Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
{T)

Mim blowin’ it

SOF
TTF

MOSTLY SUNNY,
“SX ESTORM

Volume: 105 No.150

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

HIGH
LOW







Te)
War

SEE INSIGHT SECTION

Christie: PLP party
leaders ‘secure’

Head of the
Opposition has

US



SS



Claim that police
charging bailed
individuals ‘to get
them off streets’

Allegation made by Bar
Association President

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

POLICE often charge individuals released on bail for seri-
ous crimes with other offences that they have “absolutely no
evidence” that person committed simply to get them off the

6 rw 1 streets and back behind bars, the President of the Bar Asso-
ove helming ciation has alleged.
) { Wayne Munroe made this charge as he hit out at what he
su or t O claimed was the irrational and counterproductive manner in
P
which the Attorney General chooses to determine the order
followers in which accused criminals will be put down for trial — and the

lack of public outrage about it — claiming that the office
must be held responsible to some degree for the number of

@ By ALISON : :
LOWE dangerous people getting bail.
Tribune Staff His comments come after leaked information from the
Reporter Police’s Security and Intelligence branch showed that of 205
alowe@ people released from prison in April, 11 were on bail for

murder or attempted murder.
Meanwhile, in the same week, the Court of Appeal ruled
that the section of the Bail Act, 1996, which sought to prohibit

tribunemedia.net

PLP leader Per-
ry Christie yester-
day said that he,
Deputy Leader
Cynthia “Mother”
Pratt and party
chairman Glenys
Hanna Martin are all “secure” in
their positions, despite the efforts
and aspirations of certain people
who wish to “destabilise” the par-
ty or cause “political mischief.”

In the wake of signs that some
within the party have formed fac-
tions intent on promoting the
leadership ambitions of certain
individuals, opposition leader Per-



PLP LEADER
Perry Christie



AN EXPANDING SLUM has
driven residents of Gamble





judges from granting bail to people accused of “serious”
crimes such as murder was “void” and “unconstitutional.”
The attorney, senior partner at the law firm Lockhart and

SEE page 10



28-year-old in serious
condition after stabbing

A BRUTAL stabbing in Har-
bour Island has left a 28-year-
old man in serious condition.

The man was airlifted from



However police provided no
details of where the stabbing
took place in the popular tourist
destination, or if the matter was

ie 5 ! Heights to take action by the North Eleuthera island tobe a domestic incident.
oF PLP inllowsrs asa edna) © working together to clean up treated at a hospitalin New —— No one has yet been arrested
responsibility of ensuring that, 2 the area. Providence after he was stabbed _in connection with the stabbing.
“when the party is passed on, it = The growing settlement of aaa at around 4am on i fps es oe ne
. = lywood shacks is said aturday. hat may assist police investiga-
SEE page nine 2 ply : Police say he was involvedin tions should call Crime Stoppers
= to be powered by illegally an argument with a 34-year-old anonymously at 328-TIPS
.@ sourced electricity with water woman before the stabbing. (8477).
PLEASE NOTE THAT, DUETO = = Pe eS
r I I 1
THE MEMORIAL DAY HOLIDAY = “* Wg Man in custody
IN THE US, THERE WILL BE * SEE PAGE TWO after gunshots
NO USA TODAY IN TODAY'S . :
EDITION OF THE TRIBUNE. fired from vehicle
GUNSHOTS were fired from a

Tel: 394-5656

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Senator to take up
Consul General post

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

SENATOR Katherine
Forbes Smith will shortly take
up the post of Consul Gener-
al at a newly-opened Bahamas
Consulate office in Atlanta,
Georgia, the Cabinet Office
announced yesterday.

Mrs Smith will leave her
Senate appointment and job
as Parliamentary Secretary in

Quiznos

the Office of the Prime Min-
ister to start work in Atlanta
on June 1.

A statement from the Cabi-
net Office said the new con-
sular office has been opened
in response to the growing
demand for service by
Bahamians resident in the
greater Atlanta area and by
businesses in the southeastern
United States wishing to

SEE page nine

:

ta ee ru

ol

WEALTHY POTENTIAL
RESIDENTS ‘ARE
BEING DRIVEN OUT
BY GAMBLING
RESTRICTIONS’

CAT ISLANDERS
CHEER INAUGURAL
FLIGHT

. ma r F =

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HAM & CHEDDAR

STEAK & CHEESE
CHICKEN CAESAR

CHICKEN & CHEDDAR



NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

Hummer as it chased a gold
coloured Honda on Marathon
Road at around 8 o’clock Friday
night.

Police acted quickly when offi-
cers saw shots being fired from
the military-style vehicle and
called for reinforcement to chase
down the cars.

Both vehicles were stopped
moments later.

A 12 gauge shotgun and 13
shotgun shells were found in the
Hummer. The driver was arrest-

A 34-year-old man is in police
custody.

Anyone with any information
that may assist police investiga-
tions should call Crime Stoppers
anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477).

treo &

= ® =

See ba E- ha, el, ~~ @ & 9 2 22 © z —

-
J :





PAGE 2, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Gamble Heights Crime Watch
committee initiates clean-up





























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Fax: 242-328-7996

DEADLINE: June 19th, 2009

~~

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

A SLUM expanding on the
borders of a New Providence
community has driven con-
cerned residents to take
action by working together
to clean up the area.

Residents of Gamble
Heights fear rising crime,
poor sanitation and disease
spreading in the area off
Baillou Hill Road South, as
more and more people move
into a shanty village of
Haitians and Bahamians on
otherwise disused land
behind their subdivision.

The growing settlement of
plywood shacks is powered
by illegally sourced electric-
ity and water is tapped from
city pipes. Garbage is piling
up outside the village,
attracting oversized rodents,
and residents fear the slum
allows illegal immigrants and

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bushes and get rid of garbage.

criminals to infiltrate their
community.

Members of the Gamble
Heights Community Crime
Watch Committee said they
initiated a clean up of the
area when government took
too long to act.

Residents pooled their
resources to hire a tractor
and tear down overgrown
bushes on Saturday morning
in the first of a weekly clean-
up operation to improve the
environment block by block.

They say the slum has
been growing for the past
three decades, and residents
have become so settled there
are churches among their
homes.

Resident Theresa Johnson
said: “We are not prejudiced
about anybody, but some-
thing needs to be done.

“They have no bathroom
facilities so everything is
going into the ground and
eventually it will go into the
water table and diseases like
tuberculosis (TB) will get
into the community... And
we have children and our
families to think of.”

Mother of three Yalice
Bowe-Smith, of Sunrise
Road, is troubled by rising
crime as there have been
three murders in the area
this year.

Burglars

She has stopped burglars
trying to break into her
home, confronted super-
sized rats and held her chil-
dren back from playing near
the road when cars speed
through at 100mph.

“This is too much for us to
handle,” she said. “But this is
what we are facing. If
nobody else is going to stop
it, we aS a community are
going to step in and start
with cleaning up these bush-
es to avoid the rodents and
the crime.”

For Wellington
Emmanuel, 40, who grew up
in the area, the greatest con-
cern is the expanding “Hait-
ian Village.”

He said: “Haitian people
are squatting there and
building, and it's getting

Ends May 30




and Yalice Bowe-Smith.

worse, SO my main concern
is getting rid of these peo-
ple.”

The community believes
they can improve the area by
working together, but Sun-
rise Road resident Yvonne
Stubbs, 49, admits she does
not know how they will get
rid of the illegal settlement.

Mrs Stubbs said: “We have
to put a stop to it, but I don't
know how. We invite them
along with the whole com-
munity to our crime watch
meetings, so if they come
they can get a feel and
understanding of what we
are all about.

“But they have to move
these houses, they have to
go. We can't tolerate it.

“T could see if they were
helping the community, and
contributing, but they are
not, they are pulling it down.
And we can see from the
way it looks that that is
what's happening.”

Gamble Heights resident
Courtney Thompson said
Minister of Immigration and
MP for Gamble Heights
Branville McCartney assured
him he would have officers
tour the area along with
social service staff, the police
and representatives from the
Ministry of Housing.

However, government has
been telling the residents
that for years, Mr Thompson

Bernard Rd

Mackey St: 393-5684 Thompson Blvd: 328-1164



an x : â„¢ se ee Fl
CHAIRMAN OF Gamble Heights Crime Watch Committee Joe Stubbs



GAMBLE HEIGHTS residents have had to pool their resources to hire a tractor to tear down overgrown



said, so the residents are tak-
ing the issue into their own
hands.

He said: “We have been
talking about this issue for
about seven years, and noth-
ing is done, it only gets
worse.”

Mr McCartney confirmed
he is well aware of the situa-
tion and immigration officers
raided the area twice in the
last year, apprehending 15
illegal immigrants in the last
raid.

Ownership

However, he said, officials
are trying to determine own-
ership of the land before
they proceed with police,
housing officers, social ser-
vices and the defence force
to break up the ghetto.

Mr McCartney said such
slums are springing up all
over New Providence, and
he wants to make the public
more aware of them.

“Many of these persons,”
he said, “come over and
work for Bahamians illegally,
so we are causing this in our
own society. We are work-
ing on something to show the
Bahamian public how they
are aiding and developing
slums.

“People are living in
squalor. If you go there you
will find it’s a slum. People
are living outdoors, literally
live in bushes, and they know
these bushes better than
most. There are caves and
holes in the bushes where
they hide and it seems as
though it’s quite difficult to
get them.

“But certainly this is one
of many areas that the
department is very conscious
of and we have begun work-
ing to try and see if we can
deal with this.”

FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY!

AT PARTICIPATING STORES





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

Man killed
in traffic
accident

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A 23-year-old i
male resident of Bootle Bay was }
killed in a traffic accident at }
West End early Sunday morn- }
ing, pushing the traffic fatality ;
count to seven for the year on }

Grand Bahama.

Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle :
reported that the accident }
occurred around 2.30am on }
Bayshore Road involving a 1999 }
grey-coloured Delta 98 Oldsmo- }
bile with license plate number ;
43861, owned by Bowe’s Heavy }

Equipment.

The victim was ejected from :
the vehicle and pronounced :
dead at the scene. Police have }
not released the victim’s identi- }

ty.

Bayshore Road.

He lost control of the vehicle }
while trying to negotiate a }
curve, knocked down a utility ;
pole and crashed into a chain }
linked fence. The vehicle landed :
in two feet of rain water on the :

road side.

ASP Bootle said Dr Kahn

was summoned to the scene,

where he examined the victim }

and pronounced him dead.

He said the police are advis- }
ing motorists to drive with }
extreme care and caution on the }
road, especially in wet and slip- }

pery rainy conditions.

Two men
arrested

after reports”

of prowlers

FAST-ACTING police }
responded to reports of }



Mr Bootle said police inves- :
tigations revealed that the dri- :
ver was travelling east on }

driven out by vambline restrictions’

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

MILLIONS of dollars could be
spent in the Bahamas and increase
government revenue but are being
spent elsewhere as wealthy poten-
tial residents are driven out of the
islands by gambling restrictions.

A foreign investor, who consid-
ered purchasing high-value property
in the Bahamas and becoming a per-
manent resident told his Nassau real
estate agent he has been deterred
by restrictive gaming laws.

The Florida resident, who is in his
fifties, spends thousands of dollars at
the Wyndham Resort Crystal Palace
casino when on vacation, but would
be prevented from doing so if he
were to live in New Providence per-
manently.

His real estate agent, John Con-
stantakis, said his client has been put
off by cases such as Robert Halat’s.

Mr Halat, 78, was forced to give
up his gambling when he retired
in Lyford Cay as residents are
prohibited from gambling —
regardless of nationality—
under the Lotteries and Gam-
ing Act.

Mr Constantakis
said: “I think the
law they
have

to not let Bahamians gamble is good,
because it prevents people from
spending money in the casinos when
they could be spending money on
their families.

“But for somebody’s who is very
well off, and is just a resident and
not a citizen, let them spend their
money, we need it, especially at this
time.”

Economy

Mr Halat is calling for foreign
residents without the right to work in
the Bahamas to be given the
right to gamble and
pump thousands of a=
dollars into the
struggling econo-
my. :

He is frustrat- :
ed government
has not yet made




















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a decision on changes to the law
after considering reforms for two
years.

Meanwhile wealthy investors
are playing with their money else-
where.

A Canadian friend of Mr Halat’s
with property in Cable Beach chose
not to become a resident because it
would prevent him from gambling,
and instead spends money in Las
Vegas casinos.

And a couple from Germany left
New Providence because living in
the Bahamas would mean they could
not go to the casinos, Mr Halat said.

He added: “Tf just one per-

son will do that, then I'm

i certain it's hundreds of
= people. But even if it's
only three or four people,
you are talking about a cou-
ple of mil-
lion

lridescent Taffeta
Two Tone Shantung





Lamour, Chiffon

dollars that could be coming into the
economy.

“These people (the government)
are shooting themselves in the foot.

“Tf it takes two years to make a
decision like that it really bodes bad-
ly for the Bahamas, and I am seeing
that more and more. This is the
problem with both governments,
they can't make a decision, and a
decision shouldn’t take that long.

“Tf they were a business, and after
two years they haven’t been able to
find a simple solution to the prob-
lem, they would be bankrupt
already.”

The Bahamas Hotel Association
(BHA) and Casino Association have
advised the Ministry of Tourism to
lift restrictions and allow legal resi-
dents to gamble.

And as Florida considers relaxing
gaming laws and introducing more
games to the state to increase gov-
ernment revenue at a time when
government revenue is falling, even
more business could be taken away
from the Bahamas.

For Mr Halat, who suffers from
emphysema and believes he has just
eight months to live, the right to

gamble would greatly improve his
quality of life.

He said: “When I was younger I
would go to the casino occasionally,
and now with my old age, I would go
in the morning and have lunch, play
a few games, and be home by 3pm.

“T am so limited in what I can
do, and if I can’t get out of the house,
I have no drive. At least before I
had a goal in life to do something.”

Minister of Tourism and Avia-
tion Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace
said laws are under review but it is a
complicated process because there
are a number of reforms to be con-
sidered

He said: “I wish I could give you
a definitive date for when it will be
completed, but I can say it’s defi-
nitely something that is under con-
sideration.”

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prowlers in Mackey Street and ;
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The officers from Wulff }
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lounge when they arrived at

around 11.30pm.

When they caught up with
the men, they searched them to }
find a 44 handgun, two pairs of }

gloves and a tam mask.

Police believe they were :
preparing to carry out an armed }

robbery.

A 34-year-old Bamboo }
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Anyone who may be able to :
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pers anonymously on 328-TIPS



Your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Bail decision to be left to judge

BAHAMIANS now fear that Thursday’s
Appeal Court ruling that section 4(2) of the
Bail Act, 1996, is unconstitutional will release
more dangerous persons onto our streets. The
1996 amendment to the 1994 Act denies bail to
persons accused of serious offences against the
person, including murder and armed robbery.

It is not necessarily true that more persons
will be released as a result of this ruling, nor did
the Appeal Court intend it to be so. However,
what the Appeal Court’s ruling did was to return
to the presiding judge the decision of whether to
grant bail in a particular case. It called the leg-
islature’s mandatory bail denial unconstitu-
tional. However, s.4(1) also provides that if the
court is satisfied that in particular cases, gener-
ally drug matters, detention is not justified, then
on ordering a release on bail a record must be
included “giving the reasons for the order of
release on bail.” We believe the public is also
entitled to this information in the cases of mur-
der, armed robbery, rape and other serious
offences.

Whether more dangerous persons will now
be released onto the streets will be solely in
the hands of the presiding judge.

Appeals Court President Dame Joan
Sawyer said that in her view the main issue in
the Attorney General’s appeal against the
granting of bail to four men was “whether
subsection 4(2) of the Bail Act is valid under
the Constitution, in other words whether Par-
lament of the Bahamas has the power to
enact legislation which has the purported
effect of denying bail to persons arrested and
detained on reasonable suspicion of having
committed serious offences, no matter what
the circumstances of the alleged offences are,
or how long a person is detained by the prison
authorities or the police without trial.”

She said the power parliament had given
itself — taking the decision of bail in certain
cases out of the hands of the judges — flew in
the face of article 19(3) of the Constitution,
which provides that a person not tried within
a reasonable time should be released with
either a conditional discharge or until his case
is called.

It was the view of the Appeals Court that
it was for the judges — not parliament— to
exercise their discretion as to whether or not
bail should be granted. Although, the Appeal
Court last week refused bail for the cases of
the four men before it, it agreed that this
decision should have been made by the judge,
not by an Act of parliament.

That discretion, said Dame Joan, must be
carried out “judicially” as well as “judicious-

Explaining the judges’ decision, lawyer
Murrio Ducille, who represented the men
before the court, said that the appellate

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court’s decision essentially meant that par-
liament “cannot perform a judicial act. You
cannot tell a judge when and when not to
grant bail,” he said.

In 1996 the Bail Act of 1994 was amended
to make the refusal of bail for more serious
offences — kidnapping, murder, armed rob-
bery, treason and conspiracy to commit any
one of them — mandatory unless the offend-
er had not been tried within a reasonable
time. In other words parliament legislated
that the judge hearing the case could exercise
no discretion in the granting or withholding of
bail, unless, of course the accused had been
languishing in prison for an unreasonable
time.

But what was an unreasonable time? In
the past there was no bail for a murder
accused. However, in those way off days the
court calendar was not clogged as it is today
— murders were few and far between — and
justice was swift.

But times have changed. Today the courts
cannot keep up with the crime, including mur-
ders, attempted murders, armed robberies,
and violence to person and property.

In 1994, the Privy Council ruling in a case
from Jamaica prescribed a five year limit for
execution after conviction of murder. This
case came up in the House of Assembly in
October 1996 when members were debating
the very amendment to the Bail Act to which
the Appeals Court objected last week. The
legislation being introduced then was that the
denial of bail to persons charged with serious
offences be mandatory.

In view of the Privy Council’s five year
rule for convicted murderers, Mr Ingraham
told the House that government had to con-
centrate its efforts to ensure that the judicia-
ry was able to hear and determine all capital
cases and appeals quickly.

Five years was the time limit to prevent
hanging in murder cases. But in 1996 the Privy
Council commuted to life in prison two con-
victed murderers from the Bahamas. In their
case the time limit on executions had been
shortened to three and a half years.

But how long was too long to hold a person
awaiting trial in a murder case? No one knew.
However, as serious crimes increased the time
these men were being held in prison seemed
to be getting shorter and shorter. Until in
several cases murder accused out on bail were
committing second murders while awaiting a
court date for the first. Sometimes they them-
selves were killed, thus avoiding an earthly tri-
al. Tomorrow we shall deal with the reason
that the legislature took the judicial discretion
from the judges and by an act of parliament
denied bail to persons charged with serious
crimes.



Our tourists
deserve better
when they
come here

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I come to the Bahamas quite
frequently to visit my family and
always enjoy my time here. I offer
the following as someone who has
travelled extensively to all parts of
the world and understands mar-
keting.

I suspect that the tourist trade
is a major and vital contributor
to the Bahamian economy.

The Bahamas markets itself as
an island paradise and the out
islands prove the point spectacu-
larly. The trouble is that tourists
arrive in Nassau and first impres-
sions of the Bahamas are
extremely negative, not compar-
ing well to other holiday destina-
tions.

There is a container port in the
middle of the biggest tourist shop-
ping area and the traffic conges-
tion is worse than in New York or
London.

The last time I was here it took
two hours to get no more than
halfway across the island. Traffic
lights are numerous and many do
not work, buses do not appear to
understand the concept of desig-
nated bus stops and huge articu-
lated lorries jostle with tourists

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



on Bay Street. In the current eco-
nomic situation the “duty free”
prices for luxury goods are
matched by prices in the USA
and UK and are therefore not
good value.

Communications need upgrad-
ing.

The whole world uses mobile
phones and expects to be able to
use them on holiday.

European users cannot do so
in the Bahamas because the local
provider has no agreements with
any major European mobile net-
work provider. Unless one uses
FedEx, there is no point in send-
ing postcards by post as they can
take months to arrive at their des-
tinations.

My observations over the last
six years are that Nassau is
becoming a dirty, traffic choked
and faded city with vacant lots,
buildings in disrepair and pot-
holes one can fall in.

Most tourists have spent a lot
of money for their holiday and

can get their fill of diesel fumes
and traffic jams at home.

They expect and deserve better
when they come on holiday. If
customer’s expectations are not
met, they will take their business
elsewhere.

The world is getting smaller
and while the Caribbean will
remain a popular holiday desti-
nation, the Bahamas is likely to
be bypassed unless changes are
made and made quickly.

It is no good looking inwards,
trying to accommodate all the
vested interests.

Nassau needs to become out-
ward looking and examine first-
hand what their Caribbean com-
petitors are doing.

There must be experienced
people in the country able to pro-
vide an objective vision for the
future.

Without it, in tourist terms, the
future looks bleak for Nassau and
ultimately the Bahamas.

What a great waste and pity
that would be.

DW TOWNSEND
Yorkshire,
England,

May 21, 2009.

Our political leaders bury heads in the sand

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I read in the paper yesterday that another mem-
ber of Mr Knowles’ family came close to losing her
life due to another Mack truck which lost its brakes.
His brother was killed not long ago for alleged
neglect or driving without due care and attention.

What I find ‘unacceptable’ is that Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham and others have not since
addressed this issue nor publicly made any headway
in Mr Knowles’ plea. Sometimes it so happens that

could say different, but I can’t. Our political leaders
either bury their heads in the sand like dumb ostrich-

nothing is done unless a member of their own fam-

ily is either hurt, killed or injured then something is

done, maybe.

Iam a Bahamian, but not a proud one. I wish I

Nassau,
May, 2009.

es or deny any and everything, including the kitchen
sink. Bahamian people must understand that they
have the right to oust these persons and any indi-
vidual who wants to make a change, I make a sug-
gestion— run for office.

These MPs in the House now need to all be
retired so a new crew can take over without all the
other mess involved.

Cheers and lets keep our heads up OK.

IAN G MOREE

Painfully tired of this kind of leadership

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I vomited a little in my mouth
after hearing the Attorney Gen-
eral expressing his confidence in
the Bahamian judicial system and
its soundness.

The only explanation I can
think of that would make the
head of the government’s legal
office say something so unreal is
that there must be two judicial
systems: One we deal with on a
daily basis and the other known
only to Mr. Barnett, because the
one Bahamians deal with on a
daily basis cannot be described
without a few choice negative
expletives attached.

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The judicial system is in a
MESS Mr. Barnett!

And you not acknowledging
this fact is an indication that very
little significant reforms are going
to take place under your watch
as Attorney General simply
because in order to fix a problem
the problem needs to be acknowl-
edged first.

I can spend the rest of this
letter detailing examples to show
the awful state of the judicial sys-
tem, but there are enough docu-
mentation in the morning news-
papers, talk shows and the man
on the streets waiting years for
his turn to seek justice only to
have road blocks of corrupt

lawyers and molasses moving offi-
cers of the court in his way.

Mr. Barnett, this single act of
blind-sided confidence has pro-
moted you to the top of the totem
pole of inadequate leaders.

Congratulations! You were
able to surpass Neko Grant’s
explanation....sorry, I mean apol-
ogy for failing to deal with traffic
lights after over two years in
office.

When will this madness end?

Painfully tired of this kind of
leadership.

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Nassau,
May 15, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009, PAGE 5







LOCAL NEWS

A GROUP of Cat Islanders
gathered and cheered as the
inaugural flight of a new Sky
Bahamas Airlines service to
Cat Island touched down at
New Bight Airport.

Enhancing the options avail-
able to travellers, SkyBahamas
Airlines undertook the flight
to New Bight last Wednesday,
with passengers onboard a 33-
seater aircraft.

A number of island officials
and community leaders,
including Senior Island
Administrator Charles King
and Deputy Chief Councillor
Alfred Daniels, as well as “Bo
Hog”, a local rake and scrape
_| band, and the “Rooters” greet-

Call for youth to be better protected

AN ORGANISATION advocating the rights of
young people is calling for youth to be better protected
from physical, sexual and verbal abuse in society.

The Bahamas National Youth Council (BNYC), a
non-government and non-partisan organisation
formed to fight the issues facing youth, is demanding
stricter regulations of adults working in schools and
youth groups.

Teachers and school staff should only be hired after
a comprehensive background check has been com-
pleted, and they should then be subject to an annual
police check, the BNYC says.

The council has further called for school surveys
asking students about their experiences to give them
a chance to voice their fears and concerns without
shame.

A statement from the BNYC executive board
states: “It is our belief that more can be done to
ensure students of these institutions, whether public or
private, are safe from paedophilia, physical and verbal
abuse, and other acts contrary to the proper conduct
of those put in responsibility of their education.



242.422.4677

ken@erabahamas.com

www.erabahamas.com

“Tf allegations of misconduct are found, they should
be investigated expeditiously, and the alleged offend-
er taken out of the school system until the issue has
been resolved in the courts of law.”

Youth groups should also be more open about
their activities by adhering to a mandatory level of
transparency enforced by an independent body, said
the BNYC.

The executive board statement states: “Young peo-
ple involved in these programmes have a right to
voice their concerns and as such, an independent
organisation that is void of bias, objective and forth-
right, should be appointed to conduct surveys of young
persons to ascertain whether their rights are being
upheld.”

And parents are called on as having the greatest
responsibility to ensure their children are safe, as the
BNYC urges parents to talk to their children and stay
informed of their ongoing activities both in and out of
school.

For more information about the BNYC e-mail
bahamasnyc@gmail.com.



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PAGE 6, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





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m By SIR RONALD SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant and
former Caribbean diplomat)

A TECHNICAL team
has been appointed by
the foreign ministers of the
Caribbean Community and Com-
mon Market (Caricom) to con-
sider an application from the
Dominican Republic to join the
15-nation group. The team has
been asked to have the report
ready for consideration by Cari-
com heads of government when
they meet in Guyana in July.

This will not be an easy process
by any means.

Three factors are at play.

The first of these is that Cari-
com has not yet sufficiently deep-
ened the relationship among its
existing members. The second is
the different interests of the Cari-
com countries — some might see
an advantage in greater access to
the DR’s market, while others
would regard opening their own
markets to the DR as a disadvan-
tage to local companies. The third
is deep concerns of Haiti about
the DR with regard to human
rights issues related to labour and
migration.

When the West Indian Com-
mission (WIC) produced its
report, “Time for Action”, in 1992
it placed great importance on
deepening the relationship
between the then 13 Caricom
member states — all of whom were
English-speaking. The Commis-
sion regarded the 13 as a “core
group” who should deepen their
relationship in furtherance of their
collective interest in the region,
the hemisphere and the wider
world.

Amongst the actions that the
WIC recommended was the cre-
ation of a Single Market and
Economy, the establishment of
the Caribbean Court of Justice
(CCJ) to resolve trade and invest-
ment disputes and to replace the
British Privy Council as a final
appellate Court, and the institu-
tionalisation of a Commission —
similar to the Commission of the
European Union — to manage the
operations of Caricom including
the Single Market and Economy
and external economic relations.

Specifically, the WIC said:
“The West Indies must both deep-
en the process of integration and
reach out to a wider Caribbean
in appropriate levels of coopera-
tion. The dual track approach may
produce differing levels of inte-
gration within the Caribbean; it
may produce circles of associa-
tion that start with the intimate
West Indian family and others
that encompass an extended fam-
ily of the non-English speaking
islands of the Caribbean, and a
still larger circle of closer rela-
tions with countries of the
Caribbean Basin that include ter-

insight |

WORLD VIEW

ritories of the South and Central
American littoral.”

The WIC was especially con-
cerned that “on the economic
side, we have to feel our way in
enlarging the Caricom market so
that we make progress in that
direction without being over-
whelmed by new members and
end up being lost within our own
widened community.”

This process was not followed.

Caricom admitted Surinam
and then Haiti to membership
before the process of deepening
the relationship between its core
members had advanced very far.
The Single Market was not
launched until 2006, fourteen
years after it was proposed, and its
implementation by several coun-
tries has been painfully slow since
then. The CCJ, while it operates
as a Court of original jurisdiction
for trade and investment disputes
among Caricom countries, is not
the final appellate court for all
but two countries, and the
machinery for governance of Cari-
com remains ineffective since nei-
ther a Commission with executive
authority nor any thing akin to it
has been established.

This failure to consolidate and
advance the Caricom inner core
has weakened the organisation
and the capacity of its member
states to bargain effectively in the
international community and to
strengthen their own economies.
And, the introduction of new
members, before the relationship
has been deepened, complicates
the process even more particular-
ly as new members have brought
different laws, different domestic
decision-making processes and
different ambitions.

The argument remains valid
that even now Caricom should
deepen its own core arrangements
by completing the establishment
of its Single Market before
attempting to expand its mem-
bership further. Indeed, expanded
membership may serve to slow
down — if not derail — the
process of moving toward a Single
Economy which would have to
include a common currency, har-
monised tax policies, the devel-
opment of a Caricom-wide social
security system, and free move-
ment of people for several cate-
gories of workers.

The DR may not be interested
in pursuing these stated goals of
Caricom.

On the external relations of
Caricom, expanded membership
now could also impair the devel-
opment of harmonised foreign

Ministry of Public
Works and Transport

NOTICE

BAY STREET
BLAKE RD TO MACKEY ST
ROADWAY CONSTRUCTION

policies. While the Caricom
Treaty calls for the coordination
of the foreign policies of its mem-
ber states, it is clear that to deal
effectively with the international
community, coordination will not
be enough. This is a matter that
both existing Caricom countries
and the DR will have to consider
carefully in their separate inter-
ests, for their interests will not
always converge.

With regard to new market
opportunities, while a free trade
agreement exists between the DR
and Caricom countries, it covers
only trade in about 400 products;
it does not cover services. The
free trade agreement between the
DR and Caricom countries was
worth US$578 million last year.
But, of that total, natural gas
imports from Trinidad and Toba-
go alone accounted for US$546
million; the remaining US$32 mil-
lion was neither here nor there.
Trinidad and Tobago’s natural gas
exports to the DR would have
taken place even in the absence of
a free trade agreement.

Significantly, in 2007 every
Caricom country, except Belize
and Trinidad and Tobago, had a
negative trade balance with the
DR. In other words, they did not
benefit from the free trade agree-
ment.

But, since the European Union
(EUV) insisted that the DR be part
of the Economic Partnership
Agreement (EPA) with Caricom
signed last year, Caricom coun-
tries are compelled to liberalise
goods, services and investment
with the DR at the same rate as
with the EU. Therefore, from the
DR’s viewpoint, even though
there would be benefits in partic-







CARICOM: Lost in a widened
Caribbean Community?

Sir Ronald Sanders

ipating in Caricom’s single mar-
ket, the obligations of the “Sin-
gle Economy” and “Community”
aspects of the Caricom Treaty
may be too much for it to bear. In
any event, it would have to seek a
waiver from Caricom’s common
external tariff since it is higher
than the DR’s and would increase
the cost of imports and make
exports less competitive.

Then there are human rights
issues over labour and migration
between Haiti — already a mem-
ber state of Caricom — and the
DR. Even if other Caricom coun-
tries would be willing to allow the
DR’s membership of Caricom
limited to its Common Market
aspects only and not to the Com-
munity dimension which would
include foreign policy, it is unlike-
ly that Haiti would agree to the
DR’s membership without bind-
ing assurances on these two issues
— they are assurances the DR may
not be able to give.

The Caricom Treaty does pro-
vide for associate membership of
Caricom. It is an option that both
the DR and existing Caricom
states might consider at this time
in both their interests.

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com

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General computer skills (Microsoft XP, internet, social

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Strong knowledge of Microsoft Office (Word, Excel,

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Experience:

The candidate should have experience of office
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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009, PAGE 7





LEARNING IS MORE FUN — Sadie Curtis Primary School grade one
students enjoy learning with their new ENO interactive whiteboard.
Pictured watching the students are Education Minister Carl W.
Bethel; Mrs. Audrey Farrington, Principal, Sadie Curtis Primary
School; Mr. Willard Barr, District Superintendent, Southeastern
District and Dr. Mary Markowsky, President of E.T.C. International,
authorised distributor of the ENO board in the Caribbean.

Sadie Curtis
Primary gets the
latest technology

in education

MINISTER CARL
BETHEL performed double-
duty as Education Minister
and the Member of Parliament
for the Sea Breeze constituen-
cy when he presented Sadie
Curtis Primary School with
two technologically-advanced
ENO boards.

Minister Bethel told the
teachers and students during
the presentation that the funds
for the boards came from the
$100,000 parliamentary allot-
ment given to each represen-
tative to assist in their con-
stituency.

Minister Bethel said he was
delighted to provide the stu-
dents with the devices that will
replace the traditional chalk-
board in the classroom. He
said the ENO boards have
only been on the market for a
few months, and the fact that
Sadie Curtis school has two
already is evidence of his com-
mitment to their education.

Minister Bethel told the stu-
dents that the boards will
make learning fun and moti-
vate them to improve their
attendance at school. He also
encouraged the grade one stu-
dents to learn as much as they
possibly can as the benefits of
a good education, such as a
nice home, family and other
opportunities, will follow.

The students were delighted
when the Minister told them
that he would be presenting
the school with two boards and
he hoped that soon all of the
classrooms would be fitted
with this equipment.

Dr. Mary Markowsky, Pres-
ident of E.T.C. International,
the authorised distributor for
the ENO board in Caribbean
region, including The
Bahamas, attended the cere-
mony and noted that the
board is the latest advance-
ment in education. Dr.
Markowsky stated that
although there are several ver-
sions of the interactive white
boards in Bahamian schools,
the ENO board is more versa-
tile because it does not require
any electricity, and teachers
can use both permanent and
dry-erase markers on them.
The older ‘White Boards’ will
not function if permanent
markers and magnets come in

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



contact with them.

Mr. Manley Wisdom,
Regional Representative for
E.T.C. International, was also
present and performed a
demonstration for the Minis-
ter, education officers, teach-
ers and students. He called on
students to participate in the
session by using markers to
drag items on the screen to
answer questions, and place
magnets on the board to spell
words. Mr. Wisdom also
showed how the device which
has Internet access could be
used to incorporate material
from the worldwide web
instantaneously. He accessed
the web and downloaded the
Bahamian national anthem to
which the students rose to
their feet to sing.

The grade one homeroom
teacher, Mrs. Shavone Clarke,
said the ENO board will make
her teaching easier and more
interesting. She noted that
today’s children enter the
classroom being technologi-
cally savvy and instruments
such as the ENO board will
allow teachers to capture and
maintain students’ attention
throughout the lesson.

Some of the other advan-
tages of the ENO Boards are
that it:

¢ allows for greater creativ-
ity from teachers and students

reduces teacher’s lesson
preparations

improves discipline because
children are focused and hav-
ing fun learning;

* saves money because the
use of paper and ink is
reduced;

¢ fun and easy to use and is
certified ‘Green Product’
because it is made from all
recyclable material.

Mrs. Audrey Farrington,
Principal of Sadie Curtis Pri-
mary School, thanked Minister
Bethel on behalf of the teach-
ers and students. Superinten-
dent for the Southeastern Dis-
trict, Mr. Willard Barr, also
attended the presentation.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS



Christie: PLP party

leaders ‘

FROM page one

can be passed on in the same way
it was passed on to (him) — as a
stable organisation.”

Mr Christie’s comments came
in response to the dissemina-
tion of a critical internal report
by someone in the party by way
of a Bahamian political blog in
what Mr Christie and other
political commentators see as
an attempt to embarrass him in
the run up to the party’s con-
vention later this year.

The report’s contents,
although brought to public
attention by the media last
year, had never been made
available in its entirety until
now.

Published on Saturday under
the heading “Report Confirms
Perry Christie Must Go or the
PLP will die!” the document
was compiled by Washington
DC-based political consultants
shortly after the party’s May
2007 general election defeat
and comments significantly on
how Mr Christie’s perceived
“weak leadership” was the pri-
mary reason that voters did not
favour the party at the polls.

The timing of the move to
release the document to the
wider public has led Mr
Christie to conclude that it was
done “for the furtherance of
political aspirations, by people
who may see that as evidence
against me and my leadership”
in the run up to the convention,
where all leadership posts in
the party can be contested.

The PLP leader said: “There
are people who are in posses-
sion of the report and there are
people who are prepared to
release the report for their own
purposes — we know who they
are. It’s fine. The PLP has to
learn from every aspect of these
matters and strengthen itself
and move forward.”

Calling the move to highlight
the report at this time “under-
handed”, Mr Christie said: “At
the end of the day it takes
someone with the courage of
their conviction to nominate
and contest, and once they are
able to do that then the people
will determine who is best to



Glenys Hanna-Martin

lead in whatever position is
being contested.”

“Those who would wish to
take an irregular approach to
the organising of the party, I
bless them and I wish them the
very best,” he added.

The PLP leader suggested
that since the time that the sur-
veys conducted by political con-

secure’

sultants, Greenberg, Quinlan
and Rosner, were undertaken,
“further polls have been con-
ducted” which provide an
updated and changed snapshot
of the populace’s view of the
party and its leadership.

“T have moved on in terms
of the report: We have con-
ducted further polls. They are
unaware of them (those respon-
sible for the leak of the GQR
report) and that’s just how it
is. So they want to act with that
information at that time and
that’s fine, there’s nothing we
can do about this (the dissemi-
nation of the report),” he said.

Commenting on the status of
the Deputy Leadership of the
party yesterday, Mr Christie
said that with “tremendous
focus” having been brought on
the role in the last year, he
anticipates that “when Mother
Pratt does announce to the
country her intention (as to
whether she would wish to
remain deputy leader)” more
people who are interested in
that position “will then step for-
ward” to contest the role at the
convention.

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FROM page one

Consul General post

served in the Consulate General of The
Bahamas in New York and in Miami, Florida
and at the Bahamas Permanent Mission to
the United Nations in New York.

Mrs Forbes Smith is expected to serve for at
least three years in the post. It is not known
who will replace her in the Senate.

expand trade and investment in the Bahamas.

Georgia, Alabama, Arkansas, Kansas, Ken-
tucky, Missouri, North Carolina, South Car-
olina, Oklahoma, and Tennessee will come
within the jurisdiction of the Atlanta Con-
sulate General.

The new Consul General will have as her
Consul Sandra Carey, who has previously

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PAGE 10, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Claim that police charging bailed individuals

Munroe, told The Tribune that
rather than the public express-

FROM page one

Butler’s Funeral Homes
& Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Mr. James
Alonza
Cartwright, 44

of Mackey Street who died
on May 16, 2009, will be
held on Wednesday May 27,
2009 at 4:00 p.m. at Grace
Gospel Chapel, Palmetto
Avenue. Officiating will be
Pastor Rex Major. Interment
will follow in Woodlawn
Gardens Cemetery.

Left to cherish his memories are his four children; DeAndra,
James, Danielle and Jami Cartwright; his mother: Lorene
Cartwright; his four sisters: Victoria "Bessie" Fitz-Gerald,
Angela Darville, Edith "Alma" and Cynthia Cartwright; one
brother: St. Clair "Nat" Cartwright; four brothers-in-law:
Robert "Bobby" Fitz-Gerald, Oswald and Michael Cartwright
and William Darville; one sister-in-law: Susan Cartwright;
seven uncles; Jimmy, Sidney, McKinley, Frank and Randolph
Wells, Winston Cartwright and Pastor Allan Lee; ten aunts
Olga Burrows, Elthy, Ermie and Violet Cartwright, Hazel, Essie,
Cheryl and Barbara Wells, Nancy Lee and Edna Fox; numerous
nieces and nephews; grand-niece and four grand-nephews,
other family and friends including Pamela Moree (Mother of
his children), Jerome and Janette Cartwright, Tamika and Tamara
Cartwright, Archie and Pamela Moree Sr., Jeanne Miller and
family, Bonita "Bonnie" Moree, Madlyn Moree and family,
Mary Sands and family, Burton Cartwright and family, Anthony
Moree and family, Lawrence Thompson, Chrissie and family,
Annie Sands and family, Vernon Cartwright and family, Lex
Cartwright and family, Benji Cartwright and family, Flora Rolle
and family, Linda and family, Marjorie, Nelson, Gwennie, Greg
and Jackie, Celie and family, numerous cousins and friends
including the staff at Pinder's Customs Brokerage, members of
the Vikings Lodge 351, Pat Knowles, Ronnie Burrows, Brian
Burrows, Steve Burrows, Adrian Burrows and Bobby Farrington.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to account number
6253 at Scotia Bank Thompson Blvd for the children.

Friends may pay their last respects at Butlers’ Funeral
Homes and Crematorium On Tuesday May 26, 2009 from
10:00a.m. until 5:00pm and on Wednesday from 10:00
a.m. until 2:00pm and from 3:00pm until service time at
the church.






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ing outrage at these facts, he
believes they ought to direct
their attention to what he
claims is a major cause of “dan-
gerous” people getting bail:
The fact that cases are being
tried by the courts “out of
turn”, with newer and appar-
ently less serious matters going
to trial before individuals who
have charges dating back sev-
eral years for crimes like mur-
der are given a chance to have
their matters determined.

Seeking to illustrate his
point, the Bar Association
President said he finds it “mind
blowing” that the extortion
case involving former senator
Pleasant Bridgwater was set
forth for a Supreme Court trial
in September this year,
although it is less than a year
old.

“It’s astounding. She was
committed for trial and her
case was scheduled to begin
within six months — that tells
me you could do that for every
case,” said the lawyer.

Suggesting that certain mat-
ters do not get this treatment
because the Attorney Gener-
al’s office knows that they are
“wholly hopeless and going to
fail” — that is, weak eviden-
tially and unlikely to result in a
guilty verdict — Mr Munroe
proposed that the practice must
end in the best interests of soci-
ety at large.

“It boggles my mind that no
one is paying attention to what
is being tried. Wouldn’t it
make commonsense that, if you
rate me a dangerous man and I
get bail because you haven’t
tried me in four years, then you
should try to very quickly
thereafter make sure I go to
trial because I am a dangerous
man on the street? It should
but it doesn’t happen.

“Questions need to be
directed towards the law
enforcement community, the
prosecutorial community: Why
aren’t you rating these people
(those charged with murder, or
who may have multiple charges
against them dating back for
several years) and trying them
first?”

Having spent many years
practising criminal law, the Bar
Association president alleged
that he and others in the legal
community suspect that —
frustrated by the fact that cer-
tain individuals are granted
bail and put back into the com-
munity — police have been
known to go on to charge such

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people with an offence for
which they have “in some cases
absolutely no evidence” to
indicate that person commit-
ted, simply to get them off the
streets and remanded into jail
again.

But Mr Munroe charged that
the police, with the Attorney
General’s office, share some of
the responsibility for reducing
the likelihood of a person who
has committed a deadly crime
being released on bail in the
first place.

They should provide the
Attorney General’s office with
a ranking of alleged criminals
according to the level of risk
they are believed to present to
society when they forward their
files to the Attorney General’s
office which would help prose-
cutors determine how they
should be dealt with, the attor-
ney suggested.

“If (the police) say this is the
number one man then the
AG’s office should know to try
him first so he doesn’t get bail.
And the number two man —
his case should be second off
the blocks,” he said.

The lawyer said the fact that
cases are not properly priori-
tised contributes to further
criminality as accused crimi-
nals go on to get bail and the
opportunity to commit other
offences and persons accused
of crimes which they did not
commit can be persuaded to
turn to a life of crime after they
“lose everything” as a result of
being left to languish in prison
on remand for up to “three or
four years.”

“We destroy people’s live,
we reduce them to nothing,
they’re often marginal to begin
with...and then we’re surprised
that we have an increase in
crime, I’m not!” said Mr
Munroe.

On Friday Attorney General
Michael Barnett said that his
office “aims to have all cases
heard as quickly as possible,”
including “not only the cases
that make up the backlog, but
current cases as well.”

“One has to try to have all
cases heard before the courts
as quickly as possible having
regard to the constitutional
obligation for a trial within a
reasonable time within the
ambits of the number of courts
you have operating,” he said.

In response to Mr Munroe’s
suggestion that accused indi-
viduals should be ranked and
tried in order of their “danger-
ousness”, also taking into con-
sideration the number of years
they have gone without a tri-
al, Mr Barnett said his office
does not make its decisions in
such a “clinical” fashion and
must allow for “other factors”
to come into play.

Numerous messages left for
the police seeking comment
yesterday were not returned up
to press time.

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i IT TAKES an innovative
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? serious buyers, it must also
? be priced fairly. What else
? must be done to successfully
} sell your home?

? Buyers are in search of
? their dream home. If priced
? reasonably, they will pur-
: chase the home that best
i reflects their idea of that
? dream, and it’s the sellers
: who are in charge of making
: it happen.

? Experience has shown that
? buyers often reduce their
: offers by as much as $2 for
? every $1 in uncompleted
? repairs. Sellers won’t have to
i face those disappointing
i offers if attention is given to
? their home before it is ever
? shown.

i The best method for
? improving buyer appeal is a
? “walk-through” by the sell-
? er’s BREA agent. The agent
} plays the part of a prospective



buyer, and then suggests
upgrades, repairs, and cos-
metic improvements.

Then the sellers should
complete all the work before
the home is placed on the
market.

Neither a prospective buy-
er, nor another agent, should
ever see the home until it is in
100 per cent marketable con-
dition.

Excuses made at a show-
ing are an open invitation to a
reduced price. When a buyer
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ask your agent for advice, and
then take action. Buyers will
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PAGE 12, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

















































BAHAMAS REAL ESTATE ASSOCIATION
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© European soccer



Simon Dawson/AP Photo

NEWCASTLE UNITED fans react after their team was relegated from the English Premier League after los-
ing to Aston Villa in their soccer match at Villa Park stadium, Birmingham, England, Sunday, May 24, 2009.

Newcastle relegated from Premiership

m@ LONDON

One-time Newcastle great Alan
Shearer failed to keep the club
in the Premier League after it lost
1-0 to Aston Villa on Sunday and
was relegated along with West
Bromwich Albion and Middles-
brough, according to Associated
Press.

On a tense final day of the
league campaign, Sunderland and
Hull managed to stay up despite
losing. Hull lost 1-0 at home to
newly crowned champion Man-
chester United, which rested most
of its stars ahead of Wednesday’s
Champions League final against
Barcelona, and Sunderland tum-
bled 3-2 at home to third-place
Chelsea. Middlesbrough needed a
big victory at West Ham to stand

any chance of survival, but lost
2-1 and finished tied on points
with West Brom, which already
was assured of being relegated
despite a 0-0 draw at Blackburn.

West Brom and Middlesbrough
finished with 32 points, Newcastle
had 34, Hull 35 and Sunderland
36. Newcastle has not won the
league since 1927, but began the
season with high hopes under
Kevin Keegan. He quit after dis-
putes with the owner, and Shear-
er, a local-born former England
captain who scored a Premier
League record 260 goals, took
over for the last eight games, win-
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in the season. We went down
because we weren’t good enough
over 38 games,” said Shearer,

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who scored 206 league and cup
goals for Newcastle. “Big changes
have to be made at the football
club.”

In Sunday’s other games, Arse-
nal outplayed Stoke 4-1, Liver-
pool beat Tottenham 3-1, Everton
won 2-0 at Fulham, Manchester
City edged Bolton 1-0, and Wigan
beat Portsmouth 1-0.



@ MILAN — Francesco Totti’s
late free kick ruined Paolo Mal-
dini’s last home match for AC
Milan, lifting AS Roma to a 3-2
victory at San Siro.

Now 40, Maldini has been play-
ing for Milan in the top flight of
Italian soccer since he was 16. He
has won seven Italian league titles
and five European Cups with the
club. He will make his farewell
when Milan goes to Fiorentina in
the last round of games next
weekend. The loss left Milan in
second 10 points behind Inter
Milan, which has already been
crowned champion for the fourth
season in a row.



HB GLASGOW, Scotland —
Rangers won the Scottish league
title with a 3-0 victory at Dundee
United, preventing Celtic from
winning its fourth straight title.
Goals by Kyle Lafferty, Pedro
Mendes and Kris Boyd in the first
52 minutes gave Walter Smith’s
team its first league title since
2005 with 86 points. It now hopes
to complete the double by beating
Falkirk in the Scottish Cup on
May 30. Celtic, which was held
to a 0-0 draw at home by third-
place Hearts, finished four points
behind.

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009, PAGE 13



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

0 In brief | =

David Beckham was among
24 players picked Sunday for
England’s roster for World Cup
qualifiers next month and Gary
Neville received a surprise
recall for the games against
Kazakhstan and Andorra,
according to the Associated
Press. Beckham, on loan to AC
Milan from Major League Soc-
cer’s Los Angeles Galaxy, has
17 goals in 110 international
appearances. The 34-year-old
midfielder hopes to play at next
year’s World Cup, where he
could break goalkeeper Peter
Shilton’s record of 125 games
for England. Neville, a 34-year-
old veteran of 86 appearances
starting in 1995, has not played
for England since a 1-0 loss to
Spain in February 2007. Anoth-
er surprise callup was West
Bromwich Albion goalkeeper
Scott Carson. Jermain Defoe
and Theo Walcott return from
injuries and may get a start
alongside Wayne Rooney in
attack. England is 5-0 in qualify-
ing and leads Group Six. Kaza-
khstan is 1-4 and Andorra is 0-5.

The roster:

Goalkeepers: Scott Carson (West
Bromwich Albion), Robert Green
(West Ham), Paul Robinson (Black-
burn).

Defenders: Wayne Bridge (Man-
chester City), Ashley Cole
(Chelsea), Rio Ferdinand (Man-
chester United), Glen Johnson
(Portsmouth), Joleon Lescott
(Everton), Gary Neville (Manchester
United), John Terry (Chelsea),
Matthew Upson (West Ham).

Midfielders: Gareth Barry (Aston
Villa), David Beckham (AC Milan,
Italy), Michael Carrick (Manchester
United), Steven Gerrard (Liver-
pool), Frank Lampard (Chelsea),
Theo Walcott (Arsenal), Shaun
Wright-Phillips (Manchester City),
Ashley Young (Aston Villa).

Strikers: Carlton Cole (West
Ham), Peter Crouch (Portsmouth),
Jermain Defoe (Tottenham), Emile
Heskey (Aston Villa), Wayne
Rooney (Manchester United).

Hewitt, Murray
and Ivanovic win

@ PARIS — Lleyton Hewitt
lunged and whiffed at some
serves, his racket hitting only air.
He simply stood and watched oth-
er balls whirr past.

But in the end it was the two-
time major champion who pre-
vailed, overcoming 55 aces as he
beat Ivo Karlovic 6-7 (1), 6-7 (4),
7-6 (4), 6-4, 6-3. Also at the
French Open there were straight-
set wins for defending champion
Ana Ivanovic, Andy Murray and
Marat Safin — who is appearing
in his final French Open, but
please be sure not to ask him
about that — and straight-set
exits for 2004 champion Gaston
Gaudio and two-time major win-
ner Amelie Mauresmo.

=~



HEINEKEN CUP

Leinster celebrate euro glory



Gareth Copley/AP Photo/PA

LEINSTER PLAYERS celebrate as they lift the trophy after beating Leicester to win the Heineken European Cup
Final rugby union match at Murrayfield, Edinburgh, Saturday May 23, 2009.

Gareth Copley/AP Photo/PA

LEINSTER'S ISA NACEWA celebrates with the trophy after beating Leices-
ter to win the Heineken European Cup Final rugby union match at Mur-
rayfield, Edinburgh, Saturday May 23, 2009.



LEINSTER’ § Brian O'Driscoll, right, is tackled by Leicester's Martin Cas-
trogiovanni during the Heineken European Cup Final rugby union at Mur-
rayfield, Edinburgh, Saturday May 23, 2009.

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Leinster staged a thrilling
fightback to win the Heineken
Cup for the first time with a 19-
16 victory over Leicester.

In Saturday’s final, the rook-
ie finalists had the better of a
superb game at Murrayfield but
were forced to stage a superb
fightback after falling 16-9
behind shortly after half-time.

Ben Woods’ try had given
two-time champions Leicester
an interval lead, but Jamie
Heaslip's superb score helped
level matters before the excel-
lent Johnny Sexton sealed vic-
tory with a long-range penalty.

Sexton also dropped a mon-
ster drop-goal, Brian O'Driscoll
dropped a goal as well, while
Julien Dupuy kicked the Tigers’
other points.

Afterwards, captain Leo
Cullen and head coach Michael
Cheika both said belief was the
key to the Irish province's vic-
tory. "I suppose just hanging in
there, showing a bit of belief,”
said flanker Cullen, when asked
what won the game for his side.

"The period when we were
down to 14 men was pretty cost-
ly. They came at us pretty
strongly. We went seven points
down and just to hang in there
was pretty vital.”









LEINSTER'S Brian
O'Driscoll, right, is
tackled by Leices-
ter's Dan Hipkiss
during the Heineken
European Cup Final
rugby union match
at Murrayfield, Edin-
burgh.

(AP Photo/PA,
Anna Gowthorpe)

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PAGE 14, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



RUGBY: SG PRIVATE BANK INVITATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP





BUCCANEERS’
{ Jonathan
Sands holds
on to the ball.

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender

Wilson City Road Grading & Transmission
Circuit Easement Clearing
Wilson City, Abaco, The Bahamas

The Bahamas Electricity Corporatian
invites tenders for the above named services.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Comporation’s Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158




Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices - Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery ta BEC: on of before
ind June 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m,

Submissions should be marked as follows:
Tender No. 705/09
WILSON CITY ROAD GRADING AWD
TRANSMISSION CIRCUIT EASEMENT CLEARING
WILSON CITY, ABACO, THE BAHAMAS
























The Carperation reserves the right ta
accept or reject any or all proposals.

For all enquiries regarding the tenders and site visits, contact

Mr. Clark Allen at telephone 302-1212.










v ,

BUCCANEERS’ Roy Sims
liou’s Tim Thompson.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

on tries to breake away fro

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
renaldodorsett@yahoo.com

, joy for

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

a

© Caribbean soccer






m the defence of Bail-

ning the whole thing.”

youth into the game.”

event in the region.

FROM page 15

out the Bahamas Rugby Football Union’s calendar.

Baillou dominated the final, scored the opening try of
the match and never trailed in the contest.

Baillou left winger Andrew Bodie, said his team
over the course of the season had become accustomed
to the 7s game and focused on a concentrated effort on
the defensive end of the pitch.

“We worked hard at 7s, even though we were playing
15s all season we were sticking with the training for 7s
and playing in tournaments so were pretty sharp com-
ing in here and were just able to put it all together and
make it all the way through to win the Cup,” he said,
“Our defence was key. We knew once we played con-
tinuous defence the entire day and especially in the
final we had a good chance of coming out here and win-

Productive

Bodie said for his club to close out the schedule with
a tournament victory and becoming the first Bahamian
team to win the event should set the tone for their off-
season training regimen and a productive season next
year. “It feels great to come out here and to get this
done. Whenever you have a chance to win against
players from all around the world in front of the home
crowd, its great,” he said, “Next year our main goal is
recapturing the Bahamas Cup and really make an
impact on the regional and international scene,” he
said, “We also want to keep working with the devel-
opment programme bringing more and more of the

On their trek towards the Cup Final, Baillou record-
ed wins over the Texas Pirates (12-5), Coconauts (34-
0), and suffered a loss to the Buccaneers (12-4) in Pool
A. In Pool B Cuckoos reached the Final with wins
over New Tredegar (37-7), Renegades (36-5), and
defending champions, Daytona Beach (12-0).

BRFU Treasurer, Shane Garner, said with the
advancements the tournament has made in such a short
timespan, it is well on its way to becoming a marquee

“Tt does so much for sports tourism because there are
so many teams that are willing to come down here and
compete. The Bahamas is a great venue for rugby and
by hosting a successful tournament like this year after
year, it generates more interest with other clubs when
these players go back home and talk about their good
experiences they have had here.”





























































Stewart's late goal gives Jamaica tie with Haiti

m@ FORT LAUDERDALE,
Florida

Damion Stewart scored in
the 88th minute to lift Jamaica
to a 2-2 tie against Haiti Sat-
urday night in an internation-

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SHIFT ihe way ani meres summa

al match between eliminated
World Cup qualifiers.

Jason Morrison’s long free
kick from the right wing found
a charging Stewart near the
left post, where he headed in a
shot past Haiti goalkeeper
Peterson Occenat.

Haiti took a 2-1 lead Jean
Robens Jerome’s second goal
of the match in the 65th
minute.

Jerome, who entered the
match early in the first half
received Raymond Ednerson-
’s from the left wing and beat
Jamaica goalkeeper Shawn
Sawyers with a shot inside the
6-yard box.

Jamaica played the entire
second half a player down



after defender Claude Davis’
second yellow card for a hard
foul on Haiti midfielder
Vaniel Sirin in the 44th
minute.

Ejection

Davis and Sirin fell to the
ground on a hard collision,
which eventually resulted in
Davis’ ejection.

Ednerson and Jerome also
combined on Haiti’s first goal,
which tied the match 1-1 the
39th minute.

Jerome, who replaced Fab-
rice Noel in the 24th minute,
received Ednerson’s pass from
the left wing area and beat

Sawyers with a shot, which
landed inside the left post.

Nicholas Addlery put
Jamaica ahead 1-0 with a goal
in the 28th minute.

Occenat made a leg save off
Addlery’s uncontested shot
deep in the goal area.

Occenat could not retrieve
the deflection as Addlery beat
him to the ball and converted
on a shot inside the 6-yard
box.

Both teams were eliminated
from CONCACAF World
Cup regional qualifiers earlier
this year and used Saturday’s
match as preparation for the
Gold Cup which begins in
July.

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THE TRIBUNE

S
b

MONDAY, MAY 25,



Bahamas
stage another
come from
hehind victory

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Writer
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

For the second time in as
many wins for team Bahamas,
they overcame an early deficit
for a come from behind vic-
tory, and earned a berth to the
third round of the NORECA
D tournament.

The Bahamas defeated
Jamaica in the tournament
semifinals a four set win, 19-
25, 25-18, 25-22, and 25-22.

With the win, the Bahamas
secured a qualification into
the third round of the 2010
FIVB Men’s World Champi-
onship along with Mexico.

The Bahamas squared off
against Mexico last night in
the tournament final, howev-
er results were unavailable
to press time.

The match against
Jamaica, as in the opening
round against St. Lucia,
began with the Bahamas
trailing early on after the
first set, however, the come-
back effort came one set
sooner in the semifinals.

Rebounded

The Bahamas rebounded
to take the ensuing set by
their largest margin of victo-
ry of the match, by seven
points.

Shedrick Forbes led the
Bahamas’ balanced scoring
attack which placed three
players in double figures.

Forbes led the scoring with
15 points, while Byron Fer-
guson and Renaldo Knowles
added 12 and 11 respective-
ly. Danny Wilson led
Jamaica with 19 points and
Dellan Brown scored 13.

Mexico advanced to the
final by defeating Haiti in
straight sets. The Pool D
tournament winners will
advance to the NORECA
Pool G, July 6-11, in Puerto
Rico, while the losers will be
relegated to Pool H in Cuba,
August 12-17.





PAGE 15

r



ts

2009























































Bahamian team captures
championship for first time
with 29-12 win over Cuckoos

Tournament becoming
one of the biggest in the
region, say organisers

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Writer

cee eee ON THE CHARGE: Baillou's Tim Thompson fends off a challenge.

n what organisers
called an event well on
its way to becoming
one of the biggest Rug-
by tournaments in the region,
a Bahamian team captured the
Cup Final for the first time.

Baillou RC captured the SG
Private Bank Invitational
Championship with a 29-12 win
over local rivals Cuckoos RFC
Saturday at the Winton Rugby
Pitch.

In a rematch of April’s
Bahamas Cup Final, Baillou
was able to turn the tables and
avenge a 32-20 to officially close

SEE page 14



THE BAHAMAS’ female team took to
the field and won their first game.

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PAGE 16, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

31 UEANDWHITEBALL cr

PHI BETA SIGMA FRATERNITY Inc hosted the second
annual Blue and White Ball on Saturday at the Wyndham
Nassau Resort in Cable Beach. Three young men were
awarded scholarships for academic excellence and civic
involvement at the event.








QUINCY ARTHUR receives his second place
scholarship award.






PHI BETA SIGMA FRATERNITY INC. president Demario Minus presents Jamal Mesidor with
the first place scholarship award.



DENNIS SMITH receives his third place
scholarship award.



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THE TRIBUNE
D yu

ine



MONDAY,



MAY 2.5.

y S

2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Employees ‘cannot have
their cake and eat it too’ 10% decline

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

mployees “cannot have

their cake and eat it too”

by seeking termination

compensation via both

statute and common law,

the Court of Appeal has ruled, urging

that the “doctrine of election” be used to

prevent the Employment Act’s inten-

tions being “lost in the mush of litiga-
tion”.

Appeal Justice Hartman Longley, rul-

ing on an appeal brought by a former

wholesale sales manager, found that ter-



Colinalmperial.

Confidence For Life



* Court rules that Bahamian workers cannot seek both
Employment Act and common law compensation for termination

* Justices urge that ‘doctrine of election’ be used to stop
Employment Act intentions being ‘lost in the mush of litigation’

minated Bahamian workers should
either accept the statutory compensa-
tion offered to them by their former
employer under the Employment Act, or
refuse to accept this and initiate a com-
mon law action seeking greater/better
benefits. They could not seek both.

Gail Smith had appealed a Supreme
Court ruling over an action she initiated
against her former employer, Snack
Food Wholesale, for alleged breach of an
employment contract.

Reciting the facts, the Court of Appeal
found she was terminated by the com-

pany with effect from May 12, 2003, via
a letter she received dated May 10, 2003.
As a 22-year employee, who was a sales
manager/supervisor and earning $750
per week, Ms Smith received four weeks’

SEE page 8B



Some consultants
‘fleecing Bahamas’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SOME foreign consultancy
firms hired by the Government
are “simply fleecing the
Bahamas”, a senior accountant
has charged, urging the admin-
istration to look to locally-based
firms first in a bid to build
“Bahamian indigenous talent”.

Raymond Winder, managing
partner at Deloitte & Touche
(Bahamas), said assessing the
large number of consultants it
employs should be one of the
things the Government looks at
as it puts the finishing touches
to the 2009-2010 Budget, as he
praised the administration’s
reported attempts to cut recur-
rent spending by between 7-10
per cent across the board.

“The Government needs to

* Government urged
to outsource,
consolidate regulators
to cut costs in
upcoming Budget
* All Bahamians
responsible for
size of government
make assessments of the vari-
ous consultants it uses,” Mr
Winder told Tribune Business.
“The Government uses a num-
ber of consultants from outside
the country. I think a number of
the foreign consultants are sim-
ply fleecing the Bahamas.

“The major accounting firms
here represent major consult-

SEE page 6B

Casino’s losses continue
amid operator search

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

ISLE OF Capri’s Grand Bahama-based casino continues to
operate at a loss, the Minister of Tourism has told Tribune Business,
while potential new operators continue talks on taking it over
with the Government and Our Lucaya’s owners.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace said potential replacement ten-
ants for Our Lucaya’s casino have recently taken a look at the prop-
erty. He added that there have been several tri-party talks between
owners Hutchison Whampoa, the casino operator candidates and
the Government, with Isle of Capri having agreed to remain as
operator beyond its initial end-May departure date until a replace-

ment is found.

“Progress is being made. We have expressions of interest, and
people have gone and a taken a look at the property. Those con-
versations are continuing,” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said.

These continuing talks have left the Government hopeful that
Grand Bahama’s only operating casino will continue to run in this
depressed economy, though it may be without the Isle of Capri

brand in the future.

“They are continuing to lose money; no question about that,” said

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace.

“T suspect they would wish to

M

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EU still yet to accept Bahamas services offer

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE European Union (EU)
has yet to accept the Bahamas’
services offer over the Eco-
nomic Partnership Agreement
(EPA), the Trade Commission’s
chairman has confirmed, adding
that most Bahamian profes-
sional services organisations are
“a far cry from where they need
to be” to maximise the agree-
ment for their members’ bene-
fit.

John Delaney told Tribune
Business he was “quite confi-
dent” that the EU would ulti-
mately accept the Bahamas’ ser-
vices offer, as it wanted this
nation to be “fully vested and
obligated under the EPA”, thus
ensuring European firms and
service providers could have
access to the third-largest mar-
ket in CARICOM.

Earlier, addressing a
Bahamas Society of Engineers
meeting, Mr Delaney had con-
firmed that the Bahamas’ ser-
vices offer was still “not set-
tled”, with negotiations still tak-
ing place between this nation
and the EU.

“The Bahamas position for
services generally was very con-
sistent in Modes three and four
in the offer put to the EU,” Mr
Delaney said. “As far as ’m

Professional organisations ‘far cry from where they
need to be’ on trade negotiating capacity

er 9
=

aCe MBIe CU



aware, the offer has not yet
been accepted. The Bahamas
complied with the timelines [to
get the offer in], so we’re well
within the arrangement.

“The goods side [of the EPA]
is in force. As to the services
side, that is still not a settled
matter. The Bahamas position
has been that all areas in the
National Investment Policy
reserved exclusively for
Bahamians, we want to pre-
serve.”

Tribune Business previously
revealed that the Bahamas’ ini-

tial services offer had been
rejected by the EU because it
failed to meet the minimum lib-
eralization thresholds set by
both it and CARIFORUM, the
body that negotiated the EPA
on this nation’s behalf.

The Europeans had wanted
the Bahamas to show more
commitment to liberalization in
certain areas such as retail and
construction services, and were
also unhappy that much of the
Bahamas’ investment-related
rules were set in policy, not
statute, thus generating consid-
erable uncertainty.

Mr Delaney said he did not
know the specifics of the talks
between the Bahamas and the
EU, telling Tribune Business
that the services offer was “in
active play, negotiations”.

He added: “As a general
statement, I think the EU, from
the very beginning, preferred
to be dealing with any protec-
tionist regime in statute, as
opposed to policy, because of
the very imprecise nature of
policy as opposed to something
that is in statute”.

Two Ministry of Finance offi-

SEE page 4B

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RoyalStar
budgets for

in premium

* But insurer says not all bad,
as risk exposure down too

* Economy taking toll on top-line,
with cat coverage dropped and
switch from comperhensive to
third party motor insurance

* Property catastrophe premiums
up 3-5% due to reinsurer woes

* Carrier delivers 15% return on
shareholder equity in 2008

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ROYALStar Assurance, the
Bahamian general insurer, has
budgeted for a 10 per cent year-
over-year drop in gross written
premiums for 2009, its manag-
ing director telling Tribune
Business it has been reducing
property catastrophe exposure
because prices do not cover risk.

Steve Watson said the eco-
nomic downturn meant that
RoyalStar had seen “quite a

SEE page 2B

Colinalmperial.



PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



hoyalSiar budgets for decline in premium

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FROM page 1B

few” policyholders cancelling
or reducing insurance coverage
because they were unable to
afford the premiums, hence the
budgeted decline in top line
growth.

“It’s been an ongoing trend
on the property side,” Mr Wat-
son told Tribune Business. Pol-
icyholders who did not have a
mortgage on their properties,
he explained, were cancelling
catastrophe coverage and just
taking out fire protection,
reducing their premium pay-
ments to 25 per cent or one-
quarter of their previous value.

“The most obvious indicator
of the state of the economy is
the number of people switch-
ing from comprehensive to third
party motor insurance,” Mr
Watson added. “That’s hap-
pened a lot in the first five
months of the year. I’d say that
about five years ago, it was
50/50 between comprehensive
and third party, but now it’s
65/35 in favour of third party.”

He suggested this trend was
being exacerbated by the
increasing tendency of Bahami-
an consumers, hit hard by the
recession, to waive new car pur-
chases in favour of older, used
cars that were cheaper.

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With fewer Bahamians buy-
ing new cars, as evidenced by
the almost 50 per cent drop in
new car sales during the 2009
first quarter, consumers were
“less likely to insure compre-
hensively”, something that will
impact Bahamian insurance car-
riers in terms of reduced pre-
mium income.

“The average value of a car
on the road now is lower than it
was five years ago, and the aver-
age age of a car on the road
now is much higher than it was
five years ago,” Mr Watson
said. “That translates into more
third party and less compre-
hensive cover.”

As a result of these trends,
RoyalStar had “budgeted a 10
per cent reduction” in gross
written premium year-over-
year, which would, if it tran-
spired reduce this figure by
$7.357 million to around $66
million, based on 2008 figures.

Mr Watson added that Roy-
alStar “might see a bit more
because of the way Cayman is
going, because we’re letting
business go”. However, he
pointed out that the reduction
in top-line gross written premi-
um was not necessarily bad for
the general insurer, because it
meant less risk exposure, par-
ticularly in instances where pre-
mium prices did not equate to
the insured’s risk.

“It’s not necessarily a bad
thing for us. It’s possibly a good
thing,” Mr Watson said. He
added, though, that RoyalStar’s
claims costs were being impact-
ed by an increase in the number
of uninsured drivers on
Bahamian roads. This was
resulting in incidents where the
carrier was having to compen-
sate its comprehensively-
insured motor clients who, even
though it was not their fault,
were involved in accidents with
uninsured motorists.

But, on a brighter note, Roy-

alStar has seen no increase in
the number of fraudulent claims
submitted to it. “So far, sur-
prisingly not,” Mr Watson said,
when questioned by Tribune
Business. “No more than usual.

“Tt’s just part and parcel of
our business. So far, quite
frankly, we haven’t seen any
increase in the last six months
over the same period in the year
before.”

Writing

Writing in RoyalStar’s 2008
annual report, Mr Watson said
property catastrophe insurance
“continued to be unattractively
priced” last year, resulting in
the company’s decision not to
grow its book of business in that
line in the Bahamas. It reduced
its exposure in the Cayman
Islands and the Turks & Caicos,
resulting in the reduction in
gross written premium from
$80.156 million in 2007 to
$73.574 million last year.

“Whilst no one likes to see a
reduction in the top line of a
business, it makes little sense
to grow purely for the sake of
growth at the expense of prof-
itability,” Mr Watson told the
company’s shareholders and
policyholders.

The RoyalStar managing
director told Tribune Business
that property catastrophe trends
had continued into 2009,
explaining: “You'll see we write
less business in terms of expo-
sure to date than we did five
years ago.

“We can’t raise prices to the
level we need to for two rea-
sons. The competition, who do
not appear to perceive the risk
we do, and the economy can’t
handle higher prices, so our
choice is to reduce exposure.
It’s particularly bad in Cayman,
where rates are crazy — 30 per
cent lower than three years ago
— whereas here, they’ve come

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down 10-15 per cent over three
years.”

However, Mr Watson said
that on average property cata-
strophe premium prices in the
Bahamas had increased by 3-5
per cent for 2009. He explained
that this was largely due to
demands from reinsurers, who
were looking to replace capital
lost in stock market invest-
ments.

“That’s the feeling from the
market,” Mr Watson said of the
price increases. “I’ve talked to
other people, and everyone’s
said the same. Prices went up
because the reinsurers passed
them on to us, so in 2009 the
business is even more marginal
than it was in 2008.”

Bahamian insurers had
argued that their policyholders
should not be penalized for
reinsurers’ bad investment deci-
sions, but because they buy so
much reinsurance they had little
choice. Apart from the impact
of catastrophic events in 2008,
reinsurers themselves lost their
reinsurance capacity due to a
contraction in the hedge fund
community, further increasing
their replacement cost of capi-
tal.

"You've got a recipe for
increased prices,” Mr Watson
said. "Even if there is no big
event this year, you could see
prices increase next year for no
good reason."

Away from property cata-
strophe, Mr Watson said Roy-
alStar had seen growth in its
motor and non-catastrophe
property business, areas that
had boosted profitability and
altered its business mix. Net
written premium had increased
by 36 per cent between 2004-
2008, while catastrophe and
excess of loss reinsurance had
both declined.

For 2008, all RoyalStar’s
insurance lines proved prof-
itable, with the exception of its
marine category, which suffered
a large number of losses. While
marine was a relatively small
business line, Mr Watson told
Tribune Business: “It was bad in
September and October, when
two to three vessels were stolen
in a six-week period, Given the
small book, it had a dispropor-
tionate impact.

“We haven’t seen any thefts
since then, but we took imme-
diate corrective action. If your
boat was in the wrong category
as far as we were concerned,
your premium could have dou-
bled.” This category would
involve open boats, 25-40 feet in
length, with outboard Yamaha
engines.

“Tt’s a real, real problem, and
although we’ve not seen any-
thing since, I know four to five
vessels were stolen in the first
quarter of this year,” Mr Wat-
son said of marine insurance.

For 2008, RoyalStar generat-
ed $4.452 million in net income,
a 15 per cent return on share-
holder equity. The company
incurred claims losses from
Hurricanes Ike and Paloma that
totalled around $1 million net,
while the marine losses and a
claim from a major store fire in
Abaco, plus investment income
losses of $884,648, produced
combined losses of around $4
million.

While RoyalStar’s combined
operating ratio increased from
70 per cent to 77 per cent in
2008, Mr Watson described this
as “still a very strong number”.
He noted that since 2004, ordi-
nary shareholder equity at the
company had more than dou-
bled from $12.8 million to $25.8
million, even though dividends
totaling some $5.7 million had
been paid.

Combined with preference
shareholder investment, Roy-
alStar’s total equity stood at
$30.8 million, something Mr
Watson said left it well-posi-
tioned to cope with what was
expected to be a challenging
2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009, PAGE 3B



Insurance pessimistic To advertise in The Tribune, call 502-2371

on Act reform change

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas General
Insurance Association (BGIA)
is “actively considering our next
move” over the amendments to
the Domestic Insurance Act, its
chairman told Tribune Business,
but is pessimistic over the pos-
sibility the Government will
make changes after the legisla-
tion passed the second reading
in the House of Assembly.

“Right now, I don’t know if
there’s a whole lot that’s going
to be done at this stage,” Timo-
thy Ingraham said. “It could be
one of those objections we put
in the record and have to live
with for now. It’s a very narrow
thing that we disagreed with.
Hopefully, at some point, some-
one will look at it and say it
needs amending.”

The Bahamian insurance
industry, led by the BGIA, had
strongly opposed the Govern-
ment’s proposed amendments
to the Act, arguing that it had
overreacted to CLICO
(Bahamas) collapse by giving
sweeping, unchecked powers to
the regulators to appoint an
administrator for an insurance
firm without first obtaining a
court order.

In addition, the sector was
concerned that the amendments
also gave the administrator
wide-ranging powers to act as
he saw fit, again without first
getting permission from the
courts or Registrar of Insur-

“It could be one of those objections
we put in the record and have to live
with for now. It’s a very narrow thing

that we disagreed with. Hopefully, at
some point, someone will look at it
and say it needs amending.”

ance’s Office.

Mr Ingraham said the insur-
ance industry wanted to see “a
little more checks and bal-
ances”, adding: “We were con-
cerned that the administrator
could do whatever he wanted
without reference to the regu-
lator, the courts or anyone else.
The concern was that once
appointed, the amendments did
not require someone to report
back to the Registrar. It gave
the administrator, technically,
a free hand.”

When asked whether the
BGIA was likely to challenge
the amendments in the
Supreme Court, Mr Ingraham
said: “I’m not sure that'll
achieve anything at this
stage.....

“We’re very disappointed
with the outcome, but you play
the hand you’re dealt. We'll
continue the dialogue with the
Government, and when they’re
amending something else hope-
fully they’ll amend that before

— Timothy Ingrabam



someone has to deal with it.”

Meanwhile, Patrick Ward,
Bahamas First’s president, said
the BGIA was deciding “what
our best course of action is.
There is going to be a response
on our part.

“I do know there will be a
response, and if the industry
does not respond, we’ll respond
anyway.”

A copy of the Domestic
Insurance Act amendments that
have been tabled in Parliament,
and obtained by Tribune Busi-
ness, show that the Insurance
Commission (the successor to
the Registrar of Insurance)
“may appoint an administrator
who shall seize the management
and control of a company, or
any part of the insurance busi-
ness of the company”, in various
situations.

Among the seemingly sub-
jective situations for doing so
are if an asset on the insurance
company’s books, “in the opin-
ion of the Commission”, is “not

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satisfactorily accounted for;
“where, in the opinion of the
Commission”, the company’s
affairs are such that they could
prejudice policyholders, credi-
tors or asset owners; and
“where, in the opinion of the
Commission”, the insurance
carrier, intermediary or person
“is committing or about to com-
mit” an unsafe or unsound busi-
ness practice, or pursue such a
course.

Other reasons for the admin-
istrator’s appointment, such as
the company’s failure to meet
or pay its liabilities; the value
of its assets being less than its
liabilities or placing policyhold-
ers in jeopardy; a significant
erosion in the value of the com-
pany’s assets; and the conduct
of business in a manner that is
detrimental to policyholders,
seem more valid.

But again, if “in the opinion
of the Commission” a company
is likely to be unable to meet
its liabilities, an administrator
can be summoned.

Once appointed, the admin-
istrator has, under the current
proposed reforms, “the exclu-
sive powers to manage and con-
trol the company’s affairs”. He
can discontinue its operations,
stop or limit payment of its
obligations, and re-organise the
company. In doing the latter,
the administrator can appoint
new officers and directors, and
also consummate the sale or
merger of the insurance com-
pany to others if he so chooses.



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PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS, in 1959, the Bahamas Real Estate Association, an umbrella or-
ganization which draws membership from amongst the ranks of persons en-
gaged in real estate transactions, such as real estate brokers and salespersons,

was founded;

AND WHEREAS, in 1995 Parliament enacted the Real Estate (Brokers and
Salesmen) Act, thereby vesting The Bahamas Real Estate Association, a body
corporate, with the authority to register, license, regulate and control real es-
tate brokers and salespersons in The Bahamas;

AND WHEREAS, investment in real estate is considered by far the largest
single investment that an individual is likely to make in his or her lifetime;

AND WHEREAS, the Bahamas Real Estate Association has been highly
successful in its efforts to ensure that only competent, certified and licensed
agents engage in real estate transactions in The Bahamas, thereby protecting
the Bahamian consumers from entering into land transaction with unquali-
fied, and often times, unscrupulous individuals;

AND WHEREAS, over the fifty years of its existence, the Bahamas Real
Estate Association has experienced a substantial growth in its membership,
to the extent that the organization boasts of a current membership in excess
of 600 qualified and licensed brokers and salespersons;

AND WHEREAS, during the month of May 2009, the Bahamas Real Estate
Association will mark the 50th anniversary of its existences with an elabo-
rate schedule of activities and events, inclusive of a Gala Evening, which is
scheduled to be held on Friday, 29th May, 2009 at the Atlantis Resort and

Casino on Paradise Island;

NOW THEREFORE, | Hubert A Ingraham, Prime Minister of the Common-
wealth of The Bahamas, do hereby proclaim the week beginning Sunday,
24th May and ending Friday 29th May, 2009 as “Real Estate Week.”



IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have
hereto set my Hand and Seal
this 21st day of January 2009.

Hubert A. Ingraham —

PRIME MINISTER

Maurice O. Glinton, Freeport based Counsel and Attorney, will provide an interesting perspective on the Judiciary. Mr. Glinton

is a civil lawyer, practicing primarily in the areas of Constitutional and Administrative law, and Corporate law. He has appeared in
all of the Courts for The Bahamas including the Privy Council, since being admitted to The Bahamas Bar in December 1980. He
is a past Vice-President of The Bahamas Bar Association.

Wednesday, May 27, 6:30pm. The Nassau Yacht Club on East Bay Street.



Admission is free. Donations
accepted. Register at
www.nassauinstitute.org or
leave a message at 328-6529



PAGE 4B, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SS
EU still yet to accept

Bahamas services offer

JOB OPPORTUNITY

Graphic Designer to work in fast paced organisa-
tion.

Core responsibilities and requirements:

¢ To produce graphic design solutions for a range of
promotion and information needs.

¢ Candidates must be well versed in design concepts
and proficient in design software, including
Illustrator, Dreamweaver, QuarkXpress, Freehand,
Photoshop and others.

¢ Candidates must be proficient with both Macintosh
and Windows based computer applications and hard-
ware, including design and layout of print material.

A Bachelor’s degree in graphic design or related
field is preferred.

DA#61034
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas



FROM page 1B

cials, Simon Wilson, the director
of economic planning, and
Brickell Pinder, flew to Brus-
sels to meet with EU counter-
parts prior to the April 15, 2009,
deadline for the Bahamas’ EU
services offer to be agreed.
What was accomplished at
the meeting is uncertain, with
Tribune Business sources telling
this newspaper that the CARI-
COM Regional Negotiating
Machinery (CRNM) had yet to
see this nation’s revised services
offer. The Bahamas’ offer not
only has to be agreed by the
EU, but CARIFORUM as well,
as its members will also be our
trading partners with exactly
the same benefits and prefer-
ences as the Europeans.
Meanwhile, Mr Delaney said
it was critical for Bahamian pro-
fessional organisations to build
capacity, and not merely in

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terms of advising the Govern-
ment on the EPA and other
trade agreements but also when
it came to negotiating market
access for their members with
their EU counterparts.

“Organisational capacity
across the board is significant,
because even the work of the
Government requires the input
of the representative bodies
and, frankly speaking, save for
the tourism industry and finan-
cial services sector, organiza-
tional capacity is a far cry from
where it needs to be,” Mr
Delaney told Tribune Business.

This is particularly critical for
when it comes to organisations,
which are representing Bahami-
an services professionals, nego-
tiating Mutual Recognition
Agreements (MRAs) with their
EU counterparts. Unless the
Bahamian organisation’s stan-
dards and qualifications are
recognised by their EU coun-
terparts, their members will be
unable to access European mar-
Kets.

With MRA negotiations
involving Bahamian profes-
sionals in the areas of tourism,
architecture and engineering

scheduled to begin by 2010, Mr
Delaney added: “I would say
that any representative body in
the Bahamas needs to have, as a
matter of priority, a focus on
developing their internal capac-
ity.

“That focus should be there
with a view to getting its mem-
bers to provide greater
resources for that purpose, as
well as seeking to access public
funding for that purpose, oth-
erwise they might find they’re
not best serving their members’
interests.”

When it came to standards
and qualifications, Mr Delaney
said many Bahamian services
professionals had trained
abroad, and were thus certified
by bodies likely recognised by
the EU.

“The question is whether
they would be considered as
having maintained their certifi-
cation if we don’t have a local
organisation that oversees those
standards,” Mr Delaney said.

“There is no gainsaying the
fact that we must have our local
certification that is recognised
internationally.”

For both the EPA and trade

NOTICE

NOTICE
AUGUSTA STREET is

is hereby given that ELIE ETIENNE of
applying to

the Minister

responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/

naturalization should not be granted,

should send

a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 23' day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, ELAINE PRATT of the
Southern District of the Island of New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, intends
to change my name to LATONYA ELAINE PRATT. If there
are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.



agreements in general, Mr
Delaney said the main issue for
the Bahamas were the modes
three and four methods of sup-
ply, commercial presence and
the movement of foreign work-
ers into the country. In the
EPA, the mode three commer-
cial presence of EU firms was
the major negotiating point.

“The Bahamas would wish to
protect for its citizens those
areas in which its citizens have
been able to establish a foothold
without the influx of competi-
tion they would not be able to
handle at this point,” Mr
Delaney said, “while allowing
an adequate degree of compe-
tition to allow the Bahamas to
grow and enable Bahamian
businesses to mature at a high-
er level, because of what com-
petition might yield — joint ven-
tures, the transfer of skills and
capital.

“How do we get that right?
It’s difficult. It’s a question of
judgment.”

Apart from preserving the
existing trade benefits, in terms
of duty-free market access, for
existing Bahamian exporters to
the EU, such as the fisheries
industry and Polymers Interna-
tional, Mr Delaney said the
Government was also motivat-
ed to sign the EPA to preserve
this nation’s attractiveness as a
foreign direct investment recip-
ient.

The Bahamas, in “looking to
the future, to things not present-
ly exported”, and “to be an
attractive place” to Bahamian
companies, joint ventures and
foreign firms, with access to the
major markets such as the EU,
needed to sign the EPA.

Otherwise, said Mr Delaney:
“The Bahamas would not have
the certainty that someone
operating from this platform
would want. The Bahamas may
not be as attractive as a place to
do certain things as other places
in the Caribbean, whom we
compete with, quite frankly, for
investment.

“If the Bahamas were to be
competitive in attracting invest-
ment in the future, we need to
secure the pipeline, the access,
in no less favourable terms than
other countries.”

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Minimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents only,

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+ Junior Suites with King-size or two double beds
+ Cable TV, refrigerator, in-room safe,

coffee maker, hatr dryer

* Kids 15 and under, jree

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Limited-time offer! Reserve today /

Call 242-363-3680

*$69 per person double occupancy per night Sun. - Wed. Add $20 pp for Thurs. - Sat. Maximum
four persons per room. Rates effective through December 15. Additional fees apply for mandatory
taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on
standard room category and are subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours
prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply.





THE TRIBUNE

Economic shift
needed to aid
financial services

mg By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

crobards@tribunemedia.net

A SUCCESSFUL financial
services industry in the
Bahamas depends on a major
shift from all sectors of the
economy, the Bahamas Finan-
cial Services Board’s (BFSB)
chief executive believes, as the
global financial crisis continues
to force this country to mould a
new business model.

Wendy Warren said the Gov-
ernment and the private sector,
including “spheres in the broad
economy such as tourism-relat-
ed services and retail financial
services”, have to refine tech-
nical, professional and inter-
personal skills in order for the
Bahamas to remain a competi-
tive financial services market.

Ms Warren said competitive-
ness on a national level might
be the catalyst for some of those
changes. “The environment for
international financial services
centres changed after the finan-
cial crisis,” she said.

Ms Warren argued that skill
upgrades should be coupled
with upgrades to this nation’s
infrastructure, including
telecommunications, energy and
the environment.

She said the impending
changes to the financial services
sector will require a “national
passion that demands that we
go beyond observer status to
being change agents”.

The BFSB is continuing to
examine the current environ-
ment to see if there are modifi-
cations that will allow this coun-
try to become more attractive to
investors.

However, Ms Warren alluded
that many Bahamas-based



WENDY WARREN >

financial institutions, and
Bahamians in general, have yet
to embrace the kind of service
distinction that will set the

Bahamas apart as one of the
most attractive offshore finan-
cial centres in the world — even
in the wake of the attack against
them by OECD countries.

“Tn our daily interaction with
fellow Bahamians, we should
take time to define the standard
of excellence and encourage
adoption,” she said.

“Clients do not distinguish
between the experiences they
have in the offices of their
banker to what occurs on Bay
Street. All experiences count
toward the Bahamas brand in
financial services.”

“We have to invest in this
industry,” said Ms Warren. “It’s
critical to our economy and crit-
ical to our society.”

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Please be advised that the Head Office and
the Registered Office of the company will be
moved from the Bahamas Financial Centre,
Charlotte & Shirley Streets, 2nd Floor, Nassau,
Bahamas to Royal Bank House, East Hill Street,
Nassau, Bahamas effective 25th May, 2009.

D. BURROWS-HAINES (Mrs.)
Corporate Secretary

Dated this 22nd May 2009

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009, PAGE 5B




















































DHL JOB DESCRIPTION

POSITION:
JOB FAMILY:
RCS CODE:
REPORTS TO:
LOCATION:

Collections Agent

Credit & Collections
A20004

Collections Lead

Country Finance Department

OVERALL PURPOSE:

Under limited supervision in a team environment provide efficient and effec-
tive credit approvals. To ensure timely credit application processing, respond to
information requests and issues. Ensure accuracy of all credit decisions functions
while staying within company policy and procedural guidelines.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

Gathers, compiles and maintains basic credit information to be used in
making credit decisions.

Reviews and monitors credit sources, customer applications and
delinquent accounts. Processes credit applications.

Works with smaller customers to resolve collections issues and disputes.
Investigates disputes and reviews documentation.

Prepares and processes credit and collections account adjustments.
Implements credit suspensions.

Recommends further actions on delinquent accounts.

Maintains records of credit risks and delinquent accounts.

Provides support and coordination with third party agencies as needed.
Handles customer calls related to Collection Agency accounts.
Prepares and files bankruptcy claim documents.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

High School diploma required. .

1-3 years of experience in Collections.

Advanced administrative skills to function effectively with limited
direction amid competing priorities and deadlines.

Excellent customer service orientation and communication skills.
Proficiency using various computer software applications.
Excellent analytical and interpersonal skills.

Proficiency using various computer software applications

For more information please contact:
Romell K. Knowles I

Country Manager
Email:Romell.Knowles@dhl.com

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but TOO BUSY for Classrooms?

ON-LINE NURSING procRams
INFORMATION SESSION

TUESDAY , MAY 26th, 2009, 10AM - 4PM

Location: Doctors Hospital Conference Room, Dowdeswell St
ADVANCE YOUR CAREER!

Doctors Hospital in conjunction with Nova Southeastern Univer-
sity, of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA will host an ON-LINE
NURSING PROGRAM INFORMATION SESSION, Tuesday, May
26th, from 10 a.m - 4 p.m in the Conference Room at Doctors
Hospital. A ‘blended model’ will be presented which includes
on-line courses and video conferencing coupled with on the
ground classes. Admission is free, the general public and all
healthcare employees are invited to attend. The event is
designed for working professionals who maybe considering
advancing their career and those interested in other career
options in the healthcare industry. Live demonstration will be
held throughout the day. Representatives from Nova will be
available to answer questions, and discuss course curriculum,
career options, application procedures.

For more information contact us at: 302-4724
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COMMONWEALTH
BREWERY LTD.

ar

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ca

TPM COORDINATOR

The successful candidate would be required to:

- Facilitating the horizontal expansion of TPM in the
brewery.

- Provide Management/Pillars/Teams with advice and
support on TPM concept

- Ensuring TPM activities continuously match Brewery’s
Mission and KPI’s (HMS) through loss deployments

- Formulating, together with management, the TPM 3
year Master Plan and ensuring regular evaluation and
update

- Supporting Management with implementation of the
internal/external Audit System to ensure and manage
the change

- Stimulating the use of standard forms, reports,
templates, tools, improvement routes (from toolbox) etc
with the required document control, IT applications

- Managerial experience

- Computer knowledge required

All interested persons are asked to
fax resumes to:

(242) 362-4793

PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



=
Some consultants ‘fleecing Bahamas’

FROM page 1B

ing firms from across the world,
and the Government needs to
organisations in the Bahamas
with global reach to reduce the
cost and ensure knowledge is
developed among the Bahamas’
indigenous talent.”

Mr Winder suggested that the
Government could also gener-
ate cost savings by regulatory
consolidation in the financial
services sector, merging all the
supervisory bodies into one or
two entities, rather than pro-
vide each with a separate line of
funding.

“Tf the Government gets the
right people in the regulators,
they would not need as many
people, and the quality and effi-
ciency of regulation would
improve,” he added. “The Gov-
ernment has to look at areas
where it could cut back and be
more efficient.”

Mr Winder also suggested the
Government, in its drive to cut
costs, look at outsourcing cer-
tain functions to the private sec-
tor. Arguing that cut backs in
government spending were
“necessary” given the increased
fiscal deficit and national debt,
coupled with the decline in rev-
enues, he added that the Budget
should not increase or add new

For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight
on Mondays



taxes on the private sector,
because this could cause firms
to go out of business or lay-off
staff.

“T think the Government has
to be careful as to the level of
debt it takes on, especially if
that debt is going to go to your
recurrent expenditure,” Mr
Winder told Tribune Business.

“The Government has talked
for a long time around this issue
of public sector reform, and the
costs and inefficiencies one has
to encounter in the public sec-
tor. Now circumstances are
upon is dictating that we look at
this issue, the Government is
taking this into consideration.
They can’t increase taxes. They
have to decrease and reduce
expenditure.”

The likely strategy for the
2009-2010 Budget will be to
reduce recurrent expenditure
without any compulsory redun-
dancies for civil servants, keep
capital spending as high as pos-
sible to stimulate economic
activity and limit unemploy-
ment, and fight for every cent of
revenue possible with no new
or increased taxes.

Making civil servants com-
pulsorily redundant would be
social and political suicide for
the Government given the
unemployment figures. What
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham is likely to do is ask those
civil servants who have reached
the retirement threshold to
retire voluntarily, place a freeze
on all public sector hirings, pro-
motions and grade changes, and
cut spending everywhere else
he can.

The figures already make
grim reading. With national
gross domestic product (GDP)

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION
AND EXTENSION SERVICES

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT - SUMMER SEMESTER 022009

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- BUSINESS

CUSTSO0

_ COMPUTERS

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COMPS01 o1 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS |

COMPO WEB PAGE DESIGN WIS |

COMPS31

DANCE

DANCE

ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093 /
328-1936 / 302-4300 ext. 5202 or email prevsdev@cob.edu.bs

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time).
CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and

Course Materials.

Raviged
May 1 3eh2005

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

5S2wk-Low

1.28

11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
1.95

11.09
2.83
6.06
1.31

Securit
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

1.33
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.75
2.83
6.13
2.88
1.38
7.76
11.00
10.40
6.14
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

1.38
6.02
11.00
10.35
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Last Sale

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Securi
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

WEB PAGE DESIGN WIS II

Previous Close _ Today's Close

6:00 pm-
2:30pm
9:30am

Oar
430 p00

Wed

G >

co FF zh LL”
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 22 MAY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,608.76 | CHG -0.12 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -103.60 | YTD %
FINDEX: CLOSE 795.25 | YTD -4.75% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

Change Daily Vol.
1.33,
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.75
2.83
6.13
2.77
1.38
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.14
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

0.00
0.00

Daily Vol.
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Bid $
7.92
4.00
0.35

Ask $

Last Price
14.60
6.00

Weekly Vol.
8.42
6.25

0.40 0.35

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

ABDAB
RND Holdings

30.13
0.45

31.59

29.00

0.55 0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund

NA Vv
1.3758
2.8962
1.4630

1.3124
2.9230
1.3875
3.1964
12.1564
100.0000
96.4070

Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

3.1964
12.7397
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

1.0000
9.1599
1.0440
1.0364
1.0452

YTD%

-1.49

-5.59

-3.59

Last 12 Months
4.83
-3.35
5.25

-13.64
5.79
0.56
-3.59
0.00
-12.76
4.40
3.64
4.40

Div $
1.65

2.05

0.96
0.56

0.00
0.71
0.80
0.33
0.76

MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

('S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price
Weekly Vol
EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

- Last traded over-the-counter price
- Trading volume of the prior week

|

DESCRIPTION ‘TIME | DAY START | DUR

0:30am-
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SER. Wii's 4:30pm Thurs } 19Jun | 1 da

i



EPS $

1%
Prime + 1.75%
T%
Prime + 1.75%

EPS $
-0.041

1B -May | S450

11isJun | 2 days S550

Z0-May | & wks S275





FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

f£ITee Ff A TF AS OT.

-6.05

Div $ P/E
0.127
0.992

0.244

-0.877

0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

Interest

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E

0.000
0.001

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

Yield %
30-Apr-09
31-Mar-09
15-May-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

for 2008 estimated at around
$7.2 billion, and the Interna-
tional Monetary Fund (IMF)
predicting the Bahamian econ-
omy will contract by 4 per cent
in 2009, it seems reasonable to
estimate that GDP will slip to
around $6.9 billion.

The Bahamas’ national debt
was already around 43.4 per
cent of GDP, some $3.2 billion,
at year-end 2008. And with the
2008-2009 Budget year likely to
end with a fiscal deficit of
around $250 million, not to
mention the $200 million bor-
rowing to help refinance down-
town Nassau’s revitalization
among other needs, the $150
million borrowed from China,
and the $100 million New Prov-
idence Road Improvement Pro-
ject, that debt is likely to swell
to around $3.6 billion at con-
servative estimates.

Needless to say, this will put
the Bahamas’ debt-to-GDP
ratio well over the 50 per cent
mark.

Mr Winder said he agreed
with the Government offering
early retirement to civil servants
in their 50s and 60s, and that
the size of the public sector was
too large. The latter, he added,
was a function of its citizens.

“T think the size of govern-
ment is a reflection of the aver-
age Bahamian,” Mr Winder
said. “I don’t think government
enters into a situation where it
wants to be big. But Bahami-
ans, by and large, want the Gov-
ernment to solve their prob-
lems, and because the electorate
puts huge pressure on the Gov-
ernment to fulfil its obligations,
that forces government to grow.

“We need to better educate

the average Bahamian that he
can’t look to government, and
you, the private sector and pri-
vate individual, must look to
solve problems yourselves, and
not put the pressure on govern-
ment.

“That puts pressure on the
Government to grow, and larg-
er government is not necessari-
ly the best thing for the coun-
try.”

Rick Lowe, an executive with
the Nassau Institute economic
think-tank, praised the Gov-
ernment’s likely spending cuts
as “a smart move” and a “move
in the right direction” that
would hopefully make all
Bahamians think about how to
adjust financial plans during the
recession.

He was “doubtful”, though,
that the Government would go
as far as needed in reducing
recurrent spending, and said it
would need to watch its ability
to meet its debt servicing costs.

Mr Lowe said the Govern-
ment had a “delicate tightrope
they have to walk” in manag-
ing the public finances, adding:
“They’re in a precarious situa-
tion. We’re partially to blame
because we think the Govern-
ment has a magic well they pro-
duce money from.

“We lose sight of the fact the
Government gets its revenue
from us. If you create money
from thin air, you get boom or
bust. One way or another, the
day of reckoning will come, and
it is our generation that has to
face the music for future gener-
ations.

“T don’t wish ill or misfortune
on anyone. It’s just that now the
price has to be paid.”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LOVENCENT CLECIDOR of
JOHNSON ROAD, FOX HILL, P.O. Box FH-14412, Nassau,
Bahamas is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 18° day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

July 4, 2009 - American Independence
duly 10, 2009 - Bahamian Independence
November 26, 2009 - Thanksgiving

The Public Is Invited
10am - Until
Tel. 325-6306/636-0726

For more info contact Paul Rolle
All patriotic Bahamians join us to secure the
beaches for the future generation.
Please come show your support.

Our appreciation gors out to Atlantis
for the signs aon Cove Beach

Care Giver
Required

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILL REQUIREMENTS:

- Certified or equivalent to nurse’s aide and training.

- Must understand English both written and verbal.

- Must have current certification, i.e. Health Certificate.

- Must be able to safely and successfully perform ALL job-related
functions 1.e. CPR and Basic First Aid.

PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES:

- Care for multiple residents.
- Observe Resident Rights.

- Provide Professional care and assistance to the residents.

- Assist paramedics in cases of emergency.

- Observe residents, note physical condition, attitude, reactions,
appetite, etc., report to the Administrator.

- Available for front desk duty.

- Capable of working overnight shift 4p.m.— 12am & 12a.m.-8 am.

- Provide quality care.

- Provide a written/verbal report to the Administrator

on a daily basis.

- Perform any other related duties which might be required.

- Man front desk operation.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidates will be offered an excellent compensation
package and opportunities for training and development.

Please e-mail or fax resume to the Administrator at

CCCBAHAMAS @live.com or 323.4475





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009, PAGE 7B



Casino’s losses continue amid operator search

FROM page 1B

thing that makes sense is really multi-million dollar casino tax

come back to the Bahamas to the most time consuming part, debt that it had accumulated.

continue their good name and but we are moving along,” Mr
good will when there is an Vanderpool-Wallace said.
upswing in Grand Bahama.”

The Isle-Our Lucaya casino,
which is located in Hutchinson’s
The casino’s continued poor Our Lucaya property, saw sec-

The minister confirmed Isle financial performance, though, ond quarter revenues last year
of Capri, Hutchison Whampoa has left many questioning why decline by 28 per cent to $2.072
and the Government agreedto Isle of Capri would want to million, compared to $2.879 mil-

extend the casino’s existing remain in Grand Bahama.
agreement until a long-term
solution can be realized.

lion the previous year.
The Casino operator received For Isle of Capri’s 2008 finan-
a ‘sweet’ deal from the former cial year, the property saw loss-

“Bringing those three groups PLP administration that effec- es year-over-year amounting to
together when we have some- tively wrote-off much of the more than $1 million.

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT WC

NOTICE

CORRIDOR 11

BLUE HILL ROAD
ROADWAY CONSTRUCTION

In an effort to relieve current traffic congestion problems JOSE
CARTELLONE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES S.A _ has
been contracted for the Completion of the New Providence Road
Improvement Project — International Package. Road construction
will be commencing onCorridor 11A (Blue Hill Road),which may
require diversions from:

Duke Street & Robinson Road

Tel: 242-322-8341 /242-322-2610

Local diversions will be sign posted in due course and further

information will be provided in the local media

Email: jcccbahamas @cartellone.com. ar

PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
ADVERTISEMENT

VACANCY
FACILITIES MANAGER

GRAND BAHAMA HEALTH SERVICES

The Public Hospitals Authority invites applications from suitably qualified persons for the
post of Facilities Manager, Grand Bahama Health Services

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Value $199,000.00)

Lots #29 & #30,

(Al's 1), Blk A+?
wybruilding 1,1 4aq. f=
Matthew St, Nassau
Vilage (Appraised
Valwe $145,000.00)

Lots #5 & 6
(150.100) whee
Sthwer Palm La Insperial
Park (Appraised Value
S31 3.450200)

Lot #135 [50°.90")
wibse 1.3425 q [-
Sunflower (south)
Sunshine Park Sah Hse
8 (Appraised Value
$13 9.000.00)

Lot #11 (107 <1o0'y
wihse 2,026sq. ft-Sumset
Ridge Der, Sumset Ridge
Sub Hse #28 (Appraised
Vale 32006 00000)

Lot #176 [41.119]
whe 90Gsq. ft.-Ctd
Cedar St tellow Elder
(Appraised Value
65 (0000)

Lots #3 & 44, Blk #47
(0's LO) wey dupes &
retail shop 1,532.54. Ft-
Forbes St Nassaa Village
(Appraised Value
F120000.00)

Audios
» Beach froet loo 900s.
Ft. w building 2.100sq.
f.-Pinders Mangrove
Cay 4ipedinos [Appeals
Valae $200 (e000)

2. Loot 4,3445q. Fw duplex

building 1,1 740. f.-
Fresh Creek Andros
(Appraised Valine
$98,640) AF)

Properties

Grand Balan

t. Lot #20 (17,1 506q. ft]

wfhse 200 0eq. Ft
BIKWE, Section #2-S5ea
Gull Or, Bahama Reef
Yacht & Country Clah
Sub Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
S20, 000.0)

Vacant lot #35), Hil #%
(14,.297'sq. f]-
Yorkshire Or, Bakacnia
West Replat Grace
Bahama (4ppraised
VWahue $25 (000000)

. Vacant Lot #a Wk #12

Unt #3 (11 250%q. ft]
Henny Awe Derty Sab
Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$65 0 04h Op

. Lord B10 SE)

wy fhse & Duplex-Nelson
Rl Poinciana Gardens
Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$95,000)

7. Lot a3? (50°10 50°]

Ww fsixplex 2-storey
Apartneet beading &
Church 5,40 mq. fr-
Martin Town, Kings Sub
Egght Pelile Rock Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Value $211200,00)
Low 10 reom heel
6 008Isq. Ron 2.5
acres of beach fromt-
High Reck Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Vahoe $1,000, 0900000)

. Vacant lot #13, Blk #59,

Unat #3 (22.75 25q. ft]
45° om canal front-
Dagenham Circle &
Ingrave Dr Emerald Baw
Sub Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$110,000.00)

Vacant bot #21, Ble #3
(14,1615q. f.]-Waterfall
Dr Seahorse Village Sub
Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$40,000.00)

Loo #15, Bik #15 Unit
#3 (90'.125')-Derby
Sub Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$25,000.00)

Vacant hot #25, Blk #15
[17 B6beq, ft J-
Cutwater Ln Sharmnom
Country Chab Sub Grand
Rahama (Appraised
Value $36,000.00)
Vacant hot 24489 gecbion
268 (85's125")-Palneeri
Or Grand Bahama East
[Appraised Valine
$5,000000)

Lot az [20,000sq. ft.)

w fhudiding complex &
codn Laumdreamat—
Queens Highway
Holmes Rock

Com monape Geraad
Bahama (Appraised
Walbue $178.6 00.00)

ASSETS

BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK
Cable Beach, West Bay Street,
F.O.Box N-3034
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel:(242) 327-578INS27-S793-6
Fanx:(242) 327-5047, 327-1258
www. bahamasdevelopmenthank.com

Abaco

. Lot #54 E (6, 508s. fe.)
w/triples foundation
2.7 HBsq. ft--Murphy
Town “Albarn
(Appraised Value
$24,096.00)

. Vacant lot 6 (2 acres)
(Appraised Value
$50,000.00)

» Lot ¥#51(15,0008g. i.)
w/bullding-Murphy
Town Alboro
(Appraised Value
$102,420.00)

. Portion of lot #69
C150 00sq. ft. )-Frang St
Sunphy Town Abaca
(Appraised Value
$29,250.00)

29. Lot #55 [6,900sq. ft.)
~ruilding-Murpahy
Town Albarn
(Appraised Value
82,075.00)

. oot #45 [60 xi 60"
wi 14 room motel
S.900sq, ft-Sandy Poine
Abaco (Appraised
Valuoe $405,700.00)

» Lot By. 1208q, Foow 4
cottages & | shorape
building totaling
4.1866q. ft-Sand Banks
Treasare Cay Abaco
(Appraised Value
SH80,308.00)

Eleuthera
2. Vacant portion of lot #7
(021 LO) Wrest James
Cistern Eleuthera
(Appraised Value
$18,000.00
Cat [Slane

3. Vacant 65 acres ol
land -Arthur’s Town. Cat
island (Appraised
Value $90,000.00)

» Letw le root morcel
1234 atres—Alrthur s
Towenn Cat Islared
(Appraised Vabue
$630. 000 000)

35. Vacant bot #@ (65, 2008q.
ft.|-Moss Town Exmaima
(Appraised Vabue
$110,188.00)

36. Lot (20,4080 sq. fey wef
small bobel 4.52 08q. ft
& exclusive besch-
Porters Hill Escuma
[Appraised Vabue
$1,400, 000.00)

37. Vacant bot #1281
(6,50 0sg. ft.]-Oceanic
Riel Hahaina Sout Sec
#5 Exurmea (Appraised
Valae $18,154).00)

3B. Vacant bot #95
(80'.1 22") Commodore
Rel Elizabeth Harbour
Ess, Exum (Apepralsed
Vallee $45,000.00)

Vehicles
[1] 09 Dodge Caravan
(2) 96 Ford Explorer
(1) 97 Dodge Stracus
[1) OL Hyundai H-1 Van
(1) 01 Kia Bus 12 Seater
(1) 27 LTS00 Ford Boom Truck
(2) 02 Hyundal H-1 Van SVX
(1) 06 Hyundai H-1 Van SÂ¥% (Silver)
(1) 08 Rtchen Tandem Cheretos Tralker
(1) 00 Ford Ranger Truck
(1) 99 Ford F250 Truck
(2) 62 GMC Brigadier Drill Track
(0) 08 Mitsebishi Canter Truck
11) 9? Doble Ate Mack Dump Track
(1) 29 Ford LA000 Dri Truck
(1) 92 Mack Truck (Carmichael fd]
(1) 9? Doeble Ade Mack Dump Track

Wessels

20° (1996) Rebole Vessel w/115 HP Evin engine
21° (1974) Seacraft Vessel w 140 HP Yamaha engine
S2° (1979) Hatters Vexsel (MW Buddy)
51° (1981) Defender Vessel [Equility)
AD Costom Steel Hull Vessel [Miss Kristy]
94° Steel Hull Gulf Coast Shrimp Trawler Vesse

(1980) with (2) Volvo Diesel engine [Sweet Charlotte]
L2? Single Serew Stee! Hull (150) MV Lisa J IIL
vessel has a mew engine cequiring installation. find
cam be view at Bradford Marine. Grand Bahama
19 (1989) Fiberglass Sports Vessel (Hull Onhy]
60 (1982) Defender Vessel (Queen Vashi]
6A (1989) Detoo Marine Wessel (Sweet Dreams)
20F (1997) Abaco Seif Vessel wf115 HP Mercury engine
19 (1991) Spanish Wells Rumabout Vessel w/f115 Mercury engine
91 (155) Travis Marine Vessel (Farthutt)

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:-

* Bachelors Degree in Facilities Management or equivalent, OR related field;
¢ Member British Institute of Facilities Management OR a related professional body;
¢ Excellent communication skills (oral and written); computer skills; accounting skills;

* Seven (7) years experience in Building & Maintenance in a Healthcare facility, Hotel,
or large corporation, five (5) of which must be at a supervisory level;

The Health Facilities Manager reports to the Administrator, Grand Bahama Health
Services.

JOB SUMMARY

The Facilities Manager is responsible for coordinating and managing the Buildin
& Maintenance Departments and oversees Engineering, Biomedical & Mechanica
Units. Special emphasis must be placed on preventative maintenance and practices.

Stee] Building 70x50" Six (6) Windows, Two (2) Entry Doors, Two (2) 5°10" Rollup Doors White trimmed
Blue Approved plans and engineering drawings are available $50,000.00

DUTIES:

1. Coordinates and manages Facilities Management matters pertaining to building
and development operations, maintenance, equipment maintenance, building
fabric maintenance, renovations, use of space, biomedical, engineering,
maintenance, administration and contract management for all facilities under
the responsibility of Grand Bahama Health Services.

The public is invited be submit Sealed bids marked “Temder™ to Bahamas Derclopment Bank, Po. Box 4-3094,
Nassae, Hehamas attention Fimamcial Controller, &xed bids will met be accepted or telephone 327-5780 for
additional information. Pease mote that all bids on the aforementioned properties and assets should be received
hy or en May 29, 20049. The Bahacias Development Bank reserves the right to reject any or all offers. All assets:
are sold as is.



Inspects and evaluates the physical condition of the facilities and make
recommendations necessary for the infrastructural developments/
eee to enhance the comfort of (PHA’s) internal and external
customers.

The Tribune

Real Estate )

The Bahamas Source For Homes, Apartment Commenities 6 Rentals

Everywhere. Lit Buyers et

Prepares and administers the Facilities Management and Operations budget;
also monitors expenditures of the Departments.

Plans and directs staff in the purchasing and distribution of Public Hospitals
Authority’s supplies.

Review bids and make recommendations for awarding of contracts for
maintenance work, contracts and renovations.

Manages staff of Facilities and ensures training opportunities for staff
development.

{S
L.
L.

anat
soe
wanes

AG tli detailed policy and procedural document to ensure appropriate

sua

methods and levels of service are adhered to.

a
a
f ss f 4
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aa ao are
12
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Submits monthly reports to Administrator and quarterly reports to the Managing
Director (PHA) on facilities management matters;

Interviews and_selects candidates seeking employment in the Building and
Maintenance Departments;

Liaises with the Capital Development Unit of the Public Hospitals Authority
to ensure Building and Maintenance (Mechanical Engineering) practices
effective project management and supervision techniques;

The post of Facilities Manager is in Scale HAMAS ($37,850 x 700 - $42,050).

Letter of application and curricula vitae should be submitted through the Administrator
of Grand Bahama Health Services, Public Hospitals Authority, PO. Box F-40071, East
Atlantic Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama to the Director of Human Resources, Corporate
Office, Public Hospitals Authority, 3rd Terrace West, Centreville; or PO. Box N-8200
Nassau, Bahamas no later than 12th June, 2009.





PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EMPLOYEES, from page 1B

notice pay of $3,000; 48 weeks’
basic pay of $36,000; and three
weeks’ vacation pay worth
$2,250.

The Court of Appeal said it
was “common ground” that the
sums paid by Snack Food
Wholesale were in accordance
with the Employment Act
2001’s Section 29, but Ms Smith
initiated a legal action alleging
that under common law she was
due $64,790.

The $25,790 difference cited
between the statutory and com-



mon law was comprised,
according to Ms Smith’s amend-
ed statement of claim, of the
loss of 12 months’ worth of
commissions at $2,000 per
month of $24,000 in total; the
loss of 12 months’ group insur-
ance at $20 per week for a total
$1,040; and a 12-month annual
bonus of $750.

The Court of Appeal
acknowledged that Ms Smith
had received a bonus or com-
missions via Snack Food’s
incentive programme, and

Legal Notice

NOTICE

MANTHA POINTE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)












added: “For the year 2003, the
[company], for economic rea-
sons, implemented a new com-
mission programme by which
the employee would have
received | per cent of net prof-
its, replacing the existing
scheme based on sales. When
this was circulated at the end
of 2002, the appellant objected,
preferring the incentive pro-
gramme that was already in
place.”

Basic pay, as defined by the
Employment Act, did not
include bonuses and commis-
sions, the Court of Appeal said,
meaning that Ms Smith’s action
was “ bound to fail” if made
under the Act. She was repre-
sented by attorney and trade
union leader, Obie Ferguson.

Referring to the previous
Supreme Court hearing, Justice
Longley’s judgment read: “Jus-
tice Lyons found the pleadings
somewhat strange and confus-
ing, and not without some justi-
fication. For it was not clear
whether Mr Ferguson was try-

ing to graft a claim for commis-
sions etc at common law on to
the statutory compensation con-
ferred by section 29 of the Act
on the pretext that they were
wages, or whether it was intend-
ed to be an independent claim
having regard to the wording of
paragraph seven of the amend-
ed statement of claim.

“For if the former were the
case, he could not get through
the back door what he could
not get through the front door.
If the latter were the case, then
it was difficult to see how it
could succeed without a claim
also at common law for notice
pay that was in excess of that
conferred by the Act.”

Without the common law
claim for notice pay, Appeal
Justice Longley said the action
was just a common law claim
for commissions worth $27,950,
when Ms Smith had already
received compensation worth
more than $40,000.

He ruled: “What the law con-
templates is that if the benefits

under the Act have been paid,
the employee should have
resort to his common law claim
only if that provides for greater
benefits. Otherwise, it would be
a waste of time and costs.

“In this regard, it seems to
me that consideration may well
have to be given to the opera-
tion of the doctrine of election
when an employee has received
his full benefits under the Act.

“He should only be permit-
ted to pursue a claim at com-
mon law for greater rights and
better benefits after he has been
put to an election to abandon
the compensation under the
Act, otherwise the purpose for
which the Act was passed — to
make a ready, inexpensive for-
mula available for calculating
benefits — would be lost in the
mush of litigation.”

In the Supreme Court case,
Justice Lyons had reviewed
Snack Food Wholesale’s com-
pensation scheme, finding that it
was discretionary and the
changes made to it were “nei-

ther capricious nor irrational”.

Justice Lyons also had no evi-
dence placed before him to
show how Ms Smith had calcu-
lated the $2,000 per month com-
mission demand. Mr Ferguson,
before the Court of Appeal,
attempted to rely on pay slips
from 2000, when the company
was doing well, but they were
rejected as “unsatisfactory” giv-
en that the commissions were
claimed as special damages.

Justice Longley ruled: “In any
event, it seems to me that the
appellant cannot have her cake
and eat it, too. Either she
accepts the payments made to
her under the Act. Or she could
pursue a claim at common law.
She was not entitled to both.
She got all that she was entitled
to under the Act.

“And the learned judge
found, on the evidence before
him, her claim at common law
would have fallen short of the
benefits conferred by the Act.”
As a result, the appeal was dis-
missed.

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2009
SUPREME COURT CLE/Qui/ 00243

IN THE MATTER ALL THAT parcel or tract
of land containing 464.664 acres situated in
Alexander’s Settlement on the Island of Exuma,
Bahamas and IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT
parcel or tract of land containing 73.957 acres also
situated in Alexander’s Settlement on the Island of
Exuma, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FLORENCE SMITH
of Alexander’s Settlement in the Island of Exuma
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas is applying to the Supreme Court to have
its Title to the following land investigated under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act, and the nature
and extent thereof determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted by the said Court
in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

“ALL THAT parcel or tract of land containing
Four hundred and Sixty-four and Six hundred
and Sixty-four thousandths (464.664) acres being
a portion of Crown Grant C-24 granted to William
Alexander and situated in Alexander’s Settlement
on the Island of Exuma, Bahamas which said
parcel or tract of land has such position boundaries
shape marks and dimensions as are shown on the
diagram or plan filed in the Department of Lands
and Surveys situated in the City of Nassau in the
Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas as Plan Number
343A EX and IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT
parcel or tract of land containing Seventy-three
and Nine hundred and Fifty-Seven thousandths
(73.957) acres also being a portion of Crown Grant
C-24 granted to William Alexander and situated
in Alexander’s Settlement on the Island of Exuma,
Bahamas which said parcel or tract of land has such
position boundaries shape marks and dimensions
as are shown on the diagram or plan filed in the
Department of Lands and Surveys situated in the
City of Nassau in the Island of New Providence
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas as Plan Number 343 EX and which said
parcels or tracts of land are filed herein and edged
in “PINK”.

Copies of the Plan may be inspected during normal
office hours at the following places:-

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher
Building, East Street, in the City of Nassau;

2. The Local Administrator’s Office situated in the
Settlement of George Town, Exuma;

3. The Local Constable’s Office situated in the
Settlement of George Town, Exuma; or

4, The Chambers of Colin M. Thompson Terrace
House, First Terrace and Collins Avenue
Nassau, Bahamas.

Any person who objects to the granting of the said
Certificate of Title is required to file in the Supreme
Court and serve on the Petitioner or its Attorney a
Statement of its, his or her Claim in the prescribed
forms, verified by an Affidavit and other related
requirements to be filed therewith by the 15th day
of July A.D., 2009. Failure of any such person to
file and serve a Statement of its, his or her Claim
together with the other related requirement by the
15th day of July A.D., 2009, will operate as a bar to
such claim.



COLIN M. THOMPSON
ATTORNEY FOR THE PETITIONER

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEO RENAISSANCE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 13th day of February 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PAGO HALO CORPORATION
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
POWER TRAIL INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TIMELESS FLIGHT
ENTERPRISES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 30th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SPRING BLOOMS CORPORATION
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SOUNDOUT OCEAN CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2007. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ITR SERVICES LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DROMENSTARV INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





THE TRIBUNE





Public Education Meeting

Patterns of Biodiversity
and Climate Change
Impacts in The Bahamas

PRESENTER:

lan Elliott

Ph.D. Student, University of Exeter, UK
DATE: May 26th, 2009

TIME: 7:00 pm

VENUE: The Retreat, Village Road

lan Elliott 5 a PROD, student whe 1s re-
searching patterns of biodiversity and cli-
mate change impacts in The Bahamas util-
izing Geographic Information Systems
(GTS). GIS 15 a powertul tool that allows
for mapping and analyses of landscapes,
and the data from Mr. Elliott’s project are
currently being used to design a more sus-
tainable network of marine reserves.
Through his research, Mr. Elltott has cre-
ated key data on biodiversity, fisheries
habitat, and the impacts of climate change
and hurricanes. Visit http-''mselex.ac.uk/
guis/bahamas’/# for project information,

For meeting information call 393-1317 or
email botie bot. bs

oof Dhara’ ba Go
: ics2 2/7) Living Oceans
General Public 5 <7 g Saamilalinn

BAT Members Free

performance’

DESPITE a sluggish econo-
my, Commonwealth Bank
turned in a “remarkable per-
formance” for fiscal 2008 and
the 2009 first quarter, the bank’s

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009, PAGE 11B

ommonwealth
Bank’s ‘remarkable

chairman said.

“Despite gloom in the econ-
omy, I am pleased to report
your bank achieved its 12th con-
secutive year of record profits,”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DARREL SIMILIAN of HARBOUR
WEST, EIGHT MILE ROCK, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 25TH day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008

IN THE SUPREME COURT

CLE/qui/No.01550

Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER of The Quicting

Titles Act, 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT picce
ae or tract of land situate near Red

ays in the vicim

of Baker’s Creek and

Loggerhead Point on the Island of Abaco
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas comprising Four and

Seven Thousandths (4.00

7) acres Geng

Grant B3 page 37 to James EB. Weatherford

which said piece parcel or tract of land 1s

bounded on the

ORTH by vacant Crown

Land and running thereon Six Hundred

and ‘Twenty-three

and Seventy-three

Hundredths (623.73) Feet on the EAST
partly by land granted to L.B. Johnson
and partly by a Road Reservation and
running thereon One Hundred and Sixty-
four (164) Feet on the SOUTH by land
ranted to W. H. Weatherford and now
the property of Dudley Higgs and runnin
thereon Six Hundred and Fifty-nine an
‘Twelve Hundredths (659.12) Feet and on
the WEST by land onginally granted to the
Estate of the late Henry A. Fisher but now
the property of cee Higgs and running
€

thereon Four Hundre

an

n and Srxty-

eight Hundredths (410.68) feet.
AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
Dudley Dean Higgs and Suzette Miranda

Higgs

NOTICE

THE PETITION OF Dudley Dean Higgs and Suzette
Miranda Higgs in respect of:-

“IN THEMATTERof ALLTHAT piece
aes or tract of land situate near Red

ays in the vicimi

of Baker’s Creek and

Loggerhead Point on the Island of Abaco
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas comprising Four and

Seven Thousandths (4.00

7) acres Geng

Grant B3 page 37 to James EB. Weatherford

which said piece parcel or tract of land 1s

bounded on the

ORTH by vacant Crown

Land and running thereon Six Hundred

and ‘Twenty-three

and Seventy-three

Hundredths (623.73) Feet on the EAST
partly by land granted to L.B. Johnson
and partly by a Road Reservation and
running thereon One Hundred and Sixty-
four (164) Feet on the SOUTH by land
ranted to W. H. Weatherford and now
ne property of Dudley Higgs and runnin
thereon Six Hundred and Fifty-nine an
‘Twelve Hundredths (659.12) Feet and on
the WEST by land onginally granted to the
Estate of the late Henry A. Fisher but now
the property of mee) Figs and running
€

thereon Four Hundre

an

n and Srxty-

eight Hundredths (410.68) feet.”

Dudley Dean Higgs and Suzette Miranda Higgs claim to be the
owners of the unincumbered fee simple estate mm possession of
the said land and have made cd deep to the Supreme Court of

the Commonwealth of The B

amas under Section Three O) of

the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have their title to the said land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof determimed and
declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

Copies of the Amended Petition and the Amended Plan of the

said land may be inspected durmg normal office hours in the

following places:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street North in the

City of Nassau, Bahamas; and

2. The Chambers of Lockhart & Munroe, #35 Buen Retiro
Road, off Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower or night
to dower or an Adverse Clatm or a claim not recognized in the
Amended Petition shall on or before the expiration of Thirty
G0) days after the final publication of these presents, file in the

upreme Court and serve on the Petitioners or the undersigned
a Statement of his claim in the prescribed form venfied by an

affidavit to be filed therewith.

Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement of his
Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days after the final

publication of these presents will operate as bar to such clam.

LOCKHART & MUNROE
Chambers

#35 Buen Retiro Road

Off Shirley Street

Nassau, Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioners



() 8
said T.B. Donaldson. While the
global downturn had begun to
take its toll on the Bahamian
economy, he said the banking
industry as a whole in The
Bahamas demonstrated
strength, and Commonwealth
Bank, in particular, had turned
in what he called “a very
remarkable performance.”

Net earnings totalled $49.3
million at year-end December
31, 2008, continuing an unbro-
ken record of increasing prof-
itability started in 1998. Total
assets stood at $1.3 billion, an
increase of 12 per cent over
year-end 2007. Although Com-
monwealth Bank’s share price
fell slightly from a peak of $7, at
its close yesterday it was almost
50 per cent higher than at the
time of stock split in late 2007
and was earning more for share-
holders in dividend yields than
any other BISX-listed stock.

“Your bank,” Mr Donaldson
told more than 200 shareholders
at SuperClub Breezes for the
annual general meeting, “was
the only domestic financial insti-
tution in The Bahamas to
report an increase in profits in
2008.”

That profit, according to Ian
Jennings, Commonwealth
Bank’s senior vice-president
and chief financial officer, trans-
lated into unmatched share-
holder benefits. While the Dow
Jones was down 33.8 per cent in
2008, Mr Jennings said, and
BISX was down 17.25 per cent,
Commonwealth Bank reported
$0.31 in dividends and $0.44 in
earnings per share. At May 19,
2009, the bank’s shares were
giving a 5.76 per cent dividend
yield.

Mr Jennings said the bank’s
foundation was secure with
$211 million in share capital,
well above the $85 million
required by the Central Bank.
While loan loss provisions
increased, impaired loans were
well below the 6 per cent indus-
try average at 1.7 per cent. The
bank wrote off a total of $18.8
million in bad loans in 2008, but
amounts recovered from loan
write offs increased to $7.6 mil-
lion, giving a net write off
increase of only $2.2 million
higher than 2007.

“Impaired consumer loans —
that is, loans that have not been
paid in the last 90 days -- grew
industry wide from 3.7 per cent
to 5.1 per cent. Commonwealth
Bank fared very favourably by
comparison with only a slight
change, with impaired con-
sumer loans growing from 1.3
per cent to 1.4 per cent of our
portfolio,” Mr Jennings said.
An average loan portfolio bal-
ance of under $14,000 also
helped spread the risk, he not-
ed.

Mr Donaldson said the year’s
highlights included the “tremen-
dous success” of the Golden
Gates branch that opened in
2006, and was already self-sus-
taining, operating well ahead of
budget. The newest branch,
now rising on Prince Charles
Drive to serve the population
of eastern New Providence, is
slated to open by late autumn.
There are no plans for new
branches for 2010, Mr Donald-
son said, but $10 million is being
made available for small busi-
ness loans.

Noting the passing of long-
time director Franklyn Butler,
whom he called “a giant of a
man”, and the retirement of
senior vice-president Shirley
Cartwright after 22 years of ser-
vice, Mr Donaldson said the
bank’s 550 employees were to
be credited for its leading posi-
tion.

“They are the ones who deal
with customers all day, who
wear a smile on their faces, who
work tirelessly on behalf of your
bank. It is because of them and
because of our executive man-
agement team led by Bill Sands,
president, and our directors that
we can say Commonwealth
Bank is the largest Bahamian
bank, the largest company listed
on BISX and one of the largest
indigenous banks in the
Caribbean. It is because of them
that we can say we will weather
the storm. We will survive. And
we will continue to succeed,”
he added.

Shareholders, after reviewing
a comprehensive and transpar-
ent presentation of the Bank’s
2008 results and challenges for
the rest of 2009, did not raise a
single question and all directors
were returned to office.



PAGE 12B, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





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CULTURAL WAR

The assimilation of two separate but equal communities



@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net





















































































he Bahamas is fighting a

"very serious cultural

war” with the Haitian

community, a well known

radio personality told
Insight last week.

His comment came after two sepa-
rate sets of e-mails were sent to the
column containing correspondence
between Bahamians who were “put
off”, to say the least, by several ges-
tures emanating from the Haitian com-
munity.

The first set of e-mails centred round
the recent Haitian Flag Day celebra-
tions held in the capital. Some in the
group felt that no nationality in the
Bahamas should collectively “celebrate
their flag” as it is a symbol of their
allegiance to a foreign state.

The second was of a discussion sur-
rounding an advertisement appearing
in a local publication that encouraged
Haitian-Bahamian women to register
for what was described as the “Miss
Port au Prince in the Bahamas”
pageant.

Generally, those who were con-
cerned about these two events won-
dered why people, who so desperately
wanted to belong to a country, would
insist on holding events that identified
them as another people with another
land.

“The concern is that they are not
trying to be Bahamian,” one person
told Insight.

We’re not too sure what this means
and certainly a discussion of what is
“Bahamian” can be so mired in pedan-
tic rhetoric and so subjective, that it
should be left for another time.

Certainly what is the offence, as far
as these Bahamians are concerned,
and what is perceived as a right, as far
as some Haitian-Bahamians are con-
cerned, is an expression of identity or
heritage or even origin.

So this begs the question....

“What does it take to be a Bahami-
an? Loyalty to our Bahamas over and
above all other; zeal for our Bahamas
unmatched by any other; concern for
other Bahamians over all others.” -
Sir Lynden Pindling - address at the
National Conference on Indepen-
dence, April 12, 1972.

Sir Lynden’s statement may just be
one man’s opinion but it’s hard to
argue with it if you believe that patri-
otism is an ideal worth having.

If you think being patriotic is an out-
moded philosophy or believe it more
convenient to assign “Bahamian-ness”
based on how recently one arrived in
the Bahamas, the usefulness of that
quote to advance the conversation and
the conversation itself should end here,
but we digress.

On page 38 of the May 11 edition of
The Punch, an advertisement read:
“Miss Port au Prince in The Bahamas
2009. We are proud to invite young
women with character, 17 - 28 years
old. ‘Mothers or not’, to vie for the
title of the 21st century. No sponsors
are needed.”

This advertisement led the origina-
tor of the e-mail discussion to ask:

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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



CULTURAL WAR: The assimilation of two separate but equal communities

FROM page 1B

“Are any of you concerned that
there is a group of people in the
Bahamas who are still so tied to
another country that they are
quite comfortable asking for and
probably receiving contestants
for the capital of Haiti?”
According to Jetta Baptiste, a

community activist and busi-
nesswoman, 60 per cent of
Bahamians living in the Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas
today are of Haitian heritage
and are ashamed to admit that
their parents, grandparents, or
great grandparents came from
Haiti.

“Over 60 per cent of Bahami-

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ans living in the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas today are of
Haitian heritage, and Haitian
decent, therefore why not have
pride in the rich heritage of
Haiti and the heritage of the
Bahamas? What is so wrong
with embracing both heritages
and cultures?

“Many Bahamians are
ashamed to admit that their par-
ents, grandparents, or great
grandparents came from Haiti,
because all they can relate to is
the negative publicity and the
bad impressions that they see
or hear on the news. We must
accept and keep what is best in
both cultures and disregard the
bad things. We can improve the
world we live in by being toler-
ant. It is okay for us to disagree
and not like the same things,”
she said.

She blames most of the fear
Bahamians have over expres-
sions of Haitian culture on a fail-
ure to educate.

“We have so much in com-
mon, but we will never know if
we don’t just talk with each oth-
er. We need to embrace our dif-
ferences and make the Bahamas
a better unified country, where
we all can live in peace and har-
mony.

“Bahamians who have fore-
sight and adopt their Haitian
heritage will see that there is
nothing to be ashamed of. We
cannot change the past, but we
surely have control over what
we do in the future,” she said.

However, Minister Kevin
Harris, a DJ on 101.9 Joy FM
and owner of Harris Communi-
cations said a distinction must
be drawn between expressing
one’s culture and celebrating a
“flag day.”

“A flag is a very serious sym-
bol; it is a representation of a
country. The idea for those with-
in the Haitian community in the
Bahamas to celebrate their her-
itage is not a bad idea but you
cannot have two countries fight-
ing to be recognised in the same
land. You should not allow
another country to march in
your capital.

“This is a sovereign nation
and like any sovereign nation
you ought to reserve some
things for yourself. I think the
recognition of a national cele-
bration of independence should
be reserved for the Bahamas.
We should recognise and



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THE BAHAMAS is fighting a “very serious cultural war” with the Haitian
community, a well known radio personality told /nsight last week...

respect the culture of other peo-
ple but that should not be
placed above ours,” he said.

Mr Harris claims that the flag
day celebration is worrisome for
another reason.

“When one country is suc-
cessful in defeating another the
first thing that they do is remove
the flag of that country and
replace it with their flag to sym-
bolize that “we have conquered
this territory’. I think there are
concerns that this is a symbol
that a cultural war is taking
place. This may be an attempt
for the once sleeping giant to
show its numbers and its
strength,” he said.

However, Ms Batiste feels
that that there is “no need for a
cultural war” in the Bahamas,
if in fact one does exist.

“Tf none exists, then we don’t
need to create one either,” she
said.

However, she said what is
needed is for every citizen or
resident of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas to know what is
enshrined in the Constitution of
the Bahamas.

“Our constitution guarantees
that everyone has the right to
freedom of speech, movement,
religion, assembly, and so on
and so forth. Once one under-
stands that, then there should
be no debate on this issue. What
is wrong with a group of per-
sons parading with their flags in
the streets?

Would we be having this con-
versation if the flags were
American ones? I personally see
nothing wrong with Haitians cel-
ebrating their flag day in May.
Bahamians and Americans will
be celebrating their flag day in
July, Jamaicans will be cele-
brating their flag day in August,
so I don’t see a problem with
people showing that they are
proud of being who they are and
not afraid to show it,” Ms Bap-
tiste said.

Mr Harris disagrees with Ms
Baptiste on this point and says
there “is no one else doing this
same thing” in the Bahamas at
this time.

“No other culture in the
Bahamas is seeking to have this
kind of expression. The Cubans
aren't doing it, the Jamaicans
aren't doing it and the Chinese
aren't doing it,” he said.

Perhaps Haitians cannot help
themselves. Perhaps pride in
their heritage, history and
nationality is something bread
in them at birth.

“(Haitians) carry themselves
proudly and erect as if conscious
of their freedom and indepen-
dence.” — Frederick Douglass’
Delivered Speech on Haiti at
the World's Fair January 2,
1893.

In the case of the Ms Port au
Prince advertisement, it is easy
to be sympathetic to a young
woman of Haitian decent suf-
fering from the vexing delays
that many in her position face
after applying for citizenship
upon reaching 18. Persons like
her, may be unable to partici-
pate in a Miss Bahamas pageant
because she is technically not
Bahamian.

However, Mr Harris believes
the advertisement is indicative
of what he sees as a subversive
plan by some members of the
Haitian community to quietly
infiltrate and desensitize
Bahamians to an “invading” cul-
ture.

"I believe what you are seeing
is a multi-layered approach
towards testing the water for a
concerted and well organised
approach in putting out the
Haitian platform. I think you
have intelligent people out there
who are sympathetic to the
Haitian plight whose object it is
to try to bend Bahamian behav-
iour to accept a certain position.
I think that is morally unfair. I
don't think that I have to sus-
pend who I am to accept who
you are. It is not appropriate to
have this kind of event," he said.

At the end of the day there
simply may need to be more
understanding and sensitivity
among Bahamians for the plight
of Haitians living in the coun-
try.

“We need to be respectful,
tolerant, kind, compassionate,
merciful, fair, caring and con-
siderate towards each other as
we all came from the same
source, Mother Africa and
Adam and Eve. God created
Haitians as well. Many people
fail to appreciate that fact. Why
do you think God created
Haitians? I am sure it was not
to be abused and mistreated by
Bahamians,” Ms Baptiste said.

Anecdotally, relations
between the Bahamian and
Haitian community run hot and
cold depending on the social or
political circumstances under
which they meet.

You can always count on
immigration and the use of pub-
lic health and education
resources to get bloods boiling.

Nevertheless, the communi-
ties share common ground on
many levels.

Bahamians have shared not
only hospital and school rooms
with their Haitian brothers and
sisters, but bedrooms as well.
They go to clubs together, the
same churches and the same
public events.

Furthermore, there has never
been any violent clashes
between the two communities
to indicate the intention of one

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to eliminate the other.

It is this vexatious question
of origin that over complicates
things.

Those who choose to busy
themselves with nation building
will find an attempt to divide
and compartmentalize 300,000
people a counterintuitive effort.
The fewer people you have the
shallower the skills, experiences
and creativity.

Ms Baptiste puts it this way,
“For far too long, our leaders
have encouraged division
among our people for their own
personal agendas. But God the
Almighty’s first instruction to
mankind in the book of Genesis
was to be “fruitful and multi-
ply” — not divide or subtract.”

Whether this is what the
Almighty actually meant is up
for debate, but her point still
rings true.

“In entertainment, you find
many Bahamian men and
women going to the Haitian
clubs and restaurants to enjoy
the music and the food. This is
how many Haitian and Bahami-
ans are living in Freeport.

“From an employee/employer
point of view, the relations are
also good. Most Bahamian
employers prefer to work with
Haitian employees, because
these people are motivated and
they tend to get the job done
effectively and efficiently. Most
Bahamian employers would tell
you that they trust the Haitian
employees more than they trust
other Bahamians.

“So in a nutshell, I would say,
in Grand Bahama we are enjoy-
ing excellent relations with each
other. If this is not happening
nationwide, then maybe we
need to start and get the ball
rolling, and bridge the gaps that
exist through respect and edu-
cation. We all know how good
conch salad is, and in Freeport,
Grand Bahama we are all mixed
up just like conch salad,” Ms
Baptiste said.

The gradual unfolding of time
will reveal whether the Bahamas
is at the brink of a “cultural
war” or not. If we are, there are
certainly two things that will fuel
the battles to come: ignorance
and fear. Avoiding these hostil-
ities will require sincere efforts
to integrate and assimilate those
persons unfairly marginalized
by impractical laws that tend to
do nothing but frustrate a grow-
ing and increasingly influential
segment of our population.

But what of this “assault” on
Bahamian culture from the
Haitian community? Well, it can
only be considered an assault if
you see culture as a static thing
and in that case these islands
have been “assailed” by foreign
cultures since that legendary
Italian explorer set foot here in
1492. If we assimilate our Hait-
ian brothers and sisters and
make them feel more like
Bahamians of Haitian decent
and less like Haitians who feel
they should be Bahamian,
(Haitian-Bahamian) then Hait-
ian culture will be just another
thread in the complicated and
beautiful tapestry of all that is
“truly Bahamian.”

Both Ms Batiste and Mr Har-
ris can agree that there is a deep
need for assimilation.

“We all have a role to play in
this assimilation and integration
process. We need to start with
the media, and then have the
government, the schools and the
churches get involved in enhanc-
ing our country through educa-
tion.

But how will you reach the
majority of Haitians who are not
reading The Tribune or other
newspapers? We need a Hait-
ian-Bahamian Radio station to
fill that void. We need to reach
the Haitian community and
teach them about their rights,
our laws, our culture, our coun-
try, love and life,” she said.

However, Mr Harris points
out that there appears to be a
double standard among mem-
bers in the Haitian community.

"There is a complaint that I
feel unfairly treated but the jus-
tification of their expression of
anger is that they say ‘I will
gravitate to the Haitian flag. I
will place it on my car, in front
of my business, my home,
etcetera. The question is where
does your allegiance lie? If you
are applying and earnestly want
to be recognised as a citizen why
the need to do this?”

Remember, according to Sir
Lynden, and it's fair to assume
that as leader of the government
delegation he spoke for all per-
sons from his side, the require-
ments to be Bahamian are
embarrassingly simple: “Loyal-
ty to our Bahamas over and
above all other; zeal for our
Bahamas unmatched by any
other; concern for other
Bahamians over all others.”

It remains for those of us still
here on Earth to determine if
things have changed since April
12, 1972.

¢ What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail rmissick @tri-
bunemedia.net



PAGE 7C



THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST



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(Al

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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS









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Today Tuesday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
“4 High = Low W High Low W WASSAU Today: Eat{5-20Knots | 3-6Feet 5-10Mies S1°F
: ta, 0| 1 |2 3|4 |p| 6 6| 7|8 | ofiolt FIC OFC F/C F/C Tuesday: __ SSE at 15-25 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
a i Acapulco 89/31 73/22 pe 87/30 74/23 § FREEPORT Today: E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 80°F
PF ail LOW | MODERATE J HIGH | WHIGH J EXT = Amsterdam 73/22 57/13 s 58/14 48/8 + Tuesday: _E at 15-25 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 80° F
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Honolulu 84/28 73/22 pc 86/380 73/22 pc Oklahoma City 83/28 64/17 t 84/28 63/17 t Tucson 93/33 66/18 s 91/32 65/18 s ee 7 SS ———
Houston 91/32 71/21 t 90/32 71/21 pc Orlando 87/30 71/21 t 88/31 69/20 t Washington, DC 78/25 62/16 t 67/19 6246 r+ Nhe





PAGE 8C, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



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INSIGHT



Atlantis and crew land
after Hubble mission

@ By JOHN ANTCZAK
Associated Press Writer

EDWARDS AIR FORCE
BASE, Calif. (AP) — Space
shuttle Atlantis brought its crew
of seven astronauts safely back
to Earth on Sunday after thun-
derstorms in Florida forced a
detour to sunsplashed Califor-
nia, ending a 13-day mission
that repaired and enhanced the
Hubble Space Telescope.

“Now and only now can we
declare this mission a total suc-
cess — the astronauts are safe-
ly on the ground,” NASA sci-
ences chief Ed Weiler told a
Florida press conference.

Atlantis’ crew had waited
since Friday for the go-ahead
to land as Mission Control
hoped to avoid the time and
expense — about $1.8 million
— of diverting to California’s
Edwards Air Force Base.

The Florida weather refused
to yield and Mission Control
finally directed shuttle com-
mander Scott Altman to head
to California. The shuttle’s twin
sonic booms rocked the Mojave
Desert as it swooped out of a
dazzling morning sky.

Out on the runway after
landing, Altman reflected on
how long it had taken to get
their mission under way — and
then to end it.

“When we got down to Flori-
da I looked at everybody and
said, ’At last,”’ Altman said. “I
didn’t realize it was going to be
so hard to get back to the Earth
in the end. So again I guess I
say the same thing, at last we’re
back on the ground.”

It was the 53rd shuttle land-
ing at Edwards; the last one was
in November.

The crew finally set foot on
the ground about two hours
after touchdown, receiving
greetings from ground person-
nel before they began the cus-
tomary walkaround to inspect
the exterior of their spacecraft.
It was uncertain whether the
crew would return to their
Houston homes later Sunday
or on Monday.

NASA officials said it will
take about a week to prepare



THE SPACE shuttle Atlantis comes in for a landing Sunday at the NASA
Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base, California, at the
conclusion of mission STS-125 to repair the Hubble space telescope...

(AP Photo: Reed Saxon)

Atlantis for its ferry flight back
to Kennedy Space Center atop
a NASA Boeing 747.

During five spacewalks, the
astronauts gave the 19-year-old
Hubble new science instru-
ments, pointing devices and
batteries, and fixed broken
instruments. The astronauts
overcame stuck bolts and other
difficulties.

The work will add years to
the life of the telescope and its
study of the universe.

Initial checkouts of the
repaired Hubble were going
well, Weiler said. He noted that
the telescope had yet to see any
starlight but he said he expect-
ed it to gather data by August.

Much was made of Atlantis’
departure from Hubble as the
last time it will be touched by
humans, and Weiler acknowl-
edged that was an “emotional
moment.” But he wanted noth-
ing to do with sad thoughts.

“Geez!” he exclaimed. “We
just repaired the Hubble Space
Telescope. We got a new tele-
scope, four new instruments,
two of them dead now alive.
We've got another five, six, sev-
en, eight years with the new
telescope. These are truly the
best of times not the worst of
times.”

NASA eventually expects to
steer Hubble into the Pacific
sometime in the early 2020s
using a robotic vehicle, though
it’s possible that might be done
with a crewed vehicle, NASA’s
new Orion.

The astronauts brought back
Hubble’s old wide-field camera
they pulled out, so it can be dis-
played at the Smithsonian Insti-
tution. The replacement cam-
era and other new instruments
will enable Hubble to peer
deeper into the universe.

The $1 billion repair mission
almost didn’t happen. It was
canceled in 2004, a year after
the Columbia tragedy, because
of the dangers of flying into a
350-mile-high orbit that did not
offer any shelter in case
Atlantis suffered damage from
launch debris or space junk.
The public protest was intense,
and NASA reinstated the flight
after developing a rescue plan
and shuttle repair kits.

Shuttle Endeavour was on
standby for a possible rescue
mission until late last week,
after inspections found
Atlantis’ thermal shielding to
be solid for re-entry. Endeav-
our now will be prepped for a
June flight to the international
space station.





Full Text

PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Christie:PLP party leaders ‘secur C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.150MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER MOSTLYSUNNY, T-STORM HIGH 89F LOW 77F I N S I G H T SEEINSIGHTSECTION S P O R T S Cultural war SEEPAGEFIFTEEN Cup joy for Baillou n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@ tribunemedia.net PLP leader Per ry Christie yesterday said that he, Deputy Leader Cynthia “Mother” Pratt and party chairman Glenys Hanna Martin are all “secure” in their positions, despite the efforts and aspirations of certain people who wish to “destabilise” the par ty or cause “political mischief.” In the wake of signs that some within the party have formed factions intent on promoting the leadership ambitions of certain individuals, opposition leader Perry Christie yesterday said he still has the “overwhelming support” of PLP followers as well as the responsibility of ensuring that “when the party is passed on, it Head of the Opposition has ‘overwhelming support’ of followers The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com I N S I D E SECTIONINSIDE Real Estate Claim that police charging bailed individuals ‘to get them off streets’ AN EXPANDING SLUM has driven residents of Gamble Heights to take action by working together to clean up the area. The growing settlement of plywood shacks is said to be powered by illegally sourced electricity with water tapped from city pipes while garbage piles up outside the village. SEEPAGETWO F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f GAMBLE HEIGHT SRESIDENTSTAKECLEAN-UPACTION n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net POLICE often charge individuals released on bail for seri ous crimes with other offences that they have “absolutely no evidence” that person committed simply to get them off the streets and back behind bars, the President of the Bar Asso ciation has alleged. Wayne Munroe made this charge as he hit out at what he claimed was the irrational and counterproductive manner in which the Attorney General chooses to determine the order in which accused criminals will be put down for trial and the lack of public outrage about it claiming that the office must be held responsible to some degree for the number of dangerous people getting bail. His comments come after leaked information from the Police’s Security and Intelligence branch showed that of 205 people released from prison in April, 11 were on bail for murder or attempted murder. Meanwhile, in the same week, the Court of Appeal ruled that the section of the Bail Act, 1996, which sought to prohibit judges from granting bail to people accused of “serious” crimes such as murder was “void” and “unconstitutional.” The attorney, senior partner at the law firm Lockhart and PLEASE NOTE THAT, DUE TO THE MEMORIAL D AY HOLIDAY IN THE US, THERE WILL BE N O US A TODAY IN TODAY’S EDITION OF THE TRIBUNE. SEE page nine PLP LEADER Perry Christie Allegation made by Bar Association Pr esident SEE page 10 A BRUTAL stabbing in Har bour Island has left a 28-yearold man in serious condition. The man was airlifted from the North Eleuthera island to be treated at a hospital in New Providence after he was stabbed in the back at around 4am on Saturday. Police say he was involved in an argument with a 34-year-old woman before the stabbing. However police provided no details of where the stabbing took place in the popular tourist destination, or if the matter was a domestic incident. No one has yet been arrested in connection with the stabbing. Anyone with any information that may assist police investigations should call Crime Stoppers anonymously at 328-TIPS (8477 28-year-old in serious condition after stabbing n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net SENATOR Katherine Forbes Smith will shortly take up the post of Consul Gener al at a newly-opened Bahamas Consulate office in Atlanta, Georgia, the Cabinet Office announced yesterday. Mrs Smith will leave her Senate appointment and job as Parliamentary Secretary in the Office of the Prime Min ister to start work in Atlanta on June 1. A statement from the Cabinet Office said the new consular office has been opened in response to the growing demand for service by Bahamians resident in the greater Atlanta area and by businesses in the southeastern United States wishing to GUNSHOTS were fired from a Hummer as it chased a gold coloured Honda on Marathon Road at around 8 o’clock Friday night. Police acted quickly when offi cers saw shots being fired from the military-style vehicle and called for reinforcement to chase down the cars. Both vehicles were stopped moments later. A 12 gauge shotgun and 13 shotgun shells were found in the Hummer. The driver was arrest ed. A 34-year-old man is in police custody. Anyone with any information that may assist police investiga tions should call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477 Man in custody after gunshots fired from vehicle INSIDE WEAL THY PO TENTIAL RESIDENT S ‘ ARE BEING DRIVEN OUT BY GAMBLING RESTRICTIONS’ PAGETHREE CAT ISLANDERS CHEER INAUGURAL FLIGHT PAGEFIVE Senator to take up Consul General post SEE page nine

PAGE 2

n B y MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@ tribunemedia.net A SLUM expanding on the borders of a New Providence c ommunity has driven conc erned residents to take action by working together to clean up the area. Residents of Gamble Heights fear rising crime, poor sanitation and diseases preading in the area off Baillou Hill Road South, as more and more people move into a shanty village of Haitians and Bahamians on otherwise disused land behind their subdivision. T he growing settlement of p lywood shacks is powered b y illegally sourced electrici ty and water is tapped from c ity pipes. Garbage is piling u p outside the village, attracting oversized rodents, and residents fear the sluma llows illegal immigrants and criminals to infiltrate their c ommunity. Members of the Gamble Heights Community Crime W atch Committee said they initiated a clean up of the a rea when government took too long to act. Residents pooled their r esources to hire a tractor and tear down overgrown b ushes on Saturday morning in the first of a weekly cleanup operation to improve the e nvironment block by block. They say the slum has b een growing for the past three decades, and residents have become so settled there are churches among their homes. Resident Theresa Johnson s aid: “We are not prejudiced a bout anybody, but some thing needs to be done. “They have no bathroom f acilities so everything is going into the ground and eventually it will go into the water table and diseases liket uberculosis (TB i nto the community... And we have children and ourf amilies to think of.” M other of three Yalice Bowe-Smith, of Sunrise Road, is troubled by rising crime as there have beent hree murders in the area t his year. Bur glars She has stopped burglars trying to break into her home, confronted supersized rats and held her children back from playing near the road when cars speed through at 100mph. “This is too much for us to handle,” she said. “But this is what we are facing. If nobody else is going to stop it, we as a community are going to step in and start with cleaning up these bushes to avoid the rodents and the crime.” For Wellington Emmanuel, 40, who grew up in the area, the greatest con cern is the expanding “Haitian Village.” He said: “Haitian people are squatting there and building, and it's getting worse, so my main concern is getting rid of these peo-p le.” T he community believes they can improve the area by working together, but Sunrise Road resident YvonneS tubbs, 49, admits she does not know how they will get rid of the illegal settlement. M rs Stubbs said: “We have to put a stop to it, but I don't know how. We invite them along with the whole com munity to our crime watch meetings, so if they come they can get a feel and understanding of what we a re all about. “But they have to move these houses, they have to go. We can't tolerate it. “I could see if they were helping the community, and contributing, but they are not, they are pulling it down. And we can see from the way it looks that that is what's happening.” Gamble Heights resident Courtney Thompson said Minister of Immigration and MP for Gamble Heights Branville McCartney assured him he would have officers tour the area along with social service staff, the police and representatives from the Ministry of Housing. However, government has been telling the residents that for years, Mr Thompson said, so the residents are tak ing the issue into their own h ands. H e said: “We have been talking about this issue for about seven years, and nothing is done, it only getsw orse.” Mr McCartney confirmed he is well aware of the situa t ion and immigration officers raided the area twice in the last year, apprehending 15 illegal immigrants in the last raid. Ownership However, he said, officials are trying to determine own ership of the land before they proceed with police, housing officers, social services and the defence force to break up the ghetto. Mr McCartney said such slums are springing up all over New Providence, and he wants to make the public more aware of them. “Many of these persons,” he said, “come over and work for Bahamians illegally, so we are causing this in our own society. We are work ing on something to show the Bahamian public how they are aiding and developing slums. “People are living in squalor. If you go there you will find it’s a slum. People are living outdoors, literally live in bushes, and they know these bushes better than most. There are caves and holes in the bushes where they hide and it seems as though it’s quite difficult to get them. “But certainly this is one of many areas that the department is very conscious of and we have begun work ing to try and see if we can deal with this.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 9 9EndsMay30S S U U I I T T S S9 9$ $BernardRd:393-3463 MackeySt:393-5684ThompsonBlvd:328-1164 FineThreads FineThreads Gamble Heights Crime Watch committee initiates clean-up G AMBLEHEIGHTS r esidents have had to pool their resources to hire a tractor to tear down overgrown bushes and get rid of garbage. C HAIRMAN OF G amble Heights Crime Watch Committee Joe Stubbs and Yalice Bowe-Smith.

PAGE 3

n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net MILLIONS of dollars could be spent in the Bahamas and increase government revenue but are being spent elsewhere as wealthy potential residents are driven out of the islands by gambling restrictions. A foreign investor, who considered purchasing high-value property in the Bahamas and becoming a permanent resident told his Nassau real estate agent he has been deterred by restrictive gaming laws. The Florida resident, who is in his fifties, spends thousands of dollars at the Wyndham Resort Crystal Palace casino when on vacation, but would be prevented from doing so if he were to live in New Providence permanently. His real estate agent, John Constantakis, said his client has been put off by cases such as Robert Halat’s. Mr Halat, 78, was forced to give up his gambling when he retired in Lyford Cay as residents are prohibited from gambling regardless of nationality under the Lotteries and Gaming Act. Mr Constantakis said: “I think the l aw they have to not let Bahamians gamble is good, because it prevents people from spending money in the casinos when they could be spending money on their families. “But for somebody’s who is very well off, and is just a resident and not a citizen, let them spend their money, we need it, especially at this time.” Economy Mr Halat is calling for foreign residents without the right to work in the Bahamas to be given the right to gamble and pump thousands of dollars into the struggling economy. He is frustrated government has not yet made a decision on changes to the law after considering reforms for two years. Meanwhile wealthy investors are playing with their money elsewhere. A Canadian friend of Mr Halat’s with property in Cable Beach chose not to become a resident because it would prevent him from gambling, and instead spends money in Las Vegas casinos. And a couple from Germany left New Providence because living in the Bahamas would mean they could not go to the casinos, Mr Halat said. He added: “If just one person will do that, then I'm certain it's hundreds of people. But even if it's only three or four people, you are talking about a couple of million dollars that could be coming into the economy. “These people (the government are shooting themselves in the foot. “If it takes two years to make a decision like that it really bodes badly for the Bahamas, and I am seeing that more and more. This is the problem with both governments, they can't make a decision, and a decision shouldn’t take that long. “If they were a business, and after two years they haven’t been able to find a simple solution to the problem, they would be bankrupt already.” The Bahamas Hotel Association (BHA advised the Ministry of Tourism to lift restrictions and allow legal residents to gamble. And as Florida considers relaxing gaming laws and introducing more games to the state to increase government revenue at a time when government revenue is falling, even more business could be taken away from the Bahamas. For Mr Halat, who suffers from emphysema and believes he has just eight months to live, the right to gamble would greatly improve his quality of life. He said: “When I was younger I would go to the casino occasionally, and now with my old age, I would go in the morning and have lunch, play a few games, and be home by 3pm. “I am so limited in what I can do, and if I can’t get out of the house,I have no drive. At least before I had a goal in life to do something.” Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace said laws are under review but it is a complicated process because there are a number of reforms to be considered He said: “I wish I could give you a definitive date for when it will be completed, but I can say it’s definitely something that is under consideration.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009, PAGE 3 3 pc Queen Post Bed 3 pc Queen Post Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $3,950 $3,950 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $4,150 $4,150Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank I I r r i i s s h h C C o o u u n n t t r r y y s s i i d d e e I I r r i i s s h h C C o o u u n n t t r r y y s s i i d d e e n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – A 23-year-old male resident of Bootle Bay was killed in a traffic accident at West End early Sunday morning, pushing the traffic fatality count to seven for the year on Grand Bahama. Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle reported that the accident occurred around 2.30am on Bayshore Road involving a 1999 grey-coloured Delta 98 Oldsmobile with license plate number 43861, owned by Bowe’s Heavy Equipment. The victim was ejected from the vehicle and pronounced dead at the scene. Police have not released the victim’s identity. Mr Bootle said police investigations revealed that the driver was travelling east on Bayshore Road. He lost control of the vehicle while trying to negotiate a curve, knocked down a utility pole and crashed into a chain linked fence. The vehicle landed in two feet of rain water on the road side. ASP Bootle said Dr Kahn was summoned to the scene, where he examined the victim and pronounced him dead. He said the police are advising motorists to drive with extreme care and caution on the road, especially in wet and slippery rainy conditions. Man killed in traffic accident In brief FAST-ACTINGpolice responded to reports ofp rowlers in Mackey Street and Carib Road on Friday night. The officers from Wulff Road Police Station chased two men trying to flee the area near Red Hot liquor store and sports lounge when they arrived at around 11.30pm. When they caught up with t he men, they searched them to find a .44 handgun, two pairs of gloves and a tam mask. Police believe they were preparing to carry out an armed robbery. A 34-year-old Bamboo Town man and a 32-year-old man from South Beach have b een arrested in connection with the incident. Anyone who may be able to assist police in their investigations should call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477 Two men arrested after r epor ts of pr owlers Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. Wealthy potential residents ‘are being driven out by gambling restrictions’

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EDITOR, The Tribune. I come to the Bahamas quite frequently to visit my family and always enjoy my time here. I offer the following as someone who has travelled extensively to all parts of the world and understands mark eting. I suspect that the tourist trade is a major and vital contributor to the Bahamian economy. The Bahamas markets itself as a n island paradise and the out islands prove the point spectacularly. The trouble is that tourists arrive in Nassau and first impressions of the Bahamas aree xtremely negative, not comparing well to other holiday destina-t ions. There is a container port in the m iddle of the biggest tourist shopping area and the traffic congestion is worse than in New York or London. The last time I was here it took t wo hours to get no more than halfway across the island. Trafficl ights are numerous and many do not work, buses do not appear to u nderstand the concept of desig nated bus stops and huge articulated lorries jostle with tourists on Bay Street. In the current econ omic situation the “duty free” prices for luxury goods are matched by prices in the USA and UK and are therefore not good value. Communications need upgrading. The whole world uses mobile phones and expects to be able tou se them on holiday. European users cannot do so i n the Bahamas because the local provider has no agreements with a ny major European mobile network provider. Unless one uses FedEx, there is no point in sending postcards by post as they cant ake months to arrive at their dest inations. My observations over the last six years are that Nassau is becoming a dirty, traffic choked a nd faded city with vacant lots, buildings in disrepair and pot h oles one can fall in. Most tourists have spent a lot o f money for their holiday and can get their fill of diesel fumes and traffic jams at home. They expect and deserve better when they come on holiday. If customer’s expectations are not met, they will take their business elsewhere. The world is getting smaller a nd while the Caribbean will remain a popular holiday destination, the Bahamas is likely to be bypassed unless changes are made and made quickly. I t is no good looking inwards, trying to accommodate all the vested interests. Nassau needs to become outward looking and examine first-h and what their Caribbean competitors are doing. T here must be experienced people in the country able to prov ide an objective vision for the future. Without it, in tourist terms, the future looks bleak for Nassau and ultimately the Bahamas. W hat a great waste and pity that would be. DW TOWNSEND Y orkshire, England, May 21, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm B AHAMIANS now fear that Thursday’s A ppeal Court ruling that section 4(2 Bail Act, 1996, is unconstitutional will release m ore dangerous persons onto our streets. The 1996 amendment to the 1994 Act denies bail to persons accused of serious offences against the person, including murder and armed robbery. It is not necessarily true that more persons w ill be released as a result of this ruling, nor did the Appeal Court intend it to be so. However,w hat the Appeal Court’s ruling did was to return to the presiding judge the decision of whether to g rant bail in a particular case. It called the legislature’s mandatory bail denial unconstitutional. However, s.4(1 court is satisfied that in particular cases, generally drug matters, detention is not justified, theno n ordering a release on bail a record must be included “giving the reasons for the order of r elease on bail.” We believe the public is also entitled to this information in the cases of mur der, armed robbery, rape and other serious offences. Whether more dangerous persons will now be released onto the streets will be solely in the hands of the presiding judge. A ppeals Court President Dame Joan Sawyer said that in her view the main issue in t he Attorney General’s appeal against the granting of bail to four men was “whether subsection 4(2 the Constitution, in other words whether Par liament of the Bahamas has the power to enact legislation which has the purported effect of denying bail to persons arrested and detained on reasonable suspicion of having committed serious offences, no matter what t he circumstances of the alleged offences are, or how long a person is detained by the prison authorities or the police without trial.” She said the power parliament had given itself taking the decision of bail in certain cases out of the hands of the judges flew in the face of article 19(3 which provides that a person not tried within a reasonable time should be released with e ither a conditional discharge or until his case is called. It was the view of the Appeals Court that it was for the judges not parliament to exercise their discretion as to whether or not bail should be granted. Although, the Appeal Court last week refused bail for the cases oft he four men before it, it agreed that this decision should have been made by the judge, n ot by an Act of parliament. That discretion, said Dame Joan, must be c arried out “judicially” as well as “judicious ly.” Explaining the judges’ decision, lawyer Murrio Ducille, who represented the men before the court, said that the appellate c ourt’s decision essentially meant that parl iament “cannot perform a judicial act. You cannot tell a judge when and when not to g rant bail,” he said. In 1996 the Bail Act of 1994 was amended to make the refusal of bail for more serious offences kidnapping, murder, armed robbery, treason and conspiracy to commit anyo ne of them mandatory unless the offender had not been tried within a reasonablet ime. In other words parliament legislated that the judge hearing the case could exercise n o discretion in the granting or withholding of bail, unless, of course the accused had been languishing in prison for an unreasonable time. But what was an unreasonable time? In t he past there was no bail for a murder accused. However, in those way off days the c ourt calendar was not clogged as it is today murders were few and far between and justice was swift. But times have changed. Today the courts cannot keep up with the crime, including mur ders, attempted murders, armed robberies, and violence to person and property. I n 1994, the Privy Council ruling in a case from Jamaica prescribed a five year limit for e xecution after conviction of murder. This case came up in the House of Assembly in October 1996 when members were debating the very amendment to the Bail Act to which the Appeals Court objected last week. The legislation being introduced then was that the denial of bail to persons charged with serious offences be mandatory. In view of the Privy Council’s five year r ule for convicted murderers, Mr Ingraham told the House that government had to con centrate its efforts to ensure that the judiciary was able to hear and determine all capital cases and appeals quickly. Five years was the time limit to prevent hanging in murder cases. But in 1996 the Privy Council commuted to life in prison two convicted murderers from the Bahamas. In their c ase the time limit on executions had been shortened to three and a half years. But how long was too long to hold a person awaiting trial in a murder case? No one knew. However, as serious crimes increased the time these men were being held in prison seemed to be getting shorter and shorter. Until ins everal cases murder accused out on bail were committing second murders while awaiting a c ourt date for the first. Sometimes they themselves were killed, thus avoiding an earthly tria l. Tomorrow we shall deal with the reason that the legislature took the judicial discretion from the judges and by an act of parliament denied bail to persons charged with serious crimes. Our tourists deserve better when they come here LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Bail decision to be left to judge FREEPORTCITYSUBDIVISION CENTRAL AREA-FREEPORT LOT NO. 5Block PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single StoreyCommercialComplex PROPERTYSIZE: 65,341sq.ft. LOCATION: OntheMallattheRanfurly Circus APPRAISED VALUE: $2,260,000 F O R S A L E I NTERESTEDPARTIES SHOULD SUBMITOFFERS INCLUSIVE OF TELEPHONE CONTACTANDPOSTALADDRESS TO:CB DISTRESSED PROPERTIES,CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT, P.O. BOX-SS-6263 NASSAU, BAHAMAS OR EMAIL US AT:DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM *WERESERVETHERIGHTTOREJECTANYORALLOFFERS. )25(17)XOO\IXUQLVKHGWRZQKRXVHLQSULYDWHDUHDRQ (DVWHUQRDGQHDUEHDFK%HGURRPV :DVKURRP/DUJH.LWFKHQ%XUJODUEDUV $VNLQJSHUPRQWKIRUTXLFNUHQWDOVHULRXV LQTXLULHVRQO\SOHDVH EDITOR, The Tribune. I read in the paper yesterday that another member of Mr Knowles’ family came close to losing her life due to another Mack truck which lost its brakes. His brother was killed not long ago for alleged neglect or driving without due care and attention. W hat I find ‘unacceptable’ is that Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and others have not since addressed this issue nor publicly made any headway in Mr Knowles’ plea. Sometimes it so happens that nothing is done unless a member of their own fam-i ly is either hurt, killed or injured then something is done, maybe. I am a Bahamian, but not a proud one. I wish I could say different, but I can’t. Our political leaders either bury their heads in the sand like dumb ostriches or deny any and everything, including the kitchen sink. Bahamian people must understand that they have the right to oust these persons and any individual who wants to make a change, I make a suggestion run for office. T hese MPs in the House now need to all be retired so a new crew can take over without all the other mess involved. Cheers and lets keep our heads up OK. I AN G MOREE Nassau, May, 2009. Our political leaders bur y heads in the sand E DITOR, The Tribune. I vomited a little in my mouth after hearing the Attorney Gen eral expressing his confidence in the Bahamian judicial system and its soundness. The only explanation I can think of that would make theh ead of the government’s legal office say something so unreal is that there must be two judicial systems: One we deal with on a daily basis and the other knowno nly to Mr. Barnett, because the one Bahamians deal with on a d aily basis cannot be described without a few choice negative expletives attached. T he judicial system is in a MESS Mr. Barnett! A nd you not acknowledging this fact is an indication that very little significant reforms are going to take place under your watch as Attorney General simply because in order to fix a problem the problem needs to be acknowl-e dged first. I can spend the rest of this letter detailing examples to show the awful state of the judicial sys tem, but there are enough docum entation in the morning newspapers, talk shows and the man o n the streets waiting years for his turn to seek justice only to have road blocks of corrupt l awyers and molasses moving officers of the court in his way. M r. Barnett, this single act of blind-sided confidence has pro moted you to the top of the totem pole of inadequate leaders. Congratulations! You were able to surpass Neko Grant’s explanation.sorry, I mean apol-o gy for failing to deal with traffic lights after over two years in office. When will this madness end? Painfully tired of this kind of l eadership. E RIC B. STRACHAN Nassau, May 15, 2009. Painfully tired of this kind of leadership

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A GROUP of Cat Islanders gathered and cheered as the inaugural flight of a new Sky Bahamas Airlines service to Cat Island touched down at New Bight Airport. Enhancing the options available to travellers, SkyBahamas Airlines undertook the flight to New Bight last Wednesday, with passengers onboard a 33seater aircraft. A number of island officials and community leaders, including Senior Island Administrator Charles King and Deputy Chief Councillor Alfred Daniels, as well as “Bo Hog”, a local rake and scrape band, and the “Rooters” greeted passengers as they disembarked. Sky Bahamas CEO Randy Butler said the company was making good on its promise two months earlier to bring its services to the island. “We promised you that in short order we would return to the island to make available to you scheduled, superior and safe travel services. “Much has changed economically since then, but a promise is a promise. Our word is our bond and today is a delivery on our commitment to Cat Island to give them the superior first-class service that they deserve.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009, PAGE 5 242.422.4677ken@erabahamas.comwww.erabahamas.comDupuch Real Estate when no one else can help you find a home RATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS PHONE: 327-6464WE SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!STRUCKUM(DF55 AN ORGANISATION advocating the rights of young people is calling for youth to be better protected from physical, sexual and verbal abuse in society. The Bahamas National Youth Council (BNYC non-government and non-partisan organisation formed to fight the issues facing youth, is demanding stricter regulations of adults working in schools and youth groups. Teachers and school staff should only be hired after a comprehensive background check has been completed, and they should then be subject to an annual police check, the BNYC says. The council has further called for school surveys asking students about their experiences to give thema chance to voice their fears and concerns without shame. A statement from the BNYC executive board states: “It is our belief that more can be done to ensure students of these institutions, whether public or private, are safe from paedophilia, physical and verbal abuse, and other acts contrary to the proper conduct of those put in responsibility of their education. “If allegations of misconduct are found, they should be investigated expeditiously, and the alleged offender taken out of the school system until the issue has been resolved in the courts of law.” Youth groups should also be more open about their activities by adhering to a mandatory level of transparency enforced by an independent body, said the BNYC. The executive board statement states: “Young peo ple involved in these programmes have a right to voice their concerns and as such, an independent organisation that is void of bias, objective and forthright, should be appointed to conduct surveys of young persons to ascertain whether their rights are being upheld.” And parents are called on as having the greatest responsibility to ensure their children are safe, as the BNYC urges parents to talk to their children and stay informed of their ongoing activities both in and out of school. For more information about the BNYC e-mail bahamasnyc@gmail.com. Call for youth to be better protected Cat Islanders cheer inaugural flight Cat Islanders cheer inaugural flight Cat Islanders cheer inaugural flight Cat Islanders cheer inaugural flight Cat Islanders cheer inaugural flight Cat Islanders cheer inaugural flight Cat Islanders cheer inaugural flight Cat Islanders cheer inaugural flight Cat Islanders cheer inaugural flight Cat Islanders cheer inaugural flight

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n By SIR RONALD SANDERS (The writer is a Consultant and former Caribbean diplomat) A T ECHNICAL team has been appointed by the foreign ministers of the Caribbean Community and Common Market (Caricom sider an application from the Dominican Republic to join the 15-nation group. The team has been asked to have the report r eady for consideration by Caricom heads of government when they meet in Guyana in July. This will not be an easy process by any means. Three factors are at play. The first of these is that Caricom has not yet sufficiently deepened the relationship among its existing members. The second is the different interests of the Cari com countries – some might see an advantage in greater access to the DR’s market, while others would regard opening their own markets to the DR as a disadvantage to local companies. The third is deep concerns of Haiti about the DR with regard to human rights issues related to labour and migration. When the West Indian Commission (WIC report, “Time for Action”, in 1992 it placed great importance on deepening the relationship between the then 13 Caricom member states – all of whom were English-speaking. The Commission regarded the 13 as a “core group” who should deepen their relationship in furtherance of their collective interest in the region, the hemisphere and the wider world. Amongst the actions that the WIC recommended was the creation of a Single Market and Economy, the establishment of the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ ment disputes and to replace the British Privy Council as a final appellate Court, and the institu tionalisation of a Commission – similar to the Commission of the European Union – to manage the operations of Caricom including the Single Market and Economy and external economic relations. Specifically, the WIC said: “The West Indies must both deep en the process of integration and reach out to a wider Caribbean in appropriate levels of cooperation. The dual track approach may produce differing levels of integration within the Caribbean; it may produce circles of associa tion that start with the intimate West Indian family and others that encompass an extended family of the non-English speaking islands of the Caribbean, and a still larger circle of closer relations with countries of the Caribbean Basin that include territories of the South and Central American littoral.” The WIC was especially concerned that “on the economic side, we have to feel our way in enlarging the Caricom market so that we make progress in that direction without being overw helmed by new members and end up being lost within our own widened community.” This process was not followed. Caricom admitted Surinam and then Haiti to membership before the process of deepening the relationship between its core members had advanced very far. The Single Market was not l aunched until 2006, fourteen years after it was proposed, and its implementation by several countries has been painfully slow since then. The CCJ, while it operates as a Court of original jurisdiction for trade and investment disputes among Caricom countries, is not the final appellate court for all b ut two countries, and the machinery for governance of Caricom remains ineffective since neither a Commission with executive authority nor any thing akin to it has been established. This failure to consolidate and advance the Caricom inner core has weakened the organisation a nd the capacity of its member states to bargain effectively in the international community and to strengthen their own economies. And, the introduction of new members, before the relationship has been deepened, complicates the process even more particular ly as new members have broughtd ifferent laws, different domestic decision-making processes and different ambitions. The argument remains valid that even now Caricom should deepen its own core arrangements by completing the establishment of its Single Market before attempting to expand its mem-b ership further. Indeed, expanded membership may serve to slow down if not derail the process of moving toward a Single Economy which would have to include a common currency, har monised tax policies, the devel opment of a Caricom-wide social security system, and free movem ent of people for several cate gories of workers. The DR may not be interested in pursuing these stated goals of Caricom. On the external relations of Caricom, expanded membership now could also impair the development of harmonised foreign policies. While the Caricom Treaty calls for the coordination of the foreign policies of its member states, it is clear that to deal effectively with the international community, coordination will not be enough. This is a matter that both existing Caricom countries a nd the DR will have to consider carefully in their separate interests, for their interests will not always converge. With regard to new market opportunities, while a free trade agreement exists between the DR and Caricom countries, it covers only trade in about 400 products; it does not cover services. The f ree trade agreement between the DR and Caricom countries was worth US$578 million last year. But, of that total, natural gas imports from Trinidad and Tobago alone accounted for US$546 million; the remaining US$32 million was neither here nor there. Trinidad and Tobago’s natural gas e xports to the DR would have taken place even in the absence of a free trade agreement. Significantly, in 2007 every Caricom country, except Belize and Trinidad and Tobago, had a negative trade balance with the DR. In other words, they did not benefit from the free trade agreem ent. But, since the European Union (EU of the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA signed last year, Caricom countries are compelled to liberalise goods, services and investment with the DR at the same rate asw ith the EU. Therefore, from the DR’s viewpoint, even though there would be benefits in partic ipating in Caricom’s single mar ket, the obligations of the “Single Economy” and “Community” aspects of the Caricom Treaty may be too much for it to bear. In any event, it would have to seek a waiver from Caricom’s common external tariff since it is higher than the DR’s and would increase the cost of imports and makee xports less competitive. Then there are human rights i ssues over labour and migration between Haiti – already a member state of Caricom – and the DR. Even if other Caricom countries would be willing to allow the DR’s membership of Caricom limited to its Common Marketa spects only and not to the Community dimension which would i nclude foreign policy, it is unlikely that Haiti would agree to the DR’s membership without bind ing assurances on these two issues they are assurances the DR may not be able to give. The Caricom Treaty does provide for associate membership of Caricom. It is an option that botht he DR and existing Caricom states might consider at this time in both their interests. Responses to: ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 6, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE CARICOM: Lost in a widened Caribbean Community? WORLDVIEW S irRonald Sanders

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MINISTERCARL BETHEL p erformed doubled uty as Education Minister and the Member of Parliament for the Sea Breeze constituen cy when he presented Sadie Curtis Primary School with two technologically-advanced ENO boards. M inister Bethel told the t eachers and students during the presentation that the fundsfor the boards came from the $ 100,000 parliamentary allotment given to each representative to assist in their con stituency. M inister Bethel said he was d elighted to provide the stu dents with the devices that will replace the traditional chalk-b oard in the classroom. He said the ENO boards have only been on the market for a few months, and the fact thatS adie Curtis school has two a lready is evidence of his com mitment to their education. Minister Bethel told the stu dents that the boards will make learning fun and motivate them to improve their attendance at school. He also encouraged the grade one students to learn as much as they possibly can as the benefits of a good education, such as a n ice home, family and other opportunities, will follow. The students were delighted when the Minister told them that he would be presenting the school with two boards andhe hoped that soon all of the classrooms would be fitted with this equipment. Dr. Mary Markowsky, Pres ident of E.T.C. International, the authorised distributor for the ENO board in Caribbean region, including The Bahamas, attended the ceremony and noted that the board is the latest advancement in education. Dr. Markowsky stated that although there are several versions of the interactive white boards in Bahamian schools, the ENO board is more versa tile because it does not require any electricity, and teachers can use both permanent and dry-erase markers on them.The older ‘White Boards’ will not function if permanent markers and magnets come in contact with them. Mr. Manley Wisdom, R egional Representative for E.T.C. International, was also present and performed a demonstration for the Minister, education officers, teachers and students. He called on students to participate in the s ession by using markers to d rag items on the screen to answer questions, and place magnets on the board to spellw ords. Mr. Wisdom also showed how the device which has Internet access could be used to incorporate materialf rom the worldwide web i nstantaneously. He accessed the web and downloaded the Bahamian national anthem tow hich the students rose to their feet to sing. The grade one homeroom teacher, Mrs. Shavone Clarke,s aid the ENO board will make h er teaching easier and more interesting. She noted that today’s children enter the classroom being technologi cally savvy and instruments such as the ENO board will allow teachers to capture and maintain students’ attention throughout the lesson. Some of the other advant ages of the ENO Boards are t hat it: allows for greater creativity from teachers and students reduces teacher’s lesson preparations improves discipline because children are focused and hav ing fun learning; saves money because the use of paper and ink is reduced; fun and easy to use and is certified ‘Green Product’ because it is made from all recyclable material. Mrs. Audrey Farrington, Principal of Sadie Curtis Primary School, thanked Minister Bethel on behalf of the teach ers and students. Superintendent for the Southeastern District, Mr. Willard Barr, also attended the presentation. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009, PAGE 7 677 1111 nassau 688 1111 freeport www.indigonetworks.com purchase your home phone line and receiveFREE local number FREE local and long distance calling for one month* FREE inter-island calls to onephone customers F REE activationwhat you need to use onephoneunlimited broadband internet a one onephone telephone adapter a touch tone telephone*certain restrictions applyget your onephone at LEARNING IS MORE FUN Sadie Curtis Primary School grade one students enjoy learning with their new ENO interactive whiteboard.P ictured watching the students are Education Minister Carl W. Bethel; Mrs. Audrey Farrington, Principal, Sadie Curtis Primary School; Mr. Willard Barr, District Superintendent, Southeastern District and Dr. Mary Markowsky, President of E.T.C. International, a uthorised distributor of the ENO board in the Caribbean. Sadie Curtis Primary gets the latest technology in education Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. n R OYAL PALM B EACH, Fla. SOMEanimal rights advocates are protesting a South Florida restaurant’s game, according to Associated Press. The Royal Palm Ale House in Royal Palm Beach has a game that gives patrons a shot at winning a lobster from a tank of water. It uses a metal crane similar to ones used in game machines in which players try to win stuffed animals and other prizes. The Animal Rights Foundation of Florida organized the protest, saying the lobstersfeelpainby getting “bumped, poked, prodded and repeatedly tormented” by the machine’s claw. The machine’s makers insist the game is gentle with the lobsters. Protesters target restaurant’s lobster game

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can be passed on in the same way it was passed on to (him stable organisation.” M r Christie’s comments came in response to the dissemination of a critical internal report by someone in the party by way o f a Bahamian political blog in w hat Mr Christie and other political commentators see as an attempt to embarrass him in the run up to the party’s con-v ention later this year. The report’s contents, although brought to public attention by the media last y ear, had never been made available in its entirety until now. Published on Saturday under the heading “Report ConfirmsP erry Christie Must Go or the PLP will die!” the documentwas compiled by Washington DC-based political consultants shortly after the party’s May2 007 general election defeat a nd comments significantly on how Mr Christie’s perceived “weak leadership” was the primary reason that voters did not f avour the party at the polls. The timing of the move to release the document to the wider public has led MrC hristie to conclude that it was d one “for the furtherance of political aspirations, by people who may see that as evidence against me and my leadership” i n the run up to the convention, where all leadership posts in the party can be contested. The PLP leader said: “There a re people who are in possession of the report and there are people who are prepared to release the report for their own purposes we know who they a re. It’s fine. The PLP has to learn from every aspect of thesem atters and strengthen itself and move forward.” C alling the move to highlight the report at this time “underhanded”, Mr Christie said: “At the end of the day it takes someone with the courage of t heir conviction to nominate and contest, and once they area ble to do that then the people will determine who is best to lead in whatever position is b eing contested.” “Those who would wish to take an irregular approach to the organising of the party, I bless them and I wish them the v ery best,” he added. T he PLP leader suggested that since the time that the surveys conducted by political consultants, Greenberg, Quinlan and Rosner, were undertaken, further polls have been conducted” which provide an updated and changed snapshot of the populace’s view of the party and its leadership. I have moved on in terms of the report: We have conducted further polls. They are unaware of them (those respons ible for the leak of the GQR report) and that’s just how it is. So they want to act with that information at that time and that’s fine, there’s nothing wec an do about this (the dissemination of the report),” he said. Commenting on the status of the Deputy Leadership of the p arty yesterday, Mr Christie said that with “tremendous focus” having been brought on the role in the last year, he anticipates that “when MotherP ratt does announce to the country her intention (as to whether she would wish tor emain deputy leader)” more people who are interested in that position “will then step forw ard” to contest the role at the c onvention. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009, PAGE 9 .,'=&,7< 0RQWURVH$YHQXHDQG[IRUGWUHHWGRRUVRUWKRIXOWL'LVFRXQWf $11,9(56$5<6$/( 6DOHWDUWKLV)ULGD\D\QG t (QGVDWXUGD\D\WK %,* expand trade and investment in the Bahamas. G eorgia, Alabama, Arkansas, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, South Carolina, Oklahoma, and Tennessee will come within the jurisdiction of the Atlanta Consulate General. The new Consul General will have as her C onsul Sandra Carey, who has previously s erved in the Consulate General of The B ahamas in New York and in Miami, Florida and at the Bahamas Permanent Mission to the United Nations in New York. Mrs Forbes Smith is expected to serve for at l east three years in the post. It is not known w ho will replace her in the Senate. Consul General post F ROM page one Christie:PLP party leaders ‘secure’ F ROM page one Glenys Hanna-Martin

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Munroe, told The Tribune that rather than the public expressing outrage at these facts, he believes they ought to direct their attention to what he claims is a major cause of “dangerous” people getting bail: The fact that cases are being tried by the courts “out of turn”, with newer and apparently less serious matters going to trial before individuals who have charges dating back several years for crimes like murder are given a chance to have their matters determined. Seeking to illustrate his point, the Bar Association President said he finds it “mind blowing” that the extortion case involving former senator Pleasant Bridgwater was set forth for a Supreme Court trial in September this year, although it is less than a year old. “It’s astounding. She was committed for trial and her case was scheduled to begin within six months that tells me you could do that for every case,” said the lawyer. Suggesting that certain matters do not get this treatment because the Attorney General’s office knows that they are “wholly hopeless and going to fail” that is, weak evidentially and unlikely to result in a guilty verdict Mr Munroe proposed that the practice must end in the best interests of society at large. “It boggles my mind that no one is paying attention to what is being tried. Wouldn’t it make commonsense that, if you rate me a dangerous man and I get bail because you haven’t tried me in four years, then you should try to very quickly thereafter make sure I go to trial because I am a dangerous man on the street? It should but it doesn’t happen. “Questions need to be directed towards the law enforcement community, the prosecutorial community: Why aren’t you rating these people (those charged with murder, or who may have multiple charges against them dating back for several years) and trying them first?” Having spent many years practising criminal law, the Bar Association president alleged that he and others in the legal community suspect that frustrated by the fact that certain individuals are granted bail and put back into the com munity police have been known to go on to charge such people with an offence for which they have “in some cases absolutely no evidence” to indicate that person committed, simply to get them off the streets and remanded into jail again. But Mr Munroe charged that the police, with the Attorney General’s office, share some of the responsibility for reducing the likelihood of a person who has committed a deadly crime being released on bail in the first place. They should provide the Attorney General’s office with a ranking of alleged criminals according to the level of risk they are believed to present to society when they forward their files to the Attorney General’s office which would help prosecutors determine how they should be dealt with, the attorney suggested. “If (the police number one man then the AG’s office should know to try him first so he doesn’t get bail. And the number two man his case should be second off the blocks,” he said. The lawyer said the fact that cases are not properly prioritised contributes to further criminality as accused criminals go on to get bail and the opportunity to commit other offences and persons accused of crimes which they did not commit can be persuaded to turn to a life of crime after they “lose everything” as a result of being left to languish in prison on remand for up to “three or four years.” “We destroy people’s live, we reduce them to nothing, they’re often marginal to begin with...and then we’re surprised that we have an increase in crime, I’m not!” said Mr Munroe. On Friday Attorney General Michael Barnett said that his office “aims to have all cases heard as quickly as possible,” including “not only the cases that make up the backlog, but current cases as well.” “One has to try to have all cases heard before the courts as quickly as possible having regard to the constitutional obligation for a trial within a reasonable time within the ambits of the number of courts you have operating,” he said. In response to Mr Munroe’s suggestion that accused indi viduals should be ranked and tried in order of their “danger ousness”, also taking into con sideration the number of years they have gone without a tri al, Mr Barnett said his office does not make its decisions in such a “clinical” fashion and must allow for “other factors” to come into play. Numerous messages left for the police seeking comment yesterday were not returned up to press time. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE SUNRYSE DOES YOUR STORAGE LOOK LIKE THIS?MOBILE DOCUMENT DESTRUCTIONCALL US TODAY TO HELP WITH YOUR ARCHIVAL CLEANOUT!We provide security, shredding is only the vehicle we use to deliver it. SUNRYSE SHREDDING SERVICEST: 242-322-6448 www.sunryseshred.com Email: info@sunryseshred.com 1 0 % O F FO F F Y O U R N E X T S E R V I C EE X P I R E S M AY 3 0 2 0 0 9 IT TAKESan innovative marketing plan to cause a home to sell, but to attract serious buyers, it must also b e priced fairly. What else m ust be done to successfully s ell your home? B uyers are in search of t heir dream home. If priced r easonably, they will purchase the home that best reflects their idea of that dream, and it’s the sellers who are in charge of making it happen. Experience has shown that b uyers often reduce their offers by as much as $2 for every $1 in uncompleted r epairs. Sellers won’t have to f ace those disappointing o ffers if attention is given to their home before it is ever shown. T he best method for improving buyer appeal is a “walk-through” by the seller’s BREA agent. The agent plays the part of a prospective buyer, and then suggests u pgrades, repairs, and cosmetic improvements. T hen the sellers should complete all the work before t he home is placed on the market. N either a prospective buye r, nor another agent, should ever see the home until it is in 1 00 per cent marketable condition. Excuses made at a showing are an open invitation to a reduced price. When a buyeri s disappointed, no explanation will suffice to bring the p rice back up. When selling, ask your agent for advice, and then take action. Buyers will o ften compete for such a good value. Low offers: Prevention is the cure B ahamas real estate today Carmen Massoni Claim that police charging bailed individuals F ROM page one

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n LONDON One-time Newcastle great Alan S hearer failed to keep the club in the Premier League after it lost 1-0 to Aston Villa on Sunday and was relegated along with West B romwich Albion and Middlesbrough, according to Associated Press . On a tense final day of the l eague campaign, Sunderland and Hull managed to stay up despitel osing. Hull lost 1-0 at home to newly crowned champion Manc hester United, which rested most of its stars ahead of Wednesday’s Champions League final against Barcelona, and Sunderland tumbled 3-2 at home to third-placeC helsea. Middlesbrough needed a big victory at West Ham to stand any chance of survival, but lost 2-1 and finished tied on points with West Brom, which already was assured of being relegated d espite a 0-0 draw at Blackburn. West Brom and Middlesbrough finished with 32 points, Newcastle had 34, Hull 35 and Sunderland 36. Newcastle has not won the l eague since 1927, but began the season with high hopes under Kevin Keegan. He quit after disputes with the owner, and Shearer, a local-born former Englandc aptain who scored a Premier League record 260 goals, tooko ver for the last eight games, win ning only one. I can’t say we were unlucky in the season. We went down because we weren’t good enough over 38 games,” said Shearer, who scored 206 league and cup goals for Newcastle. “Big changes have to be made at the football club.” I n Sunday’s other games, Arsenal outplayed Stoke 4-1, Liverpool beat Tottenham 3-1, Everton won 2-0 at Fulham, Manchester City edged Bolton 1-0, and Wigan b eat Portsmouth 1-0. n MILAN Francesco Totti’s late free kick ruined Paolo Maldini’s last home match for ACM ilan, lifting AS Roma to a 3-2 victory at San Siro. N ow 40, Maldini has been play ing for Milan in the top flight of I talian soccer since he was 16. He has won seven Italian league titles and five European Cups with the club. He will make his farewell when Milan goes to Fiorentina int he last round of games next weekend. The loss left Milan ins econd 10 points behind Inter Milan, which has already been crowned champion for the fourth season in a row. n G LASGOW, Scotland Rangers won the Scottish league t itle with a 3-0 victory at Dundee United, preventing Celtic from w inning its fourth straight title. Goals by Kyle Lafferty, Pedro Mendes and Kris Boyd in the first 52 minutes gave Walter Smith’s team its first league title since 2 005 with 86 points. It now hopes to complete the double by beatingF alkirk in the Scottish Cup on May 30. Celtic, which was held t o a 0-0 draw at home by thirdplace Hearts, finished four points behind. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS PAGE 12, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS N EWCASTLE UNITED f ans react after their team was relegated from the English Premier League after losi ng to Aston Villa in their soccer match at Villa Park stadium, Birmingham, England, Sunday, May 24, 2009. Newcastle relegated fromPremiership European soccer S i m o n D a w s o n / A P P h o t o

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009, PAGE 13 LEINSTER'S ISA NACEWA celebrates with the trophy after beating Leicester to win the Heineken European Cup Final rugby union match at Mur rayfield, Edinburgh, Saturday May 23, 2009. In brief LEINSTER'S Brian O'Driscoll, right, is tackled by Leicester's Dan Hipkiss during the Heineken European Cup Final rugby union match at Murrayfield, Edinburgh. (AP Photo/PA, Anna Gowthorpe) LEINSTER'S Brian O'Driscoll, right, is tackled by Leicester's Martin Castrogiovanni during the Heineken European Cup Final rugby union at Mur rayfield, Edinburgh, Saturday May 23, 2009. LEINSTER PLAYERS celebrate as they lift the trophy after beating Leicester to win the Heineken European Cup Final rugby union match at Murrayfield, Edinburgh, Saturday May 23, 2009. Leinster staged a thrilling fightback to win the Heineken Cup for the first time with a 1916 victory over Leicester. In Saturday’s final, the rookie finalists had the better of a superb game at Murrayfield but were forced to stage a superb fightback after falling 16-9 behind shortly after half-time. Ben Woods' try had given two-time champions Leicester an interval lead, but Jamie Heaslip's superb score helped level matters before the excellent Johnny Sexton sealed victory with a long-range penalty. Sexton also dropped a monster drop-goal, Brian O'Driscoll dropped a goal as well, while Julien Dupuy kicked the Tigers' other points. Afterwards, captain Leo Cullen and head coach Michael Cheika both said belief was the key to the Irish province's victory. "I suppose just hanging in there, showing a bit of belief," said flanker Cullen, when asked what won the game for his side. "The period when we were down to 14 men was pretty costly. They came at us pretty strongly. We went seven points down and just to hang in there was pretty vital.” HEINEKENCUP Leinster celebrate euro glory G a r e t h C o p l e y / A P P h o t o / P A G a r e t h C o p l e y / A P P h o t o / P A n LONDON David Beckham was among 24 players picked Sunday forE ngland’s roster for World Cup qualifiers next month and Gary Neville received a surprise recall for the games against K azakhstan and Andorra, according to the Associated Press. Beckham, on loan to AC Milan from Major League Soccer’s Los Angeles Galaxy, has1 7 goals in 110 international appearances. The 34-year-old midfielder hopes to play at next year’s World Cup, where he c ould break goalkeeper Peter Shilton’s record of 125 games for England. Neville, a 34-yearold veteran of 86 appearances starting in 1995, has not played for England since a 1-0 loss to Spain in February 2007. Another surprise callup was West Bromwich Albion goalkeeper Scott Carson. Jermain Defoe a nd Theo Walcott return from injuries and may get a starta longside Wayne Rooney in a ttack. England is 5-0 in qualifyi ng and leads Group Six. Kazak hstan is 1-4 and Andorra is 0-5. The roster: G oalkeepers: Scott Carson (West Bromwich Albion), Robert Green ( West Ham), Paul Robinson (Blackburn). D efenders: Wayne Bridge (Manchester City), Ashley Cole ( Chelsea), Rio Ferdinand (Manchester United), Glen Johnson (Portsmouth (Everton), Gary Neville (Manchester United), John Terry (Chelsea), M atthew Upson (West Ham Midfielders: Gareth Barry (Aston V illa), David Beckham (AC Milan, Italy), Michael Carrick (Manchester United), Steven Gerrard (Liverpool), Frank Lampard (Chelsea), Theo Walcott (Arsenal W right-Phillips (Manchester City Ashley Young (Aston Villa S trikers: Carlton Cole (West Ham), Peter Crouch (Portsmouth),J ermain Defoe (Tottenham Heskey (Aston Villa R ooney (Manchester United Beckham picked by England Hewitt, Murray and Ivanovic win n P ARIS Lleyton Hewitt lunged and whiffed at some s erves, his racket hitting only air. He simply stood and watched oth e r balls whirr past. But in the end it was the twotime major champion who prevailed, overcoming 55 aces as he beat Ivo Karlovic 6-7 (14 7 -6 (4 French Open there were straights et wins for defending champion Ana Ivanovic, Andy Murray and M arat Safin who is appearing in his final French Open, but please be sure not to ask him about that and straight-set exits for 2004 champion GastonG audio and two-time major win ner Amelie Mauresmo.

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n FORT LAUDERDALE, Florida Damion Stewart scored in the 88th minute to lift Jamaica to a 2-2 tie against Haiti Saturday night in an international match between eliminated World Cup qualifiers. Jason Morrison’s long free kick from the right wing found a charging Stewart near the left post, where he headed in a shot past Haiti goalkeeper Peterson Occenat. Haiti took a 2-1 lead Jean Robens Jerome’s second goal of the match in the 65th minute. Jerome, who entered the match early in the first half received Raymond Ednerson- ’s from the left wing and beat Jamaica goalkeeper Shawn Sawyers with a shot inside the 6-yard box. Jamaica played the entire second half a player down after defender Claude Davis’ second yellow card for a hard foul on Haiti midfielder Vaniel Sirin in the 44th minute. Ejection Davis and Sirin fell to the ground on a hard collision, which eventually resulted in Davis’ ejection. Ednerson and Jerome also combined on Haiti’s first goal, which tied the match 1-1 the 39th minute. Jerome, who replaced Fabrice Noel in the 24th minute, received Ednerson’s pass from the left wing area and beat Sawyers with a shot, which landed inside the left post. Nicholas Addlery put Jamaica ahead 1-0 with a goal in the 28th minute. Occenat made a leg save off Addlery’s uncontested shot deep in the goal area. Occenat could not retrieve the deflection as Addlery beat him to the ball and converted on a shot inside the 6-yard box. Both teams were eliminated from CONCACAF World Cup regional qualifiers earlier this year and used Saturday’s match as preparation for the Gold Cup which begins in July. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS RUGBY: SGPRIVATEBANKINVITATIONALCHAMPIONSHIP By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter r enaldodorsett@yahoo.com Cup joy for Baillou BUCCANEERS’ Jonathan Sands holds on to the ball. out the Bahamas Rugby Football Union’s calendar. Baillou dominated the final, scored the opening try of the match and never trailed in the contest. Baillou left winger Andrew Bodie, said his team over the course of the season had become accustomed to the 7s game and focused on a concentrated effort on the defensive end of the pitch. “We worked hard at 7s, even though we were playing 15s all season we were sticking with the training for 7s and playing in tournaments so were pretty sharp coming in here and were just able to put it all together and make it all the way through to win the Cup,” he said, “Our defence was key. We knew once we played continuous defence the entire day and especially in the final we had a good chance of coming out here and winn ing the whole thing.” Productive Bodie said for his club to close out the schedule with a tournament victory and becoming the first Bahamian team to win the event should set the tone for their offseason training regimen and a productive season next year. “It feels great to come out here and to get this d one. Whenever you have a chance to win against p layers from all around the world in front of the home crowd, its great,” he said, “Next year our main goal is recapturing the Bahamas Cup and really make an impact on the regional and international scene,” he said, “We also want to keep working with the development programme bringing more and more of the youth into the game.” O n their trek towards the Cup Final, Baillou recorded wins over the Texas Pirates (12-5), Coconauts (340), and suffered a loss to the Buccaneers (12-4) in Pool A. In Pool B Cuckoos reached the Final with wins over New Tredegar (37-736-5 defending champions, Daytona Beach (12-0 BRFU Treasurer, Shane Garner, said with the advancements the tournament has made in such a short timespan, it is well on its way to becoming a marquee event in the region. “It does so much for sports tourism because there are so many teams that are willing to come down here and compete. The Bahamas is a great venue for rugby and by hosting a successful tournament like this year after year, it generates more interest with other clubs when these players go back home and talk about their good experiences they have had here.” BUCCANEERS’ Roy Simson tries to breake away from the defence of Bail liou’s Tim Thompson. FROM page 15 F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f Stewart’s late goal gives Jamaica tie with Haiti Car ibbean soccer

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C M Y K C M Y K MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 P AGE 13 Leinster celebrate Heineken Cup victory I n what organisers called an event well on its way to becoming one of the biggest Rugby tournaments in the region, a Bahamian team captured the Cup Final for the first time. Baillou RC captured the SG Private Bank Invitational Championship with a 29-12 win over local rivals Cuckoos RFC Saturday at the Winton Rugby Pitch. In a rematch of April’s Bahamas Cup Final, Baillou was able to turn the tables and avenge a 32-20 to officially close volleyball tournament NORECAD n By RENALDO DORSETT S ports Writer r dorsett@tribunemedia.net For the second time in as m any wins for team Bahamas, they overcame an early deficit f or a come from behind victory, and earned a berth to the third round of the NORECAD tournament. The Bahamas defeated J amaica in the tournament semifinals a four set win, 1925, 25-18, 25-22, and 25-22. W ith the win, the Bahamas secured a qualification into the third round of the 2010 FIVB Men’s World Championship along with Mexico. T he Bahamas squared off against Mexico last night in the tournament final, however results were unavailable to press time. T he match against Jamaica, as in the opening round against St. Lucia,b egan with the Bahamas trailing early on after the f irst set, however, the comeback effort came one set sooner in the semifinals. Rebounded The Bahamas rebounded to take the ensuing set byt heir largest margin of victory of the match, by seven points. Shedrick Forbes led the Bahamas’ balanced scoringa ttack which placed three players in double figures. Forbes led the scoring with 15 points, while Byron Fer guson and Renaldo Knowles a dded 12 and 11 respectively. Danny Wilson led Jamaica with 19 points andD ellan Brown scored 13. Mexico advanced to the final by defeating Haiti in straight sets. The Pool D tournament winners will advance to the NORECA Pool G, July 6-11, in Puerto Rico, while the losers will be relegated to Pool H in Cuba, August 12-17. Bahamas stage another come from behind victory RUGBY: SG PRIVATE BANK INVITATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP Cup joy for Baillou Bahamian team captures championship for first time with 29-12 win over Cuckoos Tournament becoming one of the biggest in the region, say organisers Q UICK HANDS: B aillou’s Manoli Roussos passes the ball. PHOTOS: Felip Major /Tribune staff THE BAHAMAS’ female team took to the field and won their first game. ON THE CHARGE: Baillou’s Tim Thompson fends off a challenge. SEE page 14 n By RENALDO DORSETT S ports Writer rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 16, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE BLUE AND WHITE BALL PHIBETASIGMAFRATERNITY Inc hosted the second annual Blue and White Ball on Saturday at the Wyndham Nassau Resort in Cable Beach. Three young men were awarded scholarships for academic excellence and civici nvolvement at the event. PHI BETA SIGMA FRATERNITY INC. president Demario Minus presents Jamal Mesidor with the first place scholarship award. DENNIS SMITH receives his third place scholarship award. QUINCYARTHUR receives his second place scholarship award.

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor SOME foreign consultancy firms hired by the Governmentare “simply fleecing the Bahamas”, a senior accountant has charged, urging the administration to look to locally-based firms first in a bid to build “Bahamian indigenous talent”. Raymond Winder, managing partner at Deloitte & Touche (Bahamas large number of consultants it employs should be one of the things the Government looks at as it puts the finishing touches to the 2009-2010 Budget, as he praised the administration’sr eported attempts to cut recur rent spending by between 7-10 per cent across the board. “The Government needs to make assessments of the various consultants it uses,” Mr Winder told Tribune Business. “The Government uses a number of consultants from outside the country. I think a number oft he foreign consultants are simp ly fleecing the Bahamas. “The major accounting firms here represent major consultRoyalStar budgets for 10% decline in premium C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission f rom the daily report.$ $3.61 $3.62 $3.82 t t n n r r t t !!! tff %&' $!%% !"%") !$)%%'$!'$ '&%%'*'$+'$%$!) !' &'&!)+!'&!%&" &!+!'$ "$!%" %"$ %%!$n%&&% t n r n r b b n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor E mployees “cannot have their cake and eat it too” by seeking termination compensation via both statute and common law, the Court of Appeal has ruled, urging that the “doctrine of election” be used to prevent the Employment Act’s intentions being “lost in the mush of litigation”. Appeal Justice Hartman Longley, ruling on an appeal brought by a former wholesale sales manager, found that ter minated Bahamian workers should either accept the statutory compensation offered to them by their former employer under the Employment Act, or refuse to accept this and initiate a common law action seeking greater/better benefits. They could not seek both. Gail Smith had appealed a Supreme Court ruling over an action she initiated against her former employer, Snack Food Wholesale, for alleged breach of an employment contract. Reciting the facts, the Court of Appeal found she was terminated by the company with effect from May 12, 2003, via a letter she received dated May 10, 2003. As a 22-year employee, who was a sales manager/supervisor and earning $750 per week, Ms Smith received four weeks’ Employees ‘cannot have their cake and eat it too’ n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net ISLE OF Capri’s Grand Bahama-based casino continues to operate at a loss, the Minister of Tourism has told Tribune Business, while potential new operators continue talks on taking it over with the Government and Our Lucaya’s owners. Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace said potential replacement tenants for Our Lucaya’s casino have recently taken a look at the prop erty. He added that there have been several tri-party talks between owners Hutchison Whampoa, the casino operator candidates and the Government, with Isle of Capri having agreed to remain as operator beyond its initial end-May departure date until a replacement is found. “Progress is being made. We have expressions of interest, and people have gone and a taken a look at the property. Those con versations are continuing,” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said. These continuing talks have left the Government hopeful that Grand Bahama’s only operating casino will continue to run in this depressed economy, though it may be without the Isle of Capri brand in the future. “They are continuing to lose money; no question about that,” said MrVanderpool-Wallace. “I suspect they would wish to Casino’s losses continue amid oper atorsearch Some consultants ‘fleecing Bahamas’ n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE European Union (EU has yet to accept the Bahamas’ services offer over the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA chairman has confirmed, adding that most Bahamian professional services organisations are “a far cry from where they need to be” to maximise the agreement for their members’ bene fit. John Delaney told Tribune Business he was “quite confi dent” that the EU would ulti mately accept the Bahamas’ services offer, as it wanted this nation to be “fully vested and obligated under the EPA”, thus ensuring European firms and service providers could have access to the third-largest market in CARICOM. Earlier, addressing a Bahamas Society of Engineers meeting, Mr Delaney had con firmed that the Bahamas’ ser vices offer was still “not set tled”, with negotiations still tak i ng place between this nation and the EU. “The Bahamas position for services generally was very consistent in Modes three and four in the offer put to the EU,” Mr Delaney said. “As far as I’m aware, the offer has not yet been accepted. The Bahamas complied with the timelines [to get the offer in], so we’re well within the arrangement. “The goods side [of the EPA] is in force. As to the services side, that is still not a settled matter. The Bahamas position has been that all areas in the National Investment Policy reserved exclusively for Bahamians, we want to preserve.” Tribune Business previously revealed that the Bahamas’ init ial services offer had been r ejected by the EU because it failed to meet the minimum lib eralization thresholds set by both it and CARIFORUM, the body that negotiated the EPA on this nation’s behalf. The Europeans had wanted the Bahamas to show more commitment to liberalization in certain areas such as retail and construction services, and were also unhappy that much of the Bahamas’ investment-related rules were set in policy, not statute, thus generating considerable uncertainty. Mr Delaney said he did not know the specifics of the talks between the Bahamas and the EU, telling Tribune Business that the services offer was “in active play, negotiations”. He added: “As a general statement, I think the EU, from the very beginning, preferred to be dealing with any protectionist regime in statute, as opposed to policy, because of the very imprecise nature of policy as opposed to something that is in statute”. Two Ministry of Finance offiEU still yet to accept Bahamas services offer * But insurer says not all bad, as risk exposure down too * Economy taking toll on top-line, with cat coverage dropped and switch from comperhensive to third party motor insurance * Property catastrophe premiums up 3-5% due to reinsurer woes * Carrier delivers 15% return on shareholder equity in 2008 n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor R OYALStar Assurance, the B ahamian general insurer, has b udgeted for a 10 per cent yearover-year drop in gross written premiums for 2009, its managing director telling Tribune Business it has been reducing property catastrophe exposure because prices do not cover risk. Steve Watson said the economic downturn meant that RoyalStar had seen “quite a S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 7 7 B B * Court rules that Bahamian workers cannot seek both Employment Act and common law compensation for termination * Justices urge that ‘doctrine of election’ be used to stop Employment Act intentions being ‘lost in the mush of litigation’ Professional organisations ‘far cry from where they need to be’ on trade negotiating capacity John Delaney * Go v e r nment ur ged t o outsource, consolidate r e gulators to cut costs in u pcoming Budget * All Bahamians r esponsible for size of government

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few” policyholders cancelling or reducing insurance coverage because they were unable to afford the premiums, hence the budgeted decline in top line growth. “It’s been an ongoing trend on the property side,” Mr Watson told Tribune Business. Policyholders who did not have a mortgage on their properties, he explained, were cancelling catastrophe coverage and just taking out fire protection, reducing their premium payments to 25 per cent or onequarter of their previous value. “The most obvious indicator of the state of the economy ist he number of people switchi ng from comprehensive to third party motor insurance,” Mr Watson added. “That’s happened a lot in the first five months of the year. I’d say that about five years ago, it was 50/50 between comprehensive and third party, but now it’s 65/35 in favour of third party.” He suggested this trend was being exacerbated by the increasing tendency of Bahami-an consumers, hit hard by the recession, to waive new car purchases in favour of older, used cars that were cheaper. With fewer Bahamians buying new cars, as evidenced by the almost 50 per cent drop in new car sales during the 2009 first quarter, consumers were “less likely to insure comprehensively”, something that will impact Bahamian insurance carriers in terms of reduced premium income. “The average value of a car on the road now is lower than it was five years ago, and the average age of a car on the road now is much higher than it was five years ago,” Mr Watson said. “That translates into more third party and less comprehensive cover.” As a result of these trends, RoyalStar had “budgeted a 10 per cent reduction” in gross written premium year-overyear, which would, if it transpired reduce this figure by $7.357 million to around $66 million, based on 2008 figures. Mr Watson added that RoyalStar “might see a bit more because of the way Cayman is going, because we’re letting business go”. However, he pointed out that the reduction in top-line gross written premi um was not necessarily bad for the general insurer, because it meant less risk exposure, particularly in instances where premium prices did not equate to the insured’s risk. “It’s not necessarily a bad thing for us. It’s possibly a good thing,” Mr Watson said. He added, though, that RoyalStar’s claims costs were being impacted by an increase in the number of uninsured drivers on Bahamian roads. This was resulting in incidents where the carrier was having to compensate its comprehensivelyinsured motor clients who, even though it was not their fault, were involved in accidents with uninsured motorists. But, on a brighter note, RoyalStar has seen no increase in the number of fraudulent claims submitted to it. “So far, surprisingly not,” Mr Watson said, when questioned by Tribune Business. “No more than usual. “It’s just part and parcel of our business. So far, quite frankly, we haven’t seen any increase in the last six months over the same period in the year before.” W riting Writing in RoyalStar’s 2008 annual report, Mr Watson said property catastrophe insurance “continued to be unattractively priced” last year, resulting in the company’s decision not to grow its book of business in that line in the Bahamas. It reduced its exposure in the Cayman Islands and the Turks & Caicos, resulting in the reduction in gross written premium from $80.156 million in 2007 to $73.574 million last year. “Whilst no one likes to see a reduction in the top line of a business, it makes little sense to grow purely for the sake of growth at the expense of prof itability,” Mr Watson told the company’s shareholders and policyholders. The RoyalStar managing director told Tribune Business that property catastrophe trends had continued into 2009, explaining: “You’ll see we write less business in terms of exposure to date than we did five years ago. “We can’t raise prices to the level we need to for two reasons. The competition, who do not appear to perceive the risk we do, and the economy can’t handle higher prices, so our choice is to reduce exposure. It’s particularly bad in Cayman, where rates are crazy – 30 per cent lower than three years ago whereas here, they’ve come down 10-15 per cent over three years.” However, Mr Watson said that on average property catastrophe premium prices in the Bahamas had increased by 3-5 per cent for 2009. He explained that this was largely due to demands from reinsurers, who were looking to replace capital lost in stock market investments. “That’s the feeling from the market,” Mr Watson said of the price increases. “I’ve talked to other people, and everyone’s said the same. Prices went up because the reinsurers passed them on to us, so in 2009 the business is even more marginal than it was in 2008.” Bahamian insurers had argued that their policyholders should not be penalized for reinsurers’ bad investment decisions, but because they buy so much reinsurance they had little choice. Apart from the impact of catastrophic events in 2008, reinsurers themselves lost their reinsurance capacity due to a contraction in the hedge fund community, further increasing their replacement cost of capi tal. "You've got a recipe for increased prices," Mr Watson said. "Even if there is no big event this year, you could see prices increase next year for no good reason." Away from property catastrophe, Mr Watson said RoyalStar had seen growth in its motor and non-catastrophe property business, areas that had boosted profitability and altered its business mix. Net written premium had increased by 36 per cent between 20042008, while catastrophe and excess of loss reinsurance had both declined. For 2008, all RoyalStar’s insurance lines proved profitable, with the exception of its marine category, which suffereda large number of losses. While marine was a relatively small business line, Mr Watson told Tribune Business: “It was bad in September and October, when two to three vessels were stolen in a six-week period, Given the small book, it had a disproportionate impact. “We haven’t seen any thefts since then, but we took imme d iate corrective action. If your boat was in the wrong category as far as we were concerned, your premium could have dou bled.” This category would involve open boats, 25-40 feet in length, with outboard Yamahae ngines. It’s a real, real problem, and although we’ve not seen any thing since, I know four to five vessels were stolen in the first quarter of this year,” Mr Wat son said of marine insurance. For 2008, RoyalStar generated $4.452 million in net income, a 15 per cent return on shareholder equity. The company incurred claims losses from Hurricanes Ike and Paloma that totalled around $1 million net, while the marine losses and a claim from a major store fire in Abaco, plus investment income losses of $884,648, produced combined losses of around $4 million. While RoyalStar’s combined operating ratio increased from 70 per cent to 77 per cent in 2008, Mr Watson described this as “still a very strong number”. He noted that since 2004, ordinary shareholder equity at the company had more than doubled from $12.8 million to $25.8 million, even though dividends totaling some $5.7 million had been paid. Combined with preference shareholder investment, RoyalStar’s total equity stood at $30.8 million, something Mr Watson said left it well-positioned to cope with what was expected to be a challenging 2009. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 3RVLWLRQRI$FFRXQWDQW $QDQFLDOLQVWLWXWLRQVHHNVDQ$FFRXQWDQW&DQGL GDWHVPXVWKDYHDWOHDVW\HDUVH[SHULHQFHLQDF FRXQWLQJLQWKHQDQFLDOLQGXVWU\ZLWKVRXQGNQRZO HGJHRIEXWQRWOLPLWHGWR )RUPXODWLQJEXGJHWV 0DQDJLQJ$FFRXQWVHFHLYDEOHVDQGD\DEOHV 3UHSDUDWLRQRIPRQWKO\DQGDQQXDOQDQFLDOUH SRUWVDQGVWDWHPHQWV 3UHSDUDWLRQRIEDQNUHFRQFLOLDWLRQVDQGYDULRXV JHQHUDOOHGJHUDFFRXQWVWRWKHVXEOHGJHUV &RRUGLQDWHWKHDQQXDODXGLWZLWKH[WHUQDODXGLWRUV DQGSUHSDUDWLRQRIWKHQHFHVVDU\VFKHGXOHV 3UHSDULQJUHSRUWVIRUWKHUHJXODWRUV 0XVWEHDWHDPSOD\HU 0XVWSRVVHVVSHRSOHVNLOOVDQGEHSUHSDUHGWR L QWHUDFWZLWKPHPEHUV 4XDOLFDWLRQV$$$FFRXQWLQJ 3OHDVHIRUZDUGUHVXPHWR 3 &20021:($/7+ %5(:(5<7':$5(+286( $'0,1,675$7257KHVXFFHVVIXOFDQGLGDWHZRXOGEHUHTXLUHGWR (QVXUHWKDWWKHTXDQWLW\DQGTXDOLW\RIWKHJRRGV UHFHLYHGDUHFKHFNHG &KHFNIRUGDPDJHWRJRRGVDQGFDUU\RXWUHOHYDQW GRFXPHQWDWLRQ $VVXUHKROGLQJRIEORFNHGSURGXFWVXQWLOIXUWKHUQRWLFH $UUDQJHVDOHRIDUWLFOHVDXWKRULVHGIRUGLVSRVDO 3UHSDUHUHSRUWVRQGLVSRVHGPDWHULDOV &DUU\RXWSK\VLFDOLQYHQWRU\FKHFNVDQGYHULI\ZLWK $FFRXQWV'HSDUWPHQW ,VVXHDQGGLVSDWFKRXWJRLQJVWRFNVEDVHGRQ),)2 PHWKRG (QVXUHSURSHUGLVSRVDORISDFNDJLQJPDWHULDOVLQFDVH RI TXDOLW\LVVXHV (QWUDQFHFRQWUROIRUUDZDQGSDFNDJLQJPDWHULDOV (QVXUHWKDWDOOH[SRUWRUGHUVDUHSDFNHGDQGGHOLYHUHG WRGHVLJQDWHGVKLSSLQJFDUULHU &RPSLOHVWRFNLQYHQWRU\UHSRUWV 6XSHUYLVHIRUNOLIWRSHUDWRUV$OOLQWHUHVWHGSHUVRQVDUHDVNHGWR ID[UHVXPHVWR RoyalStar budgets for decline in premium F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009, PAGE 3B 677 1111 nassau 688 1111 freeport www.indigonetworks.com purchase your home phone line and receiveFREE local number FREE Local and long distance calling for one month* FREE inter-island calls to onephone customers FREE activationwhat you need to use onephoneunlimited broadband internet a one onephone telephone adapter a touch tone telephone*certain restrictions applyget your onephone at WHEREAS, in 1959, the Bahamas Real Estate Association, an umbrella organization which draws membership from amongst the ranks of persons engaged in real estate transactions, such as real estate brokers and salespersons, was founded; AND WHEREAS, in 1995 Parliament enacted the Real Estate (Brokers and Salesmen) Act, thereby vesting The Bahamas Real Estate Association, a body corporate, with the authority to register, license, regulate and control real estate brokers and salespersons in The Bahamas; AND WHEREAS, investment in real estate is considered by far the largest single investment that an individual is likely to make in his or her lifetime; AND WHEREAS, the Bahamas Real Estate Association has been highly agents engage in real estatetransactions in The Bahamas, thereby protecting the Bahamianconsumers from entering into land transaction with unqualiAND WHEREAS, AND WHEREAS, during the month of May 2009, the Bahamas Real Estate rate schedule of activities and events, inclusive of a Gala Evening, which is scheduled to be held on Friday, 29th May, 2009 at the Atlantis Resort and Casino on Paradise Island; NOWTHEREFORE, I Hubert AIngraham, Prime Minister of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, do hereby proclaim the week beginning Sunday, 24th May and ending Friday 29th May, 2009 as “Real Estate Week.” IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereto set my Hand and Seal this 21st day of January 2009. P R O C LA M AT I O N n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas General Insurance Association (BGIA is “actively considering our next move” over the amendments to the Domestic Insurance Act, its chairman told Tribune Business,but is pessimistic over the possibility the Government will make changes after the legislation passed the second reading in the House of Assembly. “Right now, I don’t know if there’s a whole lot that’s going to be done at this stage,” Timothy Ingraham said. “It could beo ne of those objections we put in the record and have to live with for now. It’s a very narrow thing that we disagreed with. Hopefully, at some point, someone will look at it and say it needs amending.” The Bahamian insurance industry, led by the BGIA, had strongly opposed the Government’s proposed amendments to the Act, arguing that it had overreacted to CLICO (Bahamas sweeping, unchecked powers to the regulators to appoint an administrator for an insurance firm without first obtaining a court order. In addition, the sector was concerned that the amendments also gave the administrator wide-ranging powers to act as he saw fit, again without first getting permission from the courts or Registrar of Insura nce’s Office. Mr Ingraham said the insurance industry wanted to see “a little more checks and balances”, adding: “We were concerned that the administrator could do whatever he wanted without reference to the regulator, the courts or anyone else. The concern was that once appointed, the amendments did not require someone to report back to the Registrar. It gave the administrator, technically, a free hand.” When asked whether the BGIA was likely to challenge the amendments in theS upreme Court, Mr Ingraham said: “I’m not sure that’ll achieve anything at this stage.. “We’re very disappointed with the outcome, but you play the hand you’re dealt. We’ll continue the dialogue with the Government, and when they’re amending something else hopefully they’ll amend that before s omeone has to deal with it.” Meanwhile, Patrick Ward, Bahamas First’s president, said the BGIA was deciding “what our best course of action is. There is going to be a response on our part. “I do know there will be a response, and if the industry does not respond, we’ll respond anyway.” A copy of the Domestic Insurance Act amendments that have been tabled in Parliament, and obtained by Tribune Busi ness, show that the Insurance Commission (the successor to the Registrar of Insurance) may appoint an administrator who shall seize the management and control of a company, or any part of the insurance business of the company”, in various situations. Among the seemingly subjective situations for doing so are if an asset on the insurance company’s books, “in the opinion of the Commission”, is “not satisfactorily accounted for; “where, in the opinion of the Commission”, the company’s affairs are such that they could prejudice policyholders, creditors or asset owners; and “where, in the opinion of the Commission”, the insurance carrier, intermediary or person “is committing or about to commit” an unsafe or unsound business practice, or pursue such a course. Other reasons for the administrator’s appointment, such as the company’s failure to meet or pay its liabilities; the value of its assets being less than its liabilities or placing policyholders in jeopardy; a significant erosion in the value of the company’s assets; and the conduct of business in a manner that is detrimental to policyholders, seem more valid. But again, if “in the opinion of the Commission” a company is likely to be unable to meet its liabilities, an administrator can be summoned. Once appointed, the administrator has, under the current proposed reforms, “the exclusive powers to manage and control the company’s affairs”. He can discontinue its operations, stop or limit payment of its obligations, and re-organise the company. In doing the latter, the administrator can appoint new officers and directors, and also consummate the sale or merger of the insurance com-p any to others if he so chooses. Insurance pessimistic on Act reform change To advertise in The Tribune , call 502-2371 “It could be one of those objections we put in the record and have to live with for now. It’s a very narrow thing that we disagreed with. Hopefully, at some point, someone will look at it and say it needs amending. Timothy Ingraham

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cials, Simon Wilson, the director of economic planning, and Brickell Pinder, flew to Brussels to meet with EU counterparts prior to the April 15, 2009, deadline for the Bahamas’ EU services offer to be agreed. What was accomplished at the meeting is uncertain, with Tribune Business sources telling this newspaper that the CARICOM Regional Negotiating Machinery (CRNM see this nation’s revised services offer. The Bahamas’ offer not only has to be agreed by the EU, but CARIFORUM as well, as its members will also be our trading partners with exactly the same benefits and preferences as the Europeans. Meanwhile, Mr Delaney said it was critical for Bahamian professional organisations to build capacity, and not merely in terms of advising the Government on the EPA and other trade agreements but also when it came to negotiating market access for their members with their EU counterparts. “Organisational capacity across the board is significant, because even the work of the Government requires the input of the representative bodies and, frankly speaking, save for the tourism industry and financial services sector, organizational capacity is a far cry from where it needs to be,” Mr Delaney told Tribune Business. This is particularly critical for when it comes to organisations, which are representing Bahamian services professionals, negotiating Mutual Recognition Agreements (MRAs EU counterparts. Unless the B ahamian organisation’s stand ards and qualifications are r ecognised by their EU counterparts, their members will be unable to access European markets. With MRA negotiations involving Bahamian professionals in the areas of tourism, architecture and engineering scheduled to begin by 2010, Mr Delaney added: “I would say that any representative body in the Bahamas needs to have, as a matter of priority, a focus on developing their internal capacity. “That focus should be there with a view to getting its members to provide greater resources for that purpose, as well as seeking to access public funding for that purpose, otherwise they might find they’re not best serving their members’ interests.” When it came to standards and qualifications, Mr Delaney said many Bahamian services professionals had trained abroad, and were thus certified by bodies likely recognised by the EU. “The question is whether t hey would be considered as h aving maintained their certific ation if we don’t have a local organisation that oversees those standards,” Mr Delaney said. “There is no gainsaying the fact that we must have our local certification that is recognised internationally.” For both the EPA and trade agreements in general, Mr Delaney said the main issue for the Bahamas were the modes three and four methods of supply, commercial presence and the movement of foreign workers into the country. In the EPA, the mode three commercial presence of EU firms was the major negotiating point. “The Bahamas would wish to protect for its citizens those areas in which its citizens have been able to establish a foothold without the influx of competition they would not be able to handle at this point,” Mr Delaney said, “while allowing an adequate degree of competition to allow the Bahamas to grow and enable Bahamian businesses to mature at a higher level, because of what competition might yield – joint vent ures, the transfer of skills and c apital. How do we get that right? It’s difficult. It’s a question of judgment.” Apart from preserving the existing trade benefits, in terms of duty-free market access, for existing Bahamian exporters to the EU, such as the fisheries industry and Polymers International, Mr Delaney said the Government was also motivated to sign the EPA to preserve this nation’s attractiveness as a f oreign direct investment recipient. The Bahamas, in “looking to the future, to things not presently exported”, and “to be an attractive place” to Bahamian companies, joint ventures and foreign firms, with access to the major markets such as the EU, needed to sign the EPA. Otherwise, said Mr Delaney: “The Bahamas would not have the certainty that someone operating from this platform would want. The Bahamas may not be as attractive as a place to do certain things as other places in the Caribbean, whom we compete with, quite frankly, for investment. “If the Bahamas were to be competitive in attracting invest ment in the future, we need to secure the pipeline, the access, in no less favourable terms than other countries.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Vacation in Paradise.Only $69*per person double occupancy.Minimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents only. Full use of all Atlantis facilities. Plus: Limited-time offer! Reserve today !BSP Job #: CTS-9-N003 JM# 8634 Client: Comfort Suites Description: Stay In Paradise 1/4 pg Bleed: non Color: 1C Black Specs: PDFX1A Mech #3 Date: 2/25/2009 Time: 1:30 Mech Person: GUDimensions: 5.75in x 10.5 in Issue: Nassau Tribune 3/2/2009 Closing: 2/26/09 *$69 per person double occupancy per night Sun. – Wed. Add $20 pp for Thurs. – Sat. Maximum four persons per room. Rates effective through December 15. Additional fees apply for mandatory taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on standard room category and are subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply. G u s U g a r t e 2 / 2 5 4 p m CTS-9-N003_NassauGuardian.indd 2 2/25/09 4:14:07 PM www.rdicaribbean.com Recruiting Now for the July 2009 intake 27499 Riverview Center Boulevard, Suite 111, Bonita Springs, Florida 34134 USA • Tel 1 239 444 1730 • email info@rdicaribbean.com your goals MASTERSMBA University of Bradford, University of Sunderland, University of Wales MSc in Public Administration & Development University of Birmingham MSc Marketing & Management University of Bradford MSc Finance, Accounting & Management University of Bradford MA Education University of Derby LLM University of Derby MSc Information Technology University of Teesside MSc Telecommunications Birmingham City University MSc International Hospitality Management Diploma in Management University of Wales (pre-MBA for non-degree holders University of Wales BACHELOR DEGREE COURSES University of Wales specialisms in Marketing, Finance, Banking University of Sunderland Accountancy & Financial Management (top up) University of Derby Psychology University of Teesside Computing (top up • Develop your career while studying • No attendance requirement • Tutor and student support included • Free membership of International Management months months HigherNationalDiploma(entrytotopup Degreesthrough2-yearHND)inBusinessand Management,InformationTechnology,Travel andTourism,Marketing,Finance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raphic Designer to work in fast paced organisation. Core responsibilities and requirements: Toproduce graphic design solutions for a range of promotion and information needs. Candidates must be well versed in design concepts andproficient in design software, including Illustrator, Dreamweaver, QuarkXpress, Freehand, Photoshop and others. Candidates must be proficient with both Macintosh and Windows based computer applications and hardware, including design and layout of print material. ABachelor’s degree in graphic design or related field is preferred. DA#61034 c/o The Tribune P.O. Box N-3207 Nassau, Bahamas EU still yet to accept Bahamas services offer F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net A SUCCESSFUL financial services industry in the Bahamas depends on a major shift from all sectors of the economy, the Bahamas Financial Services Board’s (BFSB chief executive believes, as the global financial crisis continues to force this country to mould a new business model. Wendy Warren said the Government and the private sector, including “spheres in the broad economy such as tourism-related services and retail financial services”, have to refine technical, professional and interp ersonal skills in order for the B ahamas to remain a competit ive financial services market. Ms Warren said competitiveness on a national level mightbe the catalyst for some of those changes. “The environment for international financial services centres changed after the financial crisis,” she said. Ms Warren argued that skill upgrades should be coupled with upgrades to this nation’s infrastructure, including telecommunications, energy and the environment. She said the impending changes to the financial services sector will require a “national passion that demands that we go beyond observer status tobeing change agents”. The BFSB is continuing to examine the current environment to see if there are modifi cations that will allow this coun try to become more attractive to investors. However, Ms Warren alluded that many Bahamas-based financial institutions, and Bahamians in general, have yet to embrace the kind of service distinction that will set the Bahamas apart as one of the m ost attractive offshore financial centres in the world – even in the wake of the attack against them by OECD countries. “In our daily interaction with fellow Bahamians, we should take time to define the standard of excellence and encourage adoption,” she said. “Clients do not distinguish between the experiences they have in the offices of their banker to what occurs on Bay Street. All experiences count toward the Bahamas brand in financial services.” “We have to invest in this industry,” said Ms Warren. “It’s critical to our economy and critical to our society.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009, PAGE 5B DHL JOB DESCRIPTIONPOSITION: Collections Agent JOB FAMILY: Credit & Collections RCS CODE: A20004 REPORTS TO : Collections Lead LOCATION: Country Finance Department OVERALL PURPOSE: Under limited supervision in a team environment provide efcient and effective credit approvals. To ensure timely credit application processing, respond to information requests and issues. Ensure accuracy of all credit decisions functions while staying within company policy and procedural guidelines. DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: making credit decisions. delinquent accounts. Processes credit applications. Investigates disputes and reviews documentation. Implements credit suspensions. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: direction amid competing priorities and deadlines. For more information please contact:Romell K. Knowles I Country Manager Email:Romell.Knowles@dhl.com ),1$1&(&25325$7,21)%$+$0$6/,0,7('127,&(3OHDVHEHDGYLVHGWKDWWKH+HDG2IFHDQG WKH5HJLVWHUHG2IFHRIWKHFRPSDQ\ZLOOEH PRYHGIURPWKH%DKDPDV)LQDQFLDO&HQWUH &KDUORWWH6KLUOH\6WUHHWV)ORRU1DVVDX %DKDPDVWR5R\DO%DQN+RXVH(DVW+LOO6WUHHW 1DVVDX%DKDPDVHIIHFWLYH0D\ Economic shift needed to aid financial services WENDY WARREN

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ing firms from across the world, and the Government needs to organisations in the Bahamas with global reach to reduce the cost and ensure knowledge is developed among the Bahamas’ indigenous talent.” Mr Winder suggested that the Government could also generate cost savings by regulatory consolidation in the financial services sector, merging all the supervisory bodies into one or two entities, rather than provide each with a separate line of funding. “If the Government gets the right people in the regulators, they would not need as many people, and the quality and efficiency of regulation would improve,” he added. “The Government has to look at areas where it could cut back and be more efficient.” Mr Winder also suggested the Government, in its drive to cut costs, look at outsourcing certain functions to the private sector. Arguing that cut backs in government spending were “necessary” given the increased fiscal deficit and national debt, coupled with the decline in rev enues, he added that the Budget should not increase or add new taxes on the private sector, because this could cause firms to go out of business or lay-off staff. “I think the Government has to be careful as to the level of debt it takes on, especially if that debt is going to go to your recurrent expenditure,” Mr Winder told Tribune Business. “The Government has talked for a long time around this issue of public sector reform, and the costs and inefficiencies one hasto encounter in the public sector. Now circumstances are upon is dictating that we look at this issue, the Government is taking this into consideration. They can’t increase taxes. They have to decrease and reduce expenditure.” The likely strategy for the 2009-2010 Budget will be to reduce recurrent expenditure without any compulsory redundancies for civil servants, keep capital spending as high as possible to stimulate economic activity and limit unemploym ent, and fight for every cent of revenue possible with no new or increased taxes. Making civil servants compulsorily redundant would be social and political suicide for the Government given the unemployment figures. What Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham is likely to do is ask those civil servants who have reached the retirement threshold to retire voluntarily, place a freeze on all public sector hirings, promotions and grade changes, and cut spending everywhere else he can. The figures already make grim reading. With national gross domestic product (GDP for 2008 estimated at around $7.2 billion, and the International Monetary Fund (IMF predicting the Bahamian economy will contract by 4 per cent in 2009, it seems reasonable to estimate that GDP will slip to around $6.9 billion. The Bahamas’ national debt was already around 43.4 per cent of GDP, some $3.2 billion, at year-end 2008. And with the 2008-2009 Budget year likely to end with a fiscal deficit of around $250 million, not to mention the $200 million borrowing to help refinance downtown Nassau’s revitalization among other needs, the $150 million borrowed from China, and the $100 million New Providence Road Improvement Project, that debt is likely to swell to around $3.6 billion at conservative estimates. Needless to say, this will put the Bahamas’ debt-to-GDP ratio well over the 50 per cent mark. Mr Winder said he agreed w ith the Government offering early retirement to civil servants in their 50s and 60s, and that the size of the public sector was too large. The latter, he added, was a function of its citizens. “I think the size of government is a reflection of the average Bahamian,” Mr Winder said. “I don’t think government enters into a situation where it wants to be big. But Bahamians, by and large, want the Government to solve their problems, and because the electorate puts huge pressure on the Government to fulfil its obligations, that forces government to grow. “We need to better educate the average Bahamian that he can’t look to government, and you, the private sector and private individual, must look to solve problems yourselves, and not put the pressure on government. “That puts pressure on the Government to grow, and larger government is not necessarily the best thing for the country.” Rick Lowe, an executive with the Nassau Institute economic think-tank, praised the Government’s likely spending cuts as “a smart move” and a “move in the right direction” that would hopefully make all Bahamians think about how to adjust financial plans during the recession. He was “doubtful”, though, that the Government would go as far as needed in reducing recurrent spending, and said it would need to watch its ability to meet its debt servicing costs. Mr Lowe said the Government had a “delicate tightrope t hey have to walk” in managing the public finances, adding: “They’re in a precarious situation. We’re partially to blame because we think the Government has a magic well they produce money from. “We lose sight of the fact the Government gets its revenue from us. If you create money from thin air, you get boom or bust. One way or another, the day of reckoning will come, and it is our generation that has to face the music for future generations. “I don’t wish ill or misfortune on anyone. It’s just that now the price has to be paid.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 5 2wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y P revious CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.28Abaco Markets1.331.330.000.1270.00010.50.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.686.95Bank of Bahamas6.956.950.000.2440.26028.53.74% 0.900.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1511.09Cable Bahamas11.7511.750.001.4060.2508.42.13% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.002310.2490.04011.41.41% 7.446.06Commonwealth Bank (S16.136.130.000.4190.36014.65.87% 3.381.31Consolidated Water BDRs2.882.77-0.110.1110.05225.01.88% 3.001.38Doctor's Hospital1.381.380.000.2400.0805.85.80% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.4200.30018.53.87% 12.5011.00Finco11.0011.000.000.3220.67034.26.09% 14.6610.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.4010.400.000.7940.40013.13.85% 5.555.00Focol (S5.145.140.000.3320.15015.52.92%1 .001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.500.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8 .205.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.37581.3124Colina Bond Fund1.37581.654.83 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8962-1.49-3.35 1.39011.3875Colina Money Market Fund1.46302.055.25 3.69603.1964Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1964-5.59-13.64 12.739712.1564Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.15990.71-12.76 1.04401.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04400.804.40 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03640.333.64 1.04521.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04520.764.40 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L L L L : : C C O O L LI I N N A A 2 24 4 2 2 5 5 0 0 2 2 7 70 0 1 10 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L L F F I I D D E E L LI I T T Y Y 2 2 4 42 2 -3 35 5 6 67 7 7 7 6 64 4 | | F FG G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K K E E T T S S 2 24 4 2 2 3 3 9 9 6 6 -4 40 0 0 00 0 | | C C O O L L O O N N I I A A L L 2 2 4 4 2 2 5 50 0 2 2 -7 75 5 2 2 5 5FINDEX: CLOSE 795.25 | YTD -4.75% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSFRIDAY, 22 MAY 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,608.76 | CHG -0.12 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -103.60 | YTD % -6.05BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 30-Apr-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Mar-09 9-Feb-09 9-Feb-09 W W W WW W . .B B I I S S X X B B A A H H A A M M A A S S . .C C O O M M | | T T E E L L E E P P H HO ON N E E : :2 24 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 -2 23 3 3 3 0 0 | | F F A A C C S S I I M M I I L L E E : : 2 2 4 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 -2 23 3 2 2 0 0NAV Date 31-Mar-09 15-May-09 31-Mar-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 9-Feb-09 THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bs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“LOODUV—HDPVZLWKDGYLFHDQG 730FRQFHSW (QVXULQJ730DFWLYLWLHVFRQWLQXRXVO\PDWFK%UHZHU\ LVVLRQDQG.3,V+06fWKURXJKORVVGHSOR\PHQWV )RUPXODWLQJWRJHWKHUZLWKPDQDJHPHQWWKH \HDUDVWHUODQDQGHQVXULQJUHJXODUHYDOXDWLRQDQG XSGDWH 6XSSRUWLQJ0DQDJHPHQWZLWKLPSOHPHQWDWLRQRIWKH L QWHUQDOH[WHUQDO$XGLW6\VWHPWRHQVXUHDQGPDQDJH WKHFKDQJH 6WLPXODWLQJWKHXVHRIVWDQGDUGIRUPVUHSRUWV W HPSODWHVWRROVLPSURYHPHQWURXWHVIURPWRROER[fHWF ZLWKWKHUHTXLUHGGRFXPHQWFRQWURO,7DSSOLFDWLRQV DQDJHULDOH[SHULHQFH &RPSXWHUNQRZOHGJHUHTXLUHG$ OOLQWHUHVWHGSHUVRQVDUHDVNHGWR ID[UHVXPHVWR Some consultants ‘fleecing Bahamas’ F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009, PAGE 7B 0,1,675<:25.6t75$163257 %/8(+,//$' 52$':$<&216758&7,21 ,Q DQ HIIRUWWRUHOLHYHFXUUHQWWUDIFFRQJHVWLRQSUREOHPV -26( &$57(//21(&216758&&,21(6&,9,/(66$ KDV EHHQFRQWUDFWHGIRUWKH&RPSOHWLRQRIWKH1HZ3URYLGHQFH5RDG ,PSURYHPHQW3URMHFW,QWHUQDWLRQDO3DFNDJH5RDGFRQVWUXFWLRQ ZLOOEHFRPPHQFLQJRQ&RUULGRU%OXH+LOO5RDGfZKLFKPD\ UHTXLUHGLYHUVLRQVIURP ' XNHWUHHWtRELQVRQRDG /RFDOGLYHUVLRQVZLOOEHVLJQSRVWHGLQGXHFRXUVHDQGIXUWKHU L QIRUPDWLRQZLOOEHSURYLGHGLQWKHORFDOPHGLD Casino’s losses continue amid operatorsearch come back to the Bahamas to continue their good name and good will when there is an upswing in Grand Bahama.” The minister confirmed Isle of Capri, Hutchison Whampoa and the Government agreed to extend the casino’s existing agreement until a long-term solution can be realized. “Bringing those three groups together when we have something that makes sense is really the most time consuming part, but we are moving along,” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said. The casino’s continued poor financial performance, though, has left many questioning why Isle of Capri would want to remain in Grand Bahama. The Casino operator received a ‘sweet’ deal from the former PLP administration that effectively wrote-off much of the multi-million dollar casino tax debt that it had accumulated. The Isle-Our Lucaya casino, which is located in Hutchinson’s Our Lucaya property, saw second quarter revenues last year decline by 28 per cent to $2.072 million, compared to $2.879 million the previous year. For Isle of Capri’s 2008 financial year, the property saw losses year-over-year amounting to more than $1 million. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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notice pay of $3,000; 48 weeks’ basic pay of $36,000; and three weeks’ vacation pay worth $2,250. The Court of Appeal said it was “common ground” that the sums paid by Snack Food Wholesale were in accordance with the Employment Act 2001’s Section 29, but Ms Smith initiated a legal action alleging that under common law she wasdue $64,790. The $25,790 difference cited between the statutory and common law was comprised, according to Ms Smith’s amended statement of claim, of the loss of 12 months’ worth of commissions at $2,000 per month of $24,000 in total; the loss of 12 months’ group insurance at $20 per week for a total $1,040; and a 12-month annual bonus of $750. The Court of Appeal acknowledged that Ms Smith had received a bonus or commissions via Snack Food’s incentive programme, and added: “For the year 2003, the [company], for economic reasons, implemented a new commission programme by which the employee would have received 1 per cent of net profits, replacing the existing scheme based on sales. When this was circulated at the end of 2002, the appellant objected, preferring the incentive programme that was already in place.” Basic pay, as defined by the Employment Act, did not include bonuses and commissions, the Court of Appeal said, meaning that Ms Smith’s action was “ bound to fail” if made under the Act. She was represented by attorney and trade union leader, Obie Ferguson. Referring to the previous Supreme Court hearing, Justice Longley’s judgment read: “Justice Lyons found the pleadings somewhat strange and confusing, and not without some justification. For it was not clear whether Mr Ferguson was trying to graft a claim for commissions etc at common law on to the statutory compensation conferred by section 29 of the Act on the pretext that they were wages, or whether it was intended to be an independent claim having regard to the wording of paragraph seven of the amended statement of claim. “For if the former were the case, he could not get through the back door what he could not get through the front door. If the latter were the case, then it was difficult to see how it could succeed without a claim also at common law for notice pay that was in excess of that conferred by the Act.” Without the common law claim for notice pay, Appeal Justice Longley said the action was just a common law claim for commissions worth $27,950, when Ms Smith had already received compensation worth more than $40,000. He ruled: “What the law contemplates is that if the benefits under the Act have been paid, the employee should have resort to his common law claim only if that provides for greater benefits. Otherwise, it would be a waste of time and costs. “In this regard, it seems to me that consideration may well have to be given to the operation of the doctrine of election when an employee has received his full benefits under the Act. “He should only be permitted to pursue a claim at common law for greater rights and better benefits after he has been put to an election to abandon the compensation under the Act, otherwise the purpose for which the Act was passed – to make a ready, inexpensive formula available for calculating benefits – would be lost in the mush of litigation.” In the Supreme Court case, Justice Lyons had reviewed Snack Food Wholesale’s compensation scheme, finding that it was discretionary and the changes made to it were “neither capricious nor irrational”. Justice Lyons also had no evidence placed before him to show how Ms Smith had calculated the $2,000 per month commission demand. Mr Ferguson, before the Court of Appeal, attempted to rely on pay slips from 2000, when the company was doing well, but they were rejected as “unsatisfactory” given that the commissions were claimed as special damages. Justice Longley ruled: “In any event, it seems to me that the appellant cannot have her cake and eat it, too. Either she accepts the payments made to her under the Act. Or she could pursue a claim at common law. She was not entitled to both. She got all that she was entitled to under the Act. “And the learned judge found, on the evidence before him, her claim at common law would have fallen short of the benefits conferred by the Act.” As a result, the appeal was dismissed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f 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0D\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ WKHGD\RI)HEUXDU\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $ UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0D\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $ UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0D\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0D\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0D\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ WKHGD\RI'HFHPEHU 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$SULO 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0D\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV E E M M P P L L O O Y Y E E E E S S , , f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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D ESPITE a sluggish economy, Commonwealth Bankt urned in a “remarkable perf ormance” for fiscal 2008 and the 2009 first quarter, the bank’s c hairman said. “Despite gloom in the econo my, I am pleased to report y our bank achieved its 12th consecutive year of record profits,” s aid T.B. Donaldson. While the global downturn had begun tot ake its toll on the Bahamian e conomy, he said the banking industry as a whole in TheB ahamas demonstrated strength, and Commonwealth Bank, in particular, had turned i n what he called “a very remarkable performance.” Net earnings totalled $49.3 m illion at year-end December 31, 2008, continuing an unbrok en record of increasing profitability started in 1998.Total a ssets stood at $1.3 billion, an i ncrease of 12 per cent over year-end 2007. Although Comm onwealth Bank’s share price f ell slightly from a peak of $7, at i ts close yesterday it was almost 5 0 per cent higher than at the t ime of stock split in late 2007 a nd was earning more for shareh olders in dividend yields than any other BISX-listed stock. Your bank,” Mr Donaldson t old more than 200 shareholders at SuperClub Breezes for thea nnual general meeting, “was t he only domestic financial insti tution in The Bahamas tor eport an increase in profits in 2008.” That profit, according to Ian J ennings, Commonwealth Bank’s senior vice-president and chief financial officer, translated into unmatched share holder benefits. While the Dow Jones was down 33.8 per cent in 2008, Mr Jennings said, and BISX was down 17.25 per cent, Commonwealth Bank reported $0.31 in dividends and $0.44 in earnings per share. At May 19, 2009, the bank’s shares were giving a 5.76 per cent dividend yield. Mr Jennings said the bank’s foundation was secure with $211 million in share capital, well above the $85 million required by the Central Bank. While loan loss provisions increased, impaired loans were well below the 6 per cent indus try average at 1.7 per cent. The bank wrote off a total of $18.8 million in bad loans in 2008, but amounts recovered from loan write offs increased to $7.6 mil lion, giving a net write off increase of only $2.2 million higher than 2007. “Impaired consumer loans – that is, loans that have not been paid in the last 90 days -grew industry wide from 3.7 per cent to 5.1 per cent. CommonwealthB ank fared very favourably by comparison with only a slight change, with impaired con sumer loans growing from 1.3 per cent to 1.4 per cent of our portfolio,” Mr Jennings said. An average loan portfolio balance of under $14,000 also helped spread the risk, he not ed. Mr Donaldson said the year’s highlights included the “tremendous success” of the Golden Gates branch that opened in 2006, and was already self-sus taining, operating well ahead of budget. The newest branch, now rising on Prince Charles Drive to serve the population of eastern New Providence, is slated to open by late autumn. There are no plans for new branches for 2010, Mr Donaldson said, but $10 million is being made available for small business loans. Noting the passing of longtime director Franklyn Butler, whom he called “a giant of a man”, and the retirement of senior vice-president Shirley Cartwright after 22 years of service, Mr Donaldson said the bank’s 550 employees were to be credited for its leading posi tion. “They are the ones who deal with customers all day, who wear a smile on their faces, who work tirelessly on behalf of your bank. It is because of them and because of our executive man agement team led by Bill Sands, president, and our directors that we can say Commonwealth Bank is the largest Bahamian bank, the largest company listed on BISX and one of the largest indigenous banks in the Caribbean. It is because of them that we can say we will weather the storm. We will survive. And we will continue to succeed,” he added. Shareholders, after reviewing a comprehensive and transparent presentation of the Bank’s 2008 results and challenges for the rest of 2009, did not raise a single question and all directors were returned to office. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009, PAGE 11B & 20021:($/7+)+(%$+$0$6 ,1+((0(&285 &RPPRQ/DZDQG(TXLW\'LYLVLRQ ,1+($77(5 RIKHXLHWLQJ 7 $1' ,17+(0$77(5 RI $//7+$7 SLHFH S DUFHORUWUDFWRIODQGVLWXDWHQHDU5HG % DLQWKHYLFLQLW\RI%DNHU&UHHNDQG /RJJHUKHDG3RLQWRQWKH,VODQGRI$EDFR RQHRIWKH,VODQGVRIWKH&RPPRQZHDOWKR I7KH%DKDPDVFRPSULVLQJ)RXUDQG 6 HYHQ7KRXVDQGWKVDFUHVEHLQJ *UDQWSDJWR-DPHV:HDWKHUIRUGf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f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t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t2( &KDPEHUV HWLURRDG 2IIKLUOH\WUHHW 1DVVDX%DKDPDV $WWRUQH\VIRUWKHHWLWLRQHUV Commonwealth Bank’s ‘remarkable performance’ in

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 12B, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE CO.LTD. Atlantic House,2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue,P.O.Box SS-5915,Nassau Tel.326-8191 Suite 5,Jasmine Corporate Center,East Sunrise Highway,P.O.Box F-42655,Freeport Tel.351-3960A member of Colonial Group International:Insurance,Health,Pensions,LifeAtlantic Medical is the market leading health insurance provider because it offers the best care at the best possible price. Your health care is a very important part of your life,so it is reassuring if you know your plan and your insurance provider will deliver on care,benefits and service when you need it. You can enjoy that reassurance with Atlantic Medical.Just ask any one of 50,000 health plan members who trust Colonial Group International to work for them day-in, day-out,at home or overseas. People trust Atlantic Medical for care,service and value that really makes a difference and makes sure you will receive the best health cover money can buy.You can TRUST a health plan that delivers on its promise. Colonial Group International is rated A-(Excellentby AM Best. Atlantic Medical /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$SULO 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0D\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV THE Bahamas’ plans to seek out new investors and tourists from emerging and fast-developing markets further afield are the subject of in-depth analysis in a comprehensive English language report on the country’s investment and business opportunities. The Report: The Bahamas 2009 has been produced by O xford Business Group (OBG the global publishing, research and consultancy firm. The Group’s first-ever report on The B ahamas looks in detail at how the country hopes to tap into the Latin American and Asian markets, which are expected to pro-v ide significant growth for the country while cushioning it from the blow of the global economic crisis. O BG’s Report offers a detailed guide for foreign investors, alongside a wide range of interviews with the likes ofB rent Symonette, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs, Catherine Ashton, EU Trade Commissioner, and Bobby Ginn, founder of Ginn Enterprises. OBG’s analysis provides a detailed insight into the Government’s plans to accelerate thei mplementation of planned infrastructural development and e xpansion as part of a fiscal policy aimed at weathering the worldwide economic storm. The Report examines the steps that the Bahamas is taking to attract visitors from Latin America, Asia and Russia, as it looks for ways to expand its traditional base of cruise-line and US tourists. There is also indepth analysis of the country’s bid to enhance its retail sector, particularly in the downtown area of the nation’s capital, Nassau, aimed at giving the economy a boost while providing additional shopping and leisure facili ties for visitors. The Report: The Bahamas 2009 has been produced in partnership with the Bahamas Financ ial Services Board (BFSB Contributions have also been made by Deloitte as OBG’s accountancy partner and McK-i nney, Bancroft & Hughes as its legal partner. Andrew Jeffreys, editor-inchief of Oxford Business Group, s aid: “The Bahamas has clearly taken innovative steps in its bid to overcome the current global economic challenges. OBG’st eam of international analysts has benefited tremendously from the expertise and high quality analysis provided by our partners in analysing these mea sures.” With a distribution of 41,000 copies, The Report forms part of the range of OBG's publications. O xford Business Group (OBG r esearch and consultancy firm publishing economic and political intelligence on the markets of the Caribbean, the Middle East, Eastern Europe, Africa and Asia. Report outlines growth targets SHOWN (l-r Warren, chief executive and executive director, Bahamas Financial Services Board; and John Wilson, McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes

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INSIGHT C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune INSIGHT MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009 The stories behind the news n By RUPERT MISSICK Jr Chief Reporter rmissick@tribunemedia.net T he Bahamas is fighting a "very serious cultural war" with the Haitian community, a well known r adio personality told Insight last week. H is comment came after two separate sets of e-mails were sent to the column containing correspondence b etween Bahamians who were “put o ff”, to say the least, by several ges t ures emanating from the Haitian comm unity. T he first set of e-mails centred round the recent Haitian Flag Day celebrations held in the capital. Some in the g roup felt that no nationality in the B ahamas should collectively “celebrate t heir flag” as it is a symbol of their allegiance to a foreign state. The second was of a discussion sur rounding an advertisement appearing in a local publication that encouraged Haitian-Bahamian women to register for what was described as the “Miss Port au Prince in the Bahamas” pageant. Generally, those who were concerned about these two events won dered why people, who so desperately w anted to belong to a country, would insist on holding events that identified them as another people with another land. “The concern is that they are not trying to be Bahamian,” one person t old Insight. W e’re not too sure what this means a nd certainly a discussion of what is Bahamian” can be so mired in pedant ic rhetoric and so subjective, that it should be left for another time. C ertainly what is the offence, as far as these Bahamians are concerned, and what is perceived as a right, as far as some Haitian-Bahamians are con cerned, is an expression of identity or heritage or even origin. So this begs the question.... “What does it take to be a Bahami an? Loyalty to our Bahamas over and above all other; zeal for our Bahamas unmatched by any other; concern for other Bahamians over all others.” Sir Lynden Pindling address at the National Conference on Indepen dence, April 12, 1972. Sir Lynden’s statement may just be one man’s opinion but it’s hard to argue with it if you believe that patri otism is an ideal worth having. If you think being patriotic is an out moded philosophy or believe it more convenient to assign “Bahamian-ness” based on how recently one arrived in the Bahamas, the usefulness of that quote to advance the conversation and the conversation itself should end here, but we digress. On page 38 of the May 11 edition of The Punch, an advertisement read: “Miss Port au Prince in The Bahamas 2009. We are proud to invite young women with character, 17 28 years old. ‘Mothers or not’, to vie for the title of the 21st century. No sponsors are needed.” This advertisement led the originator of the e-mail discussion to ask: CULTURAL WAR The assimilation of two separate but equal communities S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B THE BAHAMAS is fighting a “very serious cultural war” with the Haitian community, a well known radio personality told Insight last week...

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“Are any of you concerned that there is a group of people in theB ahamas who are still so tied to a nother country that they are quite comfortable asking for and probably receiving contestants for the capital of Haiti?” According to Jetta Baptiste, a community activist and businesswoman, 60 per cent of Bahamians living in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas today are of Haitian heritage and are ashamed to admit that their parents, grandparents, or great grandparents came from Haiti. “Over 60 per cent of Bahamians living in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas today are of Haitian heritage, and Haitian decent, therefore why not have pride in the rich heritage of Haiti and the heritage of the Bahamas? What is so wrong with embracing both heritages and cultures? “Many Bahamians are ashamed to admit that their parents, grandparents, or great grandparents came from Haiti, because all they can relate to is the negative publicity and the bad impressions that they see or hear on the news. We must accept and keep what is best in both cultures and disregard the bad things. We can improve the world we live in by being tolerant. It is okay for us to disagree and not like the same things,” she said. She blames most of the fear Bahamians have over expressions of Haitian culture on a failure to educate. “We have so much in comm on, but we will never know if w e don’t just talk with each other. We need to embrace our differences and make the Bahamasa better unified country, where we all can live in peace and harmony. “Bahamians who have foresight and adopt their Haitian h eritage will see that there is n othing to be ashamed of. We cannot change the past, but we surely have control over what we do in the future,” she said. However, Minister Kevin Harris, a DJ on 101.9 Joy FM and owner of Harris Communications said a distinction must be drawn between expressing one’s culture and celebrating a flag day.” A flag is a very serious symb ol; it is a representation of a country. The idea for those withi n the Haitian community in the Bahamas to celebrate their heritage is not a bad idea but you cannot have two countries fighti ng to be recognised in the same land. You should not allow another country to march in your capital. “This is a sovereign nation and like any sovereign nation you ought to reserve some things for yourself. I think the recognition of a national cele b ration of independence should be reserved for the Bahamas. We should recognise and respect the culture of other people but that should not be p laced above ours,” he said. M r Harris claims that the flag d ay celebration is worrisome for another reason. When one country is successful in defeating another the first thing that they do is remove the flag of that country and r eplace it with their flag to sym bolize that ‘we have conquered t his territory’. I think there are c oncerns that this is a symbol that a cultural war is taking place. This may be an attempt for the once sleeping giant to s how its numbers and its s trength,” he said. H owever, Ms Batiste feels that that there is “no need for a cultural war” in the Bahamas, if in fact one does exist. “If none exists, then we don’t need to create one either,” she said. However, she said what is n eeded is for every citizen or resident of the Commonwealth o f the Bahamas to know what is enshrined in the Constitution oft he Bahamas. Our constitution guarantees that everyone has the right tof reedom of speech, movement, r eligion, assembly, and so on and so forth. Once one under s tands that, then there should be no debate on this issue. What is wrong with a group of persons parading with their flags in the streets? Would we be having this conversation if the flags were American ones? I personally see nothing wrong with Haitians celebrating their flag day in May. Bahamians and Americans will be celebrating their flag day in July, Jamaicans will be cele brating their flag day in August, so I don’t see a problem with people showing that they are proud of being who they are and n ot afraid to show it,” Ms Baptiste said. Mr Harris disagrees with Ms Baptiste on this point and says there “is no one else doing this same thing” in the Bahamas at this time. “No other culture in the Bahamas is seeking to have this kind of expression. The Cubans aren't doing it, the Jamaicans aren't doing it and the Chinese aren't doing it,” he said. Perhaps Haitians cannot help themselves. Perhaps pride in their heritage, history and nationality is something bread in them at birth. “(Haitians proudly and erect as if conscious of their freedom and independence.” Frederick Douglass' Delivered Speech on Haiti at the World's Fair January 2, 1893. In the case of the Ms Port au Prince advertisement, it is easy t o be sympathetic to a young w oman of Haitian decent suff ering from the vexing delays that many in her position face a fter applying for citizenship upon reaching 18. Persons like her, may be unable to participate in a Miss Bahamas pageant b ecause she is technically not Bahamian. H owever, Mr Harris believes t he advertisement is indicative of what he sees as a subversive plan by some members of the Haitian community to quietly i nfiltrate and desensitize B ahamians to an "invading" cult ure. "I believe what you are seeing is a multi-layered approach towards testing the water for a concerted and well organised approach in putting out the Haitian platform. I think you have intelligent people out there w ho are sympathetic to the Haitian plight whose object it is t o try to bend Bahamian behaviour to accept a certain position.I think that is morally unfair. I d on't think that I have to suspend who I am to accept whoy ou are. It is not appropriate to h ave this kind of event," he said. At the end of the day there s imply may need to be more understanding and sensitivity among Bahamians for the plight of Haitians living in the country. “We need to be respectful, tolerant, kind, compassionate, merciful, fair, caring and considerate towards each other as we all came from the same source, Mother Africa and Adam and Eve. God created Haitians as well. Many people fail to appreciate that fact. Why do you think God created Haitians? I am sure it was not to be abused and mistreated by B ahamians,” Ms Baptiste said. Anecdotally, relations between the Bahamian and Haitian community run hot and cold depending on the social or political circumstances under which they meet. You can always count on immigration and the use of public health and education resources to get bloods boiling. Nevertheless, the communities share common ground on many levels. Bahamians have shared not only hospital and school rooms with their Haitian brothers and sisters, but bedrooms as well. They go to clubs together, the same churches and the same public events. Furthermore, there has never been any violent clashes between the two communities to indicate the intention of one to eliminate the other. It is this vexatious question of origin that over complicates things. Those who choose to busy themselves with nation building will find an attempt to divide and compartmentalize 300,000 people a counterintuitive effort. The fewer people you have the shallower the skills, experiences and creativity. Ms Baptiste puts it this way, “For far too long, our leaders have encouraged division among our people for their own personal agendas. But God the Almighty’s first instruction to mankind in the book of Genesis was to be “fruitful and multiply” not divide or subtract.” Whether this is what the Almighty actually meant is up for debate, but her point still rings true. “In entertainment, you find many Bahamian men and women going to the Haitian clubs and restaurants to enjoy t he music and the food. This is h ow many Haitian and Bahamians are living in Freeport. “From an employee/employer point of view, the relations are also good. Most Bahamian employers prefer to work with Haitian employees, because these people are motivated and t hey tend to get the job done e ffectively and efficiently. Most Bahamian employers would tell you that they trust the Haitian employees more than they trust other Bahamians. “So in a nutshell, I would say, in Grand Bahama we are enjoying excellent relations with each other. If this is not happening nationwide, then maybe wen eed to start and get the ball r olling, and bridge the gaps that e xist through respect and education. We all know how good c onch salad is, and in Freeport, Grand Bahama we are all mixed up just like conch salad,” Ms Baptiste said. T he gradual unfolding of time will reveal whether the Bahamas is at the brink of a “cultural war” or not. If we are, there are certainly two things that will fuel the battles to come: ignorance and fear. Avoiding these hostilities will require sincere efforts to integrate and assimilate those p ersons unfairly marginalized by impractical laws that tend to do nothing but frustrate a grow i ng and increasingly influential s egment of our population. But what of this “assault” on B ahamian culture from the H aitian community? Well, it can o nly be considered an assault if y ou see culture as a static thing a nd in that case these islands h ave been “assailed” by foreign c ultures since that legendary Italian explorer set foot here in 1492. If we assimilate our Haitian brothers and sisters and make them feel more like Bahamians of Haitian decent and less like Haitians who feel they should be Bahamian, (Haitian-Bahamian ian culture will be just another thread in the complicated and beautiful tapestry of all that is “truly Bahamian.” Both Ms Batiste and Mr Harris can agree that there is a deep need for assimilation. “We all have a role to play in this assimilation and integration process. We need to start with the media, and then have the government, the schools and the churches get involved in enhanc ing our country through educa tion. But how will you reach the majority of Haitians who are not reading The Tribune or other newspapers? We need a Hait ian-Bahamian Radio station to fill that void. We need to reach the Haitian community and teach them about their rights, our laws, our culture, our coun try, love and life,” she said. However, Mr Harris points out that there appears to be a double standard among members in the Haitian community. "There is a complaint that I feel unfairly treated but the justification of their expression of anger is that they say 'I will gravitate to the Haitian flag. I will place it on my car, in front of my business, my home, etcetera. The question is where does your allegiance lie? If you are applying and earnestly want to be recognised as a citizen why the need to do this?" Remember, according to Sir Lynden, and it's fair to assume that as leader of the government delegation he spoke for all per sons from his side, the requirements to be Bahamian are embarrassingly simple: “Loyalty to our Bahamas over and above all other; zeal for our Bahamas unmatched by any other; concern for other Bahamians over all others.” It remains for those of us still here on Earth to determine if things have changed since April 12, 1972. What do you think? Fax 328-2398 or e-mail rmissick@tribunemedia.net C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 2C, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Email: 2 0 0 9 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e t It’sElectric! CULTURAL WAR: The assimilation of two separate but equal communities F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B THE BAHAMAS is fighting a “very serious cultural war” with the Haitian community, a well known radio personality told Insight last week...

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 71F/22C Low: 72F/22C Low: 72F/22C Low: 74F/23C Low: 74 F/23 C Low: 77F/25C Low: 77 F/25 C Low: 74 F/23 C High: 87F/31C High: 86F/30C High: 87 F/31 C High: 86 F/30 C High: 88F/31C High: 87 F/31C High: 89F/32C Low: 77F/25C High: 86F/30C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 88F/31C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 73F/23C High: 88 F/31 C Low: 74F/23C High: 87 F/31 Low: 72F/22C High: 85F/29C Low: 75 F/24C High: 88F/31C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 91F/33C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 88F/31C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 87F/31C Low: 79F/26C High: 89 F/32 C Low: 78F/26C High: 92F/33C High: 84 F/29 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI PAGE 7C THE TRIBUNE 5/25/09 THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Mostly sunny, a t-storm in spots. A t-storm in spots in the evening. Mostly sunny and largley dry. Mostly sunny, a t-storm possible. Partly sunny. High: 89 Low: 77 High: 88 High: 88 High: 88 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Some sun with a t-storm in the area. High: 86 Low: 76 Low: 76 Low: 77 AccuWeather RealFeel 105F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 87F 104-87F 102-87F 99-88F 100-80F Low: 76 TODAYTONIGHTTUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................86F/30C Low ....................................................77F/25C Normal high ......................................85F/29C Normal low ........................................72F/22C Last year's high .................................. 92 F/33C Last year's low .................................. 79 F/26C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ..................................................4.28" Normal year to date ....................................10.83" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU First Full Last New May 30 Jun. 7Jun. 15Jun. 22 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:22 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:52 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 7:11 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 9:34 p.m. Today Tuesday Wednesday Thursday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 9:06 a.m.2.63:07 a.m.-0.2 9:31 p.m.3.33:00 p.m.-0.2 9:59 a.m.2.63:58 a.m.-0.2 10:24 p.m.3.33:54 p.m.-0.2 10:53 a.m.2.74:50 a.m.-0.2 11:19 p.m.3.24:50 p.m.-0.2 11:50 a.m.2.75:43 a.m.-0.1 -----5:50 p.m.-0.1 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco89/3173/22pc87/3074/23s Amsterdam73/2257/13s58/1448/8r Ankara, Turkey75/2346/7pc73/2248/8pc Athens89/3172/22s86/3072/22s Auckland57/1350/10r57/1348/8c Bangkok90/3279/26t91/3279/26t Barbados86/3077/25pc86/3076/24s Barcelona71/2161/16pc68/2054/12s Beijing88/3161/16s88/3161/16s Beirut79/2666/18s75/2371/21s Belgrade81/2758/14s87/3065/18s Berlin78/2559/15s87/3059/15t Bermuda76/2470/21s75/2370/21pc Bogota66/1847/8sh66/1845/7sh Brussels81/2758/14s60/1541/5r Budapest83/2855/12s85/2960/15s Buenos Aires68/2055/12c64/1747/8s Cairo91/3270/21s94/3470/21s Calcutta88/3177/25r95/3581/27t Calgary65/1846/7sh69/2047/8c Cancun90/3273/22pc92/3371/21pc Caracas80/2672/22pc80/2672/22s Casablanca72/2256/13s78/2564/17s Copenhagen68/2055/12s69/2054/12t Dublin61/1646/7sh57/1345/7pc Frankfurt87/3069/20s83/2853/11t Geneva 83/28 60/15 pc 63/1752/11t Halifax 65/18 32/0 c 57/13 38/3 s Havana 88/31 70/21 r 89/31 70/21 sh Helsinki 63/17 45/7s68/2052/11pc Hong Kong 81/27 75/23 t 84/28 77/25t Islamabad 102/38 73/22 pc 114/45 76/24 s Istanbul80/2661/16sh78/2557/13s Jerusalem 72/22 57/13s77/2557/13s Johannesburg 71/2144/6s68/2046/7s Kingston 87/3079/26r87/3078/25r Lima76/2459/15s75/2359/15pc London75/2352/11r66/1848/8r Madrid70/2150/10t77/2548/8s Manila93/3381/27pc93/3381/27pc Mexico City78/2551/10t80/2651/10s Monterrey102/3877/25s107/4173/22pc Montreal61/1636/2s66/1845/7pc Moscow51/1038/3r52/1143/6pc Munich83/2858/14s70/2151/10t Nairobi81/2764/17t79/2665/18t New Delhi 108/4281/27t104/4082/27s Oslo70/2149/9s68/2054/12r Paris82/2758/14c62/1648/8r Prague 79/26 57/13 s 77/25 53/11 s Rio de Janeiro84/2871/21s85/2973/22s Riyadh109/4281/27s111/4382/27s Rome 86/30 61/16 pc 84/28 57/13 pc St. Thomas86/3079/26s85/2979/26s San Juan76/2443/6s62/1643/6c San Salvador 85/29 73/22 t 84/28 73/22 s Santiago 64/1741/5pc66/1850/10pc Santo Domingo85/2973/22sh84/2873/22sh Sao Paulo 76/24 59/15 s 78/25 59/15sh Seoul81/2759/15s77/2557/13s Stockholm 66/18 52/11 pc 68/20 52/11 s Sydney 70/21 57/13 pc72/2255/12pc Taipei79/2673/22r79/2672/22sh T okyo 77/25 61/16 pc 79/26 63/17 s T oronto 67/1949/9pc62/1654/12pc Trinidad85/2966/18sh87/3067/19sh V ancouver 67/19 51/10 pc 63/1751/10pc Vienna 82/2761/16s84/2865/18pc W arsaw 68/20 48/8 s 72/22 49/9 s Winnipeg 55/12 46/7 r 63/1748/8s H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayTuesday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 15-20 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles81F Tuesday:SSE at 15-25 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles81F Today:E at 15-20 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles80F Tuesday:E at 15-25 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles80F Today:E at 15-20 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles81F Tuesday:E at 15-25 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles81F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque81/2757/13t79/2655/12pc Anchorage66/1849/9s68/2048/8pc Atlanta80/2666/18t81/2766/18t Atlantic City74/2356/13t61/1654/12r Baltimore76/2458/14t65/1856/13r Boston73/2248/8s60/1548/8pc Buffalo71/2148/8pc67/1953/11r Charleston, SC81/2768/20t82/2767/19t Chicago67/1952/11c70/2154/12t Cleveland70/2154/12pc71/2158/14t Dallas86/3069/20t89/3168/20pc Denver70/2148/8t66/1847/8c Detroit70/2151/10pc72/2258/14t Honolulu84/2873/22pc86/3073/22pc Houston91/3271/21t90/3271/21pc HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayTuesday TodayTuesdayTodayTuesday Indianapolis72/2258/14t79/2665/18t Jacksonville83/2867/19t84/2869/20t Kansas City75/2362/16t75/2361/16t Las Vegas95/3567/19s96/3573/22s Little Rock78/2566/18t84/2868/20t Los Angeles74/2358/14pc74/2360/15pc Louisville79/2668/20t84/2868/20t Memphis82/2769/20t82/2769/20t Miami88/3174/23t87/3075/23t Minneapolis74/2355/12pc70/2154/12t Nashville81/2766/18t81/2766/18t New Orleans83/2870/21t86/3072/22t New York77/2555/12pc61/1652/11r Oklahoma City83/2864/17t84/2863/17t Orlando87/3071/21t88/3169/20t Philadelphia77/2558/14t65/1858/14r Phoenix 97/36 73/22 s 97/3673/22s Pittsburgh76/2457/13c70/2157/13t Portland, OR 74/2353/11s71/2153/11pc Raleigh-Durham 84/28 66/18 t 83/28 62/16 t St. Louis74/2366/18t79/2666/18t Salt Lake City 73/22 53/11 t 77/2556/13pc San Antonio 94/34 71/21 pc 92/33 72/22 s San Diego67/1960/15pc67/1962/16pc San Francisco 67/19 52/11 pc 69/2053/11pc Seattle68/2050/10pc66/1851/10pc T allahassee 84/2868/20t82/2768/20t T ampa 86/30 72/22 pc 86/30 73/22t Tucson93/3366/18s91/3265/18s W ashington, DC 78/25 62/16t67/1962/16r UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

PAGE 28

C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 8C, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By JOHN ANTCZAK Associated Press Writer EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. (AP shuttle Atlantis brought its crew of seven astronauts safely back to Earth on Sunday after thunderstorms in Florida forced a detour to sunsplashed California, ending a 13-day mission that repaired and enhanced the Hubble Space Telescope. “Now and only now can we declare this mission a total success the astronauts are safely on the ground,” NASA sciences chief Ed Weiler told a Florida press conference. Atlantis’ crew had waited since Friday for the go-ahead to land as Mission Controlh oped to avoid the time and expense about $1.8 million of diverting to California’s E dwards Air Force Base. The Florida weather refused to yield and Mission Control finally directed shuttle commander Scott Altman to head to California. The shuttle’s twin sonic booms rocked the Mojave Desert as it swooped out of a dazzling morning sky. Out on the runway after landing, Altman reflected on how long it had taken to get their mission under way and then to end it. When we got down to Florida I looked at everybody and said, ’At last,”’ Altman said. “I d idn’t realize it was going to be so hard to get back to the Earth in the end. So again I guess I say the same thing, at last we’re back on the ground.” It was the 53rd shuttle land ing at Edwards; the last one was in November. The crew finally set foot on the ground about two hours after touchdown, receiving greetings from ground personnel before they began the customary walkaround to inspect the exterior of their spacecraft. It was uncertain whether the crew would return to their Houston homes later Sundayor on Monday. NASA officials said it will take about a week to prepare A tlantis for its ferry flight back to Kennedy Space Center atop a NASA Boeing 747. During five spacewalks, the astronauts gave the 19-year-old Hubble new science instruments, pointing devices and batteries, and fixed broken instruments. The astronauts overcame stuck bolts and other difficulties. The work will add years to the life of the telescope and its study of the universe. Initial checkouts of the repaired Hubble were going well, Weiler said. He noted that the telescope had yet to see any starlight but he said he expected it to gather data by August. Much was made of Atlantis’ departure from Hubble as the last time it will be touched by humans, and Weiler acknowledged that was an “emotional moment.” But he wanted nothing to do with sad thoughts. “Geez!” he exclaimed. “We just repaired the Hubble Space Telescope. We got a new tele scope, four new instruments, two of them dead now alive. We’ve got another five, six, sev en, eight years with the new telescope. These are truly the best of times not the worst of times.” N ASA eventually expects to steer Hubble into the Pacific sometime in the early 2020s using a robotic vehicle, though it’s possible that might be done with a crewed vehicle, NASA’s new Orion. The astronauts brought back Hubble’s old wide-field camera they pulled out, so it can be displayed at the Smithsonian Institution. The replacement camera and other new instruments will enable Hubble to peer deeper into the universe. The $1 billion repair mission almost didn’t happen. It was canceled in 2004, a year after the Columbia tragedy, because of the dangers of flying into a 350-mile-high orbit that did not offer any shelter in case Atlantis suffered damage from launch debris or space junk. The public protest was intense, and NASA reinstated the flight after developing a rescue plan and shuttle repair kits. Shuttle Endeavour was on standby for a possible rescue mission until late last week, after inspections found Atlantis’ thermal shielding to be solid for re-entry. Endeav our now will be prepped for a June flight to the international space station. Atlantis and crew land after Hubble mission THE SPACE shuttle Atlantis comes in for a landing Sunday at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base, California, at the conclusion of mission STS-125 to repair the Hubble space telescope... (AP Photo: Reed Saxon




{T)

Mim blowin’ it

SOF
TTF

MOSTLY SUNNY,
“SX ESTORM

Volume: 105 No.150

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

HIGH
LOW







Te)
War

SEE INSIGHT SECTION

Christie: PLP party
leaders ‘secure’

Head of the
Opposition has

US



SS



Claim that police
charging bailed
individuals ‘to get
them off streets’

Allegation made by Bar
Association President

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

POLICE often charge individuals released on bail for seri-
ous crimes with other offences that they have “absolutely no
evidence” that person committed simply to get them off the

6 rw 1 streets and back behind bars, the President of the Bar Asso-
ove helming ciation has alleged.
) { Wayne Munroe made this charge as he hit out at what he
su or t O claimed was the irrational and counterproductive manner in
P
which the Attorney General chooses to determine the order
followers in which accused criminals will be put down for trial — and the

lack of public outrage about it — claiming that the office
must be held responsible to some degree for the number of

@ By ALISON : :
LOWE dangerous people getting bail.
Tribune Staff His comments come after leaked information from the
Reporter Police’s Security and Intelligence branch showed that of 205
alowe@ people released from prison in April, 11 were on bail for

murder or attempted murder.
Meanwhile, in the same week, the Court of Appeal ruled
that the section of the Bail Act, 1996, which sought to prohibit

tribunemedia.net

PLP leader Per-
ry Christie yester-
day said that he,
Deputy Leader
Cynthia “Mother”
Pratt and party
chairman Glenys
Hanna Martin are all “secure” in
their positions, despite the efforts
and aspirations of certain people
who wish to “destabilise” the par-
ty or cause “political mischief.”

In the wake of signs that some
within the party have formed fac-
tions intent on promoting the
leadership ambitions of certain
individuals, opposition leader Per-



PLP LEADER
Perry Christie



AN EXPANDING SLUM has
driven residents of Gamble





judges from granting bail to people accused of “serious”
crimes such as murder was “void” and “unconstitutional.”
The attorney, senior partner at the law firm Lockhart and

SEE page 10



28-year-old in serious
condition after stabbing

A BRUTAL stabbing in Har-
bour Island has left a 28-year-
old man in serious condition.

The man was airlifted from



However police provided no
details of where the stabbing
took place in the popular tourist
destination, or if the matter was

ie 5 ! Heights to take action by the North Eleuthera island tobe a domestic incident.
oF PLP inllowsrs asa edna) © working together to clean up treated at a hospitalin New —— No one has yet been arrested
responsibility of ensuring that, 2 the area. Providence after he was stabbed _in connection with the stabbing.
“when the party is passed on, it = The growing settlement of aaa at around 4am on i fps es oe ne
. = lywood shacks is said aturday. hat may assist police investiga-
SEE page nine 2 ply : Police say he was involvedin tions should call Crime Stoppers
= to be powered by illegally an argument with a 34-year-old anonymously at 328-TIPS
.@ sourced electricity with water woman before the stabbing. (8477).
PLEASE NOTE THAT, DUETO = = Pe eS
r I I 1
THE MEMORIAL DAY HOLIDAY = “* Wg Man in custody
IN THE US, THERE WILL BE * SEE PAGE TWO after gunshots
NO USA TODAY IN TODAY'S . :
EDITION OF THE TRIBUNE. fired from vehicle
GUNSHOTS were fired from a

Tel: 394-5656

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Senator to take up
Consul General post

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

SENATOR Katherine
Forbes Smith will shortly take
up the post of Consul Gener-
al at a newly-opened Bahamas
Consulate office in Atlanta,
Georgia, the Cabinet Office
announced yesterday.

Mrs Smith will leave her
Senate appointment and job
as Parliamentary Secretary in

Quiznos

the Office of the Prime Min-
ister to start work in Atlanta
on June 1.

A statement from the Cabi-
net Office said the new con-
sular office has been opened
in response to the growing
demand for service by
Bahamians resident in the
greater Atlanta area and by
businesses in the southeastern
United States wishing to

SEE page nine

:

ta ee ru

ol

WEALTHY POTENTIAL
RESIDENTS ‘ARE
BEING DRIVEN OUT
BY GAMBLING
RESTRICTIONS’

CAT ISLANDERS
CHEER INAUGURAL
FLIGHT

. ma r F =

ge, we

ITALIAN CLUB

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ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

Hummer as it chased a gold
coloured Honda on Marathon
Road at around 8 o’clock Friday
night.

Police acted quickly when offi-
cers saw shots being fired from
the military-style vehicle and
called for reinforcement to chase
down the cars.

Both vehicles were stopped
moments later.

A 12 gauge shotgun and 13
shotgun shells were found in the
Hummer. The driver was arrest-

A 34-year-old man is in police
custody.

Anyone with any information
that may assist police investiga-
tions should call Crime Stoppers
anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477).

treo &

= ® =

See ba E- ha, el, ~~ @ & 9 2 22 © z —

-
J :


PAGE 2, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Gamble Heights Crime Watch
committee initiates clean-up





























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DEADLINE: June 19th, 2009

~~

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

A SLUM expanding on the
borders of a New Providence
community has driven con-
cerned residents to take
action by working together
to clean up the area.

Residents of Gamble
Heights fear rising crime,
poor sanitation and disease
spreading in the area off
Baillou Hill Road South, as
more and more people move
into a shanty village of
Haitians and Bahamians on
otherwise disused land
behind their subdivision.

The growing settlement of
plywood shacks is powered
by illegally sourced electric-
ity and water is tapped from
city pipes. Garbage is piling
up outside the village,
attracting oversized rodents,
and residents fear the slum
allows illegal immigrants and

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bushes and get rid of garbage.

criminals to infiltrate their
community.

Members of the Gamble
Heights Community Crime
Watch Committee said they
initiated a clean up of the
area when government took
too long to act.

Residents pooled their
resources to hire a tractor
and tear down overgrown
bushes on Saturday morning
in the first of a weekly clean-
up operation to improve the
environment block by block.

They say the slum has
been growing for the past
three decades, and residents
have become so settled there
are churches among their
homes.

Resident Theresa Johnson
said: “We are not prejudiced
about anybody, but some-
thing needs to be done.

“They have no bathroom
facilities so everything is
going into the ground and
eventually it will go into the
water table and diseases like
tuberculosis (TB) will get
into the community... And
we have children and our
families to think of.”

Mother of three Yalice
Bowe-Smith, of Sunrise
Road, is troubled by rising
crime as there have been
three murders in the area
this year.

Burglars

She has stopped burglars
trying to break into her
home, confronted super-
sized rats and held her chil-
dren back from playing near
the road when cars speed
through at 100mph.

“This is too much for us to
handle,” she said. “But this is
what we are facing. If
nobody else is going to stop
it, we aS a community are
going to step in and start
with cleaning up these bush-
es to avoid the rodents and
the crime.”

For Wellington
Emmanuel, 40, who grew up
in the area, the greatest con-
cern is the expanding “Hait-
ian Village.”

He said: “Haitian people
are squatting there and
building, and it's getting

Ends May 30




and Yalice Bowe-Smith.

worse, SO my main concern
is getting rid of these peo-
ple.”

The community believes
they can improve the area by
working together, but Sun-
rise Road resident Yvonne
Stubbs, 49, admits she does
not know how they will get
rid of the illegal settlement.

Mrs Stubbs said: “We have
to put a stop to it, but I don't
know how. We invite them
along with the whole com-
munity to our crime watch
meetings, so if they come
they can get a feel and
understanding of what we
are all about.

“But they have to move
these houses, they have to
go. We can't tolerate it.

“T could see if they were
helping the community, and
contributing, but they are
not, they are pulling it down.
And we can see from the
way it looks that that is
what's happening.”

Gamble Heights resident
Courtney Thompson said
Minister of Immigration and
MP for Gamble Heights
Branville McCartney assured
him he would have officers
tour the area along with
social service staff, the police
and representatives from the
Ministry of Housing.

However, government has
been telling the residents
that for years, Mr Thompson

Bernard Rd

Mackey St: 393-5684 Thompson Blvd: 328-1164



an x : â„¢ se ee Fl
CHAIRMAN OF Gamble Heights Crime Watch Committee Joe Stubbs



GAMBLE HEIGHTS residents have had to pool their resources to hire a tractor to tear down overgrown



said, so the residents are tak-
ing the issue into their own
hands.

He said: “We have been
talking about this issue for
about seven years, and noth-
ing is done, it only gets
worse.”

Mr McCartney confirmed
he is well aware of the situa-
tion and immigration officers
raided the area twice in the
last year, apprehending 15
illegal immigrants in the last
raid.

Ownership

However, he said, officials
are trying to determine own-
ership of the land before
they proceed with police,
housing officers, social ser-
vices and the defence force
to break up the ghetto.

Mr McCartney said such
slums are springing up all
over New Providence, and
he wants to make the public
more aware of them.

“Many of these persons,”
he said, “come over and
work for Bahamians illegally,
so we are causing this in our
own society. We are work-
ing on something to show the
Bahamian public how they
are aiding and developing
slums.

“People are living in
squalor. If you go there you
will find it’s a slum. People
are living outdoors, literally
live in bushes, and they know
these bushes better than
most. There are caves and
holes in the bushes where
they hide and it seems as
though it’s quite difficult to
get them.

“But certainly this is one
of many areas that the
department is very conscious
of and we have begun work-
ing to try and see if we can
deal with this.”

FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY!

AT PARTICIPATING STORES


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

Man killed
in traffic
accident

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A 23-year-old i
male resident of Bootle Bay was }
killed in a traffic accident at }
West End early Sunday morn- }
ing, pushing the traffic fatality ;
count to seven for the year on }

Grand Bahama.

Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle :
reported that the accident }
occurred around 2.30am on }
Bayshore Road involving a 1999 }
grey-coloured Delta 98 Oldsmo- }
bile with license plate number ;
43861, owned by Bowe’s Heavy }

Equipment.

The victim was ejected from :
the vehicle and pronounced :
dead at the scene. Police have }
not released the victim’s identi- }

ty.

Bayshore Road.

He lost control of the vehicle }
while trying to negotiate a }
curve, knocked down a utility ;
pole and crashed into a chain }
linked fence. The vehicle landed :
in two feet of rain water on the :

road side.

ASP Bootle said Dr Kahn

was summoned to the scene,

where he examined the victim }

and pronounced him dead.

He said the police are advis- }
ing motorists to drive with }
extreme care and caution on the }
road, especially in wet and slip- }

pery rainy conditions.

Two men
arrested

after reports”

of prowlers

FAST-ACTING police }
responded to reports of }



Mr Bootle said police inves- :
tigations revealed that the dri- :
ver was travelling east on }

driven out by vambline restrictions’

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

MILLIONS of dollars could be
spent in the Bahamas and increase
government revenue but are being
spent elsewhere as wealthy poten-
tial residents are driven out of the
islands by gambling restrictions.

A foreign investor, who consid-
ered purchasing high-value property
in the Bahamas and becoming a per-
manent resident told his Nassau real
estate agent he has been deterred
by restrictive gaming laws.

The Florida resident, who is in his
fifties, spends thousands of dollars at
the Wyndham Resort Crystal Palace
casino when on vacation, but would
be prevented from doing so if he
were to live in New Providence per-
manently.

His real estate agent, John Con-
stantakis, said his client has been put
off by cases such as Robert Halat’s.

Mr Halat, 78, was forced to give
up his gambling when he retired
in Lyford Cay as residents are
prohibited from gambling —
regardless of nationality—
under the Lotteries and Gam-
ing Act.

Mr Constantakis
said: “I think the
law they
have

to not let Bahamians gamble is good,
because it prevents people from
spending money in the casinos when
they could be spending money on
their families.

“But for somebody’s who is very
well off, and is just a resident and
not a citizen, let them spend their
money, we need it, especially at this
time.”

Economy

Mr Halat is calling for foreign
residents without the right to work in
the Bahamas to be given the
right to gamble and
pump thousands of a=
dollars into the
struggling econo-
my. :

He is frustrat- :
ed government
has not yet made




















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a decision on changes to the law
after considering reforms for two
years.

Meanwhile wealthy investors
are playing with their money else-
where.

A Canadian friend of Mr Halat’s
with property in Cable Beach chose
not to become a resident because it
would prevent him from gambling,
and instead spends money in Las
Vegas casinos.

And a couple from Germany left
New Providence because living in
the Bahamas would mean they could
not go to the casinos, Mr Halat said.

He added: “Tf just one per-

son will do that, then I'm

i certain it's hundreds of
= people. But even if it's
only three or four people,
you are talking about a cou-
ple of mil-
lion

lridescent Taffeta
Two Tone Shantung





Lamour, Chiffon

dollars that could be coming into the
economy.

“These people (the government)
are shooting themselves in the foot.

“Tf it takes two years to make a
decision like that it really bodes bad-
ly for the Bahamas, and I am seeing
that more and more. This is the
problem with both governments,
they can't make a decision, and a
decision shouldn’t take that long.

“Tf they were a business, and after
two years they haven’t been able to
find a simple solution to the prob-
lem, they would be bankrupt
already.”

The Bahamas Hotel Association
(BHA) and Casino Association have
advised the Ministry of Tourism to
lift restrictions and allow legal resi-
dents to gamble.

And as Florida considers relaxing
gaming laws and introducing more
games to the state to increase gov-
ernment revenue at a time when
government revenue is falling, even
more business could be taken away
from the Bahamas.

For Mr Halat, who suffers from
emphysema and believes he has just
eight months to live, the right to

gamble would greatly improve his
quality of life.

He said: “When I was younger I
would go to the casino occasionally,
and now with my old age, I would go
in the morning and have lunch, play
a few games, and be home by 3pm.

“T am so limited in what I can
do, and if I can’t get out of the house,
I have no drive. At least before I
had a goal in life to do something.”

Minister of Tourism and Avia-
tion Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace
said laws are under review but it is a
complicated process because there
are a number of reforms to be con-
sidered

He said: “I wish I could give you
a definitive date for when it will be
completed, but I can say it’s defi-
nitely something that is under con-
sideration.”

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prowlers in Mackey Street and ;
Carib Road on Friday night.

The officers from Wulff }
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lounge when they arrived at

around 11.30pm.

When they caught up with
the men, they searched them to }
find a 44 handgun, two pairs of }

gloves and a tam mask.

Police believe they were :
preparing to carry out an armed }

robbery.

A 34-year-old Bamboo }
Town man and a 32-year-old ;
man from South Beach have }
been arrested in connection }

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Anyone who may be able to :
assist police in their investiga- }
tions should call Crime Stop- }
pers anonymously on 328-TIPS



Your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
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PAGE 4, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Bail decision to be left to judge

BAHAMIANS now fear that Thursday’s
Appeal Court ruling that section 4(2) of the
Bail Act, 1996, is unconstitutional will release
more dangerous persons onto our streets. The
1996 amendment to the 1994 Act denies bail to
persons accused of serious offences against the
person, including murder and armed robbery.

It is not necessarily true that more persons
will be released as a result of this ruling, nor did
the Appeal Court intend it to be so. However,
what the Appeal Court’s ruling did was to return
to the presiding judge the decision of whether to
grant bail in a particular case. It called the leg-
islature’s mandatory bail denial unconstitu-
tional. However, s.4(1) also provides that if the
court is satisfied that in particular cases, gener-
ally drug matters, detention is not justified, then
on ordering a release on bail a record must be
included “giving the reasons for the order of
release on bail.” We believe the public is also
entitled to this information in the cases of mur-
der, armed robbery, rape and other serious
offences.

Whether more dangerous persons will now
be released onto the streets will be solely in
the hands of the presiding judge.

Appeals Court President Dame Joan
Sawyer said that in her view the main issue in
the Attorney General’s appeal against the
granting of bail to four men was “whether
subsection 4(2) of the Bail Act is valid under
the Constitution, in other words whether Par-
lament of the Bahamas has the power to
enact legislation which has the purported
effect of denying bail to persons arrested and
detained on reasonable suspicion of having
committed serious offences, no matter what
the circumstances of the alleged offences are,
or how long a person is detained by the prison
authorities or the police without trial.”

She said the power parliament had given
itself — taking the decision of bail in certain
cases out of the hands of the judges — flew in
the face of article 19(3) of the Constitution,
which provides that a person not tried within
a reasonable time should be released with
either a conditional discharge or until his case
is called.

It was the view of the Appeals Court that
it was for the judges — not parliament— to
exercise their discretion as to whether or not
bail should be granted. Although, the Appeal
Court last week refused bail for the cases of
the four men before it, it agreed that this
decision should have been made by the judge,
not by an Act of parliament.

That discretion, said Dame Joan, must be
carried out “judicially” as well as “judicious-

Explaining the judges’ decision, lawyer
Murrio Ducille, who represented the men
before the court, said that the appellate

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court’s decision essentially meant that par-
liament “cannot perform a judicial act. You
cannot tell a judge when and when not to
grant bail,” he said.

In 1996 the Bail Act of 1994 was amended
to make the refusal of bail for more serious
offences — kidnapping, murder, armed rob-
bery, treason and conspiracy to commit any
one of them — mandatory unless the offend-
er had not been tried within a reasonable
time. In other words parliament legislated
that the judge hearing the case could exercise
no discretion in the granting or withholding of
bail, unless, of course the accused had been
languishing in prison for an unreasonable
time.

But what was an unreasonable time? In
the past there was no bail for a murder
accused. However, in those way off days the
court calendar was not clogged as it is today
— murders were few and far between — and
justice was swift.

But times have changed. Today the courts
cannot keep up with the crime, including mur-
ders, attempted murders, armed robberies,
and violence to person and property.

In 1994, the Privy Council ruling in a case
from Jamaica prescribed a five year limit for
execution after conviction of murder. This
case came up in the House of Assembly in
October 1996 when members were debating
the very amendment to the Bail Act to which
the Appeals Court objected last week. The
legislation being introduced then was that the
denial of bail to persons charged with serious
offences be mandatory.

In view of the Privy Council’s five year
rule for convicted murderers, Mr Ingraham
told the House that government had to con-
centrate its efforts to ensure that the judicia-
ry was able to hear and determine all capital
cases and appeals quickly.

Five years was the time limit to prevent
hanging in murder cases. But in 1996 the Privy
Council commuted to life in prison two con-
victed murderers from the Bahamas. In their
case the time limit on executions had been
shortened to three and a half years.

But how long was too long to hold a person
awaiting trial in a murder case? No one knew.
However, as serious crimes increased the time
these men were being held in prison seemed
to be getting shorter and shorter. Until in
several cases murder accused out on bail were
committing second murders while awaiting a
court date for the first. Sometimes they them-
selves were killed, thus avoiding an earthly tri-
al. Tomorrow we shall deal with the reason
that the legislature took the judicial discretion
from the judges and by an act of parliament
denied bail to persons charged with serious
crimes.



Our tourists
deserve better
when they
come here

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I come to the Bahamas quite
frequently to visit my family and
always enjoy my time here. I offer
the following as someone who has
travelled extensively to all parts of
the world and understands mar-
keting.

I suspect that the tourist trade
is a major and vital contributor
to the Bahamian economy.

The Bahamas markets itself as
an island paradise and the out
islands prove the point spectacu-
larly. The trouble is that tourists
arrive in Nassau and first impres-
sions of the Bahamas are
extremely negative, not compar-
ing well to other holiday destina-
tions.

There is a container port in the
middle of the biggest tourist shop-
ping area and the traffic conges-
tion is worse than in New York or
London.

The last time I was here it took
two hours to get no more than
halfway across the island. Traffic
lights are numerous and many do
not work, buses do not appear to
understand the concept of desig-
nated bus stops and huge articu-
lated lorries jostle with tourists

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



on Bay Street. In the current eco-
nomic situation the “duty free”
prices for luxury goods are
matched by prices in the USA
and UK and are therefore not
good value.

Communications need upgrad-
ing.

The whole world uses mobile
phones and expects to be able to
use them on holiday.

European users cannot do so
in the Bahamas because the local
provider has no agreements with
any major European mobile net-
work provider. Unless one uses
FedEx, there is no point in send-
ing postcards by post as they can
take months to arrive at their des-
tinations.

My observations over the last
six years are that Nassau is
becoming a dirty, traffic choked
and faded city with vacant lots,
buildings in disrepair and pot-
holes one can fall in.

Most tourists have spent a lot
of money for their holiday and

can get their fill of diesel fumes
and traffic jams at home.

They expect and deserve better
when they come on holiday. If
customer’s expectations are not
met, they will take their business
elsewhere.

The world is getting smaller
and while the Caribbean will
remain a popular holiday desti-
nation, the Bahamas is likely to
be bypassed unless changes are
made and made quickly.

It is no good looking inwards,
trying to accommodate all the
vested interests.

Nassau needs to become out-
ward looking and examine first-
hand what their Caribbean com-
petitors are doing.

There must be experienced
people in the country able to pro-
vide an objective vision for the
future.

Without it, in tourist terms, the
future looks bleak for Nassau and
ultimately the Bahamas.

What a great waste and pity
that would be.

DW TOWNSEND
Yorkshire,
England,

May 21, 2009.

Our political leaders bury heads in the sand

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I read in the paper yesterday that another mem-
ber of Mr Knowles’ family came close to losing her
life due to another Mack truck which lost its brakes.
His brother was killed not long ago for alleged
neglect or driving without due care and attention.

What I find ‘unacceptable’ is that Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham and others have not since
addressed this issue nor publicly made any headway
in Mr Knowles’ plea. Sometimes it so happens that

could say different, but I can’t. Our political leaders
either bury their heads in the sand like dumb ostrich-

nothing is done unless a member of their own fam-

ily is either hurt, killed or injured then something is

done, maybe.

Iam a Bahamian, but not a proud one. I wish I

Nassau,
May, 2009.

es or deny any and everything, including the kitchen
sink. Bahamian people must understand that they
have the right to oust these persons and any indi-
vidual who wants to make a change, I make a sug-
gestion— run for office.

These MPs in the House now need to all be
retired so a new crew can take over without all the
other mess involved.

Cheers and lets keep our heads up OK.

IAN G MOREE

Painfully tired of this kind of leadership

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I vomited a little in my mouth
after hearing the Attorney Gen-
eral expressing his confidence in
the Bahamian judicial system and
its soundness.

The only explanation I can
think of that would make the
head of the government’s legal
office say something so unreal is
that there must be two judicial
systems: One we deal with on a
daily basis and the other known
only to Mr. Barnett, because the
one Bahamians deal with on a
daily basis cannot be described
without a few choice negative
expletives attached.

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The judicial system is in a
MESS Mr. Barnett!

And you not acknowledging
this fact is an indication that very
little significant reforms are going
to take place under your watch
as Attorney General simply
because in order to fix a problem
the problem needs to be acknowl-
edged first.

I can spend the rest of this
letter detailing examples to show
the awful state of the judicial sys-
tem, but there are enough docu-
mentation in the morning news-
papers, talk shows and the man
on the streets waiting years for
his turn to seek justice only to
have road blocks of corrupt

lawyers and molasses moving offi-
cers of the court in his way.

Mr. Barnett, this single act of
blind-sided confidence has pro-
moted you to the top of the totem
pole of inadequate leaders.

Congratulations! You were
able to surpass Neko Grant’s
explanation....sorry, I mean apol-
ogy for failing to deal with traffic
lights after over two years in
office.

When will this madness end?

Painfully tired of this kind of
leadership.

ERIC B. STRACHAN
Nassau,
May 15, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009, PAGE 5







LOCAL NEWS

A GROUP of Cat Islanders
gathered and cheered as the
inaugural flight of a new Sky
Bahamas Airlines service to
Cat Island touched down at
New Bight Airport.

Enhancing the options avail-
able to travellers, SkyBahamas
Airlines undertook the flight
to New Bight last Wednesday,
with passengers onboard a 33-
seater aircraft.

A number of island officials
and community leaders,
including Senior Island
Administrator Charles King
and Deputy Chief Councillor
Alfred Daniels, as well as “Bo
Hog”, a local rake and scrape
_| band, and the “Rooters” greet-

Call for youth to be better protected

AN ORGANISATION advocating the rights of
young people is calling for youth to be better protected
from physical, sexual and verbal abuse in society.

The Bahamas National Youth Council (BNYC), a
non-government and non-partisan organisation
formed to fight the issues facing youth, is demanding
stricter regulations of adults working in schools and
youth groups.

Teachers and school staff should only be hired after
a comprehensive background check has been com-
pleted, and they should then be subject to an annual
police check, the BNYC says.

The council has further called for school surveys
asking students about their experiences to give them
a chance to voice their fears and concerns without
shame.

A statement from the BNYC executive board
states: “It is our belief that more can be done to
ensure students of these institutions, whether public or
private, are safe from paedophilia, physical and verbal
abuse, and other acts contrary to the proper conduct
of those put in responsibility of their education.



242.422.4677

ken@erabahamas.com

www.erabahamas.com

“Tf allegations of misconduct are found, they should
be investigated expeditiously, and the alleged offend-
er taken out of the school system until the issue has
been resolved in the courts of law.”

Youth groups should also be more open about
their activities by adhering to a mandatory level of
transparency enforced by an independent body, said
the BNYC.

The executive board statement states: “Young peo-
ple involved in these programmes have a right to
voice their concerns and as such, an independent
organisation that is void of bias, objective and forth-
right, should be appointed to conduct surveys of young
persons to ascertain whether their rights are being
upheld.”

And parents are called on as having the greatest
responsibility to ensure their children are safe, as the
BNYC urges parents to talk to their children and stay
informed of their ongoing activities both in and out of
school.

For more information about the BNYC e-mail
bahamasnyc@gmail.com.



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“We promised you that in
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PAGE 6, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





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m By SIR RONALD SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant and
former Caribbean diplomat)

A TECHNICAL team
has been appointed by
the foreign ministers of the
Caribbean Community and Com-
mon Market (Caricom) to con-
sider an application from the
Dominican Republic to join the
15-nation group. The team has
been asked to have the report
ready for consideration by Cari-
com heads of government when
they meet in Guyana in July.

This will not be an easy process
by any means.

Three factors are at play.

The first of these is that Cari-
com has not yet sufficiently deep-
ened the relationship among its
existing members. The second is
the different interests of the Cari-
com countries — some might see
an advantage in greater access to
the DR’s market, while others
would regard opening their own
markets to the DR as a disadvan-
tage to local companies. The third
is deep concerns of Haiti about
the DR with regard to human
rights issues related to labour and
migration.

When the West Indian Com-
mission (WIC) produced its
report, “Time for Action”, in 1992
it placed great importance on
deepening the relationship
between the then 13 Caricom
member states — all of whom were
English-speaking. The Commis-
sion regarded the 13 as a “core
group” who should deepen their
relationship in furtherance of their
collective interest in the region,
the hemisphere and the wider
world.

Amongst the actions that the
WIC recommended was the cre-
ation of a Single Market and
Economy, the establishment of
the Caribbean Court of Justice
(CCJ) to resolve trade and invest-
ment disputes and to replace the
British Privy Council as a final
appellate Court, and the institu-
tionalisation of a Commission —
similar to the Commission of the
European Union — to manage the
operations of Caricom including
the Single Market and Economy
and external economic relations.

Specifically, the WIC said:
“The West Indies must both deep-
en the process of integration and
reach out to a wider Caribbean
in appropriate levels of coopera-
tion. The dual track approach may
produce differing levels of inte-
gration within the Caribbean; it
may produce circles of associa-
tion that start with the intimate
West Indian family and others
that encompass an extended fam-
ily of the non-English speaking
islands of the Caribbean, and a
still larger circle of closer rela-
tions with countries of the
Caribbean Basin that include ter-

insight |

WORLD VIEW

ritories of the South and Central
American littoral.”

The WIC was especially con-
cerned that “on the economic
side, we have to feel our way in
enlarging the Caricom market so
that we make progress in that
direction without being over-
whelmed by new members and
end up being lost within our own
widened community.”

This process was not followed.

Caricom admitted Surinam
and then Haiti to membership
before the process of deepening
the relationship between its core
members had advanced very far.
The Single Market was not
launched until 2006, fourteen
years after it was proposed, and its
implementation by several coun-
tries has been painfully slow since
then. The CCJ, while it operates
as a Court of original jurisdiction
for trade and investment disputes
among Caricom countries, is not
the final appellate court for all
but two countries, and the
machinery for governance of Cari-
com remains ineffective since nei-
ther a Commission with executive
authority nor any thing akin to it
has been established.

This failure to consolidate and
advance the Caricom inner core
has weakened the organisation
and the capacity of its member
states to bargain effectively in the
international community and to
strengthen their own economies.
And, the introduction of new
members, before the relationship
has been deepened, complicates
the process even more particular-
ly as new members have brought
different laws, different domestic
decision-making processes and
different ambitions.

The argument remains valid
that even now Caricom should
deepen its own core arrangements
by completing the establishment
of its Single Market before
attempting to expand its mem-
bership further. Indeed, expanded
membership may serve to slow
down — if not derail — the
process of moving toward a Single
Economy which would have to
include a common currency, har-
monised tax policies, the devel-
opment of a Caricom-wide social
security system, and free move-
ment of people for several cate-
gories of workers.

The DR may not be interested
in pursuing these stated goals of
Caricom.

On the external relations of
Caricom, expanded membership
now could also impair the devel-
opment of harmonised foreign

Ministry of Public
Works and Transport

NOTICE

BAY STREET
BLAKE RD TO MACKEY ST
ROADWAY CONSTRUCTION

policies. While the Caricom
Treaty calls for the coordination
of the foreign policies of its mem-
ber states, it is clear that to deal
effectively with the international
community, coordination will not
be enough. This is a matter that
both existing Caricom countries
and the DR will have to consider
carefully in their separate inter-
ests, for their interests will not
always converge.

With regard to new market
opportunities, while a free trade
agreement exists between the DR
and Caricom countries, it covers
only trade in about 400 products;
it does not cover services. The
free trade agreement between the
DR and Caricom countries was
worth US$578 million last year.
But, of that total, natural gas
imports from Trinidad and Toba-
go alone accounted for US$546
million; the remaining US$32 mil-
lion was neither here nor there.
Trinidad and Tobago’s natural gas
exports to the DR would have
taken place even in the absence of
a free trade agreement.

Significantly, in 2007 every
Caricom country, except Belize
and Trinidad and Tobago, had a
negative trade balance with the
DR. In other words, they did not
benefit from the free trade agree-
ment.

But, since the European Union
(EUV) insisted that the DR be part
of the Economic Partnership
Agreement (EPA) with Caricom
signed last year, Caricom coun-
tries are compelled to liberalise
goods, services and investment
with the DR at the same rate as
with the EU. Therefore, from the
DR’s viewpoint, even though
there would be benefits in partic-







CARICOM: Lost in a widened
Caribbean Community?

Sir Ronald Sanders

ipating in Caricom’s single mar-
ket, the obligations of the “Sin-
gle Economy” and “Community”
aspects of the Caricom Treaty
may be too much for it to bear. In
any event, it would have to seek a
waiver from Caricom’s common
external tariff since it is higher
than the DR’s and would increase
the cost of imports and make
exports less competitive.

Then there are human rights
issues over labour and migration
between Haiti — already a mem-
ber state of Caricom — and the
DR. Even if other Caricom coun-
tries would be willing to allow the
DR’s membership of Caricom
limited to its Common Market
aspects only and not to the Com-
munity dimension which would
include foreign policy, it is unlike-
ly that Haiti would agree to the
DR’s membership without bind-
ing assurances on these two issues
— they are assurances the DR may
not be able to give.

The Caricom Treaty does pro-
vide for associate membership of
Caricom. It is an option that both
the DR and existing Caricom
states might consider at this time
in both their interests.

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com

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Wholesaler/Retailer located in Nassau seeks

Saath Seely

i he candidate will wor, k alone gside the LPeTNOF Fic anagement
team at our head office, assisting ina variety of areas such

as public

and customer relations, marketing, advertising,

HR, basic bookkeeping, and various administrative duties
such as filing and erganization. Much of the above will be

office and computer-based.

The candidate should have the following skills:

General computer skills (Microsoft XP, internet, social

networking Web SITeS,,

Strong knowledge of Microsoft Office (Word, Excel,

Outlook)

Familiarity with basic bookkeeping concepts
(particularly Accounts Payable and Receivable)

In an effort to relieve current traffic congestion
problems BAHAMAS HOT MIX has_ been
contracted for the paving of West Bay Street
between Blake Rd and Nassau St., Marlborough
St., Navy Lion Rd., and Bay Street to Mackey St.,
Paving works will be commencing from Blake
Rd., which require traffic management involving
road closures, and diversions for the route.

Paving Works include the following times:

Milling - 9:00 pm to 5:00 am
Paving - 9:30 am to 3:30 pm

Local diversions will be sign posted in due
course and further information will be provided
in local media.

Experience:

The candidate should have experience of office
administration. Specific retail, wholesale, HR of
bookkeeping not essential but beneficial. Additionally,
the candidate must be well-spoken, highly organised
and professional and have a current driver's license and
their own transportation,

Applications are to include: Recent police record,
passport photo, two references, resume, covering letter
stating where/how specific experience was gained In
(i) Microsoft Office (Word, Excel) (ii) Any bookkeeping
concepts (iii) other software programs you are
experienced / familiar with.

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Pre ele
P.O. Box 55-19021


THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009, PAGE 7





LEARNING IS MORE FUN — Sadie Curtis Primary School grade one
students enjoy learning with their new ENO interactive whiteboard.
Pictured watching the students are Education Minister Carl W.
Bethel; Mrs. Audrey Farrington, Principal, Sadie Curtis Primary
School; Mr. Willard Barr, District Superintendent, Southeastern
District and Dr. Mary Markowsky, President of E.T.C. International,
authorised distributor of the ENO board in the Caribbean.

Sadie Curtis
Primary gets the
latest technology

in education

MINISTER CARL
BETHEL performed double-
duty as Education Minister
and the Member of Parliament
for the Sea Breeze constituen-
cy when he presented Sadie
Curtis Primary School with
two technologically-advanced
ENO boards.

Minister Bethel told the
teachers and students during
the presentation that the funds
for the boards came from the
$100,000 parliamentary allot-
ment given to each represen-
tative to assist in their con-
stituency.

Minister Bethel said he was
delighted to provide the stu-
dents with the devices that will
replace the traditional chalk-
board in the classroom. He
said the ENO boards have
only been on the market for a
few months, and the fact that
Sadie Curtis school has two
already is evidence of his com-
mitment to their education.

Minister Bethel told the stu-
dents that the boards will
make learning fun and moti-
vate them to improve their
attendance at school. He also
encouraged the grade one stu-
dents to learn as much as they
possibly can as the benefits of
a good education, such as a
nice home, family and other
opportunities, will follow.

The students were delighted
when the Minister told them
that he would be presenting
the school with two boards and
he hoped that soon all of the
classrooms would be fitted
with this equipment.

Dr. Mary Markowsky, Pres-
ident of E.T.C. International,
the authorised distributor for
the ENO board in Caribbean
region, including The
Bahamas, attended the cere-
mony and noted that the
board is the latest advance-
ment in education. Dr.
Markowsky stated that
although there are several ver-
sions of the interactive white
boards in Bahamian schools,
the ENO board is more versa-
tile because it does not require
any electricity, and teachers
can use both permanent and
dry-erase markers on them.
The older ‘White Boards’ will
not function if permanent
markers and magnets come in

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



contact with them.

Mr. Manley Wisdom,
Regional Representative for
E.T.C. International, was also
present and performed a
demonstration for the Minis-
ter, education officers, teach-
ers and students. He called on
students to participate in the
session by using markers to
drag items on the screen to
answer questions, and place
magnets on the board to spell
words. Mr. Wisdom also
showed how the device which
has Internet access could be
used to incorporate material
from the worldwide web
instantaneously. He accessed
the web and downloaded the
Bahamian national anthem to
which the students rose to
their feet to sing.

The grade one homeroom
teacher, Mrs. Shavone Clarke,
said the ENO board will make
her teaching easier and more
interesting. She noted that
today’s children enter the
classroom being technologi-
cally savvy and instruments
such as the ENO board will
allow teachers to capture and
maintain students’ attention
throughout the lesson.

Some of the other advan-
tages of the ENO Boards are
that it:

¢ allows for greater creativ-
ity from teachers and students

reduces teacher’s lesson
preparations

improves discipline because
children are focused and hav-
ing fun learning;

* saves money because the
use of paper and ink is
reduced;

¢ fun and easy to use and is
certified ‘Green Product’
because it is made from all
recyclable material.

Mrs. Audrey Farrington,
Principal of Sadie Curtis Pri-
mary School, thanked Minister
Bethel on behalf of the teach-
ers and students. Superinten-
dent for the Southeastern Dis-
trict, Mr. Willard Barr, also
attended the presentation.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS



Christie: PLP party

leaders ‘

FROM page one

can be passed on in the same way
it was passed on to (him) — as a
stable organisation.”

Mr Christie’s comments came
in response to the dissemina-
tion of a critical internal report
by someone in the party by way
of a Bahamian political blog in
what Mr Christie and other
political commentators see as
an attempt to embarrass him in
the run up to the party’s con-
vention later this year.

The report’s contents,
although brought to public
attention by the media last
year, had never been made
available in its entirety until
now.

Published on Saturday under
the heading “Report Confirms
Perry Christie Must Go or the
PLP will die!” the document
was compiled by Washington
DC-based political consultants
shortly after the party’s May
2007 general election defeat
and comments significantly on
how Mr Christie’s perceived
“weak leadership” was the pri-
mary reason that voters did not
favour the party at the polls.

The timing of the move to
release the document to the
wider public has led Mr
Christie to conclude that it was
done “for the furtherance of
political aspirations, by people
who may see that as evidence
against me and my leadership”
in the run up to the convention,
where all leadership posts in
the party can be contested.

The PLP leader said: “There
are people who are in posses-
sion of the report and there are
people who are prepared to
release the report for their own
purposes — we know who they
are. It’s fine. The PLP has to
learn from every aspect of these
matters and strengthen itself
and move forward.”

Calling the move to highlight
the report at this time “under-
handed”, Mr Christie said: “At
the end of the day it takes
someone with the courage of
their conviction to nominate
and contest, and once they are
able to do that then the people
will determine who is best to



Glenys Hanna-Martin

lead in whatever position is
being contested.”

“Those who would wish to
take an irregular approach to
the organising of the party, I
bless them and I wish them the
very best,” he added.

The PLP leader suggested
that since the time that the sur-
veys conducted by political con-

secure’

sultants, Greenberg, Quinlan
and Rosner, were undertaken,
“further polls have been con-
ducted” which provide an
updated and changed snapshot
of the populace’s view of the
party and its leadership.

“T have moved on in terms
of the report: We have con-
ducted further polls. They are
unaware of them (those respon-
sible for the leak of the GQR
report) and that’s just how it
is. So they want to act with that
information at that time and
that’s fine, there’s nothing we
can do about this (the dissemi-
nation of the report),” he said.

Commenting on the status of
the Deputy Leadership of the
party yesterday, Mr Christie
said that with “tremendous
focus” having been brought on
the role in the last year, he
anticipates that “when Mother
Pratt does announce to the
country her intention (as to
whether she would wish to
remain deputy leader)” more
people who are interested in
that position “will then step for-
ward” to contest the role at the
convention.

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FROM page one

Consul General post

served in the Consulate General of The
Bahamas in New York and in Miami, Florida
and at the Bahamas Permanent Mission to
the United Nations in New York.

Mrs Forbes Smith is expected to serve for at
least three years in the post. It is not known
who will replace her in the Senate.

expand trade and investment in the Bahamas.

Georgia, Alabama, Arkansas, Kansas, Ken-
tucky, Missouri, North Carolina, South Car-
olina, Oklahoma, and Tennessee will come
within the jurisdiction of the Atlanta Con-
sulate General.

The new Consul General will have as her
Consul Sandra Carey, who has previously

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PAGE 10, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Claim that police charging bailed individuals

Munroe, told The Tribune that
rather than the public express-

FROM page one

Butler’s Funeral Homes
& Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Mr. James
Alonza
Cartwright, 44

of Mackey Street who died
on May 16, 2009, will be
held on Wednesday May 27,
2009 at 4:00 p.m. at Grace
Gospel Chapel, Palmetto
Avenue. Officiating will be
Pastor Rex Major. Interment
will follow in Woodlawn
Gardens Cemetery.

Left to cherish his memories are his four children; DeAndra,
James, Danielle and Jami Cartwright; his mother: Lorene
Cartwright; his four sisters: Victoria "Bessie" Fitz-Gerald,
Angela Darville, Edith "Alma" and Cynthia Cartwright; one
brother: St. Clair "Nat" Cartwright; four brothers-in-law:
Robert "Bobby" Fitz-Gerald, Oswald and Michael Cartwright
and William Darville; one sister-in-law: Susan Cartwright;
seven uncles; Jimmy, Sidney, McKinley, Frank and Randolph
Wells, Winston Cartwright and Pastor Allan Lee; ten aunts
Olga Burrows, Elthy, Ermie and Violet Cartwright, Hazel, Essie,
Cheryl and Barbara Wells, Nancy Lee and Edna Fox; numerous
nieces and nephews; grand-niece and four grand-nephews,
other family and friends including Pamela Moree (Mother of
his children), Jerome and Janette Cartwright, Tamika and Tamara
Cartwright, Archie and Pamela Moree Sr., Jeanne Miller and
family, Bonita "Bonnie" Moree, Madlyn Moree and family,
Mary Sands and family, Burton Cartwright and family, Anthony
Moree and family, Lawrence Thompson, Chrissie and family,
Annie Sands and family, Vernon Cartwright and family, Lex
Cartwright and family, Benji Cartwright and family, Flora Rolle
and family, Linda and family, Marjorie, Nelson, Gwennie, Greg
and Jackie, Celie and family, numerous cousins and friends
including the staff at Pinder's Customs Brokerage, members of
the Vikings Lodge 351, Pat Knowles, Ronnie Burrows, Brian
Burrows, Steve Burrows, Adrian Burrows and Bobby Farrington.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to account number
6253 at Scotia Bank Thompson Blvd for the children.

Friends may pay their last respects at Butlers’ Funeral
Homes and Crematorium On Tuesday May 26, 2009 from
10:00a.m. until 5:00pm and on Wednesday from 10:00
a.m. until 2:00pm and from 3:00pm until service time at
the church.






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ing outrage at these facts, he
believes they ought to direct
their attention to what he
claims is a major cause of “dan-
gerous” people getting bail:
The fact that cases are being
tried by the courts “out of
turn”, with newer and appar-
ently less serious matters going
to trial before individuals who
have charges dating back sev-
eral years for crimes like mur-
der are given a chance to have
their matters determined.

Seeking to illustrate his
point, the Bar Association
President said he finds it “mind
blowing” that the extortion
case involving former senator
Pleasant Bridgwater was set
forth for a Supreme Court trial
in September this year,
although it is less than a year
old.

“It’s astounding. She was
committed for trial and her
case was scheduled to begin
within six months — that tells
me you could do that for every
case,” said the lawyer.

Suggesting that certain mat-
ters do not get this treatment
because the Attorney Gener-
al’s office knows that they are
“wholly hopeless and going to
fail” — that is, weak eviden-
tially and unlikely to result in a
guilty verdict — Mr Munroe
proposed that the practice must
end in the best interests of soci-
ety at large.

“It boggles my mind that no
one is paying attention to what
is being tried. Wouldn’t it
make commonsense that, if you
rate me a dangerous man and I
get bail because you haven’t
tried me in four years, then you
should try to very quickly
thereafter make sure I go to
trial because I am a dangerous
man on the street? It should
but it doesn’t happen.

“Questions need to be
directed towards the law
enforcement community, the
prosecutorial community: Why
aren’t you rating these people
(those charged with murder, or
who may have multiple charges
against them dating back for
several years) and trying them
first?”

Having spent many years
practising criminal law, the Bar
Association president alleged
that he and others in the legal
community suspect that —
frustrated by the fact that cer-
tain individuals are granted
bail and put back into the com-
munity — police have been
known to go on to charge such

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people with an offence for
which they have “in some cases
absolutely no evidence” to
indicate that person commit-
ted, simply to get them off the
streets and remanded into jail
again.

But Mr Munroe charged that
the police, with the Attorney
General’s office, share some of
the responsibility for reducing
the likelihood of a person who
has committed a deadly crime
being released on bail in the
first place.

They should provide the
Attorney General’s office with
a ranking of alleged criminals
according to the level of risk
they are believed to present to
society when they forward their
files to the Attorney General’s
office which would help prose-
cutors determine how they
should be dealt with, the attor-
ney suggested.

“If (the police) say this is the
number one man then the
AG’s office should know to try
him first so he doesn’t get bail.
And the number two man —
his case should be second off
the blocks,” he said.

The lawyer said the fact that
cases are not properly priori-
tised contributes to further
criminality as accused crimi-
nals go on to get bail and the
opportunity to commit other
offences and persons accused
of crimes which they did not
commit can be persuaded to
turn to a life of crime after they
“lose everything” as a result of
being left to languish in prison
on remand for up to “three or
four years.”

“We destroy people’s live,
we reduce them to nothing,
they’re often marginal to begin
with...and then we’re surprised
that we have an increase in
crime, I’m not!” said Mr
Munroe.

On Friday Attorney General
Michael Barnett said that his
office “aims to have all cases
heard as quickly as possible,”
including “not only the cases
that make up the backlog, but
current cases as well.”

“One has to try to have all
cases heard before the courts
as quickly as possible having
regard to the constitutional
obligation for a trial within a
reasonable time within the
ambits of the number of courts
you have operating,” he said.

In response to Mr Munroe’s
suggestion that accused indi-
viduals should be ranked and
tried in order of their “danger-
ousness”, also taking into con-
sideration the number of years
they have gone without a tri-
al, Mr Barnett said his office
does not make its decisions in
such a “clinical” fashion and
must allow for “other factors”
to come into play.

Numerous messages left for
the police seeking comment
yesterday were not returned up
to press time.

Low offers:
Prevention
is the cure

Bahamas real
estate today

Or iwiitatmiiE KK een



i IT TAKES an innovative
? marketing plan to cause a
? home to sell, but to attract
? serious buyers, it must also
? be priced fairly. What else
? must be done to successfully
} sell your home?

? Buyers are in search of
? their dream home. If priced
? reasonably, they will pur-
: chase the home that best
i reflects their idea of that
? dream, and it’s the sellers
: who are in charge of making
: it happen.

? Experience has shown that
? buyers often reduce their
: offers by as much as $2 for
? every $1 in uncompleted
? repairs. Sellers won’t have to
i face those disappointing
i offers if attention is given to
? their home before it is ever
? shown.

i The best method for
? improving buyer appeal is a
? “walk-through” by the sell-
? er’s BREA agent. The agent
} plays the part of a prospective



buyer, and then suggests
upgrades, repairs, and cos-
metic improvements.

Then the sellers should
complete all the work before
the home is placed on the
market.

Neither a prospective buy-
er, nor another agent, should
ever see the home until it is in
100 per cent marketable con-
dition.

Excuses made at a show-
ing are an open invitation to a
reduced price. When a buyer
is disappointed, no explana-
tion will suffice to bring the
price back up. When selling,
ask your agent for advice, and
then take action. Buyers will
often compete for such a
good value.

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

















































BAHAMAS REAL ESTATE ASSOCIATION
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INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



© European soccer



Simon Dawson/AP Photo

NEWCASTLE UNITED fans react after their team was relegated from the English Premier League after los-
ing to Aston Villa in their soccer match at Villa Park stadium, Birmingham, England, Sunday, May 24, 2009.

Newcastle relegated from Premiership

m@ LONDON

One-time Newcastle great Alan
Shearer failed to keep the club
in the Premier League after it lost
1-0 to Aston Villa on Sunday and
was relegated along with West
Bromwich Albion and Middles-
brough, according to Associated
Press.

On a tense final day of the
league campaign, Sunderland and
Hull managed to stay up despite
losing. Hull lost 1-0 at home to
newly crowned champion Man-
chester United, which rested most
of its stars ahead of Wednesday’s
Champions League final against
Barcelona, and Sunderland tum-
bled 3-2 at home to third-place
Chelsea. Middlesbrough needed a
big victory at West Ham to stand

any chance of survival, but lost
2-1 and finished tied on points
with West Brom, which already
was assured of being relegated
despite a 0-0 draw at Blackburn.

West Brom and Middlesbrough
finished with 32 points, Newcastle
had 34, Hull 35 and Sunderland
36. Newcastle has not won the
league since 1927, but began the
season with high hopes under
Kevin Keegan. He quit after dis-
putes with the owner, and Shear-
er, a local-born former England
captain who scored a Premier
League record 260 goals, took
over for the last eight games, win-
ning only one.

“T can’t say we were unlucky
in the season. We went down
because we weren’t good enough
over 38 games,” said Shearer,

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who scored 206 league and cup
goals for Newcastle. “Big changes
have to be made at the football
club.”

In Sunday’s other games, Arse-
nal outplayed Stoke 4-1, Liver-
pool beat Tottenham 3-1, Everton
won 2-0 at Fulham, Manchester
City edged Bolton 1-0, and Wigan
beat Portsmouth 1-0.



@ MILAN — Francesco Totti’s
late free kick ruined Paolo Mal-
dini’s last home match for AC
Milan, lifting AS Roma to a 3-2
victory at San Siro.

Now 40, Maldini has been play-
ing for Milan in the top flight of
Italian soccer since he was 16. He
has won seven Italian league titles
and five European Cups with the
club. He will make his farewell
when Milan goes to Fiorentina in
the last round of games next
weekend. The loss left Milan in
second 10 points behind Inter
Milan, which has already been
crowned champion for the fourth
season in a row.



HB GLASGOW, Scotland —
Rangers won the Scottish league
title with a 3-0 victory at Dundee
United, preventing Celtic from
winning its fourth straight title.
Goals by Kyle Lafferty, Pedro
Mendes and Kris Boyd in the first
52 minutes gave Walter Smith’s
team its first league title since
2005 with 86 points. It now hopes
to complete the double by beating
Falkirk in the Scottish Cup on
May 30. Celtic, which was held
to a 0-0 draw at home by third-
place Hearts, finished four points
behind.

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009, PAGE 13



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

0 In brief | =

David Beckham was among
24 players picked Sunday for
England’s roster for World Cup
qualifiers next month and Gary
Neville received a surprise
recall for the games against
Kazakhstan and Andorra,
according to the Associated
Press. Beckham, on loan to AC
Milan from Major League Soc-
cer’s Los Angeles Galaxy, has
17 goals in 110 international
appearances. The 34-year-old
midfielder hopes to play at next
year’s World Cup, where he
could break goalkeeper Peter
Shilton’s record of 125 games
for England. Neville, a 34-year-
old veteran of 86 appearances
starting in 1995, has not played
for England since a 1-0 loss to
Spain in February 2007. Anoth-
er surprise callup was West
Bromwich Albion goalkeeper
Scott Carson. Jermain Defoe
and Theo Walcott return from
injuries and may get a start
alongside Wayne Rooney in
attack. England is 5-0 in qualify-
ing and leads Group Six. Kaza-
khstan is 1-4 and Andorra is 0-5.

The roster:

Goalkeepers: Scott Carson (West
Bromwich Albion), Robert Green
(West Ham), Paul Robinson (Black-
burn).

Defenders: Wayne Bridge (Man-
chester City), Ashley Cole
(Chelsea), Rio Ferdinand (Man-
chester United), Glen Johnson
(Portsmouth), Joleon Lescott
(Everton), Gary Neville (Manchester
United), John Terry (Chelsea),
Matthew Upson (West Ham).

Midfielders: Gareth Barry (Aston
Villa), David Beckham (AC Milan,
Italy), Michael Carrick (Manchester
United), Steven Gerrard (Liver-
pool), Frank Lampard (Chelsea),
Theo Walcott (Arsenal), Shaun
Wright-Phillips (Manchester City),
Ashley Young (Aston Villa).

Strikers: Carlton Cole (West
Ham), Peter Crouch (Portsmouth),
Jermain Defoe (Tottenham), Emile
Heskey (Aston Villa), Wayne
Rooney (Manchester United).

Hewitt, Murray
and Ivanovic win

@ PARIS — Lleyton Hewitt
lunged and whiffed at some
serves, his racket hitting only air.
He simply stood and watched oth-
er balls whirr past.

But in the end it was the two-
time major champion who pre-
vailed, overcoming 55 aces as he
beat Ivo Karlovic 6-7 (1), 6-7 (4),
7-6 (4), 6-4, 6-3. Also at the
French Open there were straight-
set wins for defending champion
Ana Ivanovic, Andy Murray and
Marat Safin — who is appearing
in his final French Open, but
please be sure not to ask him
about that — and straight-set
exits for 2004 champion Gaston
Gaudio and two-time major win-
ner Amelie Mauresmo.

=~



HEINEKEN CUP

Leinster celebrate euro glory



Gareth Copley/AP Photo/PA

LEINSTER PLAYERS celebrate as they lift the trophy after beating Leicester to win the Heineken European Cup
Final rugby union match at Murrayfield, Edinburgh, Saturday May 23, 2009.

Gareth Copley/AP Photo/PA

LEINSTER'S ISA NACEWA celebrates with the trophy after beating Leices-
ter to win the Heineken European Cup Final rugby union match at Mur-
rayfield, Edinburgh, Saturday May 23, 2009.



LEINSTER’ § Brian O'Driscoll, right, is tackled by Leicester's Martin Cas-
trogiovanni during the Heineken European Cup Final rugby union at Mur-
rayfield, Edinburgh, Saturday May 23, 2009.

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Leinster staged a thrilling
fightback to win the Heineken
Cup for the first time with a 19-
16 victory over Leicester.

In Saturday’s final, the rook-
ie finalists had the better of a
superb game at Murrayfield but
were forced to stage a superb
fightback after falling 16-9
behind shortly after half-time.

Ben Woods’ try had given
two-time champions Leicester
an interval lead, but Jamie
Heaslip's superb score helped
level matters before the excel-
lent Johnny Sexton sealed vic-
tory with a long-range penalty.

Sexton also dropped a mon-
ster drop-goal, Brian O'Driscoll
dropped a goal as well, while
Julien Dupuy kicked the Tigers’
other points.

Afterwards, captain Leo
Cullen and head coach Michael
Cheika both said belief was the
key to the Irish province's vic-
tory. "I suppose just hanging in
there, showing a bit of belief,”
said flanker Cullen, when asked
what won the game for his side.

"The period when we were
down to 14 men was pretty cost-
ly. They came at us pretty
strongly. We went seven points
down and just to hang in there
was pretty vital.”









LEINSTER'S Brian
O'Driscoll, right, is
tackled by Leices-
ter's Dan Hipkiss
during the Heineken
European Cup Final
rugby union match
at Murrayfield, Edin-
burgh.

(AP Photo/PA,
Anna Gowthorpe)

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PAGE 14, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



RUGBY: SG PRIVATE BANK INVITATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP





BUCCANEERS’
{ Jonathan
Sands holds
on to the ball.

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender

Wilson City Road Grading & Transmission
Circuit Easement Clearing
Wilson City, Abaco, The Bahamas

The Bahamas Electricity Corporatian
invites tenders for the above named services.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Comporation’s Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158




Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices - Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery ta BEC: on of before
ind June 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m,

Submissions should be marked as follows:
Tender No. 705/09
WILSON CITY ROAD GRADING AWD
TRANSMISSION CIRCUIT EASEMENT CLEARING
WILSON CITY, ABACO, THE BAHAMAS
























The Carperation reserves the right ta
accept or reject any or all proposals.

For all enquiries regarding the tenders and site visits, contact

Mr. Clark Allen at telephone 302-1212.










v ,

BUCCANEERS’ Roy Sims
liou’s Tim Thompson.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

on tries to breake away fro

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
renaldodorsett@yahoo.com

, joy for

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

a

© Caribbean soccer






m the defence of Bail-

ning the whole thing.”

youth into the game.”

event in the region.

FROM page 15

out the Bahamas Rugby Football Union’s calendar.

Baillou dominated the final, scored the opening try of
the match and never trailed in the contest.

Baillou left winger Andrew Bodie, said his team
over the course of the season had become accustomed
to the 7s game and focused on a concentrated effort on
the defensive end of the pitch.

“We worked hard at 7s, even though we were playing
15s all season we were sticking with the training for 7s
and playing in tournaments so were pretty sharp com-
ing in here and were just able to put it all together and
make it all the way through to win the Cup,” he said,
“Our defence was key. We knew once we played con-
tinuous defence the entire day and especially in the
final we had a good chance of coming out here and win-

Productive

Bodie said for his club to close out the schedule with
a tournament victory and becoming the first Bahamian
team to win the event should set the tone for their off-
season training regimen and a productive season next
year. “It feels great to come out here and to get this
done. Whenever you have a chance to win against
players from all around the world in front of the home
crowd, its great,” he said, “Next year our main goal is
recapturing the Bahamas Cup and really make an
impact on the regional and international scene,” he
said, “We also want to keep working with the devel-
opment programme bringing more and more of the

On their trek towards the Cup Final, Baillou record-
ed wins over the Texas Pirates (12-5), Coconauts (34-
0), and suffered a loss to the Buccaneers (12-4) in Pool
A. In Pool B Cuckoos reached the Final with wins
over New Tredegar (37-7), Renegades (36-5), and
defending champions, Daytona Beach (12-0).

BRFU Treasurer, Shane Garner, said with the
advancements the tournament has made in such a short
timespan, it is well on its way to becoming a marquee

“Tt does so much for sports tourism because there are
so many teams that are willing to come down here and
compete. The Bahamas is a great venue for rugby and
by hosting a successful tournament like this year after
year, it generates more interest with other clubs when
these players go back home and talk about their good
experiences they have had here.”





























































Stewart's late goal gives Jamaica tie with Haiti

m@ FORT LAUDERDALE,
Florida

Damion Stewart scored in
the 88th minute to lift Jamaica
to a 2-2 tie against Haiti Sat-
urday night in an internation-

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al match between eliminated
World Cup qualifiers.

Jason Morrison’s long free
kick from the right wing found
a charging Stewart near the
left post, where he headed in a
shot past Haiti goalkeeper
Peterson Occenat.

Haiti took a 2-1 lead Jean
Robens Jerome’s second goal
of the match in the 65th
minute.

Jerome, who entered the
match early in the first half
received Raymond Ednerson-
’s from the left wing and beat
Jamaica goalkeeper Shawn
Sawyers with a shot inside the
6-yard box.

Jamaica played the entire
second half a player down



after defender Claude Davis’
second yellow card for a hard
foul on Haiti midfielder
Vaniel Sirin in the 44th
minute.

Ejection

Davis and Sirin fell to the
ground on a hard collision,
which eventually resulted in
Davis’ ejection.

Ednerson and Jerome also
combined on Haiti’s first goal,
which tied the match 1-1 the
39th minute.

Jerome, who replaced Fab-
rice Noel in the 24th minute,
received Ednerson’s pass from
the left wing area and beat

Sawyers with a shot, which
landed inside the left post.

Nicholas Addlery put
Jamaica ahead 1-0 with a goal
in the 28th minute.

Occenat made a leg save off
Addlery’s uncontested shot
deep in the goal area.

Occenat could not retrieve
the deflection as Addlery beat
him to the ball and converted
on a shot inside the 6-yard
box.

Both teams were eliminated
from CONCACAF World
Cup regional qualifiers earlier
this year and used Saturday’s
match as preparation for the
Gold Cup which begins in
July.

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THE TRIBUNE

S
b

MONDAY, MAY 25,



Bahamas
stage another
come from
hehind victory

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Writer
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

For the second time in as
many wins for team Bahamas,
they overcame an early deficit
for a come from behind vic-
tory, and earned a berth to the
third round of the NORECA
D tournament.

The Bahamas defeated
Jamaica in the tournament
semifinals a four set win, 19-
25, 25-18, 25-22, and 25-22.

With the win, the Bahamas
secured a qualification into
the third round of the 2010
FIVB Men’s World Champi-
onship along with Mexico.

The Bahamas squared off
against Mexico last night in
the tournament final, howev-
er results were unavailable
to press time.

The match against
Jamaica, as in the opening
round against St. Lucia,
began with the Bahamas
trailing early on after the
first set, however, the come-
back effort came one set
sooner in the semifinals.

Rebounded

The Bahamas rebounded
to take the ensuing set by
their largest margin of victo-
ry of the match, by seven
points.

Shedrick Forbes led the
Bahamas’ balanced scoring
attack which placed three
players in double figures.

Forbes led the scoring with
15 points, while Byron Fer-
guson and Renaldo Knowles
added 12 and 11 respective-
ly. Danny Wilson led
Jamaica with 19 points and
Dellan Brown scored 13.

Mexico advanced to the
final by defeating Haiti in
straight sets. The Pool D
tournament winners will
advance to the NORECA
Pool G, July 6-11, in Puerto
Rico, while the losers will be
relegated to Pool H in Cuba,
August 12-17.





PAGE 15

r



ts

2009























































Bahamian team captures
championship for first time
with 29-12 win over Cuckoos

Tournament becoming
one of the biggest in the
region, say organisers

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Writer

cee eee ON THE CHARGE: Baillou's Tim Thompson fends off a challenge.

n what organisers
called an event well on
its way to becoming
one of the biggest Rug-
by tournaments in the region,
a Bahamian team captured the
Cup Final for the first time.

Baillou RC captured the SG
Private Bank Invitational
Championship with a 29-12 win
over local rivals Cuckoos RFC
Saturday at the Winton Rugby
Pitch.

In a rematch of April’s
Bahamas Cup Final, Baillou
was able to turn the tables and
avenge a 32-20 to officially close

SEE page 14



THE BAHAMAS’ female team took to
the field and won their first game.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff



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31 UEANDWHITEBALL cr

PHI BETA SIGMA FRATERNITY Inc hosted the second
annual Blue and White Ball on Saturday at the Wyndham
Nassau Resort in Cable Beach. Three young men were
awarded scholarships for academic excellence and civic
involvement at the event.








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scholarship award.






PHI BETA SIGMA FRATERNITY INC. president Demario Minus presents Jamal Mesidor with
the first place scholarship award.



DENNIS SMITH receives his third place
scholarship award.



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THE TRIBUNE
D yu

ine



MONDAY,



MAY 2.5.

y S

2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Employees ‘cannot have
their cake and eat it too’ 10% decline

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

mployees “cannot have

their cake and eat it too”

by seeking termination

compensation via both

statute and common law,

the Court of Appeal has ruled, urging

that the “doctrine of election” be used to

prevent the Employment Act’s inten-

tions being “lost in the mush of litiga-
tion”.

Appeal Justice Hartman Longley, rul-

ing on an appeal brought by a former

wholesale sales manager, found that ter-



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* Court rules that Bahamian workers cannot seek both
Employment Act and common law compensation for termination

* Justices urge that ‘doctrine of election’ be used to stop
Employment Act intentions being ‘lost in the mush of litigation’

minated Bahamian workers should
either accept the statutory compensa-
tion offered to them by their former
employer under the Employment Act, or
refuse to accept this and initiate a com-
mon law action seeking greater/better
benefits. They could not seek both.

Gail Smith had appealed a Supreme
Court ruling over an action she initiated
against her former employer, Snack
Food Wholesale, for alleged breach of an
employment contract.

Reciting the facts, the Court of Appeal
found she was terminated by the com-

pany with effect from May 12, 2003, via
a letter she received dated May 10, 2003.
As a 22-year employee, who was a sales
manager/supervisor and earning $750
per week, Ms Smith received four weeks’

SEE page 8B



Some consultants
‘fleecing Bahamas’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SOME foreign consultancy
firms hired by the Government
are “simply fleecing the
Bahamas”, a senior accountant
has charged, urging the admin-
istration to look to locally-based
firms first in a bid to build
“Bahamian indigenous talent”.

Raymond Winder, managing
partner at Deloitte & Touche
(Bahamas), said assessing the
large number of consultants it
employs should be one of the
things the Government looks at
as it puts the finishing touches
to the 2009-2010 Budget, as he
praised the administration’s
reported attempts to cut recur-
rent spending by between 7-10
per cent across the board.

“The Government needs to

* Government urged
to outsource,
consolidate regulators
to cut costs in
upcoming Budget
* All Bahamians
responsible for
size of government
make assessments of the vari-
ous consultants it uses,” Mr
Winder told Tribune Business.
“The Government uses a num-
ber of consultants from outside
the country. I think a number of
the foreign consultants are sim-
ply fleecing the Bahamas.

“The major accounting firms
here represent major consult-

SEE page 6B

Casino’s losses continue
amid operator search

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

ISLE OF Capri’s Grand Bahama-based casino continues to
operate at a loss, the Minister of Tourism has told Tribune Business,
while potential new operators continue talks on taking it over
with the Government and Our Lucaya’s owners.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace said potential replacement ten-
ants for Our Lucaya’s casino have recently taken a look at the prop-
erty. He added that there have been several tri-party talks between
owners Hutchison Whampoa, the casino operator candidates and
the Government, with Isle of Capri having agreed to remain as
operator beyond its initial end-May departure date until a replace-

ment is found.

“Progress is being made. We have expressions of interest, and
people have gone and a taken a look at the property. Those con-
versations are continuing,” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said.

These continuing talks have left the Government hopeful that
Grand Bahama’s only operating casino will continue to run in this
depressed economy, though it may be without the Isle of Capri

brand in the future.

“They are continuing to lose money; no question about that,” said

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace.

“T suspect they would wish to

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EU still yet to accept Bahamas services offer

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE European Union (EU)
has yet to accept the Bahamas’
services offer over the Eco-
nomic Partnership Agreement
(EPA), the Trade Commission’s
chairman has confirmed, adding
that most Bahamian profes-
sional services organisations are
“a far cry from where they need
to be” to maximise the agree-
ment for their members’ bene-
fit.

John Delaney told Tribune
Business he was “quite confi-
dent” that the EU would ulti-
mately accept the Bahamas’ ser-
vices offer, as it wanted this
nation to be “fully vested and
obligated under the EPA”, thus
ensuring European firms and
service providers could have
access to the third-largest mar-
ket in CARICOM.

Earlier, addressing a
Bahamas Society of Engineers
meeting, Mr Delaney had con-
firmed that the Bahamas’ ser-
vices offer was still “not set-
tled”, with negotiations still tak-
ing place between this nation
and the EU.

“The Bahamas position for
services generally was very con-
sistent in Modes three and four
in the offer put to the EU,” Mr
Delaney said. “As far as ’m

Professional organisations ‘far cry from where they
need to be’ on trade negotiating capacity

er 9
=

aCe MBIe CU



aware, the offer has not yet
been accepted. The Bahamas
complied with the timelines [to
get the offer in], so we’re well
within the arrangement.

“The goods side [of the EPA]
is in force. As to the services
side, that is still not a settled
matter. The Bahamas position
has been that all areas in the
National Investment Policy
reserved exclusively for
Bahamians, we want to pre-
serve.”

Tribune Business previously
revealed that the Bahamas’ ini-

tial services offer had been
rejected by the EU because it
failed to meet the minimum lib-
eralization thresholds set by
both it and CARIFORUM, the
body that negotiated the EPA
on this nation’s behalf.

The Europeans had wanted
the Bahamas to show more
commitment to liberalization in
certain areas such as retail and
construction services, and were
also unhappy that much of the
Bahamas’ investment-related
rules were set in policy, not
statute, thus generating consid-
erable uncertainty.

Mr Delaney said he did not
know the specifics of the talks
between the Bahamas and the
EU, telling Tribune Business
that the services offer was “in
active play, negotiations”.

He added: “As a general
statement, I think the EU, from
the very beginning, preferred
to be dealing with any protec-
tionist regime in statute, as
opposed to policy, because of
the very imprecise nature of
policy as opposed to something
that is in statute”.

Two Ministry of Finance offi-

SEE page 4B

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RoyalStar
budgets for

in premium

* But insurer says not all bad,
as risk exposure down too

* Economy taking toll on top-line,
with cat coverage dropped and
switch from comperhensive to
third party motor insurance

* Property catastrophe premiums
up 3-5% due to reinsurer woes

* Carrier delivers 15% return on
shareholder equity in 2008

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ROYALStar Assurance, the
Bahamian general insurer, has
budgeted for a 10 per cent year-
over-year drop in gross written
premiums for 2009, its manag-
ing director telling Tribune
Business it has been reducing
property catastrophe exposure
because prices do not cover risk.

Steve Watson said the eco-
nomic downturn meant that
RoyalStar had seen “quite a

SEE page 2B

Colinalmperial.
PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



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FROM page 1B

few” policyholders cancelling
or reducing insurance coverage
because they were unable to
afford the premiums, hence the
budgeted decline in top line
growth.

“It’s been an ongoing trend
on the property side,” Mr Wat-
son told Tribune Business. Pol-
icyholders who did not have a
mortgage on their properties,
he explained, were cancelling
catastrophe coverage and just
taking out fire protection,
reducing their premium pay-
ments to 25 per cent or one-
quarter of their previous value.

“The most obvious indicator
of the state of the economy is
the number of people switch-
ing from comprehensive to third
party motor insurance,” Mr
Watson added. “That’s hap-
pened a lot in the first five
months of the year. I’d say that
about five years ago, it was
50/50 between comprehensive
and third party, but now it’s
65/35 in favour of third party.”

He suggested this trend was
being exacerbated by the
increasing tendency of Bahami-
an consumers, hit hard by the
recession, to waive new car pur-
chases in favour of older, used
cars that were cheaper.

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With fewer Bahamians buy-
ing new cars, as evidenced by
the almost 50 per cent drop in
new car sales during the 2009
first quarter, consumers were
“less likely to insure compre-
hensively”, something that will
impact Bahamian insurance car-
riers in terms of reduced pre-
mium income.

“The average value of a car
on the road now is lower than it
was five years ago, and the aver-
age age of a car on the road
now is much higher than it was
five years ago,” Mr Watson
said. “That translates into more
third party and less compre-
hensive cover.”

As a result of these trends,
RoyalStar had “budgeted a 10
per cent reduction” in gross
written premium year-over-
year, which would, if it tran-
spired reduce this figure by
$7.357 million to around $66
million, based on 2008 figures.

Mr Watson added that Roy-
alStar “might see a bit more
because of the way Cayman is
going, because we’re letting
business go”. However, he
pointed out that the reduction
in top-line gross written premi-
um was not necessarily bad for
the general insurer, because it
meant less risk exposure, par-
ticularly in instances where pre-
mium prices did not equate to
the insured’s risk.

“It’s not necessarily a bad
thing for us. It’s possibly a good
thing,” Mr Watson said. He
added, though, that RoyalStar’s
claims costs were being impact-
ed by an increase in the number
of uninsured drivers on
Bahamian roads. This was
resulting in incidents where the
carrier was having to compen-
sate its comprehensively-
insured motor clients who, even
though it was not their fault,
were involved in accidents with
uninsured motorists.

But, on a brighter note, Roy-

alStar has seen no increase in
the number of fraudulent claims
submitted to it. “So far, sur-
prisingly not,” Mr Watson said,
when questioned by Tribune
Business. “No more than usual.

“Tt’s just part and parcel of
our business. So far, quite
frankly, we haven’t seen any
increase in the last six months
over the same period in the year
before.”

Writing

Writing in RoyalStar’s 2008
annual report, Mr Watson said
property catastrophe insurance
“continued to be unattractively
priced” last year, resulting in
the company’s decision not to
grow its book of business in that
line in the Bahamas. It reduced
its exposure in the Cayman
Islands and the Turks & Caicos,
resulting in the reduction in
gross written premium from
$80.156 million in 2007 to
$73.574 million last year.

“Whilst no one likes to see a
reduction in the top line of a
business, it makes little sense
to grow purely for the sake of
growth at the expense of prof-
itability,” Mr Watson told the
company’s shareholders and
policyholders.

The RoyalStar managing
director told Tribune Business
that property catastrophe trends
had continued into 2009,
explaining: “You'll see we write
less business in terms of expo-
sure to date than we did five
years ago.

“We can’t raise prices to the
level we need to for two rea-
sons. The competition, who do
not appear to perceive the risk
we do, and the economy can’t
handle higher prices, so our
choice is to reduce exposure.
It’s particularly bad in Cayman,
where rates are crazy — 30 per
cent lower than three years ago
— whereas here, they’ve come

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down 10-15 per cent over three
years.”

However, Mr Watson said
that on average property cata-
strophe premium prices in the
Bahamas had increased by 3-5
per cent for 2009. He explained
that this was largely due to
demands from reinsurers, who
were looking to replace capital
lost in stock market invest-
ments.

“That’s the feeling from the
market,” Mr Watson said of the
price increases. “I’ve talked to
other people, and everyone’s
said the same. Prices went up
because the reinsurers passed
them on to us, so in 2009 the
business is even more marginal
than it was in 2008.”

Bahamian insurers had
argued that their policyholders
should not be penalized for
reinsurers’ bad investment deci-
sions, but because they buy so
much reinsurance they had little
choice. Apart from the impact
of catastrophic events in 2008,
reinsurers themselves lost their
reinsurance capacity due to a
contraction in the hedge fund
community, further increasing
their replacement cost of capi-
tal.

"You've got a recipe for
increased prices,” Mr Watson
said. "Even if there is no big
event this year, you could see
prices increase next year for no
good reason."

Away from property cata-
strophe, Mr Watson said Roy-
alStar had seen growth in its
motor and non-catastrophe
property business, areas that
had boosted profitability and
altered its business mix. Net
written premium had increased
by 36 per cent between 2004-
2008, while catastrophe and
excess of loss reinsurance had
both declined.

For 2008, all RoyalStar’s
insurance lines proved prof-
itable, with the exception of its
marine category, which suffered
a large number of losses. While
marine was a relatively small
business line, Mr Watson told
Tribune Business: “It was bad in
September and October, when
two to three vessels were stolen
in a six-week period, Given the
small book, it had a dispropor-
tionate impact.

“We haven’t seen any thefts
since then, but we took imme-
diate corrective action. If your
boat was in the wrong category
as far as we were concerned,
your premium could have dou-
bled.” This category would
involve open boats, 25-40 feet in
length, with outboard Yamaha
engines.

“Tt’s a real, real problem, and
although we’ve not seen any-
thing since, I know four to five
vessels were stolen in the first
quarter of this year,” Mr Wat-
son said of marine insurance.

For 2008, RoyalStar generat-
ed $4.452 million in net income,
a 15 per cent return on share-
holder equity. The company
incurred claims losses from
Hurricanes Ike and Paloma that
totalled around $1 million net,
while the marine losses and a
claim from a major store fire in
Abaco, plus investment income
losses of $884,648, produced
combined losses of around $4
million.

While RoyalStar’s combined
operating ratio increased from
70 per cent to 77 per cent in
2008, Mr Watson described this
as “still a very strong number”.
He noted that since 2004, ordi-
nary shareholder equity at the
company had more than dou-
bled from $12.8 million to $25.8
million, even though dividends
totaling some $5.7 million had
been paid.

Combined with preference
shareholder investment, Roy-
alStar’s total equity stood at
$30.8 million, something Mr
Watson said left it well-posi-
tioned to cope with what was
expected to be a challenging
2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009, PAGE 3B



Insurance pessimistic To advertise in The Tribune, call 502-2371

on Act reform change

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas General
Insurance Association (BGIA)
is “actively considering our next
move” over the amendments to
the Domestic Insurance Act, its
chairman told Tribune Business,
but is pessimistic over the pos-
sibility the Government will
make changes after the legisla-
tion passed the second reading
in the House of Assembly.

“Right now, I don’t know if
there’s a whole lot that’s going
to be done at this stage,” Timo-
thy Ingraham said. “It could be
one of those objections we put
in the record and have to live
with for now. It’s a very narrow
thing that we disagreed with.
Hopefully, at some point, some-
one will look at it and say it
needs amending.”

The Bahamian insurance
industry, led by the BGIA, had
strongly opposed the Govern-
ment’s proposed amendments
to the Act, arguing that it had
overreacted to CLICO
(Bahamas) collapse by giving
sweeping, unchecked powers to
the regulators to appoint an
administrator for an insurance
firm without first obtaining a
court order.

In addition, the sector was
concerned that the amendments
also gave the administrator
wide-ranging powers to act as
he saw fit, again without first
getting permission from the
courts or Registrar of Insur-

“It could be one of those objections
we put in the record and have to live
with for now. It’s a very narrow thing

that we disagreed with. Hopefully, at
some point, someone will look at it
and say it needs amending.”

ance’s Office.

Mr Ingraham said the insur-
ance industry wanted to see “a
little more checks and bal-
ances”, adding: “We were con-
cerned that the administrator
could do whatever he wanted
without reference to the regu-
lator, the courts or anyone else.
The concern was that once
appointed, the amendments did
not require someone to report
back to the Registrar. It gave
the administrator, technically,
a free hand.”

When asked whether the
BGIA was likely to challenge
the amendments in the
Supreme Court, Mr Ingraham
said: “I’m not sure that'll
achieve anything at this
stage.....

“We’re very disappointed
with the outcome, but you play
the hand you’re dealt. We'll
continue the dialogue with the
Government, and when they’re
amending something else hope-
fully they’ll amend that before

— Timothy Ingrabam



someone has to deal with it.”

Meanwhile, Patrick Ward,
Bahamas First’s president, said
the BGIA was deciding “what
our best course of action is.
There is going to be a response
on our part.

“I do know there will be a
response, and if the industry
does not respond, we’ll respond
anyway.”

A copy of the Domestic
Insurance Act amendments that
have been tabled in Parliament,
and obtained by Tribune Busi-
ness, show that the Insurance
Commission (the successor to
the Registrar of Insurance)
“may appoint an administrator
who shall seize the management
and control of a company, or
any part of the insurance busi-
ness of the company”, in various
situations.

Among the seemingly sub-
jective situations for doing so
are if an asset on the insurance
company’s books, “in the opin-
ion of the Commission”, is “not

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satisfactorily accounted for;
“where, in the opinion of the
Commission”, the company’s
affairs are such that they could
prejudice policyholders, credi-
tors or asset owners; and
“where, in the opinion of the
Commission”, the insurance
carrier, intermediary or person
“is committing or about to com-
mit” an unsafe or unsound busi-
ness practice, or pursue such a
course.

Other reasons for the admin-
istrator’s appointment, such as
the company’s failure to meet
or pay its liabilities; the value
of its assets being less than its
liabilities or placing policyhold-
ers in jeopardy; a significant
erosion in the value of the com-
pany’s assets; and the conduct
of business in a manner that is
detrimental to policyholders,
seem more valid.

But again, if “in the opinion
of the Commission” a company
is likely to be unable to meet
its liabilities, an administrator
can be summoned.

Once appointed, the admin-
istrator has, under the current
proposed reforms, “the exclu-
sive powers to manage and con-
trol the company’s affairs”. He
can discontinue its operations,
stop or limit payment of its
obligations, and re-organise the
company. In doing the latter,
the administrator can appoint
new officers and directors, and
also consummate the sale or
merger of the insurance com-
pany to others if he so chooses.



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PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS, in 1959, the Bahamas Real Estate Association, an umbrella or-
ganization which draws membership from amongst the ranks of persons en-
gaged in real estate transactions, such as real estate brokers and salespersons,

was founded;

AND WHEREAS, in 1995 Parliament enacted the Real Estate (Brokers and
Salesmen) Act, thereby vesting The Bahamas Real Estate Association, a body
corporate, with the authority to register, license, regulate and control real es-
tate brokers and salespersons in The Bahamas;

AND WHEREAS, investment in real estate is considered by far the largest
single investment that an individual is likely to make in his or her lifetime;

AND WHEREAS, the Bahamas Real Estate Association has been highly
successful in its efforts to ensure that only competent, certified and licensed
agents engage in real estate transactions in The Bahamas, thereby protecting
the Bahamian consumers from entering into land transaction with unquali-
fied, and often times, unscrupulous individuals;

AND WHEREAS, over the fifty years of its existence, the Bahamas Real
Estate Association has experienced a substantial growth in its membership,
to the extent that the organization boasts of a current membership in excess
of 600 qualified and licensed brokers and salespersons;

AND WHEREAS, during the month of May 2009, the Bahamas Real Estate
Association will mark the 50th anniversary of its existences with an elabo-
rate schedule of activities and events, inclusive of a Gala Evening, which is
scheduled to be held on Friday, 29th May, 2009 at the Atlantis Resort and

Casino on Paradise Island;

NOW THEREFORE, | Hubert A Ingraham, Prime Minister of the Common-
wealth of The Bahamas, do hereby proclaim the week beginning Sunday,
24th May and ending Friday 29th May, 2009 as “Real Estate Week.”



IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have
hereto set my Hand and Seal
this 21st day of January 2009.

Hubert A. Ingraham —

PRIME MINISTER

Maurice O. Glinton, Freeport based Counsel and Attorney, will provide an interesting perspective on the Judiciary. Mr. Glinton

is a civil lawyer, practicing primarily in the areas of Constitutional and Administrative law, and Corporate law. He has appeared in
all of the Courts for The Bahamas including the Privy Council, since being admitted to The Bahamas Bar in December 1980. He
is a past Vice-President of The Bahamas Bar Association.

Wednesday, May 27, 6:30pm. The Nassau Yacht Club on East Bay Street.



Admission is free. Donations
accepted. Register at
www.nassauinstitute.org or
leave a message at 328-6529
PAGE 4B, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SS
EU still yet to accept

Bahamas services offer

JOB OPPORTUNITY

Graphic Designer to work in fast paced organisa-
tion.

Core responsibilities and requirements:

¢ To produce graphic design solutions for a range of
promotion and information needs.

¢ Candidates must be well versed in design concepts
and proficient in design software, including
Illustrator, Dreamweaver, QuarkXpress, Freehand,
Photoshop and others.

¢ Candidates must be proficient with both Macintosh
and Windows based computer applications and hard-
ware, including design and layout of print material.

A Bachelor’s degree in graphic design or related
field is preferred.

DA#61034
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas



FROM page 1B

cials, Simon Wilson, the director
of economic planning, and
Brickell Pinder, flew to Brus-
sels to meet with EU counter-
parts prior to the April 15, 2009,
deadline for the Bahamas’ EU
services offer to be agreed.
What was accomplished at
the meeting is uncertain, with
Tribune Business sources telling
this newspaper that the CARI-
COM Regional Negotiating
Machinery (CRNM) had yet to
see this nation’s revised services
offer. The Bahamas’ offer not
only has to be agreed by the
EU, but CARIFORUM as well,
as its members will also be our
trading partners with exactly
the same benefits and prefer-
ences as the Europeans.
Meanwhile, Mr Delaney said
it was critical for Bahamian pro-
fessional organisations to build
capacity, and not merely in

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terms of advising the Govern-
ment on the EPA and other
trade agreements but also when
it came to negotiating market
access for their members with
their EU counterparts.

“Organisational capacity
across the board is significant,
because even the work of the
Government requires the input
of the representative bodies
and, frankly speaking, save for
the tourism industry and finan-
cial services sector, organiza-
tional capacity is a far cry from
where it needs to be,” Mr
Delaney told Tribune Business.

This is particularly critical for
when it comes to organisations,
which are representing Bahami-
an services professionals, nego-
tiating Mutual Recognition
Agreements (MRAs) with their
EU counterparts. Unless the
Bahamian organisation’s stan-
dards and qualifications are
recognised by their EU coun-
terparts, their members will be
unable to access European mar-
Kets.

With MRA negotiations
involving Bahamian profes-
sionals in the areas of tourism,
architecture and engineering

scheduled to begin by 2010, Mr
Delaney added: “I would say
that any representative body in
the Bahamas needs to have, as a
matter of priority, a focus on
developing their internal capac-
ity.

“That focus should be there
with a view to getting its mem-
bers to provide greater
resources for that purpose, as
well as seeking to access public
funding for that purpose, oth-
erwise they might find they’re
not best serving their members’
interests.”

When it came to standards
and qualifications, Mr Delaney
said many Bahamian services
professionals had trained
abroad, and were thus certified
by bodies likely recognised by
the EU.

“The question is whether
they would be considered as
having maintained their certifi-
cation if we don’t have a local
organisation that oversees those
standards,” Mr Delaney said.

“There is no gainsaying the
fact that we must have our local
certification that is recognised
internationally.”

For both the EPA and trade

NOTICE

NOTICE
AUGUSTA STREET is

is hereby given that ELIE ETIENNE of
applying to

the Minister

responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/

naturalization should not be granted,

should send

a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 23' day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, ELAINE PRATT of the
Southern District of the Island of New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, intends
to change my name to LATONYA ELAINE PRATT. If there
are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.



agreements in general, Mr
Delaney said the main issue for
the Bahamas were the modes
three and four methods of sup-
ply, commercial presence and
the movement of foreign work-
ers into the country. In the
EPA, the mode three commer-
cial presence of EU firms was
the major negotiating point.

“The Bahamas would wish to
protect for its citizens those
areas in which its citizens have
been able to establish a foothold
without the influx of competi-
tion they would not be able to
handle at this point,” Mr
Delaney said, “while allowing
an adequate degree of compe-
tition to allow the Bahamas to
grow and enable Bahamian
businesses to mature at a high-
er level, because of what com-
petition might yield — joint ven-
tures, the transfer of skills and
capital.

“How do we get that right?
It’s difficult. It’s a question of
judgment.”

Apart from preserving the
existing trade benefits, in terms
of duty-free market access, for
existing Bahamian exporters to
the EU, such as the fisheries
industry and Polymers Interna-
tional, Mr Delaney said the
Government was also motivat-
ed to sign the EPA to preserve
this nation’s attractiveness as a
foreign direct investment recip-
ient.

The Bahamas, in “looking to
the future, to things not present-
ly exported”, and “to be an
attractive place” to Bahamian
companies, joint ventures and
foreign firms, with access to the
major markets such as the EU,
needed to sign the EPA.

Otherwise, said Mr Delaney:
“The Bahamas would not have
the certainty that someone
operating from this platform
would want. The Bahamas may
not be as attractive as a place to
do certain things as other places
in the Caribbean, whom we
compete with, quite frankly, for
investment.

“If the Bahamas were to be
competitive in attracting invest-
ment in the future, we need to
secure the pipeline, the access,
in no less favourable terms than
other countries.”

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prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply.


THE TRIBUNE

Economic shift
needed to aid
financial services

mg By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

crobards@tribunemedia.net

A SUCCESSFUL financial
services industry in the
Bahamas depends on a major
shift from all sectors of the
economy, the Bahamas Finan-
cial Services Board’s (BFSB)
chief executive believes, as the
global financial crisis continues
to force this country to mould a
new business model.

Wendy Warren said the Gov-
ernment and the private sector,
including “spheres in the broad
economy such as tourism-relat-
ed services and retail financial
services”, have to refine tech-
nical, professional and inter-
personal skills in order for the
Bahamas to remain a competi-
tive financial services market.

Ms Warren said competitive-
ness on a national level might
be the catalyst for some of those
changes. “The environment for
international financial services
centres changed after the finan-
cial crisis,” she said.

Ms Warren argued that skill
upgrades should be coupled
with upgrades to this nation’s
infrastructure, including
telecommunications, energy and
the environment.

She said the impending
changes to the financial services
sector will require a “national
passion that demands that we
go beyond observer status to
being change agents”.

The BFSB is continuing to
examine the current environ-
ment to see if there are modifi-
cations that will allow this coun-
try to become more attractive to
investors.

However, Ms Warren alluded
that many Bahamas-based



WENDY WARREN >

financial institutions, and
Bahamians in general, have yet
to embrace the kind of service
distinction that will set the

Bahamas apart as one of the
most attractive offshore finan-
cial centres in the world — even
in the wake of the attack against
them by OECD countries.

“Tn our daily interaction with
fellow Bahamians, we should
take time to define the standard
of excellence and encourage
adoption,” she said.

“Clients do not distinguish
between the experiences they
have in the offices of their
banker to what occurs on Bay
Street. All experiences count
toward the Bahamas brand in
financial services.”

“We have to invest in this
industry,” said Ms Warren. “It’s
critical to our economy and crit-
ical to our society.”

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FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED

NOTICE

Please be advised that the Head Office and
the Registered Office of the company will be
moved from the Bahamas Financial Centre,
Charlotte & Shirley Streets, 2nd Floor, Nassau,
Bahamas to Royal Bank House, East Hill Street,
Nassau, Bahamas effective 25th May, 2009.

D. BURROWS-HAINES (Mrs.)
Corporate Secretary

Dated this 22nd May 2009

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009, PAGE 5B




















































DHL JOB DESCRIPTION

POSITION:
JOB FAMILY:
RCS CODE:
REPORTS TO:
LOCATION:

Collections Agent

Credit & Collections
A20004

Collections Lead

Country Finance Department

OVERALL PURPOSE:

Under limited supervision in a team environment provide efficient and effec-
tive credit approvals. To ensure timely credit application processing, respond to
information requests and issues. Ensure accuracy of all credit decisions functions
while staying within company policy and procedural guidelines.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

Gathers, compiles and maintains basic credit information to be used in
making credit decisions.

Reviews and monitors credit sources, customer applications and
delinquent accounts. Processes credit applications.

Works with smaller customers to resolve collections issues and disputes.
Investigates disputes and reviews documentation.

Prepares and processes credit and collections account adjustments.
Implements credit suspensions.

Recommends further actions on delinquent accounts.

Maintains records of credit risks and delinquent accounts.

Provides support and coordination with third party agencies as needed.
Handles customer calls related to Collection Agency accounts.
Prepares and files bankruptcy claim documents.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

High School diploma required. .

1-3 years of experience in Collections.

Advanced administrative skills to function effectively with limited
direction amid competing priorities and deadlines.

Excellent customer service orientation and communication skills.
Proficiency using various computer software applications.
Excellent analytical and interpersonal skills.

Proficiency using various computer software applications

For more information please contact:
Romell K. Knowles I

Country Manager
Email:Romell.Knowles@dhl.com

Interested in Nursing,
but TOO BUSY for Classrooms?

ON-LINE NURSING procRams
INFORMATION SESSION

TUESDAY , MAY 26th, 2009, 10AM - 4PM

Location: Doctors Hospital Conference Room, Dowdeswell St
ADVANCE YOUR CAREER!

Doctors Hospital in conjunction with Nova Southeastern Univer-
sity, of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA will host an ON-LINE
NURSING PROGRAM INFORMATION SESSION, Tuesday, May
26th, from 10 a.m - 4 p.m in the Conference Room at Doctors
Hospital. A ‘blended model’ will be presented which includes
on-line courses and video conferencing coupled with on the
ground classes. Admission is free, the general public and all
healthcare employees are invited to attend. The event is
designed for working professionals who maybe considering
advancing their career and those interested in other career
options in the healthcare industry. Live demonstration will be
held throughout the day. Representatives from Nova will be
available to answer questions, and discuss course curriculum,
career options, application procedures.

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COMMONWEALTH
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ar

AS

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ca

TPM COORDINATOR

The successful candidate would be required to:

- Facilitating the horizontal expansion of TPM in the
brewery.

- Provide Management/Pillars/Teams with advice and
support on TPM concept

- Ensuring TPM activities continuously match Brewery’s
Mission and KPI’s (HMS) through loss deployments

- Formulating, together with management, the TPM 3
year Master Plan and ensuring regular evaluation and
update

- Supporting Management with implementation of the
internal/external Audit System to ensure and manage
the change

- Stimulating the use of standard forms, reports,
templates, tools, improvement routes (from toolbox) etc
with the required document control, IT applications

- Managerial experience

- Computer knowledge required

All interested persons are asked to
fax resumes to:

(242) 362-4793

PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



=
Some consultants ‘fleecing Bahamas’

FROM page 1B

ing firms from across the world,
and the Government needs to
organisations in the Bahamas
with global reach to reduce the
cost and ensure knowledge is
developed among the Bahamas’
indigenous talent.”

Mr Winder suggested that the
Government could also gener-
ate cost savings by regulatory
consolidation in the financial
services sector, merging all the
supervisory bodies into one or
two entities, rather than pro-
vide each with a separate line of
funding.

“Tf the Government gets the
right people in the regulators,
they would not need as many
people, and the quality and effi-
ciency of regulation would
improve,” he added. “The Gov-
ernment has to look at areas
where it could cut back and be
more efficient.”

Mr Winder also suggested the
Government, in its drive to cut
costs, look at outsourcing cer-
tain functions to the private sec-
tor. Arguing that cut backs in
government spending were
“necessary” given the increased
fiscal deficit and national debt,
coupled with the decline in rev-
enues, he added that the Budget
should not increase or add new

For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight
on Mondays



taxes on the private sector,
because this could cause firms
to go out of business or lay-off
staff.

“T think the Government has
to be careful as to the level of
debt it takes on, especially if
that debt is going to go to your
recurrent expenditure,” Mr
Winder told Tribune Business.

“The Government has talked
for a long time around this issue
of public sector reform, and the
costs and inefficiencies one has
to encounter in the public sec-
tor. Now circumstances are
upon is dictating that we look at
this issue, the Government is
taking this into consideration.
They can’t increase taxes. They
have to decrease and reduce
expenditure.”

The likely strategy for the
2009-2010 Budget will be to
reduce recurrent expenditure
without any compulsory redun-
dancies for civil servants, keep
capital spending as high as pos-
sible to stimulate economic
activity and limit unemploy-
ment, and fight for every cent of
revenue possible with no new
or increased taxes.

Making civil servants com-
pulsorily redundant would be
social and political suicide for
the Government given the
unemployment figures. What
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham is likely to do is ask those
civil servants who have reached
the retirement threshold to
retire voluntarily, place a freeze
on all public sector hirings, pro-
motions and grade changes, and
cut spending everywhere else
he can.

The figures already make
grim reading. With national
gross domestic product (GDP)

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

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Money at Work

5S2wk-Low

1.28

11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
1.95

11.09
2.83
6.06
1.31

Securit
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

1.33
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.75
2.83
6.13
2.88
1.38
7.76
11.00
10.40
6.14
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

1.38
6.02
11.00
10.35
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Last Sale

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Securi
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

WEB PAGE DESIGN WIS II

Previous Close _ Today's Close

6:00 pm-
2:30pm
9:30am

Oar
430 p00

Wed

G >

co FF zh LL”
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 22 MAY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,608.76 | CHG -0.12 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -103.60 | YTD %
FINDEX: CLOSE 795.25 | YTD -4.75% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

Change Daily Vol.
1.33,
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.75
2.83
6.13
2.77
1.38
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.14
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

0.00
0.00

Daily Vol.
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Bid $
7.92
4.00
0.35

Ask $

Last Price
14.60
6.00

Weekly Vol.
8.42
6.25

0.40 0.35

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

ABDAB
RND Holdings

30.13
0.45

31.59

29.00

0.55 0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund

NA Vv
1.3758
2.8962
1.4630

1.3124
2.9230
1.3875
3.1964
12.1564
100.0000
96.4070

Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

3.1964
12.7397
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

1.0000
9.1599
1.0440
1.0364
1.0452

YTD%

-1.49

-5.59

-3.59

Last 12 Months
4.83
-3.35
5.25

-13.64
5.79
0.56
-3.59
0.00
-12.76
4.40
3.64
4.40

Div $
1.65

2.05

0.96
0.56

0.00
0.71
0.80
0.33
0.76

MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

('S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price
Weekly Vol
EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

- Last traded over-the-counter price
- Trading volume of the prior week

|

DESCRIPTION ‘TIME | DAY START | DUR

0:30am-
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SER. Wii's 4:30pm Thurs } 19Jun | 1 da

i



EPS $

1%
Prime + 1.75%
T%
Prime + 1.75%

EPS $
-0.041

1B -May | S450

11isJun | 2 days S550

Z0-May | & wks S275





FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

f£ITee Ff A TF AS OT.

-6.05

Div $ P/E
0.127
0.992

0.244

-0.877

0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

Interest

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E

0.000
0.001

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

Yield %
30-Apr-09
31-Mar-09
15-May-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

for 2008 estimated at around
$7.2 billion, and the Interna-
tional Monetary Fund (IMF)
predicting the Bahamian econ-
omy will contract by 4 per cent
in 2009, it seems reasonable to
estimate that GDP will slip to
around $6.9 billion.

The Bahamas’ national debt
was already around 43.4 per
cent of GDP, some $3.2 billion,
at year-end 2008. And with the
2008-2009 Budget year likely to
end with a fiscal deficit of
around $250 million, not to
mention the $200 million bor-
rowing to help refinance down-
town Nassau’s revitalization
among other needs, the $150
million borrowed from China,
and the $100 million New Prov-
idence Road Improvement Pro-
ject, that debt is likely to swell
to around $3.6 billion at con-
servative estimates.

Needless to say, this will put
the Bahamas’ debt-to-GDP
ratio well over the 50 per cent
mark.

Mr Winder said he agreed
with the Government offering
early retirement to civil servants
in their 50s and 60s, and that
the size of the public sector was
too large. The latter, he added,
was a function of its citizens.

“T think the size of govern-
ment is a reflection of the aver-
age Bahamian,” Mr Winder
said. “I don’t think government
enters into a situation where it
wants to be big. But Bahami-
ans, by and large, want the Gov-
ernment to solve their prob-
lems, and because the electorate
puts huge pressure on the Gov-
ernment to fulfil its obligations,
that forces government to grow.

“We need to better educate

the average Bahamian that he
can’t look to government, and
you, the private sector and pri-
vate individual, must look to
solve problems yourselves, and
not put the pressure on govern-
ment.

“That puts pressure on the
Government to grow, and larg-
er government is not necessari-
ly the best thing for the coun-
try.”

Rick Lowe, an executive with
the Nassau Institute economic
think-tank, praised the Gov-
ernment’s likely spending cuts
as “a smart move” and a “move
in the right direction” that
would hopefully make all
Bahamians think about how to
adjust financial plans during the
recession.

He was “doubtful”, though,
that the Government would go
as far as needed in reducing
recurrent spending, and said it
would need to watch its ability
to meet its debt servicing costs.

Mr Lowe said the Govern-
ment had a “delicate tightrope
they have to walk” in manag-
ing the public finances, adding:
“They’re in a precarious situa-
tion. We’re partially to blame
because we think the Govern-
ment has a magic well they pro-
duce money from.

“We lose sight of the fact the
Government gets its revenue
from us. If you create money
from thin air, you get boom or
bust. One way or another, the
day of reckoning will come, and
it is our generation that has to
face the music for future gener-
ations.

“T don’t wish ill or misfortune
on anyone. It’s just that now the
price has to be paid.”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LOVENCENT CLECIDOR of
JOHNSON ROAD, FOX HILL, P.O. Box FH-14412, Nassau,
Bahamas is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 18° day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

July 4, 2009 - American Independence
duly 10, 2009 - Bahamian Independence
November 26, 2009 - Thanksgiving

The Public Is Invited
10am - Until
Tel. 325-6306/636-0726

For more info contact Paul Rolle
All patriotic Bahamians join us to secure the
beaches for the future generation.
Please come show your support.

Our appreciation gors out to Atlantis
for the signs aon Cove Beach

Care Giver
Required

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILL REQUIREMENTS:

- Certified or equivalent to nurse’s aide and training.

- Must understand English both written and verbal.

- Must have current certification, i.e. Health Certificate.

- Must be able to safely and successfully perform ALL job-related
functions 1.e. CPR and Basic First Aid.

PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES:

- Care for multiple residents.
- Observe Resident Rights.

- Provide Professional care and assistance to the residents.

- Assist paramedics in cases of emergency.

- Observe residents, note physical condition, attitude, reactions,
appetite, etc., report to the Administrator.

- Available for front desk duty.

- Capable of working overnight shift 4p.m.— 12am & 12a.m.-8 am.

- Provide quality care.

- Provide a written/verbal report to the Administrator

on a daily basis.

- Perform any other related duties which might be required.

- Man front desk operation.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidates will be offered an excellent compensation
package and opportunities for training and development.

Please e-mail or fax resume to the Administrator at

CCCBAHAMAS @live.com or 323.4475


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009, PAGE 7B



Casino’s losses continue amid operator search

FROM page 1B

thing that makes sense is really multi-million dollar casino tax

come back to the Bahamas to the most time consuming part, debt that it had accumulated.

continue their good name and but we are moving along,” Mr
good will when there is an Vanderpool-Wallace said.
upswing in Grand Bahama.”

The Isle-Our Lucaya casino,
which is located in Hutchinson’s
The casino’s continued poor Our Lucaya property, saw sec-

The minister confirmed Isle financial performance, though, ond quarter revenues last year
of Capri, Hutchison Whampoa has left many questioning why decline by 28 per cent to $2.072
and the Government agreedto Isle of Capri would want to million, compared to $2.879 mil-

extend the casino’s existing remain in Grand Bahama.
agreement until a long-term
solution can be realized.

lion the previous year.
The Casino operator received For Isle of Capri’s 2008 finan-
a ‘sweet’ deal from the former cial year, the property saw loss-

“Bringing those three groups PLP administration that effec- es year-over-year amounting to
together when we have some- tively wrote-off much of the more than $1 million.

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT WC

NOTICE

CORRIDOR 11

BLUE HILL ROAD
ROADWAY CONSTRUCTION

In an effort to relieve current traffic congestion problems JOSE
CARTELLONE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES S.A _ has
been contracted for the Completion of the New Providence Road
Improvement Project — International Package. Road construction
will be commencing onCorridor 11A (Blue Hill Road),which may
require diversions from:

Duke Street & Robinson Road

Tel: 242-322-8341 /242-322-2610

Local diversions will be sign posted in due course and further

information will be provided in the local media

Email: jcccbahamas @cartellone.com. ar

PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
ADVERTISEMENT

VACANCY
FACILITIES MANAGER

GRAND BAHAMA HEALTH SERVICES

The Public Hospitals Authority invites applications from suitably qualified persons for the
post of Facilities Manager, Grand Bahama Health Services

New Providence

Lot #1244 (5,000sq. ft.)
w fhse 2,257 sq. Ft-
Gokien Way Dr, Gealdern
Gates #2 [Appraised
Value $244 84 5000)

Vacant lot #147
(10,557sq. t.)-Punning=
Dr & Roy West Lane
Sotather Heights Sub
(Appraised Valuc
£00 (00000)

Lot £5'x100°
buildings (1.040eq.
f.] Mirache Towickh Agate
Care Center-FPox Hill Rd
(Appraised Value
F149,.280.00)

Lat (34's 100"]
wtruilding 1,90 2aq. f.-
Iheweaux St (Appraised
Value $199,000.00)

Lots #29 & #30,

(Al's 1), Blk A+?
wybruilding 1,1 4aq. f=
Matthew St, Nassau
Vilage (Appraised
Valwe $145,000.00)

Lots #5 & 6
(150.100) whee
Sthwer Palm La Insperial
Park (Appraised Value
S31 3.450200)

Lot #135 [50°.90")
wibse 1.3425 q [-
Sunflower (south)
Sunshine Park Sah Hse
8 (Appraised Value
$13 9.000.00)

Lot #11 (107 <1o0'y
wihse 2,026sq. ft-Sumset
Ridge Der, Sumset Ridge
Sub Hse #28 (Appraised
Vale 32006 00000)

Lot #176 [41.119]
whe 90Gsq. ft.-Ctd
Cedar St tellow Elder
(Appraised Value
65 (0000)

Lots #3 & 44, Blk #47
(0's LO) wey dupes &
retail shop 1,532.54. Ft-
Forbes St Nassaa Village
(Appraised Value
F120000.00)

Audios
» Beach froet loo 900s.
Ft. w building 2.100sq.
f.-Pinders Mangrove
Cay 4ipedinos [Appeals
Valae $200 (e000)

2. Loot 4,3445q. Fw duplex

building 1,1 740. f.-
Fresh Creek Andros
(Appraised Valine
$98,640) AF)

Properties

Grand Balan

t. Lot #20 (17,1 506q. ft]

wfhse 200 0eq. Ft
BIKWE, Section #2-S5ea
Gull Or, Bahama Reef
Yacht & Country Clah
Sub Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
S20, 000.0)

Vacant lot #35), Hil #%
(14,.297'sq. f]-
Yorkshire Or, Bakacnia
West Replat Grace
Bahama (4ppraised
VWahue $25 (000000)

. Vacant Lot #a Wk #12

Unt #3 (11 250%q. ft]
Henny Awe Derty Sab
Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$65 0 04h Op

. Lord B10 SE)

wy fhse & Duplex-Nelson
Rl Poinciana Gardens
Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$95,000)

7. Lot a3? (50°10 50°]

Ww fsixplex 2-storey
Apartneet beading &
Church 5,40 mq. fr-
Martin Town, Kings Sub
Egght Pelile Rock Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Value $211200,00)
Low 10 reom heel
6 008Isq. Ron 2.5
acres of beach fromt-
High Reck Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Vahoe $1,000, 0900000)

. Vacant lot #13, Blk #59,

Unat #3 (22.75 25q. ft]
45° om canal front-
Dagenham Circle &
Ingrave Dr Emerald Baw
Sub Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$110,000.00)

Vacant bot #21, Ble #3
(14,1615q. f.]-Waterfall
Dr Seahorse Village Sub
Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$40,000.00)

Loo #15, Bik #15 Unit
#3 (90'.125')-Derby
Sub Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$25,000.00)

Vacant hot #25, Blk #15
[17 B6beq, ft J-
Cutwater Ln Sharmnom
Country Chab Sub Grand
Rahama (Appraised
Value $36,000.00)
Vacant hot 24489 gecbion
268 (85's125")-Palneeri
Or Grand Bahama East
[Appraised Valine
$5,000000)

Lot az [20,000sq. ft.)

w fhudiding complex &
codn Laumdreamat—
Queens Highway
Holmes Rock

Com monape Geraad
Bahama (Appraised
Walbue $178.6 00.00)

ASSETS

BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK
Cable Beach, West Bay Street,
F.O.Box N-3034
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel:(242) 327-578INS27-S793-6
Fanx:(242) 327-5047, 327-1258
www. bahamasdevelopmenthank.com

Abaco

. Lot #54 E (6, 508s. fe.)
w/triples foundation
2.7 HBsq. ft--Murphy
Town “Albarn
(Appraised Value
$24,096.00)

. Vacant lot 6 (2 acres)
(Appraised Value
$50,000.00)

» Lot ¥#51(15,0008g. i.)
w/bullding-Murphy
Town Alboro
(Appraised Value
$102,420.00)

. Portion of lot #69
C150 00sq. ft. )-Frang St
Sunphy Town Abaca
(Appraised Value
$29,250.00)

29. Lot #55 [6,900sq. ft.)
~ruilding-Murpahy
Town Albarn
(Appraised Value
82,075.00)

. oot #45 [60 xi 60"
wi 14 room motel
S.900sq, ft-Sandy Poine
Abaco (Appraised
Valuoe $405,700.00)

» Lot By. 1208q, Foow 4
cottages & | shorape
building totaling
4.1866q. ft-Sand Banks
Treasare Cay Abaco
(Appraised Value
SH80,308.00)

Eleuthera
2. Vacant portion of lot #7
(021 LO) Wrest James
Cistern Eleuthera
(Appraised Value
$18,000.00
Cat [Slane

3. Vacant 65 acres ol
land -Arthur’s Town. Cat
island (Appraised
Value $90,000.00)

» Letw le root morcel
1234 atres—Alrthur s
Towenn Cat Islared
(Appraised Vabue
$630. 000 000)

35. Vacant bot #@ (65, 2008q.
ft.|-Moss Town Exmaima
(Appraised Vabue
$110,188.00)

36. Lot (20,4080 sq. fey wef
small bobel 4.52 08q. ft
& exclusive besch-
Porters Hill Escuma
[Appraised Vabue
$1,400, 000.00)

37. Vacant bot #1281
(6,50 0sg. ft.]-Oceanic
Riel Hahaina Sout Sec
#5 Exurmea (Appraised
Valae $18,154).00)

3B. Vacant bot #95
(80'.1 22") Commodore
Rel Elizabeth Harbour
Ess, Exum (Apepralsed
Vallee $45,000.00)

Vehicles
[1] 09 Dodge Caravan
(2) 96 Ford Explorer
(1) 97 Dodge Stracus
[1) OL Hyundai H-1 Van
(1) 01 Kia Bus 12 Seater
(1) 27 LTS00 Ford Boom Truck
(2) 02 Hyundal H-1 Van SVX
(1) 06 Hyundai H-1 Van SÂ¥% (Silver)
(1) 08 Rtchen Tandem Cheretos Tralker
(1) 00 Ford Ranger Truck
(1) 99 Ford F250 Truck
(2) 62 GMC Brigadier Drill Track
(0) 08 Mitsebishi Canter Truck
11) 9? Doble Ate Mack Dump Track
(1) 29 Ford LA000 Dri Truck
(1) 92 Mack Truck (Carmichael fd]
(1) 9? Doeble Ade Mack Dump Track

Wessels

20° (1996) Rebole Vessel w/115 HP Evin engine
21° (1974) Seacraft Vessel w 140 HP Yamaha engine
S2° (1979) Hatters Vexsel (MW Buddy)
51° (1981) Defender Vessel [Equility)
AD Costom Steel Hull Vessel [Miss Kristy]
94° Steel Hull Gulf Coast Shrimp Trawler Vesse

(1980) with (2) Volvo Diesel engine [Sweet Charlotte]
L2? Single Serew Stee! Hull (150) MV Lisa J IIL
vessel has a mew engine cequiring installation. find
cam be view at Bradford Marine. Grand Bahama
19 (1989) Fiberglass Sports Vessel (Hull Onhy]
60 (1982) Defender Vessel (Queen Vashi]
6A (1989) Detoo Marine Wessel (Sweet Dreams)
20F (1997) Abaco Seif Vessel wf115 HP Mercury engine
19 (1991) Spanish Wells Rumabout Vessel w/f115 Mercury engine
91 (155) Travis Marine Vessel (Farthutt)

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:-

* Bachelors Degree in Facilities Management or equivalent, OR related field;
¢ Member British Institute of Facilities Management OR a related professional body;
¢ Excellent communication skills (oral and written); computer skills; accounting skills;

* Seven (7) years experience in Building & Maintenance in a Healthcare facility, Hotel,
or large corporation, five (5) of which must be at a supervisory level;

The Health Facilities Manager reports to the Administrator, Grand Bahama Health
Services.

JOB SUMMARY

The Facilities Manager is responsible for coordinating and managing the Buildin
& Maintenance Departments and oversees Engineering, Biomedical & Mechanica
Units. Special emphasis must be placed on preventative maintenance and practices.

Stee] Building 70x50" Six (6) Windows, Two (2) Entry Doors, Two (2) 5°10" Rollup Doors White trimmed
Blue Approved plans and engineering drawings are available $50,000.00

DUTIES:

1. Coordinates and manages Facilities Management matters pertaining to building
and development operations, maintenance, equipment maintenance, building
fabric maintenance, renovations, use of space, biomedical, engineering,
maintenance, administration and contract management for all facilities under
the responsibility of Grand Bahama Health Services.

The public is invited be submit Sealed bids marked “Temder™ to Bahamas Derclopment Bank, Po. Box 4-3094,
Nassae, Hehamas attention Fimamcial Controller, &xed bids will met be accepted or telephone 327-5780 for
additional information. Pease mote that all bids on the aforementioned properties and assets should be received
hy or en May 29, 20049. The Bahacias Development Bank reserves the right to reject any or all offers. All assets:
are sold as is.



Inspects and evaluates the physical condition of the facilities and make
recommendations necessary for the infrastructural developments/
eee to enhance the comfort of (PHA’s) internal and external
customers.

The Tribune

Real Estate )

The Bahamas Source For Homes, Apartment Commenities 6 Rentals

Everywhere. Lit Buyers et

Prepares and administers the Facilities Management and Operations budget;
also monitors expenditures of the Departments.

Plans and directs staff in the purchasing and distribution of Public Hospitals
Authority’s supplies.

Review bids and make recommendations for awarding of contracts for
maintenance work, contracts and renovations.

Manages staff of Facilities and ensures training opportunities for staff
development.

{S
L.
L.

anat
soe
wanes

AG tli detailed policy and procedural document to ensure appropriate

sua

methods and levels of service are adhered to.

a
a
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12
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Submits monthly reports to Administrator and quarterly reports to the Managing
Director (PHA) on facilities management matters;

Interviews and_selects candidates seeking employment in the Building and
Maintenance Departments;

Liaises with the Capital Development Unit of the Public Hospitals Authority
to ensure Building and Maintenance (Mechanical Engineering) practices
effective project management and supervision techniques;

The post of Facilities Manager is in Scale HAMAS ($37,850 x 700 - $42,050).

Letter of application and curricula vitae should be submitted through the Administrator
of Grand Bahama Health Services, Public Hospitals Authority, PO. Box F-40071, East
Atlantic Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama to the Director of Human Resources, Corporate
Office, Public Hospitals Authority, 3rd Terrace West, Centreville; or PO. Box N-8200
Nassau, Bahamas no later than 12th June, 2009.


PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EMPLOYEES, from page 1B

notice pay of $3,000; 48 weeks’
basic pay of $36,000; and three
weeks’ vacation pay worth
$2,250.

The Court of Appeal said it
was “common ground” that the
sums paid by Snack Food
Wholesale were in accordance
with the Employment Act
2001’s Section 29, but Ms Smith
initiated a legal action alleging
that under common law she was
due $64,790.

The $25,790 difference cited
between the statutory and com-



mon law was comprised,
according to Ms Smith’s amend-
ed statement of claim, of the
loss of 12 months’ worth of
commissions at $2,000 per
month of $24,000 in total; the
loss of 12 months’ group insur-
ance at $20 per week for a total
$1,040; and a 12-month annual
bonus of $750.

The Court of Appeal
acknowledged that Ms Smith
had received a bonus or com-
missions via Snack Food’s
incentive programme, and

Legal Notice

NOTICE

MANTHA POINTE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)












added: “For the year 2003, the
[company], for economic rea-
sons, implemented a new com-
mission programme by which
the employee would have
received | per cent of net prof-
its, replacing the existing
scheme based on sales. When
this was circulated at the end
of 2002, the appellant objected,
preferring the incentive pro-
gramme that was already in
place.”

Basic pay, as defined by the
Employment Act, did not
include bonuses and commis-
sions, the Court of Appeal said,
meaning that Ms Smith’s action
was “ bound to fail” if made
under the Act. She was repre-
sented by attorney and trade
union leader, Obie Ferguson.

Referring to the previous
Supreme Court hearing, Justice
Longley’s judgment read: “Jus-
tice Lyons found the pleadings
somewhat strange and confus-
ing, and not without some justi-
fication. For it was not clear
whether Mr Ferguson was try-

ing to graft a claim for commis-
sions etc at common law on to
the statutory compensation con-
ferred by section 29 of the Act
on the pretext that they were
wages, or whether it was intend-
ed to be an independent claim
having regard to the wording of
paragraph seven of the amend-
ed statement of claim.

“For if the former were the
case, he could not get through
the back door what he could
not get through the front door.
If the latter were the case, then
it was difficult to see how it
could succeed without a claim
also at common law for notice
pay that was in excess of that
conferred by the Act.”

Without the common law
claim for notice pay, Appeal
Justice Longley said the action
was just a common law claim
for commissions worth $27,950,
when Ms Smith had already
received compensation worth
more than $40,000.

He ruled: “What the law con-
templates is that if the benefits

under the Act have been paid,
the employee should have
resort to his common law claim
only if that provides for greater
benefits. Otherwise, it would be
a waste of time and costs.

“In this regard, it seems to
me that consideration may well
have to be given to the opera-
tion of the doctrine of election
when an employee has received
his full benefits under the Act.

“He should only be permit-
ted to pursue a claim at com-
mon law for greater rights and
better benefits after he has been
put to an election to abandon
the compensation under the
Act, otherwise the purpose for
which the Act was passed — to
make a ready, inexpensive for-
mula available for calculating
benefits — would be lost in the
mush of litigation.”

In the Supreme Court case,
Justice Lyons had reviewed
Snack Food Wholesale’s com-
pensation scheme, finding that it
was discretionary and the
changes made to it were “nei-

ther capricious nor irrational”.

Justice Lyons also had no evi-
dence placed before him to
show how Ms Smith had calcu-
lated the $2,000 per month com-
mission demand. Mr Ferguson,
before the Court of Appeal,
attempted to rely on pay slips
from 2000, when the company
was doing well, but they were
rejected as “unsatisfactory” giv-
en that the commissions were
claimed as special damages.

Justice Longley ruled: “In any
event, it seems to me that the
appellant cannot have her cake
and eat it, too. Either she
accepts the payments made to
her under the Act. Or she could
pursue a claim at common law.
She was not entitled to both.
She got all that she was entitled
to under the Act.

“And the learned judge
found, on the evidence before
him, her claim at common law
would have fallen short of the
benefits conferred by the Act.”
As a result, the appeal was dis-
missed.

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2009
SUPREME COURT CLE/Qui/ 00243

IN THE MATTER ALL THAT parcel or tract
of land containing 464.664 acres situated in
Alexander’s Settlement on the Island of Exuma,
Bahamas and IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT
parcel or tract of land containing 73.957 acres also
situated in Alexander’s Settlement on the Island of
Exuma, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FLORENCE SMITH
of Alexander’s Settlement in the Island of Exuma
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas is applying to the Supreme Court to have
its Title to the following land investigated under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act, and the nature
and extent thereof determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted by the said Court
in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

“ALL THAT parcel or tract of land containing
Four hundred and Sixty-four and Six hundred
and Sixty-four thousandths (464.664) acres being
a portion of Crown Grant C-24 granted to William
Alexander and situated in Alexander’s Settlement
on the Island of Exuma, Bahamas which said
parcel or tract of land has such position boundaries
shape marks and dimensions as are shown on the
diagram or plan filed in the Department of Lands
and Surveys situated in the City of Nassau in the
Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas as Plan Number
343A EX and IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT
parcel or tract of land containing Seventy-three
and Nine hundred and Fifty-Seven thousandths
(73.957) acres also being a portion of Crown Grant
C-24 granted to William Alexander and situated
in Alexander’s Settlement on the Island of Exuma,
Bahamas which said parcel or tract of land has such
position boundaries shape marks and dimensions
as are shown on the diagram or plan filed in the
Department of Lands and Surveys situated in the
City of Nassau in the Island of New Providence
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas as Plan Number 343 EX and which said
parcels or tracts of land are filed herein and edged
in “PINK”.

Copies of the Plan may be inspected during normal
office hours at the following places:-

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher
Building, East Street, in the City of Nassau;

2. The Local Administrator’s Office situated in the
Settlement of George Town, Exuma;

3. The Local Constable’s Office situated in the
Settlement of George Town, Exuma; or

4, The Chambers of Colin M. Thompson Terrace
House, First Terrace and Collins Avenue
Nassau, Bahamas.

Any person who objects to the granting of the said
Certificate of Title is required to file in the Supreme
Court and serve on the Petitioner or its Attorney a
Statement of its, his or her Claim in the prescribed
forms, verified by an Affidavit and other related
requirements to be filed therewith by the 15th day
of July A.D., 2009. Failure of any such person to
file and serve a Statement of its, his or her Claim
together with the other related requirement by the
15th day of July A.D., 2009, will operate as a bar to
such claim.



COLIN M. THOMPSON
ATTORNEY FOR THE PETITIONER

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEO RENAISSANCE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 13th day of February 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PAGO HALO CORPORATION
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
POWER TRAIL INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TIMELESS FLIGHT
ENTERPRISES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 30th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SPRING BLOOMS CORPORATION
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SOUNDOUT OCEAN CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2007. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ITR SERVICES LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DROMENSTARV INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


THE TRIBUNE





Public Education Meeting

Patterns of Biodiversity
and Climate Change
Impacts in The Bahamas

PRESENTER:

lan Elliott

Ph.D. Student, University of Exeter, UK
DATE: May 26th, 2009

TIME: 7:00 pm

VENUE: The Retreat, Village Road

lan Elliott 5 a PROD, student whe 1s re-
searching patterns of biodiversity and cli-
mate change impacts in The Bahamas util-
izing Geographic Information Systems
(GTS). GIS 15 a powertul tool that allows
for mapping and analyses of landscapes,
and the data from Mr. Elliott’s project are
currently being used to design a more sus-
tainable network of marine reserves.
Through his research, Mr. Elltott has cre-
ated key data on biodiversity, fisheries
habitat, and the impacts of climate change
and hurricanes. Visit http-''mselex.ac.uk/
guis/bahamas’/# for project information,

For meeting information call 393-1317 or
email botie bot. bs

oof Dhara’ ba Go
: ics2 2/7) Living Oceans
General Public 5 <7 g Saamilalinn

BAT Members Free

performance’

DESPITE a sluggish econo-
my, Commonwealth Bank
turned in a “remarkable per-
formance” for fiscal 2008 and
the 2009 first quarter, the bank’s

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009, PAGE 11B

ommonwealth
Bank’s ‘remarkable

chairman said.

“Despite gloom in the econ-
omy, I am pleased to report
your bank achieved its 12th con-
secutive year of record profits,”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DARREL SIMILIAN of HARBOUR
WEST, EIGHT MILE ROCK, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 25TH day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008

IN THE SUPREME COURT

CLE/qui/No.01550

Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER of The Quicting

Titles Act, 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT picce
ae or tract of land situate near Red

ays in the vicim

of Baker’s Creek and

Loggerhead Point on the Island of Abaco
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas comprising Four and

Seven Thousandths (4.00

7) acres Geng

Grant B3 page 37 to James EB. Weatherford

which said piece parcel or tract of land 1s

bounded on the

ORTH by vacant Crown

Land and running thereon Six Hundred

and ‘Twenty-three

and Seventy-three

Hundredths (623.73) Feet on the EAST
partly by land granted to L.B. Johnson
and partly by a Road Reservation and
running thereon One Hundred and Sixty-
four (164) Feet on the SOUTH by land
ranted to W. H. Weatherford and now
the property of Dudley Higgs and runnin
thereon Six Hundred and Fifty-nine an
‘Twelve Hundredths (659.12) Feet and on
the WEST by land onginally granted to the
Estate of the late Henry A. Fisher but now
the property of cee Higgs and running
€

thereon Four Hundre

an

n and Srxty-

eight Hundredths (410.68) feet.
AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
Dudley Dean Higgs and Suzette Miranda

Higgs

NOTICE

THE PETITION OF Dudley Dean Higgs and Suzette
Miranda Higgs in respect of:-

“IN THEMATTERof ALLTHAT piece
aes or tract of land situate near Red

ays in the vicimi

of Baker’s Creek and

Loggerhead Point on the Island of Abaco
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas comprising Four and

Seven Thousandths (4.00

7) acres Geng

Grant B3 page 37 to James EB. Weatherford

which said piece parcel or tract of land 1s

bounded on the

ORTH by vacant Crown

Land and running thereon Six Hundred

and ‘Twenty-three

and Seventy-three

Hundredths (623.73) Feet on the EAST
partly by land granted to L.B. Johnson
and partly by a Road Reservation and
running thereon One Hundred and Sixty-
four (164) Feet on the SOUTH by land
ranted to W. H. Weatherford and now
ne property of Dudley Higgs and runnin
thereon Six Hundred and Fifty-nine an
‘Twelve Hundredths (659.12) Feet and on
the WEST by land onginally granted to the
Estate of the late Henry A. Fisher but now
the property of mee) Figs and running
€

thereon Four Hundre

an

n and Srxty-

eight Hundredths (410.68) feet.”

Dudley Dean Higgs and Suzette Miranda Higgs claim to be the
owners of the unincumbered fee simple estate mm possession of
the said land and have made cd deep to the Supreme Court of

the Commonwealth of The B

amas under Section Three O) of

the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have their title to the said land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof determimed and
declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

Copies of the Amended Petition and the Amended Plan of the

said land may be inspected durmg normal office hours in the

following places:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street North in the

City of Nassau, Bahamas; and

2. The Chambers of Lockhart & Munroe, #35 Buen Retiro
Road, off Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower or night
to dower or an Adverse Clatm or a claim not recognized in the
Amended Petition shall on or before the expiration of Thirty
G0) days after the final publication of these presents, file in the

upreme Court and serve on the Petitioners or the undersigned
a Statement of his claim in the prescribed form venfied by an

affidavit to be filed therewith.

Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement of his
Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days after the final

publication of these presents will operate as bar to such clam.

LOCKHART & MUNROE
Chambers

#35 Buen Retiro Road

Off Shirley Street

Nassau, Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioners



() 8
said T.B. Donaldson. While the
global downturn had begun to
take its toll on the Bahamian
economy, he said the banking
industry as a whole in The
Bahamas demonstrated
strength, and Commonwealth
Bank, in particular, had turned
in what he called “a very
remarkable performance.”

Net earnings totalled $49.3
million at year-end December
31, 2008, continuing an unbro-
ken record of increasing prof-
itability started in 1998. Total
assets stood at $1.3 billion, an
increase of 12 per cent over
year-end 2007. Although Com-
monwealth Bank’s share price
fell slightly from a peak of $7, at
its close yesterday it was almost
50 per cent higher than at the
time of stock split in late 2007
and was earning more for share-
holders in dividend yields than
any other BISX-listed stock.

“Your bank,” Mr Donaldson
told more than 200 shareholders
at SuperClub Breezes for the
annual general meeting, “was
the only domestic financial insti-
tution in The Bahamas to
report an increase in profits in
2008.”

That profit, according to Ian
Jennings, Commonwealth
Bank’s senior vice-president
and chief financial officer, trans-
lated into unmatched share-
holder benefits. While the Dow
Jones was down 33.8 per cent in
2008, Mr Jennings said, and
BISX was down 17.25 per cent,
Commonwealth Bank reported
$0.31 in dividends and $0.44 in
earnings per share. At May 19,
2009, the bank’s shares were
giving a 5.76 per cent dividend
yield.

Mr Jennings said the bank’s
foundation was secure with
$211 million in share capital,
well above the $85 million
required by the Central Bank.
While loan loss provisions
increased, impaired loans were
well below the 6 per cent indus-
try average at 1.7 per cent. The
bank wrote off a total of $18.8
million in bad loans in 2008, but
amounts recovered from loan
write offs increased to $7.6 mil-
lion, giving a net write off
increase of only $2.2 million
higher than 2007.

“Impaired consumer loans —
that is, loans that have not been
paid in the last 90 days -- grew
industry wide from 3.7 per cent
to 5.1 per cent. Commonwealth
Bank fared very favourably by
comparison with only a slight
change, with impaired con-
sumer loans growing from 1.3
per cent to 1.4 per cent of our
portfolio,” Mr Jennings said.
An average loan portfolio bal-
ance of under $14,000 also
helped spread the risk, he not-
ed.

Mr Donaldson said the year’s
highlights included the “tremen-
dous success” of the Golden
Gates branch that opened in
2006, and was already self-sus-
taining, operating well ahead of
budget. The newest branch,
now rising on Prince Charles
Drive to serve the population
of eastern New Providence, is
slated to open by late autumn.
There are no plans for new
branches for 2010, Mr Donald-
son said, but $10 million is being
made available for small busi-
ness loans.

Noting the passing of long-
time director Franklyn Butler,
whom he called “a giant of a
man”, and the retirement of
senior vice-president Shirley
Cartwright after 22 years of ser-
vice, Mr Donaldson said the
bank’s 550 employees were to
be credited for its leading posi-
tion.

“They are the ones who deal
with customers all day, who
wear a smile on their faces, who
work tirelessly on behalf of your
bank. It is because of them and
because of our executive man-
agement team led by Bill Sands,
president, and our directors that
we can say Commonwealth
Bank is the largest Bahamian
bank, the largest company listed
on BISX and one of the largest
indigenous banks in the
Caribbean. It is because of them
that we can say we will weather
the storm. We will survive. And
we will continue to succeed,”
he added.

Shareholders, after reviewing
a comprehensive and transpar-
ent presentation of the Bank’s
2008 results and challenges for
the rest of 2009, did not raise a
single question and all directors
were returned to office.
PAGE 12B, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





OXFORD |
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SHOWN (I-r): Raymond Winder, managing partner, Deloitte & Touche; G. Diane Stewart, McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes, Andrew Jeffreys, OBG; Wendy
Warren, chief executive and executive director, Bahamas Financial Services Board; and John Wilson, McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes

Legal Notice

NOTICE

OPPORTUNE VICTORY LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BLUE WHATE LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 29th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

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CULTURAL WAR

The assimilation of two separate but equal communities



@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net





















































































he Bahamas is fighting a

"very serious cultural

war” with the Haitian

community, a well known

radio personality told
Insight last week.

His comment came after two sepa-
rate sets of e-mails were sent to the
column containing correspondence
between Bahamians who were “put
off”, to say the least, by several ges-
tures emanating from the Haitian com-
munity.

The first set of e-mails centred round
the recent Haitian Flag Day celebra-
tions held in the capital. Some in the
group felt that no nationality in the
Bahamas should collectively “celebrate
their flag” as it is a symbol of their
allegiance to a foreign state.

The second was of a discussion sur-
rounding an advertisement appearing
in a local publication that encouraged
Haitian-Bahamian women to register
for what was described as the “Miss
Port au Prince in the Bahamas”
pageant.

Generally, those who were con-
cerned about these two events won-
dered why people, who so desperately
wanted to belong to a country, would
insist on holding events that identified
them as another people with another
land.

“The concern is that they are not
trying to be Bahamian,” one person
told Insight.

We’re not too sure what this means
and certainly a discussion of what is
“Bahamian” can be so mired in pedan-
tic rhetoric and so subjective, that it
should be left for another time.

Certainly what is the offence, as far
as these Bahamians are concerned,
and what is perceived as a right, as far
as some Haitian-Bahamians are con-
cerned, is an expression of identity or
heritage or even origin.

So this begs the question....

“What does it take to be a Bahami-
an? Loyalty to our Bahamas over and
above all other; zeal for our Bahamas
unmatched by any other; concern for
other Bahamians over all others.” -
Sir Lynden Pindling - address at the
National Conference on Indepen-
dence, April 12, 1972.

Sir Lynden’s statement may just be
one man’s opinion but it’s hard to
argue with it if you believe that patri-
otism is an ideal worth having.

If you think being patriotic is an out-
moded philosophy or believe it more
convenient to assign “Bahamian-ness”
based on how recently one arrived in
the Bahamas, the usefulness of that
quote to advance the conversation and
the conversation itself should end here,
but we digress.

On page 38 of the May 11 edition of
The Punch, an advertisement read:
“Miss Port au Prince in The Bahamas
2009. We are proud to invite young
women with character, 17 - 28 years
old. ‘Mothers or not’, to vie for the
title of the 21st century. No sponsors
are needed.”

This advertisement led the origina-
tor of the e-mail discussion to ask:

SEE page 2B

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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



CULTURAL WAR: The assimilation of two separate but equal communities

FROM page 1B

“Are any of you concerned that
there is a group of people in the
Bahamas who are still so tied to
another country that they are
quite comfortable asking for and
probably receiving contestants
for the capital of Haiti?”
According to Jetta Baptiste, a

community activist and busi-
nesswoman, 60 per cent of
Bahamians living in the Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas
today are of Haitian heritage
and are ashamed to admit that
their parents, grandparents, or
great grandparents came from
Haiti.

“Over 60 per cent of Bahami-

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decent, therefore why not have
pride in the rich heritage of
Haiti and the heritage of the
Bahamas? What is so wrong
with embracing both heritages
and cultures?

“Many Bahamians are
ashamed to admit that their par-
ents, grandparents, or great
grandparents came from Haiti,
because all they can relate to is
the negative publicity and the
bad impressions that they see
or hear on the news. We must
accept and keep what is best in
both cultures and disregard the
bad things. We can improve the
world we live in by being toler-
ant. It is okay for us to disagree
and not like the same things,”
she said.

She blames most of the fear
Bahamians have over expres-
sions of Haitian culture on a fail-
ure to educate.

“We have so much in com-
mon, but we will never know if
we don’t just talk with each oth-
er. We need to embrace our dif-
ferences and make the Bahamas
a better unified country, where
we all can live in peace and har-
mony.

“Bahamians who have fore-
sight and adopt their Haitian
heritage will see that there is
nothing to be ashamed of. We
cannot change the past, but we
surely have control over what
we do in the future,” she said.

However, Minister Kevin
Harris, a DJ on 101.9 Joy FM
and owner of Harris Communi-
cations said a distinction must
be drawn between expressing
one’s culture and celebrating a
“flag day.”

“A flag is a very serious sym-
bol; it is a representation of a
country. The idea for those with-
in the Haitian community in the
Bahamas to celebrate their her-
itage is not a bad idea but you
cannot have two countries fight-
ing to be recognised in the same
land. You should not allow
another country to march in
your capital.

“This is a sovereign nation
and like any sovereign nation
you ought to reserve some
things for yourself. I think the
recognition of a national cele-
bration of independence should
be reserved for the Bahamas.
We should recognise and



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THE BAHAMAS is fighting a “very serious cultural war” with the Haitian
community, a well known radio personality told /nsight last week...

respect the culture of other peo-
ple but that should not be
placed above ours,” he said.

Mr Harris claims that the flag
day celebration is worrisome for
another reason.

“When one country is suc-
cessful in defeating another the
first thing that they do is remove
the flag of that country and
replace it with their flag to sym-
bolize that “we have conquered
this territory’. I think there are
concerns that this is a symbol
that a cultural war is taking
place. This may be an attempt
for the once sleeping giant to
show its numbers and its
strength,” he said.

However, Ms Batiste feels
that that there is “no need for a
cultural war” in the Bahamas,
if in fact one does exist.

“Tf none exists, then we don’t
need to create one either,” she
said.

However, she said what is
needed is for every citizen or
resident of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas to know what is
enshrined in the Constitution of
the Bahamas.

“Our constitution guarantees
that everyone has the right to
freedom of speech, movement,
religion, assembly, and so on
and so forth. Once one under-
stands that, then there should
be no debate on this issue. What
is wrong with a group of per-
sons parading with their flags in
the streets?

Would we be having this con-
versation if the flags were
American ones? I personally see
nothing wrong with Haitians cel-
ebrating their flag day in May.
Bahamians and Americans will
be celebrating their flag day in
July, Jamaicans will be cele-
brating their flag day in August,
so I don’t see a problem with
people showing that they are
proud of being who they are and
not afraid to show it,” Ms Bap-
tiste said.

Mr Harris disagrees with Ms
Baptiste on this point and says
there “is no one else doing this
same thing” in the Bahamas at
this time.

“No other culture in the
Bahamas is seeking to have this
kind of expression. The Cubans
aren't doing it, the Jamaicans
aren't doing it and the Chinese
aren't doing it,” he said.

Perhaps Haitians cannot help
themselves. Perhaps pride in
their heritage, history and
nationality is something bread
in them at birth.

“(Haitians) carry themselves
proudly and erect as if conscious
of their freedom and indepen-
dence.” — Frederick Douglass’
Delivered Speech on Haiti at
the World's Fair January 2,
1893.

In the case of the Ms Port au
Prince advertisement, it is easy
to be sympathetic to a young
woman of Haitian decent suf-
fering from the vexing delays
that many in her position face
after applying for citizenship
upon reaching 18. Persons like
her, may be unable to partici-
pate in a Miss Bahamas pageant
because she is technically not
Bahamian.

However, Mr Harris believes
the advertisement is indicative
of what he sees as a subversive
plan by some members of the
Haitian community to quietly
infiltrate and desensitize
Bahamians to an “invading” cul-
ture.

"I believe what you are seeing
is a multi-layered approach
towards testing the water for a
concerted and well organised
approach in putting out the
Haitian platform. I think you
have intelligent people out there
who are sympathetic to the
Haitian plight whose object it is
to try to bend Bahamian behav-
iour to accept a certain position.
I think that is morally unfair. I
don't think that I have to sus-
pend who I am to accept who
you are. It is not appropriate to
have this kind of event," he said.

At the end of the day there
simply may need to be more
understanding and sensitivity
among Bahamians for the plight
of Haitians living in the coun-
try.

“We need to be respectful,
tolerant, kind, compassionate,
merciful, fair, caring and con-
siderate towards each other as
we all came from the same
source, Mother Africa and
Adam and Eve. God created
Haitians as well. Many people
fail to appreciate that fact. Why
do you think God created
Haitians? I am sure it was not
to be abused and mistreated by
Bahamians,” Ms Baptiste said.

Anecdotally, relations
between the Bahamian and
Haitian community run hot and
cold depending on the social or
political circumstances under
which they meet.

You can always count on
immigration and the use of pub-
lic health and education
resources to get bloods boiling.

Nevertheless, the communi-
ties share common ground on
many levels.

Bahamians have shared not
only hospital and school rooms
with their Haitian brothers and
sisters, but bedrooms as well.
They go to clubs together, the
same churches and the same
public events.

Furthermore, there has never
been any violent clashes
between the two communities
to indicate the intention of one

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to eliminate the other.

It is this vexatious question
of origin that over complicates
things.

Those who choose to busy
themselves with nation building
will find an attempt to divide
and compartmentalize 300,000
people a counterintuitive effort.
The fewer people you have the
shallower the skills, experiences
and creativity.

Ms Baptiste puts it this way,
“For far too long, our leaders
have encouraged division
among our people for their own
personal agendas. But God the
Almighty’s first instruction to
mankind in the book of Genesis
was to be “fruitful and multi-
ply” — not divide or subtract.”

Whether this is what the
Almighty actually meant is up
for debate, but her point still
rings true.

“In entertainment, you find
many Bahamian men and
women going to the Haitian
clubs and restaurants to enjoy
the music and the food. This is
how many Haitian and Bahami-
ans are living in Freeport.

“From an employee/employer
point of view, the relations are
also good. Most Bahamian
employers prefer to work with
Haitian employees, because
these people are motivated and
they tend to get the job done
effectively and efficiently. Most
Bahamian employers would tell
you that they trust the Haitian
employees more than they trust
other Bahamians.

“So in a nutshell, I would say,
in Grand Bahama we are enjoy-
ing excellent relations with each
other. If this is not happening
nationwide, then maybe we
need to start and get the ball
rolling, and bridge the gaps that
exist through respect and edu-
cation. We all know how good
conch salad is, and in Freeport,
Grand Bahama we are all mixed
up just like conch salad,” Ms
Baptiste said.

The gradual unfolding of time
will reveal whether the Bahamas
is at the brink of a “cultural
war” or not. If we are, there are
certainly two things that will fuel
the battles to come: ignorance
and fear. Avoiding these hostil-
ities will require sincere efforts
to integrate and assimilate those
persons unfairly marginalized
by impractical laws that tend to
do nothing but frustrate a grow-
ing and increasingly influential
segment of our population.

But what of this “assault” on
Bahamian culture from the
Haitian community? Well, it can
only be considered an assault if
you see culture as a static thing
and in that case these islands
have been “assailed” by foreign
cultures since that legendary
Italian explorer set foot here in
1492. If we assimilate our Hait-
ian brothers and sisters and
make them feel more like
Bahamians of Haitian decent
and less like Haitians who feel
they should be Bahamian,
(Haitian-Bahamian) then Hait-
ian culture will be just another
thread in the complicated and
beautiful tapestry of all that is
“truly Bahamian.”

Both Ms Batiste and Mr Har-
ris can agree that there is a deep
need for assimilation.

“We all have a role to play in
this assimilation and integration
process. We need to start with
the media, and then have the
government, the schools and the
churches get involved in enhanc-
ing our country through educa-
tion.

But how will you reach the
majority of Haitians who are not
reading The Tribune or other
newspapers? We need a Hait-
ian-Bahamian Radio station to
fill that void. We need to reach
the Haitian community and
teach them about their rights,
our laws, our culture, our coun-
try, love and life,” she said.

However, Mr Harris points
out that there appears to be a
double standard among mem-
bers in the Haitian community.

"There is a complaint that I
feel unfairly treated but the jus-
tification of their expression of
anger is that they say ‘I will
gravitate to the Haitian flag. I
will place it on my car, in front
of my business, my home,
etcetera. The question is where
does your allegiance lie? If you
are applying and earnestly want
to be recognised as a citizen why
the need to do this?”

Remember, according to Sir
Lynden, and it's fair to assume
that as leader of the government
delegation he spoke for all per-
sons from his side, the require-
ments to be Bahamian are
embarrassingly simple: “Loyal-
ty to our Bahamas over and
above all other; zeal for our
Bahamas unmatched by any
other; concern for other
Bahamians over all others.”

It remains for those of us still
here on Earth to determine if
things have changed since April
12, 1972.

¢ What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail rmissick @tri-
bunemedia.net
PAGE 7C



THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST



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: ORLANDO Ankara, Turkey 75/23 46/7 pc 73/22 48/8 pc = ABACO ‘Today: E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
High:87° F/31° c et Mostly sunny, a At-storm in spots in Mostly sunny and Mostly sunny, a Partly sunny. Some sun with a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 89/31 72/22 s 86/30 72/22 s Tuesday: Eat 15-25 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 91°F
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2 a iy ? CsA Ua Beijing 83/31 61/16 s 88/31 61/6 s
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ae @ é : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 9:31pm. 33 3:00pm. -0.2 ean 78/95 59/15 s 87/30 59/15 t
a | = 24pm. 33 3:54pm. -0. Bogota 66/18 47/8 sh 66/18 45/7 sh
J oe e Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Wednesday!053 am. 27 450am. 02 Brussels 81/27 58/14 s 6015 415 r
L = ABACO Temperature 11:19pm. 3.2 4:50pm. -0.2 Budapest 83/28 55/12 s 85/29 60/15 s
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— Low: 72° F/22°C S Precipitation Sunrise. ..... 6:22am. Moonrise.....7:11am. — Casablanca 72/22 56/13 s 78/25 64/17 s aoe
Sunset 7:52 M i 9:34
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& . FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT 3% Year to date : First Full Last New Dublin 61/16 46/7 sh 5713 45/7 pc
High: 86° F/30° C @ High: 84° F/29° C Normal year to date 0... 10.83" a a 2 Frankfurt 87/30 69/20 s 83/28 53/11 t
Low: 74° F/23°C A, Low: 74° F/23°C [. iP: Geneva 83/28 60/15 pc 63/17 52/11 t
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Low: 74° F/23° C Lew: 75°F/24°C Munich 83/28 58/14 s 70/21 51/10 t
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High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W ae High: 87° F/31°C San Juan 76/24 43/6 s 62/16 43/6 c !
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Anchorage 66/18 49/9 s 68/20 48/8 pc Jacksonville 83/28 67/19 t 84/28 69/20 t Phoenix 97/36 73/22 s 97/36 73/22 s CROOKED ISLAND A ACKLINS Santo Domingo 85/29 73/22 sh 84/28 73/22 sh ; ‘
Atlanta 80/26 66/18 t 81/27 66/18 t Kansas City 75/23 6246 t 75/23 61/16 t Pittsburgh 76/24 5713 c 70/21 57/13 t RAGGEDISLAND — Migh:91°F/33°¢ - _ ane ar s cre ore sh :
Atlantic City 74/23 56413 t 6116 5442 +r Las Vegas 95/35 6719 s 96/35 73/22 s Portland,OR 74/23 5341 s 74/21 53/11 pc Hight eeFarec |= LOW 77° Fi25°C — Sea SEE aerator ag ens.
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Boston 73/22 48/8 s 60/15 48/8 pc Los Angeles 74/23 58/14 pe 74/23 60/15 p St. Louis 74/23 66/18 t 79/26 66/18 t . "lll is a ae 79/26 73/09 Fs 79/96 72/29 i
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Charleston, SC 81/27 68/20 t 82/27 67/119 t Memphis 82/27 69/20 t 82/27 69/20 t San Antonio 94/34 71/21 pe 92/83 72/22 s High: 89° F/32°C TEGO 67/19 49/9 pe 62/16 54/12 pe (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Chicago 67/19 52/11 ¢ 70/21 54412 t Miami 88/31 74/23 t 87/30 75/23 t San Diego 67/19 60/15 pce 67/19 62/16 pc ane 5 va: . ;
: . : Low: 79° F/26° C Trinidad 85/29 66/18 sh 87/30 67/19 sh "ile
Cleveland 70/21 5442 pe 71/21 58/14 t Minneapolis 74/23 55/412 pe 70/21 542 t San Francisco 67/19 52/11 pce 69/20 53/11 pce Vemoanai 67419 51/10 pc 63/17 51/10 pc j ~ Hew Provid Coord Behe: Abaco Fleutharg
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Honolulu 84/28 73/22 pc 86/380 73/22 pc Oklahoma City 83/28 64/17 t 84/28 63/17 t Tucson 93/33 66/18 s 91/32 65/18 s ee 7 SS ———
Houston 91/32 71/21 t 90/32 71/21 pc Orlando 87/30 71/21 t 88/31 69/20 t Washington, DC 78/25 62/16 t 67/19 6246 r+ Nhe


PAGE 8C, MONDAY, MAY 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



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INSIGHT



Atlantis and crew land
after Hubble mission

@ By JOHN ANTCZAK
Associated Press Writer

EDWARDS AIR FORCE
BASE, Calif. (AP) — Space
shuttle Atlantis brought its crew
of seven astronauts safely back
to Earth on Sunday after thun-
derstorms in Florida forced a
detour to sunsplashed Califor-
nia, ending a 13-day mission
that repaired and enhanced the
Hubble Space Telescope.

“Now and only now can we
declare this mission a total suc-
cess — the astronauts are safe-
ly on the ground,” NASA sci-
ences chief Ed Weiler told a
Florida press conference.

Atlantis’ crew had waited
since Friday for the go-ahead
to land as Mission Control
hoped to avoid the time and
expense — about $1.8 million
— of diverting to California’s
Edwards Air Force Base.

The Florida weather refused
to yield and Mission Control
finally directed shuttle com-
mander Scott Altman to head
to California. The shuttle’s twin
sonic booms rocked the Mojave
Desert as it swooped out of a
dazzling morning sky.

Out on the runway after
landing, Altman reflected on
how long it had taken to get
their mission under way — and
then to end it.

“When we got down to Flori-
da I looked at everybody and
said, ’At last,”’ Altman said. “I
didn’t realize it was going to be
so hard to get back to the Earth
in the end. So again I guess I
say the same thing, at last we’re
back on the ground.”

It was the 53rd shuttle land-
ing at Edwards; the last one was
in November.

The crew finally set foot on
the ground about two hours
after touchdown, receiving
greetings from ground person-
nel before they began the cus-
tomary walkaround to inspect
the exterior of their spacecraft.
It was uncertain whether the
crew would return to their
Houston homes later Sunday
or on Monday.

NASA officials said it will
take about a week to prepare



THE SPACE shuttle Atlantis comes in for a landing Sunday at the NASA
Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base, California, at the
conclusion of mission STS-125 to repair the Hubble space telescope...

(AP Photo: Reed Saxon)

Atlantis for its ferry flight back
to Kennedy Space Center atop
a NASA Boeing 747.

During five spacewalks, the
astronauts gave the 19-year-old
Hubble new science instru-
ments, pointing devices and
batteries, and fixed broken
instruments. The astronauts
overcame stuck bolts and other
difficulties.

The work will add years to
the life of the telescope and its
study of the universe.

Initial checkouts of the
repaired Hubble were going
well, Weiler said. He noted that
the telescope had yet to see any
starlight but he said he expect-
ed it to gather data by August.

Much was made of Atlantis’
departure from Hubble as the
last time it will be touched by
humans, and Weiler acknowl-
edged that was an “emotional
moment.” But he wanted noth-
ing to do with sad thoughts.

“Geez!” he exclaimed. “We
just repaired the Hubble Space
Telescope. We got a new tele-
scope, four new instruments,
two of them dead now alive.
We've got another five, six, sev-
en, eight years with the new
telescope. These are truly the
best of times not the worst of
times.”

NASA eventually expects to
steer Hubble into the Pacific
sometime in the early 2020s
using a robotic vehicle, though
it’s possible that might be done
with a crewed vehicle, NASA’s
new Orion.

The astronauts brought back
Hubble’s old wide-field camera
they pulled out, so it can be dis-
played at the Smithsonian Insti-
tution. The replacement cam-
era and other new instruments
will enable Hubble to peer
deeper into the universe.

The $1 billion repair mission
almost didn’t happen. It was
canceled in 2004, a year after
the Columbia tragedy, because
of the dangers of flying into a
350-mile-high orbit that did not
offer any shelter in case
Atlantis suffered damage from
launch debris or space junk.
The public protest was intense,
and NASA reinstated the flight
after developing a rescue plan
and shuttle repair kits.

Shuttle Endeavour was on
standby for a possible rescue
mission until late last week,
after inspections found
Atlantis’ thermal shielding to
be solid for re-entry. Endeav-
our now will be prepped for a
June flight to the international
space station.





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