Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Mim blowin’ it

S8F
76F

HIGH
LOW

AND CLOUDS

Volume: 105 No.151

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The perfect

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‘ROCK = (0
Kill loving dad

45-year-old man dies
after ‘argument’





FROM LEFT: MELISSA FOX, Nelson Cartwright, and Terry Fox’s nieces,
sisters and friends outside the family home in the Glendale Subdivision.

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A LOVING father, uncle and
brother was killed with a blow
to the head outside his home in
the Glendale Subdivision on
Sunday night.

Police say they have identi-
fied “a stone” that may have
been used in the killing.

Terry Fox, 45, had been
watching television in the house
he shares with three sisters, one
brother, and numerous nieces
and nephews in Porkfish Road,
off Soldier Road, Nassau, when
an acquaintance came to call.

Relatives say he was arguing
with the visitor in the back yard
when Mr Fox suddenly ran out
into the street.

Moments later a neighbour
knocked at the door to say he
had collapsed with a head
injury.

Three of Mr Fox's nieces ran
to his side as he lay in the road
with a head wound to his left
temple.

They saw him take his last
breath minutes after he fell.

Police believe he may have
been hit with a rock, and rela-
tives said they found rocks

SEE page eight

The Taste

on

Tuesdays!!



Valid only on Tuesdays!

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009
I

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Coffee Fix



BAHAMAS BIGGEST

Perry Christie



TM Ey (PMNS ECL

DARK RAIN CLOUDS hang over Atlantis and cruise ships at Nassau Harbour yesterday. Torrential rain
continued on from the weekend — despite the brief glimpses of sunshine through the clouds.

Minister a constant |

presence in Lands
and Surveys Dept

MINISTER Byran
Woodside is now a con-
stant presence in the
Department of Lands and
Surveys following alleged
irregularities in the distri-
bution of Crown land. F

Former director of
Lands and Surveys Tex
Turnquest resigned after
The Tribune published
claims that members of

L : 1 Byran Woodside
his family received Crown



land grants. However, Undersecretary of }
Lands and Surveys Audley Greaves remains :
at his post despite allegations that his wife ;
and son were sold lots in Abaco in 2003 and

2004 respectively.
SEE page 12

Man who lost over $40m in
casinos in Bahamas, US and
Australia appears in court

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A “PATHOLOGICAL GAMBLER” who
lost over $40 million in casinos in the Bahamas,
the United States and Australia told an Aus-
tralian court how he hid his addiction from his
wife during their honeymoon in The Bahamas
by busying her with “pampering packages.”

Property developer Harry Kavakas owes $1
million to the Atlantis casino, $1 million to
Melbourne’s Crown casino and upwards of $5
million to casinos in Las Vegas.

He explained this to a Victoria judge as he
made his case for why he should be able to sue
the Crown casino for $20 million he lost in a16-
month gambling binge there between 2005 and
2006, according to The Brisbane Times.

SEE page eight

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NASSAU AND BAHAME

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

‘very happy’ with
party's condition

PLP ‘doing
all it can’
to be the
next govt

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@
tribunemedia.net

THE PLP is “doing all
that is necessary...to pre-
pare itself to be the next
government of the
Bahamas,” according to
its leader, Perry Christie.

In an exclusive inter-
view with The Tribune in
which Mr Christie
assessed the party’s con-
dition and that of the
country, the PLP leader
said he is “very happy”
right now as the organi-
sation is ina “very good
position” as the present
government approaches
the mid-term mark.

Despite the claims of
some sectors of the party
that it has not learned
the lessons from its May
2007 defeat — as laid out
in detail in a report by
USS. political consultants
Greenberg, Quinlan and
Rosner — and evidence
of intra-party disunity
centring around the
question of who should
lead the organisation, the
Opposition leader
claimed he has
“absolutely no doubt”
the party will have
“strengthened itself as a
result of the self exami-
nation that has taken
place” by the time the

SEE page eight



HEATED BATTLE OVER
$200,000 WINSLOW HOMER
PAINTING

MAN, 25, ACCUSED OF 10
COUNTS OF ARMED ROBBERY

RELIGIOUS LEADERS
SLAMMED FOR ‘SILENCE’ ON
ALLEGATIONS OF SCHOOL
MOLESTATION





PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009

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LOCAL NEWS

Heated battle over $200,000
Winslow Homer painting

A $200,000 painting given to
a 19th century governor of the
Bahamas is at the centre of a
heated battle between his
descendants and renowned auc-
tion house Sotheby’s.

The painting, Winslow
Homer’s Children Under a
Palm Tree, was given to Sir
Henry Arthur Blake during his
tenure as governor from 1884
to 1887.

After reportedly being found
in a dust bin, the work had been
put up for sale by a party unre-
lated to Sir Henry.

However, according to the
London Evening Standard, the
sale has been halted by an 11th-
hour appeal by Simon Murray,
the great, great grandson of the
British colonial administrator,
who claims the family are still
the rightful owners.

The concerned parties are
now expected to either settle
the matter privately or bring it
before the courts.

Winslow Homer was famous
for his paintings of US land-
scapes.

He also painted scenes in the
Bahamas, and Children Under
A Palm Tree is said to depict
the governor’s children when
they were living here.

After his post in the
Bahamas, the Irish-born Sir
Henry moved to Newfound-
land, where he was governor
until 1889.



WINSLOW HOMER’S Children Under A Palm Tree. The painting was giv-

en to the governor in 1885 or 1886.

In 1889 he became the cap-
tain-general and governor-in-
chief of Jamaica.

His term was extended in
1894 and 1896, at the request
of the legislature and public
bodies of the island.

Chief curator of the Portland
Museum of Art Thomas
Denenberg, who appeared on
the Maine Public Broadcasting
Network yesterday, said that
the work in question is different
from other paintings by the
artist.

“This is a very idiosyncratic
Homer. It is a watercolour
showing three children in very
exotic dress. They were in pan-
taloons and slippers so they

look as if they are in North
African costume.

“We conjecture that these are
the children of the British gov-
ernor in the Bahamas in 1885.
There is a wonderful bit of evi-
dence that the BBC has found
where we know that Winslow
Homer left for Cuba and the
Bahamas in December of 1884.
We know that he attended a
dance at the Governor’s House,
where the theme was the Ara-
bian Nights.

“So the fact these children
show up in these Moorish cos-
tumes dovetails nicely with the
documentary evidence of
Homer being at that dance,” he
said.

Police find gun, ammo and marijuana in South Andros home

A HANDGUN, live ammunition and 15
jars stuffed with marijuana were found by
police in a South Andros home on Sunday

morning.

North Andros Police raided the home off
Queen’s Highway at around 11.30am.

ee eR Ble
HO Lae
Pest Control
ea res
322-2157

They found a .25 handgun with four live
rounds of ammunition, 15 small jars of mari-
jana, rolls of plastic bags, a small scale and

around $600 cash.

A 30-year-old man has been arrested and is
in police custody.



KIARA SHERMAN
was crowned the
new Miss
Bahamas
Universe on
Sunday night at
the Wyndham
Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach. See
tomorrow’s Arts
section for more
coverage.



Felipé Major/Tribune staff



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

. MAGISTRATE’S COURT: David Metell
oO In brief avi etelus

Gun, ammo
recovered in
the Redland
Acres area

DRUGS Enforcement
Officers recovered a .380
handgun with six live rounds
of ammunition in the Red-
land Acres area of New
Providence at midnight on
Friday.

The officers saw a man
acting suspiciously when on
patrol in the area, and say
they saw a shiny object
thrown to the ground as they
approached him.

A 19-year-old from Mal-
colm Allotment has been
arrested in connection with
the incident.

Anyone with any informa-
tion which may assist investi-
gations should call Crime
Stoppers anonymously on
328-TIPS (8477).

Death crash
victim named
as Shavares
Cunningham

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The young
man who was killed in a traf-
fic accident in West End ear-
ly Sunday morning has been
identified as Shavares Romel
Cunningham of Bootle Bay,
Grand Bahama.

Mr Cunningham had cele-
brated his 23rd birthday on
Saturday.

Sometime around 2.30am
on Sunday, he lost control of
the 1999 srey-coloured Delta
98 Oldsmobile he was dri-
ving and crashed into a utili-
ty pole.

Thrown

He was thrown from the
vehicle and died at the scene.
His death is the seventh traf-
fic fatality for the year on
Grand Bahama.

Mr Cunningham was
employed as a marina opera-
tor at the Old Bahama Bay
Resort.

His death has shocked co-
workers at the resort.

“He was a quiet person
and everyone down here is
very saddened by his tragic
passing,” said a co-worker.
“He just turned 23 and I
understand that his girlfriend
is expecting a baby.”

Police are continuing their
investigations into the acci-
dent.

Wet welcome
for tourists
at airport

TOURISTS arriving at the
Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport had a wet wel-
come to the Bahamas yester-
day as the arrivals hall
sprang leaks after heavy
rains.

An eye-witness passing
through the airport
described the immigration
screening area as a “disas-
ter” with water dripping
from the ceilings and the
walls, giving visitors cause to
complain.

The man, who arrived in
the airport yesterday after-
noon, said: “The lines were
out the door, the floors were
drenched with water, and
they have got big garbage
bins all around, collecting
water that is dripping. It’s
really disastrous.

“It doesn’t look good for
the tourists, and everyone is
just standing around really
annoyed.”

Puddles which gathered in
front of some of the immi-
gration booths were sec-
tioned off for safety, and
other booths opened to
process arriving passengers.

Man, 25, accused of ten
counts of armed robbery

LEAVING COURT: David Metellus, 25.

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A 25-year-old Ridgeland Park man accused of
committing a spree of armed robberies was arraigned
in a Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Police have charged David Metellus, with 10
counts of armed robbery. Metellus is accused of
robbing three City Market food stores, two Super-
wash Laundromats, two Texaco Service Stations
and a Dominos Pizza store between March 18 and

May 14 of this year.

It is alleged that Metellus, while armed with a
handgun, robbed Super Wash Blue Hill Road of
$120 on Wednesday March 18, $100 cash on March
24 and $250 on April 28. Court dockets also state that
Metellus robbed Superwash Robinson Road of $190

on Monday, March 23.



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

It is further alleged that on Saturday, May 9,
Metellus robbed the City Market food store, Robin-
son Road of an undetermined amount of cash and on

Sunday, May 10, the City Market food store on
Rosetta Street of $500. He is also accused of robbing

the City Market food store, Cable Beach, on Thurs-

day, May 14, of $390, and on the same day of robbing
the Texaco Service Station on East Street and Soldier
Road of $160. On Friday, May 15, it is alleged he
robbed Dominos Pizza of $379 and on May 18 anoth-
er Texaco Service Station of an undetermined
amount of cash.

Metellus, who appeared before Chief Magistrate
Roger Gomez and Magistrate Janet Bullard, was
not required to enter a plea to the charges. The case
has been adjourned to September 7 and transferred
to Court 5, Bank Lane. Metellus was remanded to

Her Majesty’s Prison.

‘Growing number of Haitian-Bahamians seek
power to avenge treatment suffered by parents’

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THERE is a growing number
of Haitian-Bahamians who are
educating themselves to achieve
positions of power in order to
avenge the treatment received by
their parents or grandparents, a
prominent radio host claims.

During his contribution to a
recent Insight article featured in
The Tribune, local religious DJ
Kevin Harris said he discouraged
this kind of thinking and attitude
as it would lead to a “tremendous
number of clashes” among the
two groups in the country.

“Instead, people who have
Haitian parentage should demand
a discussion on the issue whether
it be through forums or town hall
meetings or other areas in a non-
emotional approach to the issue
among their own generation and
peers, to ask the questions.
Because the fundamental ques-
tion is that a lot of them feel that
it is unfair that you can be born in
Princess Margaret Hospital
(PMH) and I can be born at
PMH and I have to wait until Pm
18 to qualify (for citizenship).

Father of son
allegedly beaten

by teacher still
waiting for probe



A FATHER is still waiting for
the investigation he was promised
after his son was allegedly beaten
by a high school teacher early last
year. In a statement addressed to
the Commissioner of Police,
Jonathan Hall insists that his son
was struck in the mouth by a
teacher at a local government
school.

When he filed a complaint at
the local police station, Mr Hall
said he was given assurances that
the teacher would be removed
from the school and brought
before the courts. However to his
surprise, he said, after numerous
inquiries it turned out that not
only was the teacher still
employed at the school, but no
investigation had taken place.

“And up to this very date I
have been redirected so many
times, it is unbelievable. I am
tired of the run-around and Iam
still waiting on this matter to be
dealt with.

“After seeing no result or hear-
ing no response, I have visited
the Ministry of Education to only
find that the matter was never
even brought up with the min-
istry as I had falsely been
assured,” he said.

Mr Hall said he has visited the
Complaints Unit at Police Head-
quarters only to find that no effort
has been made by this depart-
ment to address his matter.

He said it is now the Com-
plaints officers who are giving him
the run-around, and there seems
to be “no resolution” in sight.

“Well I don’t have a challenge
with us listening to those concerns
and seeing where there can be
consideration in that light. Obvi-
ously the government, and gov-
ernments have maintained a rea-
son why they feel it is important
to control the number of persons
being allowed to have citizenship
whose parents are Haitians,” he
said.

This reason, he said, would be
interesting to find out from suc-
cessive ministers of Immigration
and Foreign Affairs as to why this
decision was not overturned.

Animosity

“Maybe they fear that there is
this sleeping giant of animosity
and concern among the two cul-
tures. Well that’s why I feel you
have to start the conversation so
that you can help some of the
younger people to realize that
there is no need for me and you
to be enemies. I can hear your
point, I can understand your
point, and perhaps I may be com-
pelled to do something about
your point i.e. in the case of many
white Americans who stood with
black Americans to fight for racial

“Lowest Prices On The Island”

justice,” he said. Mr Harris added,
however, that he would have a
problem agreeing with govern-
ment if it pushed for their teach-
ers to learn Creole in order to
cater to this one group of soci-
ety. In his opinion it would open
the floodgates for other segments
who could then demand that gov-
ernment school teachers should
learn German, Chinese, etc.

“There should be a standard
for all. Second of all it would be a
disadvantage for any child whose
parents are of any other country
not to learn the language of which
they want to become a citizen.
They are put at more of an
advantage to learn English and
to speak it fluently.

“No one is saying that they
should step away from the ability
to have another language as an
asset.

“But certainly the government
of the Bahamas and the educa-
tion system of the Bahamas
should not amend itself just
because we have parents who are
refusing to assist the teacher and
assist the system by assisting the
children to learn the language of
the country of which they are try-
ing to become a citizen,” he said.




Woman charged
with ‘trading in
prostitution’

A 21-year-old woman charged with “trading in prosti-
tution” was arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Mekell Johnson of Colliers Avenue appeared before
Magistrate Ancella Williams in Court 6, Parliament
Street.

According to court dockets, it is alleged that on Sun-
day, May 24, Johnson was in Dowdeswell Street for the
purpose of trading in prostitution.

The accused pleaded not guilty to the charge and was
granted bail in the sum of $1,500 with one surety and
ordered to report to the South Beach police station
every Sunday before 6pm.

Adjourned

The case was adjourned to September 8.

Annier Knowles, 29, of Pitt Road and Stacy Rolle, 29,
of Wilkinson Street appeared in court with Johnson yes-
terday. The two have been charged with vagrancy.

According to court dockets, it is alleged that on May
24, Knowles and Rolle were found loitering on
Dowdeswell Street with the intent to commit an offence.

They both pleaded not guilty to the charge and were
granted bail in the sum of $1,500.

They were ordered to report to the Nassau Street
police Station every Sunday before 6pm.

Tae

Goend an e

Gnohunted | ;



-
a

_—





Sven CHG.»
in one of our Fabulous
Designer Evening Dresses

The Cancer
Society Ball

Saturday, 30th May, 2009

Wyndham Nassau Resort
& Crystal Palace Casino A
Cable Beach ,

Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family
Parliament Street (near Bay St.) Tel: 322-8393 or 328-7157
* Fax: 326-9953
Crystal Court at Atlantis, Paradise Island Tel: 363-4161/2

Lyford Cay (Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay)
Tel: 362-5235

e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com
www.colesofnassau.com * P.O, Box N-121



FOR ALL YOUR DECORATING as

STORE HOURS:
Monday - Saturday
8:30am - 5:30pm

BILLY’S DREAM
STILL ALIVE

FREE DELIVERY ANY WHERE IN NASSAU AND TO THE MAIL BOAT

¢ E-Z CREDIT TERMS AVAILABLE

Donald’s Furniture
And Appliance Centre

SIXTH TERRACE CENTREVILLE TEL: 322-1731 OR 322-3875





PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Judges have final decision on bail

IN EXPLAINING to persons expressing dis-
quiet about the Appeal Court’s ruling that
mandatory legislation to hold serious criminal
offenders in prison until trial is unconstitution-
al, Bar Council President Wayne Munro said
persons often forget that “judges and lawyers all
have family in the wider community.”

They live in the community, said Mr Munro,
and “so it’s really not in their interest” to release
people on bail without good cause. That is what
one would have thought, but that was not the
reality of 1996.

And because it was not the reality, the 1994
Bail Act was amended to legislate against bail
for serious offenders.

The discretion to give bail in serious offences
was taken from the magistrates. It was legis-
lated that “not withstanding any other enact-
ment, a person charged with an offence men-
tioned in Part C of the First Schedule shall not
be granted bail.” Persons mentioned in Part C
were those accused of kidnapping, murder,
armed robbery, treason and conspiracy to com-
mit any one of those offences.

Before the amendment, criminals were
laughing at the law. The courts had become a
revolving door for the criminal who appeared to
have more rights than the law-abiding citizen.

Bahamians were asking the very question
posed by Mr Munro last week: Aren’t the mag-
istrates and criminal lawyers a part of this com-
munity? The public voice grew ever louder
wondering what planet lawyers, weeping for
bail for hardened criminals, and magistrates lis-
tening to their pleas, lived on. Their sentences
did not indicate to the public that they were of
the same planet. They seemed oblivious to pub-
lic alarm at the growing criminal element, espe-
cially to those being returned to the streets
instead of being held behind bars.

“The fact of the matter is,” then Police Com-
missioner BK Bonamy told The Tribune in
1996, “that persons who are out on bail have
been committing serious offences.” He said the
police force had a lot of dedicated officers who
were “somewhat hamstrung by a system which
has some serious flaws.” The serious flaws to
which he referred were the courts. In many cas-
es, he said, accused persons were charged by the
police, brought before the courts, granted bail
and were out committing serious crimes. More
than 100 persons charged with armed robbery
were granted bail since 1994 — it was then
1996, and those who were not killed in other
shootings were still on the streets.

He pointed out that while the police might

object to bail, the final decision was with the
magistrates.

He said police object to bail because they
fear witness tampering, or that the accused
might not return for trial. He said the return to
the streets of these men with criminal records
“increases the workload of the police consider-
ably.” And, he said, despite the Bail Act “mag-
istrates take the view that the person is entitled
to bail.”

The legislators of the day amended the Bail
Act with their eyes wide open, they weighed
the rights of the criminal and those of the citi-
zen.

Prime Minister Ingraham said in 1996 that it
had been shown that many persons out on bail
charged with serious crimes were involved in
continuing criminal activity.

“Hence, we are resolved to change the law,
tightening the rules and conditions for the grant
of bail while taking into full account individual
and constitutional rights as well as the needs of
society generally.” He had also hoped that per-
sons for which there was no bail would get ear-
ly trials.

Lawyer Brian Moree considered the Prime
Minister’s 1996 radio address on the crime issue,
the bail amendment and earlier trials, had a
balanced approach that “reflected the recog-
nition of protecting society, and at the same
time respecting the constitutional rights of
accused persons.” In his opinion the move
should “go a long way” in giving magistrates and
judges the necessary discretion in denying bail
in appropriate cases. In our opinion it must cer-
tainly have gone a long way in removing from
their court room the pressure of overbearing
lawyers pressing for the freedom of their client.

The late businessman and legislator Nor-
man Solomon, in a panel discussion on crime
and the amendment to the Bail Act, recognised
that in serious times, harsh cures are needed.

“It’s a serious decision to deprive somebody
of their liberty before their trial,” he said. “It
was very strong medicine.” But on the other
hand, he continued: “The sad fact of the matter
is the Bahamas is in a serious situation with
regard to crime.”

Today, the situation is even worse. The
judges and magistrates are now the sole arbiters
of who should get bail, we just hope that when
they make their decisions they will remember
what country they are living in, and who are
now out on the streets causing the most trouble,
and increasing the number of cases the police
have to investigate.

More government
for the Bahamas
is unsustainable

EDITOR, The Tribune.

My friend Richard Perry Pin-
der attempted to take me to
task in a recent letter to the edi-
tor.

He claimed that the inter-
vention of the governments of
France and Canada was "not so
much financed by debt, but
through sensible and equitable
tax systems."

Mr. Pinder went on to
expand this a bit more to say
that; "One only has to look at
Canada to clearly see that as a
result of sound budget manage-
ment and accountability it is a
country that has been able to
finance its social programmes
and infrastructural development
through a sensible and equitable
tax system and not exhorbitant
debt which has been the tactic
of its southern neighbour."

Bearing in mind I was
lamenting the damage we are
doing to future generations with
a government unconscionably
increasing its debt load and
deficits, that incidentally are at
about 43 per cent of GDP,
according to the Central Bank
of The Bahamas, I decided to
dig below the surface a bit.

So I Googled "France debt

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



to GDP 2009" and "Canada
debt to GDP 2009" to see if I
missed something.

In the top five results we're
informed that the "French pub-
lic deficit forecast at 5.6 per cent
of GDP in 2009, with public
debt approaching 75 per cent of
GDP".

In the case of Canada, we're
informed in the top five results
that "Canada's debt to hit 63 per
cent of GDP".

Dr. Michael Walker of
Canada's Fraser Institute
informed a Nassau Institute
conference here a couple years
back that 40 per cent of the tax
revenue of Ontario, Canada
was now being absorbed by the
health care system there.

Clearly this is all unsustain-
able.

But why stop comparing
there? According to Veronique
de Rugy, a French economist
with the Mercatus Centre, per
capita income in the United
States is $45,000 while in France

it's $33,000. She informs us that
labour strikes routinely shut the
country down, and Government
spending as a percentage of
GDP in France is 52.4 per cent
while in the US it's 37.4 per
cent.

A couple questions come to
mind:

1. If the tax system in France
and Canada is so equitable, why
do so many French and Cana-
dian citizens opt out?

2. If the Canadian health care
system 1s so competent, why do
so many Canadians go to that
dastardly southern neighbour
for services?

Mr. Pinder might be sur-
prised that the company I work
for, and many others I know of,
offer health care and pension
benefits to their associates.

What I find objectionable
though is for governments to
spend other people’s money for
them and indenture future gen-
erations.

The point is, more govern-
ment for The Bahamas is unsus-
tainable.

RICK LOWE
www.weblogbahamas.com
May 22, 2009

Coming up with a way to build a new hospital

EDITOR, The Tribune.

A few months ago a family member of mine
had to be admitted to the PMH and was unable to
due to the caving in of a portion of the roof and
the rooms flooded with water. This almost

brought tears to my eyes.

This led me to try and come up with a way to
build a new hospital if not for my lifetime but
for my children and their children and here it is.
If every working person, including self employed
persons in the Bahamas which is about some
250,000 persons, donated $20 per month towards
building a new hospital that can net some
$5,000,000.00 ($5 million) per month. Well tell me
if your country’s health care is not worth it? If this

as soda, cigarettes, alcohol and many unnecessary
things. Let us put that $20 to good use. At least we

can have a new hospital that we can be proud off.

Some persons might not agree with this,
because they may think that they don’t need it,
but I say to you just live long enough. As a people

let us give it a thought.

is done for one year, then work out the math.

Let us take the strain off the government and
let us do our country a good deed. Many per-
sons waste more than $20 a month on such things

A question of work
ethic and productivity?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Re: Pharmacy workers claim
discrimination

The Tribune, Saturday May
9, 2009.

Yes, why on earth would an
employer prefer to bring in a
foreigner over a similarly qual-
ified Bahamian? Could it be
something to do with the work
ethic and productivity?

KEN W KNOWLES MD
Nassau,
May 10, 2009.

As a people we need to help to build this coun-
try with our hands just to let our children know
that each one of us has a part to play in the build-
ing of our great country. The question is how
will this be done how would you collect these
funds? Each employer can set up a deduction
plan from each employee who is willing to par-
ticipate, or we can hold a $20 day, that’s only a
few suggestion. I know there are more.

BERNAL F BULLARD
Nassau,
April 22, 2009.



A cry for help

EDITOR, The Tribune.




You say you love me, but you do not feel my pain, (no med-
icine in our hospitals and people are dying while waiting).

You say you love me and you see my hunger so you enslave
me, (instead of teaching me to fish you give me one).

You say you love me and I will never need for anything, (so

you give my lands away).








You say you love me and you will never leave me but yet, I
can’t get to see you (even with an appointment).

You say you love me and you would look out for me, yet my
children are being abused, my sons are killing one another.

My house is in disrepair, my streets are falling in holes, my
ancestors cry out for justice as my courts are clueless about
law, homos and lesbians are taking over, my children are not
learning, but I know you love me.












You say you love me and you will love me until the end of
time, you told me not to worry as our love will get better in time
you told me I am the guava of your eyes, but yet you love foreign
better.

You said I must trust you and believe in you and because I
love you I trusted, I believed and my heart is broken in a million
pieces.

You say you love me and wherever I go you will go with me
also. So, my love, when will you be coming to help me push up
these daisies.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY,

MAY 26, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

a oneeveneecrensecorceusseeorsrecsescesssssonssrcsesssereesesoees

Nassau set
for literary
street festival

A STREET festival will
be held in Nassau this
month to celebrate and
promote the literary arts.

The first Bahamas Inter-
national Literary Festival
(BILF) will be held in

on e lleeations of school molestation

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

PTA president Troy Garvey has
criticised religious leaders and
members of the Grand Bahama
Christian Council for not speaking
out when allegations of sexual
molestation at the Eight Mile Rock
High School were first made public.

Mr Garvey said religious lead-

ers cannot remain behind the “four
walls” of their church, and must
get involved in the day-to-day con-
cerns of the country.

“When this whole thing start-
ed, it was astonishing to see that
no Christians, nobody came for-
ward to step in as men of God,”
he said.

The Eight Mile Rock High
School has been mired in scandal
since January when claims of teach-

Rawson Square from noon
to 6pm on May 30.

The festival aims to
broaden participation in
the arts, increase opportu-
nities for artists and pre-
serve and promote the
nation’s cultural resources.

Dozens of literary acts
will be performed and :
there also will be a celebra-
tion of culinary art and :
native crafts.

“Our concept of a liter-
ary street festival is one
where original work is pre-
sented by poets, folk story-
tellers, songwriters and

MONS AUN

playwrights,” said a
spokesperson for the
organisers.

“Natives and visitors can
come and experience a cel-
ebration of the rebirth of
an expressive art form that
materialised as literary art:
innovative, raw, and full of
emotion.

“Our vision is to estab-
lish a street festival as the
catalyst for expanded pub-
lic participation in the arts
and increased opportuni-
ties for artists. BILF sees
the street festival as an
avenue to further strength-
en the economic, social,
and cultural vitality of the

t ‘ WHEN US President John F Kennedy visited
literary art community.”

the Bahamas in 1962 to meet British Prime Minister

ers molesting or engaging in acts
of a sexual nature with students
surfaced.

Committee

Police are looking into allega-
tions against three teachers and a
government select committee has
been appointed to investigate the
circumstances surrounding the case.



JOHN F KENNEDY at a tree planting ceremony in the Bahamas on Peony 21, 1962.

She also joined the president at pool parties and
was once spotted hiding on the floor of his car as it

According to The Daily Mail Kennedy was said to
have almost fired her boss in the press office when

Organisers said high- Harold MacMillan he may have had his hands full left the White House.
lights will include: with more than diplomacy.

© poetry Between December 17 - 21, 1962, President

e drama Kennedy and Mr MacMillan met in Nassau to con-

clude talks on supplying Polaris nuclear missiles to
the United Kingdom.
However, according to The Daily Mail a retired

¢ rake and scrape
* traditional Bahamian

dance : church administrator is going public with intimate
* contemporary Bahami- details of her affair with President Kennedy, while
an music she was an intern at the White House.

¢ Bahamian art and craft
including culinary art.

PUBLIC NOTICE

Mimi Beardsley Alford, then 19, accompanied
President Kennedy to the Bahamas for the meeting.

Public Consultation on the Access and
Interconnection Framework for the

he failed to let her travel with the presidential par-
ty in June 1963 to Berlin, where he gave his famous
‘Ich Bin Ein Berliner’ speech.

Miss Alford admitted to the affair in 2003 after a
newspaper tracked her down, following the publi-
cation of a book called An Unfinished Life: John F.
Kennedy, 1917-1963, by Robert Dallek.

She is now expected to share the details of the
affair in a book called Once Upon A Secret.

i
“ 7

Last Thursday, Rev Glenroy
Bethel and a number of religious
leaders on Grand Bahama called
for the appointment of Christian
Council representatives to that
committee.

However, Mr Garvey claims that
he has been urging the religious
community to get involved for
some time.

“T contacted the Christian Coun-
cil ... and I told them personally
that they need to take off their
coats and get out of the four walls
and get in the midst,” he said.
“Even though I dropped letters off
throughout West Grand Bahama
asking religious leaders to come to
the PTA meeting, we did not have
participation from any of the priests
and reverends in the community.”

Mr Garvey said only three pas-
tors attended a town meeting held
by the PTA to discuss the allega-
tions.

“We call ourselves a Christian
nation and all these things are hap-
pening. This is the time when we





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need the Christians more than ever.

“God is hurting, God is crying
out now and if you look around
and see what is happening it is only
because God is angry,” he said.

Rev Bethel agreed that religious
leaders should have been more
involved in the beginning.

“We should be doing more from
the Christian side of it because we
are falling down in doing our jobs.

“(Mr Garvey) is right; they
should have been leading the
charge, but nevertheless we will see
what happens from here.

“T believe this is an opportunity
for those religious leaders to come
forward and get involved in what is
going on,” he said.

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Mexico spending
S90M on rons
ais for tourism

m@ MEXICO CITY

IF THE rich, famous and
pretty are returning to Mex-
ico's beaches now that offi-
cials say the swine flu epi-
demic is waning, won't
everyone else?

That's the message of a
$90 million campaign aimed
at luring tourists scared off
by the outbreak, which has
killed at least 86 people
worldwide, according to
Associated Press.

The government-funded
campaign will feature ads
with opera singer Placido
Domingo, champion golfer
Lorena Ochoa and other
national heroes.

President Felipe Calderon
said Monday that Mexico
will also invite international
celebrities to visit, but he
didn't name them.

Tourism is Mexico's third-
largest source of legal for-
eign income. But swine flu
fears have stemmed the flow
of visitors and pushed hotel
occupancy to a record low.

Man goes
overboard from
cruise ship

m@ TAMPA, Fla.

THE COAST GUARD
is searching for a man
believed to have gone over-
board from a cruise ship in
the Gulf of Mexico, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

The Coast Guard say 18-
year-old Bruce Okrepki
reportedly went overboard
from the Carnival Fantasy
at about 9:45 p.m. Sunday,
about 150 miles southwest
of Tampa.

Okrepki is from
Louisiana but authorities
aren’t certain of his home-
town.

A search plane, heli-
copter and Coast Guard
cutter were sent out to
search.

The ship had left New
Orleans and was en route to
Key West.

Unrest at COB as faculty
hits out at administrators

A STORM said to have been
quietly brewing at the College of
the Bahamas for some time
boiled over yesterday when
COB bosses were publicly
accused of forcing “disturbing
decisions and policy changes”
on the faculty.

A statement issued by the
Union of Tertiary Educators of
the Bahamas (UTEB) charged
that administrators and the Col-
lege Council have been exclud-
ing staff from the decision mak-
ing process and acting in con-
travention of “good industrial
practices”.

It said: “Despite attempts to
work harmoniously with admin-
istrators at the College of the
Bahamas in our push toward
university status, UTEB must,
at this time, break its long held
silence over the latest in a series
of cavalier and autocratic gov-
ernance decisions and policy
changes by college administra-
tors — decisions and changes that
continue to astonish and offend
the faculty and staff of the col-
lege. UTEB wishes to say that it
is unequivocally opposed to the
manner in which this adminis-
tration continues to circumvent
the already established decision
making process at the institu-
tion, particularly those process-
es leading to decisions which
directly impact faculty.”

Response

Yesterday afternoon, COB
issued a response denying these
allegations and calling for
UTEB to return to negotiations.

The union maintains that any
circumvention of UTEB’s
involvement in the restructur-
ing of schools and faculties,
redrafting of the College Act or
the adoption of policies that
affect terms and conditions of
employment is contrary to the
Industrial Relations Act, the
COB/UTEB Industrial Agree-
ment, and the Memorandum of
Agreement between COB and
UTEB.

“The union feels it is unfortu-
nate that, while college admin-
istrators and UTEB sit at the
bargaining table negotiating a

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Union of Tertiary Educators of
the Bahamas criticises bosses

new industrial agreement, there
have been attempts by the col-
lege and its governing council
to create policies that should be
the subject of current negotia-
tions with UTEB,” the state-
ment said.

“By circumventing proper
negotiations in this way, they
undermine the voice of labour in
the governance of the college;
thereby, creating an environ-
ment that undermines the good
faith relationship UTEB has
attempted to forge with the col-
lege’s senior administration and
governing council.

Voice

UTEB said that for more than
a year, verbally and in writing, it
has tried to get administrators
and government officials
responsible for educational
oversight to recognise the
importance of the faculty’s voice
in the decision making process.

Over the course of the next
few weeks, UTEB said, it will
make the public aware of the
specific decisions it opposes, and
will “call into question the legal-
ity of the process by which they
have been or are being imple-
mented.”

The union said these matters
are of major concern to its mem-
bers, adding: “only when those
issues that arise are properly
addressed will the proposed
University of the Bahamas
attain the pinnacle it seeks and
best serve the needs of its con-
stituents.”

UTEB said it wants to remind
college administrators that the
future University of the
Bahamas must be seen as a
product that evolved from “a
wholly collaborative effort”.

The college’s response noted
that COB is currently in negoti-
ations with UTEB, and consid-
ers that it is only through nego-
tiations at the table that a new

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agreement satisfactory for all
parties can be arrived at.

“On Friday last, the Union
of Tertiary Educators of the
Bahamas walked away from the
negotiating table.

“We have invited the Union
of Tertiary Educators of the
Bahamas to return to the table

and await its decision. With
respect to the current press
release approved by the Union
of Tertiary Educators of the
Bahamas, we wish to assure the
public that the college has not
implemented any policy that
contravenes or contradicts any
rights, privileges or conditions
in any labour contract to which
the college is a party,” COB
said.

The college said that there is
no attempt to circumvent union
involvement or to stifle the

“Indeed, the college values
the views of all faculty and seeks
the full engagement of all — fac-
ulty, students, staff, alumni and
friends — in the task of building
a university to serve and drive
national development and build
a better Bahamas for all. We
call on the Union of Tertiary
Educators of the Bahamas to
return to the negotiating table
and work together in negotiat-
ing an agreement satisfactory
for all parties and helpful for
the development of the College

voice of faculty.

and the Bahamas,” COB said.

eu PRIMARY Sa i 3 uals

KHES ADDERLEY of Temple Christian
Elementary School has been named 2009
Bahamas Primary School Student of the Year
and the winner of a $7,000 scholarship.

The first runner-up Farion Cooper of
Xavier’s Lower School was awarded a $4,000
scholarship. Second runner-up Charisma Sewell
of Walter Parker Primary School in Grand
Bahama and third runner-up Rebecca Hen-
derson of Queen’s College were each awarded
$3,000 scholarships.

Last week, the Bahamas Primary School
Student of the Year Foundation held its 13th
annual awards ceremony to recognise primary
school students from grade six, who had been
selected by their schools as the top achievers.

The students, who have been dubbed “the
best of the best”, competed for the honour of
being named Primary School Student of the
Year by writing an essay as well as submitting:
report cards from grades four, five and six;
copies of awards, certificates, newspaper clip-



pings; three letters of recommendation; and a
work portfolio of approximately 50 pages.

Minister of State for the Environment Phen-
ton Neymour commended Ricardo Deveaux,
president and CEO of the foundation, for hav-
ing the vision to establish the organisation in
1997 in collaboration with the Bahamas Pan-
Hellenic Council.

The minister said he was proud of all of the
students, particularly the young men and those
from the Family Islands.

He urged parents to continue to support their
children and teach them to uphold “true
Bahamian values”.

James Boyce, Primary School Student of the
Year for 2008, spoke of his reign as being both
exciting and overwhelming.

He told the honourees that they were all
winners and encouraged parents to spend qual-
ity time with their children and to make the
effort to support them through their educa-
tional journey.



Organisation formed to
promote ‘green industry’

THE first ever organisation dedicated to rep-
resenting the country’s growers and landscap-
ers has been established.

The Bahamas Landscape Association (BLA)
promotes the interests of individuals, associa-
tions, clubs and businesses involved in nurs-
ery, landscape maintenance, landscape instal-
lation, irrigation, pest management, arboricul-
ture, horticulture and floriculture in the
Bahamas.

Its officers are: co-chairmen Robert Myers of
Caribbean Landscape Ltd and Conray Rolle of
Atlantis; treasurer Mark Fox of ACIT Ltd, sec-
retary Sclima Campbell of Lucyan Tropical
Growers and director Kent Knowles of
Atlantis.

“The BLA is dedicated to
bringing its membership
together to improve the
standard of education, per-
formance, quality and public
awareness of the green
industries in the Bahamas,”
said the association in a
statement.

With more than 50 indi-
vidual and company mem-
bers already signed up, the officers say they
are well on their way to obtaining the critical
mass required to achieve their goals.

The BLA has partnered with the Florida
Nursery Growers Landscape Association and is
looking to partner with the Ministry of Educa-
tion to provide internationally recognised pro-
fessional certification to its members. The first
“Certified Horticultural Professional” pro-
gramme is already being offered to its members
online as of January 2009 and further classes
and certification will take place at the BTVI
once the Ministry of Education approves the
required funding.

The association said it will be encouraging the
professional certification of all of its members
and promoting the use of such professionals
to hotels, businesses, government agencies,
developments and the general public.

The BLA said it sees this programme as “piv-

To have your say on this or any other
issue, email Tbe Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your
letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street,
P.O. Box N-3207

otal in creating standards in the green industry”.

“We are particularly excited about getting
pilot programmes of this level of professional
certifications into the senior classes in the high
schools,” said co-chairman Mr Rolle. “We
understand the vast need for young people out
there looking for a head start in advancing
their education and in the business world; this
is a great programme for just that”.

Robert Myers said: “The BLA will offer indi-
viduals an opportunity to become members of
a massive international industry and will pro-
vide career training and certification thus allow-
ing them to stand out and gain recognition by
employers and or potential customers. In an
unregulated industry this
is the best possible cre-
dential a company or land-
scape professional could
have. It says to the con-
sumer that you know what
you are talking about.”

The BLA says it will:

¢ promote the use of
local grades and standards
for all to follow

¢ lobby the government
to consider proposals that will benefit the indus-
try

¢ offer special short courses and seminars to
its members

¢ send out information on new products,
machinery, ideas, laws and jobs

The BLA website, www.bla-fnegla.org, will
list the certification status of members. It will
also offer consumers or companies the oppor-
tunity to support the association’s programmes.

The BLA said: “This will be an extremely
useful tool for people who are tired of being
ripped off by scam artists and unprofessional
persons and companies in the nursery and land-
scape field. Consumers can be sure their con-
tractors or gardeners are up to date with all
the latest ideas and training as a number of
continued educational units will be required
by each member to maintain their certification
and membership each year.



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009, PAGE 7



Charity reports a sharp rise

in demand at feeding centres
Lyford Cay Foundation donates $25,000 to Salvation Army

THE Lyford Cay Foundation
has made a $25,000 donation to
the Salvation Army of the
Bahamas to support its three feed-
ing centres — which have experi-
enced a sharp rise in the number
of people seeking help since the
global economic crisis took hold.

"This gift from the Lyford Cay
Foundation has made a world of
difference to us," said Major
Lester Ferguson, the Army's divi-
sional commander. "We've been
struggling since late last summer to
keep up with the demand to sup-
ply our cooked meals and gro-
ceries for families in need, here
on Mackey Street and also in
Grants Town and Freeport. This
donation means that we've been
able to add not only to the quality
of the food parcels that we give,
but also to the quantity, so it's
making a great difference."

As a result of the gift, the two
centres in New Providence have
increased the number of free hot
lunches and food parcels they dis-
tribute each week from around
500 to more than 600, according to
Madeline Froning, the Army's
community relations and devel-
opment associate.

In Grand Bahama — where the
pantry was empty for a time last
year — more than 100 parcels
have been given out since the
grant was made. The food pack-
ages range in size and are designed
to serve an individual or family
for up to two weeks.

"In the past, if our food pantry
was empty and we had nothing to
give, we had nothing to give," said
Ms Froning. "It's an ongoing
struggle to maintain this pro-
gramme, so that's why this grant is
so important, because it allows us
to stock our food pantries on a
more regular basis."

According to Major Ferguson,
the feeding centres have not only
seen a rise in the demand for their
services, but also a change in the
kinds of individuals asking for
help.





LYFORD CAY FOUNDATION Gifts and Grants Committee members Suzy Robinson (left) and Kylie Nottage

=
a,
=>
o
=
=
a
=
i=
Oo



(right) are pictured with Salvation Army divisional commander Major Lester Ferguson at the Army's feeding
centre on Mackey Street. The centre provides hundreds of hot lunches and food parcels to individuals and

families in need every week.

"Previously the people we
assisted would be the unemployed,
or elderly folk,” he said. "Last year
we started to see those numbers
increasing, but we also saw people
who were employed who just
needed a bag of groceries to tide
them through the week. So since
the end of the summer last year,
we saw the numbers just keep ris-
ing, and they really haven't
stopped. And we're finding more
and more persons who need help,
including some who drive their
cars on their way home from work
and stop by to see if they can get
something to get them through a
couple of days."

The Lyford Cay Foundation's
Gifts and Grants Committee has
disbursed more than $10 million to
a wide range of non-profit organi-
zations to date. This year, given
the difficult economic climate, the
committee is concentrating on
addressing people's most funda-
mental needs, including food,
clothing and shelter. And instead
of waiting for grant applications
to come in, the committee has
been reaching out to groups who
specialise in these areas to find
out how best to help.

"We approached the Salvation
Army and explained that because
of the circumstances right now, we



feel a responsibility to focus on
basic human needs, and we know
that they have a system in place to
provide resources to those who
need them the most," said Suzy
Robinson, committee chair.
"Because they are a reliable
organisation that already has a
programme in place, they were
the perfect people to approach,
and we are honoured to be able to
support the great work that they
do."

In 2008, the Lyford Cay Foun-
dation also gave the Salvation
Army $22,000 to fund the pur-
chase of 20 station licenses, train-
ing and computer support for a
literacy software programme used
in the Army's 'Excel After School’
project, which offers children and
young people a safe, comfortable
and supervised place in which to

-_Scotiabank’s Processing
_ Support Centre adopts

Uriah McPhee School

ATA special assembly held at the Uriah McPhee Primary
School on Friday, May 15, Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd Pro-
cessing Support Centre announced its adoption of the Uriah
McPhee Primary School.

Each branch and unit within Scotiabank has been asked to
select a primary school in their community with whom to
partner. Each partnership is individualized and can take the
form of financial support, volunteering, shared expertise or
physical resources.

The Processing Support Centre has commenced a literacy
programme at the school and has plans to launch a science
project in the near future.

On May 15 all 49 members of the unit were treated to a
special assembly conducted by students of the school. Principal
of the Uriah McPhee Primary School, Mrs. Helen Simmons-
Johnson, thanked Scotiabank for its support.

“T am elated that members of the Processing Support Cen-
tre chose to partner with my school, this programme will
allow Scotiabank to observe first hand what we are doing in
our school and will provide our students with opportunities for
enhanced learning,” said Mrs. Simmons-Johnson.

Rekell Griffin, Senior Manager Marketing and Public
Relations at Scotiabank, presented Mrs. Simmons-Johnson
with two computers along with reading software to be used in
the school’s reading lab.

In an address to the administrators, teachers and students
of Uriah McPhee, Ms. Griffin stated, “Scotiabank is very
excited about this new initiative, through this programme
we intend to utilise the human resources, talents and ideas of
our employees to strengthen and enhance the quality of edu-
cation in the communities where we live and work.”

The Adopt-A-School Programme spins off the Scotia-
bank Bright Future Programme, which is a philanthropic
programme that helps support opportunities for the children
and communities in which we live and work.

The Scotiabank Bright Future Programme is helping to
support opportunities for children and communities.

Scotiabank has been part of the Caribbean and Central
America since 1889. It is now the leading bank in the region,
with operations in 27 countries, including affiliates.

The bank has 12,117 employees in the region, including affil-
iates, serving more than two million customers, with 593
branches, kiosks and other offices, plus about 932 automated
banking machines.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986

Port Group Limited appoint
new director of the board

THE Board of Directors of Port Group Lim-
ited have announced the appointment of Pietro
Stefanutti as a director of the board.

Mr Stefanutti is a multi-lingual executive
especially skilled at planning, organisational
development, and leading an efficient organi-
sation. He is oriented toward global businesses
that require professional management with
entrepreneurial skills, and possesses a track
record for turnarounds and solving a broad
range of cultural, technical, manufacturing and
marketing problems. He also serves on the
board of directors of Enterprise Development
International, a U.S. based non profit organi-
zation that promotes the global development of
micro enterprises through micro-lending and
training.

“We think Mr. Stefanutti’s experience in
this arena and overall management and gover-
nance acumen will greatly assist the city’s strate-
gic growth,” said Hannes Babak, Chairman of
Port Group Limited.

Mr Stefanutti’s professional career began in
1972 as an operations engineer with Shell in the
oil production region of Western Venezuela,
and continued with Exxon Chemicals. While at
Exxon, Mr. Stefanutti held several manage-
ment positions with the Venezuelan affiliate,
and was promoted to General Manager in Rio
de Janeiro with responsibility for Brazil,

Argentina and Chile before returning to
Europe in May 1990.

In September 2003 Mr. Stefanutti founded
PharmaChem Technologies (GB) Ltd. to
acquire Honeywell’s Bahamian facility and to
produce a leading antiretroviral drug for
HIV/AIDS. After inspection and approval by
the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
in December 2004, PharmaChem Technolo-
gies (GB) Ltd is now the main producer of the
active pharmaceutical ingredient Tenofovir
Disoproxil Fumarate (TDF) for Gilead Sci-
ences Inc. (NASDAQ: GILD). During late
2007 Mr. Stefanutti merged his company with
Groupe Novasep and became chairman of the
board of the combined entity with some 500
million M$ of revenues worldwide.

“The addition of Mr. Stefanutti ensures the
company will continue to benefit from a diver-
sity of knowledge and opinions,” said Ian Rolle,
President of Port Group Limited.

Mr. Stefanutti was born in Italy and immi-
grated to Venezuela when he was 5 years old.
After completing his elementary education in
Caracas, Mr. Stefanutti studied in the United
States from 1963 to 1972. He attended High
School in Chicago and obtained an engineering
degree from the University of Missouri under a
scholarship program sponsored by Shell Oil
Company.

PM MEETS FRENCH AMBASSADOR

Peter Ramsay/BIS

AMBASSADOR OF FRANCE TO THE BAHAMAS Marc-Oliver Gendry (right) talks with Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham during a courtesy call at the Office of the Prime Minister, Cable Beach, Nassau on

Thursday May 21, 2009.

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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Search for
man who went

overboard from

cruise ship

m TAMPA, Fla.

THE Coast Guard was }
searching Gulf of Mexico waters }
Monday for an 18-year-old }
recent high school graduate from
Louisiana who is believed to }
have gone overboard from a }
cruise ship, according to Associ- }

ated Press.

Bruce O’Krepki went over- }
board from the Carnival Fantasy i
at about 9:45 p.m. Sunday, about }
150 miles southwest of Tampa, }

the Coast Guard said.

O’Krepki is from Hammond, }
La., where The Daily Star news- }
paper reported that he recently :
graduated from St. Thomas
Aquinas High School. He was }
with about 35 classmates on the

ship.

happened.

“We are awaiting more }
word,” O’Krepki told the news- }
paper. “Hopefully, the brave }
men and women of the U.S. }
Coast Guard will be successfulin

searching for Bruce.”

He asked that the family’s pri-
vacy be respected and for people ;
to keep his nephew in their }

thoughts and prayers.

A search plane, helicopter and :
Coast Guard cutter were sent }

out to search.

The ship had left New Orleans i

and was en route to Key West.

‘Rock’ used to
kill loving dad

FROM page one

thrown in the front yard after
his fall.

Emergency Medical Services
and police arrived within the
hour and Mr Fox was pro-
nounced dead at the scene.

A Soldier Road man in his
forties turned himself into
police at around 6.30am yester-
day. Police say they believe he is
responsible for the incident.

Mr Fox, a self-employed
handyman, grew up in the Glen-
dale Subdivision, attending HO
Nash and CC Sweeting schools.
Relatives say he was a family
man who loved to crack jokes
and be the “life of the party.”

The uncle was popular among
his numerous nieces and
nephews. He had one son, Lar-
ry Fox, 24, who lives in Fox Hill
and would visit with his father
every week or so.

Terry Fox’s sister, Melissa
Fox, 40, who lives in the family
home in Porkfish Road, said:
“He was fun-filled, the life of

His uncle, Rick O’Krepki, said :
Monday afternoon that the fam- }
ily had no details about what

FROM page one

next election arrives.

“In our case we have had the time
to reflect to look at this and we are
putting in place now all of the nec-
essary things to make us a strong and
viable opposition to the FNM gov-
ernment and quite frankly I believe
that with the condition of the country
and the years ahead as we move
towards the next general election the
Progressive Liberal Party will be an
intense competitor to the FNM,” said
Mr Christie.

Meanwhile, said the Opposition
leader, the country has now reached
a critical point at which voters should
be in a better position to make an
informed judgment of which party is
more suited to govern the country.

“T think the people of this coun-
try will see, as we progress towards
the next election and more and more
as the FNM approaches mid-term,
and will be looking very carefully (at
how the government is handling the
management of the country).

“Having gone through the last
three or four years, that is two years
of us, the PLP, and the first two years
of the FNM, they are now in a posi-

the party, always making people
laugh. He was the life of the
family; he loved children.”

The last large family gather-
ing was at the funeral of his 74-
year-old father, Rufus Fox, in
March, who died 10 years after
the death of their 64-year-old
mother, Vernitta Fox.

Mr Fox's brothers and sis-
ters said he was a homebody
who rarely liked to go out,
although he did love music, and
he loved to dance.

Miss Fox said: “He was

tion to be making judg-
ments as to how effec-
tive my party was in its
first term and how effec-
tive the Ingraham gov-
ernment is,” he said.

In view of this evalua-
tion, Mr Christie sug-
gested there may be a
swing toward the PLP,
which it can in turn use
to its advantage.

“People form a view
firstly that they don’t
agree with what the gov-
ernment is doing — they
become disaffected. The
Opposition, however it
is organised, becomes
the beneficiary of the
view formed against
what is happening in the
government.”

Voters, he said, will increasingly
be inclined to “choose a PLP where
they would be able to return to the
glory days of an economy that was
very beneficial to them and which
they do not now have.”

“The critical position for people
in this country is to continue to watch
this government and how it is trying



i ae ~ FY 7

TERRY FOX with his brothers and sisters at their father’s funeral in
March. Terry is the second from the left. Left to right are Melissa Fox,
Terry Fox, Michaela Fox, Brinton Fox, Nelson Cartwright, Deborah
Rahming, Dianne Bowe.



to manage a very
bad situation in this
country,” said Mr
Christie.

“There are serious
concerns, legitimately
serious concerns about
how the government is
managing the economy
of The Bahamas and the
social circumstances of
The Bahamas.”

Claiming that polls
have allowed him to
“keep in touch” with
voter’s sentiments, the
former prime minister
said the party has not
lost but gained support
#4) Since the last general
election, which was
closely fought, and he,
with Deputy Leader Cynthia Pratt
and Chairman Glenys Hanna Mar-
tin, are “all, as of today, secure in
(their) positions.”

“Considering the last election was
as close as it was now you can draw
your own conclusions,” said Mr
Christie of the party’s electoral
prospects.

Yesterday, a disgruntled PLP insid-

mo

PLP ‘doing all it can’
_ to be the next govt

er questioned why Mr Christie “only
finds his voice” whenever he is per-
sonally attacked, but remains “silent”
on the issues at “all other times.”

It does nothing to dispel concerns
about the documented public per-
ception of him as “weak and indeci-
sive” to see that Mr Christie “only
speaks out when there is a question
about his leadership,” said the
source, referring to the fact that a
copy of the Greenberg, Quinlan,
Rosner report, which was “not exact-
ly favourable” to Mr Christie’s lead-
ership, was leaked in its entirety to a
local political blog over the week-
end under the heading “Report con-
firms Christie must go or PLP will
die!”

The move was described by Mr
Christie over the weekend as one
“done for the furtherance of political
aspirations by persons who may see
its as negative towards me and my
leadership.”

“It is now clear that he must be
challenged at the convention,” said
the insider.

On Sunday Mr Christie said “he
has no doubt whatsoever” that he
will emerge from the convention still
as leader of the party.

always coming in the morning,
dancing, he would come in front
of my door saying, ‘It ain't time
to sleep!’

“Always clowning around.
But he was always home, he
didn't like to go out.”

Mr Fox was the fourth of
eight children, and although he
was self-employed, he some-
times worked for his half-broth-
er, Nelson Cartwright, at
Cartwright's Carpentry and
Construction in Yamacraw.

Mr Cartwright said his broth-
er was semi-skilled, and could

Wholesaler/Retailer located in Nassau seeks

Saath eee

The candidate will work alongside the senior management
feam at our head office, assisting in.a variety of areas such
as public and custamer relations, marketing, advertising,
HR, basic bookkeeping, and various administrative duties
such as filing and organization. Much of the above will be

office and computer-based,

The candidate should have the following skills:

General computer skills (Microsoft XP, internet, social

networking web sites,,..}

Strang knowledge of Microsoft Office (Word, Excel,

Outlook)

Familiarity with basic bookkeeping concepts
(particularly Accounts Payable and Receivable}

Experience:

The candidate should have experience of office
administration. Specific retail, wholesale, HR or
bookkeeping not essential but beneficial. Additionally,
the candidate must be well-spoken, highly organised
and professional and have a current driver's license and

their own transportation,

Applications are to include: Recent police record,
passport photo, two references, resume, covering letter
Stating where/how specific experience was gained In

(i) Microsoft Office (Word, Excel) (ii) Any bookkeeping
concepts (iii) other software programs you are

experienced / familiar with,

Pye ee rae ea a
f(a) epeeee (cree) wel

f, 322-8430

P.O. Box 55-19021

have been a foreman if he had
“stuck to it.”
“Instead life just threw him
a bunch of curve balls,” he said.
“Tt could have gone a lot of
ways different for him, but our
destiny is not controlled by us.

“T'm a firm believer that if
you live by the sword, you die
by the sword, so I can't believe
anything else.”

Mr Cartwright added: “He
will be missed. We hope that
justice will be done, and police
will determine what is what.

“Tt could have been an acci-

dent, it could have been what-
ever, but we can't jump to con-
clusions.

“We have to believe in the
justice system and how the
country operates.

“We can't take matters into
our own hands because Terry
isn't coming back, so it doesn't
make any sense to take matters
into your own hands.”

Anyone who may be able to
assist police investigations
should call Crime Stoppers
anonymously on 328-TIPS
(8477).

les eed

Notice is hereby given that the Twenty-ninth
(29th) Annual General Meeting of THE

PUBLIC WORKERS’

CO-OPERATIVE

CREDIT UNION LIMITED will be held at

The British Colonial

Hilton Hotel, West

Bay Street, on Friday, June 12th, 2009
commencing at 6:30 p.m. for the following

purposes:

- To receive the report of the Board

of Directors

- To receive the Audited Report for 2008

* To elect members of the Board
of Directors, Supervisory Committee
and Credit Committee

- To discuss and approve the budget

for 2010

All eligible members, wishing to run for
a position on the Board of Directors,

Supervisory

Committee or

Credit

Committee, are asked to submit their names
to the Credit Union’s offices in Nassau or
Freeport, no later than Monday, June 8th,

2009 by 4:00 p.m.

All members are urged to attend and
Exciting door prizes will be offered.
Refreshments will be served!





NELSON CARTWRIGHT at the spot where his half brother, Terry Fox,
died in Porkfish Road, Glendale Subdivision, on Sunday night.

Man who lost
over $40 million in
casinos in Bahamas,

US and Australia
appears in court

FROM page one

According to the 42-year-old, the casino allowed him to
gamble despite knowing that he had a problem and was
banned from casinos elsewhere.

If successful in his bid to win back his funds from the
Crown, Mr Kakavas claims he will still “not have a dollar” as
he will use it to pay back millions owed to creditors else-
where.

Testifying on Monday, Mr Kakavas reinforced his argu-
ment that he was a “problem” gambler by telling the court
that despite promising his fiancée that he would quit his
addiction when they got married, he went against his com-
mitment during their honeymoon to The Bahamas in 2006.

Hiding his gambling activities during their trip by organis-
ing a “pampering package” for his wife, the property devel-
oper added to the $40 million in losses he had already racked
up in unidentified casinos in the U.S. and The Bahamas
between 2003 and 2006.

He had earlier told the court that he would book his wife in
for facials, hair stylings and manicures while he gambled in the
Crown Casino in Melbourne.

“She did not know I gambled in the Bahamas,” Mr Kakavas
said.

“IT arranged for her to do the women’s things, whatever
they do.”

Meanwhile, the Australian vehemently denied a sugges-
tion made by a lawyer during his opening remarks in the
case that he did not chase his losses.

“The only occasion I would not chase my losses was when
I had no money to chase my losses with,” he said.

“Blind Freddy could see I was chasing my losses... was
chasing them vigorously and in a blinded state.”



TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS



Howard’s 24 lead Magic
past Cavs for 2-1 lead

@ By TOM WITHERS
AP Sports Writer

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) —
From an unforgettable shot to
a cheap one.

Three games in, the Eastern
Conference finals have grown a
little nasty.

Dwight Howard scored 24
points — 14 on free throws —
and Rafer Alston added 18 as
the Orlando Magic, sick of see-
ing replays of LeBron James’
dramatic buzzer-beater to win
Game 2, downed the Cleveland
Cavaliers 99-89 on Sunday
night to take a 2-1 lead in the
series.

A physical game from start
to finish, there were 86 free
throws attempted, 58 person-
al fouls called, two technicals,
and a flagrant. The officials
spent half the night stepping
between players on both sides
as tempers flared inside an
overheated Amway Arena.

In the first half, Mo Williams
had his left eye split open by
Orlando's Anthony Johnson,
who nailed Cleveland's point
guard with an elbow.

Williams, who needed four
stitches to close two cuts, and
James felt the blow was a
cheap shot.

"T think 1t was,” James said.
"You see Mo's face, it's not a
pretty sight. That's not called
for in this game.”

James scored 41 on just 11-
of-28 shooting and missed five
free throws in the fourth quar-
ter. And once again, Cleve-
land's superstar didn't get
enough help from his team-
mates. Williams, Delonte West
and Zydrunas Ilgauskas shot a
combined 13-of-37.

Game 4 is Tuesday night.

The first two games of the
series in Cleveland were each
decided by one point. This one
was resolved by elbows, shoves
and hard fouls.

Howard, Ilgauskas and
Cleveland's Anderson Varejao
all fouled out. Afterward,
Williams said the Cavaliers
were giving the underdog Mag-
ic too much respect.

"We just need to man up,”
James said. "Orlando is a very,
very good team.”

Unlike Games 1 and 2, the
Magic got out fast, stayed close
despite Howard's early foul
trouble and put the Cavs away
at the line.

Howard, a notoriously poor
foul shooter, went 14-of-19
from the line and the Magic
made 39 of 51 attempts. In the
fourth quarter alone, Orlando
made 19 of 23 to hold off the
top-seeded Cavaliers, who
began the playoffs with eight
straight wins and have now
dropped two of their last three.

Each time he stepped to the
line, Howard sang a song in his
head he heard at halftime.

"We just kept fighting.
That's what we got to do, we
fight to the end," Howard said.
"We can't worry about noth-
ing, we can't worry about the
calls, can't worry about nobody
else. We just got to get out
there and play."

Cleveland better figure out a
way to win in steamy Florida
fast. The Cavs, who were
thumped here by 29 on April 3,
have six lost six of their last
seven in Orlando.

The Magic seem to have a
spell over the Cavs.

"They create so many
matchup problems for us,"
Williams said. "I know it. They
know it. Everybody knows it."

Despite his lack of help,
James kept Cleveland within
striking distance in the fourth
and scored on a three-point
play while getting Howard's
fifth foul with 2:34 to play to
pull the Cavs to 90-86.

Howard, wrapped up under-
neath, then made two free
throws before James was
fouled and rimmed out two at
the other end. On Orlando's
next trip, Mickael Pietrus, who
came off the bench to score 16,
grabbed a long rebound, got
fouled and was pushed in the
back by West, who was handed
aT.

Pietrus made his free throws
to make it 94-86 and the Mag-
ic appeared to have things



DWIGHT HOWARD (12) is fouled by Zydrunas Ilgauskas in the second half of Game 3 of Eastern Conference
finals in Orlando, Florida, on Sunday. Orlando won 99-89.

under control when Howard
caught James from behind and
blocked his 3-pointer. The refs
saw it otherwise and called a
three-shot foul on Superman,
who couldn't believe it.

James made all three shots,
but the Cavs were short on
time. Rashard Lewis and Hedo
Turkoglu made free throws.
Turkoglu was just 1-of-11 from
the floor but made 11 free
throws and added 10 rebounds
and seven assists.

Grand Bahamian quarter-

miler making his mark



FROM page 11



life,” said Williams, who joined
Andrae Williams (44.98) and
Chris Brown (45.03) in sur-
passing the A qualifying stan-
dard of 45.55 for the [IAAF
World Championships set for
August in Berlin, Germany.

“But I feel it’s a big achieve-
ment because as a track ath-
lete once you get fast, you are
supposed to get faster. So I
guess my point is I have to get
faster and the only way I can
do that is to train harder than I
did and lift more than I did and
improve on where I am right
now.”

Williams’ coach Blaine Wiley
said he has been amazed by his
performance. “I had very high
expectations for him,” Wiley
said.

“T felt that he had the ability
when he got here. I think his
personal best was 47.91 when
he came to South Plains. His
freshman year, he ran 46.70
after he had injured his ham-
string 10 days before.

“T was expecting him to run a
46 low last year, but he was set
back by the injury. So I knew
coming in that he would have
had the potential to run 46 or
faster. But as the season pro-
gressed and he started training
with another quarter-miler
here, he just started running
faster.”

Based on his performances,
Wiley said he knew that
Williams was on course to run
some pretty good times this
year.

“When he ran the 45.01 for
the fastest time in the world,
we continued to train harder
and so I knew going into this
meet over the weekend, I knew
he was strong enough to run
under 45 seconds.

“He proved me right. He
came off the curve and ran a
brilliant race. He came through
the first 200 in 21.6, which is
exactly what I told him and he
finished strong and nobody was
able to catch him. In both of
his races, he ran as perfect as
you could get for a quarter-mil-
er, SO it was great.”

Latoy Williams

At the beginning of the sea-
son, Williams said his ultimate
goal was to run around 45.5
and hopefully secure a lane in
the one-lapper in Berlin.

“T succeeded that, so every
time I run, I’m surprised at
what I do,” Williams stated.
“But I work really hard, so I
know I’m capable of doing it.”

Although the 400m has
already been the leading event
at the Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations’ Nation-
al Championships scheduled
for June 26-27 at the Thomas A
Robinson stadium, Williams’
performances adds an addi-
tional flair.

But Williams said he’s not
going to linger on the trip home
for that meet because he has
an even more loftier goal and
that is to represent the coun-
try well in Berlin.

“T really can’t tell what the
future holds. I will just let the
Lord guide me and go with the
flow,” he said. “One minute
you could be on top and the
next minute you are not, so ’m
not going to think too far in
the future.”

Having progressed at 3 1/2
seconds over the last two sea-
sons at South Plain, Wiley said
Williams has the potential to
run a low 44 this season.

“T really think that in 2012,
he will really be a medal con-
tender (at the Olympic
Games),” Wiley projected.
“There’s a possibility for him to
do it this year.

“But it’s more difficult for



the kids coming out of college
after the long season to main-
tain their form at the World
Championships or _ the
Olympics. But we have tried to
get him ready for the summer.
He has a lot of heart and a lot
of character. He does every-
thing that I’ve asked him to
do.”

While he has put himself
where he’s now a marked man,
Williams said it’s good because
he remembers how just last
year he was chasing all of the
top local contenders, including
Brown and Andrae Williams.

“Tm just going to train
hard,” he said. “I know it’s
going to be hard because I
don’t want them to concentrate
on just trying to beat me.

“There are still two (Ameri-
can) quarter-milers out there
(Olympic champion LaShawn
Merritt and runner-up Jeremy
Wariner), so don’t set your
sights on me because you will
be only the third best. Like ?’m
doing, try to be the best.”

Andrae Williams, another
Grand Bahamian native, said
he’s elated to see Williams per-
forming the way he has been.

“Each year we seemed to
have another quarter-miler
coming up,” he said. “It’s excit-
ing. To run 44.73 is an out-
standing time, so that should
really help us out at the World
Championships as we chase the
Americans.”

Not sure of the direct rela-
tionship between the two,
Andrae Williams said Latoy
Williams is certainly inspiring
him to train harder and he
knows that the other quarter-
milers are doing the same.

“Tm happy with my times so
far. This is the best perfor-
mance that I’ve ever had, so I
just hope that I can stay healthy
and just peak at the right time
to compete at the Nationals,”
he said.

Andrae Williams, who is
based in Lubbock, Texas,
where he’s being coached by
Dion Miller, is expected to be
back in action this weekend to
compete in the Reebok Grand
Prix in New York.

After sitting the final seven
minutes of the first half with
three fouls, Howard made it
through 9:10 of the third quar-
ter before getting No. 4— and
technical No. 5 of the postsea-
son.

He was called for pushing
Ben Wallace underneath, and
upset with the whistle, he said
something on his way to the
bench that referee Joey Craw-
ford didn't like and was T’d up.
Orlando coach Stan Van

Gundy had warned his star
to keep his composure
because the league auto-
matically suspends a player
for one game after he
receives his seventh tech-
nical foul in the playoffs.

"T didn't say anything to
Joey Crawford," Howard
said. "The response was to
the other team. I didn't say
anything to Joey Crawford.
I'm not stupid enough to
get in his face and say any-
thing, so I try to keep it to
the other team."

The Magic led 29-23
when Howard picked up
his third personal foul with
7:27 remaining in the first
half when he bumped
James ever so slightly on a

(AP Photo: Reinhold Matay)

drive.

After Johnson rocked
Williams with the elbow,
Williams laid face down on the
floor for several seconds. When
he got up, Williams, who was
called for a block, had blood
trickling from his eyebrow and
left cheek.

During the timeout, the offi-
ciating crew huddled and
decided to call a flagrant-1 on
Johnson. Williams, who had
hurried from the floor for med-
ical treatment, came back out
to shoot the free throws with
his eye already severely
swollen. If he had not returned
to shoot, Williams would not
have been able to play any-
more.

Gritting his teeth, Williams,
looking like a boxer needing a
corner cut man, made both
shots and immediately headed
to the locker room for stitches.

He was back on the floor
with about two minutes left.

Before the game, James said
he expected a physical game.

"When you play a team over
and over you start to dislike
them more,” he said. "It just
happens. It's got to be a little

chippy."
Was it ever.

NBA Today

@ By The Associated Press

Cleveland at Orlando (8:30pm
EDT). The Magic look to take a 3-1
lead over the team that had the
NBA’s best record in the regular sea-
son. After beating Cleveland two out
of three in the regular season, Orlan-
do has won two of three to open the
Eastern Conference finals.

STARS

Sunday

—Dwight Howard, Magic, went
14-of-19 from the line and scored 24
points as Orlando beat Cleveland
99-89 to take a 2-1 lead in the East-
ern Conference finals.

—Rafer Alston, Magic, scored 18
points in outplaying Cleveland All-
Star point guard Mo Williams.

—Mickael Pietrus, Magic, came
off the bench to score 16 points and
play strong defense as Orlando
forced LeBron James to shoot 11-
of-28.

HELP WANTED

LeBron James had 41 points, nine
assists and seven rebounds, but had
little help from his teammates in
Cleveland's 99-89 Game 3 loss to
Orlando. Guards Mo Williams and
Delonte West were a combined 10-
for-27 from the field and the Cava-
liers shot 37 per cent from the floor.

NO MO

Mo Williams had another poor
night — and a painful one — in
Cleveland's 99-89 loss in Game 3 of
the Eastern Conference finals. The
All-Star point guard had only five
of his 15 points after halftime and
was just 5-for-16 shooting, falling to
18-for-56 for the series. He also
briefly left the game after taking an
elbow from Orlando's Anthony
Johnson above and below the left
eye midway through the second
quarter. Williams required four
stitches to seal the lacerations and
said Johnson's elbow was "most def-
initely" a cheap shot.

MAVERICK TRADING

The Dallas Mavericks are out of
the NBA playoffs, and the spotlight
is now following the team's contro-
versial owner, Mark Cuban, to a dif-
ferent venue — federal court. The
insider trading suit filed against
Cuban by the U.S. Securities and
Exchange Commission last year is
scheduled to receive its first hearing
Tuesday when attorneys present oral
arguments on a motion by the bil-
lionaire owner to have the case dis-
missed.

CAVALIERS & CHINA

The Cleveland Cavaliers have
signed an agreement with an invest-
ment group from China to become
minority owners of the NBA fran-
chise and its arena. The Asian con-
glomerate, which includes JianHua
Huang, a Chinese businessman who
has brokered sponsorship deals with
the New York Yankees and other
sports franchises in the US., could
acquire up to 15 per cent of Cavaliers
Operating Company, the entity that
owns the team and operates Quicken
Loans Arena. If approved, the deal
would provide marketing opportu-
nities for the Cavaliers and James,
who is already popular in China.

SPEAKING

"We just need to man up. Orlando
is a very, very good team."

— LeBron James, after the Magic's
99-89 victory gave them a 2-1 lead
over the Cleveland Cavaliers in the
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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS





SPORTS

Bahamians win national titles at
US track and field championships




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AT the 2009 National Junior College Athletic Association, SHENIQUA ‘Q’ FERGUSON (shown in
this file photo), representing Southwest Mississippi, won the 100m in 11.48. And she doubled

B By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

AT two different track and
field championships across the
United States over the week-
end, a few Bahamians have
excelled by winning national
titles.

At the 2009 National Junior
College Athletic Association
(NJCAA), Latoy Williams
became only the sixth Bahami-
an to crack the 45-second bar-
rier in winning the men’s 400
metres in Hutchinson, Kansas.

Having already booked his
ticket to the [IAAF World
Championships in Berlin, Ger-
many, when he ran the then
world leading time of 45.01, the
Grand Bahamian sophomore at
South Plains College stopped
the clock in 44.73 to produce
the fastest time by a Bahamian
this year and the third best
behind Americans LaShawn
Merritt and Jeremy Wariner.

The race was so fast that
Williams had to hold Tabarie
Henry from Barton County
Community College, who was
second in 44.77.

Williams’ performance over-
shadowed the double victory
for Olympic sprinter Sheniqua
‘Q’ Ferguson, who represented
Southwest Mississippi.

Ferguson, who is preparing
to head to Auburn University to
complete her final two years of
college eligibility, won the wom-
en’s 100 in 11.48. And she dou-
bled up by taking the 200 in
23.54.

Both times, however, were
off the automatic qualifying of
11.30 and 23.00 respectively for
the World Championships.

Jamal Wilson, also from
Southwest Mississippi, matched
the same height as two other
competitors at 6-feet, 10 3/4-
inches (2.10 metres) to repeat as
the men’s high jump champion
on fewer knockdowns.

At the NATA Outdoor Track
and Field Championships in

Edwardsville, Illinois, Olympian
Ramon Miller closed out his
collegiate career by repeating
as the quarter-mile champion.

His time of 45.43 was posted
as a new meet record and a per-
sonal best, lowering the previ-
ous mark of 45.97 that he
turned in during the semifinal.

Another Bahamian and a
Dickinson State team-mate
Sean Pickstock finished second
in the final in 46.65. Pickstock,
like Miller, won his heat in
47.00.

In the 200, Dickinson State’s
John Ingraham clocked 21.47
for second in the final. The
event was won by Tyrell Cuffy
of King College in 21.06.

And Jamal Forbes, another
member of Dickinson, round-
ed out the Bahamian men’s
individual performances with a
fourth place finish in the 100m
final in 10.61. Forbes ran 10.56
in the semifinals to qualify for
the final.

On the ladies’ side, Lanece
Clarke had her best showing in
the 100 final where she was
third in 11.93 for McKendree
College. She ran 12.05 to quali-
fy.

Clarke also got second in the
200 in 24.17. She ran faster in
the preliminaries in 24.29.

And Ashley Hanna, repre-
senting Florida Memorial, was
fifth in the ladies’ 400 final in
55.02. Hanna got a fifth place
finish in her heat in the prelim-
inaries in 56.36.

Meanwhile at the Belem
Grand Prix in Brazil, two elite
athletes were in action.

Quarter-miler Christine
Amertil had to settle for fifth
place in the women’s 400 in
51.43, which surpassed the A
qualifying standard of 51.50 for
Berlin. Jamaican Bobby-Gaye
Wilkins won in 50.91.

And Olympic bronze medal-
list Leevan “Superman” Sands
soared 16.79 metres for seventh
place in the men’s triple jump.
The winning leap was 17.66 by
Nelson Evora of Portugal.

BSF executives open
Andros Softball Association

A relatively new Bahamas
Softball Federation adminis-
tration at the helm welcomed
its second member association
into the 2009 softball season.

BSF executives were on
hand to open the Andros
Softball Association on May
23 in Nicholls Town, Andros.

In a rematch of last year’s
ladies final series, defending
champions Nicholl’s Town
Navigators held the home
field advantage and defeated
the Lowe’s Sound Angels, 11-
10.

The ASA presented post-
season awards and the federa-
tion officially recognised two
of the host islands recent
entrants into the BSF Hall of
Fame Brian Cleare and Wen-
dell Evans.

On hand to attend the event
were MP for North Andros
and the Berry Islands, Vin-
cent Peet, BSF president Bur-
ket Dorsett and first vice pres-
ident Ted Miller.

Dorsett heralded Andros as
one of the major building
blocks of the federation’s suc-
cess.

“Andros now boasts one of
the largest associations in the

federation in that they have
about 11 men’s teams and five
ladies teams. In the last few
years the way the BSF format
1s now set for the National
Championship format,
Andros has fared well over
the last couple of years,” he
said.

“They have a high level of
talent in terms of players that
can represent the country at
the national level. The Navi-
gators, the league defending
champions currently boast a
shortstop on the national
team roster. With proper
training she and other players
like her can only reach the
zenith of their careers as
homegrown talents in Andros.
On the men’s side there is
young pitching prodigy
Christopher Russell. The fed-
eration will be paying keen
interest to the development of
softball, particularly the
young players true to our
theme this year, youth devel-
opment and the way for-
ward.”

Dorsett said the presence of
a vibrant softball community
on the island has served a
number of purposes for the

island.

“It is promising that such a
large crowd attended the
opening night of the associa-
tion which bodes well for the
future of softball on the island
and their impact in the BSF,”
he said. “The interest on the
island is high for softball and
there was constant talk about
the participation and competi-
tion in the league this year.
Softball and sports in general
are doing a the job of binding
the North Andros community
together.”

Next on the opening list for
the federation is the All-Aba-
co Softball Association in
Cooper’s Town, Abaco, on
May 31.

2008 ASA Season Awards

Male MVP - Christopher
Russell

Female MVP - Dora Evans

Male Rookie of the Year -
Horrace Miller

Female Rookie of the Year
- Tareka Munroe

Male Coach of the Year -
Dora Evans/Vashnell Hill

Female Coach of the Year -
Stephen Russell/Stephen
Riley

Junior Baseball League of Nassau
ends its ‘09 season on a high note

THE Junior Baseball League
of Nassau’s Division Champi-
onship Series concluded on Sat-
urday as champions were
crowned in all six divisional age
groups. Rather unusual was the
fact that all six pennant winners
lost the series to the elimina-
tion game winners.

JBLN finished its 2009 Sea-
son on a high note as 29 teams
in Six age groups saw play in
youth baseball and as seen in
the playoffs, the competition
was fierce from the start of the
season in January to its conclu-
sion on May 23.

Next up for JBLN will be its
awards presentation set for 2pm
June 13 at The Nassau Yacht
Club.

TEE BALL
Game 1 - Knights, 15
Sidewinders, 4
Game 2 - Knights, 7

Sidewinders, 6
Knights sweep series 2-0

COACH PITCH

Game 1 - Athletics, 10 Dia-
mondbacks, 0

Game 2 - Athletics, 13 Dia-
mondbacks, 2

Athletics sweep series 2-0

MINOR LEAGUE

Game 1 - Rockies, 12 Mets, 8
Game 2 - Mets, 10 Rockies, 3
Game 3 - Rockies, 5 Mets, 4
Rockies win series 2-1

MAJOR LEAGUE

Game 1 - Reds, 14 Indians, 7
Game 2 - Indians, 9 Reds, 4
Game 3 - Indians, 5 Reds, 3
Indians win series 2-1

JUNIOR LEAGUE

Game 1 - Yankees, 15
Dodgers, 10

Game 2 - Yankees, 8
Dodgers, 3

Yankees sweep series 2-0

SENIOR LEAGUE

Game 1 - Tigers, 7 Phillies, 6
Game 2 - Tigers, 8 Phillies, 5
Tigers sweep series 2-0



THE TRIBUNE



pees =—_



TUESDAY,MAY 26,

LATOY WILLIAMS became only the fourth Bahamian to dip under the 45





"

second barrier when he clocked a blistering 44.73 seconds to win the
National Junior College Athletic Association’s 400m title over the week-

end in Hutchinson, Kansas.

Es



TOUCH FOOTBALL

WEEKEND RESULTS

BELOW are scores of the
three games played over the
weekend. On Saturday at
Goodman’s Bay, the K O
Lunatics would defeat the RBC
Lions 21-20.

On Sunday, two games were
played at the Winton Rugby
field.

In game one, the EastSide
Predators demolished the Fort
Charlotte Snappers 88-0. In
game two, the Bahamas Rug-
by Team would lose to the
Warriors 44-26.

There are four games sched-
uled for this holiday weekend
and they will all be played at
the Winton Rugby Field.

See schedule below:

Saturday, May 30

3pm - The Bahamas Rugby
Team vs. The Orry J Sands Pros

Spm - The Fort Charlotte
Snappers vs. the K O Lunatics

Sunday, May 31

2:30pm - The Warriors vs.
The RBC Lions

4:30pm - EastSide Predators
vs. the Goodman’s Bay Spar-
tans

BASEBALL

FREEDOM FARM

CHAMPIONS

Four more champions were
crowned over the weekend.
Congratulations to the Coco
Plums who defeated the Sea
Grapes for the T-ball Champi-
onships on Saturday past in a
decisive game three.

Congratulations to Coach
Smithy and the Boas who after
losing Friday night against the
Bees 12-4 went on to capture
the 2009 Coach Pitch Champi-
onship 4-3 on Saturday.

The new 11-12 Division
champions are Coach Greg and
the Wild Dogs who won two
straight games this weekend
over the Conchs 10-3 on Friday
night and 5-4 on Saturday in an
epic battle.

In the 16-18 Division, Coach
Tellis and Coach Martinbor-
ough Arawaks swept the
Lucayans 10-9 and 14-7 on Sat-
urday to win the championship.

Only 9-10 Division remains
uncrowned where the battle
continues between the Dol-
phins and Barracudas. Game
two is scheduled for 6:30pm
Tuesday and if necessary,
Game 3 is scheduled for 6:30pm
Thursday.

USTA MEN’S
CHALLENGER TENNIS
MEMORIAL DAY
CLASSIC

Justin Lunn competed in the

USTA Men's Challenger Ten-
nis Memorial Day Classic
(Tournament ID 153813309) in
Pebroke Pines, FL over the
weekend.

In the first round Justin
defeated Gino Meeuwsen 7-5,
7-6 (4). In the second round, he
defeated the No. 5 seed Brian
Duschoh 6-3, 7-6. Justin was
defeated in the quarter final by
the no. 1 seed Nikola Aracic 6-
4, 7-5.

BAHAMAS HOT

ROD ASSOCIATION

GENERAL MEETING

A General Meeting of the
Bahamas Hot Rod Association
is set for 7pm May 28 at the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture’s Conference Room on
Thompson Boulevard, just west
of the Customs building.

Matters to be discussed will
be upcoming events, improve-
ments on the MotorSports
Park. Persons interested can
attend and also inquire about
the membership of BHRA.

CRICKET

WEEKEND RESULTS

THE Dynasty Starts contin-
ued their unbeaten record with
a victory by five wickets over
the Castrol Commonwealth
team Saturday as the Bahamas
Cricket Association continued
its regular season action at
Windsor Park.

Castrol Commonwealth bat-
ted first and was bowled out for
179 runs. Garth Davis had 67
runs and Carlton Brown 42 runs
to lead their offensive attack.

Bowling for Dynasty Stars,
Hussain Raza, Venris Bennett
and Garcha Blair all had three
wickets.

Dynasty Stars scored 182
runs for the loss of five wickets
in the win. Their top batsmen
were Garsha Blair with 35 runs
and Ryan Tappin with 27.

Sunday’s match between the
Police and Scotia Bank Par-
adise was rained out.

Action will continue this
weekend as follows:

Saturday - Dynasty Stars vs
Dockendale at Windsor Park.

Sunday - Police vs Castrol
Commonwealth at Haynes
Oval.

Monday - BCA’s Under-19
National team is scheduled to
play a match against England.
The latter team will consists of
cricketers from the UK resid-
ing here. It is one of a number
of warm-up matches planned
for the Under-19 team in prepa-
ration for the ICC internation-
al youth tournament in Toron-
to in July.

2009






Howard’s 24
lead Magic
past Cavs
for 2-1 lead...

See page 9

. 4

Grand Bahamian quarter-
miler making his mark

Latoy Williams the sixth Bahamian to dip under 45 second barrier in 400m



Bg By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ove over
Chris “Bay”

Brown,

Andrae

Williams and

Andretti Bain. There’s a new
quarter-miler who is making his
mark on the international scene.
Meet Latoy Williams, a
native of Grand Bahama who

FAMGUARD

is in his sophomore year at
South Plains College and is get-
ting ready to transfer to Texas
Tech to complete his final two
years of eligibility.

Williams, who on Thursday
celebrates his 21st birthday on
the same day as his mother Nor-
ma, became only the sixth
Bahamian to dip under the 45
second barrier when he clocked
a blistering 44.73 seconds to win
the National Junior College
Athletic Association’s 400m

title over the weekend in
Hutchinson, Kansas.

A 2007 graduate of St
George’s High School,
Williams’ performance came
after he stunned the track and
field world with the fastest time
of 45.01 in Waco, Texas, on
April 18 this year.

“T feel quite satisfied. It’s a
big performance, but I still feel
the same about my every day

SEE page 9

CORPORATION LIMITED

Se Ue EU (eeOCm UL StL LL
SEARO AMON, UM aad See UD TLC







PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Minister a constant presence in Lands and Surveys Dept

FROM page one

Mr Greaves’ son is said to
have bought a 15,625 square
foot lot on Wood Cay for
$1,786.25 while his wife is said
to have bought an 18,343
square foot lot in a subdivi-
sion south of Treasure Cay for
$2,201.16.

VEERGallGM CALENDAR CONTEST

It is unclear at this point
how government intends to
move forward with the inves-
tigation, but it has been con-
firmed that Mr Woodside,
Minister of State for Lands
and Local Government, is
seen to be taking a “hands on”
approach.

This, observers claim, is a

a celebration of nature

45th anniversary calendar

CONTEST RULES

1) Fam Guardian's 4nual Calendar Photo Contests

signal that government is tak-
ing the matter seriously and
is intent on addressing the
complaints of nepotism that
plague this ministry.

Mr Woodside’s presence, it
was claimed, has boosted staff
moral at the department as
employees feel confident that
government is finally taking

the matter seriously.

Since The Tribune’s first
article on the allegations, it
has come to light that several
files at the department have
“gone missing.”

Attempts to reach Mr
Woodside for comment on the
matter were not successful up
to press time last night.

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

14 winning entries will appear in Family
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Winning entries will receive 6 gift certificate

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found in The Baltantas, a3 well as, phodographs of the Family Guardian Corporate Centre, located on Village Road and East Bay Sireet. “See website
for further competion detads haww.tameyquardian.com|.



IN THIS MAY 9, 2009 PHOTO, aman rows a boat through a flooded
street in Trizidela do Vale in Brazil's northeastern state of Maranhao.
Flooding is common in the world's largest remaining tropical wilderness,
but this year the waters rose higher and stayed longer than they have in
decades, leaving fruit trees entirely submerged. Only four years ago, the
same communities suffered an unprecedented drought that ruined crops
and left mounds of river fish flapping and rotting in the mud. Experts
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DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES 15 JUNE 1, 2009, All entrees are submetted at the oaners nek and yl notie reterned

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All antiga mathe accompanied by am official entry form, aeailable at any Family Guardia office, as published in the newspapers or on the website
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Only coloer inages will be comidered. levages muct be provided ae digital files an CO. Digital images mast be of high quality (2700 x 2100 pixels or
larger). Digital images showing signs of photo manipulation, resoletion enhancement of compression will be repectes. To eesere the best colour
reproduction, digetal images abould be seppliad im Fal, TIFF or high quality JPEG and im the original coloer format the camera uees (LAB or AGB). All
entries must be supplied with colour prints (a 10} which willbe used inthe jedging process. (Note: prints submitied wethowt 60's will not be eligihbe
and view versal. The photographer's name. photo subject and location must be written on the reverse of the print

Judging of antnes well ba based on beauty, interest, composition, colour, originality and quality of photograph, Particular areas and subjects of
interes! are detailed on the website beweelamilyguardian.com|, The photographs selected yall appear in Farely Guardean’s 2010 calendar, The

to be punishing the Amazon with increasing frequency.

Amazon hit by climate
chaos of floods, drought

m SAO PAULO

ACROSS the Amazon basin, river dwellers are adding new floors
to their stilt houses, trying to stay above rising floodwaters that have
killed 44 people and left 376,000 homeless, according to Associated
Press.

decision of the padges wil be final.

A git cerirheate valued at $400 vall be presented foreach otthe photographs selected, Photograghic credits willbe green m the calendar, The number
of entries per pleodographer is limited fo a mascimum of 5 photos,

The winning photo grapes, alongwith all publication aad reproduction rights attached thereto, become the property of Famady Geardian and the company

reserves the right ta use seach in the futere Photos wall ned be returned.

Employees of Fartily Guardkan, its affiliated companies or family members are not eligible

1 Previewsly published photos are nef eligible,

*For further details & key subjects of interest

visit our wabsite at www.familyquardian.com

PA
TEL BUSINESS

EMAL

PO, Bot STHEET

ADDRESS

ISLAND

HUMBER OF PHOTOS ENTERED dred sie eof 5]

of ite ae
arty lk ar

y SOGS ieee | ao

HA (et Dalai CoP SDL

SIENATUPE

Our environment is our single
most important asset.



Flooding is common in the world's largest remaining tropical wilder-
ness, but this year the waters rose higher and stayed longer than they
have in decades, leaving fruit trees entirely submerged. Only four
years ago, the same communities suffered an unprecedented drought
that ruined crops and left mounds of river fish flapping and rotting in
the mud.

Experts suspect global warming may be driving wild climate swings
that appear to be punishing the Amazon with increasing frequency.

It's "the $1 million dollar question," says Carlos Nobre, a clima-
tologist with Brazil's National Institute for Space Research.

While a definitive answer will take years of careful study, climatol-
ogists say the world should expect more extreme weather in the years
ahead. Already, what happens in the Amazon could be affecting
rainfall elsewhere, from Brazil's agricultural heartland to the U.S.
grainbelt, as rising ocean temperatures and rain forest destruction
cause shifts in global climate patterns.

"It's important to note that it's likely that these types of record-
breaking climate events will become more and more frequent in the
near future," Nobre said. "So we all have to brace for more extreme
climate in the near future: It's not for the next generation."

The immediate cause of the unusually heavy rains across northern
Brazil is an Atlantic Ocean weather system that usually moves on in
March, but stayed put until May this year.

Almost simultaneously, southern Brazilian states far from the Ama-
zon have suffered from an extended drought, caused by La Nina — a
periodic cooling of waters in the Pacific Ocean. And La Nina alternates
with El Nino, a heating up of Pacific waters that is blamed for cata-
strophic forest fires plaguing the Amazon in recent years.

Putting
the trash
in the red
bins, Tor

example.

SAHAMAS

Live © POSITIVELY





business

Tes) ES De Aen

MAY 26,

2009

Arbitration centre
‘leg-up’ on rivals

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

he Bahamas can

“get a lead on the

competition”

through passing

legislation to cre-
ate the framework for estab-
lishing this nation as an inter-
national arbitration centre, the
co-chair of a private sector com-
mittee working on the initiative
said yesterday, with “summer’s
end” the target for getting “a
pretty comprehensive” draft Bill
on the statute book.

John Wilson, an attorney and
partner at McKinney, Bancroft
& Hughes, told Tribune Busi-
ness that the Bahamas Finan-
cial Services Board (BFSB)-led
initiative would strengthen this
nation’s international business
services offering and help
attract other industries to this
nation, giving it “another leg-
up” at a time when its financial
industry is under increasing

ST WT SLO)



pressure from the G-20/OECD.

The BFSB’s committee to
establish an arbitration centre
in the Bahamas had “gone a bit
further down the road” since
the idea was a hot issue under
the former Christie administra-

Employers chief calls for
choice in compensation

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Employers
Confederation’s (BECon) pres-
ident yesterday said it would be
“in the best interests of every-
body” if employees, when ter-
minated, had to choose between
either accepting their statutory
Employment Act compensation
or rejecting this in favour of a
common law action, as all par-
ties would “know where they
stand” and be more likely to
settle before heading to court.

Brian Nutt, commenting on
a Court of Appeal judgment

* Says Doctrine of Election in
receiving statutory termination
pay or common law action

‘in best interests of everyone’

that ruled employees “cannot
have their cake and eat it too”
by seeking termination com-
pensation via both statute and
common law, said he hoped that
having to choose between the
two would “become practice”.

“T think it’s a welcome rul-
ing,” Mr Nutt told Tribune

SEE page 6B

Homecomings set to
deliver economic help

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

HOTELS in Central
Eleuthera are expecting a much
needed economic boost during
the Palmetto Point Homecom-
ing festival this coming week-
end, with many hoteliers yes-
terday saying they had no avail-
able rooms.

The annual festival typically

PRINCE

CHARLES

Central Eleuthera resorts
sold-out for upcoming
weekend festivities

guarantees hotels from Gover-
nor’s Harbour to Tarpum Bay
almost 100 per cent occupancy.
And, according to the chief
councillor for the area, this year
appears to be no exception.

SEE page 4B

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* BFSB committee hoping to have draft legislation
‘on books by summer’s end’, having already
completed ‘comprehensive draft’

* Centre would aid maritime industry, plus attract
new business like aircraft and yacht registries, by
giving dispute resolution mechanism outside courts

* Foreign investor dispute resolution also suggested

tion, Mr Wilson explained.

“In concert, with the Attor-
ney General’s Office, we’ve
produced a pretty comprehen-
sive draft of the new legisla-
tion,” he added. “It’s a pretty
comprehensive Arbitration Act.
Our original Act was an 1870s
Act. It was really antiquated,
and the commercial world has
moved a long way beyond that
legislation.

“The new Act, if we’re able
to get it on the books, will be
relevant. It’s critical. We could
not become an arbitration cen-

tre without a modern legislative
framework. That is basically
what this Act seeks to achieve.
There’s a lot more work that
remains to be done, but hope-
fully the final version will be
out in short order and it will be
on the books by end of sum-
mer.”

The proposed legislation is
entitled The Arbitration
(Recognition and Establish-
ment of Foreign Awards 2009)
Bill, and creating a Bahamian

SEE page 3B

ROYAL FIDELITY



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE

(242) 351-3010

J.S. Johnson
targets ‘less than
five per cent fall’

in premium

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

J. S. JOHNSON, the BISX-
listed insurance broker and
agent, is “hoping to stay within
less than a 5 per cent” drop in
premium volume during 2009,
Tribune Business was told yes-
terday, after its net income
dropped by 27 per cent to
$7.905 million in fiscal 2008.

Marvin Bethell, J. S. John-
son’s managing director, told
this newspaper that 2009 to-date
was “not as bad as it could be”,
with the company hoping to
acquire new business from the
few foreign direct investment
and construction projects still
proceeding, in a bid to offset
declines taking place elsewhere.

While many Bahamas-based
insurance companies, such as
RoyalStar Assurance and
Bahamas First’s 100 per cent-
owned agency, Nassau Under-
writers, had budgeted for a 10
per cent drop in gross written
premiums and premium volume

Doctors aims to invest $3m in 2010

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

DOCTORS Hospital Health
Systems (DHHS) is looking to
invest $3 million in new med-
ical equipment and infrastruc-
ture improvements, plus expand
its premises, in fiscal 2010, after
a record 12.8 per cent increase
in Intensive Care Unit (CU)
patient days helped drive the
2.2 per cent net patient service
revenue rise that led to
enhanced 2009 profitability.

Doctors Hospital, in its 2009
annual report, said: “The con-
tinuing need to replace and
upgrade medical equipment,
and make improvements to the
premises, will require $2 mil-
lion for equipment and $1 mil-

OPEN A ROYAL FIDELITY BROKERAGE ACCOUNT

\

Examining expansion plans for hospital ‘to increase
capacity in areas which are nearing or at capacity’

lion in improvements during the
2010 fiscal year.

“The hospital is also current-
ly investigating options to
expand the facility in order to
increase capacity in areas which
are nearing or at capacity.”

Looking back on the previ-
ous financial year, Doctors Hos-
pital said “an increase in the
severity of illness of the patients
we were serving”, especially in
the fourth quarter of its finan-
cial year ended on January 31,
2009, more than offset a 5.8 per
cent decline in the total num-
ber of 4,311 patients admitted.

Largely as a result of the

ICU’s performance, patient ser-
vice revenues for fiscal 2009
rose by $0.9 million, while a 7
per cent or $85,000 rise in other
revenues took the total revenue
increase to $0.985 million or 2.3
per cent.

This slightly outshone the
$0.7 million or 2 per cent rise
in Doctors Hospital’s total
expenses to $38.847 million,
with expenses declining as a
percentage of total revenue
from 90.5 per cent in fiscal 2008
to 90.2 per cent last year.

Apart from revenue rises, the

SEE page 3B

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your stocks, bonds, and

dividends are?

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e Buy / sell stocks, bonds, preference shares,

CD’s, mutual funds, etc.

e Become a more informed investor

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BAHAMAS

Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

FUL Ppl eh)

St. Michael: 246.435.1955

royalfidelity.com

* Increased ICB affiliate
net claims and $1.4m
investment value swing
drops BISX-listed
broker/agent’s net
income 27% to
$7.9m in 2008

* ICB trading profits fall

to $1.4m from $4.1m, as

a result of Ike

* Company assessing
Collins Avenue
expansion plans

during 2009, Mr Bethell said J.
S. Johnson was hoping to do
better with a decline of no more
than 5 per cent.

“It could be worse,” he

SEE page 5B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



ROYAL @ FIDELITY

Money at Work

An RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company





PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

Se



@ By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

IT was a moderate trading
week in the Bahamian market,
with investors trading in eight
out of the 24 listed securities,

of which two declined, one
advanced and five remained
unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET
A total of 36,454 shares
changed hands last week, rep-

nen
CHICKEN
BISCUIT

try it for breakfast





resenting a decrease of 22,313
shares or 38 per cent, compared
to last week's trading volume
of 58,767 shares.

Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
led the volume for a fifth con-
secutive week and was the only
advancer with 25,400 shares
trading, its stock rising by $0.02
to end the week at $6.13.

Doctors Hospital Health Sys-
tems (DHS) was the lead
decliner for a second consecu-
tive week, its share price falling
by $0.15 to a new 52-week low
of $1.38 on a volume of 2,000
shares. Abaco Markets (AML)
traded 6,830 shares, its stock
declining by $0.07 to end the
week at $1.33.

BOND MARKET
No notes traded in the

Bahamian market this week.
COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:

There were no financial
results reported by any of the
24-listed companies during the
week.

Annual General Meeting

(AGM) Notes:

Colina Holdings (CHL)
announced that it will be hold-
ing its Annual General Meet-
ing on Thursday May 28, 2009,
at 5:30pm at the J. W. Pinder
Building, Colinalmperial Insur-
ance, Collins Avenue.

Shareholders of record as of
April 24, 2009, will be qualified
to vote during the Annual
Meeting.



The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 795.25

BISX
SYMBOL

AML
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
CWCB
DHS
FAM
FBB
FCC
ele
FCLB
FIN
ICD
JSJ
PRE

CLOSING
PRICE

$1.33
$0.63
$6.95
$11.00
$7.92
$3.15
$11.75
$6.13
$2.83
$10.40
$2.78
$1.38
$7.76
$2.37
$0.30
$5.14
$1.00
$11.00
$5.50
$10.50
$10.00

(-4.74%) YTD

CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
CHANGE

2
So
~

-22.22%

-12.43%
0.00%
-0.48%
23.56%
-45.88%
-0.51%
0.00%
0.00%
-0.58%
0.00%
-7.33%
-10.28%
-5.41%
0.00%

oO!
oS
No

So
eR
WM Go

APAAAAAAAAAAAAPRAAAAAASH



International Markets

FOREX Rates

CAD$
GBP
EUR

Commodities

Crude Oil
Gold





International Stock Market Indexes:

DITA
S & P 500

NASDAQ

Nikkei



Weekly % Change
1.1185 -5.25
1.5913 +4.80
1.4004 +3.77
Weekly % Change
$61.55 +7.16
$957.30 +2.71
Weekly % Change
8,277.32 +0.10
887.00 +0.47
1,692.01 +0.71
9,225.81 -0.42



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009, PAGE 3B



rr = 10> =<>—
Doctors aims to invest $3m in 2010

FROM page 1B

other major driver behind Doc-
tors Hospital’s 2009 net income
performance was a 29.4 per cent
reduction in its interest expens-
es to $420,883, compared to
$596,145 the year before.

The BISX-listed healthcare
services provider said this
reflected the $2 million April
2008 pay down on one of its
outstanding loan balances, and
the reduction in the size of these
balances.

According to Doctors Hospi-
tal, the loan on which the $2
million principal payment was
made relates to the financing of
Western Medical Plaza, the
Blake Road facility that the
company continues to review
for potential sale or lease to ten-
ants.

Doctors Hospital repaid
$2.554 million in principal on
the Western Medical Plaza loan
in fiscal 2009, compared to
$554,000 the year before, with
interest payments dropping
from $350,318 to $201,618.

As a result, the outstanding
balance on the Western Med-
ical Plaza loan had dropped to
$2.152 million at year-end 2009,
compared to $4.706 million the
year before. And, as the princi-
pal balance decreases, so does
the interest rate that Doctors
Hospital has to pay.

The company’s annual report
showed that a 1 per cent swing
in the interest rate it had to pay
on variable rate loans linked to
Bahamian Prime could either
increase or decrease its debt ser-

AN OUTSIDE
le view of Doctors
Hospital...

vicing costs by $50,000.
Western Medical Plaza,
which comprises three buildings
of 33,000 square feet and three
acres of land, was valued by
Bahamas Realty, on January 31,
2009, at $7.5 million, a 5.1 per
cent decline on the previous
year’s $7.9 million valuation.
Doctors Hospital saw rental
income from its Western Med-
ical Plaza leases fall by 42.5 per
cent in 2009, to $74,302 from
$129,307 in 2008, although the
expenses associated with rental
income fell to $288,456 from
$361,023 the year before.
Meanwhile, the percentage
of Doctors Hospital’s accounts
receivables owed by third-party
Bahamian insurance companies
rose from 63 per cent to 75 per
cent in fiscal 2009. The per-
centages owed by self-paying
patients and the National Insur-
ance Board (NIB) fell from 21
per cent and 16 per cent, respec-
tively, to 15 per cent and 10 per

cent.

The BISX-listed company
said the number of days rev-
enue in accounts receivables
increased to 59 in fiscal 2009,
compared to 56 days in 2008,
resulting in a net 11.4 per cent
increase in accounts receivables.

Most of these, though, are in
the zero to 30 days past due cat-
egory, with Doctors Hospital
blaming the increased accounts
receivables on increased patient
revenue during the 2009 fourth
quarter.

Provisions for doubtful
accounts as a percentage of
patient service revenues fell to
3.8 per cent in fiscal 2009, com-
pared to 5.5 per cent the previ-
ous year, showing a decrease of
$0.7 million or 29.5 per cent.

Self-paying patients account-
ed for 64 per cent of this provi-
sion, but Doctors Hospital did
manage to recover some
$232,000 from previously writ-
ten-off accounts in fiscal 2009.



That financial year saw Doc-
tors Hospital enjoy the second
highest level of inpatient activ-
ity in its history, with 13,188
patient days, as the average dai-
ly level of new patients fell from
37 to 36. Adult patient days
dropped by 1.6 per cent.

Salaries and benefits, as a per-
centage of patient service rev-
enues, rose to 38.9 per cent in
fiscal 2009 from 37.5 per cent
the previous year, but still just
below the BISX-listed firm’s 39
per cent target. Total salary and
benefit expenses rose by $0.93
million or 6 per cent year-over-
year.

Doctors Hospital said: “The
increase in expenses for fiscal
2009, relative to 2008, reflects
cost of living, merit increases,
and increased activity in criti-
cal care areas in which there
were increases overtime costs
due to nursing shortages, and
increased overtime in training
and orientation costs for new

Arbitration centre ‘leg-up’ on rivals



FROM page 1B

arbitration centre in the
Bahamas “can only aid” this
nation’s ability to attract new
industries, such as an aircraft
registry and a yacht registry, Mr
Wilson’s committee co-chair
said.

Craig “Tony’ Gomez, who is
also the BFSB’s chairman, told
Tribune Business: “I think the
legislation is important for the
development of budding indus-
tries in the Bahamas.

“Outside the maritime indus-
try, you have the potential air-
craft registry and the potential
yacht registry, and the interna-
tional disputes that come along
with new legislation can only
be aided by arbitration capaci-
ties.”

If international businesses
used the Bahamas as an arbi-
tration centre, and an alterna-
tive means of dispute resolution
and settlement, rather than
going through the courts, Mr
Gomez said the Bahamian hotel
industry would be housing high-
end guests “likely to need more
than a $99 room” when in town
for hearings.

Bahamian services profes-
sionals, such as attorneys and
accountants, would also have
the chance to enhance their
skills and talent by involvement
in arbitration hearings.

In addition to enhancing the
Bahamas’ attractiveness for
international business, Mr Wil-
son said: “We want to play off
the Bahamas being acknowl-
edged as the world’s third
largest shipping registry.

“Arbitration is, quite frankly,
the dispute resolution mecha-
nism of choice for the shipping
industry, so we figure [the
industry would want] these dis-
putes to be resolved in the
Bahamas, as opposed to going
to New York or London.

“Given that many of the ship
owners have an affiliation with
the Bahamas, it would not be a
tremendous stretch to get them
to do it in the Bahamas.”

Mr Wilson said the commit-
tee had worked “very closely”
with the Bahamas Maritime
Authority and its chairman, Ian
Fair, on the draft legislation.

On the arbitration centre
idea, Mr Wilson said establish-
ing one in the Bahamas would
“be another leg up” for the
country at a time when the G-
20/OECD were trying “to reel
in” international financial cen-
tres.

“T think we really need to
look at ways to produce a more
composite product not depen-
dent on one element of inter-
national business, and build up
what we do,” Mr Wilson said.

“My personal view is that a
component of international
business in the Bahamas should
target and try to get a lead on
the competition. This could be
one area we try to get a lead on
the competition.”

A Bahamas-based arbitration
centre would “augment” this
nation’s international business
offering and feed other sectors,
Mr Wilson said.

The committee had been
formed six months ago, and
while “not part” of its existing
discussions, Mr Wilson added:
“We should really try to include
some kind of investor dispute
resolution.

“Foreign direct investors
sometimes have disputes with
governing bodies and their
agencies, and this may help to

create more certainty in that
area, knowing the Bahamian
government has agreed to arbi-
tration.......... Certainty is a
tremendous advantage in inter-
national business.”

While the committee had
focused on international arbi-
tration issues to date, Mr Wil-
son said it would not be a huge
leap to transfer those to the
domestic arena. The Bahamas
will also have to look at the
recognition of foreign arbitra-
tion awards and decisions, if its
centre’s decisions are to be
enforced overseas, and devel-
op alliances with similar bodies
in New York and London.

Mr Gomez said that both the
legislation and an arbitration
centre would show the interna-
tional business community the

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associates.”

Utilities costs increased by
18.3 per cent or $0.3 million
over 2008, due to higher elec-
tricity charges, while medical
supplies and services costs grew
as a percentage of revenues to

25.7 per cent from 25.5 per cent
the previous year.

Other operating expenses
rose by 8.2 per cent, with costs
of collecting on self-pay patient
receivables accounting for 34
per cent of this change.

ESSAY COMPETITION

TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK

The Department of Public Service will host an Essay
Competition as one of the activities for the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week. The Competition is open to Junior
and Senior Students in New Providence.

Additionally, this year, a speech competition will be
for schools in the Northern & Southern Bahamas,
respectively. Students interested in participating in the
Essay Competition should write a 250 - 300 words (Junior
High), and 450 - 500 words (Senior High), essay on the

topic: “ The Public Service-Striving for Excellence in

Customer Service.”

The deadlines for entries, which should be referred
to the attention of Mrs. Antoinette Thompson, Deputy
Permanent Secretary, Department of Public Service, is

Friday 24th July, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 Computer System will be awarded to
the winner each category. The first runners-up for both the
Essay and Speech Competition in the Junior & Senior High
School category, will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.

The winners will be announced during the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week Awards Ceremony scheduled for

Saturday 10th October 2009.

Students interested in the Speech Competition for the
Northern and Southern Bahamas should contact their

Language Arts Teacher.






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Wednesday through Saturday for dinner

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PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE






































DHL JOB DESCRIPTION

POSITION:
JOB FAMILY:
RCS CODE:
REPORTS TO:
LOCATION:

Collections Agent

Credit & Collections
A20004

Collections Lead

Country Finance Department

OVERALL PURPOSE:

Under limited supervision in a team environment provide efficient and effec-
tive credit approvals. To ensure timely credit application processing, respond to
information requests and issues. Ensure accuracy of all credit decisions functions
while staying within company policy and procedural guidelines.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

Gathers, compiles and maintains basic credit information to be used in
making credit decisions.

Reviews and monitors credit sources, customer applications and
delinquent accounts. Processes credit applications.

Works with smaller customers to resolve collections issues and disputes.
Investigates disputes and reviews documentation.

Prepares and processes credit and collections account adjustments.
Implements credit suspensions.

Recommends further actions on delinquent accounts.

Maintains records of credit risks and delinquent accounts.

Provides support and coordination with third party agencies as needed.
Handles customer calls related to Collection Agency accounts.
Prepares and files bankruptcy claim documents.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

High School diploma required. .

1-3 years of experience in Collections.

Advanced administrative skills to function effectively with limited
direction amid competing priorities and deadlines.

Excellent customer service orientation and communication skills.
Proficiency using various computer software applications.
Excellent analytical and interpersonal skills.

Proficiency using various computer software applications

For more information please contact:
Romell K. Knowles I

Country Manager
Email:Romell.Knowles@dhl.com

Consolidated Water (Bahamas) Ltd.

Invites submissions for the sale of:

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Cat SR4 Generator inch Tropicalization and 12M
Uverspead Canacsty
CAT EMCP [I Digital Comal Panel
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Salety Shuldawns
NFPA 110 Alarm Module
Circus! Breaker
Woodward 7301 Electron Governor
24 Elecine Starter
Battery Charger
33.Amp Altemator
Lube Oil Cooler
Lube Onl and Filters
Recor Fuel Filters
Aor (leaners
Radiator
Dual Jacket Water Heaters
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ee eee eer LR
ECHO eb



Homecomings
set to deliver
economic help

FROM page 1B

Hank Johnson, who is also
chairman for the Homecoming
festival, said the event is expect-
ed to attract the same number
of visitors it always has.

The festival presents eco-
nomic opportunities for myri-
ad businesses, and it ushers in,
after Exuma’s Regatta, a sea-
son of similar festivals across
several islands throughout the
summer.

For Eleuthera, several other
settlements throughout the
summer and into October will
have the opportunity to receive
a short economic boost. Grego-
ry Town will hold its Pineapple
Fest following Palmetto Point’s
Homecoming, and the Bluff will
hold its Homecoming shortly
after.

Andros has its annual Crab
fest that draws hundreds of peo-
ple from New Providence, and
the Long Island Regatta does
the same.

Mr Johnson said the 20 stalls
for rent on the Palmetto Point
Homecoming site have been
paid for in full, and that accom-
modations are “running pretty
tight”.

“With the bookings that they

have, it [the Homecoming] will
be bringing an economic boost,”
he said.

Mate and Jenny’s Pizza have
reserved a stall at the South Pal-
metto Point festival ground,
where they will prepare home-
made pizzas on site. Mate and
Jenny’s resort has been fully
booked for three weeks.

Owner of Mate and Jenny’s,
Maitland Bethel, said becuase
their establishment will be fully
committed this weekend, it
should translate into increased
sales for their pizza restaurant.

“It comes at a good time
because things have been pret-
ty slow,” he said. “I think it’s
going to mean a lot to the com-
munity.

“All the hotels and restau-
rants are all feeling the pinch,
and these homecomings give us
a boost and put more money
into the economy.”

Mr Bethel said his hotel had
been adversely affected by the
downturn in the global econo-
my. According to him, occu-
pancies have been down year-
on-year.

“Tf I got one or two rooms
(occupied) per week, I was
doing good,” he said. “The

RBC

SS

aed

FINCO

money is just not as available
as it used to be.”

One Governor’s Harbour
hotel told this newspaper they
had received no bookings for
the Homecoming, but were ful-
ly committed due to a wedding.

According to Mr Johnson,
Bahamasair’s Central Eleuthera
flights will be full this weekend,
and already Bahamas Ferries’
bookings are at 65 per cent.

According to the Bahamas
Ferries marketing manager,
Khaalis Rolle, ferries to the
island should be at 100 per cent
by the weekend.

“We will not have a problem
selling out the boat,” he said.
“We are within our normal
threshold.”

Mr Rolle said that by
Wednesday or Thursday of this
week, the Governor’s Harbour-
bound ferry should be sold out.

According to Mr Johnson,
the Palmetto Point Homecom-
ing committee has not spared
anything on entertainment, with
five full nights of live entertain-
ment, including the Lassie Doe
Boys and the Brilanders.

“We will be pulling the same
crowd we generally pull,” he
said.

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED

NOTICE

Please be advised that the Head Office and
the Registered Office of the company will be
moved from the Bahamas Financial Centre,
Charlotte & Shirley Streets, 2nd Floor, Nassau,
Bahamas to Royal Bank House, East Hill Street,
Nassau, Bahamas effective 25th May, 2009.

D. BURROWS-HAINES (Mrs.)
Corporate Secretary

Dated this 22nd May 2009

RCO
the #1 newspaper in circulation,
ME dare a EL



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009, PAGE 5B





J.S. Johnson
targets ‘less than
five per cent fall’

in premium

FROM page 1B

explained. “We’ve been fortu-
nate, although we’ve seen a
slowdown in many areas, par-
ticularly on the motor side, with
the purchase of new cars slow-
ing down, and a slowdown on
the property side - people are
hesitating to renew with full
coverage.

“But we’ve offset some of
those losses with the acquisition
of new business. It’s not as bad
as it could be.”

Mr Bethell said J. S. Johnson
was involved with placing some
of the insurance coverage for
the $1.4 billion Albany project,
which was proceeding, and
hoped to obtain business from
the few remaining foreign direct
investment-related projects as
a way to ensure it “would not be
impacted as much” by the glob-
al economic downturn.

“We’re still getting inquiries
from residents of the Ocean
Residences [on Paradise Island],
new houses in Old Fort Bay and
Lyford Cay, so there is still
some construction going on.
There’s some new business that
has not dried up completely,
and if we get our fair share of
them, it will offset some of the
decline in other areas,” Mr
Bethell explained.

“We don’t know how much
worse it’s going to get. It’s dif-
ficult to budget at this point in
time, assuming there are no
more major challenges, but
we’re hoping to stay within less
than a5 per cent drop” on pre-
mium volume and value.

J.S. Johnson, like most other
Bahamas-based insurance car-
riers and agents/brokers, is
praying for a hurricane-free
year given the impact a major
storm would have not only on
their business but the already-
struggling wider economy.

Meanwhile, Mr Bethell con-
firmed that J. S. Johnson was
continuing to assess expansion
plans for its Collins Avenue
head office, the key factors
being the size and design of its
proposed new building and
whether - given the current
recession - the timing is right.

The J. S. Johnson managing
director told Tribune Business
that the company had acquired
the building immediately to the
south of its existing headquar-
ters, which housed the Bahamas
Optical Centre. Its current plans
involved demolishing the exist-
ing building and replacing it
with a new property that includ-
ed an elevator, for ease of cus-
tomer access.

“We’ve got drawings done
up,” Mr Bethell explained.
“The project is a little larger
than we may have anticipated,
so we’re reassessing the need
for it and whether the timing is
right. It could be quite expen-

your

news

The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in
their neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising
funds for a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



sive.”

He added that he could not
put a figure on the likely invest-
ment because the plans were
subject to change, even though
some were arguing that now
represented the best time to
build because construction
material prices were relatively
low.

Other questions to be
answered, Mr Bethell said, were
whether J. S. Johnson should
instead develop another branch
for the Collins Avenue area,
and whether the project should
be financed from its own
resources or borrowing. The
Soldier Road and Thompson
Boulevard branches also had
expansion room.

“It’s a little bit of wait and
see,” he explained. “We will go
ahead. It’s just to what extent. If
we have to wait another six
months, it’s not critical.”

With car values dropping on
an annual basis, the tendency
of recession-hit consumers to
acquire used rather than new
cars, and switch from compre-
hensive to third party coverage,
Mr Bethell said premium vol-
ume was under pressure on J. S.
Johnson’s motor portfolio.

As a result, the company did
“not expect any growth” in its
motor portfolio for 2009,
although it aimed to produce a
profitable result, especially on
underwriting, depending on the
claims experience.

For fiscal 2008, J. S. John-
son’s net income dropped below
both the $10.769 million record-
ed in 2007 and $8.3 million in
2006. This was largely due to
the net claims incurred by its
Insurance Company of the
Bahamas (ICB) affiliate, in
which it has a 40 per cent stake,
and a $1.4 million swing into a
loss on the unrealised deprecia-
tion in value of its investment
portfolio.

Mr Bethell said general insur-
ance carrier ICB received a
surge in claims from Inagua and
the Turks & Caicos Islands as a
result of Hurricane Ike, which
produced gross claims of about
$5 million and net claims of $1
million.

Meanwhile, the investment
portfolio swung into a $402,810
unrealised loss for 2008 as equi-
ty markets headed south, as
opposed to the $1.03 million
gain the previous year.

ICB’s trading profit fell to
$1.4 million, compared to $4.1
million the year before.

Elsewhere, J. S. Johnson saw
its net commissions and fees rise
by $1 million o r 5.6 per cent,
but total expenses increased by
15 per cent from $18.5 million
to $21.2 million due to rises in
salaries and benefits, net claims
and other operating expenses.

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eae Ch Miter ie ee

COMMONWEALTH

BREWERY LTD.






































WAREHOUSE
ADMINISTRATOR

The successful candidate would be required to:

MANAGEMENT
OPPORTUNITY

Awell established company is considering highly qualified applicants for the role of

FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

Requirements & Responsibilities:

- Leader and motivate accounting staff

- Experience in the preparation and interpretation of Financial Statements

- Must be able to develop and maintain an effective system of internal
accounting and operational controls in a Hotel environment

- Must possess 5 or more years experience in a supervisory accounting position

- Self motivated with strong analytical and problem-solving skills

- Must be conversant with hotel accounting software, with emphasis in areas
Food & Beverage, Front Office and Payroll

- Liaise with External Auditors, third party service providers and relevant
Regulatory & Compliance Authorities

- Preparation of budgets

- Timely and accurate preparation, presentation and interpretation of financial
reports

- Excellent written and oral communication skills

- Able to work extended hours, weekends and holidays

- Ensure that the quantity and quality of the goods
received are checked.

- Check for damage to goods and carry out relevant
documentation.

- Assure holding of blocked products until further notice.

- Arrange sale of articles authorised for disposal.

- Prepare reports on disposed materials.

- Carry out physical inventory checks and verify with
Accounts Department.

- Issue and dispatch outgoing stocks based on FIFO
method.

- Ensure proper disposal of packaging materials in case
of quality issues.

- Entrance control for raw and packaging materials.

- Ensure that all export orders are packed and delivered
to designated shipping carrier.

- Compile stock inventory reports

- Supervise forklift operators

All interested persons are asked to
fax resumes to:

(242) 362-4793

INSIGHT

For the stories behind the news,
read Insight on Mondays

Qualifications:
- BAin Accounting from an accredited University
- International accounting designation (CPA/CA) with minimum of 5 years
post qualification experience, and preferably at least 2 years in hotel
accounting environment
- Advance working knowledge of Excel
- Working knowledge of Microsoft Word
Interested persons should apply on or before June 30, 2009
Attention Manager:
DA 61165, c/o The Tribune
PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, The Bahamas
Suitably qualified candidates need only apply.
Salary is commensurate with experience and qualification

() THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION
AND EXTENSION SERVICES

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT - SUMMER SEMESTER 022009
COURSE ——————————————eEE

DESCRIPTION TME |DAY |

et
PO

. to
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SER, W'S 4: a0prn Thurs 19-Jur

WEB PAGE DESIGN WS |

_BUSINESS

CUSTSO0



























“COMPUTERS
_COMP930

COMPS31 WEB PAGE DESIGN WS II

ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093 /
328-1936 / 302-4300 ext. 5202 or email prevsdev@cob.edu.bs

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time).
CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and
Course Materials.

ale:

* /68-np, V-6 engine.

* Comfortably seats five

® Air conditioning & filtration system
* Power windows, door mirrors

and locks

Cloth or leather interior

* Front, side & side curtain airbags

hile They rot

Immobilizer theft-deterrent system
Remote entry system

B-dise CD player

Steering wheel-mounted audio

2. © ©

contrats








Shirley Street
B=) ea sc ea as ee ce ed De co el bd





PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Employers chief calls for
choice in compensation

FROM page 1B

Business. “It certainly will take
the uncertainty, primarily, out
of the equation if an employee
has to choose between accept-
ing the compensation package
under the Employment Act or
reject it and go to court under
common law.”

Forced

The BECon president sug-
gested that if forced to choose
between the two options - statu-
tory compensation or going to
court - employees would carry
the risk that they might lose and
be left with nothing if they
chose the latter.

This, Mr Nutt suggested, was
likely to encourage employees

to settle common law actions
with their former employer
before they reached the courts,
saving both sides time and mon-
ey.

Employers “fear being
dragged into litigation”, said Mr
Nutt. He added: “The fact is
that litigation is expensive and
time-consuming, and employ-
ers have to spend time away
from their job and incur quite a
few costs in pursuing matters
or defending themselves when
litigation occurs.”

The BECon president said a
further troubling factor for
employers was that labour
attorneys, rather than going to
the Industrial Tribunal on com-
mon law claims, were increas-
ingly going to the Supreme
Court. Unlike the former, the




NOTICE





INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT




No. 45 of 2000





AZZILON S.A.






Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137




of The International Business Companies Act No. 45 of



Supreme Court did award costs.

“Tf the employer loses a case
like that, the employee’s costs
are taxed, meaning the employ-
er has to pay for the employ-
ee’s attorney,” Mr Nutt said.
“But if the employer wins, the
employee does not have the
means to pay for the employ-
er’s attorney. Win or lose, it still
costs to go through litigation.”

In the court’s ruling, Appeal
Justice Hartman Longley urged
that consideration be given to
using the Doctrine of Election
in employment disputes, with
the terminated employee
required to choose between
statutory or common law com-

pensation.
Act

They could not, he said,
accept their Employment Act
compensation and then initiate
a subsequent common law claim
for greater/better benefits, in a
bid to gain both and effectively
‘double dip’.

Justice Longley ruled: “What
the law contemplates is that if
the benefits under the Act have
been paid, the employee should
have resort to his common law
claim only if that provides for
greater benefits. Otherwise, it
would be a waste of time and
costs.

“In this regard, it seems to

me that consideration may well
have to be given to the opera-
tion of the doctrine of election
when an employee has received
his full benefits under the Act.

“He should only be permit-
ted to pursue a claim at com-
mon law for greater rights and
better benefits after he has been
put to an election to abandon
the compensation under the
Act, otherwise the purpose for
which the Act was passed — to
make a ready, inexpensive for-
mula available for calculating
benefits — would be lost in the
mush of litigation.”

Mr Nutt noted that the Court
of Appeal only recommended
the Doctrine of Election
approach, and did not say that
was “absolutely the way it will
be”.

That meant there was still no
guarantee under the Employ-
ment Act that employees, in
accepting statutory compensa-
tion, would not then got to the
courts to seek greater remuner-
ation.

“Hopefully, that becomes
practice,” Mr Nutt said of the
Doctrine of Election, “and if it
becomes practice it’s in the best
interests of everyone. Right
from the start, you will know
that if you’re in a situation
where you have to litigate, there
will be more impetus to settle
the matter.

“T think if it’s one or the oth-
er, and if the choice is to be
made by the employee, and
they do not accept what they
are due under the Act and go to
a court of law, there is more
chance a settlement will be
reached before they go to court.
That route puts the employee
at a bit of risk.”

Ruling

The Appeal Court ruling
involved a case brought by Gail
Smith against her former
employer, Snack Food Whole-
sale, for alleged breach of an
employment contract.

She was terminated by the
company with effect from May
12, 2003, via a letter she
received dated May 10, 2003.
As a 22-year employee, who
was a sales manager/supervisor
and earning $750 per week, Ms
Smith received four weeks’
notice pay of $3,000; 48 weeks’
basic pay of $36,000; and three
weeks’ vacation pay worth
$2,250.

The Court of Appeal said it
was “common ground” that the
sums paid by Snack Food
Wholesale were in accordance
with the Employment Act
2001’s Section 29, but Ms Smith
initiated a legal action alleging
that under common law she was
due $64,790.

The $25,790 difference cited
between the statutory and com-
mon law was comprised,
according to Ms Smith’s amend-
ed statement of claim, of the
loss of 12 months’ worth of
commissions at $2,000 per
month of $24,000 in total; the
loss of 12 months’ group insur-
ance at $20 per week for a total
$1,040; and a 12-month annual
bonus of $750.

Basic pay, as defined by the
Employment Act, did not
include bonuses and commis-
sions, the Court of Appeal said,
meaning that Ms Smith’s action
was “ bound to fail” if made
under the Act.

Justice Longley ruled: “In any
event, it seems to me that the
appellant cannot have her cake
and eat it, too. Either she
accepts the payments made to
her under the Act. Or she could
pursue a claim at common law.
She was not entitled to both.
She got all that she was entitled
to under the Act.

“And the learned judge
found, on the evidence before
him, her claim at common law
would have fallen short of the
benefits conferred by the Act.”
As a result, the appeal was dis-
missed.

Snack Food Wholesale was
represented by attorney Sharon
Wilson, and Ms Smith by Obie
Ferguson.



2000, AZZILON S.A. is in dissolution. The date of com-

mencement of dissolution was the 17th day of April, 2009.
Dillon Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of AZZI-

LON S.A.

Dillon Dean

LIQUIDATOR

Care Giver
Required

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILL REQUIREMENTS:

- Certified or equivalent to nurse’s aide and training.

- Must understand English both written and verbal.

- Must have current certification, i.e. Health Certificate.

- Must be able to safely and successfully perform ALL job-related
functions 1.e. CPR and Basic First Aid.

PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES:

- Care for multiple residents.

- Observe Resident Rights.

- Provide Professional care and assistance to the residents.

- Assist paramedics in cases of emergency.

- Observe residents, note physical condition, attitude, reactions,
appetite, etc., report to the Administrator.

- Available for front desk duty.

- Capable of working overnight shift 4p.m. — 12am & 12a.m. —- 8 a.m.

- Provide quality care.

- Provide a written/verbal report to the Administrator
on a daily basis.

- Perform any other related duties which might be required.

- Man front desk operation.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:
The successful candidates will be offered an excellent compensation
package and opportunities for training and development.

Please e-mail or fax resume to the Administrator at

CCCBAHAMAS@live.com or 323.4475

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Boney ot Work

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ORINDA TAMARA KATHLEEN
WITTSHIRE of #2 BACHELOR’S HOUSE, HUDSON AVENUE,
FREEPORT, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 19° day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KERVIN JONASSAINT of
BUNMORE STREET, HARBOUR ISLAND, ELEUTHERA,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 26TH day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
tal Wate\ CMe ct -lo MET fo/n 1s
on Mondays

FG CAPITAL TS
BREOKEBAG:

MABRKE
E & ADYISORY SERVICES
ee

cl> ey rca Me Tt eX TT.

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 25 MAY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,613.25 | CHG 4.49 | %CHG 0.28 | YTD -99.11 | YTD % -5.79
FINDEX: CLOSE 795.25 | YTD -4.75% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

S2wk-Low

1.28

11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
1.95

11.09
2.83
6.06
1.31
1.32

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

1.33
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.75
2.83
6.13
2.77
1.38
6.02
11.00
10.35
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

7.76
11.00
10.40

5.14

1.00

0.30

5.50
10.50
10.00

Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnsen

Premier Real Estate

Previous Close Today's Close

EPS $
0.127
0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.078 40.4
0.055 43.1
1.406 8.3
0.249 11.4
0.419 14.9
0.111 27.4
0.240 5.5

18.5

34.2

Div $ P/E

11.0

Change Daily Vol.
1.40
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.65
2.83

11.1
28.5
N/M

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.10
0.00
6.25
3.04
1.32

0.12
0.27
-0.06
0.00
0.00

0.420
0.322
0.794 13.1
0.332 15.3
0.000 N/M
0.035 8.6
13.5
11.0
55.6

7.76
11.00
10.40

5.09

1.00

0.30

5.50
10.50
10.00

-0.05
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

0.407
0.952
0.180

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Securi
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale
100.00 x 7%
100.00
100.00
100.00

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

0.00 Prime + 1.75%
0.00 7%

0.00 100 Prime + 1.75%

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Bid $
7.92
4.00
0.35

Ask $
8.42
6.25
0.40

Weekly Vol. EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

Last Price P/E
14.60
6.00

0.35

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

ABDAB
RND Holdings

30.13
0.45

31.59
0.55

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

29.00
0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

NA Vv
1.3758
2.8962
1.4630

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund

1.3124
2.9230
1.3875
3.1964
12.1564
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

3.1964
12.7397
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1599
1.0526
1.0322
1.0523

YTD%

0.71

1.63
-0.08
1.45

Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
30-Apr-09
31-Mar-09
15-May-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
30-Apr-09
30-Apr-09

5.23 30-Apr-09

MARKET TERMS

COMMONWEATH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008

IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/592

IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959
AND
IN THE MATTER of The Petition of Inez Taylor Martin
NOTICE OF PETITION

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Inez Taylor-Martin of Old Place
in the Western District of the Island of Exuma, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, is applying to the Supreme
Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas to have her title inves-
tigated determined and declared under the Quieting Titles Act, 1959
(Ch. 393) in respect of the land hereafter described, that is to say:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land situate approximately One
Thousand Five-Hundred and Thirty-five (1535) feet West of Queens
Highway on the Northern side of Gilbert Grant Road and bounded
EASTWARDLY by land now or formerly the property of Zelma
Nixon jointly by Crown Land occupied by Zelma Nixon and running
thereon a total distance of Two-Hundred and Seven and Sixty-Six
Hundredths (207.66) feet thence running NORTHWEST WARDLY
by land now or formerly the property of Emerald Bay Development
and running thereon a total distance of Six-Hundred and Fifty-Nine
and Forty-One Hundredths (659.41) feet WESTWARDLY by land
the other portion of the Gilbert Grant and running thereon Fight-
Hundred and Twenty-Nine and Fifteen Hundredths (829.15) feet
SOUTHWARDLY by a Public Road known as Gilbert Grant Road
and running thereon a distance of Four-Hundred and Thirty-Ei ght
and Twenty-Seven Hundredths (438.27) feet back to the point of
commencement which said piece parcel or tract of land described
above comprises an area of Four and Four Hundred and Seventy-
Nine Thousandths (4.479) Acres and has such position boundaries
shape marks and dimensions as are shown on the plan recorded in
the Department of Lands and Surveys as Plan No. 450 EXUMA.”

AND TAKE NOTICE that copies of the Petition and the Plan of the
said land may be inspected during normal office hours at the follow-
ing places:

i. Supreme Court Registry, Ansbacher House, East Street North,
New Providence, The Bahamas.

ii. Sharon Wilson & Co., Chambers, East Shirley Street, Highland
Terrace, New Providence, The Bahamas.

it. The Administrator’s Office, Georgetown, Exuma, The Bahamas
AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that any person having dower or
right to dower, an adverse claim or a claim not recognized in the
Petition shall on or before the 22nd JULY A.D., 2009 file in the Su-
preme Court and serve on the Petition or his attorney an Adverse
Claim in the prescribed form supported by Affidavit.

FAILURE OF ANY PERSON to file and serve an Adverse Claim on
or before 22nd JULY A.D., 2009 date will operate as a bar to such
claim.

Dated this 20th day of May A.D., 2009

Sharon Wilson & Co,
Chambers

Delvest House
East Shirley Street, Highland Terrace
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
('S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100





PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



HEALTH



The Tribune



©



coe! N D



ith





Anatomy of an
Ingrown hair

INGROWN hairs, also
known as Pseudofolliculitis
barbae, manifest on skin
when hair is cut, and the
hair grows back in at an i
mmproper angle. The process :
of cutting the end of the ;
hair shaft through shaving
can force hair back into its
follicle, or even cause hair
to double over on itself, re-
entering the same follicle
and growing inward instead
of exiting the surface. The
hair shaft can also grow and
enter another follicle.

The body recognises this
ingrown hair as a foreign
body (similar to a splinter),
and triggers an inflammato-
ry response that includes
redness, itchiness and a
raised area that resembles a
pimple that can fill with pus.

To help prevent ingrown
hairs, start by exfoliating
with physical and chemical
exfoliants prior to shaving.
Physical exfoliants including
micro-fine Silica beads will
help remove dulling skin ;
cells, prep the skin's surface, ;
and lift hairs. Chemical i
exfoliants including Lactic
Acid and Salicylic Acid will
help remove dead skin cells,
lift ingrown hairs above the
skin line, and soften and
smooth skin.

Clan



For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays





blocks for the brain.

Alacta Plus Advanced formulation is the only milk food
for growing children enriched with 34 nutrients,
such as iron, iodine and zinc, as well as DHA, ARA,
and Sialic Acid, which are integral building

They'll go much further in life

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

A FEW weeks ago, Tribune
Health looked at childhood
stuttering- its causes, symp-
toms, and treatment options.
However, the unfortunate
reality of the disorder is that
in a large number of cases,
individuals forgo treatment
for various reasons resulting
in lifelong cases of functional

and dysfunctional stuttering.

According to Dr Walter Manning -
Professor and Associate Dean of the
school of Audiology and Speech-lan-
guage at the University of Memphis -
overcoming stuttering is not impossible,
however the process of correction comes
with a lot of determination and profes-
sional help.

Apart from his research and therapy
to US patients in the US, Dr Manning
has worked with several patients from
the Bahamas and other parts of the
Caribbean, and is considered by many a
foremost expert on the condition.

Speaking with Tribune Health, Dr
Manning explained: “Having stuttered
myself into my young adult years, I’ve
become quite fluent now as the result
of some good therapy and lots of prac-
tice.... am currently completing the third
edition of a text titled Clinical Decision

Making in Fluency Disorders.”

In the book, Dr Manning details his
interpretation of stuttering, and the mul-
tiple forms it can take.

“In one of the chapters in my text
there are several related definitions. A
brief and simple one is offered by the
WHO: Stuttering includes ‘disorders in
the rhythm of speech in which the indi-
vidual knows precisely what he wishes to
say, but at the time is unable to say it
because of an involuntary, repetitive pro-
longation or cessation of a sound’
(p.202),” he said.

For many stutterers, Dr Manning said
common symptoms can include; part
word repetition, monosyllabic word rep-
etition, or disrhythmic phonation, all of
which can be mistaken for common dis-
fluencies like interjection, phrase repe-
tition, or revision or incomplete phrases.

In his book, Dr Manning also
explained that despite these exterior
symptoms, more is happening in the
mind of the stutterer.

“Although complicated by commu-
nicative stress as it is for most speakers,
the person who stutters is able to lin-
guistically formulate what he or she
wants to say. The onset of stuttering is
the result of a combination of neurolog-
ical & physiological factors which, for
many individuals, are genetically influ-
enced,” he said.

This theory is certainly true for Antho-
ny Curtis - Acting Director for The
National Insurance Board (NIB) - who
said from as early as he could remember,
he and other family members have stam-
mered.

stuttering

He explained: “I remember in high
school in some of my classes where I
had to make presentations, my class-
mates were not always tolerant or con-
siderate to me, they would laugh at me
and it was a bit of an embarrassment
especially because sometimes I was not
able to pronounce my own name.”

Mr Curtis said apart from his own
severe stuttering, his grandfather, mother,
and two of his brothers also suffered from
the impairement.

Although Mr Curtis has been able to
secure a career despite his challenge, he
said there still remains particular
moments where he fears disfluency.
Whether it’s answering a phone call or
meeting someone for the first time, Mr
Curtis said the thought is always there
that he may not be able to speak fluently.

While his job comes with its share of
challenges, he adds that being a stutterer
has made him more determined to be the
best in his field. Having never resorted to
therapy, he adds that his technique for
overcoming stammering is to not always
take himself so serious, rather he makes
fun of his stammering to convey to others
that despite his speaking hurdle, there is
a whole person in him waiting to be dis-
covered.

Managing Director for Sbarro Italian
eatery Charlton Knowles, explained that
he too suffered from chronic stammer-
ing and remembers being affected from
the age of 5.

He explained that unlike most stutter-
ers who may have experienced severe
taunting and teasing, his experience grow-
ing up was very different.

“Fortunately I never got much criti-
cism of that sort...In school I was quite
talkative and was captain of the softball
team at St Johns College, and my peers
never really made reference to it other
than when we had arguments over base-
ball where they’d noticed I didn’t stut-
ter,” he said.

However Mr Knowles said he truly
started to feel the effects of stammering as
a young adult, when he began dating and
interacting more.

“T guess I become a lot more self-con-
scious of my stuttering, and I began to
avoid situations and words, which at one
point meant me not talking at all,” he
said.

Mr Knowles said this had a lot to do
with his confidence, which also led to
him avoiding telephone calls.

“T think if I didn’t stutter I probably
would have had a different job, and I
probably would have been a couple years
ahead in my finances because I’ve had to
create my own employment.”

He recounted one experience where it
took him nearly 45 seconds to say hello
while on a job interview and explained
that because of his condition many com-
panies were reluctant to hire him. This
led him to become an entrepreneur.

Now, he has since gotten married, has
a beautiful family, and is daily surpassing
the limitations of what many people
impose on stutterers.

Also receiving some therapy from
various speech specialists including Dr
Manning in recent years, Mr Knowles
has learnt to not fight his speech chal-
lenge, but to live life with the under-
standing that although he stutters, he
still deserves to be heard.

Now gearing to create the first ever
Bahamian Stutterers Association (BSA),
Mr Knowles said he remains optimistic
about this proposed organisation because
of its potential to assist so many through-
out the community that suffer from
speech impediments.

He feels the establishment of the BSA
will help in paving the way for more pub-
lic awareness, enlightenment, and focus
on the issue, and sends an open call to
anyone interested in becoming a part of
the group to contact him at 356.0808 or
e-mail cvk@sbarrobahamas.com.

(a
@ einen

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with D1 2 ead





Meadjohnson”

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Why can't I get a date?

WE need to pause this week during this dating
series as a question keeps on coming up: “Why
can't I get a date?’ or “Dating? - I haven't had a
date in years.’ It is hard not to miss the dismay and
frustration so let us take time to see what possibly
might be going on.

First let's start by assuming that they truly would
like to be in a relationship or at least get their feet
wet with some casual dating. Do we jump to the
conclusion that they are not trying hard enough or
that they just have bad luck? Has their timing
been off or are they just so inept at making initial
contact with a person?

Before we consider some of the main skills
required in dating we have to address the ques-
tion:“How much do you really want to date?” Are
you really ready to leave your safe single life?
Excuses that include the ‘but’ word often indicate
an indecisive, wishy- washy thinking that holds
singles from moving forward to 'coupledom.'

If you really have decided that this is the year to
make a change then devise a strategy. Look upon
it in the same way as job hunting. Inform friends
and family of your intentions. You are recruiting
help. Think of all the events, places and types of
people that you have fun and feel relaxed with
and make a list. Make definite plans to attend
events on all your time off. Doing this once a
month or in a sporadic manner not only reduces
your odds of meeting anyone but also prolongs
your current situation.

Next consider if you in fact project any negative
mannerisms or ones that are socially disagreeable.
Perhaps people have told you that you are too
critical, argumentative, loud, bossy, and abrasive or
that you are not friendly or do not smile enough. If
you were to stand back and see yourself as others
do would you approach yourself? It is too easy
just to say ‘well this is how I am and they can take
it or leave it’ but the truth is that if that tactic has-
n't worked all these years then surely it is time to
change. Change like this does not mean becoming
a different person or being fakey but just fine tun-
ing the good qualities and trimming the fat off the
not so good areas.

So here you are out one night with a crowd of
friends all sitting around laughing and talking
when you realise that you know everyone and



your clique does not allow any one new to enter.
Breaking out of groups is often the first step. It
does not mean forsaking old friends but just going
out in fewer numbers so that you are more
approachable. Going out with one or two friends
who have a similar goals can force you to make an
effort. Make eye contact with someone who inter-
ests you or who is trying to get your attention.
Eye contact is vitally important if you want to
connect with anyone. Being preoccupied with a cell
phone or texting means that your eyes and
thoughts are elsewhere and you may miss many
opportunities. Be present and focused and try not
to be distracted. Also a warm friendly smile is
very attractive and encouraging to the one wanti-
ng to approach. Relax, stand there, feel the
moment and try not to worry about ‘what if's.’
Remember you are not committing to anything.

The light hearted art of flirting is an important
skill to master and one that continues to be impor-
tant in long established relationships. Many people
consider flirting a bad or negative attribute perhaps
because they have taken it too seriously or they
have encountered a calculating or manipulative
person. Yes, of course be conscious of a sense of
lack of sincerity and honesty but remember the
plus side to flirting is that it allows you a chance to
gauge interest and can be used as a good screening
tool.

Developing a light hearted sense of humor which
includes a good dose of laughter and smiling is
with out a doubt a well known attractive quality.
Laughter is very contagious and draws people
together. It opens conversations and puts people at
ease. Showing people that you are enjoying your-
self makes them want to get to know you.

When all is said and done try not to take it all too
seriously. Your lighter side will bring you the first
date and from there anything is possible.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual and Couples Rela-
tionship Therapist. She is a Registered Nurse and a
Certified Clinical Sex Therapist. For appointments
call 535-7456 or e-mail her at
relatebahamas@yahoo.com or www.relateba-
hamas.blogspot.com. She is also available for
speaking engagements.

BEFORE we consider
some of the main skills
required in dating we
have to address the
question: “How much
do you really want to
date?” Are you really
ready to leave your
safe single life?



THE TRIBUNE
aN

TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009, PAGE 9B





@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

THE MOST common form
of self expression for
Bahamians is through their
art work and as the pres-
sures of a changing society
takes its toil, many persons
have turned to therapy to
help find ways to talk about
their problems without actu-

ally talking.

Art therapy has the ability to bring
together the fields of art and psychol-
ogy, integrating creative process,
visual arts, behaviour, mental health
and imagination. It is based on the
belief that the act of art making can
help persons understand more of who
they are so that they can enhance
their lives eventually leading towards
personal growth through self-expres-
sion.

Mark Redgrave, a 20 -year- trained
art and psychotherapist, said art can
contain elements that can help peo-
ple more easily integrate and synthe-
sise conflicting feelings and experi-
ences.

“Art therapy is basically a non-ver-
bal form of therapy. The main source
of communication is through
imagery, which can be drawings,
paintings, three dimensional forms
i using clay and more. It is about
expressing feelings, states of mind,
thoughts, fantasies and different
kinds of mental contents,” Mr Red-
grave said.

The art making process, during an
art therapy session, can also be a
means of cleansing to discharge



“When it comes
to children in art
therapy, it can
be like playing
because you are
experimenting
with art materi-
als. Children
play instinctively
and take to if
more quickly.”

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Art therapist Mark Redgrave uses art
to reach his patients’ inner feelings

strong emotions for relief.

“When dealing with mental states,
you are externalising them through
art therapy. When they are on paper
or in three dimension form and that
is where the therapy starts to happen.
A person can begin to communicate
themselves because during art thera-
py there is a level of verbal communi-
cation. If we are working with
imagery, we tend to ask the question
of where did it come from? Imagery
has a way of accessing the uncon-
scious mind and bringing those con-
tents to the surface. Those contents
can be distressing to a person, feel-
ings they have often forgotten or
repressed because they are psycho-
logically painful. Symptoms of
depression, obsession, compulsions
and anxiety, among other emotional
problems, are produced because they
are hidden. Art therapy helps per-
sons to access those problems,” Mr
Redgrave said.

Mr Redgrave has been in the
Bahamas since 2000 and saw a need
for this form of therapy.

Filling the need

“T got a job at Sandilands and
coming to the Bahamas, there was
no art therapist so it was an open
field for me. People were very
receptive to it. I worked with five
year olds up to the geriatrics at
Sandilands,” Mr Redgrave said.

Mr Redgrave said one of the prob-
lems he has seen in the Bahamas
with art therapy is the stigma that is
attached to mental health problems.

“By coming forward, most people
feel they are crazy, should be in
Sandilands, or become a laughing
stock, that kind of thing. I have
worked with children who have been
sexually abused, adults who have

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substance abuse and interpersonal
problems, alcoholism, pathological
problems, and personality disorders.
It’s been difficult to serve art therapy
because of this challenge. When I
feel a person is a good candidate,
and I introduce them to what it is,
there is really no problem. Once peo-
ple understand what art therapy is,
they respond to it more quickly,” Mr
Redgrave said.

He said because there are different
client groups, many of them respond
in different ways especially children.

“When it comes to children in art
therapy, it can be like playing
because you are experimenting with
art materials. Children play instinc-
tively and take to it more quickly.
With adults it becomes difficult
because they start to worry about
performance. My job is to reassure
them that art therapy is about art
teaching. A common misperception
of art therapy is that people need to
be artistically inclined in order to do
art therapy. That artistic ability is not
required, because art therapy is
about expression. The goal is not to
make masterpieces, but rather to
have an understanding and accep-
tance that everyone has an innate
ability to be creative,” Mr Redgrave
said.

Mr Redgrave said art therapy can
also be a form of self healing.

“The mind is a fascinating thing. If
you get a person to produce symbols,
then those symbols kind of translate
thoughts and feelings that can’t be
expressed and become vehicles for
those feelings as they begin to take
shape. Instead of the person being
hostage to those feelings, they even-
tually control the feelings because
the feelings can no longer control
them,” Mr Redgrave said.

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PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ea a5 aaa a ra OE ee ee eee
Moving from “Storming” to “Norming”

You have been assigned to a team
and you are excited about the prospect
of working on a project with your
coworkers. You start attending meet-
ings and in the first session you notice a
few things that cause you some con-
cern. You sit in the meeting expecting
a team agenda but everyone seems to
have their own agenda. You listen to
the conversations, you even try to par-
ticipate, but the discussions go absolute-
ly nowhere. At the end of the session
you feel you just wasted your time
because there are no solutions, no next
steps or no actionable items.

Now the deadline for your project is
approaching and you attended a num-
ber of meetings already. Team mem-
bers are still showing up to meetings
with incomplete assignments. There is
no accountability at the meetings
because there are no minutes taken or
if minutes are being taken they are so
long that no one reads them. In meet-
ings, there is still no agenda and team
members are still having unfocused dis-
cussions. So what do you do?

Working in teams is usually a com-
plex proposition because many times
we are appointed to a team and we
don't collaborate on team and mem-



ber expectations. What we do is get
caught in the trap of focusing on the
project and not how we are going to
get our team members to work togeth-
er in a functional team environment.

Based on a team building model by
Bruce Tuckman, teams should go
through five typical stages of evolution
in order to deliver results: Forming,
storming, norming, performing and
adjourning. The first stage is the for-
mative or beginning stage where the
team comes together as an entity. This
is usually followed by the storming
stage where the team begins to form
expectations, processes and roles. The
storming stage can be chaotic and
teams sometimes try to achieve results
without laying the groundwork that
leads to norming.

In building your team, be sure you
are not lulled into thinking you are past
the storming stage because the team
members seem to be getting along well.
Sometimes team members have hid-
den, individual agendas and personal
agendas range from a need for visibili-
ty to achieve a promotion, to sabotage.

When you are building your team,
the ideal is to move from storming into
the norming stage where team process-
es and expectations are clearly defined
for your team as a whole and for each
member. Here are a few tips to help
you to move your team through the
storming and norming stages to high
performance:

1. Team members should be assigned
roles like taking minutes or collating
information between meetings. Be sure
the minutes are brief with clear action
items listed, responsibilities assigned
and deadlines set.

2. Team members should be held
accountable for bringing completed
assignments or updates to each meeting
because team members are usually
interdependent. Be sure your update
indicates there is some progress and if
not, there should be an acceptable rea-

son.

3. The leader or meeting facilitator
should ensure there is role clarity,
accountability and high performance
by:

¢ Defining team objectives and member
roles. This can be done as a team for
optimal buy-in.

¢ Planning for meetings by preparing an
agenda

e Ensuring the team adheres to the
agenda by effectively bringing
conversations back to the objectives.

¢ Determining if a digression can add to
the quality of the discussion and
nipping it if it doesn't.

¢ Effectively managing conflict among
team members. This can be done both
during and between meetings.

¢ Keeping track of action items and
ensuring there is follow up during and
after each meeting.

¢ Managing meeting discussions,
ensuring everyone has a fair

opportunity to contribute.

Teams can function optimally when
members trust each other and the
process. Integrating trust building as
part of the team building equation can
lead to higher levels of commitment,
accountability and results so trust build-
ing is a useful exercise. To achieve trust,
it is important to be transparent, fair
and open during the team building
process.

If the team is stuck at the storming
stage, measures should be taken to
move the team beyond the stasis. This
may mean considering a change in lead-
ership or having a candid discussion
about the performance of the team with
its members. Once there is progress at
the storming stage, the team has a good
chance of successfully moving through
the norming and performing stages.

Team building can be an intricate
process riddled with subtle and obvi-
ous obstacles or it can be simple and
seamless. If a capable leader is at the
helm, you can successfully identify and
navigate the obstacles and move grace-
fully through the forming, storming,
norming, performing and adjourning
stages achieving your desired results.

(CY GREEN SCENE



ae

Flowers for summer
ee

Mexican sunflowers are fast

growers and can grow in fairly
poor soil.



-

Cosmos is a cheerful performer

in the summer garden.





: =

=

IT IS perhaps not surprising
that several of the annuals that
we rely upon to give us beauty
and colour during the brutal
summer months originate in
Mexico. These include Mexi-
can sunflower, zinnia and cos-
mos.

Mexican sunflower has
become a Bahamian favourite
in recent years for its fairly
large orange flowers. It can be
grown in rows but is most effec-
tive when planted in stands that
are assertive and eye catching.

Masses of blooms are pro-
duced in a season that lasts for
almost two months. Each
flower only lasts a few days and
should be clipped away once
the petals drop. Towards the
end of the plant’s life cycle you
can leave the flower heads on
until they are dry and store
them to provide seeds for next
years’ crop. You will need to
use gloves as the dried flower
heads are very prickly.

Back in the late 19th century
a botanist picked a small Mex-
ican weed and thought to him-
self that the flower would be
stunning if only it were larger.
Work proceeded in this direc-
tion and the number of vari-
eties and forms produced over
the next century makes it so
you could plant a whole gar-
den with zinnias and most peo-
ple would not realise that the
widely varying blossoms were
all related.

Zinnias come in many sizes.
The flowers can be singles or

doubles and exhibit a rainbow
of colours. Zinnias can take
summer sun and withstand
drought conditions, making
them both beautiful and tough.

Cosmos flowers look delicate
but the plant is even hardier
than zinnia. Cosmos is best dis-
played in mass plantings rather
than trying to train it in rows.
Colours available are yellow,
orange, pink and close-to-red.

Cosmos plants tend to get
leggy and sprawl against each
other. They also re-seed prolif-
ically and can become weeds
once they colonise areas of the
garden where they are not sup-
posed to be.

Not all summer annuals
come from Mexico. South
Africa is the origin of Trans-
vaal daisy or gerbera. These
sharply defined daisies tend to
be a little more expensive than
other annuals and come in yel-
low, orange, red and pink.

When we talk about cone-
flowers we are referring to a
plant characteristic rather than
one particular genus. Cone-
flowers may be Echinacea, dra-
copis, ratibida or rudbeckia but
they are ideal candidates for the
summer garden. The traditional
yellow with a prominent cen-
tre, as in Black-Eyed Susan, is
still the most common colour
but coneflowers also come in
purple, orange and pink.

One of the most drought
resistant of all leafy plants is
known in The Bahamas as
Sailor’s Button, or periwinkle.

Poisonings and pet safety issues

BECAUSE we live in a tropical
region of the world and the fact that we
are an archipelagic country- ie. a group
of many islands in a large body of
water there is always an over abun-
dance of tropical pests such as insects,
spiders, snails, rodents and weeds. Each
day we see on TV or hear on radio, a
new product on the market to elimi-
nate the problematic pest, but some-
times at a huge price. All too often our
pets are the unintended targets of these
chemicals.

The summer seems to be a risky
time for our pets. The long warm days
of summer will put our pets at
increased risk of injuries, fleas and ticks
etc. Also during this time there is an
increased usage of household pesti-
cides and chemicals around the home,
and increased risk of inadvertent pet
poisoning.

Dogs and cats, as well as birds, come
in contact with toxins through many
routes.

Ingestion of chemicals is one of the
most common ways pets can become

poisoned, but inhalation and skin con-
tact are additional routes for poisons to
enter the body. If a pet swallows a poi-
son we want to do what we can to get
some or all of it back out. Most veteri-
narians agree that if it has been less
than 2 hours since an animal has ingest-
ed a toxic substance a fair amount will
still be in the stomach where it can still
be removed. After 2 hours, much of
the poison will likely have passed into
the small intestine where it will start to
be absorbed into the blood.

During that critical first 2 hours your
vet will use medication to induce vom-
iting in your pet to help remove at least
some of the toxins from the stomach. If
more than 2 hours have passed since
the toxin was ingested, we will often
have the pet swallow a liquid charcoal



In its island form it is usually
mauve or bluish-pink but in the
nursery — where it is known as
vinca — it comes in many more
attractive colours. The down-
side is that nursery-bred vincas
do not have the same degree of
heat and drought tolerance as
the native ones. They are still
tough, however, and worth a
place in the summer garden.

Marigolds were once easily
identified by their colour but in
recent decades the standard
marigold yellow has given way
to lemon yellow, gold, orange
and red.

Portulaca makes a wonderful
subject for a summer hanging
basket. The plants tend to
recurve as they hang down, dis-
playing the flowers to good
effect. Portulaca is drought resis-
tant and the flowers, singles and
doubles, come in an array of
bright water-silk colours.

Very closely related is moss
rose, which is best used as a low-
lying edging plant or ground
cover around larger plants. The
flowers are only slightly smaller
than portulaca but the rest of
the plant is very diminutive.

One of the joys of using annu-
als for summer colour is their
tendency to reseed themselves.
The moss rose I planted six
years ago reappears every sum-
mer and cosmos turn up in all
parts of my garden.

e j.hardy@coralwave.com

containing product that helps to bind
up some of the poison in the intestines
so it will pass out with the stool and not
be absorbed.

In these cases, we have to assume
that at least some of the poison will
be absorbed into the bloodstream and
may cause some problems. We will
need to support these animals in the
hospital with intravenous fluids to help
their liver and other major organs.

The liver and kidney systems will
likely be the organs that do most of
the detoxification, and the IV fluid will
greatly help that process. Certain types
of poisons have antidotes (drugs that
directly counter the effect of the poi-
son) while others don’t. Sometimes all
we can do is use medications to control
the symptoms caused by the toxin and
keep the patient comfortable while the
animal’s system is slowly detoxified.

Insecticides are used extensively in
many homes and in most cases they
are used safely. Occasionally, pets will
ingest material recently sprayed or
treated with products intended for ants,

spiders, or other bugs. Most insecti-
cides, if ingested in toxic amounts will
cause symptoms such as muscles
tremors, excessive salivation, vomit-
ing, diarrhea and sometimes seizures.
These can develop in minutes to hours
after ingestion depending on the type
of toxin, how much was ingested and
how much the pet weighs.

Snail and slug bait is another com-
mon household pesticide. Most of
these products contain Metaldehyde,
a potent neuro muscular toxin. Once
ingested, this toxin can cause uncon-
trollable muscle tremors that can
progress to seizures and death. Dogs
and sometimes cats seem attracted to
the taste of these products.

Rodenticides are used in many
households to help control mice and
rats. The most common type of
rodent killing product is made from
coumarin like compounds. These
chemicals cause excessive and uncon-
trollable bleeding in the rodent as
well as any other animal that may
ingest them.

The most challenging aspect about
rodenticide toxicity is that symptoms
of bleeding may not be evident until
3-5 days after ingestion. Rodenticide
poisoning is relatively easy to control
if treatment is started soon after
ingestion. But if we wait to see symp-
toms of bleeding, heroic measures
may be needed to save those patients.
Remember, early treatment is very
effective and usually life saving.

If you choose to use these potent
products, be very careful to place
them in an inaccessible location
where your pet cannot reach them.

There are many other things that
can cause poisoning in our pets. Var-
ious plants, cleaning agents, drugs of
all kinds, fertilisers, herbicides, and
automobile products are just a few
examples. Considering the potential
for severe illness and even death from
such poisoning (this would include
children as well as pets). We all need
to keep our family’s safety in mind
and choose and utilise these products
wisely.



THE TRIBUNE



“x

ORLANDO
High: 88° F/31° eo



=

















Sunshine mixing with Partly cloudy, very Partly sunny. Partly sunny. Periods of sun, a Partly sunny with a












* Low:69° F/21°C some clouds. warm and humid. i-storm in spots. thunderstorm. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
‘ Crh Sta High: 88° High: 86° High: 86° High: 87°
- say High: 88° Low: 76° Low: 76° Low: 77° Low: 76° Low: 76° see ey
j TAMPA va i? EN Fe EEE
igh: 86° F/30° 2 = 95°-83° F 106°-82° F High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht. (ft.
Low: 73° F/23°C ! a. / The Se a an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and 9:59am. 26 3:58am. -0.2
Today
= 4 ~~ elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 10:24p.m. 33 3:54pm. -0.2
~~ @ \ p. p
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if e a ednesday gpm. 32 4:50pm. 02
3 FARK Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Thursday ti50am. 27 543am. -0.1
i oe ——- ABACO Temperature ae 5.50pm. -04
é Lapel ee High: 88° F/31°C diasdesivandeen cade venRaRuanddendhakauewaaalvemna is toe Friday Ce oe a
@ aii . aX Baa 25°C Normal high... Coe ES
. , Normal low 72° F/22° C
a bp bs @ WEST PALM BEACH iy Last year's HIQH occ se Fsic | NTI M IM T(IIN
‘ coca High: 86° F/30° C : Last year's lOW oo... eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeees 72° F/22° C
ee Low: 71°F/22°C Precipitation |}}||© —_—_——___~~~ Sunrise...... 6:21 a.m. Moonrise. .... 8:18 am.
ra As of 2 p.m. yesterday ee cccecccee 0.24" Sunset....... 7:53 p.m. Moonset... . 10:34 p.m.
all FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date : First Full Last New
High: 86° F/30° C @ High: 86° F/30° C Normal year to date .........ccsesscssssseeseeeeeee 10.97" 7 i.
Low: 73° F/23°C Low: 74° F/23°C
<5 AccuWeather.com
‘ @ i Forecasts and graphics provided by Ss ‘ i
a MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 May 30 aa 7 Jun.15 = Jun. 22
aera ELEUTHERA
a Low: 75° F/24°C NASSAU ‘ 9 a Eee
High: 88° F/31°C aM:
Low: 76° F/24° C
KEY WEST <5 @
- cece i CATISLAND
High: 87° F/31" C High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 78° F/26° C Low: 72° F/22°C
@ a
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= GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR
anpros ae Low: 74°F/23°C Ree
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's : ae .
highs and tonights's lows. High: 91° F/33° C
Low: 78° F/26° C
LONG ISLAND
Low: 75° F/24° C
Today Wednesday Today Wednesday Today Wednesday MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W NS High: 87° F/31°C
F/C FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FC Fic FC a Low: 77° F/25°C
Albuquerque 79/26 5542 pe 76/24 5442 t Indianapolis 82/27 65/18 t 77/25 57A3 t Philadelphia 62/16 56/13 + 73/22 62/16 c
Anchorage 68/20 50/10 s 59/15 46/7 1 Jacksonville 84/28 69/20 t 85/29 69/20 t Phoenix 97/36 73/22 s 99/37 75/23 $s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 80/26 66/18 t 81/27 6618 t Kansas City 75/23 58/14 t 70/21 55/12 t Pittsburgh 70/21 S743 t = 77/25 62/16 1 RAGGEDISLAND — igh:90°F/s2°c
Atlantic City 59/15 53/11 r+ 72/22 6015 c Las Vegas 96/35 69/20 s 98/36 75/23 pc Portland, OR 73/22 53/11 pc 79/26 54/12 s High: 87° F/31° C Low: 77° F/25°C
Baltimore 65/18 56/13 + 75/23 65/18 t Little Rock 84/28 68/20 t 84/28 64/17 t Raleigh-Durham 79/26 64/17 t 83/28 66/18 t Low: 75° F/24°C =_
Boston 60/15 48/8 s 59/15 54/12 c Los Angeles 74/23 60/15 pce 76/24 60/15 pc St. Louis 78/25 66/18 t 76/24 61/46 t . <=
Buffalo 64/417 5341 4+ 68/20 57/413 t Louisville 84/28 68/20 t 82/27 65/18 t Salt Lake City 77/25 56/13 s 80/26 58/14 pc GREAT INAGUA se
Charleston, SC 82/27 67/19 t 84/28 70/21 t Memphis 82/27 69/20 t 86/30 68/20 t San Antonio 92/33 72/22 t 88/31 68/20 t High:87° F/31°C
Chicago 70/21 5442 t 65/18 52/1 c Miami 88/31 75/23 t 88/31 74/23 t San Diego 70/21 6246 pce 70/21 61/16 pc Low. 78° F/26°C
Cleveland 68/20 63/17 t 80/26 61/16 t Minneapolis 6447 510 t 67/19 5442 pc San Francisco 69/20 53/11 pce 70/21 53/11 pc y
Dallas 89/31 66/18 t 84/28 63/17 pc Nashville 81/27 66/18 t 82/27 66/18 t Seattle 66/18 51/10 pe 73/22 51/10 s i
Denver 66/18 45/7 pce 74/23 50/10 pc New Orleans 86/30 72/22 t 90/32 71/21 pc Tallahassee 82/27 68/20 t 87/30 70/21 t an
Detroit 68/20 60/15 t 2c ima New York 63/17 53/1 4+ 69/20 60/15 c Tampa 86/30 73/22 t 85/29 74/23 t a
Honolulu 86/30 71/21 pc 86/30 72/22 pc Oklahoma City 80/26 60/15 t 79/26 58/14 pc Tucson 91/32 65/18 s 92/33 67/19 $s
Houston 92/33 71/21 t 90/32 72/22 t Orlando 88/31 69/20 t 85/29 69/20 t Washington, DC 64/17 58/14 r 80/26 66/18 t





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Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

lp HIS

High
F/C
90/32
58/14
73/22
84/28
59/15
91/32
86/30
72/22
91/32
73/22
89/31
89/31
77/25
66/18
62/16
86/30
59/15
94/34
102/38
71/21
91/32
85/29
74/23
75/23
55/12
84/28
67/19
58/14
89/31
68/20
82/27
114/45
78/25
74/23
68/20
838/31
75/23
66/18
17/25
86/30
77/25
97/36
64/17
63/17
82/27
79/26
112/44
63/17
66/18
85/29
85/29
104/40
84/28
85/29
57/13
88/31
66/18
86/30
80/26
79/26
70/21
72/22
79/26
76/24
64/17
84/28
62/16
85/29
75/23
62/16

alil

Today

Low
F/C
79/26
48/8
41/5
68/20
53/11
80/26
76/24
59/15
61/16
69/20
65/18
57/13
70/21
43/8
42/5
58/14
41/5
70/21
82/27
47/8
73/22
74/23
61/16
46/7
45/7
49/9
52/11
33/3
70/21
50/10
79/26
72/22
57/13
57/13
46/7
81/27
59/15
50/10
50/10
77/25
54/12
72/22
50/10
45/7
56/13
65/18
82/27
45/7
44/6
55/12
73/22
77/25
62/16
79/26
43/8
70/21
46/7
70/21
59/15
57/13
54/12
55/12
72/22
63/17
54/12
73/22
51/10
68/20
51/10
44/6

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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Marine FORECAST

Wednesday

High
F/C
89/31
62/16
70/21
81/27
60/15
92/33
85/29
72/22
84/28
74/23
88/31
68/20
74/23
65/18
61/16
75/23
59/15
94/34
101/38
65/18
92/33
80/26
82/27
63/17
61/16
70/21
67/19
59/15
88/31
61/16
81/27
115/46
74/23
77/25
65/18
86/30
74/23
63/17
81/27
85/29
80/26
105/40
57/13
68/20
64/17
80/26
114/45
59/15
63/17
63/17
82/27
104/40
82/27
85/29
55/12
84/28
64/17
85/29
76/24
82/27
68/20
68/20
17/25
75/23
66/18
84/28
64/17
72/22
63/17
69/20

Low W
F/C
75/23 s
49/9 +
45/7 ¢
68/20 p
50/10 r
80/26 t
77/25 s
59/15 s
64/17 p
69/20 s
59/15 t
50/10 pc
70/21 pe
48/8 t
45/7 pc
51/10 sh
39/3 pc
67/19 s
82/27 pc
43/6 pc
72/22 s
73/22 s
66/18 s
51/10 pe
52/11 sh
50/10 pc
50/10 pc
46/7 +
69/20
41/5
77/25
74/23
57/13

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Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace



TUESDAY, MAY 26TH, 2009, PAGE 11B

WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SSW at 7-14 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
Wednesday: SSW at 7-14 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
FREEPORT Today: SSW at 7-14 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 80° F
Wednesday: SSW at 7-14 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 80° F
ABACO Today: § at 7-14 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
Wednesday: S$ at 7-14 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

Minneapolis =)
64/51

4/51

(COOLER)

66/45 75/58

Miami
88/75

Showers
T-storms
Rain
Flurries

Fronts
Cod =

War) filimnfllteniite

Stationary @dengeni

Snow Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

Os [05 10s 20s (B08!) 40s



AUTO INSURANCE

t your

out us!

‘comes.to Auto Insurance,
mber the smart choice is
In urance Management.
rt people you can trust.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

“Wey Povidene Grand aay Abaco | de Eleuthera | Exum
Tt (242) 502-6400/1 Tels (242) 350-3500 } Tel: (242) 367-4204 | Tel: (242) 332-2802 J Tel: (242) 336-2304

ee





























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AriZona |

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY,MAY 26,

2009

Eyebrow threading is now the new
method of hair removal on the rise

AIR removal is a very big deal for women.
On the face, the eyebrow is the accentuat-
ing factor of facial beauty.

Eyebrow arching can upgrade
your entire look. Although there are
many methods such as using a razor,
plucking or waxing, something new
is on the rise-eyebrow threading.

Baha-Retreat Anti-Aging Spa,
located on east Bay Street just east
of Lucianos, is the only full service
spa and salon that offers eyebrow
threading. This beauty procedure
cost $18. Spa Director and Skin care
specialist, Kenya Mortimer-McKen-
zie, has been threading for about a
year and a half.

“Threading has many benefits. It
lasts at least a week to two weeks
longer than waxing. There are less
ingrown hairs, it doesn’t cause aging
of the skin because you are not using
chemicals as with waxing. Waxing
over time, because of the heat, ages
the skin. Threading is also more pre-
cise causing you to get a better arch
and for many persons who are on
acne treatments such as Retin-A or
Accutine, who can’t get waxing, this
is a better method for them,” Mrs

DN Nd f
; P rire rrr:

, Grapeade

r 4 ey
eT MTT eel ies

tt heres ac

Mrs
McKenzie

gets ready
to thread
the first
brow.

Watermelon

McKenzie said.

The threading technique uses a
100 per cent cotton thread that is
twisted and rolled along the surface
of the skin entwining the hairs in the
thread, which are then lifted out
from the follicle.

Different threading methods

“There are many different ways to
use the threading method. One way
is where they put a piece of the
thread in their mouth and extend it
out to their hands. The other way is
where they put the thread around
the neck and they use the neck to
move the direction of the thread. I
find Bahamians won’t take too much
to the thread being in your mouth
due to sanitary reasons,” Mrs
McKenzie said.

For persons with finer eyebrows
and those who are afraid of pain,
Mrs McKenzie said this method is
great for them as well.

Ven Baile mM Te

eat : c 7]

“You can take an entire row of
hair out, or you can take out one
hair at a time. You have more con-
trol of the shape. Unlike waxing
where you do not have much control
on where you put the wax, you have
control over the threads making it
very precise. Discomfort varies from
person to person. Some people say it
is less painful than waxing but most
people can stand the pain,” Mrs
McKenzie said.

The origin of the threading tech-
nique is uncertain, with some claim-
ing that it began in India, China or
the Middle East. However, Mrs
McKenzie said the technique started
in the East and is slowly making its
way into western culture. Tradition-
ally, threading is used on the entire
face, including upper lip, chin, eye-
brows, sideburns and cheeks.

“I prefer this method. The skin is
so soft after you get this done,” she
said.

Following our interview, Mrs
Mckenzie did the procedure on me.

“ T anticapated that there would be
some pain involved, but it was not as
excruitating as it looks. The only
time Ifelt pain was when one single
hair was removed. However when an
entire row was removed, it was virtu-
aly painless. I would do it again,
because the outcome is pretty
smooth and my brows are perfect.”

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway « 394-1759





Full Text
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Mim blowin’ it

S8F
76F

HIGH
LOW

AND CLOUDS

Volume: 105 No.151

aU a

The perfect

Ty

mE a

‘ROCK = (0
Kill loving dad

45-year-old man dies
after ‘argument’





FROM LEFT: MELISSA FOX, Nelson Cartwright, and Terry Fox’s nieces,
sisters and friends outside the family home in the Glendale Subdivision.

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A LOVING father, uncle and
brother was killed with a blow
to the head outside his home in
the Glendale Subdivision on
Sunday night.

Police say they have identi-
fied “a stone” that may have
been used in the killing.

Terry Fox, 45, had been
watching television in the house
he shares with three sisters, one
brother, and numerous nieces
and nephews in Porkfish Road,
off Soldier Road, Nassau, when
an acquaintance came to call.

Relatives say he was arguing
with the visitor in the back yard
when Mr Fox suddenly ran out
into the street.

Moments later a neighbour
knocked at the door to say he
had collapsed with a head
injury.

Three of Mr Fox's nieces ran
to his side as he lay in the road
with a head wound to his left
temple.

They saw him take his last
breath minutes after he fell.

Police believe he may have
been hit with a rock, and rela-
tives said they found rocks

SEE page eight

The Taste

on

Tuesdays!!



Valid only on Tuesdays!

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009
I

Ss
a

OMS Sto

eT als a ol d



Coffee Fix



BAHAMAS BIGGEST

Perry Christie



TM Ey (PMNS ECL

DARK RAIN CLOUDS hang over Atlantis and cruise ships at Nassau Harbour yesterday. Torrential rain
continued on from the weekend — despite the brief glimpses of sunshine through the clouds.

Minister a constant |

presence in Lands
and Surveys Dept

MINISTER Byran
Woodside is now a con-
stant presence in the
Department of Lands and
Surveys following alleged
irregularities in the distri-
bution of Crown land. F

Former director of
Lands and Surveys Tex
Turnquest resigned after
The Tribune published
claims that members of

L : 1 Byran Woodside
his family received Crown



land grants. However, Undersecretary of }
Lands and Surveys Audley Greaves remains :
at his post despite allegations that his wife ;
and son were sold lots in Abaco in 2003 and

2004 respectively.
SEE page 12

Man who lost over $40m in
casinos in Bahamas, US and
Australia appears in court

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A “PATHOLOGICAL GAMBLER” who
lost over $40 million in casinos in the Bahamas,
the United States and Australia told an Aus-
tralian court how he hid his addiction from his
wife during their honeymoon in The Bahamas
by busying her with “pampering packages.”

Property developer Harry Kavakas owes $1
million to the Atlantis casino, $1 million to
Melbourne’s Crown casino and upwards of $5
million to casinos in Las Vegas.

He explained this to a Victoria judge as he
made his case for why he should be able to sue
the Crown casino for $20 million he lost in a16-
month gambling binge there between 2005 and
2006, according to The Brisbane Times.

SEE page eight

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NASSAU AND BAHAME

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

‘very happy’ with
party's condition

PLP ‘doing
all it can’
to be the
next govt

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@
tribunemedia.net

THE PLP is “doing all
that is necessary...to pre-
pare itself to be the next
government of the
Bahamas,” according to
its leader, Perry Christie.

In an exclusive inter-
view with The Tribune in
which Mr Christie
assessed the party’s con-
dition and that of the
country, the PLP leader
said he is “very happy”
right now as the organi-
sation is ina “very good
position” as the present
government approaches
the mid-term mark.

Despite the claims of
some sectors of the party
that it has not learned
the lessons from its May
2007 defeat — as laid out
in detail in a report by
USS. political consultants
Greenberg, Quinlan and
Rosner — and evidence
of intra-party disunity
centring around the
question of who should
lead the organisation, the
Opposition leader
claimed he has
“absolutely no doubt”
the party will have
“strengthened itself as a
result of the self exami-
nation that has taken
place” by the time the

SEE page eight



HEATED BATTLE OVER
$200,000 WINSLOW HOMER
PAINTING

MAN, 25, ACCUSED OF 10
COUNTS OF ARMED ROBBERY

RELIGIOUS LEADERS
SLAMMED FOR ‘SILENCE’ ON
ALLEGATIONS OF SCHOOL
MOLESTATION


PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009

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LOCAL NEWS

Heated battle over $200,000
Winslow Homer painting

A $200,000 painting given to
a 19th century governor of the
Bahamas is at the centre of a
heated battle between his
descendants and renowned auc-
tion house Sotheby’s.

The painting, Winslow
Homer’s Children Under a
Palm Tree, was given to Sir
Henry Arthur Blake during his
tenure as governor from 1884
to 1887.

After reportedly being found
in a dust bin, the work had been
put up for sale by a party unre-
lated to Sir Henry.

However, according to the
London Evening Standard, the
sale has been halted by an 11th-
hour appeal by Simon Murray,
the great, great grandson of the
British colonial administrator,
who claims the family are still
the rightful owners.

The concerned parties are
now expected to either settle
the matter privately or bring it
before the courts.

Winslow Homer was famous
for his paintings of US land-
scapes.

He also painted scenes in the
Bahamas, and Children Under
A Palm Tree is said to depict
the governor’s children when
they were living here.

After his post in the
Bahamas, the Irish-born Sir
Henry moved to Newfound-
land, where he was governor
until 1889.



WINSLOW HOMER’S Children Under A Palm Tree. The painting was giv-

en to the governor in 1885 or 1886.

In 1889 he became the cap-
tain-general and governor-in-
chief of Jamaica.

His term was extended in
1894 and 1896, at the request
of the legislature and public
bodies of the island.

Chief curator of the Portland
Museum of Art Thomas
Denenberg, who appeared on
the Maine Public Broadcasting
Network yesterday, said that
the work in question is different
from other paintings by the
artist.

“This is a very idiosyncratic
Homer. It is a watercolour
showing three children in very
exotic dress. They were in pan-
taloons and slippers so they

look as if they are in North
African costume.

“We conjecture that these are
the children of the British gov-
ernor in the Bahamas in 1885.
There is a wonderful bit of evi-
dence that the BBC has found
where we know that Winslow
Homer left for Cuba and the
Bahamas in December of 1884.
We know that he attended a
dance at the Governor’s House,
where the theme was the Ara-
bian Nights.

“So the fact these children
show up in these Moorish cos-
tumes dovetails nicely with the
documentary evidence of
Homer being at that dance,” he
said.

Police find gun, ammo and marijuana in South Andros home

A HANDGUN, live ammunition and 15
jars stuffed with marijuana were found by
police in a South Andros home on Sunday

morning.

North Andros Police raided the home off
Queen’s Highway at around 11.30am.

ee eR Ble
HO Lae
Pest Control
ea res
322-2157

They found a .25 handgun with four live
rounds of ammunition, 15 small jars of mari-
jana, rolls of plastic bags, a small scale and

around $600 cash.

A 30-year-old man has been arrested and is
in police custody.



KIARA SHERMAN
was crowned the
new Miss
Bahamas
Universe on
Sunday night at
the Wyndham
Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach. See
tomorrow’s Arts
section for more
coverage.



Felipé Major/Tribune staff
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

. MAGISTRATE’S COURT: David Metell
oO In brief avi etelus

Gun, ammo
recovered in
the Redland
Acres area

DRUGS Enforcement
Officers recovered a .380
handgun with six live rounds
of ammunition in the Red-
land Acres area of New
Providence at midnight on
Friday.

The officers saw a man
acting suspiciously when on
patrol in the area, and say
they saw a shiny object
thrown to the ground as they
approached him.

A 19-year-old from Mal-
colm Allotment has been
arrested in connection with
the incident.

Anyone with any informa-
tion which may assist investi-
gations should call Crime
Stoppers anonymously on
328-TIPS (8477).

Death crash
victim named
as Shavares
Cunningham

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The young
man who was killed in a traf-
fic accident in West End ear-
ly Sunday morning has been
identified as Shavares Romel
Cunningham of Bootle Bay,
Grand Bahama.

Mr Cunningham had cele-
brated his 23rd birthday on
Saturday.

Sometime around 2.30am
on Sunday, he lost control of
the 1999 srey-coloured Delta
98 Oldsmobile he was dri-
ving and crashed into a utili-
ty pole.

Thrown

He was thrown from the
vehicle and died at the scene.
His death is the seventh traf-
fic fatality for the year on
Grand Bahama.

Mr Cunningham was
employed as a marina opera-
tor at the Old Bahama Bay
Resort.

His death has shocked co-
workers at the resort.

“He was a quiet person
and everyone down here is
very saddened by his tragic
passing,” said a co-worker.
“He just turned 23 and I
understand that his girlfriend
is expecting a baby.”

Police are continuing their
investigations into the acci-
dent.

Wet welcome
for tourists
at airport

TOURISTS arriving at the
Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport had a wet wel-
come to the Bahamas yester-
day as the arrivals hall
sprang leaks after heavy
rains.

An eye-witness passing
through the airport
described the immigration
screening area as a “disas-
ter” with water dripping
from the ceilings and the
walls, giving visitors cause to
complain.

The man, who arrived in
the airport yesterday after-
noon, said: “The lines were
out the door, the floors were
drenched with water, and
they have got big garbage
bins all around, collecting
water that is dripping. It’s
really disastrous.

“It doesn’t look good for
the tourists, and everyone is
just standing around really
annoyed.”

Puddles which gathered in
front of some of the immi-
gration booths were sec-
tioned off for safety, and
other booths opened to
process arriving passengers.

Man, 25, accused of ten
counts of armed robbery

LEAVING COURT: David Metellus, 25.

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A 25-year-old Ridgeland Park man accused of
committing a spree of armed robberies was arraigned
in a Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Police have charged David Metellus, with 10
counts of armed robbery. Metellus is accused of
robbing three City Market food stores, two Super-
wash Laundromats, two Texaco Service Stations
and a Dominos Pizza store between March 18 and

May 14 of this year.

It is alleged that Metellus, while armed with a
handgun, robbed Super Wash Blue Hill Road of
$120 on Wednesday March 18, $100 cash on March
24 and $250 on April 28. Court dockets also state that
Metellus robbed Superwash Robinson Road of $190

on Monday, March 23.



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

It is further alleged that on Saturday, May 9,
Metellus robbed the City Market food store, Robin-
son Road of an undetermined amount of cash and on

Sunday, May 10, the City Market food store on
Rosetta Street of $500. He is also accused of robbing

the City Market food store, Cable Beach, on Thurs-

day, May 14, of $390, and on the same day of robbing
the Texaco Service Station on East Street and Soldier
Road of $160. On Friday, May 15, it is alleged he
robbed Dominos Pizza of $379 and on May 18 anoth-
er Texaco Service Station of an undetermined
amount of cash.

Metellus, who appeared before Chief Magistrate
Roger Gomez and Magistrate Janet Bullard, was
not required to enter a plea to the charges. The case
has been adjourned to September 7 and transferred
to Court 5, Bank Lane. Metellus was remanded to

Her Majesty’s Prison.

‘Growing number of Haitian-Bahamians seek
power to avenge treatment suffered by parents’

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THERE is a growing number
of Haitian-Bahamians who are
educating themselves to achieve
positions of power in order to
avenge the treatment received by
their parents or grandparents, a
prominent radio host claims.

During his contribution to a
recent Insight article featured in
The Tribune, local religious DJ
Kevin Harris said he discouraged
this kind of thinking and attitude
as it would lead to a “tremendous
number of clashes” among the
two groups in the country.

“Instead, people who have
Haitian parentage should demand
a discussion on the issue whether
it be through forums or town hall
meetings or other areas in a non-
emotional approach to the issue
among their own generation and
peers, to ask the questions.
Because the fundamental ques-
tion is that a lot of them feel that
it is unfair that you can be born in
Princess Margaret Hospital
(PMH) and I can be born at
PMH and I have to wait until Pm
18 to qualify (for citizenship).

Father of son
allegedly beaten

by teacher still
waiting for probe



A FATHER is still waiting for
the investigation he was promised
after his son was allegedly beaten
by a high school teacher early last
year. In a statement addressed to
the Commissioner of Police,
Jonathan Hall insists that his son
was struck in the mouth by a
teacher at a local government
school.

When he filed a complaint at
the local police station, Mr Hall
said he was given assurances that
the teacher would be removed
from the school and brought
before the courts. However to his
surprise, he said, after numerous
inquiries it turned out that not
only was the teacher still
employed at the school, but no
investigation had taken place.

“And up to this very date I
have been redirected so many
times, it is unbelievable. I am
tired of the run-around and Iam
still waiting on this matter to be
dealt with.

“After seeing no result or hear-
ing no response, I have visited
the Ministry of Education to only
find that the matter was never
even brought up with the min-
istry as I had falsely been
assured,” he said.

Mr Hall said he has visited the
Complaints Unit at Police Head-
quarters only to find that no effort
has been made by this depart-
ment to address his matter.

He said it is now the Com-
plaints officers who are giving him
the run-around, and there seems
to be “no resolution” in sight.

“Well I don’t have a challenge
with us listening to those concerns
and seeing where there can be
consideration in that light. Obvi-
ously the government, and gov-
ernments have maintained a rea-
son why they feel it is important
to control the number of persons
being allowed to have citizenship
whose parents are Haitians,” he
said.

This reason, he said, would be
interesting to find out from suc-
cessive ministers of Immigration
and Foreign Affairs as to why this
decision was not overturned.

Animosity

“Maybe they fear that there is
this sleeping giant of animosity
and concern among the two cul-
tures. Well that’s why I feel you
have to start the conversation so
that you can help some of the
younger people to realize that
there is no need for me and you
to be enemies. I can hear your
point, I can understand your
point, and perhaps I may be com-
pelled to do something about
your point i.e. in the case of many
white Americans who stood with
black Americans to fight for racial

“Lowest Prices On The Island”

justice,” he said. Mr Harris added,
however, that he would have a
problem agreeing with govern-
ment if it pushed for their teach-
ers to learn Creole in order to
cater to this one group of soci-
ety. In his opinion it would open
the floodgates for other segments
who could then demand that gov-
ernment school teachers should
learn German, Chinese, etc.

“There should be a standard
for all. Second of all it would be a
disadvantage for any child whose
parents are of any other country
not to learn the language of which
they want to become a citizen.
They are put at more of an
advantage to learn English and
to speak it fluently.

“No one is saying that they
should step away from the ability
to have another language as an
asset.

“But certainly the government
of the Bahamas and the educa-
tion system of the Bahamas
should not amend itself just
because we have parents who are
refusing to assist the teacher and
assist the system by assisting the
children to learn the language of
the country of which they are try-
ing to become a citizen,” he said.




Woman charged
with ‘trading in
prostitution’

A 21-year-old woman charged with “trading in prosti-
tution” was arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Mekell Johnson of Colliers Avenue appeared before
Magistrate Ancella Williams in Court 6, Parliament
Street.

According to court dockets, it is alleged that on Sun-
day, May 24, Johnson was in Dowdeswell Street for the
purpose of trading in prostitution.

The accused pleaded not guilty to the charge and was
granted bail in the sum of $1,500 with one surety and
ordered to report to the South Beach police station
every Sunday before 6pm.

Adjourned

The case was adjourned to September 8.

Annier Knowles, 29, of Pitt Road and Stacy Rolle, 29,
of Wilkinson Street appeared in court with Johnson yes-
terday. The two have been charged with vagrancy.

According to court dockets, it is alleged that on May
24, Knowles and Rolle were found loitering on
Dowdeswell Street with the intent to commit an offence.

They both pleaded not guilty to the charge and were
granted bail in the sum of $1,500.

They were ordered to report to the Nassau Street
police Station every Sunday before 6pm.

Tae

Goend an e

Gnohunted | ;



-
a

_—





Sven CHG.»
in one of our Fabulous
Designer Evening Dresses

The Cancer
Society Ball

Saturday, 30th May, 2009

Wyndham Nassau Resort
& Crystal Palace Casino A
Cable Beach ,

Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family
Parliament Street (near Bay St.) Tel: 322-8393 or 328-7157
* Fax: 326-9953
Crystal Court at Atlantis, Paradise Island Tel: 363-4161/2

Lyford Cay (Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay)
Tel: 362-5235

e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com
www.colesofnassau.com * P.O, Box N-121



FOR ALL YOUR DECORATING as

STORE HOURS:
Monday - Saturday
8:30am - 5:30pm

BILLY’S DREAM
STILL ALIVE

FREE DELIVERY ANY WHERE IN NASSAU AND TO THE MAIL BOAT

¢ E-Z CREDIT TERMS AVAILABLE

Donald’s Furniture
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SIXTH TERRACE CENTREVILLE TEL: 322-1731 OR 322-3875


PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Judges have final decision on bail

IN EXPLAINING to persons expressing dis-
quiet about the Appeal Court’s ruling that
mandatory legislation to hold serious criminal
offenders in prison until trial is unconstitution-
al, Bar Council President Wayne Munro said
persons often forget that “judges and lawyers all
have family in the wider community.”

They live in the community, said Mr Munro,
and “so it’s really not in their interest” to release
people on bail without good cause. That is what
one would have thought, but that was not the
reality of 1996.

And because it was not the reality, the 1994
Bail Act was amended to legislate against bail
for serious offenders.

The discretion to give bail in serious offences
was taken from the magistrates. It was legis-
lated that “not withstanding any other enact-
ment, a person charged with an offence men-
tioned in Part C of the First Schedule shall not
be granted bail.” Persons mentioned in Part C
were those accused of kidnapping, murder,
armed robbery, treason and conspiracy to com-
mit any one of those offences.

Before the amendment, criminals were
laughing at the law. The courts had become a
revolving door for the criminal who appeared to
have more rights than the law-abiding citizen.

Bahamians were asking the very question
posed by Mr Munro last week: Aren’t the mag-
istrates and criminal lawyers a part of this com-
munity? The public voice grew ever louder
wondering what planet lawyers, weeping for
bail for hardened criminals, and magistrates lis-
tening to their pleas, lived on. Their sentences
did not indicate to the public that they were of
the same planet. They seemed oblivious to pub-
lic alarm at the growing criminal element, espe-
cially to those being returned to the streets
instead of being held behind bars.

“The fact of the matter is,” then Police Com-
missioner BK Bonamy told The Tribune in
1996, “that persons who are out on bail have
been committing serious offences.” He said the
police force had a lot of dedicated officers who
were “somewhat hamstrung by a system which
has some serious flaws.” The serious flaws to
which he referred were the courts. In many cas-
es, he said, accused persons were charged by the
police, brought before the courts, granted bail
and were out committing serious crimes. More
than 100 persons charged with armed robbery
were granted bail since 1994 — it was then
1996, and those who were not killed in other
shootings were still on the streets.

He pointed out that while the police might

object to bail, the final decision was with the
magistrates.

He said police object to bail because they
fear witness tampering, or that the accused
might not return for trial. He said the return to
the streets of these men with criminal records
“increases the workload of the police consider-
ably.” And, he said, despite the Bail Act “mag-
istrates take the view that the person is entitled
to bail.”

The legislators of the day amended the Bail
Act with their eyes wide open, they weighed
the rights of the criminal and those of the citi-
zen.

Prime Minister Ingraham said in 1996 that it
had been shown that many persons out on bail
charged with serious crimes were involved in
continuing criminal activity.

“Hence, we are resolved to change the law,
tightening the rules and conditions for the grant
of bail while taking into full account individual
and constitutional rights as well as the needs of
society generally.” He had also hoped that per-
sons for which there was no bail would get ear-
ly trials.

Lawyer Brian Moree considered the Prime
Minister’s 1996 radio address on the crime issue,
the bail amendment and earlier trials, had a
balanced approach that “reflected the recog-
nition of protecting society, and at the same
time respecting the constitutional rights of
accused persons.” In his opinion the move
should “go a long way” in giving magistrates and
judges the necessary discretion in denying bail
in appropriate cases. In our opinion it must cer-
tainly have gone a long way in removing from
their court room the pressure of overbearing
lawyers pressing for the freedom of their client.

The late businessman and legislator Nor-
man Solomon, in a panel discussion on crime
and the amendment to the Bail Act, recognised
that in serious times, harsh cures are needed.

“It’s a serious decision to deprive somebody
of their liberty before their trial,” he said. “It
was very strong medicine.” But on the other
hand, he continued: “The sad fact of the matter
is the Bahamas is in a serious situation with
regard to crime.”

Today, the situation is even worse. The
judges and magistrates are now the sole arbiters
of who should get bail, we just hope that when
they make their decisions they will remember
what country they are living in, and who are
now out on the streets causing the most trouble,
and increasing the number of cases the police
have to investigate.

More government
for the Bahamas
is unsustainable

EDITOR, The Tribune.

My friend Richard Perry Pin-
der attempted to take me to
task in a recent letter to the edi-
tor.

He claimed that the inter-
vention of the governments of
France and Canada was "not so
much financed by debt, but
through sensible and equitable
tax systems."

Mr. Pinder went on to
expand this a bit more to say
that; "One only has to look at
Canada to clearly see that as a
result of sound budget manage-
ment and accountability it is a
country that has been able to
finance its social programmes
and infrastructural development
through a sensible and equitable
tax system and not exhorbitant
debt which has been the tactic
of its southern neighbour."

Bearing in mind I was
lamenting the damage we are
doing to future generations with
a government unconscionably
increasing its debt load and
deficits, that incidentally are at
about 43 per cent of GDP,
according to the Central Bank
of The Bahamas, I decided to
dig below the surface a bit.

So I Googled "France debt

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



to GDP 2009" and "Canada
debt to GDP 2009" to see if I
missed something.

In the top five results we're
informed that the "French pub-
lic deficit forecast at 5.6 per cent
of GDP in 2009, with public
debt approaching 75 per cent of
GDP".

In the case of Canada, we're
informed in the top five results
that "Canada's debt to hit 63 per
cent of GDP".

Dr. Michael Walker of
Canada's Fraser Institute
informed a Nassau Institute
conference here a couple years
back that 40 per cent of the tax
revenue of Ontario, Canada
was now being absorbed by the
health care system there.

Clearly this is all unsustain-
able.

But why stop comparing
there? According to Veronique
de Rugy, a French economist
with the Mercatus Centre, per
capita income in the United
States is $45,000 while in France

it's $33,000. She informs us that
labour strikes routinely shut the
country down, and Government
spending as a percentage of
GDP in France is 52.4 per cent
while in the US it's 37.4 per
cent.

A couple questions come to
mind:

1. If the tax system in France
and Canada is so equitable, why
do so many French and Cana-
dian citizens opt out?

2. If the Canadian health care
system 1s so competent, why do
so many Canadians go to that
dastardly southern neighbour
for services?

Mr. Pinder might be sur-
prised that the company I work
for, and many others I know of,
offer health care and pension
benefits to their associates.

What I find objectionable
though is for governments to
spend other people’s money for
them and indenture future gen-
erations.

The point is, more govern-
ment for The Bahamas is unsus-
tainable.

RICK LOWE
www.weblogbahamas.com
May 22, 2009

Coming up with a way to build a new hospital

EDITOR, The Tribune.

A few months ago a family member of mine
had to be admitted to the PMH and was unable to
due to the caving in of a portion of the roof and
the rooms flooded with water. This almost

brought tears to my eyes.

This led me to try and come up with a way to
build a new hospital if not for my lifetime but
for my children and their children and here it is.
If every working person, including self employed
persons in the Bahamas which is about some
250,000 persons, donated $20 per month towards
building a new hospital that can net some
$5,000,000.00 ($5 million) per month. Well tell me
if your country’s health care is not worth it? If this

as soda, cigarettes, alcohol and many unnecessary
things. Let us put that $20 to good use. At least we

can have a new hospital that we can be proud off.

Some persons might not agree with this,
because they may think that they don’t need it,
but I say to you just live long enough. As a people

let us give it a thought.

is done for one year, then work out the math.

Let us take the strain off the government and
let us do our country a good deed. Many per-
sons waste more than $20 a month on such things

A question of work
ethic and productivity?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Re: Pharmacy workers claim
discrimination

The Tribune, Saturday May
9, 2009.

Yes, why on earth would an
employer prefer to bring in a
foreigner over a similarly qual-
ified Bahamian? Could it be
something to do with the work
ethic and productivity?

KEN W KNOWLES MD
Nassau,
May 10, 2009.

As a people we need to help to build this coun-
try with our hands just to let our children know
that each one of us has a part to play in the build-
ing of our great country. The question is how
will this be done how would you collect these
funds? Each employer can set up a deduction
plan from each employee who is willing to par-
ticipate, or we can hold a $20 day, that’s only a
few suggestion. I know there are more.

BERNAL F BULLARD
Nassau,
April 22, 2009.



A cry for help

EDITOR, The Tribune.




You say you love me, but you do not feel my pain, (no med-
icine in our hospitals and people are dying while waiting).

You say you love me and you see my hunger so you enslave
me, (instead of teaching me to fish you give me one).

You say you love me and I will never need for anything, (so

you give my lands away).








You say you love me and you will never leave me but yet, I
can’t get to see you (even with an appointment).

You say you love me and you would look out for me, yet my
children are being abused, my sons are killing one another.

My house is in disrepair, my streets are falling in holes, my
ancestors cry out for justice as my courts are clueless about
law, homos and lesbians are taking over, my children are not
learning, but I know you love me.












You say you love me and you will love me until the end of
time, you told me not to worry as our love will get better in time
you told me I am the guava of your eyes, but yet you love foreign
better.

You said I must trust you and believe in you and because I
love you I trusted, I believed and my heart is broken in a million
pieces.

You say you love me and wherever I go you will go with me
also. So, my love, when will you be coming to help me push up
these daisies.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY,

MAY 26, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

a oneeveneecrensecorceusseeorsrecsescesssssonssrcsesssereesesoees

Nassau set
for literary
street festival

A STREET festival will
be held in Nassau this
month to celebrate and
promote the literary arts.

The first Bahamas Inter-
national Literary Festival
(BILF) will be held in

on e lleeations of school molestation

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

PTA president Troy Garvey has
criticised religious leaders and
members of the Grand Bahama
Christian Council for not speaking
out when allegations of sexual
molestation at the Eight Mile Rock
High School were first made public.

Mr Garvey said religious lead-

ers cannot remain behind the “four
walls” of their church, and must
get involved in the day-to-day con-
cerns of the country.

“When this whole thing start-
ed, it was astonishing to see that
no Christians, nobody came for-
ward to step in as men of God,”
he said.

The Eight Mile Rock High
School has been mired in scandal
since January when claims of teach-

Rawson Square from noon
to 6pm on May 30.

The festival aims to
broaden participation in
the arts, increase opportu-
nities for artists and pre-
serve and promote the
nation’s cultural resources.

Dozens of literary acts
will be performed and :
there also will be a celebra-
tion of culinary art and :
native crafts.

“Our concept of a liter-
ary street festival is one
where original work is pre-
sented by poets, folk story-
tellers, songwriters and

MONS AUN

playwrights,” said a
spokesperson for the
organisers.

“Natives and visitors can
come and experience a cel-
ebration of the rebirth of
an expressive art form that
materialised as literary art:
innovative, raw, and full of
emotion.

“Our vision is to estab-
lish a street festival as the
catalyst for expanded pub-
lic participation in the arts
and increased opportuni-
ties for artists. BILF sees
the street festival as an
avenue to further strength-
en the economic, social,
and cultural vitality of the

t ‘ WHEN US President John F Kennedy visited
literary art community.”

the Bahamas in 1962 to meet British Prime Minister

ers molesting or engaging in acts
of a sexual nature with students
surfaced.

Committee

Police are looking into allega-
tions against three teachers and a
government select committee has
been appointed to investigate the
circumstances surrounding the case.



JOHN F KENNEDY at a tree planting ceremony in the Bahamas on Peony 21, 1962.

She also joined the president at pool parties and
was once spotted hiding on the floor of his car as it

According to The Daily Mail Kennedy was said to
have almost fired her boss in the press office when

Organisers said high- Harold MacMillan he may have had his hands full left the White House.
lights will include: with more than diplomacy.

© poetry Between December 17 - 21, 1962, President

e drama Kennedy and Mr MacMillan met in Nassau to con-

clude talks on supplying Polaris nuclear missiles to
the United Kingdom.
However, according to The Daily Mail a retired

¢ rake and scrape
* traditional Bahamian

dance : church administrator is going public with intimate
* contemporary Bahami- details of her affair with President Kennedy, while
an music she was an intern at the White House.

¢ Bahamian art and craft
including culinary art.

PUBLIC NOTICE

Mimi Beardsley Alford, then 19, accompanied
President Kennedy to the Bahamas for the meeting.

Public Consultation on the Access and
Interconnection Framework for the

he failed to let her travel with the presidential par-
ty in June 1963 to Berlin, where he gave his famous
‘Ich Bin Ein Berliner’ speech.

Miss Alford admitted to the affair in 2003 after a
newspaper tracked her down, following the publi-
cation of a book called An Unfinished Life: John F.
Kennedy, 1917-1963, by Robert Dallek.

She is now expected to share the details of the
affair in a book called Once Upon A Secret.

i
“ 7

Last Thursday, Rev Glenroy
Bethel and a number of religious
leaders on Grand Bahama called
for the appointment of Christian
Council representatives to that
committee.

However, Mr Garvey claims that
he has been urging the religious
community to get involved for
some time.

“T contacted the Christian Coun-
cil ... and I told them personally
that they need to take off their
coats and get out of the four walls
and get in the midst,” he said.
“Even though I dropped letters off
throughout West Grand Bahama
asking religious leaders to come to
the PTA meeting, we did not have
participation from any of the priests
and reverends in the community.”

Mr Garvey said only three pas-
tors attended a town meeting held
by the PTA to discuss the allega-
tions.

“We call ourselves a Christian
nation and all these things are hap-
pening. This is the time when we





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need the Christians more than ever.

“God is hurting, God is crying
out now and if you look around
and see what is happening it is only
because God is angry,” he said.

Rev Bethel agreed that religious
leaders should have been more
involved in the beginning.

“We should be doing more from
the Christian side of it because we
are falling down in doing our jobs.

“(Mr Garvey) is right; they
should have been leading the
charge, but nevertheless we will see
what happens from here.

“T believe this is an opportunity
for those religious leaders to come
forward and get involved in what is
going on,” he said.

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Mexico spending
S90M on rons
ais for tourism

m@ MEXICO CITY

IF THE rich, famous and
pretty are returning to Mex-
ico's beaches now that offi-
cials say the swine flu epi-
demic is waning, won't
everyone else?

That's the message of a
$90 million campaign aimed
at luring tourists scared off
by the outbreak, which has
killed at least 86 people
worldwide, according to
Associated Press.

The government-funded
campaign will feature ads
with opera singer Placido
Domingo, champion golfer
Lorena Ochoa and other
national heroes.

President Felipe Calderon
said Monday that Mexico
will also invite international
celebrities to visit, but he
didn't name them.

Tourism is Mexico's third-
largest source of legal for-
eign income. But swine flu
fears have stemmed the flow
of visitors and pushed hotel
occupancy to a record low.

Man goes
overboard from
cruise ship

m@ TAMPA, Fla.

THE COAST GUARD
is searching for a man
believed to have gone over-
board from a cruise ship in
the Gulf of Mexico, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

The Coast Guard say 18-
year-old Bruce Okrepki
reportedly went overboard
from the Carnival Fantasy
at about 9:45 p.m. Sunday,
about 150 miles southwest
of Tampa.

Okrepki is from
Louisiana but authorities
aren’t certain of his home-
town.

A search plane, heli-
copter and Coast Guard
cutter were sent out to
search.

The ship had left New
Orleans and was en route to
Key West.

Unrest at COB as faculty
hits out at administrators

A STORM said to have been
quietly brewing at the College of
the Bahamas for some time
boiled over yesterday when
COB bosses were publicly
accused of forcing “disturbing
decisions and policy changes”
on the faculty.

A statement issued by the
Union of Tertiary Educators of
the Bahamas (UTEB) charged
that administrators and the Col-
lege Council have been exclud-
ing staff from the decision mak-
ing process and acting in con-
travention of “good industrial
practices”.

It said: “Despite attempts to
work harmoniously with admin-
istrators at the College of the
Bahamas in our push toward
university status, UTEB must,
at this time, break its long held
silence over the latest in a series
of cavalier and autocratic gov-
ernance decisions and policy
changes by college administra-
tors — decisions and changes that
continue to astonish and offend
the faculty and staff of the col-
lege. UTEB wishes to say that it
is unequivocally opposed to the
manner in which this adminis-
tration continues to circumvent
the already established decision
making process at the institu-
tion, particularly those process-
es leading to decisions which
directly impact faculty.”

Response

Yesterday afternoon, COB
issued a response denying these
allegations and calling for
UTEB to return to negotiations.

The union maintains that any
circumvention of UTEB’s
involvement in the restructur-
ing of schools and faculties,
redrafting of the College Act or
the adoption of policies that
affect terms and conditions of
employment is contrary to the
Industrial Relations Act, the
COB/UTEB Industrial Agree-
ment, and the Memorandum of
Agreement between COB and
UTEB.

“The union feels it is unfortu-
nate that, while college admin-
istrators and UTEB sit at the
bargaining table negotiating a

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Union of Tertiary Educators of
the Bahamas criticises bosses

new industrial agreement, there
have been attempts by the col-
lege and its governing council
to create policies that should be
the subject of current negotia-
tions with UTEB,” the state-
ment said.

“By circumventing proper
negotiations in this way, they
undermine the voice of labour in
the governance of the college;
thereby, creating an environ-
ment that undermines the good
faith relationship UTEB has
attempted to forge with the col-
lege’s senior administration and
governing council.

Voice

UTEB said that for more than
a year, verbally and in writing, it
has tried to get administrators
and government officials
responsible for educational
oversight to recognise the
importance of the faculty’s voice
in the decision making process.

Over the course of the next
few weeks, UTEB said, it will
make the public aware of the
specific decisions it opposes, and
will “call into question the legal-
ity of the process by which they
have been or are being imple-
mented.”

The union said these matters
are of major concern to its mem-
bers, adding: “only when those
issues that arise are properly
addressed will the proposed
University of the Bahamas
attain the pinnacle it seeks and
best serve the needs of its con-
stituents.”

UTEB said it wants to remind
college administrators that the
future University of the
Bahamas must be seen as a
product that evolved from “a
wholly collaborative effort”.

The college’s response noted
that COB is currently in negoti-
ations with UTEB, and consid-
ers that it is only through nego-
tiations at the table that a new

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agreement satisfactory for all
parties can be arrived at.

“On Friday last, the Union
of Tertiary Educators of the
Bahamas walked away from the
negotiating table.

“We have invited the Union
of Tertiary Educators of the
Bahamas to return to the table

and await its decision. With
respect to the current press
release approved by the Union
of Tertiary Educators of the
Bahamas, we wish to assure the
public that the college has not
implemented any policy that
contravenes or contradicts any
rights, privileges or conditions
in any labour contract to which
the college is a party,” COB
said.

The college said that there is
no attempt to circumvent union
involvement or to stifle the

“Indeed, the college values
the views of all faculty and seeks
the full engagement of all — fac-
ulty, students, staff, alumni and
friends — in the task of building
a university to serve and drive
national development and build
a better Bahamas for all. We
call on the Union of Tertiary
Educators of the Bahamas to
return to the negotiating table
and work together in negotiat-
ing an agreement satisfactory
for all parties and helpful for
the development of the College

voice of faculty.

and the Bahamas,” COB said.

eu PRIMARY Sa i 3 uals

KHES ADDERLEY of Temple Christian
Elementary School has been named 2009
Bahamas Primary School Student of the Year
and the winner of a $7,000 scholarship.

The first runner-up Farion Cooper of
Xavier’s Lower School was awarded a $4,000
scholarship. Second runner-up Charisma Sewell
of Walter Parker Primary School in Grand
Bahama and third runner-up Rebecca Hen-
derson of Queen’s College were each awarded
$3,000 scholarships.

Last week, the Bahamas Primary School
Student of the Year Foundation held its 13th
annual awards ceremony to recognise primary
school students from grade six, who had been
selected by their schools as the top achievers.

The students, who have been dubbed “the
best of the best”, competed for the honour of
being named Primary School Student of the
Year by writing an essay as well as submitting:
report cards from grades four, five and six;
copies of awards, certificates, newspaper clip-



pings; three letters of recommendation; and a
work portfolio of approximately 50 pages.

Minister of State for the Environment Phen-
ton Neymour commended Ricardo Deveaux,
president and CEO of the foundation, for hav-
ing the vision to establish the organisation in
1997 in collaboration with the Bahamas Pan-
Hellenic Council.

The minister said he was proud of all of the
students, particularly the young men and those
from the Family Islands.

He urged parents to continue to support their
children and teach them to uphold “true
Bahamian values”.

James Boyce, Primary School Student of the
Year for 2008, spoke of his reign as being both
exciting and overwhelming.

He told the honourees that they were all
winners and encouraged parents to spend qual-
ity time with their children and to make the
effort to support them through their educa-
tional journey.



Organisation formed to
promote ‘green industry’

THE first ever organisation dedicated to rep-
resenting the country’s growers and landscap-
ers has been established.

The Bahamas Landscape Association (BLA)
promotes the interests of individuals, associa-
tions, clubs and businesses involved in nurs-
ery, landscape maintenance, landscape instal-
lation, irrigation, pest management, arboricul-
ture, horticulture and floriculture in the
Bahamas.

Its officers are: co-chairmen Robert Myers of
Caribbean Landscape Ltd and Conray Rolle of
Atlantis; treasurer Mark Fox of ACIT Ltd, sec-
retary Sclima Campbell of Lucyan Tropical
Growers and director Kent Knowles of
Atlantis.

“The BLA is dedicated to
bringing its membership
together to improve the
standard of education, per-
formance, quality and public
awareness of the green
industries in the Bahamas,”
said the association in a
statement.

With more than 50 indi-
vidual and company mem-
bers already signed up, the officers say they
are well on their way to obtaining the critical
mass required to achieve their goals.

The BLA has partnered with the Florida
Nursery Growers Landscape Association and is
looking to partner with the Ministry of Educa-
tion to provide internationally recognised pro-
fessional certification to its members. The first
“Certified Horticultural Professional” pro-
gramme is already being offered to its members
online as of January 2009 and further classes
and certification will take place at the BTVI
once the Ministry of Education approves the
required funding.

The association said it will be encouraging the
professional certification of all of its members
and promoting the use of such professionals
to hotels, businesses, government agencies,
developments and the general public.

The BLA said it sees this programme as “piv-

To have your say on this or any other
issue, email Tbe Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your
letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street,
P.O. Box N-3207

otal in creating standards in the green industry”.

“We are particularly excited about getting
pilot programmes of this level of professional
certifications into the senior classes in the high
schools,” said co-chairman Mr Rolle. “We
understand the vast need for young people out
there looking for a head start in advancing
their education and in the business world; this
is a great programme for just that”.

Robert Myers said: “The BLA will offer indi-
viduals an opportunity to become members of
a massive international industry and will pro-
vide career training and certification thus allow-
ing them to stand out and gain recognition by
employers and or potential customers. In an
unregulated industry this
is the best possible cre-
dential a company or land-
scape professional could
have. It says to the con-
sumer that you know what
you are talking about.”

The BLA says it will:

¢ promote the use of
local grades and standards
for all to follow

¢ lobby the government
to consider proposals that will benefit the indus-
try

¢ offer special short courses and seminars to
its members

¢ send out information on new products,
machinery, ideas, laws and jobs

The BLA website, www.bla-fnegla.org, will
list the certification status of members. It will
also offer consumers or companies the oppor-
tunity to support the association’s programmes.

The BLA said: “This will be an extremely
useful tool for people who are tired of being
ripped off by scam artists and unprofessional
persons and companies in the nursery and land-
scape field. Consumers can be sure their con-
tractors or gardeners are up to date with all
the latest ideas and training as a number of
continued educational units will be required
by each member to maintain their certification
and membership each year.
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009, PAGE 7



Charity reports a sharp rise

in demand at feeding centres
Lyford Cay Foundation donates $25,000 to Salvation Army

THE Lyford Cay Foundation
has made a $25,000 donation to
the Salvation Army of the
Bahamas to support its three feed-
ing centres — which have experi-
enced a sharp rise in the number
of people seeking help since the
global economic crisis took hold.

"This gift from the Lyford Cay
Foundation has made a world of
difference to us," said Major
Lester Ferguson, the Army's divi-
sional commander. "We've been
struggling since late last summer to
keep up with the demand to sup-
ply our cooked meals and gro-
ceries for families in need, here
on Mackey Street and also in
Grants Town and Freeport. This
donation means that we've been
able to add not only to the quality
of the food parcels that we give,
but also to the quantity, so it's
making a great difference."

As a result of the gift, the two
centres in New Providence have
increased the number of free hot
lunches and food parcels they dis-
tribute each week from around
500 to more than 600, according to
Madeline Froning, the Army's
community relations and devel-
opment associate.

In Grand Bahama — where the
pantry was empty for a time last
year — more than 100 parcels
have been given out since the
grant was made. The food pack-
ages range in size and are designed
to serve an individual or family
for up to two weeks.

"In the past, if our food pantry
was empty and we had nothing to
give, we had nothing to give," said
Ms Froning. "It's an ongoing
struggle to maintain this pro-
gramme, so that's why this grant is
so important, because it allows us
to stock our food pantries on a
more regular basis."

According to Major Ferguson,
the feeding centres have not only
seen a rise in the demand for their
services, but also a change in the
kinds of individuals asking for
help.





LYFORD CAY FOUNDATION Gifts and Grants Committee members Suzy Robinson (left) and Kylie Nottage

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Oo



(right) are pictured with Salvation Army divisional commander Major Lester Ferguson at the Army's feeding
centre on Mackey Street. The centre provides hundreds of hot lunches and food parcels to individuals and

families in need every week.

"Previously the people we
assisted would be the unemployed,
or elderly folk,” he said. "Last year
we started to see those numbers
increasing, but we also saw people
who were employed who just
needed a bag of groceries to tide
them through the week. So since
the end of the summer last year,
we saw the numbers just keep ris-
ing, and they really haven't
stopped. And we're finding more
and more persons who need help,
including some who drive their
cars on their way home from work
and stop by to see if they can get
something to get them through a
couple of days."

The Lyford Cay Foundation's
Gifts and Grants Committee has
disbursed more than $10 million to
a wide range of non-profit organi-
zations to date. This year, given
the difficult economic climate, the
committee is concentrating on
addressing people's most funda-
mental needs, including food,
clothing and shelter. And instead
of waiting for grant applications
to come in, the committee has
been reaching out to groups who
specialise in these areas to find
out how best to help.

"We approached the Salvation
Army and explained that because
of the circumstances right now, we



feel a responsibility to focus on
basic human needs, and we know
that they have a system in place to
provide resources to those who
need them the most," said Suzy
Robinson, committee chair.
"Because they are a reliable
organisation that already has a
programme in place, they were
the perfect people to approach,
and we are honoured to be able to
support the great work that they
do."

In 2008, the Lyford Cay Foun-
dation also gave the Salvation
Army $22,000 to fund the pur-
chase of 20 station licenses, train-
ing and computer support for a
literacy software programme used
in the Army's 'Excel After School’
project, which offers children and
young people a safe, comfortable
and supervised place in which to

-_Scotiabank’s Processing
_ Support Centre adopts

Uriah McPhee School

ATA special assembly held at the Uriah McPhee Primary
School on Friday, May 15, Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd Pro-
cessing Support Centre announced its adoption of the Uriah
McPhee Primary School.

Each branch and unit within Scotiabank has been asked to
select a primary school in their community with whom to
partner. Each partnership is individualized and can take the
form of financial support, volunteering, shared expertise or
physical resources.

The Processing Support Centre has commenced a literacy
programme at the school and has plans to launch a science
project in the near future.

On May 15 all 49 members of the unit were treated to a
special assembly conducted by students of the school. Principal
of the Uriah McPhee Primary School, Mrs. Helen Simmons-
Johnson, thanked Scotiabank for its support.

“T am elated that members of the Processing Support Cen-
tre chose to partner with my school, this programme will
allow Scotiabank to observe first hand what we are doing in
our school and will provide our students with opportunities for
enhanced learning,” said Mrs. Simmons-Johnson.

Rekell Griffin, Senior Manager Marketing and Public
Relations at Scotiabank, presented Mrs. Simmons-Johnson
with two computers along with reading software to be used in
the school’s reading lab.

In an address to the administrators, teachers and students
of Uriah McPhee, Ms. Griffin stated, “Scotiabank is very
excited about this new initiative, through this programme
we intend to utilise the human resources, talents and ideas of
our employees to strengthen and enhance the quality of edu-
cation in the communities where we live and work.”

The Adopt-A-School Programme spins off the Scotia-
bank Bright Future Programme, which is a philanthropic
programme that helps support opportunities for the children
and communities in which we live and work.

The Scotiabank Bright Future Programme is helping to
support opportunities for children and communities.

Scotiabank has been part of the Caribbean and Central
America since 1889. It is now the leading bank in the region,
with operations in 27 countries, including affiliates.

The bank has 12,117 employees in the region, including affil-
iates, serving more than two million customers, with 593
branches, kiosks and other offices, plus about 932 automated
banking machines.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986

Port Group Limited appoint
new director of the board

THE Board of Directors of Port Group Lim-
ited have announced the appointment of Pietro
Stefanutti as a director of the board.

Mr Stefanutti is a multi-lingual executive
especially skilled at planning, organisational
development, and leading an efficient organi-
sation. He is oriented toward global businesses
that require professional management with
entrepreneurial skills, and possesses a track
record for turnarounds and solving a broad
range of cultural, technical, manufacturing and
marketing problems. He also serves on the
board of directors of Enterprise Development
International, a U.S. based non profit organi-
zation that promotes the global development of
micro enterprises through micro-lending and
training.

“We think Mr. Stefanutti’s experience in
this arena and overall management and gover-
nance acumen will greatly assist the city’s strate-
gic growth,” said Hannes Babak, Chairman of
Port Group Limited.

Mr Stefanutti’s professional career began in
1972 as an operations engineer with Shell in the
oil production region of Western Venezuela,
and continued with Exxon Chemicals. While at
Exxon, Mr. Stefanutti held several manage-
ment positions with the Venezuelan affiliate,
and was promoted to General Manager in Rio
de Janeiro with responsibility for Brazil,

Argentina and Chile before returning to
Europe in May 1990.

In September 2003 Mr. Stefanutti founded
PharmaChem Technologies (GB) Ltd. to
acquire Honeywell’s Bahamian facility and to
produce a leading antiretroviral drug for
HIV/AIDS. After inspection and approval by
the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
in December 2004, PharmaChem Technolo-
gies (GB) Ltd is now the main producer of the
active pharmaceutical ingredient Tenofovir
Disoproxil Fumarate (TDF) for Gilead Sci-
ences Inc. (NASDAQ: GILD). During late
2007 Mr. Stefanutti merged his company with
Groupe Novasep and became chairman of the
board of the combined entity with some 500
million M$ of revenues worldwide.

“The addition of Mr. Stefanutti ensures the
company will continue to benefit from a diver-
sity of knowledge and opinions,” said Ian Rolle,
President of Port Group Limited.

Mr. Stefanutti was born in Italy and immi-
grated to Venezuela when he was 5 years old.
After completing his elementary education in
Caracas, Mr. Stefanutti studied in the United
States from 1963 to 1972. He attended High
School in Chicago and obtained an engineering
degree from the University of Missouri under a
scholarship program sponsored by Shell Oil
Company.

PM MEETS FRENCH AMBASSADOR

Peter Ramsay/BIS

AMBASSADOR OF FRANCE TO THE BAHAMAS Marc-Oliver Gendry (right) talks with Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham during a courtesy call at the Office of the Prime Minister, Cable Beach, Nassau on

Thursday May 21, 2009.

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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Search for
man who went

overboard from

cruise ship

m TAMPA, Fla.

THE Coast Guard was }
searching Gulf of Mexico waters }
Monday for an 18-year-old }
recent high school graduate from
Louisiana who is believed to }
have gone overboard from a }
cruise ship, according to Associ- }

ated Press.

Bruce O’Krepki went over- }
board from the Carnival Fantasy i
at about 9:45 p.m. Sunday, about }
150 miles southwest of Tampa, }

the Coast Guard said.

O’Krepki is from Hammond, }
La., where The Daily Star news- }
paper reported that he recently :
graduated from St. Thomas
Aquinas High School. He was }
with about 35 classmates on the

ship.

happened.

“We are awaiting more }
word,” O’Krepki told the news- }
paper. “Hopefully, the brave }
men and women of the U.S. }
Coast Guard will be successfulin

searching for Bruce.”

He asked that the family’s pri-
vacy be respected and for people ;
to keep his nephew in their }

thoughts and prayers.

A search plane, helicopter and :
Coast Guard cutter were sent }

out to search.

The ship had left New Orleans i

and was en route to Key West.

‘Rock’ used to
kill loving dad

FROM page one

thrown in the front yard after
his fall.

Emergency Medical Services
and police arrived within the
hour and Mr Fox was pro-
nounced dead at the scene.

A Soldier Road man in his
forties turned himself into
police at around 6.30am yester-
day. Police say they believe he is
responsible for the incident.

Mr Fox, a self-employed
handyman, grew up in the Glen-
dale Subdivision, attending HO
Nash and CC Sweeting schools.
Relatives say he was a family
man who loved to crack jokes
and be the “life of the party.”

The uncle was popular among
his numerous nieces and
nephews. He had one son, Lar-
ry Fox, 24, who lives in Fox Hill
and would visit with his father
every week or so.

Terry Fox’s sister, Melissa
Fox, 40, who lives in the family
home in Porkfish Road, said:
“He was fun-filled, the life of

His uncle, Rick O’Krepki, said :
Monday afternoon that the fam- }
ily had no details about what

FROM page one

next election arrives.

“In our case we have had the time
to reflect to look at this and we are
putting in place now all of the nec-
essary things to make us a strong and
viable opposition to the FNM gov-
ernment and quite frankly I believe
that with the condition of the country
and the years ahead as we move
towards the next general election the
Progressive Liberal Party will be an
intense competitor to the FNM,” said
Mr Christie.

Meanwhile, said the Opposition
leader, the country has now reached
a critical point at which voters should
be in a better position to make an
informed judgment of which party is
more suited to govern the country.

“T think the people of this coun-
try will see, as we progress towards
the next election and more and more
as the FNM approaches mid-term,
and will be looking very carefully (at
how the government is handling the
management of the country).

“Having gone through the last
three or four years, that is two years
of us, the PLP, and the first two years
of the FNM, they are now in a posi-

the party, always making people
laugh. He was the life of the
family; he loved children.”

The last large family gather-
ing was at the funeral of his 74-
year-old father, Rufus Fox, in
March, who died 10 years after
the death of their 64-year-old
mother, Vernitta Fox.

Mr Fox's brothers and sis-
ters said he was a homebody
who rarely liked to go out,
although he did love music, and
he loved to dance.

Miss Fox said: “He was

tion to be making judg-
ments as to how effec-
tive my party was in its
first term and how effec-
tive the Ingraham gov-
ernment is,” he said.

In view of this evalua-
tion, Mr Christie sug-
gested there may be a
swing toward the PLP,
which it can in turn use
to its advantage.

“People form a view
firstly that they don’t
agree with what the gov-
ernment is doing — they
become disaffected. The
Opposition, however it
is organised, becomes
the beneficiary of the
view formed against
what is happening in the
government.”

Voters, he said, will increasingly
be inclined to “choose a PLP where
they would be able to return to the
glory days of an economy that was
very beneficial to them and which
they do not now have.”

“The critical position for people
in this country is to continue to watch
this government and how it is trying



i ae ~ FY 7

TERRY FOX with his brothers and sisters at their father’s funeral in
March. Terry is the second from the left. Left to right are Melissa Fox,
Terry Fox, Michaela Fox, Brinton Fox, Nelson Cartwright, Deborah
Rahming, Dianne Bowe.



to manage a very
bad situation in this
country,” said Mr
Christie.

“There are serious
concerns, legitimately
serious concerns about
how the government is
managing the economy
of The Bahamas and the
social circumstances of
The Bahamas.”

Claiming that polls
have allowed him to
“keep in touch” with
voter’s sentiments, the
former prime minister
said the party has not
lost but gained support
#4) Since the last general
election, which was
closely fought, and he,
with Deputy Leader Cynthia Pratt
and Chairman Glenys Hanna Mar-
tin, are “all, as of today, secure in
(their) positions.”

“Considering the last election was
as close as it was now you can draw
your own conclusions,” said Mr
Christie of the party’s electoral
prospects.

Yesterday, a disgruntled PLP insid-

mo

PLP ‘doing all it can’
_ to be the next govt

er questioned why Mr Christie “only
finds his voice” whenever he is per-
sonally attacked, but remains “silent”
on the issues at “all other times.”

It does nothing to dispel concerns
about the documented public per-
ception of him as “weak and indeci-
sive” to see that Mr Christie “only
speaks out when there is a question
about his leadership,” said the
source, referring to the fact that a
copy of the Greenberg, Quinlan,
Rosner report, which was “not exact-
ly favourable” to Mr Christie’s lead-
ership, was leaked in its entirety to a
local political blog over the week-
end under the heading “Report con-
firms Christie must go or PLP will
die!”

The move was described by Mr
Christie over the weekend as one
“done for the furtherance of political
aspirations by persons who may see
its as negative towards me and my
leadership.”

“It is now clear that he must be
challenged at the convention,” said
the insider.

On Sunday Mr Christie said “he
has no doubt whatsoever” that he
will emerge from the convention still
as leader of the party.

always coming in the morning,
dancing, he would come in front
of my door saying, ‘It ain't time
to sleep!’

“Always clowning around.
But he was always home, he
didn't like to go out.”

Mr Fox was the fourth of
eight children, and although he
was self-employed, he some-
times worked for his half-broth-
er, Nelson Cartwright, at
Cartwright's Carpentry and
Construction in Yamacraw.

Mr Cartwright said his broth-
er was semi-skilled, and could

Wholesaler/Retailer located in Nassau seeks

Saath eee

The candidate will work alongside the senior management
feam at our head office, assisting in.a variety of areas such
as public and custamer relations, marketing, advertising,
HR, basic bookkeeping, and various administrative duties
such as filing and organization. Much of the above will be

office and computer-based,

The candidate should have the following skills:

General computer skills (Microsoft XP, internet, social

networking web sites,,..}

Strang knowledge of Microsoft Office (Word, Excel,

Outlook)

Familiarity with basic bookkeeping concepts
(particularly Accounts Payable and Receivable}

Experience:

The candidate should have experience of office
administration. Specific retail, wholesale, HR or
bookkeeping not essential but beneficial. Additionally,
the candidate must be well-spoken, highly organised
and professional and have a current driver's license and

their own transportation,

Applications are to include: Recent police record,
passport photo, two references, resume, covering letter
Stating where/how specific experience was gained In

(i) Microsoft Office (Word, Excel) (ii) Any bookkeeping
concepts (iii) other software programs you are

experienced / familiar with,

Pye ee rae ea a
f(a) epeeee (cree) wel

f, 322-8430

P.O. Box 55-19021

have been a foreman if he had
“stuck to it.”
“Instead life just threw him
a bunch of curve balls,” he said.
“Tt could have gone a lot of
ways different for him, but our
destiny is not controlled by us.

“T'm a firm believer that if
you live by the sword, you die
by the sword, so I can't believe
anything else.”

Mr Cartwright added: “He
will be missed. We hope that
justice will be done, and police
will determine what is what.

“Tt could have been an acci-

dent, it could have been what-
ever, but we can't jump to con-
clusions.

“We have to believe in the
justice system and how the
country operates.

“We can't take matters into
our own hands because Terry
isn't coming back, so it doesn't
make any sense to take matters
into your own hands.”

Anyone who may be able to
assist police investigations
should call Crime Stoppers
anonymously on 328-TIPS
(8477).

les eed

Notice is hereby given that the Twenty-ninth
(29th) Annual General Meeting of THE

PUBLIC WORKERS’

CO-OPERATIVE

CREDIT UNION LIMITED will be held at

The British Colonial

Hilton Hotel, West

Bay Street, on Friday, June 12th, 2009
commencing at 6:30 p.m. for the following

purposes:

- To receive the report of the Board

of Directors

- To receive the Audited Report for 2008

* To elect members of the Board
of Directors, Supervisory Committee
and Credit Committee

- To discuss and approve the budget

for 2010

All eligible members, wishing to run for
a position on the Board of Directors,

Supervisory

Committee or

Credit

Committee, are asked to submit their names
to the Credit Union’s offices in Nassau or
Freeport, no later than Monday, June 8th,

2009 by 4:00 p.m.

All members are urged to attend and
Exciting door prizes will be offered.
Refreshments will be served!





NELSON CARTWRIGHT at the spot where his half brother, Terry Fox,
died in Porkfish Road, Glendale Subdivision, on Sunday night.

Man who lost
over $40 million in
casinos in Bahamas,

US and Australia
appears in court

FROM page one

According to the 42-year-old, the casino allowed him to
gamble despite knowing that he had a problem and was
banned from casinos elsewhere.

If successful in his bid to win back his funds from the
Crown, Mr Kakavas claims he will still “not have a dollar” as
he will use it to pay back millions owed to creditors else-
where.

Testifying on Monday, Mr Kakavas reinforced his argu-
ment that he was a “problem” gambler by telling the court
that despite promising his fiancée that he would quit his
addiction when they got married, he went against his com-
mitment during their honeymoon to The Bahamas in 2006.

Hiding his gambling activities during their trip by organis-
ing a “pampering package” for his wife, the property devel-
oper added to the $40 million in losses he had already racked
up in unidentified casinos in the U.S. and The Bahamas
between 2003 and 2006.

He had earlier told the court that he would book his wife in
for facials, hair stylings and manicures while he gambled in the
Crown Casino in Melbourne.

“She did not know I gambled in the Bahamas,” Mr Kakavas
said.

“IT arranged for her to do the women’s things, whatever
they do.”

Meanwhile, the Australian vehemently denied a sugges-
tion made by a lawyer during his opening remarks in the
case that he did not chase his losses.

“The only occasion I would not chase my losses was when
I had no money to chase my losses with,” he said.

“Blind Freddy could see I was chasing my losses... was
chasing them vigorously and in a blinded state.”
TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS



Howard’s 24 lead Magic
past Cavs for 2-1 lead

@ By TOM WITHERS
AP Sports Writer

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) —
From an unforgettable shot to
a cheap one.

Three games in, the Eastern
Conference finals have grown a
little nasty.

Dwight Howard scored 24
points — 14 on free throws —
and Rafer Alston added 18 as
the Orlando Magic, sick of see-
ing replays of LeBron James’
dramatic buzzer-beater to win
Game 2, downed the Cleveland
Cavaliers 99-89 on Sunday
night to take a 2-1 lead in the
series.

A physical game from start
to finish, there were 86 free
throws attempted, 58 person-
al fouls called, two technicals,
and a flagrant. The officials
spent half the night stepping
between players on both sides
as tempers flared inside an
overheated Amway Arena.

In the first half, Mo Williams
had his left eye split open by
Orlando's Anthony Johnson,
who nailed Cleveland's point
guard with an elbow.

Williams, who needed four
stitches to close two cuts, and
James felt the blow was a
cheap shot.

"T think 1t was,” James said.
"You see Mo's face, it's not a
pretty sight. That's not called
for in this game.”

James scored 41 on just 11-
of-28 shooting and missed five
free throws in the fourth quar-
ter. And once again, Cleve-
land's superstar didn't get
enough help from his team-
mates. Williams, Delonte West
and Zydrunas Ilgauskas shot a
combined 13-of-37.

Game 4 is Tuesday night.

The first two games of the
series in Cleveland were each
decided by one point. This one
was resolved by elbows, shoves
and hard fouls.

Howard, Ilgauskas and
Cleveland's Anderson Varejao
all fouled out. Afterward,
Williams said the Cavaliers
were giving the underdog Mag-
ic too much respect.

"We just need to man up,”
James said. "Orlando is a very,
very good team.”

Unlike Games 1 and 2, the
Magic got out fast, stayed close
despite Howard's early foul
trouble and put the Cavs away
at the line.

Howard, a notoriously poor
foul shooter, went 14-of-19
from the line and the Magic
made 39 of 51 attempts. In the
fourth quarter alone, Orlando
made 19 of 23 to hold off the
top-seeded Cavaliers, who
began the playoffs with eight
straight wins and have now
dropped two of their last three.

Each time he stepped to the
line, Howard sang a song in his
head he heard at halftime.

"We just kept fighting.
That's what we got to do, we
fight to the end," Howard said.
"We can't worry about noth-
ing, we can't worry about the
calls, can't worry about nobody
else. We just got to get out
there and play."

Cleveland better figure out a
way to win in steamy Florida
fast. The Cavs, who were
thumped here by 29 on April 3,
have six lost six of their last
seven in Orlando.

The Magic seem to have a
spell over the Cavs.

"They create so many
matchup problems for us,"
Williams said. "I know it. They
know it. Everybody knows it."

Despite his lack of help,
James kept Cleveland within
striking distance in the fourth
and scored on a three-point
play while getting Howard's
fifth foul with 2:34 to play to
pull the Cavs to 90-86.

Howard, wrapped up under-
neath, then made two free
throws before James was
fouled and rimmed out two at
the other end. On Orlando's
next trip, Mickael Pietrus, who
came off the bench to score 16,
grabbed a long rebound, got
fouled and was pushed in the
back by West, who was handed
aT.

Pietrus made his free throws
to make it 94-86 and the Mag-
ic appeared to have things



DWIGHT HOWARD (12) is fouled by Zydrunas Ilgauskas in the second half of Game 3 of Eastern Conference
finals in Orlando, Florida, on Sunday. Orlando won 99-89.

under control when Howard
caught James from behind and
blocked his 3-pointer. The refs
saw it otherwise and called a
three-shot foul on Superman,
who couldn't believe it.

James made all three shots,
but the Cavs were short on
time. Rashard Lewis and Hedo
Turkoglu made free throws.
Turkoglu was just 1-of-11 from
the floor but made 11 free
throws and added 10 rebounds
and seven assists.

Grand Bahamian quarter-

miler making his mark



FROM page 11



life,” said Williams, who joined
Andrae Williams (44.98) and
Chris Brown (45.03) in sur-
passing the A qualifying stan-
dard of 45.55 for the [IAAF
World Championships set for
August in Berlin, Germany.

“But I feel it’s a big achieve-
ment because as a track ath-
lete once you get fast, you are
supposed to get faster. So I
guess my point is I have to get
faster and the only way I can
do that is to train harder than I
did and lift more than I did and
improve on where I am right
now.”

Williams’ coach Blaine Wiley
said he has been amazed by his
performance. “I had very high
expectations for him,” Wiley
said.

“T felt that he had the ability
when he got here. I think his
personal best was 47.91 when
he came to South Plains. His
freshman year, he ran 46.70
after he had injured his ham-
string 10 days before.

“T was expecting him to run a
46 low last year, but he was set
back by the injury. So I knew
coming in that he would have
had the potential to run 46 or
faster. But as the season pro-
gressed and he started training
with another quarter-miler
here, he just started running
faster.”

Based on his performances,
Wiley said he knew that
Williams was on course to run
some pretty good times this
year.

“When he ran the 45.01 for
the fastest time in the world,
we continued to train harder
and so I knew going into this
meet over the weekend, I knew
he was strong enough to run
under 45 seconds.

“He proved me right. He
came off the curve and ran a
brilliant race. He came through
the first 200 in 21.6, which is
exactly what I told him and he
finished strong and nobody was
able to catch him. In both of
his races, he ran as perfect as
you could get for a quarter-mil-
er, SO it was great.”

Latoy Williams

At the beginning of the sea-
son, Williams said his ultimate
goal was to run around 45.5
and hopefully secure a lane in
the one-lapper in Berlin.

“T succeeded that, so every
time I run, I’m surprised at
what I do,” Williams stated.
“But I work really hard, so I
know I’m capable of doing it.”

Although the 400m has
already been the leading event
at the Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations’ Nation-
al Championships scheduled
for June 26-27 at the Thomas A
Robinson stadium, Williams’
performances adds an addi-
tional flair.

But Williams said he’s not
going to linger on the trip home
for that meet because he has
an even more loftier goal and
that is to represent the coun-
try well in Berlin.

“T really can’t tell what the
future holds. I will just let the
Lord guide me and go with the
flow,” he said. “One minute
you could be on top and the
next minute you are not, so ’m
not going to think too far in
the future.”

Having progressed at 3 1/2
seconds over the last two sea-
sons at South Plain, Wiley said
Williams has the potential to
run a low 44 this season.

“T really think that in 2012,
he will really be a medal con-
tender (at the Olympic
Games),” Wiley projected.
“There’s a possibility for him to
do it this year.

“But it’s more difficult for



the kids coming out of college
after the long season to main-
tain their form at the World
Championships or _ the
Olympics. But we have tried to
get him ready for the summer.
He has a lot of heart and a lot
of character. He does every-
thing that I’ve asked him to
do.”

While he has put himself
where he’s now a marked man,
Williams said it’s good because
he remembers how just last
year he was chasing all of the
top local contenders, including
Brown and Andrae Williams.

“Tm just going to train
hard,” he said. “I know it’s
going to be hard because I
don’t want them to concentrate
on just trying to beat me.

“There are still two (Ameri-
can) quarter-milers out there
(Olympic champion LaShawn
Merritt and runner-up Jeremy
Wariner), so don’t set your
sights on me because you will
be only the third best. Like ?’m
doing, try to be the best.”

Andrae Williams, another
Grand Bahamian native, said
he’s elated to see Williams per-
forming the way he has been.

“Each year we seemed to
have another quarter-miler
coming up,” he said. “It’s excit-
ing. To run 44.73 is an out-
standing time, so that should
really help us out at the World
Championships as we chase the
Americans.”

Not sure of the direct rela-
tionship between the two,
Andrae Williams said Latoy
Williams is certainly inspiring
him to train harder and he
knows that the other quarter-
milers are doing the same.

“Tm happy with my times so
far. This is the best perfor-
mance that I’ve ever had, so I
just hope that I can stay healthy
and just peak at the right time
to compete at the Nationals,”
he said.

Andrae Williams, who is
based in Lubbock, Texas,
where he’s being coached by
Dion Miller, is expected to be
back in action this weekend to
compete in the Reebok Grand
Prix in New York.

After sitting the final seven
minutes of the first half with
three fouls, Howard made it
through 9:10 of the third quar-
ter before getting No. 4— and
technical No. 5 of the postsea-
son.

He was called for pushing
Ben Wallace underneath, and
upset with the whistle, he said
something on his way to the
bench that referee Joey Craw-
ford didn't like and was T’d up.
Orlando coach Stan Van

Gundy had warned his star
to keep his composure
because the league auto-
matically suspends a player
for one game after he
receives his seventh tech-
nical foul in the playoffs.

"T didn't say anything to
Joey Crawford," Howard
said. "The response was to
the other team. I didn't say
anything to Joey Crawford.
I'm not stupid enough to
get in his face and say any-
thing, so I try to keep it to
the other team."

The Magic led 29-23
when Howard picked up
his third personal foul with
7:27 remaining in the first
half when he bumped
James ever so slightly on a

(AP Photo: Reinhold Matay)

drive.

After Johnson rocked
Williams with the elbow,
Williams laid face down on the
floor for several seconds. When
he got up, Williams, who was
called for a block, had blood
trickling from his eyebrow and
left cheek.

During the timeout, the offi-
ciating crew huddled and
decided to call a flagrant-1 on
Johnson. Williams, who had
hurried from the floor for med-
ical treatment, came back out
to shoot the free throws with
his eye already severely
swollen. If he had not returned
to shoot, Williams would not
have been able to play any-
more.

Gritting his teeth, Williams,
looking like a boxer needing a
corner cut man, made both
shots and immediately headed
to the locker room for stitches.

He was back on the floor
with about two minutes left.

Before the game, James said
he expected a physical game.

"When you play a team over
and over you start to dislike
them more,” he said. "It just
happens. It's got to be a little

chippy."
Was it ever.

NBA Today

@ By The Associated Press

Cleveland at Orlando (8:30pm
EDT). The Magic look to take a 3-1
lead over the team that had the
NBA’s best record in the regular sea-
son. After beating Cleveland two out
of three in the regular season, Orlan-
do has won two of three to open the
Eastern Conference finals.

STARS

Sunday

—Dwight Howard, Magic, went
14-of-19 from the line and scored 24
points as Orlando beat Cleveland
99-89 to take a 2-1 lead in the East-
ern Conference finals.

—Rafer Alston, Magic, scored 18
points in outplaying Cleveland All-
Star point guard Mo Williams.

—Mickael Pietrus, Magic, came
off the bench to score 16 points and
play strong defense as Orlando
forced LeBron James to shoot 11-
of-28.

HELP WANTED

LeBron James had 41 points, nine
assists and seven rebounds, but had
little help from his teammates in
Cleveland's 99-89 Game 3 loss to
Orlando. Guards Mo Williams and
Delonte West were a combined 10-
for-27 from the field and the Cava-
liers shot 37 per cent from the floor.

NO MO

Mo Williams had another poor
night — and a painful one — in
Cleveland's 99-89 loss in Game 3 of
the Eastern Conference finals. The
All-Star point guard had only five
of his 15 points after halftime and
was just 5-for-16 shooting, falling to
18-for-56 for the series. He also
briefly left the game after taking an
elbow from Orlando's Anthony
Johnson above and below the left
eye midway through the second
quarter. Williams required four
stitches to seal the lacerations and
said Johnson's elbow was "most def-
initely" a cheap shot.

MAVERICK TRADING

The Dallas Mavericks are out of
the NBA playoffs, and the spotlight
is now following the team's contro-
versial owner, Mark Cuban, to a dif-
ferent venue — federal court. The
insider trading suit filed against
Cuban by the U.S. Securities and
Exchange Commission last year is
scheduled to receive its first hearing
Tuesday when attorneys present oral
arguments on a motion by the bil-
lionaire owner to have the case dis-
missed.

CAVALIERS & CHINA

The Cleveland Cavaliers have
signed an agreement with an invest-
ment group from China to become
minority owners of the NBA fran-
chise and its arena. The Asian con-
glomerate, which includes JianHua
Huang, a Chinese businessman who
has brokered sponsorship deals with
the New York Yankees and other
sports franchises in the US., could
acquire up to 15 per cent of Cavaliers
Operating Company, the entity that
owns the team and operates Quicken
Loans Arena. If approved, the deal
would provide marketing opportu-
nities for the Cavaliers and James,
who is already popular in China.

SPEAKING

"We just need to man up. Orlando
is a very, very good team."

— LeBron James, after the Magic's
99-89 victory gave them a 2-1 lead
over the Cleveland Cavaliers in the
Eastern Conference finals

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS





SPORTS

Bahamians win national titles at
US track and field championships




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AT the 2009 National Junior College Athletic Association, SHENIQUA ‘Q’ FERGUSON (shown in
this file photo), representing Southwest Mississippi, won the 100m in 11.48. And she doubled

B By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

AT two different track and
field championships across the
United States over the week-
end, a few Bahamians have
excelled by winning national
titles.

At the 2009 National Junior
College Athletic Association
(NJCAA), Latoy Williams
became only the sixth Bahami-
an to crack the 45-second bar-
rier in winning the men’s 400
metres in Hutchinson, Kansas.

Having already booked his
ticket to the [IAAF World
Championships in Berlin, Ger-
many, when he ran the then
world leading time of 45.01, the
Grand Bahamian sophomore at
South Plains College stopped
the clock in 44.73 to produce
the fastest time by a Bahamian
this year and the third best
behind Americans LaShawn
Merritt and Jeremy Wariner.

The race was so fast that
Williams had to hold Tabarie
Henry from Barton County
Community College, who was
second in 44.77.

Williams’ performance over-
shadowed the double victory
for Olympic sprinter Sheniqua
‘Q’ Ferguson, who represented
Southwest Mississippi.

Ferguson, who is preparing
to head to Auburn University to
complete her final two years of
college eligibility, won the wom-
en’s 100 in 11.48. And she dou-
bled up by taking the 200 in
23.54.

Both times, however, were
off the automatic qualifying of
11.30 and 23.00 respectively for
the World Championships.

Jamal Wilson, also from
Southwest Mississippi, matched
the same height as two other
competitors at 6-feet, 10 3/4-
inches (2.10 metres) to repeat as
the men’s high jump champion
on fewer knockdowns.

At the NATA Outdoor Track
and Field Championships in

Edwardsville, Illinois, Olympian
Ramon Miller closed out his
collegiate career by repeating
as the quarter-mile champion.

His time of 45.43 was posted
as a new meet record and a per-
sonal best, lowering the previ-
ous mark of 45.97 that he
turned in during the semifinal.

Another Bahamian and a
Dickinson State team-mate
Sean Pickstock finished second
in the final in 46.65. Pickstock,
like Miller, won his heat in
47.00.

In the 200, Dickinson State’s
John Ingraham clocked 21.47
for second in the final. The
event was won by Tyrell Cuffy
of King College in 21.06.

And Jamal Forbes, another
member of Dickinson, round-
ed out the Bahamian men’s
individual performances with a
fourth place finish in the 100m
final in 10.61. Forbes ran 10.56
in the semifinals to qualify for
the final.

On the ladies’ side, Lanece
Clarke had her best showing in
the 100 final where she was
third in 11.93 for McKendree
College. She ran 12.05 to quali-
fy.

Clarke also got second in the
200 in 24.17. She ran faster in
the preliminaries in 24.29.

And Ashley Hanna, repre-
senting Florida Memorial, was
fifth in the ladies’ 400 final in
55.02. Hanna got a fifth place
finish in her heat in the prelim-
inaries in 56.36.

Meanwhile at the Belem
Grand Prix in Brazil, two elite
athletes were in action.

Quarter-miler Christine
Amertil had to settle for fifth
place in the women’s 400 in
51.43, which surpassed the A
qualifying standard of 51.50 for
Berlin. Jamaican Bobby-Gaye
Wilkins won in 50.91.

And Olympic bronze medal-
list Leevan “Superman” Sands
soared 16.79 metres for seventh
place in the men’s triple jump.
The winning leap was 17.66 by
Nelson Evora of Portugal.

BSF executives open
Andros Softball Association

A relatively new Bahamas
Softball Federation adminis-
tration at the helm welcomed
its second member association
into the 2009 softball season.

BSF executives were on
hand to open the Andros
Softball Association on May
23 in Nicholls Town, Andros.

In a rematch of last year’s
ladies final series, defending
champions Nicholl’s Town
Navigators held the home
field advantage and defeated
the Lowe’s Sound Angels, 11-
10.

The ASA presented post-
season awards and the federa-
tion officially recognised two
of the host islands recent
entrants into the BSF Hall of
Fame Brian Cleare and Wen-
dell Evans.

On hand to attend the event
were MP for North Andros
and the Berry Islands, Vin-
cent Peet, BSF president Bur-
ket Dorsett and first vice pres-
ident Ted Miller.

Dorsett heralded Andros as
one of the major building
blocks of the federation’s suc-
cess.

“Andros now boasts one of
the largest associations in the

federation in that they have
about 11 men’s teams and five
ladies teams. In the last few
years the way the BSF format
1s now set for the National
Championship format,
Andros has fared well over
the last couple of years,” he
said.

“They have a high level of
talent in terms of players that
can represent the country at
the national level. The Navi-
gators, the league defending
champions currently boast a
shortstop on the national
team roster. With proper
training she and other players
like her can only reach the
zenith of their careers as
homegrown talents in Andros.
On the men’s side there is
young pitching prodigy
Christopher Russell. The fed-
eration will be paying keen
interest to the development of
softball, particularly the
young players true to our
theme this year, youth devel-
opment and the way for-
ward.”

Dorsett said the presence of
a vibrant softball community
on the island has served a
number of purposes for the

island.

“It is promising that such a
large crowd attended the
opening night of the associa-
tion which bodes well for the
future of softball on the island
and their impact in the BSF,”
he said. “The interest on the
island is high for softball and
there was constant talk about
the participation and competi-
tion in the league this year.
Softball and sports in general
are doing a the job of binding
the North Andros community
together.”

Next on the opening list for
the federation is the All-Aba-
co Softball Association in
Cooper’s Town, Abaco, on
May 31.

2008 ASA Season Awards

Male MVP - Christopher
Russell

Female MVP - Dora Evans

Male Rookie of the Year -
Horrace Miller

Female Rookie of the Year
- Tareka Munroe

Male Coach of the Year -
Dora Evans/Vashnell Hill

Female Coach of the Year -
Stephen Russell/Stephen
Riley

Junior Baseball League of Nassau
ends its ‘09 season on a high note

THE Junior Baseball League
of Nassau’s Division Champi-
onship Series concluded on Sat-
urday as champions were
crowned in all six divisional age
groups. Rather unusual was the
fact that all six pennant winners
lost the series to the elimina-
tion game winners.

JBLN finished its 2009 Sea-
son on a high note as 29 teams
in Six age groups saw play in
youth baseball and as seen in
the playoffs, the competition
was fierce from the start of the
season in January to its conclu-
sion on May 23.

Next up for JBLN will be its
awards presentation set for 2pm
June 13 at The Nassau Yacht
Club.

TEE BALL
Game 1 - Knights, 15
Sidewinders, 4
Game 2 - Knights, 7

Sidewinders, 6
Knights sweep series 2-0

COACH PITCH

Game 1 - Athletics, 10 Dia-
mondbacks, 0

Game 2 - Athletics, 13 Dia-
mondbacks, 2

Athletics sweep series 2-0

MINOR LEAGUE

Game 1 - Rockies, 12 Mets, 8
Game 2 - Mets, 10 Rockies, 3
Game 3 - Rockies, 5 Mets, 4
Rockies win series 2-1

MAJOR LEAGUE

Game 1 - Reds, 14 Indians, 7
Game 2 - Indians, 9 Reds, 4
Game 3 - Indians, 5 Reds, 3
Indians win series 2-1

JUNIOR LEAGUE

Game 1 - Yankees, 15
Dodgers, 10

Game 2 - Yankees, 8
Dodgers, 3

Yankees sweep series 2-0

SENIOR LEAGUE

Game 1 - Tigers, 7 Phillies, 6
Game 2 - Tigers, 8 Phillies, 5
Tigers sweep series 2-0
THE TRIBUNE



pees =—_



TUESDAY,MAY 26,

LATOY WILLIAMS became only the fourth Bahamian to dip under the 45





"

second barrier when he clocked a blistering 44.73 seconds to win the
National Junior College Athletic Association’s 400m title over the week-

end in Hutchinson, Kansas.

Es



TOUCH FOOTBALL

WEEKEND RESULTS

BELOW are scores of the
three games played over the
weekend. On Saturday at
Goodman’s Bay, the K O
Lunatics would defeat the RBC
Lions 21-20.

On Sunday, two games were
played at the Winton Rugby
field.

In game one, the EastSide
Predators demolished the Fort
Charlotte Snappers 88-0. In
game two, the Bahamas Rug-
by Team would lose to the
Warriors 44-26.

There are four games sched-
uled for this holiday weekend
and they will all be played at
the Winton Rugby Field.

See schedule below:

Saturday, May 30

3pm - The Bahamas Rugby
Team vs. The Orry J Sands Pros

Spm - The Fort Charlotte
Snappers vs. the K O Lunatics

Sunday, May 31

2:30pm - The Warriors vs.
The RBC Lions

4:30pm - EastSide Predators
vs. the Goodman’s Bay Spar-
tans

BASEBALL

FREEDOM FARM

CHAMPIONS

Four more champions were
crowned over the weekend.
Congratulations to the Coco
Plums who defeated the Sea
Grapes for the T-ball Champi-
onships on Saturday past in a
decisive game three.

Congratulations to Coach
Smithy and the Boas who after
losing Friday night against the
Bees 12-4 went on to capture
the 2009 Coach Pitch Champi-
onship 4-3 on Saturday.

The new 11-12 Division
champions are Coach Greg and
the Wild Dogs who won two
straight games this weekend
over the Conchs 10-3 on Friday
night and 5-4 on Saturday in an
epic battle.

In the 16-18 Division, Coach
Tellis and Coach Martinbor-
ough Arawaks swept the
Lucayans 10-9 and 14-7 on Sat-
urday to win the championship.

Only 9-10 Division remains
uncrowned where the battle
continues between the Dol-
phins and Barracudas. Game
two is scheduled for 6:30pm
Tuesday and if necessary,
Game 3 is scheduled for 6:30pm
Thursday.

USTA MEN’S
CHALLENGER TENNIS
MEMORIAL DAY
CLASSIC

Justin Lunn competed in the

USTA Men's Challenger Ten-
nis Memorial Day Classic
(Tournament ID 153813309) in
Pebroke Pines, FL over the
weekend.

In the first round Justin
defeated Gino Meeuwsen 7-5,
7-6 (4). In the second round, he
defeated the No. 5 seed Brian
Duschoh 6-3, 7-6. Justin was
defeated in the quarter final by
the no. 1 seed Nikola Aracic 6-
4, 7-5.

BAHAMAS HOT

ROD ASSOCIATION

GENERAL MEETING

A General Meeting of the
Bahamas Hot Rod Association
is set for 7pm May 28 at the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture’s Conference Room on
Thompson Boulevard, just west
of the Customs building.

Matters to be discussed will
be upcoming events, improve-
ments on the MotorSports
Park. Persons interested can
attend and also inquire about
the membership of BHRA.

CRICKET

WEEKEND RESULTS

THE Dynasty Starts contin-
ued their unbeaten record with
a victory by five wickets over
the Castrol Commonwealth
team Saturday as the Bahamas
Cricket Association continued
its regular season action at
Windsor Park.

Castrol Commonwealth bat-
ted first and was bowled out for
179 runs. Garth Davis had 67
runs and Carlton Brown 42 runs
to lead their offensive attack.

Bowling for Dynasty Stars,
Hussain Raza, Venris Bennett
and Garcha Blair all had three
wickets.

Dynasty Stars scored 182
runs for the loss of five wickets
in the win. Their top batsmen
were Garsha Blair with 35 runs
and Ryan Tappin with 27.

Sunday’s match between the
Police and Scotia Bank Par-
adise was rained out.

Action will continue this
weekend as follows:

Saturday - Dynasty Stars vs
Dockendale at Windsor Park.

Sunday - Police vs Castrol
Commonwealth at Haynes
Oval.

Monday - BCA’s Under-19
National team is scheduled to
play a match against England.
The latter team will consists of
cricketers from the UK resid-
ing here. It is one of a number
of warm-up matches planned
for the Under-19 team in prepa-
ration for the ICC internation-
al youth tournament in Toron-
to in July.

2009






Howard’s 24
lead Magic
past Cavs
for 2-1 lead...

See page 9

. 4

Grand Bahamian quarter-
miler making his mark

Latoy Williams the sixth Bahamian to dip under 45 second barrier in 400m



Bg By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ove over
Chris “Bay”

Brown,

Andrae

Williams and

Andretti Bain. There’s a new
quarter-miler who is making his
mark on the international scene.
Meet Latoy Williams, a
native of Grand Bahama who

FAMGUARD

is in his sophomore year at
South Plains College and is get-
ting ready to transfer to Texas
Tech to complete his final two
years of eligibility.

Williams, who on Thursday
celebrates his 21st birthday on
the same day as his mother Nor-
ma, became only the sixth
Bahamian to dip under the 45
second barrier when he clocked
a blistering 44.73 seconds to win
the National Junior College
Athletic Association’s 400m

title over the weekend in
Hutchinson, Kansas.

A 2007 graduate of St
George’s High School,
Williams’ performance came
after he stunned the track and
field world with the fastest time
of 45.01 in Waco, Texas, on
April 18 this year.

“T feel quite satisfied. It’s a
big performance, but I still feel
the same about my every day

SEE page 9

CORPORATION LIMITED

Se Ue EU (eeOCm UL StL LL
SEARO AMON, UM aad See UD TLC




PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Minister a constant presence in Lands and Surveys Dept

FROM page one

Mr Greaves’ son is said to
have bought a 15,625 square
foot lot on Wood Cay for
$1,786.25 while his wife is said
to have bought an 18,343
square foot lot in a subdivi-
sion south of Treasure Cay for
$2,201.16.

VEERGallGM CALENDAR CONTEST

It is unclear at this point
how government intends to
move forward with the inves-
tigation, but it has been con-
firmed that Mr Woodside,
Minister of State for Lands
and Local Government, is
seen to be taking a “hands on”
approach.

This, observers claim, is a

a celebration of nature

45th anniversary calendar

CONTEST RULES

1) Fam Guardian's 4nual Calendar Photo Contests

signal that government is tak-
ing the matter seriously and
is intent on addressing the
complaints of nepotism that
plague this ministry.

Mr Woodside’s presence, it
was claimed, has boosted staff
moral at the department as
employees feel confident that
government is finally taking

the matter seriously.

Since The Tribune’s first
article on the allegations, it
has come to light that several
files at the department have
“gone missing.”

Attempts to reach Mr
Woodside for comment on the
matter were not successful up
to press time last night.

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

14 winning entries will appear in Family
Guardian's 2010 Calandar

valued at $400

Winning entries will receive 6 gift certificate

Entry deadline is June 1, 2009

s open bo all photographers. The tele tor the company's 2010 calendar wil be “A CELEBRATION OF

ATURE - 45th Anniversary Calendar”. Photographs may be of any subject animate or inanimate) ora scene which is a abiking aeample olinature as
found in The Baltantas, a3 well as, phodographs of the Family Guardian Corporate Centre, located on Village Road and East Bay Sireet. “See website
for further competion detads haww.tameyquardian.com|.



IN THIS MAY 9, 2009 PHOTO, aman rows a boat through a flooded
street in Trizidela do Vale in Brazil's northeastern state of Maranhao.
Flooding is common in the world's largest remaining tropical wilderness,
but this year the waters rose higher and stayed longer than they have in
decades, leaving fruit trees entirely submerged. Only four years ago, the
same communities suffered an unprecedented drought that ruined crops
and left mounds of river fish flapping and rotting in the mud. Experts
suspect global warming may be driving wild climate swings that appear

DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES 15 JUNE 1, 2009, All entrees are submetted at the oaners nek and yl notie reterned

All entries are to be delivered to Family Guardian's Corporate Centre, Village Road and East Bay Street, Nassau, between S004M and S:(0PhA
weeodaye only. Envelopes should be marked “Calendar Contest”

All antiga mathe accompanied by am official entry form, aeailable at any Family Guardia office, as published in the newspapers or on the website
(yeveye, faery g eardian,.comi

Only coloer inages will be comidered. levages muct be provided ae digital files an CO. Digital images mast be of high quality (2700 x 2100 pixels or
larger). Digital images showing signs of photo manipulation, resoletion enhancement of compression will be repectes. To eesere the best colour
reproduction, digetal images abould be seppliad im Fal, TIFF or high quality JPEG and im the original coloer format the camera uees (LAB or AGB). All
entries must be supplied with colour prints (a 10} which willbe used inthe jedging process. (Note: prints submitied wethowt 60's will not be eligihbe
and view versal. The photographer's name. photo subject and location must be written on the reverse of the print

Judging of antnes well ba based on beauty, interest, composition, colour, originality and quality of photograph, Particular areas and subjects of
interes! are detailed on the website beweelamilyguardian.com|, The photographs selected yall appear in Farely Guardean’s 2010 calendar, The

to be punishing the Amazon with increasing frequency.

Amazon hit by climate
chaos of floods, drought

m SAO PAULO

ACROSS the Amazon basin, river dwellers are adding new floors
to their stilt houses, trying to stay above rising floodwaters that have
killed 44 people and left 376,000 homeless, according to Associated
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decision of the padges wil be final.

A git cerirheate valued at $400 vall be presented foreach otthe photographs selected, Photograghic credits willbe green m the calendar, The number
of entries per pleodographer is limited fo a mascimum of 5 photos,

The winning photo grapes, alongwith all publication aad reproduction rights attached thereto, become the property of Famady Geardian and the company

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Employees of Fartily Guardkan, its affiliated companies or family members are not eligible

1 Previewsly published photos are nef eligible,

*For further details & key subjects of interest

visit our wabsite at www.familyquardian.com

PA
TEL BUSINESS

EMAL

PO, Bot STHEET

ADDRESS

ISLAND

HUMBER OF PHOTOS ENTERED dred sie eof 5]

of ite ae
arty lk ar

y SOGS ieee | ao

HA (et Dalai CoP SDL

SIENATUPE

Our environment is our single
most important asset.



Flooding is common in the world's largest remaining tropical wilder-
ness, but this year the waters rose higher and stayed longer than they
have in decades, leaving fruit trees entirely submerged. Only four
years ago, the same communities suffered an unprecedented drought
that ruined crops and left mounds of river fish flapping and rotting in
the mud.

Experts suspect global warming may be driving wild climate swings
that appear to be punishing the Amazon with increasing frequency.

It's "the $1 million dollar question," says Carlos Nobre, a clima-
tologist with Brazil's National Institute for Space Research.

While a definitive answer will take years of careful study, climatol-
ogists say the world should expect more extreme weather in the years
ahead. Already, what happens in the Amazon could be affecting
rainfall elsewhere, from Brazil's agricultural heartland to the U.S.
grainbelt, as rising ocean temperatures and rain forest destruction
cause shifts in global climate patterns.

"It's important to note that it's likely that these types of record-
breaking climate events will become more and more frequent in the
near future," Nobre said. "So we all have to brace for more extreme
climate in the near future: It's not for the next generation."

The immediate cause of the unusually heavy rains across northern
Brazil is an Atlantic Ocean weather system that usually moves on in
March, but stayed put until May this year.

Almost simultaneously, southern Brazilian states far from the Ama-
zon have suffered from an extended drought, caused by La Nina — a
periodic cooling of waters in the Pacific Ocean. And La Nina alternates
with El Nino, a heating up of Pacific waters that is blamed for cata-
strophic forest fires plaguing the Amazon in recent years.

Putting
the trash
in the red
bins, Tor

example.

SAHAMAS

Live © POSITIVELY


business

Tes) ES De Aen

MAY 26,

2009

Arbitration centre
‘leg-up’ on rivals

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

he Bahamas can

“get a lead on the

competition”

through passing

legislation to cre-
ate the framework for estab-
lishing this nation as an inter-
national arbitration centre, the
co-chair of a private sector com-
mittee working on the initiative
said yesterday, with “summer’s
end” the target for getting “a
pretty comprehensive” draft Bill
on the statute book.

John Wilson, an attorney and
partner at McKinney, Bancroft
& Hughes, told Tribune Busi-
ness that the Bahamas Finan-
cial Services Board (BFSB)-led
initiative would strengthen this
nation’s international business
services offering and help
attract other industries to this
nation, giving it “another leg-
up” at a time when its financial
industry is under increasing

ST WT SLO)



pressure from the G-20/OECD.

The BFSB’s committee to
establish an arbitration centre
in the Bahamas had “gone a bit
further down the road” since
the idea was a hot issue under
the former Christie administra-

Employers chief calls for
choice in compensation

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Employers
Confederation’s (BECon) pres-
ident yesterday said it would be
“in the best interests of every-
body” if employees, when ter-
minated, had to choose between
either accepting their statutory
Employment Act compensation
or rejecting this in favour of a
common law action, as all par-
ties would “know where they
stand” and be more likely to
settle before heading to court.

Brian Nutt, commenting on
a Court of Appeal judgment

* Says Doctrine of Election in
receiving statutory termination
pay or common law action

‘in best interests of everyone’

that ruled employees “cannot
have their cake and eat it too”
by seeking termination com-
pensation via both statute and
common law, said he hoped that
having to choose between the
two would “become practice”.

“T think it’s a welcome rul-
ing,” Mr Nutt told Tribune

SEE page 6B

Homecomings set to
deliver economic help

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

HOTELS in Central
Eleuthera are expecting a much
needed economic boost during
the Palmetto Point Homecom-
ing festival this coming week-
end, with many hoteliers yes-
terday saying they had no avail-
able rooms.

The annual festival typically

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CHARLES

Central Eleuthera resorts
sold-out for upcoming
weekend festivities

guarantees hotels from Gover-
nor’s Harbour to Tarpum Bay
almost 100 per cent occupancy.
And, according to the chief
councillor for the area, this year
appears to be no exception.

SEE page 4B

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* BFSB committee hoping to have draft legislation
‘on books by summer’s end’, having already
completed ‘comprehensive draft’

* Centre would aid maritime industry, plus attract
new business like aircraft and yacht registries, by
giving dispute resolution mechanism outside courts

* Foreign investor dispute resolution also suggested

tion, Mr Wilson explained.

“In concert, with the Attor-
ney General’s Office, we’ve
produced a pretty comprehen-
sive draft of the new legisla-
tion,” he added. “It’s a pretty
comprehensive Arbitration Act.
Our original Act was an 1870s
Act. It was really antiquated,
and the commercial world has
moved a long way beyond that
legislation.

“The new Act, if we’re able
to get it on the books, will be
relevant. It’s critical. We could
not become an arbitration cen-

tre without a modern legislative
framework. That is basically
what this Act seeks to achieve.
There’s a lot more work that
remains to be done, but hope-
fully the final version will be
out in short order and it will be
on the books by end of sum-
mer.”

The proposed legislation is
entitled The Arbitration
(Recognition and Establish-
ment of Foreign Awards 2009)
Bill, and creating a Bahamian

SEE page 3B

ROYAL FIDELITY



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE

(242) 351-3010

J.S. Johnson
targets ‘less than
five per cent fall’

in premium

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

J. S. JOHNSON, the BISX-
listed insurance broker and
agent, is “hoping to stay within
less than a 5 per cent” drop in
premium volume during 2009,
Tribune Business was told yes-
terday, after its net income
dropped by 27 per cent to
$7.905 million in fiscal 2008.

Marvin Bethell, J. S. John-
son’s managing director, told
this newspaper that 2009 to-date
was “not as bad as it could be”,
with the company hoping to
acquire new business from the
few foreign direct investment
and construction projects still
proceeding, in a bid to offset
declines taking place elsewhere.

While many Bahamas-based
insurance companies, such as
RoyalStar Assurance and
Bahamas First’s 100 per cent-
owned agency, Nassau Under-
writers, had budgeted for a 10
per cent drop in gross written
premiums and premium volume

Doctors aims to invest $3m in 2010

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

DOCTORS Hospital Health
Systems (DHHS) is looking to
invest $3 million in new med-
ical equipment and infrastruc-
ture improvements, plus expand
its premises, in fiscal 2010, after
a record 12.8 per cent increase
in Intensive Care Unit (CU)
patient days helped drive the
2.2 per cent net patient service
revenue rise that led to
enhanced 2009 profitability.

Doctors Hospital, in its 2009
annual report, said: “The con-
tinuing need to replace and
upgrade medical equipment,
and make improvements to the
premises, will require $2 mil-
lion for equipment and $1 mil-

OPEN A ROYAL FIDELITY BROKERAGE ACCOUNT

\

Examining expansion plans for hospital ‘to increase
capacity in areas which are nearing or at capacity’

lion in improvements during the
2010 fiscal year.

“The hospital is also current-
ly investigating options to
expand the facility in order to
increase capacity in areas which
are nearing or at capacity.”

Looking back on the previ-
ous financial year, Doctors Hos-
pital said “an increase in the
severity of illness of the patients
we were serving”, especially in
the fourth quarter of its finan-
cial year ended on January 31,
2009, more than offset a 5.8 per
cent decline in the total num-
ber of 4,311 patients admitted.

Largely as a result of the

ICU’s performance, patient ser-
vice revenues for fiscal 2009
rose by $0.9 million, while a 7
per cent or $85,000 rise in other
revenues took the total revenue
increase to $0.985 million or 2.3
per cent.

This slightly outshone the
$0.7 million or 2 per cent rise
in Doctors Hospital’s total
expenses to $38.847 million,
with expenses declining as a
percentage of total revenue
from 90.5 per cent in fiscal 2008
to 90.2 per cent last year.

Apart from revenue rises, the

SEE page 3B

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your stocks, bonds, and

dividends are?

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e Buy / sell stocks, bonds, preference shares,

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BAHAMAS

Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

FUL Ppl eh)

St. Michael: 246.435.1955

royalfidelity.com

* Increased ICB affiliate
net claims and $1.4m
investment value swing
drops BISX-listed
broker/agent’s net
income 27% to
$7.9m in 2008

* ICB trading profits fall

to $1.4m from $4.1m, as

a result of Ike

* Company assessing
Collins Avenue
expansion plans

during 2009, Mr Bethell said J.
S. Johnson was hoping to do
better with a decline of no more
than 5 per cent.

“It could be worse,” he

SEE page 5B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



ROYAL @ FIDELITY

Money at Work

An RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company


PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

Se



@ By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

IT was a moderate trading
week in the Bahamian market,
with investors trading in eight
out of the 24 listed securities,

of which two declined, one
advanced and five remained
unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET
A total of 36,454 shares
changed hands last week, rep-

nen
CHICKEN
BISCUIT

try it for breakfast





resenting a decrease of 22,313
shares or 38 per cent, compared
to last week's trading volume
of 58,767 shares.

Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
led the volume for a fifth con-
secutive week and was the only
advancer with 25,400 shares
trading, its stock rising by $0.02
to end the week at $6.13.

Doctors Hospital Health Sys-
tems (DHS) was the lead
decliner for a second consecu-
tive week, its share price falling
by $0.15 to a new 52-week low
of $1.38 on a volume of 2,000
shares. Abaco Markets (AML)
traded 6,830 shares, its stock
declining by $0.07 to end the
week at $1.33.

BOND MARKET
No notes traded in the

Bahamian market this week.
COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:

There were no financial
results reported by any of the
24-listed companies during the
week.

Annual General Meeting

(AGM) Notes:

Colina Holdings (CHL)
announced that it will be hold-
ing its Annual General Meet-
ing on Thursday May 28, 2009,
at 5:30pm at the J. W. Pinder
Building, Colinalmperial Insur-
ance, Collins Avenue.

Shareholders of record as of
April 24, 2009, will be qualified
to vote during the Annual
Meeting.



The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 795.25

BISX
SYMBOL

AML
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
CWCB
DHS
FAM
FBB
FCC
ele
FCLB
FIN
ICD
JSJ
PRE

CLOSING
PRICE

$1.33
$0.63
$6.95
$11.00
$7.92
$3.15
$11.75
$6.13
$2.83
$10.40
$2.78
$1.38
$7.76
$2.37
$0.30
$5.14
$1.00
$11.00
$5.50
$10.50
$10.00

(-4.74%) YTD

CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
CHANGE

2
So
~

-22.22%

-12.43%
0.00%
-0.48%
23.56%
-45.88%
-0.51%
0.00%
0.00%
-0.58%
0.00%
-7.33%
-10.28%
-5.41%
0.00%

oO!
oS
No

So
eR
WM Go

APAAAAAAAAAAAAPRAAAAAASH



International Markets

FOREX Rates

CAD$
GBP
EUR

Commodities

Crude Oil
Gold





International Stock Market Indexes:

DITA
S & P 500

NASDAQ

Nikkei



Weekly % Change
1.1185 -5.25
1.5913 +4.80
1.4004 +3.77
Weekly % Change
$61.55 +7.16
$957.30 +2.71
Weekly % Change
8,277.32 +0.10
887.00 +0.47
1,692.01 +0.71
9,225.81 -0.42
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009, PAGE 3B



rr = 10> =<>—
Doctors aims to invest $3m in 2010

FROM page 1B

other major driver behind Doc-
tors Hospital’s 2009 net income
performance was a 29.4 per cent
reduction in its interest expens-
es to $420,883, compared to
$596,145 the year before.

The BISX-listed healthcare
services provider said this
reflected the $2 million April
2008 pay down on one of its
outstanding loan balances, and
the reduction in the size of these
balances.

According to Doctors Hospi-
tal, the loan on which the $2
million principal payment was
made relates to the financing of
Western Medical Plaza, the
Blake Road facility that the
company continues to review
for potential sale or lease to ten-
ants.

Doctors Hospital repaid
$2.554 million in principal on
the Western Medical Plaza loan
in fiscal 2009, compared to
$554,000 the year before, with
interest payments dropping
from $350,318 to $201,618.

As a result, the outstanding
balance on the Western Med-
ical Plaza loan had dropped to
$2.152 million at year-end 2009,
compared to $4.706 million the
year before. And, as the princi-
pal balance decreases, so does
the interest rate that Doctors
Hospital has to pay.

The company’s annual report
showed that a 1 per cent swing
in the interest rate it had to pay
on variable rate loans linked to
Bahamian Prime could either
increase or decrease its debt ser-

AN OUTSIDE
le view of Doctors
Hospital...

vicing costs by $50,000.
Western Medical Plaza,
which comprises three buildings
of 33,000 square feet and three
acres of land, was valued by
Bahamas Realty, on January 31,
2009, at $7.5 million, a 5.1 per
cent decline on the previous
year’s $7.9 million valuation.
Doctors Hospital saw rental
income from its Western Med-
ical Plaza leases fall by 42.5 per
cent in 2009, to $74,302 from
$129,307 in 2008, although the
expenses associated with rental
income fell to $288,456 from
$361,023 the year before.
Meanwhile, the percentage
of Doctors Hospital’s accounts
receivables owed by third-party
Bahamian insurance companies
rose from 63 per cent to 75 per
cent in fiscal 2009. The per-
centages owed by self-paying
patients and the National Insur-
ance Board (NIB) fell from 21
per cent and 16 per cent, respec-
tively, to 15 per cent and 10 per

cent.

The BISX-listed company
said the number of days rev-
enue in accounts receivables
increased to 59 in fiscal 2009,
compared to 56 days in 2008,
resulting in a net 11.4 per cent
increase in accounts receivables.

Most of these, though, are in
the zero to 30 days past due cat-
egory, with Doctors Hospital
blaming the increased accounts
receivables on increased patient
revenue during the 2009 fourth
quarter.

Provisions for doubtful
accounts as a percentage of
patient service revenues fell to
3.8 per cent in fiscal 2009, com-
pared to 5.5 per cent the previ-
ous year, showing a decrease of
$0.7 million or 29.5 per cent.

Self-paying patients account-
ed for 64 per cent of this provi-
sion, but Doctors Hospital did
manage to recover some
$232,000 from previously writ-
ten-off accounts in fiscal 2009.



That financial year saw Doc-
tors Hospital enjoy the second
highest level of inpatient activ-
ity in its history, with 13,188
patient days, as the average dai-
ly level of new patients fell from
37 to 36. Adult patient days
dropped by 1.6 per cent.

Salaries and benefits, as a per-
centage of patient service rev-
enues, rose to 38.9 per cent in
fiscal 2009 from 37.5 per cent
the previous year, but still just
below the BISX-listed firm’s 39
per cent target. Total salary and
benefit expenses rose by $0.93
million or 6 per cent year-over-
year.

Doctors Hospital said: “The
increase in expenses for fiscal
2009, relative to 2008, reflects
cost of living, merit increases,
and increased activity in criti-
cal care areas in which there
were increases overtime costs
due to nursing shortages, and
increased overtime in training
and orientation costs for new

Arbitration centre ‘leg-up’ on rivals



FROM page 1B

arbitration centre in the
Bahamas “can only aid” this
nation’s ability to attract new
industries, such as an aircraft
registry and a yacht registry, Mr
Wilson’s committee co-chair
said.

Craig “Tony’ Gomez, who is
also the BFSB’s chairman, told
Tribune Business: “I think the
legislation is important for the
development of budding indus-
tries in the Bahamas.

“Outside the maritime indus-
try, you have the potential air-
craft registry and the potential
yacht registry, and the interna-
tional disputes that come along
with new legislation can only
be aided by arbitration capaci-
ties.”

If international businesses
used the Bahamas as an arbi-
tration centre, and an alterna-
tive means of dispute resolution
and settlement, rather than
going through the courts, Mr
Gomez said the Bahamian hotel
industry would be housing high-
end guests “likely to need more
than a $99 room” when in town
for hearings.

Bahamian services profes-
sionals, such as attorneys and
accountants, would also have
the chance to enhance their
skills and talent by involvement
in arbitration hearings.

In addition to enhancing the
Bahamas’ attractiveness for
international business, Mr Wil-
son said: “We want to play off
the Bahamas being acknowl-
edged as the world’s third
largest shipping registry.

“Arbitration is, quite frankly,
the dispute resolution mecha-
nism of choice for the shipping
industry, so we figure [the
industry would want] these dis-
putes to be resolved in the
Bahamas, as opposed to going
to New York or London.

“Given that many of the ship
owners have an affiliation with
the Bahamas, it would not be a
tremendous stretch to get them
to do it in the Bahamas.”

Mr Wilson said the commit-
tee had worked “very closely”
with the Bahamas Maritime
Authority and its chairman, Ian
Fair, on the draft legislation.

On the arbitration centre
idea, Mr Wilson said establish-
ing one in the Bahamas would
“be another leg up” for the
country at a time when the G-
20/OECD were trying “to reel
in” international financial cen-
tres.

“T think we really need to
look at ways to produce a more
composite product not depen-
dent on one element of inter-
national business, and build up
what we do,” Mr Wilson said.

“My personal view is that a
component of international
business in the Bahamas should
target and try to get a lead on
the competition. This could be
one area we try to get a lead on
the competition.”

A Bahamas-based arbitration
centre would “augment” this
nation’s international business
offering and feed other sectors,
Mr Wilson said.

The committee had been
formed six months ago, and
while “not part” of its existing
discussions, Mr Wilson added:
“We should really try to include
some kind of investor dispute
resolution.

“Foreign direct investors
sometimes have disputes with
governing bodies and their
agencies, and this may help to

create more certainty in that
area, knowing the Bahamian
government has agreed to arbi-
tration.......... Certainty is a
tremendous advantage in inter-
national business.”

While the committee had
focused on international arbi-
tration issues to date, Mr Wil-
son said it would not be a huge
leap to transfer those to the
domestic arena. The Bahamas
will also have to look at the
recognition of foreign arbitra-
tion awards and decisions, if its
centre’s decisions are to be
enforced overseas, and devel-
op alliances with similar bodies
in New York and London.

Mr Gomez said that both the
legislation and an arbitration
centre would show the interna-
tional business community the

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associates.”

Utilities costs increased by
18.3 per cent or $0.3 million
over 2008, due to higher elec-
tricity charges, while medical
supplies and services costs grew
as a percentage of revenues to

25.7 per cent from 25.5 per cent
the previous year.

Other operating expenses
rose by 8.2 per cent, with costs
of collecting on self-pay patient
receivables accounting for 34
per cent of this change.

ESSAY COMPETITION

TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK

The Department of Public Service will host an Essay
Competition as one of the activities for the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week. The Competition is open to Junior
and Senior Students in New Providence.

Additionally, this year, a speech competition will be
for schools in the Northern & Southern Bahamas,
respectively. Students interested in participating in the
Essay Competition should write a 250 - 300 words (Junior
High), and 450 - 500 words (Senior High), essay on the

topic: “ The Public Service-Striving for Excellence in

Customer Service.”

The deadlines for entries, which should be referred
to the attention of Mrs. Antoinette Thompson, Deputy
Permanent Secretary, Department of Public Service, is

Friday 24th July, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 Computer System will be awarded to
the winner each category. The first runners-up for both the
Essay and Speech Competition in the Junior & Senior High
School category, will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.

The winners will be announced during the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week Awards Ceremony scheduled for

Saturday 10th October 2009.

Students interested in the Speech Competition for the
Northern and Southern Bahamas should contact their

Language Arts Teacher.






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PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE






































DHL JOB DESCRIPTION

POSITION:
JOB FAMILY:
RCS CODE:
REPORTS TO:
LOCATION:

Collections Agent

Credit & Collections
A20004

Collections Lead

Country Finance Department

OVERALL PURPOSE:

Under limited supervision in a team environment provide efficient and effec-
tive credit approvals. To ensure timely credit application processing, respond to
information requests and issues. Ensure accuracy of all credit decisions functions
while staying within company policy and procedural guidelines.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

Gathers, compiles and maintains basic credit information to be used in
making credit decisions.

Reviews and monitors credit sources, customer applications and
delinquent accounts. Processes credit applications.

Works with smaller customers to resolve collections issues and disputes.
Investigates disputes and reviews documentation.

Prepares and processes credit and collections account adjustments.
Implements credit suspensions.

Recommends further actions on delinquent accounts.

Maintains records of credit risks and delinquent accounts.

Provides support and coordination with third party agencies as needed.
Handles customer calls related to Collection Agency accounts.
Prepares and files bankruptcy claim documents.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

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1-3 years of experience in Collections.

Advanced administrative skills to function effectively with limited
direction amid competing priorities and deadlines.

Excellent customer service orientation and communication skills.
Proficiency using various computer software applications.
Excellent analytical and interpersonal skills.

Proficiency using various computer software applications

For more information please contact:
Romell K. Knowles I

Country Manager
Email:Romell.Knowles@dhl.com

Consolidated Water (Bahamas) Ltd.

Invites submissions for the sale of:

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F000 Gallen (11300 Liter) UL. Listed Double Wall Fuel
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Heavy Duty Enclosure
Warranty — Nore
PACKAGING: Prepared for Flat Bed Transpart

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Weimer Mk eet MEL Tip ey

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Tee go cee Ae |

The Gemeral Manager
Consalidated Water |Hahaneas) Ltd.
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ECHO eb



Homecomings
set to deliver
economic help

FROM page 1B

Hank Johnson, who is also
chairman for the Homecoming
festival, said the event is expect-
ed to attract the same number
of visitors it always has.

The festival presents eco-
nomic opportunities for myri-
ad businesses, and it ushers in,
after Exuma’s Regatta, a sea-
son of similar festivals across
several islands throughout the
summer.

For Eleuthera, several other
settlements throughout the
summer and into October will
have the opportunity to receive
a short economic boost. Grego-
ry Town will hold its Pineapple
Fest following Palmetto Point’s
Homecoming, and the Bluff will
hold its Homecoming shortly
after.

Andros has its annual Crab
fest that draws hundreds of peo-
ple from New Providence, and
the Long Island Regatta does
the same.

Mr Johnson said the 20 stalls
for rent on the Palmetto Point
Homecoming site have been
paid for in full, and that accom-
modations are “running pretty
tight”.

“With the bookings that they

have, it [the Homecoming] will
be bringing an economic boost,”
he said.

Mate and Jenny’s Pizza have
reserved a stall at the South Pal-
metto Point festival ground,
where they will prepare home-
made pizzas on site. Mate and
Jenny’s resort has been fully
booked for three weeks.

Owner of Mate and Jenny’s,
Maitland Bethel, said becuase
their establishment will be fully
committed this weekend, it
should translate into increased
sales for their pizza restaurant.

“It comes at a good time
because things have been pret-
ty slow,” he said. “I think it’s
going to mean a lot to the com-
munity.

“All the hotels and restau-
rants are all feeling the pinch,
and these homecomings give us
a boost and put more money
into the economy.”

Mr Bethel said his hotel had
been adversely affected by the
downturn in the global econo-
my. According to him, occu-
pancies have been down year-
on-year.

“Tf I got one or two rooms
(occupied) per week, I was
doing good,” he said. “The

RBC

SS

aed

FINCO

money is just not as available
as it used to be.”

One Governor’s Harbour
hotel told this newspaper they
had received no bookings for
the Homecoming, but were ful-
ly committed due to a wedding.

According to Mr Johnson,
Bahamasair’s Central Eleuthera
flights will be full this weekend,
and already Bahamas Ferries’
bookings are at 65 per cent.

According to the Bahamas
Ferries marketing manager,
Khaalis Rolle, ferries to the
island should be at 100 per cent
by the weekend.

“We will not have a problem
selling out the boat,” he said.
“We are within our normal
threshold.”

Mr Rolle said that by
Wednesday or Thursday of this
week, the Governor’s Harbour-
bound ferry should be sold out.

According to Mr Johnson,
the Palmetto Point Homecom-
ing committee has not spared
anything on entertainment, with
five full nights of live entertain-
ment, including the Lassie Doe
Boys and the Brilanders.

“We will be pulling the same
crowd we generally pull,” he
said.

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED

NOTICE

Please be advised that the Head Office and
the Registered Office of the company will be
moved from the Bahamas Financial Centre,
Charlotte & Shirley Streets, 2nd Floor, Nassau,
Bahamas to Royal Bank House, East Hill Street,
Nassau, Bahamas effective 25th May, 2009.

D. BURROWS-HAINES (Mrs.)
Corporate Secretary

Dated this 22nd May 2009

RCO
the #1 newspaper in circulation,
ME dare a EL
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009, PAGE 5B





J.S. Johnson
targets ‘less than
five per cent fall’

in premium

FROM page 1B

explained. “We’ve been fortu-
nate, although we’ve seen a
slowdown in many areas, par-
ticularly on the motor side, with
the purchase of new cars slow-
ing down, and a slowdown on
the property side - people are
hesitating to renew with full
coverage.

“But we’ve offset some of
those losses with the acquisition
of new business. It’s not as bad
as it could be.”

Mr Bethell said J. S. Johnson
was involved with placing some
of the insurance coverage for
the $1.4 billion Albany project,
which was proceeding, and
hoped to obtain business from
the few remaining foreign direct
investment-related projects as
a way to ensure it “would not be
impacted as much” by the glob-
al economic downturn.

“We’re still getting inquiries
from residents of the Ocean
Residences [on Paradise Island],
new houses in Old Fort Bay and
Lyford Cay, so there is still
some construction going on.
There’s some new business that
has not dried up completely,
and if we get our fair share of
them, it will offset some of the
decline in other areas,” Mr
Bethell explained.

“We don’t know how much
worse it’s going to get. It’s dif-
ficult to budget at this point in
time, assuming there are no
more major challenges, but
we’re hoping to stay within less
than a5 per cent drop” on pre-
mium volume and value.

J.S. Johnson, like most other
Bahamas-based insurance car-
riers and agents/brokers, is
praying for a hurricane-free
year given the impact a major
storm would have not only on
their business but the already-
struggling wider economy.

Meanwhile, Mr Bethell con-
firmed that J. S. Johnson was
continuing to assess expansion
plans for its Collins Avenue
head office, the key factors
being the size and design of its
proposed new building and
whether - given the current
recession - the timing is right.

The J. S. Johnson managing
director told Tribune Business
that the company had acquired
the building immediately to the
south of its existing headquar-
ters, which housed the Bahamas
Optical Centre. Its current plans
involved demolishing the exist-
ing building and replacing it
with a new property that includ-
ed an elevator, for ease of cus-
tomer access.

“We’ve got drawings done
up,” Mr Bethell explained.
“The project is a little larger
than we may have anticipated,
so we’re reassessing the need
for it and whether the timing is
right. It could be quite expen-

your

news

The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in
their neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising
funds for a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



sive.”

He added that he could not
put a figure on the likely invest-
ment because the plans were
subject to change, even though
some were arguing that now
represented the best time to
build because construction
material prices were relatively
low.

Other questions to be
answered, Mr Bethell said, were
whether J. S. Johnson should
instead develop another branch
for the Collins Avenue area,
and whether the project should
be financed from its own
resources or borrowing. The
Soldier Road and Thompson
Boulevard branches also had
expansion room.

“It’s a little bit of wait and
see,” he explained. “We will go
ahead. It’s just to what extent. If
we have to wait another six
months, it’s not critical.”

With car values dropping on
an annual basis, the tendency
of recession-hit consumers to
acquire used rather than new
cars, and switch from compre-
hensive to third party coverage,
Mr Bethell said premium vol-
ume was under pressure on J. S.
Johnson’s motor portfolio.

As a result, the company did
“not expect any growth” in its
motor portfolio for 2009,
although it aimed to produce a
profitable result, especially on
underwriting, depending on the
claims experience.

For fiscal 2008, J. S. John-
son’s net income dropped below
both the $10.769 million record-
ed in 2007 and $8.3 million in
2006. This was largely due to
the net claims incurred by its
Insurance Company of the
Bahamas (ICB) affiliate, in
which it has a 40 per cent stake,
and a $1.4 million swing into a
loss on the unrealised deprecia-
tion in value of its investment
portfolio.

Mr Bethell said general insur-
ance carrier ICB received a
surge in claims from Inagua and
the Turks & Caicos Islands as a
result of Hurricane Ike, which
produced gross claims of about
$5 million and net claims of $1
million.

Meanwhile, the investment
portfolio swung into a $402,810
unrealised loss for 2008 as equi-
ty markets headed south, as
opposed to the $1.03 million
gain the previous year.

ICB’s trading profit fell to
$1.4 million, compared to $4.1
million the year before.

Elsewhere, J. S. Johnson saw
its net commissions and fees rise
by $1 million o r 5.6 per cent,
but total expenses increased by
15 per cent from $18.5 million
to $21.2 million due to rises in
salaries and benefits, net claims
and other operating expenses.

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COMMONWEALTH

BREWERY LTD.






































WAREHOUSE
ADMINISTRATOR

The successful candidate would be required to:

MANAGEMENT
OPPORTUNITY

Awell established company is considering highly qualified applicants for the role of

FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

Requirements & Responsibilities:

- Leader and motivate accounting staff

- Experience in the preparation and interpretation of Financial Statements

- Must be able to develop and maintain an effective system of internal
accounting and operational controls in a Hotel environment

- Must possess 5 or more years experience in a supervisory accounting position

- Self motivated with strong analytical and problem-solving skills

- Must be conversant with hotel accounting software, with emphasis in areas
Food & Beverage, Front Office and Payroll

- Liaise with External Auditors, third party service providers and relevant
Regulatory & Compliance Authorities

- Preparation of budgets

- Timely and accurate preparation, presentation and interpretation of financial
reports

- Excellent written and oral communication skills

- Able to work extended hours, weekends and holidays

- Ensure that the quantity and quality of the goods
received are checked.

- Check for damage to goods and carry out relevant
documentation.

- Assure holding of blocked products until further notice.

- Arrange sale of articles authorised for disposal.

- Prepare reports on disposed materials.

- Carry out physical inventory checks and verify with
Accounts Department.

- Issue and dispatch outgoing stocks based on FIFO
method.

- Ensure proper disposal of packaging materials in case
of quality issues.

- Entrance control for raw and packaging materials.

- Ensure that all export orders are packed and delivered
to designated shipping carrier.

- Compile stock inventory reports

- Supervise forklift operators

All interested persons are asked to
fax resumes to:

(242) 362-4793

INSIGHT

For the stories behind the news,
read Insight on Mondays

Qualifications:
- BAin Accounting from an accredited University
- International accounting designation (CPA/CA) with minimum of 5 years
post qualification experience, and preferably at least 2 years in hotel
accounting environment
- Advance working knowledge of Excel
- Working knowledge of Microsoft Word
Interested persons should apply on or before June 30, 2009
Attention Manager:
DA 61165, c/o The Tribune
PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, The Bahamas
Suitably qualified candidates need only apply.
Salary is commensurate with experience and qualification

() THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION
AND EXTENSION SERVICES

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT - SUMMER SEMESTER 022009
COURSE ——————————————eEE

DESCRIPTION TME |DAY |

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WEB PAGE DESIGN WS |

_BUSINESS

CUSTSO0



























“COMPUTERS
_COMP930

COMPS31 WEB PAGE DESIGN WS II

ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093 /
328-1936 / 302-4300 ext. 5202 or email prevsdev@cob.edu.bs

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time).
CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and
Course Materials.

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Immobilizer theft-deterrent system
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B-dise CD player

Steering wheel-mounted audio

2. © ©

contrats








Shirley Street
B=) ea sc ea as ee ce ed De co el bd


PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Employers chief calls for
choice in compensation

FROM page 1B

Business. “It certainly will take
the uncertainty, primarily, out
of the equation if an employee
has to choose between accept-
ing the compensation package
under the Employment Act or
reject it and go to court under
common law.”

Forced

The BECon president sug-
gested that if forced to choose
between the two options - statu-
tory compensation or going to
court - employees would carry
the risk that they might lose and
be left with nothing if they
chose the latter.

This, Mr Nutt suggested, was
likely to encourage employees

to settle common law actions
with their former employer
before they reached the courts,
saving both sides time and mon-
ey.

Employers “fear being
dragged into litigation”, said Mr
Nutt. He added: “The fact is
that litigation is expensive and
time-consuming, and employ-
ers have to spend time away
from their job and incur quite a
few costs in pursuing matters
or defending themselves when
litigation occurs.”

The BECon president said a
further troubling factor for
employers was that labour
attorneys, rather than going to
the Industrial Tribunal on com-
mon law claims, were increas-
ingly going to the Supreme
Court. Unlike the former, the




NOTICE





INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT




No. 45 of 2000





AZZILON S.A.






Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137




of The International Business Companies Act No. 45 of



Supreme Court did award costs.

“Tf the employer loses a case
like that, the employee’s costs
are taxed, meaning the employ-
er has to pay for the employ-
ee’s attorney,” Mr Nutt said.
“But if the employer wins, the
employee does not have the
means to pay for the employ-
er’s attorney. Win or lose, it still
costs to go through litigation.”

In the court’s ruling, Appeal
Justice Hartman Longley urged
that consideration be given to
using the Doctrine of Election
in employment disputes, with
the terminated employee
required to choose between
statutory or common law com-

pensation.
Act

They could not, he said,
accept their Employment Act
compensation and then initiate
a subsequent common law claim
for greater/better benefits, in a
bid to gain both and effectively
‘double dip’.

Justice Longley ruled: “What
the law contemplates is that if
the benefits under the Act have
been paid, the employee should
have resort to his common law
claim only if that provides for
greater benefits. Otherwise, it
would be a waste of time and
costs.

“In this regard, it seems to

me that consideration may well
have to be given to the opera-
tion of the doctrine of election
when an employee has received
his full benefits under the Act.

“He should only be permit-
ted to pursue a claim at com-
mon law for greater rights and
better benefits after he has been
put to an election to abandon
the compensation under the
Act, otherwise the purpose for
which the Act was passed — to
make a ready, inexpensive for-
mula available for calculating
benefits — would be lost in the
mush of litigation.”

Mr Nutt noted that the Court
of Appeal only recommended
the Doctrine of Election
approach, and did not say that
was “absolutely the way it will
be”.

That meant there was still no
guarantee under the Employ-
ment Act that employees, in
accepting statutory compensa-
tion, would not then got to the
courts to seek greater remuner-
ation.

“Hopefully, that becomes
practice,” Mr Nutt said of the
Doctrine of Election, “and if it
becomes practice it’s in the best
interests of everyone. Right
from the start, you will know
that if you’re in a situation
where you have to litigate, there
will be more impetus to settle
the matter.

“T think if it’s one or the oth-
er, and if the choice is to be
made by the employee, and
they do not accept what they
are due under the Act and go to
a court of law, there is more
chance a settlement will be
reached before they go to court.
That route puts the employee
at a bit of risk.”

Ruling

The Appeal Court ruling
involved a case brought by Gail
Smith against her former
employer, Snack Food Whole-
sale, for alleged breach of an
employment contract.

She was terminated by the
company with effect from May
12, 2003, via a letter she
received dated May 10, 2003.
As a 22-year employee, who
was a sales manager/supervisor
and earning $750 per week, Ms
Smith received four weeks’
notice pay of $3,000; 48 weeks’
basic pay of $36,000; and three
weeks’ vacation pay worth
$2,250.

The Court of Appeal said it
was “common ground” that the
sums paid by Snack Food
Wholesale were in accordance
with the Employment Act
2001’s Section 29, but Ms Smith
initiated a legal action alleging
that under common law she was
due $64,790.

The $25,790 difference cited
between the statutory and com-
mon law was comprised,
according to Ms Smith’s amend-
ed statement of claim, of the
loss of 12 months’ worth of
commissions at $2,000 per
month of $24,000 in total; the
loss of 12 months’ group insur-
ance at $20 per week for a total
$1,040; and a 12-month annual
bonus of $750.

Basic pay, as defined by the
Employment Act, did not
include bonuses and commis-
sions, the Court of Appeal said,
meaning that Ms Smith’s action
was “ bound to fail” if made
under the Act.

Justice Longley ruled: “In any
event, it seems to me that the
appellant cannot have her cake
and eat it, too. Either she
accepts the payments made to
her under the Act. Or she could
pursue a claim at common law.
She was not entitled to both.
She got all that she was entitled
to under the Act.

“And the learned judge
found, on the evidence before
him, her claim at common law
would have fallen short of the
benefits conferred by the Act.”
As a result, the appeal was dis-
missed.

Snack Food Wholesale was
represented by attorney Sharon
Wilson, and Ms Smith by Obie
Ferguson.



2000, AZZILON S.A. is in dissolution. The date of com-

mencement of dissolution was the 17th day of April, 2009.
Dillon Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of AZZI-

LON S.A.

Dillon Dean

LIQUIDATOR

Care Giver
Required

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILL REQUIREMENTS:

- Certified or equivalent to nurse’s aide and training.

- Must understand English both written and verbal.

- Must have current certification, i.e. Health Certificate.

- Must be able to safely and successfully perform ALL job-related
functions 1.e. CPR and Basic First Aid.

PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES:

- Care for multiple residents.

- Observe Resident Rights.

- Provide Professional care and assistance to the residents.

- Assist paramedics in cases of emergency.

- Observe residents, note physical condition, attitude, reactions,
appetite, etc., report to the Administrator.

- Available for front desk duty.

- Capable of working overnight shift 4p.m. — 12am & 12a.m. —- 8 a.m.

- Provide quality care.

- Provide a written/verbal report to the Administrator
on a daily basis.

- Perform any other related duties which might be required.

- Man front desk operation.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:
The successful candidates will be offered an excellent compensation
package and opportunities for training and development.

Please e-mail or fax resume to the Administrator at

CCCBAHAMAS@live.com or 323.4475

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Boney ot Work

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ORINDA TAMARA KATHLEEN
WITTSHIRE of #2 BACHELOR’S HOUSE, HUDSON AVENUE,
FREEPORT, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 19° day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KERVIN JONASSAINT of
BUNMORE STREET, HARBOUR ISLAND, ELEUTHERA,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 26TH day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
tal Wate\ CMe ct -lo MET fo/n 1s
on Mondays

FG CAPITAL TS
BREOKEBAG:

MABRKE
E & ADYISORY SERVICES
ee

cl> ey rca Me Tt eX TT.

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 25 MAY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,613.25 | CHG 4.49 | %CHG 0.28 | YTD -99.11 | YTD % -5.79
FINDEX: CLOSE 795.25 | YTD -4.75% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

S2wk-Low

1.28

11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
1.95

11.09
2.83
6.06
1.31
1.32

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

1.33
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.75
2.83
6.13
2.77
1.38
6.02
11.00
10.35
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

7.76
11.00
10.40

5.14

1.00

0.30

5.50
10.50
10.00

Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnsen

Premier Real Estate

Previous Close Today's Close

EPS $
0.127
0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.078 40.4
0.055 43.1
1.406 8.3
0.249 11.4
0.419 14.9
0.111 27.4
0.240 5.5

18.5

34.2

Div $ P/E

11.0

Change Daily Vol.
1.40
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.65
2.83

11.1
28.5
N/M

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.10
0.00
6.25
3.04
1.32

0.12
0.27
-0.06
0.00
0.00

0.420
0.322
0.794 13.1
0.332 15.3
0.000 N/M
0.035 8.6
13.5
11.0
55.6

7.76
11.00
10.40

5.09

1.00

0.30

5.50
10.50
10.00

-0.05
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

0.407
0.952
0.180

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Securi
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale
100.00 x 7%
100.00
100.00
100.00

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

0.00 Prime + 1.75%
0.00 7%

0.00 100 Prime + 1.75%

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Bid $
7.92
4.00
0.35

Ask $
8.42
6.25
0.40

Weekly Vol. EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

Last Price P/E
14.60
6.00

0.35

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

ABDAB
RND Holdings

30.13
0.45

31.59
0.55

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

29.00
0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

NA Vv
1.3758
2.8962
1.4630

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund

1.3124
2.9230
1.3875
3.1964
12.1564
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

3.1964
12.7397
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1599
1.0526
1.0322
1.0523

YTD%

0.71

1.63
-0.08
1.45

Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
30-Apr-09
31-Mar-09
15-May-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
30-Apr-09
30-Apr-09

5.23 30-Apr-09

MARKET TERMS

COMMONWEATH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008

IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/592

IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959
AND
IN THE MATTER of The Petition of Inez Taylor Martin
NOTICE OF PETITION

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Inez Taylor-Martin of Old Place
in the Western District of the Island of Exuma, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, is applying to the Supreme
Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas to have her title inves-
tigated determined and declared under the Quieting Titles Act, 1959
(Ch. 393) in respect of the land hereafter described, that is to say:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land situate approximately One
Thousand Five-Hundred and Thirty-five (1535) feet West of Queens
Highway on the Northern side of Gilbert Grant Road and bounded
EASTWARDLY by land now or formerly the property of Zelma
Nixon jointly by Crown Land occupied by Zelma Nixon and running
thereon a total distance of Two-Hundred and Seven and Sixty-Six
Hundredths (207.66) feet thence running NORTHWEST WARDLY
by land now or formerly the property of Emerald Bay Development
and running thereon a total distance of Six-Hundred and Fifty-Nine
and Forty-One Hundredths (659.41) feet WESTWARDLY by land
the other portion of the Gilbert Grant and running thereon Fight-
Hundred and Twenty-Nine and Fifteen Hundredths (829.15) feet
SOUTHWARDLY by a Public Road known as Gilbert Grant Road
and running thereon a distance of Four-Hundred and Thirty-Ei ght
and Twenty-Seven Hundredths (438.27) feet back to the point of
commencement which said piece parcel or tract of land described
above comprises an area of Four and Four Hundred and Seventy-
Nine Thousandths (4.479) Acres and has such position boundaries
shape marks and dimensions as are shown on the plan recorded in
the Department of Lands and Surveys as Plan No. 450 EXUMA.”

AND TAKE NOTICE that copies of the Petition and the Plan of the
said land may be inspected during normal office hours at the follow-
ing places:

i. Supreme Court Registry, Ansbacher House, East Street North,
New Providence, The Bahamas.

ii. Sharon Wilson & Co., Chambers, East Shirley Street, Highland
Terrace, New Providence, The Bahamas.

it. The Administrator’s Office, Georgetown, Exuma, The Bahamas
AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that any person having dower or
right to dower, an adverse claim or a claim not recognized in the
Petition shall on or before the 22nd JULY A.D., 2009 file in the Su-
preme Court and serve on the Petition or his attorney an Adverse
Claim in the prescribed form supported by Affidavit.

FAILURE OF ANY PERSON to file and serve an Adverse Claim on
or before 22nd JULY A.D., 2009 date will operate as a bar to such
claim.

Dated this 20th day of May A.D., 2009

Sharon Wilson & Co,
Chambers

Delvest House
East Shirley Street, Highland Terrace
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
('S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100


PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



HEALTH



The Tribune



©



coe! N D



ith





Anatomy of an
Ingrown hair

INGROWN hairs, also
known as Pseudofolliculitis
barbae, manifest on skin
when hair is cut, and the
hair grows back in at an i
mmproper angle. The process :
of cutting the end of the ;
hair shaft through shaving
can force hair back into its
follicle, or even cause hair
to double over on itself, re-
entering the same follicle
and growing inward instead
of exiting the surface. The
hair shaft can also grow and
enter another follicle.

The body recognises this
ingrown hair as a foreign
body (similar to a splinter),
and triggers an inflammato-
ry response that includes
redness, itchiness and a
raised area that resembles a
pimple that can fill with pus.

To help prevent ingrown
hairs, start by exfoliating
with physical and chemical
exfoliants prior to shaving.
Physical exfoliants including
micro-fine Silica beads will
help remove dulling skin ;
cells, prep the skin's surface, ;
and lift hairs. Chemical i
exfoliants including Lactic
Acid and Salicylic Acid will
help remove dead skin cells,
lift ingrown hairs above the
skin line, and soften and
smooth skin.

Clan



For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays





blocks for the brain.

Alacta Plus Advanced formulation is the only milk food
for growing children enriched with 34 nutrients,
such as iron, iodine and zinc, as well as DHA, ARA,
and Sialic Acid, which are integral building

They'll go much further in life

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

A FEW weeks ago, Tribune
Health looked at childhood
stuttering- its causes, symp-
toms, and treatment options.
However, the unfortunate
reality of the disorder is that
in a large number of cases,
individuals forgo treatment
for various reasons resulting
in lifelong cases of functional

and dysfunctional stuttering.

According to Dr Walter Manning -
Professor and Associate Dean of the
school of Audiology and Speech-lan-
guage at the University of Memphis -
overcoming stuttering is not impossible,
however the process of correction comes
with a lot of determination and profes-
sional help.

Apart from his research and therapy
to US patients in the US, Dr Manning
has worked with several patients from
the Bahamas and other parts of the
Caribbean, and is considered by many a
foremost expert on the condition.

Speaking with Tribune Health, Dr
Manning explained: “Having stuttered
myself into my young adult years, I’ve
become quite fluent now as the result
of some good therapy and lots of prac-
tice.... am currently completing the third
edition of a text titled Clinical Decision

Making in Fluency Disorders.”

In the book, Dr Manning details his
interpretation of stuttering, and the mul-
tiple forms it can take.

“In one of the chapters in my text
there are several related definitions. A
brief and simple one is offered by the
WHO: Stuttering includes ‘disorders in
the rhythm of speech in which the indi-
vidual knows precisely what he wishes to
say, but at the time is unable to say it
because of an involuntary, repetitive pro-
longation or cessation of a sound’
(p.202),” he said.

For many stutterers, Dr Manning said
common symptoms can include; part
word repetition, monosyllabic word rep-
etition, or disrhythmic phonation, all of
which can be mistaken for common dis-
fluencies like interjection, phrase repe-
tition, or revision or incomplete phrases.

In his book, Dr Manning also
explained that despite these exterior
symptoms, more is happening in the
mind of the stutterer.

“Although complicated by commu-
nicative stress as it is for most speakers,
the person who stutters is able to lin-
guistically formulate what he or she
wants to say. The onset of stuttering is
the result of a combination of neurolog-
ical & physiological factors which, for
many individuals, are genetically influ-
enced,” he said.

This theory is certainly true for Antho-
ny Curtis - Acting Director for The
National Insurance Board (NIB) - who
said from as early as he could remember,
he and other family members have stam-
mered.

stuttering

He explained: “I remember in high
school in some of my classes where I
had to make presentations, my class-
mates were not always tolerant or con-
siderate to me, they would laugh at me
and it was a bit of an embarrassment
especially because sometimes I was not
able to pronounce my own name.”

Mr Curtis said apart from his own
severe stuttering, his grandfather, mother,
and two of his brothers also suffered from
the impairement.

Although Mr Curtis has been able to
secure a career despite his challenge, he
said there still remains particular
moments where he fears disfluency.
Whether it’s answering a phone call or
meeting someone for the first time, Mr
Curtis said the thought is always there
that he may not be able to speak fluently.

While his job comes with its share of
challenges, he adds that being a stutterer
has made him more determined to be the
best in his field. Having never resorted to
therapy, he adds that his technique for
overcoming stammering is to not always
take himself so serious, rather he makes
fun of his stammering to convey to others
that despite his speaking hurdle, there is
a whole person in him waiting to be dis-
covered.

Managing Director for Sbarro Italian
eatery Charlton Knowles, explained that
he too suffered from chronic stammer-
ing and remembers being affected from
the age of 5.

He explained that unlike most stutter-
ers who may have experienced severe
taunting and teasing, his experience grow-
ing up was very different.

“Fortunately I never got much criti-
cism of that sort...In school I was quite
talkative and was captain of the softball
team at St Johns College, and my peers
never really made reference to it other
than when we had arguments over base-
ball where they’d noticed I didn’t stut-
ter,” he said.

However Mr Knowles said he truly
started to feel the effects of stammering as
a young adult, when he began dating and
interacting more.

“T guess I become a lot more self-con-
scious of my stuttering, and I began to
avoid situations and words, which at one
point meant me not talking at all,” he
said.

Mr Knowles said this had a lot to do
with his confidence, which also led to
him avoiding telephone calls.

“T think if I didn’t stutter I probably
would have had a different job, and I
probably would have been a couple years
ahead in my finances because I’ve had to
create my own employment.”

He recounted one experience where it
took him nearly 45 seconds to say hello
while on a job interview and explained
that because of his condition many com-
panies were reluctant to hire him. This
led him to become an entrepreneur.

Now, he has since gotten married, has
a beautiful family, and is daily surpassing
the limitations of what many people
impose on stutterers.

Also receiving some therapy from
various speech specialists including Dr
Manning in recent years, Mr Knowles
has learnt to not fight his speech chal-
lenge, but to live life with the under-
standing that although he stutters, he
still deserves to be heard.

Now gearing to create the first ever
Bahamian Stutterers Association (BSA),
Mr Knowles said he remains optimistic
about this proposed organisation because
of its potential to assist so many through-
out the community that suffer from
speech impediments.

He feels the establishment of the BSA
will help in paving the way for more pub-
lic awareness, enlightenment, and focus
on the issue, and sends an open call to
anyone interested in becoming a part of
the group to contact him at 356.0808 or
e-mail cvk@sbarrobahamas.com.

(a
@ einen

RA Advonced Fermleticy
with D1 2 ead





Meadjohnson”

Nutritionals









Why can't I get a date?

WE need to pause this week during this dating
series as a question keeps on coming up: “Why
can't I get a date?’ or “Dating? - I haven't had a
date in years.’ It is hard not to miss the dismay and
frustration so let us take time to see what possibly
might be going on.

First let's start by assuming that they truly would
like to be in a relationship or at least get their feet
wet with some casual dating. Do we jump to the
conclusion that they are not trying hard enough or
that they just have bad luck? Has their timing
been off or are they just so inept at making initial
contact with a person?

Before we consider some of the main skills
required in dating we have to address the ques-
tion:“How much do you really want to date?” Are
you really ready to leave your safe single life?
Excuses that include the ‘but’ word often indicate
an indecisive, wishy- washy thinking that holds
singles from moving forward to 'coupledom.'

If you really have decided that this is the year to
make a change then devise a strategy. Look upon
it in the same way as job hunting. Inform friends
and family of your intentions. You are recruiting
help. Think of all the events, places and types of
people that you have fun and feel relaxed with
and make a list. Make definite plans to attend
events on all your time off. Doing this once a
month or in a sporadic manner not only reduces
your odds of meeting anyone but also prolongs
your current situation.

Next consider if you in fact project any negative
mannerisms or ones that are socially disagreeable.
Perhaps people have told you that you are too
critical, argumentative, loud, bossy, and abrasive or
that you are not friendly or do not smile enough. If
you were to stand back and see yourself as others
do would you approach yourself? It is too easy
just to say ‘well this is how I am and they can take
it or leave it’ but the truth is that if that tactic has-
n't worked all these years then surely it is time to
change. Change like this does not mean becoming
a different person or being fakey but just fine tun-
ing the good qualities and trimming the fat off the
not so good areas.

So here you are out one night with a crowd of
friends all sitting around laughing and talking
when you realise that you know everyone and



your clique does not allow any one new to enter.
Breaking out of groups is often the first step. It
does not mean forsaking old friends but just going
out in fewer numbers so that you are more
approachable. Going out with one or two friends
who have a similar goals can force you to make an
effort. Make eye contact with someone who inter-
ests you or who is trying to get your attention.
Eye contact is vitally important if you want to
connect with anyone. Being preoccupied with a cell
phone or texting means that your eyes and
thoughts are elsewhere and you may miss many
opportunities. Be present and focused and try not
to be distracted. Also a warm friendly smile is
very attractive and encouraging to the one wanti-
ng to approach. Relax, stand there, feel the
moment and try not to worry about ‘what if's.’
Remember you are not committing to anything.

The light hearted art of flirting is an important
skill to master and one that continues to be impor-
tant in long established relationships. Many people
consider flirting a bad or negative attribute perhaps
because they have taken it too seriously or they
have encountered a calculating or manipulative
person. Yes, of course be conscious of a sense of
lack of sincerity and honesty but remember the
plus side to flirting is that it allows you a chance to
gauge interest and can be used as a good screening
tool.

Developing a light hearted sense of humor which
includes a good dose of laughter and smiling is
with out a doubt a well known attractive quality.
Laughter is very contagious and draws people
together. It opens conversations and puts people at
ease. Showing people that you are enjoying your-
self makes them want to get to know you.

When all is said and done try not to take it all too
seriously. Your lighter side will bring you the first
date and from there anything is possible.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual and Couples Rela-
tionship Therapist. She is a Registered Nurse and a
Certified Clinical Sex Therapist. For appointments
call 535-7456 or e-mail her at
relatebahamas@yahoo.com or www.relateba-
hamas.blogspot.com. She is also available for
speaking engagements.

BEFORE we consider
some of the main skills
required in dating we
have to address the
question: “How much
do you really want to
date?” Are you really
ready to leave your
safe single life?
THE TRIBUNE
aN

TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009, PAGE 9B





@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

THE MOST common form
of self expression for
Bahamians is through their
art work and as the pres-
sures of a changing society
takes its toil, many persons
have turned to therapy to
help find ways to talk about
their problems without actu-

ally talking.

Art therapy has the ability to bring
together the fields of art and psychol-
ogy, integrating creative process,
visual arts, behaviour, mental health
and imagination. It is based on the
belief that the act of art making can
help persons understand more of who
they are so that they can enhance
their lives eventually leading towards
personal growth through self-expres-
sion.

Mark Redgrave, a 20 -year- trained
art and psychotherapist, said art can
contain elements that can help peo-
ple more easily integrate and synthe-
sise conflicting feelings and experi-
ences.

“Art therapy is basically a non-ver-
bal form of therapy. The main source
of communication is through
imagery, which can be drawings,
paintings, three dimensional forms
i using clay and more. It is about
expressing feelings, states of mind,
thoughts, fantasies and different
kinds of mental contents,” Mr Red-
grave said.

The art making process, during an
art therapy session, can also be a
means of cleansing to discharge



“When it comes
to children in art
therapy, it can
be like playing
because you are
experimenting
with art materi-
als. Children
play instinctively
and take to if
more quickly.”

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Art therapist Mark Redgrave uses art
to reach his patients’ inner feelings

strong emotions for relief.

“When dealing with mental states,
you are externalising them through
art therapy. When they are on paper
or in three dimension form and that
is where the therapy starts to happen.
A person can begin to communicate
themselves because during art thera-
py there is a level of verbal communi-
cation. If we are working with
imagery, we tend to ask the question
of where did it come from? Imagery
has a way of accessing the uncon-
scious mind and bringing those con-
tents to the surface. Those contents
can be distressing to a person, feel-
ings they have often forgotten or
repressed because they are psycho-
logically painful. Symptoms of
depression, obsession, compulsions
and anxiety, among other emotional
problems, are produced because they
are hidden. Art therapy helps per-
sons to access those problems,” Mr
Redgrave said.

Mr Redgrave has been in the
Bahamas since 2000 and saw a need
for this form of therapy.

Filling the need

“T got a job at Sandilands and
coming to the Bahamas, there was
no art therapist so it was an open
field for me. People were very
receptive to it. I worked with five
year olds up to the geriatrics at
Sandilands,” Mr Redgrave said.

Mr Redgrave said one of the prob-
lems he has seen in the Bahamas
with art therapy is the stigma that is
attached to mental health problems.

“By coming forward, most people
feel they are crazy, should be in
Sandilands, or become a laughing
stock, that kind of thing. I have
worked with children who have been
sexually abused, adults who have

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substance abuse and interpersonal
problems, alcoholism, pathological
problems, and personality disorders.
It’s been difficult to serve art therapy
because of this challenge. When I
feel a person is a good candidate,
and I introduce them to what it is,
there is really no problem. Once peo-
ple understand what art therapy is,
they respond to it more quickly,” Mr
Redgrave said.

He said because there are different
client groups, many of them respond
in different ways especially children.

“When it comes to children in art
therapy, it can be like playing
because you are experimenting with
art materials. Children play instinc-
tively and take to it more quickly.
With adults it becomes difficult
because they start to worry about
performance. My job is to reassure
them that art therapy is about art
teaching. A common misperception
of art therapy is that people need to
be artistically inclined in order to do
art therapy. That artistic ability is not
required, because art therapy is
about expression. The goal is not to
make masterpieces, but rather to
have an understanding and accep-
tance that everyone has an innate
ability to be creative,” Mr Redgrave
said.

Mr Redgrave said art therapy can
also be a form of self healing.

“The mind is a fascinating thing. If
you get a person to produce symbols,
then those symbols kind of translate
thoughts and feelings that can’t be
expressed and become vehicles for
those feelings as they begin to take
shape. Instead of the person being
hostage to those feelings, they even-
tually control the feelings because
the feelings can no longer control
them,” Mr Redgrave said.

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PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ea a5 aaa a ra OE ee ee eee
Moving from “Storming” to “Norming”

You have been assigned to a team
and you are excited about the prospect
of working on a project with your
coworkers. You start attending meet-
ings and in the first session you notice a
few things that cause you some con-
cern. You sit in the meeting expecting
a team agenda but everyone seems to
have their own agenda. You listen to
the conversations, you even try to par-
ticipate, but the discussions go absolute-
ly nowhere. At the end of the session
you feel you just wasted your time
because there are no solutions, no next
steps or no actionable items.

Now the deadline for your project is
approaching and you attended a num-
ber of meetings already. Team mem-
bers are still showing up to meetings
with incomplete assignments. There is
no accountability at the meetings
because there are no minutes taken or
if minutes are being taken they are so
long that no one reads them. In meet-
ings, there is still no agenda and team
members are still having unfocused dis-
cussions. So what do you do?

Working in teams is usually a com-
plex proposition because many times
we are appointed to a team and we
don't collaborate on team and mem-



ber expectations. What we do is get
caught in the trap of focusing on the
project and not how we are going to
get our team members to work togeth-
er in a functional team environment.

Based on a team building model by
Bruce Tuckman, teams should go
through five typical stages of evolution
in order to deliver results: Forming,
storming, norming, performing and
adjourning. The first stage is the for-
mative or beginning stage where the
team comes together as an entity. This
is usually followed by the storming
stage where the team begins to form
expectations, processes and roles. The
storming stage can be chaotic and
teams sometimes try to achieve results
without laying the groundwork that
leads to norming.

In building your team, be sure you
are not lulled into thinking you are past
the storming stage because the team
members seem to be getting along well.
Sometimes team members have hid-
den, individual agendas and personal
agendas range from a need for visibili-
ty to achieve a promotion, to sabotage.

When you are building your team,
the ideal is to move from storming into
the norming stage where team process-
es and expectations are clearly defined
for your team as a whole and for each
member. Here are a few tips to help
you to move your team through the
storming and norming stages to high
performance:

1. Team members should be assigned
roles like taking minutes or collating
information between meetings. Be sure
the minutes are brief with clear action
items listed, responsibilities assigned
and deadlines set.

2. Team members should be held
accountable for bringing completed
assignments or updates to each meeting
because team members are usually
interdependent. Be sure your update
indicates there is some progress and if
not, there should be an acceptable rea-

son.

3. The leader or meeting facilitator
should ensure there is role clarity,
accountability and high performance
by:

¢ Defining team objectives and member
roles. This can be done as a team for
optimal buy-in.

¢ Planning for meetings by preparing an
agenda

e Ensuring the team adheres to the
agenda by effectively bringing
conversations back to the objectives.

¢ Determining if a digression can add to
the quality of the discussion and
nipping it if it doesn't.

¢ Effectively managing conflict among
team members. This can be done both
during and between meetings.

¢ Keeping track of action items and
ensuring there is follow up during and
after each meeting.

¢ Managing meeting discussions,
ensuring everyone has a fair

opportunity to contribute.

Teams can function optimally when
members trust each other and the
process. Integrating trust building as
part of the team building equation can
lead to higher levels of commitment,
accountability and results so trust build-
ing is a useful exercise. To achieve trust,
it is important to be transparent, fair
and open during the team building
process.

If the team is stuck at the storming
stage, measures should be taken to
move the team beyond the stasis. This
may mean considering a change in lead-
ership or having a candid discussion
about the performance of the team with
its members. Once there is progress at
the storming stage, the team has a good
chance of successfully moving through
the norming and performing stages.

Team building can be an intricate
process riddled with subtle and obvi-
ous obstacles or it can be simple and
seamless. If a capable leader is at the
helm, you can successfully identify and
navigate the obstacles and move grace-
fully through the forming, storming,
norming, performing and adjourning
stages achieving your desired results.

(CY GREEN SCENE



ae

Flowers for summer
ee

Mexican sunflowers are fast

growers and can grow in fairly
poor soil.



-

Cosmos is a cheerful performer

in the summer garden.





: =

=

IT IS perhaps not surprising
that several of the annuals that
we rely upon to give us beauty
and colour during the brutal
summer months originate in
Mexico. These include Mexi-
can sunflower, zinnia and cos-
mos.

Mexican sunflower has
become a Bahamian favourite
in recent years for its fairly
large orange flowers. It can be
grown in rows but is most effec-
tive when planted in stands that
are assertive and eye catching.

Masses of blooms are pro-
duced in a season that lasts for
almost two months. Each
flower only lasts a few days and
should be clipped away once
the petals drop. Towards the
end of the plant’s life cycle you
can leave the flower heads on
until they are dry and store
them to provide seeds for next
years’ crop. You will need to
use gloves as the dried flower
heads are very prickly.

Back in the late 19th century
a botanist picked a small Mex-
ican weed and thought to him-
self that the flower would be
stunning if only it were larger.
Work proceeded in this direc-
tion and the number of vari-
eties and forms produced over
the next century makes it so
you could plant a whole gar-
den with zinnias and most peo-
ple would not realise that the
widely varying blossoms were
all related.

Zinnias come in many sizes.
The flowers can be singles or

doubles and exhibit a rainbow
of colours. Zinnias can take
summer sun and withstand
drought conditions, making
them both beautiful and tough.

Cosmos flowers look delicate
but the plant is even hardier
than zinnia. Cosmos is best dis-
played in mass plantings rather
than trying to train it in rows.
Colours available are yellow,
orange, pink and close-to-red.

Cosmos plants tend to get
leggy and sprawl against each
other. They also re-seed prolif-
ically and can become weeds
once they colonise areas of the
garden where they are not sup-
posed to be.

Not all summer annuals
come from Mexico. South
Africa is the origin of Trans-
vaal daisy or gerbera. These
sharply defined daisies tend to
be a little more expensive than
other annuals and come in yel-
low, orange, red and pink.

When we talk about cone-
flowers we are referring to a
plant characteristic rather than
one particular genus. Cone-
flowers may be Echinacea, dra-
copis, ratibida or rudbeckia but
they are ideal candidates for the
summer garden. The traditional
yellow with a prominent cen-
tre, as in Black-Eyed Susan, is
still the most common colour
but coneflowers also come in
purple, orange and pink.

One of the most drought
resistant of all leafy plants is
known in The Bahamas as
Sailor’s Button, or periwinkle.

Poisonings and pet safety issues

BECAUSE we live in a tropical
region of the world and the fact that we
are an archipelagic country- ie. a group
of many islands in a large body of
water there is always an over abun-
dance of tropical pests such as insects,
spiders, snails, rodents and weeds. Each
day we see on TV or hear on radio, a
new product on the market to elimi-
nate the problematic pest, but some-
times at a huge price. All too often our
pets are the unintended targets of these
chemicals.

The summer seems to be a risky
time for our pets. The long warm days
of summer will put our pets at
increased risk of injuries, fleas and ticks
etc. Also during this time there is an
increased usage of household pesti-
cides and chemicals around the home,
and increased risk of inadvertent pet
poisoning.

Dogs and cats, as well as birds, come
in contact with toxins through many
routes.

Ingestion of chemicals is one of the
most common ways pets can become

poisoned, but inhalation and skin con-
tact are additional routes for poisons to
enter the body. If a pet swallows a poi-
son we want to do what we can to get
some or all of it back out. Most veteri-
narians agree that if it has been less
than 2 hours since an animal has ingest-
ed a toxic substance a fair amount will
still be in the stomach where it can still
be removed. After 2 hours, much of
the poison will likely have passed into
the small intestine where it will start to
be absorbed into the blood.

During that critical first 2 hours your
vet will use medication to induce vom-
iting in your pet to help remove at least
some of the toxins from the stomach. If
more than 2 hours have passed since
the toxin was ingested, we will often
have the pet swallow a liquid charcoal



In its island form it is usually
mauve or bluish-pink but in the
nursery — where it is known as
vinca — it comes in many more
attractive colours. The down-
side is that nursery-bred vincas
do not have the same degree of
heat and drought tolerance as
the native ones. They are still
tough, however, and worth a
place in the summer garden.

Marigolds were once easily
identified by their colour but in
recent decades the standard
marigold yellow has given way
to lemon yellow, gold, orange
and red.

Portulaca makes a wonderful
subject for a summer hanging
basket. The plants tend to
recurve as they hang down, dis-
playing the flowers to good
effect. Portulaca is drought resis-
tant and the flowers, singles and
doubles, come in an array of
bright water-silk colours.

Very closely related is moss
rose, which is best used as a low-
lying edging plant or ground
cover around larger plants. The
flowers are only slightly smaller
than portulaca but the rest of
the plant is very diminutive.

One of the joys of using annu-
als for summer colour is their
tendency to reseed themselves.
The moss rose I planted six
years ago reappears every sum-
mer and cosmos turn up in all
parts of my garden.

e j.hardy@coralwave.com

containing product that helps to bind
up some of the poison in the intestines
so it will pass out with the stool and not
be absorbed.

In these cases, we have to assume
that at least some of the poison will
be absorbed into the bloodstream and
may cause some problems. We will
need to support these animals in the
hospital with intravenous fluids to help
their liver and other major organs.

The liver and kidney systems will
likely be the organs that do most of
the detoxification, and the IV fluid will
greatly help that process. Certain types
of poisons have antidotes (drugs that
directly counter the effect of the poi-
son) while others don’t. Sometimes all
we can do is use medications to control
the symptoms caused by the toxin and
keep the patient comfortable while the
animal’s system is slowly detoxified.

Insecticides are used extensively in
many homes and in most cases they
are used safely. Occasionally, pets will
ingest material recently sprayed or
treated with products intended for ants,

spiders, or other bugs. Most insecti-
cides, if ingested in toxic amounts will
cause symptoms such as muscles
tremors, excessive salivation, vomit-
ing, diarrhea and sometimes seizures.
These can develop in minutes to hours
after ingestion depending on the type
of toxin, how much was ingested and
how much the pet weighs.

Snail and slug bait is another com-
mon household pesticide. Most of
these products contain Metaldehyde,
a potent neuro muscular toxin. Once
ingested, this toxin can cause uncon-
trollable muscle tremors that can
progress to seizures and death. Dogs
and sometimes cats seem attracted to
the taste of these products.

Rodenticides are used in many
households to help control mice and
rats. The most common type of
rodent killing product is made from
coumarin like compounds. These
chemicals cause excessive and uncon-
trollable bleeding in the rodent as
well as any other animal that may
ingest them.

The most challenging aspect about
rodenticide toxicity is that symptoms
of bleeding may not be evident until
3-5 days after ingestion. Rodenticide
poisoning is relatively easy to control
if treatment is started soon after
ingestion. But if we wait to see symp-
toms of bleeding, heroic measures
may be needed to save those patients.
Remember, early treatment is very
effective and usually life saving.

If you choose to use these potent
products, be very careful to place
them in an inaccessible location
where your pet cannot reach them.

There are many other things that
can cause poisoning in our pets. Var-
ious plants, cleaning agents, drugs of
all kinds, fertilisers, herbicides, and
automobile products are just a few
examples. Considering the potential
for severe illness and even death from
such poisoning (this would include
children as well as pets). We all need
to keep our family’s safety in mind
and choose and utilise these products
wisely.
THE TRIBUNE



“x

ORLANDO
High: 88° F/31° eo



=

















Sunshine mixing with Partly cloudy, very Partly sunny. Partly sunny. Periods of sun, a Partly sunny with a












* Low:69° F/21°C some clouds. warm and humid. i-storm in spots. thunderstorm. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
‘ Crh Sta High: 88° High: 86° High: 86° High: 87°
- say High: 88° Low: 76° Low: 76° Low: 77° Low: 76° Low: 76° see ey
j TAMPA va i? EN Fe EEE
igh: 86° F/30° 2 = 95°-83° F 106°-82° F High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht. (ft.
Low: 73° F/23°C ! a. / The Se a an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and 9:59am. 26 3:58am. -0.2
Today
= 4 ~~ elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 10:24p.m. 33 3:54pm. -0.2
~~ @ \ p. p
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if e a ednesday gpm. 32 4:50pm. 02
3 FARK Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Thursday ti50am. 27 543am. -0.1
i oe ——- ABACO Temperature ae 5.50pm. -04
é Lapel ee High: 88° F/31°C diasdesivandeen cade venRaRuanddendhakauewaaalvemna is toe Friday Ce oe a
@ aii . aX Baa 25°C Normal high... Coe ES
. , Normal low 72° F/22° C
a bp bs @ WEST PALM BEACH iy Last year's HIQH occ se Fsic | NTI M IM T(IIN
‘ coca High: 86° F/30° C : Last year's lOW oo... eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeees 72° F/22° C
ee Low: 71°F/22°C Precipitation |}}||© —_—_——___~~~ Sunrise...... 6:21 a.m. Moonrise. .... 8:18 am.
ra As of 2 p.m. yesterday ee cccecccee 0.24" Sunset....... 7:53 p.m. Moonset... . 10:34 p.m.
all FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date : First Full Last New
High: 86° F/30° C @ High: 86° F/30° C Normal year to date .........ccsesscssssseeseeeeeee 10.97" 7 i.
Low: 73° F/23°C Low: 74° F/23°C
<5 AccuWeather.com
‘ @ i Forecasts and graphics provided by Ss ‘ i
a MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 May 30 aa 7 Jun.15 = Jun. 22
aera ELEUTHERA
a Low: 75° F/24°C NASSAU ‘ 9 a Eee
High: 88° F/31°C aM:
Low: 76° F/24° C
KEY WEST <5 @
- cece i CATISLAND
High: 87° F/31" C High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 78° F/26° C Low: 72° F/22°C
@ a
; | i
= GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR
anpros ae Low: 74°F/23°C Ree
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's : ae .
highs and tonights's lows. High: 91° F/33° C
Low: 78° F/26° C
LONG ISLAND
Low: 75° F/24° C
Today Wednesday Today Wednesday Today Wednesday MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W NS High: 87° F/31°C
F/C FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FC Fic FC a Low: 77° F/25°C
Albuquerque 79/26 5542 pe 76/24 5442 t Indianapolis 82/27 65/18 t 77/25 57A3 t Philadelphia 62/16 56/13 + 73/22 62/16 c
Anchorage 68/20 50/10 s 59/15 46/7 1 Jacksonville 84/28 69/20 t 85/29 69/20 t Phoenix 97/36 73/22 s 99/37 75/23 $s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 80/26 66/18 t 81/27 6618 t Kansas City 75/23 58/14 t 70/21 55/12 t Pittsburgh 70/21 S743 t = 77/25 62/16 1 RAGGEDISLAND — igh:90°F/s2°c
Atlantic City 59/15 53/11 r+ 72/22 6015 c Las Vegas 96/35 69/20 s 98/36 75/23 pc Portland, OR 73/22 53/11 pc 79/26 54/12 s High: 87° F/31° C Low: 77° F/25°C
Baltimore 65/18 56/13 + 75/23 65/18 t Little Rock 84/28 68/20 t 84/28 64/17 t Raleigh-Durham 79/26 64/17 t 83/28 66/18 t Low: 75° F/24°C =_
Boston 60/15 48/8 s 59/15 54/12 c Los Angeles 74/23 60/15 pce 76/24 60/15 pc St. Louis 78/25 66/18 t 76/24 61/46 t . <=
Buffalo 64/417 5341 4+ 68/20 57/413 t Louisville 84/28 68/20 t 82/27 65/18 t Salt Lake City 77/25 56/13 s 80/26 58/14 pc GREAT INAGUA se
Charleston, SC 82/27 67/19 t 84/28 70/21 t Memphis 82/27 69/20 t 86/30 68/20 t San Antonio 92/33 72/22 t 88/31 68/20 t High:87° F/31°C
Chicago 70/21 5442 t 65/18 52/1 c Miami 88/31 75/23 t 88/31 74/23 t San Diego 70/21 6246 pce 70/21 61/16 pc Low. 78° F/26°C
Cleveland 68/20 63/17 t 80/26 61/16 t Minneapolis 6447 510 t 67/19 5442 pc San Francisco 69/20 53/11 pce 70/21 53/11 pc y
Dallas 89/31 66/18 t 84/28 63/17 pc Nashville 81/27 66/18 t 82/27 66/18 t Seattle 66/18 51/10 pe 73/22 51/10 s i
Denver 66/18 45/7 pce 74/23 50/10 pc New Orleans 86/30 72/22 t 90/32 71/21 pc Tallahassee 82/27 68/20 t 87/30 70/21 t an
Detroit 68/20 60/15 t 2c ima New York 63/17 53/1 4+ 69/20 60/15 c Tampa 86/30 73/22 t 85/29 74/23 t a
Honolulu 86/30 71/21 pc 86/30 72/22 pc Oklahoma City 80/26 60/15 t 79/26 58/14 pc Tucson 91/32 65/18 s 92/33 67/19 $s
Houston 92/33 71/21 t 90/32 72/22 t Orlando 88/31 69/20 t 85/29 69/20 t Washington, DC 64/17 58/14 r 80/26 66/18 t





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HIGH



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=~











Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

lp HIS

High
F/C
90/32
58/14
73/22
84/28
59/15
91/32
86/30
72/22
91/32
73/22
89/31
89/31
77/25
66/18
62/16
86/30
59/15
94/34
102/38
71/21
91/32
85/29
74/23
75/23
55/12
84/28
67/19
58/14
89/31
68/20
82/27
114/45
78/25
74/23
68/20
838/31
75/23
66/18
17/25
86/30
77/25
97/36
64/17
63/17
82/27
79/26
112/44
63/17
66/18
85/29
85/29
104/40
84/28
85/29
57/13
88/31
66/18
86/30
80/26
79/26
70/21
72/22
79/26
76/24
64/17
84/28
62/16
85/29
75/23
62/16

alil

Today

Low
F/C
79/26
48/8
41/5
68/20
53/11
80/26
76/24
59/15
61/16
69/20
65/18
57/13
70/21
43/8
42/5
58/14
41/5
70/21
82/27
47/8
73/22
74/23
61/16
46/7
45/7
49/9
52/11
33/3
70/21
50/10
79/26
72/22
57/13
57/13
46/7
81/27
59/15
50/10
50/10
77/25
54/12
72/22
50/10
45/7
56/13
65/18
82/27
45/7
44/6
55/12
73/22
77/25
62/16
79/26
43/8
70/21
46/7
70/21
59/15
57/13
54/12
55/12
72/22
63/17
54/12
73/22
51/10
68/20
51/10
44/6

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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Marine FORECAST

Wednesday

High
F/C
89/31
62/16
70/21
81/27
60/15
92/33
85/29
72/22
84/28
74/23
88/31
68/20
74/23
65/18
61/16
75/23
59/15
94/34
101/38
65/18
92/33
80/26
82/27
63/17
61/16
70/21
67/19
59/15
88/31
61/16
81/27
115/46
74/23
77/25
65/18
86/30
74/23
63/17
81/27
85/29
80/26
105/40
57/13
68/20
64/17
80/26
114/45
59/15
63/17
63/17
82/27
104/40
82/27
85/29
55/12
84/28
64/17
85/29
76/24
82/27
68/20
68/20
17/25
75/23
66/18
84/28
64/17
72/22
63/17
69/20

Low W
F/C
75/23 s
49/9 +
45/7 ¢
68/20 p
50/10 r
80/26 t
77/25 s
59/15 s
64/17 p
69/20 s
59/15 t
50/10 pc
70/21 pe
48/8 t
45/7 pc
51/10 sh
39/3 pc
67/19 s
82/27 pc
43/6 pc
72/22 s
73/22 s
66/18 s
51/10 pe
52/11 sh
50/10 pc
50/10 pc
46/7 +
69/20
41/5
77/25
74/23
57/13

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Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace



TUESDAY, MAY 26TH, 2009, PAGE 11B

WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SSW at 7-14 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
Wednesday: SSW at 7-14 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
FREEPORT Today: SSW at 7-14 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 80° F
Wednesday: SSW at 7-14 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 80° F
ABACO Today: § at 7-14 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
Wednesday: S$ at 7-14 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

Minneapolis =)
64/51

4/51

(COOLER)

66/45 75/58

Miami
88/75

Showers
T-storms
Rain
Flurries

Fronts
Cod =

War) filimnfllteniite

Stationary @dengeni

Snow Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

Os [05 10s 20s (B08!) 40s



AUTO INSURANCE

t your

out us!

‘comes.to Auto Insurance,
mber the smart choice is
In urance Management.
rt people you can trust.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

“Wey Povidene Grand aay Abaco | de Eleuthera | Exum
Tt (242) 502-6400/1 Tels (242) 350-3500 } Tel: (242) 367-4204 | Tel: (242) 332-2802 J Tel: (242) 336-2304

ee


























‘¥





AriZona |

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY,MAY 26,

2009

Eyebrow threading is now the new
method of hair removal on the rise

AIR removal is a very big deal for women.
On the face, the eyebrow is the accentuat-
ing factor of facial beauty.

Eyebrow arching can upgrade
your entire look. Although there are
many methods such as using a razor,
plucking or waxing, something new
is on the rise-eyebrow threading.

Baha-Retreat Anti-Aging Spa,
located on east Bay Street just east
of Lucianos, is the only full service
spa and salon that offers eyebrow
threading. This beauty procedure
cost $18. Spa Director and Skin care
specialist, Kenya Mortimer-McKen-
zie, has been threading for about a
year and a half.

“Threading has many benefits. It
lasts at least a week to two weeks
longer than waxing. There are less
ingrown hairs, it doesn’t cause aging
of the skin because you are not using
chemicals as with waxing. Waxing
over time, because of the heat, ages
the skin. Threading is also more pre-
cise causing you to get a better arch
and for many persons who are on
acne treatments such as Retin-A or
Accutine, who can’t get waxing, this
is a better method for them,” Mrs

DN Nd f
; P rire rrr:

, Grapeade

r 4 ey
eT MTT eel ies

tt heres ac

Mrs
McKenzie

gets ready
to thread
the first
brow.

Watermelon

McKenzie said.

The threading technique uses a
100 per cent cotton thread that is
twisted and rolled along the surface
of the skin entwining the hairs in the
thread, which are then lifted out
from the follicle.

Different threading methods

“There are many different ways to
use the threading method. One way
is where they put a piece of the
thread in their mouth and extend it
out to their hands. The other way is
where they put the thread around
the neck and they use the neck to
move the direction of the thread. I
find Bahamians won’t take too much
to the thread being in your mouth
due to sanitary reasons,” Mrs
McKenzie said.

For persons with finer eyebrows
and those who are afraid of pain,
Mrs McKenzie said this method is
great for them as well.

Ven Baile mM Te

eat : c 7]

“You can take an entire row of
hair out, or you can take out one
hair at a time. You have more con-
trol of the shape. Unlike waxing
where you do not have much control
on where you put the wax, you have
control over the threads making it
very precise. Discomfort varies from
person to person. Some people say it
is less painful than waxing but most
people can stand the pain,” Mrs
McKenzie said.

The origin of the threading tech-
nique is uncertain, with some claim-
ing that it began in India, China or
the Middle East. However, Mrs
McKenzie said the technique started
in the East and is slowly making its
way into western culture. Tradition-
ally, threading is used on the entire
face, including upper lip, chin, eye-
brows, sideburns and cheeks.

“I prefer this method. The skin is
so soft after you get this done,” she
said.

Following our interview, Mrs
Mckenzie did the procedure on me.

“ T anticapated that there would be
some pain involved, but it was not as
excruitating as it looks. The only
time Ifelt pain was when one single
hair was removed. However when an
entire row was removed, it was virtu-
aly painless. I would do it again,
because the outcome is pretty
smooth and my brows are perfect.”

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway « 394-1759





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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R ‘Rock’ used to kill loving dad C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.151TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNSHINE ANDCLOUDS HIGH 88F LOW 76F F E A T U R E S SEEWOMANSECTION S P O R T S SEEPAGEELEVEN Quarter-miler making mark n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A LOVING father, uncle and brother was killed with a blow to the head outside his home in the Glendale Subdivision on Sunday night. Police say they have identi fied “a stone” that may have been used in the killing. Terry Fox, 45, had been watching television in the house he shares with three sisters, one brother, and numerous nieces and nephews in Porkfish Road, off Soldier Road, Nassau, when an acquaintance came to call. Relatives say he was arguing w ith the visitor in the back yard when Mr Fox suddenly ran out into the street. Moments later a neighbour knocked at the door to say he had collapsed with a head injury. Three of Mr Fox's nieces ran to his side as he lay in the road with a head wound to his left temple. They saw him take his last breath minutes after he fell. Police believe he may have been hit with a rock, and rela tives said they found rocks 45-y ear-old man dies after ‘ar gument’ The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com Switch to Fidelity products they have built-in savings plans:It’s not too late to build yours...Weather the storm with Fidelity. The perfect eyebrow BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E SEE page eight FROMLEFT:MELISSA FOX , Nelson Cartwright, and Terry Fox’s nieces, sisters and friends outside the family home in the Glendale Subdivision . CLOUDINGOVERTHECAPITAL PLP ‘doing all it can’ to be the next govt n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@ tribunemedia.net T HE PLP is “doing all that is necessary...to pre-p are itself to be the next g overnment of the Bahamas,” according to its leader, Perry Christie. In an exclusive inter v iew with T he Tribune i n which Mr Christie assessed the party’s con-d ition and that of the country, the PLP leader said he is “very happy” right now as the organi-s ation is in a “very good p osition” as the present government approaches the mid-term mark. Despite the claims of s ome sectors of the party that it has not learned the lessons from its May 2007 defeat as laid out in detail in a report by U.S. political consultants Greenberg, Quinlan and Rosner and evidence of intra-party disunity centring around the question of who should lead the organisation, the Opposition leader claimed hehas “absolutely no doubt” the party will have “strengthened itself as a result of the self examination that has taken place” by the time the DARK RAIN CLOUDS hang over Atlantis and cruise ships at Nassau Harbour yesterday. Torrential rain continued on from the weekend – despite the brief glimpses of sunshine through the clouds. Felip Major /Tribune staff Perry Christie ‘very happy’ with party’s condition SEE page eight MINISTER Byran Woodside is now a constant presence in the Department of Lands and Surveys following alleged irregularities in the distri bution of Crown land. Former director of Lands and Surveys Tex Turnquest resigned after The Tribune published claims that members of his family received Crown land grants. However, Undersecretary of Lands and Surveys Audley Greaves remains at his post despite allegations that his wife and son were sold lots in Abaco in 2003 and 2004 respectively. n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A “PATHOLOGICAL GAMBLER” who lost over $40 million in casinos in the Bahamas, the United States and Australia told an Aus tralian court how he hid his addiction from his wife during their honeymoon in The Bahamas by busying her with “pampering packages.” Property developer Harry Kavakas owes $1 million to the Atlantis casino, $1 million to Melbourne’s Crown casino and upwards of $5 million to casinos in Las Vegas. He explained this to a Victoria judge as he made his case for why he should be able to sue the Crown casino for $20 million he lost in a16month gambling binge there between 2005 and 2006, according to The Brisbane Times. SEE page eight Minister a constant pr esence in Lands and Sur veys Dept SEE page 12 Byran Woodside Man who lost over $40m in casinos in Bahamas, US and Australia appears in court INSIDE HEATEDBATTLEOVER $200,000 WINSLOWHOMER PAINTING P A GETWO MAN, 25, ACCUSEDOF10 COUNTSOFARMEDROBBERY P AGETHREE RELIGIOUS LEADERS SLAMMED FOR ‘SILENCE’ ON ALLEGATIONS OF SCHOOL MOLESTATION P A GE FIVE

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE A $200,000 painting given to a 19th century governor of the Bahamas is at the centre of a heated battle between his descendants and renowned auction house Sotheby’s. The painting, Winslow Homer’s Children Under a Palm Tree, was given to Sir Henry Arthur Blake during his tenure as governor from 1884 to 1887. After reportedly being found in a dust bin, the work had been put up for sale by a party unrelated to Sir Henry. However, according to the London Evening Standard, the sale has been halted by an 11thhour appeal by Simon Murray, the great, great grandson of the British colonial administrator, who claims the family are still the rightful owners. The concerned parties are now expected to either settle the matter privately or bring it before the courts. W inslow Homer was famous for his paintings of US lands capes. He also painted scenes in the Bahamas, and Children Under A Palm Tree is said to depict the governor’s children when they were living here. After his post in the Bahamas, the Irish-born Sir Henry moved to Newfoundland, where he was governor until 1889. In 1889 he became the captain-general and governor-inchief of Jamaica. His term was extended in 1894 and 1896, at the request of the legislature and public bodies of the island. Chief curator of the Portland Museum of Art Thomas Denenberg, who appeared on the Maine Public Broadcasting Network yesterday, said that the work in question is different from other paintings by the artist. “This is a very idiosyncratic Homer. It is a watercolour showing three children in very e xotic dress. They were in pant aloons and slippers so they look as if they are in North African costume. “We conjecture that these are the children of the British governor in the Bahamas in 1885. There is a wonderful bit of evidence that the BBC has found where we know that Winslow Homer left for Cuba and the Bahamas in December of 1884. We know that he attended a dance at the Governor’s House, where the theme was the Arabian Nights. “So the fact these children show up in these Moorish costumes dovetails nicely with the documentary evidence of H omer being at that dance,” he s aid. A HANDGUN, live ammunition and 15 jars stuffed with marijuana were found by police in a South Andros home on Sunday morning. North Andros Police raided the home off Queen’s Highway at around 11.30am. They found a .25 handgun with four live rounds of ammunition, 15 small jars of marijana, rolls of plastic bags, a small scale and around $600 cash. A 30-year-old man has been arrested and is in police custody. KIARA’S CR OWNING GLOR Y WINSLOW HOMER’S Children Under A Palm Tree . The painting was given to the governor in 1885 or 1886. Heated battle over $200,000 Winslow Homer painting Police find gun, ammo and marijuana in South Andros home KIARA SHERMAN w as crowned the new Miss Bahamas Universe on Sunday night at the Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach. See t omorrow’s Arts section for more coverage. PHOTOS: Felip Major /Tribune staff NEWMISS B AHAMAS UNIVERSE

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009, PAGE 3 Gun, ammo recovered inthe Redland Acres area Death crash victim namedas Shavares Cunningham W et welcome for tourists at airport In brief DRUGS Enforcement Officers recovered a .380 handgun with six live roundsof ammunition in the Redland Acres area of New P rovidence at midnight on Friday. T he officers saw a man a cting suspiciously when on p atrol in the area, and say t hey saw a shiny object thrown to the ground as they approached him. A 19-year-old from Malcolm Allotment has been arrested in connection with t he incident. Anyone with any information which may assist investigations should call Crime S toppers anonymously on 3 28-TIPS (8477 n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORT – The young man who was killed in a traf-f ic accident in West End ear ly Sunday morning has been identified as Shavares Romel Cunningham of Bootle Bay, Grand Bahama. M r Cunningham had cele b rated his 23rd birthday on S aturday. Sometime around 2.30am on Sunday, he lost control oft he 1999 grey-coloured Delta 98 Oldsmobile he was dri ving and crashed into a utili-t y pole. Thrown He was thrown from the vehicle and died at the scene. His death is the seventh traf fic fatality for the year on Grand Bahama. Mr Cunningham was employed as a marina operator at the Old Bahama Bay Resort. His death has shocked coworkers at the resort. “He was a quiet person and everyone down here is very saddened by his tragic passing,” said a co-worker. “He just turned 23 and I understand that his girlfriendis expecting a baby.” Police are continuing their investigations into the accident. TOURISTS arriving at the Lynden Pindling Interna tional Airport had a wet welcome to the Bahamas yesterday as the arrivals hall sprang leaks after heavy rains. An eye-witness passing through the airport described the immigration screening area as a “disas ter” with water dripping from the ceilings and the walls, giving visitors cause to complain. The man, who arrived in the airport yesterday afternoon, said: “The lines were out the door, the floors were drenched with water, and they have got big garbage bins all around, collecting water that is dripping. It’s really disastrous. “It doesn’t look good for the tourists, and everyone is just standing around really annoyed.” Puddles which gathered in front of some of the immigration booths were sectioned off for safety, and other booths opened to process arriving passengers. n B y NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter A 25-year-old Ridgeland Park man accused of c ommitting a spree of armed robberies was arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Police have charged David Metellus, with 10 counts of armed robbery. Metellus is accused of robbing three City Market food stores, two Super-w ash Laundromats, two Texaco Service Stations and a Dominos Pizza store between March 18 andM ay 14 of this year. It is alleged that Metellus, while armed with a h andgun, robbed Super Wash Blue Hill Road of $120 on Wednesday March 18, $100 cash on March 2 4 and $250 on April 28. Court dockets also state that Metellus robbed Superwash Robinson Road of $190 on Monday, March 23. I t is further alleged that on Saturday, May 9, M etellus robbed the City Market food store, Robins on Road of an undetermined amount of cash and on Sunday, May 10, the City Market food store on R osetta Street of $500. He is also accused of robbing the City Market food store, Cable Beach, on Thurs d ay, May 14, of $390, and on the same day of robbing the Texaco Service Station on East Street and SoldierR oad of $160. On Friday, May 15, it is alleged he robbed Dominos Pizza of $379 and on May 18 anothe r Texaco Service Station of an undetermined amount of cash. Metellus, who appeared before Chief Magistrate R oger Gomez and Magistrate Janet Bullard, was not required to enter a plea to the charges. The case h as been adjourned to September 7 and transferred to Court 5, Bank Lane. Metellus was remanded to H er Majesty’s Prison. A 21-year-old woman charged with “trading in prostitution” was arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Mekell Johnson of Colliers Avenue appeared before M agistrate Ancella Williams in Court 6, Parliament S treet. According to court dockets, it is alleged that on Sunday, May 24, Johnson was in Dowdeswell Street for the purpose of trading in prostitution. The accused pleaded not guilty to the charge and was g ranted bail in the sum of $1,500 with one surety and ordered to report to the South Beach police station every Sunday before 6pm. A djourned T he case was adjourned to September 8. Annier Knowles, 29, of Pitt Road and Stacy Rolle, 29, of Wilkinson Street appeared in court with Johnson yes-t erday. The two have been charged with vagrancy. According to court dockets, it is alleged that on May 2 4, Knowles and Rolle were found loitering on Dowdeswell Street with the intent to commit an offence. They both pleaded not guilty to the charge and were g ranted bail in the sum of $1,500. They were ordered to report to the Nassau Street p olice Station every Sunday before 6pm. n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net T HERE is a growing number o f Haitian-Bahamians who are e ducating themselves to achieve p ositions of power in order to a venge the treatment received by their parents or grandparents, a prominent radio host claims. During his contribution to a recent Insight article featured in The Tribune , local religious DJ Kevin Harris said he discouraged this kind of thinking and attitude as it would lead to a “tremendous n umber of clashes” among the two groups in the country. “Instead, people who have Haitian parentage should demand a discussion on the issue whether it be through forums or town hall meetings or other areas in a nonemotional approach to the issue among their own generation and peers, to ask the questions. Because the fundamental quest ion is that a lot of them feel that i t is unfair that you can be born in P rincess Margaret Hospital (PMH PMH and I have to wait until I’m 18 to qualify (for citizenship “Well I don’t have a challenge w ith us listening to those concerns and seeing where there can be c onsideration in that light. Obviously the government, and governments have maintained a reason why they feel it is important to control the number of persons being allowed to have citizenshipw hose parents are Haitians,” he s aid. This reason, he said, would be interesting to find out from suc c essive ministers of Immigration and Foreign Affairs as to why this d ecision was not overturned. Animosity “Maybe they fear that there is this sleeping giant of animosity and concern among the two cultures. Well that’s why I feel you h ave to start the conversation so that you can help some of the y ounger people to realize that t here is no need for me and you to be enemies. I can hear your point, I can understand your point, and perhaps I may be compelled to do something about your point i.e. in the case of many white Americans who stood with black Americans to fight for racial justice,” he said. Mr Harris added, however, that he would have a problem agreeing with govern m ent if it pushed for their teachers to learn Creole in order to cater to this one group of society. In his opinion it would open the floodgates for other segments who could then demand that government school teachers should learn German, Chinese, etc. “There should be a standard for all. Second of all it would be a disadvantage for any child whose parents are of any other countryn ot to learn the language of which they want to become a citizen. They are put at more of an advantage to learn English and to speak it fluently. “No one is saying that they should step away from the ability t o have another language as an asset. “But certainly the government of the Bahamas and the education system of the Bahamas s hould not amend itself just because we have parents who are refusing to assist the teacher and assist the system by assisting the children to learn the language of the country of which they are trying to become a citizen,” he said. A FATHER is still waiting for the investigation he was promised after his son was allegedly beaten by a high school teacher early last year. In a statement addressed to the Commissioner of Police, Jonathan Hall insists that his son was struck in the mouth by a teacher at a local government school. When he filed a complaint at the local police station, Mr Hall said he was given assurances that the teacher would be removed from the school and brought before the courts. However to his surprise, he said, after numerous inquiries it turned out that not only was the teacher still employed at the school, but no investigation had taken place. “And up to this very date I have been redirected so many times, it is unbelievable. I am tired of the run-around and I am still waiting on this matter to be dealt with. “After seeing no result or hear ing no response, I have visited the Ministry of Education to only find that the matter was never even brought up with the ministry as I had falsely been assured,” he said. Mr Hall said he has visited the Complaints Unit at Police Headquarters only to find that no effort has been made by this department to address his matter. He said it is now the Com plaints officers who are giving him the run-around, and there seems to be “no resolution” in sight. Man, 25, accused of ten counts of armed robbery MAGISTRATE’SCOURT: David Metellus L EAVING COURT: D avid Metellus, 25. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f Woman charged with ‘trading in prostitution’ ‘Growing number of Haitian-Bahamians seek po w er to avenge treatment suffered by parents’ Father of son allegedly beaten by teacher still waiting for probe

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EDITOR, The Tribune. My friend Richard Perry Pinder attempted to take me to task in a recent letter to the editor. He claimed that the intervention of the governments of France and Canada was "not so much financed by debt, but through sensible and equitable tax systems." Mr. Pinder went on to expand this a bit more to say that; "One only has to look at Canada to clearly see that as a result of sound budget management and accountability it is a country that has been able to finance its social programmes and infrastructural development through a sensible and equitable tax system and not exhorbitant d ebt which has been the tactic of its southern neighbour." Bearing in mind I was lamenting the damage we are doing to future generations witha government unconscionably increasing its debt load and deficits, that incidentally are at about 43 per cent of GDP, according to the Central Bank of The Bahamas, I decided to dig below the surface a bit. So I Googled "France debt to GDP 2009" and "Canada debt to GDP 2009" to see if I missed something. In the top five results we're informed that the "French public deficit forecast at 5.6 per cent of GDP in 2009, with public debt approaching 75 per cent of GDP" . In the case of Canada, we're informed in the top five results that "Canada's debt to hit 63 per cent of GDP" . Dr. Michael Walker of Canada's Fraser Institute informed a Nassau Institute conference here a couple years back that 40 per cent of the tax r evenue of Ontario, Canada was now being absorbed by the h ealth care system there. Clearly this is all unsustainable. But why stop comparing there? According to Veronique de Rugy, a French economist with the Mercatus Centre, per capita income in the United States is $45,000 while in France it's $33,000. She informs us that labour strikes routinely shut the country down, and Government spending as a percentage of GDP in France is 52.4 per cent while in the US it's 37.4 per cent. A couple questions come to mind: 1. If the tax system in France and Canada is so equitable, why do so many French and Canadian citizens opt out? 2. If the Canadian health care system is so competent, why do so many Canadians go to that dastardly southern neighbour for services? Mr. Pinder might be surprised that the company I work for, and many others I know of, offer health care and pension benefits to their associates. What I find objectionable though is for governments to spend other people’s money for them and indenture future generations. The point is, more government for The Bahamas is unsustainable. RICK LOWE www.weblogbahamas.com May 22, 2009 C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm IN EXPLAINING to persons expressing dis q uiet about the Appeal Court’s ruling that mandatory legislation to hold serious criminalo ffenders in prison until trial is unconstitution al, Bar Council President Wayne Munro said p ersons often forget that “judges and lawyers all have family in the wider community.” They live in the community, said Mr Munro, and “so it’s really not in their interest” to release people on bail without good cause. That is whato ne would have thought, but that was not the reality of 1996. A nd because it was not the reality, the 1994 Bail Act was amended to legislate against bail for serious offenders. The discretion to give bail in serious offences was taken from the magistrates. It was legisl ated that “not withstanding any other enactment, a person charged with an offence men t ioned in Part C of the First Schedule shall not be granted bail.” Persons mentioned in Part C w ere those accused of kidnapping, murder, armed robbery, treason and conspiracy to commit any one of those offences. Before the amendment, criminals were laughing at the law. The courts had become a r evolving door for the criminal who appeared to have more rights than the law-abiding citizen. B ahamians were asking the very question posed by Mr Munro last week: Aren’t the mag i strates and criminal lawyers a part of this community? The public voice grew ever louder wondering what planet lawyers, weeping for bail for hardened criminals, and magistrates listening to their pleas, lived on. Their sentences d id not indicate to the public that they were of the same planet. They seemed oblivious to pub l ic alarm at the growing criminal element, espe cially to those being returned to the streets i nstead of being held behind bars. “The fact of the matter is,” then Police Com missioner BK Bonamy told The Tribune in 1996, “that persons who are out on bail have been committing serious offences.” He said the police force had a lot of dedicated officers who were “somewhat hamstrung by a system whichh as some serious flaws.” The serious flaws to which he referred were the courts. In many cases, he said, accused persons were charged by the police, brought before the courts, granted baila nd were out committing serious crimes. More than 100 persons charged with armed robbery w ere granted bail since 1994 it was then 1996, and those who were not killed in other shootings were still on the streets. He pointed out that while the police might object to bail, the final decision was with the m agistrates. He said police object to bail because they f ear witness tampering, or that the accused might not return for trial. He said the return to t he streets of these men with criminal records “increases the workload of the police considerably.” And, he said, despite the Bail Act “magistrates take the view that the person is entitled to bail.” T he legislators of the day amended the Bail Act with their eyes wide open, they weighed t he rights of the criminal and those of the citi zen. Prime Minister Ingraham said in 1996 that it had been shown that many persons out on bail charged with serious crimes were involved in c ontinuing criminal activity. “Hence, we are resolved to change the law, t ightening the rules and conditions for the grant of bail while taking into full account individual a nd constitutional rights as well as the needs of society generally.” He had also hoped that persons for which there was no bail would get early trials. Lawyer Brian Moree considered the Prime M inister’s 1996 radio address on the crime issue, the bail amendment and earlier trials, had a b alanced approach that “reflected the recog nition of protecting society, and at the same t ime respecting the constitutional rights of accused persons.” In his opinion the move should “go a long way” in giving magistrates and judges the necessary discretion in denying bail in appropriate cases. In our opinion it must cer t ainly have gone a long way in removing from their court room the pressure of overbearing l awyers pressing for the freedom of their client. The late businessman and legislator Nor m an Solomon, in a panel discussion on crime and the amendment to the Bail Act, recognised that in serious times, harsh cures are needed. “It’s a serious decision to deprive somebody of their liberty before their trial,” he said. “It was very strong medicine.” But on the other hand, he continued: “The sad fact of the matteri s the Bahamas is in a serious situation with regard to crime.” Today, the situation is even worse. The judges and magistrates are now the sole arbiterso f who should get bail, we just hope that when they make their decisions they will remember w hat country they are living in, and who are now out on the streets causing the most trouble, and increasing the number of cases the police have to investigate. More government for the Bahamas is unsustainable LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Judges have final decision on bail '(6,*1 (1*,1((5,1* &203(7,7,9(,&,1* $67%,'',1*,1)250$7,21 5RDGWR&LW\'XPSDIWHUUHPL[ (PDLOJJRQJRUD#FRUDOZDYHFRP EDITOR, The Tribune. A few months ago a family member of mine had to be admitted to the PMH and was unable to due to the caving in of a portion of the roof and the rooms flooded with water. This almost brought tears to my eyes. This led me to try and come up with a way to build a new hospital if not for my lifetime but for my children and their children and here it is. If every working person, including self employed persons in the Bahamas which is about some 250,000 persons, donated $20 per month towards building a new hospital that can net some $5,000,000.00 ($5 million if your country’s health care is not worth it? If this is done for one year, then work out the math. Let us take the strain off the government and let us do our country a good deed. Many per sons waste more than $20 a month on such things as soda, cigarettes, alcohol and many unnecessary things. Let us put that $20 to good use. At least we can have a new hospital that we can be proud off. Some persons might not agree with this, because they may think that they don’t need it, but I say to you just live long enough. As a people let us give it a thought. As a people we need to help to build this country with our hands just to let our children know that each one of us has a part to play in the build ing of our great country. The question is how will this be done how would you collect these funds? Each employer can set up a deduction plan from each employee who is willing to participate, or we can hold a $20 day, that’s only a few suggestion. I know there are more. BERNAL F BULLARD Nassau, April 22, 2009. Coming up with a way to build a new hospital EDITOR, The Tribune. You say you love me, but you do not feel my pain, (no medicine in our hospitals and people are dying while waiting). You say you love me and you see my hunger so you enslave me, (instead of teaching me to fish you give me one You say you love me and I will never need for anything, (so you give my lands away). You say you love me and you will never leave me but yet, I can’t get to see you (even with an appointment You say you love me and you would look out for me, yet my children are being abused, my sons are killing one another. My house is in disrepair, my streets are falling in holes, my ancestors cry out for justice as my courts are clueless about law, homos and lesbians are taking over, my children are not learning, but I know you love me. You say you love me and you will love me until the end of time, you told me not to worry as our love will get better in time you told me I am the guava of your eyes, but yet you love foreign better. You said I must trust you and believe in you and because I love you I trusted, I believed and my heart is broken in a million pieces. You say you love me and wherever I go you will go with me also. So, my love, when will you be coming to help me push up these daisies. BRYAN SKIPPY SMITH Nassau, May 17, 2009. A cry for help EDITOR, The Tribune. Re: Pharmacy workers claim discrimination The Tribune, Saturday May 9, 2009. Yes, why on earth would an employer prefer to bring in a foreigner over a similarly qualified Bahamian? Could it be something to do with the work ethic and productivity? KEN W KNOWLES MD Nassau, May 10, 2009. A question of work ethic and productivity?

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n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net PTA president Troy Garvey has criticised religious leaders and members of the Grand Bahama Christian Council for not speakingo ut when allegations of sexual molestation at the Eight Mile Rock High School were first made public. Mr Garvey said religious leade rs cannot remain behind the “four w alls” of their church, and must get involved in the day-to-day concerns of the country. “When this whole thing starte d, it was astonishing to see that no Christians, nobody came forward to step in as men of God,” he said. T he Eight Mile Rock High S chool has been mired in scandal since January when claims of teache rs molesting or engaging in acts o f a sexual nature with students surfaced. Committee Police are looking into allegations against three teachers and a g overnment select committee has been appointed to investigate the circumstances surrounding the case. L ast Thursday, Rev Glenroy B ethel and a number of religious leaders on Grand Bahama called for the appointment of Christian Council representatives to that c ommittee. However, Mr Garvey claims that he has been urging the religious community to get involved for s ome time. I contacted the Christian Council and I told them personally that they need to take off their coats and get out of the four walls a nd get in the midst,” he said. “Even though I dropped letters off throughout West Grand Bahama asking religious leaders to come to t he PTA meeting, we did not have p articipation from any of the priests and reverends in the community.” Mr Garvey said only three pastors attended a town meeting held b y the PTA to discuss the allegations. “We call ourselves a Christian nation and all these things are happ ening. This is the time when we n eed the Christians more than ever. God is hurting, God is crying out now and if you look around and see what is happening it is only because God is angry,” he said. R ev Bethel agreed that religious leaders should have been more involved in the beginning. “We should be doing more from t he Christian side of it because we a re falling down in doing our jobs. “(Mr Garvey should have been leading the charge, but nevertheless we will see w hat happens from here. “I believe this is an opportunity for those religious leaders to come forward and get involved in what is g oing on,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009, PAGE 5 H ATTERAS SPORTSFISHERBOATDESCRIPTION: 197842’SIZE:B eam-15’/Depth11”G ROSS TON:22,800lbs LOCATION: TexacoEastBayDock A PPRAISED VALUE: $198,800 F O R S A L E IN TERESTED PARTIESSHOULD SUBMITOFFERSINCLUSIVE OF TELEPHONECONTACTAND POSTAL ADDRESS T O: CBDISTRESSED PROPERTIES, CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT, P.O BOXSS-6263 NASSAU,BAHAMAS OR E MAIL US AT:DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM * WERESERVETHERIGHTTOREJECTANYORALL OFFERS. SHARING LOVE’S MESSAGESILENTAUCTION AND RAFFLE LOTSOF FANTASTICPRIZES WENEEDYOURSUPPORTMAY30,2009 WYNDHAMNASSAURESORT CABLEBEACH COCKTAILS7:00P.M. DINNER8:00P.M. UNDERTHEDISTINGUISHEDPATRONAGE OFHISEXCELLENCYARTHURD.HANNA GOVERNORGENERALOF THECOMMONWEALTHOFTHEBAHAMAS ANDMRSHANNA FORMOREINFORMATION& TICKETSCONTACT THECANCERSOCIETYOFTHEBAHAMAS CENTREVILLE NASSAUN.P.THEBAHAMAS TELEPHONE323-4482323-4441 FAX323-4475 DONATION$200LOVE GIVESLOVE LAUGHS LOVE SHARES LOVE SPREADSSUPPORTTHE8THANNUAL BALLTHECANCERSOCIETYOFTHEBAHAMAS WHEN US President John F Kennedy visited the Bahamas in 1962 to meet British Prime Minister Harold MacMillan he may have had his hands full w ith more than diplomacy. Between December 17 21, 1962, President K ennedy and Mr MacMillan met in Nassau to conclude talks on supplying Polaris nuclear missiles to t he United Kingdom. However, according to The Daily Mail a retired church administrator is going public with intimate details of her affair with President Kennedy, while she was an intern at the White House. M imi Beardsley Alford, then 19, accompanied President Kennedy to the Bahamas for the meeting. She also joined the president at pool parties and was once spotted hiding on the floor of his car as it left the White House. A ccording to T he Daily Mail K ennedy was said to have almost fired her boss in the press office whenh e failed to let her travel with the presidential party in June 1963 to Berlin, where he gave his famous ' Ich Bin Ein Berliner' speech. Miss Alford admitted to the affair in 2003 after a newspaper tracked her down, following the publi cation of a book called An Unfinished Life: John F. Kennedy, 1917-1963, by Robert Dallek. S he is now expected to share the details of the affair in a book called Once Upon A Secret. A STREET festival will be held in Nassau this month to celebrate and promote the literary arts. The first Bahamas Intern ational Literary Festival (BILF Rawson Square from noon to 6pm on May 30. The festival aims to b roaden participation in t he arts, increase opportunities for artists and preserve and promote then ation’s cultural resources. Dozens of literary acts w ill be performed and there also will be a celebration of culinary art andn ative crafts. “Our concept of a literary street festival is onew here original work is presented by poets, folk storyt ellers, songwriters and playwrights,” said a spokesperson for theo rganisers. “Natives and visitors can c ome and experience a celebration of the rebirth of an expressive art form thatm aterialised as literary art: innovative, raw, and full of e motion. “Our vision is to establish a street festival as thec atalyst for expanded public participation in the artsa nd increased opportunities for artists. BILF sees the street festival as an avenue to further strengthen the economic, social,a nd cultural vitality of the literary art community.” Organisers said highlights will include: poetry drama rake and scrape traditional Bahamian d ance contemporary Bahamia n music Bahamian art and craft including culinary art. Nassau set for literary street festival In brief Religious leaders slammed for ‘silence’ on allegations of school molestation JOHN F KENNEDY at a tree planting ceremony in the Bahamas on December 21, 1962. WHENJFKVISITEDTHEBAHAMAS

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A STORM said to have been quietly brewing at the College of the Bahamas for some time boiled over yesterday when C OB bosses were publicly accused of forcing “disturbing decisions and policy changes” on the faculty. A statement issued by the U nion of Tertiary Educators of the Bahamas (UTEB that administrators and the College Council have been excludi ng staff from the decision making process and acting in contravention of “good industrial practices”. It said: “Despite attempts to w ork harmoniously with administrators at the College of the Bahamas in our push toward university status, UTEB must, a t this time, break its long held silence over the latest in a series of cavalier and autocratic governance decisions and policy changes by college administrators – decisions and changes that c ontinue to astonish and offend the faculty and staff of the coll ege. UTEB wishes to say that it is unequivocally opposed to the manner in which this adminis-t ration continues to circumvent the already established decisionm aking process at the institution, particularly those processe s leading to decisions which directly impact faculty.” Response Y esterday afternoon, COB i ssued a response denying these allegations and calling for U TEB to return to negotiations. The union maintains that any c ircumvention of UTEB’s involvement in the restructuring of schools and faculties, redrafting of the College Act or the adoption of policies that affect terms and conditions of employment is contrary to the Industrial Relations Act, the COB/UTEB Industrial Agreem ent, and the Memorandum of Agreement between COB and UTEB. “The union feels it is unfortunate that, while college admin istrators and UTEB sit at the bargaining table negotiating a n ew industrial agreement, there have been attempts by the college and its governing council to create policies that should be t he subject of current negotiations with UTEB,” the statement said. “By circumventing proper n egotiations in this way, they u ndermine the voice of labour in the governance of the college; thereby, creating an environment that undermines the goodf aith relationship UTEB has attempted to forge with the college’s senior administration and governing council. Voice UTEB said that for more than a year, verbally and in writing, it h as tried to get administrators and government officials responsible for educational oversight to recognise thei mportance of the faculty’s voice i n the decision making process. Over the course of the next few weeks, UTEB said, it will make the public aware of the s pecific decisions it opposes, and will “call into question the legality of the process by which they have been or are being imple-m ented.” T he union said these matters are of major concern to its memb ers, adding: “only when those issues that arise are properly a ddressed will the proposed University of the Bahamas attain the pinnacle it seeks and best serve the needs of its con stituents.” U TEB said it wants to remind college administrators that the f uture University of the Bahamas must be seen as a p roduct that evolved from “a wholly collaborative effort”. The college’s response noted that COB is currently in negoti ations with UTEB, and consid-e rs that it is only through negotiations at the table that a new a greement satisfactory for all parties can be arrived at. “On Friday last, the Union of Tertiary Educators of the B ahamas walked away from the negotiating table. “We have invited the Union of Tertiary Educators of the B ahamas to return to the table a nd await its decision. With respect to the current press release approved by the Union of Tertiary Educators of the B ahamas, we wish to assure the public that the college has not implemented any policy that contravenes or contradicts any rights, privileges or conditionsi n any labour contract to which the college is a party,” COB said. The college said that there is n o attempt to circumvent union involvement or to stifle the voice of faculty. Indeed, the college values the views of all faculty and seeks the full engagement of all – faculty, students, staff, alumni and f riends – in the task of building a university to serve and drive national development and build a better Bahamas for all. We call on the Union of TertiaryE ducators of the Bahamas to return to the negotiating table and work together in negotiating an agreement satisfactory f or all parties and helpful for the development of the College and the Bahamas,” COB said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE K HES ADDERLEY of Temple Christian Elementary School has been named 2009 Bahamas Primary School Student of the Yeara nd the winner of a $7,000 scholarship. The first runner-up Farion Cooper of Xavier’s Lower School was awarded a $4,000 scholarship. Second runner-up Charisma Sewell of Walter Parker Primary School in GrandB ahama and third runner-up Rebecca Henderson of Queen’s College were each awarded $3,000 scholarships. Last week, the Bahamas Primary School Student of the Year Foundation held its 13tha nnual awards ceremony to recognise primary school students from grade six, who had been selected by their schools as the top achievers. T he students, who have been dubbed “the best of the best”, competed for the honour of b eing named Primary School Student of the Year by writing an essay as well as submitting: r eport cards from grades four, five and six; copies of awards, certificates, newspaper clipp ings; three letters of recommendation; and a work portfolio of approximately 50 pages. Minister of State for the Environment Phent on Neymour commended Ricardo Deveaux, president and CEO of the foundation, for hav ing the vision to establish the organisation in 1997 in collaboration with the Bahamas PanHellenic Council. T he minister said he was proud of all of the students, particularly the young men and those from the Family Islands. He urged parents to continue to support their children and teach them to uphold “trueB ahamian values”. James Boyce, Primary School Student of the Year for 2008, spoke of his reign as being bothe xciting and overwhelming. He told the honourees that they were all w inners and encouraged parents to spend quality time with their children and to make the e ffort to support them through their educational journey. THE first ever organisation dedicated to representing the country’s growers and landscap ers has been established. The Bahamas Landscape Association (BLA promotes the interests of individuals, associa tions, clubs and businesses involved in nursery, landscape maintenance, landscape installation, irrigation, pest management, arboricul ture, horticulture and floriculture in the Bahamas. Its officers are: co-chairmen Robert Myers of Caribbean Landscape Ltd and Conray Rolle of Atlantis; treasurer Mark Fox of ACIT Ltd, secretary Selima Campbell of Lucyan Tropical Growers and director Kent Knowles of Atlantis. “The BLA is dedicated to bringing its membership together to improve the standard of education, per formance, quality and public awareness of the green industries in the Bahamas,” said the association in a statement. With more than 50 indi vidual and company mem bers already signed up, the officers say they are well on their way to obtaining the critical mass required to achieve their goals. The BLA has partnered with the Florida Nursery Growers Landscape Association and is looking to partner with the Ministry of Educa tion to provide internationally recognised professional certification to its members. The first “Certified Horticultural Professional” pro gramme is already being offered to its members online as of January 2009 and further classes and certification will take place at the BTVI once the Ministry of Education approves the required funding. The association said it will be encouraging the professional certification of all of its members and promoting the use of such professionals to hotels, businesses, government agencies, developments and the general public. The BLA said it sees this programme as “piv otal in creating standards in the green industry”. “We are particularly excited about getting pilot programmes of this level of professional certifications into the senior classes in the high schools,” said co-chairman Mr Rolle. “We understand the vast need for young people out there looking for a head start in advancing their education and in the business world; this is a great programme for just that”. Robert Myers said: “The BLA will offer individuals an opportunity to become members of a massive international industry and will provide career training and certification thus allowing them to stand out and gain recognition by employers and or potential customers. In an unregulated industry this is the best possible cre dential a company or landscape professional could have. It says to the con sumer that you know what you are talking about.” The BLA says it will: promote the use of local grades and standards for all to follow lobby the government to consider proposals that will benefit the industry offer special short courses and seminars to its members send out information on new products, machinery, ideas, laws and jobs The BLA website, www.bla-fngla.org, will list the certification status of members. It will also offer consumers or companies the oppor tunity to support the association’s programmes. The BLA said: “This will be an extremely useful tool for people who are tired of being ripped off by scam artists and unprofessional persons and companies in the nursery and land scape field. Consumers can be sure their con tractors or gardeners are up to date with all the latest ideas and training as a number of continued educational units will be required by each member to maintain their certification and membership each year. Unrest at COB as faculty hits out at administrators 2009 PRIMARY SCHOOL STUDENT OF THE YEAR Organisation formed to promote ‘green industry’ M exico spending $ 90M on celebrity ads for tourism n MEXICO CITY IF THErich, famous and pretty are returning to Mexico's beaches now that officials say the swine flu epidemic is waning, won't everyone else? That's the message of a $90 million campaign aimed at luring tourists scared off by the outbreak, which has killed at least 86 people worldwide, according to Associated Press. The government-funded campaign will feature ads with opera singer Placido Domingo, champion golfer Lorena Ochoa and other national heroes. President Felipe Calderon said Monday that Mexico will also invite international celebrities to visit, but he didn't name them. Tourism is Mexico's thirdlargest source of legal foreign income. But swine flu fears have stemmed the flow of visitors and pushed hotel occupancy to a record low. n TAMPA, Fla. THE COAST GUARD is searching for a man believed to have gone overboard from a cruise ship in the Gulf of Mexico, according to Associated Press. The Coast Guard say 18year-old Bruce Okrepki reportedly went overboard from the Carnival Fantasy at about 9:45 p.m. Sunday, about 150 miles southwest of Tampa. Okrepki is from Louisiana but authorities aren’t certain of his hometown. A search plane, helicopter and Coast Guard cutter were sent out to search. The ship had left New Orleans and was en route to Key West. Man goes overboard from cr uise ship Union of Tertiary Educators of the Bahamas criticises bosses To have your say on this or any other issue, email The Tribune at: letters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207

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THE Lyford Cay Foundation h as made a $25,000 donation to the Salvation Army of the Bahamas to support its three feeding centres – which have experienced a sharp rise in the numbero f people seeking help since the global economic crisis took hold. "This gift from the Lyford Cay Foundation has made a world of d ifference to us," said Major Lester Ferguson, the Army's divisional commander. "We've been struggling since late last summer to keep up with the demand to sup-p ly our cooked meals and groceries for families in need, hereon Mackey Street and also in Grants Town and Freeport. This d onation means that we've been able to add not only to the quality of the food parcels that we give, but also to the quantity, so it's making a great difference." A s a result of the gift, the two centres in New Providence have increased the number of free hotl unches and food parcels they distribute each week from around5 00 to more than 600, according to Madeline Froning, the Army's c ommunity relations and develo pment associate. In Grand Bahama where the p antry was empty for a time last year more than 100 parcels h ave been given out since the grant was made. The food pack-a ges range in size and are designed to serve an individual or family f or up to two weeks. "In the past, if our food pantry was empty and we had nothing to give, we had nothing to give," said Ms Froning. "It's an ongoing s truggle to maintain this programme, so that's why this grant is s o important, because it allows us to stock our food pantries on a more regular basis." According to Major Ferguson, the feeding centres have not only s een a rise in the demand for their services, but also a change in thek inds of individuals asking for help. "Previously the people we a ssisted would be the unemployed, or elderly folk," he said. "Last year w e started to see those numbers increasing, but we also saw people who were employed who just needed a bag of groceries to tide them through the week. So since t he end of the summer last year, we saw the numbers just keep risi ng, and they really haven't stopped. And we're finding more a nd more persons who need help, including some who drive their cars on their way home from work and stop by to see if they can get something to get them through a couple of days." The Lyford Cay Foundation's G ifts and Grants Committee has disbursed more than $10 million to a wide range of non-profit organizations to date. This year, given the difficult economic climate, the committee is concentrating on addressing people's most funda m ental needs, including food, clothing and shelter. And instead o f waiting for grant applications to come in, the committee has b een reaching out to groups who specialise in these areas to find out how best to help. "We approached the Salvation Army and explained that because of the circumstances right now, we feel a responsibility to focus on b asic human needs, and we know that they have a system in place to p rovide resources to those who need them the most," said Suzy Robinson, committee chair. "Because they are a reliable organisation that already has a p rogramme in place, they were the perfect people to approach, a nd we are honoured to be able to support the great work that they d o." In 2008, the Lyford Cay Foun dation also gave the Salvation Army $22,000 to fund the pur chase of 20 station licenses, train ing and computer support for a literacy software programme used in the Army's 'Excel After School' project, which offers children and y oung people a safe, comfortable and supervised place in which to do their school homework. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009, PAGE 7 AT A special assembly held at the Uriah McPhee Primary School on Friday, May 15, Scotiabank (Bahamasc essing Support Centre announced its adoption of the Uriah McPhee Primary School. Each branch and unit within Scotiabank has been asked to select a primary school in their community with whom to partner. Each partnership is individualized and can take thef orm of financial support, volunteering, shared expertise or p hysical resources. The Processing Support Centre has commenced a literacy programme at the school and has plans to launch a science project in the near future. On May 15 all 49 members of the unit were treated to a s pecial assembly conducted by students of the school. Principal of the Uriah McPhee Primary School, Mrs. Helen SimmonsJohnson, thanked Scotiabank for its support. I am elated that members of the Processing Support Centre chose to partner with my school, this programme will allow Scotiabank to observe first hand what we are doing ino ur school and will provide our students with opportunities for enhanced learning,” said Mrs. Simmons-Johnson. Rekell Griffin, Senior Manager Marketing and Public R elations at Scotiabank, presented Mrs. Simmons-Johnson with two computers along with reading software to be used in t he school’s reading lab. In an address to the administrators, teachers and students of Uriah McPhee, Ms. Griffin stated, “Scotiabank is verye xcited about this new initiative, through this programme we intend to utilise the human resources, talents and ideas of o ur employees to strengthen and enhance the quality of education in the communities where we live and work.” The Adopt-A-School Programme spins off the Scotiab ank Bright Future Programme, which is a philanthropic programme that helps support opportunities for the children a nd communities in which we live and work. The Scotiabank Bright Future Programme is helping to support opportunities for children and communities. S cotiabank has been part of the Caribbean and Central America since 1889. It is now the leading bank in the region, with operations in 27 countries, including affiliates. The bank has 12,117 employees in the region, including affiliates, serving more than two million customers, with 593b ranches, kiosks and other offices, plus about 932 automated banking machines. LYFORD CAY FOUNDATION Gifts and Grants Committee members Suzy Robinson (left (right centre on Mackey Street. The centre provides hundreds of hot lunches and food parcels to individuals and families in need every week. Scotiabank’s Processing Support Centre adopts Uriah McPhee School Charity reports a sharp rise in demand at feeding centres Lyford Cay Foundation donates $25,000 to Salvation Army C h r i s t i n e A y l e n Share your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are m aking news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a g ood cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar e a or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. AMBASSADOR OF FRANCE TO THE BAHAMAS Marc-Oliver Gendry (right Hubert Ingraham during a courtesy call at the Office of the Prime Minister, Cable Beach, Nassau on Thursday May 21, 2009. PMMEETS FRENCHAMBASSADOR P e t e r R a m s a y / B I S THE Board of Directors of Port Group Lim i ted have announced the appointment of Pietro Stefanutti as a director of the board. Mr Stefanutti is a multi-lingual executive e specially skilled at planning, organisational development, and leading an efficient organisation. He is oriented toward global businesses that require professional management with entrepreneurial skills, and possesses a track record for turnarounds and solving a broad range of cultural, technical, manufacturing and marketing problems. He also serves on the board of directors of Enterprise Development International, a U.S. based non profit organi zation that promotes the global development of micro enterprises through micro-lending and training. “We think Mr. Stefanutti’s experience in this arena and overall management and governance acumen will greatly assist the city’s strate gic growth,” said Hannes Babak, Chairman of Port Group Limited. Mr Stefanutti’s professional career began in 1972 as an operations engineer with Shell in the oil production region of Western Venezuela, and continued with Exxon Chemicals. While at Exxon, Mr. Stefanutti held several management positions with the Venezuelan affiliate, and was promoted to General Manager in Rio de Janeiro with responsibility for Brazil, Argentina and Chile before returning to E urope in May 1990. In September 2003 Mr. Stefanutti founded PharmaChem Technologies (GBa cquire Honeywell’s Bahamian facility and to produce a leading antiretroviral drug for HIV/AIDS. After inspection and approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA in December 2004, PharmaChem Technologies (GB active pharmaceutical ingredient Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate (TDF ences Inc. (NASDAQ: GILD 2007 Mr. Stefanutti merged his company with Groupe Novasep and became chairman of the board of the combined entity with some 500 million M$ of revenues worldwide. “The addition of Mr. Stefanutti ensures the company will continue to benefit from a diversity of knowledge and opinions,” said Ian Rolle, President of Port Group Limited. Mr. Stefanutti was born in Italy and immigrated to Venezuela when he was 5 years old. After completing his elementary education in Caracas, Mr. Stefanutti studied in the United States from 1963 to 1972. He attended High School in Chicago and obtained an engineering degree from the University of Missouri under a scholarship program sponsored by Shell Oil Company. Port Group Limited appoint new director of the board

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE According to the 42-year-old, the casino allowed him to gamble despite knowing that he had a problem and was banned from casinos elsewhere. If successful in his bid to win back his funds from the Crown, Mr Kakavas claims he will still “not have a dollar” as he will use it to pay back millions owed to creditors else where. Testifying on Monday, Mr Kakavas reinforced his argu ment that he was a “problem” gambler by telling the court that despite promising his fiance that he would quit his addiction when they got married, he went against his commitment during their honeymoon to The Bahamas in 2006. Hiding his gambling activities during their trip by organising a “pampering package” for his wife, the property devel oper added to the $40 million in losses he had already racked up in unidentified casinos in the U.S. and The Bahamas between 2003 and 2006. He had earlier told the court that he would book his wife in for facials, hair stylings and manicures while he gambled in the Crown Casino in Melbourne. “She did not know I gambled in the Bahamas,” Mr Kakavas said. “I arranged for her to do the women’s things, whatever they do.” Meanwhile, the Australian vehemently denied a suggestion made by a lawyer during his opening remarks in the case that he did not chase his losses. “The only occasion I would not chase my losses was when I had no money to chase my losses with,” he said. “Blind Freddy could see I was chasing my losses...I was chasing them vigorously and in a blinded state.” next election arrives. “In our case we have had the time to reflect to look at this and we are p utting in place now all of the nece ssary things to make us a strong and v iable opposition to the FNM government and quite frankly I believe that with the condition of the country and the years ahead as we move t owards the next general election the P rogressive Liberal Party will be an i ntense competitor to the FNM,” said M r Christie. M eanwhile, said the Opposition l eader, the country has now reached a critical point at which voters should be in a better position to make an informed judgment of which party is more suited to govern the country. I think the people of this country will see, as we progress towards t he next election and more and more as the FNM approaches mid-term, and will be looking very carefully (ath ow the government is handling the management of the country). Having gone through the last three or four years, that is two years of us, the PLP, and the first two years o f the FNM, they are now in a position to be making judgments as to how effective my party was in its f irst term and how effect ive the Ingraham gove rnment is,” he said. In view of this evaluation, Mr Christie suggested there may be a swing toward the PLP, which it can in turn uset o its advantage. People form a view f irstly that they don’t a gree with what the government is doing they become disaffected. The Opposition, however it is organised, becomes t he beneficiary of the view formed against w hat is happening in the government.” Voters, he said, will increasingly b e inclined to “choose a PLP where they would be able to return to the g lory days of an economy that was very beneficial to them and which they do not now have.” The critical position for people in this country is to continue to watch t his government and how it is trying to manage a very bad situation in this country,” said Mr C hristie. There are serious c oncerns, legitimately serious concerns about how the government is managing the economy of The Bahamas and the social circumstances ofT he Bahamas.” C laiming that polls h ave allowed him to keep in touch” with voter’s sentiments, the former prime minister said the party has not lost but gained support s ince the last general election, which was c losely fought, and he, with Deputy Leader Cynthia Pratt and Chairman Glenys Hanna Mar-t in, are “all, as of today, secure in (their Considering the last election was as close as it was now you can draw your own conclusions,” said Mr C hristie of the party’s electoral prospects. Y esterday, a disgruntled PLP insider questioned why Mr Christie “only finds his voice” whenever he is personally attacked, but remains “silent” o n the issues at “all other times.” I t does nothing to dispel concerns a bout the documented public perception of him as “weak and indecisive” to see that Mr Christie “only speaks out when there is a question about his leadership,” said the source, referring to the fact that ac opy of the Greenberg, Quinlan, R osner report, which was “not exactl y favourable” to Mr Christie’s leade rship, was leaked in its entirety to a local political blog over the weekend under the heading “Report confirms Christie must go or PLP will die!” T he move was described by Mr Christie over the weekend as one done for the furtherance of political aspirations by persons who may see its as negative towards me and myl eadership.” “It is now clear that he must be c hallenged at the convention,” said the insider. On Sunday Mr Christie said “he h as no doubt whatsoever” that he will emerge from the convention still a s leader of the party. thrown in the front yard after his fall. E mergency Medical Services and police arrived within the hour and Mr Fox was pro n ounced dead at the scene. A Soldier Road man in his forties turned himself into police at around 6.30am yester d ay. Police say they believe he is responsible for the incident. Mr Fox, a self-employed h andyman, grew up in the Glen dale Subdivision, attending HO Nash and CC Sweeting schools.R elatives say he was a family man who loved to crack jokes and be the “life of the party.” The uncle was popular among h is numerous nieces and nephews. He had one son, Lar ry Fox, 24, who lives in Fox Hill a nd would visit with his father e very week or so. Terry Fox’s sister, Melissa Fox, 40, who lives in the familyh ome in Porkfish Road, said: He was fun-filled, the life of the party, always making people laugh. He was the life of thef amily; he loved children.” The last large family gather ing was at the funeral of his 74y ear-old father, Rufus Fox, in March, who died 10 years after the death of their 64-year-old mother, Vernitta Fox. M r Fox's brothers and sis ters said he was a homebody who rarely liked to go out, a lthough he did love music, and he loved to dance. Miss Fox said: “He was a lways coming in the morning, d ancing, he would come in front of my door saying, 'It ain't time to sleep!' Always clowning around. But he was always home, he didn't like to go out.” M r Fox was the fourth of eight children, and although he was self-employed, he some-t imes worked for his half-broth er, Nelson Cartwright, at Cartwright's Carpentry and Construction in Yamacraw. M r Cartwright said his brother was semi-skilled, and could have been a foreman if he had “stuck to it.” Instead life just threw him a bunch of curve balls,” he said. “It could have gone a lot of w ays different for him, but our destiny is not controlled by us. “I'm a firm believer that if y ou live by the sword, you die by the sword, so I can't believe anything else.” Mr Cartwright added: “He w ill be missed. We hope that justice will be done, and police will determine what is what. It could have been an accident, it could have been what ever, but we can't jump to conc lusions. “We have to believe in the justice system and how the c ountry operates. “We can't take matters into our own hands because Terryi sn't coming back, so it doesn't make any sense to take matters into your own hands.” Anyone who may be able to a ssist police investigations should call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-TIPS( 8477). PLP ‘doing all it can’ to be the next govt FROM page one P erry Christie FROM page one TERRY FOX with his brothers and sisters at their father’s funeral in March. Terry is the second from the left. Left to right are Melissa Fox, Terry Fox, Michaela Fox, Brinton Fox, Nelson Cartwright, Deborah R ahming, Dianne Bowe. NELSON CARTWRIGHT at the spot where his half brother, Terry Fox, died in Porkfish Road, Glendale Subdivision, on Sunday night. ‘Rock’ used to kill loving dad Man who lost over $40 million in casinos in Bahamas, US and Australia appears in court FROM page one n TAMPA, Fla. THECoast Guard was searching Gulf of Mexico waters Monday for an 18-year-old recent high school graduate from Louisiana who is believed to have gone overboard from a cruise ship, according to Associated Press. Bruce O’Krepki went overboard from the Carnival Fantasy at about 9:45 p.m. Sunday, about 150 miles southwest of Tampa, the Coast Guard said. O’Krepki is from Hammond, La., where The Daily Star newspaper reported that he recently graduated from St. Thomas Aquinas High School. He was with about 35 classmates on the ship. His uncle, Rick O’Krepki, said Monday afternoon that the family had no details about what happened. “We are awaiting more word,” O’Krepki told the news paper. “Hopefully, the brave men and women of the U.S. Coast Guard will be successful in searching for Bruce.” He asked that the family’s pri vacy be respected and for people to keep his nephew in their thoughts and prayers. A search plane, helicopter and Coast Guard cutter were sent out to search. The ship had left New Orleans and was en route to Key West. Search for man who went overboard from c ruise ship

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n By TOM WITHERS AP Sports Writer ORLANDO, Fla. (AP From an unforgettable shot to a cheap one. Three games in, the Eastern Conference finals have grown a little nasty. Dwight Howard scored 24 points 14 on free throws and Rafer Alston added 18 as the Orlando Magic, sick of seeing replays of LeBron James' dramatic buzzer-beater to win Game 2, downed the ClevelandCavaliers 99-89 on Sunday night to take a 2-1 lead in the series. A physical game from start to finish, there were 86 free throws attempted, 58 personal fouls called, two technicals, and a flagrant. The officials spent half the night stepping between players on both sides a s tempers flared inside an o verheated Amway Arena. I n the first half, Mo Williams had his left eye split open by Orlando's Anthony Johnson, who nailed Cleveland's point guard with an elbow. Williams, who needed four stitches to close two cuts, and James felt the blow was a cheap shot. "I think it was," James said. "You see Mo's face, it's not a pretty sight. That's not called for in this game." James scored 41 on just 11of-28 shooting and missed five free throws in the fourth quar-ter. And once again, Cleve land's superstar didn't get enough help from his teammates. Williams, Delonte West and Zydrunas Ilgauskas shot a combined 13-of-37. Game 4 is Tuesday night. The first two games of the series in Cleveland were each decided by one point. This one was resolved by elbows, shoves and hard fouls. Howard, Ilgauskas and Cleveland's Anderson Varejao all fouled out. Afterward, Williams said the Cavaliers were giving the underdog Mag-ic too much respect. "We just need to man up," James said. "Orlando is a very, very good team." Unlike Games 1 and 2, the Magic got out fast, stayed close d espite Howard's early foul t rouble and put the Cavs away at the line. Howard, a notoriously poor foul shooter, went 14-of-19 from the line and the Magic made 39 of 51 attempts. In the fourth quarter alone, Orlando made 19 of 23 to hold off the top-seeded Cavaliers, who began the playoffs with eight straight wins and have now dropped two of their last three. Each time he stepped to the line, Howard sang a song in his head he heard at halftime. "We just kept fighting. That's what we got to do, we fight to the end," Howard said. "We can't worry about nothing, we can't worry about the calls, can't worry about nobody else. We just got to get out there and play." Cleveland better figure out a way to win in steamy Florida fast. The Cavs, who were thumped here by 29 on April 3, have six lost six of their last seven in Orlando. The Magic seem to have a spell over the Cavs. "They create so many matchup problems for us,"W illiams said. "I know it. They know it. Everybody knows it." Despite his lack of help, James kept Cleveland within striking distance in the fourth and scored on a three-point play while getting Howard'sf ifth foul with 2:34 to play to pull the Cavs to 90-86. Howard, wrapped up underneath, then made two free throws before James was fouled and rimmed out two at the other end. On Orlando'sn ext trip, Mickael Pietrus, who c ame off the bench to score 16, grabbed a long rebound, got fouled and was pushed in the back by West, who was handeda T. Pietrus made his free throws to make it 94-86 and the Mag ic appeared to have things under control when Howard caught James from behind and blocked his 3-pointer. The refs saw it otherwise and called a three-shot foul on Superman, who couldn't believe it. James made all three shots, but the Cavs were short on time. Rashard Lewis and Hedo Turkoglu made free throws. Turkoglu was just 1-of-11 fromt he floor but made 11 free t hrows and added 10 rebounds and seven assists. After sitting the final seven minutes of the first half with three fouls, Howard made it through 9:10 of the third quarter before getting No. 4 and technical No. 5 of the postsea son. He was called for pushing Ben Wallace underneath, and upset with the whistle, he said something on his way to theb ench that referee Joey Crawf ord didn't like and was T'd up. Orlando coach Stan Van Gundy had warned his star to keep his composure because the league auto matically suspends a player for one game after her eceives his seventh technical foul in the playoffs. "I didn't say anything to Joey Crawford," Howard said. "The response was to the other team. I didn't say anything to Joey Crawford. I'm not stupid enough to get in his face and say anything, so I try to keep it to the other team." The Magic led 29-23 when Howard picked up his third personal foul with 7:27 remaining in the first half when he bumped James ever so slightly on a drive. After Johnson rocked Williams with the elbow, Williams laid face down on the floor for several seconds. When he got up, Williams, who was called for a block, had blood trickling from his eyebrow and left cheek. During the timeout, the offi ciating crew huddled and d ecided to call a flagrant-1 on J ohnson. Williams, who had hurried from the floor for med ical treatment, came back out to shoot the free throws with his eye already severely swollen. If he had not returned to shoot, Williams would noth ave been able to play anymore. Gritting his teeth, Williams, looking like a boxer needing a corner cut man, made both shots and immediately headed to the locker room for stitches. He was back on the floor with about two minutes left. Before the game, James said he expected a physical game. "When you play a team over and over you start to dislike them more," he said. "It just happens. It's got to be a little chippy." Was it ever. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009, PAGE 9 Grand Bahamian quartermiler making his mark life,” said Williams, who joined Andrae Williams (44.98 Chris Brown (45.03 passing the A qualifying standard of 45.55 for the IAAF World Championships set for August in Berlin, Germany. “But I feel it’s a big achievement because as a track athlete once you get fast, you are supposed to get faster. So I guess my point is I have to get faster and the only way I can do that is to train harder than I did and lift more than I did and improve on where I am right now.” Williams’ coach Blaine Wiley said he has been amazed by his performance. “I had very high expectations for him,” Wiley said. “I felt that he had the ability when he got here. I think his personal best was 47.91 when he came to South Plains. His freshman year, he ran 46.70 after he had injured his hamstring 10 days before. “I was expecting him to run a 46 low last year, but he was set back by the injury. So I knew coming in that he would have had the potential to run 46 or faster. But as the season progressed and he started training with another quarter-miler here, he just started running faster.” Based on his performances, Wiley said he knew that Williams was on course to run some pretty good times this year. “When he ran the 45.01 for the fastest time in the world, we continued to train harder and so I knew going into this meet over the weekend, I knew he was strong enough to run under 45 seconds. “He proved me right. He came off the curve and ran a brilliant race. He came through the first 200 in 21.6, which is exactly what I told him and he finished strong and nobody was able to catch him. In both of his races, he ran as perfect as you could get for a quarter-miler, so it was great.” At the beginning of the season, Williams said his ultimate goal was to run around 45.5 and hopefully secure a lane in the one-lapper in Berlin. “I succeeded that, so every time I run, I’m surprised at what I do,” Williams stated. “But I work really hard, so I know I’m capable of doing it.” Although the 400m has already been the leading event at the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations’ National Championships scheduled for June 26-27 at the Thomas A Robinson stadium, Williams’ performances adds an addi tional flair. But Williams said he’s not going to linger on the trip home for that meet because he has an even more loftier goal and that is to represent the country well in Berlin. “I really can’t tell what the future holds. I will just let the Lord guide me and go with the flow,” he said. “One minute you could be on top and the next minute you are not, so I’m not going to think too far in the future.” Having progressed at 3 1/2 seconds over the last two seasons at South Plain, Wiley said Williams has the potential to run a low 44 this season. “I really think that in 2012, he will really be a medal con tender (at the Olympic Games),” Wiley projected. “There’s a possibility for him to do it this year. “But it’s more difficult for the kids coming out of college after the long season to maintain their form at the World Championships or the Olympics. But we have tried to get him ready for the summer. He has a lot of heart and a lot of character. He does everything that I’ve asked him to do.” While he has put himself where he’s now a marked man, Williams said it’s good because he remembers how just last year he was chasing all of the top local contenders, including Brown and Andrae Williams. “I’m just going to train hard,” he said. “I know it’s going to be hard because I don’t want them to concentrate on just trying to beat me. “There are still two (American) quarter-milers out there (Olympic champion LaShawn Merritt and runner-up Jeremy Wariner), so don’t set your sights on me because you will be only the third best. Like I’m doing, try to be the best.” Andrae Williams, another Grand Bahamian native, said he’s elated to see Williams performing the way he has been. “Each year we seemed to have another quarter-miler coming up,” he said. “It’s excit ing. To run 44.73 is an out standing time, so that should really help us out at the World Championships as we chase the Americans.” Not sure of the direct relationship between the two, Andrae Williams said Latoy Williams is certainly inspiring him to train harder and he knows that the other quartermilers are doing the same. “I’m happy with my times so far. This is the best performance that I’ve ever had, so I just hope that I can stay healthy and just peak at the right time to compete at the Nationals,” he said. Andrae Williams, who is based in Lubbock, Texas, where he’s being coached by Dion Miller, is expected to be back in action this weekend to compete in the Reebok Grand Prix in New York. Latoy Williams F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 1 1 n By The Associated Press Cleveland at Orlando (8:30pm EDT). The Magic look to take a 3-1 lead over the team that had the NBA’s best record in the regular sea-s on. After beating Cleveland two out of three in the regular season, Orlando has won two of three to open the Eastern Conference finals. S S T T A A R R S S Sunday Dwight Howard, Magic, went 14-of-19 from the line and scored 24p oints as Orlando beat Cleveland 99-89 to take a 2-1 lead in the Eastern Conference finals. Rafer Alston, Magic, scored 18 points in outplaying Cleveland AllStar point guard Mo Williams. Mickael Pietrus, Magic, came o ff the bench to score 16 points and play strong defense as Orlando forced LeBron James to shoot 11of-28. H H E E L L P P W W A A N N T T E E D D LeBron James had 41 points, nine assists and seven rebounds, but had little help from his teammates in C leveland's 99-89 Game 3 loss to Orlando. Guards Mo Williams and Delonte West were a combined 10for-27 from the field and the Cavaliers shot 37 per cent from the floor. N N O O M M O O Mo Williams had another poor night and a painful one inC leveland's 99-89 loss in Game 3 of the Eastern Conference finals. The All-Star point guard had only five of his 15 points after halftime and was just 5-for-16 shooting, falling to1 8-for-56 for the series. He also briefly left the game after taking an elbow from Orlando's Anthony Johnson above and below the lefte ye midway through the second quarter. Williams required four stitches to seal the lacerations and s aid Johnson's elbow was "most definitely" a cheap shot. M M A A V V E E R R I I C C K K T T R R A A D D I I N N G G T he Dallas Mavericks are out of the NBA playoffs, and the spotlight is now following the team's controversial owner, Mark Cuban, to a different venue federal court. The i nsider trading suit filed against Cuban by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission last year is scheduled to receive its first hearing Tuesday when attorneys present oral arguments on a motion by the bil lionaire owner to have the case dismissed. C C A A V V A A L L I I E E R R S S & & C C H H I I N N A A The Cleveland Cavaliers have s igned an agreement with an investm ent group from China to become minority owners of the NBA franchise and its arena. The Asian con glomerate, which includes JianHuaH uang, a Chinese businessman who has brokered sponsorship deals with the New York Yankees and other sports franchises in the U.S., could acquire up to 15 per cent of Cavaliers Operating Company, the entity that owns the team and operates Quicken Loans Arena. If approved, the deal would provide marketing opportu nities for the Cavaliers and James, who is already popular in China. S S P P E E A A K K I I N N G G "We just need to man up. Orlando is a very, very good team." LeBron James, after the Magic's 99-89 victory gave them a 2-1 lead over the Cleveland Cavaliers in the Eastern Conference finals NBA Today Howard’s 24 lead Magic past Cavs for 2-1 lead DWIGHT HOWARD (12 finals in Orlando, Florida, on Sunday. Orlando won 99-89. (AP Photo: Reinhold Matay

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A relatively new Bahamas Softball Federation administration at the helm welcomed its second member association into the 2009 softball season. BSF executives were on hand to open the Andros Softball Association on May 23 in Nicholls Town, Andros. In a rematch of last year’s ladies final series, defending champions Nicholl’s Town Navigators held the home field advantage and defeated the Lowe’s Sound Angels, 1110. The ASA presented postseason awards and the federation officially recognised two of the host islands recent entrants into the BSF Hall of Fame Brian Cleare and Wendell Evans. On hand to attend the event were MP for North Andros and the Berry Islands, Vincent Peet, BSF president Bur ket Dorsett and first vice president Ted Miller. Dorsett heralded Andros as one of the major building blocks of the federation’s suc cess. “Andros now boasts one of the largest associations in the federation in that they have about 11 men’s teams and five ladies teams. In the last few years the way the BSF format is now set for the National Championship format, Andros has fared well over the last couple of years,” he said. “They have a high level of talent in terms of players that can represent the country at the national level. The Navigators, the league defending champions currently boast a shortstop on the national team roster. With proper training she and other players like her can only reach the zenith of their careers as homegrown talents in Andros. On the men’s side there is young pitching prodigy Christopher Russell. The federation will be paying keen interest to the development of softball, particularly the young players true to our theme this year, youth devel opment and the way for ward.” Dorsett said the presence of a vibrant softball community on the island has served a number of purposes for the island. “It is promising that such a large crowd attended the opening night of the association which bodes well for the future of softball on the island and their impact in the BSF,” he said. “The interest on the island is high for softball and there was constant talk about the participation and competition in the league this year. Softball and sports in general are doing a the job of binding the North Andros community together.” Next on the opening list for the federation is the All-Abaco Softball Association in Cooper’s Town, Abaco, on May 31. 2 2 0 0 0 0 8 8 A A S S A A S S e e a a s s o o n n A A w w a a r r d d s s Male MVP Christopher Russell Female MVP Dora Evans Male Rookie of the Year Horrace Miller Female Rookie of the Year Tareka Munroe Male Coach of the Year Dora Evans/Vashnell Hill Female Coach of the Year Stephen Russell/Stephen Riley C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net AT two different track and field championships across the United States over the weekend, a few Bahamians have excelled by winning national titles. At the 2009 National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA became only the sixth Bahamian to crack the 45-second barrier in winning the men’s 400 metres in Hutchinson, Kansas. Having already booked his ticket to the IAAF World Championships in Berlin, Germany, when he ran the then world leading time of 45.01, the Grand Bahamian sophomore at South Plains College stopped the clock in 44.73 to produce the fastest time by a Bahamian this year and the third best behind Americans LaShawn Merritt and Jeremy Wariner. The race was so fast that Williams had to hold Tabarie Henry from Barton County Community College, who was second in 44.77. Williams’ performance overshadowed the double victory for Olympic sprinter Sheniqua ‘Q’ Ferguson, who represented Southwest Mississippi. Ferguson, who is preparing to head to Auburn University to complete her final two years of college eligibility, won the women’s 100 in 11.48. And she doubled up by taking the 200 in 23.54. Both times, however, were off the automatic qualifying of 11.30 and 23.00 respectively for the World Championships. Jamal Wilson, also from Southwest Mississippi, matched the same height as two other competitors at 6-feet, 10 3/4inches (2.10 metres the men’s high jump champion on fewer knockdowns. At the NAIA Outdoor Track and Field Championships in Edwardsville, Illinois, Olympian Ramon Miller closed out his collegiate career by repeating as the quarter-mile champion. His time of 45.43 was posted as a new meet record and a personal best, lowering the previous mark of 45.97 that he turned in during the semifinal. Another Bahamian and a Dickinson State team-mate Sean Pickstock finished second in the final in 46.65. Pickstock, like Miller, won his heat in 47.00. In the 200, Dickinson State’s John Ingraham clocked 21.47 for second in the final. The e vent was won by Tyrell Cuffy o f King College in 21.06. A nd Jamal Forbes, another member of Dickinson, rounded out the Bahamian men’s individual performances with a fourth place finish in the 100m final in 10.61. Forbes ran 10.56 in the semifinals to qualify for the final. On the ladies’ side, Lanece Clarke had her best showing in the 100 final where she was third in 11.93 for McKendree College. She ran 12.05 to qualif y. Clarke also got second in the 200 in 24.17. She ran faster in the preliminaries in 24.29. And Ashley Hanna, representing Florida Memorial, was fifth in the ladies’ 400 final in 55.02. Hanna got a fifth place finish in her heat in the prelim inaries in 56.36. Meanwhile at the Belem Grand Prix in Brazil, two elite athletes were in action. Quarter-miler Christine Amertil had to settle for fifth place in the women’s 400 in 51.43, which surpassed the A qualifying standard of 51.50 for Berlin. Jamaican Bobby-Gaye Wilkins won in 50.91. And Olympic bronze medal list Leevan “Superman” Sands soared 16.79 metres for seventh place in the men’s triple jump. The winning leap was 17.66 by Nelson Evora of Portugal. Bahamians win national titles at US track and field championships AT the 2009 National Junior College Athletic Association, SHENIQUA ‘Q’ FERGUSON (shown in this file photo) , representing Southwest Mississippi, won the 100m in 11.48. And she doubled up by taking the 200 in 23.54... AT the Belem Grand Prix in Brazil, LEEVAN S ANDS ( shown in this file photo) , soared 16.79 metres for seventh place in the men’s triple jump... AT the Belem Grand Prix in Brazil, CHRISTINE AMERTIL (shown in this file photo , had to settle for fifth place in the 400 in 51.43, which surpassed the A qualifying standard of 51.50 for Berlin... THE Junior Baseball League of Nassau’s Division Championship Series concluded on Saturday as champions were crowned in all six divisional age groups. Rather unusual was the fact that all six pennant winners lost the series to the elimination game winners. JBLN finished its 2009 Sea son on a high note as 29 teams in six age groups saw play in youth baseball and as seen in the playoffs, the competition was fierce from the start of the season in January to its conclu sion on May 23. Next up for JBLN will be its awards presentation set for 2pm June 13 at The Nassau Yacht Club. T T E E E E B B A A L L L L Game 1 Knights, 15 Sidewinders, 4 Game 2 Knights, 7 Sidewinders, 6 Knights sweep series 2-0 C C O O A A C C H H P P I I T T C C H H Game 1 Athletics, 10 Dia mondbacks, 0 Game 2 Athletics, 13 Diamondbacks, 2 Athletics sweep series 2-0 M M I I N N O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E Game 1 Rockies, 12 Mets, 8 Game 2 Mets, 10 Rockies, 3 Game 3 Rockies, 5 Mets, 4 Rockies win series 2-1 M M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E Game 1 Reds, 14 Indians, 7 Game 2 Indians, 9 Reds, 4 Game 3 Indians, 5 Reds, 3 Indians win series 2-1 J J U U N N I I O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E Game 1 Yankees, 15 Dodgers, 10 Game 2 Yankees, 8 Dodgers, 3 Yankees sweep series 2-0 S S E E N N I I O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E Game 1 Tigers, 7 Phillies, 6 Game 2 Tigers, 8 Phillies, 5 Tigers sweep series 2-0 Junior Baseball League of Nassau ends its season on a high note BSF executives open Andr os Softball Association

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Grand Bahamian quartermiler making his mark C M Y K C M Y K TUESDAY,MAY 26, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 P AGE 10 Bahamians shine at US track and field championships your safe harbourfor Life & Health Insurance, Pension Management, and Brokerage & Advisory ServicesFAMILY GUARDIAN 396-1355 I BAHAMAHEALTH 396-1300 I FG CAPITAL MARKETS 396-4076 I FG FINANCIAL 396-4080SALES OFFICES: NASSAU I FREEPORT I ABACO I ELEUTHERA I EXUMA I CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET I www.famguardbahamas.com A MBESTA-ExcellentFinancialStrengthRating 9 9E ndsMay30S S U U I I T T S S9 9$ $BernardRd:393-3463 MackeySt:393-5684ThompsonBlvd:328-1164 FineThreads FineThreads Latoy Williams the sixth Bahamian to dip under 45 second barrier in 400m n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net M ove over Chris “Bay” Brown, Andrae Williams and Andretti Bain. There’s a new quarter-miler who is making his mark on the international scene. Meet Latoy Williams, a native of Grand Bahama who is in his sophomore year at South Plains College and is getting ready to transfer to Texas T ech to complete his final two y ears of eligibility. W illiams, who on Thursday celebrates his 21st birthday on the same day as his mother Norma, became only the sixth Bahamian to dip under the 45 second barrier when he clocked a blistering 44.73 seconds to win the National Junior College Athletic Association’s 400m title over the weekend in Hutchinson, Kansas. A 2007 graduate of St G eorge’s High School, W illiams’ performance came a fter he stunned the track and field world with the fastest time of 45.01 in Waco, Texas, on April 18 this year. “I feel quite satisfied. It’s a big performance, but I still feel the same about my every day S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 LATOY WILLIAMS became only the fourth Bahamian to dip under the 45 second barrier when he clocked a blistering 44.73 seconds to win the National Junior College Athletic Association’s 400m title over the week end in Hutchinson, Kansas. SPOR TS IN BRIEF T T O O U U C C H H F F O O O O T T B B A A L L L L W W E E E E K K E E N N D D R R E E S S U U L L T T S S BELOW are scores of the three games played over the weekend. On Saturday at Goodman’s Bay, the K OL unatics would defeat the RBC Lions 21-20. On Sunday, two games were played at the Winton Rugby field. In game one, the EastSide Predators demolished the Fort Charlotte Snappers 88-0. Ing ame two, the Bahamas Rugby Team would lose to the W arriors 44-26. There are four games scheduled for this holiday weekend and they will all be played at the Winton Rugby Field. See schedule below: Saturday, May 30 3pm The Bahamas Rugby Team vs. The Orry J Sands Pros 5pm The Fort Charlotte Snappers vs. the K O Lunatics Sunday, May 31 2:30pm The Warriors vs. The RBC Lions 4:30pm EastSide Predators vs. the Goodman’s Bay Spar tans B B A A S S E E B B A A L L L L F F R R E E E E D D O O M M F F A A R R M M C C H H A A M M P P I I O O N N S S Four more champions were crowned over the weekend. Congratulations to the Coco Plums who defeated the Sea Grapes for the T-ball Championships on Saturday past in a decisive game three. Congratulations to Coach Smithy and the Boas who after losing Friday night against the Bees 12-4 went on to capture the 2009 Coach Pitch Championship 4-3 on Saturday. The new 11-12 Division champions are Coach Greg and the Wild Dogs who won two straight games this weekend over the Conchs 10-3 on Friday night and 5-4 on Saturday in an epic battle. In the 16-18 Division, Coach Tellis and Coach Martinbor ough Arawaks swept the Lucayans 10-9 and 14-7 on Sat urday to win the championship. Only 9-10 Division remains uncrowned where the battle continues between the Dol phins and Barracudas. Game two is scheduled for 6:30pm Tuesday and if necessary, Game 3 is scheduled for 6:30pm Thursday. U U S S T T A A M M E E N N S S C C H H A A L L L L E E N N G G E E R R T T E E N N N N I I S S M M E E M M O O R R I I A A L L D D A A Y Y C C L L A A S S S S I I C C Justin Lunn competed in the USTA Men's Challenger Ten nis Memorial Day Classic (Tournament ID 153813309 Pebroke Pines, FL over the weekend. In the first round Justin d efeated Gino Meeuwsen 7-5, 7-6 (4 defeated the No. 5 seed Brian Duschoh 6-3, 7-6. Justin was defeated in the quarter final by the no. 1 seed Nikola Aracic 64, 7-5. B B A A H H A A M M A A S S H H O O T T R R O O D D A A S S S S O O C C I I A A T T I I O O N N G G E E N N E E R R A A L L M M E E E E T T I I N N G G A General Meeting of the Bahamas Hot Rod Association is set for 7pm May 28 at the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture’s Conference Room on Thompson Boulevard, just west of the Customs building. Matters to be discussed will be upcoming events, improvements on the MotorSports Park. Persons interested can attend and also inquire about the membership of BHRA. C C R R I I C C K K E E T T W W E E E E K K E E N N D D R R E E S S U U L L T T S S THE Dynasty Starts continued their unbeaten record with a victory by five wickets over the Castrol Commonwealth team Saturday as the Bahamas Cricket Association continued its regular season action at Windsor Park. Castrol Commonwealth batted first and was bowled out for 179 runs. Garth Davis had 67 runs and Carlton Brown 42 runs to lead their offensive attack. Bowling for Dynasty Stars, Hussain Raza, Venris Bennett and Garcha Blair all had three wickets. Dynasty Stars scored 182 runs for the loss of five wickets in the win. Their top batsmen were Garsha Blair with 35 runs and Ryan Tappin with 27. Sunday’s match between the Police and Scotia Bank Paradise was rained out. Action will continue this weekend as follows: Saturday Dynasty Stars vs Dockendale at Windsor Park. Sunday Police vs Castrol Commonwealth at Haynes Oval. Monday BCA’s Under-19 National team is scheduled to play a match against England. The latter team will consists of cricketers from the UK resid ing here. It is one of a number of warm-up matches planned for the Under-19 team in preparation for the ICC international youth tournament in Toronto in July. H owars 24 lead Magic past Cavs f or 2-1 lead... S ee page 9

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C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS P AGE 12, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Mr Greaves’ son is said to h ave bought a 15,625 square f oot lot on Wood Cay for $ 1,786.25 while his wife is said to have bought an 18,343 square foot lot in a subdivision south of Treasure Cay for $2,201.16. It is unclear at this point how government intends to move forward with the investigation, but it has been conf irmed that Mr Woodside, M inister of State for Lands and Local Government, is seen to be taking a “hands on” approach. This, observers claim, is a signal that government is taking the matter seriously and is intent on addressing the complaints of nepotism that p lague this ministry. M r Woodside’s presence, it was claimed, has boosted staff moral at the department as employees feel confident that government is finally taking the matter seriously. Since The Tribune’s first article on the allegations, it has come to light that several f iles at the department have gone missing.” Attempts to reach Mr Woodside for comment on the matter were not successful up to press time last night. FROM page one Minister a constant presence in Lands and Surveys Dept IN THIS MAY 9, 2009 PHOTO, a man rows a boat through a flooded street in Trizidela do Vale in Brazil's northeastern state of Maranhao. Flooding is common in the world's largest remaining tropical wilderness, but this year the waters rose higher and stayed longer than they have in decades, leaving fruit trees entirely submerged. Only four years ago, the same communities suffered an unprecedented drought that ruined crops and left mounds of river fish flapping and rotting in the mud. Experts suspect global warming may be driving wild climate swings that appear to be punishing the Amazon with increasing frequency. A n d r e P e n n e r / A P n S AO PAULO ACROSSthe Amazon basin, river dwellers are adding new floors to their stilt houses, trying to stay above rising floodwaters that have killed 44 people and left 376,000 homeless, according to Associated Press. Flooding is common in the world's largest remaining tropical wilderness, but this year the waters rose higher and stayed longer than they have in decades, leaving fruit trees entirely submerged. Only four y ears ago, the same communities suffered an unprecedented drought that ruined crops and left mounds of river fish flapping and rotting in the mud. Experts suspect global warming may be driving wild climate swings that appear to be punishing the Amazon with increasing frequency. It's "the $1 million dollar question," says Carlos Nobre, a climatologist with Brazil's National Institute for Space Research. While a definitive answer will take years of careful study, climatologists say the world should expect more extreme weather in the years ahead. Already, what happens in the Amazon could be affecting rainfall elsewhere, from Brazil's agricultural heartland to the U.S. grainbelt, as rising ocean temperatures and rain forest destruction cause shifts in global climate patterns. "It's important to note that it's likely that these types of recordbreaking climate events will become more and more frequent in the near future," Nobre said. "So we all have to brace for more extreme climate in the near future: It's not for the next generation." The immediate cause of the unusually heavy rains across northern Brazil is an Atlantic Ocean weather system that usually moves on in March, but stayed put until May this year. Almost simultaneously, southern Brazilian states far from the Ama zon have suffered from an extended drought, caused by La Nina a periodic cooling of waters in the Pacific Ocean. And La Nina alternates with El Nino, a heating up of Pacific waters that is blamed for cata strophic forest fires plaguing the Amazon in recent years. Amazon hit by climate chaos of floods, drought

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Employers chief calls for choice in compensation n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor J. S. JOHNSON, the BISXlisted insurance broker and agent, is “hoping to stay within less than a 5 per cent” drop in premium volume during 2009, Tribune Business was told yes terday, after its net income dropped by 27 per cent to $7.905 million in fiscal 2008. Marvin Bethell, J. S. Johnson’s managing director, told this newspaper that 2009 to-date was “not as bad as it could be”, with the company hoping to a cquire new business from the f ew foreign direct investment and construction projects still proceeding, in a bid to offset declines taking place elsewhere. While many Bahamas-based insurance companies, such asR oyalStar Assurance and Bahamas First’s 100 per centowned agency, Nassau Under writers, had budgeted for a 10 per cent drop in gross written premiums and premium volume during 2009, Mr Bethell said J. S. Johnson was hoping to do better with a decline of no more than 5 per cent. “It could be worse,” he C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission f rom the daily report.$ $3.73 $3.62 $3.82 # ttfttr""# " $!&# "r!%#$" $"!' !nrtf n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net HOTELS in Central Eleuthera are expecting a much needed economic boost during the Palmetto Point Homecoming festival this coming week end, with many hoteliers yesterday saying they had no avail able rooms. The annual festival typically guarantees hotels from Governor’s Harbour to Tarpum Bay almost 100 per cent occupancy. And, according to the chief councillor for the area, this year appears to be no exception. Homecomings set to deliver economic help n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas Employers Confederation’s (BECon ident yesterday said it would be “in the best interests of everybody” if employees, when terminated, had to choose between either accepting their statutory Employment Act compensation or rejecting this in favour of a common law action, as all par-ties would “know where they stand” and be more likely tos ettle before heading to court. Brian Nutt, commenting on a Court of Appeal judgment that ruled employees “cannot have their cake and eat it too” by seeking termination com pensation via both statute and common law, said he hoped that having to choose between the two would “become practice”. “I think it’s a welcome ruling,” Mr Nutt told Tribune n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor DOCTORS Hospital Health Systems (DHHS invest $3 million in new medical equipment and infrastructure improvements, plus expand its premises, in fiscal 2010, aftera record 12.8 per cent increase in Intensive Care Unit (ICU patient days helped drive the 2.2 per cent net patient service revenue rise that led to enhanced 2009 profitability. Doctors Hospital, in its 2009 annual report, said: “The con tinuing need to replace and upgrade medical equipment, and make improvements to the premises, will require $2 million for equipment and $1 million in improvements during the 2010 fiscal year. “The hospital is also currently investigating options to expand the facility in order toi ncrease capacity in areas which are nearing or at capacity.” Looking back on the previ ous financial year, Doctors Hospital said “an increase in the severity of illness of the patients we were serving”, especially in the fourth quarter of its finan c ial year ended on January 31, 2009, more than offset a 5.8 per cent decline in the total number of 4,311 patients admitted. Largely as a result of the ICU’s performance, patient service revenues for fiscal 2009 rose by $0.9 million, while a 7 per cent or $85,000 rise in other revenues took the total revenuei ncrease to $0.985 million or 2.3 per cent. This slightly outshone the $0.7 million or 2 per cent rise in Doctors Hospital’s total expenses to $38.847 million, with expenses declining as a percentage of total revenuef rom 90.5 per cent in fiscal 2008 to 90.2 per cent last year. Apart from revenue rises, the Doctors aims to invest $3m in 2010 J.S. Johnson targets ‘less than five per cent fall’ in premium Central Eleuthera resorts sold-out for upcoming w eek end festivities Examining expansion plans for hospital ‘to increase c apacity in areas which are nearing or at capacity’ * Says Doctrine of Election in receiving statutory termination pay or common law action ‘in best interests of everyone’ S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B * Increased ICB affiliate net claims and $1.4m investment value swingd rops BISX-listed b roker/agent’s net income 27% to $7.9m in 2008 * ICB trading profits fall to $1.4m from $4.1m, as a result of Ike * Company assessing Collins Avenue expansion plans n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T he Bahamas can “get a lead on the competition” through passingl egislation to create the framework for establishing this nation as an international arbitration centre, the co-chair of a private sector committee working on the initiative said yesterday, with “summer’s end” the target for getting “a pretty comprehensive” draft Bill on the statute book. John Wilson, an attorney and partner at McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes, told Tribune Busin ess that the Bahamas Financ ial Services Board (BFSB initiative would strengthen this nation’s international business services offering and help attract other industries to this nation, giving it “another legup” at a time when its financial industry is under increasing pressure from the G-20/OECD. The BFSB’s committee to establish an arbitration centre in the Bahamas had “gone a bit further down the road” since the idea was a hot issue under the former Christie administration, Mr Wilson explained. “In concert, with the Attorney General’s Office, we’ve produced a pretty comprehensive draft of the new legislation,” he added. “It’s a pretty comprehensive Arbitration Act. Our original Act was an 1870s Act. It was really antiquated, and the commercial world has moved a long way beyond that legislation. “The new Act, if we’re able to get it on the books, will be relevant. It’s critical. We could not become an arbitration cen tre without a modern legislative framework. That is basically what this Act seeks to achieve. There’s a lot more work that remains to be done, but hopefully the final version will be out in short order and it will be on the books by end of summer.” The proposed legislation is entitled The Arbitration (Recognition and Establishment of Foreign Awards 2009) Bill, and creating a Bahamian Arbitration centre ‘leg-up’ on rivals * BFSB committee hoping to have draft legislation on books by summer’s end’, having already completed ‘comprehensive draft’ * Centre would aid maritime industry, plus attract new business like aircraft and yacht registries, by giving dispute resolution mechanism outside courts * Foreign investor dispute resolution also suggested J OHN WILSON S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B

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n By RoyalFidelity Capital Markets IT was a moderate trading week in the Bahamian market, with investors trading in eight o ut of the 24 listed securities, of which two declined, one advanced and five remained unchanged. E E Q Q U U I I T T Y Y M M A A R R K K E E T T A total of 36,454 shares changed hands last week, representing a decrease of 22,313 shares or 38 per cent, compared to last week's trading volume of 58,767 shares. Commonwealth Bank (CBL led the volume for a fifth consecutive week and was the only advancer with 25,400 shares trading, its stock rising by $0.02 to end the week at $6.13. Doctors Hospital Health Systems (DHS decliner for a second consecutive week, its share price falling by $0.15 to a new 52-week low of $1.38 on a volume of 2,000 shares. Abaco Markets (AML traded 6,830 shares, its stock declining by $0.07 to end the week at $1.33. B B O O N N D D M M A A R R K K E E T T No notes traded in the Bahamian market this week. C C O O M M P P A A N N Y Y N N E E W W S S E E a a r r n n i i n n g g s s R R e e l l e e a a s s e e s s : : There were no financial results reported by any of the 24-listed companies during the week. A A n n n n u u a a l l G G e e n n e e r r a a l l M M e e e e t t i i n n g g ( ( A A G G M M ) ) N N o o t t e e s s : : Colina Holdings (CHL announced that it will be holding its Annual General Meeting on Thursday May 28, 2009, at 5:30pm at the J. W. Pinder Building, ColinaImperial Insurance, Collins Avenue. Shareholders of record as of April 24, 2009, will be qualified to vote during the Annual Meeting. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Bahamian Stock Market F F I I N N D D E E X X 7 7 9 9 5 5 . . 2 2 5 5 ( ( 4 4 . . 7 7 4 4 % % ) ) Y Y T T D D B B I I S S X X C C L L O O S S I I N N G G C C H H A A N N G G E E V V O O L L U U M M E E Y Y T T D D P P R R I I C C E E S S Y Y M M B B O O L L P P R R I I C C E E C C H H A A N N G G E E A ML$1.33 $-0.076,830-22.22% BBL$0.63 $-0-4.55% BOB$6.95 $-0-9.03% BPF$11.00 $-0-6.78% BSL$7.92 $-0-22.28% BWL$3.15 $-00.00% CAB$11.75$-500-16.25% CBL$6.13 $0.02 25,400-12.43% CHL$2.83 $-2310.00% CIB$10.40 $-0-0.48% CWCB$2.78 $-0.13023.56% DHS$1.38 $-0.152,000-45.88% FAM$7.76 $-0-0.51% F BB$2.37 $-8830.00% F CC$0.30 $-00.00% FCL$5.14 $-0-0.58% FCLB$1.00 $-00.00% FIN$11.00$-250-7.33% ICD$5.50 $-360-10.28% JSJ$10.50 $-0-5.41% PRE$10.00 $-00.00% International Markets F F O O R R E E X X R R a a t t e e s s W W e e e e k k l l y y % % C C h h a a n n g g e e C C A A D D $ $ 1.1185 -5.25 G G B B P P 1 .5913+4.80 E E U U R R 1.4004 + 3.77 C C o o m m m m o o d d i i t t i i e e s s W W e e e e k k l l y y % % C C h h a a n n g g e e C C r r u u d d e e O O i i l l $61.55+7.76 G G o o l l d d $ 957.30 +2.71 I I n n t t e e r r n n a a t t i i o o n n a a l l S S t t o o c c k k M M a a r r k k e e t t I I n n d d e e x x e e s s : : W W e e e e k k l l y y % % C C h h a a n n g g e e D D J J I I A A 8 ,277.32 + 0.10 S S & & P P 5 5 0 0 0 0 887.00+0.47 N N A A S S D D A A Q Q 1 ,692.01+0.71 N N i i k k k k e e i i 9,225.81 0.42 ROYAL FIDELITY MARKETWRAP To advertise, call 502-2371

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other major driver behind Doctors Hospital’s 2009 net income performance was a 29.4 per cent reduction in its interest expenses to $420,883, compared to $596,145 the year before. The BISX-listed healthcare services provider said this reflected the $2 million April 2008 pay down on one of its outstanding loan balances, and the reduction in the size of these balances. According to Doctors Hospital, the loan on which the $2 million principal payment was made relates to the financing of Western Medical Plaza, the Blake Road facility that the company continues to review for potential sale or lease to tenants. Doctors Hospital repaid $2.554 million in principal on the Western Medical Plaza loan in fiscal 2009, compared to $554,000 the year before, with interest payments dropping from $350,318 to $201,618. As a result, the outstanding balance on the Western Medical Plaza loan had dropped to $2.152 million at year-end 2009, compared to $4.706 million the year before. And, as the principal balance decreases, so does the interest rate that Doctors Hospital has to pay. The company’s annual report showed that a 1 per cent swing in the interest rate it had to pay on variable rate loans linked to Bahamian Prime could either increase or decrease its debt servicing costs by $50,000. Western Medical Plaza, which comprises three buildings of 33,000 square feet and three acres of land, was valued by Bahamas Realty, on January 31,2 009, at $7.5 million, a 5.1 per c ent decline on the previous year’s $7.9 million valuation. Doctors Hospital saw rental income from its Western Medical Plaza leases fall by 42.5 per cent in 2009, to $74,302 from $129,307 in 2008, although the expenses associated with rental income fell to $288,456 from $361,023 the year before. Meanwhile, the percentage of Doctors Hospital’s accounts receivables owed by third-party Bahamian insurance companies rose from 63 per cent to 75 per cent in fiscal 2009. The percentages owed by self-paying patients and the National Insurance Board (NIB per cent and 16 per cent, respectively, to 15 per cent and 10 per cent. The BISX-listed company said the number of days revenue in accounts receivables increased to 59 in fiscal 2009, compared to 56 days in 2008,r esulting in a net 11.4 per cent i ncrease in accounts receivables. Most of these, though, are in the zero to 30 days past due category, with Doctors Hospital blaming the increased accounts receivables on increased patient revenue during the 2009 fourth quarter. Provisions for doubtful accounts as a percentage of patient service revenues fell to 3.8 per cent in fiscal 2009, compared to 5.5 per cent the previous year, showing a decrease of $0.7 million or 29.5 per cent. Self-paying patients accounted for 64 per cent of this provision, but Doctors Hospital did manage to recover some $232,000 from previously written-off accounts in fiscal 2009. That financial year saw Doctors Hospital enjoy the second highest level of inpatient activity in its history, with 13,188 patient days, as the average daily level of new patients fell from3 7 to 36. Adult patient days d ropped by 1.6 per cent. Salaries and benefits, as a percentage of patient service revenues, rose to 38.9 per cent in fiscal 2009 from 37.5 per cent the previous year, but still just below the BISX-listed firm’s 39 per cent target. Total salary and benefit expenses rose by $0.93 million or 6 per cent year-overyear. Doctors Hospital said: “The increase in expenses for fiscal 2009, relative to 2008, reflects cost of living, merit increases, and increased activity in critical care areas in which there were increases overtime costs due to nursing shortages, and increased overtime in training and orientation costs for new associates.” Utilities costs increased by 18.3 per cent or $0.3 million over 2008, due to higher electricity charges, while medical supplies and services costs grew as a percentage of revenues to 25.7 per cent from 25.5 per cent the previous year. Other operating expenses rose by 8.2 per cent, with costs of collecting on self-pay patient receivables accounting for 34 per cent of this change. arbitration centre in the Bahamas “can only aid” this nation’s ability to attract new industries, such as an aircraft registry and a yacht registry, Mr Wilson’s committee co-chair said. Craig ‘Tony’ Gomez, who is also the BFSB’s chairman, told Tribune Business: “I think the legislation is important for the development of budding industries in the Bahamas. “Outside the maritime indus try, you have the potential aircraft registry and the potential yacht registry, and the international disputes that come along with new legislation can only be aided by arbitration capacities.” If international businesses used the Bahamas as an arbitration centre, and an alternative means of dispute resolution and settlement, rather than going through the courts, Mr Gomez said the Bahamian hotel i ndustry would be housing highend guests “likely to need more than a $99 room” when in town for hearings. Bahamian services professionals, such as attorneys and accountants, would also have the chance to enhance their skills and talent by involvement in arbitration hearings. In addition to enhancing the Bahamas’ attractiveness for international business, Mr Wilson said: “We want to play off the Bahamas being acknowledged as the world’s third largest shipping registry. “Arbitration is, quite frankly, the dispute resolution mecha nism of choice for the shipping industry, so we figure [the industry would want] these disputes to be resolved in the Bahamas, as opposed to going to New York or London. “Given that many of the ship owners have an affiliation with the Bahamas, it would not be a tremendous stretch to get them to do it in the Bahamas.” Mr Wilson said the committee had worked “very closely” with the Bahamas Maritime Authority and its chairman, Ian Fair, on the draft legislation. On the arbitration centre idea, Mr Wilson said establish ing one in the Bahamas would “be another leg up” for the country at a time when the G20/OECD were trying “to reel in” international financial centres. “I think we really need to look at ways to produce a more composite product not dependent on one element of international business, and build up what we do,” Mr Wilson said. “My personal view is that a component of international business in the Bahamas should target and try to get a lead on the competition. This could be one area we try to get a lead on the competition.” A Bahamas-based arbitration centre would “augment” this nation’s international business offering and feed other sectors, Mr Wilson said. The committee had been formed six months ago, and while “not part” of its existing discussions, Mr Wilson added: “We should really try to includes ome kind of investor dispute resolution. “Foreign direct investors sometimes have disputes with governing bodies and their agencies, and this may help to create more certainty in that area, knowing the Bahamian government has agreed to arbitration.......... Certainty is a tremendous advantage in international business.” While the committee had focused on international arbitration issues to date, Mr Wil son said it would not be a huge leap to transfer those to the domestic arena. The Bahamas will also have to look at the recognition of foreign arbitration awards and decisions, if its centre’s decisions are to be enforced overseas, and devel-o p alliances with similar bodies in New York and London. Mr Gomez said that both the legislation and an arbitration centre would show the international business community the Bahamas was serious about the swift disposal of commercial cases, and providing an alternative dispute resolution mechanism. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS &20021:($/7+ %5(:(5<7' 730&225',1$7257KHVXFFHVVIXOFDQGLGDWHZRXOGEHUHTXLUHGWR )DFLOLWDWLQJWKHKRUL]RQWDOH[SDQVLRQRI730LQWKH EUHZHU\ 3URYLGHDQDJHPHQW“LOODUV—HDPVZLWKDGYLFHDQG VXSSRUWRQ730FRQFHSW (QVXULQJ730DFWLYLWLHVFRQWLQXRXVO\PDWFK%UHZHU\ 0LVVLRQDQG.3,V+06fWKURXJKORVVGHSOR\PHQWV )RUPXODWLQJWRJHWKHUZLWKPDQDJHPHQWWKH \HDUDVWHUODQDQGHQVXULQJUHJXODUHYDOXDWLRQDQG XSGDWH 6XSSRUWLQJ0DQDJHPHQWZLWKLPSOHPHQWDWLRQRIWKH LQWHUQDOH[WHUQDO$XGLW6\VWHPWRHQVXUHDQGPDQDJH WKHFKDQJH 6WLPXODWLQJWKHXVHRIVWDQGDUGIRUPVUHSRUWV WHPSODWHVWRROVLPSURYHPHQWURXWHVIURPWRROER[fHWF ZLWKWKHUHTXLUHGGRFXPHQWFRQWURO,7DSSOLFDWLRQV 0DQDJHULDOH[SHULHQFH &RPSXWHUNQRZOHGJHUHTXLUHG$OOLQWHUHVWHGSHUVRQVDUHDVNHGWR ID[UHVXPHVWR THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009, PAGE 3B Doctors aims to invest $3m in 2010 Arbitration centre ‘leg-up’ on rivals F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B AN OUTSIDE view of Doctors Hospital...

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE DHL JOB DESCRIPTIONPOSITION: Collections Agent JOB FAMILY: Credit & Collections RCS CODE: A20004 REPORTS TO : Collections Lead LOCATION: Country Finance Department OVERALL PURPOSE: Under limited supervision in a team environment provide efcient and effective credit approvals. To ensure timely credit application processing, respond to information requests and issues. Ensure accuracy of all credit decisions functions while staying within company policy and procedural guidelines. DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: making credit decisions. delinquent accounts. Processes credit applications. Investigates disputes and reviews documentation. Implements credit suspensions. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: direction amid competing priorities and deadlines. For more information please contact:Romell K. Knowles I Country Manager Email:Romell.Knowles@dhl.com ),1$1&(&25325$7,21)%$+$0$6/,0,7('127,&(3OHDVHEHDGYLVHGWKDWWKH+HDG2IFHDQG WKH5HJLVWHUHG2IFHRIWKHFRPSDQ\ZLOOEH PRYHGIURPWKH%DKDPDV)LQDQFLDO&HQWUH &KDUORWWH6KLUOH\6WUHHWV)ORRU1DVVDX %DKDPDVWR5R\DO%DQN+RXVH(DVW+LOO6WUHHW 1DVVDX%DKDPDVHIIHFWLYH0D\ Homecomings set to deliver economic help Hank Johnson, who is also chairman for the Homecoming festival, said the event is expected to attract the same number of visitors it always has. The festival presents economic opportunities for myriad businesses, and it ushers in, after Exuma’s Regatta, a season of similar festivals across several islands throughout the summer. For Eleuthera, several other settlements throughout the summer and into October will have the opportunity to receive a short economic boost.Gregory Town will hold its Pineapple Fest following Palmetto Point’s Homecoming, and the Bluff will hold its Homecoming shortly after. Andros has its annual Crab fest that draws hundreds of people from New Providence, and the Long Island Regatta does the same. Mr Johnson said the 20 stalls for rent on the Palmetto Point Homecoming site have been paid for in full, and that accommodations are “running pretty tight”. “With the bookings that they have, it [the Homecoming] will be bringing an economic boost,” he said. Mate and Jenny’s Pizza have reserved a stall at the South Palmetto Point festival ground, where they will prepare homemade pizzas on site. Mate and Jenny’s resort has been fully booked for three weeks. Owner of Mate and Jenny’s, Maitland Bethel, said becuase their establishment will be fully committed this weekend, it should translate into increased sales for their pizza restaurant. “It comes at a good time because things have been pretty slow,” he said. “I think it’s going to mean a lot to the community. “All the hotels and restaurants are all feeling the pinch, and these homecomings give us a boost and put more money into the economy.” Mr Bethel said his hotel had been adversely affected by the downturn in the global economy. According to him, occupancies have been down yearon-year. “If I got one or two rooms (occupied doing good,” he said. “The money is just not as available as it used to be.” One Governor’s Harbour hotel told this newspaper they had received no bookings for the Homecoming, but were fully committed due to a wedding. According to Mr Johnson, Bahamasair’s Central Eleuthera flights will be full this weekend, and already Bahamas Ferries’ bookings are at 65 per cent. According to the Bahamas Ferries marketing manager, Khaalis Rolle, ferries to the island should be at 100 per cent by the weekend. “We will not have a problem selling out the boat,” he said. “We are within our normal threshold.” Mr Rolle said that by Wednesday or Thursday of this week, the Governor’s Harbourbound ferry should be sold out. According to Mr Johnson, the Palmetto Point Homecoming committee has not spared anything on entertainment, with five full nights of live entertainment, including the Lassie Doe Boys and the Brilanders. “We will be pulling the same crowd we generally pull,” he said. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B T o adver tise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in cir culation, just call 502-2371 today!

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explained. “We’ve been fortunate, although we’ve seen a slowdown in many areas, particularly on the motor side, with the purchase of new cars slowing down, and a slowdown on the property side people are hesitating to renew with fullcoverage. “But we’ve offset some of those losses with the acquisitionof new business. It’s not as bad as it could be.” Mr Bethell said J. S. Johnson was involved with placing some of the insurance coverage for the $1.4 billion Albany project, which was proceeding, and hoped to obtain business from the few remaining foreign direct investment-related projects as a way to ensure it “would not be impacted as much” by the global economic downturn. “We’re still getting inquiries from residents of the Ocean Residences [on Paradise Island], new houses in Old Fort Bay and Lyford Cay, so there is still some construction going on. There’s some new business that has not dried up completely, and if we get our fair share of them, it will offset some of the decline in other areas,” Mr Bethell explained. “We don’t know how much worse it’s going to get. It’s dif ficult to budget at this point in time, assuming there are no more major challenges, but we’re hoping to stay within less than a 5 per cent drop” on premium volume and value. J. S. Johnson, like most other Bahamas-based insurance carriers and agents/brokers, is praying for a hurricane-free year given the impact a major storm would have not only on their business but the alreadystruggling wider economy. Meanwhile, Mr Bethell confirmed that J. S. Johnson was continuing to assess expansion plans for its Collins Avenue head office, the key factors being the size and design of its proposed new building and whether given the current recession the timing is right. The J. S. Johnson managing director told Tribune Business that the company had acquired the building immediately to the south of its existing headquar ters, which housed the Bahamas Optical Centre. Its current plans involved demolishing the existing building and replacing it with a new property that includ-ed an elevator, for ease of cus tomer access. “We’ve got drawings done up,” Mr Bethell explained. “The project is a little larger than we may have anticipated, so we’re reassessing the need for it and whether the timing is right. It could be quite expensive.” He added that he could not put a figure on the likely investment because the plans were subject to change, even though s ome were arguing that now r epresented the best time to build because construction material prices were relatively low. Other questions to be answered, Mr Bethell said, were whether J. S. Johnson should instead develop another branch for the Collins Avenue area, and whether the project should be financed from its own resources or borrowing. The Soldier Road and Thompson Boulevard branches also had expansion room. “It’s a little bit of wait and see,” he explained. “We will go ahead. It’s just to what extent. If w e have to wait another six m onths, it’s not critical.” With car values dropping on an annual basis, the tendency of recession-hit consumers to acquire used rather than new cars, and switch from comprehensive to third party coverage,M r Bethell said premium volume was under pressure on J. S. Johnson’s motor portfolio. As a result, the company did “not expect any growth” in its motor portfolio for 2009, although it aimed to produce ap rofitable result, especially on underwriting, depending on the claims experience. For fiscal 2008, J. S. Johnson’s net income dropped below both the $10.769 million recorded in 2007 and $8.3 million in 2006. This was largely due to the net claims incurred by its Insurance Company of the Bahamas (ICB which it has a 40 per cent stake, and a $1.4 million swing into a loss on the unrealised depreciation in value of its investment portfolio. Mr Bethell said general insur ance carrier ICB received a surge in claims from Inagua and the Turks & Caicos Islands as a result of Hurricane Ike, which produced gross claims of about $5 million and net claims of $1 million. Meanwhile, the investment portfolio swung into a $402,810 unrealised loss for 2008 as equity markets headed south, as opposed to the $1.03 million gain the previous year. ICB’s trading profit fell to $1.4 million, compared to $4.1 million the year before. Elsewhere, J. S. Johnson saw its net commissions and fees rise by $1 million o r 5.6 per cent, but total expenses increased by 15 per cent from $18.5 million to $21.2 million due to rises in salaries and benefits, net claims and other operating expenses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equirements & Responsibilities: Leader and motivate accounting staff Experience in the preparation and interpretation of Financial Statements Must be able to develop and maintain an effective system of internal accounting and operational controls in a Hotel environment Must possess 5 or more years experience in a supervisory accounting position Self motivated with strong analytical and problem-solving skills Must be conversant with hotel accounting software, with emphasis in areas Liaise with External Auditors, third party service providers and relevant R egulatory & Compliance Authorities reports Excellent written and oral communication skills Able to work extended hours, weekends and holidays BA in Accounting from an accredited University accounting environment Advance working knowledge of Excel Working knowledge of Microsoft Word Interested persons should apply on or before June 30, 2009 Attention Manager: Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y . F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B J.S. Johnson targets ‘less than five per cent fall’ in premium I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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Business. “It certainly will take the uncertainty, primarily, out of the equation if an employee has to choose between accepting the compensation package under the Employment Act or reject it and go to court under common law.” Forced The BECon president suggested that if forced to choose between the two options statutory compensation or going to court employees would carry the risk that they might lose and be left with nothing if they chose the latter. This, Mr Nutt suggested, was likely to encourage employees to settle common law actions with their former employer before they reached the courts, saving both sides time and money. Employers “fear being dragged into litigation”, said Mr Nutt. He added: “The fact is that litigation is expensive and time-consuming, and employers have to spend time away from their job and incur quite a few costs in pursuing matters or defending themselves when litigation occurs.” The BECon president said a further troubling factor for employers was that labour attorneys, rather than going to the Industrial Tribunal on common law claims, were increasingly going to the Supreme C ourt. Unlike the former, the Supreme Court did award costs. “If the employer loses a case like that, the employee’s costs are taxed, meaning the employer has to pay for the employee’s attorney,” Mr Nutt said. “But if the employer wins, the employee does not have the means to pay for the employer’s attorney. Win or lose, it still costs to go through litigation.” In the court’s ruling, Appeal Justice Hartman Longley urged that consideration be given to using the Doctrine of Election in employment disputes, with the terminated employee required to choose between statutory or common law compensation. Act T hey could not, he said, a ccept their Employment Act compensation and then initiatea subsequent common law claim for greater/better benefits, in a bid to gain both and effectively ‘double dip’. Justice Longley ruled: “What the law contemplates is that if the benefits under the Act have been paid, the employee should have resort to his common law claim only if that provides for greater benefits. Otherwise, it would be a waste of time and costs. “In this regard, it seems to me that consideration may well have to be given to the operation of the doctrine of election when an employee has received his full benefits under the Act. “He should only be permitted to pursue a claim at common law for greater rights and better benefits after he has been put to an election to abandon the compensation under the Act, otherwise the purpose for which the Act was passed – to make a ready, inexpensive formula available for calculating benefits – would be lost in the mush of litigation.” Mr Nutt noted that the Court of Appeal only recommended the Doctrine of Election approach, and did not say that was “absolutely the way it will b e”. T hat meant there was still no g uarantee under the Employment Act that employees, in accepting statutory compensation, would not then got to the courts to seek greater remuneration. “Hopefully, that becomes practice,” Mr Nutt said of the Doctrine of Election, “and if it becomes practice it’s in the best interests of everyone. Right from the start, you will know that if you’re in a situation where you have to litigate, there will be more impetus to settle the matter. “I think if it’s one or the other, and if the choice is to be made by the employee, and they do not accept what they are due under the Act and go to a court of law, there is more chance a settlement will be reached before they go to court. That route puts the employee at a bit of risk.” Ruling The Appeal Court ruling involved a case brought by Gail Smith against her former employer, Snack Food Wholesale, for alleged breach of an employment contract. She was terminated by the company with effect from May 12, 2003, via a letter she r eceived dated May 10, 2003. A s a 22-year employee, who w as a sales manager/supervisor and earning $750 per week, Ms Smith received four weeks’ notice pay of $3,000; 48 weeks’ basic pay of $36,000; and three weeks’ vacation pay worth $2,250. The Court of Appeal said it was “common ground” that the sums paid by Snack Food Wholesale were in accordance with the Employment Act 2001’s Section 29, but Ms Smith initiated a legal action alleging that under common law she was due $64,790. The $25,790 difference cited between the statutory and common law was comprised, according to Ms Smith’s amended statement of claim, of the loss of 12 months’ worth of commissions at $2,000 per month of $24,000 in total; the loss of 12 months’ group insurance at $20 per week for a total $1,040; and a 12-month annual bonus of $750. Basic pay, as defined by the Employment Act, did not include bonuses and commissions, the Court of Appeal said, meaning that Ms Smith’s action was “ bound to fail” if made under the Act. Justice Longley ruled: “In any event, it seems to me that the appellant cannot have her cake a nd eat it, too. Either she a ccepts the payments made to h er under the Act. Or she could pursue a claim at common law. She was not entitled to both. She got all that she was entitled to under the Act. “And the learned judge found, on the evidence before him, her claim at common law would have fallen short of the benefits conferred by the Act.” As a result, the appeal was dismissed. Snack Food Wholesale was represented by attorney Sharon Wilson, and Ms Smith by Obie Ferguson. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.28Abaco Markets1.331.400.078,4250.1270.00011.00.00% 1 1.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.686.95Bank of Bahamas6.956.950.000.2440.26028.53.74% 0.900.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2 .601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1511.09Cable Bahamas11.7511.65-0.1030,0001.4060.2508.32.15% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.2490.04011.41.41% 7.446.06Commonwealth Bank (S16.136.250.1220,0000.4190.36014.95.76% 3.381.31Consolidated Water BDRs2.773.040.2740,0000.1110.05227.41.71% 3.001.32Doctor's Hospital1.381.32-0.0625,0000.2400.0805.56.06% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.4200.30018.53.87% 12.5011.00Finco11.0011.000.000.3220.67034.26.09% 14.6610.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.4010.400.000.7940.40013.13.85% 5.555.00Focol (S5.145.09-0.057,5000.3320.15015.32.95% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.500.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00100 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.37581.3124Colina Bond Fund1.37581.654.83 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8962-1.49-3.35 1.39011.3875Colina Money Market Fund1.46302.055.25 3.69603.1964Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1964-5.59-13.64 12.739712.1564Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.15990.71-12.76 1.05261.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.05261.635.26 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0322-0.083.22 1.05231.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.05231.455.23 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L L L L : : C C O O L LI I N N A A 2 24 4 2 2 5 5 0 0 2 2 7 70 0 1 10 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L L F F I I D D E E L LI I T T Y Y 2 2 4 42 2 -3 35 5 6 67 7 7 7 6 64 4 | | F FG G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K K E E T T S S 2 24 4 2 2 3 3 9 9 6 6 -4 40 0 0 00 0 | | C C O O L L O O N N I I A A L L 2 2 4 4 2 2 5 50 0 2 2 -7 75 5 2 2 5 5F INDEX: CLOSE 795.25 | YTD -4.75% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSMONDAY, 25 MAY 2009B ISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,613.25 | CHG 4.49 | %CHG 0.28 | YTD -99.11 | YTD % -5.79BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 30-Apr-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Mar-09 30-Apr-09 30-Apr-09 W W W WW W . .B B I I S S X X B B A A H H A A M M A A S S . .C C O O M M | | T T E E L L E E P P H HO ON N E E : :2 24 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 -2 23 3 3 3 0 0 | | F F A A C C S S I I M M I I L L E E : : 2 2 4 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 -2 23 3 2 2 0 0NAV Date 31-Mar-09 15-May-09 31-Mar-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 30-Apr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is hereby given that KERVIN JONASSAINT of BUNMORE STREET, HARBOUR ISLAND, ELEUTHERA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26TH day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas. NOTICE COMMONWEATH OF THE BAHAMAS2008 IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/592 IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 AND IN THE MATTER of The Petition of Inez Taylor Martin N OTICE OF PETITION N OTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that Inez Taylor-Martin of Old Place in the Western District of the Island of Exuma, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, is applying to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas to have her title investigated determined and declared under the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 (Ch. 393 “ALLTHATpiece parcel or tract of land situate approximately One Highway on the Northern side of Gilbert Grant Road and bounded EASTWARDLYby land now or formerly the property of Zelma Nixon jointly by Crown Land occupied by Zelma Nixon and running thereon a total distance of Two-Hundred and Seven and Sixty-Six Hundredths (207.66running NORTHWESTWARDLY by land now or formerly the property of Emerald Bay Development and running thereon a total distance of Six-Hundred and Fifty-Nine and Forty-One Hundredths (659.41WESTWARDLYby land the other portion of the Gilbert Grant and running thereon EightHundred and Twenty-Nine and Fifteen Hundredths (829.15 SOUTHWARDLYby a Public Road known as Gilbert Grant Road and running thereon a distance of Four-Hundred and Thirty-Eight and Twenty-Seven Hundredths (438.27 commencement which said piece parcel or tract of land described above comprises an area of Four and Four Hundred and SeventyNine Thousandths (4.479Acres and has such position boundaries shape marks and dimensions as are shown on the plan recorded in the Department of Lands and Surveys as Plan No. 450 EXUMA.” AND TAKE NOTICE that copies of the Petition and the Plan of the ing places: i. Supreme Court Registry, Ansbacher House, East Street North, New Providence, The Bahamas. ii. Sharon Wilson & Co., Chambers, East Shirley Street, Highland Terrace, New Providence, The Bahamas.AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that any person having dower or right to dower, an adverse claim or a claim not recognized in the preme Court and serve on the Petition or his attorney an Adverse or before 22nd JULYA.D., 2009 date will operate as a bar to such claim. Dated this 20th day of May A.D., 2009 Sharon Wilson & Co. Chambers Delvest House East Shirley Street, Highland Terrace Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas Attorneys for the Petitioner NOTICEINTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT No. 45 of 2000A ZZILON S.A.Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 o f The International Business Companies Act No. 45 of 2000, AZZILON S.A. is in dissolution. The date of comm encement of dissolution was the 17th day of April, 2009. Dillon Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of AZZILON S.A. D illon Dean LIQUIDATOR Employers chief calls for choice in compensation I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter l allen@tribunemedia.net A FEWweeks ago, Tribune H ealth l ooked at childhood stutteringits causes, symptoms, and treatment options. H owever, the unfortunate reality of the disorder is that in a large number of cases,i ndividuals forgo treatment for various reasons resulting in lifelong cases of functional a nd dysfunctional stuttering. According to Dr Walter Manning Professor and Associate Dean of the school of Audiology and Speech-language at the University of Memphis overcoming stuttering is not impossible, however the process of correction comes with a lot of determination and profes sional help. Apart from his research and therapy to US patients in the US, Dr Manning has worked with several patients from the Bahamas and other parts of the Caribbean, and is considered by many a foremost expert on the condition. Speaking with Tribune Health , Dr Manning explained: “Having stuttered myself into my young adult years, I’ve become quite fluent now as the result of some good therapy and lots of prac ticeI am currently completing the third edition of a text titled Clinical Decision Making in Fluency Disorders.” In the book, Dr Manning details his interpretation of stuttering, and the multiple forms it can take. “In one of the chapters in my text there are several related definitions. Ab rief and simple one is offered by the WHO: Stuttering includes ‘disorders in the rhythm of speech in which the individual knows precisely what he wishes to say, but at the time is unable to say it because of an involuntary, repetitive prolongation or cessation of a sound’ (p.202 For many stutterers, Dr Manning said common symptoms can include; part word repetition, monosyllabic word repetition, or disrhythmic phonation, all of which can be mistaken for common disf luencies like interjection, phrase repet ition, or revision or incomplete phrases. I n his book, Dr Manning also explained that despite these exterior symptoms, more is happening in the mind of the stutterer. “Although complicated by communicative stress as it is for most speakers, the person who stutters is able to lin guistically formulate what he or she wants to say. The onset of stuttering is the result of a combination of neurological & physiological factors which, for many individuals, are genetically influenced,” he said. This theory is certainly true for Anthony Curtis Acting Director for The National Insurance Board (NIB said from as early as he could remember, he and other family members have stammered. He explained: “I remember in high school in some of my classes where I had to make presentations, my classmates were not always tolerant or considerate to me, they would laugh at me and it was a bit of an embarrassmente specially because sometimes I was not able to pronounce my own name.” Mr Curtis said apart from his own severe stuttering, his grandfather, mother, and two of his brothers also suffered from the impairement. Although Mr Curtis has been able to secure a career despite his challenge, he said there still remains particular moments where he fears disfluency. Whether it’s answering a phone call or meeting someone for the first time, Mr Curtis said the thought is always there t hat he may not be able to speak fluently. W hile his job comes with its share of c hallenges, he adds that being a stutterer has made him more determined to be the best in his field. Having never resorted to therapy, he adds that his technique for overcoming stammering is to not always take himself so serious, rather he makes fun of his stammering to convey to others that despite his speaking hurdle, there isa whole person in him waiting to be discovered. Managing Director for Sbarro Italian eatery Charlton Knowles, explained thathe too suffered from chronic stammer ing and remembers being affected from the age of 5. He explained that unlike most stutter ers who may have experienced severe taunting and teasing, his experience growing up was very different. “Fortunately I never got much criticism of that sortIn school I was quite talkative and was captain of the softball team at St Johns College, and my peers never really made reference to it other than when we had arguments over baseball where they’d noticed I didn’t stutter,” he said. However Mr Knowles said he truly started to feel the effects of stammering as a young adult, when he began dating and interacting more. “I guess I become a lot more self-conscious of my stuttering, and I began to avoid situations and words, which at one point meant me not talking at all,” he said. Mr Knowles said this had a lot to do with his confidence, which also led to him avoiding telephone calls. “I think if I didn’t stutter I probably would have had a different job, and I probably would have been a couple years ahead in my finances because I’ve had to create my own employment.” He recounted one experience where it took him nearly 45 seconds to say hello while on a job interview and explained that because of his condition many companies were reluctant to hire him. This led him to become an entrepreneur. Now, he has since gotten married, has a beautiful family, and is daily surpassing the limitations of what many people impose on stutterers. Also receiving some therapy from various speech specialists including Dr Manning in recent years, Mr Knowles has learnt to not fight his speech challenge, but to live life with the understanding that although he stutters, he still deserves to be heard. Now gearing to create the first ever Bahamian Stutterers Association (BSA Mr Knowles said he remains optimistic about this proposed organisation because of its potential to assist so many throughout the community that suffer from speech impediments. He feels the establishment of the BSA will help in paving the way for more public awareness, enlightenment, and focus on the issue, and sends an open call to anyone interested in becoming a part of the group to contact him at 356.0808 or e-mail cvk@sbarrobahamas.com. LOVING RELA TIONSHPS C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE WE need to pause this week during this dating series as a question keeps on coming up: “Why can't I get a date?' or “Dating? I haven't had a date in years.' It is hard not to miss the dismay and frustration so let us take time to see what possibly might be going on. F irst let's start by assuming that they truly would like to be in a relationship or at least get their feet wet with some casual dating. Do we jump to the conclusion that they are not trying hard enough or that they just have bad luck? Has their timing been off or are they just so inept at making initial contact with a person? Before we consider some of the main skills required in dating we have to address the ques tion:“How much do you really want to date?” Are you really ready to leave your safe single life? Excuses that include the 'but' word often indicate an indecisive, wishywashy thinking that holds singles from moving forward to 'coupledom.' If you really have decided that this is the year to make a change then devise a strategy. Look upon it in the same way as job hunting. Inform friends and family of your intentions. You are recruiting help. Think of all the events, places and types of people that you have fun and feel relaxed with and make a list. Make definite plans to attend events on all your time off. Doing this once a month or in a sporadic manner not only reduces your odds of meeting anyone but also prolongs your current situation. Next consider if you in fact project any negative mannerisms or ones that are socially disagreeable. Perhaps people have told you that you are too critical, argumentative, loud, bossy, and abrasive or that you are not friendly or do not smile enough. If you were to stand back and see yourself as others do would you approach yourself? It is too easy just to say 'well this is how I am and they can take it or leave it' but the truth is that if that tactic has n't worked all these years then surely it is time to change. Change like this does not mean becominga different person or being fakey but just fine tuning the good qualities and trimming the fat off the not so good areas. So here you are out one night with a crowd of friends all sitting around laughing and talking when you realise that you know everyone and your clique does not allow any one new to enter. Breaking out of groups is often the first step. It does not mean forsaking old friends but just going out in fewer numbers so that you are more approachable. Going out with one or two friends who have a similar goals can force you to make ane ffort. Make eye contact with someone who inter ests you or who is trying to get your attention. Eye contact is vitally important if you want to connect with anyone. Being preoccupied with a cell phone or texting means that your eyes and thoughts are elsewhere and you may miss many opportunities. Be present and focused and try not to be distracted. Also a warm friendly smile is very attractive and encouraging to the one wanti ng to approach. Relax, stand there, feel the moment and try not to worry about 'what if's.' Remember you are not committing to anything. The light hearted art of flirting is an important skill to master and one that continues to be important in long established relationships. Many people consider flirting a bad or negative attribute perhaps because they have taken it too seriously or they have encountered a calculating or manipulative person. Yes, of course be conscious of a sense of lack of sincerity and honesty but remember the plus side to flirting is that it allows you a chance to gauge interest and can be used as a good screening tool. Developing a light hearted sense of humor which includes a good dose of laughter and smiling is with out a doubt a well known attractive quality. Laughter is very contagious and draws people together. It opens conversations and puts people at ease. Showing people that you are enjoying yourself makes them want to get to know you. When all is said and done try not to take it all too seriously. Your lighter side will bring you the first date and from there anything is possible. Margaret Bain is an Individual and Couples Rela tionship Therapist. She is a Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical Sex Therapist. For appointments call 535-7456 or e-mail her at relatebahamas@yahoo.com or www.relateba hamas.blogspot.com. She is also available for speaking engagements. BY MAGGIE BAIN INGROWNhairs, also known as Pseudofolliculitis barbae, manifest on skin when hair is cut, and the hair grows back in at ani mproper angle. The process of cutting the end of the hair shaft through shavingc an force hair back into its follicle, or even cause hair to double over on itself, re-e ntering the same follicle and growing inward instead of exiting the surface. Thehair shaft can also grow and enter another follicle. The body recognises this ingrown hair as a foreign body (similar to a splinter and triggers an inflammato ry response that includes redness, itchiness and a raised area that resembles a p imple that can fill with pus. To help prevent ingrown hairs, start by exfoliating w ith physical and chemical exfoliants prior to shaving. Physical exfoliants including micro-fine Silica beads will help remove dulling skin cells, prep the skin's surface, and lift hairs. Chemical exfoliants including Lactic Acid and Salicylic Acid will help remove dead skin cells, lift ingrown hairs above the skin line, and soften and smooth skin. B y SARAH B EEK Anatomy of an ingrown hair I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s health BODYANDMIND T h e T r i b u n e Adult stuttering Why can’t I get a date? BEFORE we consider some of the main skills required in dating we have to address the question:“How much do you really want to date?” Are you really ready to leave your safe single life?

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T HERAPY C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009, PAGE 9B Recruiting Now for the July 2009 intake www.rdicaribbean.com • 27499 Riverview Center Boulevard, Suite 111, Bonita Springs, Florida 34134, USA • Tel 1 239 444 1730 • email info@rdicaribbean.com your goalsSpecialised MBAs offered by the University of Wales: Project Management, Management Consultancy, HR Management, Service Excellence and General MBA Higher National Diploma (HND months BA/BSc 12 months Higher National Diploma (entry to top up Degrees through 2-year HND) in Business and Management, Information Technology, Travel and Tourism, Marketing, Finance FEATURED PROGRAMME: UNIVERSITY OF WALES MBA US$8,500 COMPLETE IN MINIMUM OF ONE YEAR! • Develop your career while studying • No attendance requirement • Tutor and student MASTERSMBA University of Bradford, University of Sunderland, University of Wales MSc in Public Administration & Development University of Birmingham MSc Marketing & Management University of Bradford MSc Finance, Accounting & Management University of Bradford MA Education University of Derby LLM Commercial Law University of Derby MSc Information Technology University of Teesside MSc International Hospitality ManagementMSc Telecommunications Birmingham City University Diploma in Management University of Wales (pre-MBA for non-degree holders)BACHELOR DEGREE COURSES University of Wales BA (Honstop up specialisms in Marketing, Finance, Banking University of Sunderland BA (Hons& Management (top upHons Management (top up University of Derby BSc (Hons University of Teesside LLB, BSc (Hons (top up BSc (Hons Hospitality & Tourism (top up By Gardener Jack n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter a missick@tribunemedia.net T HE MOSTcommon form of self expression for Bahamians is through their a rt work and as the pressures of a changing society takes its toil, many persons h ave turned to therapy to help find ways to talk about their problems without actu-a lly talking. Art therapy has the ability to bring together the fields of art and psychology, integrating creative process, visual arts, behaviour, mental health and imagination. It is based on the belief that the act of art making can help persons understand more of who they are so that they can enhance their lives eventually leading towards personal growth through self-expression. Mark Redgrave, a 20 -yeartrained art and psychotherapist, said art can contain elements that can help people more easily integrate and synthesise conflicting feelings and experi ences. “Art therapy is basically a non-verbal form of therapy. The main source of communication is through imagery, which can be drawings, paintings, three dimensional forms using clay and more. It is about expressing feelings, states of mind,t houghts, fantasies and different kinds of mental contents,” Mr Redgrave said. The art making process, during an art therapy session, can also be a means of cleansing to discharge strong emotions for relief. “When dealing with mental states, you are externalising them through art therapy. When they are on paper or in three dimension form and that is where the therapy starts to happen. A person can begin to communicate themselves because during art therapy there is a level of verbal communication. If we are working with imagery, we tend to ask the question of where did it come from? Imagery has a way of accessing the unconscious mind and bringing those contents to the surface. Those contents can be distressing to a person, feelings they have often forgotten or repressed because they are psychologically painful. Symptoms of depression, obsession, compulsionsa nd anxiety, among other emotional problems, are produced because they are hidden. Art therapy helps persons to access those problems,” Mr Redgrave said. Mr Redgrave has been in the Bahamas since 2000 and saw a need for this form of therapy. Filling the need “I got a job at Sandilands and coming to the Bahamas, there was no art therapist so it was an open f ield for me. People were very receptive to it. I worked with five year olds up to the geriatrics at Sandilands,” Mr Redgrave said. Mr Redgrave said one of the problems he has seen in the Bahamas with art therapy is the stigma that is attached to mental health problems. “By coming forward, most people feel they are crazy, should be in Sandilands, or become a laughing stock, that kind of thing. I have worked with children who have been sexually abused, adults who have substance abuse and interpersonal problems, alcoholism, pathological problems, and personality disorders. It’s been difficult to serve art therapy because of this challenge. When I feel a person is a good candidate, and I introduce them to what it is, there is really no problem. Once people understand what art therapy is, they respond to it more quickly,” Mr Redgrave said. He said because there are different client groups, many of them respond in different ways especially children. “When it comes to children in art therapy, it can be like playing because you are experimenting with art materials. Children play instinctively and take to it more quickly. With adults it becomes difficultb ecause they start to worry about performance. My job is to reassure them that art therapy is about art teaching. A common misperception of art therapy is that people need to be artistically inclined in order to do art therapy. That artistic ability is not required, because art therapy is about expression. The goal is not to make masterpieces, but rather to have an understanding and acceptance that everyone has an innate ability to be creative,” Mr Redgrave said. Mr Redgrave said art therapy can also be a form of self healing. “The mind is a fascinating thing. If you get a person to produce symbols, then those symbols kind of translate thoughts and feelings that can’t be expressed and become vehicles for those feelings as they begin to take shape. Instead of the person being hostage to those feelings, they eventually control the feelings because the feelings can no longer control them,” Mr Redgrave said. Art therapist Mark Redgrave uses art to reach his patients’ inner feelings When it comes t o children in art therapy , it can be like playing because you are e xperimenting w ith art materials. Children play instinctively and take to it more quickly . MARK REDGRAVE Art

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BECAUSE we live in a tropical region of the world and the fact that we are an archipelagic countryie. a group of many islands in a large body of water there is always an over abun dance of tropical pests such as insects, spiders, snails, rodents and weeds. Each day we see on TV or hear on radio, a new product on the market to elimi nate the problematic pest, but sometimes at a huge price. All too often our pets are the unintended targets of these chemicals. The summer seems to be a risky time for our pets. The long warm days of summer will put our pets at increased risk of injuries, fleas and ticks etc. Also during this time there is an increased usage of household pesticides and chemicals around the home, and increased risk of inadvertent pet poisoning. Dogs and cats, as well as birds, come in contact with toxins through many routes. Ingestion of chemicals is one of the most common ways pets can become poisoned, but inhalation and skin contact are additional routes for poisons to enter the body. If a pet swallows a poi son we want to do what we can to get some or all of it back out. Most veterinarians agree that if it has been less than 2 hours since an animal has ingested a toxic substance a fair amount will still be in the stomach where it can still be removed. After 2 hours, much of the poison will likely have passed into the small intestine where it will start to be absorbed into the blood. During that critical first 2 hours your vet will use medication to induce vomiting in your pet to help remove at least some of the toxins from the stomach. If more than 2 hours have passed since the toxin was ingested, we will often have the pet swallow a liquid charcoal containing product that helps to bind up some of the poison in the intestines so it will pass out with the stool and not be absorbed. In these cases, we have to assume that at least some of the poison will be absorbed into the bloodstream and may cause some problems. We will need to support these animals in the hospital with intravenous fluids to help their liver and other major organs. The liver and kidney systems will likely be the organs that do most of the detoxification, and the IV fluid will greatly help that process. Certain types of poisons have antidotes (drugs that directly counter the effect of the poison) while others don’t. Sometimes all we can do is use medications to control the symptoms caused by the toxin and keep the patient comfortable while the animal’s system is slowly detoxified. Insecticides are used extensively in many homes and in most cases they are used safely. Occasionally, pets will ingest material recently sprayed or treated with products intended for ants, spiders, or other bugs. Most insecticides, if ingested in toxic amounts will cause symptoms such as muscles tremors, excessive salivation, vomiting, diarrhea and sometimes seizures. These can develop in minutes to hours after ingestion depending on the type of toxin, how much was ingested and how much the pet weighs. Snail and slug bait is another common household pesticide. Most of these products contain Metaldehyde, a potent neuro muscular toxin. Once ingested, this toxin can cause uncontrollable muscle tremors that can progress to seizures and death. Dogs and sometimes cats seem attracted to the taste of these products. Rodenticides are used in many households to help control mice and rats. The most common type of rodent killing product is made from coumarin like compounds. These chemicals cause excessive and uncontrollable bleeding in the rodent as well as any other animal that may ingest them. The most challenging aspect about rodenticide toxicity is that symptoms of bleeding may not be evident until 3-5 days after ingestion. Rodenticide poisoning is relatively easy to control if treatment is started soon after ingestion. But if we wait to see symptoms of bleeding, heroic measures may be needed to save those patients. Remember, early treatment is very effective and usually life saving. If you choose to use these potent products, be very careful to place them in an inaccessible location where your pet cannot reach them. There are many other things that can cause poisoning in our pets. Various plants, cleaning agents, drugs of all kinds, fertilisers, herbicides, and automobile products are just a few examples. Considering the potential for severe illness and even death from such poisoning (this would include children as well as pets). We all need to keep our family’s safety in mind and choose and utilise these products wisely. C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE You have been assigned to a team and you are excited about the prospect of working on a project with your coworkers. You start attending meetings and in the first session you notice a few things that cause you some concern. You sit in the meeting expectinga team agenda but everyone seems to have their own agenda. You listen to the conversations, you even try to participate, but the discussions go absolutely nowhere. At the end of the session you feel you just wasted your time because there are no solutions, no next steps or no actionable items. Now the deadline for your project is approaching and you attended a number of meetings already. Team members are still showing up to meetings with incomplete assignments. There is no accountability at the meetings because there are no minutes taken orif minutes are being taken they are so long that no one reads them. In meetings, there is still no agenda and team members are still having unfocused discussions. So what do you do? Working in teams is usually a complex proposition because many times we are appointed to a team and we don't collaborate on team and member expectations. What we do is get caught in the trap of focusing on the project and not how we are going to get our team members to work together in a functional team environment. Based on a team building model by Bruce Tuckman, teams should go through five typical stages of evolution in order to deliver results: Forming, storming, norming, performing and adjourning. The first stage is the formative or beginning stage where the team comes together as an entity. This is usually followed by the storming stage where the team begins to form expectations, processes and roles. The storming stage can be chaotic and teams sometimes try to achieve results without laying the groundwork that leads to norming. In building your team, be sure you are not lulled into thinking you are past the storming stage because the team members seem to be getting along well. Sometimes team members have hidden, individual agendas and personal agendas range from a need for visibility to achieve a promotion, to sabotage. When you are building your team, the ideal is to move from storming into the norming stage where team processes and expectations are clearly defined for your team as a whole and for each member. Here are a few tips to help you to move your team through the storming and norming stages to high performance: 1. Team members should be assigned roles like taking minutes or collating information between meetings. Be sure the minutes are brief with clear action items listed, responsibilities assigned and deadlines set. 2. Team members should be held accountable for bringing completed assignments or updates to each meeting because team members are usually interdependent. Be sure your update indicates there is some progress and if not, there should be an acceptable reason. 3. The leader or meeting facilitator should ensure there is role clarity, accountability and high performance by: Defining team objectives and member r oles. This can be done as a team for optimal buy-in. Planning for meetings by preparing an agenda Ensuring the team adheres to the agenda by effectively bringing conversations back to the objectives. Determining if a digression can add to the quality of the discussion and nipping it if it doesn't. Effectively managing conflict among t eam members. This can be done both during and between meetings. Keeping track of action items and ensuring there is follow up during and after each meeting. Managing meeting discussions, ensuring everyone has a fair opportunity to contribute. Teams can function optimally when members trust each other and the process. Integrating trust building as part of the team building equation can lead to higher levels of commitment, accountability and results so trust building is a useful exercise. To achieve trust, it is important to be transparent, fair and open during the team building process. If the team is stuck at the storming stage, measures should be taken to move the team beyond the stasis. This may mean considering a change in leadership or having a candid discussion about the performance of the team with its members. Once there is progress at the storming stage, the team has a good chance of successfully moving through the norming and performing stages. Team building can be an intricate process riddled with subtle and obvious obstacles or it can be simple and seamless. If a capable leader is at the helm, you can successfully identify and navigate the obstacles and move gracefully through the forming, storming, norming, performing and adjourning stages achieving your desired results. Moving from “Storming” to “Norming” By YVETTE BETHEL Poisonings and pet safety issues By DR BASIL SANDS IT IS perhaps not surprising that several of the annuals that w e rely upon to give us beauty and colour during the brutal summer months originate in Mexico. These include Mexican sunflower, zinnia and cosmos. Mexican sunflower has b ecome a Bahamian favourite in recent years for its fairly large orange flowers. It can be grown in rows but is most effec tive when planted in stands that are assertive and eye catching. Masses of blooms are prod uced in a season that lasts for almost two months. Each flower only lasts a few days and should be clipped away once the petals drop. Towards the end of the plant’s life cycle you can leave the flower heads on until they are dry and store them to provide seeds for next years’ crop. You will need to use gloves as the dried flower heads are very prickly. Back in the late 19th century a botanist picked a small Mexican weed and thought to himself that the flower would be stunning if only it were larger. Work proceeded in this direc tion and the number of varieties and forms produced over the next century makes it so you could plant a whole gar den with zinnias and most people would not realise that the widely varying blossoms were all related. Zinnias come in many sizes. The flowers can be singles or doubles and exhibit a rainbow of colours. Zinnias can takes ummer sun and withstand drought conditions, making them both beautiful and tough. Cosmos flowers look delicate but the plant is even hardier than zinnia. Cosmos is best displayed in mass plantings rathert han trying to train it in rows. Colours available are yellow, orange, pink and close-to-red. Cosmos plants tend to get leggy and sprawl against each other. They also re-seed prolifically and can become weedso nce they colonise areas of the garden where they are not sup posed to be. Not all summer annuals come from Mexico. South Africa is the origin of Transvaal daisy or gerbera. These sharply defined daisies tend to be a little more expensive than other annuals and come in yellow, orange, red and pink. When we talk about cone flowers we are referring to a plant characteristic rather than one particular genus. Coneflowers may be Echinacea, dracopis, ratibida or rudbeckia but they are ideal candidates for the summer garden. The traditional yellow with a prominent cen tre, as in Black-Eyed Susan, is still the most common colour but coneflowers also come in purple, orange and pink. One of the most drought resistant of all leafy plants is known in The Bahamas as Sailor’s Button, or periwinkle. In its island form it is usually mauve or bluish-pink but in then ursery – where it is known as vinca – it comes in many more attractive colours. The downside is that nursery-bred vincas do not have the same degree of heat and drought tolerance as the native ones. They are stillt ough, however, and worth a place in the summer garden. Marigolds were once easily identified by their colour but in recent decades the standard marigold yellow has given way to lemon yellow, gold, orangea nd red. Portulaca makes a wonderful subject for a summer hanging basket. The plants tend to recurve as they hang down, displaying the flowers to good effect. Portulaca is drought resistant and the flowers, singles and doubles, come in an array of bright water-silk colours. Very closely related is moss rose, which is best used as a lowlying edging plant or ground cover around larger plants. The flowers are only slightly smaller than portulaca but the rest of the plant is very diminutive. One of the joys of using annu als for summer colour is their tendency to reseed themselves. The moss rose I planted six years ago reappears every sum mer and cosmos turn up in all parts of my garden. j.hardy@coralwave.com G REEN SCENE Flowers for summer Mexican sunflowers are fast growers and can grow in fairly poor soil. Cosmos is a cheerful performer in the summer garden.

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 69F/21C Low: 73F/23C Low: 71F/22C Low: 73F/23C Low: 75 F/24 C Low: 78F/26C Low: 76 F/24 C Low: 74 F/23 C High: 88F/31C High: 86F/30C High: 86 F/30 C High: 86 F/30 C High: 88F/31C High: 87 F/31C High: 88F/31C Low: 77F/25C High: 88F/31C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 90F/32C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 75F/24C High: 87 F/31 C Low: 74F/23C High: 85 F/29 Low: 72F/22C High: 86F/30C Low: 74 F/23C High: 89F/32C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 90F/32C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 88F/31C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 87F/31C Low: 78F/26C High: 87 F/31 C Low: 78F/26C High: 91F/33C High: 86 F/30 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MAY 26 TH , 2009, PAGE 11B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Sunshine mixing with some clouds. Partly cloudy, very warm and humid. Partly sunny.Partly sunny. Periods of sun, a t-storm in spots. High: 88 Low: 76 High: 88 High: 86 High: 86 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny with a thunderstorm. High: 87 Low: 76 Low: 77 Low: 76 AccuWeather RealFeel 98F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 83F 98-87F 97-79F 95-83F 106-82F Low: 76 TODAYTONIGHTWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................86F/30C Low ....................................................73F/23C Normal high ......................................85F/29C Normal low ........................................72F/22C Last year's high .................................. 88 F/31C Last year's low .................................. 72 F/22C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.24" Year to date ..................................................4.52" Normal year to date ....................................10.97" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU First Full Last New May 30 Jun. 7Jun. 15Jun. 22 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:21 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:53 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 8:18 a.m. Moonset . . . . 10:34 p.m. Today Wednesday Thursday Friday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 9:59 a.m.2.63:58 a.m.-0.2 10:24 p.m.3.33:54 p.m.-0.2 10:53 a.m.2.74:50 a.m.-0.2 11:19 p.m.3.24:50 p.m.-0.2 11:50 a.m.2.75:43 a.m.-0.1 -----5:50 p.m.-0.1 12:15 a.m.3.06:36 a.m.-0.1 12:49 p.m.2.76:52 p.m.0.0 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco90/3279/26s89/3175/23s Amsterdam58/1448/8r62/1649/9r Ankara, Turkey73/2241/5pc70/2145/7c Athens84/2868/20s81/2768/20pc Auckland59/1553/11sh60/1550/10r Bangkok91/3280/26sh92/3380/26t Barbados86/3076/24s85/2977/25s Barcelona72/2259/15s72/2259/15s Beijing91/3261/16s84/2864/17pc Beirut73/2269/20s74/2369/20s Belgrade89/3165/18s88/3159/15t Berlin89/3157/13t68/2050/10pc Bermuda77/2570/21pc74/2370/21pc Bogota66/1848/8c65/1848/8t Brussels62/1642/5r61/1645/7pc Budapest86/3058/14s75/2351/10sh Buenos Aires59/1541/5s59/1539/3pc Cairo94/3470/21s94/3467/19s Calcutta102/3882/27sh101/3882/27pc Calgary71/2147/8pc65/1843/6pc Cancun91/3273/22s92/3372/22s Caracas85/2974/23s80/2673/22s Casablanca74/2361/16s82/2766/18s Copenhagen75/2346/7t63/1751/10pc Dublin55/1245/7sh61/1652/11sh Frankfurt84/2849/9t70/2150/10pc Geneva 67/19 52/11 t 67/1950/10pc Halifax 58/14 38/3 s 59/15 46/7 r Havana 89/31 70/21 t 88/31 69/20 r Helsinki 68/20 50/10pc61/1641/5r Hong Kong 82/27 79/26 r 81/27 77/25r Islamabad 114/45 72/22 s 115/46 74/23 s Istanbul78/2557/13s74/2357/13s Jerusalem 74/23 57/13s77/2557/13s Johannesburg 68/2046/7s65/1845/7s Kingston 88/3181/27t86/3078/25r Lima75/2359/15pc74/2358/14pc London66/1850/10pc63/1752/11r Madrid77/2550/10s81/2750/10s Manila86/3077/25sh85/2978/25r Mexico City77/2554/12pc80/2651/10pc Monterrey97/3672/22pc105/4073/22s Montreal64/1750/10s57/1346/7r Moscow63/1745/7s68/2048/8pc Munich82/2756/13t64/1750/10pc Nairobi79/2665/18t80/2666/18t New Delhi 112/4482/27s114/4585/29s Oslo63/1745/7r59/1541/5sh Paris66/1844/6sh63/1753/11pc Prague 85/29 55/12 s 63/17 49/9 pc Rio de Janeiro85/2973/22s82/2774/23pc Riyadh104/4077/25s104/4079/26s Rome 84/28 62/16 s 82/27 61/16 pc St. Thomas85/2979/26pc85/2980/26s San Juan57/1348/8sh55/1242/5c San Salvador 88/31 70/21 t 84/28 73/22 t Santiago 66/1846/7pc64/1748/8c Santo Domingo86/3070/21t85/2972/22r Sao Paulo 80/26 59/15 t 76/24 61/16t Seoul79/2657/13pc82/2759/15s Stockholm 70/21 54/12 s 68/20 48/8 pc Sydney 72/22 55/12 c68/2052/11sh Taipei79/2672/22r77/2574/23r T okyo 76/24 63/17 s 75/23 62/16 pc T oronto 64/1754/12pc66/1854/12r Trinidad84/2873/22t84/2872/22t V ancouver 62/16 51/10 pc 64/1752/11s Vienna 85/2968/20s72/2253/11pc W arsaw 75/23 51/10 s 63/17 42/5 r Winnipeg 62/16 44/6 s 69/2048/8s H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayWednesday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SSW at 7-14 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles81F Wednesday:SSW at 7-14 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles81F Today:SSW at 7-14 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles80F Wednesday:SSW at 7-14 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles80F Today:S at 7-14 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles81F Wednesday:S at 7-14 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles81F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque79/2655/12pc76/2454/12t Anchorage68/2050/10s59/1546/7r Atlanta80/2666/18t81/2766/18t Atlantic City59/1553/11r72/2260/15c Baltimore65/1856/13r75/2365/18t Boston60/1548/8s59/1554/12c Buffalo64/1753/11r68/2057/13t Charleston, SC82/2767/19t84/2870/21t Chicago70/2154/12t65/1852/11c Cleveland68/2063/17t80/2661/16t Dallas89/3166/18t84/2863/17pc Denver66/1845/7pc74/2350/10pc Detroit68/2060/15t75/2357/13r Honolulu86/3071/21pc86/3072/22pc Houston92/3371/21t90/3272/22t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayWednesday TodayWednesdayTodayWednesday Indianapolis82/2765/18t77/2557/13t Jacksonville84/2869/20t85/2969/20t Kansas City75/2358/14t70/2155/12t Las Vegas96/3569/20s98/3675/23pc Little Rock84/2868/20t84/2864/17t Los Angeles74/2360/15pc76/2460/15pc Louisville84/2868/20t82/2765/18t Memphis82/2769/20t86/3068/20t Miami88/3175/23t88/3174/23t Minneapolis64/1751/10t67/1954/12pc Nashville81/2766/18t82/2766/18t New Orleans86/3072/22t90/3271/21pc New York63/1753/11r69/2060/15c Oklahoma City80/2660/15t79/2658/14pc Orlando88/3169/20t85/2969/20t Philadelphia62/1656/13r73/2262/16c Phoenix 97/36 73/22 s 99/3775/23s Pittsburgh70/2157/13t77/2562/16t Portland, OR 73/2253/11pc79/2654/12s Raleigh-Durham 79/26 64/17 t 83/28 66/18 t St. Louis78/2566/18t76/2461/16t Salt Lake City 77/25 56/13 s 80/2658/14pc San Antonio 92/33 72/22 t 88/31 68/20 t San Diego70/2162/16pc70/2161/16pc San Francisco 69/20 53/11 pc 70/2153/11pc Seattle66/1851/10pc73/2251/10s T allahassee 82/2768/20t87/3070/21t T ampa 86/30 73/22 t 85/29 74/23t Tucson91/3265/18s92/3367/19s W ashington, DC 64/17 58/14r80/2666/18t UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T -storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE SECTIONB HEALTH: Body and mind T UESDAY,MAY 26, 2009 Eyebrow threading is now the new method of hair removal on the rise Eyebrow arching can upgrade your entire look. Although there arem any methods such as using a razor, plucking or waxing, something new i s on the rise-eyebrow threading. Baha-Retreat Anti-Aging Spa, located on east Bay Street just easto f Lucianos, is the only full service spa and salon that offers eyebrow threading. This beauty procedure cost $18. Spa Director and Skin care specialist, Kenya Mortimer-McKen-z ie, has been threading for about a year and a half. “Threading has many benefits. It lasts at least a week to two weeks longer than waxing. There are lessi ngrown hairs, it doesn’t cause aging of the skin because you are not using chemicals as with waxing. Waxing over time, because of the heat, ages the skin. Threading is also more pre c ise causing you to get a better arch and for many persons who are on acne treatments such as Retin-A or Accutine, who can’t get waxing, this is a better method for them,” Mrs McKenzie said. The threading technique uses a 1 00 per cent cotton thread that is twisted and rolled along the surface o f the skin entwining the hairs in the thread, which are then lifted out from the follicle. Different threading methods “There are many different ways to u se the threading method. One way is where they put a piece of the thread in their mouth and extend ito ut to their hands. The other way is where they put the thread around the neck and they use the neck to move the direction of the thread. I find Bahamians won’t take too mucht o the thread being in your mouth due to sanitary reasons,” Mrs McKenzie said. For persons with finer eyebrows and those who are afraid of pain,M rs McKenzie said this method is great for them as well. You can take an entire row of hair out, or you can take out one hair at a time. You have more cont rol of the shape. Unlike waxing where you do not have much control on where you put the wax, you have control over the threads making it very precise. Discomfort varies fromp erson to person. Some people say it is less painful than waxing but most people can stand the pain,” Mrs McKenzie said. The origin of the threading techn ique is uncertain, with some claiming that it began in India, China or the Middle East. However, MrsM cKenzie said the technique started in the East and is slowly making its w ay into western culture. Traditionally, threading is used on the entire face, including upper lip, chin, eye-b rows, sideburns and cheeks. “I prefer this method. The skin is so soft after you get this done,” she said. Following our interview, Mrs M ckenzie did the procedure on me. I anticapated that there would be some pain involved, but it was not as excruitating as it looks. The only time Ifelt pain was when one single hair was removed. However when an entire row was removed, it was virtualy painless. I would do it again, because the outcome is pretty smooth and my brows are perfect.” n B y ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net H AIR removal is a very big deal for women. On t he face, the eyebrow is the accentuating f act o r of f acial beauty . M r s M c K e n z i e g e t s r e a d y t o t h r e a d t h e f i r s t b r o w .