Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Mim blowin’ it

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The Tribune

up all night!

MeDonald’s downtown
drive-thru is now open

24 hours

HIGH
LOW

CLOUDY WITH

copy ESTORM

Volume: 105 No.149

Team Bahamas

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SEE SPORTS ON PAGES NINE AND TEN



=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009

PLP chairman faces
convention challenge

Claim that
position will
be contested
along with
the deputy
leader post

AS THE
furore sur-
rounding the
PLP’ s
upcoming
national con-
vention con-
tinues to
build,
sources with-
in the party
suggest that



not only will Glenys
the post of Yanna-Martin
deputy

leader be contested, but also
that of National Chairman.

According to sources within
the party, there is a growing
dislike, “or at the very least
displeasure” with the current
chairman Glenys Hanna-Mar-
tin, who has been busy
reopening and revitalising
branches over the past few
months.

As the daughter of Gover-
nor General Arthur Hanna,
Mrs Hanna-Martin is a life-
long member of the PLP, and
has substantial influence with
its stalwart councillors. How-
ever, it is believed that her
influence throughout the
branches in New Providence is
where would-be challengers
might make a play to under-
mine her authority and make
their presence known.

Slated for October 18th, the
PLP’s convention is being
billed as the staging ground
for the greatest political
“bloodbath” that this country
has seen in the last few years.

With nearly eight candidates
reportedly vying for the post
of deputy leader, this position
is being seen by party insid-
ers as the ultimate “stepping
stone” to the all powerful
position of leader of the party.

Among those slated to con-
test this position are PLP MP
for Cat Island and San Sal-
vador Philip Davis, PLP MP
for Fort Charlotte Alfred
Sears, Senator Jerome Fitzger-
ald, lawyer Paul Moss, and the
party’s MP for West End and
Bimini Obie Wilchcombe.

One of the party’s up and
coming figures, South Andros
MP Picewell Forbes has also

SEE page six

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

Fridays & Saturdays



ENS



Bahamians
‘should be
pleased’ with
bail ruling



GRADE ONE students of Sandilands Primary School give flowers to Mrs Stehanie McDonald yesterday. Mrs McDonald was honoured at
Fox Hill Community Centre for her 45 years of dedicated service to teaching.

Police urge businesses to

band together to fight crime

m@ By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

BUSINESS owners and
employees are being told to
fight back against criminals
by banding together under
the new Business Crime
Watch initiative being
launched by police.

Speaking to business rep-
resentatives in the
Dowdeswell Street area of
the Central Division yester-
day, police encouraged pro-
fessionals to pool their
resources to install mutually
beneficial CCTV cameras
and share information to dri-
ve criminals out of the area.

Business representatives
told police about crime in
the area, including frequent
armed robberies, a continu-

New initiative
is launched

ing problem of prostitutes
touting for business, trou-
blesome vagrants occupying
abandoned houses, and
unsanitary streets.

One businessman told
police he had been robbed
at gunpoint six times over
the last year, and in the last
instance $20,000 worth of
goods were stolen.

Another said: “People are
sleeping in the doorways of
these old buildings and hav-
ing sex in them during the
day time, but not only that,
when I come to work some-
times in the morning there
are used condoms on the
steps.

SEE page six



e SEE PAGE TWO

Hotel union elections
have been postponed
until further notice

BAHAMAS Hotel Cater-
ing and Allied Workers
Union President Roy Cole-
brook has announced that
the elections scheduled for
Tuesday, May 26, have been
postponed until further
notice.

In the press statement
issued from the office of
Commercial Law Advocates,
Mr Colebrook said that
because of the refusal of the
Registrar of Trade Unions to
indicate that he will super-
vise and certify the election
of officers and members of
the executive council of the
union on Wednesday, May
27, “the said elections and
the triennial general meeting
of the general membership,
scheduled for Tuesday, May
26, is now postponed until
further notice of the execu-
tive council following the

decision of Justice Jon Isaacs
in the matter current before
him.”

On Thursday, First Vice
President of the (BHCAWU)
Kirk Wilson, secured a
Supreme Court order to pro-
hibit Labour Minister Dion
Foulkes and the Registrar of
Trade Unions from supervis-
ing or certifying the union’s
elections scheduled for the
end of this month.

This order, which was
handed down by Justice
Isaacs rules that the union’s
executive team and the Min-
ister are free to challenge it.

According to reports from
the union’s executive, its
president Roy Colebrook,
Treasurer Basil McKenzie
and General Secretary Leo
Douglas did not go through
the proper channels to sched-
ule the election dates.



NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



Bar President
Says it was
wrong for
parliament to
try to take
responsibility
from judiciary

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@
tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIANS should
be pleased that the Court
of Appeal has ruled that
people accused of mur-
der or other serious
crimes cannot be denied
bail without considera-
tion of their constitution-
al rights, the President of
the Bar Association said.

Wayne Munroe said it
was wrong for parliament
ever to have tried to take
from within the responsi-
bility of the judiciary the
right to determine
whether or not an
accused person should or
should not be let free.

“Bahamian people
should be very happy
that no Bahamian can be
locked up on the say-so
of the executive (branch
of the government) with-
out a judge being able to
scrutinise the case and
determine whether you
should be in custody or
not.

SEE page six



MEMORIAL SERVICE
FOR EXPAT
BUSINESSMAN

MINISTRY IS SET
TO LAUNCH A
‘WORLD-FIRST’
TOURISM CONCEPT



PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

MEMORIAL
IASI

Photos by TIM CLARKE

ROB Thomas shared fond memories of his friend Hywel Jones and their 22 trips to Jamaica. A celebration in honour of the life of the late expatri-
ate businessman Hywel Jones was held yesterday at the New Providence Community Centre. Mr Jones became the year’s 26th murder victim when
he died at the Princess Margaret Hospital from injuries he received when he was shot by an unknown assailant more than three weeks ago. A banker
by profession, who lived in the Bahamas for more than 20 years, Mr Jones was just 55.

LONGTIME friend of Hywel Jones, Keith Knox, spoke about why Hywel
Jones was such an extraordinary friend.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

MRS Stephanie McDonald speaks at her honourary service yesterday, where Sandilands primary teachers,
students and special guests honoured her for 45 years of dedicated service to teaching.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
le AO icy
Ue Pa ay
322-2197

TARO aera pe

Useyiaargeres
liss Unt





THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



PMH metlical ant

© In bri ! a Ministry is set to launch a
‘world-first tourism concept

surgical clinics to
Close for three days

MEDICAL and surgical clin-
ics at the Princess Nearer’ 2
Hospital will be closed for three
days while University of the i
West Indies medical students }
to sit their final exams. i

The clinic will be closed to }
the public on Thursday May 28, }
Tuesday June 2, and Thursday }
June 4. 7

Anyone who has an appoint-
ment scheduled for these dates i
should contact the clinic on }
322-2861. :

PMH authorities apologise }
for any inconvenience this may
cause. i

Florida-based
airline fined $1.3m

m@ WASHINGTON

FEDERAL regulators
fined a Florida-based
regional airline $1.3 million
for overworking its pilots
and dispatchers, according
to Associated Press.

The Federal Aviation
Administration said Thurs-
day that Gulfstream Inter-
national Airlines of Fort
Lauderdale violated regula-
tions on how many hours
puots and dispatchers can
work and improperly main-
tained equipment.

FAA spokeswoman Lau-
ra Brown said an investiga-
tion last summer found
instances in 2007 and 2008
in which flight crews were
not provided a minimum of
eight hours rest in a 24-hour
period and in which they
flew more than 34 hours in a
seven-day period.

Brown said FAA also ;
found 148 instances in which :
flight dispatchers worked ;
more than 10-straight
hours, the maximum permit-
ted under federal regula-
tions.

The fine came on the
heels of hearings last week
by the National Transporta-
tion Safety Board into the
crash of a regional airliner
near Buffalo, N.Y., in Feb-
ruary.

The captain of that plane,
Marvin Renslow, received
his pilot training from Gulf- }
stream Training Academy of :
Fort Lauderdale, which is ;
run by Gulfstream Interna-
tional Airlines.

The Buffalo flight was
operated by another region-
al airline, Colgan Air Inc. of
Manassas, Va., for Conti-
nental Airlines. Gulfstream
airlines’ Web site says it
also operates flights for
Continental.

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribumemedia.net

THE Ministry of Tourism is set to
launch a “world-first” tourism concept
within the next week, in the expecta-
tion that the “all-inclusive island”
offering will encourage a better spread
of visitors’ dollars throughout the local
economy and a more diverse range of
experiences for holiday-makers.

An initial May 15 deadline to start
selling the all-inclusive “Club Grand
Bahama” package holidays was nar-
rowly missed as the ministry finalised
arrangements with a local Bahamian
company to create a special debit-type
card intended to smooth the pre-paid
experience for participants.

The “Club Grand Bahama” card,

‘Club Grand Bahama’ card intended

replacing an originally envisioned
coupon system, will allow holiday-
makers to access the accommodation,
meals and other experiences which will
be available to them in Grand Bahama
as part of their silver, gold or platinum
holiday pre-paid package without ever
having to resort to their wallets.

It is made by Transfer Solutions
Providers Limited, the same compa-
ny which created the rechargeable
“Mango card” currently in use in the
public bus system to reduce the use
and storage of cash on public buses.

“The company showed an under-

to smooth pre-paid experience

standing of the programme and pro-
ceeded to develop a customised ver-
sion of their card for us.

“We wanted to ensure we didn’t use
a system which was not desirable and
not convenient,” said David Johnson,
deputy director general at the Min-
istry of Tourism.

Among the hotel properties featured
the Club Grand Bahama all-inclusive
packages, which will be promoted by
the ministry alongside its regular holi-
day options, are the two Our Lucaya
hotels, Flamingo Bay and Pelican Bay.

Various Grand Bahama restaurants,

from cafes to gourmet dining experi-
ences, have also gotten in on the deal,
and will be available to tourists across
the three-tiered programme.

Minister of Tourism Vincent Van-
derpool Wallace said: “What’s very
important to understand about this
effort is that it’s an innovation which
we hope will be the future of ensuring
that visitor expenditure and experi-
ence are distributed far more broadly.

“We don’t expect it to take off like a
rocket; we think it will grow very slow-
ly in the beginning and then much
more quickly when we iron the kinks
out.”

In the long term, the ministry
expects that based on its success, the
all-inclusive programme might be
expanded to New Providence and the
Family Islands.

Help for the unemployed through national campaign

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -— Carry Your
Candle Light the Bahamas has
teamed up with the Grand
Affair Island Women’s Con-
ference to help six unemployed
persons as part of a nationwide
campaign to encourage acts of
love and kindness.

CYCLTB founder Patrice
Stubbs and committee mem-
bers Diane Wildgoose and
Rehuder Rolle came to the aid
of two unemployed women
this week, presenting Rochelle
Johnson with a cheque to cov-
er her electricity bill and Bren-
da Lee Thompson with gro-
ceries.

Dr Wanda Davis-Turner of
the GAIWC has pledged to
collect donations for four
unemployed women every
night of the conference, which
began Wednesday at the St
John’s Jubilee Cathedral.

Dr Turner has also agreed
to allow the women to attend
the conference and Saturday’s
Byron Cage Concert for free.

“I think the CYCLTB ini-
tiative is phenomenal... I am
so glad that the conference is
joining in doing what we can to
say to women who are unem-
ployed that we love you and
support you,” she said.

Dr Turner said: “It is not
how much but it is what you



FROM LEFT: donation recipients Brenda Lee Thompson and Rochelle Johnson; CYCLTB committee member
Andrew Moss, CYCLTB founder Patrice Stubbs, committee member Maureen Sands, Dr Wanda Davis-Turner
and Anastacia Lewis of the GAIWC; and committee members Diane Wildgoose and Rehuder Rolle.

do to make the difference in
someone’s life who may be
thinking about committing sui-
cide.

“When the hopeless feel that
they’re noticed and their needs
are being met then they know
that God sees them and cares
for them through people. And
this is how we can be God’s
eyes, hands, feet, and legs — by
taking this opportunity to help
someone.”

The conference, which is
being held under the theme,
‘Turning Scars into Stars,’ is
billed as an effort to reach out
to all women, especially those
who are “unemployed, heart-
broken and abused”.

25-year prison sentence
upheld by Court of Appeal

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE COURT of Appeal
has upheld the 25-year
prison sentence of a man
convicted of attempting to
murder his cousin in 2007.

Shawn Culmer had
appealed his conviction of
the December 2005 attempt-
ed murder of his cousin,
Leander Culmer. The vic-
tim, who is now paralyzed
from the waist down as a
result of gunshot injuries,
was a key prosecution wit-
ness in the trial of Angelo
Brennen alias “Nasty.”

Culmer was shot two
months after testifying at
the trial. Brennen was con-
victed on November 3, 2005,
of the murder of his former
girlfriend Alfreda Pinder,
34, and the attempted mur-
der of her daughter,
Calvonya Grant, 16, on
October 29, 2004. Brennen
was given the mandatory
death penalty, which was
later commuted to life
imprisonment due to a sub-
sequent ruling by the Privy

Council declaring the
mandatory death penalty
unconstitutional.

In the ruling of Justices
Emmanuel Osadebay, Hart-
man Longley and Christo-
pher Blackman, which was
handed down Thursday, the
court noted that the primary
issue for determination on
the appeal was the identifi-
cation of the appellant by
Leander Culmer and his
brother, Ricardo. At the tri-
al before Justice Jon Isaacs,
the brothers identified
Shawn Culmer as the man

who had entered their home
around 5 am on December
20, 2005, and shot Leander.
According to their evidence,
Culmer who was masked
entered through a window
and fired a shot, which
struck Leander in his leg. A
struggle followed between
the gunman and Leander,
resulting in Leander being
shot a second time. Leander
fell backwards onto a bed
but was able to remove the
intruder’s mask and realized
that it was his cousin,
Shawn. The intruder placed
the gun to Leander’s head
and attempted to fire, how-
ever, ran off when the gun
failed to discharge. Ricardo

Galleria

HR FR Rw

testified that he gave chase
with a cutlass and was also
able to identify the gunman
as Shawn Culmer during the
pursuit.

The accused, under oath,
however, testified that he
was at home in bed at the
time of the incident until
about 7.30 that morning.
The Justices in their ruling
stated that in view of their
conclusions on the issue of
identification, along with the
evidence of the case, they
did not consider the origi-
nal verdict either “unsafe or
unsatisfactory.”

The court dismissed the
appeal and affirmed the
conviction.

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“We've been having an
incredible time and we expect
amighty move of God that will
impact the social needs of this
nation, especially as it relates
to women,” Dr Turner said.

CYCLTB founder Mrs
Stubbs commended Dr Turner



and conference organisers for
“lighting their candle of love”.
She expects to launch a
CYCLTB initiative in New
Providence next weekend.
“We are looking at working
with (talk show host) Steve
McKinney in holding a press

conference and shooting a tele-
vision show to launch it in Nas-
sau,” she said.

Mrs Stubbs said that since
the programme was officially
launched on May 1 in Freeport,
several families have been
assisted with rent, groceries,
and utility and medical bills.

“The global economic dilem-
ma we find ourselves in and its
affect on the Bahamian peo-
ple, as well as the level of crime
in this country are the main
reasons why this initiative was
started,” she said.

“We have a lot of people in
our nation who feel hopeless
and are contemplating suicide,
and whose cupboards are bare,
and others who are oblivious to
what is going on.

“Our aim is to invite every
person living in this Bahamas
to find one unemployed per-
son and do something: help
with rent, mortgage, electricity,
babysitting, however they can
assist,” she said, adding that
the campaign will run for a
year.

SHARING LOVE’S MESSAGE.
SUPPORT THE

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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009

THE: TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Obama debating Cheney 1s plus for GOP

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — In political debate,
the side that keeps its arguments simple and
repeats them again and again is likely to gain the
advantage. It is an easier sale, especially when the
topic is as scary as terrorism.

That's how Republicans got the edge in the
dispute over President Barack Obama's planned
closing of the Guantanamo Bay prison. And it put
former Vice President Dick Cheney on a separate
but almost equal platform with the president of
the United States, which is a plus any time the
party out of power can manage it.

Their back-to-back speeches on Thursday
gave Cheney "a lot of credibility” and put Obama
on the defensive, said Republican pollster David
Winston.

"From a political standpoint, I think Cheney
wins on points," said GOP strategist Rich Galen.
Long-term, the former vice president's premier
role may have a downside for the Republicans,
given his 25 per cent approval rating and his sta-
tus as the most unpopular top figure in an unpop-
ular administration. But Galen said that at this
point, "It's either Cheney or who else. There's no
who else, so you take Cheney.”

In the Guantanamo argument,Obama’s critics
didn't worry about legalities, court decisions or
complexities. They invented an argument about
letting terrorists move next door to Americans.

Although no one had ever suggested such a
thing, it worked, and the Democratic Senate vot-
ed overwhelmingly to deny Obama an $80 million
appropriation to close the prison camp by eight
months from now, as he had promised. Now
Democratic leaders are saying that if Obama will
come up with a plan on what to do with the pris-
oners — there are about 240 of them — they
might agree.

He said he's working on it, but it isn't easy. If
it were, the place might already have been shut,
since former President George W. Bush said that
he wanted to close it but 2008 wasn't the right
time.

"We're cleaning up something that is, quite
simply, a mess," Obama said. He said the prison
Bush ordered opened in 2002 has left prisoners in
legal limbo, flooded the government with legal
challenges and distracted officials who should be
spending their time dealing with potential threats.

"There are no neat and easy answers here,” he
said. "I wish there were."

He said the issues are too complicated for
absolutes or rigid ideology. So instead of scrap-
ping everything the Bush administration did, he
is adapting some of it, notably the use of military
commissions to try terrorist suspects, to bring
them "in line with the rule of law."

To which Cheney, in his own terrorism speech
minutes after Obama's, said there's no place "for
some kind of middle ground" on the issue. " ...
Half measures keep you half exposed,” he said.
"You cannot keep just some nuclear-armed ter-
rorists out of the United States, you must keep
every nuclear-armed terrorist out.”

There's no disputing that. But conjuring nuclear
terrorists serves his argument that it is all or noth-
ing, with no room for "sensible compromise" or
"splitting differences," in Cheney's words.

Don't Miss This Year's 5 |

Pa 7 AY
@ The Public Cove Beach’)

Back of Atlantis

July 4, 2009 - American Independance
July 10, 2009 - Bahamian Independence
November 26, 200 - Thanksgiving

The Public Is Invited

10am - Until

Tel. 325-6306/636-0726

For more info contact Paul Rolle
All patriotic Bahamians join us to secure the
beaches for the future generation.
Please come show your support.

Our appreciation goes oul to Atlantis

for the signs on Cove Beach

Even debating the issues is wrong in Cheney's
view. "The terrorists see just what they were hop-
ing for — our unity gone, our resolve shaken,
our leaders distracted," he said.

And not only over Guantanamo, but also over
the interrogation tactics Cheney calls enhanced
and Obama calls torture.

"Torture was never permitted," Cheney
repeated. But waterboarding and other methods
certainly sound torturous. Cheney dismissed that
issue as "contrived indignation and phony mor-
alizing.” He also said that hard-line questioning
produced information that "prevented the violent
death of thousands, if not hundreds of thousands,
of innocent people."

No proof, but he said that is because it's in clas-
sified memos Obama hasn't released. That is
said to be under review. Still, in an information
sieve like Washington, it is hard to conceive that
information involving hundreds of thousands of
lives saved would not have been leaked by now.

Cheney argues that closing Guantanamo will
make America less safe, and that in promising to
do it, Obama and his allies are trying to cozy up
to European opinion. Cheney's administration
wanted it shut at some point, and so did Sen.
John McCain, the Republican presidential nom-
inee who now says it can't be done without a
plan on what to do with the inmates.

It was, as Obama said, opened without a plan
on what to do with the prisoners except lock
them up. Bush did it by presidential order; there
was no discussion or legislation involved, and in
2006 the Supreme Court overruled the system
by which the administration planned to try pris-
oners. At one point, Guantanamo held up to 750
inmates. The new president noted that more than
525 prisoners were released under the Bush
administration, before he took office and ordered
the place closed.

"Rather than keeping us safer, the prison at
Guantanamo has weakened American national
security," Obama said. "It is a rallying cry for
our enemies. It sets back the willingness of our
allies to work with us in fighting an enemy that
operates in scores of countries.”

That's complicated. Republicans are still keep-
ing it simple.

"Guantanamo has worked very well," said
Sen. Mitch McConnell, the GOP leader. "I'm
not sure this is broken and needs fixing.”

And certainly not if it will mean bringing pris-
oners to the United States to be tried and impris-
oned if convicted.

"Republicans oppose releasing these terrorists
or importing them into our local communities,”
said Rep. John Boehner, the House Republican
leader.

Obviously, but nobody has proposed either.

Obama said trying to scare people won't pro-
tect them. "And we will be ill-served by some of
the fear-mongering that emerges whenever we
discuss this issue."

But for the present, it serves the political pur-
poses of his opponents.

(This article was written by Walter R. Mears,
AP Special Correspondent)



Our inadequately
maintained storm
drainage systems

EDITOR, The Tribune.

AS WE await the start of
the 2009 Atlantic hurricane
season in two weeks time, I
couldn't help but notice the
considerable flooding that
resulted today from a mere
two inches of rainfall. At cer-
tain locations on East and
West Bay Streets, downtown
and in the Dowdeswell Street
area it was almost knee deep
for a while, glaringly high-
lighting Nassau's inadequate-
ly maintained storm drain sys-
tems.

These are generally so
choked with soil, weeds, rub-
bish or a combination of all
of the above as to be totally
incapable of performing their
intended function. In the Fort
Charlotte area for example,

Praising —
PMH for my
treatment

EDITOR, The Tribune.

LAST evening I watcheda
film on NBC produced by Far-
rah Fawcett and filmed by i
Alana Stewart in which Far-
rah’s battle with anal cancer
was documented for two
years, through all her treat-
ments in LA and Germany,

(at enormous expense), her
pain and her high hope for
recovery which now unfortu-
nately is not to be.

I was diagnosed with the
same cancer at approximately
the same time and my last CT
scan performed two weeks ago
showed that Iam still cancer-
free. I was treated with
surgery, chemo and radiation
all right here at PMH and the
Cancer Centre on Collins :
Avenue. I cannot speak highly i
enough of Dr Locksley i
Munroe, my surgeon, Drs Tra-
cy Roberts, Theodore Turn-
quest and Duvaughn Curling,
my oncologists, Dr Margo
Munroe, my radiation oncolo-
gist and all those unsung
heroes, the nurses of PMH, in
particular those in the oncolo-
gy clinic where I was treated
as a public patient.

PMH comes in for a lot of
criticism, but I could not have
been treated better anywhere
in the world. Had Farrah Faw-
cetthad my team behindher
who knows if she would have
had a different outcome?

I will be eternally grateful.

A SURVIVOR
Nassau,
May 18, 2009.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, MICHAEL WAYDE BROWN of
Avocado Gardens, Carmichael Roadin the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence one of the Islands of Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, intends to change my name to MICHAEL WAYDE
TURNQUEST. If there are any objections to this change of name
by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ROSNELL JOSEPH of MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, GENERAL DELIVERY is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,

for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written

and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 23rd day of MAY 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE



NOTICE is hereby given that PAUL ISAACS of CASSIA
CL, GLENISTON GARDENS, P.O. BOX SS-6345, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and

Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why

registration/naturalization should not be granted, should



send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 23 day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



the street sweepers “sweep”
the debris from the road verge
almost daily but not one of
them bothers to lift the inspec-
tion plates in the sidewalk, let
alone clean out the drainage
channels below, that are
meant to channel the water
from the street into the
drainage swale.

The result is traffic conges-
tion, further erosion of our
already dreadful roads, and
stagnant standing water espe-
cially in low lying areas, caus-
ing damage to properties, ill-
ness from water supplies con-
taminated by overflowing sew-

erage systems and invariably,
a severe island wide mosquito
problem.

The government, God bless
them, continues the struggle
to upgrade the condition of
the roads and verges, clean up
our filthy island and educate
our slovenly people about the
consequences indiscriminate
littering and dumping has on
our tourism industry and our
own lives. Let's have the rele-
vant department heads out
there giving some direction to
their staff, instead of hiding
behind their suits, so the job
gets properly done in a timely
fashion and we all get what
we're hoping and paying for.

IAN MABON
Nassau,
May 19, 2009

Unemployment
cheque issues at NIB

EDITOR, The Tribune.

TODAY (May Sth) a friend and I went over to National
Insurance to collect an unemployment cheque (since this person
is disabled, and filled all necessary documents, and was told that
every detail, including mention of disability, was correct) and
was declined. For weeks and month it was advertised that per-
sons can collect monies, if unemployed prior to 2004, made all
necessary contributions to NIB, not self-employed, under 65,
excluding disability and survivor’s benefits.

Now when we got there the person was told that they cannot
receive monies, bear in mind that this person became disabled
on the job (had been working over Paradise Island for almost 30
years, and just got made redundant after getting a stroke in 2005)
and continued on until 2006, which an employment letter was
given to verify these statements. What is my concern for my
friend is why they were denied the claim and have made con-
tributions as an employed person over many years and still

could not claim.

Strangely, the person/s who were stationed at the school
were the same person/s actually verifying or denying the claims,
even though my friend put on the application that they are
receiving a cheque for disability, and are still capable of move-
ment and willing to do minimal work, can an explanation be giv-

en for this?

The Prime Minister, who also has NIB in his portfolio, said the
most claims can be honoured, so what will become of this,
since this person has contributed to this fund up to 2006?

Thanks for the space, and hope that someone knowledgeable

can throw light on this matter.

R PRATT
Nassau,
May 5, 2009.

Flamingo affair prompts
airspace concern

EDITOR, The Tribune.

With my “pet project” - accord-
ing to a very prominent individual
- being the creation of a Bahamian
Flight Information Region (FIR),
a recent newspaper article refo-
cused my attention on the matter.

In a Nassau Guardian report of
Tuesday May 12, 2009 (“Slain
HMBS Flamingo Crew Members
Remembered”), Minister of Edu-
cation Carl Bethel, paying homage
to the four “patriotic” marines who
died after Cuban MIGs attacked
the Flamingo off the Ragged
Island chain on May 10, 1980, said,
inter alia, “It is now for us to etch
them in our recollection...”

With the RBDF falling within
the portfolio of the Ministry of
National Security, the rationale for
the Education minister giving the
eulogy is somewhat difficult to
appreciate.

In any event, as documented in
Anthony Thompson’s excellent
and recently updated “An Eco-
nomic History of The Bahamas”,
following this Act of War, “The
Cuban government paid $5 mil-
lion in compensation for the sink-
ing of HMBS Flamingo. The par-
ents of each dead marine received
a total of $400,000 paid by the
Cuban Government for the four
families.”

Despite the passage of 29 years
since the tragic incident occurred -
and just seven years after Bahami-
an independence, it is still not

absolutely clear what triggered the
Cuban MIG attack. The deadly
airstrike, during which Duncan
Town was also buzzed, took place
within Bahamian sovereign air-
space that, since 1952 up to the
present, is included within the
Cuban FIR. Similar to Bimini -
which, located only about 50 miles
from the US mainland and which is
actually included within US air-
space - the Ragged Islands area
about 60 miles from the Cuban
north coast.

Without sounding unduly
alarmist, a “clear and present dan-
ger” may exist off the southern
Andros coastline, where, it is
understood, members of the
Bahamas uniformed forces flying
missions in US Black Hawk heli-
copters must strictly adhere to
Cuban protocol for flight authori-
sation in the area.

“Man, we in Bahamian air-
space” should definitely not be the
rationale for failing to alert Cuban
aviation authorities of flight activ-
ities, less, God forbid, itchy trig-
ger fingers once again create hav-
oc and loss of life.

Although Cuba was suspended
from the OAS in 1962, indications
are that they’re still interested in
regional solidarity and integration,
and fully endorse the creation of a
Bahamian FIR.

SIMON ARTZI
Nassau,
May, 2009.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, CECIL BRAD BETHEL
of the Western District of the said Island of New Providence,

Bahamas, intends to change my name to CECIL BRAD
DASSLER-BETHEL. If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.





THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009, PAGE 5





‘Tam vex and extremely
outraged at the public ver-
bal abuse — or diarrhoea -—
spewed by a public business
speaker hiding behind a
scholarly apron criticising
the government for not
reducing its staff and not
selling or closing govern-
ment entities in order to
reduce the government
debt.

Such mischievously desta-

bilising criticisms of even
the government's assistance
to helping the unemployed
and suffering at this time is
beyond belief.

"These are extremely dif-
ficult times for the poor and
many thousands who have
lost their jobs because of
business failures. It's
absolutely shocking that
this selfish person can
presently want to see our
government lay off its staff
and not think in the best
interest of the majority of
its people. My goodness,
and I thought we had fin-
ished with this minority
issue controlling the majori-
ty since 1967."

~ CONCERNED CITIZEN,
NASSAU

"Tam wex because of
Attorney General Michael
Barnett. I switch my TV to
channel 40 last week
Wednesday at 10.34am to
hear Senator and Minister
of Tourism Vincent Van-
derpool-Wallace making his
contribution to the debate
on the new communications
legislation — while behind
him, in clear view of the
cameras, Mr Barnett is
leaning back in his appar-
ently too comfortable chair,
eyes closed, asleep!

"He was practically hori-
zontal. There is no way he
could not realise that, seat-
ed within inches of the per-
son speaking at the time, he
would be in full view of
anyone watching the minis-
ter of tourism give his
speech. So what’s the con-
clusion? He has no interest
in the matter at hand, no
interest in even pretending
to be engaged in the matter
at hand, and no shame.
Well shame on you, attor-
ney general."

= POLITICAL OBSERVER,
NASSAU :

"T vex that even though

government said the trench-

ing on Bay Street would
soon be finished them deep
holes in the road still there.
Tam tired of my car wob-
bling all over the street,
dust flying in my face and
stink cars not letting me get
in the next lane, all because
government can't get their
act together and finish
things on time.”

"T vex because it seems
like most Bahamians don't
know what manners or
common courtesy is. They
too caught up in their stink
attitudes and nasty ways to
realise that the way they
treat other people comes
back to haunt them. No
wonder we are in the posi-
tion we are in, I mean,
wherever you call you can't
find a sensible, nice recep-
tionist, cashier or employee
who don't treat you as if
you doin’ them something
just for calling or going to
the place where they work.

"These people need to
learn to fix they face and
attitude before they go on
people job, because I surely
ain’ paying my good money

to get any stinkness from no

manners fools."

— FIX YA FACE, NASSAU

"T vex that whenever a lil’
piece of rain hit this island
traffic is hit a standstill. I
mean it could just be the
smallest spry what barely
wet the windshield and yet
traffic is be bumper to
bumper, causing me to be
late for work because peo-
ple on the road acting fool.

"People, y'all need to
learn how to drive and stop
creeping on the road just
because a lil’ piece of wet-
ness on the road.”

= MAD MOTORIST, NASSAU

¢ Are you vex? Send your
complaints to whyyouvex@tri-
bunemedia.net

~ TIRED OF THE
TRENCHES, NASSAU

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

PRESIDENT of the Police
Staff Association Bradley Sands
is agitating for government to
quickly enact the Police Force
Bill to ensure that members of
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force receive “critical” job
quality improvements.

"Why did we rush and pass
the Police Act when we have
yet to implement the benefits
that are affecting junior police
officers? There are a whole
heap of issues that are affecting
the welfare of police officers
and the association is tired of
diplomacy because it is not
working while junior officers

LOCAL NEWS

Sands calls for govt to

are hurting,” Mr Sands argued
yesterday.

Mr Sands claimed that two
police officers recently injured
in the line of duty — one shot
while making an arrest and
another injured during a car
crash — had both received let-
ters from the force's human
resources department stating
that their allotted 28 days of
leave had expired.

He claimed the officers were
told that if they remained on
leave they would be placed on
reduced pay.

Mr Sands said that if the 2009
Police Force Bill was being
enforced this would not have
happened, as such situations are
dealt with in the legislation.

The PSA, which is also call-

Classes launched
for parents of
troubled children

THE Department of Rehabil-
itative Services is offering classes
each Tuesday for parents and
guardians who are having prob-
lems managing their children.

Beginning 5pm at the depart-
ment’s head office on Thomp-
son Boulevard, the classes are
open to the public. Most parents
who attend are referred by social
workers and the courts.

“Some of us do not think we
have any problems with our par-
enting skills, and some say it is
not them but instead it is their
children,” observed senior pro-
bation officer Deidre Hepburn.
However, she said, parents often
suffer from a number of “issues”
that affect their relationship with
their children.

Mrs Hepburn pointed out that
some parents are simply not
good at supervising, guiding and
disciplining children, while others
are affected by a breakdown in
their relationship with the other
parent.

“The classes allow parents to
examine their parenting skills
and open them to various meth-
ods of disciplining their chil-
dren,” she said.

“Each child responds differ-
ently to various forms of disci-
pline so parents need to know
the different methods of disci-
plining their children.”

The topics discussed include
the effects of child abuse and
neglect, investing in children,
managing finances and how that
affects the upbringing of chil-
dren, and how to have effective

communication between parents
and children.

Forgiveness is one of the first
topics dealt with in the sessions.

“Some parents come to the
sessions angry and cannot move
on and gain anything until they
learn forgiveness,” said Mrs Hep-
burn.

“After the first two sessions,
they become more involved and
participate. They become more
vocal and the classes become
more interactive. They learn
from each other, sharing their
experiences and looking at things
differently.”

Facilitators also teach parents
how to communicate effectively
with family members and how
to pick up on non-verbal cues
displayed by children.

Participants can see officers at
the department on a one-on-one
basis. There is also the option of
organising a support group after
the classes are finished.

Mrs Hepburn said she hopes
the classes will eventually be held
throughout New Providence, not
just at the department’s office,
and expanded to the Family
Islands.

Jermaine, whose full name
cannot be published due to the
confidential nature of the case,
was ordered to attend the classes
by a judge. He is the father of a
14-year-old girl.

“Everyone should take these
classes,” he said. “No one should
send you here because everyone
has little problems with their chil-
dren.

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ing for increased pensions for
retired officers, said officers sta-
tioned on the Family Islands
are frustrated with their living
conditions and are under-
equipped.

“We are putting these police
officers in harm’s way and
nobody is checking. Officers are
fighting the dump fire without
proper equipment.

“The relevant authorities are
very much aware that these
issues were brought up, that
they are not acting in the best
interest of junior men of the
force.

"The Act was passed in the
House of Assembly and the
Senate but it's not signed into
law and all the while Rome is
burning,” argued Mr Sands.



“T thought it was going to be
‘Hey, you are a bad parent.’ But
it is not like that.

“Everyone is open in these
classes. The instructors give you
solutions you can try and you get
feedback on how to handle your
problems.”

He is paying more attention
to his daughter and listening to
what she tells him.

“She lets me know herself that
she is telling me things that oth-
er children would not tell their
parents,” he said.

The Bill — passed by Parlia-
mentarians earlier this year —
will make several changes to
the police force including the
establishment of a police com-
plaints inspectorate and limit
the terms of both the commis-
sioner and deputy commission-
er of police. It will repeal the
1965 Police Act and the Police
Force Act of 2007.

Another point of contention
for the PSA is the alleged
behaviour of the Police Tri-
bunal, which investigates and
if necessary punishes officers
accused of crimes or infractions.

Mr Sands claimed many offi-
cers are treated as "guilty until
proven innocent", and urged
the government to carry out a
review of the tribunal.

A judge also ordered Monal-
isa, the mother of twin girls, to
attend the classes.

At first she wanted to know
why she and not her daughters
was sent to the classes.

“But I told myself to stay
focused because there is a reason
they are sending me here,” she
said. “I had to do that or I would
not have been here all of these
weeks.

“More persons should attend
the classes to learn how to be
good parents.”



“We are
putting these
police officers
in harm’s way
and nobody is
checking.
Officers are
fighting the
dump fire
without proper
equipment.”



Bradley Sands

Raymond Bethel/BIS Photo

PICTURED from left are: executive
parenting officer Fronzetta John-
son, case worker Jenelle Cumber-
batch, senior probation officer
Deidre Hepburn and senior proba-
tion officer Sonia Saunders.

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Gathers, compiles and maintains basic credit information to be used in
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Investigates disputes and reviews documentation.

Prepares and processes credit and collections account adjustments.
Implements credit suspensions.
Recommends further actions on delinquent accounts.

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Provides support and coordination with third party agencies as needed.
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PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



PLP chairman

FROM page one

been rumoured as a potential
candidate to vie for the post :

pleased’ with bail ruling

current deputy leader Mrs :
Cynthia Pratt who recently :
let it be known that she has :
yet to make up her mind as }
to her political future. She :
has said that she has to meet }
with party leader Perry :
Christie before she makes }

with St Thomas More MP
Frank Smith and the PLP
MP for North Andros Vin-
cent Peet.

Standing in the way of the
ambitions of these men is

any future announcement.

Having advised the Nation-
al Convention at its last sit- :
ting over a year ago that she }
would not continue in her :
post at the next general elec- ;
tion, speculation has been :
rampant throughout the :
country that Mrs Pratt may }

Bahamians ‘should be

FROM page one

“Parliament can’t remove from judi-
cial oversight the liberty of the sub-
ject,” said Mr Munroe.

Meanwhile, the Bar Association
President suggested that there is no
reason for the public to fear that the
ruling will lead to more accused crim-
inals being let out onto the streets.

His comments came after the court
handed down a landmark ruling on
Thursday, which stated that a section
of the Bail Act that prohibits the grant-
ing of bail in such cases is “unconsti-
tutional” and “void.”

Relatives of murder victims and
spokesman for the group “Families of
Murder Victims”, Rodney Moncur,
spoke out against the decision, saying
that they could not support it and sug-
gesting it would heighten “paranoia” in
an already fearful populace.

But Mr Munroe confirmed that the
ruling really only formalises a state of
affairs that has existed for sometime —
exemplified by the fact that judges
have frequently granted bail to people
accused of murder and other “serious
crimes” in instances where it is deemed
likely that they cannot be tried in a
“reasonable” period of time despite

He said such a practice “existed all
over the common law world” but in
The Bahamas, politicians always
“seemed to have a problem telling the
Bahamian public that you can’t
arbitrarily lock people up” without
reference to their constitutional
rights.

Mr Munroe added: “There’s nothing
in this judgment says that the experi-
ence is going to be that you are
arraigned for murder and you get bail
right away.

“That just wouldn’t be a proper use
of discretion. It would be very unusu-
al,” said Mr Munroe.

remanded and then to receive bail only
if they cannot receive a trial within a
reasonable time.

“If people think judges, who live in
the community, whose friends family
etcetera are subject to the same kind of
crime that the rest of us are, would
put on the street people who might
injure or kill their family or friends,
then they should be worried.

“But what people tend to overlook is
that judges, lawyers, they all have fam-
ily in the wider community.

“They live in the community so it’s
really not in their interest (to release
people on bail without good cause),”

have “changed her mind.”

the Act.

Such individuals are still likely to be

US asks Cuba to resume
talks on legal immigration

m@ WASHINGTON

IN A new overture to Cuba, the Obama
administration asked the island’s commu-
nist government on Friday to resume talks
on legal immigration of Cubans to the
United States suspended by former Presi-
dent George W. Bush, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

The State Department said it had pro-
posed that the discussions, which were
halted after the last meeting in 2003, be
restarted to “reaffirm both sides’ commit-
ment to safe, legal and orderly migration,
to review trends in illegal Cuban migration
to the United States and to improve oper-
ational relations with Cuba on migration
issues.”

President Barack Obama “wants to
ensure that we are doing all we can to sup-
port the Cuban people in fulfilling their
desire to live in freedom,” said Darla Jor-
dan, a department spokeswoman. “He will
continue to make policy decisions accord-
ingly.”

The move follows Obama’s decision in
April to rescind restrictions on travel to
Cuba by Americans with family there and
on the amount of money they can send to
their relatives on the island.

It also comes ahead of a high-level meet-
ing early next month of the Organization
of American States, where Cuba’s possible
re-entry into the regional bloc will be dis-
cussed. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham
Clinton will attend the June 2 meeting in
Honduras.

Clinton, however, told lawmakers this
week that the U.S. would not support

Cuba’s membership in the
organization until and unless
President Raul Castro’s
regime makes democratic
reforms and releases political
prisoners.

She and Obama have also
said that broader engagement
with Cuba, including the pos-
sible lifting of the U.S. embar-
go on the island, is dependent
on such steps.

There was no immediate
reaction from the Cuban gov-
ernment on Friday, but com-
munist officials were angered
when the Bush administration
decided to scuttle the talks on
grounds they were not crucial
for monitoring agreements
aimed at preventing a mass
exodus from the island.

In Miami on Friday, the
influential Cuban American
National Foundation wel-
comed the news, saying
resumed migration talks could
be “an opportunity to resolve issues of
United States national interest.”

However, three Cuban-American mem-
bers of Congress from Florida denounced
the move as “another unilateral conces-
sion by the Obama administration to the
dictatorship.”

“The United States suspended the
*migration talks’ with the Cuban dictator-
ship in January 2004 because the Cuban
regime refused to comply with basic
aspects of the Migration Accord of 1995,”

“



A DEPARTMENT spokes-
woman said President
Barack Obama (above)
‘wants to ensure that we
are doing all we can to
support the Cuban people
in fulfilling their desire to
live in freedom,’ said

Republican Reps. Lincoln
Diaz-Balart, his brother
Mario and [leana Ros-Lehti-
nen, said in a statement.
“The Cuban regime contin-
ues to violate the accord by
denying hundreds of exit per-
mits annually to Cuban
nationals who have received
visas to enter the United
States. The Obama adminis-
tration should first insist that
the Castro dictatorship com-
plies with the accord before
renewing *talks.”’

The twice-yearly meetings
in alternating countries had
been the highest level con-
tacts between the two coun-
tries, which have no diplo-
matic relations.

The suspension of the talks
occurred during an especial-
ly prickly period during
which then-president Fidel
Castro publicly criticizing
James Cason, at the time
head of the U.S. Interests Section in
Havana, as a “bully” and Washington con-
demning Havana for a crackdown that
rounded up 75 dissidents and sentenced
them to long prison terms.

The talks were created so the countries
could track adherence to 1994 and 1995
accords designed to promote legal, order-
ly migration between the two countries.
The aim was to avoid a repeat of the sum-
mer of 1994, when tens of thousands of
Cubans took to the sea in flimsy boats

said Mr Munroe.

Police urge





































businesses to

band together
to fight crime

FROM page one

“When it rains the water comes up to two feet in the road

and if we walk through it you will get something, and we
have illegal immigrants, all of that. Right here in this
area.”

Larry Forbes of Lucayan construction said he had

$30,000 worth of materials stolen from his business in Feb-
ruary, but has had no communication from police about the
progress of the case and whereabouts of his goods despite
learning from the news of the thief turning himself in. He
asked officers to keep victims of crime better informed.

Anthon Saunders, security co-ordinator for Doctor’s

Hospital, said one of his biggest challenges is getting the
attention of the police when he catches criminals in the act.

He said officers will insist he files a report at the station

before assistance will be provided.

Chief Superintendent Glenn Miller in charge of the

central division said officers should respond immediately
when called, and if they fail to, they should be reported to
the complaints unit.

“T hope that would not happen again in the central

division,” Mr Miller said. “We are encouraging our officers
to reach out and speak to people and advise you on what’s
going on.”

Mr Miller and his team ensured business representatives

attending the meeting at the Doctor’s Hospital confer-
ence centre in Dowdeswell Street that by forming a tight
network they will be powerful enough to drive out crime.

He urged business owners to purchase CCTV cameras



to overlook several businesses in the area as they can pro-
vide solid evidence in court for the conviction of criminals.

Mr Miller said: “We have frequently seen witnesses
appear in court and panic and change their story, or wit-
nesses do not appear to give evidence at all, or unfortu-
nately in some cases, witnesses disappear.

“What we need now is for business partners to develop
a witness. A very simple one is CCTV. It’s a powerful
form of witness that the world is using.”

He also suggested Business Watch could purchase a
vehicle to conduct patrols of the area.

Business representatives were introduced to one anoth-
er and to local officers, and Mr Miller assured them their
concerns had been noted and would be acted on immedi-
ately.

Business Watch groups will be headed by a co-ordinator
and team and hold monthly meetings with law enforcement
officials to discuss crime in the area.

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, MAY 24TH, 2009
7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Bro. Jamicko Forde

11:00 a.m. BOMC Service/Queen’s College Gym
7:00 a.m. Sis. Tezel Anderson/Sis. Marilyn Tinker (H.C.}

OT a AW CCM A eA On LEM

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL
CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS « Tel: 325-2921
SUNDAY, MAY 24TH, 2009

11:30 a.m. Speaker:

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Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. ¢ Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
¢ Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. ¢ Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.

SUNDAY SERVICES ¢ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)





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THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



WHO to consider
the severity of

‘sneaky’ swine flu

m@ GENEVA

THE World Health Orga-
nization said Friday it will
change the rules for declar-
ing a swine flu pandemic, a
virus the agency’s chief called
“sneaky” because of its abili-
ty to spread quickly from per-
son to person and potentially
mutate into a deadlier form,
according to Associated Press.

Under political pressure
from many of its 193 mem-
bers to consider factors other
than just the spread of the
disease before announcing a
global epidemic, WHO’s flu
chief said “course correc-
tions” were being made.

“What we will be looking
for is events which signify a
really substantial increase in
risk of harm to people,” Kei-
ji Fukuda told reporters in
Geneva.

So far the virus has been
mild, sickening 11,168 people
and causing 86 deaths, most
of them in Mexico, according
to WHO.

But experts worry it could
evolve into a more deadly
strain or overwhelm countries
unprepared for a major flu
outbreak.

Many countries fear a pan-
demic declaration would trig-
ger mass panic, and be eco-
nomically and politically dam-
aging. For developed coun-
tries that already have acti-
vated their pandemic pre-
paredness plans, a pandemic
declaration would change lit-
tle in their response strate-
gies.

Earlier this week, Britain
and other countries urged
WHO to reconsider its pan-
demic definition.

WHO hastily responded to
these concerns, as Fukuda
said the agency would revise
the conditions needed to
move from the current phase
5 to the highest level, phase 6,
which makes it a pandemic.

“The countries are telling
us now that moving from
phase 5 to 6 is not so help-
ful,” Fukuda said. He said the
alert phases were developed
before the outbreak hit, and
now need to be adjusted to
the reality of the situation.

The virus’ lethality could
become one of the required
criteria before a pandemic is
declared, Fukuda said.

Fukuda’s comments
echoed those of WHO Direc-
tor-General Margaret Chan,
who told governments she
would heed their call to cau-
tion in declaring a pandem-
ic.

At the same time, Chan
warned against complacency.

“This is a subtle, sneaky
virus,” she said at the close
of the weeklong meeting. “It
does not announce its pres-
ence or arrival in a new coun-
try with a sudden explosion
of patients seeking medical
care or requiring hospitaliza-
tion.”

“We expect it to continue
to spread to new countries
and continue to spread with-
in countries already affect-
ed,” Chan said.

Countries taking part in the
Geneva meeting agreed Fri-
day to delay efforts to finalize
a deal on sharing flu viruses,
instead instructing Chan to
find a solution by early next
year.

Developing countries lob-
bied hard to ensure they
would benefit from any drugs
created using their virus sam-
ples.





Palm B

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

OWNERS of the Palm Bay Beach Club
in Exuma yesterday dispelled reports that
the small beach-front resort has filed for
bankruptcy.

While admitting the property is battling
with the tourism downturn like most of its
counterparts, co-owners and managers Ron
and Bette Francis said they remain com-
mitted to keeping it open while maintaining
staff levels.

After inaccurate reports about the
resort's financial state were reported
through the broadcast media and on local
online message boards, the hotel was pep-
pered with calls from Labour and Social
Services officials, said Mr Francis.

Coupled with the recent announcement
that the Four Seasons at Emerald Bay will
shut its doors on May 26 leaving about 500

ay Beach Club owners
dispel bankruptcy reports



“I don't know
where the rumours
come from but it's
hurting us and I
wish people would
check their facts
before they put
them on the air.”

Co-owner and manager
Ron Francis



persons jobless, Mr Francis said misin-
formed persons on the island were wor-

ried about a new round of layoffs.

"Rumours sometimes can be more dam-
aging than the truth and unfortunately
everytime someone reads (the reports) and
cancels their booking it's making things
even more difficult for us. I don't know
where the rumours come from but it's hurt-
ing us and I wish people would check their
facts before they put them on the air,” said
Mr Francis, speaking to The Tribune from
Exuma yesterday.

Despite the depressed tourism market,
only two part-time waitresses have been
laid off from its 40-member staff.

With things not expected to turn around
until at best, the end of the year, the resort
is focused on attracting domestic tourists to
the 70-villa property. Management is cur-
rently offering a 35 per cent discount to
locals.

The beach-front property has two swim-
ming pools, jacuzzis, a full range of water
sports, and shuttle service to George Town.

"We're struggling as every business in
the Bahamas is, but we have always stayed
open for the last 10 years even when every-
one else has shut - 365 days a year - and we
intend to do so throughout this time. We're
resilient people and we have a fantastic
Bahamian staff who we count as family
and we're all going to work through this
tough time.

"My personal belief is that we'll see some
positive changes by the winter season — by
December — and 2010 will be an improve-
ment over 2009 and 2011 hopefully we'll be
back to normal," said Mr Francis.

Last week Exuma's largest employer —
the Four Seasons at Emerald Bay —
announced it was shutting its doors on May
26 leaving some 500 persons jobless. The
closure comes nearly two years after the
resort was placed in receivership.

Without new investors to acquire the
project, secured creditor Mitsui chose to
temporarily close the property.

Former gymnast to judge skills
of Nassau ’Nastics members

FORMER gymnast and state judging
director Susan Monahan is in New
Providence this weekend to share her
expertise as she judges the skills of
members of the nation’s oldest gym-
nastic club — Nassau ‘Nastics.

Gymnasts were tested on Friday at
the Oakes Field gym on the uneven
bars and today at the Kendal GL Isaacs
Gymnasium on their floor routines,
vault and beam. The events are a part
of Nassau ‘Nastics’ Gymfest Spring
Spectacular.

“We are thrilled to have Susan Mon-
ahan judging the gymnasts,” said head
coach of Nassau ‘Nastics, Trevor Ram-
sey. “In addition to being a former
gymnast, she’s been judging for over 16
years and sits on the Florida State
Judges Board of Directors, which
means that she’s responsible for men-
toring and training new judges. Her
three kids have also competed so she
knows what its like to be a gym mom,
supporter, coach, carpool driver and
judge.”



Coach Ramsey noted that competi-
tions are essential because they
allow gymnasts to see exactly how
they are progressing based on their
scores.

It also prepares and conditions them

Susan Monahan will be
judging Bahamian
gymnasts this weekend
as a part of Nassau
‘Nastics Gymfest
Spring Spectacular.

to be performers, an essential element
in wooing the judges abroad.
“Healthy competition boosts scores,
boosts confidence levels and the enjoy-
ment of competing motivates them to
work harder when they return to the

”

gym,” explained Coach Ramsey.
“However, we have a unique problem
— because there are no other clubs here
in Nassau, our kids don't have the
opportunity to attend enough compe-
titions.

“We attempt to go abroad two to
three times a year in order to give our
gymnasts that exposure but this alone
simply isn't enough.”

“Since we are the only club here,
we cannot bring a judge here to a com-
petition so instead we are calling this
event a 'testing’,” he added.

“At the end of the day, every gym-
nast in our club will have the exposure
of standing in front of a judge, and will
know exactly how much they have
achieved within the last year of training
and how much more is needed to con-
tinue to improve.”

Nassau ‘Nastics Spring Spectacular
will conclude on Sunday afternoon with
a performance by the gymnasts and an
awards ceremony at the Kendall Isaacs
Gymnasium at 4pm.



Minnis: primary care remains ‘a high priority’

m@ By MATT MAURA

STRENGTHENING the
primary health care system
remains “a high priority" for
the government, Minister of
Health Dr Hubert Minnis said.

Addressing the 62nd World
Health Assembly, he said it is
“crucial” that sustained finan-
cial investment in public health
and primary health care
remains high on the agenda.

“Investment in primary care
is value for money,” Dr Minnis
said.

Almost 31 years after the
Declaration of Alma-Ata,
health officials in the Bahamas
have proven the benefits of
investing in primary health
care, Mr Minnis said.

The declaration was signed
in 1978 at the International
Conference on Primary Health
Care in Alma-Ata, the former
Soviet Union.

Among other things, it gave
attention to building the foun-
dation of health care systems
on primary care.

Care Giver
Required

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILL REQUIREMENTS:

- Certified or equivalent to nurse’s aide and training.

- Must understand English both written and verbal.

- Must have current certification, i.e. Health Certificate.

- Must be able to safely and successfully perform ALL job-related
functions i.e. CPR and Basic First Aid.

PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES:

- Care for multiple residents.
- Observe Resident Rights.



Dim mleleysyat Minnis

It was agreed at that confer-
ence that a strong primary
health service could result in
disease prevention and con-
trol, longer life expectancies

52wk-Low

1.28

11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
1.95

11.09
2.83
6.06
1.31
1.38

Abaco Markets

Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Doctor's Hospital
6.02
11.00
10.35
5.00

Famguard
Finco

Focol (S)
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnsen

Securit y

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate

and the promotion of safe
motherhood, particularly in
developing countries.

Dr Minnis said the success
of primary health care pro-
grammes “ensures equity from
the start for our children” as
proved by the Bahamas’ very
successful programme for the
prevention of mother-to-child
transmission of HIV/AIDS.

“Primary health care must
not compete with hospitals for
budgetary allocations,” Dr
Minnis said. “There must be
equitable benefits for the
health workforce across the
entire health sector.

“Staff working in primary
health care must be recognised
for the value they bring to the
health sector. It is therefore
crucial that sustained financial
investment in public health

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

and primary health care sys-
tems remain high on the agen-
da of policymakers.”

Dr Minnis said the Ministry
of Health has implemented ini-
tiatives and strategies that
have improved the delivery of
quality primary health care to
Bahamians.

One has been the strength-
ening of public health infor-
mation systems to support evi-
dence-based decision making
at all levels of the health sec-
tor, he said.

This is being done through
the expanded use of informa-
tion and communication tech-
nology (ICT).

While ICT is proving to be a
very effective means of
strengthening the health infor-
mation systems, Dr Minnis
said, the delivery of primary

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 22 MAY 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,608.76 | CHG -0.12 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -103.60 | YTD % -6.05

FINDEX: CLOSE 795.25 | YTD -4.75% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

1.33
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.75
2.83
6.13
2.88
1.38
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.14
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol.
1.33
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.75
2.83
6.13
2.77
1.38
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.14
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

EPS $

health care services can also
benefit from additional new-
er technologies.

“In a country such as the
Bahamas with its more than
30 inhabited islands and a pop-
ulation that is spread across
100,000 square miles,” he said,
"ICT can be used to not only
strengthen primary care ser-
vices, but also to promote uni-
versal access to health services
through tele-health diagnostic
services and referrals, as well
as access to specialist manage-
ment when required

“These technologies have
also been proven to enhance
the management of patient
records through electronic
medical records which also
allows for patients to
access their medical informa-
tion."

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKEBAG!

Ee ADVISORY SERVICES

KTP TL. €a mT ST.

Div $ P/E
0.127
0.992

0.244

-0.877

0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

- Provide Professional care and assistance to the residents.

- Assist paramedics in cases of emergency.

- Observe residents, note physical condition, attitude, reactions,
appetite, etc., report to the Administrator.

- Available for front desk duty.

- Capable of working overnight shift 4p.m. — 12am & 12a.m. - 8 a.m.

- Provide quality care.

- Provide a written/verbal report to the Administrator

on a daily basis.

- Perform any other related duties which might be required.

- Man front desk operation.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidates will be offered an excellent compensation
package and opportunities for training and development.

Please e-mail or fax resume to the Administrator at

CCCBAHAMAS@live.com or 323.4475

S2wk-Hi

Previous

52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +
52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund

1.3124
2.9230
1.3875
3.1964
12.1564
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Fidelity Prime Income Fund

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

- Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change
Daily Vol

- Change in closing price from day to day

- Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Last Sale
100.00
100.00

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13 100.00 0.00
FBB15 100.00 0.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00

0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3758 1.65 4.83
2.8962 -1.49 -3.35
1.4630 2.05 5.25
3.1964 -5.59 -13.64
12.7397 0.96 5.79
100.5606 0.56 0.56
96.4070 -3.59 -3.59
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.1599 0.71 -12.76
1.0440 0.80 4.40
1.0364 0.33 3.64
1.0452 0.76 4.40
MARKET TERMS

Change
0.00
0.00

Daily Vol.

Weekly Vol.

Div $

Interest
7% 19 October 2017
Prime + 1.75% 19 October 2022
7% 30 May 2013
Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015

EPS $
-0.041
0.000
0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

Yield %
30-Apr-09
31-Mar-09
15-May-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525





THE TRIBUNE





RENALDO KNOWLES (shown on
the right in this file photo) once
again led the Bahamas in scoring
with nine points, well short of
the 16 point pace he established
in game one...

PAGE 9



S O
le
SATURDAY, MAY 23,

2009

ts







Nuggets beat
‘Lakers 106-103

in Game 2...
See page 10

Team Bahamas fails to
Mexico in three sets

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

fter a thrilling come-

from-behind win in

their opening effort of

the tournament, there

would be no such luck

for the Bahamas in their second game

as the odds on favourite lived up to

their top billing for a straight set win.

The Bahamas fell to a heavily

favoured Mexico team in three sets,

25-13, 25-20, and 25-16 in their sec-

ond game of the NORECA D second

round tournament of the 2010 FIVB
Men’s World Championship.

A resilient Bahamian team was

unable to counteract the virtually
impenetrable Mexican defense at the
net which created continuous scoring
opportunities.

Renaldo Knowles once again led
the Bahamas in scoring with nine
points, well short of the 16 point pace
he established in game one.

Shedrick Forbes also added nine in
a losing effort.

In their first game of the tourna-
ment, Mexico came out aggressively
on the offensive, opening the game
on a 12-5 run, never allowing the
Bahamas within striking distance.

Joe Smith, Bahamas Volleyball Fed-
eration executive, traveling with the
team to Kingston, Jamaica, said the
team got a good impression of the

Mexican squad and now knows what
to expect in a second meeting.

“Tt was defiantly a learning experi-
ence for them, Mexico came out
strong from the beginning of the
game,” he said. “The good thing about
it is this game does not mean as much
in the grand scheme of things as we
are still alive and will be in the quar-
terfinal. The team is more prepared
now and going into a rematch with
Mexico we should expect a great per-
formance.”

The Bahamas fell to 1-1, while Mex-
ico improved to 1-0.

Despite the loss, Team Bahamas is
doing well in the statistical depart-
ment as they boast the tournament’s
top three scorers thus far.

Knowles remains the tournament’s
leading scorer with 28 points, 25 of
which came on spikes at a success rate
of 41 per cent, Forbes is second with
23 points and Prince Wilson is third
with 23.

Romel Lightbourne is one of the
tournament’s top servers with three
serves for aces.

Mexico is scheduled to face St
Lucia, the third team in Group B,
tonight at 9pm.

By virtue of their opening round
win over St Lucia on Wednesday
night, the Bahamas advanced to the
quarterfinal where they will face Mex-
ico for the second time.

Over in Group A, Haiti remains the
surprising leader with a 1-1 win loss

record.

Jamaica sits at 1-1 with their lone
win — a three set sweep over Haiti —
while the Cayman Islands are at 0-1.

Only the champions and runners-
up from the tournament will advance
to the third round of play. Mexico is
favoured in the pool followed by
Jamaica in Group B.

The pool D champion winner will
face Puerto Rico and Barbados, which
have already advanced to NORCE-
CA Pool G.

The second place team in Pool D
will advance to face Cuba, Canada
and the winners of Pool C, which
includes Trinidad & Tobago, Suri-
name, Aruba, the US Virgin Islands
and Antigua.

No. 1 Safina can look to Big Brother for tips

m@ By HOWARD FENDRICH
AP Tennis Writer

PARIS (AP) — Venus and
Serena Williams have not cor-
nered the market on sibling
success in tennis: Dinara Safina
and Marat Safin are the first
sister and brother to both reach
No. 1 in the rankings.

When the French Open
starts Sunday, Safina will be
seeded No. 1 at a Grand Slam
tournament for the first time.
Now the Russian wants to win
her first major title — and she
can turn to Big Brother for all-
in-the-family Slam advice.

His best words of wisdom?
"You just have to enjoy every
moment,” Safina said Friday.
"Have to live by the day and
enjoy every day."

Not that she always heeds
what Safin says, even if he does
own U.S. Open and Australian
Open championships.

"He can maybe practice 10
hours a day, and for him, it's
enough. I'm a little bit more
stubborn. I need, like, to have
maybe four hours on the
court,” Safina said. "And he
was, like, 'No, just practice half
an hour, and it's fine for you.""

The resemblance to her

brother is striking, and a smile
crossed that familiar face as
Safina earned a laugh at his
expense. Then her expression
turned more serious, and she
added: "But, no, now he does-
n't go into the tennis. I think he
respects me much more now."

The 23-year-old Safina and
29-year-old Safin — he is seed-
ed 20th at the French Open —
were born into the sport. Their
father is the director of a
Moscow tennis club, and their
mother is a tennis coach who
worked with both kids when
they were young.

Safina has been known to
show tiny flashes of the sort of
on-court temper for which her
brother is famous, though noth-
ing quite to his extremes. Right
now, her game is what's match-
ing his standards.

Safina comes to Roland Gar-
ros on a 10-match winning
streak and 14-1 overall this sea-
son on clay, all since her April
20 rise to No. 1.

"Since I became No. 1, I've
been in a final and I won two
tournaments," Safina said, "so
I guess I'm feeling pretty
good."

As well she should. For every
jab she might hear about

DINARA SAFINA returns the ball to Caroline Wozniacki during the Madrid



Open at the Caja Magica in Madrid on Sunday...

(AP Photo: Daniel Ochoa de Olza)

whether she deserves to lead
the rankings despite not hav-
ing a major championship on
her resume — most notably,
Serena Williams recently called
herself "the real No. 1" — Safi-
na also earns praise for her
recent play.

Just one example: When for-
mer No. 1 Amelie Mauresmo,
twice a Grand Slam title win-
ner, was asked Friday about
her own chances at this French
Open, she noted that women's
tennis recently has been wide
open, "except maybe for Safi-
na, who has been on a roll the
last couple of weeks on clay."

There is a general sentiment
heading into the tournament
that while the men's event
might very well come down to
a Rafael Nadal vs. Roger Fed-
erer final for the fourth con-
secutive year, no one is quite
sure what will happen in the
women's draw.

Serena Williams has won the
U.S. Open and Australian
Open to raise her career count
to 10 Grand Slam titles, but she
also lost her past four matches
and quit her most recent outing
because of a bad knee.

Venus Williams is on a two-
match losing streak and has

never had her greatest success
on clay.

Maria Sharapova returned
to singles only this week after
nearly 10 months away because
of right shoulder surgery.

Defending champion Ana
Ivanovic's right knee has been
troubling her — she wore black
tape on it while practicing Fri-
day — and played only three
matches on clay this year.

Those women all have won
major titles. Safina, meanwhile,
lost to Ivanovic in last year's
French Open final and to Ser-
ena Williams in this year's Aus-
tralian Open final.

As for those who say Safina
is the closest thing to a favorite
over the next two weeks?

"T'm not even listening what
the people are saying. I'm just
focusing on myself, you know?
Just taking one day at a time,"
she said. "I don't think about
what I want to happen in 14,
15, 16 days, you know. I live
today. Today I had a practice.
That's all. Tomorrow 1s anoth-
er day."

Sounds like something a cer-
tain sibling might say.

e Associated Press Writer
Trung Latieule contributed to
this report.



PAGE 10, SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



‘It’s going to be a long series’
Nuggets beat Lakers 106-103 in Game 2

@ By BETH HARRIS
AP Sports Writer

LOS ANGELES (AP) —
Similar game, different ending
for the Los Angeles Lakers.

Their 24-year playoff domi-
nance of the Denver Nuggets
dissipated over the final 29 sec-
onds of the fourth quarter in
the second down-to-the-wire
game in the Western Confer-
ence finals.

That's when Kenyon Martin
hit a layup in traffic and
Chauncey Billups made 3 of 4
free throws to give Denver a
106-103 victory in Game 2 on
Thursday night to even the
series.

"It's going to be a long
series," Nuggets coach George
Karl said.

It was Denver's first playoff
win against Los Angeles since
1985, a span of 11 games, the
second-longest postseason win-
ning streak against one team in
NBA history.

"There was just a demand
that we had to win this game,"
Karl said. "There was an inner
spirit. We're a much more
smart, mentally tough team
than you look at last year and
what we are now. It's a great
win."

Carmelo Anthony scored 34
points, Billups had 27 points
and Linas Kleiza added 16 for
the Nuggets. Nene finished with
six points, nine rebounds and
Six assists.

"To get one on the road is
always tough. We came in and
got it,” Anthony said. "We're
mentally tough and we showed
that in this game coming off the
loss that we gave away in Game
1 '

Anthony twisted his ankle in
the game, but he said he would
be fine for Game 3 Saturday in
Denver.

Kobe Bryant had 32 points,
including making all 10 of his
free throws, Trevor Ariza
scored a career playoff-high 20
points and Pau Gasol had 17
points and 17 rebounds for the

Vick meets
probation
officer

@ By LARRY O’DELL

Associated Press Writer

NORFOLK, Va. (AP) —
Michael Vick walked into a feder-
al courthouse on Friday to meet
his probation officer, ignoring
questions from waiting reporters
about his life under home con-
finement after being released
from prison this week.

The suspended NFL star
arrived at the Norfolk courthouse
at 10am, his first-known public
appearance since he left a federal
penitentiary in Kansas undetected
early Wednesday and drove
cross-country to arrive in Hamp-
ton early Thursday, where he
began serving two months of
home confinement.

The former Atlanta Falcons
quarterback is serving a 23-month
sentence for a dogfighting con-
spiracy.

Vick arrived at the courthouse
in the passenger seat of a Range
Rover driven by his fiancee,
Kijafa Frink. She let him out near
the front door and Vick walked
silently past waiting cameras and
reporters, ignoring questions
about his first day home and his
plans. Vick was wearing jeans, a
light blue shirt and a dark blue
blazer.

He left again after nearly an
hour, with his fiancee and a
lawyer in tow as he exited the
courthouse. Vick again said noth-
ing to waiting reporters before
getting into the waiting Range
Rover. One man in a crowd of
bystanders yelled out, "Keep your
head up, Mike!"

Vick had previously met with
probation officials. They came to
his house Thursday to equip him
with an electronic monitor so they
can track his movements until he
is released from federal custody
July 20. The monitor was not visi-
ble under his clothes at the court-
house.

Vick had managed to remain
mostly out of sight since returning
home in a van equipped with
blackout curtains.

But now that he has been out-
fitted with the electronic monitor,
federal officials probably won't
be the only ones watching his
movements.

¢ AP Sports Writer Hank Kurz
Jr contributed to this report

Lakers, who dropped to 7-2 at
Staples Center this postseason.

"They have home court
advantage now. Now it's time
to go to Denver, see if we can
do the same," Bryant said.
"We're not the best road team
in the NBA for no reason."

The Nuggets recovered from
poor free throw shooting in a
two-point loss in Game 1 to
make 17 consecutive foul shots
until Billups missed one with 4
seconds remaining. He made
the second for the three-point
lead.

"T want to kill Chauncey for
missing that free throw,” Karl
said.

Derek Fisher launched a 3-
pointer from the right corner
that Nene got a piece of as time
expired.

"Nene had a great contest,"
Billups said. "I don't think Fish-
er got a good chance to get a
good look on the shot.
Nonetheless, I was down there
trying to rebound and trying to
get my hands on the ball again,
try to get back on that free
throw line."

Fisher thought he did get a
good look.

"T figured they were going to
try to foul to prevent us from
shooting a 3," he said. "I got rid
of it a little quicker than I prob-
ably had to. Definitely don't
want to put yourself in a posi-
tion where you need that kind
of shot to try and tie the game.”

Tied at 101, Martin made the
layup off Nene's assist that gave
the Nuggets the lead for good.

Bryant dribbled upcourt and
got into traffic, with Nene tip-
ping the ball away to earn a
jump ball with 18 seconds left.
Gasol controlled the tip to
Ariza, but the ball squirted
away and Fisher fouled Billups.
He made both for a 105-101
lead. "Looked to me like
Anthony pushed on Trevor and
Trevor tried to get rid of the
ball, and no foul was called and
they recovered the basketball,”
Lakers coach Phil Jackson said.

Martin then fouled Gasol,

CHAUNCEY BILLUPS puts up a shot as Lamar Odom defends during second half of Game 2 in Western conference

final series Thursday night in Los Angeles.



(AP Photo: Mark J Terrill)

Ye

i By The Associated
Press

Los Angeles Lakers at
Denver (8:30pm EDT). The
Nuggets beat the Lakers 106-
103 on Thursday night in Los
Angeles to even the West-
ern Conference finals 1-1.

STARS

Thursday

—Carmelo Anthony and
Chauncey Billups, Nuggets.
Anthony had 34 points and
nine rebounds, and Billups
added 27 points in Denver's
106-103 victory over the Los
Angeles Lakers in the West-
ern Conference finals. The
series is tied 1-1.

12th TIME'S A CHARM

Denver's 106-103 victory
over Los Angeles on Thurs-
day night in Game 2 of the
Western Conference was the
Nuggets’ first playoff victory
over the Lakers. Los Ange-
les won the first 11 postsea-
son games against Denver.

GOOD AS GOLD

Carmelo Anthony had 34
points in the Nuggets’ 106-
103 Game 2 win Thursday
night to become the first
Denver player to score 30 or
more points in five consecu-
tive playoff games since
1976. He had 39 in Game 1.

SPEAKING

"T think this is going to be
a long series."

— Denver coach George
Karl after the Nuggets beat
the Los Angeles Lakers 106-
103 on Thursday night to tie
the Western Conference semi-
final series 1-1

before Bryant's 3-pointer, again
with Anthony guarding close-
ly, tied the game at 99 with 1:59
remaining. Billups made two

who made both before Billups
got fouled.

The Lakers were shaky on
free throws in the fourth, mak-
ing 9 of 14, while Denver didn't
blink at the line. The Nuggets
were 29 of 37, with Billups hit-
ting 13 of 16 and Anthony 10
of 14.

Kleiza's 3-pointer early in the
fourth quarter gave the Nuggets
an 85-82 lead, their first since
the game's opening minutes.
Billups followed with two free
throws and Anthony hit two
straight baskets to extend Den-
ver's lead to 91-84.

Bryant missed a jumper, but

he came up big on the Lakers’
next possession, hitting a 3-
pointer with Anthony's hand in
his face. Shannon Brown tossed
in a 3 and Lamar Odom made
two free throws as part of an
11-2 run that put the Lakers
back in front 95-93.

Denver regained the lead

free throws before Bryant's
jumper tied it at 101.

The Lakers led by 14 early in
the second quarter. Anthony
began a run of 14 consecutive
points for the Nuggets to get
them to 51-40. They outscored
the Lakers 14-2 to get within
55-54 at halftime.

JOE MAUER hits a grand slam during the
sixth inning of a game against the Chicago
White Sox in Chicago Thursday. Mauer
also had two doubles and drove in a
career-high six runs as Minnesota routed
the White Sox 20-1.

(AP Photo: Charles Rex Arbogast)



UEFA charges Drogba, Bosingwa with misconduct

B By GRAHAM DUNBAR
AP Sports Writer

GENEVA, Switzerland (AP) —
UEFA charged Didier Drogba and Jose
Bosingwa with misconduct on Friday
for insulting the referee after Chelsea's
elimination from the Champions
League.

European football's governing body
also charged the club with failing to
control the players as well as fans who
threw objects.

Drogba and Bosingwa breached
sportsmanship by making offensive
comments about Norwegian referee
Tom Henning Ovrebo, UEFA said in a
statement.

Ovrebo denied several penalty
appeals in the 1-1 draw with Barcelona
in a semifinal at Stamford Bridge on
May 6. Barcelona scored a late equaliz-
er to advance to the final on away goals
and will play Manchester United in
Rome on Wednesday.

Chelsea said it would respond to
UEFA's charges, on behalf of both club
and its two players.

"We would like to make clear again,
as we did at the time, that the incidents
in question were regrettable and

occurred only because of the high emo-
tions and frustrations which arose from
the disappointment of a controversial
defeat in such an important game,” the
club said in a statement.

"We are all acutely aware of the
responsibilities that lie with both the
club and its players as regards setting a
good example as role models and
upholding the principles of fair play in
football. Both of the players accept that
and apologized very soon afterwards
for their actions."

UEFA president Michel Platini, who
is independent of the disciplinary com-
mittee, told The Associated Press that
the biggest issue confronting referees
is how to punish "dangerous" players
who provoke them on the pitch.

"I can understand the referee, I can
understand the players and I will under-
stand very well (the results) of the dis-
ciplinary committee," Platini told the
AP. "It is not just a problem for today,
it is a problem for 40, 50 years. From the
moment you think there is a mistake,
the players are furious at the referee, the
fans are furious at the referee.

"The referee does his job, the players
were not happy and the disciplinary
committee will do its job."

Chelsea and the two players must file
statements to UEFA by May 29.

UEFA's disciplinary panel will hear
the cases June 17.

It can ban players from Champions
League matches and make Chelsea play
behind closed doors.

Drogba approached Ovrebo in a fin-
ger-waving outburst, and was pulled
away by security staff and Chelsea coach
Guus Hiddink while yelling an expletive
toward a television camera.

Portuguese defender Bosingwa com-
pared Ovrebo to a "thief" in a post-
match television interview.

Michael Ballack escaped being
charged despite aggressively chasing
after Ovrebo when a late penalty appeal
was rejected. The German midfielder's
action occurred during the match and is
judged to have been dealt with by the
referee on the field of play.

Competition organizer UEFA had
this season renewed its campaign calling
for players, clubs and fans to respect
match officials.

"We have to punish immediately the
player who provokes, who gives the
spark," Platini said.

° AP Sports Writer Rob Harris in
Istanbul contributed to this report.

Williams sisters
on Opposite
halves of French
Open draw

m By HOWARD FENDRICH
AP Tennis Writer

PARIS (AP) — Serena and Venus
Williams were drawn into opposite sides
of the French Open field Friday, while the
men's semifinals could pit four-time defend-
ing champion Rafael Nadal against Andy
Murray, and Roger Federer against Novak
Djokovic.

Second-seeded Serena — one of two past
women's champions in the tournament —
will meet Klara Zakopalova of the Czech
Republic in the first round. Third-seeded
Venus faces Bethanie Mattek-Sands of the
United States in her opener.

The Williams sisters can only meet in the
championship match. Serena beat Venus
in the 2002 final.

Top-ranked Dinara Safina of Russia
starts against Anne Keothavong of Britain.

Maria Sharapova will play Anastasiya
Yakimova of Belarus in her first Grand
Slam match since Wimbledon last year.
Sharapova returned to the tour this week
after missing nearly 10 months due to a
shoulder injury and is not seeded.

Trying to become the first man to win
five consecutive French Opens, top-seeded
Nadal will begin against a qualifier. He
could meet past No. 1 Lleyton Hewitt in the
third round, and 14th-seeded David Fer-
rer in the fourth.

Hewitt's first match is against No. 26 Ivo
Karlovic, the 6-foot-11 player from Croat-
ia who upset him in the first round at Wim-
bledon in 2003, when Hewitt was the reign-
ing champion.

Federer's bid to tie Pete Sampras with a
record 14 major singles title will start
against Alberto Martin of Spain. Murray's
first opponent is Juan Ignacio Chela of
Argentina, whose four career tour titles all
came on clay and who once was ranked
15th.

The potential men's quarterfinals are
Nadal vs. No. § Fernando Verdasco, Mur-
ray vs. No. 7 Gilles Simon, Federer vs. No.
6 Andy Roddick, and Djokovic vs. No. 5
Juan Martin Del Potro.

David Nalbandian, Carlos Moya and
Mario Ancic are among the men who with-
drew. The International Tennis Federation
had said Dmitry Tursunov would pull out
because of a heel injury, but Tursunov was
in Friday's draw, seeded 21st.

The possible women's quarterfinals are
Safina vs. defending champion Ana
Ivanovic, Venus Williams vs. No. 6 Vera
Zvonareva, Serena Williams vs. No. 7 Svet-
lana Kuznetsova, and No. 4 Elena Demen-
tieva vs. No. 5 Jelena Jankovic.

Play begins Sunday.



PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





Bahamian

COR ana
Collie

?

and

to exhibit in

Tennessee



exhibited together. Ms
Collie and Dr Cox, both
born in Nassau, have been
friends for years and exhib-
ited together in the
Bahamas where they were
also neighbours.

Dr Cox was the first per-
son to exhibit in Ms Col-
lie’s gallery in Nassau.
When Ms Collie moved to
Memphis in December of
2008, the two decided to
continue their connection
through exhibiting annual-
ly together, but now on the
coast of Memphis.

The works of both artists
offer colourful displays of
light, energy and emotion.

“Life is full of colour,”
Ms Collie said. “Those red
hot moments when passion
is all around you, you can
taste what life has to offer.
When your heart pounds
for the next moment.”

“Born and raised in the
Bahamas I have been
blessed with all the colours
of the world. We are a
colourful country and ever
more colourful are our
people,” she said.

Dr Cox, who recently
returned from a solo exhi-
bition in London said, “I
want my paintings to be
portals to mythical realms,
gateways to imaginary
worlds beyond everyday
reality. Seeing beyond the
illusion of ‘reality’ is the
first step to dreaming our
own dreams. When we
dream our own dreams, we
bring light to the world and
we inspire others to let
their light shine.”

Dr Cox comes to the
visual arts with a unique
and diverse background.
Described by the British
Medical Journal as a
‘Renaissance Woman’ in
2004, she is a medical doc-
tor, a historian, social
entrepreneur, professional
jazz-singer, writer and
visionary artist. Dr Cox
was also the first Bahami-
an to become a Rhodes
Scholar.

“T decided from an early
age that I would follow my
own path, and be guided
by my inner voice and intu-
ition. My path has led to
me working in a number of
different professions. I
have worked as a medical
doctor, an academic histo-
rian of medicine, a jazz-
singer, a writer, a consul-
tant in human develop-
ment and urban renewal.
Now finally, Iam able to
speak my truth using the

Wy 5 = 4

A

“hey

Mk





1

MEMPHIS, Tennessee
— Opening on May 28,
the Art Village Gallery
will be presenting the

works of two Bahamian

ees artists, Dr Desiree Cox

and Nicole Collie, with
their exhibition titled
“Sine.Qua.Non: Without

which it could not be.”

It is not the first time these two artists have

—
ELT ie
t

iit

Lik

symbolism of words, sound
and colour on canvas.”

A recent review in The
Londonist from the UK
said, “Her brash strokes
and colourful palettes are
derived from a place deep
within the soul - a place
she encourages everyone
to look into.”

“Tam so pleased to have
Desiree exhibiting here
with me in Memphis,” said
Ms Collie.

Speaking about her art,
Ms Collie said, “I think
women are incredible crea-
tures. We have such big
shoes to fill from being a
mother, lover, caregiver,
housekeeper, wife, friend
and still have to work our
40 plus hours a week. We
as women have learnt to
do it all and I try to reflect
this in my paintings. As a
woman I realise that we
don't take time to pat our-
selves on to back as we
nurture the world around
us.”

“There’s an old Spanish
proverb that continues to
inspire me and captures
the essence of this joint
art exhibition of the works
of Nicole and myself. It is
‘Traveler, there is no
road. The road is made by
travelling.’ ”

|. Dr Desiree

Cox.

2. Artist
Nicole Collie

with her son.

3. “Lullaby”
by Dr Desiree
Cox.

4. The art

work of
Nicole Collie.

© In brief

Floods in Haiti
Kill 11 people,
: destroy homes

| Ml PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti

FLOODS have killed at least

: 11 people this week as heavy
rains swamp towns still rebuild-
: ing from last year’s hurricanes,
: Haiti’s civil protection depart-
: ment said Friday, according to
i the Associated Press.

Most of the victims were

? swept away by swollen rivers
: or died when their flimsy
: homes collapsed, officials said.
: Five of the deaths were report-
i ed in the rice-growing Arti-
: bonite Valley.

Rains that began a week ago

? have been heaviest on the
? southern peninsula near Les
? Cayes and Camp Perrin, where
? 1,000 homes have been flood-
i ed. Some areas received nearly
: 3 inches (74 millimeters) of rain
: Thursday night, Haiti’s meteo-
? rological office said.

New flood alerts were issued

Friday for all of Haiti’s 10
; administrative regions.

Even small amounts of rain

i can swell rivers and overflow
: fields in this poor Caribbean
: nation, which is particularly
? vulnerable to flooding because
: of erosion from farming and
: deforestation.

President Rene Preval visit-

i ed the west-coast town of St.
: Marc to view flooding
: Wednesday and urged resi-
: dents to stop building homes in
i ravines, Radio Kiskeya report-
: ed.

With a new hurricane sea-

i son officially starting June 1,
? officials worry new floods
: could damage Haiti’s strug-
: gling agriculture and economy.
: Last year, four tropical storms
i killed some 800 people and
: caused $1 billion of damage,
: aggravating chronic malnutri-
? tion in several areas.

International donors pledged

_ } $324 million last month to help
+ Haiti rebuild, but the govern-
: ment said it could need three
: times that amount.

Official Cuban
daily proposes
"Savings or
Death!’

| MHAVANA

CUBAN state media says

: the island should adopt the
? motto “Savings or Death!” to
? withstand tough economic
: times, according to the Asso-
i ciated Press.

Friday’s proposal in an edi-

: torial by Granma director
: Lazaro Barredo is a play on
: the communist leadership’s slo-
: gan “Socialism or Death!”
: Barredo says Central Bank
i president Francisco Soberan
: came up with the phrase.

The editorial complains

? about “squandering” fuel and
? other resources, and worker
: “passivity.” Barredo writes that
i the crisis means laborers must
? work harder and conserve
: resources, and their bosses
: must push them more.

He says more productivity

? is necessary to help Cuba be
? more self-sufficient and cor-
rect what he calls an unsus-
tainable trade imbalance of 78
? percent imports during the first
} quarter.

Barbados
ames gov't
bldg. for US
attorney general

m@ BRIDGETOWN, Barbados

U.S. Attorney General Eric

: Holder’s visit to Barbados is
? only for three days, but his
? name will remain even after he
: leaves, according to the Associ-
? ated Press.

The country is renaming a

: collection of government offices
? the Eric H. Holder Jr. Munici-
? pal Complex to honor Wash-
: ington’s No. 1 prosecutor.

Holder’s father was born in

: Barbados, and his mother has
} roots on the island as well.

The attorney general met Fri-

? day with Prime Minister David
: Thompson and other officials
: to discuss efforts to fight drug
? trafficking and other crime.

Formerly known as Tamarind

Hall, the complex in St. Joseph
? Parish includes a police station,
; court, library and post office.



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CLOUDY WITH

copy ESTORM

Volume: 105 No.149

Team Bahamas

eS te

SEE SPORTS ON PAGES NINE AND TEN



=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009

PLP chairman faces
convention challenge

Claim that
position will
be contested
along with
the deputy
leader post

AS THE
furore sur-
rounding the
PLP’ s
upcoming
national con-
vention con-
tinues to
build,
sources with-
in the party
suggest that



not only will Glenys
the post of Yanna-Martin
deputy

leader be contested, but also
that of National Chairman.

According to sources within
the party, there is a growing
dislike, “or at the very least
displeasure” with the current
chairman Glenys Hanna-Mar-
tin, who has been busy
reopening and revitalising
branches over the past few
months.

As the daughter of Gover-
nor General Arthur Hanna,
Mrs Hanna-Martin is a life-
long member of the PLP, and
has substantial influence with
its stalwart councillors. How-
ever, it is believed that her
influence throughout the
branches in New Providence is
where would-be challengers
might make a play to under-
mine her authority and make
their presence known.

Slated for October 18th, the
PLP’s convention is being
billed as the staging ground
for the greatest political
“bloodbath” that this country
has seen in the last few years.

With nearly eight candidates
reportedly vying for the post
of deputy leader, this position
is being seen by party insid-
ers as the ultimate “stepping
stone” to the all powerful
position of leader of the party.

Among those slated to con-
test this position are PLP MP
for Cat Island and San Sal-
vador Philip Davis, PLP MP
for Fort Charlotte Alfred
Sears, Senator Jerome Fitzger-
ald, lawyer Paul Moss, and the
party’s MP for West End and
Bimini Obie Wilchcombe.

One of the party’s up and
coming figures, South Andros
MP Picewell Forbes has also

SEE page six

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

Fridays & Saturdays



ENS



Bahamians
‘should be
pleased’ with
bail ruling



GRADE ONE students of Sandilands Primary School give flowers to Mrs Stehanie McDonald yesterday. Mrs McDonald was honoured at
Fox Hill Community Centre for her 45 years of dedicated service to teaching.

Police urge businesses to

band together to fight crime

m@ By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

BUSINESS owners and
employees are being told to
fight back against criminals
by banding together under
the new Business Crime
Watch initiative being
launched by police.

Speaking to business rep-
resentatives in the
Dowdeswell Street area of
the Central Division yester-
day, police encouraged pro-
fessionals to pool their
resources to install mutually
beneficial CCTV cameras
and share information to dri-
ve criminals out of the area.

Business representatives
told police about crime in
the area, including frequent
armed robberies, a continu-

New initiative
is launched

ing problem of prostitutes
touting for business, trou-
blesome vagrants occupying
abandoned houses, and
unsanitary streets.

One businessman told
police he had been robbed
at gunpoint six times over
the last year, and in the last
instance $20,000 worth of
goods were stolen.

Another said: “People are
sleeping in the doorways of
these old buildings and hav-
ing sex in them during the
day time, but not only that,
when I come to work some-
times in the morning there
are used condoms on the
steps.

SEE page six



e SEE PAGE TWO

Hotel union elections
have been postponed
until further notice

BAHAMAS Hotel Cater-
ing and Allied Workers
Union President Roy Cole-
brook has announced that
the elections scheduled for
Tuesday, May 26, have been
postponed until further
notice.

In the press statement
issued from the office of
Commercial Law Advocates,
Mr Colebrook said that
because of the refusal of the
Registrar of Trade Unions to
indicate that he will super-
vise and certify the election
of officers and members of
the executive council of the
union on Wednesday, May
27, “the said elections and
the triennial general meeting
of the general membership,
scheduled for Tuesday, May
26, is now postponed until
further notice of the execu-
tive council following the

decision of Justice Jon Isaacs
in the matter current before
him.”

On Thursday, First Vice
President of the (BHCAWU)
Kirk Wilson, secured a
Supreme Court order to pro-
hibit Labour Minister Dion
Foulkes and the Registrar of
Trade Unions from supervis-
ing or certifying the union’s
elections scheduled for the
end of this month.

This order, which was
handed down by Justice
Isaacs rules that the union’s
executive team and the Min-
ister are free to challenge it.

According to reports from
the union’s executive, its
president Roy Colebrook,
Treasurer Basil McKenzie
and General Secretary Leo
Douglas did not go through
the proper channels to sched-
ule the election dates.



NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



Bar President
Says it was
wrong for
parliament to
try to take
responsibility
from judiciary

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@
tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIANS should
be pleased that the Court
of Appeal has ruled that
people accused of mur-
der or other serious
crimes cannot be denied
bail without considera-
tion of their constitution-
al rights, the President of
the Bar Association said.

Wayne Munroe said it
was wrong for parliament
ever to have tried to take
from within the responsi-
bility of the judiciary the
right to determine
whether or not an
accused person should or
should not be let free.

“Bahamian people
should be very happy
that no Bahamian can be
locked up on the say-so
of the executive (branch
of the government) with-
out a judge being able to
scrutinise the case and
determine whether you
should be in custody or
not.

SEE page six



MEMORIAL SERVICE
FOR EXPAT
BUSINESSMAN

MINISTRY IS SET
TO LAUNCH A
‘WORLD-FIRST’
TOURISM CONCEPT
PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

MEMORIAL
IASI

Photos by TIM CLARKE

ROB Thomas shared fond memories of his friend Hywel Jones and their 22 trips to Jamaica. A celebration in honour of the life of the late expatri-
ate businessman Hywel Jones was held yesterday at the New Providence Community Centre. Mr Jones became the year’s 26th murder victim when
he died at the Princess Margaret Hospital from injuries he received when he was shot by an unknown assailant more than three weeks ago. A banker
by profession, who lived in the Bahamas for more than 20 years, Mr Jones was just 55.

LONGTIME friend of Hywel Jones, Keith Knox, spoke about why Hywel
Jones was such an extraordinary friend.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

MRS Stephanie McDonald speaks at her honourary service yesterday, where Sandilands primary teachers,
students and special guests honoured her for 45 years of dedicated service to teaching.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
le AO icy
Ue Pa ay
322-2197

TARO aera pe

Useyiaargeres
liss Unt


THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



PMH metlical ant

© In bri ! a Ministry is set to launch a
‘world-first tourism concept

surgical clinics to
Close for three days

MEDICAL and surgical clin-
ics at the Princess Nearer’ 2
Hospital will be closed for three
days while University of the i
West Indies medical students }
to sit their final exams. i

The clinic will be closed to }
the public on Thursday May 28, }
Tuesday June 2, and Thursday }
June 4. 7

Anyone who has an appoint-
ment scheduled for these dates i
should contact the clinic on }
322-2861. :

PMH authorities apologise }
for any inconvenience this may
cause. i

Florida-based
airline fined $1.3m

m@ WASHINGTON

FEDERAL regulators
fined a Florida-based
regional airline $1.3 million
for overworking its pilots
and dispatchers, according
to Associated Press.

The Federal Aviation
Administration said Thurs-
day that Gulfstream Inter-
national Airlines of Fort
Lauderdale violated regula-
tions on how many hours
puots and dispatchers can
work and improperly main-
tained equipment.

FAA spokeswoman Lau-
ra Brown said an investiga-
tion last summer found
instances in 2007 and 2008
in which flight crews were
not provided a minimum of
eight hours rest in a 24-hour
period and in which they
flew more than 34 hours in a
seven-day period.

Brown said FAA also ;
found 148 instances in which :
flight dispatchers worked ;
more than 10-straight
hours, the maximum permit-
ted under federal regula-
tions.

The fine came on the
heels of hearings last week
by the National Transporta-
tion Safety Board into the
crash of a regional airliner
near Buffalo, N.Y., in Feb-
ruary.

The captain of that plane,
Marvin Renslow, received
his pilot training from Gulf- }
stream Training Academy of :
Fort Lauderdale, which is ;
run by Gulfstream Interna-
tional Airlines.

The Buffalo flight was
operated by another region-
al airline, Colgan Air Inc. of
Manassas, Va., for Conti-
nental Airlines. Gulfstream
airlines’ Web site says it
also operates flights for
Continental.

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribumemedia.net

THE Ministry of Tourism is set to
launch a “world-first” tourism concept
within the next week, in the expecta-
tion that the “all-inclusive island”
offering will encourage a better spread
of visitors’ dollars throughout the local
economy and a more diverse range of
experiences for holiday-makers.

An initial May 15 deadline to start
selling the all-inclusive “Club Grand
Bahama” package holidays was nar-
rowly missed as the ministry finalised
arrangements with a local Bahamian
company to create a special debit-type
card intended to smooth the pre-paid
experience for participants.

The “Club Grand Bahama” card,

‘Club Grand Bahama’ card intended

replacing an originally envisioned
coupon system, will allow holiday-
makers to access the accommodation,
meals and other experiences which will
be available to them in Grand Bahama
as part of their silver, gold or platinum
holiday pre-paid package without ever
having to resort to their wallets.

It is made by Transfer Solutions
Providers Limited, the same compa-
ny which created the rechargeable
“Mango card” currently in use in the
public bus system to reduce the use
and storage of cash on public buses.

“The company showed an under-

to smooth pre-paid experience

standing of the programme and pro-
ceeded to develop a customised ver-
sion of their card for us.

“We wanted to ensure we didn’t use
a system which was not desirable and
not convenient,” said David Johnson,
deputy director general at the Min-
istry of Tourism.

Among the hotel properties featured
the Club Grand Bahama all-inclusive
packages, which will be promoted by
the ministry alongside its regular holi-
day options, are the two Our Lucaya
hotels, Flamingo Bay and Pelican Bay.

Various Grand Bahama restaurants,

from cafes to gourmet dining experi-
ences, have also gotten in on the deal,
and will be available to tourists across
the three-tiered programme.

Minister of Tourism Vincent Van-
derpool Wallace said: “What’s very
important to understand about this
effort is that it’s an innovation which
we hope will be the future of ensuring
that visitor expenditure and experi-
ence are distributed far more broadly.

“We don’t expect it to take off like a
rocket; we think it will grow very slow-
ly in the beginning and then much
more quickly when we iron the kinks
out.”

In the long term, the ministry
expects that based on its success, the
all-inclusive programme might be
expanded to New Providence and the
Family Islands.

Help for the unemployed through national campaign

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -— Carry Your
Candle Light the Bahamas has
teamed up with the Grand
Affair Island Women’s Con-
ference to help six unemployed
persons as part of a nationwide
campaign to encourage acts of
love and kindness.

CYCLTB founder Patrice
Stubbs and committee mem-
bers Diane Wildgoose and
Rehuder Rolle came to the aid
of two unemployed women
this week, presenting Rochelle
Johnson with a cheque to cov-
er her electricity bill and Bren-
da Lee Thompson with gro-
ceries.

Dr Wanda Davis-Turner of
the GAIWC has pledged to
collect donations for four
unemployed women every
night of the conference, which
began Wednesday at the St
John’s Jubilee Cathedral.

Dr Turner has also agreed
to allow the women to attend
the conference and Saturday’s
Byron Cage Concert for free.

“I think the CYCLTB ini-
tiative is phenomenal... I am
so glad that the conference is
joining in doing what we can to
say to women who are unem-
ployed that we love you and
support you,” she said.

Dr Turner said: “It is not
how much but it is what you



FROM LEFT: donation recipients Brenda Lee Thompson and Rochelle Johnson; CYCLTB committee member
Andrew Moss, CYCLTB founder Patrice Stubbs, committee member Maureen Sands, Dr Wanda Davis-Turner
and Anastacia Lewis of the GAIWC; and committee members Diane Wildgoose and Rehuder Rolle.

do to make the difference in
someone’s life who may be
thinking about committing sui-
cide.

“When the hopeless feel that
they’re noticed and their needs
are being met then they know
that God sees them and cares
for them through people. And
this is how we can be God’s
eyes, hands, feet, and legs — by
taking this opportunity to help
someone.”

The conference, which is
being held under the theme,
‘Turning Scars into Stars,’ is
billed as an effort to reach out
to all women, especially those
who are “unemployed, heart-
broken and abused”.

25-year prison sentence
upheld by Court of Appeal

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE COURT of Appeal
has upheld the 25-year
prison sentence of a man
convicted of attempting to
murder his cousin in 2007.

Shawn Culmer had
appealed his conviction of
the December 2005 attempt-
ed murder of his cousin,
Leander Culmer. The vic-
tim, who is now paralyzed
from the waist down as a
result of gunshot injuries,
was a key prosecution wit-
ness in the trial of Angelo
Brennen alias “Nasty.”

Culmer was shot two
months after testifying at
the trial. Brennen was con-
victed on November 3, 2005,
of the murder of his former
girlfriend Alfreda Pinder,
34, and the attempted mur-
der of her daughter,
Calvonya Grant, 16, on
October 29, 2004. Brennen
was given the mandatory
death penalty, which was
later commuted to life
imprisonment due to a sub-
sequent ruling by the Privy

Council declaring the
mandatory death penalty
unconstitutional.

In the ruling of Justices
Emmanuel Osadebay, Hart-
man Longley and Christo-
pher Blackman, which was
handed down Thursday, the
court noted that the primary
issue for determination on
the appeal was the identifi-
cation of the appellant by
Leander Culmer and his
brother, Ricardo. At the tri-
al before Justice Jon Isaacs,
the brothers identified
Shawn Culmer as the man

who had entered their home
around 5 am on December
20, 2005, and shot Leander.
According to their evidence,
Culmer who was masked
entered through a window
and fired a shot, which
struck Leander in his leg. A
struggle followed between
the gunman and Leander,
resulting in Leander being
shot a second time. Leander
fell backwards onto a bed
but was able to remove the
intruder’s mask and realized
that it was his cousin,
Shawn. The intruder placed
the gun to Leander’s head
and attempted to fire, how-
ever, ran off when the gun
failed to discharge. Ricardo

Galleria

HR FR Rw

testified that he gave chase
with a cutlass and was also
able to identify the gunman
as Shawn Culmer during the
pursuit.

The accused, under oath,
however, testified that he
was at home in bed at the
time of the incident until
about 7.30 that morning.
The Justices in their ruling
stated that in view of their
conclusions on the issue of
identification, along with the
evidence of the case, they
did not consider the origi-
nal verdict either “unsafe or
unsatisfactory.”

The court dismissed the
appeal and affirmed the
conviction.

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“We've been having an
incredible time and we expect
amighty move of God that will
impact the social needs of this
nation, especially as it relates
to women,” Dr Turner said.

CYCLTB founder Mrs
Stubbs commended Dr Turner



and conference organisers for
“lighting their candle of love”.
She expects to launch a
CYCLTB initiative in New
Providence next weekend.
“We are looking at working
with (talk show host) Steve
McKinney in holding a press

conference and shooting a tele-
vision show to launch it in Nas-
sau,” she said.

Mrs Stubbs said that since
the programme was officially
launched on May 1 in Freeport,
several families have been
assisted with rent, groceries,
and utility and medical bills.

“The global economic dilem-
ma we find ourselves in and its
affect on the Bahamian peo-
ple, as well as the level of crime
in this country are the main
reasons why this initiative was
started,” she said.

“We have a lot of people in
our nation who feel hopeless
and are contemplating suicide,
and whose cupboards are bare,
and others who are oblivious to
what is going on.

“Our aim is to invite every
person living in this Bahamas
to find one unemployed per-
son and do something: help
with rent, mortgage, electricity,
babysitting, however they can
assist,” she said, adding that
the campaign will run for a
year.

SHARING LOVE’S MESSAGE.
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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009

THE: TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Obama debating Cheney 1s plus for GOP

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — In political debate,
the side that keeps its arguments simple and
repeats them again and again is likely to gain the
advantage. It is an easier sale, especially when the
topic is as scary as terrorism.

That's how Republicans got the edge in the
dispute over President Barack Obama's planned
closing of the Guantanamo Bay prison. And it put
former Vice President Dick Cheney on a separate
but almost equal platform with the president of
the United States, which is a plus any time the
party out of power can manage it.

Their back-to-back speeches on Thursday
gave Cheney "a lot of credibility” and put Obama
on the defensive, said Republican pollster David
Winston.

"From a political standpoint, I think Cheney
wins on points," said GOP strategist Rich Galen.
Long-term, the former vice president's premier
role may have a downside for the Republicans,
given his 25 per cent approval rating and his sta-
tus as the most unpopular top figure in an unpop-
ular administration. But Galen said that at this
point, "It's either Cheney or who else. There's no
who else, so you take Cheney.”

In the Guantanamo argument,Obama’s critics
didn't worry about legalities, court decisions or
complexities. They invented an argument about
letting terrorists move next door to Americans.

Although no one had ever suggested such a
thing, it worked, and the Democratic Senate vot-
ed overwhelmingly to deny Obama an $80 million
appropriation to close the prison camp by eight
months from now, as he had promised. Now
Democratic leaders are saying that if Obama will
come up with a plan on what to do with the pris-
oners — there are about 240 of them — they
might agree.

He said he's working on it, but it isn't easy. If
it were, the place might already have been shut,
since former President George W. Bush said that
he wanted to close it but 2008 wasn't the right
time.

"We're cleaning up something that is, quite
simply, a mess," Obama said. He said the prison
Bush ordered opened in 2002 has left prisoners in
legal limbo, flooded the government with legal
challenges and distracted officials who should be
spending their time dealing with potential threats.

"There are no neat and easy answers here,” he
said. "I wish there were."

He said the issues are too complicated for
absolutes or rigid ideology. So instead of scrap-
ping everything the Bush administration did, he
is adapting some of it, notably the use of military
commissions to try terrorist suspects, to bring
them "in line with the rule of law."

To which Cheney, in his own terrorism speech
minutes after Obama's, said there's no place "for
some kind of middle ground" on the issue. " ...
Half measures keep you half exposed,” he said.
"You cannot keep just some nuclear-armed ter-
rorists out of the United States, you must keep
every nuclear-armed terrorist out.”

There's no disputing that. But conjuring nuclear
terrorists serves his argument that it is all or noth-
ing, with no room for "sensible compromise" or
"splitting differences," in Cheney's words.

Don't Miss This Year's 5 |

Pa 7 AY
@ The Public Cove Beach’)

Back of Atlantis

July 4, 2009 - American Independance
July 10, 2009 - Bahamian Independence
November 26, 200 - Thanksgiving

The Public Is Invited

10am - Until

Tel. 325-6306/636-0726

For more info contact Paul Rolle
All patriotic Bahamians join us to secure the
beaches for the future generation.
Please come show your support.

Our appreciation goes oul to Atlantis

for the signs on Cove Beach

Even debating the issues is wrong in Cheney's
view. "The terrorists see just what they were hop-
ing for — our unity gone, our resolve shaken,
our leaders distracted," he said.

And not only over Guantanamo, but also over
the interrogation tactics Cheney calls enhanced
and Obama calls torture.

"Torture was never permitted," Cheney
repeated. But waterboarding and other methods
certainly sound torturous. Cheney dismissed that
issue as "contrived indignation and phony mor-
alizing.” He also said that hard-line questioning
produced information that "prevented the violent
death of thousands, if not hundreds of thousands,
of innocent people."

No proof, but he said that is because it's in clas-
sified memos Obama hasn't released. That is
said to be under review. Still, in an information
sieve like Washington, it is hard to conceive that
information involving hundreds of thousands of
lives saved would not have been leaked by now.

Cheney argues that closing Guantanamo will
make America less safe, and that in promising to
do it, Obama and his allies are trying to cozy up
to European opinion. Cheney's administration
wanted it shut at some point, and so did Sen.
John McCain, the Republican presidential nom-
inee who now says it can't be done without a
plan on what to do with the inmates.

It was, as Obama said, opened without a plan
on what to do with the prisoners except lock
them up. Bush did it by presidential order; there
was no discussion or legislation involved, and in
2006 the Supreme Court overruled the system
by which the administration planned to try pris-
oners. At one point, Guantanamo held up to 750
inmates. The new president noted that more than
525 prisoners were released under the Bush
administration, before he took office and ordered
the place closed.

"Rather than keeping us safer, the prison at
Guantanamo has weakened American national
security," Obama said. "It is a rallying cry for
our enemies. It sets back the willingness of our
allies to work with us in fighting an enemy that
operates in scores of countries.”

That's complicated. Republicans are still keep-
ing it simple.

"Guantanamo has worked very well," said
Sen. Mitch McConnell, the GOP leader. "I'm
not sure this is broken and needs fixing.”

And certainly not if it will mean bringing pris-
oners to the United States to be tried and impris-
oned if convicted.

"Republicans oppose releasing these terrorists
or importing them into our local communities,”
said Rep. John Boehner, the House Republican
leader.

Obviously, but nobody has proposed either.

Obama said trying to scare people won't pro-
tect them. "And we will be ill-served by some of
the fear-mongering that emerges whenever we
discuss this issue."

But for the present, it serves the political pur-
poses of his opponents.

(This article was written by Walter R. Mears,
AP Special Correspondent)



Our inadequately
maintained storm
drainage systems

EDITOR, The Tribune.

AS WE await the start of
the 2009 Atlantic hurricane
season in two weeks time, I
couldn't help but notice the
considerable flooding that
resulted today from a mere
two inches of rainfall. At cer-
tain locations on East and
West Bay Streets, downtown
and in the Dowdeswell Street
area it was almost knee deep
for a while, glaringly high-
lighting Nassau's inadequate-
ly maintained storm drain sys-
tems.

These are generally so
choked with soil, weeds, rub-
bish or a combination of all
of the above as to be totally
incapable of performing their
intended function. In the Fort
Charlotte area for example,

Praising —
PMH for my
treatment

EDITOR, The Tribune.

LAST evening I watcheda
film on NBC produced by Far-
rah Fawcett and filmed by i
Alana Stewart in which Far-
rah’s battle with anal cancer
was documented for two
years, through all her treat-
ments in LA and Germany,

(at enormous expense), her
pain and her high hope for
recovery which now unfortu-
nately is not to be.

I was diagnosed with the
same cancer at approximately
the same time and my last CT
scan performed two weeks ago
showed that Iam still cancer-
free. I was treated with
surgery, chemo and radiation
all right here at PMH and the
Cancer Centre on Collins :
Avenue. I cannot speak highly i
enough of Dr Locksley i
Munroe, my surgeon, Drs Tra-
cy Roberts, Theodore Turn-
quest and Duvaughn Curling,
my oncologists, Dr Margo
Munroe, my radiation oncolo-
gist and all those unsung
heroes, the nurses of PMH, in
particular those in the oncolo-
gy clinic where I was treated
as a public patient.

PMH comes in for a lot of
criticism, but I could not have
been treated better anywhere
in the world. Had Farrah Faw-
cetthad my team behindher
who knows if she would have
had a different outcome?

I will be eternally grateful.

A SURVIVOR
Nassau,
May 18, 2009.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, MICHAEL WAYDE BROWN of
Avocado Gardens, Carmichael Roadin the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence one of the Islands of Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, intends to change my name to MICHAEL WAYDE
TURNQUEST. If there are any objections to this change of name
by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ROSNELL JOSEPH of MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, GENERAL DELIVERY is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,

for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written

and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 23rd day of MAY 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE



NOTICE is hereby given that PAUL ISAACS of CASSIA
CL, GLENISTON GARDENS, P.O. BOX SS-6345, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and

Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why

registration/naturalization should not be granted, should



send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 23 day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



the street sweepers “sweep”
the debris from the road verge
almost daily but not one of
them bothers to lift the inspec-
tion plates in the sidewalk, let
alone clean out the drainage
channels below, that are
meant to channel the water
from the street into the
drainage swale.

The result is traffic conges-
tion, further erosion of our
already dreadful roads, and
stagnant standing water espe-
cially in low lying areas, caus-
ing damage to properties, ill-
ness from water supplies con-
taminated by overflowing sew-

erage systems and invariably,
a severe island wide mosquito
problem.

The government, God bless
them, continues the struggle
to upgrade the condition of
the roads and verges, clean up
our filthy island and educate
our slovenly people about the
consequences indiscriminate
littering and dumping has on
our tourism industry and our
own lives. Let's have the rele-
vant department heads out
there giving some direction to
their staff, instead of hiding
behind their suits, so the job
gets properly done in a timely
fashion and we all get what
we're hoping and paying for.

IAN MABON
Nassau,
May 19, 2009

Unemployment
cheque issues at NIB

EDITOR, The Tribune.

TODAY (May Sth) a friend and I went over to National
Insurance to collect an unemployment cheque (since this person
is disabled, and filled all necessary documents, and was told that
every detail, including mention of disability, was correct) and
was declined. For weeks and month it was advertised that per-
sons can collect monies, if unemployed prior to 2004, made all
necessary contributions to NIB, not self-employed, under 65,
excluding disability and survivor’s benefits.

Now when we got there the person was told that they cannot
receive monies, bear in mind that this person became disabled
on the job (had been working over Paradise Island for almost 30
years, and just got made redundant after getting a stroke in 2005)
and continued on until 2006, which an employment letter was
given to verify these statements. What is my concern for my
friend is why they were denied the claim and have made con-
tributions as an employed person over many years and still

could not claim.

Strangely, the person/s who were stationed at the school
were the same person/s actually verifying or denying the claims,
even though my friend put on the application that they are
receiving a cheque for disability, and are still capable of move-
ment and willing to do minimal work, can an explanation be giv-

en for this?

The Prime Minister, who also has NIB in his portfolio, said the
most claims can be honoured, so what will become of this,
since this person has contributed to this fund up to 2006?

Thanks for the space, and hope that someone knowledgeable

can throw light on this matter.

R PRATT
Nassau,
May 5, 2009.

Flamingo affair prompts
airspace concern

EDITOR, The Tribune.

With my “pet project” - accord-
ing to a very prominent individual
- being the creation of a Bahamian
Flight Information Region (FIR),
a recent newspaper article refo-
cused my attention on the matter.

In a Nassau Guardian report of
Tuesday May 12, 2009 (“Slain
HMBS Flamingo Crew Members
Remembered”), Minister of Edu-
cation Carl Bethel, paying homage
to the four “patriotic” marines who
died after Cuban MIGs attacked
the Flamingo off the Ragged
Island chain on May 10, 1980, said,
inter alia, “It is now for us to etch
them in our recollection...”

With the RBDF falling within
the portfolio of the Ministry of
National Security, the rationale for
the Education minister giving the
eulogy is somewhat difficult to
appreciate.

In any event, as documented in
Anthony Thompson’s excellent
and recently updated “An Eco-
nomic History of The Bahamas”,
following this Act of War, “The
Cuban government paid $5 mil-
lion in compensation for the sink-
ing of HMBS Flamingo. The par-
ents of each dead marine received
a total of $400,000 paid by the
Cuban Government for the four
families.”

Despite the passage of 29 years
since the tragic incident occurred -
and just seven years after Bahami-
an independence, it is still not

absolutely clear what triggered the
Cuban MIG attack. The deadly
airstrike, during which Duncan
Town was also buzzed, took place
within Bahamian sovereign air-
space that, since 1952 up to the
present, is included within the
Cuban FIR. Similar to Bimini -
which, located only about 50 miles
from the US mainland and which is
actually included within US air-
space - the Ragged Islands area
about 60 miles from the Cuban
north coast.

Without sounding unduly
alarmist, a “clear and present dan-
ger” may exist off the southern
Andros coastline, where, it is
understood, members of the
Bahamas uniformed forces flying
missions in US Black Hawk heli-
copters must strictly adhere to
Cuban protocol for flight authori-
sation in the area.

“Man, we in Bahamian air-
space” should definitely not be the
rationale for failing to alert Cuban
aviation authorities of flight activ-
ities, less, God forbid, itchy trig-
ger fingers once again create hav-
oc and loss of life.

Although Cuba was suspended
from the OAS in 1962, indications
are that they’re still interested in
regional solidarity and integration,
and fully endorse the creation of a
Bahamian FIR.

SIMON ARTZI
Nassau,
May, 2009.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, CECIL BRAD BETHEL
of the Western District of the said Island of New Providence,

Bahamas, intends to change my name to CECIL BRAD
DASSLER-BETHEL. If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.


THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009, PAGE 5





‘Tam vex and extremely
outraged at the public ver-
bal abuse — or diarrhoea -—
spewed by a public business
speaker hiding behind a
scholarly apron criticising
the government for not
reducing its staff and not
selling or closing govern-
ment entities in order to
reduce the government
debt.

Such mischievously desta-

bilising criticisms of even
the government's assistance
to helping the unemployed
and suffering at this time is
beyond belief.

"These are extremely dif-
ficult times for the poor and
many thousands who have
lost their jobs because of
business failures. It's
absolutely shocking that
this selfish person can
presently want to see our
government lay off its staff
and not think in the best
interest of the majority of
its people. My goodness,
and I thought we had fin-
ished with this minority
issue controlling the majori-
ty since 1967."

~ CONCERNED CITIZEN,
NASSAU

"Tam wex because of
Attorney General Michael
Barnett. I switch my TV to
channel 40 last week
Wednesday at 10.34am to
hear Senator and Minister
of Tourism Vincent Van-
derpool-Wallace making his
contribution to the debate
on the new communications
legislation — while behind
him, in clear view of the
cameras, Mr Barnett is
leaning back in his appar-
ently too comfortable chair,
eyes closed, asleep!

"He was practically hori-
zontal. There is no way he
could not realise that, seat-
ed within inches of the per-
son speaking at the time, he
would be in full view of
anyone watching the minis-
ter of tourism give his
speech. So what’s the con-
clusion? He has no interest
in the matter at hand, no
interest in even pretending
to be engaged in the matter
at hand, and no shame.
Well shame on you, attor-
ney general."

= POLITICAL OBSERVER,
NASSAU :

"T vex that even though

government said the trench-

ing on Bay Street would
soon be finished them deep
holes in the road still there.
Tam tired of my car wob-
bling all over the street,
dust flying in my face and
stink cars not letting me get
in the next lane, all because
government can't get their
act together and finish
things on time.”

"T vex because it seems
like most Bahamians don't
know what manners or
common courtesy is. They
too caught up in their stink
attitudes and nasty ways to
realise that the way they
treat other people comes
back to haunt them. No
wonder we are in the posi-
tion we are in, I mean,
wherever you call you can't
find a sensible, nice recep-
tionist, cashier or employee
who don't treat you as if
you doin’ them something
just for calling or going to
the place where they work.

"These people need to
learn to fix they face and
attitude before they go on
people job, because I surely
ain’ paying my good money

to get any stinkness from no

manners fools."

— FIX YA FACE, NASSAU

"T vex that whenever a lil’
piece of rain hit this island
traffic is hit a standstill. I
mean it could just be the
smallest spry what barely
wet the windshield and yet
traffic is be bumper to
bumper, causing me to be
late for work because peo-
ple on the road acting fool.

"People, y'all need to
learn how to drive and stop
creeping on the road just
because a lil’ piece of wet-
ness on the road.”

= MAD MOTORIST, NASSAU

¢ Are you vex? Send your
complaints to whyyouvex@tri-
bunemedia.net

~ TIRED OF THE
TRENCHES, NASSAU

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

PRESIDENT of the Police
Staff Association Bradley Sands
is agitating for government to
quickly enact the Police Force
Bill to ensure that members of
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force receive “critical” job
quality improvements.

"Why did we rush and pass
the Police Act when we have
yet to implement the benefits
that are affecting junior police
officers? There are a whole
heap of issues that are affecting
the welfare of police officers
and the association is tired of
diplomacy because it is not
working while junior officers

LOCAL NEWS

Sands calls for govt to

are hurting,” Mr Sands argued
yesterday.

Mr Sands claimed that two
police officers recently injured
in the line of duty — one shot
while making an arrest and
another injured during a car
crash — had both received let-
ters from the force's human
resources department stating
that their allotted 28 days of
leave had expired.

He claimed the officers were
told that if they remained on
leave they would be placed on
reduced pay.

Mr Sands said that if the 2009
Police Force Bill was being
enforced this would not have
happened, as such situations are
dealt with in the legislation.

The PSA, which is also call-

Classes launched
for parents of
troubled children

THE Department of Rehabil-
itative Services is offering classes
each Tuesday for parents and
guardians who are having prob-
lems managing their children.

Beginning 5pm at the depart-
ment’s head office on Thomp-
son Boulevard, the classes are
open to the public. Most parents
who attend are referred by social
workers and the courts.

“Some of us do not think we
have any problems with our par-
enting skills, and some say it is
not them but instead it is their
children,” observed senior pro-
bation officer Deidre Hepburn.
However, she said, parents often
suffer from a number of “issues”
that affect their relationship with
their children.

Mrs Hepburn pointed out that
some parents are simply not
good at supervising, guiding and
disciplining children, while others
are affected by a breakdown in
their relationship with the other
parent.

“The classes allow parents to
examine their parenting skills
and open them to various meth-
ods of disciplining their chil-
dren,” she said.

“Each child responds differ-
ently to various forms of disci-
pline so parents need to know
the different methods of disci-
plining their children.”

The topics discussed include
the effects of child abuse and
neglect, investing in children,
managing finances and how that
affects the upbringing of chil-
dren, and how to have effective

communication between parents
and children.

Forgiveness is one of the first
topics dealt with in the sessions.

“Some parents come to the
sessions angry and cannot move
on and gain anything until they
learn forgiveness,” said Mrs Hep-
burn.

“After the first two sessions,
they become more involved and
participate. They become more
vocal and the classes become
more interactive. They learn
from each other, sharing their
experiences and looking at things
differently.”

Facilitators also teach parents
how to communicate effectively
with family members and how
to pick up on non-verbal cues
displayed by children.

Participants can see officers at
the department on a one-on-one
basis. There is also the option of
organising a support group after
the classes are finished.

Mrs Hepburn said she hopes
the classes will eventually be held
throughout New Providence, not
just at the department’s office,
and expanded to the Family
Islands.

Jermaine, whose full name
cannot be published due to the
confidential nature of the case,
was ordered to attend the classes
by a judge. He is the father of a
14-year-old girl.

“Everyone should take these
classes,” he said. “No one should
send you here because everyone
has little problems with their chil-
dren.

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ing for increased pensions for
retired officers, said officers sta-
tioned on the Family Islands
are frustrated with their living
conditions and are under-
equipped.

“We are putting these police
officers in harm’s way and
nobody is checking. Officers are
fighting the dump fire without
proper equipment.

“The relevant authorities are
very much aware that these
issues were brought up, that
they are not acting in the best
interest of junior men of the
force.

"The Act was passed in the
House of Assembly and the
Senate but it's not signed into
law and all the while Rome is
burning,” argued Mr Sands.



“T thought it was going to be
‘Hey, you are a bad parent.’ But
it is not like that.

“Everyone is open in these
classes. The instructors give you
solutions you can try and you get
feedback on how to handle your
problems.”

He is paying more attention
to his daughter and listening to
what she tells him.

“She lets me know herself that
she is telling me things that oth-
er children would not tell their
parents,” he said.

The Bill — passed by Parlia-
mentarians earlier this year —
will make several changes to
the police force including the
establishment of a police com-
plaints inspectorate and limit
the terms of both the commis-
sioner and deputy commission-
er of police. It will repeal the
1965 Police Act and the Police
Force Act of 2007.

Another point of contention
for the PSA is the alleged
behaviour of the Police Tri-
bunal, which investigates and
if necessary punishes officers
accused of crimes or infractions.

Mr Sands claimed many offi-
cers are treated as "guilty until
proven innocent", and urged
the government to carry out a
review of the tribunal.

A judge also ordered Monal-
isa, the mother of twin girls, to
attend the classes.

At first she wanted to know
why she and not her daughters
was sent to the classes.

“But I told myself to stay
focused because there is a reason
they are sending me here,” she
said. “I had to do that or I would
not have been here all of these
weeks.

“More persons should attend
the classes to learn how to be
good parents.”



“We are
putting these
police officers
in harm’s way
and nobody is
checking.
Officers are
fighting the
dump fire
without proper
equipment.”



Bradley Sands

Raymond Bethel/BIS Photo

PICTURED from left are: executive
parenting officer Fronzetta John-
son, case worker Jenelle Cumber-
batch, senior probation officer
Deidre Hepburn and senior proba-
tion officer Sonia Saunders.

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Gathers, compiles and maintains basic credit information to be used in
making credit decisions.
Reviews and monitors credit sources, customer applications and
delinquent accounts. Processes credit applications.

Works with smaller customers to resolve collections issues and disputes.

Investigates disputes and reviews documentation.

Prepares and processes credit and collections account adjustments.
Implements credit suspensions.
Recommends further actions on delinquent accounts.

Maintains records of credit risks and delinquent accounts.

Provides support and coordination with third party agencies as needed.
Handles customer calls related to Collection Agency accounts.

Prepares and files bankruptcy claim documents.

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For more information please contact:
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PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



PLP chairman

FROM page one

been rumoured as a potential
candidate to vie for the post :

pleased’ with bail ruling

current deputy leader Mrs :
Cynthia Pratt who recently :
let it be known that she has :
yet to make up her mind as }
to her political future. She :
has said that she has to meet }
with party leader Perry :
Christie before she makes }

with St Thomas More MP
Frank Smith and the PLP
MP for North Andros Vin-
cent Peet.

Standing in the way of the
ambitions of these men is

any future announcement.

Having advised the Nation-
al Convention at its last sit- :
ting over a year ago that she }
would not continue in her :
post at the next general elec- ;
tion, speculation has been :
rampant throughout the :
country that Mrs Pratt may }

Bahamians ‘should be

FROM page one

“Parliament can’t remove from judi-
cial oversight the liberty of the sub-
ject,” said Mr Munroe.

Meanwhile, the Bar Association
President suggested that there is no
reason for the public to fear that the
ruling will lead to more accused crim-
inals being let out onto the streets.

His comments came after the court
handed down a landmark ruling on
Thursday, which stated that a section
of the Bail Act that prohibits the grant-
ing of bail in such cases is “unconsti-
tutional” and “void.”

Relatives of murder victims and
spokesman for the group “Families of
Murder Victims”, Rodney Moncur,
spoke out against the decision, saying
that they could not support it and sug-
gesting it would heighten “paranoia” in
an already fearful populace.

But Mr Munroe confirmed that the
ruling really only formalises a state of
affairs that has existed for sometime —
exemplified by the fact that judges
have frequently granted bail to people
accused of murder and other “serious
crimes” in instances where it is deemed
likely that they cannot be tried in a
“reasonable” period of time despite

He said such a practice “existed all
over the common law world” but in
The Bahamas, politicians always
“seemed to have a problem telling the
Bahamian public that you can’t
arbitrarily lock people up” without
reference to their constitutional
rights.

Mr Munroe added: “There’s nothing
in this judgment says that the experi-
ence is going to be that you are
arraigned for murder and you get bail
right away.

“That just wouldn’t be a proper use
of discretion. It would be very unusu-
al,” said Mr Munroe.

remanded and then to receive bail only
if they cannot receive a trial within a
reasonable time.

“If people think judges, who live in
the community, whose friends family
etcetera are subject to the same kind of
crime that the rest of us are, would
put on the street people who might
injure or kill their family or friends,
then they should be worried.

“But what people tend to overlook is
that judges, lawyers, they all have fam-
ily in the wider community.

“They live in the community so it’s
really not in their interest (to release
people on bail without good cause),”

have “changed her mind.”

the Act.

Such individuals are still likely to be

US asks Cuba to resume
talks on legal immigration

m@ WASHINGTON

IN A new overture to Cuba, the Obama
administration asked the island’s commu-
nist government on Friday to resume talks
on legal immigration of Cubans to the
United States suspended by former Presi-
dent George W. Bush, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

The State Department said it had pro-
posed that the discussions, which were
halted after the last meeting in 2003, be
restarted to “reaffirm both sides’ commit-
ment to safe, legal and orderly migration,
to review trends in illegal Cuban migration
to the United States and to improve oper-
ational relations with Cuba on migration
issues.”

President Barack Obama “wants to
ensure that we are doing all we can to sup-
port the Cuban people in fulfilling their
desire to live in freedom,” said Darla Jor-
dan, a department spokeswoman. “He will
continue to make policy decisions accord-
ingly.”

The move follows Obama’s decision in
April to rescind restrictions on travel to
Cuba by Americans with family there and
on the amount of money they can send to
their relatives on the island.

It also comes ahead of a high-level meet-
ing early next month of the Organization
of American States, where Cuba’s possible
re-entry into the regional bloc will be dis-
cussed. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham
Clinton will attend the June 2 meeting in
Honduras.

Clinton, however, told lawmakers this
week that the U.S. would not support

Cuba’s membership in the
organization until and unless
President Raul Castro’s
regime makes democratic
reforms and releases political
prisoners.

She and Obama have also
said that broader engagement
with Cuba, including the pos-
sible lifting of the U.S. embar-
go on the island, is dependent
on such steps.

There was no immediate
reaction from the Cuban gov-
ernment on Friday, but com-
munist officials were angered
when the Bush administration
decided to scuttle the talks on
grounds they were not crucial
for monitoring agreements
aimed at preventing a mass
exodus from the island.

In Miami on Friday, the
influential Cuban American
National Foundation wel-
comed the news, saying
resumed migration talks could
be “an opportunity to resolve issues of
United States national interest.”

However, three Cuban-American mem-
bers of Congress from Florida denounced
the move as “another unilateral conces-
sion by the Obama administration to the
dictatorship.”

“The United States suspended the
*migration talks’ with the Cuban dictator-
ship in January 2004 because the Cuban
regime refused to comply with basic
aspects of the Migration Accord of 1995,”

“



A DEPARTMENT spokes-
woman said President
Barack Obama (above)
‘wants to ensure that we
are doing all we can to
support the Cuban people
in fulfilling their desire to
live in freedom,’ said

Republican Reps. Lincoln
Diaz-Balart, his brother
Mario and [leana Ros-Lehti-
nen, said in a statement.
“The Cuban regime contin-
ues to violate the accord by
denying hundreds of exit per-
mits annually to Cuban
nationals who have received
visas to enter the United
States. The Obama adminis-
tration should first insist that
the Castro dictatorship com-
plies with the accord before
renewing *talks.”’

The twice-yearly meetings
in alternating countries had
been the highest level con-
tacts between the two coun-
tries, which have no diplo-
matic relations.

The suspension of the talks
occurred during an especial-
ly prickly period during
which then-president Fidel
Castro publicly criticizing
James Cason, at the time
head of the U.S. Interests Section in
Havana, as a “bully” and Washington con-
demning Havana for a crackdown that
rounded up 75 dissidents and sentenced
them to long prison terms.

The talks were created so the countries
could track adherence to 1994 and 1995
accords designed to promote legal, order-
ly migration between the two countries.
The aim was to avoid a repeat of the sum-
mer of 1994, when tens of thousands of
Cubans took to the sea in flimsy boats

said Mr Munroe.

Police urge





































businesses to

band together
to fight crime

FROM page one

“When it rains the water comes up to two feet in the road

and if we walk through it you will get something, and we
have illegal immigrants, all of that. Right here in this
area.”

Larry Forbes of Lucayan construction said he had

$30,000 worth of materials stolen from his business in Feb-
ruary, but has had no communication from police about the
progress of the case and whereabouts of his goods despite
learning from the news of the thief turning himself in. He
asked officers to keep victims of crime better informed.

Anthon Saunders, security co-ordinator for Doctor’s

Hospital, said one of his biggest challenges is getting the
attention of the police when he catches criminals in the act.

He said officers will insist he files a report at the station

before assistance will be provided.

Chief Superintendent Glenn Miller in charge of the

central division said officers should respond immediately
when called, and if they fail to, they should be reported to
the complaints unit.

“T hope that would not happen again in the central

division,” Mr Miller said. “We are encouraging our officers
to reach out and speak to people and advise you on what’s
going on.”

Mr Miller and his team ensured business representatives

attending the meeting at the Doctor’s Hospital confer-
ence centre in Dowdeswell Street that by forming a tight
network they will be powerful enough to drive out crime.

He urged business owners to purchase CCTV cameras



to overlook several businesses in the area as they can pro-
vide solid evidence in court for the conviction of criminals.

Mr Miller said: “We have frequently seen witnesses
appear in court and panic and change their story, or wit-
nesses do not appear to give evidence at all, or unfortu-
nately in some cases, witnesses disappear.

“What we need now is for business partners to develop
a witness. A very simple one is CCTV. It’s a powerful
form of witness that the world is using.”

He also suggested Business Watch could purchase a
vehicle to conduct patrols of the area.

Business representatives were introduced to one anoth-
er and to local officers, and Mr Miller assured them their
concerns had been noted and would be acted on immedi-
ately.

Business Watch groups will be headed by a co-ordinator
and team and hold monthly meetings with law enforcement
officials to discuss crime in the area.

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, MAY 24TH, 2009
7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Bro. Jamicko Forde

11:00 a.m. BOMC Service/Queen’s College Gym
7:00 a.m. Sis. Tezel Anderson/Sis. Marilyn Tinker (H.C.}

OT a AW CCM A eA On LEM

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL
CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS « Tel: 325-2921
SUNDAY, MAY 24TH, 2009

11:30 a.m. Speaker:

DR. DAVID ALLEN

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. ¢ Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
¢ Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. ¢ Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.

SUNDAY SERVICES ¢ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)





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Church School during Worship Service

RADIO MINISTRY

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Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles
P.O.Box EE-16807

Telephone number 325-57 12

LÂ¥O EMAIL - lynnk@bateinet.bs
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



WHO to consider
the severity of

‘sneaky’ swine flu

m@ GENEVA

THE World Health Orga-
nization said Friday it will
change the rules for declar-
ing a swine flu pandemic, a
virus the agency’s chief called
“sneaky” because of its abili-
ty to spread quickly from per-
son to person and potentially
mutate into a deadlier form,
according to Associated Press.

Under political pressure
from many of its 193 mem-
bers to consider factors other
than just the spread of the
disease before announcing a
global epidemic, WHO’s flu
chief said “course correc-
tions” were being made.

“What we will be looking
for is events which signify a
really substantial increase in
risk of harm to people,” Kei-
ji Fukuda told reporters in
Geneva.

So far the virus has been
mild, sickening 11,168 people
and causing 86 deaths, most
of them in Mexico, according
to WHO.

But experts worry it could
evolve into a more deadly
strain or overwhelm countries
unprepared for a major flu
outbreak.

Many countries fear a pan-
demic declaration would trig-
ger mass panic, and be eco-
nomically and politically dam-
aging. For developed coun-
tries that already have acti-
vated their pandemic pre-
paredness plans, a pandemic
declaration would change lit-
tle in their response strate-
gies.

Earlier this week, Britain
and other countries urged
WHO to reconsider its pan-
demic definition.

WHO hastily responded to
these concerns, as Fukuda
said the agency would revise
the conditions needed to
move from the current phase
5 to the highest level, phase 6,
which makes it a pandemic.

“The countries are telling
us now that moving from
phase 5 to 6 is not so help-
ful,” Fukuda said. He said the
alert phases were developed
before the outbreak hit, and
now need to be adjusted to
the reality of the situation.

The virus’ lethality could
become one of the required
criteria before a pandemic is
declared, Fukuda said.

Fukuda’s comments
echoed those of WHO Direc-
tor-General Margaret Chan,
who told governments she
would heed their call to cau-
tion in declaring a pandem-
ic.

At the same time, Chan
warned against complacency.

“This is a subtle, sneaky
virus,” she said at the close
of the weeklong meeting. “It
does not announce its pres-
ence or arrival in a new coun-
try with a sudden explosion
of patients seeking medical
care or requiring hospitaliza-
tion.”

“We expect it to continue
to spread to new countries
and continue to spread with-
in countries already affect-
ed,” Chan said.

Countries taking part in the
Geneva meeting agreed Fri-
day to delay efforts to finalize
a deal on sharing flu viruses,
instead instructing Chan to
find a solution by early next
year.

Developing countries lob-
bied hard to ensure they
would benefit from any drugs
created using their virus sam-
ples.





Palm B

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

OWNERS of the Palm Bay Beach Club
in Exuma yesterday dispelled reports that
the small beach-front resort has filed for
bankruptcy.

While admitting the property is battling
with the tourism downturn like most of its
counterparts, co-owners and managers Ron
and Bette Francis said they remain com-
mitted to keeping it open while maintaining
staff levels.

After inaccurate reports about the
resort's financial state were reported
through the broadcast media and on local
online message boards, the hotel was pep-
pered with calls from Labour and Social
Services officials, said Mr Francis.

Coupled with the recent announcement
that the Four Seasons at Emerald Bay will
shut its doors on May 26 leaving about 500

ay Beach Club owners
dispel bankruptcy reports



“I don't know
where the rumours
come from but it's
hurting us and I
wish people would
check their facts
before they put
them on the air.”

Co-owner and manager
Ron Francis



persons jobless, Mr Francis said misin-
formed persons on the island were wor-

ried about a new round of layoffs.

"Rumours sometimes can be more dam-
aging than the truth and unfortunately
everytime someone reads (the reports) and
cancels their booking it's making things
even more difficult for us. I don't know
where the rumours come from but it's hurt-
ing us and I wish people would check their
facts before they put them on the air,” said
Mr Francis, speaking to The Tribune from
Exuma yesterday.

Despite the depressed tourism market,
only two part-time waitresses have been
laid off from its 40-member staff.

With things not expected to turn around
until at best, the end of the year, the resort
is focused on attracting domestic tourists to
the 70-villa property. Management is cur-
rently offering a 35 per cent discount to
locals.

The beach-front property has two swim-
ming pools, jacuzzis, a full range of water
sports, and shuttle service to George Town.

"We're struggling as every business in
the Bahamas is, but we have always stayed
open for the last 10 years even when every-
one else has shut - 365 days a year - and we
intend to do so throughout this time. We're
resilient people and we have a fantastic
Bahamian staff who we count as family
and we're all going to work through this
tough time.

"My personal belief is that we'll see some
positive changes by the winter season — by
December — and 2010 will be an improve-
ment over 2009 and 2011 hopefully we'll be
back to normal," said Mr Francis.

Last week Exuma's largest employer —
the Four Seasons at Emerald Bay —
announced it was shutting its doors on May
26 leaving some 500 persons jobless. The
closure comes nearly two years after the
resort was placed in receivership.

Without new investors to acquire the
project, secured creditor Mitsui chose to
temporarily close the property.

Former gymnast to judge skills
of Nassau ’Nastics members

FORMER gymnast and state judging
director Susan Monahan is in New
Providence this weekend to share her
expertise as she judges the skills of
members of the nation’s oldest gym-
nastic club — Nassau ‘Nastics.

Gymnasts were tested on Friday at
the Oakes Field gym on the uneven
bars and today at the Kendal GL Isaacs
Gymnasium on their floor routines,
vault and beam. The events are a part
of Nassau ‘Nastics’ Gymfest Spring
Spectacular.

“We are thrilled to have Susan Mon-
ahan judging the gymnasts,” said head
coach of Nassau ‘Nastics, Trevor Ram-
sey. “In addition to being a former
gymnast, she’s been judging for over 16
years and sits on the Florida State
Judges Board of Directors, which
means that she’s responsible for men-
toring and training new judges. Her
three kids have also competed so she
knows what its like to be a gym mom,
supporter, coach, carpool driver and
judge.”



Coach Ramsey noted that competi-
tions are essential because they
allow gymnasts to see exactly how
they are progressing based on their
scores.

It also prepares and conditions them

Susan Monahan will be
judging Bahamian
gymnasts this weekend
as a part of Nassau
‘Nastics Gymfest
Spring Spectacular.

to be performers, an essential element
in wooing the judges abroad.
“Healthy competition boosts scores,
boosts confidence levels and the enjoy-
ment of competing motivates them to
work harder when they return to the

”

gym,” explained Coach Ramsey.
“However, we have a unique problem
— because there are no other clubs here
in Nassau, our kids don't have the
opportunity to attend enough compe-
titions.

“We attempt to go abroad two to
three times a year in order to give our
gymnasts that exposure but this alone
simply isn't enough.”

“Since we are the only club here,
we cannot bring a judge here to a com-
petition so instead we are calling this
event a 'testing’,” he added.

“At the end of the day, every gym-
nast in our club will have the exposure
of standing in front of a judge, and will
know exactly how much they have
achieved within the last year of training
and how much more is needed to con-
tinue to improve.”

Nassau ‘Nastics Spring Spectacular
will conclude on Sunday afternoon with
a performance by the gymnasts and an
awards ceremony at the Kendall Isaacs
Gymnasium at 4pm.



Minnis: primary care remains ‘a high priority’

m@ By MATT MAURA

STRENGTHENING the
primary health care system
remains “a high priority" for
the government, Minister of
Health Dr Hubert Minnis said.

Addressing the 62nd World
Health Assembly, he said it is
“crucial” that sustained finan-
cial investment in public health
and primary health care
remains high on the agenda.

“Investment in primary care
is value for money,” Dr Minnis
said.

Almost 31 years after the
Declaration of Alma-Ata,
health officials in the Bahamas
have proven the benefits of
investing in primary health
care, Mr Minnis said.

The declaration was signed
in 1978 at the International
Conference on Primary Health
Care in Alma-Ata, the former
Soviet Union.

Among other things, it gave
attention to building the foun-
dation of health care systems
on primary care.

Care Giver
Required

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILL REQUIREMENTS:

- Certified or equivalent to nurse’s aide and training.

- Must understand English both written and verbal.

- Must have current certification, i.e. Health Certificate.

- Must be able to safely and successfully perform ALL job-related
functions i.e. CPR and Basic First Aid.

PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES:

- Care for multiple residents.
- Observe Resident Rights.



Dim mleleysyat Minnis

It was agreed at that confer-
ence that a strong primary
health service could result in
disease prevention and con-
trol, longer life expectancies

52wk-Low

1.28

11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
1.95

11.09
2.83
6.06
1.31
1.38

Abaco Markets

Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Doctor's Hospital
6.02
11.00
10.35
5.00

Famguard
Finco

Focol (S)
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnsen

Securit y

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate

and the promotion of safe
motherhood, particularly in
developing countries.

Dr Minnis said the success
of primary health care pro-
grammes “ensures equity from
the start for our children” as
proved by the Bahamas’ very
successful programme for the
prevention of mother-to-child
transmission of HIV/AIDS.

“Primary health care must
not compete with hospitals for
budgetary allocations,” Dr
Minnis said. “There must be
equitable benefits for the
health workforce across the
entire health sector.

“Staff working in primary
health care must be recognised
for the value they bring to the
health sector. It is therefore
crucial that sustained financial
investment in public health

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

and primary health care sys-
tems remain high on the agen-
da of policymakers.”

Dr Minnis said the Ministry
of Health has implemented ini-
tiatives and strategies that
have improved the delivery of
quality primary health care to
Bahamians.

One has been the strength-
ening of public health infor-
mation systems to support evi-
dence-based decision making
at all levels of the health sec-
tor, he said.

This is being done through
the expanded use of informa-
tion and communication tech-
nology (ICT).

While ICT is proving to be a
very effective means of
strengthening the health infor-
mation systems, Dr Minnis
said, the delivery of primary

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 22 MAY 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,608.76 | CHG -0.12 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -103.60 | YTD % -6.05

FINDEX: CLOSE 795.25 | YTD -4.75% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

1.33
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.75
2.83
6.13
2.88
1.38
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.14
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol.
1.33
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.75
2.83
6.13
2.77
1.38
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.14
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

EPS $

health care services can also
benefit from additional new-
er technologies.

“In a country such as the
Bahamas with its more than
30 inhabited islands and a pop-
ulation that is spread across
100,000 square miles,” he said,
"ICT can be used to not only
strengthen primary care ser-
vices, but also to promote uni-
versal access to health services
through tele-health diagnostic
services and referrals, as well
as access to specialist manage-
ment when required

“These technologies have
also been proven to enhance
the management of patient
records through electronic
medical records which also
allows for patients to
access their medical informa-
tion."

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKEBAG!

Ee ADVISORY SERVICES

KTP TL. €a mT ST.

Div $ P/E
0.127
0.992

0.244

-0.877

0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

- Provide Professional care and assistance to the residents.

- Assist paramedics in cases of emergency.

- Observe residents, note physical condition, attitude, reactions,
appetite, etc., report to the Administrator.

- Available for front desk duty.

- Capable of working overnight shift 4p.m. — 12am & 12a.m. - 8 a.m.

- Provide quality care.

- Provide a written/verbal report to the Administrator

on a daily basis.

- Perform any other related duties which might be required.

- Man front desk operation.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidates will be offered an excellent compensation
package and opportunities for training and development.

Please e-mail or fax resume to the Administrator at

CCCBAHAMAS@live.com or 323.4475

S2wk-Hi

Previous

52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +
52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund

1.3124
2.9230
1.3875
3.1964
12.1564
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Fidelity Prime Income Fund

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

- Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change
Daily Vol

- Change in closing price from day to day

- Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Last Sale
100.00
100.00

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13 100.00 0.00
FBB15 100.00 0.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00

0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3758 1.65 4.83
2.8962 -1.49 -3.35
1.4630 2.05 5.25
3.1964 -5.59 -13.64
12.7397 0.96 5.79
100.5606 0.56 0.56
96.4070 -3.59 -3.59
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.1599 0.71 -12.76
1.0440 0.80 4.40
1.0364 0.33 3.64
1.0452 0.76 4.40
MARKET TERMS

Change
0.00
0.00

Daily Vol.

Weekly Vol.

Div $

Interest
7% 19 October 2017
Prime + 1.75% 19 October 2022
7% 30 May 2013
Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015

EPS $
-0.041
0.000
0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

Yield %
30-Apr-09
31-Mar-09
15-May-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525


THE TRIBUNE





RENALDO KNOWLES (shown on
the right in this file photo) once
again led the Bahamas in scoring
with nine points, well short of
the 16 point pace he established
in game one...

PAGE 9



S O
le
SATURDAY, MAY 23,

2009

ts







Nuggets beat
‘Lakers 106-103

in Game 2...
See page 10

Team Bahamas fails to
Mexico in three sets

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

fter a thrilling come-

from-behind win in

their opening effort of

the tournament, there

would be no such luck

for the Bahamas in their second game

as the odds on favourite lived up to

their top billing for a straight set win.

The Bahamas fell to a heavily

favoured Mexico team in three sets,

25-13, 25-20, and 25-16 in their sec-

ond game of the NORECA D second

round tournament of the 2010 FIVB
Men’s World Championship.

A resilient Bahamian team was

unable to counteract the virtually
impenetrable Mexican defense at the
net which created continuous scoring
opportunities.

Renaldo Knowles once again led
the Bahamas in scoring with nine
points, well short of the 16 point pace
he established in game one.

Shedrick Forbes also added nine in
a losing effort.

In their first game of the tourna-
ment, Mexico came out aggressively
on the offensive, opening the game
on a 12-5 run, never allowing the
Bahamas within striking distance.

Joe Smith, Bahamas Volleyball Fed-
eration executive, traveling with the
team to Kingston, Jamaica, said the
team got a good impression of the

Mexican squad and now knows what
to expect in a second meeting.

“Tt was defiantly a learning experi-
ence for them, Mexico came out
strong from the beginning of the
game,” he said. “The good thing about
it is this game does not mean as much
in the grand scheme of things as we
are still alive and will be in the quar-
terfinal. The team is more prepared
now and going into a rematch with
Mexico we should expect a great per-
formance.”

The Bahamas fell to 1-1, while Mex-
ico improved to 1-0.

Despite the loss, Team Bahamas is
doing well in the statistical depart-
ment as they boast the tournament’s
top three scorers thus far.

Knowles remains the tournament’s
leading scorer with 28 points, 25 of
which came on spikes at a success rate
of 41 per cent, Forbes is second with
23 points and Prince Wilson is third
with 23.

Romel Lightbourne is one of the
tournament’s top servers with three
serves for aces.

Mexico is scheduled to face St
Lucia, the third team in Group B,
tonight at 9pm.

By virtue of their opening round
win over St Lucia on Wednesday
night, the Bahamas advanced to the
quarterfinal where they will face Mex-
ico for the second time.

Over in Group A, Haiti remains the
surprising leader with a 1-1 win loss

record.

Jamaica sits at 1-1 with their lone
win — a three set sweep over Haiti —
while the Cayman Islands are at 0-1.

Only the champions and runners-
up from the tournament will advance
to the third round of play. Mexico is
favoured in the pool followed by
Jamaica in Group B.

The pool D champion winner will
face Puerto Rico and Barbados, which
have already advanced to NORCE-
CA Pool G.

The second place team in Pool D
will advance to face Cuba, Canada
and the winners of Pool C, which
includes Trinidad & Tobago, Suri-
name, Aruba, the US Virgin Islands
and Antigua.

No. 1 Safina can look to Big Brother for tips

m@ By HOWARD FENDRICH
AP Tennis Writer

PARIS (AP) — Venus and
Serena Williams have not cor-
nered the market on sibling
success in tennis: Dinara Safina
and Marat Safin are the first
sister and brother to both reach
No. 1 in the rankings.

When the French Open
starts Sunday, Safina will be
seeded No. 1 at a Grand Slam
tournament for the first time.
Now the Russian wants to win
her first major title — and she
can turn to Big Brother for all-
in-the-family Slam advice.

His best words of wisdom?
"You just have to enjoy every
moment,” Safina said Friday.
"Have to live by the day and
enjoy every day."

Not that she always heeds
what Safin says, even if he does
own U.S. Open and Australian
Open championships.

"He can maybe practice 10
hours a day, and for him, it's
enough. I'm a little bit more
stubborn. I need, like, to have
maybe four hours on the
court,” Safina said. "And he
was, like, 'No, just practice half
an hour, and it's fine for you.""

The resemblance to her

brother is striking, and a smile
crossed that familiar face as
Safina earned a laugh at his
expense. Then her expression
turned more serious, and she
added: "But, no, now he does-
n't go into the tennis. I think he
respects me much more now."

The 23-year-old Safina and
29-year-old Safin — he is seed-
ed 20th at the French Open —
were born into the sport. Their
father is the director of a
Moscow tennis club, and their
mother is a tennis coach who
worked with both kids when
they were young.

Safina has been known to
show tiny flashes of the sort of
on-court temper for which her
brother is famous, though noth-
ing quite to his extremes. Right
now, her game is what's match-
ing his standards.

Safina comes to Roland Gar-
ros on a 10-match winning
streak and 14-1 overall this sea-
son on clay, all since her April
20 rise to No. 1.

"Since I became No. 1, I've
been in a final and I won two
tournaments," Safina said, "so
I guess I'm feeling pretty
good."

As well she should. For every
jab she might hear about

DINARA SAFINA returns the ball to Caroline Wozniacki during the Madrid



Open at the Caja Magica in Madrid on Sunday...

(AP Photo: Daniel Ochoa de Olza)

whether she deserves to lead
the rankings despite not hav-
ing a major championship on
her resume — most notably,
Serena Williams recently called
herself "the real No. 1" — Safi-
na also earns praise for her
recent play.

Just one example: When for-
mer No. 1 Amelie Mauresmo,
twice a Grand Slam title win-
ner, was asked Friday about
her own chances at this French
Open, she noted that women's
tennis recently has been wide
open, "except maybe for Safi-
na, who has been on a roll the
last couple of weeks on clay."

There is a general sentiment
heading into the tournament
that while the men's event
might very well come down to
a Rafael Nadal vs. Roger Fed-
erer final for the fourth con-
secutive year, no one is quite
sure what will happen in the
women's draw.

Serena Williams has won the
U.S. Open and Australian
Open to raise her career count
to 10 Grand Slam titles, but she
also lost her past four matches
and quit her most recent outing
because of a bad knee.

Venus Williams is on a two-
match losing streak and has

never had her greatest success
on clay.

Maria Sharapova returned
to singles only this week after
nearly 10 months away because
of right shoulder surgery.

Defending champion Ana
Ivanovic's right knee has been
troubling her — she wore black
tape on it while practicing Fri-
day — and played only three
matches on clay this year.

Those women all have won
major titles. Safina, meanwhile,
lost to Ivanovic in last year's
French Open final and to Ser-
ena Williams in this year's Aus-
tralian Open final.

As for those who say Safina
is the closest thing to a favorite
over the next two weeks?

"T'm not even listening what
the people are saying. I'm just
focusing on myself, you know?
Just taking one day at a time,"
she said. "I don't think about
what I want to happen in 14,
15, 16 days, you know. I live
today. Today I had a practice.
That's all. Tomorrow 1s anoth-
er day."

Sounds like something a cer-
tain sibling might say.

e Associated Press Writer
Trung Latieule contributed to
this report.
PAGE 10, SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



‘It’s going to be a long series’
Nuggets beat Lakers 106-103 in Game 2

@ By BETH HARRIS
AP Sports Writer

LOS ANGELES (AP) —
Similar game, different ending
for the Los Angeles Lakers.

Their 24-year playoff domi-
nance of the Denver Nuggets
dissipated over the final 29 sec-
onds of the fourth quarter in
the second down-to-the-wire
game in the Western Confer-
ence finals.

That's when Kenyon Martin
hit a layup in traffic and
Chauncey Billups made 3 of 4
free throws to give Denver a
106-103 victory in Game 2 on
Thursday night to even the
series.

"It's going to be a long
series," Nuggets coach George
Karl said.

It was Denver's first playoff
win against Los Angeles since
1985, a span of 11 games, the
second-longest postseason win-
ning streak against one team in
NBA history.

"There was just a demand
that we had to win this game,"
Karl said. "There was an inner
spirit. We're a much more
smart, mentally tough team
than you look at last year and
what we are now. It's a great
win."

Carmelo Anthony scored 34
points, Billups had 27 points
and Linas Kleiza added 16 for
the Nuggets. Nene finished with
six points, nine rebounds and
Six assists.

"To get one on the road is
always tough. We came in and
got it,” Anthony said. "We're
mentally tough and we showed
that in this game coming off the
loss that we gave away in Game
1 '

Anthony twisted his ankle in
the game, but he said he would
be fine for Game 3 Saturday in
Denver.

Kobe Bryant had 32 points,
including making all 10 of his
free throws, Trevor Ariza
scored a career playoff-high 20
points and Pau Gasol had 17
points and 17 rebounds for the

Vick meets
probation
officer

@ By LARRY O’DELL

Associated Press Writer

NORFOLK, Va. (AP) —
Michael Vick walked into a feder-
al courthouse on Friday to meet
his probation officer, ignoring
questions from waiting reporters
about his life under home con-
finement after being released
from prison this week.

The suspended NFL star
arrived at the Norfolk courthouse
at 10am, his first-known public
appearance since he left a federal
penitentiary in Kansas undetected
early Wednesday and drove
cross-country to arrive in Hamp-
ton early Thursday, where he
began serving two months of
home confinement.

The former Atlanta Falcons
quarterback is serving a 23-month
sentence for a dogfighting con-
spiracy.

Vick arrived at the courthouse
in the passenger seat of a Range
Rover driven by his fiancee,
Kijafa Frink. She let him out near
the front door and Vick walked
silently past waiting cameras and
reporters, ignoring questions
about his first day home and his
plans. Vick was wearing jeans, a
light blue shirt and a dark blue
blazer.

He left again after nearly an
hour, with his fiancee and a
lawyer in tow as he exited the
courthouse. Vick again said noth-
ing to waiting reporters before
getting into the waiting Range
Rover. One man in a crowd of
bystanders yelled out, "Keep your
head up, Mike!"

Vick had previously met with
probation officials. They came to
his house Thursday to equip him
with an electronic monitor so they
can track his movements until he
is released from federal custody
July 20. The monitor was not visi-
ble under his clothes at the court-
house.

Vick had managed to remain
mostly out of sight since returning
home in a van equipped with
blackout curtains.

But now that he has been out-
fitted with the electronic monitor,
federal officials probably won't
be the only ones watching his
movements.

¢ AP Sports Writer Hank Kurz
Jr contributed to this report

Lakers, who dropped to 7-2 at
Staples Center this postseason.

"They have home court
advantage now. Now it's time
to go to Denver, see if we can
do the same," Bryant said.
"We're not the best road team
in the NBA for no reason."

The Nuggets recovered from
poor free throw shooting in a
two-point loss in Game 1 to
make 17 consecutive foul shots
until Billups missed one with 4
seconds remaining. He made
the second for the three-point
lead.

"T want to kill Chauncey for
missing that free throw,” Karl
said.

Derek Fisher launched a 3-
pointer from the right corner
that Nene got a piece of as time
expired.

"Nene had a great contest,"
Billups said. "I don't think Fish-
er got a good chance to get a
good look on the shot.
Nonetheless, I was down there
trying to rebound and trying to
get my hands on the ball again,
try to get back on that free
throw line."

Fisher thought he did get a
good look.

"T figured they were going to
try to foul to prevent us from
shooting a 3," he said. "I got rid
of it a little quicker than I prob-
ably had to. Definitely don't
want to put yourself in a posi-
tion where you need that kind
of shot to try and tie the game.”

Tied at 101, Martin made the
layup off Nene's assist that gave
the Nuggets the lead for good.

Bryant dribbled upcourt and
got into traffic, with Nene tip-
ping the ball away to earn a
jump ball with 18 seconds left.
Gasol controlled the tip to
Ariza, but the ball squirted
away and Fisher fouled Billups.
He made both for a 105-101
lead. "Looked to me like
Anthony pushed on Trevor and
Trevor tried to get rid of the
ball, and no foul was called and
they recovered the basketball,”
Lakers coach Phil Jackson said.

Martin then fouled Gasol,

CHAUNCEY BILLUPS puts up a shot as Lamar Odom defends during second half of Game 2 in Western conference

final series Thursday night in Los Angeles.



(AP Photo: Mark J Terrill)

Ye

i By The Associated
Press

Los Angeles Lakers at
Denver (8:30pm EDT). The
Nuggets beat the Lakers 106-
103 on Thursday night in Los
Angeles to even the West-
ern Conference finals 1-1.

STARS

Thursday

—Carmelo Anthony and
Chauncey Billups, Nuggets.
Anthony had 34 points and
nine rebounds, and Billups
added 27 points in Denver's
106-103 victory over the Los
Angeles Lakers in the West-
ern Conference finals. The
series is tied 1-1.

12th TIME'S A CHARM

Denver's 106-103 victory
over Los Angeles on Thurs-
day night in Game 2 of the
Western Conference was the
Nuggets’ first playoff victory
over the Lakers. Los Ange-
les won the first 11 postsea-
son games against Denver.

GOOD AS GOLD

Carmelo Anthony had 34
points in the Nuggets’ 106-
103 Game 2 win Thursday
night to become the first
Denver player to score 30 or
more points in five consecu-
tive playoff games since
1976. He had 39 in Game 1.

SPEAKING

"T think this is going to be
a long series."

— Denver coach George
Karl after the Nuggets beat
the Los Angeles Lakers 106-
103 on Thursday night to tie
the Western Conference semi-
final series 1-1

before Bryant's 3-pointer, again
with Anthony guarding close-
ly, tied the game at 99 with 1:59
remaining. Billups made two

who made both before Billups
got fouled.

The Lakers were shaky on
free throws in the fourth, mak-
ing 9 of 14, while Denver didn't
blink at the line. The Nuggets
were 29 of 37, with Billups hit-
ting 13 of 16 and Anthony 10
of 14.

Kleiza's 3-pointer early in the
fourth quarter gave the Nuggets
an 85-82 lead, their first since
the game's opening minutes.
Billups followed with two free
throws and Anthony hit two
straight baskets to extend Den-
ver's lead to 91-84.

Bryant missed a jumper, but

he came up big on the Lakers’
next possession, hitting a 3-
pointer with Anthony's hand in
his face. Shannon Brown tossed
in a 3 and Lamar Odom made
two free throws as part of an
11-2 run that put the Lakers
back in front 95-93.

Denver regained the lead

free throws before Bryant's
jumper tied it at 101.

The Lakers led by 14 early in
the second quarter. Anthony
began a run of 14 consecutive
points for the Nuggets to get
them to 51-40. They outscored
the Lakers 14-2 to get within
55-54 at halftime.

JOE MAUER hits a grand slam during the
sixth inning of a game against the Chicago
White Sox in Chicago Thursday. Mauer
also had two doubles and drove in a
career-high six runs as Minnesota routed
the White Sox 20-1.

(AP Photo: Charles Rex Arbogast)



UEFA charges Drogba, Bosingwa with misconduct

B By GRAHAM DUNBAR
AP Sports Writer

GENEVA, Switzerland (AP) —
UEFA charged Didier Drogba and Jose
Bosingwa with misconduct on Friday
for insulting the referee after Chelsea's
elimination from the Champions
League.

European football's governing body
also charged the club with failing to
control the players as well as fans who
threw objects.

Drogba and Bosingwa breached
sportsmanship by making offensive
comments about Norwegian referee
Tom Henning Ovrebo, UEFA said in a
statement.

Ovrebo denied several penalty
appeals in the 1-1 draw with Barcelona
in a semifinal at Stamford Bridge on
May 6. Barcelona scored a late equaliz-
er to advance to the final on away goals
and will play Manchester United in
Rome on Wednesday.

Chelsea said it would respond to
UEFA's charges, on behalf of both club
and its two players.

"We would like to make clear again,
as we did at the time, that the incidents
in question were regrettable and

occurred only because of the high emo-
tions and frustrations which arose from
the disappointment of a controversial
defeat in such an important game,” the
club said in a statement.

"We are all acutely aware of the
responsibilities that lie with both the
club and its players as regards setting a
good example as role models and
upholding the principles of fair play in
football. Both of the players accept that
and apologized very soon afterwards
for their actions."

UEFA president Michel Platini, who
is independent of the disciplinary com-
mittee, told The Associated Press that
the biggest issue confronting referees
is how to punish "dangerous" players
who provoke them on the pitch.

"I can understand the referee, I can
understand the players and I will under-
stand very well (the results) of the dis-
ciplinary committee," Platini told the
AP. "It is not just a problem for today,
it is a problem for 40, 50 years. From the
moment you think there is a mistake,
the players are furious at the referee, the
fans are furious at the referee.

"The referee does his job, the players
were not happy and the disciplinary
committee will do its job."

Chelsea and the two players must file
statements to UEFA by May 29.

UEFA's disciplinary panel will hear
the cases June 17.

It can ban players from Champions
League matches and make Chelsea play
behind closed doors.

Drogba approached Ovrebo in a fin-
ger-waving outburst, and was pulled
away by security staff and Chelsea coach
Guus Hiddink while yelling an expletive
toward a television camera.

Portuguese defender Bosingwa com-
pared Ovrebo to a "thief" in a post-
match television interview.

Michael Ballack escaped being
charged despite aggressively chasing
after Ovrebo when a late penalty appeal
was rejected. The German midfielder's
action occurred during the match and is
judged to have been dealt with by the
referee on the field of play.

Competition organizer UEFA had
this season renewed its campaign calling
for players, clubs and fans to respect
match officials.

"We have to punish immediately the
player who provokes, who gives the
spark," Platini said.

° AP Sports Writer Rob Harris in
Istanbul contributed to this report.

Williams sisters
on Opposite
halves of French
Open draw

m By HOWARD FENDRICH
AP Tennis Writer

PARIS (AP) — Serena and Venus
Williams were drawn into opposite sides
of the French Open field Friday, while the
men's semifinals could pit four-time defend-
ing champion Rafael Nadal against Andy
Murray, and Roger Federer against Novak
Djokovic.

Second-seeded Serena — one of two past
women's champions in the tournament —
will meet Klara Zakopalova of the Czech
Republic in the first round. Third-seeded
Venus faces Bethanie Mattek-Sands of the
United States in her opener.

The Williams sisters can only meet in the
championship match. Serena beat Venus
in the 2002 final.

Top-ranked Dinara Safina of Russia
starts against Anne Keothavong of Britain.

Maria Sharapova will play Anastasiya
Yakimova of Belarus in her first Grand
Slam match since Wimbledon last year.
Sharapova returned to the tour this week
after missing nearly 10 months due to a
shoulder injury and is not seeded.

Trying to become the first man to win
five consecutive French Opens, top-seeded
Nadal will begin against a qualifier. He
could meet past No. 1 Lleyton Hewitt in the
third round, and 14th-seeded David Fer-
rer in the fourth.

Hewitt's first match is against No. 26 Ivo
Karlovic, the 6-foot-11 player from Croat-
ia who upset him in the first round at Wim-
bledon in 2003, when Hewitt was the reign-
ing champion.

Federer's bid to tie Pete Sampras with a
record 14 major singles title will start
against Alberto Martin of Spain. Murray's
first opponent is Juan Ignacio Chela of
Argentina, whose four career tour titles all
came on clay and who once was ranked
15th.

The potential men's quarterfinals are
Nadal vs. No. § Fernando Verdasco, Mur-
ray vs. No. 7 Gilles Simon, Federer vs. No.
6 Andy Roddick, and Djokovic vs. No. 5
Juan Martin Del Potro.

David Nalbandian, Carlos Moya and
Mario Ancic are among the men who with-
drew. The International Tennis Federation
had said Dmitry Tursunov would pull out
because of a heel injury, but Tursunov was
in Friday's draw, seeded 21st.

The possible women's quarterfinals are
Safina vs. defending champion Ana
Ivanovic, Venus Williams vs. No. 6 Vera
Zvonareva, Serena Williams vs. No. 7 Svet-
lana Kuznetsova, and No. 4 Elena Demen-
tieva vs. No. 5 Jelena Jankovic.

Play begins Sunday.
PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





Bahamian

COR ana
Collie

?

and

to exhibit in

Tennessee



exhibited together. Ms
Collie and Dr Cox, both
born in Nassau, have been
friends for years and exhib-
ited together in the
Bahamas where they were
also neighbours.

Dr Cox was the first per-
son to exhibit in Ms Col-
lie’s gallery in Nassau.
When Ms Collie moved to
Memphis in December of
2008, the two decided to
continue their connection
through exhibiting annual-
ly together, but now on the
coast of Memphis.

The works of both artists
offer colourful displays of
light, energy and emotion.

“Life is full of colour,”
Ms Collie said. “Those red
hot moments when passion
is all around you, you can
taste what life has to offer.
When your heart pounds
for the next moment.”

“Born and raised in the
Bahamas I have been
blessed with all the colours
of the world. We are a
colourful country and ever
more colourful are our
people,” she said.

Dr Cox, who recently
returned from a solo exhi-
bition in London said, “I
want my paintings to be
portals to mythical realms,
gateways to imaginary
worlds beyond everyday
reality. Seeing beyond the
illusion of ‘reality’ is the
first step to dreaming our
own dreams. When we
dream our own dreams, we
bring light to the world and
we inspire others to let
their light shine.”

Dr Cox comes to the
visual arts with a unique
and diverse background.
Described by the British
Medical Journal as a
‘Renaissance Woman’ in
2004, she is a medical doc-
tor, a historian, social
entrepreneur, professional
jazz-singer, writer and
visionary artist. Dr Cox
was also the first Bahami-
an to become a Rhodes
Scholar.

“T decided from an early
age that I would follow my
own path, and be guided
by my inner voice and intu-
ition. My path has led to
me working in a number of
different professions. I
have worked as a medical
doctor, an academic histo-
rian of medicine, a jazz-
singer, a writer, a consul-
tant in human develop-
ment and urban renewal.
Now finally, Iam able to
speak my truth using the

Wy 5 = 4

A

“hey

Mk





1

MEMPHIS, Tennessee
— Opening on May 28,
the Art Village Gallery
will be presenting the

works of two Bahamian

ees artists, Dr Desiree Cox

and Nicole Collie, with
their exhibition titled
“Sine.Qua.Non: Without

which it could not be.”

It is not the first time these two artists have

—
ELT ie
t

iit

Lik

symbolism of words, sound
and colour on canvas.”

A recent review in The
Londonist from the UK
said, “Her brash strokes
and colourful palettes are
derived from a place deep
within the soul - a place
she encourages everyone
to look into.”

“Tam so pleased to have
Desiree exhibiting here
with me in Memphis,” said
Ms Collie.

Speaking about her art,
Ms Collie said, “I think
women are incredible crea-
tures. We have such big
shoes to fill from being a
mother, lover, caregiver,
housekeeper, wife, friend
and still have to work our
40 plus hours a week. We
as women have learnt to
do it all and I try to reflect
this in my paintings. As a
woman I realise that we
don't take time to pat our-
selves on to back as we
nurture the world around
us.”

“There’s an old Spanish
proverb that continues to
inspire me and captures
the essence of this joint
art exhibition of the works
of Nicole and myself. It is
‘Traveler, there is no
road. The road is made by
travelling.’ ”

|. Dr Desiree

Cox.

2. Artist
Nicole Collie

with her son.

3. “Lullaby”
by Dr Desiree
Cox.

4. The art

work of
Nicole Collie.

© In brief

Floods in Haiti
Kill 11 people,
: destroy homes

| Ml PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti

FLOODS have killed at least

: 11 people this week as heavy
rains swamp towns still rebuild-
: ing from last year’s hurricanes,
: Haiti’s civil protection depart-
: ment said Friday, according to
i the Associated Press.

Most of the victims were

? swept away by swollen rivers
: or died when their flimsy
: homes collapsed, officials said.
: Five of the deaths were report-
i ed in the rice-growing Arti-
: bonite Valley.

Rains that began a week ago

? have been heaviest on the
? southern peninsula near Les
? Cayes and Camp Perrin, where
? 1,000 homes have been flood-
i ed. Some areas received nearly
: 3 inches (74 millimeters) of rain
: Thursday night, Haiti’s meteo-
? rological office said.

New flood alerts were issued

Friday for all of Haiti’s 10
; administrative regions.

Even small amounts of rain

i can swell rivers and overflow
: fields in this poor Caribbean
: nation, which is particularly
? vulnerable to flooding because
: of erosion from farming and
: deforestation.

President Rene Preval visit-

i ed the west-coast town of St.
: Marc to view flooding
: Wednesday and urged resi-
: dents to stop building homes in
i ravines, Radio Kiskeya report-
: ed.

With a new hurricane sea-

i son officially starting June 1,
? officials worry new floods
: could damage Haiti’s strug-
: gling agriculture and economy.
: Last year, four tropical storms
i killed some 800 people and
: caused $1 billion of damage,
: aggravating chronic malnutri-
? tion in several areas.

International donors pledged

_ } $324 million last month to help
+ Haiti rebuild, but the govern-
: ment said it could need three
: times that amount.

Official Cuban
daily proposes
"Savings or
Death!’

| MHAVANA

CUBAN state media says

: the island should adopt the
? motto “Savings or Death!” to
? withstand tough economic
: times, according to the Asso-
i ciated Press.

Friday’s proposal in an edi-

: torial by Granma director
: Lazaro Barredo is a play on
: the communist leadership’s slo-
: gan “Socialism or Death!”
: Barredo says Central Bank
i president Francisco Soberan
: came up with the phrase.

The editorial complains

? about “squandering” fuel and
? other resources, and worker
: “passivity.” Barredo writes that
i the crisis means laborers must
? work harder and conserve
: resources, and their bosses
: must push them more.

He says more productivity

? is necessary to help Cuba be
? more self-sufficient and cor-
rect what he calls an unsus-
tainable trade imbalance of 78
? percent imports during the first
} quarter.

Barbados
ames gov't
bldg. for US
attorney general

m@ BRIDGETOWN, Barbados

U.S. Attorney General Eric

: Holder’s visit to Barbados is
? only for three days, but his
? name will remain even after he
: leaves, according to the Associ-
? ated Press.

The country is renaming a

: collection of government offices
? the Eric H. Holder Jr. Munici-
? pal Complex to honor Wash-
: ington’s No. 1 prosecutor.

Holder’s father was born in

: Barbados, and his mother has
} roots on the island as well.

The attorney general met Fri-

? day with Prime Minister David
: Thompson and other officials
: to discuss efforts to fight drug
? trafficking and other crime.

Formerly known as Tamarind

Hall, the complex in St. Joseph
? Parish includes a police station,
; court, library and post office.






PAGE 1

PLP chairman ‘faces convention challenge’ N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.149SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25) WEATHER CLOUDY WITH T-STORM HIGH 86F LOW 76F S P O R T SEESPORTSONPAGES NINEANDTEN Team Bahamas falls to Mexico AS THE furore surrounding the PLP’s upcoming national convention con tinues to build, sources withi n the party s uggest that not only will the post of deputy leader be contested, but also that of National Chairman. According to sources within the party, there is a growing dislike, “or at the very least displeasure” with the current chairman Glenys Hanna-Martin, who has been busy reopening and revitalising branches over the past few months. As the daughter of Governor General Arthur Hanna, Mrs Hanna-Martin is a lifelong member of the PLP, and has substantial influence with its stalwart councillors. However, it is believed that her influence throughout the branches in New Providence is where would-be challengers might make a play to undermine her authority and make their presence known. Slated for October 18th, the PLP’s convention is being billed as the staging ground for the greatest political “bloodbath” that this country has seen in the last few years. With nearly eight candidates reportedly vying for the post of deputy leader, this position is being seen by party insiders as the ultimate “stepping stone” to the all powerful position of leader of the party. Among those slated to contest this position are PLP MP for Cat Island and San Sal vador Philip Davis, PLP MP for Fort Charlotte Alfred Sears, Senator Jerome Fitzgerald, lawyer Paul Moss, and the party’s MP for West End and Bimini Obie Wilchcombe. One of the party’s up and coming figures, South Andros MP Picewell Forbes has also Claim that position will be contested along with the deputy leader post The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com I N S I D E CLASSIFIEDSTRADER CLASSIFIEDSTRADER CARS! CARS! CARS! JOBSAND HELPWANTED L L O O A A D D S S O O F F Bahamians ‘should be pleased’ with bail ruling GRADEONE students of Sandilands Primary School give flowers to Mrs Stehanie McDonald yesterday. Mrs McDonald was honoured at Fox Hill Community Centre for her 45 years of dedicated service to teaching. SEE PAGE TWO n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter a lowe@ tribunemedia.net BAHAMIANS should be pleased that the Court of Appeal has ruled that people accused of murd er or other serious c rimes cannot be denied b ail without considera tion of their constitution al rights, the President of the Bar Association said. Wayne Munroe said it was wrong for parliament ever to have tried to take from within the responsi bility of the judiciary the right to determine whether or not an accused person should or should not be let free. “Bahamian people should be very happy that no Bahamian can be locked up on the say-so of the executive (branch of the government) without a judge being able to scrutinise the case and determine whether you should be in custody or not. Bar President says it was wrong for parliament to try to take responsibility from judiciary Glenys Hanna-Martin SEE page six SEE page six T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f 45 YEARS OF DEDIC ATEDSERVICETOTEACHING n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@ tribunemedia.net BUSINESS owners and employees are being told to fight back against criminals by banding together under the new Business Crime Watch initiative being launched by police. Speaking to business rep resentativesinthe Dowdeswell Street area of the Central Division yesterday, police encouraged professionals to pool their resources to install mutually beneficial CCTV cameras and share information to drive criminals out of the area. Business representatives told police about crime in the area, including frequent armed robberies, a continuing problem of prostitutes touting for business,troublesome vagrants occupying abandoned houses, and unsanitary streets. One businessman told police he had been robbed at gunpoint six times over the last year, and in the last instance $20,000 worth of goods were stolen. Another said: “People are sleeping in the doorways of these old buildings and hav ing sex in them during the day time, but not only that, when I come to work some times in the morning there are used condoms on the steps. Police urge businesses to band together to fight crime SEE page six New initiative is launc hed BAHAMAS Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union President Roy Colebrook has announced that the elections scheduled for Tuesday, May 26, have been postponed until further notice. In the press statement issued from the office of Commercial Law Advocates, Mr Colebrook said that because of the refusal of the Registrar of Trade Unions to indicate that he will supervise and certify the election of officers and members of the executive council of the union on Wednesday, May 27, “the said elections and the triennial general meeting of the general membership, scheduled for Tuesday, May 26, is now postponed until further notice of the execu tive council following the decision of Justice Jon Isaacs in the matter current before him.” On Thursday, First Vice President of the (BHCAWU Kirk Wilson, secured a Supreme Court order to prohibit Labour Minister Dion Foulkes and the Registrar of Trade Unions from supervis ing or certifying the union’s elections scheduled for the end of this month. This order, which was handed down by Justice Isaacs rules that the union’s executive team and the Min ister are free to challenge it. According to reports from the union’s executive, its president Roy Colebrook, Treasurer Basil McKenzie and General Secretary Leo Douglas did not go through the proper channels to sched ule the election dates. Hotel union elections ha ve been postponed until fur ther notice INSIDE MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR EXPAT BUSINESSMAN P A GE TWO MINIS TR Y IS SET T O LAUNCH A ORLD-FIRSTT OURISM C ONCEPT PAGETHREE

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C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS P AGE 2, SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 9 9EndsMay30S S U U I I T T S S9 9$ $BernardRd:393-3463 MackeySt:393-5684ThompsonBlvd:328-1164 FineThreads FineThreads ROB Thomas shared fond memories of his friend Hywel Jones and their 22 trips to Jamaica. A celebration in honour of the life of the late expatriate businessman Hywel Jones was held yesterday at the New Providence Community Centre. Mr Jones became the year’s 26th murder victim when he died at the Princess Margaret Hospital from injuries he received when he was shot by an unknown assailant more than three weeks ago. A bankerb y profession, who lived in the Bahamas for more than 20 years, Mr Jones was just 55. MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR EXPAT BUSINESSMAN L ONGTIME f riend of Hywel Jones, Keith Knox, spoke about why Hywel Jones was such an extraordinary friend. M INISTER o f Sports Desmond Banister spoke at Hywel Jones’ memorial service held at the New Providence Community Centre yesterday evening. P h o t o s b y T I M C L A R K E T r i b u n e s t a f f HONOURED FOR 45 YEARS OF TEACHING MRS Stephanie McDonald speaks at her honourary service yesterday, where Sandilands primary teachers, students and special guests honoured her for 45 years of dedicated service to teaching. Tim Clarke /Tribune staff

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n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORT – Carry Your Candle Light the Bahamas has teamed up with the Grand Affair Island Women’s Con-f erence to help six unemployed p ersons as part of a nationwide c ampaign to encourage acts of l ove and kindness. CYCLTB founder Patrice S tubbs and committee members Diane Wildgoose andR ehuder Rolle came to the aid o f two unemployed women t his week, presenting Rochelle Johnson with a cheque to cover her electricity bill and Bren da Lee Thompson with groceries. D r Wanda Davis-Turner of the GAIWC has pledged to collect donations for four u nemployed women every night of the conference, which began Wednesday at the StJ ohn’s Jubilee Cathedral. D r Turner has also agreed to allow the women to attend the conference and Saturday’s B yron Cage Concert for free. “I think the CYCLTB initiative is phenomenal . . . I am s o glad that the conference is j oining in doing what we can to say to women who are unemployed that we love you and support you,” she said. D r Turner said: “It is not how much but it is what you do to make the difference in someone’s life who may be thinking about committing sui c ide. “When the hopeless feel that they’re noticed and their needs are being met then they knowt hat God sees them and cares for them through people. And this is how we can be God’se yes, hands, feet, and legs – by t aking this opportunity to help someone.” The conference, which is being held under the theme, Turning Scars into Stars,’ is billed as an effort to reach out to all women, especially those w ho are “unemployed, heartb roken and abused”. “We’ve been having an incredible time and we expecta mighty move of God that will i mpact the social needs of this nation, especially as it relates to women,” Dr Turner said. CYCLTB founder Mrs S tubbs commended Dr Turner and conference organisers for “lighting their candle of love”. She expects to launch a C YCLTB initiative in New Providence next weekend. “We are looking at working with (talk show hostM cKinney in holding a press conference and shooting a telev ision show to launch it in Nass au,” she said. Mrs Stubbs said that since the programme was officially launchedonMay1in Freeport, several families have been assisted with rent, groceries, and utility and medical bills. The global economic dilemm a we find ourselves in and its affect on the Bahamian peop le, as well as the level of crime i n this country are the main r easons why this initiative was started,” she said. “We have a lot of people in our nation who feel hopeless and are contemplating suicide, and whose cupboards are bare,a nd others who are oblivious to w hat is going on. “Our aim is to invite every person living in this Bahamas to find one unemployed per-s on and do something: help with rent, mortgage, electricity, babysitting, however they can assist,” she said, adding thatt he campaign will run for a year. n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter THE COURT of Appeal has upheld the 25-year prison sentence of a man convicted of attempting to murder his cousin in 2007. Shawn Culmer had appealed his conviction of the December 2005 attempt ed murder of his cousin, Leander Culmer. The victim, who is now paralyzed from the waist down as a result of gunshot injuries, was a key prosecution wit ness in the trial of Angelo Brennen alias “Nasty.” Culmer was shot two months after testifying at the trial. Brennen was con victed on November 3, 2005, of the murder of his former girlfriend Alfreda Pinder, 34, and the attempted mur der of her daughter, Calvonya Grant, 16, on October 29, 2004. Brennen was given the mandatory death penalty, which was later commuted to life imprisonment due to a subsequent ruling by the Privy Council declaring the mandatory death penalty unconstitutional. In the ruling of Justices Emmanuel Osadebay, Hartman Longley and Christopher Blackman, which was handed down Thursday, the court noted that the primary issue for determination on the appeal was the identification of the appellant by Leander Culmer and his brother, Ricardo. At the tri al before Justice Jon Isaacs, the brothers identified Shawn Culmer as the man who had entered their home around 5 am on December 20, 2005, and shot Leander. According to their evidence, Culmer who was masked entered through a window and fired a shot, which struck Leander in his leg. A struggle followed between the gunman and Leander, resulting in Leander being shot a second time. Leander fell backwards onto a bed but was able to remove the intruder’s mask and realized that it was his cousin, Shawn. The intruder placed the gun to Leander’s head and attempted to fire, however, ran off when the gun failed to discharge. Ricardo testified that he gave chase with a cutlass and was also able to identify the gunman as Shawn Culmer during the pursuit. The accused, under oath, however, testified that he was at home in bed at the time of the incident until about 7.30 that morning. The Justices in their ruling stated that in view of their conclusions on the issue of identification, along with the evidence of the case, they did not consider the original verdict either “unsafe or unsatisfactory.” The court dismissed the appeal and affirmed the conviction. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009, PAGE 3 SHARING LOVE’S MESSAGESILENTAUCTION AND RAFFLE LOTSOF FANTASTICPRIZES WENEEDYOURSUPPORTMAY30,2009 WYNDHAMNASSAURESORT CABLEBEACH COCKTAILS7:00P.M. DINNER8:00P.M. UNDERTHEDISTINGUISHEDPATRONAGE OFHISEXCELLENCYARTHURD.HANNA GOVERNORGENERALOF THECOMMONWEALTHOFTHEBAHAMAS ANDMRSHANNA FORMOREINFORMATION& TICKETSCONTACT THECANCERSOCIETYOFTHEBAHAMAS CENTREVILLE NASSAUN.P.THEBAHAMAS TELEPHONE323-4482323-4441 FAX323-4475 DONATION$200LOVE GIVESLOVE LAUGHS LOVE SHARES LOVE SPREADSSUPPORTTHE8THANNUAL BALLTHECANCERSOCIETYOFTHEBAHAMAS MEDICAL and surgical clinics at the Princess Margaret Hospital will be closed for three days while University of the West Indies medical students to sit their final exams. The clinic will be closed to the public on Thursday May 28, Tuesday June 2, and Thursday June 4. Anyone who has an appointment scheduled for these dates should contact the clinic on 322-2861. PMH authorities apologise for any inconvenience this may cause. n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribumemedia.net THEMinistry of Tourism is set to launch a “world-first” tourism concept within the next week, in the expectation that the “all-inclusive island” offering will encourage a better spread of visitors’ dollars throughout the local economy and a more diverse range of e xperiences for holiday-makers. An initial May 15 deadline to start selling the all-inclusive “Club Grand B ahama” package holidays was narr owly missed as the ministry finalised arrangements with a local Bahamian c ompany to create a special debit-type c ard intended to smooth the pre-paid e xperience for participants. The “Club Grand Bahama” card, replacing an originally envisioned coupon system, will allow holidaymakers to access the accommodation, m eals and other experiences which will b e available to them in Grand Bahama as part of their silver, gold or platinumh oliday pre-paid package without ever h aving to resort to their wallets. I t is made by Transfer Solutions P roviders Limited, the same compan y which created the rechargeable “Mango card” currently in use in the public bus system to reduce the use and storage of cash on public buses. “The company showed an understanding of the programme and proceeded to develop a customised version of their card for us. We wanted to ensure we didn’t use a system which was not desirable and not convenient,” said David Johnson,d eputy director general at the Mini stry of Tourism. A mong the hotel properties featured t he Club Grand Bahama all-inclusive p ackages, which will be promoted by the ministry alongside its regular holiday options, are the two Our Lucaya hotels, Flamingo Bay and Pelican Bay. Various Grand Bahama restaurants, from cafes to gourmet dining experiences, have also gotten in on the deal, and will be available to tourists across the three-tiered programme. Minister of Tourism Vincent Vanderpool Wallace said: “What’s very i mportant to understand about this e ffort is that it’s an innovation which w e hope will be the future of ensuring that visitor expenditure and experience are distributed far more broadly. “We don’t expect it to take off like a r ocket; we think it will grow very slowl y in the beginning and then much m ore quickly when we iron the kinks o ut.” I n the long term, the ministry e xpects that based on its success, the all-inclusive programme might be expanded to New Providence and theF amily Islands. Ministry is set to launch a ‘world-first’ tourism concept ‘Club Grand Bahama’ card intended to smooth pre-paid experience FROM LEFT: donation recipients Brenda Lee Thompson and Rochelle Johnson; CYCLTB committee member A ndrew Moss, CYCLTB founder Patrice Stubbs, committee member Maureen Sands, Dr Wanda Davis-Turner and Anastacia Lewis of the GAIWC; and committee members Diane Wildgoose and Rehuder Rolle. Help for the unemployed through national campaign 25-year prison sentence upheld by Court of Appeal PMH medical and s urgical clinics to close for three days In brief n WASHINGTON FEDERALregulators fined a Florida-based regional airline $1.3 million for overworking its pilots and dispatchers, according to Associated Press. The Federal Aviation Administration said Thursday that Gulfstream International Airlines of Fort Lauderdale violated regulations on how many hours pilots and dispatchers can work and improperly maintained equipment. FAA spokeswoman Laura Brown said an investigation last summer found instances in 2007 and 2008 in which flight crews were not provided a minimum of eight hours rest in a 24-hour period and in which they flew more than 34 hours in a seven-day period. Brown said FAA also found 148 instances in which flight dispatchers worked more than 10-straight hours, the maximum permitted under federal regulations. The fine came on the heels of hearings last week by the National Transporta tion Safety Board into the crash of a regional airliner near Buffalo, N.Y., in February. The captain of that plane, Marvin Renslow, received his pilot training from Gulf stream Training Academy ofFort Lauderdale, which is run by Gulfstream Interna tional Airlines. The Buffalo flight was operated by another region al airline, Colgan Air Inc. of Manassas, Va., for Continental Airlines. Gulfstream airlines' Web site says it also operates flights for Continental. Florida-based airline fined $1.3m

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EDITOR, The Tribune . A S WEawait the start of t he 2009 Atlantic hurricane s eason in two weeks time, I couldn't help but notice thec onsiderable flooding that resulted today from a mere t wo inches of rainfall. At cert ain locations on East and W est Bay Streets, downtown and in the Dowdeswell Street area it was almost knee deepf or a while, glaringly highlighting Nassau's inadequately maintained storm drain sys tems. T hese are generally so choked with soil, weeds, rub bish or a combination of allo f the above as to be totally i ncapable of performing their i ntended function. In the Fort C harlotte area for example, t he street sweepers “sweep” the debris from the road verge almost daily but not one of t hem bothers to lift the inspect ion plates in the sidewalk, let a lone clean out the drainage c hannels below, that are m eant to channel the water f rom the street into the drainage swale. T he result is traffic congestion, further erosion of our already dreadful roads, and s tagnant standing water especially in low lying areas, causi ng damage to properties, illness from water supplies contaminated by overflowing sewerage systems and invariably, a severe island wide mosquito p roblem. T he government, God bless t hem, continues the struggle to upgrade the condition oft he roads and verges, clean up our filthy island and educate o ur slovenly people about the c onsequences indiscriminate l ittering and dumping has on our tourism industry and our own lives. Let's have the rele-v ant department heads out there giving some direction to their staff, instead of hiding behind their suits, so the job g ets properly done in a timely fashion and we all get what we're hoping and paying for. I AN MABON N assau, M ay 19, 2009 C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., ( Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt . P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising A dvertising Manager (242 WEBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm CHAPEL HILL, N.C. In political debate, t he side that keeps its arguments simple and repeats them again and again is likely to gain the advantage. It is an easier sale, especially when the topic is as scary as terrorism. That's how Republicans got the edge in the dispute over President Barack Obama's planned closing of the Guantanamo Bay prison. And it put former Vice President Dick Cheney on a separate but almost equal platform with the president of t he United States, which is a plus any time the party out of power can manage it. Their back-to-back speeches on Thursday gave Cheney "a lot of credibility" and put Obama on the defensive, said Republican pollster David Winston. "From a political standpoint, I think Cheney wins on points," said GOP strategist Rich Galen. Long-term, the former vice president's premier r ole may have a downside for the Republicans, given his 25 per cent approval rating and his sta tus as the most unpopular top figure in an unpopular administration. But Galen said that at this point, "It's either Cheney or who else. There's no who else, so you take Cheney." In the Guantanamo argument,Obama's critics didn't worry about legalities, court decisions or complexities. They invented an argument aboutl etting terrorists move next door to Americans. Although no one had ever suggested such a thing, it worked, and the Democratic Senate vot ed overwhelmingly to deny Obama an $80 million appropriation to close the prison camp by eight months from now, as he had promised. Now Democratic leaders are saying that if Obama will come up with a plan on what to do with the prisoners there are about 240 of them theym ight agree. He said he's working on it, but it isn't easy. If it were, the place might already have been shut, since former President George W. Bush said that he wanted to close it but 2008 wasn't the right time. "We're cleaning up something that is, quite simply, a mess," Obama said. He said the prison Bush ordered opened in 2002 has left prisoners in l egal limbo, flooded the government with legal challenges and distracted officials who should be spending their time dealing with potential threats. "There are no neat and easy answers here," he said. "I wish there were." He said the issues are too complicated for absolutes or rigid ideology. So instead of scrap ping everything the Bush administration did, he is adapting some of it, notably the use of military commissions to try terrorist suspects, to bring them "in line with the rule of law." To which Cheney, in his own terrorism speech minutes after Obama's, said there's no place "for some kind of middle ground" on the issue. " ... Half measures keep you half exposed," he said. "You cannot keep just some nuclear-armed ter rorists out of the United States, you must keep every nuclear-armed terrorist out." There's no disputing that. But conjuring nuclear terrorists serves his argument that it is all or nothing, with no room for "sensible compromise" or "splitting differences," in Cheney's words. Even debating the issues is wrong in Cheney's v iew. "The terrorists see just what they were hoping for our unity gone, our resolve shaken, our leaders distracted," he said. And not only over Guantanamo, but also over the interrogation tactics Cheney calls enhanced and Obama calls torture. "Torture was never permitted," Cheney repeated. But waterboarding and other methods certainly sound torturous. Cheney dismissed that i ssue as "contrived indignation and phony moralizing." He also said that hard-line questioning produced information that "prevented the violent death of thousands, if not hundreds of thousands, of innocent people." No proof, but he said that is because it's in classified memos Obama hasn't released. That is said to be under review. Still, in an information sieve like Washington, it is hard to conceive that i nformation involving hundreds of thousands of lives saved would not have been leaked by now. Cheney argues that closing Guantanamo will make America less safe, and that in promising to do it, Obama and his allies are trying to cozy upto European opinion. Cheney's administration wanted it shut at some point, and so did Sen. John McCain, the Republican presidential nominee who now says it can't be done without ap lan on what to do with the inmates. It was, as Obama said, opened without a plan on what to do with the prisoners except lock them up. Bush did it by presidential order; there was no discussion or legislation involved, and in 2006 the Supreme Court overruled the system by which the administration planned to try prisoners. At one point, Guantanamo held up to 750 inmates. The new president noted that more than5 25 prisoners were released under the Bush administration, before he took office and ordered the place closed. "Rather than keeping us safer, the prison at Guantanamo has weakened American national security," Obama said. "It is a rallying cry for our enemies. It sets back the willingness of our allies to work with us in fighting an enemy that operates in scores of countries." T hat's complicated. Republicans are still keeping it simple. "Guantanamo has worked very well," said Sen. Mitch McConnell, the GOP leader. "I'm not sure this is broken and needs fixing." And certainly not if it will mean bringing pris oners to the United States to be tried and impris oned if convicted. "Republicans oppose releasing these terrorists or importing them into our local communities," said Rep. John Boehner, the House Republican leader. Obviously, but nobody has proposed either. Obama said trying to scare people won't protect them. "And we will be ill-served by some of the fear-mongering that emerges whenever we discuss this issue." But for the present, it serves the political purposes of his opponents. (This article was written by Walter R. Mears, AP Special Correspondent) Our inadequately maintained storm drainage systems LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Obama debating Cheney is plus for GOP NOTICE is hereby given that PAULISAACS of CASSIA CL, GLENISTON GARDENS, P.O. BOX SS-6345, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 23rd day of May, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.NOTICE 7KH3XEOLFLVKHUHE\DGYLVHGWKDW 0,&+$(/:$<'(%52:1 RI $YRFDGR*DUGHQV&DUPLFKDHO5RDGLQWKH6RXWKHUQ'LVWULFWRIWKH ,VODQGRI1HZ3URYLGHQFHRQHRIWKH,VODQGVRI&RPPRQZHDOWKRI 7KH%DKDPDVLQWHQGVWRFKDQJHQDPHWR 0,&+$(/:$<'( 785148(67 4 ,IWKHUHDUHDQ\REMHFWLRQVWRWKLVFKDQJHRIQDPH 'HHG3ROO\RXPD\ZULWHVXFKREMHFWLRQVWRWKH &KLHI3DVVSRUW 2IFHU31DVVDX%DKDPDVQRODWHUWKDQWKLUW\ GD\VDIWHUWKHGDWHRISXEOLFDWLRQRIWKLVQRWLFH 7KH3XEOLFLVKHUHE\DGYLVHGWKDW &(&,/%5$'%(7+(/ RIWKH:HVWHUQ'LVWULFWRIWKHVDLG,VODQGRI1HZ3URYLGHQFH %DKDPDVLQWHQGVWRFKDQJHQDPHWR &(&,/%5$' '$66/(5%(7+(/ ,IWKHUHDUHDQ\REMHFWLRQVWR WKLVFKDQJHRIQDPH'HHG3ROO\RXPD\ZULWHVXFK REMHFWLRQVWRWKH &KLHI3DVVSRUW2IFHU3 1DVVDX%DKDPDVQRODWHUWKDQWKLUW\GD\VDIWHUWKH GDWHRISXEOLFDWLRQRIWKLVQRWLFH E DITOR, The Tribune. LASTevening I watched a film on NBC produced by Farr ah Fawcett and filmed by Alana Stewart in which Far rah’s battle with anal cancer w as documented for two years, through all her treatments in LA and Germany, (at enormous expense p ain and her high hope for recovery which now unfortunately is not to be. I was diagnosed with the same cancer at approximately the same time and my last CTs can performed two weeks ago s howed that I am still cancerfree. I was treated with surgery, chemo and radiationa ll right here at PMH and the Cancer Centre on Collins Avenue. I cannot speak highly e nough of Dr Locksley Munroe, my surgeon, Drs Tracy Roberts, Theodore Turn q uest and Duvaughn Curling, my oncologists, Dr Margo Munroe, my radiation oncolo gist and all those unsung h eroes, the nurses of PMH, in particular those in the oncology clinic where I was treated as a public patient. PMH comes in for a lot of criticism, but I could not have been treated better anywhere in the world. Had Farrah Fawcett had my team behind her who knows if she would have had a different outcome? I will be eternally grateful. A SURVIVOR Nassau, May 18, 2009. Praising PMH for my treatment EDITOR, The Tribune. T ODAY(May 5th I nsurance to collect an unemployment cheque (since this person is disabled, and filled all necessary documents, and was told thate very detail, including mention of disability, was correct) and w as declined. For weeks and month it was advertised that persons can collect monies, if unemployed prior to 2004, made all necessary contributions to NIB, not self-employed, under 65,e xcluding disability and survivor’s benefits. N ow when we got there the person was told that they cannot receive monies, bear in mind that this person became disabled on the job (had been working over Paradise Island for almost 30y ears, and just got made redundant after getting a stroke in 2005) and continued on until 2006, which an employment letter was given to verify these statements. What is my concern for my friend is why they were denied the claim and have made con t ributions as an employed person over many years and still could not claim. Strangely, the person/s who were stationed at the school were the same person/s actually verifying or denying the claims,e ven though my friend put on the application that they are receiving a cheque for disability, and are still capable of move ment and willing to do minimal work, can an explanation be giv e n for this? T he Prime Minister, who also has NIB in his portfolio, said the most claims can be honoured, so what will become of this, since this person has contributed to this fund up to 2006? T hanks for the space, and hope that someone knowledgeable c an throw light on this matter. R PRATT Nassau, M ay 5, 2009. Unemployment cheque issues at NIB EDITOR, The Tribune. With my “pet project” accord ing to a very prominent individualbeing the creation of a Bahamian Flight Information Region (FIR a recent newspaper article refocused my attention on the matter. In a Nassau Guardian report of Tuesday May 12, 2009 (“Slain HMBS Flamingo Crew Members Remembered”), Minister of Edu cation Carl Bethel, paying homage to the four “patriotic” marines who died after Cuban MIGs attacked the Flamingo off the Ragged Island chain on May 10, 1980, said, inter alia, “It is now for us to etch them in our recollection...” With the RBDF falling within the portfolio of the Ministry of National Security, the rationale for the Education minister giving the eulogy is somewhat difficult to appreciate. In any event, as documented in Anthony Thompson’s excellent and recently updated “An Economic History of The Bahamas”, following this Act of War, “The Cuban government paid $5 mil lion in compensation for the sinking of HMBS Flamingo. The parents of each dead marine received a total of $400,000 paid by the Cuban Government for the four families.” Despite the passage of 29 years since the tragic incident occurred and just seven years after Bahami an independence, it is still not absolutely clear what triggered the Cuban MIG attack. The deadly airstrike, during which Duncan Town was also buzzed, took place within Bahamian sovereign airspace that, since 1952 up to the present, is included within the Cuban FIR. Similar to Bimini which, located only about 50 miles from the US mainland and which is actually included within US airspace the Ragged Islands area about 60 miles from the Cuban north coast. Without sounding unduly alarmist, a “clear and present danger” may exist off the southern Andros coastline, where, it is understood, members of the Bahamas uniformed forces flying missions in US Black Hawk helicopters must strictly adhere to Cuban protocol for flight authori sation in the area. “Man, we in Bahamian airspace” should definitely not be the rationale for failing to alert Cuban aviation authorities of flight activities, less, God forbid, itchy trig ger fingers once again create havoc and loss of life. Although Cuba was suspended from the OAS in 1962, indications are that they’re still interested in regional solidarity and integration, and fully endorse the creation of a Bahamian FIR. SIMON ARTZI Nassau, May, 2009. Flamingo affair prompts airspace concern

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THE Department of Rehabilitative Services is offering classes each Tuesday for parents and guardians who are having problems managing their children. Beginning 5pm at the departm ent’s head office on Thompson Boulevard, the classes are open to the public. Most parents w ho attend are referred by social workers and the courts. “Some of us do not think we have any problems with our parenting skills, and some say it is not them but instead it is their children,” observed senior probation officer Deidre Hepburn. However, she said, parents often suffer from a number of “issues” that affect their relationship with their children. Mrs Hepburn pointed out that s ome parents are simply not good at supervising, guiding andd isciplining children, while others a re affected by a breakdown in their relationship with the other parent. “The classes allow parents to examine their parenting skills and open them to various methods of disciplining their children,” she said. Each child responds differ e ntly to various forms of discipline so parents need to knowt he different methods of disciplining their children.” The topics discussed include the effects of child abuse and neglect, investing in children, managing finances and how that affects the upbringing of children, and how to have effective communication between parents and children. Forgiveness is one of the first topics dealt with in the sessions. “Some parents come to the sessions angry and cannot moveo n and gain anything until they learn forgiveness,” said Mrs Hepburn. After the first two sessions, they become more involved and participate. They become more vocal and the classes become more interactive. They learn from each other, sharing their experiences and looking at things differently.” Facilitators also teach parents how to communicate effectively with family members and how to pick up on non-verbal cues displayed by children. P articipants can see officers at the department on a one-on-oneb asis. There is also the option of o rganising a support group after the classes are finished. Mrs Hepburn said she hopes the classes will eventually be held throughout New Providence, not just at the department’s office, and expanded to the Family Islands. J ermaine, whose full name c annot be published due to the confidential nature of the case,w as ordered to attend the classes by a judge. He is the father of a 14-year-old girl. “Everyone should take these classes,” he said. “No one should send you here because everyone has little problems with their children. “I thought it was going to be ‘Hey, you are a bad parent.’ But it is not like that. “Everyone is open in these classes. The instructors give you s olutions you can try and you get feedback on how to handle your problems.” He is paying more attention to his daughter and listening to what she tells him. “She lets me know herself that she is telling me things that oth er children would not tell their parents,” he said. A judge also ordered Monalisa, the mother of twin girls, to attend the classes. At first she wanted to know why she and not her daughters w as sent to the classes. “But I told myself to stay focused because there is a reason they are sending me here,” she said. “I had to do that or I would not have been here all of these weeks. “More persons should attend the classes to learn how to be good parents.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009, PAGE 5 DHL JOB DESCRIPTIONPOSITION: Collections Agent JOB FAMILY: Credit & Collections RCS CODE: A20004 REPORTS TO : Collections Lead LOCATION: Country Finance Department OVERALL PURPOSE: Under limited supervision in a team environment provide efcient and effective credit approvals. To ensure timely credit application processing, respond to information requests and issues. Ensure accuracy of all credit decisions functions while staying within company policy and procedural guidelines. DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: making credit decisions. delinquent accounts. Processes credit applications. Investigates disputes and reviews documentation. Implements credit suspensions. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: direction amid competing priorities and deadlines. For more information please contact:Romell K. Knowles I Country Manager Email:Romell.Knowles@dhl.com PICTURED from left are: executive parenting officer Fronzetta Johnson, case worker Jenelle Cumber batch, senior probation officerD eidre Hepburn and senior probat ion officer Sonia Saunders. 'I am vex and extremely outraged at the public verb al abuse – or diarrhoea – s pewed by a public business speaker hiding behind a scholarly apron criticising the government for not reducing its staff and not selling or closing government entities in order to reduce the government debt. Such mischievously destab ilising criticisms of even t he government's assistance to helping the unemployed and suffering at this time is b eyond belief. "These are extremely difficult times for the poor and many thousands who have lost their jobs because ofb usiness failures. It's absolutely shocking that this selfish person can p resently want to see our g overnment lay off its staff a nd not think in the best i nterest of the majority of i ts people. My goodness, and I thought we had finished with this minority i ssue controlling the majorit y since 1967." CONCERNED CITIZEN, NASSAU " I am wex because of A ttorney General Michael Barnett. I switch my TV to c hannel 40 last week W ednesday at 10.34am to hear Senator and Minister o f Tourism Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace making his contribution to the debate on the new communications legislation – while behindhim, in clear view of the cameras, Mr Barnett isl eaning back in his appar e ntly too comfortable chair, eyes closed, asleep! "He was practically horizontal. There is no way he could not realise that, seat e d within inches of the per son speaking at the time, he would be in full view of a nyone watching the minister of tourism give his speech. So what’s the con c lusion? He has no interest in the matter at hand, no interest in even pretending t o be engaged in the matter at hand, and no shame. W ell shame on you, attor n ey general." POLITICAL OBSERVER, NASSAU " I vex that even though government said the trench i ng on Bay Street would soon be finished them deep h oles in the road still there. I am tired of my car wobbling all over the street,dust flying in my face and stink cars not letting me get in the next lane, all because government can't get their act together and finish things on time.” TIRED OF THE TRENCHES, NASSAU "I vex because it seems like most Bahamians don't know what manners or common courtesy is. They too caught up in their stink attitudes and nasty ways to realise that the way they treat other people comes back to haunt them. No wonder we are in the posi tion we are in, I mean, wherever you call you can't find a sensible, nice recep tionist, cashier or employee who don't treat you as if you doin' them something just for calling or going to the place where they work. "These people need to learn to fix they face and attitude before they go on people job, because I surely ain' paying my good money to get any stinkness from no manners fools." FIX YA FACE, NASSAU "I vex that whenever a lil’ piece of rain hit this island traffic is hit a standstill. I mean it could just be the smallest spry what barely wet the windshield and yet traffic is be bumper to bumper, causing me to be late for work because peo ple on the road acting fool. "People, y'all need to learn how to drive and stop creeping on the road just because a lil’ piece of wetness on the road.” MAD MOTORIST, NASSAU Are you vex? Send your complaints to whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net Why you VEX? n B y TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net PRESIDENT of the Police Staff Association Bradley Sands is agitating for government to quickly enact the Police ForceB ill to ensure that members of t he Royal Bahamas Police Force receive "critical" job quality improvements. "Why did we rush and pass the Police Act when we have yet to implement the benefitst hat are affecting junior police o fficers? There are a whole heap of issues that are affecting the welfare of police officers and the association is tired of diplomacy because it is not working while junior officers a re hurting," Mr Sands argued y esterday. M r Sands claimed that two police officers recently injured in the line of duty – one shot while making an arrest and another injured during a carc rash – had both received lett ers from the force's human resources department stating that their allotted 28 days of leave had expired. He claimed the officers were told that if they remained onl eave they would be placed on r educed pay. Mr Sands said that if the 2009 Police Force Bill was being enforced this would not have happened, as such situations are d ealt with in the legislation. The PSA, which is also calli ng for increased pensions for r etired officers, said officers stat ioned on the Family Islands are frustrated with their living conditions and are underequipped. “We are putting these police o fficers in harm’s way and n obody is checking. Officers are fighting the dump fire without proper equipment. “The relevant authorities are very much aware that these issues were brought up, thatt hey are not acting in the best i nterest of junior men of the force. "The Act was passed in the House of Assembly and the Senate but it's not signed into l aw and all the while Rome is burning," argued Mr Sands. T he Bill – passed by Parliam entarians earlier this year – w ill make several changes to the police force including the establishment of a police complaints inspectorate and limit the terms of both the commis-s ioner and deputy commissione r of police. It will repeal the 1965 Police Act and the Police Force Act of 2007. Another point of contention for the PSA is the alleged behaviour of the Police Tri-b unal, which investigates and i f necessary punishes officers accused of crimes or infractions. Mr Sands claimed many officers are treated as "guilty until proven innocent", and urged t he government to carry out a review of the tribunal. S S a a n n d d s s c c a a l l l l s s f f o o r r g g o o v v t t t t o o e e n n a a c c t t t t h h e e P P o o l l i i c c e e F F o o r r c c e e B B i i l l l l Classes launched for parents of troubled children R a y m o n d B e t h e l / B I S P h o t o We are putting these police officers in harm’s way and nobody is c hecking. Officers are fighting the d ump fire without proper e quipment.” B radley Sands

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE been rumoured as a potential c andidate to vie for the post w ith St Thomas More MP Frank Smith and the PLP MP for North Andros Vincent Peet. Standing in the way of the ambitions of these men is current deputy leader Mrs C ynthia Pratt who recently l et it be known that she has y et to make up her mind as to her political future. She has said that she has to meet with party leader Perry Christie before she makes any future announcement. Having advised the National Convention at its last sitt ing over a year ago that she w ould not continue in her post at the next general election, speculation has beenr ampant throughout the country that Mrs Pratt may have “changed her mind.” When it rains the water comes up to two feet in the road and if we walk through it you will get something, and weh ave illegal immigrants, all of that. Right here in this a rea.” Larry Forbes of Lucayan construction said he had $30,000 worth of materials stolen from his business in Feb r uary, but has had no communication from police about the p rogress of the case and whereabouts of his goods despite learning from the news of the thief turning himself in. He asked officers to keep victims of crime better informed. Anthon Saunders, security co-ordinator for Doctor’s H ospital, said one of his biggest challenges is getting the attention of the police when he catches criminals in the act. He said officers will insist he files a report at the station b efore assistance will be provided. Chief Superintendent Glenn Miller in charge of the central division said officers should respond immediately when called, and if they fail to, they should be reported tot he complaints unit. I hope that would not happen again in the central division,” Mr Miller said. “We are encouraging our officers to reach out and speak to people and advise you on what’sg oing on.” Mr Miller and his team ensured business representatives attending the meeting at the Doctor’s Hospital conference centre in Dowdeswell Street that by forming a tightn etwork they will be powerful enough to drive out crime. H e urged business owners to purchase CCTV cameras to overlook several businesses in the area as they can provide solid evidence in court for the conviction of criminals. M r Miller said: “We have frequently seen witnesses appear in court and panic and change their story, or witnesses do not appear to give evidence at all, or unfortu nately in some cases, witnesses disappear. “What we need now is for business partners to develop a witness. A very simple one is CCTV. It’s a powerful form of witness that the world is using.” He also suggested Business Watch could purchase a vehicle to conduct patrols of the area. Business representatives were introduced to one anoth er and to local officers, and Mr Miller assured them their concerns had been noted and would be acted on immediately. Business Watch groups will be headed by a co-ordinator and team and hold monthly meetings with law enforcement officials to discuss crime in the area. “Parliament can’t remove from judic ial oversight the liberty of the subj ect,” said Mr Munroe. Meanwhile, the Bar Association President suggested that there is no reason for the public to fear that the ruling will lead to more accused criminals being let out onto the streets. His comments came after the court handed down a landmark ruling on T hursday, which stated that a section o f the Bail Act that prohibits the granti ng of bail in such cases is “unconstit utional” and “void.” R elatives of murder victims and spokesman for the group “Families of Murder Victims”, Rodney Moncur, spoke out against the decision, saying that they could not support it and suggesting it would heighten “paranoia” in an already fearful populace. B ut Mr Munroe confirmed that the ruling really only formalises a state of affairs that has existed for sometime exemplified by the fact that judges have frequently granted bail to people accused of murder and other “serious crimes” in instances where it is deemed likely that they cannot be tried in a “reasonable” period of time despite t he Act. H e said such a practice “existed all over the common law world” but in The Bahamas, politicians always “seemed to have a problem telling the Bahamian public that you can’t arbitrarily lock people up” without reference to their constitutional r ights. Mr Munroe added: “There’s nothing in this judgment says that the experience is going to be that you are arraigned for murder and you get bail right away. “That just wouldn’t be a proper use of discretion. It would be very unusual,” said Mr Munroe. S uch individuals are still likely to be r emanded and then to receive bail only if they cannot receive a trial within a reasonable time. “If people think judges, who live in the community, whose friends family etcetera are subject to the same kind of crime that the rest of us are, would p ut on the street people who might injure or kill their family or friends, then they should be worried. “But what people tend to overlook is that judges, lawyers, they all have family in the wider community. “They live in the community so it’s really not in their interest (to release people on bail without good cause),” s aid Mr Munroe. Bahamians ‘should be pleased’ with bail ruling FROM page one Police urge businesses to band together to fight crime FROM page one PLPchairman F ROM page one n WASHINGTON I N Anew overture to Cuba, the Obama administration asked the island’s communist government on Friday to resume talks o n legal immigration of Cubans to the U nited States suspended by former President George W. Bush, according to Asso ciated Press. T he State Department said it had pro posed that the discussions, which were halted after the last meeting in 2003, ber estarted to “reaffirm both sides’ commitm ent to safe, legal and orderly migration, to review trends in illegal Cuban migration to the United States and to improve opera tional relations with Cuba on migration issues.” President Barack Obama “wants to e nsure that we are doing all we can to support the Cuban people in fulfilling their desire to live in freedom,” said Darla Jor dan, a department spokeswoman. “He will c ontinue to make policy decisions accordingly.” The move follows Obama’s decision in A pril to rescind restrictions on travel to Cuba by Americans with family there and on the amount of money they can send to their relatives on the island. I t also comes ahead of a high-level meeting early next month of the Organization of American States, where Cuba’s possible re-entry into the regional bloc will be discussed. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton will attend the June 2 meeting inH onduras. Clinton, however, told lawmakers this week that the U.S. would not support C uba’s membership in the o rganization until and unless President Raul Castro’s regime makes democratic reforms and releases political p risoners. She and Obama have also s aid that broader engagement with Cuba, including the possible lifting of the U.S. embargo on the island, is dependent on such steps. T here was no immediate r eaction from the Cuban gove rnment on Friday, but communist officials were angered when the Bush administrationd ecided to scuttle the talks on g rounds they were not crucial for monitoring agreements aimed at preventing a masse xodus from the island. In Miami on Friday, the influential Cuban American N ational Foundation wel comed the news, saying resumed migration talks could be “an opportunity to resolve issues of U nited States national interest.” However, three Cuban-American members of Congress from Florida denounced the move as “another unilateral conces sion by the Obama administration to the dictatorship.” “The United States suspended the ’migration talks’ with the Cuban dictator ship in January 2004 because the Cuban r egime refused to comply with basic aspects of the Migration Accord of 1995,” R epublican Reps. Lincoln D iaz-Balart, his brother Mario and Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, said in a statement. “The Cuban regime continu es to violate the accord by denying hundreds of exit perm its annually to Cuban nationals who have received visas to enter the United States. The Obama administration should first insist that t he Castro dictatorship comp lies with the accord before r enewing ’talks.”’ The twice-yearly meetings in alternating countries hadb een the highest level cont acts between the two coun tries, which have no diplo matic relations. T he suspension of the talks occurred during an especially prickly period during w hich then-president Fidel Castro publicly criticizing James Cason, at the time head of the U.S. Interests Section in H avana, as a “bully” and Washington con demning Havana for a crackdown that rounded up 75 dissidents and sentenced them to long prison terms. The talks were created so the countries could track adherence to 1994 and 1995 accords designed to promote legal, orderly migration between the two countries. The aim was to avoid a repeat of the sum-m er of 1994, when tens of thousands of Cubans took to the sea in flimsy boats US asks Cuba to resume talks on legal immig ration A DEPARTMENT s pokeswoman said President Barack Obama (above wants to ensure that we are doing all we can to support the Cuban people in fulfilling their desire to l ive in freedom,’ said

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n By MATT MAURA S TRENGTHENING the primary health care system remains "a high priority" for t he government, Minister of H ealth Dr Hubert Minnis said. Addressing the 62nd World Health Assembly, he said it is “crucial” that sustained financial investment in public health and primary health care remains high on the agenda. “Investment in primary care is value for money,” Dr Minnis said. Almost 31 years after the Declaration of Alma-Ata, health officials in the Bahamas have proven the benefits of investing in primary health care, Mr Minnis said. The declaration was signed in 1978 at the International Conference on Primary Health Care in Alma-Ata, the former Soviet Union. Among other things, it gave attention to building the foundation of health care systems on primary care. It was agreed at that confer ence that a strong primary health service could result in disease prevention and control, longer life expectancies a nd the promotion of safe motherhood, particularly in developing countries. D r Minnis said the success o f primary health care pro grammes “ensures equity from the start for our children” as proved by the Bahamas’ very successful programme for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV/AIDS. “Primary health care must not compete with hospitals for budgetary allocations,” Dr Minnis said. “There must be equitable benefits for the health workforce across the entire health sector. “Staff working in primary health care must be recognised for the value they bring to the health sector. It is therefore crucial that sustained financial investment in public health a nd primary health care sys tems remain high on the agenda of policymakers.” D r Minnis said the Ministry o f Health has implemented ini tiatives and strategies that have improved the delivery of quality primary health care to Bahamians. One has been the strengthening of public health infor mation systems to support evidence-based decision making at all levels of the health sec tor, he said. This is being done through the expanded use of information and communication technology (ICT While ICT is proving to be a very effective means of strengthening the health information systems, Dr Minnis said, the delivery of primary h ealth care services can also benefit from additional newer technologies. In a country such as the B ahamas with its more than 30 inhabited islands and a population that is spread across 100,000 square miles," he said, "ICT can be used to not only strengthen primary care services, but also to promote uni versal access to health services through tele-health diagnostic services and referrals, as well as access to specialist management when required “These technologies have also been proven to enhance the management of patient records through electronic medical records which also allows for patients to access their medical information." C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009, PAGE 7 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.28Abaco Markets1.331.330.000.1270.00010.50.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.686.95Bank of Bahamas6.956.950.000.2440.26028.53.74% 0.900.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1511.09Cable Bahamas11.7511.750.001.4060.2508.42.13% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.002310.2490.04011.41.41% 7.446.06Commonwealth Bank (S16.136.130.000.4190.36014.65.87% 3.381.31Consolidated Water BDRs2.882.77-0.110.1110.05225.01.88% 3.001.38Doctor's Hospital1.381.380.000.2400.0805.85.80% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.4200.30018.53.87% 12.5011.00Finco11.0011.000.000.3220.67034.26.09% 14.6610.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.4010.400.000.7940.40013.13.85% 5.555.00Focol (S5.145.140.000.3320.15015.52.92% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.500.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.37581.3124Colina Bond Fund1.37581.654.83 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8962-1.49-3.35 1.39011.3875Colina Money Market Fund1.46302.055.25 3.69603.1964Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1964-5.59-13.64 12.739712.1564Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.15990.71-12.76 1.04401.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04400.804.40 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03640.333.64 1.04521.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04520.764.40 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L L L L : : C C O O L L I I N N A A 2 2 4 4 2 25 5 0 0 2 2 7 70 0 1 1 0 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L LF F I I D D E E L LI I T T Y Y 2 2 4 4 2 23 35 5 6 6 -7 77 7 6 6 4 4 | | F F G G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K KE E T T S S 2 2 4 4 2 2-3 39 9 6 64 40 0 0 0 0 0 | | C C O O L LO O N N I I A A L L 2 2 4 4 2 2 5 5 0 02 2 7 7 5 5 2 2 5 5FINDEX: CLOSE 795.25 | YTD -4.75% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSFRIDAY, 22 MAY 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,608.76 | CHG -0.12 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -103.60 | YTD % -6.05BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 30-Apr-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Mar-09 9-Feb-09 9-Feb-09 W W W WW W. .B B I I S S X X B B A A H HA A M M A A S S . .C C O OM M | | T T E E L L E E P P H HO O N NE E : : 2 2 4 4 2 2 -3 3 2 23 32 2 3 3 3 3 0 0 | | F FA A C C S S I I M M I I L L E E : : 2 24 4 2 2-3 32 2 3 3 2 2 3 32 2 0 0NAV Date 31-Mar-09 15-May-09 31-Mar-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 9-Feb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gymnast and state judging d irector Susan Monahan is in New P rovidence this weekend to share her expertise as she judges the skills of members of the nation’s oldest gymnastic club – Nassau ‘Nastics. Gymnasts were tested on Friday at the Oakes Field gym on the uneven bars and today at the Kendal GL Isaacs G ymnasium on their floor routines, vault and beam. The events are a part of Nassau ‘Nastics’ Gymfest Spring S pectacular. We are thrilled to have Susan Mona han judging the gymnasts,” said head coach of Nassau ‘Nastics, Trevor Ram sey. “In addition to being a former g ymnast, she’s been judging for over 16 years and sits on the Florida State Judges Board of Directors, which means that she’s responsible for men t oring and training new judges. Her three kids have also competed so she knows what its like to be a gym mom, supporter, coach, carpool driver andj udge.” C oach Ramsey noted that competi tions are essential because they allow gymnasts to see exactly how t hey are progressing based on their scores. It also prepares and conditions them t o be performers, an essential element in wooing the judges abroad. “Healthy competition boosts scores, b oosts confidence levels and the enjoyment of competing motivates them to work harder when they return to the g ym,” explained Coach Ramsey. However, we have a unique problem because there are no other clubs here in Nassau, our kids don't have the opportunity to attend enough competitions. “We attempt to go abroad two to three times a year in order to give our gymnasts that exposure but this alone s imply isn't enough.” “Since we are the only club here, we cannot bring a judge here to a comp etition so instead we are calling this e vent a 'testing',” he added. At the end of the day, every gym nast in our club will have the exposure of standing in front of a judge, and willk now exactly how much they have achieved within the last year of training and how much more is needed to continue to improve.” N assau ‘Nastics Spring Spectacular will conclude on Sunday afternoon witha performance by the gymnasts and an awards ceremony at the Kendall IsaacsG ymnasium at 4pm. Minnis: primary care remains ‘a high priority’ Dr Hubert Minnis n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net OWNERS of the Palm Bay Beach Club in Exuma yesterday dispelled reports that the small beach-front resort has filed for bankruptcy. While admitting the property is battling with the tourism downturn like most of its counterparts, co-owners and managers Ron and Bette Francis said they remain committed to keeping it open while maintaining staff levels. After inaccurate reports about the resort's financial state were reported through the broadcast media and on local online message boards, the hotel was peppered with calls from Labour and Social Services officials, said Mr Francis. Coupled with the recent announcement that the Four Seasons at Emerald Bay will shut its doors on May 26 leaving about 500 persons jobless, Mr Francis said misinformed persons on the island were worried about a new round of layoffs. "Rumours sometimes can be more damaging than the truth and unfortunately everytime someone reads (the reports cancels their booking it's making things even more difficult for us. I don't know where the rumours come from but it's hurting us and I wish people would check their facts before they put them on the air," said Mr Francis, speaking to The Tribune from Exuma yesterday. Despite the depressed tourism market, only two part-time waitresses have been laid off from its 40-member staff. With things not expected to turn around until at best, the end of the year, the resort is focused on attracting domestic tourists to the 70-villa property. Management is currently offering a 35 per cent discount to locals. The beach-front property has two swimming pools, jacuzzis, a full range of water sports, and shuttle service to George Town. "We're struggling as every business in the Bahamas is, but we have always stayed open for the last 10 years even when everyone else has shut 365 days a year and we intend to do so throughout this time. We're resilient people and we have a fantastic Bahamian staff who we count as family and we're all going to work through this tough time. "My personal belief is that we'll see some positive changes by the winter season by December and 2010 will be an improvement over 2009 and 2011 hopefully we'll be back to normal," said Mr Francis. Last week Exuma's largest employer the Four Seasons at Emerald Bay announced it was shutting its doors on May 26 leaving some 500 persons jobless. The closure comes nearly two years after the resort was placed in receivership. Without new investors to acquire the project, secured creditor Mitsui chose to temporarily close the property. Palm Bay Beach Club owners dispel bankruptcy reports GYMNASTIC JUDGE Susan Monahan will be judging Bahamian g ymnasts this weekend as a part of Nassau ‘Nastics Gymfest S pring Spectacular. Former gymnast to judge skills of Nassau ’Nastics members I I d d o o n n ' ' t t k k n n o o w w w w h h e e r r e e t t h h e e r r u u m m o o u u r r s s c c o o m m e e f f r r o o m m b b u u t t i i t t ' ' s s h h u u r r t t i i n n g g u u s s a a n n d d I I w w i i s s h h p p e e o o p p l l e e w w o o u u l l d d c c h h e e c c k k t t h h e e i i r r f f a a c c t t s s b b e e f f o o r r e e t t h h e e y y p p u u t t t t h h e e m m o o n n t t h h e e a a i i r r . . C o-o w ner and manager R on Francis n GENEVA THEWorld Health Organization said Friday it will change the rules for declar-i ng a swine flu pandemic, a v irus the agency’s chief called “sneaky” because of its ability to spread quickly from person to person and potentially mutate into a deadlier form, according to Associated Press. U nder political pressure f rom many of its 193 members to consider factors other than just the spread of the disease before announcing a global epidemic, WHO’s flu c hief said “course correct ions” were being made. What we will be looking for is events which signify a really substantial increase in risk of harm to people,” Keiji Fukuda told reporters in Geneva. So far the virus has been m ild, sickening 11,168 people a nd causing 86 deaths, most of them in Mexico, according to WHO. B ut experts worry it could evolve into a more deadly strain or overwhelm countriesu nprepared for a major flu o utbreak. Many countries fear a pandemic declaration would trigg er mass panic, and be eco nomically and politically damaging. For developed coun-t ries that already have activ ated their pandemic preparedness plans, a pandemic declaration would change little in their response strategies. Earlier this week, Britain a nd other countries urged WHO to reconsider its pan demic definition. WHO hastily responded to these concerns, as Fukuda said the agency would revise the conditions needed tom ove from the current phase 5 to the highest level, phase 6, which makes it a pandemic. The countries are telling us now that moving from phase 5 to 6 is not so help ful,” Fukuda said. He said the a lert phases were developed before the outbreak hit, and now need to be adjusted to t he reality of the situation. The virus’ lethality could become one of the requiredc riteria before a pandemic is d eclared, Fukuda said. Fukuda’s comments echoed those of WHO Direc t or-General Margaret Chan, who told governments she would heed their call to cau-t ion in declaring a pandem ic. At the same time, Chan w arned against complacency. “This is a subtle, sneaky virus,” she said at the close of the weeklong meeting. “It does not announce its presence or arrival in a new coun try with a sudden explosion of patients seeking medical care or requiring hospitalization.” “We expect it to continue to spread to new countries and continue to spread within countries already affect ed,” Chan said. Countries taking part in the Geneva meeting agreed Fri day to delay efforts to finalize a deal on sharing flu viruses, instead instructing Chan to find a solution by early next year. Developing countries lobbied hard to ensure they would benefit from any drugs created using their virus samples. WHO to consider the severity of ‘sneaky’ swine flu

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C M Y K C M Y K SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 9 P AGE 10 Williams sisters on opposite halves of French draw... Nuggets beat L akers 106-103 in Game 2... See page 10 n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net A fter a thrilling comefrom-behind win in their opening effort of the tournament, there would be no such luck for the Bahamas in their second game as the odds on favourite lived up to their top billing for a straight set win. The Bahamas fell to a heavily favoured Mexico team in three sets, 25-13, 25-20, and 25-16 in their second game of the NORECA D second round tournament of the 2010 FIVB Men’s World Championship. A resilient Bahamian team was u nable to counteract the virtually i mpenetrable Mexican defense at the net which created continuous scoring opportunities. Renaldo Knowles once again led the Bahamas in scoring with nine points, well short of the 16 point pace he established in game one. Shedrick Forbes also added nine in a losing effort. In their first game of the tournament, Mexico came out aggressively on the offensive, opening the game on a 12-5 run, never allowing the Bahamas within striking distance. Joe Smith, Bahamas Volleyball Fed eration executive, traveling with the team to Kingston, Jamaica, said the team got a good impression of the M exican squad and now knows what t o expect in a second meeting. “It was defiantly a learning experience for them, Mexico came out strong from the beginning of the game,” he said. “The good thing about it is this game does not mean as much in the grand scheme of things as we are still alive and will be in the quarterfinal. The team is more prepared now and going into a rematch with Mexico we should expect a great performance.” The Bahamas fell to 1-1, while Mex ico improved to 1-0. Despite the loss, Team Bahamas is doing well in the statistical depart ment as they boast the tournament’s top three scorers thus far. K nowles remains the tournament’s l eading scorer with 28 points, 25 of which came on spikes at a success rate of 41 per cent, Forbes is second with 23 points and Prince Wilson is third with 23. Romel Lightbourne is one of the tournament’s top servers with three serves for aces. Mexico is scheduled to face St Lucia, the third team in Group B, tonight at 9pm. By virtue of their opening round win over St Lucia on Wednesday night, the Bahamas advanced to the quarterfinal where they will face Mex ico for the second time. Over in Group A, Haiti remains the surprising leader with a 1-1 win loss r ecord. J amaica sits at 1-1 with their lone win – a three set sweep over Haiti – while the Cayman Islands are at 0-1. Only the champions and runnersup from the tournament will advance to the third round of play. Mexico is favoured in the pool followed by Jamaica in Group B. The pool D champion winner will face Puerto Rico and Barbados, which have already advanced to NORCECA Pool G. The second place team in Pool D will advance to face Cuba, Canada and the winners of Pool C, which includes Trinidad & Tobago, Suri name, Aruba, the US Virgin Islands and Antigua. T eam Bahamas falls to Mexico in three sets n By HOWARD FENDRICH AP Tennis Writer PARIS (AP Serena Williams have not cornered the market on sibling success in tennis: Dinara Safina and Marat Safin are the first sister and brother to both reach No. 1 in the rankings. When the French Open starts Sunday, Safina will be seeded No. 1 at a Grand Slam tournament for the first time. Now the Russian wants to win her first major title and she can turn to Big Brother for allin-the-family Slam advice. His best words of wisdom? "You just have to enjoy every moment," Safina said Friday. "Have to live by the day and enjoy every day." Not that she always heeds what Safin says, even if he does own U.S. Open and Australian Open championships. "He can maybe practice 10 hours a day, and for him, it's enough. I'm a little bit more stubborn. I need, like, to have maybe four hours on the court," Safina said. "And he was, like, 'No, just practice half an hour, and it's fine for you.'" The resemblance to her brother is striking, and a smile crossed that familiar face as Safina earned a laugh at his expense. Then her expression turned more serious, and she added: "But, no, now he does n't go into the tennis. I think he respects me much more now." The 23-year-old Safina and 29-year-old Safin he is seed ed 20th at the French Open were born into the sport. Their father is the director of a Moscow tennis club, and their mother is a tennis coach who worked with both kids when they were young. Safina has been known to show tiny flashes of the sort of on-court temper for which her brother is famous, though nothing quite to his extremes. Right now, her game is what's match ing his standards. Safina comes to Roland Gar ros on a 10-match winning streak and 14-1 overall this sea son on clay, all since her April 20 rise to No. 1. "Since I became No. 1, I've been in a final and I won two tournaments," Safina said, "so I guess I'm feeling pretty good." As well she should. For every jab she might hear about whether she deserves to lead the rankings despite not having a major championship on her resume most notably, Serena Williams recently called herself "the real No. 1" Safi na also earns praise for her recent play. Just one example: When former No. 1 Amelie Mauresmo, twice a Grand Slam title winner, was asked Friday about her own chances at this French Open, she noted that women's tennis recently has been wide open, "except maybe for Safi na, who has been on a roll the last couple of weeks on clay." There is a general sentiment heading into the tournament that while the men's event might very well come down to a Rafael Nadal vs. Roger Fed erer final for the fourth consecutive year, no one is quite sure what will happen in the women's draw. Serena Williams has won the U.S. Open and Australian Open to raise her career count to 10 Grand Slam titles, but she also lost her past four matches and quit her most recent outing because of a bad knee. Venus Williams is on a twomatch losing streak and has never had her greatest success on clay. Maria Sharapova returned to singles only this week after nearly 10 months away because of right shoulder surgery. Defending champion Ana Ivanovic's right knee has been troubling her she wore black tape on it while practicing Fri day and played only three matches on clay this year. Those women all have won major titles. Safina, meanwhile, lost to Ivanovic in last year's French Open final and to Ser ena Williams in this year's Australian Open final. As for those who say Safina is the closest thing to a favorite over the next two weeks? "I'm not even listening what the people are saying. I'm just focusing on myself, you know? Just taking one day at a time," she said. "I don't think about what I want to happen in 14, 15, 16 days, you know. I live today. Today I had a practice. That's all. Tomorrow is another day." Sounds like something a certain sibling might say. Associated Press Writer Trung Latieule contributed to this report. No. 1 Safina can look to Big Brother for tips RENALDO KNOWLES (shown on the right in this file photo) once again led the Bahamas in scoring with nine points, well short of the 16 point pace he established in game one... DINARA SAFINA returns the ball to Caroline Wozniacki during the Madrid Open at the Caja Magica in Madrid on Sunday... (AP Photo: Daniel Ochoa de Olza

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n By BETH HARRIS A P Sports Writer L OS ANGELES (AP Similar game, different ending for the Los Angeles Lakers. Their 24-year playoff dominance of the Denver Nuggets dissipated over the final 29 seconds of the fourth quarter in the second down-to-the-wire game in the Western Conference finals. That's when Kenyon Martin hit a layup in traffic and Chauncey Billups made 3 of 4 f ree throws to give Denver a 106-103 victory in Game 2 on Thursday night to even the series. "It's going to be a long series," Nuggets coach George Karl said. It was Denver's first playoff win against Los Angeles since 1985, a span of 11 games, the second-longest postseason winning streak against one team in NBA history. "There was just a demand that we had to win this game," Karl said. "There was an inner spirit. We're a much more smart, mentally tough team t han you look at last year and w hat we are now. It's a great w in." Carmelo Anthony scored 34 points, Billups had 27 points and Linas Kleiza added 16 for the Nuggets. Nene finished with six points, nine rebounds and six assists. " To get one on the road is always tough. We came in and got it," Anthony said. "We're mentally tough and we showed that in this game coming off the loss that we gave away in Game 1." Anthony twisted his ankle in the game, but he said he would be fine for Game 3 Saturday in Denver. Kobe Bryant had 32 points, including making all 10 of his free throws, Trevor Ariza scored a career playoff-high 20 points and Pau Gasol had 17 points and 17 rebounds for the Lakers, who dropped to 7-2 at Staples Center this postseason. "They have home court advantage now. Now it's time to go to Denver, see if we can do the same," Bryant said. "We're not the best road team in the NBA for no reason." The Nuggets recovered from poor free throw shooting in a two-point loss in Game 1 to make 17 consecutive foul shots until Billups missed one with 4 seconds remaining. He made the second for the three-point lead. "I want to kill Chauncey for missing that free throw," Karl said. Derek Fisher launched a 3pointer from the right corner that Nene got a piece of as time expired. "Nene had a great contest," Billups said. "I don't think Fisher got a good chance to get a good look on the shot. Nonetheless, I was down there trying to rebound and trying to get my hands on the ball again, try to get back on that free throw line." Fisher thought he did get a good look. "I figured they were going to try to foul to prevent us from shooting a 3," he said. "I got rid of it a little quicker than I probably had to. Definitely don't want to put yourself in a position where you need that kind of shot to try and tie the game." Tied at 101, Martin made the layup off Nene's assist that gave the Nuggets the lead for good. Bryant dribbled upcourt and got into traffic, with Nene tipping the ball away to earn a jump ball with 18 seconds left. Gasol controlled the tip to Ariza, but the ball squirteda way and Fisher fouled Billups. He made both for a 105-101 lead. "Looked to me like Anthony pushed on Trevor and Trevor tried to get rid of the ball, and no foul was called and they recovered the basketball,"L akers coach Phil Jackson said. Martin then fouled Gasol, who made both before Billups g ot fouled. The Lakers were shaky on free throws in the fourth, making 9 of 14, while Denver didn't blink at the line. The Nuggets were 29 of 37, with Billups hit ting 13 of 16 and Anthony 10 o f 14. Kleiza's 3-pointer early in the f ourth quarter gave the Nuggets an 85-82 lead, their first since the game's opening minutes. Billups followed with two free throws and Anthony hit two straight baskets to extend Den ver's lead to 91-84. B ryant missed a jumper, but he came up big on the Lakers' n ext possession, hitting a 3pointer with Anthony's hand in his face. Shannon Brown tossed in a 3 and Lamar Odom made two free throws as part of an 11-2 run that put the Lakers back in front 95-93. D enver regained the lead b efore Bryant's 3-pointer, again with Anthony guarding closely, tied the game at 99 with 1:59 remaining. Billups made two free throws before Bryant's jumper tied it at 101. The Lakers led by 14 early in the second quarter. Anthony began a run of 14 consecutive points for the Nuggets to get them to 51-40. They outscored the Lakers 14-2 to get within 55-54 at halftime. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS PAGE 10, SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS n By The Associated Press Los Angeles Lakers at Denver (8:30pm EDT Nuggets beat the Lakers 106103 on Thursday night in Los Angeles to even the Western Conference finals 1-1. S S T T A A R R S S Thursday Carmelo Anthony and Chauncey Billups, Nuggets. Anthony had 34 points and nine rebounds, and Billups added 27 points in Denver's 106-103 victory over the Los Angeles Lakers in the Western Conference finals. The series is tied 1-1. 1 1 2 2 t t h h T T I I M M E E ' ' S S A A C C H H A A R R M M Denver's 106-103 victory over Los Angeles on Thursday night in Game 2 of the Western Conference was the Nuggets' first playoff victory over the Lakers. Los Angeles won the first 11 postseason games against Denver. G G O O O O D D A A S S G G O O L L D D Carmelo Anthony had 34 points in the Nuggets' 106103 Game 2 win Thursday night to become the first Denver player to score 30 or more points in five consecutive playoff games since 1976. He had 39 in Game 1. S S P P E E A A K K I I N N G G "I think this is going to be a long series." Denver coach George Karl after the Nuggets beat the Los Angeles Lakers 106103 on Thursday night to tie the Western Conference semi final series 1-1 NBA Today s going to be a long series’ Nuggets beat Lakers 106-103 in Game 2 CHAUNCEY BILLUPS puts up a shot as Lamar Odom defends during second half of Game 2 in Western conference final series Thursday night in Los Angeles. (AP Photo: Mark J Terrill n By LARRY O’DELL Associated Press Writer NORFOLK, Va. (AP Michael Vick walked into a federal courthouse on Friday to meet his probation officer, ignoring questions from waiting reporters about his life under home con finement after being released from prison this week. The suspended NFL star arrived at the Norfolk courthouse at 10am, his first-known public appearance since he left a federal penitentiary in Kansas undetected early Wednesday and drove cross-country to arrive in Hamp ton early Thursday, where he began serving two months of home confinement. The former Atlanta Falcons quarterback is serving a 23-month sentence for a dogfighting conspiracy. Vick arrived at the courthouse in the passenger seat of a Range Rover driven by his fiancee, Kijafa Frink. She let him out near the front door and Vick walked silently past waiting cameras and reporters, ignoring questions about his first day home and his plans. Vick was wearing jeans, a light blue shirt and a dark blue blazer. He left again after nearly an hour, with his fiancee and a lawyer in tow as he exited the courthouse. Vick again said nothing to waiting reporters before getting into the waiting Range Rover. One man in a crowd of bystanders yelled out, "Keep your head up, Mike!" Vick had previously met with probation officials. They came to his house Thursday to equip him with an electronic monitor so they can track his movements until he is released from federal custody July 20. The monitor was not visi ble under his clothes at the courthouse. Vick had managed to remain mostly out of sight since returning home in a van equipped with blackout curtains. But now that he has been outfitted with the electronic monitor, federal officials probably won't be the only ones watching his movements. AP Sports Writer Hank Kurz Jr contributed to this report Vick meets pr obation of ficer n By HOWARD FENDRICH AP Tennis Writer PARIS (AP Williams were drawn into opposite sides of the French Open field Friday, while the men's semifinals could pit four-time defending champion Rafael Nadal against Andy Murray, and Roger Federer against Novak Djokovic. Second-seeded Serena one of two past women's champions in the tournament will meet Klara Zakopalova of the Czech Republic in the first round. Third-seeded Venus faces Bethanie Mattek-Sands of the United States in her opener. The Williams sisters can only meet in the championship match. Serena beat Venus in the 2002 final. Top-ranked Dinara Safina of Russia starts against Anne Keothavong of Britain. Maria Sharapova will play Anastasiya Yakimova of Belarus in her first Grand Slam match since Wimbledon last year. Sharapova returned to the tour this week after missing nearly 10 months due to a shoulder injury and is not seeded. Trying to become the first man to win five consecutive French Opens, top-seeded Nadal will begin against a qualifier. He could meet past No. 1 Lleyton Hewitt in the third round, and 14th-seeded David Ferrer in the fourth. Hewitt's first match is against No. 26 Ivo Karlovic, the 6-foot-11 player from Croat ia who upset him in the first round at Wim bledon in 2003, when Hewitt was the reigning champion. Federer's bid to tie Pete Sampras with a record 14 major singles title will start against Alberto Martin of Spain. Murray's first opponent is Juan Ignacio Chela of Argentina, whose four career tour titles all came on clay and who once was ranked 15th. The potential men's quarterfinals are Nadal vs. No. 8 Fernando Verdasco, Murray vs. No. 7 Gilles Simon, Federer vs. No. 6 Andy Roddick, and Djokovic vs. No. 5 Juan Martin Del Potro. David Nalbandian, Carlos Moya and Mario Ancic are among the men who withdrew. The International Tennis Federation had said Dmitry Tursunov would pull out because of a heel injury, but Tursunov was in Friday's draw, seeded 21st. The possible women's quarterfinals are Safina vs. defending champion Ana Ivanovic, Venus Williams vs. No. 6 Vera Zvonareva, Serena Williams vs. No. 7 Svet lana Kuznetsova, and No. 4 Elena Dementieva vs. No. 5 Jelena Jankovic. Play begins Sunday. Williams sisters on opposite halves of French Open draw Mauer s grand slam helps T wins r out White Sox 20-1 JOE MAUER hits a grand slam during the sixth inning of a game against the Chicago White Sox in Chicago Thursday. Mauer also had two doubles and drove in a career-high six runs as Minnesota routed the White Sox 20-1. (AP Photo: Charles Rex Arbogast n By GRAHAM DUNBAR AP Sports Writer GENEVA, Switzerland (AP UEFA charged Didier Drogba and Jose Bosingwa with misconduct on Friday for insulting the referee after Chelsea's elimination from the Champions League. European football's governing body also charged the club with failing to control the players as well as fans who threw objects. Drogba and Bosingwa breached sportsmanship by making offensive comments about Norwegian referee Tom Henning Ovrebo, UEFA said in a statement. Ovrebo denied several penalty appeals in the 1-1 draw with Barcelona in a semifinal at Stamford Bridge on May 6. Barcelona scored a late equalizer to advance to the final on away goals and will play Manchester United in Rome on Wednesday. Chelsea said it would respond to UEFA's charges, on behalf of both club and its two players. "We would like to make clear again, as we did at the time, that the incidents in question were regrettable and occurred only because of the high emotions and frustrations which arose from the disappointment of a controversial defeat in such an important game," the club said in a statement. "We are all acutely aware of the responsibilities that lie with both the club and its players as regards setting a good example as role models and upholding the principles of fair play in football. Both of the players accept that and apologized very soon afterwards for their actions." UEFA president Michel Platini, who is independent of the disciplinary committee, told The Associated Press that the biggest issue confronting referees is how to punish "dangerous" players who provoke them on the pitch. "I can understand the referee, I can understand the players and I will understand very well (the results ciplinary committee," Platini told the AP. "It is not just a problem for today, it is a problem for 40, 50 years. From the moment you think there is a mistake, the players are furious at the referee, the fans are furious at the referee. "The referee does his job, the players were not happy and the disciplinary committee will do its job." Chelsea and the two players must file statements to UEFA by May 29. UEFA's disciplinary panel will hear the cases June 17. It can ban players from Champions League matches and make Chelsea play behind closed doors. Drogba approached Ovrebo in a fin ger-waving outburst, and was pulled away by security staff and Chelsea coach Guus Hiddink while yelling an expletive toward a television camera. Portuguese defender Bosingwa compared Ovrebo to a "thief" in a postmatch television interview. Michael Ballack escaped being charged despite aggressively chasing after Ovrebo when a late penalty appeal was rejected. The German midfielder's action occurred during the match and is judged to have been dealt with by the referee on the field of play. Competition organizer UEFA had this season renewed its campaign calling for players, clubs and fans to respect match officials. "We have to punish immediately the player who provokes, who gives the spark," Platini said. AP Sports Writer Rob Harris in Istanbul contributed to this report. UEFA charges Drogba, Bosingwa with misconduct

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Barbados names gov’ t bldg. for US attorney general In brief n BRIDGETOWN, Barbados U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder’s visit to Barbados is only for three days, but his name will remain even after he leaves, according to the Associ ated Press. The country is renaming a collection of government offices the Eric H. Holder Jr. Municipal Complex to honor Washington’s No. 1 prosecutor. Holder’s father was born in Barbados, and his mother has roots on the island as well. The attorney general met Fri day with Prime Minister David Thompson and other officials to discuss efforts to fight drug trafficking and other crime. Formerly known as Tamarind Hall, the complex in St. Joseph Parish includes a police station, court, library and post office. n PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti FLOODShave killed at least 11 people this week as heavy rains swamp towns still rebuilding from last year’s hurricanes, H aiti’s civil protection departm ent said Friday, a ccording to the Associated Press . Most of the victims were swept away by swollen rivers o r died when their flimsy h omes collapsed, officials said. Five of the deaths were reported in the rice-growing Artib onite Valley. Rains that began a week ago h ave been heaviest on the southern peninsula near LesC ayes and Camp Perrin, where 1,000 homes have been flooded. Some areas received nearly 3 inches (74 millimeters T hursday night, Haiti’s meteorological office said. N ew flood alerts were issued F riday for all of Haiti’s 10 administrative regions. E ven small amounts of rain can swell rivers and overflowf ields in this poor Caribbean nation, which is particularly vulnerable to flooding because of erosion from farming and deforestation. President Rene Preval visite d the west-coast town of St. M arc to view flooding Wednesday and urged resid ents to stop building homes in r avines, Radio Kiskeya reported. W ith a new hurricane season officially starting June 1, officials worry new floodsc ould damage Haiti’s strugg ling agriculture and economy. Last year, four tropical storms killed some 800 people and caused $1 billion of damage, aggravating chronic malnutri-t ion in several areas. International donors pledged $ 324 million last month to help Haiti rebuild, but the govern m ent said it could need three times that amount. F loods in Haiti kill 11 people, destroy homes n H AVANA CUBANstate media says the island should adopt the motto “Savings or Death!” to withstand tough economict imes, a ccording to the Asso ciated Press . Friday’s proposal in an edi torial by Granma director Lazaro Barredo is a play on the communist leadership’s slogan “Socialism or Death!” Barredo says Central Bank president Francisco Soberan came up with the phrase. The editorial complains about “squandering” fuel and other resources, and worker “passivity.” Barredo writes that the crisis means laborers must work harder and conserve resources, and their bosses must push them more. He says more productivity is necessary to help Cuba be more self-sufficient and correct what he calls an unsus tainable trade imbalance of 78 percent imports during the first quarter. Of ficial Cuban daily proposes ’Savings or Death!’ MEMPHIS, Tennessee Opening on May 28, the Art Village Gallery will be presenting the works of two Bahamian artists, Dr Desiree Cox and Nicole Collie, with their exhibition titled “Sine.Qua.Non: Without which it could not be.” It is not the first time these two artists have 1. Dr Desiree Cox. 2. Ar tist Nicole Collie with her son. 3. “Lullaby” by Dr Desiree Cox. 4. The ar t work of Nicole Collie. Cox Collie Tennessee to exhibit in Bahamian artists, and 2 3 4 1 e xhibited together. Ms C ollie and Dr Cox, both born in Nassau, have been friends for years and exhib-i ted together in the Bahamas where they were also neighbours. Dr Cox was the first per s on to exhibit in Ms Col lie’s gallery in Nassau. When Ms Collie moved to Memphis in December of2 008, the two decided to continue their connection through exhibiting annual ly together, but now on the coast of Memphis. The works of both artists offer colourful displays of l ight, energy and emotion. “Life is full of colour,” Ms Collie said. “Those red hot moments when passion is all around you, you can taste what life has to offer. When your heart pounds for the next moment.” “Born and raised in the Bahamas I have been blessed with all the colours of the world. We are a colourful country and ever more colourful are our people,” she said. Dr Cox, who recently returned from a solo exhibition in London said, “I want my paintings to be portals to mythical realms, gateways to imaginary worlds beyond everyday reality. Seeing beyond the illusion of ‘reality’ is the first step to dreaming our own dreams. When we dream our own dreams, we bring light to the world and we inspire others to let their light shine.” Dr Cox comes to the visual arts with a unique and diverse background. Described by the British Medical Journal as a ‘Renaissance Woman’ in 2004, she is a medical doctor, a historian, social entrepreneur, professional jazz-singer, writer and visionary artist. Dr Cox was also the first Bahami an to become a Rhodes Scholar. “I decided from an early age that I would follow my own path, and be guided by my inner voice and intu ition. My path has led to me working in a number of different professions. I have worked as a medical doctor, an academic historian of medicine, a jazzsinger, a writer, a consul tant in human develop ment and urban renewal. Now finally, I am able to speak my truth using the symbolism of words, sound and colour on canvas.” A recent review in The Londonist from the UK said, “Her brash strokes and colourful palettes are derived from a place deep within the soul a place she encourages everyone to look into.” “I am so pleased to have Desiree exhibiting here with me in Memphis,” said Ms Collie. Speaking about her art, Ms Collie said, “I think women are incredible creatures. We have such big shoes to fill from being a mother, lover, caregiver, housekeeper, wife, friend and still have to work our 40 plus hours a week. We as women have learnt to do it all and I try to reflect this in my paintings. As a woman I realise that we don't take time to pat ourselves on to back as we nurture the world around us.” “There’s an old Spanish proverb that continues to inspire me and captures the essence of this joint art exhibition of the works of Nicole and myself. It is ‘Traveler, there is no road. The road is made by travelling.’ ”