt

Currency risk (continued)

Bar

i EURO OTHERS TOTAL
Anrty

ash and duc fom banks 7 ote £ | 458 £24 ike * 21K * Tien

Lone ond aca noe. ag a7) Le LEI 73h

} 12 a9

i an

Other aescts 7
Toul aasers § Sold
Liwtlites aad Hharchelder’s

eyuity

[dur to hanks
Customers current aed depot

ACT
Ceher liutelinies

Shares den’ 5. equity

Total abel ic aed ehoarchodier

expats § 74) f shit
fh a rere
rate against the LS dollaz, with all other variobles held constant, the result om the nom-consolidated
statement of income is as follows:

cme s heal celiale thal the elieet at a easly pecsible avement of the Cur heres

Effect on
Profit

Changes iin
Currency Currency Rate

Ag of December, 41 2008
FUR
EVE
CHE
CHE

4426
(3,928)
14 7Fo

(38,079)

As of December, 31 2007
EUR

ELE =
CHE t 2.04% 428
CHE {428}

545]

(5,351)

Excessive risk concentrations
Concentrviions onise when a nunber of COUMLEr RIES Tne engaged if sitolar buen eclviles,
similar geographac regions of have similar ecomoméc features which oy cause their abélity ie meet
comtractial obligations to be sintilarly affected by changes in economic, political and other
Comeibons Comecnizaisans indicme ithe relative semsitivigy of the

developments ina particular industry or geographic region.

Bank’s perlormwnce to

In order to avoid excessive comcentrations of risk, the Bank's policies and procedures include
specilic guadelines to focus om mamlaining diversified portiolios. In addition to the Bank's own
policies and procedures, regulatory guidance related to the concentration of risks must also be
adhered to

The distribution of assets and liabilities at December 31, by geographic region wes as follows (im

hones of dollars’

ee Zia.
Assets Liabilities

217

Assets Liabdlities
5 Alaay S 2n297 3238
5,463 a erk3
9 a3 7365
Pas
e178

13,509
1028
549 328
7 tS
$70.80)

Switeeriand
Wieser Eerope * [2.675
Batumas & Canbissin
Osher

(o744
1437 1 Gah

§ Lids § dh

* ccliing Meier’

Ciperational risk

Operational nisk is the risk of loss ansing from systems failure, human eros, food of eciernal
evens. When costal: fai) to perform, operational miks can caus: damage lo reputation, have
legal or regulatory implications, of lead to financial loss
operational risks, bul through a control framework and by mondioring and responding to potential
rigka, the Hank 16 able io manage the neka, Conbnols over thease nike incleds ellpetive scpregation
of duties, access, suthoreation ond reconcilintion procedures, staff education and assessment
processes, including the use of internal contra. The Bank canies oul a regular mview of all
ORT ilicnal Arens bo congue opermional risks are being peaperly identified, controlled and reported
Contingency plans are in place to achiewe business continusty im the ewent of serious disruptions to
During the vear cried December 31, 2008, loses anaing fram operaticeeal

The Hank carol Sopect io aimanme all

business operalices

efnars Bnouneed to approx mately oaT eos

Li. Fair Value of Financial [nstrements

Financial instruments utilized by the Bank include recorded aserts and iatiliters, a& well as heres thal
perinatal lh The majority of the Pam's financial instruments are either
short-term in matere or have interest rates thet aviomatically reset to market om a pericelic basis.
Accordingly, the estimaiod fair value is net significantly dillerent from ihe carrying value tor each

nol? Of-Balarce shee Ask

major calegery of the Bank's recorded assets and liabilities.

To advertise in
The Tribune Classified
call
502-2351

FROM page 1B

definition of ‘consumable
stores’ in relation to Grand
Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) licensees being able
to use their bonded vehicles
outside the Port area for busi-
ness purposes.

The Chamber, Mr Moss
added, had already submitted
to the Government a Supreme
Court judgment, other legal
precedents and
definitions/interpretations of
the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment to show that the con-
cerns of the Ministry of
Finance and Customs Depart-
ment were unfounded.

Mr Moss said that discus-
sions with the Customs
Department had been “taken
to the point where Customs
had represented that they nev-
er suggested bonded vehicles
could not move out of the Port
area, and that they would not
confiscate them if they moved
out of the Port area”.

However, Customs then
raised the issue that GBPA
licensees “had converted the
use of their vehicles to con-
sumable stores under the pro-
visions of the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement” by taking them -
and using them for the pur-
poses of their business - out-
side the Port area.

The issue was then referred
by Customs to the Attorney
General’s Office over the
meaning of ‘consumable
stores’. When no word was
forthcoming from the Gov-
ernment, Mr Moss said: “We
set a deadline of May 8 by
which we would have to issue
a writ against the Govern-
ment.

“We finally issued a letter
to them at the end of April
that if they didn’t respond by

FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009, PAGE 15B

Chamber facing mid-

June decision on bonded
vehicle litigation action

that date, we would file a
writ.”

This, the Chamber presi-
dent, explained, prompted an
immediate response from the
Attorney General’s Office,
which said that the issues
raised by the organisation’s
letter “were such that they
were taking the matter seri-
ously”, and had reverted back
to the Ministry of Finance and
Customs. In the meantime, the
Government had “asked us to
hold off, which we did”.

The two issues raised by the
Government and Customs
were, Mr Moss explained, that
Port Authority licensees were
“exporting” their bonded
vehicles by taking them out-
side the Port area.

Judgment

The Chamber as a result
furnished the Government
with the Supreme Court judg-
ment won by UNEXSO and
other legal precedents to show
that “a temporary excursion
of bonded vehicles out of the
Port area does not amount to
exporting” because they
would not remain outside
Freeport permanently - only
for temporary business pur-
poses.

The other concern raised,
Mr Moss said, was that by tak-
ing bonded vehicles outside
the Port area, licensees could
convert them for personal use
by selling, gifting or otherwise
transferring them to someone
else for that purpose.

The Chamber president,
though, said this could only
apply when the actual title
changed hands.

“We said to them this now
brings the matter to rest,” Mr
Moss said.

“There is no other provision



or definition from the Hawks-
bill Creek Agreement that
brings to bear on this issue.”

He added: “We’ve deter-
mined at a Board level that
we would defer the matter for
a month and review it at the
next Board meeting, which is
the middle of next month
[June].

“We are hoping that we will
have a substantive response
from the Government at that
meeting. We already have a
Board resolution to commerce
legal action.” Without a
response from the Govern-
ment, “we will have to make a
decision at that meeting”.

Customs’ policy has been
not to allow bonded vehicles
outside the Port area, some-
thing the Chamber has argued
contravenes the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement, and thus
the law.

The Hawksbill Creek
Agreement allows Port
Authority licensees to import
into Freeport goods that are
bonded - or duty free, mean-
ing no import or stamp duties
are paid on them - provided
they are for legitimate use in
the licensee’s own business.
They key test for determining
whether goods should be sold
as bonded or duty-paid is
whether they are to be used
by a Port Authority licensee in
their own legitimate business
activities.

The fear among Port
Authority licensees is that
Customs could apply its policy
on vehicles to other bonded
goods, potentially causing
chaos for their businesses.
They would then have to keep
tow sets of goods and inven-
tory - one bonded for use in
Freeport, the other duty-paid
for use outside the Port area.

PUBLIC AUCTION

SATURDAY, MAY 30â„¢, 2009

By Order of

The Bahamas Development Bank
Cable Beach, Nassau, The Bahamas
Commonwealth of The Bahamas

WHAT: Three (2) assorted used vessels as set out in the schedule below:

Equility

Loa 49’
Beam 16

Depth 4
Year/Mk/Eng

Vessels

1981 Defender Vessel,

Caterpillar 3208 engine

Location

Bayshore Marina East Bay

Street

Farbutt

Loa 5T
177.5”

Beam
Depth 5
Year/Mk/Eng

1996 Fiberglass Vessel,

Caterpillar 3412 engine

Location

Bayshore Marina East Bay

Street

LOCATION: Bayshore Marina East Bay Street — Nassau The

Bahamas

TIME: 11:00am — Saturday, May 30th, 2009 — Preview and Inspection
from 9:00am Until Auction time at the site.

TERMS: All items to be Sold Where Is As Is for Cash, Cashier’ Cheque
or current Bank Guarantee Letter. Purchase will not be released until paid
for in full not later than 4:00pm Tuesday, June 2", 2009. Where a deposit
is required, the same is non refundable. If final payment is not made by
4:00pm Tuesday, June 2", 2009 any and all deposits made will be

forfeited.

Bahamas Development Bank
At (242) 327-5780/ 702-5730/702-5714
Or Fax (242) 702-5047
email: bahamasdevelopmentbank.com



THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST

5/29/09, PAGE 17B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

> {Fl (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

a a (ccc

































=x: ' Today Saturday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
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High: 86° F/30°C _ Clouds and sun, a Mostly cloudy, a Partly sunny with a Some sun with a Partly sunny with a Partly sunny and The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 82/27 68/20 s 83/28 66/18 s Saturday: SSW at 10-20 Knots 3-6 Feat 5-10 Miles 31°F
- Low: 70° F/21° Et a t-storm in spots. couple of t-storms. thunderstorm. t-storm possible. shower possible. pleasant. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 61/16 52/11 pc 6116 47/8 +
{ % “fe High: 87° High: 85° High: 87° High: 86° Bangkok 90/32 79/26 t 89/31 78/25 t pi
i! eas 7 ‘ : ° A Barbados 86/30 76/24 pc ESLIOE 6LODAY'S U.S. FORECAST
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i : TA Ever CEE TUS ee ee Beijin 36/30 62/16 pc 88/31 63/17 s
High: 87° F/31°C. ae 106°-84° F 102°-84° F 99°-82° F 100°-82° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low _Ht.(ft. ar ee a : ee ete
Low: 71° F/22°C ry yr The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel oe an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 12:15am. 3.0 6:36am. -0.1 Belgrade 68/20 47/8 sh 69/20 52/11 pc
. P 2 levati the h body— thing that effects h Id feels. Te tl flect the high and the low for the day. : :
ae @ elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day 12:49pm. 27 6:52pm. 0.0 Berlin 63/17 45/7 sh 66/18 50/10 sh
; ¢ as 50pm. 27 7:57pm. 0. Bogota 65/18 47/8 + 66/18 48/8 +
2 i Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Sintay 14am. 06 S25am. 00 Brussels 66/18 46/7 5s 70/21 49/8 s
: ic ——— ABACO Temperature 251p.m. 28 9:03pm. 0.2 Budapest 61/16 45/7 sh 6417 48/8 6
f : = High: 86°F/20° C HIGH sessascsoiins beesdnaia sins aswlicecucpane 90° F/32° C ian 25 Oe Buenos Aires 61/16 46/7 pc 5412 46/7 +
y 1 Fond gle : 7 81°F/27°C LEO asscttesarseeste 77° F/25°¢ = Monday pm. 28 10:06pm. 02 Cairo 92/33 66/18 s 93/33 65/18 s
: y, = ow: 81° F/27 Normal high. .... ge°F30°G Ce 103/39 81/27 s 101/38 83/28 pc
? r 7 Normal low 72° F/22° C Calgary 78/25 49/9 s 65/18 40/4 pe
4 ofa Se @ WEST PALM BEACH mo Last year's fIQDD sscseicenecneisenneas 90° F/32° C Sun AND Moon Conran 91/32 77/25 pe 91/32 74/23 pc
: — High: 85° F/29° C —» Last year's low ire isch ave ences 73° F/23° C Caracas 79/26 71/21 5 79/26 71/21 pc
oe Low: 71° F/22°C a Sr . Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:21am. Moonrise....11:41a.m. Casablanca 82/27 66/18 pc 78/25 60/15 s
¢ a FT. LAUDERDALE Fe As of 2 p.m. yesterday occ 0.13" Sunset... 754 p.m. Moonset .... 12:12am. Copenhagen 64/17 46/7 c 68/20 54/12 c
-., FREEPORT Year to date First Full Last New Dublin 68/20 52/11 pc 64/17 48/8 s
High: 85° F/29° C @ High: 84° F/29° C Normal year to date .......c.cccecsessesseceeseeeeeee 11.39" 7 7 ag Frankfurt 72/22 45/7 pc 70/21 48/8 pc
Low: 71° F/22°C a Low: 78° F/26° C i ie Geneva 73/22 45/7 s 75/23 46/7 s
af AccuWeather.com r . es Halifax 510 50/10 c 60/15 48/8 c Showers Miami
a @ aa ‘ Forecasts and graphics provided by ; i" tay Havana 88/31 70/21 t 86/30 70/21 t T-storms 85/73
. MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 May30 9 Jun.7)— Jun. 1500 Jun. 22-———sHelsinki 63/17 45/7 pe 70/21 50/10 pc Rain Fronts
er High: 85° F/29° C I addi Hong Kong 81/27 73/22 r 82/27 75/23 sh Lx, * Flurries Cold
af 0 6 igh: 90° . Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
“ft Low: 73° F/23°C ; NASSAU Loa 80° F/27°C peu Ue _ : il — : Be Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. a —
High: 88 F/1°C TERIA 74/93 53/11 s 80/26 55/12 s [y_y] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Meagan
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KEY WEST -, @ i. CATISLAND Kingston 87/30 78/25 t 88/31 77/25 sh
High: 85° F/29° C i : 3 3 Lima 22S pc (22S ils pe
Low: 78° F/26°C - High: 85° F/29° C London 73/22 50/10 pc 70/21 50/10 s
: di _ Low: 74° F/23°C Madrid 88/31 57/13 s 91/32 59/15 pe
© ; Manila 84/28 77/25 + 84/28 78/25 + a ‘@) 2 8 Cc
HN + hams Mexico City 81/27 57/13 t 73/22 53/11 t a ij In RA N E
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a GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR Montreal 68/20 50/10 r 6618 52/11 pc
alll I High: 87° F/31°C Hi h: 89° F/32°C Moscow 75/23 54/12 + 70/21 46/7 pe
: Low: 74° F/23°C Low: 76°F/24°C Munich 54/12 43/6 t 44/6 38/3 c
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS : Nairobi 79/26 63/17 t 80/26 63/17 t 1 ]
highs and tonights's lows. High: 89° F/32°C = . New Delhi 110/43 83/28 pc 106/41 82/27 t CVer S O r
Low: 80° F/27°C ae a Oslo 64/17 49/9 s 68/20 52/11 s
ale ; a Paris 72/22 50/10 s 72/22 52/11 s eli SS Wit QO t us!
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Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday ; MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 87/30 78/25 t 86/30 79/26 s he Smart choice is
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W ae High: 87° F/31°C San Juan 54/12 38/3 sh 64/17 37/2 pe “i
FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC Low: 76° F/24° C ee ouas an pe a aa t 1c Management.
Albuquerque 81/27 58/14 t 82/27 58/14 t Indianapolis 80/26 59/15 s 79/26 GING t Philadelphia 80/26 G16 t 79/26 58/14 s antiago C pe
Anchorage 58/14 46/7 c 61/16. 46/7 ++ Jacksonville 86/30 68/20 t 88/31 65/18 t Phoenix 100/37 75/23 pe 103/39 75/23 s CROOKEDISLAND/ACKLINS sai Damninigs BSiSt = De ESE eras . ple you can trust.
Atlanta 86/30 61/16 pc 83/28 61/16 s Kansas City 84/28 62/16 s 87/30 64/17 pe _ Pittsburgh 74/23 56/13 pce 76/24 54/12 t RAGGEDISLAND — High:s0°F/s2°c - _ arr aT i cr are i
Atlantic City 78/25 5743 t 78/25 58/14 s Las Vegas 97/36 70/21 s 99/37 72/22 pc Portland,OR 84/28 56/13 s 81/27 53/11. s High: 89° F/32°C Low: 78° F/26°C ; en map : a pe ca ° on pe
Baltimore 80/26 58/14 t 80/26 5613 s Little Rock 84/28 58/14 s 89/31 6216 s Raleigh-Durham 87/30 61/16 t 84/28 59/15 s Low: 73°F/23°C ¢ hay oA oe Rt Sein 7 ae aan af
Boston 64/17 5713 t 74/23 54/12 t LosAngeles 78/25 62/16 pc 78/25 60/15 pc St. Louis 82/27 6518 s 85/29 67/19 t . vail, om ae aoe : ee 7
Buffalo 66/18 47/8 po 66/18 46/7 t Louisville 80/26 6216 s 83/28 65/18 t Salt Lake City 85/29 63/17 pce 84/28 61/16 pc GREAT INAGUA Tok ; 70191 647 1 73/99 66/18 '
Charleston, SC 89/31 66/18 t 85/29 62/16 s Memphis 82/27 65/18 pc 88/31 68/20 s San Antonio 89/31 64/17 t 89/31 66/18 pc High: 92°F/33°C aaa 66/18 48/8. pc Bei Ad/6 t (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Chicago 76/24 5010 t 77/25 52/11 t Miami 95/29 73/22 t 87/30 72/22 t San Diego 70/21 6417 po 71/21 63/17 pe Low 77°F/25°C Trinidad BG/18 59/15 t 79/99 57/13 sh
Cleveland 66/18 51/10 s 73/22 52/1 t Minneapolis 75/23 55/12 pe 76/24 55/12 pce San Francisco 72/22 53/11 pe 69/20 54/12 pc .
Vancouver 71/21 54/12 pc 69/20 50/10 s ew ef mo
Dallas 88/31 64/17 s 90/32 66/18 s Nashville 80/26 58/14 pc 85/29 62416 pc Seattle 77/25 5140 s 73/22 52/1 s :
Vienna 57/13 48/8 sh 56/13 49/9 r
Denver 82/27 54/12 pc 83/28 53/41 pc NewOrleans 96/30 68/20 pc 87/30 69/20 s Tallahassee 89/31 66418 t 89/31 65/18 pc aS B17 ABI? sh BAIT ABIR ate BD) 35-3500 VeE (2AD) SAPARD | Tes (EAT) SED-DBAD | Tek: (DEE) 230-2304
Detroit 74/23 5241 s 73/22 52/1 t New York 76/24 61416 t 76/24 62/16 pc Tampa 87/30 71/21 t 86/30 70/21 t Winnipeg 66/18 43/6 pc 59/15 40/4 pc \ to ie ,
Honolulu 86/30 72/22 pc 85/29 74/23 s Oklahoma City 88/31 63/17 s 91/32 62/16 s Tucson 96/35 68/20 s 98/36 66/18 s :
Houston 89/31 64/17 pc 90/32 66/18 s Orlando 86/30 70/21 t 89/31 70/21 t Washington,DC 84/28 60/15 t 80/26 62/16 s Th ee ee



PAGE 18B, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





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INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

Dell profit falls 63%

mg JESSICA MINTZ
AP Technology Writer
SEATTLE

Dell Inc. said Thursday its fis-
cal first-quarter profit fell 63
percent as the recession contin-
ued to crimp computer sales
around the world, according to
Associated Press.

The results, coupled with a
cautious outlook from the
world's top PC seller, Hewlett-
Packard Co., indicate that the
computer market has not
improved much since last year's
economic meltdown led to a
holiday season that was the
industry's worst stretch in six
years.

Dell's earnings for the three
months that ended May 1 sank
to $290 million, or 15 cents per
share, from $784 million, or 38
cents per share, in the same
period last year.

The most recent results
included a 9-cent charge from
closing facilities and paying sev-
erance to laid-off workers.
Excluding the charge, Dell
earned 24 cents per share, or a
penny better than analysts had
predicted, according to a Thom-
son Reuters survey.

Sales dropped 23 percent to
$12.3 billion, lower than the
$12.6 billion analysts had pre-
dicted for Round Rock, Texas-
based Dell.

In a conference call, Chief
Financial Officer Brian Glad-
den said sales picked up toward
the end of the quarter, but that
is normal for the time of year.
Gladden said May was no bet-
ter than the first quarter, and
looking ahead he said orders
and conversations with cus-
tomers yield "mixed signals."

"We would hope that we
would see improved demand in
the later part of the year," Glad-
den said. "Hopefully sooner
versus later."

Hewlett-Packard's chief exec-
utive, Mark Hurd, has
expressed similar caution.
Speaking at an investor confer-
ence Thursday, Hurd would not



Giatacdyn, aS PC sales stay soft

Paul Sakuma/AP Photo

IN THIS JAN. 9, 2009 PHOTO, Dell Computers are seen on display at
the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. Dell Inc. on Thursday,
May 28, 2009 said its fiscal first-quarter profit fell 63 percent as the
recession continued to crimp computer sales around the world.

say when he thought the PC
market would begin to rebound.

That is in contrast to Paul
Otellini, the CEO of Intel
Corp., the world's biggest sup-
plier of PC microprocessors,
who has said sales already
appear to have bottomed out
and returned to normal season-
al patterns.

Netbooks

At Dell, sales of laptops and
the smaller, less powerful net-
books, which together make up
Dell's largest product category,
fell 20 percent in the quarter.
Recession-weary shoppers’
preference for netbooks and
low-end PCs dragged average
prices down 8 percent.

Revenue from large enter-
prises and small and medium-
sized businesses worldwide fell
about 30 percent. Consumer
sales dropped 16 percent.

U.S. revenue, which accounts
for 52 percent of Dell's total,
declined 21 percent, as did rev-
enue in its Asia Pacific-Japan
segment. Sales fell a steeper 29
percent in Europe, the Middle
East and Africa combined. In



Brazil, Russia, India and Chi-
na, the so-called "BRIC" coun-
tries, revenue fell 21 percent.

Despite the PC maker's
uncertainty about the market,
CEO Michael Dell said he
expects big businesses to
replace many workers’ com-
puters in 2010, after Microsoft
Corp.'s next operating system,
Windows 7, has been released.

The company said it slashed
operating expenses by 15 per-
cent from a year ago to $1.8 bil-
lion as the PC maker tries to
squeeze $4 billion out of its
annual costs.

Some of the savings is coming
from a shift from company-
owned factories to less-expen-
sive contract manufacturers,
and some is tied to layoffs.
Gladden would not say how
many people Dell laid off in the
quarter, nor would he say what
the PC maker's plans are for
future job cuts.

Shares of Dell edged up 12
cents to $11.60 in after-hours
trading.

Before the earnings report,
they rose 36 cents, or 3.2 per-
cent, to end the regular session
at $11.48.



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PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.154FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNYWITH T-STORM HIGH 86F LOW 74F B U S I N E S S SEEFRONTOFBUSINESSSECTION S P O R T S Law firm moves on BVI expansion SEEPAGEFOURTEEN Budget ‘should not affect ministr A SHOOTOUT in broad daylight erupted near the KFC outlet on Prince Charles Drivew hen bystanders tried to rescue an old woman who was being held up for her purse. What started out as an attempt by good Samaritans to catch a purse snatcher turned dangerous when the perpetrator pulled out a gun and starting shooting randomly. Witnesses say the situation descended into complete chaos when an unidentified man in a car pulled out a shotgun and began firing back at the gunwielding thief. While those who initially con f ronted the robber were praised for their bravery, people on the scene criticised the police for not responding to calls quickly enough and said they fear Nassau is becoming a lawless town. One said: “It felt like a movie. Nassau has become like the Wild Wild West, where some one can walk up to you in broad daylight and kill you.” The incident began at around 6pm on Wednesday when an old woman was accosted by a man as she walked down a side street near the back of the KFC building. An unidentified man saw what was happening and ran over to help. He was quickly followed by several other men. By the time they got to the victim, the robber had snatched her purse and taken off running down the side street. The men eventually caught up and attempted to tackle him to the ground, probably hoping to hold him there until the police arrived, witnesses said. However, the perpetrator was Have-a-go heroes tackle gunman The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com BAHAMASBIGGEST THREEPAGESOF HELPWANTEDIN TODAY’STRADER I N S I D E Street shootout ‘like Wild West’ MP ‘will take 20% salary cut’ to save treasury cash Philip ‘Br a ve Davis urges colleagues to do the same AN MP says he is will ing to take a 20 per cent cut in his parliamentary salary in an effort to save the treasury some much needed money. Cat Island MP Philip “Brave” Davis is also urging his parliamentary colleagues to do the same and has called on Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham to eliminate the duplicate ministers in his cabinet. He branded Byron Woodside, Zhivargo Laing, Branville McCartney, Brensil Rolle, Phenton Neymour, Loretta Butler-Turner and Charles Maynard “unnecessary burdens on taxpayers” during this deep recession as “full ministers” are responsible for each of their respective areas. Mr Davis then criticised Mr Ingraham for his “shocking” decision to deny nurses their health insurance saying he “opposed the decision in the strongest terms.” “These dedicated work ers are the backbone of our entire health care system. Nurses often go beyond the call of duty to care for the sick and dying without any thanks. A caring government, or a caring prime minister, would never deny nurses health insurance,” he said. During his budget communication yesterday the Prime Minster announced that teachers, doctors and nurses will be among those on the public payMOTORISTS were hopping mad yesterday after crowds of hotel workers taking part in their union elections caused traffic on major roadways to come to a near standstill for much of the day. Results of executive elections held by the Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union yesterday were not known up to press time. However, one thing certainly was: Many Nassuvians did not appreci ate the decision to use St Matthew’s Anglican Church as one of two polling stations for the BHCAWU’s approximately 6,000 union members. The move meant that crowds of hotel workers UNIONELECTIONCROWDSANGERMOTORISTS CROWDS GATHER at St Matthew’s Anglican Church for the BHCAWU’s election. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f FAMILYOFMURDERVICTIM S A YREPORTSINACCURATE THE family of murder victim Shenise Adderley say news reports published yesterday contained inaccurate information about her murder. Specifically, the family denied suggestions that a young man being questioned in connection with the murder was in a relationship with the victim. They also said Shenise did not live with the young man. SEE page 11 SEE page 11 n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net ALLEGATIONS of security forces using excessive force and Bahamian police officers unlaw fully killing one man have been logged in Amnesty International’s annual report released yes terday. The international human rights watchdog’s evaluation of events throughout 2008 further notes discrimination towards Haitian migrants in the country and mistreatment of Cuban detainees in the Carmichael Road Detention Centre. It states Haitians living in the Bahamas have appealed to the Haitian government to help them overcome the discrimination they face, while Cuban detainees have complained of ill-treatment and breaches of immigration laws at the Detention Centre. The annual report also states: “Several allegations of use of excessive force and one case of SEE page 11 Report alleges Bahamian officers unlawfully killed man SEE page thr ee EXTREME WEA THERCAUSESSEVEREDAMAGE THESUDDEN extreme weather that swept Nassau yesterday managed to force a trailer on top of these cars at the British Colonial Hilton – causing severe damage. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

PAGE 2

A NEW local lottery has opened in Nassau, boasting four new locations and attractive jackpots hinged on the United States l otteries. Island Luck – which has locat ions on East Bay, Collins Avenue and Madeira Street,R obinson Road and Six Street, a nd the Dunkin Donuts Plaza on East Street South – offers patrons the chance to wager $1 for the chance to make $900 if their three ball selection is drawn in either t he New York, Chicago, or Miami lotteries. P aying out $3,000 to the dollar for the four ball selection, patronsw ho play this game have a 1,032 t o one chance of winning, while t hose playing the three ball lott ery stand a much better chance of hitting with only 56 to one o dds. With security posted at its front d oor, the establishment on East Bay Street has counters at whichp atrons can submit their “lucky picks” for the day to the helpful a ttendants who are secure behind an inch and a half of bullet proof glass. O nce you have submitted your selections, you are punctually i ssued a computerised receipt complete with its own individual r eceipt number and bar code. Each number is printed in the f irst column along with the US lottery identification in the sec ond, followed by the amount wagered. It is unknown how much business this relatively new enterprise – the self-styled place where “winners live” – has been a ble to attract away from established lotteries such as FML, Red H ot, Clesos, and NWS. While it is technically illegal to p lay the lottery in the Bahamas, t he number of Bahamians who a re involved in the numbers syst em is so great that it is slowly becoming an “un-policeable” p henomenon, some claim. Recently, two of the establish m ents of FML CEO Craig Flowers were raided by police. T his much publicised event dominated national headlines as p olice confiscated nearly $1 million in cash from this single branch. F ollowing this raid, Mr Flowers spoke exclusively with The Tri b une o n his views about the establishment of a national lottery and h is reaction to the raid. Denying any anger over the m atter, Mr Flowers said that 90 per cent of the officers involved in the raid were his friends, and were simply doing their jobs. “We don’t have any problems w ith this sort of conduct because of the fact that they are carrying o ut their roles as mandated, and certainly ours is of a different a genda and we are just going to have to find a way to work along with the authorities,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 9 9 9 9$ $SUITS F F i i n n e e T T h h r r e e a a d d s sBernardRd-MackeySt-ThompsonBlvd FROM Island Luck lottery opens in Nassau DOCTORS Hospital’s Blood Bank is in urgent need of O Positive, O Negative and A negative blood. People able to make a donation are asked to do so as soon as possible. Blood alert F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f NEW LOTTERY: Island Luck boasts four new locations.

PAGE 3

THE Department of Social S ervices will focus this year on its core mandate of ensuring that every Bahamian has food to eat, clothes to wear and a roof over their head, rather than attempting to developa ny new social projects, Min ister of State Loretta Butler Turner said yesterday. Mrs Butler Turner told The Tribune yesterday that despite c uts to some areas of the department’s responsibility the “important thing” about theb udget in relation to Social Services was that it was able t o “hold the line” overall in terms of funding still receiving $39,167,977 in total. T his after it had already received a massive increase in its allocation in the previous budgetary period, of around $12 million. S he made her comments as the 2009/2010 budget reveals that funds for certain projects, including the Department’s Poverty Alleviation Pro gramme and the not yet operational Centre for Childrenw ith Disabilities (Cheshire Home), have been slashed. The Poverty Alleviation P rogramme saw a reduction of $594,000 in its allocation, to $2.4 million, while the Cheshire Home will now only have $50,000 at its disposal rather than $300,000 in the lastb udgetary period. Also reduced was the allo cation for “family island operations,” which fell from $4.547 million to $2.673m a reduc t ion of $1.873 million. In the case of the Poverty Alleviation Programme andt he Cheshire Home, Mrs Butler Turner suggested that both w ere projects that had yet to fully get off the ground and whose full development is nowb eing postponed in view of the need for government to exercise spending restraints due to difficult economic conditions. A n official at the Disability Affairs Division of the Departmentyesterday expressed some surprise at the reduction i n funding for the Cheshire Home as he said government did have plans to relaunch the home as a centre for children with disabilities. “There were a lot of plans,” h e said, adding that he was “still hopeful” that the Home can be developed this year despite the cutbacks. Mrs Butler Turner said a consensus had never really been reached” on “what to do” with the Home, and inv iew of a need for fiscal restraint it was not going to be t reated as a priority. “We are going to be very focused on ensuring thoset hings that are priority are that every Bahamian is taken care of in terms of their basic needs,” she said. Meanwhile,though r esources for Grand Bahama, one of the Department’s “biggest users of assistance funds,” had previously come out of the “Family Island Operations” allocation, the$ 1.9 million reduction in that area is in part due to the fact that social services funding for Grand Bahama now “goes through the public trea s ury,” explained Mrs Butler Turner. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009, PAGE 3 n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net BUDGET cuts at various government ministries, departments and agencies allowing them to operate with financing to meet their "core" mandates could hurt the level of service given to the public, President of the Bahamas Public Service Union John Pinder said. His comments came in response to Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham's 2009/2010 budget communication in the House of Assembly, during which Mr Ingraham said significant revenue losses lead to all government ministries, departments, and agencies "being allocated funding sufficient to meet their core mandate to the public, albeit in the context of the overriding need to maintain a disciplined approach to public expenditure." "It doesn't enhance service, the general public demands high quality service from the civil servants but in most cases we don't have the necessary tools and equipment to compete with the private sector. And also in some cases persons need more training and it's a cost in training people but if you don't invest in human resources you're not going to get the kind of quality performance that you're looking for," Mr Pinder told The Tribune. While stressing that he understood the financial constraints facing government due to the global economic downturn, Mr Pinder said funding for training of human resources is vital to the development of a well-performing public sector. But outgoing head of the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce Dionisio D'Aguilar feels the budget cuts will not hamper what he called an already "inefficient" public service. "I don't think it's going to cripple the public service, I don't think it's going to make quite a bit of difference to the public service because it depends how you are going to do more with less. Are you going to have less people andI think he said when people retire he's not going to replace them, but I think it's general knowledge that the public service is overstaffed, they're incredibly inefficient," said Mr D'Aguilar, who is also the president of the Superwash chain of laundromats. The prime minister stated that the positions of the 138 civil servants who will reach the mandatory age of retirement in the this fiscal period, July 1 to June 30, 2010, will not be replaced at an expected annual salary savings of $4.1 million. Nearly all government ministries and departments will see decreases in their allocations in 2009/2010 budget year over approved estimates for the previous budget period, said the prime minister. However, there were a few increases, including $10.4 million to the Department of Public Service; $7.3 million to the Public Hospital's Authority; $2.9 million to the Department of Environmental Health Services; and $1.9 million to the Department of Public Health. Mr Pinder as also of the opinion that an audit of the public sector's staff capabilities is needed to ensure that qualified persons are deployed to areas left vacant by persons who've reached the mandatory age of retirement. "He's (the prime minister ting rid of a number of persons and they've not been replaced. So he's really put the public service is in a worse position than before I wish they would have done an audit of the human resources side of the public service so we can better redeploy persons, based on their skills and their job experience and academics. "Unless we are satisfied that we have now done a proper audit of the human resources (department sons can be redeployed to fill some of those positions and allow persons who are already in the service to be promoted rather than bringing in new people (that would the expenditure on new salaries," said Mr Pinder. POLICE Commissioner Reginald Ferguson has pledged that operations on the Family Islands will not be cut despite more than $2 million in budget cuts. In the 2009/2010 budget, the amount allocated to the Royal Bahamian Police Force's Family Island operations will be reduced from $4 million to an estimated $1,722,547 for the coming budget year, represent ing a shortfall of $2,277,454. When asked during a brief telephone interview how this reduction would affect the force's abilities in the Family Islands,Mr Ferguson said: "Nothing that we need to do is curtailed from that point of view." He did not provide a breakdown of which specific areas the cuts would affect. On Wednesday, PrimeMinister Hubert Ingraham presented the 2009/2010 budget communica tion for the fiscal year, which begins on July1. During the address, MrIngraham explained that due to the severe downturn in the economy, government is "pacing" itself financially to prepare for possible worsening of the economy. The Prime Minister said the harsh global downturn led to an almost 17 per cent decline in recurrent revenue, estimated to be $260 million lower than projected in last year's budget. He also painted a grim picture of the country's ballooning deficit for 2008/2009, estimated at $352 million, more than double the amount projected in last year's budget communication. The RBPF was allotted an estimated $118,926,059 for the upcoming fiscal year compared to $121,931,871 in approved estimates for the 2008/2009 budget year, representing a change of $3,005,812. Other areas of note where cuts were made to the RBPF in the budget include an a $470,000 reduction in government spend ing on tuition, training, in-service awards and subsistence; a $700,000 decrease spent on clothing and clothing supplies; a $30,000 decrease on workshops, conferences, seminars, meetings and exhibits; and a $400,000 cut on electricity expenditure, compared to approved estimates for the previous budget year. Budget cuts ‘could hit level of service given to public’ J ohn Pinder To have your say on this or any other issue, email The Tribune at: l etters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street, P .O. Box N-3207 Social Services Dept ‘will focus on core mandate’ Loretta Butler Turner BUDGET 2009/10 roll who will be hit by cutbacks in government's budget, having to forego salary increases with the latter not receiving an anticipated $10.5 million health insurance benefit in this fiscal year. The MP pointed out that while Mr Ingraham said there will be across the board expenditure cuts in the public service, he did not tell Bahamians what these cuts will mean to the thousands of civil servants across the country. “As we look through the budget in the days to come Ia m certain that we will see more surprises like the massive tax increases he hid from the country last year,” he said. Mr Davis said that the budget statement sounded morel ike a resignation speech than a national address intended to steer the country during a time of economic crisis. “The prime minister had no new ideas, no words of inspi ration and appears resigned t o wait until world leaders figu re out the problem before there is resolution for the Bahamas. He is a man past his prime and past his usefulness,” the Cat Island MP said. He said he was “especially concerned” about what the prime minister did not say during his address. “With the country again on pace to set another homicide record, the Prime Minister said nothing about crime and his government’s plan to reduce the level of violence on our streets,” he said. Philip ‘Brave’ Davis MP ‘will take 20% salary cut’ to save treasury cash F ROM page one n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net AFTER seeing the Ministry of Tourism’s funds slashed by $12 million in this year’s budget, the Minister of Tourism claimed the reduction will not severely impact its ability to do its job in a harsh tourism cli mate. However, both the Minister and Bahamas Hotel Associa tion President Robert Sands agreed yesterday that the cutback will require the Ministry to ensure it focuses on utilising the money it does have in the most effective way possible. Describing the move as “disappointing” but to some extent understandable in view of present conditions, Mr Sands said the cut “will give cause for the Ministry of Tourism to re-engineer itself and to ensure the monies they have available become productive sums.” Meanwhile, Mr Vanderpool Wallace said programmes that are going to “survive” in the Ministry of Tourism are those that are known to have a “direct impact on visitor arrivals” while more “exploratory programmes are going to suffer.” In his Budget Communica tion to parliament on Wednesday Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham described how “decidedly weak” tourism performance in 2008 worsened going into 2009. He said Government is “moving to address (the lenges (faced by the industry and improve the attractiveness of our tourism product.” Mr Vanderpool Wallace told The Tribune the Ministry already finds itself in a more favourable position than it was to respond under budgetary constraints. “Nobody likes to see a reduction in budget but we have had the good fortune this year of buying media, for example advertising, much better than we ever did before. So the cost to get same kind of exposure is lower this year than last year and year before, so we’re going to get good value for money,” he said. “Secondly, certain commitments that were contractual commitments in the budget last year don’t exist this year, so in terms of the real deduction, in terms of what has happened to our budget it’s nowhere near the $12 million. It is lower but it’s not as is reflected (by the $12 million figure said. On Wednesday the Prime Minister said that t hrough April total arrivals to The Bahamas were down by 1.2 per cent from the same period last year, at 1.68 million. He added that although more people visited the country on cruise ships arrivals by sea were actually up by 5.5 per cent over the first four months, air arrivals in New Providence were down by 10.5 per cent in the January to April 2009 period compared with same period in 2008. Meanwhile, in Grand Bahama and the other Family Islands, were down by a massive 28.9 per cent and 27.6 per cent respectively. Noting that this impact on the Bahamian tourism sector is not “unique” in the world, but reflective of similar drop offs elsewhere, he added that the “short term prospects” for the country’s major industry “remain challenging.” In responding to these conditions, which see consumers in The Bahamas’ primary market, the U.S., far less prone to spend their money on holiday’s abroad, Mr Ingraham said the Ministry of Tourism “is embarking on a plan to increase the number of airlines serving our country with reduced airfares for customers.” “Further, the Ministry of Tourism will undertake a broad spectrum of strategic marketing initiatives in the U.S., Europe, Canada and Latin America,” added the Prime Minister. $12m cut to Ministry of Tourism funds ‘won’t severely impact ability’ Vincent Vanderpool Wallace Police Family Island operations ‘will not be cut’ Reginald Ferguson

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EDITOR, The Tribune . Firstly let me thank you for allowing me space in your esteemed daily to share yet another concern of mine. God made all women different. Some are slim and shapely. Some are chubby and round. Some are dark in complexion. Some have lighter skin tones. S ome have crinkly hair, while t he hair of others is straight. S ome are surly while others enjoy more pleasant attitudes towards life. I say all this to illustrate that each woman is different and should be comfortable in being who they are. Why then do we have women bleaching their skin, risking cancer, to be lighter than the complexion God made them? Why then do some women lose the quality of their hair by using chemicals that deem themselves unsuitable in short order. Those are just two superficial examples of being who you are not as a woman, but it goes much deeper than that. To answer those questions, many women in our society suffer from very low self esteem and feel that altering their appearance will make them more acceptable to others and ultimately who they see in the mirror. This is nonsense as every woman is beautiful in her own right. Being confident is one of the greatest gifts a woman can have. The black woman should embrace her “Africaness” through locking her hair or wearing it short and natural as opposed to straightening it and becoming someone you are not. A woman who feels she is overweight should simply take on a lifetime change by way of a new diet inclusive of fruits and vegetables and lots of water. Exercise is a must and she will soon start to feel better about herself inside and out. Accepting oneself is a major step in being comfortable in one’s own skin. If your nose is round and not straight, that is how your maker intended it to b e. Accept it. I f your lips are fuller than t he woman next to you, that’s how it was intended to be. Accept it. It makes you who YOU ARE. We need to be proud of ourselves as women. We were, after all, chosen as the vessel of humanity. That alone should make us confident! Be comfortable in your own skin. MAYA NEWBOLD Nassau, May 25, 2008 C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 WEBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm IN THIS column yesterday we discussed the complaint of a letter writer who believed Prime Minister Ingraham had insulted Bahamians bya nnouncing that a foreigner was to be brought in to regulate government’s electronic commu-n ications network in preparation for the sale of BTC. The writer took this as an inference by t he Prime Minister that Bahamians were not smart enough to regulate their own communications business. Mr Ingraham was insulting no one. He was just being realistic that at present there is noB ahamian with the experience required at this time to meet global standards. We do not havet o go very far to find proof of this because if we did have the local expertise our telecommunic ations would be far superior to what it is now. However, this does not mean that Bahamians will never be able to control their own system.It just means that they do not have the experi ence to do it now. And since 1967 we have m uch evidence of what happens when people take on positions for which they are neitherf ormally trained, nor have practical experience. For these examples, we can start with the politi c ians. Even before there was talk of globalisation, Bahamians were urged to take their school work and technical training seriously to pre pare themselves to compete on the world stage. Now that that time is here, we have reports from all sides that Bahamians, who expect to be b ig players in the global market, are not prepared. T he address to the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s annual general meeting Wednesday by Baha Mar’s Chief Executive Sarkis Izmirlian should be a serious wake up call for Bahamians. “Just this month,” said Mr Izmirlian, “in the middle of the great recession, the Government o f Qatar invested $75 million to build a luxury 250-room hotel in Cuba. We had contacted the Government of Qatar some time back about an investment in the Baha Mar (Cable Beach clear they had no interest in investing in the Bahamas.” Mr Izmirlian said his company first consid ered Qatar’s disinterest due to the economic e nvironment. But when Qatar made such a heavy commitment in Cuba despite the eco n omic crisis, they felt they should have looked “closer to home for the reason.” He pointed to the closure of Four Seasons E merald Bay in Exuma as a sign of the times for the Bahamas. It was the only hotel, he said, in t he globally branded chain to close. “That should tell us something,” he said. He recited air and cruise arrival figures to the Bahamas to suggest that the Bahamas is losing ground as a competitive destination in the region. While tourist arrivals were down in the Bahamas, they were up in such places as Can-c un, Cuba, Jamaica and even Aruba, despite the negative publicity generated against thati sland by the disappearance of an American medical student. And all this, he pointed out, d espite the Bahamas’ advantage at being so near to the US mainland. “Let me be blunt,” he said, “unless we improve the education of all Bahamians: Schools for younger Bahamian children andt rade schools, or continuing education for mature Bahamians, we are doomed.” R alph Massey, who has done much research into the Bahamian educational system, has been w arning for some time of the “devastating impli cations” for the economy because of the high illiteracy levels among Bahamian high school leavers. He predicted that the present situation could make this nation “progressively less comp etitive.” We are now seeing evidence of this happen i ng. And recently, again in an address to the C hamber of Commerce, a senior policy adviser to the Caribbean Export Development Agency (CEDA sionals will not be able to supply the European Union market under the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA are “not recognised” by countries in that trad i ng bloc. He said that access to this market is not a utomatically open to Bahamians and other Caribbean nations just because their countries signed on to the EPA. Bahamian services professionals, he said, would have to sign Mutual Recognition Agreements with their EU counterparts, which had to be approved by the relevant EPA governing b ody, to ensure that they can supply the EU market. If qualifications are not recognised in the EU market,” he told Bahamian businessmen, “you can’t sell goods and services there.” And although we are a seafaring nation, a scholarship programme has been launched to help Bahamians acquire specialised, skills-based training to compete in the international mar-i time industry. Without this training Bahamians will not be able to take advantage of the many o pportunities now open in the international deep sea fleet. Gone are the days when an MP could burden t he civil service with their constituents, many of whom had no qualifications for the positions t hey were given in exchange for their vote. Bahamians now face a future that will depend upon what they know, not who they know to move forward. Why women need to be proud of themselves LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Bahamians need to be better trained EDITOR, The Tribune. Recently I wrote a letter about pot holes and traffic lights and I now discover that the Minister o f Works is also Minister of Traffic Lights as he w as quoted in the Guardian (May 19 capacities. So this is a letter addressed to the Minister to first of all thank him for fixing the “New Breed” of pot hole on West Bay and Blake Road, but to remind him that there are many others that require his attention. Secondly I would like to take exception to his comments on traffic lights. While commending him for issuing a contract to fix the non-working lights, it was inexcusable to refuse to explain why they have not been working for a longtime. “There are a number of circumstances that I prefer not to go into at this time”, he said. I think the minister and his colleagues should look at what is happening in the world and note that the public no longer tolerate vague and unresponsive answers from public servants anymore. An apology is no longer acceptable, the question is w hy were they not fixed months ago? E ven the speaker of the UK Parliament is no exception. I think the public respect for public ser vants is at an all time low and if they, and I do not single out the Minister of Works, are not pre pared to be upfront and honest with the public they should leave the job. It will be great when the traffic lights are fixed, but, of course, the traffic light problem is only a symptom of what is happening in the world where a second rate performance is considered good when it comes to public servants. PATRICK H THOMSON Nassau, May 19, 2009. Pot holes and traffic lights still need fixing EDITOR, The Tribune. How could our police and our G overnment allow these fools to go through our streets andt hrough our neighbourhoods, with music booming, shaking e arth and sky, at any hour of morning, night or day? Are these people ungodly and criminal, as well as are our police and our Government? Only way to cope is to withdraw and to imagine that this is not my country, it cannot be. I pretend, though I am stuck here, to be elsewhere. I am not a part of this m adness. I just cannot be part of such a backward place and such ab ackward people. Why does no one in authority s ay something, do something? This perplexes me. In whose hands are we? OBEDIAH SMITH Nassau, May 9, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. Re: Cruise Lines: We don’t recognize tour body Tribune, 24 April, 2009 Amazing. You mean to tell me cruise passengers prefer to spend their money at Half Moon Cay, Coco Cay and Castaway Cay rather than beautiful downtown Nassau? Who would a think! KEN W KNOWLES, MD Nassau, April 26, 2009. How could anyone r esist spending money in beautiful downtown Nassau? EDITOR, The Tribune. I surmise that the controversy over the US State Department’s listi ng of Cuba as a state sponsor of terrorism originates in a simple choice of nomenclature. You see every year Cuba dispatches hundreds of white-suited, masked agents, armed with chemical kits, to poor countries around the world. That much is not in dispute. But whereas in US State Department jargon, these functionaries are called “terrorists”, everywhere else in the world (including the Oxford English Dictionary) they are known as “doctors”. ANDREW ALLEN Nassau, May 4, 2009. Backward place, backward people One man’s terrorist is another man’s doctor

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THE FUROR surrounding the results of the Miss Bahamas pageant continues with a judge claiming that five out the nine officials had voted in favor of another contestant. Speaking with The Tribune on the condition of anonymity, the judge yesterday claimed thef ive voted overwhelmingly in support of Amanda Appleyard, and not Kiara Sherman, who w as crowned Miss Bahamas on Sunday night. Reportedly, officials at the event claim that Ms Sherman’s results were far higher than any o ther a claim some judges are finding hard to believe. Points A llegedly in the lead up until the pageant, Ms Sherman was reported to be 150 points ahead o f any other contestant following the prelimin ary rounds. While the judge questioned the a uthenticity of this assessment, they also quest ioned how preliminary results, which they c laim should not have been included in the t otals on the pageant night could possibly have b een used. The Miss Universe pageant requires that a ll preliminary scores are discarded once the finalist are chosen. However, there is now a suggestion that all the scores were used cumul atively. If this is so, then why this change from the Miss Universe rules?” they asked. Additionally, the judge questioned who actually had carriage of the preliminary scoresw hich were collected from the judges before they were handed into the accounting firm of D eloitte and Touche. “If these preliminary scores were not hande d to them until the pageant that night, who knows what could have happened to those scores. Were all the judges including the pre-l iminary judges invited to view their final scores after the pageant? Also, about three days before the final pageant night, two prominent judges were r emoved from the event, and replaced with two judges who did not even interview the girls on a one on one basis,” the judge said. S ince Miss Bahamas was crowned, she has been the blunt of vicious attacks online through n etworking websites and in emails. The Miss Bahamas Committee is set to hold a press conference today to answer these attacks and other questions that have arisen following the pageant. n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net R EDUNDANT staff collected their final paychecks f rom the Emerald Bay Resort yesterday with the hope that severance will last them until the development re-opens. The resort and marina, Four S easons Hotel and golf course officially closed on Tuesday, w hile receivers work to secure a buyer for the property in F armers Hill, Exuma. Although some staff are expected to stay on at the resort for a while longer to close down operations, and others were let go last week, the majority of workers picked up their final pay yesterday. M any of the 500 employees who flocked to Emerald Bay from across the Bahamas to take up positions at the resort, will now return to their original homes. Others will stay in Exuma anticipating a quicks ale and re-opening of the hotel. E xuma MP Anthony Moss said: “Some have left already a nd some are in the process of leaving. Certainly some of them are looking for new jobs because we are not certain when it will re-open, but we want to remain optimistic.” Mr Moss said potential buyers toured the property last week and he is hopeful a deci sion will be made soon. Receivers for Japanese creditors Mitsui, Pricewaterhouse Coopers, confirmed there are over 20 interested buyers and they expect to make an announcement regarding the sale within weeks. When asked if the receivers were any closer to securing a buyer yesterday representative Russell Downs said: “We are closer, but we are not at a stage where we are going to announce what is happening for another couple of weeks. “As soon as there is news we will say, but at the moment we are running through the process, and hopefully within a couple of weeks we will have some news.” M r Moss said he hopes the turnaround will be secured and c ompleted as quickly as possible. H e said: “We are hoping it would be a matter of months, because the programme the government has in place right now is for a couple of months. So while people may have a small amount of money, it may c arry them for a couple of months until we get them back t o work.” Former food and beverage department employee Kimberley Rolle, 22, left Emerald Bay with a small number of staff last Thursday. She is hoping the hotel will re-open within the couple of months she expects her severa nce package will last. Miss Rolle said: “I just have to do something positive with the money I have. “I am hoping the hotel will get sold in the next couple of months so I can get back to work.” Appreciation Mr Moss said government agencies organised an ecu menical church service at the Ebenezer Union Baptist Church in Farmer's Hill, near the resort on Wednesday evening to show appreciation to the redundant staff. The MP said it was important to give those who have worked at Emerald Bay over the last four or five years thanks and encouragement at this difficult time. Around 150 of those who were in Emerald Bay on the eve of the final payday attended the service along with government officials including director of Labour Harcourt Brown. Mr Moss said: “We want to give thanks to Reverend Dr Irvin Clarke for opening the doors of his church to assist with his church services that was organised by the local government and our administrator and government agencies all were present.” S pecialists from the Ministry of Health, Department of S ocial Services, and the National Insurance Board have b een in Exuma this to provide guidance and support to redundant staff seeking assistance. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009, PAGE 5 w ww.shamrockcorp.com 954.578.4120info@shamrockcorp.comFully furnished and equipped apartments by the day, week or month inSpring Specials: $65 per night 2 bedroomSunrise Ft. LauderdaleMiami Miami T T H H E E C C L L E E A A R R I I N N G G B B A A N N K K S S A A S S S S O O C C I I A A T T I I O O N N W W h h i i t t M M o o n n d d a a y y H H o o l l i i d d a a y y B B a a n n k k i i n n g g H H o o u u r r s sMONDAY, JUNE 1, 2009 – CLOSED Normal Banking Hours resume TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 9:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. L L a a b b o o u u r r D D a a y y H H o o l l i i d d a a y y B B a a n n k k i i n n g g H H o o u u r r s sTHURSDAY, JUNE 4, 2009 – 9:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. FRIDAY, JUNE 5, 2009 – CLOSED Normal Banking Hours resume MONDAY, JUNE 8, 2009 9:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Participating Member Banks Bank of The Bahamas Limited Citibank, N.A. Commonwealth Bank Limited Fidelity Bank (Bahamas FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas Royal Bank of Canada Scotiabank (Bahamas Harbour Bay S S i i z z e es s X X S S t t o o 3 3 X X L L Sale on Selected items Up to 50.% Off ALL CLOTHING THE man accused of killing a father-of-one with a rock on S unday night appeared in Magistrates Court yesterday on a manslaughter charge. Jeffrey Moncur, 42, of Soldier Road, has been chargedw ith killing 45-year-old Terry Fox. Mr Fox, 45, had reportedly been watching television at his h ome on Pork Fish Drive when an acquaintance called him outside. Relatives claimed Mr Fox, a self-employed handyman, wasa rguing with the visitor in the back yard before he ran out into the street and collapsed. Police believed he died as a result of a b low to the head with a rock. His death was the 30th homicide for the year. Moncur who appeared before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomeza nd Magistrate Janet Bullard in Court One, Bank Lane, was not required to enter a plea. H e was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison and is expect-e d back in court today for a bail hearing. Man accused of killing fathera ppears in court In brief A POLICE officer charged w ith killing in the course of dangerous driving was arraigned inM agistrates Court yesterday. Police Constable Sean Benj amin, 37, appeared before Chief magistrate Roger Gomez in Court One, Bank Lane yesterday. It is alleged that Benjamin, o f Avocado Street, caused the death of Omar Anthony Stuarto n July 14, 2007, while driving on the Tonique Williams Darl ing Highway. According to reports, the accident occurred shortly after 6pm when the driver of a white 1996 Nissan Sentra traveling w est on Tonique Williams Dar ling Highway lost control of the c ar which collided with a tree. The vehicle reportedly overt urned resulting in a passenger being ejected. The three occu pants of the car, all males, were transported to hospital, howev er, the passenger who was eject e d eventually succumbed to injuries. B enjamin was granted bail in the sum of $8,000 with one s urety. His case has been adjourned to June 2 and transferred to Court 6, Parliament Street. Benjamin was ordered to report to the East Street South Police Station every Saturday before 6 pm. Officer charged with killing in the course of dangerous driving Staff collect final cheques from Emerald Bay Resort Judge claims five of nine officials didn’t vote for the winner M ISS BAHAMAS PAGEANT FUROR Kiara Sherman Amanda Appleyard A 27-YEAR-OLD man of Kennedy Subdivision was jailed for two years imprison ment after pleading guilty to ammunition charges. Philip Gray who appeared before Magistrate Carolita Bethel in Court 8, Bank Lane, on Wednesday admitted pos session of an unlicensed firearm and possession of ammunition. According to court dockets, Gray was found in possession of a black and chrome .38 revolver and six .38 rounds. Magistrate Bethel sentenced Gray to two years imprisonment on both charges. The sentences are to run concurrently. Man pleads guilty to ammunition charges

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n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A SCHOLARSHIP party at Blairwood Academy helped raise f unds to allow students with special educational needs attend the school despite their parents’ economic hardships. The academy, behaviour and f amily therapy centre in Village Road, provides a multi-sensorya pproach to learning to help pupils with math and learning disa bilities, dyslexia, ADD/ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder), behavioural and emotional difficulties and Autistic Spectrum Disorders. W ith just 105 pupils and ten students per teacher, the academy employs world-class educational methods including auditory, visual and kinesthetic programmes, Blairwood Academy owner andd irector Kim Kooskalis said. But the special attention pupils r eceive means school fees are often too high for many families, d espite the fact dedicated teach ers are grossly underpaid, the director said. She added: “There are a large number of students sitting in publ ic schools who cannot read. The national average is a D. Much of t he reason for this is due to the fact that there are children who a re supposed to be in a school like Blairwood but cannot afford it and are failing out.” Full-time scholarships are provided to two students aged 10 and 1 1 who have ADHD and dyslexia but are unable to pay the fees, a nd part-scholarships cover some of the fees for around 15 other s tudents. Often children are a grade or t wo behind when they begin at Blairwood, but within two years they will be at the same level as their mainstreamed peers, Ms Kooskalis said. A nd the scholarship party on Thursday, May 21, moved par e nts and visitors to tears as staff and children conveyed the school’s success story. Ms Kooskalis said: “Many people believe our students at Blair wood are not capable of being successful but that is not true. “Our children are the future b asketball stars, artists, photographers, and some are even schola rs. “Most of our population have n ormal IQ levels but just learn differently than the mainstreamed kids.” The school recently added a basketball team which made n ational history by making when both the junior and senior teams w ent to the finals, Ms Kooskalis said. S he added: “Over and over again parents are taking their child from school to school until they find out about Blairwood. “Some are in denial regarding t he abilities or disabilities of their child, but some are just unaware o f how successful we are with children who do not fit ‘into the m ould’. “So many of our parents are g rateful for the individualised attention and concern we give their children.” The school is appealing for donations for the scholarship fund t o keep needy children in educa tion. T o find out more about Blairwood Academy or to make a donation contact the school on 393-1303 or 394-3329. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Our Nassau Office Will Be Closed On Thursday June 4th, 2009 For Our AnnualWe Will Re-Open For Business As Usual On Monday June 8th, 2009.We Apologize For Any Inconvenience Caused 2009 T HE Bahamas Gaming Reform Committee has again urged Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham to legalise gambling a cross the Bahamas. Declaring current gaming laws discriminatory and “a laughing stock”, the BGR asked why Mr Ingraham is indifferent to the willo f the people on this matter. Citing a recent on-line poll, the BGR told the prime minister Bahamians overwhelmingly supp ort the legalisation of gambling. In a letter to Mr Ingraham, the BGR criticised the failure of government to engage citizens in an open discussion on public poli-c y. “Again the integrity of basic democratic principles is brought into question,” the letter said. C ommittee chairperson Sidney Strachan added: “Public discussion of the gaming issue could not be more pronounced. The airwaves are filled with discus-s ion of the issue. Talk shows are inundated with calls and print media are writing about the matter daily. The message being conv eyed is consistently that gaming must be legalised. “The depth of interest across t he country is evident. Now the issue has moved into the international arena on the web. A recent on-line Twiigs Poll has 78 p er cent of Bahamians supporting the legalisation of gaming. It’s just another of many strong indicators. Bahamians are asking, ‘Where is the government on thisi ssue?’ Effectively it is in hiding while the issue consumes the nation. That’s irresponsible however you look at it.” T he letter said, in part: “We again write out of frustration. For weeks the Bahamas Gaming Reform Committee has been attempting to learn the formalp osition of the government on gaming law reform. Our efforts have been to no avail despite adherence to an orderly process. I n fact, we have not been accorded the most fundamental of courtesies from the government – the acknowledgment of correspondence. “The Cayman Islands have now made us the last standingC aribbean democracy afraid to c hallenge the constitutional and g aming status quo. Against strong religious opposition, the people voted in referendum by 63 per c ent for change and it should be noted that they changed the government in the process. Your government must not be afraid t o act.” The letter noted that Minister of Tourism Vincent VaderpoolWallace, in the May 22, 2009 edition of The Tribune, said the gove rnment is thinking about reviewing the Gaming and Financial Transaction Reporting Act to permit “legal residents” to game. By all accounts, this will not a ugur well with Bahamians if they too are not afforded the opportunity to gamble through gaming reform. A comprehens ive review of the Gaming Act is necessary if your government intends to clearly demonstrate that it is indeed respectful of the will of the people. Anything shorto f this, sir, will only serve to further exasperate the feelings of hypocrisy and discrimination throughout the Bahamas,” the B GR said. THE government has signed a ‘Short Stay Visa Waiver Agreement’ which allows Bahamians to travel visa-free to Schengen European countries for up to three months, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs announced. The agreement was signed yesterday during a ceremony at the Council of the European Union in Brussels, Belgium by Paul Farquharson, Ambassador of the Bahamas to the European Community. He is also High Commissioner to London. The agreement, to take effect immediately, applies to the following Schengen countries: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hun gary, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Por tugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain and Sweden. The agreement does not apply to Ireland or the United Kingdom. Bahamian passport holders may still travel to these countries without a visa for stays of up to six months, said Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette. The agreement also does not apply to the overseas territories of France or the Netherlands. A French visa is required for French Guiana, Guadeloupe, Martinique, Reunion, Tahiti and St Martin. A visa is not required for the Netherlands overseas territories of Aruba, and Netherlands Antilles including Bonaire, Curacao, and St Maarten. This agreement does not yet apply to Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway. Under the current European Union rules regard ing travel to the Schengen area, a short stay is defined as a time not exceeding three months, within a sixmonth period following the first date of entry into the Schengen area as a whole. S tays are calculated on a c umulative basis within that six-month period, including both the number of days stayed, and the number of Schengen countries visited. This means that a visit to any one of the 25 countries is considered as a visit to all and will count towards the maximum three months stay within a sixmonth period, according to the agreement. This does not prevent persons from travelling to several of the countries on any one visit or from visiting Europe more than once in a six-month period. “Bahamians who travel frequently to Europe, and whose visits may potential ly exceed three months within any six month period, should contact the nearest embassy or consulate of the country to which they intend to travel in order to secure the necessary visas or permits,” Mr Symonette said. “For the time being, vis its to Bulgaria, Cyprus and Romania would be the exception to this, as Bahamian passport holders could make three month visits to each of these countries without it count ing towards their overall three month allowance. This exception would fall away once these countries fully implement the Schengen Agreement,” he said. For the purpose of the agreement, short stays are considered as visits for tourism, business, sports, journalism, and intra-corporate training. “The agreement does not cover students or persons seeking employment,” said Mr Symonette. “These persons must continue to secure the necessary visas and permits for educational or employment purposes.” The agreement was also signed between the European Union and Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Mauritius, St Kitts and Nevis and the Seychelles. Gambling laws ‘a laughing stock’ BGR says Bahamians overwhelmingly support legalisation BLAIRWOOD ACADEMY pupils sing at the scholarship party. BLAIRWOODACADEMY HOLDSSCHOLARSHIPPARTY Govt signs ‘Short Stay Visa Waiver Agreement’

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n By BAHAMAS PATIENT ADVOCACY T H E role of the Coroner h as adapted over the eight centuries since the office was formally established in England in1194, from being a formo f medieval tax gatherer to an i ndependent judicial officer charged with the investigation of sudden, violent or unnatural death. And with the Coroner’s Act of 1988, no criminal charges could result as a consequence of evidence produced at an inquest. However, the notable case of Dr Harold Shipman (who wasc onvicted of murdering 15 patients) resulted in three public inquiries, and brought the Coroner’s Act again under review. But in the Bahamas there has been no review, amendments, regulations or rules made under our Coroner’s Act of 1909, in the last 100 years. And how well does that one century old Act enable ourC oroner to meet the changing needs of a rapidly developing society, and provide service to the public in general, and the bereaved in particular? Well, the first issue, is that we do not have a Coroner’s Court as such. Each magistrate is byv irtue of his office a coroner but there is no official coroner equipped with his own office, funding and staffing. Under our law, the coroner is a magistrate appointed on an ad hoc basis to hear cases. Responsibility for hearing inquests has been a shifting brief, although there was a period of allocating all cases to one mag istrate who became the “de fac to” coroner. This arrangement was discontinued a few yearsa go. The specialist coroner system h as a critical advantage, and it is this: the specialist coroner is not a magistrate who has to deal with the pressure of other cases, which are bound to be seen as more urgent, because those othe r cases concern the living. The demand for an inquest lacks that vitality, in every sense of that word. However, under both systems, a backlog of unheard cases accu mulated. Long delays represent a failing to meet the needs of those bereaved families. Given the escalating rate of reported unnatural deaths, the backlog will likely increase. It may be, that this small jurisdiction needs more than one coroner, so that an alternate coroner can hear matters from which the first might recuse himself. With more than 900 lawyers admitted to the bar, and mre than 900 doctors licensed to practice, we should have suffi-c ient qualified personnel to constitute dedicated coroner’s courts to meet the current level of need. The years of delay experie nced by Bahamians in getting inquests held by the Coroner’s Court adds insult to injury. It prolongs grieving, aggravates thes ense of grievance for the deceased=s family, and impacts the reputation of the judicial sys-t em, which at this point, needs refurbishing. Local psychiatrists have written widely and well on “anger management issues” as a causeo f violence in our society. The perceived lack of effective recourse or accountabilityt hrough appropriate channels, might also be a factor in stimulating public anger. And the fact remains that in 100 years, our Coroner’s Court h as not evolved to support or re-inforce current provisions for accountability, which do exist, at least in law. Take one case which illust rates both problems: A 42-yearold patient dies unexpectedly in hospital in 2002. It then takes five years for that case to be brought before the Coroner’s Court, and another year for the inquest to complete. That inquest involved more than 20 witnesses, and occupied about 24 court days, over 15 months. The evidence emerging from that case is voluminous. Apart from clinical ‘neglect’, according to one expert witness, the hospital records showed a complete ‘systems failure’. The evidence in that case indicates there are health care safe t y issues, which should be addressed by two statutory boards: the Hospitals Board, and the Medical Council. These bod ies have the duty to investigate and evaluate private hospitals and medical professionals as an adjunct of their powers to licenset hose hospitals and doctors, for public safety. However, Bahamian law does n ot give a coroner the power to refer matters to anywhere but the Supreme Court for criminal charges, once there is an appropriate verdict. Even if our law did give the coroner authority to refer a matter to a statutory authority for remedial action, this assumes that we have, for instance, a Hospital Board able and willing to act. It also assumes that a Medical Council is not prevented by a judge’s order from carrying out an evaluation the pro-f essionals it licenses. If these assumptions are wrong, the information coming out of an Inquest, at public expense, would not be used to the publicb enefit. The Inquest process can also reveal deficiencies in prisons, the police force, and other organi-z ations responsible for the circumstances of a death. This information could put the agen-c ies responsible, in a better position to respond more promptly, to address deficiencies and prevent other lives being avoidably lost. T he Coroner’s Court, is – or should be the citizen’s watchdog when it comes to investi-g ating abuse of power . The citizen has a right not to be unlawfully deprived of his life by the State. A verdict of manslaughter against a police officer, or any o ther person, needs to proceed in the Supreme Court, and not lie buried in the Attorney General’s office. The coroner should be, and h as to be, a watchdog for society to establish the real cause of death. We need an informed citizenry and strong civic bodies to push for an effective follow up to a coroner’s verdict. And to develop an informed citizenry, we need the investigative journalism of a free press. But in the Bahamas, some suspicious deaths never make it to coroner’s court. We are building up an inordinate backlog of those cases which are referred. Verdicts of manslaughter can languish silently in the AG’s office, regulatory bodies charged with protecting the public, arew eak and /or hamstrung, the rule of law lapses, and the press still needs to push for answers and reforms. What kind of reforms? Ideally, we should have an official Coroner of The Bahamas, and a coroner’s office, as in England.H owever, as a starting point, to make the court more efficient and prevent the build up of a b acklog, we could make the follow reforms, without much cost, and even some savings. The coroner should have power to sit alone, without a jury, in certain cases not involving agents of the state: police, warders, immigration, and defense force officers. Fix the minimum and maximum number of jurors, so that the absence of a juror does not lead to an inevitable adjournment. Raise the remuneration of the jurors. Provide coroner rules for this jurisdiction. The first two changes are critical to an increased disposal of inquests and require small changes in the Coroners Act. Too much expense and delay is entailed now, when one juror is disabled or dies, and the inquest has to be started all over again. T hese changes could be speedily put in place, and go a long way to having an effective and properly functioning coro-n er’s court. In other jurisdictions, the role and the importance of the coroner’s courts are increasing. Here it is diminishing. Why? A Coroner’s Court should be able to respond to the community’s needs, in a timely fashion. This requires review of the legislation, and also review of the funding, support facilities and staff available to the Coroner. “Governments do not rise and fall on proposed amendments to the Coroner’s Act,” according to one pundit. But the circumstances of a death, may reveal issues of wider importance to the community which have to be rectified. So, either we continue to watch the decline of this ancient and vital Court, or we position our Coroners Court to be the W atchdog for citizens it is intended to be . W hat do you think? www.bahamaspatientadvocacy.org C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Watching out for the watchdog T HE C ORONER S C OURT – A CENTURYLATER Y OUR S AY n MIAMI NATIONALHurricane Center forecasters in Miami say a tropical depression has formed off the mid-Atlantic coast, but it’s not expected to threaten land, according to Associated Press. The National Weather Service counts the depression as the first of the 2009 Atlantic hurricane season, which officially begins June 1. The depression’s maximum sustained winds are near 35 mph. Forecasters say it could strengthen to a tropical storm Thursday night or Friday but t hen is expected to weaken or d issipate by Saturday. F orecasters expect the depression to stay over the Atlantic, where it’s moving toward the northeast near 16 mph. Around 5 p.m. EDT Thursday, the depression was centered about 305 miles southsoutheast of Providence, R.I., and about 565 miles southwest of Halifax, Nova Scotia. Season’s first tropical depression forms in Atlantic In brief n WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. A WEST PALM BEACH man is facing federal charges a fter authorities allegedly caught him in the middle of the n ight with a bag full of 119 sea turtle eggs, according to Asso ciated Press. Police stopped 52-year-old Bruce Wayne Bivins on May 8 and asked to see the contents of his bag. Bivins allegedly ranaway, but later surrendered. He appeared in federal court W ednesday. Roughly half of the eggs were covered in sand, which means they may have been collected from a female sea turtle while she was laying the eggs and before they touched the sand in her nest. The sea turtle eggs are prot ected under federal law as a threatened species. Officials estimate the eggs were worth more than $350 on the black market. Florida man faces charges over sea tur tle eggs n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A CONCERT is set to raise funds for former police officers who retired up to 40 years ago and are struggling to stretch their pensions in today’s economy. Calypso King of the World ‘The Mighty Sparrow’ will fly in with his band the Trinidad and Tobago Troubadours to play at the Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort in Cable Beach in June. The award-winning superstar who has been performing since the 1960s will play to help raise funds for the Royal Bahamas Police Force Retired Police Officers Association to help former officers who served the country for most of their lives and are now in need of support. Chairman of the organising committee Paul Thompson said: “It is all in aid of retired officers who have fallen on hard times. A lot of these officers retired in the 60s and 70s, and they’re getting on. “Some of them can’t work, and the pension in those days based on their salaries is a lot smaller than the salary we get today, so we try to help them.” Mr Thompson said the force helps former officers by providing prescription medication at the police college, and operating a bus service which transports former officers around New Providence free of charge. And funds raised at the event will help cover the cost of such initiatives as well as contribute to the cost of medical attention requiered by some former officers. The association’s executive committee head former assistant commissioner Grafton Ifill, will oversee distribution of the funds. Mr Thompson said George Myers of Restaurants Bahamas Ltd has greatly supported the world-class event which will also include entertainment from the police band, police entertainers and local guest entertainers at the Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort. The concert will be held at 8.30pm on Friday, June 19. Tickets are $25 and available from the RBPF Retired Police Officers Association office at Police Headquarters in East Street, the Shell garage in Shirley Street, the Cricket Pavillion at Hayes Oval, West Bay Street, and other locations. For more information call the association on 302-8044. To learn more about The Mighty Sparrow log on to www.mightysparrow.com. ‘Mighty Sparro to sing for former police officers CALYPSO KING of the World ‘The Mighty Sparrow’.w w w . m i g h t y s p a r r o w . c o m

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009, PAGE 11 able to pull free of the men enough to draw a handgun and begin to fire it randomly, causing bystanders to scatter. At this point, another man – who seemed to be a civilian but could have been a plain clothes officer – reportedly got out of his car carrying a shotgun and began firing at the perpetrator. One witness said: “It was a shoot out. People were running everywhere. I ran too. I just wanted to get out of there.” It is unclear what happened next as the witnesses who spoke to The Tribune say they fled the scene and did not look back. Staff at KFC said no one on duty at the time was there yes terday and senior police officials were not available for comment last night. Bystanders said they were frustrated by the fact that a number of calls were made to the police while the incident was unfolding, but there seemed to be no response. One said: “It took time for all of that to happen, but the police were nowhere to be seen. It’s like there is no one there to protect you – it’s just you. The public is not allowed to carry weapons, so we are defenseless.” Yesterday morning, police issued the press with a list of crimes committed the day before, but did not mention the incident. This is the second time this week The Tribune disclosed details of crimes that the police failed to make public. On Wednesday, a front page article revealed that a series of nighttime muggings took place throughout the capital over the weekend. Although the police think the attacks were "isolated", a senior officer warned the public to be vigilant of their surroundings at night to avoid falling victim to an armed criminal. Members of the public who heard rumours of the muggings expressed concern that the police failed to report them. A professional woman whose job forces her to travel at night said news of the attacks frightened her. “Obviously there is an increase in crime, and the police should be reporting it,” she said. The woman, asked to remain anonymous, said: “I think it has to be known if there is something going on out there.” A caller who identified himself as Mr Dean, said: “This is scary. People have to be made aware if messed up things are going on so they can be more careful. You can’t keep them dumb.” swarmed Shirley and Church Streets for hours, taking away business from local operations by parking their cars in nearby parking spaces and touched off angry phone calls to The Tribune newsroom from irate drivers. One man, who wished to remain anonymous, said it had taken him an hour and a half to get from the Village Road and Shirley Street intersection to Elizabeth Avenue downtown. He hit out at the union for deciding to locate the polling station at the church and for the police for not making efforts to help motorists trapped by the activities of the unionists. “It caused traffic to be backed up all the way down Eastern Road. They were drinking beer, laughing and playing around like it was a street carnival in the middle of Shirley Street. “I don’t understand how anyone in their right mind could possibly pick that location on one of the busiest streets in probably the whole country to put a polling station for thousands and thousands of people to vote in a union election. “The worst part is the police who stood there in the middle of Church Street looking very official but doing absolutely nothing surely it’s their responsibility to make sure that cars can pass on Shirley Street?” A local business owner said that the flow of customers into her shop was severely curtailed byt he fact that union members parked in all available p arking spots outside her Shirley Street shop. St Matthew’s church was one of two polling stations available to members wishing to vote yesterday at Worker’s House and St Matthews church. The process took placed between 8am and around 7pm with the members of the country’s second biggest union being offered a chance to choose between five teams vying for leadership positions. Despite complaints from the public, the voting appeared to have proceeded much more smoothly than the nomination process, which saw several fights break out and a dispute over which was the correct day for nominations to take place. The election went ahead after a Supreme Court judge lifted an injunction against it on Tuesday. The injunction had been called for by the union’s First Vice President Kirk Wilson, who, with other members of the executive, has been at odds with the union’s President Roy Colebrooke. Mr Wilson had claimed that proper procedures were not followed when the date for the election was set. unlawful killing by the police were reported. “The lack of an independent body to investigate allegations of ill-treatment involving police officers undermined confidence in due process.” Amnesty has recorded the killing of Patrick Strachan, who was shot in the stomach by police in Wilson Tract on February 27 last year, and later died in hospital. Local residents maintain Mr Strachan was not armed when he was shot, while police say the victim had fired at officers before they shot at him, the report states. However, the progress of an investigation into the incident were not known by Amnesty at the end of last year. The organisation also notes details of the alleged harassment and ill-treatment of envi ronmental organisation chairman Emmanuel McKenzie, who it is claimed was handcuffed, dragged off to a clearing, and had a gun pointed at his head when police/army officers raided a fundraising event on April 19 last year. Others attending the event were also beaten and ill-treated, and although a formal complaint was logged, no investigation had been initiated by the end of the year, Amnesty records. In other areas Amnesty has acknowledged how the Domestic Violence Protection Order Act came into force on December 1, more thana year after it was passed by Parliament, while amendments to the Sexual Offences and Domestic Violence Act to increase the penalty for serious sexual crimes to life imprisonment were passed in November. At least one person was sentenced to death during the year, according to the press, although no executions were carried out, the report states. Amnesty records: “A number of prisoners had their death sentences reviewed and commuted to life imprisonment; this followed a ruling in 2006 by the UK-based Judicial Committee of the Privy Council which abolished mandatory death sentences for murder. “The national public debate on executions continued, with the Prime Minister, the Presi dent of the Bar Association and the Acting Commissioner of Police voicing support for resumption.” The Bahamas voted against a United Nations General Assembly resolution calling for a worldwide moratorium on executions in December, and ratified the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. FROM page one FROM page one FROM page one Union election Report allegations Street shootout ‘like Wild West’ n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE Government yesterday confirmed to the cultural community that it will no longer be h osting Carifesta XI and is no l onger in a position to bid for the right to stage either of the two succeeding arts festivals. This comes even as the C aribbean Community (CARICOM) revealed it has decided to delay Carifesta XI until 2011 in view of the economic challenges b eing faced by all of the region. H aving then scrapped all slated hosts countries, CARICOM is to start soliciting bids from all member countries interested in staging e ither Carifesta XI, XII (which will take place in 2013) or XIII (which will take place in 2015 from next month until Septemb er, T he Tribune h as learned. H owever, Culture Minister Charles Maynard, reflecting statements made by Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham in his budget communication yesterday, said t he challenges facing the Bahamian economy mean it would be crazy for us to put a bid on any of them right now.” While The Bahamas might be interested in hosting Carifesta XII or XIII, the fact that CARICOMh as decided to open up bidding for all three of the festivals now rather than at a later date when the Bahamian economy has had a c hance to start rebounding excludes this country as a potential host for any of them, he said. “It’s unfortunate they’ve chos en to put three successive Carifestas to bid at one time,” said Mr Maynard, adding, however, that he would suspect mostC aribbean countries would feel the same way and may put ups ome resistance to the decision. These latest developments c ome after T he Tribune r evealed exclusively in April that Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham had told his Caricom counterparts at a meeting of Caribbean leaders in Trinidad that month appare ntly before the grouping had reached the decision to delay the festival that The Bahamas could no longer host Carifesta X I. A meeting was called at the Ministry of Culture last night to formally explain the situation to the cultural community and too ffer an opportunity to “chart the way forward”, according to Mr Maynard. Speaking prior to that meeti ng, the minister of state said that despite Carifesta and the enormous multi-disciplinary contingents of artists from across the region not coming to TheB ahamas any time soon, he has heard a number of proposals from within the Bahamian arts community to stage alternative more focused” events. These include a visual arts festival and an international drumming festival, he said. “There are any number of prop osals out there that we can participate in,” added Mr Maynard. He said that the $1 million the G overnment has allocated towards upgrading the NationalP erforming Arts Centre shows t hat it is “still putting emphasis i nto cultural infrastructure” which w ill “help The Bahamas be ready whenever the time comes to do w hatever it is we could do.” Govt ‘in no position’ to bid for Carifesta events Charles Maynard

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS there will be no plans to replace them. “We have some people who are up for retirement this year, but as far as Iknow, most of them are in administrative positions andso it should not affect on the ongoing operation of the sports department,” Bannis ter said. “Persons who are in the sports department who are eligible for retirement, will have the option to retire.” There was some rumors that both Director of Sports, Martin Lundy and Assistant Director of Sports, Frank ‘Pancho’ Rahming, may be retiring. But Bannister said: “I don’t think it affects them.I think both of time have time where they can determine when and if it’s the right time to retire. I don’t think it affects either one of them.” As for facilities, Bannister said the construction of the new stadium is underway at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Center as well as the resurfacing of the track at the Grand Bahama Sports Complex. “We’re doing capital works in a lot of the Family Islands, we’re putting basketball courts down in Red Bays, Lowe Sound and Fresh Creek, Andros,” he revealed. “We’ve just shipped basketball backboards and stands to Exuma and we are constantly doing a whole lot of stuff to keep sports going throughout the country. A lot of things we are going people don’t know about.” Bannister was referring to the restoration of a number of parks throughout New Providence, which have been upgraded to host a number of recreational and competitive events in the commu nities. As he look forward to the upcoming year, Bannister said he’s particularly impressed with what’s happened in volleyball with the men’s national team advancing to the third round of the FIVA NORCEA’s Qualify ing Round for the 2010 World Championships. “Judging by the performances of our athletes as well over the last few weeks,I think we will be gearing up for an outstanding showing at the World Championships in Athletics,” he said. “And we haven’t even gotten to the NCAA Championships or the height of the season for the elite athletes. So it should be a goodyear ahead of us in sports.” in town and we should have two weeks to get them ready,” he said. By today, Smith said they should be able to trim the 15 players down to the final 12 for the tournament. The team, which will be managed by Yvonne Rolle, should be led by Kelsie Johnson once it is selected. The major concern, according to Jermaine Adderley, who traveled as the manager of the men’s team, is funding. “The federation had the difficult task of getting the men’s team off, but we were able to advance, so that was a good thing for us,” Adderley said. “But however, the women have the same difficulty as it relates to funding because they are leaving on June 9 and at this time, we are still looking for fund ing.” Adderley said it is estimated that it will cost the federation some $40,000 to make the trip to Barbados and right on the heels of that, both the junior boys and girls will be travelling in July and they will need an additional $30,000. “We are in such a hole right now as it relates to funding,” Adderley said. “We have great expectations for these teams because of the talent available. “At the same time, we are also look ing for funding for our men’s team to travel to Santo Domingo over the holi day weekend in July to prepare for the next round in Cuba.” The FIVB will be assisting us with our funding in Santo Domingo, which isa great boost. But Adderley said the federation will have to make their own travel arrangement. Then in August, Adderley said the federation will have to fund the entire trip to Cuba for the third round, which will determine whether or not the Bahamas will advance to the World Championships next year in Tokyo, Japan and eventually the Olympic Games in 2012 in London. “So we’re still looking for funding as it relates to all of our national teams,” Adderley pointed out. “So it’s looking rocky right now for us.” In all, Adderley said they have an estimated budget of $130,000 for all of the teams to be able to travel over the next three months. Persons interested in making a con tribution to the federation to assist the national teams can contact Adderley at 535-6623, DeVince Smith at 357-7707 or Joe Smith at 457-1050. Fiscal budget should not affect sports ministry FROM page 14 FROM page 14 W omen’ s National V olleyball T eam gearing up for NORCEA qualifiers n B y RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net AFTERa brief hiatus, First Class Promotions is back on the local boxing scene with its first show of the year featuring its top fighters including a bout for the WBA FedCaribe Super Middleweight title. Jermain "Choo Choo" Macke y (17-3 w hen he defends his title a gainst Emiliano Cayetano (182) of the Dominican Republic tomorrow night at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. Featured on the undercard will be Jerry "Big Daddy" Butler (7-5-1 bout against Dominican Michael Santiago (0-0 professional debut of female fighter Kelly Finlayson. Mackey, whose last fight came 11 months ago, said he is ready willing and able to set foot in the ring again to successfully defend the WBA title at home for the third time. " I am 120 percent ready. I a m ready to carry the Bahamian flag into the ring and also bring it back with my head held high defending the WBC title. He's a very good fighter. He's 18-2 so he has a better record than me by one fight. He is a good quality fighter on my road toward a world title fight," he said, "After I beat this opponent I defend the Commonwealth title and from then I will see where it goes. It is exciting to get back into the ring. I am just waiting on the hours to pass right now to get back into the ring where I feel at home." Butler, who came off a draw in his last fight in November of 2008, said he is ready to get back into the ring and expects a productive finish to the end of the year. "Right now I'm very focused, trying to get in my last bit of work. But the training has gone as good as I would have hoped, just getting in my last few touches and final movements but I'm ready for Saturday night. I know nothing about my opponent, just his record, hisn ame and where he is from, that is all I need," he said. "My time will be soon, it is coming in October. It is up to me to stay in shape and stay on board especially with all that was going on. I just have to stay ready and in shape and able to fight." Finlayson, who has the potential to become the face of female boxing in the Bahamas, said irrespective of the fight's outcome fans should expect her top effort in her debut. "It's going to be interesting and exciting. Physically and mentally I'll be prepared for it. I know nothing about my opponent it just makes me want to train a little more harder to get up my confidence because I do not know where she is coming from, how she is trying, how strong she is or her preparation," he said, "One thing is certain I will go out there, give it my all." First Class Promotions Chief Executive Officer, Michelle Minus, said the fighters and theg eneral public highly anticipate the return to the ring. "We are expecting to have a large crowd we have been getting a lot of response from people in the boxing community and the Bahamas in general. People are very excited we are back, it looks as though as if they are really going to support us," she said. "It feels great to be back. First Class Promotions our aim and objective is to mold these young people now so we will have successful citizens of tomorrow. Our main focus is for these young men to utilize their talent and skills to find something to do in a career than can take them places." With this event as their inaugural event of the year, Minus said her organisation has an exciting remainder of the year planned for its fans and fighters. "We are looking forward to hosting a Commonwealth title fight August 8th. We are looking forward to great things from Choo Choo and some of our up and coming boxers like Big Daddy Jerry Butler, we see him getting in line to fight for a WBA or WBC title hopefully before the end of the year," she said. "We are also looking for things from some of our other fighters like Alpachino Allen, and some of the other guys that will be featured on the card Saturday night.” ‘Choo Choo’ defends WBA FedCaribe title Saturday night JERMAINE “CHOO CHOO” MACKEY Female fighter makes pro debut on undercard INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays n TENNIS PARIS Associated Press CLOSE doesn't count. Roger Fed erer knows that as well as anyone. Still, even Federer had to acknowl edge he found himself in a much tighter and tougher match than he would have expected or is used to in the French Open's second round Thursday before producing a 7-6 (82 6-2 victory over Jose Acasuso of Argentina. How near did the 45th-ranked Acasuso come to a startling upset in straight sets, no less? On four occasions, the Argentine was a point from taking the first set. After winning the second, he held a set point in the third. Federer, whose season hasn't been up to his high standards, was up to the task each time, though. "Mentally, I've always been very strong, but I'm not being put in a posi tion like this very often, you know," Federer said. Then, moments later, as if to make sure everyone understood him, Federer added: "Coming through such a match is always a great feeling. Like I said, I'm not part of such close matches that often." Particularly at this stage of a Grand Slam tournament. And particularly against anyone other than Rafael Nadal, who supplanted Federer at No. 1 in the rankings last year and edged him in five-set Wimbledon and Aus tralian Open finals. "I thought," Acasuso said, "I could have won this match." But this has not been a French Open for underdogs or upsets, and no seeded men lost Thursday, when the winners included No. 5 Juan Martin del Potro, No. 6 Andy Roddick, No. 9 Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, No. 10 Nikolay Davydenko, No. 11 Gael Monfils and No. 16 Tommy Robredo. Four seeded women went home, though none higher than No. 13 Mari on Bartoli. Those moving into the third round included both Williams sisters Venus needed three sets, Serena two No. 5 Jelena Jankovic, No. 7 Svetlana Kuznetsova and No. 4 Elena Dementieva, who advanced when Jele na Dokic stopped playing because of a bad back while leading 6-2, 3-4. "I really don't deserve to win today because of the way I was playing," Dementieva said. The biggest surprise Thursday might have been how well Roddick played, given that he hadn't made the third round at Roland Garros since his 2001 tournament debut. "There's a lot of work to go," said Roddick, the only U.S. man remaining of the nine who entered the tournament. "By no means have I accomplished anything yet." In his 6-2, 6-2, 7-6 (2 85th-ranked Ivo Minar of the Czech Republic, Roddick hit 15 aces, saved all four break points he faced and won the point on 23 of 26 trips to the net. "I'm not going to sit here and jump up on a soap box like I'm really good on this stuff now because I won two matches. I think that's what you need to guard against," Roddick said. "Today I felt pretty good, and I felt pretty in control of what I was doing." Federer, in contrast, offered this assessment of his performance: "I was not managing and controlling the match the way I should have." He has made the semifinals at a record 19 consecutive majors and has n't lost before the third round at any Grand Slam event since the 2003 French Open. But of Federer's 13 Grand Slam titles one shy of Pete Sampras' career mark zero have come at Roland Garros. Federer reached the past three finals and the 2005 semifinals at the claycourt major before losing to Nadal each time. No one over the last five years, apart from Nadal, had really made Federer seem ordinary at the French Open until Acasuso did for stretches. That he would give Federer a hard time is espe cially noteworthy: Acasuso advanced past the second round only once in 28 career Grand Slam tournaments. Federer struggles in 2nd round at French Open SWITZERLAND'S Roger Federer returns the ball to Argentina's Jose Acasuso during their second round match at the Roland Garros stadium in Paris, Thursday May 28, 2009. C h r i s t o p h e E n a / A P P h o t o

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009, PAGE 13 S EVENteams have regist ered to compete in the Bahamas National Drug Council’s (BNDC iv e -onF iv e Rehabilitation Basketb all Tournament scheduled f or May 30-31. The double-elimination tournament will make its return to the historicA rchdeacon William Thompson Park (Southern Recreation Grounds will be played in honour of Mr.A ndrew “Rasta” Pratt who passed away in 2009. I t will be played under the motto: “Your Life, Your Community, No Place for Drugs.” M r. Pratt was named Most Valuable Player of both the third and f ourth annual tournaments and was a fierce, yet gracious, competitor, whose intensity of the basketball court was matched in the fight against drug use and abuse. This fifth tournament has great significance to the organising committee, the Bahamas National DrugC ouncil and the participating teams b ecause it allows us to salute the con tributions of two persons so dear to o ur hearts,” said Tournament Chairm an, Mr. Floyd McPhee. “Firstly, it gives us the opportunity to honour the memory one of our owni n the person of Mr. Andrew Pratt who was not only a very active partic i pant in the tournament as witnessed b y his back-to-back MVP titles, but was also a great colleague who playeda vital role in the work we do in the f ight against drug use and abuse. “By hosting the tournament at the Archdeacon William Thompson Park, it gives us an opportunity to salute the contributions Archdeacon Thomp-s on made to the surrounding community and the Bahamas National Drug Council, through its RehabilitativeC ommittee. Archdeacon Thompson was a pil lar of strength who worked tirelessly a nd unselfishly with regards to the f ight against drugs and the need for the provision of rehabilitative services for drug users and abusers in the coun-t ry,” Mr. McPhee added. Mr. McPhee said the Five-on-Five t ournament is one of the many a venues the BNDC uses to promote drug awareness in The Bahamas in its ongoing fight against drug use and a buse and illicit drug trafficking. He said the Five-on-Five tournament “emerged” from what was a social gathering of recovering addicts, along with others from the variousS upport Services, who would gather during the evenings for games of “friendly, but competitive basketballg ames” at the then Temple Christian A cademy Gymnasium. “This gathering became more than j ust an opportunity to compete in bask etball games after awhile, as it also gave brothers who did not play the game an opportunity to come out ande njoy the social atmosphere and bond with others,” Mr. McPhee said. As the spirit of brotherhood and c ompetition grew, a committee was formed for the purpose of organizinga tournament for the rehabilitation c entres and support services. “After extensive planning and collaboration with stakeholders and sponsors, the tournament was established with the Bahamas NationalD rug Council serving as hosts,” Mr. McPhee added. The tournament begins on Satur d ay, May 30 at 9am. Play is expected t o end at 3pm. Day two will com mence at 1pm on Sunday, May 31 with p resentation of awards scheduled to t ake place at 6pm following athe Championship game. The team from the Dean Granger C entre is the two-time champions, winning consecutive titles in 2007 and2 008. P ast winners have included Great Commission (2005 lenge (2006 THE FIFTH annual Bahamas National Drug Council's Five-on-Five Basketball tournament will be played over the May 30-31 weekend at the historic Archdeacon William Thompson Park (Government Ground the tournament showcase some of the trophies that will be up for grabs. BNDC basketball tourney set for end of month Dear Sir, KINDLY allow me space in your newspaper to respond to the many lies, half truths and foolishness that has surrounded the recently publicized exhi bitions by Ray Minus Jr. and one Quincy Pratt. For the sake of clarity let us first concentrate on Pratt. A long time ago when Lloyd Turnquest was Chairman of the Bahamas Boxing Commission and Algernon Allen was Minister of Sports, Pratt’s license was taken away from him because as I understand it, he was legally blind. The next boxing Chairman was Dr. Norman Gay, whom I had the pleasure of serving as Vice Chairman. Again Pratt’s license was rejected because the Commission was satisfied that he is legally blind. In 2007, I was appointed Chairman of the Commission. Among the Commissioners named was one Quincy Pratt. Quincy again expressed a desire to fight. He met with myself and members of the Commission. Quincy was advised that the first thing he needed to do was submit a letter of resignation then he can re-apply for a license. That has not happened up to this day. So, as far as we are concerned, Quincy Pratt is still a member on the Commis sion. Some years ago, Ray Minus Jr. announced his retirement from professional boxing. Ray is fully aware that the Boxing Commission is responsible for regulating the sport of professional boxing in this country. His wife is head of a promo tions company. He is a trainer of many fighters. Yet he chooses to ignore the ‘process’ that he is fully familiar with and announce to the public a series of exhibitions between himself and Pratt. I, in my capacity as Chair man, had no choice but to send out the notice from the Commission. Afterwards, Ray went on one of the radio talk shows and advised that these are not Exhibitions; they are demonstrations between him and Quincy, trying to raise funds for the amateurs. Also Ray left a message at my office, saying there was a misunderstanding. We apolo gize. “It is not an exhibition, it is a sparring session.” Mr. Editor, there is a bigger picture here. And that is what is disturbing to me the most. It would seem to me that those among us feel we are above the rules and the rules do not apply to us. And when the regulators put their feet down, all sorts of accusations are hurled at the ones putting their feet down. Even more disturbing is that some members of the press choose to print the foolishness spewed out by some individuals instead of doing some investigative reporting and finding out the truth. But it is an even deeper issue. And that is of honesty. And that I believe is notorius throughout our soci ety. It is incredible that some of us are so used to getting away with foolishness we have a problem adjusting when the rules are enforced. Mr. Editor, what is so amazing is that when Dr. Norman Gay served as Chairman these very same trouble makers never posed a problem to him. In fact, they genuflect to him for four consecutive years. But as soon as my friend Pat Strachan becomes Chairman, all of a sudden the rules do not apply to them. And I’m on a campaign to stem the growth of professional boxing and victimize promoters. How hypocritical! Let me say for the record, the Bahamas Boxing Commission is committed to going the extra mile and providing avenues for our many fighters to embrace the many opportunities that are out there. At this time, we have the most fighters rated in the British Commonwealth ratings because of the action of the Commission. The President of the Com monwealth Boxing Council is Fred Sturrup. And I witnessed first hand how he campaigned to put Bahamian fighters in the British Commonwealth ratings. Fred is also the Secretary for the Bahamas Boxing Commission. PAT STRACHAN Chairman of the Bahamas Boxing Commission LETTER T O THE EDIT OR Here are the facts surrounding the Minus and Pratt exhibitions QUINCY PRATT (leftright mote their exhibition.

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C M Y K C M Y K FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 14 I NSIDE Local sports news n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net STILL basking in the historic performance from the men’s national team, the Bahamas Volleyball Federation is gearing up for an encore for the women’s team. Like the men, the women will be travelling to Barbados on June 9 to begin their NORCEA’S qualifying rounds for the 2010 World Champi onships where they will have to play both host Barbados and Haiti in their pool. Federation’s first vice presi dent Joseph ‘Joe Mo’ Smith, who accompanied the men’s team to Kingston, Jamaica where they qualified to go to the third round in Cuba in August, know that the task will be just as tough for the women. “We have roughly two weeks of preparation left,” said Smith, who will travel as the head coach for the women’s team. “We know what we’re up against. “The difference is going to be the new balls. I brought two of them for us to get used to playing with them. The ball really threw the guys off in their first game. It’s very light and it travel quick. If we can get the girls to touch the ball before they get to Barbados it will be an incentive to them.” While he preferred not to put so much attention on the ball, Smith admitted that the team will have to play solid defense if they are going to succeed. “The plan is for us to readjust our game off the net, instead of playing tight on the net,” he said. “So we will be doing some things over the next two weeks to get them ready.” Although he missed about a week working out with the team as he traveled with the men, Smith said the woman were kept busy under the guid ance of assistant coach Jackie Conyers. He noted that they are look ing forward to taking a solid team to the tournament, comprising of a mixture of locallybased and collegiate players returning home from school. “The whole team should be TENNIS M ATCH RAINED OUT MARK Knowles and Mahesh Bhupathi’s first round men’s doubles at the French Open at Roland Garros was rained out yesterday. Knowles and Bhupathi, seeded number four in the second Grand Slam Tournament for the year, were scheduled to play the unseeded team of Josselin Ouanna and Jo-Wilfried Tsonga from France on Thursday. But their match was postponed until today. Knowles and Bhupathi, the No.3 team ranked teamin the ATP computer rankings, are looking for their first title victory for the year. They were runners-up to the American identical twin brothers combo of Bob and Mike Bryan at the first grand slam for the year at the Australian Open in Melbourne in January. The Bryans, seeded at No.2, won their opening match yesterday. So did Daniel Nestor and his partner Nanad Zimonjic, the top seeds in the tournament. BODYBUILDING NOVICE CHAMPIONSHIP THE Bahamas Bodybuilding and Fitness Feder ation will hold its annual Novice Bodybuilding Championships tonight at the National Center for Performance Arts. The championships is expected to showcase a number of first time com petitors and those who competed before but never won their divisional title. Competitors from Grand Bahama and Long Islandare expected to join a host of competitors from New Providence in the championship that will get started at 8 pm. Satelitte Bahamas Limited is the official sponsors for the championships. n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net WHILE there may have been some concern about the government’s 2009/2010 fiscal budget that was presented in the House of Assembly on Wednesday, the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture should not be affected at all. M inister Desmond Bannis ter told The Tribune yesterday that his ministry will maintain a “fair and substantial” budget for sports because they have not spent all of the mon ey that was allocated from last year. “We had money in last year’s budget, for example, to build a gym in Abaco and a gym in Eleuthera and we didn’t build those gyms,” Bannis ter said. “The year just beat us out and we just didn’t get them built, even though we have designed them and the Min istry can now go ahead with them. In that respect, we didn’t build them. So if you take out the money for those two gyms, the money is still the same.” In the budget, presented by Prime Minister Hubert Ingra ham, the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture will receive an estimated $19,087,933, a variance of $$1,110,127 from the $17,087,933 from last year’s budget. Additionally, the subvention to elite athletes have been increased by $270,815 with an estimated $1,170,815, up from the $900,000 from last year. Bannister said a full detail of the allocation for his ministry will be outlined when he makes his contribution in the House. But he noted that in this year’s budget, there is a substantial amount of funding to ensure that the work goes on for the construction of the national stadium that is being headed by the People’s Repub lic of China. “The stadium requires a Bahamian component, so there’s a half a million dollars that is in there for work and contracts for Bahamians,” revealed Bannister, of the con struction that is currently underway. “There’s also the same allocation for the subvention of our elite athletes. That’s been increased. So on the sports side, there’s really no loss.” To all sporting federations and associations, Bannister assured them all that the endowment for sports has not been affected at all. “The government is committed to that endowment and so federations need not be con cerned about that,” Bannister charged. “I would say there are two things that sports federations need to be concerned about. “They need to make sure that they are up to date with their constitutions and they are keeping us up to date with their financial statements. Any federation who is in compliance, should get their money as they did before.” On the issue of those persons who retire from the public service this year, Bannister said Ingraham mentioned that sports NOTES Pictured are some of the Chinese workers contracted to work on the new National Sports Stadium. THE national men’s volleyball team pose after winning a silver medal at the qualifiers for the FIVB Men’s Volleyball World Championships. Women’s national volleyball team gearing up for NORCEA qualifiers SEE page 12 SEE page 12 Desmond Bannister Fiscal budget should not affect sports ministry T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.73 $3.84 $3.82 SALES OFFICES: NASSAU I FREEPORT I ABACO I ELEUTHERA I EXUMA I CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET I www.famguardbahamas.com call our mortgage department today at396-4000 (NassauFreeport A SUBSIDIARY OF A MBESTA-ExcellentFinancialStrengthRating home ownership rent forever wait to inherit a home live with your in-lawsown your own home for as little as 5% down Deficits to total $1.4bn over 4 years Retailer sees 30% sales drop n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A Bahamian law firm yester day said it was forging ahead with international expansion plans despite the economic slowdown, with its British Virgin Islands (BVI “officially open in the next few months”, in a bid to exploit the “symmetry” between the two jurisdictions. Brian Simms, the Lennox Paton partner in charge of thef irm’s litigation/dispute resolution practice, said that while the company had “seen a slight slowdown” in legal work, unlike other law practices it had not reached “the point where we’re h aving to consider laying-off s taff and attorneys”. H e attributed this to Lennox Paton’s diversified practice, and its strength in financial servicesrelated fields such as trusts and investment funds, coupled with the fact that its real estate/conveyancing department had targeted major resort developments for work rather than focusing solely on private client business. Mr Simms also confirmed to Tribune Business that Lennox Paton was set to make BVI its second operational base after its London office, having whit tled down the number of candi Law firm moves on BVI expansion L ennox Paton to ‘officially open second international office in next few months’ aiming to exploit ‘symmetry’ with Bahamas Bahamas needs to do ‘a better job marketing’ its legal and financial services Bahamian law firm ‘holding strong’ across all departments, and contemplating no lay-offs Brian Simms S EE page 4B n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T he combined fiscal deficits the Bahamas will incur in the 2008-2009 Budget year and over the next three fiscal y ears will total a staggering $1.411 billion if the Government’s forecasts hold true, Tribune Business can reveal, with the national debt breaking through the 50 perc ent-of-GDP ratio in the 2010-2011 fiscal period. Using the Government’s figures from the 2009-2010 B udget communication, the total deficit (including debt principal repayments) for the current and subsequentt hree Budget years are projected as follows: 2008-2009: $422 million 2009-2010: $374 million2 010-2011: $340 million 2011-2012: $275 million Central Bank pushes back Bahamian economic recovery until 2011, with national debt-to-GDP ratio breaking 50% ratio in 2010-2011 S EE page 5B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Summit Insurance Company, the Bahamian general insurance carrier through which Insurance Management places much of its business, yesterday said fiscal 2008 was its “best year yet by a slim margin”, with improved underwriting profits propelling it to a 93.5 per cent net income. Timothy Ingraham, Summit’s general manager and director, said “fair results on the claims for most classes of business” helped propel the general insurance company to $3.44 million in net income for the 12 months to December 31, 2008, compared to $1.777 million the year before. Underwriting profits more than doubled to $3.543 million, a 110.9 per cent increase on the previous year’s $1.68 million, a performance aided by an almost-21 per cent reduction in net claims incurred from $7.233 million to $5.721 million. “Last year was the best one for us so far by a slim margin,” Mr Ingraham told Tri bune Business . “We had a fair result on the claims for most classes of business. It just sort of worked out that way. “We purchased a little more reinsurance protection, so all that helped to give us a positive result. Old claims also cost slightly less than anticipated, which helped to bring a positive result to the bottom line. “We can say that we had a reasonable year, and it’s positioned us well for this year. Obviously we’re in a mode of Summit scales the peak with 94% profit rise * General insurance carrier enjoys ‘best year by a slim margin in 2008’ due to 110% impr o v ement in underwriting and net claims reduction * Anticipating tougher y ear in 2009, with g r oss wr itten pr emium likely to fall by 5-10% in line with industry projections SEE page 6B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Grand Bahama Chamber of Commerce will decide at its n ext Board meeting in mid-June whether to issue a writ against the Government over the use of bonded vehicles outside the Port area if no “substantive response” is received by then fromt he Attorney General’s Office, Tribune Business was told yes terday. Gregory Moss, the Chamber’s president, said the Board had already resolved to initiate legal action over the issue, but had held off on filing a writ with the Supreme Court following pleas from the Government via the Attorney General’s Office. He explained that the only issue left to work out was the Chamber facing mid-June decision on bonded vehicle litigation action If Government fails to reply in time SEE page 15B n B y CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net COUPLED with the 25 per cent excise tax imposed on perfumes and toiletw ater, competition from cruise ships’ onboard dutyf ree stores and the Internet, and the economic downturn, one Bay Street retailer’ss ales have declined by 30 per cent, Tribune Business was t old yesterday. Tim Lightbourne, owner of The Perfume Shop, saidt hat despite the duty-free status placed on many items sold on Bay Street, the Government having reduced the excise tax on perfume andt oilet water from 25 per cent to 10 per cent in Wednesday’s Budget, the “whop-p ing” Stamp duty imposed on these items made the B ahamas one of the most heavily-taxed Caribbean destinations. M r Lightbourne said that even with the excise tax decrease, retailers’ prices in the Bahamas will still be higher than competitors int he region but “just as competitive”. “We lost over 7 per cent of our profit margin as a result of the tax increase [in the2 008-2009 Budget],” said Mr Lightbourne. “It’s been an extremely h ard year, but there is more to it (the competition just import duties. It’s theI nternet and major destinations. The younger genera tion are buying on the Inter net and not from retail shops.” He suggested that for downtown Bay Street to become more competitive in the region, it will need to offer a diversity of stores. Mr Lightbourne said downtown merchants primarily sell jewellery, makeup, perfume and liquor. “We have become a downtown where if you go from George Street to Market Street, every shop is jewellery,” he said. “You need a greater variety of products to make the whole of downtown come back to life.” President of the Nassau Institute, Joan Thompson, said the Government should implement an across-theboard flat rate of duty for almost everything. She argued that a 7 per cent sales tax should be implemented in the Bahamas. “If we were to have a flat sales tax on all goods and services, that should provide enough revenue for this country,” said Mrs Thompson. “And government should be downsized to live with the revenue of the 7 per cent tax.” She said the reduction in taxes for some sectors seemed somewhat discriminatory, and asserted that the Government should not be in the business of helping some over others. Mrs Thompson said most retailers in the Bahamas are facing the same challenges and don’t see a turnaround in the economy in the short term. “My gut says every retailer is facing the same thing and is worried about what sales will be in the future,” said Mrs Thompson. “My gut sense says we won’t get out of this quickly. People don’t change their habits overnight.”

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n B y CHESTER R OBARDS B usiness Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net T HE PROPOSED 45 to 10 p er cent customs duty reduct ion for printer parts and standalone computer monit ors could mean a drastic r eduction in their in-store p rices, a Custom Computers m anager said yesterday. Tammy Thompson, who is also the Hewlett Packard line m anager for the store, said c onsumers could see a reduction on the price of certain i tems as soon as today. S he said Custom Computers was awaiting a shipment of products that may be sub j ect to the decrease in import duties. “Consumers will see d ecreasing prices on the shelf,” she said. M s Thompson said the store h as received numerous complaints about the high price of c omputer items, compared to U S prices. She said many people opted t o defer repair of their computers or forgo the item until t hey could take a trip to the U S in order to purchase it. “A lot of the parts they c ould pick up in the States t hey can purchase here,” said Ms Thompson. She suggested that now some of the duties have been decreased there will be morep eople shopping at home for immediate replacement of parts, instead of having tot ravel abroad and buy in bulk. “Let’s say they bought the c omputer away. Now they w ould purchase the replace m ent parts here,” she said. C ustom Computers has not suffered a decline in sales with the failing economy, accord ing to Ms Thompson. She said many people who l ost jobs because of the eco n omic downturn were encouraged to hone their computer skills, and consequently bought entry-level computers. “A lot of people were buy i ng entry level PCs from us,” s he said. Custom Computers opened their second location in theo ld City Market Plaza on Cable Beach in November last year, and have been staying competitive in the market by offering classes related to the m uch desired Apple computers. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By CHESTER ROBARDSB usiness Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net Bahamas-based boating advocates and a South Florida Boating association yesterday lauded the Government’s decision to provide exempt ions on repair parts for motor v essels, their engines and mechanical parts. T he Bahamas Hotel Association’s (BHA d ent, Frank Comito, told Tribune Business that the organi sation had been lobbying for the Government to remove the tax imposed last year on boating vessel repair parts c oming into the Bahamas. We hope it will advocate m ore and longer stays by boats in the country,” said Mr Comito. He added that pleasure boat a rrivals to the Bahamas often translate into room nights for many resorts with marinas. This certainly has a broader impact on the industry and the country,” Mr Comito said. “Policies like this send a message to the international community that the Bahamas is a p lace that they can rely on.” D irector of Association Services for the 850-member M arine Industries Association of South Florida, Gordon Connell, shared Mr Comito’s sentiment on the policyc hange. "The Islands of the Bahamas have always been a popular destination, offer some of the best fishing and diving available and have always been popular," said Mr Connell. "Boaters still look to the Bahamas as one of their top destinations from Florida even with the tough economict imes." H e added that the Bahamas government clearly recognises, with the implementation of a t ax exemption on service parts for motor boats, that tariff breaks are incentives that will keep South Florida boaters coming to these islands. “Exemption on boat engine r epair parts are good because t hey [boaters] want to go where they are appreciated a nd welcome,” said Mr Connell. It was recently revealed that recreational yachts and boata rrivals were down about 20 per cent this year. Boating experts and enthusiasts also cited the high cost of travel to the Bahamas, including fuel and cruising fees, as a reason for the decline. Mr Comito said islands such as Abaco, Eleuthera and Grand Bahama have expressed frustrations over thed ecline in private boat arrivals. H e argued that the industry may have even seen a 50 per cent decline. T he Government last July implemented the 35 per cent t ax on repair parts for motor vessels, which vexed many South Florida boaters who frequented the Bahamas year round. P ublisher of Southern Boati ng Magazine, Skip Allen, told Tribune Business that boaters w ere opting to visit the Florida Keys instead of making the t rip across the Gulfstream to the waters of the Bahamas. According to Mr Comito, t he Government is in need of a long-term strategy for the area of tourism that caters to visiting pleasure craft. “There needs to be a broader approach to the industry,” he said Boaters welcome tax exemption for spare parts Computer, printer prices may decline on duty reduction Share your news T he Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods.P erhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area o r have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. “A lot of the parts they could pick up in the States they can purchase here.” Tammy Thompson

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n By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor The Bahamas Real Estate Association’s (BREA yesterday said “the Government just don’t get it” when it came to this nation’s competitiveness in the foreign second home buyer market, arguing that the Governm ent’s real property tax reforms in the 2009-2010 Budget did not go far enough. William Wong told Tribune Business that BREA, plus the legal profession, had wanted the Government to reinstate the $35,000 cap on real property tax paid on high-end homes, which w as removed in the 2008-2009 Budget. This, they argued, had exposed wealthy foreign home o wners to higher levels of taxation, deterring interest from new b uyers and making the Bahamas u ncompetitive in the region in this market. Most other nations, B REA had argued, had no or minimal property-based taxes. From what I see, this government just doesn’t get it,” MrW ong told Tribune Business. “We are not competitive in this r egion, and the Government is losing on both sides. People have choices other than the Bahamas. “It is not enough. This is not the way to do it. We want peoplet o come here. They [the Government] just don’t get it.” W hile properties occupied by their owners for nine months of t he year are exempt from real property tax payments, Mr Wong said it would be impossible to ask wealthy foreign home owners to stay for this duration, and to p olice this. He added that the Bahamas’ r elatively high tax rates would not only deter new buyers, thus costi ng the Government stamp tax on the property purchase, but also the per annum real property tax rates. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, in his 2009-2010 Budg et communication, announced that while the $35,000 cap would n ot be reinstated, the real property tax structure was being reduced from three to two. A 1 per cent rate would be a pplied to properties valued at up to $7.5 million, above the $250,000 exemption level, and properties valued in excess of $7.5 m illion would see a 0.25 per cent r ate applied on the value above $7.5 million. Mike Lightbourn, president of Coldwell Banker Lightbourn Realty, yesterday agreed with Mr Wong that theG overnment’s amendments were “not enough” and did not bring the necessary real property tax relief to wealthy Bahamian and f oreign home owners who occup ied their property for less than nine months of the year. “There’s some relief, but it’s not enough. We needed more,” Mr Lightbourn told Tribune Busi-n ess. Elsewhere, in a bid to encourage real property tax defaulters to pay, the Government will write-off the surcharge o n owner-occupied dwellings. T he outstanding tax remains and has to be paid within six months of the amendments coming into effect, after which a 5 per cent per annum surcharge will bel evied on the outstanding balances. The tax-rate on foreignowned, vacant property valued at up to $7,000 will be $100, with p roperties worth more than $ 7,000 paying a 1.5 per cent rate. This is likely to be the Government giving foreign purchasers an incentive to build, rather than simply hold, then flip their real e state for profit. The exemption o n owner-occupied property will be applicable automatically except for foreign home owners, where the nine-month occupancy p eriod will continue to apply, and a 0.5 per cent tax rate will be applied to buildings on leased Crown cays. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009, PAGE 3B Incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of e BahamasINTERIM REPORT – THREE MONTHS ENDING 31 MARCH, 2008MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIRMANDear Shareholder: strong growth in premium income experienced in 2008 continued in 2009 and we recorded at the end of the rst quarter an increase in premium income of $2.7 million or 15.7% over prior year-to-date. O ur Group Life and Health Division recorded the strongest gains in premium income as a result of the sustained growth in new business. At the end of March 2009, new sales outstripped the prior year-to-date by 82%. Ourdecisiontochangeouraccountingmethodforequitiesduring2008from fairvaluethroughprotandloss(FVTPLtoavailableforsale(AFSassistedin minimizinguctuationsininvestmentincomecausedbychangesintheprice ofsharesheldinourequitiesportfolio.Werecordedinvestmentincomeof$2.4 million for the rst quarter of 2009 compared to $1.9 million for the same period lastyear.Prioryearwasimpactedsignicantlybyunrealizedlossesonequitiesof $441 thousand. During the quarter policyholder benets trended higher than prior year-to-date by 30% reecting an increase in health claims. is increase in policyholder benets negatively impacted net income, which ended the quarter at $1.6 million. Board of Directors declared a dividend of 6 cents per share, which was paid to shareholders on May 18 2009 based on the performance of the company for the three months to March 31 2009. Sincerely, Norbert F. Boissiere Chairman CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET (UNAUDITEDas at 31 march 2009 (Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)ASSETS Cash and bank balances Short term bank deposits Other bank term deposits Financial Investment Assets Held-to-maturity Available for sale Loans Total investment assets Receivables and other assets Premiums receivable Property, plant and equipment, netTOTALLIABILITIES & EQUITYLIABILITIESReserves for future policyholders’ benets Other policyholders’ funds Policy liabilities Payables and accruals Total liabilitiesEQUITYPreference shares Ordinary shares Share premium Revaluation surplus Retained earnings Total equityTOTAL CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY (UNAUDITEDfor the three months ended 31 march 2009(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)Balance as of December 31, 2007 Transfer from revaluation surplus Adjustment to fair value of investment in equities Adjustment to appraised value of land and buildings Net income for 2008 Dividends declared and paid preference shares ordinary shares ($0.24 per share) Balance as of December 31, 2008 Adjustment to fair value of investment in equities Adjustment to appraised value of land and buildings Net income for the period Dividends declared and paid preference shares ordinary shares ($0.06 per share) Balance as of March 31, 2009Ordinary Shares $ $ 20,000,000 ---20,000,000 --$ 20,000,000 Revaluation Reserve $ $ 7,361,959 (496,893 3,512,550 10,377,616 (455,314 -$ 9,922,302 Total $ $ 54,003,516 (496,893 3,512,550 4,899,043 (700,000 (2,400,000 58,818,216 (455,314 1,570,838 (600,000 $ 59,333,740 Preference Shares $ $ 10,000,000 ---10,000,000 --$ 10,000,000 Share Premium $ $ 10,801,000 ---10,801,000 --$ 10,801,000 Retained Earnings $ $ 23,840,477 --4,899,043 (700,000 (2,400,000 25,639,520 -1,570,838 (600,000 $ 26,610,3582009 $1,833,305 340,635 4,233,591 56,390,833 6,787,851 69,567,290 139,153,505 2,208,520 3,086,519 34,442,304 178,890,848 104,806,556 9,898,793 114,705,349 4,851,759 119,557,108 10,000,000 2,000,000 10,801,080 9,922,302 26,610,358 59,333,740 178,890,84831 December 2008 $1,954,114 339,737 13,789,621 44,255,404 7,243,165 69,292,456 136,874,497 2,784,130 2,749,750 34,062,774 176,471,151 102,902,989 7,756,601 110,659,590 6,993,345 117,652,935 10,000,000 2,000,000 10,801,080 10,377,616 25,639,520 58,818,216 176,471,151NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED INTERIM FINANCIAL STATEMENTSas at 31 march 20091. ACCOUNTING POLICIESese interim consolidated nancial statements have been prepared in accordance with International Accounting Standards 34: Interim Financial Reporting. e accounting policies used in the preparation of the interim consolidated nancial statements are consistent with those used in the annual consolidated nancial statements for the year ended 31 December 2008. ese unaudited consolidated nancial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly owned subsidiaries, Family Guardian Insurance Company, FG General Insurance Agency Limited, FG Financial Limited, FG Capital Markets Limited and BahamaHealth Insurance Brokers and Benets Consultants Limited.2. EARNINGS PER SHAREEarnings per share: Weighted average number of shares outstanding Consolidated net income Earnings per share3. COMMITMENTSOutstanding commitments to extend credit under the mortgage loan agreements amounted to approximately $3,675,003 as at 31 March 2009 (31 December 2008: $2,820,390)3 months to 31 March 200810,000,000 $ 2,747,405 $0.273 months to 31 March 200910,000,000 $ 1,570,838 $0.16 CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS (UNAUDITEDfor the three months ended 31 march 2009(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)Cash ows from operating activities Net incomeA djustments for: Depreciation Change in appreciation on investments in equitiesC hange in mortgage provision Reserve for policyholder benets Interest incomeD ividend income Operating prot before working capital changes (Increase) decrease in operating assets Receivables and other assets Premium in arrears (Decrease) increase in operating liabilities Payables and accruals Other policyholder funds Net cash from operating activities Cash ows from investing activities Policy loans Purchase of xed assets Construction in progress Other loans repaid Net mortgage loans issued Purchase of Government bonds Interest received Dividends received Net cash from investing activities Cash ows from nancing activities Dividends paid Net cash used in nancing activities Net increase in cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of the period Cash and cash equivalents at end of the period Cash and cash equivalents is comprised of: Cash and bank balances Short-term deposits Other bank term deposits3 months to 31 March 2008 $2,747,405 215,445 4 41,118 (292,226 1,963,015 (2,292,048 (83,450 2,699,259 ( 2,059,784) 488,924 (172,457 (148,617 807,325 (318,573 (1,103,542 60,410 (597,078 2,496,682 83,450 621,349 (600,000 (600,000 828,674 13,912,100 14,740,774 4,445,601 329,659 9,965,514 14,740,7743 months to 31 March 2009 $1,570,838 323,841 (6,642 1,921,295 (2,303,409 (112,932 1,392,991 5 75,610 (336,769 (2,141,586 2,142,192 1,632,438 44,996 (618,423 84,948 96,451 (367,843 (11,250,000 1,188,560 112,932 (10,708,379 (600,000 (600,000 (9,675,941 16,083,472 6,407,531 1,833,305 340,635 4,233,591 6,407,531 CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME (UNAUDITEDfor the three months ended 31 march 2009(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)INCOME Gross premium incomeP remium ceded to reinsurers Net premium income Annuity deposits N et premium income and annuity deposits Interest income Dividend incomeC hange in unrealized loss on investments Realized gain from sale of assets Other operating income T otal income BENEFITS & EXPENSES BENEFITS P olicyholders’ benets Reinsurance recoveries Net policyholders’ benets I ncrease in reserves for future policyholders’ benets Total benets EXPENSES C ommissions Operating expenses Premium tax Depreciation and ammortization expense Bad debt expense Total expenses Total benets and expenses NET INCOME Earnings per shareRestated 3 months to 31 March 2008 $1 7,768,174 (1,253,150 16,515,024 1,154,892 1 7,669,916 2,292,048 83,450 (441,118 153,661 19,757,957 9,229,155 (846,444 8,382,711 1 ,963,014 10,345,725 2 ,648,135 3,555,827 537,621 215,445 ( 292,201) 6,664,827 17,010,552 2,747,405 0.273 months to 31 March 2009 $2 0,484,476 (2,283,130 18,201,346 1,604,804 1 9,806,150 2,303,409 112,932 100 156,348 22,378,939 11,997,201 (624,133 11,373,068 1 ,921,295 13,294,363 2 ,908,194 3,670,388 617,957 323,841 ( 6,642) 7,513,738 20,808,101 1,570,838 0.16 Realtors: Government ‘just don’t get it’ on tax BREA chief says ‘more relief was needed’ on real property tax cap issue

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dates to head the new office to three. “We’ve just finished renovations to the office in BVI, which has the capacity for six attorneys,” he said. “We expect tohave the office opening shortly in the next few months.” By then, Lennox Paton will have identified and appointed the BVI office head. Mr Simmssaid the firm chose that nation for expansion because of similarities with the Bahamian product, legal and regulatory frame work, and the synergies it could achieve from BVI’s strong corporate registry and investment funds business markets in which Lennox Paton works. “We chose BVI for a number of reasons,” he explained. “BVI and the Bahamas are similar in the products they offer, and BVI, as an offshore corporate jurisdiction, has trust business and mutual fund business, which we deal with here. “Our International Business Companies (IBCs developed from BVI legislation. The laws are very similar. BVI, unlike the Bahamas, was not blacklisted [by the Financial Action Task Force] in the first round, and did not have a mass exodus of companies. BVI’s register has 800,000 companies, and from those companies comes litigation and other work.” Mr Simms added that BVI was the chosen domicile for 40 per cent of the world’s offshore hedge funds, giving it a “very strong presence” and the ability to compete directly with the Cayman Islands. “BVI is fairly fertile ground in that the large firms that are there do not have a significant presence, and we feel that given our client base and the many clients using both jurisdictions, not only will be able to obtain work already there but be in a position to provide Bahamian and BVI products to our clients and new clients,” Mr Simms said. “There is a lot of symmetry between both jurisdictions, so it makes sense for us to be there.” Lennox Paton already had an associate on the ground in BVI in the shape of Fiona Forbes, and after appointing someone to head the office, the company will assess how quickly it expands the operation there. When asked why Bahamian law firms should look to expand internationally, Mr Simms said moving into different jurisdictions created diversified revenue streams, and helped to guard against a downturn in business in any one particular country. He told Tribune Business : think it is a hedge against having all your eggs in one basket. If you spread yourself out, you hedge against a slowdown of business in any particular jurisdiction.” Lennox Paton is not the only Bahamian law firm to have expanded overseas, Callender’s & Co having also opened a L ondon office, and Higgs & J ohnson moved into the Cayman Islands through its acquisition and merger with Truman, Bodden & Company. Mr Simms, though, said Lennox Paton preferred to grow “organically”, opening its own offices and establishing its own presence, rather than via acquisition. “We’ll grow our own office with our own people, and our culture and our work ethic,” he explained. “We’re quite happy growing our firm and our people.”. The Lennox Paton litigation partner told Tribune Business that while he believed the Bahamas was competitive in the global legal services market, it needed “to do a better marketing job” to ensure it matched rival international financial centres. “My personal view is we are competitive,” Mr Simms said. “My view is the other jurisdictions do a better marketing generally, and talk about how good their services are, when they’re no better than ours. We have a much larger court system we have approximately 10 judges in the Court of First Instance [Supreme Court] when others have just one or two, and get matters through the legal system much faster. We don’t go out and mark et our strengths. We are not c hained to Britain, or a sibling of other Crown protectorates. As firms in those countries grow, they market their sister jurisdictions and often criticise the Bahamas, but only to ensure they’re getting the business for the jurisdictions they’re in.” Mr Simms added: “As a jurisdiction we need to put more effort into selling our services and the fact we have the best legislation in the world. The Bahamas has the best trust legislation that everyone wants to emulate. The Bahamas has been a leader in the trust field, and need to make sure we hold on to work we have in areas that are slowing down.” The Lennox Paton partner said the Bahamas “will be one of those” international financial centres to survive the Obama/G-20 onslaught, “providing we continue to put in best efforts, putting forwards good products and good services”. As for Lennox Paton’s current status, Mr Simms said: “Certainly, there is a general slowdown in the world economy, and that ultimately has an effect on legal services. In our particular case, we have seen a slight slowdown, but not to the point where we have to consider laying-off staff and associates. We’re monitoring the situa tion, but are quite pleased with t he way the firm has been doing, even in this slow time, and are maintaining a certain level of business.” Mr Simms said Lennox Paton’s conveyancing/real estate department “remains busy”. He added: “That is probably due to the fact that strategically we have placed the firm as a major legal advisor to resort developments, as opposed to focusing solely on private client business. “As such, these resort devel opments need constant legal services, including refinancing and restructuring, in this economic market.” All departments, including litigation, were “holding steady”, Mr Simms added, with Lennox Paton not experiencing a slowdown to “the extent of other firms”. “Firms very dependent on conveyancing, particularly private client conveyancing, are suffering greatly at this time,” he explained. Mr Simms said it could be dangerous for law firms to layoff attorneys during a recession, as they might not be in a posi tion to be competitive when the economy recovers. Lennox Paton was not contemplating lay-offs, but Mr Simms added: “That’s not to say we’re not watching things and not being careful where we expand and how we expand. “At the end of the day, we’d have to think long and hard about letting anyone go. “We have a good relationship with all our employees, and it would be hard to let any go.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE ),1$1&(&25325$7,21)%$+$0$6/,0,7(' 127,&( 3OHDVHEHDGYLVHGWKDWWKH+HDG2IFHDQG WKH5HJLVWHUHG2IFHRIWKHFRPSDQ\ZLOOEH PRYHGIURPWKH%DKDPDV)LQDQFLDO&HQWUH &KDUORWWH6KLUOH\6WUHHWV)ORRU1DVVDX %DKDPDVWR5R\DO%DQN+RXVH(DVW+LOO6WUHHW 1DVVDX%DKDPDVHIIHFWLYH0D\ Law firm moves on BVI expansion F ROM page 1B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009, PAGE 5B Deficits to total $1.4bn over 4 years A dding those four figures together produces $1.411 billion as the combined total deficit the Government will incur over the next four years, highlighting the full extent of the cri-s is in the public finances, and the diff iculty the Ingraham administration will have in getting them back on track. The Government appears to be pinning its faith in a relatively stronge conomic rebound from 2011 onwards, with gross domestic product (GDP per cent that year, with a more sustained 2.5 per cent GDP expansion in 2011-2012. It also seems to be hopingt hat the level of economic growth will have returned to normal, something that is also not a given, due tot he depth and severity of the current recession. E ven the Central Bank of the Bahamas appears to have again postponed its forecast recovery for theB ahamian economy, writing in the economic background to the Prime M inister’s Budget communication: “The prospects for the Bahamian economy over the remainder of 2009 a ppear weak, with real GDP not expected to return to a positive trajectory before 2011.” S tripping out debt principal redemptions, and using the GFS deficit, the Government’s predic-t ions, if they come true, will see the public finances run a cumulative $ 1.073 billion in deficits between the 2008-2009 and 2011-2012 Budget periods. T hose deficits, as forecast, are: 2008-2009: $352 million 2009-2010: $286 million 2010-2011: $250 million 2011-2012: $185 million And the GFS deficits, as a perc entage of GDP, for those periods a re: 2008-2009: 4.7 per cent 2 009-2010: 3.9 per cent 2 010-2011: 3.3 per cent 2011-2012: 2.4 per cent All this goes to show that getting the fiscal deficit and national debt under control, and recreating what Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham referred to on Thursday as “fiscal headroom”, will be no easy task. The Government seems to be hoping that a return to GDP growth in 2011 will u ltimately keep the rising debt-toGDP ratio in check, before it gets out of control. Not surprisingly, the continuously heavy fiscal deficits will impact the Government’s debt. The direct debt charge on government is expected to increase as follows: 2008-2009: $2.912 billion 2009-2010: $3.198 billion 2 010-2011: $3.448 billion 2011-2012: $3.633 million And as a percentage of GDP, they are: 2008-2009: 38.9 per cent 2009-2010: 43.2 per cent 2010-2011: 46.2 per cent 2 011-2012: 47.4 per cent Yet the latter set of figures do not t ake into account the $439 million w orth of debt that the Government has guaranteed, a figure that is likely to have been increased further by the $30 million guarantee the Ingraham administration on Wednesday gave to the CLICO (Bahamas cyholders. With government-guaranteed debt already amounting to 6 per cent of GDP, and the latter figure declining, this has to be added on to the G overnment’s direct charge to obtain a true picture of the national debt. This means that the national debt will increase to 49.2 per cent at the 2009-2010 budget year-end, with this breaking the 50 per cent gap to 52.2 per cent in 2010-2011. And for 20112012, the national debt-to-GDP will be 53.4 per cent. Sounding the alarm, Rick Lowe, a N assau Institute executive and noted fiscal hawk, said of the Government’s Budget figures: “We’re over the precipice. It’s the perfect storm.” He added that, when the Government’s fiscal woes were added to the escalating problems with crime, education, the courts and other areas: That compounds all the other probl ems we face in the country. It could be the tipping point. It’s going to be v ery hard to recover. It leaves me speechless. It’s obvious the Government’s going to have a very difficult task ahead of them. The responsibility rests in Parliament and successive governments, and wanton and profligate spending as if future generations don’t matter. “It’s up to us as people to realise that continually placing demands on government to do things is out of the question.” T he Government is basing its fiscal forecasts on the International Monetary Fund’s (IMF 1.5 per cent real GDP growth for the Bahamas in 2011, and 3 per cent in 2012. It is also assuming that recurrent revenues, as a percentage of GDP, will increase from 17.5 per cent in 2008-2009 to 20.4 per cent in 20112 012. It has been forecast as remaining flat at 20.7 per cent of GDP in 2011-2012. F ROM page 1B “It is up to us as people to realise that continually placing demands on government to do things is out of the question.” Rick Lowe

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trying to hold on to the business we have. Growth is not a realistic target at this point,a nd having had a good year last year, hopefully it will soften the impact this time. We’re all in the same boat in thatr egard.” Mr Ingraham acknowle dged, though, that with the e conomy mired in recession, he expected that 2009 was going to be more of a challenge”, with Summit joining the likes of RoyalStar Assur-a nce, J. S. Johnson and NUA in projecting a 5-10 per cent d rop in top-line gross written premium. Summit, though, actually d id more with less in 2008, so to speak. For while gross writt en premiums increased slightly to $42.0645 million, comp ared to $40.133 million in 2007, net written premiums a ctually declined from $20.565 million to $19.84 million, due to the more than $2 millioni ncrease in reinsurance coverage that was purchased. So far to date it’s been fairly reasonable,” Mr Ingraham s aid. “I think it’s going to come through in the latter part oft he year. “A lot of people will have b een laid-off, there savings will have been exhausted, so things will tighten up and peo-p le will look to save money on insurance. “Hopefully, at the end of this year, we’ll start to pull out of this.” W hen asked whether Summ it was projecting similar gross written premium d ecreases to the likes of rival RoyalStar, Mr Ingraham said: “We can expect to see that. We’ve started to see it already in one or two lines.” It was especially prevalent in motori nsurance, as Summit clients switched from comprehensive to third party coverage. Given the Bahamian econo my’s current condition, Mr Ingraham said Summit was in n o position to pass on increased reinsurance costs to its clients, something thatw ould also impact its financial performance in 2009. Reinsurance costs have increased marginally, and that’s something we can’t passo n. That’s going to impact the bottom line to a certain extent,” the Summit generalm anager explained. During 2008, Summit’s pers onnel expenses rose from $694,936 in the previous year to $761,669, with general anda dministrative expenses rising from $482,006 to $532,179. A s a result, total operating expenses rose from $1.211 million in 2007 to $1.495 millioni n 2008. Mr Ingraham said the increases were caused by the c ombination of a new computer system’s installation, and the full-year impact of addi-t ional staff, who had only been appointed mid-way through fiscal 2007. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.841.28Abaco Markets1.401.400.000.1270.00011.00.00% 11.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.436.94Bank of Bahamas6.946.940.000.2440.26028.43.75%0 .890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.603.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2 .372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.2010.18Cable Bahamas11.7411.740.001.4060.2508.32.13% 2.902.75Colina Holdings2.832.830.001040.2490.04011.41.41% 7.506.00Commonwealth Bank (S16.026.020.000.4190.36014.45.98% 4.781.27Consolidated Water BDRs2.793.040.250.1110.05227.41.71% 2.951.32Doctor's Hospital1.321.400.0845,6960.2400.0805.85.71% 8.207.50Famguard7.767.760.000.4200.30018.53.87% 12.5010.00Finco10.9710.970.000.3220.67034.16.11% 11.7910.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.4010.400.000.7940.40013.13.85%5 .554.95Focol (S5.095.090.002940.3320.15015.32.95% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0 .450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9.025.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.0010.50J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.37581.3124Colina Bond Fund1.37581.654.83 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8962-1.49-3.35 1.39011.3875Colina Money Market Fund1.46302.055.25 3.69603.1964Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1964-5.59-13.64 12.739712.1564Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.15990.71-12.76 1.05261.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.05261.635.26 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0322-0.083.22 1.05231.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.05231.455.23 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L L L L : : C C O O L LI I N N A A 2 24 4 2 2 5 5 0 0 2 2 7 70 0 1 1 0 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L LF F I I D D E E L LI I T T Y Y 2 2 4 4 2 23 35 5 6 6 7 7 7 7 6 64 4 | | F FG G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K K E E T T S S 2 24 4 2 2 3 39 9 6 6-4 40 0 0 0 0 0 | | C C O OL LO ON N I I A A L L 2 24 4 2 2-5 50 02 2 7 7 5 52 2 5 5F INDEX: CLOSE 792.33 | YTD -5.09% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMST HURSDAY, 28 MAY 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,602.47 | CHG 0.67 | %CHG 0.04 | YTD -109.89 | YTD % -6.42BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 30-Apr-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Mar-09 30-Apr-09 30-Apr-09 W W W W W W . .B B I I S S X X B B A A H H A A M M A A S S . .C C O O M M | | T T E E L L E E P P H H O ON N E E : :2 2 4 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 2 2 3 3 3 3 0 0 | | F F A A C C S S I I M M I I L L E E : : 2 2 4 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 -2 2 3 3 2 2 0 0NAV Date 31-Mar-09 15-May-09 31-Mar-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 30-Apr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fGD\VDIWHUWKHGDWHRISXEOLFDWLRQRIWKLVQRWLFH Summit scales the peak with 94% profit rise F ROM page 1B “Reinsurance costs have increased marginally, and that’s something we can’t pass on. That’s going to impact the bottom line to a certain extent.” Timothy Ingraham

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009, PAGE 15B To advertise in The Tribune Classified call 502-2351 Chamber facing midJune decision on bonded vehicle litigation action definition of ‘consumable s tores’ in relation to Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPAt o use their bonded vehicles outside the Port area for business purposes. T he Chamber, Mr Moss added, had already submitted to the Government a Supreme Court judgment, other legal p recedents and definitions/interpretations oft he Hawksbill Creek Agreement to show that the concerns of the Ministry of Finance and Customs Department were unfounded. M r Moss said that discussions with the Customs Department had been “takent o the point where Customs h ad represented that they nev e r suggested bonded vehicles could not move out of the Port area, and that they would not confiscate them if they moved o ut of the Port area”. However, Customs then raised the issue that GBPA licensees “had converted the u se of their vehicles to consumable stores under the prov isions of the Hawksbill Creek A greement” by taking them a nd using them for the pur poses of their business outside the Port area. T he issue was then referred b y Customs to the Attorney G eneral’s Office over the m eaning of ‘consumable stores’. When no word was forthcoming from the Government, Mr Moss said: “We set a deadline of May 8 by which we would have to issue a writ against the Government. We finally issued a letter to them at the end of April that if they didn’t respond by that date, we would file a w rit.” This, the Chamber presid ent, explained, prompted an immediate response from the Attorney General’s Office, w hich said that the issues raised by the organisation’s letter “were such that they were taking the matter seriously”, and had reverted back to the Ministry of Finance and C ustoms. In the meantime, the G overnment had “asked us to hold off, which we did”. T he two issues raised by the G overnment and Customs w ere, Mr Moss explained, that Port Authority licensees were exporting” their bonded vehicles by taking them outs ide the Port area. Judgment The Chamber as a result f urnished the Government with the Supreme Court judgment won by UNEXSO and o ther legal precedents to show that “a temporary excursion of bonded vehicles out of theP ort area does not amount to e xporting” because they would not remain outside Freeport permanently only f or temporary business purposes. T he other concern raised, Mr Moss said, was that by taki ng bonded vehicles outside t he Port area, licensees could convert them for personal use by selling, gifting or otherwiset ransferring them to someone else for that purpose. The Chamber president, t hough, said this could only apply when the actual title changed hands. “We said to them this now brings the matter to rest,” Mr Moss said. “There is no other provision or definition from the Hawksbill Creek Agreement thatb rings to bear on this issue.” He added: “We’ve determined at a Board level that we would defer the matter for a month and review it at then ext Board meeting, which is the middle of next month [ June]. We are hoping that we will have a substantive responsef rom the Government at that meeting. We already have a Board resolution to commercel egal action.” Without a response from the Government, “we will have to make a decision at that meeting”. Customs’ policy has been not to allow bonded vehicles outside the Port area, something the Chamber has argued contravenes the Hawksbill C reek Agreement, and thus t he law. The Hawksbill Creek A greement allows Port Authority licensees to import into Freeport goods that are b onded or duty free, meaning no import or stamp duties are paid on them providedt hey are for legitimate use in the licensee’s own business. They key test for determining whether goods should be sold as bonded or duty-paid is whether they are to be used by a Port Authority licensee in their own legitimate business activities. T he fear among Port Authority licensees is that Customs could apply its policyo n vehicles to other bonded goods, potentially causing chaos for their businesses. They would then have to keep tow sets of goods and inven tory one bonded for use in F reeport, the other duty-paid for use outside the Port area. F ROM page 1B

PAGE 19

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 70F/21C Low: 71F/22C Low: 71F/22C Low: 71F/22C Low: 73 F/23 C Low: 78F/26C Low: 76 F/24 C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 86F/30C High: 87F/31C High: 85 F/29 C High: 85 F/29 C High: 85F/29C High: 85 F/29C High: 88F/31C Low: 81F/27C High: 86F/30C Low: 80 F/27 C High: 90F/32C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 73F/23C High: 89 F/32 C Low: 74F/23C High: 87 F/31 Low: 74F/23C High: 85F/29C Low: 76 F/24C High: 89F/32C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 90F/32C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 88F/31C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 87F/31C Low: 77F/25C High: 92 F/33 C Low: 80F/27C High: 89F/32C High: 84 F/29 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE 5/29/09, PAGE 17B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Clouds and sun, a t-storm in spots. Mostly cloudy, a couple of t-storms. Partly sunny with a thunderstorm. Some sun with a t-storm possible. Partly sunny with a shower possible. High: 88 Low: 76 High: 87 High: 85 High: 87 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny and pleasant. High: 86 Low: 76 Low: 78 Low: 77 AccuWeather RealFeel 97F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 85F 106-84F 102-84F 99-82F 100-82F Low: 76 TODAYTONIGHTSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................90F/32C Low ....................................................77F/25C Normal high ......................................85F/30C Normal low ........................................72F/22C Last year's high .................................. 90 F/32C Last year's low .................................. 73 F/23C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.13" Year to date ..................................................6.93" Normal year to date ....................................11.39" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU First Full Last New May 30 Jun. 7Jun. 15Jun. 22 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:21 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:54 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 11:41 a.m. Moonset . . . . 12:12 a.m. Today Saturday Sunday Monday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 12:15 a.m.3.06:36 a.m.-0.1 12:49 p.m.2.76:52 p.m.0.0 1:14 a.m.2.87:31 a.m.0.0 1:50 p.m.2.77:57 p.m.0.1 2:14 a.m.2.68:25 a.m.0.0 2:51 p.m.2.89:03 p.m.0.2 3:14 a.m.2.59:20 a.m.0.1 3:50 p.m.2.810:06 p.m.0.2 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco91/3277/25s91/3277/25pc Amsterdam66/1849/9s65/1849/9s Ankara, Turkey76/2446/7s77/2550/10s Athens82/2768/20s83/2866/18s Auckland61/1652/11pc61/1647/8r Bangkok90/3279/26t89/3178/25t Barbados86/3076/24pc86/3076/24s Barcelona75/2363/17s72/2261/16s Beijing86/3062/16pc88/3163/17s Beirut74/2370/21s77/2571/21s Belgrade68/2047/8sh69/2052/11pc Berlin63/1745/7sh66/1850/10sh Bermuda79/2672/22sh79/2670/21pc Bogota65/1847/8r66/1848/8r Brussels66/1846/7s70/2148/8s Budapest61/1645/7sh64/1748/8r Buenos Aires61/1646/7pc54/1246/7r Cairo92/3366/18s93/3365/18s Calcutta103/3981/27s101/3883/28pc Calgary78/2549/9s65/1840/4pc Cancun91/3277/25pc91/3274/23pc Caracas79/2671/21s79/2671/21pc Casablanca82/2766/18pc78/2560/15s Copenhagen64/1746/7c68/2054/12c Dublin68/2052/11pc64/1748/8s Frankfurt72/2245/7pc70/2148/8pc Geneva 73/22 45/7 s 75/2346/7s Halifax 51/10 50/10 c 60/15 48/8 c Havana 88/31 70/21 t 86/30 70/21 t Helsinki 63/17 45/7pc70/2150/10pc Hong Kong 81/27 73/22 r 82/27 75/23sh Islamabad 114/45 75/23 s 114/45 76/24 s Istanbul79/2664/17s84/2868/20c Jerusalem 74/23 53/11s80/2655/12s Johannesburg 66/1840/4s59/1535/1s Kingston 87/3078/25t88/3177/25sh Lima72/2257/13pc73/2257/13pc London73/2250/10pc70/2150/10s Madrid88/3157/13s91/3259/15pc Manila84/2877/25r84/2878/25r Mexico City81/2757/13t73/2253/11t Monterrey88/3166/18t91/3269/20t Montreal68/2050/10r66/1852/11pc Moscow75/2354/12r70/2146/7pc Munich54/1243/6t44/638/3c Nairobi79/2663/17t80/2663/17t New Delhi 110/4383/28pc106/4182/27t Oslo64/1749/9s68/2052/11s Paris72/2250/10s72/2252/11s Prague 56/13 49/9 sh 53/11 44/6 r Rio de Janeiro72/2264/17r74/2368/20pc Riyadh106/4178/25s105/4077/25s Rome 77/25 55/12 s 72/22 54/12 sh St. Thomas87/3078/25t86/3079/26s San Juan54/1238/3sh64/1737/2pc San Salvador 90/32 72/22 pc 88/31 73/22 t Santiago 57/1343/6c61/1636/2pc Santo Domingo88/3172/22pc85/2973/22r Sao Paulo 65/18 58/14 r 72/22 61/16t Seoul79/2658/14pc75/2352/11pc Stockholm 63/17 43/6 pc 68/20 46/7 pc Sydney 64/17 50/10 sh64/1748/8sh Taipei83/2870/21s84/2872/22pc T okyo 70/21 64/17 r 73/22 66/18 r T oronto 66/1848/8pc66/1844/6t Trinidad66/1859/15r72/2257/13sh V ancouver 71/21 54/12 pc 69/2050/10s Vienna 57/1348/8sh56/1349/9r W arsaw 63/17 45/7 sh 64/17 48/8 r Winnipeg 66/18 43/6 pc 59/1540/4pc H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySaturday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:S at 7-14 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles81F Saturday:SW at 10-20 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles81F Today:S at 7-14 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles80F Saturday:SW at 10-20 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles80F Today:S at 7-14 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles81F Saturday:SSW at 10-20 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles81F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque81/2758/14t82/2758/14t Anchorage58/1446/7c61/1646/7r Atlanta86/3061/16pc83/2861/16s Atlantic City78/2557/13t78/2558/14s Baltimore80/2658/14t80/2656/13s Boston64/1757/13t74/2354/12t Buffalo66/1847/8pc66/1846/7t Charleston, SC89/3166/18t85/2962/16s Chicago76/2450/10t77/2552/11t Cleveland66/1851/10s73/2252/11t Dallas88/3164/17s90/3266/18s Denver82/2754/12pc83/2853/11pc Detroit74/2352/11s73/2252/11t Honolulu86/3072/22pc85/2974/23s Houston89/3164/17pc90/3266/18s HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySaturday TodaySaturdayTodaySaturday Indianapolis80/2659/15s79/2661/16t Jacksonville86/3068/20t88/3165/18t Kansas City84/2862/16s87/3064/17pc Las Vegas97/3670/21s99/3772/22pc Little Rock84/2858/14s89/3162/16s Los Angeles78/2562/16pc78/2560/15pc Louisville80/2662/16s83/2865/18t Memphis82/2765/18pc88/3168/20s Miami85/2973/22t87/3072/22t Minneapolis75/2355/12pc76/2455/12pc Nashville80/2658/14pc85/2962/16pc New Orleans86/3068/20pc87/3069/20s New York76/2461/16t76/2462/16pc Oklahoma City88/3163/17s91/3262/16s Orlando86/3070/21t89/3170/21t Philadelphia80/2661/16t79/2658/14s Phoenix 100/37 75/23 pc 103/3975/23s Pittsburgh74/2356/13pc76/2454/12t Portland, OR 84/2856/13s81/2753/11s Raleigh-Durham 87/30 61/16 t 84/28 59/15 s St. Louis82/2765/18s85/2967/19t Salt Lake City 85/29 63/17 pc 84/2861/16pc San Antonio 89/31 64/17 t 89/31 66/18 pc San Diego70/2164/17pc71/2163/17pc San Francisco 72/22 53/11 pc 69/2054/12pc Seattle77/2551/10s73/2252/11s T allahassee 89/3166/18t89/3165/18pc T ampa 87/30 71/21 t 86/30 70/21t Tucson96/3568/20s98/3666/18s W ashington, DC 84/28 60/15t80/2662/16s UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONALBUSINESS PAGE 18B, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n JESSICA MINTZ AP Technology Writer SEATTLE Dell Inc. said Thursday its fiscal first-quarter profit fell 63 percent as the recession continued to crimp computer sales around the world, according to Associated Press . The results, coupled with a cautious outlook from the world's top PC seller, HewlettPackard Co., indicate that the computer market has not improved much since last year's economic meltdown led to a holiday season that was the industry's worst stretch in six years. Dell's earnings for the three months that ended May 1 sank to $290 million, or 15 cents per share, from $784 million, or 38 cents per share, in the same period last year. The most recent results included a 9-cent charge from c losing facilities and paying severance to laid-off workers. Excluding the charge, Dell earned 24 cents per share, or a penny better than analysts had predicted, according to a Thomson Reuters survey. Sales dropped 23 percent to $12.3 billion, lower than the $12.6 billion analysts had predicted for Round Rock, Texasbased Dell. In a conference call, Chief Financial Officer Brian Gladden said sales picked up toward the end of the quarter, but that is normal for the time of year. Gladden said May was no better than the first quarter, and looking ahead he said orders and conversations with customers yield "mixed signals." "We would hope that we would see improved demand in the later part of the year," Gladden said. "Hopefully sooner versus later." Hewlett-Packard's chief executive, Mark Hurd, has expressed similar caution. Speaking at an investor confer ence Thursday, Hurd would not say when he thought the PC market would begin to rebound. That is in contrast to Paul Otellini, the CEO of Intel Corp., the world's biggest supplier of PC microprocessors, who has said sales already appear to have bottomed out and returned to normal seasonal patterns. Netbooks At Dell, sales of laptops and the smaller, less powerful netbooks, which together make up Dell's largest product category, fell 20 percent in the quarter. Recession-weary shoppers' preference for netbooks and low-end PCs dragged average prices down 8 percent. Revenue from large enter prises and small and mediumsized businesses worldwide fell about 30 percent. Consumer sales dropped 16 percent. U.S. revenue, which accounts for 52 percent of Dell's total, declined 21 percent, as did rev enue in its Asia Pacific-Japan segment. Sales fell a steeper 29 percent in Europe, the Middle East and Africa combined. In Brazil, Russia, India and China, the so-called "BRIC" countries, revenue fell 21 percent. D espite the PC maker's uncertainty about the market, CEO Michael Dell said he expects big businesses to replace many workers' computers in 2010, after Microsoft Corp.'s next operating system, Windows 7, has been released. The company said it slashed operating expenses by 15 percent from a year ago to $1.8 billion as the PC maker tries to squeeze $4 billion out of its annual costs. Some of the savings is coming from a shift from companyowned factories to less-expen sive contract manufacturers, and some is tied to layoffs. Gladden would not say how many people Dell laid off in the quarter, nor would he say what the PC maker's plans are for future job cuts. Shares of Dell edged up 12 cents to $11.60 in after-hours trading. Before the earnings report, they rose 36 cents, or 3.2 per cent, to end the regular session at $11.48. Dell profit falls 63% as PC sales stay soft IN THIS JAN. 9, 2009 PHOTO , Dell Computers are seen on display at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. Dell Inc. on Thursday, May 28, 2009 said its fiscal first-quarter profit fell 63 percent as the recession continued to crimp computer sales around the world. P a u l S a k u m a / A P P h o t o


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Have-a-go heroes
tackle gunman

A SHOOTOUT in broad
daylight erupted near the KFC
outlet on Prince Charles Drive
when bystanders tried to res-
cue an old woman who was
being held up for her purse.

What started out as an
attempt by good Samaritans to
catch a purse snatcher turned
dangerous when the perpetrator
pulled out a gun and starting
shooting randomly.

Witnesses say the situation
descended into complete chaos
when an unidentified man in a
car pulled out a shotgun and

FAMILY OF MURDER VICTIM
SAY REPORTS INACCURATE

THE family of murder vic-
tim Shenise Adderley say
news reports published yes-
terday contained inaccurate
information about her mur-
der.

Specifically, the family
denied suggestions that a
young man being questioned
in connection with the mur-
der was in a relationship with
the victim. They also said
Shenise did not live with the
young man.



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began firing back at the gun-
wielding thief.

While those who initially con-
fronted the robber were praised
for their bravery, people on the
scene criticised the police for
not responding to calls quickly
enough and said they fear Nas-
sau is becoming a lawless town.

One said: “It felt like a movie.
Nassau has become like the
Wild Wild West, where some-
one can walk up to you in broad
daylight and kill you.”

The incident began at around
6pm on Wednesday when an
old woman was accosted by a
man as she walked down a side
street near the back of the KFC
building. An unidentified man
saw what was happening and
ran over to help. He was quick-
ly followed by several other
men.

By the time they got to the
victim, the robber had snatched
her purse and taken off running
down the side street. The men
eventually caught up and
attempted to tackle him to the
ground, probably hoping to
hold him there until the police
arrived, witnesses said.

However, the perpetrator was

SEE page 11

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CROWDS GATHER at
St Matthew’s Anglican
Church for the

BHCAWU’s election.

MOTORISTS were
hopping mad yesterday
after crowds of hotel
workers taking part in
their union elections
caused traffic on major
roadways to come to a
near standstill for much
of the day.

Results of executive
elections held by the
Bahamas Hotel Catering
and Allied Workers
Union yesterday were
not known up to press
time.

However, one thing
certainly was: Many Nas-
suvians did not appreci-
ate the decision to use St
Matthew’s Anglican
Church as one of two
polling stations for the
BHCAWU’s approxi-
mately 6,000 union mem-
bers.

The move meant that
crowds of hotel workers

SEE page 11





























Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Report alleges Bahamian

20% salary
cut’ to save

Philip ‘Brave’
Davis urges
colleagues to
do the same








officers unlawfully killed man

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

ALLEGATIONS of security
forces using excessive force and
Bahamian police officers unlaw-
fully killing one man have been
logged in Amnesty Internation-
al’s annual report released yes-
terday.

The international human
rights watchdog’s evaluation of
events throughout 2008 further
notes discrimination towards
Haitian migrants in the country
and mistreatment of
Cuban detainees in the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre.

It states Haitians living in the
Bahamas have appealed to the
Haitian government to help them
overcome the discrimination they
face, while Cuban detainees have
complained of ill-treatment and
breaches of immigration laws at

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the Detention Centre.

The annual report also states:
“Several allegations of use of
excessive force and one case of

SEE page 11

=

Y treasury cash

AN MP says he is will-
ing to take a 20 per cent
cut in his parliamentary
salary in an effort to save
the treasury some much
needed money.

Cat Island MP Philip
“Brave” Davis is also urg-
ing his parliamentary col-
leagues to do the same
and has called on Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
to eliminate the duplicate
ministers in his cabinet.

He branded Byron
Woodside, Zhivargo
Laing, Branville McCart-
ney, Brensil Rolle, Phen-
ton Neymour, Loretta
Butler-Turner and
Charles Maynard “unnec-
essary burdens on taxpay-
ers” during this deep
recession as “full minis-
ters” are responsible for
each of their respective
areas.

Mr Davis then criticised
Mr Ingraham for his
“shocking” decision to
deny nurses their health
insurance saying he
“opposed the decision in
the strongest terms.”

“These dedicated work-
ers are the backbone of
our entire health care sys-
tem. Nurses often go
beyond the call of duty to
care for the sick and dying
without any thanks. A car-
ing government, or a car-
ing prime minister, would
never deny nurses health
insurance,” he said.

During his budget com-
munication yesterday the
Prime Minster announced
that teachers, doctors and
nurses will be among
those on the public pay-

SEE page three



THE SUDDEN extreme weather that

swept Nassau yesterday managed to force
trailer on top of these cars at the British
Olonial Hilton — causing severe damage.





Financing For
Government Workers!



NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

@)ntague

Village Road Near Shirley Street

Tel: 394-0323/5 OR 394-1377


PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009



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Eden Street Store Hours
Zam - 7pm (Mon. - Sat.)
fam - 3pm (Sundays)
fam - 12noon (Holidays)

Special #1($50.00):



Special #2($50.00):

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

NEW LOTTERY: Island Luck boasts ail new locations.

A NEW local lottery has
opened in Nassau, boasting four
new locations and attractive jack-
pots hinged on the United States
lotteries.

Island Luck — which has loca-
tions on East Bay, Collins
Avenue and Madeira Street,
Robinson Road and Six Street,
and the Dunkin Donuts Plaza on

DOCTORS Hospital’s
Blood Bank is in urgent need

of O Positive, O Negative
and A negative blood.

People able to make a
donation are asked to do so
as soon as possible.



Me

Bernard Rd - Mackey St - Thompson Blvd

East Street South — offers patrons
the chance to wager $1 for the
chance to make $900 if their three
ball selection is drawn in either
the New York, Chicago, or Miami
lotteries.

Paying out $3,000 to the dollar
for the four ball selection, patrons
who play this game have a 1,032
to one chance of winning, while
those playing the three ball lot-
tery stand a much better chance
of hitting with only 56 to one
odds.

With security posted at its front
door, the establishment on East
Bay Street has counters at which
patrons can submit their “lucky
picks” for the day to the helpful
attendants who are secure behind
an inch and a half of bullet proof
glass.

Once you have submitted your
selections, you are punctually
issued a computerised receipt
complete with its own individual
receipt number and bar code.

Each number is printed in the
first column along with the US
lottery identification in the sec-
ond, followed by the amount

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Island Luck lottery

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

wagered. It is unknown how
much business this relatively new
enterprise — the self-styled place
where “winners live” — has been
able to attract away from estab-
lished lotteries such as FML, Red
Hot, Clesos, and NWS.

While it is technically illegal to
play the lottery in the Bahamas,
the number of Bahamians who
are involved in the numbers sys-
tem is so great that it is slowly
becoming an “un-policeable”
phenomenon, some claim.

Recently, two of the establish-
ments of FML CEO Craig Flow-
ers were raided by police.

This much publicised event
dominated national headlines as
police confiscated nearly $1 mil-
lion in cash from this single
branch.

Following this raid, Mr Flowers
spoke exclusively with The Tri-
bune on his views about the estab-
lishment of a national lottery and
his reaction to the raid.

Denying any anger over the
matter, Mr Flowers said that 90
per cent of the officers involved in
the raid were his friends, and
were simply doing their jobs.

“We don’t have any problems
with this sort of conduct because
of the fact that they are carrying
out their roles as mandated, and
certainly ours is of a different
agenda and we are just going to
have to find a way to work along
with the authorities,” he said.

Percival Roberts (Son /Proprietor

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5Lbs Snappers or Jacks

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Sam - 6pm (Mon. - Sat.)
8am - 1pm (Sundays)
Closed (Holidays)

Special #3:
Lobster Tails-$16.95/Lb
Jacks-$80.00/Kit

*** Conch Trimmings-$1.00/Lb***


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Philip ‘Brave’ Davis



MP ‘will take
20% salary
cut’ to save
treasury cash

FROM page one

roll who will be hit by cut-
backs in government's budget, :
having to forego salary :
increases — with the latter not :
receiving an anticipated $10.5 ;
million health insurance ben- }
efit — in this fiscal year. ;

The MP pointed out that :
while Mr Ingraham said there :
will be across the board }
expenditure cuts in the pub- i
lic service, he did not tell :
Bahamians what these cuts }
will mean to the thousands of }
civil servants across the coun- }
try. i
“As we look through the }
budget in the days to come I }
am certain that we will see !
more surprises like the mas- }
sive tax increases he hid from }
the country last year,” he said. }

Mr Davis said that the bud-
get statement sounded more ;
like a resignation speech than
a national address intended to
steer the country during a time }
of economic crisis. :

“The prime minister had no }
new ideas, no words of inspi- }
ration and appears resigned
to wait until world leaders fig-
ure out the problem before }
there is resolution for the }
Bahamas. He is a man past his :
prime and past his usefulness,”
the Cat Island MP said. i

He said he was “especially
concerned” about what the
prime minister did not say :
during his address. :

“With the country again on }
pace to set another homicide }
record, the Prime Minister }
said nothing about crime and }
his government’s plan to:
reduce the level of violence }
on our streets,” he said. i

Budget cuts ‘could hit level
of service given to public’

BUDGET) 009 / 10

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

BUDGET cuts at various govern-
ment ministries, departments and agen-
cies allowing them to operate with
financing to meet their "core" man-
dates could hurt the level of service
given to the public, President of the
Bahamas Public Service Union John
Pinder said.

His comments came in response to
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham's
2009/2010 budget communication in the
House of Assembly, during which Mr
Ingraham said significant revenue loss-
es lead to all government ministries,
departments, and agencies "being allo-
cated funding sufficient to meet their
core mandate to the public, albeit in
the context of the overriding need to
maintain a disciplined approach to pub-
lic expenditure."

"It doesn't enhance service, the gen-
eral public demands high quality ser-
vice from the civil servants but in most
cases we don't have the necessary tools
and equipment to compete with the

private sector. And also in
some cases persons need
more training — and it's a
cost in training people —
but if you don't invest in
human resources you're
not going to get the kind of
quality performance that
you're looking for," Mr
Pinder told The Tribune.

While stressing that he
understood the financial |
constraints facing govern- |
ment due to the global eco-
nomic downturn, Mr Pin- &
der said funding for train-
ing of human resources is
vital to the development of a well-per-
forming public sector.

But outgoing head of the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce Dionisio
D'Aguilar feels the budget cuts will not
hamper what he called an already
"inefficient" public service.

"I don't think it's going to cripple
the public service, I don't think it's
going to make quite a bit of difference
to the public service because it depends
how you are going to do more with less.
Are you going to have less people and
I think he said when people retire he's
not going to replace them, but I think
it's general knowledge that the public

John annie



service is overstaffed,
they're incredibly ineffi-
cient," said Mr D'Aguilar,
who is also the president of
the Superwash chain of
laundromats.

The prime minister stat-
§ ed that the positions of the
) 138 civil servants who will
reach the mandatory age of
retirement in the this fiscal
period, July 1 to June 30,
2010, will not be replaced
— at an expected annual
salary savings of $4.1 mil-
lion.

Nearly all government
ministries and departments will see
decreases in their allocations in
2009/2010 budget year over approved
estimates for the previous budget peri-
od, said the prime minister. However,
there were a few increases, including
$10.4 million to the Department of
Public Service; $7.3 million to the Pub-
lic Hospital's Authority; $2.9 million
to the Department of Environmental
Health Services; and $1.9 million to the
Department of Public Health.

Mr Pinder as also of the opinion that
an audit of the public sector's staff
capabilities is needed to ensure that
qualified persons are deployed to areas

left vacant by persons who've reached
the mandatory age of retirement.

"He's (the prime minister) been get-
ting rid of a number of persons and
they've not been replaced. So he's real-
ly put the public service is in a worse
position than before — I wish they
would have done an audit of the human
resources side of the public service so
we can better redeploy persons, based
on their skills and their job experience
and academics.

"Unless we are satisfied that we have
now done a proper audit of the human
resources (department) and that per-
sons can be redeployed to fill some of
those positions and allow persons who
are already in the service to be pro-
moted — rather than bringing in new
people— (that would) help to control
the expenditure on new salaries," said
Mr Pinder.

To have your say on this or any other
issue, email Tbe Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your
letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street,
P.O. Box N-3207



Social Services Dept ‘will focus on core mandate’

THE Department of Social

The Poverty Alleviation

some surprise at the reduction

Meanwhile, though

Services will focus this year on
its core mandate of ensuring
that every Bahamian has food
to eat, clothes to wear and a
roof over their head, rather
than attempting to develop
any new social projects, Min-
ister of State Loretta Butler
Turner said yesterday.

Mrs Butler Turner told The
Tribune yesterday that despite
cuts to some areas of the
department’s responsibility the
“important thing” about the
budget in relation to Social
Services was that it was able
to “hold the line” overall in
terms of funding — still receiv-
ing $39,167,977 in total.

This after it had already
received a massive increase in
its allocation in the previous
budgetary period, of around
$12 million.

She made her comments as
the 2009/2010 budget reveals
that funds for certain projects,

Me)anecMoleN vam MOANA

including the Department’s
Poverty Alleviation Pro-
gramme and the not yet oper-
ational Centre for Children
with Disabilities (Cheshire
Home), have been slashed.



Programme saw a reduction
of $594,000 in its allocation, to
$2.4 million, while the
Cheshire Home will now only
have $50,000 at its disposal
rather than $300,000 in the last
budgetary period.

Also reduced was the allo-
cation for “family island oper-
ations,” which fell from $4.547
million to $2.673m — a reduc-
tion of $1.873 million.

In the case of the Poverty
Alleviation Programme and
the Cheshire Home, Mrs But-
ler Turner suggested that both
were projects that had yet to
fully get off the ground and
whose full development is now
being postponed in view of the
need for government to exer-
cise spending restraints due
to difficult economic condi-
tions.

An official at the Disability
Affairs Division of the Depart-
ment yesterday expressed

in funding for the Cheshire
Home as he said government
did have plans to relaunch the
home as a centre for children
with disabilities.

“There were a lot of plans,”
he said, adding that he was
“still hopeful” that the Home
can be developed this year
despite the cutbacks.

Mrs Butler Turner said a
“consensus had never really
been reached” on “what to
do” with the Home, and in
view of a need for fiscal
restraint it was not going to be
treated as a priority.

“We are going to be very
focused on ensuring those
things that are priority are that
every Bahamian is taken care
of in terms of their basic
needs,” she said.

resources for Grand Bahama,
one of the Department’s
“biggest users of assistance
funds,” had previously come
out of the “Family Island
Operations” allocation, the
$1.9 million reduction in that
area is in part due to the fact
that social services funding for
Grand Bahama now
“goes through the public trea-
sury,” explained Mrs Butler
Turner.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

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$12m cut to Ministry of Tourism
funds ‘won't severely impact ability’

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AFTER seeing the Ministry
of Tourism’s funds slashed by
$12 million in this year’s budget,
the Minister of Tourism
claimed the reduction will not
severely impact its ability to do
its job in a harsh tourism cli-
mate.

However, both the Minister
and Bahamas Hotel Associa- F
tion President Robert Sands
agreed yesterday that the cut-
back will require the Ministry to
ensure it focuses on utilising the
money it does have in the most effective
way possible.

Describing the move as “disappointing”
but to some extent understandable in view of
present conditions, Mr Sands said the cut
“will give cause for the Ministry of Tourism
to re-engineer itself and to ensure the monies
they have available become productive
sums.”

Meanwhile, Mr Vanderpool Wallace said
programmes that are going to “survive” in
the Ministry of Tourism are those that are
known to have a “direct impact on visitor
arrivals” while more “exploratory pro-
grammes are going to suffer.”

Vincent Netcast Wallace



In his Budget Communica-
tion to parliament on Wednes-
day Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham described how
“decidedly weak” tourism per-
formance in 2008 worsened
going into 2009.

He said Government is
“moving to address (the) chal-
lenges (faced by the industry)
and improve the attractiveness
| of our tourism product.”

Mr Vanderpool Wallace
told The Tribune the Ministry
already finds itself in a more
favourable position than it was
to respond under budgetary
constraints.

“Nobody likes to see a reduction in budget
but we have had the good fortune this year of
buying media, for example advertising, much
better than we ever did before. So the cost to
get same kind of exposure is lower this year
than last year and year before, so we’re going
to get good value for money,” he said.

“Secondly, certain commitments that were
contractual commitments in the budget last
year don’t exist this year, so in terms of the
real deduction, in terms of what has hap-
pened to our budget it’s nowhere near the
$12 million. It is lower — but it’s not as is
reflected (by the $12 million figure),” he
said.

On Wednesday the Prime Minister said
that through April total arrivals to The
Bahamas were down by 1.2 per cent from the
same period last year, at 1.68 million.

He added that although more people vis-
ited the country on cruise ships — arrivals by
sea were actually up by 5.5 per cent over
the first four months, air arrivals in New
Providence were down by 10.5 per cent in the
January to April 2009 period compared with
same period in 2008.

Meanwhile, in Grand Bahama and the oth-
er Family Islands, were down by a massive
28.9 per cent and 27.6 per cent respectively.

Noting that this impact on the Bahamian
tourism sector is not “unique” in the world,
but reflective of similar drop offs elsewhere,
he added that the “short term prospects”
for the country’s major industry “remain
challenging.”

In responding to these conditions, which
see consumers in The Bahamas’ primary
market, the U.S., far less prone to spend
their money on holiday’s abroad, Mr Ingra-
ham said the Ministry of Tourism “is
embarking on a plan to increase the number
of airlines serving our country with reduced
airfares for customers.”

“Further, the Ministry of Tourism will
undertake a broad spectrum of strategic mar-
keting initiatives in the U.S., Europe, Cana-
da and Latin America,” added the Prime
Minister.

Police Family Island operations ‘will not be cut’

POLICE Commissioner Regi-
nald Ferguson has pledged that
operations on the Family Islands
will not be cut despite more than
$2 million in budget cuts.

In the 2009/2010 budget, the
amount allocated to the Royal
Bahamian Police Force's Fami-
ly Island operations will be
reduced from $4 million to an
estimated $1,722,547 for the
coming budget year, represent- 1.
ing a shortfall of $2,277,454.

When asked during a brief Mr

He did not provide
a breakdown of which
specific areas the cuts
would affect.

On Wednesday,
Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham pre-
sented the 2009/2010
budget communica-
tion for the fiscal year,
which begins on July

During the address,
Ingraham



Seenele ey aeTUEYON

The Prime Minister
said the harsh global
downturn led to an
almost 17 per cent
decline in recurrent
revenue, estimated to
be $260 million lower
than projected in last
year's budget.

He also painted a
grim picture of the
country's ballooning
deficit for 2008/2009,
estimated at $352 mil-

upcoming fiscal year compared
to $121,931,871 in approved esti-
mates for the 2008/2009 budget
year, representing a change of
$3,005,812.

Other areas of note where
cuts were made to the RBPF in
the budget include an a $470,000
reduction in government spend-
ing on tuition, training, in-ser-
vice awards and subsistence; a
$700,000 decrease spent on
clothing and clothing supplies;
a $30,000 decrease on work-

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telephone interview how this
reduction would affect the force's
abilities in the Family Islands,
Mr Ferguson said: "Nothing that
we need to do is curtailed from
that point of view."

explained that due to
the severe downturn in the
economy, government is "pac-
ing" itself financially to prepare
for possible worsening of the
economy.

lion, more than
double the amount projected in
last year's budget communica-
tion.

The RBPF was allotted an
estimated $118,926,059 for the

shops, conferences, seminars,
meetings and exhibits; and a
$400,000 cut on electricity
expenditure, compared to
approved estimates for the pre-
vious budget year.

~ 380-FLIX


PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited | Why women
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master nee d to be prou d
of themselves



LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Bahamians need to be better trained

IN THIS column yesterday we discussed the
complaint of a letter writer who believed Prime
Minister Ingraham had insulted Bahamians by
announcing that a foreigner was to be brought
in to regulate government’s electronic commu-
nications network in preparation for the sale
of BTC. The writer took this as an inference by
the Prime Minister that Bahamians were not
smart enough to regulate their own communi-
cations business.

Mr Ingraham was insulting no one. He was
just being realistic that at present there is no
Bahamian with the experience required at this
time to meet global standards. We do not have
to go very far to find proof of this because if we
did have the local expertise our telecommuni-
cations would be far superior to what it is now.
However, this does not mean that Bahamians
will never be able to control their own system.
It just means that they do not have the experi-
ence to do it now. And since 1967 we have
much evidence of what happens when people
take on positions for which they are neither
formally trained, nor have practical experience.
For these examples, we can start with the politi-
cians.

Even before there was talk of globalisation,
Bahamians were urged to take their school
work and technical training seriously to pre-
pare themselves to compete on the world stage.

Now that that time is here, we have reports
from all sides that Bahamians, who expect to be
big players in the global market, are not pre-
pared.

The address to the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s annual general meeting Wednes-
day by Baha Mar’s Chief Executive Sarkis
Izmirlian should be a serious wake up call for
Bahamians.

“Just this month,” said Mr Izmirlian, “in the
middle of the great recession, the Government
of Qatar invested $75 million to build a luxury
250-room hotel in Cuba.

“We had contacted the Government of Qatar
some time back about an investment in the
Baha Mar (Cable Beach). They made it very
clear they had no interest in investing in the
Bahamas.”

Mr Izmirlian said his company first consid-
ered Qatar’s disinterest due to the economic
environment. But when Qatar made such a
heavy commitment in Cuba despite the eco-
nomic crisis, they felt they should have looked
“closer to home for the reason.”

He pointed to the closure of Four Seasons
Emerald Bay in Exuma as a sign of the times for
the Bahamas. It was the only hotel, he said, in
the globally branded chain to close. “That
should tell us something,” he said.

He recited air and cruise arrival figures to the

ground as a competitive destination in the
region. While tourist arrivals were down in the
Bahamas, they were up in such places as Can-
cun, Cuba, Jamaica and even Aruba, despite
the negative publicity generated against that
island by the disappearance of an American
medical student. And all this, he pointed out,
despite the Bahamas’ advantage at being so
near to the US mainland.

“Let me be blunt,” he said, “unless we
improve the education of all Bahamians:
Schools for younger Bahamian children and
trade schools, or continuing education for
mature Bahamians, we are doomed.”

Ralph Massey, who has done much research
into the Bahamian educational system, has been
warning for some time of the “devastating impli-
cations” for the economy because of the high
illiteracy levels among Bahamian high school
leavers. He predicted that the present situation
could make this nation “progressively less com-
petitive.”

We are now seeing evidence of this happen-
ing.

And recently, again in an address to the
Chamber of Commerce, a senior policy adviser
to the Caribbean Export Development Agency
(CEDA), said that Bahamian service profes-
sionals will not be able to supply the European
Union market under the Economic Partner-
ship Agreement (EPA) if their qualifications
are “not recognised” by countries in that trad-
ing bloc.

He said that access to this market is not
automatically open to Bahamians and other
Caribbean nations just because their countries
signed on to the EPA.

Bahamian services professionals, he said,
would have to sign Mutual Recognition Agree-
ments with their EU counterparts, which had to
be approved by the relevant EPA governing
body, to ensure that they can supply the EU
market.

“Tf qualifications are not recognised in the
EU market,” he told Bahamian businessmen,
“you can’t sell goods and services there.”

And although we are a seafaring nation, a
scholarship programme has been launched to
help Bahamians acquire specialised, skills-based
training to compete in the international mar-
itime industry. Without this training Bahamians
will not be able to take advantage of the many
opportunities now open in the international
deep sea fleet.

Gone are the days when an MP could burden
the civil service with their constituents, many of
whom had no qualifications for the positions
they were given in exchange for their vote.
Bahamians now face a future that will depend
upon what they know, not who they know to

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Firstly let me thank you for
allowing me space in your
esteemed daily to share yet
another concern of mine.

God made all women differ-
ent. Some are slim and shapely.
Some are chubby and round.
Some are dark in complexion.
Some have lighter skin tones.
Some have crinkly hair, while
the hair of others is straight.
Some are surly while others
enjoy more pleasant attitudes
towards life.

I say all this to illustrate that
each woman is different and
should be comfortable in being
who they are. Why then do we
have women bleaching their
skin, risking cancer, to be lighter
than the complexion God made
them? Why then do some
women lose the quality of their
hair by using chemicals that
deem themselves unsuitable in
short order.

Those are just two superficial

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



examples of being who you are
not as a woman, but it goes
much deeper than that.

To answer those questions,
many women in our society suf-
fer from very low self esteem
and feel that altering their
appearance will make them
more acceptable to others and
ultimately who they see in the
mirror. This is nonsense as
every woman is beautiful in her
own right.

Being confident is one of the
greatest gifts a woman can have.
The black woman should
embrace her “Africaness”
through locking her hair or
wearing it short and natural as
opposed to straightening it and
becoming someone you are not.

A woman who feels she is
overweight should simply take

on a lifetime change by way of a
new diet inclusive of fruits and
vegetables and lots of water.
Exercise is a must and she will
soon start to feel better about
herself inside and out.

Accepting oneself is a major
step in being comfortable in
one’s own skin. If your nose is
round and not straight, that is
how your maker intended it to
be. Accept it.

If your lips are fuller than
the woman next to you, that’s
how it was intended to be.
Accept it. It makes you who
YOU ARE.

We need to be proud of our-
selves as women.

We were, after all, chosen as
the vessel of humanity. That
alone should make us confi-
dent!

Be comfortable in your own
skin.

MAYA NEWBOLD
Nassau,
May 25, 2008

Pot holes and traffic lights still need fixing

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Recently I wrote a letter about pot holes and
traffic lights and I now discover that the Minister
of Works is also Minister of Traffic Lights as he
was quoted in the Guardian (May 19) under both
capacities. So this is a letter addressed to the
Minister to first of all thank him for fixing the
“New Breed” of pot hole on West Bay and Blake
Road, but to remind him that there are many
others that require his attention. Secondly I would
like to take exception to his comments on traffic

lights.

While commending him for issuing a contract to
fix the non-working lights, it was inexcusable to
refuse to explain why they have not been working

for a longtime.

“There are a number of circumstances that I
prefer not to go into at this time”, he said. I think
the minister and his colleagues should look at

Ss COvacnnl Leite
resist spending

COIR IO MN eTULOT LT
downtown Nassau?



EDITOR, The Tribune.

Re: Cruise Lines: We don’t
recognize tour body Tribune,
24 April, 2009

Amazing. You mean to tell
me cruise passengers prefer to
spend their money at Half
Moon Cay, Coco Cay and Cast-
away Cay rather than beautiful
downtown Nassau? Who would
a think!

KEN W
KNOWLES, MD

what is happening in the world and note that the
public no longer tolerate vague and unrespon-

sive answers from public servants anymore. An
apology is no longer acceptable, the question is
why were they not fixed months ago?

Even the speaker of the UK Parliament is no
exception. I think the public respect for public ser-
vants is at an all time low and if they, and I do not
single out the Minister of Works, are not pre-
pared to be upfront and honest with the public
they should leave the job.

It will be great when the traffic lights are fixed,

but, of course, the traffic light problem is only a

Nassau,

May 19, 2009.

symptom of what is happening in the world where
a second rate performance is considered good
when it comes to public servants.

PATRICK H THOMSON

Backward place, backward people

EDITOR, The Tribune.

How could our police and our
Government allow these fools to
go through our streets and
through our neighbourhoods,
with music booming, shaking
earth and sky, at any hour of
morning, night or day?

Are these people ungodly and
criminal, as well as are our police
and our Government? Only way
to cope is to withdraw and to
imagine that this is not my coun-

try, it cannot be. I pretend,
though I am stuck here, to be
elsewhere. I am not a part of this
madness. I just cannot be part of
such a backward place and such a
backward people.

Why does no one in authority
say something, do something?

This perplexes me. In whose
hands are we?

OBEDIAH SMITH
Nassau,
May 9, 2009.

One man's terrorist is another man’s doctor

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Isurmise that the controversy over the US State Department’s list-
ing of Cuba as a state sponsor of terrorism originates in a simple

choice of nomenclature.

Nassau,
April 26, 2009.

You see every year Cuba dispatches hundreds of white-suited,
masked agents, armed with chemical kits, to poor countries around the
world. That much is not in dispute.

But whereas in US State Department jargon, these functionaries are
called “terrorists”, everywhere else in the world (including the Oxford
English Dictionary) they are known as “doctors”.

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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009, PAGE 5



oln brief. MISS BAHAMAS PAGEANT FUROR

Man accused
of killing father
appears in court

THE man accused of killing a
father-of-one with a rock on
Sunday night appeared in Mag-
istrates Court yesterday on a
manslaughter charge.

Jeffrey Moncur, 42, of Sol-
dier Road, has been charged

Fox.

side.

Relatives claimed Mr Fox, a }
self-employed handyman, was :
arguing with the visitor in the i
back yard before he ran out into }
the street and collapsed. Police :
believed he died as a result of a :

blow to the head with a rock.

His death was the 30th homi-

cide for the year.

Moncur who appeared before }
Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez
and Magistrate Janet Bullardin }
Court One, Bank Lane, was not }

required to enter a plea.

He was remanded to Her :
Majesty’s Prison and is expect- }
ed back in court today for a bail :

hearing.

Officer charged
with killing in
the course of

dangerous driving

A POLICE officer charged
with killing in the course of dan- }
gerous driving was arraigned in }

Magistrates Court yesterday.

Police Constable Sean Ben-
jamin, 37, appeared before }
Chief magistrate Roger Gomez }
in Court One, Bank Lane yes- }

terday.

It is alleged that Benjamin, }
of Avocado Street, caused the }
death of Omar Anthony Stuart }
on July 14, 2007, while driving :
on the Tonique Williams Dar- :

ling Highway.

According to reports, the :
accident occurred shortly after }
6pm when the driver of a white
1996 Nissan Sentra traveling :
west on Tonique Williams Dar- }
ling Highway lost control of the ;
car which collided with a tree. }
The vehicle reportedly over- }
turned resulting in a passenger }
being ejected. The three occu- }
pants of the car, all males, were }
transported to hospital, howev- }
er, the passenger who was eject- }
ed eventually succumbed to :




injuries.

Benjamin was granted bail }
in the sum of $8,000 with one ;
surety. His case has been
adjourned to June 2 and trans- }
ferred to Court 6, Parliament }
Street. Benjamin was ordered :
to report to the East Street }
South Police Station every Sat- }

urday before 6 pm.

Man pleads
guilty to
ammunition
charges

A 27-YEAR-OLD man of
Kennedy Subdivision was
jailed for two years imprison-
ment after pleading guilty to
ammunition charges.

Philip Gray who appeared
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel in Court 8, Bank Lane,
on Wednesday admitted pos-
session of an unlicensed
firearm and possession of
ammunition.

According to court dock-
ets, Gray was found in posses-
sion of a black and chrome .38
revolver and six .38 rounds.

Magistrate Bethel sen-
tenced Gray to two years
imprisonment on both
charges. The sentences are to
run concurrently.

Mr Fox, 45, had reportedly }
been watching television at his :
home on Pork Fish Drive when }
an acquaintance called him out- }

THE FUROR surrounding the results of the
Miss Bahamas pageant continues with a judge
claiming that five out the nine officials had
voted in favor of another contestant.

Speaking with The Tribune on the condition
of anonymity, the judge yesterday claimed the
five voted overwhelmingly in support of Aman-
da Appleyard, and not Kiara Sherman, who
was crowned Miss Bahamas on Sunday night.

Reportedly, officials at the event claim that
Ms Sherman’s results were far higher than any
other - a claim some judges are finding hard to
believe.

Points

Allegedly in the lead up until the pageant, Ms
Sherman was reported to be 150 points ahead
of any other contestant following the prelimi-
nary rounds. While the judge questioned the
authenticity of this assessment, they also ques-
tioned how preliminary results, which they
claim should not have been included in the
totals on the pageant night could possibly have
been used.

“The Miss Universe pageant requires that
all preliminary scores are discarded once the

Judge claims five of
nine officials didn’t
vote for the winner

with killing 45-year-old Terry ;

finalist are chosen. However, there is now a
suggestion that all the scores were used cumu-
latively. If this is so, then why this change from
the Miss Universe rules?” they asked.

Additionally, the judge questioned who actu-
ally had carriage of the preliminary scores
which were collected from the judges before
they were handed into the accounting firm of
Deloitte and Touche.

“If these preliminary scores were not hand-
ed to them until the pageant that night, who
knows what could have happened to those
scores. Were all the judges including the pre-
liminary judges invited to view their final scores
after the pageant?

“Also, about three days before the final
pageant night, two prominent judges were
removed from the event, and replaced with
two judges who did not even interview the girls
on a one on one basis,” the judge said.

Since Miss Bahamas was crowned, she has
been the blunt of vicious attacks online through
networking websites and in emails.

The Miss Bahamas Committee is set to hold
a press conference today to answer these
attacks and other questions that have arisen fol-
lowing the pageant.

Staff collect final cheques
from Emerald Bay Resort

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

REDUNDANT staff col-
lected their final paychecks
from the Emerald Bay Resort
yesterday with the hope that
severance will last them until
the development re-opens.

The resort and marina, Four
Seasons Hotel and golf course
officially closed on Tuesday,
while receivers work to secure
a buyer for the property in
Farmers Hill, Exuma.

Although some staff are
expected to stay on at the
resort for a while longer to
close down operations, and
others were let go last week,
the majority of workers
picked up their final pay yes-
terday.

Many of the 500 employees
who flocked to Emerald Bay
from across the Bahamas to
take up positions at the resort,
will now return to their origi-
nal homes. Others will stay in
Exuma anticipating a quick
sale and re-opening of the
hotel.

Exuma MP Anthony Moss
said: “Some have left already
and some are in the process of
leaving. Certainly some of
them are looking for new jobs
because we are not certain
when it will re-open, but we
want to remain optimistic.”

Mr Moss said potential buy-
ers toured the property last
week and he is hopeful a deci-
sion will be made soon.

Receivers for Japanese cred-
itors Mitsui, Pricewaterhouse
Coopers, confirmed there are
over 20 interested buyers and
they expect to make an
announcement regarding the
sale within weeks.

When asked if the receivers
were any closer to securing a
buyer yesterday representative
Russell Downs said: “We are
closer, but we are not ata
stage where we are going to
announce what is happening
for another couple of weeks.

“As soon as there is news we
will say, but at the moment we
are running through the
process, and hopefully within a

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some news.”

Mr Moss said he hopes the
turnaround will be secured and
completed as quickly as possi-
ble.

He said: “We are hoping it
would be a matter of months,
because the programme the
government has in place right
now is for a couple of months.

“So while people may have a
small amount of money, it may
carry them for a couple of
months until we get them back
to work.”

Former food and beverage
department employee Kim-
berley Rolle, 22, left Emerald
Bay with a small number of
staff last Thursday.

She is hoping the hotel will
re-open within the couple of
months she expects her sever-
ance package will last.

Miss Rolle said: “I just have
to do something positive with
the money I have.

“Tam hoping the hotel will
get sold in the next couple of
months so I can get back to
work.”

Appreciation

Mr Moss said government
agencies organised an ecu-
menical church service at the
Ebenezer Union Baptist
Church in Farmer's Hill, near
the resort on Wednesday
evening to show appreciation
to the redundant staff.

The MP said it was impor-
tant to give those who have
worked at Emerald Bay over
the last four or five years
thanks and encouragement at
this difficult time.

Around 150 of those who
were in Emerald Bay on the
eve of the final payday attend-
ed the service along with gov-
ernment officials including
director of Labour Harcourt
Brown.

Mr Moss said: “We want to
give thanks to Reverend Dr
Irvin Clarke for opening the
doors of his church to assist
with his church services that
was organised by the local gov-
ernment and our administra-

tor and government agencies
all were present.”

Specialists from the Ministry
of Health, Department of
Social Services, and the
National Insurance Board have
been in Exuma this to provide
guidance and support to
redundant staff seeking assis-
tance.

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Gambling laws ‘a laughing stock’

THE Bahamas Gaming
Reform Committee has again
urged Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham to legalise gambling
across the Bahamas.

Declaring current gaming laws
discriminatory and “a laughing
stock”, the BGR asked why Mr
Ingraham is indifferent to the will
of the people on this matter.

Citing a recent on-line poll, the
BGR told the prime minister
Bahamians overwhelmingly sup-
port the legalisation of gambling.

In a letter to Mr Ingraham, the
BGR criticised the failure of gov-
ernment to engage citizens in an
open discussion on public poli-
cy.

“Again the integrity of basic
democratic principles is brought
into question,” the letter said.

Committee chairperson Sidney
Strachan added: “Public discus-
sion of the gaming issue could
not be more pronounced. The
airwaves are filled with discus-
sion of the issue. Talk shows are
inundated with calls and print
media are writing about the mat-
ter daily. The message being con-
veyed is consistently that gaming
must be legalised.

“The depth of interest across
the country is evident. Now the
issue has moved into the inter-
national arena on the web. A
recent on-line Twiigs Poll has 78

BGR says Bahamians
overwhelmingly
support legalisation

per cent of Bahamians supporting
the legalisation of gaming. It’s
just another of many strong indi-
cators. Bahamians are asking,
‘Where is the government on this
issue?’ Effectively it is in hiding
while the issue consumes the
nation. That’s irresponsible how-
ever you look at it.”

The letter said, in part: “We
again write out of frustration. For
weeks the Bahamas Gaming
Reform Committee has been
attempting to learn the formal
position of the government on
gaming law reform. Our efforts
have been to no avail despite
adherence to an orderly process.
In fact, we have not been accord-
ed the most fundamental of cour-
tesies from the government — the
acknowledgment of correspon-
dence.

“The Cayman Islands have
now made us the last standing
Caribbean democracy afraid to
challenge the constitutional and

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gaming status quo. Against strong
religious opposition, the people
voted in referendum by 63 per

COSCON

cent for change and it should be
noted that they changed the gov-
ernment in the process. Your
government must not be afraid
to act.”

The letter noted that Minister
of Tourism Vincent Vaderpool-
Wallace, in the May 22, 2009 edi-
tion of The Tribune, said the gov-
ernment is thinking about review-
ing the Gaming and Financial
Transaction Reporting Act to
permit “legal residents” to game.

“By all accounts, this will not

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methods including auditory, visu-
al and kinesthetic programmes,
Blairwood Academy owner and
director Kim Kooskalis said.

But the special attention pupils
receive means school fees are
often too high for many families,
despite the fact dedicated teach-
ers are grossly underpaid, the
director said.

She added: “There are a large
number of students sitting in pub-
lic schools who cannot read. The
national average is a D. Much of
the reason for this is due to the
fact that there are children who
are supposed to be in a school
like Blairwood but cannot afford
it and are failing out.”

Full-time scholarships are pro-
vided to two students aged 10 and
11 who have ADHD and dyslex-
ia but are unable to pay the fees,
and part-scholarships cover some
of the fees for around 15 other
students.

Often children are a grade or
two behind when they begin at
Blairwood, but within two years
they will be at the same level as
their mainstreamed peers, Ms
Kooskalis said.

And the scholarship party on
Thursday, May 21, moved par-
ents and visitors to tears as staff
and children conveyed the
school’s success story.

Ms Kooskalis said: “Many peo-

augur well with Bahamians if
they too are not afforded the
opportunity to gamble through
gaming reform. A comprehen-
sive review of the Gaming Act is
necessary if your government
intends to clearly demonstrate
that it is indeed respectful of the
will of the people. Anything short
of this, sir, will only serve to fur-
ther exasperate the feelings of
hypocrisy and discrimination
throughout the Bahamas,” the
BGR said.

= Dw,



ple believe our students at Blair-
wood are not capable of being
successful but that is not true.

“Our children are the future
basketball stars, artists, photog-
raphers, and some are even schol-
ars.

“Most of our population have
normal IQ levels but just learn
differently than the mainstreamed
kids.”

The school recently added a
basketball team which made
national history by making when
both the junior and senior teams
went to the finals, Ms Kooskalis
said.

She added: “Over and over
again parents are taking their
child from school to school until
they find out about Blairwood.

“Some are in denial regarding
the abilities or disabilities of their
child, but some are just unaware
of how successful we are with
children who do not fit ‘into the
mould’.

“So many of our parents are
grateful for the individualised
attention and concern we give
their children.”

The school is appealing for
donations for the scholarship fund
to keep needy children in educa-
tion.

To find out more about Blair-
wood Academy or to make a
donation contact the school on
393-1303 or 394-3329.

Caves Village Professional
Turn Key Office Suites For Rent

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Al



INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

Our Nassau Office

Will Be Closed On
Thursday June 4th,
2009 For Our Annual

START
EUN DAY

ZOOQ9

We Will Re-Open For
Business As Usual On
Monday June 8th, 2009.

We Apologize For Any
Inconvenience Caused

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Govt signs
‘Short Stay
Visa Waiver
Agreement’

THE government has
signed a ‘Short Stay Visa
Waiver Agreement’ which
allows Bahamians to travel
visa-free to Schengen
European countries for up
to three months, the Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs
announced.

The agreement was
signed yesterday during a
ceremony at the Council of
the European Union in
Brussels, Belgium by Paul
Farquharson, Ambassador
of the Bahamas to the
European Community. He
is also High Commissioner
to London.

The agreement, to take
effect immediately, applies
to the following Schengen
countries: Austria, Bel-
gium, Bulgaria, Cyprus,
Czech Republic, Denmark,
Estonia, Finland, France,
Germany, Greece, Hun-
gary, Italy, Latvia, Lithua-
nia, Luxembourg, Malta,
Netherlands, Poland, Por-
tugal, Romania, Slovakia,
Slovenia, Spain and Swe-
den.

The agreement does not
apply to Ireland or the
United Kingdom. Bahami-
an passport holders may
still travel to these coun-
tries without a visa for
stays of up to six months,
said Deputy Prime Minis-
ter and Minister of Foreign
Affairs Brent Symonette.

The agreement also does
not apply to the overseas
territories of France or the
Netherlands. A French visa
is required for French
Guiana, Guadeloupe, Mar-
tinique, Reunion, Tahiti
and St Martin. A visa is not
required for the Nether-
lands overseas territories
of Aruba, and Netherlands
Antilles including Bonaire,
Curacao, and St Maarten.

This agreement does not
yet apply to Iceland,
Liechtenstein and Norway.

Under the current Euro-
pean Union rules regard-
ing travel to the Schengen
area, a short stay is defined
as a time not exceeding
three months, within a six-
month period following the
first date of entry into the
Schengen area as a whole.

Stays are calculated on a
cumulative basis within
that six-month period,
including both the number
of days stayed, and the
number of Schengen coun-
tries visited.

This means that a visit to
any one of the 25 countries
is considered as a Visit to
all and will count towards
the maximum three
months stay within a six-
month period, according to
the agreement.

This does not prevent
persons from travelling to
several of the countries on
any one visit or from visit-
ing Europe more than once
in a six-month period.

“Bahamians who travel
frequently to Europe, and
whose visits may potential-
ly exceed three months
within any six month peri-
od, should contact the
nearest embassy or con-
sulate of the country to
which they intend to travel
in order to secure the nec-
essary visas or permits,”
Mr Symonette said.

“For the time being, vis-
its to Bulgaria, Cyprus and
Romania would be the
exception to this, as
Bahamian passport holders
could make three month
visits to each of these
countries without it count-
ing towards their overall
three month allowance.
This exception would
fall away once these coun-
tries fully implement the
Schengen Agreement,” he
said.

For the purpose of the
agreement, short stays are
considered as visits for
tourism, business, sports,
journalism, and intra-cor-
porate training.

“The agreement does
not cover students or per-
sons seeking employment,”
said Mr Symonette. “These
persons must continue to
secure the necessary visas
and permits for education-
al or employment purpos-
es.”

The agreement was also
signed between the
European Union and
Antigua and Barbuda, Bar-
bados, Mauritius, St Kitts
and Nevis and the Sey-
chelles.
PAGE 8, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





0 In brief

Season's

first tropical
fepression =
forms in Atlantic |

@ MIAMI

z

NATIONAL Hurricane }
Center forecasters in Miami }
say a tropical depression has }
formed off the mid-Atlantic }
coast, but it’s not expected to }
threaten land, according to }
Associated Press. :

The National Weather Ser- }
vice counts the depression as }
the first of the 2009 Atlantic }
hurricane season, which offi- }
cially begins June 1. :

The depression’s maximum
sustained winds are near 35 }
mph. Forecasters say it could }
strengthen to a tropical storm }
Thursday night or Friday but }
then is expected to weaken or }
dissipate by Saturday. ;

Forecasters expect the :
depression to stay over the }
Atlantic, where it’s moving }
toward the northeast near 16 }
mph. :
Around 5 p.m. EDT Thurs-
day, the depression was cen- }
tered about 305 miles south- }
southeast of Providence, R.L, }
and about 565 miles southwest i
of Halifax, Nova Scotia. i

Florida man
faces charges
over Séa
turtle eggs

m@ WEST PALM BEACH, Fla.

A WEST PALM BEACH
man is facing federal charges
after authorities allegedly
caught him in the middle of the
night with a bag full of 119 sea
turtle eggs, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Police stopped 52-year-old
Bruce Wayne Bivins on May 8
and asked to see the contents of
his bag. Bivins allegedly ran-
away, but later surrendered. He
appeared in federal court
Wednesday.

Roughly half of the eggs
were covered in sand, which
means they may have been col-
lected from a female sea turtle
while she was laying the eggs
and before they touched the
sand in her nest.

The sea turtle eggs are pro-
tected under federal law as a
threatened species. Officials
estimate the eggs were worth
more than $350 on the black
market.

Watching out for the watchdog

THE CORONER’S COURT -

m@ By BAHAMAS
PATIENT ADVOCACY

HE role of the Coroner

has adapted over the
eight centuries since the office
was formally established in Eng-
land in1194, from being a form
of medieval tax gatherer to an
independent judicial officer
charged with the investigation
of sudden, violent or unnatural
death.

And with the Coroner’s Act
of 1988, no criminal charges
could result as a consequence of
evidence produced at an inquest.
However, the notable case of
Dr Harold Shipman (who was
convicted of murdering 15
patients) resulted in three public
inquiries, and brought the Coro-
ner’s Act again under review.

But in the Bahamas there has
been no review, amendments,
regulations or rules made under
our Coroner’s Act of 1909, in
the last 100 years.

And how well does that one
century old Act enable our
Coroner to meet the changing
needs of a rapidly developing
society, and provide service to
the public in general, and the
bereaved in particular?

Well, the first issue, is that we
do not have a Coroner’s Court
as such. Each magistrate is by
virtue of his office a coroner but
there is no official coroner
equipped with his own office,
funding and staffing. Under our
law, the coroner is a magistrate
appointed on an ad hoc basis to
hear cases.

Responsibility for hearing
inquests has been a shifting brief,
although there was a period of
allocating all cases to one mag-
istrate who became the “de fac-
to” coroner. This arrangement
was discontinued a few years
ago.

The specialist coroner system
has a critical advantage, and it is
this: the specialist coroner is not
a magistrate who has to deal
with the pressure of other cases,
which are bound to be seen as
more urgent, because those oth-
er cases concern the living. The
demand for an inquest lacks that
vitality, in every sense of that
word.

However, under both systems,
a backlog of unheard cases accu-
mulated. Long delays represent
a failing to meet the needs of
those bereaved families. Given
the escalating rate of reported
unnatural deaths, the backlog
will likely increase.

Local Company
seeking applicants
for the position of

Accountant

Excellent opportunity for an experienced and
highly motivated full-charge Accountant. This
position requires an individual that can multi-
task & has excellent verbal and organizational
skills. This position is responsible to assist in
the overseeing of the accounting and adminis-
trative duties of the company.

This position requires the knowledge of all

accounting procedures
Must be able to work indepen-

Statements.

through financial

dently, as well as work with all departments.
Experience with Human Resources would be
an asset. Must be dynamic and disciplined.

Requirements include:

Thorough knowledge of Microsoft Software
Systems including: Word, Access and Excel,
Advanced Computer Accounting.

Degree in Finance/ Accounting or other related

field.

Interested persons should apply
in writing, with resume, to:

Accountant Position

P.O. Box 55-5698
Nassau, Bahamas

or via Email to:

applications.dropbox?gmail.com



YOUR SAY



It may be, that this small juris-
diction needs more than one
coroner, so that an alternate
coroner can hear matters from
which the first might recuse him-
self.

With more than 900 lawyers
admitted to the bar, and mre
than 900 doctors licensed to
practice, we should have suffi-
cient qualified personnel to con-
stitute dedicated coroner’s courts
to meet the current level of
need.

The years of delay experi-
enced by Bahamians in getting
inquests held by the Coroner’s
Court adds insult to injury. It
prolongs grieving, aggravates the
sense of grievance for the
deceased=s family, and impacts
the reputation of the judicial sys-
tem, which at this point, needs
refurbishing.

Local psychiatrists have writ-
ten widely and well on “anger
management issues” as a cause
of violence in our society. The
perceived lack of effective
recourse or accountability
through appropriate channels,
might also be a factor in stimu-
lating public anger.

And the fact remains that in
100 years, our Coroner’s Court
has not evolved to support or
re-inforce current provisions for
accountability, which do exist,
at least in law.

Take one case which illus-
trates both problems: A 42-year-
old patient dies unexpectedly in
hospital in 2002. It then takes
five years for that case to be
brought before the Coroner’s
Court, and another year for the
inquest to complete.

That inquest involved more
than 20 witnesses, and occupied
about 24 court days, over 15
months. The evidence emerging
from that case is voluminous.
Apart from clinical ‘neglect’,
according to one expert witness,
the hospital records showed a
complete ‘systems failure’.

The evidence in that case indi-
cates there are health care safe-
ty issues, which should be
addressed by two statutory
boards: the Hospitals Board, and
the Medical Council. These bod-
ies have the duty to investigate
and evaluate private hospitals
and medical professionals as an
adjunct of their powers to license
those hospitals and doctors, for
public safety.

However, Bahamian law does
not give a coroner the power to
refer matters to anywhere but
the Supreme Court for criminal
charges, once there is an appro-
priate verdict.




Even if our law did give the
coroner authority to refer a mat-
ter to a statutory authority for
remedial action, this assumes
that we have, for instance, a
Hospital Board able and willing
to act. It also assumes that a
Medical Council is not prevent-
ed by a judge’s order from car-
rying out an evaluation the pro-
fessionals it licenses. If these
assumptions are wrong, the
information coming out of an
Inquest, at public expense,
would not be used to the public
benefit.

The Inquest process can also
reveal deficiencies in prisons, the
police force, and other organi-
zations responsible for the cir-
cumstances of a death. This
information could put the agen-
cies responsible, in a better posi-
tion to respond more promptly,
to address deficiencies and pre-
vent other lives being avoidably
lost.

The Coroner’s Court, is — or
should be - the citizen’s watch-
dog when it comes to investi-
gating abuse of power . The cit-
izen has a right not to be unlaw-
fully deprived of his life by the
State. A verdict of manslaughter
against a police officer, or any
other person, needs to proceed
in the Supreme Court, and not
lie buried in the Attorney Gen-
eral’s office.

The coroner should be, and
has to be, a watchdog for society
- to establish the real cause of
death. We need an informed
citizenry and strong civic bodies
to push for an effective follow
up to a coroner’s verdict. And
to develop an informed citizenry,
we need the investigative jour-
nalism of a free press.

But in the Bahamas, some
suspicious deaths never make it
to coroner’s court. We are build-
ing up an inordinate backlog of
those cases which are referred.
Verdicts of manslaughter can
languish silently in the AG’s
office, regulatory bodies charged
with protecting the public, are
weak and /or hamstrung, the rule
of law lapses, and the press still
needs to push for answers and
reforms.

What kind of reforms? Ideal-
ly, we should have an official
Coroner of The Bahamas, and a
coroner’s office, as in England.
However, as a starting point, to
make the court more efficient
and prevent the build up of a
backlog, we could make the fol-
low reforms, without much cost,
and even some savings.

The coroner should have pow-
er to sit alone, without a jury, in

Wholesaler/Retailer located in Nassau seeks

aah Seely









The candidate will work alongside the senior management
team at our head office, assisting in a variety of areas such
as public and custamer relations, marketing, advertising,
HR, basic bookkeeping, and various administrative duties
such as filing and organization. Much of the above will be











office and computer-based.

The candidate should have the following skills:




General computer skills (Microsoft XP. internet, social
networking web sites,...)

Strang knowledge of Microsoft Office (Word, Excel,

Outlook)

Familiarity with basic bookkeeping concepts
(particularly Accounts Payable and Receivable}

Experience:

The candidate should have experience of office
administration. Specific retail, wholesale, HR or
bookkeeping not essential but beneficial. Additionally,
the candidate must be well-spoken, highly organised
and professional and have a current driver's license and

their own transportation,

Applications are to include: Recent police record,
passport photo, two references, resume, covering letter
Stating where/how specific experience was gained In

(i) Microsoft Office (Word, Excel) (ii) Any bookkeeping
concepts (iii) other software programs you are

experienced / familiar with.

Applications can be sent via email, fax or post to:
fe) sees Ulcer] Reel

f, 322-8430

P.O. Box 55-19021

certain cases not involving
agents of the state: police,
warders, immigration, and
defense force officers.

Fix the minimum and maxi-
mum number of jurors, so that
the absence of a juror does not
lead to an inevitable adjourn-
ment.

Raise the remuneration of the
jurors.

Provide coroner rules for this
jurisdiction.

The first two changes are crit-
ical to an increased disposal of
inquests and require small
changes in the Coroners Act.
Too much expense and delay is
entailed now, when one juror is
disabled or dies, and the inquest
has to be started all over again.

These changes could be
speedily put in place, and go a
long way to having an effective
and properly functioning coro-
ner’s court. In other jurisdictions,
the role and the importance of

A CENTURY LATER

the coroner’s courts are increas-
ing. Here it is diminishing. Why?

A Coroner’s Court should be
able to respond to the commu-
nity’s needs, in a timely fashion.
This requires review of the leg-
islation, and also review of the
funding, support facilities and
staff available to the Coroner.

“Governments do not rise and
fall on proposed amendments to
the Coroner’s Act,” according
to one pundit. But the circum-
stances of a death, may reveal
issues of wider importance to
the community which have to be
rectified.

So, either we continue to
watch the decline of this ancient
and vital Court, or we position
our Coroners Court to be the
Watchdog for citizens it is
intended to be.

What do you think?
www.bahamaspatientadvocacy.org

‘Mighty Sparrow’
to sing for former
police officers

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CALYPSO KING of the World ‘The Mighty Sparrow’.

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



A CONCERT is set to raise funds for former police officers
who retired up to 40 years ago and are struggling to stretch their

pensions in today’s economy.

Calypso King of the World ‘The Mighty Sparrow’ will fly in
with his band the Trinidad and Tobago Troubadours to play at the
Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort in Cable Beach in June.

The award-winning superstar who has been performing since the
1960s will play to help raise funds for the Royal Bahamas Police
Force Retired Police Officers Association to help former officers
who served the country for most of their lives and are now in need

of support.

Chairman of the organising committee Paul Thompson said: “It
is all in aid of retired officers who have fallen on hard times. A lot
of these officers retired in the 60s and 70s, and they’re getting on.

“Some of them can’t work, and the pension in those days based
on their salaries is a lot smaller than the salary we get today, so we

try to help them.”

Mr Thompson said the force helps former officers by providing
prescription medication at the police college, and operating a bus
service which transports former officers around New Providence

free of charge.

And funds raised at the event will help cover the cost of such ini-
tiatives as well as contribute to the cost of medical attention
requiered by some former officers.

The association’s executive committee head former assistant
commissioner Grafton Ifill, will oversee distribution of the funds.

Mr Thompson said George Myers of Restaurants Bahamas Ltd
has greatly supported the world-class event which will also include
entertainment from the police band, police entertainers and local
guest entertainers at the Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort.

The concert will be held at 8.30pm on Friday, June 19.

Tickets are $25 and available from the RBPF Retired Police
Officers Association office at Police Headquarters in East Street,
the Shell garage in Shirley Street, the Cricket Pavillion at Hayes
Oval, West Bay Street, and other locations.

For more information call the association on 302-8044.

To learn more about The Mighty Sparrow log on to

www.mightysparrow.com.

Open ‘Monday-Saturday 9am to bpm. Closed Thursdays

Ne. #9 Mowat Gopal Soe

a

Prone “Fay 24,


THE TRIBUNE

BANQUE SCS ALLIANCE (WASSAIN LTD,

Coren whed Melanics “Sheer

December 31, 20S, sith cemespending fleures for 2007
(bapréeecd in Swiss Francs)

FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009, PAGE 11



Govt ‘in no position’ to

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bid for Carifesta events

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Government yesterday
confirmed to the cultural com-
munity that it will no longer be
hosting Carifesta XI and is no
longer in a position to bid for the
right to stage either of the two
succeeding arts festivals.

This comes even as the
Caribbean Community (CARI-
COM) revealed it has decided to
delay Carifesta XT until 2011 in
view of the economic challenges
being faced by all of the region.

Having then scrapped all slated
hosts countries, CARICOM is to
start soliciting bids from all mem-
ber countries interested in staging
either Carifesta XI, XII (which
will take place in 2013) or XIII
(which will take place in 2015),
from next month until Septem-
ber, The Tribune has learned.

However, Culture Minister
Charles Maynard, reflecting state-
ments made by Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham in his budget
communication yesterday, said
the challenges facing the Bahami-
an economy mean it would be
“crazy for us to put a bid on any
of them right now.”

While The Bahamas might be
interested in hosting Carifesta XII
or XIII, the fact that CARICOM
has decided to open up bidding

Charles Maynard



for all three of the festivals now
rather than at a later date when
the Bahamian economy has had a
chance to start rebounding
excludes this country as a poten-
tial host for any of them, he said.
“It’s unfortunate they’ve cho-
sen to put three successive Car-
ifestas to bid at one time,” said
Mr Maynard, adding, however,
that he would suspect most
Caribbean countries would feel
the same way and may put up
some resistance to the decision.
These latest developments
come after The Tribune revealed
exclusively in April that Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham had
told his Caricom counterparts at a
meeting of Caribbean leaders in

Trinidad that month — appar-
ently before the grouping had
reached the decision to delay the
festival — that The Bahamas
could no longer host Carifesta
XI.

A meeting was called at the
Ministry of Culture last night to
formally explain the situation to
the cultural community and to
offer an opportunity to “chart the
way forward”, according to Mr
Maynard.

Speaking prior to that meet-
ing, the minister of state said that
despite Carifesta and the enor-
mous multi-disciplinary contin-
gents of artists from across the
region not coming to The
Bahamas any time soon, he has
heard a number of proposals
from within the Bahamian arts
community to stage alternative
“more focused” events.

These include a visual arts fes-
tival and an international drum-
ming festival, he said.

“There are any number of pro-
posals out there that we can par-
ticipate in,” added Mr Maynard.

He said that the $1 million the
Government has allocated
towards upgrading the National
Performing Arts Centre shows
that it is “still putting emphasis
into cultural infrastructure” which
will “help The Bahamas be ready
whenever the time comes to do
whatever it is we could do.”

Fair

Fair

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Union election

FROM page one

swarmed Shirley and Church Streets for hours,
taking away business from local operations by
parking their cars in nearby parking spaces and
touched off angry phone calls to The Tribune
newsroom from irate drivers.

One man, who wished to remain anonymous,
said it had taken him an hour and a half to get from
the Village Road and Shirley Street intersection to
Elizabeth Avenue downtown.

He hit out at the union for deciding to locate the
polling station at the church and for the police
for not making efforts to help motorists trapped by
the activities of the unionists.

“It caused traffic to be backed up all the way
down Eastern Road. They were drinking beer,
laughing and playing around like it was a street car-
nival in the middle of Shirley Street.

“T don’t understand how anyone in their right
mind could possibly pick that location on one of
the busiest streets in probably the whole country to
put a polling station for thousands and thousands
of people to vote in a union election.

“The worst part is the police who stood there in
the middle of Church Street looking very official
but doing absolutely nothing - surely it’s their
responsibility to make sure that cars can pass on
Shirley Street?”

A local business owner said that the flow of
customers into her shop was severely curtailed by
the fact that union members parked in all available
parking spots outside her Shirley Street shop.

St Matthew’s church was one of two polling sta-
tions available to members wishing to vote yes-
terday — at Worker’s House and St Matthews
church.

The process took placed between Sam and
around 7pm with the members of the country’s
second biggest union being offered a chance to
choose between five teams vying for leadership
positions.

Despite complaints from the public, the voting
appeared to have proceeded much more smooth-
ly than the nomination process, which saw sever-
al fights break out and a dispute over which was
the correct day for nominations to take place.

The election went ahead after a Supreme Court
judge lifted an injunction against it on Tuesday.

The injunction had been called for by the union’s
First Vice President Kirk Wilson, who, with other
members of the executive, has been at odds with
the union’s President Roy Colebrooke.

Mr Wilson had claimed that proper procedures
were not followed when the date for the election
was set.

Report allegations
FROM page one

unlawful killing by the police were reported.

“The lack of an independent body to investi-
gate allegations of ill-treatment involving police
officers undermined confidence in due process.”

Amnesty has recorded the killing of Patrick
Strachan, who was shot in the stomach by police
in Wilson Tract on February 27 last year, and lat-
er died in hospital.

Local residents maintain Mr Strachan was
not armed when he was shot, while police say
the victim had fired at officers before they shot
at him, the report states. However, the progress
of an investigation into the incident were not
known by Amnesty at the end of last year.

The organisation also notes details of the
alleged harassment and ill-treatment of envi-
ronmental organisation chairman Emmanuel
McKenzie, who it is clatmed was handcuffed,
dragged off to a clearing, and had a gun pointed
at his head when police/army officers raided a
fundraising event on April 19 last year.

Others attending the event were also beaten
and ill-treated, and although a formal complaint
was logged, no investigation had been initiated
by the end of the year, Amnesty records.

In other areas Amnesty has acknowledged
how the Domestic Violence Protection Order
Act came into force on December 1, more than
a year after it was passed by Parliament, while
amendments to the Sexual Offences and
Domestic Violence Act to increase the penalty
for serious sexual crimes to life imprisonment
were passed in November.

At least one person was sentenced to death
during the year, according to the press, although
no executions were carried out, the report states.

Amnesty records: “A number of prisoners
had their death sentences reviewed and com-
muted to life imprisonment; this followed a rul-
ing in 2006 by the UK-based Judicial Committee
of the Privy Council which abolished mandato-
ry death sentences for murder.

“The national public debate on executions
continued, with the Prime Minister, the Presi-
dent of the Bar Association and the Acting
Commissioner of Police voicing support for
resumption.”

The Bahamas voted against a United Nations
General Assembly resolution calling for a world-
wide moratorium on executions in December,
and ratified the International Covenant on Civ-
il and Political Rights and the International
Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural
Rights.

PLEASE CALL FOR RESERVATIONS & INFORMATION

cee ere eae ee



Street shootout
‘like Wild West’

FROM page one

able to pull free of the men
enough to draw a handgun and
begin to fire it randomly, caus-
ing bystanders to scatter.

At this point, another man —
who seemed to be a civilian but
could have been a plain clothes
officer — reportedly got out of
his car carrying a shotgun and
began firing at the perpetrator.

One witness said: “It was a
shoot out. People were running
everywhere. I ran too. I just
wanted to get out of there.”

It is unclear what happened
next as the witnesses who spoke
to The Tribune say they fled the
scene and did not look back.
Staff at KFC said no one on
duty at the time was there yes-
terday and senior police offi-
cials were not available for com-
ment last night.

Bystanders said they were
frustrated by the fact that a

number of calls were made to
the police while the incident was
unfolding, but there seemed to
be no response.

One said: “It took time for
all of that to happen, but the
police were nowhere to be seen.
It’s like there is no one there to
protect you — it’s just you. The
public is not allowed to carry
weapons, so we are defense-
less.”

Yesterday morning, police
issued the press with a list of
crimes committed the day
before, but did not mention the
incident.

This is the second time this
week The Tribune disclosed
details of crimes that the police
failed to make public.

On Wednesday, a front page
article revealed that a series of
nighttime muggings took place
throughout the capital over the
weekend.

Although the police think the

attacks were "isolated", a senior
officer warned the public to be
vigilant of their surroundings at
night to avoid falling victim to
an armed criminal.

Members of the public who
heard rumours of the muggings
expressed concern that the
police failed to report them.

A professional woman whose
job forces her to travel at night
said news of the attacks fright-
ened her.

“Obviously there is an
increase in crime, and the police
should be reporting it,” she said.

The woman, asked to remain
anonymous, said: “I think it has
to be Known if there is some-
thing going on out there.”

A caller who identified him-
self as Mr Dean, said: “This is
scary. People have to be made
aware if messed up things are
going on so they can be more
careful. You can’t keep them
dumb.”
PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

‘Choo Choo’ defends WBA FedCarihe title Saturday night

Fiscal budget
should not affect ©
sports ministry
FROM page 14

there will be no plans to }
replace them. i

“We have some people }
who are up for retirement }
this year, but as far as I }
know, most of them are in }
administrative positions and i
so it should not affect on the
ongoing operation of the }
sports department,” Bannis- }
ter said. i

“Persons who are in the
sports department who are }
eligible for retirement, will i
have the option to retire.” }

There was some rumors }
that both Director of Sports, }
Martin Lundy and Assistant }
Director of Sports, Frank
‘Pancho’ Rahming, may be
retiring.

But Bannister said: “I
don’t think it affects them.
I think both of time have
time where they can deter-
mine when and if it’s the
right time to retire. I don’t
think it affects either one of
them.”

As for facilities, Bannister
said the construction of the
new stadium is underway at
the Queen Elizabeth Sports
Center as well as the resur-
facing of the track at the
Grand Bahama Sports Com-
plex.

“We’re doing capital
works in a lot of the Family
Islands, we’re putting bas-
ketball courts down in Red
Bays, Lowe Sound and
Fresh Creek, Andros,” he
revealed.

“We’ve just shipped bas-
ketball backboards and
stands to Exuma and we are
constantly doing a whole lot
of stuff to keep sports going
throughout the country. A
lot of things we are going
people don’t know about.”

Bannister was referring to
the restoration of a number
of parks throughout New
Providence, which have been
upgraded to host a number
of recreational and compet-
itive events in the commu-
nities.

As he look forward to the
upcoming year, Bannister
said he’s particularly
impressed with what’s hap-
pened in volleyball with the
men’s national team advanc-
ing to the third round of the
FIVA NORCEA’s Qualify-
ing Round for the 2010
World Championships.

“Judging by the perfor-
mances of our athletes as
well over the last few weeks,
I think we will be gearing up
for an outstanding showing i
at the World Championships }
in Athletics,” he said. i

“And we haven’t even }
gotten to the NCAA Cham- }
pionships or the height of }
the season for the elite ath- {
letes. So it should be a good }
year ahead of us in sports.”

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays



m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

AFTER a brief hiatus, First
Class Promotions is back on the
local boxing scene with its first
show of the year featuring its
top fighters including a bout for
the WBA FedCaribe Super
Middleweight title.

Jermain "Choo Choo" Mack-
ey (17-3) will headline the card
when he defends his title
against Emiliano Cayetano (18-
2) of the Dominican Republic
tomorrow night at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium.

Featured on the undercard
will be Jerry "Big Daddy” But-
ler (7-5-1) in an eight round
bout against Dominican
Michael Santiago (0-0) and the
professional debut of female
fighter Kelly Finlayson.

Mackey, whose last fight
came 11 months ago, said he is
ready willing and able to set
foot in the ring again to suc-
cessfully defend the WBA title
at home for the third time.

"Tam 120 percent ready. I
am ready to carry the Bahami-
an flag into the ring and also
bring it back with my head held
high defending the WBC title.
He's a very good fighter. He's

Female fighter makes
pro debut on undercard

18-2 so he has a better record
than me by one fight. He is a
good quality fighter on my road
toward a world title fight,” he
said, "After I beat this oppo-
nent I defend the Common-
wealth title and from then I will
see where it goes. It is exciting
to get back into the ring. I am
just waiting on the hours to pass
right now to get back into the
ring where I feel at home."

Butler, who came off a draw
in his last fight in November of
2008, said he is ready to get
back into the ring and expects a
productive finish to the end of
the year.

"Right now I'm very focused,
trying to get in my last bit of
work. But the training has gone
as good as I would have hoped,
just getting in my last few
touches and final movements
but I'm ready for Saturday
night. I know nothing about my
opponent, just his record, his
name and where he is from,
that is all Ineed,” he said. "My
time will be soon, it is coming in
October. It is up to me to stay

in shape and stay on board
especially with all that was
going on. I just have to stay
ready and in shape and able to
fight."

Finlayson, who has the
potential to become the face of
female boxing in the Bahamas,
said irrespective of the fight's
outcome fans should expect her
top effort in her debut.

"It's going to be interesting
and exciting. Physically and
mentally I'll be prepared for it.
I know nothing about my oppo-
nent it just makes me want to
train a little more harder to get
up my confidence because I do
not know where she is coming
from, how she is trying, how
strong she is or her prepara-
tion,” he said, "One thing is
certain I will go out there, give
it my all.”

First Class Promotions Chief
Executive Officer, Michelle
Minus, said the fighters and the
general public highly anticipate
the return to the ring.

"We are expecting to have a
large crowd we have been get-

ting a lot of response from peo-
ple in the boxing community
and the Bahamas in general.
People are very excited we are
back, it looks as though as if
they are really going to support
us,” she said. "It feels great to
be back. First Class Promotions
our aim and objective is to
mold these young people now
so we will have successful citi-
zens of tomorrow. Our main
focus is for these young men to
utilize their talent and skills to
find something to do in a career
than can take them places."

With this event as their inau-
gural event of the year, Minus
said her organisation has an
exciting remainder of the year
planned for its fans and fighters.

"We are looking forward to
hosting a Commonwealth title
fight August 8th. We are look-
ing forward to great things from
Choo Choo and some of our
up and coming boxers like Big
Daddy Jerry Butler, we see him
getting in line to fight for a
WBA or WBC title hopefully
before the end of the year,” she
said. "We are also looking for
things from some of our other
fighters like Alpachino Allen,
and some of the other guys that
will be featured on the card Sat-
urday night.”





Christophe Ena/AP Photo

SWITZERLAND'S Roger Federer returns the ball to Argentina's Jose Acasuso during their second round match at the Roland Garros stadium in Paris, Thursday May 28,
2009.

Federer struggles in 2nd round at French Open

@ TENNIS
PARIS
Associated Press

CLOSE doesn't count. Roger Fed-
erer knows that as well as anyone.

Still, even Federer had to acknowl-
edge he found himself in a much tighter
and tougher match than he would have
expected — or is used to — in the
French Open's second round Thursday
before producing a 7-6 (8), 5-7, 7-6 (2),
6-2 victory over Jose Acasuso of
Argentina.

How near did the 45th-ranked Aca-
suso come to a startling upset — in
straight sets, no less? On four occa-
sions, the Argentine was a point from
taking the first set. After winning the
second, he held a set point in the third.

Federer, whose season hasn't been
up to his high standards, was up to the
task each time, though.

"Mentally, I've always been very
strong, but I'm not being put in a posi-
tion like this very often, you know,"
Federer said. Then, moments later, as if

to make sure everyone understood him,
Federer added: "Coming through such
a match is always a great feeling. Like I
said, I'm not part of such close match-
es that often."

Particularly at this stage of a Grand
Slam tournament. And particularly
against anyone other than Rafael
Nadal, who supplanted Federer at No.
1 in the rankings last year and edged
him in five-set Wimbledon and Aus-
tralian Open finals.

"T thought,” Acasuso said, "I could
have won this match."

But this has not been a French Open
for underdogs or upsets, and no seeded
men lost Thursday, when the winners
included No. 5 Juan Martin del Potro,
No. 6 Andy Roddick, No. 9 Jo-Wilfried
Tsonga, No. 10 Nikolay Davydenko,
No. 11 Gael Monfils and No. 16 Tom-
my Robredo.

Four seeded women went home,
though none higher than No. 13 Mari-
on Bartoli. Those moving into the third
round included both Williams sisters
— Venus needed three sets, Serena two

— No. 5 Jelena Jankovic, No. 7 Svet-
lana Kuznetsova and No. 4 Elena
Dementieva, who advanced when Jele-
na Dokic stopped playing because of
a bad back while leading 6-2, 3-4.

"T really don't deserve to win today
because of the way I was playing,”
Dementieva said.

The biggest surprise Thursday might
have been how well Roddick played,
given that he hadn't made the third
round at Roland Garros since his 2001
tournament debut.

"There's a lot of work to go,” said
Roddick, the only U.S. man remaining
of the nine who entered the tourna-
ment. "By no means have I accom-
plished anything yet.”

In his 6-2, 6-2, 7-6 (2) victory over
85th-ranked Ivo Minar of the Czech
Republic, Roddick hit 15 aces, saved
all four break points he faced and won
the point on 23 of 26 trips to the net.

"I'm not going to sit here and jump
up on a soap box like I'm really good
on this stuff now because I won two
matches. I think that's what you need to

guard against,” Roddick said. "Today I
felt pretty good, and I felt pretty in
control of what I was doing."

Federer, in contrast, offered this
assessment of his performance: "I was
not managing and controlling the match
the way I should have."

He has made the semifinals at a
record 19 consecutive majors and has-
n't lost before the third round at any
Grand Slam event since the 2003
French Open. But of Federer's 13
Grand Slam titles — one shy of Pete
Sampras’ career mark — zero have
come at Roland Garros.

Federer reached the past three finals
and the 2005 semifinals at the clay-
court major before losing to Nadal each
time.

No one over the last five years, apart
from Nadal, had really made Federer
seem ordinary at the French Open until
Acasuso did for stretches. That he
would give Federer a hard time is espe-
cially noteworthy: Acasuso advanced
past the second round only once in 28
career Grand Slam tournaments.

Women's National Volleyball Team gearing up for NORCEA qualifiers

FROM page 14

in town and we should have two weeks
to get them ready,” he said.

By today, Smith said they should be
able to trim the 15 players down to the
final 12 for the tournament.

The team, which will be managed by
Yvonne Rolle, should be led by Kelsie
Johnson once it is selected.

The major concern, according to Jer-
maine Adderley, who traveled as the
manager of the men’s team, is funding.

“The federation had the difficult task
of getting the men’s team off, but we

were able to advance, so that was a g00d
thing for us,” Adderley said.

“But however, the women have the
same difficulty as it relates to funding
because they are leaving on June 9 and
at this time, we are still looking for fund-
ing.”

Adderley said it is estimated that it
will cost the federation some $40,000
to make the trip to Barbados and right
on the heels of that, both the junior
boys and girls will be travelling in July
and they will need an additional $30,000.

“We are in such a hole right now as it
relates to funding,” Adderley said. “We
have great expectations for these teams

because of the talent available.

“At the same time, we are also look-
ing for funding for our men’s team to
travel to Santo Domingo over the holi-
day weekend in July to prepare for the
next round in Cuba.”

The FIVB will be assisting us with
our funding in Santo Domingo, which is
a great boost. But Adderley said the
federation will have to make their own
travel arrangement.

Then in August, Adderley said the
federation will have to fund the entire
trip to Cuba for the third round, which
will determine whether or not the
Bahamas will advance to the World

Championships next year in Tokyo,
Japan and eventually the Olympic
Games in 2012 in London.

“So we’re still looking for funding as
it relates to all of our national teams,”
Adderley pointed out. “So it’s looking
rocky right now for us.”

In all, Adderley said they have an
estimated budget of $130,000 for all of
the teams to be able to travel over the
next three months.

Persons interested in making a con-
tribution to the federation to assist the
national teams can contact Adderley at
535-6623, DeVince Smith at 357-7707
or Joe Smith at 457-1050.
TRIBUNE SPORTS

FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS





THE FIFTH annual Bahamas National Drug Council's Five-on-Five Basketball tournament will be played over the May 30-31 weekend at the historic Archdeacon William Thompson Park (Government Ground). Organizers of

the tournament showcase some of the trophies that will be up for grabs.

BNOG basketball tourney set for end of month

SEVEN teams have regis-
tered to compete in the
Bahamas National Drug
Council’s (BNDC) Five-on-
Five Rehabilitation Basket-
ball Tournament scheduled
for May 30-31.

The double-climination tournament
will make its return to the historic
Archdeacon Wiliam Thompson Park
(Southern Recreation Grounds), and
will be played in honour of Mr.
Andrew “Rasta” Pratt who passed
away in 2009.

It will be played under the motto:
“Your Life, Your Community, No
Place for Drugs.”

Mr. Pratt was named Most Valu-
able Player of both the third and

fourth annual tournaments and was
a fierce, yet gracious, competitor,
whose intensity of the basketball court
was matched in the fight against drug
use and abuse.

“This fifth tournament has great sig-
nificance to the organising commit-
tee, the Bahamas National Drug
Council and the participating teams
because it allows us to salute the con-
tributions of two persons so dear to
our hearts,” said Tournament Chair-
man, Mr. Floyd McPhee.

“Firstly, it gives us the opportunity
to honour the memory one of our own
in the person of Mr. Andrew Pratt
who was not only a very active partic-
ipant in the tournament as witnessed
by his back-to-back MVP titles, but
was also a great colleague who played
a vital role in the work we do in the

fight against drug use and abuse.

“By hosting the tournament at the
Archdeacon William Thompson Park,
it gives us an opportunity to salute
the contributions Archdeacon Thomp-
son made to the surrounding commu-
nity and the Bahamas National Drug
Council, through its Rehabilitative
Committee.

“Archdeacon Thompson was a pil-
lar of strength who worked tirelessly
and unselfishly with regards to the
fight against drugs and the need for
the provision of rehabilitative services
for drug users and abusers in the coun-
try,” Mr. McPhee added.

Mr. McPhee said the Five-on-Five
tournament is one of the many
avenues the BNDC uses to promote
drug awareness in The Bahamas in its
ongoing fight against drug use and

Here are the facts

surrounding the Minus
and Pratt exhibitions



Dear Sir,

KINDLY allow me space in
your newspaper to respond to
the many lies, half truths and
foolishness that has surround-
ed the recently publicized exhi-
bitions by Ray Minus Jr. and
one Quincy Pratt.

For the sake of clarity let us
first concentrate on Pratt. A
long time ago when Lloyd
Turnquest was Chairman of the
Bahamas Boxing Commission
and Algernon Allen was Minis-
ter of Sports, Pratt’s license was
taken away from him because
as I understand it, he was legal-
ly blind.

The next boxing Chairman
was Dr. Norman Gay, whom I
had the pleasure of serving as
Vice Chairman. Again Pratt’s
license was rejected because the
Commission was satisfied that
he is legally blind.

In 2007, I was appointed
Chairman of the Commission.
Among the Commissioners
named was one Quincy Pratt.
Quincy again expressed a desire
to fight. He met with myself and
members of the Commission.

Quincy was advised that the
first thing he needed to do was
submit a letter of resignation
then he can re-apply for a
license. That has not happened
up to this day. So, as far as we
are concerned, Quincy Pratt is
still a member on the Commis-
sion.

Some years ago, Ray Minus
Jr. announced his retirement
from professional boxing. Ray is
fully aware that the Boxing
Commission is responsible for
regulating the sport of profes-
sional boxing in this country.

His wife is head of a promo-
tions company. He is a trainer
of many fighters. Yet he choos-
es to ignore the ‘process’ that
he is fully familiar with and
announce to the public a series
of exhibitions between himself
and Pratt.

I, in my capacity as Chair-
man, had no choice but to send



QUINCY PRATT (left) and Ray Minus Jr. (right) face off to pro-
mote their exhibition.

out the notice from the Com-
mission. Afterwards, Ray went
on one of the radio talk shows
and advised that these are not
Exhibitions; they are demon-
strations between him and
Quincy, trying to raise funds for
the amateurs.

Also Ray left a message at
my office, saying there was a
misunderstanding. We apolo-
gize. “It is not an exhibition, it is
a Sparring session.”

Mr. Editor, there is a bigger
picture here. And that is what is
disturbing to me the most. It
would seem to me that those
among us feel we are above the
rules and the rules do not apply
to us. And when the regulators
put their feet down, all sorts of
accusations are hurled at the
ones putting their feet down.

Even more disturbing is that
some members of the press
choose to print the foolishness
spewed out by some individuals
instead of doing some inves-
tigative reporting and finding
out the truth. But it is an even
deeper issue. And that is of
honesty. And that I believe is
notorius throughout our soci-
ety.

It is incredible that some of us
are so used to getting away with
foolishness we have a problem
adjusting when the rules are
enforced.

Mr. Editor, what is so amaz-
ing is that when Dr. Norman
Gay served as Chairman these
very same trouble makers nev-
er posed a problem to him. In
fact, they genuflect to him for
four consecutive years.

But as soon as my friend Pat
Strachan becomes Chairman,
all of a sudden the rules do not
apply to them. And I’m ona
campaign to stem the growth of
professional boxing and victim-
ize promoters.

How hypocritical!

Let me say for the record, the
Bahamas Boxing Commission
is committed to going the extra
mile and providing avenues for
our many fighters to embrace
the many opportunities that are
out there. At this time, we have
the most fighters rated in the
British Commonwealth ratings
because of the action of the
Commission.

The President of the Com-
monwealth Boxing Council is
Fred Sturrup. And I witnessed
first hand how he campaigned
to put Bahamian fighters in the
British Commonwealth ratings.
Fred is also the Secretary for
the Bahamas Boxing Commis-
sion.

PAT STRACHAN
Chairman of the Bahamas
Boxing Commission

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abuse and illicit drug trafficking.

He said the Five-on-Five tourna-
ment “emerged” from what was a
social gathering of recovering addicts,
along with others from the various
Support Services, who would gather
during the evenings for games of
“friendly, but competitive basketball
games” at the then Temple Christian
Academy Gymnasium.

“This gathering became more than
just an opportunity to compete in bas-
ketball games after awhile, as it also
gave brothers who did not play the
game an opportunity to come out and
enjoy the social atmosphere and bond
with others,” Mr. McPhee said.

“As the spirit of brotherhood and
competition grew, a committee was
formed for the purpose of organizing
a tournament for the rehabilitation

centres and support services.

“After extensive planning and col-
laboration with stakeholders and
sponsors, the tournament was estab-
lished with the Bahamas National
Drug Council serving as hosts,” Mr.
McPhee added.

The tournament begins on Satur-
day, May 30 at 9am. Play is expected
to end at 3pm. Day two will com-
mence at lpm on Sunday, May 31 with
presentation of awards scheduled to
take place at 6pm following athe
Championship game.

The team from the Dean Granger
Centre is the two-time champions,
winning consecutive titles in 2007 and
2008.

Past winners have included Great
Commission (2005) and Teen Chal-
lenge (2006).

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THE TRIBUNE







TENNIS
MATCH RAINED OUT

¢ MARK Knowles and
Mahesh Bhupathi’s first
round men’s doubles at the
French Open at Roland
Garros was rained out yes-
terday.

Knowles and Bhupathi,
seeded number four in the
second Grand Slam Tour-
nament for the year, were
scheduled to play the
unseeded team of Josselin
Quanna and Jo-Wilfried
Tsonga from France on
Thursday.

But their match was post-
poned until today.

Knowles and Bhupathi,
the No.3 team ranked team
in the ATP computer rank-
ings, are looking for their
first title victory for the
year.

They were runners-up to
the American identical twin
brothers combo of Bob and
Mike Bryan at the first
grand slam for the year at
the Australian Open in
Melbourne in January.

The Bryans, seeded at
No.2, won their opening
match yesterday. So did
Daniel Nestor and his part-
ner Nanad Zimonjic, the
top seeds in the tourna-

ment.

BODYBUILDING
NOVICE

CHAMPIONSHIP

e THE Bahamas Body-
building and Fitness Feder-
ation will hold its annual
Novice Bodybuilding
Championships tonight at
the National Center for
Performance Arts.

The championships is
expected to showcase a
number of first time com-
petitors and those who
competed before but never
won their divisional title.

Competitors from Grand
Bahama and Long Island
are expected to join a host
of competitors from New
Providence in the champi-
onship that will get started
at 8 pm.

Satelitte Bahamas Limit-
ed is the official sponsors
for the championships.

FRIDAY, MAY 29,

1 4

PAGE





Pictured are some of the Chinese workers contracted to work on the new National Sports Stadium.

2009







Fiscal budget should not
affect sports ministry

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WHILE there may have
been some concern about the
government’s 2009/2010 fiscal
budget that was presented in
the House of Assembly on
Wednesday, the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture
should not be affected at all.

Minister Desmond Bannis-
ter told The Tribune yesterday
that his ministry will maintain
a “fair and substantial” bud-
get for sports because they
have not spent all of the mon-
ey that was allocated from last
year.

“We had money in last
year’s budget, for example, to

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Br

build a gym in Abaco and a
gym in Eleuthera and we did-
n’t build those gyms,” Bannis-
ter said.

“The year just beat us out
and we just didn’t get them
built, even though we have
designed them and the Min-
istry can now go ahead with
them. In that respect, we didn’t
build them. So if you take out
the money for those two gyms,
the money is still the same.”

In the budget, presented by
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham, the Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture will receive
an estimated $19,087,933, a
variance of $$1,110,127 from
the $17,087,933 from last year’s
budget.

Additionally, the subvention

Women’

to elite athletes have been
increased by $270,815 with an
estimated $1,170,815, up from
the $900,000 from last year.

Bannister said a full detail
of the allocation for his min-
istry will be outlined when he
makes his contribution in the
House.

But he noted that in this
year’s budget, there is a sub-
stantial amount of funding to
ensure that the work goes on
for the construction of the
national stadium that is being
headed by the People’s Repub-
lic of China.

“The stadium requires a
Bahamian component, so
there’s a half a million dollars
that is in there for work and
contracts for Bahamians,”

revealed Bannister, of the con-
struction that is currently
underway.

“There’s also the same allo-
cation for the subvention of
our elite athletes. That’s been
increased. So on the sports
side, there’s really no loss.”

To all sporting federations
and associations, Bannister
assured them all that the
endowment for sports has not
been affected at all.

“The government is com-
mitted to that endowment and
so federations need not be con-
cerned about that,” Bannister
charged. “I would say there are
two things that sports federa-
tions need to be concerned
about.

“They need to make sure



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff .

Desmond Bannister

that they are up to date with
their constitutions and they are
keeping us up to date with
their financial statements. Any
federation who is in compli-
ance, should get their money
as they did before.”

On the issue of those per-
sons who retire from the public
service this year, Bannister
said Ingraham mentioned that

SEE page 12

s national volleyball team

gearing up for NORCEA qualifiers

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

STILL basking in the historic
performance from the men’s
national team, the Bahamas
Volleyball Federation is gear-
ing up for an encore for the
women’s team.

Like the men, the women
will be travelling to Barbados
on June 9 to begin their
NORCEAY’S qualifying rounds
for the 2010 World Champi-
onships where they will have
to play both host Barbados and
Haiti in their pool.

Federation’s first vice presi-
dent Joseph ‘Joe Mo’ Smith,
who accompanied the men’s
team to Kingston, Jamaica
where they qualified to go to
the third round in Cuba in
August, know that the task will
be just as tough for the women.

“We have roughly two weeks
of preparation left,” said Smith,
who will travel as the head
coach for the women’s team.
“We know what we’re up
against.

“The difference is going to
be the new balls. I brought two
of them for us to get used to
playing with them. The ball
really threw the guys off in their
first game. It’s very light and it
travel quick. If we can get the



THE national men’s volleyball team pose after winning a her medal at the qualifiers for the FIVB Men’s Volleyball
World Championships.

girls to touch the ball before
they get to Barbados it will be
an incentive to them.”

While he preferred not to put
so much attention on the ball,
Smith admitted that the team
will have to play solid defense if
they are going to succeed.

“The plan is for us to readjust
our game off the net, instead

of playing tight on the net,” he
said. “So we will be doing some
things over the next two weeks
to get them ready.”

Although he missed about a
week working out with the
team as he traveled with the
men, Smith said the woman
were kept busy under the guid-
ance of assistant coach Jackie

Conyers.

He noted that they are look-
ing forward to taking a solid
team to the tournament, com-
prising of a mixture of locally-
based and collegiate players
returning home from school.

“The whole team should be

SEE page 12






Retailer
sees 30%

sales
Ue)

@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter

crobards @tribunemedia.net

COUPLED with the 25
per cent excise tax imposed
on perfumes and toilet
water, competition from
cruise ships’ onboard duty-
free stores and the Internet,
and the economic downturn,
one Bay Street retailer’s
sales have declined by 30 per
cent, Tribune Business was
told yesterday.

Tim Lightbourne, owner
of The Perfume Shop, said
that despite the duty-free
status placed on many items
sold on Bay Street, the Gov-
ernment having reduced the
excise tax on perfume and
toilet water from 25 per cent
to 10 per cent in Wednes-
day’s Budget, the “whop-
ping” Stamp duty imposed
on these items made the
Bahamas one of the most
heavily-taxed Caribbean des-
tinations.

Mr Lightbourne said that
even with the excise tax
decrease, retailers’ prices in
the Bahamas will still be
higher than competitors in
the region but “just as com-
petitive”.

“We lost over 7 per cent of
our profit margin as a result
of the tax increase [in the
2008-2009 Budget],” said Mr
Lightbourne.

“It’s been an extremely
hard year, but there is more
to it (the competition) than
just import duties. It’s the
Internet and major destina-
tions. The younger genera-
tion are buying on the Inter-
net and not from retail
shops.”

He suggested that for
downtown Bay Street to
become more competitive in
the region, it will need to
offer a diversity of stores.

Mr Lightbourne said
downtown merchants pri-
marily sell jewellery, make-
up, perfume and liquor.

“We have become a down-
town where if you go from
George Street to Market
Street, every shop is jew-
ellery,” he said.

“You need a greater vari-
ety of products to make the
whole of downtown come
back to life.”

President of the Nassau
Institute, Joan Thompson,
said the Government should
implement an across-the-
board flat rate of duty for
almost everything. She
argued that a 7 per cent sales
tax should be implemented
in the Bahamas.

“If we were to have a flat
sales tax on all goods and
services, that should provide
enough revenue for this
country,” said Mrs Thomp-
son.

“And government should
be downsized to live with the
revenue of the 7 per cent
tax.”

She said the reduction in
taxes for some sectors
seemed somewhat discrimi-
natory, and asserted that the
Government should not be
in the business of helping
some over others.

Mrs Thompson said most
retailers in the Bahamas are
facing the same challenges
and don’t see a turnaround
in the economy in the short
term.

“My gut says every retailer
is facing the same thing and
is worried about what sales
will be in the future,” said
Mrs Thompson.

“My gut sense says we
won't get out of this quickly.
People don’t change their
habits overnight.”

THE TRIBUNE

usine

FRIDAY,





MAY 2-9 -



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Law firm moves
on BVI expansion

Mj Lennox Paton to ‘officially open second international office in
next few months’ aiming to exploit ‘symmetry with Bahamas
MH Bahamas needs to do ‘a better job marketing’ its legal and

financial services

MH) Bahamian law firm ‘holding strong’ across all departments,

A >

Brian Simms

and contemplating no lay-offs

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

A Bahamian law firm yester-
day said it was forging ahead
with international expansion
plans despite the economic
slowdown, with its British Vir-
gin Islands (BVI) office set to
“officially open in the next few
months”, in a bid to exploit the
“symmetry” between the two
jurisdictions.

Brian Simms, the Lennox
Paton partner in charge of the
firm’s litigation/dispute resolu-
tion practice, said that while the
company had “seen a slight
slowdown” in legal work, unlike
other law practices it had not
reached “the point where we’re

Summit scales the peak
with 94% profit rise

* General insurance carrier enjoys
‘best year by a slim margin in
2008’ due to 110% improvement
in underwriting and net claims

reduction

* Anticipating tougher year in
2009, with gross written premium
likely to fall by 5-10% in line with
industry projections

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Summit Insurance Compa-
ny, the Bahamian general
insurance carrier through
which Insurance Management
places much of its business,
yesterday said fiscal 2008 was
its “best year yet by a slim
margin”, with improved
underwriting profits propelling
it to a 93.5 per cent net
income.

Timothy Ingraham, Sum-
mit’s general manager and
director, said “fair results on
the claims for most classes of
business” helped propel the
general insurance company to
$3.44 million in net income for
the 12 months to December
31, 2008, compared to $1.777
million the year before.

Underwriting profits more
than doubled to $3.543 mil-
lion, a 110.9 per cent increase
on the previous year’s $1.68
million, a performance aided
by an almost-21 per cent
reduction in net claims
incurred from $7.233 million
to $5.721 million.

“Last year was the best one
for us so far by a slim mar-
gin,” Mr Ingraham told Tri-
bune Business. “We had a fair
result on the claims for most
classes of business. It just sort
of worked out that way.

“We purchased a little more
reinsurance protection, so all
that helped to give us a posi-
tive result. Old claims also cost
slightly less than anticipated,
which helped to bring a posi-
tive result to the bottom line.

“We can say that we had a
reasonable year, and it’s posi-
tioned us well for this year.
Obviously we’re in a mode of

SEE page 6B

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

home owner shi

call our mortgage department today at
00 (Nassau) or 352-3670 (Freeport)



having to consider laying-off
staff and attorneys”.

He attributed this to Lennox
Paton’s diversified practice, and
its strength in financial services-
related fields such as trusts and
investment funds, coupled with
the fact that its real estate/con-
veyancing department had tar-
geted major resort develop-
ments for work rather than
focusing solely on private client
business.

Mr Simms also confirmed to
Tribune Business that Lennox
Paton was set to make BVI its
second operational base after
its London office, having whit-
tled down the number of candi-

SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
fesponsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



Deficits to
total $1.4bn

over 4 years

Central Bank pushes back Bahamian
economic recovery until 2011, with
national debt-to-GDP ratio breaking
50% ratio in 2010-2011

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The combined fiscal deficits the Bahamas will incur in
the 2008-2009 Budget year and over the next three fiscal
years will total a staggering $1.411 billion if the Gov-
ernment’s forecasts hold true, Tribune Business can
reveal, with the national debt breaking through the 50 per
cent-of-GDP ratio in the 2010-2011 fiscal period.

Using the Government’s figures from the 2009-2010
Budget communication, the total deficit (including debt
principal repayments) for the current and subsequent
three Budget years are projected as follows:

2008-2009: $422 million

2009-2010: $374 million

2010-2011: $340 million

2011-2012: $275 million

SEE page 5B



Chamber facing mid-June decision
on honded vehicle litigation action

If Government fails to reply in time

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Grand Bahama Chamber of Commerce will decide at its
next Board meeting in mid-June whether to issue a writ against
the Government over the use of bonded vehicles outside the
Port area if no “substantive response” is received by then from
the Attorney General’s Office, Tribune Business was told yes-
terday.

Gregory Moss, the Chamber’s president, said the Board had
already resolved to initiate legal action over the issue, but had
held off on filing a writ with the Supreme Court following pleas
from the Government via the Attorney General’s Office.

He explained that the only issue left to work out was the

SEE page 15B

Financial Strength Rating

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A: Excellent __

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[] wait to inherit a home
[live with your in-laws

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little as 5% down

EEPORT | ABACO | ELEUTHERA | EXUMA | CORPO


PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are making
news in their neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising funds
for a good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.

OO

breakfast



Boaters welcome tax
exemption for spare parts

m@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

Bahamas-based boating
advocates and a South Florida
Boating association yesterday
lauded the Government’s
decision to provide exemp-
tions on repair parts for motor
vessels, their engines and
mechanical parts.

The Bahamas Hotel Asso-
ciation’s (BHA) vice-presi-
dent, Frank Comito, told Tri-
bune Business that the organ-
isation had been lobbying for
the Government to remove
the tax imposed last year on
boating vessel repair parts
coming into the Bahamas.

“We hope it will advocate
more and longer stays by
boats in the country,” said Mr
Comito.

He added that pleasure boat
arrivals to the Bahamas often
translate into room nights for

many resorts with marinas.

“This certainly has a broad-
er impact on the industry and
the country,” Mr Comito said.
“Policies like this send a mes-
sage to the international com-
munity that the Bahamas is a
place that they can rely on.”

Director of Association Ser-
vices for the 850-member
Marine Industries Association
of South Florida, Gordon
Connell, shared Mr Comito’s
sentiment on the policy
change.

"The Islands of the
Bahamas have always been a
popular destination, offer
some of the best fishing and
diving available and have
always been popular,” said
Mr Connell.

"Boaters still look to the
Bahamas as one of their top
destinations from Florida even
with the tough economic
times."

He added that the Bahamas
government clearly recognises,

with the implementation of a
tax exemption on service parts
for motor boats, that tariff
breaks are incentives that will
keep South Florida boaters
coming to these islands.

“Exemption on boat engine
repair parts are g00d because
they [boaters] want to go
where they are appreciated
and welcome,” said Mr Con-
nell.

It was recently revealed that
recreational yachts and boat
arrivals were down about 20
per cent this year.

Boating experts and enthu-
siasts also cited the high cost
of travel to the Bahamas,
including fuel and cruising
fees, as a reason for the
decline.

Mr Comito said islands such
as Abaco, Eleuthera and
Grand Bahama _ have
expressed frustrations over the
decline in private boat arrivals.
He argued that the industry
may have even seen a 50 per

cent decline.

The Government last July
implemented the 35 per cent
tax on repair parts for motor
vessels, which vexed many
South Florida boaters who fre-
quented the Bahamas year
round.

Publisher of Southern Boat-
ing Magazine, Skip Allen, told
Tribune Business that boaters
were opting to visit the Flori-
da Keys instead of making the
trip across the Gulfstream to
the waters of the Bahamas.

According to Mr Comito,
the Government is in need of
a long-term strategy for the
area of tourism that caters to
visiting pleasure craft.

“There needs to be a broad-
er approach to the industry,”
he said

Computer, printer prices may
decline on duty reduction

m@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE PROPOSED 45 to 10
per cent customs duty reduc-
tion for printer parts and
standalone computer moni-
tors could mean a drastic
reduction in their in-store
prices, a Custom Computers
manager said yesterday.

Tammy Thompson, who is
also the Hewlett Packard line

manager for the store, said
consumers could see a reduc-
tion on the price of certain
items as soon as today.

She said Custom Comput-
ers was awaiting a shipment
of products that may be sub-
ject to the decrease in import
duties. “Consumers will see
decreasing prices on the
shelf,” she said.

Ms Thompson said the store
has received numerous com-
plaints about the high price of
computer items, compared to
US prices.

She said many people opted
to defer repair of their com-
puters or forgo the item until
they could take a trip to the
US in order to purchase it.

“A lot of the parts they
could pick up in the States
they can purchase here,” said
Ms Thompson.

She suggested that now



“A lot of the
parts they
could pick up
in the States
they can pur-
chase here.”



Tammy Thompson

some of the duties have been
decreased there will be more
people shopping at home for
immediate replacement of
parts, instead of having to
travel abroad and buy in bulk.

“Let’s say they bought the
computer away. Now they

would purchase the replace-
ment parts here,” she said.

Custom Computers has not
suffered a decline in sales with
the failing economy, accord-
ing to Ms Thompson.

She said many people who
lost jobs because of the eco-
nomic downturn were encour-
aged to hone their computer
skills, and consequently
bought entry-level computers.

“A lot of people were buy-
ing entry level PCs from us,”
she said.

Custom Computers opened
their second location in the
old City Market Plaza on
Cable Beach in November last
year, and have been staying
competitive in the market by
offering classes related to the
much desired Apple comput-
ers.

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activities, visit National Parks, and
participate in adventurous
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Lunch, all materials and gear included.

Ages: 8 = 14 years
Daily Hours: 9am - 3pm

New Providence: June 22nd - 27th
Venue: Retreat Gardens, Village Rd
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Grand Bahama: June 22nd - 27th
Venue: The Rand Nature Center
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Available spaces: 35 (first come, first served basis)

Cost: $150.00 (non-BNT members)
$100.00 (BNT members)

For more information call:
393-1317 (Nassau)
352-5438 (Grand Bahama)
email: bnt@bnt.bs

Ze
Q


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009, PAGE 3B





Realtors: Government
just don’t get it on tax

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas Real Estate
Association’s (BREA) president
yesterday said “the Government
just don’t get it” when it came to
this nation’s competitiveness in
the foreign second home buyer
market, arguing that the Govern-
ment’s real property tax reforms
in the 2009-2010 Budget did not
go far enough.

William Wong told Tribune
Business that BREA, plus the
legal profession, had wanted the
Government to reinstate the
$35,000 cap on real property tax
paid on high-end homes, which
was removed in the 2008-2009
Budget. This, they argued, had
exposed wealthy foreign home
owners to higher levels of taxa-
tion, deterring interest from new
buyers and making the Bahamas
uncompetitive in the region in
this market. Most other nations,
BREA had argued, had no or
minimal property-based taxes.

“From what I see, this govern-
ment just doesn’t get it,” Mr
Wong told Tribune Business.
“We are not competitive in this
region, and the Government is
losing on both sides. People have
choices other than the Bahamas.

“It is not enough. This is not
the way to doit. We want people
to come here. They [the Govern-
ment] just don’t get it.”

While properties occupied by
their owners for nine months of
the year are exempt from real
property tax payments, Mr Wong
said it would be impossible to ask
wealthy foreign home owners to
stay for this duration, and to
police this.

He added that the Bahamas’
relatively high tax rates would not
only deter new buyers, thus cost-
ing the Government stamp tax
on the property purchase, but also
the per annum real property tax
rates. Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, in his 2009-2010 Bud-
get communication, announced
that while the $35,000 cap would
not be reinstated, the real prop-

BREA chief says ‘more relief was needed’ on real property tax cap issue

erty tax structure was being
reduced from three to two.

A 1 per cent rate would be
applied to properties valued at
up to $7.5 million, above the
$250,000 exemption level, and
properties valued in excess of $7.5
million would see a 0.25 per cent
rate applied on the value above
$7.5 million. Mike Lightbourn,

president of Coldwell Banker
Lightbourn Realty, yesterday
agreed with Mr Wong that the
Government’s amendments were
“not enough” and did not bring
the necessary real property tax
relief to wealthy Bahamian and
foreign home owners who occu-
pied their property for less than
nine months of the year.

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FAMGUARD

CORPORATION LIMITED

Incorporated under the laws of the Commonweatth of The Bahamas

INTERIM REPORT — THREE MONTHS ENDING 31 MARCH, 2008
MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIRMAN

Dear Shareholder:

The strong growth in premium income experienced in 2008 continued in 2009 and
we recorded at the end of the first quarter an increase in premium income of $2.7
million or 15.7% over prior year-to-date.

Our Group Life and Health Division recorded the strongest gains in premium
income as a result of the sustained growth in new business. At the end of March
2009, new sales outstripped the prior year-to-date by 82%.



CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS (UNAUDITED)
FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED 31 MARCH 2009

(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)

Cash flows from operating activities
et income

Adjustments for:

Depreciation

ment giving foreign purchasers
an incentive to build, rather than

“There’s some relief, but it’s
not enough. We needed more,”
Mr Lightbourn told Tribune Busi-
ness. Elsewhere, in a bid to
encourage real property tax
defaulters to pay, the Govern-
ment will write-off the surcharge
on owner-occupied dwellings.
The outstanding tax remains and
has to be paid within six months

of the amendments coming into
effect, after which a 5 per cent
per annum surcharge will be
levied on the outstanding bal-
ances. The tax-rate on foreign-
owned, vacant property valued at
up to $7,000 will be $100, with
properties worth more than
$7,000 paying a 1.5 per cent rate.
This is likely to be the Govern-

simply hold, then flip their real
estate for profit. The exemption
on owner-occupied property will
be applicable automatically
except for foreign home owners,
where the nine-month occupancy
period will continue to apply, and
a 0.5 per cent tax rate will be
applied to buildings on leased
Crown cays.



.
seal



BUR INS

Harsour Bay Suoppinc PLaza
322.3170

Case Cottace, Cas_e Beacu
327.7072





FLATTENS
YOUR TUMMY
& SLIMS
YOUR SHAPE.

ZeZeZzeron <~
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME (UNAUDITED)
FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED 31 MARCH 2009

(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars) besa

3 months to 3 months to
31 March 2009 31 March 2008
$ $

20,484,476 17,768,174
(2,283,130) (1,253,150)
18,201,346 16,515,024
1,604,804 1,154,892
19,806,150 17,669,916
2,303,409 2,292,048
112,932 83,450
(441,118)

INCOME
Gross premium income
Premium ceded to reinsurers
Net premium income
Annuity deposits
Net premium income and annuity deposits
Interest income
Dividend income
Change in unrealized loss on investments
Realized gain from sale of assets 100
Other operating income
Total income

BENEFITS & EXPENSES

3 months to 3 months to
31 March 2009 31 March 2008
$ $

1,570,838 2,747,405

156,348 153,661

22,378,939 19,757,957

323,841 215,445

Our decision to change our accounting method for equities during 2008 from
fair value through profit and loss (FVTPL) to available for sale (AFS) assisted in
minimizing fluctuations in investment income caused by changes in the price
of shares held in our equities portfolio. We recorded investment income of $2.4
million for the first quarter of 2009 compared to $1.9 million for the same period
last year. Prior year was impacted significantly by unrealized losses on equities of

$441 thousand.

During the quarter policyholder benefits trended higher than prior year-to-date by
30% reflecting an increase in health claims. This increase in policyholder benefits
negatively impacted net income, which ended the quarter at $1.6 million.

The Board of Directors declared a dividend of 6 cents per share, which was paid to
shareholders on May 18 2009 based on the performance of the company for the three
months to March 31 2009.

Sincerely, f ;

Norbeft E. Boissiere
Chairman

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET (UNAUDITED)
AS AT 31 MARCH 2009

(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars) ai Dieeanber

2009 2008
$ $

1,954,114
339,737
13,789,621

ASSETS
Cash and bank balances
Short term bank deposits
Other bank term deposits
Financial Investment Assets
Held-to-maturity
Available for sale

Loans

1,833,305
340,635
4,233,591

56,390,833
6,787,851
69,567,290
139,153,505
2,208,520
3,086,519 2,749,750
34,442,304 34,062,774

178,890,848 176,471,151

44,255 404
7,243,165
69,292,456
136,874,497

2,784,130

Total investment assets

Receivables and other assets
Premiums receivable
Property, plant and equipment, net

TOTAL

LIABILITIES & EQUITY
LIABILITIES
Reserves for future policyholders benefits
Other policyholders funds
Policy liabilities
ayables and accruals

Total liabilities

104,806,556
9,898,793
114,705,349
4,851,759
119,557,108

102,902,989
7,756,601
110,659,590
6,993,345
117,652,935
EQUITY
reference shares
Ordinary shares
Share premium
Revaluation surplus
Retained earnings
Total equity
TOTAL

10,000,000
2,000,000
10,801,080
9,922,302
26,610,358
59,333,740

178,890,848

10,000,000

2,000,000
10,801,080
10,377,616
25,639,520
58,818,216

176,471,151





441,118
(292,226)
1,921,295 1,963,015
(2,303,409) (2,292,048)

112,932 $3,450
1,392,991 2,699,259

Change in appreciation on investments in equities
Change in mortgage provision (6,642)
Reserve for policyholder benefits

nterest income
Dividend income

Operating profit before working capital changes
(Increase) decrease in operating assets
Receivables and other assets 575,610

(336,769)

(2,059,784)
remium in arrears 488,924
(Decrease) increase in operating liabilities
(2,141,586) (172,457)
2,142,192 148,617
1,632,438 807,325

ayables and accruals
Other policyholder funds
Net cash from operating activities
Cash flows from investing activities
44,996
(618,423)
84,948
96,451
(367,843)
(11,250,000)
1,188,560
112,932
(10,708,379)

(318,573)
(1,103,542)

olicy loans

urchase of fixed assets
Construction in progress
Other loans repaid

let mortgage loans issued

60,410
(597,078)
urchase of Government bonds
nterest received

2,496,682
83,450
621,349

Dividends received

Net cash from investing activities
Cash flows from financing activities
Dividends paid

Net cash used in financing activities

(600,000) (600,000)
(600,000) (600,000)



(9,675,941)
16,083,472
6,407,531

828,674
13,912,100
14,740,774

let increase in cash and cash equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of the period
Cash and cash equivalents at end of the period

Cash and cash equivalents is comprised of:
Cash and bank balances

Short-term deposits

Other bank term deposits

1,833,305

340,635
4,233,591
6,407,531

4,445,601
329,659
9,965,514
14,740,774

BENEFITS
Policyholders’ benefits
Reinsurance recoveries
Net policyholders’ benefits
Increase in reserves for future policyholders’ benefits
Total benefits
EXPENSES
Commissions
Operating expenses
Premium tax
Depreciation and ammortization expense
Bad debt expense
Total expenses
Total benefits and expenses

NET INCOME

Earnings per share

11,997,201 9,229,155
624,133 846.444
11,373,068 8,382,711

1,921,295 1,963,014

13,294,363 10,345,725

2,908,194
3,670,388

2,648,135
3,555,827
617,957 537,621
323,841 215,445
6,642 292,201

7,513,738 6,664,827

20,808,101 17,010,552

1,570,838 2,747,405
0.16 0,27



NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED INTERIM FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
AS AT 31 MARCH 2009

1. ACCOUNTING POLICIES

hese interim consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with
International Accounting Standards 34: Interim Financial Reporting, The accounting policies
used in the preparation of the interim consolidated financial statements are consistent with those
used in the annual consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2008.







hese unaudited consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its
wholly owned subsidiaries, Family Guardian Insurance Company, FG General Insurance Agency
Limited, FG Financial Limited, FG Capital Markets Limited and BahamaHealth Insurance
Brokers and Benefits Consultants Limited.

2. EARNINGS PER SHARE

Earnings per share:



3 months to
31 March 2008

3 months to
31 March 2009

10,000,000
$ 1,570,838
0.16 $

10,000,000
$ 2,747,405
0,27

Weighted average number of shares outstanding
Consolidated net income
Earnings per share

3. COMMITMENTS

Outstanding commitments to extend credit under the mortgage loan agreements amounted to

approximately $3,675,003 as at 31 March 2009 (31 December 2008: $2,820,390)

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY (UNAUDITED)

FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED 31 MARCH 2009

(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)

Preference Ordinary

Share Revaluation Retained

Shares Shares Premium Reserve Earnings Total

$ $

Balance as of December 31, 2007 $ 10,000,000 $ 20,000,000
Transfer from revaluation surplus - -
Adjustment to fair value of investment in equities
Adjustment to appraised value of land and buildings
Net income for 2008
Dividends declared and paid -

preference shares

ordinary shares ($0.24 per share)
Balance as of December 31, 2008
Adjustment to fair value of investment in equities
Adjustment to appraised value of land and buildings
Net income for the period
Dividends declared and paid -

preference shares

ordinary shares ($0.06 per share)
Balance as of March 31, 2009

10,000,000 20,000,000

$ 10,000,000 $ 20,000,000

$ $ $ $
$ 10,801,000 $ 7,361,959 $ 23,840,477 $ 54,003,516
(496,893)

3,512,550
4,899,043

(496,893)
3,512,550 -
. 4,899,043

(700,000) (700,000)

% 2,400,000 2,400,000

10,377,616
(455,314)

10,801,000 25,639,520 58,818,216
- (455,314)

1,570,838 1,570,838

(600,000)
$ 59,333,740

(600,000)

$ 10,801,000 $ 9,922,302 $ 26,610,358






PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Law firm moves on BVI expansion

FROM page 1B

dates to head the new office to
three.

“We’ve just finished renova-
tions to the office in BVI, which
has the capacity for six attor-
neys,” he said. “We expect to
have the office opening shortly
in the next few months.”

By then, Lennox Paton will



which Lennox Paton works.

“We chose BVI for a num-
ber of reasons,” he explained.
“BVI and the Bahamas are sim-
ilar in the products they offer,
and BVI, as an offshore corpo-
rate jurisdiction, has trust busi-
ness and mutual fund business,
which we deal with here.

“Our International Business
Companies (IBCs) Act was
developed from BVI legislation.

Mr Simms added that BVI
was the chosen domicile for 40
per cent of the world’s offshore
hedge funds, giving it a “very
strong presence” and the ability
to compete directly with the
Cayman Islands.

“BVI is fairly fertile ground
in that the large firms that are
there do not have a significant
presence, and we feel that given
our client base and the many

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FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED

NOTICE

Please be advised that the Head Office and
the Registered Office of the company will be

moved from the Bahamas Financial Centre,
Charlotte & Shirley Streets, 2nd Floor, Nassau,
Bahamas to Royal Bank House, East Hill Street,
Nassau, Bahamas effective 25th May, 2009.

D. BURROWS-HAINES (Mrs.)
Corporate Secretary

Dated this 22nd May 2009

Telephone Number - 356-8500
Telefax - 356-8660



there.” Lennox Paton already
had an associate on the ground
in BVI in the shape of Fiona
Forbes, and after appointing
someone to head the office, the
company will assess how quick-
ly it expands the operation
there.

When asked why Bahamian
law firms should look to expand
internationally, Mr Simms said
moving into different jurisdic-
tions created diversified rev-
enue streams, and helped to
guard against a downturn in
business in any one particular
country.

He told Tribune Business: “T
think it is a hedge against hav-
ing all your eggs in one basket.
If you spread yourself out, you
hedge against a slowdown of
business in any particular juris-
diction.”

Lennox Paton is not the only
Bahamian law firm to have
expanded overseas, Callender’s
& Co having also opened a
London office, and Higgs &
Johnson moved into the Cay-
man Islands through its acqui-
sition and merger with Truman,
Bodden & Company.

Mr Simms, though, said
Lennox Paton preferred to
grow “organically”, opening its
own offices and establishing its
own presence, rather than via
acquisition.

“We'll grow our own office
with our own people, and our

BKG/410.03

culture and our work ethic,” he
explained. “We’re quite happy
growing our firm and our peo-
ple.”.

The Lennox Paton litigation
partner told Tribune Business
that while he believed the
Bahamas was competitive in the
global legal services market, it
needed “to do a better market-
ing job” to ensure it matched
rival international financial cen-
tres.

“My personal view is we are
competitive,” Mr Simms said.
“My view is the other jurisdic-
tions do a better marketing gen-
erally, and talk about how good
their services are, when they’re
no better than ours. We have a
much larger court system - we
have approximately 10 judges
in the Court of First Instance
[Supreme Court] when others
have just one or two, and get
matters through the legal sys-
tem much faster.

“We don’t go out and mar-
ket our strengths. We are not
chained to Britain, or a sibling
of other Crown protectorates.
As firms in those countries
grow, they market their sister
jurisdictions and often criticise
the Bahamas, but only to ensure
they’re getting the business for
the jurisdictions they’re in.”

Mr Simms added: “As a juris-
diction we need to put more
effort into selling our services
and the fact we have the best

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT TREASURY BILLS

Sealed tenders for B$84,100,000.00 of 91-Day Treasury Bills
will be received by the Banking Manager, The Central Bank
of The Bahamas, Frederick Street, Nassau up to 3:00 p.m
on Friday, May 29, 2009. Successful tenderers, who will be
advised should take up their bills against payment on

Tuesday, June 2, 2009. These bills will be in minimum
multiples of B$100.00. Tenders are to be on special forms
obtainable from the Central Bank of The Bahamas or

Commercial Banks.

Tenders must state the net price percent (in multiples of one
cent) and should be marked “Tender”. The Central Bank of the
Bahamas reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.

Ce aan, €
eee steep eee



legislation in the world. The
Bahamas has the best trust leg-
islation that everyone wants to
emulate. The Bahamas has
been a leader in the trust field,
and need to make sure we hold
on to work we have in areas
that are slowing down.”

The Lennox Paton partner
said the Bahamas “will be one
of those” international finan-
cial centres to survive the Oba-
ma/G-20 onslaught, “providing
we continue to put in best
efforts, putting forwards good
products and good services”.

As for Lennox Paton’s cur-
rent status, Mr Simms said:
“Certainly, there is a general
slowdown in the world econo-
my, and that ultimately has an
effect on legal services. In our
particular case, we have seen a
slight slowdown, but not to the
point where we have to consid-
er laying-off staff and associ-
ates.

“We’re monitoring the situ-
ation, but are quite pleased with
the way the firm has been
doing, even in this slow time,
and are maintaining a certain
level of business.”

Mr Simms said Lennox
Paton’s conveyancing/real
estate department “remains
busy”. He added: “That is prob-
ably due to the fact that strate-
gically we have placed the firm
as a major legal advisor to
resort developments, as
opposed to focusing solely on
private client business.

“As such, these resort devel-
opments need constant legal
services, including refinancing
and restructuring, in this eco-
nomic market.”

All departments, including lit-
igation, were “holding steady”,
Mr Simms added, with Lennox
Paton not experiencing a slow-
down to “the extent of other
firms”.

“Firms very dependent on
conveyancing, particularly pri-
vate client conveyancing, are
suffering greatly at this time,”
he explained.

Mr Simms said it could be
dangerous for law firms to lay-
off attorneys during a recession,
as they might not be in a posi-
tion to be competitive when the
economy recovers.

Lennox Paton was not con-
templating lay-offs, but Mr
Simms added: “That’s not to
say we’re not watching things
and not being careful where we
expand and how we expand.

“At the end of the day, we’d
have to think long and hard
about letting anyone go.

“We have a good relationship
with all our employees, and it
would be hard to let any go.”

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THE TRIBUNE

FROM page 1B

Adding those four figures together
produces $1.411 billion as the com-
bined total deficit the Government
will incur over the next four years,
highlighting the full extent of the cri-
sis in the public finances, and the dif-
ficulty the Ingraham administration
will have in getting them back on
track.

The Government appears to be
pinning its faith in a relatively strong
economic rebound from 2011
onwards, with gross domestic product
(GDP) in current prices rising by 0.9
per cent that year, with a more sus-
tained 2.5 per cent GDP expansion in
2011-2012. It also seems to be hoping
that the level of economic growth
will have returned to normal, some-
thing that is also not a given, duc to
the depth and severity of the current
recession.

Even the Central Bank of the
Bahamas appears to have again post-
poned its forecast recovery for the
Bahamian economy, writing in the
economic background to the Prime
Minister’s Budget communication:
“The prospects for the Bahamian

“It is up to us as
people to realise
that continually
placing demands
on government to
do things is out of
the question.”



Rick Lowe

economy over the remainder of 2009
appear weak, with real GDP not
expected to return to a positive tra-
jectory before 2011.”

Stripping out debt principal
redemptions, and using the GFS
deficit, the Government’s predic-
tions, if they come true, will see the

ublic finances run a cumulative

1.073 billion in deficits between the
2008-2009 and 2011-2012 Budget
periods.

Those deficits, as forecast, are:

2008-2009: $352 million

2009-2010: $286 million
2010-2011: $250 million
2011-2012: $185 million

And the GFS deficits, as a per-
centage of GDP, for those periods
are:

2008-2009: 4.7 per cent

2009-2010: 3.9 per cent

2010-2011: 3.3 per cent

2011-2012: 2.4 per cent

All this goes to show that getting
the fiscal deficit and national debt
under control, and recreating what
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
referred to on Thursday as “fiscal
headroom”, will be no easy task. The
Government seems to be hoping that
a return to GDP growth in 2011 will
ultimately keep the rising debt-to-
GDP ratio in check, before it gets
out of control.

Not surprisingly, the continuous-
ly heavy fiscal deficits will impact the
Government’s debt. The direct debt
charge on government is expected
to increase as follows:

2008-2009: $2.912 billion

2009-2010: $3.198 billion

2010-2011: $3.448 billion

2011-2012: $3.633 million

GN-865

GOVERNMENT

THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT
(CHAPTER 326)

lt is hereby notified pursuant ta Section 7 of the Industries Encouragement
Act that the Minister is about to consider whether the following products
should be declared “APPROVED PRODUCTS” for the purpose of that
Act.

Biodiesel, Biomass, Ethanol

Any interested person having any objection to such a declaration should give
notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds thereof to the Office of the
Prime Minister, before the 8th day of June, 2009, by letter addressed to:-

NOTICE

NOTICE

RAW MATERIALS TO BE USED
IN MANUFACTURE

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER

Act.

Coconut, Jatropha Oil, Miscanthus,
Sugar Cane, Potassium Hydroxide,
Potassium Methoxide, Sodium
Hydroxide, Sodium Methoxide,

THE PERMANENT SECRETARY
OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER
P.O. Box CB-10980

NASSAU, N.P.,
THE BAHAMAS

DAVID R. DAVIS

Permanent Secretary

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER

THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT

NOTICE

(CHAPTER 326)

It is hereby notified pursuant to Section 5 of the Industries Encouragement
Act, Chapter 301, that the Minister is about to consider whether the
manufacturer specified in the first column of the table below should be
declared an “APPROVED MANUFACTURER?” in relation to the products
specified in the third column,

MANUFACTURER LOCATION OF PRODUCTS
FACTORY PREMISES

Biodiesel, Biomass,
Fihanel

Natural (ils
International

Any interested person having any objection to such a declaration should give
notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds thereof to the Office of the
Prime Minister, before the 8th day of June, 2009, by letter addressed to:-

Abaco, The Bahamas

THE PERMANENT SECRETARY
OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER
P.O. Box CB-10980

NASSAU, N.P.,
THE BAHAMAS

DAVID R. DAVIS

Permanent Secretary

Phosphoric Acid/HCL

FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009, PAGE 5B

Deficits to total $1.4bn over 4 years

And as a percentage of GDP, they
are:

2008-2009: 38.9 per cent

2009-2010: 43.2 per cent

2010-2011: 46.2 per cent

2011-2012: 47.4 per cent

Yet the latter set of figures do not
take into account the $439 million
worth of debt that the Government
has guaranteed, a figure that is like-
ly to have been increased further by
the $30 million guarantee the Ingra-
ham administration on Wednesday
gave to the CLICO (Bahamas) poli-
cyholders.

With government-guaranteed debt
already amounting to 6 per cent of
GDP, and the latter figure declin-
ing, this has to be added on to the
Government’s direct charge to obtain
a true picture of the national debt.

This means that the national debt
will increase to 49.2 per cent at the
2009-2010 budget year-end, with this
breaking the 50 per cent gap to 52.2
per cent in 2010-2011. And for 2011-
2012, the national debt-to-GDP will
be 53.4 per cent.

Sounding the alarm, Rick Lowe, a
Nassau Institute executive and noted
fiscal hawk, said of the Governmen-
ts Budget figures: “We’re over the

precipice. It’s the perfect storm.”

He added that, when the Govern-
ment’s fiscal woes were added to the
escalating problems with crime, edu-
cation, the courts and other areas:
“That compounds all the other prob-
lems we face in the country. It could
be the tipping point. It’s going to be
very hard to recover.

“It leaves me speechless. It’s obvi-
ous the Government’s going to have
avery difficult task ahead of them.
The responsibility rests in Parliament
and successive governments, and
wanton and profligate spending as if
future generations don’t matter.

“It’s up to us as people to realise
that continually placing demands on
government to do things is out of the
question.”

The Government is basing its fiscal
forecasts on the International Mon-
etary Fund’s (IMF) projections of
1.5 per cent real GDP growth for the
Bahamas in 2011, and 3 per cent in
2012.

It is also assuming that recurrent
revenues, as a percentage of GDP,
will increase from 17.5 per cent in
2008-2009 to 20.4 per cent in 2011-
2012. It has been forecast as remain-
ing flat at 20.7 per cent of GDP in
2011-2012.

GN-&64

GOVERNMENT
NOTICE

NOTICE

THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT

(CHAPTER 326)

li is hereby notified pursuant to Section 7 of the Industries Encouragement
Act that the Minister is about to consider whether the following products
should be declared “APPROVED PRODUCTS" for the purpose of that

RAW MATERIALS TO BE USED
IN MANUFACTURE

Unfinished cabinet doors, lumber,
plywood, formica, corian, nails,

(Cabinets

acrews, wood, hardware, contact

cement

Any interested person having any objection to such a declaration should give
notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds thereof to the Office of the
Prime Minister, before the 8th day of June, 2009, by letter addressed to:-

THE PERMANENT SECRETARY
OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER
P.O. Box CB-10980

NASSAU, N.P.,
THE BAHAMAS

DAVID R. DAVIS

Permanent Secretary

NOTICE

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER

THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT

(CHAPTER 326)

specified in the third column.

The Abaco Cabinet
Company

The Bahamas

It is hereby notified pursuant to Section 5 of the Industries Encouragement
Act, Chapter 301, that the Minister is about to consider whether the
manufacturer specified in the first column of the table below should be
declared an “APPROVED MANUFACTURER?” in relation to the products

MANUFACTURER LOCATION OF PRODUCTS
FACTORY PREMISES

Marsh Harbour, Abaco,

Cabinets

Any interested person having any objection to such a declaration should give
notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds thereof to the Office of the
Prime Minister, before the 8th day of June, 2009, by letter addressed to:-

THE PERMANENT SECRETARY
OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER
P.O. Box CB-10980

NASSAU, N.P.,
THE BAHAMAS

DAVID R. DAVIS

Permanent Secretary


PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





NOTICE

DYNOMAR DEVELOPMENT CORP.

In Voluntary Liquidation












































Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act. 2000,
DYNOMAR DEVELOPMENT CORP. is in dissolution as of
May 27, 2009.

Steffen H. Heitland situated at 3200 Tamiami Trail North,
Naples, Florida is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

CLEAR WATER FUND LIMITED

HOTICE = hereby green that the Cosifors of the abowesesdi Company we

7 ari “ewan & 7
feaguird on of baton June 90 2000 to card tain nares and addraasaa, with

Particulars of fiir Gebts or daims, and fie rames and addresses of ther

Attra [if ary), io Alien J Tres and Maria M4, Féréra, Joint Liquidalirs ol

Clear Water Fund Limited, cfo FT Consultants Lic. P.O. Bow N-4992, Nassau

Claris

Dated this 20° day of May, 2005

Adret Treea
Mara M. Finire
Joirt Liquidators

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

Pursuant to the peovisions of Section 137 (4) of The International
Business Companies Act, 2000, Motice is hereby given thatt:-

UNICOM LIMITED is in dissolution;
the dale of commencement of the dissolution is 28° day af May,

2008,

the name of the Liquidator i Alison J. Treco, FT Consultants Led.,
One Monlaguea Placa, East Bay Street, P.O. Bow Meds,
Nassau, Bahamas

FURTHER NOTICE is hereby given thal the Creditors of the above-
named Company are required, on or before the 30° cay of June, 2009 to
send their names and addresses, with particulars of their dable or claims,
and the namas end addresses of their Attorneys (if any), to the
Liquidator, Alson Treco, elo FT Consultants Ltd., P.O. Box M-3932,

Nassau, Bahamas.

Deted this 2° dey of May, A.D. 2008

Algom J. Treco
Liquidator

ROYAL = FIDELITY

eoney at Work

Summit scales the peak
with 94% profit rise

FROM page 1B

trying to hold on to the busi-
ness we have. Growth is not a
realistic target at this point,
and having had a good year
last year, hopefully it will soft-
en the impact this time. We’re
all in the same boat in that
regard.”

Mr Ingraham acknowl-
edged, though, that with the
economy mired in recession,
he expected that 2009 was
“going to be more of a chal-
lenge”, with Summit joining
the likes of RoyalStar Assur-
ance, J. S. Johnson and NUA
in projecting a 5-10 per cent

extent.”

ly to $42.0645 million, com-

drop in top-line gross written
premium.

Summit, though, actually
did more with less in 2008, so
to speak. For while gross writ-
ten premiums increased slight-

pared to $40.133 million in
2007, net written premiums
actually declined from $20.565
million to $19.84 million, due
to the more than $2 million
increase in reinsurance cover-

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, CRYSTAL LEWIS of #17
Windward Isle Way, intend to change my son’s name from

AVONTE JERVAR LEWIS to AVONT JERVAR SAUNDERS.
lf there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, KIRSCH LEWITT
FERGUSON of the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, intend to
my name to KIRCH LEWITT FERGUSON, If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write
such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date
of publication of this notice.

NOTICE
OF
CHERRY PIE
HOLDING LIMITED

Pursuant to Park [X, Section 137 (6) of the (Interna-
tional Business Companies Act, 2000), we hereby sub-
mit that winding-up and dissolution of the Company
has been completed on the 27th day of May, 2009.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

FG CAPITAL TS
BROKERAGE

EB & ADVISORY SERYVIC-ES

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:

THURSDAY,

28 MAY 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,602.47 | CHG 0.67 | %CHG 0.04 | YTD -109.89 | YTD % -6.42
FINDEX: CLOSE 792.33 | YTD -5.09% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

S2wk-Low
1.28
10.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
2.14
10.18
2.75
6.00
1.27
1.32
7.50
10.00
10.35
4.95

Securit
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnsen
Premier Real Estate

1.40
11.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.74
2.83
6.02
2.79
1.32
7.76
10.97
10.40
5.09
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol. EPS $
0.127
0.992
0.244

-0.877
0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

Div $ P/E
1.40
11.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.74
2.83
6.02
3.04
1.40
7.76
10.97
10.40
5.09
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

See eee eee eee ee
29299090N909000000
666656600606506060

11.0
55.6

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale

Change Daily Vol. Interest
0.00 T%

0.00 Prime + 1.75%
0.00 T%

0.00 Prime + 1.75%

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

S52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Bid $
7.92
4.00
0.35

Ask $

Last Price
14.60
6.00
0.35

Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
8.42
6.25

0.40



“Reinsurance costs have
increased marginally, and
that’s something we can’t pass
on. That’s going to impact the
bottom line to a certain



Timothy Ingraham

age that was purchased.

“So far to date it’s been fair-
ly reasonable,” Mr Ingraham
said.

“T think it’s going to come
through in the latter part of
the year.

“A lot of people will have
been laid-off, there savings
will have been exhausted, so
things will tighten up and peo-
ple will look to save money
on insurance.

“Hopefully, at the end of
this year, we’ll start to pull out
of this.”

When asked whether Sum-
mit was projecting similar
gross written premium
decreases to the likes of rival
RoyalStar, Mr Ingraham said:

“We can expect to see that.
We've started to see it already
in one or two lines.” It was
especially prevalent in motor
insurance, as Summit clients
switched from comprehensive
to third party coverage.

Given the Bahamian econ-
omy’s current condition, Mr
Ingraham said Summit was in
no position to pass on
increased reinsurance costs to
its clients, something that
would also impact its financial
performance in 2009.

“Reinsurance costs have
increased marginally, and
that’s something we can’t pass
on. That’s going to impact the
bottom line to a certain
extent,” the Summit general
manager explained.

During 2008, Summit’s per-
sonnel expenses rose from
$694,936 in the previous year
to $761,669, with general and
administrative expenses rising
from $482,006 to $532,179.

As a result, total operating
expenses rose from $1.211 mil-
lion in 2007 to $1.495 million
in 2008. Mr Ingraham said the
increases were caused by the
combination of a new com-
puter system’s installation, and
the full-year impact of addi-
tional staff, who had only been
appointed mid-way through
fiscal 2007.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, FABIAN MARSTULLAS
SAUNDERS of #6 Tranquil Gardens Subdivision, P.O. Box
N-10006, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to my name to FABIAN
MARSTULLAS ARANHA, If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections
to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau,
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of
publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANNA GRACE LECORGNE
of EASTERN ROAD, P.O. BOX N-3006, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 22"> day of May, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
AIRLEASE FIVE LIMITED is in dissolution. Mrs Alrena
Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at Winterbotham
Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names addresses and
particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before June 8th, 2009

Os 918d:

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA _ Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3758 1.65 4.83
2.8962 -1.49 -3.35
1.4630 2.05 5.25
3.1964 -5.59 -13.64
12.7397 0.96 5.79
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1599
1.0526
1.0322 -0.08
1.0523 1.45
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
LUNDBERG TRADING INC., is in dissolution. Continen-
tal Liquidators Inc. 1s the Liquidator and can be contacted
at 60 Market Square, P.O. Box 1906, Belize City, Belize.
All persons having claims against the above-named company
are required to send their names, addresses and particulars of
their debts or claims to the Liquidator before 27th day of June,
2009,

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
1.3875 Colina Money Market Fund
3.1964 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
12.1564 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Div $
1.3124
2.9230

30-Apr-09
31-Mar-09
15-May-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
30-Apr-09
30-Apr-09
30-Apr-09

0.56
-3.59
0.00
0.71
1.63

0.56
-3.59
0.00
-12.76
5.26
3.22
5.23

Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
ing price in last 52 weeks
last 52 weeks
Previous Close
Today's Close -
Change - Ch

hted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. - olume of the prior week

rom day to day EPS $ -A compa reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths.
es traded today NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

cy ai : 2s ena ge }
Tha h. ear

Kor Cowon es Lied ateen line.
Lige Kecy

ighted price for daily volume rice - F pri |

pri

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S11) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525


THE TRIBUNE



















































Finter Bank & Trust (Bahernes) Linsited

Notes io Mon-Consclicated Financial Staerscns (Continued)

I Bisk Management (Continued)

Currency risk (continaed)
The Fol loving if An anahysis of peeeis lubilities and chorchiolder'’ a aunty on Lkecerber 31,
CUPRENEY | if thoes of ciotlars)

ek by

21a

ELIRCE WTHERS TOTAL,
Asoois

40,i0 §
Lies aed ahveancos |e a

Lither aeaeis 14 - - 40

Lash and departs wee berks 4.959

Total aiseta
Liabilities and shareholder's
ceils
Dae bo Danks
Calenen' caren and dep
acts
Caheer liatilinies
Sharchobhier's qjuity
1.3tal liatalees and shorcholkder's
6914 §

equity 11 Bt

Currency risk (continued)

Bar

i EURO OTHERS TOTAL
Anrty

ash and duc fom banks 7 ote £ | 458 £24 ike * 21K * Tien

Lone ond aca noe. ag a7) Le LEI 73h

} 12 a9

i an

Other aescts 7
Toul aasers § Sold
Liwtlites aad Hharchelder’s

eyuity

[dur to hanks
Customers current aed depot

ACT
Ceher liutelinies

Shares den’ 5. equity

Total abel ic aed ehoarchodier

expats § 74) f shit
fh a rere
rate against the LS dollaz, with all other variobles held constant, the result om the nom-consolidated
statement of income is as follows:

cme s heal celiale thal the elieet at a easly pecsible avement of the Cur heres

Effect on
Profit

Changes iin
Currency Currency Rate

Ag of December, 41 2008
FUR
EVE
CHE
CHE

4426
(3,928)
14 7Fo

(38,079)

As of December, 31 2007
EUR

ELE =
CHE t 2.04% 428
CHE {428}

545]

(5,351)

Excessive risk concentrations
Concentrviions onise when a nunber of COUMLEr RIES Tne engaged if sitolar buen eclviles,
similar geographac regions of have similar ecomoméc features which oy cause their abélity ie meet
comtractial obligations to be sintilarly affected by changes in economic, political and other
Comeibons Comecnizaisans indicme ithe relative semsitivigy of the

developments ina particular industry or geographic region.

Bank’s perlormwnce to

In order to avoid excessive comcentrations of risk, the Bank's policies and procedures include
specilic guadelines to focus om mamlaining diversified portiolios. In addition to the Bank's own
policies and procedures, regulatory guidance related to the concentration of risks must also be
adhered to

The distribution of assets and liabilities at December 31, by geographic region wes as follows (im

hones of dollars’

ee Zia.
Assets Liabilities

217

Assets Liabdlities
5 Alaay S 2n297 3238
5,463 a erk3
9 a3 7365
Pas
e178

13,509
1028
549 328
7 tS
$70.80)

Switeeriand
Wieser Eerope * [2.675
Batumas & Canbissin
Osher

(o744
1437 1 Gah

§ Lids § dh

* ccliing Meier’

Ciperational risk

Operational nisk is the risk of loss ansing from systems failure, human eros, food of eciernal
evens. When costal: fai) to perform, operational miks can caus: damage lo reputation, have
legal or regulatory implications, of lead to financial loss
operational risks, bul through a control framework and by mondioring and responding to potential
rigka, the Hank 16 able io manage the neka, Conbnols over thease nike incleds ellpetive scpregation
of duties, access, suthoreation ond reconcilintion procedures, staff education and assessment
processes, including the use of internal contra. The Bank canies oul a regular mview of all
ORT ilicnal Arens bo congue opermional risks are being peaperly identified, controlled and reported
Contingency plans are in place to achiewe business continusty im the ewent of serious disruptions to
During the vear cried December 31, 2008, loses anaing fram operaticeeal

The Hank carol Sopect io aimanme all

business operalices

efnars Bnouneed to approx mately oaT eos

Li. Fair Value of Financial [nstrements

Financial instruments utilized by the Bank include recorded aserts and iatiliters, a& well as heres thal
perinatal lh The majority of the Pam's financial instruments are either
short-term in matere or have interest rates thet aviomatically reset to market om a pericelic basis.
Accordingly, the estimaiod fair value is net significantly dillerent from ihe carrying value tor each

nol? Of-Balarce shee Ask

major calegery of the Bank's recorded assets and liabilities.

To advertise in
The Tribune Classified
call
502-2351

FROM page 1B

definition of ‘consumable
stores’ in relation to Grand
Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) licensees being able
to use their bonded vehicles
outside the Port area for busi-
ness purposes.

The Chamber, Mr Moss
added, had already submitted
to the Government a Supreme
Court judgment, other legal
precedents and
definitions/interpretations of
the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment to show that the con-
cerns of the Ministry of
Finance and Customs Depart-
ment were unfounded.

Mr Moss said that discus-
sions with the Customs
Department had been “taken
to the point where Customs
had represented that they nev-
er suggested bonded vehicles
could not move out of the Port
area, and that they would not
confiscate them if they moved
out of the Port area”.

However, Customs then
raised the issue that GBPA
licensees “had converted the
use of their vehicles to con-
sumable stores under the pro-
visions of the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement” by taking them -
and using them for the pur-
poses of their business - out-
side the Port area.

The issue was then referred
by Customs to the Attorney
General’s Office over the
meaning of ‘consumable
stores’. When no word was
forthcoming from the Gov-
ernment, Mr Moss said: “We
set a deadline of May 8 by
which we would have to issue
a writ against the Govern-
ment.

“We finally issued a letter
to them at the end of April
that if they didn’t respond by

FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009, PAGE 15B

Chamber facing mid-

June decision on bonded
vehicle litigation action

that date, we would file a
writ.”

This, the Chamber presi-
dent, explained, prompted an
immediate response from the
Attorney General’s Office,
which said that the issues
raised by the organisation’s
letter “were such that they
were taking the matter seri-
ously”, and had reverted back
to the Ministry of Finance and
Customs. In the meantime, the
Government had “asked us to
hold off, which we did”.

The two issues raised by the
Government and Customs
were, Mr Moss explained, that
Port Authority licensees were
“exporting” their bonded
vehicles by taking them out-
side the Port area.

Judgment

The Chamber as a result
furnished the Government
with the Supreme Court judg-
ment won by UNEXSO and
other legal precedents to show
that “a temporary excursion
of bonded vehicles out of the
Port area does not amount to
exporting” because they
would not remain outside
Freeport permanently - only
for temporary business pur-
poses.

The other concern raised,
Mr Moss said, was that by tak-
ing bonded vehicles outside
the Port area, licensees could
convert them for personal use
by selling, gifting or otherwise
transferring them to someone
else for that purpose.

The Chamber president,
though, said this could only
apply when the actual title
changed hands.

“We said to them this now
brings the matter to rest,” Mr
Moss said.

“There is no other provision



or definition from the Hawks-
bill Creek Agreement that
brings to bear on this issue.”

He added: “We’ve deter-
mined at a Board level that
we would defer the matter for
a month and review it at the
next Board meeting, which is
the middle of next month
[June].

“We are hoping that we will
have a substantive response
from the Government at that
meeting. We already have a
Board resolution to commerce
legal action.” Without a
response from the Govern-
ment, “we will have to make a
decision at that meeting”.

Customs’ policy has been
not to allow bonded vehicles
outside the Port area, some-
thing the Chamber has argued
contravenes the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement, and thus
the law.

The Hawksbill Creek
Agreement allows Port
Authority licensees to import
into Freeport goods that are
bonded - or duty free, mean-
ing no import or stamp duties
are paid on them - provided
they are for legitimate use in
the licensee’s own business.
They key test for determining
whether goods should be sold
as bonded or duty-paid is
whether they are to be used
by a Port Authority licensee in
their own legitimate business
activities.

The fear among Port
Authority licensees is that
Customs could apply its policy
on vehicles to other bonded
goods, potentially causing
chaos for their businesses.
They would then have to keep
tow sets of goods and inven-
tory - one bonded for use in
Freeport, the other duty-paid
for use outside the Port area.

PUBLIC AUCTION

SATURDAY, MAY 30â„¢, 2009

By Order of

The Bahamas Development Bank
Cable Beach, Nassau, The Bahamas
Commonwealth of The Bahamas

WHAT: Three (2) assorted used vessels as set out in the schedule below:

Equility

Loa 49’
Beam 16

Depth 4
Year/Mk/Eng

Vessels

1981 Defender Vessel,

Caterpillar 3208 engine

Location

Bayshore Marina East Bay

Street

Farbutt

Loa 5T
177.5”

Beam
Depth 5
Year/Mk/Eng

1996 Fiberglass Vessel,

Caterpillar 3412 engine

Location

Bayshore Marina East Bay

Street

LOCATION: Bayshore Marina East Bay Street — Nassau The

Bahamas

TIME: 11:00am — Saturday, May 30th, 2009 — Preview and Inspection
from 9:00am Until Auction time at the site.

TERMS: All items to be Sold Where Is As Is for Cash, Cashier’ Cheque
or current Bank Guarantee Letter. Purchase will not be released until paid
for in full not later than 4:00pm Tuesday, June 2", 2009. Where a deposit
is required, the same is non refundable. If final payment is not made by
4:00pm Tuesday, June 2", 2009 any and all deposits made will be

forfeited.

Bahamas Development Bank
At (242) 327-5780/ 702-5730/702-5714
Or Fax (242) 702-5047
email: bahamasdevelopmentbank.com
THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST

5/29/09, PAGE 17B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

> {Fl (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

a a (ccc

































=x: ' Today Saturday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
a ! rt a = = a High = Low W High Low W WASSAU ‘Today. Sat7-14Knots S-OFeet S-10Mies 81°F |
- , oft oN ¥ *. ia iin. : - 4 F/C F/C F/C F/C Saturday: | SW at 10-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
~~ a , all ~~ /.. alls pas o| 1|2 3|4|5 6|7 allio Acapulco 91/32 77/25 s 91/32 77/25 pe FREEPORT Today: : § at 7-14 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 80° F
7 # s /
- ; — i — li — en Low | MODERATE J HIGH | V.HIGH | EX. Amsterdam 66/18 49/9 s 65/18 49/9 s Saturday: SW at 10-20 Knots 3-6Feet___5-10 Miles 80° F
é mt ORLANDO — A Ankara, Turkey 76/24 46/7 s Ties S00 Ss = ABACO ‘Today: § at 7-14 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
High: 86° F/30°C _ Clouds and sun, a Mostly cloudy, a Partly sunny with a Some sun with a Partly sunny with a Partly sunny and The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 82/27 68/20 s 83/28 66/18 s Saturday: SSW at 10-20 Knots 3-6 Feat 5-10 Miles 31°F
- Low: 70° F/21° Et a t-storm in spots. couple of t-storms. thunderstorm. t-storm possible. shower possible. pleasant. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 61/16 52/11 pc 6116 47/8 +
{ % “fe High: 87° High: 85° High: 87° High: 86° Bangkok 90/32 79/26 t 89/31 78/25 t pi
i! eas 7 ‘ : ° A Barbados 86/30 76/24 pc ESLIOE 6LODAY'S U.S. FORECAST
TAMPA a High: 88 Low: 76 Low: 76 Low: 78 Low: 77 Low: 76 yb Pee UL Barcelona 75/23 63/17 s 72/22 61/16 s
i : TA Ever CEE TUS ee ee Beijin 36/30 62/16 pc 88/31 63/17 s
High: 87° F/31°C. ae 106°-84° F 102°-84° F 99°-82° F 100°-82° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low _Ht.(ft. ar ee a : ee ete
Low: 71° F/22°C ry yr The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel oe an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 12:15am. 3.0 6:36am. -0.1 Belgrade 68/20 47/8 sh 69/20 52/11 pc
. P 2 levati the h body— thing that effects h Id feels. Te tl flect the high and the low for the day. : :
ae @ elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day 12:49pm. 27 6:52pm. 0.0 Berlin 63/17 45/7 sh 66/18 50/10 sh
; ¢ as 50pm. 27 7:57pm. 0. Bogota 65/18 47/8 + 66/18 48/8 +
2 i Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Sintay 14am. 06 S25am. 00 Brussels 66/18 46/7 5s 70/21 49/8 s
: ic ——— ABACO Temperature 251p.m. 28 9:03pm. 0.2 Budapest 61/16 45/7 sh 6417 48/8 6
f : = High: 86°F/20° C HIGH sessascsoiins beesdnaia sins aswlicecucpane 90° F/32° C ian 25 Oe Buenos Aires 61/16 46/7 pc 5412 46/7 +
y 1 Fond gle : 7 81°F/27°C LEO asscttesarseeste 77° F/25°¢ = Monday pm. 28 10:06pm. 02 Cairo 92/33 66/18 s 93/33 65/18 s
: y, = ow: 81° F/27 Normal high. .... ge°F30°G Ce 103/39 81/27 s 101/38 83/28 pc
? r 7 Normal low 72° F/22° C Calgary 78/25 49/9 s 65/18 40/4 pe
4 ofa Se @ WEST PALM BEACH mo Last year's fIQDD sscseicenecneisenneas 90° F/32° C Sun AND Moon Conran 91/32 77/25 pe 91/32 74/23 pc
: — High: 85° F/29° C —» Last year's low ire isch ave ences 73° F/23° C Caracas 79/26 71/21 5 79/26 71/21 pc
oe Low: 71° F/22°C a Sr . Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:21am. Moonrise....11:41a.m. Casablanca 82/27 66/18 pc 78/25 60/15 s
¢ a FT. LAUDERDALE Fe As of 2 p.m. yesterday occ 0.13" Sunset... 754 p.m. Moonset .... 12:12am. Copenhagen 64/17 46/7 c 68/20 54/12 c
-., FREEPORT Year to date First Full Last New Dublin 68/20 52/11 pc 64/17 48/8 s
High: 85° F/29° C @ High: 84° F/29° C Normal year to date .......c.cccecsessesseceeseeeeeee 11.39" 7 7 ag Frankfurt 72/22 45/7 pc 70/21 48/8 pc
Low: 71° F/22°C a Low: 78° F/26° C i ie Geneva 73/22 45/7 s 75/23 46/7 s
af AccuWeather.com r . es Halifax 510 50/10 c 60/15 48/8 c Showers Miami
a @ aa ‘ Forecasts and graphics provided by ; i" tay Havana 88/31 70/21 t 86/30 70/21 t T-storms 85/73
. MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 May30 9 Jun.7)— Jun. 1500 Jun. 22-———sHelsinki 63/17 45/7 pe 70/21 50/10 pc Rain Fronts
er High: 85° F/29° C I addi Hong Kong 81/27 73/22 r 82/27 75/23 sh Lx, * Flurries Cold
af 0 6 igh: 90° . Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
“ft Low: 73° F/23°C ; NASSAU Loa 80° F/27°C peu Ue _ : il — : Be Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. a —
High: 88 F/1°C TERIA 74/93 53/11 s 80/26 55/12 s [y_y] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Meagan
- ed Lee haere > Johannesburg 66/18 40/4 s 5O/15 35/1 s 10s | -0s (a3) 10s | 20s (Biel 40s
KEY WEST -, @ i. CATISLAND Kingston 87/30 78/25 t 88/31 77/25 sh
High: 85° F/29° C i : 3 3 Lima 22S pc (22S ils pe
Low: 78° F/26°C - High: 85° F/29° C London 73/22 50/10 pc 70/21 50/10 s
: di _ Low: 74° F/23°C Madrid 88/31 57/13 s 91/32 59/15 pe
© ; Manila 84/28 77/25 + 84/28 78/25 + a ‘@) 2 8 Cc
HN + hams Mexico City 81/27 57/13 t 73/22 53/11 t a ij In RA N E
iin, -, Monterrey 88/31 66/18 t 91/32 69/20 t
a GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR Montreal 68/20 50/10 r 6618 52/11 pc
alll I High: 87° F/31°C Hi h: 89° F/32°C Moscow 75/23 54/12 + 70/21 46/7 pe
: Low: 74° F/23°C Low: 76°F/24°C Munich 54/12 43/6 t 44/6 38/3 c
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS : Nairobi 79/26 63/17 t 80/26 63/17 t 1 ]
highs and tonights's lows. High: 89° F/32°C = . New Delhi 110/43 83/28 pc 106/41 82/27 t CVer S O r
Low: 80° F/27°C ae a Oslo 64/17 49/9 s 68/20 52/11 s
ale ; a Paris 72/22 50/10 s 72/22 52/11 s eli SS Wit QO t us!
Prague 56/13 49/9 sh 53/11 44/6 +
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High: 88° F/31° C iya s § str :
a rc rt foe rims soos 7a 5412 sn fa) WW s to Auto Insurance,
Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday ; MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 87/30 78/25 t 86/30 79/26 s he Smart choice is
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W ae High: 87° F/31°C San Juan 54/12 38/3 sh 64/17 37/2 pe “i
FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC Low: 76° F/24° C ee ouas an pe a aa t 1c Management.
Albuquerque 81/27 58/14 t 82/27 58/14 t Indianapolis 80/26 59/15 s 79/26 GING t Philadelphia 80/26 G16 t 79/26 58/14 s antiago C pe
Anchorage 58/14 46/7 c 61/16. 46/7 ++ Jacksonville 86/30 68/20 t 88/31 65/18 t Phoenix 100/37 75/23 pe 103/39 75/23 s CROOKEDISLAND/ACKLINS sai Damninigs BSiSt = De ESE eras . ple you can trust.
Atlanta 86/30 61/16 pc 83/28 61/16 s Kansas City 84/28 62/16 s 87/30 64/17 pe _ Pittsburgh 74/23 56/13 pce 76/24 54/12 t RAGGEDISLAND — High:s0°F/s2°c - _ arr aT i cr are i
Atlantic City 78/25 5743 t 78/25 58/14 s Las Vegas 97/36 70/21 s 99/37 72/22 pc Portland,OR 84/28 56/13 s 81/27 53/11. s High: 89° F/32°C Low: 78° F/26°C ; en map : a pe ca ° on pe
Baltimore 80/26 58/14 t 80/26 5613 s Little Rock 84/28 58/14 s 89/31 6216 s Raleigh-Durham 87/30 61/16 t 84/28 59/15 s Low: 73°F/23°C ¢ hay oA oe Rt Sein 7 ae aan af
Boston 64/17 5713 t 74/23 54/12 t LosAngeles 78/25 62/16 pc 78/25 60/15 pc St. Louis 82/27 6518 s 85/29 67/19 t . vail, om ae aoe : ee 7
Buffalo 66/18 47/8 po 66/18 46/7 t Louisville 80/26 6216 s 83/28 65/18 t Salt Lake City 85/29 63/17 pce 84/28 61/16 pc GREAT INAGUA Tok ; 70191 647 1 73/99 66/18 '
Charleston, SC 89/31 66/18 t 85/29 62/16 s Memphis 82/27 65/18 pc 88/31 68/20 s San Antonio 89/31 64/17 t 89/31 66/18 pc High: 92°F/33°C aaa 66/18 48/8. pc Bei Ad/6 t (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Chicago 76/24 5010 t 77/25 52/11 t Miami 95/29 73/22 t 87/30 72/22 t San Diego 70/21 6417 po 71/21 63/17 pe Low 77°F/25°C Trinidad BG/18 59/15 t 79/99 57/13 sh
Cleveland 66/18 51/10 s 73/22 52/1 t Minneapolis 75/23 55/12 pe 76/24 55/12 pce San Francisco 72/22 53/11 pe 69/20 54/12 pc .
Vancouver 71/21 54/12 pc 69/20 50/10 s ew ef mo
Dallas 88/31 64/17 s 90/32 66/18 s Nashville 80/26 58/14 pc 85/29 62416 pc Seattle 77/25 5140 s 73/22 52/1 s :
Vienna 57/13 48/8 sh 56/13 49/9 r
Denver 82/27 54/12 pc 83/28 53/41 pc NewOrleans 96/30 68/20 pc 87/30 69/20 s Tallahassee 89/31 66418 t 89/31 65/18 pc aS B17 ABI? sh BAIT ABIR ate BD) 35-3500 VeE (2AD) SAPARD | Tes (EAT) SED-DBAD | Tek: (DEE) 230-2304
Detroit 74/23 5241 s 73/22 52/1 t New York 76/24 61416 t 76/24 62/16 pc Tampa 87/30 71/21 t 86/30 70/21 t Winnipeg 66/18 43/6 pc 59/15 40/4 pc \ to ie ,
Honolulu 86/30 72/22 pc 85/29 74/23 s Oklahoma City 88/31 63/17 s 91/32 62/16 s Tucson 96/35 68/20 s 98/36 66/18 s :
Houston 89/31 64/17 pc 90/32 66/18 s Orlando 86/30 70/21 t 89/31 70/21 t Washington,DC 84/28 60/15 t 80/26 62/16 s Th ee ee
PAGE 18B, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2009

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INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

Dell profit falls 63%

mg JESSICA MINTZ
AP Technology Writer
SEATTLE

Dell Inc. said Thursday its fis-
cal first-quarter profit fell 63
percent as the recession contin-
ued to crimp computer sales
around the world, according to
Associated Press.

The results, coupled with a
cautious outlook from the
world's top PC seller, Hewlett-
Packard Co., indicate that the
computer market has not
improved much since last year's
economic meltdown led to a
holiday season that was the
industry's worst stretch in six
years.

Dell's earnings for the three
months that ended May 1 sank
to $290 million, or 15 cents per
share, from $784 million, or 38
cents per share, in the same
period last year.

The most recent results
included a 9-cent charge from
closing facilities and paying sev-
erance to laid-off workers.
Excluding the charge, Dell
earned 24 cents per share, or a
penny better than analysts had
predicted, according to a Thom-
son Reuters survey.

Sales dropped 23 percent to
$12.3 billion, lower than the
$12.6 billion analysts had pre-
dicted for Round Rock, Texas-
based Dell.

In a conference call, Chief
Financial Officer Brian Glad-
den said sales picked up toward
the end of the quarter, but that
is normal for the time of year.
Gladden said May was no bet-
ter than the first quarter, and
looking ahead he said orders
and conversations with cus-
tomers yield "mixed signals."

"We would hope that we
would see improved demand in
the later part of the year," Glad-
den said. "Hopefully sooner
versus later."

Hewlett-Packard's chief exec-
utive, Mark Hurd, has
expressed similar caution.
Speaking at an investor confer-
ence Thursday, Hurd would not



Giatacdyn, aS PC sales stay soft

Paul Sakuma/AP Photo

IN THIS JAN. 9, 2009 PHOTO, Dell Computers are seen on display at
the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. Dell Inc. on Thursday,
May 28, 2009 said its fiscal first-quarter profit fell 63 percent as the
recession continued to crimp computer sales around the world.

say when he thought the PC
market would begin to rebound.

That is in contrast to Paul
Otellini, the CEO of Intel
Corp., the world's biggest sup-
plier of PC microprocessors,
who has said sales already
appear to have bottomed out
and returned to normal season-
al patterns.

Netbooks

At Dell, sales of laptops and
the smaller, less powerful net-
books, which together make up
Dell's largest product category,
fell 20 percent in the quarter.
Recession-weary shoppers’
preference for netbooks and
low-end PCs dragged average
prices down 8 percent.

Revenue from large enter-
prises and small and medium-
sized businesses worldwide fell
about 30 percent. Consumer
sales dropped 16 percent.

U.S. revenue, which accounts
for 52 percent of Dell's total,
declined 21 percent, as did rev-
enue in its Asia Pacific-Japan
segment. Sales fell a steeper 29
percent in Europe, the Middle
East and Africa combined. In



Brazil, Russia, India and Chi-
na, the so-called "BRIC" coun-
tries, revenue fell 21 percent.

Despite the PC maker's
uncertainty about the market,
CEO Michael Dell said he
expects big businesses to
replace many workers’ com-
puters in 2010, after Microsoft
Corp.'s next operating system,
Windows 7, has been released.

The company said it slashed
operating expenses by 15 per-
cent from a year ago to $1.8 bil-
lion as the PC maker tries to
squeeze $4 billion out of its
annual costs.

Some of the savings is coming
from a shift from company-
owned factories to less-expen-
sive contract manufacturers,
and some is tied to layoffs.
Gladden would not say how
many people Dell laid off in the
quarter, nor would he say what
the PC maker's plans are for
future job cuts.

Shares of Dell edged up 12
cents to $11.60 in after-hours
trading.

Before the earnings report,
they rose 36 cents, or 3.2 per-
cent, to end the regular session
at $11.48.