Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Mim blowin’ it

SOF
TIF

The Tribune

LOW The Paint:

Mt. Royal Ave. \

PLENTY OF

Volume: 105 No.153



=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009

WSS

LCM mM

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE

> DP BAHAMAS BUDGET 2009/10 SPECIAL Sins
‘Litigation likely’
over amendment

to the Customs
Management Act

leacher's, doctors

PM delivers
sober address

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

TEACHERS, doc-
tors and nurses are
among those on the
public payroll who
will be hit by cutbacks
in government's
upcoming budget,
having to forego
salary increases —
with the latter not
receiving an antici-
pated $10.5 million
health insurance ben-
efit — in this fiscal
year.

This revelation was
made by Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham as he delivered a
sober address on the state of
the economy during the pre-
sentation of the 2009/2010 fiscal
budget to the House of Assem-
bly yesterday.

He explained that to reduce
public spending during the eco-
nomic turbulence, government
plans to maintain recurrent
expenditure — such as salary
payments — in the upcoming
fiscal year.



PRIME MINISTER
Hubert Ingraham at the
House of Assembly
making his budget
communication.
¢ SEE PAGES THREE,
SEVEN AND BUSINESS
SECTION FOR MORE
BUDGET NEWS

"In this regard, we
will endeavour to
maintain employment
levels and other pri-
orities. And we will
move firmly to elimi-
nate expenditures
which, in present cir-
cumstances, are of
low priority. For
example, travel to
international confer-
ences will be reduced
to the bare minimum
and only urgent
staffing appointments
will be approved.
Each ministry and
department is aware
of government policy
on this issue and is
gearing to give effect
to it,” he said.

This "expenditure restraint”
led government to make some
tough decisions which will affect
professionals in core sectors of
the economy.

"T note in this regard the need
to require teachers, doctors and
nurses to forgo this year, the
salary increases, and in the case
of nurses, a new health insur-
ance benefit, provided for in
their contract, totalling some

SEE page 10

Felipé Major/Tribune staff |



m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

AFTER reportedly being released from Her
Majesty’s Prison only two days ago, a 24-year-old
man is back in police custody being questioned in
connection with the murder of his 19-year-old
girlfriend and an attempt to bury her body in the
War Veterans Cemetery early yesterday morning.

According to reports reaching The Tribune,

Former president
of GB Chamber

of Commerce
responds to Budget






LEFT: The uncle
of Shenise Adder-
ley, Calvin Fisher,
and her mother,
Carol Fisher, show
a photograph of
the 19-year-old
(above).

the 24-year-old Chippingham resident was at SHENISE ADDERLEY’S body was found in this grave.
home when his girlfriend, Shenise Adderley
returned to their residence that night from work.

Reportedly, there was an argument, and gun-
shots were heard by neighbours sometime around
2am. A short time later, a resident in the area
reported that he had been approached by a man

















CHAIR OMMTe eT C
protect CLICO policyholders

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

chase policies from the failed
company Clico (Bahamas) Ltd
and assume the possible expo-
sure of $30 million without the
surety from government.

It is expected the $30 million
maximum guarantee will be in
place for five years and cover all
policies that are already in force.

The maximum covered by the
guarantee includes the full
amount for accident and sickness
policies, as well as group life,

SEE page 14

CLICO policyholders will be
protected by a $30 million guar-
antee from government to facil-
itate the sale of Clico’s policy lia-
bilities to insurance companies,
the Prime Minister has
announced.

During his Budget Communi-
cation in the House of Assem-
bly Mr Ingraham said insurance
companies were unwilling to pur-



asking for assistance in “disposing” of a body.
Police were later told that a man had gone to
the Veterans Cemetery on Infant View Road

SEE page 10



AIRPORT SECURITY

CHIEF REPORTEDLY SHOT

SANDILANDS NURSING STAFF
THREATEN SICK-OUT

OPPOSITION CONCERNED
OVER PUBLIC SERVICE JOBS





Durham § es
P.0.Box N3723

‘Tel:326-1875









m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

A FORMER Grand
Bahama Chamber of Com-
merce president last night
said renewed litigation was
likely over the Governmen-
t’s 2009-2010 Budget plans
to amend the Customs Man-
agement Act, given that the
changes appeared to be an
attempt to give Customs
“arbitrary powers” to con-
duct audits of Port Authori-
ty licensees.

Christopher Lowe, who is
also operations manager at
Kelly’s (Freeport), said
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham’s Budget commu-
nication, and the amend-
ments tabled in the House
of Assembly for their First
Reading yesterday, seemed
to be a government attempt
to circumvent previous

SEE page 12

Govt ‘making
reforms to
keep country
above water’

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia. net

WITH the future still uncertain
and the possibility that any economic
projections may quickly be rendered
obsolete, the Prime Minister has
sought to assure the public that gov-
ernment is acting cautiously and
making reforms to keep the country
above water in challenging times.

But despite these pledges Mr
Ingraham yesterday provided the
public with little reason to rejoice
when he delivered the 2009/2010
Budget Communication in parlia-
ment.

Instead he offered domestic and
global facts and figures to justify cut-
backs in spending almost across the
board and the need for what may in
some cases be unpopular but cost-
saving reforms.

This as he confirmed that the
Bahamas is experiencing “a severe
downturn in our economy in a most
extreme form - (with) reduced
tourism, reduced foreign direct
investments, reduced government
revenues, reduced employment and
contracting living standards.”

Outlining government’s financial
strategy for the 2009/2010 fiscal year,

SEE page 14

Ph: (242) 825-2576

East Stree! (Seuth of Andeos Avenue)

or
‘any A

emai: janaens cor alvere.com
WW. janaeeebridal. com







NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS” LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Nursing staff at Sandilands rehabilitation centre threaten action toda



m By PAUL G TURNQUEST

lands received cuts ranging from

late on arrival at work, they claim

ter resolve this today. This is

‘Reverse pay cuts - or face a sick-out

Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

NURSING staff at the Sandi-
lands rehabilitation centre have
threatened to stage a sick out
today if salary pay cuts are not
reimbursed, union president Cle-
ola Hamilton warned.

Yesterday, more than 500 nurs-
es and auxiliary staff at Sandi-











































ee ey lat eee la
pa a4

as low as $1.50 to nearly $600.

The deductions, it was claimed,
are due to the results of a pilot
project that required employees
to sign in. The data was then
transferred to the accounting
department, which recorded who
arrived late, or left the facility
before their shifts had been com-
pleted.

While the majority of those
affected accept that they signed in

= hi I
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An gocchusive luxury

no due process was followed in
terms of issuing first a verbal
warning, followed by a written
one before any pay cuts could be
carried out.

“When you start messing with
people’s money that’s when you
have problems,” Ms Hamilton,
the president of the Nursing
Union said.

“Tf it is not resolved they will
not be back to work. So they bet-

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wrong,” she exclaimed.

As one out of a few entities
under the Public Hospital’s
Authority, Sandilands staff com-
plain that no pay cuts have yet to
be seen at the Rand Memorial
Hospital, the Princess Margaret
Hospital, or the Public Hospital
Authority’s corporate headquar-
ters itself — only Sandilands.

“They are violating the indus-
trial agreement, and they are try-
ing to take advantage of the peo-
ple out on the front line. I told
Dr (Hubert) Minnis that the nurs-
es are on a pinnacle and with only
a little bit of hot air they will blow
us over. If this is the hot air then
we welcome it,” Ms Hamilton
said.

About a dozen other nurses
congregated with Ms Hamilton
and shop stewart Margaret
Knowles outside the Sandilands
centre when the media arrived.
They outlined their concerns and
warned they would not sit idly by
and allow this kind of “foolish-
ness” to happen.

Ends May 30

Mackey St: 393-5684

Fabulous

Selection of

ANIME CLEIN

BCBGIRLS





Felipé Major/Tribune staff

NURSING STAFF at the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre have threat-
ened to stage a sick out today in a pay dispute.

Ms Hamilton added: “They cut
some girls for being late twice.
Some people were late once and
you cut them?

“No warning letter you give
them? This is procedural impro-
priety. Everyone except the doc-
tors swipe. Management say they
swipe for security but they aren’t

Bernard Rd

Thompson Blvd: 328-1164

Ue

pad Tes
aa Vil Vi 7





Whopper Jr.

Double
Cheeseburger

BLT & Cheese

timed. No one says nothing when
these nurses are here over their
time. No one says nothing when
they work through their lunch
hour.”

Attempts to contact the Minis-
ter of Health Dr Hubert Minnis
were unsuccessful up to press
time last night.

© In brief

Marijuana
haul found
after police
shootout

GUNFIRE rang out in east-
ern New Providence when a
group of men shot at police
and officers returned fire,
causing the men to flee and
drop $11,000 worth of mari-
juana.

The officers had been on
patrol when they heard gun-
shots and found the men gath-
ered behind City Market on
the corner of Wulff and Vil-
lage Roads.

As the officers approached,
shots were fired and the police
shot back.

No one was injured in the
exchange, and the men ran
off.

A bag containing 10 and a
half pounds of marijuana with
a Street value of just under
$11,000 was found in the area.

No arrests have been made
and police investigations con-
tinue.

Anyone with any informa-
tion which may assist the
police with this matter should
call Crime Stoppers anony-
mously on 328-TIPS (8477).

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 3



Opposition concerned [7772 Gj can

over public service jobs

Woman who

admitied lying

about kidnap |
hack in court

m@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE

Tribune Staff Reporter

A WOMAN who admit-
ted lying to police about
her three-year-old son
being kidnapped by her

former boyfriend was back

in court yesterday.

Angie Moss, 37, who
also goes by the name
Angie Brown, appeared
before Chief Magistrate
Roger Gomez in Court
One, Bank Lane after
spending three weeks at
the Sandilands rehabilita-
tion centre.

In an emotional plea to
the court, Moss asked for
help, claiming she was in
fear for her life.

She also alleged that
while undergoing a court-
ordered evaluation at

Sandilands she was contin-

uously being harassed by
her former boyfriend,
Kendrick Siefort, 35.

Moss claimed he had left i
numerous threatening mes-

sages on her cellular
phone.

Magistrate Gomez
expressed concern for
Moss and her children. He
ordered the matter be

referred to the Department

of Social Services for a
report.

Moss was granted bail in
the sum of $1,000 with one
surety. The case was

adjourned to July 31 which

is when Moss is expected
to be sentenced.

Moss pleaded guilty to
deceit earlier this month,
admitting she had made a
false kidnap claim because
she wanted police to lock
up her former boyfriend.

Mother of five, Moss told

police on May | that
Siefort had removed her

1996 Bluebird from outside }
her Lewis Street home. She i

also told them her son,
Shannon Bannister, was
asleep on the back seat.

Police issued an all
points bulletin for Siefort,
who subsequently turned
himself in.

m By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

DESPITE assurances given by Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham yesterday that government will do its best to try
to maintain employment levels within the public service,
there is concern from the Opposition that the nation's
chief has not revealed "the whole story", meaning that
further public staff reductions may be inevitable as a
further cost cutting measure to survive the dire economic
climate.

During a grave presentation yesterday of the 2009/2010
fiscal budget, Mr Ingraham said the severe global down-
turn led to an almost 17 per cent decline in recurrent rev-
enue, estimated to be $260 million lower than projected
in last year’s budget. He also painted a grim picture of the
country's ballooning deficit for 2008/2009, estimated at
$352 million, more than double the amount projected in
last year's budget communication.

In order to strengthen fiscal discipline during the cur-
rent economic turbulence, government intends to hold the
line on recurrent expenditure - such as salaries - in the
2009/2010 fiscal year, said Mr Ingraham.

Employment

"In this regard, we will endeavour to maintain employ-
ment levels and other priorities. And we will move firm-
ly to eliminate expenditures which, in present circum-
stances, are of low priority," said Mr Ingraham.

But leader of Opposition Business in the House of
Assembly Dr Bernard Nottage feels the prime minister
did not reveal the full scope of the possible need to shed
more staff from the public service.

"It's really a budget of doom and gloom and I'm not
sure that we've got the whole story yet," he told The
Tribune after the prime minister's communication yes-
terday. "He's talked about not replacing persons who've
retired - the next step to that might have to be to reduce
staff.

"I'm not suggesting that is the plan but I wouldn't be
surprised if that becomes necessary because they are

A
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BUDGET

predicting a revenue shortfall this year (and) they've
reduced the allocation to ministries. He says that he's
expecting to do more with less money but I'm not sure the
government will be able to do that, that the ministries will
be able to do that, year over year," Dr Nottage continued.

The prime minister said yesterday that the spots left
vacant by 138 public servants who will reach the manda-
tory age of retirement during the fiscal year will not be
filled, bringing the government annual salary savings of
an estimated $4.1 million.

The nation's chief also announced several planned
cutbacks on government spending such as reducing
unnecessary travel to conferences abroad "to the bare
minimum" and adding that only “urgent staffing appoint-
ments" will be approved.

Government will also restrain spending by allocating
funding to all government ministries, departments and
agencies sufficient to meet their "core" mandate to the
public. Subsequently, this year's budget includes decreas-
es in allocations to nearly all ministries and departments
over approved estimates in the current fiscal period.

"Clearly, all will be challenged to manage public
resources within very stringent budgetary conditions.
The stark reality is that the severe fiscal situation in
which we find ourselves warrants that to be the case," said
Mr Ingraham.

Still there are a few selected increases, the largest are
allotted to the Department of Public Service, $10.4 mil-
lion (for pensions, insurance for uniformed services and
others); the Public Hospitals Authority, $7.3 million; the
Department of Environmental Health Services, $2.9 mil-
lion; and the Department of Public Health, $1.9 million.

Total recurrent expenditure allocations in 2009/2010 fis-
cal year are set at a level of $1.53 billion, some $39.3
million lower than the approved estimates for 2008/09.

"Expenditure restraint" will also lead to the foregoing
of salary increases for nurses, doctors and teachers dur-
ing the upcoming fiscal year.

Nurses will also have to forego an anticipated $10.5 mil-
lion healthcare benefit as a result.



ZHIVARGO LAING, Minister of
State in the Ministry of Finance,
holding the 2009/2010 budget
communication, surroundechby-
other Cabinet ministers.



Christie: Budget offers no blueprint for way forward

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

RESPONDING to govern-
ment’s 2009/2010 budget com-
munication, opposition leader
Perry Christie said that if the
prime minister is serious about
fiscal prudence during these
tough economic times, he should
start cutting back on the size of
his Cabinet.

Chastising Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham’s government
for its sober and “depressing”
view of the state of the country,
Mr Christie said this year’s bud-
get once again offered no blue-
print for the way forward.

Claiming government is “sim-
ply waiting” for the world to
change, Mr Christie said the
Bahamas must accept the eco-
nomic realities it is faced with,
but must not waive the white flag
of surrender, “as this govern-
ment proposes to do.”

“This budget inspires no hope.
Do we stand still and do nothing
hoping that the world changes?
There is not one thing in the
prime minister’s statement to use
our ingenuity, creativity to
inspire our people,” he said.

Mr Christie said that the prime
minister should have presented
the country with strategies to
help it grow in these difficult
times — such as plans for devel-
oping agriculture and fisheries,
improving the financial services
sector and meeting the chal-
lenges facing the tourism indus-
try.

“We remind the prime minis-
ter with regard to changes in the
terms and conditions of workers
in the public service that those
changes will require the concur-
rence of workers. We are espe-
cially concerned about the gov-
ernment’s decision to eliminate
health insurance for nurses. This
was a very strongly negotiated
benefit, which nurses who are
exposed to diseases on a daily
basis require. We urge the gov-
ernment to reconsider this deci-
sion.

“We are also concerned that
no mention was made about the
much promoted drug prescrip-
tion programme. What does this
budget statement say to the chil-
dren who are coming out of
school this year about their
futures? The people who are in
college today. What will they do?
What is the promise for them?
The budget said nothing to the
new college graduate, to the stu-
dents at the College of the

Bahamas, to the thou-
sands coming out of
high school this year,”
he said.

With thousands of
Bahamians out of
work, and many more
on the brink of losing
their homes, Mr
Christie said that
Bahamians had been
looking to the budget
communication for
some glimmer of
hope.

“Instead of a plan,
instead of hope, what

Perry Christie



mechanics,
reform, passing laws,
bringing into force
new regulations, not
hiring people. This is
a budget that will
inflict pain.

“We reiterate — and
this is reinforced by no
less than Standard and
Poor’s — that it is the
policies of this gov-
ernment that stopped
the momentum of this
economy and under-
mined internal and
external investor con-

talk of direct investments left on the
table by my government, the
economy of the Bahamas may
have been cushioned from the
full effects of the global eco-
nomic crisis,” he said.

Mr Christie added that the
government’s decision to initi-
ate budget cuts in its third year in
office is an admission that its
economic policies over the last
two years “have failed.”

He promised that the PLP
would carefully analyse the bud-
get communication and its
accompanying bills and speak
more fully on the matter during

they have gotten yet again from
the prime minister is a long
description of what the problem
is mixed in with self-congratula-
tion over social service interven-
tions. There was no recognition
that the policies of this adminis-
tration helped to put us in this
situation. There is plenty on

fidence. The termination of hun-
dreds of public sector workers
sent the signal to the private sec-
tor that they were free to lay off
employees.

“We maintain that had the
FNM not stopped the public
infrastructure contracts, not
delayed the approval of foreign

the debate next week.

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“APL SERVE TIC





PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Realistic approach is correct

EARLIER this month a letter writer to The
Tribune criticised Prime Minister Ingraham for
selecting a foreigner to head the soon to be
established Utilities Regulation and Competi-
tion Authority (URCA), whose job it will be to
regulate government’s electronic communica-
tions policy.

During the recent debate on the 2009 Com-
munications Bill to provide communications
services — preparatory to the sale of the
Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC)
— Mr Ingraham had said that although gov-
ernment hoped to staff the regulatory authori-
ty with Bahamians, they “had to be realists.”

“But we are realists,” he said, “and we also
recognise that in this early phase we will be
required to access talent that may not be avail-
able in the Bahamas.”

Government, he said, had already identified
this talent. The new policy director of URCA
would be a foreigner. Mr Ingraham also expect-
ed that “some of the salaries paid to some of the
professionals will be higher than what is nor-
mally paid in other areas in the Bahamas.”

“Basically,” said the letter writer, what Mr
Ingraham was telling his fellow countrymen
was: “Bahamians you are too incompetent and
unqualified to set policy and/or regulate your
own utilities and communications sector —ha!
take that like a swift kick to you know where!”

The letter writer said, for example, that he
had spent 12 years working at a major telecom-
munications company in the USA “in spe-
cialised areas, the last being negotiating inter-
national settlement rates between the telecom-
munications company and foreign telecommu-
nications carriers saving monies...” He did not
say how many years ago it was that he had held
such a position. Of course, what might have
been then and what is now could be light years
apart. What one could have done then, could
not be done now with the rapid advancement in
technology.

Mr Ingraham’s statement is an insult to no
Bahamian. However, it is a realistic assessment
of the present standard of local talent. Busi-
nesses — especially international businesses —
will tell you that the present standard of our
telecommunications system is one of the stum-
bling blocks to the advancement of e-commerce.
BaTelCo (now BTC) did the best it could with
the local talent that it had. However, that local
talent from a small archipelago of 300,000 souls
has not had the opportunity of the needed expo-
sure in the fast developing and changing
telecommunications world of today. If we had
had the talent of which the correspondent
writes, then we would have had a better
telecommunications service than we have now
and there would be no need to sell BTC. The
Bahamas has to move to the next level. If we do

Bay farms in the 1970s, government will have to
bring in foreign experts to train the next gen-
eration of Bahamians to replace them.

The letter writer questioned whether the
USA would have so insulted its citizens. It was
not so many years ago that the USA was com-
plaining of a shortage of technical staff to keep
it the world leader in telecommunications and
modern technology. It was not backward in
importing the smartest brains India had to offer
to fill the void. And when American business-
men felt that the unions were pricing them-
selves and their members out of the market,
they had no crisis of conscience when they
decided to transfer their work overseas to be
expertly handled by Asian workers. It is not
unusual for a person to call an American com-
pany for information, only to have the call and
question answered by a company in New Delhi.

So the lack of talent in their own country is
not going to hold back America in maintaining
its position as a world leader. If they don’t have
the talent, they will import it. And if local exper-
tise is too expensive they will reach half across
the world to employ people who offer more
competitive services.

To say that the Bahamas is moving into the
next generation of the telecommunications
industry with a foreigner at the head, is no
reflection on the ability of Bahamians. There are
many smart Bahamians, who with training will
be able to prepare for the top jobs. But making
decisions on the basis of nationalistic pride is
foolhardy — as the people left behind in Alice
Town, Eleuthera will now tell you. Mind you
when the Pindling administration decided to
take over the once flourishing Hatchet Bay
farms, drive out the foreign scientists and the
trained Bahamians who were not PLP, many
Alice Town residents were delighted. They were
delighted because they felt they would step into
the vacant positions. However, as those who
took over the farm had no experience, and the
politicos in Nassau, who made the decisions.
had even less, the Bahamian run farm was a
colossal failure. It soon shut down. The Alice
Town residents now realise that if the foreign-
ers had stayed and trained them, they might
have indeed had what former prime minister
Lynden Pindling promised — the “greatest
success story in the country’s history of agri-
culture.” Instead they have a ramshackle waste-
land, not the promised “triumph of the human
spirit”, but the folly of short-sighted, inexperi-
enced politicians in a small country who put
pride before commonsense.

Fortunately, Mr Ingraham is a realist who is
not willing to walk down that thorny path to
oblivion. Bahamians will take their place in the
sun when they accept that this can only be
achieved with a better trained and more pro-

Grading our
Ministers — an

exercise in
democracy

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

A recent Tribune article which
graded the Cabinet Ministers was
a very interesting one. I think this
kind of exercise is one that
encourages people to understand
that the power in this country,
and in any true democracy, lies
with the people and not with the
41 Members of Parliament whom
we elect to represent us and to
be our servants.

An even more interesting exer-
cise, I believe, would be to have
all of us, (the general public),
grade our employees, (the min-
isters)....on a regular basis.

To this end, a website has been
constructed and we invite all
Bahamians to participate. The
website can be found at the fol-
lowing address http://qrade.speed-
survey.com

Before we get too high and
mighty about being the boss, I
would like to stress that we also
have our part to play. Bahami-
ans are often too complacent. We
sit back and complain about what
the Members of Parliament are
not doing, but we seldom take
action. During elections, we
attend rallies and congregate at
constituency offices, we chat and
rant and rave, and then as soon as
elections are over we all sit back,
watch, criticise, condemn, many
of us begging MP’s for handouts,
asking them to pay our rent and
light bills, find us government
jobs, give us government con-
tracts, get rid of crime, solve the
problem of health care, bring the

letters@tribunemedia net



tourists here, develop agriculture,
get rid of the illegal aliens —
whom we continue to employ —
and the list of expectations and
demands goes on and on..... and
then we expect the 41 men and
women in parliament to get it all
done. While the 350,000 of us left,
do nothing but sit and watch...and
condemn.

It is clear that Bahamians are
confused about where the power
lies when we can make comments
like “This Minister is no good
because he has no plan.” The
question is, what is your plan!?
Ministers of the government
should be carrying out the peo-
ple’s agenda! Not an agenda of
their own!

I was most impressed recent-
ly, when The Hon Branville
McCartney actually posted a
notice to let constituents know
what the discussion in the House
was going to be about and then
asked for their input! Now that is
true representation!

Many of us do not read the
notices in the papers or attend
constituency meetings, or town
meetings, or any other event to
show our support or lack of sup-
port of anything. The majority of
us even fail to try and work
together in our own neighbour-
hoods. We complain about how

we haven’t seen our MP since
election, when we ourselves have
never visited the constituency
office or shown up to any event
that has organised for the con-
stituency office, or volunteered
our services for even one day!
Surely we don’t expect the MP
to visit 5000 voters every week!
And don’t insist that he send his
representatives because....we are
the people he represents! We
need to get up and help out!

If anyone or all of the 41 MP’s
and Ministers are not perform-
ing, it is because the 350,000+ of
us left, have allowed it. They can
only get away with what we let
them. It takes all of us to make a
difference, no matter which party
is In power.

The purpose of the survey is
not to bash or blame or criticise,
but to get an honest opinion of
how The Bahamian public feels
about the performance of each
of the ministers whom we pay to
work for us.

The comments and the grades
will be sent to each of the minis-
ters, in an effort to get them to
improve and make changes,
based on the constructive criti-
cism, and suggestions of their
employers....we....the people!

Thank you for your concern
and willingness to participate as a
citizen of this country.
http://grade.speedsurvey.gzm

BAHAMA VOICE
Nassau,
May 19, 2009.

No legitimate reason to stop eating of turtles

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I have been following all of the letters in your
paper regarding the capture of turtles in the Bahamas

and I have to reply now.

I am a conscientious conservationist but not a
fanatic one. I want my grandchildren and their grand-
children to be able to enjoy more of this Bahamas
and what it has to offer than what I have enjoyed,
and believe me that is plenty. I, and my wife much
more than I, do not condone the ill treatment of

any animal or living thing.

As such I have spent the last 15 years taking my
children and grandchildren on my boat for the entire
month of August all through the islands and I have
taught them that you do not kill anything unless
you are going to make good use of it.

To all of the people who are aginst turtles being
captured by Bahamians for food, I say to them, "Get
off their laurels and go out into the waters of the
Bahamas and see for themselves as the fishermen
from every island do, that there is absolutely no
shortage of green turtles in the Bahamas.”

As a matter of fact there are more turtles in the

Bahamas today than at any time during my life and
I have been fishing and diving for the past 45 years,

The problem is the Ministry of Fisheries for years
had a fish market on Potter's Cay and before that

down at the old fish market on Woodes Rogers
Wharf where turtles were taken to be slaughtered in

private where the public did not see it, therefore it

did not create a problem which is now being com-
plained about, that turtles are being ill treated.
The eating of turtle has been a part of the
Bahamian diet for the 60 years that I have been
alive and there is no legitimate reason for it now to
be stopped. If cows, sheep or chickens were being

slaughtered on Potters Cay or Montagu Ramp, then

so the endangered argument goes out the window.

I guess we would soon not be able to eat anymore of
them and then what is next?

As I said I do not condone treating anything
inhumanely, but if it is done properly and privately,
then I see nothing wrong with it.

There are thousands of Bahamians who love to
eat turtle whenever they can and with today’s eco-
nomic crisis it would be very unfair of the Ministry of
Fisheries or the Government to deprive them of
being able to do this. If the persons who are against
this do not want to eat turtle that is their God-given
right, but by the same token do not stop other per-
sons from being able to do so. I shall wait for the
rebuttal which I know will come.



: Mr. Allen is very right in his thinking that ABNER PINDER
not want to repeat the tragedy of the Hatchet ductive local work force. Bahamians should not be deprived of a delicacy Spanish Wells,
that God put there for them to enjoy. May 26, 2009

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 5



0 In brief

Boy critically
hurt after head
hits concrete
during fight

A 14-YEAR-OLD Abaco
boy is in critical condition after
his head hit a concrete surface
during a fight with another boy.

The boy was airlifted from
Marsh Harbour, Abaco, to Nas-
sau for treatment, and is
presently in critical condition in
the Intensive Care Unit.

Police say he was involved in
a fight some time after 11pm on
Tuesday with another boy who
he knew. Abaco Police have
launched an investigation into
the matter.

Anyone with any information
which may assist the police
should call Crime Stoppers
anonymously on 328-TIPS
(8477).

Man jailed for
harhouring
suspected
pastor killer

|_| By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A MAN has been jailed for
two years after being convicted
of harbouring a man suspected
of killing pastor Troy Seymour
in Grand Bahama three years
ago. Solomon Young, 37, alias
Marvin Gibson of Blue Hill
Road south, was found guilty
and convicted of the offence on
Tuesday by Magistrate Carolita
Bethel.

Young was accused of con-
cealing the suspect between
November 13 and September
2007 with the purpose of
enabling him to avoid lawful
arrest. Father-of-three Mr Sey-
mour, a Kentucky Fried Chick-
en employee, was robbed of
$11,529 takings and killed on
November 13, 2006.

His death sent shockwaves
throughout the Eight Mile Rock
community in Grand Bahama.

The 37-year-old was report-
edly run off the road in the
Hanna Hill area and then
stabbed and chased into a near-
by house before being shot in
the face.

Mr Seymour, a resident of
Pinedale, was an associate pas-
tor at Mt Zion Baptist Church
in Eight Mile Rock.

Airport security chief reportedly in
serious condition after shooting

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

AN AIRPORT security
chief is reportedly in serious
condition following a shoot-
ing outside Asa H Pritchard
in Robinson Road yesterday
morning.

Jerry Hutchinson, who The
Tribune understands is gener-
al manager of security for the
Airport Authority and a
senior reserve police officer,
was shot in the abdomen
when collecting money from
the grocery wholesalers at
around 6.30am.

He was approached by an
armed robber as he was leav-
ing Asa H Pritchard on the
corner of Claridge Road with
funds to take for deposit.

The gunman threatened
him with a handgun and
demanded Mr Hutchinson
hand over the cash.

Assistant Superintendent
Leon Bethel said there was a

struggle between the two men
and Mr Hutchinson was shot
in the abdomen.

The gunman grabbed the
bag of cash, jumped into the
driver’s seat of a white Honda,
with registration number
111982, and sped off.

Police said crime scene offi-
cers recovered evidence of
firearms discharged outside
Asa H Pritchard at the time.

Appealing

Asst Supt Bethel added:
“We are appealing to the pub-
lic for help.

“Some persons would have
been around at the time and
we believe there are persons
who may have seen what hap-
pened.

“We are asking if they are
able to assist us.

“The car would have been
seen speeding away from
there and we would appreci-
ate any information.”

Asa H Pritchard bosses

Me EASES

declined to comment on the
robbery.

Anyone who may have any
information which may assist
investigations should call

Crime Stoppers urgently on
328-TIPS (8477). All calls are
toll-free and answered in the
United States to ensure total
anonymity.

Su a0) Or .@6 si

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(left) greeted Federation of International Football Association (FIFA)
president yesterday at the Lynden Pindling International Airport.
Bahamas Football Association president Anton Sealey made the
introduction. Mr Blatter is in Nassau for the FIFA Congress 2009
which will be held June 2 and 3 at Atlantis, Paradise Island.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



A number of prominent judges
have been appointed the difficult
task of selecting the next Miss
Bahamas World from amongst the
young women collectively known
as the Earth Angels.

International and local experts
from the fields of pageantry, beau-
ty and fashion will spend three
days this weekend selecting the
nation’s newest beauty ambas-
sador.

Noted fashion stylist, beauty
expert and television personality

Nolé Marin heads the list of inter-
national celebrities who will be
judging the event.

Nolé served as a judge on the
hit television reality series Amer-
ica’s Next Top Model and has
contributed as a fashion expert
on numerous television shows and
celebrity events such as the Acad-

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MTV hit show “Made”, and cre-
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Top Model.

Stir

Also judging is a young lady
who created quite a stir in the
2007 Miss Universe pageant. Fla-
viana Matata won the very first
edition of the Miss Universe Tan-
zania pageant in 2007, and went
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PAGEANT QUEEN: Kiara Sherman,
who was crowned Miss Bahamas
Universe 2009.

She was the first contestant
from Tanzania to compete at Miss
Universe, and she did so with flair
— competing with a shaved head.
Now based in South Africa, she is
in high demand as a supermodel
across the continent and in
Europe.

Serving as head judge is fashion
designer and pageant expert Bob-
by Ackbarali, who has worked in
the international fashion and
pageant industries for nearly 30
years; achieving an unparalleled
record of success in his native
Trinidad and Tobago before
migrating to Toronto, Canada.

Former Miss Bahamas Tasha

Ramirez Cartharn has returned
home to serve as a juror. She has
been involved in pageantry for
over 21 years, and won the titles
of Miss Grand Bahama 1988 and
Miss Bahamas 1988-1989, and
competed in the 1989 Miss Uni-
verse Pageant held in Cancun,
Mexico as well as the Miss Model
of the World Competition held in
Taipei, Taiwan in 1990.

Brynda Knowles is an award
winning fashion designer, make-
up artist, and a four time Bahami-
an Designer of the Year award
winner.

She has travelled extensively
representing the Bahamas with
the Ministry of Tourism.

Dr Gregory Neil is a much
sought after cosmetic surgeon in
the Bahamas. He is also the offi-
cial cosmetic surgeon of the Miss
Bahamas Organisation.

Rounding out the panel is for-
mer Miss World Bahamas Latia
Bowe-Duncombe, who was
crowned in 2000 and represented
the Bahamas at Miss World in
London that year.

The judges will adjudicate the
evening gown and talent compe-
titions on Friday evening at the
British Colonial Hilton hotel.

They will then meet the con-
testants during one-one-one inter-
views on Saturday.

The Grand Finale will be held
on Sunday evening at the Rain-
forest Theatre when a new Miss
Bahamas World will be crowned.

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Scholarship
programme
to produce
qualified local
mariners

IN an effort to produce
qualified Bahamian mariners
to fulfil the needs of the
country’s domestic and inter-
national deep sea fleet, a
new $5,000 scholarship pro-
gramme has been intro-
duced.

The programme, launched
by the Bahamas Technologi-
cal Training and Allied Ser-
vices (BMTTAS), will offer
the following courses:

* associates degree in
marine engineering — 18
months

* associates degree in
marine transportation — 18
months

“BMTTAS would like to
reiterate our commitment to
fight the unemployment
problem in the country
through the maritime indus-
try. The Bahamas, as the
third largest vessel registry in
the world, can take advan-
tage of this global opportuni-
ty. To gain employment
onboard ships, Bahamians
must have specialised, skills-
based training to be competi-
tive in the international mar-
itime industry,” said a
spokesperson for the organi-
sation. BMTTAS noted that
ships are now using highly
sophisticated machinery and
equipment, which has in turn
increased wages and the
demand for college gradu-
ates.

The United Nations Con-
ference on Trade and Devel-
opment (UNCTAD) esti-
mates that the operation of
merchant ships contributes
about $380 billion in freight
rates to the global economy.

As of January 2008 the
world trading fleet was made
up of 50,525 ships and
manned by more than a mil-
lion seafarers of virtually
every nationality.

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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 7



Mexico reports six
more swine flu deaths

MMEXICOCITY

MEXICO is reporting six more } :
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Mexico says its epidemic has }
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PM: Import tax cuts
On variety of items

si, BUDGET 2009/10



@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribumemedia.net

IN ADDITION to touting his
budget as one which contains
“no new taxes”, the Prime Min-
ister told Parliament yesterday
there would be cuts and reduc-
tions in import taxes levied on a
variety of items — ranging from
books, to suitcases and condoms.

Mr Ingraham said the rate
adjustments were being carried
out in response to “concerns that
have been expressed” and to
“increase the competitiveness”
of struggling retailers who sell
items popular among tourists.

He added that as government
continues its commitment to
simplify Customs administration
and make rate determinations
“more transparent” it will this
year be eliminating six more
duty and excise tax rates “by
moving them, in all cases, to a
lower rate of duty or tax.”

This follows government’s
amalgamation effort in last
year’s budget which saw the
number of rates in the Tariff Act
and the new Excise Act com-
bined reduced by 6 to 23.

Controversy brewed, however,
when it was determined that in
that effort a number of products
had the tax levied on them
rounded up rather than down —
among them, books, which went
from being subject to a seven
per cent stamp tax to a 10 per
cent excise tax.

Priscilla Cartwright, office
manager at Logos bookstore
yesterday said staff were “very
happy” to see the tariff rate on
books reduced to zero, as Mr
Ingraham announced it would
be come the start of the new
budget year on July 1, 2009.

Books had previously been
subject to a seven per cent stamp
duty, however in last year’s bud-
get retailers saw the tax rise to
10 per cent.

“We'd have been happy if it
went back to seven — but if it is
zero, that’s great!” said the man-
ager.

The company had made its
concerns known to government
about the rate rise while doing
all it could to try to keep their
books at the same prices but had
started to think it had no alter-
native but to raise them.

Now, however, she said she
hopes this will not have to hap-
pen, keeping books more acces-
sibly priced.

Along with several different
categories of books, toothpaste,
diapers and other “disposable
undergarments” for infants and
adults, female sanitary napkins,
condoms and other contracep-
tives are all having their tariff
rate reduced to zero in the
2009/2010 fiscal year.

Among the “tourist” products,
which will become less expen-
sive to import, having their
excise tax rate reduced from 25
to 10 per cent, are perfumes and
cases, including suitcases, trunks
and brief cases.

Products that will see a three
per cent excise tax drop include
knitted and crocheted items such
as jerseys, pullovers and cardi-
gans; tableware and other house-
hold items made of porcelain or
china; glassware used for table,
kitchen, toilet, office, indoor
decoration or similar purposes
made of crystal and photo-
graphic cameras and flashlight
apparatus.

Meanwhile, some items will
see the rates levied on them
“rationalised” and reduced to

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bring them in line with that
applied to similar products, said
Mr Ingraham.

Computer monitors will now
be free to import just as those
imported with computers are;
printer parts and accessories will
see their import duty rate fall
from 45 to 10 per cent in line
with that charged for printers;
blood pressure meters will be
subject to a 25 per cent rate as
are glucose meters and salad
dressing will see its rate reduced
from 40 - 30 per cent “in line
with the rate other sauces and
mixed seasonings.”

“It is also proposed to modify
the Fourth Schedule of the Tar-
iff Act to once again provide
exemptions for: materials used
for the restoration and mainte-
nance of historical buildings;
motor vessels and their engine
and mechanical parts used for
inter-island service; and parts
for temporary cruising vessels,”
said Mr Ingraham.

Noting that there would be
“only a minor increase in one
rate of tax” Mr Ingraham said
there it is proposed that the duty
on items “imported temporarily”
will rise from seven to 10 per
cent “for every three months the
items are in the country.”

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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009

Ohama declares Volusia disaster area after floods

m DAYTONA BEACH, Fla.

PRESIDENT Barack Obama
has declared Volusia County a
major disaster area, freeing up mil-
lions of federal dollars to aid vic-
tims of the flood ravaged site,
according to Associated Press.

As much as 21 inches of rain
drenched the area last week, caus-
ing an estimated $55.1 million in
losses and damaging 1,500 struc-
tures. Gov. Charlie Crist surveyed
the damages Tuesday, watching as

hundreds of victims lined up at two
assistance centers seeking help.
The president’s announcement
Wednesday will assist victims with
grants for temporary housing and
home repairs and low-cost loans
to cover uninsured property losses.
Tt will also include help for business

owners recovering from the effects

of the disaster.

The weeklong rain also flood- }
ed two parts of the Daytona Beach }
International Speedway, though }
none of the water was on the track. }

Wholesaler/Retailer located in Nassau seeks

Executive Assistant

The candidate will work alongside the senior management
feam at our head office, assisting in.a variety of areas such
as public and customer relations, marketing, advertising,
HR, basic bookkeeping, and various administrative duties
such as fling and organization. Much of the above will be
office and computer-based.

The candidate should have the following skills:

General computer skills (Microsoft XP, internet, social
networking web sites,...}

Strang knowledge of Microsoft Office (Word, Excel,

Outlook)

Familiarity with basic bookkeeping concepts
(particularly Accounts Payable and Receivable}

Experience:

The candidate should have experience of office
administration. Specific retail, wholesale, HR or
bookkeeping not essential but beneficial. Additionally,
the candidate must be well-spoken, highly organised

and professional and have a current driver's license and

their own transportation,

Applications are to include: Recent police record,
passport photo, two references, resume, covering letter
Stating where/how specific experience was gained In

(i) Microsoft Office (Word, Excel) (ii) Any bookkeeping
concepts (iii) other software programs you are

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@ By TIMOTHY ZUNIGA-BROWN
US Embassy Chargé d’Affaires

| ODAY we celebrate women

around the globe for their
extraordinary contributions in all areas
of society — as professionals, as bread-
winners, as caregivers and caretakers.

But today we must also focus on the
stark reality that women suffer dispro-
portionately from inadequate health
services, including maternal health and
family planning services, discrimina-
tion, the effects of war, and, at times,
victimisation by harmful traditions.

The statistics are staggering:

Several hundreds of thousands of girls
and women are trafficked every year
as illegal workers and/or forced into
prostitution.

An estimated 100 million to 140 mil-
lion women and girls undergo female
genital mutilation/cutting — the act of
cutting, removing, or otherwise harming
the female genital area, a major threat
to their health and well being.

More than 530,000 women die in
pregnancy or childbirth every year.

The vast majority of these deaths are
avoidable with known, simple, and cost-
effective health interventions.

More than 200 million women in the
developing world would prefer to post-
pone their next pregnancy or not have
more children, but are not allowed
access to modern methods of contra-
ception, leading to 52 million unin-
tended pregnancies and 22 million abor-
tions.

Women and girls are disproportion-
ately affected by hunger, disease, and
death.

For example, in sub-Saharan Africa,
approximately 58 per cent of all people
living with HIV are female.

In some countries, girls between the
ages of 15 and 19 have three to six times
higher HIV prevalence than boys their
age.

Inaccessible medical care, poverty,
and malnutrition cause at least 80,000
women to suffer complications during
pregnancy that include obstetric fistula.
The consequences of this condition,
when untreated, are life shattering.
Many times the child dies, and the
mother has lifelong reproductive and
urinary complications.

“More than
530,000 women die
in pregnancy or
childbirth every
year. The vast
majority of
these deaths are
avoidable with
known, simple, and
cost-effective health
interventions.”



Every year, 51 million girls are mar-
ried before their 18th birthday.

Girls who marry as children are often
more susceptible to the health risks
associated with early sexual debut and
childbearing, including HIV and obstet-
ric fistula. Lacking status and power,
these girls are often subjected to
domestic violence, sexual abuse and
social isolation. And early marriage
almost always deprives girls of their
education or meaningful work, which
perpetuates the cycle of poverty as well
as gender inequality and sickness.

D espite these startling statistics
we know that women around
the world have an undying spirit, are
surmounting obstacles, and are com-
mitted to making their lives, their fam-
ilies’ lives, and their communities bet-
ter. As President Obama said: “...we
must also recommit ourselves more
broadly to ensuring that our daughters
have the same rights and opportunities
as our sons: the chance to attain a
world-class education; to have fulfill-
ing careers in any industry; to be treat-
ed fairly and paid equally for their
work; and to have no limits on their
dreams. That is what I want for women
everywhere.”

On May 5, President Obama
announced that his administration was
committed to spending $63 billion over
six years to bring better health to peo-

THE TRIBUNE

_ The International Day of
Action for Women’s Health

Timothy Zufiga-Brown



ple around the globe. The President’s
2010 Budget focuses attention on
broader global health challenges,
including child and maternal health,
family planning, and neglected tropi-
cal diseases, with cost effective inter-
ventions. It also provides robust funding
for HIV/AIDS and adopts an integrat-
ed approach to fighting diseases,
improving health, and strengthening
health systems.

On behalf of the American people, I
am proud to celebrate this year’s Inter-
national Day of Action for Women’s
Health. In partnership with the people
of the Bahamas, the US not only sup-
ports education for all girls and critical
health and family planning services,
including HIV/AIDS and reproductive
health programmes, but also opposes
violence and discrimination against
women. We will continue drawing inspi-
ration and strength from our partners
around the world — to work together
to protect and improve the lives of
every woman and child on this globe.
For in doing so, we will fulfill the great
promise of prosperity and progress for
all people, and for all nations.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS

Business owner: people power

Castro's daughter:
Cuba to reinstate
sex changes

mHAVANA

operations previously banned on
the island, President Raul Castro’s :
daughter Mariela said Wednesday. }
The Health Ministry authorized }
the operations last year, but none }
has been performed since. It was
unclear when the surgeries would }
begin, according to Associated Press. }
Mariela Castro, a sexologist and ;
gay-rights advocate, announced the
return of sex-change procedures in }
comments aired on state television. }
She runs the Center for Sex Educa- }
tion, which prepares transsexuals
for sex-change operations and has }
identified 19 transsexuals it deems }
ready to undergo the procedure.
Castro also said she backs efforts
to allow lesbians to be artificially :
inseminated, a procedure currently }
barred. i
The first successful sex-change
operation was performed on the }
island in 1988, but subsequent pro- }
cedures were prohibited, Mariela ;
Castro told an international con- }
gress on assisted reproduction meet- }
ing in Havana. i
Some Cubans protested the deci- }
sion last year to allow the opera-
tions, either because of general }
opposition to the procedure or for }
its high costs for a developing coun- ;
try with economic problems.

WWII-era ship
hecomes sunken :
reef off Key West

@ KEY WEST, Fla.

A SHIP last used by the U.S.
Air Force to track missiles and
spacecraft has been sunk in the
Florida Keys, creating a new
artificial reef for sport divers
and anglers, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

The Gen. Hoyt S. Vanden-
berg sank in less than two min-
utes Wednesday morning, after
demolition experts triggered a
series of explosives that lined
both sides of the ship.

Key West City Manager Jim
Scholl says he believes the
17,000-ton, 523-foot-long ship
settled on the bottom of the
Florida Keys National Marine
Sanctuary in an upright posi-
tion, but he was awaiting con-
firmation from divers.










re =
ms

Colinalmperial

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A BUSINESS owner facing
rising crime in the Carmichael
area said his only hope for fight-
ing criminals lies in the power of
the people.

Etrich Bowe, 50, president of
the Carmichael Business League,
said piracy and corruption are so
endemic in Bahamian society he
has no faith in the police, the gov-
ernment or the judiciary to tack-
le escalating crime.

Crime is higher in the
Carmichael area stretching from
Baillou Hill Road east to Ade-
laide Village in south west New
Providence, as several criminals
live in the area and around 1,000
businesses are targets for thieves
and armed robbers, Mr Bowe
said.

He runs Advanced Technical
Enterprises in Mermaids Boule-
vard, off Carmichael Road, which
has been burgled every three to
six months over the last four
years or more. He said other
businesses in the area have also
been burgled, or staff robbed at
gunpoint, and one businessman
was shot on two occasions.

The Carmichael Business
League was set up in 2006 after
businessman Keith Carey was
gunned down on the steps of the
Bank of the Bahamas in Tonique

Darling Williams Highway, and
Mr Bowe is continually recruiting
members to improve surveillance
of criminals.

He intends to install 16 CCTV
cameras in the area but said he
has had little assistance from
police who are understaffed, and
therefore not only slow to assist,
but also slow to crackdown on
local drug dens and criminals.

Mr Bowe said: “There is no
monitoring, there is no police
presence, the things that would
deter crime are not there.

“We have drug houses and
police know where they are and
they don’t shut them down.
There are things that we can do
and we do not do.

“Crime is very serious in this
country and both the PLP and
the FNM have done nothing to
convince many of us that they
are serious about stemming the
flow of crime.

“IT have no confidence in the
police, no confidence in the court
system, and no confidence in the
political directorate.”

The government’s approach to
crime fighting has also been pub-
licly criticised this week by Bish-
op Simeon Hall, chair of the
National Advisory Panel on
crime under the Ministry of
National Security, which was
appointed in 2007 to examine
causes of crime and ways to mit-
igate it.

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Bishop Hall handed in the pan-
el’s final report including some

40 recommendations
to the ministry in
November last year,
just months after a
select committee on
crime was set up under
Dr Bernard Nottage to
examine the same
problem, but he has
not yet seen any action
taken.

“Tam a little doubt-
ful about what is the
intention of these
commissions because
they never seem to get
anywhere,” Bishop
Hall said.

“It’s something to
placate the cries of the

public, but we worked for one
year and we want something to

become of it.”

cere ws






GOVT’S approach to
crime fighting has
also been criticised
this week by Bishop
Simeon Hall.

Meanwhile businesses in
Carmichael Road are being bat-

tered, according to Mr
Bowe.

He said: “It seems as
if the government
wants to act to get on
television or in the
newspaper, but I know
if the government used
our resources properly
they could impact
crime.

“They could even
get more resources
from us, but what we
need from the govern-
ment in a lot of
instances is leadership
and the cooperation of
the police.”

Without action from

authorities, Mr Bowe believes
people will not have a choice but

to take on crime independently.

==. is the only hope in crime fight

He said: “I can foresee a lot
more private police — people
banding together to protect
themselves or having groups to
protect them, but we are heading
down a very bad path.

“People will just have to decide
what side they are on and going
to have to deal with the situa-
tion, but the road we are heading
down is a road where revolution
may not be a bad option.

“The pirates have to go, com-
merce must be restored, and we
need a system of justice. Not
laws, justice.

“It’s a whole system and cul-
ture of corruption that we’re
dealing with.

“We need to look at our
whole system and piece by piece
fix it.

“We will have to make some
sacrifices but we have to intro-
duce justice in our society.”

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THE TRIBUNE



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Buriget cuthacks

FROM page one

5 million,” said Mr Ingra-
ham.

The news came as no surprise
to several persons in the affect-
ed areas who spoke with The
Tribune yesterday.

President of the Bahamas
Union of Teachers (BUT)
Belinda Wilson said over the
last few days the union, in antic-
ipation of the cutbacks, had
meetings with teachers through-
out the country.

The group came to a consen-
sus to forgo a $3.2 million pay-
ment this fiscal year — repre-
senting an $800 lump sum in
payments due to public school
teachers — in response to the
current economic conditions,
she said.

"We want to be very con-
scious of the people who are
unemployed and losing their
jobs and on short work weeks.
So we're prepared to defer in
good faith with the government
at this time," said Ms Wilson.

Those in the nursing commu-
nity, who were expecting relief
from pricey healthcare costs,
are hopeful the anticipated
health insurance will be deliv-
ered once the economy turns
around.

"T think most of the nurses
are aware of the financial crisis
and they would understand if
its not included in the budget
this year but (hope) it would be
considered when the economy
is back on track," said one 27-
year nursing veteran yesterday
after the prime minister's
announcement.

"Right now (we) are looking
forward to health benefits in
terms of insurance because we
have to pay like everybody else
whether we go public or pri-
vate. We work in a high risk
environment and I think we are
entitled to some benefits
because we don't have anything
because if we get sick we have
to lay up with the public ward,
and if there are no beds you lay
on a trolley like everyone else,"
said the nurse who is stationed
at the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital.

During his address yesterday,
Mr Ingraham said that in line
with the growth projections,
government expects gross
domestic product (GDP) in cur-
rent dollars to be lower in
upcoming fiscal year - July 1,
2009 through June 30, 2010 -
than it was for the previous
period, by some $78 million.

To lessen the impact of this
on the country's revenue, gov-
ernment plans to "redouble" its
efforts in the upcoming fiscal
year to collect the maximum
amount of revenue due to it, he
said, while also continuing to
streamline revenue collections
to facilitate the payment of tax-
es and fees.

He estimated next year's
recurrent expenditure at $1.53
billion - $34 million more than
the projected out-turn for the
2008/2009 fiscal years - but $39
million less than projected for
that year in the 2008/09 budget.

The combination of revenue
enhancements and expenditure
restraint, Mr Ingraham said, will
result in a lower recurrent
deficit in 2009/2010 as compared
to 2008/2009 - $141 million com-
pared to $186 million.

When combined with capital
expenditure of $255 million and
debt redemption of $88 million,
this is expected to produce a
GFS deficit of $286 million, or
3.9 per cent of GDP in
2009/2010, down by 0.8 per cent
from the 4.7 per cent ($352 mil-
lion) projected outturn for
2008/2009, said Mr Ingraham.

Girl murdered
FROM page one

where the resting site of former
World War II legion stalwart
Audley Humes had been dese-
crated, and a girl had been
buried inside his grave.

Police who responded to the
report and arrived on the scene
around 6am used their trained
dogs to find the body, which
was dressed in pink and yellow
plaid shorts and a black blouse.

Visiting the girl’s former
home, police reportedly discov-
ered a bare back man sitting on
the porch in an unresponsive
and “dazed” state.

He was taken into custody for
questioning.

Shenise’s murder marks the
31st murder recorded for the
first five months of this year.

This latest homicide will
again raise concern about per-
sons being released from Her
Majesty’s Prison.

Last week The Tribune
revealed in an exclusive report
that 153 persons, who were
being held on bail, were
released from prison in the
month of April — some
charged with murder, rape, and
armed robbery.



THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Media is barred from
union press conference sry. 7775

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT —- THE media was
barred from covering a press confer-
ence called by second vice president of
the Bahamas Hotel and Allied Workers
Union Lionel Morley at Workers House
yesterday.

Wendy Pratt, an administrative official
in the union’s Freeport office, and the
niece of BHAWU Secretary General
Leo Douglas, told reporters to leave the
union’s conference room.

Mrs Pratt told a ZNS reporter that a
union boss had informed them in a let-
ter that reporters are barred from the
property unless invited by Mr Douglas.

As a result, Mr Morley and trustees
Ian Neely and Brian Collie spoke with
the press outside the building.

The Tribune attempted to reach Mrs
Pratt, but was that she was out of office.

Mr Morley, who is running for a union
executive position as part of Team
Deliverance, said banning the press
from Workers House is just one of many
instances in which the union has acted

THE Bahamas Humane
Society has lots of orphaned
kittens and are appealing to
the animal loving public to
open up their hearts and
homes to a cuddly ball of
fluff.

"This is just the time of the
year, I guess," BHS Presi-
dent Kim Aranha said. "We
have lots of kittens (in) all
sizes and colours looking for
good homes. There are oth-
er times of the year where
we only have one or two kit-
tens at a time.

"We try to find good lov-
ing homes for every healthy
animal that is surrendered
to us, but sometimes we real-
ly have to rely on others to
help us make it happen.

"Sometimes people plan to
adopt in the summer because
the kids are home from
school, what we are hoping is
that if people want to adopt
that they will do so now,"
she added.

Interested persons can see
the cats at BHS's headquar-
ters in the Chippingham area
or call the shelter at 323-
5138.

BHS is a non profit organi-
zation that is run exclusively
on donations from the gen-
eral public and profits from
fund raising events.

Persons interested in vol-
unteering at the BHS are
invited to call the shelter for
more information.




SMTA ROTA Ce CLUE e

Whit Monday Holiday Banking

Reporters are told to
leave BHAWU room

dictatorially.

Although the injunction filed by Team
Deliverance leader Kirk Wilson to block
today’s elections was lifted on Tuesday
by the Supreme Court, the team is con-
fident that justice will prevail on June 26
when a judicial review in the matter is to
be held.

By the end of the day, 6,000 members
of the Bahamas Hotel Catering and
Allied Workers Union will cast their
votes to elect a new team of executives.

Five teams are vying for the reigns of
the union — the Unity Team, the M
Team, the A Team, the Justice Team,
and Team Deliverance.

Me Wilson along with eight other
elected union executives have hit out
at the current leadership of the
BHCAWU, claiming that the proper



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MONDAY, JUNE 1, 2009 — CLOSED

Normal Banking Hours resume
TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 - 9:30 a.m. — 3:00 p.m.

Labour Day Holiday B

THURSDAY, JUNE 4, 2009 — 9:30 a.m. — 4:30 p.m.

FRIDAY, JUNE 5, 2009 — CLOSED

Normal Banking Hours resume
MONDAY, JUNE 8, 2009 - 9:30 a.m. — 3:00 p.m.

Participating Member Banks

Bank of The Bahamas Limited
Citibank, N.A.
Commonwealth Bank Limited
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited
FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Royal Bank of Canada
Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited

Hours

ing Hours

rules and regulations were not followed
when the nomination and election dates
were Set.

He was granted an injunction last
Thursday staying the elections until such
time as a judicial review in the matter
had been heard. While the stay has been
overturned, Mr Wilson believes the judi-
cial review will go forward, and that
things will work out for Team Deliver-
ance in the end.

Mr Morley, a candidate for first vice
president, urged members to be cau-
tious in casting their vote.

“Members are disheartened, confused
and frustrated by what has been going
on in the union,” he said. “But I urge
them to be strong and vigilant about
their decision because it could have far
reaching implications.”

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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



‘Litigation likely’ over amendment to the Customs Management Act

errata 4 ‘ie | a

FROM page one

Supreme Court rulings that pre-
vented Customs from conducting
arbitrary audits of Grand Bahama
Port Authority (GBPA) licensees.
In particular, he suggested the
proposed Customs Management
Act amendment was an attempt
to do an “end-around” former
Supreme Court Justice Stanley
Moore’s August 30, 20002, ruling
in the case brought against Cus-
toms by International Underwa-
ter Explorers Society (UNEXSO).
In his Budget address to the
House of Assembly, Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham said: “There
is also an urgent need to clarify
and bring certainty to the admin-
istration of the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement in the Port Area.
“Accordingly, the Customs
Management Act will be amended
to put beyond doubt the powers

of the Bahamas throughout our
archipelago.”

The amendment, a copy of
which was obtained by Tribune
Business, said the reason for the
change was “to remove all doubts
that the Comptroller is the person
designated by the Minister to car-
ry out the powers in clause 2 (4)(f)
of the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment”.

The actual amendment’s word-
ing states that the Customs comp-
troller, his deputy or the assistant
comptroller “be the person desig-
nated by the minister to carry out
any and all powers” contained in
that Hawksbill Creek Agreement
clause.

The clause in question, as
analysed by Tribune Business,
gives a person designated by the

of Customs to protect the revenue minister “free access at all reason-






















KINGSWAY ACADEMY
TEACHER VACANCIES
For September 2009

Kingsway Academy High School is seeking
applicants for teaching positions in the following
areas:

® Information Technology

® Mathematics/Physics up to the Advanced
Placement Level

Spanish up to the Advanced Placement Level

Track and Field Coach

® Woodwork/Technical Drawing

All applicants should have the following:

0 Be a born again Christian

® An Academic degree in the area of specialization
0 A Teaching Certificate

0 Excellent Communication Skills

® A love for children and learning

0 High standards of morality

Letters of application together with a recent
color photograph and detailed Curriculum Vita
(including the names and addresses of at least
three references, one being the name of one’s
church minister). These should be forwarded to:

The Academy Affairs Manager
Kingsway Academy Business Office
Bernard Road
Nassau

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATION IS FRIDAY
JUNE 12, 2009.

NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Twenty-ninth
(29th) Annual General Meeting of THE

PUBLIC WORKERS’ CO-OPERATIVE
CREDIT UNION LIMITED will be held at
The British Colonial Hilton Hotel, West
Bay Street, on Friday, June 12th, 2009
commencing at 6:30 p.m. for the following
purposes:

- To receive the report of the Board
of Directors

- To receive the Audited Report for 2008

* To elect members of the Board
of Directors, Supervisory Committee
and Credit Committee

- To discuss and approve the budget
for 2010

eligible members, wishing to run for
a position on the Board of Directors,
Supervisory Committee or Credit
Committee, are asked to submit their names
to the Credit Union’s offices in Nassau or
Freeport, no later than Monday, June 8th,
2009 by 4:00 p.m.

All members are urged to attend and
Exciting door prizes will be offered.
Refreshments will be served!



PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham and his Cabinet ministers making their
way to the House of Assembly yesterday.

able times” to any development
project, business, company or com-
mercial entity in the Port area, and
access to all parts of their business,
“for the purpose of ascertaining
whether the several articles” admut-
ted duty-free under the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement are being used
for their stated purpose — mean-
ing in a licensee’s business, so that
no duty is payable on them.

Mr Lowe told Tribune Business
last night that the proposed
amendment appeared to partly
stem from Government’s despera-
tion to collect every cent in rev-
enue it could lay its hands on.

Customs has in the past believed
it is losing $150 million a year in
revenue in Freeport, but Mr Lowe
pointed out that the legislation was
not necessary, as the existing Act
gives the Comptroller powers to
investigate businesses where he
has reasonable ground to suspect a

fraud is occurring. This, though,
cannot be done arbitrarily.

“Here we go again. More
Hawksbill Creek stupidity,” Mr
Lowe said. “Yet again, national
leadership does not understand
national agreements designed to
develop the country.

“Tt looks like another licensee
is going to have to litigate again
to preserve the existence of all
licensees, as the Government
moves towards self-preservation.
Typical.

“We’re not going to take this
lying down, given the hundreds of
thousands of dollars spent for this
tax regime migration.

“Tt looks like more litigation is
on the horizon for any bonded
licensee that wishes to preserve its
own existence in this tough eco-
nomic environment.”

Mr Lowe said the Government
appeared to have charged ahead

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with its own planned reform with-
out consulting the private sector,
despite the Grand Bahama Cham-
ber and himself submitting numer-
ous recommendations — at the
Ministry of Finance’s request —
on how over-the-counter bonded
goods sales operated, and the
way forward for taxation in
Freeport.

The Government, Mr Lowe
added, was looking at the situa-
tion as one where it was losing rev-
enue in Freeport and needed to
get that back, yet it did not want to
repeal the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment because of the likely impact
on investor confidence.

“T hope, in hiring these interna-
tional customs experts, he shares
with them the reports prepared at
the Ministry of Finance’s request
with respect to the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement and the Cus-
toms Management Act, and the
operation of bonded goods sales
and migration to a new tax
regime,” Mr Lowe said.

“Maybe by sharing those they’d
save the taxpayers a bit of money,
because they’ve already been con-
sulted on. In so far as ’m con-
cerned, the Customs Management
Act and the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement have never been in
conflict. It’s the operators of both
that have been in conflict because
of government policy.”

Mr Lowe said that in relation to
Freeport, revenue was not gov-
ernment’s to lose, as the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement and its invest-
ment incentives had been designed
to aid national development.

In his judgment, Justice Moore
said UNEXSO had “sought relief
aimed at preventing the Comp-
troller of Customs from entering
and searching its premises, and
auditing it on the basis that the
Comptroller’s sole or principal
motivation in ordering and carry-

ing out an audit was malicious and
also unlawful.”

On the audit question, Justice
Moore found: “I am far from sat-
isfied that the Comptroller, let
alone Mr Sherick Martin, Super-
intendent Bahamas Customs
though he may be, can unilaterally
clothe himself with the over-broad
powers which he claims to enjoy,
which are quite outside the law
and, as far as he is concerned,
beyond the ken of the Comptroller
himself.”

The judgment later found: “The
Comptroller of Customs may not
enter except by due process of law.
Any form of non-consensual entry
would be indefensible unless sanc-
tioned by law. The Customs Man-
agement Act provides an ampli-
tude and sufficiency of powers to
enable the Comptroller to enter
premises for good and sufficiently
lawful reason, provided the stipu-
lated preconditions are met.

“Else oppression of the subject
may take place, whether wittingly
or unwittingly, however lacking in
malevolence the Comptroller’s
actions may be, and however solic-
itous of the protection of the rev-
enue...

“It follows, therefore, that the
Comptroller, well meaning no
doubt as he may have been, has
eschewed the plenitude of powers
open to him under the law, and
overreached into the realms of the
unlawful by devising the regime of
the audit, which is unknown to law
and completely beyond the bounds
of any statutory provision.

“With this vast array of pow-
ers... at his disposal, there was no
necessity for the Comptroller to
venture beyond the perimeters of
the law to devise a new strategy
called ‘The Audit’ to achieve ends
which could have amply
been achieved within the existing
law.”

Congratulations



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THE TRIBUNE



Bid to protect tourism from

the effects of climate change

A COALITION has been formed to
protect tourism in the Bahamas and
Caribbean countries from the effects of
climate change.

Several agencies, ministries and con-
servation groups were brought together
on Tuesday by Oxford University and
Caribsave, the Caribbean community cli-
mate change cente’s partnership.

Through Caribsave, the Bahamas and
Jamaica will be used as pilot countries
for efforts to protect the Caribbean from
climate changes which could be costly to
tourism in the region.

On a projected budget of $35 million
over approximately five years, Caribsave



structure and natural resources that could
result from climate change and its effects.
“Those are important considerations,”
Ms Walkine said. “So we have talked
about how we prepare ourselves to miti-
gate some of those types of impacts. But
in terms of our ability to actually deter-
mine what are the appropriate measures
to take, this programme is intended to
help us identify what we literally can do.”
Caribsave’s scope of research and strat-
egy formulations will include rising sea
level, coastal erosion and restoration of
mangroves and sand dunes, said Dr Mur-
ray Simpson of Oxford University.
“The Caribbean is the most tourism-

will hold workshops and symposia that DR MURRAY SIMPSON _ reliant region in the world and tourism in

will assess vulnerabilities and ways to
adapt to climate change throughout the
Caribbean.

“It’s a very important discussion about what we can
do collectively to ensure that to the greatest degree
possible, we put in place some policies and pro-
grammes that will help us to protect the resources that
tourism as a business and as an industry very heavily
relies on,” said Vernice Walkine, Director General of
the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation.

As a pilot country in the project, the Bahamas has
the opportunity to get into early explorations of the
practices that can be adopted to protect tourism, Ms
Walkine explained. She said other countries also will
be added to the discussion and assessments.

But the Bahamas has been considering climate
change for many years, Ms Walkine also pointed
out. Through the annual Weather Conference, estab-
lished by Ministry of Tourism and Aviation, the
Bahamian stakeholders have always been advised
that the increasingly warmer temperatures seen in the
Caribbean over the years would result in more fre-
quent and more intense hurricanes. The conference
has also kept up guards for the loss of basic infra-

of Oxford University

the Caribbean underpins national
economies,” he said.

“Tt underpins the livelihoods of communities here
in the Caribbean.

“And if we don’t protect and work with the tourism
sector and the other sectors that relate to the tourism
sector to address climate change, then what we will be
looking at are some serious threats to the economic
development and the sustainable development of
people living here.”

Dr Simpson said the government of the Bahamas
is working closely with the Caribsave partnership to
develop practical strategies for counteracting the
effects of climate change.

“What we need is information and strong data and
analysis of the problems, the analysis of climate
change so that we can define and design strategies that
are appropriate, practical and effective to deal with
the climate change issues,” he said.

Dr Simpson said the Caribsave partnership is work-
ing with donor organisations and development banks
to achieve the funding necessary to carry out its work.
He said several Caribbean countries will benefit from
the partnership as more funding becomes available.

Jim Lawlor elected President of Bahamas Historical Society

JIM Lawlor has been elected
President of the Bahamas His- tee.

Dames — management commit-

4pm each weekday. I would urge
all members to try to identify peo-

torical Society.
His election took place on
April 29 at the society’s annual

meeting.

Other officials elected
were:

¢ Stephen Aranha — first vice
president

¢ Dr Vernell Allen— second
vice president

¢ David Cates — treasurer

¢ Vernita Johnson, recording
secretary

¢ Joan Clarke — corresponding
secretary

e Gail Saunders, John
Knowles, Clarice Grainger, and
Betty Cole, June Maura and Paul
Aranha — trustees;

¢ Virginia Balance, Dawn
Davies, Anne Lawlor, Beryl Stra-
chan, Jamaal

Miller and Shantell Campbell-

In his first newsletter Jim
Lawlor said: "I will endeavour to
build the membership, finances
and the museum to a higher level.

“This coming year is the 50th
anniversary of the society and I
am hoping we can have a grand
celebration in the fall. Sugges-
tions for the format and venue of
the celebration are welcomed.

“In addition, I would like to
have a membership drive, and am
asking each active member to
recruit new members into the
society. An undisclosed prize will
be given to the member who is
most successful in this exercise. I
would remind all that member-
ship fees are now due for the
coming year.

“Presently I am working along
with our volunteers to keep the
museum open from 10am until

ple who might be interested in
helping out at the museum.”

Mr Lawlor said he has been
extremely pleased with the
response as they have added two
more volunteers and had a good
response to the membership dri-
ve.

The dates and topics for the
May and June meetings are as
follow:

¢ Thursday, May 28, 6pm —
Professor Kenneth Startup of
Williams Baptist College, AR:
"'This Small Act of Courtesy’:
Admiral Sir George Willes Wat-
son, Turmoil, Trials, and Trou-
ble in Bahama Waters."

Thursday, June 25, at 6 pm -
Scott Sherouse, PhD: "The His-
tory of Sweeting's Cay, Grand
Bahama"

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THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 13

SUNNYIS. S.CHAPTER

“EXCELLENCE IN ACTION”

The International Association of Administrative Professionals’® (IAAP) newest Chapter in The
Bahamas, Sunny Isles Chapter®, (SiC) which was chartered some 4 \4 years ago, was the
proud recipient of the Chapter Honourable Mention Award for Chapters with less than 40
members in the 2009 Avery Great Results Chapter and Division Achievement Awards!

Avery Dennison and IAAP started the Chapter Achievement Awards program in 1989 to award
IAAP Chapters that display excellence in specific areas of chapter operations, such as
membersnip recruitment and retention, outstanding educational programs, promotion of
professional certifications and community service.

During the Administrative Professionals Week (APW) 2009 celebrations, SIC made its annual
presentation to the Cancer Society of the Bahamas, On hand to receive that presentation

was President, Earle Bethel, he encouraged professionals to obtain annual screening for
breast cancer and to remind your spouses to screen for prostate cancer.

Picture above: Mr. Lennis Rahming, Sales and Marketing Manager, John Bull (Avery
Representative in The Bahamas) Mrs, Shornell Ellis, President, SiC

Presentation to Cancer Society

Picture above: Mi. Teresa Briggs and Mr. Earl Bethel, President Cancer Society

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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Local Company
seeking applicants
for the position of

Accountant

Excellent opportunity for an experienced and
highly motivated full-charge Accountant. This
position requires an individual that can multi-
task & has excellent verbal and organizational
skills. This position is responsible to assist in
the overseeing of the accounting and adminis-
trative duties of the company.

This position requires the knowledge of all
accounting procedures through financial
statements. Must be able to work indepen-
dently, as well as work with all departments.
Experience with Human Resources would be
an asset. Must be dynamic and disciplined.

Requirements include:

Thorough knowledge of Microsoft Software
Systems including: Word, Access and Excel,
Advanced Computer Accounting.

Degree in Finance/ Accounting or other related
field.

Interested persons should apply
in writing, with resume, to:

Accountant Position

P.O. Box $S$-5698
Nassau, Bahamas

or via Email to:
applications.dropbox?®gqmail.com




















FROM page one

which begins on July Ist, and the
significant extent to which the glob-
al economic downturn disrupted pro-
jections made in the 2008/2009 bud-
get, Mr Ingraham said his govern-
ment is “pacing” itself financially to
deal with the possibility that condi-
tions may not improve soon or may
“deteriorate further.”

With poor economic conditions
already severely restricting the funds
it has access to - the amount that
came into the government’s coffers
in the 2008/2009 budgetary period
was ultimately $260 million, or 17
per cent, lower than had been antic-
ipated - the Prime Minister
explained that his government must
place emphasis on “maximising exist-
ing revenues” to fund the services it
provides and maintain living stan-
dards currently enjoyed.

“This requires a two-pronged
approach: Modernising all aspects
of revenue collection on the one
hand and enhancing the efficiency
of all aspects of current expendi-
ture,” said Mr Ingraham, referring to
how government is seeking to get
its hands on more of the money
owed to it and more out of the small-
er allocation of funds it will be mak-
ing to its various departments and
agencies this year.

He said government is already
focusing on how it can “recreate the
fiscal headroom this crisis con-
sumed” as the flexibility it provided
will be as critical to the country’s
economic health moving forward as
it has been in the present crisis, he
suggested.

In these regards, modernisation
of the customs department, which is
responsible for collecting more than
50 per cent of government revenue,
is “vitally important”; as it is to finan-
cial administration - how public
funds are disbursed - to ensure it is
done in a manner as efficient and
accountable as it should be.

Emphasis will also be placed on
the modernisation of public corpo-
rations, with privatisation a key part
of this. “The financial resources
released from propping up these cor-
porations plus the proceeds of pri-
vatisation would provide very wel-
come relief to the Bahamian tax pay-
er,” he said.
Meanwhile, changes to the real prop-
erty tax act are expected to help the
government collect overdue tax of
this kind and ensure it improves the
likelihood of receiving it on an ongo-
ing basis.

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Govt ‘making reforms’

Mr Ingraham said that Govern-
ment Ministries, Departments and
Agencies will be challenged to man-
age public resources within very
stringent budgetary conditions and
managers will be called upon to iden-
tify areas where greater financial
efficiency can be obtained.

“The stark reality is that the
severe fiscal situation in which we
find ourselves warrants that to be
the case,” he said.

Notwithstanding its efforts in this
regard, the Governmentis still set to
borrow $255 million to cover its
expenses this year.

This as the country’s deficit, after
factoring in capital expenditure and
debt redemption, ballooned to an
“unsustainable” $352 million in the
2008/2009 budgetary period - more
than double what was projected
when the budget for that year was
prepared - as demands for govern-
ment services increased at the same
time as its revenue fell.

The Prime Minister told parlia-
ment that the global economy, the
backdrop against which Bahamian
economic challenges are set, is mired
in the deepest recession in over six-
ty years.

The International Monetary Fund
predicted in April that global activi-
ty will fall by 1.3 per cent in 2009 -
down sharply even from its own pro-
jection in January.

A recovery, when it happens, is
likely to be weaker and much slow-
er than in previous rebounds, he said.

Meanwhile, The Bahamas’ pri-
mary trading partner, the United
States, has not seen conditions
improve to the extent that had been
expected, with households hard hit
by the recession, in conjunction with
large financial losses and job losses
causing consumer confidence to hit
record lows.

Countries which are major trading
partners of the U.S. - like The
Bahamas - including Mexico, Japan
and Germany, have been hit espe-
cially hard, he noted.

In the Bahamian economy, Mr
Ingraham described how a weaken-
ing of the economy across all sec-
tors in 2008, precipitated by the glob-
al meltdown, has continued into the
first quarter of 2009, with further
declines in tourism, construction,
real estate purchases and foreign
direct investment.

Expectations that activity in these
areas will continue to remain weak
throughout 2009 means that further

Harbour
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George Limniatis
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increases in the unemployment
rate are anticipated, said Mr Ingra-
ham.

The Prime Minister said his party
has maintained a “strategic vision”
since coming to office in 1992.

“By budgeting wisely, we creat-
ed the fiscal headroom which is
enabling The Bahamas to maintain
its course through these deeply trou-

bling times,” said Mr Ingraham.

He said he believes the Bahamian
people and outside observers will
for this reason commend his gov-
ernment and “continue to place their
fullest confidence in my Govern-
ment’s ability to return The
Bahamas to the path of social and
economic progress temporarily inter-
rupted by this crisis.”

$30 million govt guarantee

FROM page one

medical and annuity policies, as well as up to
$300,000 of insurance coverage for life insurance
policies, up to $100,000 of the accumulated val-
ue of annuity-gold retirement policies, and up to
$100,000 of the accumulated value of annuity-
executive flexible premium annuities.

It will not apply to policies and annuities of
directors and senior management of the com-
pany, or persons closely related to them, nor will
it apply to institutional or corporate policy hold-
ers or annuities.

Government will also establish a Statutory
Insurance Guarantee Fund to accommodate
the operational requirements necessary for the
proposed insurance guarantee and protect Bahamian policyholders in the
event of an insurance company’s failure to engage in domestic insurance
business, said the Prime Minister.

PLP Senator Jerome Fitzgerald said he was “pleased” the Prime Min-
ister’s statement addressed “some of the issues pertaining to the annui-
tants who had balances under $100,000” but said he felt the govern-
ment’s statement was “still to a great extent woefully inadequate in
addressing the concerns of a great many who have balances in excess of
that.”

He said he would have liked to see more details about the Statutory
Insurance Guarantee Fund.

“T wish they had said when it was going to happen and what the terms
are going to be, but I think on the whole it still leaves a lot of questions
unanswered.

Meanwhile, he added that “Bahamian people still want to know how
it all happened and who is responsible.”

The Office of the Registrar of Insurance Companies found a gap
between the assets and liabilities of Clico leaving a net liability of $42 mil-
lion. There are realisable assets estimated at $85 million and adjusted lia-
bilities of $127 million.

Policy liabilities are estimated at $73 million and other liabilities $54 mil-
lion, and as policy liabilities have a first claim on all assets, Mr Ingraham
said it is expected policy liabilities are fully covered.

Mr Ingraham said: “Many policyholders have expectations that day-to-
day contractual obligations arising under the terms of their different
policies should be honoured if they continue to keep such insurance
policies in force, by virtue of the payment of their insurance premiums.

“In order for this expectation on the part of policyholders to have any
hope of realisation it is necessary to sell that part of Clico’s insurance busi-
ness relating to such policyholders liabilities to one or more active insur-
ance companies with the capability of successfully managing the assets and
servicing the liabilities.”

Clico policyholder Bishop Simeon Hall said he is pleased the gov-
ernment will back policyholders.

He said: “TI expected no less from a government that has packaged itself
as a government of trust and caring and so I expected the Prime Minis-
ter to come through as he did, and even as they do, somebody must be
reminded that it was under his watch that somebody fell down at the wheel
and caused this Clico thing to come.”

A 26-year-old policyholder said: “Whatever speeds the process along
and ensures that the money we’ve already in the policies is worthwhile is

ood.
. “Since the Prime Minister encouraged policyholders to continue pay-
ing premiums I think he had some kind of moral obligation to ensure that
these policies were picked up by another company.”

Mother Debra Strachan who has life and medical policies for her two
sons, aged 21 and 26, and an annuity for one of her sons, is anxious for
assets to be sold so she will be able to claim for her sons.

Her 21-year-old boy, a university athlete, fell 15ft when doing a pole-
vault recently and she was not able to claim.

Ms Strachan said: “The Prime Minister kept saying to keep paying, so
we are holding on, hoping that it would come through, so we wouldn’t
have to take our insurance somewhere else.

“T would be pleased if someone would purchase the company and then
we would be covered once again because right now I feel as if we are not
covered. If someone was to die then what would happen?”

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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009



SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Howard leads Magic to

116-114 OT win over Cavs

B By TOM WITHERS
AP Sports Writer

ORLANDO, Florida (AP)
— As LeBron James pulled up
for the final shot, Orlando’s
crowd gasped, Magic coach
Stan Van Gundy gulped and
time stood still.

Spinning through the air,
James’ 3-poimter looked good.

Not this time, MVP. This was
a Magic night.

Dwight Howard scored 10
points in overtime and Orlando,
raining down 3-pointers like a
Florida thunderstorm, with-
stood 44 points and the last-sec-
ond fling by James for a 116-
114 victory over the Cleveland
Cavaliers on Tuesday night to
take a 3-1 lead in the Eastern
Conference finals.

The resilient Magic, who
have overcome injuries, dou-
ble-digit deficits and a spat
between their star and coach,
are one win from their first trip
to the NBA finals since 1995.

“You can almost taste it,”
said Orlando’s Rafer Alston,
who scored 26 points. “We’ve
got to win one more game and
it’s not going to be easy.”

The Magic, who won a Game
7 in Boston in the last round,
can close out the Cavaliers in
Cleveland on Thursday night.

Howard finished with 27
points, 14 rebounds and again
made his free throws — 7 of 9
— and the Magic made a team
playoff record 17 3-pointers.
Rashard Lewis and Mickael
Pietrus had 17 points each for
Orlando.

“We just have to keep fight-
ing,” Howard said. “We have
an excellent opportunity in
front of us. We can’t think that
anything’s going to be easy. As
a team, we believe that anytime
we step on the floor and play
our brand of basketball we can
win.”

James added 12 rebounds
and seven assists, but he had
eight turnovers for the Cavs,
whose season of seasons is slip-
ping away.

After Lewis made one of two
free throws with 3.2 seconds left
to give the Magic the 116-114
lead, the Cavs had one last
chance.

Every person inside Amway
Arena and millions watching
on TV knew who was going to
get the ball — James, who
saved the Cavaliers with a 3-
pointer at the final horn in
Game 2.

He was double-teamed on
the inbounds pass but still man-
aged to get free. Dribbling into
the frontcourt, James rose from

35 feet, and with a clean look at
the basket, sent his shot toward
the rim.

When it fell short, Van
Gundy could finally exhale.

“With LeBron James on the
court, doesn’t 3.2 seconds seem
like two minutes?” he asked.
“We had two guys on him and
he made a move like a tight
end, caught the ball and still got
off a reasonable shot. This guy
is unbelievable.”

James said the ball felt good

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leaving his hand.

“T always feel I can make any
shot I take,” he said. “I was just
hoping I could make one
more.”

James, who played the entire
second half and overtime, has
scored more than 40 in three
games in the series. Cleveland is
0-3 in them.

Mo Williams, who guaran-
teed the Cavs would win Game
4 and the series, scored 18
points, none after the third

quarter. Delonte West added
17 for the Cavaliers.
Following the game, Magic
fans chanted “One more win.”
History is on the Magic’s side
heading into Game 5. Teams
with a 3-1 lead are a staggering
182-8 in series dating to 1947.
“We’re not happy with just
winning a few games in the
Eastern Conference finals,”
Howard said. “We want to win
the whole thing.”
Lewis’ catch-and-shoot 3-

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Mr. Clark Allen at telephome 302-1212.



LeBRON JAMES gets tangled up

with Dwight Howard as he goes
up for a shot in the fourth quarter
in the overtime of Game 4 of the
Eastern Conference finals in
Orlando Tuesday night...

(AP Photo: John Raoux)



pointer on an inbounds play
with 4.1 seconds left in regula-
tion gave the Magic, who
attempted 38 3s, a 100-98 lead.

Cleveland set up a clear-out
play for James, who drove the
right side and was tripped in
the lane by Pietrus with .5 sec-
onds to play.

James swished his first free
throw attempt, and then after a
long delay, he made his second,
which danced on the rim before
falling through. James said he
never considered taking a 3-
pointer.

“If I was Rashard Lewis we
would have won,” James said,
smiling.

Orlando called a timeout and
tried a lob play for Howard,
who was ridden out under the
basket by Anderson Varejao.
Both players tumbled out of
bounds, and although there was
enough contact for the officials
to call two or three fouls, there
was no whistle.

Howard screamed in protest,
pleading his case to anyone who
would listen.

“Are you serious?” Howard
said, turning to the media sec-
tion. “If that was LeBron ... “

Howard took over in over-
time. He dunked the first two
times he touched it, shaking the
backboard each time and
Orlando opened what looked
to be an insurmountable six-
point lead with 1:11 left on his
tip-in.

James wasn’t done.

He made a left-handed
scoop, two free throws and an
are-you-kidding-me 3 while
falling into Orlando’s bench
with 4.6 seconds to go.

The Cavs put Lewis on the
line, and when he short-armed
his first free throw, they had
life.

James couldn’t repeat his
Game 2 miracle and must now
hope the Cavs can regroup at
home, where they are 43-3 this
season.

Howard picked up his sixth
technical foul for taunting Vare-
jao after a layup in the fourth
quarter. Cleveland’s forward
had draped his arms around
Howard in a failed attempt to
stop him from scoring, but
Howard muscled in his shot
before getting his T.

He'll have to behave himself
from here out. A seventh tech-
nical would earn him an auto-
matic 1-game suspension in the
playoffs.

“T might have to get some
duct tape,” Howard said.

NBA Today

@ By The Associated
Press

SCOREBOARD

Thursday, May 28

Orlando at Cleveland
(8:30pm EDT). The Magic
can close out the Eastern Con-
ference final by beating the
Cavaliers, who trail the series
3-1 after having the best
record in the NBA this sea-
son. Cleveland swept its first
two playoff series.

STARS

Tuesday

—Dwight Howard, Magic,
scored 10 points in overtime,
finishing with 27 points to go
with 14 rebounds as Orlando
won Game 4 of the Eastern
Conference final over visiting
Cleveland 116-114 to take a
3-1 lead in the series.

—Rafer Alston and Hedo
Turkoglu, Magic. Alston
added 26 points and Turkoglu
had 15 points, seven rebounds
and eight assists for Orlando,
which will try to close out the
series in Cleveland on Thurs-
day.

STRONG IN DEFEAT

LeBron James had 44
points, 12 rebounds and seven
assists, but Cleveland lost to
Orlando 116-114 in OT in
Game 4 of the Eastern Con-
ference finals. Orlando leads
the series 3-1. James has
scored at least 40 points in all
three Cleveland defeats in the
series.

STATS

History is on the Magic’s
side heading into Game 5 of
the Eastern Conference final
at Cleveland. Teams with a 3-
1 lead are a staggering 182-8 in
series dating to 1947 ... The
Cavaliers are 43-3 at home
this season, but just 1-1 in this
series.

RAINING 3S

The Orlando Magic made
a team playoff-record 17 3-
pointers, 11 after halftime, in
their 116-114 overtime victory
against Cleveland. Rafer
Alston hit 6 of 12 and Mickael
Pietrus made 5 of 11 3-point-
ers.

LONG WAIT

Orlando can make its first
final since being swept in 1995
by Houston if it wins one
more game against Cleveland
in the Eastern Conference
final. The Magic took a 3-1
lead over the Cavaliers with
their 116-114 overtime win.

FINED

The NBA fined Lakers
coach Phil Jackson and the
team $25,000 on Tuesday for
his post-game comments on
the officiating in Game 4,
which the Lakers lost at Den-
ver to tie the Western Con-
ference final 2-2. Jackson was
angry with the free throw dis-
crepancy — Denver’s 49
attempts were 14 more than
the Lakers — and accused the
Nuggets’ Dahntay Jones of a
dirty play for tripping Kobe
Bryant. Jackson was also
upset by a flurry of fouls called
against Luke Walton. The
league assessed Jones, Den-
ver’s defensive specialist, a fla-
grant-1 foul for sending the
Lakers’ star sprawling through
the lane.

KG’S SURGERY

Kevin Garnett had surgery
on his right knee after miss-
ing all of the playoffs. The
Boston Celtics’ star and inspi-
rational leader had bone spurs
removed during the arthro-
scopic surgery.

SPEAKING

“You can almost taste it.
We’ve got to win one more
game and it’s not going to be
easy.”

— Orlando’s Rafer Alston,
who scored 26 points in a 116-
114 overtime victory that gave
the Magic a 3-1 lead over
Cleveland in the Eastern Con-
ference final

“The guy’s out there chirp-
ing and talking and all that
kind of stuff. They were, all
of them, doing a little more
talking than usual. But as long
as none of them put their
hands on me, I’m cool.”

— Magic guard Anthony
Johnson on Cleveland guard
Mo Williams’ victory guaran-
tee. Orlando beat the Cavaliers
116-114 in OT in Game 4 of
the Eastern Conference final
and leads 3-1

For the stories
rz ale mia Ma=\ oe

tle MeL Tfo/ iT y
on Mondays





TRIBUNE SPORTS

THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 17



SPORTS



Barcelona defeats Manchester
United 2-0

eee ae be eS

be c
eee Es

BARCELONA COACH Pep Guardiola is throw

in Champions final



n in the air in celebration at the end of the UEFA Champions

League final between Man United and Barcelona in Rome Wednesday. (TOP RIGHT) - Messi holds the trophy at

the end of the match...

(AP Photos: Alessandra Tarantino)

Sharapova joins Safina and
Ivanovic in the third round

@ By CHRIS LEHOURITES
AP Sports Writer

PARIS (AP) — Maria Shara-
pova struggled again in her
Grand Slam tournament come-
back at the French Open, need-
ing three sets and a few extra
games to reach the third round
with a 6-2, 1-6, 8-6 victory over
Nadia Petrova on Wednesday.

Playing with tape on her trou-
blesome right shoulder, the
unseeded Sharapova hung on
to join top-seeded Dinara Safi-
na and defending champion
Ana Ivanovic in the next round.

"Obviously I am spending a
little bit more time out there
than I want to, but I think I'm
learning so many new things, as
well,” Sharapova said. "I think
this was a great match where I
had to fight my way through
many, many challenges. And I
did."

On the men's side, four-time
defending champion Rafael
Nadal and third-seeded Andy
Murray advanced to the third
round.

Nadal, attempting to become
the first to win five straight
French Open titles, extended
his French Open record to 30-0
by beating Teimuraz Gabashvili
of Russia 6-1, 6-4, 6-2.

"So what?" Nadal said of his
accomplishment. "(I'm) happy
for the record, but in the end
happy for the result."

Murray defeated Potito
Starace of Italy 6-3, 2-6, 7-5, 6-4.

Sharapova, a three-time
Grand Slam champion who has
slipped to No. 102 in the rank-
ings because of her injury layoff,
won five straight games to close
out the first set.

Trailing 4-2 in the deciding
set, she broke the 11th-seeded
Petrova to get back on serve at
4-4, and then saved two break
points to take a 5-4 lead. She
saved another break point while
serving at 6-6.

"I got off to a really good
start,” Sharapova said. "I kind
of started stumbling away.
Things went in the wrong direc-
tion. I was just glad I could pick
myself up and keep fighting and
do the right things, and end the
match with a win."

Sharapova is making her first
Grand Slam appearance in
almost a year after missing both



SHARAPOVA returns the ball to
compatriot Nadia Petrova during
their second round match at the
Roland Garros stadium in Paris on
Wednesday...

(AP Photo: Bernat Armangue)

the U.S. Open and the Aus-
tralian Open because of her
shoulder injury. She had surgery
in October.

Safina easily beat 18-year-old
Russian qualifier Vitalia
Diatchenko 6-1, 6-1, and
Ivanovic defeated Tamarine
Tanasugarn of Thailand 6-1, 6-
2.

Safina took a 5-0 lead to open
the match, stretching her streak
to 17 straight games after win-
ning 6-0, 6-0 in the first round.

"Pretty good start for the
tournament," said Safina, who
lost in the Australian Open final
and was the runner-up at
Roland Garros last year. "I just
played a good game today, good
enough to win."

Ivanovic looked more com-
fortable on court after strug-
gling in her opening match. The
eighth-seeded Ivanovic broke
the 32-year-old Tanasugarn
twice in the first set and three
times in the second.

"T just want to sort of get my
way through the rounds and just
feel more comfortable match
after match," Ivanovic said.
"Today I think I served some
aces, which gave me some con-
fidence in my serve, and that’s
something I've been working

on.
The 21-year-old Serb finished
with three aces.

No. 9 Victoria Azarenka of
Belarus also made it through,
while No. 21 Alize Cornet of
France reached the second
round. No. 15 Zheng Jie of Chi-
na lost.

The top-seeded Nadal has
never lost at Roland Garros,
and his 30th straight win on the
tournament's red clay gives him
the record for most consecutive
wins.

Nadal was forced to save
three break points in the first
game of the match. He only had
to save one more the rest of the
way, winning in straight sets for
the second match in a row.

Murray trailed 5-1 in the third
set but broke Starace three
straight times to win.

"On clay, there's always time
for you to get sort of back into
the match and find your game,
even if you're struggling,” Mur-
ray said.

Murray also reached the third
round at Roland Garros last
year but lost to Nicolas Alma-
gro in four sets. In his only oth-
er appearance at the French
Open, in 2006, he lost in the
first round.

No. 7 Gilles Simon of France,
No. 8 Fernando Verdasco of
Spain, No. 12 Fernando Gon-
zalez of Chile and No. 13 Marin
Cilic of Croatia also advanced,
but French veteran Fabrice San-
toro played his last match at
Roland Garros.

Santoro, who has made a
record 67 Grand Slam appear-
ances, lost in the first round of
this year's French Open — his

record-tying 20th — to
Christophe Rochus of Belgium
6-3, 6-1, 3-6, 6-4.

"Twenty years. That counts
for something in a lifetime,”
Santoro said. "It has been a
long road, a fantastic career. I
had a lot of fun and learned a
lot."

Santoro and Rochus started
their match Tuesday, but it was
suspended by darkness with the
Belgian leading 5-3 in the fourth
set. The pair came back out
onto the court after Safina's win
and played only eight minutes.

No. 21 Dmitry Tursunov of
Russia and No. 28 Feliciano
Lopez of Spain also lost.

m By ROBERT MILLWARD
AP Football Writer

ROME (AP) — A rare head-
ed goal by Lionel Messi helped
Barcelona beat Manchester
United 2-0 in the Champions
League final on Wednesday,
giving the Spanish side its third
European Cup title and third
trophy in a magical season.

Samuel Eto’o put the Spanish
champions ahead in the 10th
minute and Messi's 70th-minute
goal — his ninth in the Cham-
pions League this season —
sealed the victory over the
defending champions at the Sta-
dio Olimpico.

The triumph completed a
sweep of titles for 38-year-old
Barcelona coach Pep Guardio-
la in his first season, after wins
in the Spanish league and cup.
The former Barcelona star, who
started as a ball boy at Camp
Nou, now joins the ranks of
those who have won the title
both as a player and a coach.

Guardiola became the
youngest coach to win Euro-
pean soccer's top club competi-
tion since the European Cup
became the Champions League
in 1993. Barcelona also won the
trophy in 1992 and 2006.

"No team has ever done the
treble in Spain, and we'll be
remembered as the first team
to do it," Barcelona striker
Thierry Henry said. "That's
amazing."

United had been chasing its
fourth European Cup title, and
fourth trophy this season after
winning the Premier League,
FIFA Club World Cup and
League Cup.

But United was thoroughly
outplayed by the Spanish side as
Messi scored his 38th goal of an
amazing year for Barcelona,
which has 53 league and cup
goals this season.

Xavi floated a diagonal ball
into the United area to find
Messi unmarked, and the 5-
foot-7 (1.69 m) Argentina strik-
er — renowned for his deft



dribbling and shooting — used
his head to loop the ball over
United goalkeeper Edwin Van
der Sar and into the net.

Messi set off colorful cele-
brations at one end of the sta-
dium, filled with 62,467 fans,
and left English fans in silence.

The loss left Man United
manager Alex Ferguson at 25
titles in 23 seasons. He failed to
match Liverpool's Bob Paisley's
three titles in the competition.

"We started the game bright-
ly. We were confident and we
could have been in front," Fer-
guson said. "We had the ball
but didn't use it very well. ...
We defended fantastically all
season but they were two shod-
dy goals.

"We didn't play as well as we
can, but they are a good team.
We have to give them credit.
Xavi (Hernandez) and
(Andres) Iniesta can keep the
ball all night. They made it very
difficult."

South Korean winger Park Ji-
sung became the first Asian to
play in a Champions League
final. He almost scored for
United in the opening minute
but his shot was deflected wide
after Cristiano Ronaldo's free
kick had been blocked by the
goalkeeper. It was the nearest
United came to scoring all
night.

The victory also marked the
first Champions League title for
Henry, the French striker who
was on the losing side when
Arsenal lost to Barcelona in
2006.

"Finally, I've been waiting for
so long to get this title and now
finally today," said Henry, who
had been doubtful for the final
because of a knee injury. "The

last five minutes were the
longest of my life.”

United almost went ahead in
the opening minute when a
needless foul by Yaya Toure on
Anderson handed Ronaldo an
early free kick. His powerful
drive was blocked by the hands
of goalkeeper Victor Valdes
and Park's rebound was deflect-
ed for a corner by Gerard
Pique.

With Barcelona's dangerous
forwards barely getting a touch
of the ball in the early stages,
there was little danger at the
other end until the Spanish
champions went ahead with
their first attack of the game.

Iniesta started the move with
a break through midfield and
found Eto'o on the right. The
striker cut inside a weak tackle
by Nemanja Vidic and poked a
low angled shot past Van de
Sar.

The goal changed the pattern
of the play with Barcelona's
stars settling into their confi-
dent style of interpassing. Unit-
ed, now chasing the game, was
unable to create any real dan-
ger. Ronaldo wanted to shoot at
every opportunity, but fired
wide and headed over.

Seeing his title slipping away,
Ferguson reshaped his attack
for the second half.

The 67-year-old Scot took off
midfielder Anderson and sent
on Carlos Tevez, the Argentina
striker who is convinced he's
leaving the club because United
won't turn his loan deal into a
full term transfer.

That left United under-
manned in midfield and
Barcelona continued to create
openings.

Ferguson made another
change when he took off Park
and sent on Dimitar Berbatov.

Barcelona could have added
more but Van der Sar saved
twice from Carles Puyol and
Ronaldo was shown the yellow
card for some petulant late chal-
lenges on the Barcelona cap-
tain.

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TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS





'

SPECIAL OLYMPICS judo participants

Special Olympics: More than
250 athletes set to compete at
‘largest national games ever’

AFTER training all year, ath-
letes from the islands of Abaco,
Grand Bahama, New Provi-
dence and Long Island are rear-
ing up for their opportunity to
win medals at this year’s
National Special Olympics
Games.

More than 250 athletes are
expected to compete in various
sports in the capital this week-
end, and the organisers are con-
fident that the event will be the
best ever.

At 9am Friday, they are slat-
ed to compete in swimming and
judo at the Betty Kelly Kenning
swim complex.

And on Saturday at the
Thomas A Robinson Stadium,
following the opening ceremony
at 9:30am, athletes will show off
their skills in bocce and track
and field.

Roosevelt Thompson, nation-
al director of Special Olympics
Bahamas, reports that athletes
from the sub-programmes in the
islands have trained all year for
this event.

And they are anxious to com-
pete. As there are no interna-
tional games this year, this will
be the highlight of their training.

The

[>

‘7

Special Ohpmpics

The increased number of
coaches certified this year guar-
antees that the quality of their
performances should surpass
the high level demonstrated in
the past.

With the programme pro-
ducing more athletes, the com-
petition should be exciting, and
the public is invited to witness
an inspiring display of courage
and determination by the par-
ticipants.

Basil Christie, national chair-
man, expressed his appreciation
to the many sponsors and sup-
porters of the national pro-
gramme. He also encourages
everybody to come out and
cheer for the athletes.

The coaches and volunteers
have worked hard and he is
confident that spectators will be
proud of the results of their
efforts.

=

We must find a way
to provide more

THE success of the men’s
national volleyball team at the
2010 World Championships
NORCEA’S Qualifying
Round should drive home a
point that has been empha-
sized for quite some time.

We have to find a way to
provide more funding for
sports, particularly team
sports.

While welcoming the team
home from Jamaica on Tues-
day, Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture Desmond Bannis-
ter said that while the team
was not quite sure if they
would have been able to travel
up to the eleventh hour
because of the lack of funding,
they did manage to go and
they represented the country
very well.

While he pledged his gov-
ernment's commitment to the
Bahamas Volleyball Federa-
tion, headed by Don Cornish,
Bannister said it’s just as vital
to get corporate Bahamas on
board.

"As you build on this suc-
cess, I want everybody in the
country to appreciate that you
need the financial support,
even in difficult times," he
charged.

Indicating that the young
men are doing everything that
is positive, Bannister said as
they are enjoying their success,
now is a good time for the
country to rally behind them
and assist their efforts finan-
cially.

Considering that it is one of
the core sports in the country,
volleyball has actually seen a
decline in its participation with
more potential players opting
to play basketball and com-
pete in track and field.

But with the performance of
this team, which earned the

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OPINION

rights to advance to the third
qualifying round in August in
Cuba, the federation obviously
has its work cut out for the
members.

Not only do they have to
find the funding to make that
trip to Cuba, but the federa-
tion is looking at going toa
training camp in Santo
Domingo and they are also
looking at engaging the ser-
vices of a coach from Cuba.

All of that takes money.

Additionally, the women's
national team is scheduled to
go to Barbados on June 9 to
play in their qualifying round
for the World Championships.

With just about two weeks
before the women travel, the

federation should be riding the
momentum from the men as
they start knocking on the
doors of corporate Bahamas
for their support. Like the
men, the federation is expect-
ed to put together a good crop
of players that will include the
best local ones and those
returning home from college.
So there chances of succeeding
should be just as great as the
men’s.

Normally, corporate
Bahamas will be willing to
throw their support behind an
individual athlete, but for too
long, little or no emphasis has
been placed on team sports
and that should change.

The government, in its new
budget that is being debated in
the House of Assembly, is
going through a tremendous
challenge, which would mean
that there will definitely be
some significant cuts in fund-
ing that is provided for sports.

So like all of the other sport-
ing bodies, the federation will
have a task to ensure that the
Bahamas continues on the
path that the men have paved
as they look ahead at qualify-
ing for the prestigious World
Championships and eventually
the Olympic Games in 2012.

The latter may pose more of
a challenge for the federation,
but if any of the teams can
achieve the former, it will fur-
ther indicate the need for a
sustainable fund-raising pro-
gramme because there will be
the need for more involve-
ment in training camps to pre-
pare the team(s).

If we're not going to intro-
duce the National Lottery,
then we need to find a way to
help support our various
sporting bodies, especially in
these tough economic times

' funding for sports

when just about everybody
will be looking for funding to
assist with their disciplines.

TRACK AND FIELD IN

SAME BOAT

So far this year, the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations has seen
quite a number of significant
performances as the IAAF
World Championships in
Berlin, Germany, draws near.

Minister Bannister has start-
ed a personal campaign high-
lighting the performances on
Facebook and he has gotten
quite a number of responses
from Bahamians who have
indicated that they are just as
delighted about what they
have seen.

Kermit Romer, a die hard
Bahamian sports enthusiast
now residing in New York, put
it quite aptly when he wrote:

"For whatever reasons, the
powers that be cannot agree
on funding for sports so maybe
we (John Q Public) can do our
part. If we (300,000 plus peo-
ple) were to donate $1 a week
until the upcoming World
Games and for once give them
more than what they need.”

Like volleyball, track and
field athletes will also proba-
bly be heading to a training
camp before they go to the
World Championships and
that is going to take a lot of
funding for them to achieve
their goal.

So while we relish in the
performances turned in so far
by our athletes, we have to be
prepared to lend our support
financially to ensure that they
are put in a better position to
just go out and represent their
country and not have to worry
about how they will get to
their destination.

Tyson family asks for
privacy after tot’s death

m By JONATHAN J COOPER
Associated Press Writer

PHOENIX (AP) — The
death of Mike Tyson’s 4-year-
old daughter in a bizarre acci-
dent adds an awful chapter to
the boxer’s troubled life.

Exodus Tyson died at a hos-
pital Tuesday, a day after her
neck apparently got caught in a
cord dangling from a treadmill at
her Phoenix home, police said.

Police said Exodus either
slipped or put her head in the
loop of a cord hanging under the
console and suffocated. She was
pronounced dead just before
noon after being on life support,
said police Sgt. Andy Hill, who
called the injury a “tragic acci-
dent.”

“There are no words to
describe the tragic loss of our
beloved Exodus,” the family said
in a statement. “We ask you now
to please respect our need at this
very difficult time for privacy to
grieve and try to help each other
heal.”

Tyson, who has been living in
Las Vegas, flew Monday to
Phoenix, where he was seen
entering the hospital.

The modest house where his
daughter was injured contrasts
starkly with the lavish lifestyle
Tyson had through his tumul-
tuous years of boxing, when he
spent tens of millions of dollars
and says he had millions more
stolen from him by unscrupu-
lous associates.

During two years at the height
of his career, he earned $140 mil-
lion — but he filed for Chapter
11 protection in U.S. Bankrupt-
cy Court in 2003.

He has been promoting a new

MACKEY, from page 19

Beach resort.

His first title defense came a year later against
Anibal Acevedo where he scored a seventh round
knockout and his most recent title defense came
in a second round knockout against Senette.

Both fighters are 4-2 in their last six bouts and
the 36-year-old Cayetano, like Mackey, comes
into the bout with wins in his last two appear-

ances.

Cayetano defeated Nelsido Miguel via a second
round TKO in March of this year and Manuel
Florian by unanimous decision in the sixth round

in 2008.

Both Mackey and Cayetano have suffered their
latest loss at the hands of Germany’s Karo Murat.



MIKE TYSON (AP)

documentary about his life and
told The New York Times earli-
er this month he had been sober
for 15 months after years of drug
and alcohol abuse.

“T don’t know who I am,” he
told the newspaper. “That might
sound stupid. I really have no
idea. All my life I’ve been drink-
ing and drugging and partying,
and all of a sudden this comes to
a stop.”

Tyson first began boxing in a
facility for juvenile delinquents
in upstate New York at the age
of 12. Eight years later, he
became the youngest heavy-
weight champion ever when he
Knocked out Trevor Berbick in
1986. But in 1990, he was defeat-
ed by James “Buster” Douglas
in one of the biggest upsets in
boxing history, and soon after
was convicted of raping a beau-
ty pageant contestant in Indi-
anapolis.

Tyson, who still denies he
raped the woman, served three
years in prison.

A few years later, he served
three months in jail for beating
up two men after a minor car
crash in suburban Washington.

As his career continued, so
did his bizarre behavior. He bit
off a piece of Evander Holy-
field’s ear during a boxing match
and once threatened to eat the
children of heavyweight cham-
pion Lennox Lewis.

Although Tyson’s children
had lived in their unassuming
neighborhood for several years,
he purchased a separate home
in the Tony Phoenix suburb of
Paradise Valley in 2005 for $2.1
million, selling it two years later
for $2.3 million.

In November 2007, Tyson
spent 24 hours in Maricopa
County’s “Tent City” jail after
pleading guilty to one count of
cocaine possession and one mis-
demeanor count of driving under
the influence. Police found the
drug when they pulled over
Tyson’s car after he left a Scotts-
dale night club.

According to police, Tyson
said after his arrest that he
bought cocaine “whenever I can
get my hands on it.”

At Tyson’s sentencing hear-
ing, nearly a year after the arrest,
his attorney David Chesnoff said
his client had taken 29 drug tests
without a relapse and was
attending Alcoholic Anonymous
and Narcotics Anonymous
meetings.

Tyson had become an exam-
ple of how a person overcomes
problems with drugs, a violent
past and poor upbringing, Ches-
noff said.

“He’s tried his hardest,” his
attorney said, “despite coming
from almost impossible begin-
nings.”

¢ Associated Press writers Bob
Baum and Terry Tang con-
tributed to this report

Mackey lost by unanimous decision in an eight
rounder, while the Dominican fighter fell by TKO

in the seventh round.

In his five-year professional career, Mackey
has never lost a fight at home while Cayetano
has yet to win a professional fight outside of the
Dominican Republic.

Also featured on the undercard will be Bahami-
an heavyweight contender Jerry Butler. This

scheduled fight is an eight round bout against

Michael Santiago of the Dominican Republic.
And there will be three four-round bouts,
including a match between Bahamian female

boxer Kelly “Tiger” Farquharson (she will be

nent.

making her pro-debut) and an unspecified oppo-







Howard leads



THE TRIBUNE PAGE 19
c - P Magic to 116-
| 114 OT win
) over Cavs...
THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009 See page 16

1 y
Choo Choo’ Mac
to face Dominic

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia
media.net

or the third time

since winning the

World Boxing

Council Caribbean

Boxing Federation
supper middleweight champi-
onship in 2006, Jermaine “Choo
Choo” Mackey is slated to
defend his title here.

Mackey is set to face Emil-
iano Cayetano of the Domini-
can Republic at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium in the fea-
ture bout of the evening on May
: The sign of thi !

In a scheduled 12-round bout, gq g eat gq To
Mackey will place his 17-3 (13 e $ n r in $ come:
KO) and the WBC title on the
line against Cayetano who
comes in at 18-2 (11 KO).

The 29-year-old Mackey has
won his last two fights — a fourth
round TKO of Jeremy Yelton such as iron, iodine and zine, as well as DHA, ARA,
and a unanimous decision over
Michael Gbenga which cap- and Sialic Acid, which are integral building
tured the Commonwealth super
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Caribe title es he won a suc- They'll go much further in life
cessful title defense against Kirt
Senette.

Mackey won the then vacant

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PAGE 20, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009

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THURSDAY,

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

PRIME MINISTER HUBERT INGRAHAM in the House of Assembly...

Water Corp project
costs varied 130 per
cent from budget

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

PROJECT costs at the Water
& Sewerage Corporation some-
times varied as much as 130 per
cent from Budget, an external
audit of its internal financial
controls discovered, the final
report uncovering numerous
weaknesses and deficiencies in
the Corporation’s controls and
procedures.

The report on the Water &
Sewerage Corporation’s inter-
nal control and accounting pro-
cedures for the year ended
December 31, 2007, by accoun-
tants Pannell Kerr Foster
(PKF), found that “bank rec-
onciliations were not being pre-
pared on a timely basis” - some
being delayed “as late as three
months after the relevant
month.

“The absence of timely bank
reconciliations also highlights
the potential for misstatement
or cut-off errors, and the non-



* External audit report highlights
2/3 of accounts receivables 180
days past due, and ongoing
liquidity issues, with overdrafts
used for short-term financing

* Corporation’s accounts confirm
$24m-plus loss in fiscal 2007

reliability, and accuracy, of
reported cash balances.”

And the situation was not
much better when it came to
accounts receivables. PKF
added: “We again noted that
two-thirds (some $1.225 million
out of a total $1.877 million) of
the total accounts receivable
balance related to accounts with
balances outstanding in excess
of 180 days.

“These balances, if not care-
fully monitored, have the poten-
tial for doubtful recovery.
Included in these balances are
some delinquent accounts for
which no payment has been
made for the past several years.

“These balances have subse-
quently been earmarked in the
system as ‘final’ which means
that service has been terminat-
ed, and thus collection is
deemed doubtful.”

PKF urged that the Water &
Sewerage Corporation man-
agement write-off accounts
where all collections efforts had
been exhausted, removing them
from being treated as an ‘asset’
under accounts receivables.
This, in turn, would improve the
accuracy of the Corporation’s
financial statements, with
accounts receivables being
reported at their ‘net realisable
value’.

“Management should also
pay particular attention to the
reduction in the quality of the
accounts receivable balances
and formulate strategies to mit-
igate any resulting risks,” the

SEE page 6B

6
ra
I | 4
pe



ile

MAY 28,

y
2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net



Money Safe.
Money Fast.

Inteveatianal Maney Tranter

i? Bank of The Bahamas

ite



ERRMATIOBMNAL

Online at

BankBahamas Online.com

.7% fiscal deficit
‘not sustainable’

* PM reveals extent of public finances crisis, with 2009-2010 deficit projected at 3.9% or $286m
* Follows on from disastrous 4.7% or $352m deficit for 2008-2009, with revenues

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

rime Minister
Hubert Ingraham
yesterday warned
that the 4.7 per cent
or $352 million
GFS fiscal deficit that the Gov-
ernment’s finances are project-
ed to produce for the 2008-2009
Budget year “is not sustainable

down $260m and only 17.5% of GDP - some 2.8% lower than projected

* Debt servicing costs become biggest Budget item, at $264m - a $30m increase year-over-year
* Warning that getting government's finances back on track within three years will be ‘notable achievement’

over the medium term”, with
the upcoming year’s deficit fore-
cast to be slightly lower at 3.9
per cent of GDP - some $286
million.

‘More expected’ over
loss-making entities

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE outgoing Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce presi-
dent yesterday told Tribune
Business he had expected Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham to
“be more aggressive” in dealing
with the loss-making public Cor-
porations in yesterday’s 2009-
2010 Budget, and added that he
had been “looking for a bit
more” from the Government.

While the Prime Minister had
“just said the bad news”, Dioni-
sio D’Aguilar, who is also Super-
wash’s president, told this news-
paper he had been hoping the
Government would deal more
firmly with the loss-making Cor-
porations burdening the
Bahamian taxpayer, namely
Bahamasair, ZNS and the Water
& Sewerage Corporation.

However, he praised the
Prime Minister for his plans to
create a ‘one-stop shop’ Busi-
ness Licence through an amend-
ed Act that will scrap the Licens-
ing Authority and amalgamate
three existing licensing process-
es into one, thus reducing
bureaucracy and red tape.

“The removal of a bureau-
cratic impediment is always
good, and hopefully it will facil-
itate the formation of businesses
and reduce the level of bureau-

* Outgoing Chamber chief
praises Business Licence
amendments, but still wants
change in calculation method

* Bahamasair sees subsidy
reduced by almost 40% or
$11m to $17m, with
government ‘at a loss’
in financial crisis

cracy businesses have to go
through in their licensing,” Mr
D’Aguilar said.

The amendments, which the
Government plans to bring to
the House of Assembly early in
the 2009-2010 fiscal year, will
amalgamate the existing Busi-
ness Licence Act with the
Liquor Licences Act, the Shop
Licences Act and the Music and
Dancing Licences Act “to create
a so-called ‘one-stop’ service to
the public to replace the current
outdated, cumbersome and
time-consuming processes”.

While the Licensing Authori-
ty will no longer be required,
the new Act will provide for
liquor licences as a special cate-
gory. A Review Board will be
established to hear public objec-
tions to certain licence applica-

SEE page 9B

The 2009-2010 Budget state-
ment to the House of Assembly
revealed just how precarious
and weak the condition of the
public finances is, with the Gov-

ernment seeking to enhance
and streamline collections on
the revenue side, and to “hold

SEE page 8B

Foreign real estate
permits decline 36%

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

PERMITS issued by the Investments Board for the foreign
acquisition of Bahamas-based commercial and residential
properties fell by 36 per cent and 19.4 per cent respectively dur-
ing the 2009 first quarter, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said
yesterday, highlighting the slowdown in foreign direct invest-

ment.

For January-March 2009, Mr Ingraham said the Invest-
ments Board issued 254 registration certificates for the foreign

acquisition of residential
properties in the Bahamas,

SEE page 4B



Realtors optimistic on tax amendment

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN realtors yes-
terday gave a cautious welcome
to the Government’s proposed
Real Property Tax amend-
ments, including the plan to
reduce the number of tax rates
from three to two, in the hope it
will make this nation’s second
home market more competitive.

Mike Lightbourn, head of
Coldwell Banker Lightbourn
Realty, told Tribune Business
that the proposed amendments
were “great” because “people
who buy high-end properties,

the foreigners who come here,
will not have to pay exorbitant
tax rates”.

Both the real estate industry
and attorneys had asked the
Government to re-institute the
$35,000 real property tax cap
that had limited the amount of
tax paid by owners of high-end,
multi-million properties.

Its removal in the 2008-2009
Budget had made the Bahamas
uncompetitive against other
Caribbean nations, many of
which did not have or had lim-
ited, property-based taxes. For-

SEE page 4B

ARE YOU PREPARED. FOR THIS
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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



| >) =<;\;
Be guided over firm’s corporate governance

THE Central Bank of the
Bahamas introduced the
‘Guidelines for Corporate Govy-
ernance of Banks and Trust
Companies Licensed to do
Business within and from with-
in the Bahamas’ (the Guide-
lines) on the December 13,
2001.

The objective of the guide-
lines is to simply “reassert the

role of the Board of Directors”.
The development and imple-
mentation of the guidelines
reflects the commitment of the
Central Bank to ensure compli-
ance with international stan-
dards of best practice in corpo-
rate governance, and to clearly
articulate its expectations of
licensees in the adoption of, and
adherence to, corporate gover-

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nance principles in the man-
agement and oversight of their
financial institutions.

While the Guidelines provide
only an overall regulatory and
administrative framework with-
in which directors and senior
executives of financial institu-
tions may operate, in order to
prudently and ethically manage,
oversee and direct their organ-
isations in the best interests of
their stakeholders (clients,
shareholders, intermediaries,
creditors and employees), they
do not have the force of law -
only regulatory oversight and
risk measurement - on inspec-
tion of licensees.

The Guidelines define cor-
porate governance as “the
processes, structures and infor-
mation used for directing and
overseeing the management of
an organisation”. Corporate
governance provides the criti-
cal underpinning for the rela-
tionships, responsibilities and
reporting lines for the Board of
Directors, senior management,
shareholders, employees, clients
and other stakeholders.

When the corporate gover-
nance regime is fully and effec-
tively implemented and adhered
to, it can not only assist stake-
holders in achieving the objec-
tives of the institution through
sound policies, procedures and
mandates, but it can also pro-
vide a reasonably proficient
measurement of the productiv-
ity and credibility of its busi-
ness strategy, organidational
growth and corporate social
responsibility, in meeting the
challenges and demands of
commerce and compliance.

At the centre of good corpo-
rate governance is the proper
understanding, appreciation and
practice of the high standard of
duty, skill and care expected of
directors and senior manage-
ment. Then there is the prudent
discharge of their duties and
responsibilities, both internally
and externally, within the ambit
of applicable law, local regula-
tions and international stan-
dards of best practice.

While the Guidelines are
applicable only to banks, trust
companies and foreign banks
licensed to operate branches
within - and from within - the
Bahamas, and are intended only
as a prescriptive guide of the
minimum standards expected
of licensees by the Central

Legal
Ease

by Tyrone Fitzgerald
tA | 3 Ps fo)



Bank, they do provide detailed
guidance and direction to com-
panies operating within the
Bahamas generally for good
corporate governance.

Process of Corporate

Governance

In order to ensure appropri-
ate independence and freedom
from undue influence, the
Guidelines recommend that the
Board of Directors of licensees
(and companies generally)
should comprise both execu-
tive and non-executive mem-
bers.

A comprehensive under-
standing of their responsibili-
ties and accountabilities by
directors and senior manage-
ment, and clear, consistent com-
munication of the process of
good corporate governance
within an organisation to such
stakeholders, are paramount to
the effectiveness of any corpo-
rate governance regime.

An integral part of the man-
date of directors and senior
management is the identifica-
tion, measurement, monitoring,
control and minimisation of var-
ious risks to an organisation,
depending upon its size, the
nature of its business, clientele,
and the vulnerabilities of its
products, services, internal con-
trols, systems and processes.
They can be impacted by inter-
nal or external threats of money
laundering, fraud, collusion,
impropriety or overall legal or
regulatory liability.

Being able to measure the
accuracy, reliability, timeliness,
relevancy and thoroughness of
an organisation’s risk manage-
ment system, and the frequency,
effectiveness, and productivity
with which directors and senior
management are able to obtain
information regarding these
measurements, are critical to
the soundness of any corporate
governance programme and its
attendant compliance require-
ments.

Risks to Businesses
Depending upon an individ-
ual business’s size, activities,

clients and geographical loca-
tion, it may experience the fol-
lowing risks during its lifetime:

Legal risk
Credit risk
Market risk
Fiduciary risk
Operational risk
Compliance risk
Regulatory risk
Reputation risk
Technology risk

Each risk has its own defini-
tion and effect on a business,
and requires the careful identi-
fication, analysis, monitoring,
control and minimisation by the
key stakeholders in any busi-
ness and the relevant commit-
tees that it may establish (the
risk management committee,
credit committee, etc), to
address these various risks.

Annual Review and

Annual Certification

The Central Bank guidelines
require the Board of Directors
of licensees to document annu-
ally whether their corporate
governance process has been
implemented effectively, and
has successfully enabled them
to achieve their overall business
goals and objectives.

Licensees are also required
to determine their capital ade-
quacy requirements; measure
and assess their overall risk pro-
file; recommend and implement
new policies, procedures and
internal controls where neces-
sary; ensure the accuracy and
reliability of their management
information systems; and
encourage their management
and staff to maintain high cor-
porate values and ethical stan-
dards.

In short, licensees should gen-
erally assess whether their over-
all control environment, com-
pliance culture, policies, proce-
dures and risk management sys-
tems are appropriate and effec-
tive in meeting and protecting
the interests of stakeholders,
particularly shareholders, and
clients.

The Board of Directors is
required, on an annual basis,
within 120 days of the calendar
year-end to certify in writing,
to the Inspector of Banks and
Trust Companies, that upon the
advice and assistance of man-
agement, it has assessed and
documented the effectiveness

of the licensee’s corporate gov-
ernance process and its success
in meeting the organisation’s
overall objectives.

As part of this annual certifi-
cation, the Board of Directors
must also report any material
deficiencies, weaknesses and
problems they may have identi-
fied in their risk management
assessment and monitoring dur-
ing the year, along with any
action plans and timetables for
remedial action.

An external auditor must be
engaged by the licensee to
annually review and assess the
methodology followed by the
Board of Directors in analysing
and monitoring the organisa-
tion’s corporate governance
process, and the auditor must
report directly to the Board of
Directors and the Inspector of
Banks and Trust Companies on
any discrepancies with the
Board’s risk management
assessment.

Responsibilities of the

Board of Directors

The Guidelines outline the
responsibilities of the Board of
Directors of a licensee as fol-
lows:

* To ensure competent man-
agement by appointing a chief
executive; overseeing and par-
ticipating in the appointment of
other senior executives with the
skills and integrity necessary to
manage the relevant organisa-
tion; setting performance-based
compensation policies, pro-
grammes, goals and standards
for senior management; super-
vising and evaluating manage-
ment’s performance; develop-
ing and regularly updating a
management succession plan;
and establishing standards of
business conduct and ethical
behaviour.

* Approve objectives, strate-
gies, plans and operating poli-
cies, standards and procedures

* Ensure the organisation’s
operations are conducted pru-
dently and within the frame-
work of laws, regulations and
guidelines, as well as established
policies and procedures

* Ensure the organisation
conducts its affairs with a high
degree of integrity

* Review the organisation’s
business and operating perfor-
mance

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 3B



> =~
‘We are doomed with no education upgrade’

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE COMPLETION of the
Baha Mar project will be the
“single largest opportunity” for
the future of the Bahamas,
according to its chairman and
chief executive, who suggested
the development will come to
fruition despite its long delay
and investor search.

Sarkis Izmirlian, speaking at
the Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce’s Annual General Meet-
ing, said the Baha Mar project
will put the Bahamas on the
map as a “truly world class
resort destination”.

But he hinted that for Baha
Mar to succeed, the Govern-
ment and the private sector
remain accountable for rede-
veloping the country’s main
gateway, Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport (LPIA), and
bringing the educational system,
especially the public system, up
to arespectable standard.

“Let me be blunt: Unless we
improve the education of all
Bahamians: Schools for younger
Bahamian children and trade
schools, or continuing education
for mature Bahamians, we are
doomed,” he said.

“We need to train and invest

in our teachers, not shy away
from hiring great teachers,
whether local or expat, and
invest in better-on-the-job train-
ing.”

Mr Izmirlian said the all-
important first impression
offered by a clean and well-
maintained airport was of the
utmost importance to the future
of the tourism industry, and the
departure process crucial to
repeat visitors.

He said that departure from
LPIA can be a “nightmare”, and
suggested the tiresome process
of two checkpoints and a ran-
dom third search often creates
grumbling and discontent
among departing visitors, a sen-
timent commonly shared by
tourists and Bahamians alike.

“Much of this is as ridiculous
as it is unnecessary,” said Mr
Izmirlian.

He also suggested that statis-
tics show the Bahamas is losing
ground as a competitive desti-
nation in the region.

Statistics he collected show
tourist arrivals to the Bahamas
in 2008 were down by 4.3 per
cent last year, while Cancun was
up by 7 per cent, Cuba up by 9
per cent, Jamaica up by 4 per
cent and Aruba up by 10 per
cent. These figures exist despite
the Bahamas’ proximity advan-

Attorney passes Series 6 exam

AN attorney with
Graham Thompson
& Co, Anastasia M.
Bastian, has success-
fully completed the
Series 6 Exam in
Florida after study-
ing at the Nassau-
based Securities
Training Institute
(STD. ir
The Series 6 qual- "i
ifying exam is
administered by the
New York Stock
Exchange (NYSE) and the
National Association of Secu-



Anastasia M Bastian

rities Dealers
(NASD) in the US.

Ms Albury, STT’s
course administra-
tor, said: “Our goal
is to remain the
recognised leader in
providing high qual-
ity investment train-
ing. STI provides
comprehensive
course materials,
and our instructors
offer relevant
insights that are crit-
ical to exam success.” Ms Bas-
tian is pictured.

tage to the US compared to oth-
er destinations.

Cruise

Mr Izmirlian said cruise
arrivals to the Bahamas were
down by 3.7 per cent, while in
the Dominican Republic arrivals
were up by 8.5 per cent, Mexico
up by 3.3 per cent and Aruba
up by 15 per cent.

“Just this month, in the mid-
dle of the great recession, the
Government of Qatar invested
$75 million to build a luxury




250-room hotel in Cuba,” said
Mr Izmirlian.

“We had contacted the Gov-
ernment of Qatar some time
back about an investment in
Baha Mar. They made it very
clear they had no interest in
investing in the Bahamas.”

He said Baha Mar considered
Qatar’s disinterest a factor of
the economic environment.
However, he suggested they
should have looked “closer to
home for the reason”.

Mr Izmirlian said the Four
Seasons Emerald Bay closure,

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Suitably qualified candidates need only apply.









as a sign of the times in the
Bahamas, was the only hotel in
the globally branded chain to
close.

“That should tell us some-
thing,” he said.

Mr Izmirlian has in recent
times spoken candidly about the
Bahamas’ deteriorating social
fabric and physical infrastruc-
ture, suggesting it is time for
government-owned utilities to
privatise and Nassau city cen-
tre to be upgraded and revital-
ized.

However, he said it will

require a public/private, blue-
ribbon partnership to prepare a
list of actions to solve some of
the problems.

He said much of what he has
discussed regarding capital
improvement projects and pri-
vate sector accountability, he
has tried to incorporate in the
Baha Mar project.

“As the project progresses,
and certainly at fruition, it will
provide substantial job and
career advancement opportuni-
ties for the people of the
Bahamas,” said Mr Izmirlian.



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THE} [| Mal | [Al

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED

NOTICE

Please be advised that the Head Office and
the Registered Office of the company will be
moved from the Bahamas Financial Centre,
Charlotte & Shirley Streets, 2nd Floor, Nassau,
Bahamas to Royal Bank House, East Hill Street,
Nassau, Bahamas effective 25th May, 2009.

D. BURROWS-HAINES (Mrs.)
Corporate Secretary

Dated this 22nd May 2009

Telephone Number - 356-8500
Telefax - 356-8660

NMC SALES, SERVICE and PARTS
All for One NEW NUMBER

Distributors for Honda, Chevrolet, Cadillac and ACDelco Parts | Shirley Street, Nassau

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ARATH | 10) )} ON - ‘ie

Saturday, May 30, 2009
2:00 pm
Mall Center Court

Island 102.9 FM Radio Remote
10:00am - 2:00pm

YODEPHY DANCE & MODELING ACADEMY WILL HOST THE SHOW

302-0130



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PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, MATEDAS THOMPSON
Golden Gates #1 of the Western District of the Island of New
Providence intends to change my son’s name from MALIK

ROHANO RAHDIGAN RAHMING to HENRY STEPHEN
MILES STORR. If there are any objections to this change of
name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than
thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

OF

CRANSTON HOLDINGS
LIMITED

Notice is herby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 25th day of May, 2009.
Credit Suisee Trust Limited of Bahamas Financial Cen-
tre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, The Bahamas
has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE

OF

EMERY MANAGEMENT
LIMITED

Pursuant to Park LX, Section 137 (6) of the (Interna-
tional Business Companies Act, 2000), we hereby sub-
mit that winding-up and dissolution of the Company
has been completed on the 25th day of May, 2009.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator



THE TRIBUNE





Foreign real estate
permits decline 36%

FROM page 1B

compared to 315 certificates in
the same period in 2008.

The 2009 certificates covered
properties valued at a cumula-
tive $139.6 million, compared
to a total value of $107.4 mil-
lion for the first three months of
2008.

On the acquisition of com-
mercial properties by foreign
investors, Mr Ingraham said
that in the same January-March
2009 period, the Investments
Board issued 115 permits for
real estate valued at a collec-
tive $70 million.

This compared to 182 per-
mits issued in 2008 for property
valued at $194.3 million.

This translated into a con-
traction in the construction sec-
tor’s output, which fell by 10
per cent in 2008, Mr Ingraham
said, “primarily due to the tight-
ening in foreign investment”.
However, domestic residential
and commercial construction
helped to give the industry
some stability.

“First quarter 2009 approvals
for new building starts fell to
463 from the 471 approved in

the same period in 2008,” the
Prime Minister added.

“It is to be noted that the
inclusion of the approval for the
$150 million Lynden Pindling
International Airport (LPIA)
expansion in February 2009
helped push the value of build-
ing permits for this year to
$325.7 million, up from the $124
million value of approvals
granted in 2008.”

On the tourism front, major
declines in occupancy and for-
ward booking levels from 2008
onwards resulted in the termi-
nation of 2,200 jobs in the hotel
industry, with shortened work
weeks for many others.

“The latest preliminary data
available for the first four
months of 2009 reveal quite
starkly the gravity of the situa-
tion in the tourism sector,” the
Prime Minister said.

“Through April, total arrivals
to the Bahamas, at 1.68 million,
were down by 1.2 per cent from
the same period last year. How-
ever, the most important air
arrivals segment was lower by
15.5 per cent.

“Arrivals by sea were actual-
ly up by 5.5 per cent over the
first four months, in part reflect-
ing the repositioning of cruise

ships back to the Bahamas, due
to the growing popularity of
short cruises, especially
Bahamas-only cruises staying
in port overnight.

“Air arrivals in New Provi-
dence, at some 348,000 in the
January to April 2009 period,
were down by 10.5 per cent
from the same period in 2008.
Declines in this segment were
even more pronounced in
Grand Bahama and the other
Family Islands, at 28.9 per cent
and 27.6 per cent, respective-

ly.”
Noted

Mr Ingraham, though noted
that other major worldwide
tourism markets were faring just
as badly, with London down by
18 per cent, Las Vegas suffering
a $65 million drop in hotel tax
revenue, and Orlando suffering
a 21 per cent decline. Global
travel was estimated to be down
by an average of 18 per cent.

“Expectations are that the
key tourism and foreign invest-
ment sectors will remain weak
in 2009, resulting in further
weakness in the construction
sector and a further increase in
the unemployment rate. How-

ever, some tempering to this
outcome is expected to occur
from the Government’s ‘accel-
erated’ capital works pro-
gramme,” Mr Ingraham said.

Inflation rose to 4.5 per cent
in 2008, some 2 per cent above
the previous year, with housing
costs rising to 3.5 per cent from
0.5 per cent, while food and
beverage prices nearly doubled
to 6.7 per cent.

Mr Ingraham said this trend
had persisted into 2009, with
inflation at 4.8 per cent in the 12
months to April this year. Hous-
ing costs rose 3.3 per cent, while
food and beverage and other
goods and services were up 8
per cent and 9 per cent respec-
tively.

External reserves stood at
$647.7 million at May 20, 2009,
compared to $562.9 million at
year-end 2008, continuing their
upward trend.

The Bahamas’ current
account deficit narrowed by 1
per cent to $2.1 billion, due toa
17.5 per cent fall in non-oil
imports that offset the 44.7 per
cent fuel bill increase. The drop
in private investment inflows
saw the capital account surplus
fall by $59.4 million to $927.2
million.

Realtors optimistic on tax amendment

FROM page 1B

eign second home buyers, in particular, had
been faced with major real property tax
bill increases, something that realtors and
attorneys had complained was costing them

business.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham yester-
day announced that while the cap would
not be reinstated, the real property tax
structure was being reduced from three to

two.

Al per cent rate would be applied to

PUBLIC AUCTION

SATURDAY, MAY 30â„¢, 2009

By Order of

The Bahamas Development Bank
Cable Beach, Nassau, The Bahamas
Commonwealth of The Bahamas

WHAT: Three (2) assorted used vessels as set out in the schedule below:

Vessels
Equility
Loa 49’
Beam 16
Depth 4
Year/Mk/Eng 1981 Defender Vessel,
Caterpillar 3208 engine
Bayshore Marina East Bay
Street

Location

Farbutt

Loa 51

Beam 177.5”

Depth 5’

Year/Mk/Eng 1996 Fiberglass Vessel,
Caterpillar 3412 engine
Bayshore Marina East Bay
Street

Location

LOCATION: Bayshore Marina East Bay Street — Nassau The

Bahamas

TIME: 11:00am — Saturday, May 30th, 2009 — Preview and Inspection

from 9:00am Until Auction time at the site.

TERMS: All items to be Sold Where Is As Is for Cash, Cashier’ Cheque
or current Bank Guarantee Letter. Purchase will not be released until paid
for in full not later than 4:00pm Tuesday, June 2â„¢, 2009. Where a deposit
is required, the same is non refundable. If final payment is not made by
4:00pm Tuesday, June 2â„¢, 2009 any and all deposits made will be

forfeited.

Bahamas Development Bank
At (242) 327-5780/ 702-5730/702-5714
Or Fax (242) 702-5047
email: bahamasdevelopmentbank.com

properties valued at up to $7.5 million,
above the $250,000 exemption level, and
properties valued in excess of $7.5 million
would see a 0.25 per cent rate applied on the
value above $7.5 million.

In a bid to encourage real property tax
defaulters to pay, the Government will
write-off the surcharge on owner-occupied
dwellings. The outstanding tax remains and
has to be paid within six months of the
amendments coming into effect, after which
a5 per cent per annum surcharge will be
levied on the outstanding balances.



The tax-rate on foreign-owned, vacant
property valued at up to $7,000 will be $100,
with properties worth more than $7,000
paying a 1.5 per cent rate. This is likely to be
the Government giving foreign purchasers
an incentive to build, rather than simply
hold, then flip their real estate for profit.

The exemption on owner-occupied prop-
erty will be applicable automatically except
for foreign home owners, where the nine-
month occupancy period will continue to
apply, and a 0..5 per cent tax rate will be
applied to buildings on leased Crown cays.

Consolidated Water (Bahamas) Ltd.

Invites submissions for the sale of:

ONE 1250 kW Diesel Generator Set with 3812 DITA Caterpillar Engine Fully

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THE TRIBUNE



April existin

THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 5B

g home sales

inch upward, prices fall

By ALAN ZIBEL
AP Real Estate Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Buyers who were brave enough
to dive into the market for a
bargain-priced house helped
provide a modest boost to sales
last month.

Sales of inexpensive foreclo-
sures and other distressed low-
end properties have even
sparked bidding wars in places
like Las Vegas, Phoenix and
Miami. But the market for high-
end properties is at a virtual
standstill, mainly because it
remains difficult to get a mort-
gage for expensive homes.

“We’re looking at a dual mar-
ket right now,” said Sherry
Chris, chief executive of Better
Homes and Gardens Real
Estate.

The National Association of
Realtors said Wednesday that
home sales rose 2.9 per cent to
an annual rate of 4.68 million
in April from a downwardly
revised pace of 4.55 million in
March. Sales were 4.6 per cent
below April last year, without
adjusting for seasonal factors.

Compared with January, the
lowest point in the housing
recession, April sales were up
nearly four per cent. But com-
pared with the peak in Septem-
ber 2005, sales are still down 35
per cent.

And they have not kept pace
with foreclosures, which con-
tinue to pile up at an alarming
pace. Those properties helped
drag down the median sales
price to $170,200.

Affordability brought Roge-
lio Gonzalez, 44, back into the
Miami market. Gonzalez sold
his five-bedroom home in 2004
for $485,000 and has been rent-
ing ever since. Now, prices have
dropped to the point where he
wants to buy a foreclosure in
the $150,000 range, but he’s
finding plenty of competition.

“Since I sold at the highest
point, I was waiting until I could
buy at the lowest point,” Gon-
zalez said. “I’ve been to open
houses and I’ve run into eight,
10, 15 people looking for hous-
es >”?

Foreclosures and other dis-
tressed sales made up about 45
per cent of all transactions in
April, according to the Realtors
group.

In Phoenix, Floyd Scott, bro-
ker-owner of Century 21 Ari-
zona-Foothills, said roughly 70
per cent of sales in his area are
from distressed buyers. But that
can’t last forever, he said, noting
that “we’re running out of
inventory.”

Nationally, however, the
number of unsold homes on the
market at the end of April rose
almost nine per cent from a
month earlier to nearly four mil-



IN THIS FILE PHOTO taken March 3, 2009, a sale pending sign is seen for
a real estate listing in Gloucester, Mass.

lion. That’s a 10-month supply
at the current sales pace, and
was particularly troubling to
economists.

The rise in unsold homes
“suggests foreclosure activity
may be adding homes to the
market faster than sales are
removing them,” wrote David
Resler, chief economist with
Nomura Securities.

Another big problem is the
lack of activity at the higher-
end of the housing market.
Lenders have tightened stan-
dards dramatically, especially
for so-called “jumbo” loans
above $730,000 that cannot be
purchased by Fannie Mae or
Freddie Mac, the government-

(AP Photo: Lisa Poole)

controlled mortgage companies.

The Realtors group is push-
ing for the Federal Reserve to
start buying up those loans. It
also wants higher loan limits
enacted last year to apply to the
whole country, not just expen-
sive areas like California and
New York.

In San Francisco, properties
listed for $1 million and above
are languishing on the market.
“That’s where we’re really feel-
ing the pinch,” said Ben Cole-
man, owner of Century 21 Hart-
ford Properties.

In Philadelphia, “the luxury
market is still dragging because
of the difficulty for jumbo loans
and the lack of cash from buy-

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ers,” David Friedman, an agent
with Coldwell Banker Pre-
ferred. “It’s pretty much at a
nonexistent level right now.”

Jumbo loans made up only
five per cent of the mortgage
market in the first quarter of
this year, down from 17 per cent
two years ago, according to
trade publication Inside Mort-
gage Finance.

Rates for 30-year jumbo
loans are averaging around 6.3
per cent, compared with around
five per cent for non-jumbo
loans, according to data pub-
lisher HSH Associates.

Since banks generally hold
jumbo loans on their books, it’s
not surprising that they are
keeping lending standards tight,
noted Keith Gumbinger, a
senior vice president with HSH
Associates, who said, “It’s not a
risk-free investment.”

¢ AP Real Estate Writers Alex
Veiga, Adrian Sainz and J.W.
Elphinstone contributed to this
report

NOTICE

PISTON INVESTMENT
MANAGEMENT INC.

An International Business Company

Notice is hereby given that the voluntary dissolution
of the above company commenced on the 22nd day
of May, 2009. Articles of Dissolution have been duly
registered by the Registrar General’s office, P.O. Box
N-532, 50 Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas. The
Liquidator is A.J.K. Corporate Services (Bahamas)
Limited, whose address is Suite 11, Bayparl Building,
18 Parliament Street, P.O. Box AP59205/3352,
Nassau, The Bahamas.



$300,000 lite cover tor

the price*â„¢ of a coffee

per day! No medical

required!

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=

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MEDICAL



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Atlantic House, dnd Terrace & Collins Avenue. PO. Bow 55-5915, Nassau

Tal, 36-5439 wee egigraup. ben

A member of Colonial Group levernational: Insurance, Health, Pengices, Lite

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY

NOTICE

TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF COURIER SERVICES,
PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY

TENDERS ARE

INVITED FROM QUALIFIED CONTRACTORS TO

PROVIDE COURIER SERVICES FOR THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS
AUTHORITY, FORA PERIOD OF ONE (1) YEAR.

TENDER DOCUMENTS,

TO TENDERERS,
INFORMATION CAN

WHICH INCLUDE INSTRUCTIONS
SPECIFICATIONS AND OTHER RELEVANT
BE COLLECTED 9 AM - 5:00 PM MONDAY TO

FRIDAY AT THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY, CORPORATE

CENTRE, BUILDING
AVENUE.

“B”, THIRD AND WEST TERRACES, COLLINS

A TENDER MUST BE SUBMITTED IN DUPLICATE IN A SEALED

ENVELOPE OR PAC

KAGE IDENTIFIED AS “TENDER FOR THE

PROVISION OF COURIER SERVICES, PUBLIC HOSPITALS

AUTHORITY” ADD

RESSED TO:

THE CHAIRMAN,
TENDERS COMMITTEE
THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
CORPORATE CENTRE BUILDING “B”
THIRD & WEST TERRACES, COLLINS AVENUE
P.O. BOX N-8200
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

TENDERS ARE TO ARRIVE AT THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
NO LATER THAN 5:00 P.M. Friday 19‘ June, 2009. LATE

TENDER(S) WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.

Free
Cholesterol,
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Abood Pressure Checks

Regis alien Pee
Inelides a 1 -Shoet
SIA Adult S100
Children (12 ard
under

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A copy of a valid business license and a certificate verifying up
to date National Insurance Contributions should accompany all
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The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to accept or reject any
or all Tender(s).

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PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Water Corp project costs varied 130 per cent from budget

















































































THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cobh.edu.hs

The Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute's (CHMI's)
Lil’ Chefs Summer Training Programme

Trained chef instructors mentor kids ages 10-15 and teach them how to
prepare:-

Hot meals

Assorted Sandwiches
Pastries

Fruit Platters and much more!

Where: CHMI, Bahamas Tourism Training Centre,
Thompson Boulevard
When: July 13-31, 2009,
Mondays 9a.m.-4p,.m.; Tuesday-Friday, 9a.m.-3p.m.
Cost: 1 week, $275; 2 weeks S500; 3 weeks, $675

Call: 323-5804, 677-3220 or 677-3202 for more information and
applications.

Also available in Exuma and Grand Bahama

Application deadline June 15, 2009

"i, 4

PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
ADVERTISEMENT

VACANCY
FACILITIES MANAGER

GRAND BAHAMA HEALTH SERVICES

The Public Hospitals Authority invites applications from suitably qualified persons for the
post of Facilities Manager, Grand Bahama Health Services

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:-

* Bachelors Degree in Facilities Management or equivalent, OR related field;
* Member British Institute of Facilities Management OR a related professional body;
* Excellent communication skills (oral and written); computer skills; accounting skills;

* Seven (7) years experience in Building & Maintenance in a Healthcare facility, Hotel,
or large corporation, five (5) of which must be at a supervisory level:

The Health Facilities Manager reports to the Administrator, Grand Bahama Health
Services.

JOB SUMMARY

The Facilities Manager is responsible for coordinating and managing the Buildin
& Maintenance Departments and oversees Engineering, Biomedical & Mechanica
Units. Special emphasis must be placed on preventative maintenance and practices.

DUTIES:

1. Coordinates and manages Facilities Management matters pertaining to building
sehen Lab abl operations, maintenance, equipment maintenance, building
fabric maintenance, renovations, use of space, biomedical, engineering,
maintenance, administration and contract management for all facilities under
the responsibility of Grand Bahama Health Services.

Inspects and evaluates the physical condition of the facilities and make
recommendations Lecce for the infrastructural developments/
improvements, to enhance the comfort of (PHA’s) internal and external
customers.

Prepares and administers the Facilities Management and Operations budget;
also monitors expenditures of the Departments.

Plans and directs staff in the purchasing and distribution of Public Hospitals
Authority's supplies.

Review bids and make recommendations for awarding of contracts for
maintenance work, contracts and renovations.

Manages staff of Facilities and ensures training opportunities for staff
development.

ea detailed policy and procedural document to ensure appropriate
methods and levels of service are adhered to.

Submits monthly reports to Administrator and quarterly reports to the Managing
Director (PHA) on facilities management matters;

Interviews and selects candidates seeking employment in the Building and
Maintenance Departments;

Liaises with the Capital Development Unit of the Public Hospitals Authority
to ensure Building and Maintenance (Mechanical Engineering) practices
effective project management and supervision techniques;

The post of Facilities Manager is in Scale HAMAS ($37,850 x 700 - $42,050).

Letter of application and curricula vitae should be submitted through the Administrator
of Grand Bahama Health Services, Public Hospitals Authority, PO. Box F-40071, East
Atlantic Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama to the Director of Human Resources, Corporate
Office, Public Hospitals Authority, 3rd Terrace West, Centreville; or PO. Box N-8200
Nassau, Bahamas no later than 12th June, 2009.

asy Credit VO Interest.

! a: A Sy,
.

sere

Dining Koom

FROM page 1B

PKF report urged.

“Moreover, management
should establish policies for
impairment testing on accounts
receivable for inclusion in the
comprehensive operations man-
ual.”

In response, the Water &
Sewerage Corporation’s man-
agement said they had begun
“a more aggressive effort to
transfer” accounts past 180 days
due to the Bad Debt Register,
and initiated over improve-
ments.

Yet, further highlighting the
Corporation’s financial woes,
PKF added: “We noted that the
actual amount spent on specific
projects varied significantly
from the budgeted amounts.

“Some of these projects had
variances of up to 130 per cent
from the budgeted amounts.
Management should ensure that
persons involved in the plan-
ning process provide a more

AN
NAD

Nassau Airport
Dovolopmont Company

concise budget, so that the oth-
er projects are not placed on
hold due allocation of scarce
resources.”

And as for liquidity, PKF
said: “At present, the Corpora-
tion is being funded by high lev-
els of short-term financing
(overdraft facilities), with no
likely indication of a turnaround
in the method of financing the
shortfalls in its cash position.

“Management should give
serious consideration to the
restructuring of its operations,
in the immediate future, with
the ultimate objective of reduc-
ing its reliance on the high cost
of short-term financing.”

In response, the Water &
Sewerage Corporation man-
agement said: “The current
operating model is one of high
costs associated with water pro-
duction (principally reverse
osmosis water purchases) and
staffing.

“Management is constantly

Environmental Coordinator

The Nassau Ainport Cewelopment Gampany (MAD is
Seeking candidates for ihe postion of Environmental
Coordinator. The duties and responsibilities of ihe
successful applica will indude researching, planning and
‘atiling environmental procedures. and plans, conducting
reguiar irepection of company and tenant facilities and
acing as a liaison with govemment agendes and
onic on environmental matters

The ideal candidate vall have a minimum of an Associates
degree (Bachelor's degree pretened), experience rn
identifying environmental issues, knowledge of
environmental field moritonng protocols and the ability to
manage environmental pragrams tram inceplian ta

completion

This pasiien offers compete compercabon and benefits,
COP EAGT! WN eipenenoe and qualifications.

For more detaila, please visit our website al

Wwww.nas.bs

Ilyotl are qualthed and infgresied please subrrel
your resume by Mary 2%, 20808 to

Manager Paople

Aachadl Arnot Devaopmenl Go.

FO. Box AP 58228

Nassau, Haberras

Only hogs apphcants sherl beled wal be contacted

seeking to identify avenues for
cost containment but points out
that tariff adjustments (or addi-
tional government funding) are
necessary and overdue, partic-
ularly in light of escalating ener-
gy costs.”

None of this is surprising, but
the PKF report is useful in high-
lighting what is going on behind
the numbers at the Water &
Sewerage Corporation. The
Corporation’s 2007 year-end
accounts, also audited by PKF,
confirmed Tribune Business’s
revelations that it had incurred
a $24.107 million net loss before
receiving a $20.2 million gov-
ernment subsidy.

The Corporation’s New Prov-
idence-based operations gener-
ated a $15.423 million net loss
prior to the subsidy’s receipt,
while the pre-subsidy loss on
the Family Islands was some
$8.685 million.

And PKF said in its audit
opinion that “without qualify-
ing our report” it had noted that
the Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration’s net current liabilities
exceeded assets by $66.941 mil-
lion, making it entirely depen-
dent on government and tax-
payer funding for the continua-
tion of its operations.

Meanwhile, PKF’s internal
audit controls report found that
Water & Sewerage Corporation
was ‘capitalising’ and treating
as an asset those it did not have
title to, especially financed
assets, which required the ful-
fillment of certain conditions
before title passed.

On trade payables, the PKF
team noted that the Water &
Sewerage Corporation was rec-
onciling items from prior years,
dating back to 2004, on its gen-
eral ledger control account bal-
ances.

This, the accountants warned,
could “jeopardise” the Water
& Sewerage Corporation’s abil-
ity to obtain supplier credit.

“The Corporation should re-
examine its policies in relation
to reducing the level of accounts
payable, in addition to reduc-
ing the length of time taken to
satisfy its obligations,” the PKF
report said. “This should be
done with a view to maintaining
healthy business relationships
with suppliers so as not to affect
the timing of critical capital
works.”

Inventory checks, and prob-
lems in accessing critical sup-
port documents, were identified
by PKF. It also highlighted the
absence of operational proce-
dures, policies and controls
manuals at the Water & Sewer-
age Corporation, and the fact
there were no documented pro-
cedures to assess the risk of
fraud.

2 MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT WG

NOTICE

CORRIDOR 11

BLUE HILL ROAD
ROADWAY CONSTRUCTION

In an effort to relieve current traffic congestion problems JOSE
CARTELLONE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES S.A_ has
been contracted for the Completion of the New Providence Road
Improvement Project — International Package. Road construction
will be commencing onCorridor 11A (Blue Hill Road),which may
require diversions from:

Duke Street & Robinson Road

Local diversions will be sign posted in due course and further
information will be provided in the local media

Tel: 242-322-8341 /242-322-2610

“The mark of excellence in fine manufactured furniture”
AUTHORIZED YAMAHA AUDIO / MUSIC DEALER PARTS & SERVICES

(Check our .
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Email: jcccbahamas @cartellone.com.ar

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Open daily: 8:30a.m. - 5:00p.m.

aj

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ita



THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 7B



Consumer confidence
skyrockets in May

@ By ANNE D’INNOCENZIO
AP Retail Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Con-
sumer confidence extended its
rebound in May, soaring to the
highest level since last Septem-
ber as more shoppers are feel-
ing the worst of the recession
is behind them.

The Conference Board said
Tuesday that its Consumer
Confidence Index, which had
dramatically increased in April,
zoomed past economists’ expec-
tations to 54.9 from a revised
40.8 in April. Economists sur-
veyed by Thomson Reuters
were expecting 42.3. In Febru-
ary, confidence levels had hit a
new historic low of 25.3.

The reading marks the high-
est in eight months when the
level was 61.4. The levels are
also closer to the year-ago’s
58.1, though the widely watched
barometer is still below 100,
which indicates a healthy econ-
omy.

The Present Situation Index,
which measures how shoppers
feel now about the economy,
rose to 28.9 from 25.5 last
month. But the Expectations
Index, which measures shop-
pers’ outlook over the next six
months, climbed to 72.3 from
51.0 in April.

Investors focused on the
upbeat sentiment reading, shak-
ing off a mostly downbeat
report on the housing market,
also released Tuesday. In mid-
morning trading, the Dow
Jones industrial average rose
203.42, or 2.5 per cent, to
8,480.74.

“Looking ahead, consumers
are considerably less pessimistic
than they were earlier this year,
and expectations are that busi-
ness conditions, the labor mar-
ket and incomes will improve
in the coming months,” Lynn
Franco, director of The Con-
ference Board Consumer
Research Center, said in a state-
ment. “While confidence is still
weak by historic standards, as
far as consumers are concerned,
the worst is now behind us.”

The confidence report
offered encouraging news to
merchants,which are counting
on consumers to be in the mood
to spend after confidence plum-
meted to historic lows late last
year but has been rising since
March. A two-month stock ral-
ly has helped make shoppers
feel a little better about their
retirement funds, spurring dra-
matic rebounds in confidence
in April and May levels.

Meanwhile, better-than-
expected earnings results from
such retailers as Sears Holdings
Corp. and Gap Inc. have
offered the latest evidence that
spending has begun to stabilize,
though overall business is still
weak.

The size of the monthly
increases in April and May in
consumer confidence encour-
aged economists. Gary Thayer,
chief economist at Wells Fargo
Advisors, says that unless the
economy suffers from major
financial shocks, it looks like
“we’ve turned the corner” on
confidence.

“This is a significant change,”
said Thayer. “While (con-
sumers) are unhappy about
their job situation and their
home values, they see light at
the end of the tunnel.” He
added, however, sentiment has
a way to go before shoppers go
back to splurging. That can only
happen when the job and hous-
ing markets, which have been
holding down sentiment, start

The Tribune wants to hear

to turn around.

The latest report on home
prices, released Tuesday, wasn’t
comforting. Home prices fell at
the fastest annual rate on
record in the first quarter,
though the pace of month-to-
month declines continues to
slow, according to a closely
watched housing index.

The Standard & Poor’s/Case-
Shiller National Home Price
index reported home prices
tumbled by 19.1 per cent in the
first quarter, the most in its 21-
year history.

Home prices have fallen 32.2
per cent since peaking in the
second quarter of 2006 and are
at levels not seen since the end
of 2002.

Meanwhile, Americans con-
tinue to cut back on nonessen-
tials like furniture while focus-
ing on buying necessities as they
worry about their jobs. The
unemployment rate is expect-
ed to climb to 9.2 per cent in
May from 8.9 per cent in April
and employers are expected to
shed a net total of 523,000 jobs,
according to economists sur-
veyed by Thomson Reuters.
The Labour Department is
expected to release unemploy-
ment figures on June 5.

The Consumer Confidence
survey — whose responses were
received through May 19 from a
representative sample of 5,000
U.S. households — showed a
marked improvement in con-
sumers’ outlook for jobs. The
percentage of consumers
expecting more jobs in the
months ahead increased to 20.0
per cent from 14.2 per cent,
while those anticipating fewer

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(AP Photo: Nick Ut)

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Gerd) on cirireny tare.

Through December 30, 2011.

Long tern extension possible.

BAHAMAS REALTY iro
COMME CHAD
in owoceber wet

CBRE

CB AICHAND ELUS



2. at 2.46 at
(7745 cee Fh

CM DOD 3, p04, OOD

BL DOP: B17,

al

7b
JUL

Met woh eed in finesting activities

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Terie! pifere beccera: Abe chee ot in cot and roth eqidealert.

CPE RAG FP SS. Cah an ah eqeivaierh maf begin nies of po
Pore! woh Cah aed coach equi. 65? end of pean (More Zh
ener and ado rd bepere

Deprei alban aad arecetiny

The full audited Consolidated Financial Statements including the
Potes which form an integral part of the Financial Statements are
available on the Company's website: wivwuirsabahanas.com

Si Ll Gye P eay paperra

MET IMC ORE





PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



eS eS Ee SS SSS SSS Se
.7% fiscal deficit ‘not sustainable’

FROM page 1B

the line” on recurrent spend-
ing, in an effort to stabilise the
situation.

Looking further out, Mr
Ingraham said the Government
hoped to reduce the GFS fiscal
deficits over the next three Bud-
get years to 2011-2012, but
warned: “In light of the magni-
tude of the fiscal challenges that
we face, that in and of itself will
be a notable achievement.”

The Prime Minister struck a
somewhat sombre tone at times
in delivering his Budget, no
doubt trying to impress upon
Bahamians the seriousness of
the situation the public finances
were in. However, there was lit-
tle that was new or unexpected
in his presentation.

And while he said there were

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays





only four government depart-
ments scheduled to receive an
increase in their 2009-2010 Bud-
getary spending allocation, he
omitted to mention two that
received the greatest increase -
and which are now competing
with health as the area receiving
most funding.

These departments are gov-
ernment debt servicing - interest
and principal redemptions. The
Government will on 2009-2010
spend $12.055 million more in
meeting interest payments on
its debt, a rise from $164.886
million to $176.94 million, while
debt principal redemptions will
increase by $17.458 million to
$87.794 million from $70.336
million.

Altogether, some $264 mil-
lion - a $30 million year-over-
year increase - will be spent on
meeting debt repayments, a
similar sum to the combined
allocation received by the Min-
istry of Health, Public Hospi-
tals Authority, Department of
Public Health and Department
of Environmental Health Ser-
vices.

For 2009-2010, Mr Ingraham
said the Government was pro-
jecting that recurrent revenues
would total $1.389 billion, some
$184.5 million less than the orig-
inal forecasts for the current
Budget year. The lowered pro-
jections indicate just how
severely the Government’s nar-

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row tax base, with its reliance
on international trade and
imports, has been impacted by
the global economic downturn.

With gross domestic product
(GDP) expected to be $78 mil-
lion lower than the 2008-2009
fiscal year, in current dollars,
Mr Ingraham said the Govern-
ment would seek to mitigate the
impact on its revenues by
“redoubling our efforts in 2010
to collect the maximum amount
of revenues that are rightfully
due to the Government”.

He pledged that his adminis-
tration would “continue to
streamline revenue collections
to facilitate the payment of tax-
es and fees”, with the projected
2009-2010 revenues of $1.389
billion standing at 18.8 per cent
of GDP.

This was better than the 2008-
2009 fiscal year’s projected per-
formance, in which the Gov-
ernment’s revenues amounted
to only 17.5 per cent of GDP -
some 2.8 per cent lower than
expected and “the lowest [rev-
enue to GDP ratio] in three
years”.

“That would still be some-
what lower than the ratio
attained in 2007-08,” Mr Ingra-
ham said if the projected 2009-
2010 revenue-GDP ratio, “but
at least it puts us back on the
upward trajectory that had been
envisaged in last year’s Budget
Communication.

“Ongoing enhancements in
revenue administration and col-
lections should lead to yet fur-
ther improvements in the ratio
of revenues to GDP as we move

beyond next year.”

As for the Government’s
recurrent spending, which goes
on its fixed costs, such as
salaries, emoluments and rents,
Mr Ingraham pledged to “hold
the line”, eliminating unneces-
sary spending and trying to
maintain public sector/civil ser-
vice employment at current lev-
els.

Spending

With recurrent spending for
2009-2010 pegged at $1.53 bil-
lion, some $38.908 million less
than the 2008-2009 projected
spend of $1.569 billion, Mr
Ingraham said the Government
planned to reduce both the
recurrent deficit and the overall
GFS fiscal deficit.

The recurrent deficit, which
measures the Government’s
revenues minus recurrent
spending, is projected to be
$141 million for 2009-2010, as
opposed to $186 million in 2008-
2009. The Ingraham adminis-
tration had initially forecast a
minor $20 million recurrent sur-
plus (meaning revenues would
exceed recurrent spending) in
its 2008-2009 Budget, before the
global economic crisis took hold
and threw that projection out
the window.

Combined with $255 million
in capital spending and $88 mil-
lion in debt principal redemp-
tion, the Prime Minister said a
GFS deficit of 3.9 per cent or
$286 million was projected for
2009-2010, a 0.7 per cent reduc-
tion upon this year’s 4.7 per cent

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COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2006
IN THE SUPREME COURT No. 00219
Equity Side

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel
or lot of land containing 20,283 sq. ft. situate on
the southwestern side of Queen’s Highway in the
settlement of Doctors Creek in the island of Long Island
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
AND
IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959.
AND
IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Leonard Knowles and
Patrice Knowles.

NOTICE

The Petition of Leonard Knowles and Patrice Knowles
in respect of all that piece parcel or lot of land containing 20, 283
sq. ft. situate on the southwestern side of Queen’s Highway in the
settlement of Doctors Creek in the island of Long Island in the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas, which said piece parcel or lot
of land is bounded on the NORTHWEST by land said to be the
property of Antonette Beckford running thereon One hundred and
Seventy-five (175) feet thereon. One hundred and Fifty and Three
hundredths (150.03) feet SOUTHWEST by land the property of
Llewolyn Knowles and running thereon One hundred and Forty-
five and Twenty-two hundredths (145.22) feet on the Southwest by
the sea and running thereon One hundred and Ten and Sixty-four
hundredths (110.64) feet which said piece parcel or lot of land has
the dwelling home of the Petitioner upon it and 1s more particularly
described by the Amended Plan filed herewith and is thereon
coloured PINK.

The Petitioners, Leonard and Patrice Knowles, claim to be the legal
and beneficial owners of the fee simple estate in possession of the
piece parcel or lot of land hereinbefore described and the Petitioners
have made application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959,
to have their title to the said lot of land investigated.

Copies of the filed plan may be inspected during normal working
hours at:-

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Second Floor, Ansbacher
House, East Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.

(b) The Chambers of Martin, Martin and Co., Second Floor, Pond
Plaza, East Bay and Ernest Streets, Nassau N.P., The Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that any person having dower or right to
dower or any adverse claim/s not recognized 1n the Petition shall on
or before the 15th. day of July, A.D., 2009, file in the Registry of
the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned
a statement of such claim 1n the prescribed form and verified by an
affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file and
serve a statement of such claim on or before the aforementioned
date will operate as a bar to such claim.

MARTIN, MARTIN & CO.
Chambers, Second Floor, Pond Plaza
East Bay and Ermest Streets
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

ATTORNEYS FOR THE PETITONERS

NOTICE is hereby given that KENRICK KORDELL
LIGHTBOURNE of SEA GRAPE, EIGHT MILE ROCK, GRAND
BAHAMA is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 21st day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE of URBAN SINCLAIR MILLER
JR. late of the Southern District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that all persons having any claim
or demand against the above Estate are required to
send their names, addresses and particulars of the same
certified in writing to the undersigned on or before the 28th
day May A. D., 2009, and if required, prove such debts
or claims, or in default be excluded fron{ any distribution;
after the above date the assets will be distributed having
regard only to the proved debts or claims of which the
Administrator shall have had Notice.

And Notice is hereby given that all persons indebted to the
said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or
before the aforementioned date.
MICHAEL A. DEAN & CO.,
Attorneys for the Administrator Alvernia Court, 94
Dowdeswell Street

P.O. Box N-3114
Nassau, The Bahamas

Position of Accountant

A financial institution seeks an Accountant. Candi-
dates must have at least 3-5 years experience in ac-
counting in the financial industry with sound knowl-
edge of but not limited to:

¢ Formulating budgets
¢ Managing Accounts Receivables and Payables

¢ Preparation of monthly and annual financial re-
ports and statements

¢ Preparation of bank reconciliations and various
general ledger accounts to the sub ledgers

¢ Co-ordinate the annual audit with external auditors
and preparation of the necessary schedules

¢ Preparing reports for the regulators
¢ Must be a team player

¢ Must possess people skills and be prepared to
interact with members

* Qualifications: AA in Accounting

Please forward resume to
P. O. Box N-7544

or $352 million.

“A deficit of such a magni-
tude is not sustainable over the
medium term and will clearly
have implications for the stock
of Government Debt which, at
the end of June 2009, is expect-
ed to stand at just over $2.9 bil-
lion or 38.9 per cent of GDP,”
Mr Ingraham said of the 2008-
2009 fiscal performance.

Looking back over the 2008-
2009 Budget year, which ends
on June 30, 2009, the Prime
Minister - not surprisingly - said
revenues were “bearing the
brunt of the recessionary pres-
sures”. He estimated that they
would finish the year at $1.31
billion, down by more than $260
million upon Budget estimates
of $1.574 million.

That figure was some 17 per
cent down on estimates, Mr
Ingraham added, “and bears
witness to the extent of the fis-
cal challenge that confronts the
Government in the current
environment.

“The GFS deficit in 2008-
2009 is being severely and neg-
atively affected by the global
downturn, which is having a
major effect on the perfor-
mance of the Bahamian econo-
my. It is to be noted, in particu-
lar, that GDP in current dol-
lars, which is a critical factor in
the evolution of revenues, is
expected to be lower than fore-
cast in 2008-2009 by some 3.5
per cent or $ 265 million.”

While recurrent spending was
expected to be $40 million
below initial estimates, “as a
result of the significant decline
in revenues”, the recurrent
deficit was expected to come in
at $186 million.

When capital spending and
debt redemptions were factored
in, the total GFS deficit was
estimated to be $352 million or
4.7 per cent of GDP, more than
double the initial projections of

a 2.1 per cent GFS deficit. The
GFS deficit for 2008-2009 is
likely to be $187 million above
projections.

Due to the widening fiscal
deficits, Mr Ingraham said the
Government’s debt would
increase to 43.2 per cent of
GDP by the 2009-2010 fiscal
year-end, compared to 38.9 per
cent one year earlier.

“There was a time in the
Bahamas when we would not
dream of exceeding the 40 per
cent debt-to-GDP ratio,” the
Prime Minister said. “It was
beyond our contemplation.”

However, the Central Bank
of the Bahamas in its 2008
annual report noted that the
Bahamas’ national debt was
already more than 43 per cent
of GDP, indicating that its cal-
culations and those of the Prime
Minister are not aligned.

The Government’s own Bud-
get document yesterday showed
that with the Government’s
direct debt standing at $2.764
billion, and debt it had guaran-
teed at $436 million, the nation-
al debt already stood at 43 per
cent of GDP at year-end 2008.
This indicates that Mr Ingra-
ham is likely to be talking about
the direct debt charge on gov-
ernment in reference to the
June 2010 date.

The implications of this,
though, indicate that if guaran-
teed government debt remains
constant at 6 per cent of GDP,
the total national debt will be
just shy of 50 per cent of GDP
when the next Budget year
ends.

Mr Ingraham acknowledged
that a “sustainable fiscal posi-
tion is so vitally important to
our economic future”, adding
that controlling the fiscal deficit
and the economy’s eventual
return to growth would get the
debt-to-GDP ratio back under
control.

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promotion and information needs.

* Candidates must be well versed in design concepts
and proficient in design software, including
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Photoshop and others.

¢ Candidates must be proficient with both Macintosh
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A Bachelor’s degree in graphic design or related
field is preferred.

DA#61034
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas

ESSAY COMPETITION

TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK

The Department of Public Service will host an Essay
Competition as one of the activities for the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week. The Competition is open to Junior
and Senior Students in New Providence.

Additionally, this year, a speech competition will be
for schools in the Northern & Southern Bahamas,
respectively. Students interested in participating in the
Essay Competition should write a 250 - 300 words (Junior
High), and 450 - 500 words (Senior High), essay on the
topic: “ The Public Service-Striving for Excellence in
Customer Service.”

The deadlines for entries, which should be referred
to the attention of Mrs. Antoinette Thompson, Deputy
Permanent Secretary, Department of Public Service, is
Friday 24th July, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 Computer System will be awarded to
the winner each category. The first runners-up for both the
Essay and Speech Competition in the Junior & Senior High
School category, will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.

The winners will be announced during the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week Awards Ceremony scheduled for
Saturday 10th October 2009.

Students interested in the Speech Competition for the
Northern and Southern Bahamas should contact their
Language Arts Teacher.




THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 9B


ENTITIES, from page 1]

tions, appeals against licence
revocations, suspensions and
rejections, and other complaints
relating to the Business Licence
Act.
Prime Minister Ingraham said
the Business Licence Act would
come under the Ministry of
Finance, requiring an amend-
ment to the Local Government
Act.
He added: "Business licence is
another area ripe for public sec-
tor reform because it is an area
where inefficiencies and unnec-
essary bureaucratic practices
prevail.
"The Government has
remained steadfast in its resolve
to simplify the process of starting
a business in the Bahamas such
that entrepreneurs can convert
ideas into concrete businesses
as rapidly and efficiently as pos-
sible."


However, Mr D'Aguilar
added: "I was disappointed not
to hear him make amendments
to the Business Licence Act to
make the payment fairer - how
the business licence fee is calcu-
lated."
While not looking for a fee
reduction, the outgoing Cham-
ber president told Tribune Busi-
ness the organisation wanted to
alter the current calculation
method, which is based on gross
profits. Businesses with high
sales and low gross margins, such
as food stores, paid "a dispro-
portionate business licence fee"
in comparison to firms with low
sales and high gross margins,
such as law firms.
"The situation is dire," Mr
D'Aguilar said of the public
finances. "The Prime Minister
painted a fairly gloomy picture,
and really given the enormity of


the crisis and the significant
reduction in government rev-
enues he's really at a loss about
what to do."
The outgoing Chamber presi-
dent added that Mr Ingraham
was i.o... ili l right" in saying
that present levels of govern-
ment spending were unsustain-
able, given the fall-off in rev-
enues and the projected 4.7 per
cent ($352 million) deficit for
fiscal 2008-2009. The upcoming
financial year does not look
much better, with a 3.9 per cent
GFS fiscal deficit or $286 mil-
lion hole forecast.
Mr D'Aguilar said it was
"admirable" that the Govern-
ment was focusing on restrict-
ing public spending, but argued
that this was easier to say than
achieve in practice.
"I was looking for a bit more,"
he added. "I don't think the
recession has gone on long
enough for the Prime Minister to


say it's really, really bad and we
need to make hard decisions
about the public corporations
and the losses that occur.
"They didn't take any of the
difficult decisions about the
economy. They did not touch
Bahamasair, did not touch ZNS,
did not touch the Water & Sew-
erage Corporation. There needs
to be an end game. We need
some significant, hard decisions
to reduce our expenditure."
Mr D'Aguilar urged the Gov-
ernment to get out of businesses
such as airlines and a radio/TV
station, and suggested they be
outsourced to the private sec-
tor. "The Government has a lot
of loss-making entities, depart-
ments and a lot of inefficien-
cies," he added.
"I expected him to be a lot
more aggressive in dealing with
that. This was a great opportu-
nity to get out of these busi-
nesses. It's going to be a trying


period. This would be a great
time for him to make sweeping
policy changes in the way we run
our government, and I didn't get
the feeling he was going there."
For 2009-2010, Bahamasair
has seen its taxpayer subsidy cut
by 39.7 per cent to $17 million -
a drop of $11 million from last
year's $28 million.
ZNS, too, has seen a taxpayer
subsidy cut of $3.2 million to
$8.5 million, compared to $11.7
million in 2008-2009. The Gov-
ernment has tried to hold the
line on all other taxpayer subsi-
dies, with the Water & Sewerage
Corporation getting $19 million
- despite the 2008-2009 half-
yearly allocation that took its
subsidy for this fiscal year to $30
million.
Only the Bahamas Agricul-
tural and Industrial Corporation
(BAIC) saw an increase, a $1
million rise to $2.5 million for
fiscal 2009-2010.


The Prime Minister did not
say much about the public cor-
porations in the House of
Assembly yesterday, only con-
firming that the Government
was "on course" to privatise the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company (BTC) "at a profit to
the Bahamas" early in the 2009-
2010 fiscal year. The privatisa-
tion proceeds will be used to
reduce the Government's bor-
rowing requirements.
"Other public corporations
are being subjected to the same
evaluation to determine the ben-
efits of privatization. In some
cases, privatization would mean
shedding the burden which they
place on the Consolidated Fund
and the Bahamian taxpayer. The
financial resources released from
propping up these corporations
plus the proceeds of privatisa-
tion would provide very wel-
come relief to the Bahamian tax-
payer," Mr Ingraham said.


Doctor ITmpital HflFKti Systrm Lmitqid
iQrmma d nbpiJO3
:hluirm rin% Rpalmrl
IIm'Ors Hilspilul llrftlh S)ytem l.imrried


Dew -Sl.u1il. lli.

Omn tbelf ofr ite BInrd of Dircior II I.i Ik H,,pi-l eI ulth SyWMl . I ura pleaiid to felxpn i n yr
c'n.a,,v ny'!s financial result for the 1hree months ended . pnl I Sl 209.

We jire a imsifiel mir firnciuil1 i;hivcenvm is dilc in lInr in mcsra ti Ii ihe hari wirrk fItand l ;.inilnwrit
(if nLiT AsViL1;iite'i, a Inyal rL.ien'ln- thal clniinuIs In rncse confidence in ciur n Hnr il4al, ilr Itie rinvalhi-
able ..Jprxl~pt and partninage oif 4r crledelrilaledl Th-yArcianr .

'ipe utint quarter ui fli~aul 2 IG I.~Jr evlcedtheLt.ilmLnualirrw lI ul .a 'mtit trend lit buiKI w*4ol-
unWt!. E"Mtiiing, per slar i,' wrel weiy-ti-Li: Leccri for u l pcIIfijid. Lhi'\ rvflet% ari inflerc Iffom leI
Oc18.1 fori )E 1KF11LIffabIC prliOUj list year. Net ilon t e lfic L three inoih llh. lvs Ir?2 inllicki iOtilput:LJ
to S 1.0 ii II un fir itbe icimpaiubl pcrioti in 2IE8.

The financinI result r .efleci g~-Lr t in putient service revewuix-o ,512.24 A millkn from blO 5 million in Ihe
prior yci perioFld. un inrc4e f 'if 17.4,.

Total expenial increase S50.h 6 rillinn, icU~1 iilcreused $S1.4M or 15.f.' anid %aiLri arIn hIieri iin aiLset d y (a I.Z M ur 5.9%; hiilli illnr;!w i are
a direLt Enulil oI frLvIL I gniwltI Irtid c'iciir;lIv < 4 l tiuilj..

Dpctpitc the unLcilaJn ecomimicn c .1lirnic. we r n-min opLutnimii ahtlaurf prpcc fr the rcMnainmier r
0ihc %\.i. The Bo ard oilt ne 1c Ihanking .our valued slarchtehlder. fir o icir .onrinucd supon ir nd lw-
alry to the Ho>pilal W'e cxlend an invilialin for you tojoin iu u t ir Compuny'i Annual General
NMrcting on hJuin . 23XiJ ut Dxo1nrx HI-.pi:i''k newCU iri.lcrrncG C-eTiitr C 1i icwcI r rswl


JIrnrph Knikw ski
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My 24, 200


IM) TOR HOSPITAL HEALTH SY STIM LIMITED


A1'1il 30. 2011' wuith wmparLhc liguan ;i ul ,anuur, 31. 2ll'tf
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CI.rIItm liJda. N Slamn: . of RI1caud inan d EI'lxpo

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nKD .TORS HOSPITAL. Il HFAI .TH SSTEM ILIMITE.D
(rAin+idiat Slaalinut utl Cf-a.' Flowm

Irs; umlahsi cnL.-d Axpril 3). 200 9 wiLl ubnnparaLive C iuuis lr Ih Ltmh munwlhi cndd .April 3f0. 20 I
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DOCTORS IfHOPITAL HEALTH St STEIN I,IMITED
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DOCTORS IIOSP1ITAL TIEALTI! SYSTEM LIMITED
N ) i to ilnteriml C',aL.*AiiJdak I ilianiia1 ~Ilal..lL;

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4. DeMImfw lId
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li ll <-4 etsuir




THE TRIBUNE

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government yesterday
said it had agreed to provide a
$30 million guarantee to cover
CLICO (Bahamas) policy liabili-
ties, as no other Bahamas-based
insurance company was willing to
purchase the collapsed carrier’s
policies due to the exposure risk
they faced without this.

Stating that the guarantee
would be for a $30 million maxt-
mum and last no longer than five
years, Mr Ingraham said it would
not apply to Bahamian institu-
tions or corporations that had
purchased CLICO (Bahamas)
annuities, nor the bankrupt com-
pany’s senior management, direc-
tors and their family members.

THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 11B

Institutions not covered in $30m CLICO guarantee

“We are advised that insurance
companies are unwilling to pur-
chase CLICO’s policies and
assume the possible exposure of
$30 million without a Govern-
ment Guarantee,” Mr Ingraham
said.

“In order to facilitate the sale
of CLICO’s policy liabilities, the
Government has agreed to pro-
vide such a guarantee.”

CLICO’s life insurance policy-
holders will be covered up to
$300,000 worth of insurance cov-
erage, while accident and sick-
ness, and group life, medical and
annuity, all covered for their full
amount. Annuity policyholders
will be covered up to $100,000 of
their policy’s accumulated value.

Only policies in force will be
covered by the guarantee, and the

Government will establish a
Statutory Insurance Compensa-
tion Guarantee Fund to protect
Bahamian policyholders in the
event of future insurance compa-
ny failures.

Mr Ingraham added: “The
Office of the Registrar of Insur-
ance Companies advises that
there is a gap between the assets
and liabilities of CLICO leaving a
net liability of $42 million. There
are realisable assets estimated at
$85 million, and adjusted liabili-
ties of $127 million.

“Policy liabilities are estimat-
ed at $73 million and other liabil-
ities at $54 million. As policy lia-
bilities may have a first claim on
all assets, it is therefore expected
that policy liabilities are fully cov-
ered.”

Peer review set to boost accounting industry standard

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIAN accounting firms
will soon be subject to a quality
assurance check every six years
by a body of their peers, the sec-
ond vice-president of the Bahamas
Institute of Chartered Accoun-
tants (BICA) said yesterday. This
will cause in increase in BICA’s
annual membership fee per part-
ner.

Philip Galanis, who is also man-
aging partner at HLB Galanis
Bain, said the peer review or prac-
tice monitoring was proposed so
that those firms in public practice
would have access to material that
would help them engage in best
practices. “The public is going to
benefit as a result of knowing that

all accountants in the Bahamas
who are licensed by BICA would
have had a peer review performed
of their practice, so they all sub-
scribe to a particular standard,”
he said.

Mr Galanis said all accounting
firms who are engaged in public
practice and are licensed by BICA
will be subject to a peer review by
members of the Association of
Chartered Certified Accountants
(ACCA), a globally recognised
body.

Mr Galanis said the ACCA will
scrutinise all firms, including large
international firms, such as
Deloitte and Touche, and will
report their findings to a body
selected by BICA.

Should a firm’s review be found
to have any unsatisfactory out-
comes it will be given a period of

time to correct the problem.

Mr Galanis said this will be
done every six years. Those firms
who are licensed by BICA to prac-
tice will also be subject to
increased per annum license fees
per partner of $280. He said this is
because BICA will be responsible
for underwriting the cost of the
reviews for almost 300 members.

This new peer review has also
been mandated by the Interna-
tional Federation of Accountants,
of which the Institute of Chartered
Accountants of the Caribbean is a
part.

The ACCA was chosen to con-
duct the reviews. Initially, howev-
er, they will in the process train a
local team to do peer reviews in
the region, as they do not have a
“vested” interest in staying in the
Bahamas.

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

MUST SELL

NEW PROVIDENCE

Lot 2840, OBAFEMI! AVENUE, LYNDEN PINDLING EST.
WEST SIDE OF LADY PINDLING HIGHWAY Appraisal: $156,000.00

on this 5,000 sq. fr. prog

hathroam house,

Livirwg,
approximately 1,077 se

ed living Space,

Directions: Travelling Charles Saunders Highway east, turn onto Lady Marquerite
Pindling Avenue, turn to the first corner on the right. Subject property is #2840, at
the end on the left side of the street painted peach and white,

SSM FSA ETS

#7 MALCOLM ROAD

Lot 18, House #7, Malcolm Road

West having an area of 5,000

square feet. Existing thereon is

a 40-year-old split leveled

residence divided into five (5) &

one bedroam, one bathroom

apartments, four located on the

main floor and one on the upper

portion is made of durock and is

about 5 complete. The

building isin fair condition ard

is in serious need ol

maintenance.

Directions: From Baillou Hill Road heading South pass §.C. McPherson
School, take Malcolm Road heading East. Pass the first corner on the left to
House #7 painted white trimmed green.

Appraisal: $156,747.50

Lot No. 59 LOWER BOGUE, ELEUTHERA
North of the T-Junction (Needs Repairs) Appraisal: $84,045.00
ery 3

J living, dining rooms and kitchen, t
and utility room, Total area of enclosed living space is 1,622 se
addition to (63.7 sq. ft. utility room and 120 sq. ft. car port.

FOR CONDITIONS OF SALE & ANY OTHER INFORMATION
ie ee dS 0 le |
ee 0 ee ee te
Te ee ee ek |

ROSETTA STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS





PAGE 18B, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Be guided over firm’s corporate governance

* Ensure that the organisation is “in
control” of itself

Duties of Directors

The Guidelines reinforce the legal
and statutory requirements, and
acceptable standards, of best practice
for the discharge of the duties of direc-
tors. They must:

* Act with honesty, integrity, good
faith and in the best interests of the
licensee (and company), and its clients.

* Exercise the care, diligence and
skill that a reasonably prudent person

would exercise in comparable circum-
stances.

* Exercise independent judgment in
their approach to decision-making and
problem-solving.

* Act on a fully-informed basis.

* Understand and devote sufficient
time to their responsibilities.

* Act only within the scope of their
authority.

* Recognise and guard against con-
flicts of interest in dealing with the
licensee, taking into account the inter-
ests of all stakeholders.

The overall guidance and direction
that the Guidelines provide to licensees
(and companies generally) cannot be
underestimated, particularly in an envi-
ronment where no such Guidelines
existed before, in whole or in part.

It would be prudent for executive
and non-executive directors and senior
management to understand, implement
and adhere to the requirements and
recommendations within the Guide-
lines, in the first instance, and to con-
tinue to develop their individual cor-
porate governance processes and

regime within the parameters of its
directives.

This is to ensure the interests of all
stakeholders are protected, maintained
and valued by directors and senior
management of licensees within the
Bahamas, without compromise or com-
plicity.

© 2006. Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald. All
rights reserved.

NB: The information contained in
this article does not constitute nor is it
a substitute for legal advice. Persons
reading this article and/or column, gen-

erally, are encouraged to seek the rel-
evant legal advice and assistance
regarding issues that may affect them
and may relate to the information pre-
sented.

Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald is an attor-
ney with Fitzgerald & Fitzgerald.
Should you have any comments on this
article, you may contact Mr Fitzger-
ald at Suite 212, Lagoon Court Build-
ing, Olde Towne Mall at Sandyport,
West Bay St., P. O. Box CB-11173,
Nassau, Bahamas or at tyrone@tle-
fitzgeraldgroup.com.

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY





MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES



Investment Opportunity Muct Sell Lot No. 217
Pinewood Gardens Sobdivision

All teat lot of land hawing an area of 5 MK) sg ft, being Lot No.
117 of the Subdivision bnown. us Pinewood Cardess, the caid subdivision
ateated in the Souchem District of Mew Providence Bahamas.
Located on this property is a strectume cemprising of an approximencly
2) yr oid single family wesidence conedstieg of S92 sy. fod enckeed
living space with 3-bedrooms, |-hathroom. living/dining room.
kitchen, drive way and walk way. The land is on a grade and level
and appears to be sulticienily ckevaied $0 disallow the possizilty
of flooding. The grounds are fairly kept and yard is open.

Appraieal: $127, 568M)

Trevelisa wut on East Servet io the juoction of Soldier Road, make a left at the ght then tum ngbt imo Keenedy Sebdivision,
eo all the wiry to T:jenetion, tum night them first left then ight again toward Moen Tabor Church building, after parsing Moant Tabor
take first lef (sapodille bled), the sebject bose is about 40M) yards on the right painted yellow rimmed geven, with geen and whine
door



LOT NO. #7, BOILING HOLE SUBDIVISION

All that piece parcel or lot of land and inpeoyements situated
on the Island af Eeuthem, North of Gowennor’s Harter,
comprising of Lat No. 7 in the Bolling Hola Subdivision and
comprising of approximately 10,000 sq. ft., this site
encompasses 217 ears old duples with each unit consisting
of 2-beckooma; | bathroom, frortroom, diningroom and kitchen
alli fe floor area of approximately 1.47420 sq, ft, and
covered porch ama of approwimainty 164.70 sq. ft. this dupinx
was built in accordance with the plan and spechication as
approved, and ata standard that was acceptable to tha Ministry Cd Pubic Works. This structure is in fonditian.
Each apartment could be rented at $800.00 per manth, The land is landscaped and planted with fous trees, but

Needs Some Manicuring.
APPRAISAL: $138,669.00





Exunma Lid i, 770A, Rahena Sond # 11

All that piece parce! or loot land having an area of approuimatety
TOWKM) aq 1h, heeeg bet Ta, ditiatied in a region’ eeblivicom
kao & Babar Sound of Esuma Section 11, Sineated on this
property is oY yrs old single sioney residence consisting of 3-
Bedrooms, 2-balleooms, livingrote, dinamgrom & kinchon, with
appro Gly 1363 49. 1, of eaclieed living spacs, The heiking
is structurally soend & is generally in good condition. The leet is
rectengelas in shape. No adverse site conditions were sowed

Appralsal: $185 646 21





Property keewted about 2 4/4 miles southemwardly of the settlemeat of George Toon. Pariced peak wimmed whine.



Lat Wo, 235 Tawnam Heights Sibiliviaion

All that lot of Lind having an areca of 8.534 sq ft, being Log #
SS) 235, of the tubdiviesen known ae Tw ynem Heights, The said
SuiVisiOn siete in the ete district of New Providence
Located on his poopeny is an appelimaichy Gyr old singh tamily
retidence coniting of apprivimulely | S26 sy Mal coche
living space with S-bednecnd. 7 -haths. living. diftihge, Einichen
& carport, the land on a grade & level; & appears tp be
sultickemily cevaned to disalboe che possibilirg of Norling. The
@roueds art fairly kept, with aaproweces includiag walkway,



dreeweay & front boundary wall
Appraisal: $244,422 3)

Traveling ext on Prince Charles, turn rigat at Super Value Food Sore, chen Ust left tn t-junction, tum left at jencticn then
right & the property will be the ah om the belt side of the road palneed Blue trimmed white.

LOT MO, 370 GRENADA CLOSE GOLIKEN GATES #2 (haewi)

All that lol af aad kevin an area of 5 500)9g. ft. beine bot 370 Grenada
Close of the sURiMeion Knows and disigrated a6 Gomes Gans Mo, 2,
sitvaied in the Southeecstom district of Mew Providence Boheme, This
property 18 comprised of 75 years old angle family peskeooe conasting
Of apprcsineely | 234 sg. [Loot eneiossd living apace with 3 badroorrs,
ren halons, liviig ining pom, dtd kilehen, Tie Lael is on a grade
aml bei andl appari he eollicaenly clewadial to lealhvw thar poanitelty
Of Dodise dering semua) heavy rainy pore. The pocueads anc Taiely lop,
Wilh inprveneis inclading driveway, wilkwey ond bow shinibs, Yard
af eetloaed with chain linked feecing in the aided ood roe,



Appraisal: $149,406 0

Traveling south sheng Blac Hill Road. tem night at the Farmers Pelarker jist after gassing the Ciolien foes Shoppeng Center, Gite let oie
fen, Windward Isles Way, hes like Sed comer night, St Tien Road, then first lef, Wrerada Crest, dive arqumd the: bed Chen Tet leh
again the sebject peopery is the 2nd property let hiwuse 4 paimed peoch trimmed hock



LOT NO. 10C, YAMACRAW BREACH ESTATES

All that peece parcel or lot of lend having an area of approsimanely
S03 Leg ft. being Lot #0 im Yamacrew Beach Estates erected
an this property is an approximately |5yrs old single storey triples
aparinent buakliag wilh Qoor apace of approximately 350) sq
ft. 3 units consisting of |, 3-bedrooms vith close}, 2-bath, living.
dining kitchen & porch, 2, 2-bedroomes with closets, | hath, living.
dining & kitchen the property 3 graded down & landscaped. Note:
the Suikding bes a prreuic water eyetcm

Aupprraisal: $374 MHbIM)



Traveling south on Foo Hill Road take dhe comer after Inhnean’s

Barber Shop them Let belt & Jet left again; the subject property i straighl ahewl! painted beige rime while.











Pelee ells
Cees ae 0)

WINTON MEATMOWS (Lot No. 3H2)

All thal piece parcel or lot of land having
am apta Of B00 aq. 1. being bot No. 382
situwied im the subdivision knawn as. Frinton
Meadows, the sad subdivision situated in
the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence, Babamas. This property is
canipriaed of a 24 year old single family
residence with an attached efficiency
iformerly the carport) consisting af
approxkmately 2,674 ag. fof enclosed living
sce, from porch- 198 a. f., back patio 380.
The buikling is a tao storey house. Besklcs
ihe efficiency apartment, the house ia comprigh! of 3-bedrooms, 3-bathroomns, inclaive of a master bedlroor
sulle upstairs. Foyer, front room, dining soom, family room. powder room, utility room, breakfast nook and
kitchen downstairs. Climate control is provided by ducted central air conditioning, with air circulation
enhanced by ceiling fans and other amenities. Qhoality of construction: Average. Standard of maintenance
Averuge, Elfective age: seven years (7) the land is on flat terrain, however the site AppeEnrs he be sulfichently
elevated to disallow the parsaabaliny od flooding under normal weather condition, Loree: Lael ig amnusl haraw'y
rainy periods. The grounds arc well kept, with improvements including neatly maintained lawns with flowering
trees, and a concrete pardem'storage shed, which is located im ihe backyard. The yard is enclosed along the
sides with chain-link fencing, and comereie block walls thot are topped with metal railings, and metal gates
wt the frond ard back,



APPRAISAL: $343,072.50

Traweling east on Prince Charnes Drive, _ the streetlight at Pox Hill Row wntil youl get to Meadiws
Bowlevard, tum right onto Meadows Boulevard, go south and toke the 4th left, then lat right. The subject
howse is the Ind house on the left side painted beige trimmed white,

Crown Alletment 67, Murpay Town Alhocn

All that parcel of land having am approwkmate area of 931MP aq ft,
heing lot #672, 0 portion of the murphy town crown albement #
67. Located on thas property is a single storey wooden residence
with a botal se eat approcimely | BM sg, 1 & consisting
of 3-bedrooms, 2-bathrooms, living/dining bitches 2-car garnge
& covered porch. Additional floor space is available within roof
dormers. Exterior walls are of wood overlain with burdi board
sidiag or comcrete duriboard siding. interior walls are of gypsum
wallbozed siding. Construction demonstrates above averge quality
workmanship. however manor aesthetic rement is still needed
Landscaping bas commenced, bat not yet completed. The property
is level with no immediate flooding danger. All major otilities are within (O00 of the subject site

Aquprralsaal; $241 20MM)
This proerty is situated off Bay Street Drive, Murphy Town.

Lot No. 13, Masthe Point, Highway

All that piece, paced of bot of lated bee lot 213 and eateased on
the mimi Mastic Poin Highway in the senicmem of Mastic Poin,
on te Teland af Merth Anco, one of the Tabane of The
Commonwealth of The Beharas. The subpool property 8 pactangeker
In shape and is appro mately 40,000 aq, Tt, located on the suhjeet
Property isan approsimaltely oil single-storey dples opartecn!
coraisting of appeonmaacly 104 sq fof enclosed living apace
With ten 1-bedionen 1-bethrecun, living, dining pocoms A kinches
The land is on a grade & lewel, berwever the site appears uy be
GM ciesly elevated i disallow the pemhilicy of feeding derung
ennual heavy rainy periceks of the wear, The property 6 mo



londscuped,
Appraisal: $163,247 Jo

Lat Ao. 14 Berk 11, Coral Hicights Fast Saldiviches

All that lot of lad having an acs of approximately 330M) sq fl,
being Low 14. Block UL af the suidivision ecw as Coral Hees,
East, in the Westers Distinct of the lelaad of New Providenoe.
Located On the subpoct property i6.an approaicnatcly Uyrold singk
storey resklence wich appemimacely 2.03569. ft. of enclosed living
ipace 4 consisting of 4-bedenoess, 2-balhro=oms, living re,
dinihg poo, Tamely noon, Gichen, hin foe, willy poor,
lnwrdry oom Ae caren, the lend is on a grade & level; however
Ihe: site opens bo be sulticenly clewaed in disallow the possitilirg
of thending during annual heavy rainy periods of the year.

Appraisal: S242)

Travelling weston Camechec! Rend, jo bo the Corel Harkour poundahon, enter Coral Harta fron the pom abeven them
tae the Det left (central drive east), drive to the 2nd. commer on the left, (emt lobe dr). The sabject pooperty is located om
ihe comer painied green cienmed white. The yard & opes.

LOT MO. 225, TREASURE COVE SUBDIVISION

All that piece parcel of lot of land having an area. of approcimaich:
6114 sq fi. being Lot 22,0f Treasure Cowe erected om this propemy
ian approcimately UOyr old simgle fmiby Grand Abaco design
residence with approximately | SBA op. ft of living space & conseting
of Hhedroome, 2-tathrooms, kiichen, living. dinumg, familly & utiliey
ROIS. ETIprovemenis incledes cemtral air conditioning A huncane
shutters. The land ison a grade & bevel & omeaes to be sufficaently
ehaied to disallow the pessitility of Dooding during bewy nainy
periods. The land is landscaped.

Appraisal: 34357 6

Trvelling on Yamacres Hill Road, turn into Treasure Cove entrance the subject property t& located on the Sea comer on the
left pinted yellow trimmed while. The yard is open.





Lat Aion, 136 Garden Hills Eatades
AD thet hotof bed having an area of 5.989 sq fL, being Lot Mo. 10396 of the sabdivision known as Garden Hills Estates, a
fi vision eiled in the southern distinct of New Prowenoe. Bahamas. This property 6 vacant heed and is) 2oened
meidential - single family, The subject property is severely sloping downwards
Appraisal: 65 10M) 00

Travelling weston the East Weal Highway, lake the rel entrance left into Garden Hills Getates aext to Hillkide Mission

Bape Choreh. teal op the hall an Eckel wer Awe to Orange blossom ave, mak a tight on orang: Bloseom Ave & the sib

Property is the Dred om che left side

BOCK WELL ESTATES
All that piece parcel of lot of vacant land having an aren of 600M) sq. fi. being lot me 19, of the subdivision kmown
as Rockwell Estates, situated in the wesiern district of aged gohan yee bahamas. this property is zoned residential
single family ¢ multi-family. the land is on a grade and bevel, amd is sufficienily elevated © disallow the
possibility of flooding during heavy rainy periods of the year. Rockwell Estates Is Located Just OFF Mekinney Drive

ind Rocky Pine Road.
Appraisal: S00 JMH)AM)

VACANT PROPERTIES

Let So. 15, Block b0, Winton Heights

All that lot of vecemt land having am ores of 17144 9g fi, of the subdivision known as Winton Heights siteated in the
Basten District of New Providence Bahamas. This property is rectangular in stape and zoned malti family = single family.

Appradsal: $171 44h)
This property is about 230ft West of Sassoon Drive and is about the third Jot om the North Side of Hill Side Road.

Lat No. 44, South Westridge Sebdivision

All that piece. parcel or loa of vacant land having am area of 41,490 sq. fi, being lot #24 of the subdivision bnoown as
aout Westrider, the said subdivision situated in the westem distictof New Providence Bohomas. This property is xonmedd
singh: famiby residential area. The land & slighdly elevated & appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility
of flooding during anos heey rainy periods of the year.

Appraisal: $342,292.00

Trevelling west on JP. tunn left imo Soeth Weetricgee [pank wal. towel! to the 2nd comer left & tonn left of the t-junction.
The subject property will be about the 3rd.an the left side of the road.

For conditions of sale and other information contact 326-1771 * Fax 356-3851



Inc WEAIRECN AerU

5-Day FORECAST



er ORLANDO ‘ .
High:88°F/31°C 3 Partly sunny. Cloudy with a spotty Mainly cloudy, a Becoming cloudy
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Low: 74° F/23° C
ANDROS ;

High: 92° F/33° C

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Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.



Today Friday Today Friday Today Friday
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W

F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C
Albuquerque 79/26 57/13 t 81/27 58/14 t Indianapolis 74/23 56/13 t 80/26 59/15 s Philadelphia 72/22 6417 t 80/26 61/16 t
Anchorage 56/12 44/6 c 58/14 45/7 ¢c Jacksonville 88/31 68/20 t 88/31 68/20 t Phoenix 99/37 75/23 s 102/38 75/23 s
Atlanta 86/30 65/18 t 80/26 63/17 t Kansas City 78/25 58/14 pe 85/29 62/16 s Pittsburgh 78/25 58/14 t 72/22 54/12 pc
Atlantic City 68/20 64/17 pc 80/26 57/13 t Las Vegas 99/37 71/21 $s 99/37 75/23 s Portland, OR 82/27 56/13 s 84/28 56/13 s
Baltimore 75/23 64/17 t 80/26 58/14 t Little Rock 78/25 59/15 pc 84/28 58/14 s Raleigh-Durham 87/30 67/19 t 84/28 61/16 t
Boston 58/14 52/11 c 67/19 57/13 t Los Angeles 78/25 62/16 pc 78/25 60/15 pc St. Louis 74/23 60/15 t 84/28 65/18 s
Buffalo 72/22 56/13 t 64417 52/11 pe Louisville 78/25 60/15 t 82/27 62/16 s Salt Lake City 84/28 60/15 s 89/31 63/17 pc
Charleston, SC 86/30 70/21 t 89/31 66/18 t Memphis 80/26 64/17 c 82/27 65/18 pc San Antonio 89/31 64/17 t 91/32 67/19 pc
Chicago 69/20 51/10 pc 75/23 50/10 t Miami 86/30 74/23 t 85/29 71/21 t San Diego 72/22 63/17 pc 72/22 62/16 pc
Cleveland 76/24 55/12 t 68/20 51/10 s Minneapolis 75/23 55/12 po 73/22 55/12 pe San Francisco 71/21 55/12 pe 72/22 53/11 pe
Dallas 86/30 64/17 pc 90/32 64/17 s Nashville 80/26 61/16 t 81/27 58/14 pe Seattle 75/23 51/10 s 77/25 5110 s
Denver 82/27 52/11 pc 82/27 54/12 pc New Orleans 86/30 68/20 t 86/30 68/20 pc Tallahassee 87/30 69/20 t 89/31 66/18 t
Detroit 72/22 52/1 ¢ 76/24 52/11 s New York 68/20 62/16 c 79/26 63/17 t Tampa 85/29 74/23 t 84/28 71/21 t
Honolulu 83/28 72/22 pc 86/30 72/22 pc Oklahoma City 84/28 57/13 s 89/31 60/15 s Tucson 95/35 66/18 s 98/36 68/20 s
Houston 89/31 69/20 pc 89/31 67/19 pc Orlando 838/31 70/21 t 86/30 70/21 t Washington, DC 81/27 66/18 t 82/27 60/15 t



PAGE 20B, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009

INTERNATIONAL
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Includes: 2 Nights Hotel Accomodations and 2 Days Car Rental with LDW insurance.

Rate based on 2-persons traveling together. Excludes taxes, surcharges and
any additonal fees. Subject to availability. Other restrictions may apply.

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It’s a breath of fresh air

THE TRIBUNE

‘7
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Tha gomee be gel more dene.

©2009 P&G

Meadows and Rain
Febreze Air Effects eliminates odors leaving a fresh scent.





The Tribune oo""""”
OBIMUARIES
RELIGION



\ -< The Tribune
OLD | tty Arcee, My Newspaper!

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707.9

SS hour chaice for ihe family:



PG 20 ® Thursday, May 28, 2009

RELIGION

The Tribune

The Franciscan Dream

IN Victorian England young John
Cyril Hawes could never have dreamt
that he would become known as the
Hermit of Cat Island in the far off
Bahamas. He was born on September
7, 1876 in Richmond, Surrey. He was
brought up in the Anglican faith and
while attending Kings School,
Canterbury, where he loved to visit the
cathedral, he became attracted to High
Church rites. He had an inclination to
become a priest but he reluctantly
agreed with his father's advice to train
as an architect.

He regularly visited many cathedrals
and churches but at the age of 21, at
the Church of St

Thomas he was overcome with the
stirring roll of Gregorian chants, the
psalms of evensong, the Magnificat
and the sermon of Canon Rhodes-
Bristow speaking of the call of Elisha
and of St Francis of Assissi pondering
on the words "What shall it profit a
man if he gain the whole world and
lose his own soul."

The effect was startling, "And then
suddenly Our Lord touched me with
His grace.... Unspeakable joy flooded
my soul and I thought sacrifice is no
sacrifice at all because it is such a joy to
offer it"... I did not realise that when
the Master says ‘Follow me’ it will be
through the Garden of Gethsemane."

From that day, John modeled his life
on St Francis of Assissi and longed for
monastic asceticism. He wanted to
become a Roman Catholic there and
then.

What would seem to most people as
a great honour was looked upon as a
great temptation to John Hawes. He
was invited by Anglican Bishop
Hornby to design and build a church at




JIM
LAWLOR

Chollerton, Northumberland. He set-
tled there and became a lay reader in a
nearby Anglican Church. His design
of the church approximated a Catholic
place of worship. Bishop Hornby per-
suaded him to study for Anglican
Orders and he duly entered Lincoln

Theological College in 1901. After
ordination at Fulham Palace he was
referred by Bishop Hornby to be
curate at the Church of the Holy
Redeemer, Clerkenwell. Fortunately,
this unique church had a Renaissance
interior with a high altar and a Catholic
environment - Hawes felt that he
would be able to fulfill his Franciscan
ideals there. After a year he was raised
to the priesthood.

In 1906, Abbot Aelred offered
Father Hawes to design ‘The
Homecoming’ at the Isle of Caldey and
become a novitiate for the Franciscan
life. Clothed in the novice's habit he
took on the name Brother Jerome. But
after only 4 months tensions arose
between the old fashioned Protestant
villagers and the Franciscan brother-
hood in their habits and sandals.
Brother Jerome took up a wandering
life living in poverty.

Again Bishop Hornby, who was now
in Nassau, came to the rescue. The
bishop offered Brother Jerome the
charge of Long Island, Bahamas that
had been devastated by the 1908 hur-

ricane and was in desperate need of his
architectural and priestly services.
After an initial tour with the Bishop of
the Northern Islands, Brother Jerome
settled in Deadman's Cay, Long Island.

He found himself spellbound by the
tropical world, the strong sun, blue
skies and seas. At Clarence Town the
nave of the church was still intact and
the population, largely white was made
up of farmers and fishermen. He felt
his missionary yearnings would be sat-
isfied and set to work. He gathered a
crowd of willing workers each offering
3 days of labour - men did carpentry
and masonry and women toted rocks
and sand on their heads while their half
naked children played round the site.
Fires were lit and galley pots of hominy
grits bubbled on them.

Brother Jerome indulged himself
with Catholic services in two of the
remaining churches but at Simms the
congregation were violently opposed to
High Church ways - they would have
nothing to do with confession, images,
candles, incense, wafers or holy water
and strongly disapproved of the Virgin
Mary. The church at Deadman's Cay
was rebuilt in a year and an old Negro
lady remarked: " Ain’ dat beautiful, dat
de Hebenly Jerusalem.” Soon St Paul's
Church, Clarence Town was rebuilt -
with its twin baroque towers, gleaming
white in the brilliant sun it was called
"The Pearl of the Bahamas." The first
service was January 25, 1911, the
Sunday after the Feast of the conver-
sion of St Paul. At that service he
informed the congregation that he was
going to Nassau for a visit - he didn't
tell them he wouldn't be back for 30
years. Privately he had realised, "My
heart had long been in Rome, but now

my head was bringing me over boldly".

Hawes travelled to New York and
attended a Catholic Mass, visited a
Franciscan Convent for a few weeks
then received baptism into the Roman
Catholic Church on March 19, 1911. He
was now faced with an uncertain
future. He visited his parents in
England but then left for Canada and
worked as a teamster on the Canadian
railroad. Finally, he decided to go to
Rome, where he was granted an inter-
view with Pope Pius X at the Vatican.
The Pope, learning that he was a con-
vert clergyman, laid his hand on his
head and said, "Bravo! Bravo!" and
gave him a special blessing. John
Hawes studied for 2 years at Beda
College and joined the Third Order of
St Francis at the Basilica of St Francis
at Assissi - his new name became
Brother John Francis Xavier Hawes.

Shortly before his ordination he was
introduced to Bishop Kelly of
Geraldton, who talked to him about
the spiritual needs of the people and
the cathedral he wanted to build in
Western Australia. From 1915 until
1939 he built many church buildings
and ministered to the miners in the
gold fields and bushmen. And he was
rewarded for his service when he was
awarded a ‘domestic prelate’, which
allowed him to be called Monsignor
Hawes.

As he aged and his health began to
fail he felt he had earned the right to
settle down comfortably and spend the
rest of his life in ecclesiastic luxury.
Monsignor Hawes hoped to end his
days in the Bahamas as Brother John.

(Next time Part 32 - Brother John
becomes the Hermit of Cat Island)



BOOK

PRESENTATION

Jackie Mycklewhyte presents Father James
Moultrie, rector of St Matthew's Anglican
Church with a signed copy of her second book
The boy and His Rooster - a book of short
Bahamian stories. The book was recently pub-
lished in March of this year. Mrs Mycklewhyte
published her first book, 'The Boy and His
Bottle’, back in 2005. She noted that she is
already in the process of working on her third
book, which is expected be released soon.



Anthony Longley/ St. Matthew's Communications



The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, May 28, 2009 ® PG 21

Ce
Free... will

"| tell you the truth, everyone who sins is
a slave to sin. Now a slave has

no permanent place in the family, but a
son belongs to it forever. So if the Son
sets you free, you will be free indeed."

John 8:34-36 (NIV)

EVERYONE wants freedom. The
little girl racing down a hill, the teenag-
er on the way to college, the young
adult looking for an apartment, and
the middle aged man readying himself
for an early retirement. Everyone likes
freedom. The ability to think, speak, or
act in any manner they so choose.
Everyone has freedom. To be free is an
ability to see yourself the way God sees
you. As a perfect creation, with an
independent mind, body and soul
unlike any other; so when you are
physically and mentally in chains, your
spirit is elsewhere. God loves freedom.
He truly loves everything it encom-
passes and wants us to as well.

This is in fact, why He gave us all



TONI
STYLES

i









freewill. The power to make our own
choices in this life. Yes, God is in con-
trol, He will never forsake us, and He
is omnipresent. And although He is,
the architect of our lives; we are still
the builders. Making the final decision
on all the particulars, most importantly
the foundation on which our lives will
grow and strengthen; from whence we
came, to where we will ultimately be. It
is our responsibility, with all this free-
dom we have, to choose a solid, sound
foundation, and take heed to not allow
ourselves to be pulled in any and every
direction. After all, there are only two
ways of doing things, a wrong way, and
a God way.

We may not be of this world, but we

are in this world, and its offerings
though deceptive, look magnificent
and promising. They glow and they
burn, guiltlessly tempting us and keep-
ing our focus on exterior gain. We can-
not afford to lose ourselves; that is our
true nature, to society’s value system.
A system based on self and not spirit,
and a disgraceful appetite for wants
and not needs. What we ought to value
above all else is our relationship with
God and the pure, sincere relation-
ships we have with others. Basically
the things that will last.

As an individual who believes in
everlasting growth and the importance
of helping others on life's journey, I
utilise my freedom to do just that; in
addition to adhering to all of God’s
word. That means I use my free will to
show my love for God.

We as believers need not be
ashamed or regretful, in knowing the
way in which we live and what we
believe is not by force, but by a choice
we've made as individuals along life's

road. Our grass is greener; because we
allow the water of life, that is God's
truth, to pour all over every aspect of
our lives. This choice we've made by
using our freewill, is the best invest-
ment, whether the economy be up or
down.

An authentic freedom found in faith,
so that as we live, and are faced with a
serious of choices, we can rest assured
we will not be alone in making our
decisions; decisions that will one day
be worth more than this world can
comprehend.

In closing remember, with freedom,
like Christ, who died not for his sins,
we honour and serve God, by allowing
His will to be done in our lives over our
own.

¢ Toni Elizabeth Styles is a Bahamian
writer and poet, currently residing in
Nassau, Bahamas.

Comments related to the article can be
sent to fearless247@gmail.com.

(ES
Labours of love

EASTER is about the Lord’s
labour on the cross to accomplish
the work of salvation.

Rogationtide is the period of
three days before Ascension Day to
thank God for the provision of food
from the sea and soil, to pray for
protection from hurricane, and for
the wise preservation of God’s cre-
ation. Ascension Day (when our
Lord returned to his Father in
glory) reminds us to keep a balance
between earthly pursuits and heav-
enly priorities. We are left here to
fulfill the work of the church as we
seek to make disciples so that none
need perish but have everlasting
life.

In John 15: 16-17, Our Lord
speaks very directly to his disciples:
“You did not choose me but I chose
you. And appointed you to go and
bear fruit, fruit that will last, so that
the Father will give you whatever
you ask him in my name. I am giv-
ing you these commands so that you
may love one another.”

When we pray in the name of
Jesus, according to the Word of
God, seeking the mind of Christ
and desiring to do the will of God,
then we can have our prayers

~~ ~~
<= a

«< — 7



C BOSFIELD
~ 4 PALACIOUS
Dias: es





answered.

Marriage and parenting are both
labours of love within the context of
the intimacy of the family. The fam-
ily is the smallest and most impor-
tant social unit where we are sup-
posed to learn how to love and be
loved. Our spiritual and emotional
maturation is essential to nation
building. Professional and financial
advancement should never be at the
expense of the wellbeing of the
family members.

The church family is the next spe-
cial unit in which the shaping of
faith and formation of character is
central. The blood of Christ unites
us in a very special bond between
believers which may at time seem
closer than that shared with “blood
relatives.” We are to support,
encourage and pray for one anoth-
er, aS we worship and work to
labour together in God’s vineyard.

The wider community is to be
our main focus as we look to bring
healing and wholeness by introduc-
ing God’s children to God’s plan for
their lives. The way we love one
another as Christians and the way
we show hospitality to strangers is

intended to be a sure sign that the
presence of the Lord is especially
visible where love is.

In I John 1: 20-21 we are chal-
lenged to do just this: “Those who
say ‘I love God, and hate their
brothers or sisters are liars; for
those who do not love a brother or
sister, whom they have seen, cannot
love God whom they have not seen.
The commandment we have from
him is this: “those who love God
must love their brothers and sisters
also.”

The famine in Judea mentioned
in Acts 11:28 elicits this immediate
response from the disciples: “the
disciples determined that according
to their ability, each would send
relief to the believers living in
Judea; this they did, sending it to
the elders by Barnabas and
Saul.” (v. 29).

Who needs to feel God’s love
through you?

66

The blood of
Christ unites us in
a very special
bond between
believers which
may at time seem
closer than that
shared with
“blood relatives.”
We are to sup-
port, encourage
and pray for one
another, as we
worship and work
to labour together
in God's vineyard.



Full Text

PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.153THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER PLENTYOF SUNSHINE HIGH 89F LOW 77F n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@ tribunemedia.net TEACHERS, doc tors and nurses are among those on the public payroll who will be hit by cutbacks in government's upcoming budget, having to forego salary increases with the latter notr eceiving an antici p ated $10.5 million health insurance benefit in this fiscal year. This revelation was made by Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham as he delivered a sober address on the state of the economy during the presentation of the 2009/2010 fiscal budget to the House of Assembly yesterday. He explained that to reduce public spending during the economic turbulence, government plans to maintain recurrent expenditure such as salary payments in the upcoming fiscal year. "In this regard, we will endeavour tom aintain employment levels and other priorities. And we will move firmly to eliminate expenditures which, in present cir cumstances, are of l ow priority. For example, travel to international confer ences will be reduced to the bare minimum and only urgent staffing appointments will be approved. Each ministry and department is aware of government policy on this issue and is gearing to give effect to it," he said. This "expenditure restraint" led government to make some tough decisions which will affect professionals in core sectors of the economy. "I note in this regard the need to require teachers, doctors and nurses to forgo this year, the salary increases, and in the case of nurses, a new health insurance benefit, provided for in their contract, totalling some PM deliv ers sober address The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com BAHAMAS BUDGET 2009/10 SPECIAL s ss Budget cutbacks hit teachers, doctors ‘Litigation likely’ over amendment to the Customs Management Act n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business E ditor A FORMERGrand Bahama Chamber of Com merce president last night s aid renewed litigation was likely over the Governmen t ’s 2009-2010 Budget plans to amend the Customs Mana gement Act, given that the changes appeared to be an attempt to give Customs “arbitrary powers” to con duct audits of Port Authority licensees. Christopher Lowe, who is a lso operations manager at Kelly’s (Freeport P rime Minister Hubert Ingraham’s Budget communication, and the amendments tabled in the House of Assembly for their First Reading yesterday, seemed to be a government attempt t o circumvent previous SEE page 10 I N S I D E CLASSIFIEDSTRADER CLASSIFIEDSTRADER I N S I D E CARS! CARS! CARS! OBITUARIES and RELIGION INTODAY’STRIBUNE JOBSAND HELPWANTED L L O O A A D D S S O O F F Former president of GB Chamber of Commerce responds to Budget n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net AFTER reportedly being released from Her Majesty’s Prison only two days ago, a 24-year-old man is back in police custody being questioned in connection with the murder of his 19-year-old girlfriend and an attempt to bury her body in the War Veterans Cemetery early yesterday morning. According to reports reaching The Tribune , the 24-year-old Chippingham resident was at home when his girlfriend, Shenise Adderley returned to their residence that night from work. Reportedly, there was an argument, and gun shots were heard by neighbours sometime around 2am. A short time later, a resident in the area reported that he had been approached by a man asking for assistance in “disposing” of a body. Police were later told that a man had gone to the Veterans Cemetery on Infant View Road LEFT: The uncle of Shenise Adder ley, Calvin Fisher, and her mother, Carol Fisher, show a photograph of the 19-year-old (above n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net CLICO policyholders will be protected by a $30 million guar antee from government to facilitate the sale of Clico’s policy lia bilities to insurance companies, the Prime Minister has announced. During his Budget Communication in the House of Assembly Mr Ingraham said insurance companies were unwilling to pur chase policies from the failed company Clico (Bahamas and assume the possible exposure of $30 million without the surety from government. It is expected the $30 million maximum guarantee will be in place for five years and cover all policies that are already in force. The maximum covered by the guarantee includes the full amount for accident and sickness policies, as well as group life, 1 9YEAR-OLD GIRL MURDERED SHENISE ADDERLEY’S body was found in this grave. SEE page 10 $30 million govt guarantee to protect CLICO policyholders SEE page 14 n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net WITH the future still uncertain and the possibility that any economic projections may quickly be rendered obsolete, the Prime Minister has sought to assure the public that gov ernment is acting cautiously and making reforms to keep the country above water in challenging times. But despite these pledges Mr Ingraham yesterday provided the public with little reason to rejoice when he delivered the 2009/2010 Budget Communication in parliament. Instead he offered domestic and global facts and figures to justify cutbacks in spending almost across the board and the need for what may in some cases be unpopular but costsaving reforms. This as he confirmed that the Bahamas is experiencing “a severe downturn in our economy in a most extreme form (with tourism, reduced foreign direct investments, reduced government revenues, reduced employment and contracting living standards.” Outlining government’s financial strategy for the 2009/2010 fiscal year, Govt ‘making reforms to keep country above water’ SEE page 12 SEE page 14 PRIME MINISTER H ubert Ingraham at the House of Assembly making his budget communication. SEE PAGESTHREE, SEVENANDBUSINESS SECTION FORMORE BUDGETNEWS INSIDE AIRPOR T SECURIT Y CHIEFREPORTEDLYSHOT PAGEFIVE SANDILANDSNURSINGSTAFF THREATENSICK-OUT PAGETWO OPPOSITION CONCERNED OVER PUBLIC SERVICE JOBS P AGETHREE F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net NURSING staff at the Sandil ands rehabilitation centre have threatened to stage a sick out today if salary pay cuts are not reimbursed, union president Cleo la Hamilton warned. Yesterday, more than 500 nurses and auxiliary staff at Sandil ands received cuts ranging from a s low as $1.50 to nearly $600. The deductions, it was claimed, are due to the results of a pilot project that required employees t o sign in. The data was then transferred to the accounting department, which recorded who arrived late, or left the facility b efore their shifts had been completed. While the majority of those affected accept that they signed in l ate on arrival at work, they claim n o due process was followed in terms of issuing first a verbal warning, followed by a written one before any pay cuts could be c arried out. “When you start messing with people’s money that’s when you have problems,” Ms Hamilton, t he president of the Nursing Union said. “If it is not resolved they will not be back to work. So they bett er resolve this today. This is w rong,” she exclaimed. As one out of a few entities under the Public Hospital’s Authority, Sandilands staff comp lain that no pay cuts have yet to be seen at the Rand Memorial Hospital, the Princess Margaret Hospital, or the Public Hospital A uthority’s corporate headquarters itself only Sandilands. “They are violating the industrial agreement, and they are trying to take advantage of the peo-p le out on the front line. I told Dr (Hubert es are on a pinnacle and with onlya little bit of hot air they will blow u s over. If this is the hot air then we welcome it,” Ms Hamilton said. About a dozen other nurses congregated with Ms Hamiltona nd shop stewart Margaret Knowles outside the Sandilands centre when the media arrived. They outlined their concerns and w arned they would not sit idly by and allow this kind of “foolishness” to happen. Ms Hamilton added: “They cut some girls for being late twice.S ome people were late once and you cut them? “No warning letter you give them? This is procedural improp riety. Everyone except the doctors swipe. Management say they swipe for security but they aren’t timed. No one says nothing when these nurses are here over theirt ime. No one says nothing when they work through their lunch hour.” Attempts to contact the Minist er of Health Dr Hubert Minnis were unsuccessful up to press time last night. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 9 9EndsMay30S S U U I I T T S S9 9$ $BernardRd:393-3463 MackeySt:393-5684ThompsonBlvd:328-1164 FineThreads FineThreads ‘Reverse pay cuts – or face a sick-out’ GUNFIRE rang out in eastern New Providence when a group of men shot at police and officers returned fire, causing the men to flee and drop $11,000 worth of mari juana. The officers had been on patrol when they heard gunshots and found the men gathered behind City Market on the corner of Wulff and Village Roads. As the officers approached, shots were fired and the police shot back. No one was injured in the exchange, and the men ran off. A bag containing 10 and a half pounds of marijuana with a street value of just under $11,000 was found in the area. No arrests have been made and police investigations continue. Anyone with any information which may assist the police with this matter should call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477 Marijuana haul found after police shootout In brief NURSING STAFF at the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre have threatened to stage a sick out today in a pay dispute. Nursing staff at Sandilands rehabilitation centre threaten action today F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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n B y PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter p turnquest@tribunemedia.net R ESPONDING to government’s 2009/2010 budget com munication, opposition leader Perry Christie said that if the prime minister is serious about fiscal prudence during these tough economic times, he shoulds tart cutting back on the size of his Cabinet. C hastising Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham’s government for its sober and “depressing” view of the state of the country, Mr Christie said this year’s budget once again offered no blueprint for the way forward. Claiming government is “sim ply waiting” for the world to change, Mr Christie said the Bahamas must accept the economic realities it is faced with, but must not waive the white flag of surrender, “as this government proposes to do.” “This budget inspires no hope. Do we stand still and do nothing hoping that the world changes? There is not one thing in the prime minister’s statement to useour ingenuity, creativity to inspire our people,” he said. Mr Christie said that the prime minister should have presented the country with strategies to help it grow in these difficult times – such as plans for developing agriculture and fisheries, improving the financial services sector and meeting the challenges facing the tourism indus try. “We remind the prime minister with regard to changes in the terms and conditions of workers in the public service that those changes will require the concurrence of workers. We are especially concerned about the government’s decision to eliminate health insurance for nurses. This was a very strongly negotiated benefit, which nurses who are exposed to diseases on a daily basis require. We urge the government to reconsider this decision. “We are also concerned that no mention was made about the much promoted drug prescrip-tion programme. What does this budget statement say to the chil dren who are coming out of school this year about their futures? The people who are in college today. What will they do? What is the promise for them? The budget said nothing to the new college graduate, to the students at the College of the B ahamas, to the thousands coming out of h igh school this year,” he said. With thousands of Bahamians out of work, and many more o n the brink of losing their homes, Mr C hristie said that Bahamians had been looking to the budget communication for some glimmer ofh ope. “Instead of a plan, instead of hope, what they have gotten yet again from the prime minister is a long description of what the problem is mixed in with self-congratulation over social service interventions. There was no recognition that the policies of this administration helped to put us in this situation. There is plenty on m echanics, talk of reform, passing laws, b ringing into force new regulations, not hiring people. This isa budget that will inflict pain. We reiterate – and this is reinforced by no l ess than Standard and Poor’s – that it is the policies of this government that stopped the momentum of thise conomy and undermined internal and external investor confidence. The termination of hundreds of public sector workers sent the signal to the private sector that they were free to lay off employees. “We maintain that had the FNM not stopped the public infrastructure contracts, not delayed the approval of foreign d irect investments left on the table by my government, the e conomy of the Bahamas may have been cushioned from the full effects of the global eco nomic crisis,” he said. Mr Christie added that the g overnment’s decision to initiate budget cuts in its third year in o ffice is an admission that its economic policies over the last two years “have failed.” He promised that the PLP would carefully analyse the bud g et communication and its accompanying bills and speak more fully on the matter during the debate next week. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 3 n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter A WOMAN who admitted lying to police about h er three-year-old son b eing kidnapped by her f ormer boyfriend was back in court yesterday. Angie Moss, 37, who also goes by the name Angie Brown, appeared before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in CourtOne, Bank Lane after spending three weeks at the Sandilands rehabilitation centre. In an emotional plea to the court, Moss asked for help, claiming she was in fear for her life. She also alleged that while undergoing a courtordered evaluation at Sandilands she was continuously being harassed by her former boyfriend, Kendrick Siefort, 35. Moss claimed he had left numerous threatening messages on her cellular phone. Magistrate Gomez expressed concern for Moss and her children. He ordered the matter be referred to the Department of Social Services for a report. M oss was granted bail in t he sum of $1,000 with one s urety. The case was adjourned to July 31 which is when Moss is expectedto be sentenced. Moss pleaded guilty to deceit earlier this month,a dmitting she had made a f alse kidnap claim because she wanted police to lock up her former boyfriend. Mother of five, Moss told police on May 1 that Siefort had removed her 1996 Bluebird from outside her Lewis Street home. She also told them her son, Shannon Bannister, was asleep on the back seat. Police issued an all points bulletin for Siefort, who subsequently turned himself in. n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net DESPITE assurances given by Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham yesterday that government will do its best to try to maintain employment levels within the public service, t here is concern from the Opposition that the nation's c hief has not revealed "the whole story", meaning that further public staff reductions may be inevitable as a further cost cutting measure to survive the dire economic climate. D uring a grave presentation yesterday of the 2009/2010 fiscal budget, Mr Ingraham said the severe global downturn led to an almost 17 per cent decline in recurrent revenue, estimated to be $260 million lower than projected i n last year’s budget. He also painted a grim picture of the c ountry's ballooning deficit for 2008/2009, estimated at $352 million, more than double the amount projected in last year's budget communication. In order to strengthen fiscal discipline during the curr ent economic turbulence, government intends to hold the line on recurrent expenditure such as salaries in the 2009/2010 fiscal year, said Mr Ingraham. Employment "In this regard, we will endeavour to maintain employment levels and other priorities. And we will move firmly to eliminate expenditures which, in present circums tances, are of low priority," said Mr Ingraham. But leader of Opposition Business in the House of A ssembly Dr Bernard Nottage feels the prime minister d id not reveal the full scope of the possible need to shed m ore staff from the public service. " It's really a budget of doom and gloom and I'm not sure that we've got the whole story yet," he told The T ribune a fter the prime minister's communication yesterday. "He's talked about not replacing persons who've r etired the next step to that might have to be to reduce staff. " I'm not suggesting that is the plan but I wouldn't be surprised if that becomes necessary because they are predicting a revenue shortfall this year (and reduced the allocation to ministries. He says that he's expecting to do more with less money but I'm not sure the g overnment will be able to do that, that the ministries will be able to do that, year over year," Dr Nottage continued. The prime minister said yesterday that the spots left vacant by 138 public servants who will reach the mandatory age of retirement during the fiscal year will not be filled, bringing the government annual salary savings of an estimated $4.1 million. The nation's chief also announced several planned cutbacks on government spending such as reducing u nnecessary travel to conferences abroad "to the bare minimum" and adding that only "urgent staffing appointments" will be approved. Government will also restrain spending by allocating funding to all government ministries, departments and agencies sufficient to meet their "core" mandate to the public. Subsequently, this year's budget includes decreases in allocations to nearly all ministries and departments over approved estimates in the current fiscal period. " Clearly, all will be challenged to manage public resources within very stringent budgetary conditions. The stark reality is that the severe fiscal situation in which we find ourselves warrants that to be the case," said Mr Ingraham. Still there are a few selected increases, the largest are allotted to the Department of Public Service, $10.4 million (for pensions, insurance for uniformed services and others); the Public Hospitals Authority, $7.3 million; theD epartment of Environmental Health Services, $2.9 million; and the Department of Public Health, $1.9 million. Total recurrent expenditure allocations in 2009/2010 fiscal year are set at a level of $1.53 billion, some $39.3 million lower than the approved estimates for 2008/09. " Expenditure restraint" will also lead to the foregoing of salary increases for nurses, doctors and teachers dur-i ng the upcoming fiscal year. Nurses will also have to forego an anticipated $10.5 mill ion healthcare benefit as a result. Woman who admitted lying about kidnapback in court Christie:Budget offers no blueprint for way forward Perry Christie Opposition concerned over public service jobs ZHIVARGO LAING , Minister of State in the Ministry of Finance, holding the 2009/2010 budget c ommunication, surrounded by o ther Cabinet ministers. P a t r i c k H a n n a / B I S BAHAMAS BUDGET 2009/10

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E DITOR, The Tribune. A recent Tribune article which graded the Cabinet Ministers was a very interesting one. I think this kind of exercise is one that encourages people to understand that the power in this country, and in any true democracy, liesw ith the people and not with the 41 Members of Parliament whom we elect to represent us and to be our servants. A n even more interesting exercise, I believe, would be to have a ll of us, (the general public g rade our employees, (the mini sters)....on a regular basis. To this end, a website has been c onstructed and we invite all Bahamians to participate. The w ebsite can be found at the following address http://qrade.speed-s urvey.com B efore we get too high and m ighty about being the boss, I w ould like to stress that we also have our part to play. Bahamia ns are often too complacent. We sit back and complain about what t he Members of Parliament are not doing, but we seldom takea ction. During elections, we attend rallies and congregate at c onstituency offices, we chat and rant and rave, and then as soon as elections are over we all sit back, watch, criticise, condemn, many of us begging MP’s for handouts, a sking them to pay our rent and light bills, find us government j obs, give us government contracts, get rid of crime, solve the p roblem of health care, bring the tourists here, develop agriculture, get rid of the illegal aliens whom we continue to employ and the list of expectations andd emands goes on and on..... and then we expect the 41 men and women in parliament to get it all done. While the 350,000 of us left, do nothing but sit and watch...andc ondemn. I t is clear that Bahamians are confused about where the power lies when we can make comments like “This Minister is no good b ecause he has no plan.” The question is, what is your plan!? Ministers of the government should be carrying out the peo-p le’s agenda! Not an agenda of t heir own! I was most impressed recently, when The Hon Branville McCartney actually posted a n otice to let constituents know what the discussion in the House was going to be about and then asked for their input! Now that ist rue representation! Many of us do not read the notices in the papers or attend constituency meetings, or town meetings, or any other event to s how our support or lack of sup port of anything. The majority ofu s even fail to try and work together in our own neighbourh oods. We complain about how w e haven’t seen our MP since election, when we ourselves have never visited the constituency office or shown up to any event t hat has organised for the constituency office, or volunteered our services for even one day! Surely we don’t expect the MP to visit 5000 voters every week!A nd don’t insist that he send his representatives because....we are the people he represents! We need to get up and help out! I f anyone or all of the 41 MP’s and Ministers are not performi ng, it is because the 350,000+ of u s left, have allowed it. They can o nly get away with what we let them. It takes all of us to make a d ifference, no matter which party is in power. T he purpose of the survey is not to bash or blame or criticise,b ut to get an honest opinion of h ow The Bahamian public feels a bout the performance of each o f the ministers whom we pay to work for us. T he comments and the grades will be sent to each of the minist ers, in an effort to get them to improve and make changes,b ased on the constructive criticism, and suggestions of their e mployers....we....the people! Thank you for your concern and willingness to participate as a citizen of this country. http://grade.speedsurvey.gzm BAHAMA VOICE N assau, May 19, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm EARLIER this month a letter writer to The Tribune criticised Prime Minister Ingraham for selecting a foreigner to head the soon to be established Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority (URCAr egulate government’s electronic communications policy. D uring the recent debate on the 2009 Communications Bill to provide communications s ervices preparatory to the sale of the Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC Mr Ingraham had said that although government hoped to staff the regulatory authority with Bahamians, they “had to be realists.” But we are realists,” he said, “and we also recognise that in this early phase we will ber equired to access talent that may not be available in the Bahamas.” G overnment, he said, had already identified this talent. The new policy director of URCA w ould be a foreigner. Mr Ingraham also expect ed that “some of the salaries paid to some of the professionals will be higher than what is normally paid in other areas in the Bahamas.” “Basically,” said the letter writer, what Mr I ngraham was telling his fellow countrymen was: “Bahamians you are too incompetent andu nqualified to set policy and/or regulate your own utilities and communications sector ha! t ake that like a swift kick to you know where!” The letter writer said, for example, that he had spent 12 years working at a major telecommunications company in the USA “in spe cialised areas, the last being negotiating international settlement rates between the telecommunications company and foreign telecommu n ications carriers saving monies” He did not say how many years ago it was that he had held s uch a position. Of course, what might have been then and what is now could be light years apart. What one could have done then, could not be done now with the rapid advancement in technology. Mr Ingraham’s statement is an insult to no Bahamian. However, it is a realistic assessment o f the present standard of local talent. Businesses especially international businesses w ill tell you that the present standard of our telecommunications system is one of the stumbling blocks to the advancement of e-commerce. BaTelCo (now BTC the local talent that it had. However, that local talent from a small archipelago of 300,000 souls has not had the opportunity of the needed exposure in the fast developing and changing telecommunications world of today. If we had had the talent of which the correspondent writes, then we would have had a better telecommunications service than we have now and there would be no need to sell BTC. The Bahamas has to move to the next level. If we do not want to repeat the tragedy of the Hatchet Bay farms in the 1970s, government will have to bring in foreign experts to train the next gen eration of Bahamians to replace them. The letter writer questioned whether the USA would have so insulted its citizens. It wasn ot so many years ago that the USA was complaining of a shortage of technical staff to keepi t the world leader in telecommunications and modern technology. It was not backward in i mporting the smartest brains India had to offer to fill the void. And when American business men felt that the unions were pricing themselves and their members out of the market, they had no crisis of conscience when theyd ecided to transfer their work overseas to be expertly handled by Asian workers. It is notu nusual for a person to call an American company for information, only to have the call and q uestion answered by a company in New Delhi. So the lack of talent in their own country is n ot going to hold back America in maintaining its position as a world leader. If they don’t have the talent, they will import it. And if local expertise is too expensive they will reach half across the world to employ people who offer more c ompetitive services. To say that the Bahamas is moving into the n ext generation of the telecommunications industry with a foreigner at the head, is no r eflection on the ability of Bahamians. There are many smart Bahamians, who with training will be able to prepare for the top jobs. But making decisions on the basis of nationalistic pride is foolhardy as the people left behind in Alice Town, Eleuthera will now tell you. Mind you when the Pindling administration decided to t ake over the once flourishing Hatchet Bay farms, drive out the foreign scientists and the t rained Bahamians who were not PLP, many Alice Town residents were delighted. They were delighted because they felt they would step into the vacant positions. However, as those who took over the farm had no experience, and the politicos in Nassau, who made the decisions. had even less, the Bahamian run farm was a c olossal failure. It soon shut down. The Alice Town residents now realise that if the foreign e rs had stayed and trained them, they might have indeed had what former prime minister Lynden Pindling promised the “greatest success story in the country’s history of agriculture.” Instead they have a ramshackle wasteland, not the promised “triumph of the human spirit”, but the folly of short-sighted, inexperienced politicians in a small country who put pride before commonsense. Fortunately, Mr Ingraham is a realist who is not willing to walk down that thorny path to oblivion. Bahamians will take their place in the sun when they accept that this can only be achieved with a better trained and more productive local work force. Grading our Ministers – an exercise in democracy LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Realistic approach is correct Our Nassau Office Will Be Closed On Thursday June 4th, 2009 For Our AnnualWe Will Re-Open For Business As Usual On Monday June 8th, 2009.We Apologize For Any Inconvenience Caused 2009 E DITOR, The Tribune . I have been following all of the letters in your paper regarding the capture of turtles in the Bahamas and I have to reply now. I am a conscientious conservationist but not a fanatic one. I want my grandchildren and their grand c hildren to be able to enjoy more of this Bahamas and what it has to offer than what I have enjoyed, a nd believe me that is plenty. I, and my wife much more than I, do not condone the ill treatment of a ny animal or living thing. As such I have spent the last 15 years taking my children and grandchildren on my boat for the entire month of August all through the islands and I have taught them that you do not kill anything unless y ou are going to make good use of it. To all of the people who are aginst turtles being c aptured by Bahamians for food, I say to them, "Get off their laurels and go out into the watersof the B ahamas and see for themselves as the fishermen from every island do, that there is absolutely no shortage of green turtles in the Bahamas." As a matter of fact there are more turtles in the Bahamas today than at any time during my life and I have been fishing and diving for the past 45 years, so the endangered argument goes out the window. Mr. Allen is very right in his thinking that Bahamians should not be deprived of a delicacy that God put there for them to enjoy. T he problem is the Ministry of Fisheries for years had a fish market on Potter's Cay and before that d own at the old fish market on Woodes Rogers Wharf where turtles were taken to be slaughtered in private where the public did not see it, therefore it did not create a problem which is now being complained about, that turtles are being ill treated. T he eating of turtle has been a part of the Bahamian diet for the 60 years that I have been a live and there is no legitimate reason for it now to be stopped. If cows, sheep or chickens were being s laughtered on Potters Cay or Montagu Ramp, then I guess we would soon not be able to eat anymore of them and then what is next? As I said I do not condone treating anything inhumanely, but if it is done properly and privately, t hen I see nothing wrong with it. There are thousands of Bahamians who love to e at turtle whenever they can and with today’s economic crisis it would be very unfair of the Ministry of F isheries or the Government to deprive them of being able to do this. If the persons who are against this do not want to eat turtle that is their God-given right, but by the same token do not stop other persons from being able to do so. I shall wait for the rebuttal which I know will come. ABNER PINDER Spanish Wells, May 26, 2009 No legitimate reason to stop eating of turtles

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n By MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net AN AIRPORT security chief is reportedly in serious condition following a shoot-i ng outside Asa H Pritchard in Robinson Road yesterday morning. Jerry Hutchinson, who The Tribune understands is genera l manager of security for the Airport Authority and a senior reserve police officer, was shot in the abdomenw hen collecting money from the grocery wholesalers at a round 6.30am. He was approached by an armed robber as he was leav-i ng Asa H Pritchard on the corner of Claridge Road with f unds to take for deposit. The gunman threatened him with a handgun andd emanded Mr Hutchinson hand over the cash. Assistant Superintendent Leon Bethel said there was a struggle between the two men and Mr Hutchinson was shot in the abdomen. The gunman grabbed the bag of cash, jumped into thed river’s seat of a white Honda, with registration number 111982, and sped off. Police said crime scene officers recovered evidence off irearms discharged outside A sa H Pritchard at the time. Appealing Asst Supt Bethel added: “We are appealing to the pub-l ic for help. “Some persons would have b een around at the time and we believe there are persons who may have seen what hap-p ened. “We are asking if they are able to assist us. The car would have been seen speeding away from t here and we would appreciate any information.” Asa H Pritchard bosses declined to comment on the robbery. Anyone who may have any information which may assist investigations should call Crime Stoppers urgently on 328-TIPS (8477 toll-free and answered in the United States to ensure total anonymity. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 5 R ATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, F LIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS PHONE: 327-6464WE SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!STRUCKUM(DF55 M INISTER OF YOUTH, SPORTS AND CULTURE D esmond Bannister (leftFIFA president yesterday at the Lynden Pindling International Airport.B ahamas Football Association president Anton Sealey made the introduction. Mr Blatter is in Nassau for the FIFA Congress 2009 w hich will be held June 2 and 3 at Atlantis, Paradise Island. FIFAPRESIDENTARRIVESINTHEBAHAMAS Airport security chief reportedly in serious condition after shooting n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter A MAN has been jailed for two years after being convicted of harbouring a man suspected of killing pastor Troy Seymour i n Grand Bahama three years ago. Solomon Young, 37, alias Marvin Gibson of Blue Hill Road south, was found guiltya nd convicted of the offence on T uesday by Magistrate Carolita Bethel. Young was accused of concealing the suspect between N ovember 13 and September 2007 with the purpose ofe nabling him to avoid lawful arrest. Father-of-three Mr Seym our, a Kentucky Fried Chick en employee, was robbed of $11,529 takings and killed on November 13, 2006. His death sent shockwaves t hroughout the Eight Mile Rock community in Grand Bahama. T he 37-year-old was reportedly run off the road in the H anna Hill area and then stabbed and chased into a near by house before being shot in the face. Mr Seymour, a resident of P inedale, was an associate pastor at Mt Zion Baptist Church i n Eight Mile Rock. Man jailed for harbouring suspected pastor killer A 14-YEAR-OLD Abaco b oy is in critical condition after h is head hit a concrete surface during a fight with another boy. The boy was airlifted from Marsh Harbour, Abaco, to Nas-s au for treatment, and is presently in critical condition in the Intensive Care Unit. Police say he was involved in a fight some time after 11pm on T uesday with another boy who he knew. Abaco Police have launched an investigation into the matter. A nyone with any information which may assist the police should call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-TIPS ( 8477). B oy critically h urt after head hits concreted uring fight In brief

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A number of prominent judges h ave been appointed the difficult task of selecting the next Miss Bahamas World from amongst the young women collectively known as the Earth Angels. I nternational and local experts from the fields of pageantry, beauty and fashion will spend three days this weekend selecting then ation’s newest beauty ambass ador. Noted fashion stylist, beauty expert and television personality Nol Marin heads the list of intern ational celebrities who will be judging the event. Nol served as a judge on the hit television reality series Ameri ca’s Next Top Model and has contributed as a fashion expert on numerous television shows and celebrity events such as the Academy Awards, the Golden Globe A wards and the Cannes Film Festival. His clientele includes Tommy Hilfiger, Tyra Banks, Iman, Hugh J ackman, Heidi Klum and Lenny Kravitz. He is a coach on the MTV hit show “Made”, and creative director for Canada’s Next Top Model. S tir Also judging is a young lady who created quite a stir in the 2 007 Miss Universe pageant. Flaviana Matata won the very first edition of the Miss Universe Tanzania pageant in 2007, and went on to represent her country in theM iss Universe pageant the same year, where she placed among the top 15 semifinalists in sixth place after the evening gown competit ion. She was the first contestant from Tanzania to compete at MissU niverse, and she did so with flair competing with a shaved head. Now based in South Africa, she is in high demand as a supermodel a cross the continent and in Europe. Serving as head judge is fashion d esigner and pageant expert Bobb y Ackbarali, who has worked in the international fashion and p ageant industries for nearly 30 years; achieving an unparalleled r ecord of success in his native Trinidad and Tobago beforem igrating to Toronto, Canada. F ormer Miss Bahamas Tasha Ramirez Cartharn has returned h ome to serve as a juror. She has been involved in pageantry for over 21 years, and won the titles of Miss Grand Bahama 1988 and M iss Bahamas 1988-1989, and competed in the 1989 Miss Universe Pageant held in Cancun, Mexico as well as the Miss Model of the World Competition held inT aipei, Taiwan in 1990. Brynda Knowles is an award winning fashion designer, makeup artist, and a four time Bahamia n Designer of the Year award winner. She has travelled extensively representing the Bahamas with the Ministry of Tourism. D r Gregory Neil is a much sought after cosmetic surgeon in the Bahamas. He is also the official cosmetic surgeon of the Miss B ahamas Organisation. Rounding out the panel is former Miss World Bahamas Latia Bowe-Duncombe, who was crowned in 2000 and representedt he Bahamas at Miss World in London that year. The judges will adjudicate the evening gown and talent competitions on Friday evening at the B ritish Colonial Hilton hotel. T hey will then meet the cont estants during one-one-one interv iews on Saturday. The Grand Finale will be held o n Sunday evening at the Rainforest Theatre when a new Miss B ahamas World will be crowned. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE '(6,*1 (1*,1((5,1* &203(7,7,9(,&,1* )$67%,'',1*,1)250$7,21 5RDGWR&LW\'XPSDIWHUUHPL[ (PDLOJJRQJRUD#FRUDOZDYHFRP .,'=&,7< 0RQWURVH$YHQXHDQG[IRUGWUHHWGRRUVRUWKRIXOWL'LVFRXQWf $11,9(56$5<6$/( 6DOHWDUWKLV)ULGD\D\QG t(QGVDWXUGD\D\WK %,* IN an effort to produce qualified Bahamian marinerst o fulfil the needs of the country’s domestic and international deep sea fleet, a new $5,000 scholarship programme has been intro-d uced. The programme, launched b y the Bahamas Technological Training and Allied Serv ices (BMTTAS the following courses: associates degree in m arine engineering – 18 months associates degree in marine transportation – 18 months BMTTAS would like to reiterate our commitment to f ight the unemployment problem in the country through the maritime indus-t ry. The Bahamas, as the third largest vessel registry in the world, can take advan-t age of this global opportunity. To gain employment o nboard ships, Bahamians must have specialised, skillsbased training to be competi-t ive in the international maritime industry,” said a s pokesperson for the organisation. BMTTAS noted that ships are now using highly sophisticated machinery and equipment, which has in turni ncreased wages and the demand for college gradua tes. The United Nations Conference on Trade and Devel-o pment (UNCTAD mates that the operation of merchant ships contributes a bout $380 billion in freight rates to the global economy. As of January 2008 the world trading fleet was made up of 50,525 ships andm anned by more than a mil lion seafarers of virtually every nationality. Scholarship programmet o produce qualified local mariners Star studded panel to choose new Miss Bahamas World In brief I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s Judges from worlds of fashion, pageantry and beauty to select new queen PAGEANTQUEEN: Kiara Sherman, who was crowned Miss Bahamas Universe 2009.

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n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribumemedia.net IN ADDITIONto touting his b udget as one which contains “no new taxes”, the Prime Minister told Parliament yesterday there would be cuts and reductions in import taxes levied on a variety of items ranging from books, to suitcases and condoms. Mr Ingraham said the rate adjustments were being carried o ut in response to “concerns that have been expressed” and to “increase the competitiveness” of struggling retailers who selli tems popular among tourists. He added that as government c ontinues its commitment to simplify Customs administration a nd make rate determinations “more transparent” it will this year be eliminating six more duty and excise tax rates “bym oving them, in all cases, to a l ower rate of duty or tax.” This follows government’s amalgamation effort in last year’s budget which saw the n umber of rates in the Tariff Act and the new Excise Act comb ined reduced by 6 to 23. Controversy brewed, however, w hen it was determined that in that effort a number of products had the tax levied on them rounded up rather than down among them, books, which went f rom being subject to a seven per cent stamp tax to a 10 perc ent excise tax. Priscilla Cartwright, office m anager at Logos bookstore yesterday said staff were “very happy” to see the tariff rate on books reduced to zero, as Mr Ingraham announced it would be come the start of the new budget year on July 1, 2009. Books had previously been subject to a seven per cent stamp duty, however in last year’s budg et retailers saw the tax rise to 10 per cent. “We’d have been happy if it went back to seven but if it is zero, that’s great!” said the man-a ger. The company had made its concerns known to government about the rate rise while doing a ll it could to try to keep their books at the same prices but had started to think it had no altern ative but to raise them. Now, however, she said she hopes this will not have to happen, keeping books more accessibly priced. A long with several different categories of books, toothpaste,d iapers and other “disposable undergarments” for infants and a dults, female sanitary napkins, condoms and other contracep tives are all having their tariff rate reduced to zero in the 2009/2010 fiscal year. A mong the “tourist” products, which will become less expen-s ive to import, having their excise tax rate reduced from 25 to 10 per cent, are perfumes and cases, including suitcases, trunks and brief cases. P roducts that will see a three per cent excise tax drop include k nitted and crocheted items such as jerseys, pullovers and cardig ans; tableware and other house hold items made of porcelain or china; glassware used for table, kitchen, toilet, office, indoor decoration or similar purposes made of crystal and photographic cameras and flashlight apparatus. Meanwhile, some items will s ee the rates levied on them “rationalised” and reduced to b ring them in line with that a pplied to similar products, said Mr Ingraham. C omputer monitors will now be free to import just as those i mported with computers are; printer parts and accessories wills ee their import duty rate fall f rom 45 to 10 per cent in line w ith that charged for printers; b lood pressure meters will be subject to a 25 per cent rate as a re glucose meters and salad dressing will see its rate reduced f rom 40 30 per cent “in line with the rate other sauces andm ixed seasonings.” “It is also proposed to modify t he Fourth Schedule of the Tar iff Act to once again provide exemptions for: materials used for the restoration and maintenance of historical buildings; m otor vessels and their engine and mechanical parts used for i nter-island service; and parts for temporary cruising vessels,” s aid Mr Ingraham. Noting that there would be “only a minor increase in one rate of tax” Mr Ingraham said there it is proposed that the duty o n items “imported temporarily” will rise from seven to 10 per c ent “for every three months the items are in the country.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 7 Tropical HeatUnlimited Mileage + CDW + Free UpgradeMidsize in Florida as low asUS$45Daily/ US$180 Weekly w hen using the upgrade coupon.Fullsize in Florida as low asU S$49Daily/ U S$205 Weekly w hen using the upgrade coupon. F orreservations,aswellastermsand conditionspleasecontactDestinations at(786245-0520orat1-800-468-3334. B esuretouseratecodeRC1 a nd c ouponcodeAU2253VLS w henmaking thereservation.Upgradeisonlyvalid o ncompactandintermediatecarson r entalsoftwoormoredays.Rates i ncludeunlimitedmileageandCDW. O ffervalidthroughJune30th2009. alamo.com PM: Import tax cuts on variety of items BUDGET 2009/10 IMPORT TAX H ubert Ingraham n MEXICO CITY MEXICOis reporting six more deaths from swine flu, bringing the country's toll to 89, according to A ssociated Press. The Health Department says that 4,910 people have been sickened nationwide. That number includes the 89 deaths. Two deathsw ere confirmed Tuesday and four more Wednesday. Mexico says its epidemic has largely subsided, but the confirmed t oll has been rising as scientists test a backlog of samples from patients. The department announced the new toll in a statement Wednesday. M exico reports six more swine flu deaths

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C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Prof. of Oncology The Hon. Prof. Arthur Porter PC, MD, MBA, FACR, FACRO, FRCPC Director General & CEO McGill University Health Centre Managing Director & Director of Radiation Oncology The Cancer CentreMonday, June 22, 2009Starting at 10amAt The Centreville Medical Pavilion 72 Collins AveTelephone: 502-9610Open to The PublicProf. of Medical OncologyProf. Karol Sikora MA, MB BChir, PhD, FRCR, FRCP, FFPM Dean of the University of Buckingham School of Medicine Director of Medical Oncology The Cancer CentreFriday, May 29, 2009Starting at 10amTHE CANCER CENTREannouncesThe Specialists Cancer Clinics n By TIMOTHY ZUNIGA-BROWN US Embassy Charg d’Affaires T O DAYwe celebrate women a round the globe for their extraordinary contributions in all areas of society – as professionals, as breadwinners, as caregivers and caretakers. But today we must also focus on the s tark reality that women suffer disproportionately from inadequate health services, including maternal health and family planning services, discrimination, the effects of war, and, at times, victimisation by harmful traditions. T he statistics are staggering: Several hundreds of thousands of girls and women are trafficked every yeara s illegal workers and/or forced into prostitution. A n estimated 100 million to 140 million women and girls undergo female genital mutilation/cutting – the act ofc utting, removing, or otherwise harming the female genital area, a major threat t o their health and well being. More than 530,000 women die in pregnancy or childbirth every year. T he vast majority of these deaths are avoidable with known, simple, and coste ffective health interventions. More than 200 million women in the developing world would prefer to post-p one their next pregnancy or not have more children, but are not allowed access to modern methods of contraception, leading to 52 million unin tended pregnancies and 22 million abort ions. Women and girls are disproportion ately affected by hunger, disease, and d eath. For example, in sub-Saharan Africa, a pproximately 58 per cent of all people living with HIV are female. In some countries, girls between the a ges of 15 and 19 have three to six times higher HIV prevalence than boys their a ge. Inaccessible medical care, poverty, and malnutrition cause at least 80,000w omen to suffer complications during pregnancy that include obstetric fistula. The consequences of this condition, when untreated, are life shattering. Many times the child dies, and them other has lifelong reproductive and urinary complications. Every year, 51 million girls are marr ied before their 18th birthday. Girls who marry as children are often m ore susceptible to the health risks associated with early sexual debut and childbearing, including HIV and obstet-r ic fistula. Lacking status and power, these girls are often subjected to d omestic violence, sexual abuse and social isolation. And early marriage almost always deprives girls of theire ducation or meaningful work, which perpetuates the cycle of poverty as well as gender inequality and sickness. D e spite these startling statistics we know that women around the world have an undying spirit, ares urmounting obstacles, and are committed to making their lives, their families’ lives, and their communities bet-t er. As President Obama said: “we must also recommit ourselves more broadly to ensuring that our daughtersh ave the same rights and opportunities as our sons: the chance to attain a world-class education; to have fulfill ing careers in any industry; to be treat ed fairly and paid equally for their w ork; and to have no limits on their dreams. That is what I want for women everywhere.” O n May 5, President Obama announced that his administration was c ommitted to spending $63 billion over six years to bring better health to peo p le around the globe. The President’s 2010 Budget focuses attention on b roader global health challenges, including child and maternal health, family planning, and neglected tropi-c al diseases, with cost effective interventions. It also provides robust funding f or HIV/AIDS and adopts an integrated approach to fighting diseases, improving health, and strengtheningh ealth systems. On behalf of the American people, I am proud to celebrate this year’s Inter n ational Day of Action for Women’s Health. In partnership with the people of the Bahamas, the US not only sup ports education for all girls and critical health and family planning services,i ncluding HIV/AIDS and reproductive health programmes, but also opposes violence and discrimination againstw omen. We will continue drawing inspi ration and strength from our partners a round the world – to work together to protect and improve the lives of every woman and child on this globe.F or in doing so, we will fulfill the great promise of prosperity and progress for all people, and for all nations. The International Day of Action for Women’s Health M M o o r r e e t t h h a a n n 5 5 3 3 0 0 , , 0 0 0 0 0 0 w w o o m m e e n n d d i i e e i i n n p p r r e e g g n n a a n n c c y y o o r r c c h h i i l l d d b b i i r r t t h h e e v v e e r r y y y y e e a a r r . . T T h h e e v v a a s s t t m m a a j j o o r r i i t t y y o o f f t t h h e e s s e e d d e e a a t t h h s s a a r r e e a a v v o o i i d d a a b b l l e e w w i i t t h h k k n n o o w w n n , , s s i i m m p p l l e e , , a a n n d d c c o o s s t t e e f f f f e e c c t t i i v v e e h h e e a a l l t t h h i i n n t t e e r r v v e e n n t t i i o o n n s s . . Timothy Z–iga-Brown n D AYTONA BEACH, Fla. PRESIDENTBarack Obama has declared Volusia County a major disaster area, freeing up mill ions of federal dollars to aid victims of the flood ravaged site, according to Associated Press. As much as 21 inches of rain d renched the area last week, causi ng an estimated $55.1 million in losses and damaging 1,500 structures. Gov. Charlie Crist surveyed t he damages Tuesday, watching as hundreds of victims lined up at two assistance centers seeking help. The president’s announcement W ednesday will assist victims with grants for temporary housing and home repairs and low-cost loans to cover uninsured property losses. I t will also include help for business owners recovering from the effects of the disaster. The weeklong rain also flooded two parts of the Daytona Beach International Speedway, though none of the water was on the track. O bama declares Volusia disaster area after floods

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n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A BUSINESS owner facing rising crime in the Carmichael area said his only hope for fighting criminals lies in the power oft he people. Etrich Bowe, 50, president of the Carmichael Business League, said piracy and corruption are so e ndemic in Bahamian society he has no faith in the police, the government or the judiciary to tackle escalating crime. Crime is higher in the C armichael area stretching from Baillou Hill Road east to Adelaide Village in south west New Providence, as several criminals l ive in the area and around 1,000 businesses are targets for thieves and armed robbers, Mr Bowe said. He runs Advanced Technical E nterprises in Mermaids Boulevard, off Carmichael Road, which h as been burgled every three to s ix months over the last four y ears or more. He said other businesses in the area have also b een burgled, or staff robbed at gunpoint, and one businessman w as shot on two occasions. The Carmichael Business L eague was set up in 2006 after b usinessman Keith Carey was g unned down on the steps of the B ank of the Bahamas in Tonique Darling Williams Highway, and M r Bowe is continually recruiting m embers to improve surveillance of criminals. He intends to install 16 CCTV cameras in the area but said heh as had little assistance from police who are understaffed, and therefore not only slow to assist, but also slow to crackdown on l ocal drug dens and criminals. M r Bowe said: “There is no monitoring, there is no police presence, the things that would deter crime are not there. We have drug houses and police know where they are and they don’t shut them down. There are things that we can do a nd we do not do. Crime is very serious in this country and both the PLP and the FNM have done nothing to convince many of us that they a re serious about stemming the flow of crime. “I have no confidence in the police, no confidence in the court system, and no confidence in thep olitical directorate.” T he government’s approach to crime fighting has also been publicly criticised this week by Bishop Simeon Hall, chair of the N ational Advisory Panel on crime under the Ministry of National Security, which was appointed in 2007 to examinec auses of crime and ways to miti gate it. Bishop Hall handed in the pane l’s final report including some 4 0 recommendations to the ministry in November last year, just months after as elect committee on crime was set up under Dr Bernard Nottage to examine the same p roblem, but he has n ot yet seen any action taken. “I am a little doubtful about what is the i ntention of these commissions because they never seem to get anywhere,” Bishop H all said. It’s something to placate the cries of the public, but we worked for one year and we want something to b ecome of it.” Meanwhile businesses in C armichael Road are being batt ered, according to Mr Bowe. He said: “It seems as if the governmentw ants to act to get on television or in the newspaper, but I know if the government used o ur resources properly t hey could impact crime. “They could even get more resources f rom us, but what we need from the government in a lot of instances is leadership a nd the cooperation of t he police.” Without action from authorities, Mr Bowe believes people will not have a choice but t o take on crime independently. He said: “I can foresee a lot m ore private police people b anding together to protect themselves or having groups to protect them, but we are heading down a very bad path. People will just have to decide what side they are on and going to have to deal with the situation, but the road we are heading d own is a road where revolution m ay not be a bad option. “The pirates have to go, commerce must be restored, and we need a system of justice. Not l aws, justice. “It’s a whole system and culture of corruption that we’re dealing with. We need to look at our w hole system and piece by piece fix it. “We will have to make some sacrifices but we have to introd uce justice in our society.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 9 Sporty meets sophistication.It all starts the moment you set eyes on the new Mercedes-Benz CLC Sports Coup. Expressive styling and visible dynamism appeal to the heart, the mind and the eye in equal measure. Its distinctive wedge shaped design exudes energy and the desire to be on the move at all times. Its agile sportiness coupled with a high standard of comfort makes this Sports Coup heads and shoulders above the rest. Anyone opting for a CLC buys far more than just a car. You own engineering excellence. Come into Tyreflex Star Motors and test drive a MercedesBenz CLC-Class today.OUR PARTS DEPARTMENT IS FULLY STOCKED WITH EVERY COMPONENT NECESSARY TO ENSURE THAT YOUR MERCEDES RUNS TROUBLE FREE. TRAINED TECHNICIANS ON DUTY.TYREFLEX STAR MOTORSCall us today for your new Mercedes-Benz CLC-Class at 325.4961Wulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas Fax: 323.4667 Business owner:people power is the only hope in crime fight GOVT’S approach to c rime fighting has also been criticised this week by Bishop Simeon Hall. n KEY WEST, Fla. A SHIPlast used by the U.S. Air Force to track missiles and spacecraft has been sunk in the Florida Keys, creating a new a rtificial reef for sport divers and anglers, according to Assoc iated Press. The Gen. Hoyt S. Vandenb erg sank in less than two minutes Wednesday morning, after demolition experts triggered a series of explosives that lined both sides of the ship. K ey West City Manager Jim Scholl says he believes the 1 7,000-ton, 523-foot-long ship settled on the bottom of the F lorida Keys National Marine Sanctuary in an upright posi tion, but he was awaiting confirmation from divers. WWII-era ship becomes sunken reef off Key West n HAVANA CUBAwill reinstate sex-change o perations previously banned on the island, President Raul Castro’s daughter Mariela said Wednesday. The Health Ministry authorized the operations last year, but noneh as been performed since. It was unclear when the surgeries would begin, according to Associated Press. Mariela Castro, a sexologist and g ay-rights advocate, announced the return of sex-change procedures in comments aired on state television. She runs the Center for Sex Education, which prepares transsexualsf or sex-change operations and has identified 19 transsexuals it deems ready to undergo the procedure. Castro also said she backs efforts t o allow lesbians to be artificially inseminated, a procedure currently barred. The first successful sex-change operation was performed on the island in 1988, but subsequent procedures were prohibited, Mariela Castro told an international congress on assisted reproduction meeti ng in Havana. Some Cubans protested the decision last year to allow the operat ions, either because of general opposition to the procedure or for its high costs for a developing count ry with economic problems. C astro’s daughter: Cuba to reinstate sex changes

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE $10.5 million," said Mr Ingraham. The news came as no surprise to several persons in the affected areas who spoke with The T ribune yesterday. P resident of the Bahamas U nion of Teachers (BUT Belinda Wilson said over the last few days the union, in anticipation of the cutbacks, had meetings with teachers throughout the country. The group came to a consensus to forgo a $3.2 million payment this fiscal year representing an $800 lump sum in payments due to public school teachers in response to the current economic conditions, s he said. " We want to be very cons cious of the people who are unemployed and losing their jobs and on short work weeks. So we're prepared to defer in good faith with the government at this time," said Ms Wilson. Those in the nursing community, who were expecting relief from pricey healthcare costs, are hopeful the anticipated health insurance will be delivered once the economy turns around. "I think most of the nurses are aware of the financial crisis and they would understand if its not included in the budget t his year but (hope c onsidered when the economy is back on track," said one 27y ear nursing veteran yesterday after the prime minister's announcement. "Right now (we forward to health benefits in terms of insurance because we have to pay like everybody else whether we go public or private. We work in a high risk environment and I think we are entitled to some benefits because we don't have anything because if we get sick we havet o lay up with the public ward, and if there are no beds you lay on a trolley like everyone else," said the nurse who is stationed at the Princess Margaret Hospital. During his address yesterday, Mr Ingraham said that in line with the growth projections, government expects gross domestic product (GDP rent dollars to be lower in upcoming fiscal year July 1, 2009 through June 30, 2010 than it was for the previous period, by some $78 million. To lessen the impact of this on the country's revenue, government plans to "redouble" its efforts in the upcoming fiscal year to collect the maximum amount of revenue due to it, he said, while also continuing to streamline revenue collections to facilitate the payment of tax es and fees. He estimated next year's recurrent expenditure at $1.53 billion $34 million more than the projected out-turn for the 2008/2009 fiscal years but $39 million less than projected for that year in the 2008/09 budget. The combination of revenue enhancements and expenditure restraint, Mr Ingraham said, will result in a lower recurrent deficit in 2009/2010 as compared to 2008/2009 $141 million compared to $186 million. When combined with capital expenditure of $255 million and debt redemption of $88 million, this is expected to produce a GFS deficit of $286 million, or 3.9 per cent of GDP in 2009/2010, down by 0.8 per cent from the 4.7 per cent ($352 million) projected outturn for 2008/2009, said Mr Ingraham. where the resting site of former World War II legion stalwart Audley Humes had been dese crated, and a girl had been buried inside his grave. Police who responded to the report and arrived on the scene around 6am used their trained dogs to find the body, which was dressed in pink and yellow plaid shorts and a black blouse. Visiting the girl’s former home, police reportedly discovered a bare back man sitting on the porch in an unresponsive and “dazed” state. He was taken into custody for questioning. Shenise’s murder marks the 31st murder recorded for the first five months of this year. This latest homicide will again raise concern about persons being released from Her Majesty’s Prison. Last week The Tribune revealed in an exclusive report that 153 persons, who were being held on bail, were released from prison in the month of April some charged with murder, rape, and armed robbery. Budget cutbacks F ROM page one FROM page one Girl murdered

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 11 T T H H E E C C L L E E A A R R I I N N G G B B A A N N K K S S A A S S S S O O C C I I A A T T I I O O N N W W h h i i t t M M o o n n d d a a y y H H o o l l i i d d a a y y B B a a n n k k i i n n g g H H o o u u r r s sMONDAY, JUNE 1, 2009 – CLOSED Normal Banking Hours resume TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 9:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. L L a a b b o o u u r r D D a a y y H H o o l l i i d d a a y y B B a a n n k k i i n n g g H H o o u u r r s sTHURSDAY, JUNE 4, 2009 – 9:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. FRIDAY, JUNE 5, 2009 – CLOSED Normal Banking Hours resume MONDAY, JUNE 8, 2009 9:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Participating Member Banks Bank of The Bahamas Limited Citibank, N.A. Commonwealth Bank Limited Fidelity Bank (Bahamas FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas Royal Bank of Canada Scotiabank (Bahamas THE Bahamas Humane Society has lots of orphaned kittens and are appealing tot he animal loving public to open up their hearts and homes to a cuddly ball off luff. "This is just the time of the y ear, I guess," BHS President Kim Aranha said. "We have lots of kittens (ins izes and colours looking for good homes. There are othe r times of the year where we only have one or two kittens at a time. " We try to find good lov ing homes for every healthy animal that is surrendered to us, but sometimes we real ly have to rely on others to h elp us make it happen. "Sometimes people plan to adopt in the summer because the kids are home from school, what we are hoping ist hat if people want to adopt that they will do so now," she added. I nterested persons can see the cats at BHS's headquar t ers in the Chippingham area or call the shelter at 3235138. B HS is a non profit organization that is run exclusively on donations from the gen eral public and profits from fund raising events. Persons interested in vol unteering at the BHS are invited to call the shelter for more information. n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORT – THE media was barred from covering a press conference called by second vice president of the Bahamas Hotel and Allied Workers Union Lionel Morley at Workers Housey esterday. W endy Pratt, an administrative official in the union’s Freeport office, and the niece of BHAWU Secretary GeneralL eo Douglas, told reporters to leave the union’s conference room. M rs Pratt told a ZNS reporter that a union boss had informed them in a letter that reporters are barred from thep roperty unless invited by Mr Douglas. As a result, Mr Morley and trustees I an Neely and Brian Collie spoke with the press outside the building. The Tribune attempted to reach Mrs P ratt, but was that she was out of office. Mr Morley, who is running for a union e xecutive position as part of Team Deliverance, said banning the press from Workers House is just one of manyi nstances in which the union has acted dictatorially. Although the injunction filed by Team Deliverance leader Kirk Wilson to blockt oday’s elections was lifted on Tuesday by the Supreme Court, the team is confident that justice will prevail on June 26w hen a judicial review in the matter is to be held. B y the end of the day, 6,000 members of the Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union will cast theirv otes to elect a new team of executives. F ive teams are vying for the reigns of the union – the Unity Team, the M T eam, the A Team, the Justice Team, and Team Deliverance. Me Wilson along with eight other e lected union executives have hit out at the current leadership of the BHCAWU, claiming that the proper rules and regulations were not followed when the nomination and election dates were set. H e was granted an injunction last Thursday staying the elections until such time as a judicial review in the matterh ad been heard. While the stay has been overturned, Mr Wilson believes the judic ial review will go forward, and that things will work out for Team Deliverance in the end. M r Morley, a candidate for first vice p resident, urged members to be cautious in casting their vote. Members are disheartened, confused and frustrated by what has been going on in the union,” he said. “But I urget hem to be strong and vigilant about their decision because it could have far reaching implications.” Media is barred from union press conference Reporters are told to leave BHAWU room Kittens looking for a good home

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S upreme Court rulings that prev ented Customs from conducting arbitrary audits of Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA In particular, he suggested the p roposed Customs Management Act amendment was an attempt to do an “end-around” former Supreme Court Justice Stanley M oore’s August 30, 20002, ruling i n the case brought against Customs by International Underwater Explorers Society (UNEXSO In his Budget address to the H ouse of Assembly, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said: “Thereis also an urgent need to clarify and bring certainty to the admini stration of the Hawksbill Creek A greement in the Port Area. “Accordingly, the Customs Management Act will be amended to put beyond doubt the powerso f Customs to protect the revenue of the Bahamas throughout our a rchipelago.” The amendment, a copy of which was obtained by Tribune Business, said the reason for the change was “to remove all doubtst hat the Comptroller is the person designated by the Minister to carry out the powers in clause 2 (4f of the Hawksbill Creek Agreem ent”. The actual amendment’s wording states that the Customs comptroller, his deputy or the assistant comptroller “be the person desig-n ated by the minister to carry out any and all powers” contained in that Hawksbill Creek Agreement clause. T he clause in question, as analysed by Tribune Business, gives a person designated by the minister “free access at all reasonable times” to any development p roject, business, company or commercial entity in the Port area, and access to all parts of their business, “for the purpose of ascertaining whether the several articles” admit-t ed duty-free under the Hawksbill Creek Agreement are being used for their stated purpose meaning in a licensee’s business, so that n o duty is payable on them. Mr Lowe told Tribune Business last night that the proposed amendment appeared to partly stem from Government’s despera-t ion to collect every cent in revenue it could lay its hands on. Customs has in the past believed i t is losing $150 million a year in revenue in Freeport, but Mr Lowep ointed out that the legislation was n ot necessary, as the existing Act g ives the Comptroller powers to i nvestigate businesses where he has reasonable ground to suspect a fraud is occurring. This, though, c annot be done arbitrarily. “Here we go again. More Hawksbill Creek stupidity,” Mr Lowe said. “Yet again, national leadership does not understandn ational agreements designed to develop the country. “It looks like another licensee is going to have to litigate again t o preserve the existence of all licensees, as the Government moves towards self-preservation. Typical. “We’re not going to take this l ying down, given the hundreds of thousands of dollars spent for this tax regime migration. It looks like more litigation is on the horizon for any bondedl icensee that wishes to preserve its o wn existence in this tough econ omic environment.” M r Lowe said the Government appeared to have charged ahead with its own planned reform witho ut consulting the private sector, despite the Grand Bahama Chamber and himself submitting numerous recommendations at the Ministry of Finance’s request o n how over-the-counter bonded goods sales operated, and the way forward for taxation in Freeport. T he Government, Mr Lowe added, was looking at the situation as one where it was losing revenue in Freeport and needed to get that back, yet it did not want tor epeal the Hawksbill Creek Agreement because of the likely impact on investor confidence. “I hope, in hiring these internat ional customs experts, he shares with them the reports prepared at the Ministry of Finance’s request with respect to the Hawksbill Creek Agreement and the Cus-t oms Management Act, and the operation of bonded goods sales and migration to a new tax regime,” Mr Lowe said. Maybe by sharing those they’d save the taxpayers a bit of money, because they’ve already been consulted on. In so far as I’m concerned, the Customs ManagementA ct and the Hawksbill Creek Agreement have never been in conflict. It’s the operators of both that have been in conflict because of government policy.” M r Lowe said that in relation to F reeport, revenue was not gove rnment’s to lose, as the Hawksbill C reek Agreement and its investment incentives had been designed t o aid national development. In his judgment, Justice Moore s aid UNEXSO had “sought relief aimed at preventing the Comp-t roller of Customs from entering and searching its premises, and a uditing it on the basis that the Comptroller’s sole or principal motivation in ordering and carrying out an audit was malicious and a lso unlawful.” On the audit question, Justice Moore found: “I am far from satisfied that the Comptroller, let alone Mr Sherick Martin, Super-i ntendent Bahamas Customs though he may be, can unilaterally clothe himself with the over-broad powers which he claims to enjoy, w hich are quite outside the law and, as far as he is concerned, beyond the ken of the Comptroller himself.” The judgment later found: “The C omptroller of Customs may not enter except by due process of law. Any form of non-consensual entry would be indefensible unless sanct ioned by law. The Customs Management Act provides an amplitude and sufficiency of powers to enable the Comptroller to enter premises for good and sufficientlyl awful reason, provided the stipulated preconditions are met. “Else oppression of the subject may take place, whether wittingly o r unwittingly, however lacking in malevolence the Comptroller’s actions may be, and however solicitous of the protection of the revenue... It follows, therefore, that the Comptroller, well meaning no doubt as he may have been, has eschewed the plenitude of powers open to him under the law, and o verreached into the realms of the u nlawful by devising the regime of t he audit, which is unknown to law a nd completely beyond the bounds of any statutory provision. With this vast array of powers... at his disposal, there was no n ecessity for the Comptroller to venture beyond the perimeters oft he law to devise a new strategy called ‘The Audit’ to achieve ends w hich could have amply been achieved within the existing law.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE .,1*6:$<$&$'(0< 7($&+(5$&$1&,(6 . LQJVZD\$FDGHP\+LJK6FKRROLVVHHNLQJ D SSOLFDQWVIRUWHDFKLQJSRVLWLRQVLQWKHIROORZLQJ DUHDV ,QIRUPDWLRQ7HFKQRORJ\ DWKHPDWLFV“K\VLFVXSWRWKH$GYDQFHG ODFHPHQW/HYHO SDQLVKXSWRWKH$GYDQFHGODFHPHQW/HYHO 7UDFNDQG)LHOG&RDFK RRGZRUN—HFKQLFD,'UDZLQJ $OODSSOLFDQWVVKRXOGKDYHWKHIROORZLQJ %HDERUQDJDLQ&KULVWLDQ $Q$FDGHPLFGHJUHHLQWKHDUHDRIVSHFLDOL]DWLRQ $7HDFKLQJ&HUWLFDWH ([FHOOHQW&RPPXQLFDWLRQNLOOV $ORYHIRUFKLOGUHQDQGOHDUQLQJ +LJKVWDQGDUGVRIPRUDOLW\ /HWWHUVRIDSSOLFDWLRQWRJHWKHUZLWKUHFHQW FRORUSKRWRJUDSKDQGGHWDLOHG&XUULFXOXP9LWD LQFOXGLQJWKHQDPHVDQGDGGUHVVHVRIDWOHDVW WKUHHUHIHUHQFHVRQHEHLQJWKHQDPHRIRQH FKXUFKPLQLVWHUf7KHVHVKRXOGEHIRUZDUGHG 7KH$FDGHP\$IIDLUVDQDJHU .LQJVZD\$FDGHP\%XVLQHVVIFH %HUQDUGRDG 1DVVDX '($'/,1()25$33/,&$7,21,6)5,'$< F ROM page one ‘Litigation likely’ over amendment to the Customs Management Act PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham and his Cabinet ministers making their way to the House of Assembly yesterday. Patrick Hanna /BIS

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 13 JIM Lawlor has been elected P resident of the Bahamas Hist orical Society. His election took place on A pril 29 at the society’s annual meeting. O ther officials elected were: Stephen Aranha – first vice president Dr Vernell Allen– second vice president David Cates – treasurer Vernita Johnson, recording secretary Joan Clarke – corresponding secretary Gail Saunders, John Knowles, Clarice Grainger, and B etty Cole, June Maura and Paul Aranha – trustees; Virginia Balance, Dawn Davies, Anne Lawlor, Beryl Strachan, Jamaal M iller and Shantell CampbellDames – management committ ee. I n his first newsletter Jim Lawlor said: "I will endeavour to b uild the membership, finances and the museum to a higher level. This coming year is the 50th anniversary of the society and Ia m hoping we can have a grand celebration in the fall. Suggest ions for the format and venue of the celebration are welcomed. “In addition, I would like to have a membership drive, and am asking each active member to r ecruit new members into the society. An undisclosed prize will b e given to the member who is most successful in this exercise. I w ould remind all that member ship fees are now due for the coming year. “Presently I am working along with our volunteers to keep the m useum open from 10am until 4pm each weekday. I would urge a ll members to try to identify peop le who might be interested in helping out at the museum.” M r Lawlor said he has been extremely pleased with the r esponse as they have added two more volunteers and had a goodr esponse to the membership drive. T he dates and topics for the May and June meetings are as follow: Thursday, May 28, 6pm – P rofessor Kenneth Startup of Williams Baptist College, AR: " 'This Small Act of Courtesy': Admiral Sir George Willes Wats on, Turmoil, Trials, and Trou ble in Bahama Waters." Thursday, June 25, at 6 pm Scott Sherouse, PhD: "The History of Sweeting's Cay, Grand B ahama" Jim Lawlor elected President of Bahamas Historical Society A COALITION has been formed to protect tourism in the Bahamas and Caribbean countries from the effects of climate change. S everal agencies, ministries and conservation groups were brought together on Tuesday by Oxford University and Caribsave, the Caribbean community cli-mate change cente’s partnership. Through Caribsave, the Bahamas and Jamaica will be used as pilot countries for efforts to protect the Caribbean from climate changes which could be costly to t ourism in the region. On a projected budget of $35 million over approximately five years, Caribsave will hold workshops and symposia that will assess vulnerabilities and ways to adapt to climate change throughout the Caribbean. “It’s a very important discussion about what we can do collectively to ensure that to the greatest degree p ossible, we put in place some policies and programmes that will help us to protect the resources that tourism as a business and as an industry very heavily relies on,” said Vernice Walkine, Director General of the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation. As a pilot country in the project, the Bahamas has the opportunity to get into early explorations of the practices that can be adopted to protect tourism, Ms Walkine explained. She said other countries also will b e added to the discussion and assessments. But the Bahamas has been considering climate change for many years, Ms Walkine also pointedo ut. Through the annual Weather Conference, established by Ministry of Tourism and Aviation, the B ahamian stakeholders have always been advised that the increasingly warmer temperatures seen in the Caribbean over the years would result in more frequent and more intense hurricanes. The conferenceh as also kept up guards for the loss of basic infrastructure and natural resources that could result from climate change and its effects. “Those are important considerations,” Ms Walkine said. “So we have talked a bout how we prepare ourselves to mitigate some of those types of impacts. But in terms of our ability to actually determine what are the appropriate measures to take, this programme is intended to help us identify what we literally can do.” Caribsave’s scope of research and strategy formulations will include rising sea level, coastal erosion and restoration of m angroves and sand dunes, said Dr Murray Simpson of Oxford University. “The Caribbean is the most tourismreliant region in the world and tourism in the Caribbean underpins national economies,” he said. “It underpins the livelihoods of communities here in the Caribbean. “And if we don’t protect and work with the tourism s ector and the other sectors that relate to the tourism sector to address climate change, then what we will be looking at are some serious threats to the economic development and the sustainable development of people living here.” Dr Simpson said the government of the Bahamas is working closely with the Caribsave partnership to develop practical strategies for counteracting the effects of climate change. What we need is information and strong data and analysis of the problems, the analysis of climate change so that we can define and design strategies thata re appropriate, practical and effective to deal with the climate change issues,” he said. D r Simpson said the Caribsave partnership is working with donor organisations and development banks to achieve the funding necessary to carry out its work. He said several Caribbean countries will benefit fromt he partnership as more funding becomes available. Bid to protect tourism from the effects of climate change DR MURRAY SIMPSON o f Oxford University

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which begins on July 1st, and the significant extent to which the global economic downturn disrupted proj ections made in the 2008/2009 budget, Mr Ingraham said his government is “pacing” itself financially to deal with the possibility that conditions may not improve soon or may “deteriorate further.” With poor economic conditions already severely restricting the funds it has access to the amount that c ame into the government’s coffers in the 2008/2009 budgetary period was ultimately $260 million, or 17 per cent, lower than had been anticipated the Prime Ministere xplained that his government must place emphasis on “maximising existing revenues” to fund the services it provides and maintain living stand ards currently enjoyed. “This requires a two-pronged approach: Modernising all aspects of revenue collection on the one hand and enhancing the efficiency of all aspects of current expenditure,” said Mr Ingraham, referring to how government is seeking to get its hands on more of the money o wed to it and more out of the smaller allocation of funds it will be making to its various departments and agencies this year. He said government is already focusing on how it can “recreate the fiscal headroom this crisis consumed” as the flexibility it provided will be as critical to the country’s economic health moving forward asi t has been in the present crisis, he s uggested. I n these regards, modernisation of the customs department, which is responsible for collecting more than 5 0 per cent of government revenue, i s “vitally important”; as it is to financ ial administration how public funds are disbursed to ensure it is d one in a manner as efficient and accountable as it should be. E mphasis will also be placed on the modernisation of public corporations, with privatisation a key part of this. “The financial resourcesr eleased from propping up these corp orations plus the proceeds of privatisation would provide very wel c ome relief to the Bahamian tax pay er,” he said. M eanwhile, changes to the real property tax act are expected to help the government collect overdue tax of this kind and ensure it improves the likelihood of receiving it on an ongo i ng basis. M r Ingraham said that Government Ministries, Departments and Agencies will be challenged to manage public resources within very s tringent budgetary conditions and m anagers will be called upon to identify areas where greater financial efficiency can be obtained. “The stark reality is that the s evere fiscal situation in which we find ourselves warrants that to be the case,” he said. Notwithstanding its efforts in this r egard, the Government is still set to b orrow $255 million to cover its expenses this year. This as the country’s deficit, after factoring in capital expenditure andd ebt redemption, ballooned to an “unsustainable” $352 million in the 2008/2009 budgetary period more than double what was projected w hen the budget for that year was p repared as demands for government services increased at the same time as its revenue fell. The Prime Minister told parliam ent that the global economy, the backdrop against which Bahamian economic challenges are set, is mired in the deepest recession in over sixt y years. T he International Monetary Fund predicted in April that global activity will fall by 1.3 per cent in 2009 down sharply even from its own pro-j ection in January. A recovery, when it happens, is likely to be weaker and much slowe r than in previous rebounds, he said. Meanwhile, The Bahamas’ prim ary trading partner, the United States, has not seen conditions improve to the extent that had been expected, with households hard hit by the recession, in conjunction withl arge financial losses and job losses causing consumer confidence to hitr ecord lows. Countries which are major trading p artners of the U.S. like The Bahamas including Mexico, Japan and Germany, have been hit especially hard, he noted. In the Bahamian economy, Mr I ngraham described how a weakening of the economy across all sect ors in 2008, precipitated by the glob al meltdown, has continued into the f irst quarter of 2009, with further declines in tourism, construction, real estate purchases and foreign direct investment. Expectations that activity in these a reas will continue to remain weak throughout 2009 means that further increases in the unemployment r ate are anticipated, said Mr Ingraham. The Prime Minister said his party has maintained a “strategic vision” since coming to office in 1992. By budgeting wisely, we created the fiscal headroom which is enabling The Bahamas to maintain its course through these deeply troubling times,” said Mr Ingraham. H e said he believes the Bahamian people and outside observers will for this reason commend his government and “continue to place their fullest confidence in my Govern-m ent’s ability to return The Bahamas to the path of social and economic progress temporarily interrupted by this crisis.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE )25(17)XOO\IXUQLVKHGWRZQKRXVHLQSULYDWHDUHDRQ (DVWHUQRDGQHDUEHDFK%HGURRPV :DVKURRP/DUJH.LWFKHQ%XUJODUEDUV $VNLQJSHUPRQWKIRUTXLFNUHQWDOVHULRXV LQTXLULHVRQO\SOHDVH m edical and annuity policies, as well as up to $300,000 of insurance coverage for life insurance policies, up to $100,000 of the accumulated value of annuity-gold retirement policies, and up to $ 100,000 of the accumulated value of annuitye xecutive flexible premium annuities. It will not apply to policies and annuities of directors and senior management of the company, or persons closely related to them, nor willi t apply to institutional or corporate policy holders or annuities. Government will also establish a Statutory Insurance Guarantee Fund to accommodate t he operational requirements necessary for the p roposed insurance guarantee and protect Bahamian policyholders in the event of an insurance company’s failure to engage in domestic insurance business, said the Prime Minister. PLP Senator Jerome Fitzgerald said he was “pleased” the Prime Mini ster’s statement addressed “some of the issues pertaining to the annuitants who had balances under $100,000” but said he felt the government’s statement was “still to a great extent woefully inadequate in addressing the concerns of a great many who have balances in excess of t hat.” H e said he would have liked to see more details about the Statutory Insurance Guarantee Fund. “I wish they had said when it was going to happen and what the terms a re going to be, but I think on the whole it still leaves a lot of questions unanswered. M eanwhile, he added that “Bahamian people still want to know how it all happened and who is responsible.” The Office of the Registrar of Insurance Companies found a gap between the assets and liabilities of Clico leaving a net liability of $42 million. There are realisable assets estimated at $85 million and adjusted lia b ilities of $127 million. Policy liabilities are estimated at $73 million and other liabilities $54 mill ion, and as policy liabilities have a first claim on all assets, Mr Ingraham said it is expected policy liabilities are fully covered. M r Ingraham said: “Many policyholders have expectations that day-today contractual obligations arising under the terms of their different policies should be honoured if they continue to keep such insurance policies in force, by virtue of the payment of their insurance premiums. “In order for this expectation on the part of policyholders to have any h ope of realisation it is necessary to sell that part of Clico’s insurance business relating to such policyholders liabilities to one or more active insur a nce companies with the capability of successfully managing the assets and servicing the liabilities.” C lico policyholder Bishop Simeon Hall said he is pleased the government will back policyholders. He said: “I expected no less from a government that has packaged itself as a government of trust and caring and so I expected the Prime Minister to come through as he did, and even as they do, somebody must be r eminded that it was under his watch that somebody fell down at the wheel and caused this Clico thing to come.” A 26-year-old policyholder said: “Whatever speeds the process along and ensures that the money we’ve already in the policies is worthwhile isg ood. “Since the Prime Minister encouraged policyholders to continue pay i ng premiums I think he had some kind of moral obligation to ensure that these policies were picked up by another company.” Mother Debra Strachan who has life and medical policies for her two sons, aged 21 and 26, and an annuity for one of her sons, is anxious for assets to be sold so she will be able to claim for her sons. H er 21-year-old boy, a university athlete, fell 15ft when doing a polevault recently and she was not able to claim. M s Strachan said: “The Prime Minister kept saying to keep paying, so we are holding on, hoping that it would come through, so we wouldn’t h ave to take our insurance somewhere else. “I would be pleased if someone would purchase the company and then we would be covered once again because right now I feel as if we are not covered. If someone was to die then what would happen?” Govt ‘making reforms’ F ROM page one $30 million govt guarantee FROM page one J erome Fitzgerald

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n By TOM WITHERS AP Sports Writer ORLANDO, Florida (AP As LeBron James pulled up for the final shot, Orlando’s crowd gasped, Magic coachS tan Van Gundy gulped and time stood still. Spinning through the air, James’ 3-pointer looked good. Not this time, MVP. This was a Magic night. Dwight Howard scored 10 points in overtime and Orlando, r aining down 3-pointers like a Florida thunderstorm, withstood 44 points and the last-seco nd fling by James for a 116114 victory over the Cleveland Cavaliers on Tuesday night to take a 3-1 lead in the EasternC onference finals. The resilient Magic, who have overcome injuries, double-digit deficits and a spatb etween their star and coach, a re one win from their first trip to the NBA finals since 1995. “You can almost taste it,” said Orlando’s Rafer Alston, who scored 26 points. “We’veg ot to win one more game and i t’s not going to be easy.” The Magic, who won a Game 7 in Boston in the last round, can close out the Cavaliers in Cleveland on Thursday night. H oward finished with 27 p oints, 14 rebounds and again made his free throws 7 of 9 and the Magic made a team playoff record 17 3-pointers. Rashard Lewis and Mickael Pietrus had 17 points each forO rlando. “We just have to keep fighting,” Howard said. “We have an excellent opportunity inf ront of us. We can’t think that anything’s going to be easy. As a team, we believe that anytime we step on the floor and play o ur brand of basketball we can win.” J ames added 12 rebounds and seven assists, but he had e ight turnovers for the Cavs, whose season of seasons is slipp ing away. After Lewis made one of two f ree throws with 3.2 seconds left to give the Magic the 116-114 lead, the Cavs had one last chance. E very person inside Amway Arena and millions watching on TV knew who was going toget the ball James, who saved the Cavaliers with a 3pointer at the final horn in Game 2. He was double-teamed on the inbounds pass but still man aged to get free. Dribbling intot he frontcourt, James rose from 35 feet, and with a clean look at t he basket, sent his shot toward the rim. W hen it fell short, Van Gundy could finally exhale. “With LeBron James on the court, doesn’t 3.2 seconds seeml ike two minutes?” he asked. “We had two guys on him andh e made a move like a tight end, caught the ball and still got o ff a reasonable shot. This guy is unbelievable.” James said the ball felt good leaving his hand. I always feel I can make any shot I take,” he said. “I was justh oping I could make one more.” James, who played the entire second half and overtime, hass cored more than 40 in three games in the series. Cleveland is0 -3 in them. Mo Williams, who guaran t eed the Cavs would win Game 4 and the series, scored 18 points, none after the third quarter. Delonte West added 1 7 for the Cavaliers. Following the game, Magic f ans chanted “One more win.” History is on the Magic’s side heading into Game 5. Teams with a 3-1 lead are a staggering1 82-8 in series dating to 1947. “We’re not happy with just w inning a few games in the Eastern Conference finals,” H oward said. “We want to win the whole thing.” Lewis’ catch-and-shoot 3pointer on an inbounds play w ith 4.1 seconds left in regulation gave the Magic, whoa ttempted 38 3s, a 100-98 lead. Cleveland set up a clear-out play for James, who drove the right side and was tripped int he lane by Pietrus with .5 sec onds to play. J ames swished his first free throw attempt, and then after a l ong delay, he made his second, which danced on the rim before falling through. James said he never considered taking a 3pointer. “If I was Rashard Lewis we would have won,” James said, smiling. Orlando called a timeout and tried a lob play for Howard, who was ridden out under the basket by Anderson Varejao. Both players tumbled out of bounds, and although there was enough contact for the officials to call two or three fouls, there was no whistle. Howard screamed in protest, pleading his case to anyone who would listen. “Are you serious?” Howard said, turning to the media sec tion. “If that was LeBron ... “ Howard took over in overtime. He dunked the first two times he touched it, shaking the backboard each time and Orlando opened what looked to be an insurmountable sixpoint lead with 1:11 left on his tip-in. James wasn’t done. He made a left-handed scoop, two free throws and an are-you-kidding-me 3 while falling into Orlando’s bench with 4.6 seconds to go. The Cavs put Lewis on the line, and when he short-armed his first free throw, they had life. James couldn’t repeat his Game 2 miracle and must now hope the Cavs can regroup at home, where they are 43-3 this season. Howard picked up his sixth technical foul for taunting Varejao after a layup in the fourth quarter. Cleveland’s forward had draped his arms around Howard in a failed attempt to stop him from scoring, but Howard muscled in his shot before getting his T. He’ll have to behave himself from here out. A seventh technical would earn him an auto matic 1-game suspension in the playoffs. “I might have to get some duct tape,” Howard said. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 16, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS n By The Associated Press S S C C O O R R E E B B O O A A R R D D Thursday, May 28 Orlando at Cleveland (8:30pm EDT can close out the Eastern Conference final by beating the Cavaliers, who trail the series 3-1 after having the best record in the NBA this season. Cleveland swept its first two playoff series. S S T T A A R R S S Tuesday Dwight Howard, Magic, scored 10 points in overtime, finishing with 27 points to go with 14 rebounds as Orlando won Game 4 of the Eastern Conference final over visiting Cleveland 116-114 to take a 3-1 lead in the series. Rafer Alston and Hedo Turkoglu, Magic. Alston added 26 points and Turkoglu had 15 points, seven rebounds and eight assists for Orlando, which will try to close out the series in Cleveland on Thursday. S S T T R R O O N N G G I I N N D D E E F F E E A A T T LeBron James had 44 points, 12 rebounds and seven assists, but Cleveland lost to Orlando 116-114 in OT in Game 4 of the Eastern Conference finals. Orlando leads the series 3-1. James has scored at least 40 points in all three Cleveland defeats in the series. S S T T A A T T S S History is on the Magic’s side heading into Game 5 of the Eastern Conference final at Cleveland. Teams with a 31 lead are a staggering 182-8 in series dating to 1947 ... The Cavaliers are 43-3 at home this season, but just 1-1 in this series. R R A A I I N N I I N N G G 3 3 S S The Orlando Magic made a team playoff-record 17 3pointers, 11 after halftime, in their 116-114 overtime victory against Cleveland. Rafer Alston hit 6 of 12 and Mickael Pietrus made 5 of 11 3-pointers. L L O O N N G G W W A A I I T T O rlando can make its first f inal since being swept in 1995 by Houston if it wins one more game against Cleveland in the Eastern Conference final. The Magic took a 3-1 lead over the Cavaliers with their 116-114 overtime win. F F I I N N E E D D The NBA fined Lakers coach Phil Jackson and the team $25,000 on Tuesday for his post-game comments on the officiating in Game 4, which the Lakers lost at Denver to tie the Western Con ference final 2-2. Jackson was angry with the free throw discrepancy Denver’s 49 attempts were 14 more than the Lakers and accused the Nuggets’ Dahntay Jones of a dirty play for tripping Kobe Bryant. Jackson was also upset by a flurry of fouls called against Luke Walton. The league assessed Jones, Denver’s defensive specialist, a flagrant-1 foul for sending the Lakers’ star sprawling through the lane. K K G G S S S S U U R R G G E E R R Y Y Kevin Garnett had surgery on his right knee after miss ing all of the playoffs. The Boston Celtics’ star and inspirational leader had bone spurs removed during the arthroscopic surgery. S S P P E E A A K K I I N N G G “You can almost taste it. We’ve got to win one more game and it’s not going to be easy.” Orlando’s Rafer Alston, who scored 26 points in a 116114 overtime victory that gave the Magic a 3-1 lead over Cleveland in the Eastern Conference final “The guy’s out there chirping and talking and all that kind of stuff. They were, all of them, doing a little more talking than usual. But as long as none of them put their hands on me, I’m cool.” Magic guard Anthony Johnson on Cleveland guard Mo Williams’ victory guarantee. Orlando beat the Cavaliers 116-114 in OT in Game 4 of the Eastern Conference final and leads 3-1 NBA Today Howard leads Magic to 116-114 OT win over Cavs F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s LeBRON JAMES gets tangled up with Dwight Howard as he goes up for a shot in the fourth quarter i n the overtime of Game 4 of the Eastern Conference finals in Orlando Tuesday night... (AP Photo: John Raoux

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 17 n By CHRIS LEHOURITES AP Sports Writer PARIS (AP pova struggled again in her Grand Slam tournament comeback at the French Open, need ing three sets and a few extra games to reach the third round with a 6-2, 1-6, 8-6 victory over Nadia Petrova on Wednesday. Playing with tape on her troublesome right shoulder, the unseeded Sharapova hung on to join top-seeded Dinara Safi na and defending champion Ana Ivanovic in the next round. "Obviously I am spending a little bit more time out there than I want to, but I think I'm learning so many new things, as well," Sharapova said. "I think this was a great match where I had to fight my way through many, many challenges. And I did." On the men's side, four-time defending champion Rafael Nadal and third-seeded Andy Murray advanced to the third round. Nadal, attempting to become the first to win five straight French Open titles, extended his French Open record to 30-0 by beating Teimuraz Gabashvili of Russia 6-1, 6-4, 6-2. "So what?" Nadal said of his accomplishment. "(I'm for the record, but in the end happy for the result." Murray defeated Potito Starace of Italy 6-3, 2-6, 7-5, 6-4. Sharapova, a three-time Grand Slam champion who has slipped to No. 102 in the rankings because of her injury layoff,won five straight games to close out the first set. Trailing 4-2 in the deciding set, she broke the 11th-seeded Petrova to get back on serve at 4-4, and then saved two break points to take a 5-4 lead. She saved another break point while serving at 6-6. "I got off to a really good start," Sharapova said. "I kind of started stumbling away. Things went in the wrong direc tion. I was just glad I could pick myself up and keep fighting and do the right things, and end the match with a win." Sharapova is making her first Grand Slam appearance in almost a year after missing both the U.S. Open and the Australian Open because of her shoulder injury. She had surgery in October. Safina easily beat 18-year-old Russian qualifier Vitalia Diatchenko 6-1, 6-1, and Ivanovic defeated Tamarine Tanasugarn of Thailand 6-1, 62. Safina took a 5-0 lead to open the match, stretching her streak to 17 straight games after winning 6-0, 6-0 in the first round. "Pretty good start for the tournament," said Safina, who lost in the Australian Open final and was the runner-up at Roland Garros last year. "I just played a good game today, good enough to win." Ivanovic looked more com fortable on court after struggling in her opening match. The eighth-seeded Ivanovic broke the 32-year-old Tanasugarn twice in the first set and three times in the second. "I just want to sort of get my way through the rounds and just feel more comfortable match after match," Ivanovic said. "Today I think I served some aces, which gave me some confidence in my serve, and that's something I've been working on." The 21-year-old Serb finished with three aces. No. 9 Victoria Azarenka of Belarus also made it through, while No. 21 Alize Cornet of France reached the second round. No. 15 Zheng Jie of China lost. The top-seeded Nadal has never lost at Roland Garros, and his 30th straight win on the tournament's red clay gives him the record for most consecutive wins. Nadal was forced to save three break points in the first game of the match. He only had to save one more the rest of the way, winning in straight sets for the second match in a row. Murray trailed 5-1 in the third set but broke Starace three straight times to win. "On clay, there's always time for you to get sort of back into the match and find your game, even if you're struggling," Murray said. Murray also reached the third round at Roland Garros last year but lost to Nicolas Alma gro in four sets. In his only other appearance at the French Open, in 2006, he lost in the first round. No. 7 Gilles Simon of France, No. 8 Fernando Verdasco of Spain, No. 12 Fernando Gonzalez of Chile and No. 13 Marin Cilic of Croatia also advanced, but French veteran Fabrice Santoro played his last match at Roland Garros. Santoro, who has made a record 67 Grand Slam appearances, lost in the first round of this year's French Open his record-tying 20th to Christophe Rochus of Belgium 6-3, 6-1, 3-6, 6-4. "Twenty years. That counts for something in a lifetime," Santoro said. "It has been a long road, a fantastic career. I had a lot of fun and learned a lot." Santoro and Rochus started their match Tuesday, but it was suspended by darkness with the Belgian leading 5-3 in the fourth set. The pair came back out onto the court after Safina's win and played only eight minutes. No. 21 Dmitry Tursunov of Russia and No. 28 Feliciano Lopez of Spain also lost. Sharapova joins Safina and Ivanovic in the third round SHARAPOVA returns the ball to compatriot Nadia Petrova during their second round match at the Roland Garros stadium in Paris on Wednesday... (AP Photo: Bernat Armangue n By ROBERT MILLWARD AP Football Writer R OME (AP ed goal by Lionel Messi helped Barcelona beat Manchester United 2-0 in the Champions League final on Wednesday, giving the Spanish side its third European Cup title and thirdt rophy in a magical season. Samuel Eto’o put the Spanish champions ahead in the 10th minute and Messi's 70th-minute goal his ninth in the Champions League this season sealed the victory over thed efending champions at the Stadio Olimpico. The triumph completed a sweep of titles for 38-year-old Barcelona coach Pep Guardiola in his first season, after wins in the Spanish league and cup. The former Barcelona star, who started as a ball boy at Camp Nou, now joins the ranks of those who have won the title both as a player and a coach. G uardiola became the youngest coach to win European soccer's top club competition since the European Cup became the Champions League in 1993. Barcelona also won the trophy in 1992 and 2006. " No team has ever done the treble in Spain, and we'll be remembered as the first team to do it," Barcelona striker Thierry Henry said. "That's amazing." United had been chasing its f ourth European Cup title, and fourth trophy this season after winning the Premier League, FIFA Club World Cup and League Cup. But United was thoroughly outplayed by the Spanish side as M essi scored his 38th goal of an amazing year for Barcelona, which has 53 league and cup goals this season. Xavi floated a diagonal ball into the United area to find Messi unmarked, and the 5foot-7 (1.69 m er renowned for his deft dribbling and shooting used his head to loop the ball over United goalkeeper Edwin Van der Sar and into the net. Messi set off colorful celebrations at one end of the stadium, filled with 62,467 fans, and left English fans in silence. The loss left Man United manager Alex Ferguson at 25 titles in 23 seasons. He failed to match Liverpool's Bob Paisley's three titles in the competition. "We started the game brightl y. We were confident and we could have been in front," Ferguson said. "We had the ball but didn't use it very well. ... We defended fantastically all season but they were two shoddy goals. "We didn't play as well as we can, but they are a good team. We have to give them credit. Xavi (Hernandez (Andres ball all night. They made it very difficult." South Korean winger Park Jisung became the first Asian to play in a Champions Leaguef inal. He almost scored for United in the opening minute but his shot was deflected wide after Cristiano Ronaldo's free kick had been blocked by the goalkeeper. It was the nearest United came to scoring all n ight. The victory also marked the first Champions League title for Henry, the French striker who was on the losing side when Arsenal lost to Barcelona in 2006. "Finally, I've been waiting for so long to get this title and now finally today," said Henry, who had been doubtful for the final because of a knee injury. "The l ast five minutes were the longest of my life." United almost went ahead in the opening minute when a needless foul by Yaya Toure on Anderson handed Ronaldo an early free kick. His powerfuld rive was blocked by the hands of goalkeeper Victor Valdes and Park's rebound was deflected for a corner by Gerard Pique. With Barcelona's dangerous forwards barely getting a touch of the ball in the early stages, there was little danger at the other end until the Spanish champions went ahead with their first attack of the game. I niesta started the move with a break through midfield and found Eto'o on the right. The striker cut inside a weak tackle by Nemanja Vidic and poked a low angled shot past Van de Sar. The goal changed the pattern of the play with Barcelona's stars settling into their confi-d ent style of interpassing. United, now chasing the game, was unable to create any real danger. Ronaldo wanted to shoot at every opportunity, but fired wide and headed over. Seeing his title slipping away, F erguson reshaped his attack for the second half. The 67-year-old Scot took off midfielder Anderson and sent on Carlos Tevez, the Argentina striker who is convinced he's leaving the club because United w on't turn his loan deal into a full term transfer. That left United under manned in midfield and Barcelona continued to create openings. Ferguson made another change when he took off Park and sent on Dimitar Berbatov. Barcelona could have added more but Van der Sar saved twice from Carles Puyol and Ronaldo was shown the yellow card for some petulant late chal lenges on the Barcelona captain. Barcelona defeats Manchester United 2-0 in Champions final BARCELONA COACH Pep Guardiola is thrown in the air in celebration at the end of the UEFA Champions League final between Man United and Barcelona in Rome Wednesday. (TOP RIGHT Messi holds the trophy at the end of the match... (AP Photos: Alessandra Tarantino

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THE success of the men’s national volleyball team at the 2010 World Championships NORCEA’S Qualifying Round should drive home a point that has been emphasized for quite some time. We have to find a way to provide more funding for sports, particularly team sports. While welcoming the team home from Jamaica on Tuesday, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister said that while the team was not quite sure if they would have been able to travel up to the eleventh hour because of the lack of funding, they did manage to go and they represented the country very well. While he pledged his government's commitment to the Bahamas Volleyball Federation, headed by Don Cornish, Bannister said it's just as vital to get corporate Bahamas on board. " As you build on this succ ess, I want everybody in the c ountry to appreciate that you need the financial support, even in difficult times," he charged. Indicating that the young men are doing everything that is positive, Bannister said as they are enjoying their success, now is a good time for the country to rally behind them and assist their efforts financially. Considering that it is one of the core sports in the country, volleyball has actually seen a decline in its participation withm ore potential players opting to play basketball and compete in track and field. But with the performance of this team, which earned the rights to advance to the third qualifying round in August in Cuba, the federation obviously has its work cut out for the members. Not only do they have to f ind the funding to make that trip to Cuba, but the federation is looking at going to a training camp in Santo Domingo and they are also looking at engaging the ser vices of a coach from Cuba. A ll of that takes money. A dditionally, the women's national team is scheduled to go to Barbados on June 9 to play in their qualifying round for the World Championships. With just about two weeks before the women travel, the federation should be riding the momentum from the men as they start knocking on the doors of corporate Bahamas for their support. Like the men, the federation is expected to put together a good crop of players that will include the best local ones and those returning home from college. So there chances of succeeding should be just as great as the men’s. Normally, corporate Bahamas will be willing to throw their support behind an individual athlete, but for too long, little or no emphasis has been placed on team sports and that should change. The government, in its new budget that is being debated in the House of Assembly, is going through a tremendous challenge, which would mean that there will definitely be some significant cuts in funding that is provided for sports. So like all of the other sporting bodies, the federation will h ave a task to ensure that the B ahamas continues on the p ath that the men have paved as they look ahead at qualifying for the prestigious World Championships and eventually the Olympic Games in 2012. The latter may pose more of a challenge for the federation, but if any of the teams can achieve the former, it will further indicate the need for a sustainable fund-raising programme because there will be the need for more involve ment in training camps to prepare the team(s If we're not going to intro d uce the National Lottery, then we need to find a way to help support our various sporting bodies, especially in these tough economic times when just about everybody will be looking for funding to assist with their disciplines. T T R R A A C C K K A A N N D D F F I I E E L L D D I I N N S S A A M M E E B B O O A A T T So far this year, the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations has seen quite a number of significant performances as the IAAF World Championships in Berlin, Germany, draws near. Minister Bannister has started a personal campaign highlighting the performances on Facebook and he has gotten quite a number of responses from Bahamians who have indicated that they are just as delighted about what they have seen. Kermit Romer, a die hard Bahamian sports enthusiast now residing in New York, put it quite aptly when he wrote: "For whatever reasons, the powers that be cannot agree on funding for sports so maybe we (John Q Public p art. If we (300,000 plus peop le) were to donate $1 a week u ntil the upcoming World Games and for once give them more than what they need." Like volleyball, track and field athletes will also probably be heading to a training camp before they go to the World Championships and that is going to take a lot of funding for them to achieve their goal. So while we relish in the performances turned in so far by our athletes, we have to be prepared to lend our support financially to ensure that theya re put in a better position to just go out and represent their country and not have to worry about how they will get to their destination. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 18, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS T yson f amily asks for privacy after tot’s death n By JONATHAN J COOPER Associated Press Writer PHOENIX (AP d eath of Mike Tyson’s 4-yearold daughter in a bizarre accident adds an awful chapter to the boxer’s troubled life. E xodus Tyson died at a hospital Tuesday, a day after her neck apparently got caught in a cord dangling from a treadmill at her Phoenix home, police said. Police said Exodus either slipped or put her head in the loop of a cord hanging under the console and suffocated. She was pronounced dead just before noon after being on life support, said police Sgt. Andy Hill, who called the injury a “tragic accident.” “There are no words to describe the tragic loss of our beloved Exodus,” the family said in a statement. “We ask you now to please respect our need at this very difficult time for privacy to grieve and try to help each other heal.” Tyson, who has been living in Las Vegas, flew Monday to Phoenix, where he was seen entering the hospital. The modest house where his daughter was injured contrasts starkly with the lavish lifestyle Tyson had through his tumultuous years of boxing, when he spent tens of millions of dollars and says he had millions more stolen from him by unscrupulous associates. During two years at the height of his career, he earned $140 mil lion but he filed for Chapter 11 protection in U.S. Bankrupt cy Court in 2003. He has been promoting a new documentary about his life and told The New York Times earli er this month he had been sober for 15 months after years of drug and alcohol abuse. “I don’t know who I am,” he told the newspaper. “That might sound stupid. I really have no idea. All my life I’ve been drinking and drugging and partying, and all of a sudden this comes to a stop.” Tyson first began boxing in a facility for juvenile delinquents in upstate New York at the age of 12. Eight years later, he became the youngest heavyweight champion ever when he knocked out Trevor Berbick in 1986. But in 1990, he was defeat ed by James “Buster” Douglas in one of the biggest upsets in boxing history, and soon after was convicted of raping a beauty pageant contestant in Indianapolis. Tyson, who still denies he raped the woman, served three years in prison. A few years later, he served three months in jail for beating up two men after a minor car crash in suburban Washington. As his career continued, so d id his bizarre behavior. He bit off a piece of Evander Holy f ield’s ear during a boxing match and once threatened to eat the children of heavyweight champion Lennox Lewis. A lthough Tyson’s children had lived in their unassuming neighborhood for several years, he purchased a separate home in the Tony Phoenix suburb of Paradise Valley in 2005 for $2.1 million, selling it two years later for $2.3 million. In November 2007, Tyson spent 24 hours in Maricopa County’s “Tent City” jail after pleading guilty to one count of cocaine possession and one misdemeanor count of driving under the influence. Police found the drug when they pulled over Tyson’s car after he left a Scottsdale night club. According to police, Tyson said after his arrest that he bought cocaine “whenever I can get my hands on it.” At Tyson’s sentencing hearing, nearly a year after the arrest, his attorney David Chesnoff said his client had taken 29 drug tests without a relapse and was attending Alcoholic Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous meetings. Tyson had become an example of how a person overcomes problems with drugs, a violent past and poor upbringing, Ches noff said. “He’s tried his hardest,” his attorney said, “despite coming from almost impossible beginnings.” Associated Press writers Bob Baum and Terry Tang contributed to this report AFTER training all year, athletes from the islands of Abaco, Grand Bahama, New Providence and Long Island are rearing up for their opportunity to win medals at this year’s National Special Olympics Games. More than 250 athletes are expected to compete in various sports in the capital this weekend, and the organisers are confident that the event will be the best ever. At 9am Friday, they are slated to compete in swimming and judo at the Betty Kelly Kenning swim complex. And on Saturday at the Thomas A Robinson Stadium, following the opening ceremony at 9:30am, athletes will show off their skills in bocce and track and field. Roosevelt Thompson, national director of Special Olympics Bahamas, reports that athletes from the sub-programmes in the islands have trained all year for this event. And they are anxious to compete. As there are no international games this year, this will be the highlight of their training. The increased number of coaches certified this year guarantees that the quality of their performances should surpass the high level demonstrated in the past. With the programme producing more athletes, the competition should be exciting, and the public is invited to witness an inspiring display of courage and determination by the participants. Basil Christie, national chairman, expressed his appreciation to the many sponsors and sup porters of the national programme. He also encourages everybody to come out and cheer for the athletes. The coaches and volunteers have worked hard and he is confident that spectators will be proud of the results of their efforts. Special Olympics: More than 250 athletes set to compete at ‘largest national games ever’ We must find a way to provide more funding for sports OPINION STUBBS S PECIAL OLYMPICS j udo participants MIKE TYSON (AP Beach resort. His first title defense came a year later against Anibal Acevedo where he scored a seventh round knockout and his most recent title defense came in a second round knockout against Senette. Both fighters are 4-2 in their last six bouts and the 36-year-old Cayetano, like Mackey, comes into the bout with wins in his last two appearances. Cayetano defeated Nelsido Miguel via a second round TKO in March of this year and Manuel Florian by unanimous decision in the sixth round in 2008. Both Mackey and Cayetano have suffered their latest loss at the hands of Germany’s Karo Murat. Mackey lost by unanimous decision in an eight rounder, while the Dominican fighter fell by TKO in the seventh round. In his five-year professional career, Mackey has never lost a fight at home while Cayetano has yet to win a professional fight outside of the Dominican Republic. Also featured on the undercard will be Bahamian heavyweight contender Jerry Butler. This scheduled fight is an eight round bout against Michael Santiago of the Dominican Republic. And there will be three four-round bouts, including a match between Bahamian female boxer Kelly “Tiger” Farquharson (she will be making her pro-debut) and an unspecified opponent. M M A A C C K K E E Y Y , , f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e 1 1 9 9

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C M Y K C M Y K THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 19 P AGE 17 Barcelona defeats Man United in Champions final ... H oward leads Magic to 116114 OT win over Cavs... See page 16 n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia media.net F or the third time since winning the World Boxing Council Caribbean Boxing Federation s upper middleweight champio nship in 2006, Jermaine “Choo C hoo” Mackey is slated to defend his title here. Mackey is set to face Emiliano Cayetano of the Dominican Republic at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium in the feature bout of the evening on May 30. In a scheduled 12-round bout, Mackey will place his 17-3 (13 KO) and the WBC title on the line against Cayetano who comes in at 18-2 (11 KO The 29-year-old Mackey has won his last two fights – a fourth round TKO of Jeremy Yelton and a unanimous decision over Michael Gbenga which cap tured the Commonwealth super middleweight title. “Choo Choo” also holds the World Boxing Association FedCaribe title after he won a suc cessful title defense against Kirt Senette. Mackey won the then vacant WBC title in July of 2006 after a sixth round TKO over Marcus Thomas at the Radisson Cable ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey to face Dominican JERMAINE “CHOO CHOO” MACKEY S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 8 8

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C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 20, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Investment Opportunitye land, buildings and other assets of Bimini Waterfront Investments Limited (Receivers & Managers Appointed) which operated as Bimini Big Game Resort & Yacht Club (the Resort) located in Alice Town, Bimini are being oered for sale by the Receivers and Managers (the Receivers) of the Resort. e Resort consists of 51 rooms, 2 restaurants, a gift shop and a 78-slip marina capable of berthing vessels up to 120 feet in length. e entire Resort is situated on approximately 3.6 acres of land and 4.8 acres of seabed. Interested parties should contact the Receivers for additional information.Juan (John) Lopez jlopez@kpmg.com.bs Tel: (242 Fax: (242 352-6862 Simon Townend stownend@kpmg.com.bs Tel: (242 Fax: (242

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Foreign real estate permits decline 36% n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE outgoing Bahamas C hamber of Commerce president yesterday told Tribune Business he had expected Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham to “be more aggressive” in dealing with the loss-making public Cor-p orations in yesterday’s 20092010 Budget, and added that he had been “looking for a bit more” from the Government. While the Prime Minister had “just said the bad news”, Dionisio D’Aguilar, who is also Superwash’s president, told this newspaper he had been hoping the Government would deal more firmly with the loss-making Cor p orations burdening the Bahamian taxpayer, namely Bahamasair, ZNS and the Water & Sewerage Corporation. However, he praised the Prime Minister for his plans to create a ‘one-stop shop’ Busi ness Licence through an amend ed Act that will scrap the Licens ing Authority and amalgamate three existing licensing process es into one, thus reducingb ureaucracy and red tape. The removal of a bureaucratic impediment is always good, and hopefully it will facilitate the formation of businesses and reduce the level of bureaucracy businesses have to go through in their licensing,” Mr D’Aguilar said. The amendments, which the Government plans to bring to the House of Assembly early in the 2009-2010 fiscal year, will amalgamate the existing Business Licence Act with the L iquor Licences Act, the Shop Licences Act and the Music and Dancing Licences Act “to createa so-called ‘one-stop’ service to the public to replace the current outdated, cumbersome and time-consuming processes”. While the Licensing Authori ty will no longer be required, the new Act will provide for liquor licences as a special cate gory. A Review Board will be established to hear public objections to certain licence applica n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor PROJECT costs at the Water & Sewerage Corporation sometimes varied as much as 130 per cent from Budget, an external audit of its internal financial controls discovered, the final report uncovering numerous weaknesses and deficiencies in the Corporation’s controls and procedures. The report on the Water & Sewerage Corporation’s internal control and accounting pro cedures for the year ended D ecember 31, 2007, by account ants Pannell Kerr Foster (PKF onciliations were not being prepared on a timely basis” some being delayed “as late as three months after the relevant month. The absence of timely bank reconciliations also highlights the potential for misstatement or cut-off errors, and the nonreliability, and accuracy, of reported cash balances.” And the situation was not much better when it came to accounts receivables. PKF added: “We again noted that two-thirds (some $1.225 million out of a total $1.877 million) of the total accounts receivable balance related to accounts with balances outstanding in excess of 180 days. “These balances, if not carefully monitored, have the poten tial for doubtful recovery. Included in these balances are some delinquent accounts for which no payment has been made for the past several years. “These balances have subsequently been earmarked in the system as ‘final’ which means that service has been terminated, and thus collection is deemed doubtful.” PKF urged that the Water & Sewerage Corporation management write-off accounts where all collections efforts had been exhausted, removing them from being treated as an ‘asset’ under accounts receivables. This, in turn, would improve the accuracy of the Corporation’s financial statements, with accounts receivables being reported at their ‘net realisable value’. “Management should also pay particular attention to the reduction in the quality of the accounts receivable balances and formulate strategies to mitigate any resulting risks,” the C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission f rom the daily report.$ $3.73 $3.62 $3.82 n n t t f f r r t t f f n n b b &&& tn n n b b t t r!", (!',&'(!!!%" ,"(" "%' !'(%-& ,"('" '%!$(*&,''& &'%#'%#" !!&%'& "%" ,"(&',%" t n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor P rime Minister Hubert Ingraham yesterday warned t hat the 4.7 per cent o r $352 million G FS fiscal deficit that the Government’s finances are projected to produce for the 2008-2009 Budget year “is not sustainable over the medium term”, with the upcoming year’s deficit forecast to be slightly lower at 3.9 per cent of GDP some $286 million. The 2009-2010 Budget state ment to the House of Assembly revealed just how precarious and weak the condition of the public finances is, with the Government seeking to enhance and streamline collections on the revenue side, and to “hold 4.7% fiscal deficit ‘not sustainable’ PRIME MINISTER HUBERT INGRAHAM in the House of Assembly... * PM reveals extent of public finances crisis, with 2009-2010 deficit projected at 3.9% or $286m * Follows on from disastrous 4.7% or $352m deficit for 2008-2009, with revenues down $260m and only 17.5% of GDP some 2.8% lower than projected * Debt servicing costs become biggest Budget item, at $264m a $30m increase year-over-year * Warning that getting government’s finances back on track within three years will be ‘notable achievement’ T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B Water Corp project costs varied 130 per cent from budget * External audit report highlights 2/3 of accounts receivables 180 days past due, and ongoing l iquidity issues, with overdrafts u sed for short-term financing * Corporation’s accounts confirm $ 24m-plus loss in fiscal 2007 ‘More expected’ over loss-making entities * Outgoing Chamber chief praises Business Licence a mendments, but still wants change in calculation method * Bahamasair sees subsidy r educed by almost 40% or $11m to $17m, with g overnment ‘at a loss’ in financial crisis n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor PERMITS issued by the Investments Board for the foreign acquisition of Bahamas-based commercial and residential properties fell by 36 per cent and 19.4 per cent respectively during the 2009 first quarter, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said yesterday, highlighting the slowdown in foreign direct investment. For January-March 2009, Mr Ingraham said the Invest ments Board issued 254 registration certificates for the foreign acquisition of residential properties in the Bahamas, S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BAHAMIAN realtors yesterday gave a cautious welcome to the Government’s proposed Real Property Tax amendments, including the plan to reduce the number of tax rates from three to two, in the hope it will make this nation’s second home market more competitive. Mike Lightbourn, head of Coldwell Banker Lightbourn Realty, told Tribune Business that the proposed amendments were “great” because “people who buy high-end properties, the foreigners who come here, will not have to pay exorbitant tax rates”. Both the real estate industry and attorneys had asked the Government to re-institute the $35,000 real property tax cap that had limited the amount of tax paid by owners of high-end, multi-million properties. Its removal in the 2008-2009 Budget had made the Bahamas uncompetitive against other Caribbean nations, many of which did not have or had lim ited, property-based taxes. ForRealtors optimistic on tax amendment S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B

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THE Central Bank of the Bahamas introduced the ‘Guidelines for Corporate Governance of Banks and Trust Companies Licensed to do Business within and from within the Bahamas’ (the Guidelines) on the December 13, 2001. The objective of the guidelines is to simply “reassert the role of the Board of Directors”. The development and implementation of the guidelines reflects the commitment of the Central Bank to ensure compliance with international standards of best practice in corporate governance, and to clearly articulate its expectations of licensees in the adoption of, and adherence to, corporate governance principles in the management and oversight of their financial institutions. While the Guidelines provide only an overall regulatory and administrative framework within which directors and senior executives of financial institutions may operate, in order to prudently and ethically manage, oversee and direct their organisations in the best interests of their stakeholders (clients, shareholders, intermediaries, creditors and employees), they do not have the force of law only regulatory oversight and risk measurement on inspection of licensees. The Guidelines define corporate governance as “the processes, structures and information used for directing and overseeing the management of an organisation”. Corporate governance provides the critical underpinning for the relat ionships, responsibilities and r eporting lines for the Board of D irectors, senior management, shareholders, employees, clients and other stakeholders. When the corporate governance regime is fully and effectively implemented and adhered to, it can not only assist stakeholders in achieving the objectives of the institution through sound policies, procedures and mandates, but it can also provide a reasonably proficient measurement of the productivi ty and credibility of its business strategy, organidational growth and corporate social responsibility, in meeting the challenges and demands of commerce and compliance. At the centre of good corporate governance is the proper understanding, appreciation and practice of the high standard of duty, skill and care expected of directors and senior manage ment. Then there is the prudent discharge of their duties and responsibilities, both internally and externally, within the ambit of applicable law, local regulations and international stan dards of best practice. While the Guidelines are applicable only to banks, trust companies and foreign banks licensed to operate branches within and from within the Bahamas, and are intended only as a prescriptive guide of the minimum standards expected of licensees by the Central Bank, they do provide detailed guidance and direction to companies operating within the Bahamas generally for good corporate governance. P P r r o o c c e e s s s s o o f f C C o o r r p p o o r r a a t t e e G G o o v v e e r r n n a a n n c c e e In order to ensure appropriate independence and freedom from undue influence, the Guidelines recommend that the Board of Directors of licensees (and companies generally should comprise both executive and non-executive members. A comprehensive understanding of their responsibilities and accountabilities by directors and senior management, and clear, consistent communication of the process of good corporate governance within an organisation to such stakeholders, are paramount to the effectiveness of any corporate governance regime. An integral part of the mandate of directors and senior management is the identifica-t ion, measurement, monitoring, control and minimisation of various risks to an organisation, depending upon its size, the nature of its business, clientele, and the vulnerabilities of its products, services, internal controls, systems and processes. They can be impacted by internal or external threats of money laundering, fraud, collusion, impropriety or overall legal or regulatory liability. Being able to measure the a ccuracy, reliability, timeliness, relevancy and thoroughness of an organisation’s risk manage ment system, and the frequency, effectiveness, and productivity with which directors and senior management are able to obtain information regarding these measurements, are critical to the soundness of any corporate governance programme and its attendant compliance requirements. R R i i s s k k s s t t o o B B u u s s i i n n e e s s s s e e s s Depending upon an individ ual business’s size, activities, clients and geographical location, it may experience the following risks during its lifetime: Legal risk Credit risk Market risk Fiduciary risk Operational risk Compliance risk Regulatory risk Reputation risk Technology risk Each risk has its own definition and effect on a business, and requires the careful identification, analysis, monitoring, control and minimisation by the key stakeholders in any business and the relevant committees that it may establish (the risk management committee, credit committee, etc), to address these various risks. A A n n n n u u a a l l R R e e v v i i e e w w a a n n d d A A n n n n u u a a l l C C e e r r t t i i f f i i c c a a t t i i o o n n T he Central Bank guidelines r equire the Board of Directors of licensees to document annually whether their corporate governance process has been implemented effectively, and has successfully enabled them to achieve their overall business goals and objectives. Licensees are also required to determine their capital adequacy requirements; measure and assess their overall risk profile; recommend and implement n ew policies, procedures and internal controls where necessary; ensure the accuracy and reliability of their management information systems; and encourage their management and staff to maintain high corporate values and ethical standards. In short, licensees should generally assess whether their overall control environment, com pliance culture, policies, proce dures and risk management systems are appropriate and effective in meeting and protecting the interests of stakeholders, particularly shareholders, and clients. The Board of Directors is required, on an annual basis, within 120 days of the calendar year-end to certify in writing, to the Inspector of Banks and Trust Companies, that upon the advice and assistance of management, it has assessed and documented the effectiveness of the licensee’s corporate governance process and its success in meeting the organisation’s overall objectives. As part of this annual certification, the Board of Directors must also report any material deficiencies, weaknesses and problems they may have identified in their risk management assessment and monitoring during the year, along with any action plans and timetables for remedial action. An external auditor must be engaged by the licensee to annually review and assess the methodology followed by the Board of Directors in analysing and monitoring the organisation’s corporate governance process, and the auditor must report directly to the Board of Directors and the Inspector of Banks and Trust Companies on any discrepancies with the Board’s risk management a ssessment. R R e e s s p p o o n n s s i i b b i i l l i i t t i i e e s s o o f f t t h h e e B B o o a a r r d d o o f f D D i i r r e e c c t t o o r r s s The Guidelines outline the responsibilities of the Board of Directors of a licensee as follows: * To ensure competent management by appointing a chief executive; overseeing and participating in the appointment of other senior executives with the skills and integrity necessary to manage the relevant organisat ion; setting performance-based compensation policies, programmes, goals and standards for senior management; supervising and evaluating management’s performance; developing and regularly updating a management succession plan; and establishing standards of business conduct and ethical behaviour. * Approve objectives, strate gies, plans and operating poli cies, standards and procedures * Ensure the organisation’s operations are conducted prudently and within the framework of laws, regulations and guidelines, as well as established policies and procedures * Ensure the organisation conducts its affairs with a high degree of integrity * Review the organisation’s business and operating performance C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Be guided over firs corporate governance Legal Ease by Tyrone Fitzgerald S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 8 8 B B

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n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE COMPLETION of the Baha Mar project will be the “single largest opportunity” forthe future of the Bahamas, according to its chairman and chief executive, who suggested the development will come to fruition despite its long delay and investor search. Sarkis Izmirlian, speaking at the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s Annual General Meeting, said the Baha Mar project will put the Bahamas on the map as a “truly world class resort destination”. But he hinted that for Baha Mar to succeed, the Govern-ment and the private sector remain accountable for redeveloping the country’s main gateway, Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA bringing the educational system, especially the public system, upto a respectable standard. “Let me be blunt: Unless we improve the education of all Bahamians: Schools for younger Bahamian children and trade schools, or continuing education for mature Bahamians, we are doomed,” he said. “We need to train and invest in our teachers, not shy away from hiring great teachers, whether local or expat, and invest in better-on-the-job training.” Mr Izmirlian said the allimportant first impression offered by a clean and wellmaintained airport was of the utmost importance to the future of the tourism industry, and the departure process crucial to repeat visitors. He said that departure from LPIA can be a “nightmare”, and suggested the tiresome process of two checkpoints and a random third search often creates grumbling and discontenta mong departing visitors, a sent iment commonly shared by t ourists and Bahamians alike. “Much of this is as ridiculous as it is unnecessary,” said Mr Izmirlian. H e also suggested that statist ics show the Bahamas is losing g round as a competitive destin ation in the region. Statistics he collected show tourist arrivals to the Bahamas in 2008 were down by 4.3 per cent last year, while Cancun was up by 7 per cent, Cuba up by 9p er cent, Jamaica up by 4 per c ent and Aruba up by 10 per c ent.These figures exist despite t he Bahamas’ proximity advantage to the US compared to other destinations. Cruise Mr Izmirlian said cruise arrivals to the Bahamas were down by 3.7 per cent, while in the Dominican Republic arrivals were up by 8.5 per cent, Mexico up by 3.3 per cent and Aruba up by 15 per cent. “Just this month, in the middle of the great recession, the Government of Qatar invested $75 million to build a luxury 250-room hotel in Cuba,” said Mr Izmirlian. “We had contacted the Government of Qatar some time back about an investment in Baha Mar. They made it very clear they had no interest in investing in the Bahamas.” He said Baha Mar considered Qatar’s disinterest a factor of the economic environment. However, he suggested they should have looked “closer to home for the reason”. Mr Izmirlian said the Four Seasons Emerald Bay closure, as a sign of the times in the Bahamas, was the only hotel in the globally branded chain to close. “That should tell us something,” he said. Mr Izmirlian has in recent times spoken candidly about the Bahamas’ deteriorating social fabric and physical infrastructure, suggesting it is time for government-owned utilities to privatise and Nassau city centre to be upgraded and revitalized. However, he said it will require a public/private, blueribbon partnership to prepare a list of actions to solve some of the problems. He said much of what he has discussed regarding capital improvement projects and private sector accountability, he has tried to incorporate in the Baha Mar project. “As the project progresses, and certainly at fruition, it will provide substantial job and career advancement opportunities for the people of the Bahamas,” said Mr Izmirlian. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 3B ),1$1&(&25325$7,21)%$+$0$6/,0,7(' 127,&( 3OHDVHEHDGYLVHGWKDWWKH+HDG2IFHDQG WKH5HJLVWHUHG2IFHRIWKHFRPSDQ\ZLOOEH PRYHGIURPWKH%DKDPDV)LQDQFLDO&HQWUH &KDUORWWH6KLUOH\6WUHHWV)ORRU1DVVDX %DKDPDVWR5R\DO%DQN+RXVH(DVW+LOO6WUHHW 1DVVDX%DKDPDVHIIHFWLYH0D\ MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITYFINANCIAL CONTROLLERRequirements & Responsibilities: Leader and motivate accounting staff Experience in the preparation and interpretation of Financial Statements Must be able to develop and maintain an effective system of internal accounting and operational controls in a Hotel environment Must possess 5 or more years experience in a supervisory accounting positionSelf motivated with strong analytical and problem-solving skills Must be conversant with hotel accounting software, with emphasis in areas Liaise with External Auditors, third party service providers and relevant R egulatory & Compliance Authorities reports Excellent written and oral communication skillsAble to work extended hours, weekends and holidays BA in Accounting from an accredited University accounting environment Advance working knowledge of Excel Working knowledge of Microsoft Word Interested persons should apply on or before June 30, 2009 A ttention Manager: AN attorney with Graham Thompson & Co, Anastasia M. Bastian, has successfully completed the Series 6 Exam in Florida after studying at the Nassaubased Securities Training Institute (STI The Series 6 qualifying exam is administered by the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD Ms Albury, STI’s course administrator, said: “Our goal is to remain the recognised leader in providing high quality investment train ing. STI provides comprehensive course materials, and our instructors offer relevant insights that are crit ical to exam success.” Ms Bastian is pictured. Attorney passes Series 6 exam Anastasia M Bastian e are doomed with no education upgrade’

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compared to 315 certificates in the same period in 2008. The 2009 certificates covered properties valued at a cumulative $139.6 million, compared to a total value of $107.4 million for the first three months of 2008. On the acquisition of commercial properties by foreign investors, Mr Ingraham said that in the same January-March 2009 period, the Investments Board issued 115 permits for real estate valued at a collective $70 million. This compared to 182 permits issued in 2008 for property valued at $194.3 million. This translated into a contraction in the construction sector’s output, which fell by 10 per cent in 2008, Mr Ingraham said, “primarily due to the tightening in foreign investment”. However, domestic residential and commercial construction helped to give the industry some stability. “First quarter 2009 approvals for new building starts fell to 463 from the 471 approved in the same period in 2008,” the Prime Minister added. “It is to be noted that the inclusion of the approval for the $150 million Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA expansion in February 2009 helped push the value of building permits for this year to $325.7 million, up from the $124 million value of approvals granted in 2008.” On the tourism front, major declines in occupancy and forward booking levels from 2008 onwards resulted in the termination of 2,200 jobs in the hotel industry, with shortened work weeks for many others. “The latest preliminary data available for the first four months of 2009 reveal quite starkly the gravity of the situation in the tourism sector,” the Prime Minister said. “Through April, total arrivals to the Bahamas, at 1.68 million, were down by 1.2 per cent from the same period last year. However, the most important air arrivals segment was lower by 15.5 per cent. “Arrivals by sea were actually up by 5.5 per cent over the first four months, in part reflecting the repositioning of cruise ships back to the Bahamas, due to the growing popularity of short cruises, especially Bahamas-only cruises staying in port overnight. “Air arrivals in New Providence, at some 348,000 in the January to April 2009 period, were down by 10.5 per cent from the same period in 2008. Declines in this segment were even more pronounced in Grand Bahama and the other Family Islands, at 28.9 per cent and 27.6 per cent, respectively.” Noted Mr Ingraham, though noted that other major worldwide tourism markets were faring just as badly, with London down by 18 per cent, Las Vegas suffering a $65 million drop in hotel tax revenue, and Orlando sufferinga 21 per cent decline. Global travel was estimated to be down by an average of 18 per cent. “Expectations are that the key tourism and foreign investment sectors will remain weak in 2009, resulting in further weakness in the construction sector and a further increase in the unemployment rate. However, some tempering to this outcome is expected to occur from the Government’s ‘accelerated’ capital works programme,” Mr Ingraham said. Inflation rose to 4.5 per cent in 2008, some 2 per cent above the previous year, with housing costs rising to 3.5 per cent from 0.5 per cent, while food and beverage prices nearly doubled to 6.7 per cent. Mr Ingraham said this trend had persisted into 2009, with inflation at 4.8 per cent in the 12 months to April this year. Housing costs rose 3.3 per cent, while food and beverage and other goods and services were up 8 per cent and 9 per cent respectively. External reserves stood at $647.7 million at May 20, 2009, compared to $562.9 million at year-end 2008, continuing their upward trend. The Bahamas’ current account deficit narrowed by 1 per cent to $2.1 billion, due to a 17.5 per cent fall in non-oil imports that offset the 44.7 per cent fuel bill increase. The drop in private investment inflows saw the capital account surplus fall by $59.4 million to $927.2 million. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 7KH3XEOLFLVKHUHE\DGYLVHGWKDW 0$7('$67+203621 *ROGHQ*DWHVRIWKH:HVWHUQ'LVWULFWRIWKH,VODQGRI1HZ 3URYLGHQFHLQWHQGVWRFKDQJHVRQQDPHIURP 0$/,. 6 252+$125$+',*$15$+0,1* W +(15<67(3+(1 0 ,/(667255 , WKHUHDUHDQ\REMHFWLRQVWRWKLVFKDQJHRI QDPH'HHG3ROO\RXPD\ZULWHVXFKREMHFWLRQVWRWKH&KLHI 3DVVSRUW2IFHU31DVVDX%DKDPDVQRODWHUWKDQ WKLUW\fGD\VDIWHUWKHGDWHRISXEOLFDWLRQRIWKLVQRWLFH Foreign real estate permits decline 36% F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Realtors optimistic on tax amendment eign second home buyers, in particular, had been faced with major real property tax bill increases, something that realtors and attorneys had complained was costing them business. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham yesterday announced that while the cap would not be reinstated, the real property tax structure was being reduced from three to two. A 1 per cent rate would be applied to properties valued at up to $7.5 million, above the $250,000 exemption level, and properties valued in excess of $7.5 million would see a 0.25 per cent rate applied on the value above $7.5 million. In a bid to encourage real property tax defaulters to pay, the Government will write-off the surcharge on owner-occupied dwellings. The outstanding tax remains and has to be paid within six months of the amendments coming into effect, after which a 5 per cent per annum surcharge will be levied on the outstanding balances. The tax-rate on foreign-owned, vacant property valued at up to $7,000 will be $100, with properties worth more than $7,000 paying a 1.5 per cent rate. This is likely to be the Government giving foreign purchasers an incentive to build, rather than simply hold, then flip their real estate for profit. The exemption on owner-occupied property will be applicable automatically except for foreign home owners, where the ninemonth occupancy period will continue to apply, and a 0..5 per cent tax rate will be applied to buildings on leased Crown cays. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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n By ALAN ZIBEL AP Real Estate Writer WASHINGTON (AP Buyers who were brave enough to dive into the market for a bargain-priced house helped provide a modest boost to sales last month. Sales of inexpensive foreclosures and other distressed lowend properties have even sparked bidding wars in places like Las Vegas, Phoenix and Miami. But the market for highend properties is at a virtual standstill, mainly because it remains difficult to get a mort-g age for expensive homes. “We’re looking at a dual market right now,” said Sherry Chris, chief executive of Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate. The National Association of Realtors said Wednesday that home sales rose 2.9 per cent to an annual rate of 4.68 million in April from a downwardly revised pace of 4.55 million in March. Sales were 4.6 per cent below April last year, without adjusting for seasonal factors. Compared with January, the lowest point in the housing recession, April sales were up nearly four per cent. But compared with the peak in September 2005, sales are still down 35 per cent. And they have not kept pace with foreclosures, which continue to pile up at an alarming pace. Those properties helped drag down the median sales price to $170,200. Affordability brought Roge lio Gonzalez, 44, back into the Miami market. Gonzalez sold his five-bedroom home in 2004 for $485,000 and has been renting ever since. Now, prices have dropped to the point where he wants to buy a foreclosure in the $150,000 range, but he’s finding plenty of competition. “Since I sold at the highest point, I was waiting until I could buy at the lowest point,” Gonzalez said. “I’ve been to open houses and I’ve run into eight, 10, 15 people looking for hous es.” Foreclosures and other distressed sales made up about 45 per cent of all transactions in April, according to the Realtors group. In Phoenix, Floyd Scott, broker-owner of Century 21 Ari zona-Foothills, said roughly 70per cent of sales in his area are from distressed buyers. But that can’t last forever, he said, noting that “we’re running out of inventory.” Nationally, however, the number of unsold homes on the market at the end of April rose almost nine per cent from a month earlier to nearly four mil lion. That’s a 10-month supply at the current sales pace, and was particularly troubling to economists. The rise in unsold homes “suggests foreclosure activity may be adding homes to the market faster than sales are removing them,” wrote David Resler, chief economist with Nomura Securities. Another big problem is the lack of activity at the higherend of the housing market. Lenders have tightened standards dramatically, especially for so-called “jumbo” loans above $730,000 that cannot be purchased by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, the governmentcontrolled mortgage companies. The Realtors group is pushing for the Federal Reserve to start buying up those loans. It also wants higher loan limits enacted last year to apply to the whole country, not just expensive areas like California and New York. In San Francisco, properties listed for $1 million and above are languishing on the market. “That’s where we’re really feeling the pinch,” said Ben Coleman, owner of Century 21 Hartford Properties. In Philadelphia, “the luxury market is still dragging because of the difficulty for jumbo loans and the lack of cash from buy ers,” David Friedman, an agent with Coldwell Banker Preferred. “It’s pretty much at a nonexistent level right now.” Jumbo loans made up only five per cent of the mortgage market in the first quarter of this year, down from 17 per cent two years ago, according to trade publication Inside Mortgage Finance. Rates for 30-year jumbo loans are averaging around 6.3 per cent, compared with around five per cent for non-jumbo loans, according to data publisher HSH Associates. Since banks generally hold jumbo loans on their books, it’s not surprising that they are keeping lending standards tight, noted Keith Gumbinger, a senior vice president with HSH Associates, who said, “It’s not a risk-free investment.” AP Real Estate Writers Alex Veiga, Adrian Sainz and J.W. Elphinstone contributed to this report April existing home sales inch upward, prices fall C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 5B 7+(%/,&+263,7$/6$87+25,7<127,&(7(1'(5)25+(,6,21)&285,(5(59,&(6 38%/,&+263,7$/6$87+25,7<7(1'(56$5(,19,7(')52048$/,),('&2175$&72567 3529,'(&285,(56(59,&(6)257+(38%/,&+263,7$/6 $87+25,7<$<($5 7(1'(5'2&80(176:+,&+,1&/8'(,16758&7,216 77(1'(5(5663(&,7,216$1'27+(55(/(9$17 ,1)250$7,21&$1&2//(&7('$030021'$<7 )5,'$<$77+(38%/,&+263,7$/6$87+25,7<&25325$ &(175(%8,/',1*7+,5'$1':(677(55$&(6&2//,16 $9(18( $7(1'(5086768%0,77(',1'83/,&$,1$6($/(' (19(/23(253$&.$*(,'(17,),('$67(1'(5)257+( 3529,6,21&285,(56(59,&(638%/,&+263,7$/6 $87+25,7<$''5(66('7 7+(&+$,50$1 7(1'(56&200,77(( 7+(%/,&+263,7$/6$87+25,7< &25325$7(&(175(%8,/',1*% 7+,5't:(67(55$&(6&2//,16$9(18( 3 1$66$8%$+$0$67(1'(56$5(7$55,9($77+(%/,&+263,7$/6$87+25,7< 12/$7(57+$1WK/$ 7(1'(5f:,//$&&(37(' $FRS\RIYDOLGEXVLQHVVOLFHQVHDQGFHUWLFDWHYHULI\LQJXS WRGDWH1DWLRQDO,QVXUDQFH&RQWULEXWLRQVVKRXOGDFFRPSDQ\DOO SURSRVDOV7KHXEOLF+RVSLWDOV$XWKRULW\UHVHUYHVWKHULJKWWRDFFHSWRUUHMHFWDQ\ RUDOOHQGHUVf 127,&( 3,6721,19(670(17 0$1$*(0(17 $Q,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQ\ 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHYROXQWDU\GLVVROXWLRQ R WKHDERYHFRPSDQ\FRPPHQFHGRQWKHGD\ RI0D\$UWLFOHVRI'LVVROXWLRQKDYHEHHQGXO\ UHJLVWHUHGWKH5HJLVWUDU*HQHUDO3%R[ 6KLUOH\6WUHHW1DVVDX%DKDPDV7KH /LTXLGDWRULV&RUSRUDWH6HUYLFHV%DKDPDVf /LPLWHGZKRVHDGGUHVVLV6XLWH%D\SDUO%XLOGLQJ 3DUOLDPHQW6WUHHW3%R[ 1DVVDX7KH%DKDPDV IN THIS FILE PHOTO taken March 3, 2009, a sale pending sign is seen for a real estate listing in Gloucester, Mass. (AP Photo: Lisa Poole

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PKF report urged. “Moreover, management should establish policies for impairment testing on accounts receivable for inclusion in the comprehensive operations manual.” In response, the Water & Sewerage Corporation’s management said they had begun “a more aggressive effort to transfer” accounts past 180 days due to the Bad Debt Register, and initiated over improvements. Yet, further highlighting the Corporation’s financial woes, PKF added: “We noted that the actual amount spent on specificp rojects varied significantly from the budgeted amounts. “Some of these projects had variances of up to 130 per cent from the budgeted amounts. Management should ensure that persons involved in the planning process provide a more concise budget, so that the other projects are not placed on hold due allocation of scarce resources.” And as for liquidity, PKF said: “At present, the Corporation is being funded by high levels of short-term financing (overdraft facilities likely indication of a turnaround in the method of financing the shortfalls in its cash position. “Management should give serious consideration to the restructuring of its operations, in the immediate future, with the ultimate objective of reducing its reliance on the high cost of short-term financing.” In response, the Water & S ewerage Corporation management said: “The current operating model is one of high costs associated with water production (principally reverse osmosis water purchases) and staffing. “Management is constantly seeking to identify avenues for cost containment but points out that tariff adjustments (or additional government funding) are necessary and overdue, particularly in light of escalating energy costs.” None of this is surprising, but the PKF report is useful in highlighting what is going on behind the numbers at the Water & Sewerage Corporation. The Corporation’s 2007 year-end accounts, also audited by PKF, confirmed Tribune Business’s revelations that it had incurred a $24.107 million net loss before receiving a $20.2 million government subsidy. The Corporation’s New Provi dence-based operations generated a $15.423 million net loss prior to the subsidy’s receipt, while the pre-subsidy loss on the Family Islands was some $8.685 million. And PKF said in its audit opinion that “without qualifying our report” it had noted that the Water & Sewerage Corporation’s net current liabilities exceeded assets by $66.941 million, making it entirely dependent on government and taxpayer funding for the continua tion of its operations. Meanwhile, PKF’s internal audit controls report found that Water & Sewerage Corporation was ‘capitalising’ and treating as an asset those it did not have title to, especially financed assets, which required the fulfillment of certain conditions before title passed. On trade payables, the PKF team noted that the Water & Sewerage Corporation was reconciling items from prior years, dating back to 2004, on its general ledger control account balances. This, the accountants warned, could “jeopardise” the Water& Sewerage Corporation’s abil ity to obtain supplier credit. “The Corporation should reexamine its policies in relation to reducing the level of accounts payable, in addition to reduc i ng the length of time taken to satisfy its obligations,” the PKF report said. “This should be done with a view to maintaining healthy business relationships with suppliers so as not to affect the timing of critical capitalw orks.” I nventory checks, and prob lems in accessing critical support documents, were identified by PKF. It also highlighted the absence of operational proce dures, policies and controls manuals at the Water & Sewer a ge Corporation, and the fact there were no documented procedures to assess the risk of fraud. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 0,1,675<:25.6t75$163257 %/8(+,//$' 52$':$<&216758&7,21 ,QDQHIIRUWWRUHOLHYHFXUUHQWWUDIFFRQJHVWLRQSUREOHPV -26( &$57(//21(&216758&&,21(6&,9,/(66$ KDV EHHQFRQWUDFWHGIRUWKH&RPSOHWLRQRIWKH1HZ3URYLGHQFH5RDG ,PSURYHPHQW3URMHFW,QWHUQDWLRQDO3DFNDJH5RDGFRQVWUXFWLRQ ZLOOEHFRPPHQFLQJRQ&RUULGRU%OXH+LOO5RDGfZKLFKPD\ UHTXLUHGLYHUVLRQVIURP 'XNHWUHHWtRELQVRQRDG /RFDOGLYHUVLRQVZLOOEHVLJQSRVWHGLQGXHFRXUVHDQGIXUWKHU LQIRUPDWLRQZLOOEHSURYLGHGLQWKHORFDOPHGLD W ater Corp project costs varied 130 per cent from budget F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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n By ANNE D’INNOCENZIO A P Retail Writer NEW YORK (AP sumer confidence extended its rebound in May, soaring to the highest level since last September as more shoppers are feeling the worst of the recession i s behind them. The Conference Board said Tuesday that its Consumer Confidence Index, which hadd ramatically increased in April, zoomed past economists’ expectations to 54.9 from a revised 40.8 in April. Economists surveyed by Thomson Reuters w ere expecting 42.3. In February, confidence levels had hit an ew historic low of 25.3. The reading marks the highest in eight months when the level was 61.4. The levels are a lso closer to the year-ago’s 58.1, though the widely watchedb arometer is still below 100, w hich indicates a healthy economy. The Present Situation Index, which measures how shoppers feel now about the economy,r ose to 28.9 from 25.5 last m onth. But the Expectations Index, which measures shoppers’ outlook over the next six months, climbed to 72.3 from 5 1.0 in April. I nvestors focused on the upbeat sentiment reading, shaking off a mostly downbeat report on the housing market,also released Tuesday. In mid m orning trading, the Dow Jones industrial average rose 2 03.42, or 2.5 per cent, to 8,480.74. Looking ahead, consumers are considerably less pessimistict han they were earlier this year, and expectations are that busin ess conditions, the labor mar ket and incomes will improve i n the coming months,” Lynn Franco, director of The Con-f erence Board Consumer Research Center, said in a statement. “While confidence is still weak by historic standards, asf ar as consumers are concerned, the worst is now behind us.” The confidence report offered encouraging news to merchants,which are counting on consumers to be in the moodto spend after confidence plummeted to historic lows late last year but has been rising since March. A two-month stock ral ly has helped make shoppers feel a little better about their retirement funds, spurring dramatic rebounds in confidence in April and May levels. M eanwhile, better-thanexpected earnings results from such retailers as Sears Holdings C orp. and Gap Inc. have offered the latest evidence that spending has begun to stabilize, though overall business is still weak. The size of the monthly increases in April and May in consumer confidence encouraged economists. Gary Thayer, chief economist at Wells Fargo Advisors, says that unless the economy suffers from major financial shocks, it looks like “we’ve turned the corner” on confidence. “This is a significant change,” said Thayer. “While (consumers) are unhappy about their job situation and their home values, they see light atthe end of the tunnel.” He added, however, sentiment has a way to go before shoppers go back to splurging. That can only happen when the job and housing markets, which have been holding down sentiment, start to turn around. The latest report on home prices, released Tuesday, wasn’t c omforting. Home prices fell at the fastest annual rate on record in the first quarter, though the pace of month-to-m onth declines continues to slow, according to a closely watched housing index. The Standard & Poor’s/CaseShiller National Home Price index reported home prices tumbled by 19.1 per cent in the first quarter, the most in its 21y ear history. Home prices have fallen 32.2 p er cent since peaking in the second quarter of 2006 and are at levels not seen since the end of 2002. Meanwhile, Americans continue to cut back on nonessen-t ials like furniture while focusing on buying necessities as they w orry about their jobs. The unemployment rate is expected to climb to 9.2 per cent in May from 8.9 per cent in Aprila nd employers are expected to shed a net total of 523,000 jobs, a ccording to economists surveyed by Thomson Reuters. The Labour Department is expected to release unemploy m ent figures on June 5. The Consumer Confidence s urvey whose responses were received through May 19 from ar epresentative sample of 5,000 U.S. households showed a m arked improvement in consumers’ outlook for jobs. Thep ercentage of consumers expecting more jobs in the months ahead increased to 20.0 per cent from 14.2 per cent, while those anticipating fewer jobs declined to 25.2 per cent from 32.5 per cent. The proportion of consumers anticipating an increase in their incomes edged up to 10.2 per cent from 8.3 per cent. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 7B Consumer confidence skyrockets in May Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. SHOPPERS hold bags after shopping in Santa Monica, California... (AP Photo: Nick Ut

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the line” on recurrent spending, in an effort to stabilise the situation. Looking further out, Mr Ingraham said the Governmenth oped to reduce the GFS fiscal d eficits over the next three Budget years to 2011-2012, but warned: “In light of the magnitude of the fiscal challenges thatwe face, that in and of itself will b e a notable achievement.” T he Prime Minister struck a somewhat sombre tone at times in delivering his Budget, no doubt trying to impress upon Bahamians the seriousness of the situation the public financesw ere in. However, there was litt le that was new or unexpected in his presentation. And while he said there were only four government departm ents scheduled to receive an i ncrease in their 2009-2010 Budgetary spending allocation, he omitted to mention two that received the greatest increase and which are now competing with health as the area receiving most funding. T hese departments are government debt servicing interest and principal redemptions. The Government will on 2009-2010 spend $12.055 million more in m eeting interest payments on its debt, a rise from $164.886 m illion to $176.94 million, while debt principal redemptions will increase by $17.458 million to $87.794 million from $70.336 million. Altogether, some $264 million a $30 million year-overyear increase will be spent on meeting debt repayments, a similar sum to the combined allocation received by the Min-i stry of Health, Public Hospit als Authority, Department of P ublic Health and Department o f Environmental Health Services. For 2009-2010, Mr Ingraham said the Government was projecting that recurrent revenues w ould total $1.389 billion, some $184.5 million less than the orig i nal forecasts for the current B udget year. The lowered projections indicate just how s everely the Government’s narrow tax base, with its reliance o n international trade and i mports, has been impacted by the global economic downturn. With gross domestic product (GDP lion lower than the 2008-2009 fiscal year, in current dollars, Mr Ingraham said the Govern-m ent would seek to mitigate the impact on its revenues by “redoubling our efforts in 2010 to collect the maximum amount of revenues that are rightfully d ue to the Government”. He pledged that his administ ration would “continue to streamline revenue collections to facilitate the payment of taxes and fees”, with the projected 2009-2010 revenues of $1.389 billion standing at 18.8 per cent of GDP. This was better than the 20082009 fiscal year’s projected performance, in which the Government’s revenues amountedt o only 17.5 per cent of GDP s ome 2.8 per cent lower than e xpected and “the lowest [reve nue to GDP ratio] in three years”. “That would still be somewhat lower than the ratio attained in 2007-08,” Mr Ingrah am said if the projected 20092010 revenue-GDP ratio, “but a t least it puts us back on the u pward trajectory that had been envisaged in last year’s Budget C ommunication. “Ongoing enhancements in r evenue administration and coll ections should lead to yet furt her improvements in the ratio o f revenues to GDP as we move beyond next year.” A s for the Government’s r ecurrent spending, which goes on its fixed costs, such as salaries, emoluments and rents, Mr Ingraham pledged to “hold the line”, eliminating unnecessary spending and trying to maintain public sector/civil ser-v ice employment at current levels. Spending W ith recurrent spending for 2009-2010 pegged at $1.53 bill ion, some $38.908 million less than the 2008-2009 projected spend of $1.569 billion, Mr Ingraham said the Government planned to reduce both the recurrent deficit and the overall GFS fiscal deficit. The recurrent deficit, which measures the Government’s revenues minus recurrent spending, is projected to be$ 141 million for 2009-2010, as o pposed to $186 million in 20082 009. The Ingraham administ ration had initially forecast a minor $20 million recurrent surplus (meaning revenues would exceed recurrent spending) in its 2008-2009 Budget, before the g lobal economic crisis took hold and threw that projection out t he window. C ombined with $255 million in capital spending and $88 mill ion in debt principal redemption, the Prime Minister said aG FS deficit of 3.9 per cent or $ 286 million was projected for 2 009-2010, a 0.7 per cent reduct ion upon this year’s 4.7 per cent or $352 million. A deficit of such a magnit ude is not sustainable over the medium term and will clearly have implications for the stock of Government Debt which, at the end of June 2009, is expected to stand at just over $2.9 billion or 38.9 per cent of GDP,”M r Ingraham said of the 20082009 fiscal performance. Looking back over the 20082009 Budget year, which ends on June 30, 2009, the Prime M inister not surprisingly said revenues were “bearing the b runt of the recessionary pressures”. He estimated that they would finish the year at $1.31 billion, down by more than $260 million upon Budget estimates of $1.574 million. That figure was some 17 per cent down on estimates, Mr Ingraham added, “and bears witness to the extent of the fiscal challenge that confronts theG overnment in the current e nvironment. The GFS deficit in 20082 009 is being severely and negatively affected by the global downturn, which is having a major effect on the performance of the Bahamian econom y. It is to be noted, in particular, that GDP in current dol l ars, which is a critical factor in t he evolution of revenues, is expected to be lower than forec ast in 2008-2009 by some 3.5 per cent or $ 265 million.” W hile recurrent spending was e xpected to be $40 million b elow initial estimates, “as a r esult of the significant decline in revenues”, the recurrent d eficit was expected to come in at $186 million. W hen capital spending and d ebt redemptions were factored in, the total GFS deficit was estimated to be $352 million or 4.7 per cent of GDP, more than double the initial projections of a 2.1 per cent GFS deficit. The G FS deficit for 2008-2009 is l ikely to be $187 million above projections. Due to the widening fiscal deficits, Mr Ingraham said the Government’s debt would increase to 43.2 per cent of GDP by the 2009-2010 fiscaly ear-end, compared to 38.9 per cent one year earlier. “There was a time in the Bahamas when we would not dream of exceeding the 40 per c ent debt-to-GDP ratio,” the Prime Minister said. “It was b eyond our contemplation.” However, the Central Bank of the Bahamas in its 2008 annual report noted that the Bahamas’ national debt was already more than 43 per cent of GDP, indicating that its calculations and those of the Prime Minister are not aligned. The Government’s own Budget document yesterday showedt hat with the Government’s d irect debt standing at $2.764 b illion, and debt it had guarant eed at $436 million, the national debt already stood at 43 per cent of GDP at year-end 2008. This indicates that Mr Ingraham is likely to be talking about t he direct debt charge on government in reference to the J une 2010 date. T he implications of this, though, indicate that if guarant eed government debt remains constant at 6 per cent of GDP,t he total national debt will be j ust shy of 50 per cent of GDP w hen the next Budget year e nds. Mr Ingraham acknowledged t hat a “sustainable fiscal position is so vitally important too ur economic future”, adding t hat controlling the fiscal deficit and the economy’s eventual return to growth would get the debt-to-GDP ratio back under control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raphic Designer to work in fast paced organisat ion. C ore responsibilities and requirements: Toproduce graphic design solutions for a range of promotion and information needs. Candidates must be well versed in design concepts andproficient in design software, including Illustrator, Dreamweaver, QuarkXpress, Freehand, Photoshop and others. Candidates must be proficient with both Macintosh and Windows based computer applications and hardware, including design and layout of print material. ABachelor’s degree in graphic design or related field is preferred. DA#61034 c/o The Tribune P.O. Box N-3207 Nassau, Bahamas 4.7% fiscal deficit ‘not sustainable’ F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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t ions, appeals against licence revocations, suspensions and rejections, and other complaints relating to the Business Licence Act. Prime Minister Ingraham said the Business Licence Act would come under the Ministry of Finance, requiring an amendment to the Local Government Act. He added: “Business licence is another area ripe for public sector reform because it is an areaw here inefficiencies and unnecessary bureaucratic practices prevail. “The Government has remained steadfast in its resolve t o simplify the process of starting a business in the Bahamas such that entrepreneurs can convert ideas into concrete businesses as rapidly and efficiently as poss ible.” H owever, Mr D’Aguilar added: “I was disappointed not to hear him make amendments to the Business Licence Act to make the payment fairer how the business licence fee is calculated.” While not looking for a fee reduction, the outgoing Chamber president told Tribune Business the organisation wanted to alter the current calculation method, which is based on gross profits. Businesses with highs ales and low gross margins, such as food stores, paid “a disproportionate business licence fee” in comparision to firms with low sales and high gross margins, s uch as law firms. “The situation is dire,” Mr D’Aguilar said of the public finances. “The Prime Minister painted a fairly gloomy picture, a nd really given the enormity of the crisis and the significant reduction in government revenues he’s really at a loss about what to do.” The outgoing Chamber president added that Mr Ingraham was “absolutely right” in saying that present levels of government spending were unsustainable, given the fall-off in revenues and the projected 4.7 per cent ($352 million fiscal 2008-2009. The upcoming financial year does not lookm uch better, with a 3.9 per cent GFS fiscal deficit or $286 million hole forecast. Mr D’Aguilar said it was “admirable” that the Governm ent was focusing on restricting public spending, but argued t hat this was easier to say than achieve in practice. “I was looking for a bit more,” he added. “I don’t think the recession has gone on long e nough for the Prime Minister to say it’s really, really bad and we need to make hard decisions about the public corporations and the losses that occur. “They didn’t take any of the difficult decisions about the economy. They did not touch Bahamasair, did not touch ZNS, did not touch the Water & Sewerage Corporation. There needs to be an end game. We need some significant, hard decisions to reduce our expenditure.” Mr D’Aguilar urged the Gove rnment to get out of businesses such as airlines and a radio/TV station, and suggested they be outsourced to the private sector. “The Government has a lot o f loss-making entities, departments and a lot of inefficienc ies,” he added. “I expected him to be a lot more aggressive in dealing with that. This was a great opportunity to get out of these busin esses. It’s going to be a trying period. This would be a great time for him to make sweeping policy changes in the way we run our government, and I didn’t get the feeling he was going there.” For 2009-2010, Bahamasair has seen its taxpayer subsidy cut by 39.7 per cent to $17 million a drop of $11 million from last year’s $28 million. ZNS, too, has seen a taxpayer subsidy cut of $3.2 million to $8.5 million, compared to $11.7 million in 2008-2009. The Gov-e rnment has tried to hold the line on all other taxpayer subsidies, with the Water & Sewerage Corporation getting $19 million despite the 2008-2009 halfy early allocation that took its subsidy for this fiscal year to $30 m illion. Only the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation (BAIC million rise to $2.5 million for f iscal 2009-2010. The Prime Minister did not say much about the public corporations in the House of Assembly yesterday, only confirming that the Government was “on course” to privatise the Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC the Bahamas” early in the 20092010 fiscal year. The privatisation proceeds will be used to reduce the Government’s borrowing requirements. “Other public corporations a re being subjected to the same evaluation to determine the benefits of privatisation. In some cases, privatisation would mean shedding the burden which they p lace on the Consolidated Fund and the Bahamian taxpayer. The f inancial resources released from propping up these corporations plus the proceeds of privatisation would provide very welcome relief to the Bahamian taxp ayer,” Mr Ingraham said. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 9B E E N N T T I I T T I I E E S S , , f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 11B n By CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net B AHAMIAN accounting firms will soon be subject to a qualitya ssurance check every six years by a body of their peers, the second vice-president of the BahamasI nstitute of Chartered Accountants (BICA will cause in increase inBICA’sa nnual membership fee per partner. Philip Galanis, who is also mana ging partner at HLB Galanis Bain, said the peer review or practice monitoring was proposed sot hat those firms in public practice w ould have access to material that would help them engage in best practices. “The public is going tob enefit as a result of knowing that all accountants in the Bahamas who are licensed by BICA wouldh ave had a peer review performed of their practice, so they all subscribe to a particular standard,”h e said. Mr Galanis said all accounting firms who are engaged in public practice and are licensed by BICA will be subject to a peer review bym embers of the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA body. Mr Galanis said the ACCA will scrutinise all firms, including large i nternational firms, such as Deloitte and Touche, and will report their findings to a body selected by BICA. S hould a firm’s review be found to have any unsatisfactory outc omes it will be given a period of time to correct the problem. Mr Galanis said this will be d one every six years. Those firms who are licensed by BICA to practice will also be subject toi ncreased per annum license fees per partner of $280. He said this is because BICA will be responsible for underwriting the cost of the reviews for almost 300 members. T his new peer review has also been mandated by the International Federation of Accountants, of which the Institute of Chartered Accountants of the Caribbean is a part. T he ACCA was chosen to conduct the reviews. Initially, however, they will in the process train a local team to do peer reviews in t he region, as they do not have a “vested” interest in staying in the B ahamas. Peer review set to boost accounting industry standard n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Government yesterday said it had agreed to provide a $30 million guarantee to cover CLICO (Bahamas ties, as no other Bahamas-based insurance company was willing to purchase the collapsed carrier’s policies due to the exposure risk they faced without this. Stating that the guarantee would be for a $30 million maximum and last no longer than five years, Mr Ingraham said it would not apply to Bahamian institutions or corporations that had purchased CLICO (Bahamas annuities, nor the bankrupt company’s senior management, directors and their family members. “We are advised that insurance companies are unwilling to purchase CLICO’s policies and a ssume the possible exposure of $30 million without a Government Guarantee,” Mr Ingraham said. “In order to facilitate the sale of CLICO’s policy liabilities, the Government has agreed to provide such a guarantee.” CLICO’s life insurance policyholders will be covered up to $300,000 worth of insurance coverage, while accident and sickness, and group life, medical and annuity, all covered for their full amount. Annuity policyholders will be covered up to $100,000 of their policy’s accumulated value. Only policies in force will be covered by the guarantee, and the Government will establish a Statutory Insurance Compensation Guarantee Fund to protect B ahamian policyholders in the event of future insurance company failures. Mr Ingraham added: “The Office of the Registrar of Insurance Companies advises that there is a gap between the assets and liabilities of CLICO leaving a net liability of $42 million. There are realisable assets estimated at $85 million, and adjusted liabilities of $127 million. “Policy liabilities are estimated at $73 million and other liabilities at $54 million. As policy liabilities may have a first claim on all assets, it is therefore expected that policy liabilities are fully covered.” Institutions not covered in $30m CLICO guarantee

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 18B, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE * Ensure that the organisation is “in c ontrol” of itself D D u u t t i i e e s s o o f f D D i i r r e e c c t t o o r r s s The Guidelines reinforce the legal and statutory requirements, and acceptable standards, of best practice for the discharge of the duties of directors. They must: * Act with honesty, integrity, good faith and in the best interests of the licensee (and company * Exercise the care, diligence and skill that a reasonably prudent person w ould exercise in comparable circums tances. * Exercise independent judgment in their approach to decision-making and problem-solving. * Act on a fully-informed basis. * Understand and devote sufficient time to their responsibilities. * Act only within the scope of their authority. * Recognise and guard against conflicts of interest in dealing with the licensee, taking into account the interests of all stakeholders. T he overall guidance and direction t hat the Guidelines provide to licensees (and companies generally underestimated, particularly in an environment where no such Guidelines existed before, in whole or in part. It would be prudent for executive and non-executive directors and senior management to understand, implement and adhere to the requirements and recommendations within the Guidelines, in the first instance, and to continue to develop their individual corporate governance processes and r egime within the parameters of its d irectives. This is to ensure the interests of all stakeholders are protected, maintained and valued by directors and senior management of licensees within the Bahamas, without compromise or complicity. 2 2 0 0 0 0 6 6 . . T T y y r r o o n n e e L L . . E E . . F F i i t t z z g g e e r r a a l l d d . . A A l l l l r r i i g g h h t t s s r r e e s s e e r r v v e e d d . . N N B B : : T T h h e e i i n n f f o o r r m m a a t t i i o o n n c c o o n n t t a a i i n n e e d d i i n n t t h h i i s s a a r r t t i i c c l l e e d d o o e e s s n n o o t t c c o o n n s s t t i i t t u u t t e e n n o o r r i i s s i i t t a a s s u u b b s s t t i i t t u u t t e e f f o o r r l l e e g g a a l l a a d d v v i i c c e e . . P P e e r r s s o o n n s s r r e e a a d d i i n n g g t t h h i i s s a a r r t t i i c c l l e e a a n n d d / / o o r r c c o o l l u u m m n n , , g g e e n n e e r r a a l l l l y y , , a a r r e e e e n n c c o o u u r r a a g g e e d d t t o o s s e e e e k k t t h h e e r r e e l l e e v v a a n n t t l l e e g g a a l l a a d d v v i i c c e e a a n n d d a a s s s s i i s s t t a a n n c c e e r r e e g g a a r r d d i i n n g g i i s s s s u u e e s s t t h h a a t t m m a a y y a a f f f f e e c c t t t t h h e e m m a a n n d d m m a a y y r r e e l l a a t t e e t t o o t t h h e e i i n n f f o o r r m m a a t t i i o o n n p p r r e e s s e e n n t t e e d d . . T T y y r r o o n n e e L L . . E E . . F F i i t t z z g g e e r r a a l l d d i i s s a a n n a a t t t t o o r r n n e e y y w w i i t t h h F F i i t t z z g g e e r r a a l l d d & & F F i i t t z z g g e e r r a a l l d d . . S S h h o o u u l l d d y y o o u u h h a a v v e e a a n n y y c c o o m m m m e e n n t t s s o o n n t t h h i i s s a a r r t t i i c c l l e e , , y y o o u u m m a a y y c c o o n n t t a a c c t t M M r r F F i i t t z z g g e e r r a a l l d d a a t t S S u u i i t t e e 2 2 1 1 2 2 , , L L a a g g o o o o n n C C o o u u r r t t B B u u i i l l d d i i n n g g , , O O l l d d e e T T o o w w n n e e M M a a l l l l a a t t S S a a n n d d y y p p o o r r t t , , W W e e s s t t B B a a y y S S t t . . , , P P . . O O . . B B o o x x C C B B 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 7 3 3 , , N N a a s s s s a a u u , , B B a a h h a a m m a a s s o o r r a a t t t t y y r r o o n n e e @ @ t t l l e e f f i i t t z z g g e e r r a a l l d d g g r r o o u u p p . . c c o o m m . . Be guided over firs corporate governance

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ANDROS C ELEUTHERA M GREAT EXUMA C ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 70F/21C Low: 74F/23C Low: 73F/23C Low: 74 F/23C Low: 74F/23C Low: 77F/25C Low: 77 F/25C Low: 76F/24C High: 88F/31C High: 85F/29C High: 86 F/30C High: 85F/29C High: 86F/30C High: 86 F/30 High: 88F/31C Low: 79F/26C High: 86 F/30C Low: 76 F/24 High: 89 F/32C Low: 74 F/23C High: 86F/30C L Low: 77 F/25C High: 92F/33C High: 83F/28C FREEPOR T NASSAU MIAMI THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Partly sunny. Cloudy with a spotty thunderstorm. Mainly cloudy, a t-storm in spots. Becoming cloudy with a thunderstorm. Mostly cloudy, a t-storm possible. High: 88 Low: 77 High: 88 High: 87 High: 85 AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny with a shower possible. High: 87 Low: 74 Low: 76 Low: 76 AccuWeather RealFeel 100F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 82F 98-85F 95-75F 96-82F 110-84F Low: 77 TODAYTONIGHTFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAY A LMANAC High .................................................. 90F/32C Low .................................................... 79F/26C Normal high ...................................... 85F/30C Normal low ........................................ 72F/22C Last year's high .................................. 87F/31C Last year's low .................................. 74F/23C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.04" Year to date ..................................................6.80" Normal year to date ....................................11.25" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UNAND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU First Full Last New May 30 Jun. 7Jun. 15Jun. 22 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:21 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:54 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 10:36 a.m. Moonset . . . . . . . . . none Today Friday Saturday Sunday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 11:50 a.m.2.75:43 a.m.-0.1 -----5:50 p.m.-0.1 12:15 a.m.3.06:36 a.m.-0.1 12:49 p.m.2.76:52 p.m.0.0 1:14 a.m.2.87:31 a.m.0.0 1:50 p.m. 2.77:57 p.m.0.1 2:14 a.m. 2.68:25 a.m.0.0 2:51 p.m. 2.8 9:03 p.m.0.2 W ORLD C ITIES A capulco91/3279/26s88/3175/23pc Amsterdam61/1645/7c64/1749/9s Ankara, Turkey72/2241/5c73/2245/7s Athens79/2666/18pc79/2663/17pc Auckland61/1651/10s61/1654/12pc Bangkok91/3279/26r90/3279/26sh Barbados86/3076/24pc86/3076/24s Barcelona71/2163/17s74/2361/16s Beijing82/2759/15c90/3259/15pc Beirut72/2268/20s74/2370/21s Belgrade63/1752/11r71/2149/9pc Berlin63/1741/5sh61/1645/7sh Bermuda 79/2670/21sh79/2672/22pc Bogota65/1848/8r65/1847/8r Brussels64/1748/8pc68/2045/7pc Budapest68/2050/10pc70/2146/7pcB uenos Aires61/1643/6s61/1646/7s Cairo90/3266/18s92/3368/20s Calcutta 103/3982/27pc101/3881/27s Calgar y68/2045/7pc77/2549/9s Cancun90/3275/23s92/3373/22s Caracas79/2672/22pc79/2671/21s Casablanca 87/30 72/22 s 84/2866/18pc Copenhagen 56/1348/8pc62/1648/8pc Dublin66/1852/11pc68/2052/11pc Frankfurt 64/17 45/7pc68/2043/6s Geneva67/1949/9pc71/2141/5s Halifax47/846/7r61/1652/11r Havana 90/32 70/21 pc87/3071/21sh Helsinki63/1748/8pc64/1746/7s Hong Kong 84/2875/23t81/2773/22sh Islamabad113/4574/23s114/4575/23s Istanbul75/2358/14s77/2564/17s Jerusalem 76/2451/10s76/2453/11s Johannesburg 66/18 47/8pc64/1745/7s Kingston 87/30 78/25t87/3078/25t Lima72/2257/13pc72/2257/13c London 72/22 52/11 pc73/2250/10s Madrid86/3054/12s88/3157/13s Manila93/3381/27t84/2877/25t Mexico City84/2854/12t77/2555/12t Monterrey90/3272/22t90/3269/20t Montreal 59/1555/12r68/2052/11t Moscow 77/2555/12s77/2554/12pc Munich60/1542/5sh46/741/5sh Nairobi75/2361/16c81/2763/17t New Delhi106/4184/28s106/4184/28s Oslo 57/1341/5pc63/1746/7s Paris 68/2050/10pc70/2148/8s Prague62/1643/6sh50/1044/6r Rio de Janeiro82/2765/18s72/2264/17r Riyadh106/4180/26s106/4178/25s Rome78/2552/11s77/2555/12s St. Thomas 87/30 78/25s87/3078/25s San Juan55/1240/4sh53/1138/3r San Salvador88/3170/21t86/3073/22t Santiago61/1646/7c61/1643/6c Santo Domingo90/3273/22pc86/3072/22sh Sao Paulo70/2154/12t67/1955/12r Seoul 86/3059/15s81/2755/12pc Stockholm57/1341/5r63/1739/3pc Sydney63/1754/12c63/1752/11pc T aipei 80/26 69/20sh80/2670/21pc Tokyo68/2064/17r70/2164/17r Toronto73/2257/13t74/2353/11t Trinidad79/2659/15t66/1861/16r Vancouver67/1952/11pc69/2050/10pc Vienna 68/20 46/7pc55/1245/7r Warsaw65/1843/6sh58/1444/6r Winnipeg62/1643/6s66/1843/6pc HighLowWHighLowW F /CF/CF/CF/C TodayFriday W eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:S at 7-14 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles81F Friday:SW at 10-20 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles81F Today:S at 7-14 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles80F Friday:SW at 10-20 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles80F Today:S at 7-14 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles81F Friday:SSW at 10-20 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles81F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque 79/2657/13t81/2758/14t Anchorage55/1244/6c58/1445/7c Atlanta 86/30 65/18t80/2663/17t Atlantic City68/2064/17pc80/2657/13t Baltimore75/2364/17t80/2658/14t Boston 58/14 52/11c67/1957/13t Buffalo72/2256/13t64/1752/11pc Charleston, SC86/3070/21t89/3166/18t Chicago69/2051/10pc75/2350/10t Cleveland 76/24 55/12t68/2051/10s Dallas86/3064/17pc90/3264/17s Denver82/2752/11pc82/2754/12pc Detroit72/2252/11c76/2452/11s Honolulu83/2872/22pc86/3072/22pc Houston 89/31 69/20 pc89/3167/19pc HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodayFriday T odayFriday T odayFriday Indianapolis 74/2356/13t80/2659/15s Jacksonville88/3168/20t88/3168/20t Kansas City 78/25 58/14pc85/2962/16s Las Vegas99/3771/21s99/3775/23s Little Rock78/2559/15pc84/2858/14s Los Angeles 78/25 62/16pc78/2560/15pc Louisville78/2560/15t82/2762/16s Memphis80/2664/17c82/2765/18pc Miami86/3074/23t85/2971/21t Minneapolis 75/23 55/12pc73/2255/12pc Nashville80/2661/16t81/2758/14pc New Orleans86/3068/20t86/3068/20pc New York68/2062/16c79/2663/17t Oklahoma City84/2857/13s89/3160/15s Orlando 88/31 70/21 t86/3070/21t Philadelphia72/2264/17t80/2661/16t Phoenix99/3775/23s102/3875/23s Pittsburgh78/2558/14t72/2254/12pc Portland, OR82/2756/13s84/2856/13s Raleigh-Durham 87/3067/19t84/2861/16t St. Louis74/2360/15t84/2865/18s Salt Lake City 84/2860/15s89/3163/17pc San Antonio 89/31 64/17 t91/3267/19pc San Diego72/2263/17pc72/2262/16pc San Francisco71/2155/12pc72/2253/11pc Seattle 75/2351/10s77/2551/10s T allahassee 87/3069/20t89/3166/18t Tampa85/2974/23t84/2871/21t Tucson95/3566/18s98/3668/20s Washington, DC81/2766/18t82/2760/15t UV I NDEX T ODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV Index TM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 0 s 0 s 0 s 1 0 s 2 0 s 3 0 s 4 0 s 5 0 s 6 0 s 7 0 s 8 0 s 9 0 s 1 0 0 s 1 1 0 s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuWeather .com

PAGE 32

C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 20B, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 33

The Tribune The Tribune M y V o i c e , M y N e w s p a p e r ! Thursday, May 28th, 2009

PAGE 34

THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS The Tribune P G 20 Thursday, May 28, 2009 RELIGION INVictorian England young John C yril Hawes could never have dreamt t hat he would become known as the Hermit of Cat Island in the far off Bahamas. He was born on September 7, 1876 in Richmond, Surrey. He was brought up in the Anglican faith and while attending Kings School, Canterbury, where he loved to visit the cathedral, he became attracted to High Church rites. He had an inclination to become a priest but he reluctantly agreed with his father's advice to train as an architect. He regularly visited many cathedrals and churches but at the age of 21, at the Church of St Thomas he was overcome with the stirring roll of Gregorian chants, the psalms of evensong, the Magnificat and the sermon of Canon RhodesBristow speaking of the call of Elisha and of St Francis of Assissi pondering on the words "What shall it profit a man if he gain the whole world and lose his own soul." The effect was startling, "And then suddenly Our Lor d touched me with His grace.... Unspeakable joy flooded my soul and I thought sacrifice is no sacrifice at all because it is such a joy to of fer it"... I did not r ealise that when the Master says 'Follow me' it will be through the Garden of Gethsemane." Fr om that day, John modeled his life on St Francis of Assissi and longed for monastic asceticism. He wanted to become a Roman Catholic there and then. What would seem to most people as a great honour was looked upon as a great temptation to John Hawes. He was invited by Anglican Bishop Hor nby to design and build a church at Chollerton, Northumberland. He settled there and became a lay reader in a nearby Anglican Church. His design of the church approximated a Catholic place of worship. Bishop Hornby persuaded him to study for Anglican Orders and he duly entered Lincoln Theological College in 1901. After ordination at Fulham Palace he was referred by Bishop Hornby to be curate at the Church of the Holy Redeemer, Clerkenwell. Fortunately, this unique church had a Renaissance interior with a high altar and a Catholic environment Hawes felt that he would be able to fulfill his Franciscan ideals there. After a year he was raised to the priesthood. In 1906, Abbot Aelr ed of fer ed Father Hawes to design 'The Homecoming' at the Isle of Caldey and become a novitiate for the Franciscan life. Clothed in the novice's habit he took on the name Brother Jerome. But after only 4 months tensions arose between the old fashioned Protestant villagers and the Franciscan br other hood in their habits and sandals. Brother Jerome took up a wandering life living in poverty. Again Bishop Hornby, who was now in Nassau, came to the rescue. The bishop of fer ed Br other Jerome the char ge of Long Island, Bahamas that had been devastated by the 1908 hurricane and was in desperate need of his a rchitectural and priestly services. A fter an initial tour with the Bishop of the Northern Islands, Brother Jerome settled in Deadman's Cay, Long Island. He found himself spellbound by the tropical world, the strong sun, blue skies and seas. At Clarence Town the nave of the church was still intact and the population, largely white was made up of farmers and fishermen. He felt his missionary yearnings would be satisfied and set to work. He gathered a crowd of willing workers each offering3 days of labour men did carpentry and masonry and women toted rocks and sand on their heads while their half naked children played round the site. Fires were lit and galley pots of hominy grits bubbled on them. Brother Jerome indulged himself with Catholic services in two of the remaining churches but at Simms the congregation were violently opposed to High Church ways they would have nothing to do with confession, images, candles, incense, wafers or holy water and str ongly disapproved of the Virgin Mar y . The chur ch at Deadman's Cay was r ebuilt in a year and an old Negr o lady remarked: "Ain' dat beautiful, dat de Hebenly Jer usalem." Soon St Paul's Church, Clarence Town was rebuilt with its twin baroque towers, gleaming white in the brilliant sun it was called "The Pearl of the Bahamas." The first ser vice was Januar y 25, 1911, the Sunday after the Feast of the conversion of St Paul. At that service he informed the congregation that he was going to Nassau for a visit he didn't tell them he wouldn't be back for 30 years. Privately he had r ealised, "My hear t had long been in Rome, but now my head was bringing me over boldly". H awes travelled to New York and a ttended a Catholic Mass, visited a Franciscan Convent for a few weeks then received baptism into the Roman Catholic Church on March 19, 1911. He was now faced with an uncertain future. He visited his parents in England but then left for Canada and worked as a teamster on the Canadian railroad. Finally, he decided to go to Rome, where he was granted an interview with Pope Pius X at the Vatican. The Pope, learning that he was a convert clergyman, laid his hand on his head and said, "Bravo! Bravo!" and gave him a special blessing. John Hawes studied for 2 years at Beda College and joined the Third Order of St Francis at the Basilica of St Francis at Assissi his new name became Brother John Francis Xavier Hawes. Shortly before his ordination he was introduced to Bishop Kelly of Geraldton, who talked to him about the spiritual needs of the people and the cathedral he wanted to build inW estern Australia. From 1915 until 1939 he built many chur ch buildings and minister ed to the miners in the gold fields and bushmen. And he wasr ewar ded for his service when he was awarded a 'domestic prelate', which allowed him to be called Monsignor Hawes. As he aged and his health began to fail he felt he had ear ned the right to settle down comfortably and spend the rest of his life in ecclesiastic luxury. Monsignor Hawes hoped to end his days in the Bahamas as Brother John. (Next time Par t 32 Br other John becomes the Her mit of Cat Island) JIM LAWLOR The Franciscan Dream PART 31 BOOK PRESENTATION Jackie Mycklewhyte presents Father James Moultrie, rector of St Matthew's Anglican Church with a signed copy of her second book The boy and His Rooster a book of short Bahamian stories. The book was recently pub lished in March of this year. Mrs Mycklewhyte published her first book, 'The Boy and His Bottle', back in 2005. She noted that she is already in the process of working on her third book, which is expected be released soon. A n t h o n y L o n g l e y / S t . M a t t h e w ' s C o m m u n i c a t i o n s

PAGE 35

FEARLESS The Tribune Thursday, May 28, 2009 PG 21 RELIGION "I tell you the truth, everyone who sins is a slave to sin. Now a slave has no permanent place in the family, but a son belongs to it forever. So if the Son sets you free, you will be free indeed." John 8:34-36 (NIV EVERYONE wants freedom. The little girl racing down a hill, the teenager on the way to college, the young adult looking for an apartment, and the middle aged man readying himself for an early retirement. Everyone likes freedom. The ability to think, speak, or act in any manner they so choose. Everyone has freedom. To be free is an ability to see yourself the way God sees you. As a perfect creation, with an independent mind, body and soul unlike any other; so when you are physically and mentally in chains, your spirit is elsewhere. God loves freedom. He truly loves everything it encompasses and wants us to as well. This is in fact, why He gave us all freewill. The power to make our own choices in this life. Yes, God is in control, He will never forsake us, and He is omnipresent. And although He is, the architect of our lives; we are still the builders. Making the final decision on all the particulars, most importantly the foundation on which our lives will grow and strengthen; from whence we came, to where we will ultimately be. It is our responsibility, with all this freedom we have, to choose a solid, sound foundation, and take heed to not allow ourselves to be pulled in any and every direction. After all, there are only two ways of doing things, a wrong way, anda God way . W e may not be of this world, but we are in this world, and its offerings t hough deceptive, look magnificent a nd promising. They glow and they burn, guiltlessly tempting us and keeping our focus on exterior gain. We cannot afford to lose ourselves; that is our true nature, to society’s value system.A system based on self and not spirit, and a disgraceful appetite for wants and not needs. What we ought to value above all else is our relationship with God and the pure, sincere relationships we have with others. Basically the things that will last. As an individual who believes in everlasting growth and the importance of helping others on life's journey, I utilise my freedom to do just that; in addition to adhering to all of God’s word. That means I use my free will to show my love for God. We as believers need not be ashamed or regretful, in knowing the way in which we live and what we believe is not by force, but by a choice we've made as individuals along life's road. Our grass is greener; because we a llow the water of life, that is God's t ruth, to pour all over every aspect of our lives. This choice we've made by using our freewill, is the best investment, whether the economy be up or down. An authentic freedom found in faith, so that as we live, and are faced with a serious of choices, we can rest assured we will not be alone in making our decisions; decisions that will one day be worth more than this world can comprehend. In closing remember, with freedom, like Christ, who died not for his sins, we honour and serve God, by allowing His will to be done in our lives over our own. Toni Elizabeth Styles is a Bahamian writer and poet, currently residing in Nassau, Bahamas. Comments related to the article can be sent to fearless247@gmail.com. TONI STYLES Free... will EASTERis about the Lord’s labour on the cross to accomplish the work of salvation. Rogationtide is the period of three days before Ascension Day to thank God for the provision of food from the sea and soil, to pray for protection from hurricane, and for the wise preservation of God’s creation. Ascension Day (when our Lord returned to his Father in glory) reminds us to keep a balance between earthly pursuits and heavenly priorities. We are left here to fulfill the work of the church as we seek to make disciples so that none need perish but have everlasting life. In John 15: 16-17, Our Lord speaks very directly to his disciples: ou did not choose me but I chose you. And appointed you to go and bear fr uit, fruit that will last, so that the Father will give you whatever you ask him in my name. I am giv ing you these commands so that you may love one another .” When we pray in the name of Jesus, accor ding to the W or d of God, seeking the mind of Christ and desiring to do the will of God, then we can have our prayers answered. Mar riage and par enting ar e both labours of love within the context of the intimacy of the family. The family is the smallest and most impor tant social unit where we are supposed to learn how to love and be loved. Our spiritual and emotional maturation is essential to nation building. Professional and financial advancement should never be at the expense of the wellbeing of the family members. The chur ch family is the next spe cial unit in which the shaping of faith and formation of character is central. The blood of Christ unites us in a very special bond between believers which may at time seem closer than that shar ed with “blood relatives.” We are to support, encourage and pray for one another , as we worship and work to labour together in God’s vineyard. The wider community is to be our main focus as we look to bring healing and wholeness by introducing God’s children to God’s plan for their lives. The way we love one another as Christians and the way we show hospitality to strangers is intended to be a sure sign that the presence of the Lord is especially visible where love is. In I John 1: 20-21 we are challenged to do just this: “Those who say ‘I love God, and hate their brothers or sisters are liars; for those who do not love a brother or sister, whom they have seen, cannot love God whom they have not seen. The commandment we have from him is this: “those who love God must love their brothers and sisters also.” The famine in Judea mentioned in Acts 11:28 elicits this immediater esponse fr om the disciples: “the disciples deter mined that accor ding to their ability , each would send r elief to the believers living in Judea; this they did, sending it to the elders by Bar nabas and Saul.”(v . 29). Who needs to feel God’ s love thr ough you? Labour s of lo v e REV . ANGELA C BOSFIELD PALACIOUS MEDITATION The blood of Christ unites us in a very special bond between believers which may at time seem closer than that shared with “blood relatives.” W e are to sup port, encourage and pray for one another, as we worship and work to labour together in God’ s vineyard.


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The Tribune

LOW The Paint:

Mt. Royal Ave. \

PLENTY OF

Volume: 105 No.153



=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009

WSS

LCM mM

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE

> DP BAHAMAS BUDGET 2009/10 SPECIAL Sins
‘Litigation likely’
over amendment

to the Customs
Management Act

leacher's, doctors

PM delivers
sober address

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

TEACHERS, doc-
tors and nurses are
among those on the
public payroll who
will be hit by cutbacks
in government's
upcoming budget,
having to forego
salary increases —
with the latter not
receiving an antici-
pated $10.5 million
health insurance ben-
efit — in this fiscal
year.

This revelation was
made by Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham as he delivered a
sober address on the state of
the economy during the pre-
sentation of the 2009/2010 fiscal
budget to the House of Assem-
bly yesterday.

He explained that to reduce
public spending during the eco-
nomic turbulence, government
plans to maintain recurrent
expenditure — such as salary
payments — in the upcoming
fiscal year.



PRIME MINISTER
Hubert Ingraham at the
House of Assembly
making his budget
communication.
¢ SEE PAGES THREE,
SEVEN AND BUSINESS
SECTION FOR MORE
BUDGET NEWS

"In this regard, we
will endeavour to
maintain employment
levels and other pri-
orities. And we will
move firmly to elimi-
nate expenditures
which, in present cir-
cumstances, are of
low priority. For
example, travel to
international confer-
ences will be reduced
to the bare minimum
and only urgent
staffing appointments
will be approved.
Each ministry and
department is aware
of government policy
on this issue and is
gearing to give effect
to it,” he said.

This "expenditure restraint”
led government to make some
tough decisions which will affect
professionals in core sectors of
the economy.

"T note in this regard the need
to require teachers, doctors and
nurses to forgo this year, the
salary increases, and in the case
of nurses, a new health insur-
ance benefit, provided for in
their contract, totalling some

SEE page 10

Felipé Major/Tribune staff |



m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

AFTER reportedly being released from Her
Majesty’s Prison only two days ago, a 24-year-old
man is back in police custody being questioned in
connection with the murder of his 19-year-old
girlfriend and an attempt to bury her body in the
War Veterans Cemetery early yesterday morning.

According to reports reaching The Tribune,

Former president
of GB Chamber

of Commerce
responds to Budget






LEFT: The uncle
of Shenise Adder-
ley, Calvin Fisher,
and her mother,
Carol Fisher, show
a photograph of
the 19-year-old
(above).

the 24-year-old Chippingham resident was at SHENISE ADDERLEY’S body was found in this grave.
home when his girlfriend, Shenise Adderley
returned to their residence that night from work.

Reportedly, there was an argument, and gun-
shots were heard by neighbours sometime around
2am. A short time later, a resident in the area
reported that he had been approached by a man

















CHAIR OMMTe eT C
protect CLICO policyholders

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

chase policies from the failed
company Clico (Bahamas) Ltd
and assume the possible expo-
sure of $30 million without the
surety from government.

It is expected the $30 million
maximum guarantee will be in
place for five years and cover all
policies that are already in force.

The maximum covered by the
guarantee includes the full
amount for accident and sickness
policies, as well as group life,

SEE page 14

CLICO policyholders will be
protected by a $30 million guar-
antee from government to facil-
itate the sale of Clico’s policy lia-
bilities to insurance companies,
the Prime Minister has
announced.

During his Budget Communi-
cation in the House of Assem-
bly Mr Ingraham said insurance
companies were unwilling to pur-



asking for assistance in “disposing” of a body.
Police were later told that a man had gone to
the Veterans Cemetery on Infant View Road

SEE page 10



AIRPORT SECURITY

CHIEF REPORTEDLY SHOT

SANDILANDS NURSING STAFF
THREATEN SICK-OUT

OPPOSITION CONCERNED
OVER PUBLIC SERVICE JOBS





Durham § es
P.0.Box N3723

‘Tel:326-1875









m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

A FORMER Grand
Bahama Chamber of Com-
merce president last night
said renewed litigation was
likely over the Governmen-
t’s 2009-2010 Budget plans
to amend the Customs Man-
agement Act, given that the
changes appeared to be an
attempt to give Customs
“arbitrary powers” to con-
duct audits of Port Authori-
ty licensees.

Christopher Lowe, who is
also operations manager at
Kelly’s (Freeport), said
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham’s Budget commu-
nication, and the amend-
ments tabled in the House
of Assembly for their First
Reading yesterday, seemed
to be a government attempt
to circumvent previous

SEE page 12

Govt ‘making
reforms to
keep country
above water’

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia. net

WITH the future still uncertain
and the possibility that any economic
projections may quickly be rendered
obsolete, the Prime Minister has
sought to assure the public that gov-
ernment is acting cautiously and
making reforms to keep the country
above water in challenging times.

But despite these pledges Mr
Ingraham yesterday provided the
public with little reason to rejoice
when he delivered the 2009/2010
Budget Communication in parlia-
ment.

Instead he offered domestic and
global facts and figures to justify cut-
backs in spending almost across the
board and the need for what may in
some cases be unpopular but cost-
saving reforms.

This as he confirmed that the
Bahamas is experiencing “a severe
downturn in our economy in a most
extreme form - (with) reduced
tourism, reduced foreign direct
investments, reduced government
revenues, reduced employment and
contracting living standards.”

Outlining government’s financial
strategy for the 2009/2010 fiscal year,

SEE page 14

Ph: (242) 825-2576

East Stree! (Seuth of Andeos Avenue)

or
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emai: janaens cor alvere.com
WW. janaeeebridal. com







NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS” LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Nursing staff at Sandilands rehabilitation centre threaten action toda



m By PAUL G TURNQUEST

lands received cuts ranging from

late on arrival at work, they claim

ter resolve this today. This is

‘Reverse pay cuts - or face a sick-out

Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

NURSING staff at the Sandi-
lands rehabilitation centre have
threatened to stage a sick out
today if salary pay cuts are not
reimbursed, union president Cle-
ola Hamilton warned.

Yesterday, more than 500 nurs-
es and auxiliary staff at Sandi-











































ee ey lat eee la
pa a4

as low as $1.50 to nearly $600.

The deductions, it was claimed,
are due to the results of a pilot
project that required employees
to sign in. The data was then
transferred to the accounting
department, which recorded who
arrived late, or left the facility
before their shifts had been com-
pleted.

While the majority of those
affected accept that they signed in

= hi I
ee reas ete Ts

‘ f ifs
th se FRIES fy

An gocchusive luxury

no due process was followed in
terms of issuing first a verbal
warning, followed by a written
one before any pay cuts could be
carried out.

“When you start messing with
people’s money that’s when you
have problems,” Ms Hamilton,
the president of the Nursing
Union said.

“Tf it is not resolved they will
not be back to work. So they bet-

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wrong,” she exclaimed.

As one out of a few entities
under the Public Hospital’s
Authority, Sandilands staff com-
plain that no pay cuts have yet to
be seen at the Rand Memorial
Hospital, the Princess Margaret
Hospital, or the Public Hospital
Authority’s corporate headquar-
ters itself — only Sandilands.

“They are violating the indus-
trial agreement, and they are try-
ing to take advantage of the peo-
ple out on the front line. I told
Dr (Hubert) Minnis that the nurs-
es are on a pinnacle and with only
a little bit of hot air they will blow
us over. If this is the hot air then
we welcome it,” Ms Hamilton
said.

About a dozen other nurses
congregated with Ms Hamilton
and shop stewart Margaret
Knowles outside the Sandilands
centre when the media arrived.
They outlined their concerns and
warned they would not sit idly by
and allow this kind of “foolish-
ness” to happen.

Ends May 30

Mackey St: 393-5684

Fabulous

Selection of

ANIME CLEIN

BCBGIRLS





Felipé Major/Tribune staff

NURSING STAFF at the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre have threat-
ened to stage a sick out today in a pay dispute.

Ms Hamilton added: “They cut
some girls for being late twice.
Some people were late once and
you cut them?

“No warning letter you give
them? This is procedural impro-
priety. Everyone except the doc-
tors swipe. Management say they
swipe for security but they aren’t

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timed. No one says nothing when
these nurses are here over their
time. No one says nothing when
they work through their lunch
hour.”

Attempts to contact the Minis-
ter of Health Dr Hubert Minnis
were unsuccessful up to press
time last night.

© In brief

Marijuana
haul found
after police
shootout

GUNFIRE rang out in east-
ern New Providence when a
group of men shot at police
and officers returned fire,
causing the men to flee and
drop $11,000 worth of mari-
juana.

The officers had been on
patrol when they heard gun-
shots and found the men gath-
ered behind City Market on
the corner of Wulff and Vil-
lage Roads.

As the officers approached,
shots were fired and the police
shot back.

No one was injured in the
exchange, and the men ran
off.

A bag containing 10 and a
half pounds of marijuana with
a Street value of just under
$11,000 was found in the area.

No arrests have been made
and police investigations con-
tinue.

Anyone with any informa-
tion which may assist the
police with this matter should
call Crime Stoppers anony-
mously on 328-TIPS (8477).

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 3



Opposition concerned [7772 Gj can

over public service jobs

Woman who

admitied lying

about kidnap |
hack in court

m@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE

Tribune Staff Reporter

A WOMAN who admit-
ted lying to police about
her three-year-old son
being kidnapped by her

former boyfriend was back

in court yesterday.

Angie Moss, 37, who
also goes by the name
Angie Brown, appeared
before Chief Magistrate
Roger Gomez in Court
One, Bank Lane after
spending three weeks at
the Sandilands rehabilita-
tion centre.

In an emotional plea to
the court, Moss asked for
help, claiming she was in
fear for her life.

She also alleged that
while undergoing a court-
ordered evaluation at

Sandilands she was contin-

uously being harassed by
her former boyfriend,
Kendrick Siefort, 35.

Moss claimed he had left i
numerous threatening mes-

sages on her cellular
phone.

Magistrate Gomez
expressed concern for
Moss and her children. He
ordered the matter be

referred to the Department

of Social Services for a
report.

Moss was granted bail in
the sum of $1,000 with one
surety. The case was

adjourned to July 31 which

is when Moss is expected
to be sentenced.

Moss pleaded guilty to
deceit earlier this month,
admitting she had made a
false kidnap claim because
she wanted police to lock
up her former boyfriend.

Mother of five, Moss told

police on May | that
Siefort had removed her

1996 Bluebird from outside }
her Lewis Street home. She i

also told them her son,
Shannon Bannister, was
asleep on the back seat.

Police issued an all
points bulletin for Siefort,
who subsequently turned
himself in.

m By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

DESPITE assurances given by Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham yesterday that government will do its best to try
to maintain employment levels within the public service,
there is concern from the Opposition that the nation's
chief has not revealed "the whole story", meaning that
further public staff reductions may be inevitable as a
further cost cutting measure to survive the dire economic
climate.

During a grave presentation yesterday of the 2009/2010
fiscal budget, Mr Ingraham said the severe global down-
turn led to an almost 17 per cent decline in recurrent rev-
enue, estimated to be $260 million lower than projected
in last year’s budget. He also painted a grim picture of the
country's ballooning deficit for 2008/2009, estimated at
$352 million, more than double the amount projected in
last year's budget communication.

In order to strengthen fiscal discipline during the cur-
rent economic turbulence, government intends to hold the
line on recurrent expenditure - such as salaries - in the
2009/2010 fiscal year, said Mr Ingraham.

Employment

"In this regard, we will endeavour to maintain employ-
ment levels and other priorities. And we will move firm-
ly to eliminate expenditures which, in present circum-
stances, are of low priority," said Mr Ingraham.

But leader of Opposition Business in the House of
Assembly Dr Bernard Nottage feels the prime minister
did not reveal the full scope of the possible need to shed
more staff from the public service.

"It's really a budget of doom and gloom and I'm not
sure that we've got the whole story yet," he told The
Tribune after the prime minister's communication yes-
terday. "He's talked about not replacing persons who've
retired - the next step to that might have to be to reduce
staff.

"I'm not suggesting that is the plan but I wouldn't be
surprised if that becomes necessary because they are

A
ao
a
o
=
=
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x
©
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5
o
a

BUDGET

predicting a revenue shortfall this year (and) they've
reduced the allocation to ministries. He says that he's
expecting to do more with less money but I'm not sure the
government will be able to do that, that the ministries will
be able to do that, year over year," Dr Nottage continued.

The prime minister said yesterday that the spots left
vacant by 138 public servants who will reach the manda-
tory age of retirement during the fiscal year will not be
filled, bringing the government annual salary savings of
an estimated $4.1 million.

The nation's chief also announced several planned
cutbacks on government spending such as reducing
unnecessary travel to conferences abroad "to the bare
minimum" and adding that only “urgent staffing appoint-
ments" will be approved.

Government will also restrain spending by allocating
funding to all government ministries, departments and
agencies sufficient to meet their "core" mandate to the
public. Subsequently, this year's budget includes decreas-
es in allocations to nearly all ministries and departments
over approved estimates in the current fiscal period.

"Clearly, all will be challenged to manage public
resources within very stringent budgetary conditions.
The stark reality is that the severe fiscal situation in
which we find ourselves warrants that to be the case," said
Mr Ingraham.

Still there are a few selected increases, the largest are
allotted to the Department of Public Service, $10.4 mil-
lion (for pensions, insurance for uniformed services and
others); the Public Hospitals Authority, $7.3 million; the
Department of Environmental Health Services, $2.9 mil-
lion; and the Department of Public Health, $1.9 million.

Total recurrent expenditure allocations in 2009/2010 fis-
cal year are set at a level of $1.53 billion, some $39.3
million lower than the approved estimates for 2008/09.

"Expenditure restraint" will also lead to the foregoing
of salary increases for nurses, doctors and teachers dur-
ing the upcoming fiscal year.

Nurses will also have to forego an anticipated $10.5 mil-
lion healthcare benefit as a result.



ZHIVARGO LAING, Minister of
State in the Ministry of Finance,
holding the 2009/2010 budget
communication, surroundechby-
other Cabinet ministers.



Christie: Budget offers no blueprint for way forward

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

RESPONDING to govern-
ment’s 2009/2010 budget com-
munication, opposition leader
Perry Christie said that if the
prime minister is serious about
fiscal prudence during these
tough economic times, he should
start cutting back on the size of
his Cabinet.

Chastising Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham’s government
for its sober and “depressing”
view of the state of the country,
Mr Christie said this year’s bud-
get once again offered no blue-
print for the way forward.

Claiming government is “sim-
ply waiting” for the world to
change, Mr Christie said the
Bahamas must accept the eco-
nomic realities it is faced with,
but must not waive the white flag
of surrender, “as this govern-
ment proposes to do.”

“This budget inspires no hope.
Do we stand still and do nothing
hoping that the world changes?
There is not one thing in the
prime minister’s statement to use
our ingenuity, creativity to
inspire our people,” he said.

Mr Christie said that the prime
minister should have presented
the country with strategies to
help it grow in these difficult
times — such as plans for devel-
oping agriculture and fisheries,
improving the financial services
sector and meeting the chal-
lenges facing the tourism indus-
try.

“We remind the prime minis-
ter with regard to changes in the
terms and conditions of workers
in the public service that those
changes will require the concur-
rence of workers. We are espe-
cially concerned about the gov-
ernment’s decision to eliminate
health insurance for nurses. This
was a very strongly negotiated
benefit, which nurses who are
exposed to diseases on a daily
basis require. We urge the gov-
ernment to reconsider this deci-
sion.

“We are also concerned that
no mention was made about the
much promoted drug prescrip-
tion programme. What does this
budget statement say to the chil-
dren who are coming out of
school this year about their
futures? The people who are in
college today. What will they do?
What is the promise for them?
The budget said nothing to the
new college graduate, to the stu-
dents at the College of the

Bahamas, to the thou-
sands coming out of
high school this year,”
he said.

With thousands of
Bahamians out of
work, and many more
on the brink of losing
their homes, Mr
Christie said that
Bahamians had been
looking to the budget
communication for
some glimmer of
hope.

“Instead of a plan,
instead of hope, what

Perry Christie



mechanics,
reform, passing laws,
bringing into force
new regulations, not
hiring people. This is
a budget that will
inflict pain.

“We reiterate — and
this is reinforced by no
less than Standard and
Poor’s — that it is the
policies of this gov-
ernment that stopped
the momentum of this
economy and under-
mined internal and
external investor con-

talk of direct investments left on the
table by my government, the
economy of the Bahamas may
have been cushioned from the
full effects of the global eco-
nomic crisis,” he said.

Mr Christie added that the
government’s decision to initi-
ate budget cuts in its third year in
office is an admission that its
economic policies over the last
two years “have failed.”

He promised that the PLP
would carefully analyse the bud-
get communication and its
accompanying bills and speak
more fully on the matter during

they have gotten yet again from
the prime minister is a long
description of what the problem
is mixed in with self-congratula-
tion over social service interven-
tions. There was no recognition
that the policies of this adminis-
tration helped to put us in this
situation. There is plenty on

fidence. The termination of hun-
dreds of public sector workers
sent the signal to the private sec-
tor that they were free to lay off
employees.

“We maintain that had the
FNM not stopped the public
infrastructure contracts, not
delayed the approval of foreign

the debate next week.

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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Realistic approach is correct

EARLIER this month a letter writer to The
Tribune criticised Prime Minister Ingraham for
selecting a foreigner to head the soon to be
established Utilities Regulation and Competi-
tion Authority (URCA), whose job it will be to
regulate government’s electronic communica-
tions policy.

During the recent debate on the 2009 Com-
munications Bill to provide communications
services — preparatory to the sale of the
Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC)
— Mr Ingraham had said that although gov-
ernment hoped to staff the regulatory authori-
ty with Bahamians, they “had to be realists.”

“But we are realists,” he said, “and we also
recognise that in this early phase we will be
required to access talent that may not be avail-
able in the Bahamas.”

Government, he said, had already identified
this talent. The new policy director of URCA
would be a foreigner. Mr Ingraham also expect-
ed that “some of the salaries paid to some of the
professionals will be higher than what is nor-
mally paid in other areas in the Bahamas.”

“Basically,” said the letter writer, what Mr
Ingraham was telling his fellow countrymen
was: “Bahamians you are too incompetent and
unqualified to set policy and/or regulate your
own utilities and communications sector —ha!
take that like a swift kick to you know where!”

The letter writer said, for example, that he
had spent 12 years working at a major telecom-
munications company in the USA “in spe-
cialised areas, the last being negotiating inter-
national settlement rates between the telecom-
munications company and foreign telecommu-
nications carriers saving monies...” He did not
say how many years ago it was that he had held
such a position. Of course, what might have
been then and what is now could be light years
apart. What one could have done then, could
not be done now with the rapid advancement in
technology.

Mr Ingraham’s statement is an insult to no
Bahamian. However, it is a realistic assessment
of the present standard of local talent. Busi-
nesses — especially international businesses —
will tell you that the present standard of our
telecommunications system is one of the stum-
bling blocks to the advancement of e-commerce.
BaTelCo (now BTC) did the best it could with
the local talent that it had. However, that local
talent from a small archipelago of 300,000 souls
has not had the opportunity of the needed expo-
sure in the fast developing and changing
telecommunications world of today. If we had
had the talent of which the correspondent
writes, then we would have had a better
telecommunications service than we have now
and there would be no need to sell BTC. The
Bahamas has to move to the next level. If we do

Bay farms in the 1970s, government will have to
bring in foreign experts to train the next gen-
eration of Bahamians to replace them.

The letter writer questioned whether the
USA would have so insulted its citizens. It was
not so many years ago that the USA was com-
plaining of a shortage of technical staff to keep
it the world leader in telecommunications and
modern technology. It was not backward in
importing the smartest brains India had to offer
to fill the void. And when American business-
men felt that the unions were pricing them-
selves and their members out of the market,
they had no crisis of conscience when they
decided to transfer their work overseas to be
expertly handled by Asian workers. It is not
unusual for a person to call an American com-
pany for information, only to have the call and
question answered by a company in New Delhi.

So the lack of talent in their own country is
not going to hold back America in maintaining
its position as a world leader. If they don’t have
the talent, they will import it. And if local exper-
tise is too expensive they will reach half across
the world to employ people who offer more
competitive services.

To say that the Bahamas is moving into the
next generation of the telecommunications
industry with a foreigner at the head, is no
reflection on the ability of Bahamians. There are
many smart Bahamians, who with training will
be able to prepare for the top jobs. But making
decisions on the basis of nationalistic pride is
foolhardy — as the people left behind in Alice
Town, Eleuthera will now tell you. Mind you
when the Pindling administration decided to
take over the once flourishing Hatchet Bay
farms, drive out the foreign scientists and the
trained Bahamians who were not PLP, many
Alice Town residents were delighted. They were
delighted because they felt they would step into
the vacant positions. However, as those who
took over the farm had no experience, and the
politicos in Nassau, who made the decisions.
had even less, the Bahamian run farm was a
colossal failure. It soon shut down. The Alice
Town residents now realise that if the foreign-
ers had stayed and trained them, they might
have indeed had what former prime minister
Lynden Pindling promised — the “greatest
success story in the country’s history of agri-
culture.” Instead they have a ramshackle waste-
land, not the promised “triumph of the human
spirit”, but the folly of short-sighted, inexperi-
enced politicians in a small country who put
pride before commonsense.

Fortunately, Mr Ingraham is a realist who is
not willing to walk down that thorny path to
oblivion. Bahamians will take their place in the
sun when they accept that this can only be
achieved with a better trained and more pro-

Grading our
Ministers — an

exercise in
democracy

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

A recent Tribune article which
graded the Cabinet Ministers was
a very interesting one. I think this
kind of exercise is one that
encourages people to understand
that the power in this country,
and in any true democracy, lies
with the people and not with the
41 Members of Parliament whom
we elect to represent us and to
be our servants.

An even more interesting exer-
cise, I believe, would be to have
all of us, (the general public),
grade our employees, (the min-
isters)....on a regular basis.

To this end, a website has been
constructed and we invite all
Bahamians to participate. The
website can be found at the fol-
lowing address http://qrade.speed-
survey.com

Before we get too high and
mighty about being the boss, I
would like to stress that we also
have our part to play. Bahami-
ans are often too complacent. We
sit back and complain about what
the Members of Parliament are
not doing, but we seldom take
action. During elections, we
attend rallies and congregate at
constituency offices, we chat and
rant and rave, and then as soon as
elections are over we all sit back,
watch, criticise, condemn, many
of us begging MP’s for handouts,
asking them to pay our rent and
light bills, find us government
jobs, give us government con-
tracts, get rid of crime, solve the
problem of health care, bring the

letters@tribunemedia net



tourists here, develop agriculture,
get rid of the illegal aliens —
whom we continue to employ —
and the list of expectations and
demands goes on and on..... and
then we expect the 41 men and
women in parliament to get it all
done. While the 350,000 of us left,
do nothing but sit and watch...and
condemn.

It is clear that Bahamians are
confused about where the power
lies when we can make comments
like “This Minister is no good
because he has no plan.” The
question is, what is your plan!?
Ministers of the government
should be carrying out the peo-
ple’s agenda! Not an agenda of
their own!

I was most impressed recent-
ly, when The Hon Branville
McCartney actually posted a
notice to let constituents know
what the discussion in the House
was going to be about and then
asked for their input! Now that is
true representation!

Many of us do not read the
notices in the papers or attend
constituency meetings, or town
meetings, or any other event to
show our support or lack of sup-
port of anything. The majority of
us even fail to try and work
together in our own neighbour-
hoods. We complain about how

we haven’t seen our MP since
election, when we ourselves have
never visited the constituency
office or shown up to any event
that has organised for the con-
stituency office, or volunteered
our services for even one day!
Surely we don’t expect the MP
to visit 5000 voters every week!
And don’t insist that he send his
representatives because....we are
the people he represents! We
need to get up and help out!

If anyone or all of the 41 MP’s
and Ministers are not perform-
ing, it is because the 350,000+ of
us left, have allowed it. They can
only get away with what we let
them. It takes all of us to make a
difference, no matter which party
is In power.

The purpose of the survey is
not to bash or blame or criticise,
but to get an honest opinion of
how The Bahamian public feels
about the performance of each
of the ministers whom we pay to
work for us.

The comments and the grades
will be sent to each of the minis-
ters, in an effort to get them to
improve and make changes,
based on the constructive criti-
cism, and suggestions of their
employers....we....the people!

Thank you for your concern
and willingness to participate as a
citizen of this country.
http://grade.speedsurvey.gzm

BAHAMA VOICE
Nassau,
May 19, 2009.

No legitimate reason to stop eating of turtles

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I have been following all of the letters in your
paper regarding the capture of turtles in the Bahamas

and I have to reply now.

I am a conscientious conservationist but not a
fanatic one. I want my grandchildren and their grand-
children to be able to enjoy more of this Bahamas
and what it has to offer than what I have enjoyed,
and believe me that is plenty. I, and my wife much
more than I, do not condone the ill treatment of

any animal or living thing.

As such I have spent the last 15 years taking my
children and grandchildren on my boat for the entire
month of August all through the islands and I have
taught them that you do not kill anything unless
you are going to make good use of it.

To all of the people who are aginst turtles being
captured by Bahamians for food, I say to them, "Get
off their laurels and go out into the waters of the
Bahamas and see for themselves as the fishermen
from every island do, that there is absolutely no
shortage of green turtles in the Bahamas.”

As a matter of fact there are more turtles in the

Bahamas today than at any time during my life and
I have been fishing and diving for the past 45 years,

The problem is the Ministry of Fisheries for years
had a fish market on Potter's Cay and before that

down at the old fish market on Woodes Rogers
Wharf where turtles were taken to be slaughtered in

private where the public did not see it, therefore it

did not create a problem which is now being com-
plained about, that turtles are being ill treated.
The eating of turtle has been a part of the
Bahamian diet for the 60 years that I have been
alive and there is no legitimate reason for it now to
be stopped. If cows, sheep or chickens were being

slaughtered on Potters Cay or Montagu Ramp, then

so the endangered argument goes out the window.

I guess we would soon not be able to eat anymore of
them and then what is next?

As I said I do not condone treating anything
inhumanely, but if it is done properly and privately,
then I see nothing wrong with it.

There are thousands of Bahamians who love to
eat turtle whenever they can and with today’s eco-
nomic crisis it would be very unfair of the Ministry of
Fisheries or the Government to deprive them of
being able to do this. If the persons who are against
this do not want to eat turtle that is their God-given
right, but by the same token do not stop other per-
sons from being able to do so. I shall wait for the
rebuttal which I know will come.



: Mr. Allen is very right in his thinking that ABNER PINDER
not want to repeat the tragedy of the Hatchet ductive local work force. Bahamians should not be deprived of a delicacy Spanish Wells,
that God put there for them to enjoy. May 26, 2009

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 5



0 In brief

Boy critically
hurt after head
hits concrete
during fight

A 14-YEAR-OLD Abaco
boy is in critical condition after
his head hit a concrete surface
during a fight with another boy.

The boy was airlifted from
Marsh Harbour, Abaco, to Nas-
sau for treatment, and is
presently in critical condition in
the Intensive Care Unit.

Police say he was involved in
a fight some time after 11pm on
Tuesday with another boy who
he knew. Abaco Police have
launched an investigation into
the matter.

Anyone with any information
which may assist the police
should call Crime Stoppers
anonymously on 328-TIPS
(8477).

Man jailed for
harhouring
suspected
pastor killer

|_| By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A MAN has been jailed for
two years after being convicted
of harbouring a man suspected
of killing pastor Troy Seymour
in Grand Bahama three years
ago. Solomon Young, 37, alias
Marvin Gibson of Blue Hill
Road south, was found guilty
and convicted of the offence on
Tuesday by Magistrate Carolita
Bethel.

Young was accused of con-
cealing the suspect between
November 13 and September
2007 with the purpose of
enabling him to avoid lawful
arrest. Father-of-three Mr Sey-
mour, a Kentucky Fried Chick-
en employee, was robbed of
$11,529 takings and killed on
November 13, 2006.

His death sent shockwaves
throughout the Eight Mile Rock
community in Grand Bahama.

The 37-year-old was report-
edly run off the road in the
Hanna Hill area and then
stabbed and chased into a near-
by house before being shot in
the face.

Mr Seymour, a resident of
Pinedale, was an associate pas-
tor at Mt Zion Baptist Church
in Eight Mile Rock.

Airport security chief reportedly in
serious condition after shooting

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

AN AIRPORT security
chief is reportedly in serious
condition following a shoot-
ing outside Asa H Pritchard
in Robinson Road yesterday
morning.

Jerry Hutchinson, who The
Tribune understands is gener-
al manager of security for the
Airport Authority and a
senior reserve police officer,
was shot in the abdomen
when collecting money from
the grocery wholesalers at
around 6.30am.

He was approached by an
armed robber as he was leav-
ing Asa H Pritchard on the
corner of Claridge Road with
funds to take for deposit.

The gunman threatened
him with a handgun and
demanded Mr Hutchinson
hand over the cash.

Assistant Superintendent
Leon Bethel said there was a

struggle between the two men
and Mr Hutchinson was shot
in the abdomen.

The gunman grabbed the
bag of cash, jumped into the
driver’s seat of a white Honda,
with registration number
111982, and sped off.

Police said crime scene offi-
cers recovered evidence of
firearms discharged outside
Asa H Pritchard at the time.

Appealing

Asst Supt Bethel added:
“We are appealing to the pub-
lic for help.

“Some persons would have
been around at the time and
we believe there are persons
who may have seen what hap-
pened.

“We are asking if they are
able to assist us.

“The car would have been
seen speeding away from
there and we would appreci-
ate any information.”

Asa H Pritchard bosses

Me EASES

declined to comment on the
robbery.

Anyone who may have any
information which may assist
investigations should call

Crime Stoppers urgently on
328-TIPS (8477). All calls are
toll-free and answered in the
United States to ensure total
anonymity.

Su a0) Or .@6 si

SW

Pe RTS te oy
PEAT CU Sa Gea Lt
PHONE: 327-6464
a ee



JUST WEST OF CITY MAREET, TONIQUE DARLING HIGHWAY at

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MINISTER OF YOUTH, SPORTS AND CULTURE Desmond Bannister
(left) greeted Federation of International Football Association (FIFA)
president yesterday at the Lynden Pindling International Airport.
Bahamas Football Association president Anton Sealey made the
introduction. Mr Blatter is in Nassau for the FIFA Congress 2009
which will be held June 2 and 3 at Atlantis, Paradise Island.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



A number of prominent judges
have been appointed the difficult
task of selecting the next Miss
Bahamas World from amongst the
young women collectively known
as the Earth Angels.

International and local experts
from the fields of pageantry, beau-
ty and fashion will spend three
days this weekend selecting the
nation’s newest beauty ambas-
sador.

Noted fashion stylist, beauty
expert and television personality

Nolé Marin heads the list of inter-
national celebrities who will be
judging the event.

Nolé served as a judge on the
hit television reality series Amer-
ica’s Next Top Model and has
contributed as a fashion expert
on numerous television shows and
celebrity events such as the Acad-

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Jackman, Heidi Klum and Lenny
Kravitz. He is a coach on the
MTV hit show “Made”, and cre-
ative director for Canada’s Next
Top Model.

Stir

Also judging is a young lady
who created quite a stir in the
2007 Miss Universe pageant. Fla-
viana Matata won the very first
edition of the Miss Universe Tan-
zania pageant in 2007, and went
on to represent her country in the
Miss Universe pageant the same
year, where she placed among the
top 15 semifinalists in sixth place
after the evening gown competi-
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PAGEANT QUEEN: Kiara Sherman,
who was crowned Miss Bahamas
Universe 2009.

She was the first contestant
from Tanzania to compete at Miss
Universe, and she did so with flair
— competing with a shaved head.
Now based in South Africa, she is
in high demand as a supermodel
across the continent and in
Europe.

Serving as head judge is fashion
designer and pageant expert Bob-
by Ackbarali, who has worked in
the international fashion and
pageant industries for nearly 30
years; achieving an unparalleled
record of success in his native
Trinidad and Tobago before
migrating to Toronto, Canada.

Former Miss Bahamas Tasha

Ramirez Cartharn has returned
home to serve as a juror. She has
been involved in pageantry for
over 21 years, and won the titles
of Miss Grand Bahama 1988 and
Miss Bahamas 1988-1989, and
competed in the 1989 Miss Uni-
verse Pageant held in Cancun,
Mexico as well as the Miss Model
of the World Competition held in
Taipei, Taiwan in 1990.

Brynda Knowles is an award
winning fashion designer, make-
up artist, and a four time Bahami-
an Designer of the Year award
winner.

She has travelled extensively
representing the Bahamas with
the Ministry of Tourism.

Dr Gregory Neil is a much
sought after cosmetic surgeon in
the Bahamas. He is also the offi-
cial cosmetic surgeon of the Miss
Bahamas Organisation.

Rounding out the panel is for-
mer Miss World Bahamas Latia
Bowe-Duncombe, who was
crowned in 2000 and represented
the Bahamas at Miss World in
London that year.

The judges will adjudicate the
evening gown and talent compe-
titions on Friday evening at the
British Colonial Hilton hotel.

They will then meet the con-
testants during one-one-one inter-
views on Saturday.

The Grand Finale will be held
on Sunday evening at the Rain-
forest Theatre when a new Miss
Bahamas World will be crowned.

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Scholarship
programme
to produce
qualified local
mariners

IN an effort to produce
qualified Bahamian mariners
to fulfil the needs of the
country’s domestic and inter-
national deep sea fleet, a
new $5,000 scholarship pro-
gramme has been intro-
duced.

The programme, launched
by the Bahamas Technologi-
cal Training and Allied Ser-
vices (BMTTAS), will offer
the following courses:

* associates degree in
marine engineering — 18
months

* associates degree in
marine transportation — 18
months

“BMTTAS would like to
reiterate our commitment to
fight the unemployment
problem in the country
through the maritime indus-
try. The Bahamas, as the
third largest vessel registry in
the world, can take advan-
tage of this global opportuni-
ty. To gain employment
onboard ships, Bahamians
must have specialised, skills-
based training to be competi-
tive in the international mar-
itime industry,” said a
spokesperson for the organi-
sation. BMTTAS noted that
ships are now using highly
sophisticated machinery and
equipment, which has in turn
increased wages and the
demand for college gradu-
ates.

The United Nations Con-
ference on Trade and Devel-
opment (UNCTAD) esti-
mates that the operation of
merchant ships contributes
about $380 billion in freight
rates to the global economy.

As of January 2008 the
world trading fleet was made
up of 50,525 ships and
manned by more than a mil-
lion seafarers of virtually
every nationality.

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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 7



Mexico reports six
more swine flu deaths

MMEXICOCITY

MEXICO is reporting six more } :
deaths from swine flu, bringing the }
country's toll to 89, according to}

Associated Press.

The Health Department says }
that 4,910 people have been sick- }
ened nationwide. That number }
includes the 89 deaths. Two deaths }
were confirmed Tuesday and four :

more Wednesday.

Mexico says its epidemic has }
largely subsided, but the confirmed }
toll has been rising as scientists test
a backlog of samples from patients.

The department announced the i
new toll in a statement Wednes- }

day.

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PM: Import tax cuts
On variety of items

si, BUDGET 2009/10



@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribumemedia.net

IN ADDITION to touting his
budget as one which contains
“no new taxes”, the Prime Min-
ister told Parliament yesterday
there would be cuts and reduc-
tions in import taxes levied on a
variety of items — ranging from
books, to suitcases and condoms.

Mr Ingraham said the rate
adjustments were being carried
out in response to “concerns that
have been expressed” and to
“increase the competitiveness”
of struggling retailers who sell
items popular among tourists.

He added that as government
continues its commitment to
simplify Customs administration
and make rate determinations
“more transparent” it will this
year be eliminating six more
duty and excise tax rates “by
moving them, in all cases, to a
lower rate of duty or tax.”

This follows government’s
amalgamation effort in last
year’s budget which saw the
number of rates in the Tariff Act
and the new Excise Act com-
bined reduced by 6 to 23.

Controversy brewed, however,
when it was determined that in
that effort a number of products
had the tax levied on them
rounded up rather than down —
among them, books, which went
from being subject to a seven
per cent stamp tax to a 10 per
cent excise tax.

Priscilla Cartwright, office
manager at Logos bookstore
yesterday said staff were “very
happy” to see the tariff rate on
books reduced to zero, as Mr
Ingraham announced it would
be come the start of the new
budget year on July 1, 2009.

Books had previously been
subject to a seven per cent stamp
duty, however in last year’s bud-
get retailers saw the tax rise to
10 per cent.

“We'd have been happy if it
went back to seven — but if it is
zero, that’s great!” said the man-
ager.

The company had made its
concerns known to government
about the rate rise while doing
all it could to try to keep their
books at the same prices but had
started to think it had no alter-
native but to raise them.

Now, however, she said she
hopes this will not have to hap-
pen, keeping books more acces-
sibly priced.

Along with several different
categories of books, toothpaste,
diapers and other “disposable
undergarments” for infants and
adults, female sanitary napkins,
condoms and other contracep-
tives are all having their tariff
rate reduced to zero in the
2009/2010 fiscal year.

Among the “tourist” products,
which will become less expen-
sive to import, having their
excise tax rate reduced from 25
to 10 per cent, are perfumes and
cases, including suitcases, trunks
and brief cases.

Products that will see a three
per cent excise tax drop include
knitted and crocheted items such
as jerseys, pullovers and cardi-
gans; tableware and other house-
hold items made of porcelain or
china; glassware used for table,
kitchen, toilet, office, indoor
decoration or similar purposes
made of crystal and photo-
graphic cameras and flashlight
apparatus.

Meanwhile, some items will
see the rates levied on them
“rationalised” and reduced to

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bring them in line with that
applied to similar products, said
Mr Ingraham.

Computer monitors will now
be free to import just as those
imported with computers are;
printer parts and accessories will
see their import duty rate fall
from 45 to 10 per cent in line
with that charged for printers;
blood pressure meters will be
subject to a 25 per cent rate as
are glucose meters and salad
dressing will see its rate reduced
from 40 - 30 per cent “in line
with the rate other sauces and
mixed seasonings.”

“It is also proposed to modify
the Fourth Schedule of the Tar-
iff Act to once again provide
exemptions for: materials used
for the restoration and mainte-
nance of historical buildings;
motor vessels and their engine
and mechanical parts used for
inter-island service; and parts
for temporary cruising vessels,”
said Mr Ingraham.

Noting that there would be
“only a minor increase in one
rate of tax” Mr Ingraham said
there it is proposed that the duty
on items “imported temporarily”
will rise from seven to 10 per
cent “for every three months the
items are in the country.”

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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009

Ohama declares Volusia disaster area after floods

m DAYTONA BEACH, Fla.

PRESIDENT Barack Obama
has declared Volusia County a
major disaster area, freeing up mil-
lions of federal dollars to aid vic-
tims of the flood ravaged site,
according to Associated Press.

As much as 21 inches of rain
drenched the area last week, caus-
ing an estimated $55.1 million in
losses and damaging 1,500 struc-
tures. Gov. Charlie Crist surveyed
the damages Tuesday, watching as

hundreds of victims lined up at two
assistance centers seeking help.
The president’s announcement
Wednesday will assist victims with
grants for temporary housing and
home repairs and low-cost loans
to cover uninsured property losses.
Tt will also include help for business

owners recovering from the effects

of the disaster.

The weeklong rain also flood- }
ed two parts of the Daytona Beach }
International Speedway, though }
none of the water was on the track. }

Wholesaler/Retailer located in Nassau seeks

Executive Assistant

The candidate will work alongside the senior management
feam at our head office, assisting in.a variety of areas such
as public and customer relations, marketing, advertising,
HR, basic bookkeeping, and various administrative duties
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The candidate should have the following skills:

General computer skills (Microsoft XP, internet, social
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Strang knowledge of Microsoft Office (Word, Excel,

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Familiarity with basic bookkeeping concepts
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@ By TIMOTHY ZUNIGA-BROWN
US Embassy Chargé d’Affaires

| ODAY we celebrate women

around the globe for their
extraordinary contributions in all areas
of society — as professionals, as bread-
winners, as caregivers and caretakers.

But today we must also focus on the
stark reality that women suffer dispro-
portionately from inadequate health
services, including maternal health and
family planning services, discrimina-
tion, the effects of war, and, at times,
victimisation by harmful traditions.

The statistics are staggering:

Several hundreds of thousands of girls
and women are trafficked every year
as illegal workers and/or forced into
prostitution.

An estimated 100 million to 140 mil-
lion women and girls undergo female
genital mutilation/cutting — the act of
cutting, removing, or otherwise harming
the female genital area, a major threat
to their health and well being.

More than 530,000 women die in
pregnancy or childbirth every year.

The vast majority of these deaths are
avoidable with known, simple, and cost-
effective health interventions.

More than 200 million women in the
developing world would prefer to post-
pone their next pregnancy or not have
more children, but are not allowed
access to modern methods of contra-
ception, leading to 52 million unin-
tended pregnancies and 22 million abor-
tions.

Women and girls are disproportion-
ately affected by hunger, disease, and
death.

For example, in sub-Saharan Africa,
approximately 58 per cent of all people
living with HIV are female.

In some countries, girls between the
ages of 15 and 19 have three to six times
higher HIV prevalence than boys their
age.

Inaccessible medical care, poverty,
and malnutrition cause at least 80,000
women to suffer complications during
pregnancy that include obstetric fistula.
The consequences of this condition,
when untreated, are life shattering.
Many times the child dies, and the
mother has lifelong reproductive and
urinary complications.

“More than
530,000 women die
in pregnancy or
childbirth every
year. The vast
majority of
these deaths are
avoidable with
known, simple, and
cost-effective health
interventions.”



Every year, 51 million girls are mar-
ried before their 18th birthday.

Girls who marry as children are often
more susceptible to the health risks
associated with early sexual debut and
childbearing, including HIV and obstet-
ric fistula. Lacking status and power,
these girls are often subjected to
domestic violence, sexual abuse and
social isolation. And early marriage
almost always deprives girls of their
education or meaningful work, which
perpetuates the cycle of poverty as well
as gender inequality and sickness.

D espite these startling statistics
we know that women around
the world have an undying spirit, are
surmounting obstacles, and are com-
mitted to making their lives, their fam-
ilies’ lives, and their communities bet-
ter. As President Obama said: “...we
must also recommit ourselves more
broadly to ensuring that our daughters
have the same rights and opportunities
as our sons: the chance to attain a
world-class education; to have fulfill-
ing careers in any industry; to be treat-
ed fairly and paid equally for their
work; and to have no limits on their
dreams. That is what I want for women
everywhere.”

On May 5, President Obama
announced that his administration was
committed to spending $63 billion over
six years to bring better health to peo-

THE TRIBUNE

_ The International Day of
Action for Women’s Health

Timothy Zufiga-Brown



ple around the globe. The President’s
2010 Budget focuses attention on
broader global health challenges,
including child and maternal health,
family planning, and neglected tropi-
cal diseases, with cost effective inter-
ventions. It also provides robust funding
for HIV/AIDS and adopts an integrat-
ed approach to fighting diseases,
improving health, and strengthening
health systems.

On behalf of the American people, I
am proud to celebrate this year’s Inter-
national Day of Action for Women’s
Health. In partnership with the people
of the Bahamas, the US not only sup-
ports education for all girls and critical
health and family planning services,
including HIV/AIDS and reproductive
health programmes, but also opposes
violence and discrimination against
women. We will continue drawing inspi-
ration and strength from our partners
around the world — to work together
to protect and improve the lives of
every woman and child on this globe.
For in doing so, we will fulfill the great
promise of prosperity and progress for
all people, and for all nations.

THE CANCER CENTRE

announces
The Specialists’ Cancer Clinics

++ Conditions apply. * Tedereck of The Bank of Nowe Senta, used und licence
BSO708

Friday, May 29,

Prof. of Medical Oncology
Prof. Karol

Sikora

MA, MB BChir, PhD,
FRCR, FRCP, FFPM
Dean of the University

of Buckingham

School of Medicine

Director of
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Oncology

The Cancer Centre

2009

Starting at 10am

Prof. of Oncology

The Hon. Prof.

Arthur Porter

PC, MD, MBA, FACR,

FACRO, FRCPC

Director General & CEO

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Health Centre

Managing Director &
Director of Radiation
Oncology
The Cancer Centre

Monday, June 22,

2009
Starting at 10am

At The Centreville Medical Pavilion
72 Collins Ave

Telephone: 502-9610
Open to The Public


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS

Business owner: people power

Castro's daughter:
Cuba to reinstate
sex changes

mHAVANA

operations previously banned on
the island, President Raul Castro’s :
daughter Mariela said Wednesday. }
The Health Ministry authorized }
the operations last year, but none }
has been performed since. It was
unclear when the surgeries would }
begin, according to Associated Press. }
Mariela Castro, a sexologist and ;
gay-rights advocate, announced the
return of sex-change procedures in }
comments aired on state television. }
She runs the Center for Sex Educa- }
tion, which prepares transsexuals
for sex-change operations and has }
identified 19 transsexuals it deems }
ready to undergo the procedure.
Castro also said she backs efforts
to allow lesbians to be artificially :
inseminated, a procedure currently }
barred. i
The first successful sex-change
operation was performed on the }
island in 1988, but subsequent pro- }
cedures were prohibited, Mariela ;
Castro told an international con- }
gress on assisted reproduction meet- }
ing in Havana. i
Some Cubans protested the deci- }
sion last year to allow the opera-
tions, either because of general }
opposition to the procedure or for }
its high costs for a developing coun- ;
try with economic problems.

WWII-era ship
hecomes sunken :
reef off Key West

@ KEY WEST, Fla.

A SHIP last used by the U.S.
Air Force to track missiles and
spacecraft has been sunk in the
Florida Keys, creating a new
artificial reef for sport divers
and anglers, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

The Gen. Hoyt S. Vanden-
berg sank in less than two min-
utes Wednesday morning, after
demolition experts triggered a
series of explosives that lined
both sides of the ship.

Key West City Manager Jim
Scholl says he believes the
17,000-ton, 523-foot-long ship
settled on the bottom of the
Florida Keys National Marine
Sanctuary in an upright posi-
tion, but he was awaiting con-
firmation from divers.










re =
ms

Colinalmperial

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A BUSINESS owner facing
rising crime in the Carmichael
area said his only hope for fight-
ing criminals lies in the power of
the people.

Etrich Bowe, 50, president of
the Carmichael Business League,
said piracy and corruption are so
endemic in Bahamian society he
has no faith in the police, the gov-
ernment or the judiciary to tack-
le escalating crime.

Crime is higher in the
Carmichael area stretching from
Baillou Hill Road east to Ade-
laide Village in south west New
Providence, as several criminals
live in the area and around 1,000
businesses are targets for thieves
and armed robbers, Mr Bowe
said.

He runs Advanced Technical
Enterprises in Mermaids Boule-
vard, off Carmichael Road, which
has been burgled every three to
six months over the last four
years or more. He said other
businesses in the area have also
been burgled, or staff robbed at
gunpoint, and one businessman
was shot on two occasions.

The Carmichael Business
League was set up in 2006 after
businessman Keith Carey was
gunned down on the steps of the
Bank of the Bahamas in Tonique

Darling Williams Highway, and
Mr Bowe is continually recruiting
members to improve surveillance
of criminals.

He intends to install 16 CCTV
cameras in the area but said he
has had little assistance from
police who are understaffed, and
therefore not only slow to assist,
but also slow to crackdown on
local drug dens and criminals.

Mr Bowe said: “There is no
monitoring, there is no police
presence, the things that would
deter crime are not there.

“We have drug houses and
police know where they are and
they don’t shut them down.
There are things that we can do
and we do not do.

“Crime is very serious in this
country and both the PLP and
the FNM have done nothing to
convince many of us that they
are serious about stemming the
flow of crime.

“IT have no confidence in the
police, no confidence in the court
system, and no confidence in the
political directorate.”

The government’s approach to
crime fighting has also been pub-
licly criticised this week by Bish-
op Simeon Hall, chair of the
National Advisory Panel on
crime under the Ministry of
National Security, which was
appointed in 2007 to examine
causes of crime and ways to mit-
igate it.

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Bishop Hall handed in the pan-
el’s final report including some

40 recommendations
to the ministry in
November last year,
just months after a
select committee on
crime was set up under
Dr Bernard Nottage to
examine the same
problem, but he has
not yet seen any action
taken.

“Tam a little doubt-
ful about what is the
intention of these
commissions because
they never seem to get
anywhere,” Bishop
Hall said.

“It’s something to
placate the cries of the

public, but we worked for one
year and we want something to

become of it.”

cere ws






GOVT’S approach to
crime fighting has
also been criticised
this week by Bishop
Simeon Hall.

Meanwhile businesses in
Carmichael Road are being bat-

tered, according to Mr
Bowe.

He said: “It seems as
if the government
wants to act to get on
television or in the
newspaper, but I know
if the government used
our resources properly
they could impact
crime.

“They could even
get more resources
from us, but what we
need from the govern-
ment in a lot of
instances is leadership
and the cooperation of
the police.”

Without action from

authorities, Mr Bowe believes
people will not have a choice but

to take on crime independently.

==. is the only hope in crime fight

He said: “I can foresee a lot
more private police — people
banding together to protect
themselves or having groups to
protect them, but we are heading
down a very bad path.

“People will just have to decide
what side they are on and going
to have to deal with the situa-
tion, but the road we are heading
down is a road where revolution
may not be a bad option.

“The pirates have to go, com-
merce must be restored, and we
need a system of justice. Not
laws, justice.

“It’s a whole system and cul-
ture of corruption that we’re
dealing with.

“We need to look at our
whole system and piece by piece
fix it.

“We will have to make some
sacrifices but we have to intro-
duce justice in our society.”

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THE TRIBUNE



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Buriget cuthacks

FROM page one

5 million,” said Mr Ingra-
ham.

The news came as no surprise
to several persons in the affect-
ed areas who spoke with The
Tribune yesterday.

President of the Bahamas
Union of Teachers (BUT)
Belinda Wilson said over the
last few days the union, in antic-
ipation of the cutbacks, had
meetings with teachers through-
out the country.

The group came to a consen-
sus to forgo a $3.2 million pay-
ment this fiscal year — repre-
senting an $800 lump sum in
payments due to public school
teachers — in response to the
current economic conditions,
she said.

"We want to be very con-
scious of the people who are
unemployed and losing their
jobs and on short work weeks.
So we're prepared to defer in
good faith with the government
at this time," said Ms Wilson.

Those in the nursing commu-
nity, who were expecting relief
from pricey healthcare costs,
are hopeful the anticipated
health insurance will be deliv-
ered once the economy turns
around.

"T think most of the nurses
are aware of the financial crisis
and they would understand if
its not included in the budget
this year but (hope) it would be
considered when the economy
is back on track," said one 27-
year nursing veteran yesterday
after the prime minister's
announcement.

"Right now (we) are looking
forward to health benefits in
terms of insurance because we
have to pay like everybody else
whether we go public or pri-
vate. We work in a high risk
environment and I think we are
entitled to some benefits
because we don't have anything
because if we get sick we have
to lay up with the public ward,
and if there are no beds you lay
on a trolley like everyone else,"
said the nurse who is stationed
at the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital.

During his address yesterday,
Mr Ingraham said that in line
with the growth projections,
government expects gross
domestic product (GDP) in cur-
rent dollars to be lower in
upcoming fiscal year - July 1,
2009 through June 30, 2010 -
than it was for the previous
period, by some $78 million.

To lessen the impact of this
on the country's revenue, gov-
ernment plans to "redouble" its
efforts in the upcoming fiscal
year to collect the maximum
amount of revenue due to it, he
said, while also continuing to
streamline revenue collections
to facilitate the payment of tax-
es and fees.

He estimated next year's
recurrent expenditure at $1.53
billion - $34 million more than
the projected out-turn for the
2008/2009 fiscal years - but $39
million less than projected for
that year in the 2008/09 budget.

The combination of revenue
enhancements and expenditure
restraint, Mr Ingraham said, will
result in a lower recurrent
deficit in 2009/2010 as compared
to 2008/2009 - $141 million com-
pared to $186 million.

When combined with capital
expenditure of $255 million and
debt redemption of $88 million,
this is expected to produce a
GFS deficit of $286 million, or
3.9 per cent of GDP in
2009/2010, down by 0.8 per cent
from the 4.7 per cent ($352 mil-
lion) projected outturn for
2008/2009, said Mr Ingraham.

Girl murdered
FROM page one

where the resting site of former
World War II legion stalwart
Audley Humes had been dese-
crated, and a girl had been
buried inside his grave.

Police who responded to the
report and arrived on the scene
around 6am used their trained
dogs to find the body, which
was dressed in pink and yellow
plaid shorts and a black blouse.

Visiting the girl’s former
home, police reportedly discov-
ered a bare back man sitting on
the porch in an unresponsive
and “dazed” state.

He was taken into custody for
questioning.

Shenise’s murder marks the
31st murder recorded for the
first five months of this year.

This latest homicide will
again raise concern about per-
sons being released from Her
Majesty’s Prison.

Last week The Tribune
revealed in an exclusive report
that 153 persons, who were
being held on bail, were
released from prison in the
month of April — some
charged with murder, rape, and
armed robbery.
THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Media is barred from
union press conference sry. 7775

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT —- THE media was
barred from covering a press confer-
ence called by second vice president of
the Bahamas Hotel and Allied Workers
Union Lionel Morley at Workers House
yesterday.

Wendy Pratt, an administrative official
in the union’s Freeport office, and the
niece of BHAWU Secretary General
Leo Douglas, told reporters to leave the
union’s conference room.

Mrs Pratt told a ZNS reporter that a
union boss had informed them in a let-
ter that reporters are barred from the
property unless invited by Mr Douglas.

As a result, Mr Morley and trustees
Ian Neely and Brian Collie spoke with
the press outside the building.

The Tribune attempted to reach Mrs
Pratt, but was that she was out of office.

Mr Morley, who is running for a union
executive position as part of Team
Deliverance, said banning the press
from Workers House is just one of many
instances in which the union has acted

THE Bahamas Humane
Society has lots of orphaned
kittens and are appealing to
the animal loving public to
open up their hearts and
homes to a cuddly ball of
fluff.

"This is just the time of the
year, I guess," BHS Presi-
dent Kim Aranha said. "We
have lots of kittens (in) all
sizes and colours looking for
good homes. There are oth-
er times of the year where
we only have one or two kit-
tens at a time.

"We try to find good lov-
ing homes for every healthy
animal that is surrendered
to us, but sometimes we real-
ly have to rely on others to
help us make it happen.

"Sometimes people plan to
adopt in the summer because
the kids are home from
school, what we are hoping is
that if people want to adopt
that they will do so now,"
she added.

Interested persons can see
the cats at BHS's headquar-
ters in the Chippingham area
or call the shelter at 323-
5138.

BHS is a non profit organi-
zation that is run exclusively
on donations from the gen-
eral public and profits from
fund raising events.

Persons interested in vol-
unteering at the BHS are
invited to call the shelter for
more information.




SMTA ROTA Ce CLUE e

Whit Monday Holiday Banking

Reporters are told to
leave BHAWU room

dictatorially.

Although the injunction filed by Team
Deliverance leader Kirk Wilson to block
today’s elections was lifted on Tuesday
by the Supreme Court, the team is con-
fident that justice will prevail on June 26
when a judicial review in the matter is to
be held.

By the end of the day, 6,000 members
of the Bahamas Hotel Catering and
Allied Workers Union will cast their
votes to elect a new team of executives.

Five teams are vying for the reigns of
the union — the Unity Team, the M
Team, the A Team, the Justice Team,
and Team Deliverance.

Me Wilson along with eight other
elected union executives have hit out
at the current leadership of the
BHCAWU, claiming that the proper



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MONDAY, JUNE 1, 2009 — CLOSED

Normal Banking Hours resume
TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 - 9:30 a.m. — 3:00 p.m.

Labour Day Holiday B

THURSDAY, JUNE 4, 2009 — 9:30 a.m. — 4:30 p.m.

FRIDAY, JUNE 5, 2009 — CLOSED

Normal Banking Hours resume
MONDAY, JUNE 8, 2009 - 9:30 a.m. — 3:00 p.m.

Participating Member Banks

Bank of The Bahamas Limited
Citibank, N.A.
Commonwealth Bank Limited
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited
FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Royal Bank of Canada
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rules and regulations were not followed
when the nomination and election dates
were Set.

He was granted an injunction last
Thursday staying the elections until such
time as a judicial review in the matter
had been heard. While the stay has been
overturned, Mr Wilson believes the judi-
cial review will go forward, and that
things will work out for Team Deliver-
ance in the end.

Mr Morley, a candidate for first vice
president, urged members to be cau-
tious in casting their vote.

“Members are disheartened, confused
and frustrated by what has been going
on in the union,” he said. “But I urge
them to be strong and vigilant about
their decision because it could have far
reaching implications.”

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THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 11

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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



‘Litigation likely’ over amendment to the Customs Management Act

errata 4 ‘ie | a

FROM page one

Supreme Court rulings that pre-
vented Customs from conducting
arbitrary audits of Grand Bahama
Port Authority (GBPA) licensees.
In particular, he suggested the
proposed Customs Management
Act amendment was an attempt
to do an “end-around” former
Supreme Court Justice Stanley
Moore’s August 30, 20002, ruling
in the case brought against Cus-
toms by International Underwa-
ter Explorers Society (UNEXSO).
In his Budget address to the
House of Assembly, Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham said: “There
is also an urgent need to clarify
and bring certainty to the admin-
istration of the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement in the Port Area.
“Accordingly, the Customs
Management Act will be amended
to put beyond doubt the powers

of the Bahamas throughout our
archipelago.”

The amendment, a copy of
which was obtained by Tribune
Business, said the reason for the
change was “to remove all doubts
that the Comptroller is the person
designated by the Minister to car-
ry out the powers in clause 2 (4)(f)
of the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment”.

The actual amendment’s word-
ing states that the Customs comp-
troller, his deputy or the assistant
comptroller “be the person desig-
nated by the minister to carry out
any and all powers” contained in
that Hawksbill Creek Agreement
clause.

The clause in question, as
analysed by Tribune Business,
gives a person designated by the

of Customs to protect the revenue minister “free access at all reason-






















KINGSWAY ACADEMY
TEACHER VACANCIES
For September 2009

Kingsway Academy High School is seeking
applicants for teaching positions in the following
areas:

® Information Technology

® Mathematics/Physics up to the Advanced
Placement Level

Spanish up to the Advanced Placement Level

Track and Field Coach

® Woodwork/Technical Drawing

All applicants should have the following:

0 Be a born again Christian

® An Academic degree in the area of specialization
0 A Teaching Certificate

0 Excellent Communication Skills

® A love for children and learning

0 High standards of morality

Letters of application together with a recent
color photograph and detailed Curriculum Vita
(including the names and addresses of at least
three references, one being the name of one’s
church minister). These should be forwarded to:

The Academy Affairs Manager
Kingsway Academy Business Office
Bernard Road
Nassau

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATION IS FRIDAY
JUNE 12, 2009.

NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Twenty-ninth
(29th) Annual General Meeting of THE

PUBLIC WORKERS’ CO-OPERATIVE
CREDIT UNION LIMITED will be held at
The British Colonial Hilton Hotel, West
Bay Street, on Friday, June 12th, 2009
commencing at 6:30 p.m. for the following
purposes:

- To receive the report of the Board
of Directors

- To receive the Audited Report for 2008

* To elect members of the Board
of Directors, Supervisory Committee
and Credit Committee

- To discuss and approve the budget
for 2010

eligible members, wishing to run for
a position on the Board of Directors,
Supervisory Committee or Credit
Committee, are asked to submit their names
to the Credit Union’s offices in Nassau or
Freeport, no later than Monday, June 8th,
2009 by 4:00 p.m.

All members are urged to attend and
Exciting door prizes will be offered.
Refreshments will be served!



PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham and his Cabinet ministers making their
way to the House of Assembly yesterday.

able times” to any development
project, business, company or com-
mercial entity in the Port area, and
access to all parts of their business,
“for the purpose of ascertaining
whether the several articles” admut-
ted duty-free under the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement are being used
for their stated purpose — mean-
ing in a licensee’s business, so that
no duty is payable on them.

Mr Lowe told Tribune Business
last night that the proposed
amendment appeared to partly
stem from Government’s despera-
tion to collect every cent in rev-
enue it could lay its hands on.

Customs has in the past believed
it is losing $150 million a year in
revenue in Freeport, but Mr Lowe
pointed out that the legislation was
not necessary, as the existing Act
gives the Comptroller powers to
investigate businesses where he
has reasonable ground to suspect a

fraud is occurring. This, though,
cannot be done arbitrarily.

“Here we go again. More
Hawksbill Creek stupidity,” Mr
Lowe said. “Yet again, national
leadership does not understand
national agreements designed to
develop the country.

“Tt looks like another licensee
is going to have to litigate again
to preserve the existence of all
licensees, as the Government
moves towards self-preservation.
Typical.

“We’re not going to take this
lying down, given the hundreds of
thousands of dollars spent for this
tax regime migration.

“Tt looks like more litigation is
on the horizon for any bonded
licensee that wishes to preserve its
own existence in this tough eco-
nomic environment.”

Mr Lowe said the Government
appeared to have charged ahead

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with its own planned reform with-
out consulting the private sector,
despite the Grand Bahama Cham-
ber and himself submitting numer-
ous recommendations — at the
Ministry of Finance’s request —
on how over-the-counter bonded
goods sales operated, and the
way forward for taxation in
Freeport.

The Government, Mr Lowe
added, was looking at the situa-
tion as one where it was losing rev-
enue in Freeport and needed to
get that back, yet it did not want to
repeal the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment because of the likely impact
on investor confidence.

“T hope, in hiring these interna-
tional customs experts, he shares
with them the reports prepared at
the Ministry of Finance’s request
with respect to the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement and the Cus-
toms Management Act, and the
operation of bonded goods sales
and migration to a new tax
regime,” Mr Lowe said.

“Maybe by sharing those they’d
save the taxpayers a bit of money,
because they’ve already been con-
sulted on. In so far as ’m con-
cerned, the Customs Management
Act and the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement have never been in
conflict. It’s the operators of both
that have been in conflict because
of government policy.”

Mr Lowe said that in relation to
Freeport, revenue was not gov-
ernment’s to lose, as the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement and its invest-
ment incentives had been designed
to aid national development.

In his judgment, Justice Moore
said UNEXSO had “sought relief
aimed at preventing the Comp-
troller of Customs from entering
and searching its premises, and
auditing it on the basis that the
Comptroller’s sole or principal
motivation in ordering and carry-

ing out an audit was malicious and
also unlawful.”

On the audit question, Justice
Moore found: “I am far from sat-
isfied that the Comptroller, let
alone Mr Sherick Martin, Super-
intendent Bahamas Customs
though he may be, can unilaterally
clothe himself with the over-broad
powers which he claims to enjoy,
which are quite outside the law
and, as far as he is concerned,
beyond the ken of the Comptroller
himself.”

The judgment later found: “The
Comptroller of Customs may not
enter except by due process of law.
Any form of non-consensual entry
would be indefensible unless sanc-
tioned by law. The Customs Man-
agement Act provides an ampli-
tude and sufficiency of powers to
enable the Comptroller to enter
premises for good and sufficiently
lawful reason, provided the stipu-
lated preconditions are met.

“Else oppression of the subject
may take place, whether wittingly
or unwittingly, however lacking in
malevolence the Comptroller’s
actions may be, and however solic-
itous of the protection of the rev-
enue...

“It follows, therefore, that the
Comptroller, well meaning no
doubt as he may have been, has
eschewed the plenitude of powers
open to him under the law, and
overreached into the realms of the
unlawful by devising the regime of
the audit, which is unknown to law
and completely beyond the bounds
of any statutory provision.

“With this vast array of pow-
ers... at his disposal, there was no
necessity for the Comptroller to
venture beyond the perimeters of
the law to devise a new strategy
called ‘The Audit’ to achieve ends
which could have amply
been achieved within the existing
law.”

Congratulations



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Bid to protect tourism from

the effects of climate change

A COALITION has been formed to
protect tourism in the Bahamas and
Caribbean countries from the effects of
climate change.

Several agencies, ministries and con-
servation groups were brought together
on Tuesday by Oxford University and
Caribsave, the Caribbean community cli-
mate change cente’s partnership.

Through Caribsave, the Bahamas and
Jamaica will be used as pilot countries
for efforts to protect the Caribbean from
climate changes which could be costly to
tourism in the region.

On a projected budget of $35 million
over approximately five years, Caribsave



structure and natural resources that could
result from climate change and its effects.
“Those are important considerations,”
Ms Walkine said. “So we have talked
about how we prepare ourselves to miti-
gate some of those types of impacts. But
in terms of our ability to actually deter-
mine what are the appropriate measures
to take, this programme is intended to
help us identify what we literally can do.”
Caribsave’s scope of research and strat-
egy formulations will include rising sea
level, coastal erosion and restoration of
mangroves and sand dunes, said Dr Mur-
ray Simpson of Oxford University.
“The Caribbean is the most tourism-

will hold workshops and symposia that DR MURRAY SIMPSON _ reliant region in the world and tourism in

will assess vulnerabilities and ways to
adapt to climate change throughout the
Caribbean.

“It’s a very important discussion about what we can
do collectively to ensure that to the greatest degree
possible, we put in place some policies and pro-
grammes that will help us to protect the resources that
tourism as a business and as an industry very heavily
relies on,” said Vernice Walkine, Director General of
the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation.

As a pilot country in the project, the Bahamas has
the opportunity to get into early explorations of the
practices that can be adopted to protect tourism, Ms
Walkine explained. She said other countries also will
be added to the discussion and assessments.

But the Bahamas has been considering climate
change for many years, Ms Walkine also pointed
out. Through the annual Weather Conference, estab-
lished by Ministry of Tourism and Aviation, the
Bahamian stakeholders have always been advised
that the increasingly warmer temperatures seen in the
Caribbean over the years would result in more fre-
quent and more intense hurricanes. The conference
has also kept up guards for the loss of basic infra-

of Oxford University

the Caribbean underpins national
economies,” he said.

“Tt underpins the livelihoods of communities here
in the Caribbean.

“And if we don’t protect and work with the tourism
sector and the other sectors that relate to the tourism
sector to address climate change, then what we will be
looking at are some serious threats to the economic
development and the sustainable development of
people living here.”

Dr Simpson said the government of the Bahamas
is working closely with the Caribsave partnership to
develop practical strategies for counteracting the
effects of climate change.

“What we need is information and strong data and
analysis of the problems, the analysis of climate
change so that we can define and design strategies that
are appropriate, practical and effective to deal with
the climate change issues,” he said.

Dr Simpson said the Caribsave partnership is work-
ing with donor organisations and development banks
to achieve the funding necessary to carry out its work.
He said several Caribbean countries will benefit from
the partnership as more funding becomes available.

Jim Lawlor elected President of Bahamas Historical Society

JIM Lawlor has been elected
President of the Bahamas His- tee.

Dames — management commit-

4pm each weekday. I would urge
all members to try to identify peo-

torical Society.
His election took place on
April 29 at the society’s annual

meeting.

Other officials elected
were:

¢ Stephen Aranha — first vice
president

¢ Dr Vernell Allen— second
vice president

¢ David Cates — treasurer

¢ Vernita Johnson, recording
secretary

¢ Joan Clarke — corresponding
secretary

e Gail Saunders, John
Knowles, Clarice Grainger, and
Betty Cole, June Maura and Paul
Aranha — trustees;

¢ Virginia Balance, Dawn
Davies, Anne Lawlor, Beryl Stra-
chan, Jamaal

Miller and Shantell Campbell-

In his first newsletter Jim
Lawlor said: "I will endeavour to
build the membership, finances
and the museum to a higher level.

“This coming year is the 50th
anniversary of the society and I
am hoping we can have a grand
celebration in the fall. Sugges-
tions for the format and venue of
the celebration are welcomed.

“In addition, I would like to
have a membership drive, and am
asking each active member to
recruit new members into the
society. An undisclosed prize will
be given to the member who is
most successful in this exercise. I
would remind all that member-
ship fees are now due for the
coming year.

“Presently I am working along
with our volunteers to keep the
museum open from 10am until

ple who might be interested in
helping out at the museum.”

Mr Lawlor said he has been
extremely pleased with the
response as they have added two
more volunteers and had a good
response to the membership dri-
ve.

The dates and topics for the
May and June meetings are as
follow:

¢ Thursday, May 28, 6pm —
Professor Kenneth Startup of
Williams Baptist College, AR:
"'This Small Act of Courtesy’:
Admiral Sir George Willes Wat-
son, Turmoil, Trials, and Trou-
ble in Bahama Waters."

Thursday, June 25, at 6 pm -
Scott Sherouse, PhD: "The His-
tory of Sweeting's Cay, Grand
Bahama"

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THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 13

SUNNYIS. S.CHAPTER

“EXCELLENCE IN ACTION”

The International Association of Administrative Professionals’® (IAAP) newest Chapter in The
Bahamas, Sunny Isles Chapter®, (SiC) which was chartered some 4 \4 years ago, was the
proud recipient of the Chapter Honourable Mention Award for Chapters with less than 40
members in the 2009 Avery Great Results Chapter and Division Achievement Awards!

Avery Dennison and IAAP started the Chapter Achievement Awards program in 1989 to award
IAAP Chapters that display excellence in specific areas of chapter operations, such as
membersnip recruitment and retention, outstanding educational programs, promotion of
professional certifications and community service.

During the Administrative Professionals Week (APW) 2009 celebrations, SIC made its annual
presentation to the Cancer Society of the Bahamas, On hand to receive that presentation

was President, Earle Bethel, he encouraged professionals to obtain annual screening for
breast cancer and to remind your spouses to screen for prostate cancer.

Picture above: Mr. Lennis Rahming, Sales and Marketing Manager, John Bull (Avery
Representative in The Bahamas) Mrs, Shornell Ellis, President, SiC

Presentation to Cancer Society

Picture above: Mi. Teresa Briggs and Mr. Earl Bethel, President Cancer Society

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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Local Company
seeking applicants
for the position of

Accountant

Excellent opportunity for an experienced and
highly motivated full-charge Accountant. This
position requires an individual that can multi-
task & has excellent verbal and organizational
skills. This position is responsible to assist in
the overseeing of the accounting and adminis-
trative duties of the company.

This position requires the knowledge of all
accounting procedures through financial
statements. Must be able to work indepen-
dently, as well as work with all departments.
Experience with Human Resources would be
an asset. Must be dynamic and disciplined.

Requirements include:

Thorough knowledge of Microsoft Software
Systems including: Word, Access and Excel,
Advanced Computer Accounting.

Degree in Finance/ Accounting or other related
field.

Interested persons should apply
in writing, with resume, to:

Accountant Position

P.O. Box $S$-5698
Nassau, Bahamas

or via Email to:
applications.dropbox?®gqmail.com




















FROM page one

which begins on July Ist, and the
significant extent to which the glob-
al economic downturn disrupted pro-
jections made in the 2008/2009 bud-
get, Mr Ingraham said his govern-
ment is “pacing” itself financially to
deal with the possibility that condi-
tions may not improve soon or may
“deteriorate further.”

With poor economic conditions
already severely restricting the funds
it has access to - the amount that
came into the government’s coffers
in the 2008/2009 budgetary period
was ultimately $260 million, or 17
per cent, lower than had been antic-
ipated - the Prime Minister
explained that his government must
place emphasis on “maximising exist-
ing revenues” to fund the services it
provides and maintain living stan-
dards currently enjoyed.

“This requires a two-pronged
approach: Modernising all aspects
of revenue collection on the one
hand and enhancing the efficiency
of all aspects of current expendi-
ture,” said Mr Ingraham, referring to
how government is seeking to get
its hands on more of the money
owed to it and more out of the small-
er allocation of funds it will be mak-
ing to its various departments and
agencies this year.

He said government is already
focusing on how it can “recreate the
fiscal headroom this crisis con-
sumed” as the flexibility it provided
will be as critical to the country’s
economic health moving forward as
it has been in the present crisis, he
suggested.

In these regards, modernisation
of the customs department, which is
responsible for collecting more than
50 per cent of government revenue,
is “vitally important”; as it is to finan-
cial administration - how public
funds are disbursed - to ensure it is
done in a manner as efficient and
accountable as it should be.

Emphasis will also be placed on
the modernisation of public corpo-
rations, with privatisation a key part
of this. “The financial resources
released from propping up these cor-
porations plus the proceeds of pri-
vatisation would provide very wel-
come relief to the Bahamian tax pay-
er,” he said.
Meanwhile, changes to the real prop-
erty tax act are expected to help the
government collect overdue tax of
this kind and ensure it improves the
likelihood of receiving it on an ongo-
ing basis.

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Jared Higgs

Govt ‘making reforms’

Mr Ingraham said that Govern-
ment Ministries, Departments and
Agencies will be challenged to man-
age public resources within very
stringent budgetary conditions and
managers will be called upon to iden-
tify areas where greater financial
efficiency can be obtained.

“The stark reality is that the
severe fiscal situation in which we
find ourselves warrants that to be
the case,” he said.

Notwithstanding its efforts in this
regard, the Governmentis still set to
borrow $255 million to cover its
expenses this year.

This as the country’s deficit, after
factoring in capital expenditure and
debt redemption, ballooned to an
“unsustainable” $352 million in the
2008/2009 budgetary period - more
than double what was projected
when the budget for that year was
prepared - as demands for govern-
ment services increased at the same
time as its revenue fell.

The Prime Minister told parlia-
ment that the global economy, the
backdrop against which Bahamian
economic challenges are set, is mired
in the deepest recession in over six-
ty years.

The International Monetary Fund
predicted in April that global activi-
ty will fall by 1.3 per cent in 2009 -
down sharply even from its own pro-
jection in January.

A recovery, when it happens, is
likely to be weaker and much slow-
er than in previous rebounds, he said.

Meanwhile, The Bahamas’ pri-
mary trading partner, the United
States, has not seen conditions
improve to the extent that had been
expected, with households hard hit
by the recession, in conjunction with
large financial losses and job losses
causing consumer confidence to hit
record lows.

Countries which are major trading
partners of the U.S. - like The
Bahamas - including Mexico, Japan
and Germany, have been hit espe-
cially hard, he noted.

In the Bahamian economy, Mr
Ingraham described how a weaken-
ing of the economy across all sec-
tors in 2008, precipitated by the glob-
al meltdown, has continued into the
first quarter of 2009, with further
declines in tourism, construction,
real estate purchases and foreign
direct investment.

Expectations that activity in these
areas will continue to remain weak
throughout 2009 means that further

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increases in the unemployment
rate are anticipated, said Mr Ingra-
ham.

The Prime Minister said his party
has maintained a “strategic vision”
since coming to office in 1992.

“By budgeting wisely, we creat-
ed the fiscal headroom which is
enabling The Bahamas to maintain
its course through these deeply trou-

bling times,” said Mr Ingraham.

He said he believes the Bahamian
people and outside observers will
for this reason commend his gov-
ernment and “continue to place their
fullest confidence in my Govern-
ment’s ability to return The
Bahamas to the path of social and
economic progress temporarily inter-
rupted by this crisis.”

$30 million govt guarantee

FROM page one

medical and annuity policies, as well as up to
$300,000 of insurance coverage for life insurance
policies, up to $100,000 of the accumulated val-
ue of annuity-gold retirement policies, and up to
$100,000 of the accumulated value of annuity-
executive flexible premium annuities.

It will not apply to policies and annuities of
directors and senior management of the com-
pany, or persons closely related to them, nor will
it apply to institutional or corporate policy hold-
ers or annuities.

Government will also establish a Statutory
Insurance Guarantee Fund to accommodate
the operational requirements necessary for the
proposed insurance guarantee and protect Bahamian policyholders in the
event of an insurance company’s failure to engage in domestic insurance
business, said the Prime Minister.

PLP Senator Jerome Fitzgerald said he was “pleased” the Prime Min-
ister’s statement addressed “some of the issues pertaining to the annui-
tants who had balances under $100,000” but said he felt the govern-
ment’s statement was “still to a great extent woefully inadequate in
addressing the concerns of a great many who have balances in excess of
that.”

He said he would have liked to see more details about the Statutory
Insurance Guarantee Fund.

“T wish they had said when it was going to happen and what the terms
are going to be, but I think on the whole it still leaves a lot of questions
unanswered.

Meanwhile, he added that “Bahamian people still want to know how
it all happened and who is responsible.”

The Office of the Registrar of Insurance Companies found a gap
between the assets and liabilities of Clico leaving a net liability of $42 mil-
lion. There are realisable assets estimated at $85 million and adjusted lia-
bilities of $127 million.

Policy liabilities are estimated at $73 million and other liabilities $54 mil-
lion, and as policy liabilities have a first claim on all assets, Mr Ingraham
said it is expected policy liabilities are fully covered.

Mr Ingraham said: “Many policyholders have expectations that day-to-
day contractual obligations arising under the terms of their different
policies should be honoured if they continue to keep such insurance
policies in force, by virtue of the payment of their insurance premiums.

“In order for this expectation on the part of policyholders to have any
hope of realisation it is necessary to sell that part of Clico’s insurance busi-
ness relating to such policyholders liabilities to one or more active insur-
ance companies with the capability of successfully managing the assets and
servicing the liabilities.”

Clico policyholder Bishop Simeon Hall said he is pleased the gov-
ernment will back policyholders.

He said: “TI expected no less from a government that has packaged itself
as a government of trust and caring and so I expected the Prime Minis-
ter to come through as he did, and even as they do, somebody must be
reminded that it was under his watch that somebody fell down at the wheel
and caused this Clico thing to come.”

A 26-year-old policyholder said: “Whatever speeds the process along
and ensures that the money we’ve already in the policies is worthwhile is

ood.
. “Since the Prime Minister encouraged policyholders to continue pay-
ing premiums I think he had some kind of moral obligation to ensure that
these policies were picked up by another company.”

Mother Debra Strachan who has life and medical policies for her two
sons, aged 21 and 26, and an annuity for one of her sons, is anxious for
assets to be sold so she will be able to claim for her sons.

Her 21-year-old boy, a university athlete, fell 15ft when doing a pole-
vault recently and she was not able to claim.

Ms Strachan said: “The Prime Minister kept saying to keep paying, so
we are holding on, hoping that it would come through, so we wouldn’t
have to take our insurance somewhere else.

“T would be pleased if someone would purchase the company and then
we would be covered once again because right now I feel as if we are not
covered. If someone was to die then what would happen?”

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SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Howard leads Magic to

116-114 OT win over Cavs

B By TOM WITHERS
AP Sports Writer

ORLANDO, Florida (AP)
— As LeBron James pulled up
for the final shot, Orlando’s
crowd gasped, Magic coach
Stan Van Gundy gulped and
time stood still.

Spinning through the air,
James’ 3-poimter looked good.

Not this time, MVP. This was
a Magic night.

Dwight Howard scored 10
points in overtime and Orlando,
raining down 3-pointers like a
Florida thunderstorm, with-
stood 44 points and the last-sec-
ond fling by James for a 116-
114 victory over the Cleveland
Cavaliers on Tuesday night to
take a 3-1 lead in the Eastern
Conference finals.

The resilient Magic, who
have overcome injuries, dou-
ble-digit deficits and a spat
between their star and coach,
are one win from their first trip
to the NBA finals since 1995.

“You can almost taste it,”
said Orlando’s Rafer Alston,
who scored 26 points. “We’ve
got to win one more game and
it’s not going to be easy.”

The Magic, who won a Game
7 in Boston in the last round,
can close out the Cavaliers in
Cleveland on Thursday night.

Howard finished with 27
points, 14 rebounds and again
made his free throws — 7 of 9
— and the Magic made a team
playoff record 17 3-pointers.
Rashard Lewis and Mickael
Pietrus had 17 points each for
Orlando.

“We just have to keep fight-
ing,” Howard said. “We have
an excellent opportunity in
front of us. We can’t think that
anything’s going to be easy. As
a team, we believe that anytime
we step on the floor and play
our brand of basketball we can
win.”

James added 12 rebounds
and seven assists, but he had
eight turnovers for the Cavs,
whose season of seasons is slip-
ping away.

After Lewis made one of two
free throws with 3.2 seconds left
to give the Magic the 116-114
lead, the Cavs had one last
chance.

Every person inside Amway
Arena and millions watching
on TV knew who was going to
get the ball — James, who
saved the Cavaliers with a 3-
pointer at the final horn in
Game 2.

He was double-teamed on
the inbounds pass but still man-
aged to get free. Dribbling into
the frontcourt, James rose from

35 feet, and with a clean look at
the basket, sent his shot toward
the rim.

When it fell short, Van
Gundy could finally exhale.

“With LeBron James on the
court, doesn’t 3.2 seconds seem
like two minutes?” he asked.
“We had two guys on him and
he made a move like a tight
end, caught the ball and still got
off a reasonable shot. This guy
is unbelievable.”

James said the ball felt good

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leaving his hand.

“T always feel I can make any
shot I take,” he said. “I was just
hoping I could make one
more.”

James, who played the entire
second half and overtime, has
scored more than 40 in three
games in the series. Cleveland is
0-3 in them.

Mo Williams, who guaran-
teed the Cavs would win Game
4 and the series, scored 18
points, none after the third

quarter. Delonte West added
17 for the Cavaliers.
Following the game, Magic
fans chanted “One more win.”
History is on the Magic’s side
heading into Game 5. Teams
with a 3-1 lead are a staggering
182-8 in series dating to 1947.
“We’re not happy with just
winning a few games in the
Eastern Conference finals,”
Howard said. “We want to win
the whole thing.”
Lewis’ catch-and-shoot 3-

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LeBRON JAMES gets tangled up

with Dwight Howard as he goes
up for a shot in the fourth quarter
in the overtime of Game 4 of the
Eastern Conference finals in
Orlando Tuesday night...

(AP Photo: John Raoux)



pointer on an inbounds play
with 4.1 seconds left in regula-
tion gave the Magic, who
attempted 38 3s, a 100-98 lead.

Cleveland set up a clear-out
play for James, who drove the
right side and was tripped in
the lane by Pietrus with .5 sec-
onds to play.

James swished his first free
throw attempt, and then after a
long delay, he made his second,
which danced on the rim before
falling through. James said he
never considered taking a 3-
pointer.

“If I was Rashard Lewis we
would have won,” James said,
smiling.

Orlando called a timeout and
tried a lob play for Howard,
who was ridden out under the
basket by Anderson Varejao.
Both players tumbled out of
bounds, and although there was
enough contact for the officials
to call two or three fouls, there
was no whistle.

Howard screamed in protest,
pleading his case to anyone who
would listen.

“Are you serious?” Howard
said, turning to the media sec-
tion. “If that was LeBron ... “

Howard took over in over-
time. He dunked the first two
times he touched it, shaking the
backboard each time and
Orlando opened what looked
to be an insurmountable six-
point lead with 1:11 left on his
tip-in.

James wasn’t done.

He made a left-handed
scoop, two free throws and an
are-you-kidding-me 3 while
falling into Orlando’s bench
with 4.6 seconds to go.

The Cavs put Lewis on the
line, and when he short-armed
his first free throw, they had
life.

James couldn’t repeat his
Game 2 miracle and must now
hope the Cavs can regroup at
home, where they are 43-3 this
season.

Howard picked up his sixth
technical foul for taunting Vare-
jao after a layup in the fourth
quarter. Cleveland’s forward
had draped his arms around
Howard in a failed attempt to
stop him from scoring, but
Howard muscled in his shot
before getting his T.

He'll have to behave himself
from here out. A seventh tech-
nical would earn him an auto-
matic 1-game suspension in the
playoffs.

“T might have to get some
duct tape,” Howard said.

NBA Today

@ By The Associated
Press

SCOREBOARD

Thursday, May 28

Orlando at Cleveland
(8:30pm EDT). The Magic
can close out the Eastern Con-
ference final by beating the
Cavaliers, who trail the series
3-1 after having the best
record in the NBA this sea-
son. Cleveland swept its first
two playoff series.

STARS

Tuesday

—Dwight Howard, Magic,
scored 10 points in overtime,
finishing with 27 points to go
with 14 rebounds as Orlando
won Game 4 of the Eastern
Conference final over visiting
Cleveland 116-114 to take a
3-1 lead in the series.

—Rafer Alston and Hedo
Turkoglu, Magic. Alston
added 26 points and Turkoglu
had 15 points, seven rebounds
and eight assists for Orlando,
which will try to close out the
series in Cleveland on Thurs-
day.

STRONG IN DEFEAT

LeBron James had 44
points, 12 rebounds and seven
assists, but Cleveland lost to
Orlando 116-114 in OT in
Game 4 of the Eastern Con-
ference finals. Orlando leads
the series 3-1. James has
scored at least 40 points in all
three Cleveland defeats in the
series.

STATS

History is on the Magic’s
side heading into Game 5 of
the Eastern Conference final
at Cleveland. Teams with a 3-
1 lead are a staggering 182-8 in
series dating to 1947 ... The
Cavaliers are 43-3 at home
this season, but just 1-1 in this
series.

RAINING 3S

The Orlando Magic made
a team playoff-record 17 3-
pointers, 11 after halftime, in
their 116-114 overtime victory
against Cleveland. Rafer
Alston hit 6 of 12 and Mickael
Pietrus made 5 of 11 3-point-
ers.

LONG WAIT

Orlando can make its first
final since being swept in 1995
by Houston if it wins one
more game against Cleveland
in the Eastern Conference
final. The Magic took a 3-1
lead over the Cavaliers with
their 116-114 overtime win.

FINED

The NBA fined Lakers
coach Phil Jackson and the
team $25,000 on Tuesday for
his post-game comments on
the officiating in Game 4,
which the Lakers lost at Den-
ver to tie the Western Con-
ference final 2-2. Jackson was
angry with the free throw dis-
crepancy — Denver’s 49
attempts were 14 more than
the Lakers — and accused the
Nuggets’ Dahntay Jones of a
dirty play for tripping Kobe
Bryant. Jackson was also
upset by a flurry of fouls called
against Luke Walton. The
league assessed Jones, Den-
ver’s defensive specialist, a fla-
grant-1 foul for sending the
Lakers’ star sprawling through
the lane.

KG’S SURGERY

Kevin Garnett had surgery
on his right knee after miss-
ing all of the playoffs. The
Boston Celtics’ star and inspi-
rational leader had bone spurs
removed during the arthro-
scopic surgery.

SPEAKING

“You can almost taste it.
We’ve got to win one more
game and it’s not going to be
easy.”

— Orlando’s Rafer Alston,
who scored 26 points in a 116-
114 overtime victory that gave
the Magic a 3-1 lead over
Cleveland in the Eastern Con-
ference final

“The guy’s out there chirp-
ing and talking and all that
kind of stuff. They were, all
of them, doing a little more
talking than usual. But as long
as none of them put their
hands on me, I’m cool.”

— Magic guard Anthony
Johnson on Cleveland guard
Mo Williams’ victory guaran-
tee. Orlando beat the Cavaliers
116-114 in OT in Game 4 of
the Eastern Conference final
and leads 3-1

For the stories
rz ale mia Ma=\ oe

tle MeL Tfo/ iT y
on Mondays


TRIBUNE SPORTS

THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 17



SPORTS



Barcelona defeats Manchester
United 2-0

eee ae be eS

be c
eee Es

BARCELONA COACH Pep Guardiola is throw

in Champions final



n in the air in celebration at the end of the UEFA Champions

League final between Man United and Barcelona in Rome Wednesday. (TOP RIGHT) - Messi holds the trophy at

the end of the match...

(AP Photos: Alessandra Tarantino)

Sharapova joins Safina and
Ivanovic in the third round

@ By CHRIS LEHOURITES
AP Sports Writer

PARIS (AP) — Maria Shara-
pova struggled again in her
Grand Slam tournament come-
back at the French Open, need-
ing three sets and a few extra
games to reach the third round
with a 6-2, 1-6, 8-6 victory over
Nadia Petrova on Wednesday.

Playing with tape on her trou-
blesome right shoulder, the
unseeded Sharapova hung on
to join top-seeded Dinara Safi-
na and defending champion
Ana Ivanovic in the next round.

"Obviously I am spending a
little bit more time out there
than I want to, but I think I'm
learning so many new things, as
well,” Sharapova said. "I think
this was a great match where I
had to fight my way through
many, many challenges. And I
did."

On the men's side, four-time
defending champion Rafael
Nadal and third-seeded Andy
Murray advanced to the third
round.

Nadal, attempting to become
the first to win five straight
French Open titles, extended
his French Open record to 30-0
by beating Teimuraz Gabashvili
of Russia 6-1, 6-4, 6-2.

"So what?" Nadal said of his
accomplishment. "(I'm) happy
for the record, but in the end
happy for the result."

Murray defeated Potito
Starace of Italy 6-3, 2-6, 7-5, 6-4.

Sharapova, a three-time
Grand Slam champion who has
slipped to No. 102 in the rank-
ings because of her injury layoff,
won five straight games to close
out the first set.

Trailing 4-2 in the deciding
set, she broke the 11th-seeded
Petrova to get back on serve at
4-4, and then saved two break
points to take a 5-4 lead. She
saved another break point while
serving at 6-6.

"I got off to a really good
start,” Sharapova said. "I kind
of started stumbling away.
Things went in the wrong direc-
tion. I was just glad I could pick
myself up and keep fighting and
do the right things, and end the
match with a win."

Sharapova is making her first
Grand Slam appearance in
almost a year after missing both



SHARAPOVA returns the ball to
compatriot Nadia Petrova during
their second round match at the
Roland Garros stadium in Paris on
Wednesday...

(AP Photo: Bernat Armangue)

the U.S. Open and the Aus-
tralian Open because of her
shoulder injury. She had surgery
in October.

Safina easily beat 18-year-old
Russian qualifier Vitalia
Diatchenko 6-1, 6-1, and
Ivanovic defeated Tamarine
Tanasugarn of Thailand 6-1, 6-
2.

Safina took a 5-0 lead to open
the match, stretching her streak
to 17 straight games after win-
ning 6-0, 6-0 in the first round.

"Pretty good start for the
tournament," said Safina, who
lost in the Australian Open final
and was the runner-up at
Roland Garros last year. "I just
played a good game today, good
enough to win."

Ivanovic looked more com-
fortable on court after strug-
gling in her opening match. The
eighth-seeded Ivanovic broke
the 32-year-old Tanasugarn
twice in the first set and three
times in the second.

"T just want to sort of get my
way through the rounds and just
feel more comfortable match
after match," Ivanovic said.
"Today I think I served some
aces, which gave me some con-
fidence in my serve, and that’s
something I've been working

on.
The 21-year-old Serb finished
with three aces.

No. 9 Victoria Azarenka of
Belarus also made it through,
while No. 21 Alize Cornet of
France reached the second
round. No. 15 Zheng Jie of Chi-
na lost.

The top-seeded Nadal has
never lost at Roland Garros,
and his 30th straight win on the
tournament's red clay gives him
the record for most consecutive
wins.

Nadal was forced to save
three break points in the first
game of the match. He only had
to save one more the rest of the
way, winning in straight sets for
the second match in a row.

Murray trailed 5-1 in the third
set but broke Starace three
straight times to win.

"On clay, there's always time
for you to get sort of back into
the match and find your game,
even if you're struggling,” Mur-
ray said.

Murray also reached the third
round at Roland Garros last
year but lost to Nicolas Alma-
gro in four sets. In his only oth-
er appearance at the French
Open, in 2006, he lost in the
first round.

No. 7 Gilles Simon of France,
No. 8 Fernando Verdasco of
Spain, No. 12 Fernando Gon-
zalez of Chile and No. 13 Marin
Cilic of Croatia also advanced,
but French veteran Fabrice San-
toro played his last match at
Roland Garros.

Santoro, who has made a
record 67 Grand Slam appear-
ances, lost in the first round of
this year's French Open — his

record-tying 20th — to
Christophe Rochus of Belgium
6-3, 6-1, 3-6, 6-4.

"Twenty years. That counts
for something in a lifetime,”
Santoro said. "It has been a
long road, a fantastic career. I
had a lot of fun and learned a
lot."

Santoro and Rochus started
their match Tuesday, but it was
suspended by darkness with the
Belgian leading 5-3 in the fourth
set. The pair came back out
onto the court after Safina's win
and played only eight minutes.

No. 21 Dmitry Tursunov of
Russia and No. 28 Feliciano
Lopez of Spain also lost.

m By ROBERT MILLWARD
AP Football Writer

ROME (AP) — A rare head-
ed goal by Lionel Messi helped
Barcelona beat Manchester
United 2-0 in the Champions
League final on Wednesday,
giving the Spanish side its third
European Cup title and third
trophy in a magical season.

Samuel Eto’o put the Spanish
champions ahead in the 10th
minute and Messi's 70th-minute
goal — his ninth in the Cham-
pions League this season —
sealed the victory over the
defending champions at the Sta-
dio Olimpico.

The triumph completed a
sweep of titles for 38-year-old
Barcelona coach Pep Guardio-
la in his first season, after wins
in the Spanish league and cup.
The former Barcelona star, who
started as a ball boy at Camp
Nou, now joins the ranks of
those who have won the title
both as a player and a coach.

Guardiola became the
youngest coach to win Euro-
pean soccer's top club competi-
tion since the European Cup
became the Champions League
in 1993. Barcelona also won the
trophy in 1992 and 2006.

"No team has ever done the
treble in Spain, and we'll be
remembered as the first team
to do it," Barcelona striker
Thierry Henry said. "That's
amazing."

United had been chasing its
fourth European Cup title, and
fourth trophy this season after
winning the Premier League,
FIFA Club World Cup and
League Cup.

But United was thoroughly
outplayed by the Spanish side as
Messi scored his 38th goal of an
amazing year for Barcelona,
which has 53 league and cup
goals this season.

Xavi floated a diagonal ball
into the United area to find
Messi unmarked, and the 5-
foot-7 (1.69 m) Argentina strik-
er — renowned for his deft



dribbling and shooting — used
his head to loop the ball over
United goalkeeper Edwin Van
der Sar and into the net.

Messi set off colorful cele-
brations at one end of the sta-
dium, filled with 62,467 fans,
and left English fans in silence.

The loss left Man United
manager Alex Ferguson at 25
titles in 23 seasons. He failed to
match Liverpool's Bob Paisley's
three titles in the competition.

"We started the game bright-
ly. We were confident and we
could have been in front," Fer-
guson said. "We had the ball
but didn't use it very well. ...
We defended fantastically all
season but they were two shod-
dy goals.

"We didn't play as well as we
can, but they are a good team.
We have to give them credit.
Xavi (Hernandez) and
(Andres) Iniesta can keep the
ball all night. They made it very
difficult."

South Korean winger Park Ji-
sung became the first Asian to
play in a Champions League
final. He almost scored for
United in the opening minute
but his shot was deflected wide
after Cristiano Ronaldo's free
kick had been blocked by the
goalkeeper. It was the nearest
United came to scoring all
night.

The victory also marked the
first Champions League title for
Henry, the French striker who
was on the losing side when
Arsenal lost to Barcelona in
2006.

"Finally, I've been waiting for
so long to get this title and now
finally today," said Henry, who
had been doubtful for the final
because of a knee injury. "The

last five minutes were the
longest of my life.”

United almost went ahead in
the opening minute when a
needless foul by Yaya Toure on
Anderson handed Ronaldo an
early free kick. His powerful
drive was blocked by the hands
of goalkeeper Victor Valdes
and Park's rebound was deflect-
ed for a corner by Gerard
Pique.

With Barcelona's dangerous
forwards barely getting a touch
of the ball in the early stages,
there was little danger at the
other end until the Spanish
champions went ahead with
their first attack of the game.

Iniesta started the move with
a break through midfield and
found Eto'o on the right. The
striker cut inside a weak tackle
by Nemanja Vidic and poked a
low angled shot past Van de
Sar.

The goal changed the pattern
of the play with Barcelona's
stars settling into their confi-
dent style of interpassing. Unit-
ed, now chasing the game, was
unable to create any real dan-
ger. Ronaldo wanted to shoot at
every opportunity, but fired
wide and headed over.

Seeing his title slipping away,
Ferguson reshaped his attack
for the second half.

The 67-year-old Scot took off
midfielder Anderson and sent
on Carlos Tevez, the Argentina
striker who is convinced he's
leaving the club because United
won't turn his loan deal into a
full term transfer.

That left United under-
manned in midfield and
Barcelona continued to create
openings.

Ferguson made another
change when he took off Park
and sent on Dimitar Berbatov.

Barcelona could have added
more but Van der Sar saved
twice from Carles Puyol and
Ronaldo was shown the yellow
card for some petulant late chal-
lenges on the Barcelona cap-
tain.

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'

SPECIAL OLYMPICS judo participants

Special Olympics: More than
250 athletes set to compete at
‘largest national games ever’

AFTER training all year, ath-
letes from the islands of Abaco,
Grand Bahama, New Provi-
dence and Long Island are rear-
ing up for their opportunity to
win medals at this year’s
National Special Olympics
Games.

More than 250 athletes are
expected to compete in various
sports in the capital this week-
end, and the organisers are con-
fident that the event will be the
best ever.

At 9am Friday, they are slat-
ed to compete in swimming and
judo at the Betty Kelly Kenning
swim complex.

And on Saturday at the
Thomas A Robinson Stadium,
following the opening ceremony
at 9:30am, athletes will show off
their skills in bocce and track
and field.

Roosevelt Thompson, nation-
al director of Special Olympics
Bahamas, reports that athletes
from the sub-programmes in the
islands have trained all year for
this event.

And they are anxious to com-
pete. As there are no interna-
tional games this year, this will
be the highlight of their training.

The

[>

‘7

Special Ohpmpics

The increased number of
coaches certified this year guar-
antees that the quality of their
performances should surpass
the high level demonstrated in
the past.

With the programme pro-
ducing more athletes, the com-
petition should be exciting, and
the public is invited to witness
an inspiring display of courage
and determination by the par-
ticipants.

Basil Christie, national chair-
man, expressed his appreciation
to the many sponsors and sup-
porters of the national pro-
gramme. He also encourages
everybody to come out and
cheer for the athletes.

The coaches and volunteers
have worked hard and he is
confident that spectators will be
proud of the results of their
efforts.

=

We must find a way
to provide more

THE success of the men’s
national volleyball team at the
2010 World Championships
NORCEA’S Qualifying
Round should drive home a
point that has been empha-
sized for quite some time.

We have to find a way to
provide more funding for
sports, particularly team
sports.

While welcoming the team
home from Jamaica on Tues-
day, Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture Desmond Bannis-
ter said that while the team
was not quite sure if they
would have been able to travel
up to the eleventh hour
because of the lack of funding,
they did manage to go and
they represented the country
very well.

While he pledged his gov-
ernment's commitment to the
Bahamas Volleyball Federa-
tion, headed by Don Cornish,
Bannister said it’s just as vital
to get corporate Bahamas on
board.

"As you build on this suc-
cess, I want everybody in the
country to appreciate that you
need the financial support,
even in difficult times," he
charged.

Indicating that the young
men are doing everything that
is positive, Bannister said as
they are enjoying their success,
now is a good time for the
country to rally behind them
and assist their efforts finan-
cially.

Considering that it is one of
the core sports in the country,
volleyball has actually seen a
decline in its participation with
more potential players opting
to play basketball and com-
pete in track and field.

But with the performance of
this team, which earned the

poe

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OPINION

rights to advance to the third
qualifying round in August in
Cuba, the federation obviously
has its work cut out for the
members.

Not only do they have to
find the funding to make that
trip to Cuba, but the federa-
tion is looking at going toa
training camp in Santo
Domingo and they are also
looking at engaging the ser-
vices of a coach from Cuba.

All of that takes money.

Additionally, the women's
national team is scheduled to
go to Barbados on June 9 to
play in their qualifying round
for the World Championships.

With just about two weeks
before the women travel, the

federation should be riding the
momentum from the men as
they start knocking on the
doors of corporate Bahamas
for their support. Like the
men, the federation is expect-
ed to put together a good crop
of players that will include the
best local ones and those
returning home from college.
So there chances of succeeding
should be just as great as the
men’s.

Normally, corporate
Bahamas will be willing to
throw their support behind an
individual athlete, but for too
long, little or no emphasis has
been placed on team sports
and that should change.

The government, in its new
budget that is being debated in
the House of Assembly, is
going through a tremendous
challenge, which would mean
that there will definitely be
some significant cuts in fund-
ing that is provided for sports.

So like all of the other sport-
ing bodies, the federation will
have a task to ensure that the
Bahamas continues on the
path that the men have paved
as they look ahead at qualify-
ing for the prestigious World
Championships and eventually
the Olympic Games in 2012.

The latter may pose more of
a challenge for the federation,
but if any of the teams can
achieve the former, it will fur-
ther indicate the need for a
sustainable fund-raising pro-
gramme because there will be
the need for more involve-
ment in training camps to pre-
pare the team(s).

If we're not going to intro-
duce the National Lottery,
then we need to find a way to
help support our various
sporting bodies, especially in
these tough economic times

' funding for sports

when just about everybody
will be looking for funding to
assist with their disciplines.

TRACK AND FIELD IN

SAME BOAT

So far this year, the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations has seen
quite a number of significant
performances as the IAAF
World Championships in
Berlin, Germany, draws near.

Minister Bannister has start-
ed a personal campaign high-
lighting the performances on
Facebook and he has gotten
quite a number of responses
from Bahamians who have
indicated that they are just as
delighted about what they
have seen.

Kermit Romer, a die hard
Bahamian sports enthusiast
now residing in New York, put
it quite aptly when he wrote:

"For whatever reasons, the
powers that be cannot agree
on funding for sports so maybe
we (John Q Public) can do our
part. If we (300,000 plus peo-
ple) were to donate $1 a week
until the upcoming World
Games and for once give them
more than what they need.”

Like volleyball, track and
field athletes will also proba-
bly be heading to a training
camp before they go to the
World Championships and
that is going to take a lot of
funding for them to achieve
their goal.

So while we relish in the
performances turned in so far
by our athletes, we have to be
prepared to lend our support
financially to ensure that they
are put in a better position to
just go out and represent their
country and not have to worry
about how they will get to
their destination.

Tyson family asks for
privacy after tot’s death

m By JONATHAN J COOPER
Associated Press Writer

PHOENIX (AP) — The
death of Mike Tyson’s 4-year-
old daughter in a bizarre acci-
dent adds an awful chapter to
the boxer’s troubled life.

Exodus Tyson died at a hos-
pital Tuesday, a day after her
neck apparently got caught in a
cord dangling from a treadmill at
her Phoenix home, police said.

Police said Exodus either
slipped or put her head in the
loop of a cord hanging under the
console and suffocated. She was
pronounced dead just before
noon after being on life support,
said police Sgt. Andy Hill, who
called the injury a “tragic acci-
dent.”

“There are no words to
describe the tragic loss of our
beloved Exodus,” the family said
in a statement. “We ask you now
to please respect our need at this
very difficult time for privacy to
grieve and try to help each other
heal.”

Tyson, who has been living in
Las Vegas, flew Monday to
Phoenix, where he was seen
entering the hospital.

The modest house where his
daughter was injured contrasts
starkly with the lavish lifestyle
Tyson had through his tumul-
tuous years of boxing, when he
spent tens of millions of dollars
and says he had millions more
stolen from him by unscrupu-
lous associates.

During two years at the height
of his career, he earned $140 mil-
lion — but he filed for Chapter
11 protection in U.S. Bankrupt-
cy Court in 2003.

He has been promoting a new

MACKEY, from page 19

Beach resort.

His first title defense came a year later against
Anibal Acevedo where he scored a seventh round
knockout and his most recent title defense came
in a second round knockout against Senette.

Both fighters are 4-2 in their last six bouts and
the 36-year-old Cayetano, like Mackey, comes
into the bout with wins in his last two appear-

ances.

Cayetano defeated Nelsido Miguel via a second
round TKO in March of this year and Manuel
Florian by unanimous decision in the sixth round

in 2008.

Both Mackey and Cayetano have suffered their
latest loss at the hands of Germany’s Karo Murat.



MIKE TYSON (AP)

documentary about his life and
told The New York Times earli-
er this month he had been sober
for 15 months after years of drug
and alcohol abuse.

“T don’t know who I am,” he
told the newspaper. “That might
sound stupid. I really have no
idea. All my life I’ve been drink-
ing and drugging and partying,
and all of a sudden this comes to
a stop.”

Tyson first began boxing in a
facility for juvenile delinquents
in upstate New York at the age
of 12. Eight years later, he
became the youngest heavy-
weight champion ever when he
Knocked out Trevor Berbick in
1986. But in 1990, he was defeat-
ed by James “Buster” Douglas
in one of the biggest upsets in
boxing history, and soon after
was convicted of raping a beau-
ty pageant contestant in Indi-
anapolis.

Tyson, who still denies he
raped the woman, served three
years in prison.

A few years later, he served
three months in jail for beating
up two men after a minor car
crash in suburban Washington.

As his career continued, so
did his bizarre behavior. He bit
off a piece of Evander Holy-
field’s ear during a boxing match
and once threatened to eat the
children of heavyweight cham-
pion Lennox Lewis.

Although Tyson’s children
had lived in their unassuming
neighborhood for several years,
he purchased a separate home
in the Tony Phoenix suburb of
Paradise Valley in 2005 for $2.1
million, selling it two years later
for $2.3 million.

In November 2007, Tyson
spent 24 hours in Maricopa
County’s “Tent City” jail after
pleading guilty to one count of
cocaine possession and one mis-
demeanor count of driving under
the influence. Police found the
drug when they pulled over
Tyson’s car after he left a Scotts-
dale night club.

According to police, Tyson
said after his arrest that he
bought cocaine “whenever I can
get my hands on it.”

At Tyson’s sentencing hear-
ing, nearly a year after the arrest,
his attorney David Chesnoff said
his client had taken 29 drug tests
without a relapse and was
attending Alcoholic Anonymous
and Narcotics Anonymous
meetings.

Tyson had become an exam-
ple of how a person overcomes
problems with drugs, a violent
past and poor upbringing, Ches-
noff said.

“He’s tried his hardest,” his
attorney said, “despite coming
from almost impossible begin-
nings.”

¢ Associated Press writers Bob
Baum and Terry Tang con-
tributed to this report

Mackey lost by unanimous decision in an eight
rounder, while the Dominican fighter fell by TKO

in the seventh round.

In his five-year professional career, Mackey
has never lost a fight at home while Cayetano
has yet to win a professional fight outside of the
Dominican Republic.

Also featured on the undercard will be Bahami-
an heavyweight contender Jerry Butler. This

scheduled fight is an eight round bout against

Michael Santiago of the Dominican Republic.
And there will be three four-round bouts,
including a match between Bahamian female

boxer Kelly “Tiger” Farquharson (she will be

nent.

making her pro-debut) and an unspecified oppo-




Howard leads



THE TRIBUNE PAGE 19
c - P Magic to 116-
| 114 OT win
) over Cavs...
THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009 See page 16

1 y
Choo Choo’ Mac
to face Dominic

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia
media.net

or the third time

since winning the

World Boxing

Council Caribbean

Boxing Federation
supper middleweight champi-
onship in 2006, Jermaine “Choo
Choo” Mackey is slated to
defend his title here.

Mackey is set to face Emil-
iano Cayetano of the Domini-
can Republic at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium in the fea-
ture bout of the evening on May
: The sign of thi !

In a scheduled 12-round bout, gq g eat gq To
Mackey will place his 17-3 (13 e $ n r in $ come:
KO) and the WBC title on the
line against Cayetano who
comes in at 18-2 (11 KO).

The 29-year-old Mackey has
won his last two fights — a fourth
round TKO of Jeremy Yelton such as iron, iodine and zine, as well as DHA, ARA,
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cessful title defense against Kirt
Senette.

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THE TRIBUNE





THURSDAY,

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

PRIME MINISTER HUBERT INGRAHAM in the House of Assembly...

Water Corp project
costs varied 130 per
cent from budget

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

PROJECT costs at the Water
& Sewerage Corporation some-
times varied as much as 130 per
cent from Budget, an external
audit of its internal financial
controls discovered, the final
report uncovering numerous
weaknesses and deficiencies in
the Corporation’s controls and
procedures.

The report on the Water &
Sewerage Corporation’s inter-
nal control and accounting pro-
cedures for the year ended
December 31, 2007, by accoun-
tants Pannell Kerr Foster
(PKF), found that “bank rec-
onciliations were not being pre-
pared on a timely basis” - some
being delayed “as late as three
months after the relevant
month.

“The absence of timely bank
reconciliations also highlights
the potential for misstatement
or cut-off errors, and the non-



* External audit report highlights
2/3 of accounts receivables 180
days past due, and ongoing
liquidity issues, with overdrafts
used for short-term financing

* Corporation’s accounts confirm
$24m-plus loss in fiscal 2007

reliability, and accuracy, of
reported cash balances.”

And the situation was not
much better when it came to
accounts receivables. PKF
added: “We again noted that
two-thirds (some $1.225 million
out of a total $1.877 million) of
the total accounts receivable
balance related to accounts with
balances outstanding in excess
of 180 days.

“These balances, if not care-
fully monitored, have the poten-
tial for doubtful recovery.
Included in these balances are
some delinquent accounts for
which no payment has been
made for the past several years.

“These balances have subse-
quently been earmarked in the
system as ‘final’ which means
that service has been terminat-
ed, and thus collection is
deemed doubtful.”

PKF urged that the Water &
Sewerage Corporation man-
agement write-off accounts
where all collections efforts had
been exhausted, removing them
from being treated as an ‘asset’
under accounts receivables.
This, in turn, would improve the
accuracy of the Corporation’s
financial statements, with
accounts receivables being
reported at their ‘net realisable
value’.

“Management should also
pay particular attention to the
reduction in the quality of the
accounts receivable balances
and formulate strategies to mit-
igate any resulting risks,” the

SEE page 6B

6
ra
I | 4
pe



ile

MAY 28,

y
2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net



Money Safe.
Money Fast.

Inteveatianal Maney Tranter

i? Bank of The Bahamas

ite



ERRMATIOBMNAL

Online at

BankBahamas Online.com

.7% fiscal deficit
‘not sustainable’

* PM reveals extent of public finances crisis, with 2009-2010 deficit projected at 3.9% or $286m
* Follows on from disastrous 4.7% or $352m deficit for 2008-2009, with revenues

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

rime Minister
Hubert Ingraham
yesterday warned
that the 4.7 per cent
or $352 million
GFS fiscal deficit that the Gov-
ernment’s finances are project-
ed to produce for the 2008-2009
Budget year “is not sustainable

down $260m and only 17.5% of GDP - some 2.8% lower than projected

* Debt servicing costs become biggest Budget item, at $264m - a $30m increase year-over-year
* Warning that getting government's finances back on track within three years will be ‘notable achievement’

over the medium term”, with
the upcoming year’s deficit fore-
cast to be slightly lower at 3.9
per cent of GDP - some $286
million.

‘More expected’ over
loss-making entities

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE outgoing Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce presi-
dent yesterday told Tribune
Business he had expected Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham to
“be more aggressive” in dealing
with the loss-making public Cor-
porations in yesterday’s 2009-
2010 Budget, and added that he
had been “looking for a bit
more” from the Government.

While the Prime Minister had
“just said the bad news”, Dioni-
sio D’Aguilar, who is also Super-
wash’s president, told this news-
paper he had been hoping the
Government would deal more
firmly with the loss-making Cor-
porations burdening the
Bahamian taxpayer, namely
Bahamasair, ZNS and the Water
& Sewerage Corporation.

However, he praised the
Prime Minister for his plans to
create a ‘one-stop shop’ Busi-
ness Licence through an amend-
ed Act that will scrap the Licens-
ing Authority and amalgamate
three existing licensing process-
es into one, thus reducing
bureaucracy and red tape.

“The removal of a bureau-
cratic impediment is always
good, and hopefully it will facil-
itate the formation of businesses
and reduce the level of bureau-

* Outgoing Chamber chief
praises Business Licence
amendments, but still wants
change in calculation method

* Bahamasair sees subsidy
reduced by almost 40% or
$11m to $17m, with
government ‘at a loss’
in financial crisis

cracy businesses have to go
through in their licensing,” Mr
D’Aguilar said.

The amendments, which the
Government plans to bring to
the House of Assembly early in
the 2009-2010 fiscal year, will
amalgamate the existing Busi-
ness Licence Act with the
Liquor Licences Act, the Shop
Licences Act and the Music and
Dancing Licences Act “to create
a so-called ‘one-stop’ service to
the public to replace the current
outdated, cumbersome and
time-consuming processes”.

While the Licensing Authori-
ty will no longer be required,
the new Act will provide for
liquor licences as a special cate-
gory. A Review Board will be
established to hear public objec-
tions to certain licence applica-

SEE page 9B

The 2009-2010 Budget state-
ment to the House of Assembly
revealed just how precarious
and weak the condition of the
public finances is, with the Gov-

ernment seeking to enhance
and streamline collections on
the revenue side, and to “hold

SEE page 8B

Foreign real estate
permits decline 36%

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

PERMITS issued by the Investments Board for the foreign
acquisition of Bahamas-based commercial and residential
properties fell by 36 per cent and 19.4 per cent respectively dur-
ing the 2009 first quarter, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said
yesterday, highlighting the slowdown in foreign direct invest-

ment.

For January-March 2009, Mr Ingraham said the Invest-
ments Board issued 254 registration certificates for the foreign

acquisition of residential
properties in the Bahamas,

SEE page 4B



Realtors optimistic on tax amendment

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN realtors yes-
terday gave a cautious welcome
to the Government’s proposed
Real Property Tax amend-
ments, including the plan to
reduce the number of tax rates
from three to two, in the hope it
will make this nation’s second
home market more competitive.

Mike Lightbourn, head of
Coldwell Banker Lightbourn
Realty, told Tribune Business
that the proposed amendments
were “great” because “people
who buy high-end properties,

the foreigners who come here,
will not have to pay exorbitant
tax rates”.

Both the real estate industry
and attorneys had asked the
Government to re-institute the
$35,000 real property tax cap
that had limited the amount of
tax paid by owners of high-end,
multi-million properties.

Its removal in the 2008-2009
Budget had made the Bahamas
uncompetitive against other
Caribbean nations, many of
which did not have or had lim-
ited, property-based taxes. For-

SEE page 4B

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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



| >) =<;\;
Be guided over firm’s corporate governance

THE Central Bank of the
Bahamas introduced the
‘Guidelines for Corporate Govy-
ernance of Banks and Trust
Companies Licensed to do
Business within and from with-
in the Bahamas’ (the Guide-
lines) on the December 13,
2001.

The objective of the guide-
lines is to simply “reassert the

role of the Board of Directors”.
The development and imple-
mentation of the guidelines
reflects the commitment of the
Central Bank to ensure compli-
ance with international stan-
dards of best practice in corpo-
rate governance, and to clearly
articulate its expectations of
licensees in the adoption of, and
adherence to, corporate gover-

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nance principles in the man-
agement and oversight of their
financial institutions.

While the Guidelines provide
only an overall regulatory and
administrative framework with-
in which directors and senior
executives of financial institu-
tions may operate, in order to
prudently and ethically manage,
oversee and direct their organ-
isations in the best interests of
their stakeholders (clients,
shareholders, intermediaries,
creditors and employees), they
do not have the force of law -
only regulatory oversight and
risk measurement - on inspec-
tion of licensees.

The Guidelines define cor-
porate governance as “the
processes, structures and infor-
mation used for directing and
overseeing the management of
an organisation”. Corporate
governance provides the criti-
cal underpinning for the rela-
tionships, responsibilities and
reporting lines for the Board of
Directors, senior management,
shareholders, employees, clients
and other stakeholders.

When the corporate gover-
nance regime is fully and effec-
tively implemented and adhered
to, it can not only assist stake-
holders in achieving the objec-
tives of the institution through
sound policies, procedures and
mandates, but it can also pro-
vide a reasonably proficient
measurement of the productiv-
ity and credibility of its busi-
ness strategy, organidational
growth and corporate social
responsibility, in meeting the
challenges and demands of
commerce and compliance.

At the centre of good corpo-
rate governance is the proper
understanding, appreciation and
practice of the high standard of
duty, skill and care expected of
directors and senior manage-
ment. Then there is the prudent
discharge of their duties and
responsibilities, both internally
and externally, within the ambit
of applicable law, local regula-
tions and international stan-
dards of best practice.

While the Guidelines are
applicable only to banks, trust
companies and foreign banks
licensed to operate branches
within - and from within - the
Bahamas, and are intended only
as a prescriptive guide of the
minimum standards expected
of licensees by the Central

Legal
Ease

by Tyrone Fitzgerald
tA | 3 Ps fo)



Bank, they do provide detailed
guidance and direction to com-
panies operating within the
Bahamas generally for good
corporate governance.

Process of Corporate

Governance

In order to ensure appropri-
ate independence and freedom
from undue influence, the
Guidelines recommend that the
Board of Directors of licensees
(and companies generally)
should comprise both execu-
tive and non-executive mem-
bers.

A comprehensive under-
standing of their responsibili-
ties and accountabilities by
directors and senior manage-
ment, and clear, consistent com-
munication of the process of
good corporate governance
within an organisation to such
stakeholders, are paramount to
the effectiveness of any corpo-
rate governance regime.

An integral part of the man-
date of directors and senior
management is the identifica-
tion, measurement, monitoring,
control and minimisation of var-
ious risks to an organisation,
depending upon its size, the
nature of its business, clientele,
and the vulnerabilities of its
products, services, internal con-
trols, systems and processes.
They can be impacted by inter-
nal or external threats of money
laundering, fraud, collusion,
impropriety or overall legal or
regulatory liability.

Being able to measure the
accuracy, reliability, timeliness,
relevancy and thoroughness of
an organisation’s risk manage-
ment system, and the frequency,
effectiveness, and productivity
with which directors and senior
management are able to obtain
information regarding these
measurements, are critical to
the soundness of any corporate
governance programme and its
attendant compliance require-
ments.

Risks to Businesses
Depending upon an individ-
ual business’s size, activities,

clients and geographical loca-
tion, it may experience the fol-
lowing risks during its lifetime:

Legal risk
Credit risk
Market risk
Fiduciary risk
Operational risk
Compliance risk
Regulatory risk
Reputation risk
Technology risk

Each risk has its own defini-
tion and effect on a business,
and requires the careful identi-
fication, analysis, monitoring,
control and minimisation by the
key stakeholders in any busi-
ness and the relevant commit-
tees that it may establish (the
risk management committee,
credit committee, etc), to
address these various risks.

Annual Review and

Annual Certification

The Central Bank guidelines
require the Board of Directors
of licensees to document annu-
ally whether their corporate
governance process has been
implemented effectively, and
has successfully enabled them
to achieve their overall business
goals and objectives.

Licensees are also required
to determine their capital ade-
quacy requirements; measure
and assess their overall risk pro-
file; recommend and implement
new policies, procedures and
internal controls where neces-
sary; ensure the accuracy and
reliability of their management
information systems; and
encourage their management
and staff to maintain high cor-
porate values and ethical stan-
dards.

In short, licensees should gen-
erally assess whether their over-
all control environment, com-
pliance culture, policies, proce-
dures and risk management sys-
tems are appropriate and effec-
tive in meeting and protecting
the interests of stakeholders,
particularly shareholders, and
clients.

The Board of Directors is
required, on an annual basis,
within 120 days of the calendar
year-end to certify in writing,
to the Inspector of Banks and
Trust Companies, that upon the
advice and assistance of man-
agement, it has assessed and
documented the effectiveness

of the licensee’s corporate gov-
ernance process and its success
in meeting the organisation’s
overall objectives.

As part of this annual certifi-
cation, the Board of Directors
must also report any material
deficiencies, weaknesses and
problems they may have identi-
fied in their risk management
assessment and monitoring dur-
ing the year, along with any
action plans and timetables for
remedial action.

An external auditor must be
engaged by the licensee to
annually review and assess the
methodology followed by the
Board of Directors in analysing
and monitoring the organisa-
tion’s corporate governance
process, and the auditor must
report directly to the Board of
Directors and the Inspector of
Banks and Trust Companies on
any discrepancies with the
Board’s risk management
assessment.

Responsibilities of the

Board of Directors

The Guidelines outline the
responsibilities of the Board of
Directors of a licensee as fol-
lows:

* To ensure competent man-
agement by appointing a chief
executive; overseeing and par-
ticipating in the appointment of
other senior executives with the
skills and integrity necessary to
manage the relevant organisa-
tion; setting performance-based
compensation policies, pro-
grammes, goals and standards
for senior management; super-
vising and evaluating manage-
ment’s performance; develop-
ing and regularly updating a
management succession plan;
and establishing standards of
business conduct and ethical
behaviour.

* Approve objectives, strate-
gies, plans and operating poli-
cies, standards and procedures

* Ensure the organisation’s
operations are conducted pru-
dently and within the frame-
work of laws, regulations and
guidelines, as well as established
policies and procedures

* Ensure the organisation
conducts its affairs with a high
degree of integrity

* Review the organisation’s
business and operating perfor-
mance

SEE page 18B

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 3B



> =~
‘We are doomed with no education upgrade’

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE COMPLETION of the
Baha Mar project will be the
“single largest opportunity” for
the future of the Bahamas,
according to its chairman and
chief executive, who suggested
the development will come to
fruition despite its long delay
and investor search.

Sarkis Izmirlian, speaking at
the Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce’s Annual General Meet-
ing, said the Baha Mar project
will put the Bahamas on the
map as a “truly world class
resort destination”.

But he hinted that for Baha
Mar to succeed, the Govern-
ment and the private sector
remain accountable for rede-
veloping the country’s main
gateway, Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport (LPIA), and
bringing the educational system,
especially the public system, up
to arespectable standard.

“Let me be blunt: Unless we
improve the education of all
Bahamians: Schools for younger
Bahamian children and trade
schools, or continuing education
for mature Bahamians, we are
doomed,” he said.

“We need to train and invest

in our teachers, not shy away
from hiring great teachers,
whether local or expat, and
invest in better-on-the-job train-
ing.”

Mr Izmirlian said the all-
important first impression
offered by a clean and well-
maintained airport was of the
utmost importance to the future
of the tourism industry, and the
departure process crucial to
repeat visitors.

He said that departure from
LPIA can be a “nightmare”, and
suggested the tiresome process
of two checkpoints and a ran-
dom third search often creates
grumbling and discontent
among departing visitors, a sen-
timent commonly shared by
tourists and Bahamians alike.

“Much of this is as ridiculous
as it is unnecessary,” said Mr
Izmirlian.

He also suggested that statis-
tics show the Bahamas is losing
ground as a competitive desti-
nation in the region.

Statistics he collected show
tourist arrivals to the Bahamas
in 2008 were down by 4.3 per
cent last year, while Cancun was
up by 7 per cent, Cuba up by 9
per cent, Jamaica up by 4 per
cent and Aruba up by 10 per
cent. These figures exist despite
the Bahamas’ proximity advan-

Attorney passes Series 6 exam

AN attorney with
Graham Thompson
& Co, Anastasia M.
Bastian, has success-
fully completed the
Series 6 Exam in
Florida after study-
ing at the Nassau-
based Securities
Training Institute
(STD. ir
The Series 6 qual- "i
ifying exam is
administered by the
New York Stock
Exchange (NYSE) and the
National Association of Secu-



Anastasia M Bastian

rities Dealers
(NASD) in the US.

Ms Albury, STT’s
course administra-
tor, said: “Our goal
is to remain the
recognised leader in
providing high qual-
ity investment train-
ing. STI provides
comprehensive
course materials,
and our instructors
offer relevant
insights that are crit-
ical to exam success.” Ms Bas-
tian is pictured.

tage to the US compared to oth-
er destinations.

Cruise

Mr Izmirlian said cruise
arrivals to the Bahamas were
down by 3.7 per cent, while in
the Dominican Republic arrivals
were up by 8.5 per cent, Mexico
up by 3.3 per cent and Aruba
up by 15 per cent.

“Just this month, in the mid-
dle of the great recession, the
Government of Qatar invested
$75 million to build a luxury




250-room hotel in Cuba,” said
Mr Izmirlian.

“We had contacted the Gov-
ernment of Qatar some time
back about an investment in
Baha Mar. They made it very
clear they had no interest in
investing in the Bahamas.”

He said Baha Mar considered
Qatar’s disinterest a factor of
the economic environment.
However, he suggested they
should have looked “closer to
home for the reason”.

Mr Izmirlian said the Four
Seasons Emerald Bay closure,

MANAGEMENT
OPPORTUNITY

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FINANCIAL CONTROLLER











Requirements & Responsibilities:

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- Experience in the preparation and interpretation of Financial Statements

- Must be able to develop and maintain an effective system of internal
accounting and operational controls in a Hotel environment

- Must possess 5 or more years experience in a supervisory accounting position

- Self motivated with strong analytical and problem-solving skills

- Must be conversant with hotel accounting software, with emphasis in areas
Food & Beverage, Front Office and Payroll

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- Advance working knowledge of Excel
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Interested persons should apply on or before June 30,2009
Attention Manager:
DA 61165, c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, The Bahamas
Suitably qualified candidates need only apply.









as a sign of the times in the
Bahamas, was the only hotel in
the globally branded chain to
close.

“That should tell us some-
thing,” he said.

Mr Izmirlian has in recent
times spoken candidly about the
Bahamas’ deteriorating social
fabric and physical infrastruc-
ture, suggesting it is time for
government-owned utilities to
privatise and Nassau city cen-
tre to be upgraded and revital-
ized.

However, he said it will

require a public/private, blue-
ribbon partnership to prepare a
list of actions to solve some of
the problems.

He said much of what he has
discussed regarding capital
improvement projects and pri-
vate sector accountability, he
has tried to incorporate in the
Baha Mar project.

“As the project progresses,
and certainly at fruition, it will
provide substantial job and
career advancement opportuni-
ties for the people of the
Bahamas,” said Mr Izmirlian.



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THE} [| Mal | [Al

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED

NOTICE

Please be advised that the Head Office and
the Registered Office of the company will be
moved from the Bahamas Financial Centre,
Charlotte & Shirley Streets, 2nd Floor, Nassau,
Bahamas to Royal Bank House, East Hill Street,
Nassau, Bahamas effective 25th May, 2009.

D. BURROWS-HAINES (Mrs.)
Corporate Secretary

Dated this 22nd May 2009

Telephone Number - 356-8500
Telefax - 356-8660

NMC SALES, SERVICE and PARTS
All for One NEW NUMBER

Distributors for Honda, Chevrolet, Cadillac and ACDelco Parts | Shirley Street, Nassau

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Saturday, May 30, 2009
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Island 102.9 FM Radio Remote
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YODEPHY DANCE & MODELING ACADEMY WILL HOST THE SHOW

302-0130



NMC
PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, MATEDAS THOMPSON
Golden Gates #1 of the Western District of the Island of New
Providence intends to change my son’s name from MALIK

ROHANO RAHDIGAN RAHMING to HENRY STEPHEN
MILES STORR. If there are any objections to this change of
name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than
thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

OF

CRANSTON HOLDINGS
LIMITED

Notice is herby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 25th day of May, 2009.
Credit Suisee Trust Limited of Bahamas Financial Cen-
tre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, The Bahamas
has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE

OF

EMERY MANAGEMENT
LIMITED

Pursuant to Park LX, Section 137 (6) of the (Interna-
tional Business Companies Act, 2000), we hereby sub-
mit that winding-up and dissolution of the Company
has been completed on the 25th day of May, 2009.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator



THE TRIBUNE





Foreign real estate
permits decline 36%

FROM page 1B

compared to 315 certificates in
the same period in 2008.

The 2009 certificates covered
properties valued at a cumula-
tive $139.6 million, compared
to a total value of $107.4 mil-
lion for the first three months of
2008.

On the acquisition of com-
mercial properties by foreign
investors, Mr Ingraham said
that in the same January-March
2009 period, the Investments
Board issued 115 permits for
real estate valued at a collec-
tive $70 million.

This compared to 182 per-
mits issued in 2008 for property
valued at $194.3 million.

This translated into a con-
traction in the construction sec-
tor’s output, which fell by 10
per cent in 2008, Mr Ingraham
said, “primarily due to the tight-
ening in foreign investment”.
However, domestic residential
and commercial construction
helped to give the industry
some stability.

“First quarter 2009 approvals
for new building starts fell to
463 from the 471 approved in

the same period in 2008,” the
Prime Minister added.

“It is to be noted that the
inclusion of the approval for the
$150 million Lynden Pindling
International Airport (LPIA)
expansion in February 2009
helped push the value of build-
ing permits for this year to
$325.7 million, up from the $124
million value of approvals
granted in 2008.”

On the tourism front, major
declines in occupancy and for-
ward booking levels from 2008
onwards resulted in the termi-
nation of 2,200 jobs in the hotel
industry, with shortened work
weeks for many others.

“The latest preliminary data
available for the first four
months of 2009 reveal quite
starkly the gravity of the situa-
tion in the tourism sector,” the
Prime Minister said.

“Through April, total arrivals
to the Bahamas, at 1.68 million,
were down by 1.2 per cent from
the same period last year. How-
ever, the most important air
arrivals segment was lower by
15.5 per cent.

“Arrivals by sea were actual-
ly up by 5.5 per cent over the
first four months, in part reflect-
ing the repositioning of cruise

ships back to the Bahamas, due
to the growing popularity of
short cruises, especially
Bahamas-only cruises staying
in port overnight.

“Air arrivals in New Provi-
dence, at some 348,000 in the
January to April 2009 period,
were down by 10.5 per cent
from the same period in 2008.
Declines in this segment were
even more pronounced in
Grand Bahama and the other
Family Islands, at 28.9 per cent
and 27.6 per cent, respective-

ly.”
Noted

Mr Ingraham, though noted
that other major worldwide
tourism markets were faring just
as badly, with London down by
18 per cent, Las Vegas suffering
a $65 million drop in hotel tax
revenue, and Orlando suffering
a 21 per cent decline. Global
travel was estimated to be down
by an average of 18 per cent.

“Expectations are that the
key tourism and foreign invest-
ment sectors will remain weak
in 2009, resulting in further
weakness in the construction
sector and a further increase in
the unemployment rate. How-

ever, some tempering to this
outcome is expected to occur
from the Government’s ‘accel-
erated’ capital works pro-
gramme,” Mr Ingraham said.

Inflation rose to 4.5 per cent
in 2008, some 2 per cent above
the previous year, with housing
costs rising to 3.5 per cent from
0.5 per cent, while food and
beverage prices nearly doubled
to 6.7 per cent.

Mr Ingraham said this trend
had persisted into 2009, with
inflation at 4.8 per cent in the 12
months to April this year. Hous-
ing costs rose 3.3 per cent, while
food and beverage and other
goods and services were up 8
per cent and 9 per cent respec-
tively.

External reserves stood at
$647.7 million at May 20, 2009,
compared to $562.9 million at
year-end 2008, continuing their
upward trend.

The Bahamas’ current
account deficit narrowed by 1
per cent to $2.1 billion, due toa
17.5 per cent fall in non-oil
imports that offset the 44.7 per
cent fuel bill increase. The drop
in private investment inflows
saw the capital account surplus
fall by $59.4 million to $927.2
million.

Realtors optimistic on tax amendment

FROM page 1B

eign second home buyers, in particular, had
been faced with major real property tax
bill increases, something that realtors and
attorneys had complained was costing them

business.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham yester-
day announced that while the cap would
not be reinstated, the real property tax
structure was being reduced from three to

two.

Al per cent rate would be applied to

PUBLIC AUCTION

SATURDAY, MAY 30â„¢, 2009

By Order of

The Bahamas Development Bank
Cable Beach, Nassau, The Bahamas
Commonwealth of The Bahamas

WHAT: Three (2) assorted used vessels as set out in the schedule below:

Vessels
Equility
Loa 49’
Beam 16
Depth 4
Year/Mk/Eng 1981 Defender Vessel,
Caterpillar 3208 engine
Bayshore Marina East Bay
Street

Location

Farbutt

Loa 51

Beam 177.5”

Depth 5’

Year/Mk/Eng 1996 Fiberglass Vessel,
Caterpillar 3412 engine
Bayshore Marina East Bay
Street

Location

LOCATION: Bayshore Marina East Bay Street — Nassau The

Bahamas

TIME: 11:00am — Saturday, May 30th, 2009 — Preview and Inspection

from 9:00am Until Auction time at the site.

TERMS: All items to be Sold Where Is As Is for Cash, Cashier’ Cheque
or current Bank Guarantee Letter. Purchase will not be released until paid
for in full not later than 4:00pm Tuesday, June 2â„¢, 2009. Where a deposit
is required, the same is non refundable. If final payment is not made by
4:00pm Tuesday, June 2â„¢, 2009 any and all deposits made will be

forfeited.

Bahamas Development Bank
At (242) 327-5780/ 702-5730/702-5714
Or Fax (242) 702-5047
email: bahamasdevelopmentbank.com

properties valued at up to $7.5 million,
above the $250,000 exemption level, and
properties valued in excess of $7.5 million
would see a 0.25 per cent rate applied on the
value above $7.5 million.

In a bid to encourage real property tax
defaulters to pay, the Government will
write-off the surcharge on owner-occupied
dwellings. The outstanding tax remains and
has to be paid within six months of the
amendments coming into effect, after which
a5 per cent per annum surcharge will be
levied on the outstanding balances.



The tax-rate on foreign-owned, vacant
property valued at up to $7,000 will be $100,
with properties worth more than $7,000
paying a 1.5 per cent rate. This is likely to be
the Government giving foreign purchasers
an incentive to build, rather than simply
hold, then flip their real estate for profit.

The exemption on owner-occupied prop-
erty will be applicable automatically except
for foreign home owners, where the nine-
month occupancy period will continue to
apply, and a 0..5 per cent tax rate will be
applied to buildings on leased Crown cays.

Consolidated Water (Bahamas) Ltd.

Invites submissions for the sale of:

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THE TRIBUNE



April existin

THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 5B

g home sales

inch upward, prices fall

By ALAN ZIBEL
AP Real Estate Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Buyers who were brave enough
to dive into the market for a
bargain-priced house helped
provide a modest boost to sales
last month.

Sales of inexpensive foreclo-
sures and other distressed low-
end properties have even
sparked bidding wars in places
like Las Vegas, Phoenix and
Miami. But the market for high-
end properties is at a virtual
standstill, mainly because it
remains difficult to get a mort-
gage for expensive homes.

“We’re looking at a dual mar-
ket right now,” said Sherry
Chris, chief executive of Better
Homes and Gardens Real
Estate.

The National Association of
Realtors said Wednesday that
home sales rose 2.9 per cent to
an annual rate of 4.68 million
in April from a downwardly
revised pace of 4.55 million in
March. Sales were 4.6 per cent
below April last year, without
adjusting for seasonal factors.

Compared with January, the
lowest point in the housing
recession, April sales were up
nearly four per cent. But com-
pared with the peak in Septem-
ber 2005, sales are still down 35
per cent.

And they have not kept pace
with foreclosures, which con-
tinue to pile up at an alarming
pace. Those properties helped
drag down the median sales
price to $170,200.

Affordability brought Roge-
lio Gonzalez, 44, back into the
Miami market. Gonzalez sold
his five-bedroom home in 2004
for $485,000 and has been rent-
ing ever since. Now, prices have
dropped to the point where he
wants to buy a foreclosure in
the $150,000 range, but he’s
finding plenty of competition.

“Since I sold at the highest
point, I was waiting until I could
buy at the lowest point,” Gon-
zalez said. “I’ve been to open
houses and I’ve run into eight,
10, 15 people looking for hous-
es >”?

Foreclosures and other dis-
tressed sales made up about 45
per cent of all transactions in
April, according to the Realtors
group.

In Phoenix, Floyd Scott, bro-
ker-owner of Century 21 Ari-
zona-Foothills, said roughly 70
per cent of sales in his area are
from distressed buyers. But that
can’t last forever, he said, noting
that “we’re running out of
inventory.”

Nationally, however, the
number of unsold homes on the
market at the end of April rose
almost nine per cent from a
month earlier to nearly four mil-



IN THIS FILE PHOTO taken March 3, 2009, a sale pending sign is seen for
a real estate listing in Gloucester, Mass.

lion. That’s a 10-month supply
at the current sales pace, and
was particularly troubling to
economists.

The rise in unsold homes
“suggests foreclosure activity
may be adding homes to the
market faster than sales are
removing them,” wrote David
Resler, chief economist with
Nomura Securities.

Another big problem is the
lack of activity at the higher-
end of the housing market.
Lenders have tightened stan-
dards dramatically, especially
for so-called “jumbo” loans
above $730,000 that cannot be
purchased by Fannie Mae or
Freddie Mac, the government-

(AP Photo: Lisa Poole)

controlled mortgage companies.

The Realtors group is push-
ing for the Federal Reserve to
start buying up those loans. It
also wants higher loan limits
enacted last year to apply to the
whole country, not just expen-
sive areas like California and
New York.

In San Francisco, properties
listed for $1 million and above
are languishing on the market.
“That’s where we’re really feel-
ing the pinch,” said Ben Cole-
man, owner of Century 21 Hart-
ford Properties.

In Philadelphia, “the luxury
market is still dragging because
of the difficulty for jumbo loans
and the lack of cash from buy-

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BOL TE

ers,” David Friedman, an agent
with Coldwell Banker Pre-
ferred. “It’s pretty much at a
nonexistent level right now.”

Jumbo loans made up only
five per cent of the mortgage
market in the first quarter of
this year, down from 17 per cent
two years ago, according to
trade publication Inside Mort-
gage Finance.

Rates for 30-year jumbo
loans are averaging around 6.3
per cent, compared with around
five per cent for non-jumbo
loans, according to data pub-
lisher HSH Associates.

Since banks generally hold
jumbo loans on their books, it’s
not surprising that they are
keeping lending standards tight,
noted Keith Gumbinger, a
senior vice president with HSH
Associates, who said, “It’s not a
risk-free investment.”

¢ AP Real Estate Writers Alex
Veiga, Adrian Sainz and J.W.
Elphinstone contributed to this
report

NOTICE

PISTON INVESTMENT
MANAGEMENT INC.

An International Business Company

Notice is hereby given that the voluntary dissolution
of the above company commenced on the 22nd day
of May, 2009. Articles of Dissolution have been duly
registered by the Registrar General’s office, P.O. Box
N-532, 50 Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas. The
Liquidator is A.J.K. Corporate Services (Bahamas)
Limited, whose address is Suite 11, Bayparl Building,
18 Parliament Street, P.O. Box AP59205/3352,
Nassau, The Bahamas.



$300,000 lite cover tor

the price*â„¢ of a coffee

per day! No medical

required!

CALL 356-LIFE or visit Pe mete eR

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ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE Oo. LTD,
Atlantic House, dnd Terrace & Collins Avenue. PO. Bow 55-5915, Nassau

Tal, 36-5439 wee egigraup. ben

A member of Colonial Group levernational: Insurance, Health, Pengices, Lite

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY

NOTICE

TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF COURIER SERVICES,
PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY

TENDERS ARE

INVITED FROM QUALIFIED CONTRACTORS TO

PROVIDE COURIER SERVICES FOR THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS
AUTHORITY, FORA PERIOD OF ONE (1) YEAR.

TENDER DOCUMENTS,

TO TENDERERS,
INFORMATION CAN

WHICH INCLUDE INSTRUCTIONS
SPECIFICATIONS AND OTHER RELEVANT
BE COLLECTED 9 AM - 5:00 PM MONDAY TO

FRIDAY AT THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY, CORPORATE

CENTRE, BUILDING
AVENUE.

“B”, THIRD AND WEST TERRACES, COLLINS

A TENDER MUST BE SUBMITTED IN DUPLICATE IN A SEALED

ENVELOPE OR PAC

KAGE IDENTIFIED AS “TENDER FOR THE

PROVISION OF COURIER SERVICES, PUBLIC HOSPITALS

AUTHORITY” ADD

RESSED TO:

THE CHAIRMAN,
TENDERS COMMITTEE
THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
CORPORATE CENTRE BUILDING “B”
THIRD & WEST TERRACES, COLLINS AVENUE
P.O. BOX N-8200
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

TENDERS ARE TO ARRIVE AT THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
NO LATER THAN 5:00 P.M. Friday 19‘ June, 2009. LATE

TENDER(S) WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.

Free
Cholesterol,
(lacie sand

Abood Pressure Checks

Regis alien Pee
Inelides a 1 -Shoet
SIA Adult S100
Children (12 ard
under

Liepeut roi HS. grueitils, dicate sonth tes

A copy of a valid business license and a certificate verifying up
to date National Insurance Contributions should accompany all
proposals.

Damgiie WWilline-Dirliig Haghwav, oat he de
remonwlalwout at Fat Stner
Stiles = VSuatlket al

Highways, cast lack oo Leonie High Solio

weal ier the eaakalwanl af

Tormper Willtane-Derling

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to accept or reject any
or all Tender(s).

Plewer retara completed forms fo Tire Goveramear igh Sobel!

e coll (Pa S2-al PS

* 1g) Rota
Parcs fda) 30a

peeclpera® Tiiraies, oom


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Water Corp project costs varied 130 per cent from budget

















































































THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cobh.edu.hs

The Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute's (CHMI's)
Lil’ Chefs Summer Training Programme

Trained chef instructors mentor kids ages 10-15 and teach them how to
prepare:-

Hot meals

Assorted Sandwiches
Pastries

Fruit Platters and much more!

Where: CHMI, Bahamas Tourism Training Centre,
Thompson Boulevard
When: July 13-31, 2009,
Mondays 9a.m.-4p,.m.; Tuesday-Friday, 9a.m.-3p.m.
Cost: 1 week, $275; 2 weeks S500; 3 weeks, $675

Call: 323-5804, 677-3220 or 677-3202 for more information and
applications.

Also available in Exuma and Grand Bahama

Application deadline June 15, 2009

"i, 4

PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
ADVERTISEMENT

VACANCY
FACILITIES MANAGER

GRAND BAHAMA HEALTH SERVICES

The Public Hospitals Authority invites applications from suitably qualified persons for the
post of Facilities Manager, Grand Bahama Health Services

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:-

* Bachelors Degree in Facilities Management or equivalent, OR related field;
* Member British Institute of Facilities Management OR a related professional body;
* Excellent communication skills (oral and written); computer skills; accounting skills;

* Seven (7) years experience in Building & Maintenance in a Healthcare facility, Hotel,
or large corporation, five (5) of which must be at a supervisory level:

The Health Facilities Manager reports to the Administrator, Grand Bahama Health
Services.

JOB SUMMARY

The Facilities Manager is responsible for coordinating and managing the Buildin
& Maintenance Departments and oversees Engineering, Biomedical & Mechanica
Units. Special emphasis must be placed on preventative maintenance and practices.

DUTIES:

1. Coordinates and manages Facilities Management matters pertaining to building
sehen Lab abl operations, maintenance, equipment maintenance, building
fabric maintenance, renovations, use of space, biomedical, engineering,
maintenance, administration and contract management for all facilities under
the responsibility of Grand Bahama Health Services.

Inspects and evaluates the physical condition of the facilities and make
recommendations Lecce for the infrastructural developments/
improvements, to enhance the comfort of (PHA’s) internal and external
customers.

Prepares and administers the Facilities Management and Operations budget;
also monitors expenditures of the Departments.

Plans and directs staff in the purchasing and distribution of Public Hospitals
Authority's supplies.

Review bids and make recommendations for awarding of contracts for
maintenance work, contracts and renovations.

Manages staff of Facilities and ensures training opportunities for staff
development.

ea detailed policy and procedural document to ensure appropriate
methods and levels of service are adhered to.

Submits monthly reports to Administrator and quarterly reports to the Managing
Director (PHA) on facilities management matters;

Interviews and selects candidates seeking employment in the Building and
Maintenance Departments;

Liaises with the Capital Development Unit of the Public Hospitals Authority
to ensure Building and Maintenance (Mechanical Engineering) practices
effective project management and supervision techniques;

The post of Facilities Manager is in Scale HAMAS ($37,850 x 700 - $42,050).

Letter of application and curricula vitae should be submitted through the Administrator
of Grand Bahama Health Services, Public Hospitals Authority, PO. Box F-40071, East
Atlantic Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama to the Director of Human Resources, Corporate
Office, Public Hospitals Authority, 3rd Terrace West, Centreville; or PO. Box N-8200
Nassau, Bahamas no later than 12th June, 2009.

asy Credit VO Interest.

! a: A Sy,
.

sere

Dining Koom

FROM page 1B

PKF report urged.

“Moreover, management
should establish policies for
impairment testing on accounts
receivable for inclusion in the
comprehensive operations man-
ual.”

In response, the Water &
Sewerage Corporation’s man-
agement said they had begun
“a more aggressive effort to
transfer” accounts past 180 days
due to the Bad Debt Register,
and initiated over improve-
ments.

Yet, further highlighting the
Corporation’s financial woes,
PKF added: “We noted that the
actual amount spent on specific
projects varied significantly
from the budgeted amounts.

“Some of these projects had
variances of up to 130 per cent
from the budgeted amounts.
Management should ensure that
persons involved in the plan-
ning process provide a more

AN
NAD

Nassau Airport
Dovolopmont Company

concise budget, so that the oth-
er projects are not placed on
hold due allocation of scarce
resources.”

And as for liquidity, PKF
said: “At present, the Corpora-
tion is being funded by high lev-
els of short-term financing
(overdraft facilities), with no
likely indication of a turnaround
in the method of financing the
shortfalls in its cash position.

“Management should give
serious consideration to the
restructuring of its operations,
in the immediate future, with
the ultimate objective of reduc-
ing its reliance on the high cost
of short-term financing.”

In response, the Water &
Sewerage Corporation man-
agement said: “The current
operating model is one of high
costs associated with water pro-
duction (principally reverse
osmosis water purchases) and
staffing.

“Management is constantly

Environmental Coordinator

The Nassau Ainport Cewelopment Gampany (MAD is
Seeking candidates for ihe postion of Environmental
Coordinator. The duties and responsibilities of ihe
successful applica will indude researching, planning and
‘atiling environmental procedures. and plans, conducting
reguiar irepection of company and tenant facilities and
acing as a liaison with govemment agendes and
onic on environmental matters

The ideal candidate vall have a minimum of an Associates
degree (Bachelor's degree pretened), experience rn
identifying environmental issues, knowledge of
environmental field moritonng protocols and the ability to
manage environmental pragrams tram inceplian ta

completion

This pasiien offers compete compercabon and benefits,
COP EAGT! WN eipenenoe and qualifications.

For more detaila, please visit our website al

Wwww.nas.bs

Ilyotl are qualthed and infgresied please subrrel
your resume by Mary 2%, 20808 to

Manager Paople

Aachadl Arnot Devaopmenl Go.

FO. Box AP 58228

Nassau, Haberras

Only hogs apphcants sherl beled wal be contacted

seeking to identify avenues for
cost containment but points out
that tariff adjustments (or addi-
tional government funding) are
necessary and overdue, partic-
ularly in light of escalating ener-
gy costs.”

None of this is surprising, but
the PKF report is useful in high-
lighting what is going on behind
the numbers at the Water &
Sewerage Corporation. The
Corporation’s 2007 year-end
accounts, also audited by PKF,
confirmed Tribune Business’s
revelations that it had incurred
a $24.107 million net loss before
receiving a $20.2 million gov-
ernment subsidy.

The Corporation’s New Prov-
idence-based operations gener-
ated a $15.423 million net loss
prior to the subsidy’s receipt,
while the pre-subsidy loss on
the Family Islands was some
$8.685 million.

And PKF said in its audit
opinion that “without qualify-
ing our report” it had noted that
the Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration’s net current liabilities
exceeded assets by $66.941 mil-
lion, making it entirely depen-
dent on government and tax-
payer funding for the continua-
tion of its operations.

Meanwhile, PKF’s internal
audit controls report found that
Water & Sewerage Corporation
was ‘capitalising’ and treating
as an asset those it did not have
title to, especially financed
assets, which required the ful-
fillment of certain conditions
before title passed.

On trade payables, the PKF
team noted that the Water &
Sewerage Corporation was rec-
onciling items from prior years,
dating back to 2004, on its gen-
eral ledger control account bal-
ances.

This, the accountants warned,
could “jeopardise” the Water
& Sewerage Corporation’s abil-
ity to obtain supplier credit.

“The Corporation should re-
examine its policies in relation
to reducing the level of accounts
payable, in addition to reduc-
ing the length of time taken to
satisfy its obligations,” the PKF
report said. “This should be
done with a view to maintaining
healthy business relationships
with suppliers so as not to affect
the timing of critical capital
works.”

Inventory checks, and prob-
lems in accessing critical sup-
port documents, were identified
by PKF. It also highlighted the
absence of operational proce-
dures, policies and controls
manuals at the Water & Sewer-
age Corporation, and the fact
there were no documented pro-
cedures to assess the risk of
fraud.

2 MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT WG

NOTICE

CORRIDOR 11

BLUE HILL ROAD
ROADWAY CONSTRUCTION

In an effort to relieve current traffic congestion problems JOSE
CARTELLONE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES S.A_ has
been contracted for the Completion of the New Providence Road
Improvement Project — International Package. Road construction
will be commencing onCorridor 11A (Blue Hill Road),which may
require diversions from:

Duke Street & Robinson Road

Local diversions will be sign posted in due course and further
information will be provided in the local media

Tel: 242-322-8341 /242-322-2610

“The mark of excellence in fine manufactured furniture”
AUTHORIZED YAMAHA AUDIO / MUSIC DEALER PARTS & SERVICES

(Check our .
. ‘No interest’ Prices) —=*

Email: jcccbahamas @cartellone.com.ar

Home Furniture Company Ltd.
Palmdale Shopping Plaza

Tel: 322-8645-8 * Fax: 322-2547

Open daily: 8:30a.m. - 5:00p.m.

aj

ea

=

ita
THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 7B



Consumer confidence
skyrockets in May

@ By ANNE D’INNOCENZIO
AP Retail Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Con-
sumer confidence extended its
rebound in May, soaring to the
highest level since last Septem-
ber as more shoppers are feel-
ing the worst of the recession
is behind them.

The Conference Board said
Tuesday that its Consumer
Confidence Index, which had
dramatically increased in April,
zoomed past economists’ expec-
tations to 54.9 from a revised
40.8 in April. Economists sur-
veyed by Thomson Reuters
were expecting 42.3. In Febru-
ary, confidence levels had hit a
new historic low of 25.3.

The reading marks the high-
est in eight months when the
level was 61.4. The levels are
also closer to the year-ago’s
58.1, though the widely watched
barometer is still below 100,
which indicates a healthy econ-
omy.

The Present Situation Index,
which measures how shoppers
feel now about the economy,
rose to 28.9 from 25.5 last
month. But the Expectations
Index, which measures shop-
pers’ outlook over the next six
months, climbed to 72.3 from
51.0 in April.

Investors focused on the
upbeat sentiment reading, shak-
ing off a mostly downbeat
report on the housing market,
also released Tuesday. In mid-
morning trading, the Dow
Jones industrial average rose
203.42, or 2.5 per cent, to
8,480.74.

“Looking ahead, consumers
are considerably less pessimistic
than they were earlier this year,
and expectations are that busi-
ness conditions, the labor mar-
ket and incomes will improve
in the coming months,” Lynn
Franco, director of The Con-
ference Board Consumer
Research Center, said in a state-
ment. “While confidence is still
weak by historic standards, as
far as consumers are concerned,
the worst is now behind us.”

The confidence report
offered encouraging news to
merchants,which are counting
on consumers to be in the mood
to spend after confidence plum-
meted to historic lows late last
year but has been rising since
March. A two-month stock ral-
ly has helped make shoppers
feel a little better about their
retirement funds, spurring dra-
matic rebounds in confidence
in April and May levels.

Meanwhile, better-than-
expected earnings results from
such retailers as Sears Holdings
Corp. and Gap Inc. have
offered the latest evidence that
spending has begun to stabilize,
though overall business is still
weak.

The size of the monthly
increases in April and May in
consumer confidence encour-
aged economists. Gary Thayer,
chief economist at Wells Fargo
Advisors, says that unless the
economy suffers from major
financial shocks, it looks like
“we’ve turned the corner” on
confidence.

“This is a significant change,”
said Thayer. “While (con-
sumers) are unhappy about
their job situation and their
home values, they see light at
the end of the tunnel.” He
added, however, sentiment has
a way to go before shoppers go
back to splurging. That can only
happen when the job and hous-
ing markets, which have been
holding down sentiment, start

The Tribune wants to hear

to turn around.

The latest report on home
prices, released Tuesday, wasn’t
comforting. Home prices fell at
the fastest annual rate on
record in the first quarter,
though the pace of month-to-
month declines continues to
slow, according to a closely
watched housing index.

The Standard & Poor’s/Case-
Shiller National Home Price
index reported home prices
tumbled by 19.1 per cent in the
first quarter, the most in its 21-
year history.

Home prices have fallen 32.2
per cent since peaking in the
second quarter of 2006 and are
at levels not seen since the end
of 2002.

Meanwhile, Americans con-
tinue to cut back on nonessen-
tials like furniture while focus-
ing on buying necessities as they
worry about their jobs. The
unemployment rate is expect-
ed to climb to 9.2 per cent in
May from 8.9 per cent in April
and employers are expected to
shed a net total of 523,000 jobs,
according to economists sur-
veyed by Thomson Reuters.
The Labour Department is
expected to release unemploy-
ment figures on June 5.

The Consumer Confidence
survey — whose responses were
received through May 19 from a
representative sample of 5,000
U.S. households — showed a
marked improvement in con-
sumers’ outlook for jobs. The
percentage of consumers
expecting more jobs in the
months ahead increased to 20.0
per cent from 14.2 per cent,
while those anticipating fewer

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jobs declined to 25.2 per cent
from 32.5 per cent. The pro-
portion of consumers anticipat-

ing an increase in their incomes
edged up to 10.2 per cent from
8.3 per cent.



SHOPPERS hold bags after shopping in Santa Monica, California...

(AP Photo: Nick Ut)

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NASSAU, BAHAMAS

SUBLEASE
OPPORTUNITY

For information, contact:

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T: 242.376.0026
robersabohomaredity. bs

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T: 242376,00268

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The full audited Consolidated Financial Statements including the
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MET IMC ORE


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



eS eS Ee SS SSS SSS Se
.7% fiscal deficit ‘not sustainable’

FROM page 1B

the line” on recurrent spend-
ing, in an effort to stabilise the
situation.

Looking further out, Mr
Ingraham said the Government
hoped to reduce the GFS fiscal
deficits over the next three Bud-
get years to 2011-2012, but
warned: “In light of the magni-
tude of the fiscal challenges that
we face, that in and of itself will
be a notable achievement.”

The Prime Minister struck a
somewhat sombre tone at times
in delivering his Budget, no
doubt trying to impress upon
Bahamians the seriousness of
the situation the public finances
were in. However, there was lit-
tle that was new or unexpected
in his presentation.

And while he said there were

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays





only four government depart-
ments scheduled to receive an
increase in their 2009-2010 Bud-
getary spending allocation, he
omitted to mention two that
received the greatest increase -
and which are now competing
with health as the area receiving
most funding.

These departments are gov-
ernment debt servicing - interest
and principal redemptions. The
Government will on 2009-2010
spend $12.055 million more in
meeting interest payments on
its debt, a rise from $164.886
million to $176.94 million, while
debt principal redemptions will
increase by $17.458 million to
$87.794 million from $70.336
million.

Altogether, some $264 mil-
lion - a $30 million year-over-
year increase - will be spent on
meeting debt repayments, a
similar sum to the combined
allocation received by the Min-
istry of Health, Public Hospi-
tals Authority, Department of
Public Health and Department
of Environmental Health Ser-
vices.

For 2009-2010, Mr Ingraham
said the Government was pro-
jecting that recurrent revenues
would total $1.389 billion, some
$184.5 million less than the orig-
inal forecasts for the current
Budget year. The lowered pro-
jections indicate just how
severely the Government’s nar-

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row tax base, with its reliance
on international trade and
imports, has been impacted by
the global economic downturn.

With gross domestic product
(GDP) expected to be $78 mil-
lion lower than the 2008-2009
fiscal year, in current dollars,
Mr Ingraham said the Govern-
ment would seek to mitigate the
impact on its revenues by
“redoubling our efforts in 2010
to collect the maximum amount
of revenues that are rightfully
due to the Government”.

He pledged that his adminis-
tration would “continue to
streamline revenue collections
to facilitate the payment of tax-
es and fees”, with the projected
2009-2010 revenues of $1.389
billion standing at 18.8 per cent
of GDP.

This was better than the 2008-
2009 fiscal year’s projected per-
formance, in which the Gov-
ernment’s revenues amounted
to only 17.5 per cent of GDP -
some 2.8 per cent lower than
expected and “the lowest [rev-
enue to GDP ratio] in three
years”.

“That would still be some-
what lower than the ratio
attained in 2007-08,” Mr Ingra-
ham said if the projected 2009-
2010 revenue-GDP ratio, “but
at least it puts us back on the
upward trajectory that had been
envisaged in last year’s Budget
Communication.

“Ongoing enhancements in
revenue administration and col-
lections should lead to yet fur-
ther improvements in the ratio
of revenues to GDP as we move

beyond next year.”

As for the Government’s
recurrent spending, which goes
on its fixed costs, such as
salaries, emoluments and rents,
Mr Ingraham pledged to “hold
the line”, eliminating unneces-
sary spending and trying to
maintain public sector/civil ser-
vice employment at current lev-
els.

Spending

With recurrent spending for
2009-2010 pegged at $1.53 bil-
lion, some $38.908 million less
than the 2008-2009 projected
spend of $1.569 billion, Mr
Ingraham said the Government
planned to reduce both the
recurrent deficit and the overall
GFS fiscal deficit.

The recurrent deficit, which
measures the Government’s
revenues minus recurrent
spending, is projected to be
$141 million for 2009-2010, as
opposed to $186 million in 2008-
2009. The Ingraham adminis-
tration had initially forecast a
minor $20 million recurrent sur-
plus (meaning revenues would
exceed recurrent spending) in
its 2008-2009 Budget, before the
global economic crisis took hold
and threw that projection out
the window.

Combined with $255 million
in capital spending and $88 mil-
lion in debt principal redemp-
tion, the Prime Minister said a
GFS deficit of 3.9 per cent or
$286 million was projected for
2009-2010, a 0.7 per cent reduc-
tion upon this year’s 4.7 per cent

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COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2006
IN THE SUPREME COURT No. 00219
Equity Side

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel
or lot of land containing 20,283 sq. ft. situate on
the southwestern side of Queen’s Highway in the
settlement of Doctors Creek in the island of Long Island
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
AND
IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959.
AND
IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Leonard Knowles and
Patrice Knowles.

NOTICE

The Petition of Leonard Knowles and Patrice Knowles
in respect of all that piece parcel or lot of land containing 20, 283
sq. ft. situate on the southwestern side of Queen’s Highway in the
settlement of Doctors Creek in the island of Long Island in the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas, which said piece parcel or lot
of land is bounded on the NORTHWEST by land said to be the
property of Antonette Beckford running thereon One hundred and
Seventy-five (175) feet thereon. One hundred and Fifty and Three
hundredths (150.03) feet SOUTHWEST by land the property of
Llewolyn Knowles and running thereon One hundred and Forty-
five and Twenty-two hundredths (145.22) feet on the Southwest by
the sea and running thereon One hundred and Ten and Sixty-four
hundredths (110.64) feet which said piece parcel or lot of land has
the dwelling home of the Petitioner upon it and 1s more particularly
described by the Amended Plan filed herewith and is thereon
coloured PINK.

The Petitioners, Leonard and Patrice Knowles, claim to be the legal
and beneficial owners of the fee simple estate in possession of the
piece parcel or lot of land hereinbefore described and the Petitioners
have made application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959,
to have their title to the said lot of land investigated.

Copies of the filed plan may be inspected during normal working
hours at:-

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Second Floor, Ansbacher
House, East Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.

(b) The Chambers of Martin, Martin and Co., Second Floor, Pond
Plaza, East Bay and Ernest Streets, Nassau N.P., The Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that any person having dower or right to
dower or any adverse claim/s not recognized 1n the Petition shall on
or before the 15th. day of July, A.D., 2009, file in the Registry of
the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned
a statement of such claim 1n the prescribed form and verified by an
affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file and
serve a statement of such claim on or before the aforementioned
date will operate as a bar to such claim.

MARTIN, MARTIN & CO.
Chambers, Second Floor, Pond Plaza
East Bay and Ermest Streets
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

ATTORNEYS FOR THE PETITONERS

NOTICE is hereby given that KENRICK KORDELL
LIGHTBOURNE of SEA GRAPE, EIGHT MILE ROCK, GRAND
BAHAMA is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 21st day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE of URBAN SINCLAIR MILLER
JR. late of the Southern District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that all persons having any claim
or demand against the above Estate are required to
send their names, addresses and particulars of the same
certified in writing to the undersigned on or before the 28th
day May A. D., 2009, and if required, prove such debts
or claims, or in default be excluded fron{ any distribution;
after the above date the assets will be distributed having
regard only to the proved debts or claims of which the
Administrator shall have had Notice.

And Notice is hereby given that all persons indebted to the
said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or
before the aforementioned date.
MICHAEL A. DEAN & CO.,
Attorneys for the Administrator Alvernia Court, 94
Dowdeswell Street

P.O. Box N-3114
Nassau, The Bahamas

Position of Accountant

A financial institution seeks an Accountant. Candi-
dates must have at least 3-5 years experience in ac-
counting in the financial industry with sound knowl-
edge of but not limited to:

¢ Formulating budgets
¢ Managing Accounts Receivables and Payables

¢ Preparation of monthly and annual financial re-
ports and statements

¢ Preparation of bank reconciliations and various
general ledger accounts to the sub ledgers

¢ Co-ordinate the annual audit with external auditors
and preparation of the necessary schedules

¢ Preparing reports for the regulators
¢ Must be a team player

¢ Must possess people skills and be prepared to
interact with members

* Qualifications: AA in Accounting

Please forward resume to
P. O. Box N-7544

or $352 million.

“A deficit of such a magni-
tude is not sustainable over the
medium term and will clearly
have implications for the stock
of Government Debt which, at
the end of June 2009, is expect-
ed to stand at just over $2.9 bil-
lion or 38.9 per cent of GDP,”
Mr Ingraham said of the 2008-
2009 fiscal performance.

Looking back over the 2008-
2009 Budget year, which ends
on June 30, 2009, the Prime
Minister - not surprisingly - said
revenues were “bearing the
brunt of the recessionary pres-
sures”. He estimated that they
would finish the year at $1.31
billion, down by more than $260
million upon Budget estimates
of $1.574 million.

That figure was some 17 per
cent down on estimates, Mr
Ingraham added, “and bears
witness to the extent of the fis-
cal challenge that confronts the
Government in the current
environment.

“The GFS deficit in 2008-
2009 is being severely and neg-
atively affected by the global
downturn, which is having a
major effect on the perfor-
mance of the Bahamian econo-
my. It is to be noted, in particu-
lar, that GDP in current dol-
lars, which is a critical factor in
the evolution of revenues, is
expected to be lower than fore-
cast in 2008-2009 by some 3.5
per cent or $ 265 million.”

While recurrent spending was
expected to be $40 million
below initial estimates, “as a
result of the significant decline
in revenues”, the recurrent
deficit was expected to come in
at $186 million.

When capital spending and
debt redemptions were factored
in, the total GFS deficit was
estimated to be $352 million or
4.7 per cent of GDP, more than
double the initial projections of

a 2.1 per cent GFS deficit. The
GFS deficit for 2008-2009 is
likely to be $187 million above
projections.

Due to the widening fiscal
deficits, Mr Ingraham said the
Government’s debt would
increase to 43.2 per cent of
GDP by the 2009-2010 fiscal
year-end, compared to 38.9 per
cent one year earlier.

“There was a time in the
Bahamas when we would not
dream of exceeding the 40 per
cent debt-to-GDP ratio,” the
Prime Minister said. “It was
beyond our contemplation.”

However, the Central Bank
of the Bahamas in its 2008
annual report noted that the
Bahamas’ national debt was
already more than 43 per cent
of GDP, indicating that its cal-
culations and those of the Prime
Minister are not aligned.

The Government’s own Bud-
get document yesterday showed
that with the Government’s
direct debt standing at $2.764
billion, and debt it had guaran-
teed at $436 million, the nation-
al debt already stood at 43 per
cent of GDP at year-end 2008.
This indicates that Mr Ingra-
ham is likely to be talking about
the direct debt charge on gov-
ernment in reference to the
June 2010 date.

The implications of this,
though, indicate that if guaran-
teed government debt remains
constant at 6 per cent of GDP,
the total national debt will be
just shy of 50 per cent of GDP
when the next Budget year
ends.

Mr Ingraham acknowledged
that a “sustainable fiscal posi-
tion is so vitally important to
our economic future”, adding
that controlling the fiscal deficit
and the economy’s eventual
return to growth would get the
debt-to-GDP ratio back under
control.

OB OPPORTUNITY

Graphic Designer to work in fast paced organisa-

tion.

Core responsibilities and requirements:

¢ To produce graphic design solutions for a range of

promotion and information needs.

* Candidates must be well versed in design concepts
and proficient in design software, including
Illustrator, Dreamweaver, QuarkXpress, Freehand,
Photoshop and others.

¢ Candidates must be proficient with both Macintosh
and Windows based computer applications and hard-
ware, including design and layout of print material.

A Bachelor’s degree in graphic design or related
field is preferred.

DA#61034
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas

ESSAY COMPETITION

TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK

The Department of Public Service will host an Essay
Competition as one of the activities for the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week. The Competition is open to Junior
and Senior Students in New Providence.

Additionally, this year, a speech competition will be
for schools in the Northern & Southern Bahamas,
respectively. Students interested in participating in the
Essay Competition should write a 250 - 300 words (Junior
High), and 450 - 500 words (Senior High), essay on the
topic: “ The Public Service-Striving for Excellence in
Customer Service.”

The deadlines for entries, which should be referred
to the attention of Mrs. Antoinette Thompson, Deputy
Permanent Secretary, Department of Public Service, is
Friday 24th July, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 Computer System will be awarded to
the winner each category. The first runners-up for both the
Essay and Speech Competition in the Junior & Senior High
School category, will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.

The winners will be announced during the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week Awards Ceremony scheduled for
Saturday 10th October 2009.

Students interested in the Speech Competition for the
Northern and Southern Bahamas should contact their
Language Arts Teacher.
THE TRIBUNE

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government yesterday
said it had agreed to provide a
$30 million guarantee to cover
CLICO (Bahamas) policy liabili-
ties, as no other Bahamas-based
insurance company was willing to
purchase the collapsed carrier’s
policies due to the exposure risk
they faced without this.

Stating that the guarantee
would be for a $30 million maxt-
mum and last no longer than five
years, Mr Ingraham said it would
not apply to Bahamian institu-
tions or corporations that had
purchased CLICO (Bahamas)
annuities, nor the bankrupt com-
pany’s senior management, direc-
tors and their family members.

THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009, PAGE 11B

Institutions not covered in $30m CLICO guarantee

“We are advised that insurance
companies are unwilling to pur-
chase CLICO’s policies and
assume the possible exposure of
$30 million without a Govern-
ment Guarantee,” Mr Ingraham
said.

“In order to facilitate the sale
of CLICO’s policy liabilities, the
Government has agreed to pro-
vide such a guarantee.”

CLICO’s life insurance policy-
holders will be covered up to
$300,000 worth of insurance cov-
erage, while accident and sick-
ness, and group life, medical and
annuity, all covered for their full
amount. Annuity policyholders
will be covered up to $100,000 of
their policy’s accumulated value.

Only policies in force will be
covered by the guarantee, and the

Government will establish a
Statutory Insurance Compensa-
tion Guarantee Fund to protect
Bahamian policyholders in the
event of future insurance compa-
ny failures.

Mr Ingraham added: “The
Office of the Registrar of Insur-
ance Companies advises that
there is a gap between the assets
and liabilities of CLICO leaving a
net liability of $42 million. There
are realisable assets estimated at
$85 million, and adjusted liabili-
ties of $127 million.

“Policy liabilities are estimat-
ed at $73 million and other liabil-
ities at $54 million. As policy lia-
bilities may have a first claim on
all assets, it is therefore expected
that policy liabilities are fully cov-
ered.”

Peer review set to boost accounting industry standard

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIAN accounting firms
will soon be subject to a quality
assurance check every six years
by a body of their peers, the sec-
ond vice-president of the Bahamas
Institute of Chartered Accoun-
tants (BICA) said yesterday. This
will cause in increase in BICA’s
annual membership fee per part-
ner.

Philip Galanis, who is also man-
aging partner at HLB Galanis
Bain, said the peer review or prac-
tice monitoring was proposed so
that those firms in public practice
would have access to material that
would help them engage in best
practices. “The public is going to
benefit as a result of knowing that

all accountants in the Bahamas
who are licensed by BICA would
have had a peer review performed
of their practice, so they all sub-
scribe to a particular standard,”
he said.

Mr Galanis said all accounting
firms who are engaged in public
practice and are licensed by BICA
will be subject to a peer review by
members of the Association of
Chartered Certified Accountants
(ACCA), a globally recognised
body.

Mr Galanis said the ACCA will
scrutinise all firms, including large
international firms, such as
Deloitte and Touche, and will
report their findings to a body
selected by BICA.

Should a firm’s review be found
to have any unsatisfactory out-
comes it will be given a period of

time to correct the problem.

Mr Galanis said this will be
done every six years. Those firms
who are licensed by BICA to prac-
tice will also be subject to
increased per annum license fees
per partner of $280. He said this is
because BICA will be responsible
for underwriting the cost of the
reviews for almost 300 members.

This new peer review has also
been mandated by the Interna-
tional Federation of Accountants,
of which the Institute of Chartered
Accountants of the Caribbean is a
part.

The ACCA was chosen to con-
duct the reviews. Initially, howev-
er, they will in the process train a
local team to do peer reviews in
the region, as they do not have a
“vested” interest in staying in the
Bahamas.

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

MUST SELL

NEW PROVIDENCE

Lot 2840, OBAFEMI! AVENUE, LYNDEN PINDLING EST.
WEST SIDE OF LADY PINDLING HIGHWAY Appraisal: $156,000.00

on this 5,000 sq. fr. prog

hathroam house,

Livirwg,
approximately 1,077 se

ed living Space,

Directions: Travelling Charles Saunders Highway east, turn onto Lady Marquerite
Pindling Avenue, turn to the first corner on the right. Subject property is #2840, at
the end on the left side of the street painted peach and white,

SSM FSA ETS

#7 MALCOLM ROAD

Lot 18, House #7, Malcolm Road

West having an area of 5,000

square feet. Existing thereon is

a 40-year-old split leveled

residence divided into five (5) &

one bedroam, one bathroom

apartments, four located on the

main floor and one on the upper

portion is made of durock and is

about 5 complete. The

building isin fair condition ard

is in serious need ol

maintenance.

Directions: From Baillou Hill Road heading South pass §.C. McPherson
School, take Malcolm Road heading East. Pass the first corner on the left to
House #7 painted white trimmed green.

Appraisal: $156,747.50

Lot No. 59 LOWER BOGUE, ELEUTHERA
North of the T-Junction (Needs Repairs) Appraisal: $84,045.00
ery 3

J living, dining rooms and kitchen, t
and utility room, Total area of enclosed living space is 1,622 se
addition to (63.7 sq. ft. utility room and 120 sq. ft. car port.

FOR CONDITIONS OF SALE & ANY OTHER INFORMATION
ie ee dS 0 le |
ee 0 ee ee te
Te ee ee ek |

ROSETTA STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS


PAGE 18B, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Be guided over firm’s corporate governance

* Ensure that the organisation is “in
control” of itself

Duties of Directors

The Guidelines reinforce the legal
and statutory requirements, and
acceptable standards, of best practice
for the discharge of the duties of direc-
tors. They must:

* Act with honesty, integrity, good
faith and in the best interests of the
licensee (and company), and its clients.

* Exercise the care, diligence and
skill that a reasonably prudent person

would exercise in comparable circum-
stances.

* Exercise independent judgment in
their approach to decision-making and
problem-solving.

* Act on a fully-informed basis.

* Understand and devote sufficient
time to their responsibilities.

* Act only within the scope of their
authority.

* Recognise and guard against con-
flicts of interest in dealing with the
licensee, taking into account the inter-
ests of all stakeholders.

The overall guidance and direction
that the Guidelines provide to licensees
(and companies generally) cannot be
underestimated, particularly in an envi-
ronment where no such Guidelines
existed before, in whole or in part.

It would be prudent for executive
and non-executive directors and senior
management to understand, implement
and adhere to the requirements and
recommendations within the Guide-
lines, in the first instance, and to con-
tinue to develop their individual cor-
porate governance processes and

regime within the parameters of its
directives.

This is to ensure the interests of all
stakeholders are protected, maintained
and valued by directors and senior
management of licensees within the
Bahamas, without compromise or com-
plicity.

© 2006. Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald. All
rights reserved.

NB: The information contained in
this article does not constitute nor is it
a substitute for legal advice. Persons
reading this article and/or column, gen-

erally, are encouraged to seek the rel-
evant legal advice and assistance
regarding issues that may affect them
and may relate to the information pre-
sented.

Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald is an attor-
ney with Fitzgerald & Fitzgerald.
Should you have any comments on this
article, you may contact Mr Fitzger-
ald at Suite 212, Lagoon Court Build-
ing, Olde Towne Mall at Sandyport,
West Bay St., P. O. Box CB-11173,
Nassau, Bahamas or at tyrone@tle-
fitzgeraldgroup.com.

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY





MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES



Investment Opportunity Muct Sell Lot No. 217
Pinewood Gardens Sobdivision

All teat lot of land hawing an area of 5 MK) sg ft, being Lot No.
117 of the Subdivision bnown. us Pinewood Cardess, the caid subdivision
ateated in the Souchem District of Mew Providence Bahamas.
Located on this property is a strectume cemprising of an approximencly
2) yr oid single family wesidence conedstieg of S92 sy. fod enckeed
living space with 3-bedrooms, |-hathroom. living/dining room.
kitchen, drive way and walk way. The land is on a grade and level
and appears to be sulticienily ckevaied $0 disallow the possizilty
of flooding. The grounds are fairly kept and yard is open.

Appraieal: $127, 568M)

Trevelisa wut on East Servet io the juoction of Soldier Road, make a left at the ght then tum ngbt imo Keenedy Sebdivision,
eo all the wiry to T:jenetion, tum night them first left then ight again toward Moen Tabor Church building, after parsing Moant Tabor
take first lef (sapodille bled), the sebject bose is about 40M) yards on the right painted yellow rimmed geven, with geen and whine
door



LOT NO. #7, BOILING HOLE SUBDIVISION

All that piece parcel or lot of land and inpeoyements situated
on the Island af Eeuthem, North of Gowennor’s Harter,
comprising of Lat No. 7 in the Bolling Hola Subdivision and
comprising of approximately 10,000 sq. ft., this site
encompasses 217 ears old duples with each unit consisting
of 2-beckooma; | bathroom, frortroom, diningroom and kitchen
alli fe floor area of approximately 1.47420 sq, ft, and
covered porch ama of approwimainty 164.70 sq. ft. this dupinx
was built in accordance with the plan and spechication as
approved, and ata standard that was acceptable to tha Ministry Cd Pubic Works. This structure is in fonditian.
Each apartment could be rented at $800.00 per manth, The land is landscaped and planted with fous trees, but

Needs Some Manicuring.
APPRAISAL: $138,669.00





Exunma Lid i, 770A, Rahena Sond # 11

All that piece parce! or loot land having an area of approuimatety
TOWKM) aq 1h, heeeg bet Ta, ditiatied in a region’ eeblivicom
kao & Babar Sound of Esuma Section 11, Sineated on this
property is oY yrs old single sioney residence consisting of 3-
Bedrooms, 2-balleooms, livingrote, dinamgrom & kinchon, with
appro Gly 1363 49. 1, of eaclieed living spacs, The heiking
is structurally soend & is generally in good condition. The leet is
rectengelas in shape. No adverse site conditions were sowed

Appralsal: $185 646 21





Property keewted about 2 4/4 miles southemwardly of the settlemeat of George Toon. Pariced peak wimmed whine.



Lat Wo, 235 Tawnam Heights Sibiliviaion

All that lot of Lind having an areca of 8.534 sq ft, being Log #
SS) 235, of the tubdiviesen known ae Tw ynem Heights, The said
SuiVisiOn siete in the ete district of New Providence
Located on his poopeny is an appelimaichy Gyr old singh tamily
retidence coniting of apprivimulely | S26 sy Mal coche
living space with S-bednecnd. 7 -haths. living. diftihge, Einichen
& carport, the land on a grade & level; & appears tp be
sultickemily cevaned to disalboe che possibilirg of Norling. The
@roueds art fairly kept, with aaproweces includiag walkway,



dreeweay & front boundary wall
Appraisal: $244,422 3)

Traveling ext on Prince Charles, turn rigat at Super Value Food Sore, chen Ust left tn t-junction, tum left at jencticn then
right & the property will be the ah om the belt side of the road palneed Blue trimmed white.

LOT MO, 370 GRENADA CLOSE GOLIKEN GATES #2 (haewi)

All that lol af aad kevin an area of 5 500)9g. ft. beine bot 370 Grenada
Close of the sURiMeion Knows and disigrated a6 Gomes Gans Mo, 2,
sitvaied in the Southeecstom district of Mew Providence Boheme, This
property 18 comprised of 75 years old angle family peskeooe conasting
Of apprcsineely | 234 sg. [Loot eneiossd living apace with 3 badroorrs,
ren halons, liviig ining pom, dtd kilehen, Tie Lael is on a grade
aml bei andl appari he eollicaenly clewadial to lealhvw thar poanitelty
Of Dodise dering semua) heavy rainy pore. The pocueads anc Taiely lop,
Wilh inprveneis inclading driveway, wilkwey ond bow shinibs, Yard
af eetloaed with chain linked feecing in the aided ood roe,



Appraisal: $149,406 0

Traveling south sheng Blac Hill Road. tem night at the Farmers Pelarker jist after gassing the Ciolien foes Shoppeng Center, Gite let oie
fen, Windward Isles Way, hes like Sed comer night, St Tien Road, then first lef, Wrerada Crest, dive arqumd the: bed Chen Tet leh
again the sebject peopery is the 2nd property let hiwuse 4 paimed peoch trimmed hock



LOT NO. 10C, YAMACRAW BREACH ESTATES

All that peece parcel or lot of lend having an area of approsimanely
S03 Leg ft. being Lot #0 im Yamacrew Beach Estates erected
an this property is an approximately |5yrs old single storey triples
aparinent buakliag wilh Qoor apace of approximately 350) sq
ft. 3 units consisting of |, 3-bedrooms vith close}, 2-bath, living.
dining kitchen & porch, 2, 2-bedroomes with closets, | hath, living.
dining & kitchen the property 3 graded down & landscaped. Note:
the Suikding bes a prreuic water eyetcm

Aupprraisal: $374 MHbIM)



Traveling south on Foo Hill Road take dhe comer after Inhnean’s

Barber Shop them Let belt & Jet left again; the subject property i straighl ahewl! painted beige rime while.











Pelee ells
Cees ae 0)

WINTON MEATMOWS (Lot No. 3H2)

All thal piece parcel or lot of land having
am apta Of B00 aq. 1. being bot No. 382
situwied im the subdivision knawn as. Frinton
Meadows, the sad subdivision situated in
the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence, Babamas. This property is
canipriaed of a 24 year old single family
residence with an attached efficiency
iformerly the carport) consisting af
approxkmately 2,674 ag. fof enclosed living
sce, from porch- 198 a. f., back patio 380.
The buikling is a tao storey house. Besklcs
ihe efficiency apartment, the house ia comprigh! of 3-bedrooms, 3-bathroomns, inclaive of a master bedlroor
sulle upstairs. Foyer, front room, dining soom, family room. powder room, utility room, breakfast nook and
kitchen downstairs. Climate control is provided by ducted central air conditioning, with air circulation
enhanced by ceiling fans and other amenities. Qhoality of construction: Average. Standard of maintenance
Averuge, Elfective age: seven years (7) the land is on flat terrain, however the site AppeEnrs he be sulfichently
elevated to disallow the parsaabaliny od flooding under normal weather condition, Loree: Lael ig amnusl haraw'y
rainy periods. The grounds arc well kept, with improvements including neatly maintained lawns with flowering
trees, and a concrete pardem'storage shed, which is located im ihe backyard. The yard is enclosed along the
sides with chain-link fencing, and comereie block walls thot are topped with metal railings, and metal gates
wt the frond ard back,



APPRAISAL: $343,072.50

Traweling east on Prince Charnes Drive, _ the streetlight at Pox Hill Row wntil youl get to Meadiws
Bowlevard, tum right onto Meadows Boulevard, go south and toke the 4th left, then lat right. The subject
howse is the Ind house on the left side painted beige trimmed white,

Crown Alletment 67, Murpay Town Alhocn

All that parcel of land having am approwkmate area of 931MP aq ft,
heing lot #672, 0 portion of the murphy town crown albement #
67. Located on thas property is a single storey wooden residence
with a botal se eat approcimely | BM sg, 1 & consisting
of 3-bedrooms, 2-bathrooms, living/dining bitches 2-car garnge
& covered porch. Additional floor space is available within roof
dormers. Exterior walls are of wood overlain with burdi board
sidiag or comcrete duriboard siding. interior walls are of gypsum
wallbozed siding. Construction demonstrates above averge quality
workmanship. however manor aesthetic rement is still needed
Landscaping bas commenced, bat not yet completed. The property
is level with no immediate flooding danger. All major otilities are within (O00 of the subject site

Aquprralsaal; $241 20MM)
This proerty is situated off Bay Street Drive, Murphy Town.

Lot No. 13, Masthe Point, Highway

All that piece, paced of bot of lated bee lot 213 and eateased on
the mimi Mastic Poin Highway in the senicmem of Mastic Poin,
on te Teland af Merth Anco, one of the Tabane of The
Commonwealth of The Beharas. The subpool property 8 pactangeker
In shape and is appro mately 40,000 aq, Tt, located on the suhjeet
Property isan approsimaltely oil single-storey dples opartecn!
coraisting of appeonmaacly 104 sq fof enclosed living apace
With ten 1-bedionen 1-bethrecun, living, dining pocoms A kinches
The land is on a grade & lewel, berwever the site appears uy be
GM ciesly elevated i disallow the pemhilicy of feeding derung
ennual heavy rainy periceks of the wear, The property 6 mo



londscuped,
Appraisal: $163,247 Jo

Lat Ao. 14 Berk 11, Coral Hicights Fast Saldiviches

All that lot of lad having an acs of approximately 330M) sq fl,
being Low 14. Block UL af the suidivision ecw as Coral Hees,
East, in the Westers Distinct of the lelaad of New Providenoe.
Located On the subpoct property i6.an approaicnatcly Uyrold singk
storey resklence wich appemimacely 2.03569. ft. of enclosed living
ipace 4 consisting of 4-bedenoess, 2-balhro=oms, living re,
dinihg poo, Tamely noon, Gichen, hin foe, willy poor,
lnwrdry oom Ae caren, the lend is on a grade & level; however
Ihe: site opens bo be sulticenly clewaed in disallow the possitilirg
of thending during annual heavy rainy periods of the year.

Appraisal: S242)

Travelling weston Camechec! Rend, jo bo the Corel Harkour poundahon, enter Coral Harta fron the pom abeven them
tae the Det left (central drive east), drive to the 2nd. commer on the left, (emt lobe dr). The sabject pooperty is located om
ihe comer painied green cienmed white. The yard & opes.

LOT MO. 225, TREASURE COVE SUBDIVISION

All that piece parcel of lot of land having an area. of approcimaich:
6114 sq fi. being Lot 22,0f Treasure Cowe erected om this propemy
ian approcimately UOyr old simgle fmiby Grand Abaco design
residence with approximately | SBA op. ft of living space & conseting
of Hhedroome, 2-tathrooms, kiichen, living. dinumg, familly & utiliey
ROIS. ETIprovemenis incledes cemtral air conditioning A huncane
shutters. The land ison a grade & bevel & omeaes to be sufficaently
ehaied to disallow the pessitility of Dooding during bewy nainy
periods. The land is landscaped.

Appraisal: 34357 6

Trvelling on Yamacres Hill Road, turn into Treasure Cove entrance the subject property t& located on the Sea comer on the
left pinted yellow trimmed while. The yard is open.





Lat Aion, 136 Garden Hills Eatades
AD thet hotof bed having an area of 5.989 sq fL, being Lot Mo. 10396 of the sabdivision known as Garden Hills Estates, a
fi vision eiled in the southern distinct of New Prowenoe. Bahamas. This property 6 vacant heed and is) 2oened
meidential - single family, The subject property is severely sloping downwards
Appraisal: 65 10M) 00

Travelling weston the East Weal Highway, lake the rel entrance left into Garden Hills Getates aext to Hillkide Mission

Bape Choreh. teal op the hall an Eckel wer Awe to Orange blossom ave, mak a tight on orang: Bloseom Ave & the sib

Property is the Dred om che left side

BOCK WELL ESTATES
All that piece parcel of lot of vacant land having an aren of 600M) sq. fi. being lot me 19, of the subdivision kmown
as Rockwell Estates, situated in the wesiern district of aged gohan yee bahamas. this property is zoned residential
single family ¢ multi-family. the land is on a grade and bevel, amd is sufficienily elevated © disallow the
possibility of flooding during heavy rainy periods of the year. Rockwell Estates Is Located Just OFF Mekinney Drive

ind Rocky Pine Road.
Appraisal: S00 JMH)AM)

VACANT PROPERTIES

Let So. 15, Block b0, Winton Heights

All that lot of vecemt land having am ores of 17144 9g fi, of the subdivision known as Winton Heights siteated in the
Basten District of New Providence Bahamas. This property is rectangular in stape and zoned malti family = single family.

Appradsal: $171 44h)
This property is about 230ft West of Sassoon Drive and is about the third Jot om the North Side of Hill Side Road.

Lat No. 44, South Westridge Sebdivision

All that piece. parcel or loa of vacant land having am area of 41,490 sq. fi, being lot #24 of the subdivision bnoown as
aout Westrider, the said subdivision situated in the westem distictof New Providence Bohomas. This property is xonmedd
singh: famiby residential area. The land & slighdly elevated & appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility
of flooding during anos heey rainy periods of the year.

Appraisal: $342,292.00

Trevelling west on JP. tunn left imo Soeth Weetricgee [pank wal. towel! to the 2nd comer left & tonn left of the t-junction.
The subject property will be about the 3rd.an the left side of the road.

For conditions of sale and other information contact 326-1771 * Fax 356-3851
Inc WEAIRECN AerU

5-Day FORECAST



er ORLANDO ‘ .
High:88°F/31°C 3 Partly sunny. Cloudy with a spotty Mainly cloudy, a Becoming cloudy
Low: 70°F/21°C 2 thunderstorm. t-storm in spots. with a thunderstorm.

ee a ee High: 88° High: 87°

r ; os High: 88° Low: 77° Low: 74° Low: 76°
4 Cs te Lt ; Ea ;

ight 85° F/29° he
Low: 74° F/23°C ne r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, suns
my @ ’ - elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures refl
A * [
| ta a St
a , ABACO i
Lo High: 86° F/30° C i.
ol - re Low: 79° F/26°C Nec
c . No
: |, @ WEST PALM BEACH La
a High: 86° F/30°C :
= Low: 73° F/23°C @ - ‘s Pri
. A
i. FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Ye
' “ge High: 85° F/29° C High: 83° F/28° C Ne
Low: 74° F/23°C 2 “@ Low: 76° F/24° C
. @
. MIAMI

i. High: 86° F/30° C ee
; Low: 74° F/23° C NASSAU Low: 76°F/24

es High: 88° F/31°C oa

KEY WEST
High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 77° F/25°C

@

Low: 77° F/25°C
2 » 5

TR

~- GREATEXUMA
High: 86° F/30° C

Low: 74° F/23° C
ANDROS ;

High: 92° F/33° C

Low: 77° F/25°C ©

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.



Today Friday Today Friday Today Friday
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W

F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C
Albuquerque 79/26 57/13 t 81/27 58/14 t Indianapolis 74/23 56/13 t 80/26 59/15 s Philadelphia 72/22 6417 t 80/26 61/16 t
Anchorage 56/12 44/6 c 58/14 45/7 ¢c Jacksonville 88/31 68/20 t 88/31 68/20 t Phoenix 99/37 75/23 s 102/38 75/23 s
Atlanta 86/30 65/18 t 80/26 63/17 t Kansas City 78/25 58/14 pe 85/29 62/16 s Pittsburgh 78/25 58/14 t 72/22 54/12 pc
Atlantic City 68/20 64/17 pc 80/26 57/13 t Las Vegas 99/37 71/21 $s 99/37 75/23 s Portland, OR 82/27 56/13 s 84/28 56/13 s
Baltimore 75/23 64/17 t 80/26 58/14 t Little Rock 78/25 59/15 pc 84/28 58/14 s Raleigh-Durham 87/30 67/19 t 84/28 61/16 t
Boston 58/14 52/11 c 67/19 57/13 t Los Angeles 78/25 62/16 pc 78/25 60/15 pc St. Louis 74/23 60/15 t 84/28 65/18 s
Buffalo 72/22 56/13 t 64417 52/11 pe Louisville 78/25 60/15 t 82/27 62/16 s Salt Lake City 84/28 60/15 s 89/31 63/17 pc
Charleston, SC 86/30 70/21 t 89/31 66/18 t Memphis 80/26 64/17 c 82/27 65/18 pc San Antonio 89/31 64/17 t 91/32 67/19 pc
Chicago 69/20 51/10 pc 75/23 50/10 t Miami 86/30 74/23 t 85/29 71/21 t San Diego 72/22 63/17 pc 72/22 62/16 pc
Cleveland 76/24 55/12 t 68/20 51/10 s Minneapolis 75/23 55/12 po 73/22 55/12 pe San Francisco 71/21 55/12 pe 72/22 53/11 pe
Dallas 86/30 64/17 pc 90/32 64/17 s Nashville 80/26 61/16 t 81/27 58/14 pe Seattle 75/23 51/10 s 77/25 5110 s
Denver 82/27 52/11 pc 82/27 54/12 pc New Orleans 86/30 68/20 t 86/30 68/20 pc Tallahassee 87/30 69/20 t 89/31 66/18 t
Detroit 72/22 52/1 ¢ 76/24 52/11 s New York 68/20 62/16 c 79/26 63/17 t Tampa 85/29 74/23 t 84/28 71/21 t
Honolulu 83/28 72/22 pc 86/30 72/22 pc Oklahoma City 84/28 57/13 s 89/31 60/15 s Tucson 95/35 66/18 s 98/36 68/20 s
Houston 89/31 69/20 pc 89/31 67/19 pc Orlando 838/31 70/21 t 86/30 70/21 t Washington, DC 81/27 66/18 t 82/27 60/15 t
PAGE 20B, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2009

INTERNATIONAL
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THE TRIBUNE

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Tha gomee be gel more dene.

©2009 P&G

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Febreze Air Effects eliminates odors leaving a fresh scent.


The Tribune oo""""”
OBIMUARIES
RELIGION



\ -< The Tribune
OLD | tty Arcee, My Newspaper!

—‘\ ene
» \0
707.9

SS hour chaice for ihe family:
PG 20 ® Thursday, May 28, 2009

RELIGION

The Tribune

The Franciscan Dream

IN Victorian England young John
Cyril Hawes could never have dreamt
that he would become known as the
Hermit of Cat Island in the far off
Bahamas. He was born on September
7, 1876 in Richmond, Surrey. He was
brought up in the Anglican faith and
while attending Kings School,
Canterbury, where he loved to visit the
cathedral, he became attracted to High
Church rites. He had an inclination to
become a priest but he reluctantly
agreed with his father's advice to train
as an architect.

He regularly visited many cathedrals
and churches but at the age of 21, at
the Church of St

Thomas he was overcome with the
stirring roll of Gregorian chants, the
psalms of evensong, the Magnificat
and the sermon of Canon Rhodes-
Bristow speaking of the call of Elisha
and of St Francis of Assissi pondering
on the words "What shall it profit a
man if he gain the whole world and
lose his own soul."

The effect was startling, "And then
suddenly Our Lord touched me with
His grace.... Unspeakable joy flooded
my soul and I thought sacrifice is no
sacrifice at all because it is such a joy to
offer it"... I did not realise that when
the Master says ‘Follow me’ it will be
through the Garden of Gethsemane."

From that day, John modeled his life
on St Francis of Assissi and longed for
monastic asceticism. He wanted to
become a Roman Catholic there and
then.

What would seem to most people as
a great honour was looked upon as a
great temptation to John Hawes. He
was invited by Anglican Bishop
Hornby to design and build a church at




JIM
LAWLOR

Chollerton, Northumberland. He set-
tled there and became a lay reader in a
nearby Anglican Church. His design
of the church approximated a Catholic
place of worship. Bishop Hornby per-
suaded him to study for Anglican
Orders and he duly entered Lincoln

Theological College in 1901. After
ordination at Fulham Palace he was
referred by Bishop Hornby to be
curate at the Church of the Holy
Redeemer, Clerkenwell. Fortunately,
this unique church had a Renaissance
interior with a high altar and a Catholic
environment - Hawes felt that he
would be able to fulfill his Franciscan
ideals there. After a year he was raised
to the priesthood.

In 1906, Abbot Aelred offered
Father Hawes to design ‘The
Homecoming’ at the Isle of Caldey and
become a novitiate for the Franciscan
life. Clothed in the novice's habit he
took on the name Brother Jerome. But
after only 4 months tensions arose
between the old fashioned Protestant
villagers and the Franciscan brother-
hood in their habits and sandals.
Brother Jerome took up a wandering
life living in poverty.

Again Bishop Hornby, who was now
in Nassau, came to the rescue. The
bishop offered Brother Jerome the
charge of Long Island, Bahamas that
had been devastated by the 1908 hur-

ricane and was in desperate need of his
architectural and priestly services.
After an initial tour with the Bishop of
the Northern Islands, Brother Jerome
settled in Deadman's Cay, Long Island.

He found himself spellbound by the
tropical world, the strong sun, blue
skies and seas. At Clarence Town the
nave of the church was still intact and
the population, largely white was made
up of farmers and fishermen. He felt
his missionary yearnings would be sat-
isfied and set to work. He gathered a
crowd of willing workers each offering
3 days of labour - men did carpentry
and masonry and women toted rocks
and sand on their heads while their half
naked children played round the site.
Fires were lit and galley pots of hominy
grits bubbled on them.

Brother Jerome indulged himself
with Catholic services in two of the
remaining churches but at Simms the
congregation were violently opposed to
High Church ways - they would have
nothing to do with confession, images,
candles, incense, wafers or holy water
and strongly disapproved of the Virgin
Mary. The church at Deadman's Cay
was rebuilt in a year and an old Negro
lady remarked: " Ain’ dat beautiful, dat
de Hebenly Jerusalem.” Soon St Paul's
Church, Clarence Town was rebuilt -
with its twin baroque towers, gleaming
white in the brilliant sun it was called
"The Pearl of the Bahamas." The first
service was January 25, 1911, the
Sunday after the Feast of the conver-
sion of St Paul. At that service he
informed the congregation that he was
going to Nassau for a visit - he didn't
tell them he wouldn't be back for 30
years. Privately he had realised, "My
heart had long been in Rome, but now

my head was bringing me over boldly".

Hawes travelled to New York and
attended a Catholic Mass, visited a
Franciscan Convent for a few weeks
then received baptism into the Roman
Catholic Church on March 19, 1911. He
was now faced with an uncertain
future. He visited his parents in
England but then left for Canada and
worked as a teamster on the Canadian
railroad. Finally, he decided to go to
Rome, where he was granted an inter-
view with Pope Pius X at the Vatican.
The Pope, learning that he was a con-
vert clergyman, laid his hand on his
head and said, "Bravo! Bravo!" and
gave him a special blessing. John
Hawes studied for 2 years at Beda
College and joined the Third Order of
St Francis at the Basilica of St Francis
at Assissi - his new name became
Brother John Francis Xavier Hawes.

Shortly before his ordination he was
introduced to Bishop Kelly of
Geraldton, who talked to him about
the spiritual needs of the people and
the cathedral he wanted to build in
Western Australia. From 1915 until
1939 he built many church buildings
and ministered to the miners in the
gold fields and bushmen. And he was
rewarded for his service when he was
awarded a ‘domestic prelate’, which
allowed him to be called Monsignor
Hawes.

As he aged and his health began to
fail he felt he had earned the right to
settle down comfortably and spend the
rest of his life in ecclesiastic luxury.
Monsignor Hawes hoped to end his
days in the Bahamas as Brother John.

(Next time Part 32 - Brother John
becomes the Hermit of Cat Island)



BOOK

PRESENTATION

Jackie Mycklewhyte presents Father James
Moultrie, rector of St Matthew's Anglican
Church with a signed copy of her second book
The boy and His Rooster - a book of short
Bahamian stories. The book was recently pub-
lished in March of this year. Mrs Mycklewhyte
published her first book, 'The Boy and His
Bottle’, back in 2005. She noted that she is
already in the process of working on her third
book, which is expected be released soon.



Anthony Longley/ St. Matthew's Communications
The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, May 28, 2009 ® PG 21

Ce
Free... will

"| tell you the truth, everyone who sins is
a slave to sin. Now a slave has

no permanent place in the family, but a
son belongs to it forever. So if the Son
sets you free, you will be free indeed."

John 8:34-36 (NIV)

EVERYONE wants freedom. The
little girl racing down a hill, the teenag-
er on the way to college, the young
adult looking for an apartment, and
the middle aged man readying himself
for an early retirement. Everyone likes
freedom. The ability to think, speak, or
act in any manner they so choose.
Everyone has freedom. To be free is an
ability to see yourself the way God sees
you. As a perfect creation, with an
independent mind, body and soul
unlike any other; so when you are
physically and mentally in chains, your
spirit is elsewhere. God loves freedom.
He truly loves everything it encom-
passes and wants us to as well.

This is in fact, why He gave us all



TONI
STYLES

i









freewill. The power to make our own
choices in this life. Yes, God is in con-
trol, He will never forsake us, and He
is omnipresent. And although He is,
the architect of our lives; we are still
the builders. Making the final decision
on all the particulars, most importantly
the foundation on which our lives will
grow and strengthen; from whence we
came, to where we will ultimately be. It
is our responsibility, with all this free-
dom we have, to choose a solid, sound
foundation, and take heed to not allow
ourselves to be pulled in any and every
direction. After all, there are only two
ways of doing things, a wrong way, and
a God way.

We may not be of this world, but we

are in this world, and its offerings
though deceptive, look magnificent
and promising. They glow and they
burn, guiltlessly tempting us and keep-
ing our focus on exterior gain. We can-
not afford to lose ourselves; that is our
true nature, to society’s value system.
A system based on self and not spirit,
and a disgraceful appetite for wants
and not needs. What we ought to value
above all else is our relationship with
God and the pure, sincere relation-
ships we have with others. Basically
the things that will last.

As an individual who believes in
everlasting growth and the importance
of helping others on life's journey, I
utilise my freedom to do just that; in
addition to adhering to all of God’s
word. That means I use my free will to
show my love for God.

We as believers need not be
ashamed or regretful, in knowing the
way in which we live and what we
believe is not by force, but by a choice
we've made as individuals along life's

road. Our grass is greener; because we
allow the water of life, that is God's
truth, to pour all over every aspect of
our lives. This choice we've made by
using our freewill, is the best invest-
ment, whether the economy be up or
down.

An authentic freedom found in faith,
so that as we live, and are faced with a
serious of choices, we can rest assured
we will not be alone in making our
decisions; decisions that will one day
be worth more than this world can
comprehend.

In closing remember, with freedom,
like Christ, who died not for his sins,
we honour and serve God, by allowing
His will to be done in our lives over our
own.

¢ Toni Elizabeth Styles is a Bahamian
writer and poet, currently residing in
Nassau, Bahamas.

Comments related to the article can be
sent to fearless247@gmail.com.

(ES
Labours of love

EASTER is about the Lord’s
labour on the cross to accomplish
the work of salvation.

Rogationtide is the period of
three days before Ascension Day to
thank God for the provision of food
from the sea and soil, to pray for
protection from hurricane, and for
the wise preservation of God’s cre-
ation. Ascension Day (when our
Lord returned to his Father in
glory) reminds us to keep a balance
between earthly pursuits and heav-
enly priorities. We are left here to
fulfill the work of the church as we
seek to make disciples so that none
need perish but have everlasting
life.

In John 15: 16-17, Our Lord
speaks very directly to his disciples:
“You did not choose me but I chose
you. And appointed you to go and
bear fruit, fruit that will last, so that
the Father will give you whatever
you ask him in my name. I am giv-
ing you these commands so that you
may love one another.”

When we pray in the name of
Jesus, according to the Word of
God, seeking the mind of Christ
and desiring to do the will of God,
then we can have our prayers

~~ ~~
<= a

«< — 7



C BOSFIELD
~ 4 PALACIOUS
Dias: es





answered.

Marriage and parenting are both
labours of love within the context of
the intimacy of the family. The fam-
ily is the smallest and most impor-
tant social unit where we are sup-
posed to learn how to love and be
loved. Our spiritual and emotional
maturation is essential to nation
building. Professional and financial
advancement should never be at the
expense of the wellbeing of the
family members.

The church family is the next spe-
cial unit in which the shaping of
faith and formation of character is
central. The blood of Christ unites
us in a very special bond between
believers which may at time seem
closer than that shared with “blood
relatives.” We are to support,
encourage and pray for one anoth-
er, aS we worship and work to
labour together in God’s vineyard.

The wider community is to be
our main focus as we look to bring
healing and wholeness by introduc-
ing God’s children to God’s plan for
their lives. The way we love one
another as Christians and the way
we show hospitality to strangers is

intended to be a sure sign that the
presence of the Lord is especially
visible where love is.

In I John 1: 20-21 we are chal-
lenged to do just this: “Those who
say ‘I love God, and hate their
brothers or sisters are liars; for
those who do not love a brother or
sister, whom they have seen, cannot
love God whom they have not seen.
The commandment we have from
him is this: “those who love God
must love their brothers and sisters
also.”

The famine in Judea mentioned
in Acts 11:28 elicits this immediate
response from the disciples: “the
disciples determined that according
to their ability, each would send
relief to the believers living in
Judea; this they did, sending it to
the elders by Barnabas and
Saul.” (v. 29).

Who needs to feel God’s love
through you?

66

The blood of
Christ unites us in
a very special
bond between
believers which
may at time seem
closer than that
shared with
“blood relatives.”
We are to sup-
port, encourage
and pray for one
another, as we
worship and work
to labour together
in God's vineyard.