Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Fears of spike
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Reports of nighttime
mugegings in capital

REPORTS of a series of night-
time muggings throughout the cap-
ital have led to fears that a spike in
personal crime has taken hold.

Although the police think the
attacks are "isolated", a senior offi-
cer yesterday warned the public to
be vigilant of their surroundings
at night to avoid falling victim to an
armed criminal.

The Tribune has received
reports of a number of muggings
over the weekend, including that of
a young woman who was dropping
a friend off in the Shirlea area
when a man jumped inside her car
and robbed her.

Also over the weekend, a young
man was robbed at knife point in
the Yamacraw area after driving a
friend home.

The assailants are said to have
smashed the windshield, climbed
into the car and thrown the occu-
pants out.

They stole money and cell
phones from the victims, then
drove off with the car.

Another woman was reportedly
attacked by a man as she headed
into her apartment in the Village
Road area. She was able to break
free and her screams are said to
have alerted neighbours, at which
point the attacker decided to make
a run for it.

The police failed to report any of
these crimes to the press, however
when asked about them yesterday,
Assistant Commissioner for Crime

Raymond Gibson told The Tri-
bune police were aware of the inci-
dents but do not see a pattern.

“Based on what we've seen
there isn't any pattern to those rob-
beries, we consider those to be iso-
lated robberies.

“There's been a consistent num-
ber of robberies over the past week

.. but the point is we haven't seen
any pattern in that regard," he said.

Still he warned members of the
public to be on their guard when
out late at night.

“They should check their sur-
roundings, check as they move, be
careful so that they don't become
victims of these villains,” he
said.

Members of the public who
heard rumours of the muggings
expressed concern that the police
failed to report them.

A professional woman whose
job forces her to travel at night
said news of the attacks frightened
her.

“Obviously there is an increase
in crime, and the police should be
reporting it,” she said.

The woman, asked to remain
anonymous, said: “T think it has to
be known if there is something
going on out there.”

A caller who identified himself
as Mr Dean, said: “This is scary.
People have to be made aware if
messed up things are going on so
they can be more careful. You
can’t keep them dumb.”

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The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009

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AND REAL ESTATE

BAHAMAS BIGGEST



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Supreme
Court judge
lifts injunction





Felipé Major/Triby



ABOVE: A tearful Kiara Sherman
is crowned Miss Bahamas
Universe 2009.

LEFT: Contestant Enna Thomas
said she was disturbed by

allegations she may have missed out
because of a dispute over money.











m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net







JUDGES of the Miss
Bahamas Universe 2009
pageant have been invited by
the event’s organiser to review
and confirm the votes they cast
in last weekend’s contest in the
hope of calming a “furore” that
has broken out over its out- J
come, The Tribune has learned.

Cyprianna McWeeney, one
among nine judges who partic-
ipated in Sunday evening’s final
show, said her phone has been l....
“ringing off the hook” since
then with calls from people who
feel the ending was unjustified
and even rigged.

According to sources con-
nected to the pageant, many
people have expressed “sur-
prise” that 25-year-old Kiara
Sherman, lead vocalist of the
Bahamian band “Visage”, took
the much-coveted crown.

In some cases vicious com-
mentary has erupted online,
with fans and detractors making
lengthy and colourful com-
mentaries about the Queen and

SEE page 12






























Immigration Dept working
to release Cuban detainees

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE Department of Immigration is “actively” working to
release the Cuban detainees currently housed at the holding
facility, said Immigration Director Jack Thompson.

It is unclear if the Cubans will be repatriated to their home
country, released to another country willing to accept them, or
allowed to remain in the Bahamas.

While declining to get into specifics of a possible release

SEE page 12





NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

SEE PAGE FIFTEEN





PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)





Hotel union
elections
will be held

tomorrow

m@ By NATARIO
MCKENZIE

THE elections for the
Bahamas Hotel Catering
and Allied Workers
Union (BHCAWU) will
be held on Thursday it
was ruled yesterday after
a Supreme Court judge
lifted the injunction that
had blocked the elections.

Attorneys for all the
parties involved in the
dispute over whether or
not the elections should
proceed were locked in a
closed hearing before Jus-
tice Jon Isaacs for most
of Tuesday afternoon.

Following the closed
hearing, attorney Obie
Ferguson who appeared
with attorney Keod Smith
for the BHCAWU First
Vice President Kirk Wil-
son told The Tribune;
“The court vacated the
injunction and is allowing
the election to go ahead.”

“There is a hearing
scheduled for June 26 to
hear the substantive mat-
ter, but the court was of
the view that because of
all the preparation that
the union would have
gone into having regard
to the cost factor and the
statutory obligation of the
Registrar once a request
is made for voting, that
the balance of conve-
nience was in favour of
having the elections on
May 28,” Mr Ferguson
said.

SEE page 12



POLICE CRACKING
DOWN ON CRIME IN
DOWDESWELL STREET

DISCOVERY SUN 10
RESUME SERVICE

COALITION OF CHURCHES
SPEAKS OUT AGAINST
GAMBLING LEGALISATION

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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009



LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Sddseseusesisassousecteossusessecsesiigeccsesescaserserccsseeses

2008 Budget
Communication |
today at 10am |

THE 2009 national bud-
get communication will be
delivered by Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham
today beginning at 10am.

The communication,
which will outline the gov-
ernment’s plans for
2009/2010, can be seen on
ZNS TV 13 and the
Parliamentary Channel
40.

Mr Ingraham will pre-
sent government’s fiscal
agenda and is expected to
reveal cut-backs aimed at
mitigating the effects of
the global economic down-
turn.

The presentation will
last about two hours and
the debate is set to be held
in June.

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Police cracking down on
crime in Dowdeswell Street

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

IN RESPONSE to com-
plaints by professionals work-
ing in and around Dowdeswell
Street, police are cracking
down on crime in the area.

At a crime watch meeting
last week, business owners,
bosses and employees told
Central Division officers that
armed robbery, prostitution
and vagrancy have become
everyday facts of life in this
once quaint area of eastern
downtown Nassau.

Cameras

Police urged businesses to
set up a Business Crime Watch
to share information about
crime and invest in security
measures and CCTV cameras
to benefit the whole business
community.

After hearing their concerns,
special duty officers from the

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

P1,2,3,5,6,12

eee enc cee nae eeereteeeta: P4

mosh OAT Us
P13,14,15

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES



Tare

CONCERNS have been raised over crime in Dowdeswell Street.

Central Division conducted an
operation in the Dowdeswell
Street area and made three
arrests.

Superintendent Elaine
Sands said the sex trade has
been a continuing issue in
Dowdeswell Street for some
time, and businesses are par-
ticularly affected when pros-
titutes choose open locations
to carry out illegal sex acts.



She said: “In most cases we
understand they are commit-
ting these acts in open yards
and public places.”

Otherwise, prostitutes will
sell sex from homes in and
around Dowdeswell Street.
Supt Sands urged the public
not to support prostitution by
buying into it or renting prop-
erty to those who will use it to
carry out the illegal trade.

Those involved in support-
ing prostitution are also com-
mitting an offence, she
warned.

Supt Sands added: “We
want to discourage individu-
als from soliciting themselves
for immoral acts because it’s a
criminal offence.

Offence

“And we want everyone
who thinks about coming in
this area, and even those per-
sons who live in this area and
hire these kind of people for
this kind of act, we want them
to know that they are commit-
ting an offence.

“Even if they are landlords
renting their homes knowing-
ly for such persons, they need
to know that they are commit-
ting an offence.”

Operations to crackdown on
crime in the area will continue
as police continue to respond
to the concerns of “good citi-
zens”, Supt Sands said.

Tax lawyer says he will consider
running in election if PLP asks

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

INTERNATIONAL tax
lawyer Ryan Pinder said yester-
day that if the PLP asks him to
run as a candidate in the next
general election he will “seri-
ously consider it.”

The son of former PLP Local
Government minister Marvin
Pinder, told The Tribune that
while his primary focus is helping
the party “move forward” it’s
possible he may become a par-
liamentary candidate.

“As we get closer to election,
as we get past the convention
and as we get a candidate’s com-
mittee selected I'll be in a better
position to address running for a



Ryan Pinder

seat,” said Mr Pinder.

“We'll look at what’s best for
the party with respect to running
in a constituency and if the party
thinks that’s the best thing to do
then Ill seriously consider it.”

“Right now my prime focus is
to see that we address proactive
policy as a country and as a par-
ty moving forward and that’s
where I am going to lend my
input and my talents,” said the
attorney.

He was speaking at a press
conference in the Opposition
room at the House of Assembly
called by Fox Hill MP Fred
Mitchell, also shadow minister
with responsibility for foreign
affairs, foreign trade and the
public service.

At that conference Mr Pinder
was announced as the co-chair
of a newly-formed PLP Com-
mittee on Foreign Affairs and
Foreign Trade.

The committee was appoint-

ed by party leader Perry Christie,
with the aim of helping to for-
mulate the PLP’s “approach to
public policy on matters of for-
eign trade and foreign affairs.”

Other members of the large
committee include former diplo-
mats who served overseas dur-
ing the last PLP government.

Asked why he decided to
accept the post of co-chair, Mr
Pinder said his background and
expertise as an international tax
lawyer with knowledge of inter-
national tax policies and an
awareness of the “global pres-
sures on countries such as The
Bahamas in both international
tax matters, as well as financial
services and banking...brings an
element to the policy of the PLP
and this committee that the
country desperately needs.”

“It desperately needs a proac-
tive vision, it definitely needs the
technical knowledge and the
technical application in these
areas,” he added.

The Tribune understands that
Mr Pinder, a Clifton resident,
recently got permission from the
party to open a branch office for
the PLP in the constituency,
something which it did not have
up until now.

He and other PLPs in the area
have been conducting branch
meetings on a regular basis.

The attorney heads the Nas-
sau office of U.S.-based com-
mercial law firm Becker and
Poliakoff, where he provides
U.S. counsel to Americans wish-
ing to do business in The
Bahamas as well as Bahamians
seeking U.S. legal advice,
according to the company’s web-
site.

una N

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MCT EC
ET

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

THE public can
expect air travel delays
over the next few days
after lightning struck
the Lynden Pindling
International Airport
control tower.

As severe thunder-
storms swirled through
the capital on Monday
afternoon, air traffic
controllers realised that
some equipment might
have been damaged by
lightning.

As a precautionary
measure, employees
were evacuated and air
traffic services were
suspended at 3.19pm,
according to a state-
ment by the Depart-
ment of Civil Aviation.

Frequencies

Joseph Albury,
Deputy director of the
department, and a team
of senior officers were
dispatched to assess the
situation and discov-
ered that some of the
tower's frequencies had
been affected by the
strike.

The maintenance
team worked to restore
primary frequencies
while limited air traffic
service was restored at
4.03pm, using back-up
emergency systems, the
statement said.

Yesterday, Mr Albury
said operations were
back to normal at LPI-
A's control tower.

"Lightning struck the
control tower facility
building and as a result
there were some outage
with the radio commu-
nication system (but)
we're working okay,"
he said.

Still, the Department
of Civil Aviation said,
inbound and outbound
air traffic "will experi-
ence some delays" but
managers and air traffic
controllers are working
to minimise the impact
on the public.



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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

Discovery Sun to resume service

Teenager
arrested after
handgun
discovered

A TEENAGER was arrested
after officers from Elizabeth
Estates Police Station found a
9mm handgun when searching
a house in eastern New Provi-
dence.

The officers executed a
search warrant at a home in
‘Yamacraw Beach Estates short-
ly before 11pm on Monday.
They found the firearm hidden
in a shoebox in the bedroom.
The 17-year-old boy is still in
police custody and is helping
with the investigation.

Probe after
shotgun found in
abandoned car

A SHOTGUN found in an
abandoned car in Pinewood
Gardens has sparked a criminal
investigation and police are
appealing for assistance from
the public.

The weapon was found by a
concerned citizen who reported
it to police on Monday.

East Street South Police Sta-
tion officers recovered the shot-
gun and launched an investiga-
tion. No arrests have been
made. If you have any informa-
tion which may assist the police
with this matter, call Crime
Stoppers anonymously on 328-
TIPS (8477).

Woman, 30,
arraigned on
theft charge

A 30-year-old woman was
arraigned in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday on a theft charge.

Police have charged Anasta-
cia Moree, 30, with stealing.

It is alleged that on Saturday,
April 18, while at Rosetta
Street, Moree stole a ladies
purse valued at $25, a driver’s
licence valued at $20, and four
ABM cards together valued at
$40, all totalling $85, belonging
to Portia Brown.

Moree, who appeared in
Court One, Bank Lane yester-
day before Chief Magistrate
Roger Gomez and Magistrate
Janet Bullard, pleaded not
guilty. She was granted bail in
the sum of $1,000 with one sure-
ty. Her case has been adjourned
to October 1.

Oless a

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - After several
days out of service due to engine
repairs, the Discovery Sun is
scheduled to resume service
between Grand Bahama and Fort
Lauderdale on Thursday, May 28.

The management of Discovery
Cruise Line announced that the
vessel will return to normal sailing
on Thursday.

They explained why the ship
experienced a second consecutive
problem this year with its port
main engine.

Discovery initially experienced
mechanical problems in April and
discontinued sailings for several
days for engine repairs and
resumed service on May 4.

However, due to ongoing

Ship to sail on Thursday after engine repairs

engine problems the ship was
forced to cancel sailing on May
17. The company made arrange-
ments for hundreds of stranded
passengers to be flown back to
Fort Lauderdale by charter flights
on Miami Air.

Hanns J Hahn, general man-
ager of Discovery, said that the
company was too anxious to
return the ship to service after
the first problem arose on April 4.

“The company is acutely aware
of Grand Bahama’s reliance on
the ship to transport Bahamians
and merchandise between the
island and Port Everglades and,
as a result, pushed to have the
ship return to service as quickly as
possible,” he said.

“As it turned out, that was

Weel erie
move to clean

up community

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



A COMMUNITY effort to
clean up a neighbourhood and
improve it for all has been
praised by local MP and Min-
ister of Immigration Branville
McCartney.

Mr McCartney said he was
impressed to see how the
Gamble Heights Crime Watch
Committee instigated a clean
up of the area off Baillou Hill
Road South by gathering
neighbours to pick up litter
and tear down overgrown
bushes with a tractor hired
with their collective contribu-
tions on Saturday.

The community, featured in
Monday’s Tribune, is troubled
by the growing slum of ply-
wood shacks housing Haitian
migrants on otherwise disused
land behind the Gamble
Heights subdivision as they
fear it might be hiding illegal

Ga Kaen

where life is still sim ple a nd people stl care
Murphyville, 2nd Right from Sears Road.
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apparently too quick and not all
the repairs made by the outside
contractor engaged by the com-
pany were sufficiently tested.”

Tests

Mr Hahn said that led to a fol-
low-up problem affecting at first
the departures from Sunday, May
17, through Tuesday, May 19,
while as late as Tuesday, May 19,
engineers signaled a green light
for a Thursday, May 21, depar-
ture.

He noted that additional tests
through Wednesday revealed that
the extent of the persistent pis-
ton misalignment was too great
to risk departure.

" Felipé Major/Tribune staff

THE GROWING SETTLEMENT of garbage is piling up outside the vil-

lage, attracting oversized rodents.

immigrants and criminals.
They want to tackle the rising
crime rate and mounting
garbage on the outskirts of the
slum by working together.

Exercises

Mr McCartney said the
Immigration Department has
carried out two apprehension
exercises in the area over the
last year, and added that gov-
ernment needs to determine
ownership of the land before
further action can be taken.

However, he said the efforts
of the community to clean up
the area while government
deliberates should inspire oth-
ers. “I want to congratulate
the members and constituents
of Gamble Heights for taking
this proactive step in cleaning
up their community,” Mr
McCartney said.

“That’s a step to be
admired, commended and
indeed other communities
ought to take this positive step
and use this as a yard stick in
what they ought to do in their
communities. I think it’s a
good thing they are doing, it’s
very proactive and by taking
this step, I hope other com-
munities would use this as an
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Queen Sleigh Bed

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Branville Meese



“IT want to
congratulate the
members and
constituents of
Gamble Heights.”




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According to Mr Hahn, the
engineering department had
therefore requested an addition-
al five to six days to source and
install a new piston rather than
install one of the spares on board.

“Work is now well underway
and all are confident to get this
saga behind us and resume the
regular schedule on Thursday,
May 28,” he said.

Mr. Hahn noted that during
both of these periods when the
ship was out of service the com-
pany ferried Bahamians, as well
as visitors who had hotel book-
ings on Grand Bahama, back and
forth to the island on air charters
and regularly scheduled flights.

He indicated that when neces-
sary passengers were provided






with accommodations in Fort
Lauderdale and on island.

He said they were also offered
meals while they were awaiting
transport to and from the island.

Mr Hahn explained that under
the terms of Discovery’s cruise
ticket contract with its passen-
gers, the company is not required
to provide other means of trans-
portation in the event of an emer-
gency such has recently occurred,
and that the company made such
extraordinary efforts only as a
gesture of good will and at con-
siderable extra cost.

He thanked the company’s
Bahamian passengers for their
understanding and patience.

He also thanked the Ministry
of Tourism, the Tourism Board
and its resort partners for their
assistance in “this unfortunate
and most untimely matter.”

MEMBERS
of the Gamble

| Heights
Community
Crime Watch
Committee said
they initiated a
clean-up of the
area when
government took
too long to act.

@ Felipé Major/
Tribune staff

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Bayparl Building, Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-8240 « Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com













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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
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Bahamuians entitled to safe communities

THE 1994 Bail Act was amended in 1996
making it mandatory for those accused of
serious crime to be held in prison until their
trial date. At that time Bahamians were con-
cerned by escalating crime and the fact that in
two years the courts had released into society
more than 100 serious offenders, who were
being held on bail. This was the main reason
for the amendment to the Bail Act, which
the Appeals Court last week ruled unconsti-
tutional.

In the past five months this country has
averaged more than five murders a month. As
for the armed robberies, we have long since
lost count. Needless to say armed robbery
gets almost daily mention in this newspaper’s
crime report. In addition to these newest
offenders, 153 persons being held on bail
were released from prison last month. The
Central Intelligence Bureau advised that 39 of
them should be monitored. Eleven of those
released were accused of murder or attempt-
ed murder, three of sexual intercourse, three
of rape and one of assault with intent to rape.
That is the calibre of persons now on our
streets — no wonder Bar Council President
Wayne Munro has suggested that police are
charging them with crimes for which they
have no evidence just to get them off the
streets. It might just be their answer to the
impossible baby-sitting job they have been
given to do in addition to safeguarding the
public. What a waste of police manpower.

The Act said that bail was to be refused in
respect of certain offences, murder being one
of them, “unless the offender be tried within
a reasonable time.”

But what is a reasonable time? Each court
seems to have its own version of reasonable-
ness. This is a matter that should not only
be settled, but should be uniform in all the
courts. Each judge should also have to give a
written cause to justify the release, and this
should be available to the public.

Some time ago we were watching the court
of a particular magistrate who had earned
the reputation of being bail-prone.

We often wondered if he were doing this to
prod government into action to speed up the
judicial process by opening more courts and
bringing in more justices, or if he were some
disembodied spirit who was not aware of the
society in which he lived and the need for

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him to be a part of the crime fighting solution,
rather than one of its problems.

There will continue to be a “growing dis-
respect for life, law and authority”, as Mr
Ingraham put it in his 1996 radio broadcast, if
the courts cannot process criminal cases
faster.

Mr Ingraham attributed this disregard for
life and laws to the fact that persons charged
with serious crimes have formed the view
that the perennial delays in court proceedings
permit them to indefinitely postpone facing
the consequences, sanctions and punishment
of their actions.

There should be a court designated strict-
ly to hear the more serious offences — those
for which the legislature said no bail should
be granted — and a magistrate or magistrates
assigned to do nothing but get through the
backlog of murders, attempted murders,
armed robberies, kidnappings, rapes, and the
like.

These courts should meet daily — and on
time. The courts are notorious for having
witnesses waiting around all day, while
lawyers dither or are no shows because they
are in other courts, compounded by all the
other inefficiencies that delay cases. The
whole court system needs a good shake up.

If the courts operated efficiently, the ques-
tion would not arise as to how long is too
long for a person to be in prison awaiting
trial.

We always hear of the rights of the
accused. We agree that he should have rights
and that those rights should be guarded jeal-
ously.

However, we hear little about the victim’s
rights or the community’s rights.

The accused has a right to a fair trial to be
held within a reasonable time. On the other
hand citizens have rights to a safe communi-
ty.
Instead what we now have are residents
imprisoned in their own homes behind bars to
protect them from persons with long criminal
records roaming our streets awaiting the jus-
tice that is theirs by right.

It is now up to government and the judi-
ciary to give both sides their just due — a
fair trial on the one hand, and a safe com-
munity on the other. And neither one can
come too soon.



The Bahamas
is not what
we envisaged

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

There are far too many people
who have given up because they
see a vicious cycle of corruption,
exploitation, lack of pride and
downright uncivilised behaviour
that embarrasses us locally and
internationally. Someone must
have the testicular fortitude to
throw caution to the wind call it
as we see it. If I am to sleep at
night, I must step forward for the
good of all right thinking and
frightened Bahamians.

Tell me where else in the
world could an elected official be
found with fifty thousand dollars
in his closet, give an asinine expla-
nation and there is no investiga-
tion and no consequences — only
in the Bahamas.

Where else can a politician
who had nothing declared his
assets as a matter of procedure
before an election and appears
to have millions, seemingly large
plots of land and nothing hap-
pens. There are no questions and
no investigations. Who is pro-
tecting whom and why? This
could only happen in the
Bahamas.

How come immigrants can be
facilitated to enter this country
by the thousands with question-
able documents and no proof or
indication that the immigrants
have left. Again, even after the
Auditor General’s report that at
the foreign affairs ministry that
serious inconsistencies and weak-
nesses were evident, nothing hap-
pened.

Yet this was allowed to hap-
pen, there has been no further
investigation and no one was
made to explain or suffer the con-
sequences.

How could influence peddlers
apparently sell immigration work
permits to foreign contractors,
getting preferential treatment
where permits that usually took
months and even years to be
processed could be stamped and
approved in less than 24 hours?
Who was responsible, involved
and questioned? Where is the
report?

How could a celebrity get a
minister to bend the rules to give
“residency” to a bimbo because
of a special kind of friendship.
Yet there is no public outcry,
because we all see nothing wrong
with this situation. We are equal-
ly as guilty. This could only hap-
pen in the Bahamas, because the
authorities are afraid or unwill-
ing to venture and the people
could care less.

Only in the Bahamas drug
dealers sit in front of a hotel and
walk on the busiest streets and
peddle drugs in full view of police
officers and nothing happens.
Alcoholics can be seen loitering
on benches, harassing tourists,
our bread and butter on Bay
Street and the police look the oth-

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letters@tribunemedia net



er way. This is happening right
next to the House of Assembly.

The Bahamas must be the only
place where any male can urinate
on the side of any building any-
time he feels the need to relieve
himself. The whole island is rank
with urine. Men stop on the side
of the road and urinate, in front
of children or ladies without any
pride whatsoever. They walk in
any high grass and let the water
flow. No one is ever arrested and
the practice continues.

The Bahamas is the only place
in the world where the police
have conceded to the daredevil
motorcyclists who ride around on
one wheel, putting themselves
and other innocent pedestrians
and motorists at risk. How long
would it take for the police to
take these dangerous weapons,
which in most cases are unli-
censed, off the streets? How come
they have been allowed to
remove the silencers from the
mufflers disturbing residents all
hours of the night? This lawless-
ness could only happen in the
Bahamas.

How come some police offi-
cers are seen by neighbours col-
lecting “hush money” from
known drug dealers day after day
and nothing ever happens? If any-
thing is done, how come the pub-
lic does not know?

Only in the Bahamas is a per-
son with a perfectly legal title for
a piece of land be outsmarted by
a developer or a slick lawyer and
the land is literally stolen by the
lawyer and absolutely nothing
happens.

There are literally thousands
of Bahamians who have had their
birthright stolen by unscrupulous
lawyers and are supposed to be
hauled before the Bar Council
and not a word heard afterwards.
What happened?

Why does a person with clear
title have to waste his money to
fight for his own things? That can-
not be right and must be fixed,
immediately.

Why do questionable lawyers,
who are supposed to be “officers
of the court,” have to go before a
special hearing of the Bar Coun-
cil?

How could lawyers police
themselves?

Why are they not treated like
ordinary citizens? Why is there a
special law for lawyers and anoth-
er law for the rest of us?

It is high time that government
stops the haemorrhaging of the
innocent people who are being
destroyed by lawyers who take
advantage of people, who they
know cannot afford to fight them
in court.

It is time the strong stop
devouring the weak through the
courts.

There must be a system that
protects the most vulnerable of
us.

The courts seem too lenient
with lawyers. Is it because they
are all in the same boat, lawyers
protecting lawyers?

The poor and the uneducated
have been exploited enough.

And there is a culture that the
rich will stop at nothing until they

suck every penny out of the poor
until they die.

There is no mercy. Only the
poor go to court. Only the poor
wear handcuffs. Only the poor
receive jail time. Only the poor
pay national insurance, light bills
and phone bills. Only the poor
pay customs and only the rich get
to enjoy the fat of the land.

Only the big time tour opera-
tors get more bus plates, and no
one else. Why?

There is a culture that only a
few have any sense. There is a
perception that only a few will
get inside the door to be consid-
ered for anything.

There are people in authority
who are recycled every term and
no one else gets anything.

It’s the same people all the
time. Some are even senile, they
could hardly get out of their own
way, but they are still given the
hog while others are denied the
bacon.

The retired are rehired. The
people who run things are people
who have served, are already get-
ting a fantastic pension and are
rehired to get more gratuities and
more perks and more gravy.

This group is tightly knitted
together and it seems that no new
members are allowed.

The young are frustrated
because they watch the possibili-
ty of upward mobility diminished.
No country could grow like that.

It is disrespectful and distaste-
ful when highly qualified young
people sit by and watch people
with less ability get fantastic jobs
that they are incapable of doing,
but because of political connec-
tions they are given special privi-
leges and preferences.

A number of the people who
are demoralized sit quietly and
mourn.

Who will answer their cry?
Who will be humane enough to
allow their conscience to point
them in the right direction?

The pride of many of us has
caused us to be pushed aside, but
“How long, oh Lord how long”
are we prepared to wait?

The Bahamas is not what we
envisioned.

We used to have a great deal of
pride in ourselves and country,
all that is gone now.

We are simply not our broth-
er’s keeper. We are just like hogs.

The rich want more and the
rich want the poor to get none.
Multi-multi millionaires are
blocking and preventing others
every step of the way from mak-
ing a dollar. WHY?

Time is the determining factor.
Time is longer than rope.

There will be a time when
things would not be the most
important factor that drives peo-
ple, but dignity and pride would
be the driving force.

There is a move where people
will not stand idly by anymore,
but will stand up together against
the ills that have trampled us for
too long.

Iam willing to help lead that
charge.

We must look out for each oth-
er. This is a new day.

Bahamian musical icon Ron-
nie Butler sang, “I know dem
long time, dem people is mine.”

Tam relieved now.

IVOINE W. INGRAHAM
Nassau,
May 22, 2009

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\ Serving The Bahamian Community Since 1978 )





THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009, PAGE 5

Coalition of churches

speaks out against
gambling legalisation

0 In brief |

Foot store
held up by

armed robber

AN ARMED robber
held up the John Chea
Food Store in Farrington
Road at around 8am on
Monday.

The gunman demanded
money from an employee,
took an undetermined
amount of cash and ran off
into a nearby neighbour-
hood.

Police are appealing for
information from the pub-
lic which could lead to the
apprehension of the armed
robber.

He was dressed in dark
blue trousers, a black shirt
and a blue tam.

Anyone with informa-
tion which may assist the
investigation should call
Crime Stoppers immedi-
ately on 328-TIPS (8477).
Calls are free of charge
and answered in the Unit-
ed States to ensure total
anonymity.

Fishermen
claim 34 pots
removed in
two weeks

UNREST is brewing in
San Salvador after fisher-
men there reported that 34
of their pots have been
removed in the past two
weeks.

According to sources on
the island, these fishermen,
some from as far away as
Long Island, have posi-
tioned fish traps at various
locations around the
island.

Some were placed near
local dive sites, and suspi-
cion is mounting that
divers who frequent these
reefs could be responsible
for the disappearance of
the pots.

Four feet long and near-
ly three feet wide, the fish
pots in question were made
of plastic-encased wiring
and clearly marked with
buoys.

However, the buoy lines
have been cut and the pots
hauled away. The fisher-
men suspect they may have
been dumped over the
ocean shelf.

“These pots could easily
hold eight groupers at one
time, so who knows how
many fish will die in these
pots now that they have
been dumped over the
drop off. Because when a
grouper goes inside there
now and dies, he becomes
bait for other groupers and
the cycle continues,” a con-
cerned San Salvador resi-
dent said.

Reportedly, the matter
has been brought to the
attention of the local police
as tempers are beginning
to flare.

Attempts to reach the
press liaison officer with
responsibility for the Fami-
ly Islands, Assistant Com-
missioner Hulan Hanna,
were unsuccessful up until
press time last night.

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ENCOURAGING the com-
missioner of police to continue
his crackdown on suspected ille-
gal gambling operations
throughout the country, the
president of the Corner-
stone Zion Fellowship of
Christian Churches and
Ministries said his organi-
sation is completely against
the legalisation of gambling.

Bishop Andrew Stewart said
that the church supports the
police’s efforts to enforce the
law through a number of recent
raids of suspected numbers
houses in Nassau and Grand
Bahama.

He asked that the government
not consider the idea of legalis-
ing gambling any further, or
allow any Bahamian to gamble.
The group is even against for-
eigners being allowed to wager.

“Gambling is successful oper-
ating only on the principal that
many would loose and some or
few would win. First of all, we
feel that the success of an enter-
prise should not be based on so
many of our brothers and sister
losing.

“It then becomes an inade-
quate system when a large per-
centage of our population loos-
es on a regular basis. A society
should not be basing its success
on or trying to capitalise on a
system where so many would
loose in order for a few in our
society to win. It is not con-













scionable
to tax such an inequitable
system which brings me to
my next point,” he said.

Bishop Stewart rejected
the idea that it is justifiable for
the government to legalise gam-
bling in order to tax the industry
and collect revenue.

“Tf the government legalises
the illicit drug trade and taxes its
revenue that would also bring
some revenue to the treasury.
But we know that the cata-
strophic damage it would do to
the lives of individuals is just as
damaging as the illegal gambling
trade is doing to a certain seg-
ment of our society at this
moment,” he said.

Bishop Stewart said mothers
are depriving children of lunch
money, so as to be able to play
at several numbers houses each
day.

“Fathers, who do not make
enough in the first place to sup-
port their families, are taking
the little they do have that can
be of benefit to the wife and
children to gamble and play as

Prince George
Wharf readied for
mega cruise ships

THE Ministry of Public Works and
Transport and Bahamas Construction
International Limited have signed a
$2.3 million contract for the structur-
al refurbishment of Prince George
Wharf and installation of mooring bol-

lards there.

This will allow Prince George Wharf
to accommodate mega cruise ships.

“On completion of this project along
with the project to dredge the har-
bour, it is expected that Prince George
Wharf will be equipped to dock these
larger vessels at piers with new and
upgraded bollards and dolphins that
are able to withstand the forces exert-
said Minister of

ed by these vessels,”

Neko Grant

Public Works and Transport Neko Grant.

During a signing ceremony at the Ministry of Public Works,
J F Kennedy Drive, Mr Grant said after an “arduous” and
“meticulous” bidding process, Wayne “Tony” Cargill was iden-

tified as the contractor.

The work includes refurbishing existing bollards, replacing
condemned bollards, constructing new concrete footings for
new bollards, and the upgrading bollards to accommodate

increased mooring capacity.

Mr Grant said work is expected to begin in the next four
weeks and should be completed within 30 weeks.

He said his ministry is working with representatives of the
cruise industry, government agencies, and other stakeholders to

minimise logistical challenges.

Mr Cargill, president of Bahamas Construction Internation-
al, said his company plans to hire 12 to 15 workers for the pro-

ject.

“We will remove the footing down to a depth specified with-
in the plans and replace it with new concrete and new bol-

lards,” he said.

“There will also be sand blasting and painting of the existing
bollards that are in good condition.”

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many
of the
houses,
several
' times a dayif
possible. This is
why the PLP closed
down Hobby Horse Hall,
because the poor would take
what they should use for their
livelihood and the benefit of
their children, and put it on a
game of chance
“How terrible, but it is true.
Do unto others as you would
have them do unto you. Our
society should not support a sys-
tem that damages it’s poor fur-
ther than they are already dis-
advantaged. And this is why the
Cornerstone Zion Fellowship of
Christian Churches and Min-
istries cannot support gambling
in this country,” he said.

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Justice system vicious circle

| HE lack of a decisive

response to our deteriorat-
ing judicial system lies at the root
of the country's problems. We risk

everything with this. And moreover,
since the country is run by lawyers

they know exactly what the prob-
lems are, what the solutions are, and
what is at stake.

According to chief lawyer Wayne
Munroe, the controversy over grant-
ing bail to those accused of serious
crimes is symptomatic of the break-

Please check at the back of store
Aquinas entrance then first
Left look for sing upstairs
Call OR Email
Stacey@adamandeve.bs
FORA LIST OF TTEMS
326-8215 or 465-8648
Tuesday to Friday
§:00am to 5:00pm

I

The
Mah



down of the entire system. The aver-
age citizen naturally wants these
people kept behind bars until their
guilt can be determined. But that
raises serious constitutional as well
as logistical issues.

The scale and scope of the prob-
lem is by now familiar. Former
police chief prosecutor Keith Bell
outlined it for us last year:

"There are 100,000 matters
before the courts, including 11,000
criminal cases and 48,000 traffic cas-
es," he said. “That’s about a third of
the total population before the
courts, and it is getting worse and
worse...Our murder rate is higher
than the US and three times higher
than Canada...If this spreads to the
out islands we will be unable to con-
trol it.”

More than two thirds of the total
prison population of 2,556 are await-
ing trial. And insiders say the only
way to address the problem is for
the political class, as a priority, to
agree on a common agenda for com-
prehensive legal reform. But don't
hold your breath on that one. Cynics
say there will never be a solution
until the politicians and lawyers
themselves are targeted.

We have addressed this issue in
the past with unassailable logic.
There is no need for any further fig-
uring in the form of crime commis-
sions or social studies. There is no
mystery about the causes, and the
solutions are not rocket science.
Decades of research has identified
all the contributing factors, which
can be divided into three broad cat-
egories — socialisation, enforcement
and justice.

Socialisation covers all the things
that produce new entrants to our
society — the family, home life,
schooling, moral codes and work.
Enforcement is the way in which
society's rules are applied or not
applied. And justice refers to the
way we process those who break
the rules.

What must we do in terms of
enforcement? Well, first and fore-
most our leaders need to set exam-
ples and make examples. If corrupt
politicos, slackers and thugs see that
they can get away with spitting in
everyone's face, it sends a clear mes-
sage that we can all get away with
murder.

But improving enforcement is
no solution by itself. It will only lead
to gridlock unless the justice system
is fixed. And that is probably the
easiest of the three categories to
deal with, because it is perfectly clear
what needs to be done. It requires
only money to make it a reality. A
single budget exercise could resolve

cal

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Simon Wilson, Member, Committee for the Privatisation of BTC
Felix Stubbs, Member, Committee for the Privatisation of BTC
Michael Symonette, Executive Director, PUC
Usman Saadat, Director of Policy and Regulation, for the soon to be
established Utlities Regulation and Competition Authority (URCA)

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most of the bottlenecks in our courts
and prison within a year.

We know the prison is over-
crowded, so if we want to keep more
criminals locked up and deal with
all the backlogged cases we obvi-
ously need a bigger prison — or new
jails for various types of offenders —
and more prison officers. Once we
have places to put offenders we can
set about processing them — and
that simply requires more judges
(preferably foreign), more court-
rooms, more prosecutors and more
support facilities.

To those who say we can't afford
all that, here are two suggestions:
earmark a special crime tax to pay
for prosecutors, courts, judges and a
judicial secretariat. Or sell Bahama-
sair with the expressed goal of com-
mitting the proceeds to fixing the
justice system. The liquidation of a
non-performing state asset is a small
price to pay for salvaging the rule of
law.

The third category — socialisa-
tion — is more difficult to address
because it requires long-term invest-
ments in education, family coun-
selling and social health pro-
grammes. But over the years experts
have produced some agreed guide-
lines.

Education, joblessness, anti-social
activities and poverty are all closely
linked, and international experience
shows that at-risk youth benefit most
from improving basic literacy and
numeracy. This is something that
the private sector has been seeking
to convey to government officials
for years. But it takes political lead-
ership that is willing to listen and
set a long train in motion.

So we already know the answers.
And we certainly know what the
consequences are if we don't address
these issues. It all boils down to how
stupid we can be.

THE EASTERN PARADE
AND OTHER PARKING
LOTS.

Every day many of us drive by
Malcolm's Park on Dowdeswell
Street — one of the oldest and most
historic areas on New Providence.
For hundreds of years the Eastern
Parade and the Western Parade
(where the British Colonial Hilton
stands today) set the boundaries of
the city of Nassau.

St Matthew's Church on one side
of the road was built in 1802. The
graveyard on the other side dates
back even earlier to the loyalist peri-
od. And the old Pan Am terminal
across the street is where the first
scheduled flights arrived from Mia-
mi back in the 1920s. For years, the
park has also been an exercise field
and football pitch for schools in the
area. And this whole scenic district
provides the backdrop for the
entrance to Paradise Island.

But these days the park has
become a private parking lot —
expropriated by one or two busi-
nesses that now occupy the old
homes lining Dowdeswell Street.
The most egregious offender is a
private school whose customers hap-
pily block traffic and dig up the
parade grass daily.

We don't know why Town Plan-
ning would give approval for a
school with no parking facilities in an
already congested area, but this
problem has been getting worse



incrementally over many months
with not the slightest attention being
paid to finding a solution. There is
no doubt that eventually, the entire
parade will be converted into an
unsightly car park and dust bowl,
and Nassau will have lost yet more
of its historic value.

Why we should turn a blind eye
to a public asset that is being con-
fiscated by a few private individuals
as we speak is quite beyond me. I
assume it 1s because the authorities
are just as incapable of dealing with
the vexing issue of city parking as
they are of fixing the judicial sys-
tem.

THE HAITIAN PROBLEM

Recently, both John Marquis
(the Tribune's former managing edi-
tor) and Rupert Missick (the news-
paper's chief reporter) have written
lengthy Insight articles about the
Haitian migration and the assimila-
tion of illegal immigrants with bare-
ly a glancing reference to the facts.

Both articles simply repeated
unsubstantiated claims, jingoistic
cliches and racist fears based on
sheer hearsay or opinion — a dan-
gerous thing to do where communal
conflicts are involved. Neither writer
attempted to put these important
issues into any historical context,
and nor did they make use of The
Tribune's extensive archives.

For example, Missick this week
quoted a radio talk show host refer-
ring to "subversive" efforts by Hait-
ian "invaders". He also expressed
the opinion of a Haitian-Bahamian
activist that over 60 per cent of
Bahamians are of Haitian descent.
Such exaggerations and slurs should
not be presented without qualifica-
tion — even if they are comments
from other people.

In January, Marquis claimed
there were inherent differences
between Bahamians and Haitians,
and insisted that Haitians are intrin-
sically violent: “(Haiti’s) people are
from a different tribal background
than most Bahamians and they are
notoriously volatile in settling their
political and domestic differences.”
He went on to compare Haitians to
“pit bulls” and Bahamians to “pot-
cakes.”

Such simplistic treatment of a
complex and potentially explosive
situation is all the more deficient
when we consider that the govern-
ment commissioned a comprehen-
sive study on the Haitian migration
to the Bahamas in 2005. The result-
ing 98-page report is readily avail-
able online and has been the subject
of several articles in this space —
one written by Bahamian social sci-
entist Dawn Marshall.

The study by the International
Organization for Migration was
partly funded by a grant from the
United States and conducted by
researchers from the College of the
Bahamas. It had the backing of both
the government and the Haitian
Embassy, and it collated all the
available data while creole-speak-
ing interviewers surveyed 500
Haitians on four Bahamian islands.
For the first time ever the true out-
lines of the Haitian migration in the
Bahamas were revealed, and a num-
ber of myths were dispelled.

In its review of local media cov-
erage of migration issues, the IOM
report noted that "Most of the opin-



ions reported on (in the press) were
negative and focused on problems
created by Haitian nationals for the
Bahamas. Rare were any feature
articles exploring the issues with any
significant degree of depth and
reflection. Rare also were any
reports on individual Haitian nation-
als’ situations such as might give
them a human face.

"There is no elaboration on the
migration phenomena or the mean-
ing of the Haitian diaspora. These
important issues need to be under-
stood when living in a global, multi-
cultural, multilingual world, and the
media does not attempt to help the
average Bahamian to understand
the problem,” the IOM rightly con-
cluded.

MONTAGU
OUTDOOR TOILET

In recent weeks you may have
noticed gangs of government work-
ers clearing the verges on a number
of roadways, particularly in the
Montagu area. But have you noticed
that the unkempt island of tall weeds
and bush opposite the Montagu fish
market remains uncleared?

The reason is simple.

That's the public toilet for the
fishmongers and others who hang
out at this market and boat ramp
which operates in the middle of a
major arterial intersection. But don't
worry, I am sure the toilet-goers
wash their hands in the sea at the
bottom of the ramp. Of course, this
water is heavily polluted from the
Sailing Club's septic tank as well as
from storm water run-off, fish guts
and motor oil from the boats and
jet skis that use the ramp. But don't
worry — it's only raw fish they are
handling after all.

CABLE BAHAMAS
DIS AN' DAT

Phil Keeping, the Canadian
entrepeneur who launched Cable
Bahamas in 1994, still owns 30 per
cent of the shares through Columbus
Communications, with special rights
that include boardroom control.
Columbus owns regional fibre-optic
networks that stretch from Ecuador
to Florida and CBL recently agreed
to a buy-out. This would make the
company 100 per cent Bahamian,
and remove the red flag of foreign
ownership and control that has
dogged it for years.

But every so often there is a bar-
rage of repetitive attacks on CBL
that, based on the company’s track
record, are simply not justified
These charges are unsubstantiated
by the critics who level them, and
often go uncorrected in the press.
We are in such a phase now, as the
government seeks major regulatory
reforms that will dramatically
change our communications land-
scape as well as spin BTC — Cable's
top antagonist — into the private
sector.

First of all, the record shows that
CBL has invested over $260 million
to build a world class telecoms infra-
structure for the Bahamas in just a
few years — and not a single cent

SEE page 12

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PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Miss Bahamas

Universe ‘furore’

Tough Call

FROM page six

was public money. The company has }
76,500 video customers and 43,000 :
Internet subscribers. And at the same }
time, it created new wealth for thou- }
sands of Bahamian shareholders }
(including the government), and a }
whole new industry for hundreds of :
Bahamian workers and technicians. }

As to the company not living up }
to its obligations, that old saw is :
patently false. Cable provides ser-
vices to 90 per cent of Bahamian }
households on 20 islands, as per its
original agreement with government. }
And although ZNS is carried on its
network for free, it is not CBL's }
responsibility to ensure that ZNS }
reaches every household in the coun- }
try — no matter how remote they :
may be. That is clearly the responsi- }
bility of ZNS, if the government }
chooses to make such coverage a }

requirement of nationhood.

It's time for the political nonsense :
regarding CBL to end. The fact that }
Cable is a successful and efficient }
Bahamian company making good }
returns for its shareholders and }
employees is nothing to be ashamed }
of. If you have a sensible complaint, }
let's hear it. Otherwise, shut up and :

stop talking fool.
CLICO, THE CENTRAL
BANK AND COLUMBUS
COMMUNICATIONS

Last Friday there was a story }
about the CLICO liquidation which }
said that a court action had been filed }
in Florida to protect the $73 million :
that the company had invested in }
real estate ventures in that state. The }
liquidator (Craig Gomez) was quot-
ed as saying that CLICO (Bahamas) :
had loaned this money "to affiliated
companies" and it ended up in two }
Florida land developments. He }
added that there could be other CLL :
CO (Bahamas) assets in the US that

had not been identified as yet.

Well, we have yet to hear from :
the government or the central bank :
as to how $73 million of Bahamian }
policyholder money was able to be }
exported to the US. Was exchange }
control approval given for this :
siphoning of funds? Was the foreign }
exchange premium paid? Is anybody }

there?

What do you think?

Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

+
eee BS
ir is

Miss Bahamas Universe Kiara Sherman

FROM page one

other pageant contenders.

Yesterday Mrs McWeeney said: “We
have been invited this morning by
Gaynelle Rolle (Miss Bahamas Universe
President) to view the scores. I believe
that most of the judges will take them up
on that so we can just put everything to
rest.

“By the end of the week, I am sure
we can get together and say ‘Everything
checked out, these were my scores’ and
that we are satisfied the accounting firm
did the tallying right.”

She said she hopes the exercise has
the intended effect, adding: “My phone
is blowing up and I can’t take it any-
more!”

Interest in the Miss Bahamas Universe
pageant has been heightened this year as
the Miss Universe pageant takes place in
The Bahamas for the first time this year.

The Bahamian queen will go on to
represent her country alongside wanna-
be queens from across the globe in the
internationally-televised event.

Illustrating the discontent over the
pageant’s outcome, 22-year-old contes-
tant Enna Thomas contacted The Tri-
bune yesterday to explain that she has
been disturbed by allegations made
online that she may have missed out on
an opportunity to represent The

Bahamas as pageant queen because of a
dispute over money between her spon-
sor, Craig Flowers of the FML Group
of Companies, and Ms Rolle, Miss
Bahamas Universe president.

She said she already feared “some-
thing went wrong” on the final night as
although her name appeared on the
screen during a pre-recorded video of
the 12 finalists seen by TV viewers she
was not called up when the announce-
ment of who was in the group was made
live.

“Immediately I knew that someone
went wrong. I was so confident. I had
ranked highly throughout the competi-
tion. Never for one second did I think I
wouldn’t make the top 12,” said Ms
Thomas.

Meanwhile, she went on to be
announced the winner of several awards
— including Best Float and Miss Photo-
genic — and suspected that she was also
the winner of several other awards when
a presenter said they could not make
out the name that had been written on
the paper.

Mrs McWeeney confirmed that cer-
tain names were said to be illegible on
the night, and in those cases the winner
of the individual awards was never
announced.

Another judge, speaking anonymous-
ly, told The Tribune that he and other
judges were told that the fact that Ms
Thomas’ name appeared on the screen
was simply a mistake.

“We were informed behind the scenes
that it was just a technical error,” he
said.

Meanwhile, in relation to claims that
the overall result may not have been
reflective of the efforts and beauty of
the contestants who put themselves for-
ward, the judge said he felt the outcome
was “anticipated.”

“When I saw the finalists selected that
night I didn’t take exception to it. I
thought it was fair. We have an excellent
queen and I wish this country would sup-
port the decision whether all of us agree
with it or not,” he said.

A message left for Ms Rolle was not
returned up to press time yesterday.

We note that the Ministry of i
Finance is currently reviewing Cable :
Bahamas' plan to buy out its con- }
trolling shareholder, Columbus Com- }
munications for some $80 million — :
money that would be partly financed }
by preference shares. Did the Min- }
istry similarly review the CLICO pro-
posal to invest Bahamian money in :
speculative Florida real estate deals? :



Immigration Dept working to release Cuban detainees

FROM page one

date of the detained Cubans,
Mr Thompson said that the
department is aware of the
detainees’ dilemma.

"Tonly want to say that we
are actively working on the
situation, it's before us and
we are actively pursing it. .
.We are aware of the details,
we have the facts and so the
extent that we can do what-
ever we have to do, we (will)
do it," Mr Thompson said
yesterday. "We know their
plight — we know their situ-
ation."

One Cuban detainee, held
at the centre for more than
18 months, yesterday claimed
that Immigration officials
promised the group's release
from the centre at the end of
the month.

When questioned about
this, Mr Thompson refused
any additional comment.

"IT don't want to comment
further than to say that we
are working on it," he said.

According to Mr Thomp-
son, there are currently eight
Cubans held at the

Carmichael Road centre.

The Department of Immi-
gration has recently been
caught in a firestorm of alle-
gations of abuse and mis-
treatment of Cuban detainees
housed at the holding facility.

In February, one detainee
who was allegedly beaten by
officers so savagely that he
lost fingernails, announced
that he — along with other
Cubans at the centre was
starting a hunger strike to
protest conditions at the cen-
tre.

Several other claims of
alleged abuse and “concen-
tration camp" like conditions
were reported to The Tribune
by detainees prompting calls
from human rights watchdog
group Amnesty International
for an independent investiga-
tion of the claims.

These allegations were
swiftly denied by immigration
officials.

While several improve-
ments were made to the living
conditions of the centre —

THE CANCER CENTRE

LC Te et
The Specialists’ Cancer Clinics

replacements of dirty mat-
tresses with new ones,
repainting of grimy walls,
repairs of blocked toilets, and
the installation of washing
and dryer machines — offi-
cials maintained these
upgrades were unrelated to
any published allegations.

However in March a fact-
finding team was appointed
by the Department of Immi-
gration after reports of the
alleged abuses were pub-
lished. The team, made up of
psychologist Dr David Allen,
Social Services Director
Melanie Zonicle, Archdea-

con James Palacious and Mr
Thompson, toured the facili-
ty and interviewed the
detainees.

While filtered contents of
the report were given to the
press through Immigration
press conferences, the full
report was never released.

Hotel union elections
will be held tomorrow

FROM page one

The substantive matter will be heard on June 26
to determine which process was in fact the valid

one,” Mr Ferguson said.

Approximately 6,000 hotel workers are expect-
ed to cast their ballots on Thursday to elect a
new executive. Five teams are vying for leadership
positions within the union, including the Unity
Team, the M Team, the A Team, the Justice

Team, and Team Deliverance.

Wilson, who leads team Deliverance, has —

4 aa

ALL OUTDOOR

LP el@ 15

along with eight other elected union executives —
been at odds with the top three executives of the
BHCAWU, maintaining that the proper rules

and regulations were not followed when the nom-
ination and election dates were set. He was grant-

ed an injunction last Thursday staying the elec-

tions until such time as a judicial review in the
matter had been heard. That review will now
take place on June 26.

Attorney Damian Gomez and Harvey Tynes
QC, represent BHCAWU President Roy Cole-

brooke, Secretary General Leo Douglas and

Treasurer Basil McKenzie.

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009, PAGE 13

SPORTS





NBA Today

@ By The Associated
Press

Denver at Los Angeles
Lakers (9pm EDT). Tied at
two games apiece, the West-
ern Conference finals return
to Los Angeles, where Den-
ver won once and nearly
earned a sweep in the first two
games of the series.

STARS

Monday

—Chauncey Billups,
Nuggets, scored 24 points and
made all nine free throws in
Denver's 120-101 victory over
the Lakers that evened the
Western Conference finals at
two games apiece.

—J.R. Smith, Nuggets,
came off the bench to score
24 points, making four 3-
pointers and sparking a strong
effort from Denver's reserves.

DENVER'S DOUBLE-

DOUBLES

Kenyon Martin had 13
points and 15 rebounds, while
Nene added 14 points and 13
boards in the Nuggets’ 120-
101 victory over the Lakers in
Game 3 of the Western Con-
ference finals. They helped
Denver finish with a 58-40
rebounding advantage.
Reserve Chris Andersen
grabbed 14 boards.

DIRTY DAHNTAY?

Lakers coach Phil Jackson
accused Nuggets guard Dah-
ntay Jones of playing
"unsportsmanlike basketball”
by intentionally tripping Kobe
Bryant during Game 4 of the
Western Conference finals.
"There's another situation out
there tonight that was unac-
ceptable by Dahntay Jones,”
Jackson said. "Just unaccept-
able defense, tripping guys
and playing unsportsmanlike
basketball." Hornets coach
Byron Scott also criticized
Jones for dirty play in the first
round.

AILING ANTHONY

Hobbled by a sprained
ankle and slowed by a stom-
ach virus, Carmelo Anthony
was limited to 15 points on 3-
of-16 shooting in Denver's
120-101 victory over the Lak-
ers in Game 4. It was his sec-
ond straight game below 30
points after he hit that mark in
five consecutive games.

SPEAKING

"They whooped us, period.
They whooped us on the glass.
They whooped us to loose
balls.”

— Kobe Bryant after the
Lakers' 120-101 Game 4 loss
to Denver that evened the
Western Conference finals at
two games apiece



CHRIS ANDERSEN (far left) and Linas Kleiza double-team Lamar Odom
during the second half of Game 4 in Western Conference finals in Denver
Monday night. The Lakers lost 120-101...

(AP Photos: Chris Carlson)

Wallace angered
over Van Gundy
BUCojo Me kenir by

"Guarantee we're going to
win the series? Yeah, yeah.
We are down 2-1. But there is
nobody on this team and def-
initely not myself that says we
are not going to win this
series. Yeah, it is going to be
tough. We know that. We get
this game tomorrow, go home,
still got home-court advan-
tage. We don't see ourselves
losing two out of three at
home."

— Cleveland guard Mo
Williams, calling his Cavaliers

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP)
— Cleveland Cavaliers cen-
ter Ben Wallace is upset
with Orlando coach Stan
Van Gundy for accusing
him of flopping.

Van Gundy said Monday
he was bothered by the
number of times Cleveland
guard Mo Williams and
Wallace dropped to the
floor in Game 3 of the East-
ern Conference finals.

He said the pair fell down
more times than a baby.

Wallace is one of the
NBA's most intimidating
players.

When asked about Van
Gundy's comments during
Tuesday's shootaround
before Game 4, Wallace
said Van Gundy should
shut up, adding an exple-
tive for emphasis.

Van Gundy made the
same claims about
Shaquille O'Neal this sea-
son, and the coach later
apologised.

"the best team in basketball."



Ronaldo vs. Messi could
decide ‘best player’ award

m By PAUL LOGOTHETIS
AP Sports Writer

ROME (AP) — While Manches-
ter United and Barcelona play for
the Champions League trophy, Cris-
tiano Ronaldo and Lionel Messi may
well be squaring off for the right to |
call himself the world's best player.

Ronaldo, however, doesn't seem
too concerned about that.

"Now to decide (who the best
player is), who cares about that?
What I want more is to win the
Champions League and that's it,"
Ronaldo said Tuesday from the Sta-
dio Olimpico. "I respect Barcelona
very much, Messi is special also.

"Sincerely, I'm not worried about that. I would
rather win the Champions League final. I want it
very much.”

Ronaldo is the reigning FIFA world player
of the year after his 42 goals last season guided
United to both the Premier League and Cham-
pions League trophies. Messi was second in the
voting, despite Barcelona enduring a second
straight season without a trophy.

This season, however, Messi has already col-
lected two trophies and netted more goals than
Ronaldo, and the result of Wednesday's final
could be the deciding factor when votes are cast
for next year's award.

United coach Alex Ferguson said picking one
over the other was difficult because of their dif-

eae itsesssd alae)



ferent styles — Ronaldo's speedy
stepovers and long-range shooting
vs. Messi's darting runs and imagi-
nation inside the area.

"Both have the ability and
courage to attack defenders all the
time. No matter how many times
they are tackled they get up and
they want the ball, and that's the
kind of courage we want to see in
footballers. And both have it,” Fer-
guson said. "Both have different
types of qualities, both are differ-
ent types of players but at end of
the day, how can you divide it?
They're separate."

If Man United defends its Euro-
pean trophy, that will provide a
fourth piece of silverware after league, League
Cup and Club World Cup triumphs.

Messi can add a Champions League title to
Barcelona's league and cup double, and see the
Catalans become only the fifth Spanish team to
win three trophies in a season.

Ronaldo has never scored against Spanish
opposition while Messi, who leads the competi-
tion with eight goals, has never netted against a
Premier League opponent.

Ronaldo said the buildup to the their individ-
ual showdown was not proving a distraction.

"I'm 100 percent focused on the game. I know
the people want to know something about me
but I'm very focused," Ronaldo said. "I try to
score a goal and win the game, that's it.”

m By PAT GRAHAM
AP Sports Writer

DENVER (AP) — Carmelo Anthony had a
better supporting cast than Kobe Bryant on a
night he really needed it.

With Anthony sick and injured, his ensemble
pitched in and lifted the Denver Nuggets to a
120-101 win over the Los Angeles Lakers on
Monday that evened the Western Conference
finals at two games apiece.

"Tonight, all of them stepped up," Anthony
said.

They had to with their star hobbled by a
sprained ankle and a stomach virus, something he
picked up just before game time and which forced
him to receive IV treatment at halftime.

Anthony, who's averaging 27.1 points in the
postseason, struggled to find his rhythm, going 3-
for-16 from the field and finishing with 15 points.

No matter, though. J-R. Smith had his back. So
did Chauncey Billups.

Both finished with 24 points and hit clutch
shots in the fourth quarter to lift the Nuggets’
spirits as they head into Game 5 on Wednesday
night in L.A.

"We know the importance of that game,"
Billups said.

The Nuggets’ bench got back into the act on
Monday, outscoring their counterparts 42-24.

"It's satisfying,” Anthony said. "It's very satis-
fying to win a game knowing I wasn't 100 percent
out there tonight."

Bryant didn't have quite the same support.

Still, he tried to carry the Lakers down the
stretch, scoring 13 of his 34 points in the fourth
quarter.

"They just whooped us, period,” Bryant admit-
ted. "They whooped us on the glass. They
whooped us to loose balls."

Fatigue may finally be catching up with the
Lakers, who had to endure a grueling seven-game
series against Houston while the Nuggets got to
relax for a few days after wrapping up their tussle
with Dallas in five.

Bryant even conceded as much, saying he was
exhausted after almost single-handedly pulling
one out for the Lakers in Game 3 that gave them
back homecourt advantage.

"But you just gotta push through it," Bryant
said. "They played harder and better, period."

And that was with an ailing Anthony.

"It just shows we have heart and can play with
aman down," Smith said.

Smith ignited the Nuggets by rediscovering his
outside shot. After going 4-for-15 from the field in
Game 3, his confidence was reeling.

So Smith stayed late after practice on Sunday,
firing up one jumper after another.

"T think it worked,” said a smiling Smith, who

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Nuggets and Lakers even
at 2-2 in Western finals



KOBE BRYANT (right) and Pau Gasol sit on the bench
in the final minute

hit back-to-back 3 pointers late in the game to
help snuff out a final Lakers charge.

Nuggets coach George Kar] never lost faith in
Smith.

"T think his talent and his skill is flamboyant,
explosive," Karl said. "It makes us a very explo-
sive team."

Pau Gasol, frustrated by a lack of touches,
knows how the Lakers can be more explosive —
by dumping the ball into the paint more often.

"IT wish we would take more advantage of our
inside game, because it's pretty effective,” said
Gasol, who finished with 21 points on 8-of-11
shooting. "It's unfortunate we don't recognize it
enough."

Yet he holds out hope.

"It's got to be a team-conscious effort and
mindset," Gasol said. "We always have a better
chance when we establish ourselves inside."

The Nuggets had seven different players score
in double figures, including Kenyon Martin and
Nene who each had a double-double. Chris "Bird-
man” Andersen provided a boost off the bench,
grabbing 14 boards for the Nuggets, who outre-
bounded the Lakers 58-40.

"We got hammered from every direction
tonight,” Lakers forward Luke Walton said.

And Los Angeles coach Phil Jackson was none
too pleased about that.

He was particularly upset about Dahntay Jones’
trip of Bryant in the third quarter, calling it
unsportsmanlike.

Jones didn't give the assertion a moment's
thought. Jackson becomes the latest coach to
label Jones a dirty player during the playoffs,
joining Byron Scott of the Hornets, who said the
same thing in the first round.

"Just playing hard,” Jones said. "If he can't
respect it, I'm sorry. I'm trying to be aggressive
and give it all I have out there. My teammates
appreciate it.”

Anthony certainly does.

"Dahntay is Dahntay,” Anthony said. "That's
what he’s been doing."

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PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Olympic boxer visits Embassy of

The Bahamas in Washington, DC



SERENA WILLIAMS reacts as she plays Klara Zakopalova in their first
round match of the French Open tournament at Roland Garros stadium in

Paris on Tuesday...

(AP Photo: Lionel Cironneau)

French Open: Serena
through to 2nd round

@ By CHRIS LEHOURITES
AP Sports Writer

PARIS (AP) — Serena
Williams struggled to close her
match at a windy French Open
on Tuesday, wasting eight
match points before finally
beating Klara Zakopalova of
the Czech Republic 6-3, 6-7 (5),
6-4.

The second-seeded Williams
was broken twice during the
second set, including when she
was serving for the match at 5-4.
At 5-3 with Zakopalova serv-
ing, she had five match points
but couldn't end it.

Zakopalova saved three more
match points before holding to
5-3 in the third set, then broke
Williams in the next game to
get back on serve.

"T think Serena will be play-
ing better and better each
round, so it was the best chance
to at least play with her or beat
her,” Zakopalova said. "She's
Serena."

Williams completed her Ser-
ena Slam at the French Open
in 2002, winning her fourth
straight Grand Slam title. If she
wins at Roland Garros this year,
she'll have won three majors in
a row after victories at the U.S.
Open and the Australian Open.
She reached the final at Wim-
bledon last year, but lost to big
sister Venus in the final.

Third-seeded Jelena
Jankovic, No. 4 Elena Demen-
tieva and No. 7 Svetlana
Kuznetsova also advanced
among the women, while No. 4
Novak Djokovic, No. 5 Juan
Martin del Potro, No. 9 Jo-Wil-
fried Tsonga and 2003 French
Open champion Juan Carlos
Ferrero made it through on the
men's side.

Jankovic dominated her
opponent before a 2-hour rain
delay, and then did well enough
after it to beat Petra Cetkovska
of the Czech Republic 6-2, 6-3.

The Serb, once ranked No. 1,
was leading 4-1 when the rain
started at Roland Garros. She
quickly completed the first set
when play resumed and contin-
ued to play well on Cetkovska's
serve in the second but was bro-
ken twice on her own.

"IT was controlling the points

.. but then we had to stop
because of the rain," Jankovic
said. "I felt a little bit slow after
the rain delay."

While serving for the match,
Jankovic again struggled and

was forced to save break points
before finally winning.

"The serve was all right. I did-
n't go for too much," said
Jankovic, who added the balls
were heavier than usual because
of the wet weather. "I just tried
to have a high percentage.”

Jankovic finished last season
as the top-ranked player on the
women's tour, but the 24-year-
old Serb is still looking to win
her first Grand Slam singles title
after losing in the final of last
year's U.S. Open.

Kuznetsova defeated Claire
Feuerstein of France 6-1, 6-4.
The 2004 U.S. Open champion
also dominated before the rain
started falling, leading 5-1.

Djokovic advanced when
Nicolas Lapentti of Ecuador
retired while trailing 6-3, 3-1
after injuring his left ankle.
Lapentti hurt his ankle when
coming to net at 5-2 in the first
set. He called for a trainer but
then continued playing.

The fourth-seeded Djokovic,
who won his fourth career title
on clay at this month's Serbia
Open, has reached the semifi-
nals at the French Open the last
two years. He also won the 2008
Australian Open.

Del Potro had little trouble
in his opening match at Roland
Garros, beating Michael Llodra
of France 6-3, 6-3, 6-1. The
Argentine won four straight
ATP titles last year, the first
two on clay.

No. 27 Rainer Schuettler of
Germany narrowly avoided a
"triple bagel" after being shut
out in the first two sets of a 6-0,
6-0, 6-4 loss to Mare Gicquel of
France.

On Friday, Schuettler lost to
Robin Soderling 6-0, 6-0 at the
ATP World Team Champi-
onship in Germany.

"A ‘double bagel’ is fine,"
said Schuettler, who reached
the semifinals at last year's
Wimbledon. "I had one last
week. It's nothing new."

Gicquel was unapologetic
about the thrashing.

"T didn't come here to sym-
pathize," said the Frenchman,
who was trying to win the third
set at love as well. "If I tried to
give him one or two games,
then everything could be over-
turned against me.”

No. 11 Gael Monfils of
France also advanced, easily
beating Bobby Reynolds of the
United States 6-2, 6-3, 6-1
despite a knee injury.

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OUR own Olympic boxer
Taureano Johnson stopped by
the Embassy of The Bahamas
in Washington, DC, to say “hel-
lo” while he was there last week
to get some training and advice.

With Johnson were his father
Erwin, and Floyd Seymour,
who was himself among the first
Bahamian boxers to qualify at
the Olympic level — in 1991 -
and who is talking with the
younger fighter about his
future.

Johnson did the Bahamas
proud in Beying, winning his
first two fights and making it
all the way to the medal round
before losing a decision to the
home-town favourite Hanati
Silamu.

Johnson placed fifth at the
Olympics and currently holds



FLOYD Seymour (far left), Taureano Johnson and Erwin Johnson (far right)
visited The Embassy of The Bahamas in Washington DC where they met

Rhoda Jackson last week.

the rank of No. 5 amateur box-
er in the world.

“T did some good work,” he
said of his Beijing bouts. “To
be in to that level [was the] pin-
nacle of my career.”

As to whether he will fight
as an Olympian again in 2012,
Johnson said that was “some
bit of time away.” Meantime,
the question continues to pop
up: When will Taureano John-
son go pro?

The 25-year-old would not
answer the question directly but
he admitted that he is at least
considering turning profession-
al.

Instead, he said that it was
rare for fighters his age to stay
an amateur for long, especially
long enough to fight in two
Olympics.

Bahamas Volleyball Federation
2010 World Championships NORCEA’S Rounds



HERE is a look at some of the perfor-
mances produced by members of the
Bahamas Volleyball Federation men’s
team at the 2010 World Championships
NORCEA’S Rounds played over the
weekend in Kingston, Jamaica:

FINAL RESULTS
Mexico

Bahamas

Jamaica

Haiti

St. Lucia

Cayman Islands
BEST PLAYERS

Best Receiver - Renaldo Knowles -

Bahamas.
BEST SCORERS

No.2 - Renaldo Knowles - 41 spikes, 3

blocks, 1 serve = 49.

No.3 - Shedrick Forbes - 37 spikes, 5

block, 0 serve = 42.
No.15

blocks, 0 serve = 26.
No.16 - Prince Wilson - 24 spikes, 0
block, 1 serve = 25.
No.23 - Romel Lightbourne - 16 spikes,
1 block, 3 serves = 20.
No.26 - Simon Tonny - 7 spikes, 6 blocks,



- Byron Ferguson - 19 spikes, 7

ABOVE are some members of the men’s national volleyball team. From left

1 serve = 14.

No.32 - Ian Pinder - 7 sp[ikes, 1 block, 0

serve = 8.
BEST SPIKERS

in back are Jamaal Ferguson, Tony Simon, Glen Rolle, Shedrack Forbes
and lan ‘Wire’ Pinder. In front from left are Byron Ferguson, Audril Far-
quharson, Maurice ‘Cheeks’ Smith and Mullit Petit.

‘Spiking’ their way to the top

FROM page 15

know it’s good to be home
again,” he said.

“Secondly, to congratulate
you on your awesome success
in Jamaica. I followed the first
round game against St Lucia
and I was very concerned. I fol-
lowed you in the second round
and I got a call that night from
someone who is very excited
and said ‘Mr. Minister, you bet-
ter call Jamaica because we just
beat Jamaica.’”

Although he didn’t make the
trip, Bannister said what the
team achieved in Jamaica was
triumphant of the Bahamian
spirit.

He alluded to the fact that
the team’s trip was delayed
because of the lack of funding
and that once they got there,
they persevered to defeat
Jamaica on their home soil
when everybody was pulling
against them.

“Tt shows what you could do
if you pull together as a team,”
he stated. “It shows the strength
that you have and it gives us an
idea of where you could go if
you really want it. But the key
element is desire. Desire and
determination and with that
comes team work.

“You've been able in volley-
ball to bring together a group of
young men who are very tal-
ented, but by yourselves you
can’t do it. You have to create a
unit, a unit that works and func-
tions very well together.”

Head coach Raymond Wil-



DeVINCE SMITH, assistant coach,
gives his assessment of the men’s
national team at the 2010 World
Championships NORCEA’S Quali-
fying Round...

son, using a Biblical quote to
begin his comments, said: “God
gives grace and mercy and
favour to whoever he chooses to
do so. At this time, he chose to
bless the Bahamas as with
favour.

“We have a lot of work ahead
of us preparing for the next
round, but my prayer is that
God will continue to go with us
and bless us with favour and
mercy and keep our players
strong. I feel that we will do
well. All we have to do is target
the weaknesses of the teams in
every round.”

Assistant coach De Vince
Smith thanked Bannister and
his ministry for their financial
support and all of the players
for the commitment they made.

“Through discipline and hard



RENALDO KNOWLES, of the Bahamas, was
the best receiver...

No.6 - Shedrick Forbes - 37 spikes, 17





= iL233)

faults, 32 shots, 86 total attempts = 43.02.
No.7 - Renaldo Knowles - 41 spikes, 22
faults, 39 shots, 102 attempts = 40.20.
BEST BLOCKERS

No.6 Byron Ferguson - 7 kill blocks, 11
faults, 18 rebounds, 36 attempts = 0.47.
No.9 Simon Tonny - 6 kill blocks, 5
faults, 7 rebounds, 17 attewmpts = 0.42.
BEST SERVERS

No.5 Romel Lightbourne - 3 aces, 6
faults, 28 serve hits, 37 attempts = 0.20.
BEST DIGGERS

No.5 - Renaldo Knowles - 20 sigs, 7
faults, 23 receptions, 50 attempts = 1.33.
No.8 - Jamaal Ferguson - 12 digs, 9
faults, 16 receptions, 37 attempts = 0.80.
BEST SETTERS

No.4 Simon Tonny - 53 running sets, 9
faults, 185 still sets, 247 attempts = 3.53.
No.10 - Audril Farquharson - 20 run-
ning sets, 4 faults, 64 still sets, 88 attempts

BEST RECEIVERS
No.1 - Renaldo Knowles - 62 excellents,
2 faults, 16 serve receptions, 80 attempts =

75.00.

BEST LIBEROS
No.3 - Jamaal Ferguson - 60 excellents,

12 faults, 28 in play, 100 attempts = 60.00.

THREE more members of the men’s national team celebrate on their
return home. They are (shown I-r) Romel Lightbourne, Prince Wilson and
Renaldo Knowles.



RAYMOND WILSON, head coach
of the men’s national volleyball
team, addressed the audience on
the team’s performance in
Kingston, Jamaica...

work, they made it possible for
us to succeed and to excel to
the next round,” he pointed out.
“As we move on, it’s going to
get harder.

“Like coach (Wilson) said,
it’s going to get harder, but it’s
not about winning, but doing
our best and advancing. We
pray that you will continue to
support us and give you our
all.”

Team captain Audril Far-
quharson said they are aware
that these are some rough eco-
nomic times and the govern-
ment has been stretched to the
limit in ensuring that they get to
travel.

“We appreciate the effort,
but we have one more trip to
Cuba for us to advance, so
hopefully we all will still be

there,” he charged.

Federation president Don
Cornish said Bannister and the
Bahamian people would have
been proud watching the team
perform in Jamaica, especially
as they were in the “lion’s den.”

“T think the team showed a
lot of heart, especially in that
first game against St Lucia and
particularly in the semifinal
against Jamaica, a host team
that was not easy to beat at
home,” he said.

“We made them think a lot.
They changed their line-up at
least seven times trying to beat
this team. I think we were
resolved to make this a suc-
cess.”

In order to make the second
trip in August a success, Cor-
nish said they have already got-
ten permission to travel to San-
to Domingo for a training camp
and they should have a coach
from Cuba to assist in their
preparation.

“We have to learn to play
against taller players,” Cornish
said. “That was one of the big
challenges we had against Mex-
ico. We didn’t think Mexicans
can grow that tall. I don’t think
they understood how tall they
were until they were on the oth-
er side of the net.

“So they are the kind of
adjustments that we will have
to make in going forward. A
team that is technically sound
will not make that many mis-
takes. So we have to force them
into situations to make them
think. I think this was an impor-
tant test for us going forward.”





(
b

WEDNESDAY, MAY 27,



2009



TOP - MINISTER OF YOUTH, SPORTS & CULTURE DESMOND BANNISTER sits with executives and team
officials of the men’s national volleyball team. Standing are members of the team...

ABOVE - Team manager Jermaine Adderley holds the trophy that the men’s national volleyball team brought
home from Jamaica. Next to him is trainer Lloyd Davis and Joseph ‘Joe Mo’ Smith, BVF vice president...

Knowles, Bhupathi hoping
to win their first title for ‘O09

MARK Knowles’ and
Mahesh Bhupathi are hoping
that they can win their first title
for the year at the Roland Gar-
ros French Open Grand Slam.

The Bahamian-Indian duo
are seeded at No. 4 in the men’s
doubles at the tournament that
got started on Monday. How-
ever, they are not expected to
start playing until Thursday.

Knowles’ former partner,
Daniel Nestor, and Nestor’s
new partner Nenad Zimonjic
are the top seeds. The No.2
seeds are American identical
twin brothers Bob and Mike
Bryan.

Knowles and Bhupathi go
into the tournament as the No.3
ranked team on the ATP com-
puter rankings. Heading the list
is the Bryans, followed by
Nestor and Zimonijic.



MARK KNOWLES and Mahesh Bhupathi (shown in file photo) are hoping
that they can win their first title for the year at the Roland Garros French
Open Grand Slam...

Bahamas International Tennis Club
starts new interclub doubles league

Trophy for winning team is named in honour of J Barrie Farrington

KIT Spencer, president of the Bahamas Inter-
national Tennis Club, has started a new interclub
doubles league and named the trophy for the win-
ning team in honour of IC founder J Barrie Far-
rington.

The club is one of a group of prestigious world-
wide “IC’s” whose members have generally rep-
resented their country or won national titles at
tennis. Mr Farrington was the founder of our
Bahamian IC.

Among some of the international members are
Roger Federer, Tim Henman and our own Mark
Knowles.

The Gym Club team was led by Robbie Isaacs
who is now a full time tennis coach at The Gym
Club in Winton.

After a series of exciting and close matches they
emerged as the eventual winners but only after an
extremely close final match against a Lyford Cay
team in which the outcome of the whole league was
decided in the final set of the final match.

Most of the teams were led by and included
Bahamas IC members but not entirely. The
Bahamas IC invited the BLTA National Tennis
Centre to enter a team of top juniors in the league
which they hoped would give them added experi-
ence against some of our experienced older players.

Although the junior team finished at the low
end of the league they performed very creditably
and only lost matches that were closely contested.

Their team included several members of our
recent Junior Fed and Davis Cup teams and the
experience proved useful for the doubles part of
that event where our juniors performed well.



PRESENTATION TO WINNING GYM CLUB TEAM -
Shown (I-r) are Harry Saunders, Mike Isaacs, Kevin
Archer, Robbie Isaacs, Terry North, Barrie Farrington
(IC Founder), Mickey Williams and Kit Spencer (IC
President)

In July, the club has a veterans team participat-
ing in the Russian IC’s 10th Anniversary event in
Moscow. There will be teams from about a dozen
countries involved in this event.

From September 17-20, the Bahamas IC will
again be sponsoring a junior 16 & under combined
boys and girls team in The IC International Junior
Challenge. This year, bi-annual event will be held
at The Chris Evert Academy in Boca Raton.

The first North American IC Junior Challenge
was hosted four years ago here in the Bahamas by
our own IC. It is anticipated that there will also be
teams from the US, Canada, Mexico, Barbados
and Bermuda.



Nuggets and
Lakers even at
2-2 in Western

finals...
See page 15

‘Spiking’ their
V to the top

Men’s national volleyball team advance to NORCEA’S
H-Qualifying round for FIVB World Championship

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

espite being

held back a day

because of the

lack of funds to

get to Jamaica
and having to overcome a
height differential at the 2010
World Championships
NORCEA’S D-Qualifying
Rounds, the men’s national vol-
leyball team accomplished their
mission.

The Bahamas Volleyball Fed-
eration just missed out in win-
ning the four days of competi-
tion, but they have advanced to
the NORCEA’S H-Qualifying
round in Cuba in August for
the FIVB Men’s Volleyball
World Championship in Italy.

They did it upsetting Jamaica
19-25, 25-18, 25-22 in the semi-
final before losing to Mexico
25-13, 25-14 and 25-16 in the
final.

In Pool B play, the Bahamas
won its opener 22-25, 22-25, 25-



MINISTER OF YOUTH, SPORTS &
CULTURE DESMOND BANNISTER
(right) makes a point to members
of the men’s national volleyball
team as BVFederation president
Don Cornish looks on...

22, 25-18 and 15-11 over St
Lucia. But they lost 25-13, 25-20
and 25-16 to Mexico in their
second match.

On their return home yester-
day via Air Jamaica, the team
was greeted at the Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport by
Minister of Youth, Sports and
Culture Desmond Bannister
and his staff. A welcome recep-
tion was held in the VIP
Lounge.

Bannister, who congratulat-
ed the team for its best perfor-
mance ever, encouraged the
players to get used to the cour-
tesy that is afforded to all
national teams on their return
home as he anticipates the same
type of success in the future.

“Gentlemen, it falls on me on
behalf of the Government and
the people of the Bahamas first
of all to welcome you home. I

SEE page 14

















teh

Bernard Rd - Mackey St - Thompson Blvd

Meee To)

= a

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THE TRIBUNE ©

|

a
=

WEDNESDAY,

MUAY 207 5



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Certification Lay-offs hit Nassau’s

to help better
‘Landscape’

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE NEWLY-incorporated Bahamas Landscape Association
(BLA) and the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI)
have begun a tertiary pilot programme that will certify graduates
and allow them to be duly employed in the industry, the BLA’s co-

chairman sad yesterday.

Conray Rolle added that the programme was still in need of

funding and will be part of the trial certificate programme mediated
through the Daytona Beach Community College in Florida.

Mr Rolle explained that the BTVI certification programme was

proposed in order to give Bahamians the necessary theory and
practical training consistent with international standards.

This endeavour to adhere to international standards, said Mr
Rolle, was the reason the BLA, incorporated in September 2008,
partnered with the Florida Nursery, Growers and Landscape Asso-

ciation (FNGLA).

“What drove us to do this was realising the deficiencies from a
knowledge standpoint, and deficiencies when it come to hiring

new people,” he said.

Mr Rolle argued that the industry has been poorly regulated, with
the misuse of chemicals needed for landscaping and an overall

ineptitude in the industry.

He added that finding labour
qualified to work in the land-

Bar ‘outrage’

SEE page 6B

over FINCO

plan for title insurance

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Bar Council
has expressed “outrage” and
“grave concerns as to the legal-
ity” of FINCO’s proposal to
require title insurance for all
mortgages it issues, but the insti-
tution’s managing director yes-
terday told Tribune Business it
was committed to “moving
ahead” with the initiative in the
interest of consumer protection
and choice.

Tanya McCartney said BISX-
listed FINCO, which is effec-
tively Royal Bank of Canada’s
mortgage lending arm in the
Bahamas, was “in the process
of fine-tuning our decision to
move ahead with providing title

SEE page 4B

* Attorneys claim ‘grave
concern as to the legality’
of mortgage lender’s plan

* But FINCO chief says BISX-
listed firm committed to
moving ahead with title
insurance introduction in
interests of consumer
protection and choice

* Bar concerns likely to centre
on FINCO assertion that ‘no
need’ for title searches, and
subsequent loss of 2.5%
fee income

* Title insurance to be
placed through Higgs
& Johnson affiliate

Resort owner plans to sell

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE economic downturn,
coupled with the dismal tourism
economy in Central Eleuthera,
has convinced the owner of a
North Palmetto Point resort to
finally sell his property.

Owner of Unique Village,
Adison Cooper, told Tribune
Business yesterday that he was
still hopeful of an economic
turnaround later this year. How-
ever, he said he must now “seri-
ously” consider selling the
resort.

“Tt has been very, very rough
to survive at this time,” said Mr
Cooper. “I really have to con-
sider selling at this time.”

With the upcoming Palmetto
Point Homecoming festival,
which is thought to be a signifi-
cant economic boost for
Eleuthera’s hotels, and typically

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
tesponsible for errors and/or omission |
from the daily report.



Eleuthera tourism stunted by
high airlift costs that match
coast-to-coast US flight

generates 100 per cent occu-
pancy for many of them, Mr
Cooper is cautiously optimistic.

He said Unique Village was
currently only at 60 per cent
occupancyu. Last-minute hotel
bookings are the norm, howev-
er, as many Nassuvians decide
to take the weekend trip only
days before.

The chairman for the Home-
coming Festival told Tribune
Business this week that he
expects the festival draw its nor-
mal crowds, and he argues that
hotels are filling up quickly.

Mr Cooper said Eleuthera has
not been as well off as other
islands since the onset of the
global financial crisis, which
sparked the worldwide eco-
nomic recession.

He said Unique Village has
been operating with the mini-
mum staff levels needed at the
moment, because “we aren’t
booked”.

Owner and principal of the
Pineapple Fields Resort, David
Barlyn, said Eleuthera tourism
has been stunted by the high
cost of direct airlift into the
island. He explained that a one-
hour round trip flight direct to
Eleuthera is as expensive as a
four-hour round trip flight coast-
to-coast in the US.

Mr Barlyn said his resort has
seen a 30 per cent occupancy
decline year-on-year, and
though he has not received
many bookings for the home-
coming festival either, he is
expecting an almost full-house
when a Tyler Perry film shoot
comes to the island in a few
weeks.

“We're definitely seeing
things pick up,” he said.

ROYAL FIDELITY



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE

(242) 351-3010

leading law firms

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

iggs & Johnson,

Nassau’s largest

law firm, yes-

terday con-

firmed that it
had laid off a “minor and very
selective number” of staff as the
recession’s chill winds start to
freeze the Bahamian legal ser-
vices profession, as the manag-
ing partner at another leading
company said further redun-
dancies at major firms were
almost inevitable.

Colin Callender, managing
partner at Callender’s & Co,
said in response to Tribune
Business’s questions that the
economic environment facing
Bahamian law firms was cur-
rently the toughest he had expe-
rienced during his decades as a
practicing attorney.

“T anticipate there will be fur-
ther reductions in staff comple-
ments at the larger law firms,

* The largest, Higgs & Johnson, confirms letting go ‘small and very select’ number of staff
* Callender’s & Co’s top partner says economic environment facing legal services toughest he
has seen, with ‘further reductions in staff complements at the larger law firms’ almost inevitable
* Callender’s sees Nassau transaction work fall 30-40%, and 75% in Freeport
* Real property tax cap removal hurts attorneys and realtors

mine included,” Mr Callender
told Tribune Business.

He estimated that Callender’s
& Co had seen transactional
work, such as real estate con-
veyancings and mergers and
acquisitions, was down 30-40
per cent below normal levels.

Mr Callender added that real
estate transactions for both real-
tors and attorneys had been
negatively impacted by the
Government’s 2008-2009 Bud-
get decision to remove the
$35,000 real property tax cap,
discouraging high-end property
transactions by making them
more expensive.

“That is where the larger
firms were making their income.
The agents and attorneys have

been adversely impacted by the
removal of that,” Mr Callender
said.

If things are bad in Nassau,
they are even worse in Freeport.
Fred Smith, the Callender’s &
Co partner based in Freeport’s
second city, told Tribune Busi-
ness: “Our transaction business
is down 75 per cent.

“As far as Callender’s in
Freeport is concerned, we are
suffering the effects of the eco-
nomic downturn. Our commer-
cial work is down about 75 per
cent. The downward trend is
reflected in most of the other
firms in Freeport. Most of the
law firms in Freeport have, over
the latest couple of years, been
reducing their staff because of

Freeport’s economic chal-
lenges.”

Their sentiments were echoed
by John Delaney, Higgs &
Johnson’s managing partner,
who confirmed that a “recali-
bration assessment” completed
last week had identified the
need for “a select and limited”
workforce reduction as part of
both a short and medium-term
plan.

Tribune Business had been
told by legal sources that
between nine to 11 Higgs &
Johnson staff members, includ-
ing some associates and support
staff, had been released by the

SEE page 5B

Bahamas funds pay $235m to settle with Madoff trustee

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

TWO Bahamas-based invest-
ment funds have settled with
the trustee for Bernard Madof-
f’s former firm it was
announced yesterday, agreeing
to pay a collective $235 million
to resolve claims over allega-
tions they withdrew money
from the $50 billion US fraud-
ster’s scheme in the days before
it collapsed.

A statement from their
Bahamian attorneys, Lennox
Paton, said the Optimal Strate-
gic US Equity fund and Opti-
mal Arbitrage fund, had
reached agreement with Irving
Picard, trustee for Bernard L.
Madoff Investment Securities,
to re-pay some 85 per cent of
the funds they withdrew to meet
his “clawback demand”.

Those payments, the release
said, would total $129.057 mil-

How do you attract and retain

* Bahamas-domiciled funds agree to pay back 85% of money they allegedly withdrew in
days before $50bn Ponzi scheme collapse, but no wrongdoing discovered or admitted

* Santander funds’ $1.54bn claims to be allowed in liquidation

* Class action lawsuits name Bahamas-based director of funds as defendant

lion for the Optimal rr
Strategic US Equity |m@
fund, and $106.324 mil-
lion for the Optimal
Arbitrage fund. Both
are domiciled in the
Bahamas as Interna-
tional Business Com-
panies (IBCs).

In return, the two
funds, which are man-
aged by Swiss-based
Optimal Investment
Services, a wholly-
owned subsidiary of
Spanish banking giant, Banco
Santander, will have their claims
permitted by Mr Picard as part
of the Madoff liquidation
process.



Bernard Madoff

The trustee also
reduced his so-called
“clawback demands” in
return for payment of
85 per cent.

The Lennox Paton
statement said: “The
agreement provides
that the funds’ claims
against the Bernard L.
Madoff Investment
Securities estate would
be allowed in their full
amounts, calculated on
a cash-in, cash-out basis
of $1.54 billion [for Optimal
Strategic US Equity fund] and
$9.808 million respectively, and
the funds would be entitled to
Securities Investor Protection

Corporation advances of
$500,000 each.”

Optimal Investment Services
and the Santander group itself
have agreed not to file any oth-
er claims against the Bernard
L. Madoff Investment Securi-
ties estate.

“The agreement also contains
an ‘equal treatment’ provision,
so that of the trustee settles sim-
ilar clawback claims for less
than 85 per cent, the funds will
receive a rebate of a portion of
their payments to equalise the
percentages applied to the
funds,” the Lennox Paton state-
ment said.

SEE page 3B

‘best of class’ employees?

‘ait

WITH A *BEST OF CLASS’ PENSION PLAN
Superior performance * Cost effective * Customised
Call the Royal Fidelity pension experts today!

Royal Fidelity Pension Plan

ee uh he

Nassau: 242.356.9801

Freeport: 242.351.3010

PU Pel ah

St. Michael: 246.435.1955

eye aera)

ROYAL @ FIDELITY

sie ss





PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED

NOTICE

Please be advised that the Head Office and
the Registered Office of the company will be

moved from the Bahamas Financial Centre,
Charlotte & Shirley Streets, 2nd Floor, Nassau,
Bahamas to Royal Bank House, East Hill Street,
Nassau, Bahamas effective 25th May, 2009.

D. BURROWS-HAINES (Mrs.)
Corporate Secretary

Dated this 22nd May 2009



Almost

times

more loads

other brands

THE TRIBUNE



aa ee
Don’t waste my key time

THIS conversation happens
at least a couple of times a
month.

In my opinion, time is the
most valuable asset any of us
have. I respect other people’s
time and my time. Therefore, I
will not let anyone else disre-
spect my time and neither
should you.

To save time in sales and
stop chasing your own tail - or
other people’s tails - qualify
them first. If they don’t qualify
they are not worth your time.

Do this !

WHAT IS A QUALIFIED

CUSTOMER?

One who has need?

One who needs a product?

One who has authority to
purchase?

One who purchases in a rea-
sonable timeframe?

One who has means/funds to
purchase?

Asking these questions will
immediately let you know what
to do. Either they qualify or
they don’t. There is no middle
of the road. Either they are
worth your time or they or not.

Too many times, sales and
marketing persons continually
call and knock on doors when
nobody is home or at the office.

Stop wasting your time.

Office Environment TIME

WASTERS

Most of us work in an envi-
ronment with other people. We
all know that someone who
loves to come by your work
area, sit down and talk about
the weekend and any other lat-
est celebrity/gossip news. Time
wasters. Yep, that’s what I call
them, TIME WASTERS. Here
is how you deal with them.

DO THIS!
Close your door if you have
one. If the boss does not mind,

are) mi tal= My Col a (=1-)
behind the news,

syle Mara le ints
on Mondays



Ty

Promotional
Marketing



by Scott Farrington

put a ‘Do not disturb’ sign on
your door and phone.

Most time wasters cannot
read or see. So, even if you
have your door closed, they still
knock and come right in. To
avoid them sitting down, put
stuff in all the chairs in your
office or take chairs out of your
office. When you need the
chairs, bring them back in.

However, we also have what
I call SUPER TIME
WASTERS. These are the
ones who will open a closed
door without knocking, remove
items from a chair that you
have strategically placed to dis-
courage them from sitting
down, and plunk themselves
down for a nice long chat. Here
is how you deal with aSUPER
TIMEWASTER.

Take off your belt and tell
them if they ever come back
again yowll ............

OK, seriously. If a super time
waster ignores the closed door,
the ‘do not disturb’ sign,
removes items from the extra
chair in your office and tries to
sit down, simply get up out yof
our seat, walk up to him or her
and ........e cece (It’s not what
yow’re thinking) start walking
towards your door to exit your
office. Gently put your hand
on their back and motion them
back out into the hallway. Nod
your head like you arr listening
and then say: “OOOPS, I
FORGOT SOMETHING
REAL IMPORTANT. PLL
CALL YA LATER”. Go back
in your office, closing the door
behind you

This works like a charm. Try
it.

Let’s suppose you don’t have
an office with a door, but work
in an Open environment or a
cubicle.

DO THIS!

Hang a do not disturb sign
prominently where you can.

Put on a headset connected
to the phone.

ULTAA

| _ =
VOWNY,

))

If a time waster approaches,
pretend you’re on the phone
and they will walk away. If a
SUPER TIMEWASTER
shows up, stand on your chair,
jump over the cubicle and run.

OK, seriously. So you are
pretending to be on the phone
with your headset (and you
very may well be talking to
someone). The SUPER TIME-
WASTER shows up and stands
there waiting for you to finish
(remember, they have all the
time in the world) your con-
versation, and may even tap
you on the shoulder.

CALMLY (Yes, I said calm-
ly) turn around, ask the person
on the phone to politely hold
and ask the SUPER TIME-
WASTER ............04. (again,
it’s not really what I know you
want to say). Ask: “IS IT AN
EMERGENCY”? = Some
9.999999 times out of 10, it is
not. The SUPER TIME
WATER will say: “No, it’s not
an emergency.” Then you can
politely turn around and con-
tinue your conversation with
the person you left on hold.

Doing this will set the prece-
dent for all possible future
attacks from any form of a time
waster.

I don’t know about you guys,
but in today’s world my time
is super valuable and I rightly
protect it. So should you .

All of these marketing strate-
gies are certain to keep your
business on top during these
challenging economic times.
Have a productive and prof-
itable week! Remember:
“THOSE WHO MARKET
WILL MAKE IT *

NB: Scott Farrington is pres-
ident of SunTee EmbroidMe, a
promotional and marketing
company specialising in pro-
motional products. Established
over 27 years ago, SunTee
EmbroidMe has assisted
Bahamian businesses in vari-
ous industries - ranging from
tourism and banking to
telecommunications - in mar-
keting themselves. Readers can
contact Mr Farrington at Sun-
Tee EmbroidMe on East
Shirley Street, by e-mail at
scott@sun-tee.com or by tele-
phone at 242-393-3104.





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009, PAGE 3B







MADOFF, from page 1B

It added that Mr Picard had
investigated the conduct of the
two funds, and Optimal Invest-
ment Services, in dealing with
Mr Madoff, and found that this
“does not provide grounds to
assert any claim against the
Optimal companies or any oth-
er part of the Santander group
other than the clawback
claims”. The clawback liability,
the statement said, did not
imply wrongdoing.

The agreement, which is sub-
ject to US Bankruptcy Court
approval at a New York hearing
on June 16, releases all other
“clawback” and other claims
that Mr Picard may have against

the Bahamian investment funds
as a result of their investments
with Mr Madoff’s company.

“The trustee’s release would
apply to all potential claims
against other Optimal compa-
nies, Santander companies and
their investors, directors, offi-
cers and employees who agree
to release the trustee and the
Bernard L. Madoff Investment
Securities Estate, to the extent
the claims arose out of the
funds’ dealings with Bernard L.
Madoff Investment Securities,”
the Lennox Paton statement
read.

“Tt also releases both funds
from potential clawback liabili-

NOTICE

MUNIA (BAHAMAS) SHIPPING LTD.

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of
the International Business Companies Act 2000,

notice

is hereby given that the above-named

Company has been dissolved and struck off the Register

pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The
Registrar General on the 20th day of May, A.D., 2009.

Dated the 22nd day of May, A.D., 2009.

Mr. Swen-Uwe Horvath and Dr. Jochen Koeber
Joint-Liquidators of
MUNIA (BAHAMAS) SHIPPING LTD.



CREDIT SUISSE TRUST LIMITED

Consolidated Balance Sheet

December 31, 2008, with corresponding figures for 2007
(Expressed in United States dollars)

Assets
Cash and due from banks:

Cash and demand deposits:

Affiliate
Other

Time deposits - affiliate
Time deposit - other
Accounts receivable, net

Prepaid expenses and other assets

Fixed assets, net

Note

Property tax cap’s
removal loses sales

THE removal of the $35,000
real property tax cap has cost
Bahamian realtors sales, a lead-
ing real estate agent has said.

With the change to 1.5 per
cent taxation on property, bro-
Ker Mario Carey has seen poten-
tial clients walk away. “Espe-
cially in these times when every-
one is watching how they
spend,” he said, hoping that
today’s Budget will reflect
changes requested by the
Bahamas Real Estate Associa-
tion.

“The economic benefits to the
community of the sale of a single

ty for any other withdrawals
made by them.”

Banco Santander ignited a
fire storm of investor protest
when it revealed on 14 Decem-
ber, 2008, that it had a EUR
2.33 billion ($3.1 billion) expo-
sure to Mr Madoff’s fraudulent
Ponzi scheme via the Bahamas-
domiciled Optimal Strategic US
Equity fund.

Some EUR 2.01 billion of this
sum belonged to Santander’s
institutional investors and glob-
al private banking customers,
with the remaining EUR 320
million coming from structured
products that formed part of the
investment portfolio for the
bank’s Spanish private banking
customers.

That fury resulted in two
class-action lawsuits being filed
in the Miami courts against
Banco Santander. Also named
as defendants were Optimal
Investment Services, as fund
manager; HSBC Securities Ser-
vices (Ireland) and HSBC Insti-
tutional Trust Services (Ire-
land), as administrator and cus-
todian; and the three directors
of Optimal Multiadvisors, the
master fund for both the Opti-
mal Strategic US Equity fund
and Optimal Arbitrage Fund.

Among the directors named
as defendants in the class action
lawsuit filed on January 26,
2009, by a Chilean company,
Inversiones Mar Octava Limi-
tada, which allegedly invested
$300,000 in the Optimal Strate-
gic US Equity fund, was Antho-
ny InderRieden, managing
director of Euro-Dutch Trust
Company (Bahamas).

That company, a licensed
trust company since 1975, is

188,811
70,675

339,205
1,083,957
259,486 1,423,162
7,125,000 4,100,000
- 1,000,000
144,329 297,771
282,478 386,135
97,592 142,489

$ 7,908,885 7,349,557

SSG Apa rr Utrera SIA

Liabilities

Fees billed in advance

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

Due to affiliates
Other liabilities

Shareholder's Equity

Share capital:

Authorized, issued and fully paid:
1,000,000 shares of $1.00 each

Additional paid-in capital
Retained earnings

Commitment

See accompanying notes to consolidated balance sheet.

The consolidated balance sheet was approved on behalf of

the following:

/:

NMC SALES, SERVICE and PARTS
All for One NEW NUMBER

Distributors for Honda, Chevrolet, Cadillac and ACDelco Parts | Shirley Street, Nassau

Director

467,044
570,162
478,075
10,000
1,525,281

775,141
490,101
476,088
5,000
1,746,930

1,000,000
1,000,000
4,383,604
6,383,604

1,000,000
1,000,000
3,602,627
5,602,627

$ 7,908,885 7,349,557

ogrd of Dj eqtors on April 27, 2009 by ~

Director

302

large home, over a period of
time, outweigh the benefits of
real property tax. Stamp tax
alone on a $10 million home is
$1 million, straight to govern-
ment. But if that buyer goes else-
where because he thinks the
$150,000 a year for real proper-
ty tax is unacceptable, govern-
ment loses the stamp tax and
The Bahamas loses the income
that the occupancy of that home
would have generated.”
“Prices have definitely
dropped anywhere from 15% -
20%,” Mr Carey added, “but we
spend a lot of time talking about

based at Charlotte House on
Charlotte Street. The Inver-
siones lawsuit alleged that Mr
InderRieden had served as
director of Optimal Multiadvi-
sors’ first administrator, the for-
mer Fortis Fund Services
(Bahamas).

There is nothing to suggest
that Mr InderRieden or Euro-
Dutch Trust Company
(Bahamas) have done anything
wrong in relation to the Opti-
mal fund’s affair.

The Inversiones lawsuit
alleged that the defendants had
breached their legal duties to
investors by failing to carry out
proper due diligence on Mr
Madoff and his company, as
“there was a plethora of red
flags that would have alerted
any reasonable investor that
Madoff was running a Ponzi
scheme”.

The lawsuit further alleged
that Optimal Investment Ser-
vices received a management
fee equivalent to 1.9 per cent
of assets under management,
almost EUR 44 million annu-
ally.





the new needs in a changing
market. Interest rates are low,
as low as 3 per cent in some
places in the US, so many people
want to use the equity in their
homes to invest in their own
businesses or keep them afloat,
or they want to buy real estate
while prices are right.”

Others are taking equity out
for personal reasons or need
appraisals for tax or estate plan-
ning reasons. This means real
estate offices such as Mario
Carey Realty, with certified
appraisers, are doing a record
business in appraisals.

“We exceeded expectations
by a long shot,” said Mr Carey,
who specialises in properties in
Ocean Club Estates, Paradise
Island, Lyford Cay, Old Fort
Bay, Albany and in the Family
Islands, of Mario Carey Real-
ty’s first year.

He credits a “young, energetic
and dynamic staff” that has dou-
bled in size from two to four,
and added a webmaster.

“Tt’s their hard work and team
work that have helped to get us
here,” said Mr Carey this week
as he prepared for the compa-
ny’s first celebration dinner.

LONG ISLAND
REGATTA
EXCURSION

Onboard: M/V Legend

Sails: June 3rd, 2009
Returns: June 7th, 2009

Tickets $99/Cars $399.00
Telephone:

3356-6672/3

Music, Food, Drinks, Fun!!!



PUBLIC AUCTION

SATURDAY, MAY 30, 2009









By Order of

The Bahamas Development Bank
Cable Beach, Nassau, The Bahamas
Commonwealth of The Bahamas








I. G. STUBBS WILL SELL

WHAT:

Equility
Loa 49’
Beam 16
Depth 4

Year/Mk/Eng

Vessels

1981 Defender Vessel,

Caterpillar 3208 engine

Location

Loa 51
Beam
Depth 5’
Year/Mk/Eng

17°.5”

Bayshore Marina East Bay Street

1996 Fiberglass Vessel,

Caterpillar 3412 engine

Location

Bayshore Marina East Bay Street

Three (3) assorted used vessels as set out in the schedule below:

LOCATION: Bayshore Marina East Bay Street - Nassau The Bahamas

TIME: 11:00am — Saturday, May 30th, 2009 — Preview and Inspection from 9:00am
Until Auction time at the site.

TERMS: All items to be Sold Where Is As Is for Cash, Cashier’ Cheque or current
Bank Guarantee Letter. Purchase will not be released until paid for in full not later
than 4:00pm Tuesday, June 2", 2009. Where a deposit is required, the same is non
refundable. If final payment is not made by 4:00pm Tuesday, June 2", 2009 any and
all deposits made will be forfeited.

Any and all Notices or amendments by Auctioneer on said Auction Day whether
written or verbal shall supersede this or any subsequent advertisement.

For further information contact I.G. Stubbs at 322-2028 or Fax: 328-8086 or
Email: igstubbs@coralwave.com

or

Bahamas Development Bank
At (242) 327-5780/ 702-5730/702-5714

Or Fax (242) 702-5047

email: bahamasdevelopmentbank.com

I.G. Stubbs

PUBLIC AUCTIONEER — LICENSE #0360



-0130 Keonvc



PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



aa eer a ree
Bar ‘outrage’ over FINCO plan for title insurance

FROM page 1B

insurance” to all its mortgage
clients.

The only details left were to
determine how this would be
done, Ms McCartney explain-
ing to Tribune Business that
FINCO had listened to the Bar
Council’s concerns and would
attempt to take them into
account. Yet FINCO had not
moved from its commitment to
roll-out title insurance as a way
to enhance consumer protec-
tion and choice.

The Bar Council’s concerns
were sparked by an April 1,
2009, letter sent to its Bahamian
attorney members by Patrice
Ritchie, FINCO’s senior man-
ager for mortgages, in which she
confirmed the lending institu-
tion’s plans to require title
insurance for all mortgages it
issued.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

The real trigger for the Bar
Council’s opposition is likely to
have been the line in Mrs
Ritchie’s letter that attorneys
“will not have to prepare an
opinion on title on behalf of
RBC FINCO”, and all this
implies.

FINCO, in urging Bahamian
attorneys to consider “a flat
fee” with respect to the prepa-
ration of mortgage documents,
including their execution,
stamping and recording, is
essentially implying that the
introduction of title insurance
into this nation’s
mortgage/home buying market
will eliminate the need for
lawyers to do the current vol-
ume of work they handle, espe-
cially title searches.

Less work means that
Bahamian attorneys are unlike-
ly to be able to charge the cur-
rent fees - usually pegged at 2.5
per cent of the real estate trans-
action’s worth - for conveyanc-
ing work, thus reducing income
for a considerable number of
the profession.

This would happen at a time
when the Bahamian legal ser-
vices profession is already under
intense pressure from the glob-
al economic downturn, real
estate and transactional work
having dropped on average by
40 per cent, so any further cuts
in - or loss- of income will be

Mrs Ritchie’s letter, a copy
of which has been obtained by
Tribune Business, said: “In an
effort to improve the whole
mortgage experience for our
clients, by speeding up the legal
process and reducing their out-
of-pocket costs, RBC FINCO
will be requiring title insurance
on all mortgages granted after
April 30, 2009.

“We anticipate that in the
economic environment, title
insurance will result in a most
welcomed cost-saving for the
client. Hence, we are writing to
request your consideration of a
flat fee with respect to mort-
gage preparation, inclusive of
execution, stamping and record-
ing of the same, plus any dis-
bursements made to pay the
title insurance premium.”

Mrs Ritchie said FINCO
would advise its mortgage
clients of the fees charged for
this service, and added: “In the
circumstances, you will not have
to prepare an opinion of title
on behalf of RBC FINCO.”

Attorneys will also be
required to complete the mort-
gage documents within a maxi-
mum of five weeks, Mrs Ritchie
said.

The letter enclosed the insti-

tution’s revised Letter of
Instruction for Bahamian attor-
neys, requiring that they “liaise
with First Bahamas Title Insur-
ance Agency to obtain a
lender’s title insurance policy
on behalf of RBC FINCO with
respect to the marketability of
title”. The attorneys were told
to provide all relevant title doc-
uments, plus subdivision
approvals and real property tax
assessments.

Triggered

This is likely to have triggered
alarm among rival law firms,
because First Bahamas Title
Insurance Agency, which acts
as the Bahamian agent for
Lawyers Title Insurance Cor-
poration, is an affiliate of Higgs
& Johnson.

Higgs & Johnson are the
attorneys for Royal Bank of
Canada, and the firm’s manag-
ing partner, John Delaney, sits
on FINCO’s Board of Direc-
tors.

Title insurance, which is in
widespread use in many juris-
dictions, such as the US, pro-
vides homeowners and real
estate purchases with coverage
should the title to their proper-



particularly unappreciated.

Position of Accountant

A financial institution seeks an Accountant. Candi-
dates must have at least 3-5 years experience in ac-
counting in the financial industry with sound knowl-
edge of but not limited to:

¢ Formulating budgets
¢ Managing Accounts Receivables and Payables

¢ Preparation of monthly and annual financial re-
ports and statements

¢ Preparation of bank reconciliations and various
general ledger accounts to the sub ledgers

¢ Co-ordinate the annual audit with external auditors
and preparation of the necessary schedules

¢ Preparing reports for the regulators
¢ Must be a team player

¢ Must possess people skills and be prepared to
interact with members

* Qualifications: AA in Accounting

Please forward resume to
P. O. Box N-7544

COMMONWEALTH
BREWERY LTD.

WAREHOUSE
ADMINISTRATOR

The successful candidate would be required to:

- Ensure that the quantity and quality of the goods
received are checked.

- Check for damage to goods and carry out relevant
documentation.

- Assure holding of blocked products until further notice.

- Arrange sale of articles authorised for disposal.

- Prepare reports on disposed materials.

- Carry out physical inventory checks and verify with
Accounts Department.

- Issue and dispatch outgoing stocks based on FIFO
method.

- Ensure proper disposal of packaging materials in case
of quality issues.

- Entrance control for raw and packaging materials.

- Ensure that all export orders are packed and delivered
to designated shipping carrier.

- Compile stock inventory reports

- Supervise forklift operators

All interested persons are asked to
fax resumes to:

(242) 362-4793



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MAXEN PROPHETE of 1611
NE, 3RDAVE., APT. 5, DELRAY BEACH, FLORIDA, 33444,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 20"! day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ORINDA TAMARA KATHLEEN
WILTSHIRE of #2 BACHELOR’S HOUSE, HUDSON AVENUE,
FREEPORT, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 27 day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARTIN JERMAINE
McGREGOR OF #25 DIAMOND DRIVE, P.O. BOX F-44900,
GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 20th
day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO. Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
AIRLEASE EIGHT LIMITED is in dissolution. Mrs Alrena
Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at Winterbotham
Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names addresses and
particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before June 8th, 2009

NOTICE

G. LEUBA & CO. INC.

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) G.LEUBA&CO. INC. is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 26th
May, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse Trust Limited,
Nassau Bahamas.

Dated this 26th day of May, A. D. 2009



Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

ties at a later stage be shown
defective.

It is now starting to catch on
in the Bahamas, with major for-
eign mixed-use resort develop-
ers requiring title insurance
before they can sell to second
home buyers.

However, Bahamian attor-
neys are arguing that title
searches are essential, due to
the numerous defects with hun-
dreds of potential titles in this
nation. Missing deeds and con-
veyancing documents have con-
tributed to breaks in many
chains of title.

One attorney, who request-
ed anonymity, said of FINCO’s
plans to require no title search-
es: “There are hundreds of titles
with problems, and there will
be no one to check them.

“T don’t see how that’s going
to help the country. It’s going to
create a maelstrom.”

The Bar Council, in its April
24, 2009, reply to FINCO, a
copy of which has also been
obtained by Tribune Business,
said: “The response of our
members has been one of out-
rage, and there are grave con-
cerns as to the legality of the
proposed measures and the pro-
tection of the public’s interest.”

Quite what the Bar Council’s
concerns were cannot be
gleaned from the letter signed
by its honorary secretary,
Rachel Culmer.

However, Ms McCartney,
FINCO’s managing director,
told Tribune Business last night:
“They [the Bar Council] have
expressed some concerns to us
that we have decided to do this,
but we have not gotten back to
them with our final decision.
We are still mulling it over as to
how we take their concerns into
account.

“We are committed to intro-
ducing title insurance. We cer-

tainly believe our customers
should have the option as to
whether they rely on an opinion
of title, or whether they get title
insurance.

“It is about the customer.
That is the approach we will
take, as we will put it to our cus-
tomers that this is something
we feel is in their best interests.
For us, at the end of the day,
as a bank we have to be con-
cerned about our customers.”

While defective titles were
“not prevalent” in FINCO’s
$600 million-plus mortgage
portfolio, Ms McCartney said
that if subsequent to a purchase
the title was shown to be faulty,
then the purchaser’s recourse -
to sue their attorneys for negli-
gence and claim against their
professional indemnity insur-
ance - was still problematic.

“We see this as a way to pro-
tect the customer,” she
explained. “We are committed
to reducing the transaction clos-
ing costs, and are going to move
ahead.”

Mortgage customers were
often making their life’s most
important investment, Ms
McCartney said, adding:
“We’ve listened to their [the
Bar Council’s] concerns, but at
the end of the day, we feel the
customer, being fully informed
and educated, will go ahead
with title insurance.

“Our position at this time is
that clients should have the
option as to whether they rely
solely on an opinion of title, or
whether they should take out
title insurance.”

Ms McCartney said real
estate purchasers would be able
to close transactions more
quickly, and as soon as they
received a title insurance com-
mitment, another reason FIN-
CO would forge ahead with its
plans.



Notice

PHARMA MANAGEMENT CORP.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act. 2000,
PHARMA MANAGEMENT CORP. is in dissolution as
of May 22, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A Regent
Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
AIRLEASE FIVE LIMITED is in dissolution. Mrs Alrena
Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at Winterbotham
Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names addresses and
particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before June 8th, 2009

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
AIRLEASE SIX LIMITED is in dissolution. Mrs Alrena Moxey is
the Liquidator and can be contacted at Winterbotham Place,
Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons having
claims against the above-named company are required to send their
names addresses and particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before
June 8th, 2009

a

ALBETA MOREY
Le Te.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009, PAGE 5B



Lay-offs hit leading law firms

FROM page 1B

law firm. Other major firms
were also said to have laid-off
similar numbers of staff,
although Tribune Business was
unable to confirm this before
press time.

Mr Delaney, though declin-
ing to identify where the job
losses had occurred, said they
“would be less than the lower
number you mentioned. That
range would be just a bit above
what we’ve” concluded.

The Higgs & Johnson man-
aging partner said there was “no
question” that Bahamian legal
firms across the board had
experienced a decline in busi-
ness, having told Tribune Busi-
ness last month that his firm
had seen real estate-related
work decline by 40 per cent
compared to normal levels.

“T would say that was a good
estimate at the time, and it’s not
improved since,” Mr Delaney
told Tribune Business. “That’s
just the reality. What you’d find
at every firm in the country, if
they’re being completely forth-

right with you, is that they
would say the same thing.

“[’m aware that we’re not
alone. We were not the first,
and I doubt we’ll be the last.”

Mr Delaney added: “We will
essentially tough it out with our
core group, both the support
staff and our attorney comple-
ment, while restructuring with
the group to make sure we’re
working as efficiently and effec-
tively as possible.

“We have clear ideas on how
we can do just that, and we’re
still the largest employer in rela-
tion to legal skills.”

Mr Delaney said the internal
assessment completed last week
was one in a Series of exercises
Higgs & Johnson carried out to
determine whether it was oper-
ating efficiently, and whether
additional resources needed to
be targeted at certain areas.

The latest review had shown
the need to introduce informa-
tion technology (IT) in certain
areas and revamp other work-
ing systems, Mr Delaney said.

He added: “On the human
resources side, we have deter-
mined and known for some
time - a couple of quarters dat-

ing back to late last year - that
there had been substantial
declines in certain market areas.

“Basically, what we have
done and completed last week
was our assessment as to
whether we were carrying per-
sons in excess of our needs and
to what extent we needed to
reduce our workforce.”

Company

However, Mr Delaney
explained that while the com-
pany was responding to market
conditions, it was also operating
to a long-term plan. This meant
it still employed persons “not
fully utilised” currently but con-
sidered as “core to the firm”.

“By no means was it a one-
sided exercise or one aspect of
human resources,” Mr Delaney
said of the review, pointing out
that it encompassed short and
medium-term objectives, and
internal development plans.

“To the extent there was a
limited reduction in staff [Higgs
& Johnson employs more than
100] it was not easily contem-
plated at all,” he added. “This is
among the most difficult deci-

sions any employer has to take,
and that was the case for us, but
ultimately we had to make the
hard decision.”

Meanwhile, Mr Callender
added: “I think that we have
seen a significant slowdown in
what we call transactional mat-
ters, mainly conveyancings and
the like.

“Everyone is now having to
look at their bottom line very
carefully, and we are having to
become a lot more competitive.

‘I don’t think there’s room
for expansion at the moment;
certainly not. It’s most unfor-
tunate, because having to lay
people off in this economic mar-
ket is very difficult. It’s a hard
decision, because there’s not
many alternatives [jobs] out
there.”

Mr Callender said firms with
a diversified practice, such as
Higgs & Johnson; McKinney,
Bancroft & Hughes; Graham,
Thompson & Co; and his own
were in better shape, with liti-
gation likely to become “a
mainstay”. Companies that had
exclusively relied on con-
veyancings were likely to strug-

gle.

Real E Estate

at eR CaM amet eI

Everywhere Wg ey lel



untateleata ae

ACURA ale



GN-865

GOVERNMENT
NOTICE

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER
NOTICE

THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT
(CHAPTER 326)

lt is hereby notified pursuant to Section 7 of the Industries Encouragement
Act that the Minister is about to consider whether the following products
should be declared “APPROVED PRODUCTS” for the purpose of that
Act.

RAW MATERIALS TO BE USED
IN MANUFACTURE

PRODUCTS

Coconut, Jatropha Oil, Miscanthus,

oe Cane, Potassium Hydroxide,
Potassium Methoxide, Sodium
Hydroxide, Sodium Methoxide,

Biodiesel, Biomass, Ethanol Phosphoric Acid/HCL

Any interested person having any objection to such a declaration should give
notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds thereof to the Office of the
Prime Minister, before the 8th day of June, 2009, by letter addressed to:-

THE PERMANENT SECRETARY
OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER
P.O. Box CB-10980
NASSAU, N.P.,

THE BAHAMAS

DAVID R. DAVIS
Permanent deilatecel ll

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER |
NOTICE

THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT
(CHAPTER 326)

It is hereby notified pursuant to Section 5 of the Industries Encouragement
Act, Chapter 301, that the Minister is about to consider whether the

manufacturer specified in the first column of the table below should be
declared an “APPROVED MANUFACTURER?” in relation to the products
specified in the third column.

MANUFACTURER LOCATION OF PRODUCTS
FACTORY PREMISES

Biodiesel, Biomass,
Ethanol

Natural Oils Abaco, The Bahamas

International

Any interested person having any objection to such a declaration should give
notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds thereof to the Office of the
Prime Minister, before the 8th day of June, 2009, by letter addressed to:-

THE PERMANENT SECRETARY
OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER
P.O. Box CB-10980
NASSAU, N.P.,

THE BAHAMAS

DAVID R. DAVIS
Permanent Secretary



GOVERNMENT
NOTICE

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER
NOTICE

THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT
(CHAPTER 326)

li is hereby notified pursuant to Section 7 of the Industries Encouragement
Act that the Minister is about to consider whether the following products
should be declared “APPROVED PRODUCTS" for the purpose of that
Act.

RAW MATERIALS TO BE USED
IN MANUFACTURE

PRODUCTS

Unfinished cabinet doors, lumber,
plywood, formica, corian, nails,
Cabinets ecrews, wood, hardware, contact
cement

Any interested person having any objection to such a declaration should give
notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds thereof to the Office of the
Prime Minister, before the 8th day of June, 2009, by letter addressed to:-

THE PERMANENT SECRETARY
OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER
P.O. Box CB-10980
NASSAU, N.P.,

THE BAHAMAS

DAVID R. DAVIS
Permanent ee

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER |
NOTICE

THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT
(CHAPTER 326)

It is hereby notified pursuant to Section 5 of the Industries Encouragement
Act, Chapter 301, that the Minister is about to consider whether the

manufacturer specified in the first column of the table below should be
declared an “APPROVED MANUFACTURER?” in relation to the products
specified in the third column.

MANUFACTURER LOCATION OF PRODUCTS
FACTORY PREMISES

The Abaco Cabinet Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Cabinets
Company The Bahamas

Any interested person having any objection to such a declaration should give
notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds thereof to the Office of the
Prime Minister, before the 8th day of June, 2009, by letter addressed to:-

THE PERMANENT SECRETARY
OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER
P.O. Box CB-10980
NASSAU, N.P.,

THE BAHAMAS

DAVID R. DAVIS
Permanent Secretary



PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



NOTICE

MUNIA (BAHAMAS) MANAGEMENT LTD.

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice is
hereby given that the above-named Company has been
dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant to a

Certificate of Dissolution issued by The Registrar
General on the 20th day of May, A.D., 2009.

Dated the 22nd day of May, A.D., 2009.
Mr. Swen-Uwe Horvath and Dr. Jochen Koeber

Joint-Liquidators of
MUNIA (BAHAMAS) MANAGEMENT LTD.



Young Bahamians take control of financial futures

A dozen young Bahamians
are ready to become “the chief
executives of their own lives”,
having become the most recent
graduates of an eight-week
financial workshop put on by
Creative Wealth Bahamas.

The seminar, held at St Barn-
abas Parish Hall, was a joint
effort by programme director
and founder of Creative Wealth
Bahamas, Keshelle Kerr, and
the Alpha Kappa Alpha Soror-
ity.

“Part of our mandate in
Alpha Kappa Alpha is to uplift
and empower African Ameri-
cans and Black people,”
explained Nicola Evans, of the
internationally-recognised
sorority’s Bahamas chapter.

“We chose to work closely
with this group as a part of our
mandate to help advance the

SSE

DHL JOB DESCRIPTION

POSITION:
JOB FAMILY:
RCS CODE:
REPORTS TO:
LOCATION:

Collections Agent

Credit & Collections
A20004

Collections Lead

Country Finance Department

OVERALL PURPOSE:

Under limited supervision in a team environment provide efficient and effec-
tive credit approvals. To ensure timely credit application processing, respond to
information requests and issues. Ensure accuracy of all credit decisions functions
while staying within company policy and procedural guidelines.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

Gathers, compiles and maintains basic credit information to be used in

making credit decisions.

Reviews and monitors credit sources, customer applications and
delinquent accounts. Processes credit applications.
Works with smaller customers to resolve collections issues and disputes.

Investigates disputes and reviews documentation.

Prepares and processes credit and collections account adjustments.

Implements credit suspensions.

Recommends further actions on delinquent accounts.

Maintains records of credit risks and delinquent accounts.

Provides support and coordination with third party agencies as needed.
Handles customer calls related to Collection Agency accounts.

Prepares and files bankruptcy claim documents.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

High School diploma required. .
1-3 years of experience in Collections.

Advanced administrative skills to function effectively with limited
direction amid competing priorities and deadlines.

Excellent customer service orientation and communication skills.
Proficiency using various computer software applications.

Excellent analytical and interpersonal skills.

Proficiency using various computer software applications

For more information please contact:
Romell K. Knowles I

Country Manager
Email:Romell.Knowles@dhl.com



ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

cr A LL

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:

TUESDAY, 26 MAY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,601.00 | CHG -12.25 | %CHG -0.76 | YTD -111.36 | YTD % -6.50
FINDEX: CLOSE 797.44 | YTD -4.48% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW _.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

S2wk-Low
1.28
11.00
6.94

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
2.83 Colina Holdings
6.00 Commonwealth Bank (S1)
1.31 Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank

1.40
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
1.95
11.09

0.63
3.15
2.37
11.65
2.83
6.25
3.04
1.32
7.76
11.00
10.40

1.32
6.02
10.97
10.35

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol. EPS
1.40
11.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.74
2.83
6.00
3.00
1.32
7.76
10.97
10.40

black male. We felt that if they
build a firm financial founda-
tion now, when they become
adults they will be able to make
sound decisions for them-
selves.”

“During the eight weeks, the
boys covered many money top-
ics such as spending, budgeting,
investing, borrowing, debt
(good and bad) and, of course,
entrepreneurship, all in a fun
and engaging manner,” said Ms
Kerr. “Each now knows what
it is to become a financial suc-
cess”.

Parents of the graduates
agreed that some elements of
the course have already affected
their households in a positive
way. Andrew Stanford said his
son’s focus on money has
become more intense, while
Ricardo Munroe was pleased
his son is able to learn such
lessons so early.

“The things my son learns
today will keep him going on
tomorrow,” said Mr Munroe.

“One thing I realise as an
adult looking back, is that we
waste so much time making
financial mistakes simply
because we do not know what
to do. I wish I had known some
of the things Ms Kerr taught
them because I would have had
an advantage. But Iam glad my
son has learnt to make it applic-
able to his life and business
because now he has the tools
to become a millionaire — of

FROM page 1B

scaping field has impeded the
industry. Now, with the imple-
mentation of an internationally
recognised training programme,
Bahamian landscape firms can
become more competitive
nationally and internationally.

According to the BLA’s web-
site, bla-fngla.org, membership
already includes Caribbean
Landscape, Atlantis, Genesis
Landscaping and Maintenance
and Adka Laboratories.

The site also lists the bene-
fits of joining the BLA which
includes education of manage-
ment, internationally recognsed
certifications, and the estab-
lishment of grades and stan-
dards for the industry.

The association also promises
to lobby government for pro-
posals beneficial to the indus-
try, filter landscaping education
and awareness into the schools,
and provide supplier discounts
to its members.

“We are particularly excited
about getting pilot programmes
of this level of professional cer-
tifications into the senior class-
es in the high schools,” said Mr
Rolle.

“We understand the vast
need for young people out there
looking for a head start in
advancing their education and
in the business world. This is a
great programme for just that.”

Thus far, managers at
Atlantis have been the first to
become certified, and 50 per-
sons have already entered into
the programme.

Mr Rolle said he was hopeful
that the BLA, like the FNGLA,
will be able to assist in drafting
legislation sensitive to the indus-
try, and lobby the government
to curb issues dealing with water
restrictions and misuse and
overuse of fertilizers.

The BLA sees this pro-
gramme as pivotal in creating
standards in the industry and
providing “critical training to
employees in the industry”.

EG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES
co Za

clTeayv dca me Tt & TT.

s. Div $ P/E

0.127 11.0
0.992 11.1
0.244 28.4

-0.877 N/M

0.078 40.4
0.055 43.1
1.406 8.3
0.249 11.4
0.419 14.3
0.111 27.0
0.240 5.5
0.420 18.5
0.322 34.1
0.794 13.1



THIS young millionaire in the making displays his dream board during the
recent eight-week Financial Workshop hosted by Creative Wealth.

course, once that happens I can
retire.”

The students plant the seeds
of financial success by holding
down imaginary jobs and having
the option to spend funds on a
variety of things such as rent,
vehicles, bills or on pleasure
items. They also had to create a
poster to show what they want-
ed in their lives.

“Tm really happy to have tak-
en part in this course,” said
Travis, one of the graduates.

Photo: Arthia Nixon

“Overall I’ve learned that I’ve
got to pay myself first. Most
importantly, I realise that I have
to tell my money where I want
it to go instead of asking myself
one day where it all went. | am
the chief executive of my own
life.”

Ms Kerr, the only certified
creative wealth coach and youth
financial educator in the
Bahamas, is also the organiser
of Camp Millionaire and The
Money Game.

COMMONWEALTH
BREWERY LTD.

TPM COORDINATOR

The successful candidate would be required to:

- Facilitating the horizontal expansion of TPM in the

brewery.

- Provide Management/Pillars/Teams with advice and

support on TPM concept

- Ensuring TPM activities continuously match Brewery’s
Mission and KPI’s (HMS) through loss deployments

- Formulating, together with management, the TPM 3
year Master Plan and ensuring regular evaluation and

update

- Supporting Management with implementation of the
internal/external Audit System to ensure and manage

the change

- Stimulating the use of standard forms, reports,
templates, tools, improvement routes (from toolbox) etc
with the required document control, IT applications

- Managerial experience

- Computer knowledge required

All interested persons are asked to
fax resumes to:

(242) 362-4793



NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF MARIE MENITA POPLE
late of the Settlement of Bullocks Harbour on
the Island of Berry Island one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against the above

Estate are required to send the same duly
certified in writing to the Undersigned on or
before the 25 day of June, 2009, after which
date the Executor will proceed to distribute the
assets having regard only to the claims of which
she shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that
all persons indebted to the said Estate are
requested to make full settlement on or before
the date hereinbefore mentioned.

5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Securii Symbol Last Sale
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 x 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3758 1.65
2.8962 -1.49
1.4630 2.05
3.1964 -5.59
12.7397
100.5606
96.4070 -3.59
1.0000 0.00
9.1599 0.71
1.0526 1.63
1.0322 -0.08
1.0523 1.45
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

5.09
1.00
0.30
5.50

5.09
1.00
0.30
5.50

0.332 15.3
0.000 N/M
0.035 8.6
0.407 13.5
0.952 11.0
0.180 55.6

0.00

0.00 14,545

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015
52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $

-0.041

Div $ P/E
0.300

0.000

0.001

0.480
0.000

ABDAB
RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund

Div $ Yield %
1.3124
2.9230
1.3875
3.1964
12.1564 Fidelity Prime Income Fund

100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

30-Apr-09
31-Mar-09
15-May-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
30-Apr-09
30-Apr-09
30-Apr-09

FERREIRA & CO.
Attorneys for the Executor
Chambers

P. O. Box EE-15790
Kemp Building

No. 39 East Street North
Nassau, The Bahamas.

0.96
0.56

Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund 6.23
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S11) - 3for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525





PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



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hocolatefollies ~



—

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

CHOCOLATE in the eyes and taste
buds of a woman is somewhat of a
guilty and sinful pleasure, sneaking
its way into her calorie intake. With
children, it is just as delightful
despite coming in a boring square
or rectangular bar. Stay at home
mom Emma Heinel has taken her
love for making treats and turned it
into something culturally and taste-
fully satisfying.

“T have been making chocolate novelty lol-
lies since the beginning of this year. It started
out as a hobby really. I love to make things as
I have always been quite artistic. I normally
look at things in the stores and say ‘well I can
make that’ so I do,” Mrs Heinel said.

Mrs Heinel said she did not start out exact-
ly with chocolate as she is always thinking of
different favours for her children’s parties.

“T started making hard candies in different
colours and flavours, but I was afraid to do
chocolate especially in this climate. It is nice
to have something that you know no one else
is going to do. I preferred the chocolate to
the hard candies because it doesn’t take that
long to do and the finished product looks bet-
ter because you can see the detail more in the
chocolates,” Mrs Heinel said.

Since chocolate does not come in many
colours, Mrs Heinel said she uses white
chocolate to colour her creations.

“T colour the white chocolate, paint it into
the molds, and then I fill the molds with the
milk chocolate. You have to let each colour
set before you add another because the heat
will re-melt it or mix the colors together.
“The more colours you have in a piece the
longer it takes,” Mrs Heine] said.

Out of the many molds and shapes that can
be found, Mrs Heinel said she wanted to stick
with ones that were synonymous with the
Bahamas. Most of the chocolate lollies retail
from $2 to $5.

“The beach life, wildlife and that sort of
thing I thought would be fun. It is amazing
what you can find. You can order different
size molds but you can’t change the size of
the molds,” Mrs Heinel said.

Just as some pastry chefs like to bake but

feels the same way.

“T used to be a huge chocoholic, but now I
can take or leave it. I prefer to look at it
because I think it is beautiful and I love to
see the finished product. I do not have any
desire to eat it, maybe because I don’t want
to ruin it,” Mrs Heinel said.

Mrs Heinel said ultimately in the future she
can see herself making more and more treats
for both chocolate and candy lovers to enjoy.

“T would love to have my own shop and
combine it with a coffee shop and a choco-
latier. It can be somewhere nice for people to
come and get nice truffles and such. Maybe
one day we will have a bigger business
going.”

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009, PAGE 9B





The Tribune

m@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net |

AS the Summer heat contin-
ues to heat up entertainment
spots throughout town, The

Tribune’s Entertainment week-

end line-up is no exception.
Filled with glitz and glam, the
fun is sure to continue all
night long.

41. This Friday night, all roads
lead to Da Balcony lounge
nightclub where local enter-
tainer SO$A Man is expected
to have a ground shaking pre-
mier to his newest track titled
We Winning. The video which
also features Sammi Star,
MDEEZ, and Lion (out of

Canada), is a production iKnoz |
Media describes as a new con- |

cept in Bahamian music and
entertainment. There will also
be a Special performance by
‘Sketch’ Carey of his hit single
My Candidate. Tickets for the

avent are $15 per person, and |

F] THE

$20 per couple, and can be
purchased at the Beat Factory
East Street South, or at the
door.

2. This Friday at 6.30pm, The
Hub art centre opens a new
series of paintings and draw-

ings by Anya Antonovych Met- :
i Mi By ALEX MISSICK
i Tribune Features Reporter

calf called There is a Crack in
Everything. The work is com-
prised of 16 acrylic and pastel
pieces which are based on

several distressed and derelict
: beauty encouraging people from all over the

: world to spend the rest of their lives here. How-

: ever, shouldn’t Bahamians be afforded the

: chance to bask in the beauty of their own coun-

: try and enjoy a quality lifestyle? Jason Kinsale, a
: young developer and President of the Balmoral

: Development feels the same way and has trans-

i formed an historical site into something all

: Bahamians can enjoy.

areas throughout Nassau.
Curator Jonathan Murray said
the collection can be consid-
ered representational painting
because of its similarities to
photography. However, the
collection still has elements
that give some association to
abstract expression, which is
attributed to its gestured and
chromatic inspired qualities.
The work is more contextu-

alised and resonates with local

contemporary artists such as
Kendal Hanna and Jason Ben-
nett. With its premier set for
this Friday, the exhibit is
scheduled to run until June
17, 2009.

3. On Saturday, The Cancer
Society of the Bahamas will
hold its eight annual Cancer
Ball intended to increase fund-
ing and awareness. This gala
event will be held at the Wynd-
ham Nassau Resort Ballroom,
Cable Beach, at 7pm promptly
with light cocktails, and dinner
served at 8pm. There will also
be a Silent auction and raffle
available. Tickets are $200,
and can be purchase at the
Cancer Society office on
Collins Avenue.

4. Express Yourself in con-
junction with The Ministry of
Tourism and the Bahamas
International Literary Festival
presents Face the Arts Street

Saturday from noon until. The
first of its kind cultural explo-
sion will be featuring every
conceivable art form. Artists,

scrape bands and the like will
be out in full force, along with
booths with food, Bahamian
books and cd's. Artists slated
to perform include ‘B,’ Apollo
Kr-eed, Jah Lam, CREAM, DJ
Counsellor, Manifest, B'Marie,
Broken Micz, CRAB, TADa,
Baigon, Club Super Death,
NCity, 21, Lucito Bazard, and
others.

5. Now in a new location, the
Express Yourself Movement’s
Open Mic night is being fea-

Charlotte Street this Thursday.
Scheduled to start at 99m
until midnight, this event con-
tinues to showcase some of
the newest spoken word
artists and entertainers in
town. Admission is free with
drinks on sale, so come pre-
pared to be blown away.



BA



LMORAL



egance ona

amissick@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas for decades has boasted of its

Driving up to the door steps

i of the Balmoral clubhouse is
i like stepping into a chapter of
i “Lifestyles of the Rich and
i Famous.” The entrance to the
i Balmoral is nothing short of
? spectacular as the architectur-
i al elements of the home will
take your breath away.

From the mind blowing spiral

: staircase, to the beautiful 18th
! century crown moldings, gen-
: uine oak doors and intricately
‘ carved wooden fireplaces
: throughout, the home is sure to
! entice anyone who wants to
: host an elegant event at the site.
: This club house is the main
: house that will be open to club
: members once the development
i is completed.

Mr Kinsale said he embarked

on the project about 18 months
: ago and it has definitely been
i an exciting journey.

“This home was actually built

i by Sir Oliver Simmonds back
? in 1953 and the Tomlinson fam-
i ily purchased it in 1963. This
i 17,000 square foot home was
i sitting somewhat nestled away
‘ ., ; on Sanford Drive and it really
Festival In Rawson Square this i had me intrigued. I didn’t
i realise it was actually 43 acres
i surrounding the property as
? well and I didn’t really think
i much of it until a couple of
magicians comedians rake and
i the property was on the mar-
i ket,” Mr Kinsale said.

weeks later when I found out

Mr Kinsale and his team at

i the Balmoral Club have kept
i the historical elements of the
i home while making upgrades
i to suit a 21st Century lifestyle.
i The color palette choice for the
? club includes all earth tones
i such as burnt oranges, dark
i chocolate browns and deep
i beige tones creating a warm,
i down home feeling for its
: guests.

For those who want to add a

: bit of entertainment to the Bal-
tured at the Hard Rock Caféon | Moral experience, the club
: boasts of a game room, enter-
: tainment room as well as a bil-
: liards room. Fitness addicts can
: work up a sweat at the club’s
: state of the art fitness room
: complete with free weights and
: treadmills. If persons would
: rather work out in nature, they
: can choose from the stylish
: swimming pool, the Mark
: Knowles Tennis centre and

soon to come Squash court. For
the social birds and mini meal
snackers, they can enjoy the
Café Balmoral and Bar- a great
place for socialising and a light
drink.

When it comes to renting the
property for events, interested
persons must book the club at
least six months in advance due
to the high level of clientele
recognising the beauty, sophis-
tication and privacy the club has
to offer.

“The club requires a $1,500
site rental fee and we offer a
number of amenities on the
property. The event business
has really been driving a lot of
traffic in. We can hold about
500 persons easily without them
bumping into each other. We
have an on staff chef because
food is the most important
aspect of any event. We can
prepare anything and we have
out own service staff-we are a
one stop shop,” Mr Kinsale
said.

As for the residential project,
the Balmoral offers 1200 square
foot condominiums priced at
$300,000, 1400 square foot
Royale town homes priced at
$359,000, 2000 square foot
grand town homes priced at
$559,000 and 70 single family
lots priced at $200-250,000.

Mr Kinsale said he wanted to
serve a market of young pro-
fessionals whom he feels is
being under served.

“We have one condo, three
of the Royale town homes and
four of the Grand town homes
remaining. The reality of a per-
son being able to buy a single
family lot and build a home is
coming to an end for many peo-
ple. The worst lot in Nassau is
around $65-70,000. If you want
to be in the west, $180-200,000
for a lot, by the time you put a
home on it that’s $500-600,000
easily and it’s getting to a point
where people can not afford it.
People are being forced into
condos and town homes and
this is happening all over the
world,” Mr Kinsale said.

Another element of the Bal-
moral Club is the tremendous
amount of green space avail-
able on the property. Numer-
ous flowers and plants are locat-
ed throughout the club as well

as the property. This is due to
Mr Kinsale’s environmental
awareness background.

“The ministry requires you
to allocate five per cent of pub-
lic open space and we have 30-
35 per cent of public open space
and we have saved a tremen-



hill

dous amount of trees by tag-
ging over 400 trees during the
early stages of development,”
Mr Kinsale said.

Mr Kinsale said the atmos-
phere he wants to achieve for
the Balmoral is one that is lush,
warm and family oriented.

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“We are really trying to make
it more comfortable and not
arrogant-no stuffiness. We want
people to be able to relax and
not worry about what fork they
are using per say, but still main-
tain quality and valuable ser-
vice,” Mr Kinsale said.








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PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ARTS







movie

REVIEW



Zade Rosenthal/AP Photo
IN this film publicity image released by Columbia Pictures/Sony
Entertainment, Tom Hanks and Ayelet Zurer, right, are shown in a
scene from, "Angels & Demons."

Angels and Demons

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

locate the Preferiti and the anti
matter to save the Catholic
Church from total annihilation

Angels and Demons is my
favourite and I think the bes
Dan Brown novel and this
movie does what its predeces
sor, the film version of the Da
Vinci Code, failed to do - tel
the story without boring its
audience with long explana
tions that take away from the
plot. The movie is fast paced

Staring Tom Hanks,
Ewan McGegor

and Ayelet Zurer.
Directed by Ron Howard



IN Angels and Demons, Tom
Hanks reprises his role as Har-
vard symbologist Robert Lang-
don in what is actually the pre-
quel to the Da Vinci Code, the
immensely popular and con-
troversial novel by Dan Brown.

This time round Robert is
summoned to Vatican City on
the eve of the conclave to elect
a new pope, when a centuries
old mysterious brotherhood the
Iumanti- the Catholic’s
church’s archenemy- resur-
faces, claiming that they have
hidden a highly explosive vial
of antimatter somewhere inside
the city and intend to kill one of
the Preferti- the preferred
papal successors- each hour
until the antimatter explodes
at midnight taking with it Vat-
ican City and most of Rome.

Robert, Italian scientist Vit-
toria Vetra (Zurer) and the
Vatican and Italian police, have
just a few hours to decode the
“Path of Illumination” a 400-
year- old trail of symbols to

concert

REVIEW



did not read the book.

go Patrick McKenna - the late
pope’s personal assistant. His
most brilliant moments come
toward the end where the
truth of the Illuminati is
revealed and the future of the
Catholic Church hangs in the
balance.

Angels and Demons is
worth the price of admission
fans of the novel will be
pleased with the interpretation
and those who have not read
the book will be caught up in
the suspense until its dramatic
ending.



Chris Pizzello/AP Photo

SINGER Cyndi Lauper poses backstage at the "American Idol" finale in
Los Angeles, Wednesday, May 20, 2009.

CYNDI LAUPER

ATLANTIS GRAND BALLROOM,
Saturday, May 23, 2009.

@ By TRIBUNE STAFF REPORTER

A COLLEAGUE made an innocent remark which made this

very sensitive 50-year-old feel so so old.
“T didn’t know you were into the concert scene...”
I may be getting on in years but I’m still very young at heart.

And we had both just witnessed how a 55-year-old - an icon of :

the 80s - still defies time with her heart and soul.
Yes, Cyndi Lauper rocked Atlantis to its very foundations.

The trademark china white face, her little girl vocals, the wild .
hair, her ability to rock you and then soothe you with her sensitivity }
... Lauper was, and still is, the only challenger to Madonna’s pop }

queen title.

brilliance.

Drove All Night.

Time After Time.

Overall a great night’s entertainment in the intimate surround-

ings of the Grand Ballroom at Atlantis.
to Joni Mitchell.

Mitchell’s brilliant Blue album.
I guess I must be getting old after all.



and suspenseful and can be }
fully understood even if you }

Tom Hanks, one of my }
favourite actors, does a credi- :
ble job, but is overshadowed
by the dynamic Ewan McGre- }
gor (Moulin Rouge/Rogue }
Trader) who plays Camerlen- :

















































PICTURED are
Devera Pinder
and Davian
Chase, the win-
ners of the
recent Bahami-
an Stars singing
competition
sponsored by
the rotary club
of the Bahamas.
Also pictured
are members of
the Rotary Club
of West Nassau.

Rotary Bahamian stars shine

! mi By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

AFTER weeks of singing and competing
with some of the most talented performers
in the country in the recent Bahamian Stars

: competition sponsored by the West Rotary
Backed by her five-piece band, Cyndi’s fans were treated toa }
dazzling background psychedelic light show, and on-stage musical ;

Club of the Bahamas, 14-year-old Davian
Chase and 19-year-old Devera Pinder

; emerged as the two top winners.
Her high-pitched but strong and flexible vocal displays shone out }
on pop greats such as She Bop, Girls Just Wanna Have Fun and I E

Walking away with first place was Davian
who explained that he has been singing for

: family and friends for as long as he can
And they mesmerised on anthems such as True Colours and }

remember.
Davien explained: “My mom used to go
out places to sing, and some times she used

? to bring me along with her, and seeing how
My highlight of the night? It’s got to be Carey, Cyndi’s tribute ;

the audience would applaud and make her

i feel so appreciated, was the thing that
OK, so [remember first hearing Carey way back in 1971 on Ms }

inspired me to be a singer.”
Now a senior at the CV Bethel Secondary

School, Davien said he could never have
dreamed being the winner of such a com-
petition, where he was up against so many
other talented individuals.

In October 2008, Davian participated in
“Bahamian Stars Competition” and won
the competition. He received many prizes
and was also successful in receiving a schol-
arship.

Also a member of the Church of God of
Prophecy National Children’s Choir, the
Boys Choir, the Bahamas Junior Band of
the Church of God of Prophecy, and a mem-
ber of the Bahamas National Children’s and
Boys Choir, this young man has proven that
age has nothing to do with becoming the
best at the thing you love.

First runner up to the competition, 19-
year-old Devera Shante Pinder, said despite
being under the weather on the night of the
competition, she gave it her all which result-
ed in her walking away with the prize.

Having a long love for singing, she

explained: “I gave it one hundred percent,
and even though I had adversities in my
way, I still had to use that and try to push
through, because nothing should be able to
hold you back from something you’re so
adamant about.”

Devera is a multitalented Bahamian
singer, songwriter and model, who was
exposed to the various genres of music at an
early age.

Devera is a very purpose driven young
lady who enjoys singing, dancing, traveling,
modeling, pageantry, writing poetry and
music, performing and spending time with
her family and friends. She has been in
numerous talent competitions and pageants
and has achieved numerous accomplish-
ments and awards for her singing talents.

And now that the days of the competition
are done, the two winners are set to work
together on an upcoming CD which will
help to further their careers and notoriety in
the music industry.



WEDNESDAY, MAY 27,

2009

“The Balmoral
- Hegance






| See page nine

Life on a rock

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

WITH the islands of the
Bahamas offering its own
special charm with hundreds
of miles of beautiful beach-
es and landscapes, it is no
wonder that so many locals
and visitors alike dream of

one day retiring here.

However for one woman who did
stumble upon the opportunity to live on
a private island, her five year stay there
turned out to be far more than she had
bargained.

In her debut novel Life On A Rock,
K Alison Albury provides readers with
a first hand account of the tumultuous
experience she had while managing a
small island resort on Highbourne Cay
in the Exumas.

From hurricanes to drug trafficking
to nearly being murdered, Mrs Albury
explained never in a million years could
she had imagined so many unusual
encounters in a place which at first
seemed truly like heaven on earth.

In this striking tale of her experience





on the island during the early 1990's,
Mrs Albury told Tribune Entertain-
ment that readers can expect to be
drawn into the story.

An excerpt from the first chapter
reads: “I had given them everything
and they were going to kill Peter! From
facedown on the tile floor I screamed at
them, “There’s no more money! There’s
no more money! We don’t have a safe!
Geezus, we’re telling you the truth! We
don’t keep a lot of money on the cay!’

“Now, one of the burglars noticed
my rings and gold chain necklace. ‘OK,
bitch, take off da jewels,” he demanded,
as the barrel of his gun tap-tap-tapped
on my earrings. With my face still facing
the floor, I reached up and took off my
earrings, a gold necklace and my heir-
loom engagement ring. I heard Peter
unbuckle his watch. Was it going to
stop there?”

She added that apart from the rough
experiences she and her husband had
while miles away from all their friends
and family on the island, they had many
beautiful moments that are both obvi-
ous and subliminal in the book.

These were their faith in God, the
commitment to each other, and the
comfort of living in an environment
that was conducive to quiet living.

“One of the things that I loved about

aa



25-Year old Kiara Sherman
walked away with the crown in
a pageant that was marred by
controversy. (SEE Tribune
News for details). Kiara will
represent the country at this
year’s Miss Universe pageant to
be held right here at Paradise
Island this August. Runner’s up
included ist runner up Ife
Bethel-Sears and 2nd runner
up Amanda Appleyard.

out there was the quiet. There were no
stoplights, nobody is honking at you,
and in the morning what I usually did
with Peter was to get up at 6.30am...I
would go for a walk, and that was my
time of the day that was my own, it was
a little 20 minute walk along the beach,”
she said.

While on the walk with her dogs, Mrs
Albury said the most calming thing
around was the ocean, which helped
her to find her center, and also to wash
away stress that came along with the
task of overseeing the island.

Mrs Albury added that although
there were many tales that unfolded
while on the island which she had to
relive while writing the book, it was all
worth it, because it was done for a
grandson.

She said: “This job taught me that I
wasn’t a quitter, it solidified our mar-
riage even more, and I learned that I
could do anything that I put my mind
to.”

Life on a Rock has earned its spot as
one of the most exciting local books in
recent times to hit the shelves.

Available for $13.50 at local book-
stores and online at amazon.com, alib-
ris.com, and booksurge.com, this book
promises to be engaging straight
through the last page.

The Tribune SECTION B e



i,
Emma's
chocolate

lollies
see page eight

i.



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NOW ten years after her experience on Highbourne Cay, first time author K Alison
Albury tells all in her new book titled Life On A Rock.

) Felipe Major/Tribune staff





Full Text


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Fears of spike
ersonal cri



Reports of nighttime
mugegings in capital

REPORTS of a series of night-
time muggings throughout the cap-
ital have led to fears that a spike in
personal crime has taken hold.

Although the police think the
attacks are "isolated", a senior offi-
cer yesterday warned the public to
be vigilant of their surroundings
at night to avoid falling victim to an
armed criminal.

The Tribune has received
reports of a number of muggings
over the weekend, including that of
a young woman who was dropping
a friend off in the Shirlea area
when a man jumped inside her car
and robbed her.

Also over the weekend, a young
man was robbed at knife point in
the Yamacraw area after driving a
friend home.

The assailants are said to have
smashed the windshield, climbed
into the car and thrown the occu-
pants out.

They stole money and cell
phones from the victims, then
drove off with the car.

Another woman was reportedly
attacked by a man as she headed
into her apartment in the Village
Road area. She was able to break
free and her screams are said to
have alerted neighbours, at which
point the attacker decided to make
a run for it.

The police failed to report any of
these crimes to the press, however
when asked about them yesterday,
Assistant Commissioner for Crime

Raymond Gibson told The Tri-
bune police were aware of the inci-
dents but do not see a pattern.

“Based on what we've seen
there isn't any pattern to those rob-
beries, we consider those to be iso-
lated robberies.

“There's been a consistent num-
ber of robberies over the past week

.. but the point is we haven't seen
any pattern in that regard," he said.

Still he warned members of the
public to be on their guard when
out late at night.

“They should check their sur-
roundings, check as they move, be
careful so that they don't become
victims of these villains,” he
said.

Members of the public who
heard rumours of the muggings
expressed concern that the police
failed to report them.

A professional woman whose
job forces her to travel at night
said news of the attacks frightened
her.

“Obviously there is an increase
in crime, and the police should be
reporting it,” she said.

The woman, asked to remain
anonymous, said: “T think it has to
be known if there is something
going on out there.”

A caller who identified himself
as Mr Dean, said: “This is scary.
People have to be made aware if
messed up things are going on so
they can be more careful. You
can’t keep them dumb.”

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The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009

es
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AND REAL ESTATE

BAHAMAS BIGGEST



aS



Supreme
Court judge
lifts injunction





Felipé Major/Triby



ABOVE: A tearful Kiara Sherman
is crowned Miss Bahamas
Universe 2009.

LEFT: Contestant Enna Thomas
said she was disturbed by

allegations she may have missed out
because of a dispute over money.











m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net







JUDGES of the Miss
Bahamas Universe 2009
pageant have been invited by
the event’s organiser to review
and confirm the votes they cast
in last weekend’s contest in the
hope of calming a “furore” that
has broken out over its out- J
come, The Tribune has learned.

Cyprianna McWeeney, one
among nine judges who partic-
ipated in Sunday evening’s final
show, said her phone has been l....
“ringing off the hook” since
then with calls from people who
feel the ending was unjustified
and even rigged.

According to sources con-
nected to the pageant, many
people have expressed “sur-
prise” that 25-year-old Kiara
Sherman, lead vocalist of the
Bahamian band “Visage”, took
the much-coveted crown.

In some cases vicious com-
mentary has erupted online,
with fans and detractors making
lengthy and colourful com-
mentaries about the Queen and

SEE page 12






























Immigration Dept working
to release Cuban detainees

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE Department of Immigration is “actively” working to
release the Cuban detainees currently housed at the holding
facility, said Immigration Director Jack Thompson.

It is unclear if the Cubans will be repatriated to their home
country, released to another country willing to accept them, or
allowed to remain in the Bahamas.

While declining to get into specifics of a possible release

SEE page 12





NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

SEE PAGE FIFTEEN





PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)





Hotel union
elections
will be held

tomorrow

m@ By NATARIO
MCKENZIE

THE elections for the
Bahamas Hotel Catering
and Allied Workers
Union (BHCAWU) will
be held on Thursday it
was ruled yesterday after
a Supreme Court judge
lifted the injunction that
had blocked the elections.

Attorneys for all the
parties involved in the
dispute over whether or
not the elections should
proceed were locked in a
closed hearing before Jus-
tice Jon Isaacs for most
of Tuesday afternoon.

Following the closed
hearing, attorney Obie
Ferguson who appeared
with attorney Keod Smith
for the BHCAWU First
Vice President Kirk Wil-
son told The Tribune;
“The court vacated the
injunction and is allowing
the election to go ahead.”

“There is a hearing
scheduled for June 26 to
hear the substantive mat-
ter, but the court was of
the view that because of
all the preparation that
the union would have
gone into having regard
to the cost factor and the
statutory obligation of the
Registrar once a request
is made for voting, that
the balance of conve-
nience was in favour of
having the elections on
May 28,” Mr Ferguson
said.

SEE page 12



POLICE CRACKING
DOWN ON CRIME IN
DOWDESWELL STREET

DISCOVERY SUN 10
RESUME SERVICE

COALITION OF CHURCHES
SPEAKS OUT AGAINST
GAMBLING LEGALISATION

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mA is
PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009



LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Sddseseusesisassousecteossusessecsesiigeccsesescaserserccsseeses

2008 Budget
Communication |
today at 10am |

THE 2009 national bud-
get communication will be
delivered by Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham
today beginning at 10am.

The communication,
which will outline the gov-
ernment’s plans for
2009/2010, can be seen on
ZNS TV 13 and the
Parliamentary Channel
40.

Mr Ingraham will pre-
sent government’s fiscal
agenda and is expected to
reveal cut-backs aimed at
mitigating the effects of
the global economic down-
turn.

The presentation will
last about two hours and
the debate is set to be held
in June.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
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Police cracking down on
crime in Dowdeswell Street

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

IN RESPONSE to com-
plaints by professionals work-
ing in and around Dowdeswell
Street, police are cracking
down on crime in the area.

At a crime watch meeting
last week, business owners,
bosses and employees told
Central Division officers that
armed robbery, prostitution
and vagrancy have become
everyday facts of life in this
once quaint area of eastern
downtown Nassau.

Cameras

Police urged businesses to
set up a Business Crime Watch
to share information about
crime and invest in security
measures and CCTV cameras
to benefit the whole business
community.

After hearing their concerns,
special duty officers from the

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

P1,2,3,5,6,12

eee enc cee nae eeereteeeta: P4

mosh OAT Us
P13,14,15

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES



Tare

CONCERNS have been raised over crime in Dowdeswell Street.

Central Division conducted an
operation in the Dowdeswell
Street area and made three
arrests.

Superintendent Elaine
Sands said the sex trade has
been a continuing issue in
Dowdeswell Street for some
time, and businesses are par-
ticularly affected when pros-
titutes choose open locations
to carry out illegal sex acts.



She said: “In most cases we
understand they are commit-
ting these acts in open yards
and public places.”

Otherwise, prostitutes will
sell sex from homes in and
around Dowdeswell Street.
Supt Sands urged the public
not to support prostitution by
buying into it or renting prop-
erty to those who will use it to
carry out the illegal trade.

Those involved in support-
ing prostitution are also com-
mitting an offence, she
warned.

Supt Sands added: “We
want to discourage individu-
als from soliciting themselves
for immoral acts because it’s a
criminal offence.

Offence

“And we want everyone
who thinks about coming in
this area, and even those per-
sons who live in this area and
hire these kind of people for
this kind of act, we want them
to know that they are commit-
ting an offence.

“Even if they are landlords
renting their homes knowing-
ly for such persons, they need
to know that they are commit-
ting an offence.”

Operations to crackdown on
crime in the area will continue
as police continue to respond
to the concerns of “good citi-
zens”, Supt Sands said.

Tax lawyer says he will consider
running in election if PLP asks

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

INTERNATIONAL tax
lawyer Ryan Pinder said yester-
day that if the PLP asks him to
run as a candidate in the next
general election he will “seri-
ously consider it.”

The son of former PLP Local
Government minister Marvin
Pinder, told The Tribune that
while his primary focus is helping
the party “move forward” it’s
possible he may become a par-
liamentary candidate.

“As we get closer to election,
as we get past the convention
and as we get a candidate’s com-
mittee selected I'll be in a better
position to address running for a



Ryan Pinder

seat,” said Mr Pinder.

“We'll look at what’s best for
the party with respect to running
in a constituency and if the party
thinks that’s the best thing to do
then Ill seriously consider it.”

“Right now my prime focus is
to see that we address proactive
policy as a country and as a par-
ty moving forward and that’s
where I am going to lend my
input and my talents,” said the
attorney.

He was speaking at a press
conference in the Opposition
room at the House of Assembly
called by Fox Hill MP Fred
Mitchell, also shadow minister
with responsibility for foreign
affairs, foreign trade and the
public service.

At that conference Mr Pinder
was announced as the co-chair
of a newly-formed PLP Com-
mittee on Foreign Affairs and
Foreign Trade.

The committee was appoint-

ed by party leader Perry Christie,
with the aim of helping to for-
mulate the PLP’s “approach to
public policy on matters of for-
eign trade and foreign affairs.”

Other members of the large
committee include former diplo-
mats who served overseas dur-
ing the last PLP government.

Asked why he decided to
accept the post of co-chair, Mr
Pinder said his background and
expertise as an international tax
lawyer with knowledge of inter-
national tax policies and an
awareness of the “global pres-
sures on countries such as The
Bahamas in both international
tax matters, as well as financial
services and banking...brings an
element to the policy of the PLP
and this committee that the
country desperately needs.”

“It desperately needs a proac-
tive vision, it definitely needs the
technical knowledge and the
technical application in these
areas,” he added.

The Tribune understands that
Mr Pinder, a Clifton resident,
recently got permission from the
party to open a branch office for
the PLP in the constituency,
something which it did not have
up until now.

He and other PLPs in the area
have been conducting branch
meetings on a regular basis.

The attorney heads the Nas-
sau office of U.S.-based com-
mercial law firm Becker and
Poliakoff, where he provides
U.S. counsel to Americans wish-
ing to do business in The
Bahamas as well as Bahamians
seeking U.S. legal advice,
according to the company’s web-
site.

una N

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MCT EC
ET

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

THE public can
expect air travel delays
over the next few days
after lightning struck
the Lynden Pindling
International Airport
control tower.

As severe thunder-
storms swirled through
the capital on Monday
afternoon, air traffic
controllers realised that
some equipment might
have been damaged by
lightning.

As a precautionary
measure, employees
were evacuated and air
traffic services were
suspended at 3.19pm,
according to a state-
ment by the Depart-
ment of Civil Aviation.

Frequencies

Joseph Albury,
Deputy director of the
department, and a team
of senior officers were
dispatched to assess the
situation and discov-
ered that some of the
tower's frequencies had
been affected by the
strike.

The maintenance
team worked to restore
primary frequencies
while limited air traffic
service was restored at
4.03pm, using back-up
emergency systems, the
statement said.

Yesterday, Mr Albury
said operations were
back to normal at LPI-
A's control tower.

"Lightning struck the
control tower facility
building and as a result
there were some outage
with the radio commu-
nication system (but)
we're working okay,"
he said.

Still, the Department
of Civil Aviation said,
inbound and outbound
air traffic "will experi-
ence some delays" but
managers and air traffic
controllers are working
to minimise the impact
on the public.



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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

Discovery Sun to resume service

Teenager
arrested after
handgun
discovered

A TEENAGER was arrested
after officers from Elizabeth
Estates Police Station found a
9mm handgun when searching
a house in eastern New Provi-
dence.

The officers executed a
search warrant at a home in
‘Yamacraw Beach Estates short-
ly before 11pm on Monday.
They found the firearm hidden
in a shoebox in the bedroom.
The 17-year-old boy is still in
police custody and is helping
with the investigation.

Probe after
shotgun found in
abandoned car

A SHOTGUN found in an
abandoned car in Pinewood
Gardens has sparked a criminal
investigation and police are
appealing for assistance from
the public.

The weapon was found by a
concerned citizen who reported
it to police on Monday.

East Street South Police Sta-
tion officers recovered the shot-
gun and launched an investiga-
tion. No arrests have been
made. If you have any informa-
tion which may assist the police
with this matter, call Crime
Stoppers anonymously on 328-
TIPS (8477).

Woman, 30,
arraigned on
theft charge

A 30-year-old woman was
arraigned in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday on a theft charge.

Police have charged Anasta-
cia Moree, 30, with stealing.

It is alleged that on Saturday,
April 18, while at Rosetta
Street, Moree stole a ladies
purse valued at $25, a driver’s
licence valued at $20, and four
ABM cards together valued at
$40, all totalling $85, belonging
to Portia Brown.

Moree, who appeared in
Court One, Bank Lane yester-
day before Chief Magistrate
Roger Gomez and Magistrate
Janet Bullard, pleaded not
guilty. She was granted bail in
the sum of $1,000 with one sure-
ty. Her case has been adjourned
to October 1.

Oless a

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - After several
days out of service due to engine
repairs, the Discovery Sun is
scheduled to resume service
between Grand Bahama and Fort
Lauderdale on Thursday, May 28.

The management of Discovery
Cruise Line announced that the
vessel will return to normal sailing
on Thursday.

They explained why the ship
experienced a second consecutive
problem this year with its port
main engine.

Discovery initially experienced
mechanical problems in April and
discontinued sailings for several
days for engine repairs and
resumed service on May 4.

However, due to ongoing

Ship to sail on Thursday after engine repairs

engine problems the ship was
forced to cancel sailing on May
17. The company made arrange-
ments for hundreds of stranded
passengers to be flown back to
Fort Lauderdale by charter flights
on Miami Air.

Hanns J Hahn, general man-
ager of Discovery, said that the
company was too anxious to
return the ship to service after
the first problem arose on April 4.

“The company is acutely aware
of Grand Bahama’s reliance on
the ship to transport Bahamians
and merchandise between the
island and Port Everglades and,
as a result, pushed to have the
ship return to service as quickly as
possible,” he said.

“As it turned out, that was

Weel erie
move to clean

up community

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



A COMMUNITY effort to
clean up a neighbourhood and
improve it for all has been
praised by local MP and Min-
ister of Immigration Branville
McCartney.

Mr McCartney said he was
impressed to see how the
Gamble Heights Crime Watch
Committee instigated a clean
up of the area off Baillou Hill
Road South by gathering
neighbours to pick up litter
and tear down overgrown
bushes with a tractor hired
with their collective contribu-
tions on Saturday.

The community, featured in
Monday’s Tribune, is troubled
by the growing slum of ply-
wood shacks housing Haitian
migrants on otherwise disused
land behind the Gamble
Heights subdivision as they
fear it might be hiding illegal

Ga Kaen

where life is still sim ple a nd people stl care
Murphyville, 2nd Right from Sears Road.
Telephone 322-8493

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apparently too quick and not all
the repairs made by the outside
contractor engaged by the com-
pany were sufficiently tested.”

Tests

Mr Hahn said that led to a fol-
low-up problem affecting at first
the departures from Sunday, May
17, through Tuesday, May 19,
while as late as Tuesday, May 19,
engineers signaled a green light
for a Thursday, May 21, depar-
ture.

He noted that additional tests
through Wednesday revealed that
the extent of the persistent pis-
ton misalignment was too great
to risk departure.

" Felipé Major/Tribune staff

THE GROWING SETTLEMENT of garbage is piling up outside the vil-

lage, attracting oversized rodents.

immigrants and criminals.
They want to tackle the rising
crime rate and mounting
garbage on the outskirts of the
slum by working together.

Exercises

Mr McCartney said the
Immigration Department has
carried out two apprehension
exercises in the area over the
last year, and added that gov-
ernment needs to determine
ownership of the land before
further action can be taken.

However, he said the efforts
of the community to clean up
the area while government
deliberates should inspire oth-
ers. “I want to congratulate
the members and constituents
of Gamble Heights for taking
this proactive step in cleaning
up their community,” Mr
McCartney said.

“That’s a step to be
admired, commended and
indeed other communities
ought to take this positive step
and use this as a yard stick in
what they ought to do in their
communities. I think it’s a
good thing they are doing, it’s
very proactive and by taking
this step, I hope other com-
munities would use this as an
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Queen Sleigh Bed

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Branville Meese



“IT want to
congratulate the
members and
constituents of
Gamble Heights.”




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According to Mr Hahn, the
engineering department had
therefore requested an addition-
al five to six days to source and
install a new piston rather than
install one of the spares on board.

“Work is now well underway
and all are confident to get this
saga behind us and resume the
regular schedule on Thursday,
May 28,” he said.

Mr. Hahn noted that during
both of these periods when the
ship was out of service the com-
pany ferried Bahamians, as well
as visitors who had hotel book-
ings on Grand Bahama, back and
forth to the island on air charters
and regularly scheduled flights.

He indicated that when neces-
sary passengers were provided






with accommodations in Fort
Lauderdale and on island.

He said they were also offered
meals while they were awaiting
transport to and from the island.

Mr Hahn explained that under
the terms of Discovery’s cruise
ticket contract with its passen-
gers, the company is not required
to provide other means of trans-
portation in the event of an emer-
gency such has recently occurred,
and that the company made such
extraordinary efforts only as a
gesture of good will and at con-
siderable extra cost.

He thanked the company’s
Bahamian passengers for their
understanding and patience.

He also thanked the Ministry
of Tourism, the Tourism Board
and its resort partners for their
assistance in “this unfortunate
and most untimely matter.”

MEMBERS
of the Gamble

| Heights
Community
Crime Watch
Committee said
they initiated a
clean-up of the
area when
government took
too long to act.

@ Felipé Major/
Tribune staff

vineyard vines’
martha’s vineyard

MORLEY

FOR

MEN



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Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6654/6
Bayparl Building, Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-8240 « Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com













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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Bahamuians entitled to safe communities

THE 1994 Bail Act was amended in 1996
making it mandatory for those accused of
serious crime to be held in prison until their
trial date. At that time Bahamians were con-
cerned by escalating crime and the fact that in
two years the courts had released into society
more than 100 serious offenders, who were
being held on bail. This was the main reason
for the amendment to the Bail Act, which
the Appeals Court last week ruled unconsti-
tutional.

In the past five months this country has
averaged more than five murders a month. As
for the armed robberies, we have long since
lost count. Needless to say armed robbery
gets almost daily mention in this newspaper’s
crime report. In addition to these newest
offenders, 153 persons being held on bail
were released from prison last month. The
Central Intelligence Bureau advised that 39 of
them should be monitored. Eleven of those
released were accused of murder or attempt-
ed murder, three of sexual intercourse, three
of rape and one of assault with intent to rape.
That is the calibre of persons now on our
streets — no wonder Bar Council President
Wayne Munro has suggested that police are
charging them with crimes for which they
have no evidence just to get them off the
streets. It might just be their answer to the
impossible baby-sitting job they have been
given to do in addition to safeguarding the
public. What a waste of police manpower.

The Act said that bail was to be refused in
respect of certain offences, murder being one
of them, “unless the offender be tried within
a reasonable time.”

But what is a reasonable time? Each court
seems to have its own version of reasonable-
ness. This is a matter that should not only
be settled, but should be uniform in all the
courts. Each judge should also have to give a
written cause to justify the release, and this
should be available to the public.

Some time ago we were watching the court
of a particular magistrate who had earned
the reputation of being bail-prone.

We often wondered if he were doing this to
prod government into action to speed up the
judicial process by opening more courts and
bringing in more justices, or if he were some
disembodied spirit who was not aware of the
society in which he lived and the need for

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him to be a part of the crime fighting solution,
rather than one of its problems.

There will continue to be a “growing dis-
respect for life, law and authority”, as Mr
Ingraham put it in his 1996 radio broadcast, if
the courts cannot process criminal cases
faster.

Mr Ingraham attributed this disregard for
life and laws to the fact that persons charged
with serious crimes have formed the view
that the perennial delays in court proceedings
permit them to indefinitely postpone facing
the consequences, sanctions and punishment
of their actions.

There should be a court designated strict-
ly to hear the more serious offences — those
for which the legislature said no bail should
be granted — and a magistrate or magistrates
assigned to do nothing but get through the
backlog of murders, attempted murders,
armed robberies, kidnappings, rapes, and the
like.

These courts should meet daily — and on
time. The courts are notorious for having
witnesses waiting around all day, while
lawyers dither or are no shows because they
are in other courts, compounded by all the
other inefficiencies that delay cases. The
whole court system needs a good shake up.

If the courts operated efficiently, the ques-
tion would not arise as to how long is too
long for a person to be in prison awaiting
trial.

We always hear of the rights of the
accused. We agree that he should have rights
and that those rights should be guarded jeal-
ously.

However, we hear little about the victim’s
rights or the community’s rights.

The accused has a right to a fair trial to be
held within a reasonable time. On the other
hand citizens have rights to a safe communi-
ty.
Instead what we now have are residents
imprisoned in their own homes behind bars to
protect them from persons with long criminal
records roaming our streets awaiting the jus-
tice that is theirs by right.

It is now up to government and the judi-
ciary to give both sides their just due — a
fair trial on the one hand, and a safe com-
munity on the other. And neither one can
come too soon.



The Bahamas
is not what
we envisaged

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

There are far too many people
who have given up because they
see a vicious cycle of corruption,
exploitation, lack of pride and
downright uncivilised behaviour
that embarrasses us locally and
internationally. Someone must
have the testicular fortitude to
throw caution to the wind call it
as we see it. If I am to sleep at
night, I must step forward for the
good of all right thinking and
frightened Bahamians.

Tell me where else in the
world could an elected official be
found with fifty thousand dollars
in his closet, give an asinine expla-
nation and there is no investiga-
tion and no consequences — only
in the Bahamas.

Where else can a politician
who had nothing declared his
assets as a matter of procedure
before an election and appears
to have millions, seemingly large
plots of land and nothing hap-
pens. There are no questions and
no investigations. Who is pro-
tecting whom and why? This
could only happen in the
Bahamas.

How come immigrants can be
facilitated to enter this country
by the thousands with question-
able documents and no proof or
indication that the immigrants
have left. Again, even after the
Auditor General’s report that at
the foreign affairs ministry that
serious inconsistencies and weak-
nesses were evident, nothing hap-
pened.

Yet this was allowed to hap-
pen, there has been no further
investigation and no one was
made to explain or suffer the con-
sequences.

How could influence peddlers
apparently sell immigration work
permits to foreign contractors,
getting preferential treatment
where permits that usually took
months and even years to be
processed could be stamped and
approved in less than 24 hours?
Who was responsible, involved
and questioned? Where is the
report?

How could a celebrity get a
minister to bend the rules to give
“residency” to a bimbo because
of a special kind of friendship.
Yet there is no public outcry,
because we all see nothing wrong
with this situation. We are equal-
ly as guilty. This could only hap-
pen in the Bahamas, because the
authorities are afraid or unwill-
ing to venture and the people
could care less.

Only in the Bahamas drug
dealers sit in front of a hotel and
walk on the busiest streets and
peddle drugs in full view of police
officers and nothing happens.
Alcoholics can be seen loitering
on benches, harassing tourists,
our bread and butter on Bay
Street and the police look the oth-

DON STAINTON |

PROTECTION Lid.

Tel: 322-8219 322-8160

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letters@tribunemedia net



er way. This is happening right
next to the House of Assembly.

The Bahamas must be the only
place where any male can urinate
on the side of any building any-
time he feels the need to relieve
himself. The whole island is rank
with urine. Men stop on the side
of the road and urinate, in front
of children or ladies without any
pride whatsoever. They walk in
any high grass and let the water
flow. No one is ever arrested and
the practice continues.

The Bahamas is the only place
in the world where the police
have conceded to the daredevil
motorcyclists who ride around on
one wheel, putting themselves
and other innocent pedestrians
and motorists at risk. How long
would it take for the police to
take these dangerous weapons,
which in most cases are unli-
censed, off the streets? How come
they have been allowed to
remove the silencers from the
mufflers disturbing residents all
hours of the night? This lawless-
ness could only happen in the
Bahamas.

How come some police offi-
cers are seen by neighbours col-
lecting “hush money” from
known drug dealers day after day
and nothing ever happens? If any-
thing is done, how come the pub-
lic does not know?

Only in the Bahamas is a per-
son with a perfectly legal title for
a piece of land be outsmarted by
a developer or a slick lawyer and
the land is literally stolen by the
lawyer and absolutely nothing
happens.

There are literally thousands
of Bahamians who have had their
birthright stolen by unscrupulous
lawyers and are supposed to be
hauled before the Bar Council
and not a word heard afterwards.
What happened?

Why does a person with clear
title have to waste his money to
fight for his own things? That can-
not be right and must be fixed,
immediately.

Why do questionable lawyers,
who are supposed to be “officers
of the court,” have to go before a
special hearing of the Bar Coun-
cil?

How could lawyers police
themselves?

Why are they not treated like
ordinary citizens? Why is there a
special law for lawyers and anoth-
er law for the rest of us?

It is high time that government
stops the haemorrhaging of the
innocent people who are being
destroyed by lawyers who take
advantage of people, who they
know cannot afford to fight them
in court.

It is time the strong stop
devouring the weak through the
courts.

There must be a system that
protects the most vulnerable of
us.

The courts seem too lenient
with lawyers. Is it because they
are all in the same boat, lawyers
protecting lawyers?

The poor and the uneducated
have been exploited enough.

And there is a culture that the
rich will stop at nothing until they

suck every penny out of the poor
until they die.

There is no mercy. Only the
poor go to court. Only the poor
wear handcuffs. Only the poor
receive jail time. Only the poor
pay national insurance, light bills
and phone bills. Only the poor
pay customs and only the rich get
to enjoy the fat of the land.

Only the big time tour opera-
tors get more bus plates, and no
one else. Why?

There is a culture that only a
few have any sense. There is a
perception that only a few will
get inside the door to be consid-
ered for anything.

There are people in authority
who are recycled every term and
no one else gets anything.

It’s the same people all the
time. Some are even senile, they
could hardly get out of their own
way, but they are still given the
hog while others are denied the
bacon.

The retired are rehired. The
people who run things are people
who have served, are already get-
ting a fantastic pension and are
rehired to get more gratuities and
more perks and more gravy.

This group is tightly knitted
together and it seems that no new
members are allowed.

The young are frustrated
because they watch the possibili-
ty of upward mobility diminished.
No country could grow like that.

It is disrespectful and distaste-
ful when highly qualified young
people sit by and watch people
with less ability get fantastic jobs
that they are incapable of doing,
but because of political connec-
tions they are given special privi-
leges and preferences.

A number of the people who
are demoralized sit quietly and
mourn.

Who will answer their cry?
Who will be humane enough to
allow their conscience to point
them in the right direction?

The pride of many of us has
caused us to be pushed aside, but
“How long, oh Lord how long”
are we prepared to wait?

The Bahamas is not what we
envisioned.

We used to have a great deal of
pride in ourselves and country,
all that is gone now.

We are simply not our broth-
er’s keeper. We are just like hogs.

The rich want more and the
rich want the poor to get none.
Multi-multi millionaires are
blocking and preventing others
every step of the way from mak-
ing a dollar. WHY?

Time is the determining factor.
Time is longer than rope.

There will be a time when
things would not be the most
important factor that drives peo-
ple, but dignity and pride would
be the driving force.

There is a move where people
will not stand idly by anymore,
but will stand up together against
the ills that have trampled us for
too long.

Iam willing to help lead that
charge.

We must look out for each oth-
er. This is a new day.

Bahamian musical icon Ron-
nie Butler sang, “I know dem
long time, dem people is mine.”

Tam relieved now.

IVOINE W. INGRAHAM
Nassau,
May 22, 2009

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| WE DO IT WHEN WE SAY WE WILL! |
\ Serving The Bahamian Community Since 1978 )


THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009, PAGE 5

Coalition of churches

speaks out against
gambling legalisation

0 In brief |

Foot store
held up by

armed robber

AN ARMED robber
held up the John Chea
Food Store in Farrington
Road at around 8am on
Monday.

The gunman demanded
money from an employee,
took an undetermined
amount of cash and ran off
into a nearby neighbour-
hood.

Police are appealing for
information from the pub-
lic which could lead to the
apprehension of the armed
robber.

He was dressed in dark
blue trousers, a black shirt
and a blue tam.

Anyone with informa-
tion which may assist the
investigation should call
Crime Stoppers immedi-
ately on 328-TIPS (8477).
Calls are free of charge
and answered in the Unit-
ed States to ensure total
anonymity.

Fishermen
claim 34 pots
removed in
two weeks

UNREST is brewing in
San Salvador after fisher-
men there reported that 34
of their pots have been
removed in the past two
weeks.

According to sources on
the island, these fishermen,
some from as far away as
Long Island, have posi-
tioned fish traps at various
locations around the
island.

Some were placed near
local dive sites, and suspi-
cion is mounting that
divers who frequent these
reefs could be responsible
for the disappearance of
the pots.

Four feet long and near-
ly three feet wide, the fish
pots in question were made
of plastic-encased wiring
and clearly marked with
buoys.

However, the buoy lines
have been cut and the pots
hauled away. The fisher-
men suspect they may have
been dumped over the
ocean shelf.

“These pots could easily
hold eight groupers at one
time, so who knows how
many fish will die in these
pots now that they have
been dumped over the
drop off. Because when a
grouper goes inside there
now and dies, he becomes
bait for other groupers and
the cycle continues,” a con-
cerned San Salvador resi-
dent said.

Reportedly, the matter
has been brought to the
attention of the local police
as tempers are beginning
to flare.

Attempts to reach the
press liaison officer with
responsibility for the Fami-
ly Islands, Assistant Com-
missioner Hulan Hanna,
were unsuccessful up until
press time last night.

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ENCOURAGING the com-
missioner of police to continue
his crackdown on suspected ille-
gal gambling operations
throughout the country, the
president of the Corner-
stone Zion Fellowship of
Christian Churches and
Ministries said his organi-
sation is completely against
the legalisation of gambling.

Bishop Andrew Stewart said
that the church supports the
police’s efforts to enforce the
law through a number of recent
raids of suspected numbers
houses in Nassau and Grand
Bahama.

He asked that the government
not consider the idea of legalis-
ing gambling any further, or
allow any Bahamian to gamble.
The group is even against for-
eigners being allowed to wager.

“Gambling is successful oper-
ating only on the principal that
many would loose and some or
few would win. First of all, we
feel that the success of an enter-
prise should not be based on so
many of our brothers and sister
losing.

“It then becomes an inade-
quate system when a large per-
centage of our population loos-
es on a regular basis. A society
should not be basing its success
on or trying to capitalise on a
system where so many would
loose in order for a few in our
society to win. It is not con-













scionable
to tax such an inequitable
system which brings me to
my next point,” he said.

Bishop Stewart rejected
the idea that it is justifiable for
the government to legalise gam-
bling in order to tax the industry
and collect revenue.

“Tf the government legalises
the illicit drug trade and taxes its
revenue that would also bring
some revenue to the treasury.
But we know that the cata-
strophic damage it would do to
the lives of individuals is just as
damaging as the illegal gambling
trade is doing to a certain seg-
ment of our society at this
moment,” he said.

Bishop Stewart said mothers
are depriving children of lunch
money, so as to be able to play
at several numbers houses each
day.

“Fathers, who do not make
enough in the first place to sup-
port their families, are taking
the little they do have that can
be of benefit to the wife and
children to gamble and play as

Prince George
Wharf readied for
mega cruise ships

THE Ministry of Public Works and
Transport and Bahamas Construction
International Limited have signed a
$2.3 million contract for the structur-
al refurbishment of Prince George
Wharf and installation of mooring bol-

lards there.

This will allow Prince George Wharf
to accommodate mega cruise ships.

“On completion of this project along
with the project to dredge the har-
bour, it is expected that Prince George
Wharf will be equipped to dock these
larger vessels at piers with new and
upgraded bollards and dolphins that
are able to withstand the forces exert-
said Minister of

ed by these vessels,”

Neko Grant

Public Works and Transport Neko Grant.

During a signing ceremony at the Ministry of Public Works,
J F Kennedy Drive, Mr Grant said after an “arduous” and
“meticulous” bidding process, Wayne “Tony” Cargill was iden-

tified as the contractor.

The work includes refurbishing existing bollards, replacing
condemned bollards, constructing new concrete footings for
new bollards, and the upgrading bollards to accommodate

increased mooring capacity.

Mr Grant said work is expected to begin in the next four
weeks and should be completed within 30 weeks.

He said his ministry is working with representatives of the
cruise industry, government agencies, and other stakeholders to

minimise logistical challenges.

Mr Cargill, president of Bahamas Construction Internation-
al, said his company plans to hire 12 to 15 workers for the pro-

ject.

“We will remove the footing down to a depth specified with-
in the plans and replace it with new concrete and new bol-

lards,” he said.

“There will also be sand blasting and painting of the existing
bollards that are in good condition.”

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many
of the
houses,
several
' times a dayif
possible. This is
why the PLP closed
down Hobby Horse Hall,
because the poor would take
what they should use for their
livelihood and the benefit of
their children, and put it on a
game of chance
“How terrible, but it is true.
Do unto others as you would
have them do unto you. Our
society should not support a sys-
tem that damages it’s poor fur-
ther than they are already dis-
advantaged. And this is why the
Cornerstone Zion Fellowship of
Christian Churches and Min-
istries cannot support gambling
in this country,” he said.

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Justice system vicious circle

| HE lack of a decisive

response to our deteriorat-
ing judicial system lies at the root
of the country's problems. We risk

everything with this. And moreover,
since the country is run by lawyers

they know exactly what the prob-
lems are, what the solutions are, and
what is at stake.

According to chief lawyer Wayne
Munroe, the controversy over grant-
ing bail to those accused of serious
crimes is symptomatic of the break-

Please check at the back of store
Aquinas entrance then first
Left look for sing upstairs
Call OR Email
Stacey@adamandeve.bs
FORA LIST OF TTEMS
326-8215 or 465-8648
Tuesday to Friday
§:00am to 5:00pm

I

The
Mah



down of the entire system. The aver-
age citizen naturally wants these
people kept behind bars until their
guilt can be determined. But that
raises serious constitutional as well
as logistical issues.

The scale and scope of the prob-
lem is by now familiar. Former
police chief prosecutor Keith Bell
outlined it for us last year:

"There are 100,000 matters
before the courts, including 11,000
criminal cases and 48,000 traffic cas-
es," he said. “That’s about a third of
the total population before the
courts, and it is getting worse and
worse...Our murder rate is higher
than the US and three times higher
than Canada...If this spreads to the
out islands we will be unable to con-
trol it.”

More than two thirds of the total
prison population of 2,556 are await-
ing trial. And insiders say the only
way to address the problem is for
the political class, as a priority, to
agree on a common agenda for com-
prehensive legal reform. But don't
hold your breath on that one. Cynics
say there will never be a solution
until the politicians and lawyers
themselves are targeted.

We have addressed this issue in
the past with unassailable logic.
There is no need for any further fig-
uring in the form of crime commis-
sions or social studies. There is no
mystery about the causes, and the
solutions are not rocket science.
Decades of research has identified
all the contributing factors, which
can be divided into three broad cat-
egories — socialisation, enforcement
and justice.

Socialisation covers all the things
that produce new entrants to our
society — the family, home life,
schooling, moral codes and work.
Enforcement is the way in which
society's rules are applied or not
applied. And justice refers to the
way we process those who break
the rules.

What must we do in terms of
enforcement? Well, first and fore-
most our leaders need to set exam-
ples and make examples. If corrupt
politicos, slackers and thugs see that
they can get away with spitting in
everyone's face, it sends a clear mes-
sage that we can all get away with
murder.

But improving enforcement is
no solution by itself. It will only lead
to gridlock unless the justice system
is fixed. And that is probably the
easiest of the three categories to
deal with, because it is perfectly clear
what needs to be done. It requires
only money to make it a reality. A
single budget exercise could resolve

cal

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Simon Wilson, Member, Committee for the Privatisation of BTC
Felix Stubbs, Member, Committee for the Privatisation of BTC
Michael Symonette, Executive Director, PUC
Usman Saadat, Director of Policy and Regulation, for the soon to be
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most of the bottlenecks in our courts
and prison within a year.

We know the prison is over-
crowded, so if we want to keep more
criminals locked up and deal with
all the backlogged cases we obvi-
ously need a bigger prison — or new
jails for various types of offenders —
and more prison officers. Once we
have places to put offenders we can
set about processing them — and
that simply requires more judges
(preferably foreign), more court-
rooms, more prosecutors and more
support facilities.

To those who say we can't afford
all that, here are two suggestions:
earmark a special crime tax to pay
for prosecutors, courts, judges and a
judicial secretariat. Or sell Bahama-
sair with the expressed goal of com-
mitting the proceeds to fixing the
justice system. The liquidation of a
non-performing state asset is a small
price to pay for salvaging the rule of
law.

The third category — socialisa-
tion — is more difficult to address
because it requires long-term invest-
ments in education, family coun-
selling and social health pro-
grammes. But over the years experts
have produced some agreed guide-
lines.

Education, joblessness, anti-social
activities and poverty are all closely
linked, and international experience
shows that at-risk youth benefit most
from improving basic literacy and
numeracy. This is something that
the private sector has been seeking
to convey to government officials
for years. But it takes political lead-
ership that is willing to listen and
set a long train in motion.

So we already know the answers.
And we certainly know what the
consequences are if we don't address
these issues. It all boils down to how
stupid we can be.

THE EASTERN PARADE
AND OTHER PARKING
LOTS.

Every day many of us drive by
Malcolm's Park on Dowdeswell
Street — one of the oldest and most
historic areas on New Providence.
For hundreds of years the Eastern
Parade and the Western Parade
(where the British Colonial Hilton
stands today) set the boundaries of
the city of Nassau.

St Matthew's Church on one side
of the road was built in 1802. The
graveyard on the other side dates
back even earlier to the loyalist peri-
od. And the old Pan Am terminal
across the street is where the first
scheduled flights arrived from Mia-
mi back in the 1920s. For years, the
park has also been an exercise field
and football pitch for schools in the
area. And this whole scenic district
provides the backdrop for the
entrance to Paradise Island.

But these days the park has
become a private parking lot —
expropriated by one or two busi-
nesses that now occupy the old
homes lining Dowdeswell Street.
The most egregious offender is a
private school whose customers hap-
pily block traffic and dig up the
parade grass daily.

We don't know why Town Plan-
ning would give approval for a
school with no parking facilities in an
already congested area, but this
problem has been getting worse



incrementally over many months
with not the slightest attention being
paid to finding a solution. There is
no doubt that eventually, the entire
parade will be converted into an
unsightly car park and dust bowl,
and Nassau will have lost yet more
of its historic value.

Why we should turn a blind eye
to a public asset that is being con-
fiscated by a few private individuals
as we speak is quite beyond me. I
assume it 1s because the authorities
are just as incapable of dealing with
the vexing issue of city parking as
they are of fixing the judicial sys-
tem.

THE HAITIAN PROBLEM

Recently, both John Marquis
(the Tribune's former managing edi-
tor) and Rupert Missick (the news-
paper's chief reporter) have written
lengthy Insight articles about the
Haitian migration and the assimila-
tion of illegal immigrants with bare-
ly a glancing reference to the facts.

Both articles simply repeated
unsubstantiated claims, jingoistic
cliches and racist fears based on
sheer hearsay or opinion — a dan-
gerous thing to do where communal
conflicts are involved. Neither writer
attempted to put these important
issues into any historical context,
and nor did they make use of The
Tribune's extensive archives.

For example, Missick this week
quoted a radio talk show host refer-
ring to "subversive" efforts by Hait-
ian "invaders". He also expressed
the opinion of a Haitian-Bahamian
activist that over 60 per cent of
Bahamians are of Haitian descent.
Such exaggerations and slurs should
not be presented without qualifica-
tion — even if they are comments
from other people.

In January, Marquis claimed
there were inherent differences
between Bahamians and Haitians,
and insisted that Haitians are intrin-
sically violent: “(Haiti’s) people are
from a different tribal background
than most Bahamians and they are
notoriously volatile in settling their
political and domestic differences.”
He went on to compare Haitians to
“pit bulls” and Bahamians to “pot-
cakes.”

Such simplistic treatment of a
complex and potentially explosive
situation is all the more deficient
when we consider that the govern-
ment commissioned a comprehen-
sive study on the Haitian migration
to the Bahamas in 2005. The result-
ing 98-page report is readily avail-
able online and has been the subject
of several articles in this space —
one written by Bahamian social sci-
entist Dawn Marshall.

The study by the International
Organization for Migration was
partly funded by a grant from the
United States and conducted by
researchers from the College of the
Bahamas. It had the backing of both
the government and the Haitian
Embassy, and it collated all the
available data while creole-speak-
ing interviewers surveyed 500
Haitians on four Bahamian islands.
For the first time ever the true out-
lines of the Haitian migration in the
Bahamas were revealed, and a num-
ber of myths were dispelled.

In its review of local media cov-
erage of migration issues, the IOM
report noted that "Most of the opin-



ions reported on (in the press) were
negative and focused on problems
created by Haitian nationals for the
Bahamas. Rare were any feature
articles exploring the issues with any
significant degree of depth and
reflection. Rare also were any
reports on individual Haitian nation-
als’ situations such as might give
them a human face.

"There is no elaboration on the
migration phenomena or the mean-
ing of the Haitian diaspora. These
important issues need to be under-
stood when living in a global, multi-
cultural, multilingual world, and the
media does not attempt to help the
average Bahamian to understand
the problem,” the IOM rightly con-
cluded.

MONTAGU
OUTDOOR TOILET

In recent weeks you may have
noticed gangs of government work-
ers clearing the verges on a number
of roadways, particularly in the
Montagu area. But have you noticed
that the unkempt island of tall weeds
and bush opposite the Montagu fish
market remains uncleared?

The reason is simple.

That's the public toilet for the
fishmongers and others who hang
out at this market and boat ramp
which operates in the middle of a
major arterial intersection. But don't
worry, I am sure the toilet-goers
wash their hands in the sea at the
bottom of the ramp. Of course, this
water is heavily polluted from the
Sailing Club's septic tank as well as
from storm water run-off, fish guts
and motor oil from the boats and
jet skis that use the ramp. But don't
worry — it's only raw fish they are
handling after all.

CABLE BAHAMAS
DIS AN' DAT

Phil Keeping, the Canadian
entrepeneur who launched Cable
Bahamas in 1994, still owns 30 per
cent of the shares through Columbus
Communications, with special rights
that include boardroom control.
Columbus owns regional fibre-optic
networks that stretch from Ecuador
to Florida and CBL recently agreed
to a buy-out. This would make the
company 100 per cent Bahamian,
and remove the red flag of foreign
ownership and control that has
dogged it for years.

But every so often there is a bar-
rage of repetitive attacks on CBL
that, based on the company’s track
record, are simply not justified
These charges are unsubstantiated
by the critics who level them, and
often go uncorrected in the press.
We are in such a phase now, as the
government seeks major regulatory
reforms that will dramatically
change our communications land-
scape as well as spin BTC — Cable's
top antagonist — into the private
sector.

First of all, the record shows that
CBL has invested over $260 million
to build a world class telecoms infra-
structure for the Bahamas in just a
few years — and not a single cent

SEE page 12

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PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Miss Bahamas

Universe ‘furore’

Tough Call

FROM page six

was public money. The company has }
76,500 video customers and 43,000 :
Internet subscribers. And at the same }
time, it created new wealth for thou- }
sands of Bahamian shareholders }
(including the government), and a }
whole new industry for hundreds of :
Bahamian workers and technicians. }

As to the company not living up }
to its obligations, that old saw is :
patently false. Cable provides ser-
vices to 90 per cent of Bahamian }
households on 20 islands, as per its
original agreement with government. }
And although ZNS is carried on its
network for free, it is not CBL's }
responsibility to ensure that ZNS }
reaches every household in the coun- }
try — no matter how remote they :
may be. That is clearly the responsi- }
bility of ZNS, if the government }
chooses to make such coverage a }

requirement of nationhood.

It's time for the political nonsense :
regarding CBL to end. The fact that }
Cable is a successful and efficient }
Bahamian company making good }
returns for its shareholders and }
employees is nothing to be ashamed }
of. If you have a sensible complaint, }
let's hear it. Otherwise, shut up and :

stop talking fool.
CLICO, THE CENTRAL
BANK AND COLUMBUS
COMMUNICATIONS

Last Friday there was a story }
about the CLICO liquidation which }
said that a court action had been filed }
in Florida to protect the $73 million :
that the company had invested in }
real estate ventures in that state. The }
liquidator (Craig Gomez) was quot-
ed as saying that CLICO (Bahamas) :
had loaned this money "to affiliated
companies" and it ended up in two }
Florida land developments. He }
added that there could be other CLL :
CO (Bahamas) assets in the US that

had not been identified as yet.

Well, we have yet to hear from :
the government or the central bank :
as to how $73 million of Bahamian }
policyholder money was able to be }
exported to the US. Was exchange }
control approval given for this :
siphoning of funds? Was the foreign }
exchange premium paid? Is anybody }

there?

What do you think?

Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

+
eee BS
ir is

Miss Bahamas Universe Kiara Sherman

FROM page one

other pageant contenders.

Yesterday Mrs McWeeney said: “We
have been invited this morning by
Gaynelle Rolle (Miss Bahamas Universe
President) to view the scores. I believe
that most of the judges will take them up
on that so we can just put everything to
rest.

“By the end of the week, I am sure
we can get together and say ‘Everything
checked out, these were my scores’ and
that we are satisfied the accounting firm
did the tallying right.”

She said she hopes the exercise has
the intended effect, adding: “My phone
is blowing up and I can’t take it any-
more!”

Interest in the Miss Bahamas Universe
pageant has been heightened this year as
the Miss Universe pageant takes place in
The Bahamas for the first time this year.

The Bahamian queen will go on to
represent her country alongside wanna-
be queens from across the globe in the
internationally-televised event.

Illustrating the discontent over the
pageant’s outcome, 22-year-old contes-
tant Enna Thomas contacted The Tri-
bune yesterday to explain that she has
been disturbed by allegations made
online that she may have missed out on
an opportunity to represent The

Bahamas as pageant queen because of a
dispute over money between her spon-
sor, Craig Flowers of the FML Group
of Companies, and Ms Rolle, Miss
Bahamas Universe president.

She said she already feared “some-
thing went wrong” on the final night as
although her name appeared on the
screen during a pre-recorded video of
the 12 finalists seen by TV viewers she
was not called up when the announce-
ment of who was in the group was made
live.

“Immediately I knew that someone
went wrong. I was so confident. I had
ranked highly throughout the competi-
tion. Never for one second did I think I
wouldn’t make the top 12,” said Ms
Thomas.

Meanwhile, she went on to be
announced the winner of several awards
— including Best Float and Miss Photo-
genic — and suspected that she was also
the winner of several other awards when
a presenter said they could not make
out the name that had been written on
the paper.

Mrs McWeeney confirmed that cer-
tain names were said to be illegible on
the night, and in those cases the winner
of the individual awards was never
announced.

Another judge, speaking anonymous-
ly, told The Tribune that he and other
judges were told that the fact that Ms
Thomas’ name appeared on the screen
was simply a mistake.

“We were informed behind the scenes
that it was just a technical error,” he
said.

Meanwhile, in relation to claims that
the overall result may not have been
reflective of the efforts and beauty of
the contestants who put themselves for-
ward, the judge said he felt the outcome
was “anticipated.”

“When I saw the finalists selected that
night I didn’t take exception to it. I
thought it was fair. We have an excellent
queen and I wish this country would sup-
port the decision whether all of us agree
with it or not,” he said.

A message left for Ms Rolle was not
returned up to press time yesterday.

We note that the Ministry of i
Finance is currently reviewing Cable :
Bahamas' plan to buy out its con- }
trolling shareholder, Columbus Com- }
munications for some $80 million — :
money that would be partly financed }
by preference shares. Did the Min- }
istry similarly review the CLICO pro-
posal to invest Bahamian money in :
speculative Florida real estate deals? :



Immigration Dept working to release Cuban detainees

FROM page one

date of the detained Cubans,
Mr Thompson said that the
department is aware of the
detainees’ dilemma.

"Tonly want to say that we
are actively working on the
situation, it's before us and
we are actively pursing it. .
.We are aware of the details,
we have the facts and so the
extent that we can do what-
ever we have to do, we (will)
do it," Mr Thompson said
yesterday. "We know their
plight — we know their situ-
ation."

One Cuban detainee, held
at the centre for more than
18 months, yesterday claimed
that Immigration officials
promised the group's release
from the centre at the end of
the month.

When questioned about
this, Mr Thompson refused
any additional comment.

"IT don't want to comment
further than to say that we
are working on it," he said.

According to Mr Thomp-
son, there are currently eight
Cubans held at the

Carmichael Road centre.

The Department of Immi-
gration has recently been
caught in a firestorm of alle-
gations of abuse and mis-
treatment of Cuban detainees
housed at the holding facility.

In February, one detainee
who was allegedly beaten by
officers so savagely that he
lost fingernails, announced
that he — along with other
Cubans at the centre was
starting a hunger strike to
protest conditions at the cen-
tre.

Several other claims of
alleged abuse and “concen-
tration camp" like conditions
were reported to The Tribune
by detainees prompting calls
from human rights watchdog
group Amnesty International
for an independent investiga-
tion of the claims.

These allegations were
swiftly denied by immigration
officials.

While several improve-
ments were made to the living
conditions of the centre —

THE CANCER CENTRE

LC Te et
The Specialists’ Cancer Clinics

replacements of dirty mat-
tresses with new ones,
repainting of grimy walls,
repairs of blocked toilets, and
the installation of washing
and dryer machines — offi-
cials maintained these
upgrades were unrelated to
any published allegations.

However in March a fact-
finding team was appointed
by the Department of Immi-
gration after reports of the
alleged abuses were pub-
lished. The team, made up of
psychologist Dr David Allen,
Social Services Director
Melanie Zonicle, Archdea-

con James Palacious and Mr
Thompson, toured the facili-
ty and interviewed the
detainees.

While filtered contents of
the report were given to the
press through Immigration
press conferences, the full
report was never released.

Hotel union elections
will be held tomorrow

FROM page one

The substantive matter will be heard on June 26
to determine which process was in fact the valid

one,” Mr Ferguson said.

Approximately 6,000 hotel workers are expect-
ed to cast their ballots on Thursday to elect a
new executive. Five teams are vying for leadership
positions within the union, including the Unity
Team, the M Team, the A Team, the Justice

Team, and Team Deliverance.

Wilson, who leads team Deliverance, has —

4 aa

ALL OUTDOOR

LP el@ 15

along with eight other elected union executives —
been at odds with the top three executives of the
BHCAWU, maintaining that the proper rules

and regulations were not followed when the nom-
ination and election dates were set. He was grant-

ed an injunction last Thursday staying the elec-

tions until such time as a judicial review in the
matter had been heard. That review will now
take place on June 26.

Attorney Damian Gomez and Harvey Tynes
QC, represent BHCAWU President Roy Cole-

brooke, Secretary General Leo Douglas and

Treasurer Basil McKenzie.

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009, PAGE 13

SPORTS





NBA Today

@ By The Associated
Press

Denver at Los Angeles
Lakers (9pm EDT). Tied at
two games apiece, the West-
ern Conference finals return
to Los Angeles, where Den-
ver won once and nearly
earned a sweep in the first two
games of the series.

STARS

Monday

—Chauncey Billups,
Nuggets, scored 24 points and
made all nine free throws in
Denver's 120-101 victory over
the Lakers that evened the
Western Conference finals at
two games apiece.

—J.R. Smith, Nuggets,
came off the bench to score
24 points, making four 3-
pointers and sparking a strong
effort from Denver's reserves.

DENVER'S DOUBLE-

DOUBLES

Kenyon Martin had 13
points and 15 rebounds, while
Nene added 14 points and 13
boards in the Nuggets’ 120-
101 victory over the Lakers in
Game 3 of the Western Con-
ference finals. They helped
Denver finish with a 58-40
rebounding advantage.
Reserve Chris Andersen
grabbed 14 boards.

DIRTY DAHNTAY?

Lakers coach Phil Jackson
accused Nuggets guard Dah-
ntay Jones of playing
"unsportsmanlike basketball”
by intentionally tripping Kobe
Bryant during Game 4 of the
Western Conference finals.
"There's another situation out
there tonight that was unac-
ceptable by Dahntay Jones,”
Jackson said. "Just unaccept-
able defense, tripping guys
and playing unsportsmanlike
basketball." Hornets coach
Byron Scott also criticized
Jones for dirty play in the first
round.

AILING ANTHONY

Hobbled by a sprained
ankle and slowed by a stom-
ach virus, Carmelo Anthony
was limited to 15 points on 3-
of-16 shooting in Denver's
120-101 victory over the Lak-
ers in Game 4. It was his sec-
ond straight game below 30
points after he hit that mark in
five consecutive games.

SPEAKING

"They whooped us, period.
They whooped us on the glass.
They whooped us to loose
balls.”

— Kobe Bryant after the
Lakers' 120-101 Game 4 loss
to Denver that evened the
Western Conference finals at
two games apiece



CHRIS ANDERSEN (far left) and Linas Kleiza double-team Lamar Odom
during the second half of Game 4 in Western Conference finals in Denver
Monday night. The Lakers lost 120-101...

(AP Photos: Chris Carlson)

Wallace angered
over Van Gundy
BUCojo Me kenir by

"Guarantee we're going to
win the series? Yeah, yeah.
We are down 2-1. But there is
nobody on this team and def-
initely not myself that says we
are not going to win this
series. Yeah, it is going to be
tough. We know that. We get
this game tomorrow, go home,
still got home-court advan-
tage. We don't see ourselves
losing two out of three at
home."

— Cleveland guard Mo
Williams, calling his Cavaliers

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP)
— Cleveland Cavaliers cen-
ter Ben Wallace is upset
with Orlando coach Stan
Van Gundy for accusing
him of flopping.

Van Gundy said Monday
he was bothered by the
number of times Cleveland
guard Mo Williams and
Wallace dropped to the
floor in Game 3 of the East-
ern Conference finals.

He said the pair fell down
more times than a baby.

Wallace is one of the
NBA's most intimidating
players.

When asked about Van
Gundy's comments during
Tuesday's shootaround
before Game 4, Wallace
said Van Gundy should
shut up, adding an exple-
tive for emphasis.

Van Gundy made the
same claims about
Shaquille O'Neal this sea-
son, and the coach later
apologised.

"the best team in basketball."



Ronaldo vs. Messi could
decide ‘best player’ award

m By PAUL LOGOTHETIS
AP Sports Writer

ROME (AP) — While Manches-
ter United and Barcelona play for
the Champions League trophy, Cris-
tiano Ronaldo and Lionel Messi may
well be squaring off for the right to |
call himself the world's best player.

Ronaldo, however, doesn't seem
too concerned about that.

"Now to decide (who the best
player is), who cares about that?
What I want more is to win the
Champions League and that's it,"
Ronaldo said Tuesday from the Sta-
dio Olimpico. "I respect Barcelona
very much, Messi is special also.

"Sincerely, I'm not worried about that. I would
rather win the Champions League final. I want it
very much.”

Ronaldo is the reigning FIFA world player
of the year after his 42 goals last season guided
United to both the Premier League and Cham-
pions League trophies. Messi was second in the
voting, despite Barcelona enduring a second
straight season without a trophy.

This season, however, Messi has already col-
lected two trophies and netted more goals than
Ronaldo, and the result of Wednesday's final
could be the deciding factor when votes are cast
for next year's award.

United coach Alex Ferguson said picking one
over the other was difficult because of their dif-

eae itsesssd alae)



ferent styles — Ronaldo's speedy
stepovers and long-range shooting
vs. Messi's darting runs and imagi-
nation inside the area.

"Both have the ability and
courage to attack defenders all the
time. No matter how many times
they are tackled they get up and
they want the ball, and that's the
kind of courage we want to see in
footballers. And both have it,” Fer-
guson said. "Both have different
types of qualities, both are differ-
ent types of players but at end of
the day, how can you divide it?
They're separate."

If Man United defends its Euro-
pean trophy, that will provide a
fourth piece of silverware after league, League
Cup and Club World Cup triumphs.

Messi can add a Champions League title to
Barcelona's league and cup double, and see the
Catalans become only the fifth Spanish team to
win three trophies in a season.

Ronaldo has never scored against Spanish
opposition while Messi, who leads the competi-
tion with eight goals, has never netted against a
Premier League opponent.

Ronaldo said the buildup to the their individ-
ual showdown was not proving a distraction.

"I'm 100 percent focused on the game. I know
the people want to know something about me
but I'm very focused," Ronaldo said. "I try to
score a goal and win the game, that's it.”

m By PAT GRAHAM
AP Sports Writer

DENVER (AP) — Carmelo Anthony had a
better supporting cast than Kobe Bryant on a
night he really needed it.

With Anthony sick and injured, his ensemble
pitched in and lifted the Denver Nuggets to a
120-101 win over the Los Angeles Lakers on
Monday that evened the Western Conference
finals at two games apiece.

"Tonight, all of them stepped up," Anthony
said.

They had to with their star hobbled by a
sprained ankle and a stomach virus, something he
picked up just before game time and which forced
him to receive IV treatment at halftime.

Anthony, who's averaging 27.1 points in the
postseason, struggled to find his rhythm, going 3-
for-16 from the field and finishing with 15 points.

No matter, though. J-R. Smith had his back. So
did Chauncey Billups.

Both finished with 24 points and hit clutch
shots in the fourth quarter to lift the Nuggets’
spirits as they head into Game 5 on Wednesday
night in L.A.

"We know the importance of that game,"
Billups said.

The Nuggets’ bench got back into the act on
Monday, outscoring their counterparts 42-24.

"It's satisfying,” Anthony said. "It's very satis-
fying to win a game knowing I wasn't 100 percent
out there tonight."

Bryant didn't have quite the same support.

Still, he tried to carry the Lakers down the
stretch, scoring 13 of his 34 points in the fourth
quarter.

"They just whooped us, period,” Bryant admit-
ted. "They whooped us on the glass. They
whooped us to loose balls."

Fatigue may finally be catching up with the
Lakers, who had to endure a grueling seven-game
series against Houston while the Nuggets got to
relax for a few days after wrapping up their tussle
with Dallas in five.

Bryant even conceded as much, saying he was
exhausted after almost single-handedly pulling
one out for the Lakers in Game 3 that gave them
back homecourt advantage.

"But you just gotta push through it," Bryant
said. "They played harder and better, period."

And that was with an ailing Anthony.

"It just shows we have heart and can play with
aman down," Smith said.

Smith ignited the Nuggets by rediscovering his
outside shot. After going 4-for-15 from the field in
Game 3, his confidence was reeling.

So Smith stayed late after practice on Sunday,
firing up one jumper after another.

"T think it worked,” said a smiling Smith, who

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Nuggets and Lakers even
at 2-2 in Western finals



KOBE BRYANT (right) and Pau Gasol sit on the bench
in the final minute

hit back-to-back 3 pointers late in the game to
help snuff out a final Lakers charge.

Nuggets coach George Kar] never lost faith in
Smith.

"T think his talent and his skill is flamboyant,
explosive," Karl said. "It makes us a very explo-
sive team."

Pau Gasol, frustrated by a lack of touches,
knows how the Lakers can be more explosive —
by dumping the ball into the paint more often.

"IT wish we would take more advantage of our
inside game, because it's pretty effective,” said
Gasol, who finished with 21 points on 8-of-11
shooting. "It's unfortunate we don't recognize it
enough."

Yet he holds out hope.

"It's got to be a team-conscious effort and
mindset," Gasol said. "We always have a better
chance when we establish ourselves inside."

The Nuggets had seven different players score
in double figures, including Kenyon Martin and
Nene who each had a double-double. Chris "Bird-
man” Andersen provided a boost off the bench,
grabbing 14 boards for the Nuggets, who outre-
bounded the Lakers 58-40.

"We got hammered from every direction
tonight,” Lakers forward Luke Walton said.

And Los Angeles coach Phil Jackson was none
too pleased about that.

He was particularly upset about Dahntay Jones’
trip of Bryant in the third quarter, calling it
unsportsmanlike.

Jones didn't give the assertion a moment's
thought. Jackson becomes the latest coach to
label Jones a dirty player during the playoffs,
joining Byron Scott of the Hornets, who said the
same thing in the first round.

"Just playing hard,” Jones said. "If he can't
respect it, I'm sorry. I'm trying to be aggressive
and give it all I have out there. My teammates
appreciate it.”

Anthony certainly does.

"Dahntay is Dahntay,” Anthony said. "That's
what he’s been doing."

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PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Olympic boxer visits Embassy of

The Bahamas in Washington, DC



SERENA WILLIAMS reacts as she plays Klara Zakopalova in their first
round match of the French Open tournament at Roland Garros stadium in

Paris on Tuesday...

(AP Photo: Lionel Cironneau)

French Open: Serena
through to 2nd round

@ By CHRIS LEHOURITES
AP Sports Writer

PARIS (AP) — Serena
Williams struggled to close her
match at a windy French Open
on Tuesday, wasting eight
match points before finally
beating Klara Zakopalova of
the Czech Republic 6-3, 6-7 (5),
6-4.

The second-seeded Williams
was broken twice during the
second set, including when she
was serving for the match at 5-4.
At 5-3 with Zakopalova serv-
ing, she had five match points
but couldn't end it.

Zakopalova saved three more
match points before holding to
5-3 in the third set, then broke
Williams in the next game to
get back on serve.

"T think Serena will be play-
ing better and better each
round, so it was the best chance
to at least play with her or beat
her,” Zakopalova said. "She's
Serena."

Williams completed her Ser-
ena Slam at the French Open
in 2002, winning her fourth
straight Grand Slam title. If she
wins at Roland Garros this year,
she'll have won three majors in
a row after victories at the U.S.
Open and the Australian Open.
She reached the final at Wim-
bledon last year, but lost to big
sister Venus in the final.

Third-seeded Jelena
Jankovic, No. 4 Elena Demen-
tieva and No. 7 Svetlana
Kuznetsova also advanced
among the women, while No. 4
Novak Djokovic, No. 5 Juan
Martin del Potro, No. 9 Jo-Wil-
fried Tsonga and 2003 French
Open champion Juan Carlos
Ferrero made it through on the
men's side.

Jankovic dominated her
opponent before a 2-hour rain
delay, and then did well enough
after it to beat Petra Cetkovska
of the Czech Republic 6-2, 6-3.

The Serb, once ranked No. 1,
was leading 4-1 when the rain
started at Roland Garros. She
quickly completed the first set
when play resumed and contin-
ued to play well on Cetkovska's
serve in the second but was bro-
ken twice on her own.

"IT was controlling the points

.. but then we had to stop
because of the rain," Jankovic
said. "I felt a little bit slow after
the rain delay."

While serving for the match,
Jankovic again struggled and

was forced to save break points
before finally winning.

"The serve was all right. I did-
n't go for too much," said
Jankovic, who added the balls
were heavier than usual because
of the wet weather. "I just tried
to have a high percentage.”

Jankovic finished last season
as the top-ranked player on the
women's tour, but the 24-year-
old Serb is still looking to win
her first Grand Slam singles title
after losing in the final of last
year's U.S. Open.

Kuznetsova defeated Claire
Feuerstein of France 6-1, 6-4.
The 2004 U.S. Open champion
also dominated before the rain
started falling, leading 5-1.

Djokovic advanced when
Nicolas Lapentti of Ecuador
retired while trailing 6-3, 3-1
after injuring his left ankle.
Lapentti hurt his ankle when
coming to net at 5-2 in the first
set. He called for a trainer but
then continued playing.

The fourth-seeded Djokovic,
who won his fourth career title
on clay at this month's Serbia
Open, has reached the semifi-
nals at the French Open the last
two years. He also won the 2008
Australian Open.

Del Potro had little trouble
in his opening match at Roland
Garros, beating Michael Llodra
of France 6-3, 6-3, 6-1. The
Argentine won four straight
ATP titles last year, the first
two on clay.

No. 27 Rainer Schuettler of
Germany narrowly avoided a
"triple bagel" after being shut
out in the first two sets of a 6-0,
6-0, 6-4 loss to Mare Gicquel of
France.

On Friday, Schuettler lost to
Robin Soderling 6-0, 6-0 at the
ATP World Team Champi-
onship in Germany.

"A ‘double bagel’ is fine,"
said Schuettler, who reached
the semifinals at last year's
Wimbledon. "I had one last
week. It's nothing new."

Gicquel was unapologetic
about the thrashing.

"T didn't come here to sym-
pathize," said the Frenchman,
who was trying to win the third
set at love as well. "If I tried to
give him one or two games,
then everything could be over-
turned against me.”

No. 11 Gael Monfils of
France also advanced, easily
beating Bobby Reynolds of the
United States 6-2, 6-3, 6-1
despite a knee injury.

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OUR own Olympic boxer
Taureano Johnson stopped by
the Embassy of The Bahamas
in Washington, DC, to say “hel-
lo” while he was there last week
to get some training and advice.

With Johnson were his father
Erwin, and Floyd Seymour,
who was himself among the first
Bahamian boxers to qualify at
the Olympic level — in 1991 -
and who is talking with the
younger fighter about his
future.

Johnson did the Bahamas
proud in Beying, winning his
first two fights and making it
all the way to the medal round
before losing a decision to the
home-town favourite Hanati
Silamu.

Johnson placed fifth at the
Olympics and currently holds



FLOYD Seymour (far left), Taureano Johnson and Erwin Johnson (far right)
visited The Embassy of The Bahamas in Washington DC where they met

Rhoda Jackson last week.

the rank of No. 5 amateur box-
er in the world.

“T did some good work,” he
said of his Beijing bouts. “To
be in to that level [was the] pin-
nacle of my career.”

As to whether he will fight
as an Olympian again in 2012,
Johnson said that was “some
bit of time away.” Meantime,
the question continues to pop
up: When will Taureano John-
son go pro?

The 25-year-old would not
answer the question directly but
he admitted that he is at least
considering turning profession-
al.

Instead, he said that it was
rare for fighters his age to stay
an amateur for long, especially
long enough to fight in two
Olympics.

Bahamas Volleyball Federation
2010 World Championships NORCEA’S Rounds



HERE is a look at some of the perfor-
mances produced by members of the
Bahamas Volleyball Federation men’s
team at the 2010 World Championships
NORCEA’S Rounds played over the
weekend in Kingston, Jamaica:

FINAL RESULTS
Mexico

Bahamas

Jamaica

Haiti

St. Lucia

Cayman Islands
BEST PLAYERS

Best Receiver - Renaldo Knowles -

Bahamas.
BEST SCORERS

No.2 - Renaldo Knowles - 41 spikes, 3

blocks, 1 serve = 49.

No.3 - Shedrick Forbes - 37 spikes, 5

block, 0 serve = 42.
No.15

blocks, 0 serve = 26.
No.16 - Prince Wilson - 24 spikes, 0
block, 1 serve = 25.
No.23 - Romel Lightbourne - 16 spikes,
1 block, 3 serves = 20.
No.26 - Simon Tonny - 7 spikes, 6 blocks,



- Byron Ferguson - 19 spikes, 7

ABOVE are some members of the men’s national volleyball team. From left

1 serve = 14.

No.32 - Ian Pinder - 7 sp[ikes, 1 block, 0

serve = 8.
BEST SPIKERS

in back are Jamaal Ferguson, Tony Simon, Glen Rolle, Shedrack Forbes
and lan ‘Wire’ Pinder. In front from left are Byron Ferguson, Audril Far-
quharson, Maurice ‘Cheeks’ Smith and Mullit Petit.

‘Spiking’ their way to the top

FROM page 15

know it’s good to be home
again,” he said.

“Secondly, to congratulate
you on your awesome success
in Jamaica. I followed the first
round game against St Lucia
and I was very concerned. I fol-
lowed you in the second round
and I got a call that night from
someone who is very excited
and said ‘Mr. Minister, you bet-
ter call Jamaica because we just
beat Jamaica.’”

Although he didn’t make the
trip, Bannister said what the
team achieved in Jamaica was
triumphant of the Bahamian
spirit.

He alluded to the fact that
the team’s trip was delayed
because of the lack of funding
and that once they got there,
they persevered to defeat
Jamaica on their home soil
when everybody was pulling
against them.

“Tt shows what you could do
if you pull together as a team,”
he stated. “It shows the strength
that you have and it gives us an
idea of where you could go if
you really want it. But the key
element is desire. Desire and
determination and with that
comes team work.

“You've been able in volley-
ball to bring together a group of
young men who are very tal-
ented, but by yourselves you
can’t do it. You have to create a
unit, a unit that works and func-
tions very well together.”

Head coach Raymond Wil-



DeVINCE SMITH, assistant coach,
gives his assessment of the men’s
national team at the 2010 World
Championships NORCEA’S Quali-
fying Round...

son, using a Biblical quote to
begin his comments, said: “God
gives grace and mercy and
favour to whoever he chooses to
do so. At this time, he chose to
bless the Bahamas as with
favour.

“We have a lot of work ahead
of us preparing for the next
round, but my prayer is that
God will continue to go with us
and bless us with favour and
mercy and keep our players
strong. I feel that we will do
well. All we have to do is target
the weaknesses of the teams in
every round.”

Assistant coach De Vince
Smith thanked Bannister and
his ministry for their financial
support and all of the players
for the commitment they made.

“Through discipline and hard



RENALDO KNOWLES, of the Bahamas, was
the best receiver...

No.6 - Shedrick Forbes - 37 spikes, 17





= iL233)

faults, 32 shots, 86 total attempts = 43.02.
No.7 - Renaldo Knowles - 41 spikes, 22
faults, 39 shots, 102 attempts = 40.20.
BEST BLOCKERS

No.6 Byron Ferguson - 7 kill blocks, 11
faults, 18 rebounds, 36 attempts = 0.47.
No.9 Simon Tonny - 6 kill blocks, 5
faults, 7 rebounds, 17 attewmpts = 0.42.
BEST SERVERS

No.5 Romel Lightbourne - 3 aces, 6
faults, 28 serve hits, 37 attempts = 0.20.
BEST DIGGERS

No.5 - Renaldo Knowles - 20 sigs, 7
faults, 23 receptions, 50 attempts = 1.33.
No.8 - Jamaal Ferguson - 12 digs, 9
faults, 16 receptions, 37 attempts = 0.80.
BEST SETTERS

No.4 Simon Tonny - 53 running sets, 9
faults, 185 still sets, 247 attempts = 3.53.
No.10 - Audril Farquharson - 20 run-
ning sets, 4 faults, 64 still sets, 88 attempts

BEST RECEIVERS
No.1 - Renaldo Knowles - 62 excellents,
2 faults, 16 serve receptions, 80 attempts =

75.00.

BEST LIBEROS
No.3 - Jamaal Ferguson - 60 excellents,

12 faults, 28 in play, 100 attempts = 60.00.

THREE more members of the men’s national team celebrate on their
return home. They are (shown I-r) Romel Lightbourne, Prince Wilson and
Renaldo Knowles.



RAYMOND WILSON, head coach
of the men’s national volleyball
team, addressed the audience on
the team’s performance in
Kingston, Jamaica...

work, they made it possible for
us to succeed and to excel to
the next round,” he pointed out.
“As we move on, it’s going to
get harder.

“Like coach (Wilson) said,
it’s going to get harder, but it’s
not about winning, but doing
our best and advancing. We
pray that you will continue to
support us and give you our
all.”

Team captain Audril Far-
quharson said they are aware
that these are some rough eco-
nomic times and the govern-
ment has been stretched to the
limit in ensuring that they get to
travel.

“We appreciate the effort,
but we have one more trip to
Cuba for us to advance, so
hopefully we all will still be

there,” he charged.

Federation president Don
Cornish said Bannister and the
Bahamian people would have
been proud watching the team
perform in Jamaica, especially
as they were in the “lion’s den.”

“T think the team showed a
lot of heart, especially in that
first game against St Lucia and
particularly in the semifinal
against Jamaica, a host team
that was not easy to beat at
home,” he said.

“We made them think a lot.
They changed their line-up at
least seven times trying to beat
this team. I think we were
resolved to make this a suc-
cess.”

In order to make the second
trip in August a success, Cor-
nish said they have already got-
ten permission to travel to San-
to Domingo for a training camp
and they should have a coach
from Cuba to assist in their
preparation.

“We have to learn to play
against taller players,” Cornish
said. “That was one of the big
challenges we had against Mex-
ico. We didn’t think Mexicans
can grow that tall. I don’t think
they understood how tall they
were until they were on the oth-
er side of the net.

“So they are the kind of
adjustments that we will have
to make in going forward. A
team that is technically sound
will not make that many mis-
takes. So we have to force them
into situations to make them
think. I think this was an impor-
tant test for us going forward.”


(
b

WEDNESDAY, MAY 27,



2009



TOP - MINISTER OF YOUTH, SPORTS & CULTURE DESMOND BANNISTER sits with executives and team
officials of the men’s national volleyball team. Standing are members of the team...

ABOVE - Team manager Jermaine Adderley holds the trophy that the men’s national volleyball team brought
home from Jamaica. Next to him is trainer Lloyd Davis and Joseph ‘Joe Mo’ Smith, BVF vice president...

Knowles, Bhupathi hoping
to win their first title for ‘O09

MARK Knowles’ and
Mahesh Bhupathi are hoping
that they can win their first title
for the year at the Roland Gar-
ros French Open Grand Slam.

The Bahamian-Indian duo
are seeded at No. 4 in the men’s
doubles at the tournament that
got started on Monday. How-
ever, they are not expected to
start playing until Thursday.

Knowles’ former partner,
Daniel Nestor, and Nestor’s
new partner Nenad Zimonjic
are the top seeds. The No.2
seeds are American identical
twin brothers Bob and Mike
Bryan.

Knowles and Bhupathi go
into the tournament as the No.3
ranked team on the ATP com-
puter rankings. Heading the list
is the Bryans, followed by
Nestor and Zimonijic.



MARK KNOWLES and Mahesh Bhupathi (shown in file photo) are hoping
that they can win their first title for the year at the Roland Garros French
Open Grand Slam...

Bahamas International Tennis Club
starts new interclub doubles league

Trophy for winning team is named in honour of J Barrie Farrington

KIT Spencer, president of the Bahamas Inter-
national Tennis Club, has started a new interclub
doubles league and named the trophy for the win-
ning team in honour of IC founder J Barrie Far-
rington.

The club is one of a group of prestigious world-
wide “IC’s” whose members have generally rep-
resented their country or won national titles at
tennis. Mr Farrington was the founder of our
Bahamian IC.

Among some of the international members are
Roger Federer, Tim Henman and our own Mark
Knowles.

The Gym Club team was led by Robbie Isaacs
who is now a full time tennis coach at The Gym
Club in Winton.

After a series of exciting and close matches they
emerged as the eventual winners but only after an
extremely close final match against a Lyford Cay
team in which the outcome of the whole league was
decided in the final set of the final match.

Most of the teams were led by and included
Bahamas IC members but not entirely. The
Bahamas IC invited the BLTA National Tennis
Centre to enter a team of top juniors in the league
which they hoped would give them added experi-
ence against some of our experienced older players.

Although the junior team finished at the low
end of the league they performed very creditably
and only lost matches that were closely contested.

Their team included several members of our
recent Junior Fed and Davis Cup teams and the
experience proved useful for the doubles part of
that event where our juniors performed well.



PRESENTATION TO WINNING GYM CLUB TEAM -
Shown (I-r) are Harry Saunders, Mike Isaacs, Kevin
Archer, Robbie Isaacs, Terry North, Barrie Farrington
(IC Founder), Mickey Williams and Kit Spencer (IC
President)

In July, the club has a veterans team participat-
ing in the Russian IC’s 10th Anniversary event in
Moscow. There will be teams from about a dozen
countries involved in this event.

From September 17-20, the Bahamas IC will
again be sponsoring a junior 16 & under combined
boys and girls team in The IC International Junior
Challenge. This year, bi-annual event will be held
at The Chris Evert Academy in Boca Raton.

The first North American IC Junior Challenge
was hosted four years ago here in the Bahamas by
our own IC. It is anticipated that there will also be
teams from the US, Canada, Mexico, Barbados
and Bermuda.



Nuggets and
Lakers even at
2-2 in Western

finals...
See page 15

‘Spiking’ their
V to the top

Men’s national volleyball team advance to NORCEA’S
H-Qualifying round for FIVB World Championship

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

espite being

held back a day

because of the

lack of funds to

get to Jamaica
and having to overcome a
height differential at the 2010
World Championships
NORCEA’S D-Qualifying
Rounds, the men’s national vol-
leyball team accomplished their
mission.

The Bahamas Volleyball Fed-
eration just missed out in win-
ning the four days of competi-
tion, but they have advanced to
the NORCEA’S H-Qualifying
round in Cuba in August for
the FIVB Men’s Volleyball
World Championship in Italy.

They did it upsetting Jamaica
19-25, 25-18, 25-22 in the semi-
final before losing to Mexico
25-13, 25-14 and 25-16 in the
final.

In Pool B play, the Bahamas
won its opener 22-25, 22-25, 25-



MINISTER OF YOUTH, SPORTS &
CULTURE DESMOND BANNISTER
(right) makes a point to members
of the men’s national volleyball
team as BVFederation president
Don Cornish looks on...

22, 25-18 and 15-11 over St
Lucia. But they lost 25-13, 25-20
and 25-16 to Mexico in their
second match.

On their return home yester-
day via Air Jamaica, the team
was greeted at the Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport by
Minister of Youth, Sports and
Culture Desmond Bannister
and his staff. A welcome recep-
tion was held in the VIP
Lounge.

Bannister, who congratulat-
ed the team for its best perfor-
mance ever, encouraged the
players to get used to the cour-
tesy that is afforded to all
national teams on their return
home as he anticipates the same
type of success in the future.

“Gentlemen, it falls on me on
behalf of the Government and
the people of the Bahamas first
of all to welcome you home. I

SEE page 14

















teh

Bernard Rd - Mackey St - Thompson Blvd

Meee To)

= a

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THE TRIBUNE ©

|

a
=

WEDNESDAY,

MUAY 207 5



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Certification Lay-offs hit Nassau’s

to help better
‘Landscape’

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE NEWLY-incorporated Bahamas Landscape Association
(BLA) and the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI)
have begun a tertiary pilot programme that will certify graduates
and allow them to be duly employed in the industry, the BLA’s co-

chairman sad yesterday.

Conray Rolle added that the programme was still in need of

funding and will be part of the trial certificate programme mediated
through the Daytona Beach Community College in Florida.

Mr Rolle explained that the BTVI certification programme was

proposed in order to give Bahamians the necessary theory and
practical training consistent with international standards.

This endeavour to adhere to international standards, said Mr
Rolle, was the reason the BLA, incorporated in September 2008,
partnered with the Florida Nursery, Growers and Landscape Asso-

ciation (FNGLA).

“What drove us to do this was realising the deficiencies from a
knowledge standpoint, and deficiencies when it come to hiring

new people,” he said.

Mr Rolle argued that the industry has been poorly regulated, with
the misuse of chemicals needed for landscaping and an overall

ineptitude in the industry.

He added that finding labour
qualified to work in the land-

Bar ‘outrage’

SEE page 6B

over FINCO

plan for title insurance

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Bar Council
has expressed “outrage” and
“grave concerns as to the legal-
ity” of FINCO’s proposal to
require title insurance for all
mortgages it issues, but the insti-
tution’s managing director yes-
terday told Tribune Business it
was committed to “moving
ahead” with the initiative in the
interest of consumer protection
and choice.

Tanya McCartney said BISX-
listed FINCO, which is effec-
tively Royal Bank of Canada’s
mortgage lending arm in the
Bahamas, was “in the process
of fine-tuning our decision to
move ahead with providing title

SEE page 4B

* Attorneys claim ‘grave
concern as to the legality’
of mortgage lender’s plan

* But FINCO chief says BISX-
listed firm committed to
moving ahead with title
insurance introduction in
interests of consumer
protection and choice

* Bar concerns likely to centre
on FINCO assertion that ‘no
need’ for title searches, and
subsequent loss of 2.5%
fee income

* Title insurance to be
placed through Higgs
& Johnson affiliate

Resort owner plans to sell

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE economic downturn,
coupled with the dismal tourism
economy in Central Eleuthera,
has convinced the owner of a
North Palmetto Point resort to
finally sell his property.

Owner of Unique Village,
Adison Cooper, told Tribune
Business yesterday that he was
still hopeful of an economic
turnaround later this year. How-
ever, he said he must now “seri-
ously” consider selling the
resort.

“Tt has been very, very rough
to survive at this time,” said Mr
Cooper. “I really have to con-
sider selling at this time.”

With the upcoming Palmetto
Point Homecoming festival,
which is thought to be a signifi-
cant economic boost for
Eleuthera’s hotels, and typically

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
tesponsible for errors and/or omission |
from the daily report.



Eleuthera tourism stunted by
high airlift costs that match
coast-to-coast US flight

generates 100 per cent occu-
pancy for many of them, Mr
Cooper is cautiously optimistic.

He said Unique Village was
currently only at 60 per cent
occupancyu. Last-minute hotel
bookings are the norm, howev-
er, as many Nassuvians decide
to take the weekend trip only
days before.

The chairman for the Home-
coming Festival told Tribune
Business this week that he
expects the festival draw its nor-
mal crowds, and he argues that
hotels are filling up quickly.

Mr Cooper said Eleuthera has
not been as well off as other
islands since the onset of the
global financial crisis, which
sparked the worldwide eco-
nomic recession.

He said Unique Village has
been operating with the mini-
mum staff levels needed at the
moment, because “we aren’t
booked”.

Owner and principal of the
Pineapple Fields Resort, David
Barlyn, said Eleuthera tourism
has been stunted by the high
cost of direct airlift into the
island. He explained that a one-
hour round trip flight direct to
Eleuthera is as expensive as a
four-hour round trip flight coast-
to-coast in the US.

Mr Barlyn said his resort has
seen a 30 per cent occupancy
decline year-on-year, and
though he has not received
many bookings for the home-
coming festival either, he is
expecting an almost full-house
when a Tyler Perry film shoot
comes to the island in a few
weeks.

“We're definitely seeing
things pick up,” he said.

ROYAL FIDELITY



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE

(242) 351-3010

leading law firms

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

iggs & Johnson,

Nassau’s largest

law firm, yes-

terday con-

firmed that it
had laid off a “minor and very
selective number” of staff as the
recession’s chill winds start to
freeze the Bahamian legal ser-
vices profession, as the manag-
ing partner at another leading
company said further redun-
dancies at major firms were
almost inevitable.

Colin Callender, managing
partner at Callender’s & Co,
said in response to Tribune
Business’s questions that the
economic environment facing
Bahamian law firms was cur-
rently the toughest he had expe-
rienced during his decades as a
practicing attorney.

“T anticipate there will be fur-
ther reductions in staff comple-
ments at the larger law firms,

* The largest, Higgs & Johnson, confirms letting go ‘small and very select’ number of staff
* Callender’s & Co’s top partner says economic environment facing legal services toughest he
has seen, with ‘further reductions in staff complements at the larger law firms’ almost inevitable
* Callender’s sees Nassau transaction work fall 30-40%, and 75% in Freeport
* Real property tax cap removal hurts attorneys and realtors

mine included,” Mr Callender
told Tribune Business.

He estimated that Callender’s
& Co had seen transactional
work, such as real estate con-
veyancings and mergers and
acquisitions, was down 30-40
per cent below normal levels.

Mr Callender added that real
estate transactions for both real-
tors and attorneys had been
negatively impacted by the
Government’s 2008-2009 Bud-
get decision to remove the
$35,000 real property tax cap,
discouraging high-end property
transactions by making them
more expensive.

“That is where the larger
firms were making their income.
The agents and attorneys have

been adversely impacted by the
removal of that,” Mr Callender
said.

If things are bad in Nassau,
they are even worse in Freeport.
Fred Smith, the Callender’s &
Co partner based in Freeport’s
second city, told Tribune Busi-
ness: “Our transaction business
is down 75 per cent.

“As far as Callender’s in
Freeport is concerned, we are
suffering the effects of the eco-
nomic downturn. Our commer-
cial work is down about 75 per
cent. The downward trend is
reflected in most of the other
firms in Freeport. Most of the
law firms in Freeport have, over
the latest couple of years, been
reducing their staff because of

Freeport’s economic chal-
lenges.”

Their sentiments were echoed
by John Delaney, Higgs &
Johnson’s managing partner,
who confirmed that a “recali-
bration assessment” completed
last week had identified the
need for “a select and limited”
workforce reduction as part of
both a short and medium-term
plan.

Tribune Business had been
told by legal sources that
between nine to 11 Higgs &
Johnson staff members, includ-
ing some associates and support
staff, had been released by the

SEE page 5B

Bahamas funds pay $235m to settle with Madoff trustee

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

TWO Bahamas-based invest-
ment funds have settled with
the trustee for Bernard Madof-
f’s former firm it was
announced yesterday, agreeing
to pay a collective $235 million
to resolve claims over allega-
tions they withdrew money
from the $50 billion US fraud-
ster’s scheme in the days before
it collapsed.

A statement from their
Bahamian attorneys, Lennox
Paton, said the Optimal Strate-
gic US Equity fund and Opti-
mal Arbitrage fund, had
reached agreement with Irving
Picard, trustee for Bernard L.
Madoff Investment Securities,
to re-pay some 85 per cent of
the funds they withdrew to meet
his “clawback demand”.

Those payments, the release
said, would total $129.057 mil-

How do you attract and retain

* Bahamas-domiciled funds agree to pay back 85% of money they allegedly withdrew in
days before $50bn Ponzi scheme collapse, but no wrongdoing discovered or admitted

* Santander funds’ $1.54bn claims to be allowed in liquidation

* Class action lawsuits name Bahamas-based director of funds as defendant

lion for the Optimal rr
Strategic US Equity |m@
fund, and $106.324 mil-
lion for the Optimal
Arbitrage fund. Both
are domiciled in the
Bahamas as Interna-
tional Business Com-
panies (IBCs).

In return, the two
funds, which are man-
aged by Swiss-based
Optimal Investment
Services, a wholly-
owned subsidiary of
Spanish banking giant, Banco
Santander, will have their claims
permitted by Mr Picard as part
of the Madoff liquidation
process.



Bernard Madoff

The trustee also
reduced his so-called
“clawback demands” in
return for payment of
85 per cent.

The Lennox Paton
statement said: “The
agreement provides
that the funds’ claims
against the Bernard L.
Madoff Investment
Securities estate would
be allowed in their full
amounts, calculated on
a cash-in, cash-out basis
of $1.54 billion [for Optimal
Strategic US Equity fund] and
$9.808 million respectively, and
the funds would be entitled to
Securities Investor Protection

Corporation advances of
$500,000 each.”

Optimal Investment Services
and the Santander group itself
have agreed not to file any oth-
er claims against the Bernard
L. Madoff Investment Securi-
ties estate.

“The agreement also contains
an ‘equal treatment’ provision,
so that of the trustee settles sim-
ilar clawback claims for less
than 85 per cent, the funds will
receive a rebate of a portion of
their payments to equalise the
percentages applied to the
funds,” the Lennox Paton state-
ment said.

SEE page 3B

‘best of class’ employees?

‘ait

WITH A *BEST OF CLASS’ PENSION PLAN
Superior performance * Cost effective * Customised
Call the Royal Fidelity pension experts today!

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sie ss


PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED

NOTICE

Please be advised that the Head Office and
the Registered Office of the company will be

moved from the Bahamas Financial Centre,
Charlotte & Shirley Streets, 2nd Floor, Nassau,
Bahamas to Royal Bank House, East Hill Street,
Nassau, Bahamas effective 25th May, 2009.

D. BURROWS-HAINES (Mrs.)
Corporate Secretary

Dated this 22nd May 2009



Almost

times

more loads

other brands

THE TRIBUNE



aa ee
Don’t waste my key time

THIS conversation happens
at least a couple of times a
month.

In my opinion, time is the
most valuable asset any of us
have. I respect other people’s
time and my time. Therefore, I
will not let anyone else disre-
spect my time and neither
should you.

To save time in sales and
stop chasing your own tail - or
other people’s tails - qualify
them first. If they don’t qualify
they are not worth your time.

Do this !

WHAT IS A QUALIFIED

CUSTOMER?

One who has need?

One who needs a product?

One who has authority to
purchase?

One who purchases in a rea-
sonable timeframe?

One who has means/funds to
purchase?

Asking these questions will
immediately let you know what
to do. Either they qualify or
they don’t. There is no middle
of the road. Either they are
worth your time or they or not.

Too many times, sales and
marketing persons continually
call and knock on doors when
nobody is home or at the office.

Stop wasting your time.

Office Environment TIME

WASTERS

Most of us work in an envi-
ronment with other people. We
all know that someone who
loves to come by your work
area, sit down and talk about
the weekend and any other lat-
est celebrity/gossip news. Time
wasters. Yep, that’s what I call
them, TIME WASTERS. Here
is how you deal with them.

DO THIS!
Close your door if you have
one. If the boss does not mind,

are) mi tal= My Col a (=1-)
behind the news,

syle Mara le ints
on Mondays



Ty

Promotional
Marketing



by Scott Farrington

put a ‘Do not disturb’ sign on
your door and phone.

Most time wasters cannot
read or see. So, even if you
have your door closed, they still
knock and come right in. To
avoid them sitting down, put
stuff in all the chairs in your
office or take chairs out of your
office. When you need the
chairs, bring them back in.

However, we also have what
I call SUPER TIME
WASTERS. These are the
ones who will open a closed
door without knocking, remove
items from a chair that you
have strategically placed to dis-
courage them from sitting
down, and plunk themselves
down for a nice long chat. Here
is how you deal with aSUPER
TIMEWASTER.

Take off your belt and tell
them if they ever come back
again yowll ............

OK, seriously. If a super time
waster ignores the closed door,
the ‘do not disturb’ sign,
removes items from the extra
chair in your office and tries to
sit down, simply get up out yof
our seat, walk up to him or her
and ........e cece (It’s not what
yow’re thinking) start walking
towards your door to exit your
office. Gently put your hand
on their back and motion them
back out into the hallway. Nod
your head like you arr listening
and then say: “OOOPS, I
FORGOT SOMETHING
REAL IMPORTANT. PLL
CALL YA LATER”. Go back
in your office, closing the door
behind you

This works like a charm. Try
it.

Let’s suppose you don’t have
an office with a door, but work
in an Open environment or a
cubicle.

DO THIS!

Hang a do not disturb sign
prominently where you can.

Put on a headset connected
to the phone.

ULTAA

| _ =
VOWNY,

))

If a time waster approaches,
pretend you’re on the phone
and they will walk away. If a
SUPER TIMEWASTER
shows up, stand on your chair,
jump over the cubicle and run.

OK, seriously. So you are
pretending to be on the phone
with your headset (and you
very may well be talking to
someone). The SUPER TIME-
WASTER shows up and stands
there waiting for you to finish
(remember, they have all the
time in the world) your con-
versation, and may even tap
you on the shoulder.

CALMLY (Yes, I said calm-
ly) turn around, ask the person
on the phone to politely hold
and ask the SUPER TIME-
WASTER ............04. (again,
it’s not really what I know you
want to say). Ask: “IS IT AN
EMERGENCY”? = Some
9.999999 times out of 10, it is
not. The SUPER TIME
WATER will say: “No, it’s not
an emergency.” Then you can
politely turn around and con-
tinue your conversation with
the person you left on hold.

Doing this will set the prece-
dent for all possible future
attacks from any form of a time
waster.

I don’t know about you guys,
but in today’s world my time
is super valuable and I rightly
protect it. So should you .

All of these marketing strate-
gies are certain to keep your
business on top during these
challenging economic times.
Have a productive and prof-
itable week! Remember:
“THOSE WHO MARKET
WILL MAKE IT *

NB: Scott Farrington is pres-
ident of SunTee EmbroidMe, a
promotional and marketing
company specialising in pro-
motional products. Established
over 27 years ago, SunTee
EmbroidMe has assisted
Bahamian businesses in vari-
ous industries - ranging from
tourism and banking to
telecommunications - in mar-
keting themselves. Readers can
contact Mr Farrington at Sun-
Tee EmbroidMe on East
Shirley Street, by e-mail at
scott@sun-tee.com or by tele-
phone at 242-393-3104.


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009, PAGE 3B







MADOFF, from page 1B

It added that Mr Picard had
investigated the conduct of the
two funds, and Optimal Invest-
ment Services, in dealing with
Mr Madoff, and found that this
“does not provide grounds to
assert any claim against the
Optimal companies or any oth-
er part of the Santander group
other than the clawback
claims”. The clawback liability,
the statement said, did not
imply wrongdoing.

The agreement, which is sub-
ject to US Bankruptcy Court
approval at a New York hearing
on June 16, releases all other
“clawback” and other claims
that Mr Picard may have against

the Bahamian investment funds
as a result of their investments
with Mr Madoff’s company.

“The trustee’s release would
apply to all potential claims
against other Optimal compa-
nies, Santander companies and
their investors, directors, offi-
cers and employees who agree
to release the trustee and the
Bernard L. Madoff Investment
Securities Estate, to the extent
the claims arose out of the
funds’ dealings with Bernard L.
Madoff Investment Securities,”
the Lennox Paton statement
read.

“Tt also releases both funds
from potential clawback liabili-

NOTICE

MUNIA (BAHAMAS) SHIPPING LTD.

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of
the International Business Companies Act 2000,

notice

is hereby given that the above-named

Company has been dissolved and struck off the Register

pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The
Registrar General on the 20th day of May, A.D., 2009.

Dated the 22nd day of May, A.D., 2009.

Mr. Swen-Uwe Horvath and Dr. Jochen Koeber
Joint-Liquidators of
MUNIA (BAHAMAS) SHIPPING LTD.



CREDIT SUISSE TRUST LIMITED

Consolidated Balance Sheet

December 31, 2008, with corresponding figures for 2007
(Expressed in United States dollars)

Assets
Cash and due from banks:

Cash and demand deposits:

Affiliate
Other

Time deposits - affiliate
Time deposit - other
Accounts receivable, net

Prepaid expenses and other assets

Fixed assets, net

Note

Property tax cap’s
removal loses sales

THE removal of the $35,000
real property tax cap has cost
Bahamian realtors sales, a lead-
ing real estate agent has said.

With the change to 1.5 per
cent taxation on property, bro-
Ker Mario Carey has seen poten-
tial clients walk away. “Espe-
cially in these times when every-
one is watching how they
spend,” he said, hoping that
today’s Budget will reflect
changes requested by the
Bahamas Real Estate Associa-
tion.

“The economic benefits to the
community of the sale of a single

ty for any other withdrawals
made by them.”

Banco Santander ignited a
fire storm of investor protest
when it revealed on 14 Decem-
ber, 2008, that it had a EUR
2.33 billion ($3.1 billion) expo-
sure to Mr Madoff’s fraudulent
Ponzi scheme via the Bahamas-
domiciled Optimal Strategic US
Equity fund.

Some EUR 2.01 billion of this
sum belonged to Santander’s
institutional investors and glob-
al private banking customers,
with the remaining EUR 320
million coming from structured
products that formed part of the
investment portfolio for the
bank’s Spanish private banking
customers.

That fury resulted in two
class-action lawsuits being filed
in the Miami courts against
Banco Santander. Also named
as defendants were Optimal
Investment Services, as fund
manager; HSBC Securities Ser-
vices (Ireland) and HSBC Insti-
tutional Trust Services (Ire-
land), as administrator and cus-
todian; and the three directors
of Optimal Multiadvisors, the
master fund for both the Opti-
mal Strategic US Equity fund
and Optimal Arbitrage Fund.

Among the directors named
as defendants in the class action
lawsuit filed on January 26,
2009, by a Chilean company,
Inversiones Mar Octava Limi-
tada, which allegedly invested
$300,000 in the Optimal Strate-
gic US Equity fund, was Antho-
ny InderRieden, managing
director of Euro-Dutch Trust
Company (Bahamas).

That company, a licensed
trust company since 1975, is

188,811
70,675

339,205
1,083,957
259,486 1,423,162
7,125,000 4,100,000
- 1,000,000
144,329 297,771
282,478 386,135
97,592 142,489

$ 7,908,885 7,349,557

SSG Apa rr Utrera SIA

Liabilities

Fees billed in advance

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

Due to affiliates
Other liabilities

Shareholder's Equity

Share capital:

Authorized, issued and fully paid:
1,000,000 shares of $1.00 each

Additional paid-in capital
Retained earnings

Commitment

See accompanying notes to consolidated balance sheet.

The consolidated balance sheet was approved on behalf of

the following:

/:

NMC SALES, SERVICE and PARTS
All for One NEW NUMBER

Distributors for Honda, Chevrolet, Cadillac and ACDelco Parts | Shirley Street, Nassau

Director

467,044
570,162
478,075
10,000
1,525,281

775,141
490,101
476,088
5,000
1,746,930

1,000,000
1,000,000
4,383,604
6,383,604

1,000,000
1,000,000
3,602,627
5,602,627

$ 7,908,885 7,349,557

ogrd of Dj eqtors on April 27, 2009 by ~

Director

302

large home, over a period of
time, outweigh the benefits of
real property tax. Stamp tax
alone on a $10 million home is
$1 million, straight to govern-
ment. But if that buyer goes else-
where because he thinks the
$150,000 a year for real proper-
ty tax is unacceptable, govern-
ment loses the stamp tax and
The Bahamas loses the income
that the occupancy of that home
would have generated.”
“Prices have definitely
dropped anywhere from 15% -
20%,” Mr Carey added, “but we
spend a lot of time talking about

based at Charlotte House on
Charlotte Street. The Inver-
siones lawsuit alleged that Mr
InderRieden had served as
director of Optimal Multiadvi-
sors’ first administrator, the for-
mer Fortis Fund Services
(Bahamas).

There is nothing to suggest
that Mr InderRieden or Euro-
Dutch Trust Company
(Bahamas) have done anything
wrong in relation to the Opti-
mal fund’s affair.

The Inversiones lawsuit
alleged that the defendants had
breached their legal duties to
investors by failing to carry out
proper due diligence on Mr
Madoff and his company, as
“there was a plethora of red
flags that would have alerted
any reasonable investor that
Madoff was running a Ponzi
scheme”.

The lawsuit further alleged
that Optimal Investment Ser-
vices received a management
fee equivalent to 1.9 per cent
of assets under management,
almost EUR 44 million annu-
ally.





the new needs in a changing
market. Interest rates are low,
as low as 3 per cent in some
places in the US, so many people
want to use the equity in their
homes to invest in their own
businesses or keep them afloat,
or they want to buy real estate
while prices are right.”

Others are taking equity out
for personal reasons or need
appraisals for tax or estate plan-
ning reasons. This means real
estate offices such as Mario
Carey Realty, with certified
appraisers, are doing a record
business in appraisals.

“We exceeded expectations
by a long shot,” said Mr Carey,
who specialises in properties in
Ocean Club Estates, Paradise
Island, Lyford Cay, Old Fort
Bay, Albany and in the Family
Islands, of Mario Carey Real-
ty’s first year.

He credits a “young, energetic
and dynamic staff” that has dou-
bled in size from two to four,
and added a webmaster.

“Tt’s their hard work and team
work that have helped to get us
here,” said Mr Carey this week
as he prepared for the compa-
ny’s first celebration dinner.

LONG ISLAND
REGATTA
EXCURSION

Onboard: M/V Legend

Sails: June 3rd, 2009
Returns: June 7th, 2009

Tickets $99/Cars $399.00
Telephone:

3356-6672/3

Music, Food, Drinks, Fun!!!



PUBLIC AUCTION

SATURDAY, MAY 30, 2009









By Order of

The Bahamas Development Bank
Cable Beach, Nassau, The Bahamas
Commonwealth of The Bahamas








I. G. STUBBS WILL SELL

WHAT:

Equility
Loa 49’
Beam 16
Depth 4

Year/Mk/Eng

Vessels

1981 Defender Vessel,

Caterpillar 3208 engine

Location

Loa 51
Beam
Depth 5’
Year/Mk/Eng

17°.5”

Bayshore Marina East Bay Street

1996 Fiberglass Vessel,

Caterpillar 3412 engine

Location

Bayshore Marina East Bay Street

Three (3) assorted used vessels as set out in the schedule below:

LOCATION: Bayshore Marina East Bay Street - Nassau The Bahamas

TIME: 11:00am — Saturday, May 30th, 2009 — Preview and Inspection from 9:00am
Until Auction time at the site.

TERMS: All items to be Sold Where Is As Is for Cash, Cashier’ Cheque or current
Bank Guarantee Letter. Purchase will not be released until paid for in full not later
than 4:00pm Tuesday, June 2", 2009. Where a deposit is required, the same is non
refundable. If final payment is not made by 4:00pm Tuesday, June 2", 2009 any and
all deposits made will be forfeited.

Any and all Notices or amendments by Auctioneer on said Auction Day whether
written or verbal shall supersede this or any subsequent advertisement.

For further information contact I.G. Stubbs at 322-2028 or Fax: 328-8086 or
Email: igstubbs@coralwave.com

or

Bahamas Development Bank
At (242) 327-5780/ 702-5730/702-5714

Or Fax (242) 702-5047

email: bahamasdevelopmentbank.com

I.G. Stubbs

PUBLIC AUCTIONEER — LICENSE #0360



-0130 Keonvc
PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



aa eer a ree
Bar ‘outrage’ over FINCO plan for title insurance

FROM page 1B

insurance” to all its mortgage
clients.

The only details left were to
determine how this would be
done, Ms McCartney explain-
ing to Tribune Business that
FINCO had listened to the Bar
Council’s concerns and would
attempt to take them into
account. Yet FINCO had not
moved from its commitment to
roll-out title insurance as a way
to enhance consumer protec-
tion and choice.

The Bar Council’s concerns
were sparked by an April 1,
2009, letter sent to its Bahamian
attorney members by Patrice
Ritchie, FINCO’s senior man-
ager for mortgages, in which she
confirmed the lending institu-
tion’s plans to require title
insurance for all mortgages it
issued.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

The real trigger for the Bar
Council’s opposition is likely to
have been the line in Mrs
Ritchie’s letter that attorneys
“will not have to prepare an
opinion on title on behalf of
RBC FINCO”, and all this
implies.

FINCO, in urging Bahamian
attorneys to consider “a flat
fee” with respect to the prepa-
ration of mortgage documents,
including their execution,
stamping and recording, is
essentially implying that the
introduction of title insurance
into this nation’s
mortgage/home buying market
will eliminate the need for
lawyers to do the current vol-
ume of work they handle, espe-
cially title searches.

Less work means that
Bahamian attorneys are unlike-
ly to be able to charge the cur-
rent fees - usually pegged at 2.5
per cent of the real estate trans-
action’s worth - for conveyanc-
ing work, thus reducing income
for a considerable number of
the profession.

This would happen at a time
when the Bahamian legal ser-
vices profession is already under
intense pressure from the glob-
al economic downturn, real
estate and transactional work
having dropped on average by
40 per cent, so any further cuts
in - or loss- of income will be

Mrs Ritchie’s letter, a copy
of which has been obtained by
Tribune Business, said: “In an
effort to improve the whole
mortgage experience for our
clients, by speeding up the legal
process and reducing their out-
of-pocket costs, RBC FINCO
will be requiring title insurance
on all mortgages granted after
April 30, 2009.

“We anticipate that in the
economic environment, title
insurance will result in a most
welcomed cost-saving for the
client. Hence, we are writing to
request your consideration of a
flat fee with respect to mort-
gage preparation, inclusive of
execution, stamping and record-
ing of the same, plus any dis-
bursements made to pay the
title insurance premium.”

Mrs Ritchie said FINCO
would advise its mortgage
clients of the fees charged for
this service, and added: “In the
circumstances, you will not have
to prepare an opinion of title
on behalf of RBC FINCO.”

Attorneys will also be
required to complete the mort-
gage documents within a maxi-
mum of five weeks, Mrs Ritchie
said.

The letter enclosed the insti-

tution’s revised Letter of
Instruction for Bahamian attor-
neys, requiring that they “liaise
with First Bahamas Title Insur-
ance Agency to obtain a
lender’s title insurance policy
on behalf of RBC FINCO with
respect to the marketability of
title”. The attorneys were told
to provide all relevant title doc-
uments, plus subdivision
approvals and real property tax
assessments.

Triggered

This is likely to have triggered
alarm among rival law firms,
because First Bahamas Title
Insurance Agency, which acts
as the Bahamian agent for
Lawyers Title Insurance Cor-
poration, is an affiliate of Higgs
& Johnson.

Higgs & Johnson are the
attorneys for Royal Bank of
Canada, and the firm’s manag-
ing partner, John Delaney, sits
on FINCO’s Board of Direc-
tors.

Title insurance, which is in
widespread use in many juris-
dictions, such as the US, pro-
vides homeowners and real
estate purchases with coverage
should the title to their proper-



particularly unappreciated.

Position of Accountant

A financial institution seeks an Accountant. Candi-
dates must have at least 3-5 years experience in ac-
counting in the financial industry with sound knowl-
edge of but not limited to:

¢ Formulating budgets
¢ Managing Accounts Receivables and Payables

¢ Preparation of monthly and annual financial re-
ports and statements

¢ Preparation of bank reconciliations and various
general ledger accounts to the sub ledgers

¢ Co-ordinate the annual audit with external auditors
and preparation of the necessary schedules

¢ Preparing reports for the regulators
¢ Must be a team player

¢ Must possess people skills and be prepared to
interact with members

* Qualifications: AA in Accounting

Please forward resume to
P. O. Box N-7544

COMMONWEALTH
BREWERY LTD.

WAREHOUSE
ADMINISTRATOR

The successful candidate would be required to:

- Ensure that the quantity and quality of the goods
received are checked.

- Check for damage to goods and carry out relevant
documentation.

- Assure holding of blocked products until further notice.

- Arrange sale of articles authorised for disposal.

- Prepare reports on disposed materials.

- Carry out physical inventory checks and verify with
Accounts Department.

- Issue and dispatch outgoing stocks based on FIFO
method.

- Ensure proper disposal of packaging materials in case
of quality issues.

- Entrance control for raw and packaging materials.

- Ensure that all export orders are packed and delivered
to designated shipping carrier.

- Compile stock inventory reports

- Supervise forklift operators

All interested persons are asked to
fax resumes to:

(242) 362-4793



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MAXEN PROPHETE of 1611
NE, 3RDAVE., APT. 5, DELRAY BEACH, FLORIDA, 33444,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 20"! day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ORINDA TAMARA KATHLEEN
WILTSHIRE of #2 BACHELOR’S HOUSE, HUDSON AVENUE,
FREEPORT, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 27 day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARTIN JERMAINE
McGREGOR OF #25 DIAMOND DRIVE, P.O. BOX F-44900,
GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 20th
day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO. Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
AIRLEASE EIGHT LIMITED is in dissolution. Mrs Alrena
Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at Winterbotham
Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names addresses and
particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before June 8th, 2009

NOTICE

G. LEUBA & CO. INC.

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) G.LEUBA&CO. INC. is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 26th
May, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse Trust Limited,
Nassau Bahamas.

Dated this 26th day of May, A. D. 2009



Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

ties at a later stage be shown
defective.

It is now starting to catch on
in the Bahamas, with major for-
eign mixed-use resort develop-
ers requiring title insurance
before they can sell to second
home buyers.

However, Bahamian attor-
neys are arguing that title
searches are essential, due to
the numerous defects with hun-
dreds of potential titles in this
nation. Missing deeds and con-
veyancing documents have con-
tributed to breaks in many
chains of title.

One attorney, who request-
ed anonymity, said of FINCO’s
plans to require no title search-
es: “There are hundreds of titles
with problems, and there will
be no one to check them.

“T don’t see how that’s going
to help the country. It’s going to
create a maelstrom.”

The Bar Council, in its April
24, 2009, reply to FINCO, a
copy of which has also been
obtained by Tribune Business,
said: “The response of our
members has been one of out-
rage, and there are grave con-
cerns as to the legality of the
proposed measures and the pro-
tection of the public’s interest.”

Quite what the Bar Council’s
concerns were cannot be
gleaned from the letter signed
by its honorary secretary,
Rachel Culmer.

However, Ms McCartney,
FINCO’s managing director,
told Tribune Business last night:
“They [the Bar Council] have
expressed some concerns to us
that we have decided to do this,
but we have not gotten back to
them with our final decision.
We are still mulling it over as to
how we take their concerns into
account.

“We are committed to intro-
ducing title insurance. We cer-

tainly believe our customers
should have the option as to
whether they rely on an opinion
of title, or whether they get title
insurance.

“It is about the customer.
That is the approach we will
take, as we will put it to our cus-
tomers that this is something
we feel is in their best interests.
For us, at the end of the day,
as a bank we have to be con-
cerned about our customers.”

While defective titles were
“not prevalent” in FINCO’s
$600 million-plus mortgage
portfolio, Ms McCartney said
that if subsequent to a purchase
the title was shown to be faulty,
then the purchaser’s recourse -
to sue their attorneys for negli-
gence and claim against their
professional indemnity insur-
ance - was still problematic.

“We see this as a way to pro-
tect the customer,” she
explained. “We are committed
to reducing the transaction clos-
ing costs, and are going to move
ahead.”

Mortgage customers were
often making their life’s most
important investment, Ms
McCartney said, adding:
“We’ve listened to their [the
Bar Council’s] concerns, but at
the end of the day, we feel the
customer, being fully informed
and educated, will go ahead
with title insurance.

“Our position at this time is
that clients should have the
option as to whether they rely
solely on an opinion of title, or
whether they should take out
title insurance.”

Ms McCartney said real
estate purchasers would be able
to close transactions more
quickly, and as soon as they
received a title insurance com-
mitment, another reason FIN-
CO would forge ahead with its
plans.



Notice

PHARMA MANAGEMENT CORP.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act. 2000,
PHARMA MANAGEMENT CORP. is in dissolution as
of May 22, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A Regent
Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
AIRLEASE FIVE LIMITED is in dissolution. Mrs Alrena
Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at Winterbotham
Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names addresses and
particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before June 8th, 2009

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
AIRLEASE SIX LIMITED is in dissolution. Mrs Alrena Moxey is
the Liquidator and can be contacted at Winterbotham Place,
Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons having
claims against the above-named company are required to send their
names addresses and particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before
June 8th, 2009

a

ALBETA MOREY
Le Te.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009, PAGE 5B



Lay-offs hit leading law firms

FROM page 1B

law firm. Other major firms
were also said to have laid-off
similar numbers of staff,
although Tribune Business was
unable to confirm this before
press time.

Mr Delaney, though declin-
ing to identify where the job
losses had occurred, said they
“would be less than the lower
number you mentioned. That
range would be just a bit above
what we’ve” concluded.

The Higgs & Johnson man-
aging partner said there was “no
question” that Bahamian legal
firms across the board had
experienced a decline in busi-
ness, having told Tribune Busi-
ness last month that his firm
had seen real estate-related
work decline by 40 per cent
compared to normal levels.

“T would say that was a good
estimate at the time, and it’s not
improved since,” Mr Delaney
told Tribune Business. “That’s
just the reality. What you’d find
at every firm in the country, if
they’re being completely forth-

right with you, is that they
would say the same thing.

“[’m aware that we’re not
alone. We were not the first,
and I doubt we’ll be the last.”

Mr Delaney added: “We will
essentially tough it out with our
core group, both the support
staff and our attorney comple-
ment, while restructuring with
the group to make sure we’re
working as efficiently and effec-
tively as possible.

“We have clear ideas on how
we can do just that, and we’re
still the largest employer in rela-
tion to legal skills.”

Mr Delaney said the internal
assessment completed last week
was one in a Series of exercises
Higgs & Johnson carried out to
determine whether it was oper-
ating efficiently, and whether
additional resources needed to
be targeted at certain areas.

The latest review had shown
the need to introduce informa-
tion technology (IT) in certain
areas and revamp other work-
ing systems, Mr Delaney said.

He added: “On the human
resources side, we have deter-
mined and known for some
time - a couple of quarters dat-

ing back to late last year - that
there had been substantial
declines in certain market areas.

“Basically, what we have
done and completed last week
was our assessment as to
whether we were carrying per-
sons in excess of our needs and
to what extent we needed to
reduce our workforce.”

Company

However, Mr Delaney
explained that while the com-
pany was responding to market
conditions, it was also operating
to a long-term plan. This meant
it still employed persons “not
fully utilised” currently but con-
sidered as “core to the firm”.

“By no means was it a one-
sided exercise or one aspect of
human resources,” Mr Delaney
said of the review, pointing out
that it encompassed short and
medium-term objectives, and
internal development plans.

“To the extent there was a
limited reduction in staff [Higgs
& Johnson employs more than
100] it was not easily contem-
plated at all,” he added. “This is
among the most difficult deci-

sions any employer has to take,
and that was the case for us, but
ultimately we had to make the
hard decision.”

Meanwhile, Mr Callender
added: “I think that we have
seen a significant slowdown in
what we call transactional mat-
ters, mainly conveyancings and
the like.

“Everyone is now having to
look at their bottom line very
carefully, and we are having to
become a lot more competitive.

‘I don’t think there’s room
for expansion at the moment;
certainly not. It’s most unfor-
tunate, because having to lay
people off in this economic mar-
ket is very difficult. It’s a hard
decision, because there’s not
many alternatives [jobs] out
there.”

Mr Callender said firms with
a diversified practice, such as
Higgs & Johnson; McKinney,
Bancroft & Hughes; Graham,
Thompson & Co; and his own
were in better shape, with liti-
gation likely to become “a
mainstay”. Companies that had
exclusively relied on con-
veyancings were likely to strug-

gle.

Real E Estate

at eR CaM amet eI

Everywhere Wg ey lel



untateleata ae

ACURA ale



GN-865

GOVERNMENT
NOTICE

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER
NOTICE

THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT
(CHAPTER 326)

lt is hereby notified pursuant to Section 7 of the Industries Encouragement
Act that the Minister is about to consider whether the following products
should be declared “APPROVED PRODUCTS” for the purpose of that
Act.

RAW MATERIALS TO BE USED
IN MANUFACTURE

PRODUCTS

Coconut, Jatropha Oil, Miscanthus,

oe Cane, Potassium Hydroxide,
Potassium Methoxide, Sodium
Hydroxide, Sodium Methoxide,

Biodiesel, Biomass, Ethanol Phosphoric Acid/HCL

Any interested person having any objection to such a declaration should give
notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds thereof to the Office of the
Prime Minister, before the 8th day of June, 2009, by letter addressed to:-

THE PERMANENT SECRETARY
OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER
P.O. Box CB-10980
NASSAU, N.P.,

THE BAHAMAS

DAVID R. DAVIS
Permanent deilatecel ll

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER |
NOTICE

THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT
(CHAPTER 326)

It is hereby notified pursuant to Section 5 of the Industries Encouragement
Act, Chapter 301, that the Minister is about to consider whether the

manufacturer specified in the first column of the table below should be
declared an “APPROVED MANUFACTURER?” in relation to the products
specified in the third column.

MANUFACTURER LOCATION OF PRODUCTS
FACTORY PREMISES

Biodiesel, Biomass,
Ethanol

Natural Oils Abaco, The Bahamas

International

Any interested person having any objection to such a declaration should give
notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds thereof to the Office of the
Prime Minister, before the 8th day of June, 2009, by letter addressed to:-

THE PERMANENT SECRETARY
OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER
P.O. Box CB-10980
NASSAU, N.P.,

THE BAHAMAS

DAVID R. DAVIS
Permanent Secretary



GOVERNMENT
NOTICE

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER
NOTICE

THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT
(CHAPTER 326)

li is hereby notified pursuant to Section 7 of the Industries Encouragement
Act that the Minister is about to consider whether the following products
should be declared “APPROVED PRODUCTS" for the purpose of that
Act.

RAW MATERIALS TO BE USED
IN MANUFACTURE

PRODUCTS

Unfinished cabinet doors, lumber,
plywood, formica, corian, nails,
Cabinets ecrews, wood, hardware, contact
cement

Any interested person having any objection to such a declaration should give
notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds thereof to the Office of the
Prime Minister, before the 8th day of June, 2009, by letter addressed to:-

THE PERMANENT SECRETARY
OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER
P.O. Box CB-10980
NASSAU, N.P.,

THE BAHAMAS

DAVID R. DAVIS
Permanent ee

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER |
NOTICE

THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT
(CHAPTER 326)

It is hereby notified pursuant to Section 5 of the Industries Encouragement
Act, Chapter 301, that the Minister is about to consider whether the

manufacturer specified in the first column of the table below should be
declared an “APPROVED MANUFACTURER?” in relation to the products
specified in the third column.

MANUFACTURER LOCATION OF PRODUCTS
FACTORY PREMISES

The Abaco Cabinet Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Cabinets
Company The Bahamas

Any interested person having any objection to such a declaration should give
notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds thereof to the Office of the
Prime Minister, before the 8th day of June, 2009, by letter addressed to:-

THE PERMANENT SECRETARY
OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER
P.O. Box CB-10980
NASSAU, N.P.,

THE BAHAMAS

DAVID R. DAVIS
Permanent Secretary
PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



NOTICE

MUNIA (BAHAMAS) MANAGEMENT LTD.

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice is
hereby given that the above-named Company has been
dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant to a

Certificate of Dissolution issued by The Registrar
General on the 20th day of May, A.D., 2009.

Dated the 22nd day of May, A.D., 2009.
Mr. Swen-Uwe Horvath and Dr. Jochen Koeber

Joint-Liquidators of
MUNIA (BAHAMAS) MANAGEMENT LTD.



Young Bahamians take control of financial futures

A dozen young Bahamians
are ready to become “the chief
executives of their own lives”,
having become the most recent
graduates of an eight-week
financial workshop put on by
Creative Wealth Bahamas.

The seminar, held at St Barn-
abas Parish Hall, was a joint
effort by programme director
and founder of Creative Wealth
Bahamas, Keshelle Kerr, and
the Alpha Kappa Alpha Soror-
ity.

“Part of our mandate in
Alpha Kappa Alpha is to uplift
and empower African Ameri-
cans and Black people,”
explained Nicola Evans, of the
internationally-recognised
sorority’s Bahamas chapter.

“We chose to work closely
with this group as a part of our
mandate to help advance the

SSE

DHL JOB DESCRIPTION

POSITION:
JOB FAMILY:
RCS CODE:
REPORTS TO:
LOCATION:

Collections Agent

Credit & Collections
A20004

Collections Lead

Country Finance Department

OVERALL PURPOSE:

Under limited supervision in a team environment provide efficient and effec-
tive credit approvals. To ensure timely credit application processing, respond to
information requests and issues. Ensure accuracy of all credit decisions functions
while staying within company policy and procedural guidelines.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

Gathers, compiles and maintains basic credit information to be used in

making credit decisions.

Reviews and monitors credit sources, customer applications and
delinquent accounts. Processes credit applications.
Works with smaller customers to resolve collections issues and disputes.

Investigates disputes and reviews documentation.

Prepares and processes credit and collections account adjustments.

Implements credit suspensions.

Recommends further actions on delinquent accounts.

Maintains records of credit risks and delinquent accounts.

Provides support and coordination with third party agencies as needed.
Handles customer calls related to Collection Agency accounts.

Prepares and files bankruptcy claim documents.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

High School diploma required. .
1-3 years of experience in Collections.

Advanced administrative skills to function effectively with limited
direction amid competing priorities and deadlines.

Excellent customer service orientation and communication skills.
Proficiency using various computer software applications.

Excellent analytical and interpersonal skills.

Proficiency using various computer software applications

For more information please contact:
Romell K. Knowles I

Country Manager
Email:Romell.Knowles@dhl.com



ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

cr A LL

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:

TUESDAY, 26 MAY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,601.00 | CHG -12.25 | %CHG -0.76 | YTD -111.36 | YTD % -6.50
FINDEX: CLOSE 797.44 | YTD -4.48% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW _.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

S2wk-Low
1.28
11.00
6.94

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
2.83 Colina Holdings
6.00 Commonwealth Bank (S1)
1.31 Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank

1.40
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
1.95
11.09

0.63
3.15
2.37
11.65
2.83
6.25
3.04
1.32
7.76
11.00
10.40

1.32
6.02
10.97
10.35

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol. EPS
1.40
11.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.74
2.83
6.00
3.00
1.32
7.76
10.97
10.40

black male. We felt that if they
build a firm financial founda-
tion now, when they become
adults they will be able to make
sound decisions for them-
selves.”

“During the eight weeks, the
boys covered many money top-
ics such as spending, budgeting,
investing, borrowing, debt
(good and bad) and, of course,
entrepreneurship, all in a fun
and engaging manner,” said Ms
Kerr. “Each now knows what
it is to become a financial suc-
cess”.

Parents of the graduates
agreed that some elements of
the course have already affected
their households in a positive
way. Andrew Stanford said his
son’s focus on money has
become more intense, while
Ricardo Munroe was pleased
his son is able to learn such
lessons so early.

“The things my son learns
today will keep him going on
tomorrow,” said Mr Munroe.

“One thing I realise as an
adult looking back, is that we
waste so much time making
financial mistakes simply
because we do not know what
to do. I wish I had known some
of the things Ms Kerr taught
them because I would have had
an advantage. But Iam glad my
son has learnt to make it applic-
able to his life and business
because now he has the tools
to become a millionaire — of

FROM page 1B

scaping field has impeded the
industry. Now, with the imple-
mentation of an internationally
recognised training programme,
Bahamian landscape firms can
become more competitive
nationally and internationally.

According to the BLA’s web-
site, bla-fngla.org, membership
already includes Caribbean
Landscape, Atlantis, Genesis
Landscaping and Maintenance
and Adka Laboratories.

The site also lists the bene-
fits of joining the BLA which
includes education of manage-
ment, internationally recognsed
certifications, and the estab-
lishment of grades and stan-
dards for the industry.

The association also promises
to lobby government for pro-
posals beneficial to the indus-
try, filter landscaping education
and awareness into the schools,
and provide supplier discounts
to its members.

“We are particularly excited
about getting pilot programmes
of this level of professional cer-
tifications into the senior class-
es in the high schools,” said Mr
Rolle.

“We understand the vast
need for young people out there
looking for a head start in
advancing their education and
in the business world. This is a
great programme for just that.”

Thus far, managers at
Atlantis have been the first to
become certified, and 50 per-
sons have already entered into
the programme.

Mr Rolle said he was hopeful
that the BLA, like the FNGLA,
will be able to assist in drafting
legislation sensitive to the indus-
try, and lobby the government
to curb issues dealing with water
restrictions and misuse and
overuse of fertilizers.

The BLA sees this pro-
gramme as pivotal in creating
standards in the industry and
providing “critical training to
employees in the industry”.

EG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES
co Za

clTeayv dca me Tt & TT.

s. Div $ P/E

0.127 11.0
0.992 11.1
0.244 28.4

-0.877 N/M

0.078 40.4
0.055 43.1
1.406 8.3
0.249 11.4
0.419 14.3
0.111 27.0
0.240 5.5
0.420 18.5
0.322 34.1
0.794 13.1



THIS young millionaire in the making displays his dream board during the
recent eight-week Financial Workshop hosted by Creative Wealth.

course, once that happens I can
retire.”

The students plant the seeds
of financial success by holding
down imaginary jobs and having
the option to spend funds on a
variety of things such as rent,
vehicles, bills or on pleasure
items. They also had to create a
poster to show what they want-
ed in their lives.

“Tm really happy to have tak-
en part in this course,” said
Travis, one of the graduates.

Photo: Arthia Nixon

“Overall I’ve learned that I’ve
got to pay myself first. Most
importantly, I realise that I have
to tell my money where I want
it to go instead of asking myself
one day where it all went. | am
the chief executive of my own
life.”

Ms Kerr, the only certified
creative wealth coach and youth
financial educator in the
Bahamas, is also the organiser
of Camp Millionaire and The
Money Game.

COMMONWEALTH
BREWERY LTD.

TPM COORDINATOR

The successful candidate would be required to:

- Facilitating the horizontal expansion of TPM in the

brewery.

- Provide Management/Pillars/Teams with advice and

support on TPM concept

- Ensuring TPM activities continuously match Brewery’s
Mission and KPI’s (HMS) through loss deployments

- Formulating, together with management, the TPM 3
year Master Plan and ensuring regular evaluation and

update

- Supporting Management with implementation of the
internal/external Audit System to ensure and manage

the change

- Stimulating the use of standard forms, reports,
templates, tools, improvement routes (from toolbox) etc
with the required document control, IT applications

- Managerial experience

- Computer knowledge required

All interested persons are asked to
fax resumes to:

(242) 362-4793



NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF MARIE MENITA POPLE
late of the Settlement of Bullocks Harbour on
the Island of Berry Island one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against the above

Estate are required to send the same duly
certified in writing to the Undersigned on or
before the 25 day of June, 2009, after which
date the Executor will proceed to distribute the
assets having regard only to the claims of which
she shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that
all persons indebted to the said Estate are
requested to make full settlement on or before
the date hereinbefore mentioned.

5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Securii Symbol Last Sale
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 x 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3758 1.65
2.8962 -1.49
1.4630 2.05
3.1964 -5.59
12.7397
100.5606
96.4070 -3.59
1.0000 0.00
9.1599 0.71
1.0526 1.63
1.0322 -0.08
1.0523 1.45
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

5.09
1.00
0.30
5.50

5.09
1.00
0.30
5.50

0.332 15.3
0.000 N/M
0.035 8.6
0.407 13.5
0.952 11.0
0.180 55.6

0.00

0.00 14,545

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015
52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $

-0.041

Div $ P/E
0.300

0.000

0.001

0.480
0.000

ABDAB
RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund

Div $ Yield %
1.3124
2.9230
1.3875
3.1964
12.1564 Fidelity Prime Income Fund

100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

30-Apr-09
31-Mar-09
15-May-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
30-Apr-09
30-Apr-09
30-Apr-09

FERREIRA & CO.
Attorneys for the Executor
Chambers

P. O. Box EE-15790
Kemp Building

No. 39 East Street North
Nassau, The Bahamas.

0.96
0.56

Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund 6.23
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S11) - 3for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525


PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



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hocolatefollies ~



—

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

CHOCOLATE in the eyes and taste
buds of a woman is somewhat of a
guilty and sinful pleasure, sneaking
its way into her calorie intake. With
children, it is just as delightful
despite coming in a boring square
or rectangular bar. Stay at home
mom Emma Heinel has taken her
love for making treats and turned it
into something culturally and taste-
fully satisfying.

“T have been making chocolate novelty lol-
lies since the beginning of this year. It started
out as a hobby really. I love to make things as
I have always been quite artistic. I normally
look at things in the stores and say ‘well I can
make that’ so I do,” Mrs Heinel said.

Mrs Heinel said she did not start out exact-
ly with chocolate as she is always thinking of
different favours for her children’s parties.

“T started making hard candies in different
colours and flavours, but I was afraid to do
chocolate especially in this climate. It is nice
to have something that you know no one else
is going to do. I preferred the chocolate to
the hard candies because it doesn’t take that
long to do and the finished product looks bet-
ter because you can see the detail more in the
chocolates,” Mrs Heinel said.

Since chocolate does not come in many
colours, Mrs Heinel said she uses white
chocolate to colour her creations.

“T colour the white chocolate, paint it into
the molds, and then I fill the molds with the
milk chocolate. You have to let each colour
set before you add another because the heat
will re-melt it or mix the colors together.
“The more colours you have in a piece the
longer it takes,” Mrs Heine] said.

Out of the many molds and shapes that can
be found, Mrs Heinel said she wanted to stick
with ones that were synonymous with the
Bahamas. Most of the chocolate lollies retail
from $2 to $5.

“The beach life, wildlife and that sort of
thing I thought would be fun. It is amazing
what you can find. You can order different
size molds but you can’t change the size of
the molds,” Mrs Heinel said.

Just as some pastry chefs like to bake but

feels the same way.

“T used to be a huge chocoholic, but now I
can take or leave it. I prefer to look at it
because I think it is beautiful and I love to
see the finished product. I do not have any
desire to eat it, maybe because I don’t want
to ruin it,” Mrs Heinel said.

Mrs Heinel said ultimately in the future she
can see herself making more and more treats
for both chocolate and candy lovers to enjoy.

“T would love to have my own shop and
combine it with a coffee shop and a choco-
latier. It can be somewhere nice for people to
come and get nice truffles and such. Maybe
one day we will have a bigger business
going.”

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009, PAGE 9B





The Tribune

m@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net |

AS the Summer heat contin-
ues to heat up entertainment
spots throughout town, The

Tribune’s Entertainment week-

end line-up is no exception.
Filled with glitz and glam, the
fun is sure to continue all
night long.

41. This Friday night, all roads
lead to Da Balcony lounge
nightclub where local enter-
tainer SO$A Man is expected
to have a ground shaking pre-
mier to his newest track titled
We Winning. The video which
also features Sammi Star,
MDEEZ, and Lion (out of

Canada), is a production iKnoz |
Media describes as a new con- |

cept in Bahamian music and
entertainment. There will also
be a Special performance by
‘Sketch’ Carey of his hit single
My Candidate. Tickets for the

avent are $15 per person, and |

F] THE

$20 per couple, and can be
purchased at the Beat Factory
East Street South, or at the
door.

2. This Friday at 6.30pm, The
Hub art centre opens a new
series of paintings and draw-

ings by Anya Antonovych Met- :
i Mi By ALEX MISSICK
i Tribune Features Reporter

calf called There is a Crack in
Everything. The work is com-
prised of 16 acrylic and pastel
pieces which are based on

several distressed and derelict
: beauty encouraging people from all over the

: world to spend the rest of their lives here. How-

: ever, shouldn’t Bahamians be afforded the

: chance to bask in the beauty of their own coun-

: try and enjoy a quality lifestyle? Jason Kinsale, a
: young developer and President of the Balmoral

: Development feels the same way and has trans-

i formed an historical site into something all

: Bahamians can enjoy.

areas throughout Nassau.
Curator Jonathan Murray said
the collection can be consid-
ered representational painting
because of its similarities to
photography. However, the
collection still has elements
that give some association to
abstract expression, which is
attributed to its gestured and
chromatic inspired qualities.
The work is more contextu-

alised and resonates with local

contemporary artists such as
Kendal Hanna and Jason Ben-
nett. With its premier set for
this Friday, the exhibit is
scheduled to run until June
17, 2009.

3. On Saturday, The Cancer
Society of the Bahamas will
hold its eight annual Cancer
Ball intended to increase fund-
ing and awareness. This gala
event will be held at the Wynd-
ham Nassau Resort Ballroom,
Cable Beach, at 7pm promptly
with light cocktails, and dinner
served at 8pm. There will also
be a Silent auction and raffle
available. Tickets are $200,
and can be purchase at the
Cancer Society office on
Collins Avenue.

4. Express Yourself in con-
junction with The Ministry of
Tourism and the Bahamas
International Literary Festival
presents Face the Arts Street

Saturday from noon until. The
first of its kind cultural explo-
sion will be featuring every
conceivable art form. Artists,

scrape bands and the like will
be out in full force, along with
booths with food, Bahamian
books and cd's. Artists slated
to perform include ‘B,’ Apollo
Kr-eed, Jah Lam, CREAM, DJ
Counsellor, Manifest, B'Marie,
Broken Micz, CRAB, TADa,
Baigon, Club Super Death,
NCity, 21, Lucito Bazard, and
others.

5. Now in a new location, the
Express Yourself Movement’s
Open Mic night is being fea-

Charlotte Street this Thursday.
Scheduled to start at 99m
until midnight, this event con-
tinues to showcase some of
the newest spoken word
artists and entertainers in
town. Admission is free with
drinks on sale, so come pre-
pared to be blown away.



BA



LMORAL



egance ona

amissick@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas for decades has boasted of its

Driving up to the door steps

i of the Balmoral clubhouse is
i like stepping into a chapter of
i “Lifestyles of the Rich and
i Famous.” The entrance to the
i Balmoral is nothing short of
? spectacular as the architectur-
i al elements of the home will
take your breath away.

From the mind blowing spiral

: staircase, to the beautiful 18th
! century crown moldings, gen-
: uine oak doors and intricately
‘ carved wooden fireplaces
: throughout, the home is sure to
! entice anyone who wants to
: host an elegant event at the site.
: This club house is the main
: house that will be open to club
: members once the development
i is completed.

Mr Kinsale said he embarked

on the project about 18 months
: ago and it has definitely been
i an exciting journey.

“This home was actually built

i by Sir Oliver Simmonds back
? in 1953 and the Tomlinson fam-
i ily purchased it in 1963. This
i 17,000 square foot home was
i sitting somewhat nestled away
‘ ., ; on Sanford Drive and it really
Festival In Rawson Square this i had me intrigued. I didn’t
i realise it was actually 43 acres
i surrounding the property as
? well and I didn’t really think
i much of it until a couple of
magicians comedians rake and
i the property was on the mar-
i ket,” Mr Kinsale said.

weeks later when I found out

Mr Kinsale and his team at

i the Balmoral Club have kept
i the historical elements of the
i home while making upgrades
i to suit a 21st Century lifestyle.
i The color palette choice for the
? club includes all earth tones
i such as burnt oranges, dark
i chocolate browns and deep
i beige tones creating a warm,
i down home feeling for its
: guests.

For those who want to add a

: bit of entertainment to the Bal-
tured at the Hard Rock Caféon | Moral experience, the club
: boasts of a game room, enter-
: tainment room as well as a bil-
: liards room. Fitness addicts can
: work up a sweat at the club’s
: state of the art fitness room
: complete with free weights and
: treadmills. If persons would
: rather work out in nature, they
: can choose from the stylish
: swimming pool, the Mark
: Knowles Tennis centre and

soon to come Squash court. For
the social birds and mini meal
snackers, they can enjoy the
Café Balmoral and Bar- a great
place for socialising and a light
drink.

When it comes to renting the
property for events, interested
persons must book the club at
least six months in advance due
to the high level of clientele
recognising the beauty, sophis-
tication and privacy the club has
to offer.

“The club requires a $1,500
site rental fee and we offer a
number of amenities on the
property. The event business
has really been driving a lot of
traffic in. We can hold about
500 persons easily without them
bumping into each other. We
have an on staff chef because
food is the most important
aspect of any event. We can
prepare anything and we have
out own service staff-we are a
one stop shop,” Mr Kinsale
said.

As for the residential project,
the Balmoral offers 1200 square
foot condominiums priced at
$300,000, 1400 square foot
Royale town homes priced at
$359,000, 2000 square foot
grand town homes priced at
$559,000 and 70 single family
lots priced at $200-250,000.

Mr Kinsale said he wanted to
serve a market of young pro-
fessionals whom he feels is
being under served.

“We have one condo, three
of the Royale town homes and
four of the Grand town homes
remaining. The reality of a per-
son being able to buy a single
family lot and build a home is
coming to an end for many peo-
ple. The worst lot in Nassau is
around $65-70,000. If you want
to be in the west, $180-200,000
for a lot, by the time you put a
home on it that’s $500-600,000
easily and it’s getting to a point
where people can not afford it.
People are being forced into
condos and town homes and
this is happening all over the
world,” Mr Kinsale said.

Another element of the Bal-
moral Club is the tremendous
amount of green space avail-
able on the property. Numer-
ous flowers and plants are locat-
ed throughout the club as well

as the property. This is due to
Mr Kinsale’s environmental
awareness background.

“The ministry requires you
to allocate five per cent of pub-
lic open space and we have 30-
35 per cent of public open space
and we have saved a tremen-



hill

dous amount of trees by tag-
ging over 400 trees during the
early stages of development,”
Mr Kinsale said.

Mr Kinsale said the atmos-
phere he wants to achieve for
the Balmoral is one that is lush,
warm and family oriented.

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“We are really trying to make
it more comfortable and not
arrogant-no stuffiness. We want
people to be able to relax and
not worry about what fork they
are using per say, but still main-
tain quality and valuable ser-
vice,” Mr Kinsale said.








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PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ARTS







movie

REVIEW



Zade Rosenthal/AP Photo
IN this film publicity image released by Columbia Pictures/Sony
Entertainment, Tom Hanks and Ayelet Zurer, right, are shown in a
scene from, "Angels & Demons."

Angels and Demons

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

locate the Preferiti and the anti
matter to save the Catholic
Church from total annihilation

Angels and Demons is my
favourite and I think the bes
Dan Brown novel and this
movie does what its predeces
sor, the film version of the Da
Vinci Code, failed to do - tel
the story without boring its
audience with long explana
tions that take away from the
plot. The movie is fast paced

Staring Tom Hanks,
Ewan McGegor

and Ayelet Zurer.
Directed by Ron Howard



IN Angels and Demons, Tom
Hanks reprises his role as Har-
vard symbologist Robert Lang-
don in what is actually the pre-
quel to the Da Vinci Code, the
immensely popular and con-
troversial novel by Dan Brown.

This time round Robert is
summoned to Vatican City on
the eve of the conclave to elect
a new pope, when a centuries
old mysterious brotherhood the
Iumanti- the Catholic’s
church’s archenemy- resur-
faces, claiming that they have
hidden a highly explosive vial
of antimatter somewhere inside
the city and intend to kill one of
the Preferti- the preferred
papal successors- each hour
until the antimatter explodes
at midnight taking with it Vat-
ican City and most of Rome.

Robert, Italian scientist Vit-
toria Vetra (Zurer) and the
Vatican and Italian police, have
just a few hours to decode the
“Path of Illumination” a 400-
year- old trail of symbols to

concert

REVIEW



did not read the book.

go Patrick McKenna - the late
pope’s personal assistant. His
most brilliant moments come
toward the end where the
truth of the Illuminati is
revealed and the future of the
Catholic Church hangs in the
balance.

Angels and Demons is
worth the price of admission
fans of the novel will be
pleased with the interpretation
and those who have not read
the book will be caught up in
the suspense until its dramatic
ending.



Chris Pizzello/AP Photo

SINGER Cyndi Lauper poses backstage at the "American Idol" finale in
Los Angeles, Wednesday, May 20, 2009.

CYNDI LAUPER

ATLANTIS GRAND BALLROOM,
Saturday, May 23, 2009.

@ By TRIBUNE STAFF REPORTER

A COLLEAGUE made an innocent remark which made this

very sensitive 50-year-old feel so so old.
“T didn’t know you were into the concert scene...”
I may be getting on in years but I’m still very young at heart.

And we had both just witnessed how a 55-year-old - an icon of :

the 80s - still defies time with her heart and soul.
Yes, Cyndi Lauper rocked Atlantis to its very foundations.

The trademark china white face, her little girl vocals, the wild .
hair, her ability to rock you and then soothe you with her sensitivity }
... Lauper was, and still is, the only challenger to Madonna’s pop }

queen title.

brilliance.

Drove All Night.

Time After Time.

Overall a great night’s entertainment in the intimate surround-

ings of the Grand Ballroom at Atlantis.
to Joni Mitchell.

Mitchell’s brilliant Blue album.
I guess I must be getting old after all.



and suspenseful and can be }
fully understood even if you }

Tom Hanks, one of my }
favourite actors, does a credi- :
ble job, but is overshadowed
by the dynamic Ewan McGre- }
gor (Moulin Rouge/Rogue }
Trader) who plays Camerlen- :

















































PICTURED are
Devera Pinder
and Davian
Chase, the win-
ners of the
recent Bahami-
an Stars singing
competition
sponsored by
the rotary club
of the Bahamas.
Also pictured
are members of
the Rotary Club
of West Nassau.

Rotary Bahamian stars shine

! mi By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

AFTER weeks of singing and competing
with some of the most talented performers
in the country in the recent Bahamian Stars

: competition sponsored by the West Rotary
Backed by her five-piece band, Cyndi’s fans were treated toa }
dazzling background psychedelic light show, and on-stage musical ;

Club of the Bahamas, 14-year-old Davian
Chase and 19-year-old Devera Pinder

; emerged as the two top winners.
Her high-pitched but strong and flexible vocal displays shone out }
on pop greats such as She Bop, Girls Just Wanna Have Fun and I E

Walking away with first place was Davian
who explained that he has been singing for

: family and friends for as long as he can
And they mesmerised on anthems such as True Colours and }

remember.
Davien explained: “My mom used to go
out places to sing, and some times she used

? to bring me along with her, and seeing how
My highlight of the night? It’s got to be Carey, Cyndi’s tribute ;

the audience would applaud and make her

i feel so appreciated, was the thing that
OK, so [remember first hearing Carey way back in 1971 on Ms }

inspired me to be a singer.”
Now a senior at the CV Bethel Secondary

School, Davien said he could never have
dreamed being the winner of such a com-
petition, where he was up against so many
other talented individuals.

In October 2008, Davian participated in
“Bahamian Stars Competition” and won
the competition. He received many prizes
and was also successful in receiving a schol-
arship.

Also a member of the Church of God of
Prophecy National Children’s Choir, the
Boys Choir, the Bahamas Junior Band of
the Church of God of Prophecy, and a mem-
ber of the Bahamas National Children’s and
Boys Choir, this young man has proven that
age has nothing to do with becoming the
best at the thing you love.

First runner up to the competition, 19-
year-old Devera Shante Pinder, said despite
being under the weather on the night of the
competition, she gave it her all which result-
ed in her walking away with the prize.

Having a long love for singing, she

explained: “I gave it one hundred percent,
and even though I had adversities in my
way, I still had to use that and try to push
through, because nothing should be able to
hold you back from something you’re so
adamant about.”

Devera is a multitalented Bahamian
singer, songwriter and model, who was
exposed to the various genres of music at an
early age.

Devera is a very purpose driven young
lady who enjoys singing, dancing, traveling,
modeling, pageantry, writing poetry and
music, performing and spending time with
her family and friends. She has been in
numerous talent competitions and pageants
and has achieved numerous accomplish-
ments and awards for her singing talents.

And now that the days of the competition
are done, the two winners are set to work
together on an upcoming CD which will
help to further their careers and notoriety in
the music industry.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 27,

2009

“The Balmoral
- Hegance






| See page nine

Life on a rock

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

WITH the islands of the
Bahamas offering its own
special charm with hundreds
of miles of beautiful beach-
es and landscapes, it is no
wonder that so many locals
and visitors alike dream of

one day retiring here.

However for one woman who did
stumble upon the opportunity to live on
a private island, her five year stay there
turned out to be far more than she had
bargained.

In her debut novel Life On A Rock,
K Alison Albury provides readers with
a first hand account of the tumultuous
experience she had while managing a
small island resort on Highbourne Cay
in the Exumas.

From hurricanes to drug trafficking
to nearly being murdered, Mrs Albury
explained never in a million years could
she had imagined so many unusual
encounters in a place which at first
seemed truly like heaven on earth.

In this striking tale of her experience





on the island during the early 1990's,
Mrs Albury told Tribune Entertain-
ment that readers can expect to be
drawn into the story.

An excerpt from the first chapter
reads: “I had given them everything
and they were going to kill Peter! From
facedown on the tile floor I screamed at
them, “There’s no more money! There’s
no more money! We don’t have a safe!
Geezus, we’re telling you the truth! We
don’t keep a lot of money on the cay!’

“Now, one of the burglars noticed
my rings and gold chain necklace. ‘OK,
bitch, take off da jewels,” he demanded,
as the barrel of his gun tap-tap-tapped
on my earrings. With my face still facing
the floor, I reached up and took off my
earrings, a gold necklace and my heir-
loom engagement ring. I heard Peter
unbuckle his watch. Was it going to
stop there?”

She added that apart from the rough
experiences she and her husband had
while miles away from all their friends
and family on the island, they had many
beautiful moments that are both obvi-
ous and subliminal in the book.

These were their faith in God, the
commitment to each other, and the
comfort of living in an environment
that was conducive to quiet living.

“One of the things that I loved about

aa



25-Year old Kiara Sherman
walked away with the crown in
a pageant that was marred by
controversy. (SEE Tribune
News for details). Kiara will
represent the country at this
year’s Miss Universe pageant to
be held right here at Paradise
Island this August. Runner’s up
included ist runner up Ife
Bethel-Sears and 2nd runner
up Amanda Appleyard.

out there was the quiet. There were no
stoplights, nobody is honking at you,
and in the morning what I usually did
with Peter was to get up at 6.30am...I
would go for a walk, and that was my
time of the day that was my own, it was
a little 20 minute walk along the beach,”
she said.

While on the walk with her dogs, Mrs
Albury said the most calming thing
around was the ocean, which helped
her to find her center, and also to wash
away stress that came along with the
task of overseeing the island.

Mrs Albury added that although
there were many tales that unfolded
while on the island which she had to
relive while writing the book, it was all
worth it, because it was done for a
grandson.

She said: “This job taught me that I
wasn’t a quitter, it solidified our mar-
riage even more, and I learned that I
could do anything that I put my mind
to.”

Life on a Rock has earned its spot as
one of the most exciting local books in
recent times to hit the shelves.

Available for $13.50 at local book-
stores and online at amazon.com, alib-
ris.com, and booksurge.com, this book
promises to be engaging straight
through the last page.

The Tribune SECTION B e



i,
Emma's
chocolate

lollies
see page eight

i.



| » y
j a
P "=
%





NOW ten years after her experience on Highbourne Cay, first time author K Alison
Albury tells all in her new book titled Life On A Rock.

) Felipe Major/Tribune staff






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Fears of spike in personal crime N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.152WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER PARTLY SUNNY HIGH 88F LOW 76F F E A T U R E S SEEINSIDE ‘THEARTS’ S P O R T S Life on a rock SEEPAGEFIFTEEN ‘Spiking’ their way to the top REPORTS of a series of nighttime muggings throughout the cap ital have led to fears that a spike inp ersonal crime has taken hold. Although the police think the a ttacks are "isolated", a senior offi cer yesterday warned the public to b e vigilant of their surroundings at night to avoid falling victim to an armed criminal. The Tribune has received reports of a number of muggings o ver the weekend, including that of a young woman who was dropping a friend off in the Shirlea area when a man jumped inside her car and robbed her. Also over the weekend, a young man was robbed at knife point in the Yamacraw area after driving a friend home. The assailants are said to have smashed the windshield, climbed into the car and thrown the occupants out. They stole money and cell phones from the victims, then drove off with the car. Another woman was reportedly attacked by a man as she headed into her apartment in the Village Road area. She was able to break free and her screams are said to have alerted neighbours, at which point the attacker decided to make a run for it. The police failed to report any of these crimes to the press, however when asked about them yesterday, Assistant Commissioner for Crime Raymond Gibson told The Tribune police were aware of the inci dents but do not see a pattern. Based on what we've seen there isn't any pattern to those robb eries, we consider those to be iso lated robberies. There's been a consistent number of robberies over the past week . . . but the point is we haven't seen any pattern in that regard," he said. Still he warned members of the p ublic to be on their guard when out late at night. They should check their surroundings, check as they move, be careful so that they don't become victims of these villains,” he said. Members of the public who heard rumours of the muggings expressed concern that the police failed to report them. A professional woman whose job forces her to travel at night said news of the attacks frightened her. “Obviously there is an increase in crime, and the police should be reporting it,” she said. The woman, asked to remain anonymous, said: “I think it has to be known if there is something going on out there.” A caller who identified himself as Mr Dean, said: “This is scary. People have to be made aware if messed up things are going on so they can be more careful. You can’t keep them dumb.” Reports of nighttime muggings in capital The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E Hotel union elections will be held tomorrow n By NATARIO MCKENZIE THE elections for the Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union (BHCAWU be held on Thursday it was ruled yesterday after a Supreme Court judge lifted the injunction that had blocked the elections. Attorneys for all the parties involved in the dispute over whether or not the elections should proceed were locked in a closed hearing before Jus tice Jon Isaacs for most of Tuesday afternoon. Following the closed hearing, attorney Obie Ferguson who appeared with attorney Keod Smith for the BHCAWU First Vice President Kirk Wilson told The Tribune ; “The court vacated the injunction and is allowing the election to go ahead.” “There is a hearing scheduled for June 26 to hear the substantive matter, but the court was of the view that because of all the preparation that the union would have gone into having regard to the cost factor and the statutory obligation of the Registrar once a request is made for voting, that the balance of conve nience was in favour of having the elections on May 28,” Mr Ferguson said. Supreme Court judge lifts injunction SEE page 12 n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net JUDGES of the Miss Bahamas Universe 2009 pageant have been invited by the event’s organiser to review and confirm the votes they cast in last weekend’s contest in the hope of calming a “furore” that has broken out over its outcome, The Tribune has learned. Cyprianna McWeeney, one among nine judges who participated in Sunday evening’s final show, said her phone has been “ringing off the hook” since then with calls from people who feel the ending was unjustified and even rigged. According to sources con nected to the pageant, many people have expressed “surprise” that 25-year-old Kiara Sherman, lead vocalist of the Bahamian band “Visage”, took the much-coveted crown. In some cases vicious commentary has erupted online, with fans and detractors making lengthy and colourful commentaries about the Queen and MISSBAHAMASUNIVERSE ‘FURORE’ ABOVE: A tearful Kiara Sherman is crowned Miss Bahamas U niverse 2009. LEFT: Contestant Enna Thomas said she was disturbed by allegations she may have missed out because of a dispute over money. SEE page 12 F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net THE Department of Immigration is "actively" working to release the Cuban detainees currently housed at the holding facility, said Immigration Director Jack Thompson. It is unclear if the Cubans will be repatriated to their home country, released to another country willing to accept them, or allowed to remain in the Bahamas. While declining to get into specifics of a possible release Immigration Dept working to release Cuban detainees SEE page 12 INSIDE POLICE CRACKING DOWN ON CRIME IN DOWDESWELL STREET PAGETWO DISCOVERYSUNTO RESUMESERVICE PAGETHREE COALITION OF CHURCHES SPEAK S OUT A GAINS T GAMBLING LEGALIS A TION PAGEFIVE

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n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net INTERNATIONAL tax l awyer Ryan Pinder said yesterday that if the PLP asks him to r un as a candidate in the next general election he will “seri ously consider it.” The son of former PLP Local Government minister Marvin P inder, told T he Tribune t hat while his primary focus is helping t he party “move forward” it’s possible he may become a parl iamentary candidate. “As we get closer to election, as we get past the convention and as we get a candidate’s committee selected I’ll be in a better p osition to address running for a seat,” said Mr Pinder. “We’ll look at what’s best for the party with respect to running in a constituency and if the party thinks that’s the best thing to do t hen I’ll seriously consider it.” “Right now my prime focus is t o see that we address proactive policy as a country and as a party moving forward and that’s where I am going to lend my input and my talents,” said the attorney. He was speaking at a press c onference in the Opposition room at the House of Assembly called by Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell, also shadow minister with responsibility for foreign affairs, foreign trade and the public service. At that conference Mr Pinder was announced as the co-chair of a newly-formed PLP Committee on Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade. The committee was appointed by party leader Perry Christie, w ith the aim of helping to formulate the PLP’s “approach to p ublic policy on matters of foreign trade and foreign affairs.” O ther members of the large committee include former diplo m ats who served overseas dur ing the last PLP government. Asked why he decided to accept the post of co-chair, Mr Pinder said his background and e xpertise as an international tax lawyer with knowledge of inter n ational tax policies and an awareness of the “global pres s ures on countries such as The Bahamas in both international tax matters, as well as financial services and banking...brings an element to the policy of the PLP a nd this committee that the country desperately needs.” It desperately needs a proac tive vision, it definitely needs the t echnical knowledge and the technical application in these areas,” he added. The Tribune understands that Mr Pinder, a Clifton resident, r ecently got permission from the party to open a branch office for t he PLP in the constituency, something which it did not have u p until now. He and other PLPs in the area have been conducting branch meetings on a regular basis. The attorney heads the Nassau office of U.S.-based commercial law firm Becker andP oliakoff, where he provides U.S. counsel to Americans wishi ng to do business in The Bahamas as well as Bahamians seeking U.S. legal advice, according to the company’s web site. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE INDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News................................P1,2,3,5,6,12 E ditorial/Letters..........................................P4 A dvts......................................P7,8,9,10,11,16 S ports .............................................P13,14,15 B USINESS/ARTS SECTION B usiness......................................P1,2,3,4,5,6 Comics ........................................................P7 Taste........................................................P8,9 Arts......................................................P10,12W eather ..................................................... P11 CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 P AGES USA TODA Y MAIN SECTION 12 P AGES n B y MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net IN RESPONSEto comp laints by professionals worki ng in and around Dowdeswell Street, police are cracking down on crime in the area. At a crime watch meeting last week, business owners,b osses and employees told Central Division officers that armed robbery, prostitutiona nd vagrancy have become everyday facts of life in this once quaint area of easternd owntown Nassau. Cameras Police urged businesses to s et up a Business Crime Watch to share information about c rime and invest in security measures and CCTV cameras to benefit the whole businessc ommunity. After hearing their concerns, special duty officers from the C entral Division conducted an operation in the Dowdeswell Street area and made threea rrests. Superintendent Elaine S ands said the sex trade has been a continuing issue in Dowdeswell Street for somet ime, and businesses are particularly affected when prost itutes choose open locations to carry out illegal sex acts. S he said: “In most cases we understand they are committing these acts in open yardsa nd public places.” Otherwise, prostitutes will s ell sex from homes in and around Dowdeswell Street. Supt Sands urged the publicn ot to support prostitution by buying into it or renting prope rty to those who will use it to carry out the illegal trade. Those involved in supporting prostitution are also committing an offence, she warned. S upt Sands added: “We want to discourage individuals from soliciting themselves for immoral acts because it’s a criminal offence. Offence “And we want everyone w ho thinks about coming in this area, and even those pers ons who live in this area and hire these kind of people for this kind of act, we want themt o know that they are committing an offence. “Even if they are landlords r enting their homes knowingly for such persons, they need t o know that they are committing an offence.” Operations to crackdown on c rime in the area will continue as police continue to respond t o the concerns of “good citizens”, Supt Sands said. THE 2009 national budg et communication will be delivered by Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham today beginning at 10am. The communication, w hich will outline the government’s plans for 2009/2010, can be seen on ZNS TV 13 and the Parliamentary Channel 4 0. Mr Ingraham will present government’s fiscal agenda and is expected tor eveal cut-backs aimed at mitigating the effects of t he global economic downturn. The presentation will l ast about two hours and the debate is set to be held i n June. Police cracking down on crime in Dowdeswell Street n By TANEKA T HOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@ t ribunemedia.net T HE public can expect air travel delays over the next few daysa fter lightning struck the Lynden Pindling I nternational Airport control tower. As severe thunders torms swirled through the capital on Monday afternoon, air traffic controllers realised thats ome equipment might have been damaged by l ightning. As a precautionary measure, employeesw ere evacuated and air traffic services were s uspended at 3.19pm, according to a state ment by the Departm ent of Civil Aviation. Frequencies J oseph Albury, Deputy director of the department, and a teamo f senior officers were dispatched to assess the s ituation and discovered that some of the tower's frequencies hadb een affected by the strike. The maintenance team worked to restore primary frequenciesw hile limited air traffic service was restored at 4.03pm, using back-up emergency systems, the statement said. Y esterday, Mr Albury said operations were back to normal at LPIA's control tower. "Lightning struck the c ontrol tower facility building and as a result there were some outagew ith the radio commu nication system (but we're working okay," h e said. Still, the Department of Civil Aviation said, inbound and outbound air traffic "will experi ence some delays" but managers and air traffic controllers are working to minimise the impact on the public. Airport control tower damaged by lightning Tax lawyer says he will consider running in election if PLP asks CONCERNS have been raised over crime in Dowdeswell Street. Ryan Pinder 2009 Budget Communication today at 10am In brief

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n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A COMMUNITY effort to clean up a neighbourhood and improve it for all has been praised by local MP and Min i ster of Immigration Branville McCartney. Mr McCartney said he was impressed to see how the Gamble Heights Crime WatchC ommittee instigated a clean up of the area off Baillou Hill Road South by gatheringn eighbours to pick up litter and tear down overgrown b ushes with a tractor hired with their collective contributions on Saturday. T he community, featured in Monday’s Tribune, is troubled by the growing slum of plywood shacks housing Haitian migrants on otherwise disusedl and behind the Gamble Heights subdivision as they fear it might be hiding illegal immigrants and criminals. T hey want to tackle the rising crime rate and mounting g arbage on the outskirts of the slum by working together. Ex er cises Mr McCartney said the I mmigration Department has carried out two apprehension exercises in the area over the last year, and added that government needs to determineo wnership of the land before further action can be taken. However, he said the efforts of the community to clean up the area while government deliberates should inspire oth ers. “I want to congratulate the members and constituents of Gamble Heights for taking this proactive step in cleaning up their community,” Mr McCartney said. “That’s a step to be admired, commended and indeed other communities ought to take this positive step and use this as a yard stick in what they ought to do in their communities. I think it’s a good thing they are doing, it’s very proactive and by taking this step, I hope other communities would use this as an example.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009, PAGE 3 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $4,210 $4,210 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $4,410 $4,410Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank M M e e d d i i t t e e r r r r a a n n e e a a n n M M e e d d i i t t e e r r r r a a n n e e a a n n THE GROWING SETTLEMENT of garbage is piling up outside the vil lage, attracting oversized rodents. A TEENAGER was arrested after officers from Elizabeth E states Police Station found a . 9mm handgun when searching a house in eastern New Providence. The officers executed a s earch warrant at a home in Yamacraw Beach Estates shortly before 11pm on Monday. They found the firearm hidden i n a shoebox in the bedroom. The 17-year-old boy is still in police custody and is helping with the investigation. A SHOTGUN found in an abandoned car in Pinewood Gardens has sparked a criminal i nvestigation and police are appealing for assistance from t he public. The weapon was found by a concerned citizen who reported it to police on Monday. East Street South Police Stat ion officers recovered the shotgun and launched an investiga-t ion. No arrests have been made. If you have any informat ion which may assist the police with this matter, call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328TIPS (8477 Teenager arrested afterh andgun discovered Probe after shotgun found in abandoned car Woman, 30, arraigned on theft charge In brief A 30-year-old woman was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday on a theft charge. Police have charged Anasta cia Moree, 30, with stealing. I t is alleged that on Saturday, April 18, while at RosettaS treet, Moree stole a ladies purse valued at $25, a driver’s l icence valued at $20, and four ABM cards together valued at $40, all totalling $85, belonging to Portia Brown. Moree, who appeared in Court One, Bank Lane yester day before Chief MagistrateR oger Gomez and Magistrate Janet Bullard, pleaded not g uilty. She was granted bail in the sum of $1,000 with one surety. Her case has been adjourned to October 1. n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORT – After several days out of service due to engine repairs, the Discovery Sun is s cheduled to resume service between Grand Bahama and Fort L auderdale on Thursday, May 28. The management of Discovery C ruise Line announced that the vessel will return to normal sailing on Thursday. They explained why the ship experienced a second consecutivep roblem this year with its port main engine. D iscovery initially experienced mechanical problems in April and discontinued sailings for several days for engine repairs and resumed service on May 4. H owever, due to ongoing e ngine problems the ship was forced to cancel sailing on May 17. The company made arrangements for hundreds of stranded p assengers to be flown back to Fort Lauderdale by charter flights on Miami Air. Hanns J Hahn, general mana ger of Discovery, said that the c ompany was too anxious to return the ship to service after the first problem arose on April 4. “The company is acutely aware o f Grand Bahama’s reliance on the ship to transport Bahamians and merchandise between the island and Port Everglades and, a s a result, pushed to have the s hip return to service as quickly as possible,” he said. “As it turned out, that was a pparently too quick and not all the repairs made by the outside contractor engaged by the company were sufficiently tested.” T ests Mr Hahn said that led to a follow-up problem affecting at first t he departures from Sunday, May 1 7, through Tuesday, May 19, while as late as Tuesday, May 19, engineers signaled a green light for a Thursday, May 21, depart ure. He noted that additional tests through Wednesday revealed that the extent of the persistent pist on misalignment was too great to risk departure. A ccording to Mr Hahn, the engineering department had therefore requested an additional five to six days to source and i nstall a new piston rather than install one of the spares on board. “Work is now well underway and all are confident to get this s aga behind us and resume the r egular schedule on Thursday, May 28,” he said. Mr. Hahn noted that during both of these periods when the s hip was out of service the company ferried Bahamians, as well as visitors who had hotel bookings on Grand Bahama, back and f orth to the island on air charters a nd regularly scheduled flights. He indicated that when necessary passengers were provided with accommodations in Fort L auderdale and on island. He said they were also offered meals while they were awaiting transport to and from the island. M r Hahn explained that under the terms of Discovery’s cruise t icket contract with its passengers, the company is not required to provide other means of transportation in the event of an emergency such has recently occurred,a nd that the company made such extraordinary efforts only as ag esture of good will and at considerable extra cost. H e thanked the company’s Bahamian passengers for their understanding and patience. He also thanked the Ministry of Tourism, the Tourism Boarda nd its resort partners for their assistance in “this unfortunatea nd most untimely matter.” Discovery Sun to resume service Ship to sail on Thursday after engine repairs MP applauds move to clean up community MEMBERS of the Gamble Heights Community Crime Watch C ommittee said t hey initiated a c lean-up of the area when government took too long to act. n Felip Major / Tribune staff Branville McCartney “I want to congratulate the members and constituents of Gamble Heights F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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EDITOR, The Tribune . There are far too many people who have given up because theys ee a vicious cycle of corruption, exploitation, lack of pride and downright uncivilised behaviour that embarrasses us locally and internationally. Someone must have the testicular fortitude to t hrow caution to the wind call it as we see it. If I am to sleep at night, I must step forward for the g ood of all right thinking and frightened Bahamians. Tell me where else in the world could an elected official be f ound with fifty thousand dollars in his closet, give an asinine explanation and there is no investigation and no consequences only in the Bahamas. W here else can a politician w ho had nothing declared his assets as a matter of procedure before an election and appears t o have millions, seemingly large plots of land and nothing happens. There are no questions and no investigations. Who is protecting whom and why? This c ould only happen in the Bahamas. How come immigrants can be facilitated to enter this country by the thousands with questionable documents and no proof ori ndication that the immigrants have left. Again, even after the A uditor General’s report that at t he foreign affairs ministry that serious inconsistencies and weaknesses were evident, nothing hap pened. Yet this was allowed to hap p en, there has been no further investigation and no one was made to explain or suffer the con-s equences. How could influence peddlers apparently sell immigration workp ermits to foreign contractors, getting preferential treatment w here permits that usually took m onths and even years to be processed could be stamped and approved in less than 24 hours?W ho was responsible, involved and questioned? Where is the report? How could a celebrity get a minister to bend the rules to give residency” to a bimbo because of a special kind of friendship. Yet there is no public outcry, b ecause we all see nothing wrong with this situation. We are equal ly as guilty. This could only hap p en in the Bahamas, because the authorities are afraid or unwilli ng to venture and the people could care less. Only in the Bahamas drug d ealers sit in front of a hotel and walk on the busiest streets and peddle drugs in full view of police o fficers and nothing happens. Alcoholics can be seen loitering on benches, harassing tourists, our bread and butter on Bay Street and the police look the othe r way. This is happening right next to the House of Assembly. The Bahamas must be the only place where any male can urinate on the side of any building anytime he feels the need to relieve himself. The whole island is rank with urine. Men stop on the side of the road and urinate, in front of children or ladies without anyp ride whatsoever. They walk in a ny high grass and let the water flow. No one is ever arrested and the practice continues. T he Bahamas is the only place in the world where the police h ave conceded to the daredevil motorcyclists who ride around on one wheel, putting themselvesa nd other innocent pedestrians and motorists at risk. How long w ould it take for the police to take these dangerous weapons, which in most cases are unli-c ensed, off the streets? How come they have been allowed to r emove the silencers from the mufflers disturbing residents all hours of the night? This lawlessness could only happen in the Bahamas. H ow come some police offi cers are seen by neighbours col lecting “hush money” fromk nown drug dealers day after day and nothing ever happens? If anyt hing is done, how come the public does not know? Only in the Bahamas is a person with a perfectly legal title fora piece of land be outsmarted by a developer or a slick lawyer and t he land is literally stolen by the lawyer and absolutely nothing happens. There are literally thousands o f Bahamians who have had their birthright stolen by unscrupulous lawyers and are supposed to beh auled before the Bar Council and not a word heard afterwards. W hat happened? Why does a person with clear title have to waste his money tof ight for his own things? That cannot be right and must be fixed, immediately. Why do questionable lawyers, who are supposed to be “officerso f the court,” have to go before a special hearing of the Bar Coun cil? H ow could lawyers police themselves? W hy are they not treated like ordinary citizens? Why is there a special law for lawyers and anothe r law for the rest of us? It is high time that government stops the haemorrhaging of the innocent people who are being destroyed by lawyers who take advantage of people, who they know cannot afford to fight them in court. It is time the strong stop devouring the weak through the courts. There must be a system that protects the most vulnerable of us. The courts seem too lenient with lawyers. Is it because they are all in the same boat, lawyers protecting lawyers? The poor and the uneducated have been exploited enough. And there is a culture that the rich will stop at nothing until they suck every penny out of the poor u ntil they die. There is no mercy. Only the poor go to court. Only the poor wear handcuffs. Only the poorr eceive jail time. Only the poor pay national insurance, light bills and phone bills. Only the poor pay customs and only the rich get t o enjoy the fat of the land. Only the big time tour operators get more bus plates, and no one else. Why? There is a culture that only a f ew have any sense. There is a perception that only a few will get inside the door to be conside red for anything. There are people in authority who are recycled every term and no one else gets anything. It’s the same people all the t ime. Some are even senile, they could hardly get out of their ownw ay, but they are still given the hog while others are denied the b acon. The retired are rehired. The people who run things are people who have served, are already getting a fantastic pension and arer ehired to get more gratuities and more perks and more gravy. T his group is tightly knitted together and it seems that no new m embers are allowed. The young are frustrated b ecause they watch the possibili ty of upward mobility diminished. No country could grow like that. It is disrespectful and distasteful when highly qualified young p eople sit by and watch people with less ability get fantastic jobst hat they are incapable of doing, but because of political connec t ions they are given special privileges and preferences. A number of the people who are demoralized sit quietly and mourn. W ho will answer their cry? Who will be humane enough toa llow their conscience to point them in the right direction? T he pride of many of us has caused us to be pushed aside, but “How long, oh Lord how long” are we prepared to wait? The Bahamas is not what we e nvisioned. We used to have a great deal of p ride in ourselves and country, all that is gone now. W e are simply not our brother’s keeper. We are just like hogs. The rich want more and the rich want the poor to get none. Multi-multi millionaires are blocking and preventing others every step of the way from making a dollar. WHY? Time is the determining factor. Time is longer than rope. There will be a time when things would not be the most important factor that drives people, but dignity and pride would be the driving force. There is a move where people will not stand idly by anymore, but will stand up together against the ills that have trampled us for too long. I am willing to help lead that charge. We must look out for each other. This is a new day. Bahamian musical icon Ronnie Butler sang, “I know dem long time, dem people is mine.” I am relieved now. IVOINE W. INGRAHAM Nassau, May 22, 2009 C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm THE 1994 Bail Act was amended in 1996 making it mandatory for those accused of serious crime to be held in prison until their trial date. At that time Bahamians were concerned by escalating crime and the fact that in two years the courts had released into society more than 100 serious offenders, who were being held on bail. This was the main reason for the amendment to the Bail Act, which the Appeals Court last week ruled unconstitutional. In the past five months this country has averaged more than five murders a month. As for the armed robberies, we have long since lost count. Needless to say armed robbery gets almost daily mention in this newspaper’s crime report. In addition to these newest offenders, 153 persons being held on bail were released from prison last month. The Central Intelligence Bureau advised that 39 of them should be monitored. Eleven of those released were accused of murder or attempted murder, three of sexual intercourse, three of rape and one of assault with intent to rape. That is the calibre of persons now on ours treets no wonder Bar Council President W ayne Munro has suggested that police are charging them with crimes for which they have no evidence just to get them off the streets. It might just be their answer to the impossible baby-sitting job they have been given to do in addition to safeguarding the public. What a waste of police manpower. T he Act said that bail was to be refused in r espect of certain offences, murder being one of them, “unless the offender be tried withina reasonable time.” But what is a reasonable time? Each court seems to have its own version of reasonableness. This is a matter that should not only be settled, but should be uniform in all the courts. Each judge should also have to give a written cause to justify the release, and this should be available to the public. Some time ago we were watching the court of a particular magistrate who had earned the reputation of being bail-prone. We often wondered if he were doing this to prod government into action to speed up the judicial process by opening more courts and bringing in more justices, or if he were some disembodied spirit who was not aware of the society in which he lived and the need for him to be a part of the crime fighting solution, rather than one of its problems. There will continue to be a “growing dis respect for life, law and authority”, as Mr Ingraham put it in his 1996 radio broadcast, if the courts cannot process criminal cases faster. Mr Ingraham attributed this disregard for life and laws to the fact that persons charged with serious crimes have formed the view that the perennial delays in court proceedings permit them to indefinitely postpone facing the consequences, sanctions and punishment of their actions. There should be a court designated strict ly to hear the more serious offences those for which the legislature said no bail should be granted and a magistrate or magistrates assigned to do nothing but get through the backlog of murders, attempted murders, armed robberies, kidnappings, rapes, and the like. These courts should meet daily and on time. The courts are notorious for having witnesses waiting around all day, whilel awyers dither or are no shows because they a re in other courts, compounded by all the other inefficiencies that delay cases. The whole court system needs a good shake up. If the courts operated efficiently, the ques tion would not arise as to how long is too long for a person to be in prison awaiting trial. W e always hear of the rights of the a ccused. We agree that he should have rights and that those rights should be guarded jealously. However, we hear little about the victim’s rights or the community’s rights. The accused has a right to a fair trial to be held within a reasonable time. On the other hand citizens have rights to a safe community. Instead what we now have are residents imprisoned in their own homes behind bars to protect them from persons with long criminal records roaming our streets awaiting the justice that is theirs by right. It is now up to government and the judi ciary to give both sides their just due a fair trial on the one hand, and a safe community on the other. And neither one can come too soon. The Bahamas is not what we envisaged LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Bahamians entitled to safe communities VENICEBAYSUBDIVISIONLOT NO. 1 Block No. 25 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-family Residence and Six Apartment Complex PROPERTYSIZE: 10,066 sq. ft. GROSS FLOOR AREA: 4,745 sq. ft. LOCATION: Property is located in the southern district of New Providence, off Bacardi Road; positioned outside the main entrance of the Venice Bay Development. APPRAISEDVALUE: $697,000 F O R S A L E I NTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMITOFFERS INCLUSIVE OF TELEPHONECONTACTAND POSTAL ADDRESS TO: CB DISTRESSEDPROPERTIES, CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT,P.O BOX-SS-6263 NASSAU,BAHAMAS OR EMAIL US AT:DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM *WERESERVETHERIGHTTOREJECTANYORALL OFFERS.

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ENCOURAGING the commissioner of police to continue his crackdown on suspected illegal gambling operations throughout the country, the president of the Cornerstone Zion Fellowship of Christian Churches and Ministries said his organisation is completely against the legalisation of gambling. Bishop Andrew Stewart said that the church supports the police’s efforts to enforce the law through a number of recent raids of suspected numbersh ouses in Nassau and Grand Bahama. He asked that the government not consider the idea of legalising gambling any further, or allow any Bahamian to gamble. The group is even against foreigners being allowed to wager. “Gambling is successful operating only on the principal that many would loose and some or few would win. First of all, we feel that the success of an enterp rise should not be based on so m any of our brothers and sister l osing. “It then becomes an inadequate system when a large percentage of our population looses on a regular basis. A society should not be basing its success on or trying to capitalise on a system where so many would loose in order for a few in our society to win. It is not conscionable to tax such an inequitable system which brings me to my next point,” he said. Bishop Stewart rejected the idea that it is justifiable for the government to legalise gambling in order to tax the industry and collect revenue. “If the government legalises the illicit drug trade and taxes its revenue that would also bring some revenue to the treasury. But we know that the catastrophic damage it would do to the lives of individuals is just as damaging as the illegal gambling trade is doing to a certain segment of our society at this moment,” he said. Bishop Stewart said mothers are depriving children of lunch money, so as to be able to play at several numbers houses each day. “Fathers, who do not make enough in the first place to support their families, are taking the little they do have that can be of benefit to the wife and children to gamble and play as many of the houses, several times a day if possible. This is why the PLP closed down Hobby Horse Hall, because the poor would take what they should use for their livelihood and the benefit of their children, and put it on a game of chance “How terrible, but it is true. D o unto others as you would h ave them do unto you. Our society should not support a system that damages it’s poor fur ther than they are already disadvantaged. And this is why the Cornerstone Zion Fellowship of Christian Churches and Ministries cannot support gambling in this country,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009, PAGE 5 T T H H E E C C L L E E A A R R I I N N G G B B A A N N K K S S A A S S S S O O C C I I A A T T I I O O N N W W h h i i t t M M o o n n d d a a y y H H o o l l i i d d a a y y B B a a n n k k i i n n g g H H o o u u r r s sMONDAY, JUNE 1, 2009 – CLOSED Normal Banking Hours resume TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 9:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. L L a a b b o o u u r r D D a a y y H H o o l l i i d d a a y y B B a a n n k k i i n n g g H H o o u u r r s sTHURSDAY, JUNE 4, 2009 – 9:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. FRIDAY, JUNE 5, 2009 – CLOSED Normal Banking Hours resume MONDAY, JUNE 8, 2009 9:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Participating Member Banks Bank of The Bahamas Limited Citibank, N.A. Commonwealth Bank Limited Fidelity Bank (Bahamas FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas Royal Bank of Canada Scotiabank (Bahamas UNREST is brewing in San Salvador after fisherm en there reported that 34 o f their pots have been removed in the past two weeks. According to sources on the island, these fishermen, some from as far away as Long Island, have posi-t ioned fish traps at various locations around the island. Some were placed near local dive sites, and suspicion is mounting that divers who frequent these reefs could be responsible for the disappearance of the pots. Four feet long and nearly three feet wide, the fish pots in question were madeof plastic-encased wiring and clearly marked with buoys. However, the buoy lines have been cut and the pots hauled away. The fisher men suspect they may have been dumped over the ocean shelf. “These pots could easily hold eight groupers at one time, so who knows how many fish will die in these pots now that they have been dumped over the drop off. Because when a grouper goes inside there now and dies, he becomes bait for other groupers and the cycle continues,” a concerned San Salvador resident said. Reportedly, the matter has been brought to the attention of the local police as tempers are beginning to flare. Attempts to reach the press liaison officer with responsibility for the Fami ly Islands, Assistant Commissioner Hulan Hanna, were unsuccessful up until press time last night. AN ARMED robber h eld up the John Chea Food Store in Farrington Road at around 8am on Monday. The gunman demanded m oney from an employee, took an undetermined amount of cash and ran off into a nearby neighbourhood. P olice are appealing for information from the publ ic which could lead to the apprehension of the armed r obber. He was dressed in dark blue trousers, a black shirta nd a blue tam. Anyone with informat ion which may assist the investigation should call Crime Stoppers immedi-a tely on 328-TIPS (8477 Calls are free of charge a nd answered in the United States to ensure total anonymity. THE Ministry of Public Works and T ransport and Bahamas Construction International Limited have signed a $2.3 million contract for the structural refurbishment of Prince George Wharf and installation of mooring bol-l ards there. This will allow Prince George Wharf to accommodate mega cruise ships. “On completion of this project along with the project to dredge the har-b our, it is expected that Prince George Wharf will be equipped to dock these larger vessels at piers with new andu pgraded bollards and dolphins that are able to withstand the forces exert ed by these vessels,” said Minister of Public Works and Transport Neko Grant. During a signing ceremony at the Ministry of Public Works, J F Kennedy Drive, Mr Grant said after an “arduous” and “meticulous” bidding process, Wayne “Tony” Cargill was identified as the contractor. The work includes refurbishing existing bollards, replacing condemned bollards, constructing new concrete footings for new bollards, and the upgrading bollards to accommodate increased mooring capacity. Mr Grant said work is expected to begin in the next four weeks and should be completed within 30 weeks. He said his ministry is working with representatives of the cruise industry, government agencies, and other stakeholders to minimise logistical challenges. Mr Cargill, president of Bahamas Construction International, said his company plans to hire 12 to 15 workers for the project. “We will remove the footing down to a depth specified within the plans and replace it with new concrete and new bollards,” he said. “There will also be sand blasting and painting of the existing bollards that are in good condition.” Food store held up bya rmed robber Fishermen claim 34 pots removed in two weeks In brief Prince George Wharf readied for mega cr uise ships Coalition of churches speaks out against gambling legalisation Coalition of churches speaks out against gambling legalisation Coalition of churches speaks out against gambling legalisation Coalition of churches speaks out against gambling legalisation Coalition of churches speaks out against gambling legalisation Coalition of churches speaks out against gambling legalisation Coalition of churches speaks out against gambling legalisation Coalition of churches speaks out against gambling legalisation Coalition of churches speaks out against gambling legalisation Coalition of churches speaks out against gambling legalisation Neko Grant

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T HE lack of a decisive response to our deteriorating judicial system lies at the root of the country's problems. We risk everything with this. And moreover, since the country is run by lawyers they know exactly what the problems are, what the solutions are, and what is at stake. According to chief lawyer Wayne Munroe, the controversy over granting bail to those accused of serious crimes is symptomatic of the breakdown of the entire system. The average citizen naturally wants these people kept behind bars until their guilt can be determined. But that raises serious constitutional as well as logistical issues. The scale and scope of the problem is by now familiar. Former police chief prosecutor Keith Bell outlined it for us last year: "There are 100,000 matters before the courts, including 11,000 criminal cases and 48,000 traffic cases," he said. “That’s about a third of the total population before the courts, and it is getting worse and worse...Our murder rate is higher than the US and three times higher than Canada...If this spreads to the out islands we will be unable to control it." More than two thirds of the total prison population of 2,556 are awaiting trial. And insiders say the only way to address the problem is for the political class, as a priority, to agree on a common agenda for comprehensive legal reform. But don't hold your breath on that one. Cynics say there will never be a solution until the politicians and lawyers themselves are targeted. We have addressed this issue in the past with unassailable logic. There is no need for any further figuring in the form of crime commissions or social studies. There is no mystery about the causes, and the solutions are not rocket science. Decades of research has identified all the contributing factors, which can be divided into three broad categories socialisation, enforcement and justice. Socialisation covers all the things that produce new entrants to our society the family, home life, schooling, moral codes and work. Enforcement is the way in which society's rules are applied or not applied. And justice refers to the way we process those who break the rules. What must we do in terms of enforcement? Well, first and foremost our leaders need to set examples and make examples. If corrupt politicos, slackers and thugs see that they can get away with spitting in everyone's face, it sends a clear mes sage that we can all get away with murder. But improving enforcement is n o solution by itself. It will only lead to gridlock unless the justice system is fixed. And that is probably the easiest of the three categories to deal with, because it is perfectly clear what needs to be done. It requires only money to make it a reality. A single budget exercise could resolve most of the bottlenecks in our courts and prison within a year. We know the prison is overcrowded, so if we want to keep more criminals locked up and deal with all the backlogged cases we obviously need a bigger prison – or new jails for various types of offenders and more prison officers. Once we have places to put offenders we can set about processing them and that simply requires more judges (preferably foreign rooms, more prosecutors and more support facilities. To those who say we can't afford all that, here are two suggestions: earmark a special crime tax to pay for prosecutors, courts, judges and a judicial secretariat. Or sell Bahamasair with the expressed goal of committing the proceeds to fixing the justice system. The liquidation of a non-performing state asset is a small price to pay for salvaging the rule of law. The third category socialisation is more difficult to address because it requires long-term investments in education, family counselling and social health programmes. But over the years experts have produced some agreed guide lines. Education, joblessness, anti-social activities and poverty are all closely linked, and international experience shows that at-risk youth benefit most from improving basic literacy and numeracy. This is something that the private sector has been seeking to convey to government officials for years. But it takes political leadership that is willing to listen and set a long train in motion. So we already know the answers. And we certainly know what the consequences are if we don't address these issues. It all boils down to how stupid we can be. THE EASTERN PARADE AND OTHER PARKING LOTS. Every day many of us drive by Malcolm's Park on Dowdeswell Street one of the oldest and most historic areas on New Providence. For hundreds of years the Eastern Parade and the Western Parade (where the British Colonial Hilton stands today) set the boundaries of the city of Nassau. St Matthew's Church on one side of the road was built in 1802. The graveyard on the other side dates back even earlier to the loyalist peri od. And the old Pan Am terminal across the street is where the first scheduled flights arrived from Mia mi back in the 1920s. For years, the park has also been an exercise field and football pitch for schools in the area. And this whole scenic district provides the backdrop for the entrance to Paradise Island. But these days the park has become a private parking lot expropriated by one or two businesses that now occupy the old homes lining Dowdeswell Street. The most egregious offender is a private school whose customers hap pily block traffic and dig up the parade grass daily. We don't know why Town Planning would give approval for a school with no parking facilities in an already congested area, but this problem has been getting worse incrementally over many months with not the slightest attention being paid to finding a solution. There is no doubt that eventually, the entire parade will be converted into an unsightly car park and dust bowl, and Nassau will have lost yet more of its historic value. Why we should turn a blind eye to a public asset that is being confiscated by a few private individuals as we speak is quite beyond me. I assume it is because the authorities are just as incapable of dealing with the vexing issue of city parking as they are of fixing the judicial system. THE HAITIAN PROBLEM Recently, both John Marquis (the Tribune's former managing editor) and Rupert Missick (the newspaper's chief reporter) have written lengthy Insight articles about the Haitian migration and the assimilation of illegal immigrants with barely a glancing reference to the facts. Both articles simply repeated unsubstantiated claims, jingoistic cliches and racist fears based on sheer hearsay or opinion a dangerous thing to do where communal conflicts are involved. Neither writer attempted to put these important issues into any historical context, and nor did they make use of The Tribune's extensive archives. For example, Missick this week quoted a radio talk show host referring to "subversive" efforts by Haitian "invaders". He also expressed the opinion of a Haitian-Bahamian activist that over 60 per cent of Bahamians are of Haitian descent. Such exaggerations and slurs should not be presented without qualification even if they are comments from other people. In January, Marquis claimed there were inherent differences between Bahamians and Haitians, and insisted that Haitians are intrin sically violent: “(Haiti’s from a different tribal background than most Bahamians and they are notoriously volatile in settling their political and domestic differences.” He went on to compare Haitians to “pit bulls” and Bahamians to “potcakes.” Such simplistic treatment of a complex and potentially explosive situation is all the more deficient when we consider that the govern ment commissioned a comprehen sive study on the Haitian migration to the Bahamas in 2005. The result ing 98-page report is readily avail able online and has been the subject of several articles in this space one written by Bahamian social scientist Dawn Marshall. The study by the International Organization for Migration was partly funded by a grant from the United States and conducted by researchers from the College of the Bahamas. It had the backing of both the government and the Haitian Embassy, and it collated all the available data while creole-speaking interviewers surveyed 500 Haitians on four Bahamian islands. For the first time ever the true outlines of the Haitian migration in the Bahamas were revealed, and a number of myths were dispelled. In its review of local media coverage of migration issues, the IOM report noted that "Most of the opinions reported on (in the press negative and focused on problems created by Haitian nationals for the Bahamas. Rare were any feature articles exploring the issues with any s ignificant degree of depth and reflection. Rare also were any reports on individual Haitian nationals’ situations such as might give them a human face. "There is no elaboration on the migration phenomena or the meaning of the Haitian diaspora. These important issues need to be unders tood when living in a global, multi cultural, multilingual world, and the media does not attempt to help the average Bahamian to understand the problem," the IOM rightly concluded. MONTAGU OUTDOOR TOILET In recent weeks you may have noticed gangs of government worke rs clearing the verges on a number of roadways, particularly in the Montagu area. But have you noticed that the unkempt island of tall weeds and bush opposite the Montagu fish market remains uncleared? The reason is simple. That's the public toilet for the fishmongers and others who hang o ut at this market and boat ramp which operates in the middle of a major arterial intersection. But don't worry, I am sure the toilet-goers wash their hands in the sea at the bottom of the ramp. Of course, this water is heavily polluted from the Sailing Club's septic tank as well as from storm water run-off, fish guts a nd motor oil from the boats and jet skis that use the ramp. But don't worry it's only raw fish they are handling after all. CABLE BAHAMAS DIS AN' DAT Phil Keeping, the Canadian entrepeneur who launched Cable Bahamas in 1994, still owns 30 per c ent of the shares through Columbus Communications, with special rights that include boardroom control. Columbus owns regional fibre-optic networks that stretch from Ecuador to Florida and CBL recently agreed to a buy-out. This would make the company 100 per cent Bahamian, and remove the red flag of foreign o wnership and control that has dogged it for years. But every so often there is a bar rage of repetitive attacks on CBL that, based on the company's track record, are simply not justified These charges are unsubstantiated by the critics who level them, and often go uncorrected in the press. W e are in such a phase now, as the government seeks major regulatory reforms that will dramatically change our communications landscape as well as spin BTC Cable's top antagonist into the private sector. First of all, the record shows that CBL has invested over $260 million t o build a world class telecoms infra structure for the Bahamas in just a few years and not a single cent C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE WAREHOUSE IS Palmdale Justice system vicious circle SEE page 12

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Prof. of Oncology The Hon. Prof. Arthur Porter PC, MD, MBA, FACR, FACRO, FRCPC Director General & CEO McGill University Health Centre Managing Director & Director of Radiation Oncology The Cancer CentreMonday, June 22, 2009Starting at 10amAt The Centreville Medical Pavilion 72 Collins AveTelephone: 502-9610Open to The PublicProf. of Medical OncologyProf. Karol Sikora MA, MB BChir, PhD, FRCR, FRCP, FFPM Dean of the University of Buckingham School of Medicine Director of Medical Oncology The Cancer CentreFriday, May 29, 2009Starting at 10amTHE CANCER CENTREannouncesThe Specialists Cancer Clinics w as public money. The company has 76,500 video customers and 43,000 Internet subscribers. And at the same time, it created new wealth for thous ands of Bahamian shareholders (including the government whole new industry for hundreds of Bahamian workers and technicians. As to the company not living up t o its obligations, that old saw is patently false. Cable provides services to 90 per cent of Bahamian households on 20 islands, as per its o riginal agreement with government. And although ZNS is carried on its network for free, it is not CBL's responsibility to ensure that ZNS reaches every household in the coun-t ry no matter how remote they may be. That is clearly the responsibility of ZNS, if the government chooses to make such coverage a r equirement of nationhood. It's time for the political nonsense regarding CBL to end. The fact that Cable is a successful and efficient Bahamian company making goodr eturns for its shareholders and employees is nothing to be ashamed of. If you have a sensible complaint, let's hear it. Otherwise, shut up and s top talking fool. CLICO, THE CENTRAL BANK AND COLUMBUS COMMUNICATIONS Last Friday there was a story about the CLICO liquidation which s aid that a court action had been filed i n Florida to protect the $73 million t hat the company had invested in real estate ventures in that state. The liquidator (Craig Gomez e d as saying that CLICO (Bahamas h ad loaned this money "to affiliated c ompanies" and it ended up in two Florida land developments. He a dded that there could be other CLICO (Bahamas h ad not been identified as yet. Well, we have yet to hear from the government or the central bank as to how $73 million of Bahamianp olicyholder money was able to be e xported to the US. Was exchange control approval given for this s iphoning of funds? Was the foreign exchange premium paid? Is anybody t here? We note that the Ministry of Finance is currently reviewing Cable Bahamas' plan to buy out its controlling shareholder, Columbus Com m unications for some $80 million money that would be partly financed b y preference shares. Did the Ministry similarly review the CLICO pro p osal to invest Bahamian money in speculative Florida real estate deals? What do you think? Send comments to larry@tribunemedia.net Or visit www.bahamapundit.com FROM page six Tough Call date of the detained Cubans, Mr Thompson said that the department is aware of the detainees' dilemma. "I only want to say that we a re actively working on the situation, it's before us and w e are actively pursing it. . .We are aware of the details, we have the facts and so thee xtent that we can do whatever we have to do, we (will do it," Mr Thompson said yesterday. "We know their plight we know their situation." One Cuban detainee, held a t the centre for more than 18 months, yesterday claimed that Immigration officials promised the group's release from the centre at the end oft he month. When questioned about this, Mr Thompson refuseda ny additional comment. "I don't want to comment f urther than to say that we are working on it," he said. According to Mr Thomps on, there are currently eight Cubans held at the C armichael Road centre. The Department of Immig ration has recently been caught in a firestorm of allegations of abuse and mis-t reatment of Cuban detainees housed at the holding facility. In February, one detainee w ho was allegedly beaten by officers so savagely that he l ost fingernails, announced that he along with other Cubans at the centre wass tarting a hunger strike to protest conditions at the cent re. Several other claims of alleged abuse and "concen-t ration camp" like conditions were reported to The Tribune b y detainees prompting calls from human rights watchdog group Amnesty Internationalf or an independent investigation of the claims. These allegations were swiftly denied by immigration officials. W hile several improve ments were made to the living conditions of the centre r eplacements of dirty mattresses with new ones, r epainting of grimy walls, repairs of blocked toilets, and the installation of washinga nd dryer machines officials maintained these upgrades were unrelated toa ny published allegations. H owever in March a factfinding team was appointed b y the Department of Immigration after reports of the alleged abuses were pub-l ished. The team, made up of psychologist Dr David Allen, Social Services DirectorM elanie Zonicle, Archdeac on James Palacious and Mr Thompson, toured the facilit y and interviewed the detainees. While filtered contents of t he report were given to the press through Immigration press conferences, the fullr eport was never released. other pageant contenders. Yesterday Mrs McWeeney said: “We have been invited this morning by Gaynelle Rolle (Miss Bahamas Universe President) to view the scores. I believe that most of the judges will take them up on that so we can just put everything to rest. “By the end of the week, I am sure we can get together and say ‘Everything checked out, these were my scores’ and that we are satisfied the accounting firm did the tallying right.” She said she hopes the exercise has the intended effect, adding: “My phone is blowing up and I can’t take it anymore!” Interest in the Miss Bahamas Universe pageant has been heightened this year as the Miss Universe pageant takes place in The Bahamas for the first time this year. The Bahamian queen will go on to represent her country alongside wannabe queens from across the globe in the internationally-televised event. Illustrating the discontent over the pageant’s outcome, 22-year-old contestant Enna Thomas contacted The Tribune yesterday to explain that she has been disturbed by allegations made online that she may have missed out on an opportunity to represent The Bahamas as pageant queen because of a dispute over money between her spons or, Craig Flowers of the FML Group o f Companies, and Ms Rolle, Miss B ahamas Universe president. She said she already feared “something went wrong” on the final night as although her name appeared on the screen during a pre-recorded video of the 12 finalists seen by TV viewers she was not called up when the announcement of who was in the group was made live. “Immediately I knew that someone went wrong. I was so confident. I had ranked highly throughout the competition. Never for one second did I think I wouldn’t make the top 12,” said Ms Thomas. Meanwhile, she went on to be announced the winner of several awards including Best Float and Miss Photogenic and suspected that she was also the winner of several other awards when a presenter said they could not make out the name that had been written on the paper. Mrs McWeeney confirmed that certain names were said to be illegible on t he night, and in those cases the winner o f the individual awards was never a nnounced. Another judge, speaking anonymously, told The Tribune that he and other judges were told that the fact that Ms Thomas’ name appeared on the screen was simply a mistake. “We were informed behind the scenes that it was just a technical error,” he said. Meanwhile, in relation to claims that the overall result may not have been reflective of the efforts and beauty of the contestants who put themselves forward, the judge said he felt the outcome was “anticipated.” “When I saw the finalists selected that night I didn’t take exception to it. I thought it was fair. We have an excellent queen and I wish this country would support the decision whether all of us agree with it or not,” he said. A message left for Ms Rolle was not returned up to press time yesterday. The substantive matter will be heard on June 26 to determine which process was in fact the valid one,” Mr Ferguson said. Approximately 6,000 hotel workers are expected to cast their ballots on Thursday to elect a new executive. Five teams are vying for leadership positions within the union, including the Unity Team, the M Team, the A Team, the Justice Team, and Team Deliverance. Wilson, who leads team Deliverance, has along with eight other elected union executives been at odds with the top three executives of the BHCAWU, maintaining that the proper rules and regulations were not followed when the nomination and election dates were set. He was granted an injunction last Thursday staying the elections until such time as a judicial review in the matter had been heard. That review will now take place on June 26. Attorney Damian Gomez and Harvey Tynes QC, represent BHCAWU President Roy Colebrooke, Secretary General Leo Douglas and Treasurer Basil McKenzie. FROM page one Hotel union elections will be held tomorrow FROM page one Immigration Dept working to release Cuban detainees F ROM page one Miss Bahamas Universe ‘furor Miss Bahamas Universe Kiara Sherman

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Wallace angered o v er V an Gund y lop’ remark C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009, PAGE 13 n By The Associated P ress Denver at Los Angeles Lakers (9pm EDT two games apiece, the Western Conference finals return to Los Angeles, where Denver won once and nearly earned a sweep in the first two games of the series. S S T T A A R R S S Monday Chauncey Billups, Nuggets, scored 24 points and m ade all nine free throws in D enver's 120-101 victory over t he Lakers that evened the Western Conference finals at two games apiece. J.R. Smith, Nuggets, came off the bench to score 24 points, making four 3pointers and sparking a strong effort from Denver's reserves. D D E E N N V V E E R R ' ' S S D D O O U U B B L L E E D D O O U U B B L L E E S S Kenyon Martin had 13 points and 15 rebounds, while Nene added 14 points and 13 boards in the Nuggets' 120101 victory over the Lakers in Game 3 of the Western Conference finals. They helpedD enver finish with a 58-40 rebounding advantage. Reserve Chris Andersen grabbed 14 boards. D D I I R R T T Y Y D D A A H H N N T T A A Y Y ? ? Lakers coach Phil Jackson accused Nuggets guard Dahntay Jones of playing "unsportsmanlike basketball" by intentionally tripping Kobe Bryant during Game 4 of the Western Conference finals. " There's another situation out t here tonight that was unacceptable by Dahntay Jones," Jackson said. "Just unacceptable defense, tripping guys and playing unsportsmanlike basketball." Hornets coach Byron Scott also criticized Jones for dirty play in the first round. A A I I L L I I N N G G A A N N T T H H O O N N Y Y Hobbled by a sprained ankle and slowed by a stom ach virus, Carmelo Anthony was limited to 15 points on 3of-16 shooting in Denver's 120-101 victory over the Lakers in Game 4. It was his second straight game below 30 points after he hit that mark in five consecutive games. S S P P E E A A K K I I N N G G "They whooped us, period. They whooped us on the glass. They whooped us to loose balls." Kobe Bryant after the Lakers' 120-101 Game 4 loss to Denver that evened the Western Conference finals at two games apiece "Guarantee we're going to win the series? Yeah, yeah. We are down 2-1. But there is nobody on this team and def initely not myself that says we are not going to win this series. Yeah, it is going to be tough. We know that. We get this game tomorrow, go home, still got home-court advantage. We don't see ourselves losing two out of three at home." Cleveland guard Mo Williams, calling his Cavaliers "the best team in basketball." NBA Today n By PAT GRAHAM AP Sports Writer DENVER (AP better supporting cast than Kobe Bryant on a night he really needed it. With Anthony sick and injured, his ensemble pitched in and lifted the Denver Nuggets to a 120-101 win over the Los Angeles Lakers on Monday that evened the Western Conference finals at two games apiece. "Tonight, all of them stepped up," Anthony said. They had to with their star hobbled by a sprained ankle and a stomach virus, something he picked up just before game time and which forced him to receive IV treatment at halftime. Anthony, who's averaging 27.1 points in the postseason, struggled to find his rhythm, going 3for-16 from the field and finishing with 15 points. No matter, though. J.R. Smith had his back. So did Chauncey Billups. B oth finished with 24 points and hit clutch shots in the fourth quarter to lift the Nuggets' spirits as they head into Game 5 on Wednesday night in L.A. "We know the importance of that game," Billups said. The Nuggets' bench got back into the act on Monday, outscoring their counterparts 42-24. "It's satisfying," Anthony said. "It's very satisfying to win a game knowing I wasn't 100 percent out there tonight." Bryant didn't have quite the same support. Still, he tried to carry the Lakers down the stretch, scoring 13 of his 34 points in the fourth quarter. "They just whooped us, period," Bryant admitted. "They whooped us on the glass. They whooped us to loose balls." Fatigue may finally be catching up with the Lakers, who had to endure a grueling seven-game series against Houston while the Nuggets got to relax for a few days after wrapping up their tussle with Dallas in five. Bryant even conceded as much, saying he was exhausted after almost single-handedly pulling one out for the Lakers in Game 3 that gave them back homecourt advantage. "But you just gotta push through it," Bryant said. "They played harder and better, period." And that was with an ailing Anthony. "It just shows we have heart and can play with a man down," Smith said. Smith ignited the Nuggets by rediscovering his outside shot. After going 4-for-15 from the field in Game 3, his confidence was reeling. So Smith stayed late after practice on Sunday, firing up one jumper after another. "I think it worked," said a smiling Smith, who hit back-to-back 3 pointers late in the game to help snuff out a final Lakers charge. Nuggets coach George Karl never lost faith in Smith. "I think his talent and his skill is flamboyant, explosive," Karl said. "It makes us a very explosive team." Pau Gasol, frustrated by a lack of touches, knows how the Lakers can be more explosive by dumping the ball into the paint more often. "I wish we would take more advantage of our inside game, because it's pretty effective," said Gasol, who finished with 21 points on 8-of-11 shooting. "It's unfortunate we don't recognize it enough." Yet he holds out hope. "It's got to be a team-conscious effort and mindset," Gasol said. "We always have a better chance when we establish ourselves inside." The Nuggets had seven different players score in double figures, including Kenyon Martin and Nene who each had a double-double. Chris "Birdman" Andersen provided a boost off the bench, grabbing 14 boards for the Nuggets, who outrebounded the Lakers 58-40. "We got hammered from every direction tonight," Lakers forward Luke Walton said. And Los Angeles coach Phil Jackson was none too pleased about that. He was particularly upset about Dahntay Jones' trip of Bryant in the third quarter, calling it unsportsmanlike. Jones didn't give the assertion a moment's thought. Jackson becomes the latest coach to label Jones a dirty player during the playoffs, joining Byron Scott of the Hornets, who said the same thing in the first round. "Just playing hard," Jones said. "If he can't respect it, I'm sorry. I'm trying to be aggressive and give it all I have out there. My teammates appreciate it." Anthony certainly does. "Dahntay is Dahntay," Anthony said. "That's what he's been doing." Nuggets and Lakers even at 2-2 in Western finals ORLANDO, Fla. (AP Cleveland Cavaliers center Ben Wallace is upset with Orlando coach Stan Van Gundy for accusing him of flopping. Van Gundy said Monday he was bothered by the number of times Cleveland guard Mo Williams and Wallace dropped to the floor in Game 3 of the Eastern Conference finals. He said the pair fell down more times than a baby. Wallace is one of the NBA's most intimidating players. When asked about Van Gundy's comments during Tuesday's shootaround before Game 4, Wallace said Van Gundy should shut up, adding an expletive for emphasis. Van Gundy made the same claims about Shaquille O'Neal this season, and the coach later apologised. n By PAUL LOGOTHETIS AP Sports Writer ROME (AP ter United and Barcelona play for the Champions League trophy, Cris tiano Ronaldo and Lionel Messi may well be squaring off for the right to call himself the world's best player. Ronaldo, however, doesn't seem too concerned about that. "Now to decide (who the best player is), who cares about that? What I want more is to win the Champions League and that's it," Ronaldo said Tuesday from the Stadio Olimpico. "I respect Barcelona very much, Messi is special also. "Sincerely, I'm not worried about that. I would rather win the Champions League final. I want it very much." Ronaldo is the reigning FIFA world player of the year after his 42 goals last season guided United to both the Premier League and Cham pions League trophies. Messi was second in the voting, despite Barcelona enduring a second straight season without a trophy. This season, however, Messi has already collected two trophies and netted more goals than Ronaldo, and the result of Wednesday's final could be the deciding factor when votes are cast for next year's award. United coach Alex Ferguson said picking one over the other was difficult because of their different styles Ronaldo's speedy stepovers and long-range shooting vs. Messi's darting runs and imagination inside the area. "Both have the ability and courage to attack defenders all the time. No matter how many times they are tackled they get up and they want the ball, and that's the kind of courage we want to see in footballers. And both have it," Ferguson said. "Both have different types of qualities, both are differ ent types of players but at end of the day, how can you divide it? They're separate." If Man United defends its European trophy, that will provide a fourth piece of silverware after league, League Cup and Club World Cup triumphs. Messi can add a Champions League title to Barcelona's league and cup double, and see the Catalans become only the fifth Spanish team to win three trophies in a season. Ronaldo has never scored against Spanish opposition while Messi, who leads the competition with eight goals, has never netted against a Premier League opponent. Ronaldo said the buildup to the their individual showdown was not proving a distraction. "I'm 100 percent focused on the game. I know the people want to know something about me but I'm very focused," Ronaldo said. "I try to score a goal and win the game, that's it." Ronaldo vs. Messi could decide ‘best player’ award Lionel Messi (AP CHRIS ANDERSEN (far left during the second half of Game 4 in Western Conference finals in Denver Monday night. The Lakers lost 120-101... (AP Photos: Chris Carlson KOBE BRYANT (right i n the final minute

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know it’s good to be home again,” he said. “Secondly, to congratulate you on your awesome success in Jamaica. I followed the first round game against St Lucia and I was very concerned. I followed you in the second round and I got a call that night from someone who is very excited and said ‘Mr. Minister, you bet ter call Jamaica because we just beat Jamaica.’” Although he didn’t make the trip, Bannister said what the team achieved in Jamaica was triumphant of the Bahamian spirit. He alluded to the fact that the team’s trip was delayed because of the lack of funding and that once they got there, they persevered to defeat Jamaica on their home soil when everybody was pulling against them. “It shows what you could do if you pull together as a team,” he stated. “It shows the strength that you have and it gives us an idea of where you could go if you really want it. But the key element is desire. Desire and determination and with that comes team work. “You’ve been able in volleyball to bring together a group of young men who are very tal ented, but by yourselves you can’t do it. You have to create a unit, a unit that works and func tions very well together.” Head coach Raymond Wilson, using a Biblical quote to begin his comments, said: “God gives grace and mercy and favour to whoever he chooses to do so. At this time, he chose to bless the Bahamas as with favour. “We have a lot of work ahead of us preparing for the next round, but my prayer is that God will continue to go with us and bless us with favour and mercy and keep our players strong. I feel that we will do well. All we have to do is target the weaknesses of the teams in every round.” Assistant coach DeVince Smith thanked Bannister and his ministry for their financial support and all of the players for the commitment they made. “Through discipline and hard work, they made it possible for us to succeed and to excel to the next round,” he pointed out. “As we move on, it’s going to get harder. “Like coach (Wilson it’s going to get harder, but it’s not about winning, but doing our best and advancing. We pray that you will continue to support us and give you our all.” Team captain Audril Farquharson said they are aware that these are some rough economic times and the govern ment has been stretched to the limit in ensuring that they get to travel. “We appreciate the effort, but we have one more trip to Cuba for us to advance, so hopefully we all will still be there,” he charged. Federation president Don Cornish said Bannister and the Bahamian people would have been proud watching the team perform in Jamaica, especially as they were in the “lion’s den.” “I think the team showed a lot of heart, especially in that first game against St Lucia and particularly in the semifinal against Jamaica, a host team that was not easy to beat at home,” he said. “We made them think a lot. They changed their line-up at least seven times trying to beat this team. I think we were resolved to make this a suc cess.” In order to make the second trip in August a success, Cor nish said they have already gotten permission to travel to San to Domingo for a training camp and they should have a coach from Cuba to assist in their preparation. “We have to learn to play against taller players,” Cornish said. “That was one of the big challenges we had against Mexico. We didn’t think Mexicans can grow that tall. I don’t think they understood how tall they were until they were on the other side of the net. “So they are the kind of adjustments that we will have to make in going forward. A team that is technically sound will not make that many mistakes. So we have to force them into situations to make them think. I think this was an important test for us going forward.” C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS n By CHRIS LEHOURITES AP Sports Writer PARIS (AP Williams struggled to close her match at a windy French Open on Tuesday, wasting eight match points before finally beating Klara Zakopalova of the Czech Republic 6-3, 6-7 (5 6-4. The second-seeded Williams was broken twice during the second set, including when she was serving for the match at 5-4. At 5-3 with Zakopalova serving, she had five match points but couldn't end it. Zakopalova saved three more m atch points before holding to 5 -3 in the third set, then broke W illiams in the next game to get back on serve. "I think Serena will be playing better and better each round, so it was the best chance to at least play with her or beat her," Zakopalova said. "She's Serena." Williams completed her Serena Slam at the French Openin 2002, winning her fourth straight Grand Slam title. If she wins at Roland Garros this year, she'll have won three majors ina row after victories at the U.S. Open and the Australian Open.She reached the final at Wim bledon last year, but lost to big sister Venus in the final. Third-seeded Jelena Jankovic, No. 4 Elena Dementieva and No. 7 Svetlana Kuznetsova also advanced among the women, while No. 4 Novak Djokovic, No. 5 Juan Martin del Potro, No. 9 Jo-Wil fried Tsonga and 2003 French Open champion Juan Carlos Ferrero made it through on the men's side. Jankovic dominated her opponent before a 2-hour rain delay, and then did well enough after it to beat Petra Cetkovska of the Czech Republic 6-2, 6-3. The Serb, once ranked No. 1, was leading 4-1 when the rain started at Roland Garros. She quickly completed the first set when play resumed and continued to play well on Cetkovska's serve in the second but was bro-ken twice on her own. "I was controlling the points ... but then we had to stop because of the rain," Jankovic said. "I felt a little bit slow after the rain delay." While serving for the match, Jankovic again struggled and was forced to save break points before finally winning. "The serve was all right. I didn't go for too much," said Jankovic, who added the balls were heavier than usual because of the wet weather. "I just tried to have a high percentage." Jankovic finished last season as the top-ranked player on the women's tour, but the 24-yearold Serb is still looking to win her first Grand Slam singles title after losing in the final of last year's U.S. Open. Kuznetsova defeated Claire Feuerstein of France 6-1, 6-4. The 2004 U.S. Open champion also dominated before the rain started falling, leading 5-1. Djokovic advanced when Nicolas Lapentti of Ecuador retired while trailing 6-3, 3-1 after injuring his left ankle. Lapentti hurt his ankle when coming to net at 5-2 in the first set. He called for a trainer but then continued playing. The fourth-seeded Djokovic, who won his fourth career title on clay at this month's Serbia Open, has reached the semifinals at the French Open the last two years. He also won the 2008 Australian Open. Del Potro had little trouble in his opening match at Roland Garros, beating Michael Llodra of France 6-3, 6-3, 6-1. The Argentine won four straight ATP titles last year, the first two on clay. No. 27 Rainer Schuettler of Germany narrowly avoided a "triple bagel" after being shut out in the first two sets of a 6-0,6 -0, 6-4 loss to Marc Gicquel of F rance. On Friday, Schuettler lost to Robin Soderling 6-0, 6-0 at the ATP World Team Championship in Germany. "A 'double bagel' is fine," said Schuettler, who reachedt he semifinals at last year's Wimbledon. "I had one last week. It's nothing new." Gicquel was unapologetic about the thrashing. "I didn't come here to sym pathize," said the Frenchman, who was trying to win the third set at love as well. "If I tried to give him one or two games, then everything could be overturned against me." No. 11 Gael Monfils of France also advanced, easily beating Bobby Reynolds of the United States 6-2, 6-3, 6-1 despite a knee injury. French Open: Serena through to 2nd round OUR own Olympic boxer Taureano Johnson stopped by the Embassy of The Bahamas i n Washington, DC, to say “hello” while he was there last week to get some training and advice. With Johnson were his father E rwin, and Floyd Seymour, who was himself among the first Bahamian boxers to qualify at the Olympic level – in 1991 – a nd who is talking with the younger fighter about his future. Johnson did the Bahamas p roud in Beijing, winning his first two fights and making it all the way to the medal round before losing a decision to the home-town favourite Hanati Silamu. Johnson placed fifth at the Olympics and currently holds the rank of No. 5 amateur boxer in the world. “I did some good work,” he s aid of his Beijing bouts. “To be in to that level [was the] pinnacle of my career.” As to whether he will fight a s an Olympian again in 2012, Johnson said that was “some bit of time away.” Meantime, the question continues to pop u p: When will Taureano Johnson go pro? The 25-year-old would not answer the question directly but h e admitted that he is at least considering turning professional. Instead, he said that it was rare for fighters his age to stay an amateur for long, especially long enough to fight in two Olympics. Olympic boxer visits Embassy of The Bahamas in Washington, DC FLOYD Seymour (far leftfar right visited The Embassy of The Bahamas in Washington DC where they met Rhoda Jackson last week. H ERE is a look at some of the performances produced by members of the Bahamas Volleyball Federation men’s team at the 2010 World Championships NORCEA’S Rounds played over the weekend in Kingston, Jamaica: F F I I N N A A L L R R E E S S U U L L T T S S Mexico Bahamas Jamaica Haiti St. Lucia Cayman Islands B B E E S S T T P P L L A A Y Y E E R R S S Best Receiver Renaldo Knowles Bahamas. B B E E S S T T S S C C O O R R E E R R S S No.2 Renaldo Knowles 41 spikes, 3 blocks, 1 serve = 49. No.3 Shedrick Forbes 37 spikes, 5 block, 0 serve = 42. No.15 Byron Ferguson 19 spikes, 7 blocks, 0 serve = 26. No.16 Prince Wilson 24 spikes, 0 block, 1 serve = 25. No.23 Romel Lightbourne 16 spikes, 1 block, 3 serves = 20. No.26 Simon Tonny 7 spikes, 6 blocks, 1 serve = 14. No.32 Ian Pinder 7 sp[ikes, 1 block, 0 serve = 8. B B E E S S T T S S P P I I K K E E R R S S No.6 Shedrick Forbes 37 spikes, 17 f aults, 32 shots, 86 total attempts = 43.02. No.7 Renaldo Knowles 41 spikes, 22 faults, 39 shots, 102 attempts = 40.20. B B E E S S T T B B L L O O C C K K E E R R S S No.6 Byron Ferguson 7 kill blocks, 11 faults, 18 rebounds, 36 attempts = 0.47. No.9 Simon Tonny 6 kill blocks, 5 faults, 7 rebounds, 17 attewmpts = 0.42. B B E E S S T T S S E E R R V V E E R R S S No.5 Romel Lightbourne 3 aces, 6 faults, 28 serve hits, 37 attempts = 0.20. B B E E S S T T D D I I G G G G E E R R S S No.5 Renaldo Knowles 20 sigs, 7 faults, 23 receptions, 50 attempts = 1.33. No.8 Jamaal Ferguson 12 digs, 9 faults, 16 receptions, 37 attempts = 0.80. B B E E S S T T S S E E T T T T E E R R S S No.4 Simon Tonny 53 running sets, 9 faults, 185 still sets, 247 attempts = 3.53. No.10 Audril Farquharson 20 run ning sets, 4 faults, 64 still sets, 88 attempts = 1.33. B B E E S S T T R R E E C C E E I I V V E E R R S S No.1 Renaldo Knowles 62 excellents, 2 faults, 16 serve receptions, 80 attempts = 75.00. B B E E S S T T L L I I B B E E R R O O S S No.3 Jamaal Ferguson 60 excellents, 12 faults, 28 in play, 100 attempts = 60.00. Bahamas Volleyball Federation 2010 World Championships NORCEA’S Rounds SERENA WILLIAMS reacts as she plays Klara Zakopalova in their first round match of the French Open tournament at Roland Garros stadium in Paris on Tuesday... (AP Photo: Lionel Cironneau RENALDO KNOWLES , of the Bahamas, was the best receiver... DeVINCE SMITH , assistant coach, gives his assessment of the men’s national team at the 2010 World Championships NORCEA’S Qualifying Round... RAYMOND WILSON , head coach of the men’s national volleyball team, addressed the audience on the team’s performance in Kingston, Jamaica... F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 5 5 ‘Spiking’ their way to the top ABOVE are some members of the men’s national volleyball team. From left in back are Jamaal Ferguson, Tony Simon, Glen Rolle, Shedrack Forbes and Ian ‘Wire’ Pinder. In front from left are Byron Ferguson, Audril Far quharson, Maurice ‘Cheeks’ Smith and Mullit Petit. THREE more members of the men’s national team celebrate on their return home. They are (shown l-r Renaldo Knowles.

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MARK Knowles and Mahesh Bhupathi are hoping that they can win their first title for the year at the Roland Gar ros French Open Grand Slam. The Bahamian-Indian duo are seeded at No. 4 in the men’s doubles at the tournament that got started on Monday. However, they are not expected to start playing until Thursday. Knowles’ former partner, Daniel Nestor, and Nestor’s new partner Nenad Zimonjic are the top seeds. The No.2 seeds are American identical twin brothers Bob and Mike Bryan. Knowles and Bhupathi go into the tournament as the No.3 ranked team on the ATP com puter rankings. Heading the list is the Bryans, followed by Nestor and Zimonijic. n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net D espite being held back a day because of the lack of funds to get to Jamaica and having to overcome a height differential at the 2010 World Championships NORCEA’S D-Qualifying Rounds, the men’s national volleyball team accomplished their mission. The Bahamas Volleyball Federation just missed out in win ning the four days of competi tion, but they have advanced to the NORCEA’S H-Qualifying round in Cuba in August for the FIVB Men’s Volleyball World Championship in Italy. They did it upsetting Jamaica 19-25, 25-18, 25-22 in the semifinal before losing to Mexico 25-13, 25-14 and 25-16 in the final. In Pool B play, the Bahamas won its opener 22-25, 22-25, 2522, 25-18 and 15-11 over St Lucia. But they lost 25-13, 25-20 and 25-16 to Mexico in their second match. On their return home yesterday via Air Jamaica, the team was greeted at the Lynden Pindling International Airport by Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister and his staff. A welcome reception was held in the VIP Lounge. Bannister, who congratulate d the team for its best perform ance ever, encouraged the p layers to get used to the courtesy that is afforded to all national teams on their return home as he anticipates the same type of success in the future. “Gentlemen, it falls on me on behalf of the Government and the people of the Bahamas first of all to welcome you home. I C M Y K C M Y K WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 P AGE 14 Olympic boxer visits Embassy of The Bahamas ... 9 9 9 9$ $SUITS F F i i n n e e T T h h r r e e a a d d s sB ernardRd-MackeySt-ThompsonBlvd FROM KIT Spencer, president of the Bahamas International Tennis Club, has started a new interclub doubles league and named the trophy for the win ning team in honour of IC founder J Barrie Far rington. The club is one of a group of prestigious worldwide “IC’s” whose members have generally represented their country or won national titles at tennis. Mr Farrington was the founder of our Bahamian IC. Among some of the international members are Roger Federer, Tim Henman and our own Mark Knowles. The Gym Club team was led by Robbie Isaacs who is now a full time tennis coach at The Gym Club in Winton. After a series of exciting and close matches they emerged as the eventual winners but only after an extremely close final match against a Lyford Cay team in which the outcome of the whole league was decided in the final set of the final match. Most of the teams were led by and included Bahamas IC members but not entirely. The Bahamas IC invited the BLTA National Tennis Centre to enter a team of top juniors in the league which they hoped would give them added experience against some of our experienced older players. Although the junior team finished at the low end of the league they performed very creditably and only lost matches that were closely contested. Their team included several members of our recent Junior Fed and Davis Cup teams and the experience proved useful for the doubles part of that event where our juniors performed well. In July, the club has a veterans team participating in the Russian IC’s 10th Anniversary event in Moscow. There will be teams from about a dozen countries involved in this event. From September 17-20, the Bahamas IC will again be sponsoring a junior 16 & under combined boys and girls team in The IC International Junior Challenge. This year, bi-annual event will be held at The Chris Evert Academy in Boca Raton. The first North American IC Junior Challenge was hosted four years ago here in the Bahamas by our own IC. It is anticipated that there will also be teams from the US, Canada, Mexico, Barbados and Bermuda. Bahamas Inter national Tennis Club starts new interclub doubles league Trophy for winning team is named in honour of J Barrie Farrington Nuggets and Lakers even at 2-2 in Western finals... See page 13 ‘Spiking’ their way to the top Men’s national volleyball team advance to NORCEA’S H-Qualifying round for FIVB World Championship MINISTER OF YOUTH, SPORTS & C ULTURE DESMOND BANNISTER (right of the men’s national volleyball team as BVFederation president Don Cornish looks on... S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 4 4 TOP MINISTER OF YOUTH, SPORTS & CULTURE DESMOND BANNISTER sits with executives and team officials of the men’s national volleyball team. Standing are members of the team... ABOVE Team manager Jermaine Adderley holds the trophy that the men’s national volleyball team brought home from Jamaica. Next to him is trainer Lloyd Davis and Joseph ‘Joe Mo’ Smith, BVF vice president... Knowles, Bhupathi hoping to win their first title for MARK KNOWLES and Mahesh Bhupathi (shown in file photo that they can win their first title for the year at the Roland Garros French Open Grand Slam... PRESENTATION TO WINNING GYM CLUB TEAM Shown (l-r Archer, Robbie Isaacs, Terry North, Barrie Farrington (IC Founder), Mickey Williams and Kit Spencer (IC President)

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor H iggs & Johnson, Nassau’s largest law firm, yesterday confirmed that it had laid off a “minor and very selective number” of staff as the recession’s chill winds start to freeze the Bahamian legal services profession, as the managing partner at another leading company said further redundancies at major firms were almost inevitable. Colin Callender, managing partner at Callender’s & Co, said in response to Tribune Business’s questions that the economic environment facing Bahamian law firms was currently the toughest he had experienced during his decades as ap racticing attorney. “I anticipate there will be further reductions in staff comple ments at the larger law firms, mine included,” Mr Callender told Tribune Business. He estimated that Callender’s & Co had seen transactional work, such as real estate conveyancings and mergers and acquisitions, was down 30-40 per cent below normal levels. Mr Callender added that real estate transactions for both realt ors and attorneys had been n egatively impacted by the G overnment’s 2008-2009 Budget decision to remove the $35,000 real property tax cap, discouraging high-end property transactions by making them more expensive. “That is where the larger firms were making their income. The agents and attorneys have been adversely impacted by the removal of that,” Mr Callender said. If things are bad in Nassau, they are even worse in Freeport. Fred Smith, the Callender’s & Co partner based in Freeport’s second city, told Tribune Business: “Our transaction business is down 75 per cent. As far as Callender’s in F reeport is concerned, we are s uffering the effects of the economic downturn. Our commercial work is down about 75 per cent. The downward trend is reflected in most of the other firms in Freeport. Most of the law firms in Freeport have, over the latest couple of years, been reducing their staff because of Freeport’s economic challenges.” Their sentiments were echoed by John Delaney, Higgs & Johnson’s managing partner, who confirmed that a “recali bration assessment” completed last week had identified the need for “a select and limited” workforce reduction as part of b oth a short and medium-term p lan. T ribune Business had been told by legal sources that between nine to 11 Higgs & Johnson staff members, including some associates and support staff, had been released by the Certification to help better ‘Landscape’ n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE NEWLY-incorporated Bahamas Landscape Association (BLABTVI have begun a tertiary pilot programme that will certify graduates and allow them to be duly employed in the industry, the BLA’s cochairman sad yesterday. Conray Rolle added that the programme was still in need of funding and will be part of the trial certificate programme mediated through the Daytona Beach Community College in Florida. Mr Rolle explained that the BTVI certification programme was proposed in order to give Bahamians the necessary theory and practical training consistent with international standards. T his endeavour to adhere to international standards, said Mr R olle, was the reason the BLA, incorporated in September 2008, p artnered with the Florida Nursery, Growers and Landscape Association (FNGLA “What drove us to do this was realising the deficiencies from a knowledge standpoint, and deficiencies when it come to hiring new people,” he said. Mr Rolle argued that the industry has been poorly regulated, with the misuse of chemicals needed for landscaping and an overall ineptitude in the industry. He added that finding labour qualified to work in the land n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor TWO Bahamas-based invest ment funds have settled with the trustee for Bernard Madoff’s former firm it was announced yesterday, agreeing to pay a collective $235 million to resolve claims over allega tions they withdrew money from the $50 billion US fraud ster’s scheme in the days before it collapsed. A statement from their Bahamian attorneys, Lennox Paton, said the Optimal Strategic US Equity fund and Opti mal Arbitrage fund, had reached agreement with Irving Picard, trustee for Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities, to re-pay some 85 per cent of the funds they withdrew to meet his “clawback demand”. Those payments, the release said, would total $129.057 mil lion for the Optimal Strategic US Equity fund, and $106.324 million for the Optimal Arbitrage fund. Both are domiciled in the Bahamas as International Business Com panies (IBCs In return, the two funds, which are managed by Swiss-based Optimal Investment Services, a whollyowned subsidiary of Spanish banking giant, Banco Santander, will have their claims permitted by Mr Picard as part of the Madoff liquidation process. The trustee also reduced his so-called “clawback demands” in return for payment of 85 per cent. The Lennox Paton statement said: “The agreement provides that the funds’ claims against the Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities estate would be allowed in their full amounts, calculated on a cash-in, cash-out basis of $1.54 billion [for Optimal Strategic US Equity fund] and $9.808 million respectively, and the funds would be entitled to Securities Investor Protection Corporation advances of $500,000 each.” Optimal Investment Services and the Santander group itself have agreed not to file any oth er claims against the Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities estate. “The agreement also contains an ‘equal treatment’ provision, so that of the trustee settles similar clawback claims for less than 85 per cent, the funds will receive a rebate of a portion of their payments to equalise the percentages applied to the funds,” the Lennox Paton statement said. n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE economic downturn, coupled with the dismal tourism economy in Central Eleuthera, has convinced the owner of a North Palmetto Point resort to finally sell his property. Owner of Unique Village, Adison Cooper, told Tribune Business yesterday that he was still hopeful of an economic turnaround later this year. How ever, he said he must now “seriously” consider selling the resort. “It has been very, very rough to survive at this time,” said Mr Cooper. “I really have to consider selling at this time.” With the upcoming Palmetto Point Homecoming festival, which is thought to be a signifi cant economic boost for Eleuthera’s hotels, and typically generates 100 per cent occupancy for many of them, Mr Cooper is cautiously optimistic. He said Unique Village was currently only at 60 per cent occupancyu. Last-minute hotel bookings are the norm, however, as many Nassuvians decide to take the weekend trip only days before. The chairman for the Homecoming Festival told Tribune Business this week that he expects the festival draw its nor mal crowds, and he argues that hotels are filling up quickly. Mr Cooper said Eleuthera has not been as well off as other islands since the onset of the global financial crisis, which sparked the worldwide economic recession. He said Unique Village has been operating with the mini mum staff levels needed at the moment, because “we aren’t booked”. Owner and principal of the Pineapple Fields Resort, David Barlyn, said Eleuthera tourism has been stunted by the high cost of direct airlift into the island. He explained that a onehour round trip flight direct to Eleuthera is as expensive as a four-hour round trip flight coastto-coast in the US. Mr Barlyn said his resort has seen a 30 per cent occupancy decline year-on-year, and though he has not received many bookings for the homecoming festival either, he is expecting an almost full-house when a Tyler Perry film shoot comes to the island in a few weeks. “We’re definitely seeing things pick up,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report. $3.73 $3.62 $3.82 Resort owner plans to sell Bahamas funds pay $235m to settle with Madoff trustee Eleuthera tourism stunted by high airlift costs that match coast-to-coast US flight * Bahamas-domiciled funds agree to pay back 85% of money they allegedly withdrew in days before $50bn Ponzi scheme collapse, but no wrongdoing discovered or admitted * Santander funds’ $1.54bn claims to be allowed in liquidation * Class action lawsuits name Bahamas-based director of funds as defendant Bernard Madoff S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas Bar Council has expressed “outrage” and “grave concerns as to the legality” of FINCO’s proposal to require title insurance for all mortgages it issues, but the institution’s managing director yes terday told Tribune Business it was committed to “moving ahead” with the initiative in the interest of consumer protection and choice. Tanya McCartney said BISXlisted FINCO, which is effectively Royal Bank of Canada’s mortgage lending arm in the Bahamas, was “in the process of fine-tuning our decision to move ahead with providing title B B a a r r o o u u t t r r a a g g e e o o v v e e r r F F I I N N C C O O p p l l a a n n f f o o r r t t i i t t l l e e i i n n s s u u r r a a n n c c e e * Attorneys claim ‘grave concern as to the legality’ of mortgage lender’ s plan * But FINCO chief says BISXlisted firm committed to moving ahead with title insurance introduction in interests of consumer protection and choice * Bar concerns likely to centre on FINCO assertion that ‘no need’ for title searches, and subsequent loss of 2.5% fee income * Title insurance to be placed through Higgs & Johnson affiliate S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B Lay-offs hit Nassau’s leading law firms * The largest, Higgs & Johnson, confirms letting go ‘small and very select’ number of staff * Callender’s & Co’s top partner says economic environment facing legal services toughest he has seen, with ‘further reductions in staff complements at the larger law firms’ almost inevitable * Callender’s sees Nassau transaction work fall 30-40%, and 75% in Freeport* Real property tax cap removal hurts attorneys and realtors

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE ) ,1$1&(&25325$7,21)%$+$0$6/,0,7('127,&(3OHDVHEHDGYLVHGWKDWWKH+HDG2IFHDQG WKH5HJLVWHUHG2IFHRIWKHFRPSDQ\ZLOOEH PRYHGIURPWKH%DKDPDV)LQDQFLDO&HQWUH& KDUORWWH6KLUOH\6WUHHWV)ORRU1DVVDX %DKDPDVWR5R\DO%DQN+RXVH(DVW+LOO6WUHHW 1DVVDX%DKDPDVHIIHFWLYH0D\ THIS conversation happens at least a couple of times a month. I n my opinion, time is the most valuable asset any of us have. I respect other people’s time and my time. Therefore, I will not let anyone else disre-s pect my time and neither should you. To save time in sales and stop chasing your own tail oro ther people’s tails qualify them first. If they don’t qualify they are not worth your time. Do this ! W W H H A A T T I I S S A A Q Q U U A A L L I I F F I I E E D D C C U U S S T T O O M M E E R R ? ? One who has need? One who needs a product? One who has authority to p urchase? One who purchases in a reasonable timeframe? O ne who has means/funds to purchase? A sking these questions will immediately let you know what to do. Either they qualify or they don’t. There is no middle of the road. Either they are w orth your time or they or not. T oo many times, sales and marketing persons continually c all and knock on doors when n obody is home or at the office. Stop wasting your time. O O f f f f i i c c e e E E n n v v i i r r o o n n m m e e n n t t T T I I M M E E W W A A S S T T E E R R S S M ost of us work in an environment with other people. We a ll know that someone who l oves to come by your work area, sit down and talk aboutt he weekend and any other latest celebrity/gossip news. Time wasters. Yep, that’s what I call t hem, TIME WASTERS. Here is how you deal with them. D D O O T T H H I I S S ! ! C lose your door if you have o ne. If the boss does not mind, put a ‘Do not disturb’ sign on your door and phone. M ost time wasters cannot read or see. So, even if you have your door closed, they still knock and come right in. To avoid them sitting down, puts tuff in all the chairs in your office or take chairs out of your office. When you need the chairs, bring them back in. H owever, we also have what I call SUPER TIME WASTERS. These are the ones who will open a closedd oor without knocking, remove i tems from a chair that you have strategically placed to discourage them from sittingd own, and plunk themselves down for a nice long chat. Here i s how you deal with a SUPER TIMEWASTER. T ake off your belt and tell them if they ever come back again you’ll O K, seriously. If a super time waster ignores the closed door, the ‘do not disturb’ sign, removes items from the extra c hair in your office and tries to sit down, simply get up out yof our seat, walk up to him or her and . (It’s not what you’re thinking) start walking t owards your door to exit your office. Gently put your hand o n their back and motion them back out into the hallway. Nod your head like you arr listening and then say: “OOOPS, I FORGOT SOMETHINGR EAL IMPORTANT. I’LL CALL YA LATER”. Go back i n your office, closing the door behind you T his works like a charm. Try it. L et’s suppose you don’t have an office with a door, but worki n an open environment or a cubicle. D D O O T T H H I I S S ! ! Hang a do not disturb sign p rominently where you can. Put on a headset connected t o the phone. If a time waster approaches, pretend you’re on the phone and they will walk away. If aS UPER TIMEWASTER shows up, stand on your chair, jump over the cubicle and run. OK, seriously. So you are pretending to be on the phonew ith your headset (and you very may well be talking to someone). The SUPER TIMEWASTER shows up and standst here waiting for you to finish (remember, they have all the time in the world) your conversation, and may even tap you on the shoulder. C ALMLY (Yes, I said calmly) turn around, ask the person on the phone to politely hold and ask the SUPER TIMEWASTER (again,i t’s not really what I know you want to say). Ask: “IS IT AN EMERGENCY”? Some9 .999999 times out of 10, it is not. The SUPER TIME W ATER will say: “No, it’s not a n emergency.” Then you can politely turn around and continue your conversation with the person you left on hold. Doing this will set the prece d ent for all possible future a ttacks from any form of a time waster. I don’t know about you guys, b ut in today’s world my time is super valuable and I rightly protect it. So should you . All of these marketing strateg ies are certain to keep your b usiness on top during these challenging economic times. H ave a productive and profi table week! Remember: “THOSE WHO MARKETW ILL MAKE IT “ N N B B : : S S c c o o t t t t F F a a r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n i i s s p p r r e e s s i i d d e e n n t t o o f f S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e , , a a p p r r o o m m o o t t i i o o n n a a l l a a n n d d m m a a r r k k e e t t i i n n g g c c o o m m p p a a n n y y s s p p e e c c i i a a l l i i s s i i n n g g i i n n p p r r o o m m o o t t i i o o n n a a l l p p r r o o d d u u c c t t s s . . E E s s t t a a b b l l i i s s h h e e d d o o v v e e r r 2 2 7 7 y y e e a a r r s s a a g g o o , , S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e h h a a s s a a s s s s i i s s t t e e d d B B a a h h a a m m i i a a n n b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s e e s s i i n n v v a a r r i i o o u u s s i i n n d d u u s s t t r r i i e e s s r r a a n n g g i i n n g g f f r r o o m m t t o o u u r r i i s s m m a a n n d d b b a a n n k k i i n n g g t t o o t t e e l l e e c c o o m m m m u u n n i i c c a a t t i i o o n n s s i i n n m m a a r r k k e e t t i i n n g g t t h h e e m m s s e e l l v v e e s s . . R R e e a a d d e e r r s s c c a a n n c c o o n n t t a a c c t t M M r r F F a a r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n a a t t S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e o o n n E E a a s s t t S S h h i i r r l l e e y y S S t t r r e e e e t t , , b b y y e e m m a a i i l l a a t t s s c c o o t t t t @ @ s s u u n n t t e e e e . . c c o o m m o o r r b b y y t t e e l l e e p p h h o o n n e e a a t t 2 2 4 4 2 2 3 3 9 9 3 3 3 3 1 1 0 0 4 4 . . P romotional Marketing by Scott Farrington Don’t waste my key time F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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It added that Mr Picard had investigated the conduct of the two funds, and Optimal Investment Services, in dealing with M r Madoff, and found that this does not provide grounds to a ssert any claim against the Optimal companies or any other part of the Santander group other than the clawback claims”. The clawback liability, the statement said, did not imply wrongdoing. The agreement, which is subject to US Bankruptcy Court approval at a New York hearing on June 16, releases all other “clawback” and other claims that Mr Picard may have against the Bahamian investment funds as a result of their investments with Mr Madoff’s company. “The trustee’s release would a pply to all potential claims a gainst other Optimal compa n ies, Santander companies and their investors, directors, officers and employees who agree to release the trustee and the Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities Estate, to the extent the claims arose out of the funds’ dealings with Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities,” the Lennox Paton statement read. “It also releases both funds from potential clawback liability for any other withdrawals made by them.” Banco Santander ignited a fire storm of investor protest w hen it revealed on 14 Decemb er, 2008, that it had a EUR 2 .33 billion ($3.1 billion sure to Mr Madoff’s fraudulent Ponzi scheme via the Bahamasdomiciled Optimal Strategic US Equity fund. Some EUR 2.01 billion of this sum belonged to Santander’s institutional investors and global private banking customers, with the remaining EUR 320 million coming from structured products that formed part of the investment portfolio for the bank’s Spanish private banking customers. That fury resulted in two class-action lawsuits being filed in the Miami courts against Banco Santander. Also named as defendants were Optimal Investment Services, as fund manager; HSBC Securities Services (Ireland tutional Trust Services (Ireland), as administrator and cus todian; and the three directors of Optimal Multiadvisors, the master fund for both the Opti mal Strategic US Equity fund and Optimal Arbitrage Fund. Among the directors named as defendants in the class action lawsuit filed on January 26, 2009, by a Chilean company, Inversiones Mar Octava Limitada, which allegedly invested $300,000 in the Optimal Strate gic US Equity fund, was Antho ny InderRieden, managing director of Euro-Dutch Trust Company (Bahamas That company, a licensed trust company since 1975, is based at Charlotte House on Charlotte Street. The Inversiones lawsuit alleged that Mr InderRieden had served as d irector of Optimal Multiadvis ors’ first administrator, the for m er Fortis Fund Services (Bahamas There is nothing to suggest that Mr InderRieden or EuroDutch Trust Company (Bahamas wrong in relation to the Optimal fund’s affair. The Inversiones lawsuit alleged that the defendants had breached their legal duties to investors by failing to carry out proper due diligence on Mr Madoff and his company, as “there was a plethora of red flags that would have alerted any reasonable investor that Madoff was running a Ponzi scheme”. The lawsuit further alleged that Optimal Investment Services received a management fee equivalent to 1.9 per cent of assets under management, almost EUR 44 million annu ally. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009, PAGE 3B NOTICE MUNIA (BAHAMASTD. Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8 the International Business Companies Act 2000, notice is hereby given that the above-named Company has been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant to a Certicate of Dissolution issued by The Registrar General on the 20th day of May, A.D., 2009. Dated the 22nd day of May, A.D., 2009. Mr. Swen-Uwe Horvath and Dr. Jochen Koeber Joint-Liquidators of MUNIA (BAHAMASTD. THE removal of the $35,000 real property tax cap has cost Bahamian realtors sales, a leadi ng real estate agent has said. With the change to 1.5 per cent taxation on property, broker Mario Carey has seen potent ial clients walk away. “Especially in these times when everyone is watching how they spend,” he said, hoping that today’s Budget will reflect changes requested by the Bahamas Real Estate Association. “The economic benefits to the community of the sale of a single large home, over a period of time, outweigh the benefits of real property tax. Stamp tax a lone on a $10 million home is $1 million, straight to government. But if that buyer goes elsewhere because he thinks the $ 150,000 a year for real property tax is unacceptable, government loses the stamp tax and The Bahamas loses the income that the occupancy of that home would have generated.” “Prices have definitely dropped anywhere from 15% 20%,” Mr Carey added, “but we spend a lot of time talking about the new needs in a changing market. Interest rates are low, as low as 3 per cent in some p laces in the US, so many people want to use the equity in their homes to invest in their own businesses or keep them afloat, o r they want to buy real estate while prices are right.” Others are taking equity out for personal reasons or need appraisals for tax or estate planning reasons. This means real estate offices such as Mario Carey Realty, with certified appraisers, are doing a record business in appraisals. “We exceeded expectations by a long shot,” said Mr Carey, who specialises in properties in O cean Club Estates, Paradise Island, Lyford Cay, Old Fort Bay, Albany and in the Family Islands, of Mario Carey Realt y’s first year. He credits a “young, energetic and dynamic staff” that has doubled in size from two to four, and added a webmaster. “It’s their hard work and team work that have helped to get us here,” said Mr Carey this week as he prepared for the company’s first celebration dinner. Property tax cap’s removal loses sales MARIO CAREY M M A A D D O O F F F F , , f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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insurance” to all its mortgage clients. The only details left were to determine how this would be done, Ms McCartney explaining to Tribune Business that FINCO had listened to the Bar Council’s concerns and would attempt to take them into account. Yet FINCO had not moved from its commitment to roll-out title insurance as a way to enhance consumer protection and choice. The Bar Council’s concerns were sparked by an April 1, 2009, letter sent to its Bahamian attorney members by Patrice Ritchie, FINCO’s senior manager for mortgages, in which she confirmed the lending institution’s plans to require title insurance for all mortgages it issued. The real trigger for the Bar Council’s opposition is likely to have been the line in Mrs Ritchie’s letter that attorneys “will not have to prepare an opinion on title on behalf of RBC FINCO”, and all this implies. FINCO, in urging Bahamian attorneys to consider “a flat fee” with respect to the preparation of mortgage documents, including their execution, stamping and recording, is essentially implying that the introduction of title insurance into this nation’s mortgage/home buying market will eliminate the need for lawyers to do the current volume of work they handle, especially title searches. Less work means that Bahamian attorneys are unlikely to be able to charge the current fees usually pegged at 2.5 per cent of the real estate transaction’s worth for conveyancing work, thus reducing income for a considerable number of the profession. This would happen at a time when the Bahamian legal services profession is already under intense pressure from the global economic downturn, real estate and transactional work having dropped on average by 40 per cent, so any further cuts in or lossof income will be particularly unappreciated. Mrs Ritchie’s letter, a copy of which has been obtained by Tribune Business, said: “In an effort to improve the whole mortgage experience for our clients, by speeding up the legal process and reducing their outof-pocket costs, RBC FINCO will be requiring title insurance on all mortgages granted after April 30, 2009. “We anticipate that in the economic environment, title insurance will result in a most welcomed cost-saving for the client. Hence, we are writing to request your consideration of a flat fee with respect to mortgage preparation, inclusive of execution, stamping and recording of the same, plus any disbursements made to pay the title insurance premium.” Mrs Ritchie said FINCO would advise its mortgage clients of the fees charged for this service, and added: “In the circumstances, you will not have to prepare an opinion of title on behalf of RBC FINCO.” Attorneys will also be required to complete the mortgage documents within a maximum of five weeks, Mrs Ritchie said. The letter enclosed the institution’s revised Letter of Instruction for Bahamian attorneys, requiring that they “liaise with First Bahamas Title Insurance Agency to obtain a lender’s title insurance policy on behalf of RBC FINCO with respect to the marketability of title”. The attorneys were told to provide all relevant title documents, plus subdivision approvals and real property tax assessments. T riggered This is likely to have triggered alarm among rival law firms, because First Bahamas Title Insurance Agency, which acts as the Bahamian agent for Lawyers Title Insurance Corporation, is an affiliate of Higgs& Johnson. Higgs & Johnson are the attorneys for Royal Bank of Canada, and the firm’s managing partner, John Delaney, sits on FINCO’s Board of Directors. Title insurance, which is in widespread use in many jurisdictions, such as the US, provides homeowners and real estate purchases with coverage should the title to their properties at a later stage be shown defective. It is now starting to catch on in the Bahamas, with major foreign mixed-use resort developers requiring title insurance before they can sell to second home buyers. However, Bahamian attorneys are arguing that title searches are essential, due to the numerous defects with hundreds of potential titles in this nation. Missing deeds and conveyancing documents have contributed to breaks in many chains of title. One attorney, who requested anonymity, said of FINCO’s plans to require no title searches: “There are hundreds of titles with problems, and there will be no one to check them. “I don’t see how that’s going to help the country. It’s going to create a maelstrom.” The Bar Council, in its April 24, 2009, reply to FINCO, a copy of which has also been obtained by Tribune Business, said: “The response of our members has been one of outrage, and there are grave concerns as to the legality of the proposed measures and the protection of the public’s interest.” Quite what the Bar Council’s concerns were cannot be gleaned from the letter signed by its honorary secretary, Rachel Culmer. However, Ms McCartney, FINCO’s managing director, told Tribune Business last night: “They [the Bar Council] have expressed some concerns to us that we have decided to do this, but we have not gotten back to them with our final decision. We are still mulling it over as to how we take their concerns into account. “We are committed to introducing title insurance. We cer tainly believe our customers should have the option as to whether they rely on an opinion of title, or whether they get title insurance. “It is about the customer. That is the approach we will take, as we will put it to our customers that this is something we feel is in their best interests. For us, at the end of the day, as a bank we have to be concerned about our customers.” While defective titles were “not prevalent” in FINCO’s $600 million-plus mortgage portfolio, Ms McCartney said that if subsequent to a purchase the title was shown to be faulty, then the purchaser’s recourse to sue their attorneys for negligence and claim against their professional indemnity insurance was still problematic. “We see this as a way to protect the customer,” she explained. “We are committed to reducing the transaction closing costs, and are going to move ahead.” Mortgage customers were often making their life’s most important investment, Ms McCartney said, adding: “We’ve listened to their [the Bar Council’s] concerns, but at the end of the day, we feel the customer, being fully informed and educated, will go ahead with title insurance. “Our position at this time is that clients should have the option as to whether they rely solely on an opinion of title, or whether they should take out title insurance.” Ms McCartney said real estate purchasers would be able to close transactions more quickly, and as soon as they received a title insurance com mitment, another reason FINCO would forge ahead with its plans. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE N OTICE is hereby given that MAXEN PROPHETE of 1611 NE, 3RD AVE., APT. 5,DELRAYBEACH, FLORIDA, 33444, i s applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts withint wenty-eight days from the 2OTH d ay of May, 2009 to the M inister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N -7147, Nassau, Bahamas.NOTICE NOTICE is hereby given that MARTINJERMAINE McGREGOR OF #25 DIAMOND DRIVE, P.O. BOX F-44900, G RAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/ naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reasonwhy registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed s tatement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 20th day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas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ar ‘outrage’ over FINCO plan for title insurance I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009, PAGE 5B Lay-offs hit leading law firms law firm. Other major firms were also said to have laid-off similar numbers of staff, although Tribune Business was unable to confirm this before press time. Mr Delaney, though declining to identify where the job losses had occurred, said they “would be less than the lower number you mentioned. That range would be just a bit above what we’ve” concluded. T he Higgs & Johnson mana ging partner said there was “no q uestion” that Bahamian legal firms across the board had experienced a decline in business, having told Tribune Business last month that his firm had seen real estate-related work decline by 40 per cent compared to normal levels. “I would say that was a good estimate at the time, and it’s not improved since,” Mr Delaney told Tribune Business. “That’s just the reality. What you’d find at every firm in the country, if they’re being completely forth right with you, is that they would say the same thing. “I’m aware that we’re not alone. We were not the first, and I doubt we’ll be the last.” Mr Delaney added: “We will essentially tough it out with our core group, both the support staff and our attorney complement, while restructuring with the group to make sure we’re working as efficiently and effectively as possible. “We have clear ideas on how we can do just that, and we’re still the largest employer in relation to legal skills.” Mr Delaney said the internal assessment completed last week was one in a series of exercises Higgs & Johnson carried out to determine whether it was operating efficiently, and whether additional resources needed to be targeted at certain areas. The latest review had shown the need to introduce information technology (IT a reas and revamp other working systems, Mr Delaney said. He added: “On the human resources side, we have determined and known for some time a couple of quarters dating back to late last year that there had been substantial declines in certain market areas. “Basically, what we have done and completed last week was our assessment as to whether we were carrying persons in excess of our needs and to what extent we needed to reduce our workforce.” Company However, Mr Delaney explained that while the company was responding to market conditions, it was also operating to a long-term plan. This meant it still employed persons “not fully utilised” currently but considered as “core to the firm”. “By no means was it a onesided exercise or one aspect of human resources,” Mr Delaney said of the review, pointing out that it encompassed short and medium-term objectives, and internal development plans. To the extent there was a limited reduction in staff [Higgs & Johnson employs more than 100] it was not easily contemplated at all,” he added. “This is among the most difficult decisions any employer has to take, and that was the case for us, but ultimately we had to make the hard decision.” Meanwhile, Mr Callender added: “I think that we have seen a significant slowdown in what we call transactional matters, mainly conveyancings and the like. “Everyone is now having to look at their bottom line very carefully, and we are having to become a lot more competitive. ‘I don’t think there’s room for expansion at the moment; certainly not. It’s most unfortunate, because having to lay people off in this economic market is very difficult. It’s a hard decision, because there’s not many alternatives [jobs] out there.” Mr Callender said firms with a diversified practice, such as Higgs & Johnson; McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes; Graham, Thompson & Co; and his own w ere in better shape, with litigation likely to become “a mainstay”. Companies that had exclusively relied on conveyancings were likely to struggle. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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A dozen young Bahamians are ready to become “the chief executives of their own lives”, having become the most recent graduates of an eight-week financial workshop put on by Creative Wealth Bahamas. The seminar, held at St Barnabas Parish Hall, was a joint effort by programme director and founder of Creative Wealth Bahamas, Keshelle Kerr, and the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority. “Part of our mandate in Alpha Kappa Alpha is to uplift and empower African Americans and Black people,” explained Nicola Evans, of the internationally-recognised sorority’s Bahamas chapter. “We chose to work closely with this group as a part of our mandate to help advance the black male. We felt that if they build a firm financial foundation now, when they become adults they will be able to make sound decisions for themselves.” “During the eight weeks, the boys covered many money topics such as spending, budgeting, investing, borrowing, debt (good and bad entrepreneurship, all in a fun and engaging manner,” said Ms Kerr. “Each now knows what it is to become a financial success”. Parents of the graduates agreed that some elements of the course have already affected their households in a positive way. Andrew Stanford said his son’s focus on money has become more intense, while Ricardo Munroe was pleased his son is able to learn such lessons so early. “The things my son learns today will keep him going on tomorrow,” said Mr Munroe. “One thing I realise as an adult looking back, is that we waste so much time making financial mistakes simply because we do not know what to do. I wish I had known some of the things Ms Kerr taught them because I would have had an advantage. But I am glad my son has learnt to make it applicable to his life and business because now he has the tools to become a millionaire – of course, once that happens I can retire.” The students plant the seeds of financial success by holding down imaginary jobs and having the option to spend funds on a variety of things such as rent, vehicles, bills or on pleasure items. They also had to create a poster to show what they wanted in their lives. “I’m really happy to have taken part in this course,” said Travis, one of the graduates. “Overall I’ve learned that I’ve got to pay myself first. Most importantly, I realise that I have to tell my money where I want it to go instead of asking myself one day where it all went. I am the chief executive of my own life.” Ms Kerr, the only certified creative wealth coach and youth financial educator in the Bahamas, is also the organiser of Camp Millionaire and The Money Game. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.28Abaco Markets1.401.400.00209,1400.1270.00011.00.00% 1 1.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.686.94Bank of Bahamas6.956.94-0.0143,1650.2440.26028.43.75% 0.900.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2 .601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1511.09Cable Bahamas11.6511.740.0932,8941.4060.2508.32.13% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.2490.04011.41.41% 7.446.00Commonwealth Bank (S16.256.00-0.2517,1970.4190.36014.36.00% 3.381.31Consolidated Water BDRs3.043.00-0.040.1110.05227.01.73% 3.001.32Doctor's Hospital1.321.320.000.2400.0805.56.06% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.4200.30018.53.87% 12.5010.97Finco11.0010.97-0.0349,3640.3220.67034.16.11% 14.6610.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.4010.400.0080,2440.7940.40013.13.85% 5.555.00Focol (S5.095.090.000.3320.15015.32.95% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.500.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.0014,5450.4070.50013.59.09% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.37581.3124Colina Bond Fund1.37581.654.83 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8962-1.49-3.35 1.39011.3875Colina Money Market Fund1.46302.055.25 3.69603.1964Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1964-5.59-13.64 12.739712.1564Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.15990.71-12.76 1.05261.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.05261.635.26 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0322-0.083.22 1.05231.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.05231.455.23 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L L L L : : C C O O L LI I N N A A 2 24 4 2 2 5 5 0 0 2 2 7 70 0 1 10 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L L F F I I D D E E L LI I T T Y Y 2 2 4 42 2 -3 35 5 6 67 7 7 7 6 64 4 | | F FG G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K K E E T T S S 2 24 4 2 2 3 3 9 9 6 6 -4 40 0 0 00 0 | | C C O O L L O O N N I I A A L L 2 2 4 4 2 2 5 50 0 2 2 -7 75 5 2 2 5 5F INDEX: CLOSE 797.44 | YTD -4.48% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSTUESDAY, 26 MAY 2009B ISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,601.00 | CHG -12.25 | %CHG -0.76 | YTD -111.36 | YTD % -6.50BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 30-Apr-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Mar-09 30-Apr-09 30-Apr-09 W W W WW W . .B B I I S S X X B B A A H H A A M M A A S S . .C C O O M M | | T T E E L L E E P P H HO ON N E E : :2 24 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 -2 23 3 3 3 0 0 | | F F A A C C S S I I M M I I L L E E : : 2 2 4 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 -2 23 3 2 2 0 0NAV Date 31-Mar-09 15-May-09 31-Mar-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 30-Apr-09 DHL JOB DESCRIPTIONPOSITION: Collections Agent JOB FAMILY: Credit & Collections RCS CODE: A20004 REPORTS TO : Collections Lead LOCATION: Country Finance Department OVERALL PURPOSE: Under limited supervision in a team environment provide efcient and effective credit approvals. To ensure timely credit application processing, respond to information requests and issues. Ensure accuracy of all credit decisions functions while staying within company policy and procedural guidelines. DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: making credit decisions. delinquent accounts. Processes credit applications. Investigates disputes and reviews documentation. Implements credit suspensions. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: direction amid competing priorities and deadlines. For more information please contact:Romell K. Knowles I Country Manager Email:Romell.Knowles@dhl.com &20021:($/7+ %5(:(5<7' 730&225',1$7257KHVXFFHVVIXOFDQGLGDWHZRXOGEHUHTXLUHGWR )DFLOLWDWLQJWKHKRUL]RQWDOH[SDQVLRQRI730LQWKH EUHZHU\ URYLGHDQDJHPHQW“LOODUV—HDPVZLWKDGYLFHDQG VXSSRUWRQ730FRQFHSW (QVXULQJ730DFWLYLWLHVFRQWLQXRXVO\PDWFK%UHZHU\ 0LVVLRQDQG.3,V+06fWKURXJKORVVGHSOR\PHQWV )RUPXODWLQJWRJHWKHUZLWKPDQDJHPHQWWKH \HDUDVWHUODQDQGHQVXULQJUHJXODUHYDOXDWLRQDQG XSGDWH 6XSSRUWLQJ0DQDJHPHQWZLWKLPSOHPHQWDWLRQRIWKH LQWHUQDOH[WHUQDO$XGLW6\VWHPWRHQVXUHDQGPDQDJH WKHFKDQJH 6WLPXODWLQJWKHXVHRIVWDQGDUGIRUPVUHSRUWV WHPSODWHVWRROVLPSURYHPHQWURXWHVIURPWRROER[f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t&2 $WWRUQH\VIRUWKH([HFXWRU &KDPEHUV 3 .HPS%XLOGLQJ HHWRUWK 1DVVDXKH%DKDPDV NOTICE MUNIA (BAHAMAS LTD. Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8 International Business Companies Act 2000, notice is hereby given that the above-named Company has been d issolved and struck off the Register pursuant to a Certicate of Dissolution issued by The Registrar General on the 20th day of May, A.D., 2009. Dated the 22nd day of May, A.D., 2009. Mr. Swen-Uwe Horvath and Dr. Jochen Koeber Joint-Liquidators of MUNIA (BAHAMAS MANAGEMENT LTD. Young Bahamians take control of financial futures scaping field has impeded the industry.Now, with the implementation of an internationally recognised training programme, Bahamian landscape firms can become more competitive nationally and internationally. According to the BLA’s website, bla-fngla.org, membership already includes Caribbean Landscape, Atlantis, Genesis Landscaping and Maintenance and Adka Laboratories. The site also lists the bene fits of joining the BLA which includes education of management, internationally recognsed certifications, and the estab lishment of grades and standards for the industry. The association also promises to lobby government for pro posals beneficial to the industry, filter landscaping education and awareness into the schools, and provide supplier discounts to its members. “We are particularly excited about getting pilot programmes of this level of professional cer tifications into the senior class es in the high schools,” said Mr Rolle. “We understand the vast need for young people out there looking for a head start in advancing their education and in the business world. This is ag reat programme for just that.” T hus far, managers at Atlantis have been the first to become certified, and 50 persons have already entered into the programme. Mr Rolle said he was hopeful that the BLA, like the FNGLA, will be able to assist in drafting legislation sensitive to the industry, and lobby the government to curb issues dealing with water restrictions and misuse and overuse of fertilizers. The BLA sees this programme as pivotal in creating standards in the industry and providing “critical training to employees in the industry”. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B THIS young millionaire in the making displays his dream board during the recent eight-week Financial Workshop hosted by Creative Wealth. Photo: Arthia Nixon

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emma’s hocolateollies C L I have always been quite artistic. I normally look at things in the stores and say ‘well I can make that’ so I do,” Mrs Heinel said. Mrs Heinel said she did not start out exact ly with chocolate as she is always thinking of different favours for her children’s parties. “I started making hard candies in different colours and flavours, but I was afraid to do chocolate especially in this climate. It is nice to have something that you know no one else is going to do. I preferred the chocolate to the hard candies because it doesn’t take that long to do and the finished product looks bet ter because you can see the detail more in the chocolates,” Mrs Heinel said. Since chocolate does not come in many colours, Mrs Heinel said she uses white chocolate to colour her creations. “I colour the white chocolate, paint it into the molds, and then I fill the molds with the milk chocolate. You have to let each colour set before you add another because the heat will re-melt it or mix the colors together. “The more colours you have in a piece the longer it takes,” Mrs Heinel said. Out of the many molds and shapes that can be found, Mrs Heinel said she wanted to stick with ones that were synonymous with the Bahamas. Most of the chocolate lollies retail from $2 to $5. “The beach life, wildlife and that sort of thing I thought would be fun. It is amazing what you can find. You can order different size molds but you can’t change the size of the molds,” Mrs Heinel said. Just as some pastry chefs like to bake but can’t stand to eat their creations, Mrs Heinel feels the same way. “I used to be a huge chocoholic, but now I can take or leave it. I prefer to look at it because I think it is beautiful and I love to see the finished product. I do not have any desire to eat it, maybe because I don’t want to ruin it,” Mrs Heinel said. Mrs Heinel said ultimately in the future she can see herself making more and more treats for both chocolate and candy lovers to enjoy. “I would love to have my own shop and combine it with a coffee shop and a choco latier. It can be somewhere nice for people to come and get nice truffles and such. Maybe one day we will have a bigger business going.” C M Y K C M Y K TASTE PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE T h e T r i b u n e n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter a missick@tribunemedia.net CHOCOLATE in the eyes and taste buds of a w oman is some what of a guilty and sinful pleasur e, sneaking its w ay into her calorie intake. With children, it is just as delightful despit e coming in a boring square or r ect angular bar . S tay at home mom Emma Heinel has taken her love for making treats and turned it into something culturally and tastefully satisfying. “I have been making chocolate novelty lol lies since the beginning of this year. It started out as a hobby really. I love to make things as ENDULGE the kid in you with these melt in your mouth Chocolate treats .

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n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter a missick@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas for decades has boasted of its beauty encouraging people from all over the w or l d t o spend t he r e st of t heir liv es her e. Howe ver, shouldn’t Bahamians be afforded the c hance t o bask in t he beauty of t heir o w n countr y and enjo y a q uality lifestyle? Jason Kinsale, a y oung developer and President of the Balmoral Development feels the same way and has transformed an historical site into something all Bahamians can enjoy. C M Y K C M Y K TASTE THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009, PAGE 9B n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net A Sthe Summer heat continues to heat up entertainment spots throughout town, The Tribune’s Entertainment weeke nd line-up is no exception. Filled with glitz and glam, the f un is sure to continue all n ight long. 1. This Friday night, all roads lead to Da Balcony lounge nightclub where local entert ainer SO$A Man is expected t o have a ground shaking prem ier to his newest track titled We Winning . The video which also features Sammi Star, MDEEZ, and Lion (out of C anada), is a production iKnoz M edia describes as a new con c ept in Bahamian music and entertainment. There will also b e a special performance by Sketch’ Carey of his hit single My Candidate . Tickets for the event are $15 per person, and $ 20 per couple, and can be p urchased at the Beat Factory East Street South, or at the door. 2. This Friday at 6.30pm, The H ub art centre opens a new s eries of paintings and drawings by Anya Antonovych Metcalf called There is a Crack in Everything. The work is com prised of 16 acrylic and pastel pieces which are based on several distressed and derelict areas throughout Nassau. Curator Jonathan Murray saidt he collection can be considered representational painting because of its similarities to photography. However, thec ollection still has elements that give some association to abstract expression, which is attributed to its gestured and chromatic inspired qualities. The work is more contextu-a lised and resonates with local contemporary artists such as K endal Hanna and Jason Benn ett. With its premier set for this Friday, the exhibit is scheduled to run until June 17, 2009. 3. On Saturday, The Cancer Society of the Bahamas will hold its eight annual Cancer Ball intended to increase funding and awareness. This gala event will be held at the Wyndham Nassau Resort Ballroom, Cable Beach, at 7pm promptly with light cocktails, and dinner served at 8pm. There will also be a silent auction and raffle available. Tickets are $200, and can be purchase at the Cancer Society office on Collins Avenue. 4. Express Yourself in conjunction with The Ministry of Tourism and the Bahamas International Literary Festival presents Face the Arts Street Festival In Rawson Square this Saturday from noon until. The first of its kind cultural explo sion will be featuring every conceivable art form. Artists, magicians comedians rake and scrape bands and the like will be out in full force, along with booths with food, Bahamian books and cd's. Artists slated to perform include ‘B,’ Apollo Kr-eed, Jah Lam, CREAM, DJ Counsellor, Manifest, B'Marie, Broken Micz, CRAB, TADa, Baigon, Club Super Death, NCity, 21, Lucito Bazard, and others. 5. Now in a new location, the Express Yourself Movement’s Open Mic night is being featured at the Hard Rock Caf on Charlotte Street this Thursday. Scheduled to start at 9pm until midnight, this event continues to showcase some of the newest spoken word artists and entertainers in town. Admission is free with drinks on sale, so come prepared to be blown away. T h e T r i b u n e things 2 DO THE BALMORAL Elegance on a hill Driving up to the door steps of the Balmoral clubhouse is like stepping into a chapter of “Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous.” The entrance to the Balmoral is nothing short of spectacular as the architectur al elements of the home will take your breath away. From the mind blowing spiral staircase, to the beautiful 18th century crown moldings, genuine oak doors and intricately carved wooden fireplaces throughout, the home is sure to entice anyone who wants to host an elegant event at the site. This club house is the main house that will be open to club members once the development is completed. Mr Kinsale said he embarked on the project about 18 months ago and it has definitely been an exciting journey. “This home was actually built by Sir Oliver Simmonds back in 1953 and the Tomlinson fam ily purchased it in 1963. This 17,000 square foot home was sitting somewhat nestled away on Sanford Drive and it really had me intrigued. I didn’t realise it was actually 43 acres surrounding the property as well and I didn’t really think much of it until a couple of weeks later when I found out the property was on the market,” Mr Kinsale said. Mr Kinsale and his team at the Balmoral Club have kept the historical elements of the home while making upgrades to suit a 21st Century lifestyle. The color palette choice for the club includes all earth tones such as burnt oranges, dark chocolate browns and deep beige tones creating a warm, down home feeling for its guests. For those who want to add a bit of entertainment to the Balmoral experience, the club boasts of a game room, entertainment room as well as a billiards room. Fitness addicts can work up a sweat at the club’s state of the art fitness room complete with free weights and treadmills. If persons would rather work out in nature, they can choose from the stylish swimming pool, the Mark Knowles Tennis centre and soon to come Squash court. For the social birds and mini meal snackers, they can enjoy the Caf Balmoral and Bara great place for socialising and a light drink. When it comes to renting the property for events, interested persons must book the club at least six months in advance due to the high level of clientele recognising the beauty, sophistication and privacy the club has to offer. “The club requires a $1,500 site rental fee and we offer a number of amenities on the property. The event business has really been driving a lot of traffic in. We can hold about 500 persons easily without them bumping into each other. We have an on staff chef because food is the most important aspect of any event. We can prepare anything and we have out own service staff-we are a one stop shop,” Mr Kinsale said. As for the residential project, the Balmoral offers 1200 square foot condominiums priced at $300,000, 1400 square foot Royale town homes priced at $359,000, 2000 square foot grand town homes priced at $559,000 and 70 single family lots priced at $200-250,000. Mr Kinsale said he wanted to serve a market of young pro fessionals whom he feels is being under served. “We have one condo, three of the Royale town homes and four of the Grand town homes remaining. The reality of a per son being able to buy a single family lot and build a home is coming to an end for many peo ple. The worst lot in Nassau is around $65-70,000. If you want to be in the west, $180-200,000 for a lot, by the time you put a home on it that’s $500-600,000 easily and it’s getting to a point where people can not afford it. People are being forced into condos and town homes and this is happening all over the world,” Mr Kinsale said. Another element of the Balmoral Club is the tremendous amount of green space available on the property. Numer ous flowers and plants are located throughout the club as well as the property. This is due to Mr Kinsale’s environmental awareness background. “The ministry requires you to allocate five per cent of public open space and we have 3035 per cent of public open space and we have saved a tremen dous amount of trees by tagging over 400 trees during the early stages of development,” Mr Kinsale said. Mr Kinsale said the atmosphere he wants to achieve for the Balmoral is one that is lush, warm and family oriented. “We are really trying to make it more comfortable and not arrogant-no stuffiness. We want people to be able to relax and not worry about what fork they are using per say, but still maintain quality and valuable service,” Mr Kinsale said. WITH its quiet sophistication, The Balmoral can m ake any guest f eel right at home.

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C M Y K C M Y K ARTS PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE movie REVIEW concert REVIEW n By CARA BRENNENBETHEL T ribune Features Editor Staring Tom Hanks, Ewan McGegor and Ayelet Zurer. Directed by Ron Howard IN Angels and Demons, Tom H anks reprises his role as Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon in what is actually the pre-q uel to the Da Vinci Code, the immensely popular and controversial novel by Dan Brown. This time round Robert is summoned to Vatican City on the eve of the conclave to elect a new pope, when a centurieso ld mysterious brotherhood the Illumantithe Catholic’s church’s archenemyresur-f aces, claiming that they have hidden a highly explosive vial o f antimatter somewhere inside the city and intend to kill one of the Prefertithe preferredp apal successorseach hour until the antimatter explodes a t midnight taking with it Vatican City and most of Rome. Robert, Italian scientist Vit t oria Vetra (Zurer Vatican and Italian police, have just a few hours to decode the “Path of Illumination” a 400yearold trail of symbols to l ocate the Preferiti and the antimatter to save the Catholic C hurch from total annihilation. Angels and Demons is my favourite and I think the bestD an Brown novel and this movie does what its predecessor, the film version of the DaV inci Code, failed to do tell the story without boring its a udience with long explanations that take away from the plot. The movie is fast paceda nd suspenseful and can be fully understood even if you d id not read the book. Tom Hanks, one of my favourite actors, does a credi-b le job, but is overshadowed by the dynamic Ewan McGreg or (Moulin Rouge/Rogue Trader) who plays Camerlengo Patrick McKenna the latep ope’s personal assistant. His most brilliant moments come toward the end where the truth of the Illuminati is revealed and the future of theC atholic Church hangs in the balance. Angels and Demons is w orth the price of admissionfans of the novel will be p leased with the interpretation and those who have not read the book will be caught up int he suspense until its dramatic ending. Angels and Demons CYNDI LAUPER ATLANTIS GRAND BALLROOM, Saturday, May 23, 2009. n By TRIBUNE STAFF REPORTER A COLLEAGUE made an innocent remark which made this very sensitive 50-year-old feel so so old. “I didn’t know you were into the concert scene...” I may be getting on in years but I’m still very young at heart. And we had both just witnessed how a 55-year-old an icon of the 80s still defies time with her heart and soul. Yes, Cyndi Lauper rocked Atlantis to its very foundations. The trademark china white face, her little girl vocals, the wild hair, her ability to rock you and then soothe you with her sensitivity ... Lauper was, and still is, the only challenger to Madonna’s pop queen title. Backed by her five-piece band, Cyndi’s fans were treated to a dazzling background psychedelic light show, and on-stage musical brilliance. Her high-pitched but strong and flexible vocal displays shone out on pop greats such as She Bop, Girls Just Wanna Have Fun and I Drove All Night. And they mesmerised on anthems such as True Colours and Time After Time. Overall a great night’s entertainment in the intimate surroundings of the Grand Ballroom at Atlantis. My highlight of the night? It’s got to be Carey, Cyndi’s tribute to Joni Mitchell. OK, so I remember first hearing Carey way back in 1971 on Ms Mitchell’s brilliant Blue album. I guess I must be getting old after all. I N t his film publicity image released by Columbia Pictures/Sony Entertainment, Tom Hanks and Ayelet Zurer, right, are shown in a s cene from, "Angels & Demons." Zade Rosenthal /AP Photo Chris Pizzello /AP Photo SINGER Cyndi Lauper poses backstage at the "American Idol" finale in Los Angeles, Wednesday, May 20, 2009. n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net AFTER weeks of singing and competing with some of the most talented performers in the country in the recent Bahamian Stars competition sponsored by the West Rotary Club of the Bahamas, 14-year-old Davian Chase and 19-year-old Devera Pinder emerged as the two top winners. Walking away with first place was Davian who explained that he has been singing for family and friends for as long as he can remember. Davien explained: “My mom used to go out places to sing, and some times she used to bring me along with her, and seeing how the audience would applaud and make her feel so appreciated, was the thing that inspired me to be a singer.” Now a senior at the CV Bethel Secondary School, Davien said he could never have dreamed being the winner of such a com petition, where he was up against so many other talented individuals. In October 2008, Davian participated in “Bahamian Stars Competition” and won the competition. He received many prizes and was also successful in receiving a scholarship. Also a member of the Church of God of Prophecy National Children’s Choir, the Boys Choir, the Bahamas Junior Band of the Church of God of Prophecy, and a member of the Bahamas National Children’s and Boys Choir, this young man has proven that age has nothing to do with becoming the best at the thing you love. First runner up to the competition, 19year-old Devera Shante Pinder, said despite being under the weather on the night of the competition, she gave it her all which resulted in her walking away with the prize. Having a long love for singing, she explained: “I gave it one hundred percent, and even though I had adversities in my way, I still had to use that and try to push through, because nothing should be able to hold you back from something you’re so adamant about.” Devera is a multitalented Bahamian singer, songwriter and model, who was exposed to the various genres of music at an early age. Devera is a very purpose driven young lady who enjoys singing, dancing, traveling, modeling, pageantry, writing poetry and music, performing and spending time with her family and friends. She has been in numerous talent competitions and pageants and has achieved numerous accomplishments and awards for her singing talents. And now that the days of the competition are done, the two winners are set to work together on an upcoming CD which will help to further their careers and notoriety in the music industry. PICTURED are Devera Pinder and Davian Chase, the winners of the recent Bahami an Stars singing competition sponsored by the rotary club of the Bahamas. Also pictured are members of the Rotary Club of West Nassau. Rotary Bahamian stars shine SCENES FROM SUNDAY’S MISS BAHAMAS UNIVERSE

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C M Y K C M Y K I N S I D E The Balmoral Elegance on a hill See page nine Emma’s chocolate lollies See page eight 25-Year old Kiara Sherman walked away with the crown in a pageant that was marred by controversy. (SEE Tribune News for details). Kiara will represent the country at this year’s Miss Universe pageant to be held right here at Paradise Island this August. Runner’s up included 1st runner up Ife Bethel-Sears and 2nd runner up Amanda Appleyard. More pictures on pg 10 n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter l allen@tribunemedia.net WITH t h e islands of the Bahamas offering its own special charm with hundreds o f miles of beautiful beac h es and landscapes, it is no wonder that so many locals and visit ors alik e dr eam of one day retiring here. However for one woman who did stumble upon the opportunity to live on a private island, her five year stay there turned out to be far more than she had bargained. In her debut novel Life On A Rock , K Alison Albury provides readers with a first hand account of the tumultuous experience she had while managing a small island resort on Highbourne Cay in the Exumas. From hurricanes to drug trafficking to nearly being murdered, Mrs Albury explained never in a million years could she had imagined so many unusual encounters in a place which at first seemed truly like heaven on earth. In this striking tale of her experience on the island during the early 1990’s, Mrs Albury told Tribune Entertainment that readers can expect to be drawn into the story. An excerpt from the first chapter reads: “I had given them everything and they were going to kill Peter! From facedown on the tile floor I screamed at them, ‘There’s no more money! There’s no more money! We don’t have a safe! Geezus, we’re telling you the truth! We don’t keep a lot of money on the cay!’ “Now, one of the burglars noticed my rings and gold chain necklace. ‘OK, bitch, take off da jewels,” he demanded, as the barrel of his gun tap-tap-tapped on my earrings. With my face still facing the floor, I reached up and took off my earrings, a gold necklace and my heirloom engagement ring. I heard Peter unbuckle his watch. Was it going to stop there?” She added that apart from the rough e xperiences she and her husband had while miles away from all their friends and family on the island, they had many beautiful moments that are both obvi ous and subliminal in the book. These were their faith in God, the commitment to each other, and thec omfort of living in an environment t hat was conducive to quiet living. “One of the things that I loved about out there was the quiet. There were no stoplights, nobody is honking at you, and in the morning what I usually did with Peter was to get up at 6.30amI would go for a walk, and that was my time of the day that was my own, it was a little 20 minute walk along the beach,” she said. While on the walk with her dogs, Mrs Albury said the most calming thing around was the ocean, which helped her to find her center, and also to wash away stress that came along with the task of overseeing the island. Mrs Albury added that although there were many tales that unfolded while on the island which she had to relive while writing the book, it was all worth it, because it was done for a grandson. She said: “This job taught me that I wasn’t a quitter, it solidified our marriage even more, and I learned that Ic ould do anything that I put my mind to.” Life on a Rock has earned its spot as one of the most exciting local books in recent times to hit the shelves. Available for $13.50 at local book stores and online at amazon.com, alibr is.com, and booksurge.com, this book p romises to be engaging straight through the last page. Life on a rock NOW ten years after her experience on Highbourne Cay, first time author K Alison Albury tells all in her new book titled Life On A Rock. SCENES FROM SUNDAY’S MISS BAHAMAS UNIVERSE The Tribune SECTIONB WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 2009 Felipe Major /Tribune staff